Science.gov

Sample records for achieve maximal therapeutic

  1. [Achievement of therapeutic objectives].

    PubMed

    Mantilla, Teresa

    2014-07-01

    Therapeutic objectives for patients with atherogenic dyslipidemia are achieved by improving patient compliance and adherence. Clinical practice guidelines address the importance of treatment compliance for achieving objectives. The combination of a fixed dose of pravastatin and fenofibrate increases the adherence by simplifying the drug regimen and reducing the number of daily doses. The good tolerance, the cost of the combination and the possibility of adjusting the administration to the patient's lifestyle helps achieve the objectives for these patients with high cardiovascular risk. PMID:25043543

  2. Curriculum and Testing Strategies to Maximize Special Education STAAR Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, William L.; Johnson, Annabel M.; Johnson, Jared W.

    2015-01-01

    This document is from a presentation at the 2015 annual conference of the Science Teachers Association of Texas (STAT). The two sessions (each listed as feature sessions at the state conference) examined classroom strategies the presenter used in his chemistry classes to maximize Texas end-of-course chemistry test scores for his special population…

  3. Achieving Maximal Speed of Solution Exchange for Patch Clamp Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Auzmendi, Jerónimo; Fernández Do Porto, Darío; Pallavicini, Carla; Moffatt, Luciano

    2012-01-01

    Background Resolving the kinetics of agonist binding events separately from the subsequent channel gating processes requires the ability of applying and removing the agonist before channel gating occurs. No reported system has yet achieved pulses shorter than 100 µs, necessary to study nicotinic ACh receptor or AMPA receptor activation. Methodology/Principal Findings Solution exchange systems deliver short agonist pulses by moving a sharp interface between a control and an experimental solution across a channel preparation. We achieved shorter pulses by means of an exchange system that combines a faster flow velocity, narrower partition between the two streams, and increased velocity and bandwidth of the movement of the interface. The measured response of the entire system was fed back to optimize the voltage signal applied to the piezoelectric actuator overcoming the spurious oscillations arising from the mechanical resonances when a high bandwidth driving function was applied. Optimization was accomplished by analyzing the transfer function of the solution exchange system. When driven by optimized command pulses the enhanced system provided pulses lasting 26 ± 1 µs and exchanging 93 ± 1% of the solution, as measured in the open tip of a patch pipette. Conclusions/Significance Pulses of this duration open the experimental study of the molecular events that occur between the agonist binding and the opening of the channel. PMID:22879927

  4. New strategies to maximize therapeutic opportunities for NAMPT inhibitors in oncology.

    PubMed

    Roulston, Anne; Shore, Gordon C

    2016-01-01

    Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) is crucial for nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) biosynthesis in mammalian cells. NAMPT inhibitors represent multifunctional anticancer agents that act on NAD(+) metabolism to shut down glycolysis, nucleotide biosynthesis, and ATP generation and act indirectly as PARP and sirtuin inhibitors. The selectivity of NAMPT inhibitors preys on the increased metabolic requirements to replenish NAD(+) in cancer cells. Although initial clinical studies with NAMPT inhibitors did not achieve single-agent therapeutic levels before dose-limiting toxicities were reached, a new understanding of alternative rescue pathways and a biomarker that can be used to select patients provides new opportunities to widen the therapeutic window and achieve efficacious doses in the clinic. Recent work has also illustrated the potential for drug combination strategies to further enhance the therapeutic opportunities. This review summarizes recent discoveries in NAD(+)/NAMPT inhibitor biology in the context of exploiting this new knowledge to optimize the clinical outcomes for this promising new class of agents. PMID:27308565

  5. New strategies to maximize therapeutic opportunities for NAMPT inhibitors in oncology

    PubMed Central

    Roulston, Anne; Shore, Gordon C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) is crucial for nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) biosynthesis in mammalian cells. NAMPT inhibitors represent multifunctional anticancer agents that act on NAD+ metabolism to shut down glycolysis, nucleotide biosynthesis, and ATP generation and act indirectly as PARP and sirtuin inhibitors. The selectivity of NAMPT inhibitors preys on the increased metabolic requirements to replenish NAD+ in cancer cells. Although initial clinical studies with NAMPT inhibitors did not achieve single-agent therapeutic levels before dose-limiting toxicities were reached, a new understanding of alternative rescue pathways and a biomarker that can be used to select patients provides new opportunities to widen the therapeutic window and achieve efficacious doses in the clinic. Recent work has also illustrated the potential for drug combination strategies to further enhance the therapeutic opportunities. This review summarizes recent discoveries in NAD+/NAMPT inhibitor biology in the context of exploiting this new knowledge to optimize the clinical outcomes for this promising new class of agents. PMID:27308565

  6. Maximal Levels of Aspiration, Minimal Boundary Goals, and Their Relationships with Academic Achievement: The Case of Secondary-School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodis, Flaviu A.; Johnston, Michael; Meyer, Luanna H.; McClure, John; Hodis, Georgeta M.; Starkey, Louise

    2015-01-01

    Maximising educational attainment is important for both individuals and societies. However, understanding of why some students achieve better than others is far from complete. Motivation and achievement data from a sample of 782 secondary-school students in New Zealand reveal that two specific types of outcome goals, namely "maximal levels of…

  7. Reallocating Human Resources to Maximize Student Achievement: A Critical Case Study of a Southern California School District

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glazener, Adrianna Kathleen

    2013-01-01

    This study applied the Evidence-Based Model (Odden & Picus, 2008) as a framework for determining how district leadership could potentially reallocate human resources to maximize the opportunity for student achievement, relying heavily on the ten strategies for doubling student performance (Odden, 2009; Odden & Archibald, 2009) and the…

  8. Challenges and achievements in the therapeutic modulation of aquaporin functionality.

    PubMed

    Beitz, Eric; Golldack, André; Rothert, Monja; von Bülow, Julia

    2015-11-01

    Aquaporin (AQP) water and solute channels have basic physiological functions throughout the human body. AQP-facilitated water permeability across cell membranes is required for rapid reabsorption of water from pre-urine in the kidneys and for sustained near isosmolar water fluxes e.g. in the brain, eyes, inner ear, and lungs. Cellular water permeability is further connected to cell motility. AQPs of the aquaglyceroporin subfamily are necessary for lipid degradation in adipocytes and glycerol uptake into the liver, as well as for skin moistening. Modulation of AQP function is desirable in several pathophysiological situations, such as nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, Sjögren's syndrome, Menière's disease, heart failure, or tumors to name a few. Attempts to design or to find effective small molecule AQP inhibitors have yielded only a few hits. Challenges reside in the high copy number of AQP proteins in the cell membranes, and spatial restrictions in the protein structure. This review gives an overview on selected physiological and pathophysiological conditions in which modulation of AQP functions appears beneficial and discusses first achievements in the search of drug-like AQP inhibitors. PMID:26277280

  9. Parent reinforcement for child achievement: the use of a lottery to maximize parent training effects.

    PubMed Central

    Muir, K A; Milan, M A

    1982-01-01

    This study describes and evaluates a reinforcement program in which parents earned lottery tickets and won prizes for the progress made by their handicapped children during home-based intervention. An ABAB reversal design replicated across three families was used to assess the effects of the lottery on the children's mastery of language skills. Results showed that the reinforcement of the parents for training accomplishments, as indexed by their children's achievements, produced clinically significant increases in the children's progress when compared with the children's progress under the routine supportive practices of the baseline condition. The implications of the findings for parent training programs in general are discussed. PMID:6183247

  10. Achievable rate maximization for decode-and-forward MIMO-OFDM networks with an energy harvesting relay.

    PubMed

    Du, Guanyao; Yu, Jianjun

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the system achievable rate for the multiple-input multiple-output orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (MIMO-OFDM) system with an energy harvesting (EH) relay. Firstly we propose two protocols, time switching-based decode-and-forward relaying (TSDFR) and a flexible power splitting-based DF relaying (PSDFR) protocol by considering two practical receiver architectures, to enable the simultaneous information processing and energy harvesting at the relay. In PSDFR protocol, we introduce a temporal parameter to describe the time division pattern between the two phases which makes the protocol more flexible and general. In order to explore the system performance limit, we discuss the system achievable rate theoretically and formulate two optimization problems for the proposed protocols to maximize the system achievable rate. Since the problems are non-convex and difficult to solve, we first analyze them theoretically and get some explicit results, then design an augmented Lagrangian penalty function (ALPF) based algorithm for them. Numerical results are provided to validate the accuracy of our analytical results and the effectiveness of the proposed ALPF algorithm. It is shown that, PSDFR outperforms TSDFR to achieve higher achievable rate in such a MIMO-OFDM relaying system. Besides, we also investigate the impacts of the relay location, the number of antennas and the number of subcarriers on the system performance. Specifically, it is shown that, the relay position greatly affects the system performance of both protocols, and relatively worse achievable rate is achieved when the relay is placed in the middle of the source and the destination. This is different from the MIMO-OFDM DF relaying system without EH. Moreover, the optimal factor which indicates the time division pattern between the two phases in the PSDFR protocol is always above 0.8, which means that, the common division of the total transmission time into two equal phases in

  11. Latest developments in gene transfer technology: achievements, perspectives, and controversies over therapeutic applications.

    PubMed

    Romano, G; Michell, P; Pacilio, C; Giordano, A

    2000-01-01

    Over the last decade, more than 300 phase I and phase II gene-based clinical trials have been conducted worldwide for the treatment of cancer and monogenic disorders. Lately, these trials have been extended to the treatment of AIDS and, to a lesser extent, cardiovascular diseases. There are 27 currently active gene therapy protocols for the treatment of HIV-1 infection in the USA. Preclinical studies are currently in progress to evaluate the possibility of increasing the number of gene therapy clinical trials for cardiopathies, and of beginning new gene therapy programs for neurologic illnesses, autoimmuno diseases, allergies, regeneration of tissues, and to implement procedures of allogeneic tissues or cell transplantation. In addition, gene transfer technology has allowed for the development of innovative vaccine design, known as genetic immunization. This technique has already been applied in the AIDS vaccine programs in the USA. These programs aim to confer protective immunity against HIV-1 transmission to individuals who are at risk of infection. Research programs have also been considered to develop therapeutic vaccines for patients with AIDS and generate either preventive or therapeutic vaccines against malaria, tuberculosis, hepatitis A, B and C viruses, influenza virus, La Crosse virus, and Ebola virus. The potential therapeutic applications of gene transfer technology are enormous. However, the effectiveness of gene therapy programs is still questioned. Furthermore, there is growing concern over the matter of safety of gene delivery and controversy has arisen over the proposal to begin in utero gene therapy clinical trials for the treatment of inherited genetic disorders. From this standpoint, despite the latest significant achievements reported in vector design, it is not possible to predict to what extent gene therapeutic interventions will be effective in patients, and in what time frame. PMID:10661569

  12. HDAC4 as a potential therapeutic target in neurodegenerative diseases: a summary of recent achievements

    PubMed Central

    Mielcarek, Michal; Zielonka, Daniel; Carnemolla, Alisia; Marcinkowski, Jerzy T.; Guidez, Fabien

    2015-01-01

    For the past decade protein acetylation has been shown to be a crucial post-transcriptional modification involved in the regulation of protein functions. Histone acetyltransferases (HATs) mediate acetylation of histones which results in the nucleosomal relaxation associated with gene expression. The reverse reaction, histone deacetylation, is mediated by histone deacetylases (HDACs) leading to chromatin condensation followed by transcriptional repression. HDACs are divided into distinct classes: I, IIa, IIb, III, and IV, on the basis of size and sequence homology, as well as formation of distinct repressor complexes. Implications of HDACs in many diseases, such as cancer, heart failure, and neurodegeneration, have identified these molecules as unique and attractive therapeutic targets. The emergence of HDAC4 among the members of class IIa family as a major player in synaptic plasticity raises important questions about its functions in the brain. The characterization of HDAC4 specific substrates and molecular partners in the brain will not only provide a better understanding of HDAC4 biological functions but also might help to develop new therapeutic strategies to target numerous malignancies. In this review we highlight and summarize recent achievements in understanding the biological role of HDAC4 in neurodegenerative processes. PMID:25759639

  13. Alcohol liver disease: A review of current therapeutic approaches to achieve long-term abstinence

    PubMed Central

    García, María Luisa Gutiérrez; Blasco-Algora, Sara; Fernández-Rodríguez, Conrado M

    2015-01-01

    Harmful alcohol drinking may lead to significant damage on any organ or system of the body. Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is the most prevalent cause of advanced liver disease in Europe. In ALD, only alcohol abstinence was associated with a better long-term survival. Therefore, current effective therapeutic strategy should be oriented towards achieving alcohol abstinence or a significant reduction in alcohol consumption. Screening all primary care patients to detect those cases with alcohol abuse has been proposed as population-wide preventive intervention in primary care. It has been suggested that in patients with mild alcohol use disorder the best approach is brief intervention in the primary care setting with the ultimate goal being abstinence, whereas patients with moderate-to-severe alcohol use disorder must be referred to specialized care where detoxification and medical treatment of alcohol dependence must be undertaken. PMID:26229395

  14. Alcohol liver disease: A review of current therapeutic approaches to achieve long-term abstinence.

    PubMed

    García, María Luisa Gutiérrez; Blasco-Algora, Sara; Fernández-Rodríguez, Conrado M

    2015-07-28

    Harmful alcohol drinking may lead to significant damage on any organ or system of the body. Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is the most prevalent cause of advanced liver disease in Europe. In ALD, only alcohol abstinence was associated with a better long-term survival. Therefore, current effective therapeutic strategy should be oriented towards achieving alcohol abstinence or a significant reduction in alcohol consumption. Screening all primary care patients to detect those cases with alcohol abuse has been proposed as population-wide preventive intervention in primary care. It has been suggested that in patients with mild alcohol use disorder the best approach is brief intervention in the primary care setting with the ultimate goal being abstinence, whereas patients with moderate-to-severe alcohol use disorder must be referred to specialized care where detoxification and medical treatment of alcohol dependence must be undertaken. PMID:26229395

  15. Having Your Cake and Eating It Too: Maximizing Achievement and Cognitive-Social Development and Socialization through Cooperative Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, David W.; Johnson, Roger T.

    Research on the educational outcomes of cooperative learning strategies suggests that educators can "have their cake and eat it too" since these strategies have been found to promote simultaneously high achievement, constructive student-student relationships, positive attitudes toward subject areas, continuing education, critical thinking,…

  16. Pre-Type 1 Diabetes Dysmetabolism: Maximal sensitivity achieved with Both Oral and Intravenous Glucose Tolerance Testing

    PubMed Central

    Barker, Jennifer M.; McFann, Kim; Harrison, Leonard C.; Fourlanos, Spiros; Krischer, Jeffrey; Cuthbertson, David; Chase, H. Peter; Eisenbarth, George S.; Group, the DPT-1 Study

    2007-01-01

    Objective To determine the relationship of intravenous (IVGTT) and oral (OGTT) glucose tolerance tests abnormalities to diabetes development in a high-risk pre-diabetic cohort and identify an optimal testing strategy for detecting pre-clinical diabetes. Study design Diabetes Prevention Trial Type 1 randomized subjects to oral (n=372) and parenteral (n=339) insulin prevention trials. Subjects were followed with IVGTTs and OGTTs. Factors associated with progression to diabetes were evaluated. Results Survival analysis revealed that higher quartiles of 2-hour glucose and lower quartiles of FPIR at baseline were associated with decreased diabetes-free survival. Cox proportional hazards modeling showed that baseline BMI, FPIR and 2-hour glucose levels were significantly associated with an increased hazard for diabetes. On testing performed within 6 months of diabetes diagnosis, 3% (1/32) had normal first phase insulin response (FPIR) and normal 2-hour glucose on OGTT. The sensitivities for impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and low FPIR performed within 6 months of diabetes diagnosis were equivalent (76% vs. 73%). Conclusions Most (97%) subjects had abnormal IVGTTs and/or OGTTs prior to the development of diabetes. The highest sensitivity is achieved using both tests. PMID:17188609

  17. Enhanced loading regimen of teicoplanin is necessary to achieve therapeutic pharmacokinetics levels for the improvement of clinical outcomes in patients with renal dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Ueda, T; Takesue, Y; Nakajima, K; Ichiki, K; Doita, A; Wada, Y; Tsuchida, T; Takahashi, Y; Ishihara, M; Ikeuchi, H; Uchino, M; Kimura, T

    2016-09-01

    We evaluated the clinical efficacy and safety of teicoplanin according to the pharmacokinetics (PK) therapeutic level achieved in patients with renal dysfunction. Target trough concentration (Cmin) was ≥15-30 μg/ml which has been recommended in patients with normal renal function. Adult patients (estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) <60 ml/min/1.73 m(2)) who were treated by teicoplanin were included in the study. We adopted two types of regimen for the initial 3 days: the conventional regimen, and the enhanced loading regimen (10 mg/kg twice daily on the 1st day, followed by 6.7-10 mg/kg once daily for the 2nd and 3rd days]. Two hundred and eighty-eight patients were evaluated for safety, and 106 patients with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections were evaluated for clinical efficacy. A significantly higher success rate was obtained in patients who achieved the target initial Cmin compared with those that did not (75.0 % vs 50.0 %, p = 0.008). In a multivariate analysis, initial Cmin ≥15 μg/ml was an independent factor for clinical success (adjusted odds ratio: 4.20, 95 % confidence interval: 1.34-13.15). In patients with 15-30 μg/ml of maximal Cmin during therapy, nephrotoxicity occurred in 13.1 %, and hepatotoxicity in 2.6 %, and these incidences were not significantly higher compared with those patients with <15 μg/ml. In conclusion, achievement of Cmin of 15-30 μg/ml without delay was necessary to improve clinical outcomes for the treatment by teicoplanin in patients with renal dysfunction. Further investigation is required regarding the optimal loading regimen to achieve the therapeutic levels in those patients. PMID:27278654

  18. Comparison of hemoglobin A1c goal achievement with the addition of pioglitazone to maximal/highest tolerated doses of sulfonylurea and metformin combination therapy

    PubMed Central

    McFarland, M. Shawn; Huddleston, Lana; Tammareddi, Kumar; McKenzie, Michael; Bean, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Objectives It has been proposed that the combination of thiazolidinedione (TZD) therapy to metformin and sulfonylurea is beneficial due to each medication having a unique mechanism of action. Within the Veterans Affairs Hospital, specific criteria of use define when TZD therapy can be initiated. Most patients who receive TZD therapy have failed other medications prior to use. The primary objective of this study was to determine the percentage of patients achieving the American Diabetes Association (ADA) goal hemoglobin A1c (A1c) of less than 7% with the addition of pioglitazone to the maximal/highest tolerated doses of sulfonylurea and metformin combination therapy. Methods This was a six healthcare system retrospective, descriptive, analysis of type 2 diabetic patients (DM-2). Patients must have received the maximal/highest tolerated doses of sulfonylurea and metformin combination therapy and have been TZD naïve or off TZD therapy for a minimum of 6 months, a baseline A1c greater than 7%, a repeat A1c at 3 and 6 months available, and deemed medication compliant. Results We evaluated 98 total patients. The percentage of veteran patients achieving ADA goal A1c of less than 7% after the addition of pioglitazone reached statistical significance at both 3 and 6 months post TZD initiation. The mean reduction in A1c post-pioglitazone initiation was 0.67% (SD ± 0.92) and 0.78% (SD ± 0.94) at 3 and 6 months, respectively. Conclusion The addition of pioglitazone to veteran patients who were already receiving maximal/highest tolerated doses of sulfonylurea was able to achieve a higher percentage in with the ADA goal A1c of less than 7%. Initiating pioglitazone in patients with an A1c of 9% or greater did not reach statistical significance in achieving an A1c less than 7%. The initial starting dose of pioglitazone 30 mg can be considered as compared to 15 mg daily if contraindications do not exist.

  19. Preferences for Analgesic Treatments Are Influenced by Probability of the Occurrence of Adverse Effects and the Time to Reach Maximal Therapeutic Effects

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chia-Shu; Wu, Shih-Yun; Wu, Long-Ting

    2015-01-01

    Research on shared medical decision-making suggested that both the potency of a treatment and the probability of it being successful influence individual treatment preferences. Patients also need to consider the negative attributes of treatments, such as the occurrence of adverse effects or a slow start to the therapeutic effects. It remains unclear how these attributes influence individual treatment preferences. We investigated how the analgesic effect, the adverse effect, and the time-course effect influenced the preference of analgesic treatments. Forty-five healthy volunteers participated in three hypothetical analgesic decision-making tasks. They were instructed to imagine that they were experiencing pain and choose between two hypothetical analgesic treatments: the more potent radical treatment and the less potent conservative treatment. The potency of a treatment was countered by the following attributes: the probability of working successfully, the probability of inducing an adverse effect, and the time required for the treatment to reach its maximal effect. We found that (a) when the overall probability that a treatment would induce an adverse effect decreased, the participants changed their preference from a conservative treatment to a radical treatment; (b) when the time-course for a treatment to reach its maximal effect was shortened, the participants changed their preference from a conservative treatment to a radical treatment, and (c) individual differences in prior clinical pain and the degree of imagined pain relief were associated with preferences. The findings showed that the adverse effects and the time course of treatments guide the analgesic treatment preferences, highlighting the importance of sharing information about negative attributes of treatments in pain management. The findings imply that patients may over-emphasize the occurrence of adverse effect or a slow time-course of treatment effect. In terms of shared medical decision

  20. Spiral Enteroscopy Utilizing Capsule Location Index for Achieving High Diagnostic and Therapeutic Yield

    PubMed Central

    Korenblit, Jason; O'Hare, Brendan; Shnitser, Anastasia; Kedika, Ramalinga; Matro, Rebecca; Halegoua-De Marzio, Dina; Infantolino, Anthony; Conn, Mitchell

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aim. Spiral enteroscopy (SE) is a new small bowel endoscopic technique. Our aim is to review the diagnostic and therapeutic yield, safety of SE, and the predictive role of prior capsule endoscopy (CE) at an academic center. Methods. A retrospective review of patients undergoing SE after prior CE between 2008 and 2013 was performed. Capsule location index (CLI) was defined as the fraction of total small bowel transit time when the lesion was seen on CE. Results. A total of 174 SEs were performed: antegrade (147) and retrograde (27). Abnormalities on SE were detected in 65% patients. The procedure was safe in patients with surgically altered bowel anatomy (n = 12). The diagnostic yield of antegrade SE decreased with increasing CLI range. The diagnostic yield of retrograde SE decreased on decreasing CLI range. A CLI cutoff of 0.6 was derived that determined the initial route of SE. Vascular ectasias seen on CE were detected in 83% cases on SE; p < 0.01. Conclusions. SE is safe with a high diagnostic and therapeutic yield. CLI is predictive of the success of SE and determines the best route of SE. The type of small bowel pathology targeted by SE may affect its utility and yield. PMID:26681910

  1. [Update of planning tables of cholesterol-lowering therapy orientated to achieve LDL therapeutic targets].

    PubMed

    Masana, Luis; Plana, Núria

    2015-01-01

    This is the third update of a planning-table for use in cholesterol-lowering therapy, so as to obtain LDLc objectives. This is an easy to use laptop tool to help choose the best statin or combination therapy (statin plus ezetimibe) depending on the current LDL concentration of the patient, and the LDLc objective to achieve. It is based on a colour code that indicates the drugs that are efficient enough to help patients to achieve their LDL goal. Along with the table, recommendations are given for the best strategy in order to implement the optimal therapy in a maximum of two clinical encounters. PMID:25865752

  2. Tissue barriers and novel approaches to achieve hepatoselectivity of subcutaneously-injected insulin therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Shao, Juntang; Zaro, Jennica L; Shen, Wei-Chiang

    2016-01-01

    Current subcutaneously (s.c.)-injected insulin (INS) products result in a hyperinsulin exposure to peripheral tissues (skeletal muscle and adipose) while INS hardly accesses to liver after injection. This unphysiological distribution raises risks of hypoglycemia episode and causes weight gain after long term treatment. An ideal INS replacement therapy requires the distribution or action of exogenous INS to more closely mimic physiological INS in terms of its preferential hepatic action. However, there are 2 factors that limit the ability of s.c. injected INS to restore the liver: peripheral gradient in INS deficient diabetes patients: (1) the transport of INS in capillary endothelium and peripheral tissues from the injection site; and (2) peripheral INS receptor (IR) mediated INS degradation. In this review, the tissue barriers against efficient liver targeting of s.c. injected INS are discussed and current advances in developing hepatoselective insulin therapeutics are introduced. PMID:27358753

  3. A new perspective on therapeutic inhibition of advanced glycation in diabetic microvascular complications: common downstream endpoints achieved through disparate therapeutic approaches?

    PubMed

    Sourris, Karly C; Harcourt, Brooke E; Forbes, Josephine M

    2009-01-01

    A commonality among the chemically disparate compounds that inhibit the formation and accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) or their signalling pathways is their end organ protection in experimental models of diabetes complications. Although this group of therapeutics are structurally and functionally distinct with numerous mechanisms of action, the most important factor governing their therapeutic capability is clearly their ability to alleviate the tissue burden of advanced glycation, rather than the biochemical mechanism by which this is achieved. However, it remains to be determined if it is the reduction in tissue AGE levels per se or inhibition of downstream signal pathways which is ultimately required for end organ protection. For example, a number of these agents stimulate antioxidant defences, modify lipid profiles and inhibit low-grade inflammation. These novel actions emphasise the importance of further examination of the advanced glycation pathway and in particular the diverse action of these agents in ameliorating the development of diabetic complications such as nephropathy. PMID:19556753

  4. Is the required therapeutic effect always achieved by racemic switch of proton-pump inhibitors?

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Quan; Yan, Xiao-Feng; Pan, Wen-Sheng; Zeng, Su

    2008-01-01

    Many of the drugs currently used in medical practice are racemates. The enantiomers of a racemic drug differ in pharmacodynamics and/or pharmacokinetics, thus in some cases it is preferable to develop pure enantiomers by racemic switch. In a recent study by Pai et al, dexrabeprazole [R(+)-rabeprazole] (10 mg) was found to be more effective than rabeprazole (20 mg) in the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease. We read with great interest in this study and discussed whether such racemic switch would be applicable to other proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs). A literature review indicates that stereoselective pharmacokinetics, rather than stereoselective pharmacological activity, is the main cause of differences in clinical efficacy between pure enantiomer and racemic PPI. Racemic switches of PPI provide the therapeutic advantages such as reducing metabolic load on the body, simplifying pharmacokinetics, providing benefit to the non-responders to standard dose of racemate, more homogenous response to treatment and better efficacy with equal safety. Further studies in quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) are needed to address the fact that the preferred enantiomer of PPI is not always in the same absolute configuration, i.e., S-form is for omeprazole, pantoprazole and tenatoprazole whereas R-form is for lansoprazole and rabeprazole. PMID:18442220

  5. Achievement of Vancomycin Therapeutic Goals in Critically Ill Patients: Early Individualization May Be Beneficial

    PubMed Central

    Shahrami, Bita; Najmeddin, Farhad; Mousavi, Sarah; Ahmadi, Arezoo; Rouini, Mohammad Reza; Sadeghi, Kourosh; Mojtahedzadeh, Mojtaba

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The aim of our study was to assess and validate the effectiveness of early dose adjustment of vancomycin based on first dose monitoring in achieving target recommended goal in critically ill patients. Methods. Twenty critically ill patients with sepsis received loading dose of 25 mg/kg of vancomycin and then were randomly assigned to 2 groups. Group 1 received maximum empirical doses of vancomycin of 15 mg/kg every 8 hrs. In group 2, the doses were individualized based on serum concentrations of vancomycin. First dose nonsteady state sampling was used to calculate pharmacokinetic parameters of the patients within 24 hours. Results. Steady state trough serum concentrations were significantly higher in group 2 in comparison with group 1 (19.4 ± 4.4 mg/L versus 14.4 ± 4.3 mg/L) (P = 0.03). Steady state AUCs were significantly higher in group 2 compared with group 1 (665.9 ± 136.5 mg·hr/L versus 490.7 ± 101.1 mg·hr/L) (P = 0.008). Conclusions. With early individualized dosing regimen, significantly more patients achieved peak and trough steady state concentrations. In the context of pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic goal of area under the time concentration curve to minimum inhibitory concentration (AUC/MIC) ≥400 and also to obtain trough serum concentration of vancomycin of ≥15 mg/L, it is necessary to individualize doses of vancomycin in critically ill patients. PMID:27073695

  6. Designer Self-Assemble Peptides Maximize the Therapeutic Benefits of Neural Stem Cell Transplantation for Alzheimer's Disease via Enhancing Neuron Differentiation and Paracrine Action.

    PubMed

    Cui, Guo-hong; Shao, Shui-jin; Yang, Jia-jun; Liu, Jian-ren; Guo, Hai-dong

    2016-03-01

    maximize the therapeutic benefits of NSC transplantation for AD through improving the survival and differentiation of transplanted stem cells and promoting the effects of neuroprotection, anti-neuroinflammatory and paracrine action. Our results may have important clinical implications for the design of future NSC-based strategies using the biomaterials for various neurodegenerative diseases including AD. PMID:25586060

  7. Clinically achievable plasma deferoxamine concentrations are therapeutic in a rat model of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia.

    PubMed Central

    Merali, S; Chin, K; Del Angel, L; Grady, R W; Armstrong, M; Clarkson, A B

    1995-01-01

    The iron-chelating drug deferoxamine (DFO) has been shown to be active in animal models of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PCP), with effective daily intraperitoneal bolus dosages being 400 and 1,000 mg of DFO mesylate kg of body weight-1 in mouse and rat models, respectively. Continuous infusion produced a moderately improved response in a rat model. The data reported here demonstrate that the response achieved by continuous infusion of 195 and 335 mg of DFO mesylate kg-1 day-1 in the rat model is associated with mean concentrations in plasma of 1.3 and 2.5 micrograms of DFO ml-1 and mean concentrations in lung tissue of 4.9 and 6.0 micrograms of DFO g of lung tissue-1, respectively. Since current clinical use of DFO mesylate for the treatment of iron overload produces higher concentrations in the plasma of patients, DFO may prove to be a useful anti-PCP treatment. The 2.4- to 3.8-fold higher DFO concentration observed in lung tissue compared with that observed in plasma may be important in the response of PCP to DFO. PMID:8540710

  8. The Achievement of Therapeutic Objectives Scale: Interrater Reliability and Sensitivity to Change in Short-Term Dynamic Psychotherapy and Cognitive Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valen, Jakob; Ryum, Truls; Svartberg, Martin; Stiles, Tore C.; McCullough, Leigh

    2011-01-01

    This study examined interrater reliability and sensitivity to change of the Achievement of Therapeutic Objectives Scale (ATOS; McCullough, Larsen, et al., 2003) in short-term dynamic psychotherapy (STDP) and cognitive therapy (CT). The ATOS is a process scale originally developed to assess patients' achievements of treatment objectives in STDP,…

  9. Multipoint-likelihood maximization mapping on 4 segregating populations to achieve an integrated framework map for QTL analysis in pot azalea (Rhododendron simsii hybrids)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Azalea (Rhododendron simsii hybrids) is the most important flowering pot plant produced in Belgium, being exported world-wide. In the breeding program, flower color is the main feature for selection, only in later stages cultivation related plant quality traits are evaluated. As a result, plants with attractive flowering are kept too long in the breeding cycle. The inheritance of flower color has been well studied; information on the heritability of cultivation related quality traits is lacking. For this purpose, QTL mapping in diverse genetic backgrounds appeared to be a must and therefore 4 mapping populations were made and analyzed. Results An integrated framework map on four individual linkage maps in Rhododendron simsii hybrids was constructed. For genotyping, mainly dominant scored AFLP (on average 364 per population) and MYB-based markers (15) were combined with co-dominant SSR (23) and EST markers (12). Linkage groups were estimated in JoinMap. A consensus grouping for the 4 mapping populations was made and applied in each individual mapping population. Finally, 16 stable linkage groups were set for the 4 populations; the azalea chromosome number being 13. A combination of regression mapping (JoinMap) and multipoint-likelihood maximization (Carthagène) enabled the construction of 4 maps and their alignment. A large portion of loci (43%) was common to at least two populations and could therefore serve as bridging markers. The different steps taken for map optimization and integration into a reference framework map for QTL mapping are discussed. Conclusions This is the first map of azalea up to our knowledge. AFLP and SSR markers are used as a reference backbone and functional markers (EST and MYB) were added as candidate genes for QTL analysis. The alignment of the 4 maps on the basis of framework markers will facilitate in turn the alignment of QTL regions detected in each of the populations. The approach we took is thoroughly different than the

  10. MAXIM: The Blackhole Imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gendreau, Keith; Cash, Webster; Gorenstein, Paul; Windt, David; Kaaret, Phil; Reynolds, Chris

    2004-01-01

    The Beyond Einstein Program in NASA's Office of Space Science Structure and Evolution of the Universe theme spells out the top level scientific requirements for a Black Hole Imager in its strategic plan. The MAXIM mission will provide better than one tenth of a microarcsecond imaging in the X-ray band in order to satisfy these requirements. We will overview the driving requirements to achieve these goals and ultimately resolve the event horizon of a supermassive black hole. We will present the current status of this effort that includes a study of a baseline design as well as two alternative approaches.

  11. FcRn binding is not sufficient for achieving systemic therapeutic levels of immunoglobulin G after oral delivery of enteric-coated capsules in cynomolgus macaques.

    PubMed

    Muzammil, Salman; Mabus, John R; Cooper, Philip R; Brezski, Randall J; Bement, Courtney B; Perkinson, Rob; Huebert, Norman D; Thompson, Suzanne; Levine, Dalia; Kliwinski, Connie; Bradley, Dino; Hornby, Pamela J

    2016-06-01

    Although much speculation has surrounded intestinally expressed FcRn as a means for systemic uptake of orally administered immunoglobulin G (IgG), this has not been validated in translational models beyond neonates or in FcRn-expressing cells in vitro. Recently, IgG1 intestinal infusion acutely in anesthetized cynomolgus resulted in detectable serum monoclonal antibody (mAb) levels. In this study, we show that IgG2 has greater protease resistance to intestinal enzymes in vitro and mice in vivo, due to protease resistance in the hinge region. An IgG2 mAb engineered for FcRn binding, was optimally formulated, lyophilized, and loaded into enteric-coated capsules for oral dosing in cynomolgus. Small intestinal pH 7.5 was selected for enteric delivery based on gastrointestinal pH profiling of cynomolgus by operator-assisted IntelliCap System(®). Milling of the lyophilized IgG2 M428L FcRn-binding variant after formulation in 10 mmol/L histidine, pH 5.7, 8.5% sucrose, 0.04% PS80 did not alter the physicochemical properties nor the molecular integrity compared to the batch released in PBS. Size 3 hard gel capsules (23.2 mg IgG2 M428L ~3 mg/kg) were coated with hydroxypropyl methylcellulose acetate succinate for rapid dissolution at pH 7.5 in small intestine and FcRn binding of encapsulated mAb confirmed. Initial capsule dosing by endoscopic delivery into the small intestine achieved 0.2 + 0.1 ng/mL (n = 5) peak at 24 h. Weekly oral capsule dosing for 6 weeks achieved levels of 0.4 + 0.2 ng/mL and, despite increasing the dose and frequency, remained below 1 ng/mL. In conclusion, lyophilized milled mAb retains FcRn binding and molecular integrity for small intestinal delivery. The low systemic exposure has demonstrated the limitations of intestinal FcRn in non-human primates and the unfeasibility of employing this for therapeutic levels of mAb. Local mAb delivery with limited systemic exposure may be sufficient as a therapeutic for intestinal diseases. PMID

  12. Therapeutic hypothermia achieves neuroprotection via a decrease in acetylcholine with a concurrent increase in carnitine in the neonatal hypoxia-ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Takenouchi, Toshiki; Sugiura, Yuki; Morikawa, Takayuki; Nakanishi, Tsuyoshi; Nagahata, Yoshiko; Sugioka, Tadao; Honda, Kurara; Kubo, Akiko; Hishiki, Takako; Matsuura, Tomomi; Hoshino, Takao; Takahashi, Takao; Suematsu, Makoto; Kajimura, Mayumi

    2015-01-01

    Although therapeutic hypothermia is known to improve neurologic outcomes after perinatal cerebral hypoxia-ischemia, etiology remains unknown. To decipher the mechanisms whereby hypothermia regulates metabolic dynamics in different brain regions, we used a two-step approach: a metabolomics to target metabolic pathways responding to cooling, and a quantitative imaging mass spectrometry to reveal spatial alterations in targeted metabolites in the brain. Seven-day postnatal rats underwent the permanent ligation of the left common carotid artery followed by exposure to 8% O2 for 2.5 hours. The pups were returned to normoxic conditions at either 38°C or 30°C for 3 hours. The brain metabolic states were rapidly fixed using in situ freezing. The profiling of 107 metabolites showed that hypothermia diminishes the carbon biomass related to acetyl moieties, such as pyruvate and acetyl-CoA; conversely, it increases deacetylated metabolites, such as carnitine and choline. Quantitative imaging mass spectrometry demarcated that hypothermia diminishes the acetylcholine contents specifically in hippocampus and amygdala. Such decreases were associated with an inverse increase in carnitine in the same anatomic regions. These findings imply that hypothermia achieves its neuroprotective effects by mediating the cellular acetylation status through a coordinated suppression of acetyl-CoA, which resides in metabolic junctions of glycolysis, amino-acid catabolism, and ketolysis. PMID:25586144

  13. Working positively with sexual offenders: maximizing the effectiveness of treatment.

    PubMed

    Marshall, William L; Ward, Tony; Mann, Ruth E; Moulden, Heather; Fernandez, Yolanda M; Serran, Geris; Marshall, Liam E

    2005-09-01

    In this article, the authors draw on literatures outside sexual offending and make suggestions for working more positively and constructively with these offenders. Although the management of risk is a necessary feature of treatment, it needs to occur in conjunction with a strength-based approach. An exclusive focus on risk can lead to overly confrontational therapeutic encounters, a lack of rapport between offenders and clinicians, and fragmented and mechanistic treatment delivery. The authors suggest that the goals of sexual offender treatment should be the attainment of good lives, which is achieved by enhancing hope, increasing self-esteem, developing approach goals, and working collaboratively with the offenders. Examples are provided of how these targets may be met. When this is done within a therapeutic context where the treatment providers display empathy and warmth and are rewarding and directive, the authors suggest that treatment effects will be maximized. PMID:16051729

  14. Maximally nonlocal theories cannot be maximally random.

    PubMed

    de la Torre, Gonzalo; Hoban, Matty J; Dhara, Chirag; Prettico, Giuseppe; Acín, Antonio

    2015-04-24

    Correlations that violate a Bell inequality are said to be nonlocal; i.e., they do not admit a local and deterministic explanation. Great effort has been devoted to study how the amount of nonlocality (as measured by a Bell inequality violation) serves to quantify the amount of randomness present in observed correlations. In this work we reverse this research program and ask what do the randomness certification capabilities of a theory tell us about the nonlocality of that theory. We find that, contrary to initial intuition, maximal randomness certification cannot occur in maximally nonlocal theories. We go on and show that quantum theory, in contrast, permits certification of maximal randomness in all dichotomic scenarios. We hence pose the question of whether quantum theory is optimal for randomness; i.e., is it the most nonlocal theory that allows maximal randomness certification? We answer this question in the negative by identifying a larger-than-quantum set of correlations capable of this feat. Not only are these results relevant to understanding quantum mechanics' fundamental features, but also put fundamental restrictions on device-independent protocols based on the no-signaling principle. PMID:25955039

  15. Maximal combustion temperature estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golodova, E.; Shchepakina, E.

    2006-12-01

    This work is concerned with the phenomenon of delayed loss of stability and the estimation of the maximal temperature of safe combustion. Using the qualitative theory of singular perturbations and canard techniques we determine the maximal temperature on the trajectories located in the transition region between the slow combustion regime and the explosive one. This approach is used to estimate the maximal temperature of safe combustion in multi-phase combustion models.

  16. Maximizing Brightness in Photoinjectors

    SciTech Connect

    Limborg-Deprey, C.; Tomizawa, H.; /JAERI-RIKEN, Hyogo

    2011-11-30

    If the laser pulse driving photoinjectors could be arbitrarily shaped, the emittance growth induced by space charge effects could be totally compensated for. In particular, for RF guns the photo-electron distribution leaving the cathode should have a 3D-ellipsoidal shape. The emittance at the end of the injector could be as small as the cathode emittance. We explore how the emittance and the brightness can be optimized for photoinjector based on RF gun depending on the peak current requirements. Techniques available to produce those ideal laser pulse shapes are also discussed. If the laser pulse driving photoinjectors could be arbitrarily shaped, the emittance growth induced by space charge effects could be totally compensated for. In particular, for RF guns, the photo-electron distribution leaving the cathode should be close to a uniform distribution contained in a 3D-ellipsoid contour. For photo-cathodes which have very fast emission times, and assuming a perfectly uniform emitting surface, this could be achieved by shaping the laser in a pulse of constant fluence and limited in space by a 3D-ellipsoid contour. Simulations show that in such conditions, with the standard linear emittance compensation, the emittance at the end of the photo-injector beamline approaches the minimum value imposed by the cathode emittance. Brightness, which is expressed as the ratio of peak current over the product of the two transverse emittance, seems to be maximized for small charges. Numerical simulations also show that for very high charge per bunch (10nC), emittances as small as 2 mm-mrad could be reached by using 3D-ellipsoidal laser pulses in an S-Band gun. The production of 3D-ellipsoidal pulses is very challenging, but seems worthwhile the effort. We briefly discuss some of the present ideas and difficulties of achieving such pulses.

  17. Patients’ empowerment, physicians’ perceptions, and achievement of therapeutic goals in patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Lavalle-González, Fernando J; Chiquete, Erwin

    2016-01-01

    Background Physicians’ perception may not parallel objective measures of therapeutic targets in patients with diabetes. This is an issue rarely addressed in the medical literature. We aimed to analyze physicians’ perception and characteristics of adequate control of patients with diabetes. Patients and methods We studied information on physicians and their patients who participated in the third wave of the International Diabetes Management Practices Study registry in Mexico. This analysis was performed on 2,642 patients, 203 with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) and 2,439 with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), treated by 200 physicians. Results The patients perceived at target had lower hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) and fasting blood glucose than those considered not at target. However, overestimation of the frequency of patients with HbA1c <7% was 41.5% in patients with T1DM and 31.7% in patients with T2DM (underestimation: 2.8% and 8.0%, respectively). The agreement between the physicians’ perception and the class of HbA1c was suboptimal (κ: 0.612). Diabetologists and endocrinologists tested HbA1c more frequently than primary care practitioners, internists, or cardiologists; however, no differences were observed in mean HbA1c, for both T1DM (8.4% vs 7.2%, P=0.42) and T2DM (8.03% vs 8.01%, P=0.87) patients. Nevertheless, insulin users perceived at target, who practiced self-monitoring and self-adjustment of insulin, had a lower mean HbA1c than patients without these characteristics (mean HbA1c in T1DM: 6.8% vs 9.6%, respectively; mean HbA1c in T2DM: 7.0% vs 10.1%, respectively). Conclusion Although there is a significant physicians’ overestimation about the optimal glycemic control, this global impression and characteristics of patients’ empowerment, such as self-monitoring and self-adjustment of insulin, are associated with the achievement of targets. PMID:27555751

  18. Maximizing Classroom Participation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Englander, Karen

    2001-01-01

    Discusses how to maximize classroom participation in the English-as-a-Second-or-Foreign-Language classroom, and provides a classroom discussion method that is based on real-life problem solving. (Author/VWL)

  19. Maximal Outboxes of Quadrilaterals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhao, Dongsheng

    2011-01-01

    An outbox of a quadrilateral is a rectangle such that each vertex of the given quadrilateral lies on one side of the rectangle and different vertices lie on different sides. We first investigate those quadrilaterals whose every outbox is a square. Next, we consider the maximal outboxes of rectangles and those quadrilaterals with perpendicular…

  20. How To: Maximize Google

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Branzburg, Jeffrey

    2004-01-01

    Google is shaking out to be the leading Web search engine, with recent research from Nielsen NetRatings reporting about 40 percent of all U.S. households using the tool at least once in January 2004. This brief article discusses how teachers and students can maximize their use of Google.

  1. Infrared Maximally Abelian Gauge

    SciTech Connect

    Mendes, Tereza; Cucchieri, Attilio; Mihara, Antonio

    2007-02-27

    The confinement scenario in Maximally Abelian gauge (MAG) is based on the concepts of Abelian dominance and of dual superconductivity. Recently, several groups pointed out the possible existence in MAG of ghost and gluon condensates with mass dimension 2, which in turn should influence the infrared behavior of ghost and gluon propagators. We present preliminary results for the first lattice numerical study of the ghost propagator and of ghost condensation for pure SU(2) theory in the MAG.

  2. Quantum-Inspired Maximizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, Michail

    2008-01-01

    A report discusses an algorithm for a new kind of dynamics based on a quantum- classical hybrid-quantum-inspired maximizer. The model is represented by a modified Madelung equation in which the quantum potential is replaced by different, specially chosen 'computational' potential. As a result, the dynamics attains both quantum and classical properties: it preserves superposition and entanglement of random solutions, while allowing one to measure its state variables, using classical methods. Such optimal combination of characteristics is a perfect match for quantum-inspired computing. As an application, an algorithm for global maximum of an arbitrary integrable function is proposed. The idea of the proposed algorithm is very simple: based upon the Quantum-inspired Maximizer (QIM), introduce a positive function to be maximized as the probability density to which the solution is attracted. Then the larger value of this function will have the higher probability to appear. Special attention is paid to simulation of integer programming and NP-complete problems. It is demonstrated that the problem of global maximum of an integrable function can be found in polynomial time by using the proposed quantum- classical hybrid. The result is extended to a constrained maximum with applications to integer programming and TSP (Traveling Salesman Problem).

  3. Use of boron cluster-containing redox nanoparticles with ROS scavenging ability in boron neutron capture therapy to achieve high therapeutic efficiency and low adverse effects.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhenyu; Horiguchi, Yukichi; Nakai, Kei; Matsumura, Akira; Suzuki, Minoru; Ono, Koji; Nagasaki, Yukio

    2016-10-01

    A boron delivery system with high therapeutic efficiency and low adverse effects is crucial for a successful boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). In this study, we developed boron cluster-containing redox nanoparticles (BNPs) via polyion complex (PIC) formation, using a newly synthesized poly(ethylene glycol)-polyanion (PEG-polyanion, possessing a (10)B-enriched boron cluster as a side chain of one of its segments) and PEG-polycation (possessing a reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger as a side chain of one of its segments). The BNPs exhibited high colloidal stability, selective uptake in tumor cells, specific accumulation, and long retention in tumor tissue and ROS scavenging ability. After thermal neutron irradiation, significant suppression of tumor growth was observed in the BNP-treated group, with only 5-ppm (10)B in tumor tissues, whereas at least 20-ppm (10)B is generally required for low molecular weight (LMW) (10)B agents. In addition, increased leukocyte levels were observed in the LMW (10)B agent-treated group after thermal neutron irradiation, and not in BNP-treated group, which might be attributed to its ROS scavenging ability. No visual metastasis of tumor cells to other organs was observed 1 month after irradiation in the BNP-treated group. These results suggest that BNPs are promising for enhancing the BNCT performance. PMID:27467416

  4. [Achievement of therapeutic target in subjects on statin treatment in clinical practice. Results of the STAR (Statins Target Assessment in Real practice) study].

    PubMed

    Degli Esposti, Luca; Sangiorgi, Diego; Arca, Marcello; Vigna, Giovanni B; Budal, Stefano; Degli Esposti, Ezio

    2011-12-01

    The primary aim of the STAR Study (Statins Target Assessment in Real practice) was to determine the LDL-cholesterol reduction and to analyse patient's and therapeutic factors associated to LDL-cholesterol target attainment in newly treated subjects with statins in an unselected population in clinical practice setting. Administrative databases (including pharmaceutical prescriptions and hospital admissions) and laboratory test databases (including LDL-cholesterol values) of five local health units, distributed in Emilia Romagna, Toscana and Umbria, were linked. A retrospective cohort study was conducted and all subjects aged > or =18 years with a first prescription for statins (newly treated subjects) between January 1st, 2007 and June 30th, 2008 were included. All statin prescriptions over a 12 months follow-up period were considered and used to calculate adherence to treatment. Baseline and follow-up LDL-cholesterol, respectively, were defined according to the nearest determination to the first prescription for statins and to the end of the follow-up period. A total of 3.232 subjects was included, 1.516 males (47%) and 1.716 females (53%), with an average age equal to 65.9 +/- 11.3 years. Among included subjects, 22.,6% had a gap to LDL-cholesterol target <10%, 30.0% between 10 and 29%, 20.7% between 30 and 49%, and 26.7% . or =50%. Among those with a gap to target > or =50%, 30-49%, and 10-29%, respectively, LDL-cholesterol target was attained by 7.1%, 41.8%, and 62.% of subjects. LDL-cholesterol target attainment was associated to gap to target, adherence with treatment, and type of statin. PMID:22567731

  5. Ehrenfest's Lottery--Time and Entropy Maximization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashbaugh, Henry S.

    2010-01-01

    Successful teaching of the Second Law of Thermodynamics suffers from limited simple examples linking equilibrium to entropy maximization. I describe a thought experiment connecting entropy to a lottery that mixes marbles amongst a collection of urns. This mixing obeys diffusion-like dynamics. Equilibrium is achieved when the marble distribution is…

  6. AUC-Maximizing Ensembles through Metalearning

    PubMed Central

    LeDell, Erin; van der Laan, Mark J.; Peterson, Maya

    2016-01-01

    Area Under the ROC Curve (AUC) is often used to measure the performance of an estimator in binary classification problems. An AUC-maximizing classifier can have significant advantages in cases where ranking correctness is valued or if the outcome is rare. In a Super Learner ensemble, maximization of the AUC can be achieved by the use of an AUC-maximining metalearning algorithm. We discuss an implementation of an AUC-maximization technique that is formulated as a nonlinear optimization problem. We also evaluate the effectiveness of a large number of different nonlinear optimization algorithms to maximize the cross-validated AUC of the ensemble fit. The results provide evidence that AUC-maximizing metalearners can, and often do, out-perform non-AUC-maximizing metalearning methods, with respect to ensemble AUC. The results also demonstrate that as the level of imbalance in the training data increases, the Super Learner ensemble outperforms the top base algorithm by a larger degree. PMID:27227721

  7. Does contemporary vancomycin dosing achieve therapeutic targets in a heterogeneous clinical cohort of critically ill patients? Data from the multinational DALI study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The objective of this study was to describe the pharmacokinetics of vancomycin in ICU patients and to examine whether contemporary antibiotic dosing results in concentrations that have been associated with favourable response. Methods The Defining Antibiotic Levels in Intensive Care (DALI) study was a prospective, multicentre pharmacokinetic point-prevalence study. Antibiotic dosing was as per the treating clinician either by intermittent bolus or continuous infusion. Target trough concentration was defined as ≥15 mg/L and target pharmacodynamic index was defined as an area under the concentration-time curve over a 24-hour period divided by the minimum inhibitory concentration of the suspected bacteria (AUC0–24/MIC ratio) >400 (assuming MIC ≤1 mg/L). Results Data of 42 patients from 26 ICUs were eligible for analysis. A total of 24 patients received vancomycin by continuous infusion (57%). Daily dosage of vancomycin was 27 mg/kg (interquartile range (IQR) 18 to 32), and not different between patients receiving intermittent or continuous infusion. Trough concentrations were highly variable (median 27, IQR 8 to 23 mg/L). Target trough concentrations were achieved in 57% of patients, but more frequently in patients receiving continuous infusion (71% versus 39%; P = 0.038). Also the target AUC0–24/MIC ratio was reached more frequently in patients receiving continuous infusion (88% versus 50%; P = 0.008). Multivariable logistic regression analysis with adjustment by the propensity score could not confirm continuous infusion as an independent predictor of an AUC0–24/MIC >400 (odds ratio (OR) 1.65, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.2 to 12.0) or a Cmin ≥15 mg/L (OR 1.8, 95% CI 0.4 to 8.5). Conclusions This study demonstrated large interindividual variability in vancomycin pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic target attainment in ICU patients. These data suggests that a re-evaluation of current vancomycin dosing recommendations in

  8. [Anaemia, iron, transfusion and therapeutic alternatives. A review from a surgical perspective].

    PubMed

    González, Zoilo Madrazo; Barrasa, Arantxa García; Renau, Antoni Rafecas

    2010-12-01

    Anemia is very common entity or comorbidity in surgical patients. Its management involves a multidisciplinary approach with the aim of optimizing the available therapeutic resources with individualized care for each clinical situation. Rational use of blood transfusions, iron therapy (oral and intravenous), erythropoiesis stimulating agents and other therapeutic alternatives by physicians must achieve maximal benefit with minimal complications for our patients. This review article summarizes the main characteristics of anemia, iron metabolism, erythropoiesis and therapeutic alternatives from a surgical perspective in the light of present knowledge. PMID:20462573

  9. Maximally Expressive Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaap, John; Davis, Elizabeth; Richardson, Lea

    2004-01-01

    Planning and scheduling systems organize tasks into a timeline or schedule. Tasks are logically grouped into containers called models. Models are a collection of related tasks, along with their dependencies and requirements, that when met will produce the desired result. One challenging domain for a planning and scheduling system is the operation of on-board experiments for the International Space Station. In these experiments, the equipment used is among the most complex hardware ever developed; the information sought is at the cutting edge of scientific endeavor; and the procedures are intricate and exacting. Scheduling is made more difficult by a scarcity of station resources. The models to be fed into the scheduler must describe both the complexity of the experiments and procedures (to ensure a valid schedule) and the flexibilities of the procedures and the equipment (to effectively utilize available resources). Clearly, scheduling International Space Station experiment operations calls for a maximally expressive modeling schema.

  10. Maximally Expressive Task Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Japp, John; Davis, Elizabeth; Maxwell, Theresa G. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Planning and scheduling systems organize "tasks" into a timeline or schedule. The tasks are defined within the scheduling system in logical containers called models. The dictionary might define a model of this type as "a system of things and relations satisfying a set of rules that, when applied to the things and relations, produce certainty about the tasks that are being modeled." One challenging domain for a planning and scheduling system is the operation of on-board experiment activities for the Space Station. The equipment used in these experiments is some of the most complex hardware ever developed by mankind, the information sought by these experiments is at the cutting edge of scientific endeavor, and the procedures for executing the experiments are intricate and exacting. Scheduling is made more difficult by a scarcity of space station resources. The models to be fed into the scheduler must describe both the complexity of the experiments and procedures (to ensure a valid schedule) and the flexibilities of the procedures and the equipment (to effectively utilize available resources). Clearly, scheduling space station experiment operations calls for a "maximally expressive" modeling schema. Modeling even the simplest of activities cannot be automated; no sensor can be attached to a piece of equipment that can discern how to use that piece of equipment; no camera can quantify how to operate a piece of equipment. Modeling is a human enterprise-both an art and a science. The modeling schema should allow the models to flow from the keyboard of the user as easily as works of literature flowed from the pen of Shakespeare. The Ground Systems Department at the Marshall Space Flight Center has embarked on an effort to develop a new scheduling engine that is highlighted by a maximally expressive modeling schema. This schema, presented in this paper, is a synergy of technological advances and domain-specific innovations.

  11. Prevalence of Obesity and Its Influence on Achievement of Cardiometabolic Therapeutic Goals in Chinese Type 2 Diabetes Patients: An Analysis of the Nationwide, Cross-Sectional 3B Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xianghai; Ji, Linong; Ran, Xingwu; Su, Benli; Ji, Qiuhe; Pan, Changyu; Weng, Jianping; Ma, Changsheng; Hao, Chuanming; Zhang, Danyi; Hu, Dayi

    2016-01-01

    Background There are few data on the prevalence of obesity and its influence on achieving blood glucose, blood pressure, and blood lipid (3B) goals in Chinese type 2 diabetes outpatients. Methods Patient demographic data, anthropometric measurements, medications, and blood glucose and lipid profiles of 24,512 type 2 diabetes patients from a large, geographically diverse study (CCMR-3B) were analyzed. Using cut-points for body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC) recommended by the Working Group on Obesity in China, overweight and obesity were defined as BMIs of 24–27.9kg/m2 and ≥28.0kg/m2. Central obesity was defined as a waist circumference ≥80cm in women and ≥85cm in men. The 3B therapeutic goals were HbA1c<7.0%, BP<140/90mmHg and LDL-C<2.6mmol/L. Results Overall, 43.0% of type 2 diabetes patients were overweight and 16.7% were obese; 13.3% of overweight and and10.1% of obese patients achieved all the 3B target goals. Overweight or obese patients were less likely to achieve 3B goals than those with normal BMIs. More than a half the overweight or obese patients (69.6%) were centrally obese. Patients with abdominal obesity were less likely to achieve cardiometabolic targets than those without abdominal obesity. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, female, higher BMI and waist circumference, smoking, drinking, sedentary lifestyle, and longer diabetes duration were significantly correlated with failure to achieve 3B control goals. Conclusions Obesity is highly prevalent and associated with poor 3B control in Chinese type 2 diabetes patients. In clinical practice, more attention and resources should focus on weight loss for such patients. PMID:26726883

  12. Curriculum and Testing Strategies to Maximize STAAR Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, William L.; Johnson, Annabel M.; Johnson, Jared W.

