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Sample records for achieve diffraction limited

  1. Mode-converters for rectangular-core fiber amplifiers to achieve diffraction-limited power scaling.

    PubMed

    Sridharan, Arun Kumar; Pax, Paul H; Heebner, John E; Drachenberg, Derrek R; Armstrong, J Paul; Dawson, Jay W

    2012-12-17

    A rectangular-core (ribbon) fiber that guides and amplifies a single higher-order-mode (HOM) can potentially scale to much higher average powers than what is possible in traditional circular-core large-mode-area fibers. Such an amplifier would require mode-conversion at the input to enable interfacing with seed sources that typically output TEM(00) mode radiation and at the output to generate diffraction-limited radiation for end-user applications. We present the first simulation and experimental results of a mode conversion technique that uses two diffractive-optic-elements in conjugate Fourier planes to convert a diffraction limited TEM(00) mode to the HOM of a ribbon fiber. Mode-conversion-efficiency is approximately 84% and can theoretically approach 100%. We also demonstrate a mode-converter system that converts a single HOM of a ribbon fiber back to a diffraction-limited TEM(00) mode. Conversion efficiency is a record 80.5%.

  2. Diffraction-limited ultrabroadband terahertz spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baillergeau, M.; Maussang, K.; Nirrengarten, T.; Palomo, J.; Li, L. H.; Linfield, E. H.; Davies, A. G.; Dhillon, S.; Tignon, J.; Mangeney, J.

    2016-05-01

    Diffraction is the ultimate limit at which details of objects can be resolved in conventional optical spectroscopy and imaging systems. In the THz spectral range, spectroscopy systems increasingly rely on ultra-broadband radiation (extending over more 5 octaves) making a great challenge to reach resolution limited by diffraction. Here, we propose an original easy-to-implement wavefront manipulation concept to achieve ultrabroadband THz spectroscopy system with diffraction-limited resolution. Applying this concept to a large-area photoconductive emitter, we demonstrate diffraction-limited ultra-broadband spectroscopy system up to 14.5 THz with a dynamic range of 103. The strong focusing of ultrabroadband THz radiation provided by our approach is essential for investigating single micrometer-scale objects such as graphene flakes or living cells, and besides for achieving intense ultra-broadband THz electric fields.

  3. Diffraction-limited ultrabroadband terahertz spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Baillergeau, M.; Maussang, K.; Nirrengarten, T.; Palomo, J.; Li, L. H.; Linfield, E. H.; Davies, A. G.; Dhillon, S.; Tignon, J.; Mangeney, J.

    2016-01-01

    Diffraction is the ultimate limit at which details of objects can be resolved in conventional optical spectroscopy and imaging systems. In the THz spectral range, spectroscopy systems increasingly rely on ultra-broadband radiation (extending over more 5 octaves) making a great challenge to reach resolution limited by diffraction. Here, we propose an original easy-to-implement wavefront manipulation concept to achieve ultrabroadband THz spectroscopy system with diffraction-limited resolution. Applying this concept to a large-area photoconductive emitter, we demonstrate diffraction-limited ultra-broadband spectroscopy system up to 14.5 THz with a dynamic range of 103. The strong focusing of ultrabroadband THz radiation provided by our approach is essential for investigating single micrometer-scale objects such as graphene flakes or living cells, and besides for achieving intense ultra-broadband THz electric fields. PMID:27142959

  4. Printing colour at the optical diffraction limit.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Karthik; Duan, Huigao; Hegde, Ravi S; Koh, Samuel C W; Wei, Jennifer N; Yang, Joel K W

    2012-09-01

    The highest possible resolution for printed colour images is determined by the diffraction limit of visible light. To achieve this limit, individual colour elements (or pixels) with a pitch of 250 nm are required, translating into printed images at a resolution of ∼100,000 dots per inch (d.p.i.). However, methods for dispensing multiple colourants or fabricating structural colour through plasmonic structures have insufficient resolution and limited scalability. Here, we present a non-colourant method that achieves bright-field colour prints with resolutions up to the optical diffraction limit. Colour information is encoded in the dimensional parameters of metal nanostructures, so that tuning their plasmon resonance determines the colours of the individual pixels. Our colour-mapping strategy produces images with both sharp colour changes and fine tonal variations, is amenable to large-volume colour printing via nanoimprint lithography, and could be useful in making microimages for security, steganography, nanoscale optical filters and high-density spectrally encoded optical data storage.

  5. Physics issues in diffraction limited storage ring design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Wei; Bai, ZhengHe; Gao, WeiWei; Feng, GuangYao; Li, WeiMin; Wang, Lin; He, DuoHui

    2012-05-01

    Diffraction limited electron storage ring is considered a promising candidate for future light sources, whose main characteristics are higher brilliance, better transverse coherence and better stability. The challenge of diffraction limited storage ring design is how to achieve the ultra low beam emittance with acceptable nonlinear performance. Effective linear and nonlinear parameter optimization methods based on Artificial Intelligence were developed for the storage ring physical design. As an example of application, partial physical design of HALS (Hefei Advanced Light Source), which is a diffraction limited VUV and soft X-ray light source, was introduced. Severe emittance growth due to the Intra Beam Scattering effect, which is the main obstacle to achieve ultra low emittance, was estimated quantitatively and possible cures were discussed. It is inspiring that better performance of diffraction limited storage ring can be achieved in principle with careful parameter optimization.

  6. Scalar limitations of diffractive optical elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Eric G.; Hochmuth, Diane; Moharam, M. G.; Pommet, Drew

    1993-01-01

    In this paper, scalar limitations of diffractive optic components are investigated using coupled wave analyses. Results are presented for linear phase gratings and fanout devices. In addition, a parametric curve is given which correlates feature size with scalar performance.

  7. Beyond the diffraction limit via optical amplification.

    PubMed

    Kellerer, Aglaé N; Ribak, Erez N

    2016-07-15

    In a previous article [Astron. Astrophys.561, A118 (2014)], we suggested a method to overcome the diffraction limit behind a telescope. We discuss and extend recent numerical simulations and test whether it is indeed possible to use photon amplification to enhance the angular resolution of a telescope or a microscope beyond the diffraction limit. An essential addition is the proposal to select events with an above-average ratio of stimulated to spontaneous photons. The analysis shows that the diffraction limit of a telescope is surpassed by a factor of 10 for an amplifier gain of 200, if the analysis is restricted to a tenth of the incoming astronomical photons. A gain of 70 is sufficient with a hundredth of the photons. More simulations must be performed to account for the bunching of spontaneous photons. PMID:27420490

  8. Optical microscopy beyond the diffraction limit

    PubMed Central

    Smolyaninov, Igor I.

    2008-01-01

    Over the past century the resolution of far-field optical microscopes, which rely on propagating optical modes, was widely believed to be limited because of diffraction to a value on the order of a half-wavelength λ∕2 of the light used. Although immersion microscopes had slightly improved resolution on the order of λ∕2n, the increased resolution was limited by the small range of refractive indices, n, of available transparent materials. We are experiencing quick demolition of the diffraction limit in optical microscopy. Over the past few years numerous nonlinear optical microscopy techniques based on photoswitching and saturation of fluorescence demonstrated far-field resolution of 20 to 30 nm. The latest exciting example of these techniques has been demonstrated by Huang et al. [Science 319, 810–813 (2008)]. Moreover, recent progress in metamaterials indicates that artificial optical media can be created, which do not exhibit the diffraction limit. Resolution of linear “immersion” microscopes based on such metamaterials appears limited only by losses, which can be compensated by gain media. Thus, optical microscopy is quickly moving towards the 10 nm resolution scale, which should bring about numerous revolutionary advances in biomedical imaging. PMID:19404465

  9. On the Diffraction Limit for Lensless Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Mielenz, Klaus D.

    1999-01-01

    The diffraction limit for lensless imaging, defined as the sharpest possible point image obtainable with a pinhole aperture, is analyzed and compared to the corresponding limit for imaging with lenses by means of theoretical considerations and numerical computations using the Fresnel-Lommel diffraction theory for circular apertures. The numerical result (u = π) obtained for the best configuration parameter u which defines the optical setup is consistent with the quarter-wave criterion, and is the same as the value reported in a classical paper by Petzval but smaller than the value (u = 1.8π) found by Lord Rayleigh. The smallest discernible detail (pixel) in a composite image is defined by an expression found by Rayleigh on applying the half-wave criterion and is shown to be consistent with the Sparrow criterion of resolution. The numerical values of other measures of image size are reported and compared to equivalent parameters of the Fraunhofer-Airy profile that governs imaging with lenses.

  10. Diffraction-limited step-zoom telescope by image restoration.

    PubMed

    Araiza-Durán, José A; Luna, Esteban; Cornejo-Rodríguez, Alejandro; Sohn, Erika

    2015-11-10

    The design of a step-zoom telescope and its ability to achieve a diffraction-limited performance is explored. The basic idea is to include digital postprocessing to compensate for changes in the modulation transfer function of the system, assuming the knowledge of the range to the object. The instrument is conformed of a two-mirror telescope, two lenses, and a detector. High-quality images and a zoom telescope that ranges from 22 to 61 f-number is achieved by moving the primary mirror and two lenses. The preliminary calculations for the design process and a simulation that shows the performance of the step-zoom telescope are described.

  11. Geographic range limits: achieving synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Gaston, Kevin J.

    2009-01-01

    Understanding of the determinants of species' geographic range limits remains poorly integrated. In part, this is because of the diversity of perspectives on the issue, and because empirical studies have lagged substantially behind developments in theory. Here, I provide a broad overview, drawing together many of the disparate threads, considering, in turn, how influences on the terms of a simple single-population equation can determine range limits. There is theoretical and empirical evidence for systematic changes towards range limits under some circumstances in each of the demographic parameters. However, under other circumstances, no such changes may take place in particular parameters, or they may occur in a different direction, with limitation still occurring. This suggests that (i) little about range limitation can categorically be inferred from many empirical studies, which document change in only one demographic parameter, (ii) there is a need for studies that document variation in all of the parameters, and (iii) in agreement with theoretical evidence that range limits can be formed in the presence or absence of hard boundaries, environmental gradients or biotic interactions, there may be few general patterns as to the determinants of these limits, with most claimed generalities at least having many exceptions. PMID:19324809

  12. Sub-diffraction limit resolution in microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Ming (Inventor); Chen, Weinong (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A method and apparatus for visualizing sub-micron size particles employs a polarizing microscope wherein a focused beam of polarized light is projected onto a target, and a portion of the illuminating light is blocked from reaching the specimen, whereby to produce a shadow region, and projecting diffracted light from the target onto the shadow region.

  13. Diffraction-limited step-zoom telescope by image restoration.

    PubMed

    Araiza-Durán, José A; Luna, Esteban; Cornejo-Rodríguez, Alejandro; Sohn, Erika

    2015-11-10

    The design of a step-zoom telescope and its ability to achieve a diffraction-limited performance is explored. The basic idea is to include digital postprocessing to compensate for changes in the modulation transfer function of the system, assuming the knowledge of the range to the object. The instrument is conformed of a two-mirror telescope, two lenses, and a detector. High-quality images and a zoom telescope that ranges from 22 to 61 f-number is achieved by moving the primary mirror and two lenses. The preliminary calculations for the design process and a simulation that shows the performance of the step-zoom telescope are described. PMID:26560774

  14. Steerable diffraction limited line illumination system using deformable mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taniguchi, Koichi; Kim, Dae Wook; Shimura, Kei; Burge, James H.

    2013-09-01

    Many scientific and industrial applications often require high performance optical systems utilizing spatially shaped illumination patterns of laser beams. Precisely shaped line illumination can be used for various line scanning systems or surface inspection devices. In order to achieve the highest resolution or superior signal to noise ratio limited by the fundamental theory, a diffraction limited illumination optical system (e.g. <0.8 Strehl ratio) gives the narrowest illumination line width determined by the system's NA (Numerical Aperture) value. For high precision and in-factory industrial applications, the Diffraction Limited Line Illumination (DLLI) needs to be controlled in three dimensional space rapidly as the target object under the illumination may not be always aligned with respect to the illumination system. A steerable DLLI system with three degrees of freedom (i.e. axial displacement, rotation, and tilt) is developed using an adaptive optics system. By electronically controlling the Zernike based surface shapes of the deformable mirror, the DLLI in free space is actively positioned and oriented with high accuracy. The geometrical optics based mathematical model to control the Zernike modes of the deformable mirror and the performance of a bench-top proof-ofconcept system will be presented with experimental data and analysis results.

  15. Diffraction imaging: The limits of partial coherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bo; Abbey, Brian; Dilanian, Ruben; Balaur, Eugeniu; van Riessen, Grant; Junker, Mark; Tran, Chanh Q.; Jones, Michael W. M.; Peele, Andrew G.; McNulty, Ian; Vine, David J.; Putkunz, Corey T.; Quiney, Harry M.; Nugent, Keith A.

    2012-12-01

    Coherent diffraction imaging (CDI) typically requires that the source should be highly coherent both laterally and longitudinally. In this paper, we demonstrate that lateral and longitudinal partial coherence can be successfully included in a CDI reconstruction algorithm simultaneously using experimental x-ray data. We study the interplay between lateral partial coherence and longitudinal partial coherence and their relative influence on CDI. We compare our results against the coherence criteria published by Spence [Spence , UltramicroscopyULTRD60304-399110.1016/j.ultramic.2004.05.005 101, 149 (2004)] and show that for iterative ab initio phase-recovery algorithms based on those typically used in CDI and in cases where the coherence properties are known, we are able to relax the minimal coherence requirements by a factor of 2 both laterally and longitudinally, potentially yielding significant reduction in exposure time.

  16. Shaping the spatial and spectral emissivity at the diffraction limit

    SciTech Connect

    Makhsiyan, Mathilde; Bouchon, Patrick Jaeck, Julien; Pelouard, Jean-Luc; Haïdar, Riad

    2015-12-21

    Metasurfaces have attracted a growing interest for their ability to artificially tailor an electromagnetic response on various spectral ranges. In particular, thermal sources with unprecedented abilities, such as directionality or monochromaticity, have been achieved. However, these metasurfaces exhibit homogeneous optical properties whereas the spatial modulation of the emissivity up to the wavelength scale is at the crux of the design of original emitters. In this letter, we study an inhomogeneous metasurface made of a nonperiodic set of optical nano-antennas that spatially and spectrally control the emitted light up to the diffraction limit. Each antenna acts as an independent deep subwavelength emitter for given polarization and wavelength. Their juxtaposition at the subwavelength scale encodes far field multispectral and polarized images. This opens up promising breakthroughs for applications such as optical storage, anti-counterfeit devices, and multispectral emitters for biochemical sensing.

  17. Sub-diffraction-limited microscopy via Rabi gradient excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Xiaodong; Liao, Zeyang; Al-Amri, M.; Zubairy, M. Suhail

    2015-06-01

    We propose a scheme for microscopy with resolution far beyond the diffraction limit by using coherent Rabi oscillations. When the sample is illuminated by a gradient laser field, Rabi oscillations will be induced which can lead to a sinusoidal excitation in the sample. This is similar to the structured illumination microscopy (SIM) which can recover high-spatial-frequency components in the far field. However, different from linear SIM, the sinusoidal pattern here can have a spatial frequency much higher than that of the linear standing wave. Due to this property, we can achieve extremely high resolution, as in the nonlinear saturated SIM, but keep the reconstruction algorithm as simple as the linear one.

  18. Collective Effects in a Diffraction Limited Storage Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Nagaoka, Ryutaro; Bane, Karl L.F.

    2015-10-20

    Our paper gives an overview of collective effects that are likely to appear and possibly limit the performance in a diffraction-limited storage ring (DLSR) that stores a high-intensity ultra-low-emittance beam. Beam instabilities and other intensity-dependent effects that may significantly impact the machine performance are covered. The latter include beam-induced machine heating, Touschek scattering, intra-beam scattering, as well as incoherent tune shifts. The general trend that the efforts to achieve ultra-low emittance result in increasing the machine coupling impedance and the beam sensitivity to instability is reviewed. The nature of coupling impedance in a DLSR is described, followed by a series of potentially dangerous beam instabilities driven by the former, such as resistive-wall, TMCI (transverse mode coupling instability), head-tail and microwave instabilities. Additionally, beam-ion and CSR (coherent synchrotron radiation) instabilities are also treated. Means to fight against collective effects such as lengthening of the bunch with passive harmonic cavities and bunch-by-bunch transverse feedback are introduced. Numerical codes developed and used to evaluate the machine coupling impedance, as well as to simulate beam instability using the former as inputs are described.

  19. Collective Effects in a Diffraction Limited Storage Ring

    DOE PAGES

    Nagaoka, Ryutaro; Bane, Karl L.F.

    2015-10-20

    Our paper gives an overview of collective effects that are likely to appear and possibly limit the performance in a diffraction-limited storage ring (DLSR) that stores a high-intensity ultra-low-emittance beam. Beam instabilities and other intensity-dependent effects that may significantly impact the machine performance are covered. The latter include beam-induced machine heating, Touschek scattering, intra-beam scattering, as well as incoherent tune shifts. The general trend that the efforts to achieve ultra-low emittance result in increasing the machine coupling impedance and the beam sensitivity to instability is reviewed. The nature of coupling impedance in a DLSR is described, followed by a seriesmore » of potentially dangerous beam instabilities driven by the former, such as resistive-wall, TMCI (transverse mode coupling instability), head-tail and microwave instabilities. Additionally, beam-ion and CSR (coherent synchrotron radiation) instabilities are also treated. Means to fight against collective effects such as lengthening of the bunch with passive harmonic cavities and bunch-by-bunch transverse feedback are introduced. Numerical codes developed and used to evaluate the machine coupling impedance, as well as to simulate beam instability using the former as inputs are described.« less

  20. Pixel detectors for diffraction-limited storage rings.

    PubMed

    Denes, Peter; Schmitt, Bernd

    2014-09-01

    Dramatic advances in synchrotron radiation sources produce ever-brighter beams of X-rays, but those advances can only be used if there is a corresponding improvement in X-ray detectors. With the advent of storage ring sources capable of being diffraction-limited (down to a certain wavelength), advances in detector speed, dynamic range and functionality is required. While many of these improvements in detector capabilities are being pursued now, the orders-of-magnitude increases in brightness of diffraction-limited storage ring sources will require challenging non-incremental advances in detectors. This article summarizes the current state of the art, developments underway worldwide, and challenges that diffraction-limited storage ring sources present for detectors.

  1. Diffractive limit approach to elastic scattering and inelastic diffraction of high-energy hadrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Małecki, Andrzej

    1996-09-01

    An approach to inelastic diffraction based on the concept of equivalence of diffractive states is developed. In the classical description of Good and Walker, the inelastic diffraction originates from the diversity of elastic scattering amplitudes in the initial and final state Δt. We consider a multichannel correction, accounting for intermediate transitions inside the equivalence class. This correction can be factorized yielding the diffraction amplitude in the form NΔt, to be taken in the ``diffractive limit'' N-->∞, Δt-->0 such that NΔt is finite. We analyze elastic scattering and the inclusive inelastic diffraction cross sections for p-p and p-p>¯ collisions, in the range of c.m. energy √s=20-1800 GeV. We claim that the angular distribution of the inclusive inelastic diffraction at small momentum transfers is determined by elastic scattering in the transition region between the forward peak and the minimum. This is successfully verified in experiment. The detailed comparison with the Good-Walker description, with emphasis on the advantages of our approach, is presented.

  2. Accurate calculation of diffraction-limited encircled and ensquared energy.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Torben B

    2015-09-01

    Mathematical properties of the encircled and ensquared energy functions for the diffraction-limited point-spread function (PSF) are presented. These include power series and a set of linear differential equations that facilitate the accurate calculation of these functions. Asymptotic expressions are derived that provide very accurate estimates for the relative amount of energy in the diffraction PSF that fall outside a square or rectangular large detector. Tables with accurate values of the encircled and ensquared energy functions are also presented. PMID:26368873

  3. Diffraction-limited high-finesse optical cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Kleckner, Dustin; Irvine, William T. M.; Oemrawsingh, Sumant S. R.; Bouwmeester, Dirk

    2010-04-15

    High-quality optical cavities with wavelength-sized end mirrors are important to the growing field of micro-optomechanical systems. We present a versatile method for calculating the modes of diffraction limited optical cavities and show that it can be used to determine the effect of a wide variety of cavity geometries and imperfections. Additionally, we show these calculations agree remarkably well with FDTD simulations for wavelength-sized optical modes, even though our method is based on the paraxial approximation.

  4. Design examples of diffraction-limited catadioptric objectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallert, Frank

    1996-08-01

    The paper relates to different inventions, comprising three diffraction-limited catadioptric designs. All the systems use only spherical shaped surfaces and are designed from one kind of optical material only. In the examples the glass BK7 from the Schott-catalogue was used. The first example gives a three element design reaching equal performance as a Schmidt camera but with only 25 percent of its length. Additionally the field is flat and conveniently located behind the system. The second example is designed to reduce the central obstruction. It's somewhat based on the principle of the Houghton-camera. For a f-number 4 system with 1000 millimeters focal length it gives outstanding image quality at a 5 degree's field--even capable for diffraction-limited visual use. For reduced f-number 5,6 the image is diffraction-limited at the whole field. In terms of color correction it outperforms every Schmidt-Cassegrain or apochromatic triplet of even arbitrarily more reduced light gathering power. The third example is the equivalent for the so-called Wynne corrector triplet that corrects the aberrations of a parabolical mirror. But the invented corrector corrects additionally the spherical aberration of a spherical mirror. The corrector is able to correct all third order aberrations without introducing longitudinal and lateral color.

  5. Emittance Adapter for a Diffraction Limited Synchrotron Radiation Source

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, Alexander Wu; Raimondi, Pantaleo; /Frascati

    2012-03-01

    We investigate the possibility of reaching very small horizontal and vertical emittances inside an undulator in a storage ring, by means of a local exchange of the apparent horizontal and vertical emittances, performed with a combination of skew quadrupoles and one solenoid in a dedicated insertion line in the storage ring. The insertion leaves the ring parameters and its optical properties unaffected. This scheme could greatly relax the emittance requirements for a diffraction limited synchrotron light source. The lattice derivation and design is described.

  6. Design Of A Near Diffraction Limited Catadioptric Lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, D. V. B.

    1987-06-01

    A near diffraction limited catadioptric lens of EFL=324.4 mm and f/3.6 was designed for the spectral range 546 to 852 nm. This is a 5 element lens with a field of view of +/-2.5°. The obscuration ratio is 0.5 and relative illumination at the edge of the field is 81.4%. The distortion is less than 0.16%. This lens can be used for high resolution imaging applications using CCDs. The design details were presented in this paper.

  7. Sub-diffraction-limit imaging using mode multiplexing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Nan; Miyazaki, Jun; He, Jinping; Seto, Keisuke; Kobayashi, Takayoshi

    2015-05-01

    Pixel-by-pixel processed fluorescence difference microscopy is experimentally demonstrated by multiplexing excitation laser beams with Gaussian and donut spot shapes and then demultiplexing the fluorescent signals using lock-in amplifiers. With this scheme, a fixed sample of fluorescent spheres and a slice of mouse brain tissue are imaged with resolutions that exceed the diffraction limit. Compared to previously reported subtraction imaging techniques, this pixel-by-pixel scan can be applied to improve the resolution of a moving sample without introducing subtraction errors. The synchronized signal detection feature makes this method extendible to various applications.

  8. Genetic algorithm for chromaticity correction in diffraction limited storage rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrlichman, M. P.

    2016-04-01

    A multiobjective genetic algorithm is developed for optimizing nonlinearities in diffraction limited storage rings. This algorithm determines sextupole and octupole strengths for chromaticity correction that deliver optimized dynamic aperture and beam lifetime. The algorithm makes use of dominance constraints to breed desirable properties into the early generations. The momentum aperture is optimized indirectly by constraining the chromatic tune footprint and optimizing the off-energy dynamic aperture. The result is an effective and computationally efficient technique for correcting chromaticity in a storage ring while maintaining optimal dynamic aperture and beam lifetime.

  9. Diffraction-limited storage-ring vacuum technology

    PubMed Central

    Al-Dmour, Eshraq; Ahlback, Jonny; Einfeld, Dieter; Tavares, Pedro Fernandes; Grabski, Marek

    2014-01-01

    Some of the characteristics of recent ultralow-emittance storage-ring designs and possibly future diffraction-limited storage rings are a compact lattice combined with small magnet apertures. Such requirements present a challenge for the design and performance of the vacuum system. The vacuum system should provide the required vacuum pressure for machine operation and be able to handle the heat load from synchrotron radiation. Small magnet apertures result in the conductance of the chamber being low, and lumped pumps are ineffective. One way to provide the required vacuum level is by distributed pumping, which can be realised by the use of a non-evaporable getter (NEG) coating of the chamber walls. It may not be possible to use crotch absorbers to absorb the heat from the synchrotron radiation because an antechamber is difficult to realise with such a compact lattice. To solve this, the chamber walls can work as distributed absorbers if they are made of a material with good thermal conductivity, and distributed cooling is used at the location where the synchrotron radiation hits the wall. The vacuum system of the 3 GeV storage ring of MAX IV is used as an example of possible solutions for vacuum technologies for diffraction-limited storage rings. PMID:25177979

  10. Diffraction patterns and limits of Brewster angle ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froehly, L.; Verrier, Isabelle; Froehly, Claude; Brun, Gerald; Veillas, C.

    2000-03-01

    The Vectorial Modulation Transfer Function (VMTF) calculation will be used for the explanation of diffraction patterns obtained with Brewster ellipsometers. The method used to study these phenomena lays on protection of the incident monochromatic distribution on a basis constituted of monochromatic plane wave components. The first point examined is how the plane wave spectrum could be propagated through a polarizing pate considering the polarization distortions introduced by diffraction. The same calculation is realized for the whole system in order to establish the expression of the whole VMTF. Paraxial approximations are used in order to analyze more easily the reflected beam pattern and to compare it with experimental results. The good agreement between experimental results and model allows a quantitative valuation of index measurement accuracy as a function of the interface mean surface roughness of the experimental sample considering the specular reflection on the homogeneous plane interface. Taking into account the amount of light scatter by the interfaces irregularities it is then possible to specify the theoretical uncertainties limits affecting as well refractive index and refractive index gradients measurements.

  11. Dynamic microscale temperature gradient in a gold nanorod solution measured by diffraction-limited nanothermometry

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Chengmingyue; Gan, Xiaosong; Li, Xiangping; Gu, Min

    2015-09-21

    We quantify the dynamic microscale temperature gradient in a gold nanorod solution using quantum-dot-based microscopic fluorescence nanothermometry. By incorporating CdSe quantum dots into the solution as a nanothermometer, precise temperature mapping with diffraction-limited spatial resolution and sub-degree temperature resolution is achieved. The acquired data on heat generation and dissipation show an excellent agreement with theoretical simulations. This work reveals an effective approach for noninvasive temperature regulation with localized nanoheaters in microfluidic environment.

  12. A Menagerie of Stars: New Images from the Diffraction Limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuthill, P. G.; Monnier, J. D.; Danchi, W. C.

    Recent high-resolution pupil-masking interferometry experiments at the Keck-1 telescope have produced images of stellar systems at diffraction- limited angular resolutions. Targeting the dusty cocoons of young stellar objects and the circumstellar shrouds surrounding evolved giants and supergiants, these images have revealed a startling range of morphologies. Evolved stars from massive blue Wolf-Rayets to red giants, supergiants and carbon stars have shown dramatic dust plumes, clumps and shells which can dominate the dust halo, showing that mass loss from these objects can sometimes be anything but smooth and isotropic. At the other extreme of the evolutionary scale, the young stellar objects have been found to reveal dusty disks, clearly resolved for the first time in the infrared.

  13. Controllable design of super-oscillatory planar lenses for sub-diffraction-limit optical needles.

    PubMed

    Diao, Jinshuai; Yuan, Weizheng; Yu, Yiting; Zhu, Yechuan; Wu, Yan

    2016-02-01

    Sub-diffraction-limit optical needle can be created by a binary amplitude mask through tailoring the interference of diffraction beams. In this paper, a controllable design of super-oscillatory planar lenses to create sub-diffraction-limit optical needles with the tunable focal length and depth of focus (DOF) is presented. As a high-quality optical needle is influenced by various factors, we first propose a multi-objective and multi-constraint optimization model compromising all the main factors to achieve a needle with the prescribed characteristics. The optimizing procedure is self-designed using the Matlab programming language based on the genetic algorithm (GA) and fast Hankel transform algorithm. Numerical simulations show that the optical needles' properties can be controlled accurately. The optimized results are further validated by the theoretical calculation with the Rayleigh-Sommerfeld integral. The sub-diffraction-limit optical needles can be used in wide fields such as optical nanofabrication, super-resolution imaging, particle acceleration and high-density optical data storage. PMID:26906769

  14. Matter-wave diffraction at the natural limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brand, Christian; Sclafani, Michele; Knobloch, Christian; Lilach, Yigal; Juffmann, Thomas; Kotakoski, Jani; Mangler, Clemens; Winter, Andreas; Turchanin, Andrey; Meyer, Jannik; Cheshnovsky, Ori; Arndt, Markus

    2016-05-01

    The high sensitivity of matter-wave interferometry experiments to forces and perturbations makes them an essential tool for precision measurements and tests of quantum physics. While mostly grating made of laser-light are used, material gratings have the advantage that they are independent of the particle's internal properties. This makes them universally applicable. However, the molecules will experience substantial van der Waals shifts while passing the grating slits, which suggests limiting this perturbation by reducing the material thickness. In a comprehensive study we compared the van der Waals interactions for free-standing gratings made from single and double layer graphene to masks commonly used in atom interferometry. From the population of high fringe orders we deduce a surprisingly strong electrical interaction between the polarizable molecules and the nanomasks. As even for these thinnest diffraction elements which-path information is not shared with the environment, we interpret this as an experimental affirmation of Bohr's arguments in his famous debate with Einstein.

  15. Diffraction-limited lucky imaging with a 12" commercial telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baptista, Brian J.

    2014-08-01

    Here we demonstrate a novel lucky imaging camera which is designed to produce diffraction-limited imaging using small telescopes similar to ones used by many academic institutions for outreach and/or student training. We present a design that uses a Meade 12" SCT paired with an Andor iXon fast readout EMCCD. The PSF of the telescope is matched to the pixel size of the EMCCD by adding a simple, custom-fabricated, intervening optical system. We demonstrate performance of the system by observing both astronomical and terrestrial targets. The astronomical application requires simpler data reconstruction techniques as compared to the terrestrial case. We compare different lucky imaging registration and reconstruction algorithms for use with this imager for both astronomical and terrestrial targets. We also demonstrate how this type of instrument would be useful for both undergraduate and graduate student training. As an instructional aide, the instrument can provide a hands-on approach for teaching instrument design, standard data reduction techniques, lucky imaging data processing, and high resolution imaging concepts.

  16. Limits of scalar diffraction theory for conducting gratings.

    PubMed

    Gremaux, D A; Gallagher, N C

    1993-04-10

    Scalar diffraction theory and electromagnetic vector theory are compared by analyzing plane-wave scattering by a perfectly conducting, rectangular-grooved grating. General field solutions for arbitrary angles of incidence are derived by using scalar and vector theories. Diffraction efficiencies for the scalar and the vector cases as functions of wavelength, grating period, and angles of incidence are determined numerically and plotted. When the wavelength of the incident field is much shorter than the grating period, the diffraction efficiencies match. But when the wavelength is of the order of the grating period, large differences between the scalar and the vector solutions emerge. One general conclusion is that, depending on polarization, scalar theory should not be used when the grating period becomes smaller than ten wavelengths.

  17. High efficiency near diffraction-limited mid-infrared flat lenses based on metasurface reflectarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shuyan; Kim, Myoung-Hwan; Aieta, Francesco; She, Alan; Mansuripur, Tobias; Gabay, Ilan; Khorasaninejad, Mohammadreza; Rousso, David; Wang, Xiaojun; Troccoli, Mariano; Yu, Nanfang; Capasso, Federico

    2016-08-01

    A limiting factor in the development of mid-infrared optics is the lack of abundant materials that are transparent, low cost, lightweight, and easy to machine. In this paper, we demonstrate a metasurface device that circumvents these limitations. A flat lens based on antenna reflectarrays was designed to achieve near diffraction-limited focusing with a high efficiency (experiment: 80%, simulation: 83%) at 45(o) incidence angle at {\\lambda} = 4.6 {\\mu}m. This geometry considerably simplifies the experimental arrangement compared to the common geometry of normal incidence which requires beam splitters. Simulations show that the effect of comatic aberrations is small compared to parabolic mirrors. The use of single-step photolithography allows large scale fabrication.

  18. Plasmonic localized heating beyond the diffraction limit via magnetic polariton excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alshehri, Hassan; Ying, Xiaoyan; Wang, Hao; Wang, Liping

    2016-09-01

    Optical localized heating in the nanoscale has recently attracted great attention due to its unique small hot spot size with high energy. However, the hot spot size is conventionally constrained by the diffraction limit. Plasmonic localized heating can provide solutions to this limitation in nanoscale patterning, cancer treatment, and data storage. Plasmonic approaches to overcome the diffraction limit in hot spot size have mainly utilized the excitation of surface plasmon or localized surface plasmon resonance. However, achieving plasmonic localized heating by the excitation of magnetic polariton has not been researched extensively yet. In this work, we numerically investigated the optical response of a nanoscale metamaterial composed of a gold nanowire array and a gold film separated by an ultrathin polymer spacer using ANSYS High Frequency Structural Simulator. A strong absorption peak at the wavelength of 760 nm was exhibited, and the underlying physical mechanism for the strong absorption was verified via the local electromagnetic field distribution to be magnetic resonance excitation. An inductor-capacitor circuit model was used to predict the magnetic resonance wavelength and compare with the numerical results for varied geometrical parameters. Volume loss density due to the strong local optical energy confinement was transferred as heat generation to an ANSYS thermal solver to obtain the local temperature profile. The steady state temperature profile shows an average temperature of 145 °C confined in a local area as small as 33 nm within the spacer, with a full-width at half-maximum of 50 nm along the x-direction. Moreover, the temperature rise from ambient drops to half its maximum value at a distance of 5 nm from the top of the spacer along the z-direction. This clearly demonstrates plasmonic localized heating beyond the diffraction limit via magnetic polariton excitation. Furthermore, the transient temperature profile shows that the system reached

  19. Nanofocusing beyond the near-field diffraction limit via plasmonic Fano resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Maowen; Wang, Changtao; Zhao, Zeyu; Pu, Mingbo; Liu, Ling; Zhang, Wei; Yu, Honglin; Luo, Xiangang

    2016-01-01

    The past decade has witnessed a great deal of optical systems designed for exceeding the Abbe's diffraction limit. Unfortunately, a deep subwavelength spot is obtained at the price of extremely short focal length, which is indeed a near-field diffraction limit that could rarely go beyond in the nanofocusing device. One method to mitigate such a problem is to set up a rapid oscillatory electromagnetic field that converges at the prescribed focus. However, abrupt modulation of phase and amplitude within a small fraction of a wavelength seems to be the main obstacle in the visible regime, aggravated by loss and plasmonic features that come into function. In this paper, we propose a periodically repeated ring-disk complementary structure to break the near-field diffraction limit via plasmonic Fano resonance, originating from the interference between the complex hybrid plasmon resonance and the continuum of propagating waves through the silver film. This plasmonic Fano resonance introduces a π phase jump in the adjacent channels and amplitude modulation to achieve radiationless electromagnetic interference. As a result, deep subwavelength spots as small as 0.0045λ2 at 36 nm above the silver film have been numerically demonstrated. This plate holds promise for nanolithography, subdiffraction imaging and microscopy.The past decade has witnessed a great deal of optical systems designed for exceeding the Abbe's diffraction limit. Unfortunately, a deep subwavelength spot is obtained at the price of extremely short focal length, which is indeed a near-field diffraction limit that could rarely go beyond in the nanofocusing device. One method to mitigate such a problem is to set up a rapid oscillatory electromagnetic field that converges at the prescribed focus. However, abrupt modulation of phase and amplitude within a small fraction of a wavelength seems to be the main obstacle in the visible regime, aggravated by loss and plasmonic features that come into function. In this

  20. Analysis of the scalability of diffraction-limited fiber lasers and amplifiers to high average power.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Jay W; Messerly, Michael J; Beach, Raymond J; Shverdin, Miroslav Y; Stappaerts, Eddy A; Sridharan, Arun K; Pax, Paul H; Heebner, John E; Siders, Craig W; Barty, C P J

    2008-08-18

    We analyze the scalability of diffraction-limited fiber lasers considering thermal, non-linear, damage and pump coupling limits as well as fiber mode field diameter (MFD) restrictions. We derive new general relationships based upon practical considerations. Our analysis shows that if the fiber's MFD could be increased arbitrarily, 36 kW of power could be obtained with diffraction-limited quality from a fiber laser or amplifier. This power limit is determined by thermal and non-linear limits that combine to prevent further power scaling, irrespective of increases in mode size. However, limits to the scaling of the MFD may restrict fiber lasers to lower output powers.

  1. Analysis of the scalability of diffraction-limited fiber lasers and amplifiers to high average power.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Jay W; Messerly, Michael J; Beach, Raymond J; Shverdin, Miroslav Y; Stappaerts, Eddy A; Sridharan, Arun K; Pax, Paul H; Heebner, John E; Siders, Craig W; Barty, C P J

    2008-08-18

    We analyze the scalability of diffraction-limited fiber lasers considering thermal, non-linear, damage and pump coupling limits as well as fiber mode field diameter (MFD) restrictions. We derive new general relationships based upon practical considerations. Our analysis shows that if the fiber's MFD could be increased arbitrarily, 36 kW of power could be obtained with diffraction-limited quality from a fiber laser or amplifier. This power limit is determined by thermal and non-linear limits that combine to prevent further power scaling, irrespective of increases in mode size. However, limits to the scaling of the MFD may restrict fiber lasers to lower output powers. PMID:18711562

  2. Demonstration and design of a compact diffraction limited spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betters, Christopher H.; Leon-Saval, Sergio G.; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Robertson, Gordon

    2012-09-01

    PIMMS IR is a prototype high resolution diraction limited spectrograph operating in the near infrared. Its current conguration has a bandwidth of 8nm centred on 1550nm with a resolving power, λ/Δλ, of 31000 with the option to increase this to ~60000 using a dual grating system. Remarkably, this is 85% of the theoretical limit for Gaussian illumination of a diraction grating. It is based upon the PIMMS#0 (photonic integrated multi-mode micro-spectrograph), a design that utilises the multi-mode to single-mode conversion of the photonic lantern. By feeding the spectrograph with the single-mode bres we are able to design and build a spectrograph whose performance is diraction limited and independent of the input source (i.e. a telescope) it is attached to. The spectrograph has with a throughput of ~70% (that is the light from the single-mode entrance slit that lands on the detector). The spectrograph is also extremely compact with a footprint of just 450mm x 190mm. Here we present the design of PIMMS IR and its performance characteristics determined from ray tracing, physical optics simulations and experimental measurements.Δ

  3. High efficiency near diffraction-limited mid-infrared flat lenses based on metasurface reflectarrays.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuyan; Kim, Myoung-Hwan; Aieta, Francesco; She, Alan; Mansuripur, Tobias; Gabay, Ilan; Khorasaninejad, Mohammadreza; Rousso, David; Wang, Xiaojun; Troccoli, Mariano; Yu, Nanfang; Capasso, Federico

    2016-08-01

    We report the first demonstration of a mid-IR reflection-based flat lens with high efficiency and near diffraction-limited focusing. Focusing efficiency as high as 80%, in good agreement with simulations (83%), has been achieved at 45° incidence angle at λ = 4.6 μm. The off-axis geometry considerably simplifies the optical arrangement compared to the common geometry of normal incidence in reflection mode which requires beam splitters. Simulations show that the effects of incidence angle are small compared to parabolic mirrors with the same NA. The use of single-step photolithography allows large scale fabrication. Such a device is important in the development of compact telescopes, microscopes, and spectroscopic designs. PMID:27505769

  4. Far-field imaging beyond diffraction limit using single sensor in combination with a resonant aperture.

    PubMed

    Li, Lianlin; Li, Fang; Cui, Tie Jun; Yao, Kan

    2015-01-12

    Far-field imaging beyond the diffraction limit is a long sought-after goal in various imaging applications, which requires usually mechanical scanning or an array of antennas. Here, we propose to solve this challenging problem using a single sensor in combination with a spatio-temporal resonant aperture antenna. We theoretically and numerically demonstrate that such resonant aperture antenna is capable of converting part evanescent waves into propagating waves and delivering them to far fields. The proposed imaging concept provides the unique ability to achieve super resolution for real-time data when illuminated by broadband electromagnetic waves, without the harsh requirements such as near- field scanning, mechanical scanning, or antenna arrays. We expect the imaging methodology to make breakthroughs in super-resolution imaging in microwave, terahertz, optical, and ultrasound regimes. PMID:25835685

  5. Sub-diffraction-limited multilayer coatings for the 0.3-NA Micro-Exposure Tool for extreme ultraviolet lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Soufli, R; Hudyma, R M; Spiller, E; Gullikson, E M; Schmidt, M A; Robinson, J C; Baker, S L; Walton, C C; Taylor, J S

    2007-01-03

    This manuscript discusses the multilayer coating results for the primary and secondary mirrors of the Micro Exposure Tool (MET): a 0.30-numerical aperture (NA) lithographic imaging system with 200 x 600 {micro}m{sup 2} field of view at the wafer plane, operating in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) wavelength region. Mo/Si multilayers were deposited by DC-magnetron sputtering on large-area, curved MET camera substrates, and a velocity modulation technique was implemented to consistently achieve multilayer thickness profiles with added figure errors below 0.1 nm rms to achieve sub-diffraction-limited performance. This work represents the first experimental demonstration of sub-diffraction-limited multilayer coatings for high-NA EUV imaging systems.

  6. Breaking the acoustic diffraction limit in photoacoustic imaging with multiple speckle illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaigne, Thomas; Gateau, Jérôme; Allain, Marc; Katz, Ori; Gigan, Sylvain; Sentenac, Anne; Bossy, Emmanuel

    2016-03-01

    In deep photoacoustic imaging, resolution is inherently limited by acoustic diffraction, and ultrasonic frequencies cannot be arbitrarily increased because of attenuation in tissue. Here we report on the use of multiple speckle illumination to perform super resolution photoacoustic imaging. We show that the analysis of speckle-induced second-order fluctuations of the photoacoustic signal combined with deconvolution enables to resolve optically absorbing structures below the acoustic diffraction limit.

  7. Reaching the Diffraction Limit - Differential Speckle and Wide-Field Imaging for the WIYN Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Nic J.; Howell, Steve; Horch, Elliott

    2016-01-01

    Speckle imaging allows telescopes to achieve diffraction limited imaging performance. The technique requires cameras capable of reading out frames at a very fast rate, effectively 'freezing out' atmospheric seeing. The resulting speckles can be correlated and images reconstructed that are at the diffraction limit of the telescope. These new instruments are based on the successful performance and design of the Differential Speckle Survey Instrument (DSSI).The instruments are being built for the Gemini-N and WIYN telescopes and will be made available to the community via the peer review proposal process. We envision their primary use to be validation and characterization of exoplanet targets from the NASA, K2 and TESS missions and RV discovered exoplanets. Such targets will provide excellent follow-up candidates for both the WIYN and Gemini telescopes. We expect similar data quality in speckle imaging mode with the new instruments. Additionally, both cameras will have a wide-field mode and standard SDSS filters. They will be highly versatile instruments and it is that likely many other science programs will request time on the cameras. The limiting magnitude for speckle observations will remain around 13-14th at WIYN and 16-17th at Gemini, while wide-field, normal CCD imaging operation should be able to go to much fainter, providing usual CCD imaging and photometric capabilities. The instruments will also have high utility as scoring cameras for telescope engineering purposes, or other applications where high time resolution is needed. Instrument support will be provided, including a software pipeline that takes raw speckle data to fully reconstructed images.

  8. X-ray nanoprobes and diffraction-limited storage rings: opportunities and challenges of fluorescence tomography of biological specimens

    PubMed Central

    de Jonge, Martin D.; Ryan, Christopher G.; Jacobsen, Chris J.

    2014-01-01

    X-ray nanoprobes require coherent illumination to achieve optic-limited resolution, and so will benefit directly from diffraction-limited storage rings. Here, the example of high-resolution X-ray fluorescence tomography is focused on as one of the most voracious demanders of coherent photons, since the detected signal is only a small fraction of the incident flux. Alternative schemes are considered for beam delivery, sample scanning and detectors. One must consider as well the steps before and after the X-ray experiment: sample preparation and examination conditions, and analysis complexity due to minimum dose requirements and self-absorption. By understanding the requirements and opportunities for nanoscale fluorescence tomography, one gains insight into the R&D challenges in optics and instrumentation needed to fully exploit the source advances that diffraction-limited storage rings offer. PMID:25177992

  9. Generation of limited-diffraction wave by approximating theoretical X-wave with simple driving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yaqin; Ding, MingYue; Hua, Shaoyan; Ming, Yuchi

    2012-03-01

    X-wave is a particular case of limited diffracting waves which has great potential applications in the enlargement of the field depth in acoustic imaging systems. In practice, the generation of real time X-wave ultrasonic fields is a complex technology which involves precise and specific voltage for the excitations for each distinct array element. In order to simplify the X-wave generating process, L. Castellanos proposed an approach to approximate the X-wave excitations with rectangular pulses. The results suggested the possibility of achieving limited-diffraction waves with relatively simple driving waveforms, which could be implemented with a moderate cost in analogical electronics. In this work, we attempt to improve L. Castellanos's method by calculating the approximation driving pulse not only from rectangular but also triangular driving pulse. The differences between theoretical X-wave signals and driving pulses, related to their excitation effects, are minimized by L2 curve criterion. The driving pulses with the minimal optimization result we chosen. A tradeoff is obtained between the cost of implementation of classical 0-order X-wave and the precision of approximation with the simple pulsed electrical driving. The good agreement of the driving pulse and the result resulting field distributions, with those obtained from the classical X-wave excitations can be justified by the filtering effects induced by the transducer elements in frequency domain. From the simulation results, we can see that the new approach improve the precise of the approximation, the difference between theoretical X-wave and the new approach is lower 10 percent than the difference between theoretical X-wave and rectangular as the driving pulse in simulation.

  10. Covariance of lucky images for increasing objects contrast: diffraction-limited images in ground-based telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cagigal, Manuel P.; Valle, Pedro J.; Colodro-Conde, Carlos; Villó-Pérez, Isidro; Pérez-Garrido, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Images of stars adopt shapes far from the ideal Airy pattern due to atmospheric density fluctuations. Hence, diffraction-limited images can only be achieved by telescopes without atmospheric influence, e.g. spatial telescopes, or by using techniques like adaptive optics or lucky imaging. In this paper, we propose a new computational technique based on the evaluation of the COvariancE of Lucky Images (COELI). This technique allows us to discover companions to main stars by taking advantage of the atmospheric fluctuations. We describe the algorithm and we carry out a theoretical analysis of the improvement in contrast. We have used images taken with 2.2-m Calar Alto telescope as a test bed for the technique resulting that, under certain conditions, telescope diffraction limit is clearly reached.

  11. Reconstruction algorithm for limited-angle diffraction tomography for microwave NDE

    SciTech Connect

    Paladhi, P. Roy; Klaser, J.; Tayebi, A.; Udpa, L.; Udpa, S.

    2014-02-18

    Microwave tomography is becoming a popular imaging modality in nondestructive evaluation and medicine. A commonly encountered challenge in tomography in general is that in many practical situations a full 360° angular access is not possible and with limited access, the quality of reconstructed image is compromised. This paper presents an approach for reconstruction with limited angular access in diffraction tomography. The algorithm takes advantage of redundancies in image Fourier space data obtained from diffracted field measurements and couples it to an error minimization technique using a constrained total variation (CTV) minimization. Initial results from simulated data have been presented here to validate the approach.

  12. Overcoming the diffraction limit using multiple light scattering in a highly disordered medium.

    PubMed

    Choi, Youngwoon; Yang, Taeseok Daniel; Fang-Yen, Christopher; Kang, Pilsung; Lee, Kyoung Jin; Dasari, Ramachandra R; Feld, Michael S; Choi, Wonshik

    2011-07-01

    We report that disordered media made of randomly distributed nanoparticles can be used to overcome the diffraction limit of a conventional imaging system. By developing a method to extract the original image information from the multiple scattering induced by the turbid media, we dramatically increase a numerical aperture of the imaging system. As a result, the resolution is enhanced by more than 5 times over the diffraction limit, and the field of view is extended over the physical area of the camera. Our technique lays the foundation to use a turbid medium as a far-field superlens.

  13. Structuring of photosensitive material below diffraction limit using far field irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadavalli, Nataraja Sekhar; Saphiannikova, Marina; Lomadze, Nino; Goldenberg, Leonid M.; Santer, Svetlana

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, we report on in-situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) studies of topographical changes in azobenzene-containing photosensitive polymer films that are irradiated with light interference patterns. We have developed an experimental setup consisting of an AFM combined with two-beam interferometry that permits us to switch between different polarization states of the two interfering beams while scanning the illuminated area of the polymer film, acquiring corresponding changes in topography in-situ. This way, we are able to analyze how the change in topography is related to the variation of the electrical field vector within the interference pattern. It is for the first time that with a rather simple experimental approach a rigorous assignment can be achieved. By performing in-situ measurements we found that for a certain polarization combination of two interfering beams [namely for the SP (↕, ↔) polarization pattern] the topography forms surface relief grating with only half the period of the interference patterns. Exploiting this phenomenon we are able to fabricate surface relief structures with characteristic features measuring only 140 nm, by using far field optics with a wavelength of 491 nm. We believe that this relatively simple method could be extremely valuable to, for instance, produce structural features below the diffraction limit at high-throughput, and this could significantly contribute to the search of new fabrication strategies in electronics and photonics industry.

  14. An experimental apparatus for diffraction-limites soft x-ray nanofocusing

    SciTech Connect

    Merthe, Daniel; Goldberg, Kenneth; Yashchuk, Valeriy; Yuan, Sheng; McKinney, Wayne; Celestre, Richard; Mochi, Iacopo; Macdougall, James; Morrison, Gregory; Rakawa, Senajith; Anderson, Erik; Smith, Brian; Domning, Edward; Warwick, Tony; Padmore, Howard

    2011-10-21

    Realizing the experimental potential of high-brightness, next generation synchrotron and free-electron laser light sources requires the development of reflecting x-ray optics capable of wavefront preservation and high-resolution nano-focusing. At the Advanced Light Source (ALS) beamline 5.3.1, we are developing broadly applicable, high-accuracy, in situ, at-wavelength wavefront measurement techniques to surpass 100-nrad slope measurement accuracy for diffraction-limited Kirkpatrick-Baez (KB) mirrors. The at-wavelength methodology we are developing relies on a series of wavefront-sensing tests with increasing accuracy and sensitivity, including scanning-slit Hartmann tests, grating-based lateral shearing interferometry, and quantitative knife-edge testing. We describe the original experimental techniques and alignment methodology that have enabled us to optimally set a bendable KB mirror to achieve a focused, FWHM spot size of 150 nm, with 1 nm (1.24 keV) photons at 3.7 mrad numerical aperture. The predictions of wavefront measurement are confirmed by the knife-edge testing.The side-profiled elliptically bent mirror used in these one-dimensional focusing experiments was originally designed for a much different glancing angle and conjugate distances. This work demonstrates that high-accuracy, at-wavelength wavefront-slope feedback can be used to optimize the pitch, roll, and mirror-bending forces in situ, using procedures that are deterministic and repeatable.

  15. Thermal eigenmode amplifiers for diffraction-limited amplification of ultrashort pulses.

    PubMed

    Salin, F; Blanc, C L; Squier, J; Barty, C

    1998-01-01

    The design of high-repetition, high-average power, multipass amplifiers in which the pump power induced thermal lensing within the amplifier is used to create an equivalent lens waveguide for the production of diffraction-limited beams is analyzed.

  16. Computational-optical microscopy for 3D biological imaging beyond the diffraction limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grover, Ginni

    In recent years, super-resolution imaging has become an important fluorescent microscopy tool. It has enabled imaging of structures smaller than the optical diffraction limit with resolution less than 50 nm. Extension to high-resolution volume imaging has been achieved by integration with various optical techniques. In this thesis, development of a fluorescent microscope to enable high resolution, extended depth, three dimensional (3D) imaging is discussed; which is achieved by integration of computational methods with optical systems. In the first part of the thesis, point spread function (PSF) engineering for volume imaging is discussed. A class of PSFs, referred to as double-helix (DH) PSFs, is generated. The PSFs exhibit two focused spots in the image plane which rotate about the optical axis, encoding depth in rotation of the image. These PSFs extend the depth-of-field up to a factor of ˜5. Precision performance of the DH-PSFs, based on an information theoretical analysis, is compared with other 3D methods with conclusion that the DH-PSFs provide the best precision and the longest depth-of-field. Out of various possible DH-PSFs, a suitable PSF is obtained for super-resolution microscopy. The DH-PSFs are implemented in imaging systems, such as a microscope, with a special phase modulation at the pupil plane. Surface-relief elements which are polarization-insensitive and ˜90% light efficient are developed for phase modulation. The photon-efficient DH-PSF microscopes thus developed are used, along with optimal position estimation algorithms, for tracking and super-resolution imaging in 3D. Imaging at depths-of-field of up to 2.5 microm is achieved without focus scanning. Microtubules were imaged with 3D resolution of (6, 9, 39) nm, which is in close agreement with the theoretical limit. A quantitative study of co-localization of two proteins in volume was conducted in live bacteria. In the last part of the thesis practical aspects of the DH-PSF microscope are

  17. Band-limited double-step Fresnel diffraction and its application to computer-generated holograms.

    PubMed

    Okada, Naohisa; Shimobaba, Tomoyoshi; Ichihashi, Yasuyuki; Oi, Ryutaro; Yamamoto, Kenji; Oikawa, Minoru; Kakue, Takashi; Masuda, Nobuyuki; Ito, Tomoyoshi

    2013-04-01

    Double-step Fresnel diffraction (DSF) is an efficient diffraction calculation in terms of the amount of usage memory and calculation time. This paper describes band-limited DSF, which will be useful for large computer-generated holograms (CGHs) and gigapixel digital holography, mitigating the aliasing noise of the DSF. As the application, we demonstrate a CGH generation with nearly 8K × 4K pixels from texture and depth maps of a three-dimensional scene captured by a depth camera. PMID:23572007

  18. Breaking the diffraction limit of light-sheet fluorescence microscopy by RESOLFT.

    PubMed

    Hoyer, Patrick; de Medeiros, Gustavo; Balázs, Bálint; Norlin, Nils; Besir, Christina; Hanne, Janina; Kräusslich, Hans-Georg; Engelhardt, Johann; Sahl, Steffen J; Hell, Stefan W; Hufnagel, Lars

    2016-03-29

    We present a plane-scanning RESOLFT [reversible saturable/switchable optical (fluorescence) transitions] light-sheet (LS) nanoscope, which fundamentally overcomes the diffraction barrier in the axial direction via confinement of the fluorescent molecular state to a sheet of subdiffraction thickness around the focal plane. To this end, reversibly switchable fluorophores located right above and below the focal plane are transferred to a nonfluorescent state at each scanning step. LS-RESOLFT nanoscopy offers wide-field 3D imaging of living biological specimens with low light dose and axial resolution far beyond the diffraction barrier. We demonstrate optical sections that are thinner by 5-12-fold compared with their conventional diffraction-limited LS analogs. PMID:26984498

  19. Breaking the diffraction limit of light-sheet fluorescence microscopy by RESOLFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyer, Patrick; de Medeiros, Gustavo; Balázs, Bálint; Norlin, Nils; Besir, Christina; Hanne, Janina; Kräusslich, Hans-Georg; Engelhardt, Johann; Sahl, Steffen J.; Hell, Stefan W.; Hufnagel, Lars

    2016-03-01

    We present a plane-scanning RESOLFT [reversible saturable/switchable optical (fluorescence) transitions] light-sheet (LS) nanoscope, which fundamentally overcomes the diffraction barrier in the axial direction via confinement of the fluorescent molecular state to a sheet of subdiffraction thickness around the focal plane. To this end, reversibly switchable fluorophores located right above and below the focal plane are transferred to a nonfluorescent state at each scanning step. LS-RESOLFT nanoscopy offers wide-field 3D imaging of living biological specimens with low light dose and axial resolution far beyond the diffraction barrier. We demonstrate optical sections that are thinner by 5-12-fold compared with their conventional diffraction-limited LS analogs.

  20. Breaking the diffraction limit of light-sheet fluorescence microscopy by RESOLFT

    PubMed Central

    Hoyer, Patrick; de Medeiros, Gustavo; Balázs, Bálint; Norlin, Nils; Besir, Christina; Hanne, Janina; Kräusslich, Hans-Georg; Engelhardt, Johann; Sahl, Steffen J.; Hell, Stefan W.; Hufnagel, Lars

    2016-01-01

    We present a plane-scanning RESOLFT [reversible saturable/switchable optical (fluorescence) transitions] light-sheet (LS) nanoscope, which fundamentally overcomes the diffraction barrier in the axial direction via confinement of the fluorescent molecular state to a sheet of subdiffraction thickness around the focal plane. To this end, reversibly switchable fluorophores located right above and below the focal plane are transferred to a nonfluorescent state at each scanning step. LS-RESOLFT nanoscopy offers wide-field 3D imaging of living biological specimens with low light dose and axial resolution far beyond the diffraction barrier. We demonstrate optical sections that are thinner by 5–12-fold compared with their conventional diffraction-limited LS analogs. PMID:26984498

  1. Limit of Detection in X-ray Diffraction Measurements of Tissue Equivalent Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Y.; Vassiljev, N.; Konstantinidis, A.; Griffiths, J.; Speller, R.

    2015-09-01

    There is a suggestion of a new approach to mammography whereby following a conventional mammogram, the radiologist could interrogate suspicious regions using X-ray diffraction whilst the patient is still present and to establish the true extent of disease. A starting point for this work is to quantify the minimum detectable amount of breast cancer within a realistic thickness phantom. Perspex has a similar diffraction pattern to healthy breast tissue whilst water is similar to breast tumour, hence these two materials are used as tissue equivalent test objects for X-ray diffraction measurements. The preliminary results show linear agreement between the ratio of Perspex to water and the ratio of the diffraction peak intensities at 0.7 nm-1 and 1.5 nm-1. The minimum detectable limit for a component of the two ‘tissue’ mix was found to be 4.1%. This suggests that X-ray diffraction can be used to quantify tissue like mixtures down to the 4.1% / 95.9% mix level and hence has a strong potential for delineating the extent of infiltration disease.

