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Sample records for achieve numerical stability

  1. Examining the Stability of Achievement Goal Orientation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muis, Krista R.; Edwards, Ordene

    2009-01-01

    We examined stability and change in students' achievement goal orientations over varying tasks. Two naturalistic longitudinal studies were conducted in undergraduate courses. Students completed self-reports designed to measure their achievement goals. Achievement goals were measured four times: prior to two assignments and two exams. Four…

  2. Numerical Tribute to Achievement of Euler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueroa-Navarro, Carlos; Molinar-Tabares, Martín Eduardo; Castro-Arce, Lamberto; Campos-García, Julio Cesar

    2014-03-01

    This work aims to make a tribute to one of the world's brightest personalities as it was the mathematical physicist Leonhard Euler (1707-1783). Some results where the influence of Euler persists with the novelty of applying numerical analysis using Matlab are here exposed. A first analysis was done with the series that defines Euler numbers and polynomials of Frobenius-Euler; another result is the characterization of the functions that carry to Euler-Macheroni constant. In hydrodynamics is also feasible to evaluate graphically the relationship between dimensions in diameter and the exit angle of the height of Euler for turbomachines. In differential equations of Cauchy-Euler solutions for the cases of distinct real roots and complex roots are generated. Furthermore we report the generation of the Fourier series and the Fourier transform calculated by using Direct Commands of Matlab. In variational calculus it is possible to obtain plots from a problem of the Euler Lagrange equations. Finally, the Euler function is analyzed. Our purpose is to present a tribute to this giant of science also it could be an excuse to study his legacy by utilizing modern computational techniques.

  3. Numerical experiments on unstructured PIC stability.

    SciTech Connect

    Day, David Minot

    2011-04-01

    Particle-In-Cell (PIC) is a method for plasmas simulation. Particles are pushed with Verlet time integration. Fields are modeled using finite differences on a tensor product mesh (cells). The Unstructured PIC methods studied here use instead finite element discretizations on unstructured (simplicial) meshes. PIC is constrained by stability limits (upper bounds) on mesh and time step sizes. Numerical evidence (2D) and analysis will be presented showing that similar bounds constrain unstructured PIC.

  4. Numerical robust stability estimation in milling process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaoming; Zhu, Limin; Ding, Han; Xiong, Youlun

    2012-09-01

    The conventional prediction of milling stability has been extensively studied based on the assumptions that the milling process dynamics is time invariant. However, nominal cutting parameters cannot guarantee the stability of milling process at the shop floor level since there exists many uncertain factors in a practical manufacturing environment. This paper proposes a novel numerical method to estimate the upper and lower bounds of Lobe diagram, which is used to predict the milling stability in a robust way by taking into account the uncertain parameters of milling system. Time finite element method, a milling stability theory is adopted as the conventional deterministic model. The uncertain dynamics parameters are dealt with by the non-probabilistic model in which the parameters with uncertainties are assumed to be bounded and there is no need for probabilistic distribution densities functions. By doing so, interval instead of deterministic stability Lobe is obtained, which guarantees the stability of milling process in an uncertain milling environment. In the simulations, the upper and lower bounds of Lobe diagram obtained by the changes of modal parameters of spindle-tool system and cutting coefficients are given, respectively. The simulation results show that the proposed method is effective and can obtain satisfying bounds of Lobe diagrams. The proposed method is helpful for researchers at shop floor to making decision on machining parameters selection.

  5. Numerical stability in problems of linear algebra.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Babuska, I.

    1972-01-01

    Mathematical problems are introduced as mappings from the space of input data to that of the desired output information. Then a numerical process is defined as a prescribed recurrence of elementary operations creating the mapping of the underlying mathematical problem. The ratio of the error committed by executing the operations of the numerical process (the roundoff errors) to the error introduced by perturbations of the input data (initial error) gives rise to the concept of lambda-stability. As examples, several processes are analyzed from this point of view, including, especially, old and new processes for solving systems of linear algebraic equations with tridiagonal matrices. In particular, it is shown how such a priori information can be utilized as, for instance, a knowledge of the row sums of the matrix. Information of this type is frequently available where the system arises in connection with the numerical solution of differential equations.

  6. RELAP-7 Numerical Stabilization: Entropy Viscosity Method

    SciTech Connect

    R. A. Berry; M. O. Delchini; J. Ragusa

    2014-06-01

    The RELAP-7 code is the next generation nuclear reactor system safety analysis code being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The code is based on the INL's modern scientific software development framework, MOOSE (Multi-Physics Object Oriented Simulation Environment). The overall design goal of RELAP-7 is to take advantage of the previous thirty years of advancements in computer architecture, software design, numerical integration methods, and physical models. The end result will be a reactor systems analysis capability that retains and improves upon RELAP5's capability and extends the analysis capability for all reactor system simulation scenarios. RELAP-7 utilizes a single phase and a novel seven-equation two-phase flow models as described in the RELAP-7 Theory Manual (INL/EXT-14-31366). The basic equation systems are hyperbolic, which generally require some type of stabilization (or artificial viscosity) to capture nonlinear discontinuities and to suppress advection-caused oscillations. This report documents one of the available options for this stabilization in RELAP-7 -- a new and novel approach known as the entropy viscosity method. Because the code is an ongoing development effort in which the physical sub models, numerics, and coding are evolving, so too must the specific details of the entropy viscosity stabilization method. Here the fundamentals of the method in their current state are presented.

  7. Mapping numerical magnitudes onto symbols: the numerical distance effect and individual differences in children's mathematics achievement.

    PubMed

    Holloway, Ian D; Ansari, Daniel

    2009-05-01

    Although it is often assumed that abilities that reflect basic numerical understanding, such as numerical comparison, are related to children's mathematical abilities, this relationship has not been tested rigorously. In addition, the extent to which symbolic and nonsymbolic number processing play differential roles in this relationship is not yet understood. To address these questions, we collected mathematics achievement measures from 6- to 8-year-olds as well as reaction times from a numerical comparison task. Using the reaction times, we calculated the size of the numerical distance effect exhibited by each child. In a correlational analysis, we found that the individual differences in the distance effect were related to mathematics achievement but not to reading achievement. This relationship was found to be specific to symbolic numerical comparison. Implications for the role of basic numerical competency and the role of accessing numerical magnitude information from Arabic numerals for the development of mathematical skills and their impairment are discussed. PMID:18513738

  8. Achieving stabilization in interferometric logic operations.

    PubMed

    Zavalin, Andrey I; Shamir, Joseph; Vikram, Chandra S; Caulfield, H John

    2006-01-10

    Interferometric systems with amplitude beam splitters can implement reversible operations that, on detection, become Boolean operators. Being passive, they consume no energy, do not limit the operating bandwidth, and have negligible latency. Unfortunately, conventional interferometric systems are notoriously sensitive to uncontrolled disturbances. Here the use of polarization in a common-path interferometric logic gate with and without polarization beam splitters is explored as an attractive alternative to overcome those difficulties. Two of three device configurations considered offer significant stability and lower drive modulator voltage as advantages over the previous systems. The first experimental tests of such a system are reported. Common-path interferometry lends itself to even more stability and robustness by compatibility with no-air-gap, solid optics. PMID:16422166

  9. Achieving stabilization in interferometric logic operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavalin, Andrey I.; Shamir, Joseph; Vikram, Chandra S.; Caulfield, H. John

    2006-01-01

    Interferometric systems with amplitude beam splitters can implement reversible operations that, on detection, become Boolean operators. Being passive, they consume no energy, do not limit the operating bandwidth, and have negligible latency. Unfortunately, conventional interferometric systems are notoriously sensitive to uncontrolled disturbances. Here the use of polarization in a common-path interferometric logic gate with and without polarization beam splitters is explored as an attractive alternative to overcome those difficulties. Two of three device configurations considered offer significant stability and lower drive modulator voltage as advantages over the previous systems. The first experimental tests of such a system are reported. Common-path interferometry lends itself to even more stability and robustness by compatibility with no-air-gap, solid optics.

  10. Achieving better cooling of turbine blades using numerical simulation methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inozemtsev, A. A.; Tikhonov, A. S.; Sendyurev, C. I.; Samokhvalov, N. Yu.

    2013-02-01

    A new design of the first-stage nozzle vane for the turbine of a prospective gas-turbine engine is considered. The blade's thermal state is numerically simulated in conjugate statement using the ANSYS CFX 13.0 software package. Critical locations in the blade design are determined from the distribution of heat fluxes, and measures aimed at achieving more efficient cooling are analyzed. Essentially lower (by 50-100°C) maximal temperature of metal has been achieved owing to the results of the performed work.

  11. Numerical computation of homogeneous slope stability.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Shuangshuang; Li, Kemin; Ding, Xiaohua; Liu, Tong

    2015-01-01

    To simplify the computational process of homogeneous slope stability, improve computational accuracy, and find multiple potential slip surfaces of a complex geometric slope, this study utilized the limit equilibrium method to derive expression equations of overall and partial factors of safety. This study transformed the solution of the minimum factor of safety (FOS) to solving of a constrained nonlinear programming problem and applied an exhaustive method (EM) and particle swarm optimization algorithm (PSO) to this problem. In simple slope examples, the computational results using an EM and PSO were close to those obtained using other methods. Compared to the EM, the PSO had a small computation error and a significantly shorter computation time. As a result, the PSO could precisely calculate the slope FOS with high efficiency. The example of the multistage slope analysis indicated that this slope had two potential slip surfaces. The factors of safety were 1.1182 and 1.1560, respectively. The differences between these and the minimum FOS (1.0759) were small, but the positions of the slip surfaces were completely different than the critical slip surface (CSS). PMID:25784927

  12. Numerical stability in multifluid gas dynamics with implicit drag forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramshaw, J. D.; Chang, C. H.

    2015-10-01

    The numerical stability of a conventional explicit numerical scheme for solving the inviscid multifluid dynamical equations describing a multicomponent gas mixture is investigated both analytically and computationally. Although these equations do not explicitly contain diffusion terms, it is well known that they reduce to a single-fluid diffusional description when the drag coefficients in the species momentum equations are large. The question then arises as to whether their numerical solution is subject to a diffusional stability restriction on the time step in addition to the usual Courant sound-speed stability condition. An analytical stability analysis is performed for the special case of a quiescent binary gas mixture with equal sound speeds and temperatures. It is found that the Courant condition is always sufficient to ensure stability, so that no additional diffusional stability restriction arises for any value of the drag coefficient, however large. This result is confirmed by one-dimensional computational results for binary and ternary mixtures with unequal sound speeds, which remain stable even when the time step exceeds the usual diffusional limit by factors of order 100.

  13. Verbal, Numerical and Perceptual Skills Related to Chemistry Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bodner, George M.; And Others

    The relationship between students' relative ability in visual-spatial tasks as well as their verbal and numerical skills to their performance in an introductory college chemistry course was investigated. For 700 subjects, verbal and mathematics Scholastic Aptitude Test scores (SAT-V) and (SAT-M) and the following four perceptual tests were…

  14. Busted Butte: Achieving the Objectives and Numerical Modeling Results

    SciTech Connect

    W.E. Soll; M. Kearney; P. Stauffer; P. Tseng; H.J. Turin; Z. Lu

    2002-10-07

    The Unsaturated Zone Transport Test (UZTT) at Busted Butte is a mesoscale field/laboratory/modeling investigation designed to address uncertainties associated with flow and transport in the UZ site-process models for Yucca Mountain. The UZTT test facility is located approximately 8 km southeast of the potential Yucca Mountain repository area. The UZTT was designed in two phases, to address five specific objectives in the UZ: the effect of heterogeneities, flow and transport (F&T) behavior at permeability contrast boundaries, migration of colloids , transport models of sorbing tracers, and scaling issues in moving from laboratory scale to field scale. Phase 1A was designed to assess the influence of permeability contrast boundaries in the hydrologic Calico Hills. Visualization of fluorescein movement , mineback rock analyses, and comparison with numerical models demonstrated that F&T are capillary dominated with permeability contrast boundaries distorting the capillary flow. Phase 1B was designed to assess the influence of fractures on F&T and colloid movement. The injector in Phase 1B was located at a fracture, while the collector, 30 cm below, was placed at what was assumed to be the same fracture. Numerical simulations of nonreactive (Br) and reactive (Li) tracers show the experimental data are best explained by a combination of molecular diffusion and advective flux. For Phase 2, a numerical model with homogeneous unit descriptions was able to qualitatively capture the general characteristics of the system. Numerical simulations and field observations revealed a capillary dominated flow field. Although the tracers showed heterogeneity in the test block, simulation using heterogeneous fields did not significantly improve the data fit over homogeneous field simulations. In terms of scaling, simulations of field tracer data indicate a hydraulic conductivity two orders of magnitude higher than measured in the laboratory. Simulations of Li, a weakly sorbing tracer

  15. Association between Basic Numerical Abilities and Mathematics Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sasanguie, Delphine; De Smedt, Bert; Defever, Emmy; Reynvoet, Bert

    2012-01-01

    Various measures have been used to investigate number processing in children, including a number comparison or a number line estimation task. The present study aimed to examine whether and to which extent these different measures of number representation are related to performance on a curriculum-based standardized mathematics achievement test in…

  16. Determining the Numerical Stability of Quantum Chemistry Algorithms.

    PubMed

    Knizia, Gerald; Li, Wenbin; Simon, Sven; Werner, Hans-Joachim

    2011-08-01

    We present a simple, broadly applicable method for determining the numerical properties of quantum chemistry algorithms. The method deliberately introduces random numerical noise into computations, which is of the same order of magnitude as the floating point precision. Accordingly, repeated runs of an algorithm give slightly different results, which can be analyzed statistically to obtain precise estimates of its numerical stability. This noise is produced by automatic code injection into regular compiler output, so that no substantial programming effort is required, only a recompilation of the affected program sections. The method is applied to investigate: (i) the numerical stability of the three-center Obara-Saika integral evaluation scheme for high angular momenta, (ii) if coupled cluster perturbative triples can be evaluated with single precision arithmetic, (iii) how to implement the density fitting approximation in Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) most accurately, and (iv) which parts of density fitted MP2 can be safely evaluated with single precision arithmetic. In the integral case, we find a numerical instability in an equation that is used in almost all integral programs. Due to the results of (ii) and (iv), we conjecture that single precision arithmetic can be applied whenever a calculation is done in an orthogonal basis set and excessively long linear sums are avoided. PMID:26606614

  17. Stability of numerical integration techniques for transient rotor dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kascak, A. F.

    1977-01-01

    A finite element model of a rotor bearing system was analyzed to determine the stability limits of the forward, backward, and centered Euler; Runge-Kutta; Milne; and Adams numerical integration techniques. The analysis concludes that the highest frequency mode determines the maximum time step for a stable solution. Thus, the number of mass elements should be minimized. Increasing the damping can sometimes cause numerical instability. For a uniform shaft, with 10 mass elements, operating at approximately the first critical speed, the maximum time step for the Runge-Kutta, Milne, and Adams methods is that which corresponds to approximately 1 degree of shaft movement. This is independent of rotor dimensions.

  18. Numerical experiments on the stability of preplanetary disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassen, P. M.; Smith, B. F.; Reynolds, R. T.; Miller, R. H.

    1981-01-01

    Gravitational stability of gaseous protostellar disks is relevant to theories of planetary formation. Stable gas disks favor formation of planetesimals by the accumulation of solid material; unstable disks allow the possibility of direct condensation of gaseous protoplanets. This paper presents the results of numerical experiments designed to test the stability of thin disks against large-scale, self-gravitational disruption. It is found that a disk as massive as 1 solar mass, surrounding a 1 solar mass protostar, can be stable against long-wavelength gravitational disruption if its temperature is about 300 K or greater. Stability of a cooler disk requires that it be less massive, but even at 100 K a stable disk can have an appreciable fraction (about 1/3) of a solar mass.

  19. Mapping Numerical Magnitudes onto Symbols: The Numerical Distance Effect and Individual Differences in Children's Mathematics Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holloway, Ian D.; Ansari, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Although it is often assumed that abilities that reflect basic numerical understanding, such as numerical comparison, are related to children's mathematical abilities, this relationship has not been tested rigorously. In addition, the extent to which symbolic and nonsymbolic number processing play differential roles in this relationship is not yet…

  20. Stability of Numerical Interface Conditions for Fluid/Structure Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Banks, J W; Sjogreen, B

    2009-08-13

    In multi physics computations, where a compressible fluid is coupled with a linearly elastic solid, it is standard to enforce continuity of the normal velocities and of the normal stresses at the interface between the fluid and the solid. In a numerical scheme, there are many ways that the velocity- and stress-continuity can be enforced in the discrete approximation. This paper performs a normal mode analysis to investigate the stability of different numerical interface conditions for a model problem approximated by upwind type of finite difference schemes. The analysis shows that depending on the ratio of densities between the solid and the fluid, some numerical interface conditions are stable up to the maximal CFL-limit, while other numerical interface conditions suffer from a severe reduction of the stable CFL-limit. The paper also presents a new interface condition, obtained as a simplified charcteristic boundary condition, that is proved to not suffer from any reduction of the stable CFL-limit. Numerical experiments in one space dimension show that the new interface condition is stable also for computations with the non-linear Euler equations of compressible fluid flow coupled with a linearly elastic solid.

  1. Stability of Inviscid Flow over Airfoils Admitting Multiple Numerical Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ya; Xiong, Juntao; Liu, Feng; Luo, Shijun

    2012-11-01

    Multiple numerical solutions at the same flight condition are found of inviscid transonic flow over certain airfoils (Jameson et al., AIAA 2011-3509) within some Mach number range. Both symmetric and asymmetric solutions exist for a symmetric airfoil at zero angle of attack. Global linear stability analysis of the multiple solutions is conducted. Linear perturbation equations of the Euler equations around a steady-state solution are formed and discretized numerically. An eigenvalue problem is then constructed using the modal analysis approach. Only a small portion of the eigen spectrum is needed and thus can be found efficiently by using Arnoldi's algorithm. The least stable or unstable mode corresponds to the eigenvalue with the largest real part. Analysis of the NACA 0012 airfoil indicates stability of symmetric solutions of the Euler equations at conditions where buffet is found from unsteady Navier-Stokes equations. Euler solutions of the same airfoil but modified to include the displacement thickness of the boundary layer computed from the Navier-Stokes equations, however, exhibit instability based on the present linear stability analysis. Graduate Student.

  2. Numerical studies of transverse curvature effects on transonic flow stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macaraeg, M. G.; Daudpota, Q. I.

    1992-01-01

    A numerical study of transverse curvature effects on compressible flow temporal stability for transonic to low supersonic Mach numbers is presented for axisymmetric modes. The mean flows studied include a similar boundary-layer profile and a nonsimilar axisymmetric boundary-layer solution. The effect of neglecting curvature in the mean flow produces only small quantitative changes in the disturbance growth rate. For transonic Mach numbers (1-1.4) and aerodynamically relevant Reynolds numbers (5000-10,000 based on displacement thickness), the maximum growth rate is found to increase with curvature - the maximum occurring at a nondimensional radius (based on displacement thickness) between 30 and 100.

  3. Stability constraints for oceanic numerical models: implications for the formulation of time and space discretizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemarié, F.; Debreu, L.; Madec, G.; Demange, J.; Molines, J. M.; Honnorat, M.

    2015-08-01

    Except for vertical diffusion (and possibly the external mode and bottom drag), oceanic models usually rely on explicit time-stepping algorithms subject to Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy (CFL) stability criteria. Implicit methods could be unconditionally stable, but an algebraic system must be solved at each time step and other considerations such as accuracy and efficiency are less straightforward to achieve. Depending on the target application, the process limiting the maximum allowed time-step is generally different. In this paper, we introduce offline diagnostics to predict stability limits associated with internal gravity waves, advection, diffusion, and rotation. This suite of diagnostics is applied to a set of global, regional and coastal numerical simulations with several horizontal/vertical resolutions and different numerical models. We show that, for resolutions finer that 1/2°, models with an Eulerian vertical coordinate are generally constrained by vertical advection in a few hot spots and that numerics must be extremely robust to changes in Courant number. Based on those results, we review the stability and accuracy of existing numerical kernels in vogue in primitive equations oceanic models with a focus on advective processes and the dynamics of internal waves. We emphasize the additional value of studying the numerical kernel of oceanic models in the light of coupled space-time approaches instead of studying the time schemes independently from spatial discretizations. From this study, we suggest some guidelines for the development of temporal schemes in future generation multi-purpose oceanic models.

  4. Achieving Stability Requirements for Nanoprobe and Long Beam Lines at NSLS II. A Comprehensive Study

    SciTech Connect

    Simos,N.; Fallier, M.; Hill, J.; Berman, L.; Evans-Lutterodt, K.; Broadbent, A.

    2008-06-23

    Driven by beam stability requirements at the NSLS II synchrotron, such that the desired small beam sizes and high brightness are both realized and stable, a comprehensive study has been launched seeking to provide assurances that stability at the nanometer level at critical x-ray beam-lines, is achievable, given the natural and cultural vibration environment at the selected site. The study consists of (a) an extensive investigation of the site to evaluate the existing ground vibration, in terms of amplitude, frequency content and coherence, and (b) of a numerical study of wave propagation and interaction with the infrastructure of the sensitive lines. The paper presents results from both aspects of the study.

  5. Stability of vegetated slopes in unsaturated conditions: a numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battista Chirico, Giovanni; Borga, Marco; Tarolli, Paolo; Rigon, Riccardo; Preti, Federico

    2014-05-01

    Extreme rainfall events can trigger shallow landslides with failure planes located in soils far from saturated conditions. The stability of shallow soils on very steep slopes under unsaturated conditions can be highly influenced by the vegetation, according to both geo-mechanical and soil-hydrological factors, particularly in regions characterized by a strong climatic seasonality. The root structure of the vegetation reinforces the shallow soils, by providing additional apparent cohesion to the soil. The root water uptake enhances the stability by increasing the frequency of high suction pressure heads in the soil layers explored by the roots. In water controlled eco-systems, such as Mediterranean areas, these two factors are mutually related. Plants develop their root structure in order to optimize the uptake of the water available in the soil, since water availability is limited during the growing season. In this study we present the results of some numerical experiments with the aim to assess the relative importance of these two factors. We simulated the soil water dynamics within homogeneous loamy-sand soils, assuming climatic conditions and root structures typically observed in a deciduous forest of central and southern Italy. An infinite slope stability model is employed for assessing the temporal evolution of the contribute of the soil suction regime to the slope stability, as compared with the contribute of the soil root reinforcement. The results suggest that, during the wet season, the effect of the soil suction state on slope stability is much smaller than that attributable to the mechanical reinforcement provided by the root structure, at least within soil depths explored by the plant roots. Instead, during the growing and dry summer seasons, the soil suction state is far more relevant than the mechanical reinforcement. Thus, accounting for the antecedent soil suction state can be relevant for an appropriate prediction of shallow landslide hazards in

  6. a Numerical Method for Stability Analysis of Pinned Flexible Mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beale, D. G.; Lee, S. W.

    1996-05-01

    A technique is presented to investigate the stability of mechanisms with pin-jointed flexible members. The method relies on a special floating frame from which elastic link co-ordinates are defined. Energies are easily developed for use in a Lagrange equation formulation, leading to a set of non-linear and mixed ordinary differential-algebraic equations of motion with constraints. Stability and bifurcation analysis is handled using a numerical procedure (generalized co-ordinate partitioning) that avoids the tedious and difficult task of analytically reducing the system of equations to a number equalling the system degrees of freedom. The proposed method was then applied to (1) a slider-crank mechanism with a flexible connecting rod and crank of constant rotational speed, and (2) a four-bar linkage with a flexible coupler with a constant speed crank. In both cases, a single pinned-pinned beam bending mode is employed to develop resonance curves and stability boundaries in the crank length-crank speed parameter plane. Flip and fold bifurcations are common occurrences in both mechanisms. The accuracy of the proposed method was also verified by comparison with previous experimental results [1].

  7. The numerical stroop effect in primary school children: a comparison of low, normal, and high achievers.

    PubMed

    Heine, Angela; Tamm, Sascha; De Smedt, Bert; Schneider, Michael; Thaler, Verena; Torbeyns, Joke; Stern, Elsbeth; Verschaffel, Lieven; Jacobs, Arthur

    2010-01-01

    Sixty-six primary school children were selected, of which 21 scored low on a standardized math achievement test, 23 were normal, and 22 high achievers. In a numerical Stroop experiment, children were asked to make numerical and physical size comparisons on digit pairs. The effects of congruity and numerical distance were determined. All children exhibited congruity and distance effects in the numerical comparison. In the physical comparison, children of all performance groups showed Stroop effects when the numerical distance between the digits was large but failed to show them when the distance was small. Numerical distance effects depended on the congruity condition, with a typical effect of distance in the congruent, and a reversed distance effect in the incongruent condition. Our results are hard to reconcile with theories that suggest that deficits in the automaticity of numerical processing can be related to differential math achievement levels. Immaturity in the precision of mappings between numbers and their numerical magnitudes might be better suited to explain the Stroop effects in children. However, as the results for the high achievers demonstrate, in addition to numerical processing capacity per se, domain-general functions might play a crucial role in Stroop performance, too. PMID:20437281

  8. Problem-Based Instructional Strategy and Numerical Ability as Determinants of Senior Secondary Achievement in Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Badru, Ademola K.

    2016-01-01

    The study investigated Problem-based Instructional Strategy and Numerical ability as determinants of Senior Secondary Achievement in Mathematics. This study used 4 x 2 x 2 non-randomised control group Pretest-Posttest Quasi-experimental Factorial design. It consisted of two independent variables (treatment and Numerical ability) and one moderating…

  9. Relations of Different Types of Numerical Magnitude Representations to Each Other and to Mathematics Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fazio, Lisa K.; Bailey, Drew H.; Thompson, Clarissa A.; Siegler, Robert S.

    2014-01-01

    We examined relations between symbolic and non-symbolic numerical magnitude representations, between whole number and fraction representations, and between these representations and overall mathematics achievement in fifth graders. Fraction and whole number symbolic and non-symbolic numerical magnitude understandings were measured using both…

  10. Stability analysis and numerical simulation of simplified solid rocket motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyer, G.; Casalis, G.; Estivalèzes, J.-L.

    2013-08-01

    This paper investigates the Parietal Vortex Shedding (PVS) instability that significantly influences the Pressure Oscillations of the long and segmented solid rocket motors. The eigenmodes resulting from the stability analysis of a simplified configuration, namely, a cylindrical duct with sidewall injection, are presented. They are computed taking into account the presence of a wall injection defect, which is shown to induce hydrodynamic instabilities at discrete frequencies. These instabilities exhibit eigenfunctions in good agreement with the measured PVS vortical structures. They are successfully compared in terms of temporal evolution and frequencies to the unsteady hydrodynamic fluctuations computed by numerical simulations. In addition, this study has shown that the hydrodynamic instabilities associated with the PVS are the driving force of the flow dynamics, since they are responsible for the emergence of pressure waves propagating at the same frequency.

  11. Liquid falling films: linear stability and direct numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Patrick; O'Naraigh, Lennon; Valluri, Prashant; Lucquiaud, Mathieu

    2013-11-01

    Interfacial instability of falling liquid films in counter-current contact with a turbulent gas phase is investigated by means of an Orr-Sommerfeld analysis. This study is complemented by a full energy budget analysis, identifying the key mechanisms of the instability. This gives first insight into the dynamic behaviour of the two-phase system, which is relevant for a wide range of technical applications, such as absorption and distillation. The linear stability analysis is also used to identify the operating limits of a counter-current operation i.e. the so-called loading and flooding limits. In addition, the results of this analysis are benchmark for direct numerical simulations using the newly launched Two-Phase Level Set (http://sourceforge.net/projects/tpls/) solver. High resolution DNS is used to obtain detailed knowledge of important mechanisms at play, especially with regard to interfacial instability and transient system behaviour, which can help to design more efficient mass transfer equipment such as structured packings. Sulzer Chemtech Ltd, EPSRC, Energy Technology Partnership.

  12. The Influence of Pre-University Students' Mathematics Test Anxiety and Numerical Anxiety on Mathematics Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seng, Ernest Lim Kok

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the relationship between mathematics test anxiety and numerical anxiety on students' mathematics achievement. 140 pre-university students who studied at one of the institutes of higher learning were being investigated. Gender issue pertaining to mathematics anxieties was being addressed besides investigating the magnitude of…

  13. Numerical implications of stabilization by the use of integrals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beaudet, P. R.

    1975-01-01

    Liapunov or energy restraint methods for dynamic stabilization in two body motion perturbation problems are considered. Results of computerized orbital stabilization estimates show that the application of energy restraint prevents the occurrence of consistent timing errors in the stepwise integration of equations of motion for a nearly circular orbit.

  14. Recommendations for Achieving Accurate Numerical Simulation of Tip Clearance Flows in Transonic Compressor Rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanZante, Dale E.; Strazisar, Anthony J.; Wood, Jerry R,; Hathaway, Michael D.; Okiishi, Theodore H.

    2000-01-01

    The tip clearance flows of transonic compressor rotors are important because they have a significant impact on rotor and stage performance. While numerical simulations of these flows are quite sophisticated. they are seldom verified through rigorous comparisons of numerical and measured data because these kinds of measurements are rare in the detail necessary to be useful in high-speed machines. In this paper we compare measured tip clearance flow details (e.g. trajectory and radial extent) with corresponding data obtained from a numerical simulation. Recommendations for achieving accurate numerical simulation of tip clearance flows are presented based on this comparison. Laser Doppler Velocimeter (LDV) measurements acquired in a transonic compressor rotor, NASA Rotor 35, are used. The tip clearance flow field of this transonic rotor was simulated using a Navier-Stokes turbomachinery solver that incorporates an advanced k-epsilon turbulence model derived for flows that are not in local equilibrium. Comparison between measured and simulated results indicates that simulation accuracy is primarily dependent upon the ability of the numerical code to resolve important details of a wall-bounded shear layer formed by the relative motion between the over-tip leakage flow and the shroud wall. A simple method is presented for determining the strength of this shear layer.

  15. Advanced material modelling in numerical simulation of primary acetabular press-fit cup stability.

    PubMed

    Souffrant, R; Zietz, C; Fritsche, A; Kluess, D; Mittelmeier, W; Bader, R

    2012-01-01

    Primary stability of artificial acetabular cups, used for total hip arthroplasty, is required for the subsequent osteointegration and good long-term clinical results of the implant. Although closed-cell polymer foams represent an adequate bone substitute in experimental studies investigating primary stability, correct numerical modelling of this material depends on the parameter selection. Material parameters necessary for crushable foam plasticity behaviour were originated from numerical simulations matched with experimental tests of the polymethacrylimide raw material. Experimental primary stability tests of acetabular press-fit cups consisting of static shell assembly with consecutively pull-out and lever-out testing were subsequently simulated using finite element analysis. Identified and optimised parameters allowed the accurate numerical reproduction of the raw material tests. Correlation between experimental tests and the numerical simulation of primary implant stability depended on the value of interference fit. However, the validated material model provides the opportunity for subsequent parametric numerical studies. PMID:22817471

  16. A numerical study of the thermal stability of solar loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klimchuk, J. A.; Antiochos, S. K.; Mariska, J. T.

    1987-01-01

    An important property of all loops is their thermal stability. If low lying hot loops were thermally unstable, for example, a great majority of the low loops on the Sun might be expected to be cool. How small perturbations evolve in low lying, linearly unstable hot loops was determined and how high lying, linearly stable hot loops respond to large amplitude disturbances such as might be expected on the Sun were examined. Only general descriptions and results are given.

  17. Numerical stability of pseudo-spectral PIC code generalizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godfrey, Brendan B.; Vay, Jean-Luc

    2014-10-01

    Laser Plasma Accelerator (LPA) particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations are computationally demanding, because they require beam transport over times and distances long compared with the natural scales of the acceleration mechanism and because they are prone to numerical instabilities. To provide greater flexibility in LPA PIC simulations, we have generalized the Pseudo-Spectral Time Domain (PSTD) algorithm to accommodate arbitrary order spatial derivative approximations and substantially longer time steps. Here, we show that, by extending approaches developed by us for other PIC algorithms, numerical Cherenkov instabilities can be suppressed for the generalized PSTD algorithm. We also illustrate the relationships between the generalized PSTD and other PIC algorithms, such as Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) and Pseudo-Spectral Analytical Time Domain (PSATD) algorithms. Background information can be found at http://hifweb.lbl.gov/public/BLAST/Godfrey/. Work supported in part by DOE under Contract DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  18. Stabilization of numerical interchange in spectral-element magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sovinec, C. R.

    2016-08-01

    Auxiliary numerical projections of the divergence of flow velocity and vorticity parallel to magnetic field are developed and tested for the purpose of suppressing unphysical interchange instability in magnetohydrodynamic simulations. The numerical instability arises with equal-order C0 finite- and spectral-element expansions of the flow velocity, magnetic field, and pressure and is sensitive to behavior at the limit of resolution. The auxiliary projections are motivated by physical field-line bending, and coercive responses to the projections are added to the flow-velocity equation. Their incomplete expansions are limited to the highest-order orthogonal polynomial in at least one coordinate of the spectral elements. Cylindrical eigenmode computations show that the projections induce convergence from the stable side with first-order ideal-MHD equations during h-refinement and p-refinement. Hyperbolic and parabolic projections and responses are compared, together with different methods for avoiding magnetic divergence error. The projections are also shown to be effective in linear and nonlinear time-dependent computations with the NIMROD code Sovinec et al. [17], provided that the projections introduce numerical dissipation.

  19. Numerical simulation of fluid-structure interactions with stabilized finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sváček, Petr

    2016-03-01

    This paper is interested to the interactions of the incompressible flow with a flexibly supported airfoil. The bending and the torsion modes are considered. The problem is mathematically described. The numerical method is based on the finite element method. A combination of the streamline-upwind/Petrov-Galerkin and pressure stabilizing/Petrov-Galerkin method is used for the stabilization of the finite element method. The numerical results for a three-dimensional problem of flow over an airfoil are shown.

  20. A numerical model for stability considerations in HTS magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehtonen, Jorma; Mikkonen, Risto; Paasi, Jaakko

    2000-03-01

    We propose that in an HTS application, stability is lost more likely because of a global increase in temperature caused by heat generation distributed over the whole coil than because of a local normal zone which starts to propagate. For consideration of stability in HTS magnets, we present a computational model based on the heat conduction equation coupled with Maxwell's equations, whereby analysis can be performed by using commercial software packages for computational electromagnetics and thermodynamics. For temperature distribution inside the magnet, we derive the magnetic field dependent effective values of thermal conductivity, specific heat, and heat generated by electromagnetic phenomena for the composite structure of the magnet, while cooling conditions and external heat sources are described as boundary conditions. Our model enables the magnet designer to estimate a safe level of the operation current before a thermal runaway. Finally, as examples, we present some calculations of the HTS magnet with ac to review the effects of slanted electric field-current density E (J ) characteristics and high critical temperature of HTS materials.

  1. Mechanical stability of propped hydraulic fractures: A numerical study

    SciTech Connect

    Asgian, M.I.; Cundall, P.A.; Brady, B.H.

    1995-03-01

    Proppant is sometimes produced along with hydrocarbons in hydraulically fractured petroleum wells. Sometimes 10% to 20% of the proppant is backproduced, which can lead to damaged equipment and downtime. Furthermore, proppant flowback can lead to a substantial loss of fracture conductivity. A numerical study was conducted to help understand what conditions are likely to lead to proppant flowback. In the simulations, the mechanical interaction of a larger number (several thousand) individual proppant grains was modeled with a distinct-element-type code. The numerical simulations show that hydraulic fractures propped with cohesionless, unbonded proppant fail under closure stress at a critical ratio of mean grain diameter to fracture width. This is consistent with published laboratory studies. The simulations identify the mechanism (arch failure) that triggers the mechanical instability and also show that the primary way that drawdowns (less than {approx} 75 psi/ft) affect proppant flowback is to transport loose proppant grains in front of the stable arch to the wellbore. Drawdowns > 75 psi/ft are sufficient to destabilize the arch and to cause progressive failure of the propped fractures.

  2. Wake Numerical Simulation Based on the Park-Gauss Model and Considering Atmospheric Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiangsheng; Zhao, Ning; Tian, Linlin; Zhu, Jun

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, a new Park-Gauss model based on the assumption of the Park model and the Eddy-viscosity model is investigated to conduct the wake numerical simulation for solving a single wind turbine problem. The initial wake radius has been modified to improve the model’s numerical accuracy. Then the impact of the atmospheric stability based on the Park-Gauss model has been studied in the wake region. By the comparisons and the analyses of the test results, it turns out that the new Park-Gauss model could achieve better effects of the wind velocity simulation in the wake region. The wind velocity in the wake region recovers quickly under the unstable atmospheric condition provided the wind velocity is closest to the test result, and recovers slowly under stable atmospheric condition in case of the wind velocity is lower than the test result. Meanwhile, the wind velocity recovery falls in between the unstable and stable neutral atmospheric conditions.

  3. Accurate numerical solution of compressible, linear stability equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malik, M. R.; Chuang, S.; Hussaini, M. Y.

    1982-01-01

    The present investigation is concerned with a fourth order accurate finite difference method and its application to the study of the temporal and spatial stability of the three-dimensional compressible boundary layer flow on a swept wing. This method belongs to the class of compact two-point difference schemes discussed by White (1974) and Keller (1974). The method was apparently first used for solving the two-dimensional boundary layer equations. Attention is given to the governing equations, the solution technique, and the search for eigenvalues. A general purpose subroutine is employed for solving a block tridiagonal system of equations. The computer time can be reduced significantly by exploiting the special structure of two matrices.

  4. Stability and Change in Achievement Goal Orientations: A Person-Centered Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuominen-Soini, Heta; Salmela-Aro, Katariina; Niemivirta, Markku

    2011-01-01

    Two longitudinal studies used a person-centered approach to examine the stability and change in students' achievement goal orientations within a school year (i.e., during 9th grade; measurement period 4 months, N = 530) and between school years (i.e., across 11th and 12th grade; measurement period 12 months, N = 519). Distinct groups of students…

  5. Numerical Stability of Partitioned Approach in Fluid-Structure Interaction for a Deformable Thin-Walled Vessel

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Kelvin K. L.; Thavornpattanapong, Pongpat; Cheung, Sherman C. P.; Tu, Jiyuan

    2013-01-01

    Added-mass instability is known to be an important issue in the partitioned approach for fluid-structure interaction (FSI) solvers. Despite the implementation of the implicit approach, convergence of solution can be difficult to achieve. Relaxation may be applied to improve this implicitness of the partitioned algorithm, but this commonly leads to a significant increase in computational time. This is because the critical relaxation factor that allows stability of the coupling tends to be impractically small. In this study, a mathematical analysis for optimizing numerical performance based on different time integration schemes that pertain to both the fluid and solid accelerations is presented. The aim is to determine the most efficient configuration for the FSI architecture. Both theoretical and numerical results suggest that the choice of time integration schemes has a significant influence on the stability of FSI coupling. This concludes that, in addition to material and its geometric properties, the choice of time integration schemes is important in determining the stability of the numerical computation. A proper selection of the associated parameters can improve performance considerably by influencing the condition of coupling stability. PMID:24222785

  6. Stability of numerous novel potassium chlorides at high pressure.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weiwei; Oganov, Artem R; Zhu, Qiang; Lobanov, Sergey S; Stavrou, Elissaios; Goncharov, Alexander F

    2016-01-01

    K-Cl is a simple system displaying all four main types of bonding, as it contains (i) metallic potassium, (ii) elemental chlorine made of covalently bonded Cl2 molecules held together by van der Waals forces, and (iii) an archetypal ionic compound KCl. The charge balance rule, assigning classical charges of "+1" to K and "-1" to Cl, predicts that no compounds other than KCl are possible. However, our quantum-mechanical variable-composition evolutionary simulations predict an extremely complex phase diagram, with new thermodynamically stable compounds K3Cl, K2Cl, K3Cl2, K4Cl3, K5Cl4, K3Cl5, KCl3 and KCl7. Of particular interest are 2D-metallic homologs Kn+1Cln, the presence of positively charged Cl atoms in KCl7, and the predicted stability of KCl3 already at nearly ambient pressures at zero Kelvin. We have synthesized cubic -KCl3 at 40-70 GPa and trigonal -KCl3 at 20-40 GPa in a laser-heated diamond anvil cell (DAC) at temperature exceeding 2000 K from KCl and Cl2. These phases were identified using in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. Upon unloading to 10 GPa, -KCl3 transforms to a yet unknown structure before final decomposition to KCl and Cl2 at near-ambient conditions. PMID:27211847

  7. Stability of numerous novel potassium chlorides at high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Weiwei; Oganov, Artem R.; Zhu, Qiang; Lobanov, Sergey S.; Stavrou, Elissaios; Goncharov, Alexander F.

    2016-05-01

    K-Cl is a simple system displaying all four main types of bonding, as it contains (i) metallic potassium, (ii) elemental chlorine made of covalently bonded Cl2 molecules held together by van der Waals forces, and (iii) an archetypal ionic compound KCl. The charge balance rule, assigning classical charges of “+1” to K and “‑1” to Cl, predicts that no compounds other than KCl are possible. However, our quantum-mechanical variable-composition evolutionary simulations predict an extremely complex phase diagram, with new thermodynamically stable compounds K3Cl, K2Cl, K3Cl2, K4Cl3, K5Cl4, K3Cl5, KCl3 and KCl7. Of particular interest are 2D-metallic homologs Kn+1Cln, the presence of positively charged Cl atoms in KCl7, and the predicted stability of KCl3 already at nearly ambient pressures at zero Kelvin. We have synthesized cubic -KCl3 at 40–70 GPa and trigonal -KCl3 at 20–40 GPa in a laser-heated diamond anvil cell (DAC) at temperature exceeding 2000 K from KCl and Cl2. These phases were identified using in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. Upon unloading to 10 GPa, -KCl3 transforms to a yet unknown structure before final decomposition to KCl and Cl2 at near-ambient conditions.

  8. Stability of numerous novel potassium chlorides at high pressure

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Weiwei; Oganov, Artem R.; Zhu, Qiang; Lobanov, Sergey S.; Stavrou, Elissaios; Goncharov, Alexander F.

    2016-01-01

    K-Cl is a simple system displaying all four main types of bonding, as it contains (i) metallic potassium, (ii) elemental chlorine made of covalently bonded Cl2 molecules held together by van der Waals forces, and (iii) an archetypal ionic compound KCl. The charge balance rule, assigning classical charges of “+1” to K and “−1” to Cl, predicts that no compounds other than KCl are possible. However, our quantum-mechanical variable-composition evolutionary simulations predict an extremely complex phase diagram, with new thermodynamically stable compounds K3Cl, K2Cl, K3Cl2, K4Cl3, K5Cl4, K3Cl5, KCl3 and KCl7. Of particular interest are 2D-metallic homologs Kn+1Cln, the presence of positively charged Cl atoms in KCl7, and the predicted stability of KCl3 already at nearly ambient pressures at zero Kelvin. We have synthesized cubic -KCl3 at 40–70 GPa and trigonal -KCl3 at 20–40 GPa in a laser-heated diamond anvil cell (DAC) at temperature exceeding 2000 K from KCl and Cl2. These phases were identified using in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. Upon unloading to 10 GPa, -KCl3 transforms to a yet unknown structure before final decomposition to KCl and Cl2 at near-ambient conditions. PMID:27211847

  9. Effect of virtual mass on the characteristics and the numerical stability in two-phase flows

    SciTech Connect

    No, H.C.; Kazimi, M.S.

    1981-04-01

    It is known that the typical six equation two-fluid model of the two-phase flow possesses complex characteristics, exhibits unbounded instabilities in the short-wavelength limit and constitutes an ill-posed initial value problem. Among the suggestions to overcome these difficulties, one model for the virtual mass force terms were studied here, because the virtual mass represents real physical effects to accomplish the dissipation for numerical stability. It was found that the virtual mass has a profound effect upon the mathematical characteristic and numerical stability. Here a quantitative bound on the coefficient of the virtual mass terms was suggested for mathematical hyperbolicity and numerical stability. It was concluded that the finite difference scheme with the virtual mass model is restricted only by the convective stability conditions with the above suggested value.

  10. Does surface roughness influence the primary stability of acetabular cups? A numerical and experimental biomechanical evaluation.

    PubMed

    Le Cann, Sophie; Galland, Alexandre; Rosa, Benoît; Le Corroller, Thomas; Pithioux, Martine; Argenson, Jean-Noël; Chabrand, Patrick; Parratte, Sébastien

    2014-09-01

    Most acetabular cups implanted today are press-fit impacted cementless. Anchorage begins with the primary stability given by insertion of a slightly oversized cup. This primary stability is key to obtaining bone ingrowth and secondary stability. We tested the hypothesis that primary stability of the cup is related to surface roughness of the implant, using both an experimental and a numerical models to analyze how three levels of surface roughness (micro, macro and combined) affect the primary stability of the cup. We also investigated the effect of differences in diameter between the cup and its substrate, and of insertion force, on the cups' primary stability. The results of our study show that primary stability depends on the surface roughness of the cup. The presence of macro-roughness on the peripheral ring is found to decrease primary stability; there was excessive abrasion of the substrate, damaging it and leading to poor primary stability. Numerical modeling indicates that oversizing the cup compared to its substrate has an impact on primary stability, as has insertion force. PMID:25080896

  11. Stability of numerous novel potassium chlorides at high pressure

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhang, Weiwei; Oganov, Artem R.; Lobanov, Sergey S.; Stavrou, Elissaios; Goncharov, Alexander F.; Zhu, Qiang

    2016-05-23

    K-Cl is a simple system displaying all four main types of bonding, as it contains (i) metallic potassium, (ii) elemental chlorine made of covalently bonded Cl2 molecules held together by van der Waals forces, and (iii) an archetypal ionic compound KCl. The charge balance rule, assigning classical charges of “+1” to K and “–1” to Cl, predicts that no compounds other than KCl are possible. However, our quantum-mechanical variable-composition evolutionary simulations predict an extremely complex phase diagram, with new thermodynamically stable compounds K3Cl, K2Cl, K3Cl2, K4Cl3, K5Cl4, K3Cl5, KCl3 and KCl7. Of particular interest are 2D-metallic homologs Kn+1Cln, the presencemore » of positively charged Cl atoms in KCl7, and the predicted stability of KCl3 already at nearly ambient pressures at zero Kelvin. We have synthesized cubic Pm3¯n -KCl3 at 40–70 GPa and trigonal P3¯cl -KCl3 at 20–40 GPa in a laser-heated diamond anvil cell (DAC) at temperature exceeding 2000 K from KCl and Cl2. These phases were identified using in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. Lastly, upon unloading to 10 GPa, P3¯cl -KCl3 transforms to a yet unknown structure before final decomposition to KCl and Cl2 at near-ambient conditions.« less

  12. Numerical simulations and stability of magnetic structures in the heliosheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, S.; Avinash, K.; Shaikh, D.; Zank, G. P.

