Science.gov

Sample records for achieve good quality

  1. Mister Sandman, bring me good marks! On the relationship between sleep quality and academic achievement.

    PubMed

    Baert, Stijn; Omey, Eddy; Verhaest, Dieter; Vermeir, Aurélie

    2015-04-01

    There is growing evidence that health factors affect tertiary education success in a causal way. This study assesses the effect of sleep quality on academic achievement at university. To this end, we surveyed 804 students about their sleep quality by means of the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) before the start of their first exam period in December 2013 at Ghent University. PSQI scores were merged with course marks in this exam period. Instrumenting PSQI scores by sleep quality during secondary education, we find that increasing total sleep quality with one standard deviation leads to 4.85 percentage point higher course marks. Based on this finding, we suggest that higher education providers might be incentivised to invest part of their resources for social facilities in professional support for students with sleep and other health problems.

  2. Working and learning together: good quality care depends on it, but how can we achieve it?

    PubMed Central

    McPherson, K; Headrick, L; Moss, F

    2001-01-01

    Educating healthcare professionals is a key issue in the provision of quality healthcare services, and interprofessional education (IPE) has been proposed as a means of meeting this challenge. Evidence that collaborative working can be essential for good clinical outcomes underpins the real need to find out how best to develop a work force that can work together effectively. We identify barriers to mounting successful IPE programmes, report on recent educational initiatives that have aimed to develop collaborative working, and discuss the lessons learned. To develop education strategies that really prepare learners to collaborate we must: agree on the goals of IPE, identify effective methods of delivery, establish what should be learned when, attend to the needs of educators and clinicians regarding their own competence in interprofessional work, and advance our knowledge by robust evaluation using both qualitative and quantitative approaches. We must ensure that our education strategies allow students to recognise, value, and engage with the difference arising from the practice of a range of health professionals. This means tackling some long held assumptions about education and identifying where it fosters norms and attitudes that interfere with collaboration or fails to engender interprofessional knowledge and skill. We need to work together to establish education strategies that enhance collaborative working along with profession specific skills to produce a highly skilled, proactive, and respectful work force focused on providing safe and effective health for patients and communities. Key Words: interprofessional education; multiprofessional learning; teamwork PMID:11700379

  3. Goodness of Fit between Children and Classrooms: Effects of Child Temperament and Preschool Classroom Quality on Achievement Trajectories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vitiello, Virginia E.; Moas, Olga; Henderson, Heather A.; Greenfield, Daryl B.; Munis, Pelin M.

    2012-01-01

    Research Findings: The purpose of this study was to examine whether child temperament differentially predicted academic school readiness depending on the quality of classroom interactions for 179 Head Start preschoolers. Teachers rated children's temperament as overcontrolled, resilient, or undercontrolled in the fall and reported on children's…

  4. Decreased Sperm Motility Retarded ICSI Fertilization Rate in Severe Oligozoospermia but Good-Quality Embryo Transfer Had Achieved the Prospective Clinical Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jufeng; Lu, Yongning; Qu, Xianqin; Wang, Peng; Zhao, Luiwen; Gao, Minzhi; Shi, Huijuan; Jin, Xingliang

    2016-01-01

    . Overall rates in all groups were 41.26% clinical pregnancy, 25.74% implantation and 36.32% live birth, which gave live birth to 252 girls and 252 boys. Conclusions The reduction of motile spermatozoa in severe oligozoospermia decreased the rates of fertilization and good-quality embryo. Obtaining and transfer of good-quality embryos was the good prognostic to achieve prospective clinical outcomes regardless of the severity of oligozoospermia. PMID:27661081

  5. How To Achieve Good Library Acoustics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiens, Janet

    2003-01-01

    Discusses how to create a good acoustical environment for college libraries, focusing on requirements related to the HVAC system and lighting, and noting the importance of good maintenance. A sidebar looks at how to design and achieve the most appropriate HVAC and lighting systems for optimum library acoustics. (SM)

  6. Quality is good business

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Daniel L.

    1994-03-01

    Xerox virtually created the plain paper copier industry, it enjoyed unparalleled growth and its name became synonymous with copying. However, competition in the 1970s aggressively attacked this attractive growth market and took away market share. An evaluation of the competition told Xerox that its competitors were selling products for what it cost Xerox to make them, that their quality was better and that their goal was to capture all of Xerox' market share. The fundamental precept that Xerox pursued to meet this competitive threat and recapture market share was the recognition that long term success is dependent upon total mastery of quality, especially in manufacturing. In turning this precept into reality, Xerox Manufacturing made dramatic improvements in all of its processes and practices focusing on quality as defined by the customer. Actions to accomplish this result included training all people in basic statistical tools and their applications, the use of employee involvement teams and continuous quality improvement techniques. These and other actions were successful in not only enabling Xerox to turn the competitive threat and recover market share, but to also win the Malcolm Baldrige Award for Quality in 1989.

  7. [Qinghai achieves good results in planned parenthood].

    PubMed

    1979-05-11

    After 8 days in session the Qinghai provincial meeting of representatives of advanced collectives and individuals in planned parenthood and maternal and child health work concluded in Xining on May 6. The meeting discussed and studied the population plan for our province and the specific policies and stipulations on planned parenthood, summed up and exchanged experiences and appraised and awarded 62 advanced collectives and 32 advanced individuals. Ma Wanli, vice chairman of the provincial revolutionary committee, and responsible comrades of the provincial culture and education office, public health units, trade union organizations, women's federations, commercial organizations, party schools, and other departments concerned were present at the closing ceremony. The advanced collectives and individuals were given awards at the ceremony and Comrade Ma Wanli spoke. Representatives attending the meeting said: Over the past several years, Qinghai's planned parenthood and maternal and child health work have been extensively developed in the cities and rural areas under the leadership of party committees at all levels. Great results have been achieved. The rate of Qinghai's population increase was reduced from 1971's 32.4/1000 persons to 1978's 19.4/1000 persons, hitting the target set by the state for our province. The natural rate of increase in some communes was reduced to less than 12/1000 persons.

  8. Achieving Quality in Occupational Health

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Donnell, Michele (Editor); Hoffler, G. Wyckliffe (Editor)

    1997-01-01

    The conference convened approximately 100 registered participants of invited guest speakers, NASA presenters, and a broad spectrum of the Occupational Health disciplines representing NASA Headquarters and all NASA Field Centers. Centered on the theme, "Achieving Quality in Occupational Health," conferees heard presentations from award winning occupational health program professionals within the Agency and from private industry; updates on ISO 9000 status, quality assurance, and information technologies; workshops on ergonomics and respiratory protection; an overview from the newly commissioned NASA Occupational Health Assessment Team; and a keynote speech on improving women's health. In addition, NASA occupational health specialists presented 24 poster sessions and oral deliveries on various aspects of current practice at their field centers.

  9. The Impossibility of Achieving Consistently Good Mental Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Albert

    1987-01-01

    People disturb themselves with irrational beliefs, some of which are obvious and blatant while others are subtle and tricky. The latter type make people more disturbed than do the former kind. Even when helped by the most efficient forms of psychotherapy, humans have difficulty achieving and maintaining good mental health. (Author/VM)

  10. Quality of care: how good is good enough?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Israel has made impressive progress in improving performance on key measures of the quality of health care in the community in recent years. These achievements are all the more notable given Israel's modest overall spending on health care and because they have accrued to virtually the entire population of the country. Health care systems in most developed nations around the world find themselves in a similar position today with respect to health care quality. Despite significantly increased improvement efforts over the past decade, routine safety processes, such as hand hygiene and medication administration, fail routinely at rates of 30% to 50%. People with chronic diseases experience preventable episodes of acute illness that require hospitalization due to medication mix-ups and other failures of outpatient management. Patients continue to be harmed by preventable adverse events, such as surgery on the wrong part of the body and fires in operating theaters. Health care around the world is not nearly as safe as other industries, such as commercial aviation, that have mastered highly effective ways to manage serious hazards. Health care organizations will have to undertake three interrelated changes to get substantially closer to the superlative safety records of other industries: leadership commitment to zero major quality failures, widespread implementation of highly effective process improvement methods, and the adoption of all facets of a culture of safety. Each of these changes represents a major challenge to the way today's health care organizations plan and carry out their daily work. The Israeli health system is in an enviable position to implement these changes. Universal health insurance coverage, the enrolment of the entire population in a small number of health plans, and the widespread use of electronic health records provide advantages available to few other countries. Achieving and sustaining levels of safety comparable to, say, commercial aviation

  11. Achieving Quality Learning in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nightingale, Peggy; O'Neil, Mike

    This volume on quality learning in higher education discusses issues of good practice particularly action learning and Total Quality Management (TQM)-type strategies and illustrates them with seven case studies in Australia and the United Kingdom. Chapter 1 discusses issues and problems in defining quality in higher education. Chapter 2 looks at…

  12. Gifted Student Academic Achievement and Program Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Katrina Ann Woolsey

    2010-01-01

    Gifted academic achievement has been identified as a major area of interest for educational researchers. The purpose of this study was to ascertain whether there was a relation between the quality of gifted programs as perceived by teachers, coordinators and supervisors of the gifted and the achievement of the same gifted students in 6th and 7th…

  13. Pursuing the Qualities of a "Good" Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coniam, David

    2014-01-01

    This article examines the issue of the quality of teacher-produced tests, limiting itself in the current context to objective, multiple-choice tests. The article investigates a short, two-part 20-item English language test. After a brief overview of the key test qualities of reliability and validity, the article examines the two subtests in terms…

  14. Nursing Home Quality as a Common Good

    PubMed Central

    Grabowski, David C.; Gruber, Jonathan; Angelelli, Joseph J.

    2009-01-01

    A long-standing assumption among economists is that nursing home quality is common across Medicaid and private-pay patients within a shared facility. However, there has been only limited empirical work addressing this issue. Using a unique individual level panel of residents of nursing homes from seven states, we exploit both within-facility and within-person variation in payer source and quality to examine this issue. We also test the robustness of these results across states with different Medicaid and private-pay rate differentials. Across various identification strategies, our results are consistent with the assumption of common quality across Medicaid and private-paying patients within facilities. PMID:20463859

  15. 7 CFR 51.485 - Good internal quality.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Cantaloups 1 Definitions § 51.485 Good internal quality... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Good internal quality. 51.485 Section 51.485 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE...

  16. Indoor Air Quality in Schools: Clean Air Is Good Business.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guarneiri, Michele A.

    2003-01-01

    Describes the effect of poor indoor air quality (IAQ) on student health, the cost of safeguarding good IAQ, the cause of poor IAQ in schools, how to tell whether a school has an IAQ problem, and how the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency can help schools improve indoor air quality though the use of their free "Indoor Air Quality Tools for…

  17. 7 CFR 51.481 - Very good internal quality.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Very good internal quality. 51.481 Section 51.481 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Cantaloups 1 Definitions § 51.481 Very good...

  18. Integrated water quality management for drinking water of good quality.

    PubMed

    Isaji, C

    2003-01-01

    The Nagoya Waterworks and Sewerage Bureau has developed original supporting tools for the systematic and cost-effective management of problem solving. An environmental information map and prediction of pollutant reaching are used for rapid and appropriate proper countermeasures against water quality accidents in the source area. In disinfection byproduct control a method for estimating trihalomethane (THM) contents was effective for the complement of their observations. Surrogate indicators such as turbidity and conductivity that could be measured continuously also could complement water quality items measured monthly. A processing tool of voluminous data was practical for rapid judgment of water quality. Systematic monitoring was established for stricter turbidity control for measures against Cryptosporidium and keeping residual chlorine stable in the service area.

  19. Preventive psychosocietal support groups: parents' criteria for good quality.

    PubMed

    Häggman-Laitila, Arja; Pietilä, Anna-Maija

    2009-06-01

    The aim of this study is to produce concepts to describe criteria for good quality of support groups for families with children. The research questions were, what is a good support group like according to parents' experiences and what are the criteria for the good quality from the perspective of families? The study sample consisted of 13 small groups. The study participants consisted of 63 mothers and 14 fathers, who accounted for 63% of the small group attendance. Data were collected in Finland through 13 group interviews. Qualitative content analysis of manifest and latent content was used as the method of analysis. Parents appreciated the availability of information, the ability of the parents to discuss matters, the activities, interaction and good group supervision. As the parental views of the characteristics of a good support group are concrete, they can be easily taken into account with implementing family-oriented support group programmes. The concepts of the present study can be used in the future to construct instruments to evaluate quality of support groups from the perspective of families. Further studies should pay more attention to the experiences of drop out families and families that are not satisfied with group services. PMID:19302377

  20. Achieving Quality Health Services for Adolescents.

    PubMed

    2016-08-01

    This update of the 2008 statement from the American Academy of Pediatrics redirects the discussion of quality health care from the theoretical to the practical within the medical home. This statement reviews the evolution of the medical home concept and challenges the provision of quality adolescent health care within the patient-centered medical home. Areas of attention for quality adolescent health care are reviewed, including developmentally appropriate care, confidentiality, location of adolescent care, providers who offer such care, the role of research in advancing care, and the transition to adult care. PMID:27432849

  1. [Good agricultural practice (GAP) of Chinese materia medica (CMM) for ten years: achievements, problems and proposals].

    PubMed

    Guo, Lan-Ping; Zhang, Yan; Zhu, Shou-Dong; Wang, Gui-Hua; Wang, Xiu; Zhang, Xiao-Bo; Chen, Mei-Lan; He, Ya-Li; Han, Bang-Xing; Chen, Nai-Fu; Huang, Lu-Qi

    2014-04-01

    This paper aims to summarize the achievements during the implementation process of good agricultural practice (GAP) in Chinese Materia Medica (CMM), and on basis of analyzing the existing problems of GAP, to propose further implementation of GAP in TCM growing. Since the launch of GAP in CMM growing ten years ago, it has acquired great achievements, including: (1) The promulgation of a series of measures for the administration of the GAP approval in the CMM growing; (2) The expanded planting area of CMM; (3) The increased awareness of standardized CMM growing among farmers and enterprises; (4) The establishment of GAP implementation bases for CMM growing; (5) The improvement of theory and methodology for CMM growing; (6) The development of a large group of experts and scholars in GAP approval for CMM production. The problems existing in the production include: (1) A deep understanding of GAP and its certification is still needed; (2) The distribution of the certification base is not reasonable; (3) The geo-economics effect and the backward farming practices are thought to be the bottlenecks in the standardization of CMM growing and the scale production of CMM; (4) Low comparative effectiveness limits the development of the GAP; (5) The base of breeding improved variety is blank; (6) The immature of the cultivation technique lead to the risk of production process; (7) The degradation of soil microbial and the continuous cropping obstacle restrict the sustainable development of the GAP base. To further promote the health and orderly GAP in the CMM growing, the authors propose: (1) To change the mode of production; (2) To establish a sound standard system so as to ensure quality products for fair prices; (3) To fully consider the geo-economic culture and vigorously promote the definite cultivating of traditional Chinese medicinal materials; (4) To strengthen the transformation and generalization of basic researches and achievements, in order to provide technical

  2. [Good agricultural practice (GAP) of Chinese materia medica (CMM) for ten years: achievements, problems and proposals].

    PubMed

    Guo, Lan-Ping; Zhang, Yan; Zhu, Shou-Dong; Wang, Gui-Hua; Wang, Xiu; Zhang, Xiao-Bo; Chen, Mei-Lan; He, Ya-Li; Han, Bang-Xing; Chen, Nai-Fu; Huang, Lu-Qi

    2014-04-01

    This paper aims to summarize the achievements during the implementation process of good agricultural practice (GAP) in Chinese Materia Medica (CMM), and on basis of analyzing the existing problems of GAP, to propose further implementation of GAP in TCM growing. Since the launch of GAP in CMM growing ten years ago, it has acquired great achievements, including: (1) The promulgation of a series of measures for the administration of the GAP approval in the CMM growing; (2) The expanded planting area of CMM; (3) The increased awareness of standardized CMM growing among farmers and enterprises; (4) The establishment of GAP implementation bases for CMM growing; (5) The improvement of theory and methodology for CMM growing; (6) The development of a large group of experts and scholars in GAP approval for CMM production. The problems existing in the production include: (1) A deep understanding of GAP and its certification is still needed; (2) The distribution of the certification base is not reasonable; (3) The geo-economics effect and the backward farming practices are thought to be the bottlenecks in the standardization of CMM growing and the scale production of CMM; (4) Low comparative effectiveness limits the development of the GAP; (5) The base of breeding improved variety is blank; (6) The immature of the cultivation technique lead to the risk of production process; (7) The degradation of soil microbial and the continuous cropping obstacle restrict the sustainable development of the GAP base. To further promote the health and orderly GAP in the CMM growing, the authors propose: (1) To change the mode of production; (2) To establish a sound standard system so as to ensure quality products for fair prices; (3) To fully consider the geo-economic culture and vigorously promote the definite cultivating of traditional Chinese medicinal materials; (4) To strengthen the transformation and generalization of basic researches and achievements, in order to provide technical

  3. Achieving indoor air quality through contaminant control

    SciTech Connect

    Katzel, J.

    1995-07-10

    Federal laws outlining industry`s responsibilities in creating a healthy, hazard-free workspace are well known. OSHA`s laws on interior air pollution establish threshold limit values (TLVs) and permissible exposure limits (PELs) for more than 500 potentially hazardous substances found in manufacturing operations. Until now, OSHA has promulgated regulations only for the manufacturing environment. However, its recently-proposed indoor air quality (IAQ) ruling, if implemented, will apply to all workspaces. It regulates IAQ, including environmental tobacco smoke, and requires employers to write and implement IAQ compliance plans.

  4. The Relationship of Classroom Quality to Kindergarten Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burson, Susan J.

    2010-01-01

    This quantitative study focuses on the relationship between classroom quality and children's academic achievement. Specifically, it examines how classroom quality in three broad domains-- emotional climate, classroom management and instructional support--impact kindergarten achievement growth in mathematics and reading. The researcher collected…

  5. Toward integrated strategies for achieving environmental quality

    SciTech Connect

    Kuusinen, T.; Lesperance, A.; Bilyard, G. )

    1994-03-01

    In the United States, environmentalists are constantly jumping from one environmental crisis of the day'' to another without any sense of what is important and what is trivial. Moreover, when designing fixes to the environmental problems one tries to resolve, one often comes up short. This country urgently needs a national environmental strategy that will approach environmental issues proactively and logically. Without such a strategy, the authors believe that long-term, sustainable economic growth cannot be achieved in the United States. This paper outlines a participatory process by which the framework for a national environmental strategy might be developed. It also proposes that such a strategy will likely include two fundamental components: (1) consensus principles for conducting risk assessments to decide what environmental problems are most important, and (2) a generalized, market-oriented model for resolving these problems. A viable national consensus will be required for such a strategy to succeed and will need to include industry, labor, legislators, regulators, national environmental advocacy groups, local grass roots organizations, and other interested parties.

  6. Teacher Quality in Educational Production. Tracking, Decay, and Student Achievement. NBER Working Paper No. 14442

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothstein, Jesse

    2008-01-01

    Growing concerns over the achievement of U.S. students have led to proposals to reward good teachers and penalize (or fire) bad ones. The leading method for assessing teacher quality is "value added" modeling (VAM), which decomposes students' test scores into components attributed to student heterogeneity and to teacher quality. Implicit in the…

  7. Why Good Quality Care Needs Philosophy More Than Compassion

    PubMed Central

    Leget, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Although Marianna Fotaki’s Editorial is helpful and challenging by looking at both the professional and institutional requirements for reinstalling compassion in order to aim for good quality healthcare, the causes that hinder this development remain unexamined. In this commentary, 3 causes are discussed; the boundary between the moral and the political; Neoliberalism; and the underdevelopment of reflection on the nature of care. A plea is made for more philosophical reflection on the nature of care and its implications in healthcare education. PMID:26673178

  8. Obtaining good quality medical information from the World Wide Web.

    PubMed

    Thom, Deone H; Polosa, Riccardo

    2002-01-01

    Despite the complexity of the Internet, it is surprisingly easy to search the World Wide Web for medical information. With the right skills you can save yourself a lot of time and effort making the Internet a highly effective tool for supporting your work in health and medicine. Internet offers great opportunities for interactive learning and can help you to plan lectures and create teaching materials. Moreover, physicians can find many Web resources that can assist with articles and assignments and support academic research. Evidence-based indications about medical treatments are also available. However, Internet users need to be aware of the dangers of misleading and inaccurate medical information. In this article, we intend to illustrate to physicians the pros and cons of the World Wide Web, how to apply basic critical appraisal techniques to gather good quality medical information, and a number of useful medical Web sites. PMID:11975112

  9. Towards a 'Good Life' for Farm Animals: Development of a Resource Tier Framework to Achieve Positive Welfare for Laying Hens.

    PubMed

    Edgar, Joanne L; Mullan, Siobhan M; Pritchard, Joy C; McFarlane, Una J C; Main, David C J

    2013-07-05

    The concept of a 'good life' recognises the distinction that an animal's quality of life is beyond that of a 'life worth living', representing a standard of welfare substantially higher than the legal minimum (FAWC, 2009). We propose that the opportunities required for a 'good life' could be used to structure resource tiers that lead to positive welfare and are compatible with higher welfare farm assurance schemes. Published evidence and expert opinion was used to define three tiers of resource provision (Welfare +, Welfare ++ and Welfare +++) above those stipulated in UK legislation and codes of practice, which should lead to positive welfare outcomes. In this paper we describe the principles underpinning the framework and the process of developing the resource tiers for laying hens. In doing so, we summarise expert opinion on resources required to achieve a 'good life' in laying hens and discuss the philosophical and practical challenges of developing the framework. We present the results of a pilot study to establish the validity, reliability and feasibility of the draft laying hen tiers on laying hen production systems. Finally, we propose a generic welfare assessment framework for farm animals and suggest directions for implementation, alongside outcome parameters, that can help define and promote a future 'good life' for farm animals.

  10. What Makes Good Teachers Good?: A Cross-Case Analysis of the Connection between Teacher Effectiveness and Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stronge, James H.; Ward, Thomas J.; Grant, Leslie W.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined classroom practices of effective versus less effective teachers (based on student achievement gain scores in reading and mathematics). In Phase I of the study, hierarchical linear modeling was used to assess the teacher effectiveness of 307 fifth-grade teachers in terms of student learning gains. In Phase II, 32 teachers (17…

  11. The Good School: A Quality Check-List

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowley, Peter

    2004-01-01

    In response to the parents' question concerning the good school for their child, Cowley offers a four-point checklist of the key characteristics that any good school--whether an inner city school serving disadvantaged children or a well-endowed university-prep school--will process. To illustrate each of these characteristics of a good school, the…

  12. Raising Quality and Achievement. A College Guide to Benchmarking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owen, Jane

    This booklet introduces the principles and practices of benchmarking as a way of raising quality and achievement at further education colleges in Britain. Section 1 defines the concept of benchmarking. Section 2 explains what benchmarking is not and the steps that should be taken before benchmarking is initiated. The following aspects and…

  13. Good Job, Good Life? Working Conditions and Quality of Life in Europe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drobnic, Sonja; Beham, Barbara; Prag, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    Cross-national comparisons generally show large differences in life satisfaction of individuals within and between European countries. This paper addresses the question of whether and how job quality and working conditions contribute to the quality of life of employed populations in nine strategically selected EU countries: Finland, Sweden, the…

  14. HOW GOOD ARE MY DATA? INFORMATION QUALITY ASSESSMENT METHODOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory


    Quality assurance techniques used in software development and hardware maintenance/reliability help to ensure that data in a computerized information management system are maintained well. However, information workers may not know the quality of the data resident in their inf...

  15. Do patients "like" good care? measuring hospital quality via Facebook.

    PubMed

    Timian, Alex; Rupcic, Sonia; Kachnowski, Stan; Luisi, Paloma

    2013-01-01

    With the growth of Facebook, public health researchers are exploring the platform's uses in health care. However, little research has examined the relationship between Facebook and traditional hospital quality measures. The authors conducted an exploratory quantitative analysis of hospitals' Facebook pages to assess whether Facebook "Likes" were associated with hospital quality and patient satisfaction. The 30-day mortality rates and patient recommendation rates were used to quantify hospital quality and patient satisfaction; these variables were correlated with Facebook data for 40 hospitals near New York, NY. The results showed that Facebook "Likes" have a strong negative association with 30-day mortality rates and are positively associated with patient recommendation. These exploratory findings suggest that the number of Facebook "Likes" for a hospital may serve as an indicator of hospital quality and patient satisfaction. These findings have implications for researchers and hospitals looking for a quick and widely available measure of these traditional indicators.

  16. The Good Teacher: A Composite of Qualities and Attitudes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Margaret Y.

    In order to produce an authentic portrait of the good composition teacher, a questionnaire was sent to 36 chairs of English departments and directors of freshman English in 15 states asking for the traits, characteristics, and attitudes considered exemplary in the composition teacher. Responses varied extensively. As the "most accurate means of…

  17. National air quality standards: Good politics isn`t necessarily good policy

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffnagle, G.

    1997-05-01

    On December 13, 1996, the US EPA proposed to revise the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for particulate matter (PM) and ozone. The proposed revisions would lower the concentrations at which air quality is considered healthful and thus require a new round of controls on air pollutant emissions. The court has given EPA until July of this year to promulgate new NAAQS, thus sparking an intense debate. EPA argues that the costs to implement the proposed NAAQS is peanuts and the benefits are substantial. Industry argues that the costs will be excessive. The environmentalists point out that the SO{sub 2} allowances currently are trading at about $100 per ton, while industry argued they would be $10,000 per ton. The difficulty is rooted in the way cost/benefit analysis is presented and argued, i.e., last minute and in the heat of political passion. If economics is to be used and relied upon, it should be aired and studied over many months not a 60-day comment period.

  18. Molecular Aspect of Good Eating Quality Formation in Japonica Rice

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ming-Mao; Abdula, Sailila E.; Lee, Hye-Jung; Cho, Young-Chan; Han, Long-Zhi; Koh, Hee-Jong; Cho, Yong-Gu

    2011-01-01

    The composition of amylopectin is the determinant of rice eating quality under certain threshold of protein content and the ratio of amylose and amylopectin. In molecular biology level, the fine structure of amylopectin is determined by relative activities of starch branching enzyme (SBE), granule-bound starch synthase (GBSS), and soluble starch synthase (SSS) in rice grain under the same ADP-Glucose level. But the underlying mechanism of eating quality in molecular biology level remains unclear. This paper reports the differences on major parameters such as SNP and insertion-deletion sites, RNA expressions, and enzyme activities associated with eating quality of japonica varieties. Eight japonica rice varieties with significant differences in various eating quality parameters such as palatability and protein content were used in this experiment. Association analysis between nucleotide polymorphism and eating quality showed that S12 and S13 loci in SBE1, S55 in SSS1, S58 in SSS2A were significantly associated with apparent amylose content, alkali digestion value, setback viscosity, consistency viscosity, pasting temperature, which explained most of the variation in apparent amylose content, setback viscosity, and consistency viscosity; and explained almost all variations in alkali digestion value and pasting temperature. Thirty-five SNPs and insertion-deletions from SBE1, SBE3, GBSS1, SSS1, and SSS2A differentiated high or intermediate palatability rice varieties from low palatability rice varieties. Correlation analysis between enzyme activities and eating quality properties revealed that SBE25 and SSS15/W15 were positively correlated with palatability, whereas GBSS10 and GBSS15 were negatively correlated. Gene expressions showed that SBE1 and SBE3 expressions in high palatability varieties tended to be higher than middle and low palatability varieties. Collectively, SBE1, SBE3, SSS1, and SSS2A, especially SBE1 and SBE3 could improve eating quality, but GBSS1

  19. Quality is still the backbone of good education.

    PubMed

    Hebbard, F W

    1977-06-01

    The author believes that quality optometric education results from excellent teaching, which depends on qualified faculty members who also add to optometric knowledge through research, and on a curriculum that stresses fundamentals. He believes that practicing optometrists can help to encourage and assist research.

  20. Want Economic Growth with Good Quality Institutions? Spend on Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mamoon, Dawood; Murshed, S. Mansoob

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to compare the role of human capital accumulation measured by number of years of schooling with the relative contribution of institutional capacity to prosperity. We employ several concepts of institutional quality prevalent in the literature. We discover that developing human capital is as important as superior…

  1. Likelihood of achieving air quality targets under model uncertainties.

    PubMed

    Digar, Antara; Cohan, Daniel S; Cox, Dennis D; Kim, Byeong-Uk; Boylan, James W

    2011-01-01

    Regulatory attainment demonstrations in the United States typically apply a bright-line test to predict whether a control strategy is sufficient to attain an air quality standard. Photochemical models are the best tools available to project future pollutant levels and are a critical part of regulatory attainment demonstrations. However, because photochemical models are uncertain and future meteorology is unknowable, future pollutant levels cannot be predicted perfectly and attainment cannot be guaranteed. This paper introduces a computationally efficient methodology for estimating the likelihood that an emission control strategy will achieve an air quality objective in light of uncertainties in photochemical model input parameters (e.g., uncertain emission and reaction rates, deposition velocities, and boundary conditions). The method incorporates Monte Carlo simulations of a reduced form model representing pollutant-precursor response under parametric uncertainty to probabilistically predict the improvement in air quality due to emission control. The method is applied to recent 8-h ozone attainment modeling for Atlanta, Georgia, to assess the likelihood that additional controls would achieve fixed (well-defined) or flexible (due to meteorological variability and uncertain emission trends) targets of air pollution reduction. The results show that in certain instances ranking of the predicted effectiveness of control strategies may differ between probabilistic and deterministic analyses. PMID:21138291

  2. Likelihood of achieving air quality targets under model uncertainties.

    PubMed

    Digar, Antara; Cohan, Daniel S; Cox, Dennis D; Kim, Byeong-Uk; Boylan, James W

    2011-01-01

    Regulatory attainment demonstrations in the United States typically apply a bright-line test to predict whether a control strategy is sufficient to attain an air quality standard. Photochemical models are the best tools available to project future pollutant levels and are a critical part of regulatory attainment demonstrations. However, because photochemical models are uncertain and future meteorology is unknowable, future pollutant levels cannot be predicted perfectly and attainment cannot be guaranteed. This paper introduces a computationally efficient methodology for estimating the likelihood that an emission control strategy will achieve an air quality objective in light of uncertainties in photochemical model input parameters (e.g., uncertain emission and reaction rates, deposition velocities, and boundary conditions). The method incorporates Monte Carlo simulations of a reduced form model representing pollutant-precursor response under parametric uncertainty to probabilistically predict the improvement in air quality due to emission control. The method is applied to recent 8-h ozone attainment modeling for Atlanta, Georgia, to assess the likelihood that additional controls would achieve fixed (well-defined) or flexible (due to meteorological variability and uncertain emission trends) targets of air pollution reduction. The results show that in certain instances ranking of the predicted effectiveness of control strategies may differ between probabilistic and deterministic analyses.

  3. Achieving adequate BMP`s for stormwater quality management

    SciTech Connect

    Jones-Lee, A.; Lee, G.F.

    1994-12-31

    There is considerable controversy about the technical appropriateness and the cost-effectiveness of requiring cities to control contaminants in urban stormwater discharges to meet state water quality standards equivalent to US EPA numeric chemical water quality criteria. At this time and likely for the next 10 years, urban stormwater discharges will be exempt from regulation to achieve state water quality standards in receiving waters, owing to the high cost to cities of the management of contaminants in the stormwater runoff-discharge so as to prevent exceedances of water quality standards in the receiving waters. Instead of requiring the same degree of contaminant control for stormwater discharges as is required for point-source discharges of municipal and industrial wastewaters, those responsible for urban stormwater discharges will have to implement Best Management Practices (BMP`s) for contaminant control. The recommended approach for implementation of BMP`s involves the use of site-specific evaluations of what, if any, real problems (use impairment) are caused by stormwater-associated contaminants in the waters receiving that stormwater discharge. From this type of information BMP`s can then be developed to control those contaminants in stormwater discharges that are, in fact, impairing the beneficial uses of receiving waters.

  4. Parallel Monte Carlo Particle Transport and the Quality of Random Number Generators: How Good is Good Enough?

    SciTech Connect

    Procassini, R J; Beck, B R

    2004-12-07

    It might be assumed that use of a ''high-quality'' random number generator (RNG), producing a sequence of ''pseudo random'' numbers with a ''long'' repetition period, is crucial for producing unbiased results in Monte Carlo particle transport simulations. While several theoretical and empirical tests have been devised to check the quality (randomness and period) of an RNG, for many applications it is not clear what level of RNG quality is required to produce unbiased results. This paper explores the issue of RNG quality in the context of parallel, Monte Carlo transport simulations in order to determine how ''good'' is ''good enough''. This study employs the MERCURY Monte Carlo code, which incorporates the CNPRNG library for the generation of pseudo-random numbers via linear congruential generator (LCG) algorithms. The paper outlines the usage of random numbers during parallel MERCURY simulations, and then describes the source and criticality transport simulations which comprise the empirical basis of this study. A series of calculations for each test problem in which the quality of the RNG (period of the LCG) is varied provides the empirical basis for determining the minimum repetition period which may be employed without producing a bias in the mean integrated results.

  5. Identification of Effects of Regulatory Actions on Air Quality in Goods Movement Corridors in California.

    PubMed

    Su, Jason G; Meng, Ying-Ying; Pickett, Melissa; Seto, Edmund; Ritz, Beate; Jerrett, Michael

    2016-08-16

    Few studies have assessed the impact of regulatory actions on air quality improvement through a comprehensive monitoring effort. In this study, we designed saturation sampling of nitrogen oxides (NOX) for the counties of Los Angeles and Alameda (San Francisco Bay) before (2003-2007) and after (2008-2013) implementation of goods movement actions in California. We further separated the research regions into three location categories, including goods movement corridors (GMCs), nongoods movement corridors (NGMCs), and control areas (CTRLs). Linear mixed models were developed to identify whether reductions in NOX were greater in GMCs than in other areas, after controlling for potential confounding, including weather conditions (e.g., wind speed and temperature) and season of sampling. We also considered factors that might confound the relationship, including traffic and cargo volumes that may have changed due to economic downturn impacts. Compared to the pre-policy period, we found reductions of average pollutant concentrations for nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and NOX in GMCs of 6.4 and 21.7 ppb. The reductions were smaller in NGMCs (5.9 and 16.3 ppb, respectively) and in CTRLs (4.6 and 12.1 ppb, respectively). After controlling for potential confounding from weather conditions, season of sampling, and the economic downturn in 2008, the linear mixed models demonstrated that reductions in NO2 and NOX were significantly greater in GMCs compared to reductions observed in CTRLs; there were no statistically significant differences between NGMCs and CTRLs. These results indicate that policies regulating goods movement are achieving the desired outcome of improving air quality for the state, particularly in goods movement corridors where most disadvantaged communities live.

  6. Identification of Effects of Regulatory Actions on Air Quality in Goods Movement Corridors in California.

    PubMed

    Su, Jason G; Meng, Ying-Ying; Pickett, Melissa; Seto, Edmund; Ritz, Beate; Jerrett, Michael

    2016-08-16

    Few studies have assessed the impact of regulatory actions on air quality improvement through a comprehensive monitoring effort. In this study, we designed saturation sampling of nitrogen oxides (NOX) for the counties of Los Angeles and Alameda (San Francisco Bay) before (2003-2007) and after (2008-2013) implementation of goods movement actions in California. We further separated the research regions into three location categories, including goods movement corridors (GMCs), nongoods movement corridors (NGMCs), and control areas (CTRLs). Linear mixed models were developed to identify whether reductions in NOX were greater in GMCs than in other areas, after controlling for potential confounding, including weather conditions (e.g., wind speed and temperature) and season of sampling. We also considered factors that might confound the relationship, including traffic and cargo volumes that may have changed due to economic downturn impacts. Compared to the pre-policy period, we found reductions of average pollutant concentrations for nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and NOX in GMCs of 6.4 and 21.7 ppb. The reductions were smaller in NGMCs (5.9 and 16.3 ppb, respectively) and in CTRLs (4.6 and 12.1 ppb, respectively). After controlling for potential confounding from weather conditions, season of sampling, and the economic downturn in 2008, the linear mixed models demonstrated that reductions in NO2 and NOX were significantly greater in GMCs compared to reductions observed in CTRLs; there were no statistically significant differences between NGMCs and CTRLs. These results indicate that policies regulating goods movement are achieving the desired outcome of improving air quality for the state, particularly in goods movement corridors where most disadvantaged communities live. PMID:27380254

  7. Psychoticism and disruptive behavior can be also good predictors of school achievement.

    PubMed

    Flores-Mendoza, Carmen; Widaman, Keith; Mansur-Alves, Marcela; Bacelar, Tatiane Dias; Saldanha, Renata

    2013-01-01

    The relations of Gf (Standard Progressive Matrices Raven), Gc (verbal scale of Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Third Version), personality dimensions (Eysenck Personality Questionnaire-Junior Version), and disruptive behavior (TDAH scale) with school achievement (measured by TDE test and PISA test) were investigated. Two samples of students (total N = 534) representing a broad range of socioeconomic status (SES) participated in this study. Path models were conducted. The results demonstrated that (1) in both samples no sex differences related to school achievement were found; (2) in the first sample, after controlling for age and SES differences, Gf and psychoticism predicted (.38 and -.13, respectively) school achievement (measured by TDE test); (3) in the second sample, after controlling for SES differences to which additional measures were administered, Gf and Gc positively predicted (.22 and .40, respectively) school achievement (measured by PISA test). In addition, psychoticism and disruptive behavior also predicted school performance (-.14 and -.28, respectively). Some theoretical and practical implications are discussed.

  8. Good character at school: positive classroom behavior mediates the link between character strengths and school achievement.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Lisa; Ruch, Willibald

    2015-01-01

    Character strengths have been found to be substantially related to children's and adolescents' well-being. Initial evidence suggests that they also matter for school success (e.g., Weber and Ruch, 2012). The present set of two studies aimed at replicating and extending these findings in two different age groups, primary school students (N = 179; mean age = 11.6 years) and secondary school students (N = 199; mean age = 14.4 years). The students completed the VIA-Youth (Values in Action Inventory of Strengths for Youth), a self-report measure of the 24 character strengths in the VIA classification. Their teachers rated the students' positive behavior in the classroom. Additionally, school achievement was assessed: For the primary school students (Study 1), teachers rated the students' overall school achievement and for the secondary school students (Study 2), we used their grades as a measure of school achievement. We found that several character strengths were associated with both positive classroom behavior and school achievement. Across both samples, school achievement was correlated with love of learning, perseverance, zest, gratitude, hope, and perspective. The strongest correlations with positive classroom behavior were found for perseverance, self-regulation, prudence, social intelligence, and hope. For both samples, there were indirect effects of some of the character strengths on school achievement through teacher-rated positive classroom behavior. The converging findings from the two samples support the notion that character strengths contribute to positive classroom behavior, which in turn enhances school achievement. Results are discussed in terms of their implications for future research and for school interventions based on character strengths. PMID:26029144

  9. Good character at school: positive classroom behavior mediates the link between character strengths and school achievement

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Lisa; Ruch, Willibald

    2015-01-01

    Character strengths have been found to be substantially related to children’s and adolescents’ well-being. Initial evidence suggests that they also matter for school success (e.g., Weber and Ruch, 2012). The present set of two studies aimed at replicating and extending these findings in two different age groups, primary school students (N = 179; mean age = 11.6 years) and secondary school students (N = 199; mean age = 14.4 years). The students completed the VIA-Youth (Values in Action Inventory of Strengths for Youth), a self-report measure of the 24 character strengths in the VIA classification. Their teachers rated the students’ positive behavior in the classroom. Additionally, school achievement was assessed: For the primary school students (Study 1), teachers rated the students’ overall school achievement and for the secondary school students (Study 2), we used their grades as a measure of school achievement. We found that several character strengths were associated with both positive classroom behavior and school achievement. Across both samples, school achievement was correlated with love of learning, perseverance, zest, gratitude, hope, and perspective. The strongest correlations with positive classroom behavior were found for perseverance, self-regulation, prudence, social intelligence, and hope. For both samples, there were indirect effects of some of the character strengths on school achievement through teacher-rated positive classroom behavior. The converging findings from the two samples support the notion that character strengths contribute to positive classroom behavior, which in turn enhances school achievement. Results are discussed in terms of their implications for future research and for school interventions based on character strengths. PMID:26029144

  10. Raising the Achievement of Portuguese Pupils in British Schools: A Case Study of Good Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demie, Feyisa; Lewis, Kirstin

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the research was to study the experiences of Portuguese heritage pupils in British schools. The main findings from empirical data suggest Portuguese children are underachieving at the end of primary education but the case study confirms that in good schools Portuguese pupils do well and have made huge improvements over the periods. The…

  11. Alternative Methods for Estimating Achievement Trends and School Effects: When Is Simple Good Enough?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warkentien, Siri; Silver, David

    2016-01-01

    Public schools with impressive records of serving lower-performing students are often overlooked because their average test scores, even when students are growing quickly, are lower than scores in schools that serve higher-performing students. Schools may appear to be doing poorly either because baseline achievement is not easily accounted for or…

  12. Integrating Economic and Social Policy: Good Practices from High-Achieving Countries. Innocenti Working Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mehrotra, Santosh

    This paper examines the successes of 10 "high achievers," countries with social indicators far higher than might be expected, given their national wealth, pulling together the lessons learned for social policy in the developing world. The 10 countries identified are Costa Rica, Cuba, Barbados, Botswana, Zimbabwe, Mauritius, Kerala, Sri Lanka,…

  13. Psychoticism and disruptive behavior can be also good predictors of school achievement.

    PubMed

    Flores-Mendoza, Carmen; Widaman, Keith; Mansur-Alves, Marcela; Bacelar, Tatiane Dias; Saldanha, Renata

    2013-01-01

    The relations of Gf (Standard Progressive Matrices Raven), Gc (verbal scale of Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Third Version), personality dimensions (Eysenck Personality Questionnaire-Junior Version), and disruptive behavior (TDAH scale) with school achievement (measured by TDE test and PISA test) were investigated. Two samples of students (total N = 534) representing a broad range of socioeconomic status (SES) participated in this study. Path models were conducted. The results demonstrated that (1) in both samples no sex differences related to school achievement were found; (2) in the first sample, after controlling for age and SES differences, Gf and psychoticism predicted (.38 and -.13, respectively) school achievement (measured by TDE test); (3) in the second sample, after controlling for SES differences to which additional measures were administered, Gf and Gc positively predicted (.22 and .40, respectively) school achievement (measured by PISA test). In addition, psychoticism and disruptive behavior also predicted school performance (-.14 and -.28, respectively). Some theoretical and practical implications are discussed. PMID:23866206

  14. Quality Science Teacher Professional Development and Student Achievement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubner, J.

    2007-12-01

    Studies show that socio-economic background and parental education accounts for 50-60 percent of a child's achievement in school. School, and other influences, account for the remaining 40-50 percent. In contrast to most other professions, schools require no real apprenticeship training of science teachers. Overall, only 38 percent of United States teachers have had any on-the-job training in their first teaching position, and in some cases this consisted of a few meetings over the course of a year between the beginning teacher and the assigned mentor or master teacher. Since individual teachers determine the bulk of a student's school experiences, interventions focused on teachers have the greatest likelihood of affecting students. To address this deficiency, partnerships between scientists and K-12 teachers are increasingly recognized as an excellent method for improving teacher preparedness and the quality of science education. Columbia University's Summer Research Program for Science Teachers' (founded in 1990) basic premise is simple: teachers cannot effectively teach science if they have no firsthand experience doing science, hence the Program's motto, "Practice what you teach." Columbia University's Summer Research Program for Science Teachers provides strong evidence that a teacher research program is a very effective form of professional development for secondary school science teachers and has a direct correlation to increased student achievement in science. The author will present the methodology of the program's evaluation citing statistically significant data. The author will also show the economic benefits of teacher participation in this form of professional development.

  15. Quality in university physics teaching: is it being achieved?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-11-01

    This was the title of a Physics Discipline Workshop held at the University of Leeds on 10 and 11 September 1998. Organizer Ashley Clarke of the university's Physics and Astronomy Department collected together an interesting variety of speakers polygonically targeting the topic, although as workshops go the audience didn't have to do much work except listen. There were representatives from 27 university physics departments who must have gone away with a lot to think about and possibly some new academic year resolutions to keep. But as a non-university no-longer teacher of (school) physics I was impressed with the general commitment to the idea that if you get the right quality of learning the teaching must be OK. I also learned (but have since forgotten) a lot of new acronyms. The keynote talk was by Gillian Hayes, Associate Director of the Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education (QAA). She explained the role and implementation of the Subject Reviews that QAA is making for all subjects in all institutions of higher education on a five- to seven-year cycle. Physics Education hopes to publish an article about all this from QAA shortly. In the meantime, suffice it to say that the review looks at six aspects of provision, essentially from the point of view of enhancing students' experiences and learning. No doubt all participants would agree with this (they'd better if they want to score well on the Review) but may have been more worried by the next QAA speaker, Norman Jackson, who drummed in the basic facts of life as HE moves from an elite provision system to a mass provision system. He had an interesting graph showing how in the last ten years or so more students were getting firsts and upper seconds and fewer getting thirds. It seems that all those A-level students getting better grades than they used to are carrying on their good luck to degree level. But they still can't do maths (allegedly) and I doubt whether Jon Ogborn (IoP Advancing Physics Project

  16. Does High School Facility Quality Affect Student Achievement? A Two-Level Hierarchical Linear Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowers, Alex J.; Urick, Angela

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to isolate the independent effects of high school facility quality on student achievement using a large, nationally representative U.S. database of student achievement and school facility quality. Prior research on linking school facility quality to student achievement has been mixed. Studies that relate overall…

  17. Good-quality social care for people with Parkinson’s disease: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Fiona; Stocks, Amanda-Jayne; McDonnell, Ann; Ramaswamy, Bhanu; Wood, Brendan; Whitfield, Malcolm

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The study examines the meaning of good-quality social care for people with Parkinson's disease and their carers. It identifies, from their perspective, the impact of good-quality social care on health and well-being. Design Qualitative case study methodology, interview and framework analysis techniques were used. Setting: community locations in the north and midlands of England. Participants Data were collected from 43 participants including individual interviews with people with Parkinson's disease (n=4), formal and informal social care providers (n=13), 2 focus groups, 1 with people with Parkinson's disease and their carers (n=17), and 1 with professionals (n=8), plus a telephone interview with a former commissioner. Findings Good-quality social care, delivered in a timely fashion, was reported to have a positive impact on health. Furthermore, there is an indication that good-quality social care can prevent untoward events, such as infections, symptom deterioration and deterioration in mental health. The concept of the ‘Impact Gap’ developed from the findings, illustrates how the costs of care may be reduced by delivering good-quality social care. Control, choice and maintaining independence emerged as indicators of good-quality social care, irrespective of clinical condition. Participants identified characteristics indicative of good-quality social care specific to Parkinson's disease, including understanding Parkinson's disease, appropriate administration of medication, timing of care and reassessment. ‘Parkinson's aware’ social care was seen to generate psychological, physical and social benefits that were inter-related. Conclusions The findings indicate how maximising quality in social care delivery for people with Parkinson's disease can impact on health and well-being. Long-term or short-term benefits may result in prevented events and reductions in health and social care resource. Health professionals can be instrumental in early

  18. Progress towards Good-Quality Education for All in Turkey: A Qualified Success?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Köseleci, Nihan

    2015-01-01

    Drawing from a range of secondary data sources, this paper succinctly overviews patterns of access to good-quality education in Turkey over the last 15 years. It also maps the policy context within which issues of access, quality and equity are examined. As a result of effective supply and demand side strategies, enrolment ratios beyond the…

  19. A Critical Analysis of the INQAAHE Guidelines of Good Practice for Higher Education Quality Assurance Agencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackmur, Douglas

    2008-01-01

    The International Network of Quality Assurance Agencies in Higher Education's Guidelines of Good Practice by higher education quality assurance agencies need substantial revision before they can be considered adequate by stakeholders in any national higher education system. Various revisions are proposed in this article. But the International…

  20. Why Good Quality Care Needs Philosophy More Than Compassion: Comment on "Why and How Is Compassion Necessary to Provide Good Quality Healthcare?".

