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Sample records for achieve high compression

  1. A technique to achieve uniform stress distribution in compressive creep testing of advanced ceramics at high temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, K.C.; Stevens, C.O.; Brinkman, C.R.; Holshauser, N.E.

    1996-05-01

    A technique to achieve stable and uniform uniaxial compression is offered for creep testing of advanced ceramic materials at elevated temperatures, using an innovative self-aligning load-train assembly. Excellent load-train alignment is attributed to the inherent ability of a unique hydraulic universal coupler to maintain self-aligning. Details of key elements, design concept, and pricniples of operation of the self-aligning coupler are described. A method of alignment verification using a strain-gaged specimen is then discussed. Results of verification tests indicate that bending below 1.5% is routinely achievable usin the load-train system. A successful compression creep test is demonstrated using a dumbbell-shpaed Si nitride specimen tested at 1300 C for over 4000 h.

  2. FRESCO: Referential compression of highly similar sequences.

    PubMed

    Wandelt, Sebastian; Leser, Ulf

    2013-01-01

    In many applications, sets of similar texts or sequences are of high importance. Prominent examples are revision histories of documents or genomic sequences. Modern high-throughput sequencing technologies are able to generate DNA sequences at an ever-increasing rate. In parallel to the decreasing experimental time and cost necessary to produce DNA sequences, computational requirements for analysis and storage of the sequences are steeply increasing. Compression is a key technology to deal with this challenge. Recently, referential compression schemes, storing only the differences between a to-be-compressed input and a known reference sequence, gained a lot of interest in this field. In this paper, we propose a general open-source framework to compress large amounts of biological sequence data called Framework for REferential Sequence COmpression (FRESCO). Our basic compression algorithm is shown to be one to two orders of magnitudes faster than comparable related work, while achieving similar compression ratios. We also propose several techniques to further increase compression ratios, while still retaining the advantage in speed: 1) selecting a good reference sequence; and 2) rewriting a reference sequence to allow for better compression. In addition,we propose a new way of further boosting the compression ratios by applying referential compression to already referentially compressed files (second-order compression). This technique allows for compression ratios way beyond state of the art, for instance,4,000:1 and higher for human genomes. We evaluate our algorithms on a large data set from three different species (more than 1,000 genomes, more than 3 TB) and on a collection of versions of Wikipedia pages. Our results show that real-time compression of highly similar sequences at high compression ratios is possible on modern hardware.

  3. FRESCO: Referential compression of highly similar sequences.

    PubMed

    Wandelt, Sebastian; Leser, Ulf

    2013-01-01

    In many applications, sets of similar texts or sequences are of high importance. Prominent examples are revision histories of documents or genomic sequences. Modern high-throughput sequencing technologies are able to generate DNA sequences at an ever-increasing rate. In parallel to the decreasing experimental time and cost necessary to produce DNA sequences, computational requirements for analysis and storage of the sequences are steeply increasing. Compression is a key technology to deal with this challenge. Recently, referential compression schemes, storing only the differences between a to-be-compressed input and a known reference sequence, gained a lot of interest in this field. In this paper, we propose a general open-source framework to compress large amounts of biological sequence data called Framework for REferential Sequence COmpression (FRESCO). Our basic compression algorithm is shown to be one to two orders of magnitudes faster than comparable related work, while achieving similar compression ratios. We also propose several techniques to further increase compression ratios, while still retaining the advantage in speed: 1) selecting a good reference sequence; and 2) rewriting a reference sequence to allow for better compression. In addition,we propose a new way of further boosting the compression ratios by applying referential compression to already referentially compressed files (second-order compression). This technique allows for compression ratios way beyond state of the art, for instance,4,000:1 and higher for human genomes. We evaluate our algorithms on a large data set from three different species (more than 1,000 genomes, more than 3 TB) and on a collection of versions of Wikipedia pages. Our results show that real-time compression of highly similar sequences at high compression ratios is possible on modern hardware. PMID:24524158

  4. The Rice coding algorithm achieves high-performance lossless and progressive image compression based on the improving of integer lifting scheme Rice coding algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jun, Xie Cheng; Su, Yan; Wei, Zhang

    2006-08-01

    In this paper, a modified algorithm was introduced to improve Rice coding algorithm and researches of image compression with the CDF (2,2) wavelet lifting scheme was made. Our experiments show that the property of the lossless image compression is much better than Huffman, Zip, lossless JPEG, RAR, and a little better than (or equal to) the famous SPIHT. The lossless compression rate is improved about 60.4%, 45%, 26.2%, 16.7%, 0.4% on average. The speed of the encoder is faster about 11.8 times than the SPIHT's and its efficiency in time can be improved by 162%. The speed of the decoder is faster about 12.3 times than that of the SPIHT's and its efficiency in time can be rasied about 148%. This algorithm, instead of largest levels wavelet transform, has high coding efficiency when the wavelet transform levels is larger than 3. For the source model of distributions similar to the Laplacian, it can improve the efficiency of coding and realize the progressive transmit coding and decoding.

  5. SPH simulation of high density hydrogen compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrel, R.; Romero, V.

    1998-07-01

    The density dependence of the electronic energy band gap of the hydrogen has been studied with respect to the insulator-metal (IM) transition. The valence conduction band gap of solid hydrogen is about 15eV at zero pressure, therefore very high pressures are required to close the gap and achieve metallization. We propose to investigate what will be the degree to which one can expect to maintain a shockless compression of hydrogen with a low temperature (close to that of a cold isentrope) and verify if it is possible to achieve metallization. Multistage compression will be driven by energetic materials in a cylindrical implosion system, in which we expect a slow compression rate that will maintain the low temperature in the isentropic compression. It is hoped that pressures on the order of 100Mbars can be achieved while maintaining low temperatures. In order to better understand this multistage compression a smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH) analysis has been performed. Since the SPH technique does not use a grid structure it is well suited to analyzing spatial deformation processes. This analysis will be used to improve the design of possible multistage compression devices.

  6. SPH Simulation of High Density Hydrogen Compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrel, R.; Romero, Van D.

    1997-07-01

    The density dependence of the electronic energy band gap of hydrogen has been studied with respect to the insulator-metal (IM) transition. The valence conduction band gap of solid hydrogen is about 15eV at zero pressure, therefore very high pressures are required to close the gap and achieve metallization. We are planning to investigate the degree to which shock less compression of hydrogen can be maintained at low temperature isentrope) and explore the possibililty of achieving metallization. Multistage compression will be driven by energetic materials in a cylindrical implosion system, in which we expect a slow compression rate that will maintain the low temperature in the isentropic compression. It is hoped that pressures of the order of 100 Mbars can be achieved while maintaining low temperatures. In order to understand this multistage compression better a smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH) analysis has been performed. Since the SPH technique uses a gridless structure it is well suited to analyzing spatial deformation processes. This paper presents the analysis which will be used to improve the design of possible multistage compression devices.

  7. Super high compression of line drawing data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, D. B.

    1976-01-01

    Models which can be used to accurately represent the type of line drawings which occur in teleconferencing and transmission for remote classrooms and which permit considerable data compression were described. The objective was to encode these pictures in binary sequences of shortest length but such that the pictures can be reconstructed without loss of important structure. It was shown that exploitation of reasonably simple structure permits compressions in the range of 30-100 to 1. When dealing with highly stylized material such as electronic or logic circuit schematics, it is unnecessary to reproduce configurations exactly. Rather, the symbols and configurations must be understood and be reproduced, but one can use fixed font symbols for resistors, diodes, capacitors, etc. Compression of pictures of natural phenomena such as can be realized by taking a similar approach, or essentially zero error reproducibility can be achieved but at a lower level of compression.

  8. High-quality lossy compression: current and future trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLaughlin, Steven W.

    1995-01-01

    This paper is concerned with current and future trends in the lossy compression of real sources such as imagery, video, speech and music. We put all lossy compression schemes into common framework where each can be characterized in terms of three well-defined advantages: cell shape, region shape and memory advantages. We concentrate on image compression and discuss how new entropy constrained trellis-based compressors achieve cell- shape, region-shape and memory gain resulting in high fidelity and high compression.

  9. A high-speed distortionless predictive image-compression scheme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheung, K.-M.; Smyth, P.; Wang, H.

    1990-01-01

    A high-speed distortionless predictive image-compression scheme that is based on differential pulse code modulation output modeling combined with efficient source-code design is introduced. Experimental results show that this scheme achieves compression that is very close to the difference entropy of the source.

  10. Simple Limits on Achieving A Quasi-Linear Magnetic Compression for an FEL Driver

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Yipeng; /SLAC

    2012-02-16

    Free electron lasers (FEL) need a very bright electron beam in three dimensions and a high peak charge density. In order to compress an initially longer electron bunch generated from the photoinjector, magnetic bunch compression systems are widely employed. In this paper, first harmonic RF linearization and its associated requirements are reviewed. Meanwhile it is also briefly discussed what is the relation between a proper initial bunch length and main RF frequency, when a harmonic RF linearization is included. Then given a reasonable bunch compression ratio, a proper initial bunch length as a function of the main RF frequency and RF phase is estimated analytically by several approaches, assuming that no harmonic RF section is needed to linearize the energy modulation introduced during main RF acceleration, and at the same time still linearly compress the bunch length. Next the upper limit of the bunch compression ratio in a single stage is evaluated analytically. The analytical relations derived on choosing a proper initial bunch length as a function of main RF frequency are confirmed by numerical simulation. These simple limit provide rough estimations and may be beneficial for choosing bunch compression ratios in different stages of an FEL driver, especially in a first stage bunch compression where there is usually a harmonic RF linearization applied. It may also be useful in evaluating the possibility of low charge operation mode without any harmonic RF linearization, where a shorter initial bunch length can be achieved from the photoinjector.

  11. High energy femtosecond pulse compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lassonde, Philippe; Mironov, Sergey; Fourmaux, Sylvain; Payeur, Stéphane; Khazanov, Efim; Sergeev, Alexander; Kieffer, Jean-Claude; Mourou, Gerard

    2016-07-01

    An original method for retrieving the Kerr nonlinear index was proposed and implemented for TF12 heavy flint glass. Then, a defocusing lens made of this highly nonlinear glass was used to generate an almost constant spectral broadening across a Gaussian beam profile. The lens was designed with spherical curvatures chosen in order to match the laser beam profile, such that the product of the thickness with intensity is constant. This solid-state optics in combination with chirped mirrors was used to decrease the pulse duration at the output of a terawatt-class femtosecond laser. We demonstrated compression of a 33 fs pulse to 16 fs with 170 mJ energy.

  12. Poor Results for High Achievers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bui, Sa; Imberman, Scott; Craig, Steven

    2012-01-01

    Three million students in the United States are classified as gifted, yet little is known about the effectiveness of traditional gifted and talented (G&T) programs. In theory, G&T programs might help high-achieving students because they group them with other high achievers and typically offer specially trained teachers and a more advanced…

  13. Analyzing High Resolution Geoscience Data using Parallelism and Compression (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daily, J.; Yin, J.

    2013-12-01

    Today's high-resolution climate datasets impose challenges in both storage space and I/O overhead. We explore parallel I/O and compression to address these challenges. The Parallel Analysis of GeOscience Data (pagaoda) toolkit is both an API for data-parallel analysis of geoscience climate data as well as a set of data-parallel processing tools based on this API. The API and the tools were designed first to support geodesic semi-structured NetCDF data, however they are generic enough to work with regularly gridded data as well. The command line tools are designed to mimic the NetCDF Operators but support both parallel IO and a combination of data and task parallelism. For large datasets, the single greatest performance bottleneck is IO. We describe multiple techniques we use to reduce the overhead of IO operations, namely the pseudo non-blocking interface of the parallel NetCDF library and compression. The techniques described can be applied generically to other applications using MPI-IO. We cover the current status of pagoda, compression techniques, and feature current performance information for high resolution data. Compression is promising for reducing storage space and I/O overhead. However, traditional compression algorithms, such as the LZW class compression, are designed mainly for text. These compression algorithms introduce high computation overhead and are not able to achieve high a compression ratio. We design compression algorithms specially customized for scientific data. Compared with traditional compression algorithms, our compression algorithm achieves a significantly higher compression ratio and introduces lower computation overhead. A naive architecture for incorporating compression is to first decompress data then perform computation on the decompressed data. Although this approach can reduce storage space, it hurts application performance. In our architecture, we pipeline the retrieval of compressed data from I/O devices, decompression of the

  14. Layered compression for high-precision depth data.

    PubMed

    Miao, Dan; Fu, Jingjing; Lu, Yan; Li, Shipeng; Chen, Chang Wen

    2015-12-01

    With the development of depth data acquisition technologies, access to high-precision depth with more than 8-b depths has become much easier and determining how to efficiently represent and compress high-precision depth is essential for practical depth storage and transmission systems. In this paper, we propose a layered high-precision depth compression framework based on an 8-b image/video encoder to achieve efficient compression with low complexity. Within this framework, considering the characteristics of the high-precision depth, a depth map is partitioned into two layers: 1) the most significant bits (MSBs) layer and 2) the least significant bits (LSBs) layer. The MSBs layer provides rough depth value distribution, while the LSBs layer records the details of the depth value variation. For the MSBs layer, an error-controllable pixel domain encoding scheme is proposed to exploit the data correlation of the general depth information with sharp edges and to guarantee the data format of LSBs layer is 8 b after taking the quantization error from MSBs layer. For the LSBs layer, standard 8-b image/video codec is leveraged to perform the compression. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed coding scheme can achieve real-time depth compression with satisfactory reconstruction quality. Moreover, the compressed depth data generated from this scheme can achieve better performance in view synthesis and gesture recognition applications compared with the conventional coding schemes because of the error control algorithm. PMID:26415171

  15. High compression image and image sequence coding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunt, Murat

    1989-01-01

    The digital representation of an image requires a very large number of bits. This number is even larger for an image sequence. The goal of image coding is to reduce this number, as much as possible, and reconstruct a faithful duplicate of the original picture or image sequence. Early efforts in image coding, solely guided by information theory, led to a plethora of methods. The compression ratio reached a plateau around 10:1 a couple of years ago. Recent progress in the study of the brain mechanism of vision and scene analysis has opened new vistas in picture coding. Directional sensitivity of the neurones in the visual pathway combined with the separate processing of contours and textures has led to a new class of coding methods capable of achieving compression ratios as high as 100:1 for images and around 300:1 for image sequences. Recent progress on some of the main avenues of object-based methods is presented. These second generation techniques make use of contour-texture modeling, new results in neurophysiology and psychophysics and scene analysis.

  16. Broadband and tunable high-performance microwave absorption of an ultralight and highly compressible graphene foam.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Huang, Yi; Zhang, Tengfei; Chang, Huicong; Xiao, Peishuang; Chen, Honghui; Huang, Zhiyu; Chen, Yongsheng

    2015-03-25

    The broadband and tunable high-performance microwave absorption properties of an ultralight and highly compressible graphene foam (GF) are investigated. Simply via physical compression, the microwave absorption performance can be tuned. The qualified bandwidth coverage of 93.8% (60.5 GHz/64.5 GHz) is achieved for the GF under 90% compressive strain (1.0 mm thickness). This mainly because of the 3D conductive network. PMID:25689269

  17. Broadband and tunable high-performance microwave absorption of an ultralight and highly compressible graphene foam.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Huang, Yi; Zhang, Tengfei; Chang, Huicong; Xiao, Peishuang; Chen, Honghui; Huang, Zhiyu; Chen, Yongsheng

    2015-03-25

    The broadband and tunable high-performance microwave absorption properties of an ultralight and highly compressible graphene foam (GF) are investigated. Simply via physical compression, the microwave absorption performance can be tuned. The qualified bandwidth coverage of 93.8% (60.5 GHz/64.5 GHz) is achieved for the GF under 90% compressive strain (1.0 mm thickness). This mainly because of the 3D conductive network.

  18. Ultralight and highly compressible graphene aerogels.

    PubMed

    Hu, Han; Zhao, Zongbin; Wan, Wubo; Gogotsi, Yury; Qiu, Jieshan

    2013-04-18

    Chemically converted graphene aerogels with ultralight density and high compressibility are prepared by diamine-mediated functionalization and assembly, followed by microwave irradiation. The resulting graphene aerogels with density as low as 3 mg cm(-3) show excellent resilience and can completely recover after more than 90% compression. The ultralight graphene aerogels possessing high elasticity are promising as compliant and energy-absorbing materials. PMID:23418081

  19. Very high ratio compression by liquid conical implosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jianguo; Lei, Yian

    2015-11-01

    A conical implosion device is designed to achieve very high ratio compression, up to 109 or even higher. The compressing liquid has very low vapor pressure. A novel method is used to prepare the initial pure and thin gas. Some preliminary results proved the concept. The device can produce high energy density (HED) states in a near thermal equilibrium state, heat a gas continuously from very low (a few K) to very high temperature (~100,000 K), or do magnetized target fusion (MTF) with a proper external pulse current or magnetic field.

  20. Achieving acoustic cloak by using compressible background flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ruo-Yang; Zhao, Qing; Ge, Mo-Lin

    2016-08-01

    We propose a scheme of acoustic spherical cloaking by means of background irrotational flow in compressible fluid. The background flow forms a virtual curved spacetime and directs the sound waves to bypass the cloaked objects. To satisfy the laws of real fluid, we show that spatially distributed mass source and momentum source are necessary to supply. The propagation of sound waves in this system is studied via both geometric acoustics approximation and full wave approach. The analytic solution of sound fields is obtained for plane wave incidence. The results reveal the effect of phase retardation (or lead) in comparison with the ordinary transformation-acoustic cloak. In addition, the ability of cloaking is also evaluated for unideal background flows by analyzing the scattering cross section. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11475088 and 11275024) and the Fund from the Ministry of Science and Technology of China (Grant No. 2013YQ030595-3).

  1. Achieving acoustic cloak by using compressible background flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ruo-Yang; Zhao, Qing; Ge, Mo-Lin

    2016-08-01

    We propose a scheme of acoustic spherical cloaking by means of background irrotational flow in compressible fluid. The background flow forms a virtual curved spacetime and directs the sound waves to bypass the cloaked objects. To satisfy the laws of real fluid, we show that spatially distributed mass source and momentum source are necessary to supply. The propagation of sound waves in this system is studied via both geometric acoustics approximation and full wave approach. The analytic solution of sound fields is obtained for plane wave incidence. The results reveal the effect of phase retardation (or lead) in comparison with the ordinary transformation-acoustic cloak. In addition, the ability of cloaking is also evaluated for unideal background flows by analyzing the scattering cross section. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11475088 and 11275024) and the Fund from the Ministry of Science and Technology of China (Grant No. 2013YQ030595-3).

  2. High pressure phase transformation in iron under fast compression

    SciTech Connect

    Bastea, M; Bastea, S; Becker, R

    2009-07-07

    We present experimental results on the solid-solid, {alpha} to {epsilon} phase transformation kinetics of iron under high pressure dynamic compression. We observe kinetic features - velocity loops - similar with the ones recently reported to occur when water is frozen into its ice VII phase under comparable experimental conditions. We analyze this behavior in terms of general ideas coupling the steady sample compression with phase nucleation and growth with a pressure dependent phase interface velocity. The model is used to predict the response of iron when steadily driven across the {alpha} - {epsilon} phase boundary on very short time scales, including those envisioned to be achieved in ultra-fast laser experiments.

  3. Fuels for high-compression engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sparrow, Stanwood W

    1926-01-01

    From theoretical considerations one would expect an increase in power and thermal efficiency to result from increasing the compression ratio of an internal combustion engine. In reality it is upon the expansion ratio that the power and thermal efficiency depend, but since in conventional engines this is equal to the compression ratio, it is generally understood that a change in one ratio is accompanied by an equal change in the other. Tests over a wide range of compression ratios (extending to ratios as high as 14.1) have shown that ordinarily an increase in power and thermal efficiency is obtained as expected provided serious detonation or preignition does not result from the increase in ratio.

  4. High Performance Compression of Science Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Storer, James A.; Carpentieri, Bruno; Cohn, Martin

    1994-01-01

    Two papers make up the body of this report. One presents a single-pass adaptive vector quantization algorithm that learns a codebook of variable size and shape entries; the authors present experiments on a set of test images showing that with no training or prior knowledge of the data, for a given fidelity, the compression achieved typically equals or exceeds that of the JPEG standard. The second paper addresses motion compensation, one of the most effective techniques used in interframe data compression. A parallel block-matching algorithm for estimating interframe displacement of blocks with minimum error is presented. The algorithm is designed for a simple parallel architecture to process video in real time.

  5. High performance compression of science data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Storer, James A.; Cohn, Martin

    1994-01-01

    Two papers make up the body of this report. One presents a single-pass adaptive vector quantization algorithm that learns a codebook of variable size and shape entries; the authors present experiments on a set of test images showing that with no training or prior knowledge of the data, for a given fidelity, the compression achieved typically equals or exceeds that of the JPEG standard. The second paper addresses motion compensation, one of the most effective techniques used in the interframe data compression. A parallel block-matching algorithm for estimating interframe displacement of blocks with minimum error is presented. The algorithm is designed for a simple parallel architecture to process video in real time.

  6. Turbulence modeling for high speed compressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandra, Suresh

    1993-01-01

    The following grant objectives were delineated in the proposal to NASA: to offer course work in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and related areas to enable mechanical engineering students at North Carolina A&T State University (N.C. A&TSU) to pursue M.S. studies in CFD, and to enable students and faculty to engage in research in high speed compressible flows. Since no CFD-related activity existed at N.C. A&TSU before the start of the NASA grant period, training of students in the CFD area and initiation of research in high speed compressible flows were proposed as the key aspects of the project. To that end, graduate level courses in CFD, boundary layer theory, and fluid dynamics were offered. This effort included initiating a CFD course for graduate students. Also, research work was performed on studying compressibility effects in high speed flows. Specifically, a modified compressible dissipation model, which included a fourth order turbulent Mach number term, was incorporated into the SPARK code and verified for the air-air mixing layer case. The results obtained for this case were compared with a wide variety of experimental data to discern the trends in the mixing layer growth rates with varying convective Mach numbers. Comparison of the predictions of the study with the results of several analytical models was also carried out. The details of the research study are described in the publication entitled 'Compressibility Effects in Modeling Turbulent High Speed Mixing Layers,' which is attached to this report.

  7. Turbulence modeling for high speed compressible flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Suresh

    1993-08-01

    The following grant objectives were delineated in the proposal to NASA: to offer course work in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and related areas to enable mechanical engineering students at North Carolina A&T State University (N.C. A&TSU) to pursue M.S. studies in CFD, and to enable students and faculty to engage in research in high speed compressible flows. Since no CFD-related activity existed at N.C. A&TSU before the start of the NASA grant period, training of students in the CFD area and initiation of research in high speed compressible flows were proposed as the key aspects of the project. To that end, graduate level courses in CFD, boundary layer theory, and fluid dynamics were offered. This effort included initiating a CFD course for graduate students. Also, research work was performed on studying compressibility effects in high speed flows. Specifically, a modified compressible dissipation model, which included a fourth order turbulent Mach number term, was incorporated into the SPARK code and verified for the air-air mixing layer case. The results obtained for this case were compared with a wide variety of experimental data to discern the trends in the mixing layer growth rates with varying convective Mach numbers. Comparison of the predictions of the study with the results of several analytical models was also carried out. The details of the research study are described in the publication entitled 'Compressibility Effects in Modeling Turbulent High Speed Mixing Layers,' which is attached to this report.

  8. Mathematics Achievement in High- and Low-Achieving Secondary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohammadpour, Ebrahim; Shekarchizadeh, Ahmadreza

    2015-01-01

    This paper identifies the amount of variance in mathematics achievement in high- and low-achieving schools that can be explained by school-level factors, while controlling for student-level factors. The data were obtained from 2679 Iranian eighth graders who participated in the 2007 Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study. Of the…

  9. High reflection mirrors for pulse compression gratings.

    PubMed

    Palmier, S; Neauport, J; Baclet, N; Lavastre, E; Dupuy, G

    2009-10-26

    We report an experimental investigation of high reflection mirrors used to fabricate gratings for pulse compression application at the wavelength of 1.053microm. Two kinds of mirrors are studied: the mixed Metal MultiLayer Dielectric (MMLD) mirrors which combine a gold metal layer with some e-beam evaporated dielectric bilayers on the top and the standard e-beam evaporated MultiLayer Dielectric (MLD) mirrors. Various samples were manufactured, damage tested at a pulse duration of 500fs. Damage sites were subsequently observed by means of Nomarski microscopy and white light interferometer microscopy. The comparison of the results evidences that if MMLD design can offer damage performances rather similar to MLD design, it also exhibits lower stresses; being thus an optimal mirror substrate for a pulse compression grating operating under vacuum.

  10. Advances in high throughput DNA sequence data compression.

    PubMed

    Sardaraz, Muhammad; Tahir, Muhammad; Ikram, Ataul Aziz

    2016-06-01

    Advances in high throughput sequencing technologies and reduction in cost of sequencing have led to exponential growth in high throughput DNA sequence data. This growth has posed challenges such as storage, retrieval, and transmission of sequencing data. Data compression is used to cope with these challenges. Various methods have been developed to compress genomic and sequencing data. In this article, we present a comprehensive review of compression methods for genome and reads compression. Algorithms are categorized as referential or reference free. Experimental results and comparative analysis of various methods for data compression are presented. Finally, key challenges and research directions in DNA sequence data compression are highlighted. PMID:26846812

  11. Highly compressed ammonia forms an ionic crystal.

    PubMed

    Pickard, Chris J; Needs, R J

    2008-10-01

    Ammonia is an important compound with many uses, such as in the manufacture of fertilizers, explosives and pharmaceuticals. As an archetypal hydrogen-bonded system, the properties of ammonia under pressure are of fundamental interest, and compressed ammonia has a significant role in planetary physics. We predict new high-pressure crystalline phases of ammonia (NH(3)) through a computational search based on first-principles density-functional-theory calculations. Ammonia is known to form hydrogen-bonded solids, but we predict that at higher pressures it will form ammonium amide ionic solids consisting of alternate layers of NH(4)(+) and NH(2)(-) ions. These ionic phases are predicted to be stable over a wide range of pressures readily obtainable in laboratory experiments. The occurrence of ionic phases is rationalized in terms of the relative ease of forming ammonium and amide ions from ammonia molecules, and the volume reduction on doing so. We also predict that the ionic bonding cannot be sustained under extreme compression and that, at pressures beyond the reach of current static-loading experiments, ammonia will return to hydrogen-bonded structures consisting of neutral NH(3) molecules. PMID:18724375

  12. Optimization of femtosecond Yb-doped fiber amplifiers for high-quality pulse compression.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hung-Wen; Lim, JinKang; Huang, Shu-Wei; Schimpf, Damian N; Kärtner, Franz X; Chang, Guoqing

    2012-12-17

    We both theoretically and experimentally investigate the optimization of femtosecond Yb-doped fiber amplifiers (YDFAs) to achieve high-quality, high-power, compressed pulses. Ultrashort pulses amplified inside YDFAs are modeled by the generalized nonlinear Schrödinger equation coupled to the steady-state propagation-rate equations. We use this model to study the dependence of compressed-pulse quality on the YDFA parameters, such as the gain fiber's doping concentration and length, and input pulse pre-chirp, duration, and power. The modeling results confirmed by experiments show that an optimum negative pre-chirp for the input pulse exists to achieve the best compression.

  13. Achieving a robust drug release from extended release tablets using an integrated continuous mixing and direct compression line.

    PubMed

    Lakio, Satu; Tajarobi, Pirjo; Wikström, Håkan; Fransson, Magnus; Arnehed, Johan; Ervasti, Tuomas; Simonaho, Simo-Pekka; Ketolainen, Jarkko; Folestad, Staffan; Abrahmsén-Alami, Susanna

    2016-09-10

    In the present work the viability of integrated continuous mixing and compression processes for manufacturing of extended release (ER) matrix tablets was investigated in terms of dissolution behavior. The purpose was also to evaluate the combined effect of processing variables and compositional variables on the release robustness. The continuous process was provoked by a challenging formulation design, including variable powder characteristics and compositions of high and low amount of poorly soluble and poorly flowing drug substance (ibuprofen). Additionally a relatively low amount of two different ER matrix former grades (standard granulation grade CR and direct compression grade DC2 of hydroxypropyl methylcellulose, HPMC) was used to challenge the system. Robust ibuprofen release was obtained faster when HPMC CR was used. However, robust release was also achieved when using HPMC DC2 at high ibuprofen content, even though it took slightly longer time to reach the steady state of the process. Due to its poor flow properties, HPMC CR would be very challenging to use in traditional direct compression. The results showed that by using continuous processing it is possible to manufacture and achieve robust performance of compositions that would not be possible with traditional batch processing due to for instance poorly flowability. PMID:27469074

  14. Self Regulated Learning of High Achievers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rathod, Ami

    2010-01-01

    The study was conducted on high achievers of Senior Secondary school. Main objectives were to identify the self regulated learners among the high achievers, to find out dominant components and characteristics operative in self regulated learners and to compare self regulated learning of learners with respect to their subject (science and non…

  15. Spectroscopy of compressed high energy density matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woolsey, N. C.; Asfaw, A.; Hammel, B.; Keane, C.; Back, C. A.; Calisti, A.; Mossé, C.; Stamm, R.; Talin, B.; Wark, J. S.; Lee, R. W.; Klein, L.

    1996-06-01

    A theoretical and experimental time-resolved spectroscopic investigation of indirectly driven microsphere implosions is described. The plasma dynamics is studied for several fill gases with a trace amount of argon. Through an analysis of the line profile of Ar XVII 1s2-1s3p 1P, with a line center position at Eυ=3684 eV, the evolution of the plasma density and temperature as a function of fill gas is examined. The theoretical calculations are performed with a fast computer code, which has been previously benchmarked through the analysis of specific complex ionic spectra in hot dense plasmas. The experimental aspect of the work utilizes the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Nova 10 beam laser facility to indirectly drive the implosion of a gas filled plastic microsphere contained in a gold Holhraum target. The dynamical density measurement is derived from a streak camera linewidth measurement and a comparison with the computed profile. Calculations demonstrate that in certain cases there can be a substantial ion dynamics effect on the line shape. The frequency fluctuation model is used to compute the effect on the line profile and a comparison with the experimental spectra provides evidence that ion dynamics may be affecting the line shape. This study provides a method for obtaining an improved understanding of the basic processes dominating the underlying plasma physics of matter compressed to a state of high energy density.

  16. High Stakes Testing and Student Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ediger, Marlow

    The effects of high stakes testing may be critical in the lives of public school students and may have many consequences for schools and teachers. There are no easy answers in measuring student achievement and in holding teachers accountable for learner progress. High stakes testing also involves responsibilities on the part of the principal who…

  17. Student Perceptions of High-Achieving Classmates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Händel, Marion; Vialle, Wilma; Ziegler, Albert

    2013-01-01

    The reported study investigated students' perceptions of their high-performing classmates in terms of intelligence, social skills, and conscientiousness in different school subjects. The school subjects for study were examined with regard to cognitive, physical, and gender-specific issues. The results show that high academic achievements in…

  18. High Achievers: 23rd Annual Survey. Attitudes and Opinions from the Nation's High Achieving Teens.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Who's Who among American High School Students, Northbrook, IL.

    This report presents data from an annual survey of high school student leaders and high achievers. It is noted that of the nearly 700,000 high achievers featured in this edition, 5,000 students were sent the survey and 2,092 questionnaires were completed. Subjects were high school juniors and seniors selected for recognition by their principals or…

  19. Achieving High Performance Perovskite Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yang

    2015-03-01

    Recently, metal halide perovskite based solar cell with the characteristics of rather low raw materials cost, great potential for simple process and scalable production, and extreme high power conversion efficiency (PCE), have been highlighted as one of the most competitive technologies for next generation thin film photovoltaic (PV). In UCLA, we have realized an efficient pathway to achieve high performance pervoskite solar cells, where the findings are beneficial to this unique materials/devices system. Our recent progress lies in perovskite film formation, defect passivation, transport materials design, interface engineering with respect to high performance solar cell, as well as the exploration of its applications beyond photovoltaics. These achievements include: 1) development of vapor assisted solution process (VASP) and moisture assisted solution process, which produces perovskite film with improved conformity, high crystallinity, reduced recombination rate, and the resulting high performance; 2) examination of the defects property of perovskite materials, and demonstration of a self-induced passivation approach to reduce carrier recombination; 3) interface engineering based on design of the carrier transport materials and the electrodes, in combination with high quality perovskite film, which delivers 15 ~ 20% PCEs; 4) a novel integration of bulk heterojunction to perovskite solar cell to achieve better light harvest; 5) fabrication of inverted solar cell device with high efficiency and flexibility and 6) exploration the application of perovskite materials to photodetector. Further development in film, device architecture, and interfaces will lead to continuous improved perovskite solar cells and other organic-inorganic hybrid optoelectronics.

  20. Reliability achievement in high technology space systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindstrom, D. L.

    1981-01-01

    The production of failure-free hardware is discussed. The elements required to achieve such hardware are: technical expertise to design, analyze, and fully understand the design; use of high reliability parts and materials control in the manufacturing process; and testing to understand the system and weed out defects. The durability of the Hughes family of satellites is highlighted.

  1. High-performance compression and double cryptography based on compressive ghost imaging with the fast Fourier transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leihong, Zhang; Zilan, Pan; Luying, Wu; Xiuhua, Ma

    2016-11-01

    To solve the problem that large images can hardly be retrieved for stringent hardware restrictions and the security level is low, a method based on compressive ghost imaging (CGI) with Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) is proposed, named FFT-CGI. Initially, the information is encrypted by the sender with FFT, and the FFT-coded image is encrypted by the system of CGI with a secret key. Then the receiver decrypts the image with the aid of compressive sensing (CS) and FFT. Simulation results are given to verify the feasibility, security, and compression of the proposed encryption scheme. The experiment suggests the method can improve the quality of large images compared with conventional ghost imaging and achieve the imaging for large-sized images, further the amount of data transmitted largely reduced because of the combination of compressive sensing and FFT, and improve the security level of ghost images through ciphertext-only attack (COA), chosen-plaintext attack (CPA), and noise attack. This technique can be immediately applied to encryption and data storage with the advantages of high security, fast transmission, and high quality of reconstructed information.

  2. CWICOM: A Highly Integrated & Innovative CCSDS Image Compression ASIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poupat, Jean-Luc; Vitulli, Raffaele

    2013-08-01

    The space market is more and more demanding in terms of on image compression performances. The earth observation satellites instrument resolution, the agility and the swath are continuously increasing. It multiplies by 10 the volume of picture acquired on one orbit. In parallel, the satellites size and mass are decreasing, requiring innovative electronic technologies reducing size, mass and power consumption. Astrium, leader on the market of the combined solutions for compression and memory for space application, has developed a new image compression ASIC which is presented in this paper. CWICOM is a high performance and innovative image compression ASIC developed by Astrium in the frame of the ESA contract n°22011/08/NLL/LvH. The objective of this ESA contract is to develop a radiation hardened ASIC that implements the CCSDS 122.0-B-1 Standard for Image Data Compression, that has a SpaceWire interface for configuring and controlling the device, and that is compatible with Sentinel-2 interface and with similar Earth Observation missions. CWICOM stands for CCSDS Wavelet Image COMpression ASIC. It is a large dynamic, large image and very high speed image compression ASIC potentially relevant for compression of any 2D image with bi-dimensional data correlation such as Earth observation, scientific data compression… The paper presents some of the main aspects of the CWICOM development, such as the algorithm and specification, the innovative memory organization, the validation approach and the status of the project.

  3. High Strain Rate Compression Testing of Ceramics and Ceramic Composites.

    SciTech Connect

    Blumenthal, W. R.

    2005-01-01

    The compressive deformation and failure behavior of ceramics and ceramic-metal composites for armor applications has been studied as a function of strain rate at Los Alamos National Laboratory since the late 1980s. High strain rate ({approx}10{sup 3} s{sup -1}) uniaxial compression loading can be achieved using the Kolsky-split-Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) technique, but special methods must be used to obtain valid strength results. This paper reviews these methods and the limitations of the Kolsky-SHPB technique for this class of materials. The Kolsky-split-Hopkinson pressure bar (Kolsky-SHPB) technique was originally developed to characterize the mechanical behavior of ductile materials such as metals and polymers where the results can be used to develop strain-rate and temperature-dependent constitutive behavior models that empirically describe macroscopic plastic flow. The flow behavior of metals and polymers is generally controlled by thermally-activated and rate-dependent dislocation motion or polymer chain motion in response to shear stresses. Conversely, the macroscopic mechanical behavior of dense, brittle, ceramic-based materials is dominated by elastic deformation terminated by rapid failure associated with the propagation of defects in the material in response to resolved tensile stresses. This behavior is usually characterized by a distribution of macroscopically measured failure strengths and strains. The basis for any strain-rate dependence observed in the failure strength must originate from rate-dependence in the damage and fracture process, since uniform, uniaxial elastic behavior is rate-independent (e.g. inertial effects on crack growth). The study of microscopic damage and fracture processes and their rate-dependence under dynamic loading conditions is a difficult experimental challenge that is not addressed in this paper. The purpose of this paper is to review the methods that have been developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory to

  4. Early predictors of high school mathematics achievement.

    PubMed

    Siegler, Robert S; Duncan, Greg J; Davis-Kean, Pamela E; Duckworth, Kathryn; Claessens, Amy; Engel, Mimi; Susperreguy, Maria Ines; Chen, Meichu

    2012-07-01

    Identifying the types of mathematics content knowledge that are most predictive of students' long-term learning is essential for improving both theories of mathematical development and mathematics education. To identify these types of knowledge, we examined long-term predictors of high school students' knowledge of algebra and overall mathematics achievement. Analyses of large, nationally representative, longitudinal data sets from the United States and the United Kingdom revealed that elementary school students' knowledge of fractions and of division uniquely predicts those students' knowledge of algebra and overall mathematics achievement in high school, 5 or 6 years later, even after statistically controlling for other types of mathematical knowledge, general intellectual ability, working memory, and family income and education. Implications of these findings for understanding and improving mathematics learning are discussed.

  5. High resolution difference schemes for compressible gas dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Woodward, P.; Colella, P.

    1980-07-30

    The advantages and disadvantages of four new high-resolution difference schemes, namely the von Neumann-Richtmyer, Godunovs, MUSCL and Glimms, for mathematically representing physical conditions in compressible gas flows are compared. (LCL)

  6. High Order Filter Methods for the Non-ideal Compressible MHD Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, H. C.; Sjoegreen, Bjoern

    2003-01-01

    The generalization of a class of low-dissipative high order filter finite difference methods for long time wave propagation of shock/turbulence/combustion compressible viscous gas dynamic flows to compressible MHD equations for structured curvilinear grids has been achieved. The new scheme is shown to provide a natural and efficient way for the minimization of the divergence of the magnetic field numerical error. Standard divergence cleaning is not required by the present filter approach. For certain non-ideal MHD test cases, divergence free preservation of the magnetic fields has been achieved.

  7. Divergence Free High Order Filter Methods for the Compressible MHD Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yea, H. C.; Sjoegreen, Bjoern

    2003-01-01

    The generalization of a class of low-dissipative high order filter finite difference methods for long time wave propagation of shock/turbulence/combustion compressible viscous gas dynamic flows to compressible MHD equations for structured curvilinear grids has been achieved. The new scheme is shown to provide a natural and efficient way for the minimization of the divergence of the magnetic field numerical error. Standard diver- gence cleaning is not required by the present filter approach. For certain MHD test cases, divergence free preservation of the magnetic fields has been achieved.

  8. Attitudes and Opinions from the Nation's High Achieving Teens. 18th Annual Survey of High Achievers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Educational Communications, Inc., Lake Forest, IL.

    This document contains factsheets and news releases which cite findings from a national survey of 1,985 high achieving high school students. Factsheets describe the Who's Who Among American High School Students recognition and service program for high school students and explain the Who's Who survey. A summary report of this eighteenth annual…

  9. A High Performance Image Data Compression Technique for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, Pen-Shu; Venbrux, Jack

    2003-01-01

    A highly performing image data compression technique is currently being developed for space science applications under the requirement of high-speed and pushbroom scanning. The technique is also applicable to frame based imaging data. The algorithm combines a two-dimensional transform with a bitplane encoding; this results in an embedded bit string with exact desirable compression rate specified by the user. The compression scheme performs well on a suite of test images acquired from spacecraft instruments. It can also be applied to three-dimensional data cube resulting from hyper-spectral imaging instrument. Flight qualifiable hardware implementations are in development. The implementation is being designed to compress data in excess of 20 Msampledsec and support quantization from 2 to 16 bits. This paper presents the algorithm, its applications and status of development.

  10. Study of radar pulse compression for high resolution satellite altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dooley, R. P.; Nathanson, F. E.; Brooks, L. W.

    1974-01-01

    Pulse compression techniques are studied which are applicable to a satellite altimeter having a topographic resolution of + 10 cm. A systematic design procedure is used to determine the system parameters. The performance of an optimum, maximum likelihood processor is analysed, which provides the basis for modifying the standard split-gate tracker to achieve improved performance. Bandwidth considerations lead to the recommendation of a full deramp STRETCH pulse compression technique followed by an analog filter bank to separate range returns. The implementation of the recommended technique is examined.

  11. Storage and compression design of high speed CCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Xichang; Zhai, LinPei

    2009-05-01

    In current field of CCD measurement, large area and high resolution CCD is used to obtain big measurement image, so that, speed and capacity of CCD requires high performance of later storage and process system. The paper discusses how to use SCSI hard disk to construct storage system and use DSPs and FPGA to realize image compression. As for storage subsystem, Because CCD is divided into multiplex output, SCSI array is used in RAID0 way. The storage system is com posed of high speed buffer, DM A controller, control M CU, SCSI protocol controller and SCSI hard disk. As for compression subsystem, according to requirement of communication and monitor system, the output is fixed resolution image and analog PA L signal. The compression means is JPEG 2000 standard, in which, 9/7 wavelets in lifting format is used. 2 DSPs and FPGA are used to com pose parallel compression system. The system is com posed of FPGA pre-processing module, DSP compression module, video decoder module, data buffer module and communication module. Firstly, discrete wavelet transform and quantization is realized in FPGA. Secondly, entropy coding and stream adaption is realized in DSPs. Last, analog PA L signal is output by Video decoder. Data buffer is realized in synchronous dual-port RAM and state of subsystem is transfer to controller. Through subjective and objective evaluation, the storage and compression system satisfies the requirement of system.

  12. On achieving pure electromagnetic left-handedness through magnetodielectric field compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markley, Loïc

    2016-08-01

    The relationship between electromagnetic phase and power flow in metamaterials composed of periodic magnetodielectric inclusions is investigated. The distribution of Poynting vectors in k space across multiple Brillouin zones suggests that backward phase is a result of field compression within the inclusions, and that left-handedness can be achieved without negative electric or magnetic susceptibility (i.e., without out-of-phase dipole moments). This hypothesis is verified by showing that a one-dimensional periodic array of magnetodielectric slabs can be designed to mimic the properties of an ideal (homogeneous) left-handed medium. Furthermore, using exact fields and without any field averaging, it is shown that the structure can be designed such that practically all power is carried in the fundamental left-handed spectral component. In the limit where the fundamental contains all the power, this periodic structure has the same spectral power signature as that of a homogeneous left-handed medium. It is shown that this congruence does not manifest when the inclusions are purely dielectric, nor does it manifest for magnetodielectric inclusions in two or three dimensions.

  13. 21st Annual Survey of High Achievers: Attitudes and Opinions from the Nation's High Achieving Teens.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Who's Who among American High School Students, Lake Forest, IL.

    This survey was conducted by Who's Who Among American High School Students during the spring of 1990, to determine the attitudes of student leaders in U.S. high schools. A survey of high achievers sent to 5,000 students was completed and returned by approximately 2,000 students. All students were members of the junior or senior class during the…

  14. 22nd Annual Survey of High Achievers: Attitudes and Opinions from the Nation's High Achieving Teens.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Who's Who among American High School Students, Northbrook, IL.

    This study surveyed high school students (N=1,879) who were student leaders or high achievers in the spring of 1991 for the purpose of determining their attitudes. Students were members of the junior or senior high school class during the 1990-91 academic year and were selected for recognition by their principals or guidance counselors, other…

  15. Compression of helium to high pressures and temperatures using a ballistic piston apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roman, B. P.; Rovel, G. P.; Lewis, M. J.

    1971-01-01

    Some preliminary experiments are described which were carried out in a high enthalpy laboratory to investigate the compression of helium, a typical shock-tube driver gas, to very high pressures and temperatures by means of a ballistic piston. The purpose of these measurements was to identify any problem areas in the compression process, to determine the importance of real gas effects duDC 47355s process, and to establish the feasibility of using a ballistic piston apparatus to achieve temperatures in helium in excess of 10,000 K.

  16. Wave-breaking-extended fiber supercontinuum generation for high compression ratio transform-limited pulse compression.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuan; Tu, Haohua; Boppart, Stephen A

    2012-06-15

    Wave-breaking often occurs when a short intense optical pulse propagates in a long normally dispersive optical fiber. This effect has conventionally been avoided in fiber (super-)continuum-based pulse compression because the accumulated frequency chirp of the output pulse cannot be fully compensated by a standard prism (or grating) pair. Thus, the spectral extending capability of the wave-breaking has not been utilized to shorten the compressed pulse. We demonstrate that wave-breaking-free operation is not necessary if a 4f pulse shaper-based compressor is employed to remove both the linear and nonlinear chirp of the output pulse. By propagating a 180 fs (FWHM) input pulse in a nonlinear photonic crystal fiber beyond the wave-breaking limit, we compress the wave-breaking-extended supercontinuum output pulse to the bandwidth-limited duration of 6.4 fs (FWHM). The combination of high compression ratio (28×) and short pulse width represents a significant improvement over that attained in the wave-breaking-free regime.

  17. Attitudes and Opinions from the Nation's High Achieving Teens: 26th Annual Survey of High Achievers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Who's Who among American High School Students, Lake Forest, IL.

    A national survey of 3,351 high achieving high school students (junior and senior level) was conducted. All students had A or B averages. Topics covered include lifestyles, political beliefs, violence and entertainment, education, cheating, school violence, sexual violence and date rape, peer pressure, popularity, suicide, drugs and alcohol,…

  18. Attitudes and Opinions from the Nation's High Achieving Teens. 24th Annual Survey of High Achievers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Who's Who among American High School Students, Lake Forest, IL.

    This survey represents information compiled by the largest national survey of adolescent leaders and high achievers. Of the 5,000 students selected demographically from "Who's Who Among American High School Students," 1,957 responded. All students surveyed had "A" or "B" averages, and 98% planned on attending college. Questions were asked about…

  19. An easily-achieved time-domain beamformer for ultrafast ultrasound imaging based on compressive sensing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Congzhi; Peng, Xi; Liang, Dong; Xiao, Yang; Qiu, Weibao; Qian, Ming; Zheng, Hairong

    2015-01-01

    In ultrafast ultrasound imaging technique, how to maintain the high frame rate, and at the same time to improve the image quality as far as possible, has become a significant issue. Several novel beamforming methods based on compressive sensing (CS) theory have been proposed in previous literatures, but all have their own limitations, such as the excessively large memory consumption and the errors caused by the short-time discrete Fourier transform (STDFT). In this study, a novel CS-based time-domain beamformer for plane-wave ultrasound imaging is proposed and its image quality has been verified to be better than the traditional DAS method and even the popular coherent compounding method on several simulated phantoms. Comparing to the existing CS method, the memory consumption of our method is significantly reduced since the encoding matrix can be sparse-expressed. In addition, the time-delay calculations of the echo signals are directly accomplished in time-domain with a dictionary concept, avoiding the errors induced by the short-time Fourier translation calculation in those frequency-domain methods. The proposed method can be easily implemented on some low-cost hardware platforms, and can obtain ultrasound images with both high frame rate and good image quality, which make it has a great potential for clinical application.

  20. Implementation of a compressive sampling scheme for wireless sensors to achieve energy efficiency in a structural health monitoring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, Sean M.; Lynch, Jerome P.; Gilbert, Anna C.

    2013-04-01

    Wireless sensors have emerged to offer low-cost sensors with impressive functionality (e.g., data acquisition, computing, and communication) and modular installations. Such advantages enable higher nodal densities than tethered systems resulting in increased spatial resolution of the monitoring system. However, high nodal density comes at a cost as huge amounts of data are generated, weighing heavy on power sources, transmission bandwidth, and data management requirements, often making data compression necessary. The traditional compression paradigm consists of high rate (>Nyquist) uniform sampling and storage of the entire target signal followed by some desired compression scheme prior to transmission. The recently proposed compressed sensing (CS) framework combines the acquisition and compression stage together, thus removing the need for storage and operation of the full target signal prior to transmission. The effectiveness of the CS approach hinges on the presence of a sparse representation of the target signal in a known basis, similarly exploited by several traditional compressive sensing applications today (e.g., imaging, MRI). Field implementations of CS schemes in wireless SHM systems have been challenging due to the lack of commercially available sensing units capable of sampling methods (e.g., random) consistent with the compressed sensing framework, often moving evaluation of CS techniques to simulation and post-processing. The research presented here describes implementation of a CS sampling scheme to the Narada wireless sensing node and the energy efficiencies observed in the deployed sensors. Of interest in this study is the compressibility of acceleration response signals collected from a multi-girder steel-concrete composite bridge. The study shows the benefit of CS in reducing data requirements while ensuring data analysis on compressed data remain accurate.

  1. The high strain compression of closed-cell polymer foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, N. J.; Zhu, H. X.

    1999-03-01

    A compressed closed-cell polymer foam was modelled using a BBC lattice model of tetrakaidecahedral cells, loaded in the [001] direction. The contributions of cell face tensions and edge bending were analysed, assuming that the faces act as membranes, for a linearly-elastic, or a yielding material. The moduli and tensile yield stresses of highly oriented polymer films were measured to provide data for modelling, and the amount of polymer in the foam cell faces found to be high. Tensile face strains are predicted to reach 40% of the foam compressive strain. The predicted Youngs moduli are slightly low, because compressive face stresses are ignored, but Poissons ratio is correctly predicted. The compressive foam yield stress is predicted to depend on tensile yielding of the cell faces. Predicted values are close to experimental values for polyethylene foams, but half those of polystyrene extruded foams. The latter foam may collapse in compression when face yielding commences, rather than by the collapse mechanism of the model.

  2. Compressed data organization for high throughput parallel entropy coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Said, Amir; Mahfoodh, Abo-Talib; Yea, Sehoon

    2015-09-01

    The difficulty of parallelizing entropy coding is increasingly limiting the data throughputs achievable in media compression. In this work we analyze what are the fundamental limitations, using finite-state-machine models for identifying the best manner of separating tasks that can be processed independently, while minimizing compression losses. This analysis confirms previous works showing that effective parallelization is feasible only if the compressed data is organized in a proper way, which is quite different from conventional formats. The proposed new formats exploit the fact that optimal compression is not affected by the arrangement of coded bits, but it goes further in exploiting the decreasing cost of data processing and memory. Additional advantages include the ability to use, within this framework, increasingly more complex data modeling techniques, and the freedom to mix different types of coding. We confirm the parallelization effectiveness using coding simulations that run on multi-core processors, and show how throughput scales with the number of cores, and analyze the additional bit-rate overhead.

  3. High rate fabrication of compression molded components

    DOEpatents

    Matsen, Marc R.; Negley, Mark A.; Dykstra, William C.; Smith, Glen L.; Miller, Robert J.

    2016-04-19

    A method for fabricating a thermoplastic composite component comprises inductively heating a thermoplastic pre-form with a first induction coil by inducing current to flow in susceptor wires disposed throughout the pre-form, inductively heating smart susceptors in a molding tool to a leveling temperature with a second induction coil by applying a high-strength magnetic field having a magnetic flux that passes through surfaces of the smart susceptors, shaping the magnetic flux that passes through surfaces of the smart susceptors to flow substantially parallel to a molding surface of the smart susceptors, placing the heated pre-form between the heated smart susceptors; and applying molding pressure to the pre-form to form the composite component.

  4. High Efficiency, Low Emissions Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) Engines

    SciTech Connect

    Gravel, Roland; Maronde, Carl; Gehrke, Chris; Fiveland, Scott

    2010-10-30

    This is the final report of the High Efficiency Clean Combustion (HECC) Research Program for the U.S. Department of Energy. Work under this co-funded program began in August 2005 and finished in July 2010. The objective of this program was to develop and demonstrate a low emission, high thermal efficiency engine system that met 2010 EPA heavy-duty on-highway truck emissions requirements (0.2g/bhp-hr NOx, 0.14g/bhp-hr HC and 0.01g/bhp-hr PM) with a thermal efficiency of 46%. To achieve this goal, development of diesel homogenous charge compression ignition (HCCI) combustion was the chosen approach. This report summarizes the development of diesel HCCI combustion and associated enabling technologies that occurred during the HECC program between August 2005 and July 2010. This program showed that although diesel HCCI with conventional US diesel fuel was not a feasible means to achieve the program objectives, the HCCI load range could be increased with a higher volatility, lower cetane number fuel, such as gasoline, if the combustion rate could be moderated to avoid excessive cylinder pressure rise rates. Given the potential efficiency and emissions benefits, continued research of combustion with low cetane number fuels and the effects of fuel distillation are recommended. The operation of diesel HCCI was only feasible at part-load due to a limited fuel injection window. A 4% fuel consumption benefit versus conventional, low-temperature combustion was realized over the achievable operating range. Several enabling technologies were developed under this program that also benefited non-HCCI combustion. The development of a 300MPa fuel injector enabled the development of extended lifted flame combustion. A design methodology for minimizing the heat transfer to jacket water, known as precision cooling, will benefit conventional combustion engines, as well as HCCI engines. An advanced combustion control system based on cylinder pressure measurements was developed. A Well

  5. A compression scheme for radio data in high performance computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masui, K.; Amiri, M.; Connor, L.; Deng, M.; Fandino, M.; Höfer, C.; Halpern, M.; Hanna, D.; Hincks, A. D.; Hinshaw, G.; Parra, J. M.; Newburgh, L. B.; Shaw, J. R.; Vanderlinde, K.

    2015-09-01

    We present a procedure for efficiently compressing astronomical radio data for high performance applications. Integrated, post-correlation data are first passed through a nearly lossless rounding step which compares the precision of the data to a generalized and calibration-independent form of the radiometer equation. This allows the precision of the data to be reduced in a way that has an insignificant impact on the data. The newly developed Bitshuffle lossless compression algorithm is subsequently applied. When the algorithm is used in conjunction with the HDF5 library and data format, data produced by the CHIME Pathfinder telescope is compressed to 28% of its original size and decompression throughputs in excess of 1 GB/s are obtained on a single core.

  6. Modeling Compressibility Effects in High-Speed Turbulent Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarkar, S.