    2008-12-01

    We extend the three fluid model of Avinash and Zank [2007] for magnetic structures in the heliosheath to a four fluid model consisting of electrons, pick-up ions (PUIs), solar wind ions (SWI), and neutral hydrogen. The PUIs are generated by neutrals via charge exchange with SWI. Since the kinetic pressure of PUIs is nearly three to four times the pressure of SWI, these are more suited to mediate small scale structures in the heliosheath such as magnetic holes/humps etc. The constant energy exchange between these two fluids drives them non-adiabatic. The PUIs are isothermal while SWI are non adiabatic with an index ~1.25. The four fluid model captures these effects via a modified equation of state for PUI and SWI. The phase space of time independent solutions in terms of the Mach numbers of PUI and SWI is constructed to delineate the parameter space which allows structure formation in the heliosheath. We examine the stability of the time independent solutions by evolving them via a full system of Hall -MHD equations. The simulation results show that these solutions are not quite stable. As the structure propagates it develops growing oscillations in the wings. Concomitantly, there are changes in the amplitude and width of the structure. This instability could be due to local changes in the velocity of the structure and reflects an exchange between the kinetic and magnetic parts of the total energy. Our results showing the presence of growing oscillations in the wings of solitary wave solutions are consistent with the recent analysis of magnetic holes in the heliosheth by Burlaga et al [2007].

  13. Ponderomotive stabilization of flute modes in mirrors Feedback control and numerical results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Similon, P. L.

    1987-01-01

    Ponderomotive stabilization of rigid plasma flute modes is numerically investigated by use of a variational principle, for a simple geometry, without eikonal approximation. While the near field of the studied antenna can be stabilizing, the far field has a small contribution only, because of large cancellation by quasi mode-coupling terms. The field energy for stabilization is evaluated and is a nonnegligible fraction of the plasma thermal energy. A new antenna design is proposed, and feedback stabilization is investigated. Their use drastically reduces power requirements.

  14. Numerical Stability and Accuracy of Temporally Coupled Multi-Physics Modules in Wind-Turbine CAE Tools

    SciTech Connect

    Gasmi, A.; Sprague, M. A.; Jonkman, J. M.; Jones, W. B.

    2013-02-01

    In this paper we examine the stability and accuracy of numerical algorithms for coupling time-dependent multi-physics modules relevant to computer-aided engineering (CAE) of wind turbines. This work is motivated by an in-progress major revision of FAST, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) premier aero-elastic CAE simulation tool. We employ two simple examples as test systems, while algorithm descriptions are kept general. Coupled-system governing equations are framed in monolithic and partitioned representations as differential-algebraic equations. Explicit and implicit loose partition coupling is examined. In explicit coupling, partitions are advanced in time from known information. In implicit coupling, there is dependence on other-partition data at the next time step; coupling is accomplished through a predictor-corrector (PC) approach. Numerical time integration of coupled ordinary-differential equations (ODEs) is accomplished with one of three, fourth-order fixed-time-increment methods: Runge-Kutta (RK), Adams-Bashforth (AB), and Adams-Bashforth-Moulton (ABM). Through numerical experiments it is shown that explicit coupling can be dramatically less stable and less accurate than simulations performed with the monolithic system. However, PC implicit coupling restored stability and fourth-order accuracy for ABM; only second-order accuracy was achieved with RK integration. For systems without constraints, explicit time integration with AB and explicit loose coupling exhibited desired accuracy and stability.

  15. Numerical stability of the electromagnetic quasinormal and quasibound modes of Kerr black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staicova, Denitsa; Fiziev, Plamen

    2015-07-01

    The proper understanding of the electromagnetic counterpart of gravity-waves emitters is of serious interest to the multimessenger astronomy. In this article, we study the numerical stability of the quasinormal modes (QNM) and quasibound modes (QBM) obtained as solutions of the Teukolsky Angular Equation and the Teukolsky Radial Equation with appropriate boundary conditions. We use the epsilon-method for the system featuring the confluent Heun functions to study the stability of the spectra with respect to changes in the radial variable. We find that the QNM and QBM are stable in certain regions of the complex plane, just as expected, while the third ``spurious'' spectrum was found to be numerically unstable and thus unphysical. This analysis shows the importance of understanding the numerical results in the framework of the theory of the confluent Heun functions, in order to be able to distinguish the physical spectra from the numerical artifacts.

  16. The Role of a Steepness Parameter in the Exponential Stability of a Model Problem. Numerical Aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todorovic, N.

    2011-06-01

    The Nekhoroshev theorem considers quasi integrable Hamiltonians providing stability of actions in exponentially long times. One of the hypothesis required by the theorem is a mathematical condition called steepness. Nekhoroshev conjectured that different steepness properties should imply numerically observable differences in the stability times. After a recent study on this problem (Guzzo et al. 2011, Todorovic et al. 2011) we show some additional numerical results on the change of resonances and the diffusion laws produced by the increasing effect of steepness. The experiments are performed on a 4-dimensional steep symplectic map designed in a way that a parameter smoothly regulates the steepness properties in the model.

  17. Comparisons of numerical magnitudes in children with different levels of mathematical achievement. An ERP study.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Velázquez, Fabiola Reveca; Berumen, Gustavo; González-Garrido, Andrés Antonio

    2015-11-19

    The ability to map between non-symbolic and symbolic magnitude representations is crucial in the development of mathematics and this map is disturbed in children with math difficulties. In addition, positive parietal ERPs have been found to be sensitive to the number distance effect and skills solving arithmetic problems. Therefore we aimed to contrast the behavioral and ERP responses in children with different levels of mathematical achievement: low (LA), average (AA) and high (HA), while comparing symbolic and non-symbolic magnitudes. The results showed that LA children repeatedly failed when comparing magnitudes, particularly the symbolic ones. In addition, a positive correlation between correct responses while analyzing symbolic quantities and WRAT-4 scores emerged. The amplitude of N200 was significantly larger during non-symbolic comparisons. In addition, P2P amplitude was consistently smaller in LA children while comparing both symbolic and non-symbolic quantities, and correlated positively with the WRAT-4 scores. The latency of P3 seemed to be sensitive to the type of numerical comparison. The results suggest that math difficulties might be related to a more general magnitude representation problem, and that ERP are useful to study its timecourse in children with different mathematical skills. PMID:26385418

  18. Numerical study on the stabilization of neoclassical tearing modes by electron cyclotron current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xiaoguang; Zhang, Xiaodong; Wu, Bin; Zhu, Sizheng; Hu, Yemin

    2015-02-15

    It is well known that electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) around the o-point of magnetic island along the plasma current direction can stabilize neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs) in tokamak devices. The effects of the radial misalignment between the island and the driven current, the phase misalignment, and the on-duty ratio for modulated current drive on NTM stabilization are studied numerically in this paper. A small radial misalignment is found to significantly decrease the stabilizing effect. When a sufficiently large phase misalignment occurs for the modulated ECCD, the stabilization effect is also reduced a lot. The optimal on-duty ratio of modulated ECCD to stabilize NTMs is found to be in the range of 60%–70%. A larger on-duty ratio than 50% could also mitigate the effect of phase misalignment if it is not too large. There is no benefit from modulation if the phase misalignment is larger than a threshold.

  19. Numerical study on the stabilization of neoclassical tearing modes by electron cyclotron current drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoguang; Zhang, Xiaodong; Wu, Bin; Zhu, Sizheng; Hu, Yemin

    2015-02-01

    It is well known that electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) around the o-point of magnetic island along the plasma current direction can stabilize neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs) in tokamak devices. The effects of the radial misalignment between the island and the driven current, the phase misalignment, and the on-duty ratio for modulated current drive on NTM stabilization are studied numerically in this paper. A small radial misalignment is found to significantly decrease the stabilizing effect. When a sufficiently large phase misalignment occurs for the modulated ECCD, the stabilization effect is also reduced a lot. The optimal on-duty ratio of modulated ECCD to stabilize NTMs is found to be in the range of 60%-70%. A larger on-duty ratio than 50% could also mitigate the effect of phase misalignment if it is not too large. There is no benefit from modulation if the phase misalignment is larger than a threshold.

  20. On the stability of numerical integration routines for ordinary differential equations.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glover, K.; Willems, J. C.

    1973-01-01

    Numerical integration methods for the solution of initial value problems for ordinary vector differential equations may be modelled as discrete time feedback systems. The stability criteria discovered in modern control theory are applied to these systems and criteria involving the routine, the step size and the differential equation are derived. Linear multistep, Runge-Kutta, and predictor-corrector methods are all investigated.

  1. The stability of numerical methods for second order ordinary differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gear, C. W.

    1978-01-01

    An important characterization of a numerical method for first order ODE's is the region of absolute stability. If all eigenvalues of the linear problem dy/dt = Ay are inside this region, the numerical method is stable. If the second order system d/dt(dy/dt) = 2Ady/dt - By is solved as a first order system, the same result applies to the eigenvalues of the generalized eigenvalue problem (lambda-squared)I 2(lambda)A + B. No such region exists for general methods for second order equations, but in some cases a region of absolute stability can be defined for methods for the single second order equation d/dt(dy/dt) = 2ady/dt - by. The absence of a region of absolute stability can occur when different members of a system of first order equations are solved by different methods.

  2. Stability analysis of numerical boundary conditions and implicit difference approximations for hyperbolic equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beam, R. M.; Warming, R. F.; Yee, H. C.

    1981-01-01

    Implicit, noniterative, finite difference schemes were recently developed by several authors for multidimensional systems of nonlinear hyperbolic partial differential equations. When applied to linear model equations with periodic boundary conditions those schemes are unconditionally stable (A-stable). As applied in practice the algorithms often face a severe time step restriction. A major source of the difficulty is the treatment of the numerical boundary conditions. One conjecture was that unconditional stability requires implicit numerical boundary conditions. An apparent counter example was the space time extrapolation considered by Gustafsson, Kreiss, and Sunstrom. Spatial (implicit) and space time (explicit) extrapolation using normal mode analysis for a finite and infinite number of spatial mesh intervals are examined. The results indicate that for unconditional stability with a finite number of spatial mesh intervals, the numerical boundary conditions must be implicit.

  3. The role of opacity and transparency in achieving strategic stability in South Asia.

    SciTech Connect

    Rajain, Arpit; Ashraf, Tariq Mahmud

    2005-08-01

    According to international relations theory, deterrence can be used as a tool to achieve stability between potentially hostile nations. India and Pakistan's long history of periodic crises raises the question of how they can achieve deterrence stability. 'Transparency' describes the flow of information between parties and plays a key role in establishing a deterrence relationship. This paper studies the balance needed between opacity and transparency in nuclear topics for the maintenance of deterrence stability between India and Pakistan. States with nuclear weapons are postulated to implement transparency in four categories: potential, capability, intent, and resolve. The study applies these categories to the nuclear components of the ongoing India-Pakistan Composite Dialogue Working Group for Peace and Security including CBMs. To focus our efforts, we defined four scenarios to characterize representative strategic/military/political conditions. The scenarios are combinations of these two sets of opposite poles: competition - cooperation; extremism - moderation (to be understood primarily in a religious/nationalistic sense). We describe each scenario in terms of select focal areas (nuclear doctrine, nuclear command and control, nuclear stockpile, nuclear delivery/defensive systems, and conventional force posture). The scenarios help frame the realm of possibilities, and have been described in terms of expected conditions for the focal areas. We then use the conditions in each scenario to prescribe a range of information-sharing actions that the two countries could take to increase stability. We also highlight the information that should not be shared. These actions can be political (e.g., declarations), procedural (e.g., advance notice of certain military activities), or technologically based (e.g., seismic monitoring of the nuclear test moratorium).

  4. Numerical stability analysis of the pseudo-spectral analytical time-domain PIC algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Godfrey, Brendan B.; Vay, Jean-Luc; Haber, Irving

    2014-02-01

    The pseudo-spectral analytical time-domain (PSATD) particle-in-cell (PIC) algorithm solves the vacuum Maxwell's equations exactly, has no Courant time-step limit (as conventionally defined), and offers substantial flexibility in plasma and particle beam simulations. It is, however, not free of the usual numerical instabilities, including the numerical Cherenkov instability, when applied to relativistic beam simulations. This paper derives and solves the numerical dispersion relation for the PSATD algorithm and compares the results with corresponding behavior of the more conventional pseudo-spectral time-domain (PSTD) and finite difference time-domain (FDTD) algorithms. In general, PSATD offers superior stability properties over a reasonable range of time steps. More importantly, one version of the PSATD algorithm, when combined with digital filtering, is almost completely free of the numerical Cherenkov instability for time steps (scaled to the speed of light) comparable to or smaller than the axial cell size.

  5. Numerical Study of the Transverse Stability of Compressive and Rarefactive Alfven Solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, R.; Haneberg, C.

    2015-12-01

    A numerical study of the stability of DNLS bright and dark solitons subject to oblique perturbations is reported. The DNLS equation is a weakly nonlinear, weakly dispersive and one dimensional limiting form of MHD with the inclusion of Hall dispersion which has been shown to remain valid for plane wave propagation parallel, as well as quasiparallel, to the ambient magnetic field. Related analytic work has dealt with the transverse stability of circularly polarized Alfven waves [E. Mjolhus, T. Hada, J. Plasma Phys., 43, 257 - 268 (1990)] describing stability in relation to the propagation angle of the perturbation and the wave's amplitude and wavenumber. The amplitude and wavenumber relation for transverse stability has a striking similarity to the criterion for modulational instability. A prior analytic work [M. S. Ruderman, Fluid Dyn. 22, 299, (1987)] found the dark soliton to be unstable. Our numerical results are established in the context of these analytic results. Additionally, the transverse stability properties of dark solitons will be addressed as they relate to their role in representing magnetic decreases observed in interplanetary space.

  6. Tailings dams stability analysis using numerical modelling of geotechnical and geophysical data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihai, S.; Zlagnean, M.; Oancea, I.; Petrescu, A.

    2009-04-01

    dam's state of safety. This study considered the SSR (Shear Strength Reduction) technique for slope stability numerical modelling. In the SSR finite element technique, elasto-plastic strength is assumed for dam's materials and shear strengths are progressively reduced until collapse occurs. Numerical modelling was performed on the most critical profile choosed through analysis of geophysical and geotechnical informational volume achieved by insitu or in laboratory tests. Finite element analysis were considered in two situations: first, before geophysical investigations and second considering the whole informational of data achieved. Both situations were analysed in static and pseudo-static conditions. The factor of safety before geophysical investigations is high enough to describe a stable state of stability even for the seismic load. The total displacement distributions were modified by the presence of internal erosional element giving a high state of instability, especially for the pseudo-static case. These analysis using the finite element method prove the importance of structural disturbance elements that may occure inside the dam body produced by internal erosional processes.

  7. Numerical Simulations of Power Law Heating Functions for Quiescent Loops: Stability and Observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martens, P. C.; Winter, H. D.; Munetsi-Mugomba, K.

    2007-12-01

    We present the numerical simulations of quiescent coronal loops with heating functions that are power law functions of pressure and temperature. These simulations are made using a time-dependent, 1D hydrodynamics code with heating functions that are treated as dynamic variables which are constantly re- evaluated during the loops' lifetimes. These numerical simulations provide a stability test for the analytical solutions formulated by Martens (2007, submitted) for the same heating functions. TRACE and XRT datasets are simulated to determine if present observables can provide adequate information to discriminate between power law heating functions.

  8. Numerical solution of wave equations for the stability of the inner cometo-sheath

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Krishna M.; Tsurutani, Bruce T.; Goldstein, Bruce E.

    1993-01-01

    Numerical solution of the MHD wave equations for stability of the cometary sheath determined by the balance between the inward Lorentz body force and the outward ion-neutral drag force is obtained by using a two-point boundary value method. The eigenvalues and the eigenfunctions are obtained numerically by treating the cometary inner sheath as a layer of finite thickness, bounded by the contact surface, i.e., the diamagnetic cavity boundary. The magnetic field structure discovered in the ionosphere of Comets Halley and Giacobini-Zinner is found to be unstable. The effects of finite plasma pressure, dissociative recombination, and mass loading due to photoionization are found to be stabilizing but are unable to quench the instability completely. It is also found that the higher the neutral production rate the lesser is the growth rate for the instability.

  9. A numerical model based on closed form solution for elastic stability of thin plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciaramella, S.; Migliore, M.; Minutolo, V.; Ruocco, E.

    2010-06-01

    An analytical approach for studying the elastic stability of thin rectangular plates under arbitrary boundary conditions is presented. Because the solution is given in closed-form, the approach can be regarded as "exact" under the Kirchhoff-Love assumption. The proposed procedure allows us to obtain the buckling load and modal displacements that do not depend on the number of elements adopted in the numerical discretization using, say, the finite element method.

  10. Equilibrium points, stability and numerical solutions of fractional-order predator-prey and rabies models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, E.; El-Sayed, A. M. A.; El-Saka, H. A. A.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we are concerned with the fractional-order predator-prey model and the fractional-order rabies model. Existence and uniqueness of solutions are proved. The stability of equilibrium points are studied. Numerical solutions of these models are given. An example is given where the equilibrium point is a centre for the integer order system but locally asymptotically stable for its fractional-order counterpart.

  11. Numerical study on the stability of weakly collisional plasma in E×B fields

    SciTech Connect

    Horký, M.

    2015-02-15

    Plasma stability in weakly collisional plasmas in the presence of E×B fields is studied with numerical simulations. Different types of ion-neutral collisions are considered in a fully magnetized regime. We study the influence of ion-neutral collisions and the role of collision types on the stability of plasma. It is found that the stability of plasma depends on the type of ion-neutral collisions, with the plasma being unstable for charge exchange collisions, and stable for the elastic scattering. The analysis focuses on the temporal evolution of the velocity phase space, RMS values of the potential fluctuations, and coherent structures in potential densities. For the unstable case, we observe growth and propagation of electrostatic waves. Simulations are performed with a three-dimensional electrostatic particle in cell code.

  12. Numerical simulations and linear stability analysis of a boundary layer developed on wavy surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siconolfi, Lorenzo; Camarri, Simone; Fransson, Jens H. M.

    2015-11-01

    The development of passive methods leading to a laminar to turbulent transition delay in a boundary layer (BL) is a topic of great interest both for applications and academic research. In literature it has been shown that a proper and stable spanwise velocity modulation can reduce the growth rate of Tollmien-Schlichting (TS) waves and delay transition. In this study, we investigate numerically the possibility of obtaining a stabilizing effect of the TS waves through the use of a spanwise sinusoidal modulation of a flat plate. This type of control has been already successfully investigated experimentally. An extensive set of direct numerical simulations is carried out to study the evolution of a BL flow developed on wavy surfaces with different geometric characteristics, and the results will be presented here. Moreover, since this configuration is characterized by a slowly-varying flow field in streamwise direction, a local stability analysis is applied to define the neutral stability curves for the BL flow controlled by this type of wall modifications. These results give the possibility of investigating this control strategy and understanding the effect of the free parameters on the stabilization mechanism.

  13. Achieving Vibration Stability of the NSLS-II Hard X-ray Nanoprobe Beamline

    SciTech Connect

    Simos, N.; Chu, Y. N.; Broadbent, A.; Nazaretski, E.; Margulies, L.; Dyling, O.; Shen, Q.; Fallier, M.

    2010-08-30

    The Hard X-ray Nanoprobe (HXN) Beamline of National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-lI) requires high levels of stability in order to achieve the desired instrument resolution. To ensure that the design of the endstation helps meet the stringent criteria and that natural and cultural vibration is mitigated both passively and actively, a comprehensive study complimentary to the design process has been undertaken. Vibration sources that have the potential to disrupt sensitive experiments such as wind, traffic and NSLS II operating systems have been studied using state of the art simulations and an array of field data. Further, final stage vibration isolation principles have been explored in order to be utilized in supporting endstation instruments. This paper presents results of the various study aspects and their influence on the HXN design optimization.

  14. The Measurement Structure, Stability and Mediating Effects of Achievement Goals in Math with Middle-School Student Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiang, Yu-Tzu; Lin, Sunny S. J.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the measurement structure, cross-year stability of achievement goals, and mediating effects of achievement goals between self-efficacy and math grades in a national sample of Taiwan middle school students. The measurement model with factorial structure showed good fit to the data. In the panel data (N?=?343), four achievement…

  15. Combined analytical and numerical approaches in Dynamic Stability analyses of engineering systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Náprstek, Jiří

    2015-03-01

    Dynamic Stability is a widely studied area that has attracted many researchers from various disciplines. Although Dynamic Stability is usually associated with mechanics, theoretical physics or other natural and technical disciplines, it is also relevant to social, economic, and philosophical areas of our lives. Therefore, it is useful to occasionally highlight the general aspects of this amazing area, to present some relevant examples and to evaluate its position among the various branches of Rational Mechanics. From this perspective, the aim of this study is to present a brief review concerning the Dynamic Stability problem, its basic definitions and principles, important phenomena, research motivations and applications in engineering. The relationships with relevant systems that are prone to stability loss (encountered in other areas such as physics, other natural sciences and engineering) are also noted. The theoretical background, which is applicable to many disciplines, is presented. In this paper, the most frequently used Dynamic Stability analysis methods are presented in relation to individual dynamic systems that are widely discussed in various engineering branches. In particular, the Lyapunov function and exponent procedures, Routh-Hurwitz, Liénard, and other theorems are outlined together with demonstrations. The possibilities for analytical and numerical procedures are mentioned together with possible feedback from experimental research and testing. The strengths and shortcomings of these approaches are evaluated together with examples of their effective complementing of each other. The systems that are widely encountered in engineering are presented in the form of mathematical models. The analyses of their Dynamic Stability and post-critical behaviour are also presented. The stability limits, bifurcation points, quasi-periodic response processes and chaotic regimes are discussed. The limit cycle existence and stability are examined together with their

  16. Continuation of equilibria and stability of slender elastic rods using an asymptotic numerical method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazarus, A.; Miller, J. T.; Reis, P. M.

    2013-08-01

    We present a theoretical and numerical framework to compute bifurcations of equilibria and stability of slender elastic rods. The 3D kinematics of the rod is treated in a geometrically exact way by parameterizing the position of the centerline and making use of quaternions to represent the orientation of the material frame. The equilibrium equations and the stability of their solutions are derived from the mechanical energy which takes into account the contributions due to internal moments (bending and twist), external forces and torques. Our use of quaternions allows for the equilibrium equations to be written in a quadratic form and solved efficiently with an asymptotic numerical continuation method. This finite element perturbation method gives interactive access to semi-analytical equilibrium branches, in contrast with the individual solution points obtained from classical minimization or predictor-corrector techniques. By way of example, we apply our numerics to address the specific problem of a naturally curved and heavy rod under extreme twisting and perform a detailed comparison against our own precision model experiments of this system. Excellent quantitative agreement is found between experiments and simulations for the underlying 3D buckling instabilities and the characterization of the resulting complex configurations. We believe that our framework is a powerful alternative to other methods for the computation of nonlinear equilibrium 3D shapes of rods in practical scenarios.

  17. Landfast ice affects the stability of the Arctic halocline: Evidence from a numerical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itkin, Polona; Losch, Martin; Gerdes, Rüdiger

    2015-04-01

    Landfast ice covers large surface areas of the winter Siberian Seas. The immobile landfast ice cover inhibits divergent and convergent motion, hence dynamical sea ice growth and redistribution, decouples winter river plumes in coastal seas from the atmosphere, and positions polynyas at the landfast ice edge offshore. In spite of the potentially large effects, state-of-the-art numerical models usually do not represent landfast ice in its correct extent. A simple parametrization of landfast ice based on bathymetry and internal sea ice strength is introduced and its effects on the simulated Arctic Ocean are demonstrated. The simulations suggest that the Siberian landfast ice impacts the Arctic halocline stability through enhanced brine production in polynyas located closer to the shelf break and by redirecting river water to the Canadian Basin. These processes strengthen the halocline in the Canadian Basin, but erode its stability in the Makarov and Eurasian Basins.

  18. Three-Dimensional Numerical Analysis for Posture Stability of Laser Propulsion Vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Masayuki; Ohnishi, Naofumi

    2011-11-01

    We have developed a three-dimensional hydrodynamics code coupling equation of motion of a rigid body for analyzing posture stability of laser propulsion vehicle through numerical simulations of flowfield interacting with unsteady motion of the vehicle. Asymmetric energy distribution is initially added around the focal spot (ring) in order to examine posture stability against an asymmetric blast wave resulting from a laser offset for a lightcraft-type vehicle. The vehicle moves to cancel out the offset from initial offset. However, the Euler angle grows and never returns to zero in a time scale of laser pulse. Also, we found that the vehicle moves to cancel tipping angle when the laser is irradiated to the vehicle with initial tipping angle over the wide angle range, through the vehicle cannot get sufficient restoring force in particular angle, and the tipping angle does not decrease from the initial value for that case.

  19. Stability analysis and numerical simulation of 1 prey - 2 predator system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savitri, D.; Abadi

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we study an ecological system that consists of 1 prey and 2 predators populations. The prey population grows logistically while Holling type II functional response is applied for both predators . The first predator preys on the prey and the second predator preys on the first one. The study starts with the stability analysis of critical points of the systems. Then, by using normal form and centre manifold method the information about other nontrivial solutions due to bifurcation including possible limit cycles appearance is obtained. The results are confirmed by numerical simulation using MatCont and biological interpretation of the results is also presented.

  20. Investigation of Nozzle Stability for the First Ovalization Mode by Numerical Solution of the Fluid Structure Interaction Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwane, R.; Zia, Y.

    2005-02-01

    The present paper validates results from numerical simulations for side load generation in rocket nozzles against related data from analytical models that are presently used for rocket engine nozzle design activities. Key words: Nozzle stability; nozzle ovalization; flow structure interaction.

  1. Time-resolved photoemission apparatus achieving sub-20-meV energy resolution and high stability

    SciTech Connect

    Ishida, Y.; Togashi, T.; Yamamoto, K.; Tanaka, M.; Kiss, T.; Otsu, T.; Kobayashi, Y.; Shin, S.

    2014-12-15

    The paper describes a time- and angle-resolved photoemission apparatus consisting of a hemispherical analyzer and a pulsed laser source. We demonstrate 1.48-eV pump and 5.92-eV probe measurements at the ⩾10.5-meV and ⩾240-fs resolutions by use of fairly monochromatic 170-fs pulses delivered from a regeneratively amplified Ti:sapphire laser system operating typically at 250 kHz. The apparatus is capable to resolve the optically filled superconducting peak in the unoccupied states of a cuprate superconductor, Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+δ}. A dataset recorded on Bi(111) surface is also presented. Technical descriptions include the followings: A simple procedure to fine-tune the spatio-temporal overlap of the pump-and-probe beams and their diameters; achieving a long-term stability of the system that enables a normalization-free dataset acquisition; changing the repetition rate by utilizing acoustic optical modulator and frequency-division circuit.

  2. A new free-surface stabilization algorithm for geodynamical modelling: Theory and numerical tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrés-Martínez, Miguel; Morgan, Jason P.; Pérez-Gussinyé, Marta; Rüpke, Lars

    2015-09-01

    The surface of the solid Earth is effectively stress free in its subaerial portions, and hydrostatic beneath the oceans. Unfortunately, this type of boundary condition is difficult to treat computationally, and for computational convenience, numerical models have often used simpler approximations that do not involve a normal stress-loaded, shear-stress free top surface that is free to move. Viscous flow models with a computational free surface typically confront stability problems when the time step is bigger than the viscous relaxation time. The small time step required for stability (< 2 Kyr) makes this type of model computationally intensive, so there remains a need to develop strategies that mitigate the stability problem by making larger (at least ∼10 Kyr) time steps stable and accurate. Here we present a new free-surface stabilization algorithm for finite element codes which solves the stability problem by adding to the Stokes formulation an intrinsic penalization term equivalent to a portion of the future load at the surface nodes. Our algorithm is straightforward to implement and can be used with both Eulerian or Lagrangian grids. It includes α and β parameters to respectively control both the vertical and the horizontal slope-dependent penalization terms, and uses Uzawa-like iterations to solve the resulting system at a cost comparable to a non-stress free surface formulation. Four tests were carried out in order to study the accuracy and the stability of the algorithm: (1) a decaying first-order sinusoidal topography test, (2) a decaying high-order sinusoidal topography test, (3) a Rayleigh-Taylor instability test, and (4) a steep-slope test. For these tests, we investigate which α and β parameters give the best results in terms of both accuracy and stability. We also compare the accuracy and the stability of our algorithm with a similar implicit approach recently developed by Kaus et al. (2010). We find that our algorithm is slightly more accurate

  3. Achieving high performance in numerical computations on RISC workstations and parallel systems

    SciTech Connect

    Goedecker, S.; Hoisie, A.

    1997-08-20

    The nominal peak speeds of both serial and parallel computers is raising rapidly. At the same time however it is becoming increasingly difficult to get out a significant fraction of this high peak speed from modern computer architectures. In this tutorial the authors give the scientists and engineers involved in numerically demanding calculations and simulations the necessary basic knowledge to write reasonably efficient programs. The basic principles are rather simple and the possible rewards large. Writing a program by taking into account optimization techniques related to the computer architecture can significantly speedup your program, often by factors of 10--100. As such, optimizing a program can for instance be a much better solution than buying a faster computer. If a few basic optimization principles are applied during program development, the additional time needed for obtaining an efficient program is practically negligible. In-depth optimization is usually only needed for a few subroutines or kernels and the effort involved is therefore also acceptable.

  4. Diesel flame lift-off stabilization in the presence of laser-ignition: a numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Cheng; Jangi, Mehdi; Bai, Xue-Song

    2015-11-01

    Diesel flame lift-off and stabilization in the presence of laser-ignition were numerically investigated with the method of Eulerian stochastic fields. The aim was to scrutinise the interaction between the lifted diesel flame and an ignition kernel upstream of the lifted flame. The numerical simulation was carried out in a constant-volume combustion vessel with n-heptane as fuel. The process was studied previously in an experiment employing Diesel #2 as the fuel in the same combustion vessel. In the experiment a lifted flame was first established at a position downstream of the nozzle. An ignition kernel was then initiated using a high-energy pulse laser at a position upstream of the natural lift-off position of the diesel flame. The laser-ignition kernel was modelled using a high-temperature (∼2000 K) hot spot. In both experiment and simulations the upstream front of the ignition kernel was shown to remain around the initial laser ignition site for a substantially long period of time, while the downstream front of the ignition kernel propagates rapidly towards the natural lift-off position downstream of the laser ignition site. The lift-off position oscillated before the final stabilization at the natural lift-off position. The structures and the propagation speed of the reaction fronts in the laser-ignition kernel and the main flame were analysed. Two different stabilization mechanisms, the auto-ignition mechanism and the flame propagation mechanism, were identified for the naturally lifted flame and the laser-induced reaction front, respectively. A mechanism was proposed to explain the oscillation of the lift-off position.

  5. A numerical study of wind turbine wakes under various atmospheric stability conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Shengbai

    The goal of this research is to investigate the properties of wind turbine wakes and their interactions with the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) via large-eddy simulations (LES) with special emphasis on the effects of atmospheric stability. The ABL is considered stable when the ground surface is cooler than the air, unstable when the opposite happens, and neutral when the temperature effect is negligible. In the literature, neutral conditions have been studied extensively, whereas the effects of stability have not. A new LES code, named Wind Turbine and Turbulence Simulator (WiTTS), was developed based on finite-difference (FD) schemes. First, the code's sensitivity to numerous aspects of the FD LES, such as the subgrid-scale (SGS) model, resolution, numerical treatment of the convective term, and filter types, was analyzed by simulating a neutral ABL. It was found that the Lagrangian-averaged scale-dependent (LASD) SGS model performs better than other scale-invariant Smagorinsky-type models. Second, the WiTTS was used to study the wakes from a miniature wind turbine inside a wind tunnel, following the setup of past experimental and numerical studies. It was found that those wakes are spatially anisotropic, with lateral growth faster than the vertical. Based on this, a new wake model is proposed and the Gaussian-type self-similarity is obtained for this simplified scenario. Third, to study a more realistic ABL, the stability conditions have been considered by the Boussinesq approximation and by varying thermal conditions on the ground surface, together with a constant Coriolis force. The LES results indicate that the properties of utility-scale wind turbine wakes are strongly correlated to the stability conditions. The wake recovery is enhanced by the increased turbulence due to buoyant convection in the unstable ABL, while in the stable ABL the spreading of the wake is significantly larger in the lateral direction than in the vertical direction. The stability

  6. Stabilized numerical solution for transient dynamic contact of inelastic solids on rough surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suwannachit, A.; Nackenhorst, U.; Chiarello, R.

    2012-06-01

    A simulation technique to deal with transient dynamic contact of tire rubber compounds on rough road surfaces is presented. The segment-to-surface approach is used for modeling the contact between tire tread rubber and road track. While the rubber components are deformable and described by a sophisticated viscoelastic damage constitutive model, the road surface is assumed to be rigid and characterized by an analytical function. A spectral approach based on an inverse computation of the 2D-Fast Fourier transform has been suggested for the reconstruction of rough surface profiles. The Newmark time-stepping method is used for the integration of transient dynamic equations. With the so-called contact-stabilized Newmark method the spurious oscillation at contact boundary has been removed. The detailed investigation on the dynamic contact of inelastic rubber block with rough road surfaces has been made. The robustness of the contact-stabilized Newmark method within a finite deformation framework is underlined by numerical studies, in which it is compared with several dissipation-based stabilization techniques selected from literature.

  7. von Neumann Stability Analysis of Numerical Solution Schemes for 1D and 2D Euler Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konangi, Santosh; Palakurthi, Nikhil Kumar; Ghia, Urmila

    2014-11-01

    A von Neumann stability analysis is conducted for numerical schemes for the full system of coupled, density-based 1D and 2D Euler equations, closed by an isentropic equation of state. The governing equations are discretized on a staggered grid, which permits equivalence to finite-volume discretization. Presently, first-order accurate spatial and temporal finite-difference techniques are analyzed. The momentum convection term is treated as explicit, semi-implicit or implicit. Density upwind bias is included in the spatial operator of the continuity equation. By combining the discretization techniques, ten solution schemes are formulated. For each scheme, unstable and stable regimes are identified through the stability analysis, and the maximum allowable CFL number is predicted. The predictions are verified for selected schemes, using the Riemann problem at incompressible and compressible Mach numbers. Very good agreement is obtained between the analytically predicted and ``experimentally'' observed CFL values for all cases, thereby validating the analysis. The demonstrated analysis provides an accurate indication of stability conditions for the Euler equations, in contrast to the simplistic conditions arising from model equations, such as the wave equation.

  8. Peaks, plateaus, numerical instabilities, and achievable accuracy in Galerkin and norm minimizing procedures for solving Ax=b

    SciTech Connect

    Cullum, J.

    1994-12-31

    Plots of the residual norms generated by Galerkin procedures for solving Ax = b often exhibit strings of irregular peaks. At seemingly erratic stages in the iterations, peaks appear in the residual norm plot, intervals of iterations over which the norms initially increase and then decrease. Plots of the residual norms generated by related norm minimizing procedures often exhibit long plateaus, sequences of iterations over which reductions in the size of the residual norm are unacceptably small. In an earlier paper the author discussed and derived relationships between such peaks and plateaus within corresponding Galerkin/Norm Minimizing pairs of such methods. In this paper, through a set of numerical experiments, the author examines connections between peaks, plateaus, numerical instabilities, and the achievable accuracy for such pairs of iterative methods. Three pairs of methods, GMRES/Arnoldi, QMR/BCG, and two bidiagonalization methods are studied.

  9. Numerical solvers to the stabilizing solution of perturbed algebraic Riccati equations in LQ zero-sum games

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, I. G.; Netov, N. C.; Bogdanova, B. C.

    2015-10-01

    This paper addresses the problem of solving a generalized algebraic Riccati equation with an indefinite sign of its quadratic term. We extend the approach introduced by Lanzon, Feng, Anderson and Rotkowitz (2008) for solving similar Riccati equations. We numerically investigate two types of iterative methods for computing the stabilizing solution. The first type of iterative methods constructs two matrix sequences, where the sum of them converges to the stabilizing solution. The second type of methods defines one matrix sequence which converges to the stabilizing solution. Computer realizations of the presented methods are numerically tested and compared on the test of family examples. Based on the experiments some conclusions are derived.

  10. Numerical Calculations Demonstrating Complete Stabilization of the Ideal Magnetohydrodynamic Resistive Wall Mode by Longitudinal Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, S.; Jardin, S. C.; Freidberg, J. P.; Guazzotto, L.

    2009-05-20

    The cylindrical ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stability problem, including ow and a resistive wall, is cast in the standard mathematical form, ωA∙x = B∙x, without discretizing the vacuum regions surrounding the plasma. This is accomplished by means of a finite element expansion for the plasma perturbations, by coupling the plasma surface perturbations to the resistive wall using a Green's function approach, and by expanding the unknown vector, x, to include the perturbed current in the resistive wall as an additional degree of freedom. The ideal MHD resistive wall mode (RWM) can be stabilized when the plasma has a uniform equilibrium ow such that the RWM frequency resonates with the plasma's Doppler-shifted sound continuum modes. The resonance induces a singularity in the parallel component of the plasma perturbations, which must be adequately resolved. Complete stabilization within the ideal MHD model (i.e. without parallel damping being added) is achieved as the grid spacing in the region of the resonance is extrapolated to 0 step size

  11. Comparative Study of Vibration Stability at Operating Light Source Facilities and Lessons Learned in Achieving NSLS II Stability Goals

    SciTech Connect

    Simos,N.; Fallier, M.; Amick, H.

    2008-06-23

    In an effort to ensure that the stability goals of the NSLS II will be met once the accelerator structure is set on the selected BNL site a comprehensive evaluation of the ground vibration observed at existing light source facilities has been undertaken. The study has relied on measurement data collected and reported by the operating facilities as well as on new data collected in the course of this study. The primary goal of this comprehensive effort is to compare the green-field conditions that exist in the various sites both in terms of amplitude as well as frequency content and quantify the effect of the interaction of these accelerator facilities with the green-field vibration. The latter represents the ultimate goal of this effort where the anticipated motion of the NSLS II ring is estimated prior to its construction and compared with the required stability criteria.

  12. Numerical stability of relativistic beam multidimensional PIC simulations employing the Esirkepov algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Godfrey, Brendan B.; Vay, Jean-Luc

    2013-09-01

    Rapidly growing numerical instabilities routinely occur in multidimensional particle-in-cell computer simulations of plasma-based particle accelerators, astrophysical phenomena, and relativistic charged particle beams. Reducing instability growth to acceptable levels has necessitated higher resolution grids, high-order field solvers, current filtering, etc. except for certain ratios of the time step to the axial cell size, for which numerical growth rates and saturation levels are reduced substantially. This paper derives and solves the cold beam dispersion relation for numerical instabilities in multidimensional, relativistic, electromagnetic particle-in-cell programs employing either the standard or the Cole–Karkkainnen finite difference field solver on a staggered mesh and the common Esirkepov current-gathering algorithm. Good overall agreement is achieved with previously reported results of the WARP code. In particular, the existence of select time steps for which instabilities are minimized is explained. Additionally, an alternative field interpolation algorithm is proposed for which instabilities are almost completely eliminated for a particular time step in ultra-relativistic simulations.

  13. Is Cu involved in prion oligopeptide stability? Experiments and numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minicozzi, V.; Morante, S.

    The high-sociological impact of neurodegenerative diseases (like Alzheimer disease, Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies, Parkinson disease, etc.) has renewed the interest of researchers in the study of misfolding processes and in particular of the rôle played by metals in plaque formation as their unbalanced concentration can be regarded as a possible concurrent cause of protein aggregation. Metals are essential players in many of the fundamental activities of cells. Storing, metabolism, and trafficking of metals through the cellular membrane and within the cytoplasm are mediated by many proteins via well-tuned mechanisms because of the toxicity of free ions. In this review article, we summarize the results of the most recent experimental and numerical investigations aimed at understanding the possible rôle of Cu in stabilizing the Prion protein structure and in the formation of protein polymers.

  14. A numerical study of the nonlinear thermal stability of solar loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klimchuk, J. A.; Antiochos, S. K.; Mariska, J. T.

    1987-01-01

    A time-dependent numerical model is used to investigate the nonlinear thermal stability of static loops of various heights. Simulations show that the instability of a hot state with loop heights of less than about 1000 km is physically significant, with an initially hot atmosphere in low-lying compact loops evolving to an extended atmosphere with temperatures far below 100,000 K. Results also show that high-lying loops are stable to all reasonable perturbations, including those of large initial amplitude and long wavelength. The simulation results suggest that low-lying compact loops should not be common to the sun, and that cool loops with temperatures near 100,000 K must be formed in the cool state initially and cannot evolve from preexisiting loops.

  15. Experimental and numerical studies of a microfluidic device with compliant chambers for flow stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyer, V.; Raj, A.; Annabattula, R. K.; Sen, A. K.

    2015-07-01

    This paper reports experimental and numerical studies of a passive microfluidic device that stabilizes a pulsating incoming flow and delivers a steady flow at the outlet. The device employs a series of chambers along the flow direction with a thin polymeric membrane (of thickness 75-250 µm) serving as the compliant boundary. The deformation of the membrane allows accumulation of fluid during an overflow and discharge of fluid during an underflow for flow stabilization. Coupled fluid-structure simulations are performed using Mooney-Rivlin formulations to account for a thin hyperelastic membrane material undergoing large deformations to accurately predict the device performance. The device was fabricated with PDMS as the substrate material and thin PDMS membrane as the compliant boundary. The performance of the device is defined in terms of a parameter called ‘Attenuation Factor (AF)’. The effect of various design parameters including membrane thickness, elastic modulus, chamber size and number of chambers in series as well as operating conditions including the outlet pressure, mean input flow rate, fluctuation amplitude and frequency on the device performance were studied using experiments and simulations. The simulation results successfully confront the experimental data (within 10%) which validates the numerical simulations. The device was used at the exit of a PZT actuated valveless micropump to take pulsating flow at the upstream and deliver steady flow downstream. The amplitude of the pulsating flow delivered by the micropump was significantly reduced (AF = 0.05 for a device with three 4 mm chambers) but at the expense of a reduction in the pressure capability (<20%). The proposed device could potentially be used for reducing flow pulsations in practical microfluidic circuits.

  16. Linear stability analysis and direct numerical simulation of two layer channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, Kirti; Govindarajan, Rama; Tripathi, Manoj

    2015-11-01

    We study the stability of two-fluid flow through a plane channel at Reynolds numbers of a hundred to a thousand. The two fluids have the same density but different viscosities. The fluids, when miscible, are separated from each other by a mixed layer of small but finite thickness, across which viscosity changes from that of one fluid to that of the other. When immiscible, the interface is sharp. Our study spans a range of Schmidt numbers, viscosity ratios and location and thickness of the mixed layer. Our two-dimensional linear stability results predict well the behaviour displayed by our three-dimensional direct numerical simulations at early times. In both linear and non-linear regimes, the miscible flow is more unstable than the corresponding immiscible one, and the miscible flow breaks spanwise symmetry more readily to go into three-dimensionality. We show that the miscible flow over our range of parameters is always significantly more unstable than the corresponding immiscible case.

  17. A numerical investigation of coorbital stability and libration in three dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morais, M. H. M.; Namouni, F.

    2016-05-01

    Motivated by the dynamics of resonance capture, we study numerically the coorbital resonance for inclination 0≤ I≤ 180° in the circular restricted three-body problem. We examine the similarities and differences between planar and three dimensional coorbital resonance capture and seek their origin in the stability of coorbital motion at arbitrary inclination. After we present stability maps of the planar prograde and retrograde coorbital resonances, we characterize the new coorbital modes in three dimensions. We see that retrograde mode I (R1) and mode II (R2) persist as we change the relative inclination, while retrograde mode III (R3) seems to exist only in the planar problem. A new coorbital mode (R4) appears in 3D which is a retrograde analogue to an horseshoe-orbit. The Kozai-Lidov resonance is active for retrograde orbits as well as prograde orbits and plays a key role in coorbital resonance capture. Stable coorbital modes exist at all inclinations, including retrograde and polar obits. This result confirms the robustness the coorbital resonance at large inclination and encourages the search for retrograde coorbital companions of the solar system's planets.

  18. Weakly nonlinear stability analysis of magnetohydrodynamic channel flow using an efficient numerical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagan, Jonathan; Priede, Jānis

    2013-12-01

    We analyze weakly nonlinear stability of a flow of viscous conducting liquid driven by pressure gradient in the channel between two parallel walls subject to a transverse magnetic field. Using a non-standard numerical approach, we compute the linear growth rate correction and the first Landau coefficient, which in a sufficiently strong magnetic field vary with the Hartmann number as μ 1˜ (0.814-i19.8)× 10^{-3}textit {Ha} and μ 2˜ (2.73-i1.50)× 10^{-5}textit {Ha}^{-4}. These coefficients describe a subcritical transverse velocity perturbation with the equilibrium amplitude |A|2=Re [μ 1]/Re [μ 2](textit {Re}c-textit {Re})˜ 29.8textit {Ha}5(textit {Re}c-textit {Re}), which exists at Reynolds numbers below the linear stability threshold textit {Re}c˜ 4.83× 104textit {Ha}. We find that the flow remains subcritically unstable regardless of the magnetic field strength. Our method for computing Landau coefficients differs from the standard one by the application of the solvability condition to the discretized rather than continuous problem. This allows us to bypass both the solution of the adjoint problem and the subsequent evaluation of the integrals defining the inner products, which results in a significant simplification of the method.