    2014-01-01

    The document is from a presentation at the 2014 annual conference of the Science Teachers Association of Texas (STAT). The presenter noted that the 2001 No Child Left Behind (NCLB) law was the most far-reaching education legislation in over four decades. To address the requirements of this legislation, the presenter examined the third-generation…

  13. Research-Based Unit and Lesson Planning: Maximizing Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pagliaro, Marie

    2012-01-01

    By integrating the best of current research and practice in curriculum planning this book presents that comprehensive topic in a manageable form. Examples throughout are representative of different grade levels and subjects areas. It should be understood at the outset that the content offered for curriculum planning is not a rigid prescriptive…

  14. A Method for Maximizing the Internal Consistency Coefficient Alpha.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pepin, Michel

    This paper presents three different ways of computing the internal consistency coefficient alpha for a same set of data. The main objective of the paper is the illustration of a method for maximizing coefficient alpha. The maximization of alpha can be achieved with the aid of a principal component analysis. The relation between alpha max. and the…

  15. Maximal temperature in a simple thermodynamical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, De-Chang; Stojkovic, Dejan

    2016-06-01

    Temperature in a simple thermodynamical system is not limited from above. It is also widely believed that it does not make sense talking about temperatures higher than the Planck temperature in the absence of the full theory of quantum gravity. Here, we demonstrate that there exist a maximal achievable temperature in a system where particles obey the laws of quantum mechanics and classical gravity before we reach the realm of quantum gravity. Namely, if two particles with a given center of mass energy come at the distance shorter than the Schwarzschild diameter apart, according to classical gravity they will form a black hole. It is possible to calculate that a simple thermodynamical system will be dominated by black holes at a critical temperature which is about three times lower than the Planck temperature. That represents the maximal achievable temperature in a simple thermodynamical system.

  16. Maximal entanglement versus entropy for mixed quantum states

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, T.-C.; Goldbart, Paul M.; Kwiat, Paul G.; Nemoto, Kae; Munro, William J.; Verstraete, Frank

    2003-02-01

    Maximally entangled mixed states are those states that, for a given mixedness, achieve the greatest possible entanglement. For two-qubit systems and for various combinations of entanglement and mixedness measures, the form of the corresponding maximally entangled mixed states is determined primarily analytically. As measures of entanglement, we consider entanglement of formation, relative entropy of entanglement, and negativity; as measures of mixedness, we consider linear and von Neumann entropies. We show that the forms of the maximally entangled mixed states can vary with the combination of (entanglement and mixedness) measures chosen. Moreover, for certain combinations, the forms of the maximally entangled mixed states can change discontinuously at a specific value of the entropy. Along the way, we determine the states that, for a given value of entropy, achieve maximal violation of Bell's inequality.

  17. Formation Control for the MAXIM Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luquette, Richard J.; Leitner, Jesse; Gendreau, Keith; Sanner, Robert M.

    2004-01-01

    Over the next twenty years, a wave of change is occurring in the space-based scientific remote sensing community. While the fundamental limits in the spatial and angular resolution achievable in spacecraft have been reached, based on today s technology, an expansive new technology base has appeared over the past decade in the area of Distributed Space Systems (DSS). A key subset of the DSS technology area is that which covers precision formation flying of space vehicles. Through precision formation flying, the baselines, previously defined by the largest monolithic structure which could fit in the largest launch vehicle fairing, are now virtually unlimited. Several missions including the Micro-Arcsecond X-ray Imaging Mission (MAXIM), and the Stellar Imager will drive the formation flying challenges to achieve unprecedented baselines for high resolution, extended-scene, interferometry in the ultraviolet and X-ray regimes. This paper focuses on establishing the feasibility for the formation control of the MAXIM mission. MAXIM formation flying requirements are on the order of microns, while Stellar Imager mission requirements are on the order of nanometers. This paper specifically addresses: (1) high-level science requirements for these missions and how they evolve into engineering requirements; and (2) the development of linearized equations of relative motion for a formation operating in an n-body gravitational field. Linearized equations of motion provide the ground work for linear formation control designs.

  18. Maximize x(a - x)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lange, L. H.

    1974-01-01

    Five different methods for determining the maximizing condition for x(a - x) are presented. Included is the ancient Greek version and a method attributed to Fermat. None of the proofs use calculus. (LS)

  19. On the maximal diphoton width

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvio, Alberto; Staub, Florian; Strumia, Alessandro; Urbano, Alfredo

    2016-03-01

    Motivated by the 750 GeV diphoton excess found at LHC, we compute the maximal width into γγ that a neutral scalar can acquire through a loop of charged fermions or scalars as function of the maximal scale at which the theory holds, taking into account vacuum (meta)stability bounds. We show how an extra gauge symmetry can qualitatively weaken such bounds, and explore collider probes and connections with Dark Matter.

  20. All maximally entangling unitary operators

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, Scott M.

    2011-11-15

    We characterize all maximally entangling bipartite unitary operators, acting on systems A and B of arbitrary finite dimensions d{sub A}{<=}d{sub B}, when ancillary systems are available to both parties. Several useful and interesting consequences of this characterization are discussed, including an understanding of why the entangling and disentangling capacities of a given (maximally entangling) unitary can differ and a proof that these capacities must be equal when d{sub A}=d{sub B}.

  1. Strategies for therapeutic hypometabothermia

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shimin; Chen, Jiang-Fan

    2013-01-01

    Although therapeutic hypothermia and metabolic suppression have shown robust neuroprotection in experimental brain ischemia, systemic complications have limited their use in treating acute stroke patients. The core temperature and basic metabolic rate are tightly regulated and maintained in a very stable level in mammals. Simply lowering body temperature or metabolic rate is actually a brutal therapy that may cause more systemic as well as regional problems other than providing protection. These problems are commonly seen in hypothermia and barbiturate coma. The main innovative concept of this review is to propose thermogenically optimal and synergistic reduction of core temperature and metabolic rate in therapeutic hypometabothermia using novel and clinically practical approaches. When metabolism and body temperature are reduced in a systematically synergistic manner, the outcome will be maximal protection and safe recovery, which happen in natural process, such as in hibernation, daily torpor and estivation. PMID:24179563

  2. Maximizing TDRS Command Load Lifetime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Aaron J.

    2002-01-01

    was therefore the key to achieving this goal. This goal was eventually realized through development of an Excel spreadsheet tool called EMMIE (Excel Mean Motion Interactive Estimation). EMMIE utilizes ground ephemeris nodal data to perform a least-squares fit to inferred mean anomaly as a function of time, thus generating an initial estimate for mean motion. This mean motion in turn drives a plot of estimated downtrack position difference versus time. The user can then manually iterate the mean motion, and determine an optimal value that will maximize command load lifetime. Once this optimal value is determined, the mean motion initially calculated by the command builder tool is overwritten with the new optimal value, and the command load is built for uplink to ISS. EMMIE also provides the capability for command load lifetime to be tracked through multiple TORS ephemeris updates. Using EMMIE, TORS command load lifetimes of approximately 30 days have been achieved.

  3. MACROMOLECULAR THERAPEUTICS

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jiyuan; Kopeček, Jindřich

    2014-01-01

    This review covers water-soluble polymer-drug conjugates and macromolecules that possess biological activity without attached low molecular weight drugs. The main design principles of traditional and backbone degradable polymer-drug conjugates as well as the development of a new paradigm in nanomedicines – (low molecular weight) drug-free macromolecular therapeutics are discussed. To address the biological features of cancer, macromolecular therapeutics directed to stem/progenitor cells and the tumor microenvironment are deliberated. Finally, the future perspectives of the field are briefly debated. PMID:24747162

  4. Carnot cycle at finite power: attainability of maximal efficiency.

    PubMed

    Allahverdyan, Armen E; Hovhannisyan, Karen V; Melkikh, Alexey V; Gevorkian, Sasun G

    2013-08-01

    We want to understand whether and to what extent the maximal (Carnot) efficiency for heat engines can be reached at a finite power. To this end we generalize the Carnot cycle so that it is not restricted to slow processes. We show that for realistic (i.e., not purposefully designed) engine-bath interactions, the work-optimal engine performing the generalized cycle close to the maximal efficiency has a long cycle time and hence vanishing power. This aspect is shown to relate to the theory of computational complexity. A physical manifestation of the same effect is Levinthal's paradox in the protein folding problem. The resolution of this paradox for realistic proteins allows to construct engines that can extract at a finite power 40% of the maximally possible work reaching 90% of the maximal efficiency. For purposefully designed engine-bath interactions, the Carnot efficiency is achievable at a large power. PMID:23952379

  5. Factors affecting maximal acid secretion

    PubMed Central

    Desai, H. G.

    1969-01-01

    The mechanisms by which different factors affect the maximal acid secretion of the stomach are discussed with particular reference to nationality, sex, age, body weight or lean body mass, procedural details, mode of calculation, the nature, dose and route of administration of a stimulus, the synergistic action of another stimulus, drugs, hormones, electrolyte levels, anaemia or deficiency of the iron-dependent enzyme system, vagal continuity and parietal cell mass. PMID:4898322

  6. Maximization, learning, and economic behavior.

    PubMed

    Erev, Ido; Roth, Alvin E

    2014-07-22

    The rationality assumption that underlies mainstream economic theory has proved to be a useful approximation, despite the fact that systematic violations to its predictions can be found. That is, the assumption of rational behavior is useful in understanding the ways in which many successful economic institutions function, although it is also true that actual human behavior falls systematically short of perfect rationality. We consider a possible explanation of this apparent inconsistency, suggesting that mechanisms that rest on the rationality assumption are likely to be successful when they create an environment in which the behavior they try to facilitate leads to the best payoff for all agents on average, and most of the time. Review of basic learning research suggests that, under these conditions, people quickly learn to maximize expected return. This review also shows that there are many situations in which experience does not increase maximization. In many cases, experience leads people to underweight rare events. In addition, the current paper suggests that it is convenient to distinguish between two behavioral approaches to improve economic analyses. The first, and more conventional approach among behavioral economists and psychologists interested in judgment and decision making, highlights violations of the rational model and proposes descriptive models that capture these violations. The second approach studies human learning to clarify the conditions under which people quickly learn to maximize expected return. The current review highlights one set of conditions of this type and shows how the understanding of these conditions can facilitate market design. PMID:25024182

  7. Maximization, learning, and economic behavior

    PubMed Central

    Erev, Ido; Roth, Alvin E.

    2014-01-01

    The rationality assumption that underlies mainstream economic theory has proved to be a useful approximation, despite the fact that systematic violations to its predictions can be found. That is, the assumption of rational behavior is useful in understanding the ways in which many successful economic institutions function, although it is also true that actual human behavior falls systematically short of perfect rationality. We consider a possible explanation of this apparent inconsistency, suggesting that mechanisms that rest on the rationality assumption are likely to be successful when they create an environment in which the behavior they try to facilitate leads to the best payoff for all agents on average, and most of the time. Review of basic learning research suggests that, under these conditions, people quickly learn to maximize expected return. This review also shows that there are many situations in which experience does not increase maximization. In many cases, experience leads people to underweight rare events. In addition, the current paper suggests that it is convenient to distinguish between two behavioral approaches to improve economic analyses. The first, and more conventional approach among behavioral economists and psychologists interested in judgment and decision making, highlights violations of the rational model and proposes descriptive models that capture these violations. The second approach studies human learning to clarify the conditions under which people quickly learn to maximize expected return. The current review highlights one set of conditions of this type and shows how the understanding of these conditions can facilitate market design. PMID:25024182

  8. Pigeon therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Harlin, R W

    2000-01-01

    This article examines therapeutics for pigeons, discussing their physiology and reproduction, housing, and nutrition. The author also looks at ways to prevent infection, while discussing treatments for various viral diseases, such as paramyxovirus and pigeon herpesvirus, bacterial infections, such as paratyphoid, and parasitic diseases. Drug dosages are listed for antibiotics, antifungals, antiparasitics, and vaccines. PMID:11228828

  9. Therapeutic Nanodevices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Stephen; Ruegsegger, Mark; Barnes, Philip; Smith, Bryan; Ferrari, Mauro

    Therapeutic nanotechnology offers minimally invasive therapies with high densities of function concentrated in small volumes, features that may reduce patient morbidity and mortality. Unlike other areas of nanotechnology, novel physical properties associated with nanoscale dimensionality are not the raison d'être of therapeutic nanotechnology, whereas the aggregation of multiple biochemical (or comparably precise) functions into controlled nanoarchitectures is. Multifunctionality is a hallmark of emerging nanotherapeutic devices, and multifunctionality can allow nanotherapeutic devices to perform multistep work processes, with each functional component contributing to one or more nanodevice subroutine such that, in aggregate, subroutines sum to a cogent work process. Cannonical nanotherapeutic subroutines include tethering (targeting) to sites of disease, dispensing measured doses of drug (or bioactive compound), detection of residual disease after therapy and communication with an external clinician/operator. Emerging nanotherapeutics thus blur the boundaries between medical devices and traditional pharmaceuticals. Assembly of therapeutic nanodevices generally exploits either (bio)material self-assembly properties or chemoselective bioconjugation techniques, or both. Given the complexity, composition, and the necessity for their tight chemical and structural definition inherent in the nature of nanotherapeutics, their cost of goods (COGs) might exceed that of (already expensive) biologics. Early therapeutic nanodevices will likely be applied to disease states which exhibit significant unmet patient need (cancer and cardiovascular disease), while application to other disease states well-served by conventional therapy may await perfection of nanotherapeutic design and assembly protocols.

  10. Therapeutic Nanodevices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Stephen C.; Ruegsegger, Mark; Barnes, Philip D.; Smith, Bryan R.; Ferrari, Mauro

    Therapeutic nanotechnology offers minimally invasive therapies with high densities of function concentrated in small volumes, features that may reduce patient morbidity and mortality. Unlike other areas of nanotechnology, novel physical properties associated with nanoscale dimensionality are not the raison d'etre of therapeutic nanotechnology, whereas the aggregation of multiple biochemical (or comparably precise) functions into controlled nanoarchitectures is. Multifunctionality is a hallmark of emerging nanotherapeutic devices, and multifunctionality can allow nanotherapeutic devices to perform multi-step work processes, with each functional component contributing to one or more nanodevice subroutine such that, in aggregate, subroutines sum to a cogent work process. Cannonical nanotherapeutic subroutines include tethering (targeting) to sites of disease, dispensing measured doses of drug (or bioactive compound), detection of residual disease after therapy and communication with an external clinician/operator. Emerging nanotherapeutics thus blur the boundaries between medical devices and traditional pharmaceuticals. Assembly of therapeutic nanodevices generally exploits either (bio)material self assembly properties or chemoselective bioconjugation techniques, or both. Given the complexity, composition, and the necessity for their tight chemical and structural definition inherent in the nature of nanotherapeutics, their cost of goods (COGs) might exceed that of (already expensive) biologics. Early therapeutic nanodevices will likely be applied to disease states which exhibit significant unmet patient need (cancer and cardiovascular disease), while application to other disease states well-served by conventional therapy may await perfection of nanotherapeutic design and assembly protocols.

  11. Feedlot therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Apley, M D; Fajt, V R

    1998-07-01

    This article discusses therapeutic approaches to conditions commonly encountered in feedlots. Challenges discussed include bovine respiratory complex, tracheal edema, atypical interstitial pneumonia, footrot, toe abscesses, mycoplasma arthritis, cardiovascular disease, lactic acidosis, bloat, coccidiosis, central nervous system diseases, abscesses and cellulitis, pregnancy management and abortion, and ocular disease. PMID:9704416

  12. Spiders Tune Glue Viscosity to Maximize Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Amarpuri, Gaurav; Zhang, Ci; Diaz, Candido; Opell, Brent D; Blackledge, Todd A; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2015-11-24

    Adhesion in humid conditions is a fundamental challenge to both natural and synthetic adhesives. Yet, glue from most spider species becomes stickier as humidity increases. We find the adhesion of spider glue, from five diverse spider species, maximizes at very different humidities that matches their foraging habitats. By using high-speed imaging and spreading power law, we find that the glue viscosity varies over 5 orders of magnitude with humidity for each species, yet the viscosity at maximal adhesion for each species is nearly identical, 10(5)-10(6) cP. Many natural systems take advantage of viscosity to improve functional response, but spider glue's humidity responsiveness is a novel adaptation that makes the glue stickiest in each species' preferred habitat. This tuning is achieved by a combination of proteins and hygroscopic organic salts that determines water uptake in the glue. We therefore anticipate that manipulation of polymer-salts interaction to control viscosity can provide a simple mechanism to design humidity responsive smart adhesives. PMID:26513350

  13. Maximizing strain in miniaturized dielectric elastomer actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosset, Samuel; Araromi, Oluwaseun; Shea, Herbert

    2015-04-01

    We present a theoretical model to optimise the unidirectional motion of a rigid object bonded to a miniaturized dielectric elastomer actuator (DEA), a configuration found for example in AMI's haptic feedback devices, or in our tuneable RF phase shifter. Recent work has shown that unidirectional motion is maximized when the membrane is both anistropically prestretched and subjected to a dead load in the direction of actuation. However, the use of dead weights for miniaturized devices is clearly highly impractical. Consequently smaller devices use the membrane itself to generate the opposing force. Since the membrane covers the entire frame, one has the same prestretch condition in the active (actuated) and passive zones. Because the passive zone contracts when the active zone expands, it does not provide a constant restoring force, reducing the maximum achievable actuation strain. We have determined the optimal ratio between the size of the electrode (active zone) and the passive zone, as well as the optimal prestretch in both in-plane directions, in order to maximize the absolute displacement of the rigid object placed at the active/passive border. Our model and experiments show that the ideal active ratio is 50%, with a displacement twice smaller than what can be obtained with a dead load. We expand our fabrication process to also show how DEAs can be laser-post-processed to remove carefully chosen regions of the passive elastomer membrane, thereby increasing the actuation strain of the device.

  14. Mentoring as Professional Development for Novice Entrepreneurs: Maximizing the Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St-Jean, Etienne

    2012-01-01

    Mentoring can be seen as relevant if not essential in the continuing professional development of entrepreneurs. In the present study, we seek to understand how to maximize the learning that occurs through the mentoring process. To achieve this, we consider various elements that the literature suggested are associated with successful mentoring and…

  15. Matching Pupils and Teachers to Maximize Expected Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Joe H., Jr.; And Others

    To achieve a good teacher-pupil match, it is necessary (1) to predict the learning outcomes that will result when each student is instructed by each teacher, (2) to use the predicted performance to compute an Optimality Index for each teacher-pupil combination to indicate the quality of each combination toward maximizing learning for all students,…

  16. Therapeutic perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Fiore, Carmelo E.; Pennisi, Pietra; Tinè, Marianna

    2008-01-01

    Osteoporosis and atherosclerosis are linked by biological association. This encourages the search for therapeutic strategies having both cardiovascular and skeletal beneficial effects. Among drugs that may concordantly enhance bone density and reduce the progression of atherosclerosis we can include bisphosphonates (BP), statins, β -blockers, and possibly anti-RANKL antibodies. Available data come from experimental animals and human studies. All these treatments however lack controlled clinical studies designed to demonstrate dual-action effects. PMID:22460845

  17. Target Homework to Maximize Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heitzmann, Ray

    2007-01-01

    Targeted homework is based upon the belief that homework can make a significant contribution to student achievement in the areas of knowledge, skills, and values. It centers on the notion that homework achieves maximum effectiveness when teachers share the school's homework policy as well as their policy with students and parents or guardians. The…

  18. Knowledge discovery by accuracy maximization

    PubMed Central

    Cacciatore, Stefano; Luchinat, Claudio; Tenori, Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    Here we describe KODAMA (knowledge discovery by accuracy maximization), an unsupervised and semisupervised learning algorithm that performs feature extraction from noisy and high-dimensional data. Unlike other data mining methods, the peculiarity of KODAMA is that it is driven by an integrated procedure of cross-validation of the results. The discovery of a local manifold’s topology is led by a classifier through a Monte Carlo procedure of maximization of cross-validated predictive accuracy. Briefly, our approach differs from previous methods in that it has an integrated procedure of validation of the results. In this way, the method ensures the highest robustness of the obtained solution. This robustness is demonstrated on experimental datasets of gene expression and metabolomics, where KODAMA compares favorably with other existing feature extraction methods. KODAMA is then applied to an astronomical dataset, revealing unexpected features. Interesting and not easily predictable features are also found in the analysis of the State of the Union speeches by American presidents: KODAMA reveals an abrupt linguistic transition sharply separating all post-Reagan from all pre-Reagan speeches. The transition occurs during Reagan’s presidency and not from its beginning. PMID:24706821

  19. Generation and Transmission Maximization Model

    2001-04-05

    GTMax was developed to study complex marketing and system operational issues facing electric utility power systems. The model maximizes the value of the electric system taking into account not only a single system''s limited energy and transmission resources but also firm contracts, independent power producer (IPP) agreements, and bulk power transaction opportunities on the spot market. GTMax maximizes net revenues of power systems by finding a solution that increases income while keeping expenses at amore » minimum. It does this while ensuring that market transactions and system operations are within the physical and institutional limitations of the power system. When multiple systems are simulated, GTMax identifies utilities that can successfully compete on the market by tracking hourly energy transactions, costs, and revenues. Some limitations that are modeled are power plant seasonal capabilities and terms specified in firm and IPP contracts. GTMax also considers detaile operational limitations such as power plant ramp rates and hydropower reservoir constraints.« less

  20. Maximally coherent mixed states: Complementarity between maximal coherence and mixedness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Uttam; Bera, Manabendra Nath; Dhar, Himadri Shekhar; Pati, Arun Kumar

    2015-05-01

    Quantum coherence is a key element in topical research on quantum resource theories and a primary facilitator for design and implementation of quantum technologies. However, the resourcefulness of quantum coherence is severely restricted by environmental noise, which is indicated by the loss of information in a quantum system, measured in terms of its purity. In this work, we derive the limits imposed by the mixedness of a quantum system on the amount of quantum coherence that it can possess. We obtain an analytical trade-off between the two quantities that upperbound the maximum quantum coherence for fixed mixedness in a system. This gives rise to a class of quantum states, "maximally coherent mixed states," whose coherence cannot be increased further under any purity-preserving operation. For the above class of states, quantum coherence and mixedness satisfy a complementarity relation, which is crucial to understand the interplay between a resource and noise in open quantum systems.

  1. Maximizing exosome colloidal stability following electroporation.

    PubMed

    Hood, Joshua L; Scott, Michael J; Wickline, Samuel A

    2014-03-01

    Development of exosome-based semisynthetic nanovesicles for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes requires novel approaches to load exosomes with cargo. Electroporation has previously been used to load exosomes with RNA. However, investigations into exosome colloidal stability following electroporation have not been considered. Herein, we report the development of a unique trehalose pulse media (TPM) that minimizes exosome aggregation following electroporation. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) and RNA absorbance were employed to determine the extent of exosome aggregation and electroextraction post electroporation in TPM compared to common PBS pulse media or sucrose pulse media (SPM). Use of TPM to disaggregate melanoma exosomes post electroporation was dependent on both exosome concentration and electric field strength. TPM maximized exosome dispersal post electroporation for both homogenous B16 melanoma and heterogeneous human serum-derived populations of exosomes. Moreover, TPM enabled heavy cargo loading of melanoma exosomes with 5nm superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION5) while maintaining original exosome size and minimizing exosome aggregation as evidenced by transmission electron microscopy. Loading exosomes with SPION5 increased exosome density on sucrose gradients. This provides a simple, label-free means of enriching exogenously modified exosomes and introduces the potential for MRI-driven theranostic exosome investigations in vivo. PMID:24333249

  2. Maximal acceleration and radiative processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papini, Giorgio

    2015-08-01

    We derive the radiation characteristics of an accelerated, charged particle in a model due to Caianiello in which the proper acceleration of a particle of mass m has the upper limit 𝒜m = 2mc3/ℏ. We find two power laws, one applicable to lower accelerations, the other more suitable for accelerations closer to 𝒜m and to the related physical singularity in the Ricci scalar. Geometrical constraints and power spectra are also discussed. By comparing the power laws due to the maximal acceleration (MA) with that for particles in gravitational fields, we find that the model of Caianiello allows, in principle, the use of charged particles as tools to distinguish inertial from gravitational fields locally.

  3. Lighting spectrum to maximize colorfulness.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Osamu; Nascimento, Sérgio M C

    2012-02-01

    The spectrum of modern illumination can be computationally tailored considering the visual effects of lighting. We investigated the spectral profiles of the white illumination maximizing the theoretical limits of the perceivable object colors. A large number of metamers with various degrees of smoothness were generated on and around the Planckian locus, and the volume in the CIELAB space of the optimal colors for each metamer was calculated. The optimal spectrum was found at the color temperature of around 5.7×10(3) K, had three peaks at both ends of the visible band and at around 510 nm, and was 25% better than daylight and 35% better than Thornton's prime color lamp. PMID:22297368

  4. Varieties of maximal line subbundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oxbury, W. M.

    2000-07-01

    The point of this note is to make an observation concerning the variety M(E) parametrizing line subbundles of maximal degree in a generic stable vector bundle E over an algebraic curve C. M(E) is smooth and projective and its dimension is known in terms of the rank and degree of E and the genus of C (see Section 1). Our observation (Theorem 3·1) is that it has exactly the Chern numbers of an étale cover of the symmetric product S[delta]C where [delta] = dim M(E).This suggests looking for a natural map M(E) [rightward arrow] S[delta]C; however, it is not clear what such a map should be. Indeed, we exhibit an example in which M(E) is connected and deforms non-trivially with E, while there are only finitely many isomorphism classes of étale cover of the symmetric product. This shows that for a general deformation in the family M(E) cannot be such a cover (see Section 4).One may conjecture that M(E) is always connected. This would follow from ampleness of a certain Picard-type bundle on the Jacobian and there seems to be some evidence for expecting this, though we do not pursue this question here.Note that by forgetting the inclusion of a maximal line subbundle in E we get a natural map from M(E) to the Jacobian whose image W(E) is analogous to the classical (Brill-Noether) varieties of special line bundles. (In this sense M(E) is precisely a generalization of the symmetric products of C.) In Section 2 we give some results on W(E) which generalise standard Brill-Noether properties. These are due largely to Laumon, to whom the author is grateful for the reference [9].

  5. Therapeutic alliance.

    PubMed

    Fox, Valerie

    2002-01-01

    I have been very fortunate in my journey of mental illness. I respond well to medication, but I don't think that is the complete answer to living successfully with serious, persistent mental illness. I believe a person's environment is also of utmost importance, enabling the person suffering with mental illness to continually grow in life. I found early in my struggle with mental illness a psychiatrist with whom I have always had a very good rapport. Until recently I didn't know that what I have with this psychiatrist is professionally known as a therapeutic alliance. Over the years, when I need someone to talk over anything that is troubling to me, I seek my psychiatrist. A therapeutic alliance is non-judgmental; it is nourishing; and finally it is a relationship of complete trust. Perhaps persons reading this article who have never experienced this alliance will seek it. I believe it can make an insecure person secure; a frightened person less frightened; and allow a person to continue the journey of mental health with a sense of belief in oneself. PMID:12433224

  6. Maximal dinucleotide and trinucleotide circular codes.

    PubMed

    Michel, Christian J; Pellegrini, Marco; Pirillo, Giuseppe

    2016-01-21

    We determine here the number and the list of maximal dinucleotide and trinucleotide circular codes. We prove that there is no maximal dinucleotide circular code having strictly less than 6 elements (maximum size of dinucleotide circular codes). On the other hand, a computer calculus shows that there are maximal trinucleotide circular codes with less than 20 elements (maximum size of trinucleotide circular codes). More precisely, there are maximal trinucleotide circular codes with 14, 15, 16, 17, 18 and 19 elements and no maximal trinucleotide circular code having less than 14 elements. We give the same information for the maximal self-complementary dinucleotide and trinucleotide circular codes. The amino acid distribution of maximal trinucleotide circular codes is also determined. PMID:26382231

  7. Platelet-delivered therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Lyde, R; Sabatino, D; Sullivan, S K; Poncz, M

    2015-06-01

    We have proposed that modified platelets could potentially be used to correct intrinsic platelet defects as well as for targeted delivery of therapeutic molecules to sights of vascular injury. Ectopic expression of proteins within α-granules prior to platelet activation has been achieved for several proteins, including urokinase, factor (F) VIII, and partially for FIX. Potential uses of platelet-directed therapeutics will be discussed, focusing on targeted delivery of urokinase as a thromboprophylactic agent and FVIII for the treatment of hemophilia A patients with intractable inhibitors. This presentation will discuss new strategies that may be useful in the care of patients with vascular injury as well as remaining challenges and limitations of these approaches. PMID:26149015

  8. Maximizing Teaching through Brain Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pattridge, Gregory C.

    2009-01-01

    Teachers and parents who read about the brain on the Internet should do so critically to determine fact from opinion. Are the assertions real about certain methods/strategies that claim to be based on brain research? Will they make a difference in their teaching and in achievement levels? Turning theory into fact take time and replication of solid…

  9. Maximizing the optical network capacity

    PubMed Central

    Bayvel, Polina; Maher, Robert; Liga, Gabriele; Shevchenko, Nikita A.; Lavery, Domaniç; Killey, Robert I.

    2016-01-01

    Most of the digital data transmitted are carried by optical fibres, forming the great part of the national and international communication infrastructure. The information-carrying capacity of these networks has increased vastly over the past decades through the introduction of wavelength division multiplexing, advanced modulation formats, digital signal processing and improved optical fibre and amplifier technology. These developments sparked the communication revolution and the growth of the Internet, and have created an illusion of infinite capacity being available. But as the volume of data continues to increase, is there a limit to the capacity of an optical fibre communication channel? The optical fibre channel is nonlinear, and the intensity-dependent Kerr nonlinearity limit has been suggested as a fundamental limit to optical fibre capacity. Current research is focused on whether this is the case, and on linear and nonlinear techniques, both optical and electronic, to understand, unlock and maximize the capacity of optical communications in the nonlinear regime. This paper describes some of them and discusses future prospects for success in the quest for capacity. PMID:26809572

  10. Maximizing the optical network capacity.

    PubMed

    Bayvel, Polina; Maher, Robert; Xu, Tianhua; Liga, Gabriele; Shevchenko, Nikita A; Lavery, Domaniç; Alvarado, Alex; Killey, Robert I

    2016-03-01

    Most of the digital data transmitted are carried by optical fibres, forming the great part of the national and international communication infrastructure. The information-carrying capacity of these networks has increased vastly over the past decades through the introduction of wavelength division multiplexing, advanced modulation formats, digital signal processing and improved optical fibre and amplifier technology. These developments sparked the communication revolution and the growth of the Internet, and have created an illusion of infinite capacity being available. But as the volume of data continues to increase, is there a limit to the capacity of an optical fibre communication channel? The optical fibre channel is nonlinear, and the intensity-dependent Kerr nonlinearity limit has been suggested as a fundamental limit to optical fibre capacity. Current research is focused on whether this is the case, and on linear and nonlinear techniques, both optical and electronic, to understand, unlock and maximize the capacity of optical communications in the nonlinear regime. This paper describes some of them and discusses future prospects for success in the quest for capacity. PMID:26809572

  11. Maximal switchability of centralized networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vakulenko, Sergei; Morozov, Ivan; Radulescu, Ovidiu

    2016-08-01

    We consider continuous time Hopfield-like recurrent networks as dynamical models for gene regulation and neural networks. We are interested in networks that contain n high-degree nodes preferably connected to a large number of N s weakly connected satellites, a property that we call n/N s -centrality. If the hub dynamics is slow, we obtain that the large time network dynamics is completely defined by the hub dynamics. Moreover, such networks are maximally flexible and switchable, in the sense that they can switch from a globally attractive rest state to any structurally stable dynamics when the response time of a special controller hub is changed. In particular, we show that a decrease of the controller hub response time can lead to a sharp variation in the network attractor structure: we can obtain a set of new local attractors, whose number can increase exponentially with N, the total number of nodes of the nework. These new attractors can be periodic or even chaotic. We provide an algorithm, which allows us to design networks with the desired switching properties, or to learn them from time series, by adjusting the interactions between hubs and satellites. Such switchable networks could be used as models for context dependent adaptation in functional genetics or as models for cognitive functions in neuroscience.

  12. A Maximally Supersymmetric Kondo Model

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, Sarah; Kachru, Shamit; Torroba, Gonzalo; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC

    2012-02-17

    We study the maximally supersymmetric Kondo model obtained by adding a fermionic impurity to N = 4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory. While the original Kondo problem describes a defect interacting with a free Fermi liquid of itinerant electrons, here the ambient theory is an interacting CFT, and this introduces qualitatively new features into the system. The model arises in string theory by considering the intersection of a stack of M D5-branes with a stack of N D3-branes, at a point in the D3 worldvolume. We analyze the theory holographically, and propose a dictionary between the Kondo problem and antisymmetric Wilson loops in N = 4 SYM. We perform an explicit calculation of the D5 fluctuations in the D3 geometry and determine the spectrum of defect operators. This establishes the stability of the Kondo fixed point together with its basic thermodynamic properties. Known supergravity solutions for Wilson loops allow us to go beyond the probe approximation: the D5s disappear and are replaced by three-form flux piercing a new topologically non-trivial S3 in the corrected geometry. This describes the Kondo model in terms of a geometric transition. A dual matrix model reflects the basic properties of the corrected gravity solution in its eigenvalue distribution.

  13. Disk Density Tuning of a Maximal Random Packing

    PubMed Central

    Ebeida, Mohamed S.; Rushdi, Ahmad A.; Awad, Muhammad A.; Mahmoud, Ahmed H.; Yan, Dong-Ming; English, Shawn A.; Owens, John D.; Bajaj, Chandrajit L.; Mitchell, Scott A.

    2016-01-01

    We introduce an algorithmic framework for tuning the spatial density of disks in a maximal random packing, without changing the sizing function or radii of disks. Starting from any maximal random packing such as a Maximal Poisson-disk Sampling (MPS), we iteratively relocate, inject (add), or eject (remove) disks, using a set of three successively more-aggressive local operations. We may achieve a user-defined density, either more dense or more sparse, almost up to the theoretical structured limits. The tuned samples are conflict-free, retain coverage maximality, and, except in the extremes, retain the blue noise randomness properties of the input. We change the density of the packing one disk at a time, maintaining the minimum disk separation distance and the maximum domain coverage distance required of any maximal packing. These properties are local, and we can handle spatially-varying sizing functions. Using fewer points to satisfy a sizing function improves the efficiency of some applications. We apply the framework to improve the quality of meshes, removing non-obtuse angles; and to more accurately model fiber reinforced polymers for elastic and failure simulations. PMID:27563162

  14. Predicted maximal heart rate for upper body exercise testing.

    PubMed

    Hill, M; Talbot, C; Price, M

    2016-03-01

    Age-predicted maximal heart rate (HRMAX ) equations are commonly used for the purpose of prescribing exercise regimens, as criteria for achieving maximal exertion and for diagnostic exercise testing. Despite the growing popularity of upper body exercise in both healthy and clinical settings, no recommendations are available for exercise modes using the smaller upper body muscle mass. The purpose of this study was to determine how well commonly used age-adjusted prediction equations for HRMAX estimate actual HRMAX for upper body exercise in healthy young and older adults. A total of 30 young (age: 20 ± 2 years, height: 171·9 ± 32·8 cm, mass: 77·7 ± 12·6 kg) and 20 elderly adults (age: 66 ± 6 years, height: 162 ± 8·1 cm, mass: 65·3 ± 12·3 kg) undertook maximal incremental exercise tests on a conventional arm crank ergometer. Age-adjusted maximal heart rate was calculated using prediction equations based on leg exercise and compared with measured HRMAX data for the arms. Maximal HR for arm exercise was significantly overpredicted compared with age-adjusted prediction equations in both young and older adults. Subtracting 10-20 beats min(-1) from conventional prediction equations provides a reasonable estimate of HRMAX for upper body exercise in healthy older and younger adults. PMID:25319169

  15. Maximal Oxygen Intake and Maximal Work Performance of Active College Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higgs, Susanne L.

    Maximal oxygen intake and associated physiological variables were measured during strenuous exercise on women subjects (N=20 physical education majors). Following assessment of maximal oxygen intake, all subjects underwent a performance test at the work level which had elicited their maximal oxygen intake. Mean maximal oxygen intake was 41.32…

  16. Does mental exertion alter maximal muscle activation?

    PubMed Central

    Rozand, Vianney; Pageaux, Benjamin; Marcora, Samuele M.; Papaxanthis, Charalambos; Lepers, Romuald

    2014-01-01

    Mental exertion is known to impair endurance performance, but its effects on neuromuscular function remain unclear. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that mental exertion reduces torque and muscle activation during intermittent maximal voluntary contractions of the knee extensors. Ten subjects performed in a randomized order three separate mental exertion conditions lasting 27 min each: (i) high mental exertion (incongruent Stroop task), (ii) moderate mental exertion (congruent Stroop task), (iii) low mental exertion (watching a movie). In each condition, mental exertion was combined with 10 intermittent maximal voluntary contractions of the knee extensor muscles (one maximal voluntary contraction every 3 min). Neuromuscular function was assessed using electrical nerve stimulation. Maximal voluntary torque, maximal muscle activation and other neuromuscular parameters were similar across mental exertion conditions and did not change over time. These findings suggest that mental exertion does not affect neuromuscular function during intermittent maximal voluntary contractions of the knee extensors. PMID:25309404

  17. Inflation in maximal gauged supergravities

    SciTech Connect

    Kodama, Hideo; Nozawa, Masato

    2015-05-18

    We discuss the dynamics of multiple scalar fields and the possibility of realistic inflation in the maximal gauged supergravity. In this paper, we address this problem in the framework of recently discovered 1-parameter deformation of SO(4,4) and SO(5,3) dyonic gaugings, for which the base point of the scalar manifold corresponds to an unstable de Sitter critical point. In the gauge-field frame where the embedding tensor takes the value in the sum of the 36 and 36’ representations of SL(8), we present a scheme that allows us to derive an analytic expression for the scalar potential. With the help of this formalism, we derive the full potential and gauge coupling functions in analytic forms for the SO(3)×SO(3)-invariant subsectors of SO(4,4) and SO(5,3) gaugings, and argue that there exist no new critical points in addition to those discovered so far. For the SO(4,4) gauging, we also study the behavior of 6-dimensional scalar fields in this sector near the Dall’Agata-Inverso de Sitter critical point at which the negative eigenvalue of the scalar mass square with the largest modulus goes to zero as the deformation parameter s approaches a critical value s{sub c}. We find that when the deformation parameter s is taken sufficiently close to the critical value, inflation lasts more than 60 e-folds even if the initial point of the inflaton allows an O(0.1) deviation in Planck units from the Dall’Agata-Inverso critical point. It turns out that the spectral index n{sub s} of the curvature perturbation at the time of the 60 e-folding number is always about 0.96 and within the 1σ range n{sub s}=0.9639±0.0047 obtained by Planck, irrespective of the value of the η parameter at the critical saddle point. The tensor-scalar ratio predicted by this model is around 10{sup −3} and is close to the value in the Starobinsky model.

  18. Specificity of a Maximal Step Exercise Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darby, Lynn A.; Marsh, Jennifer L.; Shewokis, Patricia A.; Pohlman, Roberta L.

    2007-01-01

    To adhere to the principle of "exercise specificity" exercise testing should be completed using the same physical activity that is performed during exercise training. The present study was designed to assess whether aerobic step exercisers have a greater maximal oxygen consumption (max VO sub 2) when tested using an activity specific, maximal step…

  19. Inclusive fitness maximization: An axiomatic approach.

    PubMed

    Okasha, Samir; Weymark, John A; Bossert, Walter

    2014-06-01

    Kin selection theorists argue that evolution in social contexts will lead organisms to behave as if maximizing their inclusive, as opposed to personal, fitness. The inclusive fitness concept allows biologists to treat organisms as akin to rational agents seeking to maximize a utility function. Here we develop this idea and place it on a firm footing by employing a standard decision-theoretic methodology. We show how the principle of inclusive fitness maximization and a related principle of quasi-inclusive fitness maximization can be derived from axioms on an individual׳s 'as if preferences' (binary choices) for the case in which phenotypic effects are additive. Our results help integrate evolutionary theory and rational choice theory, help draw out the behavioural implications of inclusive fitness maximization, and point to a possible way in which evolution could lead organisms to implement it. PMID:24530825

  20. Statistical mechanics of maximal independent sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dall'Asta, Luca; Pin, Paolo; Ramezanpour, Abolfazl

    2009-12-01

    The graph theoretic concept of maximal independent set arises in several practical problems in computer science as well as in game theory. A maximal independent set is defined by the set of occupied nodes that satisfy some packing and covering constraints. It is known that finding minimum and maximum-density maximal independent sets are hard optimization problems. In this paper, we use cavity method of statistical physics and Monte Carlo simulations to study the corresponding constraint satisfaction problem on random graphs. We obtain the entropy of maximal independent sets within the replica symmetric and one-step replica symmetry breaking frameworks, shedding light on the metric structure of the landscape of solutions and suggesting a class of possible algorithms. This is of particular relevance for the application to the study of strategic interactions in social and economic networks, where maximal independent sets correspond to pure Nash equilibria of a graphical game of public goods allocation.

  1. Therapeutic Drug Monitoring

    MedlinePlus

    ... be limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Therapeutic Drug Monitoring Share this page: Was this page ... Monitored Drugs | Common Questions | Related Pages What is therapeutic drug monitoring? Therapeutic drug monitoring is the measurement ...

  2. Matching, maximizing, and hill-climbing

    PubMed Central

    Hinson, John M.; Staddon, J. E. R.

    1983-01-01

    In simple situations, animals consistently choose the better of two alternatives. On concurrent variable-interval variable-interval and variable-interval variable-ratio schedules, they approximately match aggregate choice and reinforcement ratios. The matching law attempts to explain the latter result but does not address the former. Hill-climbing rules such as momentary maximizing can account for both. We show that momentary maximizing constrains molar choice to approximate matching; that molar choice covaries with pigeons' momentary-maximizing estimate; and that the “generalized matching law” follows from almost any hill-climbing rule. PMID:16812350

  3. Are all maximally entangled states pure?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavalcanti, D.; Brandão, F. G. S. L.; Terra Cunha, M. O.

    2005-10-01

    We study if all maximally entangled states are pure through several entanglement monotones. In the bipartite case, we find that the same conditions which lead to the uniqueness of the entropy of entanglement as a measure of entanglement exclude the existence of maximally mixed entangled states. In the multipartite scenario, our conclusions allow us to generalize the idea of the monogamy of entanglement: we establish the polygamy of entanglement, expressing that if a general state is maximally entangled with respect to some kind of multipartite entanglement, then it is necessarily factorized of any other system.

  4. Are all maximally entangled states pure?

    SciTech Connect

    Cavalcanti, D.; Brandao, F.G.S.L.; Terra Cunha, M.O.

    2005-10-15

    We study if all maximally entangled states are pure through several entanglement monotones. In the bipartite case, we find that the same conditions which lead to the uniqueness of the entropy of entanglement as a measure of entanglement exclude the existence of maximally mixed entangled states. In the multipartite scenario, our conclusions allow us to generalize the idea of the monogamy of entanglement: we establish the polygamy of entanglement, expressing that if a general state is maximally entangled with respect to some kind of multipartite entanglement, then it is necessarily factorized of any other system.

  5. MAXIM Pathfinder x-ray interferometry mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gendreau, Keith C.; Cash, Webster C.; Shipley, Ann F.; White, Nicholas

    2003-03-01

    The MAXIM Pathfinder (MP) mission is under study as a scientific and technical stepping stone for the full MAXIM X-ray interferometry mission. While full MAXIM will resolve the event horizons of black holes with 0.1 microarcsecond imaging, MP will address scientific and technical issues as a 100 microarcsecond imager with some capabilities to resolve microarcsecond structure. We will present the primary science goals of MP. These include resolving stellar coronae, distinguishing between jets and accretion disks in AGN. This paper will also present the baseline design of MP. We will overview the challenging technical requirements and solutions for formation flying, target acquisition, and metrology.

  6. Maximal hypersurfaces in asymptotically stationary spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrusciel, Piotr T.; Wald, Robert M.

    1992-12-01

    The purpose of the work is to extend the results on the existence of maximal hypersurfaces to encompass some situations considered by other authors. The existence of maximal hypersurface in asymptotically stationary spacetimes is proven. Existence of maximal surface and of foliations by maximal hypersurfaces is proven in two classes of asymptotically flat spacetimes which possess a one parameter group of isometries whose orbits are timelike 'near infinity'. The first class consists of strongly causal asymptotically flat spacetimes which contain no 'blackhole or white hole' (but may contain 'ergoregions' where the Killing orbits fail to be timelike). The second class of space times possess a black hole and a white hole, with the black and white hole horizon intersecting in a compact 2-surface S.

  7. Gaussian maximally multipartite-entangled states

    SciTech Connect

    Facchi, Paolo; Florio, Giuseppe; Pascazio, Saverio; Lupo, Cosmo; Mancini, Stefano

    2009-12-15

    We study maximally multipartite-entangled states in the context of Gaussian continuous variable quantum systems. By considering multimode Gaussian states with constrained energy, we show that perfect maximally multipartite-entangled states, which exhibit the maximum amount of bipartite entanglement for all bipartitions, only exist for systems containing n=2 or 3 modes. We further numerically investigate the structure of these states and their frustration for n<=7.

  8. Natural selection and the maximization of fitness.

    PubMed

    Birch, Jonathan

    2016-08-01

    The notion that natural selection is a process of fitness maximization gets a bad press in population genetics, yet in other areas of biology the view that organisms behave as if attempting to maximize their fitness remains widespread. Here I critically appraise the prospects for reconciliation. I first distinguish four varieties of fitness maximization. I then examine two recent developments that may appear to vindicate at least one of these varieties. The first is the 'new' interpretation of Fisher's fundamental theorem of natural selection, on which the theorem is exactly true for any evolving population that satisfies some minimal assumptions. The second is the Formal Darwinism project, which forges links between gene frequency change and optimal strategy choice. In both cases, I argue that the results fail to establish a biologically significant maximization principle. I conclude that it may be a mistake to look for universal maximization principles justified by theory alone. A more promising approach may be to find maximization principles that apply conditionally and to show that the conditions were satisfied in the evolution of particular traits. PMID:25899152

  9. Pharmacogenetics approach to therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Koo, Seok Hwee; Lee, Edmund Jon Deoon

    2006-01-01

    1. Pharmacogenetics refers to the study of genetically controlled variations in drug response. Functional variants caused by single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes encoding drug-metabolising enzymes, transporters, ion channels and drug receptors have been known to be associated with interindividual and interethnic variation in drug response. Genetic variations in these genes play a role in influencing the efficacy and toxicity of medications. 2. Rapid, precise and cost-effective high-throughput technological platforms are essential for performing large-scale mutational analysis of genetic markers involved in the aetiology of variable responses to drug therapy. 3. The application of a pharmacogenetics approach to therapeutics in general clinical practice is still far from being achieved today owing to various constraints, such as limited accessibility of technology, inadequate knowledge, ambiguity of the role of variants and ethical concerns. 4. Drug actions are determined by the interplay of several genes encoding different proteins involved in various biochemical pathways. With rapidly emerging SNP discovery technological platforms and widespread knowledge on the role of SNPs in disease susceptibility and variability in drug response, the pharmacogenetics approach to therapeutics is anticipated to take off in the not-too-distant future. This will present profound clinical, economic and social implications for health care. PMID:16700889

  10. Homocystinuria: Therapeutic approach.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Tarun; Sharma, Gurumayum Suraj; Singh, Laishram Rajendrakumar

    2016-07-01

    Homocystinuria is a disorder of sulfur metabolism pathway caused by deficiency of cystathionine β-synthase (CBS). It is characterized by increased accumulation of homocysteine (Hcy) in the cells and plasma. Increased homocysteine results in various vascular and neurological complications. Present strategies to lower cellular and plasma homocysteine levels include vitamin B6 intake, dietary methionine restriction, betaine supplementation, folate and vitamin B12 administration. However, these strategies are inefficient for treatment of homocystinuria. In recent years, advances have been made towards developing new strategies to treat homocystinuria. These mainly include functional restoration to mutant CBS, enhanced clearance of Hcy from the body, prevention of N-homocysteinylation-induced toxicity and inhibition of homocysteine-induced oxidative stress. In this review, we have exclusively discussed the recent advances that have been achieved towards the treatment of homocystinuria. The review is an attempt to help clinicians in developing effective therapeutic strategies and designing novel drugs against homocystinuria. PMID:27059523

  11. The effects of strenuous exercises on resting heart rate, blood pressure, and maximal oxygen uptake.

    PubMed

    Oh, Deuk-Ja; Hong, Hyeon-Ok; Lee, Bo-Ae

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of strenuous exercises on resting heart rate, blood pressure, and maximal oxygen uptake. To achieve the purpose of the study, a total of 30 subjects were selected, including 15 people who performed continued regular exercises and 15 people as the control group. With regard to data processing, the IBM SPSS Statistics ver. 21.0 was used to calculate the mean and standard deviation. The difference of mean change between groups was verified through an independent t-test. As a result, there were significant differences in resting heart rate, maximal heart rate, maximal systolic blood pressure, and maximal oxygen uptake. However, the maximal systolic blood pressure was found to be an exercise-induced high blood pressure. Thus, it is thought that a risk diagnosis for it through a regular exercise stress test is necessary. PMID:26933659

  12. The effects of strenuous exercises on resting heart rate, blood pressure, and maximal oxygen uptake

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Deuk-Ja; Hong, Hyeon-Ok; Lee, Bo-Ae

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of strenuous exercises on resting heart rate, blood pressure, and maximal oxygen uptake. To achieve the purpose of the study, a total of 30 subjects were selected, including 15 people who performed continued regular exercises and 15 people as the control group. With regard to data processing, the IBM SPSS Statistics ver. 21.0 was used to calculate the mean and standard deviation. The difference of mean change between groups was verified through an independent t-test. As a result, there were significant differences in resting heart rate, maximal heart rate, maximal systolic blood pressure, and maximal oxygen uptake. However, the maximal systolic blood pressure was found to be an exercise-induced high blood pressure. Thus, it is thought that a risk diagnosis for it through a regular exercise stress test is necessary. PMID:26933659

  13. Resources and energetics determined dinosaur maximal size

    PubMed Central

    McNab, Brian K.

    2009-01-01

    Some dinosaurs reached masses that were ≈8 times those of the largest, ecologically equivalent terrestrial mammals. The factors most responsible for setting the maximal body size of vertebrates are resource quality and quantity, as modified by the mobility of the consumer, and the vertebrate's rate of energy expenditure. If the food intake of the largest herbivorous mammals defines the maximal rate at which plant resources can be consumed in terrestrial environments and if that limit applied to dinosaurs, then the large size of sauropods occurred because they expended energy in the field at rates extrapolated from those of varanid lizards, which are ≈22% of the rates in mammals and 3.6 times the rates of other lizards of equal size. Of 2 species having the same energy income, the species that uses the most energy for mass-independent maintenance of necessity has a smaller size. The larger mass found in some marine mammals reflects a greater resource abundance in marine environments. The presumptively low energy expenditures of dinosaurs potentially permitted Mesozoic communities to support dinosaur biomasses that were up to 5 times those found in mammalian herbivores in Africa today. The maximal size of predatory theropods was ≈8 tons, which if it reflected the maximal capacity to consume vertebrates in terrestrial environments, corresponds in predatory mammals to a maximal mass less than a ton, which is what is observed. Some coelurosaurs may have evolved endothermy in association with the evolution of feathered insulation and a small mass. PMID:19581600

  14. Formation Control of the MAXIM L2 Libration Orbit Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Folta, David; Hartman, Kate; Howell, Kathleen; Marchand, Belinda

    2004-01-01

    The Micro-Arcsecond X-ray Imaging Mission (MAXIM), a proposed concept for the Structure and Evolution of the Universe (SEU) Black Hole Imager mission, is designed to make a ten million-fold improvement in X-ray image clarity of celestial objects by providing better than 0.1 micro-arcsecond imaging. Currently the mission architecture comprises 25 spacecraft, 24 as optics modules and one as the detector, which will form sparse sub-apertures of a grazing incidence X-ray interferometer covering the 0.3-10 keV bandpass. This formation must allow for long duration continuous science observations and also for reconfiguration that permits re-pointing of the formation. To achieve these mission goals, the formation is required to cooperatively point at desired targets. Once pointed, the individual elements of the MAXIM formation must remain stable, maintaining their relative positions and attitudes below a critical threshold. These pointing and formation stability requirements impact the control and design of the formation. In this paper, we provide analysis of control efforts that are dependent upon the stability and the configuration and dimensions of the MAXIM formation. We emphasize the utilization of natural motions in the Lagrangian regions to minimize the control efforts and we address continuous control via input feedback linearization (IFL). Results provide control cost, configuration options, and capabilities as guidelines for the development of this complex mission.

  15. Formation Control of the MAXIM L2 Libration Orbit Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Folta, David; Hartman, Kate; Howell, Kathleen; Marchand, Belinda

    2004-01-01

    The Micro-Arcsecond Imaging Mission (MAXIM), a proposed concept for the Structure and Evolution of the Universe (SEU) Black Hole Imaging mission, is designed to make a ten million-fold improvement in X-ray image clarity of celestial objects by providing better than 0.1 microarcsecond imaging. To achieve mission requirements, MAXIM will have to improve on pointing by orders of magnitude. This pointing requirement impacts the control and design of the formation. Currently the architecture is comprised of 25 spacecraft, which will form the sparse apertures of a grazing incidence X-ray interferometer covering the 0.3-10 keV bandpass. This configuration will deploy 24 spacecraft as optics modules and one as the detector. The formation must allow for long duration continuous science observations and also for reconfiguration that permits re-pointing of the formation. In this paper, we provide analysis and trades of several control efforts that are dependent upon the pointing requirements and the configuration and dimensions of the MAXIM formation. We emphasize the utilization of natural motions in the Lagrangian regions that minimize the control efforts and we address both continuous and discrete control via LQR and feedback linearization. Results provide control cost, configuration options, and capabilities as guidelines for the development of this complex mission.