    2004-01-01

    Man has strived to make objects fly faster, first from subsonic to supersonic and then to hypersonic speeds. Spacecraft and high-speed missiles routinely fly at hypersonic Mach numbers, M greater than 5. In defense applications, aircraft reach hypersonic speeds at high altitude and so may civilian aircraft in the future. Hypersonic flight, while presenting opportunities, has formidable challenges that have spurred vigorous research and development, mainly by NASA and the Air Force in the USA. Although NASP, the premier hypersonic concept of the eighties and early nineties, did not lead to flight demonstration, much basic research and technology development was possible. There is renewed interest in supersonic and hypersonic flight with the HyTech program of the Air Force and the Hyper-X program at NASA being examples of current thrusts in the field. At high-subsonic to supersonic speeds, fluid compressibility becomes increasingly important in the turbulent boundary layers and shear layers associated with the flow around aerospace vehicles. Changes in thermodynamic variables: density, temperature and pressure, interact strongly with the underlying vortical, turbulent flow. The ensuing changes to the flow may be qualitative such as shocks which have no incompressible counterpart, or quantitative such as the reduction of skin friction with Mach number, large heat transfer rates due to viscous heating, and the dramatic reduction of fuel/oxidant mixing at high convective Mach number. The peculiarities of compressible turbulence, so-called compressibility effects, have been reviewed by Fernholz and Finley. Predictions of aerodynamic performance in high-speed applications require accurate computational modeling of these "compressibility effects" on turbulence. During the course of the project we have made fundamental advances in modeling the pressure-strain correlation and developed a code to evaluate alternate turbulence models in the compressible shear layer.

  7. High Involvement Mothers of High Achieving Children: Potential Theoretical Explanations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunsaker, Scott L.

    2013-01-01

    In American society, parents who have high aspirations for the achievements of their children are often viewed by others in a negative light. Various pejoratives such as "pushy parent," "helicopter parent," "stage mother," and "soccer mom" are used in the common vernacular to describe these parents. Multiple…

  8. Compressive high speed flow microscopy with motion contrast (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosworth, Bryan; Stroud, Jasper R.; Tran, Dung N.; Tran, Trac D.; Chin, Sang; Foster, Mark A.

    2016-03-01

    High-speed continuous imaging systems are constrained by analog-to-digital conversion, storage, and transmission. However, real video signals of objects such as microscopic cells and particles require only a few percent or less of the full video bandwidth for high fidelity representation by modern compression algorithms. Compressed Sensing (CS) is a recent influential paradigm in signal processing that builds real-time compression into the acquisition step by computing inner products between the signal of interest and known random waveforms and then applying a nonlinear reconstruction algorithm. Here, we extend the continuous high-rate photonically-enabled compressed sensing (CHiRP-CS) framework to acquire motion contrast video of microscopic flowing objects. We employ chirp processing in optical fiber and high-speed electro-optic modulation to produce ultrashort pulses each with a unique pseudorandom binary sequence (PRBS) spectral pattern with 325 features per pulse at the full laser repetition rate (90 MHz). These PRBS-patterned pulses serve as random structured illumination inside a one-dimensional (1D) spatial disperser. By multiplexing the PRBS patterns with a user-defined repetition period, the difference signal y_i=&phi_i (x_i - x_{i-tau}) can be computed optically with balanced detection, where x is the image signal, phi_i is the PRBS pattern, and tau is the repetition period of the patterns. Two-dimensional (2D) image reconstruction via iterative alternating minimization to find the best locally-sparse representation yields an image of the edges in the flow direction, corresponding to the spatial and temporal 1D derivative. This provides both a favorable representation for image segmentation and a sparser representation for many objects that can improve image compression.

  9. Data compression techniques applied to high resolution high frame rate video technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartz, William G.; Alexovich, Robert E.; Neustadter, Marc S.

    1989-01-01

    An investigation is presented of video data compression applied to microgravity space experiments using High Resolution High Frame Rate Video Technology (HHVT). An extensive survey of methods of video data compression, described in the open literature, was conducted. The survey examines compression methods employing digital computing. The results of the survey are presented. They include a description of each method and assessment of image degradation and video data parameters. An assessment is made of present and near term future technology for implementation of video data compression in high speed imaging system. Results of the assessment are discussed and summarized. The results of a study of a baseline HHVT video system, and approaches for implementation of video data compression, are presented. Case studies of three microgravity experiments are presented and specific compression techniques and implementations are recommended.

  10. High Ability Readers and the Achievement Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunsaker, Scott L.; Parke, Cynthia J.; Bramble, Joan G.

    2004-01-01

    To close the achievement gap, the "No Child Left Behind" law calls for all students to make appropriate yearly progress. This presumably means that progress is being made by capable readers at the same time progress is being made by struggling readers. However, there appear to be unintended effects of "No Child Left Behind" that may impede the…

  11. High-pressure compressibility and thermal expansion of aragonite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palaich, S.; Heffern, R. A.; Kavner, A.; Manning, C. E.; Merlini, M.; Hanfland, M.

    2015-12-01

    An important component of Earth's deep carbon cycle is the return of surficial carbon to the planet's interior. Most recycled carbon is bound in CaCO3 minerals, of which aragonite is the most significant at upper mantle pressures. It is therefore essential to understand the phase stability and compressibility of aragonite at high pressures and temperatures. Aragonite has an orthorhombic 2/m 2/m 2/m structure and a Z of 4. The high-pressure behavior of aragonite has been studied under dynamic and static compression using both X-ray diffraction and spectroscopic techniques, but these results have been contradictory and inconclusive. To address these issues, a single-crystal synchrotron X-ray diffraction study of aragonite under hydrostatic compression was performed to 40 GPa in a diamond anvil cell at ambient temperature. To supplement the compressional experiment, thermal expansion was also measured via powder X-ray diffraction at ambient pressure between 298-673 K. Ambient-pressure single-crystal measurements confirm the orthorhombic 2/m 2/m 2/m structure and yield a unit cell volume of 226.932(5) Å3. At room temperature, aragonite is stable in the orthorhombic structure to 40 GPa, with an isothermal bulk modulus of 66.5(7) GPa and K' = 5.0(1). The a-axis is most compressible and the c-axis is the least compressible. The b-axis is intermediate, but starts to decrease in compressibility at ~15 GPa. Between 25-30 GPa the aragonite unit cell distorts due to the stiffening of the b-axis, which is controlled by the orientation and distortion of the carbonate groups, layered in the aragonite structure parallel to the a-axis. The carbonate groups elongate and deform from equilateral to isosceles between 15 and 30 GPa, thus influencing the compressibility of the b-axis. The thermal expansion measurements yield expansion coefficients a0 = 4.9(2) x 10-5 and a1 =3.7(5) x 10-8, in agreement with previous data. The combination of the isothermal and isobaric studies allows the

  12. High-Achieving Students in the Era of NCLB

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loveless, Tom; Parkas, Steve; Duffett, Ann

    2008-01-01

    This report contains two separate studies examining the status of high-achieving students in the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) era. Part I, An Analysis of NAEP Data, authored by Brookings Institution scholar Tom Loveless, examines achievement trends for high-achieving students (defined, like low-achieving students, by their performance on the…

  13. Microbunching and RF Compression

    SciTech Connect

    Venturini, M.; Migliorati, M.; Ronsivalle, C.; Ferrario, M.; Vaccarezza, C.

    2010-05-23

    Velocity bunching (or RF compression) represents a promising technique complementary to magnetic compression to achieve the high peak current required in the linac drivers for FELs. Here we report on recent progress aimed at characterizing the RF compression from the point of view of the microbunching instability. We emphasize the development of a linear theory for the gain function of the instability and its validation against macroparticle simulations that represents a useful tool in the evaluation of the compression schemes for FEL sources.

  14. Active high-power RF switch and pulse compression system

    DOEpatents

    Tantawi, Sami G.; Ruth, Ronald D.; Zolotorev, Max

    1998-01-01

    A high-power RF switching device employs a semiconductor wafer positioned in the third port of a three-port RF device. A controllable source of directed energy, such as a suitable laser or electron beam, is aimed at the semiconductor material. When the source is turned on, the energy incident on the wafer induces an electron-hole plasma layer on the wafer, changing the wafer's dielectric constant, turning the third port into a termination for incident RF signals, and. causing all incident RF signals to be reflected from the surface of the wafer. The propagation constant of RF signals through port 3, therefore, can be changed by controlling the beam. By making the RF coupling to the third port as small as necessary, one can reduce the peak electric field on the unexcited silicon surface for any level of input power from port 1, thereby reducing risk of damaging the wafer by RF with high peak power. The switch is useful to the construction of an improved pulse compression system to boost the peak power of microwave tubes driving linear accelerators. In this application, the high-power RF switch is placed at the coupling iris between the charging waveguide and the resonant storage line of a pulse compression system. This optically controlled high power RF pulse compression system can handle hundreds of Megawatts of power at X-band.

  15. High-pressure synthesis and compressive behavior of tantalum nitrides

    SciTech Connect

    Yusa, Hitoshi Kawamura, Fumio; Taniguchi, Takashi; Hirao, Naohisa; Ohishi, Yasuo; Kikegawa, Takumi

    2014-03-14

    WC- and NaCl-type tantalum mononitrides and hexagonal Ta{sub 5}N{sub 6} were prepared at high pressure and temperature, and their compressive behaviors were examined using in situ high-pressure X-ray diffraction. Comparison of the formula volumes of the tantalum mononitrides indicated that the NaCl type was the densest phase. The P–V data showed that the WC-type structure had the highest bulk modulus value (K{sub 0} = 351(1) GPa). An analysis of the compression properties in terms of the crystallographic characteristics of the structures indicated that a prismatic polyhedral array with face-sharing connectivity was responsible for the incompressible nature of these tantalum nitrides.

  16. Hydraulic Response of Highly Compressible Aquitards During Consolidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudolph, D. L.; Frind, E. O.

    1991-01-01

    The transient hydraulic behavior of highly compressible aquitards is investigated through numerical analysis and field studies. Variations in the hydraulic parameters of an aquitard during consolidation are accounted for by incorporating empirical relationships derived from standard consolidation tests into the one-dimensional flow equation. The resulting equation is highly nonlinear. The hydraulic response of an aquitard with physical properties typical of the compressible clays of Mexico City is evaluated with both standard linear analysis and with a nonlinear approach where the hydraulic parameters are stress-dependent. The results indicate that decreases in the hydraulic diffusivity of the aquitard due to consolidation lead to diminished leakage flux, slower groundwater velocities and solute transport rates, longer transient response periods and less land subsidence than would be predicted by classical linear theory. Evaluation of field data from a site near Mexico City indicates that significant interpretive errors may arise if the stress dependence of the hydraulic parameters is ignored in these types of systems.

  17. Crystal structure of actinide metals at high compression

    SciTech Connect

    Fast, L.; Soederlind, P.

    1995-08-01

    The crystal structures of some light actinide metals are studied theoretically as a function of applied pressure. The first principles electronic structure theory is formulated in the framework of density functional theory, with the gradient corrected local density approximation of the exchange-correlation functional. The light actinide metals are shown to be well described as itinerant (metallic) f-electron metals and generally, they display a crystal structure which have, in agreement with previous theoretical suggestions, increasing degree of symmetry and closed-packing upon compression. The theoretical calculations agree well with available experimental data. At very high compression, the theory predicts closed-packed structures such as the fcc or the hcp structures or the nearly closed-packed bcc structure for the light actinide metals. A simple canonical band picture is presented to explain in which particular closed-packed form these metals will crystallize at ultra-high pressure.

  18. Numerical studies of high current beam compression in heavy ion fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Bisognano, J.; Lee, F.P.; Mark, J.W.K.

    1985-10-01

    The process of longitudinal compression of a drifting heavy ion pulse to be used as an ICF driver is examined with the aid of particle simulation. Space charge forces play a vital role in halting compression before the final focus lens system is reached. This must take place with minimal growth of transverse emittance and momentum spread. Of particular concern are the distortion of longitudinal phase space by the rounded transverse profile of the longitudinal self-electric field. For application as an ICF reactor driver, a heavy-ion beam pulse must be longitudinally compressed by 1 to 2 orders of magnitude to achieve the peak power required to ignite a target. This process, among others, will be tested in a facility known as the ''High-Temperature Experiment'' in heavy-ion fusion. Beam compression is a critical element of an accelerator for heavy-ion fusion; it occurs primarily after the main phase of acceleration and before final focus onto target. Here we examine the compression of a drifting heavy-ion pulse with the aid of particle simulations. We describe initial theoretical results for an in-principle solution to this problem. Further refinements including integration into a complete driver system are necessary before the least costly solution can be chosen.

  19. Improving Student Achievement: A Study of High-Poverty Schools with Higher Student Achievement Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butz, Stephen D.

    2012-01-01

    This research examined the education system at high-poverty schools that had significantly higher student achievement levels as compared to similar schools with lower student achievement levels. A multischool qualitative case study was conducted of the educational systems where there was a significant difference in the scores achieved on the…

  20. High School Employment and Youths' Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothstein, Donna S.

    2007-01-01

    This paper asks whether employment during high school impacts youths' grade point average. Unlike much of the prior literature, it allows for the endogeneity of the hours and dropout decisions, uses ASVAB test scores, and tests whether youth employment is dynamic. The results indicate that high school employment and its lag have small, negative…

  1. Viscosity and compressibility of diacylglycerol under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malanowski, Aleksander; Rostocki, A. J.; Kiełczyński, P.; Szalewski, M.; Balcerzak, A.; Kościesza, R.; Tarakowski, R.; Ptasznik, S.; Siegoczyński, R. M.

    2013-03-01

    The influence of high pressure on viscosity and compressibility of diacylglycerol (DAG) oil has been presented in this paper. The investigated DAG oil was composed of 82% of DAGs and 18% TAGs (triacylglycerols). The dynamic viscosity of DAG was investigated as a function of the pressure up to 400 MPa. The viscosity was measured by means of the surface acoustic wave method, where the acoustic waveguides were used as sensing elements. As the pressure was rising, the larger ultrasonic wave attenuation was observed, whereas amplitude decreased with the liquid viscosity augmentation. Measured changes of physical properties were most significant in the pressure range near the phase transition. Deeper understanding of DAG viscosity and compressibility changes versus pressure could shed more light on thermodynamic properties of edible oils.

  2. Equation of State for Shock Compression of High Distension Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grady, Dennis

    2013-06-01

    Shock Hugoniot data for full-density and porous compounds of boron carbide, silicon dioxide, tantalum pentoxide, uranium dioxide and playa alluvium are investigated for the purpose of equation-of-state representation of intense shock compression. Complications of multivalued Hugoniot behavior characteristic of highly distended solids are addressed through the application of enthalpy-based equations of state of the form originally proposed by Rice and Walsh in the late 1950's. Additivity of cold and thermal pressure intrinsic to the Mie-Gruneisen EOS framework is replaced by isobaric additive functions of the cold and thermal specific volume components in the enthalpy-based formulation. Additionally, experimental evidence supports acceleration of shock-induced phase transformation on the Hugoniot with increasing levels of initial distention for silicon dioxide, uranium dioxide and possibly boron carbide. Methods for addressing this experimentally observed facet of the shock compression are introduced into the EOS model.

  3. Achieving strategic surety for high consequence software

    SciTech Connect

    Pollock, G.M.

    1996-09-01

    A strategic surety roadmap for high consequence software systems under the High Integrity Software (HIS) Program at Sandia National Laboratories guides research in identifying methodologies to improve software surety. Selected research tracks within this roadmap are identified and described detailing current technology and outlining advancements to be pursued over the coming decade to reach HIS goals. The tracks discussed herein focus on Correctness by Design, and System Immunology{trademark}. Specific projects are discussed with greater detail given on projects involving Correct Specification via Visualization, Synthesis, & Analysis; Visualization of Abstract Objects; and Correct Implementation of Components.

  4. Early Predictors of High School Mathematics Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegler, Robert S.; Duncan, Greg J.; Davis-Kean, Pamela E.; Duckworth, Kathryn; Claessens, Amy; Engel, Mimi; Susperreguy, Maria Ines; Meichu, Chen

    2012-01-01

    Identifying the types of mathematics content knowledge that are most predictive of students' long-term learning is essential for improving both theories of mathematical development and mathematics education. To identify these types of knowledge, we examined long-term predictors of high school students' knowledge of algebra and overall mathematics…

  5. Norview High School: Leadership Fosters Achievment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Principal Leadership, 2013

    2013-01-01

    Often little unsaid things demonstrate what is truly important in a school. When teachers have common planning time and all of the department chairs share a single space as they do at Norview High School in Norfolk, VA, the unmistakable message is that instructional collaboration and leadership are expected and valued. Norview, an urban,…

  6. Achieving High-Temperature Ferromagnetic Topological Insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katmis, Ferhat

    Topological insulators (TIs) are insulating materials that display conducting surface states protected by time-reversal symmetry, wherein electron spins are locked to their momentum. This unique property opens new opportunities for creating next-generation electronic and spintronic devices, including TI-based quantum computation. Introducing ferromagnetic order into a TI system without compromising its distinctive quantum coherent features could lead to a realization of several predicted novel physical phenomena. In particular, achieving robust long-range magnetic order at the TI surface at specific locations without introducing spin scattering centers could open up new possibilities for devices. Here, we demonstrate topologically enhanced interface magnetism by coupling a ferromagnetic insulator (FMI) to a TI (Bi2Se3); this interfacial ferromagnetism persists up to room temperature, even though the FMI (EuS) is known to order ferromagnetically only at low temperatures (<17 K). The induced magnetism at the interface resulting from the large spin-orbit interaction and spin-momentum locking feature of the TI surface is found to greatly enhance the magnetic ordering (Curie) temperature of the TI/FMI bilayer system. Due to the short range nature of the ferromagnetic exchange interaction, the time-reversal symmetry is broken only near the surface of a TI, while leaving its bulk states unaffected. The topological magneto-electric response originating in such an engineered TI could allow for an efficient manipulation of the magnetization dynamics by an electric field, providing an energy efficient topological control mechanism for future spin-based technologies. Work supported by MIT MRSEC through the MRSEC Program of NSF under award number DMR-0819762, NSF Grant DMR-1207469, the ONR Grant N00014-13-1-0301, and the STC Center for Integrated Quantum Materials under NSF grant DMR-1231319.

  7. A dedicated compression device for high resolution X-ray tomography of compressed gas diffusion layers

    SciTech Connect

    Tötzke, C.; Manke, I.; Banhart, J.; Gaiselmann, G.; Schmidt, V.; Bohner, J.; Müller, B. R.; Kupsch, A.; Hentschel, M. P.; Lehnert, W.

    2015-04-15

    We present an experimental approach to study the three-dimensional microstructure of gas diffusion layer (GDL) materials under realistic compression conditions. A dedicated compression device was designed that allows for synchrotron-tomographic investigation of circular samples under well-defined compression conditions. The tomographic data provide the experimental basis for stochastic modeling of nonwoven GDL materials. A plain compression tool is used to study the fiber courses in the material at different compression stages. Transport relevant geometrical parameters, such as porosity, pore size, and tortuosity distributions, are exemplarily evaluated for a GDL sample in the uncompressed state and for a compression of 30 vol.%. To mimic the geometry of the flow-field, we employed a compression punch with an integrated channel-rib-profile. It turned out that the GDL material is homogeneously compressed under the ribs, however, much less compressed underneath the channel. GDL fibers extend far into the channel volume where they might interfere with the convective gas transport and the removal of liquid water from the cell.

  8. Self-Concept and Achievement Motivation of High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawrence, A. S. Arul; Vimala, A.

    2013-01-01

    The present study "Self-concept and Achievement Motivation of High School Students" was investigated to find the relationship between Self-concept and Achievement Motivation of High School Students. Data for the study were collected using Self-concept Questionnaire developed by Raj Kumar Saraswath (1984) and Achievement Motive Test (ACMT)…

  9. Context-dependent JPEG backward-compatible high-dynamic range image compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korshunov, Pavel; Ebrahimi, Touradj

    2013-10-01

    High-dynamic range (HDR) imaging is expected, together with ultrahigh definition and high-frame rate video, to become a technology that may change photo, TV, and film industries. Many cameras and displays capable of capturing and rendering both HDR images and video are already available in the market. The popularity and full-public adoption of HDR content is, however, hindered by the lack of standards in evaluation of quality, file formats, and compression, as well as large legacy base of low-dynamic range (LDR) displays that are unable to render HDR. To facilitate the wide spread of HDR usage, the backward compatibility of HDR with commonly used legacy technologies for storage, rendering, and compression of video and images are necessary. Although many tone-mapping algorithms are developed for generating viewable LDR content from HDR, there is no consensus of which algorithm to use and under which conditions. We, via a series of subjective evaluations, demonstrate the dependency of the perceptual quality of the tone-mapped LDR images on the context: environmental factors, display parameters, and image content itself. Based on the results of subjective tests, it proposes to extend JPEG file format, the most popular image format, in a backward compatible manner to deal with HDR images also. An architecture to achieve such backward compatibility with JPEG is proposed. A simple implementation of lossy compression demonstrates the efficiency of the proposed architecture compared with the state-of-the-art HDR image compression.

  10. Dynamic High-Temperature Characterization of an Iridium Alloy in Compression at High Strain Rates

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Bo; Nelson, Kevin; Lipinski, Ronald J.; Bignell, John L.; Ulrich, G. B.; George, E. P.

    2014-06-01

    Iridium alloys have superior strength and ductility at elevated temperatures, making them useful as structural materials for certain high-temperature applications. However, experimental data on their high-temperature high-strain-rate performance are needed for understanding high-speed impacts in severe elevated-temperature environments. Kolsky bars (also called split Hopkinson bars) have been extensively employed for high-strain-rate characterization of materials at room temperature, but it has been challenging to adapt them for the measurement of dynamic properties at high temperatures. Current high-temperature Kolsky compression bar techniques are not capable of obtaining satisfactory high-temperature high-strain-rate stress-strain response of thin iridium specimens investigated in this study. We analyzed the difficulties encountered in high-temperature Kolsky compression bar testing of thin iridium alloy specimens. Appropriate modifications were made to the current high-temperature Kolsky compression bar technique to obtain reliable compressive stress-strain response of an iridium alloy at high strain rates (300 – 10000 s-1) and temperatures (750°C and 1030°C). Uncertainties in such high-temperature high-strain-rate experiments on thin iridium specimens were also analyzed. The compressive stress-strain response of the iridium alloy showed significant sensitivity to strain rate and temperature.

  11. High frequency chest compression therapy: a case study.

    PubMed

    Butler, S; O'Neill, B

    1995-01-01

    A new device, the ThAIRapy Bronchial Drainage System, enables patients with cystic fibrosis to self-administer the technique of high frequency chest compression (HFCC) to assist with mucociliary clearance. We review the literature on HFCC and outline a case study of a patient currently using the ThAIRapy Bronchial Drainage System. While mucociliary clearance and lung function may be enhanced by HFCC therapy, more research is needed to determine its efficacy, cost benefits, and optimum treatment guidelines. Although our initial experience with the patient using this device has been positive, we were unable to accurately evaluate the ThAIRapy Bronchial Drainage System.

  12. Experimental Compressibility of Molten Hedenbergite at High Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agee, C. B.; Barnett, R. G.; Guo, X.; Lange, R. A.; Waller, C.; Asimow, P. D.

    2010-12-01

    Experiments using the sink/float method have bracketed the density of molten hedenbergite (CaFeSi2O6) at high pressures and temperatures. The experiments are the first of their kind to determine the compressibility of molten hedenbergite at high pressure and are part of a collaborative effort to establish a new database for an array of silicate melt compositions, which will contribute to the development of an empirically based predictive model that will allow calculation of silicate liquid density and compressibility over a wide range of P-T-X conditions where melting could occur in the Earth. Each melt composition will be measured using: (i) double-bob Archimedean method for melt density and thermal expansion at ambient pressure, (ii) sound speed measurements on liquids to constrain melt compressibility at ambient pressure, (iii) sink/float technique to measure melt density to 15 GPa, and (iv) shock wave measurements of P-V-E equation of state and temperature between 10 and 150 GPa. Companion abstracts on molten fayalite (Waller et al., 2010) and liquid mixes of hedenbergite-diopside and anorthite-hedenbergite-diopside (Guo and Lange, 2010) are also presented at this meeting. In the present study, the hedenbergite starting material was synthesized at the Experimental Petrology Lab, University of Michigan, where melt density, thermal expansion, and sound speed measurements were also carried out. The starting material has also been loaded into targets at the Caltech Shockwave Lab, and experiments there are currently underway. We report here preliminary results from static compression measurement performed at the Department of Petrology, Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam, and the High Pressure Lab, Institute of Meteoritics, University of New Mexico. Experiments were carried out in Quick Press piston-cylinder devices and a Walker-style multi-anvil device. Sink/float marker spheres implemented were gem quality synthetic forsterite (Fo100), San Carlos olivine (Fo90), and

  13. Stainless steel component with compressed fiber Bragg grating for high temperature sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jinesh, Mathew; MacPherson, William N.; Hand, Duncan P.; Maier, Robert R. J.

    2016-05-01

    A smart metal component having the potential for high temperature strain sensing capability is reported. The stainless steel (SS316) structure is made by selective laser melting (SLM). A fiber Bragg grating (FBG) is embedded in to a 3D printed U-groove by high temperature brazing using a silver based alloy, achieving an axial FBG compression of 13 millistrain at room temperature. Initial results shows that the test component can be used for up to 700°C for sensing applications.

  14. Scientific Temper among Academically High and Low Achieving Adolescent Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kour, Sunmeet

    2015-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to compare the scientific temper of high and low achieving adolescent girl students. Random sampling technique was used to draw the sample from various high schools of District Srinagar. The sample for the present study consisted of 120 school going adolescent girls (60 high and 60 low achievers). Data was…

  15. Improved bi-lateral filter in high dynamic range compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhijiang; Huang, Jing; Wang, Qiang

    2007-11-01

    The dynamic range of many real-world environments exceeds the capabilities of current display technology by several orders of magnitude. To obtain reasonable reproduction, a large number of high-quality tone-mapping operators are currently available. All of these methods can be divided into three kinds: global operation, local operation and temporal-related algorithm. As an effective local operation to avoid halo artifacts, bi-lateral filter is presented and discussed in recent years. After analysis in-depth, this paper presents an improved bi-lateral filter in high dynamic range compression focused on four points: calculating efficiency, vision theory support, scales and parameters. Experiments indicate that the new operator can generate reasonable reproduction of high dynamic range images.

  16. THE TURBULENT DYNAMO IN HIGHLY COMPRESSIBLE SUPERSONIC PLASMAS

    SciTech Connect

    Federrath, Christoph; Schober, Jennifer; Bovino, Stefano; Schleicher, Dominik R. G.

    2014-12-20

    The turbulent dynamo may explain the origin of cosmic magnetism. While the exponential amplification of magnetic fields has been studied for incompressible gases, little is known about dynamo action in highly compressible, supersonic plasmas, such as the interstellar medium of galaxies and the early universe. Here we perform the first quantitative comparison of theoretical models of the dynamo growth rate and saturation level with three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamical simulations of supersonic turbulence with grid resolutions of up to 1024{sup 3} cells. We obtain numerical convergence and find that dynamo action occurs for both low and high magnetic Prandtl numbers Pm = ν/η = 0.1-10 (the ratio of viscous to magnetic dissipation), which had so far only been seen for Pm ≥ 1 in supersonic turbulence. We measure the critical magnetic Reynolds number, Rm{sub crit}=129{sub −31}{sup +43}, showing that the compressible dynamo is almost as efficient as in incompressible gas. Considering the physical conditions of the present and early universe, we conclude that magnetic fields need to be taken into account during structure formation from the early to the present cosmic ages, because they suppress gas fragmentation and drive powerful jets and outflows, both greatly affecting the initial mass function of stars.

  17. High dynamic range coherent imaging using compressed sensing.

    PubMed

    He, Kuan; Sharma, Manoj Kumar; Cossairt, Oliver

    2015-11-30

    In both lensless Fourier transform holography (FTH) and coherent diffraction imaging (CDI), a beamstop is used to block strong intensities which exceed the limited dynamic range of the sensor, causing a loss in low-frequency information, making high quality reconstructions difficult or even impossible. In this paper, we show that an image can be recovered from high-frequencies alone, thereby overcoming the beamstop problem in both FTH and CDI. The only requirement is that the object is sparse in a known basis, a common property of most natural and manmade signals. The reconstruction method relies on compressed sensing (CS) techniques, which ensure signal recovery from incomplete measurements. Specifically, in FTH, we perform compressed sensing (CS) reconstruction of captured holograms and show that this method is applicable not only to standard FTH, but also multiple or extended reference FTH. For CDI, we propose a new phase retrieval procedure, which combines Fienup's hybrid input-output (HIO) method and CS. Both numerical simulations and proof-of-principle experiments are shown to demonstrate the effectiveness and robustness of the proposed CS-based reconstructions in dealing with missing data in both FTH and CDI. PMID:26698723

  18. High dynamic range coherent imaging using compressed sensing.

    PubMed

    He, Kuan; Sharma, Manoj Kumar; Cossairt, Oliver

    2015-11-30

    In both lensless Fourier transform holography (FTH) and coherent diffraction imaging (CDI), a beamstop is used to block strong intensities which exceed the limited dynamic range of the sensor, causing a loss in low-frequency information, making high quality reconstructions difficult or even impossible. In this paper, we show that an image can be recovered from high-frequencies alone, thereby overcoming the beamstop problem in both FTH and CDI. The only requirement is that the object is sparse in a known basis, a common property of most natural and manmade signals. The reconstruction method relies on compressed sensing (CS) techniques, which ensure signal recovery from incomplete measurements. Specifically, in FTH, we perform compressed sensing (CS) reconstruction of captured holograms and show that this method is applicable not only to standard FTH, but also multiple or extended reference FTH. For CDI, we propose a new phase retrieval procedure, which combines Fienup's hybrid input-output (HIO) method and CS. Both numerical simulations and proof-of-principle experiments are shown to demonstrate the effectiveness and robustness of the proposed CS-based reconstructions in dealing with missing data in both FTH and CDI.

  19. High-contrast linear optical pulse compression using a temporal hologram.

    PubMed

    Li, Bo; Fernández-Ruiz, Maria R; Lou, Shuqin; Azaña, José

    2015-03-01

    Temporal holograms can be realized by temporal amplitude-only modulation devices and used for generation and processing of complex (amplitude and phase) time-domain signals. Based on the temporal hologram concept, we numerically and experimentally demonstrate a novel design for linear optical pulse compression using temporal modulation of continuous-wave light combined with dispersion. The newly introduced scheme overcomes the undesired background problem that is intrinsic to designs based on temporal zone plates, while also offering an energy efficiency of ~25%. This pulse compression scheme can ideally provide an arbitrarily high time-bandwidth product using a low peak-power modulation driving signal, though in practice it is limited by the achievable modulation bandwidth and dispersion amount.

  20. A pulse-compression-ring circuit for high-efficiency electric propulsion.

    PubMed

    Owens, Thomas L

    2008-03-01

    A highly efficient, highly reliable pulsed-power system has been developed for use in high power, repetitively pulsed inductive plasma thrusters. The pulsed inductive thruster ejects plasma propellant at a high velocity using a Lorentz force developed through inductive coupling to the plasma. Having greatly increased propellant-utilization efficiency compared to chemical rockets, this type of electric propulsion system may one day propel spacecraft on long-duration deep-space missions. High system reliability and electrical efficiency are extremely important for these extended missions. In the prototype pulsed-power system described here, exceptional reliability is achieved using a pulse-compression circuit driven by both active solid-state switching and passive magnetic switching. High efficiency is achieved using a novel ring architecture that recovers unused energy in a pulse-compression system with minimal circuit loss after each impulse. As an added benefit, voltage reversal is eliminated in the ring topology, resulting in long lifetimes for energy-storage capacitors. System tests were performed using an adjustable inductive load at a voltage level of 3.3 kV, a peak current of 20 kA, and a current switching rate of 15 kA/micros.

  1. A very high speed lossless compression/decompression chip set

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venbrux, Jack; Liu, Norley; Liu, Kathy; Vincent, Peter; Merrell, Randy

    1991-01-01

    A chip is described that will perform lossless compression and decompression using the Rice Algorithm. The chip set is designed to compress and decompress source data in real time for many applications. The encoder is designed to code at 20 M samples/second at MIL specifications. That corresponds to 280 Mbits/second at maximum quantization or approximately 500 Mbits/second under nominal conditions. The decoder is designed to decode at 10 M samples/second at industrial specifications. A wide range of quantization levels is allowed (4...14 bits) and both nearest neighbor prediction and external prediction are supported. When the pre and post processors are bypassed, the chip set performs high speed entropy coding and decoding. This frees the chip set from being tied to one modeling technique or specific application. Both the encoder and decoder are being fabricated in a 1.0 micron CMOS process that has been tested to survive 1 megarad of total radiation dosage. The CMOS chips are small, only 5 mm on a side, and both are estimated to consume less than 1/4 of a Watt of power while operating at maximum frequency.

  2. High frequency chest compression effects heart rate variability.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jongwon; Lee, Yong W; Warwick, Warren J

    2007-01-01

    High frequency chest compression (HFCC) supplies a sequence of air pulses through a jacket worn by a patient to remove excessive mucus for the treatment or prevention of lung disease patients. The air pulses produced from the pulse generator propagates over the thorax delivering the vibration and compression energy. A number of studies have demonstrated that the HFCC system increases the ability to clear mucus and improves lung function. Few studies have examined the change in instantaneous heart rate (iHR) and heart rate variability (HRV) during the HFCC therapy. The purpose of this study is to measure the change of HRV with four experimental protocols: (a) without HFCC, (b) during Inflated, (c)HFCC at 6Hz, and (d) HFCC at 21Hz. The nonlinearity and regularity of HRV was assessed by approximate entropy (ApEn), a method used to quantify the complexities and randomness. To compute the ApEn, we sectioned with a total of eight epochs and displayed the ApEn over the each epoch. Our results show significant differences in the both the iHR and HRV between the experimental protocols. The iHR was elevated at both the (c) 6Hz and (d) 21Hz condition from without HFCC (10%, 16%, respectively). We also found that the HFCC system tends to increase the HRV. Our study suggests that monitoring iHR and HRV are very important physiological indexes during HFCC therapy.

  3. High-Pressure Tailored Compression: Controlled Thermodynamic Paths

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, J H; Orlikowski, D; Streitz, F H; Moriarty, J A; Holmes, N C

    2005-10-21

    We have recently carried out novel and exploratory dynamic experiments where the sample follows a prescribed thermodynamic path. In typical dynamic compression experiments, the samples are thermodynamically limited to the principal Hugoniot or quasi-isentrope. With recent developments in the functionally graded material impactor, we can prescribe and shape the applied pressure profile with similarly-shaped, non-monotonic impedance profile in the impactor. Previously inaccessible thermodynamic states beyond the quasi-isentropes and Hugoniot can now be reached in dynamic experiments with these impactors. In the light gas-gun experiments on copper reported here, we recorded the particle velocities of the Cu-LiF interfaces and employed hydrodynamic simulations to relate them to the thermodynamic phase diagram. Peak pressures for these experiments were on the order of megabars, and the time-scales ranged from nanoseconds to several microseconds. The strain rates of the quasi-isentropic experiments are approximately 10{sup 4} s{sup -1} to 10{sup 6} s{sup -1} in samples with thicknesses up to 5 mm. Though developed at a light-gas gun facility, such shaped pressure-profiles are also feasible in principle with laser ablation or magnetic driven compression techniques allowing for new directions to be taken in high pressure physics.

  4. Smart and Bored: Are We Failing Our High Achievers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cleaver, Samantha

    2008-01-01

    Some high achievers are not as easy to engage. Sometimes motivating high achievers is "a matter of being more sensitive to what they are interested in," says Don Ambrose, a professor of education at Rider University in New Jersey. But too often classrooms are not set up for that kind of sensitivity. Research shows that schools are consistently…

  5. Perspectives of High-Achieving Women on Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snodgrass, Helen

    2010-01-01

    High-achieving women are significantly less likely to enter the teaching profession than they were just 40 years ago. Why? While the social and economic reasons for this decline have been well documented in the literature, what is lacking is a discussion with high-achieving women, as they make their first career decisions, about their perceptions…

  6. Highly compressible and all-solid-state supercapacitors based on nanostructured composite sponge.

    PubMed

    Niu, Zhiqiang; Zhou, Weiya; Chen, Xiaodong; Chen, Jun; Xie, Sishen

    2015-10-21

    Based on polyaniline-single-walled carbon nanotubes -sponge electrodes, highly compressible all-solid-state supercapacitors are prepared with an integrated configuration using a poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA)/H2 SO4 gel as the electrolyte. The unique configuration enables the resultant supercapacitors to be compressed as an integrated unit arbitrarily during 60% compressible strain. Furthermore, the performance of the resultant supercapacitors is nearly unchanged even under 60% compressible strain.

  7. Highly compressible 3D periodic graphene aerogel microlattices

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Cheng; Han, T. Yong-Jin; Duoss, Eric B.; Golobic, Alexandra M.; Kuntz, Joshua D.; Spadaccini, Christopher M.; Worsley, Marcus A.

    2015-01-01

    Graphene is a two-dimensional material that offers a unique combination of low density, exceptional mechanical properties, large surface area and excellent electrical conductivity. Recent progress has produced bulk 3D assemblies of graphene, such as graphene aerogels, but they possess purely stochastic porous networks, which limit their performance compared with the potential of an engineered architecture. Here we report the fabrication of periodic graphene aerogel microlattices, possessing an engineered architecture via a 3D printing technique known as direct ink writing. The 3D printed graphene aerogels are lightweight, highly conductive and exhibit supercompressibility (up to 90% compressive strain). Moreover, the Young's moduli of the 3D printed graphene aerogels show an order of magnitude improvement over bulk graphene materials with comparable geometric density and possess large surface areas. Adapting the 3D printing technique to graphene aerogels realizes the possibility of fabricating a myriad of complex aerogel architectures for a broad range of applications. PMID:25902277

  8. Highly compressible 3D periodic graphene aerogel microlattices

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Cheng; Han, T. Yong-Jin; Duoss, Eric B.; Golobic, Alexandra M.; Kuntz, Joshua D.; Spadaccini, Christopher M.; Worsley, Marcus A.

    2015-04-22

    Graphene is a two-dimensional material that offers a unique combination of low density, exceptional mechanical properties, large surface area and excellent electrical conductivity. Recent progress has produced bulk 3D assemblies of graphene, such as graphene aerogels, but they possess purely stochastic porous networks, which limit their performance compared with the potential of an engineered architecture. Here we report the fabrication of periodic graphene aerogel microlattices, possessing an engineered architecture via a 3D printing technique known as direct ink writing. The 3D printed graphene aerogels are lightweight, highly conductive and exhibit supercompressibility (up to 90% compressive strain). Moreover, the Young’s moduli of the 3D printed graphene aerogels show an order of magnitude improvement over bulk graphene materials with comparable geometric density and possess large surface areas. Ultimately, adapting the 3D printing technique to graphene aerogels realizes the possibility of fabricating a myriad of complex aerogel architectures for a broad range of applications.

  9. Combustion in a High-Speed Compression-Ignition Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothrock, A M

    1933-01-01

    An investigation conducted to determine the factors which control the combustion in a high-speed compression-ignition engine is presented. Indicator cards were taken with the Farnboro indicator and analyzed according to the tangent method devised by Schweitzer. The analysis show that in a quiescent combustion chamber increasing the time lag of auto-ignition increases the maximum rate of combustion. Increasing the maximum rate of combustion increases the tendency for detonation to occur. The results show that by increasing the air temperature during injection the start of combustion can be forced to take place during injection and so prevent detonation from occurring. It is shown that the rate of fuel injection does not in itself control the rate of combustion.

  10. Highly compressible 3D periodic graphene aerogel microlattices.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Cheng; Han, T Yong-Jin; Duoss, Eric B; Golobic, Alexandra M; Kuntz, Joshua D; Spadaccini, Christopher M; Worsley, Marcus A

    2015-04-22

    Graphene is a two-dimensional material that offers a unique combination of low density, exceptional mechanical properties, large surface area and excellent electrical conductivity. Recent progress has produced bulk 3D assemblies of graphene, such as graphene aerogels, but they possess purely stochastic porous networks, which limit their performance compared with the potential of an engineered architecture. Here we report the fabrication of periodic graphene aerogel microlattices, possessing an engineered architecture via a 3D printing technique known as direct ink writing. The 3D printed graphene aerogels are lightweight, highly conductive and exhibit supercompressibility (up to 90% compressive strain). Moreover, the Young's moduli of the 3D printed graphene aerogels show an order of magnitude improvement over bulk graphene materials with comparable geometric density and possess large surface areas. Adapting the 3D printing technique to graphene aerogels realizes the possibility of fabricating a myriad of complex aerogel architectures for a broad range of applications.

  11. Highly compressible 3D periodic graphene aerogel microlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Cheng; Han, T. Yong-Jin; Duoss, Eric B.; Golobic, Alexandra M.; Kuntz, Joshua D.; Spadaccini, Christopher M.; Worsley, Marcus A.

    2015-04-01

    Graphene is a two-dimensional material that offers a unique combination of low density, exceptional mechanical properties, large surface area and excellent electrical conductivity. Recent progress has produced bulk 3D assemblies of graphene, such as graphene aerogels, but they possess purely stochastic porous networks, which limit their performance compared with the potential of an engineered architecture. Here we report the fabrication of periodic graphene aerogel microlattices, possessing an engineered architecture via a 3D printing technique known as direct ink writing. The 3D printed graphene aerogels are lightweight, highly conductive and exhibit supercompressibility (up to 90% compressive strain). Moreover, the Young's moduli of the 3D printed graphene aerogels show an order of magnitude improvement over bulk graphene materials with comparable geometric density and possess large surface areas. Adapting the 3D printing technique to graphene aerogels realizes the possibility of fabricating a myriad of complex aerogel architectures for a broad range of applications.

  12. High load operation in a homogeneous charge compression ignition engine

    DOEpatents

    Duffy, Kevin P.; Kieser, Andrew J.; Liechty, Michael P.; Hardy, William L.; Rodman, Anthony; Hergart, Carl-Anders

    2008-12-23

    A homogeneous charge compression ignition engine is set up by first identifying combinations of compression ratio and exhaust gas percentages for each speed and load across the engines operating range. These identified ratios and exhaust gas percentages can then be converted into geometric compression ratio controller settings and exhaust gas recirculation rate controller settings that are mapped against speed and load, and made available to the electronic

  13. Homogenous charge compression ignition engine having a cylinder including a high compression space

    DOEpatents

    Agama, Jorge R.; Fiveland, Scott B.; Maloney, Ronald P.; Faletti, James J.; Clarke, John M.

    2003-12-30

    The present invention relates generally to the field of homogeneous charge compression engines. In these engines, fuel is injected upstream or directly into the cylinder when the power piston is relatively close to its bottom dead center position. The fuel mixes with air in the cylinder as the power piston advances to create a relatively lean homogeneous mixture that preferably ignites when the power piston is relatively close to the top dead center position. However, if the ignition event occurs either earlier or later than desired, lowered performance, engine misfire, or even engine damage, can result. Thus, the present invention divides the homogeneous charge between a controlled volume higher compression space and a lower compression space to better control the start of ignition.

  14. Entropy Splitting for High Order Numerical Simulation of Compressible Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandham, N. D.; Yee, H. C.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A stable high order numerical scheme for direct numerical simulation (DNS) of shock-free compressible turbulence is presented. The method is applicable to general geometries. It contains no upwinding, artificial dissipation, or filtering. Instead the method relies on the stabilizing mechanisms of an appropriate conditioning of the governing equations and the use of compatible spatial difference operators for the interior points (interior scheme) as well as the boundary points (boundary scheme). An entropy splitting approach splits the inviscid flux derivatives into conservative and non-conservative portions. The spatial difference operators satisfy a summation by parts condition leading to a stable scheme (combined interior and boundary schemes) for the initial boundary value problem using a generalized energy estimate. A Laplacian formulation of the viscous and heat conduction terms on the right hand side of the Navier-Stokes equations is used to ensure that any tendency to odd-even decoupling associated with central schemes can be countered by the fluid viscosity. A special formulation of the continuity equation is used, based on similar arguments. The resulting methods are able to minimize spurious high frequency oscillation producing nonlinear instability associated with pure central schemes, especially for long time integration simulation such as DNS. For validation purposes, the methods are tested in a DNS of compressible turbulent plane channel flow at a friction Mach number of 0.1 where a very accurate turbulence data base exists. It is demonstrated that the methods are robust in terms of grid resolution, and in good agreement with incompressible channel data, as expected at this Mach number. Accurate turbulence statistics can be obtained with moderate grid sizes. Stability limits on the range of the splitting parameter are determined from numerical tests.

  15. Multilayer compressive seal for sealing in high temperature devices

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Yeong-Shyung; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

    2007-08-21

    A mica based compressive seal has been developed exhibiting superior thermal cycle stability when compared to other compressive seals known in the art. The seal is composed of compliant glass or metal interlayers and a sealing (gasket) member layer composed of mica that is infiltrated with a glass forming material, which effectively reduces leaks within the seal. The compressive seal shows approximately a 100-fold reduction in leak rates compared with previously developed hybrid seals after from 10 to about 40 thermal cycles under a compressive stress of from 50 psi to 100 psi at temperatures in the range from 600.degree. C. to about 850.degree. C.

  16. High-frequency chest compression: effect of the third generation compression waveform.

    PubMed

    Milla, Carlos E; Hansen, Leland G; Weber, Adam; Warwick, Warren J

    2004-01-01

    High-frequency chest compression (HFCC) therapy has become the prevailing form of airway clearance for patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) in the United States. The original square waveform was replaced in 1995 with a sine waveform without published evidence of an equality of effectiveness. The recent development of a triangle waveform for HFCC provided the opportunity to compare the functional and therapeutic effects of different waveforms. Clinical testing was done in patients at home with therapy times recorded with all sputum collected in preweighed sealable vials. The eight study patients with CF were regular users of a sine waveform device. They produced sputum consistently and were clinically stable. They used their optimum frequencies for therapy for each waveform and, for one week for each waveform, collected all sputum during their twice-daily timed HFCC therapies. After collection, these vials were reweighed, desiccated, and reweighed to calculate wet and dry weights of sputum per minute of therapy time. Frequency associated vest pressures transmitted to the mouth, and induced airflows at the mouth were measured in healthy volunteers. The pressure waveforms produced in the vest were, in shape, faithfully demonstrable at the mouth. In the healthy subject the transmission occurred in 2 ms and was attenuated to about 75% of the vest pressure for the triangle waveform and 60% for the sine waveform. All patients produced more sputum with the triangle waveform than with the sine waveform. The mean increase was 20%+ range of 4% to 41%. P value was <.001. Future studies of HFCC should investigate the other effects of the sine and triangle waveforms, as well as the neglected square waveform, on mucus clearance and determine the best frequencies for each waveform, disease, and patient.

  17. Reconstructing high-dimensional two-photon entangled states via compressive sensing.

    PubMed

    Tonolini, Francesco; Chan, Susan; Agnew, Megan; Lindsay, Alan; Leach, Jonathan

    2014-10-13

    Accurately establishing the state of large-scale quantum systems is an important tool in quantum information science; however, the large number of unknown parameters hinders the rapid characterisation of such states, and reconstruction procedures can become prohibitively time-consuming. Compressive sensing, a procedure for solving inverse problems by incorporating prior knowledge about the form of the solution, provides an attractive alternative to the problem of high-dimensional quantum state characterisation. Using a modified version of compressive sensing that incorporates the principles of singular value thresholding, we reconstruct the density matrix of a high-dimensional two-photon entangled system. The dimension of each photon is equal to d = 17, corresponding to a system of 83521 unknown real parameters. Accurate reconstruction is achieved with approximately 2500 measurements, only 3% of the total number of unknown parameters in the state. The algorithm we develop is fast, computationally inexpensive, and applicable to a wide range of quantum states, thus demonstrating compressive sensing as an effective technique for measuring the state of large-scale quantum systems.

  18. Test-Taking Strategies of High and Low Mathematics Achievers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hong, Eunsook; Sas, Maggie; Sas, John C.

    2006-01-01

    The authors explored test-preparation and test-taking strategies that high school students used in algebra tests. From a pool of high school students (N = 156), 61 students participated in interviews, and of those interviewed, 26 represented those who were high achieving as well as highly interested in mathematics (n = 15) vs. those who were low…

  19. ECG data compression by modeling.

    PubMed Central

    Madhukar, B.; Murthy, I. S.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents a novel algorithm for data compression of single lead Electrocardiogram (ECG) data. The method is based on Parametric modeling of the Discrete Cosine Transformed ECG signal. Improved high frequency reconstruction is achieved by separately modeling the low and the high frequency regions of the transformed signal. Differential Pulse Code Modulation is applied on the model parameters to obtain a further increase in the compression. Compression ratios up to 1:40 were achieved without significant distortion. PMID:1482940

  20. Effectiveness of High Schools in Australia: Holding Power and Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ainley, John; Sheret, Michael

    High schools in Australia are increasingly expected to be effective in holding students at school to year 12 as well as in promoting achievement. Analysis of quantitative data gathered as part of a longitudinal study of 22 New South Wales (Australia) schools shows that schools differ in their holding power as well as in the achievement levels of…

  1. Tracking and Detracking: High Achievers in Massachusetts Middle Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loveless, Tom

    2009-01-01

    This study examines tracking--the practice of grouping students into separate classes or courses based on their prior academic achievement--at the middle-school level, and the percentage of high-achieving students in tracked and untracked schools. It focuses on Massachusetts, a leader in "reforming" tracking, and the changes that have…

  2. Some Correlates of High School Foreign Language Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beanblossom, Gary F.

    This paper investigates the influences of traditional kinds of verbal and quantitative achievement and aptitude variables on high school foreign language achievement, as measured by Modern Language Association and University of Washington tests of language skills administered to entering college students. The report focuses on: (1) the sample and…

  3. Biculturalism and Academic Achievement of African American High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rust, Jonathan P.; Jackson, Margo A.; Ponterotto, Joseph G.; Blumberg, Fran C.

    2011-01-01

    Biculturalism was examined as a factor that may positively affect the academic achievement of African American high school students, beyond cultural identity and self-esteem. Hierarchical regression analyses determined that cultural identity and academic self-esteem were important factors for academic achievement, but not biculturalism.…

  4. Mobility and Student Achievement in High Poverty Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalton, Janet Denise

    2013-01-01

    Student mobility is an issue for high poverty schools in the shadow of increased rigor and accountability for student performance. Whereas mobility is not a sole cause for poor achievement, it is a contributing factor for students in poverty who are already considered to be at risk of low achievement. Student mobility creates a hardship for…

  5. An Ultralong, Highly Oriented Nickel-Nanowire-Array Electrode Scaffold for High-Performance Compressible Pseudocapacitors.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chao; Li, Ziheng; Yang, Cheng; Zou, Peichao; Xie, Binghe; Lin, Ziyin; Zhang, Zhexu; Li, Baohua; Kang, Feiyu; Wong, Ching-Ping

    2016-06-01

    Ultralong, highly oriented Ni nanowire arrays are used as the electrode scaffold to support metal-oxide- and conductive-polymer-based electrode materials with a high mass loading; the as-obtained asymmetric supercapacitor can be compressed by fourfold and exhibits superior energy and power densities with ultrahigh cycle stability.

  6. Attitudes and Opinions from the Nation's High Achieving Teens: 29th Annual Survey of High Achievers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Who's Who among American High School Students, Lake Forest, IL.

    This report presents the 1998 statistical findings of the annual survey to determine the attitudes of national high school student leaders. Questionnaires were completed by 3,123 high school juniors and seniors, all of whom were selected for recognition in "Who's Who among American High School Students." In addition to demographic information, the…

  7. Very High Resolution Simulations of Compressible, Turbulent Flows

    SciTech Connect

    Woodward, P R; Porter, D H; Sytine, I; Anderson, S E; Mirin, A A; Curtis, B C; Cohen, R H; Dannevik, W P; Dimits, A M; Eliason, D E; Winkler, K-H; Hodson, S W

    2001-04-26

    The steadily increasing power of supercomputing systems is enabling very high resolution simulations of compressible, turbulent flows in the high Reynolds number limit, which is of interest in astrophysics as well as in several other fluid dynamical applications. This paper discusses two such simulations, using grids of up to 8 billion cells. In each type of flow, convergence in a statistical sense is observed as the mesh is refined. The behavior of the convergent sequences indicates how a subgrid-scale model of turbulence could improve the treatment of these flows by high-resolution Euler schemes like PPM. The best resolved case, a simulation of a Richtmyer-Meshkov mixing layer in a shock tube experiment, also points the way toward such a subgrid-scale model. Analysis of the results of that simulation indicates a proportionality relationship between the energy transfer rate from large to small motions and the determinant of the deviatoric symmetric strain as well as the divergence of the velocity for the large-scale field.

  8. Intertrochanteric fractures in elderly high risk patients treated with Ender nails and compression screw

    PubMed Central

    Gangadharan, Sidhartha; Nambiar, MR

    2010-01-01

    Background: Ender and Simon Weidner popularized the concept of closed condylocephlic nailing for intertrochanteric fractures in 1970. The clinical experience of authors revealed that Ender nailing alone cannot provide secure fixation in elderly patients with osteoporosis. Hence we conducted a study to evaluate the efficacy of a combined fixation procedure using Ender nails and a cannulated compression screw for intertrochanteric fractures. Materials and Methods: 76 patients with intertrochanteric fractures were treated using intramedullary Ender nails and cannulated compression screw from January 2004 to December 2007. The mean age of the patients was 80 years (range 70-105 years).Using the Evan’s system of classification 49 were stable and 27 unstable fractures. Inclusion criteria was high risk elderly patients (age > 70 years) with intertrochanteric fracture. The exclusion criteria included patients with pressure sores over the trochanteric region. Many patients had pre-existing co-morbidities like diabetes mellitus, hypertension, COPD, ischemic heart disease, CVA and coronary artery bypass surgery. The two Ender nails of 4.5mm each were passed across the fracture site into the proximal neck. This was reinforced with a 6.5 mm cannulated compression screw passed from the sub trochanteric region, across the fracture into the head. Results: The mean follow-up was 14 months (range 9-19 months) Average time to fracture union was 10 weeks (range 6-16 weeks). The mean knee ROM was 130° (± 5°). There was no case of nail penetration into hip joint. In five cases with advanced osteoporosis there was minimal migration of Ender nails distally. Conclusions: The Ender nailing combined with compression screw fixation in cases of intertrochanteric fractures in high risk elderly patients could achieve reliable fracture stability with minimal complications. PMID:20697482

  9. Rapid-Rate Compression Testing of Sheet Materials at High Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernett, E. C.; Gerberich, W. W.

