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Sample records for achieve diffraction-limited resolution

  1. k-Microscopy: resolution beyond the diffraction limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geissbuehler, Matthias; Lasser, Theo; Leitgeb, Rainer A.

    2008-02-01

    We present a novel Fourier domain method for microscopic imaging - so-called k-microscopy - with lateral resolution independent of the detection numerical aperture. The concept is based on sample illumination by a lateral fringe-pattern of varying spatial frequency, which probes the lateral spatial frequency or k- spectrum of the sample structure. The illumination pattern is realized by interference of two collimated coherent beams. Wavelength tuning is employed for modulation of the fringe spacing. The uniqueness of the proposed system is that a single point detector is sufficient to collect the total light corresponding to a particular position in the sample k-space. By shifting the phase of the interference pattern, we get full access to the complex frequencies. An inverse Fourier transformation of the acquired band in the frequency- or k-space will reconstruct the sample. The resulting lateral resolution will be defined by the temporal coherence length associated with the detected light source spectrum as well as by the illumination angle. The feasibility of the concept has been demonstrated in 1D.

  2. Super-resolution of dense nanoscale emitters beyond the diffraction limit using spatial and temporal information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barsic, Anthony; Piestun, Rafael

    2013-06-01

    We propose a super-resolution technique for dense clusters of blinking emitters. The method relies on two basic assumptions: the emitters are statistically independent and a model of the imaging system is known. We numerically analyze the performance limits of the method as a function of emitter density and noise level. Numerical simulations show that five closely packed emitters can be resolved and localized to a precision of 17 nm. The experimental resolution of five quantum dots located within a diffraction-limited spot confirms the applicability of this approach. Statistical tests validate the independence of our quantum dots separated by nanoscale distances.

  3. Compact high-resolution spectrographs for large and extremely large telescopes: using the diffraction limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, J. Gordon; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss

    2012-09-01

    As telescopes get larger, the size of a seeing-limited spectrograph for a given resolving power becomes larger also, and for ELTs the size will be so great that high resolution instruments of simple design will be infeasible. Solutions include adaptive optics (but not providing full correction for short wavelengths) or image slicers (which give feasible but still large instruments). Here we develop the solution proposed by Bland-Hawthorn and Horton: the use of diffraction-limited spectrographs which are compact even for high resolving power. Their use is made possible by the photonic lantern, which splits a multi-mode optical fiber into a number of single-mode fibers. We describe preliminary designs for such spectrographs, at a resolving power of R ~ 50,000. While they are small and use relatively simple optics, the challenges are to accommodate the longest possible fiber slit (hence maximum number of single-mode fibers in one spectrograph) and to accept the beam from each fiber at a focal ratio considerably faster than for most spectrograph collimators, while maintaining diffraction-limited imaging quality. It is possible to obtain excellent performance despite these challenges. We also briefly consider the number of such spectrographs required, which can be reduced by full or partial adaptive optics correction, and/or moving towards longer wavelengths.

  4. Polarization sensitive ultrafast mid-IR pump probe micro-spectrometer with diffraction limited spatial resolution.

    PubMed

    Kaucikas, M; Barber, J; Van Thor, J J

    2013-04-01

    A setup of ultrafast transient infrared IR spectrometer is described in this paper that employed Schwarzschild objectives to focus the probe beam to a diffraction limited spot. Thus measurements were performed with very high spatial resolution in the mid-IR spectral region. Furthermore, modulating the polarization of the probe light enabled detecting transient dichroism of the sample. These capabilities of the setup were applied to study transient absorption of Photosystem II core complex and to image an organized film of methylene blue chloride dye. Moreover, a study of noise sources in a pump probe measurement is presented. The predicted noise level of the current setup was 8.25 μOD in 10(4) acquisitions and compared very well with the experimental observation of 9.6 μOD.

  5. Metalenses at visible wavelengths: Diffraction-limited focusing and subwavelength resolution imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khorasaninejad, Mohammadreza; Chen, Wei Ting; Devlin, Robert C.; Oh, Jaewon; Zhu, Alexander Y.; Capasso, Federico

    2016-06-01

    Subwavelength resolution imaging requires high numerical aperture (NA) lenses, which are bulky and expensive. Metasurfaces allow the miniaturization of conventional refractive optics into planar structures. We show that high-aspect-ratio titanium dioxide metasurfaces can be fabricated and designed as metalenses with NA = 0.8. Diffraction-limited focusing is demonstrated at wavelengths of 405, 532, and 660 nm with corresponding efficiencies of 86, 73, and 66%. The metalenses can resolve nanoscale features separated by subwavelength distances and provide magnification as high as 170×, with image qualities comparable to a state-of-the-art commercial objective. Our results firmly establish that metalenses can have widespread applications in laser-based microscopy, imaging, and spectroscopy.

  6. First results from IRENI - Rapid diffraction-limited high resolution imaging across the mid-infrared bandwidth

    SciTech Connect

    Nasse, Michael J.; Mattson, Eric; Hirschmugl, Carol

    2010-02-03

    First results from IRENI, a new beamline at the Synchrotron Radiation Center, demonstrate that synchrotron chemical imaging, which combines the characteristics of bright, stable, broadband synchrotron source with a multi-element detector, produces diffraction-limited images at all wavelengths simultaneously. A single cell of Micrasterias maintained in a flow cell has been measured, and results show high quality spectra and images demonstrating diffraction limited, and therefore wavelength-dependent, spatial resolution.

  7. Mode-converters for rectangular-core fiber amplifiers to achieve diffraction-limited power scaling.

    PubMed

    Sridharan, Arun Kumar; Pax, Paul H; Heebner, John E; Drachenberg, Derrek R; Armstrong, J Paul; Dawson, Jay W

    2012-12-17

    A rectangular-core (ribbon) fiber that guides and amplifies a single higher-order-mode (HOM) can potentially scale to much higher average powers than what is possible in traditional circular-core large-mode-area fibers. Such an amplifier would require mode-conversion at the input to enable interfacing with seed sources that typically output TEM(00) mode radiation and at the output to generate diffraction-limited radiation for end-user applications. We present the first simulation and experimental results of a mode conversion technique that uses two diffractive-optic-elements in conjugate Fourier planes to convert a diffraction limited TEM(00) mode to the HOM of a ribbon fiber. Mode-conversion-efficiency is approximately 84% and can theoretically approach 100%. We also demonstrate a mode-converter system that converts a single HOM of a ribbon fiber back to a diffraction-limited TEM(00) mode. Conversion efficiency is a record 80.5%.

  8. Novel techniques for detection and imaging of spin related phenomena: Towards sub-diffraction limited resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfe, Christopher Stuart

    The idea that the spin degree of freedom of particles can be used to store and transport information has revolutionized the data storage industry and inspired a huge amount of research activity. Spin electronics, or spintronics, provides a plethora of potential improvements to conventional charge electronics that include increased functionality and energy efficiency. Scientists studying spintronics will need a multitude of characterization tools to sensitively detect spins in new materials and devices. There are already a handful of powerful techniques to image spin-related phenomena, but each has limitations. Magnetic resonance force microscopy, for example, offers sensitive detection of spin moments that are localized or nearly so but requires a high vacuum, cryogenic environment. Magnetometry based on nitrogen vacancy centers in diamond is a powerful approach, but requires the nitrogen vacancy center to be in very close contact to the spin system being studied to be able to measure the field generated by the system. Spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy provides perhaps the best demonstrated spatial resolution, but typically requires ultrahigh vacuum conditions and is limited to studying the surface of a sample. Traditional optical techniques such as Faraday or Kerr microscopy are limited in spatial resolution by the optical diffraction limit. In this dissertation I will present three new techniques we have developed to address some of these issues and to provide the community with new tools to help push forward spintronics and magnetism related research. I will start by presenting the first experimental demonstration of scanned spin-precession microscopy. This technique has the potential to turn any spin-sensitive detection technique into an imaging platform by providing the groundwork for incorporating a magnetic field gradient with that technique, akin to magnetic resonance imaging, and the mathematical tools to analyze the data and extract the local

  9. Diffraction-limited spatial resolution of circumstellar shells at 10 microns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloemhof, E. E.; Townes, C. H.; Vanderwyck, A. H. B.

    1983-01-01

    A new spatial array instrument provided diffraction-limited mid-infrared intensity profiles of the type-M supergiant stars alpha Orionis and alpha Scorpii, both of which are known to exhibit excess 10 microns radiation due to the presence of circumstellar dust shells. In the case of alpha Ori, there is a marked asymmetry in the dust distribution, with peak intensity of dust emission a distance of 0.9 inches from the star.

  10. Breaking the diffraction-limited resolution barrier in fiber-optical two-photon fluorescence endoscopy by an azimuthally-polarized beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Min; Kang, Hong; Li, Xiangping

    2014-01-01

    Although fiber-optical two-photon endoscopy has been recognized as a potential high-resolution diagnostic and therapeutic procedure in vivo, its resolution is limited by the optical diffraction nature to a few micrometers due to the low numerical aperture of an endoscopic objective. On the other hand, stimulated emission depletion (STED) achieved by a circularly-polarized vortex beam has been used to break the diffraction-limited resolution barrier in a bulky microscope. It has been a challenge to apply the STED principle to a fiber-optical two-photon endoscope as a circular polarization state cannot be maintained due to the birefringence of a fiber. Here, we demonstrate the first fiber-optical STED two-photon endoscope using an azimuthally-polarized beam directly generated from a double-clad fiber. As such, the diffraction-limited resolution barrier of fiber-optical two-photon endoscopy can be broken by a factor of three. Our new accomplishment has paved a robust way for high-resolution in vivo biomedical studies.

  11. Prospects of high-resolution resonant X-ray inelastic scattering studies on solid materials, liquids and gases at diffraction-limited storage rings

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, Thorsten; de Groot, Frank M. F.; Rubensson, Jan-Erik

    2014-01-01

    The spectroscopic technique of resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) will particularly profit from immensely improved brilliance of diffraction-limited storage rings (DLSRs). In RIXS one measures the intensities of excitations as a function of energy and momentum transfer. DLSRs will allow for pushing the achievable energy resolution, signal intensity and the sampled spot size to new limits. With RIXS one nowadays probes a broad range of electronic systems reaching from simple molecules to complex materials displaying phenomena like peculiar magnetism, two-dimensional electron gases, superconductivity, photovoltaic energy conversion and heterogeneous catalysis. In this article the types of improved RIXS studies that will become possible with X-ray beams from DLSRs are envisioned. PMID:25177995

  12. Diffraction-limited ultrabroadband terahertz spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baillergeau, M.; Maussang, K.; Nirrengarten, T.; Palomo, J.; Li, L. H.; Linfield, E. H.; Davies, A. G.; Dhillon, S.; Tignon, J.; Mangeney, J.

    2016-05-01

    Diffraction is the ultimate limit at which details of objects can be resolved in conventional optical spectroscopy and imaging systems. In the THz spectral range, spectroscopy systems increasingly rely on ultra-broadband radiation (extending over more 5 octaves) making a great challenge to reach resolution limited by diffraction. Here, we propose an original easy-to-implement wavefront manipulation concept to achieve ultrabroadband THz spectroscopy system with diffraction-limited resolution. Applying this concept to a large-area photoconductive emitter, we demonstrate diffraction-limited ultra-broadband spectroscopy system up to 14.5 THz with a dynamic range of 103. The strong focusing of ultrabroadband THz radiation provided by our approach is essential for investigating single micrometer-scale objects such as graphene flakes or living cells, and besides for achieving intense ultra-broadband THz electric fields.

  13. Diffraction-limited ultrabroadband terahertz spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Baillergeau, M.; Maussang, K.; Nirrengarten, T.; Palomo, J.; Li, L. H.; Linfield, E. H.; Davies, A. G.; Dhillon, S.; Tignon, J.; Mangeney, J.

    2016-01-01

    Diffraction is the ultimate limit at which details of objects can be resolved in conventional optical spectroscopy and imaging systems. In the THz spectral range, spectroscopy systems increasingly rely on ultra-broadband radiation (extending over more 5 octaves) making a great challenge to reach resolution limited by diffraction. Here, we propose an original easy-to-implement wavefront manipulation concept to achieve ultrabroadband THz spectroscopy system with diffraction-limited resolution. Applying this concept to a large-area photoconductive emitter, we demonstrate diffraction-limited ultra-broadband spectroscopy system up to 14.5 THz with a dynamic range of 103. The strong focusing of ultrabroadband THz radiation provided by our approach is essential for investigating single micrometer-scale objects such as graphene flakes or living cells, and besides for achieving intense ultra-broadband THz electric fields. PMID:27142959

  14. Printing colour at the optical diffraction limit.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Karthik; Duan, Huigao; Hegde, Ravi S; Koh, Samuel C W; Wei, Jennifer N; Yang, Joel K W

    2012-09-01

    The highest possible resolution for printed colour images is determined by the diffraction limit of visible light. To achieve this limit, individual colour elements (or pixels) with a pitch of 250 nm are required, translating into printed images at a resolution of ∼100,000 dots per inch (d.p.i.). However, methods for dispensing multiple colourants or fabricating structural colour through plasmonic structures have insufficient resolution and limited scalability. Here, we present a non-colourant method that achieves bright-field colour prints with resolutions up to the optical diffraction limit. Colour information is encoded in the dimensional parameters of metal nanostructures, so that tuning their plasmon resonance determines the colours of the individual pixels. Our colour-mapping strategy produces images with both sharp colour changes and fine tonal variations, is amenable to large-volume colour printing via nanoimprint lithography, and could be useful in making microimages for security, steganography, nanoscale optical filters and high-density spectrally encoded optical data storage.

  15. Beyond the diffraction limit via optical amplification.

    PubMed

    Kellerer, Aglaé N; Ribak, Erez N

    2016-07-15

    In a previous article [Astron. Astrophys.561, A118 (2014)], we suggested a method to overcome the diffraction limit behind a telescope. We discuss and extend recent numerical simulations and test whether it is indeed possible to use photon amplification to enhance the angular resolution of a telescope or a microscope beyond the diffraction limit. An essential addition is the proposal to select events with an above-average ratio of stimulated to spontaneous photons. The analysis shows that the diffraction limit of a telescope is surpassed by a factor of 10 for an amplifier gain of 200, if the analysis is restricted to a tenth of the incoming astronomical photons. A gain of 70 is sufficient with a hundredth of the photons. More simulations must be performed to account for the bunching of spontaneous photons. PMID:27420490

  16. Optical microscopy beyond the diffraction limit

    PubMed Central

    Smolyaninov, Igor I.

    2008-01-01

    Over the past century the resolution of far-field optical microscopes, which rely on propagating optical modes, was widely believed to be limited because of diffraction to a value on the order of a half-wavelength λ∕2 of the light used. Although immersion microscopes had slightly improved resolution on the order of λ∕2n, the increased resolution was limited by the small range of refractive indices, n, of available transparent materials. We are experiencing quick demolition of the diffraction limit in optical microscopy. Over the past few years numerous nonlinear optical microscopy techniques based on photoswitching and saturation of fluorescence demonstrated far-field resolution of 20 to 30 nm. The latest exciting example of these techniques has been demonstrated by Huang et al. [Science 319, 810–813 (2008)]. Moreover, recent progress in metamaterials indicates that artificial optical media can be created, which do not exhibit the diffraction limit. Resolution of linear “immersion” microscopes based on such metamaterials appears limited only by losses, which can be compensated by gain media. Thus, optical microscopy is quickly moving towards the 10 nm resolution scale, which should bring about numerous revolutionary advances in biomedical imaging. PMID:19404465

  17. Physics issues in diffraction limited storage ring design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Wei; Bai, ZhengHe; Gao, WeiWei; Feng, GuangYao; Li, WeiMin; Wang, Lin; He, DuoHui

    2012-05-01

    Diffraction limited electron storage ring is considered a promising candidate for future light sources, whose main characteristics are higher brilliance, better transverse coherence and better stability. The challenge of diffraction limited storage ring design is how to achieve the ultra low beam emittance with acceptable nonlinear performance. Effective linear and nonlinear parameter optimization methods based on Artificial Intelligence were developed for the storage ring physical design. As an example of application, partial physical design of HALS (Hefei Advanced Light Source), which is a diffraction limited VUV and soft X-ray light source, was introduced. Severe emittance growth due to the Intra Beam Scattering effect, which is the main obstacle to achieve ultra low emittance, was estimated quantitatively and possible cures were discussed. It is inspiring that better performance of diffraction limited storage ring can be achieved in principle with careful parameter optimization.

  18. Sub-diffraction-limited microscopy via Rabi gradient excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Xiaodong; Liao, Zeyang; Al-Amri, M.; Zubairy, M. Suhail

    2015-06-01

    We propose a scheme for microscopy with resolution far beyond the diffraction limit by using coherent Rabi oscillations. When the sample is illuminated by a gradient laser field, Rabi oscillations will be induced which can lead to a sinusoidal excitation in the sample. This is similar to the structured illumination microscopy (SIM) which can recover high-spatial-frequency components in the far field. However, different from linear SIM, the sinusoidal pattern here can have a spatial frequency much higher than that of the linear standing wave. Due to this property, we can achieve extremely high resolution, as in the nonlinear saturated SIM, but keep the reconstruction algorithm as simple as the linear one.

  19. Dynamic microscale temperature gradient in a gold nanorod solution measured by diffraction-limited nanothermometry

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Chengmingyue; Gan, Xiaosong; Li, Xiangping; Gu, Min

    2015-09-21

    We quantify the dynamic microscale temperature gradient in a gold nanorod solution using quantum-dot-based microscopic fluorescence nanothermometry. By incorporating CdSe quantum dots into the solution as a nanothermometer, precise temperature mapping with diffraction-limited spatial resolution and sub-degree temperature resolution is achieved. The acquired data on heat generation and dissipation show an excellent agreement with theoretical simulations. This work reveals an effective approach for noninvasive temperature regulation with localized nanoheaters in microfluidic environment.

  20. Steerable diffraction limited line illumination system using deformable mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taniguchi, Koichi; Kim, Dae Wook; Shimura, Kei; Burge, James H.

    2013-09-01

    Many scientific and industrial applications often require high performance optical systems utilizing spatially shaped illumination patterns of laser beams. Precisely shaped line illumination can be used for various line scanning systems or surface inspection devices. In order to achieve the highest resolution or superior signal to noise ratio limited by the fundamental theory, a diffraction limited illumination optical system (e.g. <0.8 Strehl ratio) gives the narrowest illumination line width determined by the system's NA (Numerical Aperture) value. For high precision and in-factory industrial applications, the Diffraction Limited Line Illumination (DLLI) needs to be controlled in three dimensional space rapidly as the target object under the illumination may not be always aligned with respect to the illumination system. A steerable DLLI system with three degrees of freedom (i.e. axial displacement, rotation, and tilt) is developed using an adaptive optics system. By electronically controlling the Zernike based surface shapes of the deformable mirror, the DLLI in free space is actively positioned and oriented with high accuracy. The geometrical optics based mathematical model to control the Zernike modes of the deformable mirror and the performance of a bench-top proof-ofconcept system will be presented with experimental data and analysis results.

  1. Sub-diffraction limit resolution in microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Ming (Inventor); Chen, Weinong (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A method and apparatus for visualizing sub-micron size particles employs a polarizing microscope wherein a focused beam of polarized light is projected onto a target, and a portion of the illuminating light is blocked from reaching the specimen, whereby to produce a shadow region, and projecting diffracted light from the target onto the shadow region.

  2. On the Diffraction Limit for Lensless Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Mielenz, Klaus D.

    1999-01-01

    The diffraction limit for lensless imaging, defined as the sharpest possible point image obtainable with a pinhole aperture, is analyzed and compared to the corresponding limit for imaging with lenses by means of theoretical considerations and numerical computations using the Fresnel-Lommel diffraction theory for circular apertures. The numerical result (u = π) obtained for the best configuration parameter u which defines the optical setup is consistent with the quarter-wave criterion, and is the same as the value reported in a classical paper by Petzval but smaller than the value (u = 1.8π) found by Lord Rayleigh. The smallest discernible detail (pixel) in a composite image is defined by an expression found by Rayleigh on applying the half-wave criterion and is shown to be consistent with the Sparrow criterion of resolution. The numerical values of other measures of image size are reported and compared to equivalent parameters of the Fraunhofer-Airy profile that governs imaging with lenses.

  3. Controllable design of super-oscillatory planar lenses for sub-diffraction-limit optical needles.

    PubMed

    Diao, Jinshuai; Yuan, Weizheng; Yu, Yiting; Zhu, Yechuan; Wu, Yan

    2016-02-01

    Sub-diffraction-limit optical needle can be created by a binary amplitude mask through tailoring the interference of diffraction beams. In this paper, a controllable design of super-oscillatory planar lenses to create sub-diffraction-limit optical needles with the tunable focal length and depth of focus (DOF) is presented. As a high-quality optical needle is influenced by various factors, we first propose a multi-objective and multi-constraint optimization model compromising all the main factors to achieve a needle with the prescribed characteristics. The optimizing procedure is self-designed using the Matlab programming language based on the genetic algorithm (GA) and fast Hankel transform algorithm. Numerical simulations show that the optical needles' properties can be controlled accurately. The optimized results are further validated by the theoretical calculation with the Rayleigh-Sommerfeld integral. The sub-diffraction-limit optical needles can be used in wide fields such as optical nanofabrication, super-resolution imaging, particle acceleration and high-density optical data storage. PMID:26906769

  4. Sub-diffraction-limit imaging using mode multiplexing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Nan; Miyazaki, Jun; He, Jinping; Seto, Keisuke; Kobayashi, Takayoshi

    2015-05-01

    Pixel-by-pixel processed fluorescence difference microscopy is experimentally demonstrated by multiplexing excitation laser beams with Gaussian and donut spot shapes and then demultiplexing the fluorescent signals using lock-in amplifiers. With this scheme, a fixed sample of fluorescent spheres and a slice of mouse brain tissue are imaged with resolutions that exceed the diffraction limit. Compared to previously reported subtraction imaging techniques, this pixel-by-pixel scan can be applied to improve the resolution of a moving sample without introducing subtraction errors. The synchronized signal detection feature makes this method extendible to various applications.

  5. Diffraction-limited step-zoom telescope by image restoration.

    PubMed

    Araiza-Durán, José A; Luna, Esteban; Cornejo-Rodríguez, Alejandro; Sohn, Erika

    2015-11-10

    The design of a step-zoom telescope and its ability to achieve a diffraction-limited performance is explored. The basic idea is to include digital postprocessing to compensate for changes in the modulation transfer function of the system, assuming the knowledge of the range to the object. The instrument is conformed of a two-mirror telescope, two lenses, and a detector. High-quality images and a zoom telescope that ranges from 22 to 61 f-number is achieved by moving the primary mirror and two lenses. The preliminary calculations for the design process and a simulation that shows the performance of the step-zoom telescope are described.

  6. X-ray nanoprobes and diffraction-limited storage rings: opportunities and challenges of fluorescence tomography of biological specimens

    PubMed Central

    de Jonge, Martin D.; Ryan, Christopher G.; Jacobsen, Chris J.

    2014-01-01

    X-ray nanoprobes require coherent illumination to achieve optic-limited resolution, and so will benefit directly from diffraction-limited storage rings. Here, the example of high-resolution X-ray fluorescence tomography is focused on as one of the most voracious demanders of coherent photons, since the detected signal is only a small fraction of the incident flux. Alternative schemes are considered for beam delivery, sample scanning and detectors. One must consider as well the steps before and after the X-ray experiment: sample preparation and examination conditions, and analysis complexity due to minimum dose requirements and self-absorption. By understanding the requirements and opportunities for nanoscale fluorescence tomography, one gains insight into the R&D challenges in optics and instrumentation needed to fully exploit the source advances that diffraction-limited storage rings offer. PMID:25177992

  7. Design Of A Near Diffraction Limited Catadioptric Lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, D. V. B.

    1987-06-01

    A near diffraction limited catadioptric lens of EFL=324.4 mm and f/3.6 was designed for the spectral range 546 to 852 nm. This is a 5 element lens with a field of view of +/-2.5°. The obscuration ratio is 0.5 and relative illumination at the edge of the field is 81.4%. The distortion is less than 0.16%. This lens can be used for high resolution imaging applications using CCDs. The design details were presented in this paper.

  8. Far-field imaging beyond diffraction limit using single sensor in combination with a resonant aperture.

    PubMed

    Li, Lianlin; Li, Fang; Cui, Tie Jun; Yao, Kan

    2015-01-12

    Far-field imaging beyond the diffraction limit is a long sought-after goal in various imaging applications, which requires usually mechanical scanning or an array of antennas. Here, we propose to solve this challenging problem using a single sensor in combination with a spatio-temporal resonant aperture antenna. We theoretically and numerically demonstrate that such resonant aperture antenna is capable of converting part evanescent waves into propagating waves and delivering them to far fields. The proposed imaging concept provides the unique ability to achieve super resolution for real-time data when illuminated by broadband electromagnetic waves, without the harsh requirements such as near- field scanning, mechanical scanning, or antenna arrays. We expect the imaging methodology to make breakthroughs in super-resolution imaging in microwave, terahertz, optical, and ultrasound regimes. PMID:25835685

  9. A Menagerie of Stars: New Images from the Diffraction Limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuthill, P. G.; Monnier, J. D.; Danchi, W. C.

    Recent high-resolution pupil-masking interferometry experiments at the Keck-1 telescope have produced images of stellar systems at diffraction- limited angular resolutions. Targeting the dusty cocoons of young stellar objects and the circumstellar shrouds surrounding evolved giants and supergiants, these images have revealed a startling range of morphologies. Evolved stars from massive blue Wolf-Rayets to red giants, supergiants and carbon stars have shown dramatic dust plumes, clumps and shells which can dominate the dust halo, showing that mass loss from these objects can sometimes be anything but smooth and isotropic. At the other extreme of the evolutionary scale, the young stellar objects have been found to reveal dusty disks, clearly resolved for the first time in the infrared.

  10. Diffraction-limited step-zoom telescope by image restoration.

    PubMed

    Araiza-Durán, José A; Luna, Esteban; Cornejo-Rodríguez, Alejandro; Sohn, Erika

    2015-11-10

    The design of a step-zoom telescope and its ability to achieve a diffraction-limited performance is explored. The basic idea is to include digital postprocessing to compensate for changes in the modulation transfer function of the system, assuming the knowledge of the range to the object. The instrument is conformed of a two-mirror telescope, two lenses, and a detector. High-quality images and a zoom telescope that ranges from 22 to 61 f-number is achieved by moving the primary mirror and two lenses. The preliminary calculations for the design process and a simulation that shows the performance of the step-zoom telescope are described. PMID:26560774

  11. Shaping the spatial and spectral emissivity at the diffraction limit

    SciTech Connect

    Makhsiyan, Mathilde; Bouchon, Patrick Jaeck, Julien; Pelouard, Jean-Luc; Haïdar, Riad

    2015-12-21

    Metasurfaces have attracted a growing interest for their ability to artificially tailor an electromagnetic response on various spectral ranges. In particular, thermal sources with unprecedented abilities, such as directionality or monochromaticity, have been achieved. However, these metasurfaces exhibit homogeneous optical properties whereas the spatial modulation of the emissivity up to the wavelength scale is at the crux of the design of original emitters. In this letter, we study an inhomogeneous metasurface made of a nonperiodic set of optical nano-antennas that spatially and spectrally control the emitted light up to the diffraction limit. Each antenna acts as an independent deep subwavelength emitter for given polarization and wavelength. Their juxtaposition at the subwavelength scale encodes far field multispectral and polarized images. This opens up promising breakthroughs for applications such as optical storage, anti-counterfeit devices, and multispectral emitters for biochemical sensing.

  12. Overcoming the diffraction limit using multiple light scattering in a highly disordered medium.

    PubMed

    Choi, Youngwoon; Yang, Taeseok Daniel; Fang-Yen, Christopher; Kang, Pilsung; Lee, Kyoung Jin; Dasari, Ramachandra R; Feld, Michael S; Choi, Wonshik

    2011-07-01

    We report that disordered media made of randomly distributed nanoparticles can be used to overcome the diffraction limit of a conventional imaging system. By developing a method to extract the original image information from the multiple scattering induced by the turbid media, we dramatically increase a numerical aperture of the imaging system. As a result, the resolution is enhanced by more than 5 times over the diffraction limit, and the field of view is extended over the physical area of the camera. Our technique lays the foundation to use a turbid medium as a far-field superlens.

  13. Diffraction-limited lucky imaging with a 12" commercial telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baptista, Brian J.

    2014-08-01

    Here we demonstrate a novel lucky imaging camera which is designed to produce diffraction-limited imaging using small telescopes similar to ones used by many academic institutions for outreach and/or student training. We present a design that uses a Meade 12" SCT paired with an Andor iXon fast readout EMCCD. The PSF of the telescope is matched to the pixel size of the EMCCD by adding a simple, custom-fabricated, intervening optical system. We demonstrate performance of the system by observing both astronomical and terrestrial targets. The astronomical application requires simpler data reconstruction techniques as compared to the terrestrial case. We compare different lucky imaging registration and reconstruction algorithms for use with this imager for both astronomical and terrestrial targets. We also demonstrate how this type of instrument would be useful for both undergraduate and graduate student training. As an instructional aide, the instrument can provide a hands-on approach for teaching instrument design, standard data reduction techniques, lucky imaging data processing, and high resolution imaging concepts.

  14. Reaching the Diffraction Limit - Differential Speckle and Wide-Field Imaging for the WIYN Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Nic J.; Howell, Steve; Horch, Elliott

    2016-01-01

    Speckle imaging allows telescopes to achieve diffraction limited imaging performance. The technique requires cameras capable of reading out frames at a very fast rate, effectively 'freezing out' atmospheric seeing. The resulting speckles can be correlated and images reconstructed that are at the diffraction limit of the telescope. These new instruments are based on the successful performance and design of the Differential Speckle Survey Instrument (DSSI).The instruments are being built for the Gemini-N and WIYN telescopes and will be made available to the community via the peer review proposal process. We envision their primary use to be validation and characterization of exoplanet targets from the NASA, K2 and TESS missions and RV discovered exoplanets. Such targets will provide excellent follow-up candidates for both the WIYN and Gemini telescopes. We expect similar data quality in speckle imaging mode with the new instruments. Additionally, both cameras will have a wide-field mode and standard SDSS filters. They will be highly versatile instruments and it is that likely many other science programs will request time on the cameras. The limiting magnitude for speckle observations will remain around 13-14th at WIYN and 16-17th at Gemini, while wide-field, normal CCD imaging operation should be able to go to much fainter, providing usual CCD imaging and photometric capabilities. The instruments will also have high utility as scoring cameras for telescope engineering purposes, or other applications where high time resolution is needed. Instrument support will be provided, including a software pipeline that takes raw speckle data to fully reconstructed images.

  15. Collective Effects in a Diffraction Limited Storage Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Nagaoka, Ryutaro; Bane, Karl L.F.

    2015-10-20

    Our paper gives an overview of collective effects that are likely to appear and possibly limit the performance in a diffraction-limited storage ring (DLSR) that stores a high-intensity ultra-low-emittance beam. Beam instabilities and other intensity-dependent effects that may significantly impact the machine performance are covered. The latter include beam-induced machine heating, Touschek scattering, intra-beam scattering, as well as incoherent tune shifts. The general trend that the efforts to achieve ultra-low emittance result in increasing the machine coupling impedance and the beam sensitivity to instability is reviewed. The nature of coupling impedance in a DLSR is described, followed by a series of potentially dangerous beam instabilities driven by the former, such as resistive-wall, TMCI (transverse mode coupling instability), head-tail and microwave instabilities. Additionally, beam-ion and CSR (coherent synchrotron radiation) instabilities are also treated. Means to fight against collective effects such as lengthening of the bunch with passive harmonic cavities and bunch-by-bunch transverse feedback are introduced. Numerical codes developed and used to evaluate the machine coupling impedance, as well as to simulate beam instability using the former as inputs are described.

  16. Collective Effects in a Diffraction Limited Storage Ring

    DOE PAGES

    Nagaoka, Ryutaro; Bane, Karl L.F.

    2015-10-20

    Our paper gives an overview of collective effects that are likely to appear and possibly limit the performance in a diffraction-limited storage ring (DLSR) that stores a high-intensity ultra-low-emittance beam. Beam instabilities and other intensity-dependent effects that may significantly impact the machine performance are covered. The latter include beam-induced machine heating, Touschek scattering, intra-beam scattering, as well as incoherent tune shifts. The general trend that the efforts to achieve ultra-low emittance result in increasing the machine coupling impedance and the beam sensitivity to instability is reviewed. The nature of coupling impedance in a DLSR is described, followed by a seriesmore » of potentially dangerous beam instabilities driven by the former, such as resistive-wall, TMCI (transverse mode coupling instability), head-tail and microwave instabilities. Additionally, beam-ion and CSR (coherent synchrotron radiation) instabilities are also treated. Means to fight against collective effects such as lengthening of the bunch with passive harmonic cavities and bunch-by-bunch transverse feedback are introduced. Numerical codes developed and used to evaluate the machine coupling impedance, as well as to simulate beam instability using the former as inputs are described.« less

  17. Breaking the acoustic diffraction limit in photoacoustic imaging with multiple speckle illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaigne, Thomas; Gateau, Jérôme; Allain, Marc; Katz, Ori; Gigan, Sylvain; Sentenac, Anne; Bossy, Emmanuel

    2016-03-01

    In deep photoacoustic imaging, resolution is inherently limited by acoustic diffraction, and ultrasonic frequencies cannot be arbitrarily increased because of attenuation in tissue. Here we report on the use of multiple speckle illumination to perform super resolution photoacoustic imaging. We show that the analysis of speckle-induced second-order fluctuations of the photoacoustic signal combined with deconvolution enables to resolve optically absorbing structures below the acoustic diffraction limit.

  18. Suppression of resonance Raman scattering via ground state depletion towards sub-diffraction-limited label-free microscopy.

    PubMed

    Rieger, Steffen; Fischedick, Markus; Boller, Klaus-Jochen; Fallnich, Carsten

    2016-09-01

    We report on the first experimental demonstration of the suppression of spontaneous Raman scattering via ground state depletion. The concept of Raman suppression can be used to achieve sub-diffraction-limited resolution in label-free microscopy by exploiting spatially selective signal suppression when imaging a sample with a combination of Gaussian- and donut-shaped beams and reconstructing a resolution-enhanced image from this data. Using a nanosecond pulsed laser source with an emission wavelength of 355 nm, the ground state of tris(bipyridine)ruthenium(II) molecules solved in acetonitrile was depleted and the spontaneous Raman scattering at 355 nm suppressed by nearly 50 %. Based on spectroscopic data retrieved from our experiment, we modeled the Raman image of a scattering center in order to demonstrate the applicability of this effect for superresolution Raman microscopy. PMID:27607677

  19. Suppression of resonance Raman scattering via ground state depletion towards sub-diffraction-limited label-free microscopy.

    PubMed

    Rieger, Steffen; Fischedick, Markus; Boller, Klaus-Jochen; Fallnich, Carsten

    2016-09-01

    We report on the first experimental demonstration of the suppression of spontaneous Raman scattering via ground state depletion. The concept of Raman suppression can be used to achieve sub-diffraction-limited resolution in label-free microscopy by exploiting spatially selective signal suppression when imaging a sample with a combination of Gaussian- and donut-shaped beams and reconstructing a resolution-enhanced image from this data. Using a nanosecond pulsed laser source with an emission wavelength of 355 nm, the ground state of tris(bipyridine)ruthenium(II) molecules solved in acetonitrile was depleted and the spontaneous Raman scattering at 355 nm suppressed by nearly 50 %. Based on spectroscopic data retrieved from our experiment, we modeled the Raman image of a scattering center in order to demonstrate the applicability of this effect for superresolution Raman microscopy.

  20. Computational-optical microscopy for 3D biological imaging beyond the diffraction limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grover, Ginni

    In recent years, super-resolution imaging has become an important fluorescent microscopy tool. It has enabled imaging of structures smaller than the optical diffraction limit with resolution less than 50 nm. Extension to high-resolution volume imaging has been achieved by integration with various optical techniques. In this thesis, development of a fluorescent microscope to enable high resolution, extended depth, three dimensional (3D) imaging is discussed; which is achieved by integration of computational methods with optical systems. In the first part of the thesis, point spread function (PSF) engineering for volume imaging is discussed. A class of PSFs, referred to as double-helix (DH) PSFs, is generated. The PSFs exhibit two focused spots in the image plane which rotate about the optical axis, encoding depth in rotation of the image. These PSFs extend the depth-of-field up to a factor of ˜5. Precision performance of the DH-PSFs, based on an information theoretical analysis, is compared with other 3D methods with conclusion that the DH-PSFs provide the best precision and the longest depth-of-field. Out of various possible DH-PSFs, a suitable PSF is obtained for super-resolution microscopy. The DH-PSFs are implemented in imaging systems, such as a microscope, with a special phase modulation at the pupil plane. Surface-relief elements which are polarization-insensitive and ˜90% light efficient are developed for phase modulation. The photon-efficient DH-PSF microscopes thus developed are used, along with optimal position estimation algorithms, for tracking and super-resolution imaging in 3D. Imaging at depths-of-field of up to 2.5 microm is achieved without focus scanning. Microtubules were imaged with 3D resolution of (6, 9, 39) nm, which is in close agreement with the theoretical limit. A quantitative study of co-localization of two proteins in volume was conducted in live bacteria. In the last part of the thesis practical aspects of the DH-PSF microscope are

  1. Fast time-resolved electrostatic force microscopy: Achieving sub-cycle time resolution.

    PubMed

    Karatay, Durmus U; Harrison, Jeffrey S; Glaz, Micah S; Giridharagopal, Rajiv; Ginger, David S

    2016-05-01

    The ability to measure microsecond- and nanosecond-scale local dynamics below the diffraction limit with widely available atomic force microscopy hardware would enable new scientific studies in fields ranging from biology to semiconductor physics. However, commercially available scanning-probe instruments typically offer the ability to measure dynamics only on time scales of milliseconds to seconds. Here, we describe in detail the implementation of fast time-resolved electrostatic force microscopy using an oscillating cantilever as a means to measure fast local dynamics following a perturbation to a sample. We show how the phase of the oscillating cantilever relative to the perturbation event is critical to achieving reliable sub-cycle time resolution. We explore how noise affects the achievable time resolution and present empirical guidelines for reducing noise and optimizing experimental parameters. Specifically, we show that reducing the noise on the cantilever by using photothermal excitation instead of piezoacoustic excitation further improves time resolution. We demonstrate the discrimination of signal rise times with time constants as fast as 10 ns, and simultaneous data acquisition and analysis for dramatically improved image acquisition times. PMID:27250430

  2. Pixel detectors for diffraction-limited storage rings.

    PubMed

    Denes, Peter; Schmitt, Bernd

    2014-09-01

    Dramatic advances in synchrotron radiation sources produce ever-brighter beams of X-rays, but those advances can only be used if there is a corresponding improvement in X-ray detectors. With the advent of storage ring sources capable of being diffraction-limited (down to a certain wavelength), advances in detector speed, dynamic range and functionality is required. While many of these improvements in detector capabilities are being pursued now, the orders-of-magnitude increases in brightness of diffraction-limited storage ring sources will require challenging non-incremental advances in detectors. This article summarizes the current state of the art, developments underway worldwide, and challenges that diffraction-limited storage ring sources present for detectors.

  3. Fluorescent microscopy beyond diffraction limits using speckle illumination and joint support recovery

    PubMed Central

    Min, Junhong; Jang, Jaeduck; Keum, Dongmin; Ryu, Seung-Wook; Choi, Chulhee; Jeong, Ki-Hun; Ye, Jong Chul

    2013-01-01

    Structured illumination microscopy (SIM) breaks the optical diffraction limit by illuminating a sample with a series of line-patterned light. Recently, in order to alleviate the requirement of precise knowledge of illumination patterns, structured illumination microscopy techniques using speckle patterns have been proposed. However, these methods require stringent assumptions of the speckle statistics: for example, speckle patterns should be nearly incoherent or their temporal average should be roughly homogeneous. Here, we present a novel speckle illumination microscopy technique that overcomes the diffraction limit by exploiting the minimal requirement that is common for all the existing super-resolution microscopy, i.e. that the fluorophore locations do not vary during the acquisition time. Using numerical and real experiments, we demonstrate that the proposed method can improve the resolution up to threefold. Because our proposed method succeeds for standard fluorescence probes and experimental protocols, it can be applied in routine biological experiments. PMID:23797902

  4. Geometrical configurations of unphased diffraction-limited antennas in passive millimetre-wave imaging systems for concealed weapon detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serenelli, Roberto

    2004-12-01

    This paper analyzes simple imaging configurations to scan a human body, suitable as passive or active millimetre-wave imaging systems for concealed weapon detection (CWD). The first cylindrical configuration allows a 360 degrees scan: N unphased diffraction-limited antennas each of size L are placed on a circular support surrounding the subject (allowing scanning in the horizontal plane with N non-overlapping independent beams), and this circle is mechanically displaced over the whole body height. An analytical formula gives the maximum obtainable spatial resolution for different dimensions of the circular scanning device and operating frequencies, and the number of receivers achieving this optimal resolution. Constraints to be taken into account are diffraction, the usable total length of the circle, and the full coverage by the N beams over the subject, which is modelled as a cylinder with variable radius, coaxial with the scanning circle. Numerical calculations of system resolution are shown for different operating microwave (MW) and millimetre-wave (MMW) frequencies; in order to study off-axis performances, situations where the subject is not coaxial with the scanning device are also considered. For the case of a parallelepiped to be imaged instead of a cylinder, a linear array configuration is analyzed similarly to the circular one. A theoretical study is carried out to design other curved arrays, filled with unphased diffraction-limited antennas, for the imaging of linear subjects with finer resolution. Finally, the application of such configurations is considered for the design of active imaging systems, and different system architectures are discussed.

  5. An experimental apparatus for diffraction-limites soft x-ray nanofocusing

    SciTech Connect

    Merthe, Daniel; Goldberg, Kenneth; Yashchuk, Valeriy; Yuan, Sheng; McKinney, Wayne; Celestre, Richard; Mochi, Iacopo; Macdougall, James; Morrison, Gregory; Rakawa, Senajith; Anderson, Erik; Smith, Brian; Domning, Edward; Warwick, Tony; Padmore, Howard

    2011-10-21

    Realizing the experimental potential of high-brightness, next generation synchrotron and free-electron laser light sources requires the development of reflecting x-ray optics capable of wavefront preservation and high-resolution nano-focusing. At the Advanced Light Source (ALS) beamline 5.3.1, we are developing broadly applicable, high-accuracy, in situ, at-wavelength wavefront measurement techniques to surpass 100-nrad slope measurement accuracy for diffraction-limited Kirkpatrick-Baez (KB) mirrors. The at-wavelength methodology we are developing relies on a series of wavefront-sensing tests with increasing accuracy and sensitivity, including scanning-slit Hartmann tests, grating-based lateral shearing interferometry, and quantitative knife-edge testing. We describe the original experimental techniques and alignment methodology that have enabled us to optimally set a bendable KB mirror to achieve a focused, FWHM spot size of 150 nm, with 1 nm (1.24 keV) photons at 3.7 mrad numerical aperture. The predictions of wavefront measurement are confirmed by the knife-edge testing.The side-profiled elliptically bent mirror used in these one-dimensional focusing experiments was originally designed for a much different glancing angle and conjugate distances. This work demonstrates that high-accuracy, at-wavelength wavefront-slope feedback can be used to optimize the pitch, roll, and mirror-bending forces in situ, using procedures that are deterministic and repeatable.

  6. Single-site addressing of ultracold atoms beyond the diffraction limit via position-dependent adiabatic passage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viscor, D.; Rubio, J. L.; Birkl, G.; Mompart, J.; Ahufinger, V.

    2012-12-01

    We propose a single-site addressing implementation based on the subwavelength localization via adiabatic passage (SLAP) technique. We consider a sample of ultracold neutral atoms loaded into a two-dimensional optical lattice with one atom per site. Each atom is modeled by a three-level Λ system in interaction with a pump and a Stokes laser pulse. Using a pump field with a node in its spatial profile, the atoms at all sites are transferred from one ground state of the system to the other via stimulated Raman adiabatic passage, except the one at the position of the node that remains in the initial ground state. This technique allows for the preparation, manipulation, and detection of atoms with a spatial resolution better than the diffraction limit, which either relaxes the requirements on the optical setup used or extends the achievable spatial resolution to lattice spacings smaller than accessible to date. In comparison to techniques based on coherent population trapping, SLAP gives a higher addressing resolution and has additional advantages such as robustness against parameter variations, coherence of the transfer process, and the absence of photon induced recoil. Additionally, the advantages of our proposal with respect to adiabatic spin-flip techniques are highlighted. Analytic expressions for the achievable addressing resolution and efficiency are derived and compared to numerical simulations for 87Rb atoms in state-of-the-art optical lattices.

  7. Diffraction-limited high-finesse optical cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Kleckner, Dustin; Irvine, William T. M.; Oemrawsingh, Sumant S. R.; Bouwmeester, Dirk

    2010-04-15

    High-quality optical cavities with wavelength-sized end mirrors are important to the growing field of micro-optomechanical systems. We present a versatile method for calculating the modes of diffraction limited optical cavities and show that it can be used to determine the effect of a wide variety of cavity geometries and imperfections. Additionally, we show these calculations agree remarkably well with FDTD simulations for wavelength-sized optical modes, even though our method is based on the paraxial approximation.

  8. Design examples of diffraction-limited catadioptric objectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallert, Frank

    1996-08-01

    The paper relates to different inventions, comprising three diffraction-limited catadioptric designs. All the systems use only spherical shaped surfaces and are designed from one kind of optical material only. In the examples the glass BK7 from the Schott-catalogue was used. The first example gives a three element design reaching equal performance as a Schmidt camera but with only 25 percent of its length. Additionally the field is flat and conveniently located behind the system. The second example is designed to reduce the central obstruction. It's somewhat based on the principle of the Houghton-camera. For a f-number 4 system with 1000 millimeters focal length it gives outstanding image quality at a 5 degree's field--even capable for diffraction-limited visual use. For reduced f-number 5,6 the image is diffraction-limited at the whole field. In terms of color correction it outperforms every Schmidt-Cassegrain or apochromatic triplet of even arbitrarily more reduced light gathering power. The third example is the equivalent for the so-called Wynne corrector triplet that corrects the aberrations of a parabolical mirror. But the invented corrector corrects additionally the spherical aberration of a spherical mirror. The corrector is able to correct all third order aberrations without introducing longitudinal and lateral color.

  9. Emittance Adapter for a Diffraction Limited Synchrotron Radiation Source

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, Alexander Wu; Raimondi, Pantaleo; /Frascati

    2012-03-01

    We investigate the possibility of reaching very small horizontal and vertical emittances inside an undulator in a storage ring, by means of a local exchange of the apparent horizontal and vertical emittances, performed with a combination of skew quadrupoles and one solenoid in a dedicated insertion line in the storage ring. The insertion leaves the ring parameters and its optical properties unaffected. This scheme could greatly relax the emittance requirements for a diffraction limited synchrotron light source. The lattice derivation and design is described.

  10. Accurate calculation of diffraction-limited encircled and ensquared energy.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Torben B

    2015-09-01

    Mathematical properties of the encircled and ensquared energy functions for the diffraction-limited point-spread function (PSF) are presented. These include power series and a set of linear differential equations that facilitate the accurate calculation of these functions. Asymptotic expressions are derived that provide very accurate estimates for the relative amount of energy in the diffraction PSF that fall outside a square or rectangular large detector. Tables with accurate values of the encircled and ensquared energy functions are also presented. PMID:26368873

  11. Genetic algorithm for chromaticity correction in diffraction limited storage rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrlichman, M. P.

    2016-04-01

    A multiobjective genetic algorithm is developed for optimizing nonlinearities in diffraction limited storage rings. This algorithm determines sextupole and octupole strengths for chromaticity correction that deliver optimized dynamic aperture and beam lifetime. The algorithm makes use of dominance constraints to breed desirable properties into the early generations. The momentum aperture is optimized indirectly by constraining the chromatic tune footprint and optimizing the off-energy dynamic aperture. The result is an effective and computationally efficient technique for correcting chromaticity in a storage ring while maintaining optimal dynamic aperture and beam lifetime.

  12. Diffraction-limited storage-ring vacuum technology

    PubMed Central

    Al-Dmour, Eshraq; Ahlback, Jonny; Einfeld, Dieter; Tavares, Pedro Fernandes; Grabski, Marek

    2014-01-01

    Some of the characteristics of recent ultralow-emittance storage-ring designs and possibly future diffraction-limited storage rings are a compact lattice combined with small magnet apertures. Such requirements present a challenge for the design and performance of the vacuum system. The vacuum system should provide the required vacuum pressure for machine operation and be able to handle the heat load from synchrotron radiation. Small magnet apertures result in the conductance of the chamber being low, and lumped pumps are ineffective. One way to provide the required vacuum level is by distributed pumping, which can be realised by the use of a non-evaporable getter (NEG) coating of the chamber walls. It may not be possible to use crotch absorbers to absorb the heat from the synchrotron radiation because an antechamber is difficult to realise with such a compact lattice. To solve this, the chamber walls can work as distributed absorbers if they are made of a material with good thermal conductivity, and distributed cooling is used at the location where the synchrotron radiation hits the wall. The vacuum system of the 3 GeV storage ring of MAX IV is used as an example of possible solutions for vacuum technologies for diffraction-limited storage rings. PMID:25177979

  13. An experimental apparatus for diffraction-limited soft x-ray nano-focusing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merthe, Daniel J.; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.; Yuan, Sheng; McKinney, Wayne R.; Celestre, Richard; Mochi, Iacopo; Macdougall, James; Morrison, Gregory Y.; Rakawa, Senajith B.; Anderson, Erik; Smith, Brian V.; Domning, Edward E.; Warwick, Tony; Padmore, Howard

    2011-09-01

    Realizing the experimental potential of high-brightness, next generation synchrotron and free-electron laser light sources requires the development of reflecting x-ray optics capable of wavefront preservation and high-resolution nano-focusing. At the Advanced Light Source (ALS) beamline 5.3.1, we are developing broadly applicable, high-accuracy, in situ, at-wavelength wavefront measurement techniques to surpass 100-nrad slope measurement accuracy for diffraction-limited Kirkpatrick-Baez (KB) mirrors. The at-wavelength methodology we are developing relies on a series of wavefront-sensing tests with increasing accuracy and sensitivity, including scanning-slit Hartmann tests, grating-based lateral shearing interferometry, and quantitative knife-edge testing. We describe the original experimental techniques and alignment methodology that have enabled us to optimally set a bendable KB mirror to achieve a focused, FWHM spot size of 150 nm, with 1 nm (1.24 keV) photons at 3.7 mrad numerical aperture. The predictions of wavefront measurement are confirmed by the knife-edge testing. The side-profiled elliptically bent mirror used in these one-dimensional focusing experiments was originally designed for a much different glancing angle and conjugate distances. Visible-light long-trace profilometry was used to pre-align the mirror before installation at the beamline. This work demonstrates that high-accuracy, at-wavelength wavefront-slope feedback can be used to optimize the pitch, roll, and mirror-bending forces in situ, using procedures that are deterministic and repeatable.

  14. microARPES and nanoARPES at diffraction-limited light sources: opportunities and performance gains.

    PubMed

    Rotenberg, Eli; Bostwick, Aaron

    2014-09-01

    The scientific opportunities for microARPES and nanoARPES techniques are discussed, and the benefits to these techniques at diffraction-limited light sources are presented, in particular the impact on spectromicroscopic ARPES (angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy) of upgrading the Advanced Light Source to diffraction-limited performance. The most important consideration is whether the space-charge broadening, impacting the energy and momentum resolution, will limit the possible benefits for ARPES. Calculations of energy broadening due to space-charge effects will be presented over a wide range of parameters, and optimum conditions for ARPES will be discussed. The conclusion is that spectromicroscopic ARPES will greatly benefit from the advent of diffraction-limited light sources; space-charge broadening effects will not be a limiting factor. PMID:25177993

  15. The Adaptive Optics Lucky Imager: Diffraction limited imaging at visible wavelengths with large ground-based telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crass, Jonathan; Mackay, Craig; King, David; Rebolo-López, Rafael; Labadie, Lucas; Puga, Marta; Oscoz, Alejandro; González Escalera, Victor; Pérez Garrido, Antonio; López, Roberto; Pérez-Prieto, Jorge; Rodríguez-Ramos, Luis; Velasco, Sergio; Villó, Isidro

    2015-01-01

    One of the continuing challenges facing astronomers today is the need to obtain ever higher resolution images of the sky. Whether studying nearby crowded fields or distant objects, with increased resolution comes the ability to probe systems in more detail and advance our understanding of the Universe. Obtaining these high-resolution images at visible wavelengths however has previously been limited to the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) due to atmospheric effects limiting the spatial resolution of ground-based telescopes to a fraction of their potential. With HST now having a finite lifespan, it is prudent to investigate other techniques capable of providing these kind of observations from the ground. Maintaining this capability is one of the goals of the Adaptive Optics Lucky Imager (AOLI).Achieving the highest resolutions requires the largest telescope apertures, however, this comes at the cost of increased atmospheric distortion. To overcome these atmospheric effects, there are two main techniques employed today: adaptive optics (AO) and lucky imaging. These techniques individually are unable to provide diffraction limited imaging in the visible on large ground-based telescopes; AO currently only works at infrared wavelengths while lucky imaging reduces in effectiveness on telescopes greater than 2.5 metres in diameter. The limitations of both techniques can be overcome by combing them together to provide diffraction limited imaging at visible wavelengths on the ground.The Adaptive Optics Lucky Imager is being developed as a European collaboration and combines AO and lucky imaging in a dedicated instrument for the first time. Initially for use on the 4.2 metre William Herschel Telescope, AOLI uses a low-order adaptive optics system to reduce the effects of atmospheric turbulence before imaging with a lucky imaging based science detector. The AO system employs a novel type of wavefront sensor, the non-linear Curvature Wavefront Sensor (nlCWFS) which provides

  16. Sub-diffraction Limit Localization of Proteins in Volumetric Space Using Bayesian Restoration of Fluorescence Images from Ultrathin Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Gordon; Smith, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    Photon diffraction limits the resolution of conventional light microscopy at the lateral focal plane to 0.61λ/NA (λ = wavelength of light, NA = numerical aperture of the objective) and at the axial plane to 1.4nλ/NA2 (n = refractive index of the imaging medium, 1.51 for oil immersion), which with visible wavelengths and a 1.4NA oil immersion objective is ∼220 nm and ∼600 nm in the lateral plane and axial plane respectively. This volumetric resolution is too large for the proper localization of protein clustering in subcellular structures. Here we combine the newly developed proteomic imaging technique, Array Tomography (AT), with its native 50–100 nm axial resolution achieved by physical sectioning of resin embedded tissue, and a 2D maximum likelihood deconvolution method, based on Bayes' rule, which significantly improves the resolution of protein puncta in the lateral plane to allow accurate and fast computational segmentation and analysis of labeled proteins. The physical sectioning of AT allows tissue specimens to be imaged at the physical optimum of modern high NA plan-apochormatic objectives. This translates to images that have little out of focus light, minimal aberrations and wave-front distortions. Thus, AT is able to provide images with truly invariant point spread functions (PSF), a property critical for accurate deconvolution. We show that AT with deconvolution increases the volumetric analytical fidelity of protein localization by significantly improving the modulation of high spatial frequencies up to and potentially beyond the spatial frequency cut-off of the objective. Moreover, we are able to achieve this improvement with no noticeable introduction of noise or artifacts and arrive at object segmentation and localization accuracies on par with image volumes captured using commercial implementations of super-resolution microscopes. PMID:22956902

  17. Achieving High Resolution Timer Events in Virtualized Environment

    PubMed Central

    Adamczyk, Blazej; Chydzinski, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Virtual Machine Monitors (VMM) have become popular in different application areas. Some applications may require to generate the timer events with high resolution and precision. This however may be challenging due to the complexity of VMMs. In this paper we focus on the timer functionality provided by five different VMMs—Xen, KVM, Qemu, VirtualBox and VMWare. Firstly, we evaluate resolutions and precisions of their timer events. Apparently, provided resolutions and precisions are far too low for some applications (e.g. networking applications with the quality of service). Then, using Xen virtualization we demonstrate the improved timer design that greatly enhances both the resolution and precision of achieved timer events. PMID:26177366

  18. Achieving High Resolution Timer Events in Virtualized Environment.

    PubMed

    Adamczyk, Blazej; Chydzinski, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Virtual Machine Monitors (VMM) have become popular in different application areas. Some applications may require to generate the timer events with high resolution and precision. This however may be challenging due to the complexity of VMMs. In this paper we focus on the timer functionality provided by five different VMMs-Xen, KVM, Qemu, VirtualBox and VMWare. Firstly, we evaluate resolutions and precisions of their timer events. Apparently, provided resolutions and precisions are far too low for some applications (e.g. networking applications with the quality of service). Then, using Xen virtualization we demonstrate the improved timer design that greatly enhances both the resolution and precision of achieved timer events. PMID:26177366

  19. Nanofocusing beyond the near-field diffraction limit via plasmonic Fano resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Maowen; Wang, Changtao; Zhao, Zeyu; Pu, Mingbo; Liu, Ling; Zhang, Wei; Yu, Honglin; Luo, Xiangang

    2016-01-01

    The past decade has witnessed a great deal of optical systems designed for exceeding the Abbe's diffraction limit. Unfortunately, a deep subwavelength spot is obtained at the price of extremely short focal length, which is indeed a near-field diffraction limit that could rarely go beyond in the nanofocusing device. One method to mitigate such a problem is to set up a rapid oscillatory electromagnetic field that converges at the prescribed focus. However, abrupt modulation of phase and amplitude within a small fraction of a wavelength seems to be the main obstacle in the visible regime, aggravated by loss and plasmonic features that come into function. In this paper, we propose a periodically repeated ring-disk complementary structure to break the near-field diffraction limit via plasmonic Fano resonance, originating from the interference between the complex hybrid plasmon resonance and the continuum of propagating waves through the silver film. This plasmonic Fano resonance introduces a π phase jump in the adjacent channels and amplitude modulation to achieve radiationless electromagnetic interference. As a result, deep subwavelength spots as small as 0.0045λ2 at 36 nm above the silver film have been numerically demonstrated. This plate holds promise for nanolithography, subdiffraction imaging and microscopy.The past decade has witnessed a great deal of optical systems designed for exceeding the Abbe's diffraction limit. Unfortunately, a deep subwavelength spot is obtained at the price of extremely short focal length, which is indeed a near-field diffraction limit that could rarely go beyond in the nanofocusing device. One method to mitigate such a problem is to set up a rapid oscillatory electromagnetic field that converges at the prescribed focus. However, abrupt modulation of phase and amplitude within a small fraction of a wavelength seems to be the main obstacle in the visible regime, aggravated by loss and plasmonic features that come into function. In this

  20. Aperture masking interferometry on the Keck I Telescope: new results from the diffraction limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuthill, Peter G.; Monnier, John D.; Danchi, William C.

    2000-07-01

    A high-resolution aperture-masking interferometry experiment at the Keck-1 telescope has produced images of stellar systems at diffraction-limited angular resolutions in the near-infrared (tens of milliarcsec). Targeting the dusty cocoons of young stellar objects and the circumstellar shrouds surrounding evolved giants and supergiants, these images have revealed a startling range of morphologies. Evolved stars from massive blue Wolf-Rayets to red giants, supergiants and carbon stars have shown dramatic dust plumes, clumps and shells which can dominate the dust halo, showing that mass loss from these objects can sometimes be anything but smooth and isotropic. The photospheres of a handful of red giants were large enough to be resolved with the 10 m baselines available within the Keck pupil. Stellar diameters were found to vary with pulsation phase and with observing wavelength.

  1. At-wavelength interferometry of high-NA diffraction-limited EUV optics

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Naulleau, Patrick; Rekawa, Senajith; Denham, Paul; Liddle, J. Alexander; Anderson, Erik; Jackson, Keith; Bokor, Jeffrey; Attwood, David

    2003-08-01

    Recent advances in all-reflective diffraction-limited optical systems designed for extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography have pushed numerical aperture (NA) values from 0.1 to 0.3, providing Rayleigh resolutions of 27-nm. Worldwide, several high-NA EUV optics are being deployed to serve in the development of advanced lithographic techniques required for EUV lithography, including the creation and testing of new, high-resolution photoresists. One such system is installed on an undulator beamline at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's Advanced Light Source. Sub{angstrom}-accuracy optical testing and alignment techniques, developed for use with the previous generations of EUV lithographic optical systems, are being extended for use at high NA. Considerations for interferometer design and use are discussed.