  19. Impact of hydrothermal alteration on lava dome stability: a numerical modelling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detienne, Marie; Delmelle, Pierre

    2016-04-01

    Lava domes are a common feature of many volcanoes worldwide. They represent a serious volcanic hazard as they are prone to repeated collapses, generating devastating debris avalanches and pyroclastic flows. While it has long been known that hydrothermal alteration degrades rock properties and weakens rock mass cohesion and strength, there is still little quantitative information allowing the description of this effect and its consequences for assessing the stability of a volcanic rock mass such as a lava dome. In this study, we use the finite difference numerical model FLAC 3D to investigate the impact of hydrothermal alteration on the stability of a volcanic dome lying on a flat surface. Different hydrothermal alteration distributions were tested to encompass the variability observed in natural lava domes. Rock shear strength parameters (minimum, maximum and mean cohesion "c" and friction angle "φ" values) representative of various degrees of hydrothermal rock alteration were used in the simulations. The model predicts that reduction of the basement rock's shear strength decreases the factor of safety significantly. A similar result is found by increasing the vertical and horizontal extension of hydrothermal alteration in the basement rocks. In addition, pervasive hydrothermal alteration within the lava dome is predicted to exert a strong negative influence on the factor of safety. Through reduction of rock porosity and permeability, hydrothermal alteration may also affect pore fluid pressure within a lava dome. The results of new FLAC 3D runs which simulate the effect of hydrothermal alteration-induced pore pressure changes on lava dome stability will be presented.

  20. Experimental and Numerical Investigation of a Swirl Stabilized Premixed Combustor under Cold Flow Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    P.A. Strakey; M.J. Yip

    2007-07-01

    Planar velocity measurements under cold-flow conditions in a swirl-stabilized dump combustor typical of land-based gas turbine combustors were carried out using two-dimensional particle image velocimetry (PIV). Axial, radial, and tangential velocity components were measured sequentially using two experimental configurations. Mean and root-mean-squared velocity components are presented along with instantaneous realizations of the flowfield. A numerical study of the flowfield using large-eddy simulation (LES) and Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) techniques was conducted in an effort to help understand the complex hydrodynamics observed in the experiments. The agreement between the experimental data and LES simulation was good with both showing evidence of a precessing vortex core. The results of the RANS simulation were not as encouraging. The results provide a fundamental understanding of the complex flowfield associated with the relatively simple geometry and also serve as a baseline validation dataset for further numerical simulations of the current geometry. Validation of LES models in a highly swirled, nonreacting flowfield such as the work presented here is an essential step towards more accurate prediction in a reacting environment.

  1. A numerical experiment on the equilibrium and stability of a rotating galactic bar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. H.; Vandervoort, P. O.; Welty, D. E.; Smith, B. F.

    1982-01-01

    A self-consistent, three-dimensional numerical experiment is performed on an N-body system whose initial state is a realization of a certain theoretical model of a rotating triaxial galaxy. The model is a stellar-dynamical counterpart of a uniformly rotating polytrope of index equal to 0.5. The aim of the experiment is to study the equilibrium of the system and, in particular, to test its stability. The experimental system behaves in the mean like a realization of the theoretical model for at least seven crossing times. The principal departure of the system from equilibrium is an oscillation which is identified as a radial pulsation. There is no indication in its behavior that the system is unstable with respect to anu mode with an e-folding time shorter than or of the order of two crossing times. Certain changes that occur in the state of the system are interpreted, with the aid of the theoretical model, as secular changes which result from a slight failure of our numerical methods to conserve the mass, energy, and angular momentum of the system; these effects are small enough that they do not vitiate the experiment on a dynamical time scale.

  2. The importance of trochanteric lag screws to achieve primary stability in cementless fixation of the RM hip prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Heitemeyer, U; Hierholzer, G; Haines, J

    1987-01-01

    To allow the bony incorporation of a cementless prosthesis it is important to achieve stability at the time of operation. To neutralize tension and torsional stresses the RM-shaft prosthesis is fixed with two lag screws in the trochanteric part of the femur. By measuring the applied torque intraoperatively we could demonstrate that the threads of the screws found a better grip when inserted from the bone to the prosthesis. Thus, the stronger fixation of the screws enhanced the primary stability of the cementless prosthesis. PMID:3566504

  3. Explicit numerical formulas of improved stability and accuracy for the solution of parabolic equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olstad, W. B.

    1979-01-01

    A class of explicit numerical formulas which involve next nearest neighbor as well as nearest neighbor points are explored in this paper. These formulas are formal approximations to the linear parabolic partial-differential equation of first order in time and second order in distance. It was found that some of these formulas can employ time steps as much as four times that for the conventional explicit technique without becoming unstable. Others showed improved accuracy for a given time step and spatial grid spacing. One formula achieved a steady-state solution of specified accuracy for an example problem in less than 4 percent of the total computational time required by the conventional explicit technique.

  4. Numerical simulation of compressible Couette flow stability: Non-linear and three-dimensional effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saati, Abdulmannan Abdulhamid

    1991-02-01

    The direct numerical simulation of the stability and transition of compressible Couette flow is studied. The effects of a constant body force along the vertical direction are also studied. Cartesian geometry is adopted to approximate Couette flow produced in the gap between two coaxial cylinders rotating at high-speed, with the body force representing the effects of the centrifugal force. A new, compressible flow solver for two- and three-dimensional, time dependent Navier-Stokes equations, using both the MacCormack and the high-order Two-Four methods was developed. In order to facilitate the simulations with greater detail and accuracy, a high-speed supercomputer with large core memory is required. Thus, the computer code was written in FORTRAN for its execution on the CRAY2, at NASA Langley. In a concurrent effort, in order to study the feasibility and efficiency of massively parallel super-computers and to speed up the computations, the work was further extended by rewriting the computer code in both C* and PARIS languages, for execution on the massively parallel Connection Machine CM 2 at the University of Colorado. Extensive testing of this new computer code was performed using wave propagation problems involving small- and large-amplitude two- and three-dimensional disturbances. Numerical simulations on the stability of compressible Couette flow between two infinite, parallel plates, with the inclusion of (1) a sudden body force, and (2) a body force in equilibrium, were performed. First, two-dimensional disturbances were considered and then the work was extended by considering three-dimensional disturbances on the rectangular Couette flow problem. Effects of body force magnitude, Mach number, and Reynolds number were also investigated. The simulations provide excellent agreement with the linear theory, thus documenting the phase and amplitude accuracy of the computed results; the overall amplitude error remains less than one percent. The results show that

  5. School Stability: Improving Academic Achievement for NJ Foster Children. Policy Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernard-Rance, Kourtney; Parello, Nancy

    2014-01-01

    Children in New Jersey's foster care system are more likely to remain in their home school when they enter foster care, thanks to a law passed in 2010, giving these fragile children improved educational stability. The law allows children to remain in their "school of origin" when they are placed in foster care, even if the foster…

  6. Investigating motion and stability of particles in flows using numerical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khurana, Nidhi

    The phenomenon of transport of particles in a fluid is ubiquitous in nature and a detailed understanding of its mechanism continues to remain a fundamental question for physicists. In this thesis, we use numerical methods to study the dynamics and stability of particles advected in flows. First, we investigate the dynamics of a single, motile particle advected in a two-dimensional chaotic flow. The particle can be either spherical or ellipsoidal. Particle activity is modeled as a constant intrinsic swimming velocity and stochastic fluctuations in both the translational and rotational motions are also taken into account. Our results indicate that interaction of swimming with flow structures causes a reduction in long-term transport at low speeds. Swimmers can get trapped at the transport barriers of the flow. We show that elongated swimmers respond more strongly to the dynamical structures of the flow field. At low speeds, their macroscopic transport is reduced even further than in the case of spherical swimmers. However, at high speeds these elongated swimmers tend to get attracted to the stable manifolds of hyperbolic fixed points, leading to increased transport. We then investigate the collective dynamics of a system of particles. The particles may interact both with each other and with the background flow. We focus on two different cases. In the fist case, we examine the stability of aggregation models in a turbulent-like flow. We use a simple aggregation model in which a point-like particle moves with a constant intrinsic speed while its velocity vector is reoriented according to the average direction of motion of its neighbors. We generate a strongly fluctuating, spatially correlated background flow using Kinematic Simulation, and show that flocks are highly sensitive to this background flow and break into smaller clusters. Our results indicate that such environmental perturbations must be taken into account for models which aim to capture the collective

  7. Numerical Modeling of a Vortex Stabilized Arcjet. Ph.D. Thesis, 1991 Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pawlas, Gary E.

    1992-01-01

    Arcjet thrusters are being actively considered for use in Earth orbit maneuvering applications. Experimental studies are currently the chief means of determining an optimal thruster configuration. Earlier numerical studies have failed to include all of the effects found in typical arcjets including complex geometries, viscosity, and swirling flow. Arcjet geometries are large area ratio converging nozzles with centerbodies in the subsonic portion of the nozzle. The nozzle walls serve as the anode while the centerbody functions as the cathode. Viscous effects are important because the Reynolds number, based on the throat radius, is typically less than 1,000. Experimental studies have shown that a swirl or circumferential velocity component stabilizes a constricted arc. This dissertation describes the equations governing flow through a constricted arcjet thruster. An assumption that the flowfield is in local thermodynamic equilibrium leads to a single fluid plasma temperature model. An order of magnitude analysis reveals the governing fluid mechanics equations are uncoupled from the electromagnetic field equations. A numerical method is developed to solve the governing fluid mechanics equations, the Thin Layer Navier-Stokes equations. A coordinate transformation is employed in deriving the governing equations to simplify the application of boundary conditions in complex geometries. An axisymmetric formulation is employed to include the swirl velocity component as well as the axial and radial velocity components. The numerical method is an implicit finite-volume technique and allows for large time steps to reach a converged steady-state solution. The inviscid fluxes are flux-split, and Gauss-Seidel line relaxation is used to accelerate convergence. Converging-diverging nozzles with exit-to-throat area ratios up to 100:1 and annular nozzles were examined. Quantities examined included Mach number and static wall pressure distributions, and oblique shock structures. As

  8. Numerical Modeling of the Stability of Face-Centered Cubic Metals with High Vacancy Concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Brian P. Somerday; M. I. Baskes

    1998-12-01

    The objective of this research is to assess the possibility of forming an atomically porous structure in a low-density metal, e.g., Al with vacancies up to 0.20/lattice site; and to examine the effects of hydrogen and vacancy concentration on the stability of an atomically porous structure that has been experimentally produced in nickel. The approach involves numerical modeling using the Embedded-Atom Method (EAM). High vacancy concentrations cause the Al lattice to disorder at 300K. In contrast, Ni retains the face-centered-cubic structure at 300K for vacancy concentrations up to 0.15 Vac/lattice site. Unexpectedly, the lattice with 0.15 Vac/lattice site is more stable than the lattice with 0.10 or 0.20 Vac/lattice site. The Ni systems with 0.10 and 0.15 Vac/lattice site exhibit domains consisting of uniform lattice rotations. The Ni lattice with 0.15 Vac/lattice site is more stable with an initial distribution of random vacancies compared to ordered vacancies. The equilibrium lattice structures of Ni a d Al containing vacancies and H are less ordered to structures with vacancies only at 300K.

  9. Prevalence, Stability, and Functionality of Achievement Goal Profiles in Mathematics from Third to Seventh Grade

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwinger, Malte; Wild, Elke

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the longitudinal trajectories of achievement goal profiles in mathematics from third to seventh grade in a sample of 302 German students. Latent profile analyses were conducted separately for each school year and revealed three subgroups of students with distinct goal profiles labeled high multiple goals, moderate multiple…

  10. Stability of Self-Esteem Ratings and Their Relation to Academic Achievement: A Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubin, Rosalyn A.

    1978-01-01

    In a sample of 380 children, self-esteem as measured by the Coopersmith Self-Esteem Inventory became more stable and more highly correlated with school achievement as the children grew older. Children's self-perceptions appear less firmly established, and therefore may be more responsive to intervention, at earlier ages. (Author)

  11. Study on sub-cycling algorithm for flexible multi-body system: stability analysis and numerical examples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, J. C.; Zhu, P.; Shi, G. L.; Chen, G. L.

    2008-01-01

    Numerical stability is an important issue for any integral procedure. Since sub-cycling algorithm has been presented by Belytschko et al. (Comput Methods Appl Mech Eng 17/18: 259-275, 1979), various kinds of these integral procedures were developed in later 20 years and their stability were widely studied. However, on how to apply the sub-cycling to flexible multi-body dynamics (FMD) is still a lack of investigation up to now. A particular sub-cycling algorithm for the FMD based on the central difference method was introduced in detail in part I (Miao et al. in Comp Mech doi: 10.1007/s00466-007-0183-9) of this paper. Adopting an integral approximation operator method, stability of the presented algorithm is transformed to a generalized eigenvalue problem in the paper and is discussed by solving the problem later. Numerical examples are performed to verify the availability and efficiency of the algorithm further.

  12. Nonlinear effects in Paul traps operated in the second stability region: analytical analysis and numerical verification.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Caiqiao; Zhou, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Ning; Zhan, Lingpeng; Chen, Suming; Nie, Zongxiu

    2014-11-01

    Paul trap working in the second stability region has long been recognized as a possible approach for achieving high-resolution mass spectrometry (MS), which however is still far away from the experimental implementations because of the narrow working area and inefficient ion trapping. Full understanding of the ion motional behavior is helpful for solving the problem. In this article, the ion motion in a superimposed octopole field, which was characterized by the nonlinear Mathieu equation, was solved analytically using Poincare-Lighthill-Kuo (PLK) method. This method equivalently described the nonlinear disturbance by an effective quadrupole field with perturbed Mathieu parameters, a(u) and q(u), which would bring huge convenience in the studies of nonlinear ion dynamics and was, therefore, used for rapid evaluation of the nonlinear effects of ion motion. Fourth-order Runge-Kutta method (4th R-K) indicated the error of PLK for characterizing the frequency shift of ion motion was within 15%. PMID:25183226

  13. An experimental and numerical study on the stability and propagation of laminar premixed flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vagelopoulos, Christina Maria

    The laminar flame speed is a very important property of laminar premixed flames, especially for the validation of chemical kinetics and modeling of turbulent combustion. The counterflow technique is one of the best approaches for the experimental determination of this property because it allows for the establishment of planar, nearly adiabatic, steady, quasi-one dimensional flames that are subjected to well-defined aerodynamic strain rate. However non-linear effects as the strain rate goes to zero lead to overprediction of the laminar flame speed. In the present study these non-linear effects were investigated experimentally and numerically and significant overprediction was verified, particularly for weakly-burning hydrogen/air flames. Subsequently effort was made to establish and study flame properties at a very-low strain rate regime and qualitative and quantitative conclusions were drawn for the stability of the flame surface subjected to very low aerodynamic strain rate, coupled with the effect of gravity and preferential diffusion. A new experimental technique was developed, based on the observation that if a laminar premixed flame undergoes a transition from planar to Bunsen the strain rate changes from positive to negative values and a near-zero strain-rate regime is established. Flame speed measurements were conducted by using LDV for this regime; the flame speed measured is the true laminar flame speed and this is the first time that this property is directly and experimentally measured. Particle Streak velocimetry was developed to evaluate the strain-rates for near-zero strain-rate regime. The laminar flame speed was measured for atmospheric methane/air, ethane/air and propane/air mixtures for the whole range of equivalence ratios; the new data are lower when compared to previous ones and the overprediction is at the order of 15%.

  14. Anion control as a strategy to achieve high-mobility and high-stability oxide thin-film transistors

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun-Suk; Jeon, Sang Ho; Park, Joon Seok; Kim, Tae Sang; Son, Kyoung Seok; Seon, Jong-Baek; Seo, Seok-Jun; Kim, Sun-Jae; Lee, Eunha; Chung, Jae Gwan; Lee, Hyungik; Han, Seungwu; Ryu, Myungkwan; Lee, Sang Yoon; Kim, Kinam

    2013-01-01

    Ultra-definition, large-area displays with three-dimensional visual effects represent megatrend in the current/future display industry. On the hardware level, such a “dream” display requires faster pixel switching and higher driving current, which in turn necessitate thin-film transistors (TFTs) with high mobility. Amorphous oxide semiconductors (AOS) such as In-Ga-Zn-O are poised to enable such TFTs, but the trade-off between device performance and stability under illumination critically limits their usability, which is related to the hampered electron-hole recombination caused by the oxygen vacancies. Here we have improved the illumination stability by substituting oxygen with nitrogen in ZnO, which may deactivate oxygen vacancies by raising valence bands above the defect levels. Indeed, the stability under illumination and electrical bias is superior to that of previous AOS-based TFTs. By achieving both mobility and stability, it is highly expected that the present ZnON TFTs will be extensively deployed in next-generation flat-panel displays. PMID:23492854

  15. Anion control as a strategy to achieve high-mobility and high-stability oxide thin-film transistors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun-Suk; Jeon, Sang Ho; Park, Joon Seok; Kim, Tae Sang; Son, Kyoung Seok; Seon, Jong-Baek; Seo, Seok-Jun; Kim, Sun-Jae; Lee, Eunha; Chung, Jae Gwan; Lee, Hyungik; Han, Seungwu; Ryu, Myungkwan; Lee, Sang Yoon; Kim, Kinam

    2013-01-01

    Ultra-definition, large-area displays with three-dimensional visual effects represent megatrend in the current/future display industry. On the hardware level, such a "dream" display requires faster pixel switching and higher driving current, which in turn necessitate thin-film transistors (TFTs) with high mobility. Amorphous oxide semiconductors (AOS) such as In-Ga-Zn-O are poised to enable such TFTs, but the trade-off between device performance and stability under illumination critically limits their usability, which is related to the hampered electron-hole recombination caused by the oxygen vacancies. Here we have improved the illumination stability by substituting oxygen with nitrogen in ZnO, which may deactivate oxygen vacancies by raising valence bands above the defect levels. Indeed, the stability under illumination and electrical bias is superior to that of previous AOS-based TFTs. By achieving both mobility and stability, it is highly expected that the present ZnON TFTs will be extensively deployed in next-generation flat-panel displays. PMID:23492854

  16. Enhanced erythrocyte suspension layer stability achieved by surface tension lowering additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Omenyi, S. N.; Snyder, R. S.; Absolom, D. R.; Van Oss, C. J.; Neumann, A. W.

    1982-01-01

    In connection with a fractionation procedure involving the separation of particles, a dilute suspension of these particles in a liquid is carefully layered on a dense liquid. Under ideal conditions, the suspension forms a zone of finite thickness with a 'sharp' interface between the suspension layer and the supporting liquid. Under an applied field, e.g., gravitational or electrical, the particles in the suspension layer migrate to form different layers according to their size and/or density or according to their electrophoretic mobilities. However, in many cases the ideal conditions necessary for the fractionation process are not obtained. Many studies have been conducted to explore the reasons for suspension layer 'instability'. The present investigation represents an extension of a study conducted by Omenyi et al. (1981). An electrostatic repulsion-van der Waals mechanism was used to study the stability of fixed erythrocyte suspensions layered on a D2O cushion.

  17. Body temperature stability achieved by the large body mass of sea turtles.

    PubMed

    Sato, Katsufumi

    2014-10-15

    To investigate the thermal characteristics of large reptiles living in water, temperature data were continuously recorded from 16 free-ranging loggerhead turtles, Caretta caretta, during internesting periods using data loggers. Core body temperatures were 0.7-1.7°C higher than ambient water temperatures and were kept relatively constant. Unsteady numerical simulations using a spherical thermodynamic model provided mechanistic explanations for these phenomena, and the body temperature responses to fluctuating water temperature can be simply explained by a large body mass with a constant thermal diffusivity and a heat production rate rather than physiological thermoregulation. By contrast, body temperatures increased 2.6-5.1°C in 107-152 min during their emergences to nest on land. The estimated heat production rates on land were 7.4-10.5 times the calculated values in the sea. The theoretical prediction that temperature difference between body and water temperatures would increase according to the body size was confirmed by empirical data recorded from several species of sea turtles. Comparing previously reported data, the internesting intervals of leatherback, green and loggerhead turtles were shorter when the body temperatures were higher. Sea turtles seem to benefit from a passive thermoregulatory strategy, which depends primarily on the physical attributes of their large body masses. PMID:25147244

  18. Achieving synergy between chemical oxidation and stabilization in a contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Vipul J; Hudson, Jeffrey Michael; Cassidy, Daniel P

    2016-07-01

    Eight in situ solidification/stabilization (ISS) amendments were tested to promote in situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) with activated persulfate (PS) in a contaminated soil. A 3% (by weight) dose of all ISS amendments selected for this study completely activated a 1.5% dose of PS within 3 h by raising temperatures above 30 °C (heat activation) and/or increasing pH above 10.5 (alkaline activation). Heat is released by the reaction of CaO with water, and pH increases because this reaction produces Ca(OH)2. Heat activation is preferred because it generates 2 mol of oxidizing radicals per mole of PS, whereas alkaline activation releases only 1. The relative contribution of heat vs. alkaline activation increased with CaO content of the ISS amendment, which was reflected by enhanced contaminant oxidation with increasing CaO content, and was confirmed by comparing to controls promoting purely heat or alkaline (NaOH) activation. The test soil was contaminated with benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), particularly naphthalene (NAP). ISS-activated PS oxidized between 47% and 84% of the BTEX & NAP, and between 13% and 33% of the higher molecular weight PAH. ISS-activated PS reduced the leachability of BTEX & NAP by 76%-91% and of the 17 PAH by 83%-96%. Combined ISCO/ISS reduced contaminant leachability far than ISCO or ISS treatments alone, demonstrating the synergy that is possible with combined remedies. PMID:27088536

  19. Numerical Models of Slow Slip and Dynamic Rupture Including Dilatant Stabilization and Thermal Pressurization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segall, P.; Bradley, A. M.

    2009-12-01

    Seismic and geodetic observations indicate that slow-slip events (SSE) occur down-dip of locked megathrusts, in areas of high pore-pressure, p. We suggest that at low effective stress (σ -p) dilatancy stabilizes rate-weakening faults, whereas at higher (σ -p) thermal pressurization overwhelms dilatancy leading to dynamic slip. 2D simulations include rate-state (slip-law) friction with Linker-Dieterich normal stress effect, Segall-Rice dilatancy linked to state evolution, and heat and pore-fluid flow normal to the fault. The fault is loaded by down-dip slip at v∞ . We discretize the fault normal direction with log spacing, and employ explicit-implicit time integration to improve speed and accuracy. The governing equations involve numerous physical parameters, but relatively few non-dimensional groups. Ep={ɛ h}/ [2 {β (σ - p∞)}√ {{v{∞ }}/ {chyd}dc] and ET=({f_0Λ }/{2ρ cp})√ {{chydd_c v∞}}/{cth}2 represent dilatancy and shear heating efficiency, respectively. For a nominal set of parameters (given below), spatially uniform properties, and σ -p=1MPa, (Ep = 1.5 × 10-3, ET = 3 × 10-5), we find a series of propagating SSE, that are stabilized by dilatancy-induced drops in p at the rupture tips. For a broad range of parameters we observe slow-slip events driven by down-dip slip, with negative stress drop, as well as faster (but quasi-static) events that relax the accumulated stress. At 10 MPa effective stress, the models exhibit both SSE and dynamic ruptures. Following dynamic stress drops, a sequence of slow slip events is driven from the down-dip end of the fault, with generally increasing maximum slip-speeds. We also consider spatially variable (σ -p), ranging from 2 MPa down-dip to 10 MPa up-dip (with arctangent distribution such that 80% of the variation occurs across 20% of the fault), and uniform material properties. The models exhibit both SSE and dynamic events. Following a dynamic rupture there are initially no slow events, and the

  20. Analysis of numerical stability and amplification matrices: Fourth-order Runge-Kutta methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, E. W.

    1979-01-01

    Amplification matrices, numerical kernels, stable, and exponentially stable numerical solutions are examined. The various techniques involved in these concepts are applied to certain systems that have Jordan forms, which are nondiagonal, with particular interest in the case of imaginary or zero eigenvalues.

  1. Simultaneous stability and sensitivity in model cortical networks is achieved through anti-correlations between the in- and out-degree of connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Vasquez, Juan C.; Houweling, Arthur R.; Tiesinga, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Neuronal networks in rodent barrel cortex are characterized by stable low baseline firing rates. However, they are sensitive to the action potentials of single neurons as suggested by recent single-cell stimulation experiments that reported quantifiable behavioral responses in response to short spike trains elicited in single neurons. Hence, these networks are stable against internally generated fluctuations in firing rate but at the same time remain sensitive to similarly-sized externally induced perturbations. We investigated stability and sensitivity in a simple recurrent network of stochastic binary neurons and determined numerically the effects of correlation between the number of afferent (“in-degree”) and efferent (“out-degree”) connections in neurons. The key advance reported in this work is that anti-correlation between in-/out-degree distributions increased the stability of the network in comparison to networks with no correlation or positive correlations, while being able to achieve the same level of sensitivity. The experimental characterization of degree distributions is difficult because all pre-synaptic and post-synaptic neurons have to be identified and counted. We explored whether the statistics of network motifs, which requires the characterization of connections between small subsets of neurons, could be used to detect evidence for degree anti-correlations. We find that the sample frequency of the 3-neuron “ring” motif (1→2→3→1), can be used to detect degree anti-correlation for sub-networks of size 30 using about 50 samples, which is of significance because the necessary measurements are achievable experimentally in the near future. Taken together, we hypothesize that barrel cortex networks exhibit degree anti-correlations and specific network motif statistics. PMID:24223550

  2. Sensitivity of free bar morphology in rivers to secondary flow modeling: Linear stability analysis and numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasaki, Toshiki; Shimizu, Yasuyuki; Kimura, Ichiro

    2016-06-01

    A number of numerical models have been proposed to understand and simulate fluvial river morphodynamics; however, it is somewhat unclear whether all the models are able to consistently simulate flow-bed instability phenomena. This study investigates the sensitivity of free bar morphology in rivers to secondary flow models used in depth-averaged models using linear stability analyses and numerical simulations. Both the linear analyses and numerical simulations suggest that under certain hydraulic conditions, an equilibrium-type secondary flow model, which has been widely used in river morphodynamic models, fails to generate a finite wavelength and bar mode, allowing the inception of bars of infinitely short scale and infinitely high mode. Using a nonequilibrium-type secondary flow model avoids the unphysical formation of these incipient free bars, and gives better solutions regarding finite amplitude bars. Since free bars are essential, intrinsic river morphological features, the findings of this study can be applied to a wide range of river morphodynamic calculations.

  3. Stability analysis of Western flank of Cumbre Vieja volcano (La Palma) using numerical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bru, Guadalupe; Gonzalez, Pablo J.; Fernandez-Merodo, Jose A.; Fernandez, Jose

    2016-04-01

    La Palma volcanic island is one of the youngest of the Canary archipelago, being a composite volcano formed by three overlapping volcanic centers. There are clear onshore and offshore evidences of past giant landslides that have occurred during its evolution. Currently, the active Cumbre Vieja volcano is in an early development state (Carracedo et al., 2001). The study of flank instability processes aim to assess, among other hazards, catastrophic collapse and potential tsunami generation. Early studies of the potential instability of Cumbre Vieja volcano western flank have focused on the use of sparse geodetic networks (Moss et al. 1999), surface geological mapping techniques (Day et al. 1999) and offshore bathymetry (Urgeles et al. 1999). Recently, a dense GNSS network and satellite radar interferometry results indicate ground motion consistent with deep-seated creeping processes (Prieto et al. 2009, Gonzalez et al. 2010). In this work, we present a geomechanical advanced numerical model that captures the ongoing deformation processes at Cumbre Vieja. We choose the Finite Elements Method (FEM) which is based in continuum mechanics and is the most used for geotechnical applications. FEM has the ability of using arbitrary geometry, heterogeneities, irregular boundaries and different constitutive models representative of the geotechnical units involved. Our main contribution is the introduction of an inverse approach to constrain the geomechanical parameters using satellite radar interferometry displacements. This is the first application of such approach on a large volcano flank study. We suggest that the use of surface displacements and inverse methods to rigorously constrain the geomechanical model parameter space is a powerful tool to understand volcano flank instability. A particular important result of the studied case is the estimation of displaced rock volume, which is a parameter of critical importance for simulations of Cumbre Vieja tsunamigenic hazard

  4. The Effects of Teaching Numerical Control Concepts Via Simulator Versus Non-Simulator Activities on the Achievement, Programming Proficiency and Attitude of High School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pine, Douglas Taylor

    This study utilized 120 metalworking students and six teachers from Columbus, Ohio area high schools to ascertain the effects of teaching numerical control to industrial arts students by means of simulator-aided activities versus nonsimulator aided activities. Scores obtained from an achievement test, attitude inventory, and word address…

  5. Stability analysis of numerical solutions of wave propagation when pseudoviscosity is replaced by real viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanget, A.

    1996-05-01

    The artificial viscocity method was originally introduced by Von Neuman and Richtmeyer [R.D. Richtmeyer and K. W. Morton, in Difference methods for Initial Value Problem (Interscience, New York, 1967)] to spread the shock over several cells of the mesh. This method is useful if the physical phenomena present in the shock front are not of interest. In some cases, such as for polymers, the amount of viscosity is large enough to spread the front shock naturally. In our problem, pseudoviscosity is ignored. A stability analysis shows that time step restrictions for stability can be less stringent than with pseudoviscosity.

  6. Numerical investigation of stability of breather-type solutions of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calini, A.; Schober, C. M.

    2013-09-01

    In this article we present the results of a broad numerical investigation on the stability of breather-type solutions of the nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation, specifically the one- and two-mode breathers for an unstable plane wave, which are frequently used to model rogue waves. The numerical experiments involve large ensembles of perturbed initial data for six typical random perturbations. Ensemble estimates of the "closeness", A(t), of the perturbed solution to an element of the respective unperturbed family indicate that the only neutrally stable breathers are the ones of maximal dimension, that is: given an unstable background with N unstable modes, the only neutrally stable breathers are the N-dimensional ones (obtained as a superimposition of N simple breathers via iterated Backlund transformations). Conversely, breathers which are not fully saturated are sensitive to noisy environments and are unstable. Interestingly, A(t) is smallest for the coalesced two-mode breather indicating the coalesced case may be the most robust two-mode breather in a laboratory setting. The numerical simulations confirm and provide a realistic realization of the stability behavior established analytically by the authors.

  7. Numerical stability analysis and flow simulation of lid-driven cavity subjected to high magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marioni, L.; Bay, F.; Hachem, E.

    2016-05-01

    In this work, we study the flow of a conducting fluid inside a two-dimensional square domain. The problem is solved by using a variational multiscale finite element approach. The study focuses on a high magnetic interaction parameter range and high Reynolds number. Under the imposition of a high magnetic field, the flow gets regularized, but fast transient phenomena take place, which could lead to numerical errors. An expression to compute the maximum time step that guarantees convergence in explicit schemes is proposed and validated through numerical tests.

  8. Achieving ligament stability and correct rotational alignment of the femur in knee arthroplasty: a study using the Medial Pivot knee.

    PubMed

    Shakespeare, David; Kinzel, Vera; Ledger, Michael

    2005-12-01

    In a series of 90 Medial Pivot arthroplasties rotational alignment of the femur was achieved by provisionally reconstructing the lateral side of the joint and tensioning the medial side with feeler gauges. Axial CT scans were employed to measure the rotational alignment relative to surgical epicondylar axis. In valgus knees the cutting block was externally rotated to adjust for posterolateral bone loss. The mean rotational alignment of the femur was 0.6 degrees of external rotation (S.D. 1.3, range 3 degrees of ER to 4 degrees of IR). The mean laxity of the medial ligament was 1 mm in flexion (SD 1, range 0-5 mm) and 0.5 mm in flexion (S.D. 0.5, range 0-2 mm) In those knees in which the medial ligament had been released the CT alignment was perfect, but when internally rotated against the hip 3-4 mm of gapping was noted. In valgus knees the mean rotation of the femoral component was 0.8 degrees of internal rotation (S.D. 1.5, range 1 degrees of IR to 4 degrees of ER). In spite of externally rotating the cutting block there was still a tendency to internally rotate the femur in some knees. This simple technique achieves the two goals of ligament stability and correct rotational alignment in a high proportion of cases. It may be applicable to any instrument system which employs posterior referencing. PMID:15967668

  9. Numerical computation of the linear stability of the diffusion model for crystal growth simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, C.; Sorensen, D.C.; Meiron, D.I.; Wedeman, B.

    1996-12-31

    We consider a computational scheme for determining the linear stability of a diffusion model arising from the simulation of crystal growth. The process of a needle crystal solidifying into some undercooled liquid can be described by the dual diffusion equations with appropriate initial and boundary conditions. Here U{sub t} and U{sub a} denote the temperature of the liquid and solid respectively, and {alpha} represents the thermal diffusivity. At the solid-liquid interface, the motion of the interface denoted by r and the temperature field are related by the conservation relation where n is the unit outward pointing normal to the interface. A basic stationary solution to this free boundary problem can be obtained by writing the equations of motion in a moving frame and transforming the problem to parabolic coordinates. This is known as the Ivantsov parabola solution. Linear stability theory applied to this stationary solution gives rise to an eigenvalue problem of the form.

  10. Application of numerical simulation using a progressive failure approach to underground-coal-mine stability analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ash, N.F.

    1987-01-01

    Stability in underground coal mines is of major concern to the coal industry due to its effect on both safety and productivity. Consequently, this can have a great influence on the design of efficient mine systems. In this work a progressive failure approach was used to simulate underground coal mine stability at two different mines. The two mines considered have different characteristics. Two- and three- dimensional finite element models were created to model different areas of a longwall mine. Different chain pillar configurations were considered and the resulting stress distributions were comparable to field measurements. A complete mine section was successfully modeled taking into consideration face advancement. The roof above entry intersections was also modeled using laminated composite simulation and the finite element method. The results showed trends similar to field observations. In addition, the progressive development of subsidence for the two different mines was simulated. The same variation in subsidence behavior recorded at the mine was realized in the finite element simulation. The progressive failure approach used in this work can successfully simulate underground coal mine stability. It can also be a helpful tool in the design of more efficient mine systems which can increase productivity and maintain a high level of safety.

  11. A numerical study of global axisymmetric states and their stability to quasi-geostrophic disturbances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, H. W.; Dutton, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    A steady, axisymmetric model of the general circulation is developed as a basis for climate stability studies. The model includes the effects of heating, rotation, and internal friction, but neglects topography. It is assumed that the axisymmetric flow may be modeled by making the Boussinesq and deep convection approximations. The hydrostatic assumption is not made, thus permitting the advective terms to be included in the vertical equation of motion. The initial set of five primitive equations is reduced to three equations in terms of the zonal velocity, meridional streamfunction, and the potential temperature perturbation. The application of the Boussinesq, deep convection, and quasi-geostrophic assumptions limits the ranges of the heating and rotation rates. For values not too far from typical atmospheric values, the model produces a stability boundary separating Hadley from Rossby flow. The boundary is characterized by a particular value of vertical wind shear, which suggests that baroclinic instability is the primary mechanism for the loss of stability. The initial growth rates are largest for longitudinal waves 4-7, also in agreement with studies of baroclinic instability.

  12. Experimental and Numerical Investigation of Vortical Structures in Lean Premixed Swirl-Stabilized Combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taamallah, Soufien; Chakroun, Nadim; Shanbhogue, Santosh; Kewlani, Gaurav; Ghoniem, Ahmed

    2015-11-01

    A combined experimental and LES investigation is performed to identify the origin of major flow dynamics and vortical structures in a model gas turbine's swirl-stabilized turbulent combustor. Swirling flows in combustion lead to the formation of complex flow dynamics and vortical structures that can interact with flames and influence its stabilization. Our experimental results for non-reacting flow show the existence of large scale precession motion. The precessing vortex core (PVC) dynamics disappears with combustion but only above a threshold of equivalence ratio. In addition, large scale vortices along the inner shear layer (ISL) are observed. These structures interact with the ISL stabilized flame and contribute to its wrinkling. Next, the LES setup is validated against the flow field's low-order statistics and point temperature measurement in relevant areas of the chamber. Finally, we show that LES is capable of predicting the precession motion as well as the ISL vortices in the reacting case: we find that ISL vortices originate from a vortex core that is formed right downstream of the swirler's centerbody. The vortex core has a conical spiral shape resembling a corkscrew that interacts - as it winds out - with the flame when it reaches the ISL.

  13. Numerical Analysis of Large Telescopes in Terms of Induced Loads and Resulting Geometrical Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upnere, S.; Jekabsons, N.; Joffe, R.

    2013-03-01

    Comprehensive numerical studies, involving structural and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis, have been carried out at the Engineering Research Institute "Ventspils International Radio Astron- omy Center" (VIRAC) of the Ventspils University College to investigate the gravitational and wind load effects on large, ground-based radio tele- scopes RT-32 performance. Gravitational distortions appear to be the main limiting factor for the reflector performance in everyday operation. Random loads caused by wind gusts (unavoidable at zenith) contribute to the fatigue accumulation.

  14. Individual differences in children's mathematics achievement: The roles of symbolic numerical magnitude processing and domain-general cognitive functions.

    PubMed

    Vanbinst, K; De Smedt, B

    2016-01-01

    This contribution reviewed the available evidence on the domain-specific and domain-general neurocognitive determinants of children's arithmetic development, other than nonsymbolic numerical magnitude processing, which might have been overemphasized as a core factor of individual differences in mathematics and dyscalculia. We focused on symbolic numerical magnitude processing, working memory, and phonological processing, as these determinants have been most researched and their roles in arithmetic can be predicted against the background of brain imaging data. Our review indicates that symbolic numerical magnitude processing is a major determinant of individual differences in arithmetic. Working memory, particularly the central executive, also plays a role in learning arithmetic, but its influence appears to be dependent on the learning stage and experience of children. The available evidence on phonological processing suggests that it plays a more subtle role in children's acquisition of arithmetic facts. Future longitudinal studies should investigate these factors in concert to understand their relative contribution as well as their mediating and moderating roles in children's arithmetic development. PMID:27339010

  15. Slope stability analysis for Valles Marineris, Mars: a numerical analysis of controlling conditions and failure types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosta, G.; Castellanza, R.; De Blasio, F.; Utili, S.

    2012-04-01

    Valles Marineris (VM hereafter) in the equatorial area of Mars exhibits several gravitative failures often involving the whole 6-8 km thickness of the valley walls. The failures have resulted in a series of long-runout landslides up to several hundred cubic kilometres in volume (Quantin et al., 2004), and the formation of sub-circular alcoves perched on the top. Several questions arise as to forces at play in the stability of the walls of VM, the geometrical shape of the alcoves and the shape and long-runout of the landslides (see for example Lucas et al., 2011). In this work, we concentrate on the stability analysis of the walls of VM with two precise questions in mind starting from past studies (Bigot-Cormier and Montgomery, 2006; Neuffer and Schultz, 2006, Schultz, 2002). The first concerns the properties of the materials that give origin to instability. We performed several finite element and discrete element calculations tailored to slope stability analysis based on the genuine shape of the walls of VM taken from the MOLA topographic data. We considered stratified and differently altered/degraded materials to define the range of physical mechanical properties required for failure to occur and to explain the discrete distribution of failures along the VM valley flanks. A second question addressed in this work is the geometrical shape of the sub-circular alcoves. Normally, these shapes are commonplace for slopes made of uniform and isotropic properties, and are also observed in subaqueous environment. We performed calculations taking into consideration the progressive failure in the slope showing the final results in terms of surface failure geometry. Bigot-Cormier, F., Montgomery, D.R. (2007) Valles Marineris landslides: Evidence for a strength limit to Martian relief? Earth and Planetary Science Letters, 260, 1-2, 15, 179-186 Lucas, A., Mangeney, A., Mège, D., and Bouchut, F., 2011. Influence of the scar geometry on landslide dynamics and deposits

  16. Numerical assessment of efficiency and control stability of an HTS synchronous motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xian, Wei; Yuan, Weijia; Coombs, T. A.

    2010-06-01

    A high temperature superconducting (HTS) permanent magnet synchronous motor (PMSM) is designed and developed in Cambridge University. It is expected to become cost competitive with the conventional PMSM owing to its high efficiency, high power density, high torque density, etc. The structure and parameters of HTS PMSM are detailed. Both AC losses by transport current and applied filed in stator armature winding of HTS PMSM are also analyzed. Computed and simulated results of the characteristics of the HTS PMSM and conventional PMSM are compared. The improvement on stability of direct torque control (DTC) on the HTS PMSM is estimated, and proved by simulation on Matlab/Simulink.

  17. A novel numerical approach and stability analysis of thermo-acoustic phenomenon in the Rijke tube problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayadi, Taraneh; Le Chenadec, Vincent; Schmid, Peter; Richecoeur, Franck; Massot, Marc

    2013-11-01

    The modeling of thermo-acoustic coupling in reactive flows represents a challenging task. In this study, we focus on the Rijke tube problem, which includes relevant features such as a compact acoustic source, an empirical modeling of the heat source, and non-linearities. This thermo-acoustic system features a complex dynamical behavior, which renders the characterization of the different encountered flow regimes difficult. In order to synthesize accurate time series, we tackle this problem from a numerical point-of-view, and start by proposing a dedicated solver designed for dealing with the underlying stiffness, in particular, the retarded time and the discontinuity at the location of the heat source. Convergence and parametric studies are carried out to assess the accuracy of the discretization, hence laying a foundation for a stability analysis of the semi-discrete system. This stability analysis is performed by means of the projection method proposed by Jarlebring, which alleviates the linearization of the retarded term, and is used to validate the numerical results. Finally, the focus is set on the application of the dynamic mode decomposition technique to study bifurcations.

  18. A numerical study of the thermal stability of low-lying coronal loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klimchuk, J. A.; Antiochos, S. K.; Mariska, J. T.

    1986-01-01

    The nonlinear evolution of loops that are subjected to a variety of small but finite perturbations was studied. Only the low-lying loops are considered. The analysis was performed numerically using a one-dimensional hydrodynamical model developed at the Naval Research Laboratory. The computer codes solve the time-dependent equations for mass, momentum, and energy transport. The primary interest is the active region filaments, hence a geometry appropriate to those structures was considered. The static solutions were subjected to a moderate sized perturbation and allowed to evolve. The results suggest that both hot and cool loops of the geometry considered are thermally stable against amplitude perturbations of all kinds.

  19. Development and stability of bed forms: a numerical analysis of dune pattern coarsening and giant dunes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xin; Narteau, Clement; Rozier, Olivier

    2015-04-01

    We investigate the development and stability of transverse dunes for ranges of flow depths and velocities using a cellular automaton dune model. Subsequent to the initial bed instability, dune pattern coarsening is driven by bed form interactions. Collisions lead to two types of coalescence associated with upstream or downstream dominant dunes. In addition, a single collision-ejection mechanism enhances the exchange of mass between two consecutive bed forms (through-passing dunes). The power-law increases in wavelength and amplitude exhibit the same exponents, which are independent of flow properties. Contrary to the wavelength, dune height is not only limited by flow depth but also by the strength of the flow. Superimposed bedforms may propagate and continuously destabilize the largest dunes. Then, we identify three classes of steady-state transverse dune fields according to the periodicity in crest-to-crest spacing and the mechanism of size limitation. In all cases, the steady state is reached when the bed shear stress in the dune trough regions is close to its critical value for motion inception. Such a critical shear stress value is reached and maintained through the dynamic equilibrium between flow strength and dune aspect ratio. Comparisons with natural dune fields show that many of them may have reached such a steady state. Finally, we infer that the sedimentary patterns in the model may be used to bring new constraints on the stability of modern and ancient dune fields.

  20. Convective flows generated by evaporation: experiments, linear stability analysis and numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunstan, Jocelyn; Lee, Kyoung Jin; Park, Simon; Goldstein, Raymond E.

    A novel form of convection was observed in a suspension of non-motile Photobacterium phosphoreum bacteria. The pattern resembles classical bioconvection, however this strain has limited if any motility, which excludes this possible explanation. After performing a series of control experiments we found that the convection was actually driven by the evaporation of the salty bacterial medium, and the same kind of plumes were observed using polystyrene beads suspended in water with salt added. A mathematical model was formulated for the process and studied using a linear stability analysis and finite element method simulations, reproducing most of the observed experimental features. From the linear stability analysis, a threshold in salt concentration to observe convective motion was obtained, as well as the wavelength of the pattern at the onset of the instability. This was complemented by finite element simulations, which produced plume dynamics remarkably similar to the experimental observations. Evaporation-driven convection on the millimeter scale has not been studied extensively, and its effect may have been underestimated in other experiments.

  1. Numerical prediction of turbulent flame stability in premixed/prevaporized (HSCT) combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winowich, Nicholas S.

    1990-01-01

    A numerical analysis of combustion instabilities that induce flashback in a lean, premixed, prevaporized dump combustor is performed. KIVA-II, a finite volume CFD code for the modeling of transient, multidimensional, chemically reactive flows, serves as the principal analytical tool. The experiment of Proctor and T'ien is used as a reference for developing the computational model. An experimentally derived combustion instability mechanism is presented on the basis of the observations of Proctor and T'ien and other investigators of instabilities in low speed (M less than 0.1) dump combustors. The analysis comprises two independent procedures that begin from a calculated stable flame: The first is a linear increase of the equivalence ratio and the second is the linear decrease of the inflow velocity. The objective is to observe changes in the aerothermochemical features of the flow field prior to flashback. It was found that only the linear increase of the equivalence ratio elicits a calculated flashback result. Though this result did not exhibit large scale coherent vortices in the turbulent shear layer coincident with a flame flickering mode as was observed experimentally, there were interesting acoustic effects which were resolved quite well in the calculation. A discussion of the k-e turbulence model used by KIVA-II is prompted by the absence of combustion instabilities in the model as the inflow velocity is linearly decreased. Finally, recommendations are made for further numerical analysis that may improve correlation with experimentally observed combustion instabilities.

  2. Numerical simulation of a crack in the cement stabilized stone using cohesive zone models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jing-hui; Wang, Duan-yi

    2008-11-01

    Reflective cracking arising from cracks in base materials has been a major distress of semi-rigid asphalt concrete road. Previous studies in base mixture cracking have typically considered the materials homogeneity. Adopting Digital Image Processing techniques and Finite Element Method, in the micro scale, the cement and aggregates are treated as distinct materials with different materials parameters. The potential crack zones are simulated by Cohesive Zone Model. The initiation and propagation of the crack in the cylindrical specimen under conventional Indirect Tensile Test (IDT) are modeled. The numerical results from the micromechanical analysis match well with the results from the macro experiment. Even though this study only presented a attempt to a numerical simulation of a simple IDT test, the theory and methods adopted by this study can be applied to the fatigue damage scenario under complicated loading conditions including material heterogeneity. It effectively allows researchers to link the micro-scale damage observed on the local scale with the real pavements failing on the global scale.