    1961-01-01

    This Report describes the test equipment that was developed and the procedures that were used to evaluate structural sheet-material compression properties at preselected constant strain rates and/or loads. Electrical self-resistance was used to achieve a rapid heating rate of 200 F/sec. Four materials were tested at maximum temperatures which ranged from 600 F for the aluminum alloy to 2000 F for the Ni-Cr-Co iron-base alloy. Tests at 0.1, 0.001, and 0.00001 in./in./sec showed that strain rate has a major effect on the measured strength, especially at the high temperatures. The tests, under conditions of constant temperature and constant compression stress, showed that creep deformation can be a critical factor even when the time involved is on the order of a few seconds or less. The theoretical and practical aspects of rapid-rate compression testing are presented, and suggestions are made regarding possible modifications of the equipment which would improve the over-all capabilities.

  10. Mechanical response of porcine skin under compression from low to high strain rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bo, Chiara; Butler, Ben; Williams, Alun; Brown, Katherine; Proud, William

    2013-06-01

    Uniaxial compression experiments were performed on fresh porcine skin samples at different strain rates to study the stress-strain response. Low strain rate experiments were performed with an Instron 5566, while high strain rates were achieved using a Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar system. Magnesium bars and semiconductor strain gauges were used respectively to maximize the signal transmission from porcine skin to the output bar and to allow the signal measurement. Skin samples were harvested from different area of the animal to investigate the heterogeneity of such material. The experimental results showed that the mechanical response of skin in compression is strongly dependent on the strain rate of loading and on the location from which the samples were collected. Specimens collected from the rump showed a stiffer response compared to samples harvested from the thigh. Finally, a histological analysis of the samples post compression was carried out to examine the extent of tissue damage as a function of strain rate. This work is supported by the Atomic Weapons Establishment, UK and The Royal British Legion Centre for Blast Injury Studies at Imperial College London, UK.

  11. DNABIT Compress - Genome compression algorithm.

    PubMed

    Rajarajeswari, Pothuraju; Apparao, Allam

    2011-01-01

    Data compression is concerned with how information is organized in data. Efficient storage means removal of redundancy from the data being stored in the DNA molecule. Data compression algorithms remove redundancy and are used to understand biologically important molecules. We present a compression algorithm, "DNABIT Compress" for DNA sequences based on a novel algorithm of assigning binary bits for smaller segments of DNA bases to compress both repetitive and non repetitive DNA sequence. Our proposed algorithm achieves the best compression ratio for DNA sequences for larger genome. Significantly better compression results show that "DNABIT Compress" algorithm is the best among the remaining compression algorithms. While achieving the best compression ratios for DNA sequences (Genomes),our new DNABIT Compress algorithm significantly improves the running time of all previous DNA compression programs. Assigning binary bits (Unique BIT CODE) for (Exact Repeats, Reverse Repeats) fragments of DNA sequence is also a unique concept introduced in this algorithm for the first time in DNA compression. This proposed new algorithm could achieve the best compression ratio as much as 1.58 bits/bases where the existing best methods could not achieve a ratio less than 1.72 bits/bases.

  12. The comparison of three high-frequency chest compression devices.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong W; Lee, Jongwon; Warwick, Warren J

    2008-01-01

    High-frequency chest compression (HFCC) is shown to enhance clearance of pulmonary airway secretions. Several HFCC devices have been designed to provide this therapy. Standard equipment consists of an air pulse generator attached by lengths of tubing to an adjustable, inflatable vest/jacket (V/J) garment. In this study, the V/Js were fitted over a mannequin. The three device air pulse generators produced characteristic waveform patterns. The variations in the frequency and pressure setting of devices were consistent with specific device design features. These studies suggest that a better understanding of the effects of different waveform, frequency, and pressure combinations may improve HFCC therapeutic efficacy of three different HFCC machines. The V/J component of HFCC devices delivers the compressive pulses to the chest wall to produce both airflow through and oscillatory effects in the airways. The V/J pressures of three HFCC machines were measured and analyzed to characterize the frequency, pressure, and waveform patterns generated by each of three device models. The dimensions of all V/Js were adjusted to a circumference of approximately 110% of the chest circumference. The V/J pressures were measured, and maximum, minimum, and mean pressure, pulse pressure, and root mean square of three pulse generators were calculated. Jacket pressures ranged between 2 and 34 mmHg. The 103 and 104 models' pulse pressures increased with the increase in HFCC frequency at constant dial pressure. With the ICS the pulse pressure decreased when the frequency increased. The waveforms of models 103 and 104 were symmetric sine wave and asymmetric sine wave patterns, respectively. The ICS had a triangular waveform. At 20 Hz, both the 103 and 104 were symmetric sine waveform but the ICS remained triangular. Maximum crest factors emerged in low-frequency and high-pressure settings for the ICS and in the high-frequency and low-pressure settings for models 103 and 104. Recognizing the

  13. The "Renaissance Child": High Achievement and Gender in Late Modernity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skelton, Christine; Francis, Becky

    2012-01-01

    This paper draws on the concept of the "Renaissance Child" to illustrate the ways in which gender influences the opportunities and possibilities of high-achieving pupils. Using data from a study of 12-13-year high-achieving boys and girls based in schools in England, the paper considers the ways in which a group of popular boys was able to show an…

  14. Attitudes and Opinions from the Nation's High Achieving Teens: 27th Annual Survey of High Achievers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Who's Who among American High School Students, Lake Forest, IL.

    This report details the 27th annual study to examine the attitudes of student leaders in U.S. high schools. Participating in the survey were 3,370 adolescents, primarily 16- and 17-year-olds, who had been featured in the 1996 edition of "Who's Who Among American High School Students." The report presents demographic information on the survey…

  15. Attitudes and Opinions from the Nation's High Achieving Teens: 28th Annual Survey of High Achievers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Who's Who among American High School Students, Lake Forest, IL.

    This report details the 28th annual study to examine the attitudes of student leaders in U.S. high schools. Participating in the survey were 3,210 adolescents, primarily 16- and 17-year-olds, who had been featured in the 1997 edition of "Who's Who Among American High School Students." The report presents demographic information on the survey…

  16. Thermal management in high average power pulsed compression systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wavrik, R.W.; Reed, K.W.; Harjes, H.C.; Weber, G.J.; Butler, M.; Penn, K.J.; Neau, E.L.

    1992-08-01

    High average power repetitively pulsed compression systems offer a potential source of electron beams which may be applied to sterilization of wastes, treatment of food products, and other environmental and consumer applications. At Sandia National Laboratory, the Repetitive High Energy Pulsed Power (RHEPP) program is developing a 7 stage magnetic pulse compressor driving a linear induction voltage adder with an electron beam diode load. The RHEPP machine is being design to deliver 350 kW of average power to the diode in 60 ns FWHM, 2.5 MV, 3 kJ pulses at a repetition rate of 120 Hz. In addition to the electrical design considerations, the repetition rate requires thermal management of the electrical losses. Steady state temperatures must be kept below the material degradation temperatures to maximize reliability and component life. The optimum design is a trade off between thermal management, maximizing overall electrical performance of the system, reliability, and cost effectiveness. Cooling requirements and configurations were developed for each of the subsystems of RHEPP. Finite element models that combine fluid flow and heat transfer were used to screen design concepts. The analysis includes one, two, and three dimensional heat transfer using surface heat transfer coefficients and boundary layer models. Experiments were conducted to verify the models as well as to evaluate cooling channel fabrication materials and techniques in Metglas wound cores. 10 refs.

  17. Thermal management in high average power pulsed compression systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wavrik, R.W.; Reed, K.W.; Harjes, H.C.; Weber, G.J.; Butler, M.; Penn, K.J.; Neau, E.L.

    1992-01-01

    High average power repetitively pulsed compression systems offer a potential source of electron beams which may be applied to sterilization of wastes, treatment of food products, and other environmental and consumer applications. At Sandia National Laboratory, the Repetitive High Energy Pulsed Power (RHEPP) program is developing a 7 stage magnetic pulse compressor driving a linear induction voltage adder with an electron beam diode load. The RHEPP machine is being design to deliver 350 kW of average power to the diode in 60 ns FWHM, 2.5 MV, 3 kJ pulses at a repetition rate of 120 Hz. In addition to the electrical design considerations, the repetition rate requires thermal management of the electrical losses. Steady state temperatures must be kept below the material degradation temperatures to maximize reliability and component life. The optimum design is a trade off between thermal management, maximizing overall electrical performance of the system, reliability, and cost effectiveness. Cooling requirements and configurations were developed for each of the subsystems of RHEPP. Finite element models that combine fluid flow and heat transfer were used to screen design concepts. The analysis includes one, two, and three dimensional heat transfer using surface heat transfer coefficients and boundary layer models. Experiments were conducted to verify the models as well as to evaluate cooling channel fabrication materials and techniques in Metglas wound cores. 10 refs.

  18. High-Strain-Rate Compression Testing of Ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shazly, Mostafa; Prakash, Vikas; Lerch, Bradley A.

    2006-01-01

    In the present study a modified split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) was employed to study the effect of strain rate on the dynamic material response of ice. Disk-shaped ice specimens with flat, parallel end faces were either provided by Dartmouth College (Hanover, NH) or grown at Case Western Reserve University (Cleveland, OH). The SHPB was adapted to perform tests at high strain rates in the range 60 to 1400/s at test temperatures of -10 and -30 C. Experimental results showed that the strength of ice increases with increasing strain rates and this occurs over a change in strain rate of five orders of magnitude. Under these strain rate conditions the ice microstructure has a slight influence on the strength, but it is much less than the influence it has under quasi-static loading conditions. End constraint and frictional effects do not influence the compression tests like they do at slower strain rates, and therefore the diameter/thickness ratio of the samples is not as critical. The strength of ice at high strain rates was found to increase with decreasing test temperatures. Ice has been identified as a potential source of debris to impact the shuttle; data presented in this report can be used to validate and/or develop material models for ice impact analyses for shuttle Return to Flight efforts.

  19. High quality sub-two cycle pulses from compression of supercontinuum generated in all-normal dispersion photonic crystal fiber.

    PubMed

    Heidt, Alexander M; Rothhardt, Jan; Hartung, Alexander; Bartelt, Hartmut; Rohwer, Erich G; Limpert, Jens; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2011-07-18

    We demonstrate nonlinear pulse compression based on recently introduced highly coherent broadband supercontinuum (SC) generation in all-normal dispersion photonic crystal fiber (ANDi PCF). The special temporal properties of the octave-spanning SC spectra generated with 15 fs, 1.7 nJ pulses from a Ti:Sapphire oscillator in a 1.7 mm fiber piece allow the compression to 5.0 fs high quality pulses by linear chirp compensation with a compact chirped mirror compressor. This is the shortest pulse duration achieved to date from the external recompression of SC pulses generated in PCF. Numerical simulations in excellent agreement with the experimental results are used to discuss the scalability of the concept to the single-cycle regime employing active phase shaping. We show that previously reported limits to few-cycle pulse generation from compression of SC spectra generated in conventional PCF possessing one or more zero dispersion wavelengths do not apply for ANDi PCF.

  20. Attitudes and Opinions from the Nation's High Achieving Teens. 25th Annual Survey of High Achievers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Who's Who among American High School Students, Lake Forest, IL.

    This survey was conducted during the spring of 1994 for the purpose of determining the attitudes of student leaders in the nation's high schools. Eight thousand surveys were sent out to students, of which 3177 were returned. All students surveyed were members of the junior or senior class during the 1993-94 academic year. They were selected for…

  1. Highly compressible 3D periodic graphene aerogel microlattices

    DOE PAGES

    Zhu, Cheng; Han, T. Yong-Jin; Duoss, Eric B.; Golobic, Alexandra M.; Kuntz, Joshua D.; Spadaccini, Christopher M.; Worsley, Marcus A.

    2015-04-22

    Graphene is a two-dimensional material that offers a unique combination of low density, exceptional mechanical properties, large surface area and excellent electrical conductivity. Recent progress has produced bulk 3D assemblies of graphene, such as graphene aerogels, but they possess purely stochastic porous networks, which limit their performance compared with the potential of an engineered architecture. Here we report the fabrication of periodic graphene aerogel microlattices, possessing an engineered architecture via a 3D printing technique known as direct ink writing. The 3D printed graphene aerogels are lightweight, highly conductive and exhibit supercompressibility (up to 90% compressive strain). Moreover, the Young’s modulimore » of the 3D printed graphene aerogels show an order of magnitude improvement over bulk graphene materials with comparable geometric density and possess large surface areas. Ultimately, adapting the 3D printing technique to graphene aerogels realizes the possibility of fabricating a myriad of complex aerogel architectures for a broad range of applications.« less

  2. High-frequency chest compression: a summary of the literature.

    PubMed

    Dosman, Cara F; Jones, Richard L

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of the present literature summary is to describe high-frequency chest compression (HFCC), summarize its history and outline study results on its effect on mucolysis, mucus transport, pulmonary function and quality of life. HFCC is a mechanical method of self-administered chest physiotherapy, which induces rapid air movement in and out of the lungs. This mean oscillated volume is an effective method of mucolysis and mucus clearance. HFCC can increase independence. Some studies have shown that HFCC leads to more mucus clearance and better lung function compared with conventional chest physiotherapy. However, HFCC also decreases end-expiratory lung volume, which can lead to increased airway resistance and a decreased oscillated volume. Adding positive end-expiratory pressure to HFCC has been shown to prevent this decrease in end-expiratory lung volume and to increase the oscillated volume. It is possible that the HFCC-induced decrease in end-expiratory lung volume may result in more mucus clearance in airways that remain open by reducing airway size. Adjunctive methods, such as positive end-expiratory pressure, may not always be needed to make HFCC more effective.

  3. Student Achievement for Whom? High-Performing and Still "Playing the Game," the Meaning of School Achievement among High Achieving African American Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiggan, Greg

    2014-01-01

    The preponderance of the research on African American students has generally focused on issues of school failure and underperformance. While the literature on high achieving Black students is sparse, very little is known about these students' school experiences and the meanings that they assign to achievement. Using student-based inquiry…

  4. High-resolution MRI of spinal cords by compressive sensing parallel imaging.

    PubMed

    Peng Li; Xiangdong Yu; Griffin, Jay; Levine, Jonathan M; Jim Ji

    2015-08-01

    Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) is a common injury due to diseases or accidents. Noninvasive imaging methods play a critical role in diagnosing SCI and monitoring the response to therapy. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), by the virtue of providing excellent soft tissue contrast, is the most promising imaging method for this application. However, spinal cord has a very small cross-section, which needs high-resolution images for better visualization and diagnosis. Acquiring high-resolution spinal cord MRI images requires long acquisition time due to the physical and physiological constraints. Moreover, long acquisition time makes MRI more susceptible to motion artifacts. In this paper, we studied the application of compressive sensing (CS) and parallel imaging to achieve high-resolution imaging from sparsely sampled and reduced k-space data acquired by parallel receive arrays. In particular, the studies are limited to the effects of 2D Cartesian sampling with different subsampling schemes and reduction factors. The results show that compressive sensing parallel MRI has the potential to provide high-resolution images of the spinal cord in 1/3 of the acquisition time required by the conventional methods.

  5. High School Employment and Academic Achievement: A Note for Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keister, Mary; Hall, Joshua

    2010-01-01

    Educators are often in a position to affect student decisions to work during the school term. This study reviews and summarizes the literature on the effect that employment during high school has on academic achievement. The available evidence suggests that part-time jobs for high school students are beneficial as long as the number of hours…

  6. Exploring High-Achieving Students' Images of Mathematicians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aguilar, Mario Sánchez; Rosas, Alejandro; Zavaleta, Juan Gabriel Molina; Romo-Vázquez, Avenilde

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to describe the images that a group of high-achieving Mexican students hold of mathematicians. For this investigation, we used a research method based on the Draw-A-Scientist Test (DAST) with a sample of 63 Mexican high school students. The group of students' pictorial and written descriptions of mathematicians assisted us…

  7. Brain Hemisphericity and Mathematics Achievement of High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernandez, Sanny F.

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to find out the brain hemisphericity and mathematics achievement of high school students. The respondents of the study were the 168 first year high school students of Colegio de San Jose, during school year 2010-2011 who were chosen through stratified random sampling. The descriptive and interview methods of research were used in…

  8. Compression and lubrication of salt free polyelectrolyte microgel particles in highly compressed suspensions by counterion osmotic pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokoloff, J. B.

    2015-06-01

    The compression of polyelectrolyte microgel particles in a salt-free highly compressed colloid due to osmotic pressure outside of the particles due to counterions located there is studied for a model based on a quasi-analytic solution of the Poisson-Boltzmann equation and a model for the gel elasticity based on counterion osmotic pressure inside the particles and polymer elasticity (of entropic origin). It is found that for particles of radius of the order of a tenth of a micron, the counterion osmotic pressure should play a significant role in the compression of the particles, especially particles which do not have a corona (i.e., nonlinked polymer chains attached to their surface). The presence of a corona of monomer density smaller than that of the core of the microgel reduces the contribution of the osmotic pressure due to counterions outside of the microgel. It is also demonstrated that counterion osmotic pressure outside the particles can provide a significant contribution to the lubrication of the interface between the particles and a surface along which the compressed colloid is made to slide, for sufficiently slow velocities.

  9. Porosity Development of Single-Wall Carbon Nanohorn @Assemblies by High Pressure Compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekyarova, E.; Murata, K.; Kaneko, K.; Yudasaka, M.; Kasuya, D.; Iijima, S.

    2002-03-01

    Pore structure modification of single-wall carbon nanohorns (SWNHs) after compression at high pressure was studied by physical adsorption and TEM. Dahlia-SWNHs were dispersed in ethanol, dried and compressed at high pressure. The adsorption studies show a remarkable development of porosity after compression. Thus, the surface area and micropore volume of compressed SWNHs double those of as-grown SWNHs. The changes in the pore size distribution, dramatic in the range 20-50 nm, will be discussed. It will be shown that dispersion of SWNHs in solvents, heat treatment in vacuum and oxygen before and after compression, alter the porosity development. Particular attention is focused on the compressed SWNHs as an efficient adsorbent for methane.

  10. High dimensional seismic data interpolation with weighted matching pursuit based on compressed sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiongwen, Wang; Huazhong, Wang; Xiaopeng, Zheng

    2014-12-01

    The spatial aliasing of seismic data is usually serious because of the sub-sampling rate of the acquisition system. It induces amplitude artifacts or blurs the migration result when the spatial aliasing is not removed before migration. The compressed sensing (CS) method has been proven to be an effective tool to restore a sub-sampled signal which is compressible in another domain. Since the wave-fronts of seismic data are sparse and linear in a local spatiotemporal window, they can be significantly compressed by linear Radon transform or Fourier transform. Therefore, seismic data interpolation can be considered as a CS problem. The approximate solution of a CS problem using L0-norm can be achieved by matching pursuit (MP) algorithm. MP becomes intractable due to the high computing cost induced by the increasing dimension of the problem. In order to tackle this issue, a variant of MP—weighted matching pursuit (WMP)—is presented in this paper. Since there is little spatial aliasing in the data of low frequency and the events are supposed to be linear, the linear Radon spectrogram of the interpolated data of low frequency can be used to predict the energy distribution of data of high frequency in a frequency-wavenumber (FK) domain. The predicted energy distribution is then utilized to form the weighted factor of WMP. With this factor, WMP possesses the ability to distinguish the linear events from the spatial aliasing in the FK domain. WMP is also proven to be an efficient algorithm. Since projection onto convex sets (POCS) is another common sparsity-based method, we use Fourier POCS and WMP to realize high-dimension interpolation in numerical examples. The numerical examples show that the interpolation result of WMP significantly improves the quality of seismic data, and the quality of the migration result is also improved by the interpolation.

  11. An Analysis of High School Mathematics Achievement and English Language Arts Achievement as Predictors of Science Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Anthony C.

    2012-01-01

    Science assessments require students to read and comprehend questions and to solve mathematical problems. The purpose of this study is to determine whether the following variables can be used to predict science achievement: English language arts achievement, mathematics achievement, socioeconomic status (SES), limited English proficiency (LEP)…

  12. 50% duty cycle may be inappropriate to achieve a sufficient chest compression depth when cardiopulmonary resuscitation is performed by female or light rescuers

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chang Jae; Chung, Tae Nyoung; Bae, Jinkun; Kim, Eui Chung; Choi, Sung Wook; Kim, Ok Jun

    2015-01-01

    Objective Current guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation recommend chest compressions (CC) during 50% of the duty cycle (DC) in part because of the ease with which individuals may learn to achieve it with practice. However, no consideration has been given to a possible interaction between DC and depth of CC, which has been the subject of recent study. Our aim was to determine if 50% DC is inappropriate to achieve sufficient chest compression depth for female and light rescuers. Methods Previously collected CC data, performed by senior medical students guided by metronome sounds with various down-stroke patterns and rates, were included in the analysis. Multiple linear regression analysis was performed to determine the association between average compression depth (ACD) with average compression rate (ACR), DC, and physical characteristics of the performers. Expected ACD was calculated for various settings. Results DC, ACR, body weight, male sex, and self-assessed physical strength were significantly associated with ACD in multivariate analysis. Based on our calculations, with 50% of DC, only men with ACR of 140/min or faster or body weight over 74 kg with ACR of 120/min can achieve sufficient ACD. Conclusion A shorter DC is independently correlated with deeper CC during simulated cardiopulmonary resuscitation. The optimal DC recommended in current guidelines may be inappropriate for achieving sufficient CD, especially for female or lighter-weight rescuers.

  13. Compressive sensing based high-speed time-stretch optical microscopy for two-dimensional image acquisition.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qiang; Chen, Hongwei; Weng, Zhiliang; Chen, Minghua; Yang, Sigang; Xie, Shizhong

    2015-11-16

    In this paper, compressive sensing based high-speed time-stretch optical microscopy for two-dimensional (2D) image acquisition is proposed and experimentally demonstrated for the first time. A section of dispersion compensating fiber (DCF) is used to perform wavelength-to-time conversion and then ultrafast spectral shaping of broadband optical pulses can be achieved via high-speed intensity modulation. A 2D spatial disperser comprising a pair of orthogonally oriented dispersers is employed to produce spatially structured illumination for 2D image acquisition and a section of single mode fiber (SMF) is utilized for pulse compression in the optical domain. In our scheme, a 1.2-GHz photodetector and a 50-MHz analog-to-digital converter (ADC) are used to acquire the energy of the compressed pulses. Image reconstructions are demonstrated at a frame rate of 500 kHz and a sixteen-fold image compression is achieved in our proof-of-concept demonstration.

  14. Behind the High Achievement of East Asian Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leung, Frederick K. S.

    2002-01-01

    Studied reasons for the high achievement students from Hong Kong, Japan, South Korea, and Singapore on the Third International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS). Questionnaire data provided by students participating show that the superior results of these students may have come at the expense of other aspects of student development. Results…

  15. Progress Lags in High School, Especially for Advanced Achievers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Digest: Essential Readings Condensed for Quick Review, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This report by the Center on Education Policy (CEP), an independent nonprofit organization, examines trends in the achievement of high school students on the state reading/English language arts (ELA) and mathematics tests used for accountability under the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB). This study confirms that there is reason for concern about…

  16. Learning Environment, Motivation, and Achievement in High School Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nolen, Susan Bobbitt

    2003-01-01

    Examines the relationship between high school students' perceptions of their science learning environments and their motivation, learning strategies, and achievement. Discusses the focus of shared perceptions and instruction and indicates that shared perceptions focused on understanding and independent thinking positively predicted students'…

  17. High Achieving Girls in Mathematics: What's Wrong with Working Hard?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howe, Ann C.; Berenson, Sarah B.

    2003-01-01

    The participation of women in graduate studies and mathematics-related careers remains a social and economic problem in the United States. Part of a larger study to understand this lack of participation, here we present preliminary findings of girls who are high achievers in middle grades mathematics. This interpretive study documents girls'…

  18. Relationship between High School Leadership Team Practices and Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McInnis, Timothy M.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated if a relationship existed between student achievement in 10th grade Missouri Assessment Program mathematics and 11th grade communication arts scores in 2007 and high school leadership team perceptions of the extent to which they demonstrated leadership practices. The secondary purpose was to compare perceptional…

  19. Improving Student Achievement in Today's High Schools: What Works.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shields, Marie S.

    This paper is based on a study of two high schools in Maine that achieved outstanding and consistent gains in English, math, and science over a 5-year period. Three strands of inquiry were used for the study: surveys, interviews, and observations. A multiple-perspective approach was used to integrate the information so as to evaluate the…

  20. Mercer Middle School Case Study: High Science and Math Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington State Board of Education, 2010

    2010-01-01

    To spotlight effective practices, the Washington State Board of Education (SBE) is highlighting schools that are closing achievement gaps and performing at high levels. In 2009, the SBE partnered with the Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction (OSPI) to create the Washington Accountability Index. The Index is a new way to measure schools'…

  1. Supplementary Education: The Hidden Curriculum of High Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Edmund W., Ed.; Bridglall, Beatrice L., Ed.; Meroe, Aundra Saa, Ed.

    2004-01-01

    In this book, the editors argue that while access to schools that enable and expect academic achievement is a necessary ingredient for the education of students, schools alone may not be sufficient to ensure universally high levels of academic development. Supplemental educational experiences may also be needed. The idea of supplementary education…

  2. Analysis of Three High-Achieving Young Adolescent Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lim, Jae Hoon; Chae, Jeong-Lim; Schinck-Mikel, Amelie G.; Watson, Jimmy

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an in-depth cross-case analysis of three high-achieving young adolescent girls who had contrasting mathematics learning experiences during the first year of middle school. In particular, this study examines the foundation for their motivation, as well as the dominant mode of learning and academic engagement in relation to three…

  3. Test Score Decline Among High Achievers: Policy Implications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Jerrold; Hsia, Jayjia

    Since 1967, the mean Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) score has declined. Likewise, the numbers of candidates receiving high SAT scores have been decreasing steadily. The same downward trend in student achievement can be seen among student groups from grade 4 through post graduate studies. In recent years, policy has been directed towards making…

  4. Student Achievement through the Development of Complete High School Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamphere, Michael Frederick, Jr.

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation undertook an investigation of school culture and achievement in the high school setting. The national data set ELS:2002 was used as the pool of variables because it allows for a complete picture of school culture comprising students, parents, administrators, and teachers. The data were selected based on current literature and…

  5. The High Trust Classroom: Raising Achievement from the Inside Out

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Lonnie

    2009-01-01

    This book provides a roadmap to developing a high-trust classroom, a classroom: (1) With increased student achievement; (2) With few discipline problems; (3) Where students are intrinsically motivated; and (4) Where the teacher can confidently use creative lesson planning. The author presents a simple step by step approach to earning the trust of…

  6. Self-Esteem and Academic Achievement of High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moradi Sheykhjan, Tohid; Jabari, Kamran; Rajeswari, K.

    2014-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to determine the influence of self-esteem on academic achievement among high school students in Miandoab City of Iran. The methodology of the research is descriptive and correlation that descriptive and inferential statistics were used to analyze the data. Statistical Society includes male and female high…

  7. Adiabat shape Laser Pulses for ablation front instability control and high fuel compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milovich, Jose; Jones, O. S.; Berzak-Hopkins, L.; Clark, D. S.; Baker, K. L.; Casey, D. T.; Macphee, A. G.; Peterson, J. L.; Robey, H. F.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Weber, C. R.

    2014-10-01

    At the end of the NIC campaign a large body of experimental evidence showed that the point-design implosions driven by low-adiabat pulses had a high degree of mix. To reduce instability a high-adiabat (~3 × higher picket drive) design was fielded in the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The experimental results from this campaign have shown considerable improvement in performance (10 × neutron yields) over the point design with little evidence of mix. However, the adiabat of the implosions may be too high to achieve ignition for the available laser energy. To overcome this difficulty, and to take advantage of the high-picket drives, we have developed hybrid laser pulses that combined the virtue of both designs. These pulses can be thought of achieving adiabat shaping, where the ablator is set in a higher adiabat for instability control, while the fuel is maintained at a lower adiabat favoring higher fuel compression. Using these pulses, recent experiments at the NIF have indeed shown reduced growth rates. In this talk we will present the design of high-yield low-growth DT ignition experiments using these adiabat-shaped pulses. Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. D.O.E. by LLNL under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  8. High-efficiency laser-pulse compression by stimulated Brillouin scattering.

    PubMed

    Damzen, M J; Hutchinson, M H

    1983-06-01

    Highly efficient compression of laser pulses down to 1 nsec in duration by stimulated Brillouin scattering has been demonstrated. Compression ratios of ~10 and energy-conversion efficiencies >70% have been produced. Several compressor systems have been investigated, including the use of tapered waveguides, long-focal-length geometries, and generator-amplifier systems. PMID:19718098

  9. Learning environment, motivation, and achievement in high school science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobbitt Nolen, Susan

    2003-04-01

    In a study of the relationship between high school students' perceptions of their science learning environments and their motivation, learning strategies, and achievement, 377 students in 22 introductory science classrooms completed surveys in the fall and spring of their ninth-grade year. Hierarchical linear regression was used to model the effects of variables at both the classroom and individual level simultaneously. High intraclass agreement (indicated by high parameter reliability) on all classroom environment measures indicated that students shared perceptions of the classroom learning environment. Controlling for other factors, shared perceptions that only the most able could succeed in science classrooms and that instruction was fast-paced and focused on correct answers negatively predicted science achievement, as measured on a districtwide curriculum-linked test. Shared perceptions that classrooms focused on understanding and independent thinking positively predicted students' self-reported satisfaction with learning. Implications of these results for both teaching and research into classroom environments are discussed.

  10. High-resolution mesoscopic fluorescence molecular tomography based on compressive sensing.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fugang; Ozturk, Mehmet S; Zhao, Lingling; Cong, Wenxiang; Wang, Ge; Intes, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Mesoscopic fluorescence molecular tomography (MFMT) is new imaging modality aiming at 3-D imaging of molecular probes in a few millimeter thick biological samples with high-spatial resolution. In this paper, we develop a compressive sensing-based reconstruction method with l1-norm regularization for MFMT with the goal of improving spatial resolution and stability of the optical inverse problem. Three-dimensional numerical simulations of anatomically accurate microvasculature and real data obtained from phantom experiments are employed to evaluate the merits of the proposed method. Experimental results show that the proposed method can achieve 80 μm spatial resolution for a biological sample of 3 mm thickness and more accurate quantifications of concentrations and locations for the fluorophore distribution than those of the conventional methods.

  11. Parent Involvement Practices of High-Achieving Elementary Science Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waller, Samara Susan

    This study addressed a prevalence of low achievement in science courses in an urban school district in Georgia. National leaders and educators have identified the improvement of science proficiency as critical to the future of American industry. The purpose of this study was to examine parent involvement in this school district and its contribution to the academic achievement of successful science students. Social capital theory guided this study by suggesting that students achieve best when investments are made into their academic and social development. A collective case study qualitative research design was used to interview 9 parent participants at 2 elementary schools whose children scored in the exceeds category on the Science CRCT. The research questions focused on what these parents did at home to support their children's academic achievement. Data were collected using a semi-structured interview protocol and analyzed through the categorical aggregation of transcribed interviews. Key findings revealed that the parents invested time and resources in 3 practices: communicating high expectations, supporting and developing key skills, and communicating with teachers. These findings contribute to social change at both the local and community level by creating a starting point for teachers, principals, and district leaders to reexamine the value of parent input in the educational process, and by providing data to support the revision of current parent involvement policies. Possibilities for further study building upon the findings of this study may focus on student perceptions of their parents' parenting as it relates to their science achievement.

  12. High speed inviscid compressible flow by the finite element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zienkiewicz, O. C.; Loehner, R.; Morgan, K.

    1984-01-01

    The finite element method and an explicit time stepping algorithm which is based on Taylor-Galerkin schemes with an appropriate artificial viscosity is combined with an automatic mesh refinement process which is designed to produce accurate steady state solutions to problems of inviscid compressible flow in two dimensions. The results of two test problems are included which demonstrate the excellent performance characteristics of the proposed procedures.

  13. Toward an image compression algorithm for the high-resolution electronic still camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nerheim, Rosalee

    1989-01-01

    Taking pictures with a camera that uses a digital recording medium instead of film has the advantage of recording and transmitting images without the use of a darkroom or a courier. However, high-resolution images contain an enormous amount of information and strain data-storage systems. Image compression will allow multiple images to be stored in the High-Resolution Electronic Still Camera. The camera is under development at Johnson Space Center. Fidelity of the reproduced image and compression speed are of tantamount importance. Lossless compression algorithms are fast and faithfully reproduce the image, but their compression ratios will be unacceptably low due to noise in the front end of the camera. Future efforts will include exploring methods that will reduce the noise in the image and increase the compression ratio.

  14. Compression? Yes, but for low or high frequencies, for low or high intensities, and with what response times?

    PubMed

    Dillon, H

    1996-08-01

    Several rationales for using compression in hearing aids are outlined. These rationales comprise discomfort avoidance, loudness normalization, noise reduction, short term signal dynamic range reduction, empirically determined compression, and long-term signal dynamic range reduction. The compression systems needed to implement each of these differ greatly, and these differences can be viewed as differences in the frequency range undergoing most compression, the intensity range undergoing most compression, and the speed at which the compressor(s) operate. A classification system along these lines is introduced and examples of currently available hearing aids falling into each category are given. The effects of each type of compression on speech intelligibility is investigated via a review of published research. The results of this indicate that, for speech in quiet at a comfortable level, no compression scheme yet tested offers better intelligibility than individually selected linear amplification. If input level is then decreased and the aid wearer is prevented from adjusting the volume control, many types of compression provide intelligibility superior to that available from linear amplification. In broadband noise, only one system, containing wideband compression followed by fast acting high-frequency compression, has so far been shown to provide significant intelligibility advantages.

  15. The Will to Achieve: A Phenomenological Study of the Experiences of African American High Achieving Students and Their Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spencer, Natalie Faye

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this research study was to understand the experiences of high achieving African American students and their parents. The experiences of high achieving African American students and their parents have been missing from literature on the academic achievement of African American students. Much of the literature that has been published…

  16. Achieving High Performance on the i860 Microprocessor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, King; Kutler, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The i860 is a high performance microprocessor used in the Intel Touchstone project. This paper proposes a paradigm for programming the i860 that is modelled on the vector instructions of the Cray computers. Fortran callable assembler subroutines were written that mimic the concurrent vector instructions of the Cray. Cache takes the place of vector registers. Using this paradigm we have achieved twice the performance of compiled code on a traditional solve.

  17. Developments in time-resolved high pressure x-ray diffraction using rapid compression and decompression

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Jesse S.; Sinogeikin, Stanislav V.; Lin, Chuanlong; Rod, Eric; Bai, Ligang; Shen, Guoyin

    2015-07-15

    Complementary advances in high pressure research apparatus and techniques make it possible to carry out time-resolved high pressure research using what would customarily be considered static high pressure apparatus. This work specifically explores time-resolved high pressure x-ray diffraction with rapid compression and/or decompression of a sample in a diamond anvil cell. Key aspects of the synchrotron beamline and ancillary equipment are presented, including source considerations, rapid (de)compression apparatus, high frequency imaging detectors, and software suitable for processing large volumes of data. A number of examples are presented, including fast equation of state measurements, compression rate dependent synthesis of metastable states in silicon and germanium, and ultrahigh compression rates using a piezoelectric driven diamond anvil cell.

  18. Dynamic compressive behavior of Pr-Nd alloy at high strain rates and temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Huanran; Cai Canyuan; Chen Danian; Ma Dongfang

    2012-07-01

    Based on compressive tests, static on 810 material test system and dynamic on the first compressive loading in split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) tests for Pr-Nd alloy cylinder specimens at high strain rates and temperatures, this study determined a J-C type [G. R. Johnson and W. H. Cook, in Proceedings of Seventh International Symposium on Ballistics (The Hague, The Netherlands, 1983), pp. 541-547] compressive constitutive equation of Pr-Nd alloy. It was recorded by a high speed camera that the Pr-Nd alloy cylinder specimens fractured during the first compressive loading in SHPB tests at high strain rates and temperatures. From high speed camera images, the critical strains of the dynamic shearing instability for Pr-Nd alloy in SHPB tests were determined, which were consistent with that estimated by using Batra and Wei's dynamic shearing instability criterion [R. C. Batra and Z. G. Wei, Int. J. Impact Eng. 34, 448 (2007)] and the determined compressive constitutive equation of Pr-Nd alloy. The transmitted and reflected pulses of SHPB tests for Pr-Nd alloy cylinder specimens computed with the determined compressive constitutive equation of Pr-Nd alloy and Batra and Wei's dynamic shearing instability criterion could be consistent with the experimental data. The fractured Pr-Nd alloy cylinder specimens of compressive tests were investigated by using 3D supper depth digital microscope and scanning electron microscope.

  19. Compression of regions in the global advanced very high resolution radiometer 1-km data set

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kess, Barbara L.; Steinwand, Daniel R.; Reichenbach, Stephen E.

    1994-01-01

    The global advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR) 1-km data set is a 10-band image produced at USGS' EROS Data Center for the study of the world's land surfaces. The image contains masked regions for non-land areas which are identical in each band but vary between data sets. They comprise over 75 percent of this 9.7 gigabyte image. The mask is compressed once and stored separately from the land data which is compressed for each of the 10 bands. The mask is stored in a hierarchical format for multi-resolution decompression of geographic subwindows of the image. The land for each band is compressed by modifying a method that ignores fill values. This multi-spectral region compression efficiently compresses the region data and precludes fill values from interfering with land compression statistics. Results show that the masked regions in a one-byte test image (6.5 Gigabytes) compress to 0.2 percent of the 557,756,146 bytes they occupy in the original image, resulting in a compression ratio of 89.9 percent for the entire image.

  20. Experiences of High-Achieving High School Students Who Have Taken Multiple Concurrent Advanced Placement Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milburn, Kristine M.

    2011-01-01

    Problem: An increasing number of high-achieving American high school students are enrolling in multiple Advanced Placement (AP) courses. As a result, high schools face a growing need to understand the impact of taking multiple AP courses concurrently on the social-emotional lives of high-achieving students. Procedures: This phenomenological…

  1. High precision Hugoniot measurements of D2 near maximum compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benage, John; Knudson, Marcus; Desjarlais, Michael

    2015-11-01

    The Hugoniot response of liquid deuterium has been widely studied due to its general importance and to the significant discrepancy in the inferred shock response obtained from early experiments. With improvements in dynamic compression platforms and experimental standards these results have converged and show general agreement with several equation of state (EOS) models, including quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) calculations within the Generalized Gradient Approximation (GGA). This approach to modeling the EOS has also proven quite successful for other materials and is rapidly becoming a standard approach. However, small differences remain among predictions obtained using different local and semi-local density functionals; these small differences show up in the deuterium Hugoniot at ~ 30-40 GPa near the region of maximum compression. Here we present experimental results focusing on that region of the Hugoniot and take advantage of advancements in the platform and standards, resulting in data with significantly higher precision than that obtained in previous studies. These new data may prove to distinguish between the subtle differences predicted by the various density functionals. Results of these experiments will be presented along with comparison to various QMD calculations. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin company, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  2. Generating high temperature tolerant transgenic plants: Achievements and challenges.

    PubMed

    Grover, Anil; Mittal, Dheeraj; Negi, Manisha; Lavania, Dhruv

    2013-05-01

    Production of plants tolerant to high temperature stress is of immense significance in the light of global warming and climate change. Plant cells respond to high temperature stress by re-programming their genetic machinery for survival and reproduction. High temperature tolerance in transgenic plants has largely been achieved either by over-expressing heat shock protein genes or by altering levels of heat shock factors that regulate expression of heat shock and non-heat shock genes. Apart from heat shock factors, over-expression of other trans-acting factors like DREB2A, bZIP28 and WRKY proteins has proven useful in imparting high temperature tolerance. Besides these, elevating the genetic levels of proteins involved in osmotic adjustment, reactive oxygen species removal, saturation of membrane-associated lipids, photosynthetic reactions, production of polyamines and protein biosynthesis process have yielded positive results in equipping transgenic plants with high temperature tolerance. Cyclic nucleotide gated calcium channel proteins that regulate calcium influxes across the cell membrane have recently been shown to be the key players in induction of high temperature tolerance. The involvement of calmodulins and kinases in activation of heat shock factors has been implicated as an important event in governing high temperature tolerance. Unfilled gaps limiting the production of high temperature tolerant transgenic plants for field level cultivation are discussed.

  3. Laser driven quasi-isentropic compression experiments (ICE) for dynamically loading materials at high strain rates

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R; Eggert, J; Celliers, P; Jankowski, A; Lorenz, T; Moon, S; Edwards, M J; Collins, G

    2006-03-30

    We demonstrate the recently developed technique of laser driven isentropic compression (ICE) for dynamically compressing Al samples at high loading rates close to the room temperature isentrope and up to peak stresses above 100GPa. Upon analysis of the unloading profiles from a multi-stepped Al/LiF target a continuous path through Stress-Density space may be calculated. For materials with phase transformations ramp compression techniques reveals the location of equilibrium phase boundaries and provide information on the kinetics of the lattice re-ordering.

  4. A family of high-order targeted ENO schemes for compressible-fluid simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Lin; Hu, Xiangyu Y.; Adams, Nikolaus A.

    2016-01-01

    Although classical WENO schemes have achieved great success and are widely accepted, they exhibit several shortcomings. They are too dissipative for direct simulations of turbulence and lack robustness when very-high-order versions are applied to complex flows. In this paper, we propose a family of high-order targeted ENO schemes which are applicable for compressible-fluid simulations involving a wide range of flow scales. In order to increase the numerical robustness as compared to very-high-order classical WENO schemes, the reconstruction dynamically assembles a set of low-order candidate stencils with incrementally increasing width. While discontinuities and small-scale fluctuations are efficiently separated, the numerical dissipation is significantly diminished by an ENO-like stencil selection, which either applies a candidate stencil with its original linear weight, or removes its contribution when it is crossed by a discontinuity. The background linear scheme is optimized under the constraint of preserving an approximate dispersion-dissipation relation. By means of quasi-linear analyses and practical numerical experiments, a set of case-independent parameters is determined. The general formulation of arbitrarily high-order schemes is presented in a straightforward way. A variety of benchmark-test problems, including broadband waves, strong shock and contact discontinuities are studied. Compared to well-established classical WENO schemes, the present schemes exhibit significantly improved robustness, low numerical dissipation and sharp discontinuity capturing. They are particularly suitable for DNS and LES of shock-turbulence interactions.

  5. Unlocking Emergent Talent: Supporting High Achievement of Low-Income, High Ability Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olszewski-Kubilius, Paula; Clarenbach, Jane

    2012-01-01

    This report takes a comprehensive look at achievement for low-income promising learners--past, present, and future. At its core, it challenges the nation to move beyond its near-singular focus of achieving minimum performance for all students, to identifying and developing the talent of all students who are capable of high achievement, including…

  6. Hexagonal ice transforms at high pressures and compression rates directly into "doubly metastable" ice phases.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Marion; Winkel, Katrin; Toebbens, Daniel M; Mayer, Erwin; Loerting, Thomas

    2009-12-14

    We report compression and decompression experiments of hexagonal ice in a piston cylinder setup in the temperature range of 170-220 K up to pressures of 1.6 GPa. The main focus is on establishing the effect that an increase in compression rate up to 4000 MPa/min has on the phase changes incurred at high pressures. While at low compression rates, a phase change to stable ice II takes place (in agreement with earlier comprehensive studies), we find that at higher compression rates, increasing fractions and even pure ice III forms from hexagonal ice. We show that the critical compression rate, above which mainly the metastable ice III polymorph is produced, decreases by a factor of 30 when decreasing the temperature from 220 to 170 K. At the highest rate capable with our equipment, we even find formation of an ice V fraction in the mixture, which is metastable with respect to ice II and also metastable with respect to ice III. This indicates that at increasing compression rates, progressively more metastable phases of ice grow from hexagonal ice. Since ices II, III, and V differ very much in, e.g., strength and rheological properties, we have prepared solids of very different mechanical properties just by variation in compression rate. In addition, these metastable phases have stability regions in the phase diagrams only at much higher pressures and temperatures. Therefore, we anticipate that the method of isothermal compression at low temperatures and high compression rates is a tool for the academic and industrial polymorph search with great potential. PMID:20001064

  7. High pressure, quasi-isentropic compression experiments on the Omega laser

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenz, K; Edwards, M; Jankowski, A; Pollaine, S; Smith, R; Remington, B

    2006-05-26

    The high energy density of pulsed lasers can be used to generate shockless loading in solids to high pressures and compressions but low temperatures. We have used the Omega laser to extend the capabilities of this technique to multi-Mbar pressures and compressions approaching a factor of 2 in aluminum foils. The energy from a 3.7 ns laser pulse is used to drive a strong shock through a 200 {micro}m polystyrene disc. The disc material unloads from a high-pressure state and expands across a 300 {micro}m vacuum gap where it stagnates against the sample to produce a smooth, monotonically increasing load with rise times from a few to {approx} 20 ns. Ramped compression reasing waves having peak pressures of 14-200 GPa (0.14-2.0 Mbar) and peak compressions {rho}/{rho}{sub 0} of 1.1-2.0 were generated in the aluminum samples using laser pulse energies of 400 J to 2 kJ. Wave profiles from a series of successively thicker targets loaded to 120 GPa show the evolution of the high-pressure compression wave within the sample. The initial loading in the sample is shockless, and develops into a shock at a depth of 20-25 {micro}m. We compare these wave profiles with hydrodynamic simulations from which we extract material temperatures and plastic strain rates behind the compression wave. Limitations and future prospects for this new shockless loading technique are discussed.

  8. Investigations of Compression Shocks and Boundary Layers in Gases Moving at High Speed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackeret, J.; Feldmann, F.; Rott, N.

    1947-01-01

    The mutual influences of compression shocks and friction boundary layers were investigated by means of high speed wind tunnels.Schlieren optics provided a clear picture of the flow phenomena and were used for determining the location of the compression shocks, measurement of shock angles, and also for Mach angles. Pressure measurement and humidity measurements were also taken into consideration.Results along with a mathematical model are described.

  9. Pulsed spheromak reactor with adiabatic compression

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, T K

    1999-03-29

    Extrapolating from the Pulsed Spheromak reactor and the LINUS concept, we consider ignition achieved by injecting a conducting liquid into the flux conserver to compress a low temperature spheromak created by gun injection and ohmic heating. The required energy to achieve ignition and high gain by compression is comparable to that required for ohmic ignition and the timescale is similar so that the mechanical power to ignite by compression is comparable to the electrical power to ignite ohmically. Potential advantages and problems are discussed. Like the High Beta scenario achieved by rapid fueling of an ohmically ignited plasma, compression must occur on timescales faster than Taylor relaxation.

  10. A high-resolution SWIR camera via compressed sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMackin, Lenore; Herman, Matthew A.; Chatterjee, Bill; Weldon, Matt

    2012-06-01

    Images from a novel shortwave infrared (SWIR, 900 nm to 1.7 μm) camera system are presented. Custom electronics and software are combined with a digital micromirror device (DMD) and a single-element sensor; the latter are commercial off-the-shelf devices, which together create a lower-cost imaging system than is otherwise available in this wavelength regime. A compressive sensing (CS) encoding schema is applied to the DMD to modulate the light that has entered the camera. This modulated light is directed to a single-element sensor and an ensemble of measurements is collected. With the data ensemble and knowledge of the CS encoding, images are computationally reconstructed. The hardware and software combination makes it possible to create images with the resolution of the DMD while employing a substantially lower-cost sensor subsystem than would otherwise be required by the use of traditional focal plane arrays (FPAs). In addition to the basic camera architecture, we also discuss a technique that uses the adaptive functionality of the DMD to search and identify regions of interest. We demonstrate adaptive CS in solar exclusion experiments where bright pixels, which would otherwise reduce dynamic range in the images, are automatically removed.

  11. Achieving high energy absorption capacity in cellular bulk metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S. H.; Chan, K. C.; Wu, F. F.; Xia, L.

    2015-05-01

    Cellular bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) have exhibited excellent energy-absorption performance by inheriting superior strength from the parent BMGs. However, how to achieve high energy absorption capacity in cellular BMGs is vital but mysterious. In this work, using step-by-step observations of the deformation evolution of a series of cellular BMGs, the underlying mechanisms for the remarkable energy absorption capacity have been investigated by studying two influencing key factors: the peak stress and the decay of the peak stress during the plastic-flow plateau stages. An analytical model of the peak stress has been proposed, and the predicted results agree well with the experimental data. The decay of the peak stress has been attributed to the geometry change of the macroscopic cells, the formation of shear bands in the middle of the struts, and the “work-softening” nature of BMGs. The influencing factors such as the effect of the strut thickness and the number of unit cells have also been investigated and discussed. Strategies for achieving higher energy absorption capacity in cellular BMGs have been proposed.

  12. Achieving high energy absorption capacity in cellular bulk metallic glasses

    PubMed Central

    Chen, S. H.; Chan, K. C.; Wu, F. F.; Xia, L.

    2015-01-01

    Cellular bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) have exhibited excellent energy-absorption performance by inheriting superior strength from the parent BMGs. However, how to achieve high energy absorption capacity in cellular BMGs is vital but mysterious. In this work, using step-by-step observations of the deformation evolution of a series of cellular BMGs, the underlying mechanisms for the remarkable energy absorption capacity have been investigated by studying two influencing key factors: the peak stress and the decay of the peak stress during the plastic-flow plateau stages. An analytical model of the peak stress has been proposed, and the predicted results agree well with the experimental data. The decay of the peak stress has been attributed to the geometry change of the macroscopic cells, the formation of shear bands in the middle of the struts, and the “work-softening” nature of BMGs. The influencing factors such as the effect of the strut thickness and the number of unit cells have also been investigated and discussed. Strategies for achieving higher energy absorption capacity in cellular BMGs have been proposed. PMID:25973781

  13. Surgical treatment of the high jugular bulb by compressing sinus sigmoideus: two cases.

    PubMed

    Oztürkcan, Sedat; Katilmiş, Hüseyin; Ozkul, Yilmaz; Erdoğan, Nezahat; Başoğlu, Sinan; Tayfun, Mehmet Ali

    2008-08-01

    If the jugular bulb normally surrounded by a bony layer in jugular fossa is anatomically over the inferior surface of the bony annulus, in the middle ear or over the basal turn of cochlea, it is then named as high jugular bulb (HJB). It may be dehiscent or aberrant. It is reported to occur in 5% of the temporal bone specimens. In accordance with the literature jugular bulb compression, jugular vein ligation and embolization are suggested in such cases. In both of the presented cases, there was bleeding from jugular bulb during surgery and jugular bulb was compressed with bone wax and Surgicel, but sigmoid sinus has been compressed after failure to stop bleeding through jugular bulb compression. Venous MR angiographies showed no flow in postoperative controls. Although it is very rarely seen clinically, we present two HJB cases and different treatment perspectives accompanied by literature. PMID:18046566

  14. Achieving High Resolution Timer Events in Virtualized Environment

    PubMed Central

    Adamczyk, Blazej; Chydzinski, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Virtual Machine Monitors (VMM) have become popular in different application areas. Some applications may require to generate the timer events with high resolution and precision. This however may be challenging due to the complexity of VMMs. In this paper we focus on the timer functionality provided by five different VMMs—Xen, KVM, Qemu, VirtualBox and VMWare. Firstly, we evaluate resolutions and precisions of their timer events. Apparently, provided resolutions and precisions are far too low for some applications (e.g. networking applications with the quality of service). Then, using Xen virtualization we demonstrate the improved timer design that greatly enhances both the resolution and precision of achieved timer events. PMID:26177366

  15. Achieving High Resolution Timer Events in Virtualized Environment.

    PubMed

    Adamczyk, Blazej; Chydzinski, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Virtual Machine Monitors (VMM) have become popular in different application areas. Some applications may require to generate the timer events with high resolution and precision. This however may be challenging due to the complexity of VMMs. In this paper we focus on the timer functionality provided by five different VMMs-Xen, KVM, Qemu, VirtualBox and VMWare. Firstly, we evaluate resolutions and precisions of their timer events. Apparently, provided resolutions and precisions are far too low for some applications (e.g. networking applications with the quality of service). Then, using Xen virtualization we demonstrate the improved timer design that greatly enhances both the resolution and precision of achieved timer events. PMID:26177366

  16. Design considerations for achieving high vacuum integrity in fusion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Fuller, G.M.; Haines, J.R.

    1983-01-01

    Achieving high vacuum integrity in fusion devices requires close attention to both the overall system configuration and the design details of joints and seals. This paper describes the factors in selecting the system configuration, from a vacuum standpoint, for the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) DCT-8 Tokamak device. The DCT-8 (driven current tokamak) is the eighth design in a series of tokamak concepts defined to cover the magnetic confinement and development gap between the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) and the Engineering Test Reactor (ETR). Leak detection concept development is considered a vital activity, as well as the definition of a configuration that minimizes the consequences of leaks. A major part of the vacuum boundaries of the magnet system and the plasma system is common. For the major penetrations, primary and secondary seals are provided with vacuum control over the region between seals. The intent is to instrument these cavities and provide automated recordings of these measurements for leak maintenance.

  17. Audiovisual focus of attention and its application to Ultra High Definition video compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rerabek, Martin; Nemoto, Hiromi; Lee, Jong-Seok; Ebrahimi, Touradj

    2014-02-01

    Using Focus of Attention (FoA) as a perceptual process in image and video compression belongs to well-known approaches to increase coding efficiency. It has been shown that foveated coding, when compression quality varies across the image according to region of interest, is more efficient than the alternative coding, when all region are compressed in a similar way. However, widespread use of such foveated compression has been prevented due to two main conflicting causes, namely, the complexity and the efficiency of algorithms for FoA detection. One way around these is to use as much information as possible from the scene. Since most video sequences have an associated audio, and moreover, in many cases there is a correlation between the audio and the visual content, audiovisual FoA can improve efficiency of the detection algorithm while remaining of low complexity. This paper discusses a simple yet efficient audiovisual FoA algorithm based on correlation of dynamics between audio and video signal components. Results of audiovisual FoA detection algorithm are subsequently taken into account for foveated coding and compression. This approach is implemented into H.265/HEVC encoder producing a bitstream which is fully compliant to any H.265/HEVC decoder. The influence of audiovisual FoA in the perceived quality of high and ultra-high definition audiovisual sequences is explored and the amount of gain in compression efficiency is analyzed.

  18. Achieving ultra-high temperatures with a resistive emitter array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danielson, Tom; Franks, Greg; Holmes, Nicholas; LaVeigne, Joe; Matis, Greg; McHugh, Steve; Norton, Dennis; Vengel, Tony; Lannon, John; Goodwin, Scott

    2016-05-01

    The rapid development of very-large format infrared detector arrays has challenged the IR scene projector community to also develop larger-format infrared emitter arrays to support the testing of systems incorporating these detectors. In addition to larger formats, many scene projector users require much higher simulated temperatures than can be generated with current technology in order to fully evaluate the performance of their systems and associated processing algorithms. Under the Ultra High Temperature (UHT) development program, Santa Barbara Infrared Inc. (SBIR) is developing a new infrared scene projector architecture capable of producing both very large format (>1024 x 1024) resistive emitter arrays and improved emitter pixel technology capable of simulating very high apparent temperatures. During earlier phases of the program, SBIR demonstrated materials with MWIR apparent temperatures in excess of 1400 K. New emitter materials have subsequently been selected to produce pixels that achieve even higher apparent temperatures. Test results from pixels fabricated using the new material set will be presented and discussed. A 'scalable' Read In Integrated Circuit (RIIC) is also being developed under the same UHT program to drive the high temperature pixels. This RIIC will utilize through-silicon via (TSV) and Quilt Packaging (QP) technologies to allow seamless tiling of multiple chips to fabricate very large arrays, and thus overcome the yield limitations inherent in large-scale integrated circuits. Results of design verification testing of the completed RIIC will be presented and discussed.