    PubMed

    Leget, Carlo

    2015-06-30

    Although Marianna Fotaki's Editorial is helpful and challenging by looking at both the professional and institutional requirements for reinstalling compassion in order to aim for good quality healthcare, the causes that hinder this development remain unexamined. In this commentary, 3 causes are discussed; the boundary between the moral and the political; Neoliberalism; and the underdevelopment of reflection on the nature of care. A plea is made for more philosophical reflection on the nature of care and its implications in healthcare education.

  1. A Korean survey on qualities and definition of a good psychiatrist.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Hyun; Tor, Phern-Chern; King, Joel; Seo, Jeong Seok

    2015-05-01

    The definition of a "good" psychiatrist has varied over the past decades due to changing roles of psychiatrists. Studies on the qualities of "good" psychiatrists have been completed in many countries. However, no such study has been undertaken in Korea. In Korea, recent growing interest in psychiatry demands the identification of qualities for a good psychiatrist. The purpose of this study was to define the qualities of a good psychiatrist in Korea, subsequently facilitating the improvement of psychiatric training programs. The questionnaire was based on a Singaporean survey with the permission from the original authors. Respondents were divided into patient group and psychiatrist group. The 40-item questionnaire contained items grouped into four themes: Professional, Personal Values, Academic Executive and Relationship. Of the four themes, both patient and psychiatrist groups considered Professional as the most important, whereas Academic Executive as the least important. The mean scores for all items of each theme in the patient group were higher than those in the psychiatrist group, reflecting higher expectations for good psychiatrist in the patient group. Patients emphasized Relationship more than psychiatrists did. It is concluded that a good psychiatrist in Korea can be defined as "a good communicator and listener with a professional manner, who respects confidentiality and has good doctor-patient relationships." PMID:25931796

  2. Using Collaborative Course Development to Achieve Online Course Quality Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chao, Ining Tracy; Saj, Tami; Hamilton, Doug

    2010-01-01

    The issue of quality is becoming front and centre as online distance education moves into the mainstream of higher education. Many believe collaborative course development is the best way to design quality online courses. This research uses a case study approach to probe into the collaborative course development process and the implementation of…

  3. How healthcare organizations use the Internet to market quality achievements.

    PubMed

    Revere, Lee; Robinson, Leroy

    2010-01-01

    The increasingly competitive environment is having a strong bearing on the strategic marketing practices of hospitals. The Internet is a fairly new marketing tool, and it has the potential to dramatically influence healthcare consumers. This exploratory study investigates how hospitals use the Internet as a tool to market the quality of their services. Significant evidence exists that customers use the Internet to find information about potential healthcare providers, including information concerning quality. Data were collected from a random sample of 45 U.S. hospitals from the American Hospital Association database. The data included hospital affiliation, number of staffed beds, accreditation status, Joint Commission quality awards, and number of competing hospitals. The study's findings show that system-affiliated hospitals do not provide more, or less, quality information on their websites than do non-system-affiliated hospitals. The findings suggest that the amount of quality information provided on a hospital website is not dependent on hospital size. Research provides evidence that hospitals with more Joint Commission awards promote their quality accomplishments more so than their counterparts that earned fewer Joint Commission awards. The findings also suggest that the more competitors in a marketplace the more likely a hospital is to promote its quality as a potential differential advantage. The study's findings indicate that a necessary element of any hospital's competitive strategy should be to include the marketing of its quality on the organization's website.

  4. Towards a ‘Good Life’ for Farm Animals: Development of a Resource Tier Framework to Achieve Positive Welfare for Laying Hens

    PubMed Central

    Edgar, Joanne L.; Mullan, Siobhan M.; Pritchard, Joy C.; McFarlane, Una J. C.; Main, David C. J.

    2013-01-01

    Simple Summary Farm animals can be said to have a ‘good life’ if their quality of life is substantially higher than the current legal minimum and includes positive experiences such as pleasure. In commercial farms, animals can be provided with different resources such as bedding, exercise areas and enrichment objects. We used scientific evidence and expert opinion to determine which resources laying hens need to contribute to a ‘good life’. These resources were organised into three tiers, of increasing welfare, leading towards a ‘good life’. We describe how we developed the resource tiers and suggest how the overall framework might be used to promote a ‘good life’ for farm animals. Abstract The concept of a ‘good life’ recognises the distinction that an animal’s quality of life is beyond that of a ‘life worth living’, representing a standard of welfare substantially higher than the legal minimum (FAWC, 2009). We propose that the opportunities required for a ‘good life’ could be used to structure resource tiers that lead to positive welfare and are compatible with higher welfare farm assurance schemes. Published evidence and expert opinion was used to define three tiers of resource provision (Welfare +, Welfare ++ and Welfare +++) above those stipulated in UK legislation and codes of practice, which should lead to positive welfare outcomes. In this paper we describe the principles underpinning the framework and the process of developing the resource tiers for laying hens. In doing so, we summarise expert opinion on resources required to achieve a ‘good life’ in laying hens and discuss the philosophical and practical challenges of developing the framework. We present the results of a pilot study to establish the validity, reliability and feasibility of the draft laying hen tiers on laying hen production systems. Finally, we propose a generic welfare assessment framework for farm animals and suggest directions for implementation

  5. Current good manufacturing practices, quality control procedures, quality factors, notification requirements, and records and reports, for infant formula. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2014-06-10

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA or we) is issuing a final rule that adopts, with some modifications, the interim final rule (IFR) entitled "Current Good Manufacturing Practices, Quality Control Procedures, Quality Factors, Notification Requirements, and Records and Reports, for Infant Formula'' (February 10, 2014). This final rule affirms the IFR's changes to FDA's regulations and provides additional modifications and clarifications. The final rule also responds to certain comments submitted in response to the request for comments in the IFR.

  6. Current good manufacturing practices, quality control procedures, quality factors, notification requirements, and records and reports, for infant formula. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2014-06-10

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA or we) is issuing a final rule that adopts, with some modifications, the interim final rule (IFR) entitled "Current Good Manufacturing Practices, Quality Control Procedures, Quality Factors, Notification Requirements, and Records and Reports, for Infant Formula'' (February 10, 2014). This final rule affirms the IFR's changes to FDA's regulations and provides additional modifications and clarifications. The final rule also responds to certain comments submitted in response to the request for comments in the IFR. PMID:24922980

  7. Quality and Early Field Experiences: Partnering with Junior Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piro, Jody S.; Anderson, Gina; Fredrickson, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    This study explored the perceptions of preservice teacher candidates who participated in a pilot partnership between a public teacher education preparation program and Junior Achievement (JA). The partnership was grounded in the premise that providing early field experiences to preservice teacher candidates was a necessary requirement of quality…

  8. Hospice in Assisted Living: Promoting Good Quality Care at End of Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cartwright, Juliana C.; Miller, Lois; Volpin, Miriam

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to describe good quality care at the end of life (EOL) for hospice-enrolled residents in assisted living facilities (ALFs). Design and Methods: A qualitative descriptive design was used to obtain detailed descriptions of EOL care provided by ALF medication aides, caregivers, nurses, and hospice nurses in…

  9. The Impact of Good Quality Instructions of Early Education on the Performance of University Newcomers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    AL-Othman, F. H.

    2014-01-01

    Good quality instruction in the early years of education has a positive impact in helping newcomers in universities and colleges to adapt to the new environment. This concept is widely applied in contemporary higher education because of the numerous benefits it offers to the students and the instructors. It, is not therefore, subject to the…

  10. Are Mathematics and Science Test Scores Good Indicators of Labor-Force Quality?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Shiu-Sheng; Luoh, Ming-Ching

    2010-01-01

    Using data from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and the Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS), we investigate the link between test scores (mathematics and science) and cross-country income differences. We would like to know whether test scores are good indicators of labor-force quality. The…

  11. Quality and fairness: achieving the paradigm. A personal perspective.

    PubMed

    Laurencin, C T

    1999-05-01

    African Americans and those traditionally underrepresented and discriminated against by society face particular roadblocks in achieving success. In the case of training for orthopaedic surgery selection, this paper presents fundamental concepts addressing misconceptions regarding the pool of underrepresented applicants for positions in orthopaedic surgery residency and the notion and definition of the terms qualified and best qualified regarding the residency applicant pool. The paper underscores the fact, that despite advances in the century, racism continues to be pervasive in America, and efforts at leveling the playing field should be used.

  12. Design of a Highly Stable, High-Conversion-Efficiency, Optical Parametric Chirped-Pulse Amplification System with Good Beam Quality

    SciTech Connect

    Guardalben, M.J.; Keegan, J.; Waxer, L.J.; Bagnoud, V.; Begishev, I.A.; Puth, J.; Zuegel, J.D.

    2003-10-06

    OAK B204 An optical parametric chirped-pulse amplifier (OPCPA) design that provides 40% pump-to-signal conversion efficiency and over-500-mJ signal energy at 1054 nm for front-end injection into a Nd:glass amplifier chain is presented. This OPCPA system is currently being built as the prototype front end for the OMEGA EP (extended performance) laser system at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics. Using a three-dimensional spatial and temporal numerical model, several design considerations necessary to achieve high conversion efficiency, good output stability, and good beam quality are discussed. The dependence of OPCPA output on the pump beam's spatiotemporal shape and the relative size of seed and pump beams is described. This includes the effects of pump intensity modulation and pump-signal walk-off. The trade-off among efficiency, stability, and low output beam intensity modulation is discussed.

  13. The value of Good Manufacturing Practice to a Blood Service in managing the delivery of quality.

    PubMed

    Slopecki, A; Smith, K; Moore, S

    2007-04-01

    The delivery of 'quality' in transfusion medicine is addressed by considering how safe and efficacious blood, blood components, reagents, and services can be provided through the application of an effective quality assurance management system. The creation of such a system in the UK is reviewed through the development of the UK Guide to Good Pharmaceutical Manufacturing Practice from 1971 to the present. It provides simple practical guidance and standards. The UK experience shows how quality assurance has evolved, it is not offered as a model to be followed. The UK approach merged with that of the European Union from the early 1990s. The use of such a quality management system to support the application of licensing and accreditation standards relevant to the work of a modern Blood Service is considered, as are processes to learn about the effective and efficacious use of blood and blood components.

  14. Evaluating the Good Ontology Design Guideline (GoodOD) with the Ontology Quality Requirements and Evaluation Method and Metrics (OQuaRE)

    PubMed Central

    Duque-Ramos, Astrid; Boeker, Martin; Jansen, Ludger; Schulz, Stefan; Iniesta, Miguela; Fernández-Breis, Jesualdo Tomás

    2014-01-01

    Objective To (1) evaluate the GoodOD guideline for ontology development by applying the OQuaRE evaluation method and metrics to the ontology artefacts that were produced by students in a randomized controlled trial, and (2) informally compare the OQuaRE evaluation method with gold standard and competency questions based evaluation methods, respectively. Background In the last decades many methods for ontology construction and ontology evaluation have been proposed. However, none of them has become a standard and there is no empirical evidence of comparative evaluation of such methods. This paper brings together GoodOD and OQuaRE. GoodOD is a guideline for developing robust ontologies. It was previously evaluated in a randomized controlled trial employing metrics based on gold standard ontologies and competency questions as outcome parameters. OQuaRE is a method for ontology quality evaluation which adapts the SQuaRE standard for software product quality to ontologies and has been successfully used for evaluating the quality of ontologies. Methods In this paper, we evaluate the effect of training in ontology construction based on the GoodOD guideline within the OQuaRE quality evaluation framework and compare the results with those obtained for the previous studies based on the same data. Results Our results show a significant effect of the GoodOD training over developed ontologies by topics: (a) a highly significant effect was detected in three topics from the analysis of the ontologies of untrained and trained students; (b) both positive and negative training effects with respect to the gold standard were found for five topics. Conclusion The GoodOD guideline had a significant effect over the quality of the ontologies developed. Our results show that GoodOD ontologies can be effectively evaluated using OQuaRE and that OQuaRE is able to provide additional useful information about the quality of the GoodOD ontologies. PMID:25148262

  15. Characterizing urban areas with good sound quality: development of a research protocol.

    PubMed

    van Kempen, Elise; Devilee, Jeroen; Swart, Wim; van Kamp, Irene

    2014-01-01

    Due to rapid urbanization, the spatial variation between wanted and unwanted sounds will decrease or even disappear. Consequently, the characteristics of (urban) areas where people can temporarily withdraw themselves from urban stressors such as noise may change or become increasingly scarce. Hardly any research has been carried out into the positive health effects of spending time in areas with a good sound quality. One of the problems is that an overview of what aspects determines good sound quality in urban areas and how these are interrelated is lacking. This paper reviews the literature pertaining to the sound quality of urban areas. Aim is to summarize what is known about the influence of social, spatial, and physical aspects other than sounds, on peoples' perception of urban sound qualities. Literature from both conventional sound research and from the so-called soundscape field, published between 2000 and the beginning of 2013 in English or Dutch, was evaluated. Although a general set of validated indicators that can be directly applied, is not available yet, a set of indicators was derived from the literature. These form the basis of a study protocol that will be applied in "Towards a Sustainable acoustic Environment", a project that aims to describe sound qualities at a low-scale level. Key-elements of this study protocol, including a questionnaire and the systematic audit of neighborhoods, were presented in this paper.

  16. A "good death" for whom? Quality of spouse's death and psychological distress among older widowed persons.

    PubMed

    Carr, Deborah

    2003-06-01

    Ethicists, policy makers, and care providers are increasingly concerned with helping the dying elderly to experience a "good death." A "good death" is characterized by physical comfort, social support, acceptance, and appropriate medical care, and it should minimize psychological distress for the dying and their families. I identify the predictors of death quality and evaluate how the quality of an older adult's death affects the surviving spouse's psychological adjustment six months after the loss. Analyses use Changing Lives of Older Couples (CLOC) data, a prospective study of married persons ages 65 and older. Positive spousal relationships during the final days increase survivors' yearning yet reduce their anger. Having a spouse die a painful death is associated with elevated anxiety, yearning, and intrusive thoughts. The perception of physician negligence is associated with elevated anger. These findings suggest that improved end-of-life care and pain management will benefit both the dying and their bereaved spouses. PMID:12866391

  17. Health physics manual of good practices for reducing radiation exposure to levels that are as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA)

    SciTech Connect

    Herrington, W.N.; Higby, D.P.; Kathren,., R.L.; Merwin, S.E.; Stoetzel, G.A.

    1988-06-01

    A primary objective of the US Department of Energy (DOE) health physics and radiation protection program has been to limit radiation exposures to those levels that are as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). As a result, the ALARA concept developed into a program and a set of operational principles to ensure that the objective was consistently met. Implementation of these principles required that a guide be produced. The original ALARA guide was issued by DOE in 1980 to promote improved understanding of ALARA concepts within the DOE community and to assist those responsible for operational ALARA activities in attaining their goals. Since 1980, additional guidance has been published by national and international organizations to provide further definition and clarification to ALARA concepts. As basic ALARA experience increased, the value and role of the original guide prompted the DOE Office of Nuclear Safety (ONS) to support a current revision. The revised manual of good practices includes six sections: 1.0 Introduction, 2.0 Administration, 3.0 Optimization, 4.0 Setting and Evaluating ALARA Goals, 5.0 Radiological Design, and 6.0 Conduct of Operations. The manual is directed primarily to contractor and DOE staff who are responsible for conduct and overview of radiation protection and ALARA programs at DOE facilities. The intent is to provide sufficient guidance such that the manual, if followed, will ensure that radiation exposures are maintained as low as reasonably achievable and will establish the basis for a formally structured and auditable program. 118 refs., 16 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Does Teacher Quality Affect Student Achievement? An Empirical Study in Indonesia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sirait, Swando

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study is to examine the relationship between teacher qualities in relation to student achievement in Indonesia. Teacher quality in this study defines as teacher evaluation score, in the areas of professional and pedagogic competency. The result of this study consonant to previous study that teacher quality, in term of teacher…

  19. Quality After-School Programming and Its Relationship to Achievement-Related Behaviors and Academic Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grassi, Annemarie M.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to understand the relationship between quality social support networks developed through high quality afterschool programming and achievement amongst middle school and high school aged youth. This study seeks to develop a deeper understanding of how quality after-school programs influence a youth's developmental…

  20. Good Quality Sleep is Associated with Better Academic Performance among University Students in Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Lemma, Seblewengel; Berhane, Yemane; Worku, Alemayehu; Gelaye, Bizu; Williams, Michelle A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose This study assessed the association of sleep quality with academic performance among University students in Ethiopia. Methods this cross sectional study of 2173 college students (471 female and 1672 male) was conducted in two Universities in Ethiopia. Students were selected in to the study using a multistage sampling procedure and data were collected through a self administered questionnaire. Sleep quality was assessed using Pittsburgh sleep quality index and academic performance was based on self reported cumulative grade point average. The Student ‘t’ test, Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) and multiple linear regression were used to evaluate associations. Results We found that students with better sleep quality score achieved better on their academic performance (P-value =0.001) while sleep duration was not associated with academic performance in the final model. Conclusion Our study underscores the importance of sleep quality on better academic performance. Future studies need to identify the possible factors which influence sleep quality other than the academic environment repeatedly reported by other literature. It is imperative to design and implement appropriate interventions to improve sleep quality in light of the current body of evidence to enhance academic success in the study setting. PMID:23928956

  1. Do quality indicators for general practice teaching practices predict good outcomes for students?

    PubMed

    Bartlett, Maggie; Potts, Jessica; McKinley, Bob

    2016-07-01

    Keele medical students spend 113 days in general practices over our five-year programme. We collect practice data thought to indicate good quality teaching. We explored the relationships between these data and two outcomes for students; Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) scores and feedback regarding the placements. Though both are surrogate markers of good teaching, they are widely used. We collated practice and outcome data for one academic year. Two separate statistical analyses were carried out: (1) to determine how much of the variation seen in the OSCE scores was due to the effect of the practice and how much to the individual student. (2) to identify practice characteristics with a relationship to student feedback scores. (1) OSCE performance: 268 students in 90 practices: six quality indicators independently influenced the OSCE score, though without linear relationships and not to statistical significance. (2) Student satisfaction: 144 students in 69 practices: student feedback scores are not influenced by practice characteristics. The relationships between the quality indicators we collect for practices and outcomes for students are not clear. It may be that neither the quality indicators nor the outcome measures are reliable enough to inform decisions about practices' suitability for teaching. PMID:27117344

  2. The developmental quality of participation experiences: beyond the rhetoric that "participation is always good!".

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Pedro D; Azevedo, Cristina N; Menezes, Isabel

    2012-06-01

    A powerful rhetoric regarding the importance of adolescents' civic engagement and political participation is common in contemporary societies, whilst citizens, both adolescent and adults, seem to express a growing scepticism and alienation regarding politics. Even if this disengagement is debatable, as there are simultaneous signs of an increasing involvement in a variety of emerging and broadly-defined civic and political activities, we argue that the benefits of these experiences should be scrutinized using psychological evidence-based criteria. We rest on classical contributions from developmental psychology, educational theory and political science to define criteria that could inform the quality of participation experiences, and then present two studies that explore its adequacy. Study 1 is a cross-sectional study that observes that higher quality civic and political experiences are connected with more complex modes of thinking about politics. In Study 2, a two-wave longitudinal design, the quality of participation experiences is a significant predictor of change patterns of political attitudes; moreover, results support the argument that participation is not good in itself and that some experiences, with lesser developmental quality, might have a detrimental effect on adolescents' political development.

  3. 77 FR 1687 - EPA Workshops on Achieving Water Quality Through Integrated Municipal Stormwater and Wastewater...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-11

    ... AGENCY EPA Workshops on Achieving Water Quality Through Integrated Municipal Stormwater and Wastewater Plans Under the Clean Water Act (CWA) AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice... water quality objectives of the CWA. The workshops are intended to assist EPA in developing...

  4. Academic Achievement, School Quality and Family Background: Study in Seven Latin American Countries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanguinetty, Jorge A.

    Educational production can be studied by correlating levels of academic achievement with three independent variables: student's family background, student's mental ability, and school quality. To examine family background and school quality, information was gathered from schools in Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Mexico, Paraguay, and Peru.…

  5. Effects of Secondary School Students' Perceptions of Mathematics Education Quality on Mathematics Anxiety and Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Çiftçi, S. Koza

    2015-01-01

    The two aims of this study are as follows: (1) to compare the differences in mathematics anxiety and achievement in secondary school students according to their perceptions of the quality of their mathematics education via a cluster analysis and (2) to test the effects of the perception of mathematics education quality on anxiety and achievement…

  6. A Good Beginning Makes a Good Market: The Effect of Different Market Opening Structures on Market Quality

    PubMed Central

    Hinterleitner, Gernot; Leopold-Wildburger, Ulrike; Mestel, Roland; Palan, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    This paper deals with the market structure at the opening of the trading day and its influence on subsequent trading. We compare a single continuous double auction and two complement markets with different call auction designs as opening mechanisms in a unified experimental framework. The call auctions differ with respect to their levels of transparency. We find that a call auction not only improves market efficiency and liquidity at the beginning of the trading day when compared to the stand-alone continuous double auction, but also causes positive spillover effects on subsequent trading. Concerning the design of the opening call auction, we find no significant differences between the transparent and nontransparent specification with respect to opening prices and liquidity. In the course of subsequent continuous trading, however, market quality is slightly higher after a nontransparent call auction. PMID:26351653

  7. Is Early Ability Grouping Good for High-Achieving Students' Psychosocial Development? Effects of the Transition into Academically Selective Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Michael; Neumann, Marko; Tetzner, Julia; Böse, Susanne; Knoppick, Henrike; Maaz, Kai; Baumert, Jürgen; Lehmann, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigates school context effects on psychosocial characteristics (academic self-concept, peer relations, school satisfaction, and school anxiety) of high-achieving and gifted students. Students who did or did not make an early transition from elementary to secondary schools for high-achieving and gifted students in 5th grade…

  8. Information Quality in Regulatory Decision Making: Peer Review versus Good Laboratory Practice

    PubMed Central

    Borgert, Christopher J.; Mihaich, Ellen M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: There is an ongoing discussion on the provenance of toxicity testing data regarding how best to ensure its validity and credibility. A central argument is whether journal peer-review procedures are superior to Good Laboratory Practice (GLP) standards employed for compliance with regulatory mandates. Objective: We sought to evaluate the rationale for regulatory decision making based on peer-review procedures versus GLP standards. Method: We examined pertinent published literature regarding how scientific data quality and validity are evaluated for peer review, GLP compliance, and development of regulations. Discussion: Some contend that peer review is a coherent, consistent evaluative procedure providing quality control for experimental data generation, analysis, and reporting sufficient to reliably establish relative merit, whereas GLP is seen as merely a tracking process designed to thwart investigator corruption. This view is not supported by published analyses pointing to subjectivity and variability in peer-review processes. Although GLP is not designed to establish relative merit, it is an internationally accepted quality assurance, quality control method for documenting experimental conduct and data. Conclusions: Neither process is completely sufficient for establishing relative scientific soundness. However, changes occurring both in peer-review processes and in regulatory guidance resulting in clearer, more transparent communication of scientific information point to an emerging convergence in ensuring information quality. The solution to determining relative merit lies in developing a well-documented, generally accepted weight-of-evidence scheme to evaluate both peer-reviewed and GLP information used in regulatory decision making where both merit and specific relevance inform the process. PMID:22343028

  9. Depressive symptoms in third-grade teachers: relations to classroom quality and student achievement.

    PubMed

    McLean, Leigh; McDonald Connor, Carol

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated associations among third-grade teachers' (N = 27) symptoms of depression, quality of the classroom-learning environment (CLE), and students' (N = 523, Mage  = 8.6 years) math and literacy performance. teachers' depressive symptoms in the winter negatively predicted students' spring mathematics achievement. This depended on students' fall mathematics scores; students who began the year with weaker math skills and were in classrooms where teachers reported more depressive symptoms achieved smaller gains than did peers whose teachers reported fewer symptoms. teachers' depressive symptoms were negatively associated with quality of CLE, and quality of CLE mediated the association between depressive symptoms and student achievement. The findings point to the importance of teachers' mental health, with implications for policy and practice.

  10. A Guide to the Librarian's Responsibility in Achieving Quality in Lighting and Ventilation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, Ellsworth

    1967-01-01

    Quality, not intensity, is the keystone to good library lighting. The single most important problem in lighting is glare caused by extremely intense centers of light. Multiple interfiling of light rays is a factor required in library lighting. A fixture that diffuses light well is basic when light emerges from the fixture. It scatters widely,…

  11. Development and measurement of the goodness of test images for visual print quality evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halonen, Raisa; Nuutinen, Mikko; Asikainen, Reijo; Oittinen, Pirkko

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the study was to develop a test image for print quality evaluation to improve the current state of the art in testing the quality of digital printing. The image presented by the authors in EI09 portrayed a breakfast scene, the content of which could roughly be divided in four object categories: a woman, a table with objects, a landscape picture and a gray wall. The image was considered to have four main areas of improvement: the busyness of the image, the control of the color world, the salience of the object categories, and the naturalness of the event and the setting. To improve the first image, another test image was developed. Whereas several aspects were improved, the shortcomings of the new image found by visual testing and self-report were in the same four areas. To combine the insights of the two test images and to avoid their pitfalls, a third image was developed. The goodness of the three test images was measured in subjective tests. The third test image was found to address efficiently three of the four improvement areas, only the salience of the objects left a bit to be desired.

  12. Accountability, Rigor, and Detracking: Achievement Effects of Embracing a Challenging Curriculum as a Universal Good for All Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burris, Carol Corbet; Wiley, Ed; Welner, Kevin G.; Murphy, John

    2008-01-01

    Background: This longitudinal study examines the long-term effects on the achievement of students at a diverse suburban high school after all students were given accelerated mathematics in a detracked middle school as well as ninth-grade "high-track" curriculum in all subjects in heterogeneously grouped classes. Despite considerable research…

  13. What Makes a Good Student? How Emotions, Self-Regulated Learning, and Motivation Contribute to Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mega, Carolina; Ronconi, Lucia; De Beni, Rossana

    2014-01-01

    The authors propose a theoretical model linking emotions, self-regulated learning, and motivation to academic achievement. This model was tested with 5,805 undergraduate students. They completed the Self-Regulated Learning, Emotions, and Motivation Computerized Battery (LEM-B) composed of 3 self-report questionnaires: the Self-Regulated Learning…

  14. It Feels Good to Learn Where I Belong: School Belonging, Academic Emotions, and Academic Achievement in Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lam, Un Fong; Chen, Wei-Wen; Zhang, Jingqi; Liang, Ting

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the relationships between school belonging, academic emotions, and academic achievement in Macau adolescents. A survey of 406 junior high school students in Macau was used to collect information on the extent to which these students felt accepted and respected in their schools (school belonging), the emotions they experienced…

  15. Life Satisfaction among Highly Achieving Students in Hong Kong: Do Gratitude and the "Good-Enough Mindset" Add to the Contribution of Perfectionism in Prediction?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, David W.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated whether gratitude and the "good-enough mindset" added to the contribution of perfectionism in predicting life satisfaction in 245 Chinese highly achieving students in Hong Kong. Participants completed self-report questionnaires that included scales on life satisfaction, positive and negative perfectionism (perfectionistic…

  16. E's Are Good: Standards of Quality in Public Administration as Reflected in Discourse on Canadian Public Policy Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Dana Lee; Miller, Audrey Anna; Bratton, Todd

    2015-01-01

    Promoting understanding of quality in the context of good governance can be a challenging classroom exercise not only because of the potential for hijacking politicization of the discussion, but also because of the variety of ways in which public sector goals can be defined, even in the context of a single policy. Standards of quality in the…

  17. Physicochemical, nutritional, and sensory qualities of wine grape pomace fortified baked goods.

    PubMed

    Walker, Rebecca; Tseng, Angela; Cavender, George; Ross, Andrew; Zhao, Yanyun

    2014-09-01

    Wine grape pomace (WGP) as a source of antioxidant dietary fiber (DF) was used to fortify baked goods, including breads, muffins, and brownies. Pinot Noir WGP (RWGP) and Pinot Grigio WGP (WWGP) substituted wheat flour at concentration of 5%, 10%, and 15% for bread, 10%, 15%, 20%, and 25% RWGP for brownies, and 5%, 10%, and 15% RWGP or 10%, 15%, and 20% WWGP for muffins. The finished products were evaluated for total phenolic content (TPC), radical scavenging activity (RSA), and total DF, as well as physicochemical and sensory properties. WGP flour blends were also tested for solvent retention capacity (SRC). The highest TPC and RSA values for bread and muffins were achieved in 15% RWGP fortified samples with TPC and RSA values of 68.32 mg gallic acid equivalent (GAE)/serving and 80.70 AAE mg/serving, respectively for bread, and 2164 mg GAE/serving and 1526 mg AAE/serving, respectively for muffins. Brownies fortified with 10% RWGP had the highest RSA value (115.52 mg AAE/serving) while the control had the highest TPC value (1152 mg GAE/serving). Breads and muffins with 15% RWGP and brownies with 25% RWGP had the highest amount of DF (6.33, 12.32, and 7.73 g/serving, respectively). Sensory evaluation concluded that there is no difference in overall liking of 5% and 10% RWGP breads and muffins or 15% and 20% WGP brownies compared to the controls. This study demonstrated that WGP is a viable functional ingredient in bakery goods to increase TPC, RSA, and DF in consumer's diets.

  18. Friendship Quality and School Achievement: A Longitudinal Analysis during Primary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zucchetti, Giulia; Candela, Filippo; Sacconi, Beatrice; Rabaglietti, Emanuela

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the longitudinal relationship between friendship quality (positive and negative) and school achievement among 228 school-age children (51% girls, M = 8.09, SD = 0.41). A three-wave cross-lagged analysis was used to determine the direction of influence between these domains across school years. Findings revealed that: (a) school…

  19. The Effect of the Adoption of the Quality Philosophy by Teachers on Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandifer, Cody Clark

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if the adoption of the Deming philosophy by teachers and use of the LtoJ[R] process resulted in greater academic achievement. Results of internal consistency analysis indicated that the instrument, the "Commitment to Quality Inventory for Educators," was a reliable measure of the Deming philosophy for…

  20. Classroom Instructional Quality, Exposure to Mathematics Instruction and Mathematics Achievement in Fifth Grade

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ottmar, Erin R.; Decker, Lauren E.; Cameron, Claire E.; Curby, Timothy W.; Rimm-Kaufman, Sara E.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the quality of teacher-child interactions and exposure to mathematics instruction as predictors of 5th grade student's mathematics achievement. The sample was a subset of the children involved in the NICHD-SECC longitudinal study (N = 657). Results indicate that, even after controlling for student demographic…

  1. The Effects of Two Intervention Programs on Teaching Quality and Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Azkiyah, S. N.; Doolaard, Simone; Creemers, Bert P. M.; Van Der Werf, M. P. C.

    2014-01-01

    This paper compares the effectiveness of two interventions aimed to improve teaching quality and student achievement in Indonesia. The first intervention was the use of education standards, while the second one was the combination of education standards with a teacher improvement program. The study involved 50 schools, 52 teachers, and 1660…

  2. Transactional Relationships between Latinos' Friendship Quality and Academic Achievement during the Transition to Middle School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sebanc, Anne M.; Guimond, Amy B.; Lutgen, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates whether friendship quality, academic achievement, and mastery goal orientation predict each other across the transition to middle school. Participants were 146 Latino students (75 girls) followed from the end of elementary school through the first year of middle school. Measures included positive and negative friendship…

  3. Social Capital, Human Capital and Parent-Child Relation Quality: Interacting for Children's Educational Achievement?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Otter, Cecilia; Stenberg, Sten-Åke

    2015-01-01

    We analyse the utility of social capital for children's achievement, and if this utility interacts with family human capital and the quality of the parent-child relationship. Our focus is on parental activities directly related to children's school work. Our data stem from a Swedish cohort born in 1953 and consist of both survey and register data.…

  4. Mathematics Teacher Quality: Its Distribution and Relationship with Student Achievement in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Özel, Zeynep Ebrar Yetkiner; Özel, Serkan

    2013-01-01

    A main purpose of the present study was to investigate the distribution of qualified mathematics teachers in relation to students' socioeconomic status (SES), as measured by parental education, among Turkish middle schools. Further, relationships between mathematics teacher quality indicators and students' mathematics achievement were…

  5. The Relation among School District Health, Total Quality Principles for School Organization and Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall, Jon; Pritchard, Ruie; Gunderson, Betsey

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the congruence among W. E. Deming's 14 points for Total Quality Management (TQM), the organizational health of school districts, and student achievement. Based on Kanter's (1983) concept of a Culture of Pride with a Climate of Success, healthy districts were defined as having an organizational culture…

  6. Improving quality and reducing inequities: a challenge in achieving best care

    PubMed Central

    Nicewander, David A.; Qin, Huanying; Ballard, David J.

    2006-01-01

    The health care quality chasm is better described as a gulf for certain segments of the population, such as racial and ethnic minority groups, given the gap between actual care received and ideal or best care quality. The landmark Institute of Medicine report Crossing the Quality Chasm: A New Health System for the 21st Century challenges all health care organizations to pursue six major aims of health care improvement: safety, timeliness, effectiveness, efficiency, equity, and patient-centeredness. “Equity” aims to ensure that quality care is available to all and that the quality of care provided does not differ by race, ethnicity, or other personal characteristics unrelated to a patient's reason for seeking care. Baylor Health Care System is in the unique position of being able to examine the current state of equity in a typical health care delivery system and to lead the way in health equity research. Its organizational vision, “culture of quality,” and involved leadership bode well for achieving equitable best care. However, inequities in access, use, and outcomes of health care must be scrutinized; the moral, ethical, and economic issues they raise and the critical injustice they create must be remedied if this goal is to be achieved. Eliminating any observed inequities in health care must be synergistically integrated with quality improvement. Quality performance indicators currently collected and evaluated indicate that Baylor Health Care System often performs better than the national average. However, there are significant variations in care by age, gender, race/ethnicity, and socioeconomic status that indicate the many remaining challenges in achieving “best care” for all. PMID:16609733

  7. Beyond good intentions: The role of proactive coping in achieving sustained behavioural change in the context of diabetes management.

    PubMed

    Thoolen, Bart Johan; de Ridder, Denise; Bensing, Jozien; Gorter, Kees; Rutten, Guy

    2009-03-01

    This study examines the effectiveness of a brief self-management intervention to support patients recently diagnosed with type-2 diabetes to achieve sustained improvements in their self-care behaviours. Based on proactive coping, the intervention emphasizes the crucial role of anticipation and planning in maintaining self-care behaviours. In a randomised controlled trial among recent screen-detected patients, participants who received the intervention were compared with usual-care controls, examining changes in proximal outcomes (intentions, self-efficacy and proactive coping), self-care behaviour (diet, physical activity and medication) and weight over time (0, 3 and 12 months). Subsequently, the contribution of proactive coping in predicting maintenance of behavioural change was analysed using stepwise hierarchical regression analyses, controlling for baseline self-care behaviour, patient characteristics, and intentions and self-efficacy as measured after the course. The intervention was effective in improving proximal outcomes and behaviour with regard to diet and physical activity, resulting in significant weight loss at 12 months. Furthermore, proactive coping was a better predictor of long-term self-management than either intentions or self-efficacy. Proactive coping thus offers new insights into behavioural maintenance theory and can be used to develop effective self-management interventions. PMID:20204991

  8. Trigone ventricular meningiomas: Is it possible to achieve good results even in the absence of high tech tools?

    PubMed Central

    Faquini, Igor; Fonseca, Ricardo Brandão; Vale de Melo, Sérgio Luís; Negri, Herika; Vieira, Eduardo; Saboia, Tammy; Azevedo-Filho, Hildo

    2015-01-01

    Background: Intraventricular meningiomas constitute 2% of intracranial meningiomas, representing a challenging disease for neurosurgeons; we report our experience through a case series, emphasizing surgical approaches and results. Methods: Between 2009 and 2012, four patients underwent microsurgical resection in our department. Clinical and imaging findings, surgical approaches, outcomes, and follow-up were analyzed. Results: Four patients (three females and one male) were included and the signs of intracranial hypertension were the main clinical presentation in all cases. The parietal approach through intraparietal sulcus was performed in 3 cases and parieto-occipital interhemispheric surgical route in 1 case. Gross total resection was achieved in all the patients without additional deficits and without the aid of neuronavigation, intraoperative monitoring, and intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging. Conclusion: Gross total resection is the gold standard treatment for such tumors and the intraparietal sulcus approach is an excellent choice for most of the cases. Careful anatomical knowledge contributes to a safer procedure even in the absence of high tech equipment assistance. PMID:26674002

  9. Achieving attainable outcomes from good science in an untidy world: case studies in land and air pollution.

    PubMed

    Mahoney, Gary; Stewart, Alex G; Kennedy, Nattalie; Whitely, Becky; Turner, Linda; Wilkinson, Ewan

    2015-08-01

    While scientific understanding of environmental issues develops through careful observation, experiment and modelling, the application of such advances in the day to day world is much less clean and tidy. Merseyside in northwest England has an industrial heritage from the earliest days of the industrial revolution. Indeed, the chemical industry was borne here. Land contamination issues are rife, as are problems with air quality. Through the examination of one case study for each topic, the practicalities of applied science are explored. An integrated, multidisciplinary response to pollution needs more than a scientific risk assessment. The needs of the various groups (from public to government) involved in the situations must be considered, as well as wider, relevant contexts (from history to European legislation), before a truly integrated response can be generated. However, no such situation exists in isolation and the introduction of environmental investigations and the exploration of suitable, integrated responses will alter the situation in unexpected ways, which must be considered carefully and incorporated in a rolling fashion to enable solutions to continue to be applicable and relevant to the problem being faced. This integrated approach has been tested over many years in Merseyside and found to be a robust approach to ever-changing problems that are well described by the management term, "wicked problems".

  10. Comparison of obese adults with poor versus good sleep quality during a functional neuroimaging delay discounting task: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Martin, Laura E; Pollack, Lauren; McCune, Ashley; Schulte, Erica; Savage, Cary R; Lundgren, Jennifer D

    2015-10-30

    This study aimed to determine if obese adults with poor versus good sleep quality demonstrate reduced self-regulatory capacity and different patterns of neural activation when making impulsive monetary choices. Six obese, good quality sleepers (M age=44.7 years, M BMI=38.1 kg/m(2)) were compared to 13 obese, poor quality sleepers (M age=42.6, M BMI=39.2 kg/m(2)) on sleep and eating behavior and brain activation in prefrontal and insular regions while engaging in a delay discounting task during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Poor quality sleepers demonstrated significantly lower brain activation in the right inferior frontal gyrus, right middle frontal gyrus, and bilateral insula when making immediate and smaller (impulsive) monetary choices compared to the baseline condition. Behaviorally, poor compared to good quality sleepers reported higher scores in the night eating questionnaire. Obese adults with poor sleep quality demonstrate decreased brain activation in multiple regions that regulate cognitive control and interceptive awareness, possibly reducing self-regulatory capacity when making immediately gratifying decisions.

  11. Comparison of Obese Adults with Poor versus Good Sleep Quality during a Functional Neuroimaging Delay Discounting Task: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Laura E.; Pollack, Lauren; McCune, Ashley; Schulte, Erica; Savage, Cary R.; Lundgren, Jennifer D.

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to determine if obese adults with poor versus good sleep quality demonstrate reduced self-regulatory capacity and different patterns of neural activation when making impulsive monetary choices. Six obese, good quality sleepers (M age = 44.7 years, M BMI = 83.1 kg/m2) were compared to 13 obese, poor quality sleepers (M age = 42.6, M BMI = 39.2 kg/m2) on sleep and eating behavior and brain activation in prefrontal and insular regions while engaging in a delay discounting task during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Poor quality sleepers demonstrated significantly lower brain activation in the right inferior frontal gyrus, right middle frontal gyrus, and bilateral insula when making immediate and smaller (impulsive) monetary choices compared to the baseline condition. Behaviorally, poor compared to good quality sleepers reported higher scores in the night eating questionnaire. Obese adults with poor sleep quality demonstrate decreased brain activation in multiple regions that regulate cognitive control and interceptive awareness, possibly reducing self-regulatory capacity when making immediately gratifying decisions. PMID:26358975

  12. Implementing Good Practices Programs to Encourage Production of High-Quality, Safer Produce in Mississippi

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahmoud, Barakat S. M.; Stafne, Eric T.; Coker, Christine H.; Bachman, Gary R.; Bell, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Fifty-four growers/producers attended four 1-day good agricultural practices (GAP) and good handling practices (GHP) workshops at four locations in Mississippi. Pre- and post workshop survey data indicated that the participants' food safety knowledge increased by 15%. Furthermore, the workshops helped producers develop their own food safety plans.…

  13. Pre-operative factors predicting good outcome in terms of health-related quality of life after ACL reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Månsson, O; Kartus, J; Sernert, N

    2013-02-01

    The life situation of many patients changes after an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture and subsequent reconstruction, and this may affect their health-related quality of life in many ways. It is well known that the overall clinical results after ACL reconstruction are considered good, but pre-operative predictive factors for a good post-operative clinical outcome after ACL reconstruction have not been studied in as much detail. The purpose of this study was to identify pre-operative factors that predict a good post-operative outcome as measured by the Short Form 36 (SF-36) and Knee Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) 3-6 years after ACL reconstruction. Seventy-three patients scheduled for ACL reconstruction were clinically examined pre-operatively. The SF-36 and KOOS questionnaires were sent by mail to these patients 3-6 years after reconstruction. Predictive factors for health-related quality of life were investigated using a stepwise regression analysis. In conclusion, pre-operative factors, such as pivot shift, knee function, and range of motion, may predict a good post-operative outcome and explain up to 25% in terms of health-related quality of life after ACL reconstruction. Furthermore, it appears that the patients' pre-injury and pre-operative Tegner activity levels are important predictors of post-operative health-related quality of life.

  14. Quality improvement in diabetes--successful in achieving better care with hopes for prevention.

    PubMed

    Haw, J Sonya; Narayan, K M Venkat; Ali, Mohammed K

    2015-09-01

    Diabetes affects 29 million Americans and is associated with billions of dollars in health expenditures and lost productivity. Robust evidence has shown that lifestyle interventions in people at high risk for diabetes and comprehensive management of cardiometabolic risk factors like glucose, blood pressure, and lipids can delay the onset of diabetes and its complications, respectively. However, realizing the "triple aim" of better health, better care, and lower cost in diabetes has been hampered by low adoption of lifestyle interventions to prevent diabetes and poor achievement of care goals for those with diabetes. To achieve better care, a number of quality improvement (QI) strategies targeting the health system, healthcare providers, and/or patients have been evaluated in both controlled trials and real-world programs, and have shown some successes, though barriers still impede wider adoption, effectiveness, real-world feasibility, and scalability. Here, we summarize the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness data regarding QI strategies in diabetes care and discuss the potential role of quality monitoring and QI in trying to implement primary prevention of diabetes more widely and effectively. Over time, achieving better care and better health will likely help bend the ever-growing cost curve. PMID:26495771

  15. The Advisor Quality Survey: Good College Advisors Are Available, Knowledgeable, and Autonomy Supportive

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheldon, Kennon M.; Garton, Bryan; Orr, Rachael; Smith, Amy

    2015-01-01

    Most US institutions of higher education do not assess advisor quality. We report a scale development effort informed by the developmental prescriptions of self-determination theory (Deci & Ryan, 1985, 2000). The 15-item Missouri Advisor Quality Survey assesses advisor knowledge, advisor availability, and advisor autonomy supportiveness.…

  16. As Good as It Gets? A Life Course Perspective on Marital Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Umberson, Debra; Williams, Kristi; Powers, Daniel A.; Chen, Meichu D.; Campbell, Anna M.

    2005-01-01

    Marital relationships, like individuals, follow a developmental trajectory over time with ups and downs and gains and losses. We work from a life course perspective and use growth curve analysis to look at trajectories of change in marital quality over time. Although the tendency is for marital quality to decline over time, some groups begin with…

  17. Quality Assurance and Qualifications Frameworks: Exchanging Good Practice. ENQA Workshop Report 21

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blomqvist, Carita; Donohoe, Tony; Kelo, Maria; Linde, Karin Jarplid; Llavori, Rafael; Maguire, Bryan; Metz, David; Sanchez, Teresa

    2012-01-01

    The theme of qualifications frameworks and their relation to quality assurance is gaining urgency in the European scene as more and more countries are completing their national qualifications frameworks and quality assurance agencies need to take important decisions on how to implement them. Some of the key features of the qualifications…

  18. Quantity and Quality of Computer Use and Academic Achievement: Evidence from a Large-Scale International Test Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheema, Jehanzeb R.; Zhang, Bo

    2013-01-01

    This study looked at the effect of both quantity and quality of computer use on achievement. The Program for International Student Assessment (PISA) 2003 student survey comprising of 4,356 students (boys, n = 2,129; girls, n = 2,227) was used to predict academic achievement from quantity and quality of computer use while controlling for…

  19. Good manufacturing practice for modelling air pollution: Quality criteria for computer models to calculate air pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekker, C. M.; Sliggers, C. J.

    To spur on quality assurance for models that calculate air pollution, quality criteria for such models have been formulated. By satisfying these criteria the developers of these models and producers of the software packages in this field can assure and account for the quality of their products. In this way critics and users of such (computer) models can gain a clear understanding of the quality of the model. Quality criteria have been formulated for the development of mathematical models, for their programming—including user-friendliness, and for the after-sales service, which is part of the distribution of such software packages. The criteria have been introduced into national and international frameworks to obtain standardization.

  20. Achieving "Final Storage Quality" of municipal solid waste in pilot scale bioreactor landfills.

    PubMed

    Valencia, R; van der Zon, W; Woelders, H; Lubberding, H J; Gijzen, H J

    2009-01-01

    Entombed waste in current sanitary landfills will generate biogas and leachate when physical barriers fail in the future, allowing the intrusion of moisture into the waste mass contradicting the precepts of the sustainability concept. Bioreactor landfills are suggested as a sustainable option to achieve Final Storage Quality (FSQ) status of waste residues; however, it is not clear what characteristics the residues should have in order to stop operation and after-care monitoring schemes. An experiment was conducted to determine the feasibility to achieve FSQ status (Waste Acceptance Criteria of the European Landfill Directive) of residues in a pilot scale bioreactor landfill. The results of the leaching test were very encouraging due to their proximity to achieve the proposed stringent FSQ criterion after 2 years of operation. Furthermore, residues have the same characteristics of alternative waste stabilisation parameters (low BMP, BOD/COD ratio, VS content, SO4(2-)/Cl- ratio) established by other researchers. Mass balances showed that the bioreactor landfill simulator was capable of practically achieving biological stabilisation after 2 years of operation, while releasing approximately 45% of the total available (organic and inorganic) carbon and nitrogen into the liquid and gas phases.