  2. Plasmonic localized heating beyond the diffraction limit via magnetic polariton excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alshehri, Hassan; Ying, Xiaoyan; Wang, Hao; Wang, Liping

    2016-09-01

    Optical localized heating in the nanoscale has recently attracted great attention due to its unique small hot spot size with high energy. However, the hot spot size is conventionally constrained by the diffraction limit. Plasmonic localized heating can provide solutions to this limitation in nanoscale patterning, cancer treatment, and data storage. Plasmonic approaches to overcome the diffraction limit in hot spot size have mainly utilized the excitation of surface plasmon or localized surface plasmon resonance. However, achieving plasmonic localized heating by the excitation of magnetic polariton has not been researched extensively yet. In this work, we numerically investigated the optical response of a nanoscale metamaterial composed of a gold nanowire array and a gold film separated by an ultrathin polymer spacer using ANSYS High Frequency Structural Simulator. A strong absorption peak at the wavelength of 760 nm was exhibited, and the underlying physical mechanism for the strong absorption was verified via the local electromagnetic field distribution to be magnetic resonance excitation. An inductor-capacitor circuit model was used to predict the magnetic resonance wavelength and compare with the numerical results for varied geometrical parameters. Volume loss density due to the strong local optical energy confinement was transferred as heat generation to an ANSYS thermal solver to obtain the local temperature profile. The steady state temperature profile shows an average temperature of 145 °C confined in a local area as small as 33 nm within the spacer, with a full-width at half-maximum of 50 nm along the x-direction. Moreover, the temperature rise from ambient drops to half its maximum value at a distance of 5 nm from the top of the spacer along the z-direction. This clearly demonstrates plasmonic localized heating beyond the diffraction limit via magnetic polariton excitation. Furthermore, the transient temperature profile shows that the system reached

  3. Efficient photonic reformatting of celestial light for diffraction-limited spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLachlan, D. G.; Harris, R. J.; Gris-Sánchez, I.; Morris, T. J.; Choudhury, D.; Gendron, E.; Basden, A. G.; Spaleniak, I.; Arriola, A.; Birks, T. A.; Allington-Smith, J. R.; Thomson, R. R.

    2016-10-01

    The spectral resolution of a dispersive astronomical spectrograph is limited by the trade-off between throughput and the width of the entrance slit. Photonic guided-wave transitions have been proposed as a route to bypass this trade-off, by enabling the efficient reformatting of incoherent seeing-limited light collected by the telescope into a linear array of single modes: a pseudo-slit which is highly multimode in one axis but diffraction-limited in the dispersion axis of the spectrograph. It is anticipated that the size of a single-object spectrograph fed with light in this manner would be essentially independent of the telescope aperture size. A further anticipated benefit is that such spectrographs would be free of `modal noise', a phenomenon that occurs in high-resolution multimode fibre-fed spectrographs due to the coherent nature of the telescope point-spread-function (PSF). We seek to address these aspects by integrating a multicore fibre photonic lantern with an ultrafast laser inscribed three-dimensional waveguide interconnect to spatially reformat the modes within the PSF into a diffraction-limited pseudo-slit. Using the CANARY adaptive optics (AO) demonstrator on the William Herschel Telescope, and 1530 ± 80 nm stellar light, the device exhibits a transmission of 47 - 53 per cent depending upon the mode of AO correction applied. We also show the advantage of using AO to couple light into such a device by sampling only the core of the CANARY PSF. This result underscores the possibility that a fully-optimised guided-wave device can be used with AO to provide efficient spectroscopy at high spectral resolution.

  4. Breaking the diffraction limit of light-sheet fluorescence microscopy by RESOLFT.

    PubMed

    Hoyer, Patrick; de Medeiros, Gustavo; Balázs, Bálint; Norlin, Nils; Besir, Christina; Hanne, Janina; Kräusslich, Hans-Georg; Engelhardt, Johann; Sahl, Steffen J; Hell, Stefan W; Hufnagel, Lars

    2016-03-29

    We present a plane-scanning RESOLFT [reversible saturable/switchable optical (fluorescence) transitions] light-sheet (LS) nanoscope, which fundamentally overcomes the diffraction barrier in the axial direction via confinement of the fluorescent molecular state to a sheet of subdiffraction thickness around the focal plane. To this end, reversibly switchable fluorophores located right above and below the focal plane are transferred to a nonfluorescent state at each scanning step. LS-RESOLFT nanoscopy offers wide-field 3D imaging of living biological specimens with low light dose and axial resolution far beyond the diffraction barrier. We demonstrate optical sections that are thinner by 5-12-fold compared with their conventional diffraction-limited LS analogs. PMID:26984498

  5. Breaking the diffraction limit of light-sheet fluorescence microscopy by RESOLFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyer, Patrick; de Medeiros, Gustavo; Balázs, Bálint; Norlin, Nils; Besir, Christina; Hanne, Janina; Kräusslich, Hans-Georg; Engelhardt, Johann; Sahl, Steffen J.; Hell, Stefan W.; Hufnagel, Lars

    2016-03-01

    We present a plane-scanning RESOLFT [reversible saturable/switchable optical (fluorescence) transitions] light-sheet (LS) nanoscope, which fundamentally overcomes the diffraction barrier in the axial direction via confinement of the fluorescent molecular state to a sheet of subdiffraction thickness around the focal plane. To this end, reversibly switchable fluorophores located right above and below the focal plane are transferred to a nonfluorescent state at each scanning step. LS-RESOLFT nanoscopy offers wide-field 3D imaging of living biological specimens with low light dose and axial resolution far beyond the diffraction barrier. We demonstrate optical sections that are thinner by 5-12-fold compared with their conventional diffraction-limited LS analogs.

  6. Breaking the diffraction limit of light-sheet fluorescence microscopy by RESOLFT

    PubMed Central

    Hoyer, Patrick; de Medeiros, Gustavo; Balázs, Bálint; Norlin, Nils; Besir, Christina; Hanne, Janina; Kräusslich, Hans-Georg; Engelhardt, Johann; Sahl, Steffen J.; Hell, Stefan W.; Hufnagel, Lars

    2016-01-01

    We present a plane-scanning RESOLFT [reversible saturable/switchable optical (fluorescence) transitions] light-sheet (LS) nanoscope, which fundamentally overcomes the diffraction barrier in the axial direction via confinement of the fluorescent molecular state to a sheet of subdiffraction thickness around the focal plane. To this end, reversibly switchable fluorophores located right above and below the focal plane are transferred to a nonfluorescent state at each scanning step. LS-RESOLFT nanoscopy offers wide-field 3D imaging of living biological specimens with low light dose and axial resolution far beyond the diffraction barrier. We demonstrate optical sections that are thinner by 5–12-fold compared with their conventional diffraction-limited LS analogs. PMID:26984498

  7. Diffraction-limited two-dimensional hard-x-ray focusing at the 100 nm level using a Kirkpatrick-Baez mirror arrangement

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuyama, S.; Mimura, H.; Yumoto, H.; Yamamura, K.; Sano, Y.; Endo, K.; Mori, Y.; Nishino, Y.; Tamasaku, K.; Ishikawa, T.; Yabashi, M.; Yamauchi, K.

    2005-08-15

    The spatial resolution of scanning x-ray microscopy depends on the beam size of focused x rays. Recently, nearly diffraction-limited line focusing has been achieved using elliptical mirror optics at the 100 nm level. To realize such focusing two-dimensionally in a Kirkpatrick-Baez system, the required accuracies of the mirror aligners in this system were estimated using optical simulators based on geometrical or wave-optical theories. A focusing unit fulfilling the required adjustment accuracies was constructed. The relationships between alignment errors and focused beam profiles were quantitatively examined at the 1 km long beamline (BL29XUL) of SPring-8 to be in good agreement with the simulation results.

  8. Sub-diffraction-limited multilayer coatings for the 0.3-NA Micro-Exposure Tool for extreme ultraviolet lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Soufli, R; Hudyma, R M; Spiller, E; Gullikson, E M; Schmidt, M A; Robinson, J C; Baker, S L; Walton, C C; Taylor, J S

    2007-01-03

    This manuscript discusses the multilayer coating results for the primary and secondary mirrors of the Micro Exposure Tool (MET): a 0.30-numerical aperture (NA) lithographic imaging system with 200 x 600 {micro}m{sup 2} field of view at the wafer plane, operating in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) wavelength region. Mo/Si multilayers were deposited by DC-magnetron sputtering on large-area, curved MET camera substrates, and a velocity modulation technique was implemented to consistently achieve multilayer thickness profiles with added figure errors below 0.1 nm rms to achieve sub-diffraction-limited performance. This work represents the first experimental demonstration of sub-diffraction-limited multilayer coatings for high-NA EUV imaging systems.

  9. High efficiency near diffraction-limited mid-infrared flat lenses based on metasurface reflectarrays.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuyan; Kim, Myoung-Hwan; Aieta, Francesco; She, Alan; Mansuripur, Tobias; Gabay, Ilan; Khorasaninejad, Mohammadreza; Rousso, David; Wang, Xiaojun; Troccoli, Mariano; Yu, Nanfang; Capasso, Federico

    2016-08-01

    We report the first demonstration of a mid-IR reflection-based flat lens with high efficiency and near diffraction-limited focusing. Focusing efficiency as high as 80%, in good agreement with simulations (83%), has been achieved at 45° incidence angle at λ = 4.6 μm. The off-axis geometry considerably simplifies the optical arrangement compared to the common geometry of normal incidence in reflection mode which requires beam splitters. Simulations show that the effects of incidence angle are small compared to parabolic mirrors with the same NA. The use of single-step photolithography allows large scale fabrication. Such a device is important in the development of compact telescopes, microscopes, and spectroscopic designs. PMID:27505769

  10. High efficiency near diffraction-limited mid-infrared flat lenses based on metasurface reflectarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shuyan; Kim, Myoung-Hwan; Aieta, Francesco; She, Alan; Mansuripur, Tobias; Gabay, Ilan; Khorasaninejad, Mohammadreza; Rousso, David; Wang, Xiaojun; Troccoli, Mariano; Yu, Nanfang; Capasso, Federico

    2016-08-01

    A limiting factor in the development of mid-infrared optics is the lack of abundant materials that are transparent, low cost, lightweight, and easy to machine. In this paper, we demonstrate a metasurface device that circumvents these limitations. A flat lens based on antenna reflectarrays was designed to achieve near diffraction-limited focusing with a high efficiency (experiment: 80%, simulation: 83%) at 45(o) incidence angle at {\\lambda} = 4.6 {\\mu}m. This geometry considerably simplifies the experimental arrangement compared to the common geometry of normal incidence which requires beam splitters. Simulations show that the effect of comatic aberrations is small compared to parabolic mirrors. The use of single-step photolithography allows large scale fabrication.

  11. PIMMS échelle: the next generation of compact diffraction limited spectrographs for arbitrary input beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betters, Christopher H.; Leon-Saval, Sergio G.; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Richards, Samuel N.; Birks, Tim A.; Gris-Sánchez, Itandehui

    2014-07-01

    PIMMS échelle is an extension of previous PIMMS (photonic integrated multimode spectrograph) designs, enhanced by using an échelle diffraction grating as the primary dispersing element for increased spectral band- width. The spectrograph operates at visible wavelengths (550 to 780nm), and is capable of capturing ~100 nm of R > 60, 000 (λ/(triangle)λ) spectra in a single exposure. PIMMS échelle uses a photonic lantern to convert an arbitrary (e.g. incoherent) input beam into N diffraction-limited outputs (i.e. N single-mode fibres). This allows a truly diffraction limited spectral resolution, while also decoupling the spectrograph design from the input source. Here both the photonic lantern and the spectrograph slit are formed using a single length of multi-core fibre. A 1x19 (1 multi-mode fiber to 19 single-mode fibres) photonic lantern is formed by tapering one end of the multi-core fibre, while the other end is used to form a TIGER mode slit (i.e. for a hexagonal grid with sufficient spacing and the correct orientations, the cores of the multi-core fibre can be dispersed such that they do not overlap without additional reformatting). The result is an exceptionally compact, shoebox sized, spectrograph that is constructed primarily from commercial off the shelf components. Here we present a brief overview of the échelle spectrograph design, followed by results from on-sky testing of the breadboard mounted version of the spectrograph at the `UK Schmidt Telescope'.

  12. Covariance of lucky images for increasing objects contrast: diffraction-limited images in ground-based telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cagigal, Manuel P.; Valle, Pedro J.; Colodro-Conde, Carlos; Villó-Pérez, Isidro; Pérez-Garrido, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Images of stars adopt shapes far from the ideal Airy pattern due to atmospheric density fluctuations. Hence, diffraction-limited images can only be achieved by telescopes without atmospheric influence, e.g. spatial telescopes, or by using techniques like adaptive optics or lucky imaging. In this paper, we propose a new computational technique based on the evaluation of the COvariancE of Lucky Images (COELI). This technique allows us to discover companions to main stars by taking advantage of the atmospheric fluctuations. We describe the algorithm and we carry out a theoretical analysis of the improvement in contrast. We have used images taken with 2.2-m Calar Alto telescope as a test bed for the technique resulting that, under certain conditions, telescope diffraction limit is clearly reached.

  13. Photonic spatial reformatting of stellar light for diffraction-limited spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, R. J.; MacLachlan, D. G.; Choudhury, D.; Morris, T. J.; Gendron, E.; Basden, A. G.; Brown, G.; Allington-Smith, J. R.; Thomson, R. R.

    2015-06-01

    The spectral resolution of a dispersive spectrograph is dependent on the width of the entrance slit. This means that astronomical spectrographs trade-off throughput with spectral resolving power. Recently, optical guided-wave transitions known as photonic lanterns have been proposed to circumvent this trade-off, by enabling the efficient reformatting of multimode light into a pseudo-slit which is highly multimode in one axis, but diffraction-limited in the other. Here, we demonstrate the successful reformatting of a telescope point spread function into such a slit using a three-dimensional integrated optical waveguide device, which we name the photonic dicer. Using the CANARY adaptive optics (AO) demonstrator on the William Herschel Telescope, and light centred at 1530 nm with a 160 nm full width at half-maximum, the device shows a transmission of between 10 and 20 per cent depending upon the type of AO correction applied. Most of the loss is due to the overfilling of the input aperture in poor and moderate seeing. Taking this into account, the photonic device itself has a transmission of 57 ± 4 per cent. We show how a fully-optimized device can be used with AO to provide efficient spectroscopy at high spectral resolution.

  14. Demonstration and design of a compact diffraction limited spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betters, Christopher H.; Leon-Saval, Sergio G.; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Robertson, Gordon

    2012-09-01

    PIMMS IR is a prototype high resolution diraction limited spectrograph operating in the near infrared. Its current conguration has a bandwidth of 8nm centred on 1550nm with a resolving power, λ/Δλ, of 31000 with the option to increase this to ~60000 using a dual grating system. Remarkably, this is 85% of the theoretical limit for Gaussian illumination of a diraction grating. It is based upon the PIMMS#0 (photonic integrated multi-mode micro-spectrograph), a design that utilises the multi-mode to single-mode conversion of the photonic lantern. By feeding the spectrograph with the single-mode bres we are able to design and build a spectrograph whose performance is diraction limited and independent of the input source (i.e. a telescope) it is attached to. The spectrograph has with a throughput of ~70% (that is the light from the single-mode entrance slit that lands on the detector). The spectrograph is also extremely compact with a footprint of just 450mm x 190mm. Here we present the design of PIMMS IR and its performance characteristics determined from ray tracing, physical optics simulations and experimental measurements.Δ

  15. Spatially dependent Rabi oscillations: An approach to sub-diffraction-limited coherent anti-Stokes Raman-scattering microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Beeker, Willem P.; Lee, Chris J.; Boller, Klaus-Jochen; Gross, Petra; Cleff, Carsten; Fallnich, Carsten; Offerhaus, Herman L.; Herek, Jennifer L.

    2010-01-15

    We present a theoretical investigation of coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) that is modulated by periodically depleting the ground-state population through Rabi oscillations driven by an additional control laser. We find that such a process generates optical sidebands in the CARS spectrum and that the frequency of the sidebands depends on the intensity of the control laser light field. We show that analyzing the sideband frequency upon scanning the beams across the sample allows one to spatially resolve emitter positions where a spatial resolution of 65 nm, which is well below the diffraction limit, can be obtained.

  16. Structuring of photosensitive material below diffraction limit using far field irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadavalli, Nataraja Sekhar; Saphiannikova, Marina; Lomadze, Nino; Goldenberg, Leonid M.; Santer, Svetlana

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, we report on in-situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) studies of topographical changes in azobenzene-containing photosensitive polymer films that are irradiated with light interference patterns. We have developed an experimental setup consisting of an AFM combined with two-beam interferometry that permits us to switch between different polarization states of the two interfering beams while scanning the illuminated area of the polymer film, acquiring corresponding changes in topography in-situ. This way, we are able to analyze how the change in topography is related to the variation of the electrical field vector within the interference pattern. It is for the first time that with a rather simple experimental approach a rigorous assignment can be achieved. By performing in-situ measurements we found that for a certain polarization combination of two interfering beams [namely for the SP (↕, ↔) polarization pattern] the topography forms surface relief grating with only half the period of the interference patterns. Exploiting this phenomenon we are able to fabricate surface relief structures with characteristic features measuring only 140 nm, by using far field optics with a wavelength of 491 nm. We believe that this relatively simple method could be extremely valuable to, for instance, produce structural features below the diffraction limit at high-throughput, and this could significantly contribute to the search of new fabrication strategies in electronics and photonics industry.

  17. Characterization of Differential Toll-Like Receptor Responses below the Optical Diffraction Limit**

    PubMed Central

    Aaron, Jesse S.; Carson, Bryan D.; Timlin, Jerilyn A.

    2013-01-01

    Many membrane receptors are recruited to specific cell surface domains to form nanoscale clusters upon ligand activation. This step appears to be necessary to initiate signaling, including pathways in innate immune system activation. However, virulent pathogens such as Yersinia pestis (the causative agent of plague) are known to evade innate immune detection, in contrast to similar microbes (such as E. coli) that elicit a robust response. This disparity has been partly attributed to the structure of lipopolysaccharides (LPS) on the bacterial cell wall, which are recognized by the innate immune receptor TLR4. As such, we hypothesized that nanoscale differences would exist between the spatial clustering of TLR4 upon binding of LPS derived from Y. pestis and E. coli. Although optical imaging can provide exquisite details of the spatial organization of biomolecules, there is a mismatch between the scale at which receptor clustering occurs (<300 nm) and the optical diffraction limit (>400 nm). The last decade has seen the emergence of super-resolution imaging methods that effectively break the optical diffraction barrier to yield truly nanoscale information in intact biological samples. This study reports the first visualizations of TLR4 distributions on intact cells at image resolutions of <30 nm using a novel, dual-color stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM) technique. This methodology permits distinction between receptors containing bound LPS from those without at the nanoscale. Importantly, we also show that LPS derived from immuno-stimulatory bacteria resulted in significantly higher LPS-TLR4 cluster sizes and a nearly two-fold greater ligand/receptor colocalization as compared to immuno-evading LPS. PMID:22807232

  18. Achievement of a 920-MHz High Resolution NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashi, Kenjiro; Shimizu, Tadashi; Goto, Atsushi; Kiyoshi, Tsukasa; Matsumoto, Shinji; Wada, Hitoshi; Fujito, Teruaki; Hasegawa, Ken-ichi; Yoshikawa, Masatoshi; Miki, Takashi; Ito, Satoshi; Hamada, Mamoru; Hayashi, Seiji

    2002-06-01

    We have developed a 920-MHz NMR system and performed the proton NMR measurement of H 2O and ethylbenzene using the superconducting magnet operating at 21.6 T (920 MHz for proton), which is the highest field produced by a superconducting NMR magnet in the persistent mode. From the NMR measurements, it is verified that both homogeneity and stability of the magnet have a specification sufficient for a high resolution NMR.

  19. Analysis of the scalability of diffraction-limited fiber lasers and amplifiers to high average power.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Jay W; Messerly, Michael J; Beach, Raymond J; Shverdin, Miroslav Y; Stappaerts, Eddy A; Sridharan, Arun K; Pax, Paul H; Heebner, John E; Siders, Craig W; Barty, C P J

    2008-08-18

    We analyze the scalability of diffraction-limited fiber lasers considering thermal, non-linear, damage and pump coupling limits as well as fiber mode field diameter (MFD) restrictions. We derive new general relationships based upon practical considerations. Our analysis shows that if the fiber's MFD could be increased arbitrarily, 36 kW of power could be obtained with diffraction-limited quality from a fiber laser or amplifier. This power limit is determined by thermal and non-linear limits that combine to prevent further power scaling, irrespective of increases in mode size. However, limits to the scaling of the MFD may restrict fiber lasers to lower output powers.

  20. Analysis of the scalability of diffraction-limited fiber lasers and amplifiers to high average power.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Jay W; Messerly, Michael J; Beach, Raymond J; Shverdin, Miroslav Y; Stappaerts, Eddy A; Sridharan, Arun K; Pax, Paul H; Heebner, John E; Siders, Craig W; Barty, C P J

    2008-08-18

    We analyze the scalability of diffraction-limited fiber lasers considering thermal, non-linear, damage and pump coupling limits as well as fiber mode field diameter (MFD) restrictions. We derive new general relationships based upon practical considerations. Our analysis shows that if the fiber's MFD could be increased arbitrarily, 36 kW of power could be obtained with diffraction-limited quality from a fiber laser or amplifier. This power limit is determined by thermal and non-linear limits that combine to prevent further power scaling, irrespective of increases in mode size. However, limits to the scaling of the MFD may restrict fiber lasers to lower output powers. PMID:18711562

  1. High power broadband all fiber super-fluorescent source with linear polarization and near diffraction-limited beam quality.

    PubMed

    Ma, Pengfei; Huang, Long; Wang, Xiaolin; Zhou, Pu; Liu, Zejin

    2016-01-25

    In this manuscript, a high power broadband superfluorescent source (SFS) with linear polarization and near-diffraction-limited beam quality is achieved based on an ytterbium-doped (Yb-doped), all fiberized and polarization-maintained master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) configuration. The MOPA structure generates a linearly polarized output power of 1427 W with a slope efficiency of 80% and a full width at half maximum (FWHM) of 11 nm, which is power scaled by an order of magnitude compared with the previously reported SFSs with linear polarization. In the experiment, both the polarization extinction ratio (PER) and beam quality (M(2) factor) are degraded little during the power scaling process. At maximal output power, the PER and M(2) factor are measured to be 19.1dB and 1.14, respectively. The root-mean-square (RMS) and peak-vale (PV) values of the power fluctuation at maximal output power are just 0.48% and within 3%, respectively. Further power scaling of the whole system is limited by the available pump sources. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of kilowatt level broadband SFS with linear polarization and near-diffraction-limited beam quality. PMID:26832492

  2. Thermal eigenmode amplifiers for diffraction-limited amplification of ultrashort pulses.

    PubMed

    Salin, F; Blanc, C L; Squier, J; Barty, C

    1998-01-01

    The design of high-repetition, high-average power, multipass amplifiers in which the pump power induced thermal lensing within the amplifier is used to create an equivalent lens waveguide for the production of diffraction-limited beams is analyzed.

  3. HYBRID Simulations of Diffraction-Limited Focusing with Kirkpatrick-Baez Mirrors for a Next-Generation In Situ Hard X-ray Nanoprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maser, Jörg; Shi, Xianbo; Reininger, Ruben; Lai, Barry; Vogt, Stefan

    2016-02-01

    Next-generation hard X-ray nanoprobe beamlines such as the In Situ Nanoprobe (ISN) beamline being planned at the Advanced Photon Source aim at providing very high spatial resolution while also enabling very high focused flux, to study complex materials and devices using fast, multidimensional imaging across many length scales. The ISN will use diffractive optics to focus X-rays with a bandpass of ∆E/E = 10-4 into a focal spot of 20 nm or below. Reflective optics in Kirkpatrick-Baez geometry will be used to focus X-rays with a bandpass as large as ∆E/E = 10-2 into a focal spot of 50 nm. Diffraction-limited focusing with reflective optics is achieved by spatial filtering and use of a very long, vertically focusing mirror. To quantify the performance of the ISN beamline, we have simulated the propagation of both partially and fully coherent wavefronts from the undulator source, through the ISN beamline and into the mirror-based focal spot. Simulations were carried out using the recently developed software "HYBRID."

  4. Instrument for Achieving High Angular Resolution on the Infrared Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Donald N. B.

    1998-01-01

    Aberrations in stellar images caused by the atmosphere sets a significant limit on angular resolution in ground based astronomy. The largest of these aberrations is the image motion or wavefront tilt. Since the image motion is random it causes a blurring of the image, and this causes a blurring of the image from 0.3 arcseconds to about 0.7 arcseconds. The purpose of the tip-tilt project was to devise a system for the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility that would measure the image movement and correct it by rapidly tilting a mirror in two axes (tip and tilt). The system would involve building a CCD sensor package to measure the image motion, a new top end for the telescope to hold the tip-tilt mirror, a control system, and software. The system was designed to correct images for the facility camera, NSFCAM, and for the facility spectrometer, SPEX. Both of these instruments are equipped with a cold beamsplitter to feed the sensor package.

  5. Characterization of analytical figures of merit of a sub-diffraction limited fiber bundle array for SERS imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Languirand, Eric R.; Cullum, Brian M.

    2016-05-01

    Super resolution chemical imaging can provide high spatial resolution images that contain chemically specific information. Additionally, using a technique such as Raman scattering provides molecular specific information based on the inherent vibrations within the analyte of interest. In this work, commercially available fiber bundle arrays (1mm diameter) consisting of 30,000 individual fiber elements (4μm diameter) that are then modified to obtain surface enhanced Raman scatter are employed. This allows for the visualization of vibrational information with high spatial (i.e. sub-diffraction limited) resolution over the 30,000 individual points of interrogation covering a total imaging diameter of approximately 20μm in a non-scanning format. Using these bundles, it has been shown that dithering can increase the spatial resolution of the arrays further by obtaining several sub-element shifted images. To retain the spatial resolution of such images, cross talk associated with these tpared bundles must be kept at a negligible level. In this paper, a study of luminescent particles isolated in individual fiber wells has been performed to characterize the cross talk associated with these fiber bundles. Scanning-electron microscope (SEM) images provide nanometric characterization of the fiber array, while luminescent signals allow for the quantitation of cross talk between adjacent fiber elements. From these studies negligible cross-talk associated with both untapered and tapered bundles was found to exist.

  6. Super-resolving quantum radar: Coherent-state sources with homodyne detection suffice to beat the diffraction limit

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Kebei; Lee, Hwang; Gerry, Christopher C.; Dowling, Jonathan P.

    2013-11-21

    There has been much recent interest in quantum metrology for applications to sub-Raleigh ranging and remote sensing such as in quantum radar. For quantum radar, atmospheric absorption and diffraction rapidly degrades any actively transmitted quantum states of light, such as N00N states, so that for this high-loss regime the optimal strategy is to transmit coherent states of light, which suffer no worse loss than the linear Beer's law for classical radar attenuation, and which provide sensitivity at the shot-noise limit in the returned power. We show that coherent radar radiation sources, coupled with a quantum homodyne detection scheme, provide both longitudinal and angular super-resolution much below the Rayleigh diffraction limit, with sensitivity at shot-noise in terms of the detected photon power. Our approach provides a template for the development of a complete super-resolving quantum radar system with currently available technology.

  7. Wavefront correction for near diffraction-limited focal spot on a 6×100 J/1-ns laser facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, Julien; Wattellier, Benoit F.; Zou, Ji P.; Chanteloup, Jean-Christophe; Bandulet, H.; Michel, P.; Labaune, C.; Depierreux, S.; Kudryashov, Alexis V.; Aleksandrov, Alexander G.

    2003-10-01

    We have implemented on one beam of the LULI six-beam high-energy (6×100 J, 1 ns) Nd:glass laser facility a closed-loop Adaptive Optics (AO) system to compensate for thermal distortions onto the wave front. Using the AO system composed of a dielectric coated deformable mirror and of a wave front sensor, we are able to improve the wave front quality in order to obtain a focal spot close to the diffraction limit. This allows not only to improve the reproducibility of the experiments but also to increase by at least two orders of magnitude the peak intensity as compared with what usual laser smoothing techniques can achieve.

  8. High resolution telescope

    DOEpatents

    Massie, Norbert A.; Oster, Yale

    1992-01-01

    A large effective-aperture, low-cost optical telescope with diffraction-limited resolution enables ground-based observation of near-earth space objects. The telescope has a non-redundant, thinned-aperture array in a center-mount, single-structure space frame. It employs speckle interferometric imaging to achieve diffraction-limited resolution. The signal-to-noise ratio problem is mitigated by moving the wavelength of operation to the near-IR, and the image is sensed by a Silicon CCD. The steerable, single-structure array presents a constant pupil. The center-mount, radar-like mount enables low-earth orbit space objects to be tracked as well as increases stiffness of the space frame. In the preferred embodiment, the array has elemental telescopes with subaperture of 2.1 m in a circle-of-nine configuration. The telescope array has an effective aperture of 12 m which provides a diffraction-limited resolution of 0.02 arc seconds. Pathlength matching of the telescope array is maintained by an electro-optical system employing laser metrology. Speckle imaging relaxes pathlength matching tolerance by one order of magnitude as compared to phased arrays. Many features of the telescope contribute to substantial reduction in costs. These include eliminating the conventional protective dome and reducing on-site construction activites. The cost of the telescope scales with the first power of the aperture rather than its third power as in conventional telescopes.

  9. Wavelength scanning achieves pixel super-resolution in holographic on-chip microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Wei; Göröcs, Zoltan; Zhang, Yibo; Feizi, Alborz; Greenbaum, Alon; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2016-03-01

    Lensfree holographic on-chip imaging is a potent solution for high-resolution and field-portable bright-field imaging over a wide field-of-view. Previous lensfree imaging approaches utilize a pixel super-resolution technique, which relies on sub-pixel lateral displacements between the lensfree diffraction patterns and the image sensor's pixel-array, to achieve sub-micron resolution under unit magnification using state-of-the-art CMOS imager chips, commonly used in e.g., mobile-phones. Here we report, for the first time, a wavelength scanning based pixel super-resolution technique in lensfree holographic imaging. We developed an iterative super-resolution algorithm, which generates high-resolution reconstructions of the specimen from low-resolution (i.e., under-sampled) diffraction patterns recorded at multiple wavelengths within a narrow spectral range (e.g., 10-30 nm). Compared with lateral shift-based pixel super-resolution, this wavelength scanning approach does not require any physical shifts in the imaging setup, and the resolution improvement is uniform in all directions across the sensor-array. Our wavelength scanning super-resolution approach can also be integrated with multi-height and/or multi-angle on-chip imaging techniques to obtain even higher resolution reconstructions. For example, using wavelength scanning together with multi-angle illumination, we achieved a halfpitch resolution of 250 nm, corresponding to a numerical aperture of 1. In addition to pixel super-resolution, the small scanning steps in wavelength also enable us to robustly unwrap phase, revealing the specimen's optical path length in our reconstructed images. We believe that this new wavelength scanning based pixel super-resolution approach can provide competitive microscopy solutions for high-resolution and field-portable imaging needs, potentially impacting tele-pathology applications in resource-limited-settings.

  10. Achievable spatial resolution of time-resolved transillumination imaging systems which utilize multiply scattered light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, J. A.; Battle, P. R.; Bashkansky, M.; Mahon, R.; Duncan, M. D.; Reintjes, J.

    1996-01-01

    We describe theoretically and measure experimentally the best achievable time-dependent point-spread-function of light in the presence of strong turbidity. We employ the rescaled isotropic-scattering solution to the time-dependent radiative transfer equation to examine three mathematically distinct limits of photonic transport: the ballistic, quasidiffuse, and diffuse limits. In all cases we follow the constraint that a minimum fractional number of launched photons must be received before the time-integrating detector is turned off. We show how the achievable ballistic resolution maps into the diffusion-limited achievable resolution, and verify this behavior experimentally by using a coherently amplified Raman polarization gate imaging system. We are able to quantitatively fit the measured best achievable resolution by empirically rescaling the scattering length in the model.

  11. Space infrared telescope facility wide field and diffraction limited array camera (IRAC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fazio, Giovanni G.

    1988-01-01

    The wide-field and diffraction limited array camera (IRAC) is capable of two-dimensional photometry in either a wide-field or diffraction-limited mode over the wavelength range from 2 to 30 microns with a possible extension to 120 microns. A low-doped indium antimonide detector was developed for 1.8 to 5.0 microns, detectors were tested and optimized for the entire 1.8 to 30 micron range, beamsplitters were developed and tested for the 1.8 to 30 micron range, and tradeoff studies of the camera's optical system performed. Data are presented on the performance of InSb, Si:In, Si:Ga, and Si:Sb array detectors bumpbonded to a multiplexed CMOS readout chip of the source-follower type at SIRTF operating backgrounds (equal to or less than 1 x 10 to the 8th ph/sq cm/sec) and temperature (4 to 12 K). Some results at higher temperatures are also presented for comparison to SIRTF temperature results. Data are also presented on the performance of IRAC beamsplitters at room temperature at both 0 and 45 deg angle of incidence and on the performance of the all-reflecting optical system baselined for the camera.

  12. 100-watt fiber-based green laser with near diffraction-limited beam quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Dan; Eisenberg, Eric; Brar, Khush; Yilmaz, Tolga; Honea, Eric

    2010-02-01

    An air-cooled, light-weight, fiber-based, high power green laser has been prototyped. The system consists of an all-fibercoupled IR pump laser at 1064 nm and a frequency-conversion module in a compact and flexible configuration. The IR laser operates in QCW mode, with 10 MHz pulse repetition frequency and 3-5 ns pulse width, to generate sufficient peak power for frequency doubling in the converter module. The IR laser can produce more than 200 W in a linearlypolarized diffraction-limited output beam with high spectral brightness for frequency conversion. The converter module has an input telescope and an oven with a nonlinear crystal to efficiently convert the 1064-nm IR fiber laser output to 532-nm green output. The IR laser and conversion module are connected via a stainless-steel protected delivery fiber for optical beam delivery and an electrical cable harness for electrical power delivery and system control. The beam quality of the 532 nm output remains near diffraction-limited, with M2<1.4. Up to 101 W of 532 nm output was demonstrated and multi-hour runs were characterized at 75 W output. The weights of the IR laser package and doubler are 69 lbs and 14 lbs respectively. An overview of the system and full characterization results will be presented. Such compact, highbrightness green laser sources are expected to enable various scientific, defense and industrial applications.

  13. 70-Watt green laser with near diffraction-limited beam quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Dan; Eisenberg, Eric; Madasamy, Pratheepan; Mead, Roy; Honea, Eric

    2009-02-01

    A 70-Watt green laser with M2<1.4 has been demonstrated. This green laser consists of an all-fiber-based IR pump laser at 1064 nm and a frequency-conversion module in a compact and flexible configuration. The IR laser produces up to 150 Watts in a polarized diffraction-limited output beam with high spectral brightness for frequency conversion. The IR laser is operating under QCW mode, e.g. 10 MHz with 3~5 ns pulse width or 700 MHz with 50 ps pulse width, to generate sufficient peak power for frequency doubling in the converter module. The IR laser and conversion module are connected via a 5-mm stainless-steel protected delivery fiber for optical beam delivery and an electrical cable harness for electrical power delivery and system control. Both the IR laser and converter module are run through embedded software that controls laser operations such as warm up and shut down. System overview and full characterization results will be presented. Such a high power green laser with near diffraction-limited output in a compact configuration will enable various scientific as well as industrial applications.

  14. Optical Imaging of Nonuniform Ferroelectricity and Strain at the Diffraction Limit

    PubMed Central

    Vlasin, Ondrej; Casals, Blai; Dix, Nico; Gutiérrez, Diego; Sánchez, Florencio; Herranz, Gervasi

    2015-01-01

    We have imaged optically the spatial distributions of ferroelectricity and piezoelectricity at the diffraction limit. Contributions to the birefringence from electro-optics –linked to ferroelectricity– as well as strain –arising from converse piezoelectric effects– have been recorded simultaneously in a BaTiO3 thin film. The concurrent recording of electro-optic and piezo-optic mappings revealed that, far from the ideal uniformity, the ferroelectric and piezoelectric responses were strikingly inhomogeneous, exhibiting significant fluctuations over the scale of the micrometer. The optical methods here described are appropriate to study the variations of these properties simultaneously, which are of great relevance when ferroelectrics are downscaled to small sizes for applications in data storage and processing. PMID:26522345

  15. Diffraction-limited Fabry-Perot cavity in the near concentric regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durak, K.; Nguyen, C. H.; Leong, V.; Straupe, S.; Kurtsiefer, C.

    2014-10-01

    Nearly concentric optical cavities can be used to prepare optical fields with a very small mode volume. We implement an anaclastic design of such a cavity that significantly simplifies mode matching to the fundamental cavity mode. The cavity is shown to have diffraction-limited performance for a mode volume of ≈ {{10}4}{{λ }3}. This is in sharp contrast with the behavior of cavities with plano-concave mirrors, where aberrations significantly decrease the coupling of the input mode to the fundamental mode of the cavity and increase the coupling to the higher-order modes. We estimate the related cavity quantum electrodynamics parameters and show that the proposed cavity design allows for strong coupling without a need for high finesse or small physical-cavity volume.

  16. Optical Imaging of Nonuniform Ferroelectricity and Strain at the Diffraction Limit.

    PubMed

    Vlasin, Ondrej; Casals, Blai; Dix, Nico; Gutiérrez, Diego; Sánchez, Florencio; Herranz, Gervasi

    2015-01-01

    We have imaged optically the spatial distributions of ferroelectricity and piezoelectricity at the diffraction limit. Contributions to the birefringence from electro-optics--linked to ferroelectricity--as well as strain--arising from converse piezoelectric effects--have been recorded simultaneously in a BaTiO3 thin film. The concurrent recording of electro-optic and piezo-optic mappings revealed that, far from the ideal uniformity, the ferroelectric and piezoelectric responses were strikingly inhomogeneous, exhibiting significant fluctuations over the scale of the micrometer. The optical methods here described are appropriate to study the variations of these properties simultaneously, which are of great relevance when ferroelectrics are downscaled to small sizes for applications in data storage and processing. PMID:26522345

  17. Three-dimensional array diffraction-limited foci from Greek ladders to generalized Fibonacci sequences.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junyong

    2015-11-16

    Greek ladder is a technique for approximating Cn by rational numbers where n is a positive integer and C is a positive real number. For the classical Greek ladder, the value isC. Based on the continued fraction theory and algebraic equation, the classical Greek ladder in a special case can be reduced to the generalized Fibonacci sequence. By means of proper switching and binary, ternary or quaternary phase modulation, here we have successfully designed the various kinds of nano-photonic devices to produce three-dimensional array foci whose focusing properties satisfy the above mathematical characteristics. With this technology, the diffraction-limited array foci are freely designed or distributed under the requirement at the desired multiple focal planes. PMID:26698510

  18. Social Perspective Taking: A Facilitating Aptitude for Conflict Resolution, Historical Empathy, and Social Studies Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gehlbach, Hunter

    2004-01-01

    This article examines the relationship between social perspective taking (SPT) and student achievement in three domains: conflict resolution, historical empathy, and social studies grades. Although many have asserted that SPT relates to important educational outcomes, varying conceptualizations of SPT have impeded researchers' abilities to assess…

  19. High power, diffraction limited picosecond oscillator based on Nd:GdVO4 bulk crystal with σ polarized in-band pumping.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hua; Guo, Jie; Gao, Peng; Yu, Hai; Liang, Xiaoyan

    2016-06-27

    We report on a high power passively mode-locked picosecond oscillator based on Nd:GdVO4 crystal with σ polarized in-band pumping. Thermal gradient and thermal aberration was greatly decreased with proposed configuration. Maximum output power of 37 W at 81 MHz repetition rate with 19.3 ps pulse duration was achieved directly from Nd:GdVO4 oscillator, corresponding to 51% optical efficiency. The oscillator maintained diffraction limited beam quality of M2 < 1.05 at different output coupling with pulse duration between 11.2 ps to 19.3 ps.

  20. Electromagnetic energy transport below the diffraction limit in periodic metal nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, Stefan A.; Kik, Pieter G.; Brongersma, Mark L.; Atwater, Harry A.

    2001-12-01

    We investigate the possibility of using arrays of closely spaced metal nanoparticles as waveguides for electromagnetic energy below the diffraction limit of visible light. Coupling between adjacent particles sets up coupled plasmon modes that give rise to coherent propagation of energy along the array. A point dipole analysis predicts group velocities of energy transport that exceed 0.1c along straight arrays and shows that energy transmission through chain networks such as corners and tee structures is possible at high efficiencies. Although radiation losses into the far field are negligible due to the near-field nature of the coupling, resistive heating leads to transmission losses of about 3 dB/500 nm for gold and silver particles. We confirmed the predictions of this analytical model using numeric finite difference time domain (FDTD) simulations. Also, we have fabricated gold nanoparticle arrays using electron beam lithography to study this type of electromagnetic energy transport. A modified illumination near field scanning optical microscope (NSOM) was used as a local excitation source of a nanoparticle in these arrays. Transport is studied by imaging the fluorescence of dye-filled latex beads positioned next to the nanoparticle arrays. We report on initial experiments of this kind.

  1. Sub-Diffraction Limited Writing based on Laser Induced Periodic Surface Structures (LIPSS)

    PubMed Central

    He, Xiaolong; Datta, Anurup; Nam, Woongsik; Traverso, Luis M.; Xu, Xianfan

    2016-01-01

    Controlled fabrication of single and multiple nanostructures far below the diffraction limit using a method based on laser induced periodic surface structure (LIPSS) is presented. In typical LIPSS, multiple lines with a certain spatial periodicity, but often not well-aligned, were produced. In this work, well-controlled and aligned nanowires and nanogrooves with widths as small as 40 nm and 60 nm with desired orientation and length are fabricated. Moreover, single nanowire and nanogroove were fabricated based on the same mechanism for forming multiple, periodic structures. Combining numerical modeling and AFM/SEM analyses, it was found these nanostructures were formed through the interference between the incident laser radiation and the surface plasmons, the mechanism for forming LIPSS on a dielectric surface using a high power femtosecond laser. We expect that our method, in particular, the fabrication of single nanowires and nanogrooves could be a promising alternative for fabrication of nanoscale devices due to its simplicity, flexibility, and versatility. PMID:27721428

  2. Sub-Diffraction Limited Writing based on Laser Induced Periodic Surface Structures (LIPSS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xiaolong; Datta, Anurup; Nam, Woongsik; Traverso, Luis M.; Xu, Xianfan

    2016-10-01

    Controlled fabrication of single and multiple nanostructures far below the diffraction limit using a method based on laser induced periodic surface structure (LIPSS) is presented. In typical LIPSS, multiple lines with a certain spatial periodicity, but often not well-aligned, were produced. In this work, well-controlled and aligned nanowires and nanogrooves with widths as small as 40 nm and 60 nm with desired orientation and length are fabricated. Moreover, single nanowire and nanogroove were fabricated based on the same mechanism for forming multiple, periodic structures. Combining numerical modeling and AFM/SEM analyses, it was found these nanostructures were formed through the interference between the incident laser radiation and the surface plasmons, the mechanism for forming LIPSS on a dielectric surface using a high power femtosecond laser. We expect that our method, in particular, the fabrication of single nanowires and nanogrooves could be a promising alternative for fabrication of nanoscale devices due to its simplicity, flexibility, and versatility.

  3. Diffractive limit approach to elastic scattering and inelastic diffraction of high-energy hadrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Małecki, Andrzej

    1996-09-01

    An approach to inelastic diffraction based on the concept of equivalence of diffractive states is developed. In the classical description of Good and Walker, the inelastic diffraction originates from the diversity of elastic scattering amplitudes in the initial and final state Δt. We consider a multichannel correction, accounting for intermediate transitions inside the equivalence class. This correction can be factorized yielding the diffraction amplitude in the form NΔt, to be taken in the ``diffractive limit'' N-->∞, Δt-->0 such that NΔt is finite. We analyze elastic scattering and the inclusive inelastic diffraction cross sections for p-p and p-p>¯ collisions, in the range of c.m. energy √s=20-1800 GeV. We claim that the angular distribution of the inclusive inelastic diffraction at small momentum transfers is determined by elastic scattering in the transition region between the forward peak and the minimum. This is successfully verified in experiment. The detailed comparison with the Good-Walker description, with emphasis on the advantages of our approach, is presented.

  4. Bispectrum speckle interferometry of the Red Rectangle: Diffraction-limited near-infrared images reconstructed from Keck telescope speckle data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuthill, P. G.; Men'shchikov, A. B.; Schertl, D.; Monnier, J. D.; Danchi, W. C.; Weigelt, G.

    2002-07-01

    We present new near-infrared (2.1-3.3 mu m) images of the Red Rectangle with unprecedented diffraction-limited angular resolutions of 46-68 mas; 4 times higher than that of the Hubble space telescope and almost a factor of two improvement over the previous 6 m SAO telecope speckle images presented by Men'shchikov et al. (\\cite{Men'shchikov_etal1998}). The new images, which were reconstructed from Keck telescope speckle data using the bispectrum speckle interferometry method, clearly show two bright lobes above and below the optically thick dark lane obscuring the central binary. X-shaped spikes, thought to trace the surface of a biconical flow, change the intensity distribution of the bright lobes, making them appear broadened or with an east-west double-peak in images with the highest resolution. The striking biconical appearance of the Red Rectangle is preserved on scales from 50 mas to 1 arcmin and from the visible (red) to at least 10 mu m, implying that large grains of at least several microns in size dominate scattering. The new images supplement previous 76 mas resolution speckle reconstructions at shorter wavelengths of 0.6-0.8 mu m (Osterbart et al. \\cite{Osterbart_etal1997}) and 0.7-2.2 mu m (Men'shchikov et al. \\cite{Men'shchikov_etal1998}), allowing a more detailed analysis of the famous bipolar nebula. The intensity distribution of the images is inconsistent with a flat disk geometry frequently used to model the bipolar nebulae. Instead, a geometrically thick torus-like density distribution with bipolar conical cavities is preferred. The extent of the bright lobes indicates that the dense torus has a diameter of >~ 100 AU, for an assumed distance of 330 pc. This torus may be the outer reaches of a flared thick disk tapering inwards to the central star, however such a density enhancement on the midplane is not strictly required to explain the narrow dark lane obscuring the central stars.

  5. Achieving selective interrogation and sub-wavelength resolution in thin plates with embedded metamaterial acoustic lenses

    SciTech Connect

    Semperlotti, F. Zhu, H.

    2014-08-07

    In this study, we present an approach to ultrasonic beam-forming and high resolution identification of acoustic sources having critical implications for applications such as structural health monitoring. The proposed concept is based on the design of dynamically tailored structural elements via embedded acoustic metamaterial lenses. This approach provides a completely new alternative to conventional phased-array technology enabling the formation of steerable and collimated (or focused) ultrasonic beams by exploiting a single transducer. Numerical results show that the ultrasonic beam can be steered by simply tuning the frequency of the excitation. Also, the embedded lens can be designed to achieve sub-wavelength resolution to clustered acoustic sources, which is a typical scenario encountered in incipient structural damage.

  6. Beyond the diffraction limit of optical/IR interferometers. II. Stellar parameters of rotating stars from differential phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadjara, M.; Domiciano de Souza, A.; Vakili, F.; Jankov, S.; Millour, F.; Meilland, A.; Khorrami, Z.; Chelli, A.; Baffa, C.; Hofmann, K.-H.; Lagarde, S.; Robbe-Dubois, S.

    2014-09-01

    , PArot = 65.6° ± 5°, for Fomalhaut. They were found to be compatible with previously published values from differential phase and visibility measurements, while we were able to determine, for the first time, the inclination angle i of Fomalhaut (i = 90° ± 9°) and δ Aquilae (i = 81° ± 13°), and the rotation-axis position angle PArot of δ Aquilae. Conclusions: Beyond the theoretical diffraction limit of an interferometer (ratio of the wavelength to the baseline), spatial super resolution is well suited to systematically estimating the angular diameters of rotating stars and their fundamental parameters with a few sets of baselines and the Earth-rotation synthesis provided a high enough spectral resolution. Based on observations performed at the European Southern Observatory, Chile, under ESO AMBER-consortium GTO program IDs 084.D-0456 081.D-0293 and 082.C-0376.Figure 5 is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  7. Techniques for mass resolution improvement achieved by typical plasma mass analyzers: Modeling and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolaou, Georgios; Yamauchi, Masatoshi; Wieser, Martin; Barabash, Stas; Fedorov, Andrei

    2016-04-01

    Mass separation and particularly distinction between atomic ions and molecular ions are essential in understanding a wide range of plasma environments, with each consisted of different species with various properties. In this study we present the optimization results of light-weight (about 2 kg) magnetic mass analyzers with high g-factor for Rosetta (Ion Composition Analyser: ICA) and for Mars Express and Venus Express (Ion Mass Analyser: IMA). For the instrument's optimization we use SIMION, a 3D ion tracing software in which we can trace particle beams of several energies and directions, passing through the instrument's units. We first reproduced ICA and IMA results, which turned out to be different from simple models for low energy (< 100 eV). We then change the mechanical structure of several units of the instrument and we quantify the new mass resolution achieved with each change. Our goal is to find the optimal instrument's structure, which will allow us to achieve a proper mass resolution to distinguish atomic nitrogen from atomic oxygen for the purposes of a future magnetospheric mission.

  8. Data reduction pipeline for OSIRIS, the new NIR diffraction-limited imaging field spectrograph for the Keck adaptive optics system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krabbe, Alfred; Gasaway, Tom; Song, Inseok; Iserlohe, Christof; Weiss, Jason; Larkin, James E.; Barczys, Matthew; Lafreniere, David

    2004-09-01

    OSIRIS is a near infrared diffraction limited imaging field spectrograph under development for the Keck observatory adaptive optics system and scheduled for commissioning in fall 2004. Based upon lenslet pupil imaging, diffraction grating, and a 2Kx2K Hawaii2 HgCdTe array, OSIRIS is a highly efficient instrument at the forefront of today's technology. OSIRIS will deliver per readout up to 4096 diffraction limited spectra in a complex interleaved format, requiring new challenges to be met regarding user interaction and data reduction. A data reduction software package is under development, aiming to provide the observer with a facility instrument allowing him to concentrate on science rather than dealing with instrumental as well as telescope and atmosphere related effects. Together with OSIRIS, a pipeline for basic data reduction will be provided for a new Keck instrument for the first time. A status report is presented here together with some aspects of the data reduction pipeline.

  9. Achieving behavioral control with millisecond resolution in a high-level programming environment.

    PubMed

    Asaad, Wael F; Eskandar, Emad N

    2008-08-30

    The creation of psychophysical tasks for the behavioral neurosciences has generally relied upon low-level software running on a limited range of hardware. Despite the availability of software that allows the coding of behavioral tasks in high-level programming environments, many researchers are still reluctant to trust the temporal accuracy and resolution of programs running in such environments, especially when they run atop non-real-time operating systems. Thus, the creation of behavioral paradigms has been slowed by the intricacy of the coding required and their dissemination across labs has been hampered by the various types of hardware needed. However, we demonstrate here that, when proper measures are taken to handle the various sources of temporal error, accuracy can be achieved at the 1 ms time-scale that is relevant for the alignment of behavioral and neural events.

  10. Saturated excitation microscopy for sub-diffraction-limited imaging of cell clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamanaka, Masahito; Yonemaru, Yasuo; Kawano, Shogo; Uegaki, Kumiko; Smith, Nicholas I.; Kawata, Satoshi; Fujita, Katsumasa

    2013-12-01

    Saturated excitation (SAX) microscopy offers high-depth discrimination predominantly due to nonlinearity in the fluorescence response induced by the SAX. Calculation of the optical transfer functions and the edge responses for SAX microscopy revealed the contrast improvement of high-spatial frequency components in the sample structure and the effective reduction of background signals from the out-of-focus planes. Experimental observations of the edge response and x-z cross-sectional images of stained HeLa cells agreed well with theoretical investigations. We applied SAX microscopy to the imaging of three-dimensional cultured cell clusters and confirmed the resolution improvement at a depth of 40 μm. This study shows the potential of SAX microscopy for super-resolution imaging of deep parts of biological specimens.

  11. Fault-tolerant and finite-error localization for point emitters within the diffraction limit.

    PubMed

    Tang, Zong Sheng; Durak, Kadir; Ling, Alexander

    2016-09-19

    We implement a self-interference technique for determining the separation between two incoherent point sources. This method relies on image inversion interferometry and when used with the appropriate data analytics, it yields an estimate of the separation with finite-error, including the case when the sources overlap completely. The experimental results show that the technique has a good tolerance to noise and misalignment, making it an interesting consideration for high resolution instruments in microscopy or astronomy. PMID:27661935

  12. Fault-tolerant and finite-error localization for point emitters within the diffraction limit.

    PubMed

    Tang, Zong Sheng; Durak, Kadir; Ling, Alexander

    2016-09-19

    We implement a self-interference technique for determining the separation between two incoherent point sources. This method relies on image inversion interferometry and when used with the appropriate data analytics, it yields an estimate of the separation with finite-error, including the case when the sources overlap completely. The experimental results show that the technique has a good tolerance to noise and misalignment, making it an interesting consideration for high resolution instruments in microscopy or astronomy.

  13. Biological imaging beyond the diffraction limit by saturated excitation (SAX) microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamanaka, M.; Kawano, S.; Fujita, K.; Smith, N. I.; Kawata, S.

    2009-02-01

    We present an alternative high-resolution fluorescence imaging technique, saturated excitation (SAX) microscopy, for observations of biological samples. In the technique, we saturate the population of fluorescence molecules at the excited state with high excitation intensity. Under this condition, the fluorescence intensity is no longer proportional to the excitation intensity and the relation of the fluorescence and excitation intensity shows strong nonlinearity. In the centre of laser focus, the nonlinear responses induced by the saturation appear notably because of higher excitation intensity. By detecting fluorescence signals from the saturated area, we can push the spatial resolution beyond the diffraction barrier in three dimensions. SAX microscopy can be realized with a simple optics, where a laser intensity modulation sisytem and a lock-in amplifier are simply added to a conventional confocal microscope system. Using the SAX microscope, we demonstrated high-resolution imaging of a biological sample by observing mitochondria in HeLa cells. We also examined the nonlinear response of commercially available dyes under saturated excitation conditions.

  14. Photoacoustic FT-IR depth imaging of polymeric surfaces: overcoming IR diffraction limits.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ping; Urban, Marek W

    2004-11-23

    It is well established that the photoacoustic effect based on absorption of electromagnetic radiation into thermal waves allows surface depth profiling. However, limited knowledge exists concerning its spatial resolution. The spiral-stepwise (SSW) approach combined with phase rotational analysis is utilized to determine surface depth profiling of homogeneous and nonhomogeneous multilayered polymeric surfaces in a step-scan photoacoustic FT-IR experiment. In this approach, the thermal wave propagating to the surface is represented as the integral of all heat wave vectors propagating across the sampling depth xn, and the spiral function K'beta(lambda)e(-beta)(lambda)xne(-x)n/mu(th)e(i)(omegat-(xn/mu(th))) represents the amplitude and phase of the heat wave vector propagating to the surface. The SSW approach can be applied to heterogeneous surfaces by representing thermal waves propagating to the surface as the sum of the thermal waves propagating through homogeneous layers that are integrals of all heat vectors from a given sampling depth. The proposed model is tested on multilayered polymeric surfaces and shows that the SSW approach allows semiquantitative surface imaging with the spatial resolution ranging from micrometer to 500 nm levels, and the spatial resolution is a function of the penetration depth.

  15. Diffraction limited amplification of picosecond pulses in 1170 microm2 effective area erbium fiber.

    PubMed

    Jasapara, J C; DeSantolo, A; Nicholson, J W; Yablon, A D; Várallyay, Z

    2008-11-10

    Robust fundamental mode propagation and amplification of picosecond pulses at 1.56 microm wavelength is demonstrated in a core-pumped Er fiber with 1170 microm2 effective area. Record peak power exceeding 120 kW, and 67 nJ pulse energy are achieved before the onset of pulse breakup. A small increase in input pulse energy results in a temporal collapse of the pulse center to 58 fs duration, with peak powers approaching 200 kW.

  16. Time-resolved photoemission apparatus achieving sub-20-meV energy resolution and high stability

    SciTech Connect

    Ishida, Y.; Togashi, T.; Yamamoto, K.; Tanaka, M.; Kiss, T.; Otsu, T.; Kobayashi, Y.; Shin, S.

    2014-12-15

    The paper describes a time- and angle-resolved photoemission apparatus consisting of a hemispherical analyzer and a pulsed laser source. We demonstrate 1.48-eV pump and 5.92-eV probe measurements at the ⩾10.5-meV and ⩾240-fs resolutions by use of fairly monochromatic 170-fs pulses delivered from a regeneratively amplified Ti:sapphire laser system operating typically at 250 kHz. The apparatus is capable to resolve the optically filled superconducting peak in the unoccupied states of a cuprate superconductor, Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+δ}. A dataset recorded on Bi(111) surface is also presented. Technical descriptions include the followings: A simple procedure to fine-tune the spatio-temporal overlap of the pump-and-probe beams and their diameters; achieving a long-term stability of the system that enables a normalization-free dataset acquisition; changing the repetition rate by utilizing acoustic optical modulator and frequency-division circuit.

  17. Maximum precision closed-form solution for localizing diffraction-limited spots in noisy images.

    PubMed

    Larkin, Joshua D; Cook, Peter R

    2012-07-30

    Super-resolution techniques like PALM and STORM require accurate localization of single fluorophores detected using a CCD. Popular localization algorithms inefficiently assume each photon registered by a pixel can only come from an area in the specimen corresponding to that pixel (not from neighboring areas), before iteratively (slowly) fitting a Gaussian to pixel intensity; they fail with noisy images. We present an alternative; a probability distribution extending over many pixels is assigned to each photon, and independent distributions are joined to describe emitter location. We compare algorithms, and recommend which serves best under different conditions. At low signal-to-noise ratios, ours is 2-fold more precise than others, and 2 orders of magnitude faster; at high ratios, it closely approximates the maximum likelihood estimate.

  18. Ultra-broadband unidirectional launching of surface plasmon polaritons by a double-slit structure beyond the diffraction limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jianjun; Sun, Chengwei; Li, Hongyun; Gong, Qihuang

    2014-10-01

    Surface-plasmon-polariton (SPP) launchers, which can couple the free space light to the SPPs on the metal surface, are among the key elements for the plasmonic devices and nano-photonic systems. Downscaling the SPP launchers below the diffraction limit and directly delivering the SPPs to the desired subwavelength plasmonic waveguides are of importance for high-integration plasmonic circuits. By designing a submicron double-slit structure with different slit widths, an ultra-broadband (>330 nm) unidirectional SPP launcher is realized theoretically and experimentally based on the different phase delays of SPPs propagating along the metal surface and the near-field interfering effect. More importantly, the broadband and unidirectional properties of the SPP launcher are still maintained when the slit length is reduced to a subwavelength scale. This can make the launcher occupy only a very small area of <λ2/10 on the metal surface. Such a robust unidirectional SPP launcher beyond the diffraction limit can be directly coupled to a subwavelength plasmonic waveguide efficiently, leading to an ultra-tight SPP source, especially as a subwavelength localized guided SPP source.Surface-plasmon-polariton (SPP) launchers, which can couple the free space light to the SPPs on the metal surface, are among the key elements for the plasmonic devices and nano-photonic systems. Downscaling the SPP launchers below the diffraction limit and directly delivering the SPPs to the desired subwavelength plasmonic waveguides are of importance for high-integration plasmonic circuits. By designing a submicron double-slit structure with different slit widths, an ultra-broadband (>330 nm) unidirectional SPP launcher is realized theoretically and experimentally based on the different phase delays of SPPs propagating along the metal surface and the near-field interfering effect. More importantly, the broadband and unidirectional properties of the SPP launcher are still maintained when the slit length

  19. Localization of atomic excitation beyond the diffraction limit using electromagnetically induced transparency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miles, J. A.; Das, Diptaranjan; Simmons, Z. J.; Yavuz, D. D.

    2015-09-01

    We experimentally demonstrate the localization of excitation between hyperfine ground states of 87Rb atoms to as small as λ /13 -wide spatial regions. We use ultracold atoms trapped in a dipole trap and utilize electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) for the atomic excitation. The localization is achieved by combining a spatially varying coupling laser (standing wave) with the intensity dependence of EIT. The excitation is fast (150 ns laser pulses) and the dark-state fidelity can be made higher than 94% throughout the standing wave. Because the width of the localized regions is much smaller than the wavelength of the driving light, traditional optical imaging techniques cannot resolve the localized features. Therefore, to measure the excitation profile, we use an autocorrelation-like method where we perform two EIT sequences separated by a time delay, during which we move the standing wave.