  19. Nonlinear vibration analysis of the high-efficiency compressive-mode piezoelectric energy harvester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhengbao; Zu, Jean

    2015-04-01

    Power source is critical to achieve independent and autonomous operations of electronic mobile devices. The vibration-based energy harvesting is extensively studied recently, and recognized as a promising technology to realize inexhaustible power supply for small-scale electronics. Among various approaches, the piezoelectric energy harvesting has gained the most attention due to its high conversion efficiency and simple configurations. However, most of piezoelectric energy harvesters (PEHs) to date are based on bending-beam structures and can only generate limited power with a narrow working bandwidth. The insufficient electric output has greatly impeded their practical applications. In this paper, we present an innovative lead zirconate titanate (PZT) energy harvester, named high-efficiency compressive-mode piezoelectric energy harvester (HC-PEH), to enhance the performance of energy harvesters. A theoretical model was developed analytically, and solved numerically to study the nonlinear characteristics of the HC-PEH. The results estimated by the developed model agree well with the experimental data from the fabricated prototype. The HC-PEH shows strong nonlinear responses, favorable working bandwidth and superior power output. Under a weak excitation of 0.3 g (g = 9.8 m/s2), a maximum power output 30 mW is generated at 22 Hz, which is about ten times better than current energy harvesters. The HC-PEH demonstrates the capability of generating enough power for most of wireless sensors.

  20. Calculations of the Performance of a Compression-Ignition Engine-Compressor Turbine Combination I : Performance of a Highly Supercharged Compression-Ignition Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, J. C.; Mendelson, Alexander

    1945-01-01

    Small high-speed single-cylinder compression-ignition engines were tested to determine their performance characteristics under high supercharging. Calculations were made on the energy available in the exhaust gas of the compression-ignition engines. The maximum power at any given maximum cylinder pressure was obtained when the compression pressure was equal to the maximum cylinder pressure. Constant-pressure combustion was found possible at an engine speed of 2200 rpm. Exhaust pressures and temperatures were determined from an analysis of indicator cards. The analysis showed that, at rich mixtures with the exhaust back pressure equal to the inlet-air pressure, there is excess energy available for driving a turbine over that required for supercharging. The presence of this excess energy indicates that a highly supercharged compression-ignition engine might be desirable as a compressor and combustion chamber for a turbine.

  1. How to achieve high-level expression of microbial enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Long; Yang, Haiquan; Shin, Hyun-dong; Chen, Rachel R.; Li, Jianghua; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian

    2013-01-01

    Microbial enzymes have been used in a large number of fields, such as chemical, agricultural and biopharmaceutical industries. The enzyme production rate and yield are the main factors to consider when choosing the appropriate expression system for the production of recombinant proteins. Recombinant enzymes have been expressed in bacteria (e.g., Escherichia coli, Bacillus and lactic acid bacteria), filamentous fungi (e.g., Aspergillus) and yeasts (e.g., Pichia pastoris). The favorable and very advantageous characteristics of these species have resulted in an increasing number of biotechnological applications. Bacterial hosts (e.g., E. coli) can be used to quickly and easily overexpress recombinant enzymes; however, bacterial systems cannot express very large proteins and proteins that require post-translational modifications. The main bacterial expression hosts, with the exception of lactic acid bacteria and filamentous fungi, can produce several toxins which are not compatible with the expression of recombinant enzymes in food and drugs. However, due to the multiplicity of the physiological impacts arising from high-level expression of genes encoding the enzymes and expression hosts, the goal of overproduction can hardly be achieved, and therefore, the yield of recombinant enzymes is limited. In this review, the recent strategies used for the high-level expression of microbial enzymes in the hosts mentioned above are summarized and the prospects are also discussed. We hope this review will contribute to the development of the enzyme-related research field. PMID:23686280

  2. High precision Hugoniot measurements on statically pre-compressed fluid helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seagle, Christopher T.; Reinhart, William D.; Lopez, Andrew J.; Hickman, Randy J.; Thornhill, Tom F.

    2016-09-01

    The capability for statically pre-compressing fluid targets for Hugoniot measurements utilizing gas gun driven flyer plates has been developed. Pre-compression expands the capability for initial condition control, allowing access to thermodynamic states off the principal Hugoniot. Absolute Hugoniot measurements with an uncertainty less than 3% on density and pressure were obtained on statically pre-compressed fluid helium utilizing a two stage light gas gun. Helium is highly compressible; the locus of shock states resulting from dynamic loading of an initially compressed sample at room temperature is significantly denser than the cryogenic fluid Hugoniot even for relatively modest (0.27-0.38 GPa) initial pressures. The dynamic response of pre-compressed helium in the initial density range of 0.21-0.25 g/cm3 at ambient temperature may be described by a linear shock velocity (us) and particle velocity (up) relationship: us = C0 + sup, with C0 = 1.44 ± 0.14 km/s and s = 1.344 ± 0.025.

  3. Comparison of the Level of Using Metacognitive Strategies during Study between High Achieving and Low Achieving Prospective Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doganay, Ahmet; Demir, Ozden

    2011-01-01

    The main purpose of this study is to compare the level of using metacognitive strategies during study between high achieving and low achieving prospective classroom teachers. This study was designed as a mixed method study. Metacognitive Learning Strategies Scale developed by Namlu (2004) was used to measure the use of metacognitive strategies…

  4. Effects of Partner's Ability on the Achievement and Conceptual Organization of High-Achieving Fifth-Grade Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Glenda; Jones, M. Gail; Rua, Melissa

    2003-01-01

    Investigates high-achieving fifth-grade students' achievement gains and conceptual reorganization on convection. Features an instructional sequence of three dyadic inquiry investigations related to convection currents as well as pre- and post-assessment consisting of a multiple-choice test, a card sorting task, construction of a concept map, and…

  5. Gender Differences in Attitudes toward Mathematics between Low-Achieving and High-Achieving Fifth Grade Elementary Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rathbone, A. Sue

    Possible gender differences in attitudes toward mathematics were studied between low-achieving and high-achieving fifth-grade students in selected elementary schools within a large, metropolitan area. The attitudes of pre-adolescent children at an intermediate grade level were assessed to determine the effects of rapidly emerging gender-related…

  6. High resolution transmission electron microscopic in-situ observations of plastic deformation of compressed nanocrystalline gold

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Guoyong; Lian, Jianshe; Jiang, Qing; Sun, Sheng; Zhang, Tong-Yi

    2014-09-14

    Nanocrystalline (nc) metals possess extremely high strength, while their capability to deform plastically has been debated for decades. Low ductility has hitherto been considered an intrinsic behavior for most nc metals, due to the lack of five independent slip systems actively operating during deformation in each nanograin. Here we report in situ high resolution transmission electron microscopic (HRTEM) observations of deformation process of nc gold under compression, showing the excellent ductility of individual and aggregate nanograins. Compression causes permanent change in the profile of individual nanograins, which is mediated by dislocation slip and grain rotation. The high rate of grain boundary sliding and large extent of widely exited grain rotation may meet the boundary compatibility requirements during plastic deformation. The in situ HRTEM observations suggest that nc gold is not intrinsically brittle under compressive loading.

  7. An exact and consistent adjoint method for high-fidelity discretization of the compressible flow equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramanian, Ramanathan Vishnampet Ganapathi

    Methods and computing hardware advances have enabled accurate predictions of complex compressible turbulence phenomena, such as the generation of jet noise that motivates the present effort. However, limited understanding of underlying physical mechanisms restricts the utility of such predictions since they do not, by themselves, indicate a route to design improvement. Gradient-based optimization using adjoints can circumvent the flow complexity to guide designs. Such methods have enabled sensitivity analysis and active control of turbulence at engineering flow conditions by providing gradient information at computational cost comparable to that of simulating the flow. They accelerate convergence of numerical design optimization algorithms, though this is predicated on the availability of an accurate gradient of the discretized flow equations. This is challenging to obtain, since both the chaotic character of the turbulence and the typical use of discretizations near their resolution limits in order to efficiently represent its smaller scales will amplify any approximation errors made in the adjoint formulation. Formulating a practical exact adjoint that avoids such errors is especially challenging if it is to be compatible with state-of-the-art simulation methods used for the turbulent flow itself. Automatic differentiation (AD) can provide code to calculate a nominally exact adjoint, but existing general-purpose AD codes are inefficient to the point of being prohibitive for large-scale turbulence simulations. We analyze the compressible flow equations as discretized using the same high-order workhorse methods used for many high-fidelity compressible turbulence simulations, and formulate a practical space--time discrete-adjoint method without changing the basic discretization. A key step is the definition of a particular discrete analog of the continuous norm that defines our cost functional; our selection leads directly to an efficient Runge--Kutta-like scheme

  8. Achieving High Throughput for Data Transfer over ATM Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Marjory J.; Townsend, Jeffrey N.

    1996-01-01

    File-transfer rates for ftp are often reported to be relatively slow, compared to the raw bandwidth available in emerging gigabit networks. While a major bottleneck is disk I/O, protocol issues impact performance as well. Ftp was developed and optimized for use over the TCP/IP protocol stack of the Internet. However, TCP has been shown to run inefficiently over ATM. In an effort to maximize network throughput, data-transfer protocols can be developed to run over UDP or directly over IP, rather than over TCP. If error-free transmission is required, techniques for achieving reliable transmission can be included as part of the transfer protocol. However, selected image-processing applications can tolerate a low level of errors in images that are transmitted over a network. In this paper we report on experimental work to develop a high-throughput protocol for unreliable data transfer over ATM networks. We attempt to maximize throughput by keeping the communications pipe full, but still keep packet loss under five percent. We use the Bay Area Gigabit Network Testbed as our experimental platform.

  9. High strain rate compressive characterization of aluminum alloy/fly ash cenosphere composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luong, Dung D.; Gupta, Nikhil; Daoud, Atef; Rohatgi, Pradeep K.

    2011-02-01

    The strain rate dependence of compressive response is determined for aluminum alloy/hollow fly ash cenosphere composites. A4032 alloy is used as the matrix material. Quasi-static and high strain rate compression tests are conducted on the matrix alloy and the composite. A split-Hopkinson pressure bar is used for high strain rate testing. While the matrix alloy does not show any appreciable strain rate sensitivity, the composite shows higher strength at higher strain rates. The energy absorption capability of A4032/fly ash cenosphere composites is found to be higher at higher strain rates.

  10. Student Perception of Academic Achievement Factors at High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bahar, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    Measuring the quality of the "product" is elemental in education, and most studies depend on observational data about student achievement factors, focusing overwhelmingly on quantitative data namely achievement scores, school data like attendance, facilities, expenditure class size, etc. But there is little evidence of learner…

  11. Learning Styles and High School Students' Chemistry Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uzuntiryaki, Esen

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of students' learning styles on their chemistry achievement, and whether matching between teaching and learning styles also affects students' chemistry achievement. Two hundred and sixty-five tenth-grade students enrolled in a chemistry course and seven chemistry teachers participated in…

  12. Does Recreational Computer Use Affect High School Achievement?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowers, Alex J.; Berland, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    Historically, the relationship between student academic achievement and use of computers for fun and video gaming has been described from a multitude of perspectives, from positive, to negative, to neutral. However, recent research has indicated that computer use and video gaming may be positively associated with achievement, yet these studies…

  13. High-Achieving High School Students and Not so High-Achieving College Students: A Look at Lack of Self-Control, Academic Ability, and Performance in College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honken, Nora B.; Ralston, Patricia A. S.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship among lack of self-control, academic ability, and academic performance for a cohort of freshman engineering students who were, with a few exceptions, extremely high achievers in high school. Structural equation modeling analysis led to the conclusion that lack of self-control in high school, as measured by…

  14. Characterization of light emission from mechanoluminescent composites subjected to high-rate compressive loading (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Donghyeon; Castaño, Nicolas; Bhakta, Raj; Romero, Michael; Kimberley, Jamie

    2016-04-01

    This study aims to devise multifunctional composites using fracto-mechanoluminescent (FML) materials and photoactive sensing thin films for autonomous and self-powered impact damage detection. In previous studies, multifunctional photoactive thin films were suggested as a strain sensor that does not require any external electrical source. Instead, the photoactive thin films generated direct current (DC) (or photocurrent) under ambient light, whose magnitude varied linearly with applied strain. In this study, multifunctional FML materials-photoactive thin film composites will be devised for autonomously sensing high-speed compressive strains without supplying any external photonic or electrical energy. FML materials exhibit transformative properties that emit light when its crystalline structures are fractured. The developed photoactive strain sensing thin film will be integrated with the FML materials. Thus, it is envisioned that the FML materials will emit light, which will be supplied to the photoactive sensing thin films when the high-speed compressive loadings break FML materials' crystalline structures. First, synthesized europium tetrakit(dibenzoylmethide) triethylammonium (EuD4TEA) crystals will be embedded in the elastomeric and transparent polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) matrix to prepare test specimens. Second, the FML properties of the EuD4TEA-PDMS composites will be characterized at various compressive strains, which will be applied by Kolsky bar testing setup. Light emission from the EuD4TEA-PDMS test specimens will be recorded using a high-speed camera. Intensity of the light emissions will be quantified via image processing techniques by taking into account pixel profiles of the high-speed camera captured images (e.g., pixel values, counts of pixels, and RGB values) at various levels of compressive strains. Lastly, the autonomous high-speed compressive sensor modules will be fabricated by integrating the EuD4TEA-PDMS composites with the photoactive thin

  15. High-temperature superconductivity in compressed solid silane.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huadi; Jin, Xilian; Lv, Yunzhou; Zhuang, Quan; Liu, Yunxian; Lv, Qianqian; Bao, Kuo; Li, Da; Liu, Bingbing; Cui, Tian

    2015-01-01

    Crystal structures of silane have been extensively investigated using ab initio evolutionary simulation methods at high pressures. Two metallic structures with P2₁/c and C2/m symmetries are found stable above 383 GPa. The superconductivities of metallic phases are fully explored under BCS theory, including the reported C2/c one. Perturbative linear-response calculations for C2/m silane at 610 GPa reveal a high superconducting critical temperature that beyond the order of 10(2) K.

  16. Fabrication of high gradient insulators by stack compression

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, John Richardson; Sanders, Dave; Hawkins, Steven Anthony; Norona, Marcelo

    2014-04-29

    Individual layers of a high gradient insulator (HGI) are first pre-cut to their final dimensions. The pre-cut layers are then stacked to form an assembly that is subsequently pressed into an HGI unit with the desired dimension. The individual layers are stacked, and alignment is maintained, using a sacrificial alignment tube that is removed after the stack is hot pressed. The HGI's are used as high voltage vacuum insulators in energy storage and transmission structures or devices, e.g. in particle accelerators and pulsed power systems.

  17. Reaching High-Yield Fusion with a Slow Plasma Liner Compressing a Magnetized Target

    SciTech Connect

    Ryutov, D D; Parks, P B

    2008-03-18

    Dynamics of the compression of a magnetized plasma target by a heavy liner made of partially ionized high high-Z material is discussed. A 'soft-landing' (shockless) mode of the liner deceleration is analyzed. Conclusion is drawn that such mode is possible for the liners whose thickness at the time of the first contact with the target is smaller than, roughly, 10% of the initial (un-compressed) target radius. A combination of the plasma liner with one or two glide cones allows for a direct access to the area near the center of the reactor chamber. One can then generate plasma target inside the plasma liner at the optimum time. The other advantage of the glide cones is that they can be used to deliver additional fuel to the center of the target near the point of a maximum compression and thereby increase the fusion yield.

  18. The high strain compression of micro- and nano-sized random irregular honeycombs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, J. F.; Zhang, H. C.; Zhu, H. X.; Kennedy, D.

    2016-09-01

    This paper investigates the effects of cell wall thickness, initial stress/strain, and cell regularity on the high strain compressive responses of micro- and nano-sized low density random irregular honeycombs. The strain gradient effects at the micrometer scale, and the surface elasticity and initial stress effects at the nanometer scale are incorporated into the dominant deformation mechanisms in finite element simulations. It is found that the dimensionless compressive stress strain relation strongly depends on the thickness of the cell walls at the micron scale, and at the nano-meter scale, this relation is not only size-dependent, but are also tunable and controllable over a large range. It is also found that under high strain compression, the Poisson’s ratios of micro- and nano-sized low density random irregular honeycombs strongly depend on the cell regularity, but are almost independent of the cell wall thickness and the amplitudes of the initial stress or strain.

  19. Development of High Speed Imaging and Analysis Techniques Compressible Dynamics Stall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandrasekhara, M. S.; Carr, L. W.; Wilder, M. C.; Davis, Sanford S. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    parameters on the dynamic stall process. When interferograms can be captured in real time, the potential for real-time mapping of a developing unsteady flow such as dynamic stall becomes a possibility. This has been achieved in the present case through the use of a high-speed drum camera combined with electronic circuitry which has resulted in a series of interferograms obtained during a single cycle of dynamic stall; images obtained at the rate of 20 KHz will be presented as a part of the formal presentation. Interferometry has been available for a long time; however, most of its use has been limited to visualization. The present research has focused on use of interferograms for quantitative mapping of the flow over oscillating airfoils. Instantaneous pressure distributions can now be obtained semi-automatically, making practical the analysis of the thousands of interferograms that are produced in this research. A review of the techniques that have been developed as part of this research effort will be presented in the final paper.

  20. Achievement of Hispanic Students in American High Schools: Background Characteristics and Achievement. Contractor Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nielsen, Francois; Fernandez, Roberto M.

    Presenting data and analyses from the first wave of the study "High School and Beyond" (HS&B), a longitudinal study of United States high school sophomores and seniors, the report focuses on the composition of the Hispanic tenth and twelfth grade student population with respect to various characteristics; i.e., language use and proficiency, length…

  1. NGC: lossless and lossy compression of aligned high-throughput sequencing data.

    PubMed

    Popitsch, Niko; von Haeseler, Arndt

    2013-01-01

    A major challenge of current high-throughput sequencing experiments is not only the generation of the sequencing data itself but also their processing, storage and transmission. The enormous size of these data motivates the development of data compression algorithms usable for the implementation of the various storage policies that are applied to the produced intermediate and final result files. In this article, we present NGC, a tool for the compression of mapped short read data stored in the wide-spread SAM format. NGC enables lossless and lossy compression and introduces the following two novel ideas: first, we present a way to reduce the number of required code words by exploiting common features of reads mapped to the same genomic positions; second, we present a highly configurable way for the quantization of per-base quality values, which takes their influence on downstream analyses into account. NGC, evaluated with several real-world data sets, saves 33-66% of disc space using lossless and up to 98% disc space using lossy compression. By applying two popular variant and genotype prediction tools to the decompressed data, we could show that the lossy compression modes preserve >99% of all called variants while outperforming comparable methods in some configurations.

  2. High Compressive Stresses Near the Surface of the Sierra Nevada, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martel, S. J.; Logan, J. M.; Stock, G. M.

    2012-12-01

    Observations and stress measurements in granitic rocks of the Sierra Nevada, California reveal strong compressive stresses parallel to the surface of the range at shallow depths. New overcoring measurements show high compressive stresses at three locations along an east-west transect through Yosemite National Park. At the westernmost site (west end of Tenaya Lake), the mean compressive stress is 1.9. At the middle site (north shore of Tenaya Lake) the mean compressive stress is 6.8 MPa. At the easternmost site (south side of Lembert Dome) the mean compressive stress is 3.0 MPa. The trend of the most compressive stress at these sites is within ~30° of the strike of the local topographic surface. Previously published hydraulic fracturing measurements by others elsewhere in the Sierra Nevada indicate surface-parallel compressive stresses of several MPa within several tens of meters of the surface, with the stress magnitudes generally diminishing to the west. Both the new and the previously published compressive stress magnitudes are consistent with the presence of sheeting joints (i.e., "exfoliation joints") in the Sierra Nevada, which require lateral compressive stresses of several MPa to form. These fractures are widespread: they are distributed in granitic rocks from the north end of the range to its southern tip and across the width of the range. Uplift along the normal faults of the eastern escarpment, recently measured by others at ~1-2 mm/yr, probably contributes to these stresses substantially. Geodetic surveys reveal that normal faulting flexes a range concave upwards in response to fault slip, and this flexure is predicted by elastic dislocation models. The topographic relief of the eastern escarpment of the Sierra Nevada is 2-4 km, and since alluvial fill generally buries the bedrock east of the faults, the offset of granitic rocks is at least that much. Compressive stresses of several MPa are predicted by elastic dislocation models of the range front

  3. One-dimensional compression of sands at high pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamuro, J.A.; Bopp, P.A.; Lade, P.V.

    1996-02-01

    A one-dimensional testing apparatus was developed to test soils to axial stresses up to 850 MPa. The apparatus was instrumented with strain gauges such that lateral soil stresses, and therefore K{sub 0}, could be inferred from measured circumferential strains. Three different initial densities of quartz, Cambria, and gypsum sands were tested and it was found that the effect of initial density was eliminated at high stress magnitudes. This stress magnitude was higher for mineralogically harder grains than for softer grains. The inferred values of K{sub 0} for the mineralogically harder Cambria sand was found to be constant at high pressures, but slightly below that indicates by Jaky`s equation. However, the softer gypsum sand indicated increasing values of K{sub 0} as the stress magnitude increased. This apparently was caused by inelastic, viscous flow during shearing.

  4. Preferences of High Achieving High School Students in Their Career Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Mihyeon

    2010-01-01

    The intent of this study was to identify the needs and preference of high-achieving high school students. In terms of career related programs in high school, students listed AP courses and mentoring as their preferred career-related programs. Also, students stated that career guidance by counselors, workshops or sessions, and tech prep were the…

  5. Threatened and Placed at Risk: High Achieving African American Males in Urban High Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGee, Ebony O.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the risk and protective factors of 11 high-achieving African American males attending 4 urban charter high schools in a Midwestern city to determine what factors account for their resilience and success in mathematics courses, and in high school more generally. This research was guided by a Phenomenological Variant of…

  6. Numerical solution of compressible viscous flows at high Reynolds numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maccormack, R. W.

    1981-01-01

    A new numerical method which was used to reduce the computation time required in fluid dynamics to solve the Navier-Stokes equations at flight Reynolds numbers is described. The method is the implicit analogue of the explicit finite different method. It uses this as its first stage, while the second stage removes the restrictive stability condition by recasting the difference equations in an implicit form. The resulting matrix equations to be solved are either upper or lower block bidiagonal equations. The new method makes it possible and practical to calculate many important three dimensional, high Reynolds number flow fields on computers.

  7. Compressibility of highly coordinated metal oxynitrides: LDA calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowther, J. E.

    2005-11-01

    The highest oxygen coordination number observed in any metal dioxide is when the material takes the cotunnite structure. This has been observed in several high pressure synthesized metal oxide based materials. Properties of similar hypothetical metal based oxynitrides are examined using ab initio electronic structure techniques. TaON in the cottunite, structure appears especially significant. Strong differences are found for the metal dioxide and the similar oxynitride depending on the metal’s character. The differences are attributed to the contribution of nitrogen to the density of states especially around the Fermi energy and a relative reduction in the volume of the unit cell.

  8. Very High Resolution Simulation of Compressible Turbulence on the IBM-SP System

    SciTech Connect

    Mirin, A.A.; Cohen, R.H.; Curtis, B.C.; Dannevik, W.P.; Dimits, A.M.; Duchaineau, M.A.; Eliason, D.E.; Schikore, D.R.; Anderson, S.E.; Woodward, P.R.; Shieh, L.J.; White, S.W.; Porter, D.H.

    1999-08-05

    Understanding turbulence and mix in compressible flows is of fundamental importance to real-world applications such as chemical combustion and supernova evolution. The ability to run in three dimensions and at very high resolution is required for the simulation to accurately represent the interaction of the various length scales, and consequently, the reactivity of the intermixing species. Toward this end, we have carried out a very high resolution (over 8 billion zones) 3-D simulation of the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability and turbulent mixing on the IBM Sustained Stewardship TeraOp (SST) system, developed under the auspices of the Department of Energy (DOE) Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI) and located at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. We have also undertaken an even higher resolution proof-of-principle calculation (over 24 billion zones) on 5832 processors of the IBM, which executed for over an hour at a sustained rate of 1.05 Tflop/s, as well as a short calculation with a modified algorithm that achieved a sustained rate of 1.18 Tflop/s. The full production scientific simulation, using a further modified algorithm, ran for 27,000 timesteps in slightly over a week of n-all time using 3840 processors of the IBM system, clocking a sustained throughput of roughly 0.6 teraflop per second. Nearly 300,000 graphics files comprising over three terabytes of data were produced and post-processed. The capability of running in 3-D at high resolution enabled us to get a more accurate and detailed picture of the fluid-flow structure--in particular, to simulate the development of fine scale structures from the interactions of long- and short-wavelength phenomena, to elucidate differences between two-dimensional and three-dimensional turbulence, to explore a conjecture regarding the transition from unstable flow to fully developed turbulence with increasing Reynolds number, and to ascertain convergence of the computed solution with respect to mesh

  9. Compressive sensing in medical imaging.

    PubMed

    Graff, Christian G; Sidky, Emil Y

    2015-03-10

    The promise of compressive sensing, exploitation of compressibility to achieve high quality image reconstructions with less data, has attracted a great deal of attention in the medical imaging community. At the Compressed Sensing Incubator meeting held in April 2014 at OSA Headquarters in Washington, DC, presentations were given summarizing some of the research efforts ongoing in compressive sensing for x-ray computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging systems. This article provides an expanded version of these presentations. Sparsity-exploiting reconstruction algorithms that have gained popularity in the medical imaging community are studied, and examples of clinical applications that could benefit from compressive sensing ideas are provided. The current and potential future impact of compressive sensing on the medical imaging field is discussed.

  10. Compressive sensing in medical imaging

    PubMed Central

    Graff, Christian G.; Sidky, Emil Y.

    2015-01-01

    The promise of compressive sensing, exploitation of compressibility to achieve high quality image reconstructions with less data, has attracted a great deal of attention in the medical imaging community. At the Compressed Sensing Incubator meeting held in April 2014 at OSA Headquarters in Washington, DC, presentations were given summarizing some of the research efforts ongoing in compressive sensing for x-ray computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging systems. This article provides an expanded version of these presentations. Sparsity-exploiting reconstruction algorithms that have gained popularity in the medical imaging community are studied, and examples of clinical applications that could benefit from compressive sensing ideas are provided. The current and potential future impact of compressive sensing on the medical imaging field is discussed. PMID:25968400

  11. Kagome-type hollow-core photonic crystal fibers for beam delivery and pulse compression of high-power ultrafast lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saraceno, C. J.; Emaury, F.; Diebold, A.; Schriber, C.; Debord, B.; Gérôme, F.; Südmeyer, T.; Benabid, F.; Keller, U.

    2015-02-01

    Tremendous progress has been achieved in the last years in the field of ultrafast high-power sources. Among the different laser technologies driving this progress, thin-disk lasers (TDLs) have gained significant ground, both from amplifiers and modelocked oscillators. Modelocked TDLs are particularly attractive, as they allow for unprecedented high energy and average powers directly from an oscillator. The exponential progress in the performance of these sources drives growing needs for efficient means of beam delivery and pulse compression at high average power (< 100 W) and high peak power (> 10 MW). This remains a challenging regime for standard fiber solutions: microstructured large-mode-area silica photonic-crystal fibers (PCFs) are good candidates, but peak powers are limited to ≈4-6 MW by self-focusing. Hollow-core (HC) capillaries are adapted for higher peak powers, but exhibit high losses and are not suitable for compact beam delivery. In parallel to the progress achieved in the performance of ultrafast laser systems, recent progress in novel hollow-core PCF designs are currently emerging as an excellent solution for these challenges. In particular, Inhibited-coupling Kagome-type HC-PCFs are particularly promising: their intrinsic guiding properties allow for extremely high damage thresholds, low losses over wide transmission windows and ultra-low dispersion. In our most recent results, we achieve pulse compression in the hundred-watt average power regime using Kagome-type HC-PCFs. We launch 127-W, 18-μJ, 740-fs pulses from our modelocked TDL into an Ar-filled fiber (13 bar), reaching 93% transmission. The resulting spectral broadening allows us to compress the pulses to 88 fs at 112 W of average power, reaching 105 MW of peak power, at 88% compression efficiency. These results demonstrate the outstanding suitability of Kagome HC-PCFs for compression and beam delivery of state-of-the-art kilowatt-class ultrafast systems.

  12. Insulator-metal transition in highly compressed NiO.

    PubMed

    Gavriliuk, Alexander G; Trojan, Ivan A; Struzhkin, Viktor V

    2012-08-24

    The insulator-metal transition was observed experimentally in nickel monoxide (NiO) at very high pressures of ~240 GPa. The sample resistance becomes measurable at about 130 GPa and decreases substantially with the pressure increase to ~240 GPa. A sharp drop in resistance by about 3 orders of magnitude has been observed at ~240 GPa with a concomitant change of the resistance type from semiconducting to metallic. This is the first experimental observation of an insulator-metal transition in NiO, which was anticipated by Mott decades ago. From simple multielectron consideration, the metallic phase of NiO forms when the effective Hubbard energy U(eff) is almost equal to the estimated full bandwidth 2W. PMID:23002762

  13. High-pressure phase equilibria with compressed gases.

    PubMed

    Ren, Wei; Scurto, Aaron M

    2007-12-01

    An apparatus is described that is capable of determining high-pressure vapor-liquid equilibrium, liquid-liquid equilibrium, solid-liquid-vapor equilibrium, vapor-liquid-liquid equilibrium, and mixture critical points and transitions. The device is capable of temperatures to 150 degrees C and pressures to 300 bars (higher with slight modifications). The construction and operation are described in detail and do not require the use of mercury. This method requires very low sample volumes and no analytical equipment nor system-specific calibration. The apparatus was verified by comparison with literature data for the decane-CO(2) mixture and CO(2)-ionic liquid [1-hexyl-3-methyl-imidazolium bis(trifyl)imide)] systems. The experimental data have excellent agreement with the literature data that used different experimental methods. A rigorous error analysis of the system is also presented.

  14. Muon cooling: longitudinal compression.

    PubMed

    Bao, Yu; Antognini, Aldo; Bertl, Wilhelm; Hildebrandt, Malte; Khaw, Kim Siang; Kirch, Klaus; Papa, Angela; Petitjean, Claude; Piegsa, Florian M; Ritt, Stefan; Sedlak, Kamil; Stoykov, Alexey; Taqqu, David

    2014-06-01

    A 10  MeV/c positive muon beam was stopped in helium gas of a few mbar in a magnetic field of 5 T. The muon "swarm" has been efficiently compressed from a length of 16 cm down to a few mm along the magnetic field axis (longitudinal compression) using electrostatic fields. The simulation reproduces the low energy interactions of slow muons in helium gas. Phase space compression occurs on the order of microseconds, compatible with the muon lifetime of 2  μs. This paves the way for the preparation of a high-quality low-energy muon beam, with an increase in phase space density relative to a standard surface muon beam of 10^{7}. The achievable phase space compression by using only the longitudinal stage presented here is of the order of 10^{4}.

  15. Muon Cooling: Longitudinal Compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Yu; Antognini, Aldo; Bertl, Wilhelm; Hildebrandt, Malte; Khaw, Kim Siang; Kirch, Klaus; Papa, Angela; Petitjean, Claude; Piegsa, Florian M.; Ritt, Stefan; Sedlak, Kamil; Stoykov, Alexey; Taqqu, David

    2014-06-01

    A 10 MeV/c positive muon beam was stopped in helium gas of a few mbar in a magnetic field of 5 T. The muon "swarm" has been efficiently compressed from a length of 16 cm down to a few mm along the magnetic field axis (longitudinal compression) using electrostatic fields. The simulation reproduces the low energy interactions of slow muons in helium gas. Phase space compression occurs on the order of microseconds, compatible with the muon lifetime of 2 μs. This paves the way for the preparation of a high-quality low-energy muon beam, with an increase in phase space density relative to a standard surface muon beam of 107. The achievable phase space compression by using only the longitudinal stage presented here is of the order of 104.

  16. The Effect of Music Participation on Mathematical Achievement and Overall Academic Achievement of High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, H. A.; Stephens, L. J.

    2006-01-01

    A study was conducted on high school students, comparing those with some music credits to those with none. No statistically significant difference was found in their mean math grade point averages (GPA) or their mean cumulative GPAs. Students were then separated into two groups based on the number of music credits. Students who had earned at least…

  17. Geostatistical analysis of Landsat-TM lossy compression images in a high-performance computing environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pesquer, Lluís; Cortés, Ana; Serral, Ivette; Pons, Xavier

    2011-11-01

    The main goal of this study is to characterize the effects of lossy image compression procedures on the spatial patterns of remotely sensed images, as well as to test the performance of job distribution tools specifically designed for obtaining geostatistical parameters (variogram) in a High Performance Computing (HPC) environment. To this purpose, radiometrically and geometrically corrected Landsat-5 TM images from April, July, August and September 2006 were compressed using two different methods: Band-Independent Fixed-Rate (BIFR) and three-dimensional Discrete Wavelet Transform (3d-DWT) applied to the JPEG 2000 standard. For both methods, a wide range of compression ratios (2.5:1, 5:1, 10:1, 50:1, 100:1, 200:1 and 400:1, from soft to hard compression) were compared. Variogram analyses conclude that all compression ratios maintain the variogram shapes and that the higher ratios (more than 100:1) reduce variance in the sill parameter of about 5%. Moreover, the parallel solution in a distributed environment demonstrates that HPC offers a suitable scientific test bed for time demanding execution processes, as in geostatistical analyses of remote sensing images.

  18. Compressed sensing embedded in an operational wireless sensor network to achieve energy efficiency in long-term monitoring applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, S. M.; Lynch, J. P.; Gilbert, A. C.

    2014-08-01

    Compressed sensing (CS) is a powerful new data acquisition paradigm that seeks to accurately reconstruct unknown sparse signals from very few (relative to the target signal dimension) random projections. The specific objective of this study is to save wireless sensor energy by using CS to simultaneously reduce data sampling rates, on-board storage requirements, and communication data payloads. For field-deployed low power wireless sensors that are often operated with limited energy sources, reduced communication translates directly into reduced power consumption and improved operational reliability. In this study, acceleration data from a multi-girder steel-concrete deck composite bridge are processed for the extraction of mode shapes. A wireless sensor node previously designed to perform traditional uniform, Nyquist rate sampling is modified to perform asynchronous, effectively sub-Nyquist rate sampling. The sub-Nyquist data are transmitted off-site to a computational server for reconstruction using the CoSaMP matching pursuit recovery algorithm and further processed for extraction of the structure’s mode shapes. The mode shape metric used for reconstruction quality is the modal assurance criterion (MAC), an indicator of the consistency between CS and traditional Nyquist acquired mode shapes. A comprehensive investigation of modal accuracy from a dense set of acceleration response data reveals that MAC values above 0.90 are obtained for the first four modes of a bridge structure when at least 20% of the original signal is sampled using the CS framework. Reduced data collection, storage and communication requirements are found to lead to substantial reductions in the energy requirements of wireless sensor networks at the expense of modal accuracy. Specifically, total energy reductions of 10-60% can be obtained for a sensor network with 10-100 sensor nodes, respectively. The reduced energy requirements of the CS sensor nodes are shown to directly result in

  19. High capacity image steganography method based on framelet and compressive sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Moyan; He, Zhibiao

    2015-12-01

    To improve the capacity and imperceptibility of image steganography, a novel high capacity and imperceptibility image steganography method based on a combination of framelet and compressive sensing (CS) is put forward. Firstly, SVD (Singular Value Decomposition) transform to measurement values obtained by compressive sensing technique to the secret data. Then the singular values in turn embed into the low frequency coarse subbands of framelet transform to the blocks of the cover image which is divided into non-overlapping blocks. Finally, use inverse framelet transforms and combine to obtain the stego image. The experimental results show that the proposed steganography method has a good performance in hiding capacity, security and imperceptibility.

  20. Precision laboratory apparatus for high temperature compression molding of glass lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firestone, Gregory C.; Jain, Anurag; Yi, Allen Y.

    2005-06-01

    Recently, compression molding of glass aspherical lenses has become a viable manufacturing process for precision optical devices. In this research, an apparatus designed for precision compression molding of glass optics was constructed. The apparatus design was governed by two primary goals: molding process control and property measurement of common optical glasses such as BK 7, SK5, and soda lime glass. Equipped with high precision components, a closed loop feedback control and a unique force adaptive scheme, the apparatus was successfully used for glass property measurement tests. Moreover, the performance of the apparatus was also validated using selected microlens molding experiments.

  1. Design of indirectly driven, high-compression Inertial Confinement Fusion implosions with improved hydrodynamic stability using a 4-shock adiabat-shaped drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milovich, J. L.; Robey, H. F.; Clark, D. S.; Baker, K. L.; Casey, D. T.; Cerjan, C.; Field, J.; MacPhee, A. G.; Pak, A.; Patel, P. K.; Peterson, J. L.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Weber, C. R.

    2015-12-01

    Experimental results from indirectly driven ignition implosions during the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) [M. J. Edwards et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 070501 (2013)] achieved a record compression of the central deuterium-tritium fuel layer with measured areal densities up to 1.2 g/cm2, but with significantly lower total neutron yields (between 1.5 × 1014 and 5.5 × 1014) than predicted, approximately 10% of the 2D simulated yield. An order of magnitude improvement in the neutron yield was subsequently obtained in the "high-foot" experiments [O. A. Hurricane et al., Nature 506, 343 (2014)]. However, this yield was obtained at the expense of fuel compression due to deliberately higher fuel adiabat. In this paper, the design of an adiabat-shaped implosion is presented, in which the laser pulse is tailored to achieve similar resistance to ablation-front instability growth, but with a low fuel adiabat to achieve high compression. Comparison with measured performance shows a factor of 3-10× improvement in the neutron yield (>40% of predicted simulated yield) over similar NIC implosions, while maintaining a reasonable fuel compression of >1 g/cm2. Extension of these designs to higher laser power and energy is discussed to further explore the trade-off between increased implosion velocity and the deleterious effects of hydrodynamic instabilities.

  2. Design of indirectly driven, high-compression Inertial Confinement Fusion implosions with improved hydrodynamic stability using a 4-shock adiabat-shaped drive

    SciTech Connect

    Milovich, J. L. Robey, H. F.; Clark, D. S.; Baker, K. L.; Casey, D. T.; Cerjan, C.; Field, J.; MacPhee, A. G.; Pak, A.; Patel, P. K.; Peterson, J. L.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Weber, C. R.

    2015-12-15

    Experimental results from indirectly driven ignition implosions during the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) [M. J. Edwards et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 070501 (2013)] achieved a record compression of the central deuterium-tritium fuel layer with measured areal densities up to 1.2 g/cm{sup 2}, but with significantly lower total neutron yields (between 1.5 × 10{sup 14} and 5.5 × 10{sup 14}) than predicted, approximately 10% of the 2D simulated yield. An order of magnitude improvement in the neutron yield was subsequently obtained in the “high-foot” experiments [O. A. Hurricane et al., Nature 506, 343 (2014)]. However, this yield was obtained at the expense of fuel compression due to deliberately higher fuel adiabat. In this paper, the design of an adiabat-shaped implosion is presented, in which the laser pulse is tailored to achieve similar resistance to ablation-front instability growth, but with a low fuel adiabat to achieve high compression. Comparison with measured performance shows a factor of 3–10× improvement in the neutron yield (>40% of predicted simulated yield) over similar NIC implosions, while maintaining a reasonable fuel compression of >1 g/cm{sup 2}. Extension of these designs to higher laser power and energy is discussed to further explore the trade-off between increased implosion velocity and the deleterious effects of hydrodynamic instabilities.

  3. Sugar Determination in Foods with a Radially Compressed High Performance Liquid Chromatography Column.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ondrus, Martin G.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Advocates use of Waters Associates Radial Compression Separation System for high performance liquid chromatography. Discusses instrumentation and reagents, outlining procedure for analyzing various foods and discussing typical student data. Points out potential problems due to impurities and pump seal life. Suggests use of ribose as internal…

  4. Dynamic compression of copper to over 450 GPa: A high-pressure standard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraus, R. G.; Davis, J.-P.; Seagle, C. T.; Fratanduono, D. E.; Swift, D. C.; Brown, J. L.; Eggert, J. H.

    2016-04-01

    An absolute stress-density path for shocklessly compressed copper is obtained to over 450 GPa. A magnetic pressure drive is temporally tailored to generate shockless compression waves through over 2.5-mm-thick copper samples. The free-surface velocity data is analyzed for Lagrangian sound velocity using the iterative Lagrangian analysis (ILA) technique, which relies upon the method of characteristics. We correct for the effects of strength and plastic work heating to determine an isentropic compression path. By assuming a Debye model for the heat capacity, we can further correct the isentrope to an isotherm. Our determination of the isentrope and isotherm of copper represents a highly accurate pressure standard for copper to over 450 GPa.

  5. Laser-driven magnetic-flux compression in high-energy-density plasmas.

    PubMed

    Gotchev, O V; Chang, P Y; Knauer, J P; Meyerhofer, D D; Polomarov, O; Frenje, J; Li, C K; Manuel, M J-E; Petrasso, R D; Rygg, J R; Séguin, F H; Betti, R

    2009-11-20

    The demonstration of magnetic field compression to many tens of megagauss in cylindrical implosions of inertial confinement fusion targets is reported for the first time. The OMEGA laser [T. R. Boehly, Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)10.1016/S0030-4018(96)00325-2] was used to implode cylindrical CH targets filled with deuterium gas and seeded with a strong external field (>50 kG) from a specially developed magnetic pulse generator. This seed field was trapped (frozen) in the shock-heated gas fill and compressed by the imploding shell at a high implosion velocity, minimizing the effect of resistive flux diffusion. The magnetic fields in the compressed core were probed via proton deflectrometry using the fusion products from an imploding D3He target. Line-averaged magnetic fields between 30 and 40 MG were observed.

  6. Edge Polynomial Fractal Compression Algorithm for High Quality Video Transmission. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Freddie

    1999-06-01

    In this final report, Physical Optics Corporation (POC) provides a review of its Edge Polynomial Autonomous Compression (EPAC) technology. This project was undertaken to meet the need for low bandwidth transmission of full-motion video images. In addition, this report offers a synopsis of the logical data representation study that was performed to compress still images and video. The mapping singularities and polynomial representation of 3-D surfaces were found to be ideal for very high image compression. Our efforts were then directed to extending the EPAC algorithm for the motion of singularities by tracking the 3-D coordinates of characteristic points and the development of system components. Finally, we describe the integration of the software with the hardware components. This process consists of acquiring and processing each separate camera view, combining the information from different cameras to calculate the location of an object in three dimensions, and tracking the information history and the behavior of the objects.

  7. Revealing compressed stops using high-momentum recoils

    DOE PAGES

    Macaluso, Sebastian; Park, Michael; Shih, David; Tweedie, Brock

    2016-03-22

    In this study, searches for supersymmetric top quarks at the LHC have been making great progress in pushing sensitivity out to higher mass, but are famously plagued by gaps in coverage around lower-mass regions where the decay phase space is closing off. Within the common stop-NLSP/neutralino-LSP simplified model, the line in the mass plane where there is just enough phase space to produce an on-shell top quark remains almost completely unconstrained. Here, we show that is possible to define searches capable of probing a large patch of this difficult region, with S/B ~ 1 and significances often well beyond 5σ.more » The basic strategy is to leverage the large energy gain of LHC Run 2, leading to a sizable population of stop pair events recoiling against a hard jet. The recoil not only re-establishes a ET, but also leads to a distinctive anti-correlation between the ET and the recoil jet transverse vectors when the stops decay all-hadronically. Accounting for jet combinatorics, backgrounds, and imperfections in ET measurements, we estimate that Run 2 will already start to close the gap in exclusion sensitivity with the first few 10s of fb–1. By 300 fb–1, exclusion sensitivity may extend from stop masses of 550 GeV on the high side down to below 200 GeV on the low side, approaching the “stealth” point at mt¯ = mt and potentially overlapping with limits from tt¯ cross section and spin correlation measurements.« less

  8. Revealing compressed stops using high-momentum recoils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macaluso, Sebastian; Park, Michael; Shih, David; Tweedie, Brock

    2016-03-01

    Searches for supersymmetric top quarks at the LHC have been making great progress in pushing sensitivity out to higher mass, but are famously plagued by gaps in coverage around lower-mass regions where the decay phase space is closing off. Within the common stop-NLSP/neutralino-LSP simplified model, the line in the mass plane where there is just enough phase space to produce an on-shell top quark remains almost completely unconstrained. Here, we show that is possible to define searches capable of probing a large patch of this difficult region, with S/B ˜ 1 and significances often well beyond 5 σ. The basic strategy is to leverage the large energy gain of LHC Run 2, leading to a sizable population of stop pair events recoiling against a hard jet. The recoil not only re-establishes a [InlineMediaObject not available: see fulltext.] signature, but also leads to a distinctive anti-correlation between the [InlineMediaObject not available: see fulltext.] and the recoil jet transverse vectors when the stops decay all-hadronically. Accounting for jet combinatorics, backgrounds, and imperfections in [InlineMediaObject not available: see fulltext.] measurements, we estimate that Run 2 will already start to close the gap in exclusion sensitivity with the first few 10s of fb-1. By 300 fb-1, exclusion sensitivity may extend from stop masses of 550 GeV on the high side down to below 200 GeV on the low side, approaching the "stealth" point at {m}_{overline{t}}={m}_t and potentially overlapping with limits from toverline{t} cross section and spin correlation measurements.

  9. Transverse vibrations of embedded nanowires under axial compression with high-order surface stress effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y. Q.; Pang, M.; Chen, W. Q.

    2015-02-01

    Implementing the high-order surface stress model into the Bernoulli-Euler beam theory, the transverse vibration of an axially compressed nanowire embedded in elastic medium is investigated. Closed-form expression is obtained for the natural frequency of a simply supported nanowire. The influences of compressive axial load, high-order surface stress and surrounding elastic medium on the natural frequency are discussed. Additionally, the analytical solution of axial buckling load for the simply supported nanowire is derived, which takes into account the effects of high-order surface stress and surrounding elastic medium. It is concluded from numerical results that the natural frequency of transverse vibration of the nanowire is dependent upon axial load, surrounding elastic medium, and high-order surface stress. Similarly, the dependences of the buckling load on surrounding elastic medium and high-order surface stress are significant.

  10. High-Power Multimode X-Band RF Pulse Compression System for Future Linear Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Tantawi, S.G.; Nantista, C.D.; Dolgashev, V.A.; Pearson, C.; Nelson, J.; Jobe, K.; Chan, J.; Fant, K.; Frisch, J.; Atkinson, D.; /LLNL, Livermore

    2005-08-10

    We present a multimode X-band rf pulse compression system suitable for a TeV-scale electron-positron linear collider such as the Next Linear Collider (NLC). The NLC main linac operating frequency is 11.424 GHz. A single NLC rf unit is required to produce 400 ns pulses with 475 MW of peak power. Each rf unit should power approximately 5 m of accelerator structures. The rf unit design consists of two 75 MW klystrons and a dual-moded resonant-delay-line pulse compression system that produces a flat output pulse. The pulse compression system components are all overmoded, and most components are designed to operate with two modes. This approach allows high-power-handling capability while maintaining a compact, inexpensive system. We detail the design of this system and present experimental cold test results. We describe the design and performance of various components. The high-power testing of the system is verified using four 50 MW solenoid-focused klystrons run off a common 400 kV solid-state modulator. The system has produced 400 ns rf pulses of greater than 500 MW. We present the layout of our system, which includes a dual-moded transmission waveguide system and a dual-moded resonant line (SLED-II) pulse compression system. We also present data on the processing and operation of this system, which has set high-power records in coherent and phase controlled pulsed rf.

  11. High-power multimode X-band rf pulse compression system for future linear colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tantawi, Sami G.; Nantista, Christopher D.; Dolgashev, Valery A.; Pearson, Chris; Nelson, Janice; Jobe, Keith; Chan, Jose; Fant, Karen; Frisch, Josef; Atkinson, Dennis

    2005-04-01

    We present a multimode X-band rf pulse compression system suitable for a TeV-scale electron-positron linear collider such as the Next Linear Collider (NLC). The NLC main linac operating frequency is 11.424 GHz. A single NLC rf unit is required to produce 400 ns pulses with 475 MW of peak power. Each rf unit should power approximately 5 m of accelerator structures. The rf unit design consists of two 75 MW klystrons and a dual-moded resonant-delay-line pulse compression system that produces a flat output pulse. The pulse compression system components are all overmoded, and most components are designed to operate with two modes. This approach allows high-power-handling capability while maintaining a compact, inexpensive system. We detail the design of this system and present experimental cold test results. We describe the design and performance of various components. The high-power testing of the system is verified using four 50 MW solenoid-focused klystrons run off a common 400 kV solid-state modulator. The system has produced 400 ns rf pulses of greater than 500 MW. We present the layout of our system, which includes a dual-moded transmission waveguide system and a dual-moded resonant line (SLED-II) pulse compression system. We also present data on the processing and operation of this system, which has set high-power records in coherent and phase controlled pulsed rf.

  12. "Brains before "Beauty"?" High Achieving Girls, School and Gender Identities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skelton, Christine; Francis, Becky; Read, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    In recent years educational policy on gender and achievement has concentrated on boys' underachievement, frequently comparing it with the academic success of girls. This has encouraged a perception of girls as the "winners" of the educational stakes and assumes that they no longer experience the kinds of gender inequalities identified in earlier…

  13. High-Achieving Middle Schools for Latino Students in Poverty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jesse, Dan; Davis, Alan; Pokorny, Nancy

    2004-01-01

    This study was conducted to examine the characteristics of middle schools in which Latino students from low-income families made substantial achievement gains. Nine schools in Texas were selected where Latino students had shown strong gains in the Texas Assessment of Academic Skills. Data from onsite interviews, focus groups, and documents were…

  14. Dominant Achievement Goals across Tracks in High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheltinga, Peter A. M.; Kuyper, Hans; Timmermans, Anneke C.; van der Werf, Greetje P. C.

    2016-01-01

    The dominant achievement goals (DAGs) of 7,008 students in the third grade of Dutch secondary education (US grade 9) were investigated, based on Elliot & McGregors' 2 × 2 framework (2001), in relation to track-level and motivational variables. We found the mastery-approach goal and the performance-approach goal, generally considered adaptive,…

  15. Success Despite Socioeconomics: A Case Study of a High-Achieving, High-Poverty School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tilley, Thomas Brent; Smith, Samuel J.; Claxton, Russell L.

    2012-01-01

    This case study of a high-achieving, high-poverty school describes the school's leadership, culture, and programs that contributed to its success. Data were collected from two surveys (the School Culture Survey and the Vanderbilt Assessment of Leadership in Education), observations at the school site, and interviews with school personnel. The…

  16. Parenting Style, Perfectionism, and Creativity in High-Ability and High-Achieving Young Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Angie L.; Lambert, Amber D.; Speirs Neumeister, Kristie L.

    2012-01-01

    The current study explores the potential relationships among perceived parenting style, perfectionism, and creativity in a high-ability and high-achieving young adult population. Using data from 323 honors college students at a Midwestern university, bivariate correlations suggested positive relationships between (a) permissive parenting style and…

  17. A high-order vertex-based central ENO finite-volume scheme for three-dimensional compressible flows

    DOE PAGES

    Charest, Marc R.J.; Canfield, Thomas R.; Morgan, Nathaniel R.; Waltz, Jacob; Wohlbier, John G.

    2015-03-11

    High-order discretization methods offer the potential to reduce the computational cost associated with modeling compressible flows. However, it is difficult to obtain accurate high-order discretizations of conservation laws that do not produce spurious oscillations near discontinuities, especially on multi-dimensional unstructured meshes. A novel, high-order, central essentially non-oscillatory (CENO) finite-volume method that does not have these difficulties is proposed for tetrahedral meshes. The proposed unstructured method is vertex-based, which differs from existing cell-based CENO formulations, and uses a hybrid reconstruction procedure that switches between two different solution representations. It applies a high-order k-exact reconstruction in smooth regions and a limited linearmore » reconstruction when discontinuities are encountered. Both reconstructions use a single, central stencil for all variables, making the application of CENO to arbitrary unstructured meshes relatively straightforward. The new approach was applied to the conservation equations governing compressible flows and assessed in terms of accuracy and computational cost. For all problems considered, which included various function reconstructions and idealized flows, CENO demonstrated excellent reliability and robustness. Up to fifth-order accuracy was achieved in smooth regions and essentially non-oscillatory solutions were obtained near discontinuities. The high-order schemes were also more computationally efficient for high-accuracy solutions, i.e., they took less wall time than the lower-order schemes to achieve a desired level of error. In one particular case, it took a factor of 24 less wall-time to obtain a given level of error with the fourth-order CENO scheme than to obtain the same error with the second-order scheme.« less

  18. A high-order vertex-based central ENO finite-volume scheme for three-dimensional compressible flows

    SciTech Connect

    Charest, Marc R.J.; Canfield, Thomas R.; Morgan, Nathaniel R.; Waltz, Jacob; Wohlbier, John G.

    2015-03-11

    High-order discretization methods offer the potential to reduce the computational cost associated with modeling compressible flows. However, it is difficult to obtain accurate high-order discretizations of conservation laws that do not produce spurious oscillations near discontinuities, especially on multi-dimensional unstructured meshes. A novel, high-order, central essentially non-oscillatory (CENO) finite-volume method that does not have these difficulties is proposed for tetrahedral meshes. The proposed unstructured method is vertex-based, which differs from existing cell-based CENO formulations, and uses a hybrid reconstruction procedure that switches between two different solution representations. It applies a high-order k-exact reconstruction in smooth regions and a limited linear reconstruction when discontinuities are encountered. Both reconstructions use a single, central stencil for all variables, making the application of CENO to arbitrary unstructured meshes relatively straightforward. The new approach was applied to the conservation equations governing compressible flows and assessed in terms of accuracy and computational cost. For all problems considered, which included various function reconstructions and idealized flows, CENO demonstrated excellent reliability and robustness. Up to fifth-order accuracy was achieved in smooth regions and essentially non-oscillatory solutions were obtained near discontinuities. The high-order schemes were also more computationally efficient for high-accuracy solutions, i.e., they took less wall time than the lower-order schemes to achieve a desired level of error. In one particular case, it took a factor of 24 less wall-time to obtain a given level of error with the fourth-order CENO scheme than to obtain the same error with the second-order scheme.