  16. Optimum array design to maximize Fisher information for bearing estimation.

    PubMed

    Tuladhar, Saurav R; Buck, John R

    2011-11-01

    Source bearing estimation is a common application of linear sensor arrays. The Cramer-Rao bound (CRB) sets a lower bound on the achievable mean square error (MSE) of any unbiased bearing estimate. In the spatially white noise case, the CRB is minimized by placing half of the sensors at each end of the array. However, many realistic ocean environments have a mixture of both white noise and spatially correlated noise. In shallow water environments, the correlated ambient noise can be modeled as cylindrically isotropic. This research designs a fixed aperture linear array to maximize the bearing Fisher information (FI) under these noise conditions. The FI is the inverse of the CRB, so maximizing the FI minimizes the CRB. The elements of the optimum array are located closer to the array ends than uniform spacing, but are not as extreme as in the white noise case. The optimum array results from a trade off between maximizing the array bearing sensitivity and minimizing output noise power variation over the bearing. Depending on the source bearing, the resulting improvement in MSE performance of the optimized array over a uniform array is equivalent to a gain of 2-5 dB in input signal-to-noise ratio. PMID:22087908

  17. Reference Values of Maximal Oxygen Uptake for Polish Rowers

    PubMed Central

    Klusiewicz, Andrzej; Starczewski, Michał; Ładyga, Maria; Długołęcka, Barbara; Braksator, Wojciech; Mamcarz, Artur; Sitkowski, Dariusz

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize changes in maximal oxygen uptake over several years and to elaborate current reference values of this index based on determinations carried out in large and representative groups of top Polish rowers. For this study 81 female and 159 male rowers from the sub-junior to senior categories were recruited from the Polish National Team and its direct backup. All the subjects performed an incremental exercise test on a rowing ergometer. During the test maximal oxygen uptake was measured with the BxB method. The calculated reference values for elite Polish junior and U23 rowers allowed to evaluate the athletes’ fitness level against the respective reference group and may aid the coach in controlling the training process. Mean values of VO2max achieved by members of the top Polish rowing crews who over the last five years competed in the Olympic Games or World Championships were also presented. The results of the research on the “trainability” of the maximal oxygen uptake may lead to a conclusion that the growth rate of the index is larger in case of high-level athletes and that the index (in absolute values) increases significantly between the age of 19–22 years (U23 category). PMID:25713672

  18. Polarity Related Influence Maximization in Signed Social Networks

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dong; Xu, Zhi-Ming; Chakraborty, Nilanjan; Gupta, Anika; Sycara, Katia; Li, Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Influence maximization in social networks has been widely studied motivated by applications like spread of ideas or innovations in a network and viral marketing of products. Current studies focus almost exclusively on unsigned social networks containing only positive relationships (e.g. friend or trust) between users. Influence maximization in signed social networks containing both positive relationships and negative relationships (e.g. foe or distrust) between users is still a challenging problem that has not been studied. Thus, in this paper, we propose the polarity-related influence maximization (PRIM) problem which aims to find the seed node set with maximum positive influence or maximum negative influence in signed social networks. To address the PRIM problem, we first extend the standard Independent Cascade (IC) model to the signed social networks and propose a Polarity-related Independent Cascade (named IC-P) diffusion model. We prove that the influence function of the PRIM problem under the IC-P model is monotonic and submodular Thus, a greedy algorithm can be used to achieve an approximation ratio of 1-1/e for solving the PRIM problem in signed social networks. Experimental results on two signed social network datasets, Epinions and Slashdot, validate that our approximation algorithm for solving the PRIM problem outperforms state-of-the-art methods. PMID:25061986

  19. Maximal likelihood correspondence estimation for face recognition across pose.

    PubMed

    Li, Shaoxin; Liu, Xin; Chai, Xiujuan; Zhang, Haihong; Lao, Shihong; Shan, Shiguang

    2014-10-01

    Due to the misalignment of image features, the performance of many conventional face recognition methods degrades considerably in across pose scenario. To address this problem, many image matching-based methods are proposed to estimate semantic correspondence between faces in different poses. In this paper, we aim to solve two critical problems in previous image matching-based correspondence learning methods: 1) fail to fully exploit face specific structure information in correspondence estimation and 2) fail to learn personalized correspondence for each probe image. To this end, we first build a model, termed as morphable displacement field (MDF), to encode face specific structure information of semantic correspondence from a set of real samples of correspondences calculated from 3D face models. Then, we propose a maximal likelihood correspondence estimation (MLCE) method to learn personalized correspondence based on maximal likelihood frontal face assumption. After obtaining the semantic correspondence encoded in the learned displacement, we can synthesize virtual frontal images of the profile faces for subsequent recognition. Using linear discriminant analysis method with pixel-intensity features, state-of-the-art performance is achieved on three multipose benchmarks, i.e., CMU-PIE, FERET, and MultiPIE databases. Owe to the rational MDF regularization and the usage of novel maximal likelihood objective, the proposed MLCE method can reliably learn correspondence between faces in different poses even in complex wild environment, i.e., labeled face in the wild database. PMID:25163062

  20. Reference values of maximal oxygen uptake for polish rowers.

    PubMed

    Klusiewicz, Andrzej; Starczewski, Michał; Ładyga, Maria; Długołęcka, Barbara; Braksator, Wojciech; Mamcarz, Artur; Sitkowski, Dariusz

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize changes in maximal oxygen uptake over several years and to elaborate current reference values of this index based on determinations carried out in large and representative groups of top Polish rowers. For this study 81 female and 159 male rowers from the sub-junior to senior categories were recruited from the Polish National Team and its direct backup. All the subjects performed an incremental exercise test on a rowing ergometer. During the test maximal oxygen uptake was measured with the BxB method. The calculated reference values for elite Polish junior and U23 rowers allowed to evaluate the athletes' fitness level against the respective reference group and may aid the coach in controlling the training process. Mean values of VO2max achieved by members of the top Polish rowing crews who over the last five years competed in the Olympic Games or World Championships were also presented. The results of the research on the "trainability" of the maximal oxygen uptake may lead to a conclusion that the growth rate of the index is larger in case of high-level athletes and that the index (in absolute values) increases significantly between the age of 19-22 years (U23 category). PMID:25713672

  1. Polarity related influence maximization in signed social networks.

    PubMed

    Li, Dong; Xu, Zhi-Ming; Chakraborty, Nilanjan; Gupta, Anika; Sycara, Katia; Li, Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Influence maximization in social networks has been widely studied motivated by applications like spread of ideas or innovations in a network and viral marketing of products. Current studies focus almost exclusively on unsigned social networks containing only positive relationships (e.g. friend or trust) between users. Influence maximization in signed social networks containing both positive relationships and negative relationships (e.g. foe or distrust) between users is still a challenging problem that has not been studied. Thus, in this paper, we propose the polarity-related influence maximization (PRIM) problem which aims to find the seed node set with maximum positive influence or maximum negative influence in signed social networks. To address the PRIM problem, we first extend the standard Independent Cascade (IC) model to the signed social networks and propose a Polarity-related Independent Cascade (named IC-P) diffusion model. We prove that the influence function of the PRIM problem under the IC-P model is monotonic and submodular Thus, a greedy algorithm can be used to achieve an approximation ratio of 1-1/e for solving the PRIM problem in signed social networks. Experimental results on two signed social network datasets, Epinions and Slashdot, validate that our approximation algorithm for solving the PRIM problem outperforms state-of-the-art methods. PMID:25061986

  2. Accolades or Achievement? Addressing the Unforeseen Consequences of Therapeutic Pedagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McWilliam, Erica

    2015-01-01

    In June this year, Wellesley High School became a focus of attention worldwide, following a graduation speech made by a teacher at the school. Departing from the traditional rhetoric of such ceremonies, English teacher David McCullough told the assembled graduates that they were neither special nor exceptional, but may well believe they were…

  3. [Liver metastasis: therapeutic strategy].

    PubMed

    Gennari, L; Doci, R; Bignami, P

    1996-01-01

    The liver is one of the most frequent sites of metastatic growth, in particular from digestive malignancies (DM). The first goal is to reduce the incidence of metastases. Adjuvant systemic chemotherapies have been demonstrated to reduce the recurrence rate and to improve survival in Dukes C colon cancer. Fluorouracil is the pivot of adjuvant treatment modulated by Leucovorin or Levamisol. A short postoperative administration of fluorouracil by intraportal route has been tested, but the results are controversial. Adjuvant treatments for different DM are under investigation. When hepatic metastases are clinically evident, therapeutic decisions depend on several factors: site and nature of primary, extent of hepatic and extrahepatic disease, patient characteristics, efficacy of treatments. A staging system should be adopted to allow a rational approach. In selected cases a locoregional treatment can achieve consistent results. Hepatic Intrarterial Chemotherapy (HIAC) for colorectal metastases achieves objective responses in more than 50% of patients. Survival seems positively affected. When feasible, Ro hepatic resection is the most effective treatment, five-year survival rate being about 30% when metastases are from colorectal cancer. Since the liver is the most frequent site of recurrence after resection, repeat resection have been successfully performed. PMID:9214269

  4. Caffeine, maximal power output and fatigue.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, J H; Signorile, J F; Barnes, W S; Henrich, T W

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine the effects of caffeine ingestion on maximal power output and fatigue during short term, high intensity exercise. Nine adult males performed 15 s maximal exercise bouts 60 min after ingestion of caffeine (7 mg.kg-1) or placebo. Exercise bouts were carried out on a modified cycle ergometer which allowed power output to be computed for each one-half pedal stroke via microcomputer. Peak power output under caffeine conditions was not significantly different from that obtained following placebo ingestion. Similarly, time to peak power, total work, power fatigue index and power fatigue rate did not differ significantly between caffeine and placebo conditions. These results suggest that caffeine ingestion does not increase one's maximal ability to generate power. Further, caffeine does not alter the rate or magnitude of fatigue during high intensity, dynamic exercise. PMID:3228680

  5. Energy Band Calculations for Maximally Even Superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krantz, Richard; Byrd, Jason

    2007-03-01

    Superlattices are multiple-well, semiconductor heterostructures that can be described by one-dimensional potential wells separated by potential barriers. We refer to a distribution of wells and barriers based on the theory of maximally even sets as a maximally even superlattice. The prototypical example of a maximally even set is the distribution of white and black keys on a piano keyboard. Black keys may represent wells and the white keys represent barriers. As the number of wells and barriers increase, efficient and stable methods of calculation are necessary to study these structures. We have implemented a finite-element method using the discrete variable representation (FE-DVR) to calculate E versus k for these superlattices. Use of the FE-DVR method greatly reduces the amount of calculation necessary for the eigenvalue problem.

  6. Maximal Holevo Quantity Based on Weak Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yao-Kun; Fei, Shao-Ming; Wang, Zhi-Xi; Cao, Jun-Peng; Fan, Heng

    2015-01-01

    The Holevo bound is a keystone in many applications of quantum information theory. We propose “ maximal Holevo quantity for weak measurements” as the generalization of the maximal Holevo quantity which is defined by the optimal projective measurements. The scenarios that weak measurements is necessary are that only the weak measurements can be performed because for example the system is macroscopic or that one intentionally tries to do so such that the disturbance on the measured system can be controlled for example in quantum key distribution protocols. We evaluate systematically the maximal Holevo quantity for weak measurements for Bell-diagonal states and find a series of results. Furthermore, we find that weak measurements can be realized by noise and project measurements. PMID:26090962

  7. An information maximization model of eye movements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Renninger, Laura Walker; Coughlan, James; Verghese, Preeti; Malik, Jitendra

    2005-01-01

    We propose a sequential information maximization model as a general strategy for programming eye movements. The model reconstructs high-resolution visual information from a sequence of fixations, taking into account the fall-off in resolution from the fovea to the periphery. From this framework we get a simple rule for predicting fixation sequences: after each fixation, fixate next at the location that minimizes uncertainty (maximizes information) about the stimulus. By comparing our model performance to human eye movement data and to predictions from a saliency and random model, we demonstrate that our model is best at predicting fixation locations. Modeling additional biological constraints will improve the prediction of fixation sequences. Our results suggest that information maximization is a useful principle for programming eye movements.

  8. On the Relationship between Maximal Reliability and Maximal Validity of Linear Composites

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penev, Spiridon; Raykov, Tenko

    2006-01-01

    A linear combination of a set of measures is often sought as an overall score summarizing subject performance. The weights in this composite can be selected to maximize its reliability or to maximize its validity, and the optimal choice of weights is in general not the same for these two optimality criteria. We explore several relationships…

  9. Managing the innovation supply chain to maximize personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Waldman, S A; Terzic, A

    2014-02-01

    Personalized medicine epitomizes an evolving model of care tailored to the individual patient. This emerging paradigm harnesses radical technological advances to define each patient's molecular characteristics and decipher his or her unique pathophysiological processes. Translated into individualized algorithms, personalized medicine aims to predict, prevent, and cure disease without producing therapeutic adverse events. Although the transformative power of personalized medicine is generally recognized by physicians, patients, and payers, the complexity of translating discoveries into new modalities that transform health care is less appreciated. We often consider the flow of innovation and technology along a continuum of discovery, development, regulation, and application bridging the bench with the bedside. However, this process also can be viewed through a complementary prism, as a necessary supply chain of services and providers, each making essential contributions to the development of the final product to maximize value to consumers. Considering personalized medicine in this context of supply chain management highlights essential points of vulnerability and/or scalability that can ultimately constrain translation of the biological revolution or potentiate it into individualized diagnostics and therapeutics for optimized value creation and delivery. PMID:24448453

  10. Optimal Thresholding of Classifiers to Maximize F1 Measure

    PubMed Central

    Lipton, Zachary C.; Elkan, Charles; Naryanaswamy, Balakrishnan

    2015-01-01

    This paper provides new insight into maximizing F1 measures in the context of binary classification and also in the context of multilabel classification. The harmonic mean of precision and recall, the F1 measure is widely used to evaluate the success of a binary classifier when one class is rare. Micro average, macro average, and per instance average F1 measures are used in multilabel classification. For any classifier that produces a real-valued output, we derive the relationship between the best achievable F1 value and the decision-making threshold that achieves this optimum. As a special case, if the classifier outputs are well-calibrated conditional probabilities, then the optimal threshold is half the optimal F1 value. As another special case, if the classifier is completely uninformative, then the optimal behavior is to classify all examples as positive. When the actual prevalence of positive examples is low, this behavior can be undesirable. As a case study, we discuss the results, which can be surprising, of maximizing F1 when predicting 26,853 labels for Medline documents. PMID:26023687

  11. Understanding violations of Gricean maxims in preschoolers and adults.

    PubMed

    Okanda, Mako; Asada, Kosuke; Moriguchi, Yusuke; Itakura, Shoji

    2015-01-01

    This study used a revised Conversational Violations Test to examine Gricean maxim violations in 4- to 6-year-old Japanese children and adults. Participants' understanding of the following maxims was assessed: be informative (first maxim of quantity), avoid redundancy (second maxim of quantity), be truthful (maxim of quality), be relevant (maxim of relation), avoid ambiguity (second maxim of manner), and be polite (maxim of politeness). Sensitivity to violations of Gricean maxims increased with age: 4-year-olds' understanding of maxims was near chance, 5-year-olds understood some maxims (first maxim of quantity and maxims of quality, relation, and manner), and 6-year-olds and adults understood all maxims. Preschoolers acquired the maxim of relation first and had the greatest difficulty understanding the second maxim of quantity. Children and adults differed in their comprehension of the maxim of politeness. The development of the pragmatic understanding of Gricean maxims and implications for the construction of developmental tasks from early childhood to adulthood are discussed. PMID:26191018

  12. Understanding violations of Gricean maxims in preschoolers and adults

    PubMed Central

    Okanda, Mako; Asada, Kosuke; Moriguchi, Yusuke; Itakura, Shoji

    2015-01-01

    This study used a revised Conversational Violations Test to examine Gricean maxim violations in 4- to 6-year-old Japanese children and adults. Participants' understanding of the following maxims was assessed: be informative (first maxim of quantity), avoid redundancy (second maxim of quantity), be truthful (maxim of quality), be relevant (maxim of relation), avoid ambiguity (second maxim of manner), and be polite (maxim of politeness). Sensitivity to violations of Gricean maxims increased with age: 4-year-olds' understanding of maxims was near chance, 5-year-olds understood some maxims (first maxim of quantity and maxims of quality, relation, and manner), and 6-year-olds and adults understood all maxims. Preschoolers acquired the maxim of relation first and had the greatest difficulty understanding the second maxim of quantity. Children and adults differed in their comprehension of the maxim of politeness. The development of the pragmatic understanding of Gricean maxims and implications for the construction of developmental tasks from early childhood to adulthood are discussed. PMID:26191018

  13. Maximal aerobic exercise following prolonged sleep deprivation.

    PubMed

    Goodman, J; Radomski, M; Hart, L; Plyley, M; Shephard, R J

    1989-12-01

    The effect of 60 h without sleep upon maximal oxygen intake was examined in 12 young women, using a cycle ergometer protocol. The arousal of the subjects was maintained by requiring the performance of a sequence of cognitive tasks throughout the experimental period. Well-defined oxygen intake plateaus were obtained both before and after sleep deprivation, and no change of maximal oxygen intake was observed immediately following sleep deprivation. The endurance time for exhausting exercise also remained unchanged, as did such markers of aerobic performance as peak exercise ventilation, peak heart rate, peak respiratory gas exchange ratio, and peak blood lactate. However, as in an earlier study of sleep deprivation with male subjects (in which a decrease of treadmill maximal oxygen intake was observed), the formula of Dill and Costill (4) indicated the development of a substantial (11.6%) increase of estimated plasma volume percentage with corresponding decreases in hematocrit and red cell count. Possible factors sustaining maximal oxygen intake under the conditions of the present experiment include (1) maintained arousal of the subjects with no decrease in peak exercise ventilation or the related respiratory work and (2) use of a cycle ergometer rather than a treadmill test with possible concurrent differences in the impact of hematocrit levels and plasma volume expansion upon peak cardiac output and thus oxygen delivery to the working muscles. PMID:2628360

  14. Does evolution lead to maximizing behavior?

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Laurent; Alger, Ingela; Weibull, Jörgen

    2015-07-01

    A long-standing question in biology and economics is whether individual organisms evolve to behave as if they were striving to maximize some goal function. We here formalize this "as if" question in a patch-structured population in which individuals obtain material payoffs from (perhaps very complex multimove) social interactions. These material payoffs determine personal fitness and, ultimately, invasion fitness. We ask whether individuals in uninvadable population states will appear to be maximizing conventional goal functions (with population-structure coefficients exogenous to the individual's behavior), when what is really being maximized is invasion fitness at the genetic level. We reach two broad conclusions. First, no simple and general individual-centered goal function emerges from the analysis. This stems from the fact that invasion fitness is a gene-centered multigenerational measure of evolutionary success. Second, when selection is weak, all multigenerational effects of selection can be summarized in a neutral type-distribution quantifying identity-by-descent between individuals within patches. Individuals then behave as if they were striving to maximize a weighted sum of material payoffs (own and others). At an uninvadable state it is as if individuals would freely choose their actions and play a Nash equilibrium of a game with a goal function that combines self-interest (own material payoff), group interest (group material payoff if everyone does the same), and local rivalry (material payoff differences). PMID:26082379

  15. How to Generate Good Profit Maximization Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Lewis

    2014-01-01

    In this article, the author considers the merits of two classes of profit maximization problems: those involving perfectly competitive firms with quadratic and cubic cost functions. While relatively easy to develop and solve, problems based on quadratic cost functions are too simple to address a number of important issues, such as the use of…

  16. Robust Utility Maximization Under Convex Portfolio Constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Matoussi, Anis; Mezghani, Hanen Mnif, Mohamed

    2015-04-15

    We study a robust maximization problem from terminal wealth and consumption under a convex constraints on the portfolio. We state the existence and the uniqueness of the consumption–investment strategy by studying the associated quadratic backward stochastic differential equation. We characterize the optimal control by using the duality method and deriving a dynamic maximum principle.

  17. Faculty Salaries and the Maximization of Prestige

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melguizo, Tatiana; Strober, Myra H.

    2007-01-01

    Through the lens of the emerging economic theory of higher education, we look at the relationship between salary and prestige. Starting from the premise that academic institutions seek to maximize prestige, we hypothesize that monetary rewards are higher for faculty activities that confer prestige. We use data from the 1999 National Study of…

  18. Maximizing the Spectacle of Water Fountains

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simoson, Andrew J.

    2009-01-01

    For a given initial speed of water from a spigot or jet, what angle of the jet will maximize the visual impact of the water spray in the fountain? This paper focuses on fountains whose spigots are arranged in circular fashion, and couches the measurement of the visual impact in terms of the surface area and the volume under the fountain's natural…

  19. A Model of College Tuition Maximization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bosshardt, Donald I.; Lichtenstein, Larry; Zaporowski, Mark P.

    2009-01-01

    This paper develops a series of models for optimal tuition pricing for private colleges and universities. The university is assumed to be a profit maximizing, price discriminating monopolist. The enrollment decision of student's is stochastic in nature. The university offers an effective tuition rate, comprised of stipulated tuition less financial…

  20. Why Contextual Preference Reversals Maximize Expected Value

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Contextual preference reversals occur when a preference for one option over another is reversed by the addition of further options. It has been argued that the occurrence of preference reversals in human behavior shows that people violate the axioms of rational choice and that people are not, therefore, expected value maximizers. In contrast, we demonstrate that if a person is only able to make noisy calculations of expected value and noisy observations of the ordinal relations among option features, then the expected value maximizing choice is influenced by the addition of new options and does give rise to apparent preference reversals. We explore the implications of expected value maximizing choice, conditioned on noisy observations, for a range of contextual preference reversal types—including attraction, compromise, similarity, and phantom effects. These preference reversal types have played a key role in the development of models of human choice. We conclude that experiments demonstrating contextual preference reversals are not evidence for irrationality. They are, however, a consequence of expected value maximization given noisy observations. PMID:27337391

  1. Maximizing the Phytonutrient Content of Potatoes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We are exploring to what extent the rich genetic diversity of potatoes can be used to maximize the nutritional potential of potatoes. Metabolic profiling is being used to screen potatoes for genotypes with elevated amounts of vitamins and phytonutrients. Substantial differences in phytonutrients am...

  2. Maximizing Resource Utilization in Video Streaming Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alsmirat, Mohammad Abdullah

    2013-01-01

    Video streaming has recently grown dramatically in popularity over the Internet, Cable TV, and wire-less networks. Because of the resource demanding nature of video streaming applications, maximizing resource utilization in any video streaming system is a key factor to increase the scalability and decrease the cost of the system. Resources to…

  3. Therapeutic drug levels

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003430.htm Therapeutic drug levels To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Therapeutic drug levels are lab tests to look for the presence ...

  4. Therapeutic Cancer Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Ye, Zhenlong; Li, Zhong; Jin, Huajun; Qian, Qijun

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is one of the major leading death causes of diseases. Prevention and treatment of cancer is an important way to decrease the incidence of tumorigenesis and prolong patients' lives. Subversive achievements on cancer immunotherapy have recently been paid much attention after many failures in basic and clinical researches. Based on deep analysis of genomics and proteomics of tumor antigens, a variety of cancer vaccines targeting tumor antigens have been tested in preclinical and human clinical trials. Many therapeutic cancer vaccines alone or combination with other conventional treatments for cancer obtained spectacular efficacy, indicating the tremendously potential application in clinic. With the illustration of underlying mechanisms of cancer immune regulation, valid, controllable, and persistent cancer vaccines will play important roles in cancer treatment, survival extension and relapse and cancer prevention. This chapter mainly summarizes the recent progresses and developments on cancer vaccine research and clinical application, thus exploring the existing obstacles in cancer vaccine research and promoting the efficacy of cancer vaccine. PMID:27240458

  5. Maximal CP violation in flavor neutrino masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitabayashi, Teruyuki; Yasuè, Masaki

    2016-03-01

    Since flavor neutrino masses Mμμ,ττ,μτ can be expressed in terms of Mee,eμ,eτ, mutual dependence among Mμμ,ττ,μτ is derived by imposing some constraints on Mee,eμ,eτ. For appropriately imposed constraints on Mee,eμ,eτ giving rise to both maximal CP violation and the maximal atmospheric neutrino mixing, we show various specific textures of neutrino mass matrices including the texture with Mττ = Mμμ∗ derived as the simplest solution to the constraint of Mττ ‑ Mμμ = imaginary, which is required by the constraint of Meμcos θ23 ‑ Meτsin θ23 = real for cos 2θ23 = 0. It is found that Majorana CP violation depends on the phase of Mee.

  6. Hamiltonian formalism and path entropy maximization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Sergio; González, Diego

    2015-10-01

    Maximization of the path information entropy is a clear prescription for constructing models in non-equilibrium statistical mechanics. Here it is shown that, following this prescription under the assumption of arbitrary instantaneous constraints on position and velocity, a Lagrangian emerges which determines the most probable trajectory. Deviations from the probability maximum can be consistently described as slices in time by a Hamiltonian, according to a nonlinear Langevin equation and its associated Fokker-Planck equation. The connections unveiled between the maximization of path entropy and the Langevin/Fokker-Planck equations imply that missing information about the phase space coordinate never decreases in time, a purely information-theoretical version of the second law of thermodynamics. All of these results are independent of any physical assumptions, and thus valid for any generalized coordinate as a function of time, or any other parameter. This reinforces the view that the second law is a fundamental property of plausible inference.

  7. Nondecoupling of maximal supergravity from the superstring.

    PubMed

    Green, Michael B; Ooguri, Hirosi; Schwarz, John H

    2007-07-27

    We consider the conditions necessary for obtaining perturbative maximal supergravity in d dimensions as a decoupling limit of type II superstring theory compactified on a (10-d) torus. For dimensions d=2 and d=3, it is possible to define a limit in which the only finite-mass states are the 256 massless states of maximal supergravity. However, in dimensions d>or=4, there are infinite towers of additional massless and finite-mass states. These correspond to Kaluza-Klein charges, wound strings, Kaluza-Klein monopoles, or branes wrapping around cycles of the toroidal extra dimensions. We conclude that perturbative supergravity cannot be decoupled from string theory in dimensions>or=4. In particular, we conjecture that pure N=8 supergravity in four dimensions is in the Swampland. PMID:17678349

  8. Experimental implementation of maximally synchronizable networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sevilla-Escoboza, R.; Buldú, J. M.; Boccaletti, S.; Papo, D.; Hwang, D.-U.; Huerta-Cuellar, G.; Gutiérrez, R.

    2016-04-01

    Maximally synchronizable networks (MSNs) are acyclic directed networks that maximize synchronizability. In this paper, we investigate the feasibility of transforming networks of coupled oscillators into their corresponding MSNs. By tuning the weights of any given network so as to reach the lowest possible eigenratio λN /λ2, the synchronized state is guaranteed to be maintained across the longest possible range of coupling strengths. We check the robustness of the resulting MSNs with an experimental implementation of a network of nonlinear electronic oscillators and study the propagation of the synchronization errors through the network. Importantly, a method to study the effects of topological uncertainties on the synchronizability is proposed and explored both theoretically and experimentally.

  9. Basic principles of maximizing dental office productivity.

    PubMed

    Mamoun, John

    2012-01-01

    To maximize office productivity, dentists should focus on performing tasks that only they can perform and not spend office hours performing tasks that can be delegated to non-dentist personnel. An important element of maximizing productivity is to arrange the schedule so that multiple patients are seated simultaneously in different operatories. Doing so allows the dentist to work on one patient in one operatory without needing to wait for local anesthetic to take effect on another patient in another operatory, or for assistants to perform tasks (such as cleaning up, taking radiographs, performing prophylaxis, or transporting and preparing equipment and supplies) in other operatories. Another way to improve productivity is to structure procedures so that fewer steps are needed to set up and implement them. In addition, during procedures, four-handed dental passing methods can be used to provide the dentist with supplies or equipment when needed. This article reviews basic principles of maximizing dental office productivity, based on the author's observations of business logistics used by various dental offices. PMID:22414506

  10. Revenue maximization in survivable WDM networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sridharan, Murari; Somani, Arun K.

    2000-09-01

    Service availability is an indispensable requirement for many current and future applications over the Internet and hence has to be addressed as part of the optical QoS service model. Network service providers can offer varying classes of services based on the choice of protection employed which can vary from full protection to no protection. Based on the service classes, traffic in the network falls into one of the three classes viz., full protection, no protection and best-effort. The network typically relies on the best-effort traffic for maximizing revenue. We consider two variations on the best-effort class, (1) all connections are accepted and network tries to protect as many as possible and (2) a mix of protected and unprotected connections and the goal is to maximize revenue. In this paper, we present a mathematical formulation, that captures service differentiation based on lightpath protection, for revenue maximization in a wavelength routed backbone networks. Our approach also captures the service disruption aspect into the problem formulation, as there may be a penalty for disrupting currently working connections.

  11. Maximal acceleration is non-rotating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, Don N.

    1998-06-01

    In a stationary axisymmetric spacetime, the angular velocity of a stationary observer whose acceleration vector is Fermi-Walker transported is also the angular velocity that locally extremizes the magnitude of the acceleration of such an observer. The converse is also true if the spacetime is symmetric under reversing both t and 0264-9381/15/6/020/img1 together. Thus a congruence of non-rotating acceleration worldlines (NAW) is equivalent to a stationary congruence accelerating locally extremely (SCALE). These congruences are defined completely locally, unlike the case of zero angular momentum observers (ZAMOs), which requires knowledge around a symmetry axis. The SCALE subcase of a stationary congruence accelerating maximally (SCAM) is made up of stationary worldlines that may be considered to be locally most nearly at rest in a stationary axisymmetric gravitational field. Formulae for the angular velocity and other properties of the SCALEs are given explicitly on a generalization of an equatorial plane, infinitesimally near a symmetry axis, and in a slowly rotating gravitational field, including the far-field limit, where the SCAM is shown to be counter-rotating relative to infinity. These formulae are evaluated in particular detail for the Kerr-Newman metric. Various other congruences are also defined, such as a stationary congruence rotating at minimum (SCRAM), and stationary worldlines accelerating radially maximally (SWARM), both of which coincide with a SCAM on an equatorial plane of reflection symmetry. Applications are also made to the gravitational fields of maximally rotating stars, the Sun and the Solar System.

  12. The 5 Essentials of Organizational Excellence: Maximizing Schoolwide Student Achievement and Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marazza, Lawrence L.

    This book explores the necessity for building strong relationships among administrators, teachers, parents, and the community by applying what the book calls the five essentials of organizational excellence. The five essentials are planning strategically; benchmarking for excellence; leading collaboratively; engaging the community; and governing…

  13. Getting Excited about Data: Combining People, Passion, and Proof to Maximize Student Achievement. Second Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holcomb, Edie L.

    2004-01-01

    This book builds upon the best-selling first edition to provide additional guidance and support for educators who are "ready, willing, and able" to explore more sophisticated uses of data. New tools and activities facilitate active engagement with data and a collaborative culture of collective responsibility for the learning of all students.…

  14. Maximal violation of tight Bell inequalities for maximal high-dimensional entanglement

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Seung-Woo; Jaksch, Dieter

    2009-07-15

    We propose a Bell inequality for high-dimensional bipartite systems obtained by binning local measurement outcomes and show that it is tight. We find a binning method for even d-dimensional measurement outcomes for which this Bell inequality is maximally violated by maximally entangled states. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the Bell inequality is applicable to continuous variable systems and yields strong violations for two-mode squeezed states.

  15. Maximally spaced projection sequencing in electron paramagnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Redler, Gage; Epel, Boris; Halpern, Howard J.

    2015-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI) provides 3D images of absolute oxygen concentration (pO2) in vivo with excellent spatial and pO2 resolution. When investigating such physiologic parameters in living animals, the situation is inherently dynamic. Improvements in temporal resolution and experimental versatility are necessary to properly study such a system. Uniformly distributed projections result in efficient use of data for image reconstruction. This has dictated current methods such as equal-solid-angle (ESA) spacing of projections. However, acquisition sequencing must still be optimized to achieve uniformity throughout imaging. An object-independent method for uniform acquisition of projections, using the ESA uniform distribution for the final set of projections, is presented. Each successive projection maximizes the distance in the gradient space between itself and prior projections. This maximally spaced projection sequencing (MSPS) method improves image quality for intermediate images reconstructed from incomplete projection sets, enabling useful real-time reconstruction. This method also provides improved experimental versatility, reduced artifacts, and the ability to adjust temporal resolution post factum to best fit the data and its application. The MSPS method in EPRI provides the improvements necessary to more appropriately study a dynamic system. PMID:26185490

  16. A Geometric-Structure Theory for Maximally Random Jammed Packings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Jianxiang; Xu, Yaopengxiao; Jiao, Yang; Torquato, Salvatore

    2015-11-01

    Maximally random jammed (MRJ) particle packings can be viewed as prototypical glasses in that they are maximally disordered while simultaneously being mechanically rigid. The prediction of the MRJ packing density ϕMRJ, among other packing properties of frictionless particles, still poses many theoretical challenges, even for congruent spheres or disks. Using the geometric-structure approach, we derive for the first time a highly accurate formula for MRJ densities for a very wide class of two-dimensional frictionless packings, namely, binary convex superdisks, with shapes that continuously interpolate between circles and squares. By incorporating specific attributes of MRJ states and a novel organizing principle, our formula yields predictions of ϕMRJ that are in excellent agreement with corresponding computer-simulation estimates in almost the entire α-x plane with semi-axis ratio α and small-particle relative number concentration x. Importantly, in the monodisperse circle limit, the predicted ϕMRJ = 0.834 agrees very well with the very recently numerically discovered MRJ density of 0.827, which distinguishes it from high-density “random-close packing” polycrystalline states and hence provides a stringent test on the theory. Similarly, for non-circular monodisperse superdisks, we predict MRJ states with densities that are appreciably smaller than is conventionally thought to be achievable by standard packing protocols.

  17. Critical behavior of large maximally informative neural populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkowitz, John; Sharpee, Tatyana

    We consider maximally informative encoding of scalar signals by neural populations. In a small time window, neural responses are binary, with spiking probability that follows a sigmoidal tuning curve. The width of the tuning curve represents effective noise in neural transmission. Previous analyses of this problem for relatively small numbers of neurons with identical noise parameters indicated the presence of multiple bifurcations that occurred with decreasing noise value. For very high noise values, maximal information is achieved when all neurons have the same threshold values. With decreasing noise, the threshold values split into two or more groups via a series of bifurcations, until finally each neuron has a different threshold. Analyzing this problem in the large N limit, we found instead that there is a single phase transition from redundant coding to coding based on distributed thresholds. The order parameter of this transition is the threshold standard deviation across the population; differences in noise parameter from the mean are analogous to local magnetic fields. Near the bifurcation point, information transmitted follows a Landau expansion. We use this expansion to quantify the scaling of the order parameter with noise and effective magnetic field. NSF CAREER Award IIS-1254123, NSF Ideas Lab Collaborative Research IOS 1556388.

  18. Maximizing mutagenesis with solubilized CRISPR-Cas9 ribonucleoprotein complexes.

    PubMed

    Burger, Alexa; Lindsay, Helen; Felker, Anastasia; Hess, Christopher; Anders, Carolin; Chiavacci, Elena; Zaugg, Jonas; Weber, Lukas M; Catena, Raul; Jinek, Martin; Robinson, Mark D; Mosimann, Christian

    2016-06-01

    CRISPR-Cas9 enables efficient sequence-specific mutagenesis for creating somatic or germline mutants of model organisms. Key constraints in vivo remain the expression and delivery of active Cas9-sgRNA ribonucleoprotein complexes (RNPs) with minimal toxicity, variable mutagenesis efficiencies depending on targeting sequence, and high mutation mosaicism. Here, we apply in vitro assembled, fluorescent Cas9-sgRNA RNPs in solubilizing salt solution to achieve maximal mutagenesis efficiency in zebrafish embryos. MiSeq-based sequence analysis of targeted loci in individual embryos using CrispRVariants, a customized software tool for mutagenesis quantification and visualization, reveals efficient bi-allelic mutagenesis that reaches saturation at several tested gene loci. Such virtually complete mutagenesis exposes loss-of-function phenotypes for candidate genes in somatic mutant embryos for subsequent generation of stable germline mutants. We further show that targeting of non-coding elements in gene regulatory regions using saturating mutagenesis uncovers functional control elements in transgenic reporters and endogenous genes in injected embryos. Our results establish that optimally solubilized, in vitro assembled fluorescent Cas9-sgRNA RNPs provide a reproducible reagent for direct and scalable loss-of-function studies and applications beyond zebrafish experiments that require maximal DNA cutting efficiency in vivo. PMID:27130213

  19. A Geometric-Structure Theory for Maximally Random Jammed Packings

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Jianxiang; Xu, Yaopengxiao; Jiao, Yang; Torquato, Salvatore

    2015-01-01

    Maximally random jammed (MRJ) particle packings can be viewed as prototypical glasses in that they are maximally disordered while simultaneously being mechanically rigid. The prediction of the MRJ packing density ϕMRJ, among other packing properties of frictionless particles, still poses many theoretical challenges, even for congruent spheres or disks. Using the geometric-structure approach, we derive for the first time a highly accurate formula for MRJ densities for a very wide class of two-dimensional frictionless packings, namely, binary convex superdisks, with shapes that continuously interpolate between circles and squares. By incorporating specific attributes of MRJ states and a novel organizing principle, our formula yields predictions of ϕMRJ that are in excellent agreement with corresponding computer-simulation estimates in almost the entire α-x plane with semi-axis ratio α and small-particle relative number concentration x. Importantly, in the monodisperse circle limit, the predicted ϕMRJ = 0.834 agrees very well with the very recently numerically discovered MRJ density of 0.827, which distinguishes it from high-density “random-close packing” polycrystalline states and hence provides a stringent test on the theory. Similarly, for non-circular monodisperse superdisks, we predict MRJ states with densities that are appreciably smaller than is conventionally thought to be achievable by standard packing protocols. PMID:26568437

  20. Maximization of noise immunity of a two-layer hydroacoustic antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smaryshev, M. D.

    2008-09-01

    A method of maximizing the noise immunity coefficient of a two-layer hydroacoustic antenna is proposed. An antenna consisting of two parallel linear arrays is considered as an example to estimate the gain in noise immunity achieved with the proposed algorithm against the cardioid-type connection of these arrays.

  1. Holistic Admissions after Affirmative Action: Does "Maximizing" the High School Curriculum Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bastedo, Michael N.; Howard, Joseph E.; Flaster, Allyson

    2016-01-01

    Selective colleges and universities purport to consider students' achievement in the context of the academic opportunities available in their high schools. Thus, students who "maximize" their curricular opportunities should be more likely to gain admission. Using nationally representative data, we examine the effect of "maximizing…

  2. A Brief Review of Effective Teaching Practices That Maximize Student Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harbour, Kristin E.; Evanovich, Lauren L.; Sweigart, Chris A.; Hughes, Lindsay E.

    2015-01-01

    What teachers do and how students perform intersect, making teachers a critical factor for determining student success. When teachers use effective practices, they maximize the probability that students will be actively engaged in instruction. Student engagement is one of the most well-established predictors of achievement; when students are more…

  3. Maximizing the Performance and Job-Related Behaviors of Contract and Permanent IT Workers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pai, Tanusree

    2010-01-01

    As the use of contracting for Information Technology (IT) services steadily increases, IT managers are challenged with reconciling the need for flexibility achieved through the use of contract workers, with the need to understand the factors that maximize the performance and behaviors of contract and permanent IT workers. While several research…

  4. Steroid hormone receptors and prostate cancer: role of structural dynamics in therapeutic targeting.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Raj

    2016-01-01

    Steroid hormone receptors (SHRs) act in cell type- and gene-specific manner through interactions with coregulatory proteins to regulate numerous physiological and pathological processes at the level of gene regulation. Binding of steroid receptor modulator (SRM) ligand leads to allosteric changes in SHR to exert positive or negative effects on the expression of target genes. Due, in part, to the fact that current SRMs generally target ligand binding domain (LBD)/AF2 and neglect intrinsically disordered (ID) N-terminal domain (NTD)/AF1, clinically relevant SRMs lack selectivity and are also prone to the development of resistance over time. Therefore, to maximize the efficacy of SHR-based therapeutics, the possibility of developing unique modulators that act to control AF1 activity must be considered. Recent studies targeting androgen receptor's (AR's) ID AF1 domain for the castration-resistant prostate cancer has provided the possibility of therapeutically targeting ID NTD/AF1 surfaces by allosteric modulations to achieve desired effects. In this review article, we discuss how inter- and intra- molecular allosteric regulations controlled by AR's structural flexibility and dynamics particularly the ID NTD/AF1 is an emerging area of investigation, which could be exploited for drug development and therapeutic targeting of prostate cancer. PMID:27364545

  5. Steroid hormone receptors and prostate cancer: role of structural dynamics in therapeutic targeting

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Raj

    2016-01-01

    Steroid hormone receptors (SHRs) act in cell type- and gene-specific manner through interactions with coregulatory proteins to regulate numerous physiological and pathological processes at the level of gene regulation. Binding of steroid receptor modulator (SRM) ligand leads to allosteric changes in SHR to exert positive or negative effects on the expression of target genes. Due, in part, to the fact that current SRMs generally target ligand binding domain (LBD)/AF2 and neglect intrinsically disordered (ID) N-terminal domain (NTD)/AF1, clinically relevant SRMs lack selectivity and are also prone to the development of resistance over time. Therefore, to maximize the efficacy of SHR-based therapeutics, the possibility of developing unique modulators that act to control AF1 activity must be considered. Recent studies targeting androgen receptor's (AR's) ID AF1 domain for the castration-resistant prostate cancer has provided the possibility of therapeutically targeting ID NTD/AF1 surfaces by allosteric modulations to achieve desired effects. In this review article, we discuss how inter- and intra- molecular allosteric regulations controlled by AR's structural flexibility and dynamics particularly the ID NTD/AF1 is an emerging area of investigation, which could be exploited for drug development and therapeutic targeting of prostate cancer. PMID:27364545

  6. Success or survival. Redeploying strategic assets to maximize their value.

    PubMed

    Maier, R A

    1991-01-01

    As capital sources dry up, hospitals should consider restructuring their finances to maximize the value of current assets, to achieve greater cost efficiency, and to fund new businesses and services that will generate new revenues. Strategic asset redeployment consists of analyzing assets; plans for new business development, equipment, and real estate acquisitions; and the impact on the budget. Hospitals are leasing more frequently to finance new equipment and property, but they are also looking at existing equipment and property to determine whether refinancing through a sale/leaseback makes sense. Also, before a hospital decides to offer a costly new service, such as magnetic resonance imaging, an impartial analysis should first determine the market for and the financial feasibility of the service. Once a service is determined to be viable, the term of the financing should match the life span of the project. PMID:10108422

  7. KATTS: a framework for maximizing NCLEX-RN performance.

    PubMed

    McDowell, Betsy M

    2008-04-01

    A key indicator of the quality of a nursing education program is the performance of its graduates as first-time takers of the NCLEX-RN. As a result, nursing schools are open to strategies that strengthen the performance of their graduates on the examination. The Knowledge base, Anxiety control, Test-Taking Skills (KATTS) framework focuses on the three components of achieving a maximum score on an examination. In KATTS, all three components must be present and in proper balance to maximize a test taker's score. By strengthening not just one but all of these components, graduates can improve their overall test scores significantly. Suggested strategies for strengthening each component of KATTS are provided. This framework has been used successfully in designing remedial tutoring programs and in assisting first-time NCLEX test takers in preparing for the licensing examination. PMID:18468296

  8. Auctions with Dynamic Populations: Efficiency and Revenue Maximization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Said, Maher

    We study a stochastic sequential allocation problem with a dynamic population of privately-informed buyers. We characterize the set of efficient allocation rules and show that a dynamic VCG mechanism is both efficient and periodic ex post incentive compatible; we also show that the revenue-maximizing direct mechanism is a pivot mechanism with a reserve price. We then consider sequential ascending auctions in this setting, both with and without a reserve price. We construct equilibrium bidding strategies in this indirect mechanism where bidders reveal their private information in every period, yielding the same outcomes as the direct mechanisms. Thus, the sequential ascending auction is a natural institution for achieving either efficient or optimal outcomes.

  9. Maximal Air Bubble Entrainment at Liquid-Drop Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouwhuis, Wilco; van der Veen, Roeland C. A.; Tran, Tuan; Keij, Diederik L.; Winkels, Koen G.; Peters, Ivo R.; van der Meer, Devaraj; Sun, Chao; Snoeijer, Jacco H.; Lohse, Detlef

    2012-12-01

    At impact of a liquid drop on a solid surface, an air bubble can be entrapped. Here, we show that two competing effects minimize the (relative) size of this entrained air bubble: for large drop impact velocity and large droplets, the inertia of the liquid flattens the entrained bubble, whereas for small impact velocity and small droplets, capillary forces minimize the entrained bubble. However, we demonstrate experimentally, theoretically, and numerically that in between there is an optimum, leading to maximal air bubble entrapment. For a 1.8 mm diameter ethanol droplet, this optimum is achieved at an impact velocity of 0.25m/s. Our results have a strong bearing on various applications in printing technology, microelectronics, immersion lithography, diagnostics, or agriculture.

  10. Maximizing versus satisficing: happiness is a matter of choice.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Barry; Ward, Andrew; Monterosso, John; Lyubomirsky, Sonja; White, Katherine; Lehman, Darrin R

    2002-11-01

    Can people feel worse off as the options they face increase? The present studies suggest that some people--maximizers--can. Study 1 reported a Maximization Scale, which measures individual differences in desire to maximize. Seven samples revealed negative correlations between maximization and happiness, optimism, self-esteem, and life satisfaction, and positive correlations between maximization and depression, perfectionism, and regret. Study 2 found maximizers less satisfied than nonmaximizers (satisficers) with consumer decisions, and more likely to engage in social comparison. Study 3 found maximizers more adversely affected by upward social comparison. Study 4 found maximizers more sensitive to regret and less satisfied in an ultimatum bargaining game. The interaction between maximizing and choice is discussed in terms of regret, adaptation, and self-blame. PMID:12416921

  11. Electromagnetically induced grating with maximal atomic coherence

    SciTech Connect

    Carvalho, Silvania A.; Araujo, Luis E. E. de

    2011-10-15

    We describe theoretically an atomic diffraction grating that combines an electromagnetically induced grating with a coherence grating in a double-{Lambda} atomic system. With the atom in a condition of maximal coherence between its lower levels, the combined gratings simultaneously diffract both the incident probe beam as well as the signal beam generated through four-wave mixing. A special feature of the atomic grating is that it will diffract any beam resonantly tuned to any excited state of the atom accessible by a dipole transition from its ground state.

  12. Coloring random graphs and maximizing local diversity.

    PubMed

    Bounkong, S; van Mourik, J; Saad, D

    2006-11-01

    We study a variation of the graph coloring problem on random graphs of finite average connectivity. Given the number of colors, we aim to maximize the number of different colors at neighboring vertices (i.e., one edge distance) of any vertex. Two efficient algorithms, belief propagation and Walksat, are adapted to carry out this task. We present experimental results based on two types of random graphs for different system sizes and identify the critical value of the connectivity for the algorithms to find a perfect solution. The problem and the suggested algorithms have practical relevance since various applications, such as distributed storage, can be mapped onto this problem. PMID:17280022

  13. Using molecular biology to maximize concurrent training.

    PubMed

    Baar, Keith

    2014-11-01

    Very few sports use only endurance or strength. Outside of running long distances on a flat surface and power-lifting, practically all sports require some combination of endurance and strength. Endurance and strength can be developed simultaneously to some degree. However, the development of a high level of endurance seems to prohibit the development or maintenance of muscle mass and strength. This interaction between endurance and strength is called the concurrent training effect. This review specifically defines the concurrent training effect, discusses the potential molecular mechanisms underlying this effect, and proposes strategies to maximize strength and endurance in the high-level athlete. PMID:25355186

  14. Maximizing algebraic connectivity in air transportation networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Peng

    In air transportation networks the robustness of a network regarding node and link failures is a key factor for its design. An experiment based on the real air transportation network is performed to show that the algebraic connectivity is a good measure for network robustness. Three optimization problems of algebraic connectivity maximization are then formulated in order to find the most robust network design under different constraints. The algebraic connectivity maximization problem with flight routes addition or deletion is first formulated. Three methods to optimize and analyze the network algebraic connectivity are proposed. The Modified Greedy Perturbation Algorithm (MGP) provides a sub-optimal solution in a fast iterative manner. The Weighted Tabu Search (WTS) is designed to offer a near optimal solution with longer running time. The relaxed semi-definite programming (SDP) is used to set a performance upper bound and three rounding techniques are discussed to find the feasible solution. The simulation results present the trade-off among the three methods. The case study on two air transportation networks of Virgin America and Southwest Airlines show that the developed methods can be applied in real world large scale networks. The algebraic connectivity maximization problem is extended by adding the leg number constraint, which considers the traveler's tolerance for the total connecting stops. The Binary Semi-Definite Programming (BSDP) with cutting plane method provides the optimal solution. The tabu search and 2-opt search heuristics can find the optimal solution in small scale networks and the near optimal solution in large scale networks. The third algebraic connectivity maximization problem with operating cost constraint is formulated. When the total operating cost budget is given, the number of the edges to be added is not fixed. Each edge weight needs to be calculated instead of being pre-determined. It is illustrated that the edge addition and the

  15. Fibromyalgia syndrome: novel therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Ablin, Jacob N; Häuser, Winfried

    2016-05-01

    Fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) is a chronic disorder characterized by widespread pain and tenderness, accompanied by disturbed sleep, chronic fatigue and multiple additional functional symptoms. FMS continues to pose an unmet need regarding pharmacological treatment and many patients fail to achieve sufficient relief from existing treatments. As FMS is considered to be a condition in which pain amplification occurs within the CNS, therapeutic interventions, both pharmacological and otherwise, have revolved around attempts to influence pain processing in the CNS. In the current review, we present an update on novel targets in the search for effective treatment of FMS. PMID:27296699

  16. Graded Achievement, Tested Achievement, and Validity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brookhart, Susan M.

    2015-01-01

    Twenty-eight studies of grades, over a century, were reviewed using the argument-based approach to validity suggested by Kane as a theoretical framework. The review draws conclusions about the meaning of graded achievement, its relation to tested achievement, and changes in the construct of graded achievement over time. "Graded…

  17. Therapeutic Recreation Practicum Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneegas, Kay

    This manual provides information on the practicum program offered by Moraine Valley Community College (MVCC) for students in its therapeutic recreation program. Sections I and II outline the rationale and goals for providing practical, on-the-job work experiences for therapeutic recreation students. Section III specifies MVCC's responsibilities…

  18. Chicanoizing the Therapeutic Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aron, William S.; And Others

    1974-01-01

    Focusing on the drug addiction problem and its antecedent conditions in a Chicano population, the article examines several therapeutic interventions suggested by these conditions and indicates how they might be incorporated into a drug addiction Therapeutic Community treatment program designed to meet the needs of Chicano drug addicts. (Author/NQ)

  19. Optimizing Population Variability to Maximize Benefit

    PubMed Central

    Izu, Leighton T.; Bányász, Tamás; Chen-Izu, Ye

    2015-01-01

    Variability is inherent in any population, regardless whether the population comprises humans, plants, biological cells, or manufactured parts. Is the variability beneficial, detrimental, or inconsequential? This question is of fundamental importance in manufacturing, agriculture, and bioengineering. This question has no simple categorical answer because research shows that variability in a population can have both beneficial and detrimental effects. Here we ask whether there is a certain level of variability that can maximize benefit to the population as a whole. We answer this question by using a model composed of a population of individuals who independently make binary decisions; individuals vary in making a yes or no decision, and the aggregated effect of these decisions on the population is quantified by a benefit function (e.g. accuracy of the measurement using binary rulers, aggregate income of a town of farmers). Here we show that an optimal variance exists for maximizing the population benefit function; this optimal variance quantifies what is often called the “right mix” of individuals in a population. PMID:26650247

  20. Factors affecting maximal momentary grip strength.

    PubMed

    Martin, S; Neale, G; Elia, M

    1985-03-01

    Maximal voluntary grip strength has been measured in normal adults aged 18-70 years (17 f, 18 m) and compared with other indices of body muscle mass. Grip strength (dominant side) was directly proportional to creatinine excretion (r = 0.81); to forearm muscle area (r = 0.73); to upper arm muscle area (r = 0.71) and to lean body mass (r = 0.65). Grip strength relative to forearm muscle area decreased with age. The study of a subgroup of normal subjects revealed a small but significant postural and circadian effect on grip strength. The effect on maximal voluntary grip strength of sedatives in elderly subjects undergoing routine endoscopy (n = 6), and of acute infections in otherwise healthy individuals (n = 6), severe illness in patients requiring intensive care (n = 6), chronic renal failure (n = 7) and anorexia nervosa (n = 6) has been assessed. Intravenous diazepam and buscopan produced a 50 per cent reduction in grip strength which returned to normal within the next 2-3 h. Acute infections reduced grip strength by a mean of 35 per cent and severe illness in patients in intensive care by 60 per cent. In patients with chronic renal failure grip strength was 80-85 per cent of that predicted from forearm 'muscle area' (P less than 0.05). In anorectic patients the values were appropriate for their forearm muscle area. Nevertheless nutritional rehabilitation of one anorectic patient did not lead to a consistent improvement in grip strength. PMID:3926728

  1. Robust estimation by expectation maximization algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Karl Rudolf

    2013-02-01

    A mixture of normal distributions is assumed for the observations of a linear model. The first component of the mixture represents the measurements without gross errors, while each of the remaining components gives the distribution for an outlier. Missing data are introduced to deliver the information as to which observation belongs to which component. The unknown location parameters and the unknown scale parameter of the linear model are estimated by the EM algorithm, which is iteratively applied. The E (expectation) step of the algorithm determines the expected value of the likelihood function given the observations and the current estimate of the unknown parameters, while the M (maximization) step computes new estimates by maximizing the expectation of the likelihood function. In comparison to Huber's M-estimation, the EM algorithm does not only identify outliers by introducing small weights for large residuals but also estimates the outliers. They can be corrected by the parameters of the linear model freed from the distortions by gross errors. Monte Carlo methods with random variates from the normal distribution then give expectations, variances, covariances and confidence regions for functions of the parameters estimated by taking care of the outliers. The method is demonstrated by the analysis of measurements with gross errors of a laser scanner.

  2. Maximal lactate steady state in Judo

    PubMed Central

    de Azevedo, Paulo Henrique Silva Marques; Pithon-Curi, Tania; Zagatto, Alessandro Moura; Oliveira, João; Perez, Sérgio

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background: the purpose of this study was to verify the validity of respiratory compensation threshold (RCT) measured during a new single judo specific incremental test (JSIT) for aerobic demand evaluation. Methods: to test the validity of the new test, the JSIT was compared with Maximal Lactate Steady State (MLSS), which is the gold standard procedure for aerobic demand measuring. Eight well-trained male competitive judo players (24.3 ± 7.9 years; height of 169.3 ± 6.7cm; fat mass of 12.7 ± 3.9%) performed a maximal incremental specific test for judo to assess the RCT and performed on 30-minute MLSS test, where both tests were performed mimicking the UchiKomi drills. Results: the intensity at RCT measured on JSIT was not significantly different compared to MLSS (p=0.40). In addition, it was observed high and significant correlation between MLSS and RCT (r=0.90, p=0.002), as well as a high agreement. Conclusions: RCT measured during JSIT is a valid procedure to measure the aerobic demand, respecting the ecological validity of Judo. PMID:25332923

  3. Cytokines and therapeutic oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, G; Bidlingmaier, M; Eigler, A; Hacker, U; Endres, S

    1997-12-01

    Therapeutic oligonucleotides - short strands of synthetic nucleic acids - encompass antisense and aptamer oligonucleotides. Antisense oligonucleotides are designed to bind to target RNA by complementary base pairing and to inhibit translation of the target protein. Antisense oligonucleotides enable specific inhibition of cytokine synthesis. In contrast, aptamer oligonucleotides are able to bind directly to specific proteins. This binding depends on the sequence of the oligonucleotide. Aptamer oligonucleotides with CpG motifs can exert strong immunostimulatory effects. Both kinds of therapeutic oligonucleotides - antisense and aptamer oligonucleotides - provide promising tools to modulate immunological functions. Recently, therapeutic oligonucleotides have moved towards clinical application. An antisense oligonucleotide directed against the proinflammatory intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) is currently being tested in clinical trials for therapy of inflammatory disease. Immunostimulatory aptamer oligonucleotides are in preclinical development for immunotherapy. In the present review we summarize the application of therapeutic oligonucleotides to modulate immunological functions. We include technological aspects as well as current therapeutic concepts and clinical studies. PMID:9740353

  4. Enzyme therapeutics for systemic detoxification.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Li, Jie; Lu, Yunfeng

    2015-08-01

    Life relies on numerous biochemical processes working synergistically and correctly. Certain substances disrupt these processes, inducing living organism into an abnormal state termed intoxication. Managing intoxication usually requires interventions, which is referred as detoxification. Decades of development on detoxification reveals the potential of enzymes as ideal therapeutics and antidotes, because their high substrate specificity and catalytic efficiency are essential for clearing intoxicating substances without adverse effects. However, intrinsic shortcomings of enzymes including low stability and high immunogenicity are major hurdles, which could be overcome by delivering enzymes with specially designed nanocarriers. Extensive investigations on protein delivery indicate three types of enzyme-nanocarrier architectures that show more promise than others for systemic detoxification, including liposome-wrapped enzymes, polymer-enzyme conjugates, and polymer-encapsulated enzymes. This review highlights recent advances in these nano-architectures and discusses their applications in systemic detoxifications. Therapeutic potential of various enzymes as well as associated challenges in achieving effective delivery of therapeutic enzymes will also be discussed. PMID:25980935

  5. Therapeutic Strategies Based on Polymeric Microparticles

    PubMed Central

    Vilos, C.; Velasquez, L. A.

    2012-01-01

    The development of the field of materials science, the ability to perform multidisciplinary scientific work, and the need for novel administration technologies that maximize therapeutic effects and minimize adverse reactions to readily available drugs have led to the development of delivery systems based on microencapsulation, which has taken one step closer to the target of personalized medicine. Drug delivery systems based on polymeric microparticles are generating a strong impact on preclinical and clinical drug development and have reached a broad development in different fields supporting a critical role in the near future of medical practice. This paper presents the foundations of polymeric microparticles based on their formulation, mechanisms of drug release and some of their innovative therapeutic strategies to board multiple diseases. PMID:22665988

  6. Reporting therapeutic discourse in a therapeutic community.

    PubMed

    Chapman, G E

    1988-03-01

    Research in nurses' communications has concentrated on nurse to patient interactions. Those few studies which focus on nurse to nurse communications seem to be generated by a pragmatic and normative concern with effective information sharing. In this paper, which describes one aspect of a larger case study of a hospital-based therapeutic community, the description and analysis of nurses' reports flows not from a normative model of professional practice, but rather an exploration of how professional practice is articulated as discourse in nurses' written accounts. Foucault's ideas about therapeutic discourse inform the theoretical framework of the research. Ethnomethodological concerns with the importance of documentary analysis provide the methodological rationale for examining nurses' 24-hour report documents, as official discourse, reflecting therapeutic practice in this setting. A content analysis of nurses' reports, collected over a period of 4 months, demonstrated the importance of domesticity and ordinary everyday activities in nurses' accounts of hospital life. Disruption to the 'life as usual' domesticity in the community seemed to be associated with admission to and discharge from the hospital when interpersonal and interactional changes between patients occur. It is suggested that nurses in general hospital wards and more orthodox psychiatric settings might usefully consider the impact of admissions and discharges on the group of patients they manage, and make this a discursive focus of their work. PMID:3372900

  7. Dispatch Scheduling to Maximize Exoplanet Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Samson; McCrady, Nate; MINERVA

    2016-01-01

    MINERVA is a dedicated exoplanet detection telescope array using radial velocity measurements of nearby stars to detect planets. MINERVA will be a completely robotic facility, with a goal of maximizing the number of exoplanets detected. MINERVA requires a unique application of queue scheduling due to its automated nature and the requirement of high cadence observations. A dispatch scheduling algorithm is employed to create a dynamic and flexible selector of targets to observe, in which stars are chosen by assigning values through a weighting function. I designed and have begun testing a simulation which implements the functions of a dispatch scheduler and records observations based on target selections through the same principles that will be used at the commissioned site. These results will be used in a larger simulation that incorporates weather, planet occurrence statistics, and stellar noise to test the planet detection capabilities of MINERVA. This will be used to heuristically determine an optimal observing strategy for the MINERVA project.