  20. Spin-flip resolution achieved with a one-proton self-excited oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guise, Nicholas Damien Sun-Wo

    In a Penning trap with an extremely large magnetic gradient, the axial frequency of a one-proton self-excited oscillator is resolved at the level of the shift from a proton spin flip. This sensitivity opens a possible path towards detection of single-proton spin flips, novel measurements of the proton and antiproton g-factors, and a stringent test of CPT invariance by comparing proton and antiproton magnetic moments at precision likely to be a million times higher than achieved to date. The central challenge of extending similar electron magnetic moment measurements to one proton is overcoming the substantially larger mass and weaker magnetic moment, which conspire to greatly reduce the frequency shift that signals a spin flip. Within a magnetic bottle gradient 50 times larger than used in the recent electron g-factor measurements, the proton spin-flip shift is still only 60 mHz out of a 553 kHz axial frequency. In such a large gradient, standard application of sideband cooling to reduce the magnetron radius changes the axial frequency by an amount greater than this spin-flip shift on average. Proton axial frequency resolution at the 60 mHz level is enabled by feedback techniques realized previously only with one electron. Self-excitation produces a narrow feature with large signal-to-noise, ideal for rapid frequency measurements at high precision. Unwanted effects of the strong magnetic gradient are minimized by axial and radial cooling. Feedback cooling is used to reduce the proton axial motion below the temperature of a damping resistor. Axial-magnetron sideband cooling of the undamped radial motion is then demonstrated to reach a 14 mK theoretical limit.

  1. Data Reduction Pipeline for OSIRIS, the new NIR Diffraction Limited Imaging Field Spectrometer for the Keck Adaptive Optics System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krabbe, Alfred; Gasaway, Thomas M.; Weiss, Jason; Larkin, James E.; Barczys, Matthew; Quirrenbach, Andreas; LaFreniere, David

    2002-12-01

    OSIRIS is a near infrared diffraction limited imaging field spectrometer under development for the Keck observatory adaptive optics system. Based upon lenslet pupil imaging, diffraction grating, and a 2K×2K Hawaii2 HgCdTe array, OSIRIS is a highly efficient instrument at the forefront of today"s technology. OSIRIS will deliver per readout up to 4096 diffraction limited spectra in a complex interleaved format, requiring new challenges to be met regarding user interaction and data reduction. A data reduction software package is under development, aiming to provide the observer with a facility instrument allowing him to concentrate on science rather than dealing with instrumental as well as telescope and atmosphere related effects. Together with OSIRIS, a pipeline for basic data reduction will be provided for a new Keck instrument for the first time. Some aspects of the data reduction pipeline will be presented here. The OSIRIS instrument as such, the astronomical background as well as other software tools were presented elsewhere on this conference.

  2. Fourier ring correlation as a resolution criterion for super-resolution microscopy.

    PubMed

    Banterle, Niccolò; Bui, Khanh Huy; Lemke, Edward A; Beck, Martin

    2013-09-01

    Optical nanoscopy techniques using localization based image reconstruction, also termed super-resolution microscopy (SRM), have become a standard tool to bypass the diffraction limit in fluorescence light microscopy. The localization precision measured for the detected fluorophores is commonly used to describe the maximal attainable resolution. However, this measure takes not all experimental factors, which impact onto the finally achieved resolution, into account. Several other methods to measure the resolution of super-resolved images were previously suggested, typically relying on intrinsic standards, such as molecular rulers, or on a priori knowledge about the specimen, e.g. its spatial frequency content. Here we show that Fourier ring correlation provides an easy-to-use, laboratory consistent standard for measuring the resolution of SRM images. We provide a freely available software tool that combines resolution measurement with image reconstruction.

  3. Single Molecules, Cells, and Super-Resolution Optics (Nobel Lecture).

    PubMed

    Betzig, Eric

    2015-07-01

    The resolution of a microscope is determined by the diffraction limit in classical microscopy, whereby objects that are separated by half a wavelength can no longer be visually separated. To go below the diffraction limit required several tricks and discoveries. In his Nobel Lecture, E. Betzig describes the developments that have led to modern super high-resolution microscopy.

  4. Formation of crownlike and related nanostructures on thin supported gold films irradiated by single diffraction-limited nanosecond laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Kulchin, Yu N; Vitrik, O B; Kuchmizhak, A A; Emel'yanov, V I; Ionin, A A; Kudryashov, S I; Makarov, S V

    2014-08-01

    A type of laser-induced surface relief nanostructure-the nanocrown-on thin metallic films was studied both experimentally and theoretically. The nanocrowns, representing a thin corrugated rim of resolidified melt and resembling well-known impact-induced water-crown splashes, were produced by single diffraction-limited nanosecond laser pulses on thin gold films of variable thickness on low-melting copper and high-melting tungsten substrates, providing different transient melting and adhesion conditions for these films. The proposed model of the nanocrown formation, based on a hydrodynamical (thermocapillary Marangoni) surface instability and described by a Kuramoto-Sivashinsky equation, envisions key steps of the nanocrown appearance and gives qualitative predictions of the acquired nanocrown parameters. PMID:25215830

  5. Formation of crownlike and related nanostructures on thin supported gold films irradiated by single diffraction-limited nanosecond laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Kulchin, Yu N; Vitrik, O B; Kuchmizhak, A A; Emel'yanov, V I; Ionin, A A; Kudryashov, S I; Makarov, S V

    2014-08-01

    A type of laser-induced surface relief nanostructure-the nanocrown-on thin metallic films was studied both experimentally and theoretically. The nanocrowns, representing a thin corrugated rim of resolidified melt and resembling well-known impact-induced water-crown splashes, were produced by single diffraction-limited nanosecond laser pulses on thin gold films of variable thickness on low-melting copper and high-melting tungsten substrates, providing different transient melting and adhesion conditions for these films. The proposed model of the nanocrown formation, based on a hydrodynamical (thermocapillary Marangoni) surface instability and described by a Kuramoto-Sivashinsky equation, envisions key steps of the nanocrown appearance and gives qualitative predictions of the acquired nanocrown parameters.

  6. Large deflection angle, high-power adaptive fiber optics collimator with preserved near-diffraction-limited beam quality.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Dong; Ma, Yanxing; Chen, Zilun; Wang, Xiaolin; Zhou, Pu; Si, Lei

    2016-05-15

    We report on the development of a monolithic adaptive fiber optics collimator, with a large deflection angle and preserved near-diffraction-limited beam quality, that has been tested at a maximal output power at the 300 W level. Additionally, a new measurement method of beam quality (M2 factor) is developed. Experimental results show that the deflection angle of the collimated beam is in the range of 0-0.27 mrad in the X direction and 0-0.19 mrad in the Y direction. The effective working frequency of the device is about 710 Hz. By employing the new measurement method of the M2 factor, we calculate that the beam quality is Mx2=1.35 and My2=1.24, which is in agreement with the result from the beam propagation analyzer and is preserved well with the increasing output power.

  7. Generation of 3.5 W of diffraction-limited green light from SHG of a single tapered diode laser in a cascade of nonlinear crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Anders K.; Jensen, Ole B.; Sumpf, Bernd; Erbert, Götz; Unterhuber, Angelika; Drexler, Wolfgang; Andersen, Peter E.; Petersen, Paul Michael

    2014-02-01

    Many applications, e.g., within biomedicine stand to benefit greatly from the development of diode laser-based multi- Watt efficient compact green laser sources. The low power of existing diode lasers in the green area (about 100 mW) means that the most promising approach remains nonlinear frequency conversion of infrared tapered diode lasers. Here, we describe the generation of 3.5 W of diffraction-limited green light from SHG of a single tapered diode laser, itself yielding 10 W at 1063 nm. This SHG is performed in single pass through a cascade of two PPMgO:LN crystals with re-focusing and dispersion compensating optics between the two nonlinear crystals. In the low-power limit, such a cascade of two crystals has the theoretical potential for generation of four times as much power as a single crystal without adding significantly to the complexity of the system. The experimentally achieved power of 3.5 W corresponds to a power enhancement greater than 2 compared to SHG in each of the crystals individually and is the highest visible output power generated by frequency conversion of a single diode laser. Such laser sources provide the necessary pump power for biophotonics applications, such as optical coherence tomography or multimodal imaging devices, e.g., FTCARS-OCT, based on a strongly pumped ultrafast Ti:Sapphire laser.

  8. Making the Library Management Systems Acquisition: Achieving Resolution of a Tough Decision.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Steven J.; Cronin-Kardon, Cynthia

    1998-01-01

    Offers exploratory research on the automation decision process for library administrators who are considering a new library management system (LMS) and those factors that lead to decision difficulty. Using the Garbage Can Model of Organizational Choice as a theoretical framework for LMS, this study uses decision resolution as a criterion of…

  9. Application and Refinement of a Method to Achieve Uniform Convective Response on Variable-Resolution Meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walko, R. L.; Medvigy, D.; Avissar, R.

    2013-12-01

    Variable-resolution computational grids can substantially improve the benefit-to-cost ratio in many environmental modeling applications, but they can also introduce unwanted and unrealistic numerical anomalies if not properly utilized. For example, we showed in previous studies that resolved (non-parameterized) atmospheric convection develops more quickly as resolution increases. Furthermore, on variable grids that transition from resolved to parameterized convection, timing and intensity of the convection in both regimes is generally disparate unless special care is taken to tune the parameterization. In both cases, the convection that develops first (due to purely numerical reasons) tends to suppress convection elsewhere by inducing subsidence in the surrounding environment. This highly nonlinear competition, while desirable when induced by natural causes such as surface inhomogeneity, is highly undesirable when it is a numerical artifact of variable grid resolution and/or selective application of convective parameterization. Our current research is aimed at leveling the playing field for convection across a variable resolution grid so that the above problems are avoided. The underlying idea is to apply the same or very similar 'convective machinery' to all areas of the grid. For convection-resolving regions of the grid, this machinery is simply the model grid itself, along with explicit representation of dynamics and a bulk microphysics parameterization. For coarser regions of the grid, the local environment is sampled from one or more grid columns (depending on local resolution) and fed to a separate 'convective processor', which determines the convective response to that environment and feeds the result back to the host grid. The convective processor chooses to either (1) explicitly resolve convective activity in the given environment on a separate (independent) limited-area 3D computational grid of comparable resolution to the convection-resolving part of the

  10. Achieving atomic resolution magnetic dichroism by controlling the phase symmetry of an electron probe

    SciTech Connect

    Rusz, Jan; Idrobo, Juan -Carlos; Bhowmick, Somnath

    2014-09-30

    The calculations presented here reveal that an electron probe carrying orbital angular momentum is just a particular case of a wider class of electron beams that can be used to measure electron magnetic circular dichroism (EMCD) with atomic resolution. It is possible to obtain an EMCD signal with atomic resolution by simply breaking the symmetry of the electron probe phase front using the aberration-corrected optics of a scanning transmission electron microscope. The probe’s required phase distribution depends on the sample’s magnetic symmetry and crystal structure. The calculations indicate that EMCD signals that use the electron probe’s phase are as strong as those obtained by nanodiffraction methods.

  11. Achieving atomic resolution magnetic dichroism by controlling the phase symmetry of an electron probe

    DOE PAGES

    Rusz, Jan; Idrobo, Juan -Carlos; Bhowmick, Somnath

    2014-09-30

    The calculations presented here reveal that an electron probe carrying orbital angular momentum is just a particular case of a wider class of electron beams that can be used to measure electron magnetic circular dichroism (EMCD) with atomic resolution. It is possible to obtain an EMCD signal with atomic resolution by simply breaking the symmetry of the electron probe phase front using the aberration-corrected optics of a scanning transmission electron microscope. The probe’s required phase distribution depends on the sample’s magnetic symmetry and crystal structure. The calculations indicate that EMCD signals that use the electron probe’s phase are as strongmore » as those obtained by nanodiffraction methods.« less

  12. Observation of coupled plasmon-polariton modes of plasmon waveguides for electromagnetic energy transport below the diffraction limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, Stefan A.; Kik, Pieter G.; Atwater, Harry A.; Meltzer, Sheffer; Requicha, Aristides A. G.; Koel, Bruce E.

    2002-10-01

    We investigate the possibility of using arrays of closely spaced metal nanoparticles as plasmon waveguides for electromagnetic energy below the diffraction limit of light. Far-field spectroscopy on arrays of closely spaced 50 nm Au particles fabricated using electron beam lithography reveals the presence of near-field optical particle interactions that lead to shifts in the plasmon resonance frequencies for longitudinal and transverse excitations. We link this observation to a point-dipole model for energy transfer in plasmon waveguides and give an estimate of the expected group velocities and energy decay lengths for the fabricated structures. A near-field optical excitation and detection scheme for energy transport is proposed and demonstrated. The fabricated structures show a high propagation loss of about 3 dB / 15 nm which renders a direct experimental observation of energy transfer impossible. The nature of the loss and ways to decrease it by an order of magnitude are discussed. We also present finite-difference time-domain simulations on the energy transfer properties of plasmon waveguides.

  13. Investigation of stimulated raman scattering using short-pulse diffraction limited laser beam near the instability threshold

    SciTech Connect

    Kline, John L; Montgomery, David S; Flippo, Kirk A; Rose, Harvey A; Yin, L; Albright, B J; Johnson, R P; Shimada, T; Bowers, K; Rousseaux, C; Tassin, V; Baton, S D; Amiranoff, F; Hardin, R A

    2008-01-01

    Short pulse laser plasma interaction experiments using diffraction limited beams provide an excellent platform to investigate the fundamental physics of Stimulated Raman Scattering. Detailed understanding of these laser plasma instabilities impacts the current inertial confinement fusion ignition designs and could potentially impact fast ignition when higher energy lasers are used with longer pulse durations ( > 1 kJ and> 1 ps). Using short laser pulses, experiments can be modeled over the entire interaction time of the laser using particle-in-cell codes to validate our understanding quantitatively. Experiments have been conducted at the Trident laser facility and the LULI (Laboratoire pour l'Utilisation des Lasers Intenses) to investigate stimulated Raman scattering near the threshold of the instability using 527 nm and 1059 nm laser light respectively with 1.5-3.0 ps pulses. In both experiments, the interaction beam was focused into a pre-ionized He gas-jet plasma. Measurements of the reflectivity as a function of intensity and k{lambda}{sub D} were completed at the Trident laser facility. At LULI, a 300 fs Thomson scattering probe is used to directly measure the density fluctuations of the driven electron plasma and ion acoustic waves. Work is currently underway comparing the results of the experiments with simulations using the VPIC [K. J. Bowers, et at., Phys. Plasmas, 15 055703 (2008)] particle-in-cell code. Details of the experimental results are presented in this manuscript.

  14. Localized tip enhanced Raman spectroscopic study of impurity incorporated single GaN nanowire in the sub-diffraction limit

    SciTech Connect

    Patsha, Avinash E-mail: dhara@igcar.gov.in; Dhara, Sandip; Tyagi, A. K.

    2015-09-21

    The localized effect of impurities in single GaN nanowires in the sub-diffraction limit is reported using the study of lattice vibrational modes in the evanescent field of Au nanoparticle assisted tip enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS). GaN nanowires with the O impurity and the Mg dopants were grown by the chemical vapor deposition technique in the catalyst assisted vapor-liquid-solid process. Symmetry allowed Raman modes of wurtzite GaN are observed for undoped and doped nanowires. Unusually very strong intensity of the non-zone center zone boundary mode is observed for the TERS studies of both the undoped and the Mg doped GaN single nanowires. Surface optical mode of A{sub 1} symmetry is also observed for both the undoped and the Mg doped GaN samples. A strong coupling of longitudinal optical (LO) phonons with free electrons, however, is reported only in the O rich single nanowires with the asymmetric A{sub 1}(LO) mode. Study of the local vibration mode shows the presence of Mg as dopant in the single GaN nanowires.

  15. Enhancement of low-quality reconstructed digital hologram images based on frequency extrapolation of large objects under the diffraction limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ning; Li, Weiliang; Zhao, Dongxue

    2016-06-01

    During the reconstruction of a digital hologram, the reconstructed image is usually degraded by speckle noise, which makes it hard to observe the original object pattern. In this paper, a new reconstructed image enhancement method is proposed, which first reduces the speckle noise using an adaptive Gaussian filter, then calculates the high frequencies that belong to the object pattern based on a frequency extrapolation strategy. The proposed frequency extrapolation first calculates the frequency spectrum of the Fourier-filtered image, which is originally reconstructed from the +1 order of the hologram, and then gives the initial parameters for an iterative solution. The analytic iteration is implemented by continuous gradient threshold convergence to estimate the image level and vertical gradient information. The predicted spectrum is acquired through the analytical iteration of the original spectrum and gradient spectrum analysis. Finally, the reconstructed spectrum of the restoration image is acquired from the synthetic correction of the original spectrum using the predicted gradient spectrum. We conducted our experiment very close to the diffraction limit and used low-quality equipment to prove the feasibility of our method. Detailed analysis and figure demonstrations are presented in the paper.

  16. Investigation of Stimulated Raman Scattering Using Short-Pulse Diffraction Limited Laser Beam near the Instability Threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kline, J. L.; Montgomery, D. S.; Yin, L.; Flippo, K. A.; Albright, B. J.; Johnson, R. P.; Shimada, T.; Rose, H. A.; Rousseaux, C.; Tassin, V.; Baton, S. D.; Amiranoff, F.; Hardin, R. A.

    2008-11-01

    Short pulse laser plasma interaction experiments using diffraction limited beams provide an excellent platform to investigate the fundamental physics of Stimulated Raman (SRS) and Stimulated Brillouin (SBS) Scattering. Detailed understanding of these laser plasma instabilities impacts the current inertial confinement fusion ignition designs and could potentially impact fast ignition when higher energy lasers are used with longer pulse durations ( > 1 kJ and > 1 ps). Using short laser pulses, experiments can be modeled over the entire interaction time of the laser using PIC codes to validate our understanding. Experiments have been conducted at the Trident laser and the LULI to investigate SRS near the threshold of the instability using 527 and 1064 nm laser light respectively with 1.5 -- 3 ps pulses. In the case of both experiments, the interaction beam was focused into a pre-ionized He gasjet plasma. Measurements of the reflectivity as a function of intensity and k?D were completed at the Trident laser. At LULI, a 300 fs Thomson scattering probe is used to directly measure the density fluctuations of the driven electron plasma and ion acoustic waves. Details of the experimental results will be presented.

  17. The close circumstellar environment of Betelgeuse. II. Diffraction-limited spectro-imaging from 7.76 to 19.50 μm with VLT/VISIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kervella, P.; Perrin, G.; Chiavassa, A.; Ridgway, S. T.; Cami, J.; Haubois, X.; Verhoelst, T.

    2011-07-01

    Context. Mass-loss occurring in red supergiants (RSGs) is a major contributor to the enrichment of the interstellar medium in dust and molecules. The physical mechanism of this mass loss is however relatively poorly known. Betelgeuse is the nearest RSG, and as such a prime object for high angular resolution observations of its surface (by interferometry) and close circumstellar environment. Aims: The goal of our program is to understand how the material expelled from Betelgeuse is transported from its surface to the interstellar medium, and how it evolves chemically in this process. Methods: We obtained diffraction-limited images of Betelgeuse and a calibrator (Aldebaran) in six filters in the N band (7.76 to 12.81 μm) and two filters in the Q band (17.65 and 19.50 μm), using the VLT/VISIR instrument. Results: Our images show a bright, extended and complex circumstellar envelope at all wavelengths. It is particularly prominent longwards of ≈ 9-10 μm, pointing at the presence of O-rich dust, such as silicates or alumina. A partial circular shell is observed between 0.5 and 1.0″ from the star, and could correspond to the inner radius of the dust envelope. Several knots and filamentary structures are identified in the nebula. One of the knots, located at a distance of 0.9″ west of the star, is particularly bright and compact. Conclusions: The circumstellar envelope around Betelgeuse extends at least up to several tens of stellar radii. Its relatively high degree of clumpiness indicates an inhomogeneous spatial distribution of the material lost by the star. Its extension corresponds to an important intermediate scale, where most of the dust is probably formed, between the hot and compact gaseous envelope observed previously in the near infrared and the interstellar medium. Based on observations made with ESO telescopes at Paranal Observatory, under ESO DDT program 286.D-5007(A).

  18. Apparatus and method to achieve high-resolution microscopy with non-diffracting or refracting radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, Jr., Kenneth W.; Bingham, Philip R.; Hawari, Ayman I.

    2012-11-06

    An imaging system employing a coded aperture mask having multiple pinholes is provided. The coded aperture mask is placed at a radiation source to pass the radiation through. The radiation impinges on, and passes through an object, which alters the radiation by absorption and/or scattering. Upon passing through the object, the radiation is detected at a detector plane to form an encoded image, which includes information on the absorption and/or scattering caused by the material and structural attributes of the object. The encoded image is decoded to provide a reconstructed image of the object. Because the coded aperture mask includes multiple pinholes, the radiation intensity is greater than a comparable system employing a single pinhole, thereby enabling a higher resolution. Further, the decoding of the encoded image can be performed to generate multiple images of the object at different distances from the detector plane. Methods and programs for operating the imaging system are also disclosed.

  19. Focal plane actuation to achieve ultra-high resolution on suborbital balloon payloads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scowen, Paul A.; Miller, Alex; Challa, Priya; Veach, Todd; Groppi, Chris; Mauskopf, Phil

    2014-07-01

    Over the past few years there has been remarkable success flying imaging telescope systems suspended from suborbital balloon payload systems. These imaging systems have covered optical, ultraviolet, sub-­-millimeter and infrared passbands (i.e. BLAST, STO, SBI, Fireball and others). In recognition of these advances NASA is now considering ambitious programs to promote planetary imaging from high altitude at a fraction of the cost of similar fully orbital systems. The challenge with imaging from a balloon payload is delivering the full diffraction-­-limited resolution of the system from a moving payload. Good progress has been made with damping mechanisms and oscillation control to remove most macroscopic movement in the departures of the imaging focal plane from a static configuration, however a jitter component remains that is difficult to remove using external corrections. This paper reports on work to demonstrate in the laboratory the utility and performance of actuating a detector focal plane (of whatever type) to remove the final jitter terms using an agile hexapod design. The input to this demonstration is the jitter signal generated by the pointing system of a previously flown balloon mission (the Stratospheric Terahertz Observatory, STO). Our group has a mature jitter compensation system that thermally isolates the control head from the focal plane itself. This allows the hexapod to remain at ambient temperature in a vacuum environment with the focal plane cooled to cryogenic temperatures. Our lab design mounts the focal plane on the hexapod in a custom cryostat and delivers an active optical stimulus together with the corresponding jitter signal, using the actuation of the hexapod to correct for the departures from a static, stable configuration. We believe this demonstration will make the case for inclusion of this technological solution in future balloon-­-borne imaging systems requiring ultra-­-high resolution.

  20. Resolution limits of ultrafast ultrasound localization microscopy.

    PubMed

    Desailly, Yann; Pierre, Juliette; Couture, Olivier; Tanter, Mickael

    2015-11-21

    As in other imaging methods based on waves, the resolution of ultrasound imaging is limited by the wavelength. However, the diffraction-limit can be overcome by super-localizing single events from isolated sources. In recent years, we developed plane-wave ultrasound allowing frame rates up to 20,000 fps. Ultrafast processes such as rapid movement or disruption of ultrasound contrast agents (UCA) can thus be monitored, providing us with distinct punctual sources that could be localized beyond the diffraction limit. We previously showed experimentally that resolutions beyond λ/10 can be reached in ultrafast ultrasound localization microscopy (uULM) using a 128 transducer matrix in reception. Higher resolutions are theoretically achievable and the aim of this study is to predict the maximum resolution in uULM with respect to acquisition parameters (frequency, transducer geometry, sampling electronics). The accuracy of uULM is the error on the localization of a bubble, considered a point-source in a homogeneous medium. The proposed model consists in two steps: determining the timing accuracy of the microbubble echo in radiofrequency data, then transferring this time accuracy into spatial accuracy. The simplified model predicts a maximum resolution of 40 μm for a 1.75 MHz transducer matrix composed of two rows of 64 elements. Experimental confirmation of the model was performed by flowing microbubbles within a 60 μm microfluidic channel and localizing their blinking under ultrafast imaging (500 Hz frame rate). The experimental resolution, determined as the standard deviation in the positioning of the microbubbles, was predicted within 6 μm (13%) of the theoretical values and followed the analytical relationship with respect to the number of elements and depth. Understanding the underlying physical principles determining the resolution of superlocalization will allow the optimization of the imaging setup for each organ. Ultimately, accuracies better than the size of

  1. Resolution limits of ultrafast ultrasound localization microscopy.

    PubMed

    Desailly, Yann; Pierre, Juliette; Couture, Olivier; Tanter, Mickael

    2015-11-21

    As in other imaging methods based on waves, the resolution of ultrasound imaging is limited by the wavelength. However, the diffraction-limit can be overcome by super-localizing single events from isolated sources. In recent years, we developed plane-wave ultrasound allowing frame rates up to 20,000 fps. Ultrafast processes such as rapid movement or disruption of ultrasound contrast agents (UCA) can thus be monitored, providing us with distinct punctual sources that could be localized beyond the diffraction limit. We previously showed experimentally that resolutions beyond λ/10 can be reached in ultrafast ultrasound localization microscopy (uULM) using a 128 transducer matrix in reception. Higher resolutions are theoretically achievable and the aim of this study is to predict the maximum resolution in uULM with respect to acquisition parameters (frequency, transducer geometry, sampling electronics). The accuracy of uULM is the error on the localization of a bubble, considered a point-source in a homogeneous medium. The proposed model consists in two steps: determining the timing accuracy of the microbubble echo in radiofrequency data, then transferring this time accuracy into spatial accuracy. The simplified model predicts a maximum resolution of 40 μm for a 1.75 MHz transducer matrix composed of two rows of 64 elements. Experimental confirmation of the model was performed by flowing microbubbles within a 60 μm microfluidic channel and localizing their blinking under ultrafast imaging (500 Hz frame rate). The experimental resolution, determined as the standard deviation in the positioning of the microbubbles, was predicted within 6 μm (13%) of the theoretical values and followed the analytical relationship with respect to the number of elements and depth. Understanding the underlying physical principles determining the resolution of superlocalization will allow the optimization of the imaging setup for each organ. Ultimately, accuracies better than the size of

  2. Interpreting 16S metagenomic data without clustering to achieve sub-OTU resolution

    PubMed Central

    Tikhonov, Mikhail; Leach, Robert W; Wingreen, Ned S

    2015-01-01

    The standard approach to analyzing 16S tag sequence data, which relies on clustering reads by sequence similarity into Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs), underexploits the accuracy of modern sequencing technology. We present a clustering-free approach to multi-sample Illumina data sets that can identify independent bacterial subpopulations regardless of the similarity of their 16S tag sequences. Using published data from a longitudinal time-series study of human tongue microbiota, we are able to resolve within standard 97% similarity OTUs up to 20 distinct subpopulations, all ecologically distinct but with 16S tags differing by as little as one nucleotide (99.2% similarity). A comparative analysis of oral communities of two cohabiting individuals reveals that most such subpopulations are shared between the two communities at 100% sequence identity, and that dynamical similarity between subpopulations in one host is strongly predictive of dynamical similarity between the same subpopulations in the other host. Our method can also be applied to samples collected in cross-sectional studies and can be used with the 454 sequencing platform. We discuss how the sub-OTU resolution of our approach can provide new insight into factors shaping community assembly. PMID:25012900

  3. Reaching the Diffraction Limit - Differential Speckle and Wide-Field Imaging for the Gemini-N Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Nic J.; Howell, Steve; Horch, Elliott

    2016-01-01

    Speckle imaging allows telescopes to achieve di raction limited imaging performance. The technique requires cameras capable of reading out frames at a very fast rate, e ectively `freezing out' atmospheric seeing. The resulting speckles can be correlated and images reconstructed that are at the di raction limit of the telescope. These new instruments are based on the successful performance and design of the Di erential Speckle Survey Instrument (DSSI) [2, 1]. The instruments are being built for the Gemini-N and WIYN telescopes and will be made available to the community via the peer review proposal process. We envision their primary use to be validation and characterization of exoplanet targets from the NASA K2 and TESS missions and RV discovered exoplanets. Such targets will provide excellent follow-up candidates for both the WIYN and Gemini telescopes [3]. Examples of DSSI data are shown in the gures below. We expect similar data quality in speckle imaging mode with the new instruments. Additionally, both cameras will have a wide- eld mode and standard SDSS lters. They will be highly versatile instruments and it is that likely many other science programs will request time on the cameras. The limiting magnitude for speckle observations, will remain around 13-14th at WIYN and 16-17th at Gemini, while wide- eld, normal CCD imaging operation should be able to go to much fainter, providing usual CCD imaging and photometric capabilities. The instruments will also have high utility as scoring cameras for telescope engineering purposes, or other applications where high time resolution is needed. Instrument support will be provided, including a software pipeline that takes raw speckle data to fully reconstructed images.

  4. NOTE: On the clinical spatial resolution achievable with protons and heavier charged particle radiotherapy beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreo, Pedro

    2009-06-01

    The 'sub-millimetre precision' often claimed to be achievable in protons and light ion beam therapy is analysed using the Monte Carlo code SHIELD-HIT for a broad range of energies. Based on the range of possible values and uncertainties of the mean excitation energy of water and human tissues, as well as of the composition of organs and tissues, it is concluded that precision statements deserve careful reconsideration for treatment planning purposes. It is found that the range of I-values of water stated in ICRU reports 37, 49 and 73 (1984, 1993 and 2005) for the collision stopping power formulae, namely 67 eV, 75 eV and 80 eV, yields a spread of the depth of the Bragg peak of protons and heavier charged particles (carbon ions) of up to 5 or 6 mm, which is also found to be energy dependent due to other energy loss competing interaction mechanisms. The spread is similar in protons and in carbon ions having analogous practical range. Although accurate depth-dose distribution measurements in water can be used at the time of developing empirical dose calculation models, the energy dependence of the spread causes a substantial constraint. In the case of in vivo human tissues, where distribution measurements are not feasible, the problem poses a major limitation. In addition to the spread due to the currently accepted uncertainties of their I-values, a spread of the depth of the Bragg peak due to the varying compositions of soft tissues is also demonstrated, even for cases which could be considered practically identical in clinical practice. For these, the spreads found were similar to those of water or even larger, providing support to international recommendations advising that body-tissue compositions should not be given the standing of physical constants. The results show that it would be necessary to increase the margins of a clinical target volume, even in the case of a water phantom, due to an 'intrinsic basic physics uncertainty', adding to those margins usually

  5. Subsurface Super-resolution Imaging of Unstained Polymer Nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    Urban, Ben E.; Dong, Biqin; Nguyen, The-Quyen; Backman, Vadim; Sun, Cheng; Zhang, Hao F.

    2016-01-01

    Optical imaging has offered unique advantages in material researches, such as spectroscopy and lifetime measurements of deeply embedded materials, which cannot be matched using electron or scanning-probe microscopy. Unfortunately, conventional optical imaging cannot provide the spatial resolutions necessary for many nanoscopic studies. Despite recent rapid progress, super-resolution optical imaging has yet to be widely applied to non-biological materials. Herein we describe a method for nanoscopic optical imaging of buried polymer nanostructures without the need for extrinsic staining. We observed intrinsic stochastic fluorescence emission or blinking from unstained polymers and performed spatial-temporal spectral analysis to investigate its origin. We further applied photon localization super-resolution imaging reconstruction to the detected stochastic blinking, and achieved a spatial resolution of at least 100 nm, which corresponds to a six-fold increase over the optical diffraction limit. This work demonstrates the potential for studying the static heterogeneities of intrinsic polymer molecular-specific properties at sub-diffraction-limited optical resolutions. PMID:27354178

  6. Subsurface Super-resolution Imaging of Unstained Polymer Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urban, Ben E.; Dong, Biqin; Nguyen, The-Quyen; Backman, Vadim; Sun, Cheng; Zhang, Hao F.

    2016-06-01

    Optical imaging has offered unique advantages in material researches, such as spectroscopy and lifetime measurements of deeply embedded materials, which cannot be matched using electron or scanning-probe microscopy. Unfortunately, conventional optical imaging cannot provide the spatial resolutions necessary for many nanoscopic studies. Despite recent rapid progress, super-resolution optical imaging has yet to be widely applied to non-biological materials. Herein we describe a method for nanoscopic optical imaging of buried polymer nanostructures without the need for extrinsic staining. We observed intrinsic stochastic fluorescence emission or blinking from unstained polymers and performed spatial-temporal spectral analysis to investigate its origin. We further applied photon localization super-resolution imaging reconstruction to the detected stochastic blinking, and achieved a spatial resolution of at least 100 nm, which corresponds to a six-fold increase over the optical diffraction limit. This work demonstrates the potential for studying the static heterogeneities of intrinsic polymer molecular-specific properties at sub-diffraction-limited optical resolutions.

  7. Fast, background-free, 3D super-resolution optical fluctuation imaging (SOFI).

    PubMed

    Dertinger, T; Colyer, R; Iyer, G; Weiss, S; Enderlein, J

    2009-12-29

    Super-resolution optical microscopy is a rapidly evolving area of fluorescence microscopy with a tremendous potential for impacting many fields of science. Several super-resolution methods have been developed over the last decade, all capable of overcoming the fundamental diffraction limit of light. We present here an approach for obtaining subdiffraction limit optical resolution in all three dimensions. This method relies on higher-order statistical analysis of temporal fluctuations (caused by fluorescence blinking/intermittency) recorded in a sequence of images (movie). We demonstrate a 5-fold improvement in spatial resolution by using a conventional wide-field microscope. This resolution enhancement is achieved in iterative discrete steps, which in turn allows the evaluation of images at different resolution levels. Even at the lowest level of resolution enhancement, our method features significant background reduction and thus contrast enhancement and is demonstrated on quantum dot-labeled microtubules of fibroblast cells.

  8. Super-Resolution Scanning Laser Microscopy Based on Virtually Structured Detection

    PubMed Central

    Zhi, Yanan; Wang, Benquan; Yao, Xincheng

    2016-01-01

    Light microscopy plays a key role in biological studies and medical diagnosis. The spatial resolution of conventional optical microscopes is limited to approximately half the wavelength of the illumination light as a result of the diffraction limit. Several approaches—including confocal microscopy, stimulated emission depletion microscopy, stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy, photoactivated localization microscopy, and structured illumination microscopy—have been established to achieve super-resolution imaging. However, none of these methods is suitable for the super-resolution ophthalmoscopy of retinal structures because of laser safety issues and inevitable eye movements. We recently experimentally validated virtually structured detection (VSD) as an alternative strategy to extend the diffraction limit. Without the complexity of structured illumination, VSD provides an easy, low-cost, and phase artifact–free strategy to achieve super-resolution in scanning laser microscopy. In this article we summarize the basic principles of the VSD method, review our demonstrated single-point and line-scan super-resolution systems, and discuss both technical challenges and the potential of VSD-based instrumentation for super-resolution ophthalmoscopy of the retina. PMID:27480461

  9. Real-time visual sensing system achieving high-speed 3D particle tracking with nanometer resolution.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Peng; Jhiang, Sissy M; Menq, Chia-Hsiang

    2013-11-01

    This paper presents a real-time visual sensing system, which is created to achieve high-speed three-dimensional (3D) motion tracking of microscopic spherical particles in aqueous solutions with nanometer resolution. The system comprises a complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) camera, a field programmable gate array (FPGA), and real-time image processing programs. The CMOS camera has high photosensitivity and superior SNR. It acquires images of 128×120 pixels at a frame rate of up to 10,000 frames per second (fps) under the white light illumination from a standard 100 W halogen lamp. The real-time image stream is downloaded from the camera directly to the FPGA, wherein a 3D particle-tracking algorithm is implemented to calculate the 3D positions of the target particle in real time. Two important objectives, i.e., real-time estimation of the 3D position matches the maximum frame rate of the camera and the timing of the output data stream of the system is precisely controlled, are achieved. Two sets of experiments were conducted to demonstrate the performance of the system. First, the visual sensing system was used to track the motion of a 2 μm polystyrene bead, whose motion was controlled by a three-axis piezo motion stage. The ability to track long-range motion with nanometer resolution in all three axes is demonstrated. Second, it was used to measure the Brownian motion of the 2 μm polystyrene bead, which was stabilized in aqueous solution by a laser trapping system. PMID:24216655

  10. Super-resolution photoacoustic microscopy using photonic nanojets: a simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upputuri, Paul Kumar; Wen, Zhuo-Bin; Wu, Zhe; Pramanik, Manojit

    2014-11-01

    Optical resolution photoacoustic microscopy (ORPAM) is important for various biomedical applications, such as the study of cellular structures, microcirculation systems, and tumor angiogenesis. However, the lateral resolution of a conventional ORPAM is limited by optical diffraction. In this work, we report a simulation study to achieve subdiffraction-limited super-resolution in ORPAM using microspheres. Laser radiation is focused through a microsphere to generate a photonic nanojet, which provides the possibility to break the diffraction limit in ORPAM by reducing the size of the excitation volume. In our simulations using microspheres, we observed improvement in the lateral resolution up to ˜fourfold compared to conventional ORPAM. The method is simple, cost effective, and can provide far-field resolution. This approach may provide new opportunities for many biomedical imaging applications that require finer resolution.

  11. Mirror-enhanced super-resolution microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xusan; Xie, Hao; Alonas, Eric; Liu, Yujia; Chen, Xuanze; Santangelo, Philip J; Ren, Qiushi; Xi, Peng; Jin, Dayong

    2016-01-01

    Axial excitation confinement beyond the diffraction limit is crucial to the development of next-generation, super-resolution microscopy. STimulated Emission Depletion (STED) nanoscopy offers lateral super-resolution using a donut-beam depletion, but its axial resolution is still over 500 nm. Total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy is widely used for single-molecule localization, but its ability to detect molecules is limited to within the evanescent field of ~ 100 nm from the cell attachment surface. We find here that the axial thickness of the point spread function (PSF) during confocal excitation can be easily improved to 110 nm by replacing the microscopy slide with a mirror. The interference of the local electromagnetic field confined the confocal PSF to a 110-nm spot axially, which enables axial super-resolution with all laser-scanning microscopes. Axial sectioning can be obtained with wavelength modulation or by controlling the spacer between the mirror and the specimen. With no additional complexity, the mirror-assisted excitation confinement enhanced the axial resolution six-fold and the lateral resolution two-fold for STED, which together achieved 19-nm resolution to resolve the inner rim of a nuclear pore complex and to discriminate the contents of 120 nm viral filaments. The ability to increase the lateral resolution and decrease the thickness of an axial section using mirror-enhanced STED without increasing the laser power is of great importance for imaging biological specimens, which cannot tolerate high laser power. PMID:27398242

  12. Nature's crucible: Manufacturing optical nonlinearities for high resolution, high sensitivity encoding in the compound eye of the fly, Musca domestica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, Mike

    1993-01-01

    The number of pixels per unit area sampling an image determines Nyquist resolution. Therefore, the highest pixel density is the goal. Unfortunately, as reduction in pixel size approaches the wavelength of light, sensitivity is lost and noise increases. Animals face the same problems and have achieved novel solutions. Emulating these solutions offers potentially unlimited sensitivity with detector size approaching the diffraction limit. Once an image is 'captured', cellular preprocessing of information allows extraction of high resolution information from the scene. Computer simulation of this system promises hyperacuity for machine vision.

  13. Analytical description of high-aperture STED resolution with 0–2π vortex phase modulation

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Hao; Liu, Yujia; Jin, Dayong; Santangelo, Philip J.; Xi, Peng

    2014-01-01

    Stimulated emission depletion (STED) can achieve optical superresolution, with the optical diffraction limit broken by the suppression on the periphery of the fluorescent focal spot. Previously, it is generally experimentally accepted that there exists an inverse square root relationship with the STED power and the resolution, but with arbitrary coefficients in expression. In this paper, we have removed the arbitrary coefficients by exploring the relationship between the STED power and the achievable resolution from vector optical theory for the widely used 0–2π vortex phase modulation. Electromagnetic fields of the focal region of a high numerical aperture objective are calculated and approximated into polynomials of radius in the focal plane, and analytical expression of resolution as a function of the STED intensity has been derived. As a result, the resolution can be estimated directly from the measurement of the saturation power of the dye and the STED power applied in the region of high STED power. PMID:24323224

  14. Rapid super-resolution line-scanning microscopy through virtually structured detection.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Yanan; Lu, Rongwen; Wang, Benquan; Zhang, Qiuxiang; Yao, Xincheng

    2015-04-15

    Virtually structured detection (VSD) has been demonstrated to break the diffraction limit in scanning laser microscopy (SLM). VSD provides an easy, low-cost, and phase-artifact-free strategy to achieve super-resolution imaging. However, practical application of this method is challenging due to a limited image acquisition speed. We report here the combination of VSD and line-scanning microscopy (LSM) to improve the image acquisition speed. A motorized dove prism was used to achieve automatic control of four-angle (i.e., 0°, 45°, 90°, and 135°) scanning, thus ensuring isotropic resolution improvement. Both an optical resolution target and a living frog eyecup were used to verify resolution enhancement.

  15. Super-resolution two-photon microscopy via scanning patterned illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urban, Ben E.; Yi, Ji; Chen, Siyu; Dong, Biqin; Zhu, Yongling; DeVries, Steven H.; Backman, Vadim; Zhang, Hao F.

    2015-04-01

    We developed two-photon scanning patterned illumination microscopy (2P-SPIM) for super-resolution two-photon imaging. Our approach used a traditional two-photon microscopy setup with temporally modulated excitation to create patterned illumination fields. Combing nine different illuminations and structured illumination reconstruction, super-resolution imaging was achieved in two-photon microscopy. Using 2P-SPIM we achieved a lateral resolution of 141 nm, which represents an improvement by a factor of 1.9 over the corresponding diffraction limit. We further demonstrated super-resolution cellular imaging by 2P-SPIM to image actin cytoskeleton in mammalian cells and three-dimensional imaging in highly scattering retinal tissue.

  16. Rapid super-resolution line-scanning microscopy through virtually structured detection

    PubMed Central

    Zhi, Yanan; Lu, Rongwen; Wang, Benquan; Zhang, Qiuxiang; Yao, Xincheng

    2015-01-01

    Virtually structured detection (VSD) has been demonstrated to break the diffraction limit in scanning laser microscopy (SLM). VSD provides an easy, low-cost, and phase-artifact-free strategy to achieve super-resolution imaging. However, practical application of this method is challenging due to a limited image acquisition speed. We report here the combination of VSD and line-scanning microscopy (LSM) to improve the image acquisition speed. A motorized dove prism was used to achieve automatic control of four-angle (i.e., 0°, 45°, 90°, and 135°) scanning, thus ensuring isotropic resolution improvement. Both an optical resolution target and a living frog eyecup were used to verify resolution enhancement. PMID:25872047

  17. Model-based resolution: applying the theory in quantitative microscopy.

    PubMed

    Santos, A; Young, I T

    2000-06-10

    Model-based image processing techniques have been proposed as a way to increase the resolution of optical microscopes. Here a model based on the microscope's point-spread function is analyzed, and the resolution limits achieved with a proposed goodness-of-fit criterion are quantified. Several experiments were performed to evaluate the possibilities and limitations of this method: (a) experiments with an ideal (diffraction-limited) microscope, (b) experiments with simulated dots and a real microscope, and (c) experiments with real dots acquired with a real microscope. The results show that a threefold increase over classical resolution (e.g., Rayleigh) is possible. These results can be affected by model misspecifications, whereas model corruption, as seen in the effect of Poisson noise, seems to be unimportant. This research can be considered to be preliminary with the final goal being the accurate measurement of various cytogenetic properties, such as gene distributions, in labeled preparations.

  18. Multi-pulse pumping for far-field super-resolution imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Requena, Sebastian; Raut, Sangram; Doan, Hung; Kimball, Joe; Fudala, Rafal; Borejdo, Julian; Gryczynski, Ignacy; Strzhemechny, Yuri; Gryczynski, Zygmunt

    2016-02-01

    Recently, far-field optical imaging with a resolution significantly beyond diffraction limit has attracted tremendous attention allowing for high resolution imaging in living objects. Various methods have been proposed that are divided in to two basic approaches; deterministic super-resolution like STED or RESOLFT and stochastic super-resolution like PALM or STORM. We propose to achieve super-resolution in far-field fluorescence imaging by the use of controllable (on-demand) bursts of pulses that can change the fluorescence signal of long-lived component over one order of magnitude. We demonstrate that two beads, one labeled with a long-lived dye and another with a short-lived dye, separated by a distance lower than 100 nm can be easily resolved in a single experiment. The proposed method can be used to separate two biological structures in a cell by targeting them with two antibodies labeled with long-lived and short-lived fluorophores.

  19. High-power ({gt}0.9 W cw) diffraction-limited semiconductor laser based on a fiber Bragg grating external cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Cornwell, D.M. , Jr.; Thomas, H.J.

    1997-02-01

    We have developed a high-power ({gt}0.9 W cw) diffraction-limited semiconductor laser based on a tapered semiconductor optical amplifier using a fiber Bragg grating in an external cavity configuration. Frequency-selective feedback from the fiber grating is injected into the amplifier via direct butt coupling through a single mode fiber, resulting in a spectrally stable and narrow ({lt}0.3 nm) high-power laser for solid-state laser pumping, laser remote sensing, and optical communications. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  20. Near-diffraction-limited,35.4 W laser-diode end-pumped Nd:YVO4 slab laser operating at 1342 nm.

    PubMed

    Yan, Ying; Zhang, Hengli; Liu, Yang; Yu, Xilong; Zhang, Huaijin; He, Jingliang; Xin, Jianguo

    2009-07-15

    A diode stack end-pumped Nd:YVO4 slab laser at 1342 nm with near-diffraction-limited beam quality by using a hybrid resonator was presented. At a pump power of 139.5 W, laser power of 35.4 W was obtained with a conversion efficiency of 25.4% of the laser diode to laser output. The beam quality M2 factors were measured to be 1.2 in the unstable direction and 1.3 in the stable direction at the output power of 29 W. PMID:19823516

  1. Near-diffraction-limited green source by frequency doubling of a diode-stack pumped Q-switched Nd:YAG slab oscillator-amplifier system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hengli; Liu, Xiaomeng; Li, Daijun; Shi, Peng; Schell, Alex; Haas, Claus Rüdige; Du, Keming

    2007-09-10

    A near-diffraction-limited, stable, 18 mJ green source with a pulse width of 16.7 ns was generated at a 1 kHz repetition rate by frequency doubling of diode stacks end-pumped electro-optically Q-switched slab Nd:YAG oscillator-amplifier system. The pump to green optical conversion efficiency was 10.7%. At the output energy of 15 mJ at 532 nm, the M2 factors were 1.3 and 1.7 in the unstable and stable directions, respectively. The energy pulse stability was approximately 0.8%.

  2. Near-diffraction-limited,35.4 W laser-diode end-pumped Nd:YVO4 slab laser operating at 1342 nm.

    PubMed

    Yan, Ying; Zhang, Hengli; Liu, Yang; Yu, Xilong; Zhang, Huaijin; He, Jingliang; Xin, Jianguo

    2009-07-15

    A diode stack end-pumped Nd:YVO4 slab laser at 1342 nm with near-diffraction-limited beam quality by using a hybrid resonator was presented. At a pump power of 139.5 W, laser power of 35.4 W was obtained with a conversion efficiency of 25.4% of the laser diode to laser output. The beam quality M2 factors were measured to be 1.2 in the unstable direction and 1.3 in the stable direction at the output power of 29 W.

  3. High resolution telescope including an array of elemental telescopes aligned along a common axis and supported on a space frame with a pivot at its geometric center

    DOEpatents

    Norbert, Massie A.; Yale, Oster

    1992-01-01

    A large effective-aperture, low-cost optical telescope with diffraction-limited resolution enables ground-based observation of near-earth space objects. The telescope has a non-redundant, thinned-aperture array in a center-mount, single-structure space frame. It employes speckle interferometric imaging to achieve diffraction-limited resolution. The signal-to-noise ratio problem is mitigated by moving the wavelength of operation to the near-IR, and the image is sensed by a Silicon CCD. The steerable, single-structure array presents a constant pupil. The center-mount, radar-like mount enables low-earth orbit space objects to be tracked as well as increases stiffness of the space frame. In the preferred embodiment, the array has elemental telescopes with subaperture of 2.1 m in a circle-of-nine configuration. The telescope array has an effective aperture of 12 m which provides a diffraction-limited resolution of 0.02 arc seconds. Pathlength matching of the telescope array is maintained by a electro-optical system employing laser metrology. Speckle imaging relaxes pathlength matching tolerance by one order of magnitude as compared to phased arrays. Many features of the telescope contribute to substantial reduction in costs. These include eliminating the conventional protective dome and reducing on-site construction activities. The cost of the telescope scales with the first power of the aperture rather than its third power as in conventional telescopes.

  4. High resolution telescope including an array of elemental telescopes aligned along a common axis and supported on a space frame with a pivot at its geometric center

    DOEpatents

    Norbert, M.A.; Yale, O.

    1992-04-28

    A large effective-aperture, low-cost optical telescope with diffraction-limited resolution enables ground-based observation of near-earth space objects. The telescope has a non-redundant, thinned-aperture array in a center-mount, single-structure space frame. It employes speckle interferometric imaging to achieve diffraction-limited resolution. The signal-to-noise ratio problem is mitigated by moving the wavelength of operation to the near-IR, and the image is sensed by a Silicon CCD. The steerable, single-structure array presents a constant pupil. The center-mount, radar-like mount enables low-earth orbit space objects to be tracked as well as increases stiffness of the space frame. In the preferred embodiment, the array has elemental telescopes with subaperture of 2.1 m in a circle-of-nine configuration. The telescope array has an effective aperture of 12 m which provides a diffraction-limited resolution of 0.02 arc seconds. Pathlength matching of the telescope array is maintained by a electro-optical system employing laser metrology. Speckle imaging relaxes pathlength matching tolerance by one order of magnitude as compared to phased arrays. Many features of the telescope contribute to substantial reduction in costs. These include eliminating the conventional protective dome and reducing on-site construction activities. The cost of the telescope scales with the first power of the aperture rather than its third power as in conventional telescopes. 15 figs.

  5. Using a short-pulse diffraction-limited laser beam to probe filamentation of a random phase plate smoothed beam.

    PubMed

    Kline, J L; Montgomery, D S; Flippo, K A; Johnson, R P; Rose, H A; Shimada, T; Williams, E A

    2008-10-01

    A short pulse (few picoseconds) laser probe provides high temporal resolution measurements to elucidate details of fast dynamic phenomena not observable with typical longer laser pulse probes and gated diagnostics. Such a short pulse laser probe (SPLP) has been used to measure filamentation of a random phase plate (RPP) smoothed laser beam in a gas-jet plasma. The plasma index of refraction due to driven density and temperature fluctuations by the RPP beam perturbs the phase front of a SPLP propagating at a 90 degree angle with respect to the RPP interaction beam. The density and temperature fluctuations are quasistatic on the time scale of the SPLP (approximately 2 ps). The transmitted near-field intensity distribution from the SPLP provides a measure of the phase front perturbation. At low plasma densities, the transmitted intensity pattern is asymmetric with striations across the entire probe beam in the direction of the RPP smoothed beam. As the plasma density increases, the striations break up into smaller sizes along the direction of the RPP beam propagation. The breakup of the intensity pattern is consistent with self-focusing of the RPP smoothed interaction beam. Simulations of the experiment using the wave propagation code, PF3D, are in qualitative agreement demonstrating that the asymmetric striations can be attributed to the RPP driven density fluctuations. Quantification of the beam breakup measured by the transmitted SPLP could lead to a new method for measuring self-focusing of lasers in underdense plasmas.

  6. Going far beyond the near-field diffraction limit via plasmonic cavity lens with high spatial frequency spectrum off-axis illumination

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zeyu; Luo, Yunfei; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Changtao; Gao, Ping; Wang, Yanqin; Pu, Mingbo; Yao, Na; Zhao, Chengwei; Luo, Xiangang

    2015-01-01

    For near-field imaging optics, minimum resolvable feature size is highly constrained by the near-field diffraction limit associated with the illumination light wavelength and the air distance between the imaging devices and objects. In this study, a plasmonic cavity lens composed of Ag-photoresist-Ag form incorporating high spatial frequency spectrum off-axis illumination (OAI) is proposed to realize deep subwavelength imaging far beyond the near-field diffraction limit. This approach benefits from the resonance effect of the plasmonic cavity lens and the wavevector shifting behavior via OAI, which remarkably enhances the object’s subwavelength information and damps negative imaging contribution from the longitudinal electric field component in imaging region. Experimental images of well resolved 60-nm half-pitch patterns under 365-nm ultra-violet light are demonstrated at air distance of 80 nm between the mask patterns and plasmonic cavity lens, approximately four-fold longer than that in the conventional near-field lithography and superlens scheme. The ultimate air distance for the 60-nm half-pitch object could be theoretically extended to 120 nm. Moreover, two-dimensional L-shape patterns and deep subwavelength patterns are illustrated via simulations and experiments. This study promises the significant potential to make plasmonic lithography as a practical, cost-effective, simple and parallel nano-fabrication approach. PMID:26477856

  7. Fast two-dimensional super-resolution image reconstruction algorithm for ultra-high emitter density.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jiaqing; Gumpper, Kristyn; Chi, Yuejie; Sun, Mingzhai; Ma, Jianjie

    2015-07-01

    Single-molecule localization microscopy achieves sub-diffraction-limit resolution by localizing a sparse subset of stochastically activated emitters in each frame. Its temporal resolution is limited by the maximal emitter density that can be handled by the image reconstruction algorithms. Multiple algorithms have been developed to accurately locate the emitters even when they have significant overlaps. Currently, compressive-sensing-based algorithm (CSSTORM) achieves the highest emitter density. However, CSSTORM is extremely computationally expensive, which limits its practical application. Here, we develop a new algorithm (MempSTORM) based on two-dimensional spectrum analysis. With the same localization accuracy and recall rate, MempSTORM is 100 times faster than CSSTORM with ℓ(1)-homotopy. In addition, MempSTORM can be implemented on a GPU for parallelism, which can further increase its computational speed and make it possible for online super-resolution reconstruction of high-density emitters.

  8. Advances in high-resolution imaging – techniques for three-dimensional imaging of cellular structures

    PubMed Central

    Lidke, Diane S.; Lidke, Keith A.

    2012-01-01

    A fundamental goal in biology is to determine how cellular organization is coupled to function. To achieve this goal, a better understanding of organelle composition and structure is needed. Although visualization of cellular organelles using fluorescence or electron microscopy (EM) has become a common tool for the cell biologist, recent advances are providing a clearer picture of the cell than ever before. In particular, advanced light-microscopy techniques are achieving resolutions below the diffraction limit and EM tomography provides high-resolution three-dimensional (3D) images of cellular structures. The ability to perform both fluorescence and electron microscopy on the same sample (correlative light and electron microscopy, CLEM) makes it possible to identify where a fluorescently labeled protein is located with respect to organelle structures visualized by EM. Here, we review the current state of the art in 3D biological imaging techniques with a focus on recent advances in electron microscopy and fluorescence super-resolution techniques. PMID:22685332

  9. Development and biological applications of high-resolution ion beam induced fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhaohong, Mi

    High-resolution fluorescence microscopy has become an essential tool in both biological and biomedical sciences, to directly visualize biological processes at the cellular and subcellular levels through specific fluorescence labeling. Among the fluorescence microscopy techniques, mega-electron-volt (MeV) ion-induced fluorescence microscopy has unique advantages because MeV ions can penetrate through biological cells with little deflection in their trajectories. The state-of-the-art bioimaging facility in the Centre for Ion Beam Applications, National University of Singapore can achieve sub-30 nm spatial resolutions for structural imaging of biological cells, which is well below the diffraction limits imposed by optical microscopy. Our aim is to achieve similar spatial resolutions for Ion Beam Induced Fluorescence Imaging. (Abstract shortened by UMI.).

  10. High-resolution OCT balloon imaging catheter with astigmatism correction

    PubMed Central

    Xi, Jiefeng; Huo, Li; Wu, Yicong; Cobb, Michael J.; Hwang, Joo Ha; Li, Xingde

    2014-01-01

    We report new optics designs for an optical coherence tomography (OCT) balloon imaging catheter to achieve diffraction-limited high resolution at a large working distance and enable the correction of severe astigmatism in the catheter. The designs employed a 1 mm diameter gradient-index lens of a properly chosen pitch number and a glass rod spacer to fully utilize the available NA of the miniature optics. Astigmatism caused by the balloon tubing was analyzed, and a method based on a cylindrical reflector was proposed and demonstrated to compensate the astigmatism. A catheter based on the new designs was successfully developed with a measured diffraction-limited lateral resolution of ∼21 μm, a working distance of ∼ 11 –12 mm, and a round-shape beam profile. The performance of the OCT balloon catheter was demonstrated by 3D full-circumferential imaging of a swine esophagus in vivo along with a high-speed, Fourier-domain, mode-locked swept-source OCT system. PMID:19571960

  11. Super-resolution spinning-disk confocal microscopy using optical photon reassignment.

    PubMed

    Azuma, Takuya; Kei, Takayuki

    2015-06-01

    Spinning-disk confocal microscopy is a proven technology for investigating 3D structures of biological specimens. Here we report a super-resolution method based on spinning-disk confocal microscopy that optically improves lateral resolution by a factor of 1.37 with a single exposure. Moreover, deconvolution yields twofold improvement over the diffraction limit. With the help of newly modified Nipkow disk which comprises pinholes and micro-lenses on the front and back respectively, emitted photons from specimen can be optically reassigned to the most probable locations they originate from. Consequently, the improvement in resolution is achieved preserving inherent sectioning capabilities of confocal microscopy. This extremely simple implementation will enable reliable observations at super high resolution in biomedical routine research.

  12. Nearly diffraction-limited X-ray focusing with variable-numerical-aperture focusing optical system based on four deformable mirrors.

    PubMed

    Matsuyama, Satoshi; Nakamori, Hiroki; Goto, Takumi; Kimura, Takashi; Khakurel, Krishna P; Kohmura, Yoshiki; Sano, Yasuhisa; Yabashi, Makina; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Nishino, Yoshinori; Yamauchi, Kazuto

    2016-01-01

    Unlike the electrostatic and electromagnetic lenses used in electron microscopy, most X-ray focusing optical systems have fixed optical parameters with constant numerical apertures (NAs). This lack of adaptability has significantly limited application targets. In the research described herein, we developed a variable-NA X-ray focusing system based on four deformable mirrors, two sets of Kirkpatrick-Baez-type focusing mirrors, in order to control the focusing size while keeping the position of the focus unchanged. We applied a mirror deformation procedure using optical/X-ray metrology for offline/online adjustments. We performed a focusing test at a SPring-8 beamline and confirmed that the beam size varied from 108 nm to 560 nm (165 nm to 1434 nm) in the horizontal (vertical) direction by controlling the NA while maintaining diffraction-limited conditions. PMID:27097853

  13. Methodology for optimal in situ alignment and setting of bendable optics for diffraction-limited focusing of soft x-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merthe, Daniel J.; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Kunz, Martin; Tamura, Nobumichi; McKinney, Wayne R.; Artemiev, Nikolay A.; Celestre, Richard S.; Morrison, Gregory Y.; Anderson, Erik; Smith, Brian V.; Domning, Edward E.; Rekawa, Senajith B.; Padmore, Howard A.

    2012-09-01

    We demonstrate a comprehensive and broadly applicable methodology for the optimal in situ configuration of bendable soft x-ray Kirkpatrick-Baez mirrors. The mirrors used for this application are preset at the ALS Optical Metrology Laboratory prior to beamline installation. The in situ methodology consists of a new technique for simultaneously setting the height and pitch angle of each mirror. The benders of both mirrors were then optimally tuned in order to minimize ray aberrations to a level below the diffraction-limited beam waist size of 200 nm (horizontal) × 100 nm (vertical). After applying this methodology, we measured a beam waist size of 290 nm (horizontal) × 130 nm (vertical) with 1 nm light using the Foucault knife-edge test. We also discuss the utility of using a grating-based lateral shearing interferometer with quantitative wavefront feedback for further improvement of bendable optics.

  14. Methodology for optimal in situ alignment and setting of bendable optics for nearly diffraction-limited focusing of soft x-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merthe, Daniel J.; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Kunz, Martin; Tamura, Nobumichi; McKinney, Wayne R.; Artemiev, Nikolay A.; Celestre, Richard S.; Morrison, Gregory Y.; Anderson, Erik H.; Smith, Brian V.; Domning, Edward E.; Rekawa, Senajith B.; Padmore, Howard A.