  2. An experimental apparatus for diffraction-limited soft x-ray nano-focusing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merthe, Daniel J.; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.; Yuan, Sheng; McKinney, Wayne R.; Celestre, Richard; Mochi, Iacopo; Macdougall, James; Morrison, Gregory Y.; Rakawa, Senajith B.; Anderson, Erik; Smith, Brian V.; Domning, Edward E.; Warwick, Tony; Padmore, Howard

    2011-09-01

    Realizing the experimental potential of high-brightness, next generation synchrotron and free-electron laser light sources requires the development of reflecting x-ray optics capable of wavefront preservation and high-resolution nano-focusing. At the Advanced Light Source (ALS) beamline 5.3.1, we are developing broadly applicable, high-accuracy, in situ, at-wavelength wavefront measurement techniques to surpass 100-nrad slope measurement accuracy for diffraction-limited Kirkpatrick-Baez (KB) mirrors. The at-wavelength methodology we are developing relies on a series of wavefront-sensing tests with increasing accuracy and sensitivity, including scanning-slit Hartmann tests, grating-based lateral shearing interferometry, and quantitative knife-edge testing. We describe the original experimental techniques and alignment methodology that have enabled us to optimally set a bendable KB mirror to achieve a focused, FWHM spot size of 150 nm, with 1 nm (1.24 keV) photons at 3.7 mrad numerical aperture. The predictions of wavefront measurement are confirmed by the knife-edge testing. The side-profiled elliptically bent mirror used in these one-dimensional focusing experiments was originally designed for a much different glancing angle and conjugate distances. Visible-light long-trace profilometry was used to pre-align the mirror before installation at the beamline. This work demonstrates that high-accuracy, at-wavelength wavefront-slope feedback can be used to optimize the pitch, roll, and mirror-bending forces in situ, using procedures that are deterministic and repeatable.

  3. Beating the Rayleigh limit: orbital-angular-momentum-based super-resolution diffraction tomography.

    PubMed

    Li, Lianlin; Li, Fang

    2013-09-01

    This paper reports a super-resolution imaging approach based on orbital-angular-momentum diffraction tomography (OAM-DT), which makes an important breakthrough on the Rayleigh limit associated with conventional diffraction tomography (DT) technique. It is well accepted that orbital-angular momentum (OAM) provides additional electromagnetic degrees of freedom. This concept has been widely applied in science and technology. In this paper we revisit the DT problem extended with OAM, and demonstrate theoretically and numerically that there is no physical limit on imaging resolution with OAM-DT. The physical mechanism behind it is that either the near field or superoscillation of the transmitter is employed to super-resolve probed objects. This super-resolution OAM-DT imaging paradigm does not require near-field measurement, a subtle focusing lens, or complicated postprocessing, etc., thus providing an approach to realize the wave-field imaging of universal objects with subwavelength resolution.

  4. Fluorescent microscopy beyond diffraction limits using speckle illumination and joint support recovery

    PubMed Central

    Min, Junhong; Jang, Jaeduck; Keum, Dongmin; Ryu, Seung-Wook; Choi, Chulhee; Jeong, Ki-Hun; Ye, Jong Chul

    2013-01-01

    Structured illumination microscopy (SIM) breaks the optical diffraction limit by illuminating a sample with a series of line-patterned light. Recently, in order to alleviate the requirement of precise knowledge of illumination patterns, structured illumination microscopy techniques using speckle patterns have been proposed. However, these methods require stringent assumptions of the speckle statistics: for example, speckle patterns should be nearly incoherent or their temporal average should be roughly homogeneous. Here, we present a novel speckle illumination microscopy technique that overcomes the diffraction limit by exploiting the minimal requirement that is common for all the existing super-resolution microscopy, i.e. that the fluorophore locations do not vary during the acquisition time. Using numerical and real experiments, we demonstrate that the proposed method can improve the resolution up to threefold. Because our proposed method succeeds for standard fluorescence probes and experimental protocols, it can be applied in routine biological experiments. PMID:23797902

  5. Diffraction-limited spatial resolution of circumstellar shells at 10 microns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloemhof, E. E.; Townes, C. H.; Vanderwyck, A. H. B.

    1983-01-01

    A new spatial array instrument provided diffraction-limited mid-infrared intensity profiles of the type-M supergiant stars alpha Orionis and alpha Scorpii, both of which are known to exhibit excess 10 microns radiation due to the presence of circumstellar dust shells. In the case of alpha Ori, there is a marked asymmetry in the dust distribution, with peak intensity of dust emission a distance of 0.9 inches from the star.

  6. Super-resolution of dense nanoscale emitters beyond the diffraction limit using spatial and temporal information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barsic, Anthony; Piestun, Rafael

    2013-06-01

    We propose a super-resolution technique for dense clusters of blinking emitters. The method relies on two basic assumptions: the emitters are statistically independent and a model of the imaging system is known. We numerically analyze the performance limits of the method as a function of emitter density and noise level. Numerical simulations show that five closely packed emitters can be resolved and localized to a precision of 17 nm. The experimental resolution of five quantum dots located within a diffraction-limited spot confirms the applicability of this approach. Statistical tests validate the independence of our quantum dots separated by nanoscale distances.

  7. High power broadband all fiber super-fluorescent source with linear polarization and near diffraction-limited beam quality.

    PubMed

    Ma, Pengfei; Huang, Long; Wang, Xiaolin; Zhou, Pu; Liu, Zejin

    2016-01-25

    In this manuscript, a high power broadband superfluorescent source (SFS) with linear polarization and near-diffraction-limited beam quality is achieved based on an ytterbium-doped (Yb-doped), all fiberized and polarization-maintained master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) configuration. The MOPA structure generates a linearly polarized output power of 1427 W with a slope efficiency of 80% and a full width at half maximum (FWHM) of 11 nm, which is power scaled by an order of magnitude compared with the previously reported SFSs with linear polarization. In the experiment, both the polarization extinction ratio (PER) and beam quality (M(2) factor) are degraded little during the power scaling process. At maximal output power, the PER and M(2) factor are measured to be 19.1dB and 1.14, respectively. The root-mean-square (RMS) and peak-vale (PV) values of the power fluctuation at maximal output power are just 0.48% and within 3%, respectively. Further power scaling of the whole system is limited by the available pump sources. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of kilowatt level broadband SFS with linear polarization and near-diffraction-limited beam quality. PMID:26832492

  8. How diffraction limits ultrasonic screening in phononic plate composed of a periodic array of resonant slits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elayouch, Aliyasin; Addouche, Mahmoud; Lasaygues, Philippe; Achaoui, Younes; Ouisse, Morvan; Khelif, Abdelkrim

    2016-05-01

    We explore experimentally the role played by diffraction in the phenomenon of acoustic shielding provided by a plate that is periodically perforated with subwavelength slits and immersed in water. We carried out ultrasonic transmission measurements for all directions of propagation in order to check the omnidirectionality of acoustic shielding. While a single slit acts as a Fabry-Perot resonator in the frequency range of interest, the coupling between adjacent slits provides an attenuation frequency band centered around the resonant frequency that is mostly independent of the angle of incidence. Beyond the incident angle of 45 degrees, however, we observe the appearance of scattered radiation that limits the attenuation of ultrasound. This spurious scattering is shown to arise from diffraction by the grating of slits. xml:lang="fr"

  9. Achievements and Limitations of Evidence-Based Medicine.

    PubMed

    Sheridan, Desmond J; Julian, Desmond G

    2016-07-12

    Evidence-based medicine (EBM) has a long history, but was revived in the early 1990s by a campaign mounted by a movement that took its name. The EBM movement focused attention on the need for greater objectivity in medical decision-making and led to the Cochrane Collaboration, which provides reviews of evidence on the basis of comparative research. Important limitations of EBM's effect on medicine have also emerged. Failure to acknowledge the limitations of clinical trials and systematic reviews has limited their applicability to individual patients' circumstances. An almost exclusive focus on drugs and devices has left vast areas of health care in an evidence vacuum. An overdependence on commissions for its research may have limited its independence in selecting what it investigates. EBM needs to widen its scope beyond drugs and devices to address many areas that often lack evidence at present, notably, health policy, management, and reforms. PMID:27386775

  10. Compact high-resolution spectrographs for large and extremely large telescopes: using the diffraction limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, J. Gordon; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss

    2012-09-01

    As telescopes get larger, the size of a seeing-limited spectrograph for a given resolving power becomes larger also, and for ELTs the size will be so great that high resolution instruments of simple design will be infeasible. Solutions include adaptive optics (but not providing full correction for short wavelengths) or image slicers (which give feasible but still large instruments). Here we develop the solution proposed by Bland-Hawthorn and Horton: the use of diffraction-limited spectrographs which are compact even for high resolving power. Their use is made possible by the photonic lantern, which splits a multi-mode optical fiber into a number of single-mode fibers. We describe preliminary designs for such spectrographs, at a resolving power of R ~ 50,000. While they are small and use relatively simple optics, the challenges are to accommodate the longest possible fiber slit (hence maximum number of single-mode fibers in one spectrograph) and to accept the beam from each fiber at a focal ratio considerably faster than for most spectrograph collimators, while maintaining diffraction-limited imaging quality. It is possible to obtain excellent performance despite these challenges. We also briefly consider the number of such spectrographs required, which can be reduced by full or partial adaptive optics correction, and/or moving towards longer wavelengths.

  11. Achieving the physical limits of the bounded-storage model

    SciTech Connect

    Mandayam, Prabha; Wehner, Stephanie

    2011-02-15

    Secure two-party cryptography is possible if the adversary's quantum storage device suffers imperfections. For example, security can be achieved if the adversary can store strictly less then half of the qubits transmitted during the protocol. This special case is known as the bounded-storage model, and it has long been an open question whether security can still be achieved if the adversary's storage were any larger. Here, we answer this question positively and demonstrate a two-party protocol which is secure as long as the adversary cannot store even a small fraction of the transmitted pulses. We also show that security can be extended to a larger class of noisy quantum memories.

  12. Perceived Achievement Limitations and Deviance-Proneness among Rural Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mookherjee, Harsha N.

    The study's purpose was to determine the degree to which homogeneous rural youths living in an economically impoverished region might be vulnerable to anomia, powerlessness, and deviance given varying levels of perceived limitations in opportunity and self-ability. Comparative data relative to earlier studies in rural areas was also provided.…

  13. Geometrical configurations of unphased diffraction-limited antennas in passive millimetre-wave imaging systems for concealed weapon detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serenelli, Roberto

    2004-12-01

    This paper analyzes simple imaging configurations to scan a human body, suitable as passive or active millimetre-wave imaging systems for concealed weapon detection (CWD). The first cylindrical configuration allows a 360 degrees scan: N unphased diffraction-limited antennas each of size L are placed on a circular support surrounding the subject (allowing scanning in the horizontal plane with N non-overlapping independent beams), and this circle is mechanically displaced over the whole body height. An analytical formula gives the maximum obtainable spatial resolution for different dimensions of the circular scanning device and operating frequencies, and the number of receivers achieving this optimal resolution. Constraints to be taken into account are diffraction, the usable total length of the circle, and the full coverage by the N beams over the subject, which is modelled as a cylinder with variable radius, coaxial with the scanning circle. Numerical calculations of system resolution are shown for different operating microwave (MW) and millimetre-wave (MMW) frequencies; in order to study off-axis performances, situations where the subject is not coaxial with the scanning device are also considered. For the case of a parallelepiped to be imaged instead of a cylinder, a linear array configuration is analyzed similarly to the circular one. A theoretical study is carried out to design other curved arrays, filled with unphased diffraction-limited antennas, for the imaging of linear subjects with finer resolution. Finally, the application of such configurations is considered for the design of active imaging systems, and different system architectures are discussed.

  14. PIMMS échelle: the next generation of compact diffraction limited spectrographs for arbitrary input beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betters, Christopher H.; Leon-Saval, Sergio G.; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Richards, Samuel N.; Birks, Tim A.; Gris-Sánchez, Itandehui

    2014-07-01

    PIMMS échelle is an extension of previous PIMMS (photonic integrated multimode spectrograph) designs, enhanced by using an échelle diffraction grating as the primary dispersing element for increased spectral band- width. The spectrograph operates at visible wavelengths (550 to 780nm), and is capable of capturing ~100 nm of R > 60, 000 (λ/(triangle)λ) spectra in a single exposure. PIMMS échelle uses a photonic lantern to convert an arbitrary (e.g. incoherent) input beam into N diffraction-limited outputs (i.e. N single-mode fibres). This allows a truly diffraction limited spectral resolution, while also decoupling the spectrograph design from the input source. Here both the photonic lantern and the spectrograph slit are formed using a single length of multi-core fibre. A 1x19 (1 multi-mode fiber to 19 single-mode fibres) photonic lantern is formed by tapering one end of the multi-core fibre, while the other end is used to form a TIGER mode slit (i.e. for a hexagonal grid with sufficient spacing and the correct orientations, the cores of the multi-core fibre can be dispersed such that they do not overlap without additional reformatting). The result is an exceptionally compact, shoebox sized, spectrograph that is constructed primarily from commercial off the shelf components. Here we present a brief overview of the échelle spectrograph design, followed by results from on-sky testing of the breadboard mounted version of the spectrograph at the `UK Schmidt Telescope'.

  15. Space infrared telescope facility wide field and diffraction limited array camera (IRAC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fazio, Giovanni G.

    1988-01-01

    The wide-field and diffraction limited array camera (IRAC) is capable of two-dimensional photometry in either a wide-field or diffraction-limited mode over the wavelength range from 2 to 30 microns with a possible extension to 120 microns. A low-doped indium antimonide detector was developed for 1.8 to 5.0 microns, detectors were tested and optimized for the entire 1.8 to 30 micron range, beamsplitters were developed and tested for the 1.8 to 30 micron range, and tradeoff studies of the camera's optical system performed. Data are presented on the performance of InSb, Si:In, Si:Ga, and Si:Sb array detectors bumpbonded to a multiplexed CMOS readout chip of the source-follower type at SIRTF operating backgrounds (equal to or less than 1 x 10 to the 8th ph/sq cm/sec) and temperature (4 to 12 K). Some results at higher temperatures are also presented for comparison to SIRTF temperature results. Data are also presented on the performance of IRAC beamsplitters at room temperature at both 0 and 45 deg angle of incidence and on the performance of the all-reflecting optical system baselined for the camera.

  16. 100-watt fiber-based green laser with near diffraction-limited beam quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Dan; Eisenberg, Eric; Brar, Khush; Yilmaz, Tolga; Honea, Eric

    2010-02-01

    An air-cooled, light-weight, fiber-based, high power green laser has been prototyped. The system consists of an all-fibercoupled IR pump laser at 1064 nm and a frequency-conversion module in a compact and flexible configuration. The IR laser operates in QCW mode, with 10 MHz pulse repetition frequency and 3-5 ns pulse width, to generate sufficient peak power for frequency doubling in the converter module. The IR laser can produce more than 200 W in a linearlypolarized diffraction-limited output beam with high spectral brightness for frequency conversion. The converter module has an input telescope and an oven with a nonlinear crystal to efficiently convert the 1064-nm IR fiber laser output to 532-nm green output. The IR laser and conversion module are connected via a stainless-steel protected delivery fiber for optical beam delivery and an electrical cable harness for electrical power delivery and system control. The beam quality of the 532 nm output remains near diffraction-limited, with M2<1.4. Up to 101 W of 532 nm output was demonstrated and multi-hour runs were characterized at 75 W output. The weights of the IR laser package and doubler are 69 lbs and 14 lbs respectively. An overview of the system and full characterization results will be presented. Such compact, highbrightness green laser sources are expected to enable various scientific, defense and industrial applications.

  17. 70-Watt green laser with near diffraction-limited beam quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Dan; Eisenberg, Eric; Madasamy, Pratheepan; Mead, Roy; Honea, Eric

    2009-02-01

    A 70-Watt green laser with M2<1.4 has been demonstrated. This green laser consists of an all-fiber-based IR pump laser at 1064 nm and a frequency-conversion module in a compact and flexible configuration. The IR laser produces up to 150 Watts in a polarized diffraction-limited output beam with high spectral brightness for frequency conversion. The IR laser is operating under QCW mode, e.g. 10 MHz with 3~5 ns pulse width or 700 MHz with 50 ps pulse width, to generate sufficient peak power for frequency doubling in the converter module. The IR laser and conversion module are connected via a 5-mm stainless-steel protected delivery fiber for optical beam delivery and an electrical cable harness for electrical power delivery and system control. Both the IR laser and converter module are run through embedded software that controls laser operations such as warm up and shut down. System overview and full characterization results will be presented. Such a high power green laser with near diffraction-limited output in a compact configuration will enable various scientific as well as industrial applications.

  18. Suppression of resonance Raman scattering via ground state depletion towards sub-diffraction-limited label-free microscopy.

    PubMed

    Rieger, Steffen; Fischedick, Markus; Boller, Klaus-Jochen; Fallnich, Carsten

    2016-09-01

    We report on the first experimental demonstration of the suppression of spontaneous Raman scattering via ground state depletion. The concept of Raman suppression can be used to achieve sub-diffraction-limited resolution in label-free microscopy by exploiting spatially selective signal suppression when imaging a sample with a combination of Gaussian- and donut-shaped beams and reconstructing a resolution-enhanced image from this data. Using a nanosecond pulsed laser source with an emission wavelength of 355 nm, the ground state of tris(bipyridine)ruthenium(II) molecules solved in acetonitrile was depleted and the spontaneous Raman scattering at 355 nm suppressed by nearly 50 %. Based on spectroscopic data retrieved from our experiment, we modeled the Raman image of a scattering center in order to demonstrate the applicability of this effect for superresolution Raman microscopy. PMID:27607677

  19. Suppression of resonance Raman scattering via ground state depletion towards sub-diffraction-limited label-free microscopy.

    PubMed

    Rieger, Steffen; Fischedick, Markus; Boller, Klaus-Jochen; Fallnich, Carsten

    2016-09-01

    We report on the first experimental demonstration of the suppression of spontaneous Raman scattering via ground state depletion. The concept of Raman suppression can be used to achieve sub-diffraction-limited resolution in label-free microscopy by exploiting spatially selective signal suppression when imaging a sample with a combination of Gaussian- and donut-shaped beams and reconstructing a resolution-enhanced image from this data. Using a nanosecond pulsed laser source with an emission wavelength of 355 nm, the ground state of tris(bipyridine)ruthenium(II) molecules solved in acetonitrile was depleted and the spontaneous Raman scattering at 355 nm suppressed by nearly 50 %. Based on spectroscopic data retrieved from our experiment, we modeled the Raman image of a scattering center in order to demonstrate the applicability of this effect for superresolution Raman microscopy.

  20. Wavefront correction for near diffraction-limited focal spot on a 6×100 J/1-ns laser facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, Julien; Wattellier, Benoit F.; Zou, Ji P.; Chanteloup, Jean-Christophe; Bandulet, H.; Michel, P.; Labaune, C.; Depierreux, S.; Kudryashov, Alexis V.; Aleksandrov, Alexander G.

    2003-10-01

    We have implemented on one beam of the LULI six-beam high-energy (6×100 J, 1 ns) Nd:glass laser facility a closed-loop Adaptive Optics (AO) system to compensate for thermal distortions onto the wave front. Using the AO system composed of a dielectric coated deformable mirror and of a wave front sensor, we are able to improve the wave front quality in order to obtain a focal spot close to the diffraction limit. This allows not only to improve the reproducibility of the experiments but also to increase by at least two orders of magnitude the peak intensity as compared with what usual laser smoothing techniques can achieve.

  1. Conventional transmission electron microscopy imaging beyond the diffraction and information limits.

    PubMed

    Rosenauer, Andreas; Krause, Florian F; Müller, Knut; Schowalter, Marco; Mehrtens, Thorsten

    2014-08-29

    There are mainly two complementary imaging modes in transmission electron microscopy (TEM): Conventional TEM (CTEM) and scanning TEM (STEM). In the CTEM mode the specimen is illuminated with a plane electron wave, and the direct image formed by the objective lens is recorded in the image plane. STEM is based on scanning the specimen surface with a focused electron beam and collecting scattered electrons with an extended disk or ring-shaped detector. Here we show that combination of CTEM imaging with STEM illumination generally allows extending the point resolution of CTEM imaging beyond the diffraction limit. This new imaging mode improves imaging characteristics, is more robust against chromatic aberration, exhibits direct structural imaging with superior precision, visualizes light elements with excellent contrast, and even allows us to overcome the conventional information limit of a microscope. PMID:25215995

  2. Conventional Transmission Electron Microscopy Imaging beyond the Diffraction and Information Limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenauer, Andreas; Krause, Florian F.; Müller, Knut; Schowalter, Marco; Mehrtens, Thorsten

    2014-08-01

    There are mainly two complementary imaging modes in transmission electron microscopy (TEM): Conventional TEM (CTEM) and scanning TEM (STEM). In the CTEM mode the specimen is illuminated with a plane electron wave, and the direct image formed by the objective lens is recorded in the image plane. STEM is based on scanning the specimen surface with a focused electron beam and collecting scattered electrons with an extended disk or ring-shaped detector. Here we show that combination of CTEM imaging with STEM illumination generally allows extending the point resolution of CTEM imaging beyond the diffraction limit. This new imaging mode improves imaging characteristics, is more robust against chromatic aberration, exhibits direct structural imaging with superior precision, visualizes light elements with excellent contrast, and even allows us to overcome the conventional information limit of a microscope.

  3. Efficient photonic reformatting of celestial light for diffraction-limited spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLachlan, D. G.; Harris, R. J.; Gris-Sánchez, I.; Morris, T. J.; Choudhury, D.; Gendron, E.; Basden, A. G.; Spaleniak, I.; Arriola, A.; Birks, T. A.; Allington-Smith, J. R.; Thomson, R. R.

    2016-10-01

    The spectral resolution of a dispersive astronomical spectrograph is limited by the trade-off between throughput and the width of the entrance slit. Photonic guided-wave transitions have been proposed as a route to bypass this trade-off, by enabling the efficient reformatting of incoherent seeing-limited light collected by the telescope into a linear array of single modes: a pseudo-slit which is highly multimode in one axis but diffraction-limited in the dispersion axis of the spectrograph. It is anticipated that the size of a single-object spectrograph fed with light in this manner would be essentially independent of the telescope aperture size. A further anticipated benefit is that such spectrographs would be free of `modal noise', a phenomenon that occurs in high-resolution multimode fibre-fed spectrographs due to the coherent nature of the telescope point-spread-function (PSF). We seek to address these aspects by integrating a multicore fibre photonic lantern with an ultrafast laser inscribed three-dimensional waveguide interconnect to spatially reformat the modes within the PSF into a diffraction-limited pseudo-slit. Using the CANARY adaptive optics (AO) demonstrator on the William Herschel Telescope, and 1530 ± 80 nm stellar light, the device exhibits a transmission of 47 - 53 per cent depending upon the mode of AO correction applied. We also show the advantage of using AO to couple light into such a device by sampling only the core of the CANARY PSF. This result underscores the possibility that a fully-optimised guided-wave device can be used with AO to provide efficient spectroscopy at high spectral resolution.

  4. Vortex characteristics of Fraunhofer diffractions of a plane wave by a spiral phase plate limited by pseudoring polygonal apertures.

    PubMed

    Tang, Huiqin; Wang, Taofen; Zhu, Kaicheng

    2008-08-15

    We introduce a multilevel spiral phase plate (SPP) limited by a pseudoring polygonal aperture (PRPA). Such an SPP has the advantages of easier fabrication and greater suppression of the sidelobes of the diffraction field over that generated with a polygonal aperture (PA). The Fraunhofer diffraction fields generated by an SPP with a PRPA or with a PA have the same topological charge features and a similar diffraction pattern. Numerical evaluations show that the maximum bright annular-intensity difference between the diffraction patterns for the SPP with a PRPA and that of a PA does not exceed 3% under optimal design parameters.

  5. First results from IRENI - Rapid diffraction-limited high resolution imaging across the mid-infrared bandwidth

    SciTech Connect

    Nasse, Michael J.; Mattson, Eric; Hirschmugl, Carol

    2010-02-03

    First results from IRENI, a new beamline at the Synchrotron Radiation Center, demonstrate that synchrotron chemical imaging, which combines the characteristics of bright, stable, broadband synchrotron source with a multi-element detector, produces diffraction-limited images at all wavelengths simultaneously. A single cell of Micrasterias maintained in a flow cell has been measured, and results show high quality spectra and images demonstrating diffraction limited, and therefore wavelength-dependent, spatial resolution.

  6. Polarization sensitive ultrafast mid-IR pump probe micro-spectrometer with diffraction limited spatial resolution.

    PubMed

    Kaucikas, M; Barber, J; Van Thor, J J

    2013-04-01

    A setup of ultrafast transient infrared IR spectrometer is described in this paper that employed Schwarzschild objectives to focus the probe beam to a diffraction limited spot. Thus measurements were performed with very high spatial resolution in the mid-IR spectral region. Furthermore, modulating the polarization of the probe light enabled detecting transient dichroism of the sample. These capabilities of the setup were applied to study transient absorption of Photosystem II core complex and to image an organized film of methylene blue chloride dye. Moreover, a study of noise sources in a pump probe measurement is presented. The predicted noise level of the current setup was 8.25 μOD in 10(4) acquisitions and compared very well with the experimental observation of 9.6 μOD.

  7. Aperture masking interferometry on the Keck I Telescope: new results from the diffraction limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuthill, Peter G.; Monnier, John D.; Danchi, William C.

    2000-07-01

    A high-resolution aperture-masking interferometry experiment at the Keck-1 telescope has produced images of stellar systems at diffraction-limited angular resolutions in the near-infrared (tens of milliarcsec). Targeting the dusty cocoons of young stellar objects and the circumstellar shrouds surrounding evolved giants and supergiants, these images have revealed a startling range of morphologies. Evolved stars from massive blue Wolf-Rayets to red giants, supergiants and carbon stars have shown dramatic dust plumes, clumps and shells which can dominate the dust halo, showing that mass loss from these objects can sometimes be anything but smooth and isotropic. The photospheres of a handful of red giants were large enough to be resolved with the 10 m baselines available within the Keck pupil. Stellar diameters were found to vary with pulsation phase and with observing wavelength.

  8. At-wavelength interferometry of high-NA diffraction-limited EUV optics

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Naulleau, Patrick; Rekawa, Senajith; Denham, Paul; Liddle, J. Alexander; Anderson, Erik; Jackson, Keith; Bokor, Jeffrey; Attwood, David

    2003-08-01

    Recent advances in all-reflective diffraction-limited optical systems designed for extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography have pushed numerical aperture (NA) values from 0.1 to 0.3, providing Rayleigh resolutions of 27-nm. Worldwide, several high-NA EUV optics are being deployed to serve in the development of advanced lithographic techniques required for EUV lithography, including the creation and testing of new, high-resolution photoresists. One such system is installed on an undulator beamline at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's Advanced Light Source. Sub{angstrom}-accuracy optical testing and alignment techniques, developed for use with the previous generations of EUV lithographic optical systems, are being extended for use at high NA. Considerations for interferometer design and use are discussed.

  9. Optical Imaging of Nonuniform Ferroelectricity and Strain at the Diffraction Limit

    PubMed Central

    Vlasin, Ondrej; Casals, Blai; Dix, Nico; Gutiérrez, Diego; Sánchez, Florencio; Herranz, Gervasi

    2015-01-01

    We have imaged optically the spatial distributions of ferroelectricity and piezoelectricity at the diffraction limit. Contributions to the birefringence from electro-optics –linked to ferroelectricity– as well as strain –arising from converse piezoelectric effects– have been recorded simultaneously in a BaTiO3 thin film. The concurrent recording of electro-optic and piezo-optic mappings revealed that, far from the ideal uniformity, the ferroelectric and piezoelectric responses were strikingly inhomogeneous, exhibiting significant fluctuations over the scale of the micrometer. The optical methods here described are appropriate to study the variations of these properties simultaneously, which are of great relevance when ferroelectrics are downscaled to small sizes for applications in data storage and processing. PMID:26522345

  10. Metalenses at visible wavelengths: Diffraction-limited focusing and subwavelength resolution imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khorasaninejad, Mohammadreza; Chen, Wei Ting; Devlin, Robert C.; Oh, Jaewon; Zhu, Alexander Y.; Capasso, Federico

    2016-06-01

    Subwavelength resolution imaging requires high numerical aperture (NA) lenses, which are bulky and expensive. Metasurfaces allow the miniaturization of conventional refractive optics into planar structures. We show that high-aspect-ratio titanium dioxide metasurfaces can be fabricated and designed as metalenses with NA = 0.8. Diffraction-limited focusing is demonstrated at wavelengths of 405, 532, and 660 nm with corresponding efficiencies of 86, 73, and 66%. The metalenses can resolve nanoscale features separated by subwavelength distances and provide magnification as high as 170×, with image qualities comparable to a state-of-the-art commercial objective. Our results firmly establish that metalenses can have widespread applications in laser-based microscopy, imaging, and spectroscopy.

  11. Diffraction-limited Fabry-Perot cavity in the near concentric regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durak, K.; Nguyen, C. H.; Leong, V.; Straupe, S.; Kurtsiefer, C.

    2014-10-01

    Nearly concentric optical cavities can be used to prepare optical fields with a very small mode volume. We implement an anaclastic design of such a cavity that significantly simplifies mode matching to the fundamental cavity mode. The cavity is shown to have diffraction-limited performance for a mode volume of ≈ {{10}4}{{λ }3}. This is in sharp contrast with the behavior of cavities with plano-concave mirrors, where aberrations significantly decrease the coupling of the input mode to the fundamental mode of the cavity and increase the coupling to the higher-order modes. We estimate the related cavity quantum electrodynamics parameters and show that the proposed cavity design allows for strong coupling without a need for high finesse or small physical-cavity volume.

  12. Optical Imaging of Nonuniform Ferroelectricity and Strain at the Diffraction Limit.

    PubMed

    Vlasin, Ondrej; Casals, Blai; Dix, Nico; Gutiérrez, Diego; Sánchez, Florencio; Herranz, Gervasi

    2015-01-01

    We have imaged optically the spatial distributions of ferroelectricity and piezoelectricity at the diffraction limit. Contributions to the birefringence from electro-optics--linked to ferroelectricity--as well as strain--arising from converse piezoelectric effects--have been recorded simultaneously in a BaTiO3 thin film. The concurrent recording of electro-optic and piezo-optic mappings revealed that, far from the ideal uniformity, the ferroelectric and piezoelectric responses were strikingly inhomogeneous, exhibiting significant fluctuations over the scale of the micrometer. The optical methods here described are appropriate to study the variations of these properties simultaneously, which are of great relevance when ferroelectrics are downscaled to small sizes for applications in data storage and processing. PMID:26522345

  13. Three-dimensional array diffraction-limited foci from Greek ladders to generalized Fibonacci sequences.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junyong

    2015-11-16

    Greek ladder is a technique for approximating Cn by rational numbers where n is a positive integer and C is a positive real number. For the classical Greek ladder, the value isC. Based on the continued fraction theory and algebraic equation, the classical Greek ladder in a special case can be reduced to the generalized Fibonacci sequence. By means of proper switching and binary, ternary or quaternary phase modulation, here we have successfully designed the various kinds of nano-photonic devices to produce three-dimensional array foci whose focusing properties satisfy the above mathematical characteristics. With this technology, the diffraction-limited array foci are freely designed or distributed under the requirement at the desired multiple focal planes. PMID:26698510

  14. microARPES and nanoARPES at diffraction-limited light sources: opportunities and performance gains.

    PubMed

    Rotenberg, Eli; Bostwick, Aaron

    2014-09-01

    The scientific opportunities for microARPES and nanoARPES techniques are discussed, and the benefits to these techniques at diffraction-limited light sources are presented, in particular the impact on spectromicroscopic ARPES (angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy) of upgrading the Advanced Light Source to diffraction-limited performance. The most important consideration is whether the space-charge broadening, impacting the energy and momentum resolution, will limit the possible benefits for ARPES. Calculations of energy broadening due to space-charge effects will be presented over a wide range of parameters, and optimum conditions for ARPES will be discussed. The conclusion is that spectromicroscopic ARPES will greatly benefit from the advent of diffraction-limited light sources; space-charge broadening effects will not be a limiting factor. PMID:25177993

  15. The Adaptive Optics Lucky Imager: Diffraction limited imaging at visible wavelengths with large ground-based telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crass, Jonathan; Mackay, Craig; King, David; Rebolo-López, Rafael; Labadie, Lucas; Puga, Marta; Oscoz, Alejandro; González Escalera, Victor; Pérez Garrido, Antonio; López, Roberto; Pérez-Prieto, Jorge; Rodríguez-Ramos, Luis; Velasco, Sergio; Villó, Isidro

    2015-01-01

    One of the continuing challenges facing astronomers today is the need to obtain ever higher resolution images of the sky. Whether studying nearby crowded fields or distant objects, with increased resolution comes the ability to probe systems in more detail and advance our understanding of the Universe. Obtaining these high-resolution images at visible wavelengths however has previously been limited to the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) due to atmospheric effects limiting the spatial resolution of ground-based telescopes to a fraction of their potential. With HST now having a finite lifespan, it is prudent to investigate other techniques capable of providing these kind of observations from the ground. Maintaining this capability is one of the goals of the Adaptive Optics Lucky Imager (AOLI).Achieving the highest resolutions requires the largest telescope apertures, however, this comes at the cost of increased atmospheric distortion. To overcome these atmospheric effects, there are two main techniques employed today: adaptive optics (AO) and lucky imaging. These techniques individually are unable to provide diffraction limited imaging in the visible on large ground-based telescopes; AO currently only works at infrared wavelengths while lucky imaging reduces in effectiveness on telescopes greater than 2.5 metres in diameter. The limitations of both techniques can be overcome by combing them together to provide diffraction limited imaging at visible wavelengths on the ground.The Adaptive Optics Lucky Imager is being developed as a European collaboration and combines AO and lucky imaging in a dedicated instrument for the first time. Initially for use on the 4.2 metre William Herschel Telescope, AOLI uses a low-order adaptive optics system to reduce the effects of atmospheric turbulence before imaging with a lucky imaging based science detector. The AO system employs a novel type of wavefront sensor, the non-linear Curvature Wavefront Sensor (nlCWFS) which provides

  16. Single-site addressing of ultracold atoms beyond the diffraction limit via position-dependent adiabatic passage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viscor, D.; Rubio, J. L.; Birkl, G.; Mompart, J.; Ahufinger, V.

    2012-12-01

    We propose a single-site addressing implementation based on the subwavelength localization via adiabatic passage (SLAP) technique. We consider a sample of ultracold neutral atoms loaded into a two-dimensional optical lattice with one atom per site. Each atom is modeled by a three-level Λ system in interaction with a pump and a Stokes laser pulse. Using a pump field with a node in its spatial profile, the atoms at all sites are transferred from one ground state of the system to the other via stimulated Raman adiabatic passage, except the one at the position of the node that remains in the initial ground state. This technique allows for the preparation, manipulation, and detection of atoms with a spatial resolution better than the diffraction limit, which either relaxes the requirements on the optical setup used or extends the achievable spatial resolution to lattice spacings smaller than accessible to date. In comparison to techniques based on coherent population trapping, SLAP gives a higher addressing resolution and has additional advantages such as robustness against parameter variations, coherence of the transfer process, and the absence of photon induced recoil. Additionally, the advantages of our proposal with respect to adiabatic spin-flip techniques are highlighted. Analytic expressions for the achievable addressing resolution and efficiency are derived and compared to numerical simulations for 87Rb atoms in state-of-the-art optical lattices.

  17. Characterization of Differential Toll-Like Receptor Responses below the Optical Diffraction Limit**

    PubMed Central

    Aaron, Jesse S.; Carson, Bryan D.; Timlin, Jerilyn A.

    2013-01-01

    Many membrane receptors are recruited to specific cell surface domains to form nanoscale clusters upon ligand activation. This step appears to be necessary to initiate signaling, including pathways in innate immune system activation. However, virulent pathogens such as Yersinia pestis (the causative agent of plague) are known to evade innate immune detection, in contrast to similar microbes (such as E. coli) that elicit a robust response. This disparity has been partly attributed to the structure of lipopolysaccharides (LPS) on the bacterial cell wall, which are recognized by the innate immune receptor TLR4. As such, we hypothesized that nanoscale differences would exist between the spatial clustering of TLR4 upon binding of LPS derived from Y. pestis and E. coli. Although optical imaging can provide exquisite details of the spatial organization of biomolecules, there is a mismatch between the scale at which receptor clustering occurs (<300 nm) and the optical diffraction limit (>400 nm). The last decade has seen the emergence of super-resolution imaging methods that effectively break the optical diffraction barrier to yield truly nanoscale information in intact biological samples. This study reports the first visualizations of TLR4 distributions on intact cells at image resolutions of <30 nm using a novel, dual-color stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM) technique. This methodology permits distinction between receptors containing bound LPS from those without at the nanoscale. Importantly, we also show that LPS derived from immuno-stimulatory bacteria resulted in significantly higher LPS-TLR4 cluster sizes and a nearly two-fold greater ligand/receptor colocalization as compared to immuno-evading LPS. PMID:22807232

  18. Novel techniques for detection and imaging of spin related phenomena: Towards sub-diffraction limited resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfe, Christopher Stuart

    The idea that the spin degree of freedom of particles can be used to store and transport information has revolutionized the data storage industry and inspired a huge amount of research activity. Spin electronics, or spintronics, provides a plethora of potential improvements to conventional charge electronics that include increased functionality and energy efficiency. Scientists studying spintronics will need a multitude of characterization tools to sensitively detect spins in new materials and devices. There are already a handful of powerful techniques to image spin-related phenomena, but each has limitations. Magnetic resonance force microscopy, for example, offers sensitive detection of spin moments that are localized or nearly so but requires a high vacuum, cryogenic environment. Magnetometry based on nitrogen vacancy centers in diamond is a powerful approach, but requires the nitrogen vacancy center to be in very close contact to the spin system being studied to be able to measure the field generated by the system. Spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy provides perhaps the best demonstrated spatial resolution, but typically requires ultrahigh vacuum conditions and is limited to studying the surface of a sample. Traditional optical techniques such as Faraday or Kerr microscopy are limited in spatial resolution by the optical diffraction limit. In this dissertation I will present three new techniques we have developed to address some of these issues and to provide the community with new tools to help push forward spintronics and magnetism related research. I will start by presenting the first experimental demonstration of scanned spin-precession microscopy. This technique has the potential to turn any spin-sensitive detection technique into an imaging platform by providing the groundwork for incorporating a magnetic field gradient with that technique, akin to magnetic resonance imaging, and the mathematical tools to analyze the data and extract the local

  19. Two-dimensionally-periodic diffractive optical elements: limitations of scalar analysis.

    PubMed

    Glytsis, Elias N

    2002-04-01

    The range of validity of the scalar diffraction analysis is quantified for the case of two-dimensionally-periodic diffractive optical elements (crossed gratings). Three canonical classes of two-dimensionally-periodic grating structures are analyzed by using the rigorous coupled-wave analysis as well as the scalar diffraction analysis. In all cases the scalar-analysis diffraction efficiencies are compared with the exact diffraction efficiencies. The error in using the scalar analysis is then determined as a function of the grating-period(s)-to-wavelength ratio(s), the minimum feature size, the grating depth, the refractive index of the grating, the incident polarization, and the number of phase levels. The three classes of two-dimensional (2-D) unit cells are as follows: (1) a rectangular pillar, (2) an elliptical pillar, and (3) an arbitrarily pixellated multilevel 2-D unit cell that is representative of more complicated diffractive optical elements such as computer-generated holograms. In all cases a normally incident electromagnetic plane wave is considered. It is shown that the error of the scalar diffraction analysis in the case of two-dimensionally-periodic diffractive optical elements is greater than that for the corresponding one-dimensionally-periodic counterparts. In addition, the accuracy of the scalar diffraction analysis degrades with increasing refractive index, grating thickness, and asymmetry of the 2-D unit cell and with decreasing grating-period-to-wavelength ratio and feature size.

  20. Photonic spatial reformatting of stellar light for diffraction-limited spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, R. J.; MacLachlan, D. G.; Choudhury, D.; Morris, T. J.; Gendron, E.; Basden, A. G.; Brown, G.; Allington-Smith, J. R.; Thomson, R. R.

    2015-06-01

    The spectral resolution of a dispersive spectrograph is dependent on the width of the entrance slit. This means that astronomical spectrographs trade-off throughput with spectral resolving power. Recently, optical guided-wave transitions known as photonic lanterns have been proposed to circumvent this trade-off, by enabling the efficient reformatting of multimode light into a pseudo-slit which is highly multimode in one axis, but diffraction-limited in the other. Here, we demonstrate the successful reformatting of a telescope point spread function into such a slit using a three-dimensional integrated optical waveguide device, which we name the photonic dicer. Using the CANARY adaptive optics (AO) demonstrator on the William Herschel Telescope, and light centred at 1530 nm with a 160 nm full width at half-maximum, the device shows a transmission of between 10 and 20 per cent depending upon the type of AO correction applied. Most of the loss is due to the overfilling of the input aperture in poor and moderate seeing. Taking this into account, the photonic device itself has a transmission of 57 ± 4 per cent. We show how a fully-optimized device can be used with AO to provide efficient spectroscopy at high spectral resolution.

  1. Electromagnetic energy transport below the diffraction limit in periodic metal nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, Stefan A.; Kik, Pieter G.; Brongersma, Mark L.; Atwater, Harry A.

    2001-12-01

    We investigate the possibility of using arrays of closely spaced metal nanoparticles as waveguides for electromagnetic energy below the diffraction limit of visible light. Coupling between adjacent particles sets up coupled plasmon modes that give rise to coherent propagation of energy along the array. A point dipole analysis predicts group velocities of energy transport that exceed 0.1c along straight arrays and shows that energy transmission through chain networks such as corners and tee structures is possible at high efficiencies. Although radiation losses into the far field are negligible due to the near-field nature of the coupling, resistive heating leads to transmission losses of about 3 dB/500 nm for gold and silver particles. We confirmed the predictions of this analytical model using numeric finite difference time domain (FDTD) simulations. Also, we have fabricated gold nanoparticle arrays using electron beam lithography to study this type of electromagnetic energy transport. A modified illumination near field scanning optical microscope (NSOM) was used as a local excitation source of a nanoparticle in these arrays. Transport is studied by imaging the fluorescence of dye-filled latex beads positioned next to the nanoparticle arrays. We report on initial experiments of this kind.

  2. Sub-Diffraction Limited Writing based on Laser Induced Periodic Surface Structures (LIPSS)

    PubMed Central

    He, Xiaolong; Datta, Anurup; Nam, Woongsik; Traverso, Luis M.; Xu, Xianfan

    2016-01-01

    Controlled fabrication of single and multiple nanostructures far below the diffraction limit using a method based on laser induced periodic surface structure (LIPSS) is presented. In typical LIPSS, multiple lines with a certain spatial periodicity, but often not well-aligned, were produced. In this work, well-controlled and aligned nanowires and nanogrooves with widths as small as 40 nm and 60 nm with desired orientation and length are fabricated. Moreover, single nanowire and nanogroove were fabricated based on the same mechanism for forming multiple, periodic structures. Combining numerical modeling and AFM/SEM analyses, it was found these nanostructures were formed through the interference between the incident laser radiation and the surface plasmons, the mechanism for forming LIPSS on a dielectric surface using a high power femtosecond laser. We expect that our method, in particular, the fabrication of single nanowires and nanogrooves could be a promising alternative for fabrication of nanoscale devices due to its simplicity, flexibility, and versatility. PMID:27721428

  3. Sub-Diffraction Limited Writing based on Laser Induced Periodic Surface Structures (LIPSS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xiaolong; Datta, Anurup; Nam, Woongsik; Traverso, Luis M.; Xu, Xianfan

    2016-10-01

    Controlled fabrication of single and multiple nanostructures far below the diffraction limit using a method based on laser induced periodic surface structure (LIPSS) is presented. In typical LIPSS, multiple lines with a certain spatial periodicity, but often not well-aligned, were produced. In this work, well-controlled and aligned nanowires and nanogrooves with widths as small as 40 nm and 60 nm with desired orientation and length are fabricated. Moreover, single nanowire and nanogroove were fabricated based on the same mechanism for forming multiple, periodic structures. Combining numerical modeling and AFM/SEM analyses, it was found these nanostructures were formed through the interference between the incident laser radiation and the surface plasmons, the mechanism for forming LIPSS on a dielectric surface using a high power femtosecond laser. We expect that our method, in particular, the fabrication of single nanowires and nanogrooves could be a promising alternative for fabrication of nanoscale devices due to its simplicity, flexibility, and versatility.

  4. 40 CFR 450.22 - Effluent limitations reflecting the best available technology economically achievable (BAT).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... best available technology economically achievable (BAT). 450.22 Section 450.22 Protection of... Effluent limitations reflecting the best available technology economically achievable (BAT). Except as provided in 40 CFR 125.30 through 125.32, any point source subject to this subpart must achieve, at...

  5. 40 CFR 450.22 - Effluent limitations reflecting the best available technology economically achievable (BAT).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... best available technology economically achievable (BAT). 450.22 Section 450.22 Protection of... limitations reflecting the best available technology economically achievable (BAT). Except as provided in 40 CFR 125.30 through 125.32, any point source subject to this subpart must achieve, at a minimum,...

  6. 40 CFR 450.22 - Effluent limitations reflecting the best available technology economically achievable (BAT).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... best available technology economically achievable (BAT). 450.22 Section 450.22 Protection of... Effluent limitations reflecting the best available technology economically achievable (BAT). Except as provided in 40 CFR 125.30 through 125.32, any point source subject to this subpart must achieve, at...

  7. 40 CFR 450.22 - Effluent limitations reflecting the best available technology economically achievable (BAT).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... best available technology economically achievable (BAT). 450.22 Section 450.22 Protection of... limitations reflecting the best available technology economically achievable (BAT). Except as provided in 40 CFR 125.30 through 125.32, any point source subject to this subpart must achieve, at a minimum,...

  8. 40 CFR 450.22 - Effluent limitations reflecting the best available technology economically achievable (BAT).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... best available technology economically achievable (BAT). 450.22 Section 450.22 Protection of... Effluent limitations reflecting the best available technology economically achievable (BAT). Except as provided in 40 CFR 125.30 through 125.32, any point source subject to this subpart must achieve, at...

  9. Data reduction pipeline for OSIRIS, the new NIR diffraction-limited imaging field spectrograph for the Keck adaptive optics system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krabbe, Alfred; Gasaway, Tom; Song, Inseok; Iserlohe, Christof; Weiss, Jason; Larkin, James E.; Barczys, Matthew; Lafreniere, David

    2004-09-01

    OSIRIS is a near infrared diffraction limited imaging field spectrograph under development for the Keck observatory adaptive optics system and scheduled for commissioning in fall 2004. Based upon lenslet pupil imaging, diffraction grating, and a 2Kx2K Hawaii2 HgCdTe array, OSIRIS is a highly efficient instrument at the forefront of today's technology. OSIRIS will deliver per readout up to 4096 diffraction limited spectra in a complex interleaved format, requiring new challenges to be met regarding user interaction and data reduction. A data reduction software package is under development, aiming to provide the observer with a facility instrument allowing him to concentrate on science rather than dealing with instrumental as well as telescope and atmosphere related effects. Together with OSIRIS, a pipeline for basic data reduction will be provided for a new Keck instrument for the first time. A status report is presented here together with some aspects of the data reduction pipeline.

  10. Breaking the efficiency limit for high-frequency blazed multilayer soft x-ray gratings: Conical vs classical diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goray, L. I.; Egorov, A. Yu.

    2016-09-01

    High-frequency multilayer-coated blazed diffraction gratings (HFMBGs) are most promising elements for ultrahigh resolution soft x-ray spectroscopy. As it has been demonstrated recently [Voronov et al., Opt. Express 23, 4771 (2015)], the efficiency limit for in-plane diffraction can exceed 2-3 times, in higher orders too, when the period of a HFMBG is shorter than an attenuation length for soft x-rays and a bilayer asymmetry is designed. In this letter, using numerical experiments based on the rigorous electromagnetic theory, a possibility of off-plane diffraction and symmetrical multilayer coatings to enhance the efficiency of soft-x-ray high-order HFMBGs very closely to the absolute limit, i.e., 0.92-0.98 of the reflectance of the respective W/B4C multilayer, has been demonstrated.

  11. Sub-diffraction Limit Localization of Proteins in Volumetric Space Using Bayesian Restoration of Fluorescence Images from Ultrathin Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Gordon; Smith, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    Photon diffraction limits the resolution of conventional light microscopy at the lateral focal plane to 0.61λ/NA (λ = wavelength of light, NA = numerical aperture of the objective) and at the axial plane to 1.4nλ/NA2 (n = refractive index of the imaging medium, 1.51 for oil immersion), which with visible wavelengths and a 1.4NA oil immersion objective is ∼220 nm and ∼600 nm in the lateral plane and axial plane respectively. This volumetric resolution is too large for the proper localization of protein clustering in subcellular structures. Here we combine the newly developed proteomic imaging technique, Array Tomography (AT), with its native 50–100 nm axial resolution achieved by physical sectioning of resin embedded tissue, and a 2D maximum likelihood deconvolution method, based on Bayes' rule, which significantly improves the resolution of protein puncta in the lateral plane to allow accurate and fast computational segmentation and analysis of labeled proteins. The physical sectioning of AT allows tissue specimens to be imaged at the physical optimum of modern high NA plan-apochormatic objectives. This translates to images that have little out of focus light, minimal aberrations and wave-front distortions. Thus, AT is able to provide images with truly invariant point spread functions (PSF), a property critical for accurate deconvolution. We show that AT with deconvolution increases the volumetric analytical fidelity of protein localization by significantly improving the modulation of high spatial frequencies up to and potentially beyond the spatial frequency cut-off of the objective. Moreover, we are able to achieve this improvement with no noticeable introduction of noise or artifacts and arrive at object segmentation and localization accuracies on par with image volumes captured using commercial implementations of super-resolution microscopes. PMID:22956902

  12. Breaking the diffraction-limited resolution barrier in fiber-optical two-photon fluorescence endoscopy by an azimuthally-polarized beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Min; Kang, Hong; Li, Xiangping

    2014-01-01

    Although fiber-optical two-photon endoscopy has been recognized as a potential high-resolution diagnostic and therapeutic procedure in vivo, its resolution is limited by the optical diffraction nature to a few micrometers due to the low numerical aperture of an endoscopic objective. On the other hand, stimulated emission depletion (STED) achieved by a circularly-polarized vortex beam has been used to break the diffraction-limited resolution barrier in a bulky microscope. It has been a challenge to apply the STED principle to a fiber-optical two-photon endoscope as a circular polarization state cannot be maintained due to the birefringence of a fiber. Here, we demonstrate the first fiber-optical STED two-photon endoscope using an azimuthally-polarized beam directly generated from a double-clad fiber. As such, the diffraction-limited resolution barrier of fiber-optical two-photon endoscopy can be broken by a factor of three. Our new accomplishment has paved a robust way for high-resolution in vivo biomedical studies.

  13. High power, diffraction limited picosecond oscillator based on Nd:GdVO4 bulk crystal with σ polarized in-band pumping.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hua; Guo, Jie; Gao, Peng; Yu, Hai; Liang, Xiaoyan

    2016-06-27

    We report on a high power passively mode-locked picosecond oscillator based on Nd:GdVO4 crystal with σ polarized in-band pumping. Thermal gradient and thermal aberration was greatly decreased with proposed configuration. Maximum output power of 37 W at 81 MHz repetition rate with 19.3 ps pulse duration was achieved directly from Nd:GdVO4 oscillator, corresponding to 51% optical efficiency. The oscillator maintained diffraction limited beam quality of M2 < 1.05 at different output coupling with pulse duration between 11.2 ps to 19.3 ps.

  14. High frame rate imaging system for limited diffraction array beam imaging with square-wave aperture weightings.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jian-Yu; Cheng, Jiqi; Wang, Jing

    2006-10-01

    A general-purpose high frame rate (HFR) medical imaging system has been developed. This system has 128 independent linear transmitters, each of which is capable of producing an arbitrary broadband (about 0.05-10 MHz) waveform of up to +/- 144 V peak voltage on a 75-ohm resistive load using a 12-bit/40-MHz digital-to-analog converter. The system also has 128 independent, broadband (about 0.25-10 MHz), and time-variable-gain receiver channels, each of which has a 12-bit/40-MHz analog-to-digital converter and up to 512 MB of memory. The system is controlled by a personal computer (PC), and radio frequency echo data of each channel are transferred to the same PC via a standard USB 2.0 port for image reconstructions. Using the HFR imaging system, we have developed a new limited-diffraction array beam imaging method with square-wave aperture voltage weightings. With this method, in principle, only one or two transmitters are required to excite a fully populated two-dimensional (2-D) array transducer to achieve an equivalent dynamic focusing in both transmission and reception to reconstruct a high-quality three-dimensional image without the need of the time delays of traditional beam focusing and steering, potentially simplifying the transmitter subsystem of an imager. To validate the method, for simplicity, 2-D imaging experiments were performed using the system. In the in vitro experiment, a custom-made, 128-element, 0.32-mm pitch, 3.5-MHz center frequency linear array transducer with about 50% fractional bandwidth was used to reconstruct images of an ATS 539 tissue-mimicking phantom at an axial distance of 130 mm with a field of view of more than 90 degrees. In the in vivo experiment of a human heart, images with a field of view of more than 90 degrees at 120-mm axial distance were obtained with a 128-element, 2.5-MHz center frequency, 0.15-mm pitch Acuson V2 phased array. To ensure that the system was operated under the limits set by the U.S. Food and Drug

  15. Super-resolving quantum radar: Coherent-state sources with homodyne detection suffice to beat the diffraction limit

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Kebei; Lee, Hwang; Gerry, Christopher C.; Dowling, Jonathan P.

    2013-11-21

    There has been much recent interest in quantum metrology for applications to sub-Raleigh ranging and remote sensing such as in quantum radar. For quantum radar, atmospheric absorption and diffraction rapidly degrades any actively transmitted quantum states of light, such as N00N states, so that for this high-loss regime the optimal strategy is to transmit coherent states of light, which suffer no worse loss than the linear Beer's law for classical radar attenuation, and which provide sensitivity at the shot-noise limit in the returned power. We show that coherent radar radiation sources, coupled with a quantum homodyne detection scheme, provide both longitudinal and angular super-resolution much below the Rayleigh diffraction limit, with sensitivity at shot-noise in terms of the detected photon power. Our approach provides a template for the development of a complete super-resolving quantum radar system with currently available technology.

  16. Conventional fluorescence microscopy below the diffraction limit with simultaneous capture of two fluorophores in DNA origami

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glasgow, Ben J.

    2016-02-01

    A conventional fluorescence microscope was previously constructed for simultaneous imaging of two colors to gain sub-diffraction localization. The system is predicated on color separation of overlapping Airy discs, construction of matrices of Cartesian coordinates to determine locations as well as centers of the point spread functions of fluorophores. Quantum dots that are separated by as little as 10 nm were resolved in the x-y coordinates. Inter-fluorophore distances that vary by 10 nm could also be distinguished. Quantum dots are bright point light source emitters that excite with a single laser and can serve as a label for many biomolecules. Here, alterations in the method are described to test the ability to resolve Atto 488 and Atto 647 dyes attached to DNA origami at ~40 nm spacing intervals. Dual laser excitation is used in tandem with multi-wavelength bandpass filters. Notwithstanding challenges from reduced intensity in Atto labeled DNA origami helical bundles compared to quantum dots, preliminary data show a mean inter-fluorophore distance of 56 nm with a range (14-148 nm). The range closely matches published results with DNA origami with other methods of subdiffraction microscopy. Sub-diffraction simultaneous two-color imaging fluorescence microscopy acronymically christened (SSTIFM) is a simple, readily accessible, technique for measurement of inter-fluorophore distances in compartments less than 40 nm. Preliminary results with so called nanorulers are encouraging for use with other biomolecules.

  17. Prospects of high-resolution resonant X-ray inelastic scattering studies on solid materials, liquids and gases at diffraction-limited storage rings

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, Thorsten; de Groot, Frank M. F.; Rubensson, Jan-Erik

    2014-01-01

    The spectroscopic technique of resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) will particularly profit from immensely improved brilliance of diffraction-limited storage rings (DLSRs). In RIXS one measures the intensities of excitations as a function of energy and momentum transfer. DLSRs will allow for pushing the achievable energy resolution, signal intensity and the sampled spot size to new limits. With RIXS one nowadays probes a broad range of electronic systems reaching from simple molecules to complex materials displaying phenomena like peculiar magnetism, two-dimensional electron gases, superconductivity, photovoltaic energy conversion and heterogeneous catalysis. In this article the types of improved RIXS studies that will become possible with X-ray beams from DLSRs are envisioned. PMID:25177995

  18. Data Reduction Pipeline for OSIRIS, the new NIR Diffraction Limited Imaging Field Spectrometer for the Keck Adaptive Optics System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krabbe, Alfred; Gasaway, Thomas M.; Weiss, Jason; Larkin, James E.; Barczys, Matthew; Quirrenbach, Andreas; LaFreniere, David

    2002-12-01

    OSIRIS is a near infrared diffraction limited imaging field spectrometer under development for the Keck observatory adaptive optics system. Based upon lenslet pupil imaging, diffraction grating, and a 2K×2K Hawaii2 HgCdTe array, OSIRIS is a highly efficient instrument at the forefront of today"s technology. OSIRIS will deliver per readout up to 4096 diffraction limited spectra in a complex interleaved format, requiring new challenges to be met regarding user interaction and data reduction. A data reduction software package is under development, aiming to provide the observer with a facility instrument allowing him to concentrate on science rather than dealing with instrumental as well as telescope and atmosphere related effects. Together with OSIRIS, a pipeline for basic data reduction will be provided for a new Keck instrument for the first time. Some aspects of the data reduction pipeline will be presented here. The OSIRIS instrument as such, the astronomical background as well as other software tools were presented elsewhere on this conference.

  19. Estimating the Impact of the Massachusetts English Immersion Law on Limited English Proficient Students' Reading Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guo, Qian; Koretz, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The large number of limited English proficient (LEP) children in U.S. schools and the uncertainty about the impact of bilingual education versus English immersion on their achievement warrant rigorous investigation of the effects of "English immersion laws." We estimated the impact of "Question 2", the Massachusetts English immersion law, and…

  20. Understanding Possibilities and Limitations of Abstract Chemical Representations for Achieving Conceptual Understanding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corradi, David M. J.; Elen, Jan; Schraepen, Beno; Clarebout, Geraldine

    2014-01-01

    When learning with abstract and scientific multiple external representations (MERs), low prior knowledge learners are said to have difficulties in using these MERs to achieve conceptual understanding. Yet little is known about what these limitations precisely entail. In order to understand this, we presented 101 learners with low prior knowledge…

  1. Biological imaging beyond the diffraction limit by saturated excitation (SAX) microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamanaka, M.; Kawano, S.; Fujita, K.; Smith, N. I.; Kawata, S.

    2009-02-01

    We present an alternative high-resolution fluorescence imaging technique, saturated excitation (SAX) microscopy, for observations of biological samples. In the technique, we saturate the population of fluorescence molecules at the excited state with high excitation intensity. Under this condition, the fluorescence intensity is no longer proportional to the excitation intensity and the relation of the fluorescence and excitation intensity shows strong nonlinearity. In the centre of laser focus, the nonlinear responses induced by the saturation appear notably because of higher excitation intensity. By detecting fluorescence signals from the saturated area, we can push the spatial resolution beyond the diffraction barrier in three dimensions. SAX microscopy can be realized with a simple optics, where a laser intensity modulation sisytem and a lock-in amplifier are simply added to a conventional confocal microscope system. Using the SAX microscope, we demonstrated high-resolution imaging of a biological sample by observing mitochondria in HeLa cells. We also examined the nonlinear response of commercially available dyes under saturated excitation conditions.