  1. Comparison of good- and bad-quality cork: application of high-throughput sequencing of phellogenic tissue.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Rita Teresa; Fortes, Ana Margarida; Pinheiro, Carla; Pereira, Helena

    2014-09-01

    Cork is one of the most valuable non-wood forest products and plays an important role in Mediterranean economies. The production of high-quality cork is dependent on both genome and environment, posing constraints on the industry because an ever-growing amount of bad-quality cork (BQC) development has been observed. In order to identify genes responsible for production of cork of superior quality we performed a comparative analysis using the 454 pyrosequencing approach on phellogenic tissue of good- and bad-quality samples. The transcriptional profiling showed a high number of genes differentially expressed (8.48%) from which 78.8% displayed annotation. Genes more highly represented in BQC are involved in DNA synthesis, RNA processing, proteolysis, and transcription factors related to the abiotic stress response. Putative stomatal/lenticular-associated genes which may be responsible for the disadvantageous higher number of lenticular channels in BQC are also more highly represented. BQC also showed an elevated content of free phenolics. On the other hand, good-quality cork (GQC) can be distinguished by highly expressed genes encoding heat-shock proteins. Together the results provide valuable new information about the molecular events leading to cork formation and provide putative biomarkers associated with cork quality that can be useful in breeding programmes.

  2. COST VS. QUALITY IN DEMOGRAPHIC MODELLING: WHEN IS A VITAL RATE GOOD ENOUGH?

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation will focus on the assessment of quality for demographic parameters to be used in population-level risk assessment. Current population models can handle genetic, demographic, and environmental stochasticity, density dependence, and multiple stressors. However, cu...

  3. The smell of good food: volatile infochemicals as resource quality indicators.

    PubMed

    Moelzner, Jana; Fink, Patrick

    2014-09-01

    Foraging success generally depends on various environmental and physiological factors. Particularly for organisms with limited motility such as gastropods, food searching is a very cost-intensive process. As energy gain through foraging is dependent on both resource quality and quantity, consumers have to be able to differentiate between varying resource items. The effectiveness of food searching could be increased through the perception of diet-derived chemical signals that convey information about a food resource's quality over a certain distance. This strategy would clearly help to optimize movement decisions. In this study, we investigated the foraging behaviour of a freshwater gastropod towards volatile signal substances released from benthic algae grown under high and low nutrient availability, representing high and low food quality, using behavioural assays in the laboratory. Our results demonstrate that volatile organic compounds (VOCs) serve as foraging kairomones for these aquatic, benthic herbivores. Further, we were able to show for the first time that snails are able to differentiate between high- and low-quality food sources, only by the perception of food odours alone (volatile infochemicals). Gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry demonstrated quantitative as well as qualitative differences in the chemical composition of the VOCs bouquet, dependent on algal nutrient content. Our results suggest that the recognition of resource quality via the reception of signal substances is likely to be adaptive for consumers with low mobility to maximize ingestion of high-quality resources. PMID:24666400

  4. The smell of good food: volatile infochemicals as resource quality indicators.

    PubMed

    Moelzner, Jana; Fink, Patrick

    2014-09-01

    Foraging success generally depends on various environmental and physiological factors. Particularly for organisms with limited motility such as gastropods, food searching is a very cost-intensive process. As energy gain through foraging is dependent on both resource quality and quantity, consumers have to be able to differentiate between varying resource items. The effectiveness of food searching could be increased through the perception of diet-derived chemical signals that convey information about a food resource's quality over a certain distance. This strategy would clearly help to optimize movement decisions. In this study, we investigated the foraging behaviour of a freshwater gastropod towards volatile signal substances released from benthic algae grown under high and low nutrient availability, representing high and low food quality, using behavioural assays in the laboratory. Our results demonstrate that volatile organic compounds (VOCs) serve as foraging kairomones for these aquatic, benthic herbivores. Further, we were able to show for the first time that snails are able to differentiate between high- and low-quality food sources, only by the perception of food odours alone (volatile infochemicals). Gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry demonstrated quantitative as well as qualitative differences in the chemical composition of the VOCs bouquet, dependent on algal nutrient content. Our results suggest that the recognition of resource quality via the reception of signal substances is likely to be adaptive for consumers with low mobility to maximize ingestion of high-quality resources.

  5. What Is Quality Education? How Can It Be Achieved? The Perspectives of School Middle Leaders in Singapore

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ng, Pak Tee

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the findings of a research project that examines how middle leaders in Singapore schools understand "quality education" and how they think quality education can be achieved. From the perspective of these middle leaders, quality education emphasises holistic development, equips students with the knowledge and skills…

  6. Assurance of Medical Device Quality with Quality Management System: An Analysis of Good Manufacturing Practice Implementation in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Pei-Weng; Wu, Shiow-Ing

    2015-01-01

    The implementation of an effective quality management system has always been considered a principal method for a manufacturer to maintain and improve its product and service quality. Globally many regulatory authorities incorporate quality management system as one of the mandatory requirements for the regulatory control of high-risk medical devices. The present study aims to analyze the GMP enforcement experience in Taiwan between 1998 and 2013. It describes the regulatory implementation of medical device GMP requirement and initiatives taken to assist small and medium-sized enterprises in compliance with the regulatory requirement. Based on statistical data collected by the competent authority and industry research institutes, the present paper reports the growth of Taiwan local medical device industry after the enforcement of GMP regulation. Transition in the production, technologies, and number of employees of Taiwan medical device industry between 1998 and 2013 provides the competent authorities around the world with an empirical foundation for further policy development. PMID:26075255

  7. Assurance of medical device quality with quality management system: an analysis of good manufacturing practice implementation in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Li, Tzu-Wei; Tu, Pei-Weng; Liu, Li-Ling; Wu, Shiow-Ing

    2015-01-01

    The implementation of an effective quality management system has always been considered a principal method for a manufacturer to maintain and improve its product and service quality. Globally many regulatory authorities incorporate quality management system as one of the mandatory requirements for the regulatory control of high-risk medical devices. The present study aims to analyze the GMP enforcement experience in Taiwan between 1998 and 2013. It describes the regulatory implementation of medical device GMP requirement and initiatives taken to assist small and medium-sized enterprises in compliance with the regulatory requirement. Based on statistical data collected by the competent authority and industry research institutes, the present paper reports the growth of Taiwan local medical device industry after the enforcement of GMP regulation. Transition in the production, technologies, and number of employees of Taiwan medical device industry between 1998 and 2013 provides the competent authorities around the world with an empirical foundation for further policy development.

  8. What is a good life? Selecting capabilities to assess women's quality of life in rural Malawi.

    PubMed

    Greco, Giulia; Skordis-Worrall, Jolene; Mkandawire, Bryan; Mills, Anne

    2015-04-01

    There is growing interest in using Sen's Capability Approach to assess quality of life and to evaluate social policies. This paper describes the formative stages of developing a quality of life measure: the selection of the relevant capabilities. This measure is intended to provide a more comprehensive outcome measure for the evaluation of complex interventions such as Maimwana womens' groups, a community based participatory intervention to improve maternal health in rural Malawi. Fifteen focus group discussions with 129 women were conducted to explore relevant concepts of quality of life in rural Malawi. Data collection started in October 2009. Findings were elicited based on framework analysis. The findings portray a complex and highly nuanced perception that women in rural Malawi have of their life and wellbeing. Quality of life was described using a variety of dimensions that are highly interconnected. Quality of life emerges to be not only shaped by the realisation of basic material needs such as being sufficiently nourished and adequately sheltered, but is also highly dependent on complex feelings, relations and social norms. The full exposition of wellbeing with its domains was organised into a framework constituting six different spheres of wellbeing: physical strength, inner wellbeing, household wellbeing, community relations, economic security and happiness. Despite the list being developed in a specific context and for a specific group of people, the similarities with lists developed in other contexts, with different methods and for different purposes, are considerable. This suggests that there are a number of core aspects of wellbeing considered a minimum requirement for a life of human dignity, that should be included in any attempt to assess quality of life and human development across populations. PMID:25687242

  9. What is a good life? Selecting capabilities to assess women's quality of life in rural Malawi.

    PubMed

    Greco, Giulia; Skordis-Worrall, Jolene; Mkandawire, Bryan; Mills, Anne

    2015-04-01

    There is growing interest in using Sen's Capability Approach to assess quality of life and to evaluate social policies. This paper describes the formative stages of developing a quality of life measure: the selection of the relevant capabilities. This measure is intended to provide a more comprehensive outcome measure for the evaluation of complex interventions such as Maimwana womens' groups, a community based participatory intervention to improve maternal health in rural Malawi. Fifteen focus group discussions with 129 women were conducted to explore relevant concepts of quality of life in rural Malawi. Data collection started in October 2009. Findings were elicited based on framework analysis. The findings portray a complex and highly nuanced perception that women in rural Malawi have of their life and wellbeing. Quality of life was described using a variety of dimensions that are highly interconnected. Quality of life emerges to be not only shaped by the realisation of basic material needs such as being sufficiently nourished and adequately sheltered, but is also highly dependent on complex feelings, relations and social norms. The full exposition of wellbeing with its domains was organised into a framework constituting six different spheres of wellbeing: physical strength, inner wellbeing, household wellbeing, community relations, economic security and happiness. Despite the list being developed in a specific context and for a specific group of people, the similarities with lists developed in other contexts, with different methods and for different purposes, are considerable. This suggests that there are a number of core aspects of wellbeing considered a minimum requirement for a life of human dignity, that should be included in any attempt to assess quality of life and human development across populations.

  10. Hackneyed, Acned, or Just Plain Good: Perceiving Quality in Young Adult Fiction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agee, Hugh

    A rating scale was developed by Stephen Dunning for evaluating adolescent literature objectively. The distinguishing features of the scale's five categories are designed to produce a numerical score between 5 and 25 (each category a 1-to-5 ranking for poor/excellent quality), indicating the relative worth of a specific literary work. The first…

  11. Use of a macroinvertebrate based biotic index to estimate critical metal concentrations for good ecological water quality.

    PubMed

    Van Ael, Evy; De Cooman, Ward; Blust, Ronny; Bervoets, Lieven

    2015-01-01

    Large datasets from total and dissolved metal concentrations in Flemish (Belgium) fresh water systems and the associated macroinvertebrate-based biotic index MMIF (Multimetric Macroinvertebrate Index Flanders) were used to estimate critical metal concentrations for good ecological water quality, as imposed by the European Water Framework Directive (2000). The contribution of different stressors (metals and water characteristics) to the MMIF were studied by constructing generalized linear mixed effect models. Comparison between estimated critical concentrations and the European and Flemish EQS, shows that the EQS for As, Cd, Cu and Zn seem to be sufficient to reach a good ecological quality status as expressed by the invertebrate-based biotic index. In contrast, the EQS for Cr, Hg and Pb are higher than the estimated critical concentrations, which suggests that when environmental concentrations are at the same level as the EQS a good quality status might not be reached. The construction of mixed models that included metal concentrations in their structure did not lead to a significant outcome. However, mixed models showed the primary importance of water characteristics (oxygen level, temperature, ammonium concentration and conductivity) for the MMIF.

  12. Does the concept of resilience contribute to understanding good quality of life in the context of epilepsy?

    PubMed

    Ring, Adele; Jacoby, Ann; Baker, Gus A; Marson, Anthony; Whitehead, Margaret M

    2016-03-01

    A significant body of research highlights negative impacts of epilepsy for individual quality of life (QOL). Poor seizure control is frequently associated with reporting of poor QOL and good seizure control with good QOL; however, this is not a universal finding. Evidence suggests that some people enjoy good QOL despite ongoing seizures while others report poor QOL despite good seizure control. Understanding the factors that influence QOL for people with epilepsy and the processes via which such factors exert their influence is central to the development of interventions to support people with epilepsy to experience the best possible QOL. We present findings of a qualitative investigation exploring influences and processes on QOL for people with epilepsy. We describe the clinical, psychological, and social factors contributing to QOL. In particular, we focus on the value of the concept of resilience for understanding quality of life in epilepsy. Based on our analysis, we propose a model of resilience wherein four key component sets of factors interact to determine QOL. This model reflects the fluid nature of resilience that, we suggest, is subject to change based on shifts within the individual components and the interactions between them. The model offers a representation of the complex influences that act and interact to either mitigate or further compound the negative impacts of epilepsy on individual QOL.

  13. Evaluation of differences in quality of experience features for test stimuli of good-only and bad-only overall audiovisual quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strohmeier, Dominik; Kunze, Kristina; Göbel, Klemens; Liebetrau, Judith

    2013-01-01

    Assessing audiovisual Quality of Experience (QoE) is a key element to ensure quality acceptance of today's multimedia products. The use of descriptive evaluation methods allows evaluating QoE preferences and the underlying QoE features jointly. From our previous evaluations on QoE for mobile 3D video we found that mainly one dimension, video quality, dominates the descriptive models. Large variations of the visual video quality in the tests may be the reason for these findings. A new study was conducted to investigate whether test sets of low QoE are described differently than those of high audiovisual QoE. Reanalysis of previous data sets seems to confirm this hypothesis. Our new study consists of a pre-test and a main test, using the Descriptive Sorted Napping method. Data sets of good-only and bad-only video quality were evaluated separately. The results show that the perception of bad QoE is mainly determined one-dimensionally by visual artifacts, whereas the perception of good quality shows multiple dimensions. Here, mainly semantic-related features of the content and affective descriptors are used by the naïve test participants. The results show that, with increasing QoE of audiovisual systems, content semantics and users' a_ective involvement will become important for assessing QoE differences.

  14. Good cop, bad cop: quality of parental involvement in type 1 diabetes management in youth.

    PubMed

    Young, Mackenzie T; Lord, Jadienne H; Patel, Niral J; Gruhn, Meredith A; Jaser, Sarah S

    2014-01-01

    Sustained parental involvement in diabetes management has been generally advised to counteract the deteriorating adherence and glycemic control often seen during adolescence, yet until recently, little attention has been given to the optimal amount, type, and quality of parental involvement to promote the best health outcomes for adolescents with type 1 diabetes (T1D). This review synthesizes research regarding the involvement of caregivers-primarily mothers and fathers-of youth with T1D, with a focus on biopsychosocial outcomes. The recent literature on parental involvement in diabetes management highlights a shift in focus from not only amount but also the types (e.g., monitoring, problem-solving) and quality (e.g., warm, critical) of involvement in both mothers and fathers. We provide recommendations for ways that both parents can remain involved to facilitate greater collaboration in shared direct and indirect responsibility for diabetes care and improve outcomes in youth with T1D. PMID:25212099

  15. Good Cop, Bad Cop: Quality of Parental Involvement in Type 1 Diabetes Management in Youth

    PubMed Central

    Young, Mackenzie T.; Lord, Jadienne H.; Patel, Niral J.; Gruhn, Meredith A.

    2014-01-01

    Sustained parental involvement in diabetes management has been generally advised to counteract the deteriorating adherence and glycemic control often seen during adolescence, yet until recently, little attention has been given to the optimal amount, type, and quality of parental involvement to promote the best health outcomes for adolescents with type 1 diabetes (T1D). This review synthesizes research regarding the involvement of caregivers—primarily mothers and fathers—of youth with T1D, with a focus on biopsychosocial outcomes. The recent literature on parental involvement in diabetes management highlights a shift in focus from not only amount but also the types (e.g., monitoring, problem-solving) and quality (e.g., warm, critical) of involvement in both mothers and fathers. We provide recommendations for ways that both parents can remain involved to facilitate greater collaboration in shared direct and indirect responsibility for diabetes care and improve outcomes in youth with T1D. PMID:25212099

  16. Why and how is compassion necessary to provide good quality healthcare?

    PubMed Central

    Fotaki, Marianna

    2015-01-01

    Recent disclosures of failures of care in the National Health Service (NHS) in England have led to debates about compassion deficits disallowing health professionals to provide high quality responsive care. While the link between high quality care and compassion is often taken for granted, it is less obvious how compassion – often originating in the individual’s emotional response – can become a moral sentiment and lead to developing a system of norms and values underpinning ethics of care. In this editorial, I argue why and how compassion might become a foundation of ethics guiding health professionals and a basis for ethics of care in health service organisations. I conclude by discussing a recent case of prominent healthcare failure in the NHS to highlight the relationship between compassion as an aspect of professional ethics on the one hand, and values and norms that institutions and specific policies promote on the other hand. PMID:25844380

  17. Irrigation water quality and the benefits of implementing good agricultural practices during tomato (Lycopersicum esculentum) production.

    PubMed

    Estrada-Acosta, M; Jiménez, M; Chaidez, C; León-Félix, J; Castro-Del Campo, N

    2014-07-01

    The implementation of good agricultural practices (GAP) from irrigation water to the tomato packaging process enhances the safety of fresh produce and its value throughout the food chain. The aim of the present study was to show that fresh produce farms that apply and enforce GAP could reduce the presence of Salmonella in finished produce. Samples were collected biweekly from six packing houses from the central region of Sinaloa, México, for the isolation of Salmonella spp by the ISO 6579:2002 method, and the isolated strains were serotyped and genotyped by the Kauffmman-White scheme and pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), respectively. Salmonella strains were detected in 13 (36.1 %) irrigation water samples, while only two tomato samples were positive (5.5 %). Eight different serotypes were identified in irrigation water, and Salmonella Oranienburg (34 %) was the most prevalent; however, only Salmonella Agona and Salmonella Weltevreden were present on tomatoes. Salmonella Oranienburg was the most widely dispersed and variable serotype, with 10 different PFGE profiles. Salmonella Weltevreden was isolated from both types of samples, albeit with distinct genetic profiles, implying that the sources of contamination differ. These results confirm the utility of implementing good agricultural practices to reduce Salmonella contamination in irrigation water and the packaging process. PMID:24682661

  18. Charting the course for home health care quality: action steps for achieving sustainable improvement: conference proceedings.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Penny Hollander; Peterson, Laura E; Reische, Laurie; Bruno, Lori; Clark, Amy

    2004-12-01

    On June 30 and July 1, 2003, the first national meeting Charting the Course for Home Health Care Quality: Action Steps for Achieving Sustainable Improvement convened in New York City. The Center for Home Care Policy & Research of the Visiting Nurse Service of New York (VNSNY) hosted the meeting with support from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Fifty-seven attendees from throughout the United States participated. The participants included senior leaders and managers and nurses working directly in home care today. The meeting's objectives were to: 1. foster dialogue among key constituents influencing patient safety and home care, 2. promote information-sharing across sectors and identify areas where more information is needed, and, 3. develop an agenda and strategy for moving forward. This article reports the meeting's proceedings.

  19. Achieving sustainability, quality and access: lessons from the world's largest revolving drug fund in Khartoum.

    PubMed

    Witter, S

    2007-01-01

    Ensuring a reliable and affordable supply of essential drugs to health facilities is one of the main challenges facing developing countries. This paper describes the revolving drug fund in Khartoum, which was set up in 1989 to improve access to high quality drugs across the State. An evaluation in 2004 showed that the fund has successfully managed a number of threats to its financial sustainability and has expanded its network of facilities, its range of products and its financial assets. It now supplies essential drugs to 3 million out of the 5 million population of Khartoum each year, at prices between 40% and 100% less than alternative sources. However, results illustrated the tension between achieving an efficient cost-recovery system and access for the poorest.

  20. Taking advantage of ground data systems attributes to achieve quality results in testing software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sigman, Clayton B.; Koslosky, John T.; Hageman, Barbara H.

    1994-01-01

    During the software development life cycle process, basic testing starts with the development team. At the end of the development process, an acceptance test is performed for the user to ensure that the deliverable is acceptable. Ideally, the delivery is an operational product with zero defects. However, the goal of zero defects is normally not achieved but is successful to various degrees. With the emphasis on building low cost ground support systems while maintaining a quality product, a key element in the test process is simulator capability. This paper reviews the Transportable Payload Operations Control Center (TPOCC) Advanced Spacecraft Simulator (TASS) test tool that is used in the acceptance test process for unmanned satellite operations control centers. The TASS is designed to support the development, test and operational environments of the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) operations control centers. The TASS uses the same basic architecture as the operations control center. This architecture is characterized by its use of distributed processing, industry standards, commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) hardware and software components, and reusable software. The TASS uses much of the same TPOCC architecture and reusable software that the operations control center developer uses. The TASS also makes use of reusable simulator software in the mission specific versions of the TASS. Very little new software needs to be developed, mainly mission specific telemetry communication and command processing software. By taking advantage of the ground data system attributes, successful software reuse for operational systems provides the opportunity to extend the reuse concept into the test area. Consistency in test approach is a major step in achieving quality results.

  1. Quality Matters: Extension of Clusters of Residues with Good Hydrophobic Contacts Stabilize (Hyper)Thermophilic Proteins

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Identifying determinant(s) of protein thermostability is key for rational and data-driven protein engineering. By analyzing more than 130 pairs of mesophilic/(hyper)thermophilic proteins, we identified the quality (residue-wise energy) of hydrophobic interactions as a key factor for protein thermostability. This distinguishes our study from previous ones that investigated predominantly structural determinants. Considering this key factor, we successfully discriminated between pairs of mesophilic/(hyper)thermophilic proteins (discrimination accuracy: ∼80%) and searched for structural weak spots in E. coli dihydrofolate reductase (classification accuracy: 70%). PMID:24437522

  2. Quality matters: extension of clusters of residues with good hydrophobic contacts stabilize (hyper)thermophilic proteins.

    PubMed

    Rathi, Prakash Chandra; Höffken, Hans Wolfgang; Gohlke, Holger

    2014-02-24

    Identifying determinant(s) of protein thermostability is key for rational and data-driven protein engineering. By analyzing more than 130 pairs of mesophilic/(hyper)thermophilic proteins, we identified the quality (residue-wise energy) of hydrophobic interactions as a key factor for protein thermostability. This distinguishes our study from previous ones that investigated predominantly structural determinants. Considering this key factor, we successfully discriminated between pairs of mesophilic/(hyper)thermophilic proteins (discrimination accuracy: ∼80%) and searched for structural weak spots in E. coli dihydrofolate reductase (classification accuracy: 70%).

  3. [26th Conference of the Spanish Society of Quality in Healthcare: a good balance between quality, innovation, science and participation].

    PubMed

    Astier-Peña, M P; Barrasa-Villar, I; García-Mata, J R; Aranaz-Andrés, J; Enriquez-Martín, N; Vela-Marquina, M L

    2010-01-01

    The experience and learning process of preparing a scientific conference programme, organising and conducting a conference ccompletes the quality circle with the quantitative and qualitative assessment of the process and results. The transmission of this experience and learning process through this paper will improve the performance of committees of future conference venues, partners and participants and collaborators. The method for performing this evaluation is the assessment of the activities of both the scientific and organising committees of the XXVI Conference of the Spanish Society of Quality Healthcare in October 2008 in Zaragoza. The methodology evaluated the observance of the timetable and tasks assigned to the committees in the Congress Manual of the society along with the presentation of final results of the congress concerning scientific participation and overall satisfaction. There were a total of 1211 communications with a rejection rate of 9.1%. Of the total, 577 communications were presented in oral format and 544 in poster format. Aragon was the community of origin of 24% of communications. By subject areas, those of most interest were patient safety, organisational and management processes, and patient perspectives. A total of 83 participants attended 7 of the 11 workshops offered. The average attendance for each workshop was 12 people. The response rate to the assessment of workshops questionnaire was 54.2% with an average score of 4 (scale of 1 to 5). A total of 1131 people attended the conference of which 17% (193) were SECA associates. Out of a total of 1075 overall satisfaction conference questionnaires distributed there was a response rate of 9.30% (100). The scientific content was assessed with an average score of 3.6 and the organization with 3.87, both on a total score of 5 points. According to the number of abstracts received, number of conferences, level of satisfaction with the scientific program and organisation, we can conclude that

  4. Filtration is a time-efficient option to Histopaque, providing good-quality islets in mouse islet isolation.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Domínguez, Miriam; Castaño, Luis

    2015-03-01

    Pancreatic islet transplantation is a promising therapy for Type I Diabetes. For many years the method used worldwide for islet purification in both rodent and human islet isolation has been Ficoll-based density gradients, such as Histopaque. However, it is difficult to purify islets in laboratories with staff limitations when large scale isolations are required. We hypothesized that filtration could be a more simple and fast alternative to obtain good quality islets. Four separate islet isolations were performed per method, comparing filtration and Histopaque purification with handpicking as the gold standard method for islet purity. Different parameters of quality were assessed: yield in number of islets per pancreas, purity by dithizone staining, viability by Fluorescein Diacetate/Propidium Iodide vital staining and in vitro functionality assessed by Glucose Stimulated Insulin Secretion. Time efficiency and cost were also analyzed. The overall quality of the islets obtained both by Histopaque and filtration was good. Filtration saved almost 90 % of the time consumed by Histopaque purification, and was also cheaper. However, one-third of the islets were lost. Since human and rodent islets share similar size but different density, filtration appears as a purification method with potential interest in translation to clinic. PMID:24443076

  5. Teacher Quality and Educational Equality: Do Teachers with Higher Standards-Based Evaluation Ratings Close Student Achievement Gaps?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borman, Geoffrey D.; Kimball, Steven M.

    2005-01-01

    Using standards-based evaluation ratings for nearly 400 teachers, and achievement results for over 7,000 students from grades 4-6, this study investigated the distribution and achievement effects of teacher quality in Washoe County, a mid-sized school district serving Reno and Sparks, Nevada. Classrooms with higher concentrations of minority,…

  6. Assessing the quality of rainfall data when aiming to achieve flood resilience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang, C. T.; Tchiguirinskaia, I.; Schertzer, D.; Lovejoy, S.

    2012-04-01

    A new EU Floods Directive entered into force five years ago. This Directive requires Member States to coordinate adequate measures to reduce flood risk. European flood management systems require reliable rainfall statistics, e.g. the Intensity-duration-Frequency curves for shorter and shorter durations and for a larger and larger range of return periods. Preliminary studies showed that the number of floods was lower when using low time resolution data of high intensity rainfall events, compared to estimates obtained with the help of higher time resolution data. These facts suggest that a particular attention should be paid to the rainfall data quality in order to adequately investigate flood risk aiming to achieve flood resilience. The potential consequences of changes in measuring and recording techniques have been somewhat discussed in the literature with respect to a possible introduction of artificial inhomogeneities in time series. In this paper, we discuss how to detect another artificiality: most of the rainfall time series have a lower recording frequency than that is assumed, furthermore the effective high-frequency limit often depends on the recording year due to algorithm changes. This question is particularly important for operational hydrology, because an error on the effective recording high frequency introduces biases in the corresponding statistics. In this direction, we developed a first version of a SERQUAL procedure to automatically detect the effective time resolution of highly mixed data. Being applied to the 166 rainfall time series in France, the SERQUAL procedure has detected that most of them have an effective hourly resolution, rather than a 5 minutes resolution. Furthermore, series having an overall 5 minute resolution do not have it for all years. These results raise serious concerns on how to benchmark stochastic rainfall models at a sub-hourly resolution, which are particularly desirable for operational hydrology. Therefore, database

  7. Developing Countries Vaccine Manufacturers Network: doing good by making high-quality vaccines affordable for all.

    PubMed

    Pagliusi, Sonia; Leite, Luciana C C; Datla, Mahima; Makhoana, Morena; Gao, Yongzhong; Suhardono, Mahendra; Jadhav, Suresh; Harshavardhan, Gutla V J A; Homma, Akira

    2013-04-18

    The Developing Countries Vaccine Manufacturers Network (DCVMN) is a unique model of a public and private international alliance. It assembles governmental and private organizations to work toward a common goal of manufacturing and supplying high-quality vaccines at affordable prices to protect people around the world from known and emerging infectious diseases. Together, this group of manufacturers has decades of experience in manufacturing vaccines, with technologies, know-how, and capacity to produce more than 40 vaccines types. These manufacturers have already contributed more than 30 vaccines in various presentations that have been prequalified by the World Health Organization for use by global immunization programmes. Furthermore, more than 45 vaccines are in the pipeline. Recent areas of focus include vaccines to protect against rotavirus, human papillomavirus (HPV), Japanese encephalitis, meningitis, hepatitis E, poliovirus, influenza, and pertussis, as well as combined pentavalent vaccines for children. The network has a growing number of manufacturers that produce a growing number of products to supply the growing demand for vaccines in developing countries.

  8. Why Is Quality in Higher Education Not Achieved? The View of Academics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cardoso, Sónia; Rosa, Maria J.; Stensaker, Bjørn

    2016-01-01

    Quality assurance is currently an established activity in Europe, driven either by national quality assurance agencies or by institutions themselves. However, whether quality assurance is perceived as actually being capable of promoting quality is still a question open to discussion. Based on three different views on quality derived from the…

  9. Quality of operation notes in orthopaedic hip arthroplasty surgery: are we complying with British Orthopaedic Association's guide to good practice?

    PubMed

    Menakaya, C U; Ingoe, H; Malhotra, R; Shah, M; Boddice, T; Mohsen, A

    2013-12-01

    This retrospective audit evaluates the compliance of our operation notes with the British Orthopaedic Society Primary Hip Arthroplasty 'A guide to good practice' using a 24-data point question (BOA 2006). Ninety-nine notes reviewed, of which 94% had patient identifiers, the surgical team was documented in 92.5%, post-operative instruction in 97%, and prosthesis stability in 97% of cases. Despite high standards, we did not achieve the 100% gold standard. We suggest that increased awareness of the 24-point BOA guideline via education and proformas would help to ensure better practice

  10. Achieving quality in cardiovascular imaging: proceedings from the American College of Cardiology-Duke University Medical Center Think Tank on Quality in Cardiovascular Imaging.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Pamela; Iskandrian, Ami E; Krumholz, Harlan M; Gillam, Linda; Hendel, Robert; Jollis, James; Peterson, Eric; Chen, Jersey; Masoudi, Frederick; Mohler, Emile; McNamara, Robert L; Patel, Manesh R; Spertus, John

    2006-11-21

    Cardiovascular imaging has enjoyed both rapid technological advances and sustained growth, yet less attention has been focused on quality than in other areas of cardiovascular medicine. To address this deficit, representatives from cardiovascular imaging societies, private payers, government agencies, the medical imaging industry, and experts in quality measurement met, and this report provides an overview of the discussions. A consensus definition of quality in imaging and a convergence of opinion on quality measures across imaging modalities was achieved and are intended to be the start of a process culminating in the development, dissemination, and adoption of quality measures for all cardiovascular imaging modalities.

  11. Good is better than excellent: Bowel preparation quality and adenoma detection rates

    PubMed Central

    Calderwood, Audrey H.; Thompson, Katherine; Schroy, Paul C.; Lieberman, David A.; Jacobson, Brian C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Inadequate bowel cleanliness is associated with missed lesions, yet whether polyp and adenoma detection rates (PDR, ADR) increase at the highest levels of bowel cleanliness is unknown. Objective To evaluate the association between bowel preparation quality using the Boston Bowel Preparation Scale (BBPS) and PDR and ADR among colonoscopies with adequate preparation. Design Cross-sectional analysis Setting Boston Medical Center (BMC) and the Clinical Outcomes Research Initiative (CORI) Patients Average-risk ambulatory patients attending screening colonoscopy with adequate bowel preparation defined as BBPS score ≥ 6 Main Outcome Measurements PDR and ADR stratified by BBPS score Results Among the 3713 colonoscopies at BMC performed by 19 endoscopists, the PDR, ADR, and advanced ADR were 49.8%, 37.7%, and 6.0%, respectively. Among the 5532 colonoscopies in CORI performed by 85 endoscopists at 41 different sites, the PDR was 44.5% and PDR for polyps >9 mm (surrogate for advanced ADR) was 6.2%. The PDR associated with total BBPS scores of 6, 7, and 8 were higher than those associated with a BBPS score of 9 at BMC (BBPS 6:51%, BBPS 7:53%, BBPS 8:52% vs. BBBPS 9:46%; P =.002) and CORI (BBPS 6:51%, BBPS 7:48%, BBPS 8:45% vs. BBPS 9:40%; P <.0001). This trend persisted after adjusting for age, gender, race/ethnicity and was also observed for ADR and advanced ADR. PDR was higher among “good” compared to “excellent” preparations at BMC (OR 1.3 [1.0-1.5]) and CORI (OR 4.7 [3.1-7.1]). Limitations Retrospective study Conclusions The PDR and ADR decreased at the highest levels of bowel cleanliness. Endoscopists finding a pristine bowel preparation should avoid a sense of over-confidence for polyp detection during the inspection phase of screening colonoscopy and still perform a careful evaluation for polyps. Furthermore, endoscopists expending additional effort to maximize cleansing of the bowel should never sacrifice on their inspection technique or inspection

  12. Classroom quality as a predictor of first graders' time in non-instructional activities and literacy achievement.

    PubMed

    McLean, Leigh; Sparapani, Nicole; Toste, Jessica R; Connor, Carol McDonald

    2016-06-01

    This study investigated how quality of the classroom learning environment influenced first grade students' (n=533) time spent in two non-instructional classroom activities (off-task and in transition) and their subsequent literacy outcomes. Hierarchical linear modeling revealed that higher classroom quality was related to higher student performance in reading comprehension and expressive vocabulary. Further, classroom quality predicted the amount of time students spent off-task and in transitions in the classroom, with slopes of change across the year particularly impacted. Mediation effects were detected in the case of expressive vocabulary such that the influence of classroom quality on students' achievement operated through students' time spent in these non-instructional activities. Results highlight the importance of overall classroom quality to how students navigate the classroom environment during learning opportunities, with subsequent literacy achievement impacted. Implications for policy and educational practices are discussed.

  13. Classroom quality as a predictor of first graders' time in non-instructional activities and literacy achievement.

    PubMed

    McLean, Leigh; Sparapani, Nicole; Toste, Jessica R; Connor, Carol McDonald

    2016-06-01

    This study investigated how quality of the classroom learning environment influenced first grade students' (n=533) time spent in two non-instructional classroom activities (off-task and in transition) and their subsequent literacy outcomes. Hierarchical linear modeling revealed that higher classroom quality was related to higher student performance in reading comprehension and expressive vocabulary. Further, classroom quality predicted the amount of time students spent off-task and in transitions in the classroom, with slopes of change across the year particularly impacted. Mediation effects were detected in the case of expressive vocabulary such that the influence of classroom quality on students' achievement operated through students' time spent in these non-instructional activities. Results highlight the importance of overall classroom quality to how students navigate the classroom environment during learning opportunities, with subsequent literacy achievement impacted. Implications for policy and educational practices are discussed. PMID:27268569

  14. Improving Service Quality: Achieving High Performance in the Public and Private Sectors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milakovich, Michael E.

    Quality-improvement principles are a sound means to respond to customer needs. However, when various quality and productivity theories and methods are applied, it is very difficult to consistently deliver quality results, especially in quasi-monopolistic, non-competitive, and regulated environments. This book focuses on quality-improvement methods…

  15. Achieving high research reporting quality through the use of computational ontologies.

    PubMed

    Zaveri, Amrapali; Cofiel, Luciana; Shah, Jatin; Pradhan, Shreyasee; Chan, Edwin; Dameron, Olivier; Pietrobon, Ricardo; Ang, Beng Ti

    2010-12-01

    Systematic reviews and meta-analyses constitute one of the central pillars of evidence-based medicine. However, clinical trials are poorly reported which delays meta-analyses and consequently the translation of clinical research findings to clinical practice. We propose a Center of Excellence in Research Reporting in Neurosurgery (CERR-N) and the creation of a clinically significant computational ontology to encode Randomized Controlled Trials (RCT) studies in neurosurgery. A 128 element strong computational ontology was derived from the Trial Bank ontology by omitting classes which were not required to perform meta-analysis. Three researchers from our team tagged five randomly selected RCT's each, published in the last 5 years (2004-2008), in the Journal of Neurosurgery (JoN), Neurosurgery Journal (NJ) and Journal of Neurotrauma (JoNT). We evaluated inter and intra observer reliability for the ontology using percent agreement and kappa coefficient. The inter-observer agreement was 76.4%, 75.97% and 74.9% and intra-observer agreement was 89.8%, 80.8% and 86.56% for JoN, NJ and JoNT respectively. The inter-observer kappa coefficient was 0.60, 0.54 and 0.53 and the intra-observer kappa coefficient was 0.79, 0.82 and 0.79 for JoN, NJ and JoNT journals respectively. The high degree of inter and intra-observer agreement confirms tagging consistency in sections of a given scientific manuscript. Standardizing reporting for neurosurgery articles can be reliably achieved through the integration of a computational ontology within the context of a CERR-N. This approach holds potential for the overall improvement in the quality of reporting of RCTs in neurosurgery, ultimately streamlining the translation of clinical research findings to improvement in patient care. PMID:20953737

  16. Head Start Program Quality: Examination of Classroom Quality and Parent Involvement in Predicting Children's Vocabulary, Literacy, and Mathematics Achievement Trajectories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wen, Xiaoli; Bulotsky-Shearer, Rebecca J.; Hahs-Vaughn, Debbie L.; Korfmacher, Jon

    2012-01-01

    Guided by a developmental-ecological framework and Head Start's two-generational approach, this study examined two dimensions of Head Start program quality, classroom quality and parent involvement and their unique and interactive contribution to children's vocabulary, literacy, and mathematics skills growth from the beginning of Head Start…

  17. Water quality indices across Europe--a comparison of the good ecological status of five river basins.

    PubMed

    von der Ohe, Peter Carsten; Prüss, Andrea; Schäfer, Ralf Bernhard; Liess, Matthias; de Deckere, Eric; Brack, Werner

    2007-09-01

    The European Water Framework Directive (WFD) requires the definition of near-natural reference conditions to determine the extent of water bodies' deviation from "good ecological status" caused by stress gradients. However, the classification of ecological quality depends on the assessment method applied and the stressor concerned. While assessment methods that are generally applicable would be favourable, many European countries employ the locally developed water quality metrics that assess the impact of organic pollution (including eutrophication) and the associated decrease in dissolved oxygen. These indices do not specifically address stress from organic toxicants, such as pesticides. The aim of this study was to examine the performance of presently used assessment methods to identify reference conditions of non-contaminated streams in five selected European river basins, covering the geographical region from Spain to Finland, as a crucial prerequisite to indicate toxic gradients. The analysis comprised the Belgium biotic index (BBI), the biological monitoring working party (BMWP) scoring system and the revised German saprobic index. For comparison, we included an adaptation of the recently developed SPEAR index. In two previous field studies, this metric highly correlated with measured pesticide gradients. In this study, SPEAR was the only indicator that was generally applicable to all monitoring data and capable of determining "high ecological status" of reference conditions in all basins. Thus, based upon previous and own results, the authors suggest the species at risk (SPEAR) index to be potentially useful as a European-wide index to address deviations from "good ecological status" due to organic toxicants and recommend it for consideration in integrated water-resource evaluations under the WFD. PMID:17726558

  18. Imaging techniques applied to quality control of civil manufactured goods obtained starting from ready-to-use mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonifazi, Giuseppe; Castaldi, Federica

    2003-05-01

    Concrete materials obtained from the utilization of pre-mixed and ready to use products (central mix-concrete) are more and more used. They represent a big portion of the civil construction market. Such products are used at different scale, ranging from small scale works, as those commonly realized inside and house, an apartment, etc. or at big civil or industrial scale works. In both cases the problem to control the mixtures and the final work is usually realized through the analysis of properly collected samples. Through appropriate sampling it can be derived objective parameters, as size class distribution and composition of the constituting particulate matter, or mechanical characteristics of the sample itself. An important parameter not considered by the previous mentioned approach is "segregation", that is the possibility that some particulate materials migrate preferentially in some zones of the mixtures and/or of the final product. Such a behavior dramatically influences the quality of the product and of the final manufactured good. Actually this behavior is only studied adopting a human based visual approach. Not repeatable analytical procedures or quantitative data processing exist. In this paper a procedure fully based on image processing techniques is described and applied. Results are presented and analyzed with reference to industrial products. A comparison is also made between the new proposed digital imaging based techniques and the analyses usually carried out at industrial laboratory scale for standard quality control.

  19. Mathematics Achievement among Secondary Students in Relation to Enrollment/Nonenrollment in Music Programs of Differing Content or Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van der Vossen, Maria R.

    2012-01-01

    This causal-comparative study examined the relationship between enrollment/non-enrollment in music programs of differing content or quality and mathematical achievement among 739 secondary (grades 8-12) students from four different Maryland counties. The students, both female and male, were divided into sample groups by their participation in a…

  20. Training Needs for Faculty Members: Towards Achieving Quality of University Education in the Light of Technological Innovations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abouelenein, Yousri Attia Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify training needs of university faculty members, in order to achieve the desired quality in the light of technological innovations. A list of training needs of faculty members was developed in terms of technological innovations in general, developing skills of faculty members in the use of technological…

  1. Does Higher Quality Early Child Care Promote Low-Income Children's Math and Reading Achievement in Middle Childhood?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dearing, Eric; McCartney, Kathleen; Taylor, Beck A.

    2009-01-01

    Higher quality child care during infancy and early childhood (6-54 months of age) was examined as a moderator of associations between family economic status and children's (N = 1,364) math and reading achievement in middle childhood (4.5-11 years of age). Low income was less strongly predictive of underachievement for children who had been in…

  2. Bhutanese Stakeholders' Perceptions about Multi-Grade Teaching as a Strategy for Achieving Quality Universal Primary Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kucita, Pawan; Kivunja, Charles; Maxwell, T. W.; Kuyini, Bawa

    2013-01-01

    This study employed document analysis and qualitative interviews to explore the perceptions of different Bhutanese stakeholders about multi-grade teaching, which the Bhutanese Government identified as a strategy for achieving quality Universal Primary Education. The data from Ministry officials, teachers and student teachers were analyzed using…

  3. A Multilevel Analysis of the Role of School Quality and Family Background on Students' Mathematics Achievement in the Middle East

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kareshki, Hossein; Hajinezhad, Zahra

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is investigating the correlation between school quality and family socioeconomic background and students' mathematics achievement in the Middle East. The countries in comparison are UAE, Syria, Qatar, Iran, Saudi Arabia, Oman, Lebanon, Jordan, and Bahrain. The study utilized data from IEA's Trends in International…

  4. Homework Works If Homework Quality Is High: Using Multilevel Modeling to Predict the Development of Achievement in Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dettmers, Swantje; Trautwein, Ulrich; Ludtke, Oliver; Kunter, Mareike; Baumert, Jurgen

    2010-01-01

    The present study examined the associations of 2 indicators of homework quality (homework selection and homework challenge) with homework motivation, homework behavior, and mathematics achievement. Multilevel modeling was used to analyze longitudinal data from a representative national sample of 3,483 students in Grades 9 and 10; homework effects…

  5. The Perception of Preservice Mathematics Teachers on the Role of Scaffolding in Achieving Quality Mathematics Classroom Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bature, Iliya Joseph; Jibrin, Adamu Gagdi

    2015-01-01

    This paper was designed to investigate the perceptions of four preservice mathematics teachers on the role of scaffolding in supporting and assisting them achieves quality classroom teaching. A collaborative approach to teaching through a community of practice was used to obtain data for the three research objectives that were postulated. Two…

  6. Does High Quality Childcare Narrow the Achievement Gap at Two Years of Age?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruzek, Erik; Burchinal, Margaret; Farkas, George; Duncan, Greg; Dang, Tran; Lee, Weilin

    2011-01-01

    The authors use the ECLS-B, a nationally-representative study of children born in 2001 to report the child care arrangements and quality characteristics for 2-year olds in the United States and to estimate the effects of differing levels of child care quality on two-year old children's cognitive development. Their goal is to test whether high…

  7. The quality transformation: A catalyst for achieving energy`s strategic vision

    SciTech Connect

    1995-01-01

    This plan describes the initial six corporate quality goals for DOE. It also includes accompanying performance measures which will help DOE determine progress towards meeting these goals. The six goals are: (1) There is effective use of performance measurement based on regular assessment of Energy operations using the Presidential Award for Quality, the Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award, or equivalent criteria. (2) All managers champion continuous quality improvement training for all employees through planning, attendance, and active application. (3) The Department leadership has provided the environment in which employees are enabled to satisfy customer requirements and realize their full potential. (4) The Department management practices foster employee involvement, development and recognition. (5) The Department continuously improves customer service and satisfaction, and internal and external customers recognize Energy as an excellent service provider. (6) The Department has a system which aligns strategic and operational planning with strategic intent, ensures this planning drives resource allocation, provides for regular evaluation of results, and provides feedback.

  8. How to achieve comprehensive teamwork in your pediatric dental office through total quality management (TQM).

    PubMed

    Nacht, E S

    1995-01-01

    Teamwork is considered the key to success in any organization. Total Quality Management (TQM) is a systematic process that optimizes quality and copes with change. The process includes customer satisfaction, as the ultimate criterion of quality; worker empowerment; and reliance on statistical process, rather than inspection and continuous improvement. Managers not only adopt new techniques but also a new philosophy, rethinking their roles to become leaders and mentors instead of bosses. Fourteen points, developed during several decades, are considered the cornerstone of quality and teamwork, and they can apply to what we do in the pediatric dental office. Together, these principles should be viewed as an ongoing process that can take up to five years or more and should be managed with the same emphasis as other systems in your office. The dentist, or leader, implements and takes part in the process, which will improve morale by increasing team spirit.

  9. Good Agreements Make Good Friends

    PubMed Central

    Han, The Anh; Pereira, Luís Moniz; Santos, Francisco C.; Lenaerts, Tom

    2013-01-01

    When starting a new collaborative endeavor, it pays to establish upfront how strongly your partner commits to the common goal and what compensation can be expected in case the collaboration is violated. Diverse examples in biological and social contexts have demonstrated the pervasiveness of making prior agreements on posterior compensations, suggesting that this behavior could have been shaped by natural selection. Here, we analyze the evolutionary relevance of such a commitment strategy and relate it to the costly punishment strategy, where no prior agreements are made. We show that when the cost of arranging a commitment deal lies within certain limits, substantial levels of cooperation can be achieved. Moreover, these levels are higher than that achieved by simple costly punishment, especially when one insists on sharing the arrangement cost. Not only do we show that good agreements make good friends, agreements based on shared costs result in even better outcomes. PMID:24045873

  10. Live births achieved via IVF are increased by improvements in air quality and laboratory environment.

    PubMed

    Heitmann, Ryan J; Hill, Micah J; James, Aidita N; Schimmel, Tim; Segars, James H; Csokmay, John M; Cohen, Jacques; Payson, Mark D

    2015-09-01

    Infertility is a common disease, which causes many couples to seek treatment with assisted reproduction techniques. Many factors contribute to successful assisted reproduction technique outcomes. One important factor is laboratory environment and air quality. Our facility had the unique opportunity to compare consecutively used, but separate assisted reproduction technique laboratories, as a result of a required move. Environmental conditions were improved by strategic engineering designs. All other aspects of the IVF laboratory, including equipment, physicians, embryologists, nursing staff and protocols, were kept constant between facilities. Air quality testing showed improved air quality at the new IVF site. Embryo implantation (32.4% versus 24.3%; P < 0.01) and live birth (39.3% versus 31.8%, P < 0.05) were significantly increased in the new facility compared with the old facility. More patients met clinical criteria and underwent mandatory single embryo transfer on day 5 leading to both a reduction in multiple gestation pregnancies and increased numbers of vitrified embryos per patient with supernumerary embryos available. Improvements in IVF laboratory conditions and air quality had profound positive effects on laboratory measures and patient outcomes. This study further strengthens the importance of the laboratory environment and air quality in the success of an IVF programme.