  8. Maximally polarized states for quantum light fields

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez-Soto, Luis L.; Yustas, Eulogio C.; Bjoerk, Gunnar; Klimov, Andrei B.

    2007-10-15

    The degree of polarization of a quantum field can be defined as its distance to an appropriate set of states. When we take unpolarized states as this reference set, the states optimizing this degree for a fixed average number of photons N present a fairly symmetric, parabolic photon statistic, with a variance scaling as N{sup 2}. Although no standard optical process yields such a statistic, we show that, to an excellent approximation, a highly squeezed vacuum can be taken as maximally polarized. We also consider the distance of a field to the set of its SU(2) transformed, finding that certain linear superpositions of SU(2) coherent states make this degree to be unity.

  9. Maximal energy extraction under discrete diffusive exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, M. J.; Schiff, J.; Fisch, N. J.

    2015-10-15

    Waves propagating through a bounded plasma can rearrange the densities of states in the six-dimensional velocity-configuration phase space. Depending on the rearrangement, the wave energy can either increase or decrease, with the difference taken up by the total plasma energy. In the case where the rearrangement is diffusive, only certain plasma states can be reached. It turns out that the set of reachable states through such diffusive rearrangements has been described in very different contexts. Building upon those descriptions, and making use of the fact that the plasma energy is a linear functional of the state densities, the maximal extractable energy under diffusive rearrangement can then be addressed through linear programming.

  10. Mixtures of maximally entangled pure states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, M. M.; Galapon, E. A.

    2016-09-01

    We study the conditions when mixtures of maximally entangled pure states remain entangled. We found that the resulting mixed state remains entangled when the number of entangled pure states to be mixed is less than or equal to the dimension of the pure states. For the latter case of mixing a number of pure states equal to their dimension, we found that the mixed state is entangled provided that the entangled pure states to be mixed are not equally weighted. We also found that one can restrict the set of pure states that one can mix from in order to ensure that the resulting mixed state is genuinely entangled. Also, we demonstrate how these results could be applied as a way to detect entanglement in mixtures of the entangled pure states with noise.

  11. Characterizing maximally singular phase-space distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sperling, J.

    2016-07-01

    Phase-space distributions are widely applied in quantum optics to access the nonclassical features of radiations fields. In particular, the inability to interpret the Glauber-Sudarshan distribution in terms of a classical probability density is the fundamental benchmark for quantum light. However, this phase-space distribution cannot be directly reconstructed for arbitrary states, because of its singular behavior. In this work, we perform a characterization of the Glauber-Sudarshan representation in terms of distribution theory. We address important features of such distributions: (i) the maximal degree of their singularities is studied, (ii) the ambiguity of representation is shown, and (iii) their dual space for nonclassicality tests is specified. In this view, we reconsider the methods for regularizing the Glauber-Sudarshan distribution for verifying its nonclassicality. This treatment is supported with comprehensive examples and counterexamples.

  12. Biomimetic Particles as Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Green, Jordan J.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, there have been major advances in the development of novel nanoparticle and microparticle-based therapeutics. An emerging paradigm is the incorporation of biomimetic features into these synthetic therapeutic constructs to enable them to better interface with biological systems. Through the control of size, shape, and material consistency, particle cores have been generated that better mimic natural cells and viruses. In addition, there have been significant advances in biomimetic surface functionalization of particles through the integration of bio-inspired artificial cell membranes and naturally derived cell membranes. Biomimetic technologies enable therapeutic particles to have increased potency to benefit human health. PMID:26277289

  13. Does Maximizing Information at the Cut Score Always Maximize Classification Accuracy and Consistency?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyse, Adam E.; Babcock, Ben

    2016-01-01

    A common suggestion made in the psychometric literature for fixed-length classification tests is that one should design tests so that they have maximum information at the cut score. Designing tests in this way is believed to maximize the classification accuracy and consistency of the assessment. This article uses simulated examples to illustrate…

  14. From entropy-maximization to equality-maximization: Gauss, Laplace, Pareto, and Subbotin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliazar, Iddo

    2014-12-01

    The entropy-maximization paradigm of statistical physics is well known to generate the omnipresent Gauss law. In this paper we establish an analogous socioeconomic model which maximizes social equality, rather than physical disorder, in the context of the distributions of income and wealth in human societies. We show that-on a logarithmic scale-the Laplace law is the socioeconomic equality-maximizing counterpart of the physical entropy-maximizing Gauss law, and that this law manifests an optimized balance between two opposing forces: (i) the rich and powerful, striving to amass ever more wealth, and thus to increase social inequality; and (ii) the masses, struggling to form more egalitarian societies, and thus to increase social equality. Our results lead from log-Gauss statistics to log-Laplace statistics, yield Paretian power-law tails of income and wealth distributions, and show how the emergence of a middle-class depends on the underlying levels of socioeconomic inequality and variability. Also, in the context of asset-prices with Laplace-distributed returns, our results imply that financial markets generate an optimized balance between risk and predictability.

  15. Therapeutic Dimensions of the Black Aesthetic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toldson, Ivory L.; Pasteur, Alfred B.

    1976-01-01

    The authors of this article see the black aesthetic largely in terms of the affective component. Emotional oneness which is foreign to the white world view is the means by which the black man can achieve optimal mental health and development. The therapeutic implications of the black aesthetic are outlined. (NG)

  16. Engineering antibody therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Mark L; Gilliland, Gary L

    2016-06-01

    The successful introduction of antibody-based protein therapeutics into the arsenal of treatments for patients has within a few decades fostered intense innovation in the production and engineering of antibodies. Reviewed here are the methods currently used to produce antibodies along with how our knowledge of the structural and functional characterization of immunoglobulins has resulted in the engineering of antibodies to produce protein therapeutics with unique properties, both biological and biophysical, that are leading to novel therapeutic approaches. Antibody engineering includes the introduction of the antibody combining site (variable regions) into a host of architectures including bi and multi-specific formats that further impact the therapeutic properties leading to further advantages and successes in patient treatment. PMID:27525816

  17. Mutually Unbiasedness between Maximally Entangled Bases and Unextendible Maximally Entangled Systems in C2⊗ C^{2k}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jun; Nan, Hua; Tao, Yuan-Hong; Fei, Shao-Ming

    2016-02-01

    The mutually unbiasedness between a maximally entangled basis (MEB) and an unextendible maximally entangled system (UMES) in the bipartite system C2⊗ C^{2k} (k>1) are introduced and discussed first in this paper. Then two mutually unbiased pairs of a maximally entangled basis and an unextendible maximally entangled system are constructed; lastly, explicit constructions are obtained for mutually unbiased MEB and UMES in C2⊗ C4 and C2⊗ C8, respectively.

  18. Are therapeutic communities therapeutic for women?

    PubMed Central

    Eliason, Michele J

    2006-01-01

    This paper addresses the growing phenomena of therapeutic community (TC) treatment approaches for women in correctional settings. Although rapidly increasing in number across the country, there is very little empirical research to support the effectiveness of TC treatment for women. Therefore, the literature on the efficacy and effectiveness of TC treatment for women is reviewed in relation to the literature on women's treatment issues. The literature review highlights the gaps where TC treatment ignores or exacerbates issues that are common to addicted women, or uses methods that may be contradictory to women's recovery. PMID:16722560

  19. Task complexity and maximal isometric strength gains through motor learning

    PubMed Central

    McGuire, Jessica; Green, Lara A.; Gabriel, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract This study compared the effects of a simple versus complex contraction pattern on the acquisition, retention, and transfer of maximal isometric strength gains and reductions in force variability. A control group (N = 12) performed simple isometric contractions of the wrist flexors. An experimental group (N = 12) performed complex proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) contractions consisting of maximal isometric wrist extension immediately reversing force direction to wrist flexion within a single trial. Ten contractions were completed on three consecutive days with a retention and transfer test 2‐weeks later. For the retention test, the groups performed their assigned contraction pattern followed by a transfer test that consisted of the other contraction pattern for a cross‐over design. Both groups exhibited comparable increases in strength (20.2%, P < 0.01) and reductions in mean torque variability (26.2%, P < 0.01), which were retained and transferred. There was a decrease in the coactivation ratio (antagonist/agonist muscle activity) for both groups, which was retained and transferred (35.2%, P < 0.01). The experimental group exhibited a linear decrease in variability of the torque‐ and sEMG‐time curves, indicating transfer to the simple contraction pattern (P < 0.01). The control group underwent a decrease in variability of the torque‐ and sEMG‐time curves from the first day of training to retention, but participants returned to baseline levels during the transfer condition (P < 0.01). However, the difference between torque RMS error versus the variability in torque‐ and sEMG‐time curves suggests the demands of the complex task were transferred, but could not be achieved in a reproducible way. PMID:25428951

  20. Targeting reduction of proteinuria in glomerulonephritis: Maximizing the antifibrotic effect of valsartan by protecting podocytes.

    PubMed

    Gu, Chunyan; Zhou, Guangyu; Noble, Nancy A; Border, Wayne A; Cheung, Alfred K; Huang, Yufeng

    2014-06-01

    Although angiotensin (Ang) II blockade has become a standard antifibrotic therapy in kidney disease, the therapeutic efficacy of Ang II blockade is yet to be optimized. Considering the prognostic impact of proteinuria reduction, we hypothesized that titration of Ang II blockade for optimal anti-proteinuric effect would improve renoprotection. One day after induction of Thy 1.1 glomeruonephritis, rats were treated with increasing doses of the Ang II receptor blocker valsartan in drinking water. Six days after disease induction, the therapeutic effect on proteinuria, podocyte injury and glomerular fibrosis was evaluated. Increasing doses of valsartan resulted in increasing reduction of proteinuria. The maximally effective dose of valsartan was determined to be 1000 mg/l, which reduced proteinuria by 80% and maximally reduced glomerular matrix expansion, fibronectin, collagen I and collagen III staining and glomerular mRNAs for TGFß1, PAI-1, FN and collagen I. Notably, valsartan given at this dose prevented podocyte dysfunction by preserving expression of podocin and nephrin and the counter-regulating molecule B7-1 that is involved in podocyte injury. These results support the hypothesis that higher doses of valsartan are required to optimize proteinuria reduction and glomerulosclerosis amelioration. Further, the optimal dose of valsartan also provides an additional therapeutic effect by preventing podocyte dysfunction. PMID:23223090

  1. MAXIMIZING THE FERTILITY POTENTIAL OF TURKEY SEMEN

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Turkeys are the only commercial poultry species completely dependent upon artificial insemination for fertile egg production. Although time and labor-intensive, artificial insemination has proven to be a key strategy for achieving rapid genetic improvements in economically important traits such as g...

  2. Maximizing NGL recovery by refrigeration optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Baldonedo H., A.H.

    1999-07-01

    PDVSA--Petroleo y Gas, S.A. has within its facilities in Lake Maracaibo two plants that extract liquids from natural gas (NGL), They use a combined mechanic refrigeration absorption with natural gasoline. Each of these plants processes 420 MMsccfd with a pressure of 535 psig and 95 F that comes from the compression plants PCTJ-2 and PCTJ-3 respectively. About 40 MMscfd of additional rich gas comes from the high pressure system. Under the present conditions these plants produce in the order of 16,800 and 23,800 b/d of NGL respectively, with a propane recovery percentage of approximately 75%, limited by the capacity of the refrigeration system. To optimize the operation and the design of the refrigeration system and to maximize the NGL recovery, a conceptual study was developed in which the following aspects about the process were evaluated: capacity of the refrigeration system, refrigeration requirements, identification of limitations and evaluation of the system improvements. Based on the results obtained it was concluded that by relocating some condensers, refurbishing the main refrigeration system turbines and using HIGH FLUX piping in the auxiliary refrigeration system of the evaporators, there will be an increase of 85% on the propane recovery, with an additional production of 25,000 b/d of NGL and 15 MMscfd of ethane rich gas.

  3. Maximally Expressive Modeling of Operations Tasks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaap, John; Richardson, Lea; Davis, Elizabeth

    2002-01-01

    Planning and scheduling systems organize "tasks" into a timeline or schedule. The tasks are defined within the scheduling system in logical containers called models. The dictionary might define a model of this type as "a system of things and relations satisfying a set of rules that, when applied to the things and relations, produce certainty about the tasks that are being modeled." One challenging domain for a planning and scheduling system is the operation of on-board experiments for the International Space Station. In these experiments, the equipment used is among the most complex hardware ever developed, the information sought is at the cutting edge of scientific endeavor, and the procedures are intricate and exacting. Scheduling is made more difficult by a scarcity of station resources. The models to be fed into the scheduler must describe both the complexity of the experiments and procedures (to ensure a valid schedule) and the flexibilities of the procedures and the equipment (to effectively utilize available resources). Clearly, scheduling International Space Station experiment operations calls for a "maximally expressive" modeling schema.

  4. Steganalysis feature improvement using expectation maximization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Benjamin M.; Peterson, Gilbert L.; Agaian, Sos S.

    2007-04-01

    Images and data files provide an excellent opportunity for concealing illegal or clandestine material. Currently, there are over 250 different tools which embed data into an image without causing noticeable changes to the image. From a forensics perspective, when a system is confiscated or an image of a system is generated the investigator needs a tool that can scan and accurately identify files suspected of containing malicious information. The identification process is termed the steganalysis problem which focuses on both blind identification, in which only normal images are available for training, and multi-class identification, in which both the clean and stego images at several embedding rates are available for training. In this paper an investigation of a clustering and classification technique (Expectation Maximization with mixture models) is used to determine if a digital image contains hidden information. The steganalysis problem is for both anomaly detection and multi-class detection. The various clusters represent clean images and stego images with between 1% and 10% embedding percentage. Based on the results it is concluded that the EM classification technique is highly suitable for both blind detection and the multi-class problem.

  5. [Therapeutic update in cystic fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Durupt, S; Nove Josserand, R; Durieu, I

    2014-06-01

    We present the recent therapeutic advances in the cystic fibrosis care. It concerns improvements in symptomatic treatment with the development of dry powder inhaled antibiotics that improved quality of life, and innovative treatments namely the modulators of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane protein conductance regulator (CFTR), molecules which act specifically at the level of the defective mechanisms implied in the disease. The life expectancy of cystic fibrosis patients born after 2000, is estimated now to be about 50 years. This improvement of survival was obtained with the organization of the care within the specialized centers for cystic fibrosis (Centre de ressource et de compétences de la mucoviscidose) and remains still based on heavy symptomatic treatments. Dry powder inhaled antibiotics constitute a significant time saving for patients to whom all the care can achieve two hours daily. Since 2012, the modulators of CFTR, molecules allowing a pharmacological approach targeted according to the type of the mutations, allows a more specific approach of the disease. Ivacaftor (Kalydeco(®)) which potentialises the function of the CFTR protein expressed on the cellular surface is now available for patients with the G551D mutation. Lumacaftor is going to be tested in association with ivacaftor in patients with the F508del mutation, that is present in at least 75% of the patients. The ataluren which allows the production of a functional protein CFTR in patients with a no sense mutation is the third representing of this new therapeutic class. We presently have numerous symptomatic treatments for the cystic fibrosis care. The development of CFTR modulators, today available to a restricted number of patients treated with ivacaftor represents a very promising therapeutic avenue. It will represent probably the first step to a personalized treatment according to CFTR genotype. PMID:24309546

  6. Milestones in Parkinson's disease therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Rascol, Olivier; Lozano, Andres; Stern, Matthew; Poewe, Werner

    2011-05-01

    In the mid-1980s, the treatment of Parkinson's disease was quite exclusively centered on dopatherapy and was focusing on dopamine systems and motor symptoms. A few dopamine agonists and a monoamine oxidase B inhibitor (selegiline) were used as adjuncts in advanced Parkinson's disease. In the early 2010s, levodopa remains the gold standard. New insights into the organization of the basal ganglia paved the way for deep brain stimulation, especially of the subthalamic nucleus, providing spectacular improvement of drug-refractory levodopa-induced motor complications. Novel dopamine agonists (pramipexole, ropinirole, rotigotine), catecholmethyltransferase inhibitors (entacapone), and monoamine oxidase B inhibitors (rasagiline) have also been developed to provide more continuous oral delivery of dopaminergic stimulation in order to improve motor outcomes. Using dopamine agonists early, before levodopa, proved to delay the onset of dyskinesia, although this is achieved at the price of potentially disabling daytime somnolence or impulse control disorders. The demonstration of an antidyskinetic effect of the glutamate antagonist amantadine opened the door for novel nondopaminergic approaches of Parkinson's disease therapy. More recently, nonmotor symptoms (depression, dementia, and psychosis) have been the focus of the first randomized controlled trials in this field. Despite therapeutic advances, Parkinson's disease continues to be a relentlessly progressive disorder leading to severe disability. Neuroprotective interventions able to modify the progression of Parkinson's disease have stood out as a failed therapeutic goal over the last 2 decades, despite potentially encouraging results with compounds like rasagiline. Newer molecular targets, new animal models, novel clinical trial designs, and biomarkers to assess disease modification have created hope for future therapeutic interventions. PMID:21626552

  7. Glacier Surface Monitoring by Maximizing Mutual Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erten, E.; Rossi, C.; Hajnsek, I.

    2012-07-01

    The contribution of Polarimetric Synthetic Aperture Radar (PolSAR) images compared with the single-channel SAR in terms of temporal scene characterization has been found and described to add valuable information in the literature. However, despite a number of recent studies focusing on single polarized glacier monitoring, the potential of polarimetry to estimate the surface velocity of glaciers has not been explored due to the complex mechanism of polarization through glacier/snow. In this paper, a new approach to the problem of monitoring glacier surface velocity is proposed by means of temporal PolSAR images, using a basic concept from information theory: Mutual Information (MI). The proposed polarimetric tracking method applies the MI to measure the statistical dependence between temporal polarimetric images, which is assumed to be maximal if the images are geometrically aligned. Since the proposed polarimetric tracking method is very powerful and general, it can be implemented into any kind of multivariate remote sensing data such as multi-spectral optical and single-channel SAR images. The proposed polarimetric tracking is then used to retrieve surface velocity of Aletsch glacier located in Switzerland and of Inyltshik glacier in Kyrgyzstan with two different SAR sensors; Envisat C-band (single polarized) and DLR airborne L-band (fully polarimetric) systems, respectively. The effect of number of channel (polarimetry) into tracking investigations demonstrated that the presence of snow, as expected, effects the location of the phase center in different polarization, such as glacier tracking with temporal HH compared to temporal VV channels. Shortly, a change in polarimetric signature of the scatterer can change the phase center, causing a question of how much of what I am observing is motion then penetration. In this paper, it is shown that considering the multi-channel SAR statistics, it is possible to optimize the separate these contributions.

  8. Rare flavor processes in Maximally Natural Supersymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, Isabel García; March-Russell, John

    2015-01-01

    We study CP-conserving rare flavor violating processes in the recently proposed theory of Maximally Natural Supersymmetry (MNSUSY). MNSUSY is an unusual supersymmetric (SUSY) extension of the Standard Model (SM) which, remarkably, is untuned at present LHC limits. It employs Scherk-Schwarz breaking of SUSY by boundary conditions upon compactifying an underlying 5-dimensional (5D) theory down to 4D, and is not well-described by softly-broken SUSY, with much different phenomenology than the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) and its variants. The usual CP-conserving SUSY-flavor problem is automatically solved in MNSUSY due to a residual almost exact U(1) R symmetry, naturally heavy and highly degenerate 1st- and 2nd-generation sfermions, and heavy gauginos and Higgsinos. Depending on the exact implementation of MNSUSY there exist important new sources of flavor violation involving gauge boson Kaluza-Klein (KK) excitations. The spatial localization properties of the matter multiplets, in particular the brane localization of the 3rd generation states, imply KK-parity is broken and tree-level contributions to flavor changing neutral currents are present in general. Nevertheless, we show that simple variants of the basic MNSUSY model are safe from present flavor constraints arising from kaon and B-meson oscillations, the rare decays B s, d → μ + μ -, μ → ēee and μ- e conversion in nuclei. We also briefly discuss some special features of the radiative decays μ → eγ and . Future experiments, especially those concerned with lepton flavor violation, should see deviations from SM predictions unless one of the MNSUSY variants with enhanced flavor symmetries is realized.

  9. Expectation maximization applied to GMTI convoy tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Wolfgang

    2002-08-01

    Collectively moving ground targets are typical of a military ground situation and have to be treated as separate aggregated entities. For a long-range ground surveillance application with airborne GMTI radar we inparticular address the task of track maintenance for ground moving convoys consisting of a small number of individual vehicles. In the proposed approach the identity of the individual vehicles within the convoy is no longer stressed. Their kinematical state vectors are rather treated as internal degrees of freedom characterizing the convoy, which is considered as a collective unit. In this context, the Expectation Maximization technique (EM), originally developed for incomplete data problems in statistical inference and first applied to tracking applications by STREIT et al. seems to be a promising approach. We suggest to embed the EM algorithm into a more traditional Bayesian tracking framework for dealing with false or unwanted sensor returns. The proposed distinction between external and internal data association conflicts (i.e. those among the convoy vehicles) should also enable the application of sequential track extraction techniques introduced by Van Keuk for aircraft formations, providing estimates of the number of the individual convoy vehicles involved. Even with sophisticated signal processing methods (STAP: Space-Time Adaptive Processing), ground moving vehicles can well be masked by the sensor specific clutter notch (Doppler blinding). This physical phenomenon results in interfering fading effects, which can well last over a longer series of sensor updates and therefore will seriously affect the track quality unless properly handled. Moreover, for ground moving convoys the phenomenon of Doppler blindness often superposes the effects induced by the finite resolution capability of the sensor. In many practical cases a separate modeling of resolution phenomena for convoy targets can therefore be omitted, provided the GMTI detection model is used

  10. Maximal exercise performance after adaptation to microgravity.

    PubMed

    Levine, B D; Lane, L D; Watenpaugh, D E; Gaffney, F A; Buckey, J C; Blomqvist, C G

    1996-08-01

    The cardiovascular system appears to adapt well to microgravity but is compromised on reestablishment of gravitational forces leading to orthostatic intolerance and a reduction in work capacity. However, maximal systemic oxygen uptake (Vo2) and transport, which may be viewed as a measure of the functional integrity of the cardiovascular system and its regulatory mechanisms, has not been systematically measured in space or immediately after return to Earth after spaceflight. We studied six astronauts (4 men and 2 women, age 35-50 yr) before, during, and immediately after 9 or 14 days of microgravity on two Spacelab Life Sciences flights (SLS-1 and SLS-2). Peak Vo2 (Vo2peak) was measured with an incremental protocol on a cycle ergometer after prolonged submaximal exercise at 30 and 60% of Vo2peak. We measured gas fractions by mass spectrometer and ventilation via turbine flowmeter for the calculation of breath-by-breath Vo2, heart rate via electrocardiogram, and cardiac output (Qc) via carbon dioxide rebreathing. Peak power and Vo2 were well maintained during spaceflight and not significantly different compared with 2 wk preflight. Vo2peak was reduced by 22% immediately postflight (P < 0.05), entirely because of a decrease in peak stroke volume and Qc. Peak heart rate, blood pressure, and systemic arteriovenous oxygen difference were unchanged. We conclude that systemic Vo2peak is well maintained in the absence of gravity for 9-14 days but is significantly reduced immediately on return to Earth, most likely because of reduced intravascular blood volume, stroke volume, and Qc. PMID:8872635

  11. Therapeutic Antioxidant Medical Gas

    PubMed Central

    Nakao, Atsunori; Sugimoto, Ryujiro; Billiar, Timothy R; McCurry, Kenneth R

    2009-01-01

    Medical gases are pharmaceutical gaseous molecules which offer solutions to medical needs and include traditional gases, such as oxygen and nitrous oxide, as well as gases with recently discovered roles as biological messenger molecules, such as carbon monoxide, nitric oxide and hydrogen sulphide. Medical gas therapy is a relatively unexplored field of medicine; however, a recent increasing in the number of publications on medical gas therapies clearly indicate that there are significant opportunities for use of gases as therapeutic tools for a variety of disease conditions. In this article, we review the recent advances in research on medical gases with antioxidant properties and discuss their clinical applications and therapeutic properties. PMID:19177183

  12. Therapeutics for cognitive aging

    PubMed Central

    Shineman, Diana W.; Salthouse, Timothy A.; Launer, Lenore J.; Hof, Patrick R.; Bartzokis, George; Kleiman, Robin; Luine, Victoria; Buccafusco, Jerry J.; Small, Gary W.; Aisen, Paul S.; Lowe, David A.; Fillit, Howard M.

    2011-01-01

    This review summarizes the scientific talks presented at the conference “Therapeutics for Cognitive Aging,” hosted by the New York Academy of Sciences and the Alzheimer’s Drug Discovery Foundation on May 15, 2009. Attended by scientists from industry and academia, as well as by a number of lay people—approximately 200 in all—the conference specifically tackled the many aspects of developing therapeutic interventions for cognitive impairment. Discussion also focused on how to define cognitive aging and whether it should be considered a treatable, tractable disease. PMID:20392284

  13. Advances in Therapeutic Cholangioscopy

    PubMed Central

    Moura, Renata Nobre; de Moura, Eduardo Guimarães Hourneaux

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, cholangioscopy is an established modality in diagnostic and treatment of pancreaticobiliary diseases. The more widespread use and the recent development of new technologies and accessories had renewed the interest of endoscopic visualization of the biliary tract, increasing the range of indications and therapeutic procedures, such as diagnostic of indeterminate biliary strictures, lithotripsy of difficult bile duct stones, ablative techniques for intraductal malignancies, removal of foreign bodies and gallbladder drainage. These endoscopic interventions will probably be the last frontier in the near future. This paper presents the new advances in therapeutic cholangioscopy, focusing on the current clinical applications and on research areas. PMID:27403156

  14. DELIVERY OF THERAPEUTIC PROTEINS

    PubMed Central

    Pisal, Dipak S.; Kosloski, Matthew P.; Balu-Iyer, Sathy V.

    2009-01-01

    The safety and efficacy of protein therapeutics are limited by three interrelated pharmaceutical issues, in vitro and in vivo instability, immunogenicity and shorter half-lives. Novel drug modifications for overcoming these issues are under investigation and include covalent attachment of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), polysialic acid, or glycolic acid, as well as developing new formulations containing nanoparticulate or colloidal systems (e.g. liposomes, polymeric microspheres, polymeric nanoparticles). Such strategies have the potential to develop as next generation protein therapeutics. This review includes a general discussion on these delivery approaches. PMID:20049941

  15. Therapeutic directions for Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Shoulson, Ira

    2010-01-01

    The focus on disease-modifying treatments and cures for Parkinson's disease (PD) has raised expectations for quantum leaps and overshadowed incremental gains that have been slowly achieved. Large multi-center clinical trials such as DATATOP and PRECEPT keep on generating new knowledge that is relevant to clinical care as well as experimental therapeutics. The largely unforeseen relationship between circulating uric acid and the occurrence and progression of PD was developed and confirmed in these clinical trials. Systematic follow-up of clinical trial cohorts after conclusion of the interventional phase provides added value that continues to inform about natural history, state and trait biomarkers, and genotype-phenotype relationships. These efforts are enhanced by data mining, public reporting, and timely sharing of data and biological samples. PMID:20187232

  16. Maximizing the safety of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug use for postoperative dental pain: an evidence-based approach.

    PubMed Central

    Ong, K. S.; Seymour, R. A.

    2003-01-01

    This article reviews the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for postoperative dental pain. An evidence-based approach is used to evaluate the clinical studies to date on the safe use of these drugs in dental patients. No drugs are without adverse effects or are perfectly safe, but their safe use in clinical practice would entail maximizing the therapeutic efficacy and minimizing the adverse effects. Therapeutic recommendations are made after reviewing the evidence for the safe use of NSAIDs in postoperative dental pain. PMID:12866802

  17. Antibody Therapeutics in Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Wold, Erik D; Smider, Vaughn V; Felding, Brunhilde H

    2016-01-01

    One of the newer classes of targeted cancer therapeutics is monoclonal antibodies. Monoclonal antibody therapeutics are a successful and rapidly expanding drug class due to their high specificity, activity, favourable pharmacokinetics, and standardized manufacturing processes. Antibodies are capable of recruiting the immune system to attack cancer cells through complement-dependent cytotoxicity or antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity. In an ideal scenario the initial tumor cell destruction induced by administration of a therapeutic antibody can result in uptake of tumor associated antigens by antigen-presenting cells, establishing a prolonged memory effect. Mechanisms of direct tumor cell killing by antibodies include antibody recognition of cell surface bound enzymes to neutralize enzyme activity and signaling, or induction of receptor agonist or antagonist activity. Both approaches result in cellular apoptosis. In another and very direct approach, antibodies are used to deliver drugs to target cells and cause cell death. Such antibody drug conjugates (ADCs) direct cytotoxic compounds to tumor cells, after selective binding to cell surface antigens, internalization, and intracellular drug release. Efficacy and safety of ADCs for cancer therapy has recently been greatly advanced based on innovative approaches for site-specific drug conjugation to the antibody structure. This technology enabled rational optimization of function and pharmacokinetics of the resulting conjugates, and is now beginning to yield therapeutics with defined, uniform molecular characteristics, and unprecedented promise to advance cancer treatment. PMID:27081677

  18. Therapeutic Recombinant Monoclonal Antibodies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakhtiar, Ray

    2012-01-01

    During the last two decades, the rapid growth of biotechnology-derived techniques has led to a myriad of therapeutic recombinant monoclonal antibodies with significant clinical benefits. Recombinant monoclonal antibodies can be obtained from a number of natural sources such as animal cell cultures using recombinant DNA engineering. In contrast to…

  19. Blood detection in wireless capsule endoscopy using expectation maximization clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Sae; Oh, JungHwan; Cox, Jay; Tang, Shou Jiang; Tibbals, Harry F.

    2006-03-01

    Wireless Capsule Endoscopy (WCE) is a relatively new technology (FDA approved in 2002) allowing doctors to view most of the small intestine. Other endoscopies such as colonoscopy, upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, push enteroscopy, and intraoperative enteroscopy could be used to visualize up to the stomach, duodenum, colon, and terminal ileum, but there existed no method to view most of the small intestine without surgery. With the miniaturization of wireless and camera technologies came the ability to view the entire gestational track with little effort. A tiny disposable video capsule is swallowed, transmitting two images per second to a small data receiver worn by the patient on a belt. During an approximately 8-hour course, over 55,000 images are recorded to a worn device and then downloaded to a computer for later examination. Typically, a medical clinician spends more than two hours to analyze a WCE video. Research has been attempted to automatically find abnormal regions (especially bleeding) to reduce the time needed to analyze the videos. The manufacturers also provide the software tool to detect the bleeding called Suspected Blood Indicator (SBI), but its accuracy is not high enough to replace human examination. It was reported that the sensitivity and the specificity of SBI were about 72% and 85%, respectively. To address this problem, we propose a technique to detect the bleeding regions automatically utilizing the Expectation Maximization (EM) clustering algorithm. Our experimental results indicate that the proposed bleeding detection method achieves 92% and 98% of sensitivity and specificity, respectively.

  20. Maximizing the biochemical resolving power of fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Alessandro; Popleteeva, Marina; Venkitaraman, Ashok R

    2013-01-01

    Most recent advances in fluorescence microscopy have focused on achieving spatial resolutions below the diffraction limit. However, the inherent capability of fluorescence microscopy to non-invasively resolve different biochemical or physical environments in biological samples has not yet been formally described, because an adequate and general theoretical framework is lacking. Here, we develop a mathematical characterization of the biochemical resolution in fluorescence detection with Fisher information analysis. To improve the precision and the resolution of quantitative imaging methods, we demonstrate strategies for the optimization of fluorescence lifetime, fluorescence anisotropy and hyperspectral detection, as well as different multi-dimensional techniques. We describe optimized imaging protocols, provide optimization algorithms and describe precision and resolving power in biochemical imaging thanks to the analysis of the general properties of Fisher information in fluorescence detection. These strategies enable the optimal use of the information content available within the limited photon-budget typically available in fluorescence microscopy. This theoretical foundation leads to a generalized strategy for the optimization of multi-dimensional optical detection, and demonstrates how the parallel detection of all properties of fluorescence can maximize the biochemical resolving power of fluorescence microscopy, an approach we term Hyper Dimensional Imaging Microscopy (HDIM). Our work provides a theoretical framework for the description of the biochemical resolution in fluorescence microscopy, irrespective of spatial resolution, and for the development of a new class of microscopes that exploit multi-parametric detection systems. PMID:24204821

  1. Moderate intra-group bias maximizes cooperation on interdependent populations.

    PubMed

    Tang, Changbing; Wang, Zhen; Li, Xiang

    2014-01-01

    Evolutionary game theory on spatial structures has received increasing attention during the past decades. However, the majority of these achievements focuses on single and static population structures, which is not fully consistent with the fact that real structures are composed of many interactive groups. These groups are interdependent on each other and present dynamical features, in which individuals mimic the strategy of neighbors and switch their partnerships continually. It is however unclear how the dynamical and interdependent interactions among groups affect the evolution of collective behaviors. In this work, we employ the prisoner's dilemma game to investigate how the dynamics of structure influences cooperation on interdependent populations, where populations are represented by group structures. It is found that the more robust the links between cooperators (or the more fragile the links between cooperators and defectors), the more prevalent of cooperation. Furthermore, theoretical analysis shows that the intra-group bias can favor cooperation, which is only possible when individuals are likely to attach neighbors within the same group. Yet, interestingly, cooperation can be even inhibited for large intra-group bias, allowing the moderate intra-group bias maximizes the cooperation level. PMID:24533084

  2. Maximizing the Biochemical Resolving Power of Fluorescence Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Esposito, Alessandro; Popleteeva, Marina; Venkitaraman, Ashok R.

    2013-01-01

    Most recent advances in fluorescence microscopy have focused on achieving spatial resolutions below the diffraction limit. However, the inherent capability of fluorescence microscopy to non-invasively resolve different biochemical or physical environments in biological samples has not yet been formally described, because an adequate and general theoretical framework is lacking. Here, we develop a mathematical characterization of the biochemical resolution in fluorescence detection with Fisher information analysis. To improve the precision and the resolution of quantitative imaging methods, we demonstrate strategies for the optimization of fluorescence lifetime, fluorescence anisotropy and hyperspectral detection, as well as different multi-dimensional techniques. We describe optimized imaging protocols, provide optimization algorithms and describe precision and resolving power in biochemical imaging thanks to the analysis of the general properties of Fisher information in fluorescence detection. These strategies enable the optimal use of the information content available within the limited photon-budget typically available in fluorescence microscopy. This theoretical foundation leads to a generalized strategy for the optimization of multi-dimensional optical detection, and demonstrates how the parallel detection of all properties of fluorescence can maximize the biochemical resolving power of fluorescence microscopy, an approach we term Hyper Dimensional Imaging Microscopy (HDIM). Our work provides a theoretical framework for the description of the biochemical resolution in fluorescence microscopy, irrespective of spatial resolution, and for the development of a new class of microscopes that exploit multi-parametric detection systems. PMID:24204821

  3. Moderate Intra-Group Bias Maximizes Cooperation on Interdependent Populations

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Changbing; Wang, Zhen; Li, Xiang

    2014-01-01

    Evolutionary game theory on spatial structures has received increasing attention during the past decades. However, the majority of these achievements focuses on single and static population structures, which is not fully consistent with the fact that real structures are composed of many interactive groups. These groups are interdependent on each other and present dynamical features, in which individuals mimic the strategy of neighbors and switch their partnerships continually. It is however unclear how the dynamical and interdependent interactions among groups affect the evolution of collective behaviors. In this work, we employ the prisoner's dilemma game to investigate how the dynamics of structure influences cooperation on interdependent populations, where populations are represented by group structures. It is found that the more robust the links between cooperators (or the more fragile the links between cooperators and defectors), the more prevalent of cooperation. Furthermore, theoretical analysis shows that the intra-group bias can favor cooperation, which is only possible when individuals are likely to attach neighbors within the same group. Yet, interestingly, cooperation can be even inhibited for large intra-group bias, allowing the moderate intra-group bias maximizes the cooperation level. PMID:24533084

  4. Maximizing the rigidity of a large planar orifice air bearing.

    PubMed

    Mullen, Michael; Broadhurst, John

    2014-08-01

    A rotating support for a large astronomical mirror has been implemented using an opposed surface planar orifice air bearing. This bearing needs to provide rotation as free as possible of static and dynamic friction, as well as maximizing the resistance to sudden angular deviations produced by wind gusts. Information on the design of traditional bearings, namely, a cavity supplied with air under pressure through an orifice or diffuser flow restriction and closed by the moving member, has been published in detail. These traditional bearings are not suitable for the application described, due to their slow speed of response to transient changes in forces, a considerable volume of air being needed to change the pressure in the cavity. The air bearing used in this application has no cavity but consists of two flat surfaces in close proximity with air under pressure introduced at the center of one of the surfaces. The volume of air in the bearing is therefore minimized, improving the response to load change transients. The load capacity of this type bearing is reduced as the air between the bearing surfaces is not at constant pressure, but is expanding from the center point of injection to its escape at the edges. This paper indicates a quantitative method of determining the size of the air supply orifices to achieve the maximum rigidity orthogonal to the direction of motion. The approach described can also be applied to optimizing the geometry of other non-cavity air bearings. PMID:25173317

  5. Who are maximizers? Future oriented and highly numerate individuals.

    PubMed

    Misuraca, Raffaella; Teuscher, Ursina; Carmeci, Floriana Antonella

    2016-08-01

    Two studies investigated cognitive mechanisms that may be associated with people's tendency to maximize. Maximizers are individuals who are spending a great amount of effort in order to find the very best option in a decision situation, rather than stopping the decision process when they encounter a satisfying option. These studies show that maximizers are more future oriented than other people, which may motivate them to invest the extra energy into optimal choices. Maximizers also have higher numerical skills, possibly facilitating the cognitive processes involved with decision trade-offs. PMID:25960435

  6. Explanatory Variance in Maximal Oxygen Uptake

    PubMed Central

    Robert McComb, Jacalyn J.; Roh, Daesung; Williams, James S.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a prediction equation that could be used to estimate maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) from a submaximal water running protocol. Thirty-two volunteers (n =19 males, n = 13 females), ages 18 - 24 years, underwent the following testing procedures: (a) a 7-site skin fold assessment; (b) a land VO2max running treadmill test; and (c) a 6 min water running test. For the water running submaximal protocol, the participants were fitted with an Aqua Jogger Classic Uni-Sex Belt and a Polar Heart Rate Monitor; the participants’ head, shoulders, hips and feet were vertically aligned, using a modified running/bicycle motion. A regression model was used to predict VO2max. The criterion variable, VO2max, was measured using open-circuit calorimetry utilizing the Bruce Treadmill Protocol. Predictor variables included in the model were percent body fat (% BF), height, weight, gender, and heart rate following a 6 min water running protocol. Percent body fat accounted for 76% (r = -0.87, SEE = 3.27) of the variance in VO2max. No other variables significantly contributed to the explained variance in VO2max. The equation for the estimation of VO2max is as follows: VO2max ml.kg-1·min-1 = 56.14 - 0.92 (% BF). Key Points Body Fat is an important predictor of VO2 max. Individuals with low skill level in water running may shorten their stride length to avoid the onset of fatigue at higher work-loads, therefore, the net oxygen cost of the exercise cannot be controlled in inexperienced individuals in water running at fatiguing workloads. Experiments using water running protocols to predict VO2max should use individuals trained in the mechanics of water running. A submaximal water running protocol is needed in the research literature for individuals trained in the mechanics of water running, given the popularity of water running rehabilitative exercise programs and training programs. PMID:24260003

  7. Dietary nitrate reduces maximal oxygen consumption while maintaining work performance in maximal exercise.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Filip J; Weitzberg, Eddie; Lundberg, Jon O; Ekblom, Björn

    2010-01-15

    The anion nitrate-abundant in our diet-has recently emerged as a major pool of nitric oxide (NO) synthase-independent NO production. Nitrate is reduced stepwise in vivo to nitrite and then NO and possibly other bioactive nitrogen oxides. This reductive pathway is enhanced during low oxygen tension and acidosis. A recent study shows a reduction in oxygen consumption during submaximal exercise attributable to dietary nitrate. We went on to study the effects of dietary nitrate on various physiological and biochemical parameters during maximal exercise. Nine healthy, nonsmoking volunteers (age 30+/-2.3 years, VO(2max) 3.72+/-0.33 L/min) participated in this study, which had a randomized, double-blind crossover design. Subjects received dietary supplementation with sodium nitrate (0.1 mmol/kg/day) or placebo (NaCl) for 2 days before the test. This dose corresponds to the amount found in 100-300 g of a nitrate-rich vegetable such as spinach or beetroot. The maximal exercise tests consisted of an incremental exercise to exhaustion with combined arm and leg cranking on two separate ergometers. Dietary nitrate reduced VO(2max) from 3.72+/-0.33 to 3.62+/-0.31 L/min, P<0.05. Despite the reduction in VO(2max) the time to exhaustion trended to an increase after nitrate supplementation (524+/-31 vs 563+/-30 s, P=0.13). There was a correlation between the change in time to exhaustion and the change in VO(2max) (R(2)=0.47, P=0.04). A moderate dietary dose of nitrate significantly reduces VO(2max) during maximal exercise using a large active muscle mass. This reduction occurred with a trend toward increased time to exhaustion implying that two separate mechanisms are involved: one that reduces VO(2max) and another that improves the energetic function of the working muscles. PMID:19913611

  8. Therapeutic Angiogenesis in Critical Limb Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Ouma, Geoffrey O.; Zafrir, Barak; Mohler, Emile R.; Flugelman, Moshe Y.

    2013-01-01

    Critical limb ischemia (CLI) is a severe form of peripheral artery disease associated with high morbidity and mortality. The primary therapeutic goals in treating CLI are to reduce the risk of adverse cardiovascular events, relieve ischemic pain, heal ulcers, prevent major amputation, and improve quality of life (QoL) and survival. These goals may be achieved by medical therapy, endovascular intervention, open surgery, or amputation and require a multidisciplinary approach including pain management, wound care, risk factors reduction, and treatment of comorbidities. No-option patients are potential candidates for the novel angiogenic therapies. The application of genetic, molecular, and cellular-based modalities, the so-called therapeutic angiogenesis, in the treatment of arterial obstructive diseases has not shown consistent efficacy. This article summarizes the current status related to the management of patients with CLI and discusses the current findings of the emerging modalities for therapeutic angiogenesis. PMID:23129733

  9. Comparing Science Achievement Constructs: Targeted and Achieved

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrara, Steve; Duncan, Teresa

    2011-01-01

    This article illustrates how test specifications based solely on academic content standards, without attention to other cognitive skills and item response demands, can fall short of their targeted constructs. First, the authors inductively describe the science achievement construct represented by a statewide sixth-grade science proficiency test.…

  10. Varieties of Achievement Motivation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kukla, Andre; Scher, Hal

    1986-01-01

    A recent article by Nicholls on achievement motivation is criticized on three points: (1) definitions of achievement motives are ambiguous; (2) behavioral consequences predicted do not follow from explicit theoretical assumptions; and (3) Nicholls's account of the relation between his theory and other achievement theories is factually incorrect.…

  11. Motivation and School Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maehr, Martin L.; Archer, Jennifer

    Addressing the question, "What can be done to promote school achievement?", this paper summarizes the literature on motivation relating to classroom achievement and school effectiveness. Particular attention is given to how values, ideology, and various cultural patterns impinge on classroom performance and serve to enhance motivation to achieve.…

  12. Mobility and Reading Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waters, Theresa Z.

    A study examined the effect of geographic mobility on elementary school students' achievement. Although such mobility, which requires students to make multiple moves among schools, can have a negative impact on academic achievement, the hypothesis for the study was that it was not a determining factor in reading achievement test scores. Subjects…

  13. PASS and Reading Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirby, John R.

    Two studies examined the effectiveness of the PASS (Planning, Attention, Simultaneous, and Successive cognitive processes) theory of intelligence in predicting reading achievement scores of normally achieving children and distinguishing children with reading disabilities from normally achieving children. The first study dealt with predicting…

  14. How many manoeuvres should be done to measure maximal inspiratory mouth pressure in patients with chronic airflow obstruction?

    PubMed Central

    Fiz, J A; Montserrat, J M; Picado, C; Plaza, V; Agusti-Vidal, A

    1989-01-01

    To determine the number of maximal mouth pressure manoeuvres needed to obtain a reproducible value of maximal inspiratory mouth pressure (MIP), we studied 44 patients with chronic airflow obstruction, with a mean (SD) % predicted FEV1 value of 53.9 (25), who were clinically stable. Maximal inspiratory mouth pressure was determined with an anaeroid manometer during maximal inspiratory efforts in a quasi static condition at residual volume. All patients performed 20 consecutive maximal inspiratory mouth manoeuvres, each one separated by 30-40 seconds. The mean (SD) values of MIP varied from 71.5 (25.5) cm H2O at the first measurement to 80.1 (27) cm H2O at the last measurement. Maximal values of MIP were usually achieved after nine determinations. It is concluded that to obtain a reproducible MIP value in patients with chronic airflow obstruction who are untrained and unexperienced in such manoeuvres a minimum of nine technically acceptable maximal mouth pressure manoeuvres should be performed. PMID:2763242

  15. Evaluation of anti-hyperglycemic effect of Actinidia kolomikta (Maxim. etRur.) Maxim. root extract.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xuansheng; Cheng, Delin; Wang, Linbo; Li, Shuhong; Wang, Yuepeng; Li, Kejuan; Yang, Yingnan; Zhang, Zhenya

    2015-05-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the anti-hyperglycemic effect of ethanol extract from Actinidia kolomikta (Maxim. etRur.) Maxim. root (AKE).An in vitro evaluation was performed by using rat intestinal α-glucosidase (maltase and sucrase), the key enzymes linked with type 2 diabetes. And an in vivo evaluation was also performed by loading maltose, sucrose, glucose to normal rats. As a result, AKE showed concentration-dependent inhibition effects on rat intestinal maltase and rat intestinal sucrase with IC(50) values of 1.83 and 1.03mg/mL, respectively. In normal rats, after loaded with maltose, sucrose and glucose, administration of AKE significantly reduced postprandial hyperglycemia, which is similar to acarbose used as an anti-diabetic drug. High contents of total phenolics (80.49 ± 0.05mg GAE/g extract) and total flavonoids (430.69 ± 0.91mg RE/g extract) were detected in AKE. In conclusion, AKE possessed anti-hyperglycemic effects and the possible mechanisms were associated with its inhibition on α-glucosidase and the improvement on insulin release and/or insulin sensitivity as well. The anti-hyperglycemic activity possessed by AKE maybe attributable to its high contents of phenolic and flavonoid compounds. PMID:26051735

  16. D2-brane Chern-Simons theories: F -maximization = a-maximization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fluder, Martin; Sparks, James

    2016-01-01

    We study a system of N D2-branes probing a generic Calabi-Yau three-fold singularity in the presence of a non-zero quantized Romans mass n. We argue that the low-energy effective c N=2 Chern-Simons quiver gauge theory flows to a superconformal fixed point in the IR, and construct the dual AdS4 solution in massive IIA supergravity. We compute the free energy F of the gauge theory on S 3 using localization. In the large N limit we find F = c ( nN )1/3 a 2/3, where c is a universal constant and a is the a-function of the "parent" four-dimensional N=1 theory on N D3-branes probing the same Calabi-Yau singularity. It follows that maximizing F over the space of admissible R-symmetries is equivalent to maximizing a for this class of theories. Moreover, we show that the gauge theory result precisely matches the holographic free energy of the supergravity solution, and provide a similar matching of the VEV of a BPS Wilson loop operator.

  17. Maximal and sub-maximal functional lifting performance at different platform heights.

    PubMed

    Savage, Robert J; Jaffrey, Mark A; Billing, Daniel C; Ham, Daniel J

    2015-01-01

    Introducing valid physical employment tests requires identifying and developing a small number of practical tests that provide broad coverage of physical performance across the full range of job tasks. This study investigated discrete lifting performance across various platform heights reflective of common military lifting tasks. Sixteen Australian Army personnel performed a discrete lifting assessment to maximal lifting capacity (MLC) and maximal acceptable weight of lift (MAWL) at four platform heights between 1.30 and 1.70 m. There were strong correlations between platform height and normalised lifting performance for MLC (R(2) = 0.76 ± 0.18, p < 0.05) and MAWL (R(2) = 0.73 ± 0.21, p < 0.05). The developed relationship allowed prediction of lifting capacity at one platform height based on lifting capacity at any of the three other heights, with a standard error of < 4.5 kg and < 2.0 kg for MLC and MAWL, respectively. PMID:25420678

  18. Anaerobic capacity: a maximal anaerobic running test versus the maximal accumulated oxygen deficit.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, N S; Nimmo, M A

    1996-02-01

    The present investigation evaluates a maximal anaerobic running test (MART) against the maximal accumulated oxygen deficit (MAOD) for the determination of anaerobic capacity. Essentially, this involved comparing 18 male students performing two randomly assigned supramaximal runs to exhaustion on separate days. Post warm-up and 1, 3, and 6 min postexercise capillary blood samples were taken during both tests for plasma blood lactate (BLa) determination. In the MART only, blood ammonia (BNH3) concentration was measured, while capillary blood samples were additionally taken after every second sprint for BLa determination. Anaerobic capacity, measured as oxygen equivalents in the MART protocol, averaged 112.2 +/- 5.2 ml.kg-1.min-1. Oxygen deficit, representing the anaerobic capacity in the MAOD test, was an average of 74.6 +/- 7.3 ml.kg-1. There was a significant correlation between the MART and MAOD (r = .83, p < .001). BLa values obtained over time in the two tests showed no significant difference, nor was there any difference in the peak BLa recorded. Peak BNH3 concentration recorded was significantly increased from resting levels at exhaustion during the MART. PMID:8664845

  19. Know how to maximize maintenance spending

    SciTech Connect

    Carrino, A.J.; Jones, R.B.; Platt, W.E.; Tiffany, E.D.

    2009-07-15

    Solomon has developed a methodology to determine a large optimum point where availability meets maintenance spending for Powder River Basin (PRB) coal-fired units. Using a database of sufficient size and composition across various operating ranges, Solomon generated an algorithm that predicts the relationship between maintenance spending and availability. Coupling this generalized algorithm with a unit-specific market-loss curve determines the optimum spending for a facility. The article presents the results of the analysis, how this methodology can be applied to develop optimum operating and financial targets for specific units and markets and a process to achieve those targets. It also describes how this methodology can be used for other types of fossil-fired technologies and future enhancements to the analysis. 5 figs.

  20. Method of making maximally dispersed heterogeneous catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Jennison, Dwight R.

    2005-11-15

    A method of making a catalyst with monolayer or sub-monolayer metal by controlling the wetting characteristics on the support surface and increasing the adhesion between the catalytic metal and an oxide layer. There are two methods that have been demonstrated by experiment and supported by theory. In the first method, which is useful for noble metals as well as others, a negatively-charged species is introduced to the surface of a support in sub-ML coverage. The layer-by-layer growth of metal deposited onto the oxide surface is promoted because the adhesion strength of the metal-oxide interface is increased. This method can also be used to achieve nanoislands of metal upon sub-ML deposition. The negatively-charged species can either be deposited onto the oxide surface or a compound can be deposited that dissociates on, or reacts with, the surface to form the negatively-charged species. The deposited metal adatoms can thereby bond laterally to the negatively-charged species as well as vertically to the oxide surface. Thus the negatively-charged species serve as anchors for the metal. In the second method, a chemical reaction that occurs when most metals are deposited on a fully hydroxylated oxide surface is used to create cationic metal species that bind strongly both to the substrate and to metallic metal atoms. These are incorporated into the top layer of the substrate and bind strongly both to the substrate and to metallic metal atoms. In this case, these oxidized metal atoms serve as the anchors. Here, as in the previous method, nanoislands of catalytic metal can be achieved to increase catalytic activity, or monolayers or bilayers of reactive metal can also be made.

  1. Expanding the therapeutic index of radiation therapy by combining in situ gene therapy in the treatment of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Tetzlaff, Michael T; Teh, Bin S; Timme, Terry L; Fujita, Tetsuo; Satoh, Takefumi; Tabata, Ken-Ichi; Mai, Wei-Yuan; Vlachaki, Maria T; Amato, Robert J; Kadmon, Dov; Miles, Brian J; Ayala, Gustavo; Wheeler, Thomas M; Aguilar-Cordova, Estuardo; Thompson, Timothy C; Butler, E Brian

    2006-02-01

    The advances in radiotherapy (3D-CRT, IMRT) have enabled high doses of radiation to be delivered with the least possible associated toxicity. However, the persistence of cancer (local recurrence after radiotherapy) despite these increased doses as well as distant failure suggesting the existence of micro-metastases, especially in the case of higher risk disease, have underscored the need for continued improvement in treatment strategies to manage local and micro-metastatic disease as definitively as possible. This has prompted the idea that an increase in the therapeutic index of radiotherapy might be achieved by combining it with in situ gene therapy. The goal of these combinatorial therapies is to maximize the selective pressure against cancer cell growth while minimizing treatment-associated toxicity. Major efforts utilizing different gene therapy strategies have been employed in conjunction with radiotherapy. We reviewed our and other published clinical trials utilizing this combined radio-genetherapy approach including their associated pre-clinical in vitro and in vivo models. The use of in situ gene therapy as an adjuvant to radiation therapy dramatically reduced cell viability in vitro and tumor growth in vivo. No significant worsening of the toxicities normally observed in single-modality approaches were identified in Phase I/II clinical studies. Enhancement of both local and systemic T-cell activation was noted with this combined approach suggesting anti-tumor immunity. Early clinical outcome including biochemical and biopsy data was very promising. These results demonstrate the increased therapeutic efficacy achieved by combining in situ gene therapy with radiotherapy in the management of local prostate cancer. The combined approach maximizes tumor control, both local-regional and systemic through radio-genetherapy induced cytotoxicity and anti-tumor immunity. PMID:16417399

  2. Engineered Hybrid Nanoparticles for On-Demand Diagnostics and Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Kim Truc; Zhao, Yanli

    2015-12-15

    Together with the simultaneous development of nanomaterials and molecular biology, the bionano interface brings about various applications of hybrid nanoparticles in nanomedicine. The hybrid nanoparticles not only present properties of the individual components but also show synergistic effects for specialized applications. Thus, the development of advanced hybrid nanoparticles for targeted and on-demand diagnostics and therapeutics of diseases has rapidly become a hot research topic in nanomedicine. The research focus is to fabricate novel classes of programmable hybrid nanoparticles that are precisely engineered to maximize drug concentrations in diseased cells, leading to enhanced efficacy and reduced side effects of chemotherapy for the disease treatment. In particular, the hybrid nanoparticle platforms can simultaneously target diseased cells, enable the location to be imaged by optical methods, and release therapeutic drugs to the diseased cells by command. This Account specially discusses the rational fabrication of integrated hybrid nanoparticles and their applications in diagnostics and therapeutics. For diagnostics applications, hybrid nanoparticles can be utilized as imaging agents that enable detailed visualization at the molecular level. By the use of suitable targeting ligands incorporated on the nanoparticles, targeted optical imaging may be feasible with improved performance. Novel imaging techniques such as multiphoton excitation and photoacoustic imaging using near-infrared light have been developed using the intrinsic properties of particular nanoparticles. The use of longer-wavelength excitation sources allows deeper penetration into the human body for disease diagnostics and at the same time reduces the adverse effects on normal tissues. Furthermore, multimodal imaging techniques have been achieved by combining several types of components in nanoparticles, offering higher accuracy and better spatial views, with the aim of detecting life

  3. Four therapeutic diets: adherence and acceptability.

    PubMed

    Berkow, Susan E; Barnard, Neal; Eckart, Jill; Katcher, Heather

    2010-01-01

    Many health conditions are treated, at least in part, by therapeutic diets. Although the success of any intervention depends on its acceptability to the patient, the acceptability of therapeutic diets and factors that influence it have been largely neglected in nutrition research. A working definition of acceptability is proposed and an examination and summary are provided of available data on the acceptability of common diet regimens used for medical conditions. The goal is to suggest ways to improve the success of therapeutic diets. The proposed working definition of "acceptability" refers to the user's judgment of the advantages and disadvantages of a therapeutic diet-in relation to palatability, costs, and effects on eating behaviour and health-that influence the likelihood of adherence. Very low-calorie, reduced-fat omnivorous, vegetarian and vegan, and low-carbohydrate diets all achieve acceptability among the majority of users in studies of up to one year, in terms of attrition and adherence rates and results of questionnaires assessing eating behaviours. Longer studies are fewer, but they suggest that vegetarian, vegan, and reduced-fat diets are acceptable, as indicated by sustained changes in nutrient intake. Few studies of this length have been published for very low-calorie or low-carbohydrate diets. Long-term studies of adherence and acceptability of these and other therapeutic diets are warranted. PMID:21144137

  4. Note on maximally entangled Eisert-Lewenstein-Wilkens quantum games

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolonek-Lasoń, Katarzyna; Kosiński, Piotr

    2015-12-01

    Maximally entangled Eisert-Lewenstein-Wilkens games are analyzed. For a general class of gates defined in the previous papers of the first author, the general conditions are derived which allow to determine the form of gate leading to maximally entangled games. The construction becomes particularly simple provided one does distinguish between games differing by relabeling of strategies. Some examples are presented.