  3. Numerical proof of stability of roll waves in the small-amplitude limit for inclined thin film flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, Blake

    2014-10-01

    We present a rigorous numerical proof based on interval arithmetic computations categorizing the linearized and nonlinear stability of periodic viscous roll waves of the KdV-KS equation modeling weakly unstable flow of a thin fluid film on an incline in the small-amplitude KdV limit. The argument proceeds by verification of a stability condition derived by Bar-Nepomnyashchy and Johnson-Noble-Rodrigues-Zumbrun involving inner products of various elliptic functions arising through the KdV equation. One key point in the analysis is a bootstrap argument balancing the extremely poor sup norm bounds for these functions against the extremely good convergence properties for analytic interpolation in order to obtain a feasible computation time. Another is the way of handling analytic interpolation in several variables by a two-step process carving up the parameter space into manageable pieces for rigorous evaluation. These and other general aspects of the analysis should serve as blueprints for more general analyses of spectral stability.

  4. Numerical analysis of two-ring flame stabilizer flows in aircraft afterburners

    SciTech Connect

    Ravichandran, M.; Ganesan, V.; Sampath, S.

    1995-07-01

    A computational procedure is described for the calculation of isothermal flow fields of two-ring flame stabilizers in practical afterburners and also for the reacting flow parameters in a research afterburner. The predictions have been obtained using a finite volume solution procedure for the steady three-dimensional elliptic equations of fluid flow. The physical models include the {kappa}-{epsilon} turbulence model, eddy breakup model, two-step reaction model, droplet vaporization and combustion model, and six-flux radiation model. The presence of radial gutters and staggering the distance between two-ring gutters alter the afterburner flow patterns considerably, including the elimination of diffuser stall and flow separation losses near the diffuser. The predicted and measured emissions in the research afterburner geometry agree qualitatively. The effect of the fuel to air ratio and location of the fuel injector on the temperature and species concentration distribution are presented in detail.

  5. Numerical Simulations of the Onset and Stability of Dynamical Mass Transfer in Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Souza, Mario C. R.; Motl, Patrick M.; Tohline, Joel E.; Frank, Juhan

    2006-05-01

    Hydrodynamical simulations of semidetached, polytropic binary stars are presented in an effort to study the onset and stability of dynamical mass transfer events. Initial, synchronously rotating equilibrium models are constructed using a self-consistent field technique and then evolved with an Eulerian hydrodynamics code in a fully self-consistent manner. We describe code improvements introduced over the past few years that permit us to follow dynamical mass transfer events through more than 30 orbits. Mass transfer evolutions are presented for two different initial configurations: a dynamically unstable binary with initial mass ratio (donor/accretor) q0=1.3 that leads to a complete merger in ~10 orbits, and a double-degenerate binary with initial mass ratio q0=0.5 that, after some initial unstable growth of mass transfer, tends to separate as the mass transfer rate levels off.

  6. Experimental and numerical investigation on the motorcycle front frame flexibility and its effect on stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cossalter, V.; Doria, A.; Massaro, M.; Taraborrelli, L.

    2015-08-01

    It is well known that front fork flexibility may have a significant effect on motorcycle stability. This work addresses the problem of developing lumped element models of the front fork from experimental results. The front forks of an enduro motorcycle and of a super sport motorcycle are characterized performing static, dynamic and modal tests by means of specific testing equipment. The concept of wheel twisting axis is proposed to characterize static and dynamic deformability of the front fork. Modal analysis results show the presence of two important modes of vibration of the front assembly in the low frequency range: the lateral mode and the longitudinal mode. Different lumped models are discussed and a new model that takes into account information obtained from static and dynamic tests is proposed. Simulations are carried out by means of a multibody code and show the effect of the front assembly deformability on the weave and wobble vibration modes.

  7. A numerical and analytical study of nonlinear bifurcations associated with the morphological stability of two-dimensional single crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brush, L. N.; Mcfadden, G. B.; Sekerka, R. F.

    1990-01-01

    The nonlinear stability of a two-dimensional single crystal of pure material in an undercooled melt is studied both analytically and numerically. The quasi-steady state approximation is used for the thermal fields, and the effects of different solid and liquid thermal conductivities, isotropic interfacial growth kinetics, and isotropic surface tension are included. The bifurcation analysis is performed by calculating the instantaneous value of the fundamental component of the local normal growth speed for an interface perturbed by a single Fourier shape component. Numerically, the fundamental component of the interfacial growth speed is found by Fourier analysis of the solution to an integrodifferential equation obeyed at the interface. Analytically, an expansion technique is used to derive a solvability condition defining each of these bifurcation points. The analytical and numerical results are in very close agreement. Almost all of the bifurcations are subcritical, and the results are presented by giving values of the Landau coefficient as a function of the different dimensionless parameters used in the model.

  8. A numerical study of the stability of radiative shocks. [in accretion flows onto white dwarf stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imamura, J. N.; Wolff, M. T.; Durisen, R. H.

    1984-01-01

    Attention is given to the oscillatory instability of optically thin radiative shocks in time-dependent numerical calculations of accretion flows onto degenerate dwarfs. The present nonlinear calculations yield good quantitative agreement with the linear results obtained for oscillation frequencies, damping rates, and critical alpha-values. The fundamental mode and the first overtone in the shock radius and luminosity variations can be clearly identified, and evidence is sometimes seen for the second overtone. Time-dependent calculations are also performed which include additional physics relevant to degenerate dwarf accretion, such as electron thermal conduction, unequal electron and ion temperatures, Compton cooling, and relativistic corrections to the bremsstrahlung cooling law. All oscillatory modes are found to be damped, and hence stable, in the case of a 1-solar mass white dwarf accreting in spherical symmetry.

  9. Stabilizing coherence with nested environments: a numerical study using kicked Ising models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Gutiérrez, C.; Villaseñor, E.; Pineda, C.; Seligman, T. H.

    2016-08-01

    We study a tripartite system of coupled spins, where a first set of one or two spins is our central system which is coupled to another set considered, the near environment, in turn coupled to the third set, the far environment. The dynamics considered are those of a generalized kicked spin chain in the regime of quantum chaotic dynamics. This allows us to test recent results that suggest that the presence of a far environment, coupled to the near environment, slows decoherence of the central system. After an extensive numerical study, we confirm previous results for extreme values and special cases. In particular, under a wide variety of circumstances an increasing coupling between near and far environment, slows decoherence, as measured by purity, and protects internal entanglement.

  10. A numerical study of a marine subtropical stratus cloud layer and its stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moeng, C.-H.; Arakawa, A.

    1980-01-01

    A model for numerical simulation of stratus cloud layers is constructed by combining a second-order closure, turbulent transfer model with a thermal radiative transfer model. The turbulent transfer model allows water vapor saturation. The combined turbulence-radiation model is applied to both a horizontally uniform one-dimensional case and a horizontally nonuniform two-dimensional case. In the latter, the dynamics of mesoscale circulations are also incorporated. Results of the two-dimensional simulation show that the layer cloud instability occurs where the sea surface temperature is high and the large-scale subsidence is weak. The simulated instability is analyzed in view of an instability criterion, the eddy kinetic energy budget, and evaporative cooling near the cloud top.

  11. The stability of Taylor bubbles in large-diameter tubes: direct numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhanjal, Amanjalot; Saravan-Butler, Maya; Smith, Sydney; Yang, Junfeng; Matar, Omar

    2015-11-01

    Slug flow corresponds to intermittent Taylor bubbles and liquid slugs, and is widely observed in the oil-and-gas industry. The fluctuating flow rate caused by Taylor bubbles is problematical; thus, the destabilisation of this regime would be beneficial. To gain better understanding of this regime in vertical tubes, three-dimensional CFD simulations of Taylor air bubble rise in initially stagnant water and progressively larger diameter tubes, are carried out. Tubes with diameters in the range of 0.032m-0.290m and a height of 2m are considered. The topology of the Taylor bubbles and their rise velocity are predicted and validated against experimental results. Our results suggest that the wake of leading bubbles plays a key role in the deformation and break-up of trailing bubbles. Motivated by these results, the effect of bubble separation distance, and aspect ratio, on bubble stability and the slug flow regime is investigated. EPSRC Programme Grant, MEMPHIS, EP/K0039761/1.

  12. Theoretical Hill-type muscle and stability: numerical model and application.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, S; Günther, M; Rupp, T; Bayer, A; Häufle, D

    2013-01-01

    The construction of artificial muscles is one of the most challenging developments in today's biomedical science. The application of artificial muscles is focused both on the construction of orthotics and prosthetics for rehabilitation and prevention purposes and on building humanoid walking machines for robotics research. Research in biomechanics tries to explain the functioning and design of real biological muscles and therefore lays the fundament for the development of functional artificial muscles. Recently, the hyperbolic Hill-type force-velocity relation was derived from simple mechanical components. In this contribution, this theoretical yet biomechanical model is transferred to a numerical model and applied for presenting a proof-of-concept of a functional artificial muscle. Additionally, this validated theoretical model is used to determine force-velocity relations of different animal species that are based on the literature data from biological experiments. Moreover, it is shown that an antagonistic muscle actuator can help in stabilising a single inverted pendulum model in favour of a control approach using a linear torque generator. PMID:24319495

  13. Theoretical Hill-Type Muscle and Stability: Numerical Model and Application

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, S.; Günther, M.; Rupp, T.; Bayer, A.; Häufle, D.

    2013-01-01

    The construction of artificial muscles is one of the most challenging developments in today's biomedical science. The application of artificial muscles is focused both on the construction of orthotics and prosthetics for rehabilitation and prevention purposes and on building humanoid walking machines for robotics research. Research in biomechanics tries to explain the functioning and design of real biological muscles and therefore lays the fundament for the development of functional artificial muscles. Recently, the hyperbolic Hill-type force-velocity relation was derived from simple mechanical components. In this contribution, this theoretical yet biomechanical model is transferred to a numerical model and applied for presenting a proof-of-concept of a functional artificial muscle. Additionally, this validated theoretical model is used to determine force-velocity relations of different animal species that are based on the literature data from biological experiments. Moreover, it is shown that an antagonistic muscle actuator can help in stabilising a single inverted pendulum model in favour of a control approach using a linear torque generator. PMID:24319495

  14. Stability of submarine slopes in the northern South China Sea: a numerical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Liang; Luan, Xiwu

    2013-01-01

    Submarine landslides occur frequently on most continental margins. They are effective mechanisms of sediment transfer but also a geological hazard to seafloor installations. In this paper, submarine slope stability is evaluated using a 2D limit equilibrium method. Considerations of slope, sediment, and triggering force on the factor of safety (FOS) were calculated in drained and undrained ( Φ=0) cases. Results show that submarine slopes are stable when the slope is <16° under static conditions and without a weak interlayer. With a weak interlayer, slopes are stable at <18° in the drained case and at <9° in the undrained case. Earthquake loading can drastically reduce the shear strength of sediment with increased pore water pressure. The slope became unstable at >13° with earthquake peak ground acceleration (PGA) of 0.5 g; whereas with a weak layer, a PGA of 0.2 g could trigger instability at slopes >10°, and >3° for PGA of 0.5 g. The northern slope of the South China Sea is geomorphologically stable under static conditions. However, because of the possibility of high PGA at the eastern margin of the South China Sea, submarine slides are likely on the Taiwan Bank slope and eastern part of the Dongsha slope. Therefore, submarine slides recognized in seismic profiles on the Taiwan Bank slope would be triggered by an earthquake, the most important factor for triggering submarine slides on the northern slope of the South China Sea. Considering the distribution of PGA, we consider the northern slope of the South China Sea to be stable, excluding the Taiwan Bank slope, which is tectonically active.

  15. Numerical studies on convective stability and flow pattern in three-dimensional spherical mantle of terrestrial planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagisawa, Takatoshi; Kameyama, Masanori; Ogawa, Masaki

    2016-06-01

    We explore thermal convection of a fluid with a temperature-dependent viscosity in a basally heated three-dimensional spherical shell using linear stability analyses and numerical experiments, while considering the application of our results to terrestrial planets. The inner to outer radius ratio of the shell f assumed in the linear stability analyses is in the range of 0.11-0.88. The critical Rayleigh number Rc for the onset of thermal convection decreases by two orders of magnitude as f increases from 0.11 to 0.88, when the viscosity depends sensitively on the temperature, as is the case for real mantle materials. Numerical simulations carried out in the range of f = 0.11-0.55 show that a thermal boundary layer (TBL) develops both along the surface and bottom boundaries to induce cold and hot plumes, respectively, when f is 0.33 or larger. However, for smaller f values, a TBL develops only on the bottom boundary. Convection occurs in the stagnant-lid regime where the root mean square velocity on the surface boundary is less than 1% of its maximum at depth, when the ratio of the viscosity at the surface boundary to that at the bottom boundary exceeds a threshold that depends on f. The threshold decreases from 106.5 at f = 0.11 to 104 at f = 0.55. If the viscosity at the base of the convecting mantle is 1020-1021 Pa s, the Rayleigh number exceeds Rc for Mars, Venus and the Earth, but does not for the Moon and Mercury; convection is unlikely to occur in the latter planets unless the mantle viscosity is much lower than 1020 Pa s and/or the mantle contains a strong internal heat source.

  16. Stability Assessment of the Gökgöl Karstic Cave (Zonguldak, Turkey) by Analytical and Numerical Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geniş, Melih; Çolak, Berdan

    2015-11-01

    Turkey has many cave formations and some caves are important tourist attractions. Theses caves have natural and historical characteristics that need to be investigated and protected. An important rock engineering topic is the identification of possible rock falls and collapses in caves that are open to the public and planning preventive measures. In this study, the locations and types of instability problems were identified along a section of 875 m of the Gökgöl cave in Zonguldak, Turkey. The main instabilities were identified as block falls controlled by discontinuities, rock block sliding, and flexural toppling. To obtain the intact rock and rock mass properties of the stratified limestone which is the host rock of the cave, field and laboratory studies were conducted. Stability assessments for four different sections inside the cave were carried out using numerical and analytical methods, and the results were compared. The results of the analyses revealed that some countermeasures and precautions must be implemented to increase the stability in some areas of the Gökgöl cave, especially those which have potential for regional failure.

  17. Numerical slope stability simulations of chasma walls in Valles Marineris/Mars using a distinct element method (dem).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imre, B.

    2003-04-01

    NUMERICAL SLOPE STABILITY SIMULATIONS OF CHASMA WALLS IN VALLES MARINERIS/MARS USING A DISTINCT ELEMENT METHOD (DEM). B. Imre (1) (1) German Aerospace Center, Berlin Adlershof, bernd.imre@gmx.net The 8- to 10-km depths of Valles Marineris (VM) offer excellent views into the upper Martian crust. Layering, fracturing, lithology, stratigraphy and the content of volatiles have influenced the evolution of the Valles Marineris wallslopes. But these parameters also reflect the development of VM and its wall slopes. The scope of this work is to gain understanding in these parameters by back-simulating the development of wall slopes. For that purpose, the two dimensional Particle Flow Code PFC2D has been chosen (ITASCA, version 2.00-103). PFC2D is a distinct element code for numerical modelling of movements and interactions of assemblies of arbitrarily sized circular particles. Particles may be bonded together to represent a solid material. Movements of particles are unlimited. That is of importance because results of open systems with numerous unknown variables are non-unique and therefore highly path dependent. This DEM allows the simulation of whole development paths of VM walls what makes confirmation of the model more complete (e.g. Oreskes et al., Science 263, 1994). To reduce the number of unknown variables a proper (that means as simple as possible) field-site had to be selected. The northern wall of eastern Candor Chasma has been chosen. This wall is up to 8-km high and represents a significant outcrop of the upper Martian crust. It is quite uncomplex, well-aligned and of simple morphology. Currently the work on the model is at the stage of performing the parameter study. Results will be presented via poster by the EGS-Meeting.

  18. A Combined Remote Sensing-Numerical Modelling Approach to the Stability Analysis of Delabole Slate Quarry, Cornwall, UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havaej, Mohsen; Coggan, John; Stead, Doug; Elmo, Davide

    2016-04-01

    Rock slope geometry and discontinuity properties are among the most important factors in realistic rock slope analysis yet they are often oversimplified in numerical simulations. This is primarily due to the difficulties in obtaining accurate structural and geometrical data as well as the stochastic representation of discontinuities. Recent improvements in both digital data acquisition and incorporation of discrete fracture network data into numerical modelling software have provided better tools to capture rock mass characteristics, slope geometries and digital terrain models allowing more effective modelling of rock slopes. Advantages of using improved data acquisition technology include safer and faster data collection, greater areal coverage, and accurate data geo-referencing far exceed limitations due to orientation bias and occlusion. A key benefit of a detailed point cloud dataset is the ability to measure and evaluate discontinuity characteristics such as orientation, spacing/intensity and persistence. This data can be used to develop a discrete fracture network which can be imported into the numerical simulations to study the influence of the stochastic nature of the discontinuities on the failure mechanism. We demonstrate the application of digital terrestrial photogrammetry in discontinuity characterization and distinct element simulations within a slate quarry. An accurately geo-referenced photogrammetry model is used to derive the slope geometry and to characterize geological structures. We first show how a discontinuity dataset, obtained from a photogrammetry model can be used to characterize discontinuities and to develop discrete fracture networks. A deterministic three-dimensional distinct element model is then used to investigate the effect of some key input parameters (friction angle, spacing and persistence) on the stability of the quarry slope model. Finally, adopting a stochastic approach, discrete fracture networks are used as input for 3D

  19. Steric repulsion as a way to achieve the required stability for the preparation of ionic liquid-based ferrofluids.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Arco, Laura; López-López, Modesto T; González-Caballero, Fernando; Durán, Juan D G

    2011-05-01

    With this work we would like to emphasize the necessity of steric repulsion to stabilize novel ionic liquid-based ferrofluids. For this purpose, we prepared a suspension of magnetite nanoparticles coated with a double layer of oleic acid, dispersed in 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium ethylsulphate ([EMIM][EtSO(4)]). For comparison, a suspension of bare magnetite nanoparticles in [EMIM][EtSO(4)] was also prepared. The stability of these suspensions was checked by magnetic sedimentation and centrifugation processes. Furthermore, their yield stress was measured as a function of the applied magnetic field, which gave additional information on their stability. The results of these experiments showed that the suspension of bare nanoparticles was rather unstable, whereas the suspension of double layer coated nanoparticles gave rise to a true (stable) ferrofluid. PMID:21345446

  20. A Longitudinal Study of Reading Comprehension Achievement from Grades 3 to 10: Investigating Models of Stability, Cumulative Growth, and Compensation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kwiatkowska-White, Bozena; Kirby, John R.; Lee, Elizabeth A.

    2016-01-01

    This longitudinal study of 78 Canadian English-speaking students examined the applicability of the stability, cumulative, and compensatory models in reading comprehension development. Archival government-mandated assessments of reading comprehension at Grades 3, 6, and 10, and the Canadian Test of Basic Skills measure of reading comprehension…

  1. Experimental and numerical analysis of the influence of tyres' properties on the straight running stability of a sport-touring motorcycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cossalter, Vittore; Doria, Alberto; Formentini, Matteo; Peretto, Martino

    2012-03-01

    The behaviour of a motorcycle on the road is largely governed by tyre properties. This paper presents experimental and numerical analyses dealing with the influence of tyre properties on the stability of weave and wobble in straight running. The final goal is to find optimal sets of tyre properties that improve the stability of a motorcycle. The investigation is based on road tests carried out on a sport-touring motorcycle equipped with sensors. Three sets of tyres are tested at different speeds in the presence of weave and wobble. The analysis of telemetry data highlights significant differences in the trends of frequency and damping of weave and wobble against speed. The experimental analysis is integrated by a parametric numerical analysis. Tyre properties are varied according to the design of experiments method, in order to highlight the single effects on stability of lateral and cornering coefficient of front and rear tyres.

  2. Evaluating the Effect of Rainfall Infiltration on the Slope Stability of T16 tower of Taipei Mao-kong Gondola by Numerical Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    RUNG, J.

    2013-12-01

    In this study, a series of rainfall-stability analyses were performed to simulate the failure mechanism and the function of remediation works of the down slope of T-16 tower pier, Mao-Kong gondola (or T-16 Slope) at the hillside of Taipei City using two-dimensional finite element method. The failure mechanism of T-16 Slope was simulated using the rainfall hyetograph of Jang-Mi typhoon in 2008 based on the field investigation data, monitoring data, soil/rock mechanical testing data and detail design plots of remediation works. Eventually, the numerical procedures and various input parameters in the analysis were verified by comparing the numerical results with the field observations. In addition, 48 hrs design rainfalls corresponding to 5, 10, 25 and 50 years return periods were prepared using the 20 years rainfall data of Mu-Zha rainfall observation station, Central Weather Bureau for the rainfall-stability analyses of T-16 Slope to inspect the effect of the compound stabilization works on the overall stability of the slope. At T-16 Slope, without considering the longitudinal and transverse drainages on the ground surface, there totally 4 types of stabilization works were installed to stabilize the slope. From the slope top to the slope toe, the stabilization works of T-16 Slope consists of RC-retaining wall with micro-pile foundation at the up-segment, earth anchor at the up-middle-segment, soil nailing at the middle-segment and retaining pile at the down-segment of the slope. The effect of each individual stabilization work on the slope stability under rainfall condition was examined and evaluated by raising field groundwater level.

  3. Spatial and temporal variations of glacial erosion in the European Alps: numerical models and implications for slope stability (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sternai, P.; Herman, F.; Willett, S.; Champagnac, J.; Fox, M.; Valla, P.; Salcher, B.

    2013-12-01

    Glacial erosion in alpine landscapes can be highly variable in space and time and lead to significant morphologic modification and mass redistribution at virtually all scales. Because they affect the near-surface stress and strain distribution by producing cyclic variations of the surface load, removing and abrading rocks, storing/releasing sediments and affecting the surface and subsurface hydrology, glaciations have multiple effects on slope stability. Understanding how glacial erosion evolves in space and time is thus important for investigating potential feedbacks between glacial erosion and deep-seated gravitational slope deformation (DSGSD). The present-day topography of the European Alps shows evidence of intense glacial erosion. However, significant questions regarding Alpine landscape evolution during glaciations still persist. For example, large-scale topographic analyses suggest that glacial erosion is maximized at and above the glaciers' long-term Equilibrium Line Altitude. In contrast, measurements of long-term denudation rates from low-temperature thermochronology and reconstructions of the pre-glacial Alpine topography suggest high erosion towards low altitudes and formation of overdeepnenings, in turn indicating an increase of local relief in response to glacial processes. Based on sediment record, low-temperature thermochronology and burial cosmogenic nuclide dating, it has also been proposed that the mid-Pleistocene climatic transition from symmetric, 40kyr to asymmetric, 100kyr glacial/interglacial oscillations sets the onset of intense glacial erosion within the Alps. However, this climate threshold in glacial erosion has not been showed in other orogens, and positive feedbacks between climate periodicity and glacial erosion efficiency still remain to be proven. Numerical modeling provides estimates of the patterns and magnitudes of glacial erosion through time. Modeling results on an advanced reconstruction of the pre-glacial topography and the

  4. Prediction of soil stability and erosion in semiarid regions using numerical hydrological model (MCAT) and airborne hyperspectral imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brook, Anna; Wittenberg, Lea

    2015-04-01

    promising models is the MCAT, which is a MATLAB library of visual and numerical analysis tools for the evaluation of hydrological and environmental models. The model applied in this paper presents an innovative infrastructural system for predicting soil stability and erosion impacts. This integrated model is applicable to mixed areas with spatially varying soil properties, landscape, and land-cover characteristics. Data from a semiarid site in southern Israel was used to evaluate the model and analyze fundamental erosion mechanisms. The findings estimate the sensitivity of the suggested model to the physical parameters and encourage the use of hyperspectral remote sensing imagery (HSI). The proposed model is integrated according to the following stages: 1. The soil texture, aggregation, soil moisture estimated via airborne HSI data, including soil surface clay and calcium carbonate erosions; 2. The mechanical stability of soil assessed via pedo-transfer function corresponding to load dependent changes in soil physical properties due to pre-compression stress (set of equations study shear strength parameters take into account soil texture, aggregation, soil moisture and ecological soil variables); 3. The precipitation-related runoff model program (RMP) satisfactorily reproduces the observed seasonal mean and variation of surface runoff for the current climate simulation; 4. The Monte Carlo Analysis Toolbox (MCAT), a library of visual and numerical analysis tools for the evaluation of hydrological and environmental models, is proposed as a tool for integrate all the approaches to an applicable model. The presented model overcomes the limitations of existing modeling methods by integrating physical data produced via HSI and yet stays generic in terms of space and time independency.

  5. Item Calibration Samples and the Stability of Achievement Estimates and System Rankings: Another Look at the PISA Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rutkowski, Leslie; Rutkowski, David; Zhou, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Using an empirically-based simulation study, we show that typically used methods of choosing an item calibration sample have significant impacts on achievement bias and system rankings. We examine whether recent PISA accommodations, especially for lower performing participants, can mitigate some of this bias. Our findings indicate that standard…

  6. The Stability of Teacher Effects on Student Math and Reading Achievement over Time: A Study of One Midsize District

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bessolo, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Increased attention on teacher accountability via student achievement gains has brought proposed policy changes which recommend teachers receive performance pay as recognition for effective teaching. In response to growing consensus that teachers' contributions to student learning should be a part of the teacher evaluation process, education…

  7. Influence of the fluoride ion in the stability of bone hydroxyapatite achieved in patients after the fluo-calcic therapy.

    PubMed

    Mongiorgi, R; Bertocchi, G; Gnudi, S; Maggi, G; Moroni, A; Coppola, G; Riva di Sanseverino, L

    1991-04-01

    It has been proposed that fluoride ion might actively enter into the basic structural framework of the bone, within its main constituent, the hydroxyapatite (HA), by substituting systematically the OH- ion in the crystal chemical formula Ca5[(PO4)3OH]. Accurate compositional studies have become necessary in order to explain an eventual stabilizing effect. Loss in weight (TG) and chemical reaction (DTG) while varying the temperature have been carried out for the first time on specimens under normal conditions and after fluo-calcic treatment, in parallel with accurate chemical compositional determinations by atomic absorption analysis. Our investigation shows that the new structure present after treatment is mechanically stable and proves more resistant to osteolytic processes. PMID:1910745

  8. Using interlayer step-wise triplet transfer to achieve an efficient white organic light-emitting diode with high color-stability

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Qi; Ma, Dongge Ding, Junqiao; Wang, Lixiang; Leo, Karl; Qiao, Qiquan; Jia, Huiping; Gnade, Bruce E.

    2014-05-12

    An efficient phosphorescent white organic light emitting-diode with a red-green-blue tri-emitting-layer structure is reported. The host of the red dopant possesses a lower triplet-energy than the green dye. An interlayer step-wise triplet transfer via blue dye → green dye → red host → red dye is achieved. This mechanism allows an efficient triplet harvesting by the three dopants, thus maintaining a balanced white light and reducing energy loss. Moreover, the color stability of the device is improved significantly. The white device not only achieves a peak external quantum efficiency of 21.1 ± 0.8% and power efficiency of 37.5 ± 1.4 lm/W but shows no color shift over a wide range of voltages.

  9. Numerical stability of an explicit finite difference scheme for the solution of transient conduction in composite media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, W.

    1981-01-01

    A theoretical evaluation of the stability of an explicit finite difference solution of the transient temperature field in a composite medium is presented. The grid points of the field are assumed uniformly spaced, and media interfaces are either vertical or horizontal and pass through grid points. In addition, perfect contact between different media (infinite interfacial conductance) is assumed. A finite difference form of the conduction equation is not valid at media interfaces; therefore, heat balance forms are derived. These equations were subjected to stability analysis, and a computer graphics code was developed that permitted determination of a maximum time step for a given grid spacing.

  10. Estimation of Geomechanical Deformation and Stability Change Due to Geologic Storage of Carbon Dioxide Using a Thermo-Hydro-Mechanical Numerical Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, S.; Kihm, J.; Kim, J.; SNU CO2 GEO-SEQ TEAM

    2011-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to quantitatively estimate groundwater and carbon dioxide flow and geomechanical deformation and stability changes due to geologic storage of carbon dioxide. A hypothetical layered aquifer system with alternation of sandstone and shale layers is set up considering geologic characteristics of the Sindong Group in the Gyeongsang Basin, Korea. A series of numerical simulations is then performed for 1,000 years of geologic storage of carbon dioxide including 10 years of carbon dioxide injection period with various injection rates using a multiphase thermo-hydro-mechanical numerical model. The numerical simulation results show that geomechanical deformation and stability change occur as the fluid pressure builds up mainly near the screen interval of the injection well, and the injection rate of carbon dioxide significantly influences geomechanical deformation and stability change. For the base case with the injection rate of 0.2 Mton/year, the safety factor with respect to tensile failure is reduced to about 2.0 near the screen interval of the injection well with a sudden increase of the fluid pressure in the early stage of the carbon dioxide injection period. Such geomechanical deformation and instability near the screen interval of the injection well are then reduced as the fluid pressure build-up propagates and diminishes outward from the injection well. The vertical displacement on the ground surface right above the injection well is maximal, and it is reduced as the horizontal distance from the injection well increases. In addition, the maximum vertical displacement on the ground surface right above the injection well increases almost linearly as the injection rate of carbon dioxide increases. The results of this study suggest that integrated thermo-hydro-mechanical numerical simulation is required when the stability of injection wells and surface injection facilities has to be ensured for geologic storage of carbon dioxide. This work

  11. Numerical investigation of CO{sub 2} emission and thermal stability of a convective and radiative stockpile of reactive material in a cylindrical pipe of variable thermal conductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Lebelo, Ramoshweu Solomon

    2014-10-24

    In this paper the CO{sub 2} emission and thermal stability in a long cylindrical pipe of combustible reactive material with variable thermal conductivity are investigated. It is assumed that the cylindrical pipe loses heat by both convection and radiation at the surface. The nonlinear differential equations governing the problem are tackled numerically using Runge-Kutta-Fehlberg method coupled with shooting technique method. The effects of various thermophysical parameters on the temperature and carbon dioxide fields, together with critical conditions for thermal ignition are illustrated and discussed quantitatively.

  12. A tabulated chemistry approach for numerical modeling of diesel spray evaporation in a 'stabilized cool flame' environment

    SciTech Connect

    Kolaitis, D.I.; Founti, M.A.

    2006-04-15

    Droplet evaporation in a 'stabilized cool flame' environment leads to a homogeneous, heated air-fuel vapor mixture that can be subsequently either burnt or utilized in fuel-reforming applications for fuel cell systems. The paper investigates the locally occurring physico-chemical phenomena in an atmospheric pressure, diesel spray, stabilized cool flame reactor, utilizing a tabulated chemistry approach in conjunction with a two-phase, Eulerian-Lagrangian computational fluid dynamics code. Actual diesel oil physical properties are used to model spray evaporation in the two-phase simulations, whereas the corresponding chemistry is represented by n-heptane. A lookup table is constructed by performing a plethora of perfectly stirred reactor simulations, utilizing a semidetailed n-heptane oxidation chemical kinetics mechanism. The overall exothermicity of the preignition n-heptane oxidation chemistry and the fuel consumption rates are examined as a function of selected independent parameters, namely temperature, fuel concentration, and residence time; their influence on cool flame reactivity is thoroughly studied. It is shown that the tabulated chemistry approach allows accurate investigation of the chemical phenomena with low computational cost. The two-phase flow inside the stabilized cool flame reactor is simulated, utilizing the developed lookup table. Predictions are presented for a variety of test cases and are compared to available experimental data, with satisfactory agreement. Model validation tests indicate that prediction quality improves with increasing values of air temperature at the reactor's inlet. (author)

  13. Mathematical modeling and numerical simulation of an actively stabilized beam-column with circular cross-section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaeffner, Maximilian; Enss, Georg C.; Platz, Roland

    2014-04-01

    Buckling of axially loaded beam-columns represents a critical design constraint for light-weight structures. Besides passive solutions to increase the critical buckling load, active buckling control provides a possibility to stabilize slender elements in structures. So far, buckling control by active forces or bending moments has been mostly investigated for beam-columns with rectangular cross-section and with a preferred direction of buckling. The proposed approach investigates active buckling control of a beam-column with circular solid cross-section which is fixed at its base and pinned at its upper end. Three controlled active lateral forces are applied near the fixed base with angles of 120° to each other to stabilize the beam-column and allow higher critical axial loads. The beam-column is subject to supercritical static axial loads and lateral disturbance forces with varying directions and offsets. Two independent modal state space systems are derived for the bending planes in the lateral y- and z-directions of the circular cross-section. These are used to design two linear-quadratic regulators (LQR) that determine the necessary control forces which are transformed into the directions of the active lateral forces. The system behavior is simulated with a finite element model using one-dimensional beam elements with six degrees of freedom at each node. With the implemented control, it is possible to actively stabilize a beam-column with circular cross-section in arbitrary buckling direction for axial loads significantly above the critical axial buckling load.

  14. A predictive numerical model for potential mapping of the gas hydrate stability zone in the Gulf of Cadiz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leon, R.; Somoza, L.

    2009-04-01

    This comunication presents a computational model for mapping the regional 3D distribution in which seafloor gas hydrates would be stable, that is carried out in a Geographical Information System (GIS) environment. The construction of the model is comprised of three primary steps, namely (1) the construction of surfaces for the various variables based on available 3D data (seafloor temperature, geothermal gradient and depth-pressure); (2) the calculation of the gas function equilibrium functions for the various hydrocarbon compositions reported from hydrate and sediment samples; and (3) the calculation of the thickness of the hydrate stability zone. The solution is based on a transcendental function, which is solved iteratively in a GIS environment. The model has been applied in the northernmost continental slope of the Gulf of Cadiz, an area where an abundant supply for hydrate formation, such as extensive hydrocarbon seeps, diapirs and fault structures, is combined with deep undercurrents and a complex seafloor morphology. In the Gulf of Cadiz, model depicts the distribution of the base of the gas hydrate stability zone for both biogenic and thermogenic gas compositions, and explains the geometry and distribution of geological structures derived from gas venting in the Tasyo Field (Gulf of Cadiz) and the generation of BSR levels on the upper continental slope.

  15. Evaluation of Rainfall Impacts on Groundwater Flow and Land Deformation in an Unsaturated Heterogeneous Slope and Slope Stability Using a Fully Coupled Hydrogeomechanical Numerical Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kihm, J.; Kim, J.

    2006-12-01

    A series of numerical simulations using a fully coupled hydrogeomechanical numerical model, which is named COWADE123D, is performed to analyze groundwater flow and land deformation in an unsaturated heterogeneous slope and its stability under various rainfall rates. The slope is located along a dam lake in Republic of Korea. The slope consists of the Cretaceous granodiorite and can be subdivided into the four layers such as weathered soil, weathered rock, intermediate rock, and hard rock from its ground surface due to weathering process. The numerical simulation results show that both rainfall rate and heterogeneity play important roles in controlling groundwater flow and land deformation in the unsaturated slope. The slope becomes more saturated, and thus its overall hydrogeomechanical stability deteriorates, especially in the weathered rock and weathered soil layers, as the rainfall increases up to the maximum daily rainfall rate in the return period of one year. However, the slope becomes fully saturated, and thus its hydrogeomechanical responses are almost identical under more than such a critical rainfall rate. From the viewpoint of hydrogeology, the pressure head, and hence the hydraulic head increase as the rainfall rate increases. As a result, the groundwater table rises, the unsaturated zone reduces, the seepage face expands from the slope toe toward the slope crest, and the groundwater flow velocity increases along the seepage face. Particularly, the groundwater flow velocity increases significantly in the weathered soil and weathered rock layers as the rainfall rate increases. This is because their hydraulic conductivity is relatively higher than that of the intermediate rock and hard rock layers. From the viewpoint of geomechanics, the horizontal displacement increases, while the vertical displacement decreases toward the slope toe as the rainfall rate increases. This may result from the buoyancy effect associated with the groundwater table rise as the

  16. Numerical analysis of stress distribution in Cu-stabilized GdBCO CC tapes during anvil tests for the evaluation of transverse delamination strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dizon, John Ryan C.; Gorospe, Alking B.; Shin, Hyung-Seop

    2014-05-01

    Rare-earth-Ba-Cu-O (REBCO) based coated conductors (CCs) are now being used for electric device applications. For coil-based applications such as motors, generators and magnets, the CC tape needs to have robust mechanical strength along both the longitudinal and transverse directions. The CC tape in these coils is subjected to transverse tensile stresses during cool-down and operation, which results in delamination within and between constituent layers. In this study, in order to explain the behaviour observed in the evaluation of c-axis delamination strength in Cu-stabilized GdBCO CC tapes by anvil tests, numerical analysis of the mechanical stress distribution within the CC tape has been performed. The upper anvil size was varied in the analysis to understand the effect of anvil size on stress distribution within the multilayered CC tape, which is closely related to the delamination strength, delamination mode and delamination sites that were experimentally observed. The numerical simulation results showed that, when an anvil size covering the whole tape width was used, the REBCO coating film was subjected to the largest stress, which could result in low mechanical delamination and electromechanical delamination strengths. Meanwhile, when smaller-sized anvils were used, the copper stabilizer layer would experience the largest stress among all the constituent layers of the CC tape, which could result in higher mechanical and electromechanical delamination strengths, as well as high scattering of both of these delamination strengths. As a whole, the numerical simulation results could explain the damage evolution observed in CC tapes tested under transverse tensile stress, as well as the transverse tensile stress response of the critical current, Ic.

  17. Three-dimensional direct numerical simulation of a turbulent lifted hydrogen jet flame in a heated coflow: flame stabilization and structure

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jackie; Sankaran, Ramanan; Yoo, Chun S

    2009-01-01

    Direct numerical simulation (DNS) of the near field of a three-dimensional spatially developing turbulent lifted hydrogen jet flame in heated coflow is performed with a detailed mechanism to determine the stabilization mechanism and the flame structure. The DNS was performed at a jet Reynolds number of 11,000 with over 940 million grid points. The results show that auto-ignition in a fuel-lean mixture at the flame base is the main source of stabilization of the lifted jet flame. A chemical flux analysis shows the occurrence of near-isothermal chemical chain branching preceding thermal runaway upstream of the stabilization point, indicative of hydrogen auto-ignition in the second limit. The Damkoehler number and key intermediate-species behaviour near the leading edge of the lifted flame also verify that auto-ignition occurs at the flame base. At the lifted-flame base, it is found that heat release occurs predominantly through ignition in which the gradients of reactants are opposed. Downstream of the flame base, both rich-premixed and non-premixed flames develop and coexist with auto-ignition. In addition to auto-ignition, Lagrangian tracking of the flame base reveals the passage of large-scale flow structures and their correlation with the fluctuations of the flame base. In particular, the relative position of the flame base and the coherent flow structure induces a cyclic motion of the flame base in the transverse and axial directions about a mean lift-off height. This is confirmed by Lagrangian tracking of key scalars, heat release rate and velocity at the stabilization point.

  18. Numerical studies of nitric oxide formation in nanosecond-pulsed discharge-stabilized flames of premixed methane/air.

    PubMed

    Bak, Moon Soo; Cappelli, Mark A

    2015-08-13

    A simulation is developed to investigate the kinetics of nitric oxide (NO) formation in premixed methane/air combustion stabilized by nanosecond-pulsed discharges. The simulation consists of two connected parts. The first part calculates the kinetics within the discharge while considering both plasma/combustion reactions and species diffusion, advection and thermal conduction to the surrounding flow. The second part calculates the kinetics of the overall flow after mixing the discharge flow with the surrounding flow to account for the effect that the discharge has on the overall kinetics. The simulation reveals that the discharge produces a significant amount of atomic oxygen (O) as a result of the high discharge temperature and dissociative quenching of excited state nitrogen by molecular oxygen. This atomic oxygen subsequently produces hydroxyl (OH) radicals. The fractions of these O and OH then undergo Zel'dovich reactions and are found to contribute to as much as 73% of the total NO that is produced. The post-discharge simulation shows that the NO survives within the flow once produced. PMID:26170428

  19. Spreading of a surfactant-laden droplet down an inclined and pre-wetted plane - Numerics, Asymptotics and Linear Stability Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goddard, Joseph

    2012-11-01

    Non-uniformities in surfactant concentration result in a surface shear stress, known as the Marangoni stress. This stress, if sufficiently large, can influence the flow at the interface. Naturally occurring surfactants in the mammalian lung reduce the surface tension within the liquid lining the airways and help to prevent collapse of smaller airways. Premature infants produce insufficient surfactant because the lungs are under developed. Resulting Respiratory Distress Syndrome is treated by Surfactant Replacement Therapy. Motivated by this medical application we theoretically investigate a model problem involving the spreading of a drop laden with an insoluble surfactant down an inclined and pre-wetted plane. Our focus is on understanding the mechanisms behind a ``fingering'' instability observed experimentally by high-resolution numerics revealing a multi-region asymptotic structure of the spreading droplet. Approximate solutions for each region are then derived using asymptotic analysis. In particular, a quasi-steady similarity solution is obtained for the leading edge of the droplet and a linear stability analysis shows that the base state is linearly unstable to long-wavelength perturbations for all inclination angles. The Marangoni effect is shown to be behind this instability at small inclination angles. A stability criterion is derived at small wave number and it's implication in the onset of the instability will be discussed.

  20. Validation of three-dimensional incompressible spatial direct numerical simulation code: A comparison with linear stability and parabolic stability equation theories for boundary-layer transition on a flat plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joslin, Ronald D.; Streett, Craig L.; Chang, Chau-Lyan

    1992-01-01

    Spatially evolving instabilities in a boundary layer on a flat plate are computed by direct numerical simulation (DNS) of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. In a truncated physical domain, a nonstaggered mesh is used for the grid. A Chebyshev-collocation method is used normal to the wall; finite difference and compact difference methods are used in the streamwise direction; and a Fourier series is used in the spanwise direction. For time stepping, implicit Crank-Nicolson and explicit Runge-Kutta schemes are used to the time-splitting method. The influence-matrix technique is used to solve the pressure equation. At the outflow boundary, the buffer-domain technique is used to prevent convective wave reflection or upstream propagation of information from the boundary. Results of the DNS are compared with those from both linear stability theory (LST) and parabolized stability equation (PSE) theory. Computed disturbance amplitudes and phases are in very good agreement with those of LST (for small inflow disturbance amplitudes). A measure of the sensitivity of the inflow condition is demonstrated with both LST and PSE theory used to approximate inflows. Although the DNS numerics are very different than those of PSE theory, the results are in good agreement. A small discrepancy in the results that does occur is likely a result of the variation in PSE boundary condition treatment in the far field. Finally, a small-amplitude wave triad is forced at the inflow, and simulation results are compared with those of LST. Again, very good agreement is found between DNS and LST results for the 3-D simulations, the implication being that the disturbance amplitudes are sufficiently small that nonlinear interactions are negligible.

  1. Symbolic generation of elastic rotor blade equations using a FORTRAN processor and numerical study on dynamic inflow effects on the stability of helicopter rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, T. S. R.

    1986-01-01

    The process of performing an automated stability analysis for an elastic-bladed helicopter rotor is discussed. A symbolic manipulation program, written in FORTRAN, is used to aid in the derivation of the governing equations of motion for the rotor. The blades undergo coupled bending and torsional deformations. Two-dimensional quasi-steady aerodynamics below stall are used. Although reversed flow effects are neglected, unsteady effects, modeled as dynamic inflow are included. Using a Lagrangian approach, the governing equations are derived in generalized coordinates using the symbolic program. The program generates the steady and perturbed equations and writes into subroutines to be called by numerical routines. The symbolic program can operate on both expressions and matrices. For the case of hovering flight, the blade and dynamic inflow equations are converted to equations in a multiblade coordinate system by rearranging the coefficients of the equations. For the case of forward flight, the multiblade equations are obtained through the symbolic program. The final multiblade equations are capable of accommodating any number of elastic blade modes. The computer implementation of this procedure consists of three stages: (1) the symbolic derivation of equations; (2) the coding of the equations into subroutines; and (3) the numerical study after identifying mass, damping, and stiffness coefficients. Damping results are presented in hover and in forward flight with and without dynamic inflow effects for various rotor blade models, including rigid blade lag-flap, elastic flap-lag, flap-lag-torsion, and quasi-static torsion. Results from dynamic inflow effects which are obtained from a lift deficiency function for a quasi-static inflow model in hover are also presented.

  2. Numerical Boundary Condition Procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Topics include numerical procedures for treating inflow and outflow boundaries, steady and unsteady discontinuous surfaces, far field boundaries, and multiblock grids. In addition, the effects of numerical boundary approximations on stability, accuracy, and convergence rate of the numerical solution are discussed.

  3. Slope stability and stabilization methods

    SciTech Connect

    Abramson, L.W.; Lee, T.S.; Boyce, G.M.; Sharma, S.S.

    1995-12-01

    Slope stability can be a major problem during the construction of surface facilities. Cutting into existing ground disturbs the mechanics of the surrounding area, which can result in landslides and rock falls. This practical reference gives you the comprehensive information you need for slope stability analysis, suitable methods of analysis with and without the use of computers, and examples of common stability problems and stabilization methods for cuts and fills. It includes detailed discussions of methods used in slope stability analysis, including the Ordinary Method of Slices, Simplified Janbu Method, Simplified Bishop Method, Spencer`s Method, other limit equilibrium methods, numerical methods, total stress analysis, effective stress analysis, and the use of computer programs to solve problems. Chapters include: General Slope Stability Concepts; Engineering Geology Principles; Groundwater Conditions; Geologic Site Exploration; Laboratory Testing Interpretation; Slope Stability Concepts; Slope Stabilization Methods; and Design, Construction and Maintenance.

  4. Wechsler Individual Achievement Test.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Ronald L.

    1999-01-01

    This article describes the Wechsler Individual Achievement Test, a comprehensive measure of achievement for individuals in grades K-12. Eight subtests assess mathematics reasoning, spelling, reading comprehension, numerical operations, listening comprehension, oral expression, and written expression. Its administration, standardization,…

  5. Numerical simulation of the insertion process of an uncemented hip prosthesis in order to evaluate the influence of residual stress and contact distribution on the stem initial stability.