  11. Live births achieved via IVF are increased by improvements in air quality and laboratory environment

    PubMed Central

    Heitmann, Ryan J; Hill, Micah J; James, Aidita N; Schimmel, Tim; Segars, James H; Csokmay, John M; Cohen, Jacques; Payson, Mark D

    2016-01-01

    Infertility is a common disease, which causes many couples to seek treatment with assisted reproduction techniques. Many factors contribute to successful assisted reproduction technique outcomes. One important factor is laboratory environment and air quality. Our facility had the unique opportunity to compare consecutively used, but separate assisted reproduction technique laboratories, as a result of a required move. Environmental conditions were improved by strategic engineering designs. All other aspects of the IVF laboratory, including equipment, physicians, embryologists, nursing staff and protocols, were kept constant between facilities. Air quality testing showed improved air quality at the new IVF site. Embryo implantation (32.4% versus 24.3%; P < 0.01) and live birth (39.3% versus 31.8%, P < 0.05) were significantly increased in the new facility compared with the old facility. More patients met clinical criteria and underwent mandatory single embryo transfer on day 5 leading to both a reduction in multiple gestation pregnancies and increased numbers of vitrified embryos per patient with supernumerary embryos available. Improvements in IVF laboratory conditions and air quality had profound positive effects on laboratory measures and patient outcomes. This study further strengthens the importance of the laboratory environment and air quality in the success of an IVF programme. PMID:26194882

  12. Quality of education predicts performance on the Wide Range Achievement Test-4th Edition Word Reading subtest.

    PubMed

    Sayegh, Philip; Arentoft, Alyssa; Thaler, Nicholas S; Dean, Andy C; Thames, April D

    2014-12-01

    The current study examined whether self-rated education quality predicts Wide Range Achievement Test-4th Edition (WRAT-4) Word Reading subtest and neurocognitive performance, and aimed to establish this subtest's construct validity as an educational quality measure. In a community-based adult sample (N = 106), we tested whether education quality both increased the prediction of Word Reading scores beyond demographic variables and predicted global neurocognitive functioning after adjusting for WRAT-4. As expected, race/ethnicity and education predicted WRAT-4 reading performance. Hierarchical regression revealed that when including education quality, the amount of WRAT-4's explained variance increased significantly, with race/ethnicity and both education quality and years as significant predictors. Finally, WRAT-4 scores, but not education quality, predicted neurocognitive performance. Results support WRAT-4 Word Reading as a valid proxy measure for education quality and a key predictor of neurocognitive performance. Future research should examine these findings in larger, more diverse samples to determine their robust nature.

  13. Goal Setting in Principal Evaluation: Goal Quality and Predictors of Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinnema, Claire E. L.; Robinson, Viviane M. J.

    2012-01-01

    This article draws on goal-setting theory to investigate the goals set by experienced principals during their performance evaluations. While most goals were about teaching and learning, they tended to be vaguely expressed and only partially achieved. Five predictors (commitment, challenge, learning, effort, and support) explained a significant…

  14. Achieving Quality Education in Ghana: The Spotlight on Primary Education within the Kumasi Metropolis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boakye-Amponsah, Abraham; Enninful, Ebenezer Kofi; Anin, Emmanuel Kwabena; Vanderpuye, Patience

    2015-01-01

    Background: Ghana being a member of the United Nations, committed to the Universal Primary Education initiative in 2000 and has since implemented series of educational reforms to meet the target for the Millennium Development Goal (MDG) 2. Despite the numerous government interventions to achieve the MDG 2, many children in Ghana have been denied…

  15. School Improvement Plans and Student Achievement: Preliminary Evidence from the Quality and Merit Project in Italy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caputo, Andrea; Rastelli, Valentina

    2014-01-01

    This study provides preliminary evidence from an Italian in-service training program addressed to lower secondary school teachers which supports school improvement plans (SIPs). It aims at exploring the association between characteristics/contents of SIPs and student improvement in math achievement. Pre-post standardized tests and text analysis of…

  16. Leveraging Quality Improvement to Achieve Student Learning Assessment Success in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glenn, Nancy Gentry

    2009-01-01

    Mounting pressure for transformational change in higher education driven by technology, globalization, competition, funding shortages, and increased emphasis on accountability necessitates that universities implement reforms to demonstrate responsiveness to all stakeholders and to provide evidence of student achievement. In the face of the demand…

  17. Educational Inequality in Colombia: Family Background, School Quality and Student Achievement in Cartagena

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rangel, Claudia; Lleras, Christy

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the effects of family socio-economic disadvantage and differences in school resources on student achievement in the city of Cartagena, Colombia. Using data from the ICFES and C-600 national databases, we conduct a multilevel analysis to determine the unique contribution of school-level factors above and beyond family…

  18. Understanding and Achieving Quality in Sure Start Children's Centres: Practitioners' Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cottle, Michelle

    2011-01-01

    This article focuses on some of the issues that shape understandings of professional practice in the rapidly expanding context of children's centres in England. Drawing on data from an ESRC-funded project exploring practitioners' understandings of quality and success, the perspectives of 115 practitioners working in 11 Sure Start Children's…

  19. How to Achieve High-Quality Oocytes? The Key Role of Myo-Inositol and Melatonin

    PubMed Central

    Rossetti, Paola; Corrado, Francesco; Rapisarda, Agnese Maria Chiara; Condorelli, Rosita Angela; Valenti, Gaetano; Sapia, Fabrizio; Buscema, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Assisted reproductive technologies (ART) have experienced growing interest from infertile patients seeking to become pregnant. The quality of oocytes plays a pivotal role in determining ART outcomes. Although many authors have studied how supplementation therapy may affect this important parameter for both in vivo and in vitro models, data are not yet robust enough to support firm conclusions. Regarding this last point, in this review our objective has been to evaluate the state of the art regarding supplementation with melatonin and myo-inositol in order to improve oocyte quality during ART. On the one hand, the antioxidant effect of melatonin is well known as being useful during ovulation and oocyte incubation, two occasions with a high level of oxidative stress. On the other hand, myo-inositol is important in cellular structure and in cellular signaling pathways. Our analysis suggests that the use of these two molecules may significantly improve the quality of oocytes and the quality of embryos: melatonin seems to raise the fertilization rate, and myo-inositol improves the pregnancy rate, although all published studies do not fully agree with these conclusions. However, previous studies have demonstrated that cotreatment improves these results compared with melatonin alone or myo-inositol alone. We recommend that further studies be performed in order to confirm these positive outcomes in routine ART treatment.

  20. Forward-Oriented Designing for Learning as a Means to Achieve Educational Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghislandi, Patrizia M. M.; Raffaghelli, Juliana E.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we reflect on how Design for Learning can create the basis for a culture of educational quality. We explore the process of Design for Learning within a blended, undergraduate university course through a teacher-led inquiry approach, aiming at showing the connections between the process of Design for Learning and academic…

  1. Achieving Quality Assurance and Moving to a World Class University in the 21st Century

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Lung-Sheng Steven

    2013-01-01

    Globalization in the 21st century has brought innumerable challenges and opportunities to universities and countries. Universities are primarily concerned with how to ensure the quality of their education and how to boost their local and global competitiveness. The pressure from both international competition and public accountability on…

  2. Teacher-Student Relationship Quality Type in Elementary Grades: Effects on Trajectories for Achievement and Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Jiun-Yu; Hughes, Jan N.; Kwok, Oi-Man

    2010-01-01

    Teacher, peer, and student reports of the quality of the teacher-student relationship were obtained for an ethnically diverse and academically at-risk sample of 706 second- and third-grade students. Cluster analysis identified four types of relationships based on the consistency of child reports of support and conflict in the relationship with…

  3. The Walls Speak: The Interplay of Quality Facilities, School Climate, and Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uline, Cynthia; Tschannen-Moran, Megan

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: A growing body of research connecting the quality of school facilities to student performance accompanies recent efforts to improve the state of the educational infrastructure in the USA. Less is known about the mechanisms of these relationships. This paper seeks to examine the proposition that part of the explanation may be the mediating…

  4. Quality, peer review, and the achievement of consensus in probabilistic risk analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Apostolakis, G.; Garrick, B.J.; Okrent, D.

    1983-01-01

    This article addresses some of the issues that arise in connection with the problems associated with probabilistic risk assessment (PRA). Some opinions are given on quality assurance, PRA scope, and peer review. Then the issue of consensus and some of the reasons that lead to disagreement are discussed.

  5. How to Achieve High-Quality Oocytes? The Key Role of Myo-Inositol and Melatonin.

    PubMed

    Vitale, Salvatore Giovanni; Rossetti, Paola; Corrado, Francesco; Rapisarda, Agnese Maria Chiara; La Vignera, Sandro; Condorelli, Rosita Angela; Valenti, Gaetano; Sapia, Fabrizio; Laganà, Antonio Simone; Buscema, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Assisted reproductive technologies (ART) have experienced growing interest from infertile patients seeking to become pregnant. The quality of oocytes plays a pivotal role in determining ART outcomes. Although many authors have studied how supplementation therapy may affect this important parameter for both in vivo and in vitro models, data are not yet robust enough to support firm conclusions. Regarding this last point, in this review our objective has been to evaluate the state of the art regarding supplementation with melatonin and myo-inositol in order to improve oocyte quality during ART. On the one hand, the antioxidant effect of melatonin is well known as being useful during ovulation and oocyte incubation, two occasions with a high level of oxidative stress. On the other hand, myo-inositol is important in cellular structure and in cellular signaling pathways. Our analysis suggests that the use of these two molecules may significantly improve the quality of oocytes and the quality of embryos: melatonin seems to raise the fertilization rate, and myo-inositol improves the pregnancy rate, although all published studies do not fully agree with these conclusions. However, previous studies have demonstrated that cotreatment improves these results compared with melatonin alone or myo-inositol alone. We recommend that further studies be performed in order to confirm these positive outcomes in routine ART treatment. PMID:27651794

  6. How to Achieve High-Quality Oocytes? The Key Role of Myo-Inositol and Melatonin

    PubMed Central

    Rossetti, Paola; Corrado, Francesco; Rapisarda, Agnese Maria Chiara; Condorelli, Rosita Angela; Valenti, Gaetano; Sapia, Fabrizio; Buscema, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Assisted reproductive technologies (ART) have experienced growing interest from infertile patients seeking to become pregnant. The quality of oocytes plays a pivotal role in determining ART outcomes. Although many authors have studied how supplementation therapy may affect this important parameter for both in vivo and in vitro models, data are not yet robust enough to support firm conclusions. Regarding this last point, in this review our objective has been to evaluate the state of the art regarding supplementation with melatonin and myo-inositol in order to improve oocyte quality during ART. On the one hand, the antioxidant effect of melatonin is well known as being useful during ovulation and oocyte incubation, two occasions with a high level of oxidative stress. On the other hand, myo-inositol is important in cellular structure and in cellular signaling pathways. Our analysis suggests that the use of these two molecules may significantly improve the quality of oocytes and the quality of embryos: melatonin seems to raise the fertilization rate, and myo-inositol improves the pregnancy rate, although all published studies do not fully agree with these conclusions. However, previous studies have demonstrated that cotreatment improves these results compared with melatonin alone or myo-inositol alone. We recommend that further studies be performed in order to confirm these positive outcomes in routine ART treatment. PMID:27651794

  7. An Analysis of Teacher Quality, Evaluation, Professional Development and Tenure as It Relates to Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pritchett, Jim; Sparks, Tara J.; Taylor-Johnson, Tiffany

    2010-01-01

    Educational leaders nationwide have been challenged by ineffective tenured teachers who continue to impact student learning. In the era of No Child Left Behind, educational leaders struggle to ensure that students receive high quality education. This problem-based research project attempted to support state, district and building educational…

  8. Quality of Achieved Employment Among Rural Youth Who Complete Junior College Associate Degree Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wakefield, Nancy C.; Dunkelberger, John E.

    Beginning in 1966, the relationship between levels of formal education, specifically the attainment of an associate degree from a two-year college, and quality of employment among young adults reared in rural areas, was examined in a multi-phase, longitudinal sampling procedure which obtained data from a pool of high school sophomores from…

  9. Integrating empowerment evaluation and quality improvement to achieve healthcare improvement outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Wandersman, Abraham; Alia, Kassandra Ann; Cook, Brittany; Ramaswamy, Rohit

    2015-01-01

    While the body of evidence-based healthcare interventions grows, the ability of health systems to deliver these interventions effectively and efficiently lags behind. Quality improvement approaches, such as the model for improvement, have demonstrated some success in healthcare but their impact has been lessened by implementation challenges. To help address these challenges, we describe the empowerment evaluation approach that has been developed by programme evaluators and a method for its application (Getting To Outcomes (GTO)). We then describe how GTO can be used to implement healthcare interventions. An illustrative healthcare quality improvement example that compares the model for improvement and the GTO method for reducing hospital admissions through improved diabetes care is described. We conclude with suggestions for integrating GTO and the model for improvement. PMID:26178332

  10. Integrating empowerment evaluation and quality improvement to achieve healthcare improvement outcomes.

    PubMed

    Wandersman, Abraham; Alia, Kassandra Ann; Cook, Brittany; Ramaswamy, Rohit

    2015-10-01

    While the body of evidence-based healthcare interventions grows, the ability of health systems to deliver these interventions effectively and efficiently lags behind. Quality improvement approaches, such as the model for improvement, have demonstrated some success in healthcare but their impact has been lessened by implementation challenges. To help address these challenges, we describe the empowerment evaluation approach that has been developed by programme evaluators and a method for its application (Getting To Outcomes (GTO)). We then describe how GTO can be used to implement healthcare interventions. An illustrative healthcare quality improvement example that compares the model for improvement and the GTO method for reducing hospital admissions through improved diabetes care is described. We conclude with suggestions for integrating GTO and the model for improvement.

  11. Quality of life in relation to future mental health problems and offending: Testing the good lives model among detained girls.

    PubMed

    Van Damme, Lore; Hoeve, Machteld; Vermeiren, Robert; Vanderplasschen, Wouter; Colins, Olivier F

    2016-06-01

    Detained girls bear high levels of criminal behavior and mental health problems that are likely to persist into young adulthood. Research with these girls began primarily from a risk management perspective, whereas a strength-based empowering perspective may increase knowledge that could improve rehabilitation. This study examines detained girls' quality of life (QoL) in relation to future mental health problems and offending, thereby testing the strength-based good lives model of offender rehabilitation (GLM). At baseline, 95 girls (Mage = 16.25) completed the World Health Organization QoL instrument to assess their QoL prior to detention in the domains of physical health, psychological health, social relationships, and environment. Six months after discharge, mental health problems and offending were assessed by self-report measures. Structural equation models were conducted to test GLM's proposed (in)direct pathways from QoL (via mental health problems) toward offending. Although we could not find support for GLM's direct negative pathway from QoL to offending, our findings did provide support for GLM's indirect negative pathway via mental health problems to future offending. In addition, we found a direct positive pathway from detained girls' satisfaction with their social relationships to offending after discharge. The current findings support the potential relevance of addressing detained girls' QoL, pursuing the development of new skills, and supporting them to build constructive social contacts. Our findings, however, also show that clinicians should not only focus on strengths but that detecting and modifying mental health problems in this vulnerable group is also warranted. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26844913

  12. Potential of organic filter materials for treating greywater to achieve irrigation quality: a review.

    PubMed

    Dalahmeh, Sahar S; Hylander, Lars D; Vinnerås, Björn; Pell, Mikael; Oborn, Ingrid; Jönsson, Håkan

    2011-01-01

    The objectives of this literature review were to: (i) evaluate the impact of greywater generated in rural communities, with the emphasis on Jordanian conditions, on soil, plant and public health and assess the need for treatment of this greywater before it is used for irrigation, and (ii) assess the potential of different types of organic by-products as carrier material in different filter units for removal of pollutants from greywater. Greywater with high BOD5, COD, high concentrations of SS, fat, oil and grease and high levels of surfactants is commonly found in rural areas in Jordan. Oxygen depletion, odour emission, hydrophobic soil phenomena, plant toxicity, blockage of piping systems and microbiological health risks are common problems associated with greywater without previous treatment. Organic by-products such as wood chips, bark, peat, wheat straw and corncob may be used as carrier material in so-called mulch filters for treating wastewater and greywater from different sources. A down-flow-mode vertical filter is a common setup used in mulch filters. Wastewaters with a wide range of SS, cBOD5 and COD fed into different mulch filters have been studied. The different mulch materials achieved SS removal ranging between 51 and 91%, a BOD5 reduction range of 55-99.9%, and COD removal of 51-98%. Most types of mulches achieved a higher organic matter removal than that achieved by an ordinary septic tank. Bark, peat and wood chips filters removed organic matter better than sand and trickling filters, under similar conditions. Release of filter material and increase in COD in the effluent was reported using some mulch materials. In conclusion, some mulch materials such as bark, peat and woodchips seem to have a great potential for treatment of greywater in robust, low-tech systems. They can be expected to be resilient in dealing with variable low and high organic loads and shock loads.

  13. Why Are Some Texts Good and Others Not? Relationship between Text Quality and Management of the Writing Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beauvais, Caroline; Olive, Thierry; Passerault, Jean-Michel

    2011-01-01

    Two experiments examined whether text quality is related to online management of the writing processes. Experiment 1 focused on the relationship between online management and text quality in narrative and argumentative texts. Experiment 2 investigated how this relationship might be affected by a goal emphasizing text quality. In both experiments,…

  14. Achieving consistent image quality with dose optimization in 64-row multidetector computed tomography prospective ECG gated coronary calcium scoring.

    PubMed

    Pan, Zilai; Pang, Lifang; Li, Jianying; Zhang, Huan; Yang, Wenjie; Ding, Bei; Chai, Weimin; Chen, Kemin; Yao, Weiwu

    2011-04-01

    To evaluate the clinical value of a body mass index (BMI) based tube current (mA) selection method for obtaining consistent image quality with dose optimization in MDCT prospective ECG gated coronary calcium scoring. A formula for selecting mA to achieve desired image quality based on patient BMI was established using a control group (A) of 200 MDCT cardiac patients with a standard scan protocol. One hundred patients in Group B were scanned with this BMI-dependent mA for achieving a desired noise level of 18 HU at 2.5 mm slice thickness. The CTDIvol and image noise on the ascending aorta for the two groups were recorded. Two experienced radiologists quantitatively evaluated the image quality using scores of 1-4 with 4 being the highest. The image quality scores had no statistical difference (P = 0.71) at 3.89 ± 0.32, 3.87 ± 0.34, respectively, for groups A and B of similar BMI. The image noise in Group A had linear relationship with BMI. The image noise in Group B using BMI-dependent mA was independent of BMI with average value of 17.9 HU and smaller deviations for the noise values than in Group A (2.0 vs. 2.9 HU). There was a 35% dose reduction with BMI-dependent mA selection method on average with the lowest effective dose being only 0.35 mSv for patient with BMI of 18.3. A quantitative BMI-based mA selection method in MDCT prospective ECG gated coronary calcium scoring has been proposed to obtain a desired and consistent image quality and provide dose optimization across patient population.

  15. Varying the periodicity to achieve high quality factor on asymmetrical H-Shaped resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamad Ali Nasri, Ili F.; Mbomson, Ifeoma G.; De La Rue, Richard M.; Johnson, Nigel P.

    2016-04-01

    An asymmetrical H-shaped resonator (ASH) has been designed using gold on a fused silica substrate. The aim is to obtain a high - quality factor at the reflectance resonance peaks in the mid - infrared wavelength of 2 μm to 8 μm. The structures were modelled using the Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) Lumerical Solution simulation software by adjusting the parameter of periodic boundary condition on the X and Y-axis and perfectly matched layer (PML) on the Z- axis. The asymmetric structures give double resonance peaks that depend on the arm-length of the structure. The periodicity along the X and Y-axis was varied to tune the width of the resonant peaks in order to obtain the maximum Qfactor. Experimental results broadly confirm the simulations.

  16. Hygienic support of the ISS air quality (main achievements and prospects)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moukhamedieva, Lana; Tsarkov, Dmitriy; Pakhomova, Anna

    Hygienic preventive measures during pre-flight processing of manned spaceships, selection of polymeric materials, sanitary-hygienic evaluation of cargo and scientific hardware to be used on the ISS and life support systems allow to maintain air quality in limits of regulatory requirements. However, graduate increase of total air contamination by harmful chemicals is observed as service life of the ISS gets longer. It is caused by polymeric materials used on the station overall quantity rise, by additional contamination brought by cargo spacecrafts and modules docking to the ISS and by the cargo. At the same time the range of contaminants that are typical for off-gassing from polymeric materials where modern stabilizers, plasticizers, flame retarders and other additives are used gets wider. In resolving the matters of the ISS service life extension the main question of hygienic researches is to determine real safe operation life of the polymeric material used in structures and hardware of the station, including: begin{itemize} research of polymers degradation (ageing) and its effect on intensity of off gassing and its toxicity; begin{itemize} introduction of polymers with minimal volatile organic compounds off gassing under conditions of space flight and thermal-oxidative degradation. In order to ensure human safety during long-term flight it is important to develop: begin{itemize} real-time air quality monitoring systems, including on-line analysis of highly toxic contaminants evolving during thermo-oxidative degradation of polymer materials and during blowouts of toxic contaminants; begin{itemize} hygienic standards of contaminants level for extended duration of flight up to 3 years. It is essential to develop an automated control system for on-line monitoring of toxicological status and to develop hygienic and engineer measures of its management in order to ensure crew members safety during off-nominal situation.

  17. GLIMPSE: A decision support tool for simultaneously achieving our air quality management and climate change mitigation goals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinder, R. W.; Akhtar, F.; Loughlin, D. H.; Henze, D. K.; Bowman, K. W.

    2012-12-01

    Poor air quality, ecosystem damages, and climate change all are caused by the combustion of fossil fuels, yet environmental management often addresses each of these challenges separately. This can lead to sub-optimal strategies and unintended consequences. Here we present GLIMPSE -- a decision support tool for simultaneously achieving our air quality and climate change mitigation goals. GLIMPSE comprises of two types of models, (i) the adjoint of the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model, to calculate the relationship between emissions and impacts at high spatial resolution, and (ii) the MARKAL energy system model, to calculate the relationship between energy technologies and emissions. This presentation will demonstrate how GLIMPSE can be used to explore energy scenarios to better achieve both improved air quality and mitigate climate change. Second, this presentation will discuss how space-based observations can be incorporated into GLIMPSE to improve decision-making. NASA satellite products, namely ozone radiative forcing from the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES), are used to extend GLIMPSE to include the impact of emissions on ozone radiative forcing. This provides a much needed observational constraint on ozone radiative forcing.

  18. Comparison of patient evaluations of health care quality in relation to WHO measures of achievement in 12 European countries.

    PubMed Central

    Kerssens, Jan J.; Groenewegen, Peter P.; Sixma, Herman J.; Boerma, Wienke G. W.; van der Eijk, Ingrid

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To gain insight into similarities and differences in patient evaluations of quality of primary care across 12 European countries and to correlate patient evaluations with WHO health system performance measures (for example, responsiveness) of these countries. METHODS: Patient evaluations were derived from a series of Quote (QUality of care Through patients' Eyes) instruments designed to measure the quality of primary care. Various research groups provided a total sample of 5133 patients from 12 countries: Belarus, Denmark, Finland, Greece, Ireland, Israel, Italy, the Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, United Kingdom, and Ukraine. Intraclass correlations of 10 Quote items were calculated to measure differences between countries. The world health report 2000 - Health systems: improving performance performance measures in the same countries were correlated with mean Quote scores. FINDINGS: Intra-class correlation coefficients ranged from low to very high, which indicated little variation between countries in some respects (for example, primary care providers have a good understanding of patients' problems in all countries) and large variation in other respects (for example, with respect to prescription of medication and communication between primary care providers). Most correlations between mean Quote scores per country and WHO performance measures were positive. The highest correlation (0.86) was between the primary care provider's understanding of patients' problems and responsiveness according to WHO. CONCLUSIONS: Patient evaluations of the quality of primary care showed large differences across countries and related positively to WHO's performance measures of health care systems. PMID:15042232

  19. Quality Teaching in Addressing Student Achievement: A Comparative Study between National Board Certified Teachers and Other Teachers on the Kentucky Core Content Test Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buecker, Harrie Lynne

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation focused on the link between quality teaching and its potential impact on student achievement. National Board Certification is used to represent quality teaching and student achievement is measured by the Kentucky Core Content Test. Data were gathered on the reading and mathematics scores of students of National Board Teachers who…

  20. Quality Mathematics Instructional Practices Contributing to Student Achievements in Five High-Achieving Asian Education Systems: An Analysis Using TIMSS 2011 Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Qiang

    2014-01-01

    Although teaching quality is seen as crucial in affecting students' performance, what types of instructional practices constitute quality teaching remains a question. With the theoretical assumptions of conceptual and procedural mathematics teaching as a guide, this study examined the types of quality mathematics instructional practices that…

  1. Association of consumers' sex and eyedness and lighting and wall color of a store with price attraction and perceived quality of goods and inside visual appeal.

    PubMed

    Barli, Onder; Bilgili, Bilsen; Dane, Senol

    2006-10-01

    The associations of sex and eyedness of consumers in a market and the market's lighting and wall color with price attraction and perceived quality of goods and the inside visual appeal were studied using an inventory after shopping by 440 men and 478 women, 20 to 60 years old (M = 29.3, SD = 10.2). Two lights (soft and bright) and 4 colors (blue, yellow, green, and red) and neutral light (white) were used. Women rated the prices of goods more attractive compared to men. In the total sample, left-eye preferents rated visual appeal higher compared to right-eye preferents. Bright light was associated with higher visual appeal than soft light. Green was associated with the highest inside visual appeal and perceived quality of goods, which may be due to its intermediate wavelength. PMID:17165407

  2. Association of consumers' sex and eyedness and lighting and wall color of a store with price attraction and perceived quality of goods and inside visual appeal.

    PubMed

    Barli, Onder; Bilgili, Bilsen; Dane, Senol

    2006-10-01

    The associations of sex and eyedness of consumers in a market and the market's lighting and wall color with price attraction and perceived quality of goods and the inside visual appeal were studied using an inventory after shopping by 440 men and 478 women, 20 to 60 years old (M = 29.3, SD = 10.2). Two lights (soft and bright) and 4 colors (blue, yellow, green, and red) and neutral light (white) were used. Women rated the prices of goods more attractive compared to men. In the total sample, left-eye preferents rated visual appeal higher compared to right-eye preferents. Bright light was associated with higher visual appeal than soft light. Green was associated with the highest inside visual appeal and perceived quality of goods, which may be due to its intermediate wavelength.

  3. "Good Practice" School Advisors in Greek Education: The Difficulty in Linking Collaborative Networks, Communities of Practice and Quality Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stamelos, Georgios; Bartzakli, Marianna

    2013-01-01

    Quality in education is considered to be a central aim as far as the formation and the implementation of educational policy worldwide is concerned. The basic prerequisite for it, though, is quality culture. Collaborative networks between school advisors and primary school teachers are examined to reveal how they can affect the formation of…

  4. Student Motivation and the "Feel Good" Factor: An Empirical Examination of Motivational Predictors of University Service Quality Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chong, Yit Sean; Ahmed, Pervaiz K.

    2015-01-01

    With the globalisation of the higher education industry, service quality in the higher education services is seen as a vital factor in determining a university's competitive advantage. The purpose of this study is to extend current conceptualisation of quality research in higher education by investigating the influence of self-determination…

  5. Are the streams of the Sinos River basin of good water quality? Aquatic macroinvertebrates may answer the question.

    PubMed

    Bieger, L; Carvalho, A B P; Strieder, M N; Maltchik, L; Stenert, C

    2010-12-01

    Macroinvertebrate communities are one of the most used groups in assessments of water quality, since they respond directly to the level of contamination of aquatic ecosystems. The main objective of this study was the assessment of the water quality of the Sinos River basin (Rio Grande do Sul state, Brazil) through biotic indices based on the macroinvertebrate community ("Family Biotic Index - FBI", and "Biological Monitoring Working Party Score System - BMWP"). Three lower order streams (2nd order) were selected in each one of three main regions of the basin. In each stream, the samplings were performed in three reaches (upper, middle, and lower), totalling 27 reaches. Two samplings were carried in each reach over one year (winter and summer). A total of 6,847 macroinvertebrates distributed among 54 families were sampled. The streams from the upper region were of better water quality than the lower region. The water quality did not change between the upper, middle and lower reaches of the streams. However, the upper reaches of the streams were of better water quality in all the regions of the basin. The water quality of the streams did not vary between the summer and the winter. This result demonstrated that water quality may be analysed in both studied seasons (summer and winter) using biotic indices. The analysis of the results allows us to conclude that the biotic indices used reflected the changes related to the water quality along the longitudinal gradient of the basin. Thus, aquatic macroinvertebrates were important bioindicators of the water and environmental quality of the streams of the Sinos River basin.

  6. Is the Best Evidence Good Enough: Quality Assessment and Factor Analysis of Meta-Analyses on Depression

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Meijuan; Mei, Xinchun; Hou, Jiaojiao; Shi, Zhongyong; Shuai, Yu; Shen, Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Background The quality of meta-analyses (MAs) on depression remains uninvestigated. Objective To assess the overall reporting and methodological qualities of MAs on depression and to explore potential factors influencing both qualities. Methods MAs investigating epidemiology and interventions for depression published in the most recent year (2014–2015) were selected from PubMed, EMBASE, PsycINFO and Cochrane Library. The characteristics of the included studies were collected and the total and per-item quality scores of the included studies were calculated based on the two checklists. Univariate and multivariate linear regression analyses were used to explore the potential factors influencing the quality of the articles. Results A total of 217 MAs from 74 peer-reviewed journals were included. The mean score of Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) was 23.0 of 27 and mean score of Assessment of Multiple Systematic Reviews (AMSTAR) was 8.3 of 11. Items assessing registration and protocol (14.2%, 37/217) in PRISMA and item requiring a full list of included and excluded studies (16.1%, 40/217) in AMSTAR had poorer adherences than other items. The MAs that included only RCTs, pre-registered, had five more authors or authors from Cochrane groups and the MAs found negative results had better reporting and methodological qualities. Conclusions The reporting and methodological qualities of MAs on depression remained to be improved. Design of included studies, characteristics of authors and pre-registration in PROSPERO database are important factors influencing quality of MAs in the field of depression. PMID:27336624

  7. Great achievements by dedicated nurses.

    PubMed

    Whyte, Alison

    2016-04-27

    Like many nurses, those featured here are motivated by a desire to do everything they can to give high quality care to their patients. Nurses are often reluctant to seek recognition for their achievements, but by talking publicly about the difference they have made, Gillian Elwood, Anja Templin and Sandra Wood are helping to share good practice. PMID:27191295

  8. Goodness-of-Fit in Center Day Care: Relations of Temperament, Stability, and Quality of Care with the Child's Adjustment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Schipper, J. Clasien; Tavecchio, Louis W. C.; Van IJzendoorn, Marinus H.; Van Zeijl, Jantien

    2004-01-01

    In this study, the concept of "goodness-of-fit" between the child's temperament and the environment, introduced by Thomas and Chess [Temperament and Development, Brunner/Mazel, New York, 1977], is applied within the setting of center day care. Mothers and primary professional caregivers of 186 children, aged 6-30 months, participated in this…

  9. Absence of socioeconomic inequalities in access to good-quality breast cancer treatment within a population-wide screening programme in Turin (Italy).

    PubMed

    Zengarini, Nicolás; Ponti, Antonio; Tomatis, Mariano; Casella, Denise; Giordano, Livia; Mano, Maria P; Segnan, Nereo; Whitehead, Margaret; Costa, Giuseppe; Spadea, Teresa

    2016-11-01

    Several studies suggest that population-based breast cancer screening programmes might help reduce social inequalities in breast cancer survival both by increasing early diagnosis and by improving access to effective treatments. To start disentangling the two effects, we evaluated social inequalities in quality of treatment of screen-detected breast cancer in the city of Turin (Italy). Combining data from the Audit System on Quality of Breast Cancer Treatment and the Turin Longitudinal Study, we analysed 2700 cases in the screening target age class 50-69 diagnosed in the period 1995-2008. We selected 10 indicators of the pathway of care, relative to timeliness and appropriateness of diagnosis and treatment, and three indicators of socioeconomic position: education, occupational status and housing characteristics. For each indicator of care, relative risks of failure were estimated by robust Poisson regression models, controlling for calendar period of diagnosis, size of tumour and activity volume of the surgery units. The principal predictor of failure of the good care indicators was the calendar period of diagnosis, with a general improvement with time in the quality of diagnosis and treatment, followed by size of the tumour and volume of activity. Socioeconomic indicators show only a marginal independent effect on timeliness indicators. The observed associations of quality indicators with socioeconomic characteristics are lower than expected, suggesting a possible role of the screening programme in reducing disparities in the access to good-quality treatments thanks to its capability to enter screen-detected women into a protected pathway of care.

  10. Implementation of the OECD principles of good laboratory practice in test facilities complying with a quality system accredited to the ISO/IEC 17025 standard.

    PubMed

    Feller, Etty

    2008-01-01

    Laboratories with a quality system accredited to the ISO/IEC 17025 standard have a definite advantage, compared to non-accredited laboratories, when preparing their facilities for the implementation of the principles of good laboratory practice (GLP) of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). Accredited laboratories have an established quality system covering the administrative and technical issues specified in the standard. The similarities and differences between the ISO/IEC 17025 standard and the OECD principles of GLP are compared and discussed. PMID:19351993

  11. The Education Challenge in Mexico: Delivering Good Quality Education to All. OECD Economics Department Working Papers, No. 447

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guichard, Stephanie

    2005-01-01

    The growth of potential GDP in Mexico is not fast enough to narrow the income gap with other OECD countries at a sufficient pace. The persistent weakness in human capital development contributes to this situation. In particular, Mexicans spend comparatively few years in formal education, and the quality of the education they receive is lower than…

  12. Conflicting Views on Quality: Interpretations of "A Good University" by Representatives of the State, the Market and Academia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Udam, Maiki; Heidmets, Mati

    2013-01-01

    This article presents the results of research conducted over the period 2010-2012 in Estonia with the aim of identifying the expectations for the quality of higher education by principal parties in higher education, the state, the market and academia, as well as describing the differences and similarities in their expectations. The findings show…

  13. Mussel farming in Maliakos Gulf and quality indicators of the marine environment: Good benthic below poor pelagic ecological status.

    PubMed

    Dimitriou, Panagiotis D; Karakassis, Ioannis; Pitta, Paraskevi; Tsagaraki, Tatiana Margo; Apostolaki, Eugenia T; Magiopoulos, Iordanis; Nikolioudakis, Nikolaos; Diliberto, Santi; Theodorou, John A; Tzovenis, Ioannis; Kagalou, Ifigenia; Beza, Paraskevi; Tsapakis, Manolis

    2015-12-30

    Biological and geochemical variables in the water column and sediments were monitored along a transect of a mussel farm located in a transitional environment in Maliakos Gulf, a semi-enclosed gulf in eastern Mediterranean. Analyses of water, sediment and macrofauna samples were used to calculate ecological status indicators in the context of the European Water Framework Directive. The water column ecological status was "Poor" or "Bad" showing little change with distance from the farm, but the ecological status of the benthic communities was found to be "Good," although there were quantitative changes in macrofaunal indices with distance from the farm.

  14. Reporting standards of studies and papers on the prevention and management of foot ulcers in diabetes: required details and markers of good quality.

    PubMed

    Jeffcoate, William J; Bus, Sicco A; Game, Frances L; Hinchliffe, Robert J; Price, Patricia E; Schaper, Nicolaas C

    2016-09-01

    The evidence base for many aspects of the management of foot ulcers in people with diabetes is weak, and good-quality research, especially relating to studies of direct relevance to routine clinical care, is needed. In this paper, we summarise the core details required in the planning and reporting of intervention studies in the prevention and management of diabetic foot ulcers, including studies that focus on off-loading, stimulation of wound healing, peripheral artery disease, and infection. We highlight aspects of trial design, conduct, and reporting that should be taken into account to minimise bias and improve quality. We also provide a 21-point checklist for researchers and for readers who assess the quality of published work.

  15. [Elaboration of an interactive educational CD-R on good laboratory practices for manufacturing and quality control].

    PubMed

    Nivet, J-M

    2005-11-01

    cGMPs require that QA systems rely upon qualified personnel in charge of pharmaceutical operations. In order to achieve this legal requirement, the manufacturer must provide initial training and regular re-training along with periodical evaluations of their practical efficiency. This cGMP-learning multimedia CD-R is an interactive and individual training tool, designed for QC laboratory personnel. It contains a final questionnaire allowing an assessment of the course efficiency. Building up a ten-module teaching program entitled "Le médicament en toute confiance", the development of this CD-R was supervised by an European team of experienced industrial pharmacists. PMID:16292235

  16. Intracellular flow cytometry may be combined with good quality and high sensitivity RT-qPCR analysis.

    PubMed

    Sandstedt, Mikael; Jonsson, Marianne; Asp, Julia; Dellgren, Göran; Lindahl, Anders; Jeppsson, Anders; Sandstedt, Joakim

    2015-12-01

    Flow cytometry (FCM) has become a well-established method for analysis of both intracellular and cell-surface proteins, while quantitative RT-PCR (RT-qPCR) is used to determine gene expression with high sensitivity and specificity. Combining these two methods would be of great value. The effects of intracellular staining on RNA integrity and RT-qPCR sensitivity and quality have not, however, been fully examined. We, therefore, intended to assess these effects further. Cells from the human lung cancer cell line A549 were fixed, permeabilized and sorted by FCM. Sorted cells were analyzed using RT-qPCR. RNA integrity was determined by RNA quality indicator analysis. A549 cells were then mixed with cells of the mouse cardiomyocyte cell line HL-1. A549 cells were identified by the cell surface marker ABCG2, while HL-1 cells were identified by intracellular cTnT. Cells were sorted and analyzed by RT-qPCR. Finally, cell cultures from human atrial biopsies were used to evaluate the effects of fixation and permeabilization on RT-qPCR analysis of nonimmortalized cells stored prior to analysis by FCM. A large amount of RNA could be extracted even when cells had been fixed and permeabilized. Permeabilization resulted in increased RNA degradation and a moderate decrease in RT-qPCR sensitivity. Gene expression levels were also affected to a moderate extent. Sorted populations from the mixed A549 and HL-1 cell samples showed gene expression patterns that corresponded to FCM data. When samples were stored before FCM sorting, the RT-qPCR analysis could still be performed with high sensitivity and quality. In summary, our results show that intracellular FCM may be performed with only minor impairment of the RT-qPCR sensitivity and quality when analyzing sorted cells; however, these effects should be considered when comparing RT-qPCR data of not fixed samples with those of fixed and permeabilized samples. PMID:26348124

  17. Good Quality of Life in Former Buruli Ulcer Patients with Small Lesions: Long-Term Follow-up of the BURULICO Trial

    PubMed Central

    Klis, Sandor; Ranchor, Adelita; Phillips, Richard O.; Abass, Kabiru M.; Tuah, Wilson; Loth, Susanne; Velding, Kristien; van der Werf, Tjip S.; Stienstra, Ymkje

    2014-01-01

    Background Buruli Ulcer is a tropical skin disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans, which, due to scarring and contractures can lead to stigma and functional limitations. However, recent advances in treatment, combined with increased public health efforts have the potential to significantly improve disease outcome. Objectives To study the Quality of Life (QoL) of former Buruli Ulcer patients who, in the context of a randomized controlled trial, reported early with small lesions (cross-sectional diameter <10 cm), and received a full course of antibiotic treatment. Methods 127 Participants of the BURULICO drug trial in Ghana were revisited. All former patients aged 16 or older completed the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) and the abbreviated World Health Organization Quality of Life scale (WHOQOL-BREF). The WHOQOL-BREF was also administered to 82 matched healthy controls. Those younger than 16 completed the Childrens' Dermatology Life Quality Index (CDLQI) only. Results The median (Inter Quartile Range) score on the DLQI was 0 (0–4), indicating good QoL. 85% of former patients indicated no effect, or only a small effect of the disease on their current life. Former patients also indicated good QoL on the physical and psychological domains of the WHOQOL-BREF, and scored significantly higher than healthy controls on these domains. There was a weak correlation between the DLQI and scar size (ρ = 0.32; p<0.001). Conclusions BU patients who report early with small lesions and receive 8 weeks of antimicrobial therapy have a good QoL at long-term follow-up. These findings contrast with the debilitating sequelae often reported in BU, and highlight the importance of early case detection. PMID:25010061

  18. Attributes of patient-centered primary care associated with the public perception of good healthcare quality in Brazil, Colombia, Mexico and El Salvador.

    PubMed

    Doubova, Svetlana V; Guanais, Frederico C; Pérez-Cuevas, Ricardo; Canning, David; Macinko, James; Reich, Michael R

    2016-09-01

    This study evaluated primary care attributes of patient-centered care associated with the public perception of good quality in Brazil, Colombia, Mexico and El Salvador. We conducted a secondary data analysis of a Latin American survey on public perceptions and experiences with healthcare systems. The primary care attributes examined were access, coordination, provider-patient communication, provision of health-related information and emotional support. A double-weighted multiple Poisson regression with robust variance model was performed. The study included between 1500 and 1503 adults in each country. The results identified four significant gaps in the provision of primary care: not all respondents had a regular place of care or a regular primary care doctor (Brazil 35.7%, Colombia 28.4%, Mexico 22% and El Salvador 45.4%). The communication with the primary care clinic was difficult (Brazil 44.2%, Colombia 41.3%, Mexico 45.1% and El Salvador 56.7%). There was a lack of coordination of care (Brazil 78.4%, Colombia 52.3%, Mexico 48% and El Salvador 55.9%). Also, there was a lack of information about healthy diet (Brazil 21.7%, Colombia 32.9%, Mexico 16.9% and El Salvador 20.8%). The public's perception of good quality was variable (Brazil 67%, Colombia 71.1%, Mexico 79.6% and El Salvador 79.5%). The primary care attributes associated with the perception of good quality were a primary care provider 'who knows relevant information about a patient's medical history', 'solves most of the health problems', 'spends enough time with the patient', 'coordinates healthcare' and a 'primary care clinic that is easy to communicate with'. In conclusion, the public has a positive perception of the quality of primary care, although it has unfulfilled expectations; further efforts are necessary to improve the provision of patient-centered primary care services in these four Latin American countries. PMID:26874326

  19. Attributes of patient-centered primary care associated with the public perception of good healthcare quality in Brazil, Colombia, Mexico and El Salvador.

    PubMed

    Doubova, Svetlana V; Guanais, Frederico C; Pérez-Cuevas, Ricardo; Canning, David; Macinko, James; Reich, Michael R

    2016-09-01

    This study evaluated primary care attributes of patient-centered care associated with the public perception of good quality in Brazil, Colombia, Mexico and El Salvador. We conducted a secondary data analysis of a Latin American survey on public perceptions and experiences with healthcare systems. The primary care attributes examined were access, coordination, provider-patient communication, provision of health-related information and emotional support. A double-weighted multiple Poisson regression with robust variance model was performed. The study included between 1500 and 1503 adults in each country. The results identified four significant gaps in the provision of primary care: not all respondents had a regular place of care or a regular primary care doctor (Brazil 35.7%, Colombia 28.4%, Mexico 22% and El Salvador 45.4%). The communication with the primary care clinic was difficult (Brazil 44.2%, Colombia 41.3%, Mexico 45.1% and El Salvador 56.7%). There was a lack of coordination of care (Brazil 78.4%, Colombia 52.3%, Mexico 48% and El Salvador 55.9%). Also, there was a lack of information about healthy diet (Brazil 21.7%, Colombia 32.9%, Mexico 16.9% and El Salvador 20.8%). The public's perception of good quality was variable (Brazil 67%, Colombia 71.1%, Mexico 79.6% and El Salvador 79.5%). The primary care attributes associated with the perception of good quality were a primary care provider 'who knows relevant information about a patient's medical history', 'solves most of the health problems', 'spends enough time with the patient', 'coordinates healthcare' and a 'primary care clinic that is easy to communicate with'. In conclusion, the public has a positive perception of the quality of primary care, although it has unfulfilled expectations; further efforts are necessary to improve the provision of patient-centered primary care services in these four Latin American countries.

  20. The value of good quality drinking water to Canadians and the role of risk perceptions: a preliminary analysis.

    PubMed

    Adamowicz, W; Dupont, Diane; Krupnick, Alan

    Canadian municipal water utilities have had to face many difficulties in the past few years, not the least of which has been an erosion of consumer confidence in the safety of publicly supplied drinking water. This paper discusses how economic theory is used to develop a methodology for determining consumers' or society's preferences for better quality drinking water and how these preferences are expressed in the trade-offs made between money and two different types of risk reductions: mortality and morbidity. These trade-offs are observed by examining actual consumer behavior and/or in structured (hypothetical) market choices. The information gained can be used to structure more efficient water pricing schemes for municipal water utilities and to aid these utilities in their infrastructure investment decisions.

  1. Cardiac rehabilitation: a good measure to improve quality of life in peri- and postmenopausal women with microvascular angina.

    PubMed

    Szot, Wojciech; Zając, Joanna; Kostkiewicz, Magdalena; Owoc, Jakub; Bojar, Iwona

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac Syndrome X (CSX) was considered a stable coronary syndrome, yet due to its nature, CSX symptoms often have a great impact on patients' Quality of Life (QoL). According to ESC 2013 stable coronary artery disease criteria, CSX was replaced by Microvascular Angina (MA).Unfortunately, most CSX or MA patients, after classical angina (involving main coronary vessels) has been ruled out, often do not receive proper treatment. Indications for pharmacological treatment of MA patients were introduced only recently. Another problematic issue is that scientists describing the pathophysiology of both CSX and MA stress a lack of a deeper insight into the multifactorial etiology of the source of pain associated with this disease. In the presented article we have attempted to study the influence of cardiac rehabilitation (3 months programme) on the QoL of patients recognized as suffering from MA, as well as to check if changes in myocardial perfusion in these patients at baseline and after completion of cardiac rehabilitation match changes in their QoL. Therefore, after screening 436 women for MA, we studied 55 of them who were confirmed as having MA and who agreed to participate in the study. Exercise tests, Myocardial Perfusion Imaging, and QoL questionnaires were studied at baseline and after completing 3 months period of cardiac rehabilitation. Results were subsequently compared, which showed a link between improved perfusion score in SPECT study and improved overall physical capacity, on one hand, and improved QoL score on the other. These results confirm that cardiac rehabilitation is a very useful treatment option for MA patients. It seems that training during cardiac rehabilitation is a very important factor (improved physical efficiency -> increase in self-belief), and that taking into consideration the multifactor pathophysiology of pain, it is connected with a better quality of life for MA patients.

  2. Absence of socioeconomic inequalities in access to good-quality breast cancer treatment within a population-wide screening programme in Turin (Italy).