    2013-03-01

    We demonstrate a comprehensive and broadly applicable methodology for the optimal in situ configuration of bendable soft x-ray Kirkpatrick-Baez mirrors. The mirrors used for this application are preset at the Advanced Light Source Optical Metrology Laboratory prior to beamline installation. The in situ methodology consists of a new technique for simultaneously setting the height and pitch angle of each mirror. The benders of both mirrors were then optimally tuned in order to minimize ray aberrations to a level below the diffraction-limited beam waist size of 200 nm (horizontal)×100 nm (vertical). After applying this methodology, we measured a beam waist size of 290 nm (horizontal)×130 nm (vertical) with 1 nm light using the Foucault knife-edge test. We also discuss the utility of using a grating-based lateral shearing interferometer with quantitative wavefront feedback for further improvement of bendable optics.

  15. The light-matter interaction of a single semiconducting AlGaN nanowire and noble metal Au nanoparticles in the sub-diffraction limit.

    PubMed

    Sivadasan, A K; Madapu, Kishore K; Dhara, Sandip

    2016-08-24

    Near field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM) is not only a tool for imaging of sub-diffraction limited objects but also a prominent characteristic tool for understanding the intrinsic properties of nanostructures. In order to understand light-matter interactions in the near field regime using a NSOM technique with an excitation of 532 nm (2.33 eV), we selected an isolated single semiconducting AlGaN nanowire (NW) of diameter ∼120 nm grown via a vapor liquid solid (VLS) mechanism along with a metallic Au nanoparticle (NP) catalyst. The role of electronic transitions from different native defect related energy states of AlGaN is discussed in understanding the NSOM images for the semiconducting NW. The effect of strong surface plasmon resonance absorption of an excitation laser on the NSOM images for Au NPs, involved in the VLS growth mechanism of NWs, is also observed. PMID:27511614

  16. The light-matter interaction of a single semiconducting AlGaN nanowire and noble metal Au nanoparticles in the sub-diffraction limit.

    PubMed

    Sivadasan, A K; Madapu, Kishore K; Dhara, Sandip

    2016-08-24

    Near field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM) is not only a tool for imaging of sub-diffraction limited objects but also a prominent characteristic tool for understanding the intrinsic properties of nanostructures. In order to understand light-matter interactions in the near field regime using a NSOM technique with an excitation of 532 nm (2.33 eV), we selected an isolated single semiconducting AlGaN nanowire (NW) of diameter ∼120 nm grown via a vapor liquid solid (VLS) mechanism along with a metallic Au nanoparticle (NP) catalyst. The role of electronic transitions from different native defect related energy states of AlGaN is discussed in understanding the NSOM images for the semiconducting NW. The effect of strong surface plasmon resonance absorption of an excitation laser on the NSOM images for Au NPs, involved in the VLS growth mechanism of NWs, is also observed.

  17. Nearly diffraction-limited X-ray focusing with variable-numerical-aperture focusing optical system based on four deformable mirrors

    PubMed Central

    Matsuyama, Satoshi; Nakamori, Hiroki; Goto, Takumi; Kimura, Takashi; Khakurel, Krishna P.; Kohmura, Yoshiki; Sano, Yasuhisa; Yabashi, Makina; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Nishino, Yoshinori; Yamauchi, Kazuto

    2016-01-01

    Unlike the electrostatic and electromagnetic lenses used in electron microscopy, most X-ray focusing optical systems have fixed optical parameters with constant numerical apertures (NAs). This lack of adaptability has significantly limited application targets. In the research described herein, we developed a variable-NA X-ray focusing system based on four deformable mirrors, two sets of Kirkpatrick–Baez-type focusing mirrors, in order to control the focusing size while keeping the position of the focus unchanged. We applied a mirror deformation procedure using optical/X-ray metrology for offline/online adjustments. We performed a focusing test at a SPring-8 beamline and confirmed that the beam size varied from 108 nm to 560 nm (165 nm to 1434 nm) in the horizontal (vertical) direction by controlling the NA while maintaining diffraction-limited conditions. PMID:27097853

  18. Nearly diffraction-limited X-ray focusing with variable-numerical-aperture focusing optical system based on four deformable mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuyama, Satoshi; Nakamori, Hiroki; Goto, Takumi; Kimura, Takashi; Khakurel, Krishna P.; Kohmura, Yoshiki; Sano, Yasuhisa; Yabashi, Makina; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Nishino, Yoshinori; Yamauchi, Kazuto

    2016-04-01

    Unlike the electrostatic and electromagnetic lenses used in electron microscopy, most X-ray focusing optical systems have fixed optical parameters with constant numerical apertures (NAs). This lack of adaptability has significantly limited application targets. In the research described herein, we developed a variable-NA X-ray focusing system based on four deformable mirrors, two sets of Kirkpatrick-Baez-type focusing mirrors, in order to control the focusing size while keeping the position of the focus unchanged. We applied a mirror deformation procedure using optical/X-ray metrology for offline/online adjustments. We performed a focusing test at a SPring-8 beamline and confirmed that the beam size varied from 108 nm to 560 nm (165 nm to 1434 nm) in the horizontal (vertical) direction by controlling the NA while maintaining diffraction-limited conditions.

  19. Nearly diffraction-limited X-ray focusing with variable-numerical-aperture focusing optical system based on four deformable mirrors.

    PubMed

    Matsuyama, Satoshi; Nakamori, Hiroki; Goto, Takumi; Kimura, Takashi; Khakurel, Krishna P; Kohmura, Yoshiki; Sano, Yasuhisa; Yabashi, Makina; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Nishino, Yoshinori; Yamauchi, Kazuto

    2016-04-21

    Unlike the electrostatic and electromagnetic lenses used in electron microscopy, most X-ray focusing optical systems have fixed optical parameters with constant numerical apertures (NAs). This lack of adaptability has significantly limited application targets. In the research described herein, we developed a variable-NA X-ray focusing system based on four deformable mirrors, two sets of Kirkpatrick-Baez-type focusing mirrors, in order to control the focusing size while keeping the position of the focus unchanged. We applied a mirror deformation procedure using optical/X-ray metrology for offline/online adjustments. We performed a focusing test at a SPring-8 beamline and confirmed that the beam size varied from 108 nm to 560 nm (165 nm to 1434 nm) in the horizontal (vertical) direction by controlling the NA while maintaining diffraction-limited conditions.

  20. Virtual-'Light-Sheet' Single-Molecule Localisation Microscopy Enables Quantitative Optical Sectioning for Super-Resolution Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Palayret, Matthieu; Armes, Helen; Basu, Srinjan; Watson, Adam T.; Herbert, Alex; Lando, David; Etheridge, Thomas J.; Endesfelder, Ulrike; Heilemann, Mike; Laue, Ernest; Carr, Antony M.; Klenerman, David; Lee, Steven F.

    2015-01-01

    Single-molecule super-resolution microscopy allows imaging of fluorescently-tagged proteins in live cells with a precision well below that of the diffraction limit. Here, we demonstrate 3D sectioning with single-molecule super-resolution microscopy by making use of the fitting information that is usually discarded to reject fluorophores that emit from above or below a virtual-'light-sheet', a thin volume centred on the focal plane of the microscope. We describe an easy-to-use routine (implemented as an open-source ImageJ plug-in) to quickly analyse a calibration sample to define and use such a virtual light-sheet. In addition, the plug-in is easily usable on almost any existing 2D super-resolution instrumentation. This optical sectioning of super-resolution images is achieved by applying well-characterised width and amplitude thresholds to diffraction-limited spots that can be used to tune the thickness of the virtual light-sheet. This allows qualitative and quantitative imaging improvements: by rejecting out-of-focus fluorophores, the super-resolution image gains contrast and local features may be revealed; by retaining only fluorophores close to the focal plane, virtual-'light-sheet' single-molecule localisation microscopy improves the probability that all emitting fluorophores will be detected, fitted and quantitatively evaluated. PMID:25884495

  1. Quantitative Composition Analysis of Lipid Membranes by High-Resolution Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kraft, M L; Weber, P K; Lin, W C; Blanchette, C D; Longo, M L; Hutcheon, I D; Boxer, S G

    2005-04-29

    The lateral organization and interactions of lipid and protein components within biological membranes are essential for their functions. Investigations of the lateral organization within membranes hinge upon the ability to differentiate one component of interest from another. Typically, fluorophores are conjugated to specific components, and the organization is probed with fluorescence microscopy. However, bulky fluorophores may change the physical properties of the components they label, only the labeled components can be visualized, and the diffraction limit of light restricts the lateral resolution. Here we present a method to image microdomains within supported lipid membranes using isotopic labels and high-resolution secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) performed with the NanoSIMS 50 (Cameca). Lateral resolution of 100 nm is achieved with high sensitivity. Quantitative information on the lipid composition within each domain was determined using calibration curves constructed from homogeneous lipid bilayer samples that systematically varied in the isotopically labeled lipid content.

  2. 5.5 W near-diffraction-limited power from resonant leaky-wave coupled phase-locked arrays of quantum cascade lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirch, J. D.; Chang, C.-C.; Boyle, C.; Mawst, L. J.; Lindberg, D.; Earles, T.; Botez, D.

    2015-02-01

    Five, 8.36 μm-emitting quantum-cascade lasers (QCLs) have been monolithically phase-locked in the in-phase array mode via resonant leaky-wave coupling. The structure is fabricated by etch and regrowth which provides large index steps (Δn = 0.10) between antiguided-array elements and interelement regions. Such high index contrast photonic-crystal (PC) lasers have more than an order of magnitude higher index contrast than PC-distributed feedback lasers previously used for coherent beam combining in QCLs. Absorption loss to metal layers inserted in the interelement regions provides a wide (˜1.0 μm) range in interelement width over which the resonant in-phase mode is strongly favored to lase. Room-temperature, in-phase-mode operation with ˜2.2 kA/cm2 threshold-current density is obtained from 105 μm-wide aperture devices. The far-field beam pattern has lobewidths 1.65× diffraction limit (D.L.) and 82% of the light in the main lobe, up to 1.8× threshold. Peak pulsed near-D.L. power of 5.5 W is obtained, with 4.5 W emitted in the main lobe. Means of how to increase the device internal efficiency are discussed.

  3. 5.5 W near-diffraction-limited power from resonant leaky-wave coupled phase-locked arrays of quantum cascade lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Kirch, J. D.; Chang, C.-C.; Boyle, C.; Mawst, L. J.; Botez, D.; Lindberg, D.; Earles, T.

    2015-02-09

    Five, 8.36 μm-emitting quantum-cascade lasers (QCLs) have been monolithically phase-locked in the in-phase array mode via resonant leaky-wave coupling. The structure is fabricated by etch and regrowth which provides large index steps (Δn = 0.10) between antiguided-array elements and interelement regions. Such high index contrast photonic-crystal (PC) lasers have more than an order of magnitude higher index contrast than PC-distributed feedback lasers previously used for coherent beam combining in QCLs. Absorption loss to metal layers inserted in the interelement regions provides a wide (∼1.0 μm) range in interelement width over which the resonant in-phase mode is strongly favored to lase. Room-temperature, in-phase-mode operation with ∼2.2 kA/cm{sup 2} threshold-current density is obtained from 105 μm-wide aperture devices. The far-field beam pattern has lobewidths 1.65× diffraction limit (D.L.) and 82% of the light in the main lobe, up to 1.8× threshold. Peak pulsed near-D.L. power of 5.5 W is obtained, with 4.5 W emitted in the main lobe. Means of how to increase the device internal efficiency are discussed.

  4. Laser diode end-pumped continuous-wave laser operation at 1339 nm in Nd : GGG with nearly diffraction-limited beam quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Zhi; Wang, Yi; Xu, Bin; Cheng, Yongjie; Chen, Nan; Xu, Huiying; Cai, Zhiping

    2015-08-01

    We report on the laser diode end-pumped continuous-wave laser operation of a Nd : GGG single crystal at 1339 nm in a plane parallel laser cavity configuration, for the first time to our knowledge. A simultaneous tri-wavelength laser at 1324, 1331 and 1337 nm is obtained at first with a maximum output power up to 1.66 W in a free-running laser operation with a slope efficiency of about 27.6% with respect to the absorbed pump power. By inserting a 0.1 mm glass etalon into the laser cavity and finely tilting it to a suitable angle, a single wavelength lasing at 1339 nm can be realized with a maximum output power of 0.58 W and slope efficiency of about 12.9%. The output power stability is simply estimated to be about 4.1% and the output beam quality is measured to be as near the diffraction limit as 1.33 and 1.16 in x and y directions, respectively.

  5. Testing the limits of Paleozoic chronostratigraphic correlation via high-resolution (13Ccarb) biochemostratigraphy across the Llandovery–Wenlock (Silurian) boundary: Is a unified Phanerozoic time scale achievable?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cramer, Bradley D.; Loydell, David K.; Samtleben, Christian; Munnecke, Axel; Kaljo, Dimitri; Mannik, Peep; Martma, Tonu; Jeppsson, Lennart; Kleffner, Mark A.; Barrick, James E.; Johnson, Craig A.; Emsbo, Poul; Joachimski, Michael M.; Bickert, Torsten; Saltzman, Matthew R.

    2010-01-01

    The resolution and fidelity of global chronostratigraphic correlation are direct functions of the time period under consideration. By virtue of deep-ocean cores and astrochronology, the Cenozoic and Mesozoic time scales carry error bars of a few thousand years (k.y.) to a few hundred k.y. In contrast, most of the Paleozoic time scale carries error bars of plus or minus a few million years (m.y.), and chronostratigraphic control better than ??1 m.y. is considered "high resolution." The general lack of Paleozoic abyssal sediments and paucity of orbitally tuned Paleozoic data series combined with the relative incompleteness of the Paleozoic stratigraphic record have proven historically to be such an obstacle to intercontinental chronostratigraphic correlation that resolving the Paleozoic time scale to the level achieved during the Mesozoic and Cenozoic was viewed as impractical, impossible, or both. Here, we utilize integrated graptolite, conodont, and carbonate carbon isotope (??13Ccarb) data from three paleocontinents (Baltica, Avalonia, and Laurentia) to demonstrate chronostratigraphic control for upper Llando very through middle Wenlock (Telychian-Sheinwoodian, ~436-426 Ma) strata with a resolution of a few hundred k.y. The interval surrounding the base of the Wenlock Series can now be correlated globally with precision approaching 100 k.y., but some intervals (e.g., uppermost Telychian and upper Shein-woodian) are either yet to be studied in sufficient detail or do not show sufficient biologic speciation and/or extinction or carbon isotopic features to delineate such small time slices. Although producing such resolution during the Paleozoic presents an array of challenges unique to the era, we have begun to demonstrate that erecting a Paleozoic time scale comparable to that of younger eras is achievable. ?? 2010 Geological Society of America.

  6. SU-E-J-126: Respiratory Gating Quality Assurance: A Simple Method to Achieve Millisecond Temporal Resolution

    SciTech Connect

    McCabe, B; Wiersma, R

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Low temporal latency between a gating on/off signal and a linac beam on/off during respiratory gating is critical for patient safety. Although, a measurement of temporal lag is recommended by AAPM Task Group 142 for commissioning and annual quality assurance, there currently exists no published method. Here we describe a simple, inexpensive, and reliable method to precisely measure gating lag at millisecond resolutions. Methods: A Varian Real-time Position Management™ (RPM) gating simulator with rotating disk was modified with a resistive flex sensor (Spectra Symbol) attached to the gating box platform. A photon diode was placed at machine isocenter. Output signals of the flex sensor and diode were monitored with a multichannel oscilloscope (Tektronix™ DPO3014). Qualitative inspection of the gating window/beam on synchronicity were made by setting the linac to beam on/off at end-expiration, and the oscilloscope's temporal window to 100 ms to visually examine if the on/off timing was within the recommended 100-ms tolerance. Quantitative measurements were made by saving the signal traces and analyzing in MatLab™. The on and off of the beam signal were located and compared to the expected gating window (e.g. 40% to 60%). Four gating cycles were measured and compared. Results: On a Varian TrueBeam™ STx linac with RPM gating software, the average difference in synchronicity at beam on and off for four cycles was 14 ms (3 to 30 ms) and 11 ms (2 to 32 ms), respectively. For a Varian Clinac™ 21EX the average difference at beam on and off was 127 ms (122 to 133 ms) and 46 ms (42 to 49 ms), respectively. The uncertainty in the synchrony difference was estimated at ±6 ms. Conclusion: This new gating QA method is easy to implement and allows for fast qualitative inspection and quantitative measurements for commissioning and TG-142 annual QA measurements.

  7. STED-like resolution enhancement with focus extension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Kai-Ping; Lin, Wei-Kuan; Hsu, Kuo-Jen; Lin, Yen-Yin; Chu, Shi-Wei

    2016-03-01

    In recent years, the techniques of super-resolution have generated widespread impacts in science. Stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscopy is known for achieving sub-diffraction-limit resolution by using a donut-shaped beam to deplete the fluorescence around a focal spot while leaving a central part active to emit fluorescence. However, since STED microscopy is based on fluorescence, it suffers from photo-bleaching. We recently developed a new technique and termed it as suppression of scattering imaging (SUSI) microscopy. It uses a STED-like setup and achieves super resolution imaging by utilizing the nonlinearity of scattering from gold nanoparticles. Therefore, SUSI microscopy avoids the photo-bleaching issue. Nonetheless, for fast volumetric imaging, SUSI microscopy is limited with slow axial translation of the objective or sample. Here we combine SUSI microscopy with a refractive-index-variable lens to axially move the focus at very high speed. This combination allows simultaneous observation of tissue dynamics over a three-dimensional volume within one second. The new technique paves the way toward high-speed super-resolution imaging for biological tissues.

  8. A scanning, all-fiber Sagnac interferometer for high resolution magneto-optic measurements at 820 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Fried, Alexander; Fejer, Martin; Kapitulnik, Aharon

    2014-10-15

    The Sagnac Interferometer has historically been used for detecting non-reciprocal phenomena, such as rotation. We demonstrate an apparatus in which this technique is employed for high resolution measurements of the Magneto-Optical Polar Kerr effect—a direct indicator of magnetism. Previous designs have incorporated free-space components which are bulky and difficult to align. We improve upon this technique by using all fiber-optic coupled components and demonstrate operation at a new wavelength, 820 nm, with which we can achieve better than 1 μrad resolution. Mounting the system on a piezo-electric scanner allows us to acquire diffraction limited images with 1.5 μm spatial resolution. We also provide extensive discussion on the details and of the Sagnac Interferometer's construction.

  9. Super-resolution Imaging of Live Bacteria Cells Using a Genetically Directed, Highly Photostable Fluoromodule.

    PubMed

    Saurabh, Saumya; Perez, Adam M; Comerci, Colin J; Shapiro, Lucy; Moerner, W E

    2016-08-24

    The rapid development in fluorescence microscopy and imaging techniques has greatly benefited our understanding of the mechanisms governing cellular processes at the molecular level. In particular, super-resolution microscopy methods overcome the diffraction limit to observe nanoscale cellular structures with unprecedented detail, and single-molecule tracking provides precise dynamic information about the motions of labeled proteins and oligonucleotides. Enhanced photostability of fluorescent labels (i.e., maximum emitted photons before photobleaching) is a critical requirement for achieving the ultimate spatio-temporal resolution with either method. While super-resolution imaging has greatly benefited from highly photostable fluorophores, a shortage of photostable fluorescent labels for bacteria has limited its use in these small but relevant organisms. In this study, we report the use of a highly photostable fluoromodule, dL5, to genetically label proteins in the Gram-negative bacterium Caulobacter crescentus, enabling long-time-scale protein tracking and super-resolution microscopy. dL5 imaging relies on the activation of the fluorogen Malachite Green (MG) and can be used to label proteins sparsely, enabling single-protein detection in live bacteria without initial bleaching steps. dL5-MG complexes emit 2-fold more photons before photobleaching compared to organic dyes such as Cy5 and Alexa 647 in vitro, and 5-fold more photons compared to eYFP in vivo. We imaged fusions of dL5 to three different proteins in live Caulobacter cells using stimulated emission depletion microscopy, yielding a 4-fold resolution enhancement compared to diffraction-limited imaging. Importantly, dL5 fusions to an intermediate filament protein CreS are significantly less perturbative compared to traditional fluorescent protein fusions. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of the use of fluorogen activating proteins for super-resolution imaging in live bacterial

  10. Memory-effect based deconvolution microscopy for super-resolution imaging through scattering media

    PubMed Central

    Edrei, Eitan; Scarcelli, Giuliano

    2016-01-01

    High-resolution imaging through turbid media is a fundamental challenge of optical sciences that has attracted a lot of attention in recent years for its wide range of potential applications. Here, we demonstrate that the resolution of imaging systems looking behind a highly scattering medium can be improved below the diffraction-limit. To achieve this, we demonstrate a novel microscopy technique enabled by the optical memory effect that uses a deconvolution image processing and thus it does not require iterative focusing, scanning or phase retrieval procedures. We show that this newly established ability of direct imaging through turbid media provides fundamental and practical advantages such as three-dimensional refocusing and unambiguous object reconstruction. PMID:27633483

  11. Memory-effect based deconvolution microscopy for super-resolution imaging through scattering media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edrei, Eitan; Scarcelli, Giuliano

    2016-09-01

    High-resolution imaging through turbid media is a fundamental challenge of optical sciences that has attracted a lot of attention in recent years for its wide range of potential applications. Here, we demonstrate that the resolution of imaging systems looking behind a highly scattering medium can be improved below the diffraction-limit. To achieve this, we demonstrate a novel microscopy technique enabled by the optical memory effect that uses a deconvolution image processing and thus it does not require iterative focusing, scanning or phase retrieval procedures. We show that this newly established ability of direct imaging through turbid media provides fundamental and practical advantages such as three-dimensional refocusing and unambiguous object reconstruction.

  12. Memory-effect based deconvolution microscopy for super-resolution imaging through scattering media.

    PubMed

    Edrei, Eitan; Scarcelli, Giuliano

    2016-01-01

    High-resolution imaging through turbid media is a fundamental challenge of optical sciences that has attracted a lot of attention in recent years for its wide range of potential applications. Here, we demonstrate that the resolution of imaging systems looking behind a highly scattering medium can be improved below the diffraction-limit. To achieve this, we demonstrate a novel microscopy technique enabled by the optical memory effect that uses a deconvolution image processing and thus it does not require iterative focusing, scanning or phase retrieval procedures. We show that this newly established ability of direct imaging through turbid media provides fundamental and practical advantages such as three-dimensional refocusing and unambiguous object reconstruction. PMID:27633483

  13. Experimental study of the maximum resolution and packing density achievable in sintered and non-sintered binder-jet 3D printed steel microchannels

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, Amy M; Mehdizadeh Momen, Ayyoub; Benedict, Michael; Kiggans Jr, James O

    2015-01-01

    Developing high resolution 3D printed metallic microchannels is a challenge especially when there is an essential need for high packing density of the primary material. While high packing density could be achieved by heating the structure to the sintering temperature, some heat sensitive applications require other strategies to improve the packing density of primary materials. In this study the goal is to develop high green or pack densities microchannels on the scale of 2-300 microns which have a robust mechanical structure. Binder-jet 3D printing is an additive manufacturing process in which droplets of binder are deposited via inkjet into a bed of powder. By repeatedly spreading thin layers of powder and depositing binder into the appropriate 2D profiles, complex 3D objects can be created one layer at time. Microchannels with features on the order of 500 microns were fabricated via binder jetting of steel powder and then sintered and/or infiltrated with a secondary material. The average particle size of the steel powder was varied along with the droplet volume of the inkjet-deposited binder. The resolution of the process, packing density of the primary material, the subsequent features sizes of the microchannels, and the overall microchannel quality were characterized as a function of particle size distribution, droplet sizes and heat treatment temperatures.

  14. A novel super resolution scheme to acquire and process satellite images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Dong-yu; Su, Xiao-feng; Lin, Jian-chun; Wang, Gan-quan; Kuang, Ding-bo

    2013-09-01

    Geosynchronous satellite has obvious limitations for the weight and the scale of payloads, and large aperture optical system is not permitted. The optical diffraction limit of small aperture optical system has an adverse impact on the resolution of the acquired images. Therefore, how to get high resolution images using super-resolution technique with the acquired low resolution images becomes a popular problem investigated by researchers. Here, we present a novel scheme to acquire low resolution images and process them to achieve a high resolution image. Firstly, to acquire low resolution images, we adopt a special arrangement pattern of four CCD staggered arrays on the focal plane in the remote sensing satellite framework .These four CCD linear arrays are parallelized with a 0.25√2 pixel shift along the CCD direction and a 1.25 pixel shift along the scanning direction. The rotation angle between the two directions is 45 degree. The tilting sampling mode and the special arrangement pattern allow the sensor to acquire images with a smaller sampling interval which can give the resolution a greater enhancement. Secondly, to reconstruct a high resolution image of pretty good quality with a magnification factor 4, we propose a novel algorithm based on the iterative-interpolation super resolution algorithm (IISR) and the new edge-directed interpolation algorithm (NEDI). The new algorithm makes a critical improvement to NEDI and introduces it into the multi-frame interpolation in IISR. The algorithm can preserve the edges well and requires a relatively small number of low-resolution images to achieve better reconstruction accuracy .In the last part of the paper, we carry out a simulation experiment, and use MSE as the quality measure. The results demonstrate that our new scheme substantially improves the image resolution with both better quantitative quality and visual quality compared with some previous normal methods.

  15. Two-photon instant structured illumination microscopy improves the depth penetration of super-resolution imaging in thick scattering samples.

    PubMed

    Winter, Peter W; York, Andrew G; Nogare, Damian Dalle; Ingaramo, Maria; Christensen, Ryan; Chitnis, Ajay; Patterson, George H; Shroff, Hari

    2014-09-20

    Fluorescence imaging methods that achieve spatial resolution beyond the diffraction limit (super-resolution) are of great interest in biology. We describe a super-resolution method that combines two-photon excitation with structured illumination microscopy (SIM), enabling three-dimensional interrogation of live organisms with ~150 nm lateral and ~400 nm axial resolution, at frame rates of ~1 Hz. By performing optical rather than digital processing operations to improve resolution, our microscope permits super-resolution imaging with no additional cost in acquisition time or phototoxicity relative to the point-scanning two-photon microscope upon which it is based. Our method provides better depth penetration and inherent optical sectioning than all previously reported super-resolution SIM implementations, enabling super-resolution imaging at depths exceeding 100 μm from the coverslip surface. The capability of our system for interrogating thick live specimens at high resolution is demonstrated by imaging whole nematode embryos and larvae, and tissues and organs inside zebrafish embryos.

  16. Two-photon instant structured illumination microscopy improves the depth penetration of super-resolution imaging in thick scattering samples

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Peter W.; York, Andrew G.; Nogare, Damian Dalle; Ingaramo, Maria; Christensen, Ryan; Chitnis, Ajay; Patterson, George H.; Shroff, Hari

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescence imaging methods that achieve spatial resolution beyond the diffraction limit (super-resolution) are of great interest in biology. We describe a super-resolution method that combines two-photon excitation with structured illumination microscopy (SIM), enabling three-dimensional interrogation of live organisms with ~150 nm lateral and ~400 nm axial resolution, at frame rates of ~1 Hz. By performing optical rather than digital processing operations to improve resolution, our microscope permits super-resolution imaging with no additional cost in acquisition time or phototoxicity relative to the point-scanning two-photon microscope upon which it is based. Our method provides better depth penetration and inherent optical sectioning than all previously reported super-resolution SIM implementations, enabling super-resolution imaging at depths exceeding 100 μm from the coverslip surface. The capability of our system for interrogating thick live specimens at high resolution is demonstrated by imaging whole nematode embryos and larvae, and tissues and organs inside zebrafish embryos. PMID:25485291

  17. Super-resolution Microscopy Approaches for Live Cell Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Godin, Antoine G.; Lounis, Brahim; Cognet, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    By delivering optical images with spatial resolutions below the diffraction limit, several super-resolution fluorescence microscopy techniques opened new opportunities to study biological structures with details approaching molecular structure sizes. They have now become methods of choice for imaging proteins and their nanoscale dynamic organizations in live cells. In this mini-review, we describe and compare the main far-field super-resolution approaches that allow studying endogenous or overexpressed proteins in live cells. PMID:25418158

  18. Surface plasmon resonance microscopy: Achieving a quantitative optical response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Alexander W.; Halter, Michael; Plant, Anne L.; Elliott, John T.

    2016-09-01

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) imaging allows real-time label-free imaging based on index of refraction and changes in index of refraction at an interface. Optical parameter analysis is achieved by application of the Fresnel model to SPR data typically taken by an instrument in a prism based figuration. We carry out SPR imaging on a microscope by launching light into a sample and collecting reflected light through a high numerical aperture microscope objective. The SPR microscope enables spatial resolution that approaches the diffraction limit and has a dynamic range that allows detection of subnanometer to submicrometer changes in thickness of biological material at a surface. However, unambiguous quantitative interpretation of SPR changes using the microscope system could not be achieved using the Fresnel model because of polarization dependent attenuation and optical aberration that occurs in the high numerical aperture objective. To overcome this problem, we demonstrate a model to correct for polarization diattenuation and optical aberrations in the SPR data and develop a procedure to calibrate reflectivity to index of refraction values. The calibration and correction strategy for quantitative analysis was validated by comparing the known indices of refraction of bulk materials with corrected SPR data interpreted with the Fresnel model. Subsequently, we applied our SPR microscopy method to evaluate the index of refraction for a series of polymer microspheres in aqueous media and validated the quality of the measurement with quantitative phase microscopy.

  19. High-resolution quantitative imaging of subcellular morphology and cell refractometry in a liquid environment via endogenous mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edward, Kert; Farahi, Faramarz

    2014-03-01

    Biological cells are composed primarily of water; and as such are challenging to image without staining since the induced intensity modulation of transmitted or reflected light is typically insufficient to permit acceptable contrast for optical imaging. This issue may be resolved with the aid of exogenous contrast agents, but this often has a deleterious effect on the cell and precludes in vivo imaging. A unique approach to this problem is afforded by the phase contrast microscope in which optical-path differences in transmitted light is exploited as a contrast mechanism for qualitative imaging. In recent years however, several quantitative phase imaging techniques have been developed which allow for diffraction limited endogenous-contrast imaging with excellent temporal resolution. We hereby present a laser scanning technique for quantitative phase imaging which achieves sub-diffraction limited resolution at the expense of temporal resolution. This instrument is based on a stabilized fiber interfometer which is incorporated into a near-field scanning optical microscope (NSOM) for tri-modal imaging. Our latest results will focus on modifications made to this system to facilitate imaging in a liquid environment. A simple approach for achieving stable shear-force feedback operation in a liquid will be presented. Acquired high resolution images of white blood cells revealed detailed sub-cellular features. Images of fibroblast cells in air and in a liquid environment confirm the efficacy of the feedback operation in a liquid. Moreover, we demonstrate cell refractometry capability without the need for ad hoc modifications. These results clearly highlight the unique potential of this instrument for the study of living cells.

  20. Super-Resolution Real Imaging in Microsphere-Assisted Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Feifei; Li, Yi; Jia, Boliang; Liu, Lianqing; Li, Wen Jung

    2016-01-01

    Microsphere-assisted microscopy has received a lot of attention recently due to its simplicity and its capability to surpass the diffraction limit. However, to date, sub-diffraction-limit features have only been observed in virtual images formed through the microspheres. We show that it is possible to form real, super-resolution images using high-refractive index microspheres. Also, we report on how changes to a microsphere’s refractive index and size affect image formation and planes. The relationship between the focus position and the additional magnification factor is also investigated using experimental and theoretical methods. We demonstrate that such a real imaging mode, combined with the use of larger microspheres, can enlarge sub-diffraction-limit features up to 10 times that of wide-field microscopy’s magnification with a field-of-view diameter of up to 9 μm. PMID:27768774

  1. Achieving high-resolution soft-tissue imaging with cone-beam CT: a two-pronged approach for modulation of x-ray fluence and detector gain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, S. A.; Siewerdsen, J. H.; Moseley, D. J.; Keller, H.; Shkumat, N. A.; Jaffray, D. A.

    2005-04-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) presents a highly promising and challenging advanced application of flat-panel detectors (FPDs). The great advantage of this adaptable technology is in the potential for sub-mm 3D spatial resolution in combination with soft-tissue detectability. While the former is achieved naturally by CBCT systems incorporating modern FPD designs (e.g., 200 - 400 um pixel pitch), the latter presents a significant challenge due to limitations in FPD dynamic range, large field of view, and elevated levels of x-ray scatter in typical CBCT configurations. We are investigating a two-pronged strategy to maximizing soft-tissue detectability in CBCT: 1) front-end solutions, including novel beam modulation designs (viz., spatially varying compensators) that alleviate detector dynamic range requirements, reduce x-ray scatter, and better distribute imaging dose in a manner suited to soft-tissue visualization throughout the field of view; and 2) back-end solutions, including implementation of an advanced FPD design (Varian PaxScan 4030CB) that features dual-gain and dynamic gain switching that effectively extends detector dynamic range to 18 bits. These strategies are explored quantitatively on CBCT imaging platforms developed in our laboratory, including a dedicated CBCT bench and a mobile isocentric C-arm (Siemens PowerMobil). Pre-clinical evaluation of improved soft-tissue visibility was carried out in phantom and patient imaging with the C-arm device. Incorporation of these strategies begin to reveal the full potential of CBCT for soft-tissue visualization, an essential step in realizing broad utility of this adaptable technology for diagnostic and image-guided procedures.

  2. Kilowatt-level near-diffraction-limited and linear-polarized Ytterbium-Raman hybrid nonlinear amplifier based on polarization selection loss mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ma, Pengfei; Zhang, Hanwei; Huang, Long; Wang, Xiaolin; Zhou, Pu; Liu, Zejin

    2015-10-01

    Ytterbium-Raman cascaded oscillators with linearly polarized output are designed and achieved based on polarization selection loss (PSL) mechanism for the first time. The 1120 nm laser cavity is designed with fully non polarization-maintained (NPM) fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) and NPM active fiber while the 1080 nm laser cavity is designed based on polarization-maintained (PM) FBGs and PM active fiber. By using PSL mechanism in 1080 nm cavity, even with fully NPM 1120 nm cavity, both linear-polarized 1120 nm and 1080 nm lasers are achieved in the output port of the cascaded oscillators. Based on the new designed cascaded seeds, a high power polarization-maintained Yb-Raman hybrid nonlinear amplifier is established for further power scaling of the 1120 nm laser. In the nonlinear amplifier, only 21-meter-long active fiber and 1.5-meter-long passive fiber is used for power transferring from 1080 nm to 1120 nm. Output power of 1181 W is achieved at central wavelength of 1120 nm with the M(2) factor of <1.2 and polarization-extinction ratio (PER) of 18.2 dB. As far as we known, the output power of this all fiber format is the highest one in 1120 nm with linear polarization. This type of high power Yb-Raman nonlinear amplifier design with linear polarization can be further extended to Yb-Raman amplifying the wavelength range of 1100-1200 nm. PMID:26480163

  3. Functional transcranial brain imaging by optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Song; Maslov, Konstantin; Tsytsarev, Vassiliy; Wang, Lihong V.

    2009-07-01

    Optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM) is applied to functional brain imaging in living mice. A near-diffraction-limited bright-field optical illumination is employed to achieve micrometer lateral resolution, and a dual-wavelength measurement is utilized to extract the blood oxygenation information. The variation in hemoglobin oxygen saturation (sO2) along vascular branching has been imaged in a precapillary arteriolar tree and a postcapillary venular tree, respectively. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on in vivo volumetric imaging of brain microvascular morphology and oxygenation down to single capillaries through intact mouse skulls. It is anticipated that: (i) chronic imaging enabled by this minimally invasive procedure will advance the study of cortical plasticity and neurological diseases; (ii) revealing the neuroactivity-dependent changes in hemoglobin concentration and oxygenation will facilitate the understanding of neurovascular coupling at the capillary level; and (iii) combining functional OR-PAM and high-resolution blood flowmetry will have the potential to explore cellular pathways of brain energy metabolism.

  4. Magnetically controlled planar hyperbolic metamaterials for subwavelength resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Bo Han; Chen, Hong Wen; Chang, Kai Jiun; Lan, Yung-Chiang; Tsai, Din Ping

    2015-12-01

    Breaking diffraction limitation is one of the most important issues and still remains to be solved for the demand of high-density optoelectronic components, especially for the photolithography industry. Since the scattered signals of fine feature (i.e. the size is smaller than half of the illuminating wavelength λ) are evanescent, these signals cannot be captured by using conventional glass- or plastic-based optical lens. Hence the corresponding fine feature is lost. In this work, we propose and analyze a magnetically controlled InSb-dielectric multi-layered structure with ability of subwavelength resolution at THz region. This layered structure can resolve subwavelength structures at different frequencies merely changing the magnitude of external magnetic field. Furthermore, the resolving power for a fixed incident frequency can be increased by only increasing the magnitude of applied external magnetic field. By using transfer matrix method and effective medium approach, the mechanism of achieving super resolution is elucidated. The electromagnetic numerical simulation results also prove the rationality and feasibility of the proposed design. Because the proposed device can be dynamically reconfigured by simply changing the magnitude of external magnetic field, it would provide a practical route for multi-functional material, real-time super-resolution imaging, and photolithography.

  5. Magnetically controlled planar hyperbolic metamaterials for subwavelength resolution

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Bo Han; Chen, Hong Wen; Chang, Kai Jiun; Lan, Yung-Chiang; Tsai, Din Ping

    2015-01-01

    Breaking diffraction limitation is one of the most important issues and still remains to be solved for the demand of high-density optoelectronic components, especially for the photolithography industry. Since the scattered signals of fine feature (i.e. the size is smaller than half of the illuminating wavelength λ) are evanescent, these signals cannot be captured by using conventional glass- or plastic-based optical lens. Hence the corresponding fine feature is lost. In this work, we propose and analyze a magnetically controlled InSb-dielectric multi-layered structure with ability of subwavelength resolution at THz region. This layered structure can resolve subwavelength structures at different frequencies merely changing the magnitude of external magnetic field. Furthermore, the resolving power for a fixed incident frequency can be increased by only increasing the magnitude of applied external magnetic field. By using transfer matrix method and effective medium approach, the mechanism of achieving super resolution is elucidated. The electromagnetic numerical simulation results also prove the rationality and feasibility of the proposed design. Because the proposed device can be dynamically reconfigured by simply changing the magnitude of external magnetic field, it would provide a practical route for multi-functional material, real-time super-resolution imaging, and photolithography. PMID:26656499

  6. Effect of scanning beam size on the lateral resolution of mouse retinal imaging with SLO

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Pengfei; Goswami, Mayank; Zam, Azhar; Pugh, Edward N.; Zawadzki, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    Scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (SLO) employs the eye’s optics as a microscope objective for retinal imaging in vivo. The mouse retina has become an increasingly important object for investigation of ocular disease and physiology with optogenetic probes. SLO imaging of the mouse eye, in principle, can achieve submicron lateral resolution thanks to a numerical aperture (NA) of ~0.5, about 2.5 times larger than that of the human eye. In the absence of adaptive optics, however, natural ocular aberrations limit the available optical resolution. The use of a contact lens, in principle, can correct many aberrations, permitting the use of a wider scanning beam and, thus, achieving greater resolution then would otherwise be possible. In this Letter, using an SLO equipped with a rigid contact lens, we report the effect of scanning beam size on the lateral resolution of mouse retinal imaging. Theory predicts that the maximum beam size full width at half-maximum (FWHM) that can be used without any deteriorating effects of aberrations is ~0.6 mm. However, increasing the beam size up to the diameter of the dilated pupil is predicted to improve lateral resolution, though not to the diffraction limit. To test these predictions, the dendrites of a retinal ganglion cell expressing YFP were imaged, and transverse scans were analyzed to quantify the SLO system resolution. The results confirmed that lateral resolution increases with the beam size as predicted. With a 1.3 mm scanning beam and no high-order aberration correction, the lateral resolution is ~1.15 μm, superior to that achievable by most human AO-SLO systems. Advantages of this approach include stabilization of the mouse eye and simplified optical design. PMID:26670523

  7. Effect of scanning beam size on the lateral resolution of mouse retinal imaging with SLO.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pengfei; Goswami, Mayank; Zam, Azhar; Pugh, Edward N; Zawadzki, Robert J

    2015-12-15

    Scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (SLO) employs the eye's optics as a microscope objective for retinal imaging in vivo. The mouse retina has become an increasingly important object for investigation of ocular disease and physiology with optogenetic probes. SLO imaging of the mouse eye, in principle, can achieve submicron lateral resolution thanks to a numerical aperture (NA) of ∼0.5, about 2.5 times larger than that of the human eye. In the absence of adaptive optics, however, natural ocular aberrations limit the available optical resolution. The use of a contact lens, in principle, can correct many aberrations, permitting the use of a wider scanning beam and, thus, achieving greater resolution then would otherwise be possible. In this Letter, using an SLO equipped with a rigid contact lens, we report the effect of scanning beam size on the lateral resolution of mouse retinal imaging. Theory predicts that the maximum beam size full width at half-maximum (FWHM) that can be used without any deteriorating effects of aberrations is ∼0.6  mm. However, increasing the beam size up to the diameter of the dilated pupil is predicted to improve lateral resolution, though not to the diffraction limit. To test these predictions, the dendrites of a retinal ganglion cell expressing YFP were imaged, and transverse scans were analyzed to quantify the SLO system resolution. The results confirmed that lateral resolution increases with the beam size as predicted. With a 1.3 mm scanning beam and no high-order aberration correction, the lateral resolution is ∼1.15  μm, superior to that achievable by most human AO-SLO systems. Advantages of this approach include stabilization of the mouse eye and simplified optical design.

  8. Diode-pumped dual-wavelength Nd:LSO laser at 1059 and 1067  nm with nearly diffraction-limited beam quality.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiaoxu; Lan, Jinglong; Lin, Zhi; Wang, Yi; Xu, Bin; Xu, Huiying; Cai, Zhiping; Xu, Xiaodong; Zhang, Jian; Xu, Jun

    2016-04-10

    We report a diode-pumped continuous-wave simultaneous dual-wavelength Nd:LSO laser at 1059 and 1067 nm. By employing a specially coated output coupler with relatively high transmissions at high-gain emission lines of 1075 and 1079 nm, the two low-gain emission lines, 1059 and 1067 nm, can be achieved, for the first time to our knowledge, with maximum output power of 1.27 W and slope efficiency of about 29.2%. The output power is only limited by the available pump power. Output beam quality is also measured to be about 1.19 and 1.21 of the beam propagation factors in the x and y directions, respectively.

  9. Diode-pumped dual-wavelength Nd:LSO laser at 1059 and 1067  nm with nearly diffraction-limited beam quality.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiaoxu; Lan, Jinglong; Lin, Zhi; Wang, Yi; Xu, Bin; Xu, Huiying; Cai, Zhiping; Xu, Xiaodong; Zhang, Jian; Xu, Jun

    2016-04-10

    We report a diode-pumped continuous-wave simultaneous dual-wavelength Nd:LSO laser at 1059 and 1067 nm. By employing a specially coated output coupler with relatively high transmissions at high-gain emission lines of 1075 and 1079 nm, the two low-gain emission lines, 1059 and 1067 nm, can be achieved, for the first time to our knowledge, with maximum output power of 1.27 W and slope efficiency of about 29.2%. The output power is only limited by the available pump power. Output beam quality is also measured to be about 1.19 and 1.21 of the beam propagation factors in the x and y directions, respectively. PMID:27139868

  10. Molecules and Methods for Super-Resolution Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Michael A.; Biteen, Julie S.; Lord, Samuel J.; Conley, Nicholas R.; Moerner, W. E.

    2011-01-01

    By looking at a fluorescently labeled structure one molecule at a time, it is possible to side-step the optical diffraction limit and obtain “super-resolution” images of small nanostructures. In the Moerner Lab, we seek to develop both molecules and methods to extend super-resolution fluorescence imaging. Methodologies and protocols for designing and characterizing fluorophores with switchable fluorescence required for super-resolution imaging are reported. These fluorophores include azido-DCDHF molecules, covalently linked Cy3–Cy5 dimers, and also the first example of a photoswitchable fluorescent protein, enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (EYFP). The imaging of protein superstructures in living Caulobacter crescentus bacteria is used as an example of the power of super-resolution imaging by single-molecule photoswitching to extract information beyond the diffraction limit. Finally, a new method is described for obtaining three-dimensional super-resolution information using a double-helix point-spread function. PMID:20627152

  11. Solid-immersion fluorescence microscopy with increased emission and super resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Liau, Z. L.; Porter, J. M.; Liau, A. A.; Chen, J. J.; Salmon, W. C.; Sheu, S. S.

    2015-01-07

    We investigate solid-immersion fluorescence microscopy suitable for super-resolution nanotechnology and biological imaging, and have observed limit of resolution as small as 15 nm with microspheres, mitochondria, and chromatin fibers. We have further observed that fluorescence efficiency increases with excitation power density, implicating appreciable stimulated emission and increased resolution. We discuss potential advantages of the solid-immersion microscopy, including combined use with previously established super-resolution techniques for reaching deeper beyond the conventional diffraction limit.

  12. Refocusing resolution based on negative refractive-photonic crystal group with Ag defects for target detection and imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lian, Yingfei; Zhu, Na; Fang, Yuntuan; Sun, Jiwen; Chen, Junlv; Qian, Huili

    2015-03-01

    Negative refractive-photonic crystal (NR-PC) lenses that can exceed the diffraction limit of focus resolution for imaging and target detection in the near field have gotten more and more special attention in recent years. Three flat lens groups with Ag defects based on NR-PC are designed, and the focusing imaging in the NR-PC three flat lens groups is concluded with the extension of Snell's law, and the influence on the resolution for a target detection dynamic scanning scheme is simulated by using the finite difference time domain method. An optimal-doped structure with Ag defects is achieved by different simulation combinations. The refocusing resolution 0.18834λ is achieved in the optimal structure and there is approximately a 0.06806λ improvement in the refocusing resolution compared to those undoped with Ag (0.2564λ) it also possesses distinct smaller side-lobes than a single flat lens doped with Ag. This means the optimal detecting ability for the three NR-PC flat lens groups with Ag defects is more improved than that for a single undoped and doped with Ag. This is significant for the perfect imaging being achieved for a particle structure.

  13. A resolution commending the achievements and recognizing the importance of the Alliance to Save Energy on the 35th anniversary of the incorporation of the Alliance.

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Warner, Mark R. [D-VA

    2012-03-26

    04/18/2012 Resolution agreed to in Senate without amendment and with a preamble by Unanimous Consent. (text: CR S2517) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  14. Hybrid PDMS/glass microfluidics for high resolution imaging and application to sub-wavelength particle trapping.

    PubMed

    Tonin, Mario; Descharmes, Nicolas; Houdré, Romuald

    2016-02-01

    We demonstrate the fabrication of a hybrid PDMS/glass microfluidic layer that can be placed on top of non-transparent samples and allows high-resolution optical microscopy through it. The layer mimics a glass coverslip to limit optical aberrations and can be applied on the sample without the use of permanent bonding. The bonding strength can withstand to hold up to 7 bars of injected pressure in the channel without leaking or breaking. We show that this process is compatible with multilayer soft lithography for the implementation of flexible valves. The benefits of this application is illustrated by optically trapping sub-wavelength particles and manipulate them around photonic nano-structures. Among others, we achieve close to diffraction limited imaging through the microfluidic assembly, full control on the flow with no dynamical deformations of the membrane and a 20-fold improvement on the stiffness of the trap at equivalent trapping power.

  15. A Diffraction-limited Survey for Direct Detection of Halpha Emitting/Accreting ExtraSolar Planets with the 6.5m Magellan Telescope and the MagAO Visible AO system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Close, Laird

    steady diet of hydrogen gas. Such planets should then be quite bright in Halpha accretion emission. The key point is that: instead of a steep drop off in the luminosity of the planet’s atmosphere, the accretion luminosity of these planets will just linearly decrease with decreasing mass. At an accretion rate=6e-10 Msun/yr we find low mass (~1 Mjup) accreting gap planets are much (50-1000x) brighter (for 0-3.4 mag of Halpha extinction) in Halpha than at H band. PROOF-OF_CONCEPT: A 3 hour MagAO observation at Halpha of a transitional disk in April 2013 was made. The resulting deep diffraction-limited images discovered (at 10.5 sigma) an Halpha source that was 295% above the continuum just 0.083” from the star (edge of the inner 10 AU disk gap). We also detected (at 5 sigma) an excellent (though much fainter) ~1 Mjup mass Halpha planet candidate located auspiciously at the outer edge (145 AU) of the gap. If confirmed by our “second epoch” follow-up as common proper motion then this would be the lowest mass (~1 Mjup) planet ever imaged. SURVEY: Scaling off of this exciting success we propose to deeply image (120 min) all 14 nearby (D<250pc), bright (R<11 mag) , not edge-on (i<80 deg) , young (~5 Myr) transitional disks with MagAO simultaneously at Halpha and L’. In addition, we will use BrGamma instead of Halpha for 8 additional fainter (111 Mjup in mass, we integrate across our target list and find that, in the worst case of minimal masses (1+/-0.5 Mjup), and 3.4 mag extinction, at least seven ~1 Mjup planets should be discovered by this survey --meeting all three of our science goals above.

  16. High Resolution Imaging with AEOS

    SciTech Connect

    Patience, J; Macintosh, B A; Max, C E

    2001-08-27

    The U. S. Air Force Advanced Electro-Optical System (AEOS) which includes a 941 actuator adaptive optics system on a 3.7m telescope has recently been made available for astronomical programs. Operating at a wavelength of 750 nm, the diffraction-limited angular resolution of the system is 0.04 inches; currently, the magnitude limit is V {approx} 7 mag. At the distances of nearby open clusters, diffraction-limited images should resolve companions with separations as small as 4-6 AU--comparable to the Sun-Jupiter distance. The ability to study such close separations is critical, since most companions are expected to have separations in the few AU to tens of AU range. With the exceptional angular resolution of the current AEOS setup, but restricted target magnitude range, we are conducting a companion search of a large, well-defined sample of bright early-type stars in nearby open clusters and in the field. Our data set will both characterize this relatively new adaptive optics system and answer questions in binary star formation and stellar X-ray activity. We will discuss our experience using AEOS, the data analysis involved, and our initial results.

  17. 120nm resolution in thick samples with structured illumination and adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Benjamin; Sloan, Megan; Wolstenholme, Adrian J.; Kner, Peter

    2014-03-01

    μLinear Structured Illumination Microscopy (SIM) provides a two-fold increase over the diffraction limited resolution. SIM produces excellent images with 120nm resolution in tissue culture cells in two and three dimensions. For SIM to work correctly, the point spread function (PSF) and optical transfer function (OTF) must be known, and, ideally, should be unaberrated. When imaging through thick samples, aberrations will be introduced into the optical system which will reduce the peak intensity and increase the width of the PSF. This will lead to reduced resolution and artifacts in SIM images. Adaptive optics can be used to correct the optical wavefront restoring the PSF to its unaberrated state, and AO has been used in several types of fluorescence microscopy. We demonstrate that AO can be used with SIM to achieve 120nm resolution through 25m of tissue by imaging through the full thickness of an adult C. elegans roundworm. The aberrations can be corrected over a 25μm × 45μm field of view with one wavefront correction setting, demonstrating that AO can be used effectively with widefield superresolution techniques.

  18. High Resolution Imaging with Adaptive Optics at the Multiple Mirror Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd-Hart, M.; McLeod, B. A.; Wittman, D.; Colucci, D.; McCarthy, D. W.; Angel, R.; Dekany, R.

    1992-12-01

    We present the latest results from an adaptive optics program being implemented at the MMT using a six element adaptive mirror. The tilt of the wavefront over each of the six telescopes is determined with a Shack-Hartmann type sensor using a 24times 24 pixel low-noise CCD. This system allows the MMT to operate at a resolution of 0.3'' at 2 microns -- near the diffraction limit of the individual 1.8-m telescopes. This resolution can be obtained within ~ 1' of any star with visual magnitude < 16, allowing high-resolution near-IR imaging with a NICMOS2 array of a wide variety of targets, including high-redshift galaxies and young and evolved stars. This system can also be used with the MMT operated as a phased array telescope. In this mode, the piston errors between the telescopes are determined by examining the Fourier transform of the combined 2-micron image of the natural guide star using a fast-readout InSb array. In this configuration we have achieved a resolution of 0.075''. In good seeing we expect to obtain images of interest within the isoplanatic patch of guide stars with K magnitude <7. We acknowledge financial support from the NSF (AST92-03336) and the Flintridge Foundation. The adaptive mirror was donated by ThermoTrex Corp.

  19. Pushing back the limits of Raman imaging by coupling super-resolution and chemometrics for aerosols characterization

    PubMed Central

    Offroy, Marc; Moreau, Myriam; Sobanska, Sophie; Milanfar, Peyman; Duponchel, Ludovic

    2015-01-01

    The increasing interest in nanoscience in many research fields like physics, chemistry, and biology, including the environmental fate of the produced nano-objects, requires instrumental improvements to address the sub-micrometric analysis challenges. The originality of our approach is to use both the super-resolution concept and multivariate curve resolution (MCR-ALS) algorithm in confocal Raman imaging to surmount its instrumental limits and to characterize chemical components of atmospheric aerosols at the level of the individual particles. We demonstrate the possibility to go beyond the diffraction limit with this algorithmic approach. Indeed, the spatial resolution is improved by 65% to achieve 200 nm for the considered far-field spectrophotometer. A multivariate curve resolution method is then coupled with super-resolution in order to explore the heterogeneous structure of submicron particles for describing physical and chemical processes that may occur in the atmosphere. The proposed methodology provides new tools for sub-micron characterization of heterogeneous samples using far-field (i.e. conventional) Raman imaging spectrometer. PMID:26201867

  20. Pushing back the limits of Raman imaging by coupling super-resolution and chemometrics for aerosols characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Offroy, Marc; Moreau, Myriam; Sobanska, Sophie; Milanfar, Peyman; Duponchel, Ludovic

    2015-07-01

    The increasing interest in nanoscience in many research fields like physics, chemistry, and biology, including the environmental fate of the produced nano-objects, requires instrumental improvements to address the sub-micrometric analysis challenges. The originality of our approach is to use both the super-resolution concept and multivariate curve resolution (MCR-ALS) algorithm in confocal Raman imaging to surmount its instrumental limits and to characterize chemical components of atmospheric aerosols at the level of the individual particles. We demonstrate the possibility to go beyond the diffraction limit with this algorithmic approach. Indeed, the spatial resolution is improved by 65% to achieve 200 nm for the considered far-field spectrophotometer. A multivariate curve resolution method is then coupled with super-resolution in order to explore the heterogeneous structure of submicron particles for describing physical and chemical processes that may occur in the atmosphere. The proposed methodology provides new tools for sub-micron characterization of heterogeneous samples using far-field (i.e. conventional) Raman imaging spectrometer.

  1. High-resolution and ultra-thin endo-microscopy using a GRIN rod lens (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyung-Jin; Yoon, Changhyeong; Yang, Taeseok D.; Choi, Wonshik; Kim, Beop-Min; Choi, Youngwoon

    2016-03-01

    A graded-index (GRIN) lens is suitable for developing an ultra-thin endoscope due to its small diameter and simplicity for optics design. A GRIN lens, however, generates intrinsic optical aberration causing low resolution and poor imaging quality. Recently, wavefronts of light can be measured with very high precision and the optical aberration can be corrected in numerical ways even for the case of highly scattering media. In this study, based on the high precision wavefront sensing and numerical image processing techniques, we demonstrate a high-resolution and ultra-thin endo-microscope using a GRIN rod lens as a core imaging optics. We constructed a reflection-type interferometric microscope through a GRIN rod lens using a p-polarized Nd:YAG laser (532 nm) as a light source. By recording and processing blank transmission images as a function of various illumination states, the characteristics of the aberration generated by the GRIN lens were obtained. After this pre-calibration, we could numerically compensate the aberration induced onto a reflection image of an object. Consequently, a diffraction limited lateral resolution as well as improved axial resolution could be achieved. Our approach will fascinate the use of GRIN lenses for compact and high-resolution imaging devices including ultra-thin endo-microscopes.

  2. Modeling the Nucleus Laminaris of the Barn Owl: Achieving 20 ps Resolution on a 85-MHz-Clocked Digital Device

    PubMed Central

    Salomon, Ralf; Heinrich, Enrico; Joost, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    The nucleus laminaris of the barn owl auditory system is quite impressive, since its underlying time estimation is much better than the processing speed of the involved neurons. Since precise localization is also very important in many technical applications, this paper explores to what extent the main principles of the nucleus laminaris can be implemented in digital hardware. The first prototypical implementation yields a time resolution of about 20 ps, even though the chosen standard, low-cost device is clocked at only 85 MHz, which leads to an internal duty cycle of approximately 12 ns. In addition, this paper also explores the utility of an advanced sampling scheme, known as unfolding-in-time. It turns out that with this sampling method, the prototype can easily process input signals of up to 300 MHz, which is almost four times higher than the sampling rate. PMID:22347179

  3. Modeling the Nucleus Laminaris of the Barn Owl: Achieving 20 ps Resolution on a 85-MHz-Clocked Digital Device.

    PubMed

    Salomon, Ralf; Heinrich, Enrico; Joost, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    The nucleus laminaris of the barn owl auditory system is quite impressive, since its underlying time estimation is much better than the processing speed of the involved neurons. Since precise localization is also very important in many technical applications, this paper explores to what extent the main principles of the nucleus laminaris can be implemented in digital hardware. The first prototypical implementation yields a time resolution of about 20 ps, even though the chosen standard, low-cost device is clocked at only 85 MHz, which leads to an internal duty cycle of approximately 12 ns. In addition, this paper also explores the utility of an advanced sampling scheme, known as unfolding-in-time. It turns out that with this sampling method, the prototype can easily process input signals of up to 300 MHz, which is almost four times higher than the sampling rate. PMID:22347179

  4. Assessing resolution in super-resolution imaging.

    PubMed

    Demmerle, Justin; Wegel, Eva; Schermelleh, Lothar; Dobbie, Ian M

    2015-10-15

    Resolution is a central concept in all imaging fields, and particularly in optical microscopy, but it can be easily misinterpreted. The mathematical definition of optical resolution was codified by Abbe, and practically defined by the Rayleigh Criterion in the late 19th century. The limit of conventional resolution was also achieved in this period, and it was thought that fundamental constraints of physics prevented further increases in resolution. With the recent development of a range of super-resolution techniques, it is necessary to revisit the concept of optical resolution. Fundamental differences in super-resolution modalities mean that resolution is not a directly transferrable metric between techniques. This article considers the issues in resolution raised by these new technologies, and presents approaches for comparing resolution between different super-resolution methods.

  5. Design and evaluation of new color-corrected rigid endomicroscopic high NA GRIN-objectives with a sub-micron resolution and large field of view.

    PubMed

    Matz, Gregor; Messerschmidt, Bernhard; Gross, Herbert

    2016-05-16

    We demonstrate new GRIN-based endomicroscopic objectives for high resolution single photon fluorescence imaging modalities. Two endoscopic optical design approaches are presented in detail utilizing firstly diffractive and secondly refractive optical elements for the color correction in a spectral range from 488 nm to 550 nm. They are compared with their precursor device experimentally and by simulation. Inherent aberrations for off-axis field points could be lowered remarkably compared with the values of the state-of-the-art system by increasing the intrinsic optical complexity but maintaining the outer spatial dimensions. As a result, those presented objectives predict a diffraction-limited imaging of objects up to 300 μm in diameter with a numerical aperture of 0.8 while keeping an overall outer diameter of the assembly at 1.4 mm. Lastly, confocal fluorescence imaging experiments focus on the comparison between the numerical predicted and the practically achieved quality parameters. PMID:27409921

  6. Achieving quasi-adiabatic thermal environment to maximize resolution power in very high-pressure liquid chromatography: Theory, models, and experiments.

    PubMed

    Gritti, Fabrice; Gilar, Martin; Jarrell, Joseph A

    2016-04-29

    A cylindrical vacuum chamber (inner diameter 5 cm) housing a narrow-bore 2.1 mm×100 mm column packed with 1.8 μm HSS-T3 fully porous particles was built in order to isolate thermally the chromatographic column from the external air environment. Consistent with statistical physics and the mean free path of air molecules, the experimental results show that natural air convection and conduction are fully eliminated for housing air pressures smaller than 10(-4) Torr. Heat radiation is minimized by wrapping up the column with low-emissivity aluminum-tape (emissivity coefficient ϵ=0.03 vs. 0.28 for polished stainless steel 316). Overall, the heat flux at the column wall is reduced by 96% with respect to standard still-air ovens. From a practical viewpoint, the efficiency of the column run at a flow rate of 0.6 mL/min at a constant 13,000 psi pressure drop (the viscous heat power is around 9 W/m) is improved by up to 35% irrespective of the analyte retention. Models of heat and mass transfer reveal that (1) the amplitude of the radial temperature gradient is significantly reduced from 0.30 to 0.01 K and (2) the observed improvement in resolution power stems from a more uniform distribution of the flow velocity across the column diameter. The eddy dispersion term in the van Deemter equation is reduced by 0.8±0.1 reduced plate height unit, a significant gain in column performance.