    PubMed

    Monea, Aida Georgeta; Pastrav, Leonard Cezar; Mulier, Michiel; Van der Perre, Georges; Jaecques, Siegfried V

    2014-01-01

    The long-term success of a cementless total hip arthroplasty depends on the implant geometry and interface bonding characteristics (fit, coating and ingrowth) and on stem stiffness. This study evaluates the influence of stem geometry and fitting conditions on the evolution and distribution of the bone-stem contact, stress and strain during and after the hip stem insertion, by means of dynamic finite element techniques. Next, the influence of the mechanical state (bone-stem contact, stress and strain) resulted from the insertion process on the stem initial resistance to subsidence is investigated. In addition, a study on the influence of bone-stem interface conditions (friction) on the insertion process and on the initial stem stability under physiological loading is performed. The results indicate that for a stem with tapered shape the contact in the proximal part of the stem was improved, but contact in the calcar region was achieved only when extra press-fit conditions were considered. Changes in stem geometry towards a more tapered shape and extra press fit and variation in the bone-stem interface conditions (contact amount and high friction) led to a raise in the total insertion force. A direct positive relationship was found between the stem resistance to subsidence and stem geometry (tapering and press fit), bone-stem interface conditions (bone-stem contact and friction interface) and the mechanical status at the end of the insertion (residual stress and strain). Therefore, further studies on evaluating the initial performance of different stem types should consider the parameters describing the bone-stem interface conditions and the mechanical state resulted from the insertion process. PMID:22548243

  6. Achieving extremely concentrated aqueous dispersions of graphene flakes and catalytically efficient graphene-metal nanoparticle hybrids with flavin mononucleotide as a high-performance stabilizer.

    PubMed

    Ayán-Varela, M; Paredes, J I; Guardia, L; Villar-Rodil, S; Munuera, J M; Díaz-González, M; Fernández-Sánchez, C; Martínez-Alonso, A; Tascón, J M D

    2015-05-20

    The stable dispersion of graphene flakes in an aqueous medium is highly desirable for the development of materials based on this two-dimensional carbon structure, but current production protocols that make use of a number of surfactants typically suffer from limitations regarding graphene concentration or the amount of surfactant required to colloidally stabilize the sheets. Here, we demonstrate that an innocuous and readily available derivative of vitamin B2, namely the sodium salt of flavin mononucleotide (FMNS), is a highly efficient dispersant in the preparation of aqueous dispersions of defect-free, few-layer graphene flakes. Most notably, graphene concentrations in water as high as ∼50 mg mL(-1) using low amounts of FMNS (FMNS/graphene mass ratios of about 0.04) could be attained, which facilitated the formation of free-standing graphene films displaying high electrical conductivity (∼52000 S m(-1)) without the need of carrying out thermal annealing or other types of post-treatment. The excellent performance of FMNS as a graphene dispersant could be attributed to the combined effect of strong adsorption on the sheets through the isoalloxazine moiety of the molecule and efficient colloidal stabilization provided by its negatively charged phosphate group. The FMNS-stabilized graphene sheets could be decorated with nanoparticles of several noble metals (Ag, Pd, and Pt), and the resulting hybrids exhibited a high catalytic activity in the reduction of nitroarenes and electroreduction of oxygen. Overall, the present results should expedite the processing and implementation of graphene in, e.g., conductive inks, composites, and hybrid materials with practical utility in a wide range of applications. PMID:25915172

  7. Deposition of composite materials using a wire-bar coater for achieving processability and air-stability in Organic Field-Effect Transistors (OFETs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Pozo, Freddy G.; Galindo, Sergi; Pfattner, Raphael; Rovira, Concepció; Mas-Torrent, Marta

    2015-08-01

    Organic thin films based on composite materials of semiconducting dibenzo-tetrathiafulvalene (DB-TTF) and insulating styrenic matrices (Polystyrene (PS10k) and Poly-alpha methylstyrene (PAMS10k) ) have been fabricated by the wire-bar coating technique in ambient conditions (air, light, humidity) and contrasted with the ones prepared by thermally evaporating the organic semiconductor. The transistors fabricated with DB-TTF:PS10k composites show a clear fieldeffect behavior with p-type characteristics, exhibiting charge carriers mobilities in the range of 0.01 cm2/Vs, fully comparable with the films obtained by thermal evaporation. However, while the thermally evaporated films show poor stability in air, the wire-bar coated composites films and devices are highly reproducible and exhibit lower threshold voltage values. Thus, we demonstrate the suitability of the wire-bar technique for manufacturing large area devices.

  8. Improved electrochemical stability at the surface of La(0.8)Sr(0.2)CoO3 achieved by surface chemical modification.

    PubMed

    Tsvetkov, Nikolai; Lu, Qiyang; Yildiz, Bilge

    2015-01-01

    The degradation of the surface chemistry on perovskite (ABO3) oxides is a critical issue for their performance in energy conversion systems such as solid oxide fuel/electrolysis cells and in splitting of H2O and CO2 to produce fuels. This degradation is typically in the form of segregation and phase separation of dopant cations from the A-site, driven by elastic and electrostatic energy minimization and kinetic demixing. In this study, deposition of Ti at the surface was found to hinder the dopant segregation and the corresponding electrochemical degradation on a promising SOFC cathode material, La(0.8)Sr(0.2)CoO3 (LSC). The surface of the LSC films was modified by Ti (denoted as LSC-T) deposited from a TiCl4 solution. The LSC and LSC-T thin films were investigated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, nano-probe Auger electron spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), upon annealing at 420-530 °C in air up to about 90 hours. The oxygen exchange coefficient, k(q), on LSC-T cathodes was found to be up to 8 times higher than that on LSC cathodes at 530 °C and retained its stability. Sr-rich insulating particles formed at the surface of the annealed LSC and LSC-T films, but with significantly less coverage of such particles on the LSC-T. From this result, it appears that modification of the LSC surface with Ti reduces the segregation of the blocking Sr-rich particles at the surface, and a larger area on LSC surface (with a higher Sr doping level in the lattice) is available for the oxygen reduction reaction. The stabilization of the LSC surface through Ti-deposition can open a new route for designing surface modifications on perovskite oxide electrodes for high temperature electro- and thermo-chemical applications. PMID:26227310

  9. Stability of Bareiss algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bojanczyk, Adam W.; Brent, Richard P.; de Hoog, F. R.

    1991-12-01

    In this paper, we present a numerical stability analysis of Bareiss algorithm for solving a symmetric positive definite Toeplitz system of linear equations. We also compare Bareiss algorithm with Levinson algorithm and conclude that the former has superior numerical properties.

  10. Numerical Stability and Control Analysis Towards Falling-Leaf Prediction Capabilities of Splitflow for Two Generic High-Performance Aircraft Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charlton, Eric F.

    1998-01-01

    Aerodynamic analysis are performed using the Lockheed-Martin Tactical Aircraft Systems (LMTAS) Splitflow computational fluid dynamics code to investigate the computational prediction capabilities for vortex-dominated flow fields of two different tailless aircraft models at large angles of attack and sideslip. These computations are performed with the goal of providing useful stability and control data to designers of high performance aircraft. Appropriate metrics for accuracy, time, and ease of use are determined in consultations with both the LMTAS Advanced Design and Stability and Control groups. Results are obtained and compared to wind-tunnel data for all six components of forces and moments. Moment data is combined to form a "falling leaf" stability analysis. Finally, a handful of viscous simulations were also performed to further investigate nonlinearities and possible viscous effects in the differences between the accumulated inviscid computational and experimental data.

  11. Automatic stabilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haus, FR

    1936-01-01

    This report concerns the study of automatic stabilizers and extends it to include the control of the three-control system of the airplane instead of just altitude control. Some of the topics discussed include lateral disturbed motion, static stability, the mathematical theory of lateral motion, and large angles of incidence. Various mechanisms and stabilizers are also discussed. The feeding of Diesel engines by injection pumps actuated by engine compression, achieves the required high speeds of injection readily and permits rigorous control of the combustible charge introduced into each cylinder and of the peak pressure in the resultant cycle.

  12. Numerical Study of Velocity Shear Stabilization of 3D and Theoretical Considerations for Centrifugally Confined Plasmas and Other Interchange-Limited Fusion Concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Hassam, Adil

    2015-09-21

    We studied the feasibility of resonantly driving GAMs in tokamaks. A numerical simulation was carried out and showed the essential features and limitations. It was shown further that GAMs can damp by phase-mixing, from temperature gradients, or nonlinear detuning, thus broadening the resonance. Experimental implications of this were quantified. Theoretical support was provided for the Maryland Centrifugal Experiment, funded in a separate grant by DOE. Plasma diamagnetism from supersonic rotation was established. A theoretical model was built to match the data. Additional support to the experiment in terms of numerical simulation of the interchange turbulence was provided. Spectra from residual turbulence on account of velocity shear suppression were obtained and compared favorably to experiment. A new drift wave, driven solely by the thermal force, was identified.

  13. Terrestrial Photogrammetry and Numerical Modelling for the Stability Analysis of Rock Slopes in High Mountain Areas: Aiguilles Marbrées case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtaz, M.; Ferrero, A. M.; Roncella, R.; Segalini, A.; Umili, G.

    2014-03-01

    Several high-altitude slope instability phenomena, involving rock blocks of different volumes, have been observed in recent years. The increase in these phenomena could be correlated to climatic variations and to a general increase in temperature that has induced both ice melting with consequent water seepage and glacial lowering, with a consequent loss of support of the rock face. The degradation of the high-altitude thermal layer, which is known as "permafrost", can determine the formation of highly fractured rock slopes where instabilities can concentrate. The present research has developed a methodology to improve the understanding and assessment of rock slope stability conditions in high mountain environments where access is difficult. The observed instabilities are controlled by the presence of discontinuities that can determine block detachments. Consequently, a detailed survey of the rock faces is necessary, both in terms of topography and geological structure, and in order to locate the discontinuities on the slope to obtain a better geometric reconstruction and subsequent stability analysis of the blocky rock mass. Photogrammetric surveys performed at different times allow the geostructure of the rock mass to be determined and the rock block volumes and detachment mechanisms to be estimated, in order to assess the stability conditions and potential triggering mechanisms. Photogrammetric surveys facilitate both the characterisation of the rock mass and the monitoring of slope instabilities over time. The methodology has been applied in a case study pertaining to the North Face of Aiguilles Marbrées in the Mont Blanc massif, which suffers from frequent instability phenomena. A slope failure that occurred in 2007 has been back-analysed using both the limit equilibrium method (LEM) and 3D distinct element modelling (DEM). The method has been supported and validated with traditional in situ surveys and measurements of the discontinuity orientation and other

  14. Experimental and Numerical Optimization of a High-Lift System to Improve Low-Speed Performance, Stability, and Control of an Arrow-Wing Supersonic Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahne, David E.; Glaab, Louis J.

    1999-01-01

    An investigation was performed to evaluate leading-and trailing-edge flap deflections for optimal aerodynamic performance of a High-Speed Civil Transport concept during takeoff and approach-to-landing conditions. The configuration used for this study was designed by the Douglas Aircraft Company during the 1970's. A 0.1-scale model of this configuration was tested in the Langley 30- by 60-Foot Tunnel with both the original leading-edge flap system and a new leading-edge flap system, which was designed with modem computational flow analysis and optimization tools. Leading-and trailing-edge flap deflections were generated for the original and modified leading-edge flap systems with the computational flow analysis and optimization tools. Although wind tunnel data indicated improvements in aerodynamic performance for the analytically derived flap deflections for both leading-edge flap systems, perturbations of the analytically derived leading-edge flap deflections yielded significant additional improvements in aerodynamic performance. In addition to the aerodynamic performance optimization testing, stability and control data were also obtained. An evaluation of the crosswind landing capability of the aircraft configuration revealed that insufficient lateral control existed as a result of high levels of lateral stability. Deflection of the leading-and trailing-edge flaps improved the crosswind landing capability of the vehicle considerably; however, additional improvements are required.

  15. Numerical Dissipation and Wrong Propagation Speed of Discontinuities for Stiff Source Terms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, H. C.; Kotov, D. V.; Sjogreen, B.

    2011-01-01

    In compressible turbulent combustion/nonequilibrium flows, the constructions of numerical schemes for (a) stable and accurate simulation of turbulence with strong shocks, and (b) obtaining correct propagation speed of discontinuities for stiff reacting terms on coarse grids share one important ingredient - minimization of numerical dissipation while maintaining numerical stability. Here coarse grids means standard mesh density requirement for accurate simulation of typical non-reacting flows. This dual requirement to achieve both numerical stability and accuracy with zero or minimal use of numerical dissipation is most often conflicting for existing schemes that were designed for non-reacting flows. The goal of this paper is to relate numerical dissipations that are inherited in a selected set of high order shock-capturing schemes with the onset of wrong propagation speed of discontinuities for two representative stiff detonation wave problems.

  16. Numerical Dissipation and Wrong Propagation Speed of Discontinuities for Stiff Source Terms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, H. C.; Kotov, D. V.; Sjoegreen, B.

    2012-01-01

    In compressible turbulent combustion/nonequilibrium flows, the constructions of numerical schemes for (a) stable and accurate simulation of turbulence with strong shocks, and (b) obtaining correct propagation speed of discontinuities for stiff reacting terms on coarse grids share one important ingredient - minimization of numerical dissipation while maintaining numerical stability. Here coarse grids means standard mesh density requirement for accurate simulation of typical non-reacting flows. This dual requirement to achieve both numerical stability and accuracy with zero or minimal use of numerical dissipation is most often conflicting for existing schemes that were designed for non-reacting flows. The goal of this paper is to relate numerical dissipations that are inherited in a selected set of high order shock-capturing schemes with the onset of wrong propagation speed of discontinuities as a function of stiffness of the source term and the grid spacing.

  17. Stochastic-deterministic modeling of bed load transport in shallow water flow over erodible slope: Linear stability analysis and numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohorquez, Patricio; Ancey, Christophe

    2015-09-01

    In this article we propose a stochastic bed load transport formulation within the framework of the frictional shallow-water equations in which the sediment transport rate results from the difference between the entrainment and deposition of particles. First we show that the Saint-Venant-Exner equations are linearly unstable in most cases for a uniform base flow down an inclined erodible bed for Shields numbers in excess of the threshold for incipient sediment motion allowing us to compute noise-induced pattern formation for Froude numbers below 2. The wavelength of the bed forms are selected naturally due to the absolute character of the bed instability and the existence of a maximum growth rate at a finite wavelength when the particle diffusivity coefficient and the water eddy viscosity are present as for Turing-like instability. A numerical method is subsequently developed to analyze the performance of the model and theoretical results through three examples: the simulation of the fluctuations of the particle concentration using a stochastic Langevin equation, the deterministic simulation of anti-dunes formation over an erodible slope in full sediment-mobility conditions, and the computation of noise-induced pattern formation in hybrid stochastic-deterministic flows down a periodic flume. The full non-linear numerical simulations are in excellent agreement with the theoretical solutions. We conclude highlighting that the proposed depth-averaged formulation explains the developments of upstream migrating anti-dunes in straight flumes since the seminar experiments by Gilbert (1914).

  18. An updated numerical simulation of the ground-water flow system for the Castle Lake debris dam, Mount St. Helens, Washington, and implications for dam stability against heave

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roeloffs, Evelyn A.

    1994-01-01

    A numerical simulation of the ground-water flow system in the Castle Lake debris dam, calibrated to data from the 1991 and 1992 water years, was used to estimate factors of safety against heave and internal erosion. The Castle Lake debris dam, 5 miles northwest of the summit of Mount St. Helens, impounds 19,000 acre-ft of water that could pose a flood hazard in the event of a lake breakout. A new topographic map of the Castle Lake area prior to the 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens was prepared and used to calculate the thickness of the debris avalanche deposits that compose the dam. Water levels in 22 piezometers and discharges from seeps on the dam face measured several times per year beginning in 1990 supplemented measurements in 11 piezometers and less frequent seep discharge measurements made since 1983. Observations in one group of piezometers reveal heads above the land surface and head gradients favoring upward flow that correspond to factors of safety only slightly greater than 2. The steady-state ground-water flow system in the debris dam was simulated using a threedimensional finite difference computer program. A uniform, isotropic model having the same shape as the dam and a hydraulic conductivity of 1.55 ft/day simulates the correct water level at half the observation points, but is in error by 10 ft or more at other points. Spatial variations of hydraulic conductivity were required to calibrate the model. The model analysis suggests that ground water flows in both directions between the debris dam and Castle Lake. Factors of safety against heave and internal erosion were calculated where the model simulated upward flow of ground water. A critical gradient analysis yields factors of safety as low as 2 near the piezometers where water level observations indicate low factors of safety. Low safety factors are also computed near Castle Creek where slumping was caused by a storm in January, 1990. If hydraulic property contrasts are present in areas of the

  19. Characterization of Jupiter's Deep Circulation and Static Stability through Wide Channel Numerical Simulations of the Dynamics and Interactions of Southern Midlatitudes Vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales-Juberias, Raul; Dowling, Timothy

    2012-10-01

    Previous studies have shown that the observed features and dynamics of Jovian vortices are sensitive to the underlying environmental structure of Jupiter's atmosphere, in particular to the vertical wind shear and the static stability, and that forward modeling techniques can be successfully used to eliminate a large range of possibilities in a self-consistent manner and hence constrain the atmospheric structure below the cloud regions (Youseff and Marcus 2003, Morales-Juberias et al. 2005). However, these studies have generally been done on a narrow latitude-band basis ( 15^o). Here we present wide channel simulations ( 40 ^o) of two major meteorological events observed in the southern atmosphere of Jupiter involving the interaction of the Great Red Spot (GRS) with other nearby vortices. By studying these two events using wide channel simulations, not unlike the strategy used in terrestrial synoptic meteorology, we show that we can gain new insights into the patterns governing Jupiter's global circulations, drawing a coherent picture of the vertical structure of the atmosphere for the whole southern mid-latitudinal regions of Jupiter over time.

  20. Achieving Extreme Utilization of Excitons by an Efficient Sandwich-Type Emissive Layer Architecture for Reduced Efficiency Roll-Off and Improved Operational Stability in Organic Light-Emitting Diodes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhongbin; Sun, Ning; Zhu, Liping; Sun, Hengda; Wang, Jiaxiu; Yang, Dezhi; Qiao, Xianfeng; Chen, Jiangshan; Alshehri, Saad M; Ahamad, Tansir; Ma, Dongge

    2016-02-10

    It has been demonstrated that the efficiency roll-off is generally caused by the accumulation of excitons or charge carriers, which is intimately related to the emissive layer (EML) architecture in organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). In this article, an efficient sandwich-type EML structure with a mixed-host EML sandwiched between two single-host EMLs was designed to eliminate this accumulation, thus simultaneously achieving high efficiency, low efficiency roll-off and good operational stability in the resulting OLEDs. The devices show excellent electroluminescence performances, realizing a maximum external quantum efficiency (EQE) of 24.6% with a maximum power efficiency of 105.6 lm W(-1) and a maximum current efficiency of 93.5 cd A(-1). At the high brightness of 5,000 cd m(-2), they still remain as high as 23.3%, 71.1 lm W(-1), and 88.3 cd A(-1), respectively. And, the device lifetime is up to 2000 h at initial luminance of 1000 cd m(-2), which is significantly higher than that of compared devices with conventional EML structures. The improvement mechanism is systematically studied by the dependence of the exciton distribution in EML and the exciton quenching processes. It can be seen that the utilization of the efficient sandwich-type EML broadens the recombination zone width, thus greatly reducing the exciton quenching and increasing the probability of the exciton recombination. It is believed that the design concept provides a new avenue for us to achieve high-performance OLEDs. PMID:26828128

  1. Characterization of Jupiter's Deep Circulation and Static Stability through Wide Channel Numerical Simulations of the Dynamics and Interactions of Southern Midlatitudes Vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales-Juberias, Raul; Dowling, T. E.

    2012-10-01

    Previous studies have shown that the observed features and dynamics of Jovian vortices are sensitive to the underlying environmental structure of Jupiter’s atmosphere, in particular to the vertical wind shear and the static stability, and that forward modeling techniques can be successfully used to eliminate a large range of possibilities in a self-consistent manner and hence constrain the atmospheric structure below the cloud regions (Youseff and Marcus 2003, Morales-Juberias et al. 2005). However, these studies have generally been done on a narrow latitude-band basis (˜15°). Here we present wide channel simulations (˜40°) of two major meteorological events observed in the southern atmosphere of Jupiter involving the interaction of the Great Red Spot (GRS) with other nearby vortices. Namely, the spots associated with the recirculation of the South Tropical Disturbance of 1979 (Smith et al. 1979) and the White Ovals (WOS) in 2000 when ovals BE and FA merged to form BA (Sanchez-Lavega et al. 2001). By studying these two events using wide channel simulations, not unlike the strategy used in terrestrial synoptic meteorology, we show that we can gain new insights into the patterns governing Jupiter's global circulations, drawing a coherent picture of the vertical structure of the atmosphere for the whole southern mid-latitudinal regions of Jupiter over time. In particular, we find that the model output best captures the dynamics of the individual vortices and the morphology of their interactions when the deformation length in this region is like that derived by Read et al. 2006 and the deep winds vary following a dependence like that derived by Dowling 1995 in which the westward jets remain constant with depth but the eastward jets increase with depth. Computational resources were provided by the New Mexico Computing Applications Center and NMT. This work was supported by PATM grants NNX08AE91G and NNX08AE64G.

  2. Limits to Stability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cottey, Alan

    2012-01-01

    The author reflects briefly on what limited degree of global ecological stability and human cultural stability may be achieved, provided that humanity retains hope and does not give way to despair or hide in denial. These thoughts were triggered by a recent conference on International Stability and Systems Engineering. (Contains 5 notes.)

  3. Stability of underwater periodic locomotion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Fangxu; Kanso, Eva

    2013-07-01

    Most aquatic vertebrates swim by lateral flapping of their bodies and caudal fins. While much effort has been devoted to understanding the flapping kinematics and its influence on the swimming efficiency, little is known about the stability (or lack of) of periodic swimming. It is believed that stability limits maneuverability and body designs/flapping motions that are adapted for stable swimming are not suitable for high maneuverability and vice versa. In this paper, we consider a simplified model of a planar elliptic body undergoing prescribed periodic heaving and pitching in potential flow. We show that periodic locomotion can be achieved due to the resulting hydrodynamic forces, and its value depends on several parameters including the aspect ratio of the body, the amplitudes and phases of the prescribed flapping.We obtain closedform solutions for the locomotion and efficiency for small flapping amplitudes, and numerical results for finite flapping amplitudes. This efficiency analysis results in optimal parameter values that are in agreement with values reported for some carangiform fish. We then study the stability of the (finite amplitude flapping) periodic locomotion using Floquet theory. We find that stability depends nonlinearly on all parameters. Interesting trends of switching between stable and unstable motions emerge and evolve as we continuously vary the parameter values. This suggests that, for live organisms that control their flapping motion, maneuverability and stability need not be thought of as disjoint properties, rather the organism may manipulate its motion in favor of one or the other depending on the task at hand.

  4. Influence of Hydraulic Design on Stability and on Pressure Pulsations in Francis Turbines at Overload, Part Load and Deep Part Load based on Numerical Simulations and Experimental Model Test Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnoli, M. V.; Maiwald, M.

    2014-03-01

    Francis turbines have been running more and more frequently in part load conditions, in order to satisfy the new market requirements for more dynamic and flexible energy generation, ancillary services and grid regulation. The turbines should be able to be operated for longer durations with flows below the optimum point, going from part load to deep part load and even speed-no-load. These operating conditions are characterised by important unsteady flow phenomena taking place at the draft tube cone and in the runner channels, in the respective cases of part load and deep part load. The current expectations are that new Francis turbines present appropriate hydraulic stability and moderate pressure pulsations at overload, part load, deep part load and speed-no-load with high efficiency levels at normal operating range. This study presents series of investigations performed by Voith Hydro with the objective to improve the hydraulic stability of Francis turbines at overload, part load and deep part load, reduce pressure pulsations and enlarge the know-how about the transient fluid flow through the turbine at these challenging conditions. Model test measurements showed that distinct runner designs were able to influence the pressure pulsation level in the machine. Extensive experimental investigations focused on the runner deflector geometry, on runner features and how they could reduce the pressure oscillation level. The impact of design variants and machine configurations on the vortex rope at the draft tube cone at overload and part load and on the runner channel vortex at deep part load were experimentally observed and evaluated based on the measured pressure pulsation amplitudes. Numerical investigations were employed for improving the understanding of such dynamic fluid flow effects. As example for the design and experimental investigations, model test observations and pressure pulsation curves for Francis machines in mid specific speed range, around nqopt = 50 min

  5. MHD stability of tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Chance, M.S. Sun, Y.C.; Jardin, S.C.; Kessel, C.E.; Okabayashi, M.

    1992-08-01

    This paper will give an overview of the some of the methods which are used to simulate the ideal MHD properties of tokamak plasmas. A great deal of the research in this field is necessarily numerical and the substantial progress made during the past several years has roughly paralleled the continuing availability of more advanced supercomputers. These have become essential to accurately model the complex configurations necessary for achieving MHD stable reactor grade conditions. Appropriate tokamak MHD equilibria will be described. Then the stability properties is discussed in some detail, emphasizing the difficulties of obtaining stable high {beta} discharges in plasmas in which the current is mainly ohmically driven and thus demonstrating the need for tailoring the current and pressure profiles of the plasma away from the ohmic state. The outline of this paper will roughly follow the physics development to attain the second region of stability in the PBX-M device at The Princeton Plasmas Physics Laboratory.

  6. Higher order accurate partial implicitization: An unconditionally stable fourth-order-accurate explicit numerical technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graves, R. A., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    The previously obtained second-order-accurate partial implicitization numerical technique used in the solution of fluid dynamic problems was modified with little complication to achieve fourth-order accuracy. The Von Neumann stability analysis demonstrated the unconditional linear stability of the technique. The order of the truncation error was deduced from the Taylor series expansions of the linearized difference equations and was verified by numerical solutions to Burger's equation. For comparison, results were also obtained for Burger's equation using a second-order-accurate partial-implicitization scheme, as well as the fourth-order scheme of Kreiss.

  7. Hyperbolic heat conduction problems involving non-Fourier effects - Numerical simulations via explicit Lax-Wendroff/Taylor-Galerkin finite element formulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tamma, Kumar K.; Namburu, Raju R.

    1989-01-01

    Numerical simulations are presented for hyperbolic heat-conduction problems that involve non-Fourier effects, using explicit, Lax-Wendroff/Taylor-Galerkin FEM formulations as the principal computational tool. Also employed are smoothing techniques which stabilize the numerical noise and accurately predict the propagating thermal disturbances. The accurate capture of propagating thermal disturbances at characteristic time-step values is achieved; numerical test cases are presented which validate the proposed hyperbolic heat-conduction problem concepts.

  8. Numerical Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegler, Robert S.; Braithwaite, David W.

    2016-01-01

    In this review, we attempt to integrate two crucial aspects of numerical development: learning the magnitudes of individual numbers and learning arithmetic. Numerical magnitude development involves gaining increasingly precise knowledge of increasing ranges and types of numbers: from non-symbolic to small symbolic numbers, from smaller to larger…

  9. Numerical simulations in combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, T. J.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reviews numerical simulations in reacting flows in general and combustion phenomena in particular. It is shown that use of implicit schemes and/or adaptive mesh strategies can improve convergence, stability, and accuracy of the solution. Difficulties increase as turbulence and multidimensions are considered, particularly when finite-rate chemistry governs the given combustion problem. Particular attention is given to the areas of solid-propellant combustion dynamics, turbulent diffusion flames, and spray droplet vaporization.

  10. Feedback stabilization initiative

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-01

    Much progress has been made in attaining high confinement regimes in magnetic confinement devices. These operating modes tend to be transient, however, due to the onset of MHD instabilities, and their stabilization is critical for improved performance at steady state. This report describes the Feedback Stabilization Initiative (FSI), a broad-based, multi-institutional effort to develop and implement methods for raising the achievable plasma betas through active MHD feedback stabilization. A key element in this proposed effort is the Feedback Stabilization Experiment (FSX), a medium-sized, national facility that would be specifically dedicated to demonstrating beta improvement in reactor relevant plasmas by using a variety of MHD feedback stabilization schemes.

  11. Stability analysis of the Euler discretization for SIR epidemic model

    SciTech Connect

    Suryanto, Agus

    2014-06-19

    In this paper we consider a discrete SIR epidemic model obtained by the Euler method. For that discrete model, existence of disease free equilibrium and endemic equilibrium is established. Sufficient conditions on the local asymptotical stability of both disease free equilibrium and endemic equilibrium are also derived. It is found that the local asymptotical stability of the existing equilibrium is achieved only for a small time step size h. If h is further increased and passes the critical value, then both equilibriums will lose their stability. Our numerical simulations show that a complex dynamical behavior such as bifurcation or chaos phenomenon will appear for relatively large h. Both analytical and numerical results show that the discrete SIR model has a richer dynamical behavior than its continuous counterpart.

  12. Trapped particle stability for the kinetic stabilizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berk, H. L.; Pratt, J.

    2011-08-01

    A kinetically stabilized axially symmetric tandem mirror (KSTM) uses the momentum flux of low-energy, unconfined particles that sample only the outer end-regions of the mirror plugs, where large favourable field-line curvature exists. The window of operation is determined for achieving magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stability with tolerable energy drain from the kinetic stabilizer. Then MHD stable systems are analysed for stability of the trapped particle mode. This mode is characterized by the detachment of the central-cell plasma from the kinetic-stabilizer region without inducing field-line bending. Stability of the trapped particle mode is sensitive to the electron connection between the stabilizer and the end plug. It is found that the stability condition for the trapped particle mode is more constraining than the stability condition for the MHD mode, and it is challenging to satisfy the required power constraint. Furthermore, a severe power drain may arise from the necessary connection of low-energy electrons in the kinetic stabilizer to the central region.

  13. Numerical Integration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sozio, Gerry

    2009-01-01

    Senior secondary students cover numerical integration techniques in their mathematics courses. In particular, students would be familiar with the "midpoint rule," the elementary "trapezoidal rule" and "Simpson's rule." This article derives these techniques by methods which secondary students may not be familiar with and an approach that…

  14. Numerical Relativity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, John G.

    2009-01-01

    Recent advances in numerical relativity have fueled an explosion of progress in understanding the predictions of Einstein's theory of gravity, General Relativity, for the strong field dynamics, the gravitational radiation wave forms, and consequently the state of the remnant produced from the merger of compact binary objects. I will review recent results from the field, focusing on mergers of two black holes.

  15. Graded Achievement, Tested Achievement, and Validity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brookhart, Susan M.

    2015-01-01

    Twenty-eight studies of grades, over a century, were reviewed using the argument-based approach to validity suggested by Kane as a theoretical framework. The review draws conclusions about the meaning of graded achievement, its relation to tested achievement, and changes in the construct of graded achievement over time. "Graded…

  16. Adapting livestock behaviour to achieve management goals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Using livestock to efficiently achieve management goals requires melding animal behavior with mechanical and electronic equipment. Practices such as autonomously obtaining individual animal liveweight when combined with individual animal electronic identification can produce numerous cost saving ad...

  17. Coupled trajectory and attitude stability of displaced orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baoyin, Hexi; Li, Junfeng

    2010-03-01

    Coupled trajectory and attitude stability of displaced solar orbits is studied by using sailcraft with a kind of two-folding construction with two unequal rectangular plates forming a right angle. Three-dimensional coupled trajectory and attitude equations are developed for the coupled dynamical system, and the results show that all three types of displaced solar orbits widely referenced can be achieved through selecting an appropriate size of the two-folding sail. An analysis of the corresponding linear stability of the trajectory and attitude coupled system is carried out, and both trajectory and attitude linearly stable orbits are found to exist in a small range of parameters, whose non-linear stability is then examined via numerical simulations. Finally, passively stable orbits are found to have weak stability, and such passive means of station-keeping are attractive and useful in practice because of its simplicity.

  18. Numerical simulation and modeling of combustion in scramjets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Ryan James

    In the last fifteen years the development of a viable scramjet has quickly approached the following long term goals: responsive sub-orbital space access; long-range, prompt global strike; and high-speed transportation. Nonetheless, there are significant challenges that need to be resolved. These challenges include high skin friction drag and high heat transfer rates, inherent to vehicles in sustained, hypersonic flight. Another challenge is sustaining combustion. Numerical simulation and modeling was performed to provide insight into reducing skin friction drag and sustaining combustion. Numerical simulation was used to investigate boundary layer combustion, which has been shown to reduce skin friction drag. The objective of the numerical simulations was to quantify the effect of fuel injection parameters on boundary layer combustion and ultimately on the change in the skin friction coefficient and heat transfer rate. A qualitative analysis of the results suggest that the reduction in the skin friction coefficient depends on multiple parameters and potentially an interaction between parameters. Sustained combustion can be achieved through a stabilized detonation wave. Additionally, stabilizing a detonation wave will yield rapid combustion. This will allow for a shorter and lighter-weight engine system, resulting in less required combustor cooling. A stabilized detonation wave was numerically modeled for various inlet and geometric cases. The effect of fuel concentration, inlet Mach number, and geometric configuration on the stability of a detonation wave was quantified. Correlations were established between fuel concentration, inlet speed, geometric configuration and parameters characterizing the detonation wave. A linear relationship was quantified between the fuel concentration and the parameters characterizing the detonation wave.

  19. Dynamics of Numerics and CFD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, H. C.; Rai, Man Mohan (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    This lecture attempts to illustrate the basic ideas of how the recent advances in nonlinear dynamical systems theory (dynamics) can provide new insights into the understanding of numerical algorithms used in solving nonlinear differential equations (DEs). Examples will be given of the use of dynamics to explain unusual phenomena that occur in numerics. The inadequacy of the use of linearized analysis for the understanding of long time behavior of nonlinear problems will be illustrated, and the role of dynamics in studying the nonlinear stability, accuracy, convergence property and efficiency of using time- dependent approaches to obtaining steady-state numerical solutions in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) will briefly be explained.

  20. Temperature-Stabilized Phase Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeeman, L.

    1985-01-01

    Precise temperature stabilized phase detector for clock signal distribution maintains 100-MHz signal with stability of 5 parts in 10 to the 16th power even for step changes of 20 degrees C in ambient temperature. Stabilization achieved by heating unit to 45 degrees C and maintaining temperature through bridge circuit.

  1. School Achievement Strongly Predicts Midlife IQ

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spinks, Ruth; Arndt, Stephan; Caspers, Kristin; Yucuis, Rebecca; McKirgan, L. William; Pfalzgraf, Christopher; Waterman, Elijah

    2007-01-01

    The relationship between measures of IQ and standardized school achievement tests is well established at around r~0.5 when the two are measured in close proximity. The current paper examined the stability of this correlation when comparing elementary school achievement (grades 3-8) and midlife IQ. Iowa Adoption Study participants who had…

  2. Thermal-noise limit in the frequency stabilization of lasers with rigid cavities.

    PubMed

    Numata, Kenji; Kemery, Amy; Camp, Jordan

    2004-12-17

    We evaluate thermal noise (Brownian motion) in a rigid reference cavity used for frequency stabilization of lasers, based on the mechanical loss of cavity materials and the numerical analysis of the mirror-spacer mechanics with the direct application of the fluctuation dissipation theorem. This noise sets a fundamental limit for the frequency stability achieved with a rigid frequency-reference cavity of order 1 Hz/ square root Hz (0.01 Hz/ square root Hz) at 10 mHz (100 Hz) at room temperature. This level coincides with the world-highest level stabilization results. PMID:15697887

  3. Investigation of the stability of AC repulsive force levitation systems for low-speed maglev.

    SciTech Connect

    He, J. L.; Wang, Z.; Rote, D. M.; Winkelman, S.; Energy Systems

    1992-09-01

    Discusses the stability of an AC induction levitation system, focusing on the analysis and optimum design of the secondary conductor. Several improved secondary conductor geometries are considered. A theoretical model with numerical results, as well as experimental observations and data are presented. Theoretical and experimental results indicate that only marginal stability can be achieved with a single-plate secondary conductor. Modifications of the single plate can enhance its stability at rest, but this design suffers from longitudinal instabilities when propelled. It is concluded that a double-plate secondary conductor is stable in all six degrees of freedom.

  4. Rotational stability of a posterior stabilized total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Whiteside, L A; Amador, D D

    1989-05-01

    The effect of the posterior stabilizing mechanism on rotational stability in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) was investigated in six cadaver knees using a special knee-testing device. The device evaluated varus-valgus, rotational, and anteroposterior (AP) stability in the normal knee compared to a posterior stabilized TKA with either a rotationally constrained or an unconstrained articular surface. None of the stability parameters was significantly different from normal in either configuration of the tibial surface, but the constrained surface did decrease rotational deflection compared to the rotationally unconstrained surfaces. These findings show that rotational constraint in a posterior stabilized TKA is not necessary to achieve rotational stability as long as varus-valgus stability is achieved by appropriately tensioning the collateral ligaments. PMID:2706852

  5. Elliptic systems and numerical transformations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mastin, C. W.; Thompson, J. F.

    1976-01-01

    Properties of a transformation method, which was developed for solving fluid dynamic problems on general two dimensional regions, are discussed. These include construction error of the transformation and applications to mesh generation. An error and stability analysis for the numerical solution of a model parabolic problem is also presented.

  6. Approaches to Numerical Relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    d'Inverno, Ray

    2005-07-01

    Introduction Ray d'Inverno; Preface C. J. S. Clarke; Part I. Theoretical Approaches: 1. Numerical relativity on a transputer array Ray d'Inverno; 2. Some aspects of the characteristic initial value problem in numerical relativity Nigel Bishop; 3. The characteristic initial value problem in general relativity J. M. Stewart; 4. Algebraic approachs to the characteristic initial value problem in general relativity Jõrg Frauendiener; 5. On hyperboidal hypersurfaces Helmut Friedrich; 6. The initial value problem on null cones J. A. Vickers; 7. Introduction to dual-null dynamics S. A. Hayward; 8. On colliding plane wave space-times J. B. Griffiths; 9. Boundary conditions for the momentum constraint Niall O Murchadha; 10. On the choice of matter model in general relativity A. D. Rendall; 11. A mathematical approach to numerical relativity J. W. Barrett; 12. Making sense of the effects of rotation in general relativity J. C. Miller; 13. Stability of charged boson stars and catastrophe theory Franz E. Schunck, Fjodor V. Kusmartsev and Eckehard W. Mielke; Part II. Practical Approaches: 14. Numerical asymptotics R. Gómez and J. Winicour; 15. Instabilities in rapidly rotating polytropes Scott C. Smith and Joan M. Centrella; 16. Gravitational radiation from coalescing binary neutron stars Ken-Ichi Oohara and Takashi Nakamura; 17. 'Critical' behaviour in massless scalar field collapse M. W. Choptuik; 18. Goudunov-type methods applied to general relativistic gravitational collapse José Ma. Ibánez, José Ma. Martí, Juan A. Miralles and J. V. Romero; 19. Astrophysical sources of gravitational waves and neutrinos Silvano Bonazzola, Eric Gourgoulhon, Pawel Haensel and Jean-Alain Marck; 20. Gravitational radiation from triaxial core collapse Jean-Alain Marck and Silvano Bonazzola; 21. A vacuum fully relativistic 3D numerical code C. Bona and J. Massó; 22. Solution of elliptic equations in numerical relativity using multiquadrics M. R. Dubal, S. R. Oliveira and R. A. Matzner; 23

  7. Unsteady boundary layers with an intelligent numerical scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cebeci, T.

    1986-02-01

    A numerical method has been developed to represent unsteady boundary layers with large flow reversal. It makes use of the characteristic box scheme which examines the finite-difference grid in relation to the magnitude and direction of local velocity and reaches and implements a decision to ensure that the Courant, Friedricks and Lewey stability criterion is not violated. The method has been applied to the problem of an impulsively started circular cylinder and the results, though generally consistent with those of van Dommelen and Shen obtained with a Lagrangian method, show some differences. The time step is identified as very important and, with the present intelligent numerical scheme, the results were readily extended to times far beyond those previously achieved with Eulerian methods. Extrapolation of the results suggests that the much-discussed singularity for this unsteady flow is the same as that of the corresponding steady flow.

  8. A study of numerical methods for hyperbolic conservation laws with stiff source terms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leveque, R. J.; Yee, H. C.

    1988-01-01

    The proper modeling of nonequilibrium gas dynamics is required in certain regimes of hypersonic flow. For inviscid flow this gives a system of conservation laws coupled with source terms representing the chemistry. Often a wide range of time scales is present in the problem, leading to numerical difficulties as in stiff systems of ordinary differential equations. Stability can be achieved by using implicit methods, but other numerical difficulties are observed. The behavior of typical numerical methods on a simple advection equation with a parameter-dependent source term was studied. Two approaches to incorporate the source term were utilized: MacCormack type predictor-corrector methods with flux limiters, and splitting methods in which the fluid dynamics and chemistry are handled in separate steps. Various comparisons over a wide range of parameter values were made. In the stiff case where the solution contains discontinuities, incorrect numerical propagation speeds are observed with all of the methods considered. This phenomenon is studied and explained.

  9. Ballooning Stability of the Compact Quasiaxially Symmetric Stellarator

    SciTech Connect

    M.H. Redi; J. Canik; R.L. Dewar; J.L. Johnson; S. Klasky; W.A. Cooper; W. Kerbichler

    2001-09-19

    The magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) ballooning stability of a compact, quasiaxially symmetric stellarator (QAS), expected to achieve good stability and particle confinement is examined with a method that can lead to estimates of global stability. Making use of fully 3D, ideal-MHD stability codes, the QAS beta is predicted to be limited above 4% by ballooning and high-n kink modes. Here MHD stability is analyzed through the calculation and examination of the ballooning mode eigenvalue isosurfaces in the 3-space [s, alpha, theta(subscript ''k'')]; s is the edge normalized toroidal flux, alpha is the field line variable, and theta(subscript ''k'') is the perpendicular wave vector or ballooning parameter. Broken symmetry, i.e., deviations from axisymmetry, in the stellarator magnetic field geometry causes localization of the ballooning mode eigenfunction, with new types of nonsymmetric, eigenvalue isosurfaces in both the stable and unstable spectrum. The isosurfaces around the most unstable points i n parameter space (well above marginal) are topologically spherical. In such cases, attempts to use ray tracing to construct global ballooning modes lead to a k-space runaway. Introduction of a reflecting cutoff in k(perpendicular) to model numerical truncation or finite Larmor radius (FLR) yields chaotic ray paths ergodically filling the allowed phase space, indicating that the global spectrum must be described using the language of quantum chaos theory. However, the isosurface for marginal stability in the cases studied are found to have a more complex topology, making estimation of FLR stabilization more difficult.

  10. Design and testing of magnetic controllers for Satellite stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guelman, M.; Waller, R.; Shiryaev, A.; Psiaki, M.

    2005-01-01

    A study was carried out of attitude control algorithms that are able to provide 3-axis stabilization of a satellite equipped with a magnetometer as the only sensor, and magnetic torquers as the only actuators. Two different solutions to the problem were developed, namely Linear Quadratic Regulator and No Wheel controllers. Their aptitude to achieve the required performance was confirmed by multiple numerical simulations under different initial conditions and various scenarios. The new algorithms were tested onboard the Israeli Gurwin-TechSAT micro-satellite, nominally momentum-biased, stabilized within 2- 2.5∘ precision by the proportion-plus-derivative magnetic controller. In the flight tests of the new controllers, some valuable results were obtained, such as revealing the possibility to effectively maintain the satellite 3-axis stabilization even with a very small momentum bias, and the implementation and efficient performance of the properly modified extended and linear Kalman filters in the onboard computer.

  11. Comparing Science Achievement Constructs: Targeted and Achieved

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrara, Steve; Duncan, Teresa

    2011-01-01

    This article illustrates how test specifications based solely on academic content standards, without attention to other cognitive skills and item response demands, can fall short of their targeted constructs. First, the authors inductively describe the science achievement construct represented by a statewide sixth-grade science proficiency test.…

  12. Varieties of Achievement Motivation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kukla, Andre; Scher, Hal

    1986-01-01

    A recent article by Nicholls on achievement motivation is criticized on three points: (1) definitions of achievement motives are ambiguous; (2) behavioral consequences predicted do not follow from explicit theoretical assumptions; and (3) Nicholls's account of the relation between his theory and other achievement theories is factually incorrect.…

  13. Motivation and School Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maehr, Martin L.; Archer, Jennifer

    Addressing the question, "What can be done to promote school achievement?", this paper summarizes the literature on motivation relating to classroom achievement and school effectiveness. Particular attention is given to how values, ideology, and various cultural patterns impinge on classroom performance and serve to enhance motivation to achieve.…

  14. Mobility and Reading Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waters, Theresa Z.

    A study examined the effect of geographic mobility on elementary school students' achievement. Although such mobility, which requires students to make multiple moves among schools, can have a negative impact on academic achievement, the hypothesis for the study was that it was not a determining factor in reading achievement test scores. Subjects…

  15. PASS and Reading Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirby, John R.

    Two studies examined the effectiveness of the PASS (Planning, Attention, Simultaneous, and Successive cognitive processes) theory of intelligence in predicting reading achievement scores of normally achieving children and distinguishing children with reading disabilities from normally achieving children. The first study dealt with predicting…

  16. Numerical methods in structural mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obraztsov, I. F.

    The papers contained in this volume focus on numerical, numerical-analytical, and theoretical methods for dealing with strength, stability, and dynamics problems in the design of the structural elements of flight vehicles. Topics discussed include the solution of homogeneous boundary value problems for systems of ordinary differential equations modified by a difference factorization method, a study of the rupture strength of a welded joint between plates, singular solutions in mixed problems for a wedge and a half-strip, and a thermoelasticity problem for an open-profile cylindrical shell with a localized temperature field.