  2. Conventional fluorescence microscopy below the diffraction limit with simultaneous capture of two fluorophores in DNA origami

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    A conventional fluorescence microscope was previously constructed for simultaneous imaging of two colors to gain subdiffraction localization. The system is predicated on color separation of overlapping Airy discs, construction of matrices of Cartesian coordinates to determine locations as well as centers of the point spread functions of fluorophores. Quantum dots that are separated by as little as 10 nm were resolved in the x-y coordinates. Inter-fluorophore distances that vary by 10 nm could also be distinguished. Quantum dots are bright point light source emitters that excite with a single laser and can serve as a label for many biomolecules. Here, alterations in the method are described to test the ability to resolve Atto 488 and Atto 647 dyes attached to DNA origami at ~40 nm spacing intervals. Dual laser excitation is used in tandem with multi-wavelength bandpass filters. Notwithstanding challenges from reduced intensity in Atto labeled DNA origami helical bundles compared to quantum dots, preliminary data show a mean inter-fluorophore distance of 56 nm with a range (14-148 nm). The range closely matches published results with DNA origami with other methods of subdiffraction microscopy. Sub-diffraction simultaneous two-color imaging fluorescence microscopy acronymically christened (SSTIFM) is a simple, readily accessible, technique for measurement of inter-fluorophore distances in compartments less than 40 nm. Preliminary results with so called nanorulers are encouraging for use with other biomolecules. PMID:27307653

  3. Spatially dependent Rabi oscillations: An approach to sub-diffraction-limited coherent anti-Stokes Raman-scattering microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Beeker, Willem P.; Lee, Chris J.; Boller, Klaus-Jochen; Gross, Petra; Cleff, Carsten; Fallnich, Carsten; Offerhaus, Herman L.; Herek, Jennifer L.

    2010-01-15

    We present a theoretical investigation of coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) that is modulated by periodically depleting the ground-state population through Rabi oscillations driven by an additional control laser. We find that such a process generates optical sidebands in the CARS spectrum and that the frequency of the sidebands depends on the intensity of the control laser light field. We show that analyzing the sideband frequency upon scanning the beams across the sample allows one to spatially resolve emitter positions where a spatial resolution of 65 nm, which is well below the diffraction limit, can be obtained.

  4. Ultra-broadband unidirectional launching of surface plasmon polaritons by a double-slit structure beyond the diffraction limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jianjun; Sun, Chengwei; Li, Hongyun; Gong, Qihuang

    2014-10-01

    Surface-plasmon-polariton (SPP) launchers, which can couple the free space light to the SPPs on the metal surface, are among the key elements for the plasmonic devices and nano-photonic systems. Downscaling the SPP launchers below the diffraction limit and directly delivering the SPPs to the desired subwavelength plasmonic waveguides are of importance for high-integration plasmonic circuits. By designing a submicron double-slit structure with different slit widths, an ultra-broadband (>330 nm) unidirectional SPP launcher is realized theoretically and experimentally based on the different phase delays of SPPs propagating along the metal surface and the near-field interfering effect. More importantly, the broadband and unidirectional properties of the SPP launcher are still maintained when the slit length is reduced to a subwavelength scale. This can make the launcher occupy only a very small area of <λ2/10 on the metal surface. Such a robust unidirectional SPP launcher beyond the diffraction limit can be directly coupled to a subwavelength plasmonic waveguide efficiently, leading to an ultra-tight SPP source, especially as a subwavelength localized guided SPP source.Surface-plasmon-polariton (SPP) launchers, which can couple the free space light to the SPPs on the metal surface, are among the key elements for the plasmonic devices and nano-photonic systems. Downscaling the SPP launchers below the diffraction limit and directly delivering the SPPs to the desired subwavelength plasmonic waveguides are of importance for high-integration plasmonic circuits. By designing a submicron double-slit structure with different slit widths, an ultra-broadband (>330 nm) unidirectional SPP launcher is realized theoretically and experimentally based on the different phase delays of SPPs propagating along the metal surface and the near-field interfering effect. More importantly, the broadband and unidirectional properties of the SPP launcher are still maintained when the slit length

  5. Diffraction limited amplification of picosecond pulses in 1170 microm2 effective area erbium fiber.

    PubMed

    Jasapara, J C; DeSantolo, A; Nicholson, J W; Yablon, A D; Várallyay, Z

    2008-11-10

    Robust fundamental mode propagation and amplification of picosecond pulses at 1.56 microm wavelength is demonstrated in a core-pumped Er fiber with 1170 microm2 effective area. Record peak power exceeding 120 kW, and 67 nJ pulse energy are achieved before the onset of pulse breakup. A small increase in input pulse energy results in a temporal collapse of the pulse center to 58 fs duration, with peak powers approaching 200 kW.

  6. Diffraction-limited two-dimensional hard-x-ray focusing at the 100 nm level using a Kirkpatrick-Baez mirror arrangement

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuyama, S.; Mimura, H.; Yumoto, H.; Yamamura, K.; Sano, Y.; Endo, K.; Mori, Y.; Nishino, Y.; Tamasaku, K.; Ishikawa, T.; Yabashi, M.; Yamauchi, K.

    2005-08-15

    The spatial resolution of scanning x-ray microscopy depends on the beam size of focused x rays. Recently, nearly diffraction-limited line focusing has been achieved using elliptical mirror optics at the 100 nm level. To realize such focusing two-dimensionally in a Kirkpatrick-Baez system, the required accuracies of the mirror aligners in this system were estimated using optical simulators based on geometrical or wave-optical theories. A focusing unit fulfilling the required adjustment accuracies was constructed. The relationships between alignment errors and focused beam profiles were quantitatively examined at the 1 km long beamline (BL29XUL) of SPring-8 to be in good agreement with the simulation results.

  7. Overcoming the diffraction limit in wave physics using a time-reversal mirror and a novel acoustic sink.

    PubMed

    de Rosny, J; Fink, M

    2002-09-16

    In recent years, time-reversal (TR) mirrors have been developed that create TR waves for ultrasonic transient fields propagating through complex media. A TR wave back propagates and refocuses exactly at its initial source. However, because of diffraction, even if the source is pointlike the wave refocuses on a spot size that cannot be smaller than half a wavelength. Here, by using a TR interpretation of this limit, we show that this latter limitation can be overcome if the source is replaced by its TR image. This new device acts as an acoustic sink that absorbs the TR wave. Here we report the first experimental result obtained with an acoustic sink where a focal spot size of less than 1/14th of one wavelength is recorded.

  8. Localization of atomic excitation beyond the diffraction limit using electromagnetically induced transparency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miles, J. A.; Das, Diptaranjan; Simmons, Z. J.; Yavuz, D. D.

    2015-09-01

    We experimentally demonstrate the localization of excitation between hyperfine ground states of 87Rb atoms to as small as λ /13 -wide spatial regions. We use ultracold atoms trapped in a dipole trap and utilize electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) for the atomic excitation. The localization is achieved by combining a spatially varying coupling laser (standing wave) with the intensity dependence of EIT. The excitation is fast (150 ns laser pulses) and the dark-state fidelity can be made higher than 94% throughout the standing wave. Because the width of the localized regions is much smaller than the wavelength of the driving light, traditional optical imaging techniques cannot resolve the localized features. Therefore, to measure the excitation profile, we use an autocorrelation-like method where we perform two EIT sequences separated by a time delay, during which we move the standing wave.

  9. Taking X-ray Diffraction to the Limit: Macromolecular Structures from Femtosecond X-ray Pulses and Diffraction Microscopy of Cells with Synchrotron Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, H N; Miao, J; Kirz, J; Sayre, D; Hodgson, K O

    2003-10-01

    The methodology of X-ray crystallography has recently been successfully extended to the structure determination of non-crystalline specimens. The phase problem was solved by using the oversampling method, which takes advantage of ''continuous'' diffraction pattern from non-crystalline specimens. Here we review the principle of this newly developed technique and discuss the ongoing experiments of imaging non-periodic objects, like cells and cellular structures using coherent and bright X-rays from the 3rd generation synchrotron radiation. In the longer run, the technique may be applied to image single biomolecules by using the anticipated X-ray free electron lasers. Computer simulations have so far demonstrated two important steps: (1) by using an extremely intense femtosecond X-ray pulse, a diffraction pattern can be recorded from a macromolecule before radiation damage manifests itself, and (2) the phase information can be ab initio retrieved from a set of calculated noisy diffraction patterns of single protein molecules.

  10. HYBRID Simulations of Diffraction-Limited Focusing with Kirkpatrick-Baez Mirrors for a Next-Generation In Situ Hard X-ray Nanoprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maser, Jörg; Shi, Xianbo; Reininger, Ruben; Lai, Barry; Vogt, Stefan

    2016-02-01

    Next-generation hard X-ray nanoprobe beamlines such as the In Situ Nanoprobe (ISN) beamline being planned at the Advanced Photon Source aim at providing very high spatial resolution while also enabling very high focused flux, to study complex materials and devices using fast, multidimensional imaging across many length scales. The ISN will use diffractive optics to focus X-rays with a bandpass of ∆E/E = 10-4 into a focal spot of 20 nm or below. Reflective optics in Kirkpatrick-Baez geometry will be used to focus X-rays with a bandpass as large as ∆E/E = 10-2 into a focal spot of 50 nm. Diffraction-limited focusing with reflective optics is achieved by spatial filtering and use of a very long, vertically focusing mirror. To quantify the performance of the ISN beamline, we have simulated the propagation of both partially and fully coherent wavefronts from the undulator source, through the ISN beamline and into the mirror-based focal spot. Simulations were carried out using the recently developed software "HYBRID."

  11. Plasmonics: Electromagnetic energy transfer and switching in nanoparticle chain-arrays below the diffraction limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brongersma, Mark; Hartman, John; Atwater, Harry

    2000-03-01

    Integrated optics faces the fundamental limitation that, for the guiding, modulation, and amplification of light, structures are needed that have dimensions comparable to the wavelength of light. Recently, it was theoretically shown that this problem can be circumvented by transporting electromagnetic energy along linear chains of closely spaced metal nanoparticles. This transport relies on the near-field electrodynamic interaction between metal particles that sets up coupled plasmon modes. We have modeled the transport properties of corners, T's, and switches that consist of chains of metal nanoparticles. It is shown that propagation is coherent and the group velocities can exceed saturated velocities of electrons in semiconductors ( ~ 105 m/s). High efficiency transmission of energy around sharp corners (bending radius << wavelength of visible light) is possible. The transmission is a strong function of the frequency and polarization direction of the plasmon mode. Finally, the operation of a plasmon switch is modeled in which plasmon waves can be switched. Suggestions are given for the choice of metal particle and host material. These "plasmonic devices" potentially are among the smallest structures with optical functionality.

  12. Photoacoustic FT-IR depth imaging of polymeric surfaces: overcoming IR diffraction limits.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ping; Urban, Marek W

    2004-11-23

    It is well established that the photoacoustic effect based on absorption of electromagnetic radiation into thermal waves allows surface depth profiling. However, limited knowledge exists concerning its spatial resolution. The spiral-stepwise (SSW) approach combined with phase rotational analysis is utilized to determine surface depth profiling of homogeneous and nonhomogeneous multilayered polymeric surfaces in a step-scan photoacoustic FT-IR experiment. In this approach, the thermal wave propagating to the surface is represented as the integral of all heat wave vectors propagating across the sampling depth xn, and the spiral function K'beta(lambda)e(-beta)(lambda)xne(-x)n/mu(th)e(i)(omegat-(xn/mu(th))) represents the amplitude and phase of the heat wave vector propagating to the surface. The SSW approach can be applied to heterogeneous surfaces by representing thermal waves propagating to the surface as the sum of the thermal waves propagating through homogeneous layers that are integrals of all heat vectors from a given sampling depth. The proposed model is tested on multilayered polymeric surfaces and shows that the SSW approach allows semiquantitative surface imaging with the spatial resolution ranging from micrometer to 500 nm levels, and the spatial resolution is a function of the penetration depth.

  13. Formation of crownlike and related nanostructures on thin supported gold films irradiated by single diffraction-limited nanosecond laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Kulchin, Yu N; Vitrik, O B; Kuchmizhak, A A; Emel'yanov, V I; Ionin, A A; Kudryashov, S I; Makarov, S V

    2014-08-01

    A type of laser-induced surface relief nanostructure-the nanocrown-on thin metallic films was studied both experimentally and theoretically. The nanocrowns, representing a thin corrugated rim of resolidified melt and resembling well-known impact-induced water-crown splashes, were produced by single diffraction-limited nanosecond laser pulses on thin gold films of variable thickness on low-melting copper and high-melting tungsten substrates, providing different transient melting and adhesion conditions for these films. The proposed model of the nanocrown formation, based on a hydrodynamical (thermocapillary Marangoni) surface instability and described by a Kuramoto-Sivashinsky equation, envisions key steps of the nanocrown appearance and gives qualitative predictions of the acquired nanocrown parameters. PMID:25215830

  14. Formation of crownlike and related nanostructures on thin supported gold films irradiated by single diffraction-limited nanosecond laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Kulchin, Yu N; Vitrik, O B; Kuchmizhak, A A; Emel'yanov, V I; Ionin, A A; Kudryashov, S I; Makarov, S V

    2014-08-01

    A type of laser-induced surface relief nanostructure-the nanocrown-on thin metallic films was studied both experimentally and theoretically. The nanocrowns, representing a thin corrugated rim of resolidified melt and resembling well-known impact-induced water-crown splashes, were produced by single diffraction-limited nanosecond laser pulses on thin gold films of variable thickness on low-melting copper and high-melting tungsten substrates, providing different transient melting and adhesion conditions for these films. The proposed model of the nanocrown formation, based on a hydrodynamical (thermocapillary Marangoni) surface instability and described by a Kuramoto-Sivashinsky equation, envisions key steps of the nanocrown appearance and gives qualitative predictions of the acquired nanocrown parameters.

  15. Large deflection angle, high-power adaptive fiber optics collimator with preserved near-diffraction-limited beam quality.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Dong; Ma, Yanxing; Chen, Zilun; Wang, Xiaolin; Zhou, Pu; Si, Lei

    2016-05-15

    We report on the development of a monolithic adaptive fiber optics collimator, with a large deflection angle and preserved near-diffraction-limited beam quality, that has been tested at a maximal output power at the 300 W level. Additionally, a new measurement method of beam quality (M2 factor) is developed. Experimental results show that the deflection angle of the collimated beam is in the range of 0-0.27 mrad in the X direction and 0-0.19 mrad in the Y direction. The effective working frequency of the device is about 710 Hz. By employing the new measurement method of the M2 factor, we calculate that the beam quality is Mx2=1.35 and My2=1.24, which is in agreement with the result from the beam propagation analyzer and is preserved well with the increasing output power.

  16. Microstructure analysis of complex CuO/ZnO@carbon adsorbers: what are the limits of powder diffraction methods?

    PubMed

    Tseng, J C; Schmidt, W; Sager, U; Däuber, E; Pommerin, A; Weidenthaler, C

    2015-05-14

    Activate carbon impregnated with a mixture of copper oxide and zinc oxide performs well as active adsorber for NO2 removal in automotive cabin air filters. The oxide-loaded activated carbon exhibits superior long-term stability in comparison to pure activated carbon as has been shown in previous studies. The carbon material was loaded only with 2.5 wt% of each metal oxide. Characterization of the oxide nanoparticles within the pores of the activated carbon is difficult because of the rather low concentration of the oxides. Therefore, a systematic study was performed to evaluate the limits of line profile analysis of X-ray powder diffraction patterns. The method allows evaluation of crystalline domain size distributions, crystal defect concentrations and twinning probabilities of nanoscopic materials. Here, the analysis is hampered by the presence of several phases including more or less amorphous carbon. By using physical mixtures of defined copper oxide and zinc oxide particles with activated carbon, potential errors and limits could be identified. The contribution of the activated carbon to the scattering curve was modeled with a convolution of an exponential decay curve, a Chebyshev polynomial, and two Lorentzian peaks. With this approach, domain size distributions can be calculated that are shifted only by about 0.5-1.0 nm for very low loadings (≤4 wt%). Oxide loadings of 4 wt% and 5 wt% allow very reliable analyses from diffraction patterns measured in Bragg-Brentano and Debye-Scherrer geometry, respectively. For the real adsorber material, mean domain sizes have been calculated to be 2.8 nm and 2.4 nm before and after the NO2 removal tests. PMID:25892653

  17. Review: Balancing Limiting Factors and Economic Drivers to Achieve Sustainable Midwestern US Agricultural Residue Feedstock Supplies

    SciTech Connect

    Wally W. Wilhelm; J. Richard Hess; Douglas L. Karlen; David J. Muth; Jane M. F. Johnson; John M. Baker; Hero T. Gollany; Jeff M. Novak; Diane E. Stott; Gary E. Varvel

    2010-10-01

    Advanced biofuels will be developed using cellulosic feedstock rather than grain or oilseed crops that can also be used for food and feed. To be sustainable, these new agronomic production systems must be economically viable without degrading soil resources. This review examines six agronomic factors that collectively define many of the limits and opportunities for harvesting crop residue for biofuel feedstock. These six “limiting factors” are discussed in relationship to economic drivers associated with harvesting corn (Zea mays L.) stover as a potential cellulosic feedstock. The limiting factors include soil organic carbon, wind and water erosion, plant nutrient balance, soil water and temperature dynamics, soil compaction, and off-site environmental impacts. Initial evaluations using the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation 2.0 (RUSLE2) show that a single factor analysis based on simply meeting tolerable soil loss might indicate stover could be harvested sustainably, but the same analysis based on maintaining soil organic carbon shows the practice to be non-sustainable. Modifying agricultural management to include either annual or perennial cover crops is shown to meet both soil erosion and soil carbon requirements. The importance of achieving high yields and planning in a holistic manner at the landscape scale are also shown to be crucial for balancing limitations and drivers associated with renewable bioenergy production.

  18. A collimated focused ultrasound beam of high acoustic transmission and minimum diffraction achieved by using a lens with subwavelength structures

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Zhou; Tu, Juan; Cheng, Jianchun; Guo, Xiasheng E-mail: dzhang@nju.edu.cn; Wu, Junru; Huang, Pingtong; Zhang, Dong E-mail: dzhang@nju.edu.cn

    2015-09-14

    An acoustic focusing lens incorporated with periodically aligned subwavelength grooves corrugated on its spherical surface has been developed. It is demonstrated theoretically and experimentally that acoustic focusing achieved by using the lens can suppress the relative side-lobe amplitudes, enhance the focal gain, and minimize the shifting of the focus. Use of the lens coupled with a planar ultrasound transducer can generate an ultrasound beam with enhanced acoustic transmission and collimation effect, which offers the capability of improving the safety, efficiency, and accuracy of targeted surgery implemented by high intensity focused ultrasound.

  19. Generation of 3.5 W of diffraction-limited green light from SHG of a single tapered diode laser in a cascade of nonlinear crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Anders K.; Jensen, Ole B.; Sumpf, Bernd; Erbert, Götz; Unterhuber, Angelika; Drexler, Wolfgang; Andersen, Peter E.; Petersen, Paul Michael

    2014-02-01

    Many applications, e.g., within biomedicine stand to benefit greatly from the development of diode laser-based multi- Watt efficient compact green laser sources. The low power of existing diode lasers in the green area (about 100 mW) means that the most promising approach remains nonlinear frequency conversion of infrared tapered diode lasers. Here, we describe the generation of 3.5 W of diffraction-limited green light from SHG of a single tapered diode laser, itself yielding 10 W at 1063 nm. This SHG is performed in single pass through a cascade of two PPMgO:LN crystals with re-focusing and dispersion compensating optics between the two nonlinear crystals. In the low-power limit, such a cascade of two crystals has the theoretical potential for generation of four times as much power as a single crystal without adding significantly to the complexity of the system. The experimentally achieved power of 3.5 W corresponds to a power enhancement greater than 2 compared to SHG in each of the crystals individually and is the highest visible output power generated by frequency conversion of a single diode laser. Such laser sources provide the necessary pump power for biophotonics applications, such as optical coherence tomography or multimodal imaging devices, e.g., FTCARS-OCT, based on a strongly pumped ultrafast Ti:Sapphire laser.

  20. Understanding Possibilities and Limitations of Abstract Chemical Representations for Achieving Conceptual Understanding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corradi, David M. J.; Elen, Jan; Schraepen, Beno; Clarebout, Geraldine

    2014-03-01

    When learning with abstract and scientific multiple external representations (MERs), low prior knowledge learners are said to have difficulties in using these MERs to achieve conceptual understanding. Yet little is known about what these limitations precisely entail. In order to understand this, we presented 101 learners with low prior knowledge of abstract scientific MERs to see (a) how many, and what kind of ideas (propositions) learners remembered from these MERs and (b) what the impact of these ideas is on conceptual understanding of the content. Propositional analysis indicates that learners created flawed internal representations. The discussion analyses the potentials that the learners have in using abstract representations to increase their understanding of scientific information and possible effects of instruction.

  1. Advances in genetics and genomics: use and limitations in achieving malaria elimination goals

    PubMed Central

    Gunawardena, Sharmini; Karunaweera, Nadira D.

    2015-01-01

    Success of the global research agenda towards eradication of malaria will depend on the development of new tools, including drugs, vaccines, insecticides and diagnostics. Genetic and genomic information now available for the malaria parasites, their mosquito vectors and human host, can be harnessed to both develop these tools and monitor their effectiveness. Here we review and provide specific examples of current technological advances and how these genetic and genomic tools have increased our knowledge of host, parasite and vector biology in relation to malaria elimination and in turn enhanced the potential to reach that goal. We then discuss limitations of these tools and future prospects for the successful achievement of global malaria elimination goals. PMID:25943157

  2. Advances in genetics and genomics: use and limitations in achieving malaria elimination goals.

    PubMed

    Gunawardena, Sharmini; Karunaweera, Nadira D

    2015-05-01

    Success of the global research agenda towards eradication of malaria will depend on the development of new tools, including drugs, vaccines, insecticides and diagnostics. Genetic and genomic information now available for the malaria parasites, their mosquito vectors and human host, can be harnessed to both develop these tools and monitor their effectiveness. Here we review and provide specific examples of current technological advances and how these genetic and genomic tools have increased our knowledge of host, parasite and vector biology in relation to malaria elimination and in turn enhanced the potential to reach that goal. We then discuss limitations of these tools and future prospects for the successful achievement of global malaria elimination goals.

  3. Piloted Simulator Investigation of Techniques to Achieve Attitude Command Response with Limited Authority Servos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Key, David L.; Heffley, Robert K.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to develop generic design principles for obtaining attitude command response in moderate to aggressive maneuvers without increasing SCAS series servo authority from the existing +/- 10%. In particular, to develop a scheme that would work on the UH-60 helicopter so that it can be considered for incorporation in future upgrades. The basic math model was a UH-60A version of GENHEL. The simulation facility was the NASA-Ames Vertical Motion Simulator (VMS). Evaluation tasks were Hover, Acceleration-Deceleration, and Sidestep, as defined in ADS-33D-PRF for Degraded Visual Environment (DVE). The DVE was adjusted to provide a Usable Cue Environment (UCE) equal to two. The basic concept investigated was the extent to which the limited attitude command authority achievable by the series servo could be supplemented by a 10%/sec trim servo. The architecture used provided angular rate feedback to only the series servo, shared the attitude feedback between the series and trim servos, and when the series servo approached saturation the attitude feedback was slowly phased out. Results show that modest use of the trim servo does improve pilot ratings, especially in and around hover. This improvement can be achieved with little degradation in response predictability during moderately aggressive maneuvers.

  4. Magnetic properties with multiwavelets and DFT: the complete basis set limit achieved.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Stig Rune; Flå, Tor; Jonsson, Dan; Monstad, Rune Sørland; Ruud, Kenneth; Frediani, Luca

    2016-08-01

    Multiwavelets are emerging as an attractive alternative to traditional basis sets such as Gaussian-type orbitals and plane waves. One of their distinctive properties is the ability to reach the basis set limit (often a chimera for traditional approaches) reliably and consistently by fixing the desired precision ε. We present our multiwavelet implementation of the linear response formalism, applied to static magnetic properties, at the self-consistent field level of theory (both for Hartree-Fock and density functional theories). We demonstrate that the multiwavelets consistently improve the accuracy of the results when increasing the desired precision, yielding results that have four to five digits precision, thus providing a very useful benchmark which could otherwise only be estimated by extrapolation methods. Our results show that magnetizabilities obtained with the augmented quadruple-ζ basis (aug-cc-pCVQZ) are practically at the basis set limit, whereas absolute nuclear magnetic resonance shielding tensors are more challenging: even by making use of a standard extrapolation method, the accuracy is not substantially improved. In contrast, our results provide a benchmark that: (1) confirms the validity of the extrapolation ansatz; (2) can be used as a reference to achieve a property-specific extrapolation scheme, thus providing a means to obtain much better extrapolated results; (3) allows us to separate functional-specific errors from basis-set ones and thus to assess the level of cancellation between basis set and functional errors often exploited in density functional theory. PMID:27087397

  5. Magnetic properties with multiwavelets and DFT: the complete basis set limit achieved.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Stig Rune; Flå, Tor; Jonsson, Dan; Monstad, Rune Sørland; Ruud, Kenneth; Frediani, Luca

    2016-08-01

    Multiwavelets are emerging as an attractive alternative to traditional basis sets such as Gaussian-type orbitals and plane waves. One of their distinctive properties is the ability to reach the basis set limit (often a chimera for traditional approaches) reliably and consistently by fixing the desired precision ε. We present our multiwavelet implementation of the linear response formalism, applied to static magnetic properties, at the self-consistent field level of theory (both for Hartree-Fock and density functional theories). We demonstrate that the multiwavelets consistently improve the accuracy of the results when increasing the desired precision, yielding results that have four to five digits precision, thus providing a very useful benchmark which could otherwise only be estimated by extrapolation methods. Our results show that magnetizabilities obtained with the augmented quadruple-ζ basis (aug-cc-pCVQZ) are practically at the basis set limit, whereas absolute nuclear magnetic resonance shielding tensors are more challenging: even by making use of a standard extrapolation method, the accuracy is not substantially improved. In contrast, our results provide a benchmark that: (1) confirms the validity of the extrapolation ansatz; (2) can be used as a reference to achieve a property-specific extrapolation scheme, thus providing a means to obtain much better extrapolated results; (3) allows us to separate functional-specific errors from basis-set ones and thus to assess the level of cancellation between basis set and functional errors often exploited in density functional theory.

  6. Simple Limits on Achieving A Quasi-Linear Magnetic Compression for an FEL Driver

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Yipeng; /SLAC

    2012-02-16

    Free electron lasers (FEL) need a very bright electron beam in three dimensions and a high peak charge density. In order to compress an initially longer electron bunch generated from the photoinjector, magnetic bunch compression systems are widely employed. In this paper, first harmonic RF linearization and its associated requirements are reviewed. Meanwhile it is also briefly discussed what is the relation between a proper initial bunch length and main RF frequency, when a harmonic RF linearization is included. Then given a reasonable bunch compression ratio, a proper initial bunch length as a function of the main RF frequency and RF phase is estimated analytically by several approaches, assuming that no harmonic RF section is needed to linearize the energy modulation introduced during main RF acceleration, and at the same time still linearly compress the bunch length. Next the upper limit of the bunch compression ratio in a single stage is evaluated analytically. The analytical relations derived on choosing a proper initial bunch length as a function of main RF frequency are confirmed by numerical simulation. These simple limit provide rough estimations and may be beneficial for choosing bunch compression ratios in different stages of an FEL driver, especially in a first stage bunch compression where there is usually a harmonic RF linearization applied. It may also be useful in evaluating the possibility of low charge operation mode without any harmonic RF linearization, where a shorter initial bunch length can be achieved from the photoinjector.

  7. Observation of coupled plasmon-polariton modes of plasmon waveguides for electromagnetic energy transport below the diffraction limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, Stefan A.; Kik, Pieter G.; Atwater, Harry A.; Meltzer, Sheffer; Requicha, Aristides A. G.; Koel, Bruce E.

    2002-10-01

    We investigate the possibility of using arrays of closely spaced metal nanoparticles as plasmon waveguides for electromagnetic energy below the diffraction limit of light. Far-field spectroscopy on arrays of closely spaced 50 nm Au particles fabricated using electron beam lithography reveals the presence of near-field optical particle interactions that lead to shifts in the plasmon resonance frequencies for longitudinal and transverse excitations. We link this observation to a point-dipole model for energy transfer in plasmon waveguides and give an estimate of the expected group velocities and energy decay lengths for the fabricated structures. A near-field optical excitation and detection scheme for energy transport is proposed and demonstrated. The fabricated structures show a high propagation loss of about 3 dB / 15 nm which renders a direct experimental observation of energy transfer impossible. The nature of the loss and ways to decrease it by an order of magnitude are discussed. We also present finite-difference time-domain simulations on the energy transfer properties of plasmon waveguides.

  8. Investigation of stimulated raman scattering using short-pulse diffraction limited laser beam near the instability threshold

    SciTech Connect

    Kline, John L; Montgomery, David S; Flippo, Kirk A; Rose, Harvey A; Yin, L; Albright, B J; Johnson, R P; Shimada, T; Bowers, K; Rousseaux, C; Tassin, V; Baton, S D; Amiranoff, F; Hardin, R A

    2008-01-01

    Short pulse laser plasma interaction experiments using diffraction limited beams provide an excellent platform to investigate the fundamental physics of Stimulated Raman Scattering. Detailed understanding of these laser plasma instabilities impacts the current inertial confinement fusion ignition designs and could potentially impact fast ignition when higher energy lasers are used with longer pulse durations ( > 1 kJ and> 1 ps). Using short laser pulses, experiments can be modeled over the entire interaction time of the laser using particle-in-cell codes to validate our understanding quantitatively. Experiments have been conducted at the Trident laser facility and the LULI (Laboratoire pour l'Utilisation des Lasers Intenses) to investigate stimulated Raman scattering near the threshold of the instability using 527 nm and 1059 nm laser light respectively with 1.5-3.0 ps pulses. In both experiments, the interaction beam was focused into a pre-ionized He gas-jet plasma. Measurements of the reflectivity as a function of intensity and k{lambda}{sub D} were completed at the Trident laser facility. At LULI, a 300 fs Thomson scattering probe is used to directly measure the density fluctuations of the driven electron plasma and ion acoustic waves. Work is currently underway comparing the results of the experiments with simulations using the VPIC [K. J. Bowers, et at., Phys. Plasmas, 15 055703 (2008)] particle-in-cell code. Details of the experimental results are presented in this manuscript.

  9. Localized tip enhanced Raman spectroscopic study of impurity incorporated single GaN nanowire in the sub-diffraction limit

    SciTech Connect

    Patsha, Avinash E-mail: dhara@igcar.gov.in; Dhara, Sandip; Tyagi, A. K.

    2015-09-21

    The localized effect of impurities in single GaN nanowires in the sub-diffraction limit is reported using the study of lattice vibrational modes in the evanescent field of Au nanoparticle assisted tip enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS). GaN nanowires with the O impurity and the Mg dopants were grown by the chemical vapor deposition technique in the catalyst assisted vapor-liquid-solid process. Symmetry allowed Raman modes of wurtzite GaN are observed for undoped and doped nanowires. Unusually very strong intensity of the non-zone center zone boundary mode is observed for the TERS studies of both the undoped and the Mg doped GaN single nanowires. Surface optical mode of A{sub 1} symmetry is also observed for both the undoped and the Mg doped GaN samples. A strong coupling of longitudinal optical (LO) phonons with free electrons, however, is reported only in the O rich single nanowires with the asymmetric A{sub 1}(LO) mode. Study of the local vibration mode shows the presence of Mg as dopant in the single GaN nanowires.

  10. Enhancement of low-quality reconstructed digital hologram images based on frequency extrapolation of large objects under the diffraction limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ning; Li, Weiliang; Zhao, Dongxue

    2016-06-01

    During the reconstruction of a digital hologram, the reconstructed image is usually degraded by speckle noise, which makes it hard to observe the original object pattern. In this paper, a new reconstructed image enhancement method is proposed, which first reduces the speckle noise using an adaptive Gaussian filter, then calculates the high frequencies that belong to the object pattern based on a frequency extrapolation strategy. The proposed frequency extrapolation first calculates the frequency spectrum of the Fourier-filtered image, which is originally reconstructed from the +1 order of the hologram, and then gives the initial parameters for an iterative solution. The analytic iteration is implemented by continuous gradient threshold convergence to estimate the image level and vertical gradient information. The predicted spectrum is acquired through the analytical iteration of the original spectrum and gradient spectrum analysis. Finally, the reconstructed spectrum of the restoration image is acquired from the synthetic correction of the original spectrum using the predicted gradient spectrum. We conducted our experiment very close to the diffraction limit and used low-quality equipment to prove the feasibility of our method. Detailed analysis and figure demonstrations are presented in the paper.

  11. Investigation of Stimulated Raman Scattering Using Short-Pulse Diffraction Limited Laser Beam near the Instability Threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kline, J. L.; Montgomery, D. S.; Yin, L.; Flippo, K. A.; Albright, B. J.; Johnson, R. P.; Shimada, T.; Rose, H. A.; Rousseaux, C.; Tassin, V.; Baton, S. D.; Amiranoff, F.; Hardin, R. A.

    2008-11-01

    Short pulse laser plasma interaction experiments using diffraction limited beams provide an excellent platform to investigate the fundamental physics of Stimulated Raman (SRS) and Stimulated Brillouin (SBS) Scattering. Detailed understanding of these laser plasma instabilities impacts the current inertial confinement fusion ignition designs and could potentially impact fast ignition when higher energy lasers are used with longer pulse durations ( > 1 kJ and > 1 ps). Using short laser pulses, experiments can be modeled over the entire interaction time of the laser using PIC codes to validate our understanding. Experiments have been conducted at the Trident laser and the LULI to investigate SRS near the threshold of the instability using 527 and 1064 nm laser light respectively with 1.5 -- 3 ps pulses. In the case of both experiments, the interaction beam was focused into a pre-ionized He gasjet plasma. Measurements of the reflectivity as a function of intensity and k?D were completed at the Trident laser. At LULI, a 300 fs Thomson scattering probe is used to directly measure the density fluctuations of the driven electron plasma and ion acoustic waves. Details of the experimental results will be presented.

  12. Characterization of analytical figures of merit of a sub-diffraction limited fiber bundle array for SERS imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Languirand, Eric R.; Cullum, Brian M.

    2016-05-01

    Super resolution chemical imaging can provide high spatial resolution images that contain chemically specific information. Additionally, using a technique such as Raman scattering provides molecular specific information based on the inherent vibrations within the analyte of interest. In this work, commercially available fiber bundle arrays (1mm diameter) consisting of 30,000 individual fiber elements (4μm diameter) that are then modified to obtain surface enhanced Raman scatter are employed. This allows for the visualization of vibrational information with high spatial (i.e. sub-diffraction limited) resolution over the 30,000 individual points of interrogation covering a total imaging diameter of approximately 20μm in a non-scanning format. Using these bundles, it has been shown that dithering can increase the spatial resolution of the arrays further by obtaining several sub-element shifted images. To retain the spatial resolution of such images, cross talk associated with these tpared bundles must be kept at a negligible level. In this paper, a study of luminescent particles isolated in individual fiber wells has been performed to characterize the cross talk associated with these fiber bundles. Scanning-electron microscope (SEM) images provide nanometric characterization of the fiber array, while luminescent signals allow for the quantitation of cross talk between adjacent fiber elements. From these studies negligible cross-talk associated with both untapered and tapered bundles was found to exist.

  13. Phase noise in pulsed Doppler lidar and limitations on achievable single-shot velocity accuracy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcnicholl, P.; Alejandro, S.

    1992-01-01

    The smaller sampling volumes afforded by Doppler lidars compared to radars allows for spatial resolutions at and below some sheer and turbulence wind structure scale sizes. This has brought new emphasis on achieving the optimum product of wind velocity and range resolutions. Several recent studies have considered the effects of amplitude noise, reduction algorithms, and possible hardware related signal artifacts on obtainable velocity accuracy. We discuss here the limitation on this accuracy resulting from the incoherent nature and finite temporal extent of backscatter from aerosols. For a lidar return from a hard (or slab) target, the phase of the intermediate frequency (IF) signal is random and the total return energy fluctuates from shot to shot due to speckle; however, the offset from the transmitted frequency is determinable with an accuracy subject only to instrumental effects and the signal to noise ratio (SNR), the noise being determined by the LO power in the shot noise limited regime. This is not the case for a return from a media extending over a range on the order of or greater than the spatial extent of the transmitted pulse, such as from atmospheric aerosols. In this case, the phase of the IF signal will exhibit a temporal random walk like behavior. It will be uncorrelated over times greater than the pulse duration as the transmitted pulse samples non-overlapping volumes of scattering centers. Frequency analysis of the IF signal in a window similar to the transmitted pulse envelope will therefore show shot-to-shot frequency deviations on the order of the inverse pulse duration reflecting the random phase rate variations. Like speckle, these deviations arise from the incoherent nature of the scattering process and diminish if the IF signal is averaged over times greater than a single range resolution cell (here the pulse duration). Apart from limiting the high SNR performance of a Doppler lidar, this shot-to-shot variance in velocity estimates has a

  14. Sensitivity and noise in GC-MS: Achieving low limits of detection for difficult analytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fialkov, Alexander B.; Steiner, Urs; Lehotay, Steven J.; Amirav, Aviv

    2007-01-01

    Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) instrument limit of detection (LOD) is typically listed by major vendors as that of octafluoronaphthalene (OFN). Most current GC-MS instruments can achieve LODs in the low femtogram range. However, GC-MS LODs for realistic analytes in actual samples are often a few orders of magnitude higher than OFN's. Users seldom encounter 1 pg LOD in the single ion monitoring mode in their applications. We define this detectability difference as the "OFN gap." In this paper, we demonstrate and discuss how the OFN gap can be significantly reduced by the use of GC-MS with supersonic molecular beams (SMB). Experimental results were obtained with a recently developed GC-MS with SMB named 1200-SMB, that is based on the conversion of the Varian 1200 system into a GC-MS-MS with SMB. With this 1200-SMB system, the LOD of all types of analytes, including OFN, in real samples is significantly improved through the combination of: (a) enhanced molecular ion; (b) elimination of vacuum background noise; (c) elimination of mass independent noise; (d) elimination of ion source peak tailing and degradation; (e) significantly increased range of thermally labile and low volatility compounds that are amenable for analysis through lower sample elution temperatures; (f) reduced column bleed and ghost peaks through sample elution at lower temperatures; (g) improved compatibility with large volume injections; and (h) reduced matrix interferences through the combination of enhanced molecular ion and MS-MS. As a result, the 1200-SMB LODs of common and/or difficult compounds are much closer to its OFN LOD, even in complex matrices. We crossed the <1 fg OFN LOD milestone to achieve the lowest LOD to date using GC-MS, but more importantly, we attained LOD of 2 fg for diazinon, a common pesticide analyte. In another example, we achieved an LOD of 10 fg for underivatized testosterone, which is not amenable in traditional GC-MS analysis, and conducted many analyses

  15. An assessment of the resolution limitation due to radiation-damage in X-ray diffraction microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Howells, M. R.; Beetz, T.; Chapman, H. N.; Cui, C.; Holton, J. M.; Jacobsen, C. J.; Kirz, J.; Lima, E.; Marchesini, S.; Miao, H.; et al

    2008-11-17

    X-ray diffraction microscopy (XDM) is a new form of x-ray imaging that is being practiced at several third-generation synchrotron-radiation x-ray facilities. Nine years have elapsed since the technique was first introduced and it has made rapid progress in demonstrating high-resolution three-dimensional imaging and promises few-nm resolution with much larger samples than can be imaged in the transmission electron microscope. Both life- and materials-science applications of XDM are intended, and it is expected that the principal limitation to resolution will be radiation damage for life science and the coherent power of available x-ray sources for material science. In this paper wemore » address the question of the role of radiation damage. We use a statistical analysis based on the so-called "dose fractionation theorem" of Hegerl and Hoppe to calculate the dose needed to make an image of a single life-science sample by XDM with a given resolution. We find that for simply-shaped objects the needed dose scales with the inverse fourth power of the resolution and present experimental evidence to support this finding. To determine the maximum tolerable dose we have assembled a number of data taken from the literature plus some measurements of our own which cover ranges of resolution that are not well covered otherwise. The conclusion of this study is that, based on the natural contrast between protein and water and "Rose-criterion" image quality, one should be able to image a frozen-hydrated biological sample using XDM at a resolution of about 10 nm.« less

  16. An assessment of the resolution limitation due to radiation-damage in X-ray diffraction microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Howells, M. R.; Beetz, T.; Chapman, H. N.; Cui, C.; Holton, J. M.; Jacobsen, C. J.; Kirz, J.; Lima, E.; Marchesini, S.; Miao, H.; Sayre, D.; Shapiro, D. A.; Spence, J. C.H.; Starodub, D.

    2008-11-17

    X-ray diffraction microscopy (XDM) is a new form of x-ray imaging that is being practiced at several third-generation synchrotron-radiation x-ray facilities. Nine years have elapsed since the technique was first introduced and it has made rapid progress in demonstrating high-resolution three-dimensional imaging and promises few-nm resolution with much larger samples than can be imaged in the transmission electron microscope. Both life- and materials-science applications of XDM are intended, and it is expected that the principal limitation to resolution will be radiation damage for life science and the coherent power of available x-ray sources for material science. In this paper we address the question of the role of radiation damage. We use a statistical analysis based on the so-called "dose fractionation theorem" of Hegerl and Hoppe to calculate the dose needed to make an image of a single life-science sample by XDM with a given resolution. We find that for simply-shaped objects the needed dose scales with the inverse fourth power of the resolution and present experimental evidence to support this finding. To determine the maximum tolerable dose we have assembled a number of data taken from the literature plus some measurements of our own which cover ranges of resolution that are not well covered otherwise. The conclusion of this study is that, based on the natural contrast between protein and water and "Rose-criterion" image quality, one should be able to image a frozen-hydrated biological sample using XDM at a resolution of about 10 nm.

  17. Classifying and assembling two-dimensional X-ray laser diffraction patterns of a single particle to reconstruct the three-dimensional diffraction intensity function: resolution limit due to the quantum noise

    SciTech Connect

    Tokuhisa, Atsushi; Taka, Junichiro; Kono, Hidetoshi; Go, Nobuhiro

    2012-05-01

    A new algorithm is developed for reconstructing the high-resolution three-dimensional diffraction intensity function of a globular biological macromolecule from many quantum-noise-limited two-dimensional X-ray laser diffraction patterns, each for an unknown orientation. The structural resolution is expressed as a function of the incident X-ray intensity and quantities characterizing the target molecule. A new two-step algorithm is developed for reconstructing the three-dimensional diffraction intensity of a globular biological macromolecule from many experimentally measured quantum-noise-limited two-dimensional X-ray laser diffraction patterns, each for an unknown orientation. The first step is classification of the two-dimensional patterns into groups according to the similarity of direction of the incident X-rays with respect to the molecule and an averaging within each group to reduce the noise. The second step is detection of common intersecting circles between the signal-enhanced two-dimensional patterns to identify their mutual location in the three-dimensional wavenumber space. The newly developed algorithm enables one to detect a signal for classification in noisy experimental photon-count data with as low as ∼0.1 photons per effective pixel. The wavenumber of such a limiting pixel determines the attainable structural resolution. From this fact, the resolution limit due to the quantum noise attainable by this new method of analysis as well as two important experimental parameters, the number of two-dimensional patterns to be measured (the load for the detector) and the number of pairs of two-dimensional patterns to be analysed (the load for the computer), are derived as a function of the incident X-ray intensity and quantities characterizing the target molecule.

  18. Reaching the Diffraction Limit - Differential Speckle and Wide-Field Imaging for the Gemini-N Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Nic J.; Howell, Steve; Horch, Elliott

    2016-01-01

    Speckle imaging allows telescopes to achieve di raction limited imaging performance. The technique requires cameras capable of reading out frames at a very fast rate, e ectively `freezing out' atmospheric seeing. The resulting speckles can be correlated and images reconstructed that are at the di raction limit of the telescope. These new instruments are based on the successful performance and design of the Di erential Speckle Survey Instrument (DSSI) [2, 1]. The instruments are being built for the Gemini-N and WIYN telescopes and will be made available to the community via the peer review proposal process. We envision their primary use to be validation and characterization of exoplanet targets from the NASA K2 and TESS missions and RV discovered exoplanets. Such targets will provide excellent follow-up candidates for both the WIYN and Gemini telescopes [3]. Examples of DSSI data are shown in the gures below. We expect similar data quality in speckle imaging mode with the new instruments. Additionally, both cameras will have a wide- eld mode and standard SDSS lters. They will be highly versatile instruments and it is that likely many other science programs will request time on the cameras. The limiting magnitude for speckle observations, will remain around 13-14th at WIYN and 16-17th at Gemini, while wide- eld, normal CCD imaging operation should be able to go to much fainter, providing usual CCD imaging and photometric capabilities. The instruments will also have high utility as scoring cameras for telescope engineering purposes, or other applications where high time resolution is needed. Instrument support will be provided, including a software pipeline that takes raw speckle data to fully reconstructed images.

  19. 40 CFR 449.10 - Effluent limitations representing the best available technology economically achievable (BAT).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... available technology economically achievable (BAT). Except as provided in 40 CFR 125.30 through 125.32, any... best available technology economically achievable (BAT). 449.10 Section 449.10 Protection of... following requirements representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application of...

  20. 40 CFR 449.10 - Effluent limitations representing the best available technology economically achievable (BAT).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... available technology economically achievable (BAT). Except as provided in 40 CFR 125.30 through 125.32, any... best available technology economically achievable (BAT). 449.10 Section 449.10 Protection of... following requirements representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application of...

  1. 40 CFR 449.10 - Effluent limitations representing the best available technology economically achievable (BAT).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... available technology economically achievable (BAT). Except as provided in 40 CFR 125.30 through 125.32, any... best available technology economically achievable (BAT). 449.10 Section 449.10 Protection of... following requirements representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application of...

  2. Bispectrum speckle interferometry of the Red Rectangle: Diffraction-limited near-infrared images reconstructed from Keck telescope speckle data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuthill, P. G.; Men'shchikov, A. B.; Schertl, D.; Monnier, J. D.; Danchi, W. C.; Weigelt, G.

    2002-07-01

    We present new near-infrared (2.1-3.3 mu m) images of the Red Rectangle with unprecedented diffraction-limited angular resolutions of 46-68 mas; 4 times higher than that of the Hubble space telescope and almost a factor of two improvement over the previous 6 m SAO telecope speckle images presented by Men'shchikov et al. (\\cite{Men'shchikov_etal1998}). The new images, which were reconstructed from Keck telescope speckle data using the bispectrum speckle interferometry method, clearly show two bright lobes above and below the optically thick dark lane obscuring the central binary. X-shaped spikes, thought to trace the surface of a biconical flow, change the intensity distribution of the bright lobes, making them appear broadened or with an east-west double-peak in images with the highest resolution. The striking biconical appearance of the Red Rectangle is preserved on scales from 50 mas to 1 arcmin and from the visible (red) to at least 10 mu m, implying that large grains of at least several microns in size dominate scattering. The new images supplement previous 76 mas resolution speckle reconstructions at shorter wavelengths of 0.6-0.8 mu m (Osterbart et al. \\cite{Osterbart_etal1997}) and 0.7-2.2 mu m (Men'shchikov et al. \\cite{Men'shchikov_etal1998}), allowing a more detailed analysis of the famous bipolar nebula. The intensity distribution of the images is inconsistent with a flat disk geometry frequently used to model the bipolar nebulae. Instead, a geometrically thick torus-like density distribution with bipolar conical cavities is preferred. The extent of the bright lobes indicates that the dense torus has a diameter of >~ 100 AU, for an assumed distance of 330 pc. This torus may be the outer reaches of a flared thick disk tapering inwards to the central star, however such a density enhancement on the midplane is not strictly required to explain the narrow dark lane obscuring the central stars.

  3. Beyond the diffraction limit of optical/IR interferometers. II. Stellar parameters of rotating stars from differential phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadjara, M.; Domiciano de Souza, A.; Vakili, F.; Jankov, S.; Millour, F.; Meilland, A.; Khorrami, Z.; Chelli, A.; Baffa, C.; Hofmann, K.-H.; Lagarde, S.; Robbe-Dubois, S.

    2014-09-01

    , PArot = 65.6° ± 5°, for Fomalhaut. They were found to be compatible with previously published values from differential phase and visibility measurements, while we were able to determine, for the first time, the inclination angle i of Fomalhaut (i = 90° ± 9°) and δ Aquilae (i = 81° ± 13°), and the rotation-axis position angle PArot of δ Aquilae. Conclusions: Beyond the theoretical diffraction limit of an interferometer (ratio of the wavelength to the baseline), spatial super resolution is well suited to systematically estimating the angular diameters of rotating stars and their fundamental parameters with a few sets of baselines and the Earth-rotation synthesis provided a high enough spectral resolution. Based on observations performed at the European Southern Observatory, Chile, under ESO AMBER-consortium GTO program IDs 084.D-0456 081.D-0293 and 082.C-0376.Figure 5 is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  4. A Descriptive Analysis of Enrollment and Achievement among Limited English Proficient Students in Maryland. Issues & Answers. REL 2012-No. 128

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Conner, Rosemarie; Abedi, Jamal; Tung, Stephanie

    2012-01-01

    This study describes limited English proficient (LEP) student enrollment and achievement trends in Maryland. Two research questions guide this study: (1) How did the enrollment of LEP students in Maryland public schools change between 2002/03 and 2008/09?; and (2) How did performance (the percentage scoring at the proficient or advanced level) on…

  5. [The historical achievement and the limits of the work of Sigmund Freud (1855-1939)].

    PubMed

    Katzenstein, A; Thom, A

    1982-02-01

    In this paper written on the occasion of Sigmund Freud's 125th birthday, an attempt is made to strike a balance of earlier marxist assessments of Freud's work. After a short presentation of the more important biographical and work-historical data, mainly Freud's antropological basic conceptions and their problematic consequences for his personality-theory are dealt with. Freud's historically important achievement is seen in the opening of a psychological access to the understanding of neuroses as well as the discovery of dynamic processes in the psychotherapeutic encounter. PMID:7045908

  6. Production of Biodiesel at Kinetic Limit Achieved in a Centrifugal Reactor/Separator

    SciTech Connect

    McFarlane, Joanna; Tsouris, Costas; Birdwell Jr, Joseph F; Lee, Denise L; Jennings, Hal L; Pahmer Boitrago, Amy M; Terpstra, Sarah M

    2010-01-01

    The kinetics of the transesterification of soybean oil has been investigated in a centrifugal reactor at temperatures from 45 to 80 C and pressures up to 2.6 bar using gas chromatography flame ionization detection (GC-FID) and infrared (IR) spectroscopy. The yields of product methyl esters were quantified using IR, proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (H1NMR), and viscosity measurements and were found to achieve 90% of the yield in 2 min; however, to meet ASTM specifications with one pass through the reactor, a 15 min residence time was needed. Performance was improved by sequential reactions, allowing separation of by-product glycerine and injection of additional small aliquots of methanol. The kinetics was modeled using a three-step mechanism of reversible reactions, which was used to predict performance at commercial scale. The mechanism correctly predicted the exponential decline in reaction rate as the concentration of the products allowed significant reverse reactions to occur.

  7. Microfluidic means of achieving attomolar detection limits with molecular beacon probes.

    PubMed

    Puleo, Christopher M; Wang, Tza-Huei

    2009-04-21

    We used inline, micro-evaporators to concentrate and transport DNA targets to a nanoliter single molecule fluorescence detection chamber for subsequent molecular beacon probe hybridization and analysis. This use of solvent removal as a unique means of target transport in a microanalytical platform led to a greater than 5000-fold concentration enhancement and detection limits that pushed below the femtomolar barrier commonly reported using confocal fluorescence detection. This simple microliter-to-nanoliter interconnect for single molecule counting analysis resolved several common limitations, including the need for excessive fluorescent probe concentrations at low target levels and inefficiencies in direct handling of highly dilute biological samples. In this report, the hundreds of bacteria-specific DNA molecules contained in approximately 25 microliters of a 50 aM sample were shuttled to a four nanoliter detection chamber through micro-evaporation. Here, the previously undetectable targets were enhanced to the pM regime and underwent probe hybridization and highly-efficient fluorescent event analysis via microfluidic recirculation through the confocal detection volume. This use of microfluidics in a single molecule detection (SMD) platform delivered unmatched sensitivity and introduced compliment technologies that may serve to bring SMD to more widespread use in replacing conventional methodologies for detecting rare target biomolecules in both research and clinical labs.

  8. Fermentative production of lactic acid from renewable materials: recent achievements, prospects, and limits.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Tashiro, Yukihiro; Sonomoto, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    The development and implementation of renewable materials for the production of versatile chemical resources have gained considerable attention recently, as this offers an alternative to the environmental problems caused by the petroleum industry and the limited supply of fossil resources. Therefore, the concept of utilizing biomass or wastes from agricultural and industrial residues to produce useful chemical products has been widely accepted. Lactic acid plays an important role due to its versatile application in the food, medical, and cosmetics industries and as a potential raw material for the manufacture of biodegradable plastics. Currently, the fermentative production of optically pure lactic acid has increased because of the prospects of environmental friendliness and cost-effectiveness. In order to produce lactic acid with high yield and optical purity, many studies focus on wild microorganisms and metabolically engineered strains. This article reviews the most recent advances in the biotechnological production of lactic acid mainly by lactic acid bacteria, and discusses the feasibility and potential of various processes. PMID:25077706

  9. Recent advances on enzymatic glucose/oxygen and hydrogen/oxygen biofuel cells: Achievements and limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosnier, Serge; Gross, Andrew J.; Le Goff, Alan; Holzinger, Michael

    2016-09-01

    The possibility of producing electrical power from chemical energy with biological catalysts has induced the development of biofuel cells as viable energy sources for powering portable and implanted electronic devices. These power sources employ biocatalysts, called enzymes, which are highly specific and catalytic towards the oxidation of a biofuel and the reduction of oxygen or hydrogen peroxide. Enzymes, on one hand, are promising candidates to replace expensive noble metal-based catalysts in fuel cell research. On the other hand, they offer the exciting prospect of a new generation of fuel cells which harvest energy from body fluids. Biofuel cells which use glucose as a fuel are particularly interesting for generating electricity to power electronic devices inside a living body. Hydrogen consuming biofuel cells represent an emerging alternative to platinum catalysts due to comparable efficiencies and the capability to operate at lower temperatures. Currently, these technologies are not competitive with existing commercialised fuel cell devices due to limitations including insufficient power outputs and lifetimes. The advantages and challenges facing glucose biofuel cells for implantation and hydrogen biofuel cells will be summarised along with recent promising advances and the future prospects of these exotic energy-harvesting devices.

  10. Fermentative production of lactic acid from renewable materials: recent achievements, prospects, and limits.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Tashiro, Yukihiro; Sonomoto, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    The development and implementation of renewable materials for the production of versatile chemical resources have gained considerable attention recently, as this offers an alternative to the environmental problems caused by the petroleum industry and the limited supply of fossil resources. Therefore, the concept of utilizing biomass or wastes from agricultural and industrial residues to produce useful chemical products has been widely accepted. Lactic acid plays an important role due to its versatile application in the food, medical, and cosmetics industries and as a potential raw material for the manufacture of biodegradable plastics. Currently, the fermentative production of optically pure lactic acid has increased because of the prospects of environmental friendliness and cost-effectiveness. In order to produce lactic acid with high yield and optical purity, many studies focus on wild microorganisms and metabolically engineered strains. This article reviews the most recent advances in the biotechnological production of lactic acid mainly by lactic acid bacteria, and discusses the feasibility and potential of various processes.

  11. Sapphire test-masses for measuring the standard quantum limit and achieving quantum non-demolition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobar, M. E.; Ivanov, E. N.; Oi, D. K. L.; Cuthbertson, B. D.; Blair, D. G.

    1996-01-01

    . In this paper we show that the available technology is sufficient to measure the Standard Quantum Limit (SQL) of a low loss acoustic oscillator, with a readout based on a microwave parametric transducer. The experiment makes use of the low electrical and acoustical losses in monocrystalline sapphire and new low-noise microwave technology. The crystal acts as an electrical vibration sensor and an acoustic oscillator in one monolithic structure. We analyze two new types of such structures: (1) The sapphire bar dielectric transducer and (2) the slotted sapphire dielectric transducer. We show that with a 40-60rdB double-cavity phase-noise suppression system the SQL may be measured using the sapphire bar. For the slotted structure, the phase noise requirements are less stringent because of its smaller resonant frequency and mass. We show that the SQL of this structure may be measured with a standard parametric readout. The principle of operation is demonstrated by some simple room-temperature experiments with all results verified using finite-element analysis. Given that we can expect to measure the SQL with one of these schemes, we analyze the properties of a microwave displacement measurement system based upon a high-Q parametric transducer and a double-frequency oscillator. Such a readout system represents a practical implementation of a black action evasion (BAE) displacement sensor allowing the discrimination between the quadratures of the mechanical oscillator. We determine the set of conditions which allows the enhanced sensitivity with respect to the desired quadrature and suppressed sensitivity to the unwanted quadrature. We find that tuning of the BAE system at the particular quadrature of interest can be performed by varying the phase relationship between the microwave carriers available from the double-frequency oscillator. We establish the importance of having the frequency and the phase-control servos to maintain the optimal tuning of the micro

  12. Using a dwell-time increase to compensate for SLM pixelation-limited diffraction efficiency in DMHL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAdams, Daniel R.; Cole, Daniel G.

    2012-03-01

    Dynamic maskless holographic lithography (DMHL) is a new micro-manufacturing technique that uses holograms to create patterns on a substrate instead of a mask. In DMHL, gratings and Fresnel lenses are displayed on nematic liquid crystal spatial light modulators (SLMs) to steer light to desired locations to expose sensitive photopolymers. Micro-manufacturing can be done in two modes, serial or parallel. Serial refers to a beam being scanned through a set of points and parallel refers to an entire intensity pattern being created at once. The field over which patterning can be performed is affected by the diffraction efficiency of the displayed hologram, the maximum possible spatial frequency of the SLM, and aliasing (light being steered to unintended spots due to mismatches between designed and displayed phase patterns). This paper presents a technique to compensate for these inherent inefficiencies by properly adjusting the amount of time spent by the beam at each point in the desired feature, the dwell-time, during the lithographic process. The relationship between the spatial frequency of the appropriate grating or Fresnel lens and the dwell time is discussed. Experiments are presented with and without this technique applied, and results show that feature uniformity is improved with dwell-time compensation.