    PubMed

    Zengarini, Nicolás; Ponti, Antonio; Tomatis, Mariano; Casella, Denise; Giordano, Livia; Mano, Maria P; Segnan, Nereo; Whitehead, Margaret; Costa, Giuseppe; Spadea, Teresa

    2016-11-01

    Several studies suggest that population-based breast cancer screening programmes might help reduce social inequalities in breast cancer survival both by increasing early diagnosis and by improving access to effective treatments. To start disentangling the two effects, we evaluated social inequalities in quality of treatment of screen-detected breast cancer in the city of Turin (Italy). Combining data from the Audit System on Quality of Breast Cancer Treatment and the Turin Longitudinal Study, we analysed 2700 cases in the screening target age class 50-69 diagnosed in the period 1995-2008. We selected 10 indicators of the pathway of care, relative to timeliness and appropriateness of diagnosis and treatment, and three indicators of socioeconomic position: education, occupational status and housing characteristics. For each indicator of care, relative risks of failure were estimated by robust Poisson regression models, controlling for calendar period of diagnosis, size of tumour and activity volume of the surgery units. The principal predictor of failure of the good care indicators was the calendar period of diagnosis, with a general improvement with time in the quality of diagnosis and treatment, followed by size of the tumour and volume of activity. Socioeconomic indicators show only a marginal independent effect on timeliness indicators. The observed associations of quality indicators with socioeconomic characteristics are lower than expected, suggesting a possible role of the screening programme in reducing disparities in the access to good-quality treatments thanks to its capability to enter screen-detected women into a protected pathway of care. PMID:26999379

  3. Good Quality Factor in GdMnO3-Doped (K0.5Na0.5)NbO3 Piezoelectric Ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucur, Raul Alin; Badea, Iuliana; Bucur, Alexandra Ioana; Novaconi, Stefan

    2016-06-01

    (1 - x)(K0.5Na0.5)NbO3 - xGdMnO3 (KNN- xGM) ferroelectric ceramics (0 ≤ x ≤ 5 mol.%) were obtained through a solid state technique. For all the studied compositions, orthorhombic perovskite crystalline structures were obtained at room temperature. GdMnO3 suppresses the grain growth and gives rather homogenous microstructures as the concentration increases. The doped ceramics exhibita good dielectric response, a "hard" ferroelectric behavior and good piezoelectric properties. An improved mechanical quality factor of 1180 and a high Curie temperature T C = 400°C, coupled with k p = 0.426, makes the composition x = 1 mol.% GdMnO3 suitable for lead-free piezoelectric materials for high-power and high-temperature applications.

  4. [(No) Fear of audits? Control is good, trust is better. Audits as a core element of quality management].

    PubMed

    Ertl-Wagner, B; Steinbrucker, S

    2011-10-01

    Quality management (QM) cannot be successfully implemented and performed without audits. The PDCA (Plan-Do-Check-Act) cycle is the core component of QM systems. In this cycle an audit represents the crucial step "check". Audits verify whether the performed actions and their results conform to the requirements. It is especially important to verify whether the principles of QM are omnipresent and fully implemented in a department or institution. The announcement of an audit may cause mixed feelings or even anxiety among the personnel to be audited. Without previous information and training the audit may be perceived as an act of control and intrusion into departmental affairs. The colleagues often fear sanctions if lapses are found or consider the audit to be a cross-examination. However, an audit is rather meant to be a helpful aid and a chance to continuously improve the departmental QM system by means of a constructive communication among colleagues. In the year 2009 the European Commission published guidelines for the performance of clinical audits in medical radiology, including diagnostic radiology, nuclear medicine and radiation therapy (Council Directive 97 / 43 / EURATOM). The aim is an optimal protection of the individual from the hazards of ionizing radiation and the directive expects radiological departments to perform clinical audits in accordance with national procedures.

  5. Towards good quality Bi2ZnB2O7 fibers grown by the micro-pulling down technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assi, F.; Ferriol, M.; Cochez, M.; Aillerie, M.; Ponting, B.; Maxwell, G.

    2016-10-01

    Bi2ZnB2O7 (BZBO) fibers grown by the micro-pulling down technique (μ-PD) usually present a more or less pronounced color ranging from yellow to red and a microstructure showing glassy clear parts (more concentrated in bismuth) dispersed in a darker matrix. In a previous paper, we assumed a reaction between the platinum crucible and the melt to explain both their color and microstructure. To confirm or invalidate this hypothesis, BZBO fibers were pulled under different conditions by the μ-PD or laser heated pedestal growth (LHPG) techniques. Various physical characterizations methods such as: SEM, EDS microprobe, Raman micro-spectroscopy, DTA and X-ray diffraction were performed to evaluate their crystal quality. Finally, it appears that the origin of the observed features of the fibers grown lies in the evaporation of a substantial amount of boron oxide from the melt. This leads to a shift of its composition in the ZnO-B2O3-Bi2O3 ternary system and an incongruent melting behavior. Therefore, the obtainment of colorless and transparent fibers requires very low pulling rates.

  6. A compliant-mechanism approach to achieving specific quality of motion in a lumbar total disc replacement

    PubMed Central

    Halverson, Peter A.; Bowden, Anton E.; Howell, Larry L.

    2012-01-01

    Background The current generation of total disc replacements achieves excellent short- and medium-term results by focusing on restoring the quantity of motion. Recent studies indicate that additional concerns (helical axes of motion, segmental torque-rotation behavior) may have important implications in the health of adjacent segments as well as the health of the surrounding tissue of the operative level. The objective of this article is to outline the development, validation, and biomechanical performance of a novel, compliant-mechanism total disc replacement that addresses these concerns by including them as essential design criteria. Methods Compliant-mechanism design techniques were used to design a total disc replacement capable of replicating the moment-rotation response and the location and path of the helical axis of motion. A prototype was evaluated with the use of bench-top testing and single-level cadaveric experiments in flexion-extension, lateral bending, and axial torsion. Results Bench-top testing confirmed that the moment-rotation response of the disc replacement matched the intended design behavior. Cadaveric testing confirmed that the moment-rotation and displacement response of the implanted segment mimicked those of the healthy spinal segment. Conclusions Incorporation of segmental quality of motion into the foundational stages of the design process resulted in a total disc replacement design that provides torque-rotation and helical axis–of–motion characteristics to the adjacent segments and the operative-level facets that are similar to those observed in healthy spinal segments. PMID:25694875

  7. Healthcare and Compassion: Towards an Awareness of Intersubjective Vulnerability Comment on "Why and How Is Compassion Necessary to Provide Good Quality Healthcare?".

    PubMed

    Kenny, Kate

    2015-09-01

    How to instill compassion in a healthcare organization? In this article, I respond to Marianna Fotaki's proposals in her piece, 'Why and how is compassion necessary to provide good quality healthcare?' by drawing on insights from organization studies. Following Fotaki, I argue that to instill targets and formal measures for assessing compassion would be problematic. I conclude by drawing on psychoanalytic and feminist theories to introduce alternatives, specifically proposing an approach that is grounded in a shared sense of a common, embodied precarity, which necessitates our commitment to preserving the conditions in which life might flouris.

  8. The Elusiveness of Teacher Quality: A Comparative Analysis of Teacher Certification and Student Achievement in Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiseman, Alexander W.; Al-bakr, Fawziah

    2013-01-01

    In national education systems worldwide, teacher quality has become synonymous with education reform efforts, but a more elusive goal is empirically measuring teacher quality. One proposed measure of teacher quality, teacher licensing, also known as certification, is an increasingly ubiquitous component of national education systems and…

  9. Examining the Relationship of QualityCore[R] Implementation and Student Achievement in Algebra I. ACT Research Report Series, 2012 (4)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ndum, Edwin; Allen, Jeff; Fisher, Teri

    2012-01-01

    We assessed the relationship of level of QualityCore[R] implementation and student achievement in Algebra I. The study is based on 1,291 9th grade students in three large metropolitan school districts who took EXPLORE in the fall and the QualityCore Algebra I end-of-course assessment (EOC) in the spring. During the same period, the students' 41…

  10. Good Laboratory Practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadjicostas, Evsevios

    The principles of Good Laboratory Practice (GLP) in conjunction with the principles of Total Quality Management (see chapter 6) ensure the quality and reliability of the laboratory results, which in turn help to ensure the protection of the environment and human health and safety. A step further is the accreditation of laboratories to ISO 17025 (see chapter 2) to perform specified activities.

  11. Educational Quality Is Measured by Individual Student Achievement Over Time. Mt. San Antonio College AB 1725 Model Accountability System Pilot Proposal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mount San Antonio Coll., Walnut, CA.

    In December 1990, a project was begun at Mt. San Antonio College (MSAC) in Walnut, California, to develop a model accountability system based on the belief that educational quality is measured by individual achievement over time. This proposal for the Accountability Model (AM) presents information on project methodology and organization in four…

  12. An Analysis of the Entropy Index Diversity Scores of Selected North Carolina Urban High Schools and the Impact on Teacher Quality, Student Achievement, and Graduation Rates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Robert Pernell

    2009-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to examine the differences in teacher quality, student achievement, and graduation rates among select North Carolina urban high schools based on their racial segregation when measured by the entropy index. The entropy index is a measure of evenness among racial groups used to determine the level of segregation…

  13. Achieving Quality Care at the End of Life: A Focus of the End-of-Life Nursing Education Consortium (ELNEC) Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherman, Deborah Witt; Matzo, Marianne LaPorte; Rogers, Susan; McLaughlin, Maureen; Virani, Rose

    2002-01-01

    Describes one of nine modules in the End-of-Life Nursing Education Consortium Curriculum, a train-the-trainer course to prepare nurses for palliative care. Discuses teaching strategies to achieve high-quality care and includes a list of print and web resources. (SK)

  14. States Now Collect Quality Data but Need to Act to Improve Student Achievement. Data for Action 2010: DQC's State Analysis. National Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Data Quality Campaign, 2011

    2011-01-01

    As state policymakers strive to ensure that every student is taught by an effective teacher and is ready for college and 21st-century careers, they must also make drastic budget cuts. States cannot do more with less without collecting and using quality data to determine which programs and policies increase student achievement and the state's…

  15. The Social Reconstructionist Approach to Teacher Education: A Necessary Component to Achieving Excellence and Quality Education for All

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayne, Hope

    2014-01-01

    Improving all aspects of the quality of education is dependent on preparing teachers to become critical citizens. The social reconstructionist approach to teacher education is essential to transforming an education system defined by inequity, issues of quality, and issues of access. How do pre-service teachers perceive the mission of quality…

  16. Achievements and Consequences of Two Decades of Quality Assurance in Higher Education: A Personal View from the Edge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houston, Don

    2010-01-01

    While the past two decades have seen significant expansion and harmonisation of quality assurance mechanisms in higher education, there is limited evidence of positive effects on the quality of core processes of teaching and learning. The paradox of the separation of assurance from improvement is explored. A shift in focus from surveillance to…

  17. School Quality, Achievement Bias, and Dropout Behavior in Egypt. Living Standards Measurement Study (LSMS) Working Paper No. 107.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanushek, Eric A.; Lavy, Victor

    This paper demonstrates the analytical importance of employing output-based measures of school quality. The empirical analysis employs data collected in a longitudinal survey of primary school students in Egypt during 2 academic years, 1978-79 and 1979-80. School quality and grade completion are shown to be directly linked, leading to very…

  18. Good Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoenheimer, Henry P.

    This book contains seventeen thumb-nail sketches of schools in Europe, the United States, Asia, Britain, and Australia, as they appeared in the eye of the author as a professional educator and a journalist while travelling around the world. The author considers the schools described to be good schools, and not necessarily the 17 best schools in…

  19. Under which conditions can introverts achieve happiness? Mediation and moderation effects of the quality of social relationships and emotion regulation ability on happiness.

    PubMed

    Cabello, Rosario; Fernandez-Berrocal, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Personality traits have been directly associated with happiness. One consistent finding is a strong link between extraversion and happiness: extraverts are happier than introverts. Although happy introverts exist, it is currently unclear under what conditions they can achieve happiness. The present study analyzes, generally, how the quality of social relationships and emotion regulation ability influence happiness and, specifically, how these factors can lead introverts to be happy. In the present study, 1,006 participants aged 18-80 (42% males) completed measures of extraversion, neuroticism, quality of social relationships, emotion regulation ability, and happiness. We found that extraverts had significantly higher happiness, quality of social relationships and emotion regulation ability scores than introverts. In addition, people with high quality social relationships or high emotion regulation ability were happier. Serial mediation analyses indicated that greater levels of extraversion were associated with greater happiness, with small effect size, via two indirect mechanisms: (a) higher quality of social relationships, and (b) higher quality of social relationships followed serially by higher emotion regulation ability. We also found a moderating effect due to the three-way interaction of extraversion, quality of social relationships, and emotion regulation ability: introverts were happier when they had high scores for these two variables, though the effect size was small. These results suggest that the quality of social relationships and emotion regulation ability are relevant to our understanding of complex associations between extraversion and happiness.

  20. Under which conditions can introverts achieve happiness? Mediation and moderation effects of the quality of social relationships and emotion regulation ability on happiness

    PubMed Central

    Cabello, Rosario

    2015-01-01

    Personality traits have been directly associated with happiness. One consistent finding is a strong link between extraversion and happiness: extraverts are happier than introverts. Although happy introverts exist, it is currently unclear under what conditions they can achieve happiness. The present study analyzes, generally, how the quality of social relationships and emotion regulation ability influence happiness and, specifically, how these factors can lead introverts to be happy. In the present study, 1,006 participants aged 18–80 (42% males) completed measures of extraversion, neuroticism, quality of social relationships, emotion regulation ability, and happiness. We found that extraverts had significantly higher happiness, quality of social relationships and emotion regulation ability scores than introverts. In addition, people with high quality social relationships or high emotion regulation ability were happier. Serial mediation analyses indicated that greater levels of extraversion were associated with greater happiness, with small effect size, via two indirect mechanisms: (a) higher quality of social relationships, and (b) higher quality of social relationships followed serially by higher emotion regulation ability. We also found a moderating effect due to the three-way interaction of extraversion, quality of social relationships, and emotion regulation ability: introverts were happier when they had high scores for these two variables, though the effect size was small. These results suggest that the quality of social relationships and emotion regulation ability are relevant to our understanding of complex associations between extraversion and happiness. PMID:26500814

  1. Good Stewards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    French, Jim; Oathout, Rod

    2008-01-01

    Education institutions perpetually are challenged to deliver high-quality education with limited budgets. Part of an institution's success depends on finding creative solutions to reduce building operational costs and still provide an environment that promotes learning. With the recent spikes in energy costs and increased focus on environmental…

  2. Dose reduction of up to 89% while maintaining image quality in cardiovascular CT achieved with prospective ECG gating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Londt, John H.; Shreter, Uri; Vass, Melissa; Hsieh, Jiang; Ge, Zhanyu; Adda, Olivier; Dowe, David A.; Sabllayrolles, Jean-Louis

    2007-03-01

    We present the results of dose and image quality performance evaluation of a novel, prospective ECG-gated Coronary CT Angiography acquisition mode (SnapShot Pulse, LightSpeed VCT-XT scanner, GE Healthcare, Waukesha, WI), and compare it to conventional retrospective ECG gated helical acquisition in clinical and phantom studies. Image quality phantoms were used to measure noise, slice sensitivity profile, in-plane resolution, low contrast detectability and dose, using the two acquisition modes. Clinical image quality and diagnostic confidence were evaluated in a study of 31 patients scanned with the two acquisition modes. Radiation dose reduction in clinical practice was evaluated by tracking 120 consecutive patients scanned with the prospectively gated scan mode. In the phantom measurements, the prospectively gated mode resulted in equivalent or better image quality measures at dose reductions of up to 89% compared to non-ECG modulated conventional helical scans. In the clinical study, image quality was rated excellent by expert radiologist reviewing the cases, with pathology being identical using the two acquisition modes. The average dose to patients in the clinical practice study was 5.6 mSv, representing 50% reduction compared to a similar patient population scanned with the conventional helical mode.

  3. Effects of Extracurricular Activities and Their Quality on Primary School-Age Students' Achievement in Mathematics in Switzerland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuepbach, Marianne

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we examined the development of mathematics achievement in children attending extracurricular activities intensively in comparison with the development in a control group of children attending only the obligatory hours of school instruction. In addition, we investigated the question of possible effects of intensity of attendance and…

  4. Using Performance Management To Achieve Quality Program Results. A Technical Assistance Guide. Research Report 89-03.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laventhol & Horwath, Philadelphia, PA.

    This guide provides assistance in using two primary management tools--the performance standards and performance-based, fixed unit price contracts--to achieve satisfactory results in Job Training Partnership Act (JTPA) programs. The guide is organized in six chapters. Chapter 1 reviews the original purpose of the JTPA and introduces the investment…

  5. Testing the Digital Divide: Does Access to High-Quality Use of Technology in Schools Affect Student Achievement?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talley, Gregory Keith

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the relationship between access, use of technology and student achievement in public middle schools in Maryland. The objective of this study was to determine whether a digital divide (differences in access and utilization of technology based on student characteristics of race, socioeconomic status, and gender) exists among…

  6. High-Quality 21st Century Community Learning Centers: Academic Achievement among Frequent Participants and Non-Participants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holstead, Jenell; King, Mindy Hightower

    2011-01-01

    This study examined academic differences between students who attended 21st Century Community Learning Center (CCLC) programs frequently (60 or more days) and matched nonattendees during the 2008-2009 school year. Schools included in the study represented only those centers found to be implementing high-quality programming, as measured by a…

  7. Gathering Feedback for Teaching: Combining High-Quality Observations with Student Surveys and Achievement Gains. Research Paper. MET Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kane, Thomas J.; Staiger, Douglas O.

    2012-01-01

    There is a growing consensus that teacher evaluation in the United States is fundamentally broken. Few would argue that a system that tells 98 percent of teachers they are "satisfactory" benefits anyone--including teachers. The nation's collective failure to invest in high-quality professional feedback to teachers is inconsistent with…

  8. An Examination of the Impact of Teacher Quality and "Opportunity Gap" on Student Science Achievement in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Danhui; Campbell, Todd

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to better understand questions related to the impact of teacher quality and access to qualified teachers in China. A large-scale data set collected in 2010 in China was used along with concurrently collected teacher questionnaires. In total, surveys from 9,943 8th grade students from 343 middle schools in 6 provinces were used,…

  9. The Contribution of Mathematics Instructional Quality and Class Size to Student Achievement for Third Grade Students from Low Income Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merritt, Eileen G.; Rimm-Kaufman, Sara E.; Berry, Robert Q.; Walkowiak, Temple A.; Larsen, Ross A. A.

    2011-01-01

    Classroom observational measures can provide information about high quality student-teacher interactions, allowing researchers to consider the impacts of these practices on student outcomes. Such measures can take a "process-oriented approach" that considers the nature of interactions between teachers and students, such as the sensitivity of…

  10. Good Data Can Be Better Data - How Data Management Maturity Can Help Repositories Improve Operations, Data Quality, And Usability, Helping Researchers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stall, S.

    2015-12-01

    Much earth and space science data and metadata are managed and supported by an infrastructure of repositories, ranging from large agency or instrument facilities, to institutions, to smaller repositories including labs. Scientists face many challenges in this ecosystem both on storing their data and in accessing data from others for new research. Critical for all uses is ensuring the credibility and integrity of the data and conveying that and provenance information now and in the future. Accurate information is essential for future researchers to find (or discover) the data, evaluate the data for use (content, temporal, geolocation, precision) and finally select (or discard) that data as meeting a "fit-for-purpose" criteria. We also need to optimize the effort it takes in describing the data for these determinations, which means making it efficient for the researchers who collect the data. At AGU we are developing a program aimed at helping repositories, and thereby researchers, improve data quality and data usability toward these goals. AGU has partnered with the CMMI Institute to develop their Data Management Maturity (DMM) framework within the Earth and space sciences. The CMMI DMM framework guides best practices in a range of data operations, and the application of the DMM, through an assessment, reveals how repositories and institutions can best optimize efforts to improve operations and functionality throughout the data lifecycle and elevate best practices across a variety of data management operations. Supporting processes like data operations, data governance, and data architecture are included. An assessment involves identifying accomplishment, and weaknesses compared to leading practices for data management. Broad application of the DMM can help improve quality in data and operations, and consistency across the community that will facilitate interoperability, discovery, preservation, and reuse. Good data can be better data. Consistency results in

  11. "Good mothering" or "good citizenship"?

    PubMed

    Porter, Maree; Kerridge, Ian H; Jordens, Christopher F C

    2012-03-01

    Umbilical cord blood banking is one of many biomedical innovations that confront pregnant women with new choices about what they should do to secure their own and their child's best interests. Many mothers can now choose to donate their baby's umbilical cord blood (UCB) to a public cord blood bank or pay to store it in a private cord blood bank. Donation to a public bank is widely regarded as an altruistic act of civic responsibility. Paying to store UCB may be regarded as a "unique opportunity" to provide "insurance" for the child's future. This paper reports findings from a survey of Australian women that investigated the decision to either donate or store UCB. We conclude that mothers are faced with competing discourses that force them to choose between being a "good mother" and fulfilling their role as a "good citizen." We discuss this finding with reference to the concept of value pluralism. PMID:23180199

  12. "Good mothering" or "good citizenship"?

    PubMed

    Porter, Maree; Kerridge, Ian H; Jordens, Christopher F C

    2012-03-01

    Umbilical cord blood banking is one of many biomedical innovations that confront pregnant women with new choices about what they should do to secure their own and their child's best interests. Many mothers can now choose to donate their baby's umbilical cord blood (UCB) to a public cord blood bank or pay to store it in a private cord blood bank. Donation to a public bank is widely regarded as an altruistic act of civic responsibility. Paying to store UCB may be regarded as a "unique opportunity" to provide "insurance" for the child's future. This paper reports findings from a survey of Australian women that investigated the decision to either donate or store UCB. We conclude that mothers are faced with competing discourses that force them to choose between being a "good mother" and fulfilling their role as a "good citizen." We discuss this finding with reference to the concept of value pluralism.

  13. Ensuring good governance to address emerging and re-emerging animal disease threats: supporting the veterinary services of developing countries to meet OIE international standards on quality.

    PubMed

    Vallat, B; Mallet, E

    2006-04-01

    As an effect of increased globalisation, animal diseases, in particular those transmissible to man, have an immediate global economic and social impact. This fact, dramatically illustrated by the current avian influenza epizootic in South-East Asia and Eastern Europe, clearly demonstrates the crucial importance of the national Veterinary Services (VS) for the prevention, early detection and response for the efficient control of animal diseases. Complying with this mission for the VS presupposes the existence of appropriate governance and legislation and of an official system to control their quality and reliability- an obvious weakness in many developing and in transition countries. The World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) has therefore developed a project aiming at strengthening the VS in those countries facing the greatest animal health threats and to bring them into line with OIE international standards already adopted by the same countries. Based on the evaluation of the VS and subsequent actions at the global, regional and national levels, the project will have a significant beneficial impact on the targeted countries as well as the international community as a whole, not only in the fields of agriculture, food security and production, and food safety, but also for the local and global prevention of emerging and re-emerging diseases of veterinary and public health importance. The project will be implemented in strong collaboration with the Food and Agriculture Organization. The actions proposed must be considered eligible for the concept of International Public Good. PMID:16796063

  14. Mercury and water-quality data from Rink Creek, Salmon River, and Good River, Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve, Alaska, November 2009-October 2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nagorski, Sonia A.; Neal, Edward G.; Brabets, Timothy P.

    2013-01-01

    Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve (GBNPP), Alaska, like many pristine high latitude areas, is exposed to atmospherically deposited contaminants such as mercury (Hg). Although the harmful effects of Hg are well established, information on this contaminant in southeast Alaska is scarce. Here, we assess the level of this contaminant in several aquatic components (water, sediments, and biological tissue) in three adjacent, small streams in GBNPP that drain contrasting landscapes but receive similar atmospheric inputs: Rink Creek, Salmon River, and Good River. Twenty water samples were collected from 2009 to 2011 and processed and analyzed for total mercury and methylmercury (filtered and particulate), and dissolved organic carbon quantity and quality. Ancillary stream water parameters (discharge, pH, dissolved oxygen, specific conductance, and temperature) were measured at the time of sampling. Major cations, anions, and nutrients were measured four times. In addition, total mercury was analyzed in streambed sediment in 2010 and in juvenile coho salmon and several taxa of benthic macroinvertebrates in the early summer of 2010 and 2011.

  15. Ensuring good governance to address emerging and re-emerging animal disease threats: supporting the veterinary services of developing countries to meet OIE international standards on quality.

    PubMed

    Vallat, B; Mallet, E

    2006-04-01

    As an effect of increased globalisation, animal diseases, in particular those transmissible to man, have an immediate global economic and social impact. This fact, dramatically illustrated by the current avian influenza epizootic in South-East Asia and Eastern Europe, clearly demonstrates the crucial importance of the national Veterinary Services (VS) for the prevention, early detection and response for the efficient control of animal diseases. Complying with this mission for the VS presupposes the existence of appropriate governance and legislation and of an official system to control their quality and reliability- an obvious weakness in many developing and in transition countries. The World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) has therefore developed a project aiming at strengthening the VS in those countries facing the greatest animal health threats and to bring them into line with OIE international standards already adopted by the same countries. Based on the evaluation of the VS and subsequent actions at the global, regional and national levels, the project will have a significant beneficial impact on the targeted countries as well as the international community as a whole, not only in the fields of agriculture, food security and production, and food safety, but also for the local and global prevention of emerging and re-emerging diseases of veterinary and public health importance. The project will be implemented in strong collaboration with the Food and Agriculture Organization. The actions proposed must be considered eligible for the concept of International Public Good.

  16. Substantial Improvements in Performance Indicators Achieved in a Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cell Cryopreservation Quality Assurance Program Using Single Donor Samples▿

    PubMed Central

    Dyer, Wayne B.; Pett, Sarah L.; Sullivan, John S.; Emery, Sean; Cooper, David A.; Kelleher, Anthony D.; Lloyd, Andrew; Lewin, Sharon R.

    2007-01-01

    Storage of high-quality cryopreserved peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) is often a requirement for multicenter clinical trials and requires a reproducibly high standard of practice. A quality assurance program (QAP) was established to assess an Australia-wide network of laboratories in the provision of high-quality PBMC (determined by yield, viability, and function), using blood taken from single donors (human immunodeficiency virus [HIV] positive and HIV negative) and shipped to each site for preparation and cryopreservation of PBMC. The aim of the QAP was to provide laboratory accreditation for participation in clinical trials and cohort studies which require preparation and cryopreservation of PBMC and to assist all laboratories to prepare PBMC with a viability of >80% and yield of >50% following thawing. Many laboratories failed to reach this standard on the initial QAP round. Interventions to improve performance included telephone interviews with the staff at each laboratory, two annual wet workshops, and direct access to a senior scientist to discuss performance following each QAP round. Performance improved substantially in the majority of sites that initially failed the QAP (P = 0.002 and P = 0.001 for viability and yield, respectively). In a minority of laboratories, there was no improvement (n = 2), while a high standard was retained at the laboratories that commenced with adequate performance (n = 3). These findings demonstrate that simple interventions and monitoring of PBMC preparation and cryopreservation from multiple laboratories can significantly improve performance and contribute to maintenance of a network of laboratories accredited for quality PBMC fractionation and cryopreservation. PMID:17050740

  17. [MBL quality control survey of autoantibodies--25 years of activity and its achievement--mainly antinuclear antibodies].

    PubMed

    Tsunekawa, Shinji; Arai, Jiro; Ishihara, Yasushi; Fujii, Yoshihisa

    2010-02-01

    Annual MBL Quality Control Survey of Autoantibodies has continued to this day since it started in 1983 as the only quality control survey of autoantibodies in Japan. The survey has aimed at unification and standardization of measurement value, as well as finding out between-laboratory differences in results through reporting the results of tabulation to the participating laboratories. For carrying out the survey, we intend to make our efforts to promote assurance and standardization of the quality control of the autoantibodies. The number of participant on this survey has been increasing every year and more than 500 laboratories participate not only in Japan but also from Asia and European countries. The laboratories that participated in this survey are the ones that usually perform ANA test, anti-DNA antibodies test, anti-ENA antibodies test, AMA test, ASMA test, anti-cardiolipin antibodies test and anti-CCP antibodies test. The purpose of the survey is to standardize antinuclear antibodies testing value in semi quantitative assay using ANA control serum or our titer control HEPASERA-1. We got 12% increase from 79% to 91% in 1986 using ANA control serum. Additionally, we reached 97% (86% to 97%) of convergence in 2001 by using HEPASERA-1, which contains 4 major pattern titer controls from 1993. In 2007, coefficient of variation (CV) for anti-dsDNA antibodies was 13%, showing better result than 25% of the first survey in 1993. We started secondary survey for laboratories which reported a result far apart. In the secondary survey, we made investigation for cause and improvement action. We conclude quality control survey is useful for autoantibodies testing for its result convergence.

  18. The Good Mentor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowley, James B.

    1999-01-01

    There are six basic qualities of good mentoring: commitment to the mentoring role, acceptance of beginning teachers, proficiency at providing instructional support, interpersonal effectiveness, skill at modeling continuous learning, and ability to communicate hope and optimism. A sidebar explains the Mentoring Leadership and Resource network. (10…

  19. Good Vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    A Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) sponsorship from NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, assisted MetroLaser, of Irvine, California, in the development of a self-aligned laser vibrometer system. VibroMet, capable of measuring surface vibrations in a variety of industries, provides information on the structural integrity and acoustical characteristics of manufactured products. This low-cost, easy-to-use sensor performs vibration measurement from distances of up to three meters without the need for adjustment. The laser beam is simply pointed at the target and the system then uses a compact laser diode to illuminate the surface and to subsequently analyze the reflected light. The motion of the surface results in a Doppler shift that is measured with very high precision. VibroMet is considered one of the many behind-the-scenes tools that can be relied on to assure the quality, reliability and safety of everything from airplane panels to disk brakes

  20. [Historical and Hygienic Aspects on Roles of Quality Requirements for Antibiotic Products in Japan: Part 2--Achievements of Domestic Production of Penicillin and Streptomycin].

    PubMed

    Yagisawa, Morimasa; Foster, Patrick J; Kurokawa, Tatsuo

    2015-01-01

    Domestic production of penicillin was initiated in 1946 and that of streptomycin in 1950. In the early days, however, the quality of products was considerably lower and the capacity of production small. Surprisingly, there was a sufficient amount of penicillin preparations, with a purity of 85% or more, satisfying domestic demand within three years (1949). In the case of streptomycin, within three years (1953), preparations with a purity two-fold higher than initially available were produced in amounts sufficient to meet both domestic demand and create a surplus availability for exporting purposes. Such increases in quality and production were considered to be made possible by strict quality control of penicillin and streptomycin preparations, based on "Minimum Requirements for Penicillin" established in May 1947 and "Minimum Requirements for Streptomycin" established in December 1949. These requirements were also amended over time in order to provide even higher quality standards in response to the evolving improvements in production processes. Life-threatening diseases such as septicemia and pneumonia were controlled by the sufficient supply of high-quality penicillin preparations and the mortality rate of tuberculosis, regarded as a national disease at the time, markedly decreased by that of streptomycin preparations. Achievements of domestic production of penicillin and streptomycin were considered important factors that contributed greatly to the maintenance of public health in Japan.

  1. Application of WHO ‘Near-Miss’ Tool Indicates Good Quality of Maternal Care in Rural Healthcare Setting in Uttarakhand, Northern India

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Debabrata; Aggarwal, Pradeep; Nautiyal, Ruchira; Chaturvedi, Jaya; Kakkar, Rakesh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Women who experienced and survived a severe health condition during pregnancy, childbirth or postpartum are considered as ‘near-miss’ or severe acute maternal morbidity (SAMM) cases. Women who survive life-threatening conditions arising from complications related to pregnancy and childbirth have many common aspects with those who die of such complications. Aim To evaluate health-care facility preparedness and perfor-mance in reducing severe maternal out comes at all levels of health care. Materials and Methods The present study was carried out over a period of 12 months under the Department of Community Medicine. The cross-sectional study included all the women (937) attending health-care facilities, at all levels of health care i.e. Primary, Secondary & Tertiary level in Doiwala block of Dehradun district. This study was conducted as per the WHO criteria for ‘near-miss’ by using probability sampling for random selection of health facilities. All eligible study subjects visiting health-care facilities during the study period were included, i.e. who were pregnant, in labour, or who had delivered or aborted up to 42 days ago. Results It was found that all women delivering at the THC received oxytocin to prevent postpartum haemorrhage. Treatment of severe post-partum haemorrhage by removal of retained products was significantly associated with levels of health care. Majority (94.73%) women who had eclampsia received magnesium sulfate as primary treatment. Conclusion Application of WHO ‘near-miss’ tool indicates good quality of maternal care in rural healthcare setting in Uttarakhand, North India. The women would have otherwise died due to obstetrics complications, had proper care not been provided to them in time. PMID:26894094

  2. Chia Seed Shows Good Protein Quality, Hypoglycemic Effect and Improves the Lipid Profile and Liver and Intestinal Morphology of Wistar Rats.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Bárbara Pereira; Dias, Desirrê Morais; de Castro Moreira, Maria Eliza; Toledo, Renata Celi Lopes; da Matta, Sérgio Luis Pinto; Lucia, Ceres Mattos Della; Martino, Hércia Stampini Duarte; Pinheiro-Sant'Ana, Helena Maria

    2016-09-01

    Chia has been consumed by the world population due to its high fiber, lipids and proteins content. The objective was to evaluate the protein quality of chia untreated (seed and flour) and heat treated (90 °C/20 min), their influence on glucose and lipid homeostasis and integrity of liver and intestinal morphology of Wistar rats. 36 male rats, weanling, divided into six groups which received control diet (casein), free protein diet (aproteic) and four diet tests (chia seed; chia seed with heat treatment; chia flour and chia flour with heat treatment) for 14 days were used. The protein efficiency ratio (PER), net protein ratio (NPR) and true digestibility (TD) were evaluated. The biochemical variables and liver and intestinal morphologies of animals were determined. The values of PER, NPR and TD did not differ among the animals that were fed with chia and were lower than the control group. The animals that were fed with chia showed lower concentrations of glucose; triacylglycerides, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and very low-density lipoprotein and higher high-density lipoprotein cholesterol than the control group. The liver weight of animals that were fed with chia was lower than the control group. Crypt depth and thickness of intestinal muscle layers were higher in groups that were fed with chia. The consumption of chia has shown good digestibility, hypoglycemic effect, improved lipid and glycemic profiles and reduced fat deposition in liver of animals, and also promoted changes in intestinal tissue that enhanced its functionality. PMID:27193017

  3. Chia Seed Shows Good Protein Quality, Hypoglycemic Effect and Improves the Lipid Profile and Liver and Intestinal Morphology of Wistar Rats.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Bárbara Pereira; Dias, Desirrê Morais; de Castro Moreira, Maria Eliza; Toledo, Renata Celi Lopes; da Matta, Sérgio Luis Pinto; Lucia, Ceres Mattos Della; Martino, Hércia Stampini Duarte; Pinheiro-Sant'Ana, Helena Maria

    2016-09-01

    Chia has been consumed by the world population due to its high fiber, lipids and proteins content. The objective was to evaluate the protein quality of chia untreated (seed and flour) and heat treated (90 °C/20 min), their influence on glucose and lipid homeostasis and integrity of liver and intestinal morphology of Wistar rats. 36 male rats, weanling, divided into six groups which received control diet (casein), free protein diet (aproteic) and four diet tests (chia seed; chia seed with heat treatment; chia flour and chia flour with heat treatment) for 14 days were used. The protein efficiency ratio (PER), net protein ratio (NPR) and true digestibility (TD) were evaluated. The biochemical variables and liver and intestinal morphologies of animals were determined. The values of PER, NPR and TD did not differ among the animals that were fed with chia and were lower than the control group. The animals that were fed with chia showed lower concentrations of glucose; triacylglycerides, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and very low-density lipoprotein and higher high-density lipoprotein cholesterol than the control group. The liver weight of animals that were fed with chia was lower than the control group. Crypt depth and thickness of intestinal muscle layers were higher in groups that were fed with chia. The consumption of chia has shown good digestibility, hypoglycemic effect, improved lipid and glycemic profiles and reduced fat deposition in liver of animals, and also promoted changes in intestinal tissue that enhanced its functionality.

  4. Core-shell magnetite-silica dithiocarbamate-derivatised particles achieve the Water Framework Directive quality criteria for mercury in surface waters.

    PubMed

    Lopes, C B; Figueira, P; Tavares, D S; Lin, Z; Daniel-da-Silva, A L; Duarte, A C; Rocha, J; Trindade, T; Pereira, E

    2013-09-01

    The sorption capacity of nanoporous titanosilicate Engelhard titanosilicate number 4 (ETS-4) and silica-coated magnetite particles derivatised with dithiocarbamate groups towards Hg(II) was evaluated and compared in spiked ultra-pure and spiked surface-river water, for different batch factors. In the former, and using a batch factor of 100 m(3)/kg and an initial Hg(II) concentrations matching the maximum allowed concentration in an effluent discharge, both materials achieve Hg(II) uptake efficiencies in excess of 99 % and a residual metal concentration lower than the guideline value for drinking water quality. For the surface-river water and the same initial concentration, the Hg(II) uptake efficiency of magnetite particles is outstanding, achieving the quality criteria established by the Water Framework Directive (concerning Hg concentration in surface waters) using a batch factor of 50 m(3)/kg, while the efficiency of ETS-4 is significantly inferior. The dissimilar sorbents' Hg(II) removal efficiency is attributed to different uptake mechanisms. This study also highlights the importance of assessing the effective capacity of the sorbents under realistic conditions in order to achieve trustable results.

  5. In pursuit of high-value healthcare: the case for improving quality and achieving equity in a time of healthcare transformation.

    PubMed

    Betancourt, Joseph R

    2014-01-01

    The passage of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and current efforts in payment reform signal the beginning of a significant transformation for the US healthcare system. As we embark on this transformation, disparities have emerged as the hallmark of low-value healthcare--care that does not meet quality standards, is inefficient, and is usually of high cost. A new set of structures is being developed to facilitate increased access to care that is cost-effective and high in quality--otherwise known as high-value healthcare. Addressing disparities and achieving equity are the perfect target areas for recouping value, and doing so will pave the way for high-value healthcare. As healthcare leaders make difficult choices, they should consider the realities of healthcare equity. First, racial and ethnic disparities in healthcare persist and are a clear sign of poor-quality, low-value healthcare. Second, the root causes of these disparities are complex, but a well-developed set of evidence-based approaches is available to help leaders address healthcare inequity. Third, evidence suggests that being inattentive to the root causes of disparities adversely affects efficiency and an organization's bottom line. Finally, if healthcare organizations are progressive, thoughtful, and prepared for success in such an environment, a new healthcare system that offers accessible, high-value, equitable, culturally competent, and high-quality care to all is well within reach. PMID:25291891

  6. In pursuit of high-value healthcare: the case for improving quality and achieving equity in a time of healthcare transformation.

    PubMed

    Betancourt, Joseph R

    2014-01-01

    The passage of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and current efforts in payment reform signal the beginning of a significant transformation for the US healthcare system. As we embark on this transformation, disparities have emerged as the hallmark of low-value healthcare--care that does not meet quality standards, is inefficient, and is usually of high cost. A new set of structures is being developed to facilitate increased access to care that is cost-effective and high in quality--otherwise known as high-value healthcare. Addressing disparities and achieving equity are the perfect target areas for recouping value, and doing so will pave the way for high-value healthcare. As healthcare leaders make difficult choices, they should consider the realities of healthcare equity. First, racial and ethnic disparities in healthcare persist and are a clear sign of poor-quality, low-value healthcare. Second, the root causes of these disparities are complex, but a well-developed set of evidence-based approaches is available to help leaders address healthcare inequity. Third, evidence suggests that being inattentive to the root causes of disparities adversely affects efficiency and an organization's bottom line. Finally, if healthcare organizations are progressive, thoughtful, and prepared for success in such an environment, a new healthcare system that offers accessible, high-value, equitable, culturally competent, and high-quality care to all is well within reach.

  7. SU-E-J-126: Respiratory Gating Quality Assurance: A Simple Method to Achieve Millisecond Temporal Resolution

    SciTech Connect

    McCabe, B; Wiersma, R

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Low temporal latency between a gating on/off signal and a linac beam on/off during respiratory gating is critical for patient safety. Although, a measurement of temporal lag is recommended by AAPM Task Group 142 for commissioning and annual quality assurance, there currently exists no published method. Here we describe a simple, inexpensive, and reliable method to precisely measure gating lag at millisecond resolutions. Methods: A Varian Real-time Position Management™ (RPM) gating simulator with rotating disk was modified with a resistive flex sensor (Spectra Symbol) attached to the gating box platform. A photon diode was placed at machine isocenter. Output signals of the flex sensor and diode were monitored with a multichannel oscilloscope (Tektronix™ DPO3014). Qualitative inspection of the gating window/beam on synchronicity were made by setting the linac to beam on/off at end-expiration, and the oscilloscope's temporal window to 100 ms to visually examine if the on/off timing was within the recommended 100-ms tolerance. Quantitative measurements were made by saving the signal traces and analyzing in MatLab™. The on and off of the beam signal were located and compared to the expected gating window (e.g. 40% to 60%). Four gating cycles were measured and compared. Results: On a Varian TrueBeam™ STx linac with RPM gating software, the average difference in synchronicity at beam on and off for four cycles was 14 ms (3 to 30 ms) and 11 ms (2 to 32 ms), respectively. For a Varian Clinac™ 21EX the average difference at beam on and off was 127 ms (122 to 133 ms) and 46 ms (42 to 49 ms), respectively. The uncertainty in the synchrony difference was estimated at ±6 ms. Conclusion: This new gating QA method is easy to implement and allows for fast qualitative inspection and quantitative measurements for commissioning and TG-142 annual QA measurements.

  8. Information-seeking Behavior During Residency Is Associated With Quality of Theoretical Learning, Academic Career Achievements, and Evidence-based Medical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Oussalah, Abderrahim; Fournier, Jean-Paul; Guéant, Jean-Louis; Braun, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Data regarding knowledge acquisition during residency training are sparse. Predictors of theoretical learning quality, academic career achievements and evidence-based medical practice during residency are unknown. We performed a cross-sectional study on residents and attending physicians across several residency programs in 2 French faculties of medicine. We comprehensively evaluated the information-seeking behavior (I-SB) during residency using a standardized questionnaire and looked for independent predictors of theoretical learning quality, academic career achievements, and evidence-based medical practice among I-SB components using multivariate logistic regression analysis. Between February 2013 and May 2013, 338 fellows and attending physicians were included in the study. Textbooks and international medical journals were reported to be used on a regular basis by 24% and 57% of the respondents, respectively. Among the respondents, 47% refer systematically (4.4%) or frequently (42.6%) to published guidelines from scientific societies upon their publication. The median self-reported theoretical learning quality score was 5/10 (interquartile range, 3–6; range, 1–10). A high theoretical learning quality score (upper quartile) was independently and strongly associated with the following I-SB components: systematic reading of clinical guidelines upon their publication (odds ratio [OR], 5.55; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.77–17.44); having access to a library that offers the leading textbooks of the specialty in the medical department (OR, 2.45, 95% CI, 1.33–4.52); knowledge of the specialty leading textbooks (OR, 2.12; 95% CI, 1.09–4.10); and PubMed search skill score ≥5/10 (OR, 1.94; 95% CI, 1.01–3.73). Research Master (M2) and/or PhD thesis enrolment were independently and strongly associated with the following predictors: PubMed search skill score ≥5/10 (OR, 4.10; 95% CI, 1.46–11.53); knowledge of the leading medical journals of the

  9. Quality of life outcomes from the Exercise and Nutrition Enhance Recovery and Good Health for You (ENERGY)-randomized weight loss trial among breast cancer survivors

    PubMed Central

    Colditz, Graham A.; Rock, Cheryl L.; Sedjo, Rebecca L.; Liu, Jingxia; Wolin, Kathleen Y.; Krontiras, Helen; Byers, Tim; Pakiz, Bilgé; Parker, Barbara A.; Naughton, Michael; Elias, Anthony; Ganz, Patricia A.

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is a poor prognostic factor and is negatively related to quality of life (QOL) in breast cancer survivors. Exercise and Nutrition to Enhance Recovery and Good Health for You is the largest weight loss trial completed among cancer survivors. Percent losses in body weight with an intensive group-based intervention versus an attention control were 6.0 versus 1.5 % (p < 0.0001) and 3.7 versus 1.3 % (p<0.0001) at 12 and 24 months, respectively. ENERGY also was designed to answer the research question: Does weight loss significantly improve vitality and physical function (key components of QOL)? 692 breast cancer survivors (BMI: 25–45 kg/m2) at 4 US sites were randomized to a year-long intensive intervention of 52 group sessions and telephone counseling contacts versus a non-intensive (control) of two in-person counseling sessions. Weight, self-reported QOL, and symptoms were measured semi-annually for two years. Significant decreases in physical function and increases in symptoms were observed among controls from baseline to 6 months, but not in the intervention arm, −3.45 (95 % Confidence Interval [CI] −6.10, –0.79, p = 0.0109) and 0.10 (95 %CI 0.04, 0.16, p = 0.0021), respectively. Improvements in vitality were seen in both arms but trended toward greater improvement in the intervention arm −2.72 (95 % CI −5.45, 0.01, p = 0.0508). These differences diminished over time; however, depressive symptoms increased in the intervention versus control arms and became significant at 24 months, −1.64 (95 % CI −3.13, –0.15, p = 0.0308). Increased QOL has been reported in shorter term diet and exercise trials among cancer survivors. These longer term data suggest that diet and exercise interventions improve some aspects of QOL, but these benefits may diminish over time. PMID:26518022

  10. Quality of life outcomes from the Exercise and Nutrition Enhance Recovery and Good Health for You (ENERGY)-randomized weight loss trial among breast cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy; Colditz, Graham A; Rock, Cheryl L; Sedjo, Rebecca L; Liu, Jingxia; Wolin, Kathleen Y; Krontiras, Helen; Byers, Tim; Pakiz, Bilgé; Parker, Barbara A; Naughton, Michael; Elias, Anthony; Ganz, Patricia A

    2015-11-01

    Obesity is a poor prognostic factor and is negatively related to quality of life (QOL) in breast cancer survivors. Exercise and Nutrition to Enhance Recovery and Good Health for You is the largest weight loss trial completed among cancer survivors. Percent losses in body weight with an intensive group-based intervention versus an attention control were 6.0 versus 1.5 % (p < 0.0001) and 3.7 versus 1.3 % (p < 0.0001) at 12 and 24 months, respectively. ENERGY also was designed to answer the research question: Does weight loss significantly improve vitality and physical function (key components of QOL)? 692 breast cancer survivors (BMI: 25-45 kg/m(2)) at 4 US sites were randomized to a year-long intensive intervention of 52 group sessions and telephone counseling contacts versus a non-intensive (control) of two in-person counseling sessions. Weight, self-reported QOL, and symptoms were measured semi-annually for two years. Significant decreases in physical function and increases in symptoms were observed among controls from baseline to 6 months, but not in the intervention arm, -3.45 (95 % Confidence Interval [CI] -6.10, -0.79, p = 0.0109) and 0.10 (95 %CI 0.04, 0.16, p = 0.0021), respectively. Improvements in vitality were seen in both arms but trended toward greater improvement in the intervention arm -2.72 (95 % CI -5.45, 0.01, p = 0.0508). These differences diminished over time; however, depressive symptoms increased in the intervention versus control arms and became significant at 24 months, -1.64 (95 % CI -3.13, -0.15, p = 0.0308). Increased QOL has been reported in shorter term diet and exercise trials among cancer survivors. These longer term data suggest that diet and exercise interventions improve some aspects of QOL, but these benefits may diminish over time.