  17. Numerical analysis of engine instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habiballah, M.; Dubois, I.

    Following a literature review on numerical analyses of combustion instability, to give the state of the art in the area, the paper describes the ONERA methodology used to analyze the combustion instability in liquid propellant engines. Attention is also given to a model (named Phedre) which describes the unsteady turbulent two-phase reacting flow in a liquid rocket engine combustion chamber. The model formulation includes axial or radial propellant injection, baffles, and acoustic resonators modeling, and makes it possible to treat different engine types. A numerical analysis of a cryogenic engine stability is presented, and the results of the analysis are compared with results of tests of the Viking engine and the gas generator of the Vulcain engine, showing good qualitative agreement and some general trends between experiments and numerical analysis.

  18. Heritability of Creative Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piffer, Davide; Hur, Yoon-Mi

    2014-01-01

    Although creative achievement is a subject of much attention to lay people, the origin of individual differences in creative accomplishments remain poorly understood. This study examined genetic and environmental influences on creative achievement in an adult sample of 338 twins (mean age = 26.3 years; SD = 6.6 years). Twins completed the Creative…

  19. Confronting the Achievement Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, David

    2007-01-01

    This article talks about the large achievement gap between children of color and their white peers. The reasons for the achievement gap are varied. First, many urban minorities come from a background of poverty. One of the detrimental effects of growing up in poverty is receiving inadequate nourishment at a time when bodies and brains are rapidly…

  20. States Address Achievement Gaps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christie, Kathy

    2002-01-01

    Summarizes 2 state initiatives to address the achievement gap: North Carolina's report by the Advisory Commission on Raising Achievement and Closing Gaps, containing an 11-point strategy, and Kentucky's legislation putting in place 10 specific processes. The North Carolina report is available at www.dpi.state.nc.us.closingthegap; Kentucky's…

  1. Inverting the Achievement Pyramid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White-Hood, Marian; Shindel, Melissa

    2006-01-01

    Attempting to invert the pyramid to improve student achievement and increase all students' chances for success is not a new endeavor. For decades, educators have strategized, formed think tanks, and developed school improvement teams to find better ways to improve the achievement of all students. Currently, the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) is…

  2. Achievement Test Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Dept. of Education, Columbus. Trade and Industrial Education Service.

    The Ohio Trade and Industrial Education Achievement Test battery is comprised of seven basic achievement tests: Machine Trades, Automotive Mechanics, Basic Electricity, Basic Electronics, Mechanical Drafting, Printing, and Sheet Metal. The tests were developed by subject matter committees and specialists in testing and research. The Ohio Trade and…

  3. General Achievement Trends: Maryland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  4. General Achievement Trends: Arkansas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  5. General Achievement Trends: Idaho

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  6. General Achievement Trends: Nebraska

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  7. General Achievement Trends: Colorado

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  8. General Achievement Trends: Iowa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  9. General Achievement Trends: Hawaii

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  10. General Achievement Trends: Kentucky

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  11. General Achievement Trends: Florida

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  12. General Achievement Trends: Texas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  13. General Achievement Trends: Oregon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  14. General Achievement Trends: Virginia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  15. Honoring Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Digest: Essential Readings Condensed for Quick Review, 2004

    2004-01-01

    Is the concept of "honor roll" obsolete? The honor roll has always been a way for schools to recognize the academic achievement of their students. But does it motivate students? In this article, several elementary school principals share their views about honoring student achievement. Among others, Virginia principal Nancy Moga said that students…

  16. Aiming at Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez, Paul

    The Raising Quality and Achievement Program is a 3-year initiative to support further education (FE) colleges in the United Kingdom in their drive to improve students' achievement and the quality of provision. The program offers the following: (1) quality information and advice; (2) onsite support for individual colleges; (3) help with…

  17. Achieving Perspective Transformation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nowak, Jens

    Perspective transformation is a consciously achieved state in which the individual's perspective on life is transformed. The new perspective serves as a vantage point for life's actions and interactions, affecting the way life is lived. Three conditions are basic to achieving perspective transformation: (1) "feeling" experience, i.e., getting in…

  18. Achieving Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abowitz, Kathleen Knight

    2011-01-01

    Public schools are functionally provided through structural arrangements such as government funding, but public schools are achieved in substance, in part, through local governance. In this essay, Kathleen Knight Abowitz explains the bifocal nature of achieving public schools; that is, that schools are both subject to the unitary Public compact of…

  19. General Achievement Trends: Tennessee

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  20. Achievement-Based Resourcing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fletcher, Mike; And Others

    1992-01-01

    This collection of seven articles examines achievement-based resourcing (ABR), the concept that the funding of educational institutions should be linked to their success in promoting student achievement, with a focus on the application of ABR to postsecondary education in the United Kingdom. The articles include: (1) "Introduction" (Mick…

  1. Application of three-body stability to globular clusters - I. The stability radius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Gareth F.

    2014-11-01

    The tidal radius is commonly determined analytically by equating the tidal field of the galaxy to the gravitational potential of the cluster. Stars crossing this radius can move from orbiting the cluster centre to independently orbiting the galaxy. In this paper, the stability radius of a globular cluster is estimated using a novel approach from the theoretical standpoint of the general three-body problem. This is achieved by an analytical formula for the transition radius between stable and unstable orbits in a globular cluster. A stability analysis, outlined by Mardling, is used here to predict the occurrence of unstable stellar orbits in the outermost region of a globular cluster in a distant orbit around a galaxy. It is found that the eccentricity of the cluster-galaxy orbit has a far more significant effect on the stability radius of globular clusters than previous theoretical results of the tidal radius have found. A simple analytical formula is given for determining the transition between stable and unstable orbits, which is analogous to the tidal radius for a globular cluster. The stability radius estimate is interior to tidal radius estimates and gives the innermost region from which stars can random walk to their eventual escape from the cluster. The time-scale for this random walk process is also estimated using numerical three-body scattering experiments.

  2. Stability, transition and turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hussaini, M. Y.

    1987-01-01

    A glimpse is provided of the research program in stability, transition and turbulence based on numerical simulations. This program includes both the so-called abrupt and the restrained transition processes. Attention is confined to the prototype problems of channel flow and the parallel boundary layer in the former category and the Taylor-Couette flow in the latter category. It covers both incompressible flows and supersonic flows. Some representative results are presented.

  3. Stability, transition and turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hussaini, M. Y.

    1987-01-01

    A glimpse is provided of the research program in stability, transition, and turbulence based on numerical simulations. This program includes both the so-called abrupt and the restrained transition processes. Attention is confined to the prototype problems of channel flow and the parallel boundary layer in the former category and the Taylor-Couette flow in the latter category. It covers both incompressible flows and supersonic flows. Some representative results are presented.

  4. Rock slope stability

    SciTech Connect

    Kliche, C.A.

    1999-07-01

    Whether you're involved in surface mine design, surface mine production, construction, education, or regulation, this is an important new book for your library. It describes the basic rock slope failure modes and methods of analysis--both kinematic and kinetic techniques. Chapters include geotechnical and geomechanical analysis techniques, hydrology, rock slope stabilization techniques, and geotechnical instrumentation and monitoring. Numerous examples, drawings and photos enhance the text.

  5. Nonlinear dynamics and numerical uncertainties in CFD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, H. C.; Sweby, P. K.

    1996-01-01

    The application of nonlinear dynamics to improve the understanding of numerical uncertainties in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is reviewed. Elementary examples in the use of dynamics to explain the nonlinear phenomena and spurious behavior that occur in numerics are given. The role of dynamics in the understanding of long time behavior of numerical integrations and the nonlinear stability, convergence, and reliability of using time-marching, approaches for obtaining steady-state numerical solutions in CFD is explained. The study is complemented with spurious behavior observed in CFD computations.

  6. Numerical simulation of small perturbation transonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seebass, A. R.; Yu, N. J.

    1976-01-01

    The results of a systematic study of small perturbation transonic flows are presented. Both the flow over thin airfoils and the flow over wedges were investigated. Various numerical schemes were employed in the study. The prime goal of the research was to determine the efficiency of various numerical procedures by accurately evaluating the wave drag, both by computing the pressure integral around the body and by integrating the momentum loss across the shock. Numerical errors involved in the computations that affect the accuracy of drag evaluations were analyzed. The factors that effect numerical stability and the rate of convergence of the iterative schemes were also systematically studied.

  7. Stability analysis for laminar flow control, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benney, D. J.; Orszag, S. A.

    1977-01-01

    The basic equations for the stability analysis of flow over three dimensional swept wings are developed and numerical methods for their solution are surveyed. The equations for nonlinear stability analysis of three dimensional disturbances in compressible, three dimensional, nonparallel flows are given. Efficient and accurate numerical methods for the solution of the equations of stability theory were surveyed and analyzed.

  8. The Relationship between Resources and Academic Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Womack, Sid T.

    This paper evaluates whether or not there is a direct academic-achievement benefit from additional expenditures on education in the United States. Numerous critics have said that education is already overfunded and that it can never be funded enough to make any appreciable difference. Berliner's study of 900 school districts in Texas in the 1993…

  9. [Achievement of therapeutic objectives].

    PubMed

    Mantilla, Teresa

    2014-07-01

    Therapeutic objectives for patients with atherogenic dyslipidemia are achieved by improving patient compliance and adherence. Clinical practice guidelines address the importance of treatment compliance for achieving objectives. The combination of a fixed dose of pravastatin and fenofibrate increases the adherence by simplifying the drug regimen and reducing the number of daily doses. The good tolerance, the cost of the combination and the possibility of adjusting the administration to the patient's lifestyle helps achieve the objectives for these patients with high cardiovascular risk. PMID:25043543

  10. Numerical Modeling in Geodynamics: Success, Failure and Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail-Zadeh, A.

    2005-12-01

    A real success in numerical modeling of dynamics of the Earth can be achieved only by multidisciplinary research teams of experts in geodynamics, applied and pure mathematics, and computer science. The success in numerical modeling is based on the following basic, but simple, rules. (i) People need simplicity most, but they understand intricacies best (B. Pasternak, writer). Start from a simple numerical model, which describes basic physical laws by a set of mathematical equations, and move then to a complex model. Never start from a complex model, because you cannot understand the contribution of each term of the equations to the modeled geophysical phenomenon. (ii) Study the numerical methods behind your computer code. Otherwise it becomes difficult to distinguish true and erroneous solutions to the geodynamic problem, especially when your problem is complex enough. (iii) Test your model versus analytical and asymptotic solutions, simple 2D and 3D model examples. Develop benchmark analysis of different numerical codes and compare numerical results with laboratory experiments. Remember that the numerical tool you employ is not perfect, and there are small bugs in every computer code. Therefore the testing is the most important part of your numerical modeling. (iv) Prove (if possible) or learn relevant statements concerning the existence, uniqueness and stability of the solution to the mathematical and discrete problems. Otherwise you can solve an improperly-posed problem, and the results of the modeling will be far from the true solution of your model problem. (v) Try to analyze numerical models of a geological phenomenon using as less as possible tuning model variables. Already two tuning variables give enough possibilities to constrain your model well enough with respect to observations. The data fitting sometimes is quite attractive and can take you far from a principal aim of your numerical modeling: to understand geophysical phenomena. (vi) If the number of

  11. Stability of Detached Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, K.; Volz, M. P.; Croell, A.

    2009-01-01

    Bridgman crystal growth can be conducted in the so-called "detached" solidification regime, where the growing crystal is detached from the crucible wall. A small gap between the growing crystal and the crucible wall, of the order of 100 micrometers or less, can be maintained during the process. A meniscus is formed at the bottom of the melt between the crystal and crucible wall. Under proper conditions, growth can proceed without collapsing the meniscus. The meniscus shape plays a key role in stabilizing the process. Thermal and other process parameters can also affect the geometrical steady-state stability conditions of solidification. The dynamic stability theory of the shaped crystal growth process has been developed by Tatarchenko. It consists of finding a simplified autonomous set of differential equations for the radius, height, and possibly other process parameters. The problem then reduces to analyzing a system of first order linear differential equations for stability. Here we apply a modified version of this theory for a particular case of detached solidification. Approximate analytical formulas as well as accurate numerical values for the capillary stability coefficients are presented. They display an unexpected singularity as a function of pressure differential. A novel approach to study the thermal field effects on the crystal shape stability has been proposed. In essence, it rectifies the unphysical assumption of the model that utilizes a perturbation of the crystal radius along the axis as being instantaneous. It consists of introducing time delay effects into the mathematical description and leads, in general, to stability over a broader parameter range. We believe that this novel treatment can be advantageously implemented in stability analyses of other crystal growth techniques such as Czochralski and float zone methods.

  12. Membrane stabilizer

    DOEpatents

    Mingenbach, William A.

    1988-01-01

    A device is provided for stabilizing a flexible membrane secured within a frame, wherein a plurality of elongated arms are disposed radially from a central hub which penetrates the membrane, said arms imposing alternately against opposite sides of the membrane, thus warping and tensioning the membrane into a condition of improved stability. The membrane may be an opaque or translucent sheet or other material.

  13. Predicting Achievement and Motivation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uguroglu, Margaret; Walberg, Herbert J.

    1986-01-01

    Motivation and nine other factors were measured for 970 students in grades five through eight in a study of factors predicting achievement and predicting motivation. Results are discussed. (Author/MT)

  14. Attractiveness and School Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salvia, John; And Others

    1977-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to ascertain the relationship between rated attractiveness and two measures of school performance. Attractive children received significantly higher report cards and, to some degree, higher achievement test scores than their unattractive peers. (Author)

  15. Student Achievement and Motivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flammer, Gordon H.; Mecham, Robert C.

    1974-01-01

    Compares the lecture and self-paced methods of instruction on the basis of student motivation and achieveme nt, comparing motivating and demotivating factors in each, and their potential for motivation and achievement. (Authors/JR)

  16. Entropy Splitting and Numerical Dissipation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, H. C.; Vinokur, M.; Djomehri, M. J.

    1999-01-01

    A rigorous stability estimate for arbitrary order of accuracy of spatial central difference schemes for initial-boundary value problems of nonlinear symmetrizable systems of hyperbolic conservation laws was established recently by Olsson and Oliger (1994) and Olsson (1995) and was applied to the two-dimensional compressible Euler equations for a perfect gas by Gerritsen and Olsson (1996) and Gerritsen (1996). The basic building block in developing the stability estimate is a generalized energy approach based on a special splitting of the flux derivative via a convex entropy function and certain homogeneous properties. Due to some of the unique properties of the compressible Euler equations for a perfect gas, the splitting resulted in the sum of a conservative portion and a non-conservative portion of the flux derivative. hereafter referred to as the "Entropy Splitting." There are several potential desirable attributes and side benefits of the entropy splitting for the compressible Euler equations that were not fully explored in Gerritsen and Olsson. The paper has several objectives. The first is to investigate the choice of the arbitrary parameter that determines the amount of splitting and its dependence on the type of physics of current interest to computational fluid dynamics. The second is to investigate in what manner the splitting affects the nonlinear stability of the central schemes for long time integrations of unsteady flows such as in nonlinear aeroacoustics and turbulence dynamics. If numerical dissipation indeed is needed to stabilize the central scheme, can the splitting help minimize the numerical dissipation compared to its un-split cousin? Extensive numerical study on the vortex preservation capability of the splitting in conjunction with central schemes for long time integrations will be presented. The third is to study the effect of the non-conservative proportion of splitting in obtaining the correct shock location for high speed complex shock

  17. Asymptotic and Numerical Methods for Rapidly Rotating Buoyant Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grooms, Ian G.

    methods generalize directly to the second investigation which simply adds large spatial scales -- the transition from convectively unstable to convectively stable dynamics does not change the mathematical framework. The rotating Navier-Stokes equations in the Boussinesq approximation and the equations derived from them asymptotically in the investigation of rotating convection include dispersive and dissipative linear terms that are stiff, i.e. that hinder numerical solution by explicit methods. A variety of methods which purport to alleviate this difficulty have been derived, and have been tested on and applied largely to problems with purely dissipative linear terms. But it was heretofore unfortunately quite difficult to judge and compare how effectively these methods achieve their goal when the stiff linear term is both dissipative and dispersive. The third investigation therefore introduces a visual, analytical method for comparing the linear stability properties of the various methods (the linear stability properties being a proxy for their ability to alleviate stiffness) and supports the results of this analysis by comprehensive numerical experiments.

  18. The Predictive Relationship between Achievement and Participation in Music and Achievement in Core Grade 12 Academic Subjects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gouzouasis, Peter; Guhn, Martin; Kishor, Nand

    2007-01-01

    The relationship between musical training and general intellectual capacity as well as academic achievement has been discussed in numerous contexts. In our study, we examined the relationship between participation and achievement in music and achievement in academic courses, based on data from three consecutive British Columbia student cohorts.…

  19. Nanocapsules templated on liquid cores stabilized by graft amphiphilic polyelectrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szafraniec, Joanna; Janik, Małgorzata; Odrobińska, Joanna; Zapotoczny, Szczepan

    2015-03-01

    A surfactant-free method of preparation of nanocapsules templated on liquid cores using amphiphilic graft polyelectrolytes was developed. A model photoactive copolymer, poly(sodium 2-acrylamido-2-methyl-1-propanesulfonate) with grafted poly(vinylnaphthalene) chains (PAMPS-graft-PVN) was used to stabilize toluene droplets in an aqueous emulsion. The macromolecules, due to their amphiphilic character and the presence of strong ionic groups, tend to undergo intramolecular aggregation in water but at the water-oil interface less compact conformation is preferred with PVN grafts anchoring in the oil phase and the charged PAMPS main chains residing in the aqueous phase, thus stabilizing the nanoemulsion droplets. Formation of such nanocapsules was confirmed by dynamic light scattering measurements as well as SEM and cryo-TEM imaging. Grafting density and content of the chromophores in the graft copolymers were varied in order to achieve high stability of the coated nanodroplets. It was shown that the capsules are better stabilized by the copolymers with many short hydrophobic grafts than with fewer but longer ones. Use of photoactive polyelectrolytes enabled spectroscopic investigation of the relationship between conformation of the macromolecules and stabilization of the oil-core nanocapsules. Long-term stability of the nanocapsules was achieved and further increased by multilayer shell formation using polyelectrolytes deposited via the layer-by-layer approach. The obtained capsules served as efficient nanocontainers for a hydrophobic fluorescent probe. The proposed strategy of nanocapsule preparation may be easily extended to biologically relevant polymers and applied to fabricate liquid core nanodelivery systems without the need of using low molecular weight additives which may have adverse effects in numerous biomedical applications.A surfactant-free method of preparation of nanocapsules templated on liquid cores using amphiphilic graft polyelectrolytes was developed

  20. Stabilizing oscillating universes against quantum decay

    SciTech Connect

    Mithani, Audrey T.; Vilenkin, Alexander

    2015-07-07

    We investigate the effect of vacuum corrections, due to the trace anomaly and Casimir effect, on the stability of an oscillating universe with respect to decay by tunneling to the singularity. We find that these corrections do not generally stabilize an oscillating universe. However, stability may be achieved for some specially fine-tuned non-vacuum states.

  1. Method for Studying Helicopter Longitudinal Maneuver Stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amer, Kenneth B

    1954-01-01

    A theoretical analysis of helicopter maneuver stability is made and the results are compared with experimental results for both a single and a tandem rotor helicopter. Techniques are described for measuring in flight the significant stability derivatives for use with the theory to aid in design studies of means for achieving marginal maneuver stability for a prototype helicopter.

  2. Safety Observations Achieve Results

    2000-01-16

    The SOAR web application provides a multi-checklist capability where focused observations can be created to address risk-likely work environments, tasks, etc. The SOAR web application has numerous reports to sort the data by key word, multiple factors (i.e., location, team, behavior, checklist, work environment, etc.), and the highest frequency of behaviors and error-likely predecessors, etc. Other performance indicators are also provided.

  3. Numerical simulation of nonlinear dynamical systems driven by commutative noise

    SciTech Connect

    Carbonell, F. Biscay, R.J.; Jimenez, J.C.; Cruz, H. de la

    2007-10-01

    The local linearization (LL) approach has become an effective technique for the numerical integration of ordinary, random and stochastic differential equations. One of the reasons for this success is that the LL method achieves a convenient trade-off between numerical stability and computational cost. Besides, the LL method reproduces well the dynamics of nonlinear equations for which other classical methods fail. However, in the stochastic case, most of the reported works has been focused in Stochastic Differential Equations (SDE) driven by additive noise. This limits the applicability of the LL method since there is a number of interesting dynamics observed in equations with multiplicative noise. On the other hand, recent results show that commutative noise SDEs can be transformed into a random differential equation (RDE) by means of a random diffeomorfism (conjugacy). This paper takes advantages of such conjugacy property and the LL approach for defining a LL scheme for SDEs driven by commutative noise. The performance of the proposed method is illustrated by means of numerical simulations.

  4. Membrane stabilizer

    DOEpatents

    Mingenbach, W.A.

    1988-02-09

    A device is provided for stabilizing a flexible membrane secured within a frame, wherein a plurality of elongated arms are disposed radially from a central hub which penetrates the membrane, said arms imposing alternately against opposite sides of the membrane, thus warping and tensioning the membrane into a condition of improved stability. The membrane may be an opaque or translucent sheet or other material. 10 figs.

  5. Fault stability under conditions of variable normal stress

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dieterich, J.H.; Linker, M.F.

    1992-01-01

    The stability of fault slip under conditions of varying normal stress is modelled as a spring and slider system with rate- and state-dependent friction. Coupling of normal stress to shear stress is achieved by inclining the spring at an angle, ??, to the sliding surface. Linear analysis yields two conditions for unstable slip. The first, of a type previously identified for constant normal stress systems, results in instability if stiffness is below a critical value. Critical stiffness depends on normal stress, constitutive parameters, characteristic sliding distance and the spring angle. Instability of the first type is possible only for velocity-weakening friction. The second condition yields instability if spring angle ?? <-cot-1??ss, where ??ss is steady-state sliding friction. The second condition can arise under conditions of velocity strengthening or weakening. Stability fields for finite perturbations are investigated by numerical simulation. -Authors

  6. Explorations in achievement motivation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helmreich, Robert L.

    1982-01-01

    Recent research on the nature of achievement motivation is reviewed. A three-factor model of intrinsic motives is presented and related to various criteria of performance, job satisfaction and leisure activities. The relationships between intrinsic and extrinsic motives are discussed. Needed areas for future research are described.

  7. Achieving health care affordability.

    PubMed

    Payson, Norman C

    2002-10-01

    Not all plans are jumping headlong into the consumer-centric arena. In this article, the CEO of Oxford Health Plans discusses how advanced managed care can achieve what other consumer-centric programs seek to do--provide affordable, quality health care. PMID:12391815

  8. Issues in Achievement Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Eva L.

    This booklet is intended to help school personnel, parents, students, and members of the community understand concepts and research relating to achievement testing in public schools. The paper's sections include: (1) test use with direct effects on students (test of certification, selection, and placement); (2) test use with indirect effects on…

  9. Achieving Peace through Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarken, Rodney H.

    While it is generally agreed that peace is desirable, there are barriers to achieving a peaceful world. These barriers are classified into three major areas: (1) an erroneous view of human nature; (2) injustice; and (3) fear of world unity. In a discussion of these barriers, it is noted that although the consciousness and conscience of the world…

  10. Achieving All Our Ambitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartley, Tricia

    2009-01-01

    National learning and skills policy aims both to build economic prosperity and to achieve social justice. Participation in higher education (HE) has the potential to contribute substantially to both aims. That is why the Campaign for Learning has supported the ambition to increase the proportion of the working-age population with a Level 4…

  11. Intelligence and Educational Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deary, Ian J.; Strand, Steve; Smith, Pauline; Fernandes, Cres

    2007-01-01

    This 5-year prospective longitudinal study of 70,000+ English children examined the association between psychometric intelligence at age 11 years and educational achievement in national examinations in 25 academic subjects at age 16. The correlation between a latent intelligence trait (Spearman's "g"from CAT2E) and a latent trait of educational…

  12. SALT and Spelling Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Joan

    A study investigated the effects of suggestopedic accelerative learning and teaching (SALT) on the spelling achievement, attitudes toward school, and memory skills of fourth-grade students. Subjects were 20 male and 28 female students from two self-contained classrooms at Kennedy Elementary School in Rexburg, Idaho. The control classroom and the…

  13. NCLB: Achievement Robin Hood?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bracey, Gerald W.

    2008-01-01

    In his "Wall Street Journal" op-ed on the 25th of anniversary of "A Nation At Risk", former assistant secretary of education Chester E. Finn Jr. applauded the report for turning U.S. education away from equality and toward achievement. It was not surprising, then, that in mid-2008, Finn arranged a conference to examine the potential "Robin Hood…

  14. INTELLIGENCE, PERSONALITY AND ACHIEVEMENT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MUIR, R.C.; AND OTHERS

    A LONGITUDINAL DEVELOPMENTAL STUDY OF A GROUP OF MIDDLE CLASS CHILDREN IS DESCRIBED, WITH EMPHASIS ON A SEGMENT OF THE RESEARCH INVESTIGATING THE RELATIONSHIP OF ACHIEVEMENT, INTELLIGENCE, AND EMOTIONAL DISTURBANCE. THE SUBJECTS WERE 105 CHILDREN AGED FIVE TO 6.3 ATTENDING TWO SCHOOLS IN MONTREAL. EACH CHILD WAS ASSESSED IN THE AREAS OF…

  15. School Students' Science Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shymansky, James; Wang, Tzu-Ling; Annetta, Leonard; Everett, Susan; Yore, Larry D.

    2013-01-01

    This paper is a report of the impact of an externally funded, multiyear systemic reform project on students' science achievement on a modified version of the Third International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) test in 33 small, rural school districts in two Midwest states. The systemic reform effort utilized a cascading leadership strategy…

  16. Advancing Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walberg, Herbert J.

    2010-01-01

    For the last half century, higher spending and many modern reforms have failed to raise the achievement of students in the United States to the levels of other economically advanced countries. A possible explanation, says Herbert Walberg, is that much current education theory is ill informed about scientific psychology, often drawing on fads and…

  17. Essays on Educational Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ampaabeng, Samuel Kofi

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation examines the determinants of student outcomes--achievement, attainment, occupational choices and earnings--in three different contexts. The first two chapters focus on Ghana while the final chapter focuses on the US state of Massachusetts. In the first chapter, I exploit the incidence of famine and malnutrition that resulted to…

  18. Increasing Male Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Barbara Talbert

    2008-01-01

    The No Child Left Behind legislation has brought greater attention to the academic performance of American youth. Its emphasis on student achievement requires a closer analysis of assessment data by school districts. To address the findings, educators must seek strategies to remedy failing results. In a mid-Atlantic district of the Unites States,…

  19. Setting and Achieving Objectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knoop, Robert

    1986-01-01

    Provides basic guidelines which school officials and school boards may find helpful in negotiating, establishing, and managing objectives. Discusses characteristics of good objectives, specific and directional objectives, multiple objectives, participation in setting objectives, feedback on goal process and achievement, and managing a school…

  20. Schools Achieving Gender Equity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Revis, Emma

    This guide is designed to assist teachers presenting the Schools Achieving Gender Equity (SAGE) curriculum for vocational education students, which was developed to align gender equity concepts with the Kentucky Education Reform Act (KERA). Included in the guide are lesson plans for classes on the following topics: legal issues of gender equity,…

  1. Iowa Women of Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohrn, Deborah Gore, Ed.

    1993-01-01

    This issue of the Goldfinch highlights some of Iowa's 20th century women of achievement. These women have devoted their lives to working for human rights, education, equality, and individual rights. They come from the worlds of politics, art, music, education, sports, business, entertainment, and social work. They represent Native Americans,…

  2. Achievements or Disasters?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwin, MacArthur

    2000-01-01

    Focuses on policy issues that have affected arts education in the twentieth century, such as: interest in discipline-based arts education, influence of national arts associations, and national standards and coordinated assessment. States that whether the policy decisions are viewed as achievements or disasters are for future determination. (CMK)

  3. Minority Achievement Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prince George's Community Coll., Largo, MD. Office of Institutional Research and Analysis.

    This report summarizes the achievements of Prince George's Community College (PGCC) with regard to minority outcomes. Table 1 summarizes the undergraduate enrollment trends for African Americans as well as total minorities from fall 1994 through fall 1998. Both the headcount number of African American students and the proportion of African…

  4. Appraising Reading Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ediger, Marlow

    To determine quality sequence in pupil progress, evaluation approaches need to be used which guide the teacher to assist learners to attain optimally. Teachers must use a variety of procedures to appraise student achievement in reading, because no one approach is adequate. Appraisal approaches might include: (1) observation and subsequent…

  5. Nonparallel stability of boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nayfeh, Ali H.

    1987-01-01

    The asymptotic formulations of the nonparallel linear stability of incompressible growing boundary layers are critically reviewed. These formulations can be divided into two approaches. The first approach combines a numerical method with either the method of multiple scales, or the method of averaging, of the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB) approximation; all these methods yield the same result. The second approach combined a multi-structure theory with the method of multiple scales. The first approach yields results that are in excellent agreement with all available experimental data, including the growth rates as well as the neutral stability curve. The derivation of the linear stability of the incompressible growing boundary layers is explained.

  6. Radiation transport in numerical astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, C.M.

    1983-02-01

    In this article, we discuss some of the numerical techniques developed by Jim Wilson and co-workers for the calculation of time-dependent radiation flow. Difference equations for multifrequency transport are given for both a discrete-angle representation of radiation transport and a Fick's law-like representation. These methods have the important property that they correctly describe both the streaming and diffusion limits of transport theory in problems where the mean free path divided by characteristic distances varies from much less than one to much greater than one. They are also stable for timesteps comparable to the changes in physical variables, rather than being limited by stability requirements.

  7. A phase-based hybridizable discontinuous Galerkin method for the numerical solution of the Helmholtz equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, N. C.; Peraire, J.; Reitich, F.; Cockburn, B.

    2015-06-01

    We introduce a new hybridizable discontinuous Galerkin (HDG) method for the numerical solution of the Helmholtz equation over a wide range of wave frequencies. Our approach combines the HDG methodology with geometrical optics in a fashion that allows us to take advantage of the strengths of these two methodologies. The phase-based HDG method is devised as follows. First, we enrich the local approximation spaces with precomputed phases which are solutions of the eikonal equation in geometrical optics. Second, we propose a novel scheme that combines the HDG method with ray tracing to compute multivalued solution of the eikonal equation. Third, we utilize the proper orthogonal decomposition to remove redundant modes and obtain locally orthogonal basis functions which are then used to construct the global approximation spaces of the phase-based HDG method. And fourth, we propose an appropriate choice of the stabilization parameter to guarantee stability and accuracy for the proposed method. Numerical experiments presented show that optimal orders of convergence are achieved, that the number of degrees of freedom to achieve a given accuracy is independent of the wave number, and that the number of unknowns required to achieve a given accuracy with the proposed method is orders of magnitude smaller than that with the standard finite element method.

  8. Dynamic stability of detached solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazuruk, K.; Volz, M. P.

    2016-06-01

    A dynamic stability analysis model is developed for meniscus-defined crystal growth processes. The Young-Laplace equation is used to analyze the response of a growing crystal to perturbations to its radius and a thermal transport model is used to analyze the effect of perturbations on the evolution of the crystal-melt interface. A linearized differential equation is used to analyze radius perturbations but a linear integro-differential equation is required for the height perturbations. The stability model is applied to detached solidification under zero-gravity and terrestrial conditions. A numerical analysis is supplemented with an approximate analytical analysis, valid in the limit of small Bond numbers. For terrestrial conditions, a singularity is found to exist in the capillary stability coefficients where, at a critical value of the pressure differential across the meniscus, there is a transition from stability to instability. For the zero-gravity condition, exact formulas for the capillary stability coefficients are derived.

  9. Numerical simulation of fractional Cable equation of spiny neuronal dendrites.

    PubMed

    Sweilam, N H; Khader, M M; Adel, M

    2014-03-01

    In this article, numerical study for the fractional Cable equation which is fundamental equations for modeling neuronal dynamics is introduced by using weighted average of finite difference methods. The stability analysis of the proposed methods is given by a recently proposed procedure similar to the standard John von Neumann stability analysis. A simple and an accurate stability criterion valid for different discretization schemes of the fractional derivative and arbitrary weight factor is introduced and checked numerically. Numerical results, figures, and comparisons have been presented to confirm the theoretical results and efficiency of the proposed method. PMID:25685492

  10. Mean Element Propagations Using Numerical Averaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ely, Todd A.

    2009-01-01

    The long-term evolution characteristics (and stability) of an orbit are best characterized using a mean element propagation of the perturbed two body variational equations of motion. The averaging process eliminates short period terms leaving only secular and long period effects. In this study, a non-traditional approach is taken that averages the variational equations using adaptive numerical techniques and then numerically integrating the resulting EOMs. Doing this avoids the Fourier series expansions and truncations required by the traditional analytic methods. The resultant numerical techniques can be easily adapted to propagations at most solar system bodies.

  11. Waste glass melter numerical and physical modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Eyler, L.L.; Peters, R.D.; Lessor, D.L.; Lowery, P.S.; Elliott, M.L.

    1991-10-01

    Results of physical and numerical simulation modeling of high-level liquid waste vitrification melters are presented. Physical modeling uses simulant fluids in laboratory testing. Visualization results provide insight into convective melt flow patterns from which information is derived to support performance estimation of operating melters and data to support numerical simulation. Numerical simulation results of several melter configurations are presented. These are in support of programs to evaluate melter operation characteristics and performance. Included are investigations into power skewing and alternating current electric field phase angle in a dual electrode pair reference design and bi-modal convective stability in an advanced design. 9 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Uncertainties in climate stabilization

    SciTech Connect

    Wigley, T. M.; Clarke, Leon E.; Edmonds, James A.; Jacoby, H. D.; Paltsev, S.; Pitcher, Hugh M.; Reilly, J. M.; Richels, Richard G.; Sarofim, M. C.; Smith, Steven J.

    2009-11-01

    We explore the atmospheric composition, temperature and sea level implications of new reference and cost-optimized stabilization emissions scenarios produced using three different Integrated Assessment (IA) models for U.S. Climate Change Science Program (CCSP) Synthesis and Assessment Product 2.1a. We also consider an extension of one of these sets of scenarios out to 2300. Stabilization is defined in terms of radiative forcing targets for the sum of gases potentially controlled under the Kyoto Protocol. For the most stringent stabilization case (“Level 1” with CO2 concentration stabilizing at about 450 ppm), peak CO2 emissions occur close to today, implying a need for immediate CO2 emissions abatement if we wish to stabilize at this level. In the extended reference case, CO2 stabilizes at 1000 ppm in 2200 – but even to achieve this target requires large and rapid CO2 emissions reductions over the 22nd century. Future temperature changes for the Level 1 stabilization case show considerable uncertainty even when a common set of climate model parameters is used (a result of different assumptions for non-Kyoto gases). Uncertainties are about a factor of three when climate sensitivity uncertainties are accounted for. We estimate the probability that warming from pre-industrial times will be less than 2oC to be about 50%. For one of the IA models, warming in the Level 1 case is greater out to 2050 than in the reference case, due to the effect of decreasing SO2 emissions that occur as a side effect of the policy-driven reduction in CO2 emissions. Sea level rise uncertainties for the Level 1 case are very large, with increases ranging from 12 to 100 cm over 2000 to 2300.

  13. Project ACHIEVE final report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-13

    Project ACHIEVE was a math/science academic enhancement program aimed at first year high school Hispanic American students. Four high schools -- two in El Paso, Texas and two in Bakersfield, California -- participated in this Department of Energy-funded program during the spring and summer of 1996. Over 50 students, many of whom felt they were facing a nightmare future, were given the opportunity to work closely with personal computers and software, sophisticated calculators, and computer-based laboratories -- an experience which their regular academic curriculum did not provide. Math and science projects, exercises, and experiments were completed that emphasized independent and creative applications of scientific and mathematical theories to real world problems. The most important outcome was the exposure Project ACHIEVE provided to students concerning the college and technical-field career possibilities available to them.

  14. Achieving Goal Blood Pressure.

    PubMed

    Laurent, Stéphane

    2015-07-01

    Both monotherapy and combination therapy options are appropriate for antihypertensive therapy according to the 2013 European Society of Hypertension (ESH)/European Society of Cardiology (ESC) guidelines. Most patients require more than one agent to achieve blood pressure (BP) control, and adding a second agent is more effective than doubling the dose of existing therapy. The addition of a third agent may be required to achieve adequate BP reductions in some patients. Single-pill fixed-dose combinations (FDCs) allow multiple-drug regimens to be delivered without any negative impact on patient compliance or persistence with therapy. FDCs also have documented beneficial clinical effects and use of FDCs containing two or three agents is recommended by the 2013 ESH/ESC guidelines. PMID:26002423

  15. A novel single thruster control strategy for spacecraft attitude stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godard; Kumar, Krishna Dev; Zou, An-Min

    2013-05-01

    Feasibility of achieving three axis attitude stabilization using a single thruster is explored in this paper. Torques are generated using a thruster orientation mechanism with which the thrust vector can be tilted on a two axis gimbal. A robust nonlinear control scheme is developed based on the nonlinear kinematic and dynamic equations of motion of a rigid body spacecraft in the presence of gravity gradient torque and external disturbances. The spacecraft, controlled using the proposed concept, constitutes an underactuated system (a system with fewer independent control inputs than degrees of freedom) with nonlinear dynamics. Moreover, using thruster gimbal angles as control inputs make the system non-affine (control terms appear nonlinearly in the state equation). This necessitates the control algorithms to be developed based on nonlinear control theory since linear control methods are not directly applicable. The stability conditions for the spacecraft attitude motion for robustness against uncertainties and disturbances are derived to establish the regions of asymptotic 3-axis attitude stabilization. Several numerical simulations are presented to demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed controller and validate the theoretical results. The control algorithm is shown to compensate for time-varying external disturbances including solar radiation pressure, aerodynamic forces, and magnetic disturbances; and uncertainties in the spacecraft inertia parameters. The numerical results also establish the robustness of the proposed control scheme to negate disturbances caused by orbit eccentricity.

  16. A stabilized, symmetric Nitsche method for spatially localized plasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truster, Timothy J.

    2016-01-01

    A heterogeneous interface method is developed for combining primal displacement and mixed displacement-pressure formulations across nonconforming finite element meshes to treat volume-preserving plastic flow. When the zone of inelastic response is localized within a larger domain, significant computational savings can be achieved by confining the mixed formulation solely to the localized region. The method's distinguishing feature is that the coupling terms for joining dissimilar element types are derived from a time-discrete free energy functional, which is based on a Lagrange multiplier formulation of the interface constraints. Incorporating residual-based stabilizing terms at the interface enables the condensation of the multiplier field, leading to a symmetric Nitsche formulation in which the interface operators respect the differing character of the governing equations in each region. In a series of numerical problems, the heterogeneous interface method achieved comparable results on coarser meshes as those obtained from applying the mixed formulation throughout the domain.

  17. Laser Stabilization

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, John L.; Taubman, Matthew S.; Ye, Jun

    2010-01-01

    This book chapter covers the basics of the field of stabilizing lasers to optical frequency references such as optical cavities and molecular transitions via the application of servo control systems. These discussions are given with reference to the real-life frequency metrology experienced in Hall-Labs (now Ye-Labs), JILA, University of Colorado. The subjects covered include: the basics of control system stability, a discussion of both the theoretical and experimental limitations, an outline of optical cavity susceptibility to environmental noise, and a brief introduction to the use and limitations of molecular transitions as frequency references.

  18. Nonlinear magnetohydrodynamic stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, F.; Betancourt, O.; Garabedian, P.

    1981-01-01

    The computer code developed by Bauer et al. (1978) for the study of the magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium and stability of a plasma in toroidal geometry is extended so that the growth rates of instabilities may be estimated more accurately. The original code, which is based on the variational principle of ideal magnetohydrodynamics, is upgraded by the introduction of a nonlinear formula for the growth rate of an unstable mode which acts as a quantitative measure of instability that is important in estimating numerical errors. The revised code has been applied to the determination of the nonlinear saturation, ballooning modes and beta limits for tokamaks, stellarators and torsatrons.

  19. Further studies on stability analysis of nonlinear Roesser-type two-dimensional systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Xiao-Lin

    2014-04-01

    This paper is concerned with further relaxations of the stability analysis of nonlinear Roesser-type two-dimensional (2D) systems in the Takagi-Sugeno fuzzy form. To achieve the goal, a novel slack matrix variable technique, which is homogenous polynomially parameter-dependent on the normalized fuzzy weighting functions with arbitrary degree, is developed and the algebraic properties of the normalized fuzzy weighting functions are collected into a set of augmented matrices. Consequently, more information about the normalized fuzzy weighting functions is involved and the relaxation quality of the stability analysis is significantly improved. Moreover, the obtained result is formulated in the form of linear matrix inequalities, which can be easily solved via standard numerical software. Finally, a numerical example is provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed result.

  20. Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    An overview of historical and current numerical aerodynamic simulation (NAS) is given. The capabilities and goals of the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation Facility are outlined. Emphasis is given to numerical flow visualization and its applications to structural analysis of aircraft and spacecraft bodies. The uses of NAS in computational chemistry, engine design, and galactic evolution are mentioned.

  1. Achieving Magnet status.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Beckie; Gates, Judy

    2005-01-01

    Magnet has become the gold standard for nursing excellence. It is the symbol of effective and safe patient care. It evaluates components that inspire safe care, including employee satisfaction and retention, professional education, and effective interdisciplinary collaboration. In an organization whose mission focuses on excellent patient care, Banner Thunderbird Medical Center found that pursuing Magnet status was clearly the next step. In this article, we will discuss committee selection, education, team building, planning, and the discovery process that define the Magnet journey. The road to obtaining Magnet status has permitted many opportunities to celebrate our achievements. PMID:16056158

  2. Self-stabilized and dispersion-compensated passively mode-locked Yb:Yttrium aluminum garnet laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agnesi, A.; Guandalini, A.; Reali, G.

    2005-04-01

    Self-stabilized passive mode-locking of a diode-pumped Yb:yttrium aluminum garnet laser with a semiconductor saturable absorber was achieved using an off-phase-matching second-harmonic crystal. According to the numerical model, such a condition is accomplished by self-defocusing in the nonlinear crystal in the presence of positive intracavity dispersion. Robust mode locking with Fourier-limited 1.0-ps pulses was obtained, whereas mode locking, unassisted by the nonlinear crystal, yielded 2.2-ps pulses, with the laser operating near the edge of the stability region in order to minimize the saturation energy of the semiconductor device.

  3. Visual stability

    PubMed Central

    Melcher, David

    2011-01-01

    Our vision remains stable even though the movements of our eyes, head and bodies create a motion pattern on the retina. One of the most important, yet basic, feats of the visual system is to correctly determine whether this retinal motion is owing to real movement in the world or rather our own self-movement. This problem has occupied many great thinkers, such as Descartes and Helmholtz, at least since the time of Alhazen. This theme issue brings together leading researchers from animal neurophysiology, clinical neurology, psychophysics and cognitive neuroscience to summarize the state of the art in the study of visual stability. Recently, there has been significant progress in understanding the limits of visual stability in humans and in identifying many of the brain circuits involved in maintaining a stable percept of the world. Clinical studies and new experimental methods, such as transcranial magnetic stimulation, now make it possible to test the causal role of different brain regions in creating visual stability and also allow us to measure the consequences when the mechanisms of visual stability break down. PMID:21242136

  4. Longitudinal Effects of Perceived Control on Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    You, Sukkyung; Hong, Sehee; Ho, Hsiu-Zu

    2011-01-01

    It is well established that perceived control plays an important role in student academic achievement, but little is known about its longitudinal stability, ethnic variation, and developmental effects on subsequent achievement during adolescence. Findings from this study indicated (a) perceived control remains stable during adolescence for each of…

  5. Phase stability in a multistage Zeeman decelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Wiederkehr, A. W.; Hogan, S. D.; Merkt, F.

    2010-10-15

    The phase stability of a multistage Zeeman decelerator is analyzed by numerical particle-trajectory simulations and experimental measurements. A one-dimensional model of the phase stability in multistage Stark deceleration [Bethlem et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 84, 5744 (2000)] has been adapted to multistage Zeeman deceleration and compared with one- and three-dimensional particle-trajectory simulations, including the analysis of the effect of finite switch-on and -off times of the deceleration pulses. The comparison reveals that transverse effects in the decelerator lead to a considerable reduction of the phase-space acceptance at low values of the phase angle and an enhancement at high values. The optimal combinations of phase angles and currents with which a preset amount of kinetic energy can be removed from atoms and molecules in a pulsed supersonic beam using a multistage decelerator are determined by simulation. Quantitative analysis of the phase-space acceptance within a given volume reveals that for our decelerator (8 {mu}s switch-off time) optimal conditions are achieved for values of the phase angle between 45 deg. and 55 deg. This conclusion is examined and confirmed by experimental measurements using deuterium atoms. Alternative approaches to generate optimal deceleration pulse sequences, such as the implementation of evolutionary algorithms or the use of higher-order modes of the decelerator, are discussed.

  6. Phase stability in a multistage Zeeman decelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiederkehr, A. W.; Hogan, S. D.; Merkt, F.

    2010-10-01

    The phase stability of a multistage Zeeman decelerator is analyzed by numerical particle-trajectory simulations and experimental measurements. A one-dimensional model of the phase stability in multistage Stark deceleration [Bethlem , Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.84.5744 84, 5744 (2000)] has been adapted to multistage Zeeman deceleration and compared with one- and three-dimensional particle-trajectory simulations, including the analysis of the effect of finite switch-on and -off times of the deceleration pulses. The comparison reveals that transverse effects in the decelerator lead to a considerable reduction of the phase-space acceptance at low values of the phase angle and an enhancement at high values. The optimal combinations of phase angles and currents with which a preset amount of kinetic energy can be removed from atoms and molecules in a pulsed supersonic beam using a multistage decelerator are determined by simulation. Quantitative analysis of the phase-space acceptance within a given volume reveals that for our decelerator (8 μs switch-off time) optimal conditions are achieved for values of the phase angle between 45° and 55°. This conclusion is examined and confirmed by experimental measurements using deuterium atoms. Alternative approaches to generate optimal deceleration pulse sequences, such as the implementation of evolutionary algorithms or the use of higher-order modes of the decelerator, are discussed.