  19. Adaptive uniform grayscale coded aperture design for high dynamic range compressive spectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, Nelson; Rueda, Hoover; Arguello, Henry

    2016-05-01

    Imaging spectroscopy is an important area with many applications in surveillance, agriculture and medicine. The disadvantage of conventional spectroscopy techniques is that they collect the whole datacube. In contrast, compressive spectral imaging systems capture snapshot compressive projections, which are the input of reconstruction algorithms to yield the underlying datacube. Common compressive spectral imagers use coded apertures to perform the coded projections. The coded apertures are the key elements in these imagers since they define the sensing matrix of the system. The proper design of the coded aperture entries leads to a good quality in the reconstruction. In addition, the compressive measurements are prone to saturation due to the limited dynamic range of the sensor, hence the design of coded apertures must consider saturation. The saturation errors in compressive measurements are unbounded and compressive sensing recovery algorithms only provide solutions for bounded noise or bounded with high probability. In this paper it is proposed the design of uniform adaptive grayscale coded apertures (UAGCA) to improve the dynamic range of the estimated spectral images by reducing the saturation levels. The saturation is attenuated between snapshots using an adaptive filter which updates the entries of the grayscale coded aperture based on the previous snapshots. The coded apertures are optimized in terms of transmittance and number of grayscale levels. The advantage of the proposed method is the efficient use of the dynamic range of the image sensor. Extensive simulations show improvements in the image reconstruction of the proposed method compared with grayscale coded apertures (UGCA) and adaptive block-unblock coded apertures (ABCA) in up to 10 dB.

  20. Optical pulse compression using the combination of phase modulation and high-order dispersion compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Guo; Pan, Wei; Zou, Xihua

    2010-09-01

    Optical pulse compression using high-order dispersion compensation is proposed and theoretically analyzed. Firstly, the required dispersion profile for the high-order dispersion compensation is derived, according to the linear chirp and the nonlinear chirp of a phase-modulated continuous-wave (CW) laser source. With the use of the high-order dispersion compensation, such as the combination compensation of the second order dispersion (SOD) and the fourth order dispersion (FOD), an efficient pulse compression having a less time-bandwidth product and a greater peak power is realized. A sampled fiber Bragg grating (FBG) with both the SOD and the FOD is then designed using the equivalent chirp and the reconstruction algorithm. Finally, in the numerical simulation an optical pulse with a time-bandwidth product of 0.79 is generated via high-order dispersion compensation that is performed by using the sampled FBG.

  1. Response of thoracolumbar vertebral bodies to high rate compressive loading - biomed 2013.

    PubMed

    Dooley, C J; Wester, B A; Wing, I D; Voo, L M; Armiger, R S; Merkle, A C

    2013-01-01

    Underbody blast (UBB) events created by improvised explosive devices are threats to warfighter survivability. High intensity blast waves emitted from these devices transfer large forces through vehicle structures to occupants, often resulting in injuries including debilitating spinal fractures. The vertical loading vector through the spine generates significant compressive forces at high strain rates. To better understand injury mechanisms and ultimately better protect vehicle occupants against UBB attacks, high-fidelity computational models are being developed to predict the human response to dynamic loading characteristic of these events. This effort details the results from a series of 23 high-rate compression tests on vertebral body specimen. A high-rate servo-hydraulic test system applied a range of compressive loading rates (.01 mm/s to 1238 mm/s) to vertebral bodies in the thoracolumbar region (T7-L5). The force-deflection curves generated indicate rate dependent sensitivity of vertebral stiffness, ultimate load and ultimate deflection. Specimen subjected to high-rate dynamic loading to failure experienced critical structural damage at 5.5% ± 2.1% deflection. Compared to quasi-static loading, vertebral bodies had greater stiffness, greater force to failure, and lower ultimate failure deflection at high rates. Post-failure, an average loss in height of 15% was observed, along with a mean reduction in strength of 48%. The resulting data from these tests will allow for enhanced biofidelity of computational models by characterizing the vertebral stiffness response and ultimate deflection at rates representative of UBB events.

  2. High Strain Rate Compression of Martensitic NiTi Shape Memory Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Ying; Young, Marcus L.; Nie, Xu

    2015-09-01

    The compressive response of martensitic NiTi shape memory alloys (SMAs) under high strain rate (1200 s-1) was investigated on a modified Kolsky (Split Hopkinson) compression bar. The single-loading momentum trapping system ensures precise deformation control (1.4, 1.8, 3.0, 4.8, and 9.6 % strain) and single loading during dynamic compression. With increasing strain, the phase transformation peaks shift toward lower temperatures, while the intensities of these peaks decrease and eventually disappear completely at strains above 7 %, where the onset of plastic deformation of reoriented martensite occurs. All transformation peaks are recoverable after deformation simply by annealing at 873 K (600 °C) for 30 min, except those peaks corresponding to strains above 7 % (e.g., 9.6 %) which return upon annealing, but at a lower temperature. XRD results showed the variation of the strongest diffraction peak from (1bar{1}1) to (111) crystal plane before and after high strain rate compression.

  3. Strength of Tantalum at High Pressures through Richtmyer-Meshkov Laser Compression Experiments and Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, Kristen Kathleen

    agreement between the data from the simulations and the experiments. The peak growth factors from the simulations and the experiments are within 10% agreement. For the multimode simulations, the goal is to assist in the design of the laser driven experiments using the Omega laser. A series of three-mode and four-mode patterns are simulated at various energies and the resulting growth of the RM instability is computed. Based on the results of the simulations, a configuration is selected for the multimode experiments. These simulations also serve as validation for the constitutive model and the material parameters for tantalum that are used in the simulations. By designing samples with initial perturbations in the form of single-mode and multimode ripples and subjecting these samples to high pressures, the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability is investigated in both laser compression experiments and simulations. By correlating the growth of these ripples to measures of strength, a better understanding of the strength of tantalum at high pressures is achieved.

  4. Effects of fast-acting high-frequency compression on the intelligibility of speech in steady and fluctuating background sounds.

    PubMed

    Stone, M A; Moore, B C; Wojtczak, M; Gudgin, E

    1997-08-01

    This study examines whether speech intelligibility in background sounds can be improved for persons with loudness recruitment by the use of fast-acting compression applied at high frequencies, when the overall level of the sounds is held constant by means of a slow-acting automatic gain control (AGC) system and when appropriate frequency-response shaping is applied. Two types of fast-acting compression were used in the high-frequency channel of a two-channel system: a compression limiter with a 10:1 compression ratio and with a compression threshold about 9 dB below the peak level of the signal in the high-frequency channel; and a wide dynamic range compressor with a 2:1 compression ratio and with the compression threshold about 24 dB below the peak level of the signal in the high-frequency channel. A condition with linear processing in the high-frequency channel was also used. Speech reception thresholds (SRTs) were measured for two background sounds: a steady speech-shaped noise and a single male talker. All subjects had moderate-to-severe sensorineural hearing loss. Three different types of speech material were used: the adaptive sentence lists (ASL), the Bamford-Kowal-Bench (BKB) sentence lists and the Boothroyd word lists. For the steady background noise, the compression generally led to poorer performance than for the linear condition, although the deleterious effect was only significant for the 10:1 compression ratio. For the background of a single talker, the compression had no significant effect except for the ASL sentences, where the 10:1 compression gave significantly better performance than the linear condition. Overall, the results did not show any clear benefits of the fast-acting compression, possibly because the slow-acting AGC allowed the use of gains in the linear condition that were markedly higher than would normally be used with linear hearing aids.

  5. Application specific compression : final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Melgaard, David Kennett; Byrne, Raymond Harry; Myers, Daniel S.; Harrison, Carol D.; Lee, David S.; Lewis, Phillip J.; Carlson, Jeffrey J.

    2008-12-01

    With the continuing development of more capable data gathering sensors, comes an increased demand on the bandwidth for transmitting larger quantities of data. To help counteract that trend, a study was undertaken to determine appropriate lossy data compression strategies for minimizing their impact on target detection and characterization. The survey of current compression techniques led us to the conclusion that wavelet compression was well suited for this purpose. Wavelet analysis essentially applies a low-pass and high-pass filter to the data, converting the data into the related coefficients that maintain spatial information as well as frequency information. Wavelet compression is achieved by zeroing the coefficients that pertain to the noise in the signal, i.e. the high frequency, low amplitude portion. This approach is well suited for our goal because it reduces the noise in the signal with only minimal impact on the larger, lower frequency target signatures. The resulting coefficients can then be encoded using lossless techniques with higher compression levels because of the lower entropy and significant number of zeros. No significant signal degradation or difficulties in target characterization or detection were observed or measured when wavelet compression was applied to simulated and real data, even when over 80% of the coefficients were zeroed. While the exact level of compression will be data set dependent, for the data sets we studied, compression factors over 10 were found to be satisfactory where conventional lossless techniques achieved levels of less than 3.

  6. Dynamic Range Enhancement of High-Speed Electrical Signal Data via Non-Linear Compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laun, Matthew C. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Systems and methods for high-speed compression of dynamic electrical signal waveforms to extend the measuring capabilities of conventional measuring devices such as oscilloscopes and high-speed data acquisition systems are discussed. Transfer function components and algorithmic transfer functions can be used to accurately measure signals that are within the frequency bandwidth but beyond the voltage range and voltage resolution capabilities of the measuring device.

  7. High dose compressive loads attenuate bone mineral loss in humans with spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Dudley-Javoroski, S.; Saha, P. K.; Liang, G.; Li, C.; Gao, Z.

    2012-01-01

    Summary People with spinal cord injury (SCI) lose bone and muscle integrity after their injury. Early doses of stress, applied through electrically induced muscle contractions, preserved bone density at high-risk sites. Appropriately prescribed stress early after the injury may be an important consideration to prevent bone loss after SCI. Introduction Skeletal muscle force can deliver high compressive loads to bones of people with spinal cord injury (SCI). The effective osteogenic dose of load for the distal femur, a chief site of fracture, is unknown. The purpose of this study is to compare three doses of bone compressive loads at the distal femur in individuals with complete SCI who receive a novel stand training intervention. Methods Seven participants performed unilateral quadriceps stimulation in supported stance [150% body weight (BW) compressive load—“High Dose” while opposite leg received 40% BW—“Low Dose”]. Five participants stood passively without applying quadriceps electrical stimulation to either leg (40% BW load—“Low Dose”). Fifteen participants performed no standing (0% BW load—“Untrained”) and 14 individuals without SCI provided normative data. Participants underwent bone mineral density (BMD) assessment between one and six times over a 3-year training protocol. Results BMD for the High Dose group significantly exceeded BMD for both the Low Dose and the Untrained groups (p<0.05). No significant difference existed between the Low Dose and Untrained groups (p>0.05), indicating that BMD for participants performing passive stance did not differ from individuals who performed no standing. High-resolution CT imaging of one High Dose participant revealed 86% higher BMD and 67% higher trabecular width in the High Dose limb. Conclusion Over 3 years of training, 150% BW compressive load in upright stance significantly attenuated BMD decline when compared to passive standing or to no standing. High-resolution CT indicated that

  8. A Novel Blasted and Grooved Low Profile Pedicle Screw Able to Resist High Compression Bending Loads

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Sung; Choi, Hong-June; Kim, Kyung-Hyun; Park, Jeong-Yoon; Jeong, Hyun-Yong; Chin, Dong-Kyu; Kim, Keun-Su; Yoon, Young-Sul; Lee, Yoon-Chul; Cho, Yong-Eun

    2012-01-01

    Objective Polyaxial pedicle screws are a safe, useful adjunct to transpedicular fixation. However, the large screw head size can cause soft tissue irritation, high rod positioning, and facet joint injury. However, the mechanical resistance provided by small and low profile pedicle screws is very limited. We therefore developed a novel, low profile pedicle screw using grooving and blasting treatment that is able to resist a high compression bending load. Methods We evaluated the compression bending force to displacement and yield loads for seven different screw head types that differed with regard to their groove intervals and whether or not they had been blasted. Results The rank order of screw types that had the greatest compression bending force to displacement was as follows: (1) universal polyaxial, (2) low polyaxial with 0.1mm grooves and blasting, (3) low polyaxial with blasting, (4) low polyaxial with 0.15mm grooves and blasting, (5) low polyaxial with 0.05mm grooves and blasting, (6) low polyaxial with 0.05mm grooves, (7) and low polyaxial. Low polyaxial screws with 0.1mm grooves and blasting had the maximum yield load and highest compression bending force to displacement of all seven polyaxial screw head systems evaluated. Conclusion Blasting and grooving treatment of pedicle screw heads resulted in screw heads with a high yield load and compression bending force relative to displacement because of increased friction. Low polyaxial pedicle screws with 0.1 mm grooves treated by blasting have mechanical characteristics similar to those of universal polyaxial pedicle screws. PMID:25983790

  9. Effects of high-frequency emphasis and compression time constants on speech intelligibility in noise.

    PubMed

    van Toor, Thijs; Verschuure, Hans

    2002-10-01

    The objectives of the study were to evaluate the effect of different settings with regard to speech intelligibility in noise both objectively and subjectively and thus determine a favoured setting of compression time parameters, pre-set program (high-frequency emphasis) or combination for each individual user in a prospective study. Another objective was to evaluate the relationship between patient characteristics (e.g. slope of hearing loss) and favoured settings. In total, 38 subjects divided over five audiological centres were fitted with the Philips Spaceline D71-40 BTE digital hearing aid. Subjects were asked to compare three predefined compression algorithms with different time constants, slow (indicated by the manufacturer as AVC), intermediate (NORMAL) and fast (SYLLABIC) over two 4-week periods using the intermediate setting in both comparisons and randomizing over the fast and slow conditions. A randomization determined whether a subject started with the comfort-oriented pre-set program (AUTO) or the speech intelligibility-oriented setting with high-frequency emphasis (SPIN). In a third 4-week period, the pre-sets AUTO and SPIN were compared using the setting of the compression time constants that gave the best results during the first two periods. Comparisons were made using a standard speech-in-noise test with three types of noise: continuous speaker noise, modulated ICRA-4 noise, and car noise. The patients were also asked to fill in a Dutch translation and adaptation of the APHAB questionnaire to indicate their impression of performance. The results indicate that no compression algorithm, pre-set or combination is favoured overall. The largest improvement in speech-in-noise scores was found with syllabic compression. The advantageous effect of high-frequency emphasis after optimization of compression timing is small. The APHAB showed that users tend to prefer the SPIN setting. We found no relationship between favoured compression or pre-set and the

  10. High-energy synchrotron X-ray radiography of shock-compressed materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutherford, Michael E.; Chapman, David J.; Collinson, Mark A.; Jones, David R.; Music, Jasmina; Stafford, Samuel J. P.; Tear, Gareth R.; White, Thomas G.; Winters, John B. R.; Drakopoulos, Michael; Eakins, Daniel E.

    2015-06-01

    This presentation will discuss the development and application of a high-energy (50 to 250 keV) synchrotron X-ray imaging method to study shock-compressed, high-Z samples at Beamline I12 at the Diamond Light Source synchrotron (Rutherford-Appleton Laboratory, UK). Shock waves are driven into materials using a portable, single-stage gas gun designed by the Institute of Shock Physics. Following plate impact, material deformation is probed in-situ by white-beam X-ray radiography and complimentary velocimetry diagnostics. The high energies, large beam size (13 x 13 mm), and appreciable sample volumes (~ 1 cm3) viable for study at Beamline I12 compliment existing in-house pulsed X-ray capabilities and studies at the Dynamic Compression Sector. The authors gratefully acknowledge the ongoing support of Imperial College London, EPSRC, STFC and the Diamond Light Source, and AWE Plc.

  11. Design and fabrication of hollow-core photonic crystal fibers for high-power ultrashort pulse transportation and pulse compression.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y Y; Peng, Xiang; Alharbi, M; Dutin, C Fourcade; Bradley, T D; Gérôme, F; Mielke, Michael; Booth, Timothy; Benabid, F

    2012-08-01

    We report on the recent design and fabrication of kagome-type hollow-core photonic crystal fibers for the purpose of high-power ultrashort pulse transportation. The fabricated seven-cell three-ring hypocycloid-shaped large core fiber exhibits an up-to-date lowest attenuation (among all kagome fibers) of 40 dB/km over a broadband transmission centered at 1500 nm. We show that the large core size, low attenuation, broadband transmission, single-mode guidance, and low dispersion make it an ideal host for high-power laser beam transportation. By filling the fiber with helium gas, a 74 μJ, 850 fs, and 40 kHz repetition rate ultrashort pulse at 1550 nm has been faithfully delivered at the fiber output with little propagation pulse distortion. Compression of a 105 μJ laser pulse from 850 fs down to 300 fs has been achieved by operating the fiber in ambient air.

  12. Design and fabrication of hollow-core photonic crystal fibers for high power fast laser beam transportation and pulse compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y. Y.; Peng, Xiang; Alharbi, M.; Dutin, C. F.; Bradley, T. D.; Mielke, Michael; Booth, Timothy; Benabid, F.

    2012-03-01

    We report on recent design and fabrication of Kagome type hollow-core photonic crystal fiber (HC-PCF) for the purpose of high power fast laser beam transportation. The fabricated seven-cell three-ring hypocycloid-shaped large core fiber exhibits an up-to-date lowest attenuation (among all Kagome fibers) of 40dB/km over a broadband transmission centered at 1500nm. We show that the large core size, low attenuation, broadband transmission, single modedness, low dispersion and relatively low banding loss makes it an ideal host for high power laser beam transportation. By filling the fiber with helium gas, a 74μJ, 850fs and 40kHz repetition rate ultra-short pulse at 1550nm has been faithfully delivered with little propagation pulse distortion. Compression of a 105μJ laser pulse from 850fs to 300fs has been achieved by operating the fiber in ambient air.

  13. Texture formation in orthorhombic alpha-uranium under simple compression and rolling to high strains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zecevic, Miroslav; Knezevic, Marko; Beyerlein, Irene J.; McCabe, Rodney J.

    2016-05-01

    We study the mechanical response and texture evolution of alpha-uranium during simple compression and rolling at 573 K. In order to determine the underlying mechanisms governing plasticity and texture formation, we perform detailed characterizations using electron backscattered diffraction and constitutive modeling using a dislocation-density based hardening law within a visco-plastic self-consistent homogenization. We show that the model achieves good agreement with experimental measurements in terms of texture and stress-strain response. From detailed comparison of experimental and modeling results, we infer that in both through-thickness compression (TTC) and rolling at 573K, the active slip modes are floor slip (001)[100] and chimney slip 1 / 2 { 110 } < 1 1 bar 0 > with slightly different ratios. However, { 130 } < 3 1 bar 0 > twinning is not active in TTC compression but profuse during rolling. Further analysis indicates that during rolling, floor slip (001)[100] results in the formation of two pronounced (001) texture peaks tilted 10-15° away from the normal toward the rolling direction.

  14. Spectral analysis based on compressive sensing in nanophotonic structures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhu; Yu, Zongfu

    2014-10-20

    A method of spectral sensing based on compressive sensing is shown to have the potential to achieve high resolution in a compact device size. The random bases used in compressive sensing are created by the optical response of a set of different nanophotonic structures, such as photonic crystal slabs. The complex interferences in these nanostructures offer diverse spectral features suitable for compressive sensing.

  15. Formation of compressed flat electron beams with high transverse-emittance ratios

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, J.; Piot, P.; Mihalcea, D.; Prokop, C. R.

    2014-08-01

    Flat beams—beams with asymmetric transverse emittances—have important applications in novel light-source concepts and advanced-acceleration schemes and could possibly alleviate the need for damping rings in lepton colliders. Over the last decade, a flat beam generation technique based on the conversion of an angular-momentum-dominated beam was proposed and experimentally tested. In this paper we explore the production of compressed flat beams. We especially investigate and optimize the flat beam transformation for beams with substantial fractional energy spread. We use as a simulation example the photoinjector of Fermilab’s Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator. The optimizations of the flat beam generation and compression at Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator were done via start-to-end numerical simulations for bunch charges of 3.2 nC, 1.0 nC, and 20 pC at ~37 MeV. The optimized emittances of flat beams with different bunch charges were found to be 0.25 μm (emittance ratio is ~400), 0.13 μm, 15 nm before compression, and 0.41 μm, 0.20 μm, 16 nm after full compression, respectively, with peak currents as high as 5.5 kA for a 3.2-nC flat beam. These parameters are consistent with requirements needed to excite wakefields in asymmetric dielectric-lined waveguides or produce significant photon flux using small-gap micro-undulators.

  16. DSP accelerator for the wavelet compression/decompression of high- resolution images

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, M.A.; Gleason, S.S.; Jatko, W.B.

    1993-07-23

    A Texas Instruments (TI) TMS320C30-based S-Bus digital signal processing (DSP) module was used to accelerate a wavelet-based compression and decompression algorithm applied to high-resolution fingerprint images. The law enforcement community, together with the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NISI), is adopting a standard based on the wavelet transform for the compression, transmission, and decompression of scanned fingerprint images. A two-dimensional wavelet transform of the input image is computed. Then spatial/frequency regions are automatically analyzed for information content and quantized for subsequent Huffman encoding. Compression ratios range from 10:1 to 30:1 while maintaining the level of image quality necessary for identification. Several prototype systems were developed using SUN SPARCstation 2 with a 1280 {times} 1024 8-bit display, 64-Mbyte random access memory (RAM), Tiber distributed data interface (FDDI), and Spirit-30 S-Bus DSP-accelerators from Sonitech. The final implementation of the DSP-accelerated algorithm performed the compression or decompression operation in 3.5 s per print. Further increases in system throughput were obtained by adding several DSP accelerators operating in parallel.

  17. Relationship between High School Mathematical Achievement and Quantitative GPA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Jennifer L.; Halpin, Glennelle; Halpin, Gerald

    2015-01-01

    The demand for STEM graduates has increased, but the number of incoming freshmen who declare a STEM major has remained stagnant. High school courses, such as calculus, can open or close the gate for students interested in careers in STEM. The purpose of this study was to determine if high school mathematics preparation was a significant…

  18. Relationships among Stress, Coping, and Mental Health in High-Achieving High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suldo, Shannon M.; Shaunessy, Elizabeth; Hardesty, Robin

    2008-01-01

    This study investigates the relationships among stress, coping, and mental health in 139 students participating in an International Baccalaureate (IB) high school diploma program. Mental health was assessed using both positive indicators (life satisfaction, academic achievement, academic self-efficacy) and negative indicators (psychopathology) of…

  19. The Information Search Process of High-, Middle-, and Low-Achieving High School Seniors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuhlthau, Carol C.

    1989-01-01

    Presents a model of the information search process as a complex series of stages involving thoughts and feelings as well as actions. A study that sought to verify the model using high school seniors from three different achievement levels is described, and the implications for library instruction are discussed. (five references) (CLB)

  20. The Strengths of High-Achieving Black High School Students in a Racially Diverse Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marsh, Kris; Chaney, Cassandra; Jones, Derrick

    2012-01-01

    Robert Hill (1972) identified strengths of Black families: strong kinship bonds, strong work orientation, adaptability of family roles, high achievement orientation, and religious orientation. Some suggest these strengths sustain the physical, emotional, social, and spiritual needs of Blacks. This study used narratives and survey data from a…

  1. Examining Organizational Practices That Predict Persistence among High-Achieving Black Males in High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Kenneth Alonzo

    2016-01-01

    Background/Context: This article summarizes an increasing trend of antideficit Black male research in mathematics and highlights opportunities to add to the research. A review of the literature shows that antideficit researchers often examine relationships between individual traits and persistence of high-achieving Black males in mathematics.…

  2. High Order Entropy-Constrained Residual VQ for Lossless Compression of Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kossentini, Faouzi; Smith, Mark J. T.; Scales, Allen

    1995-01-01

    High order entropy coding is a powerful technique for exploiting high order statistical dependencies. However, the exponentially high complexity associated with such a method often discourages its use. In this paper, an entropy-constrained residual vector quantization method is proposed for lossless compression of images. The method consists of first quantizing the input image using a high order entropy-constrained residual vector quantizer and then coding the residual image using a first order entropy coder. The distortion measure used in the entropy-constrained optimization is essentially the first order entropy of the residual image. Experimental results show very competitive performance.

  3. Japanese High School Entrance Examinations and Scholastic Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Togashi, Yutaka

    1985-01-01

    The Japanese high school entrance examinations were examined in detail for social studies, mathematics, and science test items. Most items measured knowledge and comprehension rather than synthesis, analysis, or scientific thinking. Implications for middle school instruction were discussed. (GDC)

  4. Practically Perfect in Every Way: Can Reframing Perfectionism for High-Achieving Undergraduates Impact Academic Resilience?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickinson, Mary J.; Dickinson, David A. G.

    2015-01-01

    This study focuses on a pan-disciplinary scheme that targeted high-achieving undergraduate students. Earlier research from the scheme argued that high achievers have discernibly different learning and personal development support needs. One of the most frequent self-reported challenges within this high-achieving group is perfectionism. This…

  5. Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian methods for modeling high-speed compressible multimaterial flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barlow, Andrew J.; Maire, Pierre-Henri; Rider, William J.; Rieben, Robert N.; Shashkov, Mikhail J.

    2016-10-01

    This paper reviews recent developments in Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) methods for modeling high speed compressible multimaterial flows in complex geometry on general polygonal meshes. We only consider the indirect ALE approach which consists of three key stages: a Lagrangian stage, in which the solution and the computational mesh are updated; a rezoning stage, in which the nodes of the computational mesh are moved to improve grid quality; and a remapping stage, in which the Lagrangian solution is transferred to the rezoned mesh.

  6. High Order Approximations for Compressible Fluid Dynamics on Unstructured and Cartesian Meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barth, Timothy (Editor); Deconinck, Herman (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    The development of high-order accurate numerical discretization techniques for irregular domains and meshes is often cited as one of the remaining challenges facing the field of computational fluid dynamics. In structural mechanics, the advantages of high-order finite element approximation are widely recognized. This is especially true when high-order element approximation is combined with element refinement (h-p refinement). In computational fluid dynamics, high-order discretization methods are infrequently used in the computation of compressible fluid flow. The hyperbolic nature of the governing equations and the presence of solution discontinuities makes high-order accuracy difficult to achieve. Consequently, second-order accurate methods are still predominately used in industrial applications even though evidence suggests that high-order methods may offer a way to significantly improve the resolution and accuracy for these calculations. To address this important topic, a special course was jointly organized by the Applied Vehicle Technology Panel of NATO's Research and Technology Organization (RTO), the von Karman Institute for Fluid Dynamics, and the Numerical Aerospace Simulation Division at the NASA Ames Research Center. The NATO RTO sponsored course entitled "Higher Order Discretization Methods in Computational Fluid Dynamics" was held September 14-18, 1998 at the von Karman Institute for Fluid Dynamics in Belgium and September 21-25, 1998 at the NASA Ames Research Center in the United States. During this special course, lecturers from Europe and the United States gave a series of comprehensive lectures on advanced topics related to the high-order numerical discretization of partial differential equations with primary emphasis given to computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Additional consideration was given to topics in computational physics such as the high-order discretization of the Hamilton-Jacobi, Helmholtz, and elasticity equations. This volume consists

  7. CO2 laser scribe of chemically strengthened glass with high surface compressive stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xinghua; Vaddi, Butchi R.

    2011-03-01

    Chemically strengthened glass is finding increasing use in handheld, IT and TV cover glass applications. Chemically strengthened glass, particularly with high (>600MPa) compressive stress (CS) and deeper depth of layer (DOL), enable to retain higher strength after damage than non-strengthened glass when its surface is abraded. Corning Gorilla® Glass has particularly proven to be advantageous over competition in this attribute. However, due to high compressive stress (CS) and Central Tension (CT) cutting ion-exchanged glass is extremely difficult and often unmanageable where ever the applications require dicing the chemically strengthened mother glass into smaller parts. We at Corning have developed a CO2 laser scribe and break method (LSB) to separate a single chemically strengthened glass sheet into plurality of devices. Furthermore, CO2 laser scribe and break method enables debris-free separation of glass with high edge strength due to its mirror-like edge finish. We have investigated laser scribe and break of chemically strengthened glass with surface compressive stress greater than 600 MPa. In this paper we present the results of CO2 scribe and break method and underlying laser scribing mechanisms. We demonstrated cross-scribe repetitively on GEN 2 size chemically strengthened glass substrates. Specimens for edge strength measurements of different thickness and CS/DOL glass were prepared using the laser scribe and break technique. The specimens were tested using the standard 4-point bend method and the results are presented.

  8. Anomalous anisotropic compression behavior of superconducting CrAs under high pressure.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhenhai; Wu, Wei; Hu, Qingyang; Zhao, Jinggeng; Li, Chunyu; Yang, Ke; Cheng, Jinguang; Luo, Jianlin; Wang, Lin; Mao, Ho-Kwang

    2015-12-01

    CrAs was observed to possess the bulk superconductivity under high-pressure conditions. To understand the superconducting mechanism and explore the correlation between the structure and superconductivity, the high-pressure structural evolution of CrAs was investigated using the angle-dispersive X-ray diffraction (XRD) method. The structure of CrAs remains stable up to 1.8 GPa, whereas the lattice parameters exhibit anomalous compression behaviors. With increasing pressure, the lattice parameters a and c both demonstrate a nonmonotonic change, and the lattice parameter b undergoes a rapid contraction at ∼ 0.18-0.35 GPa, which suggests that a pressure-induced isostructural phase transition occurs in CrAs. Above the phase transition pressure, the axial compressibilities of CrAs present remarkable anisotropy. A schematic band model was used to address the anomalous compression behavior of CrAs. The present results shed light on the structural and related electronic responses to high pressure, which play a key role toward understanding the superconductivity of CrAs.

  9. Anomalous anisotropic compression behavior of superconducting CrAs under high pressure

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Zhenhai; Wu, Wei; Hu, Qingyang; Zhao, Jinggeng; Li, Chunyu; Yang, Ke; Cheng, Jinguang; Luo, Jianlin; Wang, Lin; Mao, Ho-kwang

    2015-01-01

    CrAs was observed to possess the bulk superconductivity under high-pressure conditions. To understand the superconducting mechanism and explore the correlation between the structure and superconductivity, the high-pressure structural evolution of CrAs was investigated using the angle-dispersive X-ray diffraction (XRD) method. The structure of CrAs remains stable up to 1.8 GPa, whereas the lattice parameters exhibit anomalous compression behaviors. With increasing pressure, the lattice parameters a and c both demonstrate a nonmonotonic change, and the lattice parameter b undergoes a rapid contraction at ∼0.18−0.35 GPa, which suggests that a pressure-induced isostructural phase transition occurs in CrAs. Above the phase transition pressure, the axial compressibilities of CrAs present remarkable anisotropy. A schematic band model was used to address the anomalous compression behavior of CrAs. The present results shed light on the structural and related electronic responses to high pressure, which play a key role toward understanding the superconductivity of CrAs. PMID:26627230

  10. Achieving high-value cardiac imaging: challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Wiener, David H

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac imaging is under intense scrutiny as a contributor to health care costs, with multiple initiatives under way to reduce and eliminate inappropriate testing. Appropriate use criteria are valuable guides to selecting imaging studies but until recently have focused on the test rather than the patient. Patient-centered means are needed to define the true value of imaging for patients in specific clinical situations. This article provides a definition of high-value cardiac imaging. A paradigm to judge the efficacy of echocardiography in the absence of randomized controlled trials is presented. Candidate clinical scenarios are proposed in which echocardiography constitutes high-value imaging, as well as stratagems to increase the likelihood that high-value cardiac imaging takes place in those circumstances.

  11. Achieving high CRI from warm to super white

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Edward; Tormey, Ellen S.

    2007-09-01

    Light sources which produce a high color rendering index (CRI) have many applications in the lighting industry today. High color rendering accents the rich color which abounds in nature, interior design, theatrical costumes and props, clothing and fabric, jewelry, and machine vision applications. Multi-wavelength LED sources can pump phosphors at multiple stokes shift emission regimes and when combined with selected direct emission sources can allow for greater flexibility in the production of warm-white and cool white light of specialty interest. Unique solutions to R8 and R14 CRI >95 at 2850K, 4750K, 5250K, and 6750K presented.

  12. Community Schools Seek to Improve High School Achievement, College Readiness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilroy, Marilyn

    2011-01-01

    The Coalition for Community Schools, an alliance of more than 150 national, state, and local organizations, is bringing public schools in partnership with community resources to improve student success. While that might seem like an abstract idea, it has very concrete goals, such as boosting high school graduation rates and college readiness.…

  13. High-Achieving Schools Put Equity Front and Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gleason, Sonia Caus; Gerzon, Nancy

    2014-01-01

    How does professional learning look and feel in high-poverty schools where every student makes at least one year's worth of progress every year? How do schools and leaders put all the varied components of professional learning together so that they support all students learning every day? What professional learning grounds and sustains…

  14. Organizational Citizenship of Faculty and Achievement of High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiPaola, Michael F.; Hoy, Wayne K.

    2005-01-01

    All successful organizations, including successful high schools, have employees who go beyond their formal job responsibilities and freely give of their time and energy to succeed. Organ was the first to use the phrase "organizational citizenship behavior" (OCB) to denote organizationally beneficial behavior of workers that was not prescribed but…

  15. Academic Dishonesty among Gifted and High-Achieving Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geddes, Kimberly A.

    2011-01-01

    Gifted high school students are essentially absent in the research concerning academic integrity; however, over the past few years, educators of gifted students have noticed an increase in the occurrences of academic dishonesty among students in gifted classrooms (Abilock, 2009). This research may be analyzed to provide some insight into the…

  16. Vocational Interests of Intellectually Gifted and Highly Achieving Young Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vock, Miriam; Koller, Olaf; Nagy, Gabriel

    2013-01-01

    Background: Vocational interests play a central role in the vocational decision-making process and are decisive for the later job satisfaction and vocational success. Based on Ackerman's (1996) notion of "trait complexes," specific interest profiles of gifted high-school graduates can be expected. Aims: Vocational interests of gifted and highly…

  17. Common Core and America's High-Achieving Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plucker, Jonathan A.

    2015-01-01

    While the merit and politics of the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) have been much debated and discussed, one topic has been virtually ignored: What do the standards portend for America's high-ability students? This brief addresses that question and provides guidance for CCSS-implementing districts and schools as they seek to help these…

  18. The Relationship between Highly Qualified Teachers and Student Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macken, Sherry Lou

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between the percentage of highly qualified teachers and standardized measures of student proficiency in the core academic subjects of mathematics, reading, science, social studies, and writing. Signed into law in January of 2002 by President George W. Bush, the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act requires teachers…

  19. More High-Achieving Students Are Choosing Community Colleges First

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pluviose, David

    2008-01-01

    Certainly, "Tonight Show" host Jay Leno has nurtured the perception that community colleges are a punishment for underperforming high school students by joking that community colleges aren't "real colleges." This article shows that this perception belies the reality that contemporary community colleges serve students seeking trade skills but also…

  20. Park View High School: A World of Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Principal Leadership, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Entering the lobby of Park View High School in Sterling, VA, is like entering another world. The diversity in the student body is reflected in flags from 63 of the 80 countries that are represented in the student population, and in a special project for Hispanic Heritage Month, which covers the walls of an entire hallway. The school walls,…

  1. Testing Theories of Learning: Effects on High School Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keith, Timothy Z.; Cool, Valerie A.

    Theories of school learning consistently point to variables such as ability, time (e.g., homework), quality of instruction, motivation, and academic coursework as important influences on learning. In this study, path analysis was used to test the direct and indirect effects of these variables on high school learning, with learning measured by both…

  2. Gender, Student Motivation and Academic Achievement in a Midsized Wisconsin High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lutzke, Steven Ronald

    2013-01-01

    This mixed-methods study investigated relationships among gender, academic motivation and achievement in a mid-sized Wisconsin high school. A questionnaire was developed that focused on perceived ability, achievement motives and achievement goals. Interviews with teachers focused on relationships among academic motivation and gender achievement.…

  3. Impact of learning orientation on African American children's attitudes toward high-achieving peers.

    PubMed

    Marryshow, Derrick; Hurley, Eric A; Allen, Brenda A; Tyler, Kenneth M; Boykin, A Wade

    2005-01-01

    This study examined Ogbu's widely accepted thesis that African American students reject high academic achievement because they perceive its limited utility in a world where their upward mobility is constrained by racial discrimination. Boykin's psychosocial integrity model contends that Black students value high achievement but that discrepancies between their formative cultural experiences and those imposed in school lead them to reject the modes of achievement available in classrooms. Ninety Black children completed a measure of attitudes toward students who achieve via mainstream or African American cultural values. Participants rejected the mainstream achievers and embraced the African American cultural achievers. Moreover, they expected their teachers to embrace the mainstream achievers and reject those who achieved through high-verve behavior. Results suggest that Boykin's thesis is a needed refinement to Ogbu's ideas. They indicate that Black children may reject not high achievement but some of the mainstream cultural values and behaviors on which success in mainstream classrooms is made contingent.

  4. Investigation of compressive membrane action in ultra high performance concrete slab strips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foust, Bradley Wade

    Reinforced concrete slabs are found in very common structural systems in both civilian and military applications. The boundary conditions that support the slab play an important role in the response to a particular load. Specifically, the amount of lateral and rotational restraint dictates how a slab responds to a particular load. Compressive membrane (i.e., in-plane) forces are present in slabs when the boundaries are sufficiently stiff, therefore restricting the slab from both lateral translations and rotations. Advancements have been made to account for the additional capacity due to compressive membrane forces in conventional strength concrete. In today's world, concrete performance is improving because of increasing compressive strengths and additional ductility present in concrete members. As a result of this current improvement, there is an urgent need to investigate compressive membrane theory in ultra-high-performance concrete (UHPC) slabs to better understand their behavior. Existing compressive membrane theory should be revisited to determine if current theory is applicable, or if it is not, what modifications should be made. This study will provide insight into the validity of existing theory that is currently used to predict the ultimate capacity in conventional-strength concrete slabs and attempt to modify the existing equations to account for high-strength concrete materials. A matrix of 14 normal-strength concrete (NSC) and 13 UHPC slabs was tested both statically and dynamically to better understand the behavior of each material set and the effects that boundary conditions have on slab response. The results from these experiments were then compared to response calculations made from existing theory as well as finite element analyses. Valuable data sets on rigidly restrained UHPC slab response were obtained through an experimental research program. The experiments helped to validate the associated numerical analysis that was performed. It was

  5. Principals’ Perception of Influence on Factors Affecting Student Achievement in Low- and High-Achieving Urban High Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloom, Collette M.; Owens, Emiel W.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to compare and contrast influences principals have on staffing, curriculum issues, and discipline policies in high- and low-performing urban high schools. The data for the present study were drawn from the first year follow up of the Educational Longitudinal Survey of 2002-2004 (ELS: 02), administered by the National…

  6. A perspective on the range of gasoline compression ignition combustion strategies for high engine efficiency and low NOx and soot emissions: Effects of in-cylinder fuel stratification

    DOE PAGES

    Dempsey, Adam B.; Curran, Scott J.; Wagner, Robert M.

    2016-01-14

    Many research studies have shown that low temperature combustion in compression ignition engines has the ability to yield ultra-low NOx and soot emissions while maintaining high thermal efficiency. To achieve low temperature combustion, sufficient mixing time between the fuel and air in a globally dilute environment is required, thereby avoiding fuel-rich regions and reducing peak combustion temperatures, which significantly reduces soot and NOx formation, respectively. It has been demonstrated that achieving low temperature combustion with diesel fuel over a wide range of conditions is difficult because of its properties, namely, low volatility and high chemical reactivity. On the contrary, gasolinemore » has a high volatility and low chemical reactivity, meaning it is easier to achieve the amount of premixing time required prior to autoignition to achieve low temperature combustion. In order to achieve low temperature combustion while meeting other constraints, such as low pressure rise rates and maintaining control over the timing of combustion, in-cylinder fuel stratification has been widely investigated for gasoline low temperature combustion engines. The level of fuel stratification is, in reality, a continuum ranging from fully premixed (i.e. homogeneous charge of fuel and air) to heavily stratified, heterogeneous operation, such as diesel combustion. However, to illustrate the impact of fuel stratification on gasoline compression ignition, the authors have identified three representative operating strategies: partial, moderate, and heavy fuel stratification. Thus, this article provides an overview and perspective of the current research efforts to develop engine operating strategies for achieving gasoline low temperature combustion in a compression ignition engine via fuel stratification. In this paper, computational fluid dynamics modeling of the in-cylinder processes during the closed valve portion of the cycle was used to illustrate the opportunities

  7. Time-resolved compression of a capsule with a cone to high density for fast-ignition laser fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Theobald, W.; Solodov, A. A.; Stoeckl, C.; Anderson, K. S.; Beg, F. N.; Epstein, R.; Fiksel, G.; Giraldez, E. M.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Habara, H.; Ivancic, S.; Jarrott, L. C.; Marshall, F. J.; McKiernan, G.; McLean, H. S.; Mileham, C.; Nilson, P. M.; Patel, P. K.; Pérez, F.; Sangster, T. C.; Santos, J. J.; Sawada, H.; Shvydky, A.; Stephens, R. B.; Wei, M. S.

    2014-12-12

    The advent of high-intensity lasers enables us to recreate and study the behaviour of matter under the extreme densities and pressures that exist in many astrophysical objects. It may also enable us to develop a power source based on laser-driven nuclear fusion. Achieving such conditions usually requires a target that is highly uniform and spherically symmetric. Here we show that it is possible to generate high densities in a so-called fast-ignition target that consists of a thin shell whose spherical symmetry is interrupted by the inclusion of a metal cone. Using picosecond-time-resolved X-ray radiography, we show that we can achieve areal densities in excess of 300 mg cm -2 with a nanosecond-duration compression pulse -- the highest areal density ever reported for a cone-in-shell target. Such densities are high enough to stop MeV electrons, which is necessary for igniting the fuel with a subsequent picosecond pulse focused into the resulting plasma.

  8. Time-resolved compression of a capsule with a cone to high density for fast-ignition laser fusion.

    PubMed

    Theobald, W; Solodov, A A; Stoeckl, C; Anderson, K S; Beg, F N; Epstein, R; Fiksel, G; Giraldez, E M; Glebov, V Yu; Habara, H; Ivancic, S; Jarrott, L C; Marshall, F J; McKiernan, G; McLean, H S; Mileham, C; Nilson, P M; Patel, P K; Pérez, F; Sangster, T C; Santos, J J; Sawada, H; Shvydky, A; Stephens, R B; Wei, M S

    2014-01-01

    The advent of high-intensity lasers enables us to recreate and study the behaviour of matter under the extreme densities and pressures that exist in many astrophysical objects. It may also enable us to develop a power source based on laser-driven nuclear fusion. Achieving such conditions usually requires a target that is highly uniform and spherically symmetric. Here we show that it is possible to generate high densities in a so-called fast-ignition target that consists of a thin shell whose spherical symmetry is interrupted by the inclusion of a metal cone. Using picosecond-time-resolved X-ray radiography, we show that we can achieve areal densities in excess of 300 mg cm(-2) with a nanosecond-duration compression pulse--the highest areal density ever reported for a cone-in-shell target. Such densities are high enough to stop MeV electrons, which is necessary for igniting the fuel with a subsequent picosecond pulse focused into the resulting plasma. PMID:25503788

  9. Achievement of a 920-MHz High Resolution NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashi, Kenjiro; Shimizu, Tadashi; Goto, Atsushi; Kiyoshi, Tsukasa; Matsumoto, Shinji; Wada, Hitoshi; Fujito, Teruaki; Hasegawa, Ken-ichi; Yoshikawa, Masatoshi; Miki, Takashi; Ito, Satoshi; Hamada, Mamoru; Hayashi, Seiji

    2002-06-01

    We have developed a 920-MHz NMR system and performed the proton NMR measurement of H 2O and ethylbenzene using the superconducting magnet operating at 21.6 T (920 MHz for proton), which is the highest field produced by a superconducting NMR magnet in the persistent mode. From the NMR measurements, it is verified that both homogeneity and stability of the magnet have a specification sufficient for a high resolution NMR.

  10. Telescoping Solar Array Concept for Achieving High Packaging Efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikulas, Martin; Pappa, Richard; Warren, Jay; Rose, Geoff

    2015-01-01

    Lightweight, high-efficiency solar arrays are required for future deep space missions using high-power Solar Electric Propulsion (SEP). Structural performance metrics for state-of-the art 30-50 kW flexible blanket arrays recently demonstrated in ground tests are approximately 40 kW/cu m packaging efficiency, 150 W/kg specific power, 0.1 Hz deployed stiffness, and 0.2 g deployed strength. Much larger arrays with up to a megawatt or more of power and improved packaging and specific power are of interest to mission planners for minimizing launch and life cycle costs of Mars exploration. A new concept referred to as the Compact Telescoping Array (CTA) with 60 kW/cu m packaging efficiency at 1 MW of power is described herein. Performance metrics as a function of array size and corresponding power level are derived analytically and validated by finite element analysis. Feasible CTA packaging and deployment approaches are also described. The CTA was developed, in part, to serve as a NASA reference solar array concept against which other proposed designs of 50-1000 kW arrays for future high-power SEP missions could be compared.

  11. Efforts toward achieving an unmanned, high-altitude LTA platform

    SciTech Connect

    Onda, Masahiko; Ford, M.L.

    1996-10-01

    The modern demands for an unmanned aerospace platform, capable of long-duration stationkeeping at high-altitudes, are well-known. Satellites, balloons, and aircraft have traditionally served in the role of platform, facilitating tasks ranging from telecommunications to deep-space astronomy. However, limitations on the performance and flexibility of these systems, as well as the intrinsically high-cost of satellite construction, operation, and repair, warrants development of a supplemental technology for the platform. Much has been written in the literature on the possible advantages of a lighter-than-air (LTA) platform, if such an LTA could be constructed. Potential applications include remote sensing, environmental monitoring, mobile communications, space and polar observations, cargo delivery, military reconnaissance, and others. At present, conventional LTA`s are not capable of serving in the manner specified. Within this context, a research program known as HALROP (High Altitude Long Range Observational Platform) is currently underway. The goal is to create a stratospheric platform, possibly in the form of a next generation LTA vehicle. The authors present a qualitative review of their efforts, focusing on milestones in the HALROP Program. 12 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Achieving High Reliability Operations Through Multi-Program Integration

    SciTech Connect

    Holly M. Ashley; Ronald K. Farris; Robert E. Richards

    2009-04-01

    Over the last 20 years the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has adopted a number of operations and safety-related programs which has each periodically taken its turn in the limelight. As new programs have come along there has been natural competition for resources, focus and commitment. In the last few years, the INL has made real progress in integrating all these programs and are starting to realize important synergies. Contributing to this integration are both collaborative individuals and an emerging shared vision and goal of the INL fully maturing in its high reliability operations. This goal is so powerful because the concept of high reliability operations (and the resulting organizations) is a masterful amalgam and orchestrator of the best of all the participating programs (i.e. conduct of operations, behavior based safety, human performance, voluntary protection, quality assurance, and integrated safety management). This paper is a brief recounting of the lessons learned, thus far, at the INL in bringing previously competing programs into harmony under the goal (umbrella) of seeking to perform regularly as a high reliability organization. In addition to a brief diagram-illustrated historical review, the authors will share the INL’s primary successes (things already effectively stopped or started) and the gaps yet to be bridged.

  13. High-resolution time-lapse tomography of rat vertebrae during compressive loading: deformation response analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fíla, T.; Kytýř, D.; Zlámal, P.; Kumpová, I.; Doktor, T.; Koudelka, P.; Jiroušek, O.

    2014-05-01

    This paper is focused on investigation of mechanical properties of rat vertebrae during compressive loading in the longitudinal direction of rat's spine. High-resolution time-lapse micro-tomography was used as a tool to create models of the inner structure and deformed shape in pre-defined deformation steps. First, peripheral areas of vertebra specimen were embedded in polymethyl methacrylate to obtain proper boundary conditions of contact between specimen and loading plattens. Experimental loading device designed for application in X-ray setups was utilized to compress the vertebrae in several deformation steps. High-resolution micro-tomography scanning was carried out at each deformation step. Specimen was irradiated in tomography device equipped with microfocus X-ray tube with 5μm focal spot size and large area flat panel detector. Spatial resolution of reconstructed three-dimensional images was approximately 10μm. Digital volume correlation algorithm was utilized in order to assess displacements in the microstructure in every loading increment. Finite element model of vertebra was created from volumetric data reconstructed from tomography of the undeformed specimen. Simulated compressive test of the developed finite element model was performed in order to compare stiffness and displacements obtained by digital volume correlation and finite element simulation.

  14. Accelerated high-frame-rate mouse heart cine-MRI using compressed sensing reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Motaal, Abdallah G; Coolen, Bram F; Abdurrachim, Desiree; Castro, Rui M; Prompers, Jeanine J; Florack, Luc M J; Nicolay, Klaas; Strijkers, Gustav J

    2013-04-01

    We introduce a new protocol to obtain very high-frame-rate cinematographic (Cine) MRI movies of the beating mouse heart within a reasonable measurement time. The method is based on a self-gated accelerated fast low-angle shot (FLASH) acquisition and compressed sensing reconstruction. Key to our approach is that we exploit the stochastic nature of the retrospective triggering acquisition scheme to produce an undersampled and random k-t space filling that allows for compressed sensing reconstruction and acceleration. As a standard, a self-gated FLASH sequence with a total acquisition time of 10 min was used to produce single-slice Cine movies of seven mouse hearts with 90 frames per cardiac cycle. Two times (2×) and three times (3×) k-t space undersampled Cine movies were produced from 2.5- and 1.5-min data acquisitions, respectively. The accelerated 90-frame Cine movies of mouse hearts were successfully reconstructed with a compressed sensing algorithm. The movies had high image quality and the undersampling artifacts were effectively removed. Left ventricular functional parameters, i.e. end-systolic and end-diastolic lumen surface areas and early-to-late filling rate ratio as a parameter to evaluate diastolic function, derived from the standard and accelerated Cine movies, were nearly identical.

  15. An image compression algorithm for a high-resolution digital still camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nerheim, Rosalee

    1989-01-01

    The Electronic Still Camera (ESC) project will provide for the capture and transmission of high-quality images without the use of film. The image quality will be superior to video and will approach the quality of 35mm film. The camera, which will have the same general shape and handling as a 35mm camera, will be able to send images to earth in near real-time. Images will be stored in computer memory (RAM) in removable cartridges readable by a computer. To save storage space, the image will be compressed and reconstructed at the time of viewing. Both lossless and loss-y image compression algorithms are studied, described, and compared.

  16. Compressible fiber optic micro-Fabry-Pérot cavity with ultra-high pressure sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Wang, D N; Wang, Chao; Hu, Tianyi

    2013-06-17

    We propose and demonstrate a pressure sensor based on a micro air bubble at the end facet of a single mode fiber fusion spliced with a silica tube. When immersed into the liquid such as water, the air bubble essentially acts as a Fabry-Pérot interferometer cavity. Such a cavity can be compressed by the environmental pressure and the sensitivity obtained is >1000 nm/kPa, at least one order of magnitude higher than that of the diaphragm-based fiber-tip sensors reported so far. The compressible Fabry-Pérot interferometer cavity developed is expected to have potential applications in highly sensitive pressure and/or acoustic sensing.

  17. New experimental capabilities and theoretical insights of high pressure compression waves

    SciTech Connect

    Orlikowski, D; Nguyen, J; Patterson, J R; Minich, R; Martin, L P; Holmes, N

    2007-07-20

    Currently there are three platforms that offer quasi-isentropic compression or ramp-wave compression (RWC): light-gas gun, magnetic flux (Z-pinch), and laser. We focus here on the light-gas gun technique and on some current theoretical insights from experimental data. A gradient impedance through the length of the impactor provides the pressure pulse upon impactor to the subject material. Applications and results are given concerning high-pressure strength and liquid to solid, phase transition of water plus its associated phase fraction history. We also introduce the Korteweg-deVries-Burgers equation as a means to understand the evolution these RWC waves that propagate through the thickness of the subject material. This equation has the necessary competition between non-linear, dispersion, and dissipation processes, which is shown through observed structures that are manifested in the experimental particle velocity histories. Such methodology points towards a possible quantifiable dissipation, through which RWC experiments may be analyzed.