  7. Achieving quasi-adiabatic thermal environment to maximize resolution power in very high-pressure liquid chromatography: Theory, models, and experiments.

    PubMed

    Gritti, Fabrice; Gilar, Martin; Jarrell, Joseph A

    2016-04-29

    A cylindrical vacuum chamber (inner diameter 5 cm) housing a narrow-bore 2.1 mm×100 mm column packed with 1.8 μm HSS-T3 fully porous particles was built in order to isolate thermally the chromatographic column from the external air environment. Consistent with statistical physics and the mean free path of air molecules, the experimental results show that natural air convection and conduction are fully eliminated for housing air pressures smaller than 10(-4) Torr. Heat radiation is minimized by wrapping up the column with low-emissivity aluminum-tape (emissivity coefficient ϵ=0.03 vs. 0.28 for polished stainless steel 316). Overall, the heat flux at the column wall is reduced by 96% with respect to standard still-air ovens. From a practical viewpoint, the efficiency of the column run at a flow rate of 0.6 mL/min at a constant 13,000 psi pressure drop (the viscous heat power is around 9 W/m) is improved by up to 35% irrespective of the analyte retention. Models of heat and mass transfer reveal that (1) the amplitude of the radial temperature gradient is significantly reduced from 0.30 to 0.01 K and (2) the observed improvement in resolution power stems from a more uniform distribution of the flow velocity across the column diameter. The eddy dispersion term in the van Deemter equation is reduced by 0.8±0.1 reduced plate height unit, a significant gain in column performance. PMID:27040511

  8. Optimized multiplexing super resolution imaging based on a Fourier ptychographic microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jiasong; Chen, Qian; Zhang, Yuzhen; Zuo, Chao; Feng, Shijie; Hu, Yan; Zhang, Jialin

    2015-10-01

    Fourier ptychographic microscopy (FPM) is a recently developed super-resolution technique by using angularly varying illumination and a phase retrieval algorithm to surpass the diffraction limit of the objective lens. To be specific, FP captures a set of low-resolution (LR) images under angularly varying illuminations, and combines them into one high-resolution (HR) image in the Fourier domain. However, the long capturing process becomes an obvious limitation since there are large number of images need to be acquired. Furthermore, the time can be increased several times over in order to acquire high-dynamic range images. Utilizing the multiplexing principle, we propose an optimized multiplexing FP algorithm, which is highly efficient, to shorten the exposure time of each raw image in this work. High acquisition efficiency is achieved by employing two set of optimized multiplexing patterns for bright-field and dark-field imaging respectively. Experimental results demonstrated that this method could improve the quality of reconstructed HR intensity distributions in a faster measuring process.

  9. Optical Analysis of an Ultra-High resolution Two-Mirror Soft X-Ray Microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shealy, David L.; Wang, Cheng; Hoover, Richard B.

    1994-01-01

    This work has summarized for a Schwarzschild microscope some relationships between numerical aperture (NA), magnification, diameter of the primary mirror, radius of curvature of the secondary mirror, and the total length of the microscope. To achieve resolutions better than a spherical Schwarzschild microscope of 3.3 Lambda for a perfectly aligned and fabricated system. it is necessary to use aspherical surfaces to control higher-order aberrations. For an NA of 0.35, the aspherical Head microscope provides diffraction limited resolution of 1.4 Lambda where the aspherical surfaces differ from the best fit spherical surface by approximately 1 micrometer. However, the angle of incidence varies significantly over the primary and the secondary mirrors, which will require graded multilayer coatings to operate near peak reflectivities. For higher numerical apertures, the variation of the angle of incidence over the secondary mirror surface becomes a serious problem which must be solved before multilayer coatings can be used for this application. Tolerance analysis of the spherical Schwarzschild microscope has shown that water window operations will require 2-3 times tighter tolerances to achieve a similar performance for operations with 130 A radiation. Surface contour errors have been shown to have a significant impact on the MTF and must be controlled to a peak-to-valley variation of 50-100 A and a frequency of 8 periods over the surface of a mirror.

  10. Super-resolution photoacoustic imaging of single gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seunghyun; Kwon, Owoong; Jeon, Mansik; Song, Jaejung; Jo, Minguk; Kim, Sungjee; Son, Junwoo; Kim, Yunseok; Kim, Chulhong

    2016-03-01

    Photoacoustic imaging (PAI) is an emerging hybrid imaging modality that can provide a strong optical absorption contrast using the photoacoustic (PA) effect, and breaks through the fundamental imaging depth limit of existing optical microscopy such as optical coherence tomography (OCT), confocal or two-photon microscopy. In PAI, a short-pulsed laser is illuminated to the tissue, and the PA waves are generated by thermoelastic expansion. Despite the high lateral resolution of optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM) thanks to the tight optical focus, the lateral resolution of OR-PAM is limited to the optical diffraction limit, which is approximately a half of the excitation wavelength. Here, we demonstrate a new super-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (SR-PAM) system by breaking the optical diffraction limit. The conventional microscopes with nanoscale resolutions such as a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) are typically used to image the structures of nanomaterials, but these systems should work in a high vacuum environment and cannot provide the optical properties of the materials. Our newly developed SR-PAM system provides the optical properties with a nanoscale resolution in a normal atmosphere. We have photoacoustically imaged single gold nanoparticles with an average size of 80 nm in diameter and shown their PA expansion properties individually. The lateral resolution of this system was approximately 20 nm. Therefore, this tool will provide an unprecedented optical absorption property with an accurate nanoscale resolution and greatly impact on materials science and nanotechnology field.

  11. Large area super-resolution chemical imaging via rapid dithering of a nanoprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Languirand, Eric R.; Cullum, Brian M.

    2015-05-01

    Super-resolution chemical imaging via Raman spectroscopy provides a significant ability to simultaneously or pseudosimultaneously monitor numerous label-free analytes while elucidating their spatial distribution on the surface of the sample. However, spontaneous Raman is an inherently weak phenomenon making trace detection and thus superresolution imaging extremely difficult, if not impossible. To circumvent this and allow for trace detection of the few chemical species present in any sub-diffraction limited resolution element of an image, we have developed a surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) coherent fiber-optic imaging bundle probe consisting of 30,000 individual fiber elements. When the probes are tapered, etched and coated with metal, they provide circular Raman chemical images of a sample with a field of view of approximately 20μm (i.e. diameter) via the array of 30,000 individual 50 nm fiber elements. An acousto-optic tunable filter is used to rapidly scan or select discrete frequencies for multi- or hyperspectral analysis. Although the 50nm fiber element dimensions of this probe inherently provide spatial resolutions of approximately 100nm, further increases in the spatial resolution can be achieved by using a rapid dithering process. Using this process, additional images are obtained one-half fiber diameter translations in the x- and y- planes. A piezostage drives the movement, providing the accurate and reproducible shifts required for dithering. Optimal probability algorithms are then used to deconvolute the related images producing a final image with a three-fold increase in spatial resolution. This paper describes super-resolution chemical imaging using these probes and the dithering method as well as its potential applications in label-free imaging of lipid rafts and other applications within biology and forensics.

  12. The radio remnant of Supernova 1987A at high frequencies and high resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanardo, G.; Staveley-Smith, L.; Ng, C.-Y.; Gaensler, B. M.; Potter, T. M.; Manchester, R. N.; Tzioumis, A. K.

    2014-01-01

    As the remnant of Supernova (SN) 1987A has been getting brighter over time, new observations at high frequencies have allowed imaging of the radio emission at unprecedented detail. We present a new radio image at 44 GHz of the supernova remnant (SNR), derived from observations performed with the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) in 2011. The diffraction-limited image has a resolution of 349×225 mas, which is the highest achieved to date in high-dynamic range images of the SNR. We also present a new image at 18 GHz, also derived from ATCA observations performed in 2011, which is super-resolved to 0''.25. The new 44 and 18 GHz images yield the first high-resolution spectral index map of the remnant. The comparison of the 44 GHz image with contemporaneous X-ray and Hα observations allows further investigations of the nature of the remnant asymmetry and sheds more light into the progenitor hypotheses and SN explosion. In light of simple free-free absorption models, we discuss the likelihood of detecting at 44 GHz the possible emission originating from a pulsar wind nebula (PWN) or a compact source in the centre of the remnant.

  13. High-resolution laser direct writing with a plasmonic contact probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Howon; Kim, Yongwoo; Kim, Seok; Jang, Jinhee; Hahn, Jae W.

    2012-03-01

    We developed a contact-probe-based laser direct writing technique with nanometer scale resolution. The probe uses a solid-immersion-lens (SIL) or a bowtie nano-aperture to enhance the resolution in laser direct writing method and scans sample surface in contact mode for high scan speed. The bowtie shaped nano-aperture is fabricated by focused ion beam (FIB) milling on the metal film coated on cantilever type probe tip and dielectric material (Diamond-like carbon) is covered the probe for surface protection. Using a plasmonic contact probe, we obtained an optical spot beyond the diffraction limit and the size of spot was less than 30 nm at 405 nm wavelength. The proposed probe is integrated with a conventional laser direct writing system and by getting rid of external gap control unit for near-field writing, we achieved high scan speed (~10 mm/s). The raster scan mode for the arbitrary patterning was developed for practical applications. Furthermore, we designed developing a parallel maskless writing system for high throughput with an array of contact probes.

  14. Super-resolution of fluorescence-free plasmonic nanoparticles using enhanced dark-field illumination based on wavelength-modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Peng; Lee, Seungah; Yu, Hyunung; Fang, Ning; Ho Kang, Seong

    2015-06-01

    Super-resolution imaging of fluorescence-free plasmonic nanoparticles (NPs) was achieved using enhanced dark-field (EDF) illumination based on wavelength-modulation. Indistinguishable adjacent EDF images of 103-nm gold nanoparticles (GNPs), 40-nm gold nanorods (GNRs), and 80-nm silver nanoparticles (SNPs) were modulated at their wavelengths of specific localized surface plasmon scattering. The coordinates (x, y) of each NP were resolved by fitting their point spread functions with a two-dimensional Gaussian. The measured localization precisions of GNPs, GNRs, and SNPs were 2.5 nm, 5.0 nm, and 2.9 nm, respectively. From the resolved coordinates of NPs and the corresponding localization precisions, super-resolution images were reconstructed. Depending on the spontaneous polarization of GNR scattering, the orientation angle of GNRs in two-dimensions was resolved and provided more elaborate localization information. This novel fluorescence-free super-resolution method was applied to live HeLa cells to resolve NPs and provided remarkable sub-diffraction limit images.

  15. Super-resolution of fluorescence-free plasmonic nanoparticles using enhanced dark-field illumination based on wavelength-modulation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Peng; Lee, Seungah; Yu, Hyunung; Fang, Ning; Ho Kang, Seong

    2015-01-01

    Super-resolution imaging of fluorescence-free plasmonic nanoparticles (NPs) was achieved using enhanced dark-field (EDF) illumination based on wavelength-modulation. Indistinguishable adjacent EDF images of 103-nm gold nanoparticles (GNPs), 40-nm gold nanorods (GNRs), and 80-nm silver nanoparticles (SNPs) were modulated at their wavelengths of specific localized surface plasmon scattering. The coordinates (x, y) of each NP were resolved by fitting their point spread functions with a two-dimensional Gaussian. The measured localization precisions of GNPs, GNRs, and SNPs were 2.5 nm, 5.0 nm, and 2.9 nm, respectively. From the resolved coordinates of NPs and the corresponding localization precisions, super-resolution images were reconstructed. Depending on the spontaneous polarization of GNR scattering, the orientation angle of GNRs in two-dimensions was resolved and provided more elaborate localization information. This novel fluorescence-free super-resolution method was applied to live HeLa cells to resolve NPs and provided remarkable sub-diffraction limit images. PMID:26074302

  16. Imaging cellular structures in super-resolution with SIM, STED and Localisation Microscopy: A practical comparison

    PubMed Central

    Wegel, Eva; Göhler, Antonia; Lagerholm, B. Christoffer; Wainman, Alan; Uphoff, Stephan; Kaufmann, Rainer; Dobbie, Ian M.

    2016-01-01

    Many biological questions require fluorescence microscopy with a resolution beyond the diffraction limit of light. Super-resolution methods such as Structured Illumination Microscopy (SIM), STimulated Emission Depletion (STED) microscopy and Single Molecule Localisation Microscopy (SMLM) enable an increase in image resolution beyond the classical diffraction-limit. Here, we compare the individual strengths and weaknesses of each technique by imaging a variety of different subcellular structures in fixed cells. We chose examples ranging from well separated vesicles to densely packed three dimensional filaments. We used quantitative and correlative analyses to assess the performance of SIM, STED and SMLM with the aim of establishing a rough guideline regarding the suitability for typical applications and to highlight pitfalls associated with the different techniques. PMID:27264341

  17. High Resolution Imaging of Io's Volcanoes with LBTI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conrad, Al; Leisenring, Jarron; de Kleer, Katherine; Skemer, Andy; Hinz, Philip; Skrutskie, Michael; Veillet, Christian; de Pater, Imke; Bertero, Mario; Boccacci, Patrizia; Defrère, Denis; Hofmann, Karl-Heinz; La Camera, Andrea; Schertl, Dieter; Spencer, John; Weigelt, Gerd; Woodward, Charles E.

    2014-11-01

    The Large Binocular Telescope (LBT), located on Mount Graham in eastern Arizona, employs two 8.4 meter mirrors with a 14.4 center-to-center separation on a common mount. Coherent combination of these two AO-corrected apertures via the LBT Interferometer (LBTI) produces Fizeau interferometric images with spatial resolution consistent with the diffraction limit of the 22.8-meter aperture. In particular LBTI resolves thermal signatures (i.e., features observed at M-band) on the surface of Io down to ~150 kilometers; a two-fold improvement over what has previously been possible from the ground. We show images collected with LBTI on December 24, 2013, in which Loki's shape is clearly resolved and at least fourteen additional volcanic hot spots are detected.We analyze three locations in the LBTI data: emission features within Loki Patera, the area near Rarog and Heno Patarae, and a hot spot seen in the Colchis Regio.For Loki Patera, we interpret spatially resolved variation in the emission within that region. With M-band resolution that is comparable to what has previously been achievable only at K-band, we compare localized emission features with what has been seen in earlier observations at shorter wavelengths.Thermal emission from activity at Rarog and Heno Patarae is well resolved in these images, while a third hot-spot in the nearby Lerna Regio is also clearly resolved. This area is of special interest since it was the site of two high-effusion outbursts on August 15th, 2013 [de Pater et al. (2014) Icarus].Lastly, we explore a hot-spot seen in the Colchis Regio that may be a remnant of a violent outburst detected on August 29th, 2013 [de Kleer et al. (2014) Icarus].

  18. Super-resolution optical microscopy by using dielectric microwires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darafsheh, Arash; Wu, Gaoxiang; Yang, Shu; Finlay, Jarod C.

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate that super-resolution imaging of specimens containing sub-diffraction-limited features is feasible by using dielectric microwires fabricated through capillary force lithography followed by photopatterning. As supplementary micron scale cylindrical lenses, we fabricated uniform-sized microwires with and 5 and 10 μm diameters and refractive index ~1.3-1.6. The microwires are placed in contact with the specimen to collect the information of the sub-wavelength features of the specimen and transmit them to the far-field with magnification enabling imaging with two-fold resolution improvement. Potential applications of our imaging technique include biological imaging, microfluidics, and nanophotonics applications.

  19. A general strategy for developing cell-permeable photo-modulatable organic fluorescent probes for live-cell super-resolution imaging

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Deng; Hu, Zhe; Qiu, Fengwu; Huang, Zhen-Li; Ma, Yilong; Wang, Yina; Qin, Lingsong; Zhang, Zhihong; Zeng, Shaoqun; Zhang, Yu-Hui

    2014-01-01

    Single-molecule localization microscopy (SMLM) achieves super-resolution imaging beyond the diffraction limit but critically relies on the use of photo-modulatable fluorescent probes. Here we report a general strategy for constructing cell-permeable photo-modulatable organic fluorescent probes for live-cell SMLM by exploiting the remarkable cytosolic delivery ability of a cell-penetrating peptide (rR)3R2. We develop photo-modulatable organic fluorescent probes consisting of a (rR)3R2 peptide coupled to a cell-impermeable organic fluorophore and a recognition unit. Our results indicate that these organic probes are not only cell permeable but can also specifically and directly label endogenous targeted proteins. Using the probes, we obtain super-resolution images of lysosomes and endogenous F-actin under physiological conditions. We resolve the dynamics of F-actin with 10 s temporal resolution in live cells and discern fine F-actin structures with diameters of ~80 nm. These results open up new avenues in the design of fluorescent probes for live-cell super-resolution imaging. PMID:25410769

  20. Translation Microscopy (TRAM) for super-resolution imaging

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Zhen; Wilson, Rhodri S; Liu, Yuewei; R Dun, Alison; Saleeb, Rebecca S; Liu, Dongsheng; Rickman, Colin; Frame, Margaret; Duncan, Rory R; Lu, Weiping

    2016-01-01

    Super-resolution microscopy is transforming our understanding of biology but accessibility is limited by its technical complexity, high costs and the requirement for bespoke sample preparation. We present a novel, simple and multi-color super-resolution microscopy technique, called translation microscopy (TRAM), in which a super-resolution image is restored from multiple diffraction-limited resolution observations using a conventional microscope whilst translating the sample in the image plane. TRAM can be implemented using any microscope, delivering up to 7-fold resolution improvement. We compare TRAM with other super-resolution imaging modalities, including gated stimulated emission deletion (gSTED) microscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM). We further developed novel ‘ground-truth’ DNA origami nano-structures to characterize TRAM, as well as applying it to a multi-color dye-stained cellular sample to demonstrate its fidelity, ease of use and utility for cell biology. PMID:26822455

  1. Resolution of sleepiness and fatigue: a comparison of bupropion and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors in subjects with major depressive disorder achieving remission at doses approved in the European Union.

    PubMed

    Cooper, James A; Tucker, Vivian L; Papakostas, George I

    2014-02-01

    Unlike selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), bupropion may be classified as a dual noradrenaline and dopamine reuptake inhibitor, a difference with potential implications for the treatment of residual sleepiness and fatigue in major depressive disorder (MDD). Post-hoc analysis of subjects with remitted MDD was performed on data pooled from six double-blind, randomized trials comparing the European Union (EU)-approved dose of ≤300 mg/day bupropion with SSRIs (sertraline, paroxetine or escitalopram) for the resolution of sleepiness and fatigue. Hypersomnia score was defined as the sum of scores of the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS) items 22, 23, and 24; fatigue score as HDRS item 13 score; and remission as HDRS-17≤7. Similar proportions of bupropion- and SSRI-treated subjects achieved remission at study endpoint (169/343, 49.3% vs 324/656, 49.4%; last observation carried forward (LOCF), p=0.45). Fewer bupropion-treated remitters had residual symptoms of sleepiness (32/169, 18.9% vs 104/324, 32.1%; p<0.01) and fatigue (33/169, 19.5% vs 98/324, 30.2%; p<0.05). Bupropion-treated remitters also showed greater improvement (mean change from baseline) in sleepiness (p<0.05) and fatigue scores (p<0.01) at endpoint: benefits were evident from week 2 for sleepiness (p<0.01) and week 4 for fatigue (p<0.01). Bupropion treatment at the EU-approved dose of ≤300 mg/day may offer advantages over SSRIs in the resolution of sleepiness and fatigue in remitted MDD patients.

  2. Illustration of the use of multimode deformable plane mirrors to record high-resolution concave gratings: results for the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph gratings of the Hubble Space Telescope.

    PubMed

    Duban, M; Dohlen, K; Lemaitre, G R

    1998-11-01

    To illustrate the efficiency of using a deformable plane mirror to record holographic gratings, we have computed the three gratings for the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph. Their working conditions are severe, since they have to correct the residual spherical aberration of the Hubble Space Telescope. Nevertheless, all images obtained are largely diffraction limited with regard to the resolution.

  3. Illustration of the use of multimode deformable plane mirrors to record high-resolution concave gratings: results for the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph gratings of the Hubble Space Telescope.

    PubMed

    Duban, M; Dohlen, K; Lemaitre, G R

    1998-11-01

    To illustrate the efficiency of using a deformable plane mirror to record holographic gratings, we have computed the three gratings for the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph. Their working conditions are severe, since they have to correct the residual spherical aberration of the Hubble Space Telescope. Nevertheless, all images obtained are largely diffraction limited with regard to the resolution. PMID:18301548

  4. Focal plane actuation for the development of a high resolution suborbital telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duke Miller, Alex; Scowen, Paul A.; Veach, Todd

    2016-01-01

    We present a hexapod stabilized focal plane as the key instrument for a proposed suborbital balloon mission. Balloon gondolas currently achieve 1-2 arcsecond pointing error, but cannot correct for unavoidable jitter movements (~50μm at 20hz) caused by wind rushing over balloon surfaces, thermal variations, cryocoolers, and reaction wheels. The jitter causes image blur during exposures and is the limiting resolution of the system. To solve this, the hexapod system actuates the focal plane to counteract the jitter through real-time closed loop feedback from star-trackers. Removal of this final jitter term decreases pointing error by an order of magnitude and allows for true diffraction-limited observation. This boost in resolution will allow for Hubble-quality imaging for a fraction of the cost. Tip-tilt pointing systems have been used for these purposes in the past, but require additional optics and introduce multiple reflections. The hexapod system, rather, is compact and can be plugged into the focal point of nearly any configuration. The design also thermally isolates the hexapod from the cryogenic focal plane enabling the use of well-established non-cryogenic hexapod technology. High-resolution time domain multispectral imaging of the gas giant outer planets, especially in the UV range, is of particular interest to the planetary community, and a suborbital telescope with the hexapod stabilization in place would provide a wealth of new data. On an Antarctic ~100-day Long-Duration-Balloon mission the continued high-resolution imaging of gas giant storm systems would provide cloud formation and evolution data second to only a Flagship orbiter.

  5. Photo-imprint super-resolution photoacoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Junjie; Wang, Lidai; Li, Chiye; Zhang, Chi; Wang, Lihong V.

    2015-03-01

    Combining the absorption-based photoacoustic effect and intensity-dependent photobleaching effect, we demonstrate a simple method for super-resolution photoacoustic imaging of both fluorescent and non-fluorescent samples. Our method is based on a double-excitation process, where the first excitation pulse partially and inhomogeneously bleaches the molecules in the diffraction-limited excitation volume, thus biasing the signal contributions from a second excitation pulse striking the same region. By scanning the excitation beam, we performed three-dimensional sub-diffraction imaging of varied fluorescent and non-fluorescent species. A lateral resolution of 80 nm and an axial resolution of 370 nm have been demonstrated. This technique has the potential to enable label-free super-resolution imaging, and can be transferred to other optical imaging modalities or combined with other super-resolution methods.

  6. A simple, high efficiency, high resolution spectropolarimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barden, Samuel C.

    2012-09-01

    A simple concept is described that uses volume phase holographic gratings as polarizing dispersers for a high efficiency, high resolution spectropolarimeter. Although the idea has previously been mentioned in the literature as possible, such a concept has not been explored in detail. Performance analysis is presented for a VPHG spectropolarimeter concept that could be utilized for both solar and night-time astronomy. Instrumental peak efficiency can approach 100% with spectral dispersions permitting R~200,000 spectral resolution with diffraction limited telescopes. The instrument has 3-channels: two dispersed image planes with orthogonal polarization and an undispersed image plane. The concept has a range of versatility where it could be configured (with appropriate half-wave plates) for slit-fed spectroscopy or without slits for snapshot/hyperspectral/tomographic spectroscopic imaging. Multiplex gratings could also be used for the simultaneous recording of two separate spectral bands or multiple instruments could be daisy chained with beam splitters for further spectral coverage.

  7. Development of a measurement technique for ion distribution in an extended nanochannel by super-resolution-laser-induced fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Kazoe, Yutaka; Mawatari, Kazuma; Sugii, Yasuhiko; Kitamori, Takehiko

    2011-11-01

    Ion behavior confined in extended nanospace (10(1)-10(3) nm) is important for nanofluidics and nanochemistry with dominant surface effects. In this paper, we developed a new measurement technique of ion distribution in the nanochannel by super-resolution-laser-induced fluorescence. Stimulated emission depletion microscopy was used to achieve a spatial resolution of 87 nm higher than the diffraction limit. Fluorescein was used for ratiometric measurement of pH with two excitation wavelengths. The pH profile in a 2D nanochannel of 410 nm width and 405 nm depth was successfully measured at an uncertainty of 0.05. The excess protons, showing lower pH than the bulk, nonuniformly distributed in the nanochannel to cancel the negative charge of glass wall, especially when the electric double layer is thick compared to the channel size. The present study first revealed the ion distribution near the surface or in the nanochannel, which is directly related to the electric double layer. In addition, the obtained proton distribution is important to understand the nanoscale water structure between single molecules and continuum phase. This technique will greatly contribute to understanding the basic science in nanoscale and interfacial dynamics, which are strongly required to develop novel miniaturized systems for biochemical analysis and further applications.

  8. Super-resolution imaging with stochastic single-molecule localization: concepts, technical developments, and biological applications.

    PubMed

    Oddone, Anna; Vilanova, Ione Verdeny; Tam, Johnny; Lakadamyali, Melike

    2014-07-01

    Light microscopy has undergone a revolution with the advent of super-resolution microscopy methods that can surpass the diffraction limit. These methods have generated much enthusiasm, in particular with regards to the new possibilities they offer for biological imaging. The recent years have seen a great advancement both in terms of new technological developments and exciting biological applications. Here, we review some of the important milestones in the field and highlight some recent biological applications.

  9. Note on the classification of super-resolution in far-field microscopy and information theory.

    PubMed

    Passon, Oliver; Grebe-Ellis, Johannes

    2016-07-01

    In recent years, several far-field microscopy techniques have been developed which manage to overcome the diffraction limit of resolution. A unifying classification scheme for them is clearly desirable. We argue that existing schemes based on the information capacity of the optical system cannot easily be extended to cover, e.g., stimulated emission depletion microscopy or techniques based on single-molecule imaging. We suggest a classification based on a reconstruction of the Abbe limit.

  10. High resolution depth-resolved imaging from multi-focal images for medical ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Diamantis, Konstantinos; Dalgarno, Paul A; Greenaway, Alan H; Anderson, Tom; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Sboros, Vassilis

    2015-01-01

    An ultrasound imaging technique providing sub-diffraction limit axial resolution for point sources is proposed. It is based on simultaneously acquired multi-focal images of the same object, and on the image metric of sharpness. The sharpness is extracted by image data and presents higher values for in-focus images. The technique is derived from biological microscopy and is validated here with simulated ultrasound data. A linear array probe is used to scan a point scatterer phantom that moves in depth with a controlled step. From the beamformed responses of each scatterer position the image sharpness is assessed. Values from all positions plotted together form a curve that peaks at the receive focus, which is set during the beamforming. Selection of three different receive foci for each acquired dataset will result in the generation of three overlapping sharpness curves. A set of three calibration curves combined with the use of a maximum-likelihood algorithm is then able to estimate, with high precision, the depth location of any emitter fron each single image. Estimated values are compared with the ground truth demonstrating that an accuracy of 28.6 μm (0.13λ) is achieved for a 4 mm depth range. PMID:26737920

  11. High-resolution microspectrometer with an aberration-correcting planar grating.

    PubMed

    Grabarnik, Semen; Emadi, Arvin; Wu, Huaiwen; de Graaf, Ger; Wolffenbuttel, Reinoud F

    2008-12-01

    A concept for a highly miniaturized spectrometer featuring a two-component design is presented. The first component is a planar chip that integrates an input slit and aberration-correcting diffraction grating with an image sensor and is fabricated using microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technologies. Due to the fabrication in a simple MEMS batch process the essential elements of the spectrometer are automatically aligned, and a low fabrication cost per device can be achieved. The second component is a spherical mirror, which is the only external part. The optimized grating structure compensates for aberrations within the spectrometer operating range, resulting in a diffraction-limited performance of the spectrometer optics. The prototype of the device has been fabricated and characterized. It takes a volume of 0.5 cm(3) and provides a FWHM spectral resolution of 0.7 nm over a 350 nm bandwidth from 420 nm to 770 nm combined with an etendue of 7.4x10(-5) mm(2) sr. PMID:19037373

  12. High-resolution adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope with dual deformable mirrors for large aberration correction

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, D; Jones, S M; Silva, D A; Olivier, S S

    2007-01-25

    Scanning laser ophthalmoscopes with adaptive optics (AOSLO) have been shown previously to provide a noninvasive, cellular-scale view of the living human retina. However, the clinical utility of these systems has been limited by the available deformable mirror technology. In this paper, we demonstrate that the use of dual deformable mirrors can effectively compensate large aberrations in the human retina, making the AOSLO system a viable, non-invasive, high-resolution imaging tool for clinical diagnostics. We used a bimorph deformable mirror to correct low-order aberrations with relatively large amplitudes. The bimorph mirror is manufactured by Aoptix, Inc. with 37 elements and 18 {micro}m stroke in a 10 mm aperture. We used a MEMS deformable mirror to correct high-order aberrations with lower amplitudes. The MEMS mirror is manufactured by Boston Micromachine, Inc with 144 elements and 1.5 {micro}m stroke in a 3 mm aperture. We have achieved near diffraction-limited retina images using the dual deformable mirrors to correct large aberrations up to {+-} 3D of defocus and {+-} 3D of cylindrical aberrations with test subjects. This increases the range of spectacle corrections by the AO systems by a factor of 10, which is crucial for use in the clinical environment. This ability for large phase compensation can eliminate accurate refractive error fitting for the patients, which greatly improves the system ease of use and efficiency in the clinical environment.

  13. High resolution imaging system for Udaipur Solar Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayanna, A. Raja; Louis, Rohan Eugene; Kumar, Brajesh; Mathew, Shibu K.; Venkatakrishnan, P.

    2007-09-01

    A Multi-Application Solar Telescope (MAST) is proposed to be installed at the Udaipur Solar Observatory (USO) in India to monitor the Sun in optical and near infra-red wavelengths. The median value of the Fried's parameter at this site is 4 cm. USO is in the process of building an Adaptive optics (AO) system in order to have diffraction limited performance of the MAST under this moderate seeing condition. AO helps in achieving high-resolution imaging by compensating the atmospheric turbulence in real-time. We have performed simulations to evaluate the performance of AO for various seeing conditions. It was concluded that with the present availability of AO system components, a 55 cm aperture telescope would yield optimum performance with AO, in combination with post-processing techniques like speckle imaging and phase diversity. At present, we are developing a proto-type AO system at USO to demonstrate its performance with a 15 cm Coudé refracting telescope as a preparation for the main AO system to be deployed on the MAST. The prototype AO system is being realized in two phases. In the first phase, we have developed an image stabilization system to compensate the global tilt of the wave-front. The second phase consists of sensing and correcting the local tilts of the wave-front by integrating a micro-machined membrane deformable mirror with the image stabilization system and is currently in progress. Here, we present the details of our proto-type AO system. We also present preliminary results obtained from simulations using Phase Diversity as a post processing technique.

  14. A Conflict Resolution Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidson, John; Wood, Christine

    2004-01-01

    The Conflict Resolution Model was formulated by a group of Australian psychologists who set about integrating the literature on achieving mutually beneficial outcomes in a conflict situation in order to create a best-practice prescriptive process for conflict resolution. A number of experimental studies conducted at the University of Tasmania with…

  15. High-resolution full-field optical coherence tomography using high dynamic range image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leong-Hoï, A.; Claveau, R.; Montgomery, P. C.; Serio, B.; Uhring, W.; Anstotz, F.; Flury, M.

    2016-04-01

    Full-field optical coherence tomography (FF-OCT) based on white-light interference microscopy, is an emerging noninvasive imaging technique for characterizing biological tissue or optical scattering media with micrometer resolution. Tomographic images can be obtained by analyzing a sequence of interferograms acquired with a camera. This is achieved by scanning an interferometric microscope objectives along the optical axis and performing appropriate signal processing for fringe envelope extraction, leading to three-dimensional imaging over depth. However, noise contained in the images can hide some important details or induce errors in the size of these details. To firstly reduce temporal and spatial noise from the camera, it is possible to apply basic image post processing methods such as image averaging, dark frame subtraction or flat field division. It has been demonstrate that this can improve the quality of microscopy images by enhancing the signal to noise ratio. In addition, the dynamic range of images can be enhanced to improve the contrast by combining images acquired with different exposure times or light intensity. This can be made possible by applying a hybrid high dynamic range (HDR) technique, which is proposed in this paper. High resolution tomographic analysis is thus performed using a combination of the above-mentioned image processing techniques. As a result, the lateral resolution of the system can be improved so as to approach the diffraction limit of the microscope as well as to increase the power of detection, thus enabling new sub-diffraction sized structures contained in a transparent layer, initially hidden by the noise, to be detected.

  16. High resolution imaging at Palomar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.

    1992-01-01

    For the last two years we have embarked on a program of understanding the ultimate limits of ground-based optical imaging. We have designed and fabricated a camera specifically for high resolution imaging. This camera has now been pressed into service at the prime focus of the Hale 5 m telescope. We have concentrated on two techniques: the Non-Redundant Masking (NRM) and Weigelt's Fully Filled Aperture (FFA) method. The former is the optical analog of radio interferometry and the latter is a higher order extension of the Labeyrie autocorrelation method. As in radio Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI), both these techniques essentially measure the closure phase and, hence, true image construction is possible. We have successfully imaged binary stars and asteroids with angular resolution approaching the diffraction limit of the telescope and image quality approaching that of a typical radio VLBI map. In addition, we have carried out analytical and simulation studies to determine the ultimate limits of ground-based optical imaging, the limits of space-based interferometric imaging, and investigated the details of imaging tradeoffs of beam combination in optical interferometers.

  17. Nonlinear spectroscopy in the near-field: time resolved spectroscopy and subwavelength resolution non-invasive imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namboodiri, Mahesh; Khan, Tahirzeb; Karki, Khadga; Kazemi, Mehdi Mohammad; Bom, Sidhant; Flachenecker, Günter; Namboodiri, Vinu; Materny, Arnulf

    2014-04-01

    The combination of near-field microscopy along with nonlinear optical spectroscopic techniques is presented here. The scanning near-field imaging technique can be integrated with nonlinear spectroscopic techniques to improve spatial and axial resolution of the images. Additionally, ultrafast dynamics can be probed down to nano-scale dimension. The review shows some examples for this combination, which resulted in an exciton map and vibrational contrast images with sub-wavelength resolution. Results of two-color femtosecond time-resolved pump-probe experiments using scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM) on thin films of the organic semiconductor 3,4,9,10 Perylenetetracarboxylic dianhydride (PTCDA) are presented. While nonlinear Raman techniques have been used to obtain highly resolved images in combination with near-field microscopy, the use of femtosecond laser pulses in electronic resonance still constitutes a big challenge. Here, we present our first results on coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (fs-CARS) with femtosecond laser pulses detected in the near-field using SNOM. We demonstrate that highly spatially resolved images can be obtained from poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) nano-structures where the fs-CARS process was in resonance with the P3HT absorption and with characteristic P3HT vibrational modes without destruction of the samples. Sub-diffraction limited lateral resolution is achieved. Especially the height resolution clearly surpasses that obtained with standard microCARS. These results will be the basis for future investigations of mode-selective dynamics in the near-field.

  18. USGS aerial resolution targets.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Salamonowicz, P.H.

    1982-01-01

    It is necessary to measure the achievable resolution of any airborne sensor that is to be used for metric purposes. Laboratory calibration facilities may be inadequate or inappropriate for determining the resolution of non-photographic sensors such as optical-mechanical scanners, television imaging tubes, and linear arrays. However, large target arrays imaged in the field can be used in testing such systems. The USGS has constructed an array of resolution targets in order to permit field testing of a variety of airborne sensing systems. The target array permits any interested organization with an airborne sensing system to accurately determine the operational resolution of its system. -from Author

  19. Beholding the subcellular world in your PALM: nanometer resolution optical measurements of protein assemblies in cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shroff, Hari

    2012-02-01

    Key to understanding a protein's biological function is the accurate determination of its spatial distribution inside a cell. Although fluorescent protein markers enable specific targeting with molecular precision, much of this utility is lost when the resultant fusions are imaged with conventional, diffraction-limited optics. In response, several imaging modalities that rely on the stochastic activation and bleaching of single molecules, and that are capable of resolution 10x below the diffraction limit (250 nm for visible wavelengths), have emerged. This talk will cover superresolution imaging of biological structures using photoactivated localization microscopy (PALM). In addition to covering the theory, we will also discuss the use of the technique in understanding biological phenomena on the nanoscale, including the organization of bacterial chemoreceptors, the movement of actin in neuronal spines, and the stratification of focal adhesions.

  20. High Spatial Resolution Spectroscopy of Semiconductor Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Timothy D.; Gershoni, David; Pfeiffer, Loren N.

    1996-03-01

    Several recent reports employing high spatial resolution have revealed the dominance of exciton localization in the low temperature luminescence of semiconductor quantum structures.^[1-3] Understanding this localization is of critical importance for the reliable studies of low dimensional structures such as quantum wells, quantum wires and quantum dots. We report on low temperature and high spatial resolution photoluminescence and photoluminescence excitation studies of cleaved edge overgrown (CEO) single quantum wires. These samples permit the direct and unambiguous comparison between the optical properties of a (100) oriented quantum well, a (110) oriented quantum well, and the quantum wire which is formed at their intersection. Using low temperature near field optical spectroscopy, and a novel diffraction limited far field apparatus, we determine the carrier diffusion length dependence on pump wavelength and sample temperature in both the 2d systems and the genuinely 1D wire system. We also measure the absorption strength of the 1D system and find it to be a factor of 3 stronger than the absorption of the associated 2D systems.^[2] Using low temperature near field optical spectroscopy, and a novel diffraction limited far field apparatus, we also determine the carrier diffusion length dependence on pump wavelength and sample temperature. ^[1] H. F. Hess, E. Betzig, T. D. Harris, L. N. Pfeiffer, and K. W. West, Science 264, 1740 (1994). ^[2] T. D. Harris, D. Gershoni, R. D. Grober, L. Pfeiffer, K. West, and N. Chand, Appl. Phys. Lett, in press (1996) ^[3] D. Gammon, E. S. Snow, and D. S. Katzer, Appl. Phys. Lett. 67, 2391 (1995)

  1. Every good virtue you ever wanted in a Q-switched solid-state laser and more: Monolithic, diode-pumped, self-Q-switched, highly reproducible, diffraction-limited Nd:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y. C.; Lee, K. K.

    The applications of Q-switched lasers are well known, for example, laser radar, laser remote sensing, satellite orbit determination, Moon orbit and 'moon quake' determination, satellite laser communication, and many nonlinear optics applications. Most of the applications require additional properties of the Q-switched lasers, such as single-axial and/or single-transverse mode, high repetition rate, stable pulse shape and pulse width, or ultra compact and rugged oscillators. Furthermore, space based and airborne lasers for lidar and laser communication applications require efficient, compact, lightweight, long-lived, and stable-pulsed laser sources. Diode-pumped solid-state lasers (DPSSL) have recently shown the potential for satisfying all of these requirements. We will report on the operating characteristics of a diode-pumped, monolithic, self-Q-switched Cr,Nd:YAG laser where the chromium ions act as a saturable absorber for the laser emission at 1064 nm. The pulse duration is 3.5 ns and the output is highly polarized with an extinction ratio of 700:1. It is further shown that the output is single-longitudinal-mode with transform-limited spectral line width without pulse-to-pulse mode competition. Consequently, the pulse-to-pulse intensity fluctuation is less than the instrument resolution of 0.25 percent. This self-stabilization mechanism is because the lasing mode bleaches the distributed absorber and establishes a gain-loss grating similar to that used in the distributed feedback semiconductor lasers. A repetition rate above 5 KHz has also been demonstrated. For higher power, this laser can be used for injection seeding an amplifier (or amplifier chain) or injection locking of a power oscillator pumped by diode lasers. We will discuss some research directions on the master oscillator for higher output energy per pulse as well as how to scale the output power of the diode-pumped amplifier(s) to multi-kilowatt average power.

  2. Every Good Virtue You Ever Wanted in a Q-switched Solid-state Laser and More: Monolithic, Diode-pumped, Self-q-switched, Highly Reproducible, Diffraction-limited Nd:yag Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Y. C.; Lee, K. K.

    1993-01-01

    The applications of Q-switched lasers are well known, for example, laser radar, laser remote sensing, satellite orbit determination, Moon orbit and 'moon quake' determination, satellite laser communication, and many nonlinear optics applications. Most of the applications require additional properties of the Q-switched lasers, such as single-axial and/or single-transverse mode, high repetition rate, stable pulse shape and pulse width, or ultra compact and rugged oscillators. Furthermore, space based and airborne lasers for lidar and laser communication applications require efficient, compact, lightweight, long-lived, and stable-pulsed laser sources. Diode-pumped solid-state lasers (DPSSL) have recently shown the potential for satisfying all of these requirements. We will report on the operating characteristics of a diode-pumped, monolithic, self-Q-switched Cr,Nd:YAG laser where the chromium ions act as a saturable absorber for the laser emission at 1064 nm. The pulse duration is 3.5 ns and the output is highly polarized with an extinction ratio of 700:1. It is further shown that the output is single-longitudinal-mode with transform-limited spectral line width without pulse-to-pulse mode competition. Consequently, the pulse-to-pulse intensity fluctuation is less than the instrument resolution of 0.25 percent. This self-stabilization mechanism is because the lasing mode bleaches the distributed absorber and establishes a gain-loss grating similar to that used in the distributed feedback semiconductor lasers. A repetition rate above 5 KHz has also been demonstrated. For higher power, this laser can be used for injection seeding an amplifier (or amplifier chain) or injection locking of a power oscillator pumped by diode lasers. We will discuss some research directions on the master oscillator for higher output energy per pulse as well as how to scale the output power of the diode-pumped amplifier(s) to multi-kilowatt average power.

  3. High-resolution imaging of the Pluto-Charon system with the Faint Object Camera of the Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albrecht, R.; Barbieri, C.; Adorf, H.-M.; Corrain, G.; Gemmo, A.; Greenfield, P.; Hainaut, O.; Hook, R. N.; Tholen, D. J.; Blades, J. C.

    1994-01-01

    Images of the Pluto-Charon system were obtained with the Faint Object Camera (FOC) of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) after the refurbishment of the telescope. The images are of superb quality, allowing the determination of radii, fluxes, and albedos. Attempts were made to improve the resolution of the already diffraction limited images by image restoration. These yielded indications of surface albedo distributions qualitatively consistent with models derived from observations of Pluto-Charon mutual eclipses.

  4. Increasing FTIR spectromicroscopy speed and resolution through compressive imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Gallet, Julien; Riley, Michael; Hao, Zhao; Martin, Michael C

    2007-10-15

    At the Advanced Light Source at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, we are investigating how to increase both the speed and resolution of synchrotron infrared imaging. Synchrotron infrared beamlines have diffraction-limited spot sizes and high signal to noise, however spectral images must be obtained one point at a time and the spatial resolution is limited by the effects of diffraction. One technique to assist in speeding up spectral image acquisition is described here and uses compressive imaging algorithms. Compressive imaging can potentially attain resolutions higher than allowed by diffraction and/or can acquire spectral images without having to measure every spatial point individually thus increasing the speed of such maps. Here we present and discuss initial tests of compressive imaging techniques performed with ALS Beamline 1.4.3?s Nic-Plan infrared microscope, Beamline 1.4.4 Continuum XL IR microscope, and also with a stand-alone Nicolet Nexus 470 FTIR spectrometer.

  5. Improved Spatial Resolution for Reflection Mode Infrared Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bechtel, Hans A.; Martin, Michael C.; May, T.E.; Lerch, Philippe

    2009-10-09

    Standard commercial infrared microscopes operating in reflection mode use a mirror to direct the reflected light from the sample to the detector. This mirror blocks about half of the incident light, however, and thus degrades the spatial resolution by reducing the umerical aperture of the objective. Here, we replace the mirror with a 50% beamsplitter to allow full illumination of the objective and retain a way to direct the reflected light to the detector. The improved spatial resolution is demonstrated using two different microscopes apable of diffraction-limited resolution: the first microscope is coupled to a synchrotron source and utilizes a single point detector, whereas the second microscope has a standard blackbody source and uses a focal planetarray (FPA) detector.

  6. Efficient phase contrast imaging in STEM using a pixelated detector. Part 1: experimental demonstration at atomic resolution.

    PubMed

    Pennycook, Timothy J; Lupini, Andrew R; Yang, Hao; Murfitt, Matthew F; Jones, Lewys; Nellist, Peter D

    2015-04-01

    We demonstrate a method to achieve high efficiency phase contrast imaging in aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) with a pixelated detector. The pixelated detector is used to record the Ronchigram as a function of probe position which is then analyzed with ptychography. Ptychography has previously been used to provide super-resolution beyond the diffraction limit of the optics, alongside numerically correcting for spherical aberration. Here we rely on a hardware aberration corrector to eliminate aberrations, but use the pixelated detector data set to utilize the largest possible volume of Fourier space to create high efficiency phase contrast images. The use of ptychography to diagnose the effects of chromatic aberration is also demonstrated. Finally, the four dimensional dataset is used to compare different bright field detector configurations from the same scan for a sample of bilayer graphene. Our method of high efficiency ptychography produces the clearest images, while annular bright field produces almost no contrast for an in-focus aberration-corrected probe.

  7. High-density channel model and detection method for signal readout from super-resolution near-field structure discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosogai, Shota; Ansai, Tsutomu; Yoshinari, Takehisa; Tanabe, Takaya

    2016-09-01

    Although a readout method using the super-resolution near-field structure (super-RENS) effect can overcome diffraction limits, readout characteristics for greatly surpassed high-density conditions do not become clear, because a high-density channel function having a differential response property is superimposed on a normal readout function. We propose a high-density channel model to indicate the properties of the super-RENS effect directly. This model can be expressed as a differential response function using the finite impulse response (FIR) filter model. It expresses the super-RENS readout process, which is divided on the basis of recording densities such as high and normal Blu-ray Disc™ densities. We estimated the properties of super-RENS readout signals by comparison between theoretical expressions and experiments. Results show that good signal quality require readout signals having sharp peaks and smaller offsets. We also evaluated the channel model by adding an adaptive FIR filter and a Viterbi decoder by simulations. Results show that the super-RENS disc can achieve a fourfold higher recording density if the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) is improved to 6 dB in the case of partial response (PR) (1 + D + D 2).

  8. Efficient phase contrast imaging in STEM using a pixelated detector. Part 1: Experimental demonstration at atomic resolution

    DOE PAGES

    Pennycook, Timothy J.; Lupini, Andrew R.; Yang, Hao; Murfitt, Matthew F.; Jones, Lewys; Nellist, Peter D.

    2014-10-15

    In this paper, we demonstrate a method to achieve high efficiency phase contrast imaging in aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) with a pixelated detector. The pixelated detector is used to record the Ronchigram as a function of probe position which is then analyzed with ptychography. Ptychography has previously been used to provide super-resolution beyond the diffraction limit of the optics, alongside numerically correcting for spherical aberration. Here we rely on a hardware aberration corrector to eliminate aberrations, but use the pixelated detector data set to utilize the largest possible volume of Fourier space to create high efficiency phasemore » contrast images. The use of ptychography to diagnose the effects of chromatic aberration is also demonstrated. In conclusion, the four dimensional dataset is used to compare different bright field detector configurations from the same scan for a sample of bilayer graphene. Our method of high efficiency ptychography produces the clearest images, while annular bright field produces almost no contrast for an in-focus aberration-corrected probe.« less

  9. Efficient phase contrast imaging in STEM using a pixelated detector. Part 1: Experimental demonstration at atomic resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Pennycook, Timothy J.; Lupini, Andrew R.; Yang, Hao; Murfitt, Matthew F.; Jones, Lewys; Nellist, Peter D.

    2014-10-15

    In this paper, we demonstrate a method to achieve high efficiency phase contrast imaging in aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) with a pixelated detector. The pixelated detector is used to record the Ronchigram as a function of probe position which is then analyzed with ptychography. Ptychography has previously been used to provide super-resolution beyond the diffraction limit of the optics, alongside numerically correcting for spherical aberration. Here we rely on a hardware aberration corrector to eliminate aberrations, but use the pixelated detector data set to utilize the largest possible volume of Fourier space to create high efficiency phase contrast images. The use of ptychography to diagnose the effects of chromatic aberration is also demonstrated. In conclusion, the four dimensional dataset is used to compare different bright field detector configurations from the same scan for a sample of bilayer graphene. Our method of high efficiency ptychography produces the clearest images, while annular bright field produces almost no contrast for an in-focus aberration-corrected probe.

  10. Controllable fabrication of super-resolution nanocrater arrays by laser direct writing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yongsheng; Guo, Chuanfei; Cao, Sihai; Miao, Junjie; Ren, Tianling; Liu, Qian

    2010-11-01

    A super-resolution fabrication technique for highly-ordered nanocrater arrays is reported based on laser direct writing method. Nanocraters with diameters up to 40 nm, which is much smaller than the diffraction limit of laser system, are fabricated on titanium films using a 532 nm laser. The diameters of the craters are tunable from 350 nm to 40 nm, with a rigorous linear relationship versus the writing laser powers and an approximate linear relationship versus pulse widths. Laser ablation and oxidation are involved in formation mechanism and Gaussian distribution of laser energy density is proposed to play a key role of super-resolution structures. PMID:21137881

  11. Lateral resolution improvement of laser-scanning imaging for nano defects detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokozeki, Hiroki; Kudo, Ryota; Takahashi, Satoru; Takamasu, Kiyoshi

    2014-08-01

    Demand for higher efficiency in the semiconductor manufacturing industry is continually increasing. In particular, nano defects measurement on patterned or bare Si semiconductor wafer surfaces is an important quality control factor for realizing high productivity and reliability of semiconductor device fabrication. Optical methods and electron beam methods are conventionally used for the inspection of semiconductor wafers. Because they are nondestructive and suitable for high-throughput inspection, optical methods are preferable to electron beam methods such as scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and so on. However, optical methods generally have an essential disadvantage about lateral spatial resolution than electron beam methods, because of the diffraction limit depending on the optical wavelength. In this research, we aim to develop a novel laser-scanning imaging method that can be applied to nano-/micro manufacturing processes such as semiconductor wafer surface inspection to allow lateral spatial super-resolution imaging with resolution beyond the diffraction limit. In our proposed method, instead of detecting the light intensity value from the beam spot on the inspection surface, the light intensity distribution, which is formed with infinity corrected optical system, coming from the beam spot on the inspection surface is detected. In addition, nano scale shifts in the beam spot are applied for laser spot scanning using a conventional laser-scanning method in which the spots are shifted at about a 100 nm pitch. By detecting multiple light intensity distributions due to the nano scale shifts, a super-resolution image reconstruction with resolution beyond the diffraction limit can be expected. In order to verify the feasibility of the proposed method, several numerical simulations were carried out.

  12. Novel fluidic packaging of gimbal-less MEMS mirrors for increased optical resolution and overall performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milanovic, Veljko; Kasturi, Abhishek; Yang, James

    2016-05-01

    Gimbal-less two-axis quasistatic MEMS mirrors have the ability to reflect optical beams to arbitrary positions and with arbitrary velocity. This technology has become established in many applications including laser based tracking, 3D scanning, biomedical imaging, free-space communication, and LiDAR. However, for certain defense applications, the total angle × diameter product, or the mirror's effective achievable resolution (θ*D product), has not been large enough to address requirements for agile steering in large fields of regard and with a low diffraction-limited beam divergence. Two key limitations have been the relatively low forces available in electrostatic combdrive actuators and the susceptibility of large-diameter MEMS mirrors to shock and vibrations. In this work, we demonstrate that these same MEMS mirrors can have dramatically increased performance when fully immersed and packaged in dielectric liquids with highly favorable torque-increasing, damping-increasing, and optical gain-increasing properties. The rotating electrostatic combdrive has its torque multiplied by liquid's relative permittivity of ~2.5. Furthermore, by selecting the appropriate fluid viscosity, quality factor of the device is reduced and structural damping is tuned to near critical damping. Finally, the increased scan angle due to the ~1.5-1.7 index of refraction of the fluid is an additional benefit. These numerous benefits of the fluidic packaging enabled us to double and in some cases triple the previously achieved θ*D product of two-axis quasistatic MEMS mirrors while still maintaining speeds applicable for above mentioned applications. One of the most exciting benefits of the packaging methodologies is that the damping dramatically increases shock and vibration tolerance, which will be tested next.

  13. Super resolution fluorescence microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Bo; Bates, Mark; Zhuang, Xiaowei

    2010-01-01

    Achieving a spatial resolution that is not limited by the diffraction of light, recent developments of super-resolution fluorescence microscopy techniques allow the observation of many biological structures not resolvable in conventional fluorescence microscopy. New advances in these techniques now give them the ability to image three-dimensional (3D) structures, measure interactions by multicolor colocalization, and record dynamic processes in living cells at the nanometer scale. It is anticipated that super-resolution fluorescence microscopy will become a widely used tool for cell and tissue imaging to provide previously unobserved details of biological structures and processes. PMID:19489737

  14. Seeing the forest tree by tree: super-resolution light microscopy meets the neurosciences.

    PubMed

    Maglione, Marta; Sigrist, Stephan J

    2013-07-01

    Light microscopy can be applied in vivo and can sample large tissue volumes, features crucial for the study of single neurons and neural circuits. However, light microscopy per se is diffraction-limited in resolution, and the substructure of core signaling compartments of neuronal circuits--axons, presynaptic active zones, postsynaptic densities and dendritic spines-can be only insufficiently characterized by standard light microscopy. Recently, several forms of super-resolution light microscopy breaking the diffraction-imposed resolution limit have started to allow highly resolved, dynamic imaging in the cell-biologically highly relevant 10-100 nanometer range ('mesoscale'). New, sometimes surprising answers concerning how protein mobility and protein architectures shape neuronal communication have already emerged. Here we start by briefly introducing super-resolution microscopy techniques, before we describe their use in the analysis of neuronal compartments. We conclude with long-term prospects for super-resolution light microscopy in the molecular and cellular neurosciences.

  15. Optical far-field super-resolution microscopy using nitrogen vacancy center ensemble in bulk diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shen; Chen, Xiang-dong; Zhao, Bo-Wen; Dong, Yang; Zou, Chong-Wen; Guo, Guang-Can; Sun, Fang-Wen

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate optical far-field super-resolution microscopy using an array of nitrogen vacancy centers in bulk diamond as near-field optical probes. The local optical field, which transmits through the nanostructures on the diamond surface, is measured by detecting the charge state conversion of the nitrogen vacancy center. Locating the nitrogen vacancy center with a spatial resolution of 6.1 nm is realized with charge state depletion nanoscopy. The nanostructures on the surface of a diamond are then imaged with a resolution below the optical diffraction limit. The results offer an approach to build a general-purpose optical super-resolution microscopy technique and a convenient platform for high spatial resolution quantum sensing with nitrogen vacancy centers.

  16. High resolution drift chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Va'vra, J.

    1985-07-01

    High precision drift chambers capable of achieving less than or equal to 50 ..mu..m resolutions are discussed. In particular, we compare so called cool and hot gases, various charge collection geometries, several timing techniques and we also discuss some systematic problems. We also present what we would consider an ''ultimate'' design of the vertex chamber. 50 refs., 36 figs., 6 tabs.

  17. [Dispute Resolutions].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hale, Claudia L.; Cooks, Leda M.

    1994-01-01

    Focusing on the teaching of alternative dispute resolutions at universities, Claudia L. Hale and Leda M. Cooks argue that mediation should be taught primarily as a communication process that involves the joint efforts of mediator and disputants. Teachers of mediation should begin by distinguishing mediation from other forms of dispute resolution,…

  18. In vivo acoustic super-resolution and super-resolved velocity mapping using microbubbles.

    PubMed

    Christensen-Jeffries, Kirsten; Browning, Richard J; Tang, Meng-Xing; Dunsby, Christopher; Eckersley, Robert J

    2015-02-01

    The structure of microvasculature cannot be resolved using standard clinical ultrasound (US) imaging frequencies due to the fundamental diffraction limit of US waves. In this work, we use a standard clinical US system to perform in vivo sub-diffraction imaging on a CD1, female mouse aged eight weeks by localizing isolated US signals from microbubbles flowing within the ear microvasculature, and compare our results to optical microscopy. Furthermore, we develop a new technique to map blood velocity at super-resolution by tracking individual bubbles through the vasculature. Resolution is improved from a measured lateral and axial resolution of 112 μm and 94 μ m respectively in original US data, to super-resolved images of microvasculature where vessel features as fine as 19 μm are clearly visualized. Velocity maps clearly distinguish opposing flow direction and separated speed distributions in adjacent vessels, thereby enabling further differentiation between vessels otherwise not spatially separated in the image. This technique overcomes the diffraction limit to provide a noninvasive means of imaging the microvasculature at super-resolution, to depths of many centimeters. In the future, this method could noninvasively image pathological or therapeutic changes in the microvasculature at centimeter depths in vivo.

  19. Characterization of Porous Materials by Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy Super-resolution Optical Fluctuation Imaging.

    PubMed

    Kisley, Lydia; Brunetti, Rachel; Tauzin, Lawrence J; Shuang, Bo; Yi, Xiyu; Kirkeminde, Alec W; Higgins, Daniel A; Weiss, Shimon; Landes, Christy F

    2015-09-22

    Porous materials such as cellular cytosol, hydrogels, and block copolymers have nanoscale features that determine macroscale properties. Characterizing the structure of nanopores is difficult with current techniques due to imaging, sample preparation, and computational challenges. We produce a super-resolution optical image that simultaneously characterizes the nanometer dimensions of and diffusion dynamics within porous structures by correlating stochastic fluctuations from diffusing fluorescent probes in the pores of the sample, dubbed here as "fluorescence correlation spectroscopy super-resolution optical fluctuation imaging" or "fcsSOFI". Simulations demonstrate that structural features and diffusion properties can be accurately obtained at sub-diffraction-limited resolution. We apply our technique to image agarose hydrogels and aqueous lyotropic liquid crystal gels. The heterogeneous pore resolution is improved by up to a factor of 2, and diffusion coefficients are accurately obtained through our method compared to diffraction-limited fluorescence imaging and single-particle tracking. Moreover, fcsSOFI allows for rapid and high-throughput characterization of porous materials. fcsSOFI could be applied to soft porous environments such hydrogels, polymers, and membranes in addition to hard materials such as zeolites and mesoporous silica.

  20. Non-contact distance measurement and profilometry using thermal near-field radiation towards a high resolution inspection and metrology solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bijster, Roy; Sadeghian, Hamed; van Keulen, Fred

    2016-03-01

    Optical near-field technologies such as solid immersion lenses and hyperlenses are candidate solutions for high resolution and high throughput wafer inspection and metrology for the next technology nodes. Besides sub-diffraction limited optical performance, these concepts share the necessity of extreme proximity to the sample at distances that are measured in tens of nanometers. For the instrument this poses two major challenges: 1) how to measure the distance to the sample? and 2) how to position accurately and at high speed? For the first challenge near-field thermal radiation is proposed as a mechanism for an integrated distance sensor (patent pending). This sensor is realized by making a sensitive calorimeter (accuracy of 2:31nW root sum squared). When used for distance measurement an equivalent uncertainty of 1nm can be achieved for distances smaller than 100 nm. By scanning the distance sensor over the sample, thermal profilometry is realized, which can be used to inspect surfaces in a non-intrusive and non-contact way. This reduces wear of the probe and minimizes the likelihood of damaging the sample.

  1. HIGH-RESOLUTION RADIO OBSERVATIONS OF THE REMNANT OF SN 1987A AT HIGH FREQUENCIES

    SciTech Connect

    Zanardo, Giovanna; Staveley-Smith, L.; Potter, T. M.; Ng, C.-Y.; Gaensler, B. M.; Manchester, R. N.; Tzioumis, A. K.

    2013-04-20

    We present new imaging observations of the remnant of Supernova (SN) 1987A at 44 GHz, performed in 2011 with the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA). The 0.''35 Multiplication-Sign 0.''23 resolution of the diffraction-limited image is the highest achieved to date in high-dynamic range. We also present a new ATCA image at 18 GHz derived from 2011 observations, which is super-resolved to 0.''25. The flux density is 40 {+-} 2 mJy at 44 GHz and 81 {+-} 6 mJy at 18 GHz. At both frequencies, the remnant exhibits a ring-like emission with two prominent lobes, and an east-west brightness asymmetry that peaks on the eastern lobe. A central feature of fainter emission appears at 44 GHz. A comparison with previous ATCA observations at 18 and 36 GHz highlights higher expansion velocities of the remnant's eastern side. The 18-44 GHz spectral index is {alpha} = -0.80 (S{sub {nu}}{proportional_to}{nu}{sup {alpha}}). The spectral index map suggests slightly steeper values at the brightest sites on the eastern lobe, whereas flatter values are associated with the inner regions. The remnant morphology at 44 GHz generally matches the structure seen with contemporaneous X-ray and H{alpha} observations. Unlike the H{alpha} emission, both the radio and X-ray emission peaks on the eastern lobe. The regions of flatter spectral index align and partially overlap with the optically visible ejecta. Simple free-free absorption models suggest that emission from a pulsar wind nebula or a compact source inside the remnant may now be detectable at high frequencies or at low frequencies if there are holes in the ionized component of the ejecta.