  13. High-power ({gt}0.9 W cw) diffraction-limited semiconductor laser based on a fiber Bragg grating external cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Cornwell, D.M. , Jr.; Thomas, H.J.

    1997-02-01

    We have developed a high-power ({gt}0.9 W cw) diffraction-limited semiconductor laser based on a tapered semiconductor optical amplifier using a fiber Bragg grating in an external cavity configuration. Frequency-selective feedback from the fiber grating is injected into the amplifier via direct butt coupling through a single mode fiber, resulting in a spectrally stable and narrow ({lt}0.3 nm) high-power laser for solid-state laser pumping, laser remote sensing, and optical communications. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  14. Near-diffraction-limited,35.4 W laser-diode end-pumped Nd:YVO4 slab laser operating at 1342 nm.

    PubMed

    Yan, Ying; Zhang, Hengli; Liu, Yang; Yu, Xilong; Zhang, Huaijin; He, Jingliang; Xin, Jianguo

    2009-07-15

    A diode stack end-pumped Nd:YVO4 slab laser at 1342 nm with near-diffraction-limited beam quality by using a hybrid resonator was presented. At a pump power of 139.5 W, laser power of 35.4 W was obtained with a conversion efficiency of 25.4% of the laser diode to laser output. The beam quality M2 factors were measured to be 1.2 in the unstable direction and 1.3 in the stable direction at the output power of 29 W. PMID:19823516

  15. Near-diffraction-limited green source by frequency doubling of a diode-stack pumped Q-switched Nd:YAG slab oscillator-amplifier system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hengli; Liu, Xiaomeng; Li, Daijun; Shi, Peng; Schell, Alex; Haas, Claus Rüdige; Du, Keming

    2007-09-10

    A near-diffraction-limited, stable, 18 mJ green source with a pulse width of 16.7 ns was generated at a 1 kHz repetition rate by frequency doubling of diode stacks end-pumped electro-optically Q-switched slab Nd:YAG oscillator-amplifier system. The pump to green optical conversion efficiency was 10.7%. At the output energy of 15 mJ at 532 nm, the M2 factors were 1.3 and 1.7 in the unstable and stable directions, respectively. The energy pulse stability was approximately 0.8%.

  16. Near-diffraction-limited,35.4 W laser-diode end-pumped Nd:YVO4 slab laser operating at 1342 nm.

    PubMed

    Yan, Ying; Zhang, Hengli; Liu, Yang; Yu, Xilong; Zhang, Huaijin; He, Jingliang; Xin, Jianguo

    2009-07-15

    A diode stack end-pumped Nd:YVO4 slab laser at 1342 nm with near-diffraction-limited beam quality by using a hybrid resonator was presented. At a pump power of 139.5 W, laser power of 35.4 W was obtained with a conversion efficiency of 25.4% of the laser diode to laser output. The beam quality M2 factors were measured to be 1.2 in the unstable direction and 1.3 in the stable direction at the output power of 29 W.

  17. A computational approach to achieve situational awareness from limited observations of a complex system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherwin, Jason

    At the start of the 21st century, the topic of complexity remains a formidable challenge in engineering, science and other aspects of our world. It seems that when disaster strikes it is because some complex and unforeseen interaction causes the unfortunate outcome. Why did the financial system of the world meltdown in 2008--2009? Why are global temperatures on the rise? These questions and other ones like them are difficult to answer because they pertain to contexts that require lengthy descriptions. In other words, these contexts are complex. But we as human beings are able to observe and recognize this thing we call 'complexity'. Furthermore, we recognize that there are certain elements of a context that form a system of complex interactions---i.e., a complex system. Many researchers have even noted similarities between seemingly disparate complex systems. Do sub-atomic systems bear resemblance to weather patterns? Or do human-based economic systems bear resemblance to macroscopic flows? Where do we draw the line in their resemblance? These are the kinds of questions that are asked in complex systems research. And the ability to recognize complexity is not only limited to analytic research. Rather, there are many known examples of humans who, not only observe and recognize but also, operate complex systems. How do they do it? Is there something superhuman about these people or is there something common to human anatomy that makes it possible to fly a plane? Or to drive a bus? Or to operate a nuclear power plant? Or to play Chopin's etudes on the piano? In each of these examples, a human being operates a complex system of machinery, whether it is a plane, a bus, a nuclear power plant or a piano. What is the common thread running through these abilities? The study of situational awareness (SA) examines how people do these types of remarkable feats. It is not a bottom-up science though because it relies on finding general principles running through a host of varied

  18. Going far beyond the near-field diffraction limit via plasmonic cavity lens with high spatial frequency spectrum off-axis illumination

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zeyu; Luo, Yunfei; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Changtao; Gao, Ping; Wang, Yanqin; Pu, Mingbo; Yao, Na; Zhao, Chengwei; Luo, Xiangang

    2015-01-01

    For near-field imaging optics, minimum resolvable feature size is highly constrained by the near-field diffraction limit associated with the illumination light wavelength and the air distance between the imaging devices and objects. In this study, a plasmonic cavity lens composed of Ag-photoresist-Ag form incorporating high spatial frequency spectrum off-axis illumination (OAI) is proposed to realize deep subwavelength imaging far beyond the near-field diffraction limit. This approach benefits from the resonance effect of the plasmonic cavity lens and the wavevector shifting behavior via OAI, which remarkably enhances the object’s subwavelength information and damps negative imaging contribution from the longitudinal electric field component in imaging region. Experimental images of well resolved 60-nm half-pitch patterns under 365-nm ultra-violet light are demonstrated at air distance of 80 nm between the mask patterns and plasmonic cavity lens, approximately four-fold longer than that in the conventional near-field lithography and superlens scheme. The ultimate air distance for the 60-nm half-pitch object could be theoretically extended to 120 nm. Moreover, two-dimensional L-shape patterns and deep subwavelength patterns are illustrated via simulations and experiments. This study promises the significant potential to make plasmonic lithography as a practical, cost-effective, simple and parallel nano-fabrication approach. PMID:26477856

  19. Nearly diffraction-limited X-ray focusing with variable-numerical-aperture focusing optical system based on four deformable mirrors.

    PubMed

    Matsuyama, Satoshi; Nakamori, Hiroki; Goto, Takumi; Kimura, Takashi; Khakurel, Krishna P; Kohmura, Yoshiki; Sano, Yasuhisa; Yabashi, Makina; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Nishino, Yoshinori; Yamauchi, Kazuto

    2016-01-01

    Unlike the electrostatic and electromagnetic lenses used in electron microscopy, most X-ray focusing optical systems have fixed optical parameters with constant numerical apertures (NAs). This lack of adaptability has significantly limited application targets. In the research described herein, we developed a variable-NA X-ray focusing system based on four deformable mirrors, two sets of Kirkpatrick-Baez-type focusing mirrors, in order to control the focusing size while keeping the position of the focus unchanged. We applied a mirror deformation procedure using optical/X-ray metrology for offline/online adjustments. We performed a focusing test at a SPring-8 beamline and confirmed that the beam size varied from 108 nm to 560 nm (165 nm to 1434 nm) in the horizontal (vertical) direction by controlling the NA while maintaining diffraction-limited conditions. PMID:27097853

  20. Nearly diffraction-limited X-ray focusing with variable-numerical-aperture focusing optical system based on four deformable mirrors

    PubMed Central

    Matsuyama, Satoshi; Nakamori, Hiroki; Goto, Takumi; Kimura, Takashi; Khakurel, Krishna P.; Kohmura, Yoshiki; Sano, Yasuhisa; Yabashi, Makina; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Nishino, Yoshinori; Yamauchi, Kazuto

    2016-01-01

    Unlike the electrostatic and electromagnetic lenses used in electron microscopy, most X-ray focusing optical systems have fixed optical parameters with constant numerical apertures (NAs). This lack of adaptability has significantly limited application targets. In the research described herein, we developed a variable-NA X-ray focusing system based on four deformable mirrors, two sets of Kirkpatrick–Baez-type focusing mirrors, in order to control the focusing size while keeping the position of the focus unchanged. We applied a mirror deformation procedure using optical/X-ray metrology for offline/online adjustments. We performed a focusing test at a SPring-8 beamline and confirmed that the beam size varied from 108 nm to 560 nm (165 nm to 1434 nm) in the horizontal (vertical) direction by controlling the NA while maintaining diffraction-limited conditions. PMID:27097853

  1. Nearly diffraction-limited X-ray focusing with variable-numerical-aperture focusing optical system based on four deformable mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuyama, Satoshi; Nakamori, Hiroki; Goto, Takumi; Kimura, Takashi; Khakurel, Krishna P.; Kohmura, Yoshiki; Sano, Yasuhisa; Yabashi, Makina; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Nishino, Yoshinori; Yamauchi, Kazuto

    2016-04-01

    Unlike the electrostatic and electromagnetic lenses used in electron microscopy, most X-ray focusing optical systems have fixed optical parameters with constant numerical apertures (NAs). This lack of adaptability has significantly limited application targets. In the research described herein, we developed a variable-NA X-ray focusing system based on four deformable mirrors, two sets of Kirkpatrick-Baez-type focusing mirrors, in order to control the focusing size while keeping the position of the focus unchanged. We applied a mirror deformation procedure using optical/X-ray metrology for offline/online adjustments. We performed a focusing test at a SPring-8 beamline and confirmed that the beam size varied from 108 nm to 560 nm (165 nm to 1434 nm) in the horizontal (vertical) direction by controlling the NA while maintaining diffraction-limited conditions.

  2. Nearly diffraction-limited X-ray focusing with variable-numerical-aperture focusing optical system based on four deformable mirrors.

    PubMed

    Matsuyama, Satoshi; Nakamori, Hiroki; Goto, Takumi; Kimura, Takashi; Khakurel, Krishna P; Kohmura, Yoshiki; Sano, Yasuhisa; Yabashi, Makina; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Nishino, Yoshinori; Yamauchi, Kazuto

    2016-04-21

    Unlike the electrostatic and electromagnetic lenses used in electron microscopy, most X-ray focusing optical systems have fixed optical parameters with constant numerical apertures (NAs). This lack of adaptability has significantly limited application targets. In the research described herein, we developed a variable-NA X-ray focusing system based on four deformable mirrors, two sets of Kirkpatrick-Baez-type focusing mirrors, in order to control the focusing size while keeping the position of the focus unchanged. We applied a mirror deformation procedure using optical/X-ray metrology for offline/online adjustments. We performed a focusing test at a SPring-8 beamline and confirmed that the beam size varied from 108 nm to 560 nm (165 nm to 1434 nm) in the horizontal (vertical) direction by controlling the NA while maintaining diffraction-limited conditions.

  3. Potential for reducing air-pollutants while achieving 2 °C global temperature change limit target.

    PubMed

    Hanaoka, Tatsuya; Akashi, Osamu; Fujiwara, Kazuya; Motoki, Yuko; Hibino, Go

    2014-12-01

    This study analyzes the potential to reduce air pollutants while achieving the 2 °C global temperature change limit target above pre-industrial levels, by using the bottom-up optimization model, AIM/Enduse[Global]. This study focuses on; 1) estimating mitigation potentials and costs for achieving 2 °C, 2.5 °C, and 3 °C target scenarios, 2) assessing co-benefits of reducing air pollutants such as NOx, SO2, BC, PM, and 3) analyzing features of sectoral attributions in Annex I and Non-Annex I groups of countries. The carbon tax scenario at 50 US$/tCO2-eq in 2050 can reduce GHG emissions more than the 3 °C target scenario, but a higher carbon price around 400 US$/tCO2-eq in 2050 is required to achieve the 2 °C target scenario. However, there is also a co-benefit of large reduction potential of air pollutants, in the range of 60-80% reductions in 2050 from the reference scenario while achieving the 2 °C target. PMID:25028265

  4. Potential for reducing air-pollutants while achieving 2 °C global temperature change limit target.

    PubMed

    Hanaoka, Tatsuya; Akashi, Osamu; Fujiwara, Kazuya; Motoki, Yuko; Hibino, Go

    2014-12-01

    This study analyzes the potential to reduce air pollutants while achieving the 2 °C global temperature change limit target above pre-industrial levels, by using the bottom-up optimization model, AIM/Enduse[Global]. This study focuses on; 1) estimating mitigation potentials and costs for achieving 2 °C, 2.5 °C, and 3 °C target scenarios, 2) assessing co-benefits of reducing air pollutants such as NOx, SO2, BC, PM, and 3) analyzing features of sectoral attributions in Annex I and Non-Annex I groups of countries. The carbon tax scenario at 50 US$/tCO2-eq in 2050 can reduce GHG emissions more than the 3 °C target scenario, but a higher carbon price around 400 US$/tCO2-eq in 2050 is required to achieve the 2 °C target scenario. However, there is also a co-benefit of large reduction potential of air pollutants, in the range of 60-80% reductions in 2050 from the reference scenario while achieving the 2 °C target.

  5. MARS-a project of the diffraction-limited fourth generation X-ray source based on supermicrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulipanov, G. N.; Skrinsky, A. N.; Vinokurov, N. A.

    2001-07-01

    The new approach for the fourth generation X-ray source-Multiturn Accelerator-Recuperator Source (MARS)-was proposed recently. The installation consists of the radiofrequency (RF) multiturn accelerator (similar to the race-track microtron) and long undulator(s). After passing through the undulator(s) the electron beam is decelerated in the same RF accelerating structure. Such energy recovery reduces dramatically the radiation hazard and decreases the required RF power. In this paper we present a more detail explanation of this scheme, and specify further the parameter limitations and requirements for the accelerator.

  6. Limitation of the achievable signal-to-noise ratio in optical coherence tomography due to mismatch of the balanced receiver.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Carla Carmelo; Podoleanu, Adrian Gh

    2004-09-01

    Owing to the limited spectral response of the fiber directional coupler used in a balanced optical coherence tomography configuration, the spectra are different in the two outputs. This affects unfavorably operation of the balanced photodetector unit. Excess photon noise makes a larger contribution than a directional coupler with a flat spectral response. A theoretical model is developed that shows that an optimum set of parameters may be defined to maximize the achievable signal-to-noise ratio. The model leads to a redefinition of the effective noise bandwidth, which takes into account the nonflat response of the directional coupler used. The model also predicts a limitation on the signal-to-noise ratio even when the stray reflectances in the interferometer are brought to zero. PMID:15449466

  7. Possibilities and limitations of synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction with double crystal and double multilayer monochromators for microscopic speciation studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Nolf, Wout; Jaroszewicz, Jakub; Terzano, Roberto; Lind, Ole Christian; Salbu, Brit; Vekemans, Bart; Janssens, Koen; Falkenberg, Gerald

    2009-08-01

    The performance of a combined microbeam X-ray fluorescence/X-ray powder diffraction (XRF/XRPD) measurement station at Hamburger Synchrotronstrahlungslabor (HASYLAB) Beamline L is discussed in comparison to that at European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) ID18F/ID22. The angular resolution in the X-ray diffractograms is documented when different combinations of X-ray source, optics and X-ray diffraction detectors are employed. Typical angular resolution values in the range 0.3-0.5° are obtained at the bending magnet source when a 'pink' beam form of excitation is employed. A similar setup at European Synchrotron Radiation Facility beamlines ID18F and ID22 allows to reach angular resolution values of 0.1-0.15°. In order to document the possibilities and limitations for speciation of metals in environmental materials by means of Hamburger Synchrotronstrahlungslabor Beamline L X-ray fluorescence/X-ray powder diffraction setup, two case studies are discussed, one involved in the identification of the crystal phases in which heavy metals such as chromium, iron, barium and lead are present in polluted soils of an industrial site (Val Basento, Italy) and another involved in the speciation of uranium in depleted uranium particles (Ceja Mountains, Kosovo). In the former case, the angular resolution is sufficient to allow identification of most crystalline phases present while in the latter case, it is necessary to dispose of an angular resolution of ca. 0.2° to distinguish between different forms of oxidized uranium.

  8. Electrochemical flow injection analysis of hydrazine in an excess of an active pharmaceutical ingredient: achieving pharmaceutical detection limits electrochemically.

    PubMed

    Channon, Robert B; Joseph, Maxim B; Bitziou, Eleni; Bristow, Anthony W T; Ray, Andrew D; Macpherson, Julie V

    2015-10-01

    The quantification of genotoxic impurities (GIs) such as hydrazine (HZ) is of critical importance in the pharmaceutical industry in order to uphold drug safety. HZ is a particularly intractable GI and its detection represents a significant technical challenge. Here, we present, for the first time, the use of electrochemical analysis to achieve the required detection limits by the pharmaceutical industry for the detection of HZ in the presence of a large excess of a common active pharmaceutical ingredient (API), acetaminophen (ACM) which itself is redox active, typical of many APIs. A flow injection analysis approach with electrochemical detection (FIA-EC) is utilized, in conjunction with a coplanar boron doped diamond (BDD) microband electrode, insulated in an insulating diamond platform for durability and integrated into a two piece flow cell. In order to separate the electrochemical signature for HZ such that it is not obscured by that of the ACM (present in excess), the BDD electrode is functionalized with Pt nanoparticles (NPs) to significantly shift the half wave potential for HZ oxidation to less positive potentials. Microstereolithography was used to fabricate flow cells with defined hydrodynamics which minimize dispersion of the analyte and optimize detection sensitivity. Importantly, the Pt NPs were shown to be stable under flow, and a limit of detection of 64.5 nM or 0.274 ppm for HZ with respect to the ACM, present in excess, was achieved. This represents the first electrochemical approach which surpasses the required detection limits set by the pharmaceutical industry for HZ detection in the presence of an API and paves the wave for online analysis and application to other GI and API systems. PMID:26302058

  9. Methodology for optimal in situ alignment and setting of bendable optics for diffraction-limited focusing of soft x-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merthe, Daniel J.; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Kunz, Martin; Tamura, Nobumichi; McKinney, Wayne R.; Artemiev, Nikolay A.; Celestre, Richard S.; Morrison, Gregory Y.; Anderson, Erik; Smith, Brian V.; Domning, Edward E.; Rekawa, Senajith B.; Padmore, Howard A.

    2012-09-01

    We demonstrate a comprehensive and broadly applicable methodology for the optimal in situ configuration of bendable soft x-ray Kirkpatrick-Baez mirrors. The mirrors used for this application are preset at the ALS Optical Metrology Laboratory prior to beamline installation. The in situ methodology consists of a new technique for simultaneously setting the height and pitch angle of each mirror. The benders of both mirrors were then optimally tuned in order to minimize ray aberrations to a level below the diffraction-limited beam waist size of 200 nm (horizontal) × 100 nm (vertical). After applying this methodology, we measured a beam waist size of 290 nm (horizontal) × 130 nm (vertical) with 1 nm light using the Foucault knife-edge test. We also discuss the utility of using a grating-based lateral shearing interferometer with quantitative wavefront feedback for further improvement of bendable optics.

  10. Methodology for optimal in situ alignment and setting of bendable optics for nearly diffraction-limited focusing of soft x-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merthe, Daniel J.; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Kunz, Martin; Tamura, Nobumichi; McKinney, Wayne R.; Artemiev, Nikolay A.; Celestre, Richard S.; Morrison, Gregory Y.; Anderson, Erik H.; Smith, Brian V.; Domning, Edward E.; Rekawa, Senajith B.; Padmore, Howard A.

    2013-03-01

    We demonstrate a comprehensive and broadly applicable methodology for the optimal in situ configuration of bendable soft x-ray Kirkpatrick-Baez mirrors. The mirrors used for this application are preset at the Advanced Light Source Optical Metrology Laboratory prior to beamline installation. The in situ methodology consists of a new technique for simultaneously setting the height and pitch angle of each mirror. The benders of both mirrors were then optimally tuned in order to minimize ray aberrations to a level below the diffraction-limited beam waist size of 200 nm (horizontal)×100 nm (vertical). After applying this methodology, we measured a beam waist size of 290 nm (horizontal)×130 nm (vertical) with 1 nm light using the Foucault knife-edge test. We also discuss the utility of using a grating-based lateral shearing interferometer with quantitative wavefront feedback for further improvement of bendable optics.

  11. The light-matter interaction of a single semiconducting AlGaN nanowire and noble metal Au nanoparticles in the sub-diffraction limit.

    PubMed

    Sivadasan, A K; Madapu, Kishore K; Dhara, Sandip

    2016-08-24

    Near field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM) is not only a tool for imaging of sub-diffraction limited objects but also a prominent characteristic tool for understanding the intrinsic properties of nanostructures. In order to understand light-matter interactions in the near field regime using a NSOM technique with an excitation of 532 nm (2.33 eV), we selected an isolated single semiconducting AlGaN nanowire (NW) of diameter ∼120 nm grown via a vapor liquid solid (VLS) mechanism along with a metallic Au nanoparticle (NP) catalyst. The role of electronic transitions from different native defect related energy states of AlGaN is discussed in understanding the NSOM images for the semiconducting NW. The effect of strong surface plasmon resonance absorption of an excitation laser on the NSOM images for Au NPs, involved in the VLS growth mechanism of NWs, is also observed. PMID:27511614

  12. The light-matter interaction of a single semiconducting AlGaN nanowire and noble metal Au nanoparticles in the sub-diffraction limit.

    PubMed

    Sivadasan, A K; Madapu, Kishore K; Dhara, Sandip

    2016-08-24

    Near field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM) is not only a tool for imaging of sub-diffraction limited objects but also a prominent characteristic tool for understanding the intrinsic properties of nanostructures. In order to understand light-matter interactions in the near field regime using a NSOM technique with an excitation of 532 nm (2.33 eV), we selected an isolated single semiconducting AlGaN nanowire (NW) of diameter ∼120 nm grown via a vapor liquid solid (VLS) mechanism along with a metallic Au nanoparticle (NP) catalyst. The role of electronic transitions from different native defect related energy states of AlGaN is discussed in understanding the NSOM images for the semiconducting NW. The effect of strong surface plasmon resonance absorption of an excitation laser on the NSOM images for Au NPs, involved in the VLS growth mechanism of NWs, is also observed.

  13. Multiple implantation and multiple annealing of phosphorus doped germanium to achieve n-type activation near the theoretical limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jeehwan; Bedell, Stephen W.; Sadana, Devendra K.

    2012-09-01

    Full activation of n-type dopant in germanium (Ge) reaching to its solid solubility has never been achieved by using ion implantation doping technique. This is because implantation of dopants always leaves defects such as vacancy and interstitials in the Ge crystal. While implantation-induced defects are electrically neutral for the most of semiconductor materials, they are electrically positive for Ge resulting in compensation of n-type dopants. In this Letter, we verified that 5 × 1019 P/cm3 is the maximum active concentration, which can be fully activated in germanium "without leaving implantation damage" per implantation/annealing cycle. The repetition of implantation and annealing of phosphorous (P) with the concentration of 5 × 1019 cm-3 leads to the activation of 1 × 1020 P/cm3 close to its solid solubility limit of 2 × 1020 P/cm3.

  14. Achieving Stable Nitritation for Mainstream Deammonification by Combining Free Nitrous Acid-Based Sludge Treatment and Oxygen Limitation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dongbo; Wang, Qilin; Laloo, Andrew; Xu, Yifeng; Bond, Philip L.; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2016-01-01

    Stable nitritation is a critical bottleneck for achieving autotrophic nitrogen removal using the energy-saving mainstream deammonification process. Herein we report a new strategy to wash out both the Nitrospira sp. and Nitrobacter sp. from the treatment of domestic-strength wastewater. The strategy combines sludge treatment using free nitrous acid (FNA) with dissolved oxygen (DO) control in the nitritation reactor. Initially, the nitrifying reactor achieved full conversion of NH4+ to NO3−. Then, nitrite accumulation at ~60% was achieved in the reactor when 1/4 of the sludge was treated daily with FNA at 1.82 mg N/L in a side-stream unit for 24 h. Fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) revealed FNA treatment substantially reduced the abundance of nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB) (from 23.0 ± 4.3 to 5.3 ± 1.9%), especially that of Nitrospira sp. (from 15.7 ± 3.9 to 0.4 ± 0.1%). Nitrite accumulation increased to ~80% when the DO concentration in the mainstream reactor was reduced from 2.5–3.0 to 0.3–0.8 mg/L. FISH revealed the DO limitation further reduced the abundance of NOB (to 2.1 ± 1.0%), especially that of Nitrobacter sp. (from 4.9 ± 1.2 to 1.8 ± 0.8%). The strategy developed removes a major barrier for deammonification in low-strength domestic wastewater. PMID:27151247

  15. Achieving Stable Nitritation for Mainstream Deammonification by Combining Free Nitrous Acid-Based Sludge Treatment and Oxygen Limitation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dongbo; Wang, Qilin; Laloo, Andrew; Xu, Yifeng; Bond, Philip L; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2016-01-01

    Stable nitritation is a critical bottleneck for achieving autotrophic nitrogen removal using the energy-saving mainstream deammonification process. Herein we report a new strategy to wash out both the Nitrospira sp. and Nitrobacter sp. from the treatment of domestic-strength wastewater. The strategy combines sludge treatment using free nitrous acid (FNA) with dissolved oxygen (DO) control in the nitritation reactor. Initially, the nitrifying reactor achieved full conversion of NH4(+) to NO3(-). Then, nitrite accumulation at ~60% was achieved in the reactor when 1/4 of the sludge was treated daily with FNA at 1.82 mg N/L in a side-stream unit for 24 h. Fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) revealed FNA treatment substantially reduced the abundance of nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB) (from 23.0 ± 4.3 to 5.3 ± 1.9%), especially that of Nitrospira sp. (from 15.7 ± 3.9 to 0.4 ± 0.1%). Nitrite accumulation increased to ~80% when the DO concentration in the mainstream reactor was reduced from 2.5-3.0 to 0.3-0.8 mg/L. FISH revealed the DO limitation further reduced the abundance of NOB (to 2.1 ± 1.0%), especially that of Nitrobacter sp. (from 4.9 ± 1.2 to 1.8 ± 0.8%). The strategy developed removes a major barrier for deammonification in low-strength domestic wastewater. PMID:27151247

  16. Achieving Stable Nitritation for Mainstream Deammonification by Combining Free Nitrous Acid-Based Sludge Treatment and Oxygen Limitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dongbo; Wang, Qilin; Laloo, Andrew; Xu, Yifeng; Bond, Philip L.; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2016-05-01

    Stable nitritation is a critical bottleneck for achieving autotrophic nitrogen removal using the energy-saving mainstream deammonification process. Herein we report a new strategy to wash out both the Nitrospira sp. and Nitrobacter sp. from the treatment of domestic-strength wastewater. The strategy combines sludge treatment using free nitrous acid (FNA) with dissolved oxygen (DO) control in the nitritation reactor. Initially, the nitrifying reactor achieved full conversion of NH4+ to NO3‑. Then, nitrite accumulation at ~60% was achieved in the reactor when 1/4 of the sludge was treated daily with FNA at 1.82 mg N/L in a side-stream unit for 24 h. Fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) revealed FNA treatment substantially reduced the abundance of nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB) (from 23.0 ± 4.3 to 5.3 ± 1.9%), especially that of Nitrospira sp. (from 15.7 ± 3.9 to 0.4 ± 0.1%). Nitrite accumulation increased to ~80% when the DO concentration in the mainstream reactor was reduced from 2.5–3.0 to 0.3–0.8 mg/L. FISH revealed the DO limitation further reduced the abundance of NOB (to 2.1 ± 1.0%), especially that of Nitrobacter sp. (from 4.9 ± 1.2 to 1.8 ± 0.8%). The strategy developed removes a major barrier for deammonification in low-strength domestic wastewater.

  17. Limiter

    DOEpatents

    Cohen, S.A.; Hosea, J.C.; Timberlake, J.R.

    1984-10-19

    A limiter with a specially contoured front face is provided. The front face of the limiter (the plasma-side face) is flat with a central indentation. In addition, the limiter shape is cylindrically symmetric so that the limiter can be rotated for greater heat distribution. This limiter shape accommodates the various power scrape-off distances lambda p, which depend on the parallel velocity, V/sub parallel/, of the impacting particles.

  18. 5.5 W near-diffraction-limited power from resonant leaky-wave coupled phase-locked arrays of quantum cascade lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirch, J. D.; Chang, C.-C.; Boyle, C.; Mawst, L. J.; Lindberg, D.; Earles, T.; Botez, D.

    2015-02-01

    Five, 8.36 μm-emitting quantum-cascade lasers (QCLs) have been monolithically phase-locked in the in-phase array mode via resonant leaky-wave coupling. The structure is fabricated by etch and regrowth which provides large index steps (Δn = 0.10) between antiguided-array elements and interelement regions. Such high index contrast photonic-crystal (PC) lasers have more than an order of magnitude higher index contrast than PC-distributed feedback lasers previously used for coherent beam combining in QCLs. Absorption loss to metal layers inserted in the interelement regions provides a wide (˜1.0 μm) range in interelement width over which the resonant in-phase mode is strongly favored to lase. Room-temperature, in-phase-mode operation with ˜2.2 kA/cm2 threshold-current density is obtained from 105 μm-wide aperture devices. The far-field beam pattern has lobewidths 1.65× diffraction limit (D.L.) and 82% of the light in the main lobe, up to 1.8× threshold. Peak pulsed near-D.L. power of 5.5 W is obtained, with 4.5 W emitted in the main lobe. Means of how to increase the device internal efficiency are discussed.

  19. 5.5 W near-diffraction-limited power from resonant leaky-wave coupled phase-locked arrays of quantum cascade lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Kirch, J. D.; Chang, C.-C.; Boyle, C.; Mawst, L. J.; Botez, D.; Lindberg, D.; Earles, T.

    2015-02-09

    Five, 8.36 μm-emitting quantum-cascade lasers (QCLs) have been monolithically phase-locked in the in-phase array mode via resonant leaky-wave coupling. The structure is fabricated by etch and regrowth which provides large index steps (Δn = 0.10) between antiguided-array elements and interelement regions. Such high index contrast photonic-crystal (PC) lasers have more than an order of magnitude higher index contrast than PC-distributed feedback lasers previously used for coherent beam combining in QCLs. Absorption loss to metal layers inserted in the interelement regions provides a wide (∼1.0 μm) range in interelement width over which the resonant in-phase mode is strongly favored to lase. Room-temperature, in-phase-mode operation with ∼2.2 kA/cm{sup 2} threshold-current density is obtained from 105 μm-wide aperture devices. The far-field beam pattern has lobewidths 1.65× diffraction limit (D.L.) and 82% of the light in the main lobe, up to 1.8× threshold. Peak pulsed near-D.L. power of 5.5 W is obtained, with 4.5 W emitted in the main lobe. Means of how to increase the device internal efficiency are discussed.

  20. Laser diode end-pumped continuous-wave laser operation at 1339 nm in Nd : GGG with nearly diffraction-limited beam quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Zhi; Wang, Yi; Xu, Bin; Cheng, Yongjie; Chen, Nan; Xu, Huiying; Cai, Zhiping

    2015-08-01

    We report on the laser diode end-pumped continuous-wave laser operation of a Nd : GGG single crystal at 1339 nm in a plane parallel laser cavity configuration, for the first time to our knowledge. A simultaneous tri-wavelength laser at 1324, 1331 and 1337 nm is obtained at first with a maximum output power up to 1.66 W in a free-running laser operation with a slope efficiency of about 27.6% with respect to the absorbed pump power. By inserting a 0.1 mm glass etalon into the laser cavity and finely tilting it to a suitable angle, a single wavelength lasing at 1339 nm can be realized with a maximum output power of 0.58 W and slope efficiency of about 12.9%. The output power stability is simply estimated to be about 4.1% and the output beam quality is measured to be as near the diffraction limit as 1.33 and 1.16 in x and y directions, respectively.

  1. Eyeglass: A Very Large Aperture Diffractive Space Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Hyde, R; Dixit, S; Weisberg, A; Rushford, M

    2002-07-29

    Eyeglass is a very large aperture (25-100 meter) space telescope consisting of two distinct spacecraft, separated in space by several kilometers. A diffractive lens provides the telescope's large aperture, and a separate, much smaller, space telescope serves as its mobile eyepiece. Use of a transmissive diffractive lens solves two basic problems associated with very large aperture space telescopes; it is inherently fieldable (lightweight and flat, hence packagable and deployable) and virtually eliminates the traditional, very tight, surface shape tolerances faced by reflecting apertures. The potential drawback to use of a diffractive primary (very narrow spectral bandwidth) is eliminated by corrective optics in the telescope's eyepiece. The Eyeglass can provide diffraction-limited imaging with either single-band, multiband, or continuous spectral coverage. Broadband diffractive telescopes have been built at LLNL and have demonstrated diffraction-limited performance over a 40% spectral bandwidth (0.48-0.72 {micro}m). As one approach to package a large aperture for launch, a foldable lens has been built and demonstrated. A 75 cm aperture diffractive lens was constructed from 6 panels of 1 m thick silica; it achieved diffraction-limited performance both before and after folding. This multiple panel, folding lens, approach is currently being scaled-up at LLNL. We are building a 5 meter aperture foldable lens, involving 72 panels of 700 {micro}m thick glass sheets, diffractively patterned to operate as coherent f/50 lens.

  2. Limiter

    DOEpatents

    Cohen, Samuel A.; Hosea, Joel C.; Timberlake, John R.

    1986-01-01

    A limiter with a specially contoured front face accommodates the various power scrape-off distances .lambda..sub.p, which depend on the parallel velocity, V.sub..parallel., of the impacting particles. The front face of the limiter (the plasma-side face) is flat with a central indentation. In addition, the limiter shape is cylindrically symmetric so that the limiter can be rotated for greater heat distribution.

  3. Multilayer dielectric diffraction gratings

    DOEpatents

    Perry, Michael D.; Britten, Jerald A.; Nguyen, Hoang T.; Boyd, Robert; Shore, Bruce W.

    1999-01-01

    The design and fabrication of dielectric grating structures with high diffraction efficiency used in reflection or transmission is described. By forming a multilayer structure of alternating index dielectric materials and placing a grating structure on top of the multilayer, a diffraction grating of adjustable efficiency, and variable optical bandwidth can be obtained. Diffraction efficiency into the first order in reflection varying between 1 and 98 percent has been achieved by controlling the design of the multilayer and the depth, shape, and material comprising the grooves of the grating structure. Methods for fabricating these gratings without the use of ion etching techniques are described.

  4. Multilayer dielectric diffraction gratings

    DOEpatents

    Perry, M.D.; Britten, J.A.; Nguyen, H.T.; Boyd, R.; Shore, B.W.

    1999-05-25

    The design and fabrication of dielectric grating structures with high diffraction efficiency used in reflection or transmission is described. By forming a multilayer structure of alternating index dielectric materials and placing a grating structure on top of the multilayer, a diffraction grating of adjustable efficiency, and variable optical bandwidth can be obtained. Diffraction efficiency into the first order in reflection varying between 1 and 98 percent has been achieved by controlling the design of the multilayer and the depth, shape, and material comprising the grooves of the grating structure. Methods for fabricating these gratings without the use of ion etching techniques are described. 7 figs.

  5. A Descriptive Analysis of Enrollment and Achievement among Limited English Proficient Students in New Jersey. Summary. Issues & Answers. REL 2012-No. 108

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Conner, Rosemarie; Abedi, Jamal; Tung, Stephanie

    2012-01-01

    This study describes enrollment and achievement trends of limited English proficient (LEP) students in New Jersey public schools between 2002/03 and 2008/09. It documents achievement gaps between LEP and general education students in language arts literacy and math. The study's main findings include: (1) From 2002/03 to 2008/09, LEP student…

  6. A Descriptive Analysis of Enrollment and Achievement among Limited English Proficient Students in New Jersey. Issues & Answers. REL 2012-No. 108

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Conner, Rosemarie; Abedi, Jamal; Tung, Stephanie

    2012-01-01

    This study describes enrollment and achievement trends of limited English proficient (LEP) students in New Jersey public schools between 2002/03 and 2008/09. It documents achievement gaps between LEP and general education students in language arts literacy and math. The study's main findings include: (1) From 2002/03 to 2008/09, LEP student…

  7. The close circumstellar environment of Betelgeuse. II. Diffraction-limited spectro-imaging from 7.76 to 19.50 μm with VLT/VISIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kervella, P.; Perrin, G.; Chiavassa, A.; Ridgway, S. T.; Cami, J.; Haubois, X.; Verhoelst, T.

    2011-07-01

    Context. Mass-loss occurring in red supergiants (RSGs) is a major contributor to the enrichment of the interstellar medium in dust and molecules. The physical mechanism of this mass loss is however relatively poorly known. Betelgeuse is the nearest RSG, and as such a prime object for high angular resolution observations of its surface (by interferometry) and close circumstellar environment. Aims: The goal of our program is to understand how the material expelled from Betelgeuse is transported from its surface to the interstellar medium, and how it evolves chemically in this process. Methods: We obtained diffraction-limited images of Betelgeuse and a calibrator (Aldebaran) in six filters in the N band (7.76 to 12.81 μm) and two filters in the Q band (17.65 and 19.50 μm), using the VLT/VISIR instrument. Results: Our images show a bright, extended and complex circumstellar envelope at all wavelengths. It is particularly prominent longwards of ≈ 9-10 μm, pointing at the presence of O-rich dust, such as silicates or alumina. A partial circular shell is observed between 0.5 and 1.0″ from the star, and could correspond to the inner radius of the dust envelope. Several knots and filamentary structures are identified in the nebula. One of the knots, located at a distance of 0.9″ west of the star, is particularly bright and compact. Conclusions: The circumstellar envelope around Betelgeuse extends at least up to several tens of stellar radii. Its relatively high degree of clumpiness indicates an inhomogeneous spatial distribution of the material lost by the star. Its extension corresponds to an important intermediate scale, where most of the dust is probably formed, between the hot and compact gaseous envelope observed previously in the near infrared and the interstellar medium. Based on observations made with ESO telescopes at Paranal Observatory, under ESO DDT program 286.D-5007(A).

  8. Diode-pumped dual-wavelength Nd:LSO laser at 1059 and 1067  nm with nearly diffraction-limited beam quality.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiaoxu; Lan, Jinglong; Lin, Zhi; Wang, Yi; Xu, Bin; Xu, Huiying; Cai, Zhiping; Xu, Xiaodong; Zhang, Jian; Xu, Jun

    2016-04-10

    We report a diode-pumped continuous-wave simultaneous dual-wavelength Nd:LSO laser at 1059 and 1067 nm. By employing a specially coated output coupler with relatively high transmissions at high-gain emission lines of 1075 and 1079 nm, the two low-gain emission lines, 1059 and 1067 nm, can be achieved, for the first time to our knowledge, with maximum output power of 1.27 W and slope efficiency of about 29.2%. The output power is only limited by the available pump power. Output beam quality is also measured to be about 1.19 and 1.21 of the beam propagation factors in the x and y directions, respectively.

  9. Diode-pumped dual-wavelength Nd:LSO laser at 1059 and 1067  nm with nearly diffraction-limited beam quality.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiaoxu; Lan, Jinglong; Lin, Zhi; Wang, Yi; Xu, Bin; Xu, Huiying; Cai, Zhiping; Xu, Xiaodong; Zhang, Jian; Xu, Jun

    2016-04-10

    We report a diode-pumped continuous-wave simultaneous dual-wavelength Nd:LSO laser at 1059 and 1067 nm. By employing a specially coated output coupler with relatively high transmissions at high-gain emission lines of 1075 and 1079 nm, the two low-gain emission lines, 1059 and 1067 nm, can be achieved, for the first time to our knowledge, with maximum output power of 1.27 W and slope efficiency of about 29.2%. The output power is only limited by the available pump power. Output beam quality is also measured to be about 1.19 and 1.21 of the beam propagation factors in the x and y directions, respectively. PMID:27139868

  10. Chromatic confocal microscope using hybrid aspheric diffractive lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rayer, Mathieu; Mansfield, Daniel

    2014-05-01

    A chromatic confocal microscope is a single point non-contact distance measurement sensor. For three decades the vast majority of the chromatic confocal microscope use refractive-based lenses to code the measurement axis chromatically. However, such an approach is limiting the range of applications. In this paper the performance of refractive, diffractive and Hybrid aspheric diffractive are compared. Hybrid aspheric diffractive lenses combine the low geometric aberration of a diffractive lens with the high optical power of an aspheric lens. Hybrid aspheric diffractive lenses can reduce the number of elements in an imaging system significantly or create large hyper- chromatic lenses for sensing applications. In addition, diffractive lenses can improve the resolution and the dynamic range of a chromatic confocal microscope. However, to be suitable for commercial applications, the diffractive optical power must be significant. Therefore, manufacturing such lenses is a challenge. We show in this paper how a theoretical manufacturing model can demonstrate that the hybrid aspheric diffractive configuration with the best performances is achieved by step diffractive surface. The high optical quality of step diffractive surface is then demonstrated experimentally. Publisher's Note: This paper, originally published on 5/10/14, was replaced with a corrected/revised version on 5/19/14. If you downloaded the original PDF but are unable to access the revision, please contact SPIE Digital Library Customer Service for assistance.

  11. Limits on Achievable Dimensional and Photon Efficiencies with Intensity-Modulation and Photon-Counting Due to Non-Ideal Photon-Counter Behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moision, Bruce; Erkmen, Baris I.; Farr, William; Dolinar, Samuel J.; Birnbaum, Kevin M.

    2012-01-01

    An ideal intensity-modulated photon-counting channel can achieve unbounded photon information efficiencies (PIEs). However, a number of limitations of a physical system limit the practically achievable PIE. In this paper, we discuss several of these limitations and illustrate their impact on the channel. We show that, for the Poisson channel, noise does not strictly bound PIE, although there is an effective limit, as the dimensional information efficiency goes as e[overline] e PIE beyond a threshold PIE. Since the Holevo limit is bounded in the presence of noise, this illustrates that the Poisson approximation is invalid at large PIE for any number of noise modes. We show that a finite transmitter extinction ratio bounds the achievable PIE to a maximum that is logarithmic in the extinction ratio. We show how detector jitter limits the ability to mitigate noise in the PPM signaling framework. We illustrate a method to model detector blocking when the number of detectors is large, and illustrate mitigation of blocking with spatial spreading and altering. Finally, we illustrate the design of a high photon efficiency system using state-of-the-art photo-detectors and taking all these effects into account.

  12. Differences in Reading and Math Achievement among Students Who Are Hispanic, Limited English Proficient, or White: A Multi-Year Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rojas-LeBouef, Ana M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to examine differences in academic achievement among students who were Hispanic, Limited English Proficient (LEP), or White, using archival data from the Texas Education Agency's (TEA) Academic Excellence Indicator System (AEIS). Data examined were fifth grade reading and math passing rates from the 1993…

  13. A Descriptive Analysis of Enrollment and Achievement among Limited English Proficient Students in Maryland. Summary. Issues & Answers. REL 2012-No. 128

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Conner, Rosemarie; Abedi, Jamal; Tung, Stephanie

    2012-01-01

    This study describes limited English proficient (LEP) student enrollment and achievement trends in Maryland. Two research questions guide this study: (1) How did the enrollment of LEP students in Maryland public schools change between 2002/03 and 2008/09?; and (2) How did performance (the percentage scoring at the proficient or advanced level) on…

  14. Native Language Proficiency, English Literacy, Academic Achievement, and Occupational Attainment in Limited-English-Proficient Students: A Latent Growth Modeling Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guglielmi, R. Sergio

    2008-01-01

    The hypothesis that native language (L1) proficiency promotes English acquisition and overall academic achievement, a key theoretical assumption underlying bilingual education, was tested using latent growth modeling of data from 899 limited-English-proficient (LEP) eighth graders who were followed for 12 years in the National Education…

  15. Improving Academic Achievement through Building Self-Esteem in At-Risk Limited English Proficient Ninth Grade Haitian Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myrick, Gloria H.

    A self-esteem building program was developed and implemented to reduce the failure and potential dropout rate of limited English proficient 9th-grade Haitian students (N=15) who were enrolled in bilingual classes and were selected based on recommendations from their bilingual teachers, referrals for behavior problems, and failure in two or more…

  16. Reframing the Conversation about Students with Limited or Interrupted Formal Education: From Achievement Gap to Cultural Dissonance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeCapua, Andrea; Marshall, Helaine W.

    2015-01-01

    U.S. schools face increasing pressure to ensure that all students succeed, yet the dropout rate for English learners is alarmingly high, especially for those with limited or interrupted formal schooling (SLIFE). Serving SLIFE can be challenging because they not only need to master language and content but also need to develop literacy skills and…

  17. Spectral diffraction efficiency characterization of broadband diffractive optical elements.

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Junoh; Cruz-Cabrera, Alvaro Augusto; Tanbakuchi, Anthony

    2013-03-01

    Diffractive optical elements, with their thin profile and unique dispersion properties, have been studied and utilized in a number of optical systems, often yielding smaller and lighter systems. Despite the interest in and study of diffractive elements, the application has been limited to narrow spectral bands. This is due to the etch depths, which are optimized for optical path differences of only a single wavelength, consequently leading to rapid decline in efficiency as the working wavelength shifts away from the design wavelength. Various broadband diffractive design methodologies have recently been developed that improve spectral diffraction efficiency and expand the working bandwidth of diffractive elements. We have developed diffraction efficiency models and utilized the models to design, fabricate, and test two such extended bandwidth diffractive designs.

  18. Limited knowledge of fraction representations differentiates middle school students with mathematics learning disability (dyscalculia) vs. low mathematics achievement

    PubMed Central

    Mazzocco, Michèle M. M.; Myers, Gwen F.; Lewis, Katherine E.; Hanich, Laurie B.; Murphy, Melissa M.

    2014-01-01

    Fractions pose significant challenges for many children, but for some children those challenges persist into high school. Here we administered a fractions magnitude comparison test to 122 children, from Grades 4 to 8, to test whether their knowledge of fractions typically learned early in the sequence of formal math instruction (e.g., fractions equivalent to “one-half,” and fraction pairs with common denominators) differentiates those with mathematical learning disability (MLD) versus low achievement (LA) or typical achievement (TA) in mathematics, and whether long term learning trajectories of this knowledge also differentiate these groups. We confirmed that although 4th graders with LA (n = 18) or TA (n = 93) are more accurate evaluating one-half vs. non-half fractions (until they reach ceiling performance levels on both types of fractions), children with MLD (n=11) do not show a one-half advantage until Grade 7 and do not reach ceiling performance even by Grade 8. Both the MLD and LA groups have early difficulties with fractions, but by Grade 5 the LA group approaches performance levels of the TA group and deviates from the MLD group. All groups showed a visual model advantage over Arabic number representation of fractions, but this advantage was short lived for the TA group (because ceiling level was achieved across formats), slightly more persistent for the LA group, and persisted through Grade 8 for children with MLD. Thus, difficulties with fractions persist through Grade 8 for many students, but the nature and trajectories of those difficulties varies across children with math difficulties (MLD or LA). PMID:23587941

  19. Limited knowledge of fraction representations differentiates middle school students with mathematics learning disability (dyscalculia) versus low mathematics achievement.

    PubMed

    Mazzocco, Michèle M M; Myers, Gwen F; Lewis, Katherine E; Hanich, Laurie B; Murphy, Melissa M

    2013-06-01

    Fractions pose significant challenges for many children, but for some children those challenges persist into high school. Here we administered a fractions magnitude comparison test to 122 children, from Grades 4 to 8, to test whether their knowledge of fractions typically learned early in the sequence of formal math instruction (e.g., fractions equivalent to one-half, fraction pairs with common denominators) differentiates those with mathematics learning disability (MLD) versus low achievement (LA) or typical achievement (TA) in mathematics and whether long-term learning trajectories of this knowledge also differentiate these groups. We confirmed that although fourth graders with TA (n=93) were more accurate in evaluating "one-half" fractions than in evaluating "non-half" fractions (until they reached ceiling performance levels on both types of fractions), children with MLD (n=11) did not show a one-half advantage until Grade 7 and did not reach ceiling performance even by Grade 8. Both the MLD and LA groups had early difficulties with fractions, but by Grade 5 the LA group approached performance levels of the TA group and deviated from the MLD group. All groups showed a visual model advantage over Arabic number representation of fractions, but this advantage was short-lived for the TA group (because ceiling level was achieved across formats), whereas it was slightly more persistent for the LA group and persisted through Grade 8 for children with MLD. Thus, difficulties with fractions persist through Grade 8 for many students, but the nature and trajectories of those difficulties vary across children with math difficulties (MLD or LA). PMID:23587941

  20. Limited knowledge of fraction representations differentiates middle school students with mathematics learning disability (dyscalculia) versus low mathematics achievement.

    PubMed

    Mazzocco, Michèle M M; Myers, Gwen F; Lewis, Katherine E; Hanich, Laurie B; Murphy, Melissa M

    2013-06-01

    Fractions pose significant challenges for many children, but for some children those challenges persist into high school. Here we administered a fractions magnitude comparison test to 122 children, from Grades 4 to 8, to test whether their knowledge of fractions typically learned early in the sequence of formal math instruction (e.g., fractions equivalent to one-half, fraction pairs with common denominators) differentiates those with mathematics learning disability (MLD) versus low achievement (LA) or typical achievement (TA) in mathematics and whether long-term learning trajectories of this knowledge also differentiate these groups. We confirmed that although fourth graders with TA (n=93) were more accurate in evaluating "one-half" fractions than in evaluating "non-half" fractions (until they reached ceiling performance levels on both types of fractions), children with MLD (n=11) did not show a one-half advantage until Grade 7 and did not reach ceiling performance even by Grade 8. Both the MLD and LA groups had early difficulties with fractions, but by Grade 5 the LA group approached performance levels of the TA group and deviated from the MLD group. All groups showed a visual model advantage over Arabic number representation of fractions, but this advantage was short-lived for the TA group (because ceiling level was achieved across formats), whereas it was slightly more persistent for the LA group and persisted through Grade 8 for children with MLD. Thus, difficulties with fractions persist through Grade 8 for many students, but the nature and trajectories of those difficulties vary across children with math difficulties (MLD or LA).

  1. Fluid bilayer structure determination by the combined use of x-ray and neutron diffraction. I. Fluid bilayer models and the limits of resolution.

    PubMed Central

    Wiener, M C; White, S H

    1991-01-01

    This is the first in a series of papers concerned with methods for the determination of the structures of fluid phospholipid bilayers in the liquid-crystalline (L alpha) phase. The basic approach is the joint refinement of quasimolecular models (King and White, 1986. Biophys. J. 49:1047-1054) using x-ray and neutron diffraction data. We present here (a) the rationale for quasimolecular models, (b) the nature of the resolution problem for thermally disordered bilayers, and (c) an analysis of the resolution of experiments in which Gaussian functions are used to describe the distribution of submolecular components. We show that multilamellar liquid-crystalline bilayers are best described by the convolution of a perfect lattice function with a thermally disordered bilayer unit cell. Lamellar diffraction measurements on such a system generally yield only 5-10 orders of diffraction data from which transbilayer profiles of the unit cell can be constructed. The canonical resolution of these transbilayer profiles, defined as the Bragg spacing divided by the index of the highest recorded diffraction order, is typically 5-10 A. Using simple model calculations, we show that the canonical resolution is a measure of the widths of the distributions of constituents of the unit cell rather than a measure of the spatial separation of the distributions. The widths provide a measure of the thermal motion of the bilayer constituents which can be described by Gaussian functions. The equilibrium positions of the centers of the distributions can be determined with a precision of 0.1-0.5 A based upon typical experimental errors. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:2015381

  2. Absorber and emitter for solar thermo-photovoltaic systems to achieve efficiency exceeding the Shockley-Queisser limit.

    PubMed

    Rephaeli, Eden; Fan, Shanhui

    2009-08-17

    We present theoretical considerations as well as detailed numerical design of absorber and emitter for Solar Thermophotovoltaics (STPV) applications. The absorber, consisting of an array of tungsten pyramids, was designed to provide near-unity absorptivity over all solar wavelengths for a wide angular range, enabling it to absorb light effectively from solar sources regardless of concentration. The emitter, a tungsten slab with Si/SiO(2) multilayer stack, provides a sharp emissivity peak at the solar cell band-gap while suppressing emission at lower frequencies. We show that, under a suitable light concentration condition, and with a reasonable area ratio between the emitter and absorber, a STPV system employing such absorber-emitter pair and a single-junction solar cell can attain efficiency that exceeds the Shockley-Queisser limit.

  3. Nuclear Symbiosis - A Means to Achieve Sustainable Nuclear Growth while Limiting the Spread of Sensititive Nuclear Technology

    SciTech Connect

    David Shropshire

    2009-09-01

    Global growth of nuclear energy in the 21st century is creating new challenges to limit the spread of nuclear technology without hindering adoption in countries now considering nuclear power. Independent nuclear states desire autonomy over energy choices and seek energy independence. However, this independence comes with high costs for development of new indigenous fuel cycle capabilities. Nuclear supplier states and expert groups have proposed fuel supply assurance mechanisms such as fuel take-back services, international enrichment services and fuel banks in exchange for recipient state concessions on the development of sensitive technologies. Nuclear states are slow to accept any concessions to their rights under the Non-Proliferation Treaty. To date, decisions not to develop indigenous fuel cycle capabilities have been driven primarily by economics. However, additional incentives may be required to offset a nuclear state’s perceived loss of energy independence. This paper proposes alternative economic development incentives that could help countries decide to forgo development of sensitive nuclear technologies. The incentives are created through a nuclear-centered industrial complex with “symbiotic” links to indigenous economic opportunities. This paper also describes a practical tool called the “Nuclear Materials Exchange” for identifying these opportunities.

  4. Achieving the Complete-Basis Limit in Large Molecular Clusters: Computationally Efficient Procedures to Eliminate Basis-Set Superposition Error

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richard, Ryan M.; Herbert, John M.

    2013-06-01

    Previous electronic structure studies that have relied on fragmentation have been primarily interested in those methods' abilities to replicate the supersystem energy (or a related energy difference) without recourse to the ability of those supersystem results to replicate experiment or high accuracy benchmarks. Here we focus on replicating accurate ab initio benchmarks, that are suitable for comparison to experimental data. In doing this it becomes imperative that we correct our methods for basis-set superposition errors (BSSE) in a computationally feasible way. This criterion leads us to develop a new method for BSSE correction, which we term the many-body counterpoise correction, or MBn for short. MBn is truncated at order n, in much the same manner as a normal many-body expansion leading to a decrease in computational time. Furthermore, its formulation in terms of fragments makes it especially suitable for use with pre-existing fragment codes. A secondary focus of this study is directed at assessing fragment methods' abilities to extrapolate to the complete basis set (CBS) limit as well as compute approximate triples corrections. Ultimately, by analysis of (H_2O)_6 and (H_2O)_{10}F^- systems, it is concluded that with large enough basis-sets (triple or quad zeta) fragment based methods can replicate high level benchmarks in a fraction of the time.

  5. Color Perception with Diffraction Gratings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kruglak, Haym; Campbell, Don

    1983-01-01

    Describes an experiment enabling students to apply concept of diffraction, determine limits of their color perception, learn how to measure wavelength with a simple apparatus, observe continuous and line spectra, and associate colors with corresponding wavelengths. The homemade diffraction-grating spectrometer used is easily constructed. (JN)

  6. Experimental observation of diffraction patterns from micro-specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Sayre, D.; Yun, W.B.; Kirz, J.

    1988-03-01

    Small non-periodic specimens scatter soft x-rays strongly enough to permit scattered-photon imaging. For the type of imaging principally studied here (diffraction-pattern imaging), the requirements on divergence and monochromaticity of the illumination are also moderately well understood, and appear to be capable of being sufficiently well met by undulator beamlines to permit imaging to the diffraction-limited resolution of lambda/2, provided of course that a method of phasing the diffraction pattern is available. It may be remarked that for holography the illumination requirements, while varying with the form of holography, are more severe than for diffraction-pattern imaging, while for imaging microscopy they may be considerably less severe, depending on the angular and frequency bandwidths of the imaging element. It would appear to be for this reason that imaging microscopes are currently achieving exposure times of a few seconds even on bending-magnet beamlines.

  7. Integrated Diffractive Optics for Surface Ion Traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streed, Erik; Ghadimi, Moji; Blums, Valdis; Norton, Benjamin; Connor, Paul; Amini, Jason; Volin, Curtis; Lobino, Mirko; Kielpinski, David

    2016-05-01

    Photonic interconnects are a bottleneck to achieving large-scale trapped ion quantum computing. We have modified a Georgia Tech Research Institute microwave chip trap by using e-beam lithography to write reflective diffractive collimating optics (80 μm x 127 μm, f=58.6 μm, λ=369.5nm) on the center electrode. The optics have an NA of 0.55 x 0.73, capturing 13.2% of the solid angle. To evaluate the optics 174Yb+ was loaded by isotope selective photo-ionization from a thermal oven and then shuttled to imaging sites. Near diffraction limited sub-wavelength ion images were obtained with an observed spot sized FWHM of 338 nm x 268 nm vs. a diffraction limit of 336 nm x 257 nm. The total photon collection efficiency was measured to be 5.2+/-1.2%. Coupling into a single mode fiber of up to 2.0+/-0.6% was observed, limited by mismatch in the coupling optics. Image mode quality indicates coupling up to 4% may be possible. Funding from Australian Research Council and IARPA.

  8. Diffractive interference optical analyzer (DiOPTER)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasikumar, Harish; Prasad, Vishnu; Pal, Parama; Varma, Manoj M.

    2016-03-01

    This report demonstrates a method for high-resolution refractometric measurements using, what we have termed as, a Diffractive Interference Optical Analyzer (DiOpter). The setup consists of a laser, polarizer, a transparent diffraction grating and Si-photodetectors. The sensor is based on the differential response of diffracted orders to bulk refractive index changes. In these setups, the differential read-out of the diffracted orders suppresses signal drifts and enables time-resolved determination of refractive index changes in the sample cell. A remarkable feature of this device is that under appropriate conditions, the measurement sensitivity of the sensor can be enhanced by more than two orders of magnitude due to interference between multiply reflected diffracted orders. A noise-equivalent limit of detection (LoD) of 6x10-7 RIU was achieved in glass. This work focuses on devices with integrated sample well, made on low-cost PDMS. As the detection methodology is experimentally straightforward, it can be used across a wide array of applications, ranging from detecting changes in surface adsorbates via binding reactions to estimating refractive index (and hence concentration) variations in bulk samples. An exciting prospect of this technique is the potential integration of this device to smartphones using a simple interface based on transmission mode configuration. In a transmission configuration, we were able to achieve an LoD of 4x10-4 RIU which is sufficient to explore several applications in food quality testing and related fields. We are envisioning the future of this platform as a personal handheld optical analyzer for applications ranging from environmental sensing to healthcare and quality testing of food products.