  5. Detrimental Relations of Maximization with Academic and Career Attitudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dahling, Jason J.; Thompson, Mindi N.

    2013-01-01

    Maximization refers to a decision-making style that involves seeking the single best option when making a choice, which is generally dysfunctional because people are limited in their ability to rationally evaluate all options and identify the single best outcome. The vocational consequences of maximization are examined in two samples, college…

  6. Pace's Maxims for Homegrown Library Projects. Coming Full Circle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pace, Andrew K.

    2005-01-01

    This article discusses six maxims by which to run library automation. The following maxims are discussed: (1) Solve only known problems; (2) Avoid changing data to fix display problems; (3) Aut viam inveniam aut faciam; (4) If you cannot make it yourself, buy something; (5) Kill the alligator closest to the boat; and (6) Just because yours is…

  7. Minimal Length, Maximal Momentum and the Entropic Force Law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nozari, Kourosh; Pedram, Pouria; Molkara, M.

    2012-04-01

    Different candidates of quantum gravity proposal such as string theory, noncommutative geometry, loop quantum gravity and doubly special relativity, all predict the existence of a minimum observable length and/or a maximal momentum which modify the standard Heisenberg uncertainty principle. In this paper, we study the effects of minimal length and maximal momentum on the entropic force law formulated recently by E. Verlinde.

  8. Effect of Age and Other Factors on Maximal Heart Rate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Londeree, Ben R.; Moeschberger, Melvin L.

    1982-01-01

    To reduce confusion regarding reported effects of age on maximal exercise heart rate, a comprehensive review of the relevant English literature was conducted. Data on maximal heart rate after exercising with a bicycle, a treadmill, and after swimming were analyzed with regard to physical fitness and to age, sex, and racial differences. (Authors/PP)

  9. Therapeutic antibodies against cancer

    PubMed Central

    Adler, Mark J.; Dimitrov, Dimiter S.

    2012-01-01

    Antibody-based therapeutics against cancer are highly successful in clinic and currently enjoy unprecedented recognition of their potential; 13 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have been approved for clinical use in the European Union and in the United States (one, mylotarg, was withdrawn from market in 2010). Three of the mAbs (bevacizumab, rituximab, trastuzumab) are in the top six selling protein therapeutics with sales in 2010 of more than $5 bln each. Hundreds of mAbs including bispecific mAbs and multispecific fusion proteins, mAbs conjugated with small molecule drugs and mAbs with optimized pharmacokinetics are in clinical trials. However, challenges remain and it appears that deeper understanding of mechanisms is needed to overcome major problems including resistance to therapy, access to targets, complexity of biological systems and individual variations. PMID:22520975

  10. Multistage vector (MSV) therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Wolfram, Joy; Shen, Haifa; Ferrari, Mauro

    2015-12-10

    One of the greatest challenges in the field of medicine is obtaining controlled distribution of systemically administered therapeutic agents within the body. Indeed, biological barriers such as physical compartmentalization, pressure gradients, and excretion pathways adversely affect localized delivery of drugs to pathological tissue. The diverse nature of these barriers requires the use of multifunctional drug delivery vehicles that can overcome a wide range of sequential obstacles. In this review, we explore the role of multifunctionality in nanomedicine by primarily focusing on multistage vectors (MSVs). The MSV is an example of a promising therapeutic platform that incorporates several components, including a microparticle, nanoparticles, and small molecules. In particular, these components are activated in a sequential manner in order to successively address transport barriers. PMID:26264836

  11. Therapeutic Hypothermia for Neuroprotection

    PubMed Central

    Karnatovskaia, Lioudmila V.; Wartenberg, Katja E.

    2014-01-01

    The earliest recorded application of therapeutic hypothermia in medicine spans about 5000 years; however, its use has become widespread since 2002, following the demonstration of both safety and efficacy of regimens requiring only a mild (32°C-35°C) degree of cooling after cardiac arrest. We review the mechanisms by which hypothermia confers neuroprotection as well as its physiological effects by body system and its associated risks. With regard to clinical applications, we present evidence on the role of hypothermia in traumatic brain injury, intracranial pressure elevation, stroke, subarachnoid hemorrhage, spinal cord injury, hepatic encephalopathy, and neonatal peripartum encephalopathy. Based on the current knowledge and areas undergoing or in need of further exploration, we feel that therapeutic hypothermia holds promise in the treatment of patients with various forms of neurologic injury; however, additional quality studies are needed before its true role is fully known. PMID:24982721

  12. Polycyclic peptide therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Baeriswyl, Vanessa; Heinis, Christian

    2013-03-01

    Owing to their excellent binding properties, high stability, and low off-target toxicity, polycyclic peptides are an attractive molecule format for the development of therapeutics. Currently, only a handful of polycyclic peptides are used in the clinic; examples include the antibiotic vancomycin, the anticancer drugs actinomycin D and romidepsin, and the analgesic agent ziconotide. All clinically used polycyclic peptide drugs are derived from natural sources, such as soil bacteria in the case of vancomycin, actinomycin D and romidepsin, or the venom of a fish-hunting coil snail in the case of ziconotide. Unfortunately, nature provides peptide macrocyclic ligands for only a small fraction of therapeutic targets. For the generation of ligands of targets of choice, researchers have inserted artificial binding sites into natural polycyclic peptide scaffolds, such as cystine knot proteins, using rational design or directed evolution approaches. More recently, large combinatorial libraries of genetically encoded bicyclic peptides have been generated de novo and screened by phage display. In this Minireview, the properties of existing polycyclic peptide drugs are discussed and related to their interesting molecular architectures. Furthermore, technologies that allow the development of unnatural polycyclic peptide ligands are discussed. Recent application of these technologies has generated promising results, suggesting that polycyclic peptide therapeutics could potentially be developed for a broad range of diseases. PMID:23355488

  13. System performance evaluation of the MAXIM concept with integrated modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lieber, Michael D.; Gallagher, Dennis J.; Cash, Webster C.; Shipley, Ann F.

    2003-03-01

    The MAXIM (Mico-Arcsecond X-Ray Imaging Mission) and MAXIM Pathfinder, a technology precursor mission, is considered by NASA as 'visionary missions' in space astronomy. Currently the MAXIM mission design would fly multiple spacecraft in formation, each carrying precision optics, to direct x-rays from an astronomical source to collector and imaging spacecrafts. The mission architecture is complex and provides technical challenges in formaiton flying and external metrology, and target acquisition. To further develop the concept, an integrated model (IM) of the MAXIM and MAXIM Pathfinder was developed. Individual subsystem models from disciplines in structural dynamics, optics, controls, signal processing, detector physics and disturbance modelign are seamlessly integrated into one cohesive model to efficiently support system level trades and analysis. The optical system design is a unique combination of optical concepts and therefore results from the IM were extensively compared with ASAP optical software.

  14. Student academic achievement in college chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabibzadeh, Kiana S.

    General Chemistry is required for variety of baccalaureate degrees, including all medical related fields, engineering, and science majors. Depending on the institution, the prerequisite requirement for college level General Chemistry varies. The success rate for this course is low. The purpose of this study is to examine the factors influencing student academic achievement and retention in General Chemistry at the college level. In this study student achievement is defined by those students who earned grades of "C" or better. The dissertation contains in-depth studies on influence of Intermediate Algebra as a prerequisite compared to Fundamental Chemistry for student academic achievement and student retention in college General Chemistry. In addition the study examined the extent and manner in which student self-efficacy influences student academic achievement in college level General Chemistry. The sample for this part of the study is 144 students enrolled in first semester college level General Chemistry. Student surveys determined student self-efficacy level. The statistical analyses of study demonstrated that Fundamental Chemistry is a better prerequisite for student academic achievement and student retention. The study also found that student self-efficacy has no influence on student academic achievement. The significance of this study will be to provide data for the purpose of establishing a uniform and most suitable prerequisite for college level General Chemistry. Finally the variables identified to influence student academic achievement and enhance student retention will support educators' mission to maximize the students' ability to complete their educational goal at institutions of higher education.

  15. Maximizing Singlet Fission by Intermolecular Packing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Linjun; Olivier, Yoann; Prezhdo, Oleg V; Beljonne, David

    2014-10-01

    A novel nonadiabatic molecular dynamics scheme is applied to study the singlet fission (SF) process in pentacene dimers as a function of longitudinal and lateral displacements of the molecular backbones. Detailed two-dimensional mappings of both instantaneous and long-term triplet yields are obtained, characterizing the advantageous and unfavorable stacking arrangements, which can be achieved by chemical substitutions to the bare pentacene molecule. We show that the SF rate can be increased by more than an order of magnitude through tuning the intermolecular packing, most notably when going from cofacial to the slipped stacked arrangements encountered in some pentacene derivatives. The simulations indicate that the SF process is driven by thermal electron-phonon fluctuations at ambient and high temperatures, expected in solar cell applications. Although charge-transfer states are key to construct continuous channels for SF, a large charge-transfer character of the photoexcited state is found to be not essential for efficient SF. The reported time domain study mimics directly numerous laser experiments and provides novel guidelines for designing efficient photovoltaic systems exploiting the SF process with optimum intermolecular packing. PMID:26278443

  16. Achieving yield gains in wheat.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Matthew; Foulkes, John; Furbank, Robert; Griffiths, Simon; King, Julie; Murchie, Erik; Parry, Martin; Slafer, Gustavo

    2012-10-01

    Wheat provides 20% of calories and protein consumed by humans. Recent genetic gains are <1% per annum (p.a.), insufficient to meet future demand. The Wheat Yield Consortium brings expertise in photosynthesis, crop adaptation and genetics to a common breeding platform. Theory suggest radiation use efficiency (RUE) of wheat could be increased ~50%; strategies include modifying specificity, catalytic rate and regulation of Rubisco, up-regulating Calvin cycle enzymes, introducing chloroplast CO(2) concentrating mechanisms, optimizing light and N distribution of canopies while minimizing photoinhibition, and increasing spike photosynthesis. Maximum yield expression will also require dynamic optimization of source: sink so that dry matter partitioning to reproductive structures is not at the cost of the roots, stems and leaves needed to maintain physiological and structural integrity. Crop development should favour spike fertility to maximize harvest index so phenology must be tailored to different photoperiods, and sensitivity to unpredictable weather must be modulated to reduce conservative responses that reduce harvest index. Strategic crossing of complementary physiological traits will be augmented with wide crossing, while genome-wide selection and high throughput phenotyping and genotyping will increase efficiency of progeny screening. To ensure investment in breeding achieves agronomic impact, sustainable crop management must also be promoted through crop improvement networks. PMID:22860982

  17. Preschoolers can recognize violations of the Gricean maxims

    PubMed Central

    Eskritt, Michelle; Whalen, Juanita; Lee, Kang

    2010-01-01

    Grice (Syntax and semantics: Speech acts, 1975, pp. 41–58, Vol. 3) proposed that conversation is guided by a spirit of cooperation that involves adherence to several conversational maxims. Three types of maxims were explored in the current study: 1) Quality, to be truthful; 2) Relation, to say only what is relevant to a conversation; and 3) Quantity, to provide as much information as required. Three- to five-year-olds were tested to determine the age at which an awareness of these Gricean maxims emerges. Children requested the help of one of two puppets in finding a hidden sticker. One puppet always adhered to the maxim being tested, while the other always violated it. Consistently choosing the puppet that adhered to the maxim was considered indicative of an understanding of that maxim. The results indicate that children were initially only successful in the Relation condition. While in general, children performed better at first in the Quantity condition compared with the Quality condition, 3-year-olds never performed above chance in the Quantity condition. The findings of the present study indicate that preschool children are sensitive to the violation of the Relation, Quality, and Quantity maxims at least under some conditions. PMID:20953298

  18. A taxonomic approach to communicating maxims in interstellar messages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vakoch, Douglas A.

    2011-02-01

    Previous discussions of interstellar messages that could be sent to extraterrestrial intelligence have focused on descriptions of mathematics, science, and aspects of human culture and civilization. Although some of these depictions of humanity have implicitly referred to our aspirations, this has not clearly been separated from descriptions of our actions and attitudes as they are. In this paper, a methodology is developed for constructing interstellar messages that convey information about our aspirations by developing a taxonomy of maxims that provide guidance for living. Sixty-six maxims providing guidance for living were judged for degree of similarity to each of other. Quantitative measures of the degree of similarity between all pairs of maxims were derived by aggregating similarity judgments across individual participants. These composite similarity ratings were subjected to a cluster analysis, which yielded a taxonomy that highlights perceived interrelationships between individual maxims and that identifies major classes of maxims. Such maxims can be encoded in interstellar messages through three-dimensional animation sequences conveying narratives that highlight interactions between individuals. In addition, verbal descriptions of these interactions in Basic English can be combined with these pictorial sequences to increase intelligibility. Online projects to collect messages such as the SETI Institute's Earth Speaks and La Tierra Habla, can be used to solicit maxims from participants around the world.

  19. Design and manufacturing rules for maximizing the performance of polycrystalline piezoelectric bending actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafferis, Noah T.; Smith, Michael J.; Wood, Robert J.

    2015-06-01

    Increasing the energy and power density of piezoelectric actuators is very important for any weight-sensitive application, and is especially crucial for enabling autonomy in micro/milli-scale robots and devices utilizing this technology. This is achieved by maximizing the mechanical flexural strength and electrical dielectric strength through the use of laser-induced melting or polishing, insulating edge coating, and crack-arresting features, combined with features for rigid ground attachments to maximize force output. Manufacturing techniques have also been developed to enable mass customization, in which sheets of material are pre-stacked to form a laminate from which nearly arbitrary planar actuator designs can be fabricated using only laser cutting. These techniques have led to a 70% increase in energy density and an increase in mean lifetime of at least 15× compared to prior manufacturing methods. In addition, measurements have revealed a doubling of the piezoelectric coefficient when operating at the high fields necessary to achieve maximal energy densities, along with an increase in the Young’s modulus at the high compressive strains encountered—these two effects help to explain the higher performance of our actuators as compared to that predicted by linear models.

  20. Asparaginase pharmacokinetics and implications of therapeutic drug monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Asselin, Barbara; Rizzari, Carmelo

    2015-01-01

    Asparaginase is widely used in chemotherapeutic regimens for the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and has led to a substantial improvement in cure rates, especially in children. Optimal therapeutic effects depend on a complete and sustained depletion of serum asparagine. However, pronounced interpatient variability, differences in pharmacokinetic properties between asparaginases and the formation of asparaginase antibodies make it difficult to predict the degree of asparagine depletion that will result from a given dose of asparaginase. The pharmacological principles underlying asparaginase therapy in the treatment of ALL are summarized in this article. A better understanding of the many factors that influence asparaginase activity and subsequent asparagine depletion may allow physicians to tailor treatment to the individual, maximizing therapeutic effect and minimizing treatment-related toxicity. Therapeutic drug monitoring provides a means of assessing a patient's current depletion status and can be used to better evaluate the potential benefit of treatment adjustments. PMID:25586605

  1. Psychodynamic Perspective on Therapeutic Boundaries

    PubMed Central

    Bridges, Nancy A.

    1999-01-01

    Discussion of boundaries in therapeutic work most often focuses on boundary maintenance, risk management factors, and boundary violations. The psychodynamic meaning and clinical management of boundaries in therapeutic relationships remains a neglected area of discourse. Clinical vignettes will illustrate a psychodynamic, developmental-relational perspective using boundary dilemmas to deepen and advance the therapeutic process. This article contributes to the dialogue about the process of making meaning and constructing therapeutically useful and creative boundaries that further the psychotherapeutic process. PMID:10523432

  2. Opportunities to maximize value with integrated palliative care

    PubMed Central

    Bergman, Jonathan; Laviana, Aaron A

    2016-01-01

    Palliative care involves aggressively addressing and treating psychosocial, spiritual, religious, and family concerns, as well as considering the overall psychosocial structures supporting a patient. The concept of integrated palliative care removes the either/or decision a patient needs to make: they need not decide if they want either aggressive chemotherapy from their oncologist or symptom-guided palliative care but rather they can be comanaged by several clinicians, including a palliative care clinician, to maximize the benefit to them. One common misconception about palliative care, and supportive care in general, is that it amounts to “doing nothing” or “giving up” on aggressive treatments for patients. Rather, palliative care involves very aggressive care, targeted at patient symptoms, quality-of-life, psychosocial needs, family needs, and others. Integrating palliative care into the care plan for individuals with advanced diseases does not necessarily imply that a patient must forego other treatment options, including those aimed at a cure, prolonging of life, or palliation. Implementing interventions to understand patient preferences and to ensure those preferences are addressed, including preferences related to palliative and supportive care, is vital in improving the patient-centeredness and value of surgical care. Given our aging population and the disproportionate cost of end-of-life care, this holds great hope in bending the cost curve of health care spending, ensuring patient-centeredness, and improving quality and value of care. Level 1 evidence supports this model, and it has been achieved in several settings; the next necessary step is to disseminate such models more broadly. PMID:27226721

  3. Heritability of Creative Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piffer, Davide; Hur, Yoon-Mi

    2014-01-01

    Although creative achievement is a subject of much attention to lay people, the origin of individual differences in creative accomplishments remain poorly understood. This study examined genetic and environmental influences on creative achievement in an adult sample of 338 twins (mean age = 26.3 years; SD = 6.6 years). Twins completed the Creative…

  4. Confronting the Achievement Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, David

    2007-01-01

    This article talks about the large achievement gap between children of color and their white peers. The reasons for the achievement gap are varied. First, many urban minorities come from a background of poverty. One of the detrimental effects of growing up in poverty is receiving inadequate nourishment at a time when bodies and brains are rapidly…

  5. States Address Achievement Gaps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christie, Kathy

    2002-01-01

    Summarizes 2 state initiatives to address the achievement gap: North Carolina's report by the Advisory Commission on Raising Achievement and Closing Gaps, containing an 11-point strategy, and Kentucky's legislation putting in place 10 specific processes. The North Carolina report is available at www.dpi.state.nc.us.closingthegap; Kentucky's…

  6. Wechsler Individual Achievement Test.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Ronald L.

    1999-01-01

    This article describes the Wechsler Individual Achievement Test, a comprehensive measure of achievement for individuals in grades K-12. Eight subtests assess mathematics reasoning, spelling, reading comprehension, numerical operations, listening comprehension, oral expression, and written expression. Its administration, standardization,…

  7. Inverting the Achievement Pyramid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White-Hood, Marian; Shindel, Melissa

    2006-01-01

    Attempting to invert the pyramid to improve student achievement and increase all students' chances for success is not a new endeavor. For decades, educators have strategized, formed think tanks, and developed school improvement teams to find better ways to improve the achievement of all students. Currently, the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) is…

  8. Achievement Test Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Dept. of Education, Columbus. Trade and Industrial Education Service.

    The Ohio Trade and Industrial Education Achievement Test battery is comprised of seven basic achievement tests: Machine Trades, Automotive Mechanics, Basic Electricity, Basic Electronics, Mechanical Drafting, Printing, and Sheet Metal. The tests were developed by subject matter committees and specialists in testing and research. The Ohio Trade and…

  9. General Achievement Trends: Maryland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  10. General Achievement Trends: Arkansas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  11. General Achievement Trends: Idaho

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  12. General Achievement Trends: Nebraska

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  13. General Achievement Trends: Colorado

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  14. General Achievement Trends: Iowa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  15. General Achievement Trends: Hawaii

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  16. General Achievement Trends: Kentucky

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  17. General Achievement Trends: Florida

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  18. General Achievement Trends: Texas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  19. General Achievement Trends: Oregon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  20. General Achievement Trends: Virginia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  1. Honoring Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Digest: Essential Readings Condensed for Quick Review, 2004

    2004-01-01

    Is the concept of "honor roll" obsolete? The honor roll has always been a way for schools to recognize the academic achievement of their students. But does it motivate students? In this article, several elementary school principals share their views about honoring student achievement. Among others, Virginia principal Nancy Moga said that students…

  2. Aiming at Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez, Paul

    The Raising Quality and Achievement Program is a 3-year initiative to support further education (FE) colleges in the United Kingdom in their drive to improve students' achievement and the quality of provision. The program offers the following: (1) quality information and advice; (2) onsite support for individual colleges; (3) help with…

  3. Achieving Perspective Transformation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nowak, Jens

    Perspective transformation is a consciously achieved state in which the individual's perspective on life is transformed. The new perspective serves as a vantage point for life's actions and interactions, affecting the way life is lived. Three conditions are basic to achieving perspective transformation: (1) "feeling" experience, i.e., getting in…

  4. Achieving Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abowitz, Kathleen Knight

    2011-01-01

    Public schools are functionally provided through structural arrangements such as government funding, but public schools are achieved in substance, in part, through local governance. In this essay, Kathleen Knight Abowitz explains the bifocal nature of achieving public schools; that is, that schools are both subject to the unitary Public compact of…

  5. General Achievement Trends: Tennessee

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  6. Achievement-Based Resourcing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fletcher, Mike; And Others

    1992-01-01

    This collection of seven articles examines achievement-based resourcing (ABR), the concept that the funding of educational institutions should be linked to their success in promoting student achievement, with a focus on the application of ABR to postsecondary education in the United Kingdom. The articles include: (1) "Introduction" (Mick…

  7. Frankincense--therapeutic properties.

    PubMed

    Al-Yasiry, Ali Ridha Mustafa; Kiczorowska, Bożena

    2016-01-01

    Recently, increasing interest in natural dietary and therapeutic preparations used as dietary supplements has been observed. One of them is frankincense. This traditional medicine of the East is believed to have anti-inflammatory, expectorant, antiseptic, and even anxiolytic and anti-neurotic effects. The present study aims to verify the reported therapeutic properties of Boswellia resin and describe its chemical composition based on available scientific studies. The main component of frankincense is oil (60%). It contains mono- (13%) and diterpenes (40%) as well as ethyl acetate (21.4%), octyl acetate (13.4%) and methylanisole (7.6%). The highest biological activity among terpenes is characteristic of 11-keto-ß-acetyl-beta-boswellic acid, acetyl-11-keto-ß-boswellic acid and acetyl-α-boswellic acid. Contemporary studies have shown that resin indeed has an analgesic, tranquilising and anti-bacterial effects. From the point of view of therapeutic properties, extracts from Boswellia serrata and Boswellia carterii are reported to be particularly useful. They reduce inflammatory conditions in the course of rheumatism by inhibiting leukocyte elastase and degrading glycosaminoglycans. Boswellia preparations inhibit 5-lipoxygenase and prevent the release of leukotrienes, thus having an anti-inflammatory effect in ulcerative colitis, irritable bowel syndrome, bronchitis and sinusitis. Inhalation and consumption of Boswellia olibanum reduces the risk of asthma. In addition, boswellic acids have an antiproliferative effect on tumours. They inhibit proliferation of tumour cells of the leukaemia and glioblastoma subset. They have an anti-tumour effect since they inhibit topoisomerase I and II-alpha and stimulate programmed cell death (apoptosis). PMID:27117114

  8. Cystic Fibrosis Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Ramsey, Bonnie W.

    2013-01-01

    A great deal of excitement and hope has followed the successful trials and US Food and Drug Administration approval of the drug ivacaftor (Kalydeco), the first therapy available that targets the underlying defect that causes cystic fibrosis (CF). Although this drug has currently demonstrated a clinical benefit for a small minority of the CF population, the developmental pathway established by ivacaftor paves the way for other CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) modulators that may benefit many more patients. In addition to investigating CFTR modulators, researchers are actively developing numerous other innovative CF therapies. In this review, we use the catalog of treatments currently under evaluation with the support of the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, known as the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Therapeutics Pipeline, as a platform to discuss the variety of candidate treatments for CF lung disease that promise to improve CF care. Many of these approaches target the individual components of the relentless cycle of airway obstruction, inflammation, and infection characteristic of lung disease in CF, whereas others are aimed directly at the gene defect, or the resulting dysfunctional protein, that instigates this cycle. We discuss how new findings from the laboratory have informed not only the development of novel therapeutics, but also the rationales for their use and the outcomes used to measure their effects. By reviewing the breadth of candidate treatments currently in development, as well as the recent progress in CF therapies reflected by the evolution of the therapeutics pipeline over the past few years, we hope to build upon the optimism and anticipation generated by the recent success of Kalydeco. PMID:23276843

  9. Non-coding RNAs: Therapeutic Strategies and Delivery Systems.

    PubMed

    Ling, Hui

    2016-01-01

    The vast majority of the human genome is transcribed into RNA molecules that do not code for proteins, which could be small ones approximately 20 nucleotide in length, known as microRNAs, or transcripts longer than 200 bp, defined as long noncoding RNAs. The prevalent deregulation of microRNAs in human cancers prompted immediate interest on the therapeutic value of microRNAs as drugs and drug targets. Many features of microRNAs such as well-defined mechanisms, and straightforward oligonucleotide design further make them attractive candidates for therapeutic development. The intensive efforts of exploring microRNA therapeutics are reflected by the large body of preclinical studies using oligonucleotide-based mimicking and blocking, culminated by the recent entry of microRNA therapeutics in clinical trial for several human diseases including cancer. Meanwhile, microRNA therapeutics faces the challenge of effective and safe delivery of nucleic acid therapeutics into the target site. Various chemical modifications of nucleic acids and delivery systems have been developed to increase targeting specificity and efficacy, and reduce the associated side effects including activation of immune response. Recently, long noncoding RNAs become attractive targets for therapeutic intervention because of their association with complex and delicate phenotypes, and their unconventional pharmaceutical activities such as capacity of increasing output of proteins. Here I discuss the general therapeutic strategies targeting noncoding RNAs, review delivery systems developed to maximize noncoding RNA therapeutic efficacy, and offer perspectives on the future development of noncoding RNA targeting agents for colorectal cancer. PMID:27573903

  10. Telomerase and cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Harley, Calvin B

    2008-03-01

    Telomerase is an attractive cancer target as it appears to be required in essentially all tumours for immortalization of a subset of cells, including cancer stem cells. Moreover, differences in telomerase expression, telomere length and cell kinetics between normal and tumour tissues suggest that targeting telomerase would be relatively safe. Clinical trials are ongoing with a potent and specific telomerase inhibitor, GRN163L, and with several versions of telomerase therapeutic vaccines. The prospect of adding telomerase-based therapies to the growing list of new anticancer products is promising, but what are the advantages and limitations of different approaches, and which patients are the most likely to respond? PMID:18256617

  11. Revitalizing Psychiatric Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Hyman, Steven E

    2014-01-01

    Despite high prevalence and enormous unmet medical need, the pharmaceutical industry has recently de-emphasized neuropsychiatric disorders as ‘too difficult' a challenge to warrant major investment. Here I describe major obstacles to drug discovery and development including a lack of new molecular targets, shortcomings of current animal models, and the lack of biomarkers for clinical trials. My major focus, however, is on new technologies and scientific approaches to neuropsychiatric disorders that give promise for revitalizing therapeutics and may thus answer industry's concerns. PMID:24317307

  12. [Is therapeutic deadlock inevitable?].

    PubMed

    Vignat, Jean-Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Many long-term treatments appear to be an expression of therapeutic deadlock. The situation leads to a questioning of the concept of chronicity and the identification of the determining factors of situations which are apparently blocked, marked by the search for solutions taking a back seat to the taking of action. The interaction between patients' mental apparatus and the care apparatus lies at the heart of the question, interpreted from an institutional, collective and individual perspective, supported by the clinical and psychopathological approach, and the return to the prioritisation of the thought. PMID:27389427

  13. The Therapeutic Roller Coaster

    PubMed Central

    CHU, JAMES A.

    1992-01-01

    Survivors of severe childhood abuse often encounter profound difficulties. In addition to posttraumatic and dissociative symptomatology, abuse survivors frequently have characterologic problems, particularly regarding self-care and maintaining relationships. Backgrounds of abuse, abandonment, and betrayal are often recapitulated and reenacted in therapy, making the therapeutic experience arduous and confusing for therapists and patients. Efforts must be directed at building an adequate psychotherapeutic foundation before undertaking exploration and abreaction of past traumatic experiences. This discussion sets out a model for treatment of childhood abuse survivors, describing stages of treatment and suggesting interventions. Common treatment dilemmas or "traps" are discussed, with recommendations for their resolution. PMID:22700116

  14. Therapeutic Endoscopic Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Cheriyan, Danny

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) technology has evolved dramatically over the past 20 years, from being a supplementary diagnostic aid available only in large medical centers to being a core diagnostic and therapeutic tool that is widely available. Although formal recommendations and practice guidelines have not been developed, there are considerable data supporting the use of EUS for its technical accuracy in diagnosing pancreaticobiliary and gastrointestinal pathology. Endosonography is now routine practice not only for pathologic diagnosis and tumor staging but also for drainage of cystic lesions and celiac plexus neurolysis. In this article, we cover the use of EUS in biliary and pancreatic intervention, ablative therapy, enterostomy, and vascular intervention. PMID:27118942

  15. Maximizing information exchange between complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Bruce J.; Geneston, Elvis L.; Grigolini, Paolo

    2008-10-01

    Science is not merely the smooth progressive interaction of hypothesis, experiment and theory, although it sometimes has that form. More realistically the scientific study of any given complex phenomenon generates a number of explanations, from a variety of perspectives, that eventually requires synthesis to achieve a deep level of insight and understanding. One such synthesis has created the field of out-of-equilibrium statistical physics as applied to the understanding of complex dynamic networks. Over the past forty years the concept of complexity has undergone a metamorphosis. Complexity was originally seen as a consequence of memory in individual particle trajectories, in full agreement with a Hamiltonian picture of microscopic dynamics and, in principle, macroscopic dynamics could be derived from the microscopic Hamiltonian picture. The main difficulty in deriving macroscopic dynamics from microscopic dynamics is the need to take into account the actions of a very large number of components. The existence of events such as abrupt jumps, considered by the conventional continuous time random walk approach to describing complexity was never perceived as conflicting with the Hamiltonian view. Herein we review many of the reasons why this traditional Hamiltonian view of complexity is unsatisfactory. We show that as a result of technological advances, which make the observation of single elementary events possible, the definition of complexity has shifted from the conventional memory concept towards the action of non-Poisson renewal events. We show that the observation of crucial processes, such as the intermittent fluorescence of blinking quantum dots as well as the brain’s response to music, as monitored by a set of electrodes attached to the scalp, has forced investigators to go beyond the traditional concept of complexity and to establish closer contact with the nascent field of complex networks. Complex networks form one of the most challenging areas of

  16. Simulation of conditions for the maximal efficiency of decimeter-wave klystrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baikov, A. Yu.; Grushina, O. A.; Strikhanov, M. N.

    2014-03-01

    Using the mathematical model of electron beam transformation in a narrow tube developed by the authors and the KlypWin program suite, conditions for the maximal efficiency of decimeter-wave klystrons having from three to six amplification stages are simulated. Simulation is based on a real electron-optical system and real parameters of the cavities. It is shown that the maximal efficiency (across the load) is 83% for a four-cavity klystron, 86% for a five-cavity klystron, 88% for a six-cavity klystron, and 90% for a seven-cavity one. The electronic efficiency of the simulated seven-cavity klystron equals 94%, which implies the achievement of a global extremum.

  17. Epigenomes as therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Hamm, Christopher A; Costa, Fabricio F

    2015-07-01

    Epigenetics is a molecular phenomenon that pertains to heritable changes in gene expression that do not involve changes in the DNA sequence. Epigenetic modifications in a whole genome, known as the epigenome, play an essential role in the regulation of gene expression in both normal development and disease. Traditional epigenetic changes include DNA methylation and histone modifications. Recent evidence reveals that other players, such as non-coding RNAs, may have an epigenetic regulatory role. Aberrant epigenetic signaling is becoming to be known as a central component of human disease, and the reversible nature of the epigenetic modifications provides an exciting opportunity for the development of clinically relevant therapeutics. Current epigenetic therapies provide a clinical benefit through disrupting DNA methyltransferases or histone deacetylases. However, the emergence of next-generation epigenetic therapies provides an opportunity to more effectively disrupt epigenetic disease states. Novel epigenetic therapies may improve drug targeting and drug delivery, optimize dosing schedules, and improve the efficacy of preexisting treatment modalities (chemotherapy, radiation, and immunotherapy). This review discusses the epigenetic mechanisms that contribute to the disease, available epigenetic therapies, epigenetic therapies currently in development, and the potential future use of epigenetic therapeutics in a clinical setting. PMID:25797698

  18. AMUM LECTURE: Therapeutic ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crum, Lawrence A.

    2004-01-01

    The use of ultrasound in medicine is now quite commonplace, especially with the recent introduction of small, portable and relatively inexpensive, hand-held diagnostic imaging devices. Moreover, ultrasound has expanded beyond the imaging realm, with methods and applications extending to novel therapeutic and surgical uses. These applications broadly include: tissue ablation, acoustocautery, lipoplasty, site-specific and ultrasound mediated drug activity, extracorporeal lithotripsy, and the enhancement of natural physiological functions such as wound healing and tissue regeneration. A particularly attractive aspect of this technology is that diagnostic and therapeutic systems can be combined to produce totally non-invasive, imageguided therapy. This general lecture will review a number of these exciting new applications of ultrasound and address some of the basic scientific questions and future challenges in developing these methods and technologies for general use in our society. We shall particularly emphasize the use of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) in the treatment of benign and malignant tumors as well as the introduction of acoustic hemostasis, especially in organs which are difficult to treat using conventional medical and surgical techniques.

  19. Winnicott's therapeutic consultations revisited.

    PubMed

    Brafman, A H

    1997-08-01

    Winnicott described in his book 'Therapeutic Consultations' (1971) how a diagnostic assessment of a referred child developed into a fruitful therapeutic intervention when he was able to discover the unconscious fantasy that underlay the child's symptoms. Because these were children who were, essentially, developing normally, he used the word 'knot' to depict the obstacle the child had met. Any conflicts the parents might have were not explored in that context. This work present cases in which child and parents are seen together for the diagnostic assessment. The child's feelings about his world and his difficulties are explored through a variety of techniques including drawings. In the same interview, an analytic enquiry into the parents' history and also their views of the child reveals how the child's fantasies and the parents' past experiences interact and create a mutually reinforcing vicious circle. In other words, the 'knot' involves all of them. If the child's unconscious fantasy can be verbalised and if the parents are able to approach the child in a manner that acknowledges the child's real needs, the 'knot' disappears and normal development can be resumed. PMID:9306188

  20. Engineering therapeutic protein disaggregases.

    PubMed

    Shorter, James

    2016-05-15

    Therapeutic agents are urgently required to cure several common and fatal neurodegenerative disorders caused by protein misfolding and aggregation, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Parkinson's disease (PD), and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Protein disaggregases that reverse protein misfolding and restore proteins to native structure, function, and localization could mitigate neurodegeneration by simultaneously reversing 1) any toxic gain of function of the misfolded form and 2) any loss of function due to misfolding. Potentiated variants of Hsp104, a hexameric AAA+ ATPase and protein disaggregase from yeast, have been engineered to robustly disaggregate misfolded proteins connected with ALS (e.g., TDP-43 and FUS) and PD (e.g., α-synuclein). However, Hsp104 has no metazoan homologue. Metazoa possess protein disaggregase systems distinct from Hsp104, including Hsp110, Hsp70, and Hsp40, as well as HtrA1, which might be harnessed to reverse deleterious protein misfolding. Nevertheless, vicissitudes of aging, environment, or genetics conspire to negate these disaggregase systems in neurodegenerative disease. Thus, engineering potentiated human protein disaggregases or isolating small-molecule enhancers of their activity could yield transformative therapeutics for ALS, PD, and AD. PMID:27255695

  1. Engineering therapeutic protein disaggregases

    PubMed Central

    Shorter, James

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic agents are urgently required to cure several common and fatal neurodegenerative disorders caused by protein misfolding and aggregation, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Parkinson’s disease (PD), and Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Protein disaggregases that reverse protein misfolding and restore proteins to native structure, function, and localization could mitigate neurodegeneration by simultaneously reversing 1) any toxic gain of function of the misfolded form and 2) any loss of function due to misfolding. Potentiated variants of Hsp104, a hexameric AAA+ ATPase and protein disaggregase from yeast, have been engineered to robustly disaggregate misfolded proteins connected with ALS (e.g., TDP-43 and FUS) and PD (e.g., α-synuclein). However, Hsp104 has no metazoan homologue. Metazoa possess protein disaggregase systems distinct from Hsp104, including Hsp110, Hsp70, and Hsp40, as well as HtrA1, which might be harnessed to reverse deleterious protein misfolding. Nevertheless, vicissitudes of aging, environment, or genetics conspire to negate these disaggregase systems in neurodegenerative disease. Thus, engineering potentiated human protein disaggregases or isolating small-molecule enhancers of their activity could yield transformative therapeutics for ALS, PD, and AD. PMID:27255695

  2. Person-centered Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Cloninger, C. Robert; Cloninger, Kevin M.

    2015-01-01

    A clinician’s effectiveness in treatment depends substantially on his or her attitude toward -- and understanding of -- the patient as a person endowed with self-awareness and the will to direct his or her own future. The assessment of personality in the therapeutic encounter is a crucial foundation for forming an effective working alliance with shared goals. Helping a person to reflect on their personality provides a mirror image of their strengths and weaknesses in adapting to life’s many challenges. The Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI) provides an effective way to describe personality thoroughly and to predict both the positive and negative aspects of health. Strengths and weaknesses in TCI personality traits allow strong predictions of individual differences of all aspects of well-being. Diverse therapeutic techniques, such as diet, exercise, mood self-regulation, meditation, or acts of kindness, influence health and personality development in ways that are largely indistinguishable from one another or from effective allopathic treatments. Hence the development of well-being appears to be the result of activating a synergistic set of mechanisms of well-being, which are expressed as fuller functioning, plasticity, and virtue in adapting to life’s challenges PMID:26052429

  3. Mechanisms of Plasma Therapeutics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graves, David

    2015-09-01

    In this talk, I address research directed towards biomedical applications of atmospheric pressure plasma such as sterilization, surgery, wound healing and anti-cancer therapy. The field has seen remarkable growth in the last 3-5 years, but the mechanisms responsible for the biomedical effects have remained mysterious. It is known that plasmas readily create reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS). ROS and RNS (or RONS), in addition to a suite of other radical and non-radical reactive species, are essential actors in an important sub-field of aerobic biology termed ``redox'' (or oxidation-reduction) biology. It is postulated that cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) can trigger a therapeutic shielding response in tissue in part by creating a time- and space-localized, burst-like form of oxy-nitrosative stress on near-surface exposed cells through the flux of plasma-generated RONS. RONS-exposed surface layers of cells communicate to the deeper levels of tissue via a form of the ``bystander effect,'' similar to responses to other forms of cell stress. In this proposed model of CAP therapeutics, the plasma stimulates a cellular survival mechanism through which aerobic organisms shield themselves from infection and other challenges.

  4. Maximizing Your Investment in Building Automation System Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darnell, Charles

    2001-01-01

    Discusses how organizational issues and system standardization can be important factors that determine an institution's ability to fully exploit contemporary building automation systems (BAS). Further presented is management strategy for maximizing BAS investments. (GR)

  5. Maximal slicing of D-dimensional spherically symmetric vacuum spacetime

    SciTech Connect

    Nakao, Ken-ichi; Abe, Hiroyuki; Yoshino, Hirotaka; Shibata, Masaru

    2009-10-15

    We study the foliation of a D-dimensional spherically symmetric black-hole spacetime with D{>=}5 by two kinds of one-parameter families of maximal hypersurfaces: a reflection-symmetric foliation with respect to the wormhole slot and a stationary foliation that has an infinitely long trumpetlike shape. As in the four-dimensional case, the foliations by the maximal hypersurfaces avoid the singularity irrespective of the dimensionality. This indicates that the maximal slicing condition will be useful for simulating higher-dimensional black-hole spacetimes in numerical relativity. For the case of D=5, we present analytic solutions of the intrinsic metric, the extrinsic curvature, the lapse function, and the shift vector for the foliation by the stationary maximal hypersurfaces. These data will be useful for checking five-dimensional numerical-relativity codes based on the moving puncture approach.

  6. Sensitivity to conversational maxims in deaf and hearing children.

    PubMed

    Surian, Luca; Tedoldi, Mariantonia; Siegal, Michael

    2010-09-01

    We investigated whether access to a sign language affects the development of pragmatic competence in three groups of deaf children aged 6 to 11 years: native signers from deaf families receiving bimodal/bilingual instruction, native signers from deaf families receiving oralist instruction and late signers from hearing families receiving oralist instruction. The performance of these children was compared to a group of hearing children aged 6 to 7 years on a test designed to assess sensitivity to violations of conversational maxims. Native signers with bimodal/bilingual instruction were as able as the hearing children to detect violations that concern truthfulness (Maxim of Quality) and relevance (Maxim of Relation). On items involving these maxims, they outperformed both the late signers and native signers attending oralist schools. These results dovetail with previous findings on mindreading in deaf children and underscore the role of early conversational experience and instructional setting in the development of pragmatics. PMID:19719886

  7. Interpreting Negative Results in an Angle Maximization Problem.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, David R.; Litwiller, Bonnie H.

    1995-01-01

    Presents a situation in which differential calculus is used with inverse trigonometric tangent functions to maximize an angle measure. A negative distance measure ultimately results, requiring a reconsideration of assumptions inherent in the initial figure. (Author/MKR)

  8. Therapeutic targeting of replicative immortality

    PubMed Central

    Yaswen, Paul; MacKenzie, Karen L.; Keith, W. Nicol; Hentosh, Patricia; Rodier, Francis; Zhu, Jiyue; Firestone, Gary L.; Matheu, Ander; Carnero, Amancio; Bilsland, Alan; Sundin, Tabetha; Honoki, Kanya; Fujii, Hiromasa; Georgakilas, Alexandros G.; Amedei, Amedeo; Amin, Amr; Helferich, Bill; Boosani, Chandra S.; Guha, Gunjan; Ciriolo, Maria Rosa; Chen, Sophie; Mohammed, Sulma I.; Azmi, Asfar S.; Bhakta, Dipita; Halicka, Dorota; Niccolai, Elena; Aquilano, Katia; Ashraf, S. Salman; Nowsheen, Somaira; Yang, Xujuan

    2015-01-01

    One of the hallmarks of malignant cell populations is the ability to undergo continuous proliferation. This property allows clonal lineages to acquire sequential aberrations that can fuel increasingly autonomous growth, invasiveness, and therapeutic resistance. Innate cellular mechanisms have evolved to regulate replicative potential as a hedge against malignant progression. When activated in the absence of normal terminal differentiation cues, these mechanisms can result in a state of persistent cytostasis. This state, termed “senescence,” can be triggered by intrinsic cellular processes such as telomere dysfunction and oncogene expression, and by exogenous factors such as DNA damaging agents or oxidative environments. Despite differences in upstream signaling, senescence often involves convergent interdependent activation of tumor suppressors p53 and p16/pRB, but can be induced, albeit with reduced sensitivity, when these suppressors are compromised. Doses of conventional genotoxic drugs required to achieve cancer cell senescence are often much lower than doses required to achieve outright cell death. Additional therapies, such as those targeting cyclin dependent kinases or components of the PI3K signaling pathway, may induce senescence specifically in cancer cells by circumventing defects in tumor suppressor pathways or exploiting cancer cells’ heightened requirements for telomerase. Such treatments sufficient to induce cancer cell senescence could provide increased patient survival with fewer and less severe side effects than conventional cytotoxic regimens. This positive aspect is countered by important caveats regarding senescence reversibility, genomic instability, and paracrine effects that may increase heterogeneity and adaptive resistance of surviving cancer cells. Nevertheless, agents that effectively disrupt replicative immortality will likely be valuable components of new combinatorial approaches to cancer therapy. PMID:25869441

  9. Therapeutic targeting of replicative immortality.

    PubMed

    Yaswen, Paul; MacKenzie, Karen L; Keith, W Nicol; Hentosh, Patricia; Rodier, Francis; Zhu, Jiyue; Firestone, Gary L; Matheu, Ander; Carnero, Amancio; Bilsland, Alan; Sundin, Tabetha; Honoki, Kanya; Fujii, Hiromasa; Georgakilas, Alexandros G; Amedei, Amedeo; Amin, Amr; Helferich, Bill; Boosani, Chandra S; Guha, Gunjan; Ciriolo, Maria Rosa; Chen, Sophie; Mohammed, Sulma I; Azmi, Asfar S; Bhakta, Dipita; Halicka, Dorota; Niccolai, Elena; Aquilano, Katia; Ashraf, S Salman; Nowsheen, Somaira; Yang, Xujuan

    2015-12-01

    One of the hallmarks of malignant cell populations is the ability to undergo continuous proliferation. This property allows clonal lineages to acquire sequential aberrations that can fuel increasingly autonomous growth, invasiveness, and therapeutic resistance. Innate cellular mechanisms have evolved to regulate replicative potential as a hedge against malignant progression. When activated in the absence of normal terminal differentiation cues, these mechanisms can result in a state of persistent cytostasis. This state, termed "senescence," can be triggered by intrinsic cellular processes such as telomere dysfunction and oncogene expression, and by exogenous factors such as DNA damaging agents or oxidative environments. Despite differences in upstream signaling, senescence often involves convergent interdependent activation of tumor suppressors p53 and p16/pRB, but can be induced, albeit with reduced sensitivity, when these suppressors are compromised. Doses of conventional genotoxic drugs required to achieve cancer cell senescence are often much lower than doses required to achieve outright cell death. Additional therapies, such as those targeting cyclin dependent kinases or components of the PI3K signaling pathway, may induce senescence specifically in cancer cells by circumventing defects in tumor suppressor pathways or exploiting cancer cells' heightened requirements for telomerase. Such treatments sufficient to induce cancer cell senescence could provide increased patient survival with fewer and less severe side effects than conventional cytotoxic regimens. This positive aspect is countered by important caveats regarding senescence reversibility, genomic instability, and paracrine effects that may increase heterogeneity and adaptive resistance of surviving cancer cells. Nevertheless, agents that effectively disrupt replicative immortality will likely be valuable components of new combinatorial approaches to cancer therapy. PMID:25869441

  10. A new augmentation based algorithm for extracting maximal chordal subgraphs

    SciTech Connect

    Bhowmick, Sanjukta; Chen, Tzu-Yi; Halappanavar, Mahantesh

    2014-10-18

    If every cycle of a graph is chordal length greater than three then it contains an edge between non-adjacent vertices. Chordal graphs are of interest both theoretically, since they admit polynomial time solutions to a range of NP-hard graph problems, and practically, since they arise in many applications including sparse linear algebra, computer vision, and computational biology. A maximal chordal subgraph is a chordal subgraph that is not a proper subgraph of any other chordal subgraph. Existing algorithms for computing maximal chordal subgraphs depend on dynamically ordering the vertices, which is an inherently sequential process and therefore limits the algorithms’ parallelizability. In our paper we explore techniques to develop a scalable parallel algorithm for extracting a maximal chordal subgraph. We demonstrate that an earlier attempt at developing a parallel algorithm may induce a non-optimal vertex ordering and is therefore not guaranteed to terminate with a maximal chordal subgraph. We then give a new algorithm that first computes and then repeatedly augments a spanning chordal subgraph. After proving that the algorithm terminates with a maximal chordal subgraph, we then demonstrate that this algorithm is more amenable to parallelization and that the parallel version also terminates with a maximal chordal subgraph. That said, the complexity of the new algorithm is higher than that of the previous parallel algorithm, although the earlier algorithm computes a chordal subgraph which is not guaranteed to be maximal. Finally, we experimented with our augmentation-based algorithm on both synthetic and real-world graphs. We provide scalability results and also explore the effect of different choices for the initial spanning chordal subgraph on both the running time and on the number of edges in the maximal chordal subgraph.

  11. A new augmentation based algorithm for extracting maximal chordal subgraphs

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bhowmick, Sanjukta; Chen, Tzu-Yi; Halappanavar, Mahantesh

    2014-10-18

    If every cycle of a graph is chordal length greater than three then it contains an edge between non-adjacent vertices. Chordal graphs are of interest both theoretically, since they admit polynomial time solutions to a range of NP-hard graph problems, and practically, since they arise in many applications including sparse linear algebra, computer vision, and computational biology. A maximal chordal subgraph is a chordal subgraph that is not a proper subgraph of any other chordal subgraph. Existing algorithms for computing maximal chordal subgraphs depend on dynamically ordering the vertices, which is an inherently sequential process and therefore limits the algorithms’more » parallelizability. In our paper we explore techniques to develop a scalable parallel algorithm for extracting a maximal chordal subgraph. We demonstrate that an earlier attempt at developing a parallel algorithm may induce a non-optimal vertex ordering and is therefore not guaranteed to terminate with a maximal chordal subgraph. We then give a new algorithm that first computes and then repeatedly augments a spanning chordal subgraph. After proving that the algorithm terminates with a maximal chordal subgraph, we then demonstrate that this algorithm is more amenable to parallelization and that the parallel version also terminates with a maximal chordal subgraph. That said, the complexity of the new algorithm is higher than that of the previous parallel algorithm, although the earlier algorithm computes a chordal subgraph which is not guaranteed to be maximal. Finally, we experimented with our augmentation-based algorithm on both synthetic and real-world graphs. We provide scalability results and also explore the effect of different choices for the initial spanning chordal subgraph on both the running time and on the number of edges in the maximal chordal subgraph.« less

  12. A New Augmentation Based Algorithm for Extracting Maximal Chordal Subgraphs

    PubMed Central

    Bhowmick, Sanjukta; Chen, Tzu-Yi; Halappanavar, Mahantesh

    2014-01-01

    A graph is chordal if every cycle of length greater than three contains an edge between non-adjacent vertices. Chordal graphs are of interest both theoretically, since they admit polynomial time solutions to a range of NP-hard graph problems, and practically, since they arise in many applications including sparse linear algebra, computer vision, and computational biology. A maximal chordal subgraph is a chordal subgraph that is not a proper subgraph of any other chordal subgraph. Existing algorithms for computing maximal chordal subgraphs depend on dynamically ordering the vertices, which is an inherently sequential process and therefore limits the algorithms’ parallelizability. In this paper we explore techniques to develop a scalable parallel algorithm for extracting a maximal chordal subgraph. We demonstrate that an earlier attempt at developing a parallel algorithm may induce a non-optimal vertex ordering and is therefore not guaranteed to terminate with a maximal chordal subgraph. We then give a new algorithm that first computes and then repeatedly augments a spanning chordal subgraph. After proving that the algorithm terminates with a maximal chordal subgraph, we then demonstrate that this algorithm is more amenable to parallelization and that the parallel version also terminates with a maximal chordal subgraph. That said, the complexity of the new algorithm is higher than that of the previous parallel algorithm, although the earlier algorithm computes a chordal subgraph which is not guaranteed to be maximal. We experimented with our augmentation-based algorithm on both synthetic and real-world graphs. We provide scalability results and also explore the effect of different choices for the initial spanning chordal subgraph on both the running time and on the number of edges in the maximal chordal subgraph. PMID:25767331

  13. Materials innovation for co-delivery of diverse therapeutic cargos

    PubMed Central

    Godsey, Megan E; Suryaprakash, Smruthi; Leong, Kam W

    2014-01-01

    Co-delivery is a rapidly growing sector of drug delivery that aspires to enhance therapeutic efficacy through controlled delivery of diverse therapeutic cargoes with synergistic activities. It requires the design of carriers capable of simultaneously transporting to and releasing multiple therapeutics at a disease site. Co-delivery has arisen from the emerging trend of combination therapy, where treatment with two or more therapeutics at the same time can succeed where single therapeutics fail. However, conventional combination therapy offers little control over achieving an optimized therapeutic ratio at the target site. Co-delivery via inclusion of multiple therapeutic cargos within the same carrier addresses this issue by not only ensuring delivery of both therapeutics to the same cell, but also offering a platform for control of the delivery process, from loading to release. Co-delivery systems have been formulated using a number of carriers previously developed for single-therapeutic delivery. Liposomes, polymeric micelles, PLGA nanoparticles, and dendrimers have all been adapted for co-delivery. Much of the effort focuses on dealing with drugs having dissimilar properties, increasing loading efficiencies, and controlling loading and release ratios. In this review, we highlight the innovations in carrier designs and formulations to deliver combination cargoes of drug/drug, drug/siRNA, and drug/pDNA toward disease therapy. With rapid advances in mechanistic understanding of interrelating molecular pathways and development of molecular medicine, the future of co-delivery will become increasingly promising and prominent. PMID:24818000

  14. Predicting Achievement and Motivation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uguroglu, Margaret; Walberg, Herbert J.

    1986-01-01

    Motivation and nine other factors were measured for 970 students in grades five through eight in a study of factors predicting achievement and predicting motivation. Results are discussed. (Author/MT)

  15. Attractiveness and School Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salvia, John; And Others

    1977-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to ascertain the relationship between rated attractiveness and two measures of school performance. Attractive children received significantly higher report cards and, to some degree, higher achievement test scores than their unattractive peers. (Author)

  16. Student Achievement and Motivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flammer, Gordon H.; Mecham, Robert C.

    1974-01-01

    Compares the lecture and self-paced methods of instruction on the basis of student motivation and achieveme nt, comparing motivating and demotivating factors in each, and their potential for motivation and achievement. (Authors/JR)

  17. Synthetic Biology--Toward Therapeutic Solutions.

    PubMed

    Haellman, Viktor; Fussenegger, Martin

    2016-02-27

    Higher multicellular organisms have evolved sophisticated intracellular and intercellular biological networks that enable cell growth and survival to fulfill an organism's needs. Although such networks allow the assembly of complex tissues and even provide healing and protective capabilities, malfunctioning cells can have severe consequences for an organism's survival. In humans, such events can result in severe disorders and diseases, including metabolic and immunological disorders, as well as cancer. Dominating the therapeutic frontier for these potentially lethal disorders, cell and gene therapies aim to relieve or eliminate patient suffering by restoring the function of damaged, diseased, and aging cells and tissues via the introduction of healthy cells or alternative genes. However, despite recent success, these efforts have yet to achieve sufficient therapeutic effects, and further work is needed to ensure the safe and precise control of transgene expression and cellular processes. In this review, we describe the biological tools and devices that are at the forefront of synthetic biology and discuss their potential to advance the specificity, efficiency, and safety of the current generation of cell and gene therapies, including how they can be used to confer curative effects that far surpass those of conventional therapeutics. We also highlight the current therapeutic delivery tools and the current limitations that hamper their use in human applications. PMID:26334368

  18. Maximal oxygen uptake during exercise using trained or untrained muscles.

    PubMed

    Moreira-da-Costa, M; Russo, A K; Piçarro, I C; Silva, A C; Leite-de-Barros-Neto, T; Tarasantchi, J; Barbosa, A S

    1984-01-01

    Maximal oxygen uptake, VO2 max, was determined for cyclists, long-distance runners and non-athletes during uphill running (treadmill) and cycling (cycloergometer) to compare trained and untrained muscles. Blood lactate, maximal heart rate and maximal ventilation during work were also measured. VO2 max was higher for runners and non-athletes during exercise on the treadmill and higher for cyclists during exercise on the cycloergometer. For runners and non-athletes, maximal heart rate accompanied the increase in VO2 max, whereas similar values were obtained for cyclists on both ergometers. Maximal ventilation during work accompanied the difference in VO2 max in both groups of athletes but among non-athletes it was similar during exercise on both the cycloergometer and the treadmill. Blood lactate was similar during exercise on both ergometers for all groups. These results suggest that the quantitative effects of training on cardiovascular and respiratory functions may only be properly evaluated by using an ergometer which requires an activity similar to that usually performed by the subjects. Cycle riding may possibly induce significant and specific alterations in the muscles involved in the exercise, thus increasing peripheral O2 uptake even after stabilization of maximal cardiac output, whereas running may well induce an improvement of all factors which are responsible for aerobic work power. PMID:6518340

  19. Evolution of Shanghai STOCK Market Based on Maximal Spanning Trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chunxia; Shen, Ying; Xia, Bingying

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, using a moving window to scan through every stock price time series over a period from 2 January 2001 to 11 March 2011 and mutual information to measure the statistical interdependence between stock prices, we construct a corresponding weighted network for 501 Shanghai stocks in every given window. Next, we extract its maximal spanning tree and understand the structure variation of Shanghai stock market by analyzing the average path length, the influence of the center node and the p-value for every maximal spanning tree. A further analysis of the structure properties of maximal spanning trees over different periods of Shanghai stock market is carried out. All the obtained results indicate that the periods around 8 August 2005, 17 October 2007 and 25 December 2008 are turning points of Shanghai stock market, at turning points, the topology structure of the maximal spanning tree changes obviously: the degree of separation between nodes increases; the structure becomes looser; the influence of the center node gets smaller, and the degree distribution of the maximal spanning tree is no longer a power-law distribution. Lastly, we give an analysis of the variations of the single-step and multi-step survival ratios for all maximal spanning trees and find that two stocks are closely bonded and hard to be broken in a short term, on the contrary, no pair of stocks remains closely bonded for a long time.