  2. Optical magnetometry with sub-wavelength spatial resolution using individual spins in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maze, Jeronimo; Maurer, Peter; Stanwix, Paul; Jiang, Liang; Hodges, Jonathan; Gorshkov, Alexey; Zibrov, Alexander; Walsworth, Ronald; Lukin, Mikhail

    2009-05-01

    The ability to map weak magnetic fields with nanometer resolution is of great importance in biological science and high precision metrology of nanoscale structures. We describe and demonstrate a new technique that combines high spatial resolution in the spirit of stimulating-emission-depletion (STED) fluorescence microscopy [1] and nanoscale magnetic sensing with individual spins in diamond [2,3]. This new magnetic sensing and nanometer resolution fluorescence microscopy approach (m-STED) will allow detection of single electronic spins at a distance of 10 nm with 5-7 folds improvement beyond the diffraction limit lateral resolution. [4pt] [1] Hell, S. W. and J. Wichmann, Opt. Lett. 19, 780 (1994).[2] J.R. Maze, et al., Nature 455, 644 (2008).[3] J.M. Taylor, et al., Nature Physics 4, 810 (2008).

  3. Measuring charge carrier mobility in photovoltaic devices with micron-scale resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Ashraf, A.; Dissanayake, D. M. N. M.; Eisaman, M. D.

    2015-03-16

    We present a charge-extraction technique, micron-scale charge extraction by linearly increasing voltage, which enables simultaneous spatially resolved measurements of charge carrier mobility and photocurrent in thin-film photovoltaic devices with micron-scale resolution. An intensity-modulated laser with beam diameter near the optical diffraction limit is scanned over the device, while a linear voltage ramp in reverse bias is applied at each position of illumination. We calculate the majority carrier mobility, photocurrent, and number of photogenerated charge carriers from the resulting current transient. We demonstrate this technique on an organic photovoltaic device, but it is applicable to a wide range of photovoltaic materials.

  4. Position Resolution in DROIDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samedov, Victor V.

    2008-04-01

    Since the very beginning, Distributed Read-Out Imaging Devices (DROIDs) were proposed to achieve both good position and energy resolutions. In DROIDs, the absorption of primary particle energy occurs in a long superconductive strip. Quasiparticles produced in the absorber diffuse along the strip and counted by the superconductive tunnel junctions positioned at the two ends of the strip. In this paper the formula for estimation DROID’s position resolution from experimental data was derived. This formula takes into account correlation between fluctuations of signals of DROID’s detectors.

  5. Graded Achievement, Tested Achievement, and Validity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brookhart, Susan M.

    2015-01-01

    Twenty-eight studies of grades, over a century, were reviewed using the argument-based approach to validity suggested by Kane as a theoretical framework. The review draws conclusions about the meaning of graded achievement, its relation to tested achievement, and changes in the construct of graded achievement over time. "Graded…

  6. Far-field Imaging of Non-fluorescent Species with Sub-diffraction Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Pu; Slipchenko, Mikhail N.; Mitchell, James; Yang, Chen; Potma, Eric O.; Xu, Xianfan; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2013-01-01

    Super-resolution optical microscopy is opening a new window to unveil the unseen details on the nanoscopic scale. Current far-field super-resolution techniques rely on fluorescence as the read-out1–5. Here, we demonstrate a scheme for breaking the diffraction limit in far-field imaging of non-fluorescent species by using spatially controlled saturation of electronic absorption. Our method is based on a pump-probe process where a modulated pump field perturbs the charge-carrier density in a sample, thus modulating the transmission of a probe field. A doughnut shape laser beam is then added to transiently saturate the electronic transition in the periphery of the focal volume, thus the induced modulation in the sequential probe pulse only occurs at the focal center. By raster scanning the three collinearly aligned beams, high-speed sub-diffraction-limited imaging of graphite nano-platelets was performed. This technique potentially enables super-resolution imaging of nano-materials and non-fluorescent chromophores, which may remain out of reach for fluorescence-based methods. PMID:24436725

  7. Microarray analysis at single molecule resolution

    PubMed Central

    Mureşan, Leila; Jacak, Jarosław; Klement, Erich Peter; Hesse, Jan; Schütz, Gerhard J.

    2010-01-01

    Bioanalytical chip-based assays have been enormously improved in sensitivity in the recent years; detection of trace amounts of substances down to the level of individual fluorescent molecules has become state of the art technology. The impact of such detection methods, however, has yet not fully been exploited, mainly due to a lack in appropriate mathematical tools for robust data analysis. One particular example relates to the analysis of microarray data. While classical microarray analysis works at resolutions of two to 20 micrometers and quantifies the abundance of target molecules by determining average pixel intensities, a novel high resolution approach [1] directly visualizes individual bound molecules as diffraction limited peaks. The now possible quantification via counting is less susceptible to labeling artifacts and background noise. We have developed an approach for the analysis of high-resolution microarray images. It consists first of a single molecule detection step, based on undecimated wavelet transforms, and second, of a spot identification step via spatial statistics approach (corresponding to the segmentation step in the classical microarray analysis). The detection method was tested on simulated images with a concentration range of 0.001 to 0.5 molecules per square micron and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) between 0.9 and 31.6. For SNR above 15 the false negatives relative error was below 15%. Separation of foreground/background proved reliable, in case foreground density exceeds background by a factor of 2. The method has also been applied to real data from high-resolution microarray measurements. PMID:20123580

  8. Conflict resolution.

    PubMed

    Levin, Roger

    2006-03-01

    The sooner conflict is identified and confronted, the more quickly it can be resolved (and the sooner, the better). When this is accomplished calmly and objectively, many areas of conflict will be eliminated. Addressing conflict as it arises also sends a clear message to the team that the practice seeks resolution, not punishment or negative consequences. In addition, the dentist and the office manager need to lead by example by avoiding gossip and encouraging open communication. The goal is to go from a parent-child relationship with the dental team to an adult-adult relationship using this series of managerial conflict resolution steps.

  9. Progress in high-resolution x-ray holographic microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobsen, C.; Kirz, J.; Howells, M.; McQuaid, K.; Rothman, S.; Feder, R.; Sayre, D.

    1987-07-01

    Among the various types of x-ray microscopes that have been demonstrated, the holographic microscope has had the largest gap between promise and performance. The difficulties of fabricating x-ray optical elements have led some to view holography as the most attractive method for obtaining the ultimate in high resolution x-ray micrographs; however, we know of no investigations prior to 1987 that clearly demonstrated submicron resolution in reconstructed images. Previous efforts suffered from problems such as limited resolution and dynamic range in the recording media, low coherent x-ray flux, and aberrations and diffraction limits in visible light reconstruction. We have addressed the recording limitations through the use of an undulator x-ray source and high-resolution photoresist recording media. For improved results in the readout and reconstruction steps, we have employed metal shadowing and transmission electron microscopy, along with numerical reconstruction techniques. We believe that this approach will allow holography to emerge as a practical method of high-resolution x-ray microscopy. 30 refs., 4 figs.

  10. Black phosphorus photodetector for multispectral, high-resolution imaging.

    PubMed

    Engel, Michael; Steiner, Mathias; Avouris, Phaedon

    2014-11-12

    Black phosphorus is a layered semiconductor that is intensely researched in view of applications in optoelectronics. In this letter, we investigate a multilayer black phosphorus photodetector that is capable of acquiring high-contrast (V > 0.9) images both in the visible (λVIS = 532 nm) as well as in the infrared (λIR = 1550 nm) spectral regime. In a first step, by using photocurrent microscopy, we map the active area of the device and we characterize responsivity and gain. In a second step, by deploying the black phosphorus device as a point-like detector in a confocal microsope setup, we acquire diffraction-limited optical images with submicron resolution. The results demonstrate the usefulness of black phosphorus as an optoelectronic material for hyperspectral imaging applications.

  11. NCAI Resolutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Indian Journal of the Institute for the Development of Indian Law, 1977

    1977-01-01

    Five Major Policy Resolutions were adopted, without objection, at the 33rd Annual Convention of the National Congress of American Indians (NCAI) held in Salt Lake City, Utah, in October 1976. The issues involved were: Treaties and Trust Responsibilities, Tribal Government, Jurisdiction, Federal Administration and Structure of Indian Affairs, and…

  12. Encoding and decoding spatio-temporal information for super-resolution microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lanzanò, Luca; Coto Hernández, Iván; Castello, Marco; Gratton, Enrico; Diaspro, Alberto; Vicidomini, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    The challenge of increasing the spatial resolution of an optical microscope beyond the diffraction limit can be reduced to a spectroscopy task by proper manipulation of the molecular states. The nanoscale spatial distribution of the molecules inside the detection volume of a scanning microscope can be encoded within the fluorescence dynamics and decoded by resolving the signal into its dynamics components. Here we present a robust and general method to decode this information using phasor analysis. As an example of the application of this method, we optically generate spatially controlled gradients in the fluorescence lifetime by stimulated emission. Spatial resolution can be increased indefinitely by increasing the number of resolved dynamics components up to a maximum determined by the amount of noise. We demonstrate that the proposed method provides nanoscale imaging of subcellular structures, opening new routes in super-resolution microscopy based on the encoding/decoding of spatial information through manipulation of molecular dynamics. PMID:25833391

  13. Quantitative super-resolution imaging of Bruchpilot distinguishes active zone states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehmann, Nadine; van de Linde, Sebastian; Alon, Amit; Ljaschenko, Dmitrij; Keung, Xi Zhen; Holm, Thorge; Rings, Annika; Diantonio, Aaron; Hallermann, Stefan; Ashery, Uri; Heckmann, Manfred; Sauer, Markus; Kittel, Robert J.

    2014-08-01

    The precise molecular architecture of synaptic active zones (AZs) gives rise to different structural and functional AZ states that fundamentally shape chemical neurotransmission. However, elucidating the nanoscopic protein arrangement at AZs is impeded by the diffraction-limited resolution of conventional light microscopy. Here we introduce new approaches to quantify endogenous protein organization at single-molecule resolution in situ with super-resolution imaging by direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (dSTORM). Focusing on the Drosophila neuromuscular junction (NMJ), we find that the AZ cytomatrix (CAZ) is composed of units containing ~137 Bruchpilot (Brp) proteins, three quarters of which are organized into about 15 heptameric clusters. We test for a quantitative relationship between CAZ ultrastructure and neurotransmitter release properties by engaging Drosophila mutants and electrophysiology. Our results indicate that the precise nanoscopic organization of Brp distinguishes different physiological AZ states and link functional diversification to a heretofore unrecognized neuronal gradient of the CAZ ultrastructure.

  14. Quantitative super-resolution imaging of Bruchpilot distinguishes active zone states.

    PubMed

    Ehmann, Nadine; van de Linde, Sebastian; Alon, Amit; Ljaschenko, Dmitrij; Keung, Xi Zhen; Holm, Thorge; Rings, Annika; DiAntonio, Aaron; Hallermann, Stefan; Ashery, Uri; Heckmann, Manfred; Sauer, Markus; Kittel, Robert J

    2014-08-18

    The precise molecular architecture of synaptic active zones (AZs) gives rise to different structural and functional AZ states that fundamentally shape chemical neurotransmission. However, elucidating the nanoscopic protein arrangement at AZs is impeded by the diffraction-limited resolution of conventional light microscopy. Here we introduce new approaches to quantify endogenous protein organization at single-molecule resolution in situ with super-resolution imaging by direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (dSTORM). Focusing on the Drosophila neuromuscular junction (NMJ), we find that the AZ cytomatrix (CAZ) is composed of units containing ~137 Bruchpilot (Brp) proteins, three quarters of which are organized into about 15 heptameric clusters. We test for a quantitative relationship between CAZ ultrastructure and neurotransmitter release properties by engaging Drosophila mutants and electrophysiology. Our results indicate that the precise nanoscopic organization of Brp distinguishes different physiological AZ states and link functional diversification to a heretofore unrecognized neuronal gradient of the CAZ ultrastructure.

  15. Quantitative super-resolution imaging of Bruchpilot distinguishes active zone states

    PubMed Central

    Ehmann, Nadine; van de Linde, Sebastian; Alon, Amit; Ljaschenko, Dmitrij; Keung, Xi Zhen; Holm, Thorge; Rings, Annika; DiAntonio, Aaron; Hallermann, Stefan; Ashery, Uri; Heckmann, Manfred; Sauer, Markus; Kittel, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    The precise molecular architecture of synaptic active zones (AZs) gives rise to different structural and functional AZ states that fundamentally shape chemical neurotransmission. However, elucidating the nanoscopic protein arrangement at AZs is impeded by the diffraction-limited resolution of conventional light microscopy. Here we introduce new approaches to quantify endogenous protein organization at single-molecule resolution in situ with super-resolution imaging by direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (dSTORM). Focusing on the Drosophila neuromuscular junction (NMJ), we find that the AZ cytomatrix (CAZ) is composed of units containing ~137 Bruchpilot (Brp) proteins, three quarters of which are organized into about 15 heptameric clusters. We test for a quantitative relationship between CAZ ultrastructure and neurotransmitter release properties by engaging Drosophila mutants and electrophysiology. Our results indicate that the precise nanoscopic organization of Brp distinguishes different physiological AZ states and link functional diversification to a heretofore unrecognized neuronal gradient of the CAZ ultrastructure. PMID:25130366

  16. 21 CFR 314.103 - Dispute resolution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dispute resolution. 314.103 Section 314.103 Food... Applications § 314.103 Dispute resolution. (a) General. FDA is committed to resolving differences between... application. If resolution is not achieved, the applicant may raise the matter with the person designated...

  17. A resolution honoring the lifetime achievements of E. Thom Rumberger.

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Nelson, Bill [D-FL

    2011-09-13

    09/13/2011 Submitted in the Senate, considered, and agreed to without amendment and with a preamble by Unanimous Consent. (consideration: CR S5584-5585; text as passed Senate: CR S5585; text of measure as introduced: CR S5583) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  18. A resolution honoring the achievements of E. Thom Rumberger.

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Nelson, Bill [D-FL

    2011-08-01

    08/01/2011 Read twice and referred to the Committee on the Judiciary. (text of measure as introduced: CR S5196) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  19. Single-Molecule Spectroscopy, Imaging, and Photocontrol: Foundations for Super-Resolution Microscopy (Nobel Lecture).

    PubMed

    Moerner, W E William E

    2015-07-01

    The initial steps toward optical detection and spectroscopy of single molecules in condensed matter arose out of the study of inhomogeneously broadened optical absorption profiles of molecular impurities in solids at low temperatures. Spectral signatures relating to the fluctuations of the number of molecules in resonance led to the attainment of the single-molecule limit in 1989 using frequency-modulation laser spectroscopy. In the early 90s, many fascinating physical effects were observed for individual molecules, and the imaging of single molecules as well as observations of spectral diffusion, optical switching and the ability to select different single molecules in the same focal volume simply by tuning the pumping laser frequency provided important forerunners of the later super-resolution microscopy with single molecules. In the room temperature regime, imaging of single copies of the green fluorescent protein also uncovered surprises, especially the blinking and photoinduced recovery of emitters, which stimulated further development of photoswitchable fluorescent protein labels. Because each single fluorophore acts a light source roughly 1 nm in size, microscopic observation and localization of individual fluorophores is a key ingredient to imaging beyond the optical diffraction limit. Combining this with active control of the number of emitting molecules in the pumped volume led to the super-resolution imaging of Eric Betzig and others, a new frontier for optical microscopy beyond the diffraction limit. The background leading up to these observations is described and current developments are summarized.

  20. Nobel Lecture: Single-molecule spectroscopy, imaging, and photocontrol: Foundations for super-resolution microscopy*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moerner, W. E. William E.

    2015-10-01

    The initial steps toward optical detection and spectroscopy of single molecules in condensed matter arose out of the study of inhomogeneously broadened optical absorption profiles of molecular impurities in solids at low temperatures. Spectral signatures relating to the fluctuations of the number of molecules in resonance led to the attainment of the single-molecule limit in 1989 using frequency-modulation laser spectroscopy. In the early 1990s, many fascinating physical effects were observed for individual molecules, and the imaging of single molecules as well as observations of spectral diffusion, optical switching and the ability to select different single molecules in the same focal volume simply by tuning the pumping laser frequency provided important forerunners of the later super-resolution microscopy with single molecules. In the room-temperature regime, imaging of single copies of the green fluorescent protein also uncovered surprises, especially the blinking and photoinduced recovery of emitters, which stimulated further development of photoswitchable fluorescent protein labels. Because each single fluorophore acts as a light source roughly 1 nm in size, microscopic observation and localization of individual fluorophores is a key ingredient to imaging beyond the optical diffraction limit. Combining this with active control of the number of emitting molecules in the pumped volume led to the super-resolution imaging of Eric Betzig and others, a new frontier for optical microscopy beyond the diffraction limit. The background leading up to these observations is described and selected current developments are summarized.

  1. Super-resolution optical telescopes with local light diffraction shrinkage.

    PubMed

    Wang, Changtao; Tang, Dongliang; Wang, Yanqin; Zhao, Zeyu; Wang, Jiong; Pu, Mingbo; Zhang, Yudong; Yan, Wei; Gao, Ping; Luo, Xiangang

    2015-01-01

    Suffering from giant size of objective lenses and infeasible manipulations of distant targets, telescopes could not seek helps from present super-resolution imaging, such as scanning near-field optical microscopy, perfect lens and stimulated emission depletion microscopy. In this paper, local light diffraction shrinkage associated with optical super-oscillatory phenomenon is proposed for real-time and optically restoring super-resolution imaging information in a telescope system. It is found that fine target features concealed in diffraction-limited optical images of a telescope could be observed in a small local field of view, benefiting from a relayed metasurface-based super-oscillatory imaging optics in which some local Fourier components beyond the cut-off frequency of telescope could be restored. As experimental examples, a minimal resolution to 0.55 of Rayleigh criterion is obtained, and imaging complex targets and large targets by superimposing multiple local fields of views are demonstrated as well. This investigation provides an access for real-time, incoherent and super-resolution telescopes without the manipulation of distant targets. More importantly, it gives counterintuitive evidence to the common knowledge that relayed optics could not deliver more imaging details than objective systems. PMID:26677820

  2. Super-resolution optical telescopes with local light diffraction shrinkage

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Changtao; Tang, Dongliang; Wang, Yanqin; Zhao, Zeyu; Wang, Jiong; Pu, Mingbo; Zhang, Yudong; Yan, Wei; Gao, Ping; Luo, Xiangang

    2015-01-01

    Suffering from giant size of objective lenses and infeasible manipulations of distant targets, telescopes could not seek helps from present super-resolution imaging, such as scanning near-field optical microscopy, perfect lens and stimulated emission depletion microscopy. In this paper, local light diffraction shrinkage associated with optical super-oscillatory phenomenon is proposed for real-time and optically restoring super-resolution imaging information in a telescope system. It is found that fine target features concealed in diffraction-limited optical images of a telescope could be observed in a small local field of view, benefiting from a relayed metasurface-based super-oscillatory imaging optics in which some local Fourier components beyond the cut-off frequency of telescope could be restored. As experimental examples, a minimal resolution to 0.55 of Rayleigh criterion is obtained, and imaging complex targets and large targets by superimposing multiple local fields of views are demonstrated as well. This investigation provides an access for real-time, incoherent and super-resolution telescopes without the manipulation of distant targets. More importantly, it gives counterintuitive evidence to the common knowledge that relayed optics could not deliver more imaging details than objective systems. PMID:26677820

  3. Super-resolution microscopy of single atoms in optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alberti, Andrea; Robens, Carsten; Alt, Wolfgang; Brakhane, Stefan; Karski, Michał; Reimann, René; Widera, Artur; Meschede, Dieter

    2016-05-01

    We report on image processing techniques and experimental procedures to determine the lattice-site positions of single atoms in an optical lattice with high reliability, even for limited acquisition time or optical resolution. Determining the positions of atoms beyond the diffraction limit relies on parametric deconvolution in close analogy to methods employed in super-resolution microscopy. We develop a deconvolution method that makes effective use of the prior knowledge of the optical transfer function, noise properties, and discreteness of the optical lattice. We show that accurate knowledge of the image formation process enables a dramatic improvement on the localization reliability. This allows us to demonstrate super-resolution of the atoms’ position in closely packed ensembles where the separation between particles cannot be directly optically resolved. Furthermore, we demonstrate experimental methods to precisely reconstruct the point spread function with sub-pixel resolution from fluorescence images of single atoms, and we give a mathematical foundation thereof. We also discuss discretized image sampling in pixel detectors and provide a quantitative model of noise sources in electron multiplying CCD cameras. The techniques developed here are not only beneficial to neutral atom experiments, but could also be employed to improve the localization precision of trapped ions for ultra precise force sensing.

  4. Super-resolution optical telescopes with local light diffraction shrinkage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Changtao; Tang, Dongliang; Wang, Yanqin; Zhao, Zeyu; Wang, Jiong; Pu, Mingbo; Zhang, Yudong; Yan, Wei; Gao, Ping; Luo, Xiangang

    2015-12-01

    Suffering from giant size of objective lenses and infeasible manipulations of distant targets, telescopes could not seek helps from present super-resolution imaging, such as scanning near-field optical microscopy, perfect lens and stimulated emission depletion microscopy. In this paper, local light diffraction shrinkage associated with optical super-oscillatory phenomenon is proposed for real-time and optically restoring super-resolution imaging information in a telescope system. It is found that fine target features concealed in diffraction-limited optical images of a telescope could be observed in a small local field of view, benefiting from a relayed metasurface-based super-oscillatory imaging optics in which some local Fourier components beyond the cut-off frequency of telescope could be restored. As experimental examples, a minimal resolution to 0.55 of Rayleigh criterion is obtained, and imaging complex targets and large targets by superimposing multiple local fields of views are demonstrated as well. This investigation provides an access for real-time, incoherent and super-resolution telescopes without the manipulation of distant targets. More importantly, it gives counterintuitive evidence to the common knowledge that relayed optics could not deliver more imaging details than objective systems.

  5. Super-resolution optical telescopes with local light diffraction shrinkage.

    PubMed

    Wang, Changtao; Tang, Dongliang; Wang, Yanqin; Zhao, Zeyu; Wang, Jiong; Pu, Mingbo; Zhang, Yudong; Yan, Wei; Gao, Ping; Luo, Xiangang

    2015-12-18

    Suffering from giant size of objective lenses and infeasible manipulations of distant targets, telescopes could not seek helps from present super-resolution imaging, such as scanning near-field optical microscopy, perfect lens and stimulated emission depletion microscopy. In this paper, local light diffraction shrinkage associated with optical super-oscillatory phenomenon is proposed for real-time and optically restoring super-resolution imaging information in a telescope system. It is found that fine target features concealed in diffraction-limited optical images of a telescope could be observed in a small local field of view, benefiting from a relayed metasurface-based super-oscillatory imaging optics in which some local Fourier components beyond the cut-off frequency of telescope could be restored. As experimental examples, a minimal resolution to 0.55 of Rayleigh criterion is obtained, and imaging complex targets and large targets by superimposing multiple local fields of views are demonstrated as well. This investigation provides an access for real-time, incoherent and super-resolution telescopes without the manipulation of distant targets. More importantly, it gives counterintuitive evidence to the common knowledge that relayed optics could not deliver more imaging details than objective systems.

  6. Image Resolution in Optical Nanoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Nieuwenhuizen, Robert P.J.; Lidke, Keith A.; Bates, Mark; Puig, Daniela Leyton; Grünwald, David; Stallinga, Sjoerd; Rieger, Bernd

    2014-01-01

    Resolution in optical nanoscopy depends on the localization uncertainty of single fluorescent labels, the density of labels covering the sample, and the sample’s spatial structure. Currently there is no integral, practical resolution measure that takes all factors into account. Here we introduce such a measure that can be computed directly from the image. We demonstrate its validity and benefits on 2D and 3D localization microscopy images of tubulin and actin filaments. Our approach makes it possible to compare achieved resolutions in images taken with different nanoscopy methods, optimize and rank different emitter localization and labeling strategies, define a stopping criterion for data acquisition, describe image anisotropy and heterogeneity, and, surprisingly, estimate the average number of localizations per emitter. Our findings challenge the current focus on obtaining the best localization precision, but instead show how the best image resolution can be achieved as fast as possible. PMID:23624665

  7. Energy-Gap-Induced Super-Resolution (EG-SR) Optical Disc Using ZnO Interference Film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Go; Yamamoto, Masaki; Tajima, Hideharu; Takamori, Nobuyuki; Takahashi, Akira

    2005-05-01

    We have developed a super-resolution read-only memory (ROM) disc with a high readout stability using a zinc oxide (ZnO) thin film. Applying the reversible and repeatable change in the optical constants of ZnO induced by heat, we can successfully confirm super-resolution effects that can read out a small mark beyond the optical diffraction limit. By realizing this characteristic in a ROM disc, we obtained a linear bit density twofold higher than that of a conventional disc in the blue-laser optical system. To clarify the origin of ZnO super resolution, we performed two types of test: a test to compare ZnO super-resolution characteristics using blue- and red-laser optical systems, and a test to determine the relationship between the absorption edges of semiconductor films with various energy band gaps and readout laser wavelength.

  8. Subwavelength nanopatterning of photochromic diarylethene films

    SciTech Connect

    Cantu, Precious; Brimhall, Nicole; Menon, Rajesh; Andrew, Trisha L.; Castagna, Rossella; Bertarelli, Chiara

    2012-04-30

    The resolution of optical patterning is constrained by the far-field diffraction limit. In this letter, we describe an approach that exploits the unique photo- and electro-chemistry of diarylethene photochromic molecules to overcome this diffraction limit and achieve sub-wavelength nanopatterning.

  9. Subwavelength nanopatterning of photochromic diarylethene films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantu, Precious; Brimhall, Nicole; Andrew, Trisha L.; Castagna, Rossella; Bertarelli, Chiara; Menon, Rajesh

    2012-04-01

    The resolution of optical patterning is constrained by the far-field diffraction limit. In this letter, we describe an approach that exploits the unique photo- and electro-chemistry of diarylethene photochromic molecules to overcome this diffraction limit and achieve sub-wavelength nanopatterning.

  10. Electron microscopy at atomic resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Gronsky, R.

    1983-11-01

    The direct imaging of atomic structure in solids has become increasingly easier to accomplish with modern transmission electron microscopes, many of which have an information retrieval limit near 0.2 nm point resolution. Achieving better resolution, particularly with any useful range of specimen tilting, requires a major design effort. This presentation describes the new Atomic Resolution Microscope (ARM), recently put into operation at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Capable of 0.18 nm or better interpretable resolution over a voltage range of 400 kV to 1000 kV with +- 40/sup 0/ biaxial specimen tilting, the ARM features a number of new electron-optical and microprocessor-control designs. These are highlighted, and its atomic resolution performance demonstrated for a selection of inorganic crystals.

  11. Influence of standing wave phase error on super-resolution optical inspection for periodic microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudo, R.; Usuki, S.; Takahashi, S.; Takamasu, K.

    2012-05-01

    The miniaturization of microfabricated structures such as patterned semiconductor wafers continues to advance, thereby increasing the demand for a high-speed, nondestructive and high-resolution measurement technique. We propose a novel optical inspecting method for a microfabricated structure using the standing wave illumination (SWI) shift as such a measurement technique. This method is based on a super-resolution algorithm in which the inspection system's resolution exceeds the diffraction limit by shifting the SWI. Resolution beyond the diffraction limit has previously been studied theoretically and realized experimentally. The influence of various experimental error factors needs to be investigated and calibration needs to be performed accordingly when actual applications that utilize the proposed method are constructed. These error factors include errors related to the phase, pitch and shift step size of the standing wave. Identifying the phase accurately is extremely difficult and greatly influences the resolution result. Hence, the SWI phase was focused upon as an experimental error factor. The effect of the phase difference between the actual experimental standing wave and the computationally set standing wave was investigated using a computer simulation. The periodic structure characteristic of a microfabricated structure was analyzed. The following findings were obtained as a result. The influence of an error is divided into three modes depending on the pitch of the periodic structure: (1) if the pitch is comparatively small, the influence of the error is cancelled, allowing the structure of a sample to be resolved correctly; (2) if the pitch of the structure is from 150 to 350 nm, the reconstructed solution shifts in a transverse direction corresponding to a phase gap of SWI; and (3) if it is a comparatively large pitch, then it is difficult to reconstruct the right pitch. Verification was experimentally attempted for mode (2), and the same result as

  12. Comparing Science Achievement Constructs: Targeted and Achieved

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrara, Steve; Duncan, Teresa

    2011-01-01

    This article illustrates how test specifications based solely on academic content standards, without attention to other cognitive skills and item response demands, can fall short of their targeted constructs. First, the authors inductively describe the science achievement construct represented by a statewide sixth-grade science proficiency test.…

  13. Mobility and Reading Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waters, Theresa Z.

    A study examined the effect of geographic mobility on elementary school students' achievement. Although such mobility, which requires students to make multiple moves among schools, can have a negative impact on academic achievement, the hypothesis for the study was that it was not a determining factor in reading achievement test scores. Subjects…

  14. Conference Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-04-01

    Since the first IUPAP International Conference on Women in Physics (Paris, March 2002) and the Second Conference (Rio de Janeiro, May 2005), progress has continued in most countries and world regions to attract girls to physics and advance women into leadership roles, and many working groups have formed. The Third Conference (Seoul, October 2008), with 283 attendees from 57 countries, was dedicated to celebrating the physics achievements of women throughout the world, networking toward new international collaborations, building each participant's capacity for career success, and aiding the formation of active regional working groups to advance women in physics. Despite the progress, women remain a small minority of the physics community in most countries.

  15. Super-resolution imaging with radio interferometry using sparse modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honma, Mareki; Akiyama, Kazunori; Uemura, Makoto; Ikeda, Shiro

    2014-10-01

    We propose a new technique to obtain super-resolution images with radio interferometry using sparse modeling. In standard radio interferometry, sampling of (u, v) is quite often incomplete and thus obtaining an image from observed visibilities becomes an underdetermined problem, and a technique of so-called "zero-padding" is often used to fill up unsampled grids in the (u, v) plane, resulting in image degradation by finite beam size as well as numerous side-lobes. In this paper we show that directly solving such an underdetermined problem based on sparse modeling (in this paper, Least Absolute Shrinkage and Selection Operator, known as LASSO) avoids the above problems introduced by zero-padding, leading to super-resolution images in which structure finer than the standard beam size (diffraction limit) can be reproduced. We present results of one-dimensional and two-dimensional simulations of interferometric imaging, and discuss its implications for super-resolution imaging, particularly focusing on imaging of black hole shadows with millimeter VLBI (Very Long Baseline Interferometry).

  16. High-Resolution Organic Light-Emitting Diodes Patterned via Contact Printing.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinhai; Xu, Lisong; Tang, Ching W; Shestopalov, Alexander A

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we report a contact printing technique that uses polyurethane-acrylate (PUA) polymers as the printing stamps to pattern electroluminescent layers of organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs). We demonstrate that electroluminescent thin films can be printed with high uniformity and resolution. We also show that the performance of the printed devices can be improved via postprinting thermal annealing, and that the external quantum efficiency of the printed devices is comparable with the efficiency of the vacuum-deposited OLEDs. Our results suggest that the PUA-based contact printing can be used as an alternative to the traditional shadow mask deposition, permitting manufacturing of OLED displays with the resolution up to the diffraction limit of visible-light emission.

  17. Facile method to stain the bacterial cell surface for super-resolution fluorescence microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Gunsolus, Ian L.; Hu, Dehong; Mihai, Cosmin; Lohse, Samuel E.; Lee, Chang-Soo; Torelli, Marco; Hamers, Robert J.; Murphy, Catherine; Orr, Galya; Haynes, Christy L.

    2014-01-01

    A method to fluorescently stain the surfaces of both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial cells compatible with super-resolution fluorescence microscopy is presented. This method utilizes a commercially-available fluorescent probe to label primary amines at the surface of the cell. We demonstrate efficient staining of two bacterial strains, the Gram-negative Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and the Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis 168. Using structured illumination microscopy and stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy, which require high quantum yield or specialized dyes, we show that this staining method may be used to resolve the bacterial cell surface with sub-diffraction-limited resolution. We further use this method to identify localization patterns of nanomaterials, specifically cadmium selenide quantum dots, following interaction with bacterial cells.

  18. High-Resolution Organic Light-Emitting Diodes Patterned via Contact Printing.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinhai; Xu, Lisong; Tang, Ching W; Shestopalov, Alexander A

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we report a contact printing technique that uses polyurethane-acrylate (PUA) polymers as the printing stamps to pattern electroluminescent layers of organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs). We demonstrate that electroluminescent thin films can be printed with high uniformity and resolution. We also show that the performance of the printed devices can be improved via postprinting thermal annealing, and that the external quantum efficiency of the printed devices is comparable with the efficiency of the vacuum-deposited OLEDs. Our results suggest that the PUA-based contact printing can be used as an alternative to the traditional shadow mask deposition, permitting manufacturing of OLED displays with the resolution up to the diffraction limit of visible-light emission. PMID:27302425

  19. STED super-resolution microscopy in Drosophila tissue and in mammalian cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, Lana; Lee, Yin Loon; Matis, Maja; Axelrod, Jeff; Stearns, Tim; Moerner, W. E.

    2011-03-01

    Far-field super-resolution microscopy is a rapidly emerging method that is opening up opportunities for biological imaging beyond the optical diffraction limit. We have implemented a Stimulated Emission Depletion (STED) microscope to image single dye, cell, and tissue samples with 50-80 nm resolution. First, we compare the STED performance imaging single molecules of several common dyes and report a novel STED dye. Then we apply STED to image planar cell polarity protein complexes in intact fixed Drosophila tissue for the first time. Finally, we present a preliminary study of the centrosomal protein Cep164 in mammalian cells. Our images suggest that Cep164 is arranged in a nine-fold symmetric pattern around the centriole, consistent with findings suggested by cryoelectron tomography. Our work demonstrates that STED microscopy can be used for superresolution imaging in intact tissue and provides ultrastructural information in biological samples as an alternative to immuno-electron microscopy.

  20. Simultaneous multicolor detection of RNA and proteins using super-resolution microscopy.

    PubMed

    Mito, Mari; Kawaguchi, Tetsuya; Hirose, Tetsuro; Nakagawa, Shinichi

    2016-04-01

    A number of non-membranous cellular bodies have been identified in higher eukaryotes, and these bodies contain a specific set of proteins and RNAs that are used to fulfill their functions. The size of these RNA-containing cellular bodies is usually on a submicron scale, making it difficult to observe fine structures using optical microscopy due to the diffraction limitation of visible light. Recently, microscope companies have released super-resolution microscopes that were developed using different principles, enabling the observation of sub-micron structures not resolvable in conventional fluorescent microscopy. Here, we describe multi-color fluorescent in situ hybridization techniques optimized for the simultaneous detection of RNA and proteins using super-resolution microscopy, namely structured illumination microscopy (SIM).

  1. Terahertz near-field microscopy with subwavelength spatial resolution based on photoconductive antennas.

    PubMed

    Bitzer, Andreas; Ortner, Alex; Walther, Markus

    2010-07-01

    Imaging and sensing applications based on pulsed terahertz radiation have opened new possibilities for scientific and industrial applications. Many exploit the unique features of the terahertz (THz) spectral region, where common packaging materials are transparent and many chemical compounds show characteristic absorptions. Because of their diffraction limit, THz far-field imaging techniques lack microscopic resolution and, if subwavelength features have to be resolved, near-field techniques are required. Here, we present a THz near-field microscopy approach based on photoconductive antennas as the THz emitter and as a near-field probe. Our system allows us to measure amplitude, phase, and polarization of the electric fields in the vicinity of a sample with a spatial resolution on the micrometer scale (approximately lambda/20). Using a dielectric (plant leaf) and a metallic structure (microwire) as examples, we demonstrate the capabilities of our approach. PMID:20648112

  2. Solar Confocal interferometers for Sub-Picometer-Resolution Spectral Filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, G. Allen; Pietraszewski, Chris; West, Edward A.; Dines. Terence C.

    2007-01-01

    The confocal Fabry-Perot interferometer allows sub-picometer spectral resolution of Fraunhofer line profiles. Such high spectral resolution is needed to keep pace with the higher spatial resolution of the new set of large-aperture solar telescopes. The line-of-sight spatial resolution derived for line profile inversions would then track the improvements of the transverse spatial scale provided by the larger apertures. In particular, profile inversion allows improved velocity and magnetic field gradients to be determined independent of multiple line analysis using different energy levels and ions. The confocal interferometer's unique properties allow a simultaneous increase in both etendue and spectral power. The higher throughput for the interferometer provides significant decrease in the aperture, which is important in spaceflight considerations. We have constructed and tested two confocal interferometers. A slow-response thermal-controlled interferometer provides a stable system for laboratory investigation, while a piezoelectric interferometer provides a rapid response for solar observations. In this paper we provide design parameters, show construction details, and report on the laboratory test for these interferometers. The field of view versus aperture for confocal interferometers is compared with other types of spectral imaging filters. We propose a multiple etalon system for observing with these units using existing planar interferometers as pre-filters. The radiometry for these tests established that high spectral resolution profiles can be obtained with imaging confocal interferometers. These sub-picometer spectral data of the photosphere in both the visible and near-infrared can provide important height variation information. However, at the diffraction-limited spatial resolution of the telescope, the spectral data is photon starved due to the decreased spectral passband.

  3. Multi-beam synchrotron infrared chemical imaging with high spatial resolution: Beamline realization and first reports on image restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasse, Michael J.; Mattson, Eric C.; Reininger, Ruben; Kubala, Tim; Janowski, Sebastian; El-Bayyari, Zuheir; Hirschmugl, Carol J.

    2011-09-01

    Table-top Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) imaging using focal plane array (FPA) multi-element detectors is an increasingly popular chemical microscopy technique because it can provide microspectroscopic images of large sample areas in short times at moderate spatial resolution. The novel IR beamline IRENI at the Synchrotron Radiation Center (Wisconsin, USA), the first dedicated multi-beam synchrotron-based FT-IR imaging system, offers, within minutes, high quality chemical images at the highest available spatial resolution (diffraction-limited at all mid-IR wavelengths) with a pixel size of 0.54×0.54 μm 2 for transmission measurements. Due to this very high spatial sampling, mathematical image enhancement algorithms such as deconvolution and total variation (TV) reconstruction can be implemented to improve image contrast and thus spatial resolution. This is demonstrated for US Air force (USAF) targets, micron-sized aluminum beads, and a single living algal cell.

  4. Clean localization super-resolution microscopy for 3D biological imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Partha P.; Curthoys, Nikki M.; Hess, Samuel T.

    2016-01-01

    We propose clean localization microscopy (a variant of fPALM) using a molecule filtering technique. Localization imaging involves acquiring a large number of images containing single molecule signatures followed by one-to-one mapping to render a super-resolution image. In principle, this process can be repeated for other z-planes to construct a 3D image. But, single molecules observed from off-focal planes result in false representation of their presence in the focal plane, resulting in incorrect quantification and analysis. We overcome this with a single molecule filtering technique that imposes constraints on the diffraction limited spot size of single molecules in the image plane. Calibration with sub-diffraction size beads puts a natural cutoff on the actual diffraction-limited size of single molecules in the focal plane. This helps in distinguishing beads present in the focal plane from those in the off-focal planes thereby providing an estimate of the single molecules in the focal plane. We study the distribution of actin (labeled with a photoactivatable CAGE 552 dye) in NIH 3T3 mouse fibroblast cells.

  5. General Achievement Trends: Oklahoma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  6. General Achievement Trends: Georgia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  7. General Achievement Trends: Nebraska

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  8. General Achievement Trends: Arkansas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  9. General Achievement Trends: Maryland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  10. General Achievement Trends: Maine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  11. General Achievement Trends: Iowa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  12. General Achievement Trends: Texas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  13. General Achievement Trends: Hawaii

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  14. General Achievement Trends: Kansas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  15. General Achievement Trends: Florida

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  16. General Achievement Trends: Massachusetts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  17. General Achievement Trends: Tennessee

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  18. General Achievement Trends: Alabama

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  19. General Achievement Trends: Virginia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  20. General Achievement Trends: Michigan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  1. General Achievement Trends: Colorado

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  2. Inverting the Achievement Pyramid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White-Hood, Marian; Shindel, Melissa

    2006-01-01

    Attempting to invert the pyramid to improve student achievement and increase all students' chances for success is not a new endeavor. For decades, educators have strategized, formed think tanks, and developed school improvement teams to find better ways to improve the achievement of all students. Currently, the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) is…

  3. Achievement Test Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Dept. of Education, Columbus. Trade and Industrial Education Service.

    The Ohio Trade and Industrial Education Achievement Test battery is comprised of seven basic achievement tests: Machine Trades, Automotive Mechanics, Basic Electricity, Basic Electronics, Mechanical Drafting, Printing, and Sheet Metal. The tests were developed by subject matter committees and specialists in testing and research. The Ohio Trade and…

  4. School Effects on Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nichols, Robert C.

    The New York State Education Department conducts a Pupil Evaluation Program (PEP) in which each year all third, sixth, and ninth grade students in the state are given a series of achievement tests in reading and mathematics. The data accumulated by the department includes achievement test scores, teacher characteristics, building and curriculum…

  5. Heritability of Creative Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piffer, Davide; Hur, Yoon-Mi

    2014-01-01

    Although creative achievement is a subject of much attention to lay people, the origin of individual differences in creative accomplishments remain poorly understood. This study examined genetic and environmental influences on creative achievement in an adult sample of 338 twins (mean age = 26.3 years; SD = 6.6 years). Twins completed the Creative…

  6. Confronting the Achievement Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, David

    2007-01-01

    This article talks about the large achievement gap between children of color and their white peers. The reasons for the achievement gap are varied. First, many urban minorities come from a background of poverty. One of the detrimental effects of growing up in poverty is receiving inadequate nourishment at a time when bodies and brains are rapidly…

  7. Achieving Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abowitz, Kathleen Knight

    2011-01-01

    Public schools are functionally provided through structural arrangements such as government funding, but public schools are achieved in substance, in part, through local governance. In this essay, Kathleen Knight Abowitz explains the bifocal nature of achieving public schools; that is, that schools are both subject to the unitary Public compact of…

  8. Optical resolution of rotenoids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Abidi, S.L.

    1987-01-01

    Optical resolution of selected rotenoids containing 1-3 asymmetric centers in dihydrobenzopyranofuroben-zopyranone and dihydrobisbenzopyranopyranone series has been achieved on two chiral high-performance liquid chromatographic (hplc) stationary phases. In most cases, the absolute stereochemistry at the cis-B/C ring junction of the rotenoidal antipodes can be related to their elution order. Generally, the 6aα,12aα-enantiomers were more strongly retained by the chiral substrate than their corresponding optical antipodes. The elution-configuration relationship provides potential utility for predicting the absolute configuration of related rotenoidal compounds. Chiral phase hplc on amino-acid-bonded-silica yielded results explicable in terms of Pirkle's bonding schemes for chiral recognition. Resolution data for 12a-hydroxy-, 12a-methoxy-, and 12-hydroxyiminorotenoids further corroborate the mechanistic rationale, and demonstrate that nonpolar π-π interactions appeared to be important for enantiomeric separation on helic poly-triphenylmethylacryl-ate-silica (CPOT). In the latter system, steric effects and conformational factors in association with the modification of E-ring structures might play significant roles in the chiral separation process in view of the reversal to the elution order observed for all methoxylated rotenoids and elliptone derivatives including the parent deguelin. The unique separability (α = 1.44) of 12a-hydroxyelliptone on CPOT was suggestive of structural effects of the 5-side chain on the resolution of the rotenoids having a five-membered-E-ring. The results obtained with two different types of chiral phases are complementary and useful for optical resolution of a wide variety of natural and synthetic rotenoidal compounds.

  9. Super-resolution fluorescence imaging to study cardiac biophysics: α-actinin distribution and Z-disk topologies in optically thick cardiac tissue slices.

    PubMed

    Hou, Yufeng; Crossman, David J; Rajagopal, Vijay; Baddeley, David; Jayasinghe, Isuru; Soeller, Christian

    2014-08-01

    A major motivation for the use of super-resolution imaging methods in the investigation of cardiac biophysics has been the insight from biophysical considerations and detailed mathematical modeling that the spatial structure and protein organisation at the scale of nanometres can have enormous implications for calcium signalling in cardiac muscle. We illustrate the use of dSTORM based super-resolution in optically thick (∼10 μm) tissue slices of rat ventricular tissue to visualize proteins at the cardiac Z-disk and compare those images with confocal (diffraction-limited) as well as electron microscopy (EM) data which still provides a benchmark in terms of resolution. α-actinin is an abundant protein target that effectively defines the Z-disk in striated muscle and provides a reference structure for other proteins at the Z-line and the transverse tubules. Using super-resolution imaging α-actinin labelling provides very detailed outlines of the contractile machinery which we have used to study the properties of Z-disks and the distribution of α-actinin itself. We determined the local diameters of the myo-fibrillar and non-myofibrillar space using α-actinin labelling. Comparison between confocal and super-resolution based myofibrillar masks suggested that super-resolution data was able to segment myofibrils accurately while confocal approaches were not always able to distinguish neighbouring myofibrillar bundles which resulted in overestimated diameters. The increased resolution of super-resolution methods provides qualitatively new information to improve our understanding of cardiac biophysics. Nevertheless, conventional diffraction-limited imaging still has an important role to play which we illustrate with correlative confocal and super-resolution data.

  10. Student Achievement and Motivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flammer, Gordon H.; Mecham, Robert C.

    1974-01-01

    Compares the lecture and self-paced methods of instruction on the basis of student motivation and achieveme nt, comparing motivating and demotivating factors in each, and their potential for motivation and achievement. (Authors/JR)

  11. Optical super resolution using tilted illumination coupled with object rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Anwar; Mudassar, Asloob A.

    2015-03-01

    In conventional imaging systems, the resolution of the final image is mainly distorted due to diffraction of higher spatial frequencies of the target object. To overcome the diffraction limit, imaging techniques which synthetically enlarge the aperture of the system are used. In this paper, synthesized aperture is produced by means of a three fiber illumination assembly coupled with an in-plane object rotation. The high order diffracted spatial frequencies of the object are brought into the pass band of optical system by illuminating the object with tilted beams. The tilt produced at the fiber assembly plane is related to the dimension of the aperture, placed at the Fourier plane of the system. To span the 2D object spectrum at the Fourier plane, an in-plane object rotation procedure is applied at the object plane. The spectrum of the object is rotated as the object is rotated and illuminated with tilted beams. The corresponding object beam is interfered with a reference beam from the same source to record interferograms. All the recorded interferograms are stored in computer and de-convolution algorithm is applied to recover the synthesized spectrum. The image of the synthesized spectrum has three times improved resolution compared to the conventional image.

  12. Spartan infrared camera: high-resolution imaging for the SOAR Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loh, Edwin D.; Biel, Jason D.; Chen, Jian-Jun; Davis, Michael; Laporte, Rene; Loh, Owen Y.

    2004-09-01

    The Spartan Infrared Camera provides tip-tilt corrected imaging for the SOAR Telescope in the 1-2.5μm spectral range with four 2048x2048 HAWAII2 detectors. The median image size is expected to be less than 0.25 arcsec (FWHM), and in the H and K bands a significant amount of the light is expected to be in a core having the diffraction-limited width. The camera has two plate scales: 0.04 arcsec/pixel (f/21) for diffraction-limited sampling in the H and K bands and 0.07 arcsec/pixel (f/12) to cover a 5×5 arcmin2 field, over which tip-tilt correction is substantial. Except for CaF2 field-flattening lenses, the optics is all reflective to achieve the large field size and achromaticity, and all aluminum to match thermally the aluminum cryogenic-optical box in which the optics mount. The Strehl ratio of the camera itself is 0.95-1.00 for the f/21 channel. The optics (including the off-axis aspherical mirrors) will be aligned with precise metrology rather than adjusted using interferometry.

  13. Evaluation of Advanced Bionics high resolution mode.

    PubMed

    Buechner, Andreas; Frohne-Buechner, Carolin; Gaertner, Lutz; Lesinski-Schiedat, Anke; Battmer, Rolf-Dieter; Lenarz, Thomas

    2006-07-01

    The objective of this paper is to evaluate the advantages of the Advanced Bionic high resolution mode for speech perception, through a retrospective analysis. Forty-five adult subjects were selected who had a minimum experience of three months' standard mode (mean of 10 months) before switching to high resolution mode. Speech perception was tested in standard mode immediately before fitting with high resolution mode, and again after a maximum of six months high resolution mode usage (mean of two months). A significant improvement was found, between 11 and 17%, depending on the test material. The standard mode preference does not give any indication about the improvement when switching to high resolution. Users who are converted within any study achieve a higher performance improvement than those converted in the clinical routine. This analysis proves the significant benefits of high resolution mode for users, and also indicates the need for guidelines for individual optimization of parameter settings in a high resolution mode program.

  14. Interactively variable isotropic resolution in computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapp, Robert M.; Kyriakou, Yiannis; Kachelrieß, Marc; Wilharm, Sylvia; Kalender, Willi A.

    2008-05-01

    An individual balancing between spatial resolution and image noise is necessary to fulfil the diagnostic requirements in medical CT imaging. In order to change influencing parameters, such as reconstruction kernel or effective slice thickness, additional raw-data-dependent image reconstructions have to be performed. Therefore, the noise versus resolution trade-off is time consuming and not interactively applicable. Furthermore, isotropic resolution, expressed by an equivalent point spread function (PSF) in every spatial direction, is important for the undistorted visualization and quantitative evaluation of small structures independent of the viewing plane. Theoretically, isotropic resolution can be obtained by matching the in-plane and through-plane resolution with the aforementioned parameters. Practically, however, the user is not assisted in doing so by current reconstruction systems and therefore isotropic resolution is not commonly achieved, in particular not at the desired resolution level. In this paper, an integrated approach is presented for equalizing the in-plane and through-plane spatial resolution by image filtering. The required filter kernels are calculated from previously measured PSFs in x/y- and z-direction. The concepts derived are combined with a variable resolution filtering technique. Both approaches are independent of CT raw data and operate only on reconstructed images which allows for their application in real time. Thereby, the aim of interactively variable, isotropic resolution is achieved. Results were evaluated quantitatively by measuring PSFs and image noise, and qualitatively by comparing the images to direct reconstructions regarded as the gold standard. Filtered images matched direct reconstructions with arbitrary reconstruction kernels with standard deviations in difference images of typically between 1 and 17 HU. Isotropic resolution was achieved within 5% of the selected resolution level. Processing times of 20-100 ms per frame

  15. Resolution enhancement in tilted coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hariri Naghadeh, Diako; Keith Morley, Christopher

    2016-11-01

    Deconvolution is applied to remove source wavelet effects from seismograms. The results are resolution enhancement that enables detection of thin layers. Following enhancement of resolution, low frequency and high angle reflectors, particularly at great depth, appear as low amplitude and semi-invisible reflectors that are difficult to track and pick. A new approach to enhance resolution is introduced that estimates a derivative using continuous wavelet transform in tilted coordinates. The results are compared with sparse spike deconvolution, curvelet deconvolution and inverse quality filtering in wavelet domain. The positive consequence of the new method is to increase sampling of high dip features by changing the coordinate system from Cartesian to tilted. To compare those methods a complex data set was chosen that includes high angle faults and chaotic mass transport complex. Image enhancement using curvelet deconvolution shows a chaotic system as a non-chaotic one. The results show that sparse spike deconvolution and inverse quality filtering in wavelet domain are able to enhance resolution more than curvelet deconvolution especially at great depth but it is impossible to follow steep dip reflectors after resolution enhancement using these methods, especially when their apparent dips are more than 45°. By estimating derivatives in a continuous wavelet transform from tilted data sets similar resolution enhancement as the other deconvolution methods is achieved but additionally steep dipping reflectors are imaged much better than others. Subtracted results of the enhanced resolution data set using new method and the other introduced methods show that steeply dipping reflectors are highlighted as a particular ability of the new method. The results show that high frequency recovery in Cartesian co-ordinate is accompanied by inability to image steeply dipping reflectors especially at great depths. Conversely recovery of high frequency data and imaging of the data

  16. Iowa Women of Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohrn, Deborah Gore, Ed.

    1993-01-01

    This issue of the Goldfinch highlights some of Iowa's 20th century women of achievement. These women have devoted their lives to working for human rights, education, equality, and individual rights. They come from the worlds of politics, art, music, education, sports, business, entertainment, and social work. They represent Native Americans,…

  17. Achieving Peace through Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarken, Rodney H.

    While it is generally agreed that peace is desirable, there are barriers to achieving a peaceful world. These barriers are classified into three major areas: (1) an erroneous view of human nature; (2) injustice; and (3) fear of world unity. In a discussion of these barriers, it is noted that although the consciousness and conscience of the world…

  18. Increasing Male Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Barbara Talbert

    2008-01-01

    The No Child Left Behind legislation has brought greater attention to the academic performance of American youth. Its emphasis on student achievement requires a closer analysis of assessment data by school districts. To address the findings, educators must seek strategies to remedy failing results. In a mid-Atlantic district of the Unites States,…

  19. Leadership Issues: Raising Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horsfall, Chris, Ed.

    This document contains five papers examining the meaning and operation of leadership as a variable affecting student achievement in further education colleges in the United Kingdom. "Introduction" (Chris Horsfall) discusses school effectiveness studies' findings regarding the relationship between leadership and effective schools, distinguishes…

  20. Achievements or Disasters?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwin, MacArthur

    2000-01-01

    Focuses on policy issues that have affected arts education in the twentieth century, such as: interest in discipline-based arts education, influence of national arts associations, and national standards and coordinated assessment. States that whether the policy decisions are viewed as achievements or disasters are for future determination. (CMK)

  1. Achieving True Consensus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Napier, Rod; Sanaghan, Patrick

    2002-01-01

    Uses the example of Vermont's Middlebury College to explore the challenges and possibilities of achieving consensus about institutional change. Discusses why, unlike in this example, consensus usually fails, and presents four demands of an effective consensus process. Includes a list of "test" questions on successful collaboration. (EV)

  2. School Students' Science Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shymansky, James; Wang, Tzu-Ling; Annetta, Leonard; Everett, Susan; Yore, Larry D.

    2013-01-01

    This paper is a report of the impact of an externally funded, multiyear systemic reform project on students' science achievement on a modified version of the Third International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) test in 33 small, rural school districts in two Midwest states. The systemic reform effort utilized a cascading leadership strategy…

  3. Essays on Educational Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ampaabeng, Samuel Kofi

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation examines the determinants of student outcomes--achievement, attainment, occupational choices and earnings--in three different contexts. The first two chapters focus on Ghana while the final chapter focuses on the US state of Massachusetts. In the first chapter, I exploit the incidence of famine and malnutrition that resulted to…

  4. Assessing Handwriting Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ediger, Marlow

    Teachers in the school setting need to emphasize quality handwriting across the curriculum. Quality handwriting means that the written content is easy to read in either manuscript or cursive form. Handwriting achievement can be assessed, but not compared to the precision of assessing basic addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division facts.…

  5. Intelligence and Educational Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deary, Ian J.; Strand, Steve; Smith, Pauline; Fernandes, Cres

    2007-01-01

    This 5-year prospective longitudinal study of 70,000+ English children examined the association between psychometric intelligence at age 11 years and educational achievement in national examinations in 25 academic subjects at age 16. The correlation between a latent intelligence trait (Spearman's "g"from CAT2E) and a latent trait of educational…

  6. Explorations in achievement motivation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helmreich, Robert L.

    1982-01-01

    Recent research on the nature of achievement motivation is reviewed. A three-factor model of intrinsic motives is presented and related to various criteria of performance, job satisfaction and leisure activities. The relationships between intrinsic and extrinsic motives are discussed. Needed areas for future research are described.

  7. NCLB: Achievement Robin Hood?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bracey, Gerald W.

    2008-01-01

    In his "Wall Street Journal" op-ed on the 25th of anniversary of "A Nation At Risk", former assistant secretary of education Chester E. Finn Jr. applauded the report for turning U.S. education away from equality and toward achievement. It was not surprising, then, that in mid-2008, Finn arranged a conference to examine the potential "Robin Hood…

  8. Achieving All Our Ambitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartley, Tricia

    2009-01-01

    National learning and skills policy aims both to build economic prosperity and to achieve social justice. Participation in higher education (HE) has the potential to contribute substantially to both aims. That is why the Campaign for Learning has supported the ambition to increase the proportion of the working-age population with a Level 4…

  9. INTELLIGENCE, PERSONALITY AND ACHIEVEMENT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MUIR, R.C.; AND OTHERS

    A LONGITUDINAL DEVELOPMENTAL STUDY OF A GROUP OF MIDDLE CLASS CHILDREN IS DESCRIBED, WITH EMPHASIS ON A SEGMENT OF THE RESEARCH INVESTIGATING THE RELATIONSHIP OF ACHIEVEMENT, INTELLIGENCE, AND EMOTIONAL DISTURBANCE. THE SUBJECTS WERE 105 CHILDREN AGED FIVE TO 6.3 ATTENDING TWO SCHOOLS IN MONTREAL. EACH CHILD WAS ASSESSED IN THE AREAS OF…

  10. SALT and Spelling Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Joan

    A study investigated the effects of suggestopedic accelerative learning and teaching (SALT) on the spelling achievement, attitudes toward school, and memory skills of fourth-grade students. Subjects were 20 male and 28 female students from two self-contained classrooms at Kennedy Elementary School in Rexburg, Idaho. The control classroom and the…

  11. Appraising Reading Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ediger, Marlow

    To determine quality sequence in pupil progress, evaluation approaches need to be used which guide the teacher to assist learners to attain optimally. Teachers must use a variety of procedures to appraise student achievement in reading, because no one approach is adequate. Appraisal approaches might include: (1) observation and subsequent…

  12. Fundamental Limits of Spatial Resolution in PET

    PubMed Central

    Moses, William W.

    2010-01-01

    The fundamental limits of spatial resolution in positron emission tomography (PET) have been understood for many years. The physical size of the detector element usually plays the dominant role in determining resolution, but the combined contributions from acollinearity, positron range, penetration into the detector ring, and decoding errors in the detector modules often combine to be of similar size. In addition, the sampling geometry and statistical noise further degrade the effective resolution. This paper describes quantitatively describes these effects, discusses potential methods for reducing the magnitude of these effects, and computes the ultimately achievable spatial resolution for clinical and pre-clinical PET cameras. PMID:21804677

  13. KINOFORM LENSES - TOWARD NANOMETER RESOLUTION.

    SciTech Connect

    STEIN, A.; EVANS-LUTTERODT, K.; TAYLOR, A.

    2004-10-23

    While hard x-rays have wavelengths in the nanometer and sub-nanometer range, the ability to focus them is limited by the quality of sources and optics, and not by the wavelength. A few options, including reflective (mirrors), diffractive (zone plates) and refractive (CRL's) are available, each with their own limitations. Here we present our work with kinoform lenses which are refractive lenses with all material causing redundant 2{pi} phase shifts removed to reduce the absorption problems inherently limiting the resolution of refractive lenses. By stacking kinoform lenses together, the effective numerical aperture, and thus the focusing resolution, can be increased. The present status of kinoform lens fabrication and testing at Brookhaven is presented as well as future plans toward achieving nanometer resolution.

  14. High resolution optical DNA mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baday, Murat

    Many types of diseases including cancer and autism are associated with copy-number variations in the genome. Most of these variations could not be identified with existing sequencing and optical DNA mapping methods. We have developed Multi-color Super-resolution technique, with potential for high throughput and low cost, which can allow us to recognize more of these variations. Our technique has made 10--fold improvement in the resolution of optical DNA mapping. Using a 180 kb BAC clone as a model system, we resolved dense patterns from 108 fluorescent labels of two different colors representing two different sequence-motifs. Overall, a detailed DNA map with 100 bp resolution was achieved, which has the potential to reveal detailed information about genetic variance and to facilitate medical diagnosis of genetic disease.

  15. Single objective light-sheet microscopy for high-speed whole-cell 3D super-resolution

    DOE PAGES

    Meddens, Marjolein B. M.; Liu, Sheng; Finnegan, Patrick S.; Edwards, Thayne L.; James, Conrad D.; Lidke, Keith A.