  9. Kilowatt-level near-diffraction-limited and linear-polarized Ytterbium-Raman hybrid nonlinear amplifier based on polarization selection loss mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ma, Pengfei; Zhang, Hanwei; Huang, Long; Wang, Xiaolin; Zhou, Pu; Liu, Zejin

    2015-10-01

    Ytterbium-Raman cascaded oscillators with linearly polarized output are designed and achieved based on polarization selection loss (PSL) mechanism for the first time. The 1120 nm laser cavity is designed with fully non polarization-maintained (NPM) fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) and NPM active fiber while the 1080 nm laser cavity is designed based on polarization-maintained (PM) FBGs and PM active fiber. By using PSL mechanism in 1080 nm cavity, even with fully NPM 1120 nm cavity, both linear-polarized 1120 nm and 1080 nm lasers are achieved in the output port of the cascaded oscillators. Based on the new designed cascaded seeds, a high power polarization-maintained Yb-Raman hybrid nonlinear amplifier is established for further power scaling of the 1120 nm laser. In the nonlinear amplifier, only 21-meter-long active fiber and 1.5-meter-long passive fiber is used for power transferring from 1080 nm to 1120 nm. Output power of 1181 W is achieved at central wavelength of 1120 nm with the M(2) factor of <1.2 and polarization-extinction ratio (PER) of 18.2 dB. As far as we known, the output power of this all fiber format is the highest one in 1120 nm with linear polarization. This type of high power Yb-Raman nonlinear amplifier design with linear polarization can be further extended to Yb-Raman amplifying the wavelength range of 1100-1200 nm. PMID:26480163

  10. Radiometric analysis of diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castañeda, R.; Betancur, R.; Herrera, J.; Carrasquilla, J.

    2008-04-01

    A description of Fresnel and Fraunhofer diffraction of quasi-homogenous optical fields in any state of spatial coherence is presented, which clearly differs from the classical formalism. Instead of the propagation of the cross-spectral density from the diffracting aperture to the observation plane, the diffracting aperture is regarded as a planar quasi-homogeneous source, whose generalised radiance is carried by the spatial coherence wavelets, and the power distribution at the observation plane is expressed in terms of the generalised radiant intensity. It allows interpreting the negative values of the generalised radiance as "negative energies" emitted along specific directions and subjected to the achievement of the conservation law of energy. This interpretation is not evident in the classical formalism. Consequently, interference can be thought as resulting of energy transfer over a given wavefront, due to the addition of equal amounts of "positive" and "negative" energies, along specific directions, to the contributions provided by the individual radiators of the radiant source. In this sense, the radiant flux from the source, which is provided only by the individual contributions, is redistributed depending on the spatial coherence properties of the field. This redistribution characterises the diffraction phenomenon. It is also shown that the supports of the complex degree of spatial coherence near the aperture edge are vignetted by the edge. This feature is a cause for the generalised radiance providing "negative energies", and constitutes the actual effect of the edge on diffraction. The approach is validated by the close concordance between the numerical and the experimental results, which should be regarded as a proof of the physical existence of the spatial coherence wavelets.

  11. Computation of highly off-axis diffracted fields using the band-limited angular spectrum method with suppressed Gibbs related artifacts.

    PubMed

    Falaggis, Konstantinos; Kozacki, Tomasz; Kujawinska, Malgorzata

    2013-05-10

    The angular spectrum (AS) method is a popular solution to the Helmholtz equation without the use of approximations. Modified band-limited AS methods are of particular interest for the cases of high-off-axis and large distance propagation problems, because conventional AS methods are impractical due to requirements regarding memory and computational effort. However, these techniques make use of rectangular-shaped filters that introduce ringing artifacts in the calculated field that are related to the Gibbs phenomenon. This work proposes AS algorithms based on a smooth band-limiting filter for accurate field computation as well as techniques that evaluate only nonzero components of the field. This enables accurate field calculations with an acceptable level of computational effort that cannot be offered by current AS methods reported in the scientific literature.

  12. Polychromatic diffraction contrast tomography

    SciTech Connect

    King, A.; Reischig, P.; Adrien, J.; Peetermans, S.; Ludwig, W.

    2014-11-15

    This tutorial review introduces the use of polychromatic radiation for 3D grain mapping using X-ray diffraction contrast tomography. The objective is to produce a 3D map of the grain shapes and orientations within a bulk, millimeter-sized polycrystalline sample. The use of polychromatic radiation enables the standard synchrotron X-ray technique to be applied in a wider range of contexts: 1) Using laboratory X-ray sources allows a much wider application of the diffraction contrast tomography technique. 2) Neutron sources allow large samples, or samples containing high Z elements to be studied. 3) Applied to synchrotron sources, smaller samples may be treated, or faster measurements may be possible. Challenges and particularities in the data acquisition and processing, and the limitations of the different variants, are discussed. - Highlights: • We present a tutorial review of polychromatic diffraction contrast tomography techniques. • The use of polychromatic radiation allows the standard synchrotron DCT technique to be extended to a range of other sources. • The characteristics and limitations of all variants of the techniques are derived, discussed and compared. • Examples using laboratory X-ray and cold neutron radiation are presented. • Suggestions for the future development of these techniques are presented.

  13. Design and experiment of 4H-SiC JBS diodes achieving a near-theoretical breakdown voltage with non-uniform floating limiting rings terminal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Hao; Song, Qingwen; Tang, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Yimeng; Zhang, Yimen; Zhang, Yuming

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, a 4H-SiC Junction Barrier Schottky diode (JBS) with non-uniform floating limiting rings (FLRs) has been investigated and fabricated using n type 4H-SiC epitaxial layer with thickness of 31 μm and doping concentration of 3.3 × 1015 cm-3. According to the simulated results, the key parameters of a FLRs design to achieve a high voltage are the minimum space between two adjacent doped rings, spacing growth step and number of rings. The experimental results also show a great agreement with simulated results. Meanwhile, a near-ideal breakdown voltage of 3.7 kV was achieved, which yield around 95% of the parallel-plane breakdown voltage. The forward characteristics show that the fabricated JBS diodes have a forward current density of 210 A/cm2 at 3 V and a specific on-resistance (Rsp-on) of 7.58 mΩ cm2. Different FLRs parameters have no effect on the forward device performance.

  14. Keyhole coherent diffractive imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbey, Brian; Nugent, Keith A.; Williams, Garth J.; Clark, Jesse N.; Peele, Andrew G.; Pfeifer, Mark A.; de Jonge, Martin; McNulty, Ian

    2008-05-01

    The availability of third-generation synchrotrons and ultimately X-ray free-electron lasers is driving the development of many new methods of microscopy. Among these techniques, coherent diffractive imaging (CDI) is one of the most promising, offering nanometre-scale imaging of non-crystallographic samples. Image reconstruction from a single diffraction pattern has hitherto been possible only for small, isolated samples, presenting a fundamental limitation on the CDI method. Here we report on a form of imaging we term `keyhole' CDI, which can reconstruct objects of arbitrary size. We demonstrate the technique using visible light and X-rays, with the latter producing images of part of an extended object with a detector-limited resolution of better than 20nm. Combining the improved resolution of modern X-ray optics with the wavelength-limited resolution of CDI, the method paves the way for detailed imaging of a single quantum dot or of a small virus within a complex host environment.

  15. Femtosecond single-electron diffraction

    PubMed Central

    Lahme, S.; Kealhofer, C.; Krausz, F.; Baum, P.

    2014-01-01

    Ultrafast electron diffraction allows the tracking of atomic motion in real time, but space charge effects within dense electron packets are a problem for temporal resolution. Here, we report on time-resolved pump-probe diffraction using femtosecond single-electron pulses that are free from intra-pulse Coulomb interactions over the entire trajectory from the source to the detector. Sufficient average electron current is achieved at repetition rates of hundreds of kHz. Thermal load on the sample is avoided by minimizing the pump-probe area and by maximizing heat diffusion. Time-resolved diffraction from fibrous graphite polycrystals reveals coherent acoustic phonons in a nanometer-thick grain ensemble with a signal-to-noise level comparable to conventional multi-electron experiments. These results demonstrate the feasibility of pump-probe diffraction in the single-electron regime, where simulations indicate compressibility of the pulses down to few-femtosecond and attosecond duration. PMID:26798778

  16. Quantification of circulating steroids in individual zebrafish using stacking to achieve nanomolar detection limits with capillary electrophoresis and UV-visible absorbance detection.

    PubMed

    Nyakubaya, Vincent T; Durney, Brandon C; Ellington, Marriah C G; Kantes, Amber D; Reed, Paige A; Walter, Shaylyn E; Stueckle, Jennifer Ripley; Holland, Lisa A

    2015-09-01

    Capillary electrophoresis and UV-visible absorbance detection are used with sample stacking to achieve detection limits ranging from 0.2 to 2 ng/mL (0.8 to 6 nM) for steroids. Stacking is accomplished using negatively charged cyclodextrin steroid-carrier molecules at a discrete pH interface between the reconstituted sample and the separation electrolyte. Steroids are then separated in under 5 min using capillary electrophoresis that incorporates secondary equilibria via sodium dodecyl sulfate and cyclodextrin. The effectiveness of the method for measurements of multiple steroids in limited sample volumes is demonstrated in individual female fish with total circulating blood volumes of 5 μL or less. Steroid recoveries from plasma following a sample processing method developed with commercial extraction cartridges range from 81 to 109 % for 17α,20β-dihydroxy-pregn-4-en-3-one, testosterone, 11-ketotestosterone, estrone, 17β-estradiol, and 17α-ethinyl estradiol. When applied to reproductively active female zebrafish, changes were detected in the levels of circulating steroids as a result of exposure to different solvents and 17β-estradiol.

  17. Photoinduced diffraction in polymer waveguides.

    PubMed

    Andrews, J H; Singer, K D

    1993-11-20

    We report on techniques for measuring photoinduced diffraction in prism-coupled slab polymer waveguides. Diffraction effects resulting from photochromic gratings in slab waveguides of Disperse Red 1 dye in polymethylmethacrylate were studied. Optical damage in the form of diffractive mode conversion was observed when we coupled in light with a wavelength slightly longer than the absorption edge of Disperse Red 1 dye. Slowly growing satellite beams in the outcoupled light were attributed to anisotropic scattering between the lowest-order TE mode and the lowest-order TM mode caused by self-diffraction from a grating produced through the photochromic effect. We have also investigated the effect of mode-coupling changes on the determination of diffraction efficiency and sensitivity in waveguide experiments. Diffraction efficiencies predicted by measurements of the modulation depth in the guide are found to overstate the actual diffraction efficiencies that could be observed in this geometry. Techniques for overc ming this limitation and for improving estimates of the energy density and interaction length in the guide are noted.

  18. Diffraction of slow neutrons by holographic SiO{sub 2} nanoparticle-polymer composite gratings

    SciTech Connect

    Klepp, J.; Fally, M.; Pruner, C.; Tomita, Y.; Plonka-Spehr, C.; Geltenbort, P.; Ivanov, S.; Manzin, G.; Andersen, K. H.; Kohlbrecher, J.; Ellabban, M. A.

    2011-07-15

    Diffraction experiments with holographic gratings recorded in SiO{sub 2} nanoparticle-polymer composites have been carried out with slow neutrons. The influence of parameters such as nanoparticle concentration, grating thickness, and grating spacing on the neutron-optical properties of such materials has been tested. Decay of the grating structure along the sample depth due to disturbance of the recording process becomes an issue at grating thicknesses of about 100 microns and larger. This limits the achievable diffraction efficiency for neutrons. As a solution to this problem, the Pendelloesung interference effect in holographic gratings has been exploited to reach a diffraction efficiency of 83% for very cold neutrons.

  19. Microarcsecond relative astrometry from the ground with a diffractive pupil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ammons, S. Mark; Bendek, Eduardo A.; Guyon, Olivier

    2011-10-01

    The practical use of astrometry to detect exoplanets via the reflex motion of the parent star depends critically on the elimination of systematic noise floors in imaging systems. In the diffractive pupil technique proposed for space-based detection of exo-earths, extended diffraction spikes generated by a dotted primary mirror are referenced against a widefield grid of background stars to calibrate changing optical distortion and achieve microarcsecond astrometric precision on bright targets (Guyon et al. 2010). We describe applications of this concept to ground-based uncrowded astrometry using a diffractive, monopupil telescope and a wide-field camera to image as many as ~4000 background reference stars. Final relative astrometric precision is limited by differential tip/tilt jitter caused by high altitude layers of turbulence. A diffractive 3-meter telescope is capable of reaching ~35 μas relative astrometric error per coordinate perpendicular to the zenith vector in three hours on a bright target star (I < 10) in fields of moderate stellar density (~40 stars arcmin-2 with I < 23). Smaller diffractive apertures (D < 1 m) can achieve 100-200 μas performance with the same stellar density and exposure time and a large telescope (6.5-10 m) could achieve as low as 10 μas, nearly an order of magnitude better than current space-based facilities. The diffractive pupil enables the use of larger fields of view through calibration of changing optical distortion as well as brighter target stars (V < 6) by preventing star saturation. Permitting the sky to naturally roll to average signals over many thousands of pixels can mitigate the effects of detector imperfections.

  20. Microarcsecond relative astrometry from the ground with a diffractive pupil

    SciTech Connect

    Ammons, S M; Bendek, E; Guyon, O

    2011-09-08

    The practical use of astrometry to detect exoplanets via the reflex motion of the parent star depends critically on the elimination of systematic floors in imaging systems. In the diffractive pupil technique proposed for space-based detection of exo-earths, extended diffraction spikes generated by a dotted primary mirror are referenced against a wide-field grid of background stars to calibrate changing optical distortion and achieve microarcsecond astrometric precision on bright targets (Guyon et al. 2010). We describe applications of this concept to ground-based uncrowded astrometry using a diffractive, monopupil telescope and a wide-field camera to image as many as {approx}4000 background reference stars. Final relative astrometric precision is limited by differential tip/tilt jitter caused by high altitude layers of turbulence. A diffractive 3-meter telescope is capable of reaching {approx}35 {micro}as relative astrometric error per coordinate perpendicular to the zenith vector in three hours on a bright target star (I < 10) in fields of moderate stellar density ({approx}40 stars arcmin{sup -2} with I < 23). Smaller diffractive apertures (D < 1 m) can achieve 100-200 {micro}as performance with the same stellar density and exposure time and a large telescope (6.5-10 m) could achieve as low as 10 {micro}as, nearly an order of magnitude better than current space-based facilities. The diffractive pupil enables the use of larger fields of view through calibration of changing optical distortion as well as brighter target stars (V < 6) by preventing star saturation. Permitting the sky to naturally roll to average signals over many thousands of pixels can mitigate the effects of detector imperfections.

  1. Diffraction model for thermoreflectance data.

    PubMed

    Kureshi, S; Fabris, D; Tokairin, S; Cardenas, C V; Yang, C Y

    2015-06-10

    Thermoreflectance imaging provides the capability to map temperature spatially on the submicrometer scale by using a light source and CCD camera for data acquisition. The ability to achieve such spatial resolution and observe detailed features is influenced by optical diffraction. By combining diffraction from both the sample and substrate, a model is developed to determine the intensity of the thermoreflectance signal. This model takes into account the effective optical distance, sample width, wavelength, signal phase shift, and reflectance intensity, while showing qualitative and quantitative agreement with experimental thermoreflectance images from 1 and 10 μm wide gold lines at two wavelengths.

  2. Dichroic Coherent Diffractive Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, Ashish

    Understanding electronic structure at nanometer resolution is crucial to understanding physics such as phase separation and emergent behavior in correlated electron materials. Nondestructive probes which have the ability to see beyond surfaces on nanometer length and sub-picosecond time scales can greatly enhance our understanding of these systems and will impact development of future technologies, such as magnetic storage. Polarized x-rays are an appealing choice of probe due to their penetrating power, elemental and magnetic specificity, and high spatial resolution. The resolution of traditional x-ray microscopy is limited by the nanometer precision required to fabricate x-ray optics. In this thesis, a novel approach to lensless imaging of an extended magnetic nanostructure is presented. We demonstrate this approach by imaging ferrimagnetic "maze" domains in a Gd/Fe multilayer with perpendicular anisotropy. A series of dichroic coherent diffraction patterns, ptychographically recorded, are numerically inverted using non-convex and non-linear optimization theory, and we follow the magnetic domain configuration evolution through part of its magnetization hysteresis loop by applying an external magnetic field. Unlike holographic methods, it does not require a reference wave or precision optics, and so is a far simpler experiment. In addition, it enables the imaging of samples with arbitrarily large spatial dimensions, at a spatial resolution limited solely by the coherent x-ray flux and wavelength. It can readily be extended to other non-magnetic systems that exhibit circular or linear dichroism. This approach is scalable to imaging with diffraction-limited resolution, a prospect rapidly becoming a reality in view of the new generation of phenomenally brilliant x-ray sources.

  3. Lensless reflective point diffraction interferometer.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wenhua; Chen, Lei; Zheng, Donghui; Yang, Ying; Han, Zhigang; Li, Jinpeng

    2016-07-01

    A lensless reflective point diffraction interferometer (LRPDI) is proposed for dynamic wavefront measurement. The point diffraction interferometer is integrated on a small substrate with properly designed thin film, which is used for generating the interferogram with high carrier frequency at a CCD target. By lensless imaging, the complex amplitude at the CCD target can be propagated to the conjugated plane of the exit pupil of an incident wavefront, which not only avoids the edge diffraction in the interferogram, but also eliminates systematic error. The accuracy of LRPDI is demonstrated by simulation and experiment, and a precision better than 1/150 wavelength is achieved. The new design with lensless imaging processing is suitable for dynamic wavefront measurement. PMID:27409204

  4. Phase shifting diffraction interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Sommargren, G.E.

    1996-08-29

    An interferometer which has the capability of measuring optical elements and systems with an accuracy of {lambda}/1000 where {lambda} is the wavelength of visible light. Whereas current interferometers employ a reference surface, which inherently limits the accuracy of the measurement to about {lambda}/50, this interferometer uses an essentially perfect spherical reference wavefront generated by the fundamental process of diffraction. This interferometer is adjustable to give unity fringe visibility, which maximizes the signal-to-noise, and has the means to introduce a controlled prescribed relative phase shift between the reference wavefront and the wavefront from the optics under test, which permits analysis of the interference fringe pattern using standard phase extraction algorithms. 8 figs.

  5. Phase shifting diffraction interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Sommargren, Gary E.

    1996-01-01

    An interferometer which has the capability of measuring optical elements and systems with an accuracy of .lambda./1000 where .lambda. is the wavelength of visible light. Whereas current interferometers employ a reference surface, which inherently limits the accuracy of the measurement to about .lambda./50, this interferometer uses an essentially perfect spherical reference wavefront generated by the fundamental process of diffraction. This interferometer is adjustable to give unity fringe visibility, which maximizes the signal-to-noise, and has the means to introduce a controlled prescribed relative phase shift between the reference wavefront and the wavefront from the optics under test, which permits analysis of the interference fringe pattern using standard phase extraction algorithms.

  6. X-Ray Diffraction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, D. K.; Smith, K. L.

    1980-01-01

    Reviews applications in research and analytical characterization of compounds and materials in the field of X-ray diffraction, emphasizing new developments in applications and instrumentation in both single crystal and powder diffraction. Cites 414 references. (CS)

  7. Electromagnetic diffraction by plane reflection diffraction gratings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bocker, R. P.; Marathay, A. S.

    1972-01-01

    A plane wave theory was developed to study electromagnetic diffraction by plane reflection diffraction gratings of infinite extent. A computer program was written to calculate the energy distribution in the various orders of diffraction for the cases when the electric or magnetic field vectors are parallel to the grating grooves. Within the region of validity of this theory, results were in excellent agreement with those in the literature. Energy conservation checks were also made to determine the region of validity of the plane wave theory. The computer program was flexible enough to analyze any grating profile that could be described by a single value function f(x). Within the region of validity the program could be used with confidence. The computer program was used to investigate the polarization and blaze properties of the diffraction grating.

  8. Calculation of the diffraction efficiency on concave gratings based on Fresnel-Kirchhoff's diffraction formula.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yuanshen; Li, Ting; Xu, Banglian; Hong, Ruijin; Tao, Chunxian; Ling, Jinzhong; Li, Baicheng; Zhang, Dawei; Ni, Zhengji; Zhuang, Songlin

    2013-02-10

    Fraunhofer diffraction formula cannot be applied to calculate the diffraction wave energy distribution of concave gratings like plane gratings because their grooves are distributed on a concave spherical surface. In this paper, a method based on the Kirchhoff diffraction theory is proposed to calculate the diffraction efficiency on concave gratings by considering the curvature of the whole concave spherical surface. According to this approach, each groove surface is divided into several limited small planes, on which the Kirchhoff diffraction field distribution is calculated, and then the diffraction field of whole concave grating can be obtained by superimposition. Formulas to calculate the diffraction efficiency of Rowland-type and flat-field concave gratings are deduced from practical applications. Experimental results showed strong agreement with theoretical computations. With the proposed method, light energy can be optimized to the expected diffraction wave range while implementing aberration-corrected design of concave gratings, particularly for the concave blazed gratings.

  9. Diffractive Imaging Using Partially Coherent X Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitehead, L. W.; Williams, G. J.; Quiney, H. M.; Vine, D. J.; Dilanian, R. A.; Flewett, S.; Nugent, K. A.; Peele, A. G.; Balaur, E.; McNulty, I.

    2009-12-01

    The measured spatial coherence characteristics of the illumination used in a diffractive imaging experiment are incorporated in an algorithm that reconstructs the complex transmission function of an object from experimental x-ray diffraction data using 1.4 keV x rays. Conventional coherent diffractive imaging, which assumes full spatial coherence, is a limiting case of our approach. Even in cases in which the deviation from full spatial coherence is small, we demonstrate a significant improvement in the quality of wave field reconstructions. Our formulation is applicable to x-ray and electron diffraction imaging techniques provided that the spatial coherence properties of the illumination are known or can be measured.

  10. Automated determination of fibrillar structures by simultaneous model building and fiber diffraction refinement.

    PubMed

    Potrzebowski, Wojciech; André, Ingemar

    2015-07-01

    For highly oriented fibrillar molecules, three-dimensional structures can often be determined from X-ray fiber diffraction data. However, because of limited information content, structure determination and validation can be challenging. We demonstrate that automated structure determination of protein fibers can be achieved by guiding the building of macromolecular models with fiber diffraction data. We illustrate the power of our approach by determining the structures of six bacteriophage viruses de novo using fiber diffraction data alone and together with solid-state NMR data. Furthermore, we demonstrate the feasibility of molecular replacement from monomeric and fibrillar templates by solving the structure of a plant virus using homology modeling and protein-protein docking. The generated models explain the experimental data to the same degree as deposited reference structures but with improved structural quality. We also developed a cross-validation method for model selection. The results highlight the power of fiber diffraction data as structural constraints.

  11. Automated determination of fibrillar structures by simultaneous model building and fiber diffraction refinement.

    PubMed

    Potrzebowski, Wojciech; André, Ingemar

    2015-07-01

    For highly oriented fibrillar molecules, three-dimensional structures can often be determined from X-ray fiber diffraction data. However, because of limited information content, structure determination and validation can be challenging. We demonstrate that automated structure determination of protein fibers can be achieved by guiding the building of macromolecular models with fiber diffraction data. We illustrate the power of our approach by determining the structures of six bacteriophage viruses de novo using fiber diffraction data alone and together with solid-state NMR data. Furthermore, we demonstrate the feasibility of molecular replacement from monomeric and fibrillar templates by solving the structure of a plant virus using homology modeling and protein-protein docking. The generated models explain the experimental data to the same degree as deposited reference structures but with improved structural quality. We also developed a cross-validation method for model selection. The results highlight the power of fiber diffraction data as structural constraints. PMID:25961412

  12. Phase Aberrations in Diffraction Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Marchesini, S; Chapman, H N; Barty, A; Howells, M R; Spence, J H; Cui, C; Weierstall, U; Minor, A M

    2005-09-29

    In coherent X-ray diffraction microscopy the diffraction pattern generated by a sample illuminated with coherent x-rays is recorded, and a computer algorithm recovers the unmeasured phases to synthesize an image. By avoiding the use of a lens the resolution is limited, in principle, only by the largest scattering angles recorded. However, the imaging task is shifted from the experiment to the computer, and the algorithm's ability to recover meaningful images in the presence of noise and limited prior knowledge may produce aberrations in the reconstructed image. We analyze the low order aberrations produced by our phase retrieval algorithms. We present two methods to improve the accuracy and stability of reconstructions.

  13. Flatland Photonics: Circumventing Diffraction with Planar Plasmonic Architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dionne, Jennifer Anne

    On subwavelength scales, photon-matter interactions are limited by diffraction. The diffraction limit restricts the size of optical devices and the resolution of conventional microscopes to wavelength-scale dimensions, severely hampering our ability to control and probe subwavelength-scale optical phenomena. Circumventing diffraction is now a principle focus of integrated nanophotonics. Surface plasmons provide a particularly promising approach to sub-diffraction-limited photonics. Surface plasmons are hybrid electron-photon modes confined to the interface between conductors and transparent materials. Combining the high localization of electronic waves with the propagation properties of optical waves, plasmons can achieve extremely small mode wavelengths and large local electromagnetic field intensities. Through their unique dispersion, surface plasmons provide access to an enormous phase space of refractive indices and propagation constants that can be readily tuned with material or geometry. In this thesis, we explore both the theory and applications of dispersion in planar plasmonic architectures. Particular attention is given to the modes of metallic core and plasmon slot waveguides, which can span positive, near-zero, and even negative indices. We demonstrate how such basic plasmonic geometries can be used to develop a suite of passive and active plasmonic components, including subwavelength waveguides, color filters, negative index metamaterials, and optical MOS field effect modulators. Positive index modes are probed by near- and far-field techniques, revealing plasmon wavelengths as small as one-tenth of the excitation wavelength. Negative index modes are characterized through direct visualization of negative refraction. By fabricating prisms comprised of gold, silicon nitride, and silver multilayers, we achieve the first experimental demonstration of a negative index material at visible frequencies, with potential applications for sub-diffraction-limited

  14. Detonation diffraction through different geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorin, Rémy; Zitoun, Ratiba; Khasainov, Boris; Desbordes, Daniel

    2009-04-01

    We performed the study of the diffraction of a self-sustained detonation from a cylindrical tube (of inner diameter d) through different geometric configurations in order to characterise the transmission processes and to quantify the transmission criteria to the reception chamber. For the diffraction from a tube to the open space the transmission criteria is expressed by d c = k c · λ (with λ the detonation cell size and k c depending on the mixture and on the operture configuration, classically 13 for alkane mixtures with oxygen). The studied geometries are: (a) a sharp increase of diameter ( D/ d > 1) with and without a central obstacle in the diffracting section, (b) a conical divergent with a central obstacle in the diffracting section and (c) an inversed intermediate one end closed tube insuring a double reflection before a final diffraction between the initiator tube and the reception chamber. The results for case A show that the reinitiation process depends on the ratio d/ λ. For ratios below k c the re-ignition takes place at the receptor tube wall and at a fixed distance from the step, i.e. closely after the diffracted shock reflection shows a Mach stem configuration. For ratios below a limit ratio k lim (which depends on D/ d) the re-ignition distance increases with the decrease of d/λ. For both case A and B the introduction of a central obstacle (of blockage ratio BR = 0.5) at the exit of the initiator tube decreases the critical transmission ratio k c by 50%. The results in configuration C show that the re-ignition process depends both on d/ λ and the geometric conditions. Optimal configuration is found that provides the transmission through the two successive reflections (from d = 26 mm to D ch = 200 mm) at as small d/ λ as 2.2 whatever the intermediate diameter D is. This configuration provides a significant improvement in the detonation transmission conditions.

  15. Hard Diffraction at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Melese, P.; CDF Collaboration

    1997-06-01

    We present results on diffractive production of hard processes in {anti p}p collisions at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV at the Tevatron using the CDF detector. The signatures used to identify diffractive events are the forward rapidity gap and/or the detection of a recoil antiproton with high forward momentum. We have observed diffractive W- boson, dijet, and heavy quark production. We also present results on double-pomeron production of dijets.

  16. A Comparison of Two Standardized Reading and Mathematics Achievement Tests in the Native Language for Hispanic Limited-English-Proficient Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosa, Carlos M.; And Others

    A study was undertaken to examine psychometric properties of "La Prueba Riverside de Realizacion en Espanol" (PRRE) and the "Spanish Assessment of Basic Education" (SABE) when administered to a sample of limited-English-proficient students, grades 1 through 8. Spanish-language versions of both tests were used for the study. Subjects included a…

  17. Phononic crystal diffraction gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moiseyenko, Rayisa P.; Herbison, Sarah; Declercq, Nico F.; Laude, Vincent

    2012-02-01

    When a phononic crystal is interrogated by an external source of acoustic waves, there is necessarily a phenomenon of diffraction occurring on the external enclosing surfaces. Indeed, these external surfaces are periodic and the resulting acoustic diffraction grating has a periodicity that depends on the orientation of the phononic crystal. This work presents a combined experimental and theoretical study on the diffraction of bulk ultrasonic waves on the external surfaces of a 2D phononic crystal that consists of a triangular lattice of steel rods in a water matrix. The results of transmission experiments are compared with theoretical band structures obtained with the finite-element method. Angular spectrograms (showing frequency as a function of angle) determined from diffraction experiments are then compared with finite-element simulations of diffraction occurring on the surfaces of the crystal. The experimental results show that the diffraction that occurs on its external surfaces is highly frequency-dependent and has a definite relation with the Bloch modes of the phononic crystal. In particular, a strong influence of the presence of bandgaps and deaf bands on the diffraction efficiency is found. This observation opens perspectives for the design of efficient phononic crystal diffraction gratings.

  18. Detection of electron magnetic circular dichroism signals under zone axial diffraction geometry.

    PubMed

    Song, Dongsheng; Rusz, Jan; Cai, Jianwang; Zhu, Jing

    2016-10-01

    EMCD (electron magnetic circular dichroism) technique provides us a new opportunity to explore magnetic properties in the transmission electron microscope. However, specific diffraction geometry is the major limitation. Only the two-beam and three-beam case are demonstrated in the experiments until now. Here, we present the more general case of zone axial (ZA) diffraction geometry through which the EMCD signals can be detected even with the very strong sensitivity to dynamical diffraction conditions. Our detailed calculations and well-controlled diffraction conditions lead to experiments in agreement with theory. The effect of dynamical diffraction conditions on EMCD signals are discussed both in theory and experiments. Moreover, with the detailed analysis of dynamical diffraction effects, we experimentally obtain the separate EMCD signals for each crystallographic site in Y3Fe5O12, which is also applicable for other materials and cannot be achieved by site-specific EMCD and XMCD technique directly. Our work extends application of more general diffraction geometries and will further promote the development of EMCD technique. PMID:27448200

  19. Effect of recording condition on the diffraction efficiency of magnetic hologram with magnetic garnet films

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Yuichi Takagi, Hiroyuki; Lim, Pang Boey; Inoue, Mitsuteru

    2014-09-14

    A holographic memory has been attracting attention as recording media with high recording density and high data transfer rate. We have studied the magnetic garnets as a rewritable and long life media for magnetic holography. However, since the signal intensity of reconstructed image was relatively low, the effects of recording conditions on the diffraction efficiency of magnetic hologram were investigated with experiments and the numerical simulation using COMSOL multi-physics. The diffraction efficiency tends to decrease as increasing the spatial frequency, and the use of short pulse laser with the pulse width of 50 ps was found to be effective to achieve high diffraction efficiency. This suggests that the formation of clear magnetic fringe similar to interference pattern can be obtained by the use of short pulse laser since undesirable heat diffusion during radiation does not occur. On the other hand, the diffraction efficiency increased as increasing the film thickness up to 3.1 μm but was saturated in the garnet film thicker than 3.1 μm in the case of spatial frequency of 1500 line pair/mm. The numerical simulation showed that the effective depth of magnetic fringe was limited about 1.8 μm irrespective of the garnet film thickness because the fringes were connected by thermal diffusion near the surface of the film, and the effective depth is limited due to this connection of the magnetic fringe. Avoiding this fringe connection, much higher diffraction efficiency will be achieved.

  20. Breaking the diffraction barrier outside of the optical near-field with bright, collimated light from nanometric apertures.

    PubMed

    Stark, Peter R H; Halleck, Allison E; Larson, Dale N

    2007-11-27

    The optical diffraction limit has been the dominant barrier to achieving higher optical resolution in the fields of microscopy, photolithography, and optical data storage. We present here an approach toward imaging below the diffraction barrier. Through the exposure of photosensitive films placed a finite and known distance away from nanoscale, zero-mode apertures in thin metallic films, we show convincing, physical evidence that the propagating component of light emerging from these apertures shows a very strong degree of collimation well past the maximum extent of the near-field (lambda(0)/4n-lambda(0)/2n). Up to at least 2.5 wavelengths away from the apertures, the transmitted light exhibits subdiffraction limit irradiance patterns. These unexpected results are not explained by standard diffraction theory or nanohole-based "beaming" rationalizations. This method overcomes the diffraction barrier and makes super-resolution fluorescence imaging practical.

  1. Breaking the diffraction barrier outside of the optical near-field with bright, collimated light from nanometric apertures

    PubMed Central

    Stark, Peter R. H.; Halleck, Allison E.; Larson, Dale N.

    2007-01-01

    The optical diffraction limit has been the dominant barrier to achieving higher optical resolution in the fields of microscopy, photolithography, and optical data storage. We present here an approach toward imaging below the diffraction barrier. Through the exposure of photosensitive films placed a finite and known distance away from nanoscale, zero-mode apertures in thin metallic films, we show convincing, physical evidence that the propagating component of light emerging from these apertures shows a very strong degree of collimation well past the maximum extent of the near-field (λ0/4n–λ0/2n). Up to at least 2.5 wavelengths away from the apertures, the transmitted light exhibits subdiffraction limit irradiance patterns. These unexpected results are not explained by standard diffraction theory or nanohole-based “beaming” rationalizations. This method overcomes the diffraction barrier and makes super-resolution fluorescence imaging practical. PMID:18024583

  2. Testing the limits of Paleozoic chronostratigraphic correlation via high-resolution (13Ccarb) biochemostratigraphy across the Llandovery–Wenlock (Silurian) boundary: Is a unified Phanerozoic time scale achievable?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cramer, Bradley D.; Loydell, David K.; Samtleben, Christian; Munnecke, Axel; Kaljo, Dimitri; Mannik, Peep; Martma, Tonu; Jeppsson, Lennart; Kleffner, Mark A.; Barrick, James E.; Johnson, Craig A.; Emsbo, Poul; Joachimski, Michael M.; Bickert, Torsten; Saltzman, Matthew R.

    2010-01-01

    The resolution and fidelity of global chronostratigraphic correlation are direct functions of the time period under consideration. By virtue of deep-ocean cores and astrochronology, the Cenozoic and Mesozoic time scales carry error bars of a few thousand years (k.y.) to a few hundred k.y. In contrast, most of the Paleozoic time scale carries error bars of plus or minus a few million years (m.y.), and chronostratigraphic control better than ??1 m.y. is considered "high resolution." The general lack of Paleozoic abyssal sediments and paucity of orbitally tuned Paleozoic data series combined with the relative incompleteness of the Paleozoic stratigraphic record have proven historically to be such an obstacle to intercontinental chronostratigraphic correlation that resolving the Paleozoic time scale to the level achieved during the Mesozoic and Cenozoic was viewed as impractical, impossible, or both. Here, we utilize integrated graptolite, conodont, and carbonate carbon isotope (??13Ccarb) data from three paleocontinents (Baltica, Avalonia, and Laurentia) to demonstrate chronostratigraphic control for upper Llando very through middle Wenlock (Telychian-Sheinwoodian, ~436-426 Ma) strata with a resolution of a few hundred k.y. The interval surrounding the base of the Wenlock Series can now be correlated globally with precision approaching 100 k.y., but some intervals (e.g., uppermost Telychian and upper Shein-woodian) are either yet to be studied in sufficient detail or do not show sufficient biologic speciation and/or extinction or carbon isotopic features to delineate such small time slices. Although producing such resolution during the Paleozoic presents an array of challenges unique to the era, we have begun to demonstrate that erecting a Paleozoic time scale comparable to that of younger eras is achievable. ?? 2010 Geological Society of America.

  3. Parametric Powder Diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, William I. F.; Evans, John S. O.

    The rapidity with which powder diffraction data may be collected, not only at neutron and X-ray synchrotron facilities but also in the laboratory, means that the collection of a single diffraction pattern is now the exception rather than the rule. Many experiments involve the collection of hundreds and perhaps many thousands of datasets where a parameter such as temperature or pressure is varied or where time is the variable and life-cycle, synthesis or decomposition processes are monitored or three-dimensional space is scanned and the three-dimensional internal structure of an object is elucidated. In this paper, the origins of parametric diffraction are discussed and the techniques and challenges of parametric powder diffraction analysis are presented. The first parametric measurements were performed around 50 years ago with the development of a modified Guinier camera but it was the automation afforded by neutron diffraction combined with increases in computer speed and memory that established parametric diffraction on a strong footing initially at the ILL, Grenoble in France. The theoretical parameterisation of quantities such as lattice constants and atomic displacement parameters will be discussed and selected examples of parametric diffraction over the past 20 years will be reviewed that highlight the power of the technique.

  4. dxtbx: the diffraction experiment toolbox.

    PubMed

    Parkhurst, James M; Brewster, Aaron S; Fuentes-Montero, Luis; Waterman, David G; Hattne, Johan; Ashton, Alun W; Echols, Nathaniel; Evans, Gwyndaf; Sauter, Nicholas K; Winter, Graeme

    2014-08-01

    Data formats for recording X-ray diffraction data continue to evolve rapidly to accommodate new detector technologies developed in response to more intense light sources. Processing the data from single-crystal X-ray diffraction experiments therefore requires the ability to read, and correctly interpret, image data and metadata from a variety of instruments employing different experimental representations. Tools that have previously been developed to address this problem have been limited either by a lack of extensibility or by inconsistent treatment of image metadata. The dxtbx software package provides a consistent interface to both image data and experimental models, while supporting a completely generic user-extensible approach to reading the data files. The library is written in a mixture of C++ and Python and is distributed as part of the cctbx under an open-source licence at http://cctbx.sourceforge.net. PMID:25242914

  5. Precision lens molding of asphero diffractive surfaces in chalcogenide materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, J.; Scordato, M.; Schwertz, K.; Bagwell, J.

    2015-10-01

    Finished lens molding, and the similar process of precision lens molding, have long been practiced for high volume, accurate replication of optical surfaces on oxide glass. The physics surrounding these processes are well understood, and the processes are capable of producing high quality optics with great fidelity. However, several limitations exist due to properties inherent with oxide glasses. Tooling materials that can withstand the severe environmental conditions of oxide glass molding cannot easily be machined to produce complex geometries such as diffractive surfaces, lens arrays, and off axis features. Current machining technologies coupled with a limited selection of tool materials greatly limits the type of structures that can be molded into the finished optic. Tooling for chalcogenide glasses are not bound by these restrictions since the molding temperatures required are much lower than for oxide glasses. Innovations in tooling materials and manufacturing techniques have enabled the production of complex geometries to optical quality specifications and have demonstrated the viability of creating tools for molding diffractive surfaces, off axis features, datums, and arrays. Applications for optics having these features are found in automotive, defense, security, medical, and industrial domains. This paper will discuss results achieved in the study of various molding techniques for the formation of positive diffractive features on a concave spherical surface molded from As2Se3 chalcogenide glass. Examples and results of molding with tools having CTE match with the glass and non CTE match will be reviewed. The formation of stress within the glass during molding will be discussed, and methods of stress management will also be demonstrated and discussed. Results of process development methods and production of good diffractive surfaces will be shown.

  6. Spectroelectrochemical sensing based on multimode selectivity simultaneously achievable in a single device. 17. Improvement in detection limits using ultrathin perfluorosulfonated ionomer films in conjunction with continuous sample flow.

    PubMed

    Andria, Sara E; Richardson, John N; Kaval, Necati; Zudans, Imants; Seliskar, Carl J; Heineman, William R

    2004-06-01

    We report herein an attenuated total reflectance (ATR) absorbance-based spectroelectrochemical sensor for tris(2,2'-bipyridyl)ruthenium(II) ion [Ru(bpy)(3)(2+)] that employs ultrathin (24-50 nm) Nafion films as the charge-selective layer. This film serves to sequester and preconcentrate the analyte at the optically transparent electrode surface such that it can be efficiently detected optically via electrochemical modulation. Our studies indicate that use of ultrathin films in tandem with continuous flow of sample solution through the cell compartment leads to a 100-500-fold enhancement in detection limit (10 nM) compared to earlier absorbance-based spectroelectrochemical sensors ( approximately 1-5 microM); markedly shorter analysis times also result. We report the dependence of the measured absorbance on sample flow rate and Nafion film thickness, and also provide calibration curves that illustrate the linear range and detection limits of the sensor using a 24 nm film at a constant sample flow rate of 0.07 mL/min.

  7. Limited femoral navigation versus conventional intramedullary femoral jig based instrumentation for achieving optimal restoration of mechanical axis post total knee arthroplasty: a prospective comparative study of 200 knees.

    PubMed

    Shah, Nilen A; Patil, Hitendra G; Dhawale, Amol S; Khedkar, Bipin M

    2015-04-01

    A prospective comparative study was conducted to compare the mechanical axis post total knee arthroplasty (TKA) between two groups: In the first group of 100 knees (ASM group) Articular Surface Mounted navigation system was used to guide the distal femoral cut. In the second group of 100 knees (JIG group) conventional intramedullary femoral jig was used. The postoperative mechanical axis of the leg was within 3° of neutral alignment in 90% of the TKA in the ASM group (mean 178.12°) as compared to 74% in the JIG group (mean 177.02°). This difference was statistically significant (P<0.05). The data presented show that the use of limited femoral navigation leads to more accurate restoration of mechanical axis alignment when compared to conventional intramedullary femoral jigs.

  8. Diffraction Techniques in Structural Biology

    PubMed Central

    Egli, Martin

    2010-01-01

    A detailed understanding of chemical and biological function and the mechanisms underlying the activities ultimately requires atomic-resolution structural data. Diffraction-based techniques such as single-crystal X-ray crystallography, electron microscopy and neutron diffraction are well established and have paved the road to the stunning successes of modern-day structural biology. The major advances achieved in the last 20 years in all aspects of structural research, including sample preparation, crystallization, the construction of synchrotron and spallation sources, phasing approaches and high-speed computing and visualization, now provide specialists and non-specialists alike with a steady flow of molecular images of unprecedented detail. The present chapter combines a general overview of diffraction methods with a step-by-step description of the process of a single-crystal X-ray structure determination experiment, from chemical synthesis or expression to phasing and refinement, analysis and quality control. For novices it may serve as a stepping-stone to more in-depth treatises of the individual topics. Readers relying on structural information for interpreting functional data may find it a useful consumer guide. PMID:20517991

  9. Fraunhofer Diffraction and Polarization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortin, E.

    1979-01-01

    Describes an experiment for the intermediate undergraduate optics laboratory designed to illustrate simultaneously some aspects of the phenomena of diffraction; interference, coherence, apodization, the Fresnel-Arago law; as well as of the interrelations between these concepts. (HM)

  10. Fresnel Coherent Diffractive Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, G. J.; Quiney, H. M.; Dhal, B. B.; Tran, C. Q.; Nugent, K. A.; Peele, A. G.; Paterson, D.; de Jonge, M. D.

    2006-07-01

    We present an x-ray coherent diffractive imaging experiment utilizing a nonplanar incident wave and demonstrate success by reconstructing a nonperiodic gold sample at 24 nm resolution. Favorable effects of the curved beam illumination are identified.

  11. Multigap Diffraction at LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Goulianos, Konstantin

    2005-10-06

    The large rapidity interval available at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) offers an arena in which the QCD aspects of diffraction may be explored in an environment free of gap survival complications using events with multiple rapidity gaps.

  12. New diffractive results from the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Gallinaro, Michele; /Rockefeller U.

    2005-05-01

    Experimental results in diffractive processes are summarized and a few notable characteristics described in terms of Quantum Chromodynamics. Exclusive dijet production is used to establish a benchmark for future experiments in the quest for diffractive Higgs production at the Large Hadron Collider. Using new data from the Tevatron and dedicated diffractive triggers, no excess over a smooth falling distribution for exclusive dijet events could be found. Stringent upper limits on the exclusive dijet production cross section are presented. The quark/gluon composition of dijet final states is used to provide additional hints on exclusive dijet production.

  13. Reflective diffraction grating

    DOEpatents

    Lamartine, Bruce C.

    2003-06-24

    Reflective diffraction grating. A focused ion beam (FIB) micromilling apparatus is used to store color images in a durable medium by milling away portions of the surface of the medium to produce a reflective diffraction grating with blazed pits. The images are retrieved by exposing the surface of the grating to polychromatic light from a particular incident bearing and observing the light reflected by the surface from specified reception bearing.

  14. Diffraction pattern of gratings with erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivares-Pérez, Arturo; Fuentes-Tapia, Israel

    2015-03-01

    We present a theoretical study of amplitude diffraction gratings using computer simulating, which consists of a random sampling of points on the image grating to determine the points to be plotted and the points to remove, to simulate erosion in amplitude on the grating. We show their behavior in the diffraction patterns and the induced noise by limiting the number of points that representing the image of the eroded gratings and their symmetry.

  15. Characterization of proteins by powder diffraction.

    SciTech Connect

    Von Dreele, R.; X-Ray Science Division

    2009-01-01

    A simulation of a protein powder diffraction pattern was stunning in the apparent amount of information that was seen. A subsequent experiment on metmyoglobin gave a powder diffraction pattern that showed very little sample broadening; the peak widths were essentially limited by the instrument resolution. The challenge is to make use of this in protein structure analysis. This talk will recall some of those early experiments and data analyses as well as an overview of current progress and future possibilities.

  16. Speciation analysis of arsenic by selective hydride generation-cryotrapping-atomic fluorescence spectrometry with flame-in-gas-shield atomizer: achieving extremely low detection limits with inexpensive instrumentation.

    PubMed

    Musil, Stanislav; Matoušek, Tomáš; Currier, Jenna M; Stýblo, Miroslav; Dědina, Jiří

    2014-10-21

    This work describes the method of a selective hydride generation-cryotrapping (HG-CT) coupled to an extremely sensitive but simple in-house assembled and designed atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS) instrument for determination of toxicologically important As species. Here, an advanced flame-in-gas-shield atomizer (FIGS) was interfaced to HG-CT and its performance was compared to a standard miniature diffusion flame (MDF) atomizer. A significant improvement both in sensitivity and baseline noise was found that was reflected in improved (4 times) limits of detection (LODs). The yielded LODs with the FIGS atomizer were 0.44, 0.74, 0.15, 0.17 and 0.67 ng L(-1) for arsenite, total inorganic, mono-, dimethylated As and trimethylarsine oxide, respectively. Moreover, the sensitivities with FIGS and MDF were equal for all As species, allowing for the possibility of single species standardization with arsenate standard for accurate quantification of all other As species. The accuracy of HG-CT-AFS with FIGS was verified by speciation analysis in two samples of bottled drinking water and certified reference materials, NRC CASS-5 (nearshore seawater) and SLRS-5 (river water) that contain traces of methylated As species. As speciation was in agreement with results previously reported and sums of all quantified species corresponded with the certified total As. The feasibility of HG-CT-AFS with FIGS was also demonstrated by the speciation analysis in microsamples of exfoliated bladder epithelial cells isolated from human urine. The results for the sums of trivalent and pentavalent As species corresponded well with the reference results obtained by HG-CT-ICPMS (inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry).

  17. Anomalous refraction, diffraction, and imaging in metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Thomas; Rockstuhl, Carsten; Menzel, Christoph; Lederer, Falk

    2009-03-01

    In the past several years, optical metamaterials (MMs) have attracted a considerable deal of interest because it may be anticipated that their properties can be shaped to an unprecedented extent relieving optics from some of its natural limitations. An inevitable first step toward this goal is the evaluation of the optical properties of specifically designed MMs. To date, apart from identifying chiral properties of very specific configurations, this is primarily done in retrieving an effective refractive index—mostly—only for normal incidence. On this basis suggestions for a perfect lens, exploiting this negative refractive index have been put forward by taking advantage of geometrical optics arguments. We show that this approach is pointless for realistic MMs. Instead we prove that the dispersion relation of normal modes in these MMs provides all the required information. Most of the relevant optical parameters, such as refraction and diffraction coefficients, can be derived from this relation. Imaging properties follow straightforwardly from that data. This general approach holds for any optical material, in particular, for all MMs in question. As an example, we apply it to the fishnet structure: one of the most prominent and best studied design approaches to date. We show that both refraction and diffraction properties are strongly spatially and temporally dispersive and they can even change sign. In detail, we study the effect of these peculiarities on imaging and refraction of finite beams. In particular, we discuss both the effect of the specific dispersion relation and the losses on the imaging properties. All our physical predictions are backed by rigorous numerical calculations and the agreement is almost perfect. Ultimately the main conclusion to be drawn is that a negative index of refraction is by no means a sufficient criterion to achieve negative refraction and/or perfect imaging.

  18. Multipath analysis diffraction calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Statham, Richard B.

    1996-01-01

    This report describes extensions of the Kirchhoff diffraction equation to higher edge terms and discusses their suitability to model diffraction multipath effects of a small satellite structure. When receiving signals, at a satellite, from the Global Positioning System (GPS), reflected signals from the satellite structure result in multipath errors in the determination of the satellite position. Multipath error can be caused by diffraction of the reflected signals and a method of calculating this diffraction is required when using a facet model of the satellite. Several aspects of the Kirchhoff equation are discussed and numerical examples, in the near and far fields, are shown. The vector form of the extended Kirchhoff equation, by adding the Larmor-Tedone and Kottler edge terms, is given as a mathematical model in an appendix. The Kirchhoff equation was investigated as being easily implemented and of good accuracy in the basic form, especially in phase determination. The basic Kirchhoff can be extended for higher accuracy if desired. A brief discussion of the method of moments and the geometric theory of diffraction is included, but seems to offer no clear advantage in implementation over the Kirchhoff for facet models.

  19. Diffraction by nanocrystals II.

    PubMed

    Chen, Joe P J; Millane, Rick P

    2014-08-01

    Nanocrystals with more than one molecule in the unit cell will generally crystallize with incomplete unit cells on the crystal surface. Previous results show that the ensemble-averaged diffraction by such crystals consists of a usual Bragg component and two other Bragg-like components due to the incomplete unit cells. Using an intrinsic flexibility in the definition of the incomplete-unit-cell part of a crystal, the problem is formulated such that the magnitude of the Bragg-like components is minimized, which leads to a simpler and more useful interpretation of the diffraction. Simulations show the nature of the relative magnitudes of the diffraction components in different regions of reciprocal space and the effect of crystal faceting. PMID:25121528

  20. Diffractive Optical Analysis for Refractive Index Sensing using Transparent Phase Gratings.

    PubMed

    Kumawat, Nityanand; Pal, Parama; Varma, Manoj

    2015-01-01

    We report the implementation of a micro-patterned, glass-based photonic sensing element that is capable of label-free biosensing. The diffractive optical analyzer is based on the differential response of diffracted orders to bulk as well as surface refractive index changes. The differential read-out suppresses signal drifts and enables time-resolved determination of refractive index changes in the sample cell. A remarkable feature of this device is that under appropriate conditions, the measurement sensitivity of the sensor can be enhanced by more than two orders of magnitude due to interference between multiply reflected diffracted orders. A noise-equivalent limit of detection (LoD) of 6 × 10(-7) was achieved with this technique with scope for further improvement. PMID:26578408

  1. Diffractive Optical Analysis for Refractive Index Sensing using Transparent Phase Gratings

    PubMed Central

    Kumawat, Nityanand; Pal, Parama; Varma, Manoj

    2015-01-01

    We report the implementation of a micro-patterned, glass-based photonic sensing element that is capable of label-free biosensing. The diffractive optical analyzer is based on the differential response of diffracted orders to bulk as well as surface refractive index changes. The differential read-out suppresses signal drifts and enables time-resolved determination of refractive index changes in the sample cell. A remarkable feature of this device is that under appropriate conditions, the measurement sensitivity of the sensor can be enhanced by more than two orders of magnitude due to interference between multiply reflected diffracted orders. A noise-equivalent limit of detection (LoD) of 6 × 10−7 was achieved with this technique with scope for further improvement. PMID:26578408

  2. A Diffraction-limited Survey for Direct Detection of Halpha Emitting/Accreting ExtraSolar Planets with the 6.5m Magellan Telescope and the MagAO Visible AO system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Close, Laird

    steady diet of hydrogen gas. Such planets should then be quite bright in Halpha accretion emission. The key point is that: instead of a steep drop off in the luminosity of the planet’s atmosphere, the accretion luminosity of these planets will just linearly decrease with decreasing mass. At an accretion rate=6e-10 Msun/yr we find low mass (~1 Mjup) accreting gap planets are much (50-1000x) brighter (for 0-3.4 mag of Halpha extinction) in Halpha than at H band. PROOF-OF_CONCEPT: A 3 hour MagAO observation at Halpha of a transitional disk in April 2013 was made. The resulting deep diffraction-limited images discovered (at 10.5 sigma) an Halpha source that was 295% above the continuum just 0.083” from the star (edge of the inner 10 AU disk gap). We also detected (at 5 sigma) an excellent (though much fainter) ~1 Mjup mass Halpha planet candidate located auspiciously at the outer edge (145 AU) of the gap. If confirmed by our “second epoch” follow-up as common proper motion then this would be the lowest mass (~1 Mjup) planet ever imaged. SURVEY: Scaling off of this exciting success we propose to deeply image (120 min) all 14 nearby (D<250pc), bright (R<11 mag) , not edge-on (i<80 deg) , young (~5 Myr) transitional disks with MagAO simultaneously at Halpha and L’. In addition, we will use BrGamma instead of Halpha for 8 additional fainter (111 Mjup in mass, we integrate across our target list and find that, in the worst case of minimal masses (1+/-0.5 Mjup), and 3.4 mag extinction, at least seven ~1 Mjup planets should be discovered by this survey --meeting all three of our science goals above.

  3. Time-multiplexed chromatic-controlled axial diffractive optical elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-García, Antonio

    2010-07-01

    Programmable diffractive optical elements (DOEs) with axial response have many interesting applications, including diffractive lenses, axicons, and optical tweezers. In all these cases, it is essential to properly select the modulation configuration of the spatial light modulator (SLM) where the DOE is displayed, in order to avoid the undiffracted zero order component that appears on axis and overlaps the desired axial response. However, in general, the chromatic dispersion in liquid crystal SLMs prevents the cancellation of the zero order for a broadband light source, thus limiting the possibilities for polychromatic programmable axial DOEs. We operate a ferroelectric liquid crystal on silicon display with polychromatic illumination and with a specific polarization configuration that provides binary π-phase modulation for all wavelengths. Since this type of modulation cancels the undiffracted zero order, we use this SLM to display DOEs with axial response. Moreover, chromatic control is achieved by time-multiplexing sequences of properly scaled DOEs with the corresponding selection of the input wavelength by means of an electronically controlled color-filter wheel. The presented experimental results include wavelength-controlled diffraction gratings, axicons, and vortex-producing lenses.

  4. Encapsulation process for diffraction gratings.

    PubMed

    Ratzsch, Stephan; Kley, Ernst-Bernhard; Tünnermann, Andreas; Szeghalmi, Adriana

    2015-07-13

    Encapsulation of grating structures facilitates an improvement of the optical functionality and/or adds mechanical stability to the fragile structure. Here, we introduce novel encapsulation process of nanoscale patterns based on atomic layer deposition and micro structuring. The overall size of the encapsulated structured surface area is only restricted by the size of the available microstructuring and coating devices; thus, overcoming inherent limitations of existing bonding processes concerning cleanliness, roughness, and curvature of the components. Finally, the process is demonstrated for a transmission grating. The encapsulated grating has 97.5% transmission efficiency in the -1st diffraction order for TM-polarized light, and is being limited by the experimental grating parameters as confirmed by rigorous coupled wave analysis.

  5. Calculating cellulose diffraction patterns

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although powder diffraction of cellulose is a common experiment, the patterns are not widely understood. The theory is mathematical, there are numerous different crystal forms, and the conventions are not standardized. Experience with IR spectroscopy is not directly transferable. An awful error, tha...

  6. Diffraction with wavefront curvature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nugent, K. A.; Peele, A. G.; Quiney, H. M.; Chapman, H. N.

    2005-05-01

    Modern X-ray optics can produce a focused synchrotron beam with curvature on a scale comparable to that of an isolated biomolecule or to the lattice spacing of a biomolecular crystal. It is demonstrated that diffraction of phase-curved beams from such systems allows unique and robust phase recovery.

  7. DIFFRACTION FROM MODEL CRYSTALS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although calculating X-ray diffraction patterns from atomic coordinates of a crystal structure is a widely available capability, calculation from non-periodic arrays of atoms has not been widely applied to cellulose. Non-periodic arrays result from modeling studies that, even though started with at...

  8. Diffract, then destroy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, Philip

    2016-09-01

    A new implementation of X-ray diffraction using free-electron lasers can take snapshots of biological molecules that are inaccessible via X-ray crystallography. As Philip Ball reports, the technique can even be used to create stop-motion films of dynamic molecular processes

  9. Diffraction efficiency sensitivity to oblique incident angle for multilayer diffractive optical elements.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hongfang; Xue, Changxi; Li, Chuang; Wang, Ju; Zhang, Ran

    2016-09-01

    The relationship between diffraction efficiency of multilayer diffractive optical elements (MLDOEs) and arbitrary incident angle was numerically analyzed with the effective area method. The method is based on the shield effect between two elements of MLDOEs; a generalized diffraction efficiency formulation was obtained in a wide range of tilt angles, which overcame the limitations of scalar diffraction theory when the period width of MLDOEs is taken into account. A detailed comparison of the proposed effective area method with the scalar diffraction theory is numerically presented for MLDOEs. The validity of the proposed method is verified by comparison with the rigorous electromagnetic analysis method, especially the finite-difference time-domain method. The analysis results show that the shield effect augments with the increase of the incident angles; the effect of incident angles on MLDOEs with finite period widths is more noticeable than that with large period widths. PMID:27607291

  10. Coherent diffractive imaging of single layer microspheres

    SciTech Connect

    Dinh, Khuong Ba Le, Hoang Vu; Van Vuong, Cuong; Hannaford, Peter; Van Dao, Lap; Ong, Adabelle X. P.; Henderson, Clare A.; Smith, Trevor A.

    2015-04-28

    We report the extreme ultraviolet (XUV) coherent diffractive imaging of silica/polymer micro-particle samples illuminated by a table-top high harmonic generation source at the wavelength of 30 nm. We achieve images constructed from diffraction patterns acquired with 13 μm × 13 μm samples comprising a sparse monolayer of spherical silica and polymer micro-particles. Successful reconstructed image of an aperiodic sample using this HHG source will open the path to the realization of a compact soft x-ray microscope to investigate other complex absorbing samples.

  11. Macromolecular diffractive imaging using imperfect crystals

    PubMed Central

    Ayyer, Kartik; Yefanov, Oleksandr; Oberthür, Dominik; Roy-Chowdhury, Shatabdi; Galli, Lorenzo; Mariani, Valerio; Basu, Shibom; Coe, Jesse; Conrad, Chelsie E.; Fromme, Raimund; Schaffer, Alexander; Dörner, Katerina; James, Daniel; Kupitz, Christopher; Metz, Markus; Nelson, Garrett; Lourdu Xavier, Paulraj; Beyerlein, Kenneth R.; Schmidt, Marius; Sarrou, Iosifina; Spence, John C. H.; Weierstall, Uwe; White, Thomas A.; Yang, Jay-How; Zhao, Yun; Liang, Mengning; Aquila, Andrew; Hunter, Mark S.; Robinson, Joseph S.; Koglin, Jason E.; Boutet, Sébastien; Fromme, Petra; Barty, Anton; Chapman, Henry N.