  11. Quality of life outcomes from the Exercise and Nutrition Enhance Recovery and Good Health for You (ENERGY)-randomized weight loss trial among breast cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy; Colditz, Graham A; Rock, Cheryl L; Sedjo, Rebecca L; Liu, Jingxia; Wolin, Kathleen Y; Krontiras, Helen; Byers, Tim; Pakiz, Bilgé; Parker, Barbara A; Naughton, Michael; Elias, Anthony; Ganz, Patricia A

    2015-11-01

    Obesity is a poor prognostic factor and is negatively related to quality of life (QOL) in breast cancer survivors. Exercise and Nutrition to Enhance Recovery and Good Health for You is the largest weight loss trial completed among cancer survivors. Percent losses in body weight with an intensive group-based intervention versus an attention control were 6.0 versus 1.5 % (p < 0.0001) and 3.7 versus 1.3 % (p < 0.0001) at 12 and 24 months, respectively. ENERGY also was designed to answer the research question: Does weight loss significantly improve vitality and physical function (key components of QOL)? 692 breast cancer survivors (BMI: 25-45 kg/m(2)) at 4 US sites were randomized to a year-long intensive intervention of 52 group sessions and telephone counseling contacts versus a non-intensive (control) of two in-person counseling sessions. Weight, self-reported QOL, and symptoms were measured semi-annually for two years. Significant decreases in physical function and increases in symptoms were observed among controls from baseline to 6 months, but not in the intervention arm, -3.45 (95 % Confidence Interval [CI] -6.10, -0.79, p = 0.0109) and 0.10 (95 %CI 0.04, 0.16, p = 0.0021), respectively. Improvements in vitality were seen in both arms but trended toward greater improvement in the intervention arm -2.72 (95 % CI -5.45, 0.01, p = 0.0508). These differences diminished over time; however, depressive symptoms increased in the intervention versus control arms and became significant at 24 months, -1.64 (95 % CI -3.13, -0.15, p = 0.0308). Increased QOL has been reported in shorter term diet and exercise trials among cancer survivors. These longer term data suggest that diet and exercise interventions improve some aspects of QOL, but these benefits may diminish over time. PMID:26518022

  12. The global public good concept: a means of promoting good veterinary governance.

    PubMed

    Eloit, M

    2012-08-01

    At the outset, the concept of a 'public good' was associated with economic policies. However, it has now evolved not only from a national to a global concept (global public good), but also from a concept applying solely to the production of goods to one encompassing societal issues (education, environment, etc.) and fundamental rights, including the right to health and food. Through their actions, Veterinary Services, as defined by the Terrestrial Animal Health Code (Terrestrial Code) of the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE), help to improve animal health and reduce production losses. In this way they contribute directly and indirectly to food security and to safeguarding human health and economic resources. The organisation and operating procedures of Veterinary Services are therefore key to the efficient governance required to achieve these objectives. The OIE is a major player in global cooperation and governance in the fields of animal and public health through the implementation of its strategic standardisation mission and other programmes for the benefit of Veterinary Services and OIE Member Countries. Thus, the actions of Veterinary Services and the OIE deserve to be recognised as a global public good, backed by public investment to ensure that all Veterinary Services are in a position to apply the principles of good governance and to comply with the international standards for the quality of Veterinary Services set out in the OIE Terrestrial Code (Section 3 on Quality of Veterinary Services) and Aquatic Animal Health Code (Section 3 on Quality of Aquatic Animal Health Services).

  13. The good, the bad and the plenty: interactive effects of food quality and quantity on the growth of different Daphnia species.

    PubMed

    Bukovinszky, Tibor; Verschoor, Antonie M; Helmsing, Nico R; Bezemer, T Martijn; Bakker, Elisabeth S; Vos, Matthijs; de Senerpont Domis, Lisette N

    2012-01-01

    Effects of food quality and quantity on consumers are neither independent nor interchangeable. Although consumer growth and reproduction show strong variation in relation to both food quality and quantity, the effects of food quality or food quantity have usually been studied in isolation. In two experiments, we studied the growth and reproduction in three filter-feeding freshwater zooplankton species, i.e. Daphnia galeata x hyalina, D. pulicaria and D. magna, on their algal food (Scenedesmus obliquus), varying in carbon to phosphorus (C∶P) ratios and quantities (concentrations). In the first experiment, we found a strong positive effect of the phosphorus content of food on growth of Daphnia, both in their early and late juvenile development. Variation in the relationship between the P-content of animals and their growth rate reflected interspecific differences in nutrient requirements. Although growth rates typically decreased as development neared maturation, this did not affect these species-specific couplings between growth rate and Daphnia P-content. In the second experiment, we examined the effects of food quality on Daphnia growth at different levels of food quantity. With the same decrease in P-content of food, species with higher estimated P-content at zero growth showed a larger increase in threshold food concentrations (i.e. food concentration sufficient to meet metabolic requirements but not growth). These results suggest that physiological processes such as maintenance and growth may in combination explain effects of food quality and quantity on consumers. Our study shows that differences in response to variation in food quality and quantity exist between species. As a consequence, species-specific effects of food quality on consumer growth will also determine how species deal with varying food levels, which has implications for resource-consumer interactions. PMID:23049734

  14. Effects of Achieving Target Measures in Rheumatoid Arthritis on Functional Status, Quality of Life, and Resource Utilization: Analysis of Clinical Practice Data

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Seongjung; Kawabata, Hugh; Al, Maiwenn J.; Allison, Paul D.; Rutten‐van Mölken, Maureen P. M. H.; Frits, Michelle L.; Iannaccone, Christine K.; Shadick, Nancy A.; Weinblatt, Michael E.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate associations between achieving guideline‐recommended targets of disease activity, defined by the Disease Activity Score in 28 joints using C‐reactive protein level (DAS28‐CRP) <2.6, the Simplified Disease Activity Index (SDAI) ≤3.3, or the Clinical Disease Activity Index (CDAI) ≤2.8, and other health outcomes in a longitudinal observational study. Methods Other defined thresholds included low disease activity (LDA), moderate (MDA), or severe disease activity (SDA). To control for intraclass correlation and estimate effects of independent variables on outcomes of the modified Health Assessment Questionnaire (M‐HAQ), the EuroQol 5‐domain (EQ‐5D; a quality‐of‐life measure), hospitalization, and durable medical equipment (DME) use, we employed mixed models for continuous outcomes and generalized estimating equations for binary outcomes. Results Among 1,297 subjects, achievement (versus nonachievement) of recommended disease targets was associated with enhanced physical functioning and lower health resource utilization. After controlling for baseline covariates, achievement of disease targets (versus LDA) was associated with significantly enhanced physical functioning based on SDAI ≤3.3 (ΔM‐HAQ −0.047; P = 0.0100) and CDAI ≤2.8 (−0.073; P = 0.0003) but not DAS28‐CRP <2.6 (−0.022; P = 0.1735). Target attainment was associated with significantly improved EQ‐5D (0.022–0.096; P < 0.0030 versus LDA, MDA, or SDA). Patients achieving guideline‐recommended disease targets were 36–45% less likely to be hospitalized (P < 0.0500) and 23–45% less likely to utilize DME (P < 0.0100). Conclusion Attaining recommended target disease‐activity measures was associated with enhanced physical functioning and health‐related quality of life. Some health outcomes were similar in subjects attaining guideline targets versus LDA. Achieving LDA is a worthy clinical objective in some patients. PMID:26238974

  15. Is New Work Good Work?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westwood, Andy

    Some new work is good work. Quality is ultimately defined by the individual. However, these perceptions are inevitably colored by the circumstances in which people find themselves, by the time, place, and wide range of motivations for having to do a particular job in the first place. One person's quality may be another's purgatory and vice versa.…

  16. Food Science for the Public Good

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Cassandra

    If you are interested in food science, looking for a meaningful career path, and are motivated by the desire to make a difference, you may find that a career working for the public good can be very rewarding. Often, such opportunities address issues of social responsibility, sustainability, public health, and/or economic development. Food scientists who choose this path typically have an interest in social and public health issues, and are usually driven by the achievement of some sort of social, health, or societal gain. As food science in itself is a very broad discipline, applying this knowledge for the public good can also take a variety of paths. Whether you're interested in manufacturing, food safety, nutrition, food policy, product development, quality control, marketing and sales, or any other discipline that makes up the diverse field of food science, various opportunities exist to make a difference to society.

  17. The Good the Bad and the Ugly of Single Sensor Error Statistics for Sea Surface Temperature: What Do Spaghetti Westerns and Quality Levels Have in Common?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilpatrick, K. A.; Podesta, G. P.; Evans, R.; Minnett, P. J.

    2014-12-01

    Global High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST) L2p products are available from many different satellite-based instruments. Assimilation and fusion of SSTs from multiple sources requires knowledge of the expected accuracy and uncertainly of a retrieval and confidence that a pixel is within the uncertainty required by the application. The GHRSST L2p files provide quality levels with labels such as "worst", "acceptable", or "best." But what do these levels actually mean to a user in terms of uncertainty and bias? Does "acceptable" have the same meaning for data providers and users? Currently there is no standard or consensus for the accuracy requirement of a quality level. GHRSST providers rely on matchup databases of satellite and in situ SSTs to provide Single Sensor Error Statistics (SSES). The GHRSST L2P MODIS SSES values currently are stored in a 6-dimensional Look Up Table (LUT) - often referred to as a hypercube. This LUT lists uncertainties stratified by quality level, season, latitude, viewing geometry, surface temperature, and "wet" or "dry" atmospheres. While this approach is more useful than a single aggregate SSES estimate, the coarse nature of the hypercube bins produces obvious discontinuities in uncertainty fields at some bin boundaries when geographically mapped. In reality, the SSES should vary more smoothly as a function of different combinations of factors influencing the accuracy of retrievals. We will present ongoing efforts to model the SST bias and uncertainty as a smooth function of some of the dimensions of the SSES hypercube. Additionally, we aim to classify pixels into quality categories with explicitly defined ranges of bias and uncertainty. The ultimate goal is to develop methods that could be deployed across multiple sensors to establish a standard for objective, quantitative definitions of SST retrieval quality.

  18. Assessing Handwriting Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ediger, Marlow

    Teachers in the school setting need to emphasize quality handwriting across the curriculum. Quality handwriting means that the written content is easy to read in either manuscript or cursive form. Handwriting achievement can be assessed, but not compared to the precision of assessing basic addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division facts.…

  19. Teacher Effects and the Achievement Gap: Do Teacher and Teaching Quality Influence the Achievement Gap between Black and White and High- and Low-SES Students in the Early Grades?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Desimone, Laura; Long, Daniel A.

    2010-01-01

    Background/Context: Although there is relative agreement on the pattern of the achievement gap, attributing changes in the gap to schooling is less clear. Our study contributes to understanding potential teacher and teaching effects on achievement and inequality. Purpose/Objective/Research Question/Focus of Study: We intend our work to contribute…

  20. The Effect of Using Problem-Based Learning in Middle School Gifted Science Classes on Student Achievement and Students' Perceptions of Classroom Quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horak, Anne Karen

    The purpose of this study was to explore the impact of the Problem Based Learning (PBL) units developed by a large suburban school district in the mid-Atlantic for the middle school gifted science curriculum on: a) students' performance on standardized tests in middle school Science, as measured by a sample of relevant test questions from a district-managed test bank; and b) students' perceptions of classroom quality according to the constructs of: meaningfulness, challenge, choice, self-efficacy, and appeal as measured by the Student Perceptions of Classroom Quality scale (SPOCQ) (Gentry & Owens, 2004). A group of students taught using PBL and a comparison group of students taught using traditional instruction were studied. Between the two groups, a total of 457 students participated in the study. Pre and post student achievement data were collected using a 25 item multiple choice test that aligned with state and local objectives. It was hypothesized there would be no significant differences in gain scores or perceptions between a group of students taught using PBL in comparison to the group taught using traditional methods. Data analysis indicated statistically significant gain scores in both of the groups with a higher gain score in the PBL group. Data analysis also revealed statistically significant differences in the total score on the SPOCQ in favor of the PBL group. This study found positive effects for well-implemented PBL instruction with these students. However, much more remains to be known. Future research should include longitudinal studies expanded to different subjects, grade levels and populations of students.

  1. Dependence of Achievable Plan Quality on Treatment Technique and Planning Goal Refinement: A Head-and-Neck Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Application

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, X. Sharon Ruan, Dan; Lee, Steve P.; Pham, Andrew; Kupelian, Patrick; Low, Daniel A.; Steinberg, Michael; Demarco, John

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: To develop a practical workflow for retrospectively analyzing target and normal tissue dose–volume endpoints for various intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) delivery techniques; to develop technique-specific planning goals to improve plan consistency and quality when feasible. Methods and Materials: A total of 165 consecutive head-and-neck patients from our patient registry were selected and retrospectively analyzed. All IMRT plans were generated using the same dose–volume guidelines for TomoTherapy (Tomo, Accuray), TrueBeam (TB, Varian) using fixed-field IMRT (TB-IMRT) or RAPIDARC (TB-RAPIDARC), or Siemens Oncor (Siemens-IMRT, Siemens). A MATLAB-based dose–volume extraction and analysis tool was developed to export dosimetric endpoints for each patient. With a fair stratification of patient cohort, the variation of achieved dosimetric endpoints was analyzed among different treatment techniques. Upon identification of statistically significant variations, technique-specific planning goals were derived from dynamically accumulated institutional data. Results: Retrospective analysis showed that although all techniques yielded comparable target coverage, the doses to the critical structures differed. The maximum cord doses were 34.1 ± 2.6, 42.7 ± 2.1, 43.3 ± 2.0, and 45.1 ± 1.6 Gy for Tomo, TB-IMRT, TB-RAPIDARC, and Siemens-IMRT plans, respectively. Analyses of variance showed significant differences for the maximum cord doses but no significant differences for other selected structures among the investigated IMRT delivery techniques. Subsequently, a refined technique-specific dose–volume guideline for maximum cord dose was derived at a confidence level of 95%. The dosimetric plans that failed the refined technique-specific planning goals were reoptimized according to the refined constraints. We observed better cord sparing with minimal variations for the target coverage and other organ at risk sparing for the Tomo cases, and higher

  2. What contributes to a good quality of life in early dementia? awareness and the QoL-AD: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Self-report quality of life (QoL) measures for people with dementia are widely used as outcome measures in trials of dementia care interventions. Depressed mood, relationship quality and neuropsychiatric symptoms predict scores on these measures, whereas cognitive impairment and functional abilities typically do not. This study examines whether these self-reports are influenced by personality and by the person’s awareness of his/her impairments. A strong negative association between QoL and awareness of deficits would have implications for the validity of self-report in this context and for therapeutic interventions aiming to increase adjustment and coping. Methods Participants were 101 individuals with early‒stage dementia and their family carers participating in the Memory Impairment and Dementia Awareness (MIDAS) Study. QoL was assessed using the QoL-AD scale, and awareness was assessed in relation to memory, activities of daily living and social functioning. Self-concept, conscientiousness, quality of relationship and mood were assessed and a brief neuropsychological battery administered. Carers rated their own stress and well-being and reported on neuropsychiatric symptoms. A series of regression analyses predicting QoL-AD were carried out, identifying key variables in each domain of assessment to take forward to an overall model. Results Cognitive impairment was not related to QoL. The final model accounted for 57% of the variance in QoL-AD scores, with significant contributions from depressed mood, severity of irritability shown by the person with dementia, self-concept, quality of relationship (rated by the person with dementia) and male gender. The bivariate relationships of QoL-AD with awareness of memory function, awareness of functional abilities and conscientiousness were mediated by both depressed mood and self-concept. Conclusions This study reports the most comprehensive approach to evaluation of awareness to date. Most of the indices

  3. “What makes life good?” Developing a culturally grounded quality of life measure for Alaska Native college students

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Dinghy Kristine B.; Lopez, Ellen D. S.; Mekiana, Deborah; Ctibor, Alaina; Church, Charlene

    2013-01-01

    Background Alaska Native (AN) college students experience higher attrition rates than their non-Native peers. Understanding the factors that contribute to quality of life (“what makes life good”) for AN students will help inform supportive programs that are congruent with their culture and college life experiences. Objectives Co-develop a conceptual model and a measure of quality of life (QOL) that reflects the experiences of AN college students. Methods Six focus groups were conducted with 26 AN college students. Within a community–academic partnership, interactive data collection activities, co-analysis workgroup sessions and an interactive findings forum ensured a participant-driven research process. Findings Students identified and operationally defined eight QOL domains (values, culture and traditions, spirituality, relationships, basic needs, health, learning and leisure). The metaphor of a tree visually illustrates how the domains values, culture and traditions and spirituality form the roots to the other domains that appear to branch out as students navigate the dual worldviews of Native and Western ways of living. Conclusions The eight QOL domains and their items identified during focus groups were integrated into a visual model and an objective QOL measure. The hope is to provide a useful tool for developing and evaluating university-based programs and services aimed toward promoting a positive QOL and academic success for AN students. PMID:23984302

  4. Compassion Is a Necessity and an Individual and Collective Responsibility Comment on "Why and How Is Compassion Necessary to Provide Good Quality Healthcare?".

    PubMed

    Lown, Beth A

    2015-06-02

    Compassion is a complex process that is innate, determined in part by individual traits, and modulated by a myriad of conscious and unconscious factors, immediate context, social structures and expectations, and organizational "culture." Compassion is an ethical foundation of healthcare and a widely shared value; it is not an optional luxury in the healing process. While the interrelations between individual motivation and social structure are complex, we can choose to act individually and collectively to remove barriers to the innate compassion that most healthcare professionals bring to their work. Doing so will reduce professional burnout, improve the well-being of the healthcare workforce, and facilitate our efforts to achieve the triple aim of improving patients' experiences of care and health while lowering costs.

  5. Compassion Is a Necessity and an Individual and Collective Responsibility Comment on "Why and How Is Compassion Necessary to Provide Good Quality Healthcare?".

    PubMed

    Lown, Beth A

    2015-09-01

    Compassion is a complex process that is innate, determined in part by individual traits, and modulated by a myriad of conscious and unconscious factors, immediate context, social structures and expectations, and organizational "culture." Compassion is an ethical foundation of healthcare and a widely shared value; it is not an optional luxury in the healing process. While the interrelations between individual motivation and social structure are complex, we can choose to act individually and collectively to remove barriers to the innate compassion that most healthcare professionals bring to their work. Doing so will reduce professional burnout, improve the well-being of the healthcare workforce, and facilitate our efforts to achieve the triple aim of improving patients' experiences of care and health while lowering costs. PMID:26340491

  6. Partnering for Vaccine Emerging Markets--Berlin, June 10-11, 2013: balancing vaccine quality, capacity, and cost-of-goods in emerging markets.

    PubMed

    Onraedt, Annelies

    2013-09-01

    Phacilitates 1st Partnering event for Vaccine Emerging Markets brought together approximately 100 attendees from developed and developing world vaccine manufacturers, leading non-profit organizations and industry suppliers. The goal was to discuss the vaccine needs in the developing world and how these needs can be met by leveraging collaboration and partnership models, by improving access to existing, new and next generation vaccines, by using novel technologies to drive competitive advantage and economics of vaccine manufacturing and by investing in localized capacity, including capacity for pandemic vaccines. The present article summarizes insights out of 30 oral contributions on how quality and capacity requirements can be balanced with cost by using novel manufacturing technologies and operating models.

  7. Adrenal Insufficiency Therapy: How to Keep the Balance between Good Quality of Life and Low Risk for Long-Term Side Effects?

    PubMed

    Simunkova, Katerina; Husebye, Eystein S

    2016-01-01

    Glucocorticoid treatment in adrenal insufficiency remains a challenge since many patients complain of fatigue, reduced health-related quality of life and working ability. Moreover, there is a fear of increased mortality and morbidity related to adrenal crises and chronic overexposure to glucocorticoids. In order to counter these negative effects on daily life and future health, recent recommendations speak for lower replacement doses and administration forms that attempt to mimic the circadian variation in cortisol. At the same time, low replacement doses should not put the patient at an increased risk of an adrenal crisis. This chapter provides an overview of current state-of-the-art approaches to treatment and follow-up of adrenal insufficiency aimed at avoiding over- and undertreatment.

  8. Good Functional Outcome and Adjacent Segment Disc Quality 10 Years after Single-Level Anterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion with Posterior Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Horsting, Philip P.; Pavlov, Paul W.; Jacobs, Wilco C.H.; Obradov-Rajic, Marina; de Kleuver, Marinus

    2012-01-01

    We reviewed the records of a prospective consecutive cohort to evaluate the clinical performance of anterior lumbar interbody fusion with a titanium box cage and posterior fixation, with emphasis on long-term functional outcome. Thirty-two patients with chronic low back pain underwent anterior lumbar interbody fusion and posterior fixation. Radiological and functional results (visual analogue scale [VAS] and Oswestry score) were evaluated. Adjacent segment degeneration (ASD) was evaluated radiologically and by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Twenty-five patients (78%) were available for follow-up. Functional scores showed significant improvement in pain and function up to the 2-year follow-up observation. At 4 years, there was some deterioration of the clinical results. At 10-year follow-up, results remained stable compared with 4-year results. MRI showed ASD in 3/25 (12%) above and 2/10 (20%) below index level (compared with absent preoperatively). ASD could not be related to clinical outcome in this study. Anterior lumbar interbody fusion and posterior fixation is safe and effective. Initial improvement in VAS and Oswestry scores is partly lost at the 4-year follow-up. Good clinical results are maintained at 10-year follow-up and are not related to adjacent segment degeneration. PMID:24353942

  9. Appropriateness and variation of surgical treatment of breast cancer in Italy: when excellence in clinical research does not match with generalized good quality care. Progetto Oncologia Femminile.

    PubMed

    Scorpiglione, N; Nicolucci, A; Grilli, R; Angiolini, C; Belfiglio, M; Carinci, F; Cubasso, D; Filardo, G; Labbrozzi, D; Mainini, F

    1995-03-01

    To assess appropriateness of surgical care delivered to breast cancer patients in Italy and quantify the use of unnecessary radical procedures, a retrospective charts review of patients treated in 1988-1989 was conducted. A series of 1724 consecutive patients (median age 61 years; range 17-89) treated in 63 hospitals selected from within 8 regions with newly diagnosed operable breast carcinoma was evaluated. Overall, 541 (38%) patients had inappropriate surgery with more than two thirds of it being accounted for by the use of unnecessary mutilating Halsted mastectomy. Substantial geographic variation emerged in the overall rates of appropriateness (range 88-52%) which were not substantially affected by allowance for imbalances in patient- and hospital-related variables. Despite the important contribution given by Italian clinical researchers to the demonstration that less radical surgery can be as good as more radical procedures, still a substantial proportion of breast cancer patients are treated too aggressively. Besides pointing to the urgent need of interventions aimed at facilitating the process of technology transfer in order to promote more appropriate surgical care, these results suggest that efforts to increase patients' participation into treatment decision and awareness about alternative treatment options are warranted.

  10. The procedure of new drug application and the philosophy of critical rationalism or the limits of quality assurance with good clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Högel, J; Gaus, W

    1999-12-01

    K.R. Popper's philosophy of critical rationalism is concerned with the detection and removal of error. Fundamental contradictions exist between Popper's theory of knowledge and the present-day practice of the clinical investigation of new drugs. Currently, the public authorities concerned with the licensing of drugs pass judgment on trials, which are closely linked by the one-sponsor problem: the assertions made by the sponsor are not independently confirmed. This lack leads to excessive documentation and to costly monitoring and auditing, which are intended to ensure the credibility of results. In Popper's view, confirmatory trials, independent of the sponsor and supervised by the regulatory bodies, would be a better way to achieve reliable knowledge. The consequence would, among other things, be a reorganization of phase III of the clinical investigation of new drugs by dividing it into independent parts, one under the control of the sponsor and one under the control of the public authority. The implementation of this suggestion would lead to a more scientific manner of dealing with new drugs and to savings in terms of unproductive measures during the application process.

  11. Evaluation of molecular- and culture-dependent MST markers to detect fecal contamination and indicate viral presence in good quality groundwater.

    PubMed

    Diston, D; Sinreich, M; Zimmermann, S; Baumgartner, A; Felleisen, R

    2015-06-16

    Microbial contamination of groundwater represents a significant health risk to resource users. Culture-dependent Bacteroides phage and molecular-dependent Bacteroidales 16S rRNA assays are employed in microbial source tracking (MST) studies globally, however little is known regarding how these important groups relate to each other in the environment and which is more suitable to indicate the presence of waterborne fecal pollution and human enteric viruses. This study addresses this knowledge gap by examining 64 groundwater samples from sites with varying hydrogeological properties using a MST toolbox containing two bacteriophage groups (phage infecting GB-124 and ARABA-84), and two Bacteroidales 16S rRNA markers (Hf183 and BacR); those were compared to fecal indicator bacteria, somatic coliphage, Bacteroidales 16S rRNA marker AllBac, four human enteric viruses (norovirus GI and II, enterovirus and group A rotavirus) and supplementary hydrogeological/chemical data. Bacteroidales 16S rRNA indicators offered a more sensitive assessment of both human-specific and general fecal contamination than phage indicators, but may overestimate the risk from enteric viral pathogens. Comparison with hydrogeological and land use site characteristics as well as auxiliary microbiological and chemical data proved the plausibility of the MST findings. Sites representing karst aquifers were of significantly worse microbial quality than those with unconsolidated or fissured aquifers, highlighting the vulnerability of these hydrogeological settings.

  12. Good manufacturing practices for medicinal products for human use.

    PubMed

    Gouveia, Bruno G; Rijo, Patrícia; Gonçalo, Tânia S; Reis, Catarina P

    2015-01-01

    At international and national levels, there are public and private organizations, institutions and regulatory authorities, who work and cooperate between them and with Pharmaceutical Industry, in order to achieve a consensus of the guidelines and laws of the manufacturing of medicinal products for human use. This article includes an explanation of how operate and cooperate these participants, between them and expose the current regulations, following the line of European Community/European Economic Area, referencing, wherever appropriate, the practiced guidelines, outside of regulatory action of space mentioned. In this way, it is intended to achieve quality, security and effectiveness exceptional levels in the manufacturing of health products. Good Manufacturing Practice aim the promotion of the human health and consequently, to the improvement of quality of life. For achieve the proposed objectives, it is necessary to ensure the applicability of the presented concepts and show the benefits arising from this applicability.

  13. Good manufacturing practices for medicinal products for human use

    PubMed Central

    Gouveia, Bruno G.; Rijo, Patrícia; Gonçalo, Tânia S.; Reis, Catarina P.

    2015-01-01

    At international and national levels, there are public and private organizations, institutions and regulatory authorities, who work and cooperate between them and with Pharmaceutical Industry, in order to achieve a consensus of the guidelines and laws of the manufacturing of medicinal products for human use. This article includes an explanation of how operate and cooperate these participants, between them and expose the current regulations, following the line of European Community/European Economic Area, referencing, wherever appropriate, the practiced guidelines, outside of regulatory action of space mentioned. In this way, it is intended to achieve quality, security and effectiveness exceptional levels in the manufacturing of health products. Good Manufacturing Practice aim the promotion of the human health and consequently, to the improvement of quality of life. For achieve the proposed objectives, it is necessary to ensure the applicability of the presented concepts and show the benefits arising from this applicability. PMID:25883511

  14. Good manufacturing practices for medicinal products for human use.

    PubMed

    Gouveia, Bruno G; Rijo, Patrícia; Gonçalo, Tânia S; Reis, Catarina P

    2015-01-01

    At international and national levels, there are public and private organizations, institutions and regulatory authorities, who work and cooperate between them and with Pharmaceutical Industry, in order to achieve a consensus of the guidelines and laws of the manufacturing of medicinal products for human use. This article includes an explanation of how operate and cooperate these participants, between them and expose the current regulations, following the line of European Community/European Economic Area, referencing, wherever appropriate, the practiced guidelines, outside of regulatory action of space mentioned. In this way, it is intended to achieve quality, security and effectiveness exceptional levels in the manufacturing of health products. Good Manufacturing Practice aim the promotion of the human health and consequently, to the improvement of quality of life. For achieve the proposed objectives, it is necessary to ensure the applicability of the presented concepts and show the benefits arising from this applicability. PMID:25883511

  15. A Dataset from TIMSS to Examine the Relationship between Computer Use and Mathematics Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kadijevich, Djordje M.

    2015-01-01

    Because the relationship between computer use and achievement is still puzzling, there is a need to prepare and analyze good quality datasets on computer use and achievement. Such a dataset can be derived from TIMSS data. This paper describes how this dataset can be prepared. It also gives an example of how the dataset may be analyzed. The…

  16. The Benefits of Good Teaching Extend beyond Course Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loes, Chad N.; Pascarella, Ernest T.

    2015-01-01

    This paper synthesizes research from the Wabash National Study on Liberal Arts Education, the National Study on Student Learning, and the Research on Iowa Student Experiences study that estimates the influence of certain effective instructional practices on a range of student outcomes. Student perceptions of two specific teacher…

  17. Lifetime achievement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlowicz, Michael

    The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) is accepting nominations for the 1996 Philip Hauge Abelson Prize. The prize is awarded annually to either a public servant who has made sustained contributions to the advancement of science or to scientists who have distinguished themselves for both the quality of their work and their leadership in the scientific community.

  18. Ensuring Quality during Monitoring of the Learning Environment of Government Primary Schools Achieved through the UEI-PDP for Teachers and Head Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goderya-Shaikh, Fehmida; Madden, Margaret; Saad, Ismail

    2006-01-01

    A positive change in the learning environment in schools is visible through ongoing professional development of teachers and administrators. Monitoring the professional development program and providing support to teachers and administrators to transfer their learnings into the school environment ensures some measures of quality. Quality issues…

  19. Appraising Reading Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ediger, Marlow

    To determine quality sequence in pupil progress, evaluation approaches need to be used which guide the teacher to assist learners to attain optimally. Teachers must use a variety of procedures to appraise student achievement in reading, because no one approach is adequate. Appraisal approaches might include: (1) observation and subsequent…

  20. Are Standards Preventing Good Teaching?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berube, Clair T.

    2004-01-01

    The National Standards movement seeks to raise the quality of the American educational system. According to one of its chief architects, Diane Ravitch (2000), national standards give clear expectations for students, teachers, parents, colleges, and employers that will result in improved student achievement. Forty-nine of the fifty states (save…

  1. Good Medicine and Good Healthcare Demand Good Information (Systems).

    PubMed

    Winter, A; Hilgers, R-D; Hofestädt, R; Hübner, U; Knaup-Gregori, P; Ose, C; Schmoor, C; Timmer, A; Wege, D

    2015-01-01

    The demand for evidence-based health informatics and benchmarking of 'good' information systems in health care gives an opportunity to continue reporting on recent papers in the German journal GMS Medical Informatics, Biometry and Epidemiology (MIBE) here. The publications in focus deal with a comparison of benchmarking initiatives in German-speaking countries, use of communication standards in telemonitoring scenarios, the estimation of national cancer incidence rates and modifications of parametric tests. Furthermore papers in this issue of MIM are introduced which originally have been presented at the Annual Conference of the German Society of Medical Informatics, Biometry and Epidemiology. They deal as well with evidence and evaluation of 'good' information systems but also with data harmonization, surveillance in obstetrics, adaptive designs and parametrical testing in statistical analysis, patient registries and signal processing. PMID:26395286

  2. Eggs: good or bad?

    PubMed

    Griffin, Bruce A

    2016-08-01

    Eggs have one of the lowest energy to nutrient density ratios of any food, and contain a quality of protein that is superior to beef steak and similar to dairy. From a nutritional perspective, this must qualify eggs as 'good'. The greater burden of proof has been to establish that eggs are not 'bad', by increasing awareness of the difference between dietary and blood cholesterol, and accumulating sufficient evidence to exonerate eggs from their associations with CVD and diabetes. After 60 years of research, a general consensus has now been reached that dietary cholesterol, chiefly from eggs, exerts a relatively small effect on serum LDL-cholesterol and CVD risk, in comparison with other diet and lifestyle factors. While dietary guidelines have been revised worldwide to reflect this view, associations between egg intake and the incidence of diabetes, and increased CVD risk in diabetes, prevail. These associations may be explained, in part, by residual confounding produced by other dietary components. The strength of evidence that links egg intake to increased CVD risk in diabetes is also complicated by variation in the response of serum LDL-cholesterol to eggs and dietary cholesterol in types 1 and 2 diabetes. On balance, the answer to the question as to whether eggs are 'bad', is probably 'no', but we do need to gain a better understanding of the effects of dietary cholesterol and its association with CVD risk in diabetes.

  3. The Challenge of Quality. JTPA Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    JTPA Issues, 1990

    1990-01-01

    Achieving good quality in Job Training Partnership Act (JTPA) training is hampered by the lack of a common definition of quality. Five ideas have been consistent in definitions: targeting programs; long-term, in-depth training; basic education; work skills training; and supportive services and guidance. A definition must include suggestions on how…

  4. "What's the Plan?": "Good Management Begins with Good People"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vicars, Dennis

    2008-01-01

    In order for a successful center/school to achieve all it can for its children, staff, and operator, a plan is critical. Good planning begins by looking into the future that one wants for his or her center/school. Be as descriptive as possible in writing down the details of what that future looks like. Next, walk backwards from that future to the…

  5. Good School Districts Require Good School Boards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krysiak, Barbara H.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses issues surrounding superintendents' efforts to establish effective working relationships with their school boards. Includes topics such as role confusion, dealing with conflict, and responding to micromanaging board members. Other topics include elected versus appointed boards, good board members, and new board members. (Contains 14…

  6. Good Concrete Activity Is Good Mental Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonough, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Early years mathematics classrooms can be colourful, exciting, and challenging places of learning. Andrea McDonough and fellow teachers have noticed that some students make good decisions about using materials to assist their problem solving, but this is not always the case. These experiences lead her to ask the following questions: (1) Are…

  7. Achieving best outcomes for patients with cardiovascular disease in China by enhancing the quality of medical care and establishing a learning health-care system.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lixin; Krumholz, Harlan M; Li, Xi; Li, Jing; Hu, Shengshou

    2015-10-10

    China has an immediate need to address the rapidly growing population with cardiovascular disease events and the increasing number of people living with this illness. Despite progress in increasing access to services, China faces the dual challenge of addressing gaps in quality of care and producing more evidence to support clinical practice. In this Review, we address opportunities to strengthen performance measurement, programmes to improve quality of care, and national capacity to produce high-impact knowledge for clinical practice. Moreover, we propose recommendations, with implications for other diseases, for how China can immediately make use of its Hospital Quality-Monitoring System and other existing national platforms to assess and improve performance of medical care, and to generate new knowledge to inform clinical decisions and national policies.

  8. Achieving best outcomes for patients with cardiovascular disease in China by enhancing the quality of medical care and establishing a learning health-care system.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lixin; Krumholz, Harlan M; Li, Xi; Li, Jing; Hu, Shengshou

    2015-10-10

    China has an immediate need to address the rapidly growing population with cardiovascular disease events and the increasing number of people living with this illness. Despite progress in increasing access to services, China faces the dual challenge of addressing gaps in quality of care and producing more evidence to support clinical practice. In this Review, we address opportunities to strengthen performance measurement, programmes to improve quality of care, and national capacity to produce high-impact knowledge for clinical practice. Moreover, we propose recommendations, with implications for other diseases, for how China can immediately make use of its Hospital Quality-Monitoring System and other existing national platforms to assess and improve performance of medical care, and to generate new knowledge to inform clinical decisions and national policies. PMID:26466053

  9. Associations between Students' Perceptions of Teacher-Student Relationship Quality, Academic Achievement, and Classroom Behavior: Are They Moderated by Ethnicity, Gender, or Socio Economic Status?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gill, Khushwinder Kaur

    2012-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to explore the correlations between students' perceptions of their relationships with teachers, students' academic achievement and students' classroom behavior. A secondary purpose of the study was to investigate if students' ethnicity, gender and socio-economic status moderate the…

  10. A Comparative Analysis of the Relationship among Quality Instruction, Teacher Self-Efficacy, Student Background, and Mathematics Achievement in South Korea and the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Son, Ji-Won; Han, Seong Won; Kang, Chungseo; Kwon, Oh Nam

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare and contrast student, teacher, and school factors that are associated with student mathematics achievement in South Korea and the United States. Using the data from the Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) 2011, this study examines factors that are linked to teachers who deliver…

  11. Depreciation of public goods in spatial public goods games

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Dong-Mei; Zhuang, Yong; Li, Yu-Jian; Wang, Bing-Hong

    2011-10-01

    In real situations, the value of public goods will be reduced or even lost because of external factors or for intrinsic reasons. In this work, we investigate the evolution of cooperation by considering the effect of depreciation of public goods in spatial public goods games on a square lattice. It is assumed that each individual gains full advantage if the number of the cooperators nc within a group centered on that individual equals or exceeds the critical mass (CM). Otherwise, there is depreciation of the public goods, which is realized by rescaling the multiplication factor r to (nc/CM)r. It is shown that the emergence of cooperation is remarkably promoted for CM > 1 even at small values of r, and a global cooperative level is achieved at an intermediate value of CM = 4 at a small r. We further study the effect of depreciation of public goods on different topologies of a regular lattice, and find that the system always reaches global cooperation at a moderate value of CM = G - 1 regardless of whether or not there exist overlapping triangle structures on the regular lattice, where G is the group size of the associated regular lattice.

  12. Latino Access to Preschool Stalls after Earlier Gains: Certain to Harden Achievement Gaps, Erode Workforce Quality. New Journalism on Latino Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuller, Bruce; Kim, Anthony Y.

    2011-01-01

    It has been known that quality preschool can boost children's early literacy and social agility, skills valued highly by employers. The returns to preschool appear to be stronger for Latino children, especially those from non-English speaking families, compared with other populations. But newly available data reveal that preschool enrollment…

  13. Gathering Feedback for Teaching: Combining High-Quality Observations with Student Surveys and Achievement Gains. Policy and Practice Brief. MET Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kane, Thomas J.; Staiger, Douglas O.

    2012-01-01

    Research has long been clear that teachers matter more to student learning than any other in-school factor. Improving the quality of teaching is critical to student success. Yet only recently have many states and districts begun to take seriously the importance of evaluating teacher performance and providing teachers with the feedback they need to…

  14. Gathering Feedback for Teaching: Combining High-Quality Observations with Student Surveys and Achievement Gains. Policy and Practice Summary. MET Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Research has long been clear that teachers matter more to student learning than any other in-school factor. Improving the quality of teaching is critical to student success. Yet only recently have many states and districts begun to take seriously the importance of evaluating teacher performance and providing teachers with the feedback they need to…

  15. Back to the basics: Identifying and addressing underlying challenges in achieving high quality and relevant health statistics for indigenous populations in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Smylie, Janet; Firestone, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Canada is known internationally for excellence in both the quality and public policy relevance of its health and social statistics. There is a double standard however with respect to the relevance and quality of statistics for Indigenous populations in Canada. Indigenous specific health and social statistics gathering is informed by unique ethical, rights-based, policy and practice imperatives regarding the need for Indigenous participation and leadership in Indigenous data processes throughout the spectrum of indicator development, data collection, management, analysis and use. We demonstrate how current Indigenous data quality challenges including misclassification errors and non-response bias systematically contribute to a significant underestimate of inequities in health determinants, health status, and health care access between Indigenous and non-Indigenous people in Canada. The major quality challenge underlying these errors and biases is the lack of Indigenous specific identifiers that are consistent and relevant in major health and social data sources. The recent removal of an Indigenous identity question from the Canadian census has resulted in further deterioration of an already suboptimal system. A revision of core health data sources to include relevant, consistent, and inclusive Indigenous self-identification is urgently required. These changes need to be carried out in partnership with Indigenous peoples and their representative and governing organizations. PMID:26793283

  16. The Relationship between Gifted and General Secondary School Students' Perceptions of the Classroom Quality and Their Mathematics Achievement in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Yang

    2012-01-01

    Investigating students' perceptions of their classroom environment is one of the ways researchers and educators can effectively determine what factors may benefit students' learning. Student Perceptions of Classroom Quality (SPOCQ; Gentry & Owen, 2004) was used with a group of Chinese gifted and general secondary students in the…

  17. Progress Made on a Plan To Integrate Planning, Budgeting, Assessment and Quality Principles To Achieve Institutional Improvement. First Year Report. AIR 1996 Annual Forum Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffith, Susan R.; And Others

    This paper describes first year implementation efforts of Southwest Texas (SWT) State University to develop a system to integrate planning, budgeting, assessment, and quality to improve the delivery of education and other services to all the institution's customers. The document addresses the common situation when an organization already has…

  18. When "Good Enough" Is Not Good Enough

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacTaggart, Terry

    2009-01-01

    Achieving high performance in tough times is the most serious challenge facing presidents and trustees during this recession, when the temptation may be to substitute "getting by" for truly outstanding governance. Defining victory as making it through the fiscal year, with little thought to where the institution should be positioned in three to…

  19. Raising Boys' Achievement in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bleach, Kevan, Ed.

    This book offers insights into the range of strategies and good practice being used to raise the achievement of boys. Case studies by school-based practitioners suggest ideas and measures to address the issue of achievement by boys. The contributions are: (1) "Why the Likely Lads Lag Behind" (Kevan Bleach); (2) "Helping Boys Do Better in Their…

  20. What Are Good Universities?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connell, Raewyn

    2016-01-01

    This paper considers how we can arrive at a concept of the good university. It begins with ideas expressed by Australian Vice-Chancellors and in the "league tables" for universities, which essentially reproduce existing privilege. It then considers definitions of the good university via wish lists, classic texts, horror lists, structural…

  1. Making Good Tenure Decisions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Samuel L.; Galvin, Kathleen M.; Houston, Marsha; Friedrich, Gustav W.; Pearson, Judy C.; Seiler, William J.; Trent, Judith S.

    2001-01-01

    Presents criteria and procedures that can help to substantially increase the probability of a good tenure decision. Notes that the tenure procedures must be designed and followed in a way that ensures, to the degree possible, validity, fairness, and equity. Stresses the importance of maintaining good records and mentoring. (SG)

  2. A Pretty Good Fit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erickson, Tim

    2008-01-01

    We often look for a best-fit function to a set of data. This article describes how a "pretty good" fit might be better than a "best" fit when it comes to promoting conceptual understanding of functions. In a pretty good fit, students design the function themselves rather than choosing it from a menu; they use appropriate variable names; and they…

  3. Advice on Good Grooming.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tingey, Carol

    1987-01-01

    Suggestions are presented from parents on how to help children with disabilities (with particular focus on Downs Syndrome) learn good grooming habits in such areas as good health, exercise, cleanliness, teeth and hair care, skin care, glasses and other devices, and social behavior. (CB)

  4. "Good Citizen" Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Placer Hills Union Elementary School District, Meadow Vista, CA.

    THE FOLLOWING IS THE FULL TEXT OF THIS DOCUMENT: The "Good Citizen" Program was developed for many reasons: to keep the campus clean, to reward students for improvement, to reward students for good deeds, to improve the total school climate, to reward students for excellence, and to offer staff members a method of reward for positive…

  5. Strategies to achieve sustainability and quality in birth defects registries: the experience of the National Registry of Congenital Anomalies of Argentina.

    PubMed

    Groisman, Boris; Bidondo, Maria Paz; Gili, Juan Antonio; Barbero, Pablo; Liascovich, Rosa

    2013-01-01

    In many low-and middle-income countries, birth defects are not considered a public health priority and are perceived by the medical community as rare, unpreventable events. In this context, a registry of birth defects should address not only the collection, analysis, and dissemination of information but also contribute to local interventions like prevention, diagnosis, and treatment. We describe the National Registry of Congenital Anomalies of Argentina (RENAC) in terms of case definition, data collection, quality assurance, and data sending, coding, analysis, and information dissemination and we present the strategies used to ensure its sustainability. We emphasize strategies for motivating the people collecting data, such as training activities, participation in research projects, returning the processed data, making useful clinical information available, giving non-monetary rewards, and linking cases to genetic services. PMID:23778694

  6. Decontamination method using heat and relative humidity for radish seeds achieves a 7-log reduction of Escherichia coli O157:H7 without affecting product quality.

    PubMed

    Kim, Y B; Kim, H W; Song, M K; Rhee, M S

    2015-05-18

    We developed a novel decontamination method to inactivate Escherichia coli O157:H7 on radish seeds without adversely affecting seed germination or product quality. The use of heat (55, 60, and 65 °C) combined with relative humidity (RH; 25, 45, 65, 85, and 100%) for 24h was evaluated for effective microbial reduction and preservation of seed germination rates. A significant two-way interaction of heat and RH was observed for both microbial reduction and germination rate (P<0.0001). Increases in heat and RH were associated with corresponding reductions in E. coli O157:H7 and in germination rate (P<0.05). The order of lethality for the different treatments was generally as follows: no treatment <55 °C/25-65% RH ≒60 °C/25-45% RH ≒65 °C/25% RH <55 °C/85% RH =60 °C/65% RH <55 °C/100% RH =60 °C/85-100% RH =65 °C/45-100% RH. The most effective condition, 65 °C/45% RH, completely inactivated E. coli O157:H7 on the seeds (7.0 log CFU/g reduction) and had no significant effect on the germination rate (85.4%; P>0.05) or product quality. The method uses only heat and relative humidity without chemicals, and is thus applicable as a general decontamination procedure in spout producing plants where the use of growth chambers is the norm. PMID:25732001

  7. Decontamination method using heat and relative humidity for radish seeds achieves a 7-log reduction of Escherichia coli O157:H7 without affecting product quality.

    PubMed

    Kim, Y B; Kim, H W; Song, M K; Rhee, M S

    2015-05-18

    We developed a novel decontamination method to inactivate Escherichia coli O157:H7 on radish seeds without adversely affecting seed germination or product quality. The use of heat (55, 60, and 65 °C) combined with relative humidity (RH; 25, 45, 65, 85, and 100%) for 24h was evaluated for effective microbial reduction and preservation of seed germination rates. A significant two-way interaction of heat and RH was observed for both microbial reduction and germination rate (P<0.0001). Increases in heat and RH were associated with corresponding reductions in E. coli O157:H7 and in germination rate (P<0.05). The order of lethality for the different treatments was generally as follows: no treatment <55 °C/25-65% RH ≒60 °C/25-45% RH ≒65 °C/25% RH <55 °C/85% RH =60 °C/65% RH <55 °C/100% RH =60 °C/85-100% RH =65 °C/45-100% RH. The most effective condition, 65 °C/45% RH, completely inactivated E. coli O157:H7 on the seeds (7.0 log CFU/g reduction) and had no significant effect on the germination rate (85.4%; P>0.05) or product quality. The method uses only heat and relative humidity without chemicals, and is thus applicable as a general decontamination procedure in spout producing plants where the use of growth chambers is the norm.