  20. Maximal non-classicality in multi-setting Bell inequalities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavakoli, Armin; Zohren, Stefan; Pawlowski, Marcin

    2016-04-01

    The discrepancy between maximally entangled states and maximally non-classical quantum correlations is well-known but still not well understood. We aim to investigate the relation between quantum correlations and entanglement in a family of Bell inequalities with N-settings and d outcomes. Using analytical as well as numerical techniques, we derive both maximal quantum violations and violations obtained from maximally entangled states. Furthermore, we study the most non-classical quantum states in terms of their entanglement entropy for large values of d and many measurement settings. Interestingly, we find that the entanglement entropy behaves very differently depending on whether N = 2 or N\\gt 2: when N = 2 the entanglement entropy is a monotone function of d and the most non-classical state is far from maximally entangled, whereas when N\\gt 2 the entanglement entropy is a non-monotone function of d and converges to that of the maximally entangled state in the limit of large d.

  1. Activation of Toll-like receptor 3 amplifies mesenchymal stem cell trophic factors and enhances therapeutic potency.

    PubMed

    Mastri, Michalis; Shah, Zaeem; McLaughlin, Terence; Greene, Christopher J; Baum, Leah; Suzuki, Gen; Lee, Techung

    2012-11-15

    Clinical trials of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) therapy have thus far demonstrated moderate and inconsistent benefits, indicating an urgent need to improve therapeutic efficacy. Although administration of sufficient cells is necessary to achieve maximal therapeutic benefits, documented MSC clinical trials have largely relied on injections of ∼1 × 10(6) cells/kg, which appears too low to elicit a robust therapeutic response according to published preclinical studies. However, repeated cell passaging necessary for large-scale expansion of MSC causes cellular senescence and reduces stem cell potency. Using the RNA mimetic polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid [poly(I:C)] to engage MSC Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3), we found that poly(I:C), signaling through multiple mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways, induced therapeutically relevant trophic factors such as interleukin-6-type cytokines, stromal-derived factor 1, hepatocyte growth factor, and vascular endothelial growth factor while slightly inhibiting the proliferation and migration potentials of MSC. At the suboptimal injection dose of 1 × 10(6) cells/kg, poly(I:C)-treated MSC, but not untreated MSC, effectively stimulated regeneration of the failing hamster heart 1 mo after cell administration. The regenerating heart exhibited increased CD34(+)/Ki67(+) and CD34(+)/GATA4(+) progenitor cells in the presence of decreased inflammatory cells and cytokines. Cardiac functional improvement was associated with a ∼50% reduction in fibrosis, a ∼40% reduction in apoptosis, and a ∼55% increase in angiogenesis, culminating in prominent cardiomyogenesis evidenced by abundant distribution of small myocytes and a ∼90% increase in wall thickening. These functional, histological, and molecular characterizations thus establish the utility of TLR3 engagement for enabling the low-dose MSC therapy that may be translated to more efficacious clinical applications. PMID:22843797

  2. New therapeutic agents for acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Melmed, Shlomo

    2016-02-01

    The currently available somatostatin receptor ligands (SRLs) and growth hormone (GH) antagonists are used to control levels of GH and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) in patients with acromegaly. However, these therapies are limited by wide variations in efficacy, associated adverse effects and the need for frequent injections. A phase III trial of oral octreotide capsules demonstrated that this treatment can safely sustain suppressed levels of GH and IGF-1 and reduce the severity of symptoms in patients with acromegaly previously controlled by injectable SRL therapy, with the added benefit of no injection-site reactions. Phase I and phase II trials of the pan-selective SRL DG3173, the liquid crystal octreotide depot CAM2029 and an antisense oligonucleotide directed against the GH receptor have shown that these agents can be used to achieve biochemical suppression in acromegaly and have favourable safety profiles. This Review outlines the need for new therapeutic agents for patients with acromegaly, reviews clinical trial data of investigational agents and considers how these therapies might best be integrated into clinical practice. PMID:26610414

  3. Exploring the interplay between the motivational climate and goal orientation in predicting maximal oxygen uptake.

    PubMed

    Buch, Robert; Nerstad, Christina G L; Aandstad, Anders; Säfvenbom, Reidar

    2016-01-01

    Drawing upon achievement goal theory, this study explored the interplay between the perceived motivational climate, achievement goals and objective measurements of maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max). The results of a study of 123 individuals from three Norwegian military academies revealed that under the condition of a high-performance orientation there is a stronger positive relationship between performance climate and VO2max for individuals reporting a low (rather than high)-mastery orientation. Furthermore, we found that for individuals with a high-mastery orientation there is a stronger positive relationship between mastery climate and VO2max for individuals reporting a low (rather than high)-performance orientation. These findings contribute to achievement goal theory by providing support for an interactionist person-environment fit perspective. Implications for future research and practice are discussed. PMID:25995068

  4. High muscle blood flow in man: is maximal O2 extraction compromised?

    PubMed

    Richardson, R S; Poole, D C; Knight, D R; Kurdak, S S; Hogan, M C; Grassi, B; Johnson, E C; Kendrick, K F; Erickson, B K; Wagner, P D

    1993-10-01

    During conventional cycle ergometry, as work rate (WR) is increased toward maximum, O2 extraction increases hyperbolically, typically achieving values of 80-90% at peak O2 uptake (VO2). In contrast, studies using isolated knee-extensor exercise report much higher mass-specific blood flows (Q) and lower maximal O2 extractions (approximately 70%), which have been interpreted as transit time limitation to O2 movement out of the muscle capillary. However, maximal achievable WR levels during conventional cycle ergometry are generally reached (over 10-15 min) after rapid increases in WR, whereas the reported knee-extensor studies have used only more lengthy protocols (45 min). The duration of these protocols may have prevented the attainment of high WR levels and thus high O2 extraction ratios. Accordingly, this investigation examined leg Q and O2 extraction responses during single-leg knee-extensor exercise incremented rapidly (steps of 15-25 W per 2- to 3-min interval), which produced fatigue in 13-15 min. Q and muscle VO2 increased linearly with WR to fatigue with Q-WR and VO2-WR slopes similar to those reported in previous knee-extensor studies. However, with the use of this protocol, very high maximal achievable WR [99 +/- 6 (SE) W] and muscle Q (385 +/- 26 ml.min-1 x 100 g-1) levels were attained, some 80% greater than previously reported. An O2 extraction of 84.6 +/- 2.1% was reached, giving a maximal VO2 of 60.2 +/- 5.8 ml.min-1 x 100 g-1. We conclude that, even under the high Q conditions of single-leg knee-extensor exercise, O2 extraction does not reach a plateau on the basis of short transit times and that previous conclusions to the contrary reflect failure to attain sufficiently high WR levels. Maximal VO2, Q, and O2 extraction in this model have yet to be defined. PMID:8282650

  5. Microfabricated therapeutic actuators

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Abraham P.; Northrup, M. Allen; Ciarlo, Dino R.; Krulevitch, Peter A.; Benett, William J.

    1999-01-01

    Microfabricated therapeutic actuators are fabricated using a shape memory polymer (SMP), a polyurethane-based material that undergoes a phase transformation at a specified temperature (Tg). At a temperature above temperature Tg material is soft and can be easily reshaped into another configuration. As the temperature is lowered below temperature Tg the new shape is fixed and locked in as long as the material stays below temperature Tg. Upon reheating the material to a temperature above Tg, the material will return to its original shape. By the use of such SMP material, SMP microtubing can be used as a release actuator for the delivery of embolic coils through catheters into aneurysms, for example. The microtubing can be manufactured in various sizes and the phase change temperature Tg is determinate for an intended temperature target and intended use.

  6. Microfabricated therapeutic actuators

    DOEpatents

    Lee, A.P.; Northrup, M.A.; Ciarlo, D.R.; Krulevitch, P.A.; Benett, W.J.

    1999-06-15

    Microfabricated therapeutic actuators are fabricated using a shape memory polymer (SMP), a polyurethane-based material that undergoes a phase transformation at a specified temperature (Tg). At a temperature above temperature Tg material is soft and can be easily reshaped into another configuration. As the temperature is lowered below temperature Tg the new shape is fixed and locked in as long as the material stays below temperature Tg. Upon reheating the material to a temperature above Tg, the material will return to its original shape. By the use of such SMP material, SMP microtubing can be used as a release actuator for the delivery of embolic coils through catheters into aneurysms, for example. The microtubing can be manufactured in various sizes and the phase change temperature Tg is determinate for an intended temperature target and intended use. 8 figs.

  7. Aptamers in Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Aptamers are single strand DNA or RNA molecules, selected by an iterative process known as Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment (SELEX). Due to various advantages of aptamers such as high temperature stability, animal free, cost effective production and its high affinity and selectivity for its target make them attractive alternatives to monoclonal antibody for use in diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. Aptamer has been generated against vesicular endothelial growth factor 165 involved in age related macular degeneracy. Macugen was the first FDA approved aptamer based drug that was commercialized. Later other aptamers were also developed against blood clotting proteins, cancer proteins, antibody E, agents involved in diabetes nephropathy, autoantibodies involved in autoimmune disorders, etc. Aptamers have also been developed against viruses and could work with other antiviral agents in treating infections. PMID:27504277

  8. Antibody Engineering and Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Almagro, Juan Carlos; Gilliland, Gary L; Breden, Felix; Scott, Jamie K; Sok, Devin; Pauthner, Matthias; Reichert, Janice M; Helguera, Gustavo; Andrabi, Raiees; Mabry, Robert; Bléry, Mathieu; Voss, James E; Laurén, Juha; Abuqayyas, Lubna; Barghorn, Stefan; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Crowe, James E; Huston, James S; Johnston, Stephen Albert; Krauland, Eric; Lund-Johansen, Fridtjof; Marasco, Wayne A; Parren, Paul WHI; Xu, Kai Y

    2014-01-01

    The 24th Antibody Engineering & Therapeutics meeting brought together a broad range of participants who were updated on the latest advances in antibody research and development. Organized by IBC Life Sciences, the gathering is the annual meeting of The Antibody Society, which serves as the scientific sponsor. Preconference workshops on 3D modeling and delineation of clonal lineages were featured, and the conference included sessions on a wide variety of topics relevant to researchers, including systems biology; antibody deep sequencing and repertoires; the effects of antibody gene variation and usage on antibody response; directed evolution; knowledge-based design; antibodies in a complex environment; polyreactive antibodies and polyspecificity; the interface between antibody therapy and cellular immunity in cancer; antibodies in cardiometabolic medicine; antibody pharmacokinetics, distribution and off-target toxicity; optimizing antibody formats for immunotherapy; polyclonals, oligoclonals and bispecifics; antibody discovery platforms; and antibody-drug conjugates. PMID:24589717

  9. Mitochondrial Energetics and Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Douglas C.; Fan, Weiwei; Procaccio, Vincent

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been linked to a wide range of degenerative and metabolic diseases, cancer, and aging. All these clinical manifestations arise from the central role of bioenergetics in cell biology. Although genetic therapies are maturing as the rules of bioenergetic genetics are clarified, metabolic therapies have been ineffectual. This failure results from our limited appreciation of the role of bioenergetics as the interface between the environment and the cell. A systems approach, which, ironically, was first successfully applied over 80 years ago with the introduction of the ketogenic diet, is required. Analysis of the many ways that a shift from carbohydrate glycolytic metabolism to fatty acid and ketone oxidative metabolism may modulate metabolism, signal transduction pathways, and the epigenome gives us an appreciation of the ketogenic diet and the potential for bioenergetic therapeutics. PMID:20078222

  10. Principles of therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Miller, T R

    1992-12-01

    Topical administration of drugs is the treatment of choice for diseases of the anterior segment. Drug levels attained by this means are usually of short duration, however, necessitating frequent therapy or continuous perfusion if prolonged drug levels are required. A drug-delivery device (collagen shield or contact lens) or subconjunctival injections can be used to augment topical therapy if frequent treatment is not possible. Subconjunctival injections are recommended for drugs that have low solubility and, hence, low corneal penetration. Retrobulbar injections are seldom indicated, except for regional anesthesia. Systemic administration is useful for anti-inflammatory therapy but it may be difficult to establish therapeutic levels of antibiotic agents in the eye because of the blood-ocular barrier. In severe cases, intraocular injection may be required. PMID:1458325

  11. Antioxidant therapeutics: Pandora's box.

    PubMed

    Day, Brian J

    2014-01-01

    Evolution has favored the utilization of dioxygen (O2) in the development of complex multicellular organisms. O2 is actually a toxic mutagenic gas that is highly oxidizing and combustible. It is thought that plants are largely to blame for polluting the earth's atmosphere with O2 owing to the development of photosynthesis by blue-green algae over 2 billion years ago. The rise of the plants and atmospheric O2 levels placed evolutionary stress on organisms to adapt or become extinct. This implies that all the surviving creatures on our planet are mutants that have adapted to the "abnormal biology" of O2. Much of the adaptation to the presence of O2 in biological systems comes from well-coordinated antioxidant and repair systems that focus on converting O2 to its most reduced form, water (H2O), and the repair and replacement of damaged cellular macromolecules. Biological systems have also harnessed O2's reactive properties for energy production, xenobiotic metabolism, and host defense and as a signaling messenger and redox modulator of a number of cell signaling pathways. Many of these systems involve electron transport systems and offer many different mechanisms by which antioxidant therapeutics can alternatively produce an antioxidant effect without directly scavenging oxygen-derived reactive species. It is likely that each agent will have a different set of mechanisms that may change depending on the model of oxidative stress, organ system, or disease state. An important point is that all biological processes of aerobes have coevolved with O2 and this creates a Pandora's box for trying to understand the mechanism(s) of action of antioxidants being developed as therapeutic agents. PMID:23856377

  12. GTI-2040. Lorus Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Orr, R M

    2001-10-01

    Loris Therapeutics (formerly GeneSense Therapeutics) is developing the antisense oligonucleotide GTI-2040, directed against the R2 component of ribonucleotide reductase, for the potential treatment of cancer [348194]. It is in phase I/II trials [353796] and Lorus had anticipated phase II trials would be initiated in July 2001. By August 2001, GTI-2040 was undergoing a phase II trial as a monotherapy for the potential treatment of renal cell carcinoma, and was about to enter a phase II combination study for this indication with capecitabine (Hoffmann-La Roche). At this time, the company was also planning a phase II trial to study the drug's potential in the treatment of colorectal cancer [418739]. GTI-2040 has been tested in nine different tumor models, including tumors derived from colon, liver, lung, breast, kidney and ovary. Depending on the tumor model, significant inhibition of tumor growth, disease stabilization and dramatic tumor regressions was observed [347683]. Lorus filed an IND to commence phase I/II trials with GTI-2040 in the US in November 1999 [347683], and received approval for the trials in December 1999 [349623]. As of January 2000, these trials had commenced at the University of Chicago Cancer Research Center; it was reported in February 2000 that dosing to date had been well tolerated with no apparent safety concerns [357449]. Lorus has entered into a strategic supply alliance with Proligo to provide the higher volumes of drug product required for the planned multiple phase II trials [385976]. In February 1998, Genesense (now Lorus) received patent WO-09805769. Loris also received a patent (subsequently identified as WO-00047733) from the USPTO in January 2000, entitled 'Antitumor antisense sequences directed against components of ribonucleotide reductase' covering the design and use of unique antisense anticancer drugs, including GTI-2040 and GTI-2501 [353538]. PMID:11890366

  13. [Therapeutic strategies for systemic lupus erythematosus].

    PubMed

    Schneider, M

    2015-04-01

    Therapeutic strategy means the definition of a long-term target, which should be reached by a chosen management. As for rheumatoid arthritis, the treat to target initiative recommends remission as the target for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) but the command variables of remission are not yet defined. The basis of a therapeutic strategy is first the analysis of those factors that may influence the achievement of the objectives: SLE disease activity, the differentiation of damage, organ manifestations, comorbidities, genetics, sex, age of onset and considering the pathophysiological basis are some of these factors. The next step is the analysis of the available substances and concepts that allow the target to be reached. Finally, rules for management (e.g. guidelines) are needed that enrich the possibility to reach the target and improve the prognosis of patients suffering from SLE. PMID:25854154

  14. Engineered therapeutic-releasing nanoporous anodic alumina-aluminum wires with extended release of therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Law, Cheryl Suwen; Santos, Abel; Kumeria, Tushar; Losic, Dusan

    2015-02-18

    In this study, we present a nanoengineered therapeutic-releasing system based on aluminum wires featuring nanoporous anodic alumina layers and chitosan coatings. Nanoporous anodic alumina layers are produced on the surface of aluminum wires by electrochemical anodization. These nanoporous layers with precisely engineered nanopore geometry are used as nanocontainers for bovine serum albumin molecules labeled with fluorescein isothiocyanate (BSA-FITC), which is selected as a model drug. The surface of these therapeutic-releasing implants is coated with a biocompatible and biodegradable polymer, chitosan, in order to achieve a sustained release of protein over extended periods of time. The performance of this therapeutic-releasing device is systematically assessed through a series of experiments under static and dynamic flow conditions. In these experiments, the effect of such parameters as the number of layers of chitosan coating and the temperature and pH of the eluting medium is established. The obtained results reveal that the proposed therapeutic-releasing system based on nanoporous aluminum wires can be engineered with sustained release performance for up to 6.5 weeks, which is a critical factor for medical treatments using sensitive therapeutics such as proteins and genes when a localized delivery is desired. PMID:25625878

  15. Gaussian beam decomposition of high frequency wave fields using expectation-maximization

    SciTech Connect

    Ariel, Gil; Engquist, Bjoern; Tanushev, Nicolay M.; Tsai, Richard

    2011-03-20

    A new numerical method for approximating highly oscillatory wave fields as a superposition of Gaussian beams is presented. The method estimates the number of beams and their parameters automatically. This is achieved by an expectation-maximization algorithm that fits real, positive Gaussians to the energy of the highly oscillatory wave fields and its Fourier transform. Beam parameters are further refined by an optimization procedure that minimizes the difference between the Gaussian beam superposition and the highly oscillatory wave field in the energy norm.

  16. Molecular maximizing characterizes choice on Vaughan's (1981) procedure

    PubMed Central

    Silberberg, Alan; Ziriax, John M.

    1985-01-01

    Pigeons keypecked on a two-key procedure in which their choice ratios during one time period determined the reinforcement rates assigned to each key during the next period (Vaughan, 1981). During each of four phases, which differed in the reinforcement rates they provided for different choice ratios, the duration of these periods was four minutes, duplicating one condition from Vaughan's study. During the other four phases, these periods lasted six seconds. When these periods were long, the results were similar to Vaughan's and appeared compatible with melioration theory. But when these periods were short, the data were consistent with molecular maximizing (see Silberberg & Ziriax, 1982) and were incompatible with melioration, molar maximizing, and matching. In a simulation, stat birds following a molecular-maximizing algorithm responded on the short- and long-period conditions of this experiment. When the time periods lasted four minutes, the results were similar to Vaughan's and to the results of the four-minute conditions of this study; when the time periods lasted six seconds, the choice data were similar to the data from real subjects for the six-second conditions. Thus, a molecular-maximizing response rule generated choice data comparable to those from the short- and long-period conditions of this experiment. These data show that, among extant accounts, choice on the Vaughan procedure is most compatible with molecular maximizing. PMID:16812409

  17. Ventilatory patterns differ between maximal running and cycling.

    PubMed

    Tanner, David A; Duke, Joseph W; Stager, Joel M

    2014-01-15

    To determine the effect of exercise mode on ventilatory patterns, 22 trained men performed two maximal graded exercise tests; one running on a treadmill and one cycling on an ergometer. Tidal flow-volume (FV) loops were recorded during each minute of exercise with maximal loops measured pre and post exercise. Running resulted in a greater VO2peak than cycling (62.7±7.6 vs. 58.1±7.2mLkg(-1)min(-1)). Although maximal ventilation (VE) did not differ between modes, ventilatory equivalents for O2 and CO2 were significantly larger during maximal cycling. Arterial oxygen saturation (estimated via ear oximeter) was also greater during maximal cycling, as were end-expiratory (EELV; 3.40±0.54 vs. 3.21±0.55L) and end-inspiratory lung volumes, (EILV; 6.24±0.88 vs. 5.90±0.74L). Based on these results we conclude that ventilatory patterns differ as a function of exercise mode and these observed differences are likely due to the differences in posture adopted during exercise in these modes. PMID:24211317

  18. Clinical applications of therapeutic phlebotomy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyung Hee; Oh, Ki Young

    2016-01-01

    Phlebotomy is the removal of blood from the body, and therapeutic phlebotomy is the preferred treatment for blood disorders in which the removal of red blood cells or serum iron is the most efficient method for managing the symptoms and complications. Therapeutic phlebotomy is currently indicated for the treatment of hemochromatosis, polycythemia vera, porphyria cutanea tarda, sickle cell disease, and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease with hyperferritinemia. This review discusses therapeutic phlebotomy and the related disorders and also offers guidelines for establishing a therapeutic phlebotomy program. PMID:27486346

  19. Therapeutic proteins: A to Z.

    PubMed

    Ozgur, Aykut; Tutar, Yusuf

    2013-12-01

    In recent years, therapeutic proteins have become an important growing class of drugs in the pharmaceutics industry. The development of recombinant DNA technology has caused to appreciation of therapeutic value of many proteins and peptides in medicine. Currently, approximately 100 therapeutic proteins obtained approval from Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and they are widely used in the treatment of various diseases such as cancer, diabetes, anemia and infections. This paper will summarize the production processes, pharmaceuticals and physicochemical properties and important classes of therapeutic proteins with their potential use in clinical applications. PMID:24261980

  20. Therapeutic cloning: The ethical limits

    SciTech Connect

    Whittaker, Peter A. . E-mail: p.whittaker@lancaster.ac.uk

    2005-09-01

    A brief outline of stem cells, stem cell therapy and therapeutic cloning is given. The position of therapeutic cloning with regard to other embryonic manipulations - IVF-based reproduction, embryonic stem formation from IVF embryos and reproductive cloning - is indicated. The main ethically challenging stages in therapeutic cloning are considered to be the nuclear transfer process including the source of eggs for this and the destruction of an embryo to provide stem cells for therapeutic use. The extremely polarised nature of the debate regarding the status of an early human embryo is noted, and some potential alternative strategies for preparing immunocompatible pluripotent stem cells are indicated.

  1. Effects of rider position on continuous wave Doppler responses to maximal cycle ergometry.

    PubMed

    Franke, W D; Betz, C B; Humphrey, R H

    1994-03-01

    Using 10 well-trained (VO2peak = 60.6 ml kg-1min-1) college age cyclists and continuous wave Doppler echocardiography, peak acceleration (PkA) and velocity (PkV) of blood flow in the ascending aorta, and the stroke velocity integral (SVI) were assessed to determine if rider position influenced the central haemodynamic responses to graded maximal cycle ergometry. Cyclist position was determined by hand placement on the uprights (UPRI) or drops (DROP) of conventional handlebars or using aerodynamic handlebars (AHB). All subjects consistently achieved a peak workload of 300 W. The Doppler variables did not differ significantly between rider positions at each stage of the maximal exercise tests but did change in response to increasing workloads. PkA was significantly (P < 0.05) greater at workloads > or = 240 W versus < or = 120 W. PkV increased significantly (P < 0.05) up to 180 W and then reached a plateau. SVI increased to a workload of 120 W and then progressively declined, becoming significantly (P < 0.05) less at 300 W. For each stage, neither submaximal VO2, VI nor heart rate (HR) differed significantly between each trial. These results suggest that rider position does not affect the physiological response to maximal bicycle ergometry as responses to each position are similar. PMID:8044492

  2. Effects of rider position on continuous wave Doppler responses to maximal cycle ergometry.

    PubMed Central

    Franke, W D; Betz, C B; Humphrey, R H

    1994-01-01

    Using 10 well-trained (VO2peak = 60.6 ml kg-1min-1) college age cyclists and continuous wave Doppler echocardiography, peak acceleration (PkA) and velocity (PkV) of blood flow in the ascending aorta, and the stroke velocity integral (SVI) were assessed to determine if rider position influenced the central haemodynamic responses to graded maximal cycle ergometry. Cyclist position was determined by hand placement on the uprights (UPRI) or drops (DROP) of conventional handlebars or using aerodynamic handlebars (AHB). All subjects consistently achieved a peak workload of 300 W. The Doppler variables did not differ significantly between rider positions at each stage of the maximal exercise tests but did change in response to increasing workloads. PkA was significantly (P < 0.05) greater at workloads > or = 240 W versus < or = 120 W. PkV increased significantly (P < 0.05) up to 180 W and then reached a plateau. SVI increased to a workload of 120 W and then progressively declined, becoming significantly (P < 0.05) less at 300 W. For each stage, neither submaximal VO2, VI nor heart rate (HR) differed significantly between each trial. These results suggest that rider position does not affect the physiological response to maximal bicycle ergometry as responses to each position are similar. PMID:8044492

  3. Further reduction of minimal first-met bad markings for the computationally efficient synthesis of a maximally permissive controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, GaiYun; Chao, Daniel Yuh

    2015-08-01

    To date, research on the supervisor design for flexible manufacturing systems focuses on speeding up the computation of optimal (maximally permissive) liveness-enforcing controllers. Recent deadlock prevention policies for systems of simple sequential processes with resources (S3PR) reduce the computation burden by considering only the minimal portion of all first-met bad markings (FBMs). Maximal permissiveness is ensured by not forbidding any live state. This paper proposes a method to further reduce the size of minimal set of FBMs to efficiently solve integer linear programming problems while maintaining maximal permissiveness using a vector-covering approach. This paper improves the previous work and achieves the simplest structure with the minimal number of monitors.

  4. [Hypercholesterolemia: a therapeutic approach].

    PubMed

    Moráis López, A; Lama More, R A; Dalmau Serra, J

    2009-05-01

    High blood cholesterol levels represent an important cardiovascular risk factor. Hypercholesterolemia is defined as levels of total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol above 95th percentile for age and gender. For the paediatric population, selective screening is recommended in children older than 2 years who are overweight, with a family history of early cardiovascular disease or whose parents have high cholesterol levels. Initial therapeutic approach includes diet therapy, appropriate physical activity and healthy lifestyle changes. Drug treatment should be considered in children from the age of 10 who, after having followed appropriate diet recommendations, still have very high LDL-cholesterol levels or moderately high levels with concomitant risk factors. In case of extremely high LDL-cholesterol levels, drug treatment should be taken into consideration at earlier ages (8 years old). Modest response is usually observed with bile acid-binding resins. Statins can be considered first-choice drugs, once evidence on their efficacy and safety has been shown. PMID:19427823

  5. Plasmids encoding therapeutic agents

    DOEpatents

    Keener, William K.

    2007-08-07

    Plasmids encoding anti-HIV and anti-anthrax therapeutic agents are disclosed. Plasmid pWKK-500 encodes a fusion protein containing DP178 as a targeting moiety, the ricin A chain, an HIV protease cleavable linker, and a truncated ricin B chain. N-terminal extensions of the fusion protein include the maltose binding protein and a Factor Xa protease site. C-terminal extensions include a hydrophobic linker, an L domain motif peptide, a KDEL ER retention signal, another Factor Xa protease site, an out-of-frame buforin II coding sequence, the lacZ.alpha. peptide, and a polyhistidine tag. More than twenty derivatives of plasmid pWKK-500 are described. Plasmids pWKK-700 and pWKK-800 are similar to pWKK-500 wherein the DP178-encoding sequence is substituted by RANTES- and SDF-1-encoding sequences, respectively. Plasmid pWKK-900 is similar to pWKK-500 wherein the HIV protease cleavable linker is substituted by a lethal factor (LF) peptide-cleavable linker.

  6. Leech Therapeutic Applications

    PubMed Central

    Abdualkader, A. M.; Ghawi, A. M.; Alaama, M.; Awang, M.; Merzouk, A.

    2013-01-01

    Hematophagous animals including leeches have been known to possess biologically active compounds in their secretions, especially in their saliva. The blood-sucking annelids, leeches have been used for therapeutic purposes since the beginning of civilization. Ancient Egyptian, Indian, Greek and Arab physicians used leeches for a wide range of diseases starting from the conventional use for bleeding to systemic ailments, such as skin diseases, nervous system abnormalities, urinary and reproductive system problems, inflammation, and dental problems. Recently, extensive researches on leech saliva unveiled the presence of a variety of bioactive peptides and proteins involving antithrombin (hirudin, bufrudin), antiplatelet (calin, saratin), factor Xa inhibitors (lefaxin), antibacterial (theromacin, theromyzin) and others. Consequently, leech has made a comeback as a new remedy for many chronic and life-threatening abnormalities, such as cardiovascular problems, cancer, metastasis, and infectious diseases. In the 20th century, leech therapy has established itself in plastic and microsurgery as a protective tool against venous congestion and served to salvage the replanted digits and flaps. Many clinics for plastic surgery all over the world started to use leeches for cosmetic purposes. Despite the efficacious properties of leech therapy, the safety, and complications of leeching are still controversial. PMID:24019559

  7. Experimental Therapeutics for Dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Jinnah, H. A.; Hess, Ellen J.

    2008-01-01

    Dystonia is a neurological syndrome characterized by excessive involuntary muscle contractions leading to twisting movements and unnatural postures. It has many different clinical manifestations, and many different causes. More than 3 million people worldwide suffer from dystonia, yet there are few broadly effective treatments. In the past decade, progress in research has advanced our understanding of the pathogenesis of dystonia to a point where drug discovery efforts are now feasible. There are several strategies that can be used to develop novel therapeutics for dystonia. Existing therapies have only modest efficacy, but may be refined and improved to increase benefits while reducing side effects. Identifying rational targets for drug intervention based on the pathogenesis of dystonia is another strategy. The surge in both basic and clinical research discoveries has provided insights at all levels including etiological, physiological and nosological, to enable such a targeted approach. The empirical approach to drug discovery is complementary to the rational approach whereby compounds are identified using a non-mechanistic strategy. [MD1] With the recent development of multiple animal models of dystonia, it is now possible to develop assays and perform drug screens on vast number of compounds. This multifaceted approach to drug discovery in dystonia will likely provide lead compounds that can then be translated for clinical use. PMID:18394563

  8. Explorations in achievement motivation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helmreich, Robert L.

    1982-01-01

    Recent research on the nature of achievement motivation is reviewed. A three-factor model of intrinsic motives is presented and related to various criteria of performance, job satisfaction and leisure activities. The relationships between intrinsic and extrinsic motives are discussed. Needed areas for future research are described.

  9. Achieving health care affordability.

    PubMed

    Payson, Norman C

    2002-10-01

    Not all plans are jumping headlong into the consumer-centric arena. In this article, the CEO of Oxford Health Plans discusses how advanced managed care can achieve what other consumer-centric programs seek to do--provide affordable, quality health care. PMID:12391815

  10. Issues in Achievement Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Eva L.

    This booklet is intended to help school personnel, parents, students, and members of the community understand concepts and research relating to achievement testing in public schools. The paper's sections include: (1) test use with direct effects on students (test of certification, selection, and placement); (2) test use with indirect effects on…

  11. Achieving Peace through Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarken, Rodney H.

    While it is generally agreed that peace is desirable, there are barriers to achieving a peaceful world. These barriers are classified into three major areas: (1) an erroneous view of human nature; (2) injustice; and (3) fear of world unity. In a discussion of these barriers, it is noted that although the consciousness and conscience of the world…

  12. Achieving All Our Ambitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartley, Tricia

    2009-01-01

    National learning and skills policy aims both to build economic prosperity and to achieve social justice. Participation in higher education (HE) has the potential to contribute substantially to both aims. That is why the Campaign for Learning has supported the ambition to increase the proportion of the working-age population with a Level 4…

  13. Intelligence and Educational Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deary, Ian J.; Strand, Steve; Smith, Pauline; Fernandes, Cres

    2007-01-01

    This 5-year prospective longitudinal study of 70,000+ English children examined the association between psychometric intelligence at age 11 years and educational achievement in national examinations in 25 academic subjects at age 16. The correlation between a latent intelligence trait (Spearman's "g"from CAT2E) and a latent trait of educational…

  14. SALT and Spelling Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Joan

    A study investigated the effects of suggestopedic accelerative learning and teaching (SALT) on the spelling achievement, attitudes toward school, and memory skills of fourth-grade students. Subjects were 20 male and 28 female students from two self-contained classrooms at Kennedy Elementary School in Rexburg, Idaho. The control classroom and the…

  15. NCLB: Achievement Robin Hood?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bracey, Gerald W.

    2008-01-01

    In his "Wall Street Journal" op-ed on the 25th of anniversary of "A Nation At Risk", former assistant secretary of education Chester E. Finn Jr. applauded the report for turning U.S. education away from equality and toward achievement. It was not surprising, then, that in mid-2008, Finn arranged a conference to examine the potential "Robin Hood…

  16. INTELLIGENCE, PERSONALITY AND ACHIEVEMENT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MUIR, R.C.; AND OTHERS

    A LONGITUDINAL DEVELOPMENTAL STUDY OF A GROUP OF MIDDLE CLASS CHILDREN IS DESCRIBED, WITH EMPHASIS ON A SEGMENT OF THE RESEARCH INVESTIGATING THE RELATIONSHIP OF ACHIEVEMENT, INTELLIGENCE, AND EMOTIONAL DISTURBANCE. THE SUBJECTS WERE 105 CHILDREN AGED FIVE TO 6.3 ATTENDING TWO SCHOOLS IN MONTREAL. EACH CHILD WAS ASSESSED IN THE AREAS OF…

  17. School Students' Science Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shymansky, James; Wang, Tzu-Ling; Annetta, Leonard; Everett, Susan; Yore, Larry D.

    2013-01-01

    This paper is a report of the impact of an externally funded, multiyear systemic reform project on students' science achievement on a modified version of the Third International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) test in 33 small, rural school districts in two Midwest states. The systemic reform effort utilized a cascading leadership strategy…

  18. Advancing Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walberg, Herbert J.

    2010-01-01

    For the last half century, higher spending and many modern reforms have failed to raise the achievement of students in the United States to the levels of other economically advanced countries. A possible explanation, says Herbert Walberg, is that much current education theory is ill informed about scientific psychology, often drawing on fads and…

  19. Essays on Educational Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ampaabeng, Samuel Kofi

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation examines the determinants of student outcomes--achievement, attainment, occupational choices and earnings--in three different contexts. The first two chapters focus on Ghana while the final chapter focuses on the US state of Massachusetts. In the first chapter, I exploit the incidence of famine and malnutrition that resulted to…

  20. Increasing Male Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Barbara Talbert

    2008-01-01

    The No Child Left Behind legislation has brought greater attention to the academic performance of American youth. Its emphasis on student achievement requires a closer analysis of assessment data by school districts. To address the findings, educators must seek strategies to remedy failing results. In a mid-Atlantic district of the Unites States,…

  1. Setting and Achieving Objectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knoop, Robert

    1986-01-01

    Provides basic guidelines which school officials and school boards may find helpful in negotiating, establishing, and managing objectives. Discusses characteristics of good objectives, specific and directional objectives, multiple objectives, participation in setting objectives, feedback on goal process and achievement, and managing a school…

  2. Schools Achieving Gender Equity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Revis, Emma

    This guide is designed to assist teachers presenting the Schools Achieving Gender Equity (SAGE) curriculum for vocational education students, which was developed to align gender equity concepts with the Kentucky Education Reform Act (KERA). Included in the guide are lesson plans for classes on the following topics: legal issues of gender equity,…

  3. Iowa Women of Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohrn, Deborah Gore, Ed.

    1993-01-01

    This issue of the Goldfinch highlights some of Iowa's 20th century women of achievement. These women have devoted their lives to working for human rights, education, equality, and individual rights. They come from the worlds of politics, art, music, education, sports, business, entertainment, and social work. They represent Native Americans,…

  4. Achievements or Disasters?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwin, MacArthur

    2000-01-01

    Focuses on policy issues that have affected arts education in the twentieth century, such as: interest in discipline-based arts education, influence of national arts associations, and national standards and coordinated assessment. States that whether the policy decisions are viewed as achievements or disasters are for future determination. (CMK)

  5. Minority Achievement Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prince George's Community Coll., Largo, MD. Office of Institutional Research and Analysis.

    This report summarizes the achievements of Prince George's Community College (PGCC) with regard to minority outcomes. Table 1 summarizes the undergraduate enrollment trends for African Americans as well as total minorities from fall 1994 through fall 1998. Both the headcount number of African American students and the proportion of African…

  6. Appraising Reading Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ediger, Marlow

    To determine quality sequence in pupil progress, evaluation approaches need to be used which guide the teacher to assist learners to attain optimally. Teachers must use a variety of procedures to appraise student achievement in reading, because no one approach is adequate. Appraisal approaches might include: (1) observation and subsequent…

  7. Aging and loss decision making: increased risk aversion and decreased use of maximizing information, with correlated rationality and value maximization

    PubMed Central

    Kurnianingsih, Yoanna A.; Sim, Sam K. Y.; Chee, Michael W. L.; Mullette-Gillman, O’Dhaniel A.

    2015-01-01

    We investigated how adult aging specifically alters economic decision-making, focusing on examining alterations in uncertainty preferences (willingness to gamble) and choice strategies (what gamble information influences choices) within both the gains and losses domains. Within each domain, participants chose between certain monetary outcomes and gambles with uncertain outcomes. We examined preferences by quantifying how uncertainty modulates choice behavior as if altering the subjective valuation of gambles. We explored age-related preferences for two types of uncertainty, risk, and ambiguity. Additionally, we explored how aging may alter what information participants utilize to make their choices by comparing the relative utilization of maximizing and satisficing information types through a choice strategy metric. Maximizing information was the ratio of the expected value of the two options, while satisficing information was the probability of winning. We found age-related alterations of economic preferences within the losses domain, but no alterations within the gains domain. Older adults (OA; 61–80 years old) were significantly more uncertainty averse for both risky and ambiguous choices. OA also exhibited choice strategies with decreased use of maximizing information. Within OA, we found a significant correlation between risk preferences and choice strategy. This linkage between preferences and strategy appears to derive from a convergence to risk neutrality driven by greater use of the effortful maximizing strategy. As utility maximization and value maximization intersect at risk neutrality, this result suggests that OA are exhibiting a relationship between enhanced rationality and enhanced value maximization. While there was variability in economic decision-making measures within OA, these individual differences were unrelated to variability within examined measures of cognitive ability. Our results demonstrate that aging alters economic decision

  8. Optimal Halbach permanent magnet designs for maximally pulling and pushing nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarwar, A.; Nemirovski, A.; Shapiro, B.

    2012-03-01

    Optimization methods are presented to design Halbach arrays to maximize the forces applied on magnetic nanoparticles at deep tissue locations. In magnetic drug targeting, where magnets are used to focus therapeutic nanoparticles to disease locations, the sharp fall off of magnetic fields and forces with distances from magnets has limited the depth of targeting. Creating stronger forces at a depth by optimally designed Halbach arrays would allow treatment of a wider class of patients, e.g. patients with deeper tumors. The presented optimization methods are based on semi-definite quadratic programming, yield provably globally optimal Halbach designs in 2 and 3-dimensions, for maximal pull or push magnetic forces (stronger pull forces can collect nanoparticles against blood forces in deeper vessels; push forces can be used to inject particles into precise locations, e.g. into the inner ear). These Halbach designs, here tested in simulations of Maxwell's equations, significantly outperform benchmark magnets of the same size and strength. For example, a 3-dimensional 36 element 2000 cm3 volume optimal Halbach design yields a 5× greater force at a 10 cm depth compared to a uniformly magnetized magnet of the same size and strength. The designed arrays should be feasible to construct, as they have a similar strength (≤1 T), size (≤2000 cm3), and number of elements (≤36) as previously demonstrated arrays, and retain good performance for reasonable manufacturing errors (element magnetization direction errors ≤5°), thus yielding practical designs to improve magnetic drug targeting treatment depths.

  9. Column generation algorithms for exact modularity maximization in networks.

    PubMed

    Aloise, Daniel; Cafieri, Sonia; Caporossi, Gilles; Hansen, Pierre; Perron, Sylvain; Liberti, Leo

    2010-10-01

    Finding modules, or clusters, in networks currently attracts much attention in several domains. The most studied criterion for doing so, due to Newman and Girvan [Phys. Rev. E 69, 026113 (2004)], is modularity maximization. Many heuristics have been proposed for maximizing modularity and yield rapidly near optimal solution or sometimes optimal ones but without a guarantee of optimality. There are few exact algorithms, prominent among which is a paper by Xu [Eur. Phys. J. B 60, 231 (2007)]. Modularity maximization can also be expressed as a clique partitioning problem and the row generation algorithm of Grötschel and Wakabayashi [Math. Program. 45, 59 (1989)] applied. We propose to extend both of these algorithms using the powerful column generation methods for linear and non linear integer programming. Performance of the four resulting algorithms is compared on problems from the literature. Instances with up to 512 entities are solved exactly. Moreover, the computing time of previously solved problems are reduced substantially. PMID:21230350

  10. Force Irregularity Following Maximal Effort: The After-Peak Reduction.

    PubMed

    Doucet, Barbara M; Mettler, Joni A; Griffin, Lisa; Spirduso, Waneen

    2016-08-01

    Irregularities in force output are present throughout human movement and can impair task performance. We investigated the presence of a large force discontinuity (after-peak reduction, APR) that appeared immediately following peak in maximal effort ramp contractions performed with the thumb adductor and ankle dorsiflexor muscles in 25 young adult participants (76% males, 24% females; M age 24.4 years, SD = 7.1). The after-peak reduction displayed similar parameters in both muscle groups with comparable drops in force during the after-peak reduction minima (thumb adductor: 27.5 ± 7.5% maximal voluntary contraction; ankle dorsiflexor: 25.8 ± 6.2% maximal voluntary contraction). A trend for the presence of fewer after-peak reductions with successive ramp trials was observed, suggesting a learning effect. Further investigation should explore underlying neural mechanisms contributing to the after-peak reduction. PMID:27502241

  11. Cardiovascular consequences of bed rest: effect on maximal oxygen uptake.

    PubMed

    Convertino, V A

    1997-02-01

    Maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) is reduced in healthy individuals confined to bed rest, suggesting it is independent of any disease state. The magnitude of reduction in VO2max is dependent on duration of bed rest and the initial level of aerobic fitness (VO2max), but it appears to be independent of age or gender. Bed rest induces an elevated maximal heart rate which, in turn, is associated with decreased cardiac vagal tone, increased sympathetic catecholamine secretion, and greater cardiac beta-receptor sensitivity. Despite the elevation in heart rate, VO2max is reduced primarily from decreased maximal stroke volume and cardiac output. An elevated ejection fraction during exercise following bed rest suggests that the lower stroke volume is not caused by ventricular dysfunction but is primarily the result of decreased venous return associated with lower circulating blood volume, reduced central venous pressure, and higher venous compliance in the lower extremities. VO2max, stroke volume, and cardiac output are further compromised by exercise in the upright posture. The contribution of hypovolemia to reduced cardiac output during exercise following bed rest is supported by the close relationship between the relative magnitude (% delta) and time course of change in blood volume and VO2max during bed rest, and also by the fact that retention of plasma volume is associated with maintenance of VO2max after bed rest. Arteriovenous oxygen difference during maximal exercise is not altered by bed rest, suggesting that peripheral mechanisms may not contribute significantly to the decreased VO2max. However reduction in baseline and maximal muscle blood flow, red blood cell volume, and capillarization in working muscles represent peripheral mechanisms that may contribute to limited oxygen delivery and, subsequently, lowered VO2max. Thus, alterations in cardiac and vascular functions induced by prolonged confinement to bed rest contribute to diminution of maximal oxygen uptake

  12. Cardiovascular consequences of bed rest: effect on maximal oxygen uptake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Convertino, V. A.

    1997-01-01

    Maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) is reduced in healthy individuals confined to bed rest, suggesting it is independent of any disease state. The magnitude of reduction in VO2max is dependent on duration of bed rest and the initial level of aerobic fitness (VO2max), but it appears to be independent of age or gender. Bed rest induces an elevated maximal heart rate which, in turn, is associated with decreased cardiac vagal tone, increased sympathetic catecholamine secretion, and greater cardiac beta-receptor sensitivity. Despite the elevation in heart rate, VO2max is reduced primarily from decreased maximal stroke volume and cardiac output. An elevated ejection fraction during exercise following bed rest suggests that the lower stroke volume is not caused by ventricular dysfunction but is primarily the result of decreased venous return associated with lower circulating blood volume, reduced central venous pressure, and higher venous compliance in the lower extremities. VO2max, stroke volume, and cardiac output are further compromised by exercise in the upright posture. The contribution of hypovolemia to reduced cardiac output during exercise following bed rest is supported by the close relationship between the relative magnitude (% delta) and time course of change in blood volume and VO2max during bed rest, and also by the fact that retention of plasma volume is associated with maintenance of VO2max after bed rest. Arteriovenous oxygen difference during maximal exercise is not altered by bed rest, suggesting that peripheral mechanisms may not contribute significantly to the decreased VO2max. However reduction in baseline and maximal muscle blood flow, red blood cell volume, and capillarization in working muscles represent peripheral mechanisms that may contribute to limited oxygen delivery and, subsequently, lowered VO2max. Thus, alterations in cardiac and vascular functions induced by prolonged confinement to bed rest contribute to diminution of maximal oxygen uptake

  13. Hydrogel-nanoparticle composites for optically modulated cancer therapeutic delivery.

    PubMed

    Strong, Laura E; Dahotre, Shreyas N; West, Jennifer L

    2014-03-28

    A poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-acrylamide) (NIPAAm-co-AAm) hydrogel with near-infrared (NIR) absorbing silica-gold nanoshells was designed as a platform for pulsatile delivery of cancer therapeutics. This hydrogel was designed to have a lower critical solution temperature (LCST) above physiologic temperature, such that the material will transition from a hydrated state to a collapsed state above ~40°C. Additionally, the silica-gold nanoshells used were designed to have a peak extinction coefficient in the NIR, where penetration of light through tissue is maximal. This heat-triggered material phase transition of the composite was found to follow exposure of NIR light, indicating the ability of the NIR absorption by the nanoshells to sufficiently drive this transition. The composite material was loaded with either doxorubicin or a DNA duplex (a model nucleic acid therapeutic), two cancer therapeutics with differing physical and chemical properties. Release of both therapeutics was dramatically enhanced by NIR light exposure, causing 2-5x increase in drug release. Drug delivery profiles were influenced by both the molecular size of the drug as well as its chemical properties. The DNA therapeutic showed slower rates of nonspecific delivery by passive diffusion due to its larger size. Additionally, only 70% of the more hydrophobic doxorubicin was released from the material, whereas the more hydrophilic DNA showed over 90% release. Further, hydrogel composites were used to deliver the doxorubicin to CT.26-WT colon carcinoma cells, eliciting a therapeutic response. This work validates the potential application for this material in site-specific cancer therapeutic delivery. PMID:24462898

  14. Recruitment of some respiratory muscles during three maximal inspiratory manoeuvres.

    PubMed Central

    Nava, S; Ambrosino, N; Crotti, P; Fracchia, C; Rampulla, C

    1993-01-01

    BACKGROUND--A study was undertaken to determine the level of recruitment of the muscles used in the generation of respiratory muscle force, and to ascertain whether maximal diaphragmatic force and maximal inspiratory muscle force need to be measured by separate tests. The level of activity of three inspiratory muscles and one expiratory muscle during three maximal respiratory manoeuvres was studied: (1) maximal inspiration against a closed airway (Muller manoeuvre or maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP)); (2) maximal inspired manoeuvre followed by a maximal expiratory effort (combined manoeuvre); and (3) maximal inspiratory sniff through the nose (sniff manoeuvre). METHODS--All the manoeuvres were performed from functional residual capacity. The gastric (PGA) and oesophageal (POES) pressures and their difference, transdiaphragmatic pressure (PDI), and the integrated EMG activity of the diaphragm (EDI), the sternomastoid (ESTR), the intercostal parasternals (ERIC), and the rectus abdominis muscles (ERA) were recorded. RESULTS--Mean (SD) PDI values for the Muller, combined, and sniff manoeuvres were: 127.6 (19.4), 162.7 (22.2), and 136.6 (24.8) cm H2O, respectively. The pattern of rib cage muscle recruitment (POES/PDI) was similar for the Muller and sniff manoeuvres (88% and 80% respectively), and was 58% in the combined manoeuvre, confirming data previously reported in the literature. Peak EDI amplitude was greater during the sniff manoeuvre in all subjects (100%) than during the combined (88.1%) and Muller (61.1%) manoeuvres. ESTR and EIC were more active in the Muller and the sniff manoeuvres. The contribution of the expiratory muscle (ERA) to the three manoeuvres was 100% in the combined, 26.1% for the sniff, and 11.5% for the Muller manoeuvre. CONCLUSIONS--Each of these three manoeuvres results in different mechanisms of inspiratory and expiratory muscle activation and the intrathoracic and intra-abdominal pressures generated are a reflection of the interaction

  15. Maximal expiratory flow volume curve in quarry workers.

    PubMed

    Subhashini, Arcot Sadagopa; Satchidhanandam, Natesa

    2002-01-01

    Maximal Expiratory Flow Volume (MEFV) curves were recorded with a computerized Spirometer (Med Spiror). Forced Vital Capacity (FVC), Forced Expiratory Volumes (FEV), mean and maximal flow rates were obtained in 25 quarry workers who were free from respiratory disorders and 20 healthy control subjects. All the functional values are lower in quarry workers than in the control subject, the largest reduction in quarry workers with a work duration of over 15 years, especially for FEF75. The effects are probably due to smoking rather than dust exposure. PMID:12024961

  16. Stability region maximization by decomposition-aggregation method. [Skylab stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siljak, D. D.; Cuk, S. M.

    1974-01-01

    This work is to improve the estimates of the stability regions by formulating and resolving a proper maximization problem. The solution of the problem provides the best estimate of the maximal value of the structural parameter and at the same time yields the optimum comparison system, which can be used to determine the degree of stability of the Skylab. The analysis procedure is completely computerized, resulting in a flexible and powerful tool for stability considerations of large-scale linear as well as nonlinear systems.

  17. Projection of two biphoton qutrits onto a maximally entangled state.

    PubMed

    Halevy, A; Megidish, E; Shacham, T; Dovrat, L; Eisenberg, H S

    2011-04-01

    Bell state measurements, in which two quantum bits are projected onto a maximally entangled state, are an essential component of quantum information science. We propose and experimentally demonstrate the projection of two quantum systems with three states (qutrits) onto a generalized maximally entangled state. Each qutrit is represented by the polarization of a pair of indistinguishable photons-a biphoton. The projection is a joint measurement on both biphotons using standard linear optics elements. This demonstration enables the realization of quantum information protocols with qutrits, such as teleportation and entanglement swapping. PMID:21517363

  18. Therapeutics in Huntington's Disease.

    PubMed

    Killoran, Annie; Biglan, Kevin M

    2012-02-01

    OPINION STATEMENT: There is no specific treatment for Huntington's disease (HD). Its many symptoms of motor, psychiatric, and cognitive deterioration are managed with symptomatic relief, rehabilitation, and support. The only drug approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of HD is an antichoreic agent, tetrabenazine, but this drug is used sparingly because of uneasiness regarding its propensity to cause depression and suicidality in this population, which is already at risk for these complications. Neuroleptics are still first-line treatments for chorea accompanied by comorbid depression and/or behavioral or psychotic symptoms, as is often the case. Psychiatric features, which have a significant impact on a patient's professional and personal life, often become the major focus of management. In addition to neuroleptics, commonly used medications include antidepressants, mood stabilizers, anxiolytics, and psychostimulants. In contrast, few treatment options are available for cognitive impairment in HD; this remains an important and largely unmet therapeutic need. HD patients typically lack insight into their disease manifestations, failing to recognize their need for treatment, and possibly even arguing against it. Multipurpose medications are employed advantageously to simplify the medication regimen, so as to facilitate compliance and not overwhelm the patient. For example, haloperidol can be prescribed for a patient with chorea, agitation, and anorexia, rather than targeting each symptom with a different drug. This approach also limits the potential for adverse effects, which can be difficult to distinguish from the features of the disease itself. With HD's complexity, it is best managed with a multidisciplinary approach that includes a movement disorders specialist, a genetic counselor, a mental health professional, a physical therapist, and a social worker for support and coordination of services. As the disease progresses, there

  19. Therapeutic Devices for Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Robert S.

    2011-01-01

    Therapeutic devices provide new options for treating drug-resistant epilepsy. These devices act by a variety of mechanisms to modulate neuronal activity. Only vagus nerve stimulation, which continues to develop new technology, is approved for use in the United States. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of anterior thalamus for partial epilepsy recently was approved in Europe and several other countries. Responsive neurostimulation, which delivers stimuli to one or two seizure foci in response to a detected seizure, recently completed a successful multicenter trial. Several other trials of brain stimulation are in planning or underway. Transcutaneous magnetic stimulation (TMS) may provide a noninvasive method to stimulate cortex. Controlled studies of TMS split on efficacy, and may depend on whether a seizure focus is near a possible region for stimulation. Seizure detection devices in the form of “shake” detectors via portable accelerometers can provide notification of an ongoing tonic-clonic seizure, or peace of mind in the absence of notification. Prediction of seizures from various aspects of EEG is in early stages. Prediction appears to be possible in a subpopulation of people with refractory seizures and a clinical trial of an implantable prediction device is underway. Cooling of neocortex or hippocampus reversibly can attenuate epileptiform EEG activity and seizures, but engineering problems remain in its implementation. Optogenetics is a new technique that can control excitability of specific populations of neurons with light. Inhibition of epileptiform activity has been demonstrated in hippocampal slices, but use in humans will require more work. In general, devices provide useful palliation for otherwise uncontrollable seizures, but with a different risk profile than with most drugs. Optimizing the place of devices in therapy for epilepsy will require further development and clinical experience. PMID:22367987

  20. Magnetic Microspheres for Therapeutical Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, K.; Ramachandran, N.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Hyperthermia is a well known cancer therapy and consists of heating a tumor region to the elevated temperatures in the range of 40-45 C for an extended period of time (2-8 hours). This leads to thermal inactivation of cell regulatory and growth processes with resulting widespread necrosis, carbonization and coagulation. Moreover, heat boosts the tumor response to other treatments such as radiation, chemotherapy or immunotherapy. Of particular importance is careful control of generated heat in the treated region and keeping it localized. Higher heating, to about 56 C can lead to tissue thermo-ablation. With accurate temperature control, hyperthermia has the advantage of having minimal side effects. Several heating techniques are utilized for this purpose, such as whole body hyperthermia, radio-frequency (RF) hyperthermia, ultrasound technique, inductive microwave antenna hyperthermia, inductive needles (thermoseeds), and magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH).MFH offers many advantages as targeting capability by applying magnets. However, this technology still suffers significant inefficiencies due to lack of thermal control. This paper will provide a review of the topic and outline the ongoing work in this area. The main emphasis is in devising ways to overcome the technical difficulty in hyperthermia therapy of achieving a uniform therapeutic temperature over the required region of the body and holding it steady. The basic obstacle of the present heating methods are non-uniform thermal properties of the tissue. Our approach is to develop a novel class of magnetic fluids which have inherent thermoregulating properties. We have identified a few magnetic alloys which can serve as a suitable nano-particle material. The objective is to synthesize, characterize and evaluate the efficacy of TRMF for hyperthermia therapy.

  1. Project ACHIEVE final report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-13

    Project ACHIEVE was a math/science academic enhancement program aimed at first year high school Hispanic American students. Four high schools -- two in El Paso, Texas and two in Bakersfield, California -- participated in this Department of Energy-funded program during the spring and summer of 1996. Over 50 students, many of whom felt they were facing a nightmare future, were given the opportunity to work closely with personal computers and software, sophisticated calculators, and computer-based laboratories -- an experience which their regular academic curriculum did not provide. Math and science projects, exercises, and experiments were completed that emphasized independent and creative applications of scientific and mathematical theories to real world problems. The most important outcome was the exposure Project ACHIEVE provided to students concerning the college and technical-field career possibilities available to them.