    2016-01-01

    The three-dimensional structures of macromolecules and their complexes are predominantly elucidated by X-ray protein crystallography. A major limitation is access to high-quality crystals, to ensure X-ray diffraction extends to sufficiently large scattering angles and hence yields sufficiently high-resolution information that the crystal structure can be solved. The observation that crystals with shrunken unit-cell volumes and tighter macromolecular packing often produce higher-resolution Bragg peaks1,2 hints that crystallographic resolution for some macromolecules may be limited not by their heterogeneity but rather by a deviation of strict positional ordering of the crystalline lattice. Such displacements of molecules from the ideal lattice give rise to a continuous diffraction pattern, equal to the incoherent sum of diffraction from rigid single molecular complexes aligned along several discrete crystallographic orientations and hence with an increased information content3. Although such continuous diffraction patterns have long been observed—and are of interest as a source of information about the dynamics of proteins4 —they have not been used for structure determination. Here we show for crystals of the integral membrane protein complex photosystem II that lattice disorder increases the information content and the resolution of the diffraction pattern well beyond the 4.5 Å limit of measurable Bragg peaks, which allows us to directly phase5 the pattern. With the molecular envelope conventionally determined at 4.5 Å as a constraint, we then obtain a static image of the photosystem II dimer at 3.5 Å resolution. This result shows that continuous diffraction can be used to overcome long-supposed resolution limits of macromolecular crystallography, with a method that puts great value in commonly encountered imperfect crystals and opens up the possibility for model-free phasing6,7. PMID:26863980

  12. Macromolecular diffractive imaging using imperfect crystals.

    PubMed

    Ayyer, Kartik; Yefanov, Oleksandr M; Oberthür, Dominik; Roy-Chowdhury, Shatabdi; Galli, Lorenzo; Mariani, Valerio; Basu, Shibom; Coe, Jesse; Conrad, Chelsie E; Fromme, Raimund; Schaffer, Alexander; Dörner, Katerina; James, Daniel; Kupitz, Christopher; Metz, Markus; Nelson, Garrett; Xavier, Paulraj Lourdu; Beyerlein, Kenneth R; Schmidt, Marius; Sarrou, Iosifina; Spence, John C H; Weierstall, Uwe; White, Thomas A; Yang, Jay-How; Zhao, Yun; Liang, Mengning; Aquila, Andrew; Hunter, Mark S; Robinson, Joseph S; Koglin, Jason E; Boutet, Sébastien; Fromme, Petra; Barty, Anton; Chapman, Henry N

    2016-02-11

    The three-dimensional structures of macromolecules and their complexes are mainly elucidated by X-ray protein crystallography. A major limitation of this method is access to high-quality crystals, which is necessary to ensure X-ray diffraction extends to sufficiently large scattering angles and hence yields information of sufficiently high resolution with which to solve the crystal structure. The observation that crystals with reduced unit-cell volumes and tighter macromolecular packing often produce higher-resolution Bragg peaks suggests that crystallographic resolution for some macromolecules may be limited not by their heterogeneity, but by a deviation of strict positional ordering of the crystalline lattice. Such displacements of molecules from the ideal lattice give rise to a continuous diffraction pattern that is equal to the incoherent sum of diffraction from rigid individual molecular complexes aligned along several discrete crystallographic orientations and that, consequently, contains more information than Bragg peaks alone. Although such continuous diffraction patterns have long been observed--and are of interest as a source of information about the dynamics of proteins--they have not been used for structure determination. Here we show for crystals of the integral membrane protein complex photosystem II that lattice disorder increases the information content and the resolution of the diffraction pattern well beyond the 4.5-ångström limit of measurable Bragg peaks, which allows us to phase the pattern directly. Using the molecular envelope conventionally determined at 4.5 ångströms as a constraint, we obtain a static image of the photosystem II dimer at a resolution of 3.5 ångströms. This result shows that continuous diffraction can be used to overcome what have long been supposed to be the resolution limits of macromolecular crystallography, using a method that exploits commonly encountered imperfect crystals and enables model-free phasing.

  13. Macromolecular diffractive imaging using imperfect crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayyer, Kartik; Yefanov, Oleksandr M.; Oberthür, Dominik; Roy-Chowdhury, Shatabdi; Galli, Lorenzo; Mariani, Valerio; Basu, Shibom; Coe, Jesse; Conrad, Chelsie E.; Fromme, Raimund; Schaffer, Alexander; Dörner, Katerina; James, Daniel; Kupitz, Christopher; Metz, Markus; Nelson, Garrett; Xavier, Paulraj Lourdu; Beyerlein, Kenneth R.; Schmidt, Marius; Sarrou, Iosifina; Spence, John C. H.; Weierstall, Uwe; White, Thomas A.; Yang, Jay-How; Zhao, Yun; Liang, Mengning; Aquila, Andrew; Hunter, Mark S.; Robinson, Joseph S.; Koglin, Jason E.; Boutet, Sébastien; Fromme, Petra; Barty, Anton; Chapman, Henry N.

    2016-02-01

    The three-dimensional structures of macromolecules and their complexes are mainly elucidated by X-ray protein crystallography. A major limitation of this method is access to high-quality crystals, which is necessary to ensure X-ray diffraction extends to sufficiently large scattering angles and hence yields information of sufficiently high resolution with which to solve the crystal structure. The observation that crystals with reduced unit-cell volumes and tighter macromolecular packing often produce higher-resolution Bragg peaks suggests that crystallographic resolution for some macromolecules may be limited not by their heterogeneity, but by a deviation of strict positional ordering of the crystalline lattice. Such displacements of molecules from the ideal lattice give rise to a continuous diffraction pattern that is equal to the incoherent sum of diffraction from rigid individual molecular complexes aligned along several discrete crystallographic orientations and that, consequently, contains more information than Bragg peaks alone. Although such continuous diffraction patterns have long been observed—and are of interest as a source of information about the dynamics of proteins—they have not been used for structure determination. Here we show for crystals of the integral membrane protein complex photosystem II that lattice disorder increases the information content and the resolution of the diffraction pattern well beyond the 4.5-ångström limit of measurable Bragg peaks, which allows us to phase the pattern directly. Using the molecular envelope conventionally determined at 4.5 ångströms as a constraint, we obtain a static image of the photosystem II dimer at a resolution of 3.5 ångströms. This result shows that continuous diffraction can be used to overcome what have long been supposed to be the resolution limits of macromolecular crystallography, using a method that exploits commonly encountered imperfect crystals and enables model-free phasing.

  14. Macromolecular diffractive imaging using imperfect crystals.

    PubMed

    Ayyer, Kartik; Yefanov, Oleksandr M; Oberthür, Dominik; Roy-Chowdhury, Shatabdi; Galli, Lorenzo; Mariani, Valerio; Basu, Shibom; Coe, Jesse; Conrad, Chelsie E; Fromme, Raimund; Schaffer, Alexander; Dörner, Katerina; James, Daniel; Kupitz, Christopher; Metz, Markus; Nelson, Garrett; Xavier, Paulraj Lourdu; Beyerlein, Kenneth R; Schmidt, Marius; Sarrou, Iosifina; Spence, John C H; Weierstall, Uwe; White, Thomas A; Yang, Jay-How; Zhao, Yun; Liang, Mengning; Aquila, Andrew; Hunter, Mark S; Robinson, Joseph S; Koglin, Jason E; Boutet, Sébastien; Fromme, Petra; Barty, Anton; Chapman, Henry N

    2016-02-11

    The three-dimensional structures of macromolecules and their complexes are mainly elucidated by X-ray protein crystallography. A major limitation of this method is access to high-quality crystals, which is necessary to ensure X-ray diffraction extends to sufficiently large scattering angles and hence yields information of sufficiently high resolution with which to solve the crystal structure. The observation that crystals with reduced unit-cell volumes and tighter macromolecular packing often produce higher-resolution Bragg peaks suggests that crystallographic resolution for some macromolecules may be limited not by their heterogeneity, but by a deviation of strict positional ordering of the crystalline lattice. Such displacements of molecules from the ideal lattice give rise to a continuous diffraction pattern that is equal to the incoherent sum of diffraction from rigid individual molecular complexes aligned along several discrete crystallographic orientations and that, consequently, contains more information than Bragg peaks alone. Although such continuous diffraction patterns have long been observed--and are of interest as a source of information about the dynamics of proteins--they have not been used for structure determination. Here we show for crystals of the integral membrane protein complex photosystem II that lattice disorder increases the information content and the resolution of the diffraction pattern well beyond the 4.5-ångström limit of measurable Bragg peaks, which allows us to phase the pattern directly. Using the molecular envelope conventionally determined at 4.5 ångströms as a constraint, we obtain a static image of the photosystem II dimer at a resolution of 3.5 ångströms. This result shows that continuous diffraction can be used to overcome what have long been supposed to be the resolution limits of macromolecular crystallography, using a method that exploits commonly encountered imperfect crystals and enables model-free phasing. PMID

  15. Colored Diffraction Catastrophes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, M. V.; Klein, S.

    1996-03-01

    On fine scales, caustics produced with white light show vividly colored diffraction fringes. For caustics described by the elementary catastrophes of singularity theory, the colors are characteristic of the type of singularity. We study the diffraction colors of the fold and cusp catastrophes. The colors can be simulated computationally as the superposition of monochromatic patterns for different wavelengths. Far from the caustic, where the luminosity contrast is negligible, the fringe colors persist; an asymptotic theory explains why. Experiments with caustics produced by refraction through irregular bathroom-window glass show good agreement with theory. Colored fringes near the cusp reveal fine lines that are not present in any of the monochromatic components; these lines are explained in terms of partial decoherence between rays with widely differing path differences.

  16. Colored diffraction catastrophes.

    PubMed Central

    Berry, M V; Klein, S

    1996-01-01

    On fine scales, caustics produced with white light show vividly colored diffraction fringes. For caustics described by the elementary catastrophes of singularity theory, the colors are characteristic of the type of singularity. We study the diffraction colors of the fold and cusp catastrophes. The colors can be simulated computationally as the superposition of monochromatic patterns for different wavelengths. Far from the caustic, where the luminosity contrast is negligible, the fringe colors persist; an asymptotic theory explains why. Experiments with caustics produced by refraction through irregular bathroom-window glass show good agreement with theory. Colored fringes near the cusp reveal fine lines that are not present in any of the monochromatic components; these lines are explained in terms of partial decoherence between rays with widely differing path differences. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 6 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 PMID:11607642

  17. HIGH-PRECISION ASTROMETRY WITH A DIFFRACTIVE PUPIL TELESCOPE

    SciTech Connect

    Guyon, Olivier; Eisner, Josh A.; Angel, Roger; Woolf, Neville J.; Bendek, Eduardo A.; Milster, Thomas D.; Mark Ammons, S.; Shao, Michael; Shaklan, Stuart; Levine, Marie; Nemati, Bijan; Pitman, Joe; Woodruff, Robert A.; Belikov, Ruslan

    2012-06-01

    Astrometric detection and mass determination of Earth-mass exoplanets require sub-{mu}as accuracy, which is theoretically possible with an imaging space telescope using field stars as an astrometric reference. The measurement must, however, overcome astrometric distortions, which are much larger than the photon noise limit. To address this issue, we propose to generate faint stellar diffraction spikes using a two-dimensional grid of regularly spaced small dark spots added to the surface of the primary mirror (PM). Accurate astrometric motion of the host star is obtained by comparing the position of the spikes to the background field stars. The spikes do not contribute to scattered light in the central part of the field and therefore allow unperturbed coronagraphic observation of the star's immediate surroundings. Because the diffraction spikes are created on the PM and imaged on the same focal plane detector as the background stars, astrometric distortions affect equally the diffraction spikes and the background stars and are therefore calibrated. We describe the technique, detail how the data collected by the wide-field camera are used to derive astrometric motion, and identify the main sources of astrometric error using numerical simulations and analytical derivations. We find that the 1.4 m diameter telescope, 0.3 deg{sup 2} field we adopt as a baseline design achieves 0.2 {mu}as single measurement astrometric accuracy. The diffractive pupil concept thus enables sub-{mu}as astrometry without relying on the accurate pointing, external metrology, or high-stability hardware required with previously proposed high-precision astrometry concepts.

  18. Multiple wavelength diffractive imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bo; Dilanian, Ruben A.; Teichmann, Sven; Abbey, Brian; Peele, Andrew G.; Williams, Garth J.; Hannaford, Peter; van Dao, Lap; Quiney, Harry M.; Nugent, Keith A.

    2009-02-01

    We demonstrate coherent diffraction imaging using multiple harmonics from a high-harmonic generation source. An algorithm is presented that builds the known incident spectrum into the reconstruction procedure with the result that the useable flux is increased by more than an order of magnitude. Excellent images are obtained with a resolution of (165±5)nm and compare very well with images from a scanning electron microscope.

  19. SINGLE CRYSTAL NEUTRON DIFFRACTION.

    SciTech Connect

    KOETZLE,T.F.

    2001-03-13

    Single-crystal neutron diffraction measures the elastic Bragg reflection intensities from crystals of a material, the structure of which is the subject of investigation. A single crystal is placed in a beam of neutrons produced at a nuclear reactor or at a proton accelerator-based spallation source. Single-crystal diffraction measurements are commonly made at thermal neutron beam energies, which correspond to neutron wavelengths in the neighborhood of 1 Angstrom. For high-resolution studies requiring shorter wavelengths (ca. 0.3-0.8 Angstroms), a pulsed spallation source or a high-temperature moderator (a ''hot source'') at a reactor may be used. When complex structures with large unit-cell repeats are under investigation, as is the case in structural biology, a cryogenic-temperature moderator (a ''cold source'') may be employed to obtain longer neutron wavelengths (ca. 4-10 Angstroms). A single-crystal neutron diffraction analysis will determine the crystal structure of the material, typically including its unit cell and space group, the positions of the atomic nuclei and their mean-square displacements, and relevant site occupancies. Because the neutron possesses a magnetic moment, the magnetic structure of the material can be determined as well, from the magnetic contribution to the Bragg intensities. This latter aspect falls beyond the scope of the present unit; for information on magnetic scattering of neutrons see Unit 14.3. Instruments for single-crystal diffraction (single-crystal diffractometers or SCDs) are generally available at the major neutron scattering center facilities. Beam time on many of these instruments is available through a proposal mechanism. A listing of neutron SCD instruments and their corresponding facility contacts is included in an appendix accompanying this unit.

  20. Dimensional stability. [of glass and glass-ceramic materials in diffraction telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochen, R.; Justie, B.

    1976-01-01

    The temporal stability of glass and glass-ceramic materials is important to the success of a large diffraction-limited telescope. The results are presented of an experimental study of the dimensional stability of glasses and glass ceramics being considered for substrates of massive diffraction-limited mirrors designed for several years of service in earth orbit. The purpose of the study was to measure the relative change in length of the candidate substrate materials, to the order of 5 parts in 10 to the 8th power, as a function of several years time. The development of monolithic test etalons, the development and improvement of two types of ultra-high precision interferometers, and certain aspects of tests data presently achieved are discussed.

  1. Diffractive X-Ray Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skinner, Gerald K.

    2010-01-01

    Diffractive X-ray telescopes, using zone plates, phase Fresnel lenses, or related optical elements have the potential to provide astronomers with true imaging capability with resolution many orders of magnitude better than available in any other waveband. Lenses that would be relatively easy to fabricate could have an angular resolution of the order of micro-arc-seconds or even better, that would allow, for example, imaging of the distorted spacetime in the immediate vicinity of the super-massive black holes in the center of active galaxies. What then is precluding their immediate adoption? Extremely long focal lengths, very limited bandwidth, and difficulty stabilizing the image are the main problems. The history, and status of the development of such lenses is reviewed here and the prospects for managing the challenges that they present are discussed.

  2. Diffraction of a Laser Beam.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jodoin, Ronald E.

    1979-01-01

    Investigates the effect of the nonuniform irradiance across a laser beam on diffraction of the beam, specifically the Fraunhofer diffraction of a laser beam with a Gaussian irradiance profile as it passes through a circular aperture. (GA)

  3. Aberrations of diffracted wave fields. II. Diffraction gratings.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, V N

    2000-12-01

    The Rayleigh-Sommerfeld theory is applied to diffraction of a spherical wave by a grating. The grating equation is obtained from the aberration-free diffraction pattern, and its aberrations are shown to be the same as the conventional aberrations obtained by using Fermat's principle. These aberrations are shown to be not associated with the diffraction process. Moreover, it is shown that the irradiance distribution of a certain diffraction order is the Fraunhofer diffraction pattern of the grating aperture as a whole aberrated by the aberration of that order. PMID:11140481

  4. Recent diffractive results from HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valkárová, Alice

    2016-07-01

    The diffractive dijet cross sections for photoproduction and deep inelastic scattering were studied and compared with theoretical NLO QCD predictions. The results of exclusive dijet production were compared to predictions from models which are based on different assumptions about the nature of diffractive exchange. Isolated prompt photons in diffractive photoproduction produced inclusively or together with a jet were studied for the first time.

  5. Non Specular Diffractive Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yunjin; Overcash, Dan; Morawice, Pawel; Yin, Ming; Datta, Timir

    2009-11-01

    Geometrically decorated two-dimensional (2D) discrete surfaces can be more effective than conventional smooth reflectors in managing wave radiation. Constructive non-specular wave scattering permits the scattering angle to be other than twice that of incidence and can result in gross violations of the law of reflection. A wide range of novel reflective behaviors ensues; including the phenomenon of negative reflection were energy transport remains on the same side of the normal. Also, at a critical incidence coherent superposition can force both the transmitted and reflected waves to graze the scattering surface thus synergistically reinforcing the diffractive process in a behavior reminiscent of critical internal reflection of ray optics. We experimentally demonstrate the concept with measurements on a one-dimensionally periodic system (grating) where the scattering angle is shown to be an inverse circular function of a function that depends on the diffractive index and the two angles. Excellent agreement is found between experimental data and theory. A preliminary report on our observations will be discussed.

  6. Hard diffractive results and prospects at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Krisztian; /Manchester U.

    2006-01-01

    We review hard diffractive results and prospects at the Tevatron with an emphasis on factorization breaking in diffractive processes. Upper limits on the exclusive di-jet and {chi}{sub c}{sup 0} production cross sections at CDF and the status of the D0 Forward Proton Detectors are discussed.

  7. Hard diffraction in Pythia 8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overgaard Rasmussen, Christine

    2016-07-01

    We present an overview of the options for diffraction implemented in the general-purpose event generator Pythia 8 [1]. We review the existing model for soft diffraction and present a new model for hard diffraction. Both models use the Pomeron approach pioneered by Ingelman and Schlein, factorising the diffractive cross section into a Pomeron flux and a Pomeron PDF, with several choices for both implemented in Pythia 8. The model of hard diffraction is implemented as a part of the multiparton interactions (MPI) framework, thus introducing a dynamical gap survival probability that explicitly breaks factorisation.

  8. Multilayer diffraction grating

    DOEpatents

    Barbee, T.W. Jr.

    1990-04-10

    This invention is for a reflection diffraction grating that functions at X-ray to VUV wavelengths and at normal angles of incidence. The novel grating is comprised of a laminar grating of period D with flat-topped grating bars. A multiplicity of layered synthetic microstructures, of period d and comprised of alternating flat layers of two different materials, are disposed on the tops of the grating bars of the laminar grating. In another embodiment of the grating, a second multiplicity of layered synthetic microstructures are also disposed on the flat faces, of the base of the grating, between the bars. D is in the approximate range from 3,000 to 50,000 Angstroms, but d is in the approximate range from 10 to 400 Angstroms. The laminar grating and the layered microstructures cooperatively interact to provide many novel and beneficial instrumentational advantages. 2 figs.

  9. Multilayer diffraction grating

    DOEpatents

    Barbee, Jr., Troy W.

    1990-01-01

    This invention is for a reflection diffraction grating that functions at X-ray to VUV wavelengths and at normal angles of incidence. The novel grating is comprised of a laminar grating of period D with flat-topped grating bars. A multiplicity of layered synthetic microstructures, of period d and comprised of alternating flat layers of two different materials, are disposed on the tops of the grating bars of the laminar grating. In another embodiment of the grating, a second multiplicity of layered synthetic microstructures are also disposed on the flat faces, of the base of the grating, between the bars. D is in the approximate range from 3,000 to 50,000 Angstroms, but d is in the approximate range from 10 to 400 Angstroms. The laminar grating and the layered microstructures cooperatively interact to provide many novel and beneficial instrumentational advantages.

  10. Single Hit Energy-resolved Laue Diffraction.

    PubMed

    Patel, Shamim; Suggit, Matthew J; Stubley, Paul G; Hawreliak, James A; Ciricosta, Orlando; Comley, Andrew J; Collins, Gilbert W; Eggert, Jon H; Foster, John M; Wark, Justin S; Higginbotham, Andrew

    2015-05-01

    In situ white light Laue diffraction has been successfully used to interrogate the structure of single crystal materials undergoing rapid (nanosecond) dynamic compression up to megabar pressures. However, information on strain state accessible via this technique is limited, reducing its applicability for a range of applications. We present an extension to the existing Laue diffraction platform in which we record the photon energy of a subset of diffraction peaks. This allows for a measurement of the longitudinal and transverse strains in situ during compression. Consequently, we demonstrate measurement of volumetric compression of the unit cell, in addition to the limited aspect ratio information accessible in conventional white light Laue. We present preliminary results for silicon, where only an elastic strain is observed. VISAR measurements show the presence of a two wave structure and measurements show that material downstream of the second wave does not contribute to the observed diffraction peaks, supporting the idea that this material may be highly disordered, or has undergone large scale rotation.

  11. Single Hit Energy-resolved Laue Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Shamim; Suggit, Matthew J.; Stubley, Paul G.; Ciricosta, Orlando; Wark, Justin S.; Higginbotham, Andrew; Hawreliak, James A.; Collins, Gilbert W.; Eggert, Jon H.; Comley, Andrew J.; Foster, John M.

    2015-05-15

    In situ white light Laue diffraction has been successfully used to interrogate the structure of single crystal materials undergoing rapid (nanosecond) dynamic compression up to megabar pressures. However, information on strain state accessible via this technique is limited, reducing its applicability for a range of applications. We present an extension to the existing Laue diffraction platform in which we record the photon energy of a subset of diffraction peaks. This allows for a measurement of the longitudinal and transverse strains in situ during compression. Consequently, we demonstrate measurement of volumetric compression of the unit cell, in addition to the limited aspect ratio information accessible in conventional white light Laue. We present preliminary results for silicon, where only an elastic strain is observed. VISAR measurements show the presence of a two wave structure and measurements show that material downstream of the second wave does not contribute to the observed diffraction peaks, supporting the idea that this material may be highly disordered, or has undergone large scale rotation.

  12. Final Report: Algorithms for Diffractive Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Elser, Veit

    2010-10-08

    The phenomenal coherence and brightness of x-ray free-electron laser light sources, such as the LCLS at SLAC, have the potential of revolutionizing the investigation of structure and dynamics in the nano-domain. However, this potential will go unrealized without a similar revolution in the way the data are analyzed. While it is true that the ambitious design parameters of the LCLS have been achieved, the prospects of realizing the most publicized goal of this instrument — the imaging of individual bio-particles — remains daunting. Even with 10{sup 12} photons per x-ray pulse, the feebleness of the scattering process represents a fundamental limit that no amount of engineering ingenuity can overcome. Large bio-molecules will scatter on the order of only 10{sup 3} photons per pulse into a detector with 106 pixels; the diffraction “images” will be virtually indistinguishable from noise. Averaging such noisy signals over many pulses is not possible because the particle orientation cannot be controlled. Each noisy laser snapshot is thus confounded by the unknown viewpoint of the particle. Given the heavy DOE investment in LCLS and the profound technical challenges facing single-particle imaging, the final two years of this project have concentrated on this effort. We are happy to report that we succeeded in developing an extremely efficient algorithm that can reconstruct the shapes of particles at even the extremes of noise expected in future LCLS experiments with single bio-particles. Since this is the most important outcome of this project, the major part of this report documents this accomplishment. The theoretical techniques that were developed for the single-particle imaging project have proved useful in other imaging problems that are described at the end of the report.

  13. Cherokee Culture and School Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Anthony D.

    1980-01-01

    Compares the effect of cooperative and competitive behaviors of Cherokee and Anglo American elementary school students on academic achievement. Suggests changes in teaching techniques and lesson organization that might raise academic achievement while taking into consideration tribal traditions that limit scholastic achievement in an…

  14. Diffraction Anomalous Near-Edge Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moltaji, Habib O., Jr.

    1995-11-01

    To determine the atomic structure about atom of an element in a sample of a condensed multicomponent single crystal, contrast radiation is proposed with the use of Diffraction Anomalous Near-Edge Structure (DANES), which combines the long-range order sensitivity of the x-ray diffraction and short-range order of the x-ray absorption near-edge techniques. This is achieved by modulating the photon energy of the x-ray beam incident on the sample over a range of energies near an absorption edge of the selected element. Due to anomalous dispersion, x-ray diffraction, and x-ray absorption, the DANES intensity with respect to the selected element is obtained in a single experiment. I demonstrate that synchrotron DANES measurements for the single crystal of thin film and the powder samples and provide the same local atomic structural information as the x-ray absorption near-edge with diffraction condition and can be used to provide enhanced site selectivity. I demonstrate calculations of DAFS intensity and measurements of polarized DANES and XANES intensity.

  15. Every good virtue you ever wanted in a Q-switched solid-state laser and more: Monolithic, diode-pumped, self-Q-switched, highly reproducible, diffraction-limited Nd:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y. C.; Lee, K. K.

    The applications of Q-switched lasers are well known, for example, laser radar, laser remote sensing, satellite orbit determination, Moon orbit and 'moon quake' determination, satellite laser communication, and many nonlinear optics applications. Most of the applications require additional properties of the Q-switched lasers, such as single-axial and/or single-transverse mode, high repetition rate, stable pulse shape and pulse width, or ultra compact and rugged oscillators. Furthermore, space based and airborne lasers for lidar and laser communication applications require efficient, compact, lightweight, long-lived, and stable-pulsed laser sources. Diode-pumped solid-state lasers (DPSSL) have recently shown the potential for satisfying all of these requirements. We will report on the operating characteristics of a diode-pumped, monolithic, self-Q-switched Cr,Nd:YAG laser where the chromium ions act as a saturable absorber for the laser emission at 1064 nm. The pulse duration is 3.5 ns and the output is highly polarized with an extinction ratio of 700:1. It is further shown that the output is single-longitudinal-mode with transform-limited spectral line width without pulse-to-pulse mode competition. Consequently, the pulse-to-pulse intensity fluctuation is less than the instrument resolution of 0.25 percent. This self-stabilization mechanism is because the lasing mode bleaches the distributed absorber and establishes a gain-loss grating similar to that used in the distributed feedback semiconductor lasers. A repetition rate above 5 KHz has also been demonstrated. For higher power, this laser can be used for injection seeding an amplifier (or amplifier chain) or injection locking of a power oscillator pumped by diode lasers. We will discuss some research directions on the master oscillator for higher output energy per pulse as well as how to scale the output power of the diode-pumped amplifier(s) to multi-kilowatt average power.

  16. Every Good Virtue You Ever Wanted in a Q-switched Solid-state Laser and More: Monolithic, Diode-pumped, Self-q-switched, Highly Reproducible, Diffraction-limited Nd:yag Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Y. C.; Lee, K. K.

    1993-01-01

    The applications of Q-switched lasers are well known, for example, laser radar, laser remote sensing, satellite orbit determination, Moon orbit and 'moon quake' determination, satellite laser communication, and many nonlinear optics applications. Most of the applications require additional properties of the Q-switched lasers, such as single-axial and/or single-transverse mode, high repetition rate, stable pulse shape and pulse width, or ultra compact and rugged oscillators. Furthermore, space based and airborne lasers for lidar and laser communication applications require efficient, compact, lightweight, long-lived, and stable-pulsed laser sources. Diode-pumped solid-state lasers (DPSSL) have recently shown the potential for satisfying all of these requirements. We will report on the operating characteristics of a diode-pumped, monolithic, self-Q-switched Cr,Nd:YAG laser where the chromium ions act as a saturable absorber for the laser emission at 1064 nm. The pulse duration is 3.5 ns and the output is highly polarized with an extinction ratio of 700:1. It is further shown that the output is single-longitudinal-mode with transform-limited spectral line width without pulse-to-pulse mode competition. Consequently, the pulse-to-pulse intensity fluctuation is less than the instrument resolution of 0.25 percent. This self-stabilization mechanism is because the lasing mode bleaches the distributed absorber and establishes a gain-loss grating similar to that used in the distributed feedback semiconductor lasers. A repetition rate above 5 KHz has also been demonstrated. For higher power, this laser can be used for injection seeding an amplifier (or amplifier chain) or injection locking of a power oscillator pumped by diode lasers. We will discuss some research directions on the master oscillator for higher output energy per pulse as well as how to scale the output power of the diode-pumped amplifier(s) to multi-kilowatt average power.

  17. Diffraction Properties of a Volume Photorefractive Hologram.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hanying

    1995-01-01

    A number of topics related to the diffraction properties of a thick photorefractive hologram are investigated. First, a coupled-recording-wave approach is introduced to study the diffraction efficiency and the wavelength/angular selectivity of a reflective-type photorefractive volume hologram as affected by the coupling-erasure dynamics during recording. A closed-form expression for the diffraction efficiency is derived for the on-Bragg readout while a numerical analysis is performed for the off-Bragg readout. The erasure-limited storage capacity is analyzed. Second, intrasignal coupling effect is studied for photorefractive LiNbO_3 crystals. It is shown that the anisotropy nature of the effective electro -optic coefficient of this crystal results in an orientation -dependent intrasignal coupling, leading to a distorted image version inside the medium and hence affecting the fidelity of the reconstructed image. Analytical solutions for one-dimensional case are derived for two commonly used crystal orientations, which are shown having different characteristics. The maximum beam field angle or the maximum crystal thickness for a given intensity distortion due to the intrasignal coupling is estimated. Finally, the diffraction properties of a PR hologram as affected by the anisotropic nature of the refractive -index grating of a photorefractive crystal is investigated. The diffraction efficiency is shown to be angle dependent, which causes a nonuniform diffraction over the spatial frequency contents or pixel positions of a hologram image in a page-oriented holographic system. Its effects on the fidelity of the hologram image in terms of bit-error -rate (BER) and on the angular multiplexing scheme are discussed.

  18. Results on hard diffractive production

    SciTech Connect

    Goulianos, K.

    1995-07-01

    The results of experiments at hadron colliders probing the structure of the pomeron through hard diffraction are reviewed. Some results on deep inelastic diffractive scattering obtained a HERA are also discussed and placed in perspective. By using a properly normalized pomeron flux factor in single diffraction dissociation, as dictated by unitarity, the pomeron emerges as a combination of valence quark and gluon color singlets in a ratio suggested by asymptopia.

  19. Position-sensitive diffractive imaging in STEM by an automated chaining diffraction algorithm.

    PubMed

    Volkov, V V; Wall, J; Zhu, Y

    2008-07-01

    The diffractive imaging process used for retrieval of an aberration-free exit-wave function of a complex-valued object is optimized with a newly developed automated chaining diffraction (ACD) algorithm. Our algorithm enables automatic recovery of the amplitude and phase of the complex-valued objects with diffraction-limited resolution, starting from selected-area electron diffraction (SAED) patterns recorded from partially overlapping regions in STEM/CTEM. Based on a 'differential map' (DM) approach, the ACD algorithm meets very general requirements and, similar to 'hybrid input-output' (HIO) algorithm, can be applied to non-periodic, real or complex structures. In contrast to many other algorithms, it is not limited by the object's finite size or tight object support. Wide-field-of-view reconstructions for the complex-object-wave amplitude and phase made with ACD algorithm from SAED patterns down to sub-Angström resolution show the potential of diffractive imaging for quantitative analysis of functional materials at different length scales in terms of absorption and scattering mechanisms. The method can be applied also for imaging magnetic properties of samples by the electron or neutron microscopy and/or imaging of non-periodic objects with X-ray microscopy.

  20. Study of optical Laue diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Chakravarthy, Giridhar E-mail: aloksharan@email.com; Allam, Srinivasa Rao E-mail: aloksharan@email.com; Satyanarayana, S. V. M. E-mail: aloksharan@email.com; Sharan, Alok E-mail: aloksharan@email.com

    2014-10-15

    We present the study of the optical diffraction pattern of one and two-dimensional gratings with defects, designed using desktop pc and printed on OHP sheet using laser printer. Gratings so prepared, using novel low cost technique provides good visual aid in teaching. Diffraction pattern of the monochromatic light (632.8nm) from the grating so designed is similar to that of x-ray diffraction pattern of crystal lattice with point defects in one and two-dimensions. Here both optical and x-ray diffractions are Fraunhofer. The information about the crystalline lattice structure and the defect size can be known.

  1. Electrically-programmable diffraction grating

    DOEpatents

    Ricco, Antonio J.; Butler, Michael A.; Sinclair, Michael B.; Senturia, Stephen D.

    1998-01-01

    An electrically-programmable diffraction grating. The programmable grating includes a substrate having a plurality of electrodes formed thereon and a moveable grating element above each of the electrodes. The grating elements are electrostatically programmable to form a diffraction grating for diffracting an incident beam of light as it is reflected from the upper surfaces of the grating elements. The programmable diffraction grating, formed by a micromachining process, has applications for optical information processing (e.g. optical correlators and computers), for multiplexing and demultiplexing a plurality of light beams of different wavelengths (e.g. for optical fiber communications), and for forming spectrometers (e.g. correlation and scanning spectrometers).

  2. CDF experimental results on diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Gallinaro, Michele; /Rockefeller U.

    2009-04-01

    Experimental results on diffraction from the Fermilab Tevatron collider obtained by the CDF experiment are reviewed and compared. We report on the diffractive structure function obtained from dijet production in the range 0 < Q{sup 2} < 10,000 GeV{sup 2}, and on the |t| distribution in the region 0 < |t| < 1 GeV{sup 2} for both soft and hard diffractive events up to Q{sup 2} {approx} 4,500 GeV{sup 2}. Results on single diffractive W/Z production, forward jets, and central exclusive production of both dijets and diphotons are also presented.

  3. Ultrafast electron diffraction from laser-aligned molecules in the gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jie

    Ultrafast electron diffraction has emerged since the end of last century, and has become an increasingly important tool for revealing great details of molecular dynamics. In comparison to spectroscopic techniques, ultrafast electron diffraction directly probes time-resolved structure of target molecules, and therefore can potentially provide "molecular movies" of the reactions being studied. These molecular movies are critical for understanding and ultimately controlling the energy conversion pathways and efficiencies of photochemical processes. In this dissertation, I have focused on ultrafast electron diffraction from gas-phase molecules, and have investigated several long-standing challenges that have been preventing researchers from being able to achieve 3-D molecular movies of photochemical reactions. The first challenge is to resolve the full 3-D structure for molecules in the gas phase. The random orientation of molecules in the gas phase smears out the diffraction signal, which results in only 1-D structural information being accessible. The second challenge lies in temporal resolution. In order to resolve coherent nuclear motions on their natural time scale, a temporal resolution of ˜200 femtosecond or better is required. However, due to experimental limitations the shortest temporal resolution that had been achieved was only a few picoseconds in early 2000, by Zewail group from Caltech. The first challenge is tackled by laser-alignment. In the first half of the dissertation, I approach this method both theoretically and experimentally, and demonstrate that by using a short laser pulse to transiently align target molecules in space, 3-D molecular structure can be reconstructed ab-initio from diffraction patterns. The second half of the dissertation presents two experiments, both of which are important steps toward imaging coherent nuclear motions in real time during photochemical reactions. The first experiment simultaneously resolves molecular alignment

  4. The structure of tellurite glass: A combined NMR, neutron diffraction, and x-ray diffraction study

    SciTech Connect

    McLaughlin, J. C.; Tagg, S. L.; Zwanzier, J. W.; Shastri, S. D.; Haeffner, D. R.

    2000-04-04

    Models are presented of sodium tellurite glasses in the composition range (Na{sub 2}0){sub x}-(TeO{sub 2}){sub 1{minus}x}. 0.1 < x < 0.3. The models combine self-consistently data from three different and complementary sources: sodium-23 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), neutron diffraction, and x-ray diffraction. The models were generated using the Reverse Monte Carlo algorithm, modified to include NMR data in addition to diffraction data. The presence in the models of all five tellurite polyhedra consistent with the Te{sup +4} oxidation state were found to be necessary to achieve agreement with the data. The distribution of polyhedra among these types varied from a predominance of highly bridged species at low sodium content, to polyhedra with one or zero bridging oxygen at high sodium content. The models indicate that the sodium cations themselves form sodium oxide clusters particularly at the x = 0.2 composition.

  5. Acousto-optic Bragg diffraction in paratellurite by the sidelobes of the spatial radiation spectrum of an acoustic transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotov, V. M.

    2016-09-01

    Acousto-optic Bragg diffraction in paratellurite is investigated within the two first diffraction orders for the case of diffraction by the sidelobes of the spatial radiation spectrum of an acoustic transducer. One of the diffraction orders is due to anisotropic diffraction, and the other, to isotropic diffraction. Such a diffraction regime is achieved when the diffraction plane is inclined toward the optical axis of the crystal. For light with a wavelength of 0.63 × 10-4 cm diffracted by a "slow" sound wave with a frequency of 26 MHz, the effect manifests itself when the angle between the acousto-optic diffraction plane and the optical axis of paratellurite is ~3°. The effect is experimentally verified. The diffraction efficiency is 20% for each of the diffraction orders for a microwave signal of 8 V at the transducer.

  6. Whole-cell phase contrast imaging at the nanoscale using Fresnel Coherent Diffractive Imaging Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Michael W. M.; van Riessen, Grant A.; Abbey, Brian; Putkunz, Corey T.; Junker, Mark D.; Balaur, Eugeniu; Vine, David J.; McNulty, Ian; Chen, Bo; Arhatari, Benedicta D.; Frankland, Sarah; Nugent, Keith A.; Tilley, Leann; Peele, Andrew G.

    2013-07-01

    X-ray tomography can provide structural information of whole cells in close to their native state. Radiation-induced damage, however, imposes a practical limit to image resolution, and as such, a choice between damage, image contrast, and image resolution must be made. New coherent diffractive imaging techniques, such Fresnel Coherent Diffractive Imaging (FCDI), allows quantitative phase information with exceptional dose efficiency, high contrast, and nano-scale resolution. Here we present three-dimensional quantitative images of a whole eukaryotic cell by FCDI at a spatial resolution below 70 nm with sufficient phase contrast to distinguish major cellular components. From our data, we estimate that the minimum dose required for a similar resolution is close to that predicted by the Rose criterion, considerably below accepted estimates of the maximum dose a frozen-hydrated cell can tolerate. Based on the dose efficiency, contrast, and resolution achieved, we expect this technique will find immediate applications in tomographic cellular characterisation.

  7. Digital electron diffraction – seeing the whole picture

    SciTech Connect

    Beanland, Richard; Thomas, Paul J.; Woodward, David I.; Thomas, Pamela A.; Roemer, Rudolf A.

    2013-07-01

    Computer control of beam tilt and image capture allows the collection of electron diffraction patterns over a large angular range, without any overlap in diffraction data and from a region limited only by the size of the electron beam. This results in a significant improvement in data volumes and ease of interpretation. The advantages of convergent-beam electron diffraction for symmetry determination at the scale of a few nm are well known. In practice, the approach is often limited due to the restriction on the angular range of the electron beam imposed by the small Bragg angle for high-energy electron diffraction, i.e. a large convergence angle of the incident beam results in overlapping information in the diffraction pattern. Techniques have been generally available since the 1980s which overcome this restriction for individual diffracted beams, by making a compromise between illuminated area and beam convergence. Here a simple technique is described which overcomes all of these problems using computer control, giving electron diffraction data over a large angular range for many diffracted beams from the volume given by a focused electron beam (typically a few nm or less). The increase in the amount of information significantly improves the ease of interpretation and widens the applicability of the technique, particularly for thin materials or those with larger lattice parameters.

  8. Diffraction Techniques for Nonlamellar Phases of Phospholipids

    SciTech Connect

    Ding,L.; Liu, W.; Wang, W.; Glinka, C.; Worchester, D.; Yang, L.; Huang, H.

    2004-01-01

    A neutron diffraction method applicable to nonlamellar phases of substrate-supported lipid membranes is described and validated. When prepared on a flat substrate, the resulting nonlamellar phases have layered symmetry which provides some advantages over powder diffraction for detailed structure determination. This approach recently led to the detection of a rhombohedral phase and a distorted hexagonal phase of lipids. Here the determination of intensity and phase information for such phases is demonstrated by application to the hexagonal phase of diphytanoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPhPC). The hexagonal symmetry is used to verify the data reduction procedure for the intensities of the diffraction peaks. Diffraction intensities measured while varying the D2O/H2O ratio in the relative humidity was used to solve the phase problem. The neutron scattering length density distribution of the hexagonal phase was constructed and analyzed to elucidate the packing of the lipid molecules. The structure of DPhPC in the hexagonal phase is of interest in connection with its stalk structure in the rhombohedral phase. We also found that the incorporation of tetradecane into the DPhPC hexagonal phase is limited, similar to the case for dioleoyl phosphatidylethanolamine.

  9. Atoms in parallel fields: Analysis with diffractive periodic orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen, S. M.; Monteiro, T. S.; Dando, P. A.

    2000-11-01

    We show that fluctuations in the density of states of nonhydrogenic atoms in parallel fields are strongly influenced by diffractive periodic orbits. Unlike typical systems with a diffractive point scatterer, the atomic core of small atoms like lithium and helium is best understood as a combined geometric and diffractive scatterer. Each Gutzwiller (geometric) periodic orbit is paired with a diffractive orbit of the same action. We investigate, particularly, amplitudes for contributions from repetitions, and multiple scattering orbits. We find that periodic orbit repetitions are described by ``hybrid'' orbits, combining both diffractive and geometric core scatters, and that by including all possible permutations we can obtain excellent agreement between the semiclassical model and accurate fully quantal calculations. For high repetitions, we find even one-scatter diffractive contributions become of the same order as those of the geometric periodic orbit for repetition numbers n~ħ-1/2. Although the contribution of individual diffractive orbits is suppressed by O(ħ1/2) relative to the geometric periodic orbits, the proliferation of diffractive orbits with increasing period means that the diffractive effect for the atom can persist in the ħ-->0 limit.

  10. Computer Simulation of Diffraction Patterns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodd, N. A.

    1983-01-01

    Describes an Apple computer program (listing available from author) which simulates Fraunhofer and Fresnel diffraction using vector addition techniques (vector chaining) and allows user to experiment with different shaped multiple apertures. Graphics output include vector resultants, phase difference, diffraction patterns, and the Cornu spiral…

  11. Ptychographic Fresnel coherent diffractive imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vine, D. J.; Williams, G. J.; Abbey, B.; Pfeifer, M. A.; Clark, J. N.; de Jonge, M. D.; McNulty, I.; Peele, A. G.; Nugent, K. A.

    2009-12-01

    This paper reports improved reconstruction of complex wave fields from extended objects. The combination of ptychography with Fresnel diffractive imaging results in better reconstructions with fewer iterations required to convergence than either method considered separately. The method is applied to retrieve the projected thickness of a gold microstructure and comparative results using ptychography and Fresnel diffractive imaging are presented.

  12. Future of Electron Scattering and Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, Ernest; Stemmer, Susanne; Zheng, Haimei; Zhu, Yimei; Maracas, George

    2014-02-25

    spectroscopy with high spatial resolution without damaging their structure. The strong interaction of electrons with matter allows high-energy electron pulses to gather structural information before a sample is damaged. Electron ScatteringImaging, diffraction, and spectroscopy are the fundamental capabilities of electron-scattering instruments. The DOE BES-funded TEAM (Transmission Electron Aberration-corrected Microscope) project achieved unprecedented sub-atomic spatial resolution in imaging through aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy. To further advance electron scattering techniques that directly enable groundbreaking science, instrumentation must advance beyond traditional two-dimensional imaging. Advances in temporal resolution, recording the full phase and energy spaces, and improved spatial resolution constitute a new frontier in electron microscopy, and will directly address the BES Grand Challenges, such as to “control the emergent properties that arise from the complex correlations of atomic and electronic constituents” and the “hidden states” “very far away from equilibrium”. Ultrafast methods, such as the pump-probe approach, enable pathways toward understanding, and ultimately controlling, the chemical dynamics of molecular systems and the evolution of complexity in mesoscale and nanoscale systems. Central to understanding how to synthesize and exploit functional materials is having the ability to apply external stimuli (such as heat, light, a reactive flux, and an electrical bias) and to observe the resulting dynamic process in situ and in operando, and under the appropriate environment (e.g., not limited to UHV conditions). To enable revolutionary advances in electron scattering and science, the participants of the workshop recommended three major new instrumental developments: A. Atomic-Resolution Multi-Dimensional Transmission Electron Microscope: This instrument would provide quantitative information over the entire real space

  13. Phase-shifting point-diffraction interferometry at EUV wavelengths

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, K.A.; Tejnil, E.; Sang Lee

    1997-04-01

    A novel phase-shifting point-diffraction interferometer (PS/PDI) operating at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) is being used to perform wavefront-measuring metrology at 13.4-nm wavelength to characterize aberrations in a multilayer-coated 10x Schwarzschild objective designed for extreme ultraviolet (EUV) projection lithography experiments. To achieve 0.1-micron critical dimension pattern transfer with EUV projection lithography at 13.4-nm wavelength, nearly diffraction-limited all-reflective multilayer-coated optical systems with 0.1 numerical aperture are required. The EUV wavefront, determined by the mirror surfaces and the reflective multilayer coatings, is measurable only at the operational wavelength of the system. The authors goal is to measure the EUV wavefront to an accuracy of 0.01 waves rms (0.13 nm). The PS/PDI is a type of point-diffraction interferometer, modified for significantly improved throughput and phase-shifting capability. The interferometer design utilizes a grating beamsplitter and pinhole spatial filters in the object and image planes of the optical system under test. The 10x-reduction Schwarzschild objective, with image-side numerical aperture of 0.08, is illuminated by a sub-micron pinhole in the object plane. A coarse, 20-micron pitch grating placed between the illumination pinhole and the Schwarzschild system serves a dual role as a small-angle beam-splitter and a phase-shifting element. The first-order diffracted beam from the grating is spatially filtered in the image plane of the Schwarzschild with a sub-100-nm pinhole and becomes the `D reference` wave in the interferometer. The zero-order beam is the `test` wave, and it passes unobstructed through a 4.5-{mu}m window in the image plane. The test and reference beams are separated by several microns in the image plane to minimize beam overlap. The interference fringes are recorded with a CCD detector placed about 12 cm from the Schwarzschild image plane.

  14. k-Microscopy: resolution beyond the diffraction limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geissbuehler, Matthias; Lasser, Theo; Leitgeb, Rainer A.

    2008-02-01

    We present a novel Fourier domain method for microscopic imaging - so-called k-microscopy - with lateral resolution independent of the detection numerical aperture. The concept is based on sample illumination by a lateral fringe-pattern of varying spatial frequency, which probes the lateral spatial frequency or k- spectrum of the sample structure. The illumination pattern is realized by interference of two collimated coherent beams. Wavelength tuning is employed for modulation of the fringe spacing. The uniqueness of the proposed system is that a single point detector is sufficient to collect the total light corresponding to a particular position in the sample k-space. By shifting the phase of the interference pattern, we get full access to the complex frequencies. An inverse Fourier transformation of the acquired band in the frequency- or k-space will reconstruct the sample. The resulting lateral resolution will be defined by the temporal coherence length associated with the detected light source spectrum as well as by the illumination angle. The feasibility of the concept has been demonstrated in 1D.

  15. Electromagnetic diffraction efficiencies for plane reflection diffraction gratings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marathay, A. S.; Shrode, T. E.

    1973-01-01

    Results are presented of research activities on holographic grating research. A large portion of this work was performed using rigorous vector diffraction theory, therefore, the necessary theory has been included in this report. The diffraction efficiency studies were continued using programs based on a rigorous theory. The simultaneous occurrence of high diffraction efficiencies and the phenomenon of double Wood's anomalies is demonstrated along with a graphic method for determining the necessary grating parameters. Also, an analytical solution for a grating profile that is perfectly blazed is obtained. The performance of the perfectly blazed grating profile is shown to be significantly better than grating profiles previously studied. Finally, a proposed method is described for the analysis of coarse echelle gratings using rigorous vector diffraction that is currently being developed.

  16. Diffraction techniques in engineering applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kozarczek, K.J.; Hubbard, C.R.; Watkins, T.R.; Wang, X.L.; Spooner, S.

    1995-12-31

    Diffraction techniques applied to crystalline materials provide quantitative information about the crystallographic structure and mechanical condition of the material. Those two characteristics influence the chemical, physical, and mechanical properties of a Component. A concerted application of x-ray and neutron diffraction allows one to comprehensively study the bulk and subsurface variations of such material characteristics as crystallographic texture, residual stress, and cold work. The Residual Stress User Center at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory offers academic and industrial researchers both neutron and x-ray diffraction capabilities. Recent examples of the application of work related to thin film, metal, ceramic and composite material technologies are presented.

  17. Diffraction effects in freeform optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricketts, Melissa N.; Winston, Roland; Oliker, Vladimir

    2015-08-01

    Freeform optics is a relatively new field; it uses the methods necessary to describe surfaces lacking symmetry, and/or surfaces that create non-symmetrical irradiance distributions. The Supporting Quadrics Method (SQM) developed by Oliker is a superb for generating any desired irradiance distribution. The SQM uses an envelope of quadrics to create prescribed irradiance distributions. These optical systems are tested in ray trace software, where diffraction effects are not taken into account. It is important to understand the diffraction effects present in an optic, when moving from the ray trace stage to the prototype stage. Here we study the diffraction effects of Supporting Quadrics Method.

  18. Diffractive optics in adverse environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behrmann, Gregory P.

    1993-01-01

    An investigation at the Army Research Laboratory is in progress to characterize DOE performance in mil-spec environments. One of the most significant environmental influences is temperature. An analysis of a diffractive lens is presented in which optical performance is described as a function of temperature. In particular, we review the thermal dependence of focal length and diffraction efficiency. It is shown that the change in these parameters is independent of lens shape and relates only to material properties. Thermalized hybrid refractive/diffractive designs are discussed.

  19. Flat liquid crystal diffractive lenses with variable focus and magnification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valley, Pouria

    Non-mechanical variable lenses are important for creating compact imaging devices. Various methods employing dielectrically actuated lenses, membrane lenses, and liquid crystal lenses were previously proposed [1-4]. In This dissertation the design, fabrication, and characterization of innovative flat tunable-focus liquid crystal diffractive lenses (LCDL) are presented. LCDL employ binary Fresnel zone electrodes fabricated on Indium-Tin-Oxide using conventional micro-photolithography. The light phase can be adjusted by varying the effective refractive index of a nematic liquid crystal sandwiched between the electrodes and a reference substrate. Using a proper voltage distribution across various electrodes the focal length can be changed between several discrete values. Electrodes are shunted such that the correct phase retardation step sequence is achieved. If the number of 2pi zone boundaries is increased by a factor of m the focal length is changed from f to f/m based on the digitized Fresnel zone equation: f = rm2/2mlambda, where r m is mth zone radius, and lambda is the wavelength. The chromatic aberration of the diffractive lens is addressed and corrected by adding a variable fluidic lens. These LCDL operate at very low voltage levels (+/-2.5V ac input), exhibit fast switching times (20-150 ms), can have large apertures (>10 mm), and small form factor, and are robust and insensitive to vibrations, gravity, and capillary effects that limit membrane and dielectrically actuated lenses. Several tests were performed on the LCDL including diffraction efficiency measurement, switching dynamics, and hybrid imaging with a refractive lens. Negative focal lengths are achieved by adjusting the voltages across electrodes. Using these lenses in combination, magnification can be changed and zoom lenses can be formed. These characteristics make LCDL a good candidate for a variety of applications including auto-focus and zoom lenses in compact imaging devices such as camera

  20. Recovering magnetization distributions from their noisy diffraction data

    SciTech Connect

    Loh, Ne-Te Duane; Eisebitt, Stefan; Flewett, Samuel; Elser, Veit

    2010-12-15

    We study, using simulated experiments inspired by thin-film magnetic domain patterns, the feasibility of phase retrieval in x-ray diffractive imaging in the presence of intrinsic charge scattering given only photon-shot-noise limited diffraction data. We detail a reconstruction algorithm to recover the sample's magnetization distribution under such conditions and compare its performance with that of Fourier transform holography. Concerning the design of future experiments, we also chart out the reconstruction limits of diffractive imaging when photon-shot-noise and the intensity of charge scattering noise are independently varied. This work is directly relevant to the time-resolved imaging of magnetic dynamics using coherent and ultrafast radiation from x-ray free-electron lasers and also to broader classes of diffractive imaging experiments which suffer noisy data, missing data, or both.

  1. Spectrometer design approaching the limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riesenberg, Rainer; Wuttig, Andreas; Peschel, Thomas; Damm, Christoph; Dobschal, Hans-Jürgen

    2008-09-01

    The design limits of grating array spectral sensors are discussed. The limit of a grating spectrometer with respect to the resolution is given by the diffraction limit of the grating. To approach the limit for the visible spectral region the entrance slits should reach a width of 2 μm and larger depending on wavelength and numerical aperture. The detector pixel sizes should be in the same range, which is achieved virtually by the discussed double array arrangement with a transmissive, static slit array and detector array. A number of techniques are applied for optimizing the performance as well as for miniaturization. A sub-pixel imaging including a sub-pixel analysis based on the double array arrangement virtually reduces the detector pixel sizes down to about 20%. To avoid the imaging aberrations the spectra is imaged from different entrance positions by the entrance slit array. The throughput can be increased by using a two dimensional entrance slit array, which includes a multiplex pattern or a fixed adaptive pattern. The design example of a UV-Raman spectral sensor is presented including spectral measurements.

  2. Electrically-programmable diffraction grating

    DOEpatents

    Ricco, A.J.; Butler, M.A.; Sinclair, M.B.; Senturia, S.D.

    1998-05-26

    An electrically-programmable diffraction grating is disclosed. The programmable grating includes a substrate having a plurality of electrodes formed thereon and a moveable grating element above each of the electrodes. The grating elements are electrostatically programmable to form a diffraction grating for diffracting an incident beam of light as it is reflected from the upper surfaces of the grating elements. The programmable diffraction grating, formed by a micromachining process, has applications for optical information processing (e.g. optical correlators and computers), for multiplexing and demultiplexing a plurality of light beams of different wavelengths (e.g. for optical fiber communications), and for forming spectrometers (e.g. correlation and scanning spectrometers). 14 figs.

  3. Diffraction by random Ronchi gratings.

    PubMed

    Torcal-Milla, Francisco Jose; Sanchez-Brea, Luis Miguel

    2016-08-01

    In this work, we obtain analytical expressions for the near-and far-field diffraction of random Ronchi diffraction gratings where the slits of the grating are randomly displaced around their periodical positions. We theoretically show that the effect of randomness in the position of the slits of the grating produces a decrease of the contrast and even disappearance of the self-images for high randomness level at the near field. On the other hand, it cancels high-order harmonics in far field, resulting in only a few central diffraction orders. Numerical simulations by means of the Rayleigh-Sommerfeld diffraction formula are performed in order to corroborate the analytical results. These results are of interest for industrial and technological applications where manufacture errors need to be considered.

  4. Diffraction by random Ronchi gratings.

    PubMed

    Torcal-Milla, Francisco Jose; Sanchez-Brea, Luis Miguel

    2016-08-01

    In this work, we obtain analytical expressions for the near-and far-field diffraction of random Ronchi diffraction gratings where the slits of the grating are randomly displaced around their periodical positions. We theoretically show that the effect of randomness in the position of the slits of the grating produces a decrease of the contrast and even disappearance of the self-images for high randomness level at the near field. On the other hand, it cancels high-order harmonics in far field, resulting in only a few central diffraction orders. Numerical simulations by means of the Rayleigh-Sommerfeld diffraction formula are performed in order to corroborate the analytical results. These results are of interest for industrial and technological applications where manufacture errors need to be considered. PMID:27505363

  5. Ultrafast Coherent Diffractive Imaging at FLASH

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, H N

    2006-11-29

    Using the FLASH facility we have demonstrated high-resolution coherent diffractive imaging with single soft-X-ray free-electron laser pulses [1]. The intense focused FEL pulse gives a high resolution low-noise coherent diffraction pattern of an object before that object turns into a plasma and explodes. Our experiments are an important milestone in the development of single-particle diffractive imaging with future X-ray free-electron lasers [2, 3]. Our apparatus provides a new and unique tool at FLASH to perform imaging of biological specimens beyond conventional radiation damage resolution limits [2, 4] and to acquire images of ultrafast processes initiated by an FEL pulse or other laser pulse. Coherent diffractive imaging is an ideal method for high-resolution ultrafast imaging with an FEL. Since no optical element is required, the method can in principle be scaled to atomic resolution with short enough wavelength. Spatial and temporal coherence are necessary to ensure that the scattered light waves from all positions across the sample are correlated when they interfere at the detector, giving rise to a coherent diffraction pattern that can be phased and inverted to give a high-resolution image of the sample. In contrast to crystals, where scattering from the many unit cells constructively interfere to give Bragg spots, the coherent diffraction pattern of a non-periodic object is continuous. Such a coherent diffraction pattern contains as much as twice the information content of the pattern of its crystallized periodic counterpart--exactly the amount of information needed to solve the phase problem and deterministically invert the pattern to yield an image of the object [5, 6]. The computer algorithm that performs this function replaces the analogue computations of a lens: summing the complex-valued amplitudes of scattered waves to form an image at a particular plane. Our experimental geometry is shown in Fig. 1. We focus a coherent X-ray pulse from the FLASH

  6. New CDF results on diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Mesropian, Christina; /Rockefeller U.

    2006-12-01

    We report new diffraction results obtained by the CDF collaboration in proton-antiproton collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron collider at {radical}s=1.96 TeV. The first experimental evidence of exclusive dijet and diphoton production is presented. The exclusive results are discussed in context of the exclusive Higgs production at LHC. We also present the measurement of the Q{sup 2} and t dependence of the diffractive structure function.

  7. Anomalous behaviors of the Fraunhofer diffraction patterns for a class of partially coherent light.

    PubMed

    Pu, Jixiong; Nemoto, Shojiro

    2003-02-24

    In this paper, we investigate the Fraunhofer diffraction of a class of partially coherent light diffracted by a circular aperture. It is shown that by the illumination of partially coherent light of the special spatial correlation function, the anomalous behaviors of the diffraction patterns are found. We find that the decrease of the spatial coherence of the light in the aperture leads to the drastic changes of the diffraction pattern. Specifically, when the light in the aperture is fully coherent, the diffraction pattern is just an Airy disc. However, as the coherence decreases, the diffraction pattern becomes an annulus, and the radius of the annulus increases with the decrease of the coherence. Flattened annuli can be achieved, when the parameters characterizing the correlation of the partially coherent light are chosen with suitable values. Potential applications of modulating the coherence to achieve desired diffraction patterns are discussed.