  18. Advancing Minority High Achievement: National Trends and Promising Programs and Practices. A Report Prepared for the National Task Force on Minority High Achievement, the College Board.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borman, Geoffrey D.; Stringfield, Sam; Rachuba, Laura

    This report documents recent national progress in advancing the achievements of elementary-aged minority children, the potential for replicable whole-school reform designs to contribute to this advancement, and the individual, classroom, and school characteristics that distinguish those minority students who attain high levels of achievement. The…

  19. Response of thoracolumbar vertebral bodies to high rate compressive loading - biomed 2013.

    PubMed

    Dooley, C J; Wester, B A; Wing, I D; Voo, L M; Armiger, R S; Merkle, A C

    2013-01-01

    Underbody blast (UBB) events created by improvised explosive devices are threats to warfighter survivability. High intensity blast waves emitted from these devices transfer large forces through vehicle structures to occupants, often resulting in injuries including debilitating spinal fractures. The vertical loading vector through the spine generates significant compressive forces at high strain rates. To better understand injury mechanisms and ultimately better protect vehicle occupants against UBB attacks, high-fidelity computational models are being developed to predict the human response to dynamic loading characteristic of these events. This effort details the results from a series of 23 high-rate compression tests on vertebral body specimen. A high-rate servo-hydraulic test system applied a range of compressive loading rates (.01 mm/s to 1238 mm/s) to vertebral bodies in the thoracolumbar region (T7-L5). The force-deflection curves generated indicate rate dependent sensitivity of vertebral stiffness, ultimate load and ultimate deflection. Specimen subjected to high-rate dynamic loading to failure experienced critical structural damage at 5.5% ± 2.1% deflection. Compared to quasi-static loading, vertebral bodies had greater stiffness, greater force to failure, and lower ultimate failure deflection at high rates. Post-failure, an average loss in height of 15% was observed, along with a mean reduction in strength of 48%. The resulting data from these tests will allow for enhanced biofidelity of computational models by characterizing the vertebral stiffness response and ultimate deflection at rates representative of UBB events. PMID:23686197

  20. Effects of bandwidth, compression speed, and gain at high frequencies on preferences for amplified music.

    PubMed

    Moore, Brian C J

    2012-09-01

    This article reviews a series of studies on the factors influencing sound quality preferences, mostly for jazz and classical music stimuli. The data were obtained using ratings of individual stimuli or using the method of paired comparisons. For normal-hearing participants, the highest ratings of sound quality were obtained when the reproduction bandwidth was wide (55 to 16000 Hz) and ripples in the frequency response were small (less than ± 5 dB). For hearing-impaired participants listening via a simulated five-channel compression hearing aid with gains set using the CAM2 fitting method, preferences for upper cutoff frequency varied across participants: Some preferred a 7.5- or 10-kHz upper cutoff frequency over a 5-kHz cutoff frequency, and some showed the opposite preference. Preferences for a higher upper cutoff frequency were associated with a shallow high-frequency slope of the audiogram. A subsequent study comparing the CAM2 and NAL-NL2 fitting methods, with gains slightly reduced for participants who were not experienced hearing aid users, showed a consistent preference for CAM2. Since the two methods differ mainly in the gain applied for frequencies above 4 kHz (CAM2 recommending higher gain than NAL-NL2), these results suggest that extending the upper cutoff frequency is beneficial. A system for reducing "overshoot" effects produced by compression gave small but significant benefits for sound quality of a percussion instrument (xylophone). For a high-input level (80 dB SPL), slow compression was preferred over fast compression. PMID:23172008

  1. Effects of Bandwidth, Compression Speed, and Gain at High Frequencies on Preferences for Amplified Music

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    This article reviews a series of studies on the factors influencing sound quality preferences, mostly for jazz and classical music stimuli. The data were obtained using ratings of individual stimuli or using the method of paired comparisons. For normal-hearing participants, the highest ratings of sound quality were obtained when the reproduction bandwidth was wide (55 to 16000 Hz) and ripples in the frequency response were small (less than ± 5 dB). For hearing-impaired participants listening via a simulated five-channel compression hearing aid with gains set using the CAM2 fitting method, preferences for upper cutoff frequency varied across participants: Some preferred a 7.5- or 10-kHz upper cutoff frequency over a 5-kHz cutoff frequency, and some showed the opposite preference. Preferences for a higher upper cutoff frequency were associated with a shallow high-frequency slope of the audiogram. A subsequent study comparing the CAM2 and NAL-NL2 fitting methods, with gains slightly reduced for participants who were not experienced hearing aid users, showed a consistent preference for CAM2. Since the two methods differ mainly in the gain applied for frequencies above 4 kHz (CAM2 recommending higher gain than NAL-NL2), these results suggest that extending the upper cutoff frequency is beneficial. A system for reducing “overshoot” effects produced by compression gave small but significant benefits for sound quality of a percussion instrument (xylophone). For a high-input level (80 dB SPL), slow compression was preferred over fast compression. PMID:23172008

  2. Improving a DWT-based compression algorithm for high image-quality requirement of satellite images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiebaut, Carole; Latry, Christophe; Camarero, Roberto; Cazanave, Grégory

    2011-10-01

    Past and current optical Earth observation systems designed by CNES are using a fixed-rate data compression processing performed at a high-rate in a pushbroom mode (also called scan-based mode). This process generates fixed-length data to the mass memory and data downlink is performed at a fixed rate too. Because of on-board memory limitations and high data rate processing needs, the rate allocation procedure is performed over a small image area called a "segment". For both PLEIADES compression algorithm and CCSDS Image Data Compression recommendation, this rate allocation is realised by truncating to the desired rate a hierarchical bitstream of coded and quantized wavelet coefficients for each segment. Because the quantisation induced by truncation of the bit planes description is the same for the whole segment, some parts of the segment have a poor image quality. These artefacts generally occur in low energy areas within a segment of higher level of energy. In order to locally correct these areas, CNES has studied "exceptional processing" targeted for DWT-based compression algorithms. According to a criteria computed for each part of the segment (called block), the wavelet coefficients can be amplified before bit-plane encoding. As usual Region of Interest handling, these multiplied coefficients will be processed earlier by the encoder than in the nominal case (without exceptional processing). The image quality improvement brought by the exceptional processing has been confirmed by visual image analysis and fidelity criteria. The complexity of the proposed improvement for on-board application has also been analysed.

  3. Compression of contour data through exploiting curve-to-curve dependence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yalabik, N.; Cooper, D. B.

    1975-01-01

    An approach to exploiting curve-to-curve dependencies in order to achieve high data compression is presented. One of the approaches to date of along curve compression through use of cubic spline approximation is taken and extended by investigating the additional compressibility achievable through curve-to-curve structure exploitation. One of the models under investigation is reported on.

  4. The Relationship between Parental Involvement and Student Achievement in a Rural Florida High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Willie A.

    2011-01-01

    Parental involvement is viewed as critical to the development of effective schools and student achievement. The relationship between parental involvement and achievement test scores at a rural high school in Florida was not known. This high school has not met the state standards as determined by the Florida Comprehensive Achievement Test (FCAT)…

  5. High Achievement in Mathematics Education in India: A Report from Mumbai

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raman, Manya

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports a study aimed at characterizing the conditions that lead to high achievement in mathematics in India. The study involved eight schools in the greater Mumbai region. The main result of the study is that the notion of high achievement itself is problematic, as reflected in the reports about mathematics achievement within and…

  6. Predicting delay in reading achievement in a highly transparent language.

    PubMed

    Holopainen, L; Ahonen, T; Lyytinen, H

    2001-01-01

    A random sample of 91 preschool children was assessed prior to receiving formal reading instruction. Verbal and nonverbal measures were used as predictors for the time of instruction required to accurately decode pseudowords in the highly orthographically regular Finnish language. After 2 years, participants were divided into four groups depending on the duration of instruction they had required to reach 90 % accuracy in their reading of pseudowords. Participants were classified as precocious decoders (PD), who could read at school entry; early decoders (ED), who learned to read within the first 4 months of Grade 1; ordinary decoders (OD), who learned to read within 9 months; and late decoders (LD), who failed to reach the criterion after 18 months of reading instruction at Grade 2. Phonological awareness played a significant role only in differentiating PD from ED and OD. However, phonological awareness failed to predict the delayed learning process of LD. LD differed from all other groups in visual analogical reasoning in an analysis not containing phonological awareness measures. Letter knowledge and visual analogical reasoning explained above 90% of the PD-LD difference. Preschool composite (objects, colors, and digits) naming speed measures best predicted reading fluency at the end of Grade 2. The supportive role of orthographic knowledge in phonological awareness, the role of visual analogical reasoning, and the inability of phonological measures to discriminate late decoders are discussed.

  7. Assessment and application of Reynolds stress closure models to high-speed compressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatski, T. B.; Sarkar, S.; Speziale, C. G.; Balakrishnan, L.; Abid, R.; Anderson, E. C.

    1990-01-01

    The paper presents results from the development of higher order closure models for the phenomological modeling of high-speed compressible flows. The work presented includes the introduction of an improved pressure-strain correlationi model applicable in both the low- and high-speed regime as well as modifications to the isotropic dissipation rate to account for dilatational effects. Finally, the question of stiffness commonly associated with the solution of two-equation and Reynolds stress transport equations in wall-bounded flows is examined and ways of relaxing these restrictions are discussed.

  8. High-Density Fixed Point for Radially Compressed Single-Component Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Danielson, J. R.; Surko, C. M.; O'Neil, T. M.

    2007-09-28

    Rotating electric fields are used to compress electron plasmas confined in a Penning-Malmberg trap. Bifurcation and hysteresis are observed between low-density and high-density steady states as a function of the applied electric field amplitude and frequency. These observations are explained in terms of torque-balanced fixed points using a simple model of the torques on the plasma. Perturbation experiments near the high-density fixed point are used to determine the magnitude, frequency, and voltage dependence of the drive torque. The broader implications of these results are discussed.

  9. Achieving High-Frequency Optical Control of Synaptic Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Jackman, Skyler L.; Beneduce, Brandon M.; Drew, Iain R.

    2014-01-01

    The optogenetic tool channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) is widely used to excite neurons to study neural circuits. Previous optogenetic studies of synapses suggest that light-evoked synaptic responses often exhibit artificial synaptic depression, which has been attributed to either the inability of ChR2 to reliably fire presynaptic axons or to ChR2 elevating the probability of release by depolarizing presynaptic boutons. Here, we compare light-evoked and electrically evoked synaptic responses for high-frequency stimulation at three synapses in the mouse brain. At synapses from Purkinje cells to deep cerebellar nuclei neurons (PC→DCN), light- and electrically evoked synaptic currents were remarkably similar for ChR2 expressed transgenically or with adeno-associated virus (AAV) expression vectors. For hippocampal CA3→CA1 synapses, AAV expression vectors of serotype 1, 5, and 8 led to light-evoked synaptic currents that depressed much more than electrically evoked currents, even though ChR2 could fire axons reliably at up to 50 Hz. The disparity between optical and electrical stimulation was eliminated when ChR2 was expressed transgenically or with AAV9. For cerebellar granule cell to stellate cell (grc→SC) synapses, AAV1 also led to artificial synaptic depression and AAV9 provided superior performance. Artificial synaptic depression also occurred when stimulating over presynaptic boutons, rather than axons, at CA3→CA1 synapses, but not at PC→DCN synapses. These findings indicate that ChR2 expression methods and light stimulation techniques influence synaptic responses in a neuron-specific manner. They also identify pitfalls associated with using ChR2 to study synapses and suggest an approach that allows optogenetics to be applied in a manner that helps to avoid potential complications. PMID:24872574

  10. Quasi-Static and High Strain Rate Compressive Response of Injection-Molded Cenosphere/HDPE Syntactic Foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bharath Kumar, B. R.; Singh, Ashish Kumar; Doddamani, Mrityunjay; Luong, Dung D.; Gupta, Nikhil

    2016-07-01

    High strain rate compressive properties of high-density polyethylene (HDPE) matrix syntactic foams containing cenosphere filler are investigated. Thermoplastic matrix syntactic foams have not been studied extensively for high strain rate deformation response despite interest in them for lightweight underwater vehicle structures and consumer products. Quasi-static compression tests are conducted at 10-4 s-1, 10-3 s-1 and 10-2 s-1 strain rates. Further, a split-Hopkinson pressure bar is utilized for characterizing syntactic foams for high strain rate compression. The compressive strength of syntactic foams is higher than that of HDPE resin at the same strain rate. Yield strength shows an increasing trend with strain rate. The average yield strength values at high strain rates are almost twice the values obtained at 10-4 s-1 for HDPE resin and syntactic foams. Theoretical models are used to estimate the effectiveness of cenospheres in reinforcing syntactic foams.

  11. Simulations of in situ x-ray diffraction from uniaxially compressed highly textured polycrystalline targets

    SciTech Connect

    McGonegle, David Wark, Justin S.; Higginbotham, Andrew; Milathianaki, Despina; Remington, Bruce A.

    2015-08-14

    A growing number of shock compression experiments, especially those involving laser compression, are taking advantage of in situ x-ray diffraction as a tool to interrogate structure and microstructure evolution. Although these experiments are becoming increasingly sophisticated, there has been little work on exploiting the textured nature of polycrystalline targets to gain information on sample response. Here, we describe how to generate simulated x-ray diffraction patterns from materials with an arbitrary texture function subject to a general deformation gradient. We will present simulations of Debye-Scherrer x-ray diffraction from highly textured polycrystalline targets that have been subjected to uniaxial compression, as may occur under planar shock conditions. In particular, we study samples with a fibre texture, and find that the azimuthal dependence of the diffraction patterns contains information that, in principle, affords discrimination between a number of similar shock-deformation mechanisms. For certain cases, we compare our method with results obtained by taking the Fourier transform of the atomic positions calculated by classical molecular dynamics simulations. Illustrative results are presented for the shock-induced α–ϵ phase transition in iron, the α–ω transition in titanium and deformation due to twinning in tantalum that is initially preferentially textured along [001] and [011]. The simulations are relevant to experiments that can now be performed using 4th generation light sources, where single-shot x-ray diffraction patterns from crystals compressed via laser-ablation can be obtained on timescales shorter than a phonon period.

  12. Effect of noise and MTF on the compressibility of high-resolution color images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnychuck, Paul W.; Barry, Michael J.; Mathieu, Michael S.

    1990-06-01

    There are an increasing number of digital image processing systems that employ photographic image capture; that is, a color photographic negative or transparency is digitally scanned, compressed, and stored or transmitted for further use. To capture the information content that a photographic color negative is capable of delivering, it must be scanned at a pixel resolution of at least 50 pixels/mm. This type of high quality imagery presents certain problems and opportunities in image coding that are not present in lower resolution systems. Firstly, photographic granularity increases the entropy of a scanned negative, limiting the extent to which entropy encoding can compress the scanned record. Secondly, any MTFrelated chemical enhancement that is incorporated into a film tends to reduce the pixel-to-pixel correlation that most compression schemes attempt to exploit. This study examines the effect of noise and MTF on the compressibility of scanned photographic images by establishing experimental information theoretic bounds. Images used for this study were corrupted with noise via a computer model of photographic grain and an MTF model of blur and chemical edge enhancement. The measured bounds are expressed in terms of the entropy of a variety of decomposed image records (e.g., DPCM predictor error) for a zeroeth-order Markov-based entropy encoder, and for a context model used by the Q-coder. The resultsshow that the entropy of the DPCM predictor error is 3-5 bits/pixel, illustrating a 2 bits/pixel difference between an ideal grain-free case, and a grainy film case. This suggests that an ideal noise filtering algorithm could lower the bitrate by as much as 50%.

  13. High-performance data and video recorder with real-time lossless compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckstead, Jeffrey A.; Aceto, Steven C.; Conerty, Michelle D.; Nordhauser, Steven

    1997-01-01

    Over the last decade, the video camera has become a common diagnostic/tool for many scientific, industrial and medical applications. The amount of data collected by video capture systems can be enormous. For example, standard NTSC video requires 5 MBytes/sec, with many groups wanting higher resolution either in bit-depth, spatial resolution and/or frame speed. Despite great advances in video capture systems developed for the mass media and teleconferencing markets, the smaller markets of scientific and industrial applications have been ignored. This is primarily due to their need to maintain the independent nature of each camera system and to maintain the high quality of the video data. Many of the commercial systems are capable of digitizing a single camera (B/W or color) or multiple synchronized B/W cameras using an RGB color video capture chip set. In addition, most manufacturers utilize lossy compression to reduce the bandwidth before storing the data to disk. To address the needs of the scientific community, a high- performance data and video recorder has been developed. This system utilizes field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) to control the analog and digital signals and to perform real- time lossless compression on the incoming data streams. Due to the flexibility inherent in the system, it is able to be configured for a variety of camera resolutions, frame rates and compression algorithms. In addition, alternative general purpose data acquisition modules are also being incorporated into the design. The modular design of the video/data recorder allows the carrier components to be easily adapted to new bus technology as it becomes available or the data acquisition components to be tailored to a specific application. Details of the recorder architecture are presented along with examples applied to thermonuclear fusion experiments. A lossless compression ratio of 3:1 has been obtained on fusion plasma images, with further reductions expected, allowing the

  14. Mucus transport mechanisms in relation to the effect of high frequency chest compression (HFCC) on mucus clearance.

    PubMed

    Hansen, L G; Warwick, W J; Hansen, K L

    1994-02-01

    High frequency chest compression (HFCC) appears promising as a form of chest physiotherapy. Studies published by several clinical centers support its efficacy, and further clinical data are expected to become available.

  15. High Temperature Expansion Due to Compression Test for the Determination of a Cladding Material Failure Criterion under RIA Loading Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Le Saux, M.; Poussard, C.; Averty, X.; Sainte Catherine, C.; Carassou, S.

    2007-07-01

    This paper is mainly dedicated to the development of an out-of-pile test reproducing the thermo-mechanical loading conditions encountered during the first stage of a Reactivity Initiated Accidents (RIA) transient, dominated by Pellet Clad Mechanical Interaction (PCMI). In particular, the strain-controlled clad loading under high strain rate associated with temperatures up to 600 deg. C expected during the PCMI phase is simulated by an Expansion Due to Compression (EDC) test achievable at high temperature. The use of appropriate materials for the inner pellet made it possible to achieve the tests from 20 deg. C up to 900 deg. C. The interpretation of the test data is supported by Finite Element Analysis (FEA) including parameters tuned using an inverse method coupling FEA and tests results. A deformation model, identified upon the PROMETRA (Transient Mechanical Properties) experimental database and describing the anisotropic viscoplastic behavior of Cold-Worked Stress Relieved Zircaloy-4 cladding alloys under typical RIA loading conditions, is exploited. The combined analysis of experimental results and finite element simulations provides a deeper understanding of the deformation mode (near pure hoop tension) that arises during the tests. The failure mode appears to be representative of that obtained on tubes during the PCMI stage of RIA experiments. An appropriate device is currently developed in order to reach a bi-axiality of the loading path closer to that expected during the PCMI stage (between plane-strain and equal-biaxial tension). (authors)

  16. High-fidelity interface tracking in compressible flows: Unlimited anchored adaptive level set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nourgaliev, R. R.; Theofanous, T. G.

    2007-06-01

    The interface-capturing-fidelity issue of the level set method is addressed wholly within the Eulerian framework. Our aim is for a practical and efficient way to realize the expected benefits of grid resolution and high order schemes. Based on a combination of structured adaptive mesh refinement (SAMR), rather than quad/octrees, and on high-order spatial discretization, rather than the use of Lagrangian particles, our method is tailored to compressible flows, while it provides a potentially useful alternative to the particle level set (PLS) for incompressible flows. Interesting salient features of our method include (a) avoidance of limiting (in treating the Hamiltonian of the level set equation), (b) anchoring the level set in a manner that ensures no drift and no spurious oscillations of the zero level during PDE-reinitialization, and (c) a non-linear tagging procedure for defining the neighborhood of the interface subject to mesh refinement. Numerous computational results on a set of benchmark problems (strongly deforming, stretching and tearing interfaces) demonstrate that with this approach, implemented up to 11th order accuracy, the level set method becomes essentially free of mass conservation errors and also free of parasitic interfacial oscillations, while it is still highly efficient, and convenient for 3D parallel implementation. In addition, demonstration of performance in fully-coupled simulations is presented for multimode Rayleigh-Taylor instability (low-Mach number regime) and shock-induced, bubble-collapse (highly compressible regime).

  17. High speed X-ray phase contrast imaging of energetic composites under dynamic compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parab, Niranjan D.; Roberts, Zane A.; Harr, Michael H.; Mares, Jesus O.; Casey, Alex D.; Gunduz, I. Emre; Hudspeth, Matthew; Claus, Benjamin; Sun, Tao; Fezzaa, Kamel; Son, Steven F.; Chen, Weinong W.

    2016-09-01

    Fracture of crystals and frictional heating are associated with the formation of "hot spots" (localized heating) in energetic composites such as polymer bonded explosives (PBXs). Traditional high speed optical imaging methods cannot be used to study the dynamic sub-surface deformation and the fracture behavior of such materials due to their opaque nature. In this study, high speed synchrotron X-ray experiments are conducted to visualize the in situ deformation and the fracture mechanisms in PBXs composed of octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX) crystals and hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene binder doped with iron (III) oxide. A modified Kolsky bar apparatus was used to apply controlled dynamic compression on the PBX specimens, and a high speed synchrotron X-ray phase contrast imaging (PCI) setup was used to record the in situ deformation and failure in the specimens. The experiments show that synchrotron X-ray PCI provides a sufficient contrast between the HMX crystals and the doped binder, even at ultrafast recording rates. Under dynamic compression, most of the cracking in the crystals was observed to be due to the tensile stress generated by the diametral compression applied from the contacts between the crystals. Tensile stress driven cracking was also observed for some of the crystals due to the transverse deformation of the binder and superior bonding between the crystal and the binder. The obtained results are vital to develop improved understanding and to validate the macroscopic and mesoscopic numerical models for energetic composites so that eventually hot spot formation can be predicted.

  18. DLA based compressed sensing for high resolution MR microscopy of neuronal tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Khieu-Van; Li, Jing-Rebecca; Radecki, Guillaume; Ciobanu, Luisa

    2015-10-01

    In this work we present the implementation of compressed sensing (CS) on a high field preclinical scanner (17.2 T) using an undersampling trajectory based on the diffusion limited aggregation (DLA) random growth model. When applied to a library of images this approach performs better than the traditional undersampling based on the polynomial probability density function. In addition, we show that the method is applicable to imaging live neuronal tissues, allowing significantly shorter acquisition times while maintaining the image quality necessary for identifying the majority of neurons via an automatic cell segmentation algorithm.

  19. Performance of a High-Speed Compression-Ignition Engine Using Multiple Orifice Fuel Injection Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spanogle, J A; Foster, H H

    1930-01-01

    This report presents test results obtained at the Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics during an investigation to determine the relative performance of a single-cylinder, high-speed, compression-ignition engine when using fuel injection valve nozzles with different numbers, sizes, and directions of round orifices. A spring-loaded, automatic injection valve was used, centrally located at the top of a vertical disk-type combustion chamber formed between horizontally opposed inlet and exhaust valves of a 5 inch by 7 inch engine.

  20. Extremely high-pressure generation and compression with laser implosion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Shigemori, K.; Hironaka, Y.; Nagatomo, H.; Fujioka, S.; Azechi, H.; Sunahara, A.; Kadono, T.; Shimizu, K.

    2013-05-06

    We have tested a scheme for using laser implosion plasmas to generate pressures in the gigabar (100 TPa) regime. Cone-in-shell targets employed in fast ignition of inertial confinement fusion were irradiated to create a high-pressure source for compression of materials. The imploded plasmas pushed a foil embedded on the tip of a cone. The pressure was estimated from the shock velocity into the material; the shock velocity was obtained from an optical measurement. The measured shock velocity of the foil was above 100 km/s, corresponding to a pressure greater than 1 Gbar.

  1. DLA based compressed sensing for high resolution MR microscopy of neuronal tissue.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Khieu-Van; Li, Jing-Rebecca; Radecki, Guillaume; Ciobanu, Luisa

    2015-10-01

    In this work we present the implementation of compressed sensing (CS) on a high field preclinical scanner (17.2 T) using an undersampling trajectory based on the diffusion limited aggregation (DLA) random growth model. When applied to a library of images this approach performs better than the traditional undersampling based on the polynomial probability density function. In addition, we show that the method is applicable to imaging live neuronal tissues, allowing significantly shorter acquisition times while maintaining the image quality necessary for identifying the majority of neurons via an automatic cell segmentation algorithm. PMID:26367320

  2. A theoretical and experimental study of high-temperature compressive gas heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blekhman, David Iosifovich

    The temperature rise due to compression, although considered as undesirable in most pumping applications, can be utilized to produce an uncontaminated, high-temperature (>1500K), uniformly heated stream of gas. Based on the Roots principle, Multi-Recompression Heater (MRH) is being designed to provide such capabilities. The potential applications include pyrolitic synthesis of chemical compounds, waste and chemical munitions decomposition, optical fiber production and high temperature experimental studies. Future heater design strategies are dependent on thorough understanding of the physical mechanisms and improved modeling capabilities of the compression processes in Roots compressors. In this study, a multi-control volume model is presented. Three control volumes are employed. The well-filling process is modeled via expansion of the compressed gas from the high-pressure reservoir into the well through a "nozzle" formed by the rotor tip and the blower casing. The nozzle has a time-varying geometry and is modeled to allow transition from choked to non-choked flow. When the pressures equalize, the gas in the well is assumed to be fully-mixed and the two control volumes are subsequently considered as one. Numerical computations of the time required for the expansion-mixing process, and the time histories of the pressures and temperatures in the control volumes are performed. Two series of experiments are conducted using a Dresser-Roots Whispair RAM 404 blower at speeds of 2280 and 3430 rpm. The data is collected via ten channels: four for pressure and six for temperature measurements. The experiment control and data recording are made with LabView. The maximum temperature allowed by the unmodified compressor before it would seize up was about 700K. Measured heat transfer and leakage rates are used in calculations. Their representation may be improved by introducing more detailed models. The model presented contains dimensionless compression and thermal transport

  3. An experimental investigation of domain wall motion in polycrystalline Ni during high-rate compressive loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Dipankar; Bah, Abubakarr; Carman, Gregory P.; Ravichandran, Guruswami

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes experimental data on a polycrystalline nickel subjected to compressive loads induced in a split Hopkinson pressure bar test. A perpendicular bias magnetic field with respect to the loading direction is used to orient the domains and a pick-up coil measures the magnetic response of the sample during loading. Utilizing this experimental configuration, this study investigated the coupled effects of the magnetic and mechanical fields on domain wall motion in a polycrystalline magnetostrictive material (Ni) during the high-rate elastic loading. The experimental measurements reveal that the magnitude of the stress-induced magnetization change is dependent upon bias magnetic field.

  4. Upgrade of the SLAC SLED II Pulse Compression System Based on Recent High Power Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Vlieks, A.E.; Fowkes, W.R.; Loewen, R.J.; Tantawi, S.G.; /SLAC

    2011-09-06

    In the Next Linear Collider (NLC) it is expected that the high power rf components be able to handle peak power levels in excess of 400 MW. We present recent results of high power tests designed to investigate the RF breakdown limits of the X-band pulse compression system used at SLAC. (SLED-II). Results of these tests show that both the TE{sub 01}-TE{sub 10} mode converter and the 4-port hybrid have a maximum useful power limit of 220-250 MW. Based on these tests, modifications of these components have been undertaken to improve their peak field handling capability. Results of these modifications will be presented. As part of an international effort to develop a new 0.5-1.5 TeV electron-positron linear collider for the 21st century, SLAC has been working towards a design, referred to as 'The Next Linear Collider' (NLC), which will operate at 11.424 GHz and utilize 50-75 MW klystrons as rf power sources. One of the major challenges in this design, or any other design, is how to generate and efficiently transport extremely high rf power from a source to an accelerator structure. SLAC has been investigating various methods of 'pulse compressing' a relatively wide rf pulse ({ge} 1 {mu}s) from a klystron into a narrower, but more intense, pulse. Currently a SLED-II pulse compression scheme is being used at SLAC in the NLC Test Accelerator (NLCTA) and in the Accelerator Structures Test Area (ASTA) to provide high rf power for accelerator and component testing. In ASTA, a 1.05 {mu}s pulse from a 50 MW klystron was successfully pulse compressed to 205 MW with a pulse width of 150 ns. Since operation in NLC will require generating and transporting rf power in excess of 400 MW it was decided to test the breakdown limits of the SLED-II rf components in ASTA with rf power up to the maximum available of 400 MW. This required the combining of power from two 50 MW klystrons and feeding the summed power into the SLED-II pulse compressor. Results from this experiment demonstrated

  5. The Chinese High School Student's Stress in the School and Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Yangyang; Lu, Zuhong

    2011-01-01

    In a sample of 466 Chinese high school students, we examined the relationships between Chinese high school students' stress in the school and their academic achievements. Regression mixture modelling identified two different classes of the effects of Chinese high school students' stress on their academic achievements. One class contained 87% of…

  6. The Effects of Magnet Schools on Neighborhood High Schools: An Examination of Achievement among Entering Freshmen

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neild, Ruth Curran

    2004-01-01

    Magnet schools have been criticized for intensifying the concentration of disadvantaged, low-achieving students at neighborhood high schools. This article investigates the impact of academically selective magnet high schools on the average achievement of ninth graders enrolling in neighborhood high schools in a large urban school district. The…

  7. Beyond Academic Reputation: Factors that Influence the College of First Choice for High Achieving Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoenherr, Holly J.

    2009-01-01

    Studies that have investigated college choice factors for high-achieving students repeatedly cite academic reputation as one of the top indicators of choice but have not indicated why some high-achieving students choose to attend universities with a less prestigious reputation than the more highly prestigious options available to them. The purpose…

  8. Preferred Homework Style and Homework Environment in High- versus Low-Achieving Chinese Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hong, Eunsook; Lee, Kit-hung

    This study compared preferred homework styles of Chinese students who were characterized by: (1) high versus low self-perceived homework achievement and attitude; (2) high versus low teacher-rated homework completion and quality; (3) high versus low academic achievement in mathematics. Gender differences in homework styles were also examined.…

  9. High-fidelity numerical simulations of compressible turbulence and mixing generated by hydrodynamic instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Movahed, Pooya

    High-speed flows are prone to hydrodynamic interfacial instabilities that evolve to turbulence, thereby intensely mixing different fluids and dissipating energy. The lack of knowledge of these phenomena has impeded progress in a variety of disciplines. In science, a full understanding of mixing between heavy and light elements after the collapse of a supernova and between adjacent layers of different density in geophysical (atmospheric and oceanic) flows remains lacking. In engineering, the inability to achieve ignition in inertial fusion and efficient combustion constitute further examples of this lack of basic understanding of turbulent mixing. In this work, my goal is to develop accurate and efficient numerical schemes and employ them to study compressible turbulence and mixing generated by interactions between shocked (Richtmyer-Meshkov) and accelerated (Rayleigh-Taylor) interfaces, which play important roles in high-energy-density physics environments. To accomplish my goal, a hybrid high-order central/discontinuity-capturing finite difference scheme is first presented. The underlying principle is that, to accurately and efficiently represent both broadband motions and discontinuities, non-dissipative methods are used where the solution is smooth, while the more expensive and dissipative capturing schemes are applied near discontinuous regions. Thus, an accurate numerical sensor is developed to discriminate between smooth regions, shocks and material discontinuities, which all require a different treatment. The interface capturing approach is extended to central differences, such that smooth distributions of varying specific heats ratio can be simulated without generating spurious pressure oscillations. I verified and validated this approach against a stringent suite of problems including shocks, interfaces, turbulence and two-dimensional single-mode Richtmyer-Meshkov instability simulations. The three-dimensional code is shown to scale well up to 4000 cores

  10. A COMPREHENSIVE STUDY OF THE MOTIVATIONAL FACTORS UNDERLYING ACHIEVEMENT OF ELEVENTH-GRADE HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    FARQUHAR, WILLIAM W.

    ACHIEVEMENT MOTIVATION WAS STUDIED BETWEEN OVER- AND UNDER-ACHIEVING STUDENTS IN THE ELEVENTH-GRADE TO DEVELOP AN OBJECTIVE MEASURE OF MOTIVATION FOR USE IN PREDICTING ACADEMIC SUCCESS OR FAILURE. APPROXIMATELY 800 STUDENTS IN PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOLS WERE SELECTED FOR VALIDATION AND CROSS-VALIDATION SAMPLES. THEY WERE DIVIDED BY SEX AND ACHIEVEMENT.…

  11. Does High School Facility Quality Affect Student Achievement? A Two-Level Hierarchical Linear Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowers, Alex J.; Urick, Angela

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to isolate the independent effects of high school facility quality on student achievement using a large, nationally representative U.S. database of student achievement and school facility quality. Prior research on linking school facility quality to student achievement has been mixed. Studies that relate overall…

  12. The Effects of Web-Based/Non-Web-Based Problem-Solving Instruction and High/Low Achievement on Students' Problem-Solving Ability and Biology Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, Wen-Feng; She, Hsiao-Ching; Lee, Yu-Mei

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of two factors: the mode of problem-solving instruction (i.e. Web-based versus non-Web-based) and the level of academic achievement (i.e. high achievers versus low achievers) on students' problem-solving ability and biology achievement. A quasi-experimental design was used, in which the experimental group…

  13. A high-order time formulation of the RBC schemes for unsteady compressible Euler equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerat, A.

    2015-12-01

    Residual-Based Compact (RBC) schemes can approximate the compressible Euler equations with a high space-accuracy on a very compact stencil. For instance on a 2-D Cartesian mesh, the 5th- and 7th-order accuracy can be reached on a 5 × 5-point stencil. The time integration of the RBC schemes uses a fully implicit method of 2nd-order accuracy (Gear method) usually solved by a dual-time approach. This method is efficient for computing compressible flows in slow unsteady regimes, but for quick unsteady flows, it may be costly and not accurate enough. A new time-formulation is proposed in the present paper. Unusually, in a RBC scheme the time derivative occurs, through linear discrete operators due to compactness, not only in the main residual but also in the other two residuals (in 2-D) involved in the numerical dissipation. To extract the time derivative, a space-factorization method which preserves the high accuracy in space is developed for reducing the algebra to the direct solution of simple linear systems on the mesh lines. Then a time-integration of high accuracy is selected for the RBC schemes by comparing the efficiency of four classes of explicit methods. The new time-formulation is validated for the diagonal advection of a Gaussian shape, the rotation of a hump, the advection of a vortex for a long time and the interaction of a vortex with a shock.

  14. Visualizing fast electron energy transport into laser-compressed high-density fast-ignition targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarrott, L. C.; Wei, M. S.; McGuffey, C.; Solodov, A. A.; Theobald, W.; Qiao, B.; Stoeckl, C.; Betti, R.; Chen, H.; Delettrez, J.; Döppner, T.; Giraldez, E. M.; Glebov, V. Y.; Habara, H.; Iwawaki, T.; Key, M. H.; Luo, R. W.; Marshall, F. J.; McLean, H. S.; Mileham, C.; Patel, P. K.; Santos, J. J.; Sawada, H.; Stephens, R. B.; Yabuuchi, T.; Beg, F. N.

    2016-05-01

    Recent progress in kilojoule-scale high-intensity lasers has opened up new areas of research in radiography, laboratory astrophysics, high-energy-density physics, and fast-ignition (FI) laser fusion. FI requires efficient heating of pre-compressed high-density fuel by an intense relativistic electron beam produced from laser-matter interaction. Understanding the details of electron beam generation and transport is crucial for FI. Here we report on the first visualization of fast electron spatial energy deposition in a laser-compressed cone-in-shell FI target, facilitated by doping the shell with copper and imaging the K-shell radiation. Multi-scale simulations accompanying the experiments clearly show the location of fast electrons and reveal key parameters affecting energy coupling. The approach provides a more direct way to infer energy coupling and guide experimental designs that significantly improve the laser-to-core coupling to 7%. Our findings lay the groundwork for further improving efficiency, with 15% energy coupling predicted in FI experiments using an existing megajoule-scale laser driver.

  15. Joint 6D k-q Space Compressed Sensing for Accelerated High Angular Resolution Diffusion MRI.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jian; Shen, Dinggang; Basser, Peter J; Yap, Pew-Thian

    2015-01-01

    High Angular Resolution Diffusion Imaging (HARDI) avoids the Gaussian. diffusion assumption that is inherent in Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI), and is capable of characterizing complex white matter micro-structure with greater precision. However, HARDI methods such as Diffusion Spectrum Imaging (DSI) typically require significantly more signal measurements than DTI, resulting in prohibitively long scanning times. One of the goals in HARDI research is therefore to improve estimation of quantities such as the Ensemble Average Propagator (EAP) and the Orientation Distribution Function (ODF) with a limited number of diffusion-weighted measurements. A popular approach to this problem, Compressed Sensing (CS), affords highly accurate signal reconstruction using significantly fewer (sub-Nyquist) data points than required traditionally. Existing approaches to CS diffusion MRI (CS-dMRI) mainly focus on applying CS in the q-space of diffusion signal measurements and fail to take into consideration information redundancy in the k-space. In this paper, we propose a framework, called 6-Dimensional Compressed Sensing diffusion MRI (6D-CS-dMRI), for reconstruction of the diffusion signal and the EAP from data sub-sampled in both 3D k-space and 3D q-space. To our knowledge, 6D-CS-dMRI is the first work that applies compressed sensing in the full 6D k-q space and reconstructs the diffusion signal in the full continuous q-space and the EAP in continuous displacement space. Experimental results on synthetic and real data demonstrate that, compared with full DSI sampling in k-q space, 6D-CS-dMRI yields excellent diffusion signal and EAP reconstruction with low root-mean-square error (RMSE) using 11 times less samples (3-fold reduction in k-space and 3.7-fold reduction in q-space).

  16. Sweep and Compressibility Effects on Active Separation Control at High Reynolds Numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seifert, Avi; Pack, LaTunia G.

    2000-01-01

    This paper explores the effects of compressibility, sweep and excitation location on active separation control at high Reynolds numbers. The model, which was tested in a cryogenic pressurized wind tunnel, simulates the upper surface of a 20% thick GlauertGoldschmied type airfoil at zero angle of attack. The flow is fully turbulent since the tunnel sidewall boundary layer flows over the model. Without control, the flow separates at the highly convex area and a large turbulent separation bubble is formed. Periodic excitation is applied to gradually eliminate the separation bubble. Two alternative blowing slot locations as well as the effect of compressibility, sweep and steady suction or blowing were studied. During the test the Reynolds numbers ranged from 2 to 40 million and Mach numbers ranged from 0.2 to 0.7. Sweep angles were 0 and 30 deg. It was found that excitation must be introduced slightly upstream of the separation region regardless of the sweep angle at low Mach number. Introduction of excitation upstream of the shock wave is more effective than at its foot. Compressibility reduces the ability of steady mass transfer and periodic excitation to control the separation bubble but excitation has an effect on the integral parameters, which is similar to that observed in low Mach numbers. The conventional swept flow scaling is valid for fully and even partially attached flow, but different scaling is required for the separated 3D flow. The effectiveness of the active control is not reduced by sweep. Detailed flow field dynamics are described in the accompanying paper.

  17. Sweep and Compressibility Effects on Active Separation Control at High Reynolds Numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seifert, Avi; Pack, LaTunia G.

    2000-01-01

    This paper explores the effects of compressibility, sweep and excitation location on active separation control at high Reynolds numbers. The model, which was tested in a cryogenic pressurized wind tunnel, simulates the upper surface of a 20% thick Glauert Goldschmied type airfoil at zero angle of attack. The flow is fully turbulent since the tunnel sidewall boundary layer flows over the model. Without control, the flow separates at the highly convex area and a large turbulent separation bubble is formed. Periodic excitation is applied to gradually eliminate the separation bubble. Two alternative blowing slot locations as well as the effect of compressibility, sweep and steady suction or blowing were studied. During the test the Reynolds numbers ranged from 2 to 40 million and Mach numbers ranged from 0.2 to 0.7. Sweep angles were 0 and 30 deg. It was found that excitation must be introduced slightly upstream of the separation region regardless of the sweep angle at low Mach number. Introduction of excitation upstream of the shock wave is more effective than at its foot. Compressibility reduces the ability of steady mass transfer and periodic excitation to control the separation bubble but excitation has an effect on the integral parameters, which is similar to that observed in low Mach numbers. The conventional swept flow scaling is valid for fully and even partially attached flow, but different scaling is required for the separated 3D flow. The effectiveness of the active control is not reduced by sweep. Detailed flow field dynamics are described in the accompanying paper.

  18. An analysis of the mechanical parameters used for finite element compression of a high-resolution 3D breast phantom

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Christina M. L.; Palmeri, Mark L.; Segars, W. Paul; Veress, Alexander I.; Dobbins, James T.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The authors previously introduced a methodology to generate a realistic three-dimensional (3D), high-resolution, computer-simulated breast phantom based on empirical data. One of the key components of such a phantom is that it provides a means to produce a realistic simulation of clinical breast compression. In the current study, they have evaluated a finite element (FE) model of compression and have demonstrated the effect of a variety of mechanical properties on the model using a dense mesh generated from empirical breast data. While several groups have demonstrated an effective compression simulation with lower density finite element meshes, the presented study offers a mesh density that is able to model the morphology of the inner breast structures more realistically than lower density meshes. This approach may prove beneficial for multimodality breast imaging research, since it provides a high level of anatomical detail throughout the simulation study. Methods: In this paper, the authors describe methods to improve the high-resolution performance of a FE compression model. In order to create the compressible breast phantom, dedicated breast CT data was segmented and a mesh was generated with 4-noded tetrahedral elements. Using an explicit FE solver to simulate breast compression, several properties were analyzed to evaluate their effect on the compression model including: mesh density, element type, density, and stiffness of various tissue types, friction between the skin and the compression plates, and breast density. Following compression, a simulated projection was generated to demonstrate the ability of the compressible breast phantom to produce realistic simulated mammographic images. Results: Small alterations in the properties of the breast model can change the final distribution of the tissue under compression by more than 1 cm; which ultimately results in different representations of the breast model in the simulated images. The model

  19. Time-resolved compression of a capsule with a cone to high density for fast-ignition laser fusion

    DOE PAGES

    Theobald, W.; Solodov, A. A.; Stoeckl, C.; Anderson, K. S.; Beg, F. N.; Epstein, R.; Fiksel, G.; Giraldez, E. M.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Habara, H.; et al

    2014-12-12

    The advent of high-intensity lasers enables us to recreate and study the behaviour of matter under the extreme densities and pressures that exist in many astrophysical objects. It may also enable us to develop a power source based on laser-driven nuclear fusion. Achieving such conditions usually requires a target that is highly uniform and spherically symmetric. Here we show that it is possible to generate high densities in a so-called fast-ignition target that consists of a thin shell whose spherical symmetry is interrupted by the inclusion of a metal cone. Using picosecond-time-resolved X-ray radiography, we show that we can achievemore » areal densities in excess of 300 mg cm -2 with a nanosecond-duration compression pulse -- the highest areal density ever reported for a cone-in-shell target. Such densities are high enough to stop MeV electrons, which is necessary for igniting the fuel with a subsequent picosecond pulse focused into the resulting plasma.« less

  20. GPU Lossless Hyperspectral Data Compression System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aranki, Nazeeh I.; Keymeulen, Didier; Kiely, Aaron B.; Klimesh, Matthew A.

    2014-01-01

    Hyperspectral imaging systems onboard aircraft or spacecraft can acquire large amounts of data, putting a strain on limited downlink and storage resources. Onboard data compression can mitigate this problem but may require a system capable of a high throughput. In order to achieve a high throughput with a software compressor, a graphics processing unit (GPU) implementation of a compressor was developed targeting the current state-of-the-art GPUs from NVIDIA(R). The implementation is based on the fast lossless (FL) compression algorithm reported in "Fast Lossless Compression of Multispectral-Image Data" (NPO- 42517), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 30, No. 8 (August 2006), page 26, which operates on hyperspectral data and achieves excellent compression performance while having low complexity. The FL compressor uses an adaptive filtering method and achieves state-of-the-art performance in both compression effectiveness and low complexity. The new Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS) Standard for Lossless Multispectral & Hyperspectral image compression (CCSDS 123) is based on the FL compressor. The software makes use of the highly-parallel processing capability of GPUs to achieve a throughput at least six times higher than that of a software implementation running on a single-core CPU. This implementation provides a practical real-time solution for compression of data from airborne hyperspectral instruments.

  1. Efficient compression of molecular dynamics trajectory files.

    PubMed

    Marais, Patrick; Kenwood, Julian; Smith, Keegan Carruthers; Kuttel, Michelle M; Gain, James

    2012-10-15

    We investigate whether specific properties of molecular dynamics trajectory files can be exploited to achieve effective file compression. We explore two classes of lossy, quantized compression scheme: "interframe" predictors, which exploit temporal coherence between successive frames in a simulation, and more complex "intraframe" schemes, which compress each frame independently. Our interframe predictors are fast, memory-efficient and well suited to on-the-fly compression of massive simulation data sets, and significantly outperform the benchmark BZip2 application. Our schemes are configurable: atomic positional accuracy can be sacrificed to achieve greater compression. For high fidelity compression, our linear interframe predictor gives the best results at very little computational cost: at moderate levels of approximation (12-bit quantization, maximum error ≈ 10(-2) Å), we can compress a 1-2 fs trajectory file to 5-8% of its original size. For 200 fs time steps-typically used in fine grained water diffusion experiments-we can compress files to ~25% of their input size, still substantially better than BZip2. While compression performance degrades with high levels of quantization, the simulation error is typically much greater than the associated approximation error in such cases.

  2. Single stock dynamics on high-frequency data: from a compressed coding perspective.

    PubMed

    Fushing, Hsieh; Chen, Shu-Chun; Hwang, Chii-Ruey

    2014-01-01

    High-frequency return, trading volume and transaction number are digitally coded via a nonparametric computing algorithm, called hierarchical factor segmentation (HFS), and then are coupled together to reveal a single stock dynamics without global state-space structural assumptions. The base-8 digital coding sequence, which is capable of revealing contrasting aggregation against sparsity of extreme events, is further compressed into a shortened sequence of state transitions. This compressed digital code sequence vividly demonstrates that the aggregation of large absolute returns is the primary driving force for stimulating both the aggregations of large trading volumes and transaction numbers. The state of system-wise synchrony is manifested with very frequent recurrence in the stock dynamics. And this data-driven dynamic mechanism is seen to correspondingly vary as the global market transiting in and out of contraction-expansion cycles. These results not only elaborate the stock dynamics of interest to a fuller extent, but also contradict some classical theories in finance. Overall this version of stock dynamics is potentially more coherent and realistic, especially when the current financial market is increasingly powered by high-frequency trading via computer algorithms, rather than by individual investors.

  3. An Analysis of Java Programming Behaviors, Affect, Perceptions, and Syntax Errors among Low-Achieving, Average, and High-Achieving Novice Programmers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodrigo, Ma. Mercedes T.; Andallaza, Thor Collin S.; Castro, Francisco Enrique Vicente G.; Armenta, Marc Lester V.; Dy, Thomas T.; Jadud, Matthew C.

    2013-01-01

    In this article we quantitatively and qualitatively analyze a sample of novice programmer compilation log data, exploring whether (or how) low-achieving, average, and high-achieving students vary in their grasp of these introductory concepts. High-achieving students self-reported having the easiest time learning the introductory programming…

  4. The compressive behavior of isocyanate-crosslinked silica aerogel at high strain rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, H.; Lu, H.; Leventis, N.

    2006-06-01

    Aerogels are low-density, highly nano-porous materials. Their engineering applications are limited due to their brittleness and hydrophilicity. Recently, a strong lightweight crosslinked silica aerogel has been developed by encapsulating the skeletal framework of amine-modified silica aerogels with polyureas derived by isocyanate. The mesoporous structure of the underlying silica framework is preserved through conformal polymer coating, and the thermal conductivity remains low. Characterization has been conducted on the thermal, physical properties and the mechanical properties under quasi-static loading conditions. In this paper, we present results on the dynamic compressive behavior of the crosslinked silica aerogel (CSA) using a split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB). A new tubing pulse shaper was employed to help reach the dynamic stress equilibrium and constant strain rate. The stress-strain relationship was determined at high strain rates within 114-4386 s-1. The effects of strain rate, density, specimen thickness and water absorption on the dynamic behavior of the CSA were investigated through a series of dynamic experiments. The Young’s moduli (or 0.2% offset compressive yield strengths) at a strain rate ˜350 s-1 were determined as 10.96/2.08, 159.5/6.75, 192.2/7.68, 304.6/11.46, 407.0/20.91 and 640.5/30.47 MPa for CSA with densities 0.205, 0.454, 0.492, 0.551, 0.628 and 0.731 g cm-3, respectively. The deformation and failure behaviors of a native silica aerogel with density (0.472 g cm-3), approximately the same as a typical CSA sample were observed with a high speed digital camera. Digital image correlation technique was used to determine the surface strains through a series of images acquired using high speed photography. The relative uniform axial deformation indicated that localized compaction did not occur at a compressive strain level of ˜17%, suggesting most likely failure mechanism at high strain rate to be different from that under quasi

  5. The Compressive Behavior of Isocyanate-crosslinked Silica Aerogel at High Strain Rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luo, H.; Lu, H.; Leventis, N.

    2006-01-01

    Aerogels are low-density, highly nano-porous materials. Their engineering applications are limited due to their brittleness and hydrophilicity. Recently, a strong lightweight crosslinked silica aerogel has been developed by encapsulating the skeletal framework of amine-modified silica aerogels with polyureas derived by isocyanate. The mesoporous structure of the underlying silica framework is preserved through conformal polymer coating, and the thermal conductivity remains low. Characterization has been conducted on the thermal, physical properties and the mechanical properties under quasi-static loading conditions. In this paper, we present results on the dynamic compressive behavior of the crosslinked silica aerogel (CSA) using a split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB). A new tubing pulse shaper was employed to help reach the dynamic stress equilibrium and constant strain rate. The stress-strain relationship was determined at high strain rates within 114-4386/s. The effects of strain rate, density, specimen thickness and water absorption on the dynamic behavior of the CSA were investigated through a series of dynamic experiments. The Young's moduli (or 0.2% offset compressive yield strengths) at a strain rate approx.350/s were determined as 10.96/2.08, 159.5/6.75, 192.2/7.68, 304.6/11.46, 407.0/20.91 and 640.5/30.47 MPa for CSA with densities 0.205, 0.454, 0.492, 0.551,0.628 and 0.731 g/cu cm, respectively. The deformation and failure behaviors of a native silica aerogel with density (0.472 g/cu cm ), approximately the same as a typical CSA sample were observed with a high speed digital camera. Digital image correlation technique was used to determine the surface strains through a series of images acquired using high speed photography. The relative uniform axial deformation indicated that localized compaction did not occur at a compressive strain level of approx.17%, suggesting most likely failure mechanism at high strain rate to be different from that under quasi

  6. International Note: Between-Domain Relations of Chinese High School Students' Academic Achievements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yangyang, Liu

    2012-01-01

    The present study examined the between-domain relations of Chinese high school students' academic achievements. In a sample of 1870 Chinese 10th grade students, the results indicated that Chinese high school students' academic achievements were correlated across nine subjects. In line with the previous Western findings, the findings suggested that…

  7. The Effect of the Time Management Art on Academic Achievement among High School Students in Jordan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Zoubi, Maysoon

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed at recognizing the effect of the Time Management Art on academic achievement among high school students in the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan. The researcher employed the descriptive-analytic research to achieve the purpose of the study where he chose a sample of (2000) high school female and male students as respondents to the…

  8. High-Achieving and Average Students' Reading Growth: Contrasting School and Summer Trajectories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rambo-Hernandez, Karen E.; McCoach, D. Betsy

    2015-01-01

    Much is unknown about how initially high-achieving students grow academically, especially given the measurement issues inherent in assessing growth for the highest performing students. This study compared initially high-achieving and average students' growth in reading (in a cohort of third-grade students from 2,000 schools) over 3 years.…

  9. A Longitudinal Investigation of Project-Based Instruction and Student Achievement in High School Social Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Summers, Emily J.; Dickinson, Gail

    2012-01-01

    This longitudinal study focused on how project-based instruction (PBI) influenced secondary social studies students' academic achievement and promoted College and Career Readiness (CCR). We explored and compared student achievement in a PBI high school versus a traditional instruction high school within the same rural school district. While…

  10. Nonlinear Frequency Compression

    PubMed Central

    Scollie, Susan; Glista, Danielle; Seelisch, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Frequency lowering technologies offer an alternative amplification solution for severe to profound high frequency hearing losses. While frequency lowering technologies may improve audibility of high frequency sounds, the very nature of this processing can affect the perceived sound quality. This article reports the results from two studies that investigated the impact of a nonlinear frequency compression (NFC) algorithm on perceived sound quality. In the first study, the cutoff frequency and compression ratio parameters of the NFC algorithm were varied, and their effect on the speech quality was measured subjectively with 12 normal hearing adults, 12 normal hearing children, 13 hearing impaired adults, and 9 hearing impaired children. In the second study, 12 normal hearing and 8 hearing impaired adult listeners rated the quality of speech in quiet, speech in noise, and music after processing with a different set of NFC parameters. Results showed that the cutoff frequency parameter had more impact on sound quality ratings than the compression ratio, and that the hearing impaired adults were more tolerant to increased frequency compression than normal hearing adults. No statistically significant differences were found in the sound quality ratings of speech-in-noise and music stimuli processed through various NFC settings by hearing impaired listeners. These findings suggest that there may be an acceptable range of NFC settings for hearing impaired individuals where sound quality is not adversely affected. These results may assist an Audiologist in clinical NFC hearing aid fittings for achieving a balance between high frequency audibility and sound quality. PMID:23539261

  11. The Meaning High-Achieving African-American Males in an Urban High School Ascribe to Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, LaTasha; Davis, Julius

    2013-01-01

    Many researchers, educators, administrators, policymakers and members of the general public doubt the prevalence of high-achieving African-American males in urban high schools capable of excelling in mathematics. As part of a larger study, the current study explored the educational experiences of four high-achieving African-American males…

  12. Removing high contrast artifacts via digital inpainting in cryo-electron tomography: an application of compressed sensing.

    PubMed

    Song, Kahye; Comolli, Luis R; Horowitz, Mark

    2012-05-01

    To cope with poor quality in cryo-electron tomography images, electron-dense markers, such as colloidal goldbeads, are often used to assist image registration and analysis algorithms. However, these markers can create artifacts that occlude a specimen due to their high contrast, which can also cause failure of some image processing algorithms. One way of reducing these artifacts is to replace high contrast objects with pixel densities that blend into the surroundings in the projection domain before volume reconstruction. In this paper, we propose digital inpainting via compressed sensing (CS) as a new method to achieve this goal. We show that cryo-ET projections are sparse in the discrete cosine transform (DCT) domain, and, by finding the sparsest DCT domain decompositions given uncorrupted pixels, we can fill in the missing pixel values that are occluded by high contrast objects without discontinuities. Our method reduces visual artifacts both in projections and in tomograms better than conventional algorithms, such as polynomial interpolation and random noise inpainting.

  13. Mechanical Properties and Microstructure of the CoCrFeMnNi High Entropy Alloy Under High Strain Rate Compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bingfeng; Fu, Ao; Huang, Xiaoxia; Liu, Bin; Liu, Yong; Li, Zezhou; Zan, Xiang

    2016-07-01

    The equiatomic CoCrFeMnNi high entropy alloy, which crystallizes in the face-centered cubic (FCC) crystal structure, was prepared by the spark plasma sintering technique. Dynamic compressive tests of the CoCrFeMnNi high entropy alloy were deformed at varying strain rates ranging from 1 × 103 to 3 × 103 s-1 using a split-Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) system. The dynamic yield strength of the CoCrFeMnNi high entropy alloy increases with increasing strain rate. The Zerilli-Armstrong (Z-A) plastic model was applied to model the dynamic flow behavior of the CoCrFeMnNi high entropy alloy, and the constitutive relationship was obtained. Serration behavior during plastic deformation was observed in the stress-strain curves. The mechanism for serration behavior of the alloy deformed at high strain rate is proposed.

  14. Compressibility anomaly in the superconducting material Nb3Al under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Z. H.; Li, C. Y.; Liu, H. Z.

    2012-09-01

    Nb3Al, which is widely used in high field magnets, was studied under a range of pressures up to 39.5 GPa using diamond anvil cell. The Nb3Al superconductor is structurally stable up to the highest pressure of the present investigation from previous reports. However, an anomaly of the compressibility beyond 19.2 GPa was detected in the pressure versus volume plot. The curve of volume versus pressure shows the existence of a plateau around 18.0 GPa as seen in several other highly correlated electrons systems, The observed pressure-induced isostructural phase transition was accomplished with a volume inclination without any symmetrical change (space group, Wyckoff position). The physical mechanism behind this isostructural phase transition is the interesting issue for further studies.

  15. Strain-rate/temperature behavior of high density polyethylene in compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clements, L. L.; Sherby, O. D.

    1978-01-01

    The compressive strain rate/temperature behavior of highly linear, high density polyethylene was analyzed in terms of the predictive relations developed for metals and other crystalline materials. For strains of 5 percent and above, the relationship between applied strain rate, dotted epsilon, and resulting flow stress, sigma, was found to be: dotted epsilon exp times (Q sub f/RT) = k'(sigma/sigma sub c) to the nth power; the left-hand side is the activation-energy-compensated strain rate, where Q sub f is activation energy for flow, R is gas constant, and T is temperature; k is a constant, n is temperature-independent stress exponent, and sigma/sigma sub c is structure-compensated stress. A master curve resulted from a logarithmic plot of activation-energy-compensated strain rate versus structure-compensated stress.