  7. Laser frequency stabilization using bichromatic crossover spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Taek; Seb Moon, Han

    2015-03-07

    We propose a Doppler-free spectroscopic method named bichromatic crossover spectroscopy (BCS), which we then use for the frequency stabilization of an off-resonant frequency that does not correspond to an atomic transition. The observed BCS in the 5S{sub 1/2} → 5P{sub 1/2} transition of {sup 87}Rb is related to the hyperfine structure of the conventional saturated absorption spectrum of this transition. Furthermore, the Doppler-free BCS is numerically calculated by considering all of the degenerate magnetic sublevels of the 5S{sub 1/2} → 5P{sub 1/2} transition in an atomic vapor cell, and is found to be in good agreement with the experimental results. Finally, we successfully achieve modulation-free off-resonant locking at the center frequency between the two 5S{sub 1/2}(F = 1 and 2) → 5P{sub 1/2}(F′ = 1) transitions using a polarization rotation of the BCS. The laser frequency stability was estimated to be the Allan variance of 2.1 × 10{sup −10} at 1 s.

  8. DYNAMIC NEUROMUSCULAR STABILIZATION & SPORTS REHABILITATION

    PubMed Central

    Kobesova, Alena; Kolar, Pavel

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic neuromuscular (core) stability is necessary for optimal athletic performance and is not achieved purely by adequate strength of abdominals, spinal extensors, gluteals or any other musculature; rather, core stabilization is accomplished through precise coordination of these muscles and intra‐abdominal pressure regulation by the central nervous system. Understanding developmental kinesiology provides a framework to appreciate the regional interdependence and the inter‐linking of the skeleton, joints, musculature during movement and the importance of training both the dynamic and stabilizing function of muscles in the kinetic chain. The Dynamic Neuromuscular Stabilization (DNS) approach provides functional tools to assess and activate the intrinsic spinal stabilizers in order to optimize the movement system for both pre‐habilitation and rehabilitation of athletic injuries and performance. Level of Evidence: 5 PMID:23439921

  9. Robust control design with real parameter uncertainty using absolute stability theory. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    How, Jonathan P.; Hall, Steven R.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to investigate an extension of mu theory for robust control design by considering systems with linear and nonlinear real parameter uncertainties. In the process, explicit connections are made between mixed mu and absolute stability theory. In particular, it is shown that the upper bounds for mixed mu are a generalization of results from absolute stability theory. Both state space and frequency domain criteria are developed for several nonlinearities and stability multipliers using the wealth of literature on absolute stability theory and the concepts of supply rates and storage functions. The state space conditions are expressed in terms of Riccati equations and parameter-dependent Lyapunov functions. For controller synthesis, these stability conditions are used to form an overbound of the H2 performance objective. A geometric interpretation of the equivalent frequency domain criteria in terms of off-axis circles clarifies the important role of the multiplier and shows that both the magnitude and phase of the uncertainty are considered. A numerical algorithm is developed to design robust controllers that minimize the bound on an H2 cost functional and satisfy an analysis test based on the Popov stability multiplier. The controller and multiplier coefficients are optimized simultaneously, which avoids the iteration and curve-fitting procedures required by the D-K procedure of mu synthesis. Several benchmark problems and experiments on the Middeck Active Control Experiment at M.I.T. demonstrate that these controllers achieve good robust performance and guaranteed stability bounds.

  10. Dynamical behavior and Jacobi stability analysis of wound strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lake, Matthew J.; Harko, Tiberiu

    2016-06-01

    We numerically solve the equations of motion (EOM) for two models of circular cosmic string loops with windings in a simply connected internal space. Since the windings cannot be topologically stabilized, stability must be achieved (if at all) dynamically. As toy models for realistic compactifications, we consider windings on a small section of {R}^2, which is valid as an approximation to any simply connected internal manifold if the winding radius is sufficiently small, and windings on an S^2 of constant radius {R}. We then use Kosambi-Cartan-Chern (KCC) theory to analyze the Jacobi stability of the string equations and determine bounds on the physical parameters that ensure dynamical stability of the windings. We find that, for the same initial conditions, the curvature and topology of the internal space have nontrivial effects on the microscopic behavior of the string in the higher dimensions, but that the macroscopic behavior is remarkably insensitive to the details of the motion in the compact space. This suggests that higher-dimensional signatures may be extremely difficult to detect in the effective (3+1)-dimensional dynamics of strings compactified on an internal space, even if configurations with nontrivial windings persist over long time periods.

  11. Dynamical behavior and Jacobi stability analysis of wound strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lake, Matthew J.; Harko, Tiberiu

    2016-06-01

    We numerically solve the equations of motion (EOM) for two models of circular cosmic string loops with windings in a simply connected internal space. Since the windings cannot be topologically stabilized, stability must be achieved (if at all) dynamically. As toy models for realistic compactifications, we consider windings on a small section of mathbb {R}^2, which is valid as an approximation to any simply connected internal manifold if the winding radius is sufficiently small, and windings on an S^2 of constant radius mathcal {R}. We then use Kosambi-Cartan-Chern (KCC) theory to analyze the Jacobi stability of the string equations and determine bounds on the physical parameters that ensure dynamical stability of the windings. We find that, for the same initial conditions, the curvature and topology of the internal space have nontrivial effects on the microscopic behavior of the string in the higher dimensions, but that the macroscopic behavior is remarkably insensitive to the details of the motion in the compact space. This suggests that higher-dimensional signatures may be extremely difficult to detect in the effective (3+1)-dimensional dynamics of strings compactified on an internal space, even if configurations with nontrivial windings persist over long time periods.

  12. Orbiter Boundary Layer Transition Stability Modeling at Flight Entry Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartkowicz, Matt; Johnson, Heath; Candler, Graham; Campbell, Charles H.

    2009-01-01

    State of the art boundary layer stability modeling capabilities are increasingly seeing application to entry flight vehicles. With the advent of user friendly and robust implementations of two-dimensional chemical nonequilibrium stability modeling with the STABL/PSE-CHEM software, the need for flight data to calibrate such analyses capabilities becomes more critical. Recent efforts to perform entry flight testing with the Orbiter geometry related to entry aerothermodynamics and boundary layer transition is allowing for a heightened focus on the Orbiter configuration. A significant advancement in the state of the art can likely be achieved by establishing a basis of understanding for the occurrence of boundary layer transition on the Orbiter due to discrete protruding gap fillers and the nominal distributed roughness of the actual thermal protection system. Recent success in demonstrating centerline two-dimensional stability modeling on the centerline of the Orbiter at flight entry conditions provides a starting point for additional investigations. The more detailed paper will include smooth Orbiter configuration boundary layer stability results for several typical orbiter entry conditions. In addition, the numerical modeling approach for establishing the mean laminar flow will be reviewed and the method for determining boundary layer disturbance growth will be overviewed. In addition, if actual Orbiter TPS surface data obtained via digital surface scans become available, it may be possible to investigate the effects of an as-flown flight configuration on boundary layer transition compared to a smooth CAD reference.

  13. Numerical simulation of conservation laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Sin-Chung; To, Wai-Ming

    1992-01-01

    A new numerical framework for solving conservation laws is being developed. This new approach differs substantially from the well established methods, i.e., finite difference, finite volume, finite element and spectral methods, in both concept and methodology. The key features of the current scheme include: (1) direct discretization of the integral forms of conservation laws, (2) treating space and time on the same footing, (3) flux conservation in space and time, and (4) unified treatment of the convection and diffusion fluxes. The model equation considered in the initial study is the standard one dimensional unsteady constant-coefficient convection-diffusion equation. In a stability study, it is shown that the principal and spurious amplification factors of the current scheme, respectively, are structurally similar to those of the leapfrog/DuFort-Frankel scheme. As a result, the current scheme has no numerical diffusion in the special case of pure convection and is unconditionally stable in the special case of pure diffusion. Assuming smooth initial data, it will be shown theoretically and numerically that, by using an easily determined optimal time step, the accuracy of the current scheme may reach a level which is several orders of magnitude higher than that of the MacCormack scheme, with virtually identical operation count.

  14. Recognizing outstanding achievements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speiss, Fred

    One function of any professional society is to provide an objective, informed means for recognizing outstanding achievements in its field. In AGU's Ocean Sciences section we have a variety of means for carrying out this duty. They include recognition of outstanding student presentations at our meetings, dedication of special sessions, nomination of individuals to be fellows of the Union, invitations to present Sverdrup lectures, and recommendations for Macelwane Medals, the Ocean Sciences Award, and the Ewing Medal.Since the decision to bestow these awards requires initiative and judgement by members of our section in addition to a deserving individual, it seems appropriate to review the selection process for each and to urge you to identify those deserving of recognition.

  15. Achieving closure at Fernald

    SciTech Connect

    Bradburne, John; Patton, Tisha C.

    2001-02-25

    When Fluor Fernald took over the management of the Fernald Environmental Management Project in 1992, the estimated closure date of the site was more than 25 years into the future. Fluor Fernald, in conjunction with DOE-Fernald, introduced the Accelerated Cleanup Plan, which was designed to substantially shorten that schedule and save taxpayers more than $3 billion. The management of Fluor Fernald believes there are three fundamental concerns that must be addressed by any contractor hoping to achieve closure of a site within the DOE complex. They are relationship management, resource management and contract management. Relationship management refers to the interaction between the site and local residents, regulators, union leadership, the workforce at large, the media, and any other interested stakeholder groups. Resource management is of course related to the effective administration of the site knowledge base and the skills of the workforce, the attraction and retention of qualified a nd competent technical personnel, and the best recognition and use of appropriate new technologies. Perhaps most importantly, resource management must also include a plan for survival in a flat-funding environment. Lastly, creative and disciplined contract management will be essential to effecting the closure of any DOE site. Fluor Fernald, together with DOE-Fernald, is breaking new ground in the closure arena, and ''business as usual'' has become a thing of the past. How Fluor Fernald has managed its work at the site over the last eight years, and how it will manage the new site closure contract in the future, will be an integral part of achieving successful closure at Fernald.

  16. Numerical error in groundwater flow and solute transport simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, Juliette A.; Teubner, Michael D.; Simmons, Craig T.; Narayan, Kumar A.

    2003-06-01

    Models of groundwater flow and solute transport may be affected by numerical error, leading to quantitative and qualitative changes in behavior. In this paper we compare and combine three methods of assessing the extent of numerical error: grid refinement, mathematical analysis, and benchmark test problems. In particular, we assess the popular solute transport code SUTRA [Voss, 1984] as being a typical finite element code. Our numerical analysis suggests that SUTRA incorporates a numerical dispersion error and that its mass-lumped numerical scheme increases the numerical error. This is confirmed using a Gaussian test problem. A modified SUTRA code, in which the numerical dispersion is calculated and subtracted, produces better results. The much more challenging Elder problem [Elder, 1967; Voss and Souza, 1987] is then considered. Calculation of its numerical dispersion coefficients and numerical stability show that the Elder problem is prone to error. We confirm that Elder problem results are extremely sensitive to the simulation method used.

  17. Some Validation Data for the Achievement Motives Scale (AMS).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rand, Per

    1978-01-01

    A Norwegian version of the Achievement Motives Scale (AMS) was administered to Oslo sixth-graders, along with verbal, numeric, test anxiety, and lie/defensiveness tests. Results showed the relationships to academic performance predicted by achievement theory. Even when related to the personality scales, the AMS showed promising qualities.…

  18. Admission Requirements for Teacher Education as a Factor of Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lukaš, Mirko; Samardžic, Darko

    2015-01-01

    Numerous researches have demonstrated the enormous role of teachers in achievements of students. Educated and motivated teacher that cares about the success of students devotes more effort to preparing the lesson and thus provides the students better conditions for achieving results. The problem occurs when teachers are not equally qualified,…

  19. Culturally Responsive Pedagogies in Arizona and Latino Students' Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    López, Francesca A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Despite numerous educational reform efforts aimed at aggressively addressing achievement disparities, Latinos continue to underperform in school. In sharp contrast to the belief that the inordinate achievement disparities among Latino students stem from deficiencies, some researchers assert that culturally responsive teaching (CRT)…

  20. Robust adaptive spin-axis stabilization of a symmetric spacecraft using two bounded torques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gui, Haichao; Vukovich, George

    2015-12-01

    The spin-axis stabilization of an axisymmetric spacecraft by two control torques perpendicular to the symmetry axis is addressed. Two control laws are designed to align the symmetry axis along a desired inertial direction despite the revolution around the symmetry axis. The first controller takes a saturated proportional-derivative form and can stabilize the spin-axis to the desired direction with a priori bounded torques in the absence of modeling uncertainties. In order to achieve better robustness, an adaptive controller is then designed to account for the inertia uncertainties and disturbances, in addition to actuator saturation. Numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the advantageous features of the proposed algorithm compared with conventional spin-axis stabilization methods.

  1. Calculation of the lateral-dynamic stability of aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raikh, A

    1952-01-01

    Graphs and formulas are given with the aid of which all the aerodynamic coefficients required for computing the lateral dynamic stability can be determined. A number of numerical examples are given for obtaining the stability derivatives and solving the characteristic-stability equation. Approximate formulas are derived with the aid of which rapid preliminary computations may be made and the stability coefficients corrected for certain modifications of the airplane. A derivation of the lateral-dynamic-stability equations is included.

  2. Partial stabilization-based guidance.

    PubMed

    Shafiei, M H; Binazadeh, T

    2012-01-01

    A novel nonlinear missile guidance law against maneuvering targets is designed based on the principles of partial stability. It is demonstrated that in a real approach which is adopted with actual situations, each state of the guidance system must have a special behavior and asymptotic stability or exponential stability of all states is not realistic. Thus, a new guidance law is developed based on the partial stability theorem in such a way that the behaviors of states in the closed-loop system are in conformity with a real guidance scenario that leads to collision. The performance of the proposed guidance law in terms of interception time and control effort is compared with the sliding mode guidance law by means of numerical simulations. PMID:21963401

  3. Achievement Goals and Achievement Emotions: A Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Chiungjung

    2011-01-01

    This meta-analysis synthesized 93 independent samples (N = 30,003) in 77 studies that reported in 78 articles examining correlations between achievement goals and achievement emotions. Achievement goals were meaningfully associated with different achievement emotions. The correlations of mastery and mastery approach goals with positive achievement…

  4. Entrepreneur achievement. Liaoning province.

    PubMed

    Zhao, R

    1994-03-01

    This paper reports the successful entrepreneurial endeavors of members of a 20-person women's group in Liaoning Province, China. Jing Yuhong, a member of the Family Planning Association at Shileizi Village, Dalian City, provided the basis for their achievements by first building an entertainment/study room in her home to encourage married women to learn family planning. Once stocked with books, magazines, pamphlets, and other materials on family planning and agricultural technology, dozens of married women in the neighborhood flocked voluntarily to the room. Yuhong also set out to give these women a way to earn their own income as a means of helping then gain greater equality with their husbands and exert greater control over their personal reproductive and social lives. She gave a section of her farming land to the women's group, loaned approximately US$5200 to group members to help them generate income from small business initiatives, built a livestock shed in her garden for the group to raise marmots, and erected an awning behind her house under which mushrooms could be grown. The investment yielded $12,000 in the first year, allowing each woman to keep more than $520 in dividends. Members then soon began going to fairs in the capital and other places to learn about the outside world, and have successfully ventured out on their own to generate individual incomes. Ten out of twenty women engaged in these income-generating activities asked for and got the one-child certificate. PMID:12287775

  5. Numerical models for high beta magnetohydrodynamic flow

    SciTech Connect

    Brackbill, J.U.

    1987-01-01

    The fundamentals of numerical magnetohydrodynamics for highly conducting, high-beta plasmas are outlined. The discussions emphasize the physical properties of the flow, and how elementary concepts in numerical analysis can be applied to the construction of finite difference approximations that capture these features. The linear and nonlinear stability of explicit and implicit differencing in time is examined, the origin and effect of numerical diffusion in the calculation of convective transport is described, and a technique for maintaining solenoidality in the magnetic field is developed. Many of the points are illustrated by numerical examples. The techniques described are applicable to the time-dependent, high-beta flows normally encountered in magnetically confined plasmas, plasma switches, and space and astrophysical plasmas. 40 refs.

  6. Numerical approach to Zeeman line radiative transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Yoichi

    1991-10-01

    An accelerated lambda iteration (ALI) method, a version of the operator perturbation technique, is formulated for applications to Zeeman line formation problems in the presence of magnetic fields. This approach has proven to be quite an effective and flexible numerical device, being applicable to extensive problems (e.g., LTE one-way integration problem, noncoherent scattering etc.). In addition to its general formulation, a specialized practical version is also proposed which is limited to scattering (or multi-level) problems under the assumption of complete frequency redistribution (CRD), but requiring much less computing time. In order to examine the computational efficiency of this ALI method, numerical examples are presented concerning line formation in a magnetic field for several simple cases (LTE Milne-Eddington model, noncoherent CRD scattering, angle-dependent coherent scattering), showing a reasonably rapid convergence with notable numerical stability. Comparisons with other recent numerical techniques confirm the distinguished superiority of the present method.

  7. Space Elevator: Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perek, Lubos

    2008-04-01

    Many papers have been published on engineering and economic aspects of the Space Elevator. The Elevator, however, is a very special and unusual astronomical body. Its behavior in space is affected not only by the attraction of the Earth and by the "centrifugal force" but also by the attraction of the Sun and the Moon, by the detailed shape of the Earth, by the presence of space debris, etc. Not all of the minor effects have been adequately studied. The size of the Space Elevator and its lack of resistance against buckling or bending require a detailed study of its stability, both in its initial phase as a geostationary (GEO) satellite as well as in its operational phase as a "sling". Lunisolar perturbations and other minor forces may affect the stability in the initial phase and will cause oscillations in the operational phase. Station-keeping thrusters will have to be mounted at selected points along the cable in order to maintain stability. In addition, the thrusters will perform local maneuvers for avoiding collisions with passing space debris. The control system of thrusters has to be adaptive, reacting fast to actual situation and rectifying the attitude of the Elevator whenever necessary. A further advantage of the thrusters is a possibility to locate the Elevator at any longitude, possibly looking for a region with minimum traffic at GEO distance. Extensive numerical simulations will have to be performed in order to determine elements of the thrusters and their control system.

  8. Numerical Methods in Quantum Mechanics: Analysis of Numerical Schemes on One-Dimensional Schrodinger Wave Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Marvin Quenten, Jr.

    The motion and behavior of quantum processes can be described by the Schrodinger equation using the wave function, Psi(x,t). The use of the Schrodinger equation to study quantum phenomena is known as Quantum Mechanics, akin to classical mechanics being the tool to study classical physics. This research focuses on the emphasis of numerical techniques: Finite-Difference, Fast Fourier Transform (spectral method), finite difference schemes such as the Leapfrog method and the Crank-Nicolson scheme and second quantization to solve and analyze the Schrodinger equation for the infinite square well problem, the free particle with periodic boundary conditions, the barrier problem, tight-binding hamiltonians and a potential wall problem. We discuss these techniques and the problems created to test how these different techniques draw both physical and numerical conclusions in a tabular summary. We observed both numerical stability and quantum stability (conservation of energy, probability, momentum, etc.). We found in our results that the Crank-Nicolson scheme is an unconditionally stable scheme and conserves probability (unitary), and momentum, though dissipative with energy. The time-independent problems conserved energy, momentum and were unitary, which is of interest, but we found when time-dependence was introduced, quantum stability (i.e. conservation of mass, momentum, etc.) was not implied by numerical stability. Hence, we observed schemes that were numerically stable, but not quantum stable as well as schemes that were quantum stable, but not numerically stable for all of time, t. We also observed that second quantization removed the issues with stability as the problem was transformed into a discrete problem. Moreover, all quantum information is conserved in second quantization. This method, however, does not work universally for all problems.

  9. Direct Numerical Simulation of Air Layer Drag Reduction over a Backward-facing Step

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dokyun; Moin, Parviz

    2010-11-01

    Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of two-phase flow is performed to investigate the air layer drag reduction (ALDR) phenomenon in turbulent flow over a backward-facing step. In their experimental study, Elbing et al. (JFM, 2008) have observed a stable air layer on an entire flat plate if air is injected beyond the critical air-flow rate. In the present study, air is injected at the step on the wall into turbulent water flow for ALDR. The Reynolds and Weber numbers based on the water properties and step height are 22,800 and 560, respectively. An inlet section length before the step is 3h and the post expansion length is 30h, where h is the step height. The total number of grid points is about 271 million for DNS. The level set method is used to track the phase interface and the structured-mesh finite volume solver is used with an efficient algorithm for two-phase DNS. Two cases with different air-flow rates are performed to investigate the mechanism and stability of air layer. For high air-flow rate, the stable air layer is formed on the plate and more than 90% drag reduction is obtained. In the case of low air-flow rate, the air layer breaks up and ALDR is not achieved. The parameters governing the stability of air layer from the numerical simulations is also consistent with the results of stability analysis.

  10. Response sensitivity analysis of the dynamic milling process based on the numerical integration method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Ye; Zhu, Limin; Zhang, Xiaojian; Ding, Han

    2012-09-01

    As one of the bases of gradient-based optimization algorithms, sensitivity analysis is usually required to calculate the derivatives of the system response with respect to the machining parameters. The most widely used approaches for sensitivity analysis are based on time-consuming numerical methods, such as finite difference methods. This paper presents a semi-analytical method for calculation of the sensitivity of the stability boundary in milling. After transforming the delay-differential equation with time-periodic coefficients governing the dynamic milling process into the integral form, the Floquet transition matrix is constructed by using the numerical integration method. Then, the analytical expressions of derivatives of the Floquet transition matrix with respect to the machining parameters are obtained. Thereafter, the classical analytical expression of the sensitivity of matrix eigenvalues is employed to calculate the sensitivity of the stability lobe diagram. The two-degree-of-freedom milling example illustrates the accuracy and efficiency of the proposed method. Compared with the existing methods, the unique merit of the proposed method is that it can be used for analytically computing the sensitivity of the stability boundary in milling, without employing any finite difference methods. Therefore, the high accuracy and high efficiency are both achieved. The proposed method can serve as an effective tool for machining parameter optimization and uncertainty analysis in high-speed milling.

  11. Experimental and numerical FSI study of compliant hydrofoils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augier, B.; Yan, J.; Korobenko, A.; Czarnowski, J.; Ketterman, G.; Bazilevs, Y.

    2015-06-01

    A propulsion system based on tandem hydrofoils is studied experimentally and numerically. An experimental measurement system is developed to extract hydrodynamic loads on the foils and capture their twisting deformation during operation. The measured data allowed us to assess the efficiency of the propulsion system as a function of travel speed and stroke frequency. The numerical simulation of the propulsion system is also presented and involves 3D, full-scale fluid-structure interaction (FSI) computation of a single (forward) foil. The foil is modeled as a combination of the isogeometric rotation-free Kirchhoff-Love shell and bending-stabilized cable, while the hydrodynamics makes use of the finite-element-based arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian variational multiscale formulation. The large added mass is handled through a quasi-direct FSI coupling technique. The measurement data collected is used in the validation of the FSI simulation, and excellent agreement is achieved between the predicted and measured hydrodynamic loads and foil twisting motion.

  12. The Homogeneity of School Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cahan, Sorel

    Since the measurement of school achievement involves the administration of achievement tests to various grades on various subjects, both grade level and subject matter contribute to within-school achievement variations. To determine whether achievement test scores vary most among different fields within a grade level, or within fields among…

  13. Numerical experiments on the stability of controlled boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zang, Thomas A.; Hussaini, M. Y.

    1988-01-01

    Nonlinear simulations are presented for instability and transition in parallel water boundary layers subjected to pressure gradient, suction, or heating control. In the nonlinear regime, finite amplitude, 2-D Tollmein-Schlichting waves grow faster than is predicted by linear theory. Moreover, this discrepancy is greatest in the case of heating control. Likewise, heating control is found to be the least effective in delaying secondary instabilities of both the fundamental and subharmonic type. Flow field details (including temperature profiles) are presented for both the uncontrolled boundary layer and the heated boundary layer.

  14. Numerical Stability and Convergence of Approximate Methods for Conservation Laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galkin, V. A.

    We present the new approach to background of approximate methods convergence based on functional solutions theory for conservation laws. The applications to physical kinetics, gas and fluid dynamics are considered.

  15. Stability and Change in Markers of Core Numerical Competencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reeve, Robert; Reynolds, Fiona; Humberstone, Judi; Butterworth, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Dot enumeration (DE) and number comparison (NC) abilities are considered markers of core number competence. Differences in DE/NC reaction time (RT) signatures are thought to distinguish between typical and atypical number development. Whether a child's DE and NC signatures change or remain stable over time, relative to other developmental…

  16. HEPEX - achievements and challenges!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappenberger, Florian; Ramos, Maria-Helena; Thielen, Jutta; Wood, Andy; Wang, Qj; Duan, Qingyun; Collischonn, Walter; Verkade, Jan; Voisin, Nathalie; Wetterhall, Fredrik; Vuillaume, Jean-Francois Emmanuel; Lucatero Villasenor, Diana; Cloke, Hannah L.; Schaake, John; van Andel, Schalk-Jan

    2014-05-01

    HEPEX is an international initiative bringing together hydrologists, meteorologists, researchers and end-users to develop advanced probabilistic hydrological forecast techniques for improved flood, drought and water management. HEPEX was launched in 2004 as an independent, cooperative international scientific activity. During the first meeting, the overarching goal was defined as: "to develop and test procedures to produce reliable hydrological ensemble forecasts, and to demonstrate their utility in decision making related to the water, environmental and emergency management sectors." The applications of hydrological ensemble predictions span across large spatio-temporal scales, ranging from short-term and localized predictions to global climate change and regional modeling. Within the HEPEX community, information is shared through its blog (www.hepex.org), meetings, testbeds and intercompaison experiments, as well as project reportings. Key questions of HEPEX are: * What adaptations are required for meteorological ensemble systems to be coupled with hydrological ensemble systems? * How should the existing hydrological ensemble prediction systems be modified to account for all sources of uncertainty within a forecast? * What is the best way for the user community to take advantage of ensemble forecasts and to make better decisions based on them? This year HEPEX celebrates its 10th year anniversary and this poster will present a review of the main operational and research achievements and challenges prepared by Hepex contributors on data assimilation, post-processing of hydrologic predictions, forecast verification, communication and use of probabilistic forecasts in decision-making. Additionally, we will present the most recent activities implemented by Hepex and illustrate how everyone can join the community and participate to the development of new approaches in hydrologic ensemble prediction.

  17. Numerical solution of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation with wave operator on unbounded domains.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongwei; Wu, Xiaonan; Zhang, Jiwei

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we generalize the unified approach proposed in Zhang et al. [J. Zhang, Z. Xu, and X. Wu, Phys. Rev. E 78, 026709 (2008)] to design the nonlinear local absorbing boundary conditions (LABCs) for the nonlinear Schrödinger equation with wave operator on unbounded domains. In fact, based on the methodology underlying the unified approach, we first split the original equation into two parts-the linear equation and the nonlinear equation-then achieve a one-way operator to approximate the linear equation to make the wave outgoing, and finally combine the one-way operator with the nonlinear equation to achieve the nonlinear LABCs. The stability of the equation with the nonlinear LABCs is also analyzed by introducing some auxiliary variables, and some numerical examples are presented to verify the accuracy and effectiveness of our proposed method. PMID:25314566

  18. Prop-fan with improved stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothman, Edward A. (Inventor); Violette, John A. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    Improved prop-fan stability is achieved by providing each blade of the prop-fan with a leading edge which, outwardly, from a location thereon at the mid-span of the blade, occupy generally a single plane.

  19. Numerical methods for turbulent flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, James C., Jr.

    1988-09-01

    It has generally become accepted that the Navier-Strokes equations predict the dynamic behavior of turbulent as well as laminar flows of a fluid at a point in space away form a discontinuity such as a shock wave. Turbulence is also closely related to the phenomena of non-uniqueness of solutions of the Navier-Strokes equations. These second order, nonlinear partial differential equations can be solved analytically for only a few simple flows. Turbulent flow fields are much to complex to lend themselves to these few analytical methods. Numerical methods, therefore, offer the only possibility of achieving a solution of turbulent flow equations. In spite of recent advances in computer technology, the direct solution, by discrete methods, of the Navier-Strokes equations for turbulent flow fields is today, and in the foreseeable future, impossible. Thus the only economically feasible way to solve practical turbulent flow problems numerically is to use statistically averaged equations governing mean-flow quantities. The objective is to study some recent developments relating to the use of numerical methods to study turbulent flow.

  20. What Is Numerical Control?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goold, Vernell C.

    1977-01-01

    Numerical control (a technique involving coded, numerical instructions for the automatic control and performance of a machine tool) does not replace fundamental machine tool training. It should be added to the training program to give the student an additional tool to accomplish production rates and accuracy that were not possible before. (HD)

  1. Stability Limits and Dynamics of Nonaxisymmetric Liquid Bridges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, J. Iwan D.

    1996-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental investigation of the stability of nonaxisymmetric and axisymmetric bridges contained between equal and unequal radii disks as a function of Bond and Weber number with emphasis on the transition from unstable axisymmetric to stable nonaxisymmetric shapes. Numerical analysis of the stability of nonaxisymmetric bridges between unequal disks for various orientations of the gravity vector Experimental and numerical investigation of bridge stability (nonaxisymmetric and axisymmetric), large amplitude (nonaxisymmetric) oscillations and breaking.

  2. Stability of polymer solar cells.

    PubMed

    Jørgensen, Mikkel; Norrman, Kion; Gevorgyan, Suren A; Tromholt, Thomas; Andreasen, Birgitta; Krebs, Frederik C

    2012-02-01

    Organic photovoltaics (OPVs) evolve in an exponential manner in the two key areas of efficiency and stability. The power conversion efficiency (PCE) has in the last decade been increased by almost a factor of ten approaching 10%. A main concern has been the stability that was previously measured in minutes, but can now, in favorable circumstances, exceed many thousands of hours. This astonishing achievement is the subject of this article, which reviews the developments in stability/degradation of OPVs in the last five years. This progress has been gained by several developments, such as inverted device structures of the bulk heterojunction geometry device, which allows for more stable metal electrodes, the choice of more photostable active materials, the introduction of interfacial layers, and roll-to-roll fabrication, which promises fast and cheap production methods while creating its own challenges in terms of stability. PMID:22213056

  3. A simplified spatial model for BWR stability

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, Y.; Lederer, Y.; Meron, E.

    2012-07-01

    A spatial reduced order model for the study of BWR stability, based on the phenomenological model of March-Leuba et al., is presented. As one dimensional spatial dependence of the neutron flux, fuel temperature and void fraction is introduced, it is possible to describe both global and regional oscillations of the reactor power. Both linear stability analysis and numerical analysis were applied in order to describe the parameters which govern the model stability. The results were found qualitatively similar to past results. Doppler reactivity feedback was found essential for the explanation of the different regions of the flow-power stability map. (authors)

  4. Computerized Numerical Control Test Item Bank.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reneau, Fred; And Others

    This guide contains 285 test items for use in teaching a course in computerized numerical control. All test items were reviewed, revised, and validated by incumbent workers and subject matter instructors. Items are provided for assessing student achievement in such aspects of programming and planning, setting up, and operating machines with…

  5. Spin stabilized magnetic levitation of horizontal rotors.

    SciTech Connect

    Romero, Louis Anthony

    2004-10-01

    In this paper we present an analysis of a new configuration for achieving spin stabilized magnetic levitation. In the classical configuration, the rotor spins about a vertical axis; and the spin stabilizes the lateral instability of the top in the magnetic field. In this new configuration the rotor spins about a horizontal axis; and the spin stabilizes the axial instability of the top in the magnetic field.

  6. Residential Stability and Academic Sense of Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gigliotti, Richard J.

    1976-01-01

    Suggests that stability level of an individual and the community in which he operates is directly related to a child's sense of control and consequently his achievement in school. Findings indicate that for whites, community stability is positively and significantly related to sense of control, with the inverse for blacks. (Author/AM)

  7. Master stability islands for amplitude death in networks of delay-coupled oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huddy, Stanley R.; Sun, Jie

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents a master stability function (MSF) approach for analyzing the stability of amplitude death (AD) in networks of delay-coupled oscillators. Unlike the familiar MSFs for instantaneously coupled networks, which typically have a single input encoding for the effects of the eigenvalues of the network Laplacian matrix, for delay-coupled networks we show that such MSFs generally require two additional inputs: the time delay and the coupling strength. To utilize the MSF for determining the stability of AD of general networks for a chosen nonlinear system (node dynamics) and coupling function, we introduce the concept of master stability islands (MSIs), which are two-dimensional stability islands of the delay-coupling parameter space together with a third dimension ("altitude") encoding for eigenvalues that result in stable AD. We numerically compute the MSFs and visualize the corresponding MSIs for several common chaotic systems including the Rössler, the Lorenz, and Chen's system and find that it is generally possible to achieve AD and that a nonzero time delay is necessary for the stabilization of the AD states.

  8. The Impact of Reading Achievement on Overall Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Churchwell, Dawn Earheart

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between reading achievement and achievement in other subject areas. The purpose of this study was to determine if there was a correlation between reading scores as measured by the Standardized Test for the Assessment of Reading (STAR) and academic achievement in language arts, math, science, and social studies…

  9. Attitude Towards Physics and Additional Mathematics Achievement Towards Physics Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veloo, Arsaythamby; Nor, Rahimah; Khalid, Rozalina

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to identify the difference in students' attitude towards Physics and Additional Mathematics achievement based on gender and relationship between attitudinal variables towards Physics and Additional Mathematics achievement with achievement in Physics. This research focused on six variables, which is attitude towards…

  10. Predicting Mathematics Achievement: The Influence of Prior Achievement and Attitudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hemmings, Brian; Grootenboer, Peter; Kay, Russell

    2011-01-01

    Achievement in mathematics is inextricably linked to future career opportunities, and therefore, understanding those factors that influence achievement is important. This study sought to examine the relationships among attitude towards mathematics, ability and mathematical achievement. This examination was also supported by a focus on gender…

  11. Lattice Boltzmann model for numerical relativity.

    PubMed

    Ilseven, E; Mendoza, M

    2016-02-01

    In the Z4 formulation, Einstein equations are written as a set of flux conservative first-order hyperbolic equations that resemble fluid dynamics equations. Based on this formulation, we construct a lattice Boltzmann model for numerical relativity and validate it with well-established tests, also known as "apples with apples." Furthermore, we find that by increasing the relaxation time, we gain stability at the cost of losing accuracy, and by decreasing the lattice spacings while keeping a constant numerical diffusivity, the accuracy and stability of our simulations improve. Finally, in order to show the potential of our approach, a linear scaling law for parallelization with respect to number of CPU cores is demonstrated. Our model represents the first step in using lattice kinetic theory to solve gravitational problems. PMID:26986435

  12. Lattice Boltzmann model for numerical relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilseven, E.; Mendoza, M.

    2016-02-01

    In the Z4 formulation, Einstein equations are written as a set of flux conservative first-order hyperbolic equations that resemble fluid dynamics equations. Based on this formulation, we construct a lattice Boltzmann model for numerical relativity and validate it with well-established tests, also known as "apples with apples." Furthermore, we find that by increasing the relaxation time, we gain stability at the cost of losing accuracy, and by decreasing the lattice spacings while keeping a constant numerical diffusivity, the accuracy and stability of our simulations improve. Finally, in order to show the potential of our approach, a linear scaling law for parallelization with respect to number of CPU cores is demonstrated. Our model represents the first step in using lattice kinetic theory to solve gravitational problems.

  13. Stabilizing brokerage

    PubMed Central

    Stovel, Katherine; Golub, Benjamin; Milgrom, Eva M. Meyersson

    2011-01-01

    A variety of social and economic arrangements exist to facilitate the exchange of goods, services, and information over gaps in social structure. Each of these arrangements bears some relationship to the idea of brokerage, but this brokerage is rarely like the pure and formal economic intermediation seen in some modern markets. Indeed, for reasons illuminated by existing sociological and economic models, brokerage is a fragile relationship. In this paper, we review the causes of instability in brokerage and identify three social mechanisms that can stabilize fragile brokerage relationships: social isolation, broker capture, and organizational grafting. Each of these mechanisms rests on the emergence or existence of supporting institutions. We suggest that organizational grafting may be the most stable and effective resolution to the tensions inherent in brokerage, but it is also the most institutionally demanding. PMID:22198763

  14. STABILIZED OSCILLATOR

    DOEpatents

    Jessen, P.L.; Price, H.J.

    1958-03-18

    This patent relates to sine-wave generators and in particular describes a generator with a novel feedback circuit resulting in improved frequency stability. The generator comprises two triodes having a common cathode circuit connected to oscillate at a frequency and amplitude at which the loop galn of the circutt ls unity, and another pair of triodes having a common cathode circuit arranged as a conventional amplifier. A signal is conducted from the osciliator through a frequency selective network to the amplifier and fed back to the osciliator. The unique feature of the feedback circuit is the amplifier operates in the nonlinear portion of its tube characteristics thereby providing a relatively constant feedback voltage to the oscillator irrespective of the amplitude of its input signal.

  15. A nonlinear SIR with stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trisilowati, Darti, I.; Fitri, S.

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this work is to develop a mathematical model of a nonlinear susceptible-infectious-removed (SIR) epidemic model with vaccination. We analyze the stability of the model by linearizing the model around the equilibrium point. Then, diphtheria data from East Java province is fitted to the model. From these estimated parameters, we investigate which parameters that play important role in the epidemic model. Some numerical simulations are given to illustrate the analytical results and the behavior of the model.

  16. [Research Reports on Academic Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Latts, Sander; And Others

    1969-01-01

    Four counselors studied the relation between achievement and choice of major, achievement and motivation, counseling and motivation, and achievement and employment. To see if those with definite majors or career choices in mind did better than those without, 300 students were tested according to the certainty of their choice. No significant…

  17. Cherokee Culture and School Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Anthony D.

    1980-01-01

    Compares the effect of cooperative and competitive behaviors of Cherokee and Anglo American elementary school students on academic achievement. Suggests changes in teaching techniques and lesson organization that might raise academic achievement while taking into consideration tribal traditions that limit scholastic achievement in an…

  18. Rocket engine numerical simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidian, Ken

    1993-01-01

    The topics are presented in view graph form and include the following: a definition of the rocket engine numerical simulator (RENS); objectives; justification; approach; potential applications; potential users; RENS work flowchart; RENS prototype; and conclusions.

  19. Numbers and Numerals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, David Eugene; Ginsburg, Jekuthiel

    Counting, naming numbers, numerals, computation, and fractions are the topics covered in this pamphlet. Number lore and interesting number properties are noted; the derivation of some arithmetic terms is briefly discussed. (DT)

  20. Numerical analysis of bifurcations

    SciTech Connect

    Guckenheimer, J.

    1996-06-01

    This paper is a brief survey of numerical methods for computing bifurcations of generic families of dynamical systems. Emphasis is placed upon algorithms that reflect the structure of the underlying mathematical theory while retaining numerical efficiency. Significant improvements in the computational analysis of dynamical systems are to be expected from more reliance of geometric insight coming from dynamical systems theory. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  1. Numerical Techniques in Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J. (Compiler)

    1985-01-01

    This is the compilation of abstracts of the Numerical Techniques in Acoustics Forum held at the ASME's Winter Annual Meeting. This forum was for informal presentation and information exchange of ongoing acoustic work in finite elements, finite difference, boundary elements and other numerical approaches. As part of this forum, it was intended to allow the participants time to raise questions on unresolved problems and to generate discussions on possible approaches and methods of solution.

  2. Interpolation Approximation of Voltage Stability Constrained OPF (VSCOPF) for Reactive Power Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Tolbert, Leon M; Zhang, Wenjuan; Li, Fangxing

    2011-01-01

    Reactive power planning (RPP), or Var planning, is to identify the optimal size and location of reactive power sources. In this paper, first, the previous work using least square method to simplify the voltage stability constrained OPF (VSCOPF) model for RPP is presented. Then, this paper presents a new model simplification solution using interpolation. The interpolation approach can be easily applied to a piecewise formulation while preserving the continuity at boundary points, which cannot be easily achieved by previous works like the least square method. The proposed interpolation approach is numerically tested and compared with the least square approach. It is concluded that interpolation is an improved model simplification approach for RPP.

  3. Better Stability with Measurement Errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argun, Aykut; Volpe, Giovanni

    2016-06-01

    Often it is desirable to stabilize a system around an optimal state. This can be effectively accomplished using feedback control, where the system deviation from the desired state is measured in order to determine the magnitude of the restoring force to be applied. Contrary to conventional wisdom, i.e. that a more precise measurement is expected to improve the system stability, here we demonstrate that a certain degree of measurement error can improve the system stability. We exemplify the implications of this finding with numerical examples drawn from various fields, such as the operation of a temperature controller, the confinement of a microscopic particle, the localization of a target by a microswimmer, and the control of a population.

  4. Better Stability with Measurement Errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argun, Aykut; Volpe, Giovanni

    2016-04-01

    Often it is desirable to stabilize a system around an optimal state. This can be effectively accomplished using feedback control, where the system deviation from the desired state is measured in order to determine the magnitude of the restoring force to be applied. Contrary to conventional wisdom, i.e. that a more precise measurement is expected to improve the system stability, here we demonstrate that a certain degree of measurement error can improve the system stability. We exemplify the implications of this finding with numerical examples drawn from various fields, such as the operation of a temperature controller, the confinement of a microscopic particle, the localization of a target by a microswimmer, and the control of a population.

  5. Students' Achievement Goals, Learning-Related Emotions and Academic Achievement.

    PubMed

    Lüftenegger, Marko; Klug, Julia; Harrer, Katharina; Langer, Marie; Spiel, Christiane; Schober, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    In the present research, the recently proposed 3 × 2 model of achievement goals is tested and associations with achievement emotions and their joint influence on academic achievement are investigated. The study was conducted with 388 students using the 3 × 2 Achievement Goal Questionnaire including the six proposed goal constructs (task-approach, task-avoidance, self-approach, self-avoidance, other-approach, other-avoidance) and the enjoyment and boredom scales from the Achievement Emotion Questionnaire. Exam grades were used as an indicator of academic achievement. Findings from CFAs provided strong support for the proposed structure of the 3 × 2 achievement goal model. Self-based goals, other-based goals and task-approach goals predicted enjoyment. Task-approach goals negatively predicted boredom. Task-approach and other-approach predicted achievement. The indirect effects of achievement goals through emotion variables on achievement were assessed using bias-corrected bootstrapping. No mediation effects were found. Implications for educational practice are discussed. PMID:27199836

  6. Students’ Achievement Goals, Learning-Related Emotions and Academic Achievement

    PubMed Central

    Lüftenegger, Marko; Klug, Julia; Harrer, Katharina; Langer, Marie; Spiel, Christiane; Schober, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    In the present research, the recently proposed 3 × 2 model of achievement goals is tested and associations with achievement emotions and their joint influence on academic achievement are investigated. The study was conducted with 388 students using the 3 × 2 Achievement Goal Questionnaire including the six proposed goal constructs (task-approach, task-avoidance, self-approach, self-avoidance, other-approach, other-avoidance) and the enjoyment and boredom scales from the Achievement Emotion Questionnaire. Exam grades were used as an indicator of academic achievement. Findings from CFAs provided strong support for the proposed structure of the 3 × 2 achievement goal model. Self-based goals, other-based goals and task-approach goals predicted enjoyment. Task-approach goals negatively predicted boredom. Task-approach and other-approach predicted achievement. The indirect effects of achievement goals through emotion variables on achievement were assessed using bias-corrected bootstrapping. No mediation effects were found. Implications for educational practice are discussed. PMID:27199836

  7. Stabilization Strategies for Unstable Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Devjani J.; Morasso, Pietro

    2012-01-01

    Background When humans are faced with an unstable task, two different stabilization mechanisms are possible: a high-stiffness strategy, based on the inherent elastic properties of muscles/tools/manipulated objects, or a low-stiffness strategy, based on an explicit positional feedback mechanism. Specific constraints related to the dynamics of the task and/or the neuromuscular system often force people to adopt one of these two strategies. Methodology/Findings This experiment was designed such that subjects could achieve stability using either strategy, with a marked difference in terms of effort and control requirements between the two strategies. The task was to balance a virtual mass in an unstable environment via two elastic linkages that connected the mass to each hand. The dynamics of the mass under the influence of the unstable force field and the forces applied through the linkages were simulated using a bimanual, planar robot. The two linkages were non-linear, with a stiffness that increased with the amount of stretch. The mass could be stabilized by stretching the linkages to achieve a stiffness that was greater than the instability coefficient of the unstable field (high-stiffness), or by balancing the mass with sequences of small force impulses (low-stiffness). The results showed that 62% of the subjects quickly adopted the high-stiffness strategy, with stiffness ellipses that were aligned along the direction of instability. The remaining subjects applied the low-stiffness strategy, with no clear preference for the orientation of the stiffness ellipse. Conclusions The choice of a strategy was based on the bimanual coordination of the hands: high-stiffness subjects achieved stability quickly by separating the hands to stretch the linkages, while the low-stiffness subjects kept the hands close together and took longer to achieve stability but with lower effort. We suggest that the existence of multiple solutions leads to different types of skilled behavior

  8. Theory of colloid depletion stabilization by unattached and adsorbed polymers.

    PubMed

    Semenov, A N; Shvets, A A

    2015-12-01

    The polymer-induced forces between colloidal particles in a semidilute or concentrated polymer solution are considered theoretically. This study is focussed on the case of partially adsorbing colloidal surfaces involving some attractive centers able to trap polymer segments. In the presence of free polymers the particles are covered by self-assembled fluffy layers whose structure is elucidated. It is shown that the free-polymer-induced interaction between the particles is repulsive at distances exceeding the polymer correlation length, and that this depletion repulsion can be strongly enhanced due to the presence of fluffy layers. This enhanced depletion stabilization mechanism (which works in tandem with a more short-range steric repulsion of fluffy layers) can serve on its own to stabilize colloidal dispersions. More generally, we identify three main polymer-induced interaction mechanisms: depletion repulsion, depletion attraction, and steric repulsion. Their competition is analyzed both numerically and analytically based on an asymptotically rigorous mean-field theory. It is shown that colloid stabilization can be achieved by simply increasing the molecular weight of polymer additives, or by changing their concentration. PMID:26400677

  9. Frontiers in Numerical Relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Charles R.; Finn, Lee S.; Hobill, David W.