  8. Theory of time-resolved inelastic x-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenz, Ulf; Moeller, Klaus B.; Henriksen, Niels E.

    2010-02-15

    Starting from a general theory of time-resolved x-ray scattering, we derive a convenient expression for the diffraction signal based on a careful analysis of the relevant inelastic scattering processes. We demonstrate that the resulting inelastic limit applies to a wider variety of experimental conditions than similar, previously derived formulas, and it directly allows the application of selection rules when interpreting diffraction signals. Furthermore, we present a simple extension to systems simultaneously illuminated by x rays and a laser beam.

  9. Acoustic Pulse Diffraction by Curved and Planar Structures with Edges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qin

    1990-01-01

    Efficient and accurate solutions of acoustic wave diffraction by a rigid step discontinuity and a curved half-plane are derived by the uniform geometrical theory of diffraction. These solutions can be used in seismic data processing to evaluate and, eventually, to improve the existing data processing procedures. They can also find applications in electromagnetics, microwave antenna design, acoustic design and sound engineering. The rigid step discontinuity solution given in this thesis is more accurate than the existing solutions which are based on Kirchhoff theory of diffraction. This solution removes the previous restriction on the source and the receiver arrangement. It also provides high efficiency by the use of ray theory. This solution is further generalized to two offset half-planes and an inclined wedge. Solutions for more complicated structures can be obtained by superposition of these solutions with added interactions. The complex source position method is used to extend the omnidirectional point source solution to a beam source solution. The effect of changes of the directivity and orientation of the beam source is studied. Time-domain single and double diffraction coefficients are determined through direct Fourier transforming and convolution. An infinite impulse response filter is applied to the time-domain direct computation of single diffraction. This combination achieves a total saving of 75% of computing time over the frequency-domain approach. Diffraction by a curved half-plane is analyzed with the inclusion of creeping wave diffraction and second order edge diffraction. An acoustic model of a curved half-plane is designed to verify the theory. The experimental results obtained by Mellema have verified the existence of the creeping wave diffraction and weak traces of the second order edge diffraction.

  10. Atomic Resolution Coherent Diffractive Imaging and Ultrafast Science

    SciTech Connect

    Zuo, Jian-min

    2011-01-12

    A major scientific challenge is determining the 3-D atomic structure of small nanostructures, including single molecules. Coherent diffractive imaging (CDI) is a promising approach. Recent progress has demonstrated coherent diffraction patterns can be recorded from individual nanostructures and phased to reconstruct their structure. However, overcoming the dose limit imposed by radiation damage is a major obstacle toward the full potential of CDI. One approach is to use ultrafast x-ray or electron pulses. In electron diffraction, amplitudes recorded in a diffraction pattern are unperturbed by lens aberrations, defocus, and other microscope resolution-limiting factors. Sub-A signals are available beyond the information limit of direct imaging. Significant contrast improvement is obtained compared to high-resolution electron micrographs. progress has also been made in developing time-resolved electron diffraction and imaging for the study of ultrafast dynamic processes in materials. This talk will cover these crosscutting issues and the convergence of electron and x-ray diffraction techniques toward structure determination of single molecules.

  11. Enhanced high-speed coherent diffraction imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potier, Jonathan; Fricker, Sebastien; Idir, Mourad

    2011-03-01

    Due to recent advances in X-ray microscopy, we are now able to image objects with nanometer resolution thanks to Synchrotron beam lines or Free Electron Lasers (FEL). The PCI (Phase Contrast Imaging) is a robust technique that can recover the wavefront from measurements of only few intensity pictures in the Fresnel diffraction region. With our fast straightforward calculus methods, we manage to provide the phase induced by a microscopic specimen in few seconds. We can therefore obtain high contrasted images from transparent materials at very small scales. To reach atomic resolution imaging and thus make a transition from the near to the far field, the Coherent Diffraction Imaging (CDI) technique finds its roots in the analysis of diffraction patterns to obtain the phase of the altered complex wave. Theoretical results about existence and uniqueness of this retrieved piece of information by both iterative and direct algorithms have already been released. However, performances of algorithms remain limited by the coherence of the X-ray beam, presence of random noise and the saturation threshold of the detector. We will present reconstructions of samples using an enhanced version of HIO algorithm improving the speed of convergence and its repeatability. As a first step toward a practical X-Ray CDI system, initial images for reconstructions are acquired with the laser-based CDI system working in the visible spectrum.

  12. When holography meets coherent diffraction imaging.

    PubMed

    Latychevskaia, Tatiana; Longchamp, Jean-Nicolas; Fink, Hans-Werner

    2012-12-17

    The phase problem is inherent to crystallographic, astronomical and optical imaging where only the intensity of the scattered signal is detected and the phase information is lost and must somehow be recovered to reconstruct the object's structure. Modern imaging techniques at the molecular scale rely on utilizing novel coherent light sources like X-ray free electron lasers for the ultimate goal of visualizing such objects as individual biomolecules rather than crystals. Here, unlike in the case of crystals where structures can be solved by model building and phase refinement, the phase distribution of the wave scattered by an individual molecule must directly be recovered. There are two well-known solutions to the phase problem: holography and coherent diffraction imaging (CDI). Both techniques have their pros and cons. In holography, the reconstruction of the scattered complex-valued object wave is directly provided by a well-defined reference wave that must cover the entire detector area which often is an experimental challenge. CDI provides the highest possible, only wavelength limited, resolution, but the phase recovery is an iterative process which requires some pre-defined information about the object and whose outcome is not always uniquely-defined. Moreover, the diffraction patterns must be recorded under oversampling conditions, a pre-requisite to be able to solve the phase problem. Here, we report how holography and CDI can be merged into one superior technique: holographic coherent diffraction imaging (HCDI). An inline hologram can be recorded by employing a modified CDI experimental scheme. We demonstrate that the amplitude of the Fourier transform of an inline hologram is related to the complex-valued visibility, thus providing information on both, the amplitude and the phase of the scattered wave in the plane of the diffraction pattern. With the phase information available, the condition of oversampling the diffraction patterns can be relaxed, and the

  13. When holography meets coherent diffraction imaging.

    PubMed

    Latychevskaia, Tatiana; Longchamp, Jean-Nicolas; Fink, Hans-Werner

    2012-12-17

    The phase problem is inherent to crystallographic, astronomical and optical imaging where only the intensity of the scattered signal is detected and the phase information is lost and must somehow be recovered to reconstruct the object's structure. Modern imaging techniques at the molecular scale rely on utilizing novel coherent light sources like X-ray free electron lasers for the ultimate goal of visualizing such objects as individual biomolecules rather than crystals. Here, unlike in the case of crystals where structures can be solved by model building and phase refinement, the phase distribution of the wave scattered by an individual molecule must directly be recovered. There are two well-known solutions to the phase problem: holography and coherent diffraction imaging (CDI). Both techniques have their pros and cons. In holography, the reconstruction of the scattered complex-valued object wave is directly provided by a well-defined reference wave that must cover the entire detector area which often is an experimental challenge. CDI provides the highest possible, only wavelength limited, resolution, but the phase recovery is an iterative process which requires some pre-defined information about the object and whose outcome is not always uniquely-defined. Moreover, the diffraction patterns must be recorded under oversampling conditions, a pre-requisite to be able to solve the phase problem. Here, we report how holography and CDI can be merged into one superior technique: holographic coherent diffraction imaging (HCDI). An inline hologram can be recorded by employing a modified CDI experimental scheme. We demonstrate that the amplitude of the Fourier transform of an inline hologram is related to the complex-valued visibility, thus providing information on both, the amplitude and the phase of the scattered wave in the plane of the diffraction pattern. With the phase information available, the condition of oversampling the diffraction patterns can be relaxed, and the

  14. Diffraction described by virtual particle momentum exchange: the "diffraction force"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mobley, Michael J.

    2011-09-01

    Particle diffraction can be described by an ensemble of particle paths determined through a Fourier analysis of a scattering lattice where the momentum exchange probabilities are defined at the location of scattering, not the point of detection. This description is compatible with optical wave theories and quantum particle models and provides deeper insights to the nature of quantum uncertainty. In this paper the Rayleigh-Sommerfeld and Fresnel-Kirchoff theories are analyzed for diffraction by a narrow slit and a straight edge to demonstrate the dependence of particle scattering on the distance of virtual particle exchange. The quantized momentum exchange is defined by the Heisenberg uncertainty principle and is consistent with the formalism of QED. This exchange of momentum manifests the "diffraction force" that appears to be a universal construct as it applies to neutral and charged particles. This analysis indicates virtual particles might form an exchange channel that bridges the space of momentum exchange.

  15. Compact high-resolution Littrow conical diffraction spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qinghua

    2016-06-20

    This paper presents a compact high-resolution Littrow conical diffraction spectrometer (LCDS) that includes an echelle grating for horizontally dispersing the incident light beam into several high diffraction orders, a prism for vertically separating the overlapping diffraction orders, and a shared focusing lens used for both the incident and dispersed beams. The unique design of the optics enables the LCDS to give high dispersion on the detector without requiring a large field of view and, therefore, to achieve the benefits of high spectral resolution and compactness. The use of the Littrow conical diffraction coupled with the shared focusing lens makes the LCDS more compact. The formulas of the footprint of the dispersed spectra are derived, and the numerical simulation is given. The design calculations for application of the LCDS to an optical coherence tomography system are illustrated by an example.

  16. Synchrotron energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, C.; Barnes, P.; Cockcroft, J. K.; Colston, S. L.; Häusermann, D.; Jacques, S. D. M.; Jupe, A. C.; Kunz, M.

    1998-04-01

    Energy-dispersive diffraction tomography using white-beam synchrotron X-rays with energies up to 140 keV yields images of the interior features of solid objects up to 50 mm thick. The volume sampled is determined by the geometry of the diffracting lozenge defined by the incident beam, the detector system collimation and the Bragg angle. Using conventional beam slits to form a highly collimated 50 μm × 50 μm incident beam and a 40 μm collimator aperture, we demonstrate on a PEEK phantom that a lateral resolution (transverse to the beam direction) of a few microns can be achieved. The resolution in the direction of the incident beam is necessarily poorer than this since the diffracting lozenge is elongated in this direction, with length increasing rapidly at small angles. There is no evidence of significant contamination of the diffracted intensity by the effects of multiple scattering from outside the primary lozenge.

  17. Scalar wave diffraction from a circular aperture

    SciTech Connect

    Cerjan, C.

    1995-01-25

    The scalar wave theory is used to evaluate the expected diffraction patterns from a circular aperture. The standard far-field Kirchhoff approximation is compared to the exact result expressed in terms of oblate spheroidal harmonics. Deviations from an expanding spherical wave are calculated for circular aperture radius and the incident beam wavelength using suggested values for a recently proposed point diffractin interferometer. The Kirchhoff approximation is increasingly reliable in the far-field limit as the aperture radius is increased, although significant errors in amplitude and phase persist.

  18. Sensitive visual test for concave diffraction gratings.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruner, E. C., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    A simple visual test for the evaluation of concave diffraction gratings is described. It is twice as sensitive as the Foucault knife edge test, from which it is derived, and has the advantage that the images are straight and free of astigmatism. It is particularly useful for grating with high ruling frequency where the above image faults limit the utility of the Foucault test. The test can be interpreted quantitatively and can detect zonal grating space errors of as little as 0.1 A.

  19. Electromagnetic diffraction efficiencies for plane reflection diffraction gratings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marathay, A. S.; Shrode, T. E.

    1974-01-01

    The theory and computer programs, based on electromagnetic theory, for the analysis and design of echelle gratings were developed. The gratings are designed for instruments that operate in the ultraviolet portion of the spectrum. The theory was developed so that the resulting computer programs will be able to analyze deep (up to 30 wavelengths) gratings by including as many as 100 real or homogeneous diffraction orders. The program calculates the complex amplitude coefficient for each of the diffracted orders. A check on the numerical method used to solve the integral equations is provided by a conservation of energy calculation.

  20. Single Photon diffraction and interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodge, John

    2015-04-01

    A previous paper based on the Scalar Theory of Everything studied photon diffraction and interference (IntellectualArchive, Vol.1, No. 3, P. 20, Toronto, Canada July 2012. http://intellectualarchive.com/?link=item&id=597). Several photons were required in the experiment at the same time. Interference experiments with one photon in the experiment at a time also showed interference patterns. The previous paper with the Bohm Interpretation, models of the screen and mask, and the Transaction Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics were combined. The reverse wave required by the Transaction Interpretation was provided by a reflected plenum wave rather than a reverse time wave. The speed of the plenum wave was assumed to be much faster than the speed of photons/light. Using the assumptions of Fraunhofer diffraction resulted in the same equation for the photon distribution on a screen as the intensity pattern of the Fraunhofer diffraction. (http://myplace.frontier.com/ ~ jchodge/)

  1. Electron diffraction by plasmon waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García de Abajo, F. J.; Barwick, B.; Carbone, F.

    2016-07-01

    An electron beam traversing a structured plasmonic field is shown to undergo diffraction with characteristic angular patterns of both elastic and inelastic outgoing electron components. In particular, a plasmonic grating (e.g., a standing wave formed by two counterpropagating plasmons in a thin film) produces diffraction orders of the same parity as the net number of exchanged plasmons. Large diffracted beam fractions are predicted to occur for realistic plasmon intensities in attainable geometries due to a combination of phase and amplitude changes locally imprinted on the passing electron wave. Our study opens vistas in the study of multiphoton exchanges between electron beams and evanescent optical fields with unexplored effects related to the transversal component of the electron wave function.

  2. Diffractive optics for compact flat panel displays. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeney, D.; DeLong, K.

    1997-04-29

    Three years ago LLNL developed a practical method to dramatically reduce the chromatic aberration in single element diffractive imaging lenses. High efficiency, achromatic imaging lenses have been fabricated for human vision correction. This LDRD supported research in applying our new methods to develop a unique, diffraction-based optical interface with solid state, microelectronic imaging devices. Advances in microelectronics have led to smaller, more efficient components for optical systems. There have, however, been no equivalent advances in the imaging optics associated with these devices. The goal of this project was to replace the bulky, refractive optics in typical head-mounted displays with micro-thin diffractive optics to directly image flat-panel displays into the eye. To visualize the system think of the lenses of someone`s eyeglasses becoming flat-panel displays. To realize this embodiment, we needed to solve the problems of large chromatic aberrations and low efficiency that are associated with diffraction. We have developed a graceful tradeoff between chromatic aberrations and the diffractive optic thickness. It turns out that by doubling the thickness of a micro-thin diffractive lens we obtain nearly a two-times improvement in chromatic performance. Since the human eye will tolerate one diopter of chromatic aberration, we are able to achieve an achromatic image with a diffractive lens that is only 20 microns thick, versus 3 mm thickness for the comparable refractive lens. Molds for the diffractive lenses are diamond turned with sub-micron accuracy; the final lenses are cast from these molds using various polymers. We thus retain both the micro- thin nature of the diffractive optics and the achromatic image quality of refractive optics. During the first year of funding we successfully extended our earlier technology from 1 cm diameter optics required for vision applications up to the 5 cm diameter optics required for this application. 3 refs., 6 figs.

  3. Boundary diffraction wave integrals for diffraction modeling of external occulters.

    PubMed

    Cady, Eric

    2012-07-01

    An occulter is a large diffracting screen which may be flown in conjunction with a telescope to image extrasolar planets. The edge is shaped to minimize the diffracted light in a region beyond the occulter, and a telescope may be placed in this dark shadow to view an extrasolar system with the starlight removed. Errors in position, orientation, and shape of the occulter will diffract additional light into this region, and a challenge of modeling an occulter system is to accurately and quickly model these effects. We present a fast method for the calculation of electric fields following an occulter, based on the concept of the boundary diffraction wave: the 2D structure of the occulter is reduced to a 1D edge integral which directly incorporates the occulter shape, and which can be easily adjusted to include changes in occulter position and shape, as well as the effects of sources-such as exoplanets-which arrive off-axis to the occulter. The structure of a typical implementation of the algorithm is included. PMID:22772218

  4. Phase-diffractive coating for daylight control on smart window

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perennes, Frederic; Twardowski, Patrice J.; Gesbert, D.; Meyrueis, Patrick

    1992-11-01

    Daylight can be processed by a smart window in a transmission, reflective, refractive, and diffractive mode. In the future an optimization will be realized by a mixing of these approaches depending on the applied cases. Non-imaging diffractive optics has its roots in the work done in holographic diffractive coating for head up displays (HUD) and helmet mounted displays. For having globally good results on smart window with diffractive coating, a very high diffraction efficiency must be reached close to 100% without having a too important lowering of the control of other parameters of the light processed by a smart window (direction and frequency control essentially). We propose a method for designing, realizing, and using diffractive coating for a smart window that is based on a new organic material and diffractive model that were already validated in HUD. Potential low cost is possible for mass production on a large surface with an adapted investment. We describe the present technology and its limits and the ones that can be reached in the future. In this work, we present a holographic way to modify the slant of sun rays through a window, and to filter infrared radiations by using dichromated gelatin material. In this way it would be able to ensure a more uniform lighting and a more pleasant temperature inside buildings or vehicles, without using dye or photochromics glasses.

  5. Beam focusing characteristics of diffractive lenses with binary subwavelength structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Di; Yan, Yingbai; Jin, Guofan; Fan, Shoushan

    2004-09-01

    The diffractive optical elements with binary subwavelength structures have the ability for monolithic integration and can require only single step fabrication, but the subwavelength and aperiodic nature of the diffractive optical elements prevent the use of scalar diffraction theory and the use of coupled-wave theory. To overcome these limitations, we present the rigorous vector analysis and design of diffractive lenses that are finite in extent and have binary subwavelength structures by using a two-dimensional finite-difference time-domain method. By using these effective analysis tools, we analyze the focusing characteristics of continuous profile lenses and binary subwavelength diffractive lenses obtained by generalizing the design approach presented by Farn, for different incidence polarization waves (TE polarization and TM polarization) and for different f-numbers of lenses. The comparative results have shown that the focusing characteristics, including the focal shift, the focal depth, the focal spot size, and the diffractive efficiency, of binary subwavelength diffractive lenses are different from those of continuous profile lenses and are more sensitive to the polarization of incidence wave.

  6. Angle-resolved diffraction grating biosensor based on porous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Changwu; Jia, Zhenhong; Liu, Yajun; Mo, Jiaqing; Li, Peng; Lv, Xiaoyi

    2016-03-01

    In this study, an optical biosensor based on a porous silicon composite structure was fabricated using a simple method. This structure consists of a thin, porous silicon surface diffraction grating and a one-dimensional porous silicon photonic crystal. An angle-resolved diffraction efficiency spectrum was obtained by measuring the diffraction efficiency at a range of incident angles. The angle-resolved diffraction efficiency of the 2nd and 3rd orders was studied experimentally and theoretically. The device was sensitive to the change of refractive index in the presence of a biomolecule indicated by the shift of the diffraction efficiency spectrum. The sensitivity of this sensor was investigated through use of an 8 base pair antifreeze protein DNA hybridization. The shifts of the angle-resolved diffraction efficiency spectrum showed a relationship with the change of the refractive index, and the detection limit of the biosensor reached 41.7 nM. This optical device is highly sensitive, inexpensive, and simple to fabricate. Using shifts in diffraction efficiency spectrum to detect biological molecules has not yet been explored, so this study establishes a foundation for future work.

  7. High-pressure neutron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Hongwu

    2011-01-10

    This lecture will cover progress and prospect of applications of high-pressure neutron diffraction techniques to Earth and materials sciences. I will first introduce general high-pressure research topics and available in-situ high-pressure techniques. Then I'll talk about high-pressure neutron diffraction techniques using two types of pressure cells: fluid-driven and anvil-type cells. Lastly, I will give several case studies using these techniques, particularly, those on hydrogen-bearing materials and magnetic transitions.

  8. Diffraction encoded position measuring apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Tansey, R.J.

    1991-09-24

    When a lightwave passes through a transmission grating, diffracted beams appear at the output or opposite side of the grating that are effectively Doppler shifted in frequency (phase) whereby a detector system can compare the phase of the zero order and higher order beams to obtain an indication of position. Multiple passes through the grating increase resolution for a given wavelength of a laser signal. The resolution can be improved further by using a smaller wavelength laser to generate the grating itself. Since the grating must only have a pitch sufficient to produce diffracted orders, inexpensive, ultraviolet wavelength lasers can be utilized and still obtain high resolution detection. 3 figures.

  9. Diffraction encoded position measuring apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Tansey, Richard J.

    1991-01-01

    When a lightwave passes through a transmission grating, diffracted beams appear at the output or opposite side of the grating that are effectively Doppler shifted in frequency (phase) whereby a detector system can compare the phase of the zero order and higher order beams to obtain an indication of position. Multiple passes through the grating increase resolution for a given wavelength of a laser signal. The resolution can be improved further by using a smaller wavelength laser to generate the grating itself. Since the grating must only have a pitch sufficient to produce diffracted orders, inexpensive, ultraviolet wavelength lasers can be utilized and still obtain high resolution detection.

  10. Tilted femtosecond pulses for velocity matching in gas-phase ultrafast electron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ping; Yang, Jie; Centurion, Martin

    2014-08-01

    Recent advances in pulsed electron gun technology have resulted in femtosecond electron pulses becoming available for ultrafast electron diffraction experiments. For experiments investigating chemical dynamics in the gas phase, the resolution is still limited to picosecond time scales due to the velocity mismatch between laser and electron pulses. Tilted laser pulses can be used for velocity matching, but thus far this has not been demonstrated over an extended target in a diffraction setting. We demonstrate an optical configuration to deliver high-intensity laser pulses with a tilted pulse front for velocity matching over the typical length of a gas jet. A laser pulse is diffracted from a grating to introduce angular dispersion, and the grating surface is imaged on the target using large demagnification. The laser pulse duration and tilt angle were measured at and near the image plane using two different techniques: second harmonic cross correlation and an interferometric method. We found that a temporal resolution on the order of 100 fs can be achieved over a range of approximately 1 mm around the image plane.

  11. Photoacoustic tomography: Ultrasonically beating optical diffusion and diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lihong

    2014-03-01

    A decade of research has pushed photoacoustic computed tomography to the forefront of molecular-level imaging, notes SPIE Fellow Lihong Wang (Washington University, St. Louis) in his plenary talk, "Photoacoustic Tomography: Ultrasonically Beating Optical Diffusion and Diffraction." Modern optical microscopy has resolution and diffraction limitations. But noninvasive functional photoacoustic computed tomography has overcome this limit, offering deep penetration with optical contrast and ultrasonic resolution of 1 cm depth or more -- up to 7 cm of penetration in some cases, such as evaluating sentinel lymph nodes for breast cancer staging. This opens up applications in whole body imaging, brain function, oxygen saturation, label-free cell analysis, and noninvasive cancer biopsies.

  12. Computational imaging using lightweight diffractive-refractive optics.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yifan; Fu, Qiang; Amata, Hadi; Su, Shuochen; Heide, Felix; Heidrich, Wolfgang

    2015-11-30

    Diffractive optical elements (DOE) show great promise for imaging optics that are thinner and more lightweight than conventional refractive lenses while preserving their light efficiency. Unfortunately, severe spectral dispersion currently limits the use of DOEs in consumer-level lens design. In this article, we jointly design lightweight diffractive-refractive optics and post-processing algorithms to enable imaging under white light illumination. Using the Fresnel lens as a general platform, we show three phase-plate designs, including a super-thin stacked plate design, a diffractive-refractive-hybrid lens, and a phase coded-aperture lens. Combined with cross-channel deconvolution algorithm, both spherical and chromatic aberrations are corrected. Experimental results indicate that using our computational imaging approach, diffractive-refractive optics is an alternative candidate to build light efficient and thin optics for white light imaging.

  13. Modeling of microelectromechanical systems deformable mirror diffraction grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirbu, Dan; Pluzhnik, Eugene; Belikov, Ruslan

    2016-07-01

    Model-based wavefront control methods such as electric field conjugation require accurate optical propagation models to create high-contrast regions in the focal plane using deformable mirrors (DMs). Recently, it has been shown that it is possible to exceed the controllable outer-working angle imposed by the Nyquist limit based on the number of actuators by utilizing a diffraction grating. The print-through pattern on MEMS-based DMs formed during the fabrication process creates both an amplitude and a phase diffraction grating that can be used to enable Super-Nyquist wavefront control. Using interferometric measurements of a DM-actuator, we develop a DM-diffraction grating model. We compare the total energy enclosed in the first diffraction order due to the phase, amplitude, and combined phase-amplitude gratings with laboratory measurements.

  14. FEMTO SECOND ELECTRON BEAM DIFFRACTION USING A PHOTOCATHODE RF GUN.

    SciTech Connect

    WANG,X.J.WU,Z.IHEE,H.

    2003-05-12

    One of the 21st century scientific frontiers is to explore the molecule structure transition on the femtosecond time scale. X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) is one of the tools now under development for investigating femto-second structure transition. We are proposing an alternative technique--femto-second electron diffraction based on a photocathode RF gun. We will present a design of a kHz femto-seconds electron diffraction system based on a photocathode RF gun. Our simulation shows that, the photocathode RF gun can produce 100 fs (FWHM) electron bunch with millions electrons at about 2 MeV. This is at least one order of magnitude reduction in bunch length, and two orders of magnitude increase in number of electrons comparing to present time-resolved electron diffraction system. We will also discuss various issues and limitations related to MeV electron diffraction.

  15. High throughput optoelectronic smart pixel systems using diffractive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chih-Hao

    1999-12-01

    algorithm to design Diffractive Optical Elements (DOEs) having higher uniformity and better signal-to-noise ratio. The algorithm is based on nonlinear least-square optimization procedures and phase-shifting quantization scheme to minimize the reconstruction error of DOEs. We also describe a modified diffractive microlens design algorithm to overcome linewidth limitations in fabrication while achieving higher numerical aperture and better power efficiency. Several diffractive optical devices used in our smart pixel systems, including microlens arrays and spot array generators, are designed by these algorithms, and have been fabricated and characterized for system integration.

  16. Graded Achievement, Tested Achievement, and Validity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brookhart, Susan M.

    2015-01-01

    Twenty-eight studies of grades, over a century, were reviewed using the argument-based approach to validity suggested by Kane as a theoretical framework. The review draws conclusions about the meaning of graded achievement, its relation to tested achievement, and changes in the construct of graded achievement over time. "Graded…

  17. Fresnel Diffraction for CTR Microbunching

    SciTech Connect

    Tikhoplav, R.; Knyazik, A.; Rosenzweig, J. B.; Andonian, G.

    2009-01-22

    Laser beams of high intensities are routinely used for IFEL experiments. Such beams can potentially destroy microbunching diagnostic tools such as coherent transition radiation foils due to their low damage thresholds. Near-field Fresnel diffraction scheme for termination of CO{sub 2} laser beam has been experimentally studied and is presented in this paper. Novel THz camera was utilized for such study.

  18. Diffraction Plates for Classroom Demonstrations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoover, Richard B.

    1969-01-01

    Describes the computer generation of random and regular arrays of apertures on photographic film and their applications for classroom demonstrations of the Fraunhofer patterns produced by simple and complex apertures, Babinet's principle, resolution according to the Rayleigh criterion, and many other aspects of diffraction. (LC)

  19. Phonons from neutron powder diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Dimitrov, D.A.; Louca, D.; Roeder, H. )

    1999-09-01

    The spherically averaged structure function S([vert bar][bold q][vert bar]) obtained from pulsed neutron powder diffraction contains both elastic and inelastic scattering via an integral over energy. The Fourier transformation of S([vert bar][bold q][vert bar]) to real space, as is done in the pair density function (PDF) analysis, regularizes the data, i.e., it accentuates the diffuse scattering. We present a technique which enables the extraction of off-center ([vert bar][bold q][vert bar][ne]0) phonon information from powder diffraction experiments by comparing the experimental PDF with theoretical calculations based on standard interatomic potentials and the crystal symmetry. This procedure [dynamics from powder diffraction] has been [ital successfully] implemented as demonstrated here for two systems, a simple metal fcc Ni and an ionic crystal CaF[sub 2]. Although computationally intensive, this data analysis allows for a phonon based modeling of the PDF, and additionally provides off-center phonon information from neutron powder diffraction. [copyright] [ital 1999] [ital The American Physical Society

  20. Hard diffraction and rapidity gaps

    SciTech Connect

    Albrow, M.G.

    1994-08-01

    I describe the evolution of experiments at hadron colliders on (a) high mass diffraction (b) double pomeron exchange, from the ISR through the Sp{bar p}S to the Tevatron. I emphasize an experimental approach to the question: ``What is the pomeron?``

  1. Diffractive imaging of highly focused X-ray fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quiney, H. M.; Peele, A. G.; Cai, Z.; Paterson, D.; Nugent, K. A.

    2006-02-01

    The rapid development of new sources of coherent X-rays, such as third-generation synchrotrons, high-harmonic-generation lasers and X-ray free-electron lasers, has led to the emergence of the new field of X-ray coherent science. The extension of coherent methods to the X-ray regime makes possible methods such as coherent diffraction, X-ray photon-correlation spectroscopy, speckle interferometry and ultrafast probing at atomic resolution and femtosecond timescales. Despite rapid improvements in the resolution that conventional X-ray optics can achieve, new methods for manipulating X-rays are required to push this to the atomic scale. Here we demonstrate a coherent imaging technique that enables us to image the complex field at the focus of an X-ray zone plate without the need for conventional X-ray lenses. There are no fundamental limits on the resolution of this lensless imaging technique other than the wavelength of the X-rays themselves. The ability to characterize the beam with one measurement makes the method ideally suited to characterizing the fields generated by pulsed coherent X-ray sources.

  2. Digital diffractive optics: Have diffractive optics entered mainstream industry yet?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kress, Bernard; Hejmadi, Vic

    2010-05-01

    When a new technology is integrated into industry commodity products and consumer electronic devices, and sold worldwide in retail stores, it is usually understood that this technology has then entered the realm of mainstream technology and therefore mainstream industry. Such a leap however does not come cheap, as it has a double edge sword effect: first it becomes democratized and thus massively developed by numerous companies for various applications, but also it becomes a commodity, and thus gets under tremendous pressure to cut down its production and integration costs while not sacrificing to performance. We will show, based on numerous examples extracted from recent industry history, that the field of Diffractive Optics is about to undergo such a major transformation. Such a move has many impacts on all facets of digital diffractive optics technology, from the optical design houses to the micro-optics foundries (for both mastering and volume replication), to the final product integrators or contract manufacturers. The main causes of such a transformation are, as they have been for many other technologies in industry, successive technological bubbles which have carried and lifted up diffractive optics technology within the last decades. These various technological bubbles have been triggered either by real industry needs or by virtual investment hype. Both of these causes will be discussed in the paper. The adjective ""digital"" in "digital diffractive optics" does not refer only, as it is done in digital electronics, to the digital functionality of the element (digital signal processing), but rather to the digital way they are designed (by a digital computer) and fabricated (as wafer level optics using digital masking techniques). However, we can still trace a very strong similarity between the emergence of micro-electronics from analog electronics half a century ago, and the emergence of digital optics from conventional optics today.

  3. Spectromicroscopy and coherent diffraction imaging: focus on energy materials applications.

    PubMed

    Hitchcock, Adam P; Toney, Michael F

    2014-09-01

    Current and future capabilities of X-ray spectromicroscopy are discussed based on coherence-limited imaging methods which will benefit from the dramatic increase in brightness expected from a diffraction-limited storage ring (DLSR). The methods discussed include advanced coherent diffraction techniques and nanoprobe-based real-space imaging using Fresnel zone plates or other diffractive optics whose performance is affected by the degree of coherence. The capabilities of current systems, improvements which can be expected, and some of the important scientific themes which will be impacted are described, with focus on energy materials applications. Potential performance improvements of these techniques based on anticipated DLSR performance are estimated. Several examples of energy sciences research problems which are out of reach of current instrumentation, but which might be solved with the enhanced DLSR performance, are discussed.

  4. Diffraction Interference Induced Superfocusing in Nonlinear Talbot Effect

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dongmei; Zhang, Yong; Wen, Jianming; Chen, Zhenhua; Wei, Dunzhao; Hu, Xiaopeng; Zhao, Gang; Zhu, S. N.; Xiao, Min

    2014-01-01

    We report a simple, novel subdiffraction method, i.e. diffraction interference induced superfocusing in second-harmonic (SH) Talbot effect, to achieve focusing size of less than λSH/4 (or λpump/8) without involving evanescent waves or subwavelength apertures. By tailoring point spread functions with Fresnel diffraction interference, we observe periodic SH subdiffracted spots over a hundred of micrometers away from the sample. Our demonstration is the first experimental realization of the Toraldo di Francia's proposal pioneered 62 years ago for superresolution imaging. PMID:25138077

  5. Perturbation theory in electron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakken, L. N.; Marthinsen, K.; Hoeier, R.

    1992-12-01

    The Bloch-wave approach is used for discussing multiple inelastic electron scattering and higher-order perturbation theory in inelastic high-energy electron diffraction. In contrast to previous work, the present work describes three-dimensional diffraction so that higher-order Laue zone (HOLZ) effects are incorporated. Absorption is included and eigenvalues and eigenvectors are calculated from a structure matrix with the inclusion of an absorptive potential. Centrosymmetric as well as non-centrosymmetric crystal structures are allowed. An iteration method with a defined generalized propagation function for solving the inelastic coupling equations is described. It is shown that a similar iteration method with the same propagation function can be used for obtaining higher-order perturbation terms for the wave-function when a perturbation is added to the crystal potential. Finally, perturbation theory by matrix calculations when a general perturbation is added to the structure matrix is considered.

  6. Diffraction operators in paraxial approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasso, William; Navas, Marianela; Añez, Liz; Urdaneta, Romer; Díaz, Leonardo; Torres, César O.

    2014-07-01

    Nowadays, research in the field of science education points to the creation of alternative ways of teaching contents encouraging the development of more elaborate reasoning, where a high degree of abstraction and generalization of scientific knowledge prevails. On that subject, this research shows a didactic alternative proposal for the construction of Fresnel and Fraunhoffer diffraction concepts applying the Fourier transform technique in the study of electromagnetic waves propagation in free space. Curvature transparency and Fourier sphere operators in paraxial approximation are used in order to make the usual laborious mathematical approach easier. The main result shows that the composition of optic metaxial operators results in the discovery of a simpler way out of the standard electromagnetic wave propagation in free space between a transmitter and a receptor separated from a given distance. This allows to state that the didactic proposal shown encourages the construction of Fresnel and Fraunhoffer diffraction concepts in a more effective and easier way than the traditional teaching.

  7. Diffraction Analysis of Solar Coronagraphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabin, Douglas M.; gong, qian

    2016-05-01

    The design of a solar coronagraph is predicated on controlling diffracted and scattered light using principles dating back to Bernard Lyot in the 1930’s. The existence of many successful ground- and space-based coronagraphs testifies to our ability to apply these principles in specific cases, but it is difficult to explore a significant range of design parameters because the calculations are tricky and time-consuming. Indeed, scattered light is so design-specific that ad hoc analysis is unavoidable once guidelines from experience are used to create a first-guess system of baffles and low-scatter surfaces. Here we describe a combination of analytic and computational approaches that has the potential to explore coronagraph design space somewhat more systematically with respect to diffracted light.

  8. Neutron diffraction and Vitamin E

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harroun, T. A.

    2010-11-01

    It is generally accepted that neutron diffraction from model membrane systems is an effective biophysical technique for determining membrane structure. Here we describe an example of how deuterium labelling can elucidate the location of specific membrane soluble molecules, including a brief discussion of the technique itself. We show that deuterium labelled α-tocopherol sits upright in the bilayer, as might be expected, but at very different locations within the bilayer, depending on the degree of lipid chain unsaturation.

  9. Industrial applications of neutron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Felcher, G.P.

    1989-01-01

    Neutron diffraction (or, to be more general, neutron scattering) is a most versatile and universal tool, which has been widely employed to probe the structure, the dynamics and the magnetism of condensed matter. Traditionally used for fundamental research in solid state physics, this technique more recently has been applied to problems of immediate industrial interest, as illustrated in examples covering the main fields of endeavour. 14 refs., 14 figs.

  10. Ultra-broadband achromatic imaging with diffractive photon sieves

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiaonan; Hu, Jingpei; Lin, Yu; Xu, Feng; Zhu, Xiaojun; Pu, Donglin; Chen, Linsen; Wang, Chinhua

    2016-01-01

    Diffractive optical elements suffer from large chromatic aberration due to the strong wavelength-dependent nature in diffraction phenomena, and therefore, diffractive elements can work only at a single designed wavelength, which significantly limits the applications of diffractive elements in imaging. Here, we report on a demonstration of a wavefront coded broadband achromatic imaging with diffractive photon sieves. The broadband diffraction imaging is implemented with a wavefront coded pinhole pattern that generates equal focusing power for a wide range of operating wavelength in a single thin-film element without complicated auxiliary optical system. Experimental validation was performed using an UV-lithography fabricated wavefront coded photon sieves. Results show that the working bandwidth of the wavefront coded photon sieves reaches 28 nm compared with 0.32 nm of the conventional one. Further demonstration of the achromatic imaging with a bandwidth of 300 nm is also performed with a wavefront coded photon sieves integrated with a refractive element. PMID:27328713

  11. Ultra-broadband achromatic imaging with diffractive photon sieves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xiaonan; Hu, Jingpei; Lin, Yu; Xu, Feng; Zhu, Xiaojun; Pu, Donglin; Chen, Linsen; Wang, Chinhua

    2016-06-01

    Diffractive optical elements suffer from large chromatic aberration due to the strong wavelength-dependent nature in diffraction phenomena, and therefore, diffractive elements can work only at a single designed wavelength, which significantly limits the applications of diffractive elements in imaging. Here, we report on a demonstration of a wavefront coded broadband achromatic imaging with diffractive photon sieves. The broadband diffraction imaging is implemented with a wavefront coded pinhole pattern that generates equal focusing power for a wide range of operating wavelength in a single thin-film element without complicated auxiliary optical system. Experimental validation was performed using an UV-lithography fabricated wavefront coded photon sieves. Results show that the working bandwidth of the wavefront coded photon sieves reaches 28 nm compared with 0.32 nm of the conventional one. Further demonstration of the achromatic imaging with a bandwidth of 300 nm is also performed with a wavefront coded photon sieves integrated with a refractive element.

  12. Teaching Diffraction with Hands-On Optical Spectrometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischer, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Although the observation of optical spectra is common practice in physics classes, students are usually limited to a passive, qualitative observation of nice colours. This paper discusses a diffraction-based spectrometer that allows students to take quantitative measurements of spectral bands. Students can build it within minutes from generic…

  13. Photon diffractive dissociation in deep-inelastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, E. ); Wuesthoff, M. )

    1994-10-01

    This paper is mainly devoted to the presentation and discussion of formulas for the cross section of photon diffractive dissociation. The calculations which we present in a very detailed way are based on perturbative QCD. We improve formulas which describe this process in the triple Regge limit where the square of the missing mass [ital M][sub [ital X

  14. LED color mixing with diffractive structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonenberger, Theresa; Baumgart, Jörg; Wendel, Simon; Neumann, Cornelius

    2013-03-01

    Lighting solutions with colored LEDs provide many opportunities for illumination. One of these opportunities is to create a color tunable light source. In this way different kinds of white light (color temperature) as well as discrete colors may be realized. This opens the field for applications as mood lighting. But there is always a spatial separation of the distinct LEDs that might get converted into an angular separation by any collimating optics. This angular separation causes such problems like color fringes and colored shadows that cannot be accepted in most applications. Conventional methods to solve these problems include e.g. mixing rods or dichroic filters. A new approach is the use of the dispersive effect of a diffractive structure to compensate the angular separation of the different colors. In this contribution the potential and limitations of diffractive structures in LED color mixing applications are discussed. Ray tracing simulations were performed to analyze such important parameters like efficiency, color performance and the cross section of the color mixing optics. New means for the estimation of color mixing performance were developed. A software tool makes it possible to detect the color distribution within ray trace data and it provides a quality factor to estimate the color mixing performance. It can be shown that the spectral band width has a large influence on the mixing process. Ray tracing simulations are compared with results of an experimental setup such that both measured as well as simulated data is presented.

  15. Growing Larger Crystals for Neutron Diffraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, Marc

    2003-01-01

    Obtaining crystals of suitable size and high quality has been a major bottleneck in macromolecular crystallography. With the advent of advanced X-ray sources and methods the question of size has rapidly dwindled, almost to the point where if one can see the crystal then it was big enough. Quality is another issue, and major national and commercial efforts were established to take advantage of the microgravity environment in an effort to obtain higher quality crystals. Studies of the macromolecule crystallization process were carried out in many labs in an effort to understand what affected the resultant crystal quality on Earth, and how microgravity improved the process. While technological improvements are resulting in a diminishing of the minimum crystal size required, neutron diffraction structural studies still require considerably larger crystals, by several orders of magnitude, than X-ray studies. From a crystal growth physics perspective there is no reason why these 'large' crystals cannot be obtained: the question is generally more one of supply than limitations mechanism. This talk will discuss our laboratory s current model for macromolecule crystal growth, with highlights pertaining to the growth of crystals suitable for neutron diffraction studies.

  16. Compatibility of a Diffractive Pupil and Coronagraphic Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bendek, Eduardo; Belikov, Rusian; Pluzhnyk, Yevgeniy; Guyon, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    Detection and characterization of exo-earths require direct-imaging techniques that can deliver contrast ratios of 10(exp 10) at 100 milliarc-seconds or smaller angular separation. At the same time, astrometric data is required to measure planet masses and can help detect planets and constrain their orbital parameters. To minimize costs, a single space mission can be designed using a high efficiency coronograph to perform direct imaging and a diffractive pupil to calibrate wide-field distortions to enable high precision astrometric measurements. This paper reports the testing of a diffractive pupil on the high-contrast test bed at the NASA Ames Research Center to assess the compatibility of using a diffractive pupil with coronographic imaging systems. No diffractive contamination was found within our detectability limit of 2x10(exp -7) contrast outside a region of 12lambda/D and 2.5x10(exp -6) within a region spanning from 2 to 12lambda/D. Morphology of the image features suggests that no contamination exists even beyond the detectability limit specified or at smaller working angles. In the case that diffractive contamination is found beyond these stated levels, active wavefront control would be able to mitigate its intensity to 10(exp -7) or better contrast.

  17. Diffraction Gratings for High-Intensity Laser Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Britten, J

    2008-01-23

    The scattering of light into wavelength-dependent discrete directions (orders) by a device exhibiting a periodic modulation of a physical attribute on a spatial scale similar to the wavelength of light has been the subject of study for over 200 years. Such a device is called a diffraction grating. Practical applications of diffraction gratings, mainly for spectroscopy, have been around for over 100 years. The importance of diffraction gratings in spectroscopy for the measurement of myriad properties of matter can hardly be overestimated. Since the advent of coherent light sources (lasers) in the 1960's, applications of diffraction gratings in spectroscopy have further exploded. Lasers have opened a vast application space for gratings, and apace, gratings have enabled entirely new classes of laser systems. Excellent reviews of the history, fundamental properties, applications and manufacturing techniques of diffraction gratings up to the time of their publication can be found in the books by Hutley (1) and more recently Loewen and Popov (2). The limited scope of this chapter can hardly do justice to such a comprehensive subject, so the focus here will be narrowly limited to characteristics required for gratings suitable for high-power laser applications, and methods to fabricate them. A particular area of emphasis will be on maximally-efficient large-aperture gratings for short-pulse laser generation.

  18. X-ray diffraction analysis of residual stress in zirconia dental composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allahkarami, Masoud

    Dental restoration ceramic is a complex system to be characterized. Beside its essential biocompatibility, and pleasant appearance, it requires being mechanically strong in a catastrophic loading environment. Any design is restricted with geometry boundary and material property limits. Inspired by natural teeth, a multilayer ceramic is a smart way of achieving an enhanced restoration. Bi-layers of zirconia core covered by porcelain are known as one of the best multilayer restorations. Residual stresses may be introduced into a bi-layer dental ceramic restoration during its entire manufacturing process due to thermal expansion and elastic property mismatch. It is impossible to achieve a free of residual stresses bi-layer zirconia-porcelain restoration. The idea is to take the advantage of residual stress in design in such a way to prevent the crack initiation and progression. The hypothesis is a compressive residual stress at external contact surface would be enabling the restoration to endure a greater tensile stress. Optimizing the layers thickness, manufacturing process, and validating 3D simulations require development of new techniques of thickness, residual stresses and phase transformation measurement. In the present work, a combined mirco-tomography and finite element based method were adapted for thickness measurement. Two new 2D X-ray diffraction based techniques were adapted for phase transformation area mapping and combined phase transformation and residual stress measurement. Concerning the complex geometry of crown, an efficient method for X-ray diffraction data collection mapping on a given curved surface was developed. Finally a novel method for 3D dimensional x-ray diffraction data collection and visualization were introduced.

  19. New approaches to nonlinear diffractive field propagation.

    PubMed

    Christopher, P T; Parker, K J

    1991-07-01

    In many domains of acoustic field propagation, such as medical ultrasound imaging, lithotripsy shock treatment, and underwater sonar, a realistic calculation of beam patterns requires treatment of the effects of diffraction from finite sources. Also, the mechanisms of loss and nonlinear effects within the medium are typically nonnegligible. The combination of diffraction, attenuation, and nonlinear effects has been treated by a number of formulations and numerical techniques. A novel model that incrementally propagates the field of baffled planar sources with substeps that account for the physics of diffraction, attenuation, and nonlinearity is presented. The model accounts for the effect of refraction and reflection (but not multiple reflections) in the case of propagation through multiple, parallel layers of fluid medium. An implementation of the model for axis symmetric sources has been developed. In one substep of the implementation, a new discrete Hankel transform is used with spatial transform techniques to propagate the field over a short distance with diffraction and attenuation. In the other substep, the temporal frequency domain solution to Burgers' equation is implemented to account for the nonlinear accretion and depletion of harmonics. This approach yields a computationally efficient procedure for calculating beam patterns from a baffled planar, axially symmetric source under conditions ranging from quasilinear through shock. The model is not restricted by the usual parabolic wave approximation and the field's directionality is explicitly accounted for at each point. Useage of a harmonic-limiting scheme allows the model to propagate some previously intractable high-intensity nonlinear fields. Results of the model are shown to be in excellent agreement with measurements performed on the nonlinear field of an unfocused 2.25-MHz piston source, even in the near field where the established parabolic wave approximation model fails. Next, the model is used to

  20. Ultrafast coherent X-ray diffractive imaging with the FLASH Free-Electron Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, H. N.; Bajt, S.; Barty, A.; Benner, W. H.; Bogan, M. J.; Boutet, S.; Cavalleri, A.; Düsterer, S.; Frank, M.; Hajdu, J.; Hau-Riege, S. P.; Iwan, B.; Marchesini, S.; Sokolowski-Tinten, K.; Siebert, M. M.; Treusch, R.; Woods, B. W.

    High-resolution ultrafast coherent diffractive imaging has been carried out at the FLASH FEL. Reconstructed images show no effect of sample destruction. Time resolved imaging was achieved by time-delay holography and with a synchronized optical laser.

  1. Resolution limits of ultrafast ultrasound localization microscopy.

    PubMed

    Desailly, Yann; Pierre, Juliette; Couture, Olivier; Tanter, Mickael

    2015-11-21

    As in other imaging methods based on waves, the resolution of ultrasound imaging is limited by the wavelength. However, the diffraction-limit can be overcome by super-localizing single events from isolated sources. In recent years, we developed plane-wave ultrasound allowing frame rates up to 20,000 fps. Ultrafast processes such as rapid movement or disruption of ultrasound contrast agents (UCA) can thus be monitored, providing us with distinct punctual sources that could be localized beyond the diffraction limit. We previously showed experimentally that resolutions beyond λ/10 can be reached in ultrafast ultrasound localization microscopy (uULM) using a 128 transducer matrix in reception. Higher resolutions are theoretically achievable and the aim of this study is to predict the maximum resolution in uULM with respect to acquisition parameters (frequency, transducer geometry, sampling electronics). The accuracy of uULM is the error on the localization of a bubble, considered a point-source in a homogeneous medium. The proposed model consists in two steps: determining the timing accuracy of the microbubble echo in radiofrequency data, then transferring this time accuracy into spatial accuracy. The simplified model predicts a maximum resolution of 40 μm for a 1.75 MHz transducer matrix composed of two rows of 64 elements. Experimental confirmation of the model was performed by flowing microbubbles within a 60 μm microfluidic channel and localizing their blinking under ultrafast imaging (500 Hz frame rate). The experimental resolution, determined as the standard deviation in the positioning of the microbubbles, was predicted within 6 μm (13%) of the theoretical values and followed the analytical relationship with respect to the number of elements and depth. Understanding the underlying physical principles determining the resolution of superlocalization will allow the optimization of the imaging setup for each organ. Ultimately, accuracies better than the size of

  2. Resolution limits of ultrafast ultrasound localization microscopy.

    PubMed

    Desailly, Yann; Pierre, Juliette; Couture, Olivier; Tanter, Mickael

    2015-11-21

    As in other imaging methods based on waves, the resolution of ultrasound imaging is limited by the wavelength. However, the diffraction-limit can be overcome by super-localizing single events from isolated sources. In recent years, we developed plane-wave ultrasound allowing frame rates up to 20,000 fps. Ultrafast processes such as rapid movement or disruption of ultrasound contrast agents (UCA) can thus be monitored, providing us with distinct punctual sources that could be localized beyond the diffraction limit. We previously showed experimentally that resolutions beyond λ/10 can be reached in ultrafast ultrasound localization microscopy (uULM) using a 128 transducer matrix in reception. Higher resolutions are theoretically achievable and the aim of this study is to predict the maximum resolution in uULM with respect to acquisition parameters (frequency, transducer geometry, sampling electronics). The accuracy of uULM is the error on the localization of a bubble, considered a point-source in a homogeneous medium. The proposed model consists in two steps: determining the timing accuracy of the microbubble echo in radiofrequency data, then transferring this time accuracy into spatial accuracy. The simplified model predicts a maximum resolution of 40 μm for a 1.75 MHz transducer matrix composed of two rows of 64 elements. Experimental confirmation of the model was performed by flowing microbubbles within a 60 μm microfluidic channel and localizing their blinking under ultrafast imaging (500 Hz frame rate). The experimental resolution, determined as the standard deviation in the positioning of the microbubbles, was predicted within 6 μm (13%) of the theoretical values and followed the analytical relationship with respect to the number of elements and depth. Understanding the underlying physical principles determining the resolution of superlocalization will allow the optimization of the imaging setup for each organ. Ultimately, accuracies better than the size of

  3. An Analysis of High School Mathematics Achievement and English Language Arts Achievement as Predictors of Science Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Anthony C.

    2012-01-01

    Science assessments require students to read and comprehend questions and to solve mathematical problems. The purpose of this study is to determine whether the following variables can be used to predict science achievement: English language arts achievement, mathematics achievement, socioeconomic status (SES), limited English proficiency (LEP)…

  4. Ultrafast electron diffraction optimized for studying structural dynamics in thin films and monolayers

    PubMed Central

    Badali, D. S.; Gengler, R. Y. N.; Miller, R. J. D.

    2016-01-01

    A compact electron source specifically designed for time-resolved diffraction studies of free-standing thin films and monolayers is presented here. The sensitivity to thin samples is achieved by extending the established technique of ultrafast electron diffraction to the “medium” energy regime (1–10 kV). An extremely compact design, in combination with low bunch charges, allows for high quality diffraction in a lensless geometry. The measured and simulated characteristics of the experimental system reveal sub-picosecond temporal resolution, while demonstrating the ability to produce high quality diffraction patterns from atomically thin samples. PMID:27226978

  5. Magnetic line source diffraction by a perfect electromagnetic conductor (PEMC) step

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Saeed

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, an analytic theory for the magnetic line source diffraction by a perfect electromagnetic conductor (PEMC) step is developed. Using the duality transformation, introduced by Lindell and Sihvola, transformations have been made from the diffraction of a magnetic line source by a perfect electric conductor (PEC) step. As an application, plane wave diffracted from a planar interface of air and PEMC media is studied. PEC and PMC are the limiting cases, while there is no cross-polarized component.

  6. High-pressure neutron diffraction studies at LANSCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yusheng; Zhang, Jianzhong; Xu, Hongwu; Lokshin, Konstantin A.; He, Duanwei; Qian, Jiang; Pantea, Cristian; Daemen, Luke L.; Vogel, Sven C.; Ding, Yang; Xu, Jian

    2010-06-01

    The development of neutron diffraction under extreme pressure ( P) and temperature ( T) conditions is highly valuable to condensed matter physics, crystal chemistry, materials science, and earth and planetary sciences. We have incorporated a 500-ton press TAP-98 into the HiPPO diffractometer at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) to conduct in situ high- P- T neutron diffraction experiments. We have developed a large gem-crystal anvil cell, ZAP, to conduct neutron diffraction experiments at high P. The ZAP cell can be used to integrate multiple experimental techniques such as neutron diffraction, laser spectroscopy, and ultrasonic interferometery. More recently, we have developed high- P low- T gas/liquid cells in conjunction with neutron diffraction. These techniques enable in situ and real-time examination of gas uptake/release processes and allow accurate, time-dependent determination of changes in crystal structure and related reaction kinetics. We have successfully used these techniques to study the equations of state, structural phase transitions, and thermo-mechanical properties of metals, ceramics, and minerals. We have conducted researches on the formation/decomposition kinetics of methane, CO2 and hydrogen hydrate clathrates, and hydrogen/CO2 adsorption of inclusion compounds such as metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). The aim of our research is to accurately map out phase relations and determine structural parameters (lattice constants, atomic positions, atomic thermal parameters, bond lengths, bond angles, etc.) in the P- T- X space. We are developing further high- P- T technology with a new 2000-ton press, TAPLUS-2000, and a ZIA (Deformation-DIA type) cubic anvil package to routinely achieve pressures up to 20 GPa and temperatures up to 2000 K. The design of a dedicated high- P neutron beamline, LAPTRON, is also underway for simultaneous high- P- T neutron diffraction, ultrasonic, calorimetry, radiography, and tomography studies. Studies based

  7. The use of an improved diffraction grating interferometer.

    PubMed

    Maddox, A R; Binder, R C

    1969-11-01

    A conventional schlieren system was converted into a Kraushaar interferometer by the addition of matched diffraction gratings as the beam splitting and recombination elements. Optical quality of the added features of this installation were shown to be not a limiting factor, but the optical platform must be isolated well for good results. Basic optical theory applicable to this device is summarized. Several aspects are indicated which enhance the fringe or image quality. This device has been used to find the surface pressures and flow field structure around some simple two-dimensional airfoil shapes. Comparison of these results with calculations indicates good agreement between the diffraction grating interferometer data and analytical data.

  8. Diffraction intensity analysis of a transmission prism grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Guosheng

    2010-11-01

    Because of the inherent structures, most common gratings always produce an unexpected loss of the input signal, which limits the use of gratings in many fields to some extent. Considering that, a design of grating with many periodical micro isosceles prisms is proposed. Based on the scalar diffraction theory, the transmittance is derived from the definition of an optical path when a parallel light passes through a singular prism element. And according to the multi-slit Fraunhofer diffraction, the expression of light intensity distribution for the prism grating on the frequency plane is deduced and analyzed by means of Fourier transform.

  9. Diffractive dijet and W production in CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Goulianos, K.

    1998-06-01

    Results on diffractive dijet and W-boson production from CDF are reviewed and compared with predictions based on factorization of the diffractive structure function of the proton measured in deep inelastic scattering at HERA.

  10. Diffractive optics: Design, fabrication, and applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, G. Michael

    1993-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: features, applications, surface relief diffractive optics, optical data storage, waveguide lenses, diffractive lense imaging, phase grating synthesis, sub-wavelength structured surfaces, etc.

  11. 50 years of fiber diffraction.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Kenneth C

    2010-05-01

    In 1955 Ken Holmes started working on tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) as a research student with Rosalind Franklin at Birkbeck College, London. Afterward he spent 18months as a post doc with Don Caspar and Carolyn Cohen at the Children's Hospital, Boston where he continued the work on TMV and also showed that the core of the thick filament of byssus retractor muscle from mussels is made of two-stranded alpha-helical coiled-coils. Returning to England he joined Aaron Klug's group at the newly founded Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Cambridge. Besides continuing the TMV studies, which were aimed at calculating the three-dimensional density map of the virus, he collaborated with Pringle's group in Oxford to show that two conformation of the myosin cross-bridge could be identified in insect flight muscle. In 1968 he opened the biophysics department at the Max Planck Institute for Medical Research in Heidelberg, Germany. With Gerd Rosenbaum he initiated the use of synchrotron radiation as a source for X-ray diffraction. In his lab the TMV structure was pushed to 4A resolution and showed how the RNA binds to the protein. With his co-workers he solved the structure of g-actin as a crystalline complex and then solved the structure of the f-actin filament by orientating the g-actin structure so as to give the f-actin fiber diffraction pattern. He was also able to solve the structure of the complex of actin with tropomyosin from fiber diffraction. PMID:20079849

  12. Fiber optic diffraction grating maker

    DOEpatents

    Deason, Vance A.; Ward, Michael B.

    1991-01-01

    A compact and portable diffraction grating maker comprised of a laser beam, optical and fiber optics devices coupling the beam to one or more evanescent beam splitters, and collimating lenses or mirrors directing the split beam at an appropriate photosensitive material. The collimating optics, the output ends of the fiber optic coupler and the photosensitive plate holder are all mounted on an articulated framework so that the angle of intersection of the beams can be altered at will without disturbing the spatial filter, collimation or beam quality, and assuring that the beams will always intersect at the position of the plate.

  13. Fiber optic diffraction grating maker

    DOEpatents

    Deason, V.A.; Ward, M.B.

    1991-05-21

    A compact and portable diffraction grating maker is comprised of a laser beam, optical and fiber optics devices coupling the beam to one or more evanescent beam splitters, and collimating lenses or mirrors directing the split beam at an appropriate photosensitive material. The collimating optics, the output ends of the fiber optic coupler and the photosensitive plate holder are all mounted on an articulated framework so that the angle of intersection of the beams can be altered at will without disturbing the spatial filter, collimation or beam quality, and assuring that the beams will always intersect at the position of the plate. 4 figures.

  14. Nonlinear ptychographic coherent diffractive imaging.

    PubMed

    Odstrcil, M; Baksh, P; Gawith, C; Vrcelj, R; Frey, J G; Brocklesby, W S

    2016-09-01

    Ptychographic Coherent diffractive imaging (PCDI) is a significant advance in imaging allowing the measurement of the full electric field at a sample without use of any imaging optics. So far it has been confined solely to imaging of linear optical responses. In this paper we show that because of the coherence-preserving nature of nonlinear optical interactions, PCDI can be generalised to nonlinear optical imaging. We demonstrate second harmonic generation PCDI, directly revealing phase information about the nonlinear coefficients, and showing the general applicability of PCDI to nonlinear interactions. PMID:27607631

  15. DIFFRACTION DISSOCIATION - 50 YEARS LATER.

    SciTech Connect

    WHITE, S.N.