  8. Quality of Obturation Achieved by an Endodontic Core-carrier System with Crosslinked Gutta-percha Carrier in Single-rooted Canals

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guo-hua; Niu, Li-na; Selem, Lisa C.; Eid, Ashraf A.; Bergeron, Brian E.; Chen, Ji-hua; Pashley, David H.; Tay, Franklin R.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The present study examined the quality of obturation in root canals obturated by GuttaCore, a gutta-percha-based core-carrier system with a cross-linked thermoset gutta-percha carrier, by comparing the incidence of gaps and voids identified from similar canals obturated by cold lateral compaction or warm vertical compaction. Methods Thirty single-rooted premolars with oval-shaped canals were shaped and cleaned, and obturated with one of the three obturation techniques (N=10): GuttaCore, warm vertical compaction or cold lateral compaction. Filled canals were scanned with micro-computed tomography (micro-CT); reconstructed images were analysed for the volumetric percentage of gaps and voids at 3 canal levels (0-4 mm, 4-8 mm and 8-12 mm from working length). The roots were subsequently sectioned at the 4-mm, 8-mm and 12-mm levels for analyses of the percentage of interfacial gaps, and area percentage of interfacial and intracanal voids, using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to examine negative replicas of root sections. Data were analysed with parametric or non-parametric statistical methods at α=0.05. Results Both micro-CT and SEM data indicated that canals obturated with GuttaCore core-carriers had the lowest incidence of interfacial gaps and voids, although the results were not significantly different from canals obturated by warm vertical compaction. Both the GuttaCore and the warm vertical compaction groups, in turn, had significantly lower incidences of gaps and voids than the cold lateral compaction group. Conclusions Because of the similarity in obturation quality between GuttaCore and warm vertical compaction, practitioners may find the GuttaCore core-carrier technique a valuable alternative for obturation of oval-shaped canals. PMID:24769108

  9. The need for good practices in biomedical technology.

    PubMed

    Koech, D K

    1996-02-01

    The present modern technologies have made it possible for one to carry out intricate and highly sensitive procedures that in the past were impossible or unheard of. The pharmaceutical industry has provided sophisticated products with unique drug delivery systems. Instrumentation technology has made it possible for the production of machines and facilities for use in the diagnosis and management of disease. Clinical science has reached such high levels of achievement as to enable an efficient patient management. Scientists and professionals working in these fields have thus been provided with modern tools with which to provide more efficient service to mankind. But consumers having become as equally sophisticated as these advancements, also require to know whether these products, equipment and services are fail-safe. They demand assurance; as it were, quality assurance. Gone are the days when the health professional would maintain his/her absolute competence, the pharmacist would assert that the pharmaceutical product was perfect, the laboratory analyst would claim that the laboratory results were excellent, and the physician would sternly uphold his clinical supremacy. Now, it is well known that there are no such ideals in health science research and practice. To try to attain the best level possible, professional bodies all over the world have established guidelines for Quality Assurance, Accreditation and Certification. The International standards Organization (ISO) has formulated comprehensive standards for all forms of quality audit and certification. The five quality management standards of the ISO, known as ISO 9000, ISO 9001, ISO 9002, ISO 9003, and ISO 9004, have been adopted by many organizations in various countries of the world. The principles of Good Laboratory Practices (LP) which were initially formulated by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) of the USA was adopted by the European Union (EU) in 1989. The World Health Organization (WHO) has also

  10. Achievement Gains and Staff Perception of School Climate. Research Brief. Volume 0707

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Don

    2008-01-01

    The importance of the beliefs and attitudes of teachers and building-level administrators in achieving school reform has come to be widely acknowledged. As University of Wisconsin professor Kent Peterson put it: "You can implement a good-quality improvement plan and knowledgeable, data-driven decision making, but if the [staff] doesn't believe…

  11. Good Chemical Measurements, Good Public Policies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faulkner, Larry R.

    2005-02-01

    At every turn now, one encounters sharply debated issues and important public policies that rest on chemical information. This is true in practically any arena where public interest intersects with the material world: health care practice and public health; energy; quality of air, water, and food; manufacturing standards and product liability; criminal justice; national and international security, including the defense against terrorism. The scale can be truly global, as in the case of the current debate over climate change, which extends into international efforts to regulate gaseous emissions. Sometimes the relevant chemical measurements and applicable theory are sound and their scope is appropriate to the policy; often they are inadequate and a policy or debate overreaches the analytical capability needed to support it. In the decades ahead, the issues with us today will become even more pressing and will drive a still greater reliance on analytical chemistry. This presentation will have four parts covering (a) illustrations of the impact of analytical chemistry on public debate and public policy, including instances where analytical capabilities actually gave rise to new issues and policies, (b) the manner in which chemical information is handled and understood in public debates, (c) areas of analytical chemistry that will be critical to sound public policy in the future, and (d) implications for the education of leaders and general citizens of modern societies.

  12. Public goods and procreation.

    PubMed

    Anomaly, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Procreation is the ultimate public goods problem. Each new child affects the welfare of many other people, and some (but not all) children produce uncompensated value that future people will enjoy. This essay addresses challenges that arise if we think of procreation and parenting as public goods. These include whether individual choices are likely to lead to a socially desirable outcome, and whether changes in laws, social norms, or access to genetic engineering and embryo selection might improve the aggregate outcome of our reproductive choices.

  13. Public goods and procreation.

    PubMed

    Anomaly, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Procreation is the ultimate public goods problem. Each new child affects the welfare of many other people, and some (but not all) children produce uncompensated value that future people will enjoy. This essay addresses challenges that arise if we think of procreation and parenting as public goods. These include whether individual choices are likely to lead to a socially desirable outcome, and whether changes in laws, social norms, or access to genetic engineering and embryo selection might improve the aggregate outcome of our reproductive choices. PMID:25743046

  14. 'Excuse me, do any of you ladies speak English?' Perspectives of refugee women living in South Australia: barriers to accessing primary health care and achieving the Quality Use of Medicines.

    PubMed

    Clark, Alice; Gilbert, Andrew; Rao, Deepa; Kerr, Lorraine

    2014-01-01

    Reforms to the Australian health system aim to ensure that services are accessible, clinically and culturally appropriate, timely and affordable. During the reform consultation process there were urgent calls from stakeholders to specifically consider the health needs of the thousands of refugees who settle here each year, but little is known about what is needed from the refugee perspective. Access to health services is a basic requirement of achieving the quality use of medicines, as outlined in Australia's National Medicines Policy. This study aimed to identify the barriers to accessing primary health care services and explore medicine-related issues as experienced by refugee women in South Australia. Thirty-six women participated in focus groups with accredited and community interpreters and participants were from Sudan, Burundi, Congo, Burma, Afghanistan and Bhutan who spoke English (as a second language), Chin, Matu, Dari and Nepali. The main barrier to accessing primary health care and understanding GPs and pharmacists was not being able to speak or comprehend English. Interpreter services were used inconsistently or not at all. To implement the health reforms and achieve the quality use of medicines, refugees, support organisations, GPs, pharmacists and their staff require education, training and support.

  15. Reconsidering the "Good Divorce"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amato, Paul R.; Kane, Jennifer B.; James, Spencer

    2011-01-01

    This study attempted to assess the notion that a "good divorce" protects children from the potential negative consequences of marital dissolution. A cluster analysis of data on postdivorce parenting from 944 families resulted in three groups: cooperative coparenting, parallel parenting, and single parenting. Children in the cooperative coparenting…

  16. Good-Neighbor Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drozdowski, Mark J.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author draws on his experience as the director of the Fitchburg State College Foundation in Fitchburg, Massachusetts, to make a distinction between being a good neighbor to local non-profit organizations by sharing strategies and information, and creating conflicts of interest when both the college and its neighbor…

  17. Restructuring for Good Governance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robert, Stephen; Carey, Russell C.

    2006-01-01

    American higher education has never been more in need of good governance than it is right now. Yet much of the structure many boards have inherited or created tends to stall or impede timely, well-informed, and broadly supported decision making. At many institutions (ours included), layers of governance have been added with each passing year,…

  18. Public Education, Public Good.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomlinson, John

    1986-01-01

    Criticizes policies which would damage or destroy a public education system. Examines the relationship between government-provided education and democracy. Concludes that privatization of public education would emphasize self-interest and selfishness, further jeopardizing the altruism and civic mindedness necessary for the public good. (JDH)

  19. Doing good & doing well.

    PubMed

    Barnett, K; Pittman, M

    2001-01-01

    Leaders cannot make the "business case" for community benefit in the traditional sense of near-term financial returns on investment. The concept of returns must be expanded to encompass more long-term--yet concrete and measurable--benefits that may be accrued both by nonprofit hospitals and local communities. Hospitals can "do well" economically through a more strategic approach to "doing good."

  20. Good neighbor monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Schukraft, D.F.

    1995-11-01

    Since 1896, when a Unocal 76 products oil refinery was sited overlooking San Pablo bay, urban sprawl has crept up and neighbors now include housing projects, shopping centers and schools. To ensure that the area is a safe and enjoyable place for all to live and work, Unocal is working with local community groups to monitor air quality. The refinery has recently installed a sophisticated air quality and meterological monitoring system designed to provide an early warning should sulfur compounds or hydrocarbons begin to reach unhealthful levels. Siting of the monitoring station was a joint effort by school administrators from the nearby Hillcrest Elementary School and the Bay Area Air Quality Management District. By strategically locating the station adjacent to the school, emission levels coming from the refinery or other local sources can be effectively monitored. A unique part of this program is how closely Unocal, Hillcrest School and BAAQMD work together. All three groups have access to the data.

  1. How Good Are Statistical Models at Approximating Complex Fitness Landscapes?

    PubMed Central

    du Plessis, Louis; Leventhal, Gabriel E.; Bonhoeffer, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Fitness landscapes determine the course of adaptation by constraining and shaping evolutionary trajectories. Knowledge of the structure of a fitness landscape can thus predict evolutionary outcomes. Empirical fitness landscapes, however, have so far only offered limited insight into real-world questions, as the high dimensionality of sequence spaces makes it impossible to exhaustively measure the fitness of all variants of biologically meaningful sequences. We must therefore revert to statistical descriptions of fitness landscapes that are based on a sparse sample of fitness measurements. It remains unclear, however, how much data are required for such statistical descriptions to be useful. Here, we assess the ability of regression models accounting for single and pairwise mutations to correctly approximate a complex quasi-empirical fitness landscape. We compare approximations based on various sampling regimes of an RNA landscape and find that the sampling regime strongly influences the quality of the regression. On the one hand it is generally impossible to generate sufficient samples to achieve a good approximation of the complete fitness landscape, and on the other hand systematic sampling schemes can only provide a good description of the immediate neighborhood of a sequence of interest. Nevertheless, we obtain a remarkably good and unbiased fit to the local landscape when using sequences from a population that has evolved under strong selection. Thus, current statistical methods can provide a good approximation to the landscape of naturally evolving populations. PMID:27189564

  2. How Good Are Statistical Models at Approximating Complex Fitness Landscapes?

    PubMed

    du Plessis, Louis; Leventhal, Gabriel E; Bonhoeffer, Sebastian

    2016-09-01

    Fitness landscapes determine the course of adaptation by constraining and shaping evolutionary trajectories. Knowledge of the structure of a fitness landscape can thus predict evolutionary outcomes. Empirical fitness landscapes, however, have so far only offered limited insight into real-world questions, as the high dimensionality of sequence spaces makes it impossible to exhaustively measure the fitness of all variants of biologically meaningful sequences. We must therefore revert to statistical descriptions of fitness landscapes that are based on a sparse sample of fitness measurements. It remains unclear, however, how much data are required for such statistical descriptions to be useful. Here, we assess the ability of regression models accounting for single and pairwise mutations to correctly approximate a complex quasi-empirical fitness landscape. We compare approximations based on various sampling regimes of an RNA landscape and find that the sampling regime strongly influences the quality of the regression. On the one hand it is generally impossible to generate sufficient samples to achieve a good approximation of the complete fitness landscape, and on the other hand systematic sampling schemes can only provide a good description of the immediate neighborhood of a sequence of interest. Nevertheless, we obtain a remarkably good and unbiased fit to the local landscape when using sequences from a population that has evolved under strong selection. Thus, current statistical methods can provide a good approximation to the landscape of naturally evolving populations.

  3. The Goods Upstairs Car Innovative Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Feng-Lan; Zhang, Bo; Gao, Bo; Liu, Yan-Xin; Gao, Bo

    2016-05-01

    The design is a new kind of cars used for loading goods when you upstairs. The cars -- ones are very safe and convenient --consist of body, chassis, bottom, round, object, stage, upstairs, train wheels, handles, storage tank, security fence etc. The design, composed of combination of each structure, achieves the purpose of loading goods and even some large potted plants when you go upstairs or downstairs very flatly.

  4. Serving the public good.

    PubMed

    Greene, Jennifer C

    2010-05-01

    This discussion foregrounds four key issues engaged by the articles presented in this special issue: the unique challenges and opportunities of environmental education evaluation, how to think well about the evaluation approaches and purposes that best match this domain, evaluation capacity building in environmental education and action, and accountability and activist pressures on contemporary evaluation. Environmental education evaluators are encouraged to consider positioning their work in service of the public good.

  5. 'Good palliative care' orders.

    PubMed

    Maddocks, I

    1993-01-01

    A Select Committee of the Parliament of South Australia, considering revisions to legislation governing care of the dying, did not support allowing doctors to assist suicide. They recommended that no liability attach to the provision of reasonable palliative care which happens to shorten life. The Committee affirmed the suggestion that positive open orders to provide 'good palliative care' should replace 'do not resuscitate' orders. PMID:7506978

  6. A Virtual Good Idea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolch, Matt

    2009-01-01

    School districts across the country have always had to do more with less. Funding goes only so far, leaving administrators and IT staff to find innovative ways to save money while maintaining a high level of academic quality. Creating virtual servers accomplishes both tasks, district technology personnel say. Virtual environments not only allow…

  7. DPAL: historical perspective and summary of achievements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanov, B. V.; Knize, R. J.

    2013-10-01

    Alkali vapor lasers are under extensive research and development during the past decade because of their potential for scaling to high powers while maintaining a good beam quality. Also, a possibility of using efficient diode lasers for pumping alkali vapor promises high total wall plug efficiency for a Diode Pumped Alkali Laser (DPAL). Since the first DPAL demonstration with output power of 130 mW in 20051, a significant progress in this field was achieved. The output power of about 1 kW in continuous wave (CW) operation with optical efficiency close to 50% was recently demonstrated for a Cs DPAL2. Also, the DPALs based on other alkali metals (Rubidium and Potassium) were demonstrated3,4 . In spite of these significant achievements, there are still several problems in DPAL power scaling exist that must be addressed. Among them are the thermal5 and photoionization6 issues that become important even at power level about several tens of watts. In this paper we present a historical review of the alkali laser research and development, discuss the most important achievements and future perspectives in this field of research.

  8. Improving College Effectiveness: Raising Quality and Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Somekh, Bridget; Convery, Andy; Delaney, Jean; Fisher, Roy; Gray, John; Gunn, Stan; Henworth, Andrew; Powell, Loraine

    1999-01-01

    Work undertaken to improve the effectiveness of the United Kingdom's schools and further education (FE) sectors was identified and assessed in a study entailing four data collection methods: literature review; questionnaire administered to all FE college principals in England and Wales; expert seminar and face-to-face interviews with high-level…

  9. Achieving Quality with Online Teaching Technologies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fahy, Patrick J.

    Online teaching technologies still have three main disadvantages: cost, complexity, and negative impacts on productivity. In many areas of Canada, cost is still a major factor affecting ownership and use of computers and other new technologies. Until online teaching technologies become as simple to use as telephones and new cars, they will…

  10. One of the Good Guys

    SciTech Connect

    Wiley, H. S.

    2010-10-01

    I was talking with some younger colleagues at a meeting last month when the subject of career goals came up. These colleagues were successful in that they had recently received tenure at top research universities and had some grants and good students. Thus, the early career pressure to simply survive was gone. So now what motivated them? Solving challenging and significant scientific problems was at the top of their lists. Interestingly, they were also motivated by a desire to become one of the “good guys” in science. The fact that being an important contributor to the scientific community can be fulfilling should not come as a surprise to anyone. However, what I do consider surprising is how rarely this seems to be discussed with students and postdocs. What we do discuss are either those issues that are fundamental aspects of the job (get a grant, get tenure, do research in an important field) or those that are important to our institutions. Knowing how to do our jobs well is indeed essential for any kind of professional success. However, achieving the right balance in our ambitions is also important for our happiness.

  11. Is Good Fit Related to Good Behaviour? Goodness of Fit between Daycare Teacher-Child Relationships, Temperament, and Prosocial Behaviour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hipson, Will E.; Séguin, Daniel G.

    2016-01-01

    The Goodness-of-Fit model [Thomas, A., & Chess, S. (1977). Temperament and development. New York: Brunner/Mazel] proposes that a child's temperament interacts with the environment to influence child outcomes. In the past, researchers have shown how the association between the quality of the teacher-child relationship in daycare and child…

  12. Graded Achievement, Tested Achievement, and Validity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brookhart, Susan M.

    2015-01-01

    Twenty-eight studies of grades, over a century, were reviewed using the argument-based approach to validity suggested by Kane as a theoretical framework. The review draws conclusions about the meaning of graded achievement, its relation to tested achievement, and changes in the construct of graded achievement over time. "Graded…

  13. 76 FR 76973 - Good Neighbor Environmental Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-09

    ... infrastructure issues and needs within the States contiguous to Mexico in order to improve the quality of life of... AGENCY Good Neighbor Environmental Board AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: Under the Federal Advisory Committee Act, Public Law 92463, EPA gives notice of...

  14. 75 FR 8699 - Good Neighbor Environmental Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-25

    ... infrastructure issues and needs within the States contiguous to Mexico in order to improve the quality of life of... AGENCY Good Neighbor Environmental Board AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: Under the Federal Advisory Committee Act, Public Law 92-463, EPA gives notice of...

  15. 76 FR 52662 - Good Neighbor Environmental Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-23

    ... infrastructure issues and needs within the States contiguous to Mexico in order to improve the quality of life of... AGENCY Good Neighbor Environmental Board AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: Under the Federal Advisory Committee Act, Public Law 92463, EPA gives notice of...

  16. 76 FR 31328 - Good Neighbor Environmental Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-31

    ... infrastructure issues and needs within the States contiguous to Mexico in order to improve the quality of life of... AGENCY Good Neighbor Environmental Board AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: Under the Federal Advisory Committee Act, Public Law 92463, EPA gives notice of...

  17. 76 FR 73631 - Good Neighbor Environmental Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-29

    ... infrastructure issues and needs within the States contiguous to Mexico in order to improve the quality of life of... AGENCY Good Neighbor Environmental Board AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: Under the Federal Advisory Committee Act, Public Law 92463, EPA gives notice of...

  18. 77 FR 32636 - Good Neighbor Environmental Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-01

    ... infrastructure issues and needs within the States contiguous to Mexico in order to improve the quality of life of... AGENCY Good Neighbor Environmental Board AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: Under the Federal Advisory Committee Act, Public Law 92463, EPA gives notice of...

  19. 76 FR 12731 - Good Neighbor Environmental Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-08

    ... infrastructure issues and needs within the States contiguous to Mexico in order to improve the quality of life of... AGENCY Good Neighbor Environmental Board AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: Under the Federal Advisory Committee Act, Public Law 92463, EPA gives notice of...

  20. Good Clinical Practice Training

    PubMed Central

    Arango, Jaime; Chuck, Tina; Ellenberg, Susan S.; Foltz, Bridget; Gorman, Colleen; Hinrichs, Heidi; McHale, Susan; Merchant, Kunal; Shapley, Stephanie; Wild, Gretchen

    2016-01-01

    Good Clinical Practice (GCP) is an international standard for the design, conduct, performance, monitoring, auditing, recording, analyses, and reporting of clinical trials. The goal of GCP is to ensure the protection of the rights, integrity, and confidentiality of clinical trial participants and to ensure the credibility and accuracy of data and reported results. In the United States, trial sponsors generally require investigators to complete GCP training prior to participating in each clinical trial to foster GCP and as a method to meet regulatory expectations (ie, sponsor’s responsibility to select qualified investigators per 21 CFR 312.50 and 312.53(a) for drugs and biologics and 21 CFR 812.40 and 812.43(a) for medical devices). This training requirement is often extended to investigative site staff, as deemed relevant by the sponsor, institution, or investigator. Those who participate in multiple clinical trials are often required by sponsors to complete repeated GCP training, which is unnecessarily burdensome. The Clinical Trials Transformation Initiative convened a multidisciplinary project team involving partners from academia, industry, other researchers and research staff, and government to develop recommendations for streamlining current GCP training practices. Recommendations drafted by the project team, including the minimum key training elements, frequency, format, and evidence of training completion, were presented to a broad group of experts to foster discussion of the current issues and to seek consensus on proposed solutions. PMID:27390628

  1. The Goodness of Simultaneous Fits in ISIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kühnel, Matthias; Falkner, Sebastian; Grossberger, Christoph; Ballhausen, Ralf; Dauser, Thomas; Schwarm, Fritz-Walter; Kreykenbohm, Ingo; Nowak, Michael A.; Pottschmidt, Katja; Ferrigno, Carlo; Rothschild, Richard E.; Martínez-Núñez, Silvia; Torrejón, José Miguel; Fürst, Felix; Klochkov, Dmitry; Staubert, Rüdiger; Kretschmar, Peter; Wilms, Jörn

    2016-02-01

    In a previous work, we introduced a tool for analyzing multiple datasets simultaneously, which has been implemented into ISIS. This tool was used to fit many spectra of X-ray binaries. However, the large number of degrees of freedom and individual datasets raise an issue about a good measure for a simultaneous fit quality. We present three ways to check the goodness of these fits: we investigate the goodness of each fit in all datasets, we define a combined goodness exploiting the logical structure of a simultaneous fit, and we stack the fit residuals of all datasets to detect weak features. These tools are applied to all RXTE-spectra from GRO 1008-57, revealing calibration features that are not detected significantly in any single spectrum. Stacking the residuals from the best-fit model for the Vela X-1 and XTE J1859+083 data evidences fluorescent emission lines that would have gone undetected otherwise.

  2. Competition in Healthcare: Good, Bad or Ugly?

    PubMed

    Goddard, Maria

    2015-08-01

    The role of competition in healthcare is much debated. Despite a wealth of international experience in relation to competition, evidence is mixed and contested and the debate about the potential role for competition is often polarised. This paper considers briefly some of the reasons for this, focusing on what is meant by "competition in healthcare" and why it is more valuable to think about the circumstances in which competition is more and less likely to be a good tool to achieve benefits, rather than whether or not it is "good" or "bad," per se.

  3. There's No Romance without Finance: "Good Management Begins with Good People"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vicars, Dennis

    2008-01-01

    Centers and schools go out of business not for lack of program or good intentions. They failed because they lacked the ability to plan, budget, and utilize resources appropriately. A center or school can achieve almost any goal it desires, as long as a well-conceived plan is created and followed to the end. Yes, sometimes variables occur which…

  4. Vertical Sextants give Good Sights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon, Mark

    Many texts stress the need for marine sextants to be held precisely vertical at the instant that the altitude of a heavenly body is measured. Several authors lay particular emphasis on the technique of the instrument in a small arc about the horizontal axis to obtain a good sight. Nobody, to the author's knowledge, however, has attempted to quantify the errors involved, so as to compare them with other errors inherent in determining celestial position lines. This paper sets out to address these issues and to pose the question: what level of accuracy of vertical alignment can reasonably be expected during marine sextant work at sea ?When a heavenly body is brought to tangency with the visible horizon it is particularly important to ensure that the sextant is held in a truly vertical position. To this end the instrument is rocked gently about the horizontal so that the image of the body describes a small arc in the observer's field of vision. As Bruce Bauer points out, tangency with the horizon must be achieved during the process of rocking and not a second or so after rocking has been discontinued. The altitude is recorded for the instant that the body kisses the visible horizon at the lowest point of the rocking arc, as in Fig. 2. The only other visual clue as to whether the sextant is vertical is provided by the right angle made by the vertical edge of the horizon glass mirror with the horizon. There may also be some input from the observer's sense of balance and his hand orientation.

  5. Comparing Science Achievement Constructs: Targeted and Achieved

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrara, Steve; Duncan, Teresa

    2011-01-01

    This article illustrates how test specifications based solely on academic content standards, without attention to other cognitive skills and item response demands, can fall short of their targeted constructs. First, the authors inductively describe the science achievement construct represented by a statewide sixth-grade science proficiency test.…

  6. Mobility and Reading Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waters, Theresa Z.

    A study examined the effect of geographic mobility on elementary school students' achievement. Although such mobility, which requires students to make multiple moves among schools, can have a negative impact on academic achievement, the hypothesis for the study was that it was not a determining factor in reading achievement test scores. Subjects…

  7. Even 'Good' Insurance Comes with Hidden Hospital Bills

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159575.html Even 'Good' Insurance Comes With Hidden Hospital Bills Average out-of- ... June 27, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Quality private health insurance is no protection against large out-of-pocket ...

  8. Academic Achievement Survey and Educational Assessment Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanaka, Koji

    2009-01-01

    The recent "Nationwide academic achievement and study situation survey" was clearly influenced by the idea of "authentic assessment", an educational assessment perspective focused on "quality" and "engagement". However, when "performance assessment", the assessment method corresponding to this focus, is adopted in academic achievement surveys, it…

  9. Maryland's Achievements in Public Education, 2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maryland State Department of Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This report presents Maryland's achievements in public education for 2011. Maryland's achievements include: (1) Maryland's public schools again ranked #1 in the nation in Education Week's 2011 Quality Counts annual report; (2) Maryland ranked 1st nationwide for a 3rd year in a row in the percentage of public school students scoring 3 or higher on…

  10. Veterinary education: a basis for good governance leading to effective veterinary services.

    PubMed

    Sabin, E A; DeHaven, W R

    2012-08-01

    Veterinary education serves as the foundation on which a country can build effective Veterinary Services (VS). In addition, an appropriately well-educated animal health workforce will be better poised to actively participate in and advance good governance practices. Good governance, in turn, will lead to improved animal and veterinary public heath infrastructures and help advance economic development across the globe. A crucial first step in establishing a strong educational foundation is to define minimum competencies for both public- and private-practice veterinarians to perform veterinary service tasks. Defining minimum competencies will also assist veterinary education establishments (VEEs) in developing and implementing curricula to allow graduates to achieve those competencies. Incorporating veterinary educational prerequisites and requirements into governance documents that regulate VS will help to ensure that those who deliver VS have an adequate knowledge and skills base to do so. Public-private partnerships may be particularly effective in designing and implementing curricula that address defined minimum competencies and assure the quality of VEEs. Through these partnerships, a system of continuous quality improvement is established that embodies the qualities essential to good governance practices. Such practices will ultimately strengthen national VS, better protect animal and public health, and ensure food security. PMID:23413731

  11. Educating for Good Work: From Research to Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mucinskas, Daniel; Gardner, Howard

    2013-01-01

    Launched in 1995, the GoodWork Project is a long-term, multi-site effort to understand the nature of good work across the professional landscape and to promote its achievement by relevant groups of students and professionals. In this essay, the authors review the goals and methods of the initial research project and its most salient findings. They…

  12. RELATIVE THEORY OF GOOD IN "BRAVE NEW WORLD" AND "1984."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    PARTRIDGE, ALICE

    ONE METHOD OF INTERESTING THE AVERAGE HIGH SCHOOL STUDENT IN QUESTIONING INTELLIGENTLY THE NATURE OF GOOD IS THROUGH THE STUDY OF HUXLEY'S "BRAVE NEW WORLD" AND ORWELL'S "1984." IN BOTH OF THESE NEGATIVE UTOPIAS THE LOSS OF MAN'S HUMANITY, INDIVIDUALITY, AND RIGHT TO REASON THE NATURE OF GOOD ARE THE VERY QUALITIES WHICH MAKE HIM "EXCELLENT," AND…

  13. In Your View: What Is a Good Science Teacher?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piggott, Andy

    2014-01-01

    Search the Internet for the qualities of a good teacher and you'll find that an entire range of ideas are offered. Having spent half a working life as a science teacher and the remainder as a science education consultant (and, for a period, an Ofsted team inspector!), the author would like to attempt to tease out what makes a "good science…

  14. Using Good Literature to Teach Reading: Prostitution or Promise?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Earle, Richard A.

    The use of good literature in teaching reading can mean the relegation of literature to the role of a vehicle for instruction rather than a process of encountering human experiences. Four principles underlying a quality literature instruction program help determine whether good literature is being used or abused: (1) wide exposure to many levels,…

  15. A Multicultural View of the Good Teacher in Israel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reichel, Nirit; Arnon, Sara

    2009-01-01

    "The good teacher" is an archetypal concept; a topic of discussion in various philosophical and educational theories which expresses an ideal, while in reality is composed of many qualities and a variety of contents. This study is unique in its investigation of the similarities and differences in the perception of the good teacher among a wide…

  16. Can You Show You Are a Good Lecturer?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Leigh N.; Harding, Ansie

    2007-01-01

    Measurement of the quality of teaching activities is becoming increasingly important since universities are rewarding performance in terms of promotion, awards and bonuses and research is no longer the only key performance indicator. Good teaching is not easy to identify and measure. This paper specifically deals with the issue of good teaching in…

  17. Enjoyment and the Good Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Estes, Cheryl; Henderson, Karla

    2003-01-01

    Presents information to update parks and recreation professionals about what recent research says in regard to enjoyment and the good life, noting what applications this research has for practitioners. The article focuses on: the good life and leisure services; happiness, subjective well-being, and intrinsic motivation; leisure, happiness, and…

  18. What Are Good Child Outcomes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Kristin Anderson; Evans, V. Jeffery; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne; Roth, Jodie

    This paper considers the question "What are good child outcomes?" from the perspectives of developmental psychology, economics, and sociology. Section 1 of the paper examines good child outcomes as characteristics of stage-salient tasks of development. Section 2 emphasizes the acquisition of "human capital," the development of productive traits…

  19. Does good documentation equate to good nursing care?

    PubMed

    Bosek, Marcia Sue DeWolf; Ring, Marcia Ellen

    2010-01-01

    Good documentation does not necessarily equate to good care. This article explores the potential underpinnings of poor documentation from an ethical decision-making lens. Nursing standards of care related to documentation are reviewed. The internal and external constraints of moral distress are considered, as is moral residue. Finally, the roles of the nurse administrator as well as specific remedial and restorative measures are suggested.

  20. General Achievement Trends: Oklahoma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  1. General Achievement Trends: Georgia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  2. General Achievement Trends: Nebraska

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  3. General Achievement Trends: Arkansas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  4. General Achievement Trends: Maryland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  5. General Achievement Trends: Maine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  6. General Achievement Trends: Iowa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  7. General Achievement Trends: Texas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  8. General Achievement Trends: Hawaii

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  9. General Achievement Trends: Kansas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  10. General Achievement Trends: Florida

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  11. General Achievement Trends: Massachusetts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  12. General Achievement Trends: Tennessee

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  13. General Achievement Trends: Alabama

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  14. General Achievement Trends: Virginia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  15. General Achievement Trends: Michigan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  16. General Achievement Trends: Colorado

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  17. Inverting the Achievement Pyramid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White-Hood, Marian; Shindel, Melissa

    2006-01-01

    Attempting to invert the pyramid to improve student achievement and increase all students' chances for success is not a new endeavor. For decades, educators have strategized, formed think tanks, and developed school improvement teams to find better ways to improve the achievement of all students. Currently, the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) is…

  18. Achievement Test Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Dept. of Education, Columbus. Trade and Industrial Education Service.

    The Ohio Trade and Industrial Education Achievement Test battery is comprised of seven basic achievement tests: Machine Trades, Automotive Mechanics, Basic Electricity, Basic Electronics, Mechanical Drafting, Printing, and Sheet Metal. The tests were developed by subject matter committees and specialists in testing and research. The Ohio Trade and…

  19. School Effects on Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nichols, Robert C.

    The New York State Education Department conducts a Pupil Evaluation Program (PEP) in which each year all third, sixth, and ninth grade students in the state are given a series of achievement tests in reading and mathematics. The data accumulated by the department includes achievement test scores, teacher characteristics, building and curriculum…

  20. Heritability of Creative Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piffer, Davide; Hur, Yoon-Mi

    2014-01-01

    Although creative achievement is a subject of much attention to lay people, the origin of individual differences in creative accomplishments remain poorly understood. This study examined genetic and environmental influences on creative achievement in an adult sample of 338 twins (mean age = 26.3 years; SD = 6.6 years). Twins completed the Creative…

  1. Confronting the Achievement Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, David

    2007-01-01

    This article talks about the large achievement gap between children of color and their white peers. The reasons for the achievement gap are varied. First, many urban minorities come from a background of poverty. One of the detrimental effects of growing up in poverty is receiving inadequate nourishment at a time when bodies and brains are rapidly…

  2. Achieving Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abowitz, Kathleen Knight

    2011-01-01

    Public schools are functionally provided through structural arrangements such as government funding, but public schools are achieved in substance, in part, through local governance. In this essay, Kathleen Knight Abowitz explains the bifocal nature of achieving public schools; that is, that schools are both subject to the unitary Public compact of…

  3. Good clinical practices in phase I studies.

    PubMed

    Decousus, H; Perpoint, B; Mismetti, P; Ollagnier, M; Queneau, P

    1990-01-01

    In France, official guidelines for good clinical practices in clinical trials were issued in 1987. In December 1988, a law was passed that fixed the requirements for carrying out experiments in healthy subjects. It will be completed by official guidelines for the structures in which experiments on healthy subjects (and patients as well, when the investigation would not benefit the health of the patients) may be conducted. Hence a battery of recent legal instructions precisely state what good clinical practices are in the setting of phase I studies. Of particular importance are: subject recruitment and selection methods and procedures; specific competence of the investigator, in particular to interpret the pre-trial data; necessary and sufficient facilities to guarantee the subjects' safety; careful quality control to check all laboratory procedures; necessity of written standard operating procedures.

  4. Tools for Achieving TQE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Latta, Raymond F.; Downey, Carolyn J.

    This book presents a wide array of sophisticated problem-solving tools and shows how to use them in a humanizing way that involves all stakeholders in the process. Chapter 1 develops the rationale for educational stakeholders to consider quality tools. Chapter 2 highlights three quality group-process tools--brainstorming, the nominal group…

  5. Working for Quality Child Care: Good Child Care Jobs Equals Good Care for Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bellm, Dan; Haack, Peggy

    Although child caregivers make a major contribution to children's development and to the health and well-being of their communities, they remain underpaid and undervalued. Written for entry-level and experienced child care teachers and providers, this book presents information on the child care occupation and includes tools to help teachers and…

  6. Working for Quality Child Care: Good Child Care Jobs Equals Good Care for Children. Trainer's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bellm, Dan; Haack, Peggy

    Noting that the education and training of most early childhood practitioners lack information on child care as an adult work environment, this guide is designed to assist trainers in providing practitioners information about working with the array of adults they encounter on the job, the serious challenges and instabilities in the field, and the…

  7. Technical Excellence: A Requirement for Good Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gill, Paul S.; Vaughan, William W.

    2008-01-01

    Technical excellence is a requirement for good engineering. Technical excellence has many different ways of expressing itself within engineering. NASA has initiatives that address the enhancement of the Agency's technical excellence and thrust to maintain the associated high level of performance by the Agency on current programs/projects and as it moves into the Constellation Program and the return to the Moon with plans to visit Mars. This paper addresses some of the key initiatives associated with NASA's technical excellence thrust. Examples are provided to illustrate some results being achieved and plans to enhance these initiatives.

  8. The Good Second Language Learner

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naiman, N.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    Reports on a research study designed to find out more about the successful second language learner. By means of interviews, a list of the learning strategies of good language students was developed. (PMP)

  9. Good Health For the Holidays!

    MedlinePlus

    ... Current Issue Past Issues Good Health For the Holidays! Past Issues / Fall 2007 Table of Contents For ... PhotoDisc When the family comes together for the holidays, make sure everyone knows about MedlinePlus.gov —your ...

  10. Diet and good health (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... for a person of any age. A healthy diet is especially important for children since a variety of food is needed for proper development. Other elements of good health include exercise, rest and avoidance of stimulants such ...

  11. Good customer service for patients.

    PubMed

    Foster, Sam

    2016-08-11

    Sam Foster, Chief Nurse at Heart of England NHS Foundation Trust, looks at what the NHS can learn about good customer service from the private sector, and how Always Events can improve patient care. PMID:27523767

  12. Good Practices for Hood Use.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mikell, William G.; Drinkard, William C.

    1984-01-01

    Describes safety practices for laboratory fume hoods based on certain assumptions of hood design and performance. Also discusses the procedures in preparing to work at a hood. A checklist of good hood practices is included. (JM)

  13. Quality Counts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alderson, Kris

    2008-01-01

    Everyone wants kids to grow up smart. A child's educational success depends on good teachers, challenging curricula and involved parents. Student achievement also can be affected by the healthfulness of a school's environment. That environment includes the restrooms that consume millions of gallons of water on campuses throughout the nation.…

  14. Good Show by Today's Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowry, W. Kenneth

    1977-01-01

    Investigates whether today's students would score as well as students of the 1930-1950 era on achievement tests. Uses the Progressive Achievement Test, a test widely used in the 1930-1950 era as a barometer of student ability. (RK)

  15. Do good actions inspire good actions in others?

    PubMed Central

    Capraro, Valerio; Marcelletti, Alessandra

    2014-01-01

    Actions such as sharing food and cooperating to reach a common goal have played a fundamental role in the evolution of human societies. Despite the importance of such good actions, little is known about if and how they can spread from person to person to person. For instance, does being recipient of an altruistic act increase your probability of being cooperative with a third party? We have conducted an experiment on Amazon Mechanical Turk to test this mechanism using economic games. We have measured willingness to be cooperative through a standard Prisoner's dilemma and willingness to act altruistically using a binary Dictator game. In the baseline treatments, the endowments needed to play were given by the experimenters, as usual; in the control treatments, they came from a good action made by someone else. Across four different comparisons and a total of 572 subjects, we have never found a significant increase of cooperation or altruism when the endowment came from a good action. We conclude that good actions do not necessarily inspire good actions in others. While this is consistent with the theoretical prediction, it challenges the majority of other experimental studies. PMID:25502617

  16. Culture shock: Improving software quality

    SciTech Connect

    de Jong, K.; Trauth, S.L.

    1988-01-01

    The concept of software quality can represent a significant shock to an individual who has been developing software for many years and who believes he or she has been doing a high quality job. The very idea that software includes lines of code and associated documentation is foreign and difficult to grasp, at best. Implementation of a software quality program hinges on the concept that software is a product whose quality needs improving. When this idea is introduced into a technical community that is largely ''self-taught'' and has been producing ''good'' software for some time, a fundamental understanding of the concepts associated with software is often weak. Software developers can react as if to say, ''What are you talking about. What do you mean I'm not doing a good job. I haven't gotten any complaints about my code yetexclamation'' Coupling such surprise and resentment with the shock that software really is a product and software quality concepts do exist, can fuel the volatility of these emotions. In this paper, we demonstrate that the concept of software quality can indeed pose a culture shock to developers. We also show that a ''typical'' quality assurance approach, that of imposing a standard and providing inspectors and auditors to assure its adherence, contributes to this shock and detracts from the very goal the approach should achieve. We offer an alternative, adopted through experience, to implement a software quality program: cooperative assistance. We show how cooperation, education, consultation and friendly assistance can overcome this culture shock. 3 refs.

  17. Student Achievement and Motivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flammer, Gordon H.; Mecham, Robert C.

    1974-01-01

    Compares the lecture and self-paced methods of instruction on the basis of student motivation and achieveme nt, comparing motivating and demotivating factors in each, and their potential for motivation and achievement. (Authors/JR)

  18. A Pretty Good Paper about Pretty Good Privacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCollum, Roy

    With today's growth in the use of electronic information systems for e-mail, data development and research, and the relative ease of access to such resources, protecting one's data and correspondence has become a great concern. "Pretty Good Privacy" (PGP), an encryption program developed by Phil Zimmermann, may be the software tool that will…

  19. Why ethics is indispensable for good-quality operational research.

    PubMed

    Edginton, M; Enarson, D; Zachariah, R; Reid, T; Satyanarayana, S; Bissell, K; Hinderaker, S G; Harries, T

    2012-03-21

    This article outlines challenges encountered when ethics is taught and promoted in the Operational Research courses of the International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease, with a focus on ethical issues related to studies that involve health records reviews. Problems observed by the Ethics Advisory Group include engagement of all stakeholders, maintenance of confidentiality and authorship. The omission of ethics in the STROBE (Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology) statement and its explanatory commentary published in 2007 is highlighted and questioned.

  20. Governing for the Common Good.

    PubMed

    Ruger, Jennifer Prah

    2015-12-01

    The proper object of global health governance (GHG) should be the common good, ensuring that all people have the opportunity to flourish. A well-organized global society that promotes the common good is to everyone's advantage. Enabling people to flourish includes enabling their ability to be healthy. Thus, we must assess health governance by its effectiveness in enhancing health capabilities. Current GHG fails to support human flourishing, diminishes health capabilities and thus does not serve the common good. The provincial globalism theory of health governance proposes a Global Health Constitution and an accompanying Global Institute of Health and Medicine that together propose to transform health governance. Multiple lines of empirical research suggest that these institutions would be effective, offering the most promising path to a healthier, more just world.

  1. Governing for the Common Good.

    PubMed

    Ruger, Jennifer Prah

    2015-12-01

    The proper object of global health governance (GHG) should be the common good, ensuring that all people have the opportunity to flourish. A well-organized global society that promotes the common good is to everyone's advantage. Enabling people to flourish includes enabling their ability to be healthy. Thus, we must assess health governance by its effectiveness in enhancing health capabilities. Current GHG fails to support human flourishing, diminishes health capabilities and thus does not serve the common good. The provincial globalism theory of health governance proposes a Global Health Constitution and an accompanying Global Institute of Health and Medicine that together propose to transform health governance. Multiple lines of empirical research suggest that these institutions would be effective, offering the most promising path to a healthier, more just world. PMID:26122555

  2. Religiosity as a public good.

    PubMed

    Sherlock, Richard

    2008-09-01

    Public Goods can be seen as one important way in which societies sustain themselves over time. These are part of the puzzle of the development of political order. Public goods like the rule of law are non-substractable and non-excludable . For economists the classic textbook examples are national defense and police protection. In this paper I argue that religiosity can function like police protection, a means of sustaining order through fear of punishment from a transcendent source. As a means of reducing defection from social norms it has a role to play as a public good. But religion cannot at the same time be seen as the source of such norms or dissention will undermine the very order that punishment seems to reinforce.

  3. Going GLP: Conducting Toxicology Studies in Compliance with Good Laboratory Practices.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Erica Eggers

    2016-01-01

    Good laboratory practice standards are US federal regulations enacted as part of the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (40 CFR Part 160), the Toxic Substance Control Act (40 CFR Part 792), and the Good Laboratory Practice for Nonclinical Laboratory Studies (21 CFR Part 58) to support protection of public health in the areas of pesticides, chemicals, and drug investigations in response to allegations of inaccurate data acquisition. Essentially, good laboratory practices (GLPs) are a system of management controls for nonclinical research studies involving animals to ensure the uniformity, consistency, reliability, reproducibility, quality, and integrity of data collected as part of chemical (including pharmaceuticals) tests, from in vitro through acute to chronic toxicity tests. The GLPs were established in the United States in 1978 as a result of the Industrial Bio-Test Laboratory scandal which led to congressional hearings and actions to prevent fraudulent data reporting and collection. Although the establishment of infrastructure for GLPs compliance is labor-intensive and time-consuming, achievement and maintenance of GLP compliance ensures the accuracy of the data collected from each study, which is critical for defending results, advancing science, and protecting human and animal health. This article describes how and why those in the US Army Medical Department responsible for protecting the public health of US Army and other military personnel made the policy decision to have its toxicology laboratory achieve complete compliance with GLP standards, the first such among US Army laboratories. The challenges faced and how they were overcome are detailed. PMID:27613211

  4. Going GLP: Conducting Toxicology Studies in Compliance with Good Laboratory Practices.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Erica Eggers

    2016-01-01

    Good laboratory practice standards are US federal regulations enacted as part of the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (40 CFR Part 160), the Toxic Substance Control Act (40 CFR Part 792), and the Good Laboratory Practice for Nonclinical Laboratory Studies (21 CFR Part 58) to support protection of public health in the areas of pesticides, chemicals, and drug investigations in response to allegations of inaccurate data acquisition. Essentially, good laboratory practices (GLPs) are a system of management controls for nonclinical research studies involving animals to ensure the uniformity, consistency, reliability, reproducibility, quality, and integrity of data collected as part of chemical (including pharmaceuticals) tests, from in vitro through acute to chronic toxicity tests. The GLPs were established in the United States in 1978 as a result of the Industrial Bio-Test Laboratory scandal which led to congressional hearings and actions to prevent fraudulent data reporting and collection. Although the establishment of infrastructure for GLPs compliance is labor-intensive and time-consuming, achievement and maintenance of GLP compliance ensures the accuracy of the data collected from each study, which is critical for defending results, advancing science, and protecting human and animal health. This article describes how and why those in the US Army Medical Department responsible for protecting the public health of US Army and other military personnel made the policy decision to have its toxicology laboratory achieve complete compliance with GLP standards, the first such among US Army laboratories. The challenges faced and how they were overcome are detailed.

  5. Inspecting for Quality. California's Lowest-Achieving Schools are Routinely Visited by Inspectors on the Lookout for, among Other things, Inadequate Textbook Supplies, Dirty Drinking Water, and Evidence of Vermin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobson, Linda

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author describes how the California's lowest-achieving schools are routinely visited by inspectors on the lookout for, among other things, inadequate textbook supplies, dirty drinking water, and evidence of vermin. Following the settlement from the case "Williams v. California," the laws known as the "Williams legislation"…

  6. Everyone Loves a Good Story

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Croxall, Kathy C.; Gubler, Rea R.

    2006-01-01

    Everyone loves a good story. Reading brings back pleasant memories of being read to by parents or others. Literacy is encouraged when students are continually exposed to stories and books. Teachers can encourage students to discover their parents' favorite stories and share them with the class. In this article, the authors recommend the use of…

  7. Gender Play and Good Governance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Mark

    2008-01-01

    Like good government, thoughtful care of children requires those in power, whether teachers or parents, to recognize when it is appropriate for them to step back from day-to-day decision-making while still working behind the scenes to ensure an organizational structure that supports the independence and equitable development of those they serve.…

  8. Practicing Good Habits, Grade 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nguyen Van Quan; And Others

    This illustrated primer, designed for second grade students in Vietnam, consists of stories depicting rural family life in Vietnam. The book is divided into the following six chapters: (1) Practicing Good Habits (health, play, helpfulness); (2) Duties at Home (grandparents, father and mother, servants, the extended family; (3) Duties in School…

  9. Education for the Good Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawson, Neal; Spours, Ken

    2011-01-01

    The Left is facing a crisis of its approach to education highlighted by the "education revolution" of the Coalition Government. The authors argue that it is important to step back and present a positive vision of education based on the key pillars of the Good Society--fairness, democracy, sustainability and well-being. This values-led agenda,…

  10. Measuring Goodness of Story Narratives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Le, Karen; Coelho, Carl; Mozeiko, Jennifer; Grafman, Jordan

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this article was to evaluate a new measure of story narrative performance: story completeness. It was hypothesized that by combining organizational (story grammar) and completeness measures, story "goodness" could be quantified. Method: Discourse samples from 46 typically developing adults were compared with those from 24…

  11. "Good Morning Boys and Girls"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bigler, Rebecca S.