    2016-05-01

    Here, we have developed a method for performing light-sheet microscopy with a single high numerical aperture lens by integrating reflective side walls into a microfluidic chip. These 45° side walls generate light-sheet illumination by reflecting a vertical light-sheet into the focal plane of the objective. Light-sheet illumination of cells loaded in the channels increases image quality in diffraction limited imaging via reduction of out-of-focus background light. Single molecule super-resolution is also improved by the decreased background resulting in better localization precision and decreased photo-bleaching, leading to more accepted localizations overall and higher quality images. Moreover, 2D and 3D single moleculemore » super-resolution data can be acquired faster by taking advantage of the increased illumination intensities as compared to wide field, in the focused light-sheet.« less

  16. Optical Sectioning and High Resolution in Single-Slice Structured Illumination Microscopy by Thick Slice Blind-SIM Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Jost, Aurélie; Tolstik, Elen; Feldmann, Polina; Wicker, Kai; Sentenac, Anne; Heintzmann, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    The microscope image of a thick fluorescent sample taken at a given focal plane is plagued by out-of-focus fluorescence and diffraction limited resolution. In this work, we show that a single slice of Structured Illumination Microscopy (two or three beam SIM) data can be processed to provide an image exhibiting tight sectioning and high transverse resolution. Our reconstruction algorithm is adapted from the blind-SIM technique which requires very little knowledge of the illumination patterns. It is thus able to deal with illumination distortions induced by the sample or illumination optics. We named this new algorithm thick slice blind-SIM because it models a three-dimensional sample even though only a single two-dimensional plane of focus was measured.

  17. Single objective light-sheet microscopy for high-speed whole-cell 3D super-resolution.

    PubMed

    Meddens, Marjolein B M; Liu, Sheng; Finnegan, Patrick S; Edwards, Thayne L; James, Conrad D; Lidke, Keith A

    2016-06-01

    We have developed a method for performing light-sheet microscopy with a single high numerical aperture lens by integrating reflective side walls into a microfluidic chip. These 45° side walls generate light-sheet illumination by reflecting a vertical light-sheet into the focal plane of the objective. Light-sheet illumination of cells loaded in the channels increases image quality in diffraction limited imaging via reduction of out-of-focus background light. Single molecule super-resolution is also improved by the decreased background resulting in better localization precision and decreased photo-bleaching, leading to more accepted localizations overall and higher quality images. Moreover, 2D and 3D single molecule super-resolution data can be acquired faster by taking advantage of the increased illumination intensities as compared to wide field, in the focused light-sheet.

  18. Single objective light-sheet microscopy for high-speed whole-cell 3D super-resolution

    PubMed Central

    Meddens, Marjolein B. M.; Liu, Sheng; Finnegan, Patrick S.; Edwards, Thayne L.; James, Conrad D.; Lidke, Keith A.

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a method for performing light-sheet microscopy with a single high numerical aperture lens by integrating reflective side walls into a microfluidic chip. These 45° side walls generate light-sheet illumination by reflecting a vertical light-sheet into the focal plane of the objective. Light-sheet illumination of cells loaded in the channels increases image quality in diffraction limited imaging via reduction of out-of-focus background light. Single molecule super-resolution is also improved by the decreased background resulting in better localization precision and decreased photo-bleaching, leading to more accepted localizations overall and higher quality images. Moreover, 2D and 3D single molecule super-resolution data can be acquired faster by taking advantage of the increased illumination intensities as compared to wide field, in the focused light-sheet. PMID:27375939

  19. Optical Sectioning and High Resolution in Single-Slice Structured Illumination Microscopy by Thick Slice Blind-SIM Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Jost, Aurélie; Tolstik, Elen; Feldmann, Polina; Wicker, Kai; Sentenac, Anne; Heintzmann, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    The microscope image of a thick fluorescent sample taken at a given focal plane is plagued by out-of-focus fluorescence and diffraction limited resolution. In this work, we show that a single slice of Structured Illumination Microscopy (two or three beam SIM) data can be processed to provide an image exhibiting tight sectioning and high transverse resolution. Our reconstruction algorithm is adapted from the blind-SIM technique which requires very little knowledge of the illumination patterns. It is thus able to deal with illumination distortions induced by the sample or illumination optics. We named this new algorithm thick slice blind-SIM because it models a three-dimensional sample even though only a single two-dimensional plane of focus was measured. PMID:26147644

  20. Single objective light-sheet microscopy for high-speed whole-cell 3D super-resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Meddens, Marjolein B. M.; Liu, Sheng; Finnegan, Patrick S.; Edwards, Thayne L.; James, Conrad D.; Lidke, Keith A.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we have developed a method for performing light-sheet microscopy with a single high numerical aperture lens by integrating reflective side walls into a microfluidic chip. These 45° side walls generate light-sheet illumination by reflecting a vertical light-sheet into the focal plane of the objective. Light-sheet illumination of cells loaded in the channels increases image quality in diffraction limited imaging via reduction of out-of-focus background light. Single molecule super-resolution is also improved by the decreased background resulting in better localization precision and decreased photo-bleaching, leading to more accepted localizations overall and higher quality images. Moreover, 2D and 3D single molecule super-resolution data can be acquired faster by taking advantage of the increased illumination intensities as compared to wide field, in the focused light-sheet.

  1. Single objective light-sheet microscopy for high-speed whole-cell 3D super-resolution.

    PubMed

    Meddens, Marjolein B M; Liu, Sheng; Finnegan, Patrick S; Edwards, Thayne L; James, Conrad D; Lidke, Keith A

    2016-06-01

    We have developed a method for performing light-sheet microscopy with a single high numerical aperture lens by integrating reflective side walls into a microfluidic chip. These 45° side walls generate light-sheet illumination by reflecting a vertical light-sheet into the focal plane of the objective. Light-sheet illumination of cells loaded in the channels increases image quality in diffraction limited imaging via reduction of out-of-focus background light. Single molecule super-resolution is also improved by the decreased background resulting in better localization precision and decreased photo-bleaching, leading to more accepted localizations overall and higher quality images. Moreover, 2D and 3D single molecule super-resolution data can be acquired faster by taking advantage of the increased illumination intensities as compared to wide field, in the focused light-sheet. PMID:27375939

  2. The study on spatial resolution in two-photon induced polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takada, Kenji; Sun, Hong-Bo; Kawata, Satoshi

    2006-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that two-photon induced polymerization allows fabrication of complex threedimensional structures such as photonic crystals and micromachines with a spatial resolution around 120 nm. In this report, we show the resolution improvement till 65 nm. Experimentally, 780-nm femtosecond laser pulses were focused into a photopolymerizable resin by a high numerical aperture objective lens. The resin is polymerized by means of radical initiation. In the radical polymerization, oxygen molecules dissolved in the resin inhibit the polymerization reactions by scavenging the radicals that initiate the polymerization. At controlled laser pulse energy, the radicals can survive and initiate polymerization only at the region where exposure energy is larger than the polymerization threshold, leading to a sub-diffraction-limited spatial resolution. In order to further improve the fabrication accuracy, we introduced a radical quencher into the resin, and at an optimized concentration the lateral spatial resolution was improved to 100 nm. Moreover, we fabricated a suspended fiber connected between two anchors by controlling the exposure dose within the fiber. After removing the unsolidified resin by ethanol and drying, a 65-nm width fiber was obtained, suggesting a possible spatial resolution of similar dimension. The size less than 1/10 of the excitation wavelength could satisfy requirements of many photonic and optoelectronic devices.

  3. STED Super-Resolution Microscopy of Clinical Paraffin-Embedded Human Rectal Cancer Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Wurm, Christian Andreas; Rüschoff, Josef; Ghadimi, B. Michael; Liersch, Torsten; Jakobs, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Formalin fixed and paraffin-embedded human tissue resected during cancer surgery is indispensable for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes and represents a vast and largely unexploited resource for research. Optical microscopy of such specimen is curtailed by the diffraction-limited resolution of conventional optical microscopy. To overcome this limitation, we used STED super-resolution microscopy enabling optical resolution well below the diffraction barrier. We visualized nanoscale protein distributions in sections of well-annotated paraffin-embedded human rectal cancer tissue stored in a clinical repository. Using antisera against several mitochondrial proteins, STED microscopy revealed distinct sub-mitochondrial protein distributions, suggesting a high level of structural preservation. Analysis of human tissues stored for up to 17 years demonstrated that these samples were still amenable for super-resolution microscopy. STED microscopy of sections of HER2 positive rectal adenocarcinoma revealed details in the surface and intracellular HER2 distribution that were blurred in the corresponding conventional images, demonstrating the potential of super-resolution microscopy to explore the thus far largely untapped nanoscale regime in tissues stored in biorepositories. PMID:25025184

  4. Integrated intravascular ultrasound and optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy with a 1-mm-diameter catheter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Xiaosong; Gong, Xiaojing; Lin, Riqiang; Hau, William; Song, Liang

    2014-03-01

    Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) plays a vital role in assessing the severity of atherosclerosis and has greatly enriched our knowledge on atherosclerotic plaques. However, it mainly reveals the structural information of plaques. In contrast, spectroscopic and molecular photoacoustic imaging can potentially improve plaque composition identification, inflammation detection, and ultimately the stratification of plaque vulnerability and risk. In this work, we developed an integrated intravascular ultrasound and optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (IVUS-PAM) system with a single catheter as small as 1 mm in diameter, comparable to that of existing clinical IVUS catheters. In addition, by using a GRIN lens to focus the excitation laser pulse, the system provides an optical-diffraction limited photoacoustic lateral resolution as fine as 19.6 micrometers, ~10-fold finer than that of conventional intravascular photoacoustic imaging and existing IVUS technology. The system employs a custom-made miniaturized single-element ultrasonic transducer with a dimension of ~0.5 mm, a centre frequency of ~40 MHz, and a fractional bandwidth of ~60%. The IVUS-PAM can simultaneously acquire co-registered IVUS images with an axial resolution of ~40 micrometers and a lateral resolution of ~200 micrometers. In the future, IVUS-PAM may open up new opportunities for improved high-resolution vulnerable plaque imaging and image-guided stent deployment.

  5. Design of an eight-element refractive lens for high resolution imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, D. V. B.

    1987-06-01

    An 8 element refractive lens of 324.4 mm EFL and f/4.5 was designed for the spectral band 520nm to 590nm. The FOV of the lens was +- 5 degrees. The computed MTF of this lens system was better than 0.7 for spatial frequencies up to 60 1p/mm, as against the diffraction limited MTF of 0.81. A similar lens was designed for the spectral band 770nm to 860nm. These two lenses will be configured alongwith a panchromatic catadioptric lens of 900 mm EFL for high resolution spacecraft remote sensing applications. The design details of these lenses were presented in this paper.

  6. High spatial resolution restoration of IRAS images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grasdalen, Gary L.; Inguva, R.; Dyck, H. Melvin; Canterna, R.; Hackwell, John A.

    1990-01-01

    A general technique to improve the spatial resolution of the IRAS AO data was developed at The Aerospace Corporation using the Maximum Entropy algorithm of Skilling and Gull. The technique has been applied to a variety of fields and several individual AO MACROS. With this general technique, resolutions of 15 arcsec were achieved in 12 and 25 micron images and 30 arcsec in 60 and 100 micron images. Results on galactic plane fields show that both photometric and positional accuracy achieved in the general IRAS survey are also achieved in the reconstructed images.

  7. Project ACHIEVE final report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-13

    Project ACHIEVE was a math/science academic enhancement program aimed at first year high school Hispanic American students. Four high schools -- two in El Paso, Texas and two in Bakersfield, California -- participated in this Department of Energy-funded program during the spring and summer of 1996. Over 50 students, many of whom felt they were facing a nightmare future, were given the opportunity to work closely with personal computers and software, sophisticated calculators, and computer-based laboratories -- an experience which their regular academic curriculum did not provide. Math and science projects, exercises, and experiments were completed that emphasized independent and creative applications of scientific and mathematical theories to real world problems. The most important outcome was the exposure Project ACHIEVE provided to students concerning the college and technical-field career possibilities available to them.

  8. Second harmonic super-resolution microscopy for quantification of mRNA at single copy sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Cho, Il-Hoon; Cui, Yi; Irudayaraj, Joseph

    2014-12-23

    Cell-specific information on the quantity and localization of key mRNAs at single copy sensitivity in single cells is critical for evaluating basic cellular process, disease risk, and efficacy of therapy. Quantification of overexpressed mRNAs beyond the diffraction limit is constrained by the optical property of the probes and microscopy techniques. In this report, nanosized barium titanium oxide (BaTiO3, BTO) crystals were utilized as probes for mRNA quantification by a second harmonic super-resolution microscopy (SHaSM). The SHaSM was able to detect a single copy of the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (Her2) mRNA at a resolution of 55.6 nm with the ability to resolve multiple mRNA copies in a diffraction-limited spot. Her2 mRNA per cell was counted in SK-BR-3, MCF-7, and HeLa cell lines as 595±79.1, 38.9±8.26, and 1.5±2.8, respectively. Our single-cell quantification results were validated with the fluorescence in situ hybridization studies and quantitative PCR, showing better specificity and selectivity over current single-molecule approaches for transcript detection. The SHaSM is expected to have an upper limit of resolving ∼10(4) transcripts in a single cell with the ability to monitor intracellular transcriptional dynamics at video rate. The developed approach has strong potential in clinical research and in the early diagnosis of life-threatening diseases such as cancer.

  9. Dilation framing camera with 4 ps resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Houzhi; Zhao, Xin; Liu, Jinyuan; Xie, Weixin; Bai, Yanli; Lei, Yunfei; Liao, Yubo; Niu, Hanben

    2016-04-01

    A framing camera using pulse-dilation technology is reported in this article. The camera uses pulse dilation of an electron signal from a pulsed photo-cathode (PC) to achieve high temporal resolution. While the PC is not pulsed, the measured temporal resolution of the camera without pulse-dilation is about 71 ps. While the excitation pulse is applied on the PC, the measured temporal resolution is improved to 4 ps by using the pulse-dilation technology. The spatial resolution of the dilation framing camera is also measured, which is better than 100 μm. The relationship between the temporal resolution and the PC bias voltage is obtained. The variation of the temporal resolution with the gradient of the PC excitation pulse is also provided.

  10. Does achievement motivation mediate the semantic achievement priming effect?

    PubMed

    Engeser, Stefan; Baumann, Nicola

    2014-10-01

    The aim of our research was to understand the processes of the prime-to-behavior effects with semantic achievement primes. We extended existing models with a perspective from achievement motivation theory and additionally used achievement primes embedded in the running text of excerpts of school textbooks to simulate a more natural priming condition. Specifically, we proposed that achievement primes affect implicit achievement motivation and conducted pilot experiments and 3 main experiments to explore this proposition. We found no reliable positive effect of achievement primes on implicit achievement motivation. In light of these findings, we tested whether explicit (instead of implicit) achievement motivation is affected by achievement primes and found this to be the case. In the final experiment, we found support for the assumption that higher explicit achievement motivation implies that achievement priming affects the outcome expectations. The implications of the results are discussed, and we conclude that primes affect achievement behavior by heightening explicit achievement motivation and outcome expectancies. PMID:24820250

  11. High resolution A/D conversion based on piecewise conversion at lower resolution

    DOEpatents

    Terwilliger, Steve

    2012-06-05

    Piecewise conversion of an analog input signal is performed utilizing a plurality of relatively lower bit resolution A/D conversions. The results of this piecewise conversion are interpreted to achieve a relatively higher bit resolution A/D conversion without sampling frequency penalty.

  12. Wavefront correction and high-resolution in vivo OCT imaging with an objective integrated multi-actuator adaptive lens

    PubMed Central

    Bonora, Stefano; Jian, Yifan; Zhang, Pengfei; Zam, Azhar; Pugh, Edward N.; Zawadzki, Robert J.; Sarunic, Marinko V.

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive optics is rapidly transforming microscopy and high-resolution ophthalmic imaging. The adaptive elements commonly used to control optical wavefronts are liquid crystal spatial light modulators and deformable mirrors. We introduce a novel Multi-actuator Adaptive Lens that can correct aberrations to high order, and which has the potential to increase the spread of adaptive optics to many new applications by simplifying its integration with existing systems. Our method combines an adaptive lens with an imaged-based optimization control that allows the correction of images to the diffraction limit, and provides a reduction of hardware complexity with respect to existing state-of-the-art adaptive optics systems. The Multi-actuator Adaptive Lens design that we present can correct wavefront aberrations up to the 4th order of the Zernike polynomial characterization. The performance of the Multi-actuator Adaptive Lens is demonstrated in a wide field microscope, using a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor for closed loop control. The Multi-actuator Adaptive Lens and image-based wavefront-sensorless control were also integrated into the objective of a Fourier Domain Optical Coherence Tomography system for in vivo imaging of mouse retinal structures. The experimental results demonstrate that the insertion of the Multi-actuator Objective Lens can generate arbitrary wavefronts to correct aberrations down to the diffraction limit, and can be easily integrated into optical systems to improve the quality of aberrated images. PMID:26368169

  13. Wavefront correction and high-resolution in vivo OCT imaging with an objective integrated multi-actuator adaptive lens.

    PubMed

    Bonora, Stefano; Jian, Yifan; Zhang, Pengfei; Zam, Azhar; Pugh, Edward N; Zawadzki, Robert J; Sarunic, Marinko V

    2015-08-24

    Adaptive optics is rapidly transforming microscopy and high-resolution ophthalmic imaging. The adaptive elements commonly used to control optical wavefronts are liquid crystal spatial light modulators and deformable mirrors. We introduce a novel Multi-actuator Adaptive Lens that can correct aberrations to high order, and which has the potential to increase the spread of adaptive optics to many new applications by simplifying its integration with existing systems. Our method combines an adaptive lens with an imaged-based optimization control that allows the correction of images to the diffraction limit, and provides a reduction of hardware complexity with respect to existing state-of-the-art adaptive optics systems. The Multi-actuator Adaptive Lens design that we present can correct wavefront aberrations up to the 4th order of the Zernike polynomial characterization. The performance of the Multi-actuator Adaptive Lens is demonstrated in a wide field microscope, using a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor for closed loop control. The Multi-actuator Adaptive Lens and image-based wavefront-sensorless control were also integrated into the objective of a Fourier Domain Optical Coherence Tomography system for in vivo imaging of mouse retinal structures. The experimental results demonstrate that the insertion of the Multi-actuator Objective Lens can generate arbitrary wavefronts to correct aberrations down to the diffraction limit, and can be easily integrated into optical systems to improve the quality of aberrated images. PMID:26368169

  14. High resolution tomographic instrument development

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-08-01

    Our recent work has concentrated on the development of high-resolution PET instrumentation reflecting in part the growing importance of PET in nuclear medicine imaging. We have developed a number of positron imaging instruments and have the distinction that every instrument has been placed in operation and has had an extensive history of application for basic research and clinical study. The present program is a logical continuation of these earlier successes. PCR-I, a single ring positron tomograph was the first demonstration of analog coding using BGO. It employed 4 mm detectors and is currently being used for a wide range of biological studies. These are of immense importance in guiding the direction for future instruments. In particular, PCR-II, a volume sensitive positron tomograph with 3 mm spatial resolution has benefited greatly from the studies using PCR-I. PCR-II is currently in the final stages of assembly and testing and will shortly be placed in operation for imaging phantoms, animals and ultimately humans. Perhaps the most important finding resulting from our previous study is that resolution and sensitivity must be carefully balanced to achieve a practical high resolution system. PCR-II has been designed to have the detection characteristics required to achieve 3 mm resolution in human brain under practical imaging situations. The development of algorithms by the group headed by Dr. Chesler is based on a long history of prior study including his joint work with Drs. Pelc and Reiderer and Stearns. This body of expertise will be applied to the processing of data from PCR-II when it becomes operational.

  15. High resolution tomographic instrument development

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    Our recent work has concentrated on the development of high-resolution PET instrumentation reflecting in part the growing importance of PET in nuclear medicine imaging. We have developed a number of positron imaging instruments and have the distinction that every instrument has been placed in operation and has had an extensive history of application for basic research and clinical study. The present program is a logical continuation of these earlier successes. PCR-I, a single ring positron tomograph was the first demonstration of analog coding using BGO. It employed 4 mm detectors and is currently being used for a wide range of biological studies. These are of immense importance in guiding the direction for future instruments. In particular, PCR-II, a volume sensitive positron tomograph with 3 mm spatial resolution has benefited greatly from the studies using PCR-I. PCR-II is currently in the final stages of assembly and testing and will shortly be placed in operation for imaging phantoms, animals and ultimately humans. Perhaps the most important finding resulting from our previous study is that resolution and sensitivity must be carefully balanced to achieve a practical high resolution system. PCR-II has been designed to have the detection characteristics required to achieve 3 mm resolution in human brain under practical imaging situations. The development of algorithms by the group headed by Dr. Chesler is based on a long history of prior study including his joint work with Drs. Pelc and Reiderer and Stearns. This body of expertise will be applied to the processing of data from PCR-II when it becomes operational.

  16. High resolution tomographic instrument development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Our recent work has concentrated on the development of high-resolution PET instrumentation reflecting in part the growing importance of PET in nuclear medicine imaging. We have developed a number of positron imaging instruments and have the distinction that every instrument has been placed in operation and has had an extensive history of application for basic research and clinical study. The present program is a logical continuation of these earlier successes. PCR-I, a single ring positron tomograph was the first demonstration of analog coding using BGO. It employed 4 mm detectors and is currently being used for a wide range of biological studies. These are of immense importance in guiding the direction for future instruments. In particular, PCR-II, a volume sensitive positron tomograph with 3 mm spatial resolution has benefitted greatly from the studies using PCR-I. PCR-II is currently in the final stages of assembly and testing and will shortly be placed in operation for imaging phantoms, animals and ultimately humans. Perhaps the most important finding resulting from our previous study is that resolution and sensitivity must be carefully balanced to achieve a practical high resolution system. PCR-II has been designed to have the detection characteristics required to achieve 3 mm resolution in human brain under practical imaging situations. The development of algorithms by the group headed by Dr. Chesler is based on a long history of prior study including his joint work with Drs. Pelc and Reiderer and Stearns. This body of expertise will be applied to the processing of data from PCR-II when it becomes operational.

  17. Improving spatial resolution of confocal Raman microscopy by super-resolution image restoration.

    PubMed

    Cui, Han; Zhao, Weiqian; Wang, Yun; Fan, Ying; Qiu, Lirong; Zhu, Ke

    2016-05-16

    A new super-resolution image restoration confocal Raman microscopy method (SRIR-RAMAN) is proposed for improving the spatial resolution of confocal Raman microscopy. This method can recover the lost high spatial frequency of the confocal Raman microscopy by using Poisson-MAP super-resolution imaging restoration, thereby improving the spatial resolution of confocal Raman microscopy and realizing its super-resolution imaging. Simulation analyses and experimental results indicate that the spatial resolution of SRIR-RAMAN can be improved by 65% to achieve 200 nm with the same confocal Raman microscopy system. This method can provide a new tool for high spatial resolution micro-probe structure detection in physical chemistry, materials science, biomedical science and other areas.

  18. High-Resolution He I Spectropolarimetry of Chromospheric Fibrils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schad, Thomas A.; Penn, M. J.

    2011-05-01

    Of spectral diagnostics for the magnetic field in the solar chromosphere, the He I triplet at 1083 nm offers a comparatively simple means to determine both the magnitude and direction of the field vector. The triplet forms over a narrow range of heights when compared to strong optical lines, and recently the mechanisms that influence its polarization have been well characterized, thus allowing inversions of the magnetic field from observed Stokes profiles. We discuss recent work with the Facility Infrared Spectropolarimeter (FIRS) at the Dunn Solar Telescope (DST), New Mexico, USA to measure and infer the magnetic field vector of chromospheric fibrils. FIRS is designed to perform fast diffraction-limited dual-beam spectropolarimetry simultaneously at visible and infrared wavelengths through the use of multiple slits and narrowband filters. It can be operated in congress with the High Order Adaptive Optics (HOAO) system of the DST as well as with the Interferometric BiDimensional Spectropolarimeter (IBIS). Here we present high-resolution FIRS observations of chromospheric fibrils which employ the HOAO system under great seeing. We calibrate these observations for the full effect of the FIRS-DST combined analysis system on the Stokes vector which allow us to define the observed Stokes geometry with respect to solar coordinates. Full inversions of our measurements incorporating the effects of atomic polarization, the Hanle effect, and the Zeeman effect will be presented showing support for chromospheric fibrils that are aligned with the magnetic field direction.

  19. FIRST SCIENCE RESULTS FROM SOFIA/FORCAST: SUPER-RESOLUTION IMAGING OF THE S140 CLUSTER AT 37 {mu}m

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, Paul M.; Adams, Joseph D.; Herter, Terry L.; Gull, George; Schoenwald, Justin E-mail: jdadams@astro.cornell.edu E-mail: geg3@cornell.edu; and others

    2012-04-20

    We present 37 {mu}m imaging of the S140 complex of infrared sources centered on IRS1 made with the FORCAST camera on SOFIA. These observations are the longest wavelength imaging to resolve clearly the three main sources seen at shorter wavelengths, IRS 1, 2, and 3, and are nearly at the diffraction limit of the 2.5 m telescope. We also obtained a small number of images at 11 and 31 {mu}m that are useful for flux measurement. Our images cover the area of several strong submillimeter sources seen in the area-SMM 1, 2, and 3-that are not coincident with any mid-infrared sources and are not visible in our longer wavelength imaging either. Our new observations confirm previous estimates of the relative dust optical depth and source luminosity for the components in this likely cluster of early B stars. We also investigate the use of super-resolution to go beyond the basic diffraction limit in imaging on SOFIA and find that the van Cittert algorithm, together with the 'multi-resolution' technique, provides excellent results.

  20. Imaging live cells at high spatiotemporal resolution for lab-on-a-chip applications.

    PubMed

    Chin, Lip Ket; Lee, Chau-Hwang; Chen, Bi-Chang

    2016-05-24

    Conventional optical imaging techniques are limited by the diffraction limit and difficult-to-image biomolecular and sub-cellular processes in living specimens. Novel optical imaging techniques are constantly evolving with the desire to innovate an imaging tool that is capable of seeing sub-cellular processes in a biological system, especially in three dimensions (3D) over time, i.e. 4D imaging. For fluorescence imaging on live cells, the trade-offs among imaging depth, spatial resolution, temporal resolution and photo-damage are constrained based on the limited photons of the emitters. The fundamental solution to solve this dilemma is to enlarge the photon bank such as the development of photostable and bright fluorophores, leading to the innovation in optical imaging techniques such as super-resolution microscopy and light sheet microscopy. With the synergy of microfluidic technology that is capable of manipulating biological cells and controlling their microenvironments to mimic in vivo physiological environments, studies of sub-cellular processes in various biological systems can be simplified and investigated systematically. In this review, we provide an overview of current state-of-the-art super-resolution and 3D live cell imaging techniques and their lab-on-a-chip applications, and finally discuss future research trends in new and breakthrough research areas of live specimen 4D imaging in controlled 3D microenvironments.

  1. Multi-Sensor Fusion of Infrared and Electro-Optic Signals for High Resolution Night Images

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiaopeng; Netravali, Ravi; Man, Hong; Lawrence, Victor

    2012-01-01

    Electro-optic (EO) image sensors exhibit the properties of high resolution and low noise level at daytime, but they do not work in dark environments. Infrared (IR) image sensors exhibit poor resolution and cannot separate objects with similar temperature. Therefore, we propose a novel framework of IR image enhancement based on the information (e.g., edge) from EO images, which improves the resolution of IR images and helps us distinguish objects at night. Our framework superimposing/blending the edges of the EO image onto the corresponding transformed IR image improves their resolution. In this framework, we adopt the theoretical point spread function (PSF) proposed by Hardie et al. for the IR image, which has the modulation transfer function (MTF) of a uniform detector array and the incoherent optical transfer function (OTF) of diffraction-limited optics. In addition, we design an inverse filter for the proposed PSF and use it for the IR image transformation. The framework requires four main steps: (1) inverse filter-based IR image transformation; (2) EO image edge detection; (3) registration; and (4) blending/superimposing of the obtained image pair. Simulation results show both blended and superimposed IR images, and demonstrate that blended IR images have better quality over the superimposed images. Additionally, based on the same steps, simulation result shows a blended IR image of better quality when only the original IR image is available. PMID:23112602

  2. Imaging live cells at high spatiotemporal resolution for lab-on-a-chip applications.

    PubMed

    Chin, Lip Ket; Lee, Chau-Hwang; Chen, Bi-Chang

    2016-05-24

    Conventional optical imaging techniques are limited by the diffraction limit and difficult-to-image biomolecular and sub-cellular processes in living specimens. Novel optical imaging techniques are constantly evolving with the desire to innovate an imaging tool that is capable of seeing sub-cellular processes in a biological system, especially in three dimensions (3D) over time, i.e. 4D imaging. For fluorescence imaging on live cells, the trade-offs among imaging depth, spatial resolution, temporal resolution and photo-damage are constrained based on the limited photons of the emitters. The fundamental solution to solve this dilemma is to enlarge the photon bank such as the development of photostable and bright fluorophores, leading to the innovation in optical imaging techniques such as super-resolution microscopy and light sheet microscopy. With the synergy of microfluidic technology that is capable of manipulating biological cells and controlling their microenvironments to mimic in vivo physiological environments, studies of sub-cellular processes in various biological systems can be simplified and investigated systematically. In this review, we provide an overview of current state-of-the-art super-resolution and 3D live cell imaging techniques and their lab-on-a-chip applications, and finally discuss future research trends in new and breakthrough research areas of live specimen 4D imaging in controlled 3D microenvironments. PMID:27121367

  3. Wide-field multispectral super-resolution imaging using spin-dependent fluorescence in nanodiamonds.

    PubMed

    Chen, Edward H; Gaathon, Ophir; Trusheim, Matthew E; Englund, Dirk

    2013-05-01

    Recent advances in fluorescence microscopy have enabled spatial resolution below the diffraction limit by localizing multiple temporally or spectrally distinguishable fluorophores. Here, we introduce a super-resolution technique that deterministically controls the brightness of uniquely addressable, photostable emitters. We modulate the fluorescence brightness of negatively charged nitrogen-vacancy (NV(-)) centers in nanodiamonds through magnetic resonance techniques. Using a CCD camera, this "deterministic emitter switch microscopy" (DESM) technique enables super-resolution imaging with localization down to 12 nm across a 35 × 35 μm(2) area. DESM is particularly well suited for biological applications such as multispectral particle tracking since fluorescent nanodiamonds are not only cytocompatible but also nonbleaching and bright. We observe fluorescence count rates exceeding 1.5 × 10(6) photons per second from single NV(-) centers at saturation. When combined with emerging NV(-)-based techniques for sensing magnetic and electric fields, DESM opens the door to rapid, super-resolution imaging for tracking and sensing applications in the life and physical sciences.

  4. Multi-sensor fusion of infrared and electro-optic signals for high resolution night images.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiaopeng; Netravali, Ravi; Man, Hong; Lawrence, Victor

    2012-01-01

    Electro-optic (EO) image sensors exhibit the properties of high resolution and low noise level at daytime, but they do not work in dark environments. Infrared (IR) image sensors exhibit poor resolution and cannot separate objects with similar temperature. Therefore, we propose a novel framework of IR image enhancement based on the information (e.g., edge) from EO images, which improves the resolution of IR images and helps us distinguish objects at night. Our framework superimposing/blending the edges of the EO image onto the corresponding transformed IR image improves their resolution. In this framework, we adopt the theoretical point spread function (PSF) proposed by Hardie et al. for the IR image, which has the modulation transfer function (MTF) of a uniform detector array and the incoherent optical transfer function (OTF) of diffraction-limited optics. In addition, we design an inverse filter for the proposed PSF and use it for the IR image transformation. The framework requires four main steps: (1) inverse filter-based IR image transformation; (2) EO image edge detection; (3) registration; and (4) blending/superimposing of the obtained image pair. Simulation results show both blended and superimposed IR images, and demonstrate that blended IR images have better quality over the superimposed images. Additionally, based on the same steps, simulation result shows a blended IR image of better quality when only the original IR image is available.

  5. Super-Resolution Dynamic Imaging of Dendritic Spines Using a Low-Affinity Photoconvertible Actin Probe

    PubMed Central

    Lelek, Mickaël; Darzacq, Xavier; Triller, Antoine; Zimmer, Christophe; Dahan, Maxime

    2011-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton of dendritic spines plays a key role in morphological aspects of synaptic plasticity. The detailed analysis of the spine structure and dynamics in live neurons, however, has been hampered by the diffraction-limited resolution of conventional fluorescence microscopy. The advent of nanoscopic imaging techniques thus holds great promise for the study of these processes. We implemented a strategy for the visualization of morphological changes of dendritic spines over tens of minutes at a lateral resolution of 25 to 65 nm. We have generated a low-affinity photoconvertible probe, capable of reversibly binding to actin and thus allowing long-term photoactivated localization microscopy of the spine cytoskeleton. Using this approach, we resolve structural parameters of spines and record their long-term dynamics at a temporal resolution below one minute. Furthermore, we have determined changes in the spine morphology in response to pharmacologically induced synaptic activity and quantified the actin redistribution underlying these changes. By combining PALM imaging with quantum dot tracking, we could also simultaneously visualize the cytoskeleton and the spine membrane, allowing us to record complementary information on the morphological changes of the spines at super-resolution. PMID:21264214

  6. An adaptive optics imaging system based on a high-resolution liquid crystal on silicon device.

    PubMed

    Mu, Quanquan; Cao, Zhaoliang; Hu, Lifa; Li, Dayu; Xuan, Li

    2006-09-01

    An adaptive optics imaging system is introduced in this paper. A high resolution liquid crystal on silicon (LCOS) device was used as a phase only wave front corrector instead of a conversional deformable mirror. The wave front aberration was detected by a Shack-Hartmann (SH) wave front sensor, which has lambda/100 rms wave front measurement accuracy. Under this construction 0.09lambda (lambda=0.6328microm) Peak to Valley correction precision was reached. Further more, some low frequency hot convection turbulence induced by an electric iron was compensated in real time at the same precision. The Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) of this system was also measured before and after wave front correction. Under the active correction of LCOS, the system reached the diffraction limited resolution approximately 65l p/mm on the horizontal direction. All of this showed the ability of using this device in high resolution, low temporal turbulence imaging system, such as retinal imaging, to improve the resolution performance.

  7. Achieving closure at Fernald

    SciTech Connect

    Bradburne, John; Patton, Tisha C.

    2001-02-25

    When Fluor Fernald took over the management of the Fernald Environmental Management Project in 1992, the estimated closure date of the site was more than 25 years into the future. Fluor Fernald, in conjunction with DOE-Fernald, introduced the Accelerated Cleanup Plan, which was designed to substantially shorten that schedule and save taxpayers more than $3 billion. The management of Fluor Fernald believes there are three fundamental concerns that must be addressed by any contractor hoping to achieve closure of a site within the DOE complex. They are relationship management, resource management and contract management. Relationship management refers to the interaction between the site and local residents, regulators, union leadership, the workforce at large, the media, and any other interested stakeholder groups. Resource management is of course related to the effective administration of the site knowledge base and the skills of the workforce, the attraction and retention of qualified a nd competent technical personnel, and the best recognition and use of appropriate new technologies. Perhaps most importantly, resource management must also include a plan for survival in a flat-funding environment. Lastly, creative and disciplined contract management will be essential to effecting the closure of any DOE site. Fluor Fernald, together with DOE-Fernald, is breaking new ground in the closure arena, and ''business as usual'' has become a thing of the past. How Fluor Fernald has managed its work at the site over the last eight years, and how it will manage the new site closure contract in the future, will be an integral part of achieving successful closure at Fernald.

  8. Achievement Goals and Achievement Emotions: A Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Chiungjung

    2011-01-01

    This meta-analysis synthesized 93 independent samples (N = 30,003) in 77 studies that reported in 78 articles examining correlations between achievement goals and achievement emotions. Achievement goals were meaningfully associated with different achievement emotions. The correlations of mastery and mastery approach goals with positive achievement…

  9. Conflict Resolution Communications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lincoln, Melinda G.

    2002-01-01

    Suggests that, due to escalating violence in contemporary society, community colleges should offer certificate or degree programs in conflict resolution. Describes a conflict resolution communication program, which teaches communication skills, mediation processes, and coping strategies to prospective mediators. (NB)

  10. Entrepreneur achievement. Liaoning province.

    PubMed

    Zhao, R

    1994-03-01

    This paper reports the successful entrepreneurial endeavors of members of a 20-person women's group in Liaoning Province, China. Jing Yuhong, a member of the Family Planning Association at Shileizi Village, Dalian City, provided the basis for their achievements by first building an entertainment/study room in her home to encourage married women to learn family planning. Once stocked with books, magazines, pamphlets, and other materials on family planning and agricultural technology, dozens of married women in the neighborhood flocked voluntarily to the room. Yuhong also set out to give these women a way to earn their own income as a means of helping then gain greater equality with their husbands and exert greater control over their personal reproductive and social lives. She gave a section of her farming land to the women's group, loaned approximately US$5200 to group members to help them generate income from small business initiatives, built a livestock shed in her garden for the group to raise marmots, and erected an awning behind her house under which mushrooms could be grown. The investment yielded $12,000 in the first year, allowing each woman to keep more than $520 in dividends. Members then soon began going to fairs in the capital and other places to learn about the outside world, and have successfully ventured out on their own to generate individual incomes. Ten out of twenty women engaged in these income-generating activities asked for and got the one-child certificate.

  11. Atomic resolution holography.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Kouichi

    2014-11-01

    Atomic resolution holography, such as X-ray fluorescence holography (XFH)[1] and photoelectron holography (PH), has the attention of researcher as an informative local structure analysis, because it provides three dimensional atomic images around specific elements within a range of a few nanometers. It can determine atomic arrangements around a specific element without any prior knowledge of structures. It is considered that the atomic resolution holographic is a third method of structural analysis at the atomic level after X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS). As known by many researchers, XRD and XAFS are established methods that are widespread use in various fields. XRD and XAFS provide information on long-range translational periodicities and very local environments, respectively, whereas the atomic resolution holography gives 3D information on the local order and can visualize surrounding atoms with a large range of coordination shells. We call this feature "3D medium-range local structure observation".In addition to this feature, the atomic resolution holography is very sensitive to the displacement of atoms from their ideal positions, and one can obtain quantitative information about local lattice distortions by analyzing reconstructed atomic images[2] When dopants with different atomic radii from the matrix elements are present, the lattices around the dopants are distorted. However, using the conventional methods of structural analysis, one cannot determine the extent to which the local lattice distortions are preserved from the dopants. XFH is a good tool for solving this problem.Figure 1 shows a recent achievement on a relaxor ferroelectric of Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3 (PMN) using XFH. The structural studies of relaxor ferroelectrics have been carried out by X-ray or neutron diffractions, which suggested rhombohedral distortions of their lattices. However, their true pictures have not been obtained, yet. The Nb Kα holograms showed

  12. The design of a novel tip enhanced near-field scanning probe microscope for ultra-high resolution optical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowak, Derek Brant

    Traditional light microscopy suffers from the diffraction limit, which limits the spatial resolution to lambda/2. The current trend in optical microscopy is the development of techniques to bypass the diffraction limit. Resolutions below 40 nm will make it possible to probe biological systems by imaging the interactions between single molecules and cell membranes. These resolutions will allow for the development of improved drug delivery mechanisms by increasing our understanding of how chemical communication within a cell occurs. The materials sciences would also benefit from these high resolutions. Nanomaterials can be analyzed with Raman spectroscopy for molecular and atomic bond information, or with fluorescence response to determine bulk optical properties with tens of nanometer resolution. Near-field optical microscopy is one of the current techniques, which allows for imaging at resolutions beyond the diffraction limit. Using a combination of a shear force microscope (SFM) and an inverted optical microscope, spectroscopic resolutions below 20 nm have been demonstrated. One technique, in particular, has been named tip enhanced near-field optical microscopy (TENOM). The key to this technique is the use of solid metal probes, which are illuminated in the far field by the excitation wavelength of interest. These probes are custom-designed using finite difference time domain (FDTD) modeling techniques, then fabricated with the use of a focused ion beam (FIB) microscope. The measure of the quality of probe design is based directly on the field enhancement obtainable. The greater the field enhancement of the probe, the more the ratio of near-field to far-field background contribution will increase. The elimination of the far-field signal by a decrease of illumination power will provide the best signal-to-noise ratio in the near-field images. Furthermore, a design that facilitates the delocalization of the near-field imaging from the far-field will be beneficial

  13. HEPEX - achievements and challenges!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappenberger, Florian; Ramos, Maria-Helena; Thielen, Jutta; Wood, Andy; Wang, Qj; Duan, Qingyun; Collischonn, Walter; Verkade, Jan; Voisin, Nathalie; Wetterhall, Fredrik; Vuillaume, Jean-Francois Emmanuel; Lucatero Villasenor, Diana; Cloke, Hannah L.; Schaake, John; van Andel, Schalk-Jan

    2014-05-01

    HEPEX is an international initiative bringing together hydrologists, meteorologists, researchers and end-users to develop advanced probabilistic hydrological forecast techniques for improved flood, drought and water management. HEPEX was launched in 2004 as an independent, cooperative international scientific activity. During the first meeting, the overarching goal was defined as: "to develop and test procedures to produce reliable hydrological ensemble forecasts, and to demonstrate their utility in decision making related to the water, environmental and emergency management sectors." The applications of hydrological ensemble predictions span across large spatio-temporal scales, ranging from short-term and localized predictions to global climate change and regional modeling. Within the HEPEX community, information is shared through its blog (www.hepex.org), meetings, testbeds and intercompaison experiments, as well as project reportings. Key questions of HEPEX are: * What adaptations are required for meteorological ensemble systems to be coupled with hydrological ensemble systems? * How should the existing hydrological ensemble prediction systems be modified to account for all sources of uncertainty within a forecast? * What is the best way for the user community to take advantage of ensemble forecasts and to make better decisions based on them? This year HEPEX celebrates its 10th year anniversary and this poster will present a review of the main operational and research achievements and challenges prepared by Hepex contributors on data assimilation, post-processing of hydrologic predictions, forecast verification, communication and use of probabilistic forecasts in decision-making. Additionally, we will present the most recent activities implemented by Hepex and illustrate how everyone can join the community and participate to the development of new approaches in hydrologic ensemble prediction.

  14. The Homogeneity of School Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cahan, Sorel

    Since the measurement of school achievement involves the administration of achievement tests to various grades on various subjects, both grade level and subject matter contribute to within-school achievement variations. To determine whether achievement test scores vary most among different fields within a grade level, or within fields among…

  15. Tip-tilt compensation: Resolution limits for ground-based telescopes using laser guide star adaptive optics. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    Olivier, S.S.; Max, C.E.; Gavel, D.T.; Brase, J.M.

    1992-10-08

    The angular resolution of long-exposure images from ground-based telescopes equipped with laser guide star adaptive optics systems is fundamentally limited by the the accuracy with which the tip-tilt aberrations introduced by the atmosphere can be corrected. Assuming that a natural star is used as the tilt reference, the residual error due to tilt anisoplanatism can significantly degrade the long-exposure resolution even if the tilt reference star is separated from the object being imaged by a small angle. Given the observed distribution of stars in the sky, the need to find a tilt reference star quite close to the object restricts the fraction of the sky over which long-exposure images with diffraction limited resolution can be obtained. In this paper, the authors present a comprehensive performance analysis of tip-tilt compensation systems that use a natural star as a tilt reference, taking into account properties of the atmosphere and of the Galactic stellar populations, and optimizing over the system operating parameters to determine the fundamental limits to the long-exposure resolution. Their results show that for a ten meter telescope on Mauna Kea, if the image of the tilt reference star is uncorrected, about half the sky can be imaged in the V band with long-exposure resolution less than 60 milli-arc-seconds (mas), while if the image of the tilt reference star is fully corrected, about half the sky can be imaged in the V band with long-exposure resolution less than 16 mas. Furthermore, V band images long-exposure resolution of less than 16 mas may be obtained with a ten meter telescope on Mauna Kea for unresolved objects brighter than magnitude 22 that are fully corrected by a laser guide star adaptive optics system. This level of resolution represents about 70% of the diffraction limit of a ten meter telescope in the V band and is more than a factor of 45 better than the median seeing in the V band on Mauna Kea.

  16. Measuring temporal resolution of cardiac CT reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, David; Heuscher, Dominic

    2005-04-01

    Multi-slice CT today is capable of imaging the heart with excellent temporal resolution. Algorithms have been developed to perform reconstructions combining data from multiple cardiac cycles. This paper presents a simulation phantom that enables a direct measurement of the actual temporal resolution achieved by these algorithms. This is not only useful for assessing the temporal resolution but also for validating the algorithms themselves. A simulation phantom was developed that consists of a 20 cm. diameter water phantom containing an array of cylinders whose intensities are pulsed for various durations ranging from 10 msec. to 250 msec. The intensity varied between the background value of water (0 HU) and 800 HU. By measuring the nominal attenuation value at the center of each cylinder, a curve can be derived representing the response over the given temporal range. A temporal resolution representing the FWHM value is determined based on the half-max value of this curve. Reconstructions were performed using a multi-cycle cardiac algorithm described previously in the literature. The measured FWHM values agree quite well to the temporal resolution predicted by the cardiac algorithm itself. Even the variation along the longitudinal axis can be accounted for by the predicted values. A simulated phantom can be used to accurately assess the temporal resolution of cardiac reconstruction algorithms. Excellent agreement was achieved between the predicted and measured temporal resolution values for the multi-cycle algorithm used in this study.

  17. A resolution expressing the gratitude and appreciation of the Senate for the acts of heroism and military achievement by the members of the United States Armed Forces who participated in the June 6, 1944, amphibious landing at Normandy, France, and commending them for leadership and valor in an operation that helped bring an end to World War II.

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Sen. Boozman, John [R-AR

    2014-04-10

    05/21/2014 Resolution agreed to in Senate without amendment and with a preamble by Unanimous Consent. (consideration: CR S3243) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  18. Comments on Educational Equity Plans of the Segments. A Staff Report on the Development of Plans by the State Department of Education, the California State University, and the University of California To Achieve the Educational Equity Goals of Assembly Concurrent Resolution 83 (1984). Commission Report 88-6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Postsecondary Education Commission, Sacramento.

    In 1984 the California Legislature enacted Assembly Concurrent Resolution 83 (ACR 83), which established specific goals for enhancing the participation and success in postsecondary education of students from economic, racial, and ethnic backgrounds historically underrepresented in higher education. The Postsecondary Education Commission was…

  19. Experiments in turbulence induced super-resolution in surveillance imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, Andrew; Li, Feng; Bowman, David; Fraser, Donald

    2008-11-01

    Surveillance imaging from long-range requires use of telescopic optics, and fast electro-optic sensors. The intervening air introduces distortion of the imagery and its spatial frequency content, and does so such that regions of the image suffer dissimilar distortion, visible in the first instance as a time varying geometrical warp, and then as region specific blurring or "speckle". The severity of this, and hence the reduction in size of regions exhibiting similar distortion, is a function of the field of view of the telescope, the height above ground of the imaging path, the range to the target, and climatic conditions. Image processing algorithms must be run on the sequence of imagery to correct these distortions, on the assumption that exposure time has effectively "frozen" the turbulence. These are absent of knowledge of the actual scene under investigation. Successful algorithms do manage to correct the apparent warping, and in doing so they yield both information on the bulk turbulent medium, and allow for reconstruction of spatial frequency content of the scene that would have been lost by the capability of the optics had their been no turbulence. This is known as turbulence-induced super-resolution. To confirm the success of algorithms in both correction and reconstruction of such super-resolution we have devised a field experiment where the truth image is known and which uses other methods to evaluate the turbulence for collaboration of the results. We report here a new algorithm, which has proved successful in satellite remote sensing, for restoring this imagery to quality beyond the diffraction limits set by the optics.

  20. Attitude Towards Physics and Additional Mathematics Achievement Towards Physics Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veloo, Arsaythamby; Nor, Rahimah; Khalid, Rozalina

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to identify the difference in students' attitude towards Physics and Additional Mathematics achievement based on gender and relationship between attitudinal variables towards Physics and Additional Mathematics achievement with achievement in Physics. This research focused on six variables, which is attitude towards…

  1. The Impact of Reading Achievement on Overall Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Churchwell, Dawn Earheart

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between reading achievement and achievement in other subject areas. The purpose of this study was to determine if there was a correlation between reading scores as measured by the Standardized Test for the Assessment of Reading (STAR) and academic achievement in language arts, math, science, and social studies…

  2. Resolving the spatial relationship between intracellular components by dual color super resolution optical fluctuations imaging (SOFI)

    PubMed Central

    Gallina, Maria Elena; Xu, Jianmin; Dertinger, Thomas; Aizer, Adva; Shav-Tal, Yaron; Weiss, Shimon

    2013-01-01

    Background Multi-color super-resolution (SR) imaging microscopy techniques can resolve ultrastructura relationships between- and provide co-localization information of- different proteins inside the cell or even within organelles at a higher resolution than afforded by conventional diffraction-limited imaging. While still very challenging, important SR colocalization results have been reported in recent years using STED, PALM and STORM techniques. Results In this work, we demonstrate dual-color Super Resolution Optical Fluctuations Imaging (SOFI) using a standard far-field fluorescence microscope and different color blinking quantum dots. We define the spatial relationship between hDcp1a, a processing body (P-body, PB) protein, and the tubulin cytoskeletal network. Our finding could open up new perspectives on the role of the cytoskeleton in PB formation and assembly. Further insights into PB internal organization are also reported and discussed. Conclusions Our results demonstrate the suitability and facile use of multi-color SOFI for the investigation of intracellular ultrastructures. PMID:24324919

  3. Super Resolution Imaging of Genetically Labeled Synapses in Drosophila Brain Tissue.

    PubMed

    Spühler, Isabelle A; Conley, Gaurasundar M; Scheffold, Frank; Sprecher, Simon G

    2016-01-01

    Understanding synaptic connectivity and plasticity within brain circuits and their relationship to learning and behavior is a fundamental quest in neuroscience. Visualizing the fine details of synapses using optical microscopy remains however a major technical challenge. Super resolution microscopy opens the possibility to reveal molecular features of synapses beyond the diffraction limit. With direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy, dSTORM, we image synaptic proteins in the brain tissue of the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. Super resolution imaging of brain tissue harbors difficulties due to light scattering and the density of signals. In order to reduce out of focus signal, we take advantage of the genetic tools available in the Drosophila and have fluorescently tagged synaptic proteins expressed in only a small number of neurons. These neurons form synapses within the calyx of the mushroom body, a distinct brain region involved in associative memory formation. Our results show that super resolution microscopy, in combination with genetically labeled synaptic proteins, is a powerful tool to investigate synapses in a quantitative fashion providing an entry point for studies on synaptic plasticity during learning and memory formation. PMID:27303270

  4. A Compact "Water Window" Microscope with 60 nm Spatial Resolution for Applications in Biology and Nanotechnology.

    PubMed

    Wachulak, Przemyslaw; Torrisi, Alfio; Nawaz, Muhammad F; Bartnik, Andrzej; Adjei, Daniel; Vondrová, Šárka; Turňová, Jana; Jančarek, Alexandr; Limpouch, Jiří; Vrbová, Miroslava; Fiedorowicz, Henryk

    2015-10-01

    Short illumination wavelength allows an extension of the diffraction limit toward nanometer scale; thus, improving spatial resolution in optical systems. Soft X-ray (SXR) radiation, from "water window" spectral range, λ=2.3-4.4 nm wavelength, which is particularly suitable for biological imaging due to natural optical contrast provides better spatial resolution than one obtained with visible light microscopes. The high contrast in the "water window" is obtained because of selective radiation absorption by carbon and water, which are constituents of the biological samples. The development of SXR microscopes permits the visualization of features on the nanometer scale, but often with a tradeoff, which can be seen between the exposure time and the size and complexity of the microscopes. Thus, herein, we present a desk-top system, which overcomes the already mentioned limitations and is capable of resolving 60 nm features with very short exposure time. Even though the system is in its initial stage of development, we present different applications of the system for biology and nanotechnology. Construction of the microscope with recently acquired images of various samples will be presented and discussed. Such a high resolution imaging system represents an interesting solution for biomedical, material science, and nanotechnology applications.

  5. SIM and PALM: high-resolution microscopy methods and their consequences for cell biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krampert, Gerhard; Kleppe, Ingo; Kalkbrenner, Thomas; Weisshart, Klaus; Wolleschensky, Ralf; Kempe, Michael

    2010-04-01

    The diffraction limit in traditional fluorescence microscopy (approximately 200 and 600 nanometers in lateral and axial directions, respectively) has restricted the applications in bio-medical research. However, over the last 10 years various techniques have emerged to overcome this limit. Each of these techniques has its own characteristics that influence its application in biology. This paper will show how two of the techniques, Structured Illumination Microscopy (SIM) and PhotoActivated Localization Microscopy (PALM), complement each other in imaging of biological samples beyond the resolution of classical widefield fluorescence microscopy. As a reference the properties of two well known standard imaging techniques in this field, confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy (LSM) and Total Internal Reflection (TIRF) microscopy, are compared to the properties of the two high resolution techniques. Combined SIM/PALM imaging allows the extremely accurate localization of individual molecules within the context of various fluorescent structures already resolved in 3D with a resolution of up to 100nm using SIM. Such a combined system provides the biologist with an unprecedented view of the sub-cellular organization of life.

  6. VirusMapper: open-source nanoscale mapping of viral architecture through super-resolution microscopy.

    PubMed

    Gray, Robert D M; Beerli, Corina; Pereira, Pedro Matos; Scherer, Kathrin Maria; Samolej, Jerzy; Bleck, Christopher Karl Ernst; Mercer, Jason; Henriques, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    The nanoscale molecular assembly of mammalian viruses during their infectious life cycle remains poorly understood. Their small dimensions, generally bellow the 300nm diffraction limit of light microscopes, has limited most imaging studies to electron microscopy. The recent development of super-resolution (SR) light microscopy now allows the visualisation of viral structures at resolutions of tens of nanometers. In addition, these techniques provide the added benefit of molecular specific labelling and the capacity to investigate viral structural dynamics using live-cell microscopy. However, there is a lack of robust analytical tools that allow for precise mapping of viral structure within the setting of infection. Here we present an open-source analytical framework that combines super-resolution imaging and naïve single-particle analysis to generate unbiased molecular models. This tool, VirusMapper, is a high-throughput, user-friendly, ImageJ-based software package allowing for automatic statistical mapping of conserved multi-molecular structures, such as viral substructures or intact viruses. We demonstrate the usability of VirusMapper by applying it to SIM and STED images of vaccinia virus in isolation and when engaged with host cells. VirusMapper allows for the generation of accurate, high-content, molecular specific virion models and detection of nanoscale changes in viral architecture. PMID:27374400

  7. HIGH RESOLUTION 36 GHz IMAGING OF THE SUPERNOVA REMNANT OF SN 1987A

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, T. M.; Staveley-Smith, L.; Zanardo, G.; Ng, C.-Y.; Gaensler, B. M.; Ball, Lewis; Kesteven, M. J.; Manchester, R. N.; Tzioumis, A. K.

    2009-11-01

    The aftermath of supernova (SN) 1987A continues to provide spectacular insights into the interaction between an SN blastwave and its circumstellar environment. We here present 36 GHz observations from the Australia Telescope Compact Array of the radio remnant of SN 1987A. These new images, taken in 2008 April and 2008 October, substantially extend the frequency range of an ongoing monitoring and imaging program conducted between 1.4 and 20 GHz. Our 36.2 GHz images have a diffraction-limited angular resolution of 0.''3-0.''4, which covers the gap between high resolution, low dynamic range VLBI images of the remnant and low resolution, high dynamic range images at frequencies between 1 and 20 GHz. The radio morphology of the remnant at 36 GHz is an elliptical ring with enhanced emission on the eastern and western sides, similar to that seen previously at lower frequencies. Model fits to the data in the Fourier domain show that the emitting region is consistent with a thick inclined torus of mean radius 0.''85, and a 2008 October flux density of 27 +- 6 mJy at 36.2 GHz. The spectral index for the remnant at this epoch, determined between 1.4 GHz and 36.2 GHz, is alpha = -0.83. There is tentative evidence for an unresolved central source with flatter spectral index.

  8. VirusMapper: open-source nanoscale mapping of viral architecture through super-resolution microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Robert D. M.; Beerli, Corina; Pereira, Pedro Matos; Scherer, Kathrin Maria; Samolej, Jerzy; Bleck, Christopher Karl Ernst; Mercer, Jason; Henriques, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    The nanoscale molecular assembly of mammalian viruses during their infectious life cycle remains poorly understood. Their small dimensions, generally bellow the 300nm diffraction limit of light microscopes, has limited most imaging studies to electron microscopy. The recent development of super-resolution (SR) light microscopy now allows the visualisation of viral structures at resolutions of tens of nanometers. In addition, these techniques provide the added benefit of molecular specific labelling and the capacity to investigate viral structural dynamics using live-cell microscopy. However, there is a lack of robust analytical tools that allow for precise mapping of viral structure within the setting of infection. Here we present an open-source analytical framework that combines super-resolution imaging and naïve single-particle analysis to generate unbiased molecular models. This tool, VirusMapper, is a high-throughput, user-friendly, ImageJ-based software package allowing for automatic statistical mapping of conserved multi-molecular structures, such as viral substructures or intact viruses. We demonstrate the usability of VirusMapper by applying it to SIM and STED images of vaccinia virus in isolation and when engaged with host cells. VirusMapper allows for the generation of accurate, high-content, molecular specific virion models and detection of nanoscale changes in viral architecture. PMID:27374400

  9. Intravascular Optical-Resolution Photoacoustic Tomography with a 1.1 mm Diameter Catheter

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Xiaosong; Gong, Xiaojing; Hau, William; Lin, Riqiang; Zheng, Jiaxiang; Liu, Chengbo; Zeng, Chengzhi; Zou, Xin; Zheng, Hairong; Song, Liang

    2014-01-01

    Photoacoustic imaging is an emerging technology that can provide anatomic, functional, and molecular information about biological tissue. Intravascular spectroscopic and molecular photoacoustic imaging can potentially improve the identification of atherosclerotic plaque composition, the detection of inflammation, and ultimately the risk stratification of atherosclerosis. In this study, a first-of-its-kind intravascular optical-resolution photoacoustic tomography (OR-PAT) system with a 1.1 mm diameter catheter is developed, offering optical-diffraction limited transverse resolution as fine as 19.6 μm, ∼10-fold finer than that of conventional intravascular photoacoustic and ultrasonic imaging. To offer complementary imaging information and depth, the system also acquires co-registered intravascular ultrasound images in parallel. Imaging of an iliac stent and a lipid phantom shows that the high resolution and contrast of OR-PAT can enable improved stent implantation guidance and lipid identification. In the future, these capabilities may ultimately improve the diagnosis and interventional treatment of vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques, which are prone to cause thrombotic complications such as myocardial infarction and stroke. PMID:24651256

  10. Intensity and phase fields behind phase-shifting masks studied with high-resolution interference microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puthankovilakam, Krishnaparvathy; Scharf, Toralf; Kim, Myun Sik; Naqavi, Ali; Herzig, Hans Peter; Weichelt, Tina; Zeitner, Uwe; Vogler, Uwe; Voelkel, Reinhard

    2016-04-01

    We try to find out the details of how light fields behind the structures of photomasks develop in order to determine the best conditions and designs for proximity printing. The parameters that we use approach real situations like structure printing at proximity gaps of 20 to 50 μm and structure sizes down to 2 μm. This is the first time that an experimental analysis of light propagation through a mask is presented in detail, which includes information on intensity and phase. We use high-resolution interference microscopy (HRIM) for the measurement. HRIM is a Mach-Zehnder interferometer, which is capable of recording three-dimensional distributions of intensity and phase with diffraction-limited resolution. Our characterization technique allows plotting the evolution of the desired light field, usually called the aerial image, and therefore gives access to the printable structure until the desired proximity gap. Here, we discuss in detail the evolution of intensity and phase fields of elbow or corner structures at different positions behind a phase mask and interpret the main parameters. Of particular interest are tolerances against proximity gap variation and the theoretical explanation of the resolution in printed structures.

  11. A large field of view two-photon mesoscope with subcellular resolution for in vivo imaging

    PubMed Central

    Sofroniew, Nicholas James; Flickinger, Daniel; King, Jonathan; Svoboda, Karel

    2016-01-01

    Imaging is used to map activity across populations of neurons. Microscopes with cellular resolution have small (<1 millimeter) fields of view and cannot simultaneously image activity distributed across multiple brain areas. Typical large field of view microscopes do not resolve single cells, especially in the axial dimension. We developed a 2-photon random access mesoscope (2p-RAM) that allows high-resolution imaging anywhere within a volume spanning multiple brain areas (∅ 5 mm x 1 mm cylinder). 2p-RAM resolution is near diffraction limited (lateral, 0.66 μm, axial 4.09 μm at the center; excitation wavelength = 970 nm; numerical aperture = 0.6) over a large range of excitation wavelengths. A fast three-dimensional scanning system allows efficient sampling of neural activity in arbitrary regions of interest across the entire imaging volume. We illustrate the use of the 2p-RAM by imaging neural activity in multiple, non-contiguous brain areas in transgenic mice expressing protein calcium sensors. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14472.001 PMID:27300105

  12. Micelle-templated composite quantum dots for super-resolution imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jianquan; Fan, Qirui; Mahajan, Kalpesh D.; Ruan, Gang; Herrington, Andrew; Tehrani, Kayvan F.; Kner, Peter; Winter, Jessica O.