  2. Achieving Goal Blood Pressure.

    PubMed

    Laurent, Stéphane

    2015-07-01

    Both monotherapy and combination therapy options are appropriate for antihypertensive therapy according to the 2013 European Society of Hypertension (ESH)/European Society of Cardiology (ESC) guidelines. Most patients require more than one agent to achieve blood pressure (BP) control, and adding a second agent is more effective than doubling the dose of existing therapy. The addition of a third agent may be required to achieve adequate BP reductions in some patients. Single-pill fixed-dose combinations (FDCs) allow multiple-drug regimens to be delivered without any negative impact on patient compliance or persistence with therapy. FDCs also have documented beneficial clinical effects and use of FDCs containing two or three agents is recommended by the 2013 ESH/ESC guidelines. PMID:26002423

  3. Big Data Transforms Discovery-Utilization Therapeutics Continuum.

    PubMed

    Waldman, S A; Terzic, A

    2016-03-01

    Enabling omic technologies adopt a holistic view to produce unprecedented insights into the molecular underpinnings of health and disease, in part, by generating massive high-dimensional biological data. Leveraging these systems-level insights as an engine driving the healthcare evolution is maximized through integration with medical, demographic, and environmental datasets from individuals to populations. Big data analytics has accordingly emerged to add value to the technical aspects of storage, transfer, and analysis required for merging vast arrays of omic-, clinical-, and eco-datasets. In turn, this new field at the interface of biology, medicine, and information science is systematically transforming modern therapeutics across discovery, development, regulation, and utilization. PMID:26888297

  4. Bacteriophage Procurement for Therapeutic Purposes.

    PubMed

    Weber-Dąbrowska, Beata; Jończyk-Matysiak, Ewa; Żaczek, Maciej; Łobocka, Małgorzata; Łusiak-Szelachowska, Marzanna; Górski, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophages (phages), discovered 100 years ago, are able to infect and destroy only bacterial cells. In the current crisis of antibiotic efficacy, phage therapy is considered as a supplementary or even alternative therapeutic approach. Evolution of multidrug-resistant and pandrug-resistant bacterial strains poses a real threat, so it is extremely important to have the possibility to isolate new phages for therapeutic purposes. Our phage laboratory and therapy center has extensive experience with phage isolation, characterization, and therapeutic application. In this article we present current progress in bacteriophages isolation and use for therapeutic purposes, our experience in this field and its practical implications for phage therapy. We attempt to summarize the state of the art: properties of phages, the methods for their isolation, criteria of phage selection for therapeutic purposes and limitations of their use. Perspectives for the use of genetically engineered phages to specifically target bacterial virulence-associated genes are also briefly presented. PMID:27570518

  5. Bacteriophage Procurement for Therapeutic Purposes

    PubMed Central

    Weber-Dąbrowska, Beata; Jończyk-Matysiak, Ewa; Żaczek, Maciej; Łobocka, Małgorzata; Łusiak-Szelachowska, Marzanna; Górski, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophages (phages), discovered 100 years ago, are able to infect and destroy only bacterial cells. In the current crisis of antibiotic efficacy, phage therapy is considered as a supplementary or even alternative therapeutic approach. Evolution of multidrug-resistant and pandrug-resistant bacterial strains poses a real threat, so it is extremely important to have the possibility to isolate new phages for therapeutic purposes. Our phage laboratory and therapy center has extensive experience with phage isolation, characterization, and therapeutic application. In this article we present current progress in bacteriophages isolation and use for therapeutic purposes, our experience in this field and its practical implications for phage therapy. We attempt to summarize the state of the art: properties of phages, the methods for their isolation, criteria of phage selection for therapeutic purposes and limitations of their use. Perspectives for the use of genetically engineered phages to specifically target bacterial virulence-associated genes are also briefly presented. PMID:27570518

  6. Transdermal delivery of therapeutic agent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwiatkowski, Krzysztof C. (Inventor); Hayes, Ryan T. (Inventor); Magnuson, James W. (Inventor); Giletto, Anthony (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A device for the transdermal delivery of a therapeutic agent to a biological subject that includes a first electrode comprising a first array of electrically conductive microprojections for providing electrical communication through a skin portion of the subject to a second electrode comprising a second array of electrically conductive microprojections. Additionally, a reservoir for holding the therapeutic agent surrounding the first electrode and a pulse generator for providing an exponential decay pulse between the first and second electrodes may be provided. A method includes the steps of piercing a stratum corneum layer of skin with two arrays of conductive microprojections, encapsulating the therapeutic agent into biocompatible charged carriers, surrounding the conductive microprojections with the therapeutic agent, generating an exponential decay pulse between the two arrays of conductive microprojections to create a non-uniform electrical field and electrokinetically driving the therapeutic agent through the stratum corneum layer of skin.

  7. Therapeutic cloning: promises and issues

    PubMed Central

    Kfoury, Charlotte

    2007-01-01

    Advances in biotechnology necessitate both an understanding of scientific principles and ethical implications to be clinically applicable in medicine. In this regard, therapeutic cloning offers significant potential in regenerative medicine by circumventing immunorejection, and in the cure of genetic disorders when used in conjunction with gene therapy. Therapeutic cloning in the context of cell replacement therapy holds a huge potential for de novo organogenesis and the permanent treatment of Parkinson’s disease, Duchenne muscular dystrophy, and diabetes mellitus as shown by in vivo studies. Scientific roadblocks impeding advancement in therapeutic cloning are tumorigenicity, epigenetic reprogramming, mitochondrial heteroplasmy, interspecies pathogen transfer, low oocyte availability. Therapeutic cloning is also often tied to ethical considerations concerning the source, destruction and moral status of IVF embryos based on the argument of potential. Legislative and funding issues are also addressed. Future considerations would include a distinction between therapeutic and reproductive cloning in legislative formulations. PMID:18523539

  8. Metrics for antibody therapeutics development.

    PubMed

    Reichert, Janice M

    2010-01-01

    A wide variety of full-size monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and therapeutics derived from alternative antibody formats can be produced through genetic and biological engineering techniques. These molecules are now filling the preclinical and clinical pipelines of every major pharmaceutical company and many biotechnology firms. Metrics for the development of antibody therapeutics, including averages for the number of candidates entering clinical study and development phase lengths for mAbs approved in the United States, were derived from analysis of a dataset of over 600 therapeutic mAbs that entered clinical study sponsored, at least in part, by commercial firms. The results presented provide an overview of the field and context for the evaluation of on-going and prospective mAb development programs. The expansion of therapeutic antibody use through supplemental marketing approvals and the increase in the study of therapeutics derived from alternative antibody formats are discussed. PMID:20930555

  9. Understanding the Causal Path between Action, Learning, and Solutions: Maximizing the Power of Action Learning to Achieve Great Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leonard, H. Skipton

    2015-01-01

    Clients and practitioners alike are often confused about the ultimate purpose of action learning (AL). Because of the title of the method, many believe the primary goal of AL is to generate learning. This article clarifies the relationship between action, learning, and solutions. It also provides historical evidence to support the conclusion that…

  10. Cooperative Learning in the Secondary School: Maximizing Language Acquisition, Academic Achievement, and Social Development. NCBE Program Information Guide Series 12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holt, Daniel D.; And Others

    Cooperative learning is a valuable strategy for teaching secondary school students, especially useful with students from diverse linguistic and cultural backgrounds who are learning English as a Second Language. It offers a method for managing diversity, channeling peer influence into a positive force for improving school performance, and…

  11. Algal biofuels from urban wastewaters: maximizing biomass yield using nutrients recycled from hydrothermal processing of biomass.

    PubMed

    Selvaratnam, T; Pegallapati, A K; Reddy, H; Kanapathipillai, N; Nirmalakhandan, N; Deng, S; Lammers, P J

    2015-04-01

    Recent studies have proposed algal cultivation in urban wastewaters for the dual purpose of waste treatment and bioenergy production from the resulting biomass. This study proposes an enhancement to this approach that integrates cultivation of an acidophilic strain, Galdieria sulphuraria 5587.1, in a closed photobioreactor (PBR); hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) of the wet algal biomass; and recirculation of the nutrient-rich aqueous product (AP) of HTL to the PBR to achieve higher biomass productivity than that could be achieved with raw wastewater. The premise is that recycling nutrients in the AP can maintain optimal C, N and P levels in the PBR to maximize biomass growth to increase energy returns. Growth studies on the test species validated growth on AP derived from HTL at temperatures from 180 to 300°C. Doubling N and P concentrations over normal levels in wastewater resulted in biomass productivity gains of 20-25% while N and P removal rates also doubled. PMID:25704095

  12. Learning to maximize reward rate: a model based on semi-Markov decision processes

    PubMed Central

    Khodadadi, Arash; Fakhari, Pegah; Busemeyer, Jerome R.

    2014-01-01

    When animals have to make a number of decisions during a limited time interval, they face a fundamental problem: how much time they should spend on each decision in order to achieve the maximum possible total outcome. Deliberating more on one decision usually leads to more outcome but less time will remain for other decisions. In the framework of sequential sampling models, the question is how animals learn to set their decision threshold such that the total expected outcome achieved during a limited time is maximized. The aim of this paper is to provide a theoretical framework for answering this question. To this end, we consider an experimental design in which each trial can come from one of the several possible “conditions.” A condition specifies the difficulty of the trial, the reward, the penalty and so on. We show that to maximize the expected reward during a limited time, the subject should set a separate value of decision threshold for each condition. We propose a model of learning the optimal value of decision thresholds based on the theory of semi-Markov decision processes (SMDP). In our model, the experimental environment is modeled as an SMDP with each “condition” being a “state” and the value of decision thresholds being the “actions” taken in those states. The problem of finding the optimal decision thresholds then is cast as the stochastic optimal control problem of taking actions in each state in the corresponding SMDP such that the average reward rate is maximized. Our model utilizes a biologically plausible learning algorithm to solve this problem. The simulation results show that at the beginning of learning the model choses high values of decision threshold which lead to sub-optimal performance. With experience, however, the model learns to lower the value of decision thresholds till finally it finds the optimal values. PMID:24904252

  13. Therapeutic management of cutaneous and genital warts.

    PubMed

    Ockenfels, Hans Michael

    2016-09-01

    During their lifetime, at least 10 % of the population will be infected by human papillomaviruses (HPV), clinically characterized by the formation of cutaneous or genital warts. Although warts are ubiquitous, there are no defined treatments. Especially in the first six months, warts frequently resolve without therapeutic intervention. This complicates the interpretation of study data, given that many studies do not differentiate between newly infected patients and those with infections that have persisted for a long time. Similarly, most studies do not take location, size, and thickness of lesions into account, either. The objective of the present review article is to analyze the study data currently available, taking into consideration both subtypes and locations - factors exceedingly crucial in clinical practice. In particular, the distinction between new-onset and chronic recalcitrant warts is reflected in a therapeutic algorithm. In the case of genital warts, the algorithm is more clearly determined by the extent of the area affected rather than the longevity of lesions. In immunocompetent individuals, any therapeutic intervention must be aimed at achieving complete resolution. PMID:27607030

  14. Recombinant therapeutic proteins: production platforms and challenges.

    PubMed

    Dingermann, Theo

    2008-01-01

    Since the approval of insulin in 1982, more than 120 recombinant drug substances have been approved and become available as extremely valuable therapeutic options. Exact copying of the most common human form is no longer a value per se, as challenges, primarily related to the pharmacokinetics of artificial recombinant drugs, can be overcome by diverging from the original. However, relatively minor changes in manufacturing or packaging may impact safety of therapeutic proteins. A major achievement is the development of recombinant proteins capable of entering a cell. Such drugs open up completely new opportunities by targeting intracellular mechanisms or by substituting intracellularly operating enzymes. Concerns that protein variants would cause an intolerable immune response turned out to be exaggerated. Although most recombinant drugs provoke some immune response, they are still well tolerated. This knowledge might result in a change in attitude towards antibody formation, i.e., neutralizing antibody activity (in vitro) may be overcome by dosing consistently on the basis of antibody titers and not only on body weight. As with other drugs, efficacy and safety of therapeutic proteins have to be demonstrated in clinical studies, and superiority over available products has to be proven instead of just claimed. PMID:18041103

  15. Therapeutic postprostatectomy irradiation.

    PubMed

    Youssef, Emad; Forman, Jeffrey D; Tekyi-Mensah, Samuel; Bolton, Susan; Hart, Kim

    2002-06-01

    involvement, pathological stage, surgical margin, and perineural invasion. Upon multivariate analysis, only preradiation therapy PSA (P < 0.001) and the PSA trend during radiation therapy (P < 0.001) were significant factors. The results of therapeutic radiation for patients with elevated postprostatectomy PSA levels are sufficiently poor; other strategies should be explored as alternatives, including early adjuvant postprostatectomy irradiation or the use of combined hormonal and radiation therapy in the salvage situation. PMID:15046710

  16. Spatiotemporal laser speckle contrast analysis for blood flow imaging with maximized speckle contrast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Jianjun; Li, Pengcheng; Luo, Weihua; Wang, Jia; Zhang, Hongyan; Luo, Qingming

    2010-01-01

    Laser speckle contrast imaging is a technique used for imaging blood flow without scanning. Though several studies have attempted to combine spatial and temporal statistics of laser speckle images for reducing image noise as well as preserving acceptable spatiotemporal resolution, the statistical accuracy of these spatiotemporal methods has not been thoroughly compared. Through numerical simulation and animal experiments, this study investigates the changes in the mean speckle contrast values and the relative noise of the speckle contrast images computed by these methods with various numbers of frames and spatial windows. The simulation results show that the maximum relative error of the mean speckle contrast computed by the spatiotemporal laser speckle contrast analysis (STLASCA) method, in which the speckle contrast images are computed by analyzing the 3-D spatiotemporal speckle image cube, is approximately 5%, while it is higher than 13% for other methods. Changes in the mean speckle contrast values and the relative noise computed by these methods for animal experiment data are consistent with the simulation results. Our results demonstrate that STLASCA achieves more accurate speckle contrast, and suggest that STLASCA most effectively utilizes the number of pixels, thus achieving maximized speckle contrast, and thereby maximizing the variation of the laser speckle contrast image.

  17. Intermittent Hypoxia in Childhood: The Harmful Consequences Versus Potential Benefits of Therapeutic Uses

    PubMed Central

    Serebrovskaya, Tatiana V.; Xi, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Intermittent hypoxia (IH) often occurs in early infancy in both preterm and term infants and especially at 36–44 weeks postmenstrual age. These episodes of IH could result from sleep-disordered breathing or may be temporally unrelated to apnea or bradycardia events. There are numerous reports indicating adverse effects of IH on development, behavior, academic achievement, and cognition in children with sleep apnea syndrome. It remains uncertain about the exact causative relationship between the neurocognitive and behavioral morbidities and IH and/or its associated sleep fragmentation. On the other hand, well-controlled and moderate IH conditioning/training has been used in sick children for treating their various forms of bronchial asthma, allergic dermatoses, autoimmune thyroiditis, cerebral palsy, and obesity. This review article provides an updated and impartial analysis on the currently available evidence in supporting either side of the seemingly contradictory scenarios. We wish to stimulate a comprehensive understanding of such a complex physiological phenomenon as intermittent hypoxia, which may be accompanied by other confounding factors (e.g., hypercapnia, polycythemia), in order to prevent or reduce its harmful consequences, while maximizing its potential utility as an effective therapeutic tool in pediatric patients. PMID:26042211

  18. Increasing the Therapeutic Ratio of Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy by Individualized Isotoxic Dose Prescription.

    PubMed

    Zindler, Jaap D; Thomas, Charles R; Hahn, Stephen M; Hoffmann, Aswin L; Troost, Esther G C; Lambin, Philippe

    2016-02-01

    To obtain a favorable tradeoff between treatment benefits and morbidity ("therapeutic ratio"), radiotherapy (RT) dose is prescribed according to the tumor volume, with the goal of controlling the disease while respecting normal tissue tolerance levels. We propose a new paradigm for tumor dose prescription in stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) based on organ-at-risk (OAR) tolerance levels called isotoxic dose prescription (IDP), which is derived from experiences and limitations of conventionally fractionated radiotherapy. With IDP, the radiation dose is prescribed based on the predefined level of normal tissue complication probability of a nearby dose-limiting OAR at a prespecified dose-volume constraint. Simultaneously, the prescribed total tumor dose (TTD) is maximized to the technically highest achievable level in order to increase the local tumor control probability (TCP). IDP is especially relevant for tumors located at eloquent locations or for large tumors in which severe toxicity has been described. IDP will result in a lower RT dose or a treatment scheduled with more fractions if the OAR tolerance level is exceeded, and potential dose escalation occurs when the OAR tolerance level allows it and when it is expected to be beneficial (if TCP < 90%). For patients with small tumors at noneloquent sites, the current SABR dose prescription already results in high rates of local control at low toxicity rates. In this review, the concept of IDP is described in the context of SABR. PMID:26476075

  19. Explorations of high-intensity therapeutic ultrasound and microbubble-mediated gene delivery in mouse liver

    PubMed Central

    Song, S; Shen, Z; Chen, L; Brayman, AA; Miao, CH

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound (US) combined with microbubbles (MBs) is a promising technology for non-viral gene delivery. Significant enhancements of gene expression have been obtained in our previous studies. To optimize and prepare for application to larger animal models, the luciferase reporter gene transfer efficacy of lipid-based Definity MBs of various concentrations, pressure amplitudes and a novel unfocused high-intensity therapeutic US (HITU) system were explored. Luciferase expression exhibited a dependence on MB dose over the range of 0–25 vol%, and a strong dependence on acoustic peak negative pressure at over the range of 0–3.2 MPa. Gene expression reached an apparent plateau at MB concentration ≥2.5 vol% or at negative pressures >1.8 MPa. Maximum gene expression in treated animals was 700-fold greater than in negative controls. Pulse train US exposure protocols produced an upward trend of gene expression with increasing quiescent time. The hyperbolic correlation of gene expression and transaminase levels suggested that an optimum gene delivery effect can be achieved by maximizing acoustic cavitation-induced enhancement of DNA uptake and minimizing unproductive tissue damage. This study validated the new HITU system equipped with an unfocused transducer with a larger footprint capable of scanning large tissue areas to effectively enhance gene transfer efficiencies. PMID:21451579

  20. Intermittent hypoxia in childhood: the harmful consequences versus potential benefits of therapeutic uses.

    PubMed

    Serebrovskaya, Tatiana V; Xi, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Intermittent hypoxia (IH) often occurs in early infancy in both preterm and term infants and especially at 36-44 weeks postmenstrual age. These episodes of IH could result from sleep-disordered breathing or may be temporally unrelated to apnea or bradycardia events. There are numerous reports indicating adverse effects of IH on development, behavior, academic achievement, and cognition in children with sleep apnea syndrome. It remains uncertain about the exact causative relationship between the neurocognitive and behavioral morbidities and IH and/or its associated sleep fragmentation. On the other hand, well-controlled and moderate IH conditioning/training has been used in sick children for treating their various forms of bronchial asthma, allergic dermatoses, autoimmune thyroiditis, cerebral palsy, and obesity. This review article provides an updated and impartial analysis on the currently available evidence in supporting either side of the seemingly contradictory scenarios. We wish to stimulate a comprehensive understanding of such a complex physiological phenomenon as intermittent hypoxia, which may be accompanied by other confounding factors (e.g., hypercapnia, polycythemia), in order to prevent or reduce its harmful consequences, while maximizing its potential utility as an effective therapeutic tool in pediatric patients. PMID:26042211

  1. Therapeutic efficacy of nanomedicines for prostate cancer: An update

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in cancer nanomedicine have attracted remarkable attention in medical sectors. Pharmacologic research on nanomedicines, including targeted cancer therapy, has increased dramatically in the past 5 years. The success stories of nanomedicines in the clinical field include the fabrication of nanomedicines that show maximum loading efficiency into carriers, maximal release kinetics, and minimum toxicity to healthy cells. Nanoparticle-mediated medicines have been developed to specifically target prostate cancer tissue by use of aptamers, antibody targeting, and sustained release of nanomedicines in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Nanomedicines have been developed for therapeutic application in combination with image-guided therapy in real time. The scope of one of these nanomedicines, Abraxane (paclitaxel), may be extended to prostate cancer therapeutic applications for better quality of patient life and longer survival. This review provides an update on the latest directions and developments in nanomedicines for prostate cancer. PMID:26966723

  2. Effect of taxol on the therapeutic efficacy of radioimmunotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, K.T.; Spicer, K.M.; Means, J.

    1994-05-01

    This investigation was conducted to evaluate the potential of using taxol to maximize the therapeutic effectiveness of radioimmunotherapy. Published studies have shown taxol to be an effective radiosensitizer of tumors to external irradiation by blocking tumor cells in the G{sub 2}/M phases of the cell cycle. In vitro and in vivo studies were carried out to study the effect of low-dose taxol on the therapeutic effectiveness of I-131 anti-CEA monoclonal antibody (OEM-094-20856 MoAb) of human colonic carcinoma (LS-174T cell line). The in vitro clonogenic assay studies indicated taxol effectively enhanced the cell killing effect of I-131 MoAb.

  3. Maximizing the Online Learning Experience: Suggestions for Educators and Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cicco, Gina

    2011-01-01

    This article will discuss ways of maximizing the online course experience for teachers- and counselors-in-training. The widespread popularity of online instruction makes it a necessary learning experience for future teachers and counselors (Ash, 2011). New teachers and counselors take on the responsibility of preparing their students for real-life…

  4. How Managerial Ownership Affects Profit Maximization in Newspaper Firms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Busterna, John C.

    1989-01-01

    Explores whether different levels of a manager's ownership of a newspaper affects the manager's profit maximizing attitudes and behavior. Finds that owner-managers tend to place less emphasis on profits than non-owner-controlled newspapers, contrary to economic theory and empirical evidence from other industries. (RS)

  5. Modifying Softball for Maximizing Learning Outcomes in Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brian, Ali; Ward, Phillip; Goodway, Jacqueline D.; Sutherland, Sue

    2014-01-01

    Softball is taught in many physical education programs throughout the United States. This article describes modifications that maximize learning outcomes and that address the National Standards and safety recommendations. The modifications focus on tasks and equipment, developmentally appropriate motor-skill acquisition, increasing number of…

  6. Price of oil and OPEC behavior: a utility maximization model

    SciTech Connect

    Adeinat, M.K.

    1985-01-01

    There is growing evidence that OPEC has neither behaved as a cartel, at least in the last decade, nor maximized the discounted value of its profits as would be suggested by the theory of exhaustible resources. This dissertation attempts to find a way out of this dead end by proposing a utility maximization model. According to the utility maximization model, the decisions of how much crude oil each country produces is determined by a country's budgetary needs. The objective of each country is to choose present consumption and future consumption (which must be financed by its future income which can, in turn, be generated either by its investment out of current income or the proceeds of its oil reserves) at time t to maximize its utility function subject to its budget and absorptive capacity constraints. The model predicted that whenever the amount of savings is greater than the country's absorptive capacity as a result of higher prices of oil, it would respond by cutting back its production of oil. This prediction is supported by the following empirical findings: (1) that the marginal propensity to save (MPS) exceeded the marginal propensity to invest (MPI) during the period of study (1967-1981), implying that OPEC countries were facing an absorptive capacity constraint and (2) the quantity of oil production responded negatively to the permanent income in all three countries, the response being highly significant for those countries with the greatest budget surpluses.

  7. Bernoulli equation and the nonexistence of maximal jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zdziarski, Andrzej A.

    2016-02-01

    We discuss the idea of maximal jets introduced by Falcke & Biermann (1995, A&A, 293, 665). According to it, the maximum possible jet power in its internal energy equals the kinetic power in its rest mass. We show this result is incorrect because of an unfortunate algebraic mistake.

  8. Fertilizer placement to maximize nitrogen use by fescue

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The method of fertilizer nitrogen(N) application can affect N uptake in tall fescue and therefore its yield and quality. Subsurface-banding (knife) of fertilizer maximizes fescue N uptake in the poorly-drained clay–pan soils of southeastern Kansas. This study was conducted to determine if knifed N r...

  9. Density-metric unimodular gravity: Vacuum maximal symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Abbassi, A.H.; Abbassi, A.M.

    2011-05-15

    We have investigated the vacuum maximally symmetric solutions of recently proposed density-metric unimodular gravity theory. The results are widely different from inflationary scenario. The exponential dependence on time in deSitter space is substituted by a power law. Open space-times with non-zero cosmological constant are excluded.

  10. An effective theory of metrics with maximal proper acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallego Torromé, Ricardo

    2015-12-01

    A geometric theory for spacetimes whose world lines associated with physical particles have an upper bound for the proper acceleration is developed. After some fundamental remarks on the requirements that the classical dynamics for point particles should hold, the notion of a generalized metric and a theory of maximal proper acceleration are introduced. A perturbative approach to metrics of maximal proper acceleration is discussed and we show how it provides a consistent theory where the associated Lorentzian metric corresponds to the limit when the maximal proper acceleration goes to infinity. Then several of the physical and kinematical properties of the maximal acceleration metric are investigated, including a discussion of the rudiments of the causal theory and the introduction of the notions of radar distance and celerity function. We discuss the corresponding modification of the Einstein mass-energy relation when the associated Lorentzian geometry is flat. In such a context it is also proved that the physical dispersion relation is relativistic. Two possible physical scenarios where the modified mass-energy relation could be confronted against the experiment are briefly discussed.

  11. Optimal technique for maximal forward rotating vaults in men's gymnastics.

    PubMed

    Hiley, Michael J; Jackson, Monique I; Yeadon, Maurice R

    2015-08-01

    In vaulting a gymnast must generate sufficient linear and angular momentum during the approach and table contact to complete the rotational requirements in the post-flight phase. This study investigated the optimization of table touchdown conditions and table contact technique for the maximization of rotation potential for forwards rotating vaults. A planar seven-segment torque-driven computer simulation model of the contact phase in vaulting was evaluated by varying joint torque activation time histories to match three performances of a handspring double somersault vault by an elite gymnast. The closest matching simulation was used as a starting point to maximize post-flight rotation potential (the product of angular momentum and flight time) for a forwards rotating vault. It was found that the maximized rotation potential was sufficient to produce a handspring double piked somersault vault. The corresponding optimal touchdown configuration exhibited hip flexion in contrast to the hyperextended configuration required for maximal height. Increasing touchdown velocity and angular momentum lead to additional post-flight rotation potential. By increasing the horizontal velocity at table touchdown, within limits obtained from recorded performances, the handspring double somersault tucked with one and a half twists, and the handspring triple somersault tucked became theoretically possible. PMID:26026290

  12. Evidence for surprise minimization over value maximization in choice behavior

    PubMed Central

    Schwartenbeck, Philipp; FitzGerald, Thomas H. B.; Mathys, Christoph; Dolan, Ray; Kronbichler, Martin; Friston, Karl

    2015-01-01

    Classical economic models are predicated on the idea that the ultimate aim of choice is to maximize utility or reward. In contrast, an alternative perspective highlights the fact that adaptive behavior requires agents’ to model their environment and minimize surprise about the states they frequent. We propose that choice behavior can be more accurately accounted for by surprise minimization compared to reward or utility maximization alone. Minimizing surprise makes a prediction at variance with expected utility models; namely, that in addition to attaining valuable states, agents attempt to maximize the entropy over outcomes and thus ‘keep their options open’. We tested this prediction using a simple binary choice paradigm and show that human decision-making is better explained by surprise minimization compared to utility maximization. Furthermore, we replicated this entropy-seeking behavior in a control task with no explicit utilities. These findings highlight a limitation of purely economic motivations in explaining choice behavior and instead emphasize the importance of belief-based motivations. PMID:26564686

  13. Maximizing Thermal Efficiency and Optimizing Energy Management (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2012-03-01

    Researchers at the Thermal Test Facility (TTF) on the campus of the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Golden, Colorado, are addressing maximizing thermal efficiency and optimizing energy management through analysis of efficient heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) strategies, automated home energy management (AHEM), and energy storage systems.

  14. Dynamical generation of maximally entangled states in two identical cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Alexanian, Moorad

    2011-11-15

    The generation of entanglement between two identical coupled cavities, each containing a single three-level atom, is studied when the cavities exchange two coherent photons and are in the N=2,4 manifolds, where N represents the maximum number of photons possible in either cavity. The atom-photon state of each cavity is described by a qutrit for N=2 and a five-dimensional qudit for N=4. However, the conservation of the total value of N for the interacting two-cavity system limits the total number of states to only 4 states for N=2 and 8 states for N=4, rather than the usual 9 for two qutrits and 25 for two five-dimensional qudits. In the N=2 manifold, two-qutrit states dynamically generate four maximally entangled Bell states from initially unentangled states. In the N=4 manifold, two-qudit states dynamically generate maximally entangled states involving three or four states. The generation of these maximally entangled states occurs rather rapidly for large hopping strengths. The cavities function as a storage of periodically generated maximally entangled states.

  15. Maximizing Cohesion and Minimizing Conflict in Collaborative Writing Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Sandra J.; Smith, Douglas C.

    1990-01-01

    Presents instructional strategies designed to maximize cohesion and minimize conflict in collaborative writing groups. Argues that an understanding of sources of conflict, conflict management strategies, and group processes allows productive and creative group energy to be channeled into effective business writing. (RS)

  16. Cognitive Somatic Behavioral Interventions for Maximizing Gymnastic Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ravizza, Kenneth; Rotella, Robert

    Psychological training programs developed and implemented for gymnasts of a wide range of age and varying ability levels are examined. The programs utilized strategies based on cognitive-behavioral intervention. The approach contends that mental training plays a crucial role in maximizing performance for most gymnasts. The object of the training…

  17. The Profit-Maximizing Firm: Old Wine in New Bottles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felder, Joseph

    1990-01-01

    Explains and illustrates a simplified use of graphical analysis for analyzing the profit-maximizing firm. Believes that graphical analysis helps college students gain a deeper understanding of marginalism and an increased ability to formulate economic problems in marginalist terms. (DB)

  18. Estimation of the Maximal Lactate Steady State in Endurance Runners.

    PubMed

    Llodio, I; Gorostiaga, E M; Garcia-Tabar, I; Granados, C; Sánchez-Medina, L

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to predict the velocity corresponding to the maximal lactate steady state (MLSSV) from non-invasive variables obtained during a maximal multistage running field test (modified University of Montreal Track Test, UMTT), and to determine whether a single constant velocity test (CVT), performed several days after the UMTT, could estimate the MLSSV. Within 4-5 weeks, 20 male runners performed: 1) a modified UMTT, and 2) several 30 min CVTs to determine MLSSV to a precision of 0.25 km·h(-1). Maximal aerobic velocity (MAV) was the best predictor of MLSSV. A regression equation was obtained: MLSSV=1.425+(0.756·MAV); R(2)=0.63. Running velocity during the CVT (VCVT) and blood lactate at 6 (La6) and 30 (La30) min further improved the MLSSV prediction: MLSSV=VCVT+0.503 - (0.266·ΔLa30-6); R(2)=0.66. MLSSV can be estimated from MAV during a single maximal multistage running field test among a homogeneous group of trained runners. This estimation can be further improved by performing an additional CVT. In terms of accuracy, simplicity and cost-effectiveness, the reported regression equations can be used for the assessment and training prescription of endurance runners. PMID:27116348

  19. Nursing Students' Awareness and Intentional Maximization of Their Learning Styles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayfield, Linda Riggs

    2012-01-01

    This small, descriptive, pilot study addressed survey data from four levels of nursing students who had been taught to maximize their learning styles in a first-semester freshman success skills course. Bandura's Agency Theory supports the design. The hypothesis was that without reinforcing instruction, the students' recall and application of that…

  20. Optoelectronic plethysmography compared to spirometry during maximal exercise.

    PubMed

    Layton, Aimee M; Moran, Sienna L; Garber, Carol Ewing; Armstrong, Hilary F; Basner, Robert C; Thomashow, Byron M; Bartels, Matthew N

    2013-01-15

    The purpose of this study was to compare simultaneous measurements of tidal volume (Vt) by optoelectronic plethysmography (OEP) and spirometry during a maximal cycling exercise test to quantify possible differences between methods. Vt measured simultaneously by OEP and spirometry was collected during a maximal exercise test in thirty healthy participants. The two methods were compared by linear regression and Bland-Altman analysis at submaximal and maximal exercise. The average difference between the two methods and the mean percentage discrepancy were calculated. Submaximal exercise (SM) and maximal exercise (M) Vt measured by OEP and spirometry had very good correlation, SM R=0.963 (p<0.001), M R=0.982 (p<0.001) and high degree of common variance, SM R(2)=0.928, M R(2)=0.983. Bland-Altman analysis demonstrated that during SM, OEP could measure exercise Vt as much as 0.134 L above and -0.025 L below that of spirometry. OEP could measure exercise Vt as much as 0.188 L above and -0.017 L below that of spirometry. The discrepancy between measurements was -2.0 ± 7.2% at SM and -2.4 ± 3.9% at M. In conclusion, Vt measurements at during exercise by OEP and spirometry are closely correlated and the difference between measurements was insignificant. PMID:23022440

  1. How to Maximize Learning for Gifted Math Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chamberlin, Scott A.

    2008-01-01

    Having a gifted math or science student in the family or classroom is a fascination as well as a significant challenge and responsibility for many parents and teachers. In order to help maximize student learning, several questions need to be asked. What should be the role of technology? How well do traditional schools serve gifted students? What…

  2. PROFIT-MAXIMIZING PRINCIPLES, INSTRUCTIONAL UNITS FOR VOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BARKER, RICHARD L.

    THE PURPOSE OF THIS GUIDE IS TO ASSIST VOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE TEACHERS IN STIMULATING JUNIOR AND SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL STUDENT THINKING, UNDERSTANDING, AND DECISION MAKING AS ASSOCIATED WITH PROFIT-MAXIMIZING PRINCIPLES OF FARM OPERATION FOR USE IN FARM MANAGEMENT. IT WAS DEVELOPED UNDER A U.S. OFFICE OF EDUCATION GRANT BY TEACHER-EDUCATORS, A FARM…

  3. Maximizing plant density affects broccoli yield and quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Increased demand for fresh market bunch broccoli (Brassica oleracea L. var. italica) has led to increased production along the United States east coast. Maximizing broccoli yields is a primary concern for quickly expanding southeastern commercial markets. This broccoli plant density study was carr...

  4. Emotional Control and Instructional Effectiveness: Maximizing a Timeout

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, Staci R.

    2015-01-01

    This article provides recommendations for best practices for basketball coaches to maximize the instructional effectiveness of a timeout during competition. Practical applications are derived from research findings linking emotional intelligence to effective coaching behaviors. Additionally, recommendations are based on the implications of the…

  5. Using Debate to Maximize Learning Potential: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Firmin, Michael W.; Vaughn, Aaron; Dye, Amanda

    2007-01-01

    Following a review of the literature, an educational case study is provided for the benefit of faculty preparing college courses. In particular, we provide a transcribed debate utilized in a General Psychology course as a best practice example of how to craft a debate which maximizes student learning. The work is presented as a model for the…

  6. Maximality and Idealized Cognitive Models: The Complementation of Spanish "Tener."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilferty, Joseph; Valenzuela, Javier

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the bare-noun phrase (NP) complementation pattern of the Spanish verb "tener" (have). Shows that the maximality of the complement NP is dependent upon three factors: (1) idiosyncratic valence requirements; (2) encyclopedic knowledge related to possession; and (3) contextualized semantic construal. (Author/VWL)

  7. Maximizing grain sorghum water use efficiency under deficit irrigation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Development and evaluation of sustainable and efficient irrigation strategies is a priority for producers faced with water shortages resulting from aquifer depletion, reduced base flows, and reallocation of water to non-agricultural sectors. Under a limited water supply, yield maximization may not b...

  8. Do Speakers and Listeners Observe the Gricean Maxim of Quantity?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engelhardt, Paul E.; Bailey, Karl G. D.; Ferreira, Fernanda

    2006-01-01

    The Gricean Maxim of Quantity is believed to govern linguistic performance. Speakers are assumed to provide as much information as required for referent identification and no more, and listeners are believed to expect unambiguous but concise descriptions. In three experiments we examined the extent to which naive participants are sensitive to the…

  9. Maximally entangled mixed-state generation via local operations

    SciTech Connect

    Aiello, A.; Puentes, G.; Voigt, D.; Woerdman, J. P.

    2007-06-15

    We present a general theoretical method to generate maximally entangled mixed states of a pair of photons initially prepared in the singlet polarization state. This method requires only local operations upon a single photon of the pair and exploits spatial degrees of freedom to induce decoherence. We report also experimental confirmation of these theoretical results.

  10. IRRIGATION TO MAXIMIZE VACCINE ANTIGEN PRODUCTION IN PHARMACEUTICAL TOBACCO

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biotechnology companies have engineered plants to produce recombinant proteins for therapeutic drugs and vaccines. Chlorogen, Inc. located in St. Louis, Missouri, inserted the protective antigen (PA) gene from Bacillus anthracis into tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) chloroplasts to produce an anthrax va...

  11. Therapeutic applications of hydrogels in oral drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Sharpe, Lindsey A; Daily, Adam M; Horava, Sarena D; Peppas, Nicholas A

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Oral delivery of therapeutics, particularly protein-based pharmaceutics, is of great interest for safe and controlled drug delivery for patients. Hydrogels offer excellent potential as oral therapeutic systems due to inherent biocompatibility, diversity of both natural and synthetic material options and tunable properties. In particular, stimuli-responsive hydrogels exploit physiological changes along the intestinal tract to achieve site-specific, controlled release of protein, peptide and chemotherapeutic molecules for both local and systemic treatment applications. Areas covered This review provides a wide perspective on the therapeutic use of hydrogels in oral delivery systems. General features and advantages of hydrogels are addressed, with more considerable focus on stimuli-responsive systems that respond to pH or enzymatic changes in the gastrointestinal environment to achieve controlled drug release. Specific examples of therapeutics are given. Last, in vitro and in vivo methods to evaluate hydrogel performance are discussed. Expert opinion Hydrogels are excellent candidates for oral drug delivery, due to the number of adaptable parameters that enable controlled delivery of diverse therapeutic molecules. However, further work is required to more accurately simulate physiological conditions and enhance performance, which is important to achieve improved bioavailability and increase commercial interest. PMID:24848309

  12. Achieving Magnet status.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Beckie; Gates, Judy

    2005-01-01

    Magnet has become the gold standard for nursing excellence. It is the symbol of effective and safe patient care. It evaluates components that inspire safe care, including employee satisfaction and retention, professional education, and effective interdisciplinary collaboration. In an organization whose mission focuses on excellent patient care, Banner Thunderbird Medical Center found that pursuing Magnet status was clearly the next step. In this article, we will discuss committee selection, education, team building, planning, and the discovery process that define the Magnet journey. The road to obtaining Magnet status has permitted many opportunities to celebrate our achievements. PMID:16056158

  13. Nucleic acids as therapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Salas, Luis M

    2008-01-01

    Therapeutic nucleic acids (TNAs) and its precursors are applied to treat several pathologies and infections. TNA-based therapy has different rationales and mechanisms and can be classified into three main groups: 1) Therapeutic nucleotides and nucleosides; 2) Therapeutic oligonucleotides; and 3) Therapeutic polynucleotides. This review will focus in those TNAs that have reached clinical trials with anticancer and antiviral protocols, the two most common applications of TNAs. Although therapeutic nucleotides and nucleosides that interfere with nucleic acid metabolism and DNA polymerization have been successfully used as anticancer and antiviral drugs, they often produce toxic secondary effects related to dosage and continuous use. The use of oligonucleotides such as ribozyme and antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (AS-ODNs) showed promise as therapeutic moieties but faced several issues such as nuclease sensitivity, off-target effects and efficient delivery. Nevertheless, immunostimulatory oligodeoxynucleotides and AS-ODNs represent the most successful group of therapeutic oligonucleotides in the clinic. A newer group of therapeutic oligonucleotides, the aptamers, is rapidly advancing towards early detection and treatment alternatives the have reached the commercial interest. Despite the very high in vitro efficiency of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) they present issues with intracellular target accessibility, specificity and delivery. DNA vaccines showed great promise, but they resulted in very poor responses in the clinic and further development is uncertain. Despite their many issues, the exquisite specificity and versatility of therapeutic oligonucleotides attracts a great deal of research and resources that will certainly convert them in the TNA of choice for treating cancer and viral diseases in the near future. PMID:18991725

  14. Nanoparticle-Based Delivery of RNAi Therapeutics: Progress and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jiehua; Shum, Ka-To; Burnett, John C.; Rossi, John J.

    2013-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is an evolutionarily conserved, endogenous process for post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. Although RNAi therapeutics have recently progressed through the pipeline toward clinical trials, the application of these as ideal, clinical therapeutics requires the development of safe and effective delivery systems. Inspired by the immense progress with nanotechnology in drug delivery, efforts have been dedicated to the development of nanoparticle-based RNAi delivery systems. For example, a precisely engineered, multifunctional nanocarrier with combined passive and active targeting capabilities may address the delivery challenges for the widespread use of RNAi as a therapy. Therefore, in this review, we introduce the major hurdles in achieving efficient RNAi delivery and discuss the current advances in applying nanotechnology-based delivery systems to overcome the delivery hurdles of RNAi therapeutics. In particular, some representative examples of nanoparticle-based delivery formulations for targeted RNAi therapeutics are highlighted. PMID:23667320

  15. Stem cells as promising therapeutic options for neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jongman; Kim, Han-Soo; Hwang, Dong-Youn

    2013-04-01

    Due to the limitations of pharmacological and other current therapeutic strategies, stem cell therapies have emerged as promising options for treating many incurable neurologic diseases. A variety of stem cells including pluripotent stem cells (i.e., embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells) and multipotent adult stem cells (i.e., fetal brain tissue, neural stem cells, and mesenchymal stem cells from various sources) have been explored as therapeutic options for treating many neurologic diseases, and it is becoming obvious that each type of stem cell has pros and cons as a source for cell therapy. Wise selection of stem cells with regard to the nature and status of neurologic dysfunctions is required to achieve optimal therapeutic efficacy. To this aim, the stem cell-mediated therapeutic efforts on four major neurological diseases, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and stroke, will be introduced, and current problems and future directions will be discussed. PMID:23097262

  16. High-dose nitrates in the immediate management of unstable angina: optimal dosage, route of administration, and therapeutic goals.

    PubMed

    Cotter, G; Faibel, H; Barash, P; Shemesh, E; Moshkovitz, Y; Metzkor, E; Simovitz, A; Miller, R; Schlezinger, Z; Golik, A

    1998-05-01

    Nitrates are commonly used for rapid relief of ischemia in the initial management of unstable angina. However, their optimal dosage, route of administration, and therapeutic goals have not been fully established. This study was conducted to determine the optimal dosage and mode of administration (intravenous bolus versus sublingual spray) of nitrates and the therapeutic goals of their use in the immediate management of unstable angina. In a single-center prospective trial, 72 consecutive patients with unstable angina accompanied by typical ST-segment depression on electrocardiogram were randomly assigned to receive isosorbide dinitrate either as repeated intravenous boluses or as sublingual sprays while being delivered to the hospital by a mobile intensive care unit. Optimal nitrate dosage was tailored to pain relief while monitoring mean blood pressure reduction to an optimal range (5% to 20%) without dosage restriction. The mean nitrate dosage needed for ischemia control during the first hour of treatment was 7.8 +/- 3.8 mg. Optimal blood pressure reduction was achieved by significantly more intravenously treated patients than sublingually treated patients (68% v 41%, P = .037). Intravenously treated patients also experienced a more pronounced therapeutic effect, as assessed by reduction in chest pain score (67% v 39%, P = .0004) and decrease in ST-segment depressions (57% v 27%, P = .004). These results show that higher doses of nitrates than previously recommended are required for ischemia control during the initial management of unstable angina. The use of repeated intravenous boluses is safe and more easily controlled and, therefore, more efficacious than sublingual sprays in inducing the maximal anti-ischemic effect while avoiding significant hypotension. PMID:9596418

  17. Play Therapy and the Therapeutic Use of Story.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Roxanne; Arthur, Nancy

    1999-01-01

    Proposes that children can achieve personal growth, healing and alleviation off their emotional pain through play therapy and the therapeutic use of stories. Explores the healing process of a six-year-old boy whose family lifestyle and structured school environment presented more anxiety than he could cope with effectively. (Author/GCP)

  18. The Impact of Placement on Reading and Mathematics Achievement of Students with High Incidence Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrington, Jennifer Stell

    2011-01-01

    The question of where best to educate students with disabilities to maximize their academic achievement has been discussed and researched for over four decades, with inconsistent and contradictory results. This study focused on the mathematics and reading achievement of middle and high school students with mild disabilities in an urban district in…

  19. ERRγ Is Required for the Metabolic Maturation of Therapeutically Functional Glucose-Responsive β Cells.

    PubMed

    Yoshihara, Eiji; Wei, Zong; Lin, Chun Shi; Fang, Sungsoon; Ahmadian, Maryam; Kida, Yasuyuki; Tseng, Tiffany; Dai, Yang; Yu, Ruth T; Liddle, Christopher; Atkins, Annette R; Downes, Michael; Evans, Ronald M

    2016-04-12

    Pancreatic β cells undergo postnatal maturation to achieve maximal glucose-responsive insulin secretion, an energy intensive process. We identify estrogen-related receptor γ (ERRγ) expression as a hallmark of adult, but not neonatal β cells. Postnatal induction of ERRγ drives a transcriptional network activating mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, the electron transport chain, and ATP production needed to drive glucose-responsive insulin secretion. Mice deficient in β cell-specific ERRγ expression are glucose intolerant and fail to secrete insulin in response to a glucose challenge. Notably, forced expression of ERRγ in iPSC-derived β-like cells enables glucose-responsive secretion of human insulin in vitro, obviating in vivo maturation to achieve functionality. Moreover, these cells rapidly rescue diabetes when transplanted into β cell-deficient mice. These results identify a key role for ERRγ in β cell metabolic maturation, and offer a reproducible, quantifiable, and scalable approach for in vitro generation of functional human β cell therapeutics. PMID:27076077

  20. Gamma loop contributing to maximal voluntary contractions in man.

    PubMed

    Hagbarth, K E; Kunesch, E J; Nordin, M; Schmidt, R; Wallin, E U

    1986-11-01

    A local anaesthetic drug was injected around the peroneal nerve in healthy subjects in order to investigate whether the resulting loss in foot dorsiflexion power in part depended on a gamma-fibre block preventing 'internal' activation of spindle end-organs and thereby depriving the alpha-motoneurones of an excitatory spindle inflow during contraction. The motor outcome of maximal dorsiflexion efforts was assessed by measuring firing rates of individual motor units in the anterior tibial (t.a.) muscle, mean voltage e.m.g. from the pretibial muscles, dorsiflexion force and range of voluntary foot dorsiflexion movements. The tests were performed with and without peripheral conditioning stimuli, such as agonist or antagonist muscle vibration or imposed stretch of the contracting muscles. As compared to control values of t.a. motor unit firing rates in maximal isometric voluntary contractions, the firing rates were lower and more irregular during maximal dorsiflexion efforts performed during subtotal peroneal nerve blocks. During the development of paresis a gradual reduction of motor unit firing rates was observed before the units ceased responding to the voluntary commands. This change in motor unit behaviour was accompanied by a reduction of the mean voltage e.m.g. activity in the pretibial muscles. At a given stage of anaesthesia the e.m.g. responses to maximal voluntary efforts were more affected than the responses evoked by electric nerve stimuli delivered proximal to the block, indicating that impaired impulse transmission in alpha motor fibres was not the sole cause of the paresis. The inability to generate high and regular motor unit firing rates during peroneal nerve blocks was accentuated by vibration applied over the antagonistic calf muscles. By contrast, in eight out of ten experiments agonist stretch or vibration caused an enhancement of motor unit firing during the maximal force tasks. The reverse effects of agonist and antagonist vibration on the

  1. Recognizing outstanding achievements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speiss, Fred

    One function of any professional society is to provide an objective, informed means for recognizing outstanding achievements in its field. In AGU's Ocean Sciences section we have a variety of means for carrying out this duty. They include recognition of outstanding student presentations at our meetings, dedication of special sessions, nomination of individuals to be fellows of the Union, invitations to present Sverdrup lectures, and recommendations for Macelwane Medals, the Ocean Sciences Award, and the Ewing Medal.Since the decision to bestow these awards requires initiative and judgement by members of our section in addition to a deserving individual, it seems appropriate to review the selection process for each and to urge you to identify those deserving of recognition.

  2. Mesenchymal Stem Cells as Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Parekkadan, Biju; Milwid, Jack M.

    2013-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent cells that are being clinically explored as a new therapeutic for treating a variety of immune-mediated diseases. First heralded as a regenerative therapy for skeletal tissue repair, MSCs have recently been shown to modulate endogenous tissue and immune cells. Preclinical studies of the mechanism of action suggest that the therapeutic effects afforded by MSC transplantation are short-lived and related to dynamic, paracrine interactions between MSCs and host cells. Therefore, representations of MSCs as drug-loaded particles may allow for pharmacokinetic models to predict the therapeutic activity of MSC transplants as a function of drug delivery mode. By integrating principles of MSC biology, therapy, and engineering, the field is armed to usher in the next generation of stem cell therapeutics. PMID:20415588

  3. Achieving closure at Fernald

    SciTech Connect

    Bradburne, John; Patton, Tisha C.

    2001-02-25

    When Fluor Fernald took over the management of the Fernald Environmental Management Project in 1992, the estimated closure date of the site was more than 25 years into the future. Fluor Fernald, in conjunction with DOE-Fernald, introduced the Accelerated Cleanup Plan, which was designed to substantially shorten that schedule and save taxpayers more than $3 billion. The management of Fluor Fernald believes there are three fundamental concerns that must be addressed by any contractor hoping to achieve closure of a site within the DOE complex. They are relationship management, resource management and contract management. Relationship management refers to the interaction between the site and local residents, regulators, union leadership, the workforce at large, the media, and any other interested stakeholder groups. Resource management is of course related to the effective administration of the site knowledge base and the skills of the workforce, the attraction and retention of qualified a nd competent technical personnel, and the best recognition and use of appropriate new technologies. Perhaps most importantly, resource management must also include a plan for survival in a flat-funding environment. Lastly, creative and disciplined contract management will be essential to effecting the closure of any DOE site. Fluor Fernald, together with DOE-Fernald, is breaking new ground in the closure arena, and ''business as usual'' has become a thing of the past. How Fluor Fernald has managed its work at the site over the last eight years, and how it will manage the new site closure contract in the future, will be an integral part of achieving successful closure at Fernald.

  4. Comparison between parameters from maximal cycle ergometer test first without respiratory gas analysis and thereafter with respiratory gas analysis among healthy prepubertal children.

    PubMed

    Tompuri, Tuomo T; Lintu, Niina; Soininen, Sonja; Laitinen, Tomi; Lakka, Timo Antero

    2016-06-01

    It is important to distinguish true and clinically relevant changes and methodological noise from measure to measure. In the clinical practice, maximal cycle ergometer tests are typically performed first without respiratory gas analysis and thereafter, if needed, with respiratory gas analysis. Therefore, we report a comparison of parameters from maximal cycle ergometer exercise tests that were done first without respiratory gas analysis and thereafter with it in 38 prepubertal and healthy children (20 girls, 18 boys). The Bland-Altman method was used to assess agreement in maximal workload (WMAX), heart rate (HR), and systolic blood pressure (SBP) between rest and maximum. Girls achieved higher WMAX in the exercise tests with respiratory gas analysis compared with exercise tests without respiratory gas analysis (p = 0.016), whereas WMAX was similar in the tests among boys. Maximal HR (proportional offset, -1%; coefficients of variation, 3.3%) and highest SBP (proportional offset, 3%; coefficients of variation, 10.6%) were similar in the tests among children. Precision and agreement for HR improved and precision for SBP worsened with increasing exercise intensity. Heteroscedasticity was not observed for WMAX, HR, or SBP. We conclude that maximal cycle ergometer tests without and with respiratory gas analysis can be used consecutively because measurement of respiratory gases did not impair performance or have a significant effect on the maximality of the exercise tests. Our results suggest that similar references can be used for children who accept or refuse using a mask during a maximal exercise test. PMID:27163556

  5. Therapeutic Vaccines for Chronic Infections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Autran, Brigitte; Carcelain, Guislaine; Combadiere, Béhazine; Debre, Patrice

    2004-07-01

    Therapeutic vaccines aim to prevent severe complications of a chronic infection by reinforcing host defenses when some immune control, albeit insufficient, can already be demonstrated and when a conventional antimicrobial therapy either is not available or has limited efficacy. We focus on the rationale and challenges behind this still controversial strategy and provide examples from three major chronic infectious diseases-human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis B virus, and human papillomavirus-for which the efficacy of therapeutic vaccines is currently being evaluated.

  6. [Therapeutic touch and anorexia nervosa].

    PubMed

    Satori, Nadine

    2016-01-01

    An innovative practice, therapeutic touch has been used for around ten years in the treatment of eating disorders. Delivered by nurse clinicians having received specific training, this approach is based on nursing diagnoses which identify the major symptoms of this pathology. The support is built around the body and its perceptions. Through the helping relationship, it mobilises the patient's resources to favour a relationship of trust, a letting-go, physical, psychological and emotional relaxation, and improves the therapeutic alliance. PMID:27615696

  7. Left ventricular atrioventricular plane displacement is preserved with lifelong endurance training and is the main determinant of maximal cardiac output.

    PubMed

    Steding-Ehrenborg, Katarina; Boushel, Robert C; Calbet, José A; Åkeson, Per; Mortensen, Stefan P

    2015-12-01

    Age-related decline in cardiac function can be prevented or postponed by lifelong endurance training. However, effects of normal ageing as well as of lifelong endurance exercise on longitudinal and radial contribution to stroke volume are unknown. The aim of this study was to determine resting longitudinal and radial pumping in elderly athletes, sedentary elderly and young sedentary subjects. Furthermore, we aimed to investigate determinants of maximal cardiac output in elderly. Eight elderly athletes (63 ± 4 years), seven elderly sedentary (66 ± 4 years) and ten young sedentary subjects (29 ± 4 years) underwent cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. All subjects underwent maximal exercise testing and for elderly subjects maximal cardiac output during cycling was determined using a dye dilution technique. Longitudinal and radial contribution to stroke volume did not differ between groups (longitudinal left ventricle (LV) 52-65%, P = 0.12, right ventricle (RV) 77-87%, P = 0.16, radial 7.9-8.6%, P = 1.0). Left ventricular atrioventricular plane displacement (LVAVPD) was higher in elderly athletes and young sedentary compared with elderly sedentary subjects (14 ± 3, 15 ± 2 and 11 ± 1 mm, respectively, P < 0.05). There was no difference between groups for RVAVPD (P = 0.2). LVAVPD was an independent predictor of maximal cardiac output (R(2) = 0.61, P < 0.01, β = 0.78). Longitudinal and radial contributions to stroke volume did not differ between groups. However, how longitudinal pumping was achieved differed; elderly athletes and young sedentary subjects showed similar AVPD whereas this was significantly lower in elderly sedentary subjects. Elderly sedentary subjects achieved longitudinal pumping through increased short-axis area of the ventricle. Large AVPD was a determinant of maximal cardiac output and exercise capacity. PMID:26496146

  8. LP-925219 maximizes urinary glucose excretion in mice by inhibiting both renal SGLT1 and SGLT2

    PubMed Central

    Powell, David R; Smith, Melinda G; Doree, Deon D; Harris, Angela L; Xiong, Wendy W; Mseeh, Faika; Wilson, Alan; Gopinathan, Suma; Diaz, Damaris; Goodwin, Nicole C; Harrison, Bryce; Strobel, Eric; Rawlins, David B; Carson, Ken; Zambrowicz, Brian; Ding, Zhi-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors are a new class of oral anti-diabetic agents that improve glycemic control by inhibiting SGLT2-mediated renal glucose reabsorption. Currently available agents increase urinary glucose excretion (UGE) to <50% of maximal values because they do not inhibit SGLT1, which reabsorbs >50% of filtered glucose when SGLT2 is completely inhibited. This led us to test whether LP-925219, a small molecule dual SGLT1/SGLT2 inhibitor, increases UGE to maximal values in wild-type (WT) mice. We first tested LP-925219 inhibition of glucose transport by HEK293 cells expressing SGLT1 or SGLT2, and then characterized LP-925219 pharmacokinetics. We found that LP-925219 was a potent inhibitor of mouse SGLT1 (IC50 = 22.6 nmol/L) and SGLT2 (IC50 = 0.5 nmol/L), and that a 10 mg/kg oral dose was bioavailable (87%) with a long half-life (7 h). We next delivered LP-925219 by oral gavage to WT, SGLT1 knockout (KO), SGLT2 KO, and SGLT1/SGLT2 double KO (DKO) mice and measured their 24-h UGE. We found that, in vehicle-treated mice, DKO UGE was maximal and SGLT2 KO, SGLT1 KO, and WT UGEs were 30%, 2%, and 0.2% of maximal, respectively; we also found that LP-925219 dosed at 60 mg/kg twice daily increased UGE of SGLT1 KO, SGLT2 KO, and WT mice to DKO UGE levels. These findings show that orally available dual SGLT1/SGLT2 inhibitors can maximize 24-h UGE in mammals, and suggest that such agents merit further evaluation for their potential, in diabetic patients, to achieve better glycemic control than is achieved using selective SGLT2 inhibitors. PMID:26038705

  9. Achievement Goals and Achievement Emotions: A Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Chiungjung

    2011-01-01

    This meta-analysis synthesized 93 independent samples (N = 30,003) in 77 studies that reported in 78 articles examining correlations between achievement goals and achievement emotions. Achievement goals were meaningfully associated with different achievement emotions. The correlations of mastery and mastery approach goals with positive achievement…

  10. Maximal radius of the aftershock zone in earthquake networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezentsev, A. Yu.; Hayakawa, M.

    2009-09-01

    In this paper, several seismoactive regions were investigated (Japan, Southern California and two tectonically distinct Japanese subregions) and structural seismic constants were estimated for each region. Using the method for seismic clustering detection proposed by Baiesi and Paczuski [M. Baiesi, M. Paczuski, Phys. Rev. E 69 (2004) 066106; M. Baiesi, M. Paczuski, Nonlin. Proc. Geophys. (2005) 1607-7946], we obtained the equation of the aftershock zone (AZ). It was shown that the consideration of a finite velocity of seismic signal leads to the natural appearance of maximal possible radius of the AZ. We obtained the equation of maximal radius of the AZ as a function of the magnitude of the main event and estimated its values for each region.