  16. The high-pressure phase behavior and compressibility of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, Lewis L.; Velisavljevic, Nenad; Hooks, Daniel E.; Dattelbaum, Dana M.

    2008-10-24

    The phase stability and isothermal compression behavior of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) have been established to 26.5 GPa using angle-dispersive x-ray diffraction. P-V isotherms derived from the high-pressure x-ray spectra displayed a slight density hysteresis around 4.0 GPa and a sharp discontinuity at - 20.0 GPa. The latter transition is ascribed to a monoclinic-to-orthorhombic first-order phase transition in TNT. The conversion of the isothermal P-V data to the shock velocity-particle velocity plane revealed a deviation from linearity at low u{sub p}, a cusp associated with the phase transition at high u{sub p}, and general agreement with the wealth of unreacted Hugoniot data on TNT.

  17. Compressive sensing exploiting wavelet-domain dependencies for ECG compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polania, Luisa F.; Carrillo, Rafael E.; Blanco-Velasco, Manuel; Barner, Kenneth E.

    2012-06-01

    Compressive sensing (CS) is an emerging signal processing paradigm that enables sub-Nyquist sampling of sparse signals. Extensive previous work has exploited the sparse representation of ECG signals in compression applications. In this paper, we propose the use of wavelet domain dependencies to further reduce the number of samples in compressive sensing-based ECG compression while decreasing the computational complexity. R wave events manifest themselves as chains of large coefficients propagating across scales to form a connected subtree of the wavelet coefficient tree. We show that the incorporation of this connectedness as additional prior information into a modified version of the CoSaMP algorithm can significantly reduce the required number of samples to achieve good quality in the reconstruction. This approach also allows more control over the ECG signal reconstruction, in particular, the QRS complex, which is typically distorted when prior information is not included in the recovery. The compression algorithm was tested upon records selected from the MIT-BIH arrhythmia database. Simulation results show that the proposed algorithm leads to high compression ratios associated with low distortion levels relative to state-of-the-art compression algorithms.

  18. Pulse compression of a high-power thin disk laser using rod-type fiber amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Saraceno, C J; Heckl, O H; Baer, C R E; Südmeyer, T; Keller, U

    2011-01-17

    We report on two pulse compressors for a high-power thin disk laser oscillator using rod-type fiber amplifiers. Both systems are seeded by a standard SESAM modelocked thin disk laser that delivers 16 W of average power at a repetition rate of 10.6 MHz with a pulse energy of 1.5 μJ and a pulse duration of 1 ps. We discuss two results with different fiber parameters with different trade-offs in pulse duration, average power, damage and complexity. The first amplifier setup consists of a Yb-doped fiber amplifier with a 2200 μm2 core area and a length of 55 cm, resulting in a compressed average power of 55 W with 98-fs pulses at a repetition rate of 10.6 MHz. The second system uses a shorter 36-cm fiber with a larger core area of 4500 μm2. In a stretcher-free configuration we obtained 34 W of compressed average power and 65-fs pulses. In both cases peak powers of > 30 MW were demonstrated at several μJ pulse energies. The power scaling limitations due to damage and self-focusing are discussed.

  19. High dynamic range compression and detail enhancement of infrared images in the gradient domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Feifei; Xie, Wei; Ma, Guorui; Qin, Qianqing

    2014-11-01

    To find the trade-off between providing an accurate perception of the global scene and improving the visibility of details without excessively distorting radiometric infrared information, a novel gradient-domain-based visualization method for high dynamic range infrared images is proposed in this study. The proposed method adopts an energy function which includes a data constraint term and a gradient constraint term. In the data constraint term, the classical histogram projection method is used to perform the initial dynamic range compression to obtain the desired pixel values and preserve the global contrast. In the gradient constraint term, the moment matching method is adopted to obtain the normalized image; then a gradient gain factor function is designed to adjust the magnitudes of the normalized image gradients and obtain the desired gradient field. Lastly, the low dynamic range image is solved from the proposed energy function. The final image is obtained by linearly mapping the low dynamic range image to the 8-bit display range. The effectiveness and robustness of the proposed method are analyzed using the infrared images obtained from different operating conditions. Compared with other well-established methods, our method shows a significant performance in terms of dynamic range compression, while enhancing the details and avoiding the common artifacts, such as halo, gradient reversal, hazy or saturation.

  20. Studies in High Frequency Oscillating Compressible Flow for Application in a Micro Regenerative Cryocooler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garaway, I.; Grossman, G.

    2006-04-01

    Phenomena associated with oscillating flow in the regenerator and other cryocooler components are crucial, especially in micro regenerative systems that must operate at higher frequencies. The dependence of the phase angle and friction factor on operating frequency has been discussed quite extensively with some contradictions being reported experimentally. Recent published models have addressed this issue analytically, and pointed to fluid inertial effects as the possible cause of this dependence. When addressed analytically, an incompressible fluid with constant material properties was assumed, for simplicity. The results of these studies show considerable discrepancies when compared to the aforementioned experimental results. These discrepancies seem to be rooted in the simplifying assumptions. The helium employed in cryocoolers is hardly incompressible, nor does it possess constant properties. This paper extends earlier work to consider a compressible, temperature dependent fluid in high frequency oscillating flow. The problem is solved using a CFD numerical package. Results show that the phase angle is dependent on operating frequency at typical regenerator operating conditions while the friction factor should have no dependence at these typical frequencies. This study shows how the inclusion of compressibility and temperature dependence significantly adjusts the theoretical results to values much closer to those observed experimentally.

  1. Prediction of mechanical properties of compacted binary mixtures containing high-dose poorly compressible drug.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sarsvatkumar; Bansal, Arvind Kumar

    2011-01-17

    The aim of the study was to develop, compare and validate predictive model for mechanical property of binary systems. The mechanical properties of binary mixtures of ibuprofen (IBN) a poorly compressible high dose drug, were studied in presence of different excipients. The tensile strength of tablets of individual components viz. IBN, microcrystalline cellulose (MCC), and dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCP) and binary mixtures of IBN with excipients was measured at various relative densities. Prediction of the mechanical property of binary mixtures, from that of single components, was attempted using Ryshkewitch-Duckworth (R-D) and Percolation theory, by assuming a linear mixing rule or a power law mixing rule. The models were compared, and the best model was proposed based on the distribution of residuals and the Akaike's information criterion. Good predictions were obtained with the power law combined with linear mixing rule, using R-D and Percolation models. The results indicated that the proposed model can well predict the mechanical properties of binary system containing predominantly poorly compressible drug candidate. The predictions of these models and conclusions can be systematically generalized to other pharmaceutical powders.

  2. Anomalous compression behavior in lanthanum/cerium-based metallic glasses under high pressure.

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Q. S.; Li, Y. C.; Feng, C. M.; Liermann, P.; Somayazulu, M.; Shen, G. Y.; Mao, H. K.; Ren, Y.; Liu, J.; Hu, T. D.; Jiang, J. Z.; ICNSM and Laboratory of New-Structured Materials; Zhejiang Univ.; Chinese Academy of Sciences; Carnegie Inst. of Washington

    2007-01-01

    In situ high-pressure x-ray diffraction, low-temperature resistivity, and magnetization experiments were performed on a La{sub 32}Ce{sub 32}Al{sub 16}Ni{sub 5}Cu{sub 15} bulk metallic glass (BMG). A sudden change in compressibility at {approx}14 GPa and a rapid increase of resistivity at {approx}12 K were detected, whereas magnetic phase transformation and magnetic field dependence of the low-temperature resistivity do not occur at temperatures down to 4.2 K. An interaction between conduction electrons and the two-level systems is suggested to explain the temperature and field dependences of resistivity of the BMG alloy. Although the cause of the unusual change in compressibility at {approx}14 GPa is not clear, we believe that it could be linked with the unique electron structure of cerium in the amorphous matrix. An electronic phase transition in BMG alloys, most likely a second-order amorphous-to-amorphous phase transition, is suggested.

  3. Supercomputer implementation of finite element algorithms for high speed compressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, E. A.; Ramakrishnan, R.

    1986-01-01

    Prediction of compressible flow phenomena using the finite element method is of recent origin and considerable interest. Two shock capturing finite element formulations for high speed compressible flows are described. A Taylor-Galerkin formulation uses a Taylor series expansion in time coupled with a Galerkin weighted residual statement. The Taylor-Galerkin algorithms use explicit artificial dissipation, and the performance of three dissipation models are compared. A Petrov-Galerkin algorithm has as its basis the concepts of streamline upwinding. Vectorization strategies are developed to implement the finite element formulations on the NASA Langley VPS-32. The vectorization scheme results in finite element programs that use vectors of length of the order of the number of nodes or elements. The use of the vectorization procedure speeds up processing rates by over two orders of magnitude. The Taylor-Galerkin and Petrov-Galerkin algorithms are evaluated for 2D inviscid flows on criteria such as solution accuracy, shock resolution, computational speed and storage requirements. The convergence rates for both algorithms are enhanced by local time-stepping schemes. Extension of the vectorization procedure for predicting 2D viscous and 3D inviscid flows are demonstrated. Conclusions are drawn regarding the applicability of the finite element procedures for realistic problems that require hundreds of thousands of nodes.

  4. New Experimental Capabilities and Theoretical Insights of High Pressure Compression Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlikowski, Daniel; Nguyen, Jeffrey H.; Patterson, J. Reed; Minich, Roger; Martin, L. Peter; Holmes, Neil C.

    2007-12-01

    Currently there are three platforms that offer quasi-isentropic compression or ramp-wave compression (RWC): light-gas gun, magnetic flux (Z-pinch), and laser. We focus here on the light-gas gun technique and on some current theoretical insights from experimental data. An impedance gradient through the length of the impactor provides the pressure pulse upon impact to the subject material. Applications and results are given concerning high-pressure strength and the liquid-to-solid, phase transition of water giving its first associated phase fraction history. We also introduce the Korteweg-deVries-Burgers equation as a means to understand the evolution of these RWC waves as they propagate through the thickness of the subject material. This model equation has the necessary competition between non-linear, dispersion, and dissipation processes, which is shown through observed structures that are manifested in the experimental particle velocity histories. Such methodology points towards a possibility of quantifying dissipation, through which RWC experiments may be analyzed.

  5. High planarity x-ray drive for ultra-fast shockless-compression experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R; Pollaine, S; Moon, S; Lorenz, K T; Celliers, P; Eggert, J; Park, H; Collins, G

    2007-04-03

    A spatially-planar ({Delta}time/time {approx} 0.2%) longitudinal stress drive extending over millimeter scale lengths is used to shocklessly compress an aluminum sample to a peak stress of 210 GPa over nanosecond timescales. Direct laser irradiation onto the inner wall of an Au halfraum creates an x ray distribution with a near-uniform blackbody temperature of up to 137eV. The x rays ablate material from a low-Z foil in a region of planarity closely matched to the diameter of the halfraum. The resultant ablatively-driven shock is converted into a ramp-stress-wave in a secondary aluminum target through unloading across an intermediate vacuum-gap. Higher peak ramp stresses and shorter associated rise-times result from increasing input laser energy. Ramp-compression experiments can provide single shot equation-of-state data close to the isentrope, information on the kinetics of phase transformations and material strength at high pressures.

  6. Stability of retained austenite in high carbon steel under compressive stress: an investigation from macro to nano scale

    PubMed Central

    Hossain, R.; Pahlevani, F.; Quadir, M. Z.; Sahajwalla, V.

    2016-01-01

    Although high carbon martensitic steels are well known for their industrial utility in high abrasion and extreme operating environments, due to their hardness and strength, the compressive stability of their retained austenite, and the implications for the steels’ performance and potential uses, is not well understood. This article describes the first investigation at both the macro and nano scale of the compressive stability of retained austenite in high carbon martensitic steel. Using a combination of standard compression testing, X-ray diffraction, optical microstructure, electron backscattering diffraction imaging, electron probe micro-analysis, nano-indentation and micro-indentation measurements, we determined the mechanical stability of retained austenite and martensite in high carbon steel under compressive stress and identified the phase transformation mechanism, from the macro to the nano level. We found at the early stage of plastic deformation hexagonal close-packed (HCP) martensite formation dominates, while higher compression loads trigger body-centred tetragonal (BCT) martensite formation. The combination of this phase transformation and strain hardening led to an increase in the hardness of high carbon steel of around 30%. This comprehensive characterisation of stress induced phase transformation could enable the precise control of the microstructures of high carbon martensitic steels, and hence their properties. PMID:27725722

  7. Stability of retained austenite in high carbon steel under compressive stress: an investigation from macro to nano scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, R.; Pahlevani, F.; Quadir, M. Z.; Sahajwalla, V.

    2016-10-01

    Although high carbon martensitic steels are well known for their industrial utility in high abrasion and extreme operating environments, due to their hardness and strength, the compressive stability of their retained austenite, and the implications for the steels’ performance and potential uses, is not well understood. This article describes the first investigation at both the macro and nano scale of the compressive stability of retained austenite in high carbon martensitic steel. Using a combination of standard compression testing, X-ray diffraction, optical microstructure, electron backscattering diffraction imaging, electron probe micro-analysis, nano-indentation and micro-indentation measurements, we determined the mechanical stability of retained austenite and martensite in high carbon steel under compressive stress and identified the phase transformation mechanism, from the macro to the nano level. We found at the early stage of plastic deformation hexagonal close-packed (HCP) martensite formation dominates, while higher compression loads trigger body-centred tetragonal (BCT) martensite formation. The combination of this phase transformation and strain hardening led to an increase in the hardness of high carbon steel of around 30%. This comprehensive characterisation of stress induced phase transformation could enable the precise control of the microstructures of high carbon martensitic steels, and hence their properties.

  8. Impact of compression on gas transport in non-woven gas diffusion layers of high temperature polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froning, Dieter; Yu, Junliang; Gaiselmann, Gerd; Reimer, Uwe; Manke, Ingo; Schmidt, Volker; Lehnert, Werner

    2016-06-01

    Gas transport in non-woven gas diffusion layers of a high-temperature polymer electrolyte fuel cell was calculated with the Lattice Boltzmann method. The underlying micro structure was taken from two sources. A real micro structure was analyzed in the synchrotron under the impact of a compression mask mimicking the channel/rib structure of a flow field. Furthermore a stochastic geometry model based on synchrotron X-ray tomography studies was applied. The effect of compression is included in the stochastic model. Gas transport in these micro structures was simulated and the impact of compression was analyzed. Fiber bundles overlaying the micro structure were identified which affect the homogeneity of the gas flow. There are significant deviations between the impact of compression on effective material properties for this type of gas diffusion layers and the Kozeny-Carman equation.

  9. Shock compression response of highly reactive Ni + Al multilayered thin foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Sean C.; Thadhani, Naresh N.

    2016-03-01

    The shock-compression response of Ni + Al multilayered thin foils is investigated using laser-accelerated thin-foil plate-impact experiments over the pressure range of 2 to 11 GPa. The foils contain alternating Ni and Al layers (parallel but not flat) of nominally 50 nm bilayer spacing. The goal is to determine the equation of state and shock-induced reactivity of these highly reactive fully dense thin-foil materials. The laser-accelerated thin-foil impact set-up involved combined use of photon-doppler-velocimetry to monitor the acceleration and impact velocity of an aluminum flyer, and VISAR interferometry was used to monitor the back free-surface velocity of the impacted Ni + Al multilayered target. The shock-compression response of the Ni + Al target foils was determined using experimentally measured parameters and impedance matching approach, with error bars identified considering systematic and experimental errors. Meso-scale CTH shock simulations were performed using real imported microstructures of the cross-sections of the multilayered Ni + Al foils to compute the Hugoniot response (assuming no reaction) for correlation with their experimentally determined equation of state. It was observed that at particle velocities below ˜150 m/s, the experimentally determined equation of state trend matches the CTH-predicted inert response and is consistent with the observed unreacted state of the recovered Ni + Al target foils from this velocity regime. At higher particle velocities, the experimentally determined equation of state deviates from the CTH-predicted inert response. A complete and self-sustained reaction is also seen in targets recovered from experiments performed at these higher particle velocities. The deviation in the measured equation of state, to higher shock speeds and expanded volumes, combined with the observation of complete reaction in the recovered multilayered foils, confirmed via microstructure characterization, is indicative of the occurrence

  10. An adaptive high-order hybrid scheme for compressive, viscous flows with detailed chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, Jack L.; Deiterding, Ralf; Shepherd, Joseph E.; Pullin, D. I.

    2011-08-01

    A hybrid weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO)/centered-difference numerical method, with low numerical dissipation, high-order shock-capturing, and structured adaptive mesh refinement (SAMR), has been developed for the direct numerical simulation of the multicomponent, compressible, reactive Navier-Stokes equations. The method enables accurate resolution of diffusive processes within reaction zones. The approach combines time-split reactive source terms with a high-order, shock-capturing scheme specifically designed for diffusive flows. A description of the order-optimized, symmetric, finite difference, flux-based, hybrid WENO/centered-difference scheme is given, along with its implementation in a high-order SAMR framework. The implementation of new techniques for discontinuity flagging, scheme-switching, and high-order prolongation and restriction is described. In particular, the refined methodology does not require upwinded WENO at grid refinement interfaces for stability, allowing high-order prolongation and thereby eliminating a significant source of numerical diffusion within the overall code performance. A series of one-and two-dimensional test problems is used to verify the implementation, specifically the high-order accuracy of the diffusion terms. One-dimensional benchmarks include a viscous shock wave and a laminar flame. In two-space dimensions, a Lamb-Oseen vortex and an unstable diffusive detonation are considered, for which quantitative convergence is demonstrated. Further, a two-dimensional high-resolution simulation of a reactive Mach reflection phenomenon with diffusive multi-species mixing is presented.

  11. Achieving high strength and high ductility in magnesium alloy using hard-plate rolling (HPR) process.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui-Yuan; Yu, Zhao-Peng; Zhang, Lei; Liu, Chun-Guo; Zha, Min; Wang, Cheng; Jiang, Qi-Chuan

    2015-01-01

    Magnesium alloys are highly desirable for a wide range of lightweight structural components. However, rolling Mg alloys can be difficult due to their poor plasticity, and the strong texture yielded from rolling often results in poor plate forming ability, which limits their further engineering applications. Here we report a new hard-plate rolling (HPR) route which achieves a large reduction during a single rolling pass. The Mg-9Al-1Zn (AZ91) plates processed by HPR consist of coarse grains of 30-60 μm, exhibiting a typical basal texture, fine grains of 1-5 μm and ultrafine (sub) grains of 200-500 nm, both of the latter two having a weakened texture. More importantly, the HPR was efficient in gaining a simultaneous high strength and uniform ductility, i.e., ~371 MPa and ~23%, respectively. The superior properties should be mainly attributed to the cooperation effect of the multimodal grain structure and weakened texture, where the former facilitates a strong work hardening while the latter promotes the basal slip. The HPR methodology is facile and effective, and can avoid plate cracking that is prone to occur during conventional rolling processes. This strategy is applicable to hard-to-deform materials like Mg alloys, and thus has a promising prospect for industrial application. PMID:26603776

  12. Lipid target achievement among patients with very high and high cardiovascular risk in a lipid clinic.

    PubMed

    Barkas, Fotios; Liberopoulos, Evangelos N; Kostapanos, Michael S; Liamis, George; Tziallas, Dimitrios; Elisaf, Moses

    2015-04-01

    This was a retrospective study that assessed achievement of lipid-lowering treatment targets in the setting of a University Hospital Lipid Clinic. Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) goal attainment according to National Cholesterol Education Program-Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP ATP III) and European Society of Cardiology/European Atherosclerosis Society (ESC/EAS) guidelines was recorded in 1000 consecutive adult patients followed for ≥3 years (mean 8 years). The LDL-C targets according to the NCEP ATP III were attained by 66% and 86% of patients with "very high" (n = 477) and "high" (n = 408) cardiovascular risk, respectively. Fewer patients were within LDL-C goals according to the ESC/EAS guidelines: 25% and 42%. Overall, 92% of the patients were on statins: 67% were on statin monotherapy, while 33% were on combinations with ezetimibe (25%), ω-3 fatty acids (5%), fibrates (4%), or colesevelam (2%). Even in a specialist lipid clinic, a large proportion of patients are not at goal according to the recent ESC/EAS guidelines. PMID:24830420

  13. Achieving high strength and high ductility in magnesium alloy using hard-plate rolling (HPR) process.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui-Yuan; Yu, Zhao-Peng; Zhang, Lei; Liu, Chun-Guo; Zha, Min; Wang, Cheng; Jiang, Qi-Chuan

    2015-11-25

    Magnesium alloys are highly desirable for a wide range of lightweight structural components. However, rolling Mg alloys can be difficult due to their poor plasticity, and the strong texture yielded from rolling often results in poor plate forming ability, which limits their further engineering applications. Here we report a new hard-plate rolling (HPR) route which achieves a large reduction during a single rolling pass. The Mg-9Al-1Zn (AZ91) plates processed by HPR consist of coarse grains of 30-60 μm, exhibiting a typical basal texture, fine grains of 1-5 μm and ultrafine (sub) grains of 200-500 nm, both of the latter two having a weakened texture. More importantly, the HPR was efficient in gaining a simultaneous high strength and uniform ductility, i.e., ~371 MPa and ~23%, respectively. The superior properties should be mainly attributed to the cooperation effect of the multimodal grain structure and weakened texture, where the former facilitates a strong work hardening while the latter promotes the basal slip. The HPR methodology is facile and effective, and can avoid plate cracking that is prone to occur during conventional rolling processes. This strategy is applicable to hard-to-deform materials like Mg alloys, and thus has a promising prospect for industrial application.

  14. Achieving high strength and high ductility in magnesium alloy using hard-plate rolling (HPR) process

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hui–Yuan; Yu, Zhao–Peng; Zhang, Lei; Liu, Chun–Guo; Zha, Min; Wang, Cheng; Jiang, Qi–Chuan

    2015-01-01

    Magnesium alloys are highly desirable for a wide range of lightweight structural components. However, rolling Mg alloys can be difficult due to their poor plasticity, and the strong texture yielded from rolling often results in poor plate forming ability, which limits their further engineering applications. Here we report a new hard-plate rolling (HPR) route which achieves a large reduction during a single rolling pass. The Mg-9Al-1Zn (AZ91) plates processed by HPR consist of coarse grains of 30–60 μm, exhibiting a typical basal texture, fine grains of 1–5 μm and ultrafine (sub) grains of 200–500 nm, both of the latter two having a weakened texture. More importantly, the HPR was efficient in gaining a simultaneous high strength and uniform ductility, i.e., ~371 MPa and ~23%, respectively. The superior properties should be mainly attributed to the cooperation effect of the multimodal grain structure and weakened texture, where the former facilitates a strong work hardening while the latter promotes the basal slip. The HPR methodology is facile and effective, and can avoid plate cracking that is prone to occur during conventional rolling processes. This strategy is applicable to hard-to-deform materials like Mg alloys, and thus has a promising prospect for industrial application. PMID:26603776

  15. Failure Analysis With a New Tool Geometry, X-Die, in Areas With High Tension/Compression Strains

    SciTech Connect

    Andersson, Alf; Thilderkvist, Per

    2007-05-17

    Sheet-metal forming involves a complex strain distribution over the part. The strains consist of tension, compression, and a mix of both. A geometry has been developed, the X-Die, in order to gain insight into the strain behavior of different materials. The X-Die enables strain paths far into the tension/compression region, thus creating the possibility to extend the experimental base both for definition and for further extrapolation of the Forming Limit Curve (FLC) in the tension/compression region, as well as to evaluate FE-simulation results for the same region.Today, evaluation of cracks is made by using FLC. In the conventional test methods, the strains only reach 40% compression (true strain) and often much lower percentages. In conventional test methods, the FLC for any region beyond these levels is extrapolated from existing data.The experimental test proposed in this work consists of a geometry, the X-die, which has shown that rates of 70% tension/compression can be reached (point 0.7/-0.7 in the FLC). Thereby, the region for prediction of cracks on the compression side can be extended in the Forming Limit Diagram (FLD). Furthermore, the strain paths are easy to follow and the limits when cracks appear can be evaluated. Furthermore, the experimental results show that the behavior depends on the material quality. Qualities such as Extreme High Strength Steel (EHSS) and Aluminum have a limited tension/compression rate due to failure in plane strain tension. Material qualities with high r-values, e.g. Mild steel and High Strength Steel (HSS), reach high tension/compression rates before failure and have regions with clearly defined strain signatures. This will be favorable for comparison with numerical simulations, especially for strain signatures in the tension/compression region. Furthermore, the experiments did not indicate any limitation in the compression region besides the one defined in the normal procedure in creation of an FLC.This geometry is

  16. A practical discrete-adjoint method for high-fidelity compressible turbulence simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishnampet, Ramanathan; Bodony, Daniel J.; Freund, Jonathan B.

    2015-03-01

    Methods and computing hardware advances have enabled accurate predictions of complex compressible turbulence phenomena, such as the generation of jet noise that motivates the present effort. However, limited understanding of underlying physical mechanisms restricts the utility of such predictions since they do not, by themselves, indicate a route to design improvements. Gradient-based optimization using adjoints can circumvent the flow complexity to guide designs, though this is predicated on the availability of a sufficiently accurate solution of the forward and adjoint systems. These are challenging to obtain, since both the chaotic character of the turbulence and the typical use of discretizations near their resolution limits in order to efficiently represent its smaller scales will amplify any approximation errors made in the adjoint formulation. Formulating a practical exact adjoint that avoids such errors is especially challenging if it is to be compatible with state-of-the-art simulation methods used for the turbulent flow itself. Automatic differentiation (AD) can provide code to calculate a nominally exact adjoint, but existing general-purpose AD codes are inefficient to the point of being prohibitive for large-scale turbulence simulations. Here, we analyze the compressible flow equations as discretized using the same high-order workhorse methods used for many high-fidelity compressible turbulence simulations, and formulate a practical space-time discrete-adjoint method without changing the basic discretization. A key step is the definition of a particular discrete analog of the continuous norm that defines our cost functional; our selection leads directly to an efficient Runge-Kutta-like scheme, though it would be just first-order accurate if used outside the adjoint formulation for time integration, with finite-difference spatial operators for the adjoint system. Its computational cost only modestly exceeds that of the flow equations. We confirm that its

  17. A practical discrete-adjoint method for high-fidelity compressible turbulence simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Vishnampet, Ramanathan; Bodony, Daniel J.; Freund, Jonathan B.

    2015-03-15

    Methods and computing hardware advances have enabled accurate predictions of complex compressible turbulence phenomena, such as the generation of jet noise that motivates the present effort. However, limited understanding of underlying physical mechanisms restricts the utility of such predictions since they do not, by themselves, indicate a route to design improvements. Gradient-based optimization using adjoints can circumvent the flow complexity to guide designs, though this is predicated on the availability of a sufficiently accurate solution of the forward and adjoint systems. These are challenging to obtain, since both the chaotic character of the turbulence and the typical use of discretizations near their resolution limits in order to efficiently represent its smaller scales will amplify any approximation errors made in the adjoint formulation. Formulating a practical exact adjoint that avoids such errors is especially challenging if it is to be compatible with state-of-the-art simulation methods used for the turbulent flow itself. Automatic differentiation (AD) can provide code to calculate a nominally exact adjoint, but existing general-purpose AD codes are inefficient to the point of being prohibitive for large-scale turbulence simulations. Here, we analyze the compressible flow equations as discretized using the same high-order workhorse methods used for many high-fidelity compressible turbulence simulations, and formulate a practical space–time discrete-adjoint method without changing the basic discretization. A key step is the definition of a particular discrete analog of the continuous norm that defines our cost functional; our selection leads directly to an efficient Runge–Kutta-like scheme, though it would be just first-order accurate if used outside the adjoint formulation for time integration, with finite-difference spatial operators for the adjoint system. Its computational cost only modestly exceeds that of the flow equations. We confirm that

  18. Fuel Vaporization and Its Effect on Combustion in a High-Speed Compression-Ignition Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothrock, A M; Waldron, C D

    1933-01-01

    The tests discussed in this report were conducted to determine whether or not there is appreciable vaporization of the fuel injected into a high-speed compression-ignition engine during the time available for injection and combustion. The effects of injection advance angle and fuel boiling temperature were investigated. The results show that an appreciable amount of the fuel is vaporized during injection even though the temperature and pressure conditions in the engine are not sufficient to cause ignition either during or after injection, and that when the conditions are such as to cause ignition the vaporization process affects the combustion. The results are compared with those of several other investigators in the same field.

  19. Modeling of Flow Stress of High Titanium Content 6061 Aluminum Alloy Under Hot Compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei; Guan, Yingping; Wang, Zhenhua

    2016-07-01

    Hot compression tests were performed on high titanium content 6061 aluminum alloy (AA 6061-Ti) using a Gleeble-3500 thermomechanical testing system at temperatures from 350 to 510 °C with a constant strain rate in the range of 0.001-10 s-1. Three types of flow stress models were established from the experimental stress-strain curves, the correlation coefficient (R), mean absolute relative error (MARE), and root mean square deviation (RMSD) between the predicted data and the experimental data were also calculated. The results show that the Fields-Backofen model, which includes a softening factor, was the simplest mathematical expression with a level of precision appropriate for the numerical simulations. However, the Arrhenius and artificial neural network (ANN) models were also consistent with the experimental results but they are more limited in their application in terms of their accuracy and the mathematical expression of the models.

  20. High-order ENO methods for the unsteady compressible Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atkins, H. L.

    1991-01-01

    The adaptive stencil concepts of ENO (Essentially Non-Oscillatory) methods are applied to the laminar Navier-Stokes equations to yield a high-order, time-accurate algorithm with a shock-capturing capability. The method targets problems in the areas of nonlinear acoustics, compressible transition, and turbulence which, due to the presence of shocks or complex geometries, are not easily solved by spectral methods. The present approach has been implemented and tested for the full three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations in a transformed curvilinear coordinate system. Validation results are presented for a variety of problems which verify the method's accuracy properties and shock capturing capabilities, as well as demonstrate its use as a direct simulation tool.

  1. Review of Fluorescence-Based Velocimetry Techniques to Study High-Speed Compressible Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bathel, Brett F.; Johansen, Criag; Inman, Jennifer A.; Jones, Stephen B.; Danehy, Paul M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper reviews five laser-induced fluorescence-based velocimetry techniques that have been used to study high-speed compressible flows at NASA Langley Research Center. The techniques discussed in this paper include nitric oxide (NO) molecular tagging velocimetry (MTV), nitrogen dioxide photodissociation (NO2-to-NO) MTV, and NO and atomic oxygen (O-atom) Doppler-shift-based velocimetry. Measurements of both single-component and two-component velocity have been performed using these techniques. This paper details the specific application and experiment for which each technique has been used, the facility in which the experiment was performed, the experimental setup, sample results, and a discussion of the lessons learned from each experiment.

  2. High strain rates effects in quasi-isentropic compression of solids

    SciTech Connect

    Ravelo, Ramon; Holian, Brad L; Germann, Timothy C

    2009-01-01

    We have performed large-scale molecular-dynamics (MD) simulations of shock loading and quasi-isentropic compression in defective copper crystals, modeling the interatomic interactions with an embedded-atom method potential. For samples with a relatively low density of pre-existing defects, the strain rate dependence of the flow stress follows a power law in the 10{sup 9}-10{sup 12} s{sup -1} regime with an exponent of 0.40. For initially damaged, isotropic crystals the flow stress exhibits a narrow linear region in strain rate, which then bends over at high strain rates in a manner reminiscent of shear thinning in fluids. The MD results can be described by a modification of Eyring's theory of Couette shear flow in fluids.

  3. Some Experiences with High Order Discretization Schemes for Compressible Fluid Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barth, Timothy J.; Chancellor, Marisa K. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    It is widely recognized that the structure and complexity of compressible fluid flow places high demands on numerical discretization techniques for the fluid flow equations. Fluid flows arising in external aerodynamics often contain both flow field discontinuities and fluid boundary-layers. Both must be accurately resolved to provide useful information to aerodynamic design and analysis engineers. These accuracy requirements motivated the present author to examine a class of finite-volume techniques on arbitrary triangulated domains based on linear or quadratic reconstruction of integral-averaged data followed by upwind flux function evaluation and small time evolution. More recently, we have considered some new upwind techniques which yield compact discretizations while maintaining higher order accuracy. In the mini-symposium talk we will discuss both of these techniques as well as demonstrate the relative merits of each method by computing a number of aerodynamic flows containing shock waves and boundary-layers.

  4. Modeling of Flow Stress of High Titanium Content 6061 Aluminum Alloy Under Hot Compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei; Guan, Yingping; Wang, Zhenhua

    2016-09-01

    Hot compression tests were performed on high titanium content 6061 aluminum alloy (AA 6061-Ti) using a Gleeble-3500 thermomechanical testing system at temperatures from 350 to 510 °C with a constant strain rate in the range of 0.001-10 s-1. Three types of flow stress models were established from the experimental stress-strain curves, the correlation coefficient ( R), mean absolute relative error ( MARE), and root mean square deviation ( RMSD) between the predicted data and the experimental data were also calculated. The results show that the Fields-Backofen model, which includes a softening factor, was the simplest mathematical expression with a level of precision appropriate for the numerical simulations. However, the Arrhenius and artificial neural network (ANN) models were also consistent with the experimental results but they are more limited in their application in terms of their accuracy and the mathematical expression of the models.

  5. Two-channel high-accuracy Holoimage technique for three-dimensional data compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yajun; Zhang, Lianxin; Yang, Sheng; Ji, Fang

    2016-10-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) shape data sizes can be substantially reduced using the Holoimage technique which converts the 3D shape data into regular 24-bit 2D images. However, the Holoimage technique generally takes up all the three standard image channels (RGB) and leave no room in an image to store other information, such as a texture or a normal map. Meanwhile, the recovered 3D accuracy is not very high due to the rounding process of image storage. To overcome these problems, this paper first proposes a two-channel Holoimage technique to compress 3D data and thus leave one more channel for storing other information. In addition, a novel phase-error compensation approach is also presented to enhance the recovered accuracy for Holoimage techniques. Without adding anymore bits, the error compensation approach can greatly improve the 3D recovered accuracy. Experimental results are presented to verify the performance of the proposed methods.

  6. Electromechanical properties of high coupling single crystals under large electric drive and uniaxial compression.

    PubMed

    Amin, Ahmed

    2005-10-01

    This work investigates the 33-mode electromechanical response of relaxor-ferroelectric lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate (PMN-PT) single crystals when driven with large fields approximately 0.4 MV/m under a combined direct current (DC) field and mechanical bias similar to those used in the design of sound projectors. It demonstrates that the remarkable small signal length extensional coupling (k33 > 0.90) and other electromechanical properties of morphotropic PMN-PT single crystals prevail under large drive. The observed k33 roll-off at 42 MPa compressive stress is analyzed in terms of the recent structural data and the high-order Devonshire theory of possible ferroelectric-ferroelectric transition trajectories.

  7. Electronic structure investigation of highly compressed aluminum with K edge absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Benuzzi-Mounaix, A; Dorchies, F; Recoules, V; Festa, F; Peyrusse, O; Levy, A; Ravasio, A; Hall, T; Koenig, M; Amadou, N; Brambrink, E; Mazevet, S

    2011-10-14

    The electronic structure evolution of highly compressed aluminum has been investigated using time resolved K edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy. A long laser pulse (500 ps, I(L)≈8×10(13) W/cm(2)) was used to create a uniform shock. A second ps pulse (I(L)≈10(17)  W/cm(2)) generated an ultrashort broadband x-ray source near the Al K edge. The main target was designed to probe aluminum at reshocked conditions up to now unexplored (3 times the solid density and temperatures around 8 eV). The hydrodynamical conditions were obtained using rear side visible diagnostics. Data were compared to ab initio and dense plasma calculations, indicating potential improvements in either description. This comparison shows that x-ray-absorption near-edge structure measurements provide a unique capability to probe matter at these extreme conditions and severally constrains theoretical approaches currently used. PMID:22107398

  8. Two models of high frequency chest compression therapy: interaction of jacket pressure and mouth airflow.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong Wan; Lee, Jongwon; Warwick, Warren J

    2007-01-01

    High frequency chest compression (HFCC) therapy assists clearing the secretions in the lung. This paper presents two mathematical models: 1) HFCC jacket function model (JFM) and 2) respiratory function model (RFM). JFM predicts the variation of the jacket pressure (Pj) from the respiratory pattern of mouth airflow (Fm). RFM predicts the HFCC induced mouth airflow (Fm) from the HFCC pulse pressures at the jacket (Pj). Fm and Pj were measured from a healthy subject during HFCC therapy. JFM, which was implemented with 2nd order system using prediction error method, shows the existence of breathing pattern at Pj. RFM, which was implemented with amplitude modulation technique, shows how the HFCC pulses affects to the Fm. JFM calculations match 78% of the measured respiratory pattern of Pj>. RFM calculations match 90% of measured HFCC induced Fm. These models can be used to test new breathing patterns before designing studies on patients having chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases.

  9. Decreased latent inhibition is associated with increased creative achievement in high-functioning individuals.

    PubMed

    Carson, Shelley H; Peterson, Jordan B; Higgins, Daniel M

    2003-09-01

    Reductions in latent inhibition (LI), the capacity to screen from conscious awareness stimuli previously experienced as irrelevant, have been generally associated with the tendency towards psychosis. However, "failure" to screen out previously irrelevant stimuli might also hypothetically contribute to original thinking, particularly in combination with high IQ. Meta-analysis of two studies, conducted on youthful high-IQ samples. demonstrated that high lifetime creative achievers had significantly lower LI scores than low creative achievers (r(effect size) = .31, p = .0003, one-tailed). Eminent creative achievers (participants under 21 years who reported unusually high scores in a single domain of creative achievement) were 7 times more likely to have low rather than high LI scores, chi2 (1, N = 25) = 10.69, phi = .47. p = .003.

  10. Deformation of Ni20W20Cu20Fe20Mo20 high entropy alloy for tensile followed by compressive and compressive followed by tensile loading: A molecular dynamics simulation based study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meraj, Md; Pal, S.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations based study on deformation behavior during uniaxial tension followed by compression and compression followed by tension after 0.6 pre-strain for Ni20W20Cu20Fe20Mo20 high entropy alloy (20 at. % each element) single crystals has been reported. This MD simulation is carried out at strain rate of 108 s-1 and at the temperature of -10°C. The influence of observed nano twin on deformation behaviour for such two types of loading process (i.e. tensile followed by compressive and compressive followed by tensile) has been investigated thoroughly. It is found that the dominant deformation mechanism is twin for tensile forward loading in Ni20W20Cu20Fe20Mo20 high entropy alloy single crystal, whereas atomic diffusion is the dominating factor for deformation behaviour in compressive reverse loading direction of high entropy alloy.

  11. Understanding and Reversing Underachievement, Low Achievement, and Achievement Gaps among High-Ability African American Males in Urban School Contexts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, Donna Y.; Moore, James L., III

    2013-01-01

    This article focuses on the achievement gap, with attention devoted to underachievement and low achievement among African American males in urban school contexts. More specifically, the article explains problems and issues facing or confronting these Black male students in urban education settings. A central part of this discussion is grounded in…

  12. Instructional, Transformational, and Managerial Leadership and Student Achievement: High School Principals Make a Difference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valentine, Jerry W.; Prater, Mike

    2011-01-01

    This statewide study examined the relationships between principal managerial, instructional, and transformational leadership and student achievement in public high schools. Differences in student achievement were found when schools were grouped according to principal leadership factors. Principal leadership behaviors promoting instructional and…

  13. Low and High Mathematics Achievement in Japanese, Chinese, and American Elementary-School Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uttal, David H.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    First and fifth grade students who scored high or low on a mathematics test were tested for intellectual ability and reading achievement. Students and their mothers were interviewed. Results indicated that factors associated with levels of achievement in mathematics operate in a similar fashion across three cultures that differ greatly in their…

  14. Accelerated Mathematics and High-Ability Students' Math Achievement in Grades Three and Four

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanley, Ashley M.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between the use of a computer-managed integrated learning system entitled Accelerated Math (AM) as a supplement to traditional mathematics instruction on achievement as measured by TerraNova achievement tests of third and fourth grade high-ability students. Gender, socioeconomic status, and…

  15. A Quantitative Comparison of Pennsylvania High School Student Achievement by Middle States Association's Accreditation Status

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Christopher A.

    2012-01-01

    As public school accountability for student achievement has continued to increase, prior to and as a result of the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001, schools have sought ways of bringing new instructional services to their students to raise their levels of achievement. Some Pennsylvania public high schools have attempted to improve student…

  16. Achievement Motivation in High School: Contrasting Theoretical Models in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia-Celay, I. Montero; Tapia, J. Alonso

    1992-01-01

    Three models of achievement motivation in the classroom are contrasted. Results with 155 high school students suggest that the model of C. S. Dweck and E. S. Elliott offers a better explanation of the relationships among achievement motivation, attributions, emotional reactions, expectancies, and performance than do the other models. (SLD)

  17. The Effects of Cooperative Learning on Student Achievement and Motivation in a High School Geometry Class.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nichols, Joe D.; Hall, Neff

    In this study, the effects of a form of cooperative group instruction (Student Teams Achievement Divisions) on student motivation and achievement in a high school geometry class were examined. Ninety (mostly 10th-grade) students were randomly assigned to either a control group receiving traditional instruction or one of two treatment groups…

  18. Early Reading Skills and Academic Achievement Trajectories of Students Facing Poverty, Homelessness, and High Residential Mobility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herbers, Janette E.; Cutuli, J. J.; Supkoff, Laura M.; Heistad, David; Chan, Chi-Keung; Hinz, Elizabeth; Masten, Ann S.

    2012-01-01

    This investigation tested the importance of early academic achievement for later achievement trajectories among 18,011 students grouped by level of socioeconomic risk. Students considered to be at highest risk were those who experienced homelessness or high residential mobility (HHM). HHM students were compared with students eligible for free…

  19. Intergenerational Closure and Academic Achievement in High School: A New Evaluation of Coleman's Conjecture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Stephen L.; Todd, Jennifer J.

    2009-01-01

    This article reexamines the conjecture of James S. Coleman that intergenerational social closure promotes student achievement in high schools, analyzing the best national data on academic achievement and social networks: the 2002 and 2004 waves of the Education Longitudinal Study. The results show that within the Catholic school sector, schools…

  20. Unforgiving Confucian Culture: A Breeding Ground for High Academic Achievement, Test Anxiety and Self-Doubt?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stankov, Lazar

    2010-01-01

    This paper reviews findings from several studies that contribute to our understanding of cross-cultural differences in academic achievement, anxiety and self-doubt. The focus is on comparisons between Confucian Asian and European regions. Recent studies indicate that high academic achievement of students from Confucian Asian countries is…

  1. Gender and High School Chemistry: Student Perceptions on Achievement in a Selective Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cousins, Andrew; Mills, Martin

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on research undertaken in a middle-class Australian school. The focus of the research was on the relationship between gender and students' engagement with high school chemistry. Achievement data from many OECD [Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development] countries suggest that middle-class girls are achieving equally…

  2. Parental Involvement, Homework, and TV Time: Direct and Indirect Effects on High School Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keith, Timothy Z.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    A set of High School and Beyond data was used to study the effect of three variables on academic achievement. Homework had a positive effect, TV a negative, and parental involvement no direct effect on seniors' achievement scores, but influenced the amount of time students spent on homework. (Author/JAZ)

  3. A high-order adaptive Cartesian cut-cell method for simulation of compressible viscous flow over immersed bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muralidharan, Balaji; Menon, Suresh

    2016-09-01

    A new adaptive finite volume conservative cut-cell method that is third-order accurate for simulation of compressible viscous flows is presented. A high-order reconstruction approach using cell centered piecewise polynomial approximation of flow quantities, developed in the past for body-fitted grids, is now extended to the Cartesian based cut-cell method. It is shown that the presence of cut-cells of very low volume results in numerical oscillations in the flow solution near the embedded boundaries when standard small cell treatment techniques are employed. A novel cell clustering approach for polynomial reconstruction in the vicinity of the small cells is proposed and is shown to achieve smooth representation of flow field quantities and their derivatives on immersed interfaces. It is further shown through numerical examples that the proposed clustering method achieves the design order of accuracy and is fairly insensitive to the cluster size. Results are presented for canonical flow past a single cylinder and a sphere at different flow Reynolds numbers to verify the accuracy of the scheme. Investigations are then performed for flow over two staggered cylinders and the results are compared with prior data for the same configuration. All the simulations are carried out with both quadratic and cubic reconstruction, and the results indicate a clear improvement with the cubic reconstruction. The new cut-cell approach with cell clustering is able to predict accurate results even at relatively low resolutions. The ability of the high-order cut-cell method in handling sharp geometrical corners and narrow gaps is also demonstrated using various examples. Finally, three-dimensional flow interactions between a pair of spheres in cross flow is investigated using the proposed cut-cell scheme. The results are shown to be in excellent agreement with past studies, which employed body-fitted grids for studying this complex case.

  4. Dynamic High-temperature Testing of an Iridium Alloy in Compression at High-strain Rates: Dynamic High-temperature Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Song, B.; Nelson, K.; Lipinski, R.; Bignell, J.; Ulrich, G.; George, E. P.

    2014-08-21

    Iridium alloys have superior strength and ductility at elevated temperatures, making them useful as structural materials for certain high-temperature applications. However, experimental data on their high-strain -rate performance are needed for understanding high-speed impacts in severe environments. Kolsky bars (also called split Hopkinson bars) have been extensively employed for high-strain -rate characterization of materials at room temperature, but it has been challenging to adapt them for the measurement of dynamic properties at high temperatures. In our study, we analyzed the difficulties encountered in high-temperature Kolsky bar testing of thin iridium alloy specimens in compression. We made appropriate modifications using the current high-temperature Kolsky bar technique in order to obtain reliable compressive stress–strain response of an iridium alloy at high-strain rates (300–10 000 s-1) and temperatures (750 and 1030°C). The compressive stress–strain response of the iridium alloy showed significant sensitivity to both strain rate and temperature.

  5. Dynamic High-temperature Testing of an Iridium Alloy in Compression at High-strain Rates: Dynamic High-temperature Testing

    DOE PAGES

    Song, B.; Nelson, K.; Lipinski, R.; Bignell, J.; Ulrich, G.; George, E. P.

    2014-08-21

    Iridium alloys have superior strength and ductility at elevated temperatures, making them useful as structural materials for certain high-temperature applications. However, experimental data on their high-strain -rate performance are needed for understanding high-speed impacts in severe environments. Kolsky bars (also called split Hopkinson bars) have been extensively employed for high-strain -rate characterization of materials at room temperature, but it has been challenging to adapt them for the measurement of dynamic properties at high temperatures. In our study, we analyzed the difficulties encountered in high-temperature Kolsky bar testing of thin iridium alloy specimens in compression. We made appropriate modifications using themore » current high-temperature Kolsky bar technique in order to obtain reliable compressive stress–strain response of an iridium alloy at high-strain rates (300–10 000 s-1) and temperatures (750 and 1030°C). The compressive stress–strain response of the iridium alloy showed significant sensitivity to both strain rate and temperature.« less

  6. Resonant Ionization Laser Ion Source (RILIS) With Improved Selectivity Achieved By Ion Pulse Compression Using In-Source Time-of-flight Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Mishin, V. I.; Malinovsky, A. L.; Mishin, D. V.

    2009-03-17

    This paper describes for the first time the improved selectivity of the RILIS made possible by the time-of-flight (TOF) ion bunch compression. Brief description of the compression principles and some preliminary experimental results are presented. In the off-line experiments short ion peaks of natural Li, Na, K, Tm and Yb are observed as ions leave the RILIS-TOF structure. For Tm the ion peaks of 5 {mu}s half-height duration are detected and 1 {mu}s peaks for Sn are predicted. In view of the repetition rate of the ISOLDE-RILIS lasers it is hoped that the selectivity of Sn isotopes production may be improved as much as 100 employing the RILIS with the TOF ion bunch compression and a gating technique.

  7. Effect of size, shape, and end condition of test specimen on compressive strength of high-strength concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ipatti, A.

    Compressive testing of high-strength concrete is a critical issue on which no consensus has yet been reached. Among the many factors that are under discussion are the size, shape, and end condition of test specimens for high-strength concrete. The experimental program described herein was designed primarily to investigate the effects and the possible interactions of the above-mentioned factors on compressive strength of high-strength concrete. Three levels of specimen sizes, three methods of specimen capping (mould surface, sulphur capping, grinding), and four grades of concrete strengths were selected. A 3 x 3 x 4 factorial experimental design was adopted with two replicates (each an average of three specimens), giving a total of 72 test values (216 specimens). The strictest possible precautions were taken to ensure that all other factors which would conceivably effect the compressive strength were held constant. The statistical methods utilized included analyses of variance, linear regressions, and pairwise comparisons of factor main effects.

  8. Video Compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Optivision developed two PC-compatible boards and associated software under a Goddard Space Flight Center Small Business Innovation Research grant for NASA applications in areas such as telerobotics, telesciences and spaceborne experimentation. From this technology, the company used its own funds to develop commercial products, the OPTIVideo MPEG Encoder and Decoder, which are used for realtime video compression and decompression. They are used in commercial applications including interactive video databases and video transmission. The encoder converts video source material to a compressed digital form that can be stored or transmitted, and the decoder decompresses bit streams to provide high quality playback.

  9. Short-Term Effects of High-Frequency Chest Compression and Positive Expiratory Pressure in Patients With Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Fainardi, Valentina; Longo, Francesco; Faverzani, Silvia; Tripodi, Maria Candida; Chetta, Alfredo; Pisi, Giovanna

    2011-01-01

    Background Cystic fibrosis patients require daily airway clearance therapies. The primary objective of this study was to compare the short-term efficacy of high-frequency chest compression and positive expiratory pressure mask on expectorated sputum, pulmonary function, and oxygen saturation in patients with CF hospitalized for an acute pulmonary exacerbation. Methods A controlled randomized cross-over trial with 24 hours between treatments was used. Thirty-four CF patients (26 ± 6.5 years) were included in the study. Before and 30 minutes after each treatment were recorded: pulmonary function testing, oxygen saturation, and perceived dyspnea. Preference for the two devices was assessed. Results No statistically significant difference between high-frequency chest compression and positive expiratory pressure mask was found in sputum production and in lung function testing. A reduction in SpO2 was found after positive expiratory pressure mask (98 ± 1.0% versus 97 ± 1.2%; P < 0.001). Both treatments induced a statistically significant increase in Borg scale for dyspnea without differences between them. Patients reported greater satisfaction with positive expiratory pressure mask than with high-frequency chest compression (P < 0.001). Conclusion High-frequency chest compression and positive expiratory pressure mask have comparable short-term effects on expectorated sputum and lung function. Although positive expiratory pressure mask was associated with a lower SpO2, it was better tolerated than high-frequency chest compression. Keywords Airway clearance therapies; High-frequency chest compression; Sputum; Cystic fibrosis PMID:22393338

  10. Impacts of comprehensive reading instruction on diverse outcomes of low- and high-achieving readers.

    PubMed

    Guthrie, John T; McRae, Angela; Coddington, Cassandra S; Lutz Klauda, Susan; Wigfield, Allan; Barbosa, Pedro

    2009-01-01

    Low-achieving readers in Grade 5 often lack comprehension strategies, domain knowledge, word recognition skills, fluency, and motivation to read. Students with such multiple reading needs seem likely to benefit from instruction that supports each of these reading processes. The authors tested this expectation experimentally by comparing the effects of Concept-Oriented Reading Instruction (CORI) with traditional instruction (TI) on several outcomes in a 12-week intervention for low achievers and high achievers. Low achievers in the CORI group were afforded explicit instruction, leveled texts, and motivation support. Compared with TI students, CORI students scored higher on posttest measures of word recognition speed, reading comprehension on the Gates-MacGinitie Reading Test, and ecological knowledge. CORI was equally effective for lower achievers and higher achievers. Explicitly supporting multiple aspects of reading simultaneously appeared to benefit diverse learners on a range of reading outcomes.

  11. Understanding the Elements of Operational Reliability: A Key for Achieving High Reliability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Safie, Fayssal M.

    2010-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews operational reliability and its role in achieving high reliability through design and process reliability. The topics include: 1) Reliability Engineering Major Areas and interfaces; 2) Design Reliability; 3) Process Reliability; and 4) Reliability Applications.

  12. Intermolecular interactions in highly concentrated protein solutions upon compression and the role of the solvent.

    PubMed

    Grobelny, S; Erlkamp, M; Möller, J; Tolan, M; Winter, R

    2014-12-14

    The influence of high hydrostatic pressure on the structure and protein-protein interaction potential of highly concentrated lysozyme solutions up to about 370 mg ml(-1) was studied and analyzed using small-angle X-ray scattering in combination with a liquid-state theoretical approach. In the concentration region below 200 mg ml(-1), the interaction parameters of lysozyme solutions are affected by pressure in a nonlinear way, which is probably due to significant changes in the structural properties of bulk water, i.e., due to a solvent-mediated effect. Conversely, for higher concentrated protein solutions, where hydration layers below ∼4 water molecules are reached, the interaction potential turns rather insensitive to compression. The onset of transient (dynamic) clustering is envisaged in this concentration range. Our results also show that pressure suppresses protein nucleation, aggregation and finally crystallization in supersaturated condensed protein solutions. These findings are of importance for controlling and fine-tuning protein crystallization. Moreover, these results are also important for understanding the high stability of highly concentrated protein solutions (as they occur intracellularly) in organisms thriving under hydrostatic pressure conditions such as in the deep sea, where pressures up to the kbar-level are reached.

  13. Intermolecular interactions in highly concentrated protein solutions upon compression and the role of the solvent.

    PubMed

    Grobelny, S; Erlkamp, M; Möller, J; Tolan, M; Winter, R

    2014-12-14

    The influence of high hydrostatic pressure on the structure and protein-protein interaction potential of highly concentrated lysozyme solutions up to about 370 mg ml(-1) was studied and analyzed using small-angle X-ray scattering in combination with a liquid-state theoretical approach. In the concentration region below 200 mg ml(-1), the interaction parameters of lysozyme solutions are affected by pressure in a nonlinear way, which is probably due to significant changes in the structural properties of bulk water, i.e., due to a solvent-mediated effect. Conversely, for higher concentrated protein solutions, where hydration layers below ∼4 water molecules are reached, the interaction potential turns rather insensitive to compression. The onset of transient (dynamic) clustering is envisaged in this concentration range. Our results also show that pressure suppresses protein nucleation, aggregation and finally crystallization in supersaturated condensed protein solutions. These findings are of importance for controlling and fine-tuning protein crystallization. Moreover, these results are also important for understanding the high stability of highly concentrated protein solutions (as they occur intracellularly) in organisms thriving under hydrostatic pressure conditions such as in the deep sea, where pressures up to the kbar-level are reached. PMID:25494777

  14. The development of the electrically controlled high power RF switch and its application to active RF pulse compression systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jiquan

    In the past decades, there has been increasing interest in pulsed high power RF sources for building high-gradient high-energy particle accelerators. Passive RF pulse compression systems have been used in many applications to match the available RF sources to the loads requiring higher RF power but a shorter pulse. Theoretically, an active RF pulse compression system has the advantage of higher efficiency and compactness over the passive system. However, the key component for such a system---an element capable of switching hundreds of megawatts of RF power in a short time compared to the compressed pulse width---is still an open problem. In this dissertation, we present a switch module composed of an active window based on the bulk effects in semiconductor, a circular waveguide three-port network and a movable short plane, with the capability to adjust the S-parameters before and after switching. The RF properties of the switch module were analyzed. We give the scaling laws of the multiple-element switch systems, which allow the expansion of the system to a higher power level. We present a novel overmoded design for the circular waveguide three-port network and the associated circular-to-rectangular mode-converter. We also detail the design and synthesis process of this novel mode-converter. We demonstrate an electrically controlled ultra-fast high power X-band RF active window built with PIN diodes on high resistivity silicon. The window is capable of handling multi-megawatt RF power and can switch in 2-300ns with a 1000A current driver. A low power active pulse compression experiment was carried out with the switch module and a 375ns resonant delay line, obtaining 8 times compression gain with a compression ratio of 20.