    2014-05-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) have tremendous potential for biomedical imaging, including super-resolution techniques that permit imaging below the diffraction limit. However, most QDs are produced via organic methods, and hence require surface treatment to render them water-soluble for biological applications. Previously, we reported a micelle-templating method that yields nanocomposites containing multiple core/shell ZnS-CdSe QDs within the same nanocarrier, increasing overall particle brightness and virtually eliminating QD blinking. Here, this technique is extended to the encapsulation of Mn-doped ZnSe QDs (Mn-ZnSe QDs), which have potential applications in super-resolution imaging as a result of the introduction of Mn2+ dopant energy levels. The size, shape and fluorescence characteristics of these doped QD-micelles were compared to those of micelles created using core/shell ZnS-CdSe QDs (ZnS-CdSe QD-micelles). Additionally, the stability of both types of particles to photo-oxidation was investigated. Compared to commercial QDs, micelle-templated QDs demonstrated superior fluorescence intensity, higher signal-to-noise ratios, and greater stability against photo-oxidization,while reducing blinking. Additionally, the fluorescence of doped QD-micelles could be modulated from a bright ‘on’ state to a dark ‘off’ state, with a modulation depth of up to 76%, suggesting the potential of doped QD-micelles for applications in super-resolution imaging.

  13. Far-field imaging of non-fluorescent species with subdiffraction resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Pu; Slipchenko, Mikhail N.; Mitchell, James; Yang, Chen; Potma, Eric O.; Xu, Xianfan; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2013-06-01

    Super-resolution optical microscopy is providing a new means by which to view as yet unseen details on a nanoscopic scale. Current far-field super-resolution techniques rely on fluorescence as the readout. Here, we demonstrate a scheme for breaking the diffraction limit in far-field imaging of non-fluorescent species by using spatially controlled saturation of electronic absorption. Our method is based on a pump-probe process where a modulated pump field perturbs the charge carrier density in a sample, thus modulating the transmission of a probe field. A doughnut-shaped laser beam is then added to transiently saturate the electronic transition in the periphery of the focal volume, so the induced modulation in the sequential probe pulse only occurs at the focal centre. By raster-scanning the three collinearly aligned beams, high-speed subdiffraction-limited imaging of graphite nanoplatelets is performed. This technique has the potential to enable super-resolution imaging of nanomaterials and non-fluorescent chromophores, which may remain out of reach to fluorescence-based methods.

  14. Actin restructuring during Salmonella typhimurium infection investigated by confocal and super-resolution microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jason J.; Kunde, Yuliya A.; Hong-Geller, Elizabeth; Werner, James H.

    2014-01-01

    We have used super-resolution optical microscopy and confocal microscopy to visualize the cytoskeletal restructuring of HeLa cells that accompanies and enables Salmonella typhimurium internalization. Herein, we report the use of confocal microscopy to verify and explore infection conditions that would be compatible with super-resolution optical microscopy, using Alexa-488 labeled phalloidin to stain the actin cytoskeletal network. While it is well known that actin restructuring and cytoskeletal rearrangements often accompany and assist in bacterial infection, most studies have employed conventional diffraction-limited fluorescence microscopy to explore these changes. Here we show that the superior spatial resolution provided by single-molecule localization methods (such as direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy) enables more precise visualization of the nanoscale changes in the actin cytoskeleton that accompany bacterial infection. In particular, we found that a thin (100-nm) ring of actin often surrounds an invading bacteria 10 to 20 min postinfection, with this ring being transitory in nature. We estimate that a few hundred monofilaments of actin surround the S. typhimurium in this heretofore unreported bacterial internalization intermediate.

  15. Super Resolution Imaging of Genetically Labeled Synapses in Drosophila Brain Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Spühler, Isabelle A.; Conley, Gaurasundar M.; Scheffold, Frank; Sprecher, Simon G.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding synaptic connectivity and plasticity within brain circuits and their relationship to learning and behavior is a fundamental quest in neuroscience. Visualizing the fine details of synapses using optical microscopy remains however a major technical challenge. Super resolution microscopy opens the possibility to reveal molecular features of synapses beyond the diffraction limit. With direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy, dSTORM, we image synaptic proteins in the brain tissue of the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. Super resolution imaging of brain tissue harbors difficulties due to light scattering and the density of signals. In order to reduce out of focus signal, we take advantage of the genetic tools available in the Drosophila and have fluorescently tagged synaptic proteins expressed in only a small number of neurons. These neurons form synapses within the calyx of the mushroom body, a distinct brain region involved in associative memory formation. Our results show that super resolution microscopy, in combination with genetically labeled synaptic proteins, is a powerful tool to investigate synapses in a quantitative fashion providing an entry point for studies on synaptic plasticity during learning and memory formation. PMID:27303270

  16. Super-Resolution Imaging of a Dielectric Microsphere Is Governed by the Waist of Its Photonic Nanojet.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hui; Trouillon, Raphaël; Huszka, Gergely; Gijs, Martin A M

    2016-08-10

    Dielectric microspheres with appropriate refractive index can image objects with super-resolution, that is, with a precision well beyond the classical diffraction limit. A microsphere is also known to generate upon illumination a photonic nanojet, which is a scattered beam of light with a high-intensity main lobe and very narrow waist. Here, we report a systematic study of the imaging of water-immersed nanostructures by barium titanate glass microspheres of different size. A numerical study of the light propagation through a microsphere points out the light focusing capability of microspheres of different size and the waist of their photonic nanojet. The former correlates to the magnification factor of the virtual images obtained from linear test nanostructures, the biggest magnification being obtained with microspheres of ∼6-7 μm in size. Analyzing the light intensity distribution of microscopy images allows determining analytically the point spread function of the optical system and thereby quantifies its resolution. We find that the super-resolution imaging of a microsphere is dependent on the waist of its photonic nanojet, the best resolution being obtained with a 6 μm Ø microsphere, which generates the nanojet with the minimum waist. This comparison allows elucidating the super-resolution imaging mechanism. PMID:27398718

  17. Ultra-precise characterization of LCLS hard X-ray focusing mirrors by high resolution slope measuring deflectometry.

    PubMed

    Siewert, Frank; Buchheim, Jana; Boutet, Sébastien; Williams, Garth J; Montanez, Paul A; Krzywinski, Jacek; Signorato, Riccardo

    2012-02-13

    We present recent results on the inspection of a first diffraction-limited hard X-ray Kirkpatrick-Baez (KB) mirror pair for the Coherent X-ray Imaging (CXI) instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). The full KB system - mirrors and holders - was under inspection by use of high resolution slope measuring deflectometry. The tests confirmed that KB mirrors of 350mm aperture length characterized by an outstanding residual figure error of <1 nm rms has been realized. This corresponds to the residual figure slope error of about 0.05µrad rms, unprecedented on such long elliptical mirrors. Additional measurements show the clamping of the mirrors to be a critical step for the final - shape preserving installation of such outstanding optics.

  18. Capacity Increase in Radial Direction of Super-Resolution Near-Field Structure Read-Only-Memory Disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurihara, Kazuma; Yamakawa, Yuzo; Shima, Takayuki; Tominaga, Junji

    2007-06-01

    We propose a novel super-resolution near-field structure (super-RENS) read-only-memory (ROM) disc with a narrow track pitch using a group tracking technique. The group tracking technique enables the tracking control of an optical disc because it consists of track pitch sizes that are less than the diffraction limit. The group tracking technique to increases capacity in the radial direction of the super-RENS ROM disc. By using this technique, carrier-to-noise ratio (CNR) was obtained at 33 dB and the minimum crosstalk level was -23 dB at the 100 nm pit length. A readout track was selected by controlling the offset level of the tracking error signal in a high definition digital versatile disc (HD-DVD) system. It was confirmed that the capacity of the super-RENS ROM disc with the group tracking structure was improved in the radial direction.

  19. High-Resolution, Wide-Field-of-View Scanning Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sepulveda, Cesar; Wilson, Robert; Seshadri, Suresh

    2007-01-01

    would provide narrow-angle, diffraction-limited high resolution at a wavelength of 500 nm.

  20. Implementation of a parallel-beam optical-CT apparatus for three-dimensional radiation dosimetry using a high-resolution CCD camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wen-Tzeng; Chen, Chin-Hsing; Hung, Chao-Nan; Tuan, Chiu-Ching; Chang, Yuan-Jen

    2015-06-01

    In this study, a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera with 2-megapixel (1920×1080-pixel) and 12-bit resolution was developed for optical computed tomography(optical CT). The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of our system was 30.12 dB, better than that of commercially available CCD cameras (25.31 dB). The 50% modulation transfer function (MTF50) of our 1920×1080-pixel camera gave a line width per picture height (LW/PH) of 745, which is 73% of the diffraction-limited resolution. Compared with a commercially available 1-megapixel CCD camera (1296×966-pixel) with a LW/PH=358 and 46.6% of the diffraction-limited resolution, our camera system provided higher spatial resolution and better image quality. The NIPAM gel dosimeter was used to evaluate the optical CT with a 2-megapixel CCD. A clinical five-field irradiation treatment plan was generated using the Eclipse planning system (Varian Corp., Palo Alto, CA, USA). The gel phantom was irradiated using a 6-MV Varian Clinac IX linear accelerator (Varian). The measured NIPAM gel dose distributions and the calculated dose distributions, generated by the treatment planning software (TPS), were compared using the 3% dose-difference and 3 mm distance-to-agreement criteria. The gamma pass rate was as high as 98.2% when 2-megapixel CCD camera was used in optical CT. However, the gamma pass rate was only 96.0% when a commercially available 1-megapixel CCD camera was used.

  1. Cherokee Culture and School Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Anthony D.

    1980-01-01

    Compares the effect of cooperative and competitive behaviors of Cherokee and Anglo American elementary school students on academic achievement. Suggests changes in teaching techniques and lesson organization that might raise academic achievement while taking into consideration tribal traditions that limit scholastic achievement in an…

  2. Subgrid resolution of flow and force fields.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buneman, O.

    1973-01-01

    By means of spline fitting, both while converting a Lagrangian distribution of field sources onto an Eulerian grid, and while interpolating the field from its Eulerian grid to the Lagrangian positions of the responding elements, one achieves effective resolution down to about one-eight of a grid mesh unit. One also avoids discontinuities and noise due to cell boundary crossings.

  3. Solar corona at high resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golub, L.; Rosner, R.; Zombeck, M. V. Z.; Vaiana, G. S.

    1982-01-01

    The earth's surface is shielded from solar X rays almost completely by the atmosphere. It is, therefore, necessary to place X-ray detectors on rockets or orbiting satellites. Solar rays were detected for the first time in the late 1940's, using V-2 rockets. In 1960, the first true X-ray images of the sun were obtained with the aid of a simple pinhole camera. The spatial resolution of the X-ray images could be considerably improved by making use of reflective optics, operating at grazing incidence. Aspects of X-ray mirror developments are discussed along with the results obtained in coronal studies utilizing the new devices for the observation of solar X-ray emission. It is pointed out that the major achievements of the Skylab missions were due primarily to the unique opportunity to obtain data over an extended period of time. Attention is given to normal incidence X-ray optics, achievements possible by making use of high spatial resolution optics, and details of improved mirror design.

  4. Students’ Achievement Goals, Learning-Related Emotions and Academic Achievement

    PubMed Central

    Lüftenegger, Marko; Klug, Julia; Harrer, Katharina; Langer, Marie; Spiel, Christiane; Schober, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    In the present research, the recently proposed 3 × 2 model of achievement goals is tested and associations with achievement emotions and their joint influence on academic achievement are investigated. The study was conducted with 388 students using the 3 × 2 Achievement Goal Questionnaire including the six proposed goal constructs (task-approach, task-avoidance, self-approach, self-avoidance, other-approach, other-avoidance) and the enjoyment and boredom scales from the Achievement Emotion Questionnaire. Exam grades were used as an indicator of academic achievement. Findings from CFAs provided strong support for the proposed structure of the 3 × 2 achievement goal model. Self-based goals, other-based goals and task-approach goals predicted enjoyment. Task-approach goals negatively predicted boredom. Task-approach and other-approach predicted achievement. The indirect effects of achievement goals through emotion variables on achievement were assessed using bias-corrected bootstrapping. No mediation effects were found. Implications for educational practice are discussed. PMID:27199836

  5. Iterative Algorithms for Ptychographic Phase Retrieval

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Chao; Qian, Jianliang; Schirotzek, Andre; Maia, Filipe; Marchesini, Stefano

    2011-05-03

    Ptychography promises diffraction limited resolution without the need for high resolution lenses. To achieve high resolution one has to solve the phase problem for many partially overlapping frames. Here we review some of the existing methods for solving ptychographic phase retrieval problem from a numerical analysis point of view, and propose alternative methods based on numerical optimization.

  6. Statistical conditional sampling for variable-resolution video compression.

    PubMed

    Wong, Alexander; Shafiee, Mohammad Javad; Azimifar, Zohreh

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we investigate a variable-resolution approach to video compression based on Conditional Random Field and statistical conditional sampling in order to further improve compression rate while maintaining high-quality video. In the proposed approach, representative key-frames within a video shot are identified and stored at full resolution. The remaining frames within the video shot are stored and compressed at a reduced resolution. At the decompression stage, a region-based dictionary is constructed from the key-frames and used to restore the reduced resolution frames to the original resolution via statistical conditional sampling. The sampling approach is based on the conditional probability of the CRF modeling by use of the constructed dictionary. Experimental results show that the proposed variable-resolution approach via statistical conditional sampling has potential for improving compression rates when compared to compressing the video at full resolution, while achieving higher video quality when compared to compressing the video at reduced resolution.

  7. Effects of spatial resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abrams, M.

    1982-01-01

    Studies of the effects of spatial resolution on extraction of geologic information are woefully lacking but spatial resolution effects can be examined as they influence two general categories: detection of spatial features per se; and the effects of IFOV on the definition of spectral signatures and on general mapping abilities.

  8. Conflict Resolution Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charnofsky, Norene M., Comp.

    Various theories and approaches to conflict resolution and peace education are presented in the 31 resources listed in this annotated bibliography. It is divided into two sections. Section 1 contains materials designed to help adults become more effective role models for the peaceful resolution of conflict. Topics include parent/child conflicts,…

  9. Automated conflict resolution issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wike, Jeffrey S.

    1991-01-01

    A discussion is presented of how conflicts for Space Network resources should be resolved in the ATDRSS era. The following topics are presented: a description of how resource conflicts are currently resolved; a description of issues associated with automated conflict resolution; present conflict resolution strategies; and topics for further discussion.

  10. Super-resolution imaging in live cells.

    PubMed

    Cox, Susan

    2015-05-01

    Over the last twenty years super-resolution fluorescence microscopy has gone from proof-of-concept experiments to commercial systems being available in many labs, improving the resolution achievable by up to a factor of 10 or more. There are three major approaches to super-resolution, stimulated emission depletion microscopy, structured illumination microscopy, and localisation microscopy, which have all produced stunning images of cellular structures. A major current challenge is optimising performance of each technique so that the same sort of data can be routinely taken in live cells. There are several major challenges, particularly phototoxicity and the speed with which images of whole cells, or groups of cells, can be acquired. In this review we discuss the various approaches which can be successfully used in live cells, the tradeoffs in resolution, speed, and ease of implementation which one must make for each approach, and the quality of results that one might expect from each technique.

  11. High resolution in galaxy photometry and imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieto, J.-L.; Lelievre, G.

    Techniques for increasing the resolution of ground-based photometric observations of galaxies are discussed. The theoretical limitations on resolution and their implications for choosing telescope size at a given site considered, with an emphasis on the importance of the Fried (1966) parameter r0. The techniques recommended are shortening exposure time, selection of the highest-resolution images, and a posteriori digital image processing (as opposed to active-mirror image stabilization or the cine-CCD system of Fort et al., 1984). The value of the increased resolution (by a factor of 2) achieved at Pic du Midi observatory for studies of detailed structure in extragalactic objects, for determining the distance to galaxies, and for probing the central cores of galaxies is indicated.

  12. High resolution solar X-ray studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    Two high resolution solar X-ray payloads and their launches on Aerobee rockets with pointing system are described. The payloads included 5 to 25A X-ray spectrometers, multiaperture X-ray cameras, and command box attitude control inflight by means of a television image radioed to ground. Spatial resolution ranged from five arc minutes to ten arc seconds and spectral resolution ranged from 500 to 3000. Several laboratory tasks were completed in order to achieve the desired resolution. These included (1) development of techniques to align grid collimators, (2) studies of the spectrometric properties of crystals, (3) measurements of the absorption coefficients of various materials used in X-ray spectrometers, (4) evaluation of the performance of multiaperture cameras, and (5) development of facilities.

  13. Achievement as Resistance: The Development of a Critical Race Achievement Ideology among Black Achievers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Dorinda J.

    2008-01-01

    In this article, Dorinda Carter examines the embodiment of a critical race achievement ideology in high-achieving black students. She conducted a yearlong qualitative investigation of the adaptive behaviors that nine high-achieving black students developed and employed to navigate the process of schooling at an upper-class, predominantly white,…

  14. Super-resolution Imaging of the Bacterial Division Machinery

    PubMed Central

    Buss, Jackson; Coltharp, Carla; Xiao, Jie

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial cell division requires the coordinated assembly of more than ten essential proteins at midcell1,2. Central to this process is the formation of a ring-like suprastructure (Z-ring) by the FtsZ protein at the division plan3,4. The Z-ring consists of multiple single-stranded FtsZ protofilaments, and understanding the arrangement of the protofilaments inside the Z-ring will provide insight into the mechanism of Z-ring assembly and its function as a force generator5,6. This information has remained elusive due to current limitations in conventional fluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy. Conventional fluorescence microscopy is unable to provide a high-resolution image of the Z-ring due to the diffraction limit of light (~200 nm). Electron cryotomographic imaging has detected scattered FtsZ protofilaments in small C. crescentus cells7, but is difficult to apply to larger cells such as E. coli or B. subtilis. Here we describe the application of a super-resolution fluorescence microscopy method, Photoactivated Localization Microscopy (PALM), to quantitatively characterize the structural organization of the E. coli Z-ring8. PALM imaging offers both high spatial resolution (~35 nm) and specific labeling to enable unambiguous identification of target proteins. We labeled FtsZ with the photoactivatable fluorescent protein mEos2, which switches from green fluorescence (excitation = 488 nm) to red fluorescence (excitation = 561 nm) upon activation at 405 nm9. During a PALM experiment, single FtsZ-mEos2 molecules are stochastically activated and the corresponding centroid positions of the single molecules are determined with <20 nm precision. A super-resolution image of the Z-ring is then reconstructed by superimposing the centroid positions of all detected FtsZ-mEos2 molecules. Using this method, we found that the Z-ring has a fixed width of ~100 nm and is composed of a loose bundle of FtsZ protofilaments that overlap with each other in three dimensions. These

  15. Improved reduced-resolution satellite imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellison, James; Milstein, Jaime

    1995-01-01

    The resolution of satellite imagery is often traded-off to satisfy transmission time and bandwidth, memory, and display limitations. Although there are many ways to achieve the same reduction in resolution, algorithms vary in their ability to preserve the visual quality of the original imagery. These issues are investigated in the context of the Landsat browse system, which permits the user to preview a reduced resolution version of a Landsat image. Wavelets-based techniques for resolution reduction are proposed as alternatives to subsampling used in the current system. Experts judged imagery generated by the wavelets-based methods visually superior, confirming initial quantitative results. In particular, compared to subsampling, the wavelets-based techniques were much less likely to obscure roads, transmission lines, and other linear features present in the original image, introduce artifacts and noise, and otherwise reduce the usefulness of the image. The wavelets-based techniques afford multiple levels of resolution reduction and computational speed. This study is applicable to a wide range of reduced resolution applications in satellite imaging systems, including low resolution display, spaceborne browse, emergency image transmission, and real-time video downlinking.

  16. A high-resolution time-to-digital converter using a three-level resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehghani, Asma; Saneei, Mohsen; Mahani, Ali

    2016-08-01

    In this article, a three-level resolution Vernier delay line time-to-digital converter (TDC) was proposed. The proposed TDC core was based on the pseudo-differential digital architecture that made it insensitive to nMOS and pMOS transistor mismatches. It also employed a Vernier delay line (VDL) in conjunction with an asynchronous read-out circuitry. The time interval resolution was equal to the difference of delay between buffers of upper and lower chains. Then, via the extra chain included in the lower delay line, resolution was controlled and power consumption was reduced. This method led to high resolution and low power consumption. The measurement results of TDC showed a resolution of 4.5 ps, 12-bit output dynamic range, and integral nonlinearity of 1.5 least significant bits. This TDC achieved the consumption of 68.43 µW from 1.1-V supply.

  17. Analyses of Subnanometer Resolution Cryo-EM Density Maps

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Matthew L.; Baker, Mariah R.; Hryc, Corey F.; DiMaio, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Today, electron cryomicroscopy (cryo-EM) can routinely achieve subnanometer resolutions of complex macromolecular assemblies. From a density map, one can extract key structural and functional information using a variety of computational analysis tools. At subnanometer resolution, these tools make it possible to isolate individual subunits, identify secondary structures, and accurately fit atomic models. With several cryo-EM studies achieving resolutions beyond 5 Å, computational modeling and feature recognition tools have been employed to construct backbone and atomic models of the protein components directly from a density map. In this chapter, we describe several common classes of computational tools that can be used to analyze and model subnanometer resolution reconstructions from cryo-EM. A general protocol for analyzing subnanometer resolution density maps is presented along with a full description of steps used in analyzing the 4.3 Å resolution structure of Mm-cpn. PMID:20888467

  18. The Mechanics of Human Achievement

    PubMed Central

    Duckworth, Angela L.; Eichstaedt, Johannes C.; Ungar, Lyle H.

    2015-01-01

    Countless studies have addressed why some individuals achieve more than others. Nevertheless, the psychology of achievement lacks a unifying conceptual framework for synthesizing these empirical insights. We propose organizing achievement-related traits by two possible mechanisms of action: Traits that determine the rate at which an individual learns a skill are talent variables and can be distinguished conceptually from traits that determine the effort an individual puts forth. This approach takes inspiration from Newtonian mechanics: achievement is akin to distance traveled, effort to time, skill to speed, and talent to acceleration. A novel prediction from this model is that individual differences in effort (but not talent) influence achievement (but not skill) more substantially over longer (rather than shorter) time intervals. Conceptualizing skill as the multiplicative product of talent and effort, and achievement as the multiplicative product of skill and effort, advances similar, but less formal, propositions by several important earlier thinkers. PMID:26236393

  19. Mathematics Achievement in High- and Low-Achieving Secondary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohammadpour, Ebrahim; Shekarchizadeh, Ahmadreza

    2015-01-01

    This paper identifies the amount of variance in mathematics achievement in high- and low-achieving schools that can be explained by school-level factors, while controlling for student-level factors. The data were obtained from 2679 Iranian eighth graders who participated in the 2007 Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study. Of the…

  20. Feasibility study of high-resolution coherent diffraction microscopy using synchrotron x rays focused by Kirkpatrick-Baez mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Yukio; Nishino, Yoshinori; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Mimura, Hidekazu; Tsutsumi, Ryosuke; Kubo, Hideto; Yamauchi, Kazuto

    2009-04-15

    High-flux coherent x rays are necessary for the improvement of the spatial resolution in coherent x-ray diffraction microscopy (CXDM). In this study, high-resolution CXDM using Kirkpatrick-Baez (KB) mirrors is proposed, and the mirrors are designed for experiments of the transmission scheme at SPring-8. Both the photon density and spatial coherence of synchrotron x rays focused by the KB mirrors are investigated by wave optical simulation. The KB mirrors can produce nearly diffraction-limited two-dimensional focusing x rays of approx1 mum in size at 8 keV. When the sample size is less than approx1 mum, the sample can be illuminated with full coherent x rays by adjusting the cross-slit size set between the source and the mirrors. From the estimated photon density at the sample position, the feasibility of CXDM with a sub-1-nm spatial resolution is suggested. The present ultraprecise figuring process enables us to fabricate mirrors for carrying out high-resolution CXDM experiments.

  1. X-ray optical system for imaging laser plumes with a spatial resolution of up to 70 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nechai, A. N.; Pestov, A. E.; Polkovnikov, V. N.; Salashchenko, N. N.; Toropov, M. N.; Chkhalo, N. I.; Tsybin, N. N.; Shcherbakov, A. V.

    2016-04-01

    We consider an X-ray optical system which permits obtaining laser plume images at a wavelength of 13.5 nm with a resolution of up to 70 nm. The X-ray optical system comprises an X-ray Schwarzschild objective made up of two aspherical multilayer mirrors, a scintillator (YAG : Ce ceramics), which converts X-rays to the visible radiation, and a visible-optical system, which images the scintillator surface onto a CCD camera. The spatial resolution of the system is limited by the resolution of the optical system (0.7 μm) and the magnification (10×) of the X-ray objective and is as high as 70 nm. The effect of Schwarzschild objective mirror shapes on the spatial resolution is analysed. The profile of concave mirror aspherisation is considered, which provides the attainment of the diffraction-limited quality of the objective. Data are given for the quantum efficiency of the system at a wavelength of 13.5 nm. We describe the experimental test bench intended for studying the developed X-ray optical system and outline the first experimental data which illustrate its efficiency. Owing to the natural division into the 'X-ray' and 'visible' parts, the optical system under discussion permits an easy change of the magnification and the field of view without realigning the X-ray optical elements. The wavelength may be varied in a range between 3 and 40 nm by changing the multilayer mirrors.

  2. Design and implementation of a Cooke triplet based wave-front coded super-resolution imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hui; Wei, Jingxuan

    2015-09-01

    Wave-front coding is a powerful technique that could be used to extend the DOF (depth of focus) of incoherent imaging system. It is the suitably designed phase mask that makes the system defocus invariant and it is the de-convolution algorithm that generates the clear image with large DOF. Compared with the traditional imaging system, the point spread function (PSF) in wave-front coded imaging system has quite a large support size and this characteristic makes wave-front coding be capable of realizing super-resolution imaging without replacing the current sensor with one of smaller pitch size. An amplification based single image super-resolution reconstruction procedure has been specifically designed for wave-front coded imaging system and its effectiveness has been demonstrated experimentally. A Cooke Triplet based wave-front coded imaging system is established. For a focal length of 50 mm and f-number 4.5, objects within the range [5 m, ∞] could be clearly imaged, which indicates a DOF extension ratio of approximately 20. At the same time, the proposed processing procedure could produce at least 3× resolution improvement, with the quality of the reconstructed super-resolution image approaching the diffraction limit.

  3. Attribution theory in science achievement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, Martin

    Recent research reveals consistent lags in American students' science achievement scores. Not only are the scores lower in the United States compared to other developed nations, but even within the United States, too many students are well below science proficiency scores for their grade levels. The current research addresses this problem by examining potential malleable factors that may predict science achievement in twelfth graders using 2009 data from the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP). Principle component factor analysis was conducted to determine the specific items that contribute to each overall factor. A series of multiple regressions were then analyzed and formed the predictive value of each of these factors for science achievement. All significant factors were ultimately examined together (also using multiple regression) to determine the most powerful predictors of science achievement, identifying factors that predict science achievement, the results of which suggested interventions to strengthen students' science achievement scores and encourage persistence in the sciences at the college level and beyond. Although there is a variety of research highlighting how students in the US are falling behind other developing nations in science and math achievement, as yet, little research has addressed ways of intervening to address this gap. The current research is a starting point, seeking to identify malleable factors that contribute to science achievement. More specifically, this research examined the types of attributions that predict science achievement in twelfth grade students.

  4. High-resolution parallel optical coherence tomography in scattering samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laubscher, M.; Ducros, Mathieu G.; Karamata, Boris; Bourquin, Stephane; Lasser, Theo

    2001-11-01

    Parallel optical coherence tomography in scattering samples is demonstrated using a 58 by 58 smart-pixel detector array. A femtosecond mode-locked Ti:Sapphire laser in combination with a free space Michelson interferometer was employed to achieve 4micrometers longitudinal resolution and 9mm transverse resolution on a 260x260 micrometers 2 field of view. We imaged a resolution target covered by an intralipid solution with different scattering coefficients as well as onion cells.

  5. Obtaining high resolution XUV coronal images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golub, L.; Spiller, E.

    1992-01-01

    Photographs obtained during three flights of an 11 inch diameter normal incident soft X-ray (wavelength 63.5 A) telescope are analyzed and the data are compared to the results expected from tests of the mirror surfaces. Multilayer coated X ray telescopes have the potential for 0.01 arcsec resolution, and there is optimism that such high quality mirrors can be built. Some of the factors which enter into the performance actually achieved in practice are as follows: quality of the mirror substrate, quality of the multilayer coating, and number of photons collected. Measurements of multilayer mirrors show that the actual performance achieved in the solar X-ray images demonstrates a reduction in the scattering compared to that calculated from the topography of the top surface of the multilayer. In the brief duration of a rocket flight, the resolution is also limited by counting statistics from the number of photons collected. At X-ray Ultraviolet (XUV) wavelengths from 171 to 335 A the photon flux should be greater than 10(exp 10) ph/sec, so that a resolution better than 0.1 arcsec might be achieved, if mirror quality does not provide a limit first. In a satellite, a large collecting area will be needed for the highest resolution.

  6. High-Resolution PET Detector. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Karp, Joel

    2014-03-26

    The objective of this project was to develop an understanding of the limits of performance for a high resolution PET detector using an approach based on continuous scintillation crystals rather than pixelated crystals. The overall goal was to design a high-resolution detector, which requires both high spatial resolution and high sensitivity for 511 keV gammas. Continuous scintillation detectors (Anger cameras) have been used extensively for both single-photon and PET scanners, however, these instruments were based on NaI(Tl) scintillators using relatively large, individual photo-multipliers. In this project we investigated the potential of this type of detector technology to achieve higher spatial resolution through the use of improved scintillator materials and photo-sensors, and modification of the detector surface to optimize the light response function.We achieved an average spatial resolution of 3-mm for a 25-mm thick, LYSO continuous detector using a maximum likelihood position algorithm and shallow slots cut into the entrance surface.

  7. Lincoln's Spot Resolutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mueller, Jean West; Schamel, Wynell Burroughs

    1988-01-01

    Examines the events leading to and immediately following the declaration of war on Mexico in 1846. Includes the second and third pages of Abraham Lincoln's "Spot Resolutions" and presents teaching suggestions for interpreting the document and assessing public opinion. (GEA)

  8. The Mid-Infrared Instrument for the James Webb Space Telescope, VI: The Medium Resolution Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, Martyn; Pel, J.-W.; Glasse, Alistair; Wright, G. S.; Aitink-Kroes, Gabby; Azzollini, Ruymán; Beard, Steven; Brandl, B. R.; Gallie, Angus; Geers, V. C.; Glauser, A. M.; Hastings, Peter; Henning, Th.; Jager, Rieks; Justtanont, K.; Kruizinga, Bob; Lahuis, Fred; Lee, David; Martinez-Delgado, I.; Martínez-Galarza, J. R.; Meijers, M.; Morrison, Jane E.; Müller, Friedrich; Nakos, Thodori; O'Sullivan, Brian; Oudenhuysen, Ad; Parr-Burman, P.; Pauwels, Evert; Rohloff, R.-R.; Schmalzl, Eva; Sykes, Jon; Thelen, M. P.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Vandenbussche, Bart; Venema, Lars B.; Visser, Huib; Waters, L. B. F. M.; Wright, David

    2015-07-01

    We describe the design and performance of the Medium Resolution Spectrometer (MRS) for the JWST-MIRI instrument. The MRS incorporates four coaxial spectral channels in a compact opto-mechanical layout that generates spectral images over fields of view up to 7.7 × 7.7'' in extent and at spectral resolving powers ranging from 1300 to 3700. Each channel includes an all-reflective integral field unit (IFU): an "image slicer" that reformats the input field for presentation to a grating spectrometer. Two 1024 × 1024 focal plane detector arrays record the output spectral images with an instantaneous spectral coverage of approximately one third of the full wavelength range of each channel. The full 5-28.5 μm spectrum is then obtained by making three exposures using gratings and pass-band-determining filters that are selected using just two three-position mechanisms. The expected on-orbit optical performance is presented, based on testing of the MIRI Flight Model and including spectral and spatial coverage and resolution. The point spread function of the reconstructed images is shown to be diffraction limited and the optical transmission is shown to be consistent with the design expectations.

  9. Single-molecule resolution of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) complexes.

    PubMed

    Jonas, Kim C; Huhtaniemi, Ilpo; Hanyaloglu, Aylin C

    2016-01-01

    The organization of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) into dimers and higher-order oligomers has provided a potential mechanistic system in defining complex GPCR responses. Despite being studied for nearly 20 years it has, and still is, been an area of controversy. Although technology has developed to quantitatively measure these associations in real time, identify the structural interfaces and even systems to understand the physiological significance of di/oligomerization, key questions remain outstanding including the role of each individual complex from the monomer to the higher-order oligomer, in their native system. Recently, single-molecule microscopy approaches have provided the tools to directly visualize individual GPCRs in dimers and oligomers, though as with any technological development each have their advantages and limitations. This chapter will describe these recent developments in single-molecule fluorescent microscopy, focusing on our recent application of super-resolution imaging of the GPCR for the luteinizing hormone/chorionic gonadotropin to quantify GPCR monomers and formation of protomers in to dimers and distinct oligomeric forms. We present our approach, considerations, strategy, and challenges to visualize this receptor beyond the light diffraction limit via photoactivated localization microscopy with photoactivatable dyes. The addition of super-resolution approaches to the GPCR "nano-tool kit" will pave the way for novel avenues to answer outstanding questions regarding the existence and significance of these complexes to GPCR signaling. PMID:26928539

  10. Super-Resolution Imaging of Plasma Membrane Proteins with Click Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Mateos-Gil, Pablo; Letschert, Sebastian; Doose, Sören; Sauer, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Besides its function as a passive cell wall, the plasma membrane (PM) serves as a platform for different physiological processes such as signal transduction and cell adhesion, determining the ability of cells to communicate with the exterior, and form tissues. Therefore, the spatial distribution of PM components, and the molecular mechanisms underlying it, have important implications in various biological fields including cell development, neurobiology, and immunology. The existence of confined compartments in the plasma membrane that vary on many length scales from protein multimers to micrometer-size domains with different protein and lipid composition is today beyond all questions. As much as the physiology of cells is controlled by the spatial organization of PM components, the study of distribution, size, and composition remains challenging. Visualization of the molecular distribution of PM components has been impeded mainly due to two problems: the specific labeling of lipids and proteins without perturbing their native distribution and the diffraction-limit of fluorescence microscopy restricting the resolution to about half the wavelength of light. Here, we present a bioorthogonal chemical reporter strategy based on click chemistry and metabolic labeling for efficient and specific visualization of PM proteins and glycans with organic fluorophores in combination with super-resolution fluorescence imaging by direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (dSTORM) with single-molecule sensitivity. PMID:27668214

  11. Super-Resolution Microscopy of Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers as a Tool for Alzheimer's Disease Diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, William I; Antonios, Gregory; Rabano, Alberto; Bayer, Thomas A; Schneider, Anja; Rizzoli, Silvio O

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is neuropathologically characterized by aggregates of amyloid-β peptides (Aβ) and tau proteins. The consensus in the AD field is that Aβ and tau should serve as diagnostic biomarkers for AD. However, their aggregates have been difficult to investigate by conventional fluorescence microscopy, since their size is below the diffraction limit (∼200 nm). To solve this, we turned to a super-resolution imaging technique, stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscopy, which has a high enough precision to allow the discrimination of low- and high-molecular weight aggregates prepared in vitro. We used STED to analyze the structural organization of Aβ and tau in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from 36 AD patients, 11 patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and 21 controls. We measured the numbers of aggregates in the CSF samples, and the aggregate sizes and intensities. These parameters enabled us to distinguish AD patients from controls with a specificity of ∼87% and a sensitivity of ∼79% . In addition, the aggregate parameters determined with STED microscopy correlated with the severity of cognitive impairment in AD patients. Finally, these parameters may be useful as predictive tools for MCI cases. The STED parameters of two MCI patients who developed AD during the course of the study, as well as of MCI patients whose Aβ ELISA values fall within the accepted range for AD, placed them close to the AD averages. We suggest that super-resolution imaging is a promising tool for AD diagnostics.

  12. Improving resolution in quantum subnanometre-gap tip-enhanced Raman nanoimaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yingchao; Voronine, Dmitri V.; Qiu, Shangran; Sinyukov, Alexander M.; Hamilton, Mary; Liege, Zachary; Sokolov, Alexei V.; Zhang, Zhenrong; Scully, Marlan O.

    2016-05-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials beyond graphene such as transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) have unique mechanical, optical and electronic properties with promising applications in flexible devices, catalysis and sensing. Optical imaging of TMDs using photoluminescence and Raman spectroscopy can reveal the effects of structure, strain, doping, edge states, and surface functionalization from materials to bioscience. However, Raman signals are inherently weak and so far have been limited in spatial resolution in TMDs to a few hundred nanometres which is much larger than the intrinsic scale of these effects. Here we overcome the diffraction limit by using resonant tip-enhanced Raman scattering (TERS) of few-layer MoS2, and obtain nanoscale optical images with ~20 nm spatial resolution. This becomes possible due to electric field enhancement in an optimized subnanometre-gap resonant tip-substrate configuration. We investigate the limits of signal enhancement by varying the tip-sample gap with sub-Angstrom precision and observe a quantum quenching behavior, as well as a Schottky-Ohmic transition, for subnanometre gaps, which enable surface mapping based on this new contrast mechanism. This quantum regime of plasmonic gap-mode enhancement with a few nanometre thick MoS2 junction may be used for designing new quantum optoelectronic devices and sensors with a wide range of applications.

  13. Improving resolution in quantum subnanometre-gap tip-enhanced Raman nanoimaging

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yingchao; Voronine, Dmitri V.; Qiu, Shangran; Sinyukov, Alexander M.; Hamilton, Mary; Liege, Zachary; Sokolov, Alexei V.; Zhang, Zhenrong; Scully, Marlan O.

    2016-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials beyond graphene such as transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) have unique mechanical, optical and electronic properties with promising applications in flexible devices, catalysis and sensing. Optical imaging of TMDs using photoluminescence and Raman spectroscopy can reveal the effects of structure, strain, doping, edge states, and surface functionalization from materials to bioscience. However, Raman signals are inherently weak and so far have been limited in spatial resolution in TMDs to a few hundred nanometres which is much larger than the intrinsic scale of these effects. Here we overcome the diffraction limit by using resonant tip-enhanced Raman scattering (TERS) of few-layer MoS2, and obtain nanoscale optical images with ~20 nm spatial resolution. This becomes possible due to electric field enhancement in an optimized subnanometre-gap resonant tip-substrate configuration. We investigate the limits of signal enhancement by varying the tip-sample gap with sub-Angstrom precision and observe a quantum quenching behavior, as well as a Schottky-Ohmic transition, for subnanometre gaps, which enable surface mapping based on this new contrast mechanism. This quantum regime of plasmonic gap-mode enhancement with a few nanometre thick MoS2 junction may be used for designing new quantum optoelectronic devices and sensors with a wide range of applications. PMID:27220882

  14. Fine-resolution imaging of solar features using Phase-Diverse Speckle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paxman, Richard G.

    1995-01-01

    Phase-diverse speckle (PDS) is a novel imaging technique intended to overcome the degrading effects of atmospheric turbulence on fine-resolution imaging. As its name suggests, PDS is a blend of phase-diversity and speckle-imaging concepts. PDS reconstructions on solar data were validated by simulation, by demonstrating internal consistency of PDS estimates, and by comparing PDS reconstructions with those produced from well accepted speckle-imaging processing. Several sources of error in data collected with the Swedish Vacuum Solar Telescope (SVST) were simulated: CCD noise, quantization error, image misalignment, and defocus error, as well as atmospheric turbulence model error. The simulations demonstrate that fine-resolution information can be reliably recovered out to at least 70% of the diffraction limit without significant introduction of image artifacts. Additional confidence in the SVST restoration is obtained by comparing its spatial power spectrum with previously-published power spectra derived from both space-based images and earth-based images corrected with traditional speckle-imaging techniques; the shape of the spectrum is found to match well the previous measurements. In addition, the imagery is found to be consistent with, but slightly sharper than, imagery reconstructed with accepted speckle-imaging techniques.

  15. Nanofabrication at 1nm resolution by quantum optical lithography (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavel, Eugen

    2015-08-01

    A major problem in the optical lithography was the diffraction limit. Here, we report and demonstrate a lithography method, Quantum Optical Lithography [1,2], able to attain 1 nm resolution by optical means using new materials (fluorescent photosensitive glass-ceramics and QMC-5 resist). The performance is several times better than that described for any optical or Electron Beam Lithography (EBL) methods. In Fig. 1 we present TEM images of 1 nm lines recorded at 9.6 m/s. a) b) Fig. 1 TEM images of: a) multiple 1 nm lines written in a fluorescent photosensitive glass-ceramics sample; b) single 1 nm line written in QMC-5 resist. References [1] E. Pavel, S. Jinga, B.S. Vasile, A. Dinescu, V. Marinescu, R. Trusca and N. Tosa, "Quantum Optical Lithography from 1 nm resolution to pattern transfer on silicon wafer", Optics and Laser Technology, 60 (2014) 80-84. [2] E. Pavel, S. Jinga, E. Andronescu, B.S. Vasile, G. Kada, A. Sasahara, N. Tosa, A. Matei, M. Dinescu, A. Dinescu and O.R. Vasile, "2 nm Quantum Optical Lithography", Optics Communications,291 (2013) 259-263

  16. Super-Resolution Imaging of Plasma Membrane Proteins with Click Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Mateos-Gil, Pablo; Letschert, Sebastian; Doose, Sören; Sauer, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Besides its function as a passive cell wall, the plasma membrane (PM) serves as a platform for different physiological processes such as signal transduction and cell adhesion, determining the ability of cells to communicate with the exterior, and form tissues. Therefore, the spatial distribution of PM components, and the molecular mechanisms underlying it, have important implications in various biological fields including cell development, neurobiology, and immunology. The existence of confined compartments in the plasma membrane that vary on many length scales from protein multimers to micrometer-size domains with different protein and lipid composition is today beyond all questions. As much as the physiology of cells is controlled by the spatial organization of PM components, the study of distribution, size, and composition remains challenging. Visualization of the molecular distribution of PM components has been impeded mainly due to two problems: the specific labeling of lipids and proteins without perturbing their native distribution and the diffraction-limit of fluorescence microscopy restricting the resolution to about half the wavelength of light. Here, we present a bioorthogonal chemical reporter strategy based on click chemistry and metabolic labeling for efficient and specific visualization of PM proteins and glycans with organic fluorophores in combination with super-resolution fluorescence imaging by direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (dSTORM) with single-molecule sensitivity.

  17. Single-molecule resolution of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) complexes.

    PubMed

    Jonas, Kim C; Huhtaniemi, Ilpo; Hanyaloglu, Aylin C

    2016-01-01

    The organization of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) into dimers and higher-order oligomers has provided a potential mechanistic system in defining complex GPCR responses. Despite being studied for nearly 20 years it has, and still is, been an area of controversy. Although technology has developed to quantitatively measure these associations in real time, identify the structural interfaces and even systems to understand the physiological significance of di/oligomerization, key questions remain outstanding including the role of each individual complex from the monomer to the higher-order oligomer, in their native system. Recently, single-molecule microscopy approaches have provided the tools to directly visualize individual GPCRs in dimers and oligomers, though as with any technological development each have their advantages and limitations. This chapter will describe these recent developments in single-molecule fluorescent microscopy, focusing on our recent application of super-resolution imaging of the GPCR for the luteinizing hormone/chorionic gonadotropin to quantify GPCR monomers and formation of protomers in to dimers and distinct oligomeric forms. We present our approach, considerations, strategy, and challenges to visualize this receptor beyond the light diffraction limit via photoactivated localization microscopy with photoactivatable dyes. The addition of super-resolution approaches to the GPCR "nano-tool kit" will pave the way for novel avenues to answer outstanding questions regarding the existence and significance of these complexes to GPCR signaling.

  18. Super-Resolution Imaging of Plasma Membrane Proteins with Click Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Mateos-Gil, Pablo; Letschert, Sebastian; Doose, Sören; Sauer, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Besides its function as a passive cell wall, the plasma membrane (PM) serves as a platform for different physiological processes such as signal transduction and cell adhesion, determining the ability of cells to communicate with the exterior, and form tissues. Therefore, the spatial distribution of PM components, and the molecular mechanisms underlying it, have important implications in various biological fields including cell development, neurobiology, and immunology. The existence of confined compartments in the plasma membrane that vary on many length scales from protein multimers to micrometer-size domains with different protein and lipid composition is today beyond all questions. As much as the physiology of cells is controlled by the spatial organization of PM components, the study of distribution, size, and composition remains challenging. Visualization of the molecular distribution of PM components has been impeded mainly due to two problems: the specific labeling of lipids and proteins without perturbing their native distribution and the diffraction-limit of fluorescence microscopy restricting the resolution to about half the wavelength of light. Here, we present a bioorthogonal chemical reporter strategy based on click chemistry and metabolic labeling for efficient and specific visualization of PM proteins and glycans with organic fluorophores in combination with super-resolution fluorescence imaging by direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (dSTORM) with single-molecule sensitivity. PMID:27668214

  19. Resolution enhancement of digital laser scanning fluorescence microscopy with a dual-lens optical pickup head

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Rung-Ywan; Chen, Jung-Po; Lee, Yuan-Chin; Chiang, Hung-Chih; Huang, Tai-Ting; Huang, Chun-Chieh; Cheng, Chih-Ming; Cheng, Chung-Ta; Lo, Feng-Hsiang; Tiao, Golden

    2016-07-01

    The resolution of the cell fluorescence image captured by a digital laser scanning microscopy with a modified dual-lens BD-ROM optical pickup head is enhanced by image registration and double sample frequency. A dual objective lens of red (655 nm) and blue (405 or 488 nm) laser sources with numerical apertures of 0.6 and 0.85 is used for sample focusing and position tracking and cell fluorescence image capturing, respectively. The image registration and capturing frequency are based on the address-coded patterns of a sample slide. The address-coded patterns are designed as a string of binary code, which comprises a plurality of base-straight lands and grooves and data-straight grooves. The widths of the base-straight lands, base-straight grooves, and data-straight grooves are 0.38, 0.38, and 0.76 μm, respectively. The numbers of sample signals in the x-direction are measured at every intersection point by intersecting the base intensity of the push-pull signal of the address-coded patterns, which has a minimum spacing of 0.38 μm. After taking a double sample frequency, the resolution of the measured cell fluorescence image is enhanced from 0.38 μm to the diffraction limit of the objective lens.

  20. Design of compact apochromatic lens with very-broad spectrum and high resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Aqi; Cao, Jianzhong; Zhang, Jian; Zhang, Zhi; Wang, Hao; Wu, Dengshan; Zhou, Zuofeng; Zhang, Kaisheng; Lei, Yangjie

    2013-09-01

    This paper designs a compact apochromatic lens with long focal length, which operates over very-broad spectrum from 400nm to 900nm for high resolution image application. The focal length is 290mm, and F-number is 4.5.In order to match CCD sensor, lens resolution must be higher than 100lp/mm. It is a significant challenge to correct secondary spectrum over very-broad spectrum for this application. The paper firstly pays much attention on dispersion characteristic of optical materials over this very-broad spectrum, and dispersion characteristic of glasses is analyzed. After properly glasses combinations and optimal lens structure selected, this compact apochromatic lens is designed. The lens described in this paper comprises fewer lenses, most of them are ordinary optical materials, and only one special flint type TF3 with anomalous dispersion properties is used for secondary spectrum correction. Finally, the paper shows MTF and aberration curve for performance evaluation. It can be seen that MTF of the designed lens nearly reach diffraction limit at Nyquist frequency 100lp/mm, and residual secondary spectrum is greatly reduced to less than 0.03mm (in the lines 550nm and 787.5nm). The overall length of this compact apochromatic lens is just 0.76 times its focal length, and because of fewer lenses and ordinary optical materials widely used, production cost is also greatly reduced.

  1. Resolution enhancement of digital laser scanning fluorescence microscopy with a dual-lens optical pickup head

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Rung-Ywan; Chen, Jung-Po; Lee, Yuan-Chin; Chiang, Hung-Chih; Huang, Tai-Ting; Huang, Chun-Chieh; Cheng, Chih-Ming; Cheng, Chung-Ta; Lo, Feng-Hsiang; Tiao, Golden

    2016-10-01

    The resolution of the cell fluorescence image captured by a digital laser scanning microscopy with a modified dual-lens BD-ROM optical pickup head is enhanced by image registration and double sample frequency. A dual objective lens of red (655 nm) and blue (405 or 488 nm) laser sources with numerical apertures of 0.6 and 0.85 is used for sample focusing and position tracking and cell fluorescence image capturing, respectively. The image registration and capturing frequency are based on the address-coded patterns of a sample slide. The address-coded patterns are designed as a string of binary code, which comprises a plurality of base-straight lands and grooves and data-straight grooves. The widths of the base-straight lands, base-straight grooves, and data-straight grooves are 0.38, 0.38, and 0.76 μm, respectively. The numbers of sample signals in the x-direction are measured at every intersection point by intersecting the base intensity of the push-pull signal of the address-coded patterns, which has a minimum spacing of 0.38 μm. After taking a double sample frequency, the resolution of the measured cell fluorescence image is enhanced from 0.38 μm to the diffraction limit of the objective lens.

  2. Improved fusing infrared and electro-optic signals for high-resolution night images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xiaopeng; Netravali, Ravi; Man, Hong; Lawrence, Victor

    2012-06-01

    Electro-optic (EO) images exhibit the properties of high resolution and low noise level, while it is a challenge to distinguish objects with infrared (IR), especially for objects with similar temperatures. In earlier work, we proposed a novel framework for IR image enhancement based on the information (e.g., edge) from EO images. Our framework superimposed the detected edges of the EO image with the corresponding transformed IR image. Obviously, this framework resulted in better resolution IR images that help distinguish objects at night. For our IR image system, we used the theoretical point spread function (PSF) proposed by Russell C. Hardie et al., which is composed of the modulation transfer function (MTF) of a uniform detector array and the incoherent optical transfer function (OTF) of diffraction-limited optics. In addition, we designed an inverse filter based on the proposed PSF to transform the IR image. In this paper, blending the detected edge of the EO image with the corresponding transformed IR image and the original IR image is the principal idea for improving the previous framework. This improved framework requires four main steps: (1) inverse filter-based IR image transformation, (2) image edge detection, (3) images registration, and (4) blending of the corresponding images. Simulation results show that blended IR images have better quality over the superimposed images that were generated under the previous framework. Based on the same steps, the simulation result shows a blended IR image of better quality when only the original IR image is available.

  3. Fusing electro-optic and infrared signals for high resolution night images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xiaopeng; Netravali, Ravi; Man, Hong; Lawrence, Victor

    2012-03-01

    Electro-optic (EO) images exhibit the properties of high resolution and low noise level, while it is a challenge to distinguish objects at night through infrared (IR) images, especially for objects with a similar temperature. Therefore, we will propose a novel framework of IR image enhancement based on the information (e.g., edge) from EO images, which will result in high resolution IR images and help us distinguish objects at night. Superimposing the detected edge of the EO image onto the corresponding transformed IR image is our principal idea for the proposed framework. In this framework, we will adopt the theoretical point spread function (PSF) proposed by Russell C. Hardie et al. for our IR image system, which is contributed by the modulation transfer function (MTF) of a uniform detector array and the incoherent optical transfer function (OTF) of diffraction-limited optics. In addition, we will design an inverse filter in terms of the proposed PSF to conduct the IR image transformation. The framework requires four main steps, which are inverse filter-based IR image transformation, EO image edge detection, registration and superimposing of the obtained image pair. Simulation results will show the superimposed IR images.

  4. Perils of Standardized Achievement Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haladyna, Thomas M.

    2006-01-01

    This article argues that the validity of standardized achievement test-score interpretation and use is problematic; consequently, confidence and trust in such test scores may often be unwarranted. The problem is particularly severe in high-stakes situations. This essay provides a context for understanding standardized achievement testing, then…

  5. Poor Results for High Achievers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bui, Sa; Imberman, Scott; Craig, Steven

    2012-01-01

    Three million students in the United States are classified as gifted, yet little is known about the effectiveness of traditional gifted and talented (G&T) programs. In theory, G&T programs might help high-achieving students because they group them with other high achievers and typically offer specially trained teachers and a more advanced…

  6. Parental Involvement and Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwin, Sarah Christine

    2015-01-01

    This research study examined the correlation between student achievement and parent's perceptions of their involvement in their child's schooling. Parent participants completed the Parent Involvement Project Parent Questionnaire. Results slightly indicated parents of students with higher level of achievement perceived less demand or invitations…

  7. Examination Regimes and Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cosentino de Cohen, Clemencia

    2010-01-01

    Examination regimes at the end of secondary school vary greatly intra- and cross-nationally, and in recent years have undergone important reforms often geared towards increasing student achievement. This research presents a comparative analysis of the relationship between examination regimes and student achievement in the OECD. Using a micro…

  8. General Achievement Trends: New Jersey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  9. Teaching the Low Level Achiever.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salomone, Ronald E., Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Intended for teachers of the English language arts, the articles in this issue offer suggestions and techniques for teaching the low level achiever. Titles and authors of the articles are as follows: (1) "A Point to Ponder" (Rachel Martin); (2) "Tracking: A Self-Fulfilling Prophecy of Failure for the Low Level Achiever" (James Christopher Davis);…

  10. Family Status and School Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chalker, Rhoda N.; Horns, Virginia

    This study tested the hypothesis that there is no significant difference in reading achievement among children in grades 2 through 5 related to family structure. Researchers administered the Stanford Achievement Test to 119 students in an Alabama city suburban school system. Of the sample, 69 children lived in intact families and 50 lived in…

  11. General Achievement Trends: North Carolina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  12. Classroom Composition and Achievement Gains.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leiter, Jeffrey

    1983-01-01

    Third-grade students in high ability groups in mathematics achieved greater gains than students in low ability groups. The opposite results occurred in reading achievement. Possible reasons for this difference include different instructional techniques for reading and math and the effect of home environment on learning. (IS)

  13. Raising Boys' Achievement in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bleach, Kevan, Ed.

    This book offers insights into the range of strategies and good practice being used to raise the achievement of boys. Case studies by school-based practitioners suggest ideas and measures to address the issue of achievement by boys. The contributions are: (1) "Why the Likely Lads Lag Behind" (Kevan Bleach); (2) "Helping Boys Do Better in Their…

  14. School Size and Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riggen, Vicki

    2013-01-01

    This study examined whether a relationship between high school size and student achievement exists in Illinois public high schools in reading and math, as measured by the Prairie State Achievement Exam (PSAE), which is administered to all Illinois 11th-grade students. This study also examined whether the factors of socioeconomic status, English…

  15. Stress Correlates and Academic Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bentley, Donna Anderson; And Others

    An ongoing concern for educators is the identification of factors that contribute to or are associated with academic achievement; one such group of variables that has received little attention are those involving stress. The relationship between perceived sources of stress and academic achievement was examined to determine if reactions to stress…

  16. X-ray astronomy with ultra-high-angular resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braig, Christoph; Predehl, Peter

    2004-10-01

    We present new schemes for a next-generation X-ray telescope for the energy range between approximately 1 and 10 keV providing an angular resolution of at least 1 milli-arcsec. Its technology will be based on diffractive transmission optics, e.g. Fresnel zone plates and their derivatives. Beside near-diffraction limited imaging, these devices hold the potential of a large collecting area well beyond 10 square meters at a simple and lightweight construction, compared to conventional mirror telescopes. However, there are drawbacks. Firstly the intrinsically long focal lengths do require separation and precise formation flight of lens and detector spacecraft. Accordingly, techniques will be discussed for relative stabilization on the one hand and possibilities to reduce focal length and thus lever arm on the other hand. For this purpose, large arrays of small, independent lenses might offer a notable perspective. Secondly, diffractive optics feature severe focal length dispersion which has to be accepted using narrow-band spectral selection or-better-should be corrected over a practicable wide energy range. In the hard X-ray regime, hybrid lens devices made of beryllium, lithium or plastics like polycarbonate will be an appropriate solution for a fixed energy, while tunable systems with variable correction lenses possess-in principle-the capability for dispersion compensation in the soft X-ray region, too. An overview on the science case of milli-arcsec X-ray imaging will conclude the contribution. We show that significant new insights in astrophysical processes are expected just at and beyond this angular scale and give examples from X-ray binaries over AGN's up to gamma-ray bursts.

  17. Cepheids at high angular resolution: circumstellar envelope and pulsation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallenne, Alexandre

    2011-12-01

    In 2005, interferometric observations with VLTI/VINCI and CHARA/FLUOR revealed the existence of a circumstellar envelope (CSE) around some Cepheids. This surrounding material is particularly interesting for two reasons: it could have an impact on the distance estimates and could be linked to a past or on-going mass loss. The use of Baade-Wesselink methods for independent distance determinations could be significantly biased by the presence of these envelopes. Although their observations are difficult because of the high contrast between the photosphere of the star and the CSE, several observation techniques have the potential to improve our knowledge about their physical properties. In this thesis, I discuss in particular high angular resolution techniques that I applied to the study of several bright Galactic Cepheids. First, I used adaptive optic observations with NACO of the Cepheid RS Puppis, in order to deduce the flux ratio between the CSE and the photosphere of the star. In addition, I could carry out a statistical study of the speckle noise and inspect a possible asymmetry. Secondly, I analysed VISIR data to study the spectral energy distribution of a sample of Cepheids. These diffraction-limited images enabled me to carry out an accurate photometry in the N band and to detect an IR excess linked to the presence of a circumstellar component. On the other hand, applying a Fourier analysis I showed that some components are resolved. I then explored the K' band with the recombination instrument FLUOR for some bright Cepheids. Thanks to new set of data of Y Oph, I improved the study of its circumstellar envelope, using a ring-like model for the CSE. For two other Cepheids, U Vul and S Sge, I applied the interferometric Baade-Wesselink method in order to estimate their distance.

  18. High-Resolution Autoradiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Towe, George C; Gomberg, Henry J; Freemen, J W

    1955-01-01

    This investigation was made to adapt wet-process autoradiography to metallurgical samples to obtain high resolution of segregated radioactive elements in microstructures. Results are confined to development of the technique, which was perfected to a resolution of less than 10 microns. The radioactive samples included carbon-14 carburized iron and steel, nickel-63 electroplated samples, a powder product containing nickel-63, and tungsten-185 in N-155 alloy.

  19. Ultra high resolution tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Haddad, W.S.

    1994-11-15

    Recent work and results on ultra high resolution three dimensional imaging with soft x-rays will be presented. This work is aimed at determining microscopic three dimensional structure of biological and material specimens. Three dimensional reconstructed images of a microscopic test object will be presented; the reconstruction has a resolution on the order of 1000 A in all three dimensions. Preliminary work with biological samples will also be shown, and the experimental and numerical methods used will be discussed.

  20. Conventional fluorescence microscopy below the diffraction limit with simultaneous capture of two fluorophores in DNA origami

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glasgow, Ben J.

    2016-02-01

    A conventional fluorescence microscope was previously constructed for simultaneous imaging of two colors to gain sub-diffraction localization. The system is predicated on color separation of overlapping Airy discs, construction of matrices of Cartesian coordinates to determine locations as well as centers of the point spread functions of fluorophores. Quantum dots that are separated by as little as 10 nm were resolved in the x-y coordinates. Inter-fluorophore distances that vary by 10 nm could also be distinguished. Quantum dots are bright point light source emitters that excite with a single laser and can serve as a label for many biomolecules. Here, alterations in the method are described to test the ability to resolve Atto 488 and Atto 647 dyes attached to DNA origami at ~40 nm spacing intervals. Dual laser excitation is used in tandem with multi-wavelength bandpass filters. Notwithstanding challenges from reduced intensity in Atto labeled DNA origami helical bundles compared to quantum dots, preliminary data show a mean inter-fluorophore distance of 56 nm with a range (14-148 nm). The range closely matches published results with DNA origami with other methods of subdiffraction microscopy. Sub-diffraction simultaneous two-color imaging fluorescence microscopy acronymically christened (SSTIFM) is a simple, readily accessible, technique for measurement of inter-fluorophore distances in compartments less than 40 nm. Preliminary results with so called nanorulers are encouraging for use with other biomolecules.