    2005-04-27

    The field of Diffraction Dissociation, which is the subject of this workshop, began 50 years ago with the analysis of deuteron stripping in low energy collisions with nuclei. We return to the subject in a modern context- deuteron dissociation in {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV d-Au collisions recorded during the 2003 RHIC run in the PHENIX experiment. At RHIC energy, d {yields} n+p proceeds predominantly (90%) through Electromagnetic Dissociation and the remaining fraction via the hadronic shadowing described by Glauber. Since the dissociation cross section has a small theoretical error we adopt this process to normalize other cross sections measured in RHIC.

  16. Coherent X-ray diffraction from collagenous soft tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Berenguer de la Cuesta, Felisa; Wenger, Marco P.E.; Bean, Richard J.; Bozec, Laurent; Horton, Michael A.; Robinson, Ian K.

    2009-09-11

    Coherent X-ray diffraction has been applied in the imaging of inorganic materials with great success. However, its application to biological specimens has been limited to some notable exceptions, due to the induced radiation damage and the extended nature of biological samples, the last limiting the application of most part of the phasing algorithms. X-ray ptychography, still under development, is a good candidate to overcome such difficulties and become a powerful imaging method for biology. We describe herein the feasibility of applying ptychography to the imaging of biological specimens, in particular collagen rich samples. We report here speckles in diffraction patterns from soft animal tissue, obtained with an optimized small angle X-ray setup that exploits the natural coherence of the beam. By phasing these patterns, dark field images of collagen within tendon, skin, bone, or cornea will eventually be obtained with a resolution of 60-70 nm. We present simulations of the contrast mechanism in collagen based on atomic force microscope images of the samples. Simulations confirmed the 'speckled' nature of the obtained diffraction patterns. Once inverted, the patterns will show the disposition and orientation of the fibers within the tissue, by enhancing the phase contrast between protein and no protein regions of the sample. Our work affords the application of the most innovative coherent X-ray diffraction tools to the study of biological specimens, and this approach will have a significant impact in biology and medicine because it overcomes many of the limits of current microscopy techniques.

  17. Self-cleaning diffractive macroporous films by doctor blade coating.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hongta; Jiang, Peng

    2010-08-01

    Here we report a scalable bottom-up technology for creating three-dimensionally highly ordered macroporous polymer films with excellent water-repelling and optical diffractive properties. A simple doctor blade coating process is first utilized to create silica colloidal crystal-polymer nanocomposites. The close-packed silica spheres are selectively removed to fabricate flexible macroporous polymer films with crystalline arrays of voids which are interconnected through small nanopores. The size of the voids can be easily controlled by tuning the duration of an oxygen reactive-ion etching process prior to the removal of the templating silica spheres. After surface functionalization with fluorosilane, superhydrophobic surface with large apparent water contact angle and small sliding angle can be obtained. The water-repelling property can be quantitatively explained by adapting the Cassie's dewetting model. We further demonstrate that self-cleaning functionality can be achieved on superhydrophobic macroporous coatings by preventing bacterial contamination. The high crystalline quality of the macroporous polymers also enables strong optical diffraction from the periodic lattice. The optical properties are evaluated by normal-incidence reflectance measurements and theoretical calculation using a scalar-wave approximation model. A good agreement between theory and experiment has been obtained. The simultaneous achievement of controlled dewetting and strong optical diffraction by templated porous films could open new applications in self-cleaning diffractive optics.

  18. Undergraduate Experiment with Fractal Diffraction Gratings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monsoriu, Juan A.; Furlan, Walter D.; Pons, Amparo; Barreiro, Juan C.; Gimenez, Marcos H.

    2011-01-01

    We present a simple diffraction experiment with fractal gratings based on the triadic Cantor set. Diffraction by fractals is proposed as a motivating strategy for students of optics in the potential applications of optical processing. Fraunhofer diffraction patterns are obtained using standard equipment present in most undergraduate physics…

  19. Ultrafast electron diffraction from aligned molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Centurion, Martin

    2015-08-17

    The aim of this project was to record time-resolved electron diffraction patterns of aligned molecules and to reconstruct the 3D molecular structure. The molecules are aligned non-adiabatically using a femtosecond laser pulse. A femtosecond electron pulse then records a diffraction pattern while the molecules are aligned. The diffraction patterns are then be processed to obtain the molecular structure.

  20. High-precision method for submicron-aperture fiber point-diffraction wavefront measurement.

    PubMed

    Wang, Daodang; Xu, Yangbo; Liang, Rongguang; Kong, Ming; Zhao, Jun; Zhang, Baowu; Li, Wei

    2016-04-01

    It is a key issue to measure the point-diffraction wavefront error, which determines the achievable accuracy of point-diffraction interferometer (PDI). A high-precision method based on shearing interferometry is proposed to measure submicron-aperture fiber point-diffraction wavefront with high numerical aperture (NA). To obtain the true shearing point-diffraction wavefront, a double-step calibration method based on three-dimensional coordinate reconstruction and symmetric lateral displacement compensation is proposed to calibrate the geometric aberration in the case of high NA and large lateral wavefront displacement. The calibration can be carried out without any prior knowledge about the system configuration parameters. With the true shearing wavefront, the differential Zernike polynomials fitting method is applied to reconstruct the point-diffraction wavefront. Numerical simulation and experiments have been carried out to demonstrate the accuracy and feasibility of the proposed measurement method, and a good measurement accuracy is achieved. PMID:27137002

  1. Spectral partitioning in diffraction tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Lehman, S K; Chambers, D H; Candy, J V

    1999-06-14

    The scattering mechanism of diffraction tomography is described by the integral form of the Helmholtz equation. The goal of diffraction tomography is to invert this equation in order to reconstruct the object function from the measured scattered fields. During the forward propagation process, the spatial spectrum of the object under investigation is ''smeared,'' by a convolution in the spectral domain, across the propagating and evanescent regions of the received field. Hence, care must be taken in performing the reconstruction, as the object's spectral information has been moved into regions where it may be considered to be noise rather than useful information. This will reduce the quality and resolution of the reconstruction. We show haw the object's spectrum can be partitioned into resolvable and non-resolvable parts based upon the cutoff between the propagating and evanescent fields. Operating under the Born approximation, we develop a beam-forming on transmit approach to direct the energy into either the propagating or evanescent parts of the spectrum. In this manner, we may individually interrogate the propagating and evanescent regions of the object spectrum.

  2. Multilayer porous silicon diffraction gratings operating in the infrared.

    PubMed

    Lai, Meifang; Sridharan, Gayathri M; Parish, Giacinta; Bhattacharya, Shanti; Keating, Adrian

    2012-01-01

    Transmission diffraction gratings operating at 1,565 nm based on multilayer porous silicon films are modeled, fabricated, and tested. Features down to 2 μm have been patterned into submicron-thick mesoporous films using standard photolithographic and dry etching techniques. After patterning of the top porous film, a second anodization can be performed, allowing an under-layer of highly uniform porosity and thickness to be achieved. High transmission greater than 40% is measured, and modeling results suggest that a change in diffraction efficiency of 1 dB for a 1% change in normalized refractive index can be achieved. Preliminary measurement of solvent vapor shows a large signal change from the grating sensor in agreement with models.

  3. Application of Electron Backscatter Diffraction to Phase Identification

    SciTech Connect

    El-Dasher, B S; Deal, A

    2008-07-16

    The identification of crystalline phases in solids requires knowledge of two microstructural properties: crystallographic structure and chemical composition. Traditionally, this has been accomplished using X-ray diffraction techniques where the measured crystallographic information, in combination with separate chemical composition measurements for specimens of unknown pedigrees, is used to deduce the unknown phases. With the latest microstructural analysis tools for scanning electron microscopes, both the crystallography and composition can be determined in a single analysis utilizing electron backscatter diffraction and energy dispersive spectroscopy, respectively. In this chapter, we discuss the approach required to perform these experiments, elucidate the benefits and limitations of this technique, and detail via case studies how composition, crystallography, and diffraction contrast can be used as phase discriminators.

  4. Near-field diffraction of chirped gratings.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Brea, Luis Miguel; Torcal-Milla, Francisco Jose; Morlanes, Tomas

    2016-09-01

    In this Letter, we analyze the near-field diffraction pattern produced by chirped gratings. An intuitive analytical interpretation of the generated diffraction orders is proposed. Several interesting properties of the near-field diffraction pattern can be determined, such as the period of the fringes and its visibility. Diffraction orders present different widths and also, some of them present focusing properties. The width, location, and depth of focus of the converging diffraction orders are also determined. The analytical expressions are compared to numerical simulation and experimental results, showing a high agreement. PMID:27607980

  5. Diffraction data analysis in the presence of radiation damage

    PubMed Central

    Borek, Dominika; Cymborowski, Marcin; Machius, Mischa; Minor, Wladek; Otwinowski, Zbyszek

    2010-01-01

    In macromolecular crystallography, the acquisition of a complete set of diffraction intensities typically involves a high cumulative dose of X-ray radiation. In the process of data acquisition, the irradiated crystal lattice undergoes a broad range of chemical and physical changes. These result in the gradual decay of diffraction intensities, accompanied by changes in the macroscopic organization of crystal lattice order and by localized changes in electron density that, owing to complex radiation chemistry, are specific for a particular macromolecule. The decay of diffraction intensities is a well defined physical process that is fully correctable during scaling and merging analysis and therefore, while limiting the amount of diffraction, it has no other impact on phasing procedures. Specific chemical changes, which are variable even between different crystal forms of the same macromolecule, are more difficult to predict, describe and correct in data. Appearing during the process of data collection, they result in gradual changes in structure factors and therefore have profound consequences in phasing procedures. Examples of various combinations of radiation-induced changes are presented and various considerations pertinent to the determination of the best strategies for handling diffraction data analysis in representative situations are discussed. PMID:20382996

  6. Twenty-meter space telescope based on diffractive Fresnel lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Early, James T.; Hyde, Roderick; Baron, Richard L.

    2004-02-01

    Diffractive lenses offer two potential advantages for very large aperture space telescopes; very loose surface-figure tolerances and physical implementation as thin, flat optical elements. In order to actually realize these advantages one must be able to build large diffractive lenses with adequate optical precision and also to compactly stow the lens for launch and then fully deploy it in space. We will discuss the recent fabrication and assembly demonstration of a 5m glass diffractive Fresnel lens at LLNL. Optical performance data from smaller full telescopes with diffractive lens and corrective optics show diffraction limited performance with broad bandwidths. A systems design for a 20m space telescope will be presented. The primary optic can be rolled to fit inside of the standard fairings of the Delta IV vehicle. This configuration has a simple deployment and requires no orbital assembly. A twenty meter visible telescope could have a significant impact in conventional astronomy with eight times the resolution of Hubble and over sixty times the light gathering capacity. If the light scattering is made acceptable, this telescope could also be used in the search for terrestrial planets.

  7. Twenty Meter Space Telescope Based on Diffractive Fresnel Lens

    SciTech Connect

    Early, J; Hyde, R; Baron, R

    2003-06-26

    Diffractive lenses offer two potential advantages for very large aperture space telescopes; very loose surface-figure tolerances and physical implementation as thin, flat optical elements. In order to actually realize these advantages one must be able to build large diffractive lenses with adequate optical precision and also to compactly stow the lens for launch and then fully deploy it in space. We will discuss the recent fabrication and assembly demonstration of a 5m glass diffractive Fresnel lens at LLNL. Optical performance data from smaller full telescopes with diffractive lens and corrective optics show diffraction limited performance with broad bandwidths. A systems design for a 20m space telescope will be presented. The primary optic can be rolled to fit inside of the standard fairings of the Delta IV vehicle. This configuration has a simple deployment and requires no orbital assembly. A twenty meter visible telescope could have a significant impact in conventional astronomy with eight times the resolution of Hubble and over sixty times the light gathering capacity. If the light scattering is made acceptable, this telescope could also be used in the search for terrestrial planets.

  8. Novel cost-effective process for the replication of hybrid diffractive/refractive optical elements in silica glass

    SciTech Connect

    Maxey, L.C.; Nogues, J.L.; Moreshead, B.

    1998-08-01

    This CRADA between Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Contractor) and GELTECH, Inc. (Participant) has demonstrated the feasibility of producing hybrid diffractive/refractive optics by a replication process which lends itself to high-volume, low-cost production. The program has built unpon unique capabilities of the Contractor and the Participant to achieve this demonstration. The Contractor has extensive experience and unique capabilities in the technology of single point diamong turning for optical components. The Participant has achieved unique success in the development of manufacturing processes for high-quality silica optical components using sol-gel technology. The merging of these two leading technologies has provided a synergism resulting in the demonstration of a manufacturing technology for cost-effective, high-volume production of silica glass precision hybrid optical components. Hybrid optical components are systems that integrate diffractive optical surfaces into lenses, resulting in designs that minimize the aberrations that degrade image quality without the need for additional glass elements. This reduces the cost, weight, and complexity of the system, while improving the overall optical efficiency. Previous applications of hybrid optical components have been primarily for infra-red applications, where diamond-turned germanium or silicon optics have been used. Hybrid optics for use in the visible have been limited to laboratory curiosities that were directly turned into plastic substrates. Through this CRADA the authors have achieved a manufacturing process for producing high quality silica glass hybrid lenses in an way that lends itself to mass production.

  9. Array of reconfigurable diffractive lens on flexible substrate (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghimi, Mohammad J.; Jiang, Hongrui

    2016-03-01

    We designed and fabricated microscale lens arrays on a flexible substrate. The flexibility of the substrate allows for wide field of view imaging as well as optical focus scanning. Fresnel zone plates (FZPs), which are compact and lightweight, are used as microlenses for focusing. The arrangement of FZPs on flexible substrate can be reconfigured to maximize FOV. Tunable focus can also be achieved by stretching the FZPs laterally. In addition, the lightweight microlenses can be actuated to scan the focus axially. The lenses have a wide range of applications including displays, contact lenses, microscopy, surveillance and optical communications. The diameter of the microlenses ranges from 100 to 500 µm. The thickness of the lenses is 100 µm. Unlike refractive and reflective lenses, the focusing capability of FZPs is achieved via diffraction. FZPs consist of alternating black and white zones to modulate the phase of the incident light. The light diffracted from edge of the regions to achieve multiple focus. Most of the energy is diffracted into the first focus. The dark regions are made of silicon nanowires which are highly absorbent for visible spectrum. Standard processes, including wet and dry etching, are used to etch silicon substrate and form nanowires. The white zones are designed for both reflective and transmissive lenses. The lenses are implemented on PDMS as flexible substrate. The silicon nanowires are embedded into PDMS so that the shape of individual lens as well as the arrangement of the array can be reconfigured. In this article, we report our design, fabrication process and experiments.

  10. Exclusive, Hard Diffraction in QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freund, Andreas

    1999-03-01

    In the first chapter we give an introduction to hard diffractive scattering in QCD to introduce basic concepts and terminology. In the second chapter we make predictions for the evolution of skewed parton distributions in a proton in the LLA. We calculate the DGLAP-type evolution kernels in the LLA and solve the skewed GLAP evolution equations with a modified version of the CTEQ-package. In the third chapter, we discuss the algorithms used in the LO evolution program for skewed parton distributions in the DGLAP region, discuss the stability of the code and reproduce the LO diagonal evolution within less than 0.5% of the original CTEQ-code. In chapter 4, we show that factorization holds for the deeply virtual Compton scattering amplitude in QCD, up to power suppressed terms, to all orders in perturbation theory. In chapter 5, we demonstrate that perturbative QCD allows one to calculate the absolute cross section of diffractive, exclusive production of photons (DVCS) at large Q^2 at HERA, while the aligned jet model allows one to estimate the cross section for intermediate Q^2 ˜ 2 GeV^2. We find a significant DVCS counting rate for the current generation of experiments at HERA and a large azimuthal angle asymmetry for HERA kinematics. In the last chapter, we propose a new methodology of gaining shape fits to skewed parton distributions and, for the first time, to determine the ratio of the real to imaginary part of the DIS amplitude. We do this by using several recent fits to F_2(x,Q^2) to compute the asymmetry A for the combined DVCS and Bethe-Heitler cross section. In the appendix, we give an application of distributional methods as discussed abstractly in chapter 4.

  11. Variable focus crystal diffraction lens

    SciTech Connect

    Smither, R.K.

    1988-11-01

    A new method has been developed to control the shape of the surface of a diffracting crystal that will allow it to function as a variable focus crystal diffraction lens, for focusing photon beams from a synchrotron source. The new method uses thermal gradients in the crystal to control the shape of the surface of the crystal in two dimensions and allows one to generate both spherical and ellipsoidal surface shapes. In this work the thermal gradient was generated by core drilling two sets of cooling channels in a silicon crystal so that cooling or heating fluids could be circulated through the crystal at two different levels. The first set of channels is close to the surface of the crystal where the photon beam strikes it. The second set of channels is equal distant from the back surface. If a concave surface is desired, the fluid in the channels just below the surface exposed to the beam is cooler than the fluid circulating through the channels near the back surface. If a convex surface is desired, then the cooling fluid in the upper channels near the surface exposed to the incident photon beam, is warmer than the fluid in the lower channels. The focal length of the crystal lens is varied by varying the thermal gradient in the crystal. This approach can also be applied to the first crystal in a high power synchrotron beam line to eliminate the bowing and other thermal distortions of the crystal caused by the high heat load. 6 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Nuclear dynamical diffraction using synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, D.E.

    1993-05-01

    The scattering of synchrotron radiation by nuclei is extensively explored in this thesis. From the multipole electric field expansion resulting from time-dependent nonrelativistic perturbation theory, a dynamical scattering theory is constructed. This theory is shown, in the many particle limit, to be equivalent to the semi-classical approach where a quantum mechanical scattering amplitude is used in the Maxwell inhomogeneous wave equation. The Moessbauer specimen whose low-lying energy levels were probed is a ferromagnetic lattice of {sup 57}Fe embedded in a yttrium iron garnet (YIG) crystal matrix. The hyperfine fields in YIG thin films were studied at low and room temperature using time-resolved quantum beat spectroscopy. Nuclear hyperfine structure quantum beats were measured using a fast plastic scintillator coincidence photodetector and associated electronics having a time resolution of 2.5 nsec. The variation of the quantum beat patterns near the Bragg [0 0 2] diffraction peak gave a Lamb-Moessbauer factor of 8.2{plus_minus}0.4. Exploring characteristic dynamical features in the higher order YIG [0 0 10] reflection revealed that one of the YIG crystals had bifurcated into two different layers. The dynamics of nuclear superradiance was explored. This phenomenon includes the radiative speedup exhibited by a collective state of particles, and, in striking concurrence, resonance frequency shifts. A speedup of a factor of 4 in the total decay rate and a beat frequency shift of 1{1/2} natural resonance linewidths were observed. Nuclear resonance scattering was also found to be a useful way of performing angular interferometry experiments, and it was used to observe the phase shift of a rotated quantum state. On the whole, nuclear dynamical diffraction theory has superbly explained many of the fascinating features of resonant magnetic dipole radiation scattered by a lattice of nuclei.

  13. Comparing Science Achievement Constructs: Targeted and Achieved

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrara, Steve; Duncan, Teresa

    2011-01-01

    This article illustrates how test specifications based solely on academic content standards, without attention to other cognitive skills and item response demands, can fall short of their targeted constructs. First, the authors inductively describe the science achievement construct represented by a statewide sixth-grade science proficiency test.…

  14. Surface Coordination of Adatoms by Scanned Low Energy Photoelectron Diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asensio, M. C.

    In this article, a brief overview of the current activity in the field of low energy photoelectron diffraction is presented. Although alternatively angle and energy-scanned photoelectron diffraction can be used to obtain the surface-structural information, we limit our discussion to the low energy and energy-scanned modes and their use in connection with a new developed direct method. By the use of this most recent approach, adatom-substrate distances and adsorption sites are directly revealed from a discrete mapping of the Fourier transform of scanned energy photoelectron diffraction spectra, measured at a representative set of geometries, which depend on the symmetry of the particular studied system. In addition, a short discussion on the determination of the detailed structure of adsorbed overlayers by the traditional trial-and-error method is included, using model multiple scattering calculations. These latest developments are illustrated with a specific example of an atomic adsorbate, and comments about the capabilities and limitations of photoelectron diffraction as a structural technique in new fields.

  15. Mobility and Reading Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waters, Theresa Z.

    A study examined the effect of geographic mobility on elementary school students' achievement. Although such mobility, which requires students to make multiple moves among schools, can have a negative impact on academic achievement, the hypothesis for the study was that it was not a determining factor in reading achievement test scores. Subjects…

  16. Hands-on Fourier analysis by means of far-field diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceffa, Nicolo' Giovanni; Collini, Maddalena; D'Alfonso, Laura; Chirico, Giuseppe

    2016-11-01

    Coherent sources of light are easily available to university undergraduate laboratory courses and the demonstration of electro-magnetic wave diffraction is typically made with light. However, the construction of arbitrary patterns for the study of light diffraction is particularly demanding due to the small linear scale needed when using sub-micrometer wavelengths, limiting the possibility to thoroughly investigate diffraction experimentally. We describe and test a simple and affordable method to develop arbitrary light diffraction patterns with first year undergraduate or last year high school students. This method is exploited to investigate experimentally the connection between diffraction and the Fourier transform, leading to the development of the concept of spectral analysis of a (2D) signal. We therefore discuss the possibility of building a teaching unit for first year undergraduate or last year high school students on the interdisciplinary topic of spectral analysis starting from an experimental approach to light diffraction.

  17. Resonance domain surface relief diffractive lens for the visible spectral region.

    PubMed

    Barlev, Omri; Golub, Michael A

    2013-03-01

    Early expectations for a role of diffractive lenses were dramatically lessened by their high order overlapping foci, low optical powers, and competing advances in refractive micro-optics. By bringing the Bragg properties of volume holograms to diffractive lenses we got rid of ghost diffractive orders and the critical trade-off between diffraction efficiency, number of phase levels, and spatial feature-size. Binary off-axis resonance domain diffractive lens with high numerical aperture of 0.16 was designed with analytical effective grating theory, fabricated by direct e-beam writing, etched in fused silica and experimentally investigated. More than 81% measured diffraction efficiency exceeds twice the limits of thin binary optics.

  18. First results from a next-generation off-plane X-ray diffraction grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEntaffer, Randall; DeRoo, Casey; Schultz, Ted; Gantner, Brennan; Tutt, James; Holland, Andrew; O'Dell, Stephen; Gaskin, Jessica; Kolodziejczak, Jeffrey; Zhang, William W.; Chan, Kai-Wing; Biskach, Michael; McClelland, Ryan; Iazikov, Dmitri; Wang, Xinpeng; Koecher, Larry

    2013-08-01

    Future NASA X-ray spectroscopy missions will require high throughput, high resolving power grating spectrometers. Off-plane reflection gratings are capable of meeting the performance requirements needed to realize the scientific goals of these missions. We have identified a novel grating fabrication method that utilizes common lithographic and microfabrication techniques to produce the high fidelity groove profile necessary to achieve this performance. Application of this process has produced an initial pre-master that exhibits a radial (variable line spacing along the groove dimension), high density (> 6000 grooves/mm), laminar profile. This pre-master has been tested for diffraction efficiency at the BESSY II synchrotron light facility and diffracts up to 55 % of incident light into usable spectral orders. Furthermore, tests of spectral resolving power show that these gratings are capable of obtaining resolving powers well above 1300 ( λ/Δ λ) with limitations due to the test apparatus, not the gratings. Obtaining these results has provided confidence that this fabrication process is capable of producing off-plane reflection gratings for the next generation of X-ray observatories.

  19. In-line holography and coherent diffractive imaging with x-ray waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    De Caro, L.; Giannini, C.; Guagliardi, A.; Mocuta, C.; Metzger, T. H.; Cedola, A.; Burkeeva, I.; Lagomarsino, S.

    2008-02-15

    A Fresnel coherent diffraction imaging experiment with hard x rays is here presented, using two planar crossed waveguides as optical elements, leading to a virtual pointlike source. The coherent wave field obtained with this setup is used to illuminate a micrometric single object having the shape of a butterfly. A digital two-dimensional in-line holographic reconstruction of the unknown object at low resolution (200 nm) has been obtained directly via fast Fourier transform (FFT) of the raw data. The object and its twin image are well separated because suitable geometrical conditions are satisfied. A good estimate of the incident wave field phase has been extracted directly from the FFT of the raw data. A partial object reconstruction with 50 nm spatial resolution was achieved by fast iterative phase retrieval, the major limitation for a full reconstruction being the nonideal structure of the guided beam. The method offers a route for fast and reliable phase retrieval in x-ray coherent diffraction.

  20. Whole-cell phase contrast imaging at the nanoscale using Fresnel Coherent Diffractive Imaging Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Michael W. M.; van Riessen, Grant A.; Abbey, Brian; Putkunz, Corey T.; Junker, Mark D.; Balaur, Eugeniu; Vine, David J.; McNulty, Ian; Chen, Bo; Arhatari, Benedicta D.; Frankland, Sarah; Nugent, Keith A.; Tilley, Leann; Peele, Andrew G.

    2013-01-01

    X-ray tomography can provide structural information of whole cells in close to their native state. Radiation-induced damage, however, imposes a practical limit to image resolution, and as such, a choice between damage, image contrast, and image resolution must be made. New coherent diffractive imaging techniques, such Fresnel Coherent Diffractive Imaging (FCDI), allows quantitative phase information with exceptional dose efficiency, high contrast, and nano-scale resolution. Here we present three-dimensional quantitative images of a whole eukaryotic cell by FCDI at a spatial resolution below 70 nm with sufficient phase contrast to distinguish major cellular components. From our data, we estimate that the minimum dose required for a similar resolution is close to that predicted by the Rose criterion, considerably below accepted estimates of the maximum dose a frozen-hydrated cell can tolerate. Based on the dose efficiency, contrast, and resolution achieved, we expect this technique will find immediate applications in tomographic cellular characterisation. PMID:23887204

  1. Modified statistical dynamical diffraction theory: analysis of model SiGe heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Shreeman, P K; Dunn, K A; Novak, S W; Matyi, R J

    2013-08-01

    A modified version of the statistical dynamical diffraction theory (mSDDT) permits full-pattern fitting of high-resolution X-ray diffraction scans from thin-film systems across the entire range from fully dynamic to fully kinematic scattering. The mSDDT analysis has been applied to a set of model SiGe/Si thin-film samples in order to define the capabilities of this approach. For defect-free materials that diffract at the dynamic limit, mSDDT analyses return structural information that is consistent with commercial dynamical diffraction simulation software. As defect levels increase and the diffraction characteristics shift towards the kinematic limit, the mSDDT provides new insights into the structural characteristics of these materials. PMID:24046498

  2. A Quantitative Analysis of Room Temperature Recrystallization Kinetics in Electroplated Copper Films using High Resolution X-ray Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    A Ying; K Witt; J Jordan-Sweet; R Rosenberg; I Noyan

    2011-12-31

    Time-resolved in situ x-ray diffraction measurements were used to study the room-temperature recrystallization kinetics of electroplated copper thin films with thicknesses between 400 and 1000 nm. The thinnest films exhibited limited recrystallization and subsequent growth of grains, while recrystallized grains in the thicker films grew until all as-plated microstructure was consumed. For all films, recrystallized grains that belonged to the majority texture component, <111>, started growing after the shortest incubation time. These grains exhibited volumetric growth until they achieved the film thickness. After this point the growth mode became planar, with the <111>-type grains growing in the plane of the film. Grains with the <111> direction normal to the film surface started growing after the <111>-type grains switched to planar growth. However, the planar growth of this texture component finished at the same time as the growth of the <111> grains. Profile fitting of the 111 peak permitted the separation of the diffraction signals from recrystallized and as-plated grain populations. The average strains in these two populations, calculated from the peak position of the corresponding {l_brace}111{r_brace} reflections, were different, indicating a heterogeneous stress state within this texture component. The increasing volume fraction of recrystallized <111> grains with time was monitored via the variation in the diffracted intensity. This variation could be represented by the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kolmogorov model.

  3. Ultra-high accuracy optical testing: creating diffraction-limitedshort-wavelength optical systems

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Naulleau, Patrick P.; Rekawa, Senajith B.; Denham, Paul E.; Liddle, J. Alexander; Gullikson, Eric M.; Jackson, KeithH.; Anderson, Erik H.; Taylor, John S.; Sommargren, Gary E.; Chapman,Henry N.; Phillion, Donald W.; Johnson, Michael; Barty, Anton; Soufli,Regina; Spiller, Eberhard A.; Walton, Christopher C.; Bajt, Sasa

    2005-08-03

    Since 1993, research in the fabrication of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) optical imaging systems, conducted at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), has produced the highest resolution optical systems ever made. We have pioneered the development of ultra-high-accuracy optical testing and alignment methods, working at extreme ultraviolet wavelengths, and pushing wavefront-measuring interferometry into the 2-20-nm wavelength range (60-600 eV). These coherent measurement techniques, including lateral shearing interferometry and phase-shifting point-diffraction interferometry (PS/PDI) have achieved RMS wavefront measurement accuracies of 0.5-1-{angstrom} and better for primary aberration terms, enabling the creation of diffraction-limited EUV optics. The measurement accuracy is established using careful null-testing procedures, and has been verified repeatedly through high-resolution imaging. We believe these methods are broadly applicable to the advancement of short-wavelength optical systems including space telescopes, microscope objectives, projection lenses, synchrotron beamline optics, diffractive and holographic optics, and more. Measurements have been performed on a tunable undulator beamline at LBNL's Advanced Light Source (ALS), optimized for high coherent flux; although many of these techniques should be adaptable to alternative ultraviolet, EUV, and soft x-ray light sources. To date, we have measured nine prototype all-reflective EUV optical systems with NA values between 0.08 and 0.30 (f/6.25 to f/1.67). These projection-imaging lenses were created for the semiconductor industry's advanced research in EUV photolithography, a technology slated for introduction in 2009-13. This paper reviews the methods used and our program's accomplishments to date.

  4. Holographic generation of non-diffractive beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Byoungho; Choi, Dawoon; Hong, Keehoon; Lee, Kyookeun; Kim, Kyoung-Youm

    2014-11-01

    An Airy beam is a non-diffractive wave which propagates along a ballistic trajectory without any external force. Although it is impossible to implement ideal Airy beams because they carry infinite power, so-called finite Airy beams can be achieved by tailoring infinite side lobes with an aperture function and they have similar propagating characteristics with those of ideal Airy beams. The finite Airy beam can be optically generated by several ways: the optical Fourier transform system with imposing cubic phase to a broad Gaussian beam, nonlinear generation of Airy beams, curved plasma channel generation, and electron beam generation. In this presentation, a holographic generation of the finite Airy beams will be discussed. The finite Airy beams can be generated in virtue of holographic technique by `reading' a hologram which is recorded by the interference between a finite Airy beam generated by the optical Fourier transform and a reference plane wave. Moreover, this method can exploit the unique features of holography itself such as successful reconstruction with the imperfect incidence of reference beam, reconstruction of phase-conjugated signal beam, and multiplexing, which can shed more light on the characteristics of finite Airy beams. This method has an advantage in that once holograms are recorded in the photopolymer, a bulky optics such as the SLM and lenses are not necessary to generate Airy beams. In addition, multiple Airy beams can be stored and reconstructed simultaneously or individually.

  5. Applications of diffraction theory to aeroacoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lansing, D. L.; Chen-Huei, L.; Norum, T. D.

    1979-01-01

    A review is given of the fundamentals of diffraction theory and the application of the theory to several problems of aircraft noise generation, propagation, and measurement. The general acoustic diffraction problem is defined and the governing equations set down. Diffraction phenomena are illustrated using the classical problem of the diffraction of a plane wave by a half-plane. Infinite series and geometric acoustic methods for solving diffraction problems are described. Four applications of diffraction theory are discussed: the selection of an appropriate shape for a microphone, the use of aircraft wings to shield the community from engine noise, the reflection of engine noise from an aircraft fuselage and the radiation of trailing edge noise.

  6. Anomalous Diffraction in Crystallographic Phase Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Hendrickson, Wayne A.

    2014-01-01

    X-ray diffraction patterns from crystals of biological macromolecules contain sufficient information to define atomic structures, but atomic positions are inextricable without having electron-density images. Diffraction measurements provide amplitudes, but the computation of electron density also requires phases for the diffracted waves. The resonance phenomenon known as anomalous scattering offers a powerful solution to this phase problem. Exploiting scattering resonances from diverse elements, the methods of multiwavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) and single-wavelength anomalous diffraction (SAD) now predominate for de novo determinations of atomic-level biological structures. This review describes the physical underpinnings of anomalous diffraction methods, the evolution of these methods to their current maturity, the elements, procedures and instrumentation used for effective implementation, and the realm of applications. PMID:24726017

  7. Hard diffraction with dynamic gap survival

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmussen, Christine O.; Sjöstrand, Torbjörn

    2016-02-01

    We present a new framework for the modelling of hard diffraction in pp and poverline{p} collisions. It starts from the the approach pioneered by Ingelman and Schlein, wherein the single diffractive cross section is factorized into a Pomeron flux and a Pomeron PDF. To this it adds a dynamically calculated rapidity gap survival factor, derived from the modelling of multiparton interactions. This factor is not relevant for diffraction in ep collisions, giving non-universality between HERA and Tevatron diffractive event rates. The model has been implemented in P ythia 8 and provides a complete description of the hadronic state associated with any hard single diffractive process. Comparisons with poverline{p} and pp data reveal improvement in the description of single diffractive events.

  8. Rayleigh Limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    The theoretical resolving power of a telescope according to a criterion devised by Lord Rayleigh (1842-1919). Because of the phenomenon of diffraction the image of a point source of light (such as a star) produced even by a perfect optical instrument consists of a central bright spot (the Airy disk) surrounded by concentric dark and light rings. If two point sources are very close together, the r...

  9. Fraunhofer diffraction of light by human enamel.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, W J

    1988-02-01

    Fraunhofer diffraction patterns of human enamel samples were photographed with a helium-neon laser beam (lambda = 633 nm). The first-order diffraction angle was in reasonable agreement with a prediction based upon enamel prisms acting as a two-dimensional grating. These results support the hypothesis that enamel diffracts light because of the periodic structure of enamel prisms with interprismatic spaces, which act as slits.

  10. Twenty years of diffraction at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Goulianos, K.; /Rockefeller U.

    2005-10-01

    Results on diffractive particle interactions from the Fermilab Tevatron {bar p}p collider are placed in perspective through a QCD inspired phenomenological approach, which exploits scaling and factorization properties observed in data. The results discussed are those obtained by the CDF Collaboration from a comprehensive set of single, double, and multigap soft and hard diffraction processes studied during the twenty year period since 1985, when the CDF diffractive program was proposed and the first Blois Workshop was held.

  11. Diffraction gratings used as identifying markers

    DOEpatents

    Deason, V.A.; Ward, M.B.

    1991-03-26

    A finely detailed diffraction grating is applied to an object as an identifier or tag which is unambiguous, difficult to duplicate, or remove and transfer to another item, and can be read and compared with prior readings with relative ease. The exact pattern of the diffraction grating is mapped by diffraction moire techniques and recorded for comparison with future readings of the same grating. 7 figures.

  12. Aircraft noise propagation. [sound diffraction by wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadden, W. J.; Pierce, A. D.

    1978-01-01

    Sound diffraction experiments conducted at NASA Langley Research Center to study the acoustical implications of the engine over wing configuration (noise-shielding by wing) and to provide a data base for assessing various theoretical approaches to the problem of aircraft noise reduction are described. Topics explored include the theory of sound diffraction around screens and wedges; the scattering of spherical waves by rectangular patches; plane wave diffraction by a wedge with finite impedence; and the effects of ambient flow and distribution sources.

  13. Coherent diffractive imaging and partial coherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Garth J.; Quiney, Harry M.; Peele, Andrew G.; Nugent, Keith A.

    2007-03-01

    We formulate coherent diffractive imaging in the framework of partially spatially coherent diffraction. We find that the reconstruction can be critically dependent on the degree of coherence in the illuminating field and that even a small departure from full coherence may invalidate the conventional assumption that a mapping exists between an exit surface wave of finite support and a far field diffraction pattern. We demonstrate that the introduction of sufficient phase curvature in the illumination can overcome the adverse effects of partial coherence.

  14. Teaching diffraction with hands-on optical spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Robert

    2012-09-01

    Although the observation of optical spectra is common practice in physics classes, students are usually limited to a passive, qualitative observation of nice colours. This paper discusses a diffraction-based spectrometer that allows students to take quantitative measurements of spectral bands. Students can build it within minutes from generic low-cost materials. The spectrometer’s simple, didactic design allows students to fully comprehend the underlying physical concepts and to engage in a discussion of measurement errors and uncertainties.

  15. A femtosecond electron diffraction system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Baosheng; Zhang, Jie; Tian, Jinshou; Wang, Junfeng; Wu, Jianjun; Liu, Yunquan; Liu, Hulin

    2007-01-01

    The femtosecond electron diffraction (FED) is a unique method for the study of the changes of complex molecular structures, and has been specifically applied in the investigations of transient-optics, opto-physics, crystallography, and other fields. The FED system designed by the present group, consists of a 35nm Ag photocathode evaporated on an ultraviolet glass, an anode with a 0.1mm aperture, two pairs of deflection plate for the deflection of electron beams in X and Y directions, and the Y deflection plate can be used as a scanning plate while measuring the pulse width of electron beams, the double MCPs detector for the enhancing and detecting of electron image. The magnetic lens was used for the focusing of the electron beams, and the focal length is 125mm. The distance between the object(the photocathode) and the image(the sample) is 503mm, and the size of electron beams is smaller than 17microns after focusing, the convergence angle is of -0.075~0.075°, and the temporal resolution is better than 350fs.

  16. Convex Diffraction Grating Imaging Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chrisp, Michael P. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A 1:1 Offner mirror system for imaging off-axis objects is modified by replacing a concave spherical primary mirror that is concentric with a convex secondary mirror with two concave spherical mirrors M1 and M2 of the same or different radii positioned with their respective distances d1 and d2 from a concentric convex spherical diffraction grating having its grooves parallel to the entrance slit of the spectrometer which replaces the convex secondary mirror. By adjusting their distances d1 and d2 and their respective angles of reflection alpha and beta, defined as the respective angles between their incident and reflected rays, all aberrations are corrected without the need to increase the spectrometer size for a given entrance slit size to reduce astigmatism, thus allowing the imaging spectrometer volume to be less for a given application than would be possible with conventional imaging spectrometers and still give excellent spatial and spectral imaging of the slit image spectra over the focal plane.

  17. What Phase Matters for Diffraction?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Eric; Bach, Roger; Batelaan, Herman

    2014-05-01

    Young's double-slit experiment for matter is often compared to that of optics. In rudimentary explanations of the locations of the diffraction maxima and minima far from the slits, paths are sometimes superimposed over waves drawn from the two slits to the detection screen, leading to a phase difference of Δϕ = 2 πΔL /λdB between paths. Despite the intuitive connection of the two kinds of wave phenomena, this approach can lead to a misunderstanding of the theory for matter waves. The Feynman path-integral formalism justifies the use of paths to determine the phase difference; however, the phase accumulated along single free-particle paths according to the formalism is not ϕ = 2 πL /λdB , even though the expression for the phase difference is correct. The resulting factor of 2 difference in the single path phase from the intuitive value arises from the particular treatment of time-dependence in interpreting the problem. The nature of this misunderstanding will be discussed, and a possible resolution proposed based on the quantum mechanical principle of indistinguishability: the time duration of all interfering paths must be equal. We gratefully acknowledge support from the NSF.

  18. Large aperture diffractive space telescope

    DOEpatents

    Hyde, Roderick A.

    2001-01-01

    A large (10's of meters) aperture space telescope including two separate spacecraft--an optical primary objective lens functioning as a magnifying glass and an optical secondary functioning as an eyepiece. The spacecraft are spaced up to several kilometers apart with the eyepiece directly behind the magnifying glass "aiming" at an intended target with their relative orientation determining the optical axis of the telescope and hence the targets being observed. The objective lens includes a very large-aperture, very-thin-membrane, diffractive lens, e.g., a Fresnel lens, which intercepts incoming light over its full aperture and focuses it towards the eyepiece. The eyepiece has a much smaller, meter-scale aperture and is designed to move along the focal surface of the objective lens, gathering up the incoming light and converting it to high quality images. The positions of the two space craft are controlled both to maintain a good optical focus and to point at desired targets which may be either earth bound or celestial.

  19. Action Learning in Action: Achieving Change with Limited Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grzybowski, Anne

    2008-01-01

    Implementing change is always difficult. It is even more difficult when change is not a priority for anyone else, individuals do not have the authority to tell people to "just do it" and they do not have the resources to "do it themselves". These are some of the challenges the Records Management Section at the University of Edinburgh faces, but it…

  20. Controlling open quantum systems: tools, achievements, and limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Christiane P.

    2016-06-01

    The advent of quantum devices, which exploit the two essential elements of quantum physics, coherence and entanglement, has sparked renewed interest in the control of open quantum systems. Successful implementations face the challenge of preserving relevant nonclassical features at the level of device operation. A major obstacle is decoherence, which is caused by interaction with the environment. Optimal control theory is a tool that can be used to identify control strategies in the presence of decoherence. Here we review recent advances in optimal control methodology that allow typical tasks in device operation for open quantum systems to be tackled and discuss examples of relaxation-optimized dynamics. Optimal control theory is also a useful tool to exploit the environment for control. We discuss examples and point out possible future extensions.

  1. Diffractively corrected counter-rotating Risley prisms.

    PubMed

    Nie, Xin; Yang, Hongfang; Xue, Changxi

    2015-12-10

    Using the vector refraction equation and the vector diffraction equation, we obtain the expressions of the direction cosines of the refractive rays for the two wedge prisms, and the direction cosines of the diffractive rays for two wedge grisms, in which diffractive gratings were etched into the prism faces to correct the chromatic aberrations. A mathematical model between the two vector equations is proposed to compare the difference angle chromatic aberrations when the Risley prisms/grisms are rotating at different angles. We conclude that the use of diffractively corrected prisms offers a new method to correct chromatic aberrations in Risley prisms. PMID:26836873

  2. Broadband beam shaping with harmonic diffractive optics.

    PubMed

    Singh, Manisha; Tervo, Jani; Turunen, Jari

    2014-09-22

    We consider spatial shaping of broadband (either stationary or pulsed) spatially coherent light, comparing refractive, standard diffractive, and harmonic diffractive (modulo 2πM) elements. Considering frequency-integrated target profiles we show that, contrary to common belief, standard diffractive (M = 1) elements work reasonably well for, e.g., Gaussian femtosecond pulses and spatially coherent amplified-spontaneous-emission sources such as superluminescent diodes. It is also shown that harmonic elements with M ≥ 5 behave in essentially the same way as refractive elements and clearly outperform standard diffractive elements for highly broadband light.

  3. Diffraction by m-bonacci gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monsoriu, Juan A.; Giménez, Marcos H.; Furlan, Walter D.; Barreiro, Juan C.; Saavedra, Genaro

    2015-11-01

    We present a simple diffraction experiment with m-bonacci gratings as a new interesting generalization of the Fibonacci ones. Diffraction by these non-conventional structures is proposed as a motivational strategy to introduce students to basic research activities. The Fraunhofer diffraction patterns are obtained with the standard equipment present in most undergraduate physics labs and are compared with those obtained with regular periodic gratings. We show that m-bonacci gratings produce discrete Fraunhofer patterns characterized by a set of diffraction peaks which positions are related to the concept of a generalized golden mean. A very good agreement is obtained between experimental and numerical results and the students’ feedback is discussed.

  4. Results on hard diffraction from CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Goulianos, K.

    1997-05-01

    We present results from studies of hard diffractive processes in {anti p}p collisions at {radical}s=1.8 TeV at the Tevatron using the CDF detector. Diffractive events are identified by the characteristic signature of a rapidity gap and/or by detecting a recoil antiproton with high forward momentum. Reactions studied include the diffractive production of W-bosons and of two-jet (dijet) events, diffractive heavy quark production, and dijet production by double-pomeron exchange.

  5. Catastrophe optics of sharp-edge diffraction.

    PubMed

    Borghi, Riccardo

    2016-07-01

    A classical problem of diffraction theory, namely plane wave diffraction by sharp-edge apertures, is here reformulated from the viewpoint of the fairly new subject of catastrophe optics. On using purely geometrical arguments, properly embedded into a wave optics context, uniform analytical estimates of the diffracted wavefield at points close to fold caustics are obtained, within paraxial approximation, in terms of the Airy function and its first derivative. Diffraction from parabolic apertures is proposed to test reliability and accuracy of our theoretical predictions.

  6. Electron Diffraction Using Transmission Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Bendersky, Leonid A.; Gayle, Frank W.

    2001-01-01

    Electron diffraction via the transmission electron microscope is a powerful method for characterizing the structure of materials, including perfect crystals and defect structures. The advantages of electron diffraction over other methods, e.g., x-ray or neutron, arise from the extremely short wavelength (≈2 pm), the strong atomic scattering, and the ability to examine tiny volumes of matter (≈10 nm3). The NIST Materials Science and Engineering Laboratory has a history of discovery and characterization of new structures through electron diffraction, alone or in combination with other diffraction methods. This paper provides a survey of some of this work enabled through electron microscopy. PMID:27500060

  7. Broadband diffractive lens or imaging element

    DOEpatents

    Ceglio, Natale M.; Hawryluk, Andrew M.; London, Richard A.; Seppala, Lynn G.

    1991-01-01

    A broadband diffractive lens or imaging element produces a sharp focus and/or a high resolution image with broad bandwidth illuminating radiation. The diffractive lens is sectored or segmented into regions, each of which focuses or images a distinct narrowband of radiation but all of which have a common focal length. Alternatively, a serial stack of minus filters, each with a diffraction pattern which focuses or images a distinct narrowband of radiation but all of which have a common focal length, is used. The two approaches can be combined. Multifocal broadband diffractive elements can also be formed.

  8. Broadband diffractive lens or imaging element

    DOEpatents

    Ceglio, Natale M.; Hawryluk, Andrew M.; London, Richard A.; Seppala, Lynn G.

    1993-01-01

    A broadband diffractive lens or imaging element produces a sharp focus and/or a high resolution image with broad bandwidth illuminating radiation. The diffractive lens is sectored or segmented into regions, each of which focuses or images a distinct narrowband of radiation but all of which have a common focal length. Alternatively, a serial stack of minus filters, each with a diffraction pattern which focuses or images a distinct narrowband of radiation but all of which have a common focal length, is used. The two approaches can be combined. Multifocal broadband diffractive elements can also be formed. Thin film embodiments are described.

  9. Diffractively corrected counter-rotating Risley prisms.

    PubMed

    Nie, Xin; Yang, Hongfang; Xue, Changxi

    2015-12-10

    Using the vector refraction equation and the vector diffraction equation, we obtain the expressions of the direction cosines of the refractive rays for the two wedge prisms, and the direction cosines of the diffractive rays for two wedge grisms, in which diffractive gratings were etched into the prism faces to correct the chromatic aberrations. A mathematical model between the two vector equations is proposed to compare the difference angle chromatic aberrations when the Risley prisms/grisms are rotating at different angles. We conclude that the use of diffractively corrected prisms offers a new method to correct chromatic aberrations in Risley prisms.

  10. Broadband diffractive lens or imaging element

    DOEpatents

    Ceglio, N.M.; Hawryluk, A.M.; London, R.A.; Seppala, L.G.

    1993-10-26

    A broadband diffractive lens or imaging element produces a sharp focus and/or a high resolution image with broad bandwidth illuminating radiation. The diffractive lens is sectored or segmented into regions, each of which focuses or images a distinct narrowband of radiation but all of which have a common focal length. Alternatively, a serial stack of minus filters, each with a diffraction pattern which focuses or images a distinct narrowband of radiation but all of which have a common focal length, is used. The two approaches can be combined. Multifocal broadband diffractive elements can also be formed. Thin film embodiments are described. 21 figures.

  11. A universal measure for coherence requirements in diffractive imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bo; Abbey, Brian; Balaur, Eugeniu; van Reissen, Grant; Junker, Mark; Jones, Michael W. M.; Peele, Andrew G.; Putkunz, Corey T.; Vine, David; Quiney, Harry M.; Nugent, Keith A.

    2013-09-01

    The requirements on the spatial and temporal coherence for conventional Coherent Diffractive Imaging (CDI) have been well-established in the literature based on Shannon sampling of the diffracted intensities. The spatial coherence length of the illumination must be larger than twice the lateral dimensions of the sample whilst the temporal coherence length must be larger than the maximum optical path length difference between the two edges of the sample for the highest order diffraction peaks. However, recent approaches to CDI which have included knowledge of the spatial and temporal coherence information in the image reconstruction have allowed us to relax these conventional coherence constraints, extending the applicability of the technique to less coherent sources. In light of these developments it is useful to revisit the idea of a coherence limit in partially coherent CDI and establish a `universal' limit on the partial coherence that can be tolerated without any loss of information. In this paper we present a simple and straightforward description of the limit of spatial and temporal coherence in partially coherent CDI.

  12. Conical diffraction as a versatile building block to implement new imaging modalities for superresolution in fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallet, Clément; Caron, Julien; Oddos, Stephane; Tinevez, Jean-Yves; Moisan, Lionel; Sirat, Gabriel Y.; Braitbart, Philippe O.; Shorte, Spencer L.

    2014-08-01

    We present a new technology for super-resolution fluorescence imaging, based on conical diffraction. Conical diffraction is a linear, singular phenomenon taking place when a polarized beam is diffracted through a biaxial crystal. The illumination patterns generated by conical diffraction are more compact than the classical Gaussian beam; we use them to generate a super-resolution imaging modality. Conical Diffraction Microscopy (CODIM) resolution enhancement can be achieved with any type of objective on any kind of sample preparation and standard fluorophores. Conical diffraction can be used in multiple fashion to create new and disruptive technologies for super-resolution microscopy. This paper will focus on the first one that has been implemented and give a glimpse at what the future of microscopy using conical diffraction could be.

  13. Surface plasmon resonance microscopy: Achieving a quantitative optical response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Alexander W.; Halter, Michael; Plant, Anne L.; Elliott, John T.

    2016-09-01

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) imaging allows real-time label-free imaging based on index of refraction and changes in index of refraction at an interface. Optical parameter analysis is achieved by application of the Fresnel model to SPR data typically taken by an instrument in a prism based figuration. We carry out SPR imaging on a microscope by launching light into a sample and collecting reflected light through a high numerical aperture microscope objective. The SPR microscope enables spatial resolution that approaches the diffraction limit and has a dynamic range that allows detection of subnanometer to submicrometer changes in thickness of biological material at a surface. However, unambiguous quantitative interpretation of SPR changes using the microscope system could not be achieved using the Fresnel model because of polarization dependent attenuation and optical aberration that occurs in the high numerical aperture objective. To overcome this problem, we demonstrate a model to correct for polarization diattenuation and optical aberrations in the SPR data and develop a procedure to calibrate reflectivity to index of refraction values. The calibration and correction strategy for quantitative analysis was validated by comparing the known indices of refraction of bulk materials with corrected SPR data interpreted with the Fresnel model. Subsequently, we applied our SPR microscopy method to evaluate the index of refraction for a series of polymer microspheres in aqueous media and validated the quality of the measurement with quantitative phase microscopy.

  14. The Longitudinal Effects of Achievement Goals and Perceived Control on University Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniels, Lia M.; Perry, Raymond P.; Stupnisky, Robert H.; Stewart, Tara L.; Newall, Nancy E. G.; Clifton, Rodney A.

    2014-01-01

    In the area of achievement motivation, students' beliefs pertaining to achievement goals and perceived control have separately guided a large amount theoretical and empirical research. However, limited research has considered the simultaneous effects of goals and control on achievement. The purpose of this study was to examine primary and…

  15. Exclusive, hard diffraction in QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freund, Andreas

    In the first chapter we give an introduction to hard diffractive scattering in QCD to introduce basic concepts and terminology, thus setting the stage for the following chapters. In the second chapter we make predictions for nondiagonal parton distributions in a proton in the LLA. We calculate the DGLAP-type evolution kernels in the LLA, solve the nondiagonal GLAP evolution equations with a modified version of the CTEQ-package and comment on the range of applicability of the LLA in the asymmetric regime. We show that the nondiagonal gluon distribution g(x1,x2,t,μ2) can be well approximated at small x by the conventional gluon density xG(x,μ2). In the third chapter, we discuss the algorithms used in the LO evolution program for nondiagonal parton distributions in the DGLAP region and discuss the stability of the code. Furthermore, we demonstrate that we can reproduce the case of the LO diagonal evolution within less than 0.5% of the original code as developed by the CTEQ-collaboration. In chapter 4, we show that factorization holds for the deeply virtual Compton scattering amplitude in QCD, up to power suppressed terms, to all orders in perturbation theory. Furthermore, we show that the virtuality of the produced photon does not influence the general theorem. In chapter 5, we demonstrate that perturbative QCD allows one to calculate the absolute cross section of diffractive exclusive production of photons at large Q2 at HERA, while the aligned jet model allows one to estimate the cross section for intermediate Q2~2GeV2. Furthermore, we find that the imaginary part of the amplitude for the production of real photons is larger than the imaginary part of the corresponding DIS amplitude, leading to predictions of a significant counting rate for the current generation of experiments at HERA. We also find a large azimuthal angle asymmetry in ep scattering for HERA kinematics which allows one to directly measure the real part of the DVCS amplitude and hence the

  16. Beam steering for virtual/augmented reality displays with a cycloidal diffractive waveplate.

    PubMed

    Chen, Haiwei; Weng, Yishi; Xu, Daming; Tabiryan, Nelson V; Wu, Shin-Tson

    2016-04-01

    We proposed a switchable beam steering device with cycloidal diffractive waveplate (CDW) for eye tracking in a virtual reality (VR) or augmented reality (AR) display system. Such a CDW diffracts the incident circularly polarized light to the first order with over 95% efficiency. To convert the input linearly polarized light to right-handed or left-handed circular polarization, we developed a broadband polarization switch consisting of a twisted nematic liquid crystal cell and an achromatic quarter-wave retardation film. By cascading 2-3 CDWs together, multiple diffraction angles can be achieved. To suppress the color dispersion, we proposed two approaches to obtain the same diffraction angle for red, green, and blue LEDs-based full color displays. Our device exhibits several advantages, such as high diffraction efficiency, fast response time, low power consumption, and low cost. It holds promise for the emerging VR/AR displays. PMID:27137019

  17. Improved strain precision with high spatial resolution using nanobeam precession electron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Rouviere, Jean-Luc Martin, Yannick; Denneulin, Thibaud; Cooper, David

    2013-12-09

    NanoBeam Electron Diffraction is a simple and efficient technique to measure strain in nanostructures. Here, we show that improved results can be obtained by precessing the electron beam while maintaining a few nanometer probe size, i.e., by doing Nanobeam Precession Electron Diffraction (N-PED). The precession of the beam makes the diffraction spots more uniform and numerous, making N-PED more robust and precise. In N-PED, smaller probe size and better precision are achieved by having diffraction disks instead of diffraction dots. Precision in the strain measurement better than 2 × 10{sup −4} is obtained with a probe size approaching 1 nm in diameter.

  18. A Hybrid Reflective/Refractive/Diffractive Achromatic Fiber-Coupled Radiation Resistant Imaging System for Use in the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS)

    SciTech Connect

    Maxey, L Curt; Ally, Tanya R; Brunson, Aly; Garcia, Frances; Goetz, Kathleen C; Hasse, Katelyn E; McManamy, Thomas J; Shea, Thomas J; Simpson, Marc Livingstone

    2011-01-01

    A fiber-coupled imaging system for monitoring the proton beam profile on the target of the Spallation Neutron Source was developed using reflective, refractive and diffractive optics to focus an image onto a fiber optic imaging bundle. The imaging system monitors the light output from a chromium-doped aluminum oxide (Al{sub 2}0{sub 3}:Cr) scintillator on the nose of the target. Metal optics are used to relay the image to the lenses that focus the image onto the fiber. The material choices for the lenses and fiber were limited to high-purity fused silica, due to the anticipated radiation dose of 10{sup 8} R. In the first generation system (which had no diffractive elements), radiation damage to the scintillator on the nose of the target significantly broadened the normally monochromatic (694 nm) spectrum. This created the need for an achromatic design in the second generation system. This was achieved through the addition of a diffractive optic for chromatic correction. An overview of the target imaging system and its performance, with particular emphasis on the design and testing of a hybrid refractive/diffractive high-purity fused silica imaging triplet, is presented.

  19. General Achievement Trends: Oklahoma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  20. General Achievement Trends: Georgia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  1. General Achievement Trends: Nebraska

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  2. General Achievement Trends: Arkansas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  3. General Achievement Trends: Maryland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  4. General Achievement Trends: Maine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  5. General Achievement Trends: Iowa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  6. General Achievement Trends: Texas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  7. General Achievement Trends: Hawaii

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  8. General Achievement Trends: Kansas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  9. General Achievement Trends: Florida

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  10. General Achievement Trends: Massachusetts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  11. General Achievement Trends: Tennessee

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  12. General Achievement Trends: Alabama

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  13. General Achievement Trends: Virginia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  14. General Achievement Trends: Michigan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  15. General Achievement Trends: Colorado

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  16. Inverting the Achievement Pyramid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White-Hood, Marian; Shindel, Melissa

    2006-01-01

    Attempting to invert the pyramid to improve student achievement and increase all students' chances for success is not a new endeavor. For decades, educators have strategized, formed think tanks, and developed school improvement teams to find better ways to improve the achievement of all students. Currently, the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) is…

  17. Achievement Test Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Dept. of Education, Columbus. Trade and Industrial Education Service.

    The Ohio Trade and Industrial Education Achievement Test battery is comprised of seven basic achievement tests: Machine Trades, Automotive Mechanics, Basic Electricity, Basic Electronics, Mechanical Drafting, Printing, and Sheet Metal. The tests were developed by subject matter committees and specialists in testing and research. The Ohio Trade and…

  18. School Effects on Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nichols, Robert C.

    The New York State Education Department conducts a Pupil Evaluation Program (PEP) in which each year all third, sixth, and ninth grade students in the state are given a series of achievement tests in reading and mathematics. The data accumulated by the department includes achievement test scores, teacher characteristics, building and curriculum…

  19. Heritability of Creative Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piffer, Davide; Hur, Yoon-Mi

    2014-01-01

    Although creative achievement is a subject of much attention to lay people, the origin of individual differences in creative accomplishments remain poorly understood. This study examined genetic and environmental influences on creative achievement in an adult sample of 338 twins (mean age = 26.3 years; SD = 6.6 years). Twins completed the Creative…

  20. Confronting the Achievement Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, David

    2007-01-01

    This article talks about the large achievement gap between children of color and their white peers. The reasons for the achievement gap are varied. First, many urban minorities come from a background of poverty. One of the detrimental effects of growing up in poverty is receiving inadequate nourishment at a time when bodies and brains are rapidly…