  15. The Development of the Electrically Controlled High Power RF Switch and Its Application to Active RF Pulse Compression Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Jiquan

    2008-12-01

    In the past decades, there has been increasing interest in pulsed high power RF sources for building high-gradient high-energy particle accelerators. Passive RF pulse compression systems have been used in many applications to match the available RF sources to the loads requiring higher RF power but a shorter pulse. Theoretically, an active RF pulse compression system has the advantage of higher efficiency and compactness over the passive system. However, the key component for such a system an element capable of switching hundreds of megawatts of RF power in a short time compared to the compressed pulse width is still an open problem. In this dissertation, we present a switch module composed of an active window based on the bulk effects in semiconductor, a circular waveguide three-port network and a movable short plane, with the capability to adjust the S-parameters before and after switching. The RF properties of the switch module were analyzed. We give the scaling laws of the multiple-element switch systems, which allow the expansion of the system to a higher power level. We present a novel overmoded design for the circular waveguide three-port network and the associated circular-to-rectangular mode-converter. We also detail the design and synthesis process of this novel mode-converter. We demonstrate an electrically controlled ultra-fast high power X-band RF active window built with PIN diodes on high resistivity silicon. The window is capable of handling multi-megawatt RF power and can switch in 2-300ns with a 1000A current driver. A low power active pulse compression experiment was carried out with the switch module and a 375ns resonant delay line, obtaining 8 times compression gain with a compression ratio of 20.

  16. Do Peers Influence Achievement in High School Economics? Evidence from Georgia's Economics End of Course Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Christopher; Scafidi, Benjamin; Swinton, John R.

    2011-01-01

    The authors provide the first estimates of the impact of peers on achievement in high school economics. The estimates are obtained by analyzing three years of data on all high school students who take Georgia's required economics course and its accompanying high-stakes End of Course Test (Georgia Department of Education). They use an instrumental…

  17. A Study of Professional Learning Communities and Science Achievement in Large High Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kincannon, Susan D.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the science achievement and high school completion rates of students in a large high school implementing professional learning community concepts and practices with two large high schools not participating in professional learning community concepts and practices. The primary methodology employed was a…

  18. The Outward Bound Bridging Course for Low-Achieving High School Males: Effect on Academic Achievement and Multidimensional Self-Concepts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marsh, Herbert W.; Richards, Garry

    The Outward Bound Bridging Course is a 6-week residential program designed to improve academic achievement and self-concepts in low-achieving high school males. During 1980-1984, five courses were conducted for 66 Australian high school males. Most of them were ninth grade students, chosen on the basis of poor academic performance, an apparent…

  19. A Comparison of Emotional-Motivational (A-R-D Theory) Personality Characteristics in Learning Disabled, Normal Achieving, and High Achieving Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hufano, Linda D.

    The study examined emotional-motivational personality characteristics of 15 learning disabled, 15 normal achieving, and 15 high achieving students (grades 3-5). The study tested the hypothesis derived from the A-R-D (attitude-reinforcer-discriminative) theory of motivation that learning disabled (LD) children differ from normal and high achieving…

  20. Nonlinear compression of high energy fiber amplifier pulses in air-filled hypocycloid-core Kagome fiber.

    PubMed

    Guichard, Florent; Giree, Achut; Zaouter, Yoann; Hanna, Marc; Machinet, Guillaume; Debord, Benoît; Gérôme, Frédéric; Dupriez, Pascal; Druon, Frédéric; Hönninger, Clemens; Mottay, Eric; Benabid, Fetah; Georges, Patrick

    2015-03-23

    We report on the generation of 34 fs and 50 µJ pulses from a high energy fiber amplifier system with nonlinear compression in an air-filled hypocycloid-core Kagome fiber. The unique properties of such fibers allow bridging the gap between solid core fibers-based and hollow capillary-based post-compression setups, thereby operating with pulse energies obtained with current state-of-the-art fiber systems. The overall transmission of the compression setup is over 70%. Together with Yb-doped fiber amplifier technologies, Kagome fibers therefore appear as a promising tool for efficient generation of pulses with durations below 50 fs, energies ranging from 10 to several hundreds of µJ, and high average powers.

  1. A compressible high-order unstructured spectral difference code for stratified convection in rotating spherical shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Junfeng; Liang, Chunlei; Miesch, Mark S.

    2015-06-01

    We present a novel and powerful Compressible High-ORder Unstructured Spectral-difference (CHORUS) code for simulating thermal convection and related fluid dynamics in the interiors of stars and planets. The computational geometries are treated as rotating spherical shells filled with stratified gas. The hydrodynamic equations are discretized by a robust and efficient high-order Spectral Difference Method (SDM) on unstructured meshes. The computational stencil of the spectral difference method is compact and advantageous for parallel processing. CHORUS demonstrates excellent parallel performance for all test cases reported in this paper, scaling up to 12 000 cores on the Yellowstone High-Performance Computing cluster at NCAR. The code is verified by defining two benchmark cases for global convection in Jupiter and the Sun. CHORUS results are compared with results from the ASH code and good agreement is found. The CHORUS code creates new opportunities for simulating such varied phenomena as multi-scale solar convection, core convection, and convection in rapidly-rotating, oblate stars.

  2. The Potential for Bayesian Compressive Sensing to Significantly Reduce Electron Dose in High Resolution STEM Images

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, Andrew J.; Yang, Hao; Carin, Lawrence; Arslan, Ilke; Browning, Nigel D.

    2014-02-11

    The use of high resolution imaging methods in the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) is limited in many cases by the sensitivity of the sample to the beam and the onset of electron beam damage (for example in the study of organic systems, in tomography and during in-situ experiments). To demonstrate that alternative strategies for image acquisition can help alleviate this beam damage issue, here we apply compressive sensing via Bayesian dictionary learning to high resolution STEM images. These experiments successively reduce the number of pixels in the image (thereby reducing the overall dose while maintaining the high resolution information) and show promising results for reconstructing images from this reduced set of randomly collected measurements. We show that this approach is valid for both atomic resolution images and nanometer resolution studies, such as those that might be used in tomography datasets, by applying the method to images of strontium titanate and zeolites. As STEM images are acquired pixel by pixel while the beam is scanned over the surface of the sample, these post acquisition manipulations of the images can, in principle, be directly implemented as a low-dose acquisition method with no change in the electron optics or alignment of the microscope itself.

  3. Aligned genomic data compression via improved modeling.

    PubMed

    Ochoa, Idoia; Hernaez, Mikel; Weissman, Tsachy

    2014-12-01

    With the release of the latest Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) machine, the HiSeq X by Illumina, the cost of sequencing the whole genome of a human is expected to drop to a mere $1000. This milestone in sequencing history marks the era of affordable sequencing of individuals and opens the doors to personalized medicine. In accord, unprecedented volumes of genomic data will require storage for processing. There will be dire need not only of compressing aligned data, but also of generating compressed files that can be fed directly to downstream applications to facilitate the analysis of and inference on the data. Several approaches to this challenge have been proposed in the literature; however, focus thus far has been on the low coverage regime and most of the suggested compressors are not based on effective modeling of the data. We demonstrate the benefit of data modeling for compressing aligned reads. Specifically, we show that, by working with data models designed for the aligned data, we can improve considerably over the best compression ratio achieved by previously proposed algorithms. Our results indicate that the pareto-optimal barrier for compression rate and speed claimed by Bonfield and Mahoney (2013) [Bonfield JK and Mahoneys MV, Compression of FASTQ and SAM format sequencing data, PLOS ONE, 8(3):e59190, 2013.] does not apply for high coverage aligned data. Furthermore, our improved compression ratio is achieved by splitting the data in a manner conducive to operations in the compressed domain by downstream applications.

  4. Aligned genomic data compression via improved modeling.

    PubMed

    Ochoa, Idoia; Hernaez, Mikel; Weissman, Tsachy

    2014-12-01

    With the release of the latest Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) machine, the HiSeq X by Illumina, the cost of sequencing the whole genome of a human is expected to drop to a mere $1000. This milestone in sequencing history marks the era of affordable sequencing of individuals and opens the doors to personalized medicine. In accord, unprecedented volumes of genomic data will require storage for processing. There will be dire need not only of compressing aligned data, but also of generating compressed files that can be fed directly to downstream applications to facilitate the analysis of and inference on the data. Several approaches to this challenge have been proposed in the literature; however, focus thus far has been on the low coverage regime and most of the suggested compressors are not based on effective modeling of the data. We demonstrate the benefit of data modeling for compressing aligned reads. Specifically, we show that, by working with data models designed for the aligned data, we can improve considerably over the best compression ratio achieved by previously proposed algorithms. Our results indicate that the pareto-optimal barrier for compression rate and speed claimed by Bonfield and Mahoney (2013) [Bonfield JK and Mahoneys MV, Compression of FASTQ and SAM format sequencing data, PLOS ONE, 8(3):e59190, 2013.] does not apply for high coverage aligned data. Furthermore, our improved compression ratio is achieved by splitting the data in a manner conducive to operations in the compressed domain by downstream applications. PMID:25395305

  5. Observer performance assessment of JPEG-compressed high-resolution chest images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Good, Walter F.; Maitz, Glenn S.; King, Jill L.; Gennari, Rose C.; Gur, David

    1999-05-01

    The JPEG compression algorithm was tested on a set of 529 chest radiographs that had been digitized at a spatial resolution of 100 micrometer and contrast sensitivity of 12 bits. Images were compressed using five fixed 'psychovisual' quantization tables which produced average compression ratios in the range 15:1 to 61:1, and were then printed onto film. Six experienced radiologists read all cases from the laser printed film, in each of the five compressed modes as well as in the non-compressed mode. For comparison purposes, observers also read the same cases with reduced pixel resolutions of 200 micrometer and 400 micrometer. The specific task involved detecting masses, pneumothoraces, interstitial disease, alveolar infiltrates and rib fractures. Over the range of compression ratios tested, for images digitized at 100 micrometer, we were unable to demonstrate any statistically significant decrease (p greater than 0.05) in observer performance as measured by ROC techniques. However, the observers' subjective assessments of image quality did decrease significantly as image resolution was reduced and suggested a decreasing, but nonsignificant, trend as the compression ratio was increased. The seeming discrepancy between our failure to detect a reduction in observer performance, and other published studies, is likely due to: (1) the higher resolution at which we digitized our images; (2) the higher signal-to-noise ratio of our digitized films versus typical CR images; and (3) our particular choice of an optimized quantization scheme.

  6. Lower body predictors of glenohumeral compressive force in high school baseball pitchers.

    PubMed

    Keeley, David W; Oliver, Gretchen D; Dougherty, Christopher P; Torry, Michael R

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to better understand how lower body kinematics relate to peak glenohumeral compressive force and develop a regression model accounting for variability in peak glenohumeral compressive force. Data were collected for 34 pitchers. Average peak glenohumeral compressive force was 1.72% ± 33% body weight (1334.9 N ± 257.5). Correlation coefficients revealed 5 kinematic variables correlated to peak glenohumeral compressive force (P < .01, α = .025). Regression models indicated 78.5% of the variance in peak glenohumeral compressive force (R2 = .785, P < .01) was explained by stride length, lateral pelvis flexion at maximum external rotation, and axial pelvis rotation velocity at release. These results indicate peak glenohumeral compressive force increases with a combination of decreased stride length, increased pelvic tilt at maximum external rotation toward the throwing arm side, and increased pelvis axial rotation velocity at release. Thus, it may be possible to decrease peak glenohumeral compressive force by optimizing the movements of the lower body while pitching. Focus should be on both training and conditioning the lower extremity in an effort to increase stride length, increase pelvis tilt toward the glove hand side at maximum external rotation, and decrease pelvis axial rotation at release. PMID:25734579

  7. Lower body predictors of glenohumeral compressive force in high school baseball pitchers.

    PubMed

    Keeley, David W; Oliver, Gretchen D; Dougherty, Christopher P; Torry, Michael R

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to better understand how lower body kinematics relate to peak glenohumeral compressive force and develop a regression model accounting for variability in peak glenohumeral compressive force. Data were collected for 34 pitchers. Average peak glenohumeral compressive force was 1.72% ± 33% body weight (1334.9 N ± 257.5). Correlation coefficients revealed 5 kinematic variables correlated to peak glenohumeral compressive force (P < .01, α = .025). Regression models indicated 78.5% of the variance in peak glenohumeral compressive force (R2 = .785, P < .01) was explained by stride length, lateral pelvis flexion at maximum external rotation, and axial pelvis rotation velocity at release. These results indicate peak glenohumeral compressive force increases with a combination of decreased stride length, increased pelvic tilt at maximum external rotation toward the throwing arm side, and increased pelvis axial rotation velocity at release. Thus, it may be possible to decrease peak glenohumeral compressive force by optimizing the movements of the lower body while pitching. Focus should be on both training and conditioning the lower extremity in an effort to increase stride length, increase pelvis tilt toward the glove hand side at maximum external rotation, and decrease pelvis axial rotation at release.

  8. High-pressure single-crystal studies of pyroxene minerals in metastable compression regime with relevance to cold subducting slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dera, P. K.

    2012-12-01

    Our understanding of transformation pathways of rock-forming minerals as a function of depth in the Earth interior derives from analysis of their crystal structures at high pressure and temperature conditions and from the relations between different polymorphic forms of the same material. From this perspective, it is often valuable to consider metastable compression behavior of principal rock-forming minerals in the metastable regime, beyond the thermodynamic stability limits and outside of the PT path established by standard geotherm models. Such metastable compression regime can provide useful crystal chemical clues offering insights into intermediate stages of major geophysically-relevant phase transformations and clarifying the most important aspects of the compression mechanisms. Beyond the crystallographic and crystal chemical aspects, the metastable compression experiments may provide information applicable to deep Earth environments that significantly deviate from the standard geotherm, such as subduction zones. Seismic imaging data indicate that in subduction zones the temperatures in the cold subducted oceanic slab, which is dragged beneath the continental plate can be lower than the geotherm by as much as thousands of degrees. Recent seismic travel time tomography evidence indicates that some of the subduction zones, particularly in the Southeast Asia region, extend within the mantle well beyond the 660 km, discontinuity, perhaps as deep as 800 km. The main source of information about the compression behavior of minerals, the crystallographic experiments at high pressure and temperature, have been constrained by the limitations of the experimental in situ techniques and mostly limited to pressure range below 10 GPa. Recent developments in synchrotron-based high-pressure single-crystal diffraction, which will be reviewed in this presentation, opened possibilities to extend these studies well into the pressure range beyond 50 GPa. I will discuss the latest

  9. Relating speech production to tongue muscle compressions using tagged and high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Fangxu; Ye, Chuyang; Woo, Jonghye; Stone, Maureen; Prince, Jerry

    2015-03-01

    The human tongue is composed of multiple internal muscles that work collaboratively during the production of speech. Assessment of muscle mechanics can help understand the creation of tongue motion, interpret clinical observations, and predict surgical outcomes. Although various methods have been proposed for computing the tongue's motion, associating motion with muscle activity in an interdigitated fiber framework has not been studied. In this work, we aim to develop a method that reveals different tongue muscles' activities in different time phases during speech. We use fourdimensional tagged magnetic resonance (MR) images and static high-resolution MR images to obtain tongue motion and muscle anatomy, respectively. Then we compute strain tensors and local tissue compression along the muscle fiber directions in order to reveal their shortening pattern. This process relies on the support from multiple image analysis methods, including super-resolution volume reconstruction from MR image slices, segmentation of internal muscles, tracking the incompressible motion of tissue points using tagged images, propagation of muscle fiber directions over time, and calculation of strain in the line of action, etc. We evaluated the method on a control subject and two postglossectomy patients in a controlled speech task. The normal subject's tongue muscle activity shows high correspondence with the production of speech in different time instants, while both patients' muscle activities show different patterns from the control due to their resected tongues. This method shows potential for relating overall tongue motion to particular muscle activity, which may provide novel information for future clinical and scientific studies.

  10. Large scale dynamics in a turbulent compressible rotor/stator cavity flow at high Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lachize, C.; Verhille, G.; Le Gal, P.

    2016-08-01

    This paper reports an experimental investigation of a turbulent flow confined within a rotor/stator cavity of aspect ratio close to unity at high Reynolds number. The experiments have been driven by changing both the rotation rate of the disk and the thermodynamical properties of the working fluid. This fluid is sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) whose physical properties are adjusted by imposing the operating temperature and the absolute pressure in a pressurized vessel, especially near the critical point of SF6 reached for T c = 45.58 ◦C, P c = 37.55 bar. This original set-up allows to obtain Reynolds numbers as high as 2 × 107 together with compressibility effects as the Mach number can reach 0.5. Pressure measurements reveal that the resulting fully turbulent flow shows both a direct and an inverse cascade as observed in rotating turbulence and in accordance with Kraichnan conjecture for 2D-turbulence. The spectra are however dominated by low-frequency peaks, which are subharmonics of the rotating disk frequency, involving large scale structures at small azimuthal wavenumbers. These modes appear for a Reynolds number around 105 and experience a transition at a critical Reynolds number Re c ≈ 106. Moreover they show an unexpected nonlinear behavior that we understand with the help of a low dimensional amplitude equations.

  11. Mediatorless high-power glucose biofuel cells based on compressed carbon nanotube-enzyme electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Zebda, Abdelkader; Gondran, Chantal; Le Goff, Alan; Holzinger, Michael; Cinquin, Philippe; Cosnier, Serge

    2011-01-01

    Enzymatic fuel cells use enzymes to produce energy from bioavailable substrates. However, such biofuel cells are limited by the difficult electrical wiring of enzymes to the electrode. Here we show the efficient wiring of enzymes in a conductive pure carbon nanotube matrix for the fabrication of a glucose biofuel cell (GBFC). Glucose oxidase and laccase were respectively incorporated in carbon nanotube disks by mechanical compression. The characterization of each bioelectrode shows an open circuit potential corresponding to the redox potential of the respective enzymes, and high current densities for glucose oxidation and oxygen reduction. The mediatorless GBFC delivers a high power density up to 1.3 mW cm−2 and an open circuit voltage of 0.95 V. Moreover, the GBFC remains stable for 1 month and delivers 1 mW cm−2 power density under physiological conditions (5×10−3 mol l−1 glucose, pH 7). To date, these values are the best performances obtained for a GBFC. PMID:21712818

  12. Prospects for studying how high-intensity compression waves cause damage in human blast injuries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Katherine; Bo, Chiara; Masouros, Spyros; Ramasamy, Arul; Newell, Nicolas; Bonner, Timothy; Balzer, Jens; Hill, Adam; Clasper, Jon; Bull, Anthony; Proud, William

    2012-03-01

    Since World War I, explosions have accounted for over 70% of all injuries in conflict. With the development of improved personnel protection of the torso, improved medical care and faster aeromedical evacuation, casualties are surviving with more severe injuries to the extremities. Understanding the processes involved in the transfer of blast-induced shock waves through biological tissues is essential for supporting efforts aimed at mitigating and treating blast injury. Given the inherent heterogeneities in the human body, we argue that studying these processes demands a highly integrated approach requiring expertise in shock physics, biomechanics and fundamental biological processes. This multidisciplinary systems approach enables one to develop the experimental framework for investigating the material properties of human tissues that are subjected to high compression waves in blast conditions and the fundamental cellular processes altered by this type of stimuli. Ultimately, we hope to use the information gained from these studies in translational research aimed at developing improved protection for those at risk and improved clinical outcomes for those who have been injured from a blast wave.

  13. Social Goals, Social Status, and Problem Behavior among Low-Achieving and High-Achieving Adolescents from Rural Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ludden, Alison Bryant

    2012-01-01

    The current research examines how social goals and perceptions of what is needed for social status at school relate to school misbehavior and substance use among rural adolescents (N = 683). Results indicate that social goals and perceptions of social status have differential links to problem behaviors depending upon adolescents' achievement.…

  14. Evaluation of English Achievement Test: A Comparison between High and Low Achievers amongst Selected Elementary School Students of Pakistan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haider, Zubair; Latif, Farah; Akhtar, Samina; Mushtaq, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Validity, reliability and item analysis are critical to the process of evaluating the quality of an educational measurement. The present study evaluates the quality of an assessment constructed to measure elementary school student's achievement in English. In this study, the survey model of descriptive research was used as a research method.…

  15. High-strain-rate compression and fracture of B sub 4 C-aluminum cermets

    SciTech Connect

    Blumenthal, W.R.

    1990-01-01

    The compressive behavior of liquid-metal infiltrated boron carbide-aluminum cermets were studied as a function of strain rate, composition, and microstructure. Hopkinson split pressure bar (HSPB) and quasi-static compression tests were conducted using dumb-bell-shaped specimens. Results showed cermet compressive strength to be independent of loading rate. Strength was also found to be independent of the aluminum alloy used to infiltrate pre-sintered 65 vol % B{sub 4}C pre-forms. compositions with the smallest phase size displayed the best strength and ductility. 18 refs., 4 figs.

  16. [Irreversible image compression in radiology. Current status].

    PubMed

    Pinto dos Santos, D; Jungmann, F; Friese, C; Düber, C; Mildenberger, P

    2013-03-01

    Due to increasing amounts of data in radiology methods for image compression appear both economically and technically interesting. Irreversible image compression allows markedly higher reduction of data volume in comparison with reversible compression algorithms but is, however, accompanied by a certain amount of mathematical and visual loss of information. Various national and international radiological societies have published recommendations for the use of irreversible image compression. The degree of acceptable compression varies across modalities and regions of interest.The DICOM standard supports JPEG, which achieves compression through tiling, DCT/DWT and quantization. Although mathematical loss due to rounding up errors and reduction of high frequency information occurs this results in relatively low visual degradation.It is still unclear where to implement irreversible compression in the radiological workflow as only few studies analyzed the impact of irreversible compression on specialized image postprocessing. As long as this is within the limits recommended by the German Radiological Society irreversible image compression could be implemented directly at the imaging modality as it would comply with § 28 of the roentgen act (RöV). PMID:23456043

  17. Emotional Intelligence as a Predictor of Leadership of Kuwaiti High and Low Achieving 11th Graders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alnabhan, Mousa

    2010-01-01

    The current study examined the association between emotional intelligence (EI) and the Leadership components (L) of high school students in the state of Kuwait. The possibility of predicting each leadership component via emotional intelligence components was investigated for high and low achievers. A sample of 11th grade students from Kuwaiti…

  18. What Works Clearinghouse Quick Review: "Expanding College Opportunities for High-Achieving, Low Income Students"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2013

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the effects of providing low-income, high-achieving high school seniors with college application guidance and information about the costs of college. The "application guidance" included information about deadlines and requirements for college applications at nearby institutions, at the state's flagship institution, and at in-…

  19. The Effects of Modeling Instruction on High School Physics Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Tiffanie L.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore whether Modeling Instruction, compared to traditional lecturing, is an effective instructional method to promote academic achievement in selected high school physics classes at a rural middle Tennessee high school. This study used an "ex post facto," quasi-experimental research methodology. The…

  20. Effects of an Elementary Dual Language Immersion School Program on Junior High Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cobb, Brian; Vega, Diego; Kronauge, Cindy

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the effects of a two-way immersion elementary school program on academic achievement at the end of the elementary school and the end of the first year of junior high school. Longitudinal high stakes test data in reading, writing, and mathematics were collected on native English speakers and native Spanish…

  1. The Relationship between Self-Efficacy and Achievement in At-Risk High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gold, Jarrett Graham

    2010-01-01

    The focus of this quantitative survey study was the examination of the relationship between self-efficacy and academic achievement in 164 at-risk high school students. The study used Bandura's self-efficacy as the theoretical framework. The research questions involved understanding the levels of self-efficacy in at-risk high school students and…

  2. Small Classes in the Early Grades, Academic Achievement, and Graduating From High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finn, Jeremy D.; Gerber, Susan B.; Boyd-Zaharias, Jayne

    2005-01-01

    This investigation addressed 3 questions about the long-term effects of early school experiences: (a) Is participation in small classes in the early grades (K-3) related to high school graduation? (b) Is academic achievement in K-3 related to high school graduation? (c) If class size is related to graduation, is the relationship explained by the…

  3. Mathematics Achievement with Digital Game-Based Learning in High School Algebra 1 Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Terri Lynn Kurley

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the impact of digital game-based learning (DGBL) on mathematics achievement in a rural high school setting in North Carolina. A causal comparative research design was used in this study to collect data to determine the effectiveness of DGBL in high school Algebra 1 classes. Data were collected from the North Carolina…

  4. Towards Promoting Biliteracy and Academic Achievement: Educational Programs for High School Latino English Language Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ochoa, Alberto M.; Cadiero-Kaplan, Karen

    2004-01-01

    The Latino student presently faces many obstacles to achieve educational equity and excellence at the high school level. This article examines academic programming for Latino middle and high school English language learners (ELLs) and provides recommendations for addressing programming that promotes biliteracy policy and programming as a valued…

  5. A Case Study of 21st Century Skills in High Achieving Elementary Schools in Pennsylvania

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Egnor, Gregory P.

    2013-01-01

    This study examines if practices that advocate for 21st century skills are in conflict with the mandates of NCLB. Interviews with influential school leaders of high achieving elementary schools focused on collecting data about 21st century skills. This study was designed to (a) Determine if 21st century skills are addressed in high achieving…

  6. Achieve Scholarship Spending on Expanding Access to Rigorous High School Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota Office of Higher Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The 2007 Legislature enacted the Achieve Scholarship program, which provides a $1,200 scholarship to high school graduates who took rigorous courses in high school and met certain income and other eligibility criteria. In deliberations about this new program, concerns were expressed that certain rigorous courses like Advanced Placement,…

  7. Study-Orientation of High and Low Academic Achievers at Secondary Level in Pakistan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sarwar, Muhammad; Bashir, Muhammad; Khan, Muhammad Naemullah; Khan, Muhammad Saeed

    2009-01-01

    The study orientation of low and high academic achievers was compared, measured through a self-developed study orientation scale (SOS) primarily based on 47 items comparing study habits and attitude. Students' marks obtained in the 10th grade Examination determined the measure of academic performance. The analysis revealed that the high achievers…

  8. New experimental platform to study high density laser-compressed matter

    SciTech Connect

    Doppner, T.; LePape, S.; Ma, T.; Pak, A.; Gauthier, M.; Fletcher, L. B.; Ravasio, A.; Galtier, E.; Gamboa, E. J.; Granados, E.; Hastings, J. B.; Heimann, P.; Lee, H. J.; Nagler, B.; Schropp, A.; Glenzer, S. H.; Gleason, A.; MacDonald, M. J.; Ali, S.; Barbrel, B.; Falcone, R.; Kraus, D.; Chen, Z.; Mo, M.; Wei, M.

    2014-09-26

    We have developed a new experimental platform at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) which combines simultaneous angularly and spectrally resolved x-ray scatteringmeasurements. This technique offers a new insights on the structural and thermodynamic properties of warm dense matter. The < 50 fs temporal duration of the x-ray pulse provides near instantaneous snapshots of the dynamics of the compression. We present a proof of principle experiment for this platform to characterize a shock-compressed plastic foil. We observe the disappearance of the plastic semi-crystal structure and the formation of a compressed liquid ion-ion correlation peak. As a result, the plasma parameters of shock-compressed plastic can be measured as well, but requires an averaging over a few tens of shots.

  9. New experimental platform to study high density laser-compressed matter

    SciTech Connect

    Gauthier, M. Fletcher, L. B.; Galtier, E.; Gamboa, E. J.; Granados, E.; Hastings, J. B.; Heimann, P.; Lee, H. J.; Nagler, B.; Schropp, A.; Falcone, R.; Glenzer, S. H.; Ravasio, A.; Gleason, A.; Döppner, T.; LePape, S.; Ma, T.; Pak, A.; MacDonald, M. J.; Ali, S.; and others

    2014-11-15

    We have developed a new experimental platform at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) which combines simultaneous angularly and spectrally resolved x-ray scattering measurements. This technique offers a new insights on the structural and thermodynamic properties of warm dense matter. The < 50 fs temporal duration of the x-ray pulse provides near instantaneous snapshots of the dynamics of the compression. We present a proof of principle experiment for this platform to characterize a shock-compressed plastic foil. We observe the disappearance of the plastic semi-crystal structure and the formation of a compressed liquid ion-ion correlation peak. The plasma parameters of shock-compressed plastic can be measured as well, but requires an averaging over a few tens of shots.

  10. New experimental platform to study high density laser-compressed matter

    DOE PAGES

    Doppner, T.; LePape, S.; Ma, T.; Pak, A.; Gauthier, M.; Fletcher, L. B.; Ravasio, A.; Galtier, E.; Gamboa, E. J.; Granados, E.; et al

    2014-09-26

    We have developed a new experimental platform at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) which combines simultaneous angularly and spectrally resolved x-ray scatteringmeasurements. This technique offers a new insights on the structural and thermodynamic properties of warm dense matter. The < 50 fs temporal duration of the x-ray pulse provides near instantaneous snapshots of the dynamics of the compression. We present a proof of principle experiment for this platform to characterize a shock-compressed plastic foil. We observe the disappearance of the plastic semi-crystal structure and the formation of a compressed liquid ion-ion correlation peak. As a result, the plasma parametersmore » of shock-compressed plastic can be measured as well, but requires an averaging over a few tens of shots.« less

  11. Numerical studies of high current beam compression in heavy ion fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Bisognano, J.; Lee, E.P.; Mark, J.W.K.

    1985-05-10

    The process of longitudinal compression of a drifting heavy ion pulse to be used as an ICF driver is examined with the aid of particle simulation. Space charge forces play a vital role in halting compression before the final focus lens system is reached. This must take place with minimal growth of transverse emittance and momentum spread. Of particular concern is the distortion of longitudinal phase space by the rounded transverse profile of the longitudinal self-electric field.

  12. Does Homogeneous Ability Grouping for High School Honors English Instruction Benefit the High Achiever?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hostetter, Douglas Paul

    2013-01-01

    Public schools are examining their policies and instructional practices to address the achievement gap exposed by the reporting requirements of NCLB (Wenglinski, 2004). As accountability measures and stakes rise, there is a call for an improved use of scientific evidence to inform educational policymaking (Wiseman, 2010). In terms of the…

  13. Directed Self-assembly of Nanoparticles at the Polymer Surface by Highly Compressible Supercritical Carbon Dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    M Asada; P Gin; M Endoh; S Satija; T Taniguchi; T Koga

    2011-12-31

    We report a versatile route for self-assembly of polymer-soluble nanoparticles at the polymer surface using highly compressible supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO{sub 2}). Polystyrene and poly(methyl methacrylate)-based nanocomposite thin films with functionalized polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane and phenyl C{sub 61} butyric acid methyl ester nanoparticles were prepared on Si substrates and exposed to scCO{sub 2} at different pressures under the isothermal condition of 36 C. The resultant structures could be then preserved by the vitrification process of the glassy polymers via quick pressure quench to atmospheric pressure and subsequently characterized by using various surface sensitive experimental techniques in air. We found that the surface segregation of these nanoparticles is induced in the close vicinity of P = 8.2 MPa where the excess absorption of the fluid into the polymers maximizes. However, when the film thickness becomes less than about 4R{sub g} thick (where R{sub g} is the radius of polymer gyration), the uniform dispersion of the nanoparticles is favorable instead even at the same CO{sub 2} conditions. We clarify that the phase transition is correlated with the emergence of a concentration gradient of the fluid at the polymer/CO{sub 2} interface and is a general phenomenon for different polymer-nanoparticle interactions.

  14. Lateral-torsional buckling of compressed and highly variable cross section beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mascolo, Ida; Pasquino, Mario

    2016-06-01

    In the critical state of a beam under central compression a flexural-torsional equilibrium shape becomes possible in addition to the fundamental straight equilibrium shape and the Euler bending. Particularly, torsional configuration takes place in all cases where the line of shear centres does not correspond with the line of centres of mass. This condition is obtained here about a z-axis highly variable section beam; with the assumptions that shear centres are aligned and line of centres is bound to not deform. For the purpose, let us evaluate an open thin wall C-cross section with flanges width and web height linearly variables along z-axis in order to have shear centres axis approximately aligned with gravity centres axis. Thus, differential equations that govern the problem are obtained. Because of the section variability, the numerical integration of differential equations that gives the true critical load is complex and lengthy. For this reason, it is given an energetic formulation of the problem by the theorem of minimum total potential energy (Ritz-Rayleigh method). It is expected an experimental validation that proposes the model studied.

  15. ScalaTrace: Scalable Compression and Replay of Communication Traces for High Performance Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Noeth, M; Ratn, P; Mueller, F; Schulz, M; de Supinski, B R

    2008-05-16

    Characterizing the communication behavior of large-scale applications is a difficult and costly task due to code/system complexity and long execution times. While many tools to study this behavior have been developed, these approaches either aggregate information in a lossy way through high-level statistics or produce huge trace files that are hard to handle. We contribute an approach that provides orders of magnitude smaller, if not near-constant size, communication traces regardless of the number of nodes while preserving structural information. We introduce intra- and inter-node compression techniques of MPI events that are capable of extracting an application's communication structure. We further present a replay mechanism for the traces generated by our approach and discuss results of our implementation for BlueGene/L. Given this novel capability, we discuss its impact on communication tuning and beyond. To the best of our knowledge, such a concise representation of MPI traces in a scalable manner combined with deterministic MPI call replay are without any precedent.

  16. High-frequency chest compression system to aid in clearance of mucus from the lung.

    PubMed

    Hansen, L G; Warwick, W J

    1990-01-01

    The authors developed a high-frequency chest compression (HFCC) device to aid in mucous clearance for patients with obstructive lung disease. The device, designed for self-therapy, consists of a large-volume variable-frequency air-pulse delivery system and a nonstretchable inflatable vest worn by the patient. Pressure pulses are controlled by the patient and applied during expiration. Pulse frequency is tunable from 5 to 25 Hz. Maximum vest pressure is 39 mmHg (5.2 kPa), with patient-controlled vest inflation and deflation time constants of 0.5 s. Vest pressure increases from 28 mmHg (3.7 kPa) at 5 Hz to 39 mmHg (5.2 kPa) at 25 Hz. Preliminary clinical trials have shown the HFCC device to be more effective than standard chest physical therapy. The HFCC device yielded a mean volume of cleared mucus of 3.3 cc per session, compared with 1.8 cc for a conventional therapy session.

  17. Comparison of expectorated sputum after manual chest physical therapy and high-frequency chest compression.

    PubMed

    Warwick, Warren J; Wielinski, Catherine L; Hansen, Leland G

    2004-01-01

    This study is a quantitative comparison of the sputum produced by 12 subjects with cystic fibrosis (CF) who received high-frequency chest compression (HFCC) and standard chest physical therapy (CPT) in randomized order. Six subjects routinely used manual CPT and six routinely used the HFCC. None had acute infections or hospitalization in the six weeks before the study. Two certified respiratory therapists alternated subjects and CPT vs HFCC order during the two weeks of the matched study. For all sessions, the expectorated sputum was collected in preweighed cups, which were reweighed immediately after collection and again after evaporation to dryness. The wet and dry weights of the sputum produced as a result of the two techniques were significantly different, with HFCC having greater weight. Regardless of the mode of therapy, the sputum produced by the subjects who regularly received HFCC had greater water content than did the sputum produced by those subjects who regularly received CPT. No significant difference was found between the two therapists regarding sputum expectorated by the subjects during CPT. These results show that sputum production by subjects with CF who receive CPT by certified respiratory therapists can be as great as the sputum produced by the same subjects who receive HFCC. The results also suggest that unknown factors attributed to the therapists may produce different levels of effort from time to time that may decrease the respiratory therapists' effectiveness, whereas the HFCC therapy may be more consistently effective because it is entirely machine based.

  18. Induced respiratory system modeling by high frequency chest compression using lumped system identification method.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jongwon; Lee, Yong Wan; O'Clock, George; Zhu, Xiaoming; Parhi, Keshab K; Warwick, Warren J

    2009-01-01

    High frequency chest compression (HFCC) treatment systems are used to promote mucus transport and mitigate pulmonary system clearance problems to remove sputum from the airways in patients with Cystic Fibrosis (CF) and at risk of developing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Every HFCC system consists of a pump generator, one or two hoses connected to a vest, to deliver the pulsation. There are three different waveforms in use; symmetric sine, the asymmetric sine and the trapezoid waveforms. There have been few studies that compared the efficacy of a sine waveform with the HFCC pulsations. In this study we present a model of the respiratory system for a young normal subject who is one of co-authors. The input signal is the pressure applied by the vest to chest, at a frequency of 6Hz. Using the system model simulation, the effectiveness of different source waveforms is evaluated and compared by observing the waveform response associated with air flow at the mouth. Also the study demonstrated that the ideal rectangle wave produced the maximum peak air flow, and followed by the trapezoid, triangle and sine waveform. The study suggests that a pulmonary system evaluation or modeling effort for CF patient might be useful as a method to optimize frequency and waveform structure choices for HFCC therapeutic intervention.

  19. Comparison of high frequency chest compression and conventional chest physiotherapy in hospitalized patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Arens, R; Gozal, D; Omlin, K J; Vega, J; Boyd, K P; Keens, T G; Woo, M S

    1994-10-01

    Clearance of bronchial secretions is essential in the management of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients admitted for acute pulmonary exacerbation. Conventional physiotherapy (CPT) is labor-intensive, time-consuming, expensive, and may not be available as frequently as desired during hospitalization. High frequency chest compression (HFCC), which uses an inflatable vest linked to an air-pulse delivery system, may offer an attractive alternative. To study this, we prospectively studied 50 CF patients admitted for acute pulmonary exacerbation who were randomly allocated to receive either HFCC or CPT three times a day. On admission, clinical status and pulmonary function tests (PFT) in the HFCC group were not significantly different from those measured in the CPT group. Significant improvements in clinical status and PFT were observed after 7 and 14 d of treatment, and were similar in the two study groups, leading to patient discharge after similar periods of hospitalization. We conclude that HFCC and CPT are equally safe and effective when used during acute pulmonary exacerbations in CF patients. We speculate that HFCC may provide an adequate alternative in management of CF patients in a hospital setting.

  20. A High-Resolution Godunov Method for Compressible Multi-Material Flow on Overlapping Grids

    SciTech Connect

    Banks, J W; Schwendeman, D W; Kapila, A K; Henshaw, W D

    2006-02-13

    A numerical method is described for inviscid, compressible, multi-material flow in two space dimensions. The flow is governed by the multi-material Euler equations with a general mixture equation of state. Composite overlapping grids are used to handle complex flow geometry and block-structured adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) is used to locally increase grid resolution near shocks and material interfaces. The discretization of the governing equations is based on a high-resolution Godunov method, but includes an energy correction designed to suppress numerical errors that develop near a material interface for standard, conservative shock-capturing schemes. The energy correction is constructed based on a uniform pressure-velocity flow and is significant only near the captured interface. A variety of two-material flows are presented to verify the accuracy of the numerical approach and to illustrate its use. These flows assume an equation of state for the mixture based on Jones-Wilkins-Lee (JWL) forms for the components. This equation of state includes a mixture of ideal gases as a special case. Flow problems considered include unsteady one-dimensional shock-interface collision, steady interaction of an planar interface and an oblique shock, planar shock interaction with a collection of gas-filled cylindrical inhomogeneities, and the impulsive motion of the two-component mixture in a rigid cylindrical vessel.

  1. Human respiration at rest in rapid compression and at high pressures and gas densities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gelfand, R.; Lambertsen, C. J.; Strauss, R.; Clark, J. M.; Puglia, C. D.

    1983-01-01

    The ventilation (V), end-tidal PCO2 (PACO2), and CO2 elimination rate were determined in men at rest breathing CO2-free gas over the pressure range 1-50 ATA and the gas density range 0.4-25 g/l, during slow and rapid compressions, at stable elevated ambient pressures and during slow decompressions. Progressive increase in pulmonary gas flow resistance due to elevation of ambient pressure and inspired gas density to the He-O2 equivalent of 5000 feet of seawater was found to produce a complex pattern of change in PACO2. It was found that as both ambient pressure and pulmonary gas flow resistance were progressively raised, PACO2 at first increased, went through a maximum, and then declined towards values near the 1 ATA level. It is concluded that this pattern of PACO2 change results from the interaction on ventilation of the increase in pulmonary resistance due to the elevation of gas density with the increase in respiratory drive postulated as due to generalized central nervous system excitation associated with exposure to high hydrostatic pressure. It is suggested that a similar interaction exists between increased gas flow resistance and the increase in respiratory drive related to nitrogen partial pressure and the resulting narcosis.

  2. A novel apparatus for in situ compression of submicron structures and particles in a high resolution SEM

    SciTech Connect

    Romeis, S.; Paul, J.; Ziener, M.; Peukert, W.

    2012-09-15

    We report on the development and characterization of a novel in situ manipulation device to perform stressing experiments on the submicron scale inside a high resolution field emission scanning electron microscope. The instrument comprises two main assembly groups: an upper part for positioning and moving a mounted probe and a force sensor as well as a specimen support as lower part. The upper part consists of a closed loop tripod piezoelectric scanner mounted on a self-locking coarse positioning stage. Two interlocked steel springs and a linear variable differential transformer measuring the springs' deflections compose the lower part of the instrument. This arrangement acts as force-sensor and sample support. In comparison to already well-established concepts a wide measuring range is covered by adjusting the spring constant between 30 N/m and 50000 N/m. Moreover, the new device offers striking advantages with respect to force calibration and sample deformation measurements. Force calibration is performed using the eigenfrequency of the force detection system directly inside the SEM. Deformation data are obtained with high accuracy by simultaneously recording displacements above and below the specimen. The detrimental apparatus compliance is determined, and the influence on measured data subsequently minimized: an easy to validate two-springs-in-series model is used for data correction. A force resolution in normal direction of 100 nN accompanied by a sample deformation resolution of 5 nm can be achieved with the instrument using an appropriate load cell stiffness. The capabilities and versatility of this instrument are exemplified by compression experiments performed on submicron amorphous silica particles.

  3. Patterns of Self-Regulation: Patterns of Self-Regulatory Strategy Use among Low-Achieving and High-Achieving University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruban, Lilia; Reis, Sally M.

    2006-01-01

    The present mixed-methods study attempts to provide insights into the nature, idiosyncrasies, and inter- and intra-individual patterns of academic self-regulatory strategy use among two different populations of university students. Low-achieving (n = 49) and high-achieving students (n = 131) described their self-regulatory strategy use in their…

  4. Factors That Influence School Board Actions to Support Student Achievement: A Multi-Case Study of High-Achieving Rural School Districts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Timm, Colleen A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the factors that influence the actions taken by school boards that advance student achievement in high-achieving rural public school districts. Much of what is discussed in the literature on school improvement efforts is centered on the work carried out by school personnel at the school level. What is…

  5. High frequency wide-band transformer uses coax to achieve high turn ratio and flat response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Parry, T.

    1966-01-01

    Center-tap push-pull transformer with toroidal core helically wound with a single coaxial cable creates a high frequency wideband transformer. This transformer has a high-turn ratio, a high coupling coefficient, and a flat broadband response.

  6. Effects of a Collaborative Science Intervention on High Achieving Students' Learning Anxiety and Attitudes toward Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Zuway-R.

    2010-10-01

    This study investigated the effects of a collaborative science intervention on high achieving students' learning anxiety and attitudes toward science. Thirty-seven eighth-grade high achieving students (16 boys and 21 girls) were selected as an experimental group who joined a 20-week collaborative science intervention, which integrated and utilized an innovative teaching strategy. Fifty-eight eighth-grade high achieving students were selected as the comparison group. The Secondary School Student Questionnaire was conducted to measure all participants' learning anxiety and attitudes toward science. In addition, 12 target students from the experimental group (i.e., six active and six passive students) were recruited for weekly classroom observations and follow-up interviews during the intervention. Both quantitative and qualitative findings revealed that experimental group students experienced significant impact as seen through increased attitudes and decreased anxiety of learning science. Implications for practice and research are provided.

  7. School factors affecting postsecondary career pursuits of high-achieving girls in mathematics and science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Hyunsil

    This study examined the influences of secondary school experiences of high-achieving girls in math and science on their postsecondary career pursuits in science fields. Specifically, using the National Education Longitudinal Study of 1988 (NELS:88), the study investigated how science class experiences in high school affect science career persistence of high-achieving girls over and above personal and family factors. Selecting the top 10% on the 8 th grade math and science achievement tests from two panel samples of 1988--1994 and 1988--2000, this study examined which science instructional experiences (i.e., lecture-oriented, experiment-oriented, and student-oriented) best predicted college major choices and postsecondary degree attainments in the fields of science after controlling for personal and family factors. A two-stage test was employed for the analysis of each panel sample. The first test examined the dichotomous career pursuits between science careers and non-science careers and the second test examined the dichotomous pursuits within science careers: "hard" science and "soft" science. Logistic regression procedures were used with consideration of panel weights and design effects. This study identified that experiment-oriented and student-oriented instructional practices seem to positively affect science career pursuits of high-achieving females, while lecture-oriented instruction negatively affected their science career pursuits, and that the longitudinal effects of the two positive instructional contributors to science career pursuits appear to be differential between major choice and degree attainment. This study also found that the influences of instructional practices seem to be slight for general females, while those for high-achieving females were highly considerable, regardless of whether negative or positive. Another result of the study found that only student-oriented instruction seemed to have positive effects for high-achieving males. In

  8. Analysis of High Order Difference Methods for Multiscale Complex Compressible Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sjoegreen, Bjoern; Yee, H. C.; Tang, Harry (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Accurate numerical simulations of complex multiscale compressible viscous flows, especially high speed turbulence combustion and acoustics, demand high order schemes with adaptive numerical dissipation controls. Standard high resolution shock-capturing methods are too dissipative to capture the small scales and/or long-time wave propagations without extreme grid refinements and small time steps. An integrated approach for the control of numerical dissipation in high order schemes with incremental studies was initiated. Here we further refine the analysis on, and improve the understanding of the adaptive numerical dissipation control strategy. Basically, the development of these schemes focuses on high order nondissipative schemes and takes advantage of the progress that has been made for the last 30 years in numerical methods for conservation laws, such as techniques for imposing boundary conditions, techniques for stability at shock waves, and techniques for stable and accurate long-time integration. We concentrate on high order centered spatial discretizations and a fourth-order Runge-Kutta temporal discretizations as the base scheme. Near the bound-aries, the base scheme has stable boundary difference operators. To further enhance stability, the split form of the inviscid flux derivatives is frequently used for smooth flow problems. To enhance nonlinear stability, linear high order numerical dissipations are employed away from discontinuities, and nonlinear filters are employed after each time step in order to suppress spurious oscillations near discontinuities to minimize the smearing of turbulent fluctuations. Although these schemes are built from many components, each of which is well-known, it is not entirely obvious how the different components be best connected. For example, the nonlinear filter could instead have been built into the spatial discretization, so that it would have been activated at each stage in the Runge-Kutta time stepping. We could think

  9. COxSwAIN: Compressive Sensing for Advanced Imaging and Navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurwitz, Richard; Pulley, Marina; LaFerney, Nathan; Munoz, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    The COxSwAIN project focuses on building an image and video compression scheme that can be implemented in a small or low-power satellite. To do this, we used Compressive Sensing, where the compression is performed by matrix multiplications on the satellite and reconstructed on the ground. Our paper explains our methodology and demonstrates the results of the scheme, being able to achieve high quality image compression that is robust to noise and corruption.

  10. Formation behavior of basal texture under the high temperature plane strain compression deformation in AZ80 magnesium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, K.; Okayasu, K.; Fukutomi, H.

    2015-04-01

    The formation behavior of basal texture during high temperature deformation of AZ80 magnesium alloys in single phase was investigated by plane strain compression deformation. Three kinds of specimens with different initial textures were machined out from an extruded bar having a <101¯0> texture. Plane strain compression tests were conducted at temperatures of 623K and 723K and a strain rate of 5.0×10-2s-1, with a strain range of between - 0.4 and -1.0. After deformation, the specimens were immediately quenched in oil. Texture measurement was carried out on the compression planes by the Schulz reflection method using nickel filtered Cu Kα radiation. Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) measurements were also conducted in order to examine the spatial distribution of orientations. Three kinds of specimens named A, B and C were prepared from the same extruded bar. In the specimens A, B and C, {0001} was distributed preferentially parallel to ND, TD, and RD, respectively. After deformation, texture evaluation was conducted on the mid-plane section. At the plane strain compression deformation, peaks appeared in the true stress-true strain curves irrespective of the kinds of specimen used. It was found that the main components and the pole densities of the textures vary depending on deformation condition and initial texture. Six kinds of texture components were observed after deformation. The (0001)<101¯0> has formed regardless of the initial texture. There are two types of texture components; one exists before the deformation, and the other does not. Either types are considered to have stable orientations for plane strain compression. Also, the basal texture is composed of two crystal orientation components - (0001)<101¯0> and (0001)<112¯0>. When (0001) existed before deformation, an extremely sharp (0001) (compression plane) texture is formed.

  11. Data compression using Chebyshev transform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Andrew F. (Inventor); Hawkins, III, S. Edward (Inventor); Nguyen, Lillian (Inventor); Monaco, Christopher A. (Inventor); Seagrave, Gordon G. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    The present invention is a method, system, and computer program product for implementation of a capable, general purpose compression algorithm that can be engaged on the fly. This invention has particular practical application with time-series data, and more particularly, time-series data obtained form a spacecraft, or similar situations where cost, size and/or power limitations are prevalent, although it is not limited to such applications. It is also particularly applicable to the compression of serial data streams and works in one, two, or three dimensions. The original input data is approximated by Chebyshev polynomials, achieving very high compression ratios on serial data streams with minimal loss of scientific information.

  12. "It's a Way of Life for Us": High Mobility and High Achievement in Department of Defense Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smrekar, Claire E.; Owens, Debra E.

    2003-01-01

    Examines the academic performance of students in U.S. Department of Defense Education Activity (DoDEA) schools, which have high student mobility. Some observers contend that these students' high achievement is a function of their middle class family and community characteristics. Asserts that DoDEA schools simultaneously "do the right things" and…

  13. High direct drive illumination uniformity achieved by multi-parameter optimization approach: a case study of Shenguang III laser facility.

    PubMed

    Tian, Chao; Chen, Jia; Zhang, Bo; Shan, Lianqiang; Zhou, Weimin; Liu, Dongxiao; Bi, Bi; Zhang, Feng; Wang, Weiwu; Zhang, Baohan; Gu, Yuqiu

    2015-05-01

    The uniformity of the compression driver is of fundamental importance for inertial confinement fusion (ICF). In this paper, the illumination uniformity on a spherical capsule during the initial imprinting phase directly driven by laser beams has been considered. We aim to explore methods to achieve high direct drive illumination uniformity on laser facilities designed for indirect drive ICF. There are many parameters that would affect the irradiation uniformity, such as Polar Direct Drive displacement quantity, capsule radius, laser spot size and intensity distribution within a laser beam. A novel approach to reduce the root mean square illumination non-uniformity based on multi-parameter optimizing approach (particle swarm optimization) is proposed, which enables us to obtain a set of optimal parameters over a large parameter space. Finally, this method is applied to improve the direct drive illumination uniformity provided by Shenguang III laser facility and the illumination non-uniformity is reduced from 5.62% to 0.23% for perfectly balanced beams. Moreover, beam errors (power imbalance and pointing error) are taken into account to provide a more practical solution and results show that this multi-parameter optimization approach is effective.

  14. Spatial Experiences of High Academic Achievers: Insights from a Developmental Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weckbacher, Lisa Marie; Okamoto, Yukari

    2012-01-01

    The study explored the relationship between types of spatial experiences and spatial abilities among 13- to 14-year-old high academic achievers. Each participant completed two spatial tasks and a survey assessing favored spatial activities across five categories (computers, toys, sports, music, and art) and three developmental periods (early…

  15. High-Stakes Testing and Student Achievement: Updated Analyses with NAEP Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nichols, Sharon L.; Glass, Gene V.; Berliner, David C.

    2012-01-01

    The present research is a follow-up study of earlier published analyses that looked at the relationship between high-stakes testing pressure and student achievement in 25 states. Using the previously derived Accountability Pressure Index (APR) as a measure of state-level policy pressure for performance on standardized tests, a series of…

  16. Performance-Approach Goal Effects on Achievement under Low versus High Challenge Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Senko, Corwin; Durik, Amanda M.; Patel, Lily; Lovejoy, Chelsea M.; Valentiner, David

    2013-01-01

    Two studies examined the effects of university students' achievement goals on performance under low versus high challenge conditions. The first was a laboratory experiment in which participants were assigned goals to pursue on a novel mathematics task alleged to be simple or complex to use. The second was a survey study in which students set goals…

  17. Impact of Physical Environment on Academic Achievement of High School Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burkhalter, Bettye B.

    1983-01-01

    To study the relationship of the physical environment to high school students' academic achievement, 60 students participated in an experiential career exploration program at the Alabama Space and Rocket Center while 108 students participated in a traditional careers program. Tests indicated the former group improved more in career choice…

  18. Universal Factors of Student Achievement in High-Performing Eastern and Western Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Jihyun

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates whether a common set of student attitudes and behavioral tendencies can account for academic achievement across different, especially high-performing, countries via analysis of the PISA 2009 international data set. The 13 countries examined are 5 of the top-performing Eastern countries/systems, namely Shanghai China, South…

  19. The Federal Transformation Intervention Model in Persistently Lowest Achieving High Schools: A Mixed-Methods Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Le Patner, Michelle B.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act federal mandate of the Transformation Intervention Model (TIM) outlined by the School Improvement Grant, which was designed to turn around persistently lowest achieving schools. The study was conducted in four high schools in a large Southern California urban district that selected the…

  20. Excellence in English in Middle and High School: How Teachers' Professional Lives Support Student Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langer, Judith A.

    The Center on English Learning and Achievement (CELA) has been studying the characteristics of successful English programs in middle and high schools. This report discusses the findings of the first two years of their 5-year Excellence in English study and focuses on the educational practices that support student literacy as well as the…