    2005-01-01

    It happens every day across the nation: Teachers welcome their students to class by saying, "Good morning, boys and girls." It is one of countless ways teachers highlight gender with their speech and behavior. Unfortunately, teachers' use of gender to label students and organize the classroom can have negative consequences. New research in the…

  12. Good and Bad Public Prose.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cockburn, Stewart

    1969-01-01

    The basic requirements of all good prose are clarity, accuracy, brevity, and simplicity. Especially in public prose--in which the meaning is the crux of the article or speech--concise, vigorous English demands a minimum of adjectives, a maximum use of the active voice, nouns carefully chosen, a logical argument with no labored or obscure points,…

  13. Making the Common Good Common

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chase, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    How are independent schools to be useful to the wider world? Beyond their common commitment to educate their students for meaningful lives in service of the greater good, can they educate a broader constituency and, thus, share their resources and skills more broadly? Their answers to this question will be shaped by their independence. Any…

  14. Edifying Theory: Serving the Good.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manen, Max van

    1982-01-01

    This article, concerning the importance of and need for educational theory, elucidates the etymology of the word "theory," describes the importance of ethnomethodology to educational principles, and views the concerns of epistemology to curriculum theory. The question "What is the good of theory?" is debated in relation to the actual benefit of…

  15. What Good Are Conferences, Anyway?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pietro, David C.

    1996-01-01

    According to Frederick Herzberg's studies of employee motivation, humans are driven by motivating factors that allow them to grow psychologically and hygiene factors that help them meet physical needs. Good education conferences can enhance both factors by helping principals refocus their energies, exchange ideas with trusted colleagues, and view…

  16. 9 + 1 = Fun! "Good Management Begins with Good People"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vicars, Dennis

    2010-01-01

    All organizations are different in nature, culture, programs, and services. However, every truly successful enterprise ("successful" meaning their mission statement and strategic goals are followed and achieved) that the author has encountered: (1) Employs strategic leadership; (2) Is organized in a way to promote maximum individual staff…

  17. CHARACTERISTICS OF SUCCESSFUL SCHOOL ACHIEVERS FROM A SEVERELY DEPRIVED ENVIRONMENT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DAVIDSON, HELEN H.; AND OTHERS

    THE FOCUS IS ON PERSONALITY TRAITS OF YOUNG CHILDREN WHO ACHIEVE IN SCHOOL DESPITE ENVIRONMENTAL HANDICAPS. THE SUBJECTS WERE TEN "GOOD" AND TEN "POOR" ACHIEVERS FROM THE FOURTH GRADE IN A SCHOOL LOCATED IN A SEVERELY DEPRESSED URBAN AREA. THE CHILDREN WERE CHOSEN ON THE BASIS OF ACHIEVEMENT SCORES AND TEACHER RECOMMENDATIONS. ALTHOUGH ALL SCORED…

  18. Cooperation and the common good.

    PubMed

    Johnstone, Rufus A; Rodrigues, António M M

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we draw the attention of biologists to a result from the economic literature, which suggests that when individuals are engaged in a communal activity of benefit to all, selection may favour cooperative sharing of resources even among non-relatives. Provided that group members all invest some resources in the public good, they should refrain from conflict over the division of these resources. The reason is that, given diminishing returns on investment in public and private goods, claiming (or ceding) a greater share of total resources only leads to the actor (or its competitors) investing more in the public good, such that the marginal costs and benefits of investment remain in balance. This cancels out any individual benefits of resource competition. We illustrate how this idea may be applied in the context of biparental care, using a sequential game in which parents first compete with one another over resources, and then choose how to allocate the resources they each obtain to care of their joint young (public good) versus their own survival and future reproductive success (private good). We show that when the two parents both invest in care to some extent, they should refrain from any conflict over the division of resources. The same effect can also support asymmetric outcomes in which one parent competes for resources and invests in care, whereas the other does not invest but refrains from competition. The fact that the caring parent gains higher fitness pay-offs at these equilibria suggests that abandoning a partner is not always to the latter's detriment, when the potential for resource competition is taken into account, but may instead be of benefit to the 'abandoned' mate. PMID:26729926

  19. Iowa Women of Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohrn, Deborah Gore, Ed.

    1993-01-01

    This issue of the Goldfinch highlights some of Iowa's 20th century women of achievement. These women have devoted their lives to working for human rights, education, equality, and individual rights. They come from the worlds of politics, art, music, education, sports, business, entertainment, and social work. They represent Native Americans,…

  20. Achieving Peace through Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarken, Rodney H.

    While it is generally agreed that peace is desirable, there are barriers to achieving a peaceful world. These barriers are classified into three major areas: (1) an erroneous view of human nature; (2) injustice; and (3) fear of world unity. In a discussion of these barriers, it is noted that although the consciousness and conscience of the world…

  1. Increasing Male Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Barbara Talbert

    2008-01-01

    The No Child Left Behind legislation has brought greater attention to the academic performance of American youth. Its emphasis on student achievement requires a closer analysis of assessment data by school districts. To address the findings, educators must seek strategies to remedy failing results. In a mid-Atlantic district of the Unites States,…

  2. Leadership Issues: Raising Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horsfall, Chris, Ed.

    This document contains five papers examining the meaning and operation of leadership as a variable affecting student achievement in further education colleges in the United Kingdom. "Introduction" (Chris Horsfall) discusses school effectiveness studies' findings regarding the relationship between leadership and effective schools, distinguishes…

  3. Achievements or Disasters?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwin, MacArthur

    2000-01-01

    Focuses on policy issues that have affected arts education in the twentieth century, such as: interest in discipline-based arts education, influence of national arts associations, and national standards and coordinated assessment. States that whether the policy decisions are viewed as achievements or disasters are for future determination. (CMK)

  4. Achieving True Consensus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Napier, Rod; Sanaghan, Patrick

    2002-01-01

    Uses the example of Vermont's Middlebury College to explore the challenges and possibilities of achieving consensus about institutional change. Discusses why, unlike in this example, consensus usually fails, and presents four demands of an effective consensus process. Includes a list of "test" questions on successful collaboration. (EV)

  5. School Students' Science Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shymansky, James; Wang, Tzu-Ling; Annetta, Leonard; Everett, Susan; Yore, Larry D.

    2013-01-01

    This paper is a report of the impact of an externally funded, multiyear systemic reform project on students' science achievement on a modified version of the Third International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) test in 33 small, rural school districts in two Midwest states. The systemic reform effort utilized a cascading leadership strategy…

  6. Essays on Educational Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ampaabeng, Samuel Kofi

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation examines the determinants of student outcomes--achievement, attainment, occupational choices and earnings--in three different contexts. The first two chapters focus on Ghana while the final chapter focuses on the US state of Massachusetts. In the first chapter, I exploit the incidence of famine and malnutrition that resulted to…

  7. Intelligence and Educational Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deary, Ian J.; Strand, Steve; Smith, Pauline; Fernandes, Cres

    2007-01-01

    This 5-year prospective longitudinal study of 70,000+ English children examined the association between psychometric intelligence at age 11 years and educational achievement in national examinations in 25 academic subjects at age 16. The correlation between a latent intelligence trait (Spearman's "g"from CAT2E) and a latent trait of educational…

  8. Explorations in achievement motivation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helmreich, Robert L.

    1982-01-01

    Recent research on the nature of achievement motivation is reviewed. A three-factor model of intrinsic motives is presented and related to various criteria of performance, job satisfaction and leisure activities. The relationships between intrinsic and extrinsic motives are discussed. Needed areas for future research are described.

  9. NCLB: Achievement Robin Hood?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bracey, Gerald W.

    2008-01-01

    In his "Wall Street Journal" op-ed on the 25th of anniversary of "A Nation At Risk", former assistant secretary of education Chester E. Finn Jr. applauded the report for turning U.S. education away from equality and toward achievement. It was not surprising, then, that in mid-2008, Finn arranged a conference to examine the potential "Robin Hood…

  10. Achieving All Our Ambitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartley, Tricia

    2009-01-01

    National learning and skills policy aims both to build economic prosperity and to achieve social justice. Participation in higher education (HE) has the potential to contribute substantially to both aims. That is why the Campaign for Learning has supported the ambition to increase the proportion of the working-age population with a Level 4…

  11. INTELLIGENCE, PERSONALITY AND ACHIEVEMENT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MUIR, R.C.; AND OTHERS

    A LONGITUDINAL DEVELOPMENTAL STUDY OF A GROUP OF MIDDLE CLASS CHILDREN IS DESCRIBED, WITH EMPHASIS ON A SEGMENT OF THE RESEARCH INVESTIGATING THE RELATIONSHIP OF ACHIEVEMENT, INTELLIGENCE, AND EMOTIONAL DISTURBANCE. THE SUBJECTS WERE 105 CHILDREN AGED FIVE TO 6.3 ATTENDING TWO SCHOOLS IN MONTREAL. EACH CHILD WAS ASSESSED IN THE AREAS OF…

  12. SALT and Spelling Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Joan

    A study investigated the effects of suggestopedic accelerative learning and teaching (SALT) on the spelling achievement, attitudes toward school, and memory skills of fourth-grade students. Subjects were 20 male and 28 female students from two self-contained classrooms at Kennedy Elementary School in Rexburg, Idaho. The control classroom and the…

  13. Breeding racehorses: what price good genes?

    PubMed

    Wilson, Alastair J; Rambaut, Andrew

    2008-04-23

    Horse racing is a multi-million pound industry, in which genetic information is increasingly used to optimize breeding programmes. To maximize the probability of producing a successful offspring, the owner of a mare should mate her with a high-quality stallion. However, stallions with big reputations command higher stud fees and paying these is only a sensible strategy if, (i) there is a genetic variation for success on the racecourse and (ii) stud fees are an honest signal of a stallion's genetic quality. Using data on thoroughbred racehorses, and lifetime earnings from prize money (LE) as a measure of success, we performed quantitative genetic analyses within an animal model framework to test these two conditions. Although LE is heritable (VA=0.299+/-0.108, Pr=0.002), there is no genetic variance for stud fee and the genetic correlation between traits is therefore zero. This result is supported by an absence of any relationship between stud fees for currently active stallions and the predicted LE for their (hypothetical) offspring. Thus, while there are good genes to be bought, a stallion's fees are not an honest signal of his genetic quality and are a poor predictor of a foal's prize winning potential.

  14. Breeding racehorses: what price good genes?

    PubMed

    Wilson, Alastair J; Rambaut, Andrew

    2008-04-23

    Horse racing is a multi-million pound industry, in which genetic information is increasingly used to optimize breeding programmes. To maximize the probability of producing a successful offspring, the owner of a mare should mate her with a high-quality stallion. However, stallions with big reputations command higher stud fees and paying these is only a sensible strategy if, (i) there is a genetic variation for success on the racecourse and (ii) stud fees are an honest signal of a stallion's genetic quality. Using data on thoroughbred racehorses, and lifetime earnings from prize money (LE) as a measure of success, we performed quantitative genetic analyses within an animal model framework to test these two conditions. Although LE is heritable (VA=0.299+/-0.108, Pr=0.002), there is no genetic variance for stud fee and the genetic correlation between traits is therefore zero. This result is supported by an absence of any relationship between stud fees for currently active stallions and the predicted LE for their (hypothetical) offspring. Thus, while there are good genes to be bought, a stallion's fees are not an honest signal of his genetic quality and are a poor predictor of a foal's prize winning potential. PMID:18089517

  15. Pragmatic quality metrics for evolutionary software development models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Royce, Walker

    1990-01-01

    Due to the large number of product, project, and people parameters which impact large custom software development efforts, measurement of software product quality is a complex undertaking. Furthermore, the absolute perspective from which quality is measured (customer satisfaction) is intangible. While we probably can't say what the absolute quality of a software product is, we can determine the relative quality, the adequacy of this quality with respect to pragmatic considerations, and identify good and bad trends during development. While no two software engineers will ever agree on an optimum definition of software quality, they will agree that the most important perspective of software quality is its ease of change. We can call this flexibility, adaptability, or some other vague term, but the critical characteristic of software is that it is soft. The easier the product is to modify, the easier it is to achieve any other software quality perspective. This paper presents objective quality metrics derived from consistent lifecycle perspectives of rework which, when used in concert with an evolutionary development approach, can provide useful insight to produce better quality per unit cost/schedule or to achieve adequate quality more efficiently. The usefulness of these metrics is evaluated by applying them to a large, real world, Ada project.

  16. Achieving Finite Element Mesh Quality via Optimization of the Jacobian Matrix Norm and Associated Quantities, Part II - A Framework for Volume Mesh Optimization and the Condition Number of the Jacobian Matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Knupp, P.M.

    1999-03-26

    Three-dimensional unstructured tetrahedral and hexahedral finite element mesh optimization is studied from a theoretical perspective and by computer experiments to determine what objective functions are most effective in attaining valid, high quality meshes. The approach uses matrices and matrix norms to extend the work in Part I to build suitable 3D objective functions. Because certain matrix norm identities which hold for 2 x 2 matrices do not hold for 3 x 3 matrices. significant differences arise between surface and volume mesh optimization objective functions. It is shown, for example, that the equivalence in two-dimensions of the Smoothness and Condition Number of the Jacobian matrix objective functions does not extend to three dimensions and further. that the equivalence of the Oddy and Condition Number of the Metric Tensor objective functions in two-dimensions also fails to extend to three-dimensions. Matrix norm identities are used to systematically construct dimensionally homogeneous groups of objective functions. The concept of an ideal minimizing matrix is introduced for both hexahedral and tetrahedral elements. Non-dimensional objective functions having barriers are emphasized as the most logical choice for mesh optimization. The performance of a number of objective functions in improving mesh quality was assessed on a suite of realistic test problems, focusing particularly on all-hexahedral ''whisker-weaved'' meshes. Performance is investigated on both structured and unstructured meshes and on both hexahedral and tetrahedral meshes. Although several objective functions are competitive, the condition number objective function is particularly attractive. The objective functions are closely related to mesh quality measures. To illustrate, it is shown that the condition number metric can be viewed as a new tetrahedral element quality measure.

  17. Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP) Waste Management Project

    SciTech Connect

    HORHOTA, M.J.

    2000-12-21

    The Waste Management Project (WMP) is committed to excellence in our work and to delivering quality products and services to our customers, protecting our employees and the public and to being good stewards of the environment. We will continually strive to understand customer requirements, perform services, and activities that meet or exceed customer expectations, and be cost-effective in our performance. The WMP maintains an environment that fosters continuous improvement in our processes, performance, safety and quality. The achievement of quality will require the total commitment of all WMP employees to our ethic that Quality, Health and Safety, and Regulatory Compliance must come before profits. The successful implementation of this policy and ethic requires a formal, documented management quality system to ensure quality standards are established and achieved in all activities. The following principles are the foundation of our quality system. Senior management will take full ownership of the quality system and will create an environment that ensures quality objectives are met, standards are clearly established, and performance is measured and evaluated. Line management will be responsible for quality system implementation. Each organization will adhere to all quality system requirements that apply to their function. Every employee will be responsible for their work quality, to work safely and for complying with the policies, procedures and instructions applicable to their activities. Quality will be addressed and verified during all phases of our work scope from proposal development through closeout including contracts or projects. Continuous quality improvement will be an ongoing process. Our quality ethic and these quality principles constantly guide our actions. We will meet our own quality expectations and exceed those of our customers with vigilance, commitment, teamwork, and persistence.

  18. Switch for Good Community Program

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, Tabitha; Amran, Martha

    2013-11-19

    Switch4Good is an energy-savings program that helps residents reduce consumption from behavior changes; it was co-developed by Balfour Beatty Military Housing Management (BB) and WattzOn in Phase I of this grant. The program was offered at 11 Navy bases. Three customer engagement strategies were evaluated, and it was found that Digital Nudges (a combination of monthly consumption statements with frequent messaging via text or email) was most cost-effective.

  19. Good foragers can also be good at detecting predators.

    PubMed Central

    Cresswell, W; Quinn, J L; Whittingham, M J; Butler, S

    2003-01-01

    The degree to which foraging and vigilance are mutually exclusive is crucial to understanding the management of the predation and starvation risk trade-off in animals. We tested whether wild-caught captive chaffinches that feed at a higher rate do so at the expense of their speed in responding to a model sparrowhawk flying nearby, and whether consistently good foragers will therefore tend to respond more slowly on average. First, we confirmed that the time taken to respond to the approaching predator depended on the rate of scanning: as head-up rate increased so chaffinches responded more quickly. However, against predictions, as peck rate increased so head-up rate increased and mean length of head-up and head-down periods decreased. Head-up rate was probably dependent on peck rate because almost every time a seed was found, a bird raised its head to handle it. Therefore chaffinches with higher peck rates responded more quickly. Individual chaffinches showed consistent durations of both their head-down and head-up periods and, therefore, individuals that were good foragers were also good detectors of predators. In relation to the broad range of species that have a similar foraging mode to chaffinches, our results have two major implications for predation/starvation risk trade-offs: (i) feeding rate can determine vigilance scanning patterns; and (ii) the best foragers can also be the best at detecting predators. We discuss how our results can be explained in mechanistic terms relating to fundamental differences in how the probabilities of detecting food rather than a predator are affected by time. In addition, our results offer a plausible explanation for the widely observed effect that vigilance continues to decline with group size even when there is no further benefit to reducing vigilance. PMID:12803897

  20. Good pharmacovigilance practices: technology enabled.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Robert C; Palsulich, Bruce; Gogolak, Victor

    2002-01-01

    The assessment of spontaneous reports is most effective it is conducted within a defined and rigorous process. The framework for good pharmacovigilance process (GPVP) is proposed as a subset of good postmarketing surveillance process (GPMSP), a functional structure for both a public health and corporate risk management strategy. GPVP has good practices that implement each step within a defined process. These practices are designed to efficiently and effectively detect and alert the drug safety professional to new and potentially important information on drug-associated adverse reactions. These practices are enabled by applied technology designed specifically for the review and assessment of spontaneous reports. Specific practices include rules-based triage, active query prompts for severe organ insults, contextual single case evaluation, statistical proportionality and correlational checks, case-series analyses, and templates for signal work-up and interpretation. These practices and the overall GPVP are supported by state-of-the-art web-based systems with powerful analytical engines, workflow and audit trials to allow validated systems support for valid drug safety signalling efforts. It is also important to understand that a process has a defined set of steps and any one cannot stand independently. Specifically, advanced use of technical alerting methods in isolation can mislead and allow one to misunderstand priorities and relative value. In the end, pharmacovigilance is a clinical art and a component process to the science of pharmacoepidemiology and risk management. PMID:12071777

  1. Private Goods and Public Bads

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Renshaw, Edward F.

    1975-01-01

    The author of this article has developed a simple economic growth model which suggests that public concern for the environment increases as the quality of the environment, for any number of reasons, becomes worse. Using this model, the author believes that Earth Day, 1970, could have been predicted. (MA)

  2. Science Standards, Science Achievement, and Attitudes about Evolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belin, Charlie M.; Kisida, Brian

    2015-01-01

    This article explores the relationships between (a) the quality of state science standards and student science achievement, (b) the public's belief in teaching evolution and the quality of state standards, and (c) the public's belief in teaching evolution and student science achievement. Using multiple measures, we find no evidence of a…

  3. Project ACHIEVE final report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-13

    Project ACHIEVE was a math/science academic enhancement program aimed at first year high school Hispanic American students. Four high schools -- two in El Paso, Texas and two in Bakersfield, California -- participated in this Department of Energy-funded program during the spring and summer of 1996. Over 50 students, many of whom felt they were facing a nightmare future, were given the opportunity to work closely with personal computers and software, sophisticated calculators, and computer-based laboratories -- an experience which their regular academic curriculum did not provide. Math and science projects, exercises, and experiments were completed that emphasized independent and creative applications of scientific and mathematical theories to real world problems. The most important outcome was the exposure Project ACHIEVE provided to students concerning the college and technical-field career possibilities available to them.

  4. How nurse leaders can foster a climate of good governance.

    PubMed

    Bassett, Sally; Westmore, Kathryn

    2012-09-01

    This article is the first in a series of four examining the components of good corporate governance. Poor governance can result in patients receiving poor quality care; all healthcare professionals, therefore, have a role in ensuring effective governance. This article discusses how an organisation's culture and leadership can contribute to good corporate governance. Nurse leaders can influence the culture of effective governance by building trust and respect and challenging the behaviours that led to poor quality care. The next article in this series will look at how an organisation's systems and processes can affect the effectiveness of its governance. PMID:23008901

  5. How nurse leaders can foster a climate of good governance.

    PubMed

    Bassett, Sally; Westmore, Kathryn

    2012-09-01

    This article is the first in a series of four examining the components of good corporate governance. Poor governance can result in patients receiving poor quality care; all healthcare professionals, therefore, have a role in ensuring effective governance. This article discusses how an organisation's culture and leadership can contribute to good corporate governance. Nurse leaders can influence the culture of effective governance by building trust and respect and challenging the behaviours that led to poor quality care. The next article in this series will look at how an organisation's systems and processes can affect the effectiveness of its governance.

  6. ["Good dying"--definition and current state of research].

    PubMed

    Hutter, Nico; Stößel, Ulrich; Meffert, Cornelia; Körner, Mirjam; Bozzaro, Claudia; Becker, Gerhild; Baumeister, Harald

    2015-08-01

    The advances of modern medicine did not only result in prolongation of life expectancy, but also led to a shift from dying at home to dying in public institutions. In western countries most people die at advanced age in medical facilities. Hence, the question regarding the conditions, which should be provided by society and especially medicine, to allow terminally ill people to experience "good dying" is substantial. For this purpose, an examination of patients', family members' and health care providers' understanding of the term " good dying" is required. The present paper aims at shedding light on the term "good dying" and to summarize the current state of research. Therefore, the attributes of "good dying" will be described from the perspectives of patients, family members and health care providers, which are discussed and examined in current medical-sociological research. These attributes can be illustrated on three dimensions: Quality of life at the end of life (e. g. pain relief, mental well-being), quality of dying (e. g. avoiding prolonged dying, autonomy, presence of relatives) and quality of health care at the end of life (e. g. patient-oriented health care, positive communication between health care providers and patients, availability of guidelines). Although the attributes of "good dying" are described in detail in the existing literature, further studies have to clarify the relevance and impact of these attributes as predictors of "good dying". PMID:26306020

  7. Affirmative Action: Essential to Achieving Justice and Good Health Care for All in America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinkford, Jeanne C.; Valachovic, Richard W.

    2003-01-01

    Explains the position of the American Dental Education Association regarding affirmative action, namely, that affirmative action represents the United States' longstanding principled and constitutional commitment to equal opportunity for all citizens. (EV)

  8. Achieving a good life time in a vertical-organic-diode gas sensor.

    PubMed

    Dai, Ming-Zhi; Chen, Yen-Ho; Chuang, Ming-Yen; Zan, Hsiao-Wen; Meng, Hsin-Fei

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we investigate the keys to obtain a sensitive ammonia sensor with high air stability by using a low-cost polythiophene diode with a vertical channel and a porous top electrode. Poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and air-stable poly(5,5'-bis(3-dodecyl-2-thienyl)-2,2'-bithiophene) (PQT-12) are both evaluated as the active sensing layer. Two-dimensional current simulation reveals that the proposed device exhibits numerous connected vertical nanometer junctions (VNJ). Due to the de-doping reaction between ammonia molecules and the bulk current flowing through the vertical channel, both PQT-12 and P3HT VNJ-diodes exhibit detection limits of 50-ppb ammonia. The P3HT VNJ-diode, however, becomes unstable after being stored in air for two days. On the contrary, the PQT-12 VNJ-diode keeps an almost unchanged response to 50-ppb ammonia after being stored in air for 25 days. The improved storage lifetime of an organic-semiconductor-based gas sensor in air is successfully demonstrated.

  9. Achieving a Good Life Time in a Vertical-Organic-Diode Gas Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Ming-Zhi; Chen, Yen-Ho; Chuang, Ming-Yen; Zan, Hsiao-Wen; Meng, Hsin-Fei

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we investigate the keys to obtain a sensitive ammonia sensor with high air stability by using a low-cost polythiophene diode with a vertical channel and a porous top electrode. Poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and air-stable poly(5,5′-bis(3-dodecyl-2-thienyl)-2,2′-bithiophene) (PQT-12) are both evaluated as the active sensing layer. Two-dimensional current simulation reveals that the proposed device exhibits numerous connected vertical nanometer junctions (VNJ). Due to the de-doping reaction between ammonia molecules and the bulk current flowing through the vertical channel, both PQT-12 and P3HT VNJ-diodes exhibit detection limits of 50-ppb ammonia. The P3HT VNJ-diode, however, becomes unstable after being stored in air for two days. On the contrary, the PQT-12 VNJ-diode keeps an almost unchanged response to 50-ppb ammonia after being stored in air for 25 days. The improved storage lifetime of an organic-semiconductor-based gas sensor in air is successfully demonstrated. PMID:25184492

  10. Adding concentrated solar power plants to wind farms to achieve a good utility electrical load match

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Texas has the greatest installed wind turbine capacity of any state in the United States, the percentage of wind capacity approaches 10% of the utilities capacity (in 2010 the total wind generated capacity in Texas was 8%). It is becomimg increasingly difficult for the utility to balance the elec...

  11. Affirmative action: essential to achieving justice and good health care for all in America.

    PubMed

    Sinkford, Jeanne C; Valachovic, Richard W

    2003-04-01

    Affirmative action is an established principle that brings fairness and justice to admissions policies and practices by setting goals that encourage and pressure institutions and individuals to create educational and professional opportunities for minorities and women, if it were not for affirmative action, we would waste the talents of countless individuals who would be discounted because they are minorities or women. The result would be a nation that is weaker because it would be segregated once again in a system in which white people and men would have the preponderance of opportunity and authority and in which access would be very limited for minorities and women. It may be time to reframe the argument for affirmative action in language that denotes its benefits to all Americans by increasing access for emerging majority citizens now and in the future. ADEA, academic dentistry, and the dental profession should continue to do everything it can to preserve the policies and practices of affirmative action, especially through the support of the University of Michigan admissions policies as challenged in the cases before the U.S. Supreme Court and in our own practices. PMID:12749576

  12. Good News for New Orleans: Early Evidence Shows Reforms Lifting Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Douglas N.

    2015-01-01

    What happened to the New Orleans public schools following the tragic levee breeches after Hurricane Katrina is truly unprecedented. Within the span of one year, all public-school employees were fired, the teacher contract expired and was not replaced, and most attendance zones were eliminated. The state took control of almost all public schools…

  13. Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP) / Good Laboratory Practices (GLP) Review and Applicability for Chemical Security Enhancements

    SciTech Connect

    Iveson, Steven W.

    2014-11-01

    Global chemical security has been enhanced through the determined use and integration of both voluntary and legislated standards. Many popular standards contain components that specifically detail requirements for the security of materials, facilities and other vital assets. In this document we examine the roll of quality management standards and how they affect the security culture within the institutions that adopt these standards in order to conduct business within the international market place. Good manufacturing practices and good laboratory practices are two of a number of quality management systems that have been adopted as law in many nations. These standards are designed to protect the quality of drugs, medicines, foods and analytical test results in order to provide the world-wide consumer with safe and affective products for consumption. These standards provide no established security protocols and yet manage to increase the security of chemicals, materials, facilities and the supply chain via the effective and complete control over the manufacturing, the global supply chains and testing processes. We discuss the means through which these systems enhance security and how nations can further improve these systems with additional regulations that deal specifically with security in the realm of these management systems. We conclude with a discussion of new technologies that may cause disruption within the industries covered by these standards and how these issues might be addressed in order to maintain or increase the level of security within the industries and nations that have adopted these standards.

  14. Achieving Excellence in Preschool Literacy Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Justice, Laura M., Ed.; Vukelich, Carol, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    High-quality preschool programs are essential to improving children's outcomes in reading achievement and leveling language and literacy disparities among students from diverse backgrounds. Grounded in state-of-the-art research evidence, this practice-oriented book demonstrates how preschool professionals can create, evaluate, and sustain…

  15. Modeling Achievement by Measuring the Enacted Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walkup, John R.; Jones, Ben S.

    2008-01-01

    This article presents a mathematical algorithm that relates student achievement with directly observable, quantifiable teacher and student behaviors, producing a modified form of the Walberg model. The algorithm (1) expands the measurable factors that comprise the quality of instruction in a linear basis of research-based teaching components and…

  16. The good body: when big is better.

    PubMed

    Cassidy, C M

    1991-09-01

    An important cultural question is, "What is a 'good'--desirable, beautiful, impressive--body?" The answers are legion; here I examine why bigger bodies represent survival skill, and how this power symbolism is embodied by behaviors that guide larger persons toward the top of the social hierarchy. bigness is a complex concept comprising tallness, boniness, muscularity and fattiness. Data show that most people worldwide want to be big--both tall and fat. Those who achieve the ideal are disproportionately among the society's most socially powerful. In the food-secure West, fascination with power and the body has not waned, but has been redefined such that thinness is desired. This apparent anomaly is resolved by realizing that thinness in the midst of abundance--as long as one is also tall and muscular--still projects the traditional message of power, and brings such social boons as upward mobility. PMID:1961102

  17. How good is good? Human values and Europe's proposed Marine Strategy Directive.

    PubMed

    Mee, Laurence D; Jefferson, Rebecca L; Laffoley, Dan d'A; Elliott, Michael

    2008-02-01

    The adoption of the proposed European Marine Strategy Directive is an opportunity for a comprehensive policy for protecting, improving and sustainably using Europe's environmentally degraded seas. It calls for an ecosystem-based approach to management where humans are regarded as a key system component. Although the proposed wording has been the subject of fierce debate, the central policy goal remains achieving "Good Environmental Status". The interpretation of "good" is key to implementation and relates to human values and worldviews. We demonstrate how these vary widely across Europe. Solution of fundamental considerations such as the assignation of reference states, the balance between precautionary and evidence-based action, the degree of subsidiarity, and conservation strategies including marine protected areas, will ultimately depend upon public understanding, involvement in and support for the Directive. The social element, critical to effective adaptive management, requires greater attention within the context of a regional seas geographical framework.

  18. Does achievement motivation mediate the semantic achievement priming effect?

    PubMed

    Engeser, Stefan; Baumann, Nicola

    2014-10-01

    The aim of our research was to understand the processes of the prime-to-behavior effects with semantic achievement primes. We extended existing models with a perspective from achievement motivation theory and additionally used achievement primes embedded in the running text of excerpts of school textbooks to simulate a more natural priming condition. Specifically, we proposed that achievement primes affect implicit achievement motivation and conducted pilot experiments and 3 main experiments to explore this proposition. We found no reliable positive effect of achievement primes on implicit achievement motivation. In light of these findings, we tested whether explicit (instead of implicit) achievement motivation is affected by achievement primes and found this to be the case. In the final experiment, we found support for the assumption that higher explicit achievement motivation implies that achievement priming affects the outcome expectations. The implications of the results are discussed, and we conclude that primes affect achievement behavior by heightening explicit achievement motivation and outcome expectancies. PMID:24820250

  19. Managers' duty to maintain good workplace communications skills.

    PubMed

    Timmins, Fiona

    2011-06-01

    Communication is a fundamental element of care at every level of nursing practice. It is important, therefore, for nurse managers to create environments that promote and encourage good communication, and help nurses to develop their communication skills formally and informally. This article discusses the effects of communication on the quality of care. It examines nurses' professional duty to maintain good communication skills and how managers can help them do this. It also discusses nurse managers' communication skills in the context of leadership style, conflict resolution and self-awareness. Finally, it considers the notion of shared governance as good practice. PMID:21736171

  20. Robust data enables managers to promote good practice.

    PubMed

    Bassett, Sally; Westmore, Kathryn

    2012-11-01

    This is the third in a series of articles examining the components of good corporate governance. The effective and efficient use of information and sources of information is crucial for good governance. This article explores the ways in which boards and management can obtain and use information to monitor performance and promote good practice, and how boards can be assured about the quality of information on which they rely. The final article in this series will look at the role of accountability in corporate governance. PMID:23189532

  1. Managers' duty to maintain good workplace communications skills.

    PubMed

    Timmins, Fiona

    2011-06-01

    Communication is a fundamental element of care at every level of nursing practice. It is important, therefore, for nurse managers to create environments that promote and encourage good communication, and help nurses to develop their communication skills formally and informally. This article discusses the effects of communication on the quality of care. It examines nurses' professional duty to maintain good communication skills and how managers can help them do this. It also discusses nurse managers' communication skills in the context of leadership style, conflict resolution and self-awareness. Finally, it considers the notion of shared governance as good practice.

  2. Robust data enables managers to promote good practice.

    PubMed

    Bassett, Sally; Westmore, Kathryn

    2012-11-01

    This is the third in a series of articles examining the components of good corporate governance. The effective and efficient use of information and sources of information is crucial for good governance. This article explores the ways in which boards and management can obtain and use information to monitor performance and promote good practice, and how boards can be assured about the quality of information on which they rely. The final article in this series will look at the role of accountability in corporate governance.

  3. Good mass spectrometry and its place in good science.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Mark W

    2012-06-01

    The mass spectrometry community has expanded as instruments became more powerful, user-friendly, affordable and readily available. This opens up opportunities for novice users to perform high impact research, using highly advanced instrumentation. This introductory tutorial is targeted at the novice user working in a research setting. It aims to offer the benefit of other people's experiences and to help newcomers avoid known pitfalls and problematic issues. It discusses some of the essential features of sound analytical chemistry and highlights the need to use validated analytical methods that provide high quality results along with a measure of their uncertainty. Examples are used to illustrate potential pitfalls and their consequences.

  4. Effective multidisciplinary working: the key to high-quality care.

    PubMed

    Ndoro, Samuel

    This article explores multidisciplinary team working, inter-disciplinary, trans-disciplinary and effective collaborative practice in order to provide high-quality patient care. It discusses different views on collaboration, some of the issues around cross-discipline and multi-agency working and concerns around promoting 'high-quality' care. It also discusses the importance of evidence-based practice in multidisciplinary teams. Issues around good-quality care, clinical governance and the audit cycle in MDTs are addressed. The article highlights the importance of the 6Cs (care, compassion, competence, communication, courage and commitment) in MDTs if quality care is to be achieved. The article also explores advantages and limitations of multidisciplinary team working, trans-disciplinary working and inter-professional working in developing and delivering high-quality patient-centred care. Further research is needed on how clinical audits can help to improve how MDTs function in order improve the quality of service provided to clients.

  5. Is it good to make happy people?

    PubMed

    Rachels, Stuart

    1998-04-01

    Would it be good, other things being equal, for additional people to exist whose lives would be worth living? I examine and reject several arguments for the answer that it would not be good; then I offer opposing arguments that I believe are more successful. Thus, I agree with utilitarians who say that it is better for there to be more happy people. Next I argue for the stronger claim that the happiness of potential people is as important as that of adults. Potential quality of life, then, matters in a host of bioethical issues: abortion, commercial surrogacy, the treatment of defective newborns, and so on. What is the practical upshot of all this? I reject the idea that we must do whatever is necessary to prolong life worth living. But I also reject the view that the side-effects of overpopulation always outweigh the value of realizing potential happiness. So I advocate a middle position, which I do not identify precisely. Even from this middle position, however, potential happiness is more important that is commonly assumed in bioethics.

  6. Goode Gym Energy Renovation Project

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, Andrena

    2014-12-11

    The Ida H. Goode Gymnasium was constructed in 1964 to serve as a focal point for academics, student recreation, and health and wellness activities. This 38,000 SF building contains a gymnasium with a stage, swimming pool, eight classrooms, a weight room, six offices and auxiliary spaces for the athletic programs. The gym is located on a 4-acre greenfield, which is slated for improvement and enhancement to future athletics program at Bennett College. The available funding for this project was used to weatherize the envelope of the gymnasium, installation of a new energy-efficient mechanical system, and a retrofit of the existing lighting systems in the building’s interior. The envelope weatherization was completed without disturbing the building’s historic preservation eligibility. The existing heating system was replaced with a new high efficiency condensing system. The new heating system also includes a new Building Automation System which provides additional monitoring. Proper usage of this system will provide additional energy savings. Most of the existing interior lighting fixtures and bulbs were replaced with new LED and high efficiency T-8 bulbs and fixtures. Occupancy sensors were installed in applicable areas. The Ida Goode Gymnasium should experience high electricity and natural gas savings as well as operational/maintenance efficiency increases. The aesthetics of the building was maintained and the overall safety was improved.

  7. Going public: good scientific conduct.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Gitte; Sandøe, Peter

    2012-06-01

    The paper addresses issues of scientific conduct regarding relations between science and the media, relations between scientists and journalists, and attitudes towards the public at large. In the large and increasing body of literature on scientific conduct and misconduct, these issues seem underexposed as ethical challenges. Consequently, individual scientists here tend to be left alone with problems and dilemmas, with no guidance for good conduct. Ideas are presented about how to make up for this omission. Using a practical, ethical approach, the paper attempts to identify ways scientists might deal with ethical public relations issues, guided by a norm or maxim of openness. Drawing on and rethinking the CUDOS codification of the scientific ethos, as it was worked out by Robert K. Merton in 1942, we propose that this, which is echoed in current codifications of norms for good scientific conduct, contains a tacit maxim of openness which may naturally be extended to cover the public relations of science. Discussing openness as access, accountability, transparency and receptiveness, the argumentation concentrates on the possible prevention of misconduct with respect to, on the one hand, sins of omission-withholding important information from the public-and, on the other hand, abuses of the authority of science in order to gain publicity. Statements from interviews with scientists are used to illustrate how scientists might view the relevance of the issues raised.

  8. What Makes a Good Summary?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Qunhua; Santos, Eugene; Nguyen, Hien; Mohamed, Ahmed

    One of the biggest challenges for intelligence analysts who participate in prevention or response to a terrorism act is to quickly find relevant information from massive amounts of data. Along with research on information retrieval and filtering, text summarization is an effective technique to help intelligence analysts shorten their time to find critical information and make timely decisions. Multi-document summarization is particularly useful as it serves to quickly describe a collection of information. The obvious shortcoming lies in what it cannot capture especially in more diverse collections. Thus, the question lies in the adequacy and/or usefulness of such summarizations to the target analyst. In this chapter, we report our experimental study on the sensitivity of users to the quality and content of multi-document summarization. We used the DUC 2002 collection for multi-document summarization as our testbed. Two groups of document sets were considered: (I) the sets consisting of closely correlated documents with highly overlapped content; and (II) the sets consisting of diverse documents covering a wide scope of topics. Intuitively, this suggests that creating a quality summary would be more difficult for the latter case. However, human evaluators were discovered to be fairly insensitive to this difference. This occurred when they were asked to rank the performance of various automated summarizers. In this chapter, we examine and analyze our experiments in order to better understand this phenomenon and how we might address it to improve summarization quality. In particular, we present a new metric based on document graphs that can distinguish between the two types of document sets.

  9. Cultivating Hope through Learning for the Common Good

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McEwen, Rhonda M.; Herman, Wayne R.; Himes, Brant M.

    2016-01-01

    This article examines how an orientation toward "hope" can guide institutions of higher education in achieving their ultimate purpose of providing education for the common good of society. In today's cultural context, colleges and universities must navigate a multitude of challenges and competing philosophies, many of which question the…

  10. Use the Good Mind! An Interview with Freida Jacques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simonelli, Richard

    1997-01-01

    Freida Jacques, Onondaga clan mother, discusses the discipline of the "good mind," which involves becoming aware of your thoughts, examining the intent of your actions, and deciding whether your intent is based on love or fear and anger. Peace and healing must be achieved through forgiveness and respect. Sidebars discuss Native American healing…

  11. What are narratives good for?

    PubMed

    Beatty, John

    2016-08-01

    Narratives may be easy to come by, but not everything is worth narrating. What merits a narrative? Here, I follow the lead of narratologists and literary theorists, and focus on one particular proposal concerning the elements of a story that make it narrative-worthy. These elements correspond to features of the natural world addressed by the historical sciences, where narratives figure so prominently. What matters is contingency. Narratives are especially good for representing contingency and accounting for contingent outcomes. This will be squared with a common view that narratives leave no room for chance. On the contrary, I will argue, tracing one path through a maze of alternative possibilities, and alluding to those possibilities along the way, is what a narrative does particularly well.

  12. 'The good of the child'

    PubMed

    Warnock, Mary

    1987-04-01

    Warnock, chair of Britain's Committee of Inquiry into Human Fertilisation and Embryology, discusses the implications of the "artificial family" for children born through the use of reproductive technologies. She considers both treatment of infertility and the possible use of assisted reproduction to enable persons other than infertile couples, such as single persons and homosexuals, to have children. Warnock has found that emphasis has been placed on the wants and well-being of the adult(s) involved, and that the "good of the child" is a "wide and vague concept, widely invoked, not always plausibly." She is particularly concerned about children born as a result of the delayed implantation of frozen embryos, AID children who are deceived about their origins, and children born of surrogate pregnancies. She recommends that a detailed study of existing "artificial family" children be conducted to aid public policy decisions on assisted reproduction.

  13. Coordinating towards a Common Good

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Francisco C.; Pacheco, Jorge M.

    2010-09-01

    Throughout their life, humans often engage in collective endeavors ranging from family related issues to global warming. In all cases, the tragedy of the commons threatens the possibility of reaching the optimal solution associated with global cooperation, a scenario predicted by theory and demonstrated by many experiments. Using the toolbox of evolutionary game theory, I will address two important aspects of evolutionary dynamics that have been neglected so far in the context of public goods games and evolution of cooperation. On one hand, the fact that often there is a threshold above which a public good is reached [1, 2]. On the other hand, the fact that individuals often participate in several games, related to the their social context and pattern of social ties, defined by a social network [3, 4, 5]. In the first case, the existence of a threshold above which collective action is materialized dictates a rich pattern of evolutionary dynamics where the direction of natural selection can be inverted compared to standard expectations. Scenarios of defector dominance, pure coordination or coexistence may arise simultaneously. Both finite and infinite population models are analyzed. In networked games, cooperation blooms whenever the act of contributing is more important than the effort contributed. In particular, the heterogeneous nature of social networks naturally induces a symmetry breaking of the dilemmas of cooperation, as contributions made by cooperators may become contingent on the social context in which the individual is embedded. This diversity in context provides an advantage to cooperators, which is particularly strong when both wealth and social ties follow a power-law distribution, providing clues on the self-organization of social communities. Finally, in both situations, it can be shown that individuals no longer play a defection dominance dilemma, but effectively engage in a general N-person coordination game. Even if locally defection may seem

  14. Achieving closure at Fernald

    SciTech Connect

    Bradburne, John; Patton, Tisha C.

    2001-02-25

    When Fluor Fernald took over the management of the Fernald Environmental Management Project in 1992, the estimated closure date of the site was more than 25 years into the future. Fluor Fernald, in conjunction with DOE-Fernald, introduced the Accelerated Cleanup Plan, which was designed to substantially shorten that schedule and save taxpayers more than $3 billion. The management of Fluor Fernald believes there are three fundamental concerns that must be addressed by any contractor hoping to achieve closure of a site within the DOE complex. They are relationship management, resource management and contract management. Relationship management refers to the interaction between the site and local residents, regulators, union leadership, the workforce at large, the media, and any other interested stakeholder groups. Resource management is of course related to the effective administration of the site knowledge base and the skills of the workforce, the attraction and retention of qualified a nd competent technical personnel, and the best recognition and use of appropriate new technologies. Perhaps most importantly, resource management must also include a plan for survival in a flat-funding environment. Lastly, creative and disciplined contract management will be essential to effecting the closure of any DOE site. Fluor Fernald, together with DOE-Fernald, is breaking new ground in the closure arena, and ''business as usual'' has become a thing of the past. How Fluor Fernald has managed its work at the site over the last eight years, and how it will manage the new site closure contract in the future, will be an integral part of achieving successful closure at Fernald.

  15. Ten Pillars of a Good Childhood: A Finnish Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pulkkinen, Lea

    2012-01-01

    The organizers of the Decade for Childhood have formulated Ten Pillars of a Good Childhood as basic requirements for an optimal childhood. The pillars can be used to analyze the quality of childhood in homes and nations, and to guide policies and practices related to the experience of childhood. In this article, the author shall illustrate, pillar…

  16. Health physics manual of good practices for tritium facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Blauvelt, R.K.; Deaton, M.R.; Gill, J.T.

    1991-12-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide written guidance defining the generally accepted good practices in use at Department of Energy (DOE) tritium facilities. A {open_quotes}good practice{close_quotes} is an action, policy, or procedure that enhances the radiation protection program at a DOE site. The information selected for inclusion in this document should help readers achieve an understanding of the key radiation protection issues at tritium facilities and provide guidance as to what characterizes excellence from a radiation protection point of view. The ALARA (As Low as Reasonable Achievable) program at DOE sites should be based, in part, on following the good practices that apply to their operations.

  17. Achievement Goals and Achievement Emotions: A Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Chiungjung

    2011-01-01

    This meta-analysis synthesized 93 independent samples (N = 30,003) in 77 studies that reported in 78 articles examining correlations between achievement goals and achievement emotions. Achievement goals were meaningfully associated with different achievement emotions. The correlations of mastery and mastery approach goals with positive achievement…

  18. Quality in Postgraduate Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuber-Skerritt, Ortrun, Ed.; Ryan, Yoni, Ed.

    This collection of papers discusses issues of quality, institutional research culture, and processes which encourage, achieve, sustain, and assure high quality teaching and research in universities, primarily from a British and Australian perspective. Part 1 is titled "Issues of Quality and Institutional Research Culture" and contains the…

  19. Health physics manual of good practices for plutonium facilities. [Contains glossary

    SciTech Connect

    Brackenbush, L.W.; Heid, K.R.; Herrington, W.N.; Kenoyer, J.L.; Munson, L.F.; Munson, L.H.; Selby, J.M.; Soldat, K.L.; Stoetzel, G.A.; Traub, R.J.

    1988-05-01

    This manual consists of six sections: Properties of Plutonium, Siting of Plutonium Facilities, Facility Design, Radiation Protection, Emergency Preparedness, and Decontamination and Decommissioning. While not the final authority, the manual is an assemblage of information, rules of thumb, regulations, and good practices to assist those who are intimately involved in plutonium operations. An in-depth understanding of the nuclear, physical, chemical, and biological properties of plutonium is important in establishing a viable radiation protection and control program at a plutonium facility. These properties of plutonium provide the basis and perspective necessary for appreciating the quality of control needed in handling and processing the material. Guidance in selecting the location of a new plutonium facility may not be directly useful to most readers. However, it provides a perspective for the development and implementation of the environmental surveillance program and the in-plant controls required to ensure that the facility is and remains a good neighbor. The criteria, guidance, and good practices for the design of a plutonium facility are also applicable to the operation and modification of existing facilities. The design activity provides many opportunities for implementation of features to promote more effective protection and control. The application of ''as low as reasonably achievable'' (ALARA) principles and optimization analyses are generally most cost-effective during the design phase. 335 refs., 8 figs., 20 tabs.

  20. EuroFIR quality approach for managing food composition data; where are we in 2014?

    PubMed

    Westenbrink, Susanne; Roe, Mark; Oseredczuk, Marine; Castanheira, Isabel; Finglas, Paul

    2016-02-15

    A EuroFIR quality management framework was developed to assure data quality of food composition data, incorporating several recommendations developed or improved during the EuroFIR projects. A flow chart of the compilation process with standard operating procedures to assure critical steps was the starting point. Recommendations for food description, component identification, value documentation, recipe calculation, quality evaluation of values, guidelines to assess analytical methods, document and data repositories and training opportunities were harmonized as elements of the quality framework. European food composition database organizations reached consensus on the EuroFIR quality framework and started implementation. Peer reviews of the European compiler organizations were organized to evaluate the quality framework, focusing on what was achieved and on improvements needed. The reviews demonstrated that European food database compilers have made good use of standards and guidelines produced by EuroFIR, as well as a common understanding that a quality framework is essential to assure food composition data quality.