  11. Safety factor maximization for trusses subjected to fatigue stresses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedaya, Mohammed Mohammed; Moneeb Elsabbagh, Adel; Hussein, Ahmed Mohamed

    2015-08-01

    This article presents a mathematical model for sizing optimization of undamped trusses subjected to dynamic loading leading to fatigue. The combined effect of static and dynamic loading, at steady state, is considered. An optimization model, whose objective is the maximization of the safety factor of these trusses, is developed. A new quantity (equivalent fatigue strain energy) combining the effects of static and dynamic stresses is presented. This quantity is used as a global measure of the proximity of fatigue failure. Therefore, the equivalent fatigue strain energy is minimized, and this seems to give a good value for the maximal equivalent static stress. This assumption is verified through two simple examples. The method of moving asymptotes is used in the optimization of trusses. The applicability of the proposed approach is demonstrated through two numerical examples; a 10-bar truss with different loading cases and a helicopter tail subjected to dynamic loading.

  12. Magellan Project: Evolving enhanced operations efficiency to maximize science value

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheuvront, Allan R.; Neuman, James C.; Mckinney, J. Franklin

    1994-01-01

    Magellan has been one of NASA's most successful spacecraft, returning more science data than all planetary spacecraft combined. The Magellan Spacecraft Team (SCT) has maximized the science return with innovative operational techniques to overcome anomalies and to perform activities for which the spacecraft was not designed. Commanding the spacecraft was originally time consuming because the standard development process was envisioned as manual tasks. The Program understood that reducing mission operations costs were essential for an extended mission. Management created an environment which encouraged automation of routine tasks, allowing staff reduction while maximizing the science data returned. Data analysis and trending, command preparation, and command reviews are some of the tasks that were automated. The SCT has accommodated personnel reductions by improving operations efficiency while returning the maximum science data possible.

  13. Osthole suppresses seizures in the mouse maximal electroshock seizure model.

    PubMed

    Luszczki, Jarogniew J; Andres-Mach, Marta; Cisowski, Wojciech; Mazol, Irena; Glowniak, Kazimierz; Czuczwar, Stanislaw J

    2009-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the anticonvulsant effects of osthole {[7-methoxy-8-(3-methyl-2-butenyl)-2H-1-benzopyran-2-one]--a natural coumarin derivative} in the mouse maximal electroshock-induced seizure model. The antiseizure effects of osthole were determined at 15, 30, 60, and 120 min after its systemic (i.p.) administration. Time course of anticonvulsant action of osthole revealed that the natural coumarin derivative produced a clear-cut antielectroshock activity in mice and the experimentally-derived ED(50) values for osthole ranged from 259 to 631 mg/kg. In conclusion, osthole suppresses seizure activity in the mouse maximal electroshock-induced seizure model. It may become a novel treatment option following further investigation in other animal models of epilepsy and preclinical studies. PMID:19236860

  14. Controlled Dense Coding Using the Maximal Slice States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jun; Mo, Zhi-wen; Sun, Shu-qin

    2016-04-01

    In this paper we investigate the controlled dense coding with the maximal slice states. Three schemes are presented. Our schemes employ the maximal slice states as quantum channel, which consists of the tripartite entangled state from the first party(Alice), the second party(Bob), the third party(Cliff). The supervisor(Cliff) can supervises and controls the channel between Alice and Bob via measurement. Through carrying out local von Neumann measurement, controlled-NOT operation and positive operator-valued measure(POVM), and introducing an auxiliary particle, we can obtain the success probability of dense coding. It is shown that the success probability of information transmitted from Alice to Bob is usually less than one. The average amount of information for each scheme is calculated in detail. These results offer deeper insight into quantum dense coding via quantum channels of partially entangled states.

  15. About closedness by convolution of the Tsallis maximizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vignat, C.; Hero, A. O., III; Costa, J. A.

    2004-09-01

    In this paper, we study the stability under convolution of the maximizing distributions of the Tsallis entropy under energy constraint (called hereafter Tsallis distributions). These distributions are shown to obey three important properties: a stochastic representation property, an orthogonal invariance property and a duality property. As a consequence of these properties, the behavior of Tsallis distributions under convolution is characterized. At last, a special random convolution, called Kingman convolution, is shown to ensure the stability of Tsallis distributions.

  16. Planning for partnerships: Maximizing surge capacity resources through service learning.

    PubMed

    Adams, Lavonne M; Reams, Paula K; Canclini, Sharon B

    2015-01-01

    Infectious disease outbreaks and natural or human-caused disasters can strain the community's surge capacity through sudden demand on healthcare activities. Collaborative partnerships between communities and schools of nursing have the potential to maximize resource availability to meet community needs following a disaster. This article explores how communities can work with schools of nursing to enhance surge capacity through systems thinking, integrated planning, and cooperative efforts. PMID:26750818

  17. Letters to the editor : Cosmological constant in broken maximal supergravities.

    SciTech Connect

    Chalmers, G.; High Energy Physics

    2002-12-01

    We examine the form of the cosmological constant in the loop expansion of broken maximally supersymmetric supergravity theories, and after embedding, within superstring and M-theory. Supersymmetry breaking at the TeV scale generates values of the cosmological constant that are in agreement with current astrophysical data. The form of perturbative quantum effects in the loop expansion is consistent with this parameter regime.

  18. Cardiovascular changes during maximal breath-holding in elite divers.

    PubMed

    Guaraldi, Pietro; Serra, Maria; Barletta, Giorgio; Pierangeli, Giulia; Terlizzi, Rossana; Calandra-Buonaura, Giovanna; Cialoni, Danilo; Cortelli, Pietro

    2009-12-01

    During maximal breath-holding six healthy elite breath-hold divers, after an initial "easy-going" phase in which cardiovascular changes resembled the so-called "diving response", exhibited a sudden and severe rise in blood pressure during the "struggle" phase of the maneuver. These changes may represent the first tangible expression of a defense reaction, which overrides the classic diving reflex, aiming to reduce the hypoxic damage and to break the apnea before the loss of consciousness. PMID:19655193

  19. Oncoplastic Breast Reduction: Maximizing Aesthetics and Surgical Margins

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Michelle Milee; Huston, Tara; Ascherman, Jeffrey; Rohde, Christine

    2012-01-01

    Oncoplastic breast reduction combines oncologically sound concepts of cancer removal with aesthetically maximized approaches for breast reduction. Numerous incision patterns and types of pedicles can be used for purposes of oncoplastic reduction, each tailored for size and location of tumor. A team approach between reconstructive and breast surgeons produces positive long-term oncologic results as well as satisfactory cosmetic and functional outcomes, rendering oncoplastic breast reduction a favorable treatment option for certain patients with breast cancer. PMID:23209890

  20. Random effects structure for confirmatory hypothesis testing: Keep it maximal

    PubMed Central

    Barr, Dale J.; Levy, Roger; Scheepers, Christoph; Tily, Harry J.

    2013-01-01

    Linear mixed-effects models (LMEMs) have become increasingly prominent in psycholinguistics and related areas. However, many researchers do not seem to appreciate how random effects structures affect the generalizability of an analysis. Here, we argue that researchers using LMEMs for confirmatory hypothesis testing should minimally adhere to the standards that have been in place for many decades. Through theoretical arguments and Monte Carlo simulation, we show that LMEMs generalize best when they include the maximal random effects structure justified by the design. The generalization performance of LMEMs including data-driven random effects structures strongly depends upon modeling criteria and sample size, yielding reasonable results on moderately-sized samples when conservative criteria are used, but with little or no power advantage over maximal models. Finally, random-intercepts-only LMEMs used on within-subjects and/or within-items data from populations where subjects and/or items vary in their sensitivity to experimental manipulations always generalize worse than separate F1 and F2 tests, and in many cases, even worse than F1 alone. Maximal LMEMs should be the ‘gold standard’ for confirmatory hypothesis testing in psycholinguistics and beyond. PMID:24403724

  1. Pore space morphology analysis using maximal inscribed spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silin, Dmitriy; Patzek, Tad

    2006-11-01

    A new robust algorithm analyzing the geometry and connectivity of the pore space of sedimentary rock is based on fundamental concepts of mathematical morphology. The algorithm distinguishes between the “pore bodies” and “pore throats,” and establishes their respective volumes and connectivity. The proposed algorithm also produces a stick-and-ball diagram of the rock pore space. The tests on a pack of equal spheres, for which the results are verifiable, confirm its stability. The impact of image resolution on the algorithm output is investigated on the images of computer-generated pore space. One of distinctive features of our approach is that no image thinning is applied. Instead, the information about the skeleton is stored through the maximal inscribed balls or spheres (MIS) associated with each voxel. These maximal balls retain information about the entire pore space. Comparison with the results obtained by a thinning procedure preserving some topological properties of the pore space shows that our method produces more realistic estimates of the number and shapes of pore bodies and pore throats, and the pore coordination numbers. The distribution of maximal inscribed spheres makes possible simulation of mercury injection and computation of the corresponding dimensionless capillary pressure curve. It turns out that the calculated capillary pressure curve is a robust descriptor of the pore space geometry and, in particular, can be used to determine the quality of computer-based rock reconstruction.

  2. Echocardiographic dimensions and maximal oxygen uptake in oarsmen during training.

    PubMed Central

    Wieling, W; Borghols, E A; Hollander, A P; Danner, S A; Dunning, A J

    1981-01-01

    We studied nine freshmen and 14 senior oarsmen undergraduates during seven months of training and compared them with 17 age and sex-matched sedentary control subjects in order to assess the influence of heavy physical exercise on cardiac dimensions and maximal oxygen uptake. Standard M-mode echocardiographic techniques were used. At the start of the season senior oarsmen had a greater left ventricular end-diastolic dimension, and a thicker interventricular septum and posterior left ventricular wall than control subjects and freshmen oarsmen. The two latter groups did not differ from each other. During the training period there was a slight and gradual increase in left ventricular end-diastolic dimension, and interventricular septum and posterior wall thickness in freshmen. In seniors only left ventricular end-diastolic dimension increased significantly. Maximal oxygen uptake showed a distinct increase between the fourth and seventh month during the period of intensive rowing training. There was no relation between echocardiographic variables and maximal oxygen uptake. A combination of heavy dynamic and static exercise can thus lead to significant changes in both left ventricular wall thickness and chamber size within months. Echocardiographic variables measured at rest cannot be used as a suitable index of performance capacity. PMID:7272130

  3. Entrepreneur achievement. Liaoning province.

    PubMed

    Zhao, R

    1994-03-01

    This paper reports the successful entrepreneurial endeavors of members of a 20-person women's group in Liaoning Province, China. Jing Yuhong, a member of the Family Planning Association at Shileizi Village, Dalian City, provided the basis for their achievements by first building an entertainment/study room in her home to encourage married women to learn family planning. Once stocked with books, magazines, pamphlets, and other materials on family planning and agricultural technology, dozens of married women in the neighborhood flocked voluntarily to the room. Yuhong also set out to give these women a way to earn their own income as a means of helping then gain greater equality with their husbands and exert greater control over their personal reproductive and social lives. She gave a section of her farming land to the women's group, loaned approximately US$5200 to group members to help them generate income from small business initiatives, built a livestock shed in her garden for the group to raise marmots, and erected an awning behind her house under which mushrooms could be grown. The investment yielded $12,000 in the first year, allowing each woman to keep more than $520 in dividends. Members then soon began going to fairs in the capital and other places to learn about the outside world, and have successfully ventured out on their own to generate individual incomes. Ten out of twenty women engaged in these income-generating activities asked for and got the one-child certificate. PMID:12287775

  4. Cardiovascular, ventilatory and catecholamine responses to maximal dynamic exercise in partially curarized man.

    PubMed Central

    Galbo, H; Kjaer, M; Secher, N H

    1987-01-01

    1. In ten young men the ventilatory, cardiovascular, catecholamine and metabolic responses to maximal dynamic leg exercise on a stationary bicycle were followed during partial neuromuscular blockade with tubocurarine. Maximal exercise was performed when the drug effect was at its maximum as well as during the subsequent reduction in the effect allowing a gradually increasing work intensity. The results were compared with those obtained during submaximal and maximal exercise performed without tubocurarine. Partial neuromuscular blockade decreased hand-grip strength to 41 +/- 1.1% (S.E. of mean) and the maximal work load to 27 +/- 2.4% of control values. Voluntary effort was maximal and the rate of perceived exertion was high at all levels of exercise with tubocurarine indicating a maintained intense central nervous motor command. 2. During maximal action of the drug oxygen uptake was 1.67 +/- 0.11 l/min while only 0.91 +/- 0.13 l/min (P less than 0.01) at the same work intensity without neuromuscular blockade. This difference may reflect a dominant reliance on fast-twitch muscle fibres when work was performed under the influence of tubocurarine. 3. Compared at a given oxygen uptake ventilation was higher during work with tubocurarine than during control exercise (e.g. 55 +/- 4.2 and 40 +/- 2.2 l/min, respectively (P less than 0.01), at a mean oxygen uptake of 1.9 l/min), while heart rate did not differ significantly (146 +/- 4.4 and 139 +/- 3.0 beats/min). With decreasing drug effect both variables increased towards the maximum values of 138 +/- 4.5 l/min and 183 +/- 3.9 beats/min, respectively, achieved in control experiments at an oxygen uptake of 3.8 +/- 0.2 l/min. Like heart rate the mean arterial blood pressure increased with increasing work load and was similar at a given oxygen uptake with and without tubocurarine. 4. During maximal exercise at peak tubocurarine effect plasma adrenaline and noradrenaline concentrations were smaller than during control maximum

  5. Supramolecular Nanoparticles for Molecular Diagnostics and Therapeutics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kuan-Ju

    Over the past decades, significant efforts have been devoted to explore the use of various nanoparticle-based systems in the field of nanomedicine, including molecular imaging and therapy. Supramolecular synthetic approaches have attracted lots of attention due to their flexibility, convenience, and modularity for producing nanoparticles. In this dissertation, the developmental story of our size-controllable supramolecular nanoparticles (SNPs) will be discussed, as well as their use in specific biomedical applications. To achieve the self-assembly of SNPs, the well-characterized molecular recognition system (i.e., cyclodextrin/adamantane recognition) was employed. The resulting SNPs, which were assembled from three molecular building blocks, possess incredible stability in various physiological conditions, reversible size-controllability and dynamic disassembly that were exploited for various in vitro and in vivo applications. An advantage of using the supramolecular approach is that it enables the convenient incorporation of functional ligands onto SNP surface that confers functionality ( e.g., targeting, cell penetration) to SNPs. We utilized SNPs for molecular imaging such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) by introducing reporter systems (i.e., radio-isotopes, MR contrast agents, and fluorophores) into SNPs. On the other hand, the incorporation of various payloads, including drugs, genes and proteins, into SNPs showed improved delivery performance and enhanced therapeutic efficacy for these therapeutic agents. Leveraging the powers of (i) a combinatorial synthetic approach based on supramolecular assembly and (ii) a digital microreactor, a rapid developmental pathway was developed that is capable of screening SNP candidates for the ideal structural and functional properties that deliver optimal performance. Moreover, SNP-based theranostic delivery systems that combine reporter systems and therapeutic payloads into a

  6. Achieving better cooling of turbine blades using numerical simulation methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inozemtsev, A. A.; Tikhonov, A. S.; Sendyurev, C. I.; Samokhvalov, N. Yu.

    2013-02-01

    A new design of the first-stage nozzle vane for the turbine of a prospective gas-turbine engine is considered. The blade's thermal state is numerically simulated in conjugate statement using the ANSYS CFX 13.0 software package. Critical locations in the blade design are determined from the distribution of heat fluxes, and measures aimed at achieving more efficient cooling are analyzed. Essentially lower (by 50-100°C) maximal temperature of metal has been achieved owing to the results of the performed work.

  7. On the Achievable Throughput Over TVWS Sensor Networks.

    PubMed

    Caleffi, Marcello; Cacciapuoti, Angela Sara

    2016-01-01

    In this letter, we study the throughput achievable by an unlicensed sensor network operating over TV white space spectrum in presence of coexistence interference. Through the letter, we first analytically derive the achievable throughput as a function of the channel ordering. Then, we show that the problem of deriving the maximum expected throughput through exhaustive search is computationally unfeasible. Finally, we derive a computational-efficient algorithm characterized by polynomial-time complexity to compute the channel set maximizing the expected throughput and, stemming from this, we derive a closed-form expression of the maximum expected throughput. Numerical simulations validate the theoretical analysis. PMID:27043565

  8. Massage Therapy Education Online: Student Satisfaction and Achievement, Part I

    PubMed Central

    McQuillan, David James

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, providers of massage therapy education have, in growing numbers, started to use online technologies to support the learning processes of their students. Using a narrative review of the existing online learning literature, this paper aims to provide a solid pedagogical foundation for these early explorations. It identifies five key factors—instructional pedagogy, quality of instruction, interaction and communication, individual learner qualities, and the online interface—that contribute to student satisfaction and achievement in the online context. The relationships between those factors and the experience of the online learner are discussed with reference to maximization of student satisfaction and achievement. PMID:21589705

  9. On the Achievable Throughput Over TVWS Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Caleffi, Marcello; Cacciapuoti, Angela Sara

    2016-01-01

    In this letter, we study the throughput achievable by an unlicensed sensor network operating over TV white space spectrum in presence of coexistence interference. Through the letter, we first analytically derive the achievable throughput as a function of the channel ordering. Then, we show that the problem of deriving the maximum expected throughput through exhaustive search is computationally unfeasible. Finally, we derive a computational-efficient algorithm characterized by polynomial-time complexity to compute the channel set maximizing the expected throughput and, stemming from this, we derive a closed-form expression of the maximum expected throughput. Numerical simulations validate the theoretical analysis. PMID:27043565

  10. [Therapeutic angiogenesis using genetic transfection. An in vitro quantitative and functional study after gene code transfer for vascular endothelial growth factor].

    PubMed

    Zaric, V; Weltin, D; Stephan, D

    2000-08-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) gene transfer is a new therapeutic approach in clinical situations where insufficient angiogenesis may impair processes that require vessel formation, such as myocardial ischemia or peripheral vascular disease. The feasibility of this strategy was addressed in vitro by (i) optimisation of DNA transfection into cultured cells using a cationic liposome, (ii) study of the transgene production and it's angiogenic properties. An expression plasmid encoding VEGF165 was used to transfect endothelial cells (EAhy-926) in vitro. Different amounts of the cationic liposome were complexed to the plasmid DNA in order to achieve increasing ratios (1/1, 2/1, 3/1, 4/1, 5/1). Maximal gene expression was obtained when the cationic liposome was mixed to plasmid DNA in a 3/1 ratio. Using this optimised liposome/plasmid DNA formulation, VEGF expression measured by ELISA, reached a maximum of 60 ng/mL 24 hours after gene transfer then rapidly decreased. Conditioned media from transfected cells (CMVEGF) significantly increased the proliferation rate of endothelial cells. The maximal mitogenic effect was observed when the cell media was supplemented with 25% of CMVEGF, corresponding to 10 ng/mL of recombinant VEGF. Addition of the VEGF165 peptide into the cell media showed a similar mitogenic effect. The angiogenic property of the transgene was assessed by the demonstration of its ability to stimulate capillary tubes formation in a tridimensional biologic gel. PMID:10989743

  11. Maximizing the probability of satisfying the clinical goals in radiation therapy treatment planning under setup uncertainty

    SciTech Connect

    Fredriksson, Albin Hårdemark, Björn; Forsgren, Anders

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: This paper introduces a method that maximizes the probability of satisfying the clinical goals in intensity-modulated radiation therapy treatments subject to setup uncertainty. Methods: The authors perform robust optimization in which the clinical goals are constrained to be satisfied whenever the setup error falls within an uncertainty set. The shape of the uncertainty set is included as a variable in the optimization. The goal of the optimization is to modify the shape of the uncertainty set in order to maximize the probability that the setup error will fall within the modified set. Because the constraints enforce the clinical goals to be satisfied under all setup errors within the uncertainty set, this is equivalent to maximizing the probability of satisfying the clinical goals. This type of robust optimization is studied with respect to photon and proton therapy applied to a prostate case and compared to robust optimization using an a priori defined uncertainty set. Results: Slight reductions of the uncertainty sets resulted in plans that satisfied a larger number of clinical goals than optimization with respect to a priori defined uncertainty sets, both within the reduced uncertainty sets and within the a priori, nonreduced, uncertainty sets. For the prostate case, the plans taking reduced uncertainty sets into account satisfied 1.4 (photons) and 1.5 (protons) times as many clinical goals over the scenarios as the method taking a priori uncertainty sets into account. Conclusions: Reducing the uncertainty sets enabled the optimization to find better solutions with respect to the errors within the reduced as well as the nonreduced uncertainty sets and thereby achieve higher probability of satisfying the clinical goals. This shows that asking for a little less in the optimization sometimes leads to better overall plan quality.

  12. The Homogeneity of School Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cahan, Sorel

    Since the measurement of school achievement involves the administration of achievement tests to various grades on various subjects, both grade level and subject matter contribute to within-school achievement variations. To determine whether achievement test scores vary most among different fields within a grade level, or within fields among…

  13. Athletic Differences in the Characteristics of the Photoplethysmographic Pulse Shape: Effect of Maximal Oxygen Uptake and Maximal Muscular Voluntary Contraction

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Anran; Yang, Lin; Liu, Chengyu; Cui, Jingxuan; Li, Yao; Yang, Xingxing; Zhang, Song

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the athletic differences in the characteristics of the photoplethysmographic (PPG) pulse shape. 304 athletes were enrolled and divided into three subgroups according to a typical sport classification in terms of the maximal oxygen uptake (MaxO2_low, MaxO2_middle and MaxO2_high groups) or the maximal muscular voluntary contraction (MMVC_low, MMVC_middle, and MMVC_high groups). Finger PPG pulses were digitally recorded and then normalized to derive the pulse area, pulse peak time Tp, dicrotic notch time Tn, and pulse reflection index (RI). The four parameters were finally compared between the three subgroups categorized by MaxO2 or by MMVC. In conclusion, it has been demonstrated by quantifying the characteristics of the PPG pulses in different athletes that MaxO2, but not MMVC, had significant effect on the arterial properties. PMID:25710022

  14. HEPEX - achievements and challenges!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappenberger, Florian; Ramos, Maria-Helena; Thielen, Jutta; Wood, Andy; Wang, Qj; Duan, Qingyun; Collischonn, Walter; Verkade, Jan; Voisin, Nathalie; Wetterhall, Fredrik; Vuillaume, Jean-Francois Emmanuel; Lucatero Villasenor, Diana; Cloke, Hannah L.; Schaake, John; van Andel, Schalk-Jan

    2014-05-01

    HEPEX is an international initiative bringing together hydrologists, meteorologists, researchers and end-users to develop advanced probabilistic hydrological forecast techniques for improved flood, drought and water management. HEPEX was launched in 2004 as an independent, cooperative international scientific activity. During the first meeting, the overarching goal was defined as: "to develop and test procedures to produce reliable hydrological ensemble forecasts, and to demonstrate their utility in decision making related to the water, environmental and emergency management sectors." The applications of hydrological ensemble predictions span across large spatio-temporal scales, ranging from short-term and localized predictions to global climate change and regional modeling. Within the HEPEX community, information is shared through its blog (www.hepex.org), meetings, testbeds and intercompaison experiments, as well as project reportings. Key questions of HEPEX are: * What adaptations are required for meteorological ensemble systems to be coupled with hydrological ensemble systems? * How should the existing hydrological ensemble prediction systems be modified to account for all sources of uncertainty within a forecast? * What is the best way for the user community to take advantage of ensemble forecasts and to make better decisions based on them? This year HEPEX celebrates its 10th year anniversary and this poster will present a review of the main operational and research achievements and challenges prepared by Hepex contributors on data assimilation, post-processing of hydrologic predictions, forecast verification, communication and use of probabilistic forecasts in decision-making. Additionally, we will present the most recent activities implemented by Hepex and illustrate how everyone can join the community and participate to the development of new approaches in hydrologic ensemble prediction.

  15. Comparison of myocardial /sup 201/Tl clearance after maximal and submaximal exercise: implications for diagnosis of coronary disease: concise communication

    SciTech Connect

    Massie, B.M.; Wisneski, J.; Kramer, B.; Hollenberg, M.; Gertz, E.; Stern, D.

    1982-05-01

    Recently the quantitation of regional /sup 201/Tl clearance has been shown to increase the sensitivity of the scintigraphic detection of coronary disease. Although /sup 201/Tl clearance rates might be expected to vary with the degree of exercise, this relationship has not been explored. We therefore evaluated the rate of decrease in myocardial /sup 201/Tl activity following maximal and submaximal stress in seven normal subjects and 21 patients with chest pain, using the seven-pinhole tomographic reconstruction technique. In normals, the mean /sup 201/Tl clearance rate declined from 41% +/- 7 over a 3-hr period with maximal exercise to 25% +/- 5 after 3 hr at a submaximal level (p less than 0.001). Similar differences in clearance rates were found in the normally perfused regions of the left ventricle in patients with chest pain, depending on whether or not a maximal end point (defined as either the appearance of ischemia or reaching 85% of age-predicted heart rate) was achieved. In five patients who did not reach these end points, 3-hr clearance rates in uninvolved regions averaged 25% +/- 2, in contrast to a mean of 38% +/- 5 for such regions in 15 patients who exercised to ischemia or an adequate heart rate. These findings indicate that clearance criteria derived from normals can be applied to patients who are stressed maximally, even if the duration of exercise is limited, but that caution must be used in interpreting clearance rates in those who do not exercise to an accepted end point.

  16. Optimal Halbach Permanent Magnet Designs for Maximally Pulling and Pushing Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Sarwar, A; Nemirovski, A; Shapiro, B

    2012-03-01

    Optimization methods are presented to design Halbach arrays to maximize the forces applied on magnetic nanoparticles at deep tissue locations. In magnetic drug targeting, where magnets are used to focus therapeutic nanoparticles to disease locations, the sharp fall off of magnetic fields and forces with distances from magnets has limited the depth of targeting. Creating stronger forces at depth by optimally designed Halbach arrays would allow treatment of a wider class of patients, e.g. patients with deeper tumors. The presented optimization methods are based on semi-definite quadratic programming, yield provably globally optimal Halbach designs in 2 and 3-dimensions, for maximal pull or push magnetic forces (stronger pull forces can collect nano-particles against blood forces in deeper vessels; push forces can be used to inject particles into precise locations, e.g. into the inner ear). These Halbach designs, here tested in simulations of Maxwell's equations, significantly outperform benchmark magnets of the same size and strength. For example, a 3-dimensional 36 element 2000 cm(3) volume optimal Halbach design yields a ×5 greater force at a 10 cm depth compared to a uniformly magnetized magnet of the same size and strength. The designed arrays should be feasible to construct, as they have a similar strength (≤ 1 Tesla), size (≤ 2000 cm(3)), and number of elements (≤ 36) as previously demonstrated arrays, and retain good performance for reasonable manufacturing errors (element magnetization direction errors ≤ 5°), thus yielding practical designs to improve magnetic drug targeting treatment depths. PMID:23335834

  17. Optimal Halbach Permanent Magnet Designs for Maximally Pulling and Pushing Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Sarwar, A.; Nemirovski, A.; Shapiro, B.

    2011-01-01

    Optimization methods are presented to design Halbach arrays to maximize the forces applied on magnetic nanoparticles at deep tissue locations. In magnetic drug targeting, where magnets are used to focus therapeutic nanoparticles to disease locations, the sharp fall off of magnetic fields and forces with distances from magnets has limited the depth of targeting. Creating stronger forces at depth by optimally designed Halbach arrays would allow treatment of a wider class of patients, e.g. patients with deeper tumors. The presented optimization methods are based on semi-definite quadratic programming, yield provably globally optimal Halbach designs in 2 and 3-dimensions, for maximal pull or push magnetic forces (stronger pull forces can collect nano-particles against blood forces in deeper vessels; push forces can be used to inject particles into precise locations, e.g. into the inner ear). These Halbach designs, here tested in simulations of Maxwell’s equations, significantly outperform benchmark magnets of the same size and strength. For example, a 3-dimensional 36 element 2000 cm3 volume optimal Halbach design yields a ×5 greater force at a 10 cm depth compared to a uniformly magnetized magnet of the same size and strength. The designed arrays should be feasible to construct, as they have a similar strength (≤ 1 Tesla), size (≤ 2000 cm3), and number of elements (≤ 36) as previously demonstrated arrays, and retain good performance for reasonable manufacturing errors (element magnetization direction errors ≤ 5°), thus yielding practical designs to improve magnetic drug targeting treatment depths. PMID:23335834

  18. Motor unit firing rates of the gastrocnemii during maximal and sub-maximal isometric contractions in young and old men.

    PubMed

    Kirk, Eric A; Copithorne, Dave B; Dalton, Brian H; Rice, Charles L

    2016-08-25

    The triceps surae comprises an important group of muscles for human posture and gait. The soleus unlike other limb muscles shows atypical lower firing rates in both old and young adults across various voluntary strength levels, including maximal contractions. The other portion of the triceps surae, the gastrocnemii has not been explored in aging, and despite anatomic, histochemical and age-related morphological differences, they share many common functions with soleus. During multiple visits, 10 active young (23-33years) and 10 active old participants (76-86years) performed a series of plantar flexor isometric contractions at a range of contraction intensities including maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) with tungsten microelectrodes inserted into the lateral (LG) and medial (MG) gastrocnemius. Despite equal and near maximal voluntary activation (VA) (∼98%), MVC torque was ∼46% lower, twitch tension was ∼34% lower, and contractile speed was ∼15% slower in the old men compared with the young. At all isometric torque levels tested (25, 50, 75 and 100% MVC) there were no statistically significant differences in mean motor unit firing rates (MUFRs) between young and old men. In both groups, the range of mean MU firing rates was similar (∼8Hz at 25% MVC to ∼22Hz at 100% MVC). The structural age-related changes in the gastrocnemii are not reflected in neural drive adaptations, indicating that MUFRs may not be a common feature with aging and other factors such as habitual use or anatomical location may be influential. PMID:27298006

  19. Gas analyzer's drift leads to systematic error in maximal oxygen uptake and maximal respiratory exchange ratio determination

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Tabar, Ibai; Eclache, Jean P.; Aramendi, José F.; Gorostiaga, Esteban M.

    2015-01-01

    The aim was to examine the drift in the measurements of fractional concentration of oxygen (FO2) and carbon dioxide (FCO2) of a Nafion-using metabolic cart during incremental maximal exercise in 18 young and 12 elderly males, and to propose a way in which the drift can be corrected. The drift was verified by comparing the pre-test calibration values with the immediate post-test verification values of the calibration gases. The system demonstrated an average downscale drift (P < 0.001) in FO2 and FCO2 of −0.18% and −0.05%, respectively. Compared with measured values, corrected average maximal oxygen uptakevalues were 5–6% lower (P < 0.001) whereas corrected maximal respiratory exchange ratio values were 8–9% higher (P < 0.001). The drift was not due to an electronic instability in the analyzers because it was reverted after 20 min of recovery from the end of the exercise. The drift may be related to an incomplete removal of water vapor from the expired gas during transit through the Nafion conducting tube. These data demonstrate the importance of checking FO2 and FCO2 values by regular pre-test calibrations and post-test verifications, and also the importance of correcting a possible shift immediately after exercise. PMID:26578980

  20. Protective effect by maximal isometric contractions against maximal eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage of the knee extensors.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Kuo-Wei; Tseng, Wei-Chin; Lin, Ming-Ju; Chen, Hsin-Lian; Nosaka, Kazunori; Chen, Trevor C

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated whether maximal voluntary isometric contractions (MVIC) performed before maximal eccentric contractions (MaxEC) would attenuate muscle damage of the knee extensors. Untrained men were placed to an experimental group that performed 6 sets of 10 MVIC at 90° knee flexion 2 weeks before 6 sets of 10 MaxEC or a control group that performed MaxEC only (n = 13/group). Changes in muscle damage markers were assessed before to 5 days after each exercise. Small but significant changes in maximal voluntary concentric contraction torque, range of motion (ROM) and plasma creatine kinase (CK) activity were evident at immediately to 2 days post-MVIC (p < 0.05), but other variables (e.g. thigh girth, myoglobin concentration, B-mode echo intensity) did not change significantly. Changes in all variables after MaxEC were smaller (p < 0.05) by 45% (soreness)-67% (CK) for the experimental than the control group. These results suggest that MVIC conferred potent protective effect against MaxEC-induced muscle damage. PMID:27366814

  1. Gambling with Flu: "All in" to Maximize Reward.

    PubMed

    Stukalov, Alexey; Pichlmair, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    In this issue of Cell Host & Microbe, Tripathi et al. (2015) report an in-depth meta-analysis of eight influenza virus siRNA screens combined with viral-host protein interactome data. The integration of the different omics datasets highlights candidate genes and pathways for further investigation and potential therapeutic targeting in the future. PMID:26651939

  2. A New Mechanical Loading Configuration for Maximizing The Performance of Dielectric Elastomer Generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shian, Samuel; Huang, Jiangshui; Suo, Zhigang; Clarke, David

    2013-03-01

    Electrical energy can be generated from mechanical deformations using dielectric elastomers but currently achieved energy densities and conversion efficiencies are still small. In this presentation, we demonstrate that significant improvements, an energy density over 500 mJ/g and up to 10% in efficiency, can be produced using VHB elastomers by altering the mechanical loading geometry. A major limitation is viscous losses in the VHB elastomer indicating that higher efficiencies with other elastomers will be attainable. The basic concept of mechanical energy harvesting with a dielectric elastomer sheet is a straightforward electromechanical cycle leading to a voltage step-up: a sheet is stretched, electrical charge at low voltage is placed on either side using compliant electrodes, the stretch is released causing the sheet's initial thickness and area to be recovered increasing the charge potential which can then be harvested. Integral to maximizing the energy conversion is the amount of mechanical energy that can be stored elastically and the amount of capacitance change in the elastomer sheet during stretching. We show that these factors can be maximized by equi-biaxial loading. Details of our dielectric elastomer generator will be described as well as the procedures we use for quantifying its performance.

  3. Integrating Multiple Correlated Phenotypes for Genetic Association Analysis by Maximizing Heritability

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jin J.; Cho, Michael H.; Lange, Christoph; Lutz, Sharon; Silverman, Edwin K.; Laird, Nan M.

    2015-01-01

    Many correlated disease variables are analyzed jointly in genetic studies in the hope of increasing power to detect causal genetic variants. One approach involves assessing the relationship between each phenotype and each single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) individually and using a Bonferroni correction for the effective number of tests conducted. Alternatively, one can apply a multivariate regression or a dimension reduction technique, such as principal component analysis (PCA), and test for the association with the principal components (PC) of the phenotypes rather than the individual phenotypes. Inspired by the previous approaches of combining phenotypes to maximize heritability at individual SNPs, in this paper, we propose to construct a maximally heritable phenotype (MaxH) by taking advantage of the estimated total heritability and co-heritability. The heritability and co-heritability only need to be estimated once, therefore our method is applicable to genome-wide scans. MaxH phenotype is a linear combination of the individual phenotypes with increased heritability and power over the phenotypes being combined. Simulations show that the heritability and power achieved agree well with the theory for large samples and two phenotypes. We compare our approach with commonly used methods and assess both the heritability and the power of the MaxH phenotype. Moreover we provide suggestions for how to choose the phenotypes for combination. An application of our approach to a COPD genome-wide association study shows the practical relevance. PMID:26111731

  4. Maximizing the Impact of e-Therapy and Serious Gaming: Time for a Paradigm Shift.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Theresa M; de Beurs, Derek; Khazaal, Yasser; Gaggioli, Andrea; Riva, Giuseppe; Botella, Cristina; Baños, Rosa M; Aschieri, Filippo; Bavin, Lynda M; Kleiboer, Annet; Merry, Sally; Lau, Ho Ming; Riper, Heleen

    2016-01-01

    Internet interventions for mental health, including serious games, online programs, and apps, hold promise for increasing access to evidence-based treatments and prevention. Many such interventions have been shown to be effective and acceptable in trials; however, uptake and adherence outside of trials is seldom reported, and where it is, adherence at least, generally appears to be underwhelming. In response, an international Collaboration On Maximizing the impact of E-Therapy and Serious Gaming (COMETS) was formed. In this perspectives' paper, we call for a paradigm shift to increase the impact of internet interventions toward the ultimate goal of improved population mental health. We propose four pillars for change: (1) increased focus on user-centered approaches, including both user-centered design of programs and greater individualization within programs, with the latter perhaps utilizing increased modularization; (2) Increased emphasis on engagement utilizing processes such as gaming, gamification, telepresence, and persuasive technology; (3) Increased collaboration in program development, testing, and data sharing, across both sectors and regions, in order to achieve higher quality, more sustainable outcomes with greater reach; and (4) Rapid testing and implementation, including the measurement of reach, engagement, and effectiveness, and timely implementation. We suggest it is time for researchers, clinicians, developers, and end-users to collaborate on these aspects in order to maximize the impact of e-therapies and serious gaming. PMID:27148094

  5. Maximizing the Impact of e-Therapy and Serious Gaming: Time for a Paradigm Shift

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, Theresa M.; de Beurs, Derek; Khazaal, Yasser; Gaggioli, Andrea; Riva, Giuseppe; Botella, Cristina; Baños, Rosa M.; Aschieri, Filippo; Bavin, Lynda M.; Kleiboer, Annet; Merry, Sally; Lau, Ho Ming; Riper, Heleen

    2016-01-01

    Internet interventions for mental health, including serious games, online programs, and apps, hold promise for increasing access to evidence-based treatments and prevention. Many such interventions have been shown to be effective and acceptable in trials; however, uptake and adherence outside of trials is seldom reported, and where it is, adherence at least, generally appears to be underwhelming. In response, an international Collaboration On Maximizing the impact of E-Therapy and Serious Gaming (COMETS) was formed. In this perspectives’ paper, we call for a paradigm shift to increase the impact of internet interventions toward the ultimate goal of improved population mental health. We propose four pillars for change: (1) increased focus on user-centered approaches, including both user-centered design of programs and greater individualization within programs, with the latter perhaps utilizing increased modularization; (2) Increased emphasis on engagement utilizing processes such as gaming, gamification, telepresence, and persuasive technology; (3) Increased collaboration in program development, testing, and data sharing, across both sectors and regions, in order to achieve higher quality, more sustainable outcomes with greater reach; and (4) Rapid testing and implementation, including the measurement of reach, engagement, and effectiveness, and timely implementation. We suggest it is time for researchers, clinicians, developers, and end-users to collaborate on these aspects in order to maximize the impact of e-therapies and serious gaming. PMID:27148094

  6. How to predict polydisperse hard-sphere mixture behavior using maximally equivalent tridisperse systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogarko, Vitaliy; Luding, Stefan

    2013-03-01

    Polydisperse hard sphere mixtures have equilibrium properties which essentially depend on the number density and a reduced number K of moments of the size distribution function. Such systems are equivalent to other systems with different size distributions if the K moments are matched. In particular, a small number s of components, such that 2 s - 1 = K is sufficient to mimic systems with continuous size distributions. For most of the fluid phase K = 3 moments (s = 2 components) are enough to define an equivalent system, while in the glassy states one needs K = 5 moments (s = 3 components) to achieve good agreement between the polydisperse and its maximally-equivalent tridisperse system. With K = 5 matched moments they are also close in number- and volume-fractions of rattlers. Finally, also the jamming density of maximally-equivalent jammed packings is very close, where the tiny differences can be explained by the distribution of rattlers. This research is supported by the Dutch Technology Foundation STW, which is the applied science division of NWO, and the Technology Programme of the Ministry of Economic Affairs, project Nr. STW-MUST 10120.

  7. Bioengineering and Coordination of Regulatory Networks and Intracellular Complexes to Maximize Hydrogen Production by Phototrophic Microorganisms

    SciTech Connect

    Tabita, F. Robert

    2013-07-30

    In this study, the Principal Investigator, F.R. Tabita has teemed up with J. C. Liao from UCLA. This project's main goal is to manipulate regulatory networks in phototrophic bacteria to affect and maximize the production of large amounts of hydrogen gas under conditions where wild-type organisms are constrained by inherent regulatory mechanisms from allowing this to occur. Unrestrained production of hydrogen has been achieved and this will allow for the potential utilization of waste materials as a feed stock to support hydrogen production. By further understanding the means by which regulatory networks interact, this study will seek to maximize the ability of currently available “unrestrained” organisms to produce hydrogen. The organisms to be utilized in this study, phototrophic microorganisms, in particular nonsulfur purple (NSP) bacteria, catalyze many significant processes including the assimilation of carbon dioxide into organic carbon, nitrogen fixation, sulfur oxidation, aromatic acid degradation, and hydrogen oxidation/evolution. Moreover, due to their great metabolic versatility, such organisms highly regulate these processes in the cell and since virtually all such capabilities are dispensable, excellent experimental systems to study aspects of molecular control and biochemistry/physiology are available.

  8. [Therapeutic potential of optogenetic neuromodulation].

    PubMed

    Vandecasteele, Marie; Senova, Yann-Suhan; Palfi, Stéphane; Dugué, Guillaume P

    2015-04-01

    Optogenetic neuromodulation techniques, which have emerged during the last 15 years, have considerably enhanced our ability to probe the functioning of neural circuits by allowing the excitation and inhibition of genetically-defined neuronal populations using light. Having gained tremendous popularity in the field of fundamental neuroscience, these techniques are now opening new therapeutic avenues. Optogenetic neuromodulation is a method of choice for studying the physiopathology of neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders in a range of animal models, and could accelerate the discovery of new therapeutic strategies. New therapeutic protocols employing optogenetic neuromodulation may also emerge in the near future, offering promising alternative approaches for disorders which lack appropriate treatments, such as pharmacoresistant epilepsy and inherited retinal degeneration. PMID:25958759

  9. Therapeutic cloning and reproductive liberty.

    PubMed

    Sparrow, Robert

    2009-04-01

    Concern for "reproductive liberty" suggests that decisions about embryos should normally be made by the persons who would be the genetic parents of the child that would be brought into existence if the embryo were brought to term. Therapeutic cloning would involve creating and destroying an embryo, which, if brought to term, would be the offspring of the genetic parents of the person undergoing therapy. I argue that central arguments in debates about parenthood and genetics therefore suggest that therapeutic cloning would be prima facie unethical unless it occurred with the consent of the parents of the person being cloned. Alternatively, if therapeutic cloning is thought to be legitimate, this undermines the case for some uses of reproductive cloning by implying that the genetic relation it establishes between clones and DNA donors does not carry the same moral weight as it does in cases of normal reproduction. PMID:19240247

  10. Oligonucleotide conjugates for therapeutic applications

    PubMed Central

    Winkler, Johannes

    2013-01-01

    Insufficient pharmacokinetic properties and poor cellular uptake are the main hurdles for successful therapeutic development of oligonucleotide agents. The covalent attachment of various ligands designed to influence the biodistribution and cellular uptake or for targeting specific tissues is an attractive possibility to advance therapeutic applications and to expand development options. In contrast to advanced formulations, which often consist of multiple reagents and are sensitive to a variety of preparation conditions, oligonucleotide conjugates are defined molecules, enabling structure-based analytics and quality control techniques. This review gives an overview of current developments of oligonucleotide conjugates for therapeutic applications. Attached ligands comprise peptides, proteins, carbohydrates, aptamers and small molecules, including cholesterol, tocopherol and folic acid. Important linkage types and conjugation methods are summarized. The distinct ligands directly influence biochemical parameters, uptake machanisms and pharmacokinetic properties. PMID:23883124

  11. Therapeutic Bronchoscopy for Malignant Central Airway Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Ernst, Armin; Grosu, Horiana B.; Lei, Xiudong; Diaz-Mendoza, Javier; Slade, Mark; Gildea, Thomas R.; Machuzak, Michael S.; Jimenez, Carlos A.; Toth, Jennifer; Kovitz, Kevin L.; Ray, Cynthia; Greenhill, Sara; Casal, Roberto F.; Almeida, Francisco A.; Wahidi, Momen M.; Eapen, George A.; Feller-Kopman, David; Morice, Rodolfo C.; Benzaquen, Sadia; Tremblay, Alain; Simoff, Michael; Kovitz, Kevin; Greenhill, Sara; Gildea, Thomas R.; Machuzak, Michael; Almeida, Francisco A.; Cicenia, Joseph; Wahidi, Momen; Mahmood, Kamran; MacEachern, Paul; Tremblay, Alain; Simoff, Michael; Diaz-Mendoza, Javier; Ray, Cynthia; Feller-Kopman, David; Yarmus, Lonny; Estrada-Y-Martin, Rosa; Casal, Roberto F.; Toth, Jennifer; Karunakara, Raj; Slade, Mark; Ernst, Armin; Rafeq, Samaan; Ost, David; Eapen, George A.; Jimenez, Carlos A.; Morice, Rodolfo C.; Benzaquen, Sadia; Puchalski, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is significant variation between physicians in terms of how they perform therapeutic bronchoscopy, but there are few data on whether these differences impact effectiveness. METHODS: This was a multicenter registry study of patients undergoing therapeutic bronchoscopy for malignant central airway obstruction. The primary outcome was technical success, defined as reopening the airway lumen to > 50% of normal. Secondary outcomes were dyspnea as measured by the Borg score and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) as measured by the SF-6D. RESULTS: Fifteen centers performed 1,115 procedures on 947 patients. Technical success was achieved in 93% of procedures. Center success rates ranged from 90% to 98% (P = .02). Endobronchial obstruction and stent placement were associated with success, whereas American Society of Anesthesiology (ASA) score > 3, renal failure, primary lung cancer, left mainstem disease, and tracheoesophageal fistula were associated with failure. Clinically significant improvements in dyspnea occurred in 90 of 187 patients measured (48%). Greater baseline dyspnea was associated with greater improvements in dyspnea, whereas smoking, having multiple cancers, and lobar obstruction were associated with smaller improvements. Clinically significant improvements in HRQOL occurred in 76 of 183 patients measured (42%). Greater baseline dyspnea was associated with greater improvements in HRQOL, and lobar obstruction was associated with smaller improvements. CONCLUSIONS: Technical success rates were high overall, with the highest success rates associated with stent placement and endobronchial obstruction. Therapeutic bronchoscopy should not be withheld from patients based solely on an assessment of risk, since patients with the most dyspnea and lowest functional status benefitted the most. PMID:25358019

  12. Therapeutic target database update 2014: a resource for targeted therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Chu; Zhang, Cheng; Zhu, Feng; Xu, Feng; Chen, Shang Ying; Zhang, Peng; Li, Ying Hong; Yang, Sheng Yong; Wei, Yu Quan; Tao, Lin; Chen, Yu Zong

    2014-01-01

    Here we describe an update of the Therapeutic Target Database (http://bidd.nus.edu.sg/group/ttd/ttd.asp) for better serving the bench-to-clinic communities and for enabling more convenient data access, processing and exchange. Extensive efforts from the research, industry, clinical, regulatory and management communities have been collectively directed at the discovery, investigation, application, monitoring and management of targeted therapeutics. Increasing efforts have been directed at the development of stratified and personalized medicines. These efforts may be facilitated by the knowledge of the efficacy targets and biomarkers of targeted therapeutics. Therefore, we added search tools for using the International Classification of Disease ICD-10-CM and ICD-9-CM codes to retrieve the target, biomarker and drug information (currently enabling the search of almost 900 targets, 1800 biomarkers and 6000 drugs related to 900 disease conditions). We added information of almost 1800 biomarkers for 300 disease conditions and 200 drug scaffolds for 700 drugs. We significantly expanded Therapeutic Target Database data contents to cover >2300 targets (388 successful and 461 clinical trial targets), 20 600 drugs (2003 approved and 3147 clinical trial drugs), 20 000 multitarget agents against almost 400 target-pairs and the activity data of 1400 agents against 300 cell lines. PMID:24265219

  13. Mechanisms and therapeutic effectiveness of lactobacilli

    PubMed Central

    Di Cerbo, Alessandro; Palmieri, Beniamino; Aponte, Maria; Morales-Medina, Julio Cesar; Iannitti, Tommaso

    2016-01-01

    The gut microbiome is not a silent ecosystem but exerts several physiological and immunological functions. For many decades, lactobacilli have been used as an effective therapy for treatment of several pathological conditions displaying an overall positive safety profile. This review summarises the mechanisms and clinical evidence supporting therapeutic efficacy of lactobacilli. We searched Pubmed/Medline using the keyword ‘Lactobacillus’. Selected papers from 1950 to 2015 were chosen on the basis of their content. Relevant clinical and experimental articles using lactobacilli as therapeutic agents have been included. Applications of lactobacilli include kidney support for renal insufficiency, pancreas health, management of metabolic imbalance, and cancer treatment and prevention. In vitro and in vivo investigations have shown that prolonged lactobacilli administration induces qualitative and quantitative modifications in the human gastrointestinal microbial ecosystem with encouraging perspectives in counteracting pathology-associated physiological and immunological changes. Few studies have highlighted the risk of translocation with subsequent sepsis and bacteraemia following probiotic administration but there is still a lack of investigations on the dose effect of these compounds. Great care is thus required in the choice of the proper Lactobacillus species, their genetic stability and the translocation risk, mainly related to inflammatory disease-induced gut mucosa enhanced permeability. Finally, we need to determine the adequate amount of bacteria to be delivered in order to achieve the best clinical efficacy decreasing the risk of side effects. PMID:26578541

  14. Therapeutic potential of curcumin in digestive diseases

    PubMed Central

    Dulbecco, Pietro; Savarino, Vincenzo

    2013-01-01

    Curcumin is a low-molecular-weight hydrophobic polyphenol that is extracted from turmeric, which possesses a wide range of biological properties including anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, anti-proliferative and anti-microbial activities. Despite its diverse targets and substantial safety, clinical applications of this molecule for digestive disorders have been largely limited to case series or small clinical trials. The poor bioavailability of curcumin is likely the major hurdle for its more widespread use in humans. However, complexation of curcumin into phytosomes has recently helped to bypass this problem, as it has been demonstrated that this new lecithin formulation enables increased absorption to a level 29-fold higher than that of traditional curcuminoid products. This allows us to achieve much greater tissue substance delivery using significantly lower doses of curcumin than have been used in past clinical studies. As curcumin has already been shown to provide good therapeutic results in some small studies of both inflammatory and neoplastic bowel disorders, it is reasonable to anticipate an even greater efficacy with the advent of this new technology, which remarkably improves its bioavailability. These features are very promising and may represent a novel and effective therapeutic approach to both functional and organic digestive diseases. PMID:24409053

  15. Therapeutic potential of curcumin in digestive diseases.

    PubMed

    Dulbecco, Pietro; Savarino, Vincenzo

    2013-12-28

    Curcumin is a low-molecular-weight hydrophobic polyphenol that is extracted from turmeric, which possesses a wide range of biological properties including anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, anti-proliferative and anti-microbial activities. Despite its diverse targets and substantial safety, clinical applications of this molecule for digestive disorders have been largely limited to case series or small clinical trials. The poor bioavailability of curcumin is likely the major hurdle for its more widespread use in humans. However, complexation of curcumin into phytosomes has recently helped to bypass this problem, as it has been demonstrated that this new lecithin formulation enables increased absorption to a level 29-fold higher than that of traditional curcuminoid products. This allows us to achieve much greater tissue substance delivery using significantly lower doses of curcumin than have been used in past clinical studies. As curcumin has already been shown to provide good therapeutic results in some small studies of both inflammatory and neoplastic bowel disorders, it is reasonable to anticipate an even greater efficacy with the advent of this new technology, which remarkably improves its bioavailability. These features are very promising and may represent a novel and effective therapeutic approach to both functional and organic digestive diseases. PMID:24409053

  16. The therapeutic potential of regulated hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Gordon, C J

    2001-03-01

    Reducing body temperature of rodents has been found to improve their survival to ischaemia, hypoxia, chemical toxicants, and many other types of insults. Larger species, including humans, may also benefit from a lower body temperature when recovering from CNS ischaemia and other traumatic insults. Rodents subjected to these insults undergo a regulated hypothermic response (that is, decrease in set point temperature) characterised by preference for cooler ambient temperatures, peripheral vasodilatation, and reduced metabolic rate. However, forced hypothermia (that is, body temperature forced below set point) is the only method used in the study and treatment of human pathological insults. The therapeutic efficacy of the hypothermic treatment is likely to be influenced by the nature of the reduction in body temperature (that is, forced versus regulated). Homeostatic mechanisms counter forced reductions in body temperature resulting in physiological stress and decreased efficacy of the hypothermic treatment. On the other hand, regulated hypothermia would seem to be the best means of achieving a therapeutic benefit because thermal homeostatic systems mediate a controlled reduction in core temperature. PMID:11300205

  17. Mechanisms and therapeutic effectiveness of lactobacilli.

    PubMed

    Di Cerbo, Alessandro; Palmieri, Beniamino; Aponte, Maria; Morales-Medina, Julio Cesar; Iannitti, Tommaso

    2016-03-01

    The gut microbiome is not a silent ecosystem but exerts several physiological and immunological functions. For many decades, lactobacilli have been used as an effective therapy for treatment of several pathological conditions displaying an overall positive safety profile. This review summarises the mechanisms and clinical evidence supporting therapeutic efficacy of lactobacilli. We searched Pubmed/Medline using the keyword 'Lactobacillus'. Selected papers from 1950 to 2015 were chosen on the basis of their content. Relevant clinical and experimental articles using lactobacilli as therapeutic agents have been included. Applications of lactobacilli include kidney support for renal insufficiency, pancreas health, management of metabolic imbalance, and cancer treatment and prevention. In vitro and in vivo investigations have shown that prolonged lactobacilli administration induces qualitative and quantitative modifications in the human gastrointestinal microbial ecosystem with encouraging perspectives in counteracting pathology-associated physiological and immunological changes. Few studies have highlighted the risk of translocation with subsequent sepsis and bacteraemia following probiotic administration but there is still a lack of investigations on the dose effect of these compounds. Great care is thus required in the choice of the proper Lactobacillus species, their genetic stability and the translocation risk, mainly related to inflammatory disease-induced gut mucosa enhanced permeability. Finally, we need to determine the adequate amount of bacteria to be delivered in order to achieve the best clinical efficacy decreasing the risk of side effects. PMID:26578541

  18. [Diagnostic and therapeutic problems in Osler disease].

    PubMed

    Hauswald, B; Tymnik, G; Fritsche, F

    1986-01-01

    Osler's disease is characterized by the following symptoms: recurring, progressive bleeding, dark red angiomas of needle to rice-grain size in the region of the anterior nasal mucosa, lips, mucosa of the oral cavity, mesopharynx and hypopharynx, skin of the face, and trunk, occasionally conjunctiva. Osler's disease is an inherited disease resulting from a gene mutation. Conventional treatments include the following: as emergency measures, anterior tamponade in layers; Bellocq tamponades; Seiffert inflatable balloons; occasionally, total anterior septum resection by the Kindler method or the Wirth modification; vascular ligatures; local injection with various drugs; chemical cauterization; galvanocauterization; cryotherapy; laser or infrared coagulation. In addition the following are recommended: intra-arterial embolization of the A. maxilleris interna by carotis external angiography and intranasal contact irradiation with cobalt, radium, or iridium. Plastic surgery of the septum by the Saunders method seems to be therapeutically effective; this involves removing the diseased mucosa of the anterior septum, the nasal fundus and the head of the turbinate bone and replacing them with skin of the fissure. In recent years outstanding therapeutic effects have been achieved by administration of hormonal contraceptives, especially by parenteral application of estrogen. In males this therapy is not without risks. It can be recommended for women with consideration of contraindications. PMID:3577236

  19. Maximizing beneficence and autonomy. Ethical support for the use of nonpharmacological methods for managing dental anxiety.

    PubMed

    Donate-Bartfield, Evelyn; Spellecy, Ryan; Shane, Nicholas J

    2010-01-01

    This article examines advantages associated with nonpharmacological behavioral management techniques and suggests that there are benefits to their use (such as achieving a more lasting solution to the problem of dental anxiety) that are not realized with medication-based interventions. Analyses that use Kantian and existential viewpoints for exploring the use of medication versus behavioral interventions for managing life problems yield parallel conclusions: there are advantages gained by using behavioral interventions that are not always associated with medication-based interventions. These analyses, taken together with an understanding of the psychology of dental anxiety management, suggest that using nonpharmacological techniques for the management of dental anxiety can maximize adherence to the ethical principles of beneficence and patient autonomy. The authors discuss the barriers that make nonpharmacological interventions for anxiety management difficult for dentists to routinely use, and suggest that additional training in these methods and increased collaboration with mental health professionals are needed for dentists. PMID:21314050

  20. Dielectric elastomer energy harvesting: maximal converted energy, viscoelastic dissipation and a wave power generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Xiongfei; Liu, Liwu; Liu, Yanju; Leng, Jinsong

    2015-11-01

    Dielectric elastomer (DE) is a smart soft material. It is able to produce large deformation under mechanical force and electric field, so that it can achieve mutual conversion between mechanical energy and electrical energy. Based on this property, dielectric elastomer can be used in energy harvesting field. In this paper, firstly, we analyzed the constitutive relation under different hyperelastic models (Gent and neo-Hookean model) based on both theoretical and experimental study. Secondly, we depicted the allowable areas in force-displacement and voltage-charge plane according to different failure modes, and then calculated the maximal energy density in one energy harvesting period. Thirdly, we studied the viscoelastic energy dissipation which can lose the input mechanical energy in the energy harvesting process. Finally, we designed and fabricated a wave power generator, and tested its performance. This paper is of deep significance to the future applications of DE generators.