    2011-06-01

    Preface; Participants; Introduction; 1. Supercomputing and numerical relativity: a look at the past, present and future David W. Hobill and Larry L. Smarr; 2. Computational relativity in two and three dimensions Stuart L. Shapiro and Saul A. Teukolsky; 3. Slowly moving maximally charged black holes Robert C. Ferrell and Douglas M. Eardley; 4. Kepler's third law in general relativity Steven Detweiler; 5. Black hole spacetimes: testing numerical relativity David H. Bernstein, David W. Hobill and Larry L. Smarr; 6. Three dimensional initial data of numerical relativity Ken-ichi Oohara and Takashi Nakamura; 7. Initial data for collisions of black holes and other gravitational miscellany James W. York, Jr.; 8. Analytic-numerical matching for gravitational waveform extraction Andrew M. Abrahams; 9. Supernovae, gravitational radiation and the quadrupole formula L. S. Finn; 10. Gravitational radiation from perturbations of stellar core collapse models Edward Seidel and Thomas Moore; 11. General relativistic implicit radiation hydrodynamics in polar sliced space-time Paul J. Schinder; 12. General relativistic radiation hydrodynamics in spherically symmetric spacetimes A. Mezzacappa and R. A. Matzner; 13. Constraint preserving transport for magnetohydrodynamics John F. Hawley and Charles R. Evans; 14. Enforcing the momentum constraints during axisymmetric spacelike simulations Charles R. Evans; 15. Experiences with an adaptive mesh refinement algorithm in numerical relativity Matthew W. Choptuik; 16. The multigrid technique Gregory B. Cook; 17. Finite element methods in numerical relativity P. J. Mann; 18. Pseudo-spectral methods applied to gravitational collapse Silvano Bonazzola and Jean-Alain Marck; 19. Methods in 3D numerical relativity Takashi Nakamura and Ken-ichi Oohara; 20. Nonaxisymmetric rotating gravitational collapse and gravitational radiation Richard F. Stark; 21. Nonaxisymmetric neutron star collisions: initial results using smooth particle hydrodynamics

  10. Predicting vegetation-stabilized dune field morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barchyn, Thomas E.; Hugenholtz, Chris H.

    2012-09-01

    The morphology of vegetation-stabilized dune fields on the North American Great Plains (NAGP) mostly comprises parabolic dunes; stabilized barchan and transverse dunes are rare, with the exception of transverse and barchan mega-dunes in the Nebraska Sand Hills. We present a hypothesis from a numerical dune field model explaining the vegetation-stabilized morphology of dunes under unidirectional wind. Simulations with a range of initial dune morphologies (closely-spaced transverse to disperse barchans) indicate that stabilized morphology is determined by the ratio of slipface deposition rate to deposition tolerance of vegetation. Slipface deposition rate is related to dune height, flux, and celerity. With a fixed depositional tolerance, large, slow-moving dunes have low slipface deposition rates and ‘freeze’ in place once vegetation is introduced. Relatively small, fast dunes have high slipface deposition rates and evolve into parabolic dunes, often colliding during stabilization. Our hypothesis could explain differences in stabilized morphology across the NAGP and elsewhere.

  11. Numerical FEM modeling in dental implantology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roateşi, Iulia; Roateşi, Simona

    2016-06-01

    This paper is devoted to a numerical approach of the stress and displacement calculation of a system made up of dental implant, ceramic crown and surrounding bone. This is the simulation of a clinical situation involving both biological - the bone tissue, and non-biological - the implant and the crown, materials. On the other hand this problem deals with quite fine technical structure details - the threads, tapers, etc with a great impact in masticatory force transmission. Modeling the contact between the implant and the bone tissue is important to a proper bone-implant interface model and implant design. The authors proposed a three-dimensional numerical model to assess the biomechanical behaviour of this complex structure in order to evaluate its stability by determining the risk zones. A comparison between this numerical analysis and clinical cases is performed and a good agreement is obtained.

  12. Stability of the Levitron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heflinger, Lee O.; Ridgway, S. L.; Simon, Martin D.

    1996-05-01

    The Levitron, manufactured by Fascinations in Seattle WA, successfully demonstrates magnetic suspension. A 22 gram spinning magnetic dipole top is supported by magnetic forces that balance its weight about 3.2 cm above a magnetized base, and it will float about two minutes until its spin rate has declined to about 1000 rpm. However, since in general it is not possible (The Feynman Lectures on Physics Volume II, 5-4) to have a potential energy minimum or maximum for any rigidly connected system of poles in a magnetic field, the stability of the Levitron is not obvious. Gyroscopic forces that prevent the top from flipping over and being attracted to the base have been suggested as the source of the stability (US Patent 5,404,062, Hones et al.). We find that fixing the direction of the top axis in space is not sufficient. An analysis and numerical integration of the five degree of freedom equations of motion of the top that includes gyroscopic precession around the local magnetic field lines do predict that the top will be supported stably up to spin speeds of 2100 rpm.

  13. Stability of the Levitron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heflinger, Lee O.; Ridgway, S. L.; Simon, Martin D.

    1996-03-01

    abstract. Abstract text lines The Levitron, manufactured by Fascinations in Seattle WA, successfully demonstrates magnetic suspension. A 22 gram spinning magnetic dipole top is supported by magnetic forces that balance its weight about 3.2 cm above a magnetized base, and it will float about two minutes until its spin rate has declined to about 1000 rpm. However, since in general i t is not possible (The Feynman Lectures on Physics Volume II, 5-4) to have a potential energy minimum or maximum for any rigidly connected system of poles in a magnetic field, the stability of the Levitron is not obvious. Gyroscopic forces that prevent the top from flipping over and being attracted to the base have been suggested as the source of the stability (US Patent 5,404,062, Hones et al.). We find that fixing the direction of the top axis in space is not sufficient. An analysis and numerical integration of the five degree of freedom equations of motion of the top that includes gyroscopic precession around the local magnetic field lines do predict that the top will be supported stably up to spin speeds of 2100 rpm.

  14. Achievement as Resistance: The Development of a Critical Race Achievement Ideology among Black Achievers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Dorinda J.

    2008-01-01

    In this article, Dorinda Carter examines the embodiment of a critical race achievement ideology in high-achieving black students. She conducted a yearlong qualitative investigation of the adaptive behaviors that nine high-achieving black students developed and employed to navigate the process of schooling at an upper-class, predominantly white,…

  15. Theory and Simulation Basis for Magnetohydrodynamic Stability in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Turnbull, A.D.; Brennan, D.P.; Chu, M.S.; Lao, L.L.; Snyder, P.B.

    2005-10-15

    Theory and simulation have provided one of the critical foundations for many of the significant achievements in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stability in DIII-D over the past two decades. Early signature achievements included the validation of tokamak MHD stability limits, beta and performance optimization through cross-section shaping and profiles, and the development of new operational regimes. More recent accomplishments encompass the realization and sustainment of wall stabilization using plasma rotation and active feedback, a new understanding of edge stability and its relation to edge-localized modes, and recent successes in predicting resistive tearing and interchange instabilities. The key to success has been the synergistic tie between the theory effort and the experiment made possible by the detailed equilibrium reconstruction data available in DIII-D and the corresponding attention to the measured details in the modeling. This interaction fosters an emphasis on the important phenomena and leads to testable theoretical predictions. Also important is the application of a range of analytic and simulation techniques, coupled with a program of numerical tool development. The result is a comprehensive integrated approach to fusion science and improving the tokamak approach to burning plasmas.

  16. Optimal control of spin-stabilized spacecraft with telescoping appendages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bainum, P. M.; Sellappan, R.

    1976-01-01

    The control of a spin-stabilized spacecraft consisting of a rigid central hub and one or two movable offset telescoping booms (with end masses) is considered. The equations of rotational motion are linearized about either of two desired final states. A control law for the boom end mass position is sought such that a quadratic cost functional involving the weighted components of angular velocity plus the control is minimized when the final time is unspecified and involves the solution of the matrix Riccati algebraic equation. For three axis control more than one offset boom (orthogonal to each other) is required. For two-axis control with a single boom offset from a symmetrical hub, an analytic solution is obtained; when this system is used for nutation decay the time constant is one order of magnitude smaller than previously achieved using nonoptimal control logic. For the general case results are obtained numerically.

  17. The upper-branch stability of compressible boundary layer flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gajjar, J. S. B.; Cole, J. W.

    1989-01-01

    The upper-branch linear and nonlinear stability of compressible boundary layer flows is studied using the approach of Smith and Bodonyi (1982) for a similar incompressible problem. Both pressure gradient boundary layers and Blasius flow are considered with and without heat transfer, and the neutral eigenrelations incorporating compressibility effects are obtained explicitly. The compressible nonlinear viscous critical layer equations are derived and solved numerically and the results indicate some solutions with positive phase shift across the critical layer. Various limiting cases are investigated including the case of much larger disturbance amplitudes and this indicates the structure for the strongly nonlinear critical layer of the Benney-Bergeon (1969) type. It is also shown how a match with the inviscid neutral inflexional modes arising from the generalized inflexion point criterion, is achieved.

  18. Dynamics and stability of parametrically excited gyroscopic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vedula, Narayana L.

    We study the reduction, dynamics and stability of two-degree-of-freedom mechanical systems. We are particularly interested in understanding energy transfer between modes in such systems. The first part of this research is concerned with the stochastic stability of a two-degree-of-freedom linear system: (a) with one asymptotically stable and one critical mode, (b) with both modes critical and one of the modes corresponding to a nilpotent structure. We obtain asymptotic expansions for the moment and maximal Lyapunov exponents which characterize the exponential growth rate of the amplitude. The results from (a) indicate that the presence of noise may have a stabilizing effect and are applied to explain experimental observations on fluid flow over tube bundles. The results from (b) are applied to show that the effects of noise on a pipe conveying fluid close to divergence are always destabilising in nature. The second part of this research involves the reduction of two-degree-of-freedom randomly perturbed nonlinear gyroscopic systems close to a double zero resonance. It is shown that the long term behaviour of the original four-dimensional system can be approximated by a one dimensional Markov process which take values on a line or a graph. These results are applied to study the dynamics and stability of a rotating shaft subjected to fluctuating axial load. In the final part of this research, we study the dynamics and stability of nonlinear delay gyroscopic systems with periodically varying delay. The center manifold and normal form methods are used to obtain an approximate and simpler two dimensional system. Analysis of this simpler system shows that periodic variations in the delay may lead to larger stability boundaries. These results are applied to demonstrate that greater depths of cut may be achieved in a boring process when the speed of the spindle is modulated sinusoidally instead of being kept constant. A detailed knowledge of the machine-tool structure

  19. Maximum stabilizer dimension for nonproduct states

    SciTech Connect

    Walck, Scott N.; Lyons, David W.

    2007-08-15

    Composite quantum states can be classified by how they behave under local unitary transformations. Each quantum state has a stabilizer subgroup and a corresponding Lie algebra, the structure of which is a local unitary invariant. In this paper, we study the structure of the stabilizer subalgebra for n-qubit pure states, and find its maximum dimension to be n-1 for nonproduct states of three qubits and higher. The n-qubit Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger state has a stabilizer subalgebra that achieves the maximum possible dimension for pure nonproduct states. The converse, however, is not true: We show examples of pure 4-qubit states that achieve the maximum nonproduct stabilizer dimension, but have stabilizer subalgebra structures different from that of the n-qubit GHZ state.

  20. The Mechanics of Human Achievement

    PubMed Central

    Duckworth, Angela L.; Eichstaedt, Johannes C.; Ungar, Lyle H.

    2015-01-01

    Countless studies have addressed why some individuals achieve more than others. Nevertheless, the psychology of achievement lacks a unifying conceptual framework for synthesizing these empirical insights. We propose organizing achievement-related traits by two possible mechanisms of action: Traits that determine the rate at which an individual learns a skill are talent variables and can be distinguished conceptually from traits that determine the effort an individual puts forth. This approach takes inspiration from Newtonian mechanics: achievement is akin to distance traveled, effort to time, skill to speed, and talent to acceleration. A novel prediction from this model is that individual differences in effort (but not talent) influence achievement (but not skill) more substantially over longer (rather than shorter) time intervals. Conceptualizing skill as the multiplicative product of talent and effort, and achievement as the multiplicative product of skill and effort, advances similar, but less formal, propositions by several important earlier thinkers. PMID:26236393

  1. Unmet Promise: Raising Minority Achievement. The Achievement Gap.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Robert C.; Viadero, Debra

    2000-01-01

    This first in a four-part series on why academic achievement gaps persist discusses how to raise minority achievement. It explains how earlier progress in closing the gap has stalled, while at the same time, the greater diversity of student populations and the rapid growth of the Hispanic population and of other ethnic groups have reshaped the…

  2. To Achieve or Not to Achieve: The Question of Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilmore, Beatrice

    Questionnaire and projective data from 323 women aged 18 to 50 were analyzed in order to study the relationships of need achievement and motive to avoid success to age, sex role ideology, and stage in the family cycle. Family background and educational variables were also considered. Level of need achievement was found to be significantly related…

  3. Mathematics Achievement in High- and Low-Achieving Secondary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohammadpour, Ebrahim; Shekarchizadeh, Ahmadreza

    2015-01-01

    This paper identifies the amount of variance in mathematics achievement in high- and low-achieving schools that can be explained by school-level factors, while controlling for student-level factors. The data were obtained from 2679 Iranian eighth graders who participated in the 2007 Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study. Of the…

  4. Toward Scientific Numerical Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleb, Bil

    2007-01-01

    Ultimately, scientific numerical models need quantified output uncertainties so that modeling can evolve to better match reality. Documenting model input uncertainties and verifying that numerical models are translated into code correctly, however, are necessary first steps toward that goal. Without known input parameter uncertainties, model sensitivities are all one can determine, and without code verification, output uncertainties are simply not reliable. To address these two shortcomings, two proposals are offered: (1) an unobtrusive mechanism to document input parameter uncertainties in situ and (2) an adaptation of the Scientific Method to numerical model development and deployment. Because these two steps require changes in the computational simulation community to bear fruit, they are presented in terms of the Beckhard-Harris-Gleicher change model.

  5. Stability analysis of unsteady ablation fronts

    SciTech Connect

    Betti, R.; McCrory, R.L.; Verdon, C.P.

    1993-08-01

    The linear stability analysis of unsteady ablation fronts, is carried out for a semi-infinite uniform medium. For a laser accelerated target, it is shown that a properly selected modulation of the laser intensity can lead to the dynamic stabilization or growth-rate reduction of a large portion of the unstable spectrum. The theory is in qualitative agreement with the numerical results obtained by using the two-dimensional hydrodynamic code ORCHID.

  6. Stability analysis of unsteady ablation fronts

    SciTech Connect

    Betti, R.; McCrory, R.L.; Verdon, C.P. )

    1993-11-08

    The linear stability analysis of unsteady ablation fronts is carried out for a semi-infinite uniform medium. For a laser accelerated target, it is shown that a properly selected modulation of the laser intensity can lead to the dynamic stabilization or growth-rate reduction of a large portion of the unstable spectrum. The theory is in qualitative agreement with the numerical results obtained by using the two-dimensional hydrodynamic code ORCHID.

  7. Stability analysis of unsteady ablation fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betti, R.; McCrory, R. L.; Verdon, C. P.

    1993-11-01

    The linear stability analysis of unsteady ablation fronts is carried out for a semi-infinite uniform medium. For a laser accelerated target, it is shown that a properly selected modulation of the laser intensity can lead to the dynamic stabilization or growth-rate reduction of a large portion of the unstable spectrum. The theory is in qualitative agreement with the numerical results obtained by using the two-dimensional hydrodynamic code orchid.

  8. Stability analysis of unsteady ablation fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betti, R.; McCrory, R. L.; Verdon, C. P.

    1993-08-01

    The linear stability analysis of unsteady ablation fronts is carried out for a semi-infinite uniform medium. For a laser accelerated target, it is shown that a properly selected modulation of the laser intensity can lead to the dynamic stabilization or growth-rate reduction of a large portion of the unstable spectrum. The theory is in qualitative agreement with the numerical results obtained by using the two-dimensional hydrodynamic code ORCHID.

  9. Parameter margins for stabilized conservative multilinear systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, Wayne; Wie, Bong

    1991-01-01

    Simple and elegant derivations of recent results concerning the computation of infinity-norm real-parameter margins for stabilized, mass-spring dynamical systems with the masses and the spring constraints as uncertain parameters are presented. The authors introduce the concept of critical frequency and gain for stabilized conservative systems whose uncertain parameters do not necessarily appear multilinearly in the numerator and denominator of the plant transfer function. An approach to parameter margin computation is presented.

  10. Affective Processes and Academic Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feshbach, Norma Deitch; Feshbach, Seymour

    1987-01-01

    Data indicate that for girls, affective dispositional factors (empathy, depressive affectivity, aggression, and self-concept) are intimately linked to cognitive development and academic achievement. (PCB)

  11. Attribution theory in science achievement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, Martin

    Recent research reveals consistent lags in American students' science achievement scores. Not only are the scores lower in the United States compared to other developed nations, but even within the United States, too many students are well below science proficiency scores for their grade levels. The current research addresses this problem by examining potential malleable factors that may predict science achievement in twelfth graders using 2009 data from the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP). Principle component factor analysis was conducted to determine the specific items that contribute to each overall factor. A series of multiple regressions were then analyzed and formed the predictive value of each of these factors for science achievement. All significant factors were ultimately examined together (also using multiple regression) to determine the most powerful predictors of science achievement, identifying factors that predict science achievement, the results of which suggested interventions to strengthen students' science achievement scores and encourage persistence in the sciences at the college level and beyond. Although there is a variety of research highlighting how students in the US are falling behind other developing nations in science and math achievement, as yet, little research has addressed ways of intervening to address this gap. The current research is a starting point, seeking to identify malleable factors that contribute to science achievement. More specifically, this research examined the types of attributions that predict science achievement in twelfth grade students.

  12. Fraction Development in Children: Importance of Building Numerical Magnitude Understanding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Nancy C.; Carrique, Jessica; Hansen, Nicole; Resnick, Ilyse

    2016-01-01

    This chapter situates fraction learning within the integrated theory of numerical development. We argue that the understanding of numerical magnitudes for whole numbers as well as for fractions is critical to fraction learning in particular and mathematics achievement more generally. Results from the Delaware Longitudinal Study, which examined…

  13. Composite stabilizer unit

    DOEpatents

    Ebaugh, Larry R.; Sadler, Collin P.; Carter, Gary D.

    1992-01-01

    An improved fin stabilized projectile including multiple stabilizer fins upon a stabilizer unit situated at the aft end of the projectile is provided, the improvement wherein the stabilizer fins are joined into the stabillizer unit by an injection molded engineering grade polymer.

  14. Lens-mount stability trade-off: a survey exemplified for DUV wafer inspection objectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouazzam, Achmed; Erbe, Torsten; Fahr, Stephan; Werschnik, Jan

    2015-09-01

    The position stability of optical elements is an essential part of the tolerance budget of an optical system because its compensation would require an alignment step after the lens has left the factory. In order to achieve a given built performance the stability error contribution needs to be known and accounted for. Given a high-end lens touching the edge of technology not knowing, under- or overestimating this contribution becomes a serious cost and risk factor. If overestimated the remaining parts of the budget need to be tighter. If underestimated the total project might fail. For many mounting principles the stability benchmark is based on previous systems or information gathered by elaborated testing of complete optical systems. This renders the development of a new system into a risky endeavour, because these experiences are not sufficiently precise and tend to be not transferable when scaling of the optical elements is intended. This contribution discusses the influences of different optical mounting concepts on the position stability using the example of high numerical aperture (HNA) inspection lenses working in the deep ultraviolet (DUV) spectrum. A method to investigate the positional stability is presented for selected mounting examples typical for inspection lenses.

  15. Impact of aerobic stabilization on the characteristics of treatment sludge in the leather tanning industry.

    PubMed

    Cokgor, Emine Ubay; Aydinli, Ebru; Tas, Didem Okutman; Zengin, Gulsum Emel; Orhon, Derin

    2014-01-01

    The efficiency of aerobic stabilization on the treatment sludge generated from the leather industry was investigated to meet the expected characteristics and conditions of sludge prior to landfill. The sludge types subjected to aerobic stabilization were chemical treatment sludge, biological excess sludge, and the mixture of both chemical and biological sludges. At the end of 23 days of stabilization, suspended solids, volatile suspended solids and total organic carbon removal efficiencies were determined as 17%, 19% and 23% for biological sludge 31%, 35% and 54% for chemical sludge, and 32%, 34% and 63% for the mixture of both chemical and biological sludges, respectively. Model simulations of the respirometric oxygen uptake rate measurements showed that the ratio of active biomass remained the same at the end of the stabilization for all the sludge samples. Although mixing the chemical and biological sludges resulted in a relatively effective organic carbon and solids removal, the level of stabilization achieved remained clearly below the required level of organic carbon content for landfill. These findings indicate the potential risk of setting numerical restrictions without referring to proper scientific support. PMID:24645452

  16. Apologize or Analyze: Measuring Academic Achievement in the Reservation School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boloz, Sigmund A.; Varrati, Richard

    Three variables--student attendance, stability of enrollment, and socioeconomic status--can affect reservation students' performance on standardized tests as significantly as the quality of instruction. To test the impact of the three variables on academic achievement, the Ganado (Arizona) Unified School District No. 20 analyzed available…

  17. Predicting Engineering Major Status from Mathematics Achievement and Interest Congruence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leuwerke, Wade C.; Robbins, Steven; Sawyer, Richard; Hovland, Michael

    2004-01-01

    This study proposed that precollege students' standardized mathematics achievement score and the congruence between their occupational interests and engineering tasks would predict their second-year retention in college and the stability of their major. Binary response models were used to predict second-year major status (i.e., continue, transfer…

  18. Capacity Markets and Market Stability

    SciTech Connect

    Stauffer, Hoff

    2006-04-15

    The good news is that market stability can be achieved through a combination of longer-term contracts, auctions for far enough in the future to permit new entry, a capacity management system, and a demand curve. The bad news is that if and when stable capacity markets are designed, the markets may seem to be relatively close to where we started - with integrated resource planning. Market ideologues will find this anathema. (author)

  19. General Achievement Trends: South Dakota

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  20. The Process of Science Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papanastasiou, Constantinos; Papanastasiou, Elena C.

    2002-01-01

    Investigates the science achievement of 8th grade students in Cyprus by using a structural equation model with three exogenous constructs--family's educational background, reinforcements, and school climate, and three endogenous constructs--teaching, student attitudes, and achievement. Proposes a model for the effects of family, school, student…

  1. Examination Regimes and Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cosentino de Cohen, Clemencia

    2010-01-01

    Examination regimes at the end of secondary school vary greatly intra- and cross-nationally, and in recent years have undergone important reforms often geared towards increasing student achievement. This research presents a comparative analysis of the relationship between examination regimes and student achievement in the OECD. Using a micro…

  2. School Size and Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riggen, Vicki

    2013-01-01

    This study examined whether a relationship between high school size and student achievement exists in Illinois public high schools in reading and math, as measured by the Prairie State Achievement Exam (PSAE), which is administered to all Illinois 11th-grade students. This study also examined whether the factors of socioeconomic status, English…

  3. Motivational Factors in School Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maehr, Martin L.

    A summary is presented of the literature on motivation relating to achievement in the classroom. Special attention is given to how values, ideology, and various cultural patterns may serve to enhance motivation to achieve in the classroom. In considering what determines motivation and personal investment in educational pursuits, the following…

  4. Parental Involvement and Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwin, Sarah Christine

    2015-01-01

    This research study examined the correlation between student achievement and parent's perceptions of their involvement in their child's schooling. Parent participants completed the Parent Involvement Project Parent Questionnaire. Results slightly indicated parents of students with higher level of achievement perceived less demand or invitations…

  5. General Achievement Trends: New Jersey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  6. General Achievement Trends: North Carolina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  7. Perils of Standardized Achievement Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haladyna, Thomas M.

    2006-01-01

    This article argues that the validity of standardized achievement test-score interpretation and use is problematic; consequently, confidence and trust in such test scores may often be unwarranted. The problem is particularly severe in high-stakes situations. This essay provides a context for understanding standardized achievement testing, then…

  8. Raising Boys' Achievement in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bleach, Kevan, Ed.

    This book offers insights into the range of strategies and good practice being used to raise the achievement of boys. Case studies by school-based practitioners suggest ideas and measures to address the issue of achievement by boys. The contributions are: (1) "Why the Likely Lads Lag Behind" (Kevan Bleach); (2) "Helping Boys Do Better in Their…

  9. Stress Correlates and Academic Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bentley, Donna Anderson; And Others

    An ongoing concern for educators is the identification of factors that contribute to or are associated with academic achievement; one such group of variables that has received little attention are those involving stress. The relationship between perceived sources of stress and academic achievement was examined to determine if reactions to stress…

  10. Achievement in Writing Geometry Proofs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Senk, Sharon L.

    In 1981 a nationwide assessment of achievement in writing geometry proofs was conducted by the Cognitive Development and Achievement in Secondary School Geometry project. Over 1,500 students in 11 schools in 5 states participated. This paper describes the sample, instruments, grading procedures, and selected results. Results include: (1) at the…

  11. Teaching the Low Level Achiever.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salomone, Ronald E., Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Intended for teachers of the English language arts, the articles in this issue offer suggestions and techniques for teaching the low level achiever. Titles and authors of the articles are as follows: (1) "A Point to Ponder" (Rachel Martin); (2) "Tracking: A Self-Fulfilling Prophecy of Failure for the Low Level Achiever" (James Christopher Davis);…

  12. Predicting Achievement in Foreign Language.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, Mary Elizabeth

    A review of research is inconclusive concerning the relationship between intelligence and language proficiency. A study of 10th grade students (n=35) examined scores on a high school entrance exam and achievement in foreign language after 1 year of study. Both math and reading showed a significant correlation with foreign language achievement; the…

  13. Superintendent Tenure and Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    A correlational research design was used to examine the influence of superintendent tenure on student achievement in rural Appalachian Kentucky school districts. Superintendent tenure was compared to aggregated student achievement scores for 2011 and to changes in students' learning outcomes over the course of the superintendents' tenure. The…

  14. Numerical multi-loop integrals and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freitas, A.

    2016-09-01

    Higher-order radiative corrections play an important role in precision studies of the electroweak and Higgs sector, as well as for the detailed understanding of large backgrounds to new physics searches. For corrections beyond the one-loop level and involving many independent mass and momentum scales, it is in general not possible to find analytic results, so that one needs to resort to numerical methods instead. This article presents an overview of a variety of numerical loop integration techniques, highlighting their range of applicability, suitability for automatization, and numerical precision and stability. In a second part of this article, the application of numerical loop integration methods in the area of electroweak precision tests is illustrated. Numerical methods were essential for obtaining full two-loop predictions for the most important precision observables within the Standard Model. The theoretical foundations for these corrections will be described in some detail, including aspects of the renormalization, resummation of leading log contributions, and the evaluation of the theory uncertainty from missing higher orders.

  15. Mathematical modeling of electrocardiograms: a numerical study.

    PubMed

    Boulakia, Muriel; Cazeau, Serge; Fernández, Miguel A; Gerbeau, Jean-Frédéric; Zemzemi, Nejib

    2010-03-01

    This paper deals with the numerical simulation of electrocardiograms (ECG). Our aim is to devise a mathematical model, based on partial differential equations, which is able to provide realistic 12-lead ECGs. The main ingredients of this model are classical: the bidomain equations coupled to a phenomenological ionic model in the heart, and a generalized Laplace equation in the torso. The obtention of realistic ECGs relies on other important features--including heart-torso transmission conditions, anisotropy, cell heterogeneity and His bundle modeling--that are discussed in detail. The numerical implementation is based on state-of-the-art numerical methods: domain decomposition techniques and second order semi-implicit time marching schemes, offering a good compromise between accuracy, stability and efficiency. The numerical ECGs obtained with this approach show correct amplitudes, shapes and polarities, in all the 12 standard leads. The relevance of every modeling choice is carefully discussed and the numerical ECG sensitivity to the model parameters investigated. PMID:20033779

  16. Numerical reproducibility for implicit Monte Carlo simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Cleveland, M.; Brunner, T.; Gentile, N.

    2013-07-01

    We describe and compare different approaches for achieving numerical reproducibility in photon Monte Carlo simulations. Reproducibility is desirable for code verification, testing, and debugging. Parallelism creates a unique problem for achieving reproducibility in Monte Carlo simulations because it changes the order in which values are summed. This is a numerical problem because double precision arithmetic is not associative. In [1], a way of eliminating this roundoff error using integer tallies was described. This approach successfully achieves reproducibility at the cost of lost accuracy by rounding double precision numbers to fewer significant digits. This integer approach, and other extended reproducibility techniques, are described and compared in this work. Increased precision alone is not enough to ensure reproducibility of photon Monte Carlo simulations. A non-arbitrary precision approaches required a varying degree of rounding to achieve reproducibility. For the problems investigated in this work double precision global accuracy was achievable by using 100 bits of precision or greater on all unordered sums which where subsequently rounded to double precision at the end of every time-step. (authors)

  17. Controlled high-fidelity navigation in the charge stability diagram of a double quantum dot.

    PubMed

    Coden, Diego S Acosta; Romero, Rodolfo H; Räsänen, Esa

    2015-03-25

    We propose an efficient control protocol for charge transfer in a double quantum dot. We consider numerically a two-dimensional model system, where the quantum dots are subjected to time-dependent electric fields corresponding to experimental gate voltages. Our protocol enables navigation in the charge stability diagram from a state to another through controllable variation of the fields. We show that the well-known adiabatic Landau-Zener transition-when supplemented with a time-dependent field tailored with optimal control theory-can remarkably improve the transition speed. The results also lead to a simple control scheme obtained from the experimental charge stability diagram that requires only a single parameter. Eventually, we can achieve the ultrafast performance of the composite pulse protocol that allows the system to be driven at the quantum speed limit. PMID:25738833

  18. Finite element model creation and stability considerations of complex biological articulation: The human wrist joint.

    PubMed

    Gíslason, Magnús K; Stansfield, Benedict; Nash, David H

    2010-06-01

    The finite element method has been used with considerable success to simulate the behaviour of various joints such as the hip, knee and shoulder. It has had less impact on more complicated joints such as the wrist and the ankle. Previously published finite element studies on these multi-bone joints have needed to introduce un-physiological boundary conditions in order to establish numerical convergence of the model simulation. That is necessary since the stabilizing soft tissue mechanism of these joints is usually too elaborate in order to be fully included both anatomically and with regard to material properties. This paper looks at the methodology of creating a finite element model of such a joint focussing on the wrist and the effects additional constraining has on the solution of the model. The study shows that by investigating the effects each of the constraints, a better understanding on the nature of the stabilizing mechanisms of these joints can be achieved. PMID:20303315

  19. Delay-dependent stability and stabilisation of continuous 2D delayed systems with saturating control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hmamed, Abdelaziz; Kririm, Said; Benzaouia, Abdellah; Tadeo, Fernando

    2016-09-01

    This paper deals with the stabilisation problem of continuous two-dimensional (2D) delayed systems, in the presence of saturations on the control signals. For this, a new delay decomposition approach is proposed to deal with the stability and stabilisation issues. The idea is that the range of variation of each delay is divided into segments, and a specific Lyapunov- Krasovskii functional is used that contains different weight matrices in each segment. Then, based on this approach, new delay-dependent stability and stabilisation criteria for continuous 2D delayed systems are derived. These criteria are less conservative and include some existing results as special cases. Some numerical examples are provided to show that a significant improvement is achieved using the proposed approach.

  20. Controlled high-fidelity navigation in the charge stability diagram of a double quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acosta Coden, Diego S.; Romero, Rodolfo H.; Räsänen, Esa

    2015-03-01

    We propose an efficient control protocol for charge transfer in a double quantum dot. We consider numerically a two-dimensional model system, where the quantum dots are subjected to time-dependent electric fields corresponding to experimental gate voltages. Our protocol enables navigation in the charge stability diagram from a state to another through controllable variation of the fields. We show that the well-known adiabatic Landau-Zener transition—when supplemented with a time-dependent field tailored with optimal control theory—can remarkably improve the transition speed. The results also lead to a simple control scheme obtained from the experimental charge stability diagram that requires only a single parameter. Eventually, we can achieve the ultrafast performance of the composite pulse protocol that allows the system to be driven at the quantum speed limit.

  1. Thermohaline stability of horizontal layers of saltwater

    SciTech Connect

    Shamsundar, N.; Krishna, C.N.

    1999-07-01

    The thermohaline stability of horizontal layers of saltwater (with cold fresh water on top of warm salty water) was studied using analytical and numerical methods. The marginal oscillatory instability state was calculated for different boundary conditions for uniform s well as for nonuniform temperature and salinity gradients. A correlation was developed to use the ratio of the mean gradient to the maximum gradient to enable stability results for nonlinear gradients to be extrapolated from simpler results for linear gradients. Contrary to published expectations, localized stability criteria are not suitable for calculating the effects of nonlinear temperature gradients.

  2. Finite time stabilization of delayed neural networks.

    PubMed

    Wang, Leimin; Shen, Yi; Ding, Zhixia

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, the problem of finite time stabilization for a class of delayed neural networks (DNNs) is investigated. The general conditions on the feedback control law are provided to ensure the finite time stabilization of DNNs. Then some specific conditions are derived by designing two different controllers which include the delay-dependent and delay-independent ones. In addition, the upper bound of the settling time for stabilization is estimated. Under fixed control strength, discussions of the extremum of settling time functional are made and a switched controller is designed to optimize the settling time. Finally, numerical simulations are carried out to demonstrate the effectiveness of the obtained results. PMID:26264170

  3. Food Fortification Stability Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdulmalik, T. O.; Cooper, M. R.; Douglas, G. L.

    2015-01-01

    NASA has established the goal of traveling beyond low-Earth orbit and extending manned exploration to Mars. The extended length of a Mars mission, along with the lack of resupply missions increases the importance of nutritional content in the food system. The purpose of this research is to assess the stability of vitamin supplementation in traditionally processed spaceflight foods. It is expected that commercially available fortificants will remain stable through long-duration missions if proper formulation, processing, and storage temperatures are all achieved. Five vitamins (vitamin E, vitamin K, pantothenic acid, folic acid, and thiamin) were blended into a vitamin premix (DSM, Freeport, TX); premixes were formulated to be compatible with current processing techniques (retort or freeze-dried), varied water activities (high or low), and packaging material. The overall goal of this process is to provide 25% of the recommended daily intake of each vitamin (per serving), following processing and two years of ambient storage. Four freeze-dried foods (Scrambled Eggs, Italian Vegetables, Potatoes Au Gratin, Noodles and Chicken) and four thermostabilized foods (Curry Sauce with Vegetables, Chicken Noodle Soup, Grilled Pork Chop, Rice with Butter) were produced (with and without the vitamin premix), to assess the impact of the added fortificant on color and taste, and to determine the stability of supplemental vitamins in spaceflight foods. The use of fortification in spaceflight foods appears to be a plausible mitigation step to inadequate nutrition. This is due to the ease of vitamin addition as well as the sustainability of the premixes through initial processing steps. Postprocessing analysis indicated that vitamin fortification with this premix did not immediately impact organoleptic properties of the food. At this stage, the largest hurdle to fortification is the preciseness to which vitamins can be added; the total amount of vitamins required for production is 10

  4. Ferrofluids: Modeling, numerical analysis, and scientific computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomas, Ignacio

    This dissertation presents some developments in the Numerical Analysis of Partial Differential Equations (PDEs) describing the behavior of ferrofluids. The most widely accepted PDE model for ferrofluids is the Micropolar model proposed by R.E. Rosensweig. The Micropolar Navier-Stokes Equations (MNSE) is a subsystem of PDEs within the Rosensweig model. Being a simplified version of the much bigger system of PDEs proposed by Rosensweig, the MNSE are a natural starting point of this thesis. The MNSE couple linear velocity u, angular velocity w, and pressure p. We propose and analyze a first-order semi-implicit fully-discrete scheme for the MNSE, which decouples the computation of the linear and angular velocities, is unconditionally stable and delivers optimal convergence rates under assumptions analogous to those used for the Navier-Stokes equations. Moving onto the much more complex Rosensweig's model, we provide a definition (approximation) for the effective magnetizing field h, and explain the assumptions behind this definition. Unlike previous definitions available in the literature, this new definition is able to accommodate the effect of external magnetic fields. Using this definition we setup the system of PDEs coupling linear velocity u, pressure p, angular velocity w, magnetization m, and magnetic potential ϕ We show that this system is energy-stable and devise a numerical scheme that mimics the same stability property. We prove that solutions of the numerical scheme always exist and, under certain simplifying assumptions, that the discrete solutions converge. A notable outcome of the analysis of the numerical scheme for the Rosensweig's model is the choice of finite element spaces that allow the construction of an energy-stable scheme. Finally, with the lessons learned from Rosensweig's model, we develop a diffuse-interface model describing the behavior of two-phase ferrofluid flows and present an energy-stable numerical scheme for this model. For a

  5. Mathematical model of thermal shields for long-term stability optical resonators.

    PubMed

    Sanjuan, Josep; Gürlebeck, Norman; Braxmaier, Claus

    2015-07-13

    Modern experiments aiming at tests of fundamental physics, like measuring gravitational waves or testing Lorentz Invariance with unprecedented accuracy, require thermal environments that are highly stable over long times. To achieve such a stability, the experiment including typically an optical resonator is nested in a thermal enclosure, which passively attenuates external temperature fluctuations to acceptable levels. These thermal shields are usually designed using tedious numerical simulations or with simple analytical models. In this paper, we propose an accurate analytical method to estimate the performance of passive thermal shields in the frequency domain, which allows for fast evaluation and optimization. The model analysis has also unveiled interesting properties of the shields, such as dips in the transfer function for some frequencies under certain combinations of materials and geometries. We validate the results by comparing them to numerical simulations performed with commercial software based on finite element methods. PMID:26191850

  6. Numerical simulations of hyperfine transitions of antihydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolbinger, B.; Capon, A.; Diermaier, M.; Lehner, S.; Malbrunot, C.; Massiczek, O.; Sauerzopf, C.; Simon, M. C.; Widmann, E.

    2015-08-01

    One of the ASACUSA (Atomic Spectroscopy And Collisions Using Slow Antiprotons) collaboration's goals is the measurement of the ground state hyperfine transition frequency in antihydrogen, the antimatter counterpart of one of the best known systems in physics. This high precision experiment yields a sensitive test of the fundamental symmetry of CPT. Numerical simulations of hyperfine transitions of antihydrogen atoms have been performed providing information on the required antihydrogen events and the achievable precision.

  7. Teachers' Judgements of Students' Foreign-Language Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhu, Mingjing; Urhahne, Detlef

    2015-01-01

    Numerous studies have been conducted on the accuracy of teacher judgement in different educational areas such as mathematics, language arts and reading. Teacher judgement of students' foreign-language achievement, however, has been rarely investigated. The study aimed to examine the accuracy of teacher judgement of students' foreign-language…

  8. Reexamining the Relationship between Academic Achievement and Social Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Algozzine, Bob; Wang, Chuang; Violette, Amy S.

    2011-01-01

    Numerous studies have demonstrated the comorbidity of achievement and behavior problems in students identified with learning disabilities and emotional disturbance. The causal basis for this relationship has not been demonstrated, but several theories regarding the association have been posited, and potential benefits related to prevention keep…

  9. Stability analysis of multigrid acceleration methods for the solution of partial differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fay, John F.

    1990-01-01

    A calculation is made of the stability of various relaxation schemes for the numerical solution of partial differential equations. A multigrid acceleration method is introduced, and its effects on stability are explored. A detailed stability analysis of a simple case is carried out and verified by numerical experiment. It is shown that the use of multigrids can speed convergence by several orders of magnitude without adversely affecting stability.

  10. On the stability analysis of a pair of van der Pol oscillators with delayed self-connection, position and velocity couplings

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Kun; Chung, Kwok-wai

    2013-11-15

    In this paper, we perform a stability analysis of a pair of van der Pol oscillators with delayed self-connection, position and velocity couplings. Bifurcation diagram of the damping, position and velocity coupling strengths is constructed, which gives insight into how stability boundary curves come into existence and how these curves evolve from small closed loops into open-ended curves. The van der Pol oscillator has been considered by many researchers as the nodes for various networks. It is inherently unstable at the zero equilibrium. Stability control of a network is always an important problem. Currently, the stabilization of the zero equilibrium of a pair of van der Pol oscillators can be achieved only for small damping strength by using delayed velocity coupling. An interesting question arises naturally: can the zero equilibrium be stabilized for an arbitrarily large value of the damping strength? We prove that it can be. In addition, a simple condition is given on how to choose the feedback parameters to achieve such goal. We further investigate how the in-phase mode or the out-of-phase mode of a periodic solution is related to the stability boundary curve that it emerges from a Hopf bifurcation. Analytical expression of a periodic solution is derived using an integration method. Some illustrative examples show that the theoretical prediction and numerical simulation are in good agreement.

  11. Numerical thermal analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ketkar, S.P.

    1999-07-01

    This new volume is written for both practicing engineers who want to refresh their knowledge in the fundamentals of numerical thermal analysis as well as for students of numerical heat transfer. it is a handy desktop reference that covers all the basics of finite difference, finite element, and control volume methods. In this volume, the author presents a unique hybrid method that combines the best features of finite element modeling and the computational efficiency of finite difference network solution techniques. It is a robust technique that is used in commercially available software. The contents include: heat conduction: fundamentals and governing equations; finite difference method; control volume method; finite element method; the hybrid method; and software selection.

  12. Hybrid undulator numerical optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Hairetdinov, A.H.; Zukov, A.A.

    1995-12-31

    3D properties of the hybrid undulator scheme arc studied numerically using PANDIRA code. It is shown that there exist two well defined sets of undulator parameters which provide either maximum on-axis field amplitude or minimal higher harmonics amplitude of the basic undulator field. Thus the alternative between higher field amplitude or pure sinusoidal field exists. The behavior of the undulator field amplitude and harmonics structure for a large set of (undulator gap)/(undulator wavelength) values is demonstrated.

  13. Numerical simulation of the blood flow in the human cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Zácek, M; Krause, E

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes a numerical model of the human cardiovascular system. The model is composed of 15 elements connected in series representing the main parts of the system. Each element is composed of a rigid connecting tube and an elastic reservoir. The blood flow is described by a one-dimensional time-dependent Bernoulli equation. The action of the ventricles is simulated with a Hill's three-element model, adapted for the left and right heart. The closing of the four heart valves is simulated with the aid of time-dependent drag coefficients. Closing is achieved by letting the drag coefficient approach infinity. The resulting system of 32 non-linear ordinary differential equations is solved numerically with the Runge-Kutta method. The results of the simulation (pressure-time and volume-time dependence for the atria and ventricles and pressure forms in the aorta at a heart rate of 70 beats per minute) agree with the physiological data given in the literature. The model's input aortic impedance is 31.5 dyn s cm-5 which agrees with literature data given for aortic input impedance in man 26-80 dyn s cm-5). Long-term stability of the system was achieved. The cardiovascular system presented here can also be simulated at higher and varying heart rates--up to 200 beats per minute. The results of calculations for some pathological changes (e.g. valvular abnormalities) are discussed. PMID:8839013

  14. Parabolized stability equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbert, Thorwald

    1994-04-01

    The parabolized stability equations (PSE) are a new approach to analyze the streamwise evolution of single or interacting Fourier modes in weakly nonparallel flows such as boundary layers. The concept rests on the decomposition of every mode into a slowly varying amplitude function and a wave function with slowly varying wave number. The neglect of the small second derivatives of the slowly varying functions with respect to the streamwise variable leads to an initial boundary-value problem that can be solved by numerical marching procedures. The PSE approach is valid in convectively unstable flows. The equations for a single mode are closely related to those of the traditional eigenvalue problems for linear stability analysis. However, the PSE approach does not exploit the homogeneity of the problem and, therefore, can be utilized to analyze forced modes and the nonlinear growth and interaction of an initial disturbance field. In contrast to the traditional patching of local solutions, the PSE provide the spatial evolution of modes with proper account for their history. The PSE approach allows studies of secondary instabilities without the constraints of the Floquet analysis and reproduces the established experimental, theoretical, and computational benchmark results on transition up to the breakdown stage. The method matches or exceeds the demonstrated capabilities of current spatial Navier-Stokes solvers at a small fraction of their computational cost. Recent applications include studies on localized or distributed receptivity and prediction of transition in model environments for realistic engineering problems. This report describes the basis, intricacies, and some applications of the PSE methodology.

  15. Implicit numerical integration for periodic solutions of autonomous nonlinear systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thurston, G. A.

    1982-01-01

    A change of variables that stabilizes numerical computations for periodic solutions of autonomous systems is derived. Computation of the period is decoupled from the rest of the problem for conservative systems of any order and for any second-order system. Numerical results are included for a second-order conservative system under a suddenly applied constant load. Near the critical load for the system, a small increment in load amplitude results in a large increase in amplitude of the response.

  16. Childhood Obesity and Cognitive Achievement.

    PubMed

    Black, Nicole; Johnston, David W; Peeters, Anna

    2015-09-01

    Obese children tend to perform worse academically than normal-weight children. If poor cognitive achievement is truly a consequence of childhood obesity, this relationship has significant policy implications. Therefore, an important question is to what extent can this correlation be explained by other factors that jointly determine obesity and cognitive achievement in childhood? To answer this question, we exploit a rich longitudinal dataset of Australian children, which is linked to national assessments in math and literacy. Using a range of estimators, we find that obesity and body mass index are negatively related to cognitive achievement for boys but not girls. This effect cannot be explained by sociodemographic factors, past cognitive achievement or unobserved time-invariant characteristics and is robust to different measures of adiposity. Given the enormous importance of early human capital development for future well-being and prosperity, this negative effect for boys is concerning and warrants further investigation. PMID:26123250

  17. Using Design To Achieve Sustainability

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sustainability is defined as meeting the needs of this generation without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their needs. This is a conditional statement that places the responsibility for achieving sustainability squarely in hands of designers and planners....

  18. Stability in computed optical interferometric tomography (Part I): Stability requirements

    PubMed Central

    Shemonski, Nathan D.; Adie, Steven G.; Liu, Yuan-Zhi; South, Fredrick A.; Carney, P. Scott; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2014-01-01

    As imaging systems become more advanced and acquire data at faster rates, increasingly dynamic samples can be imaged without concern of motion artifacts. For optical interferometric techniques such as optical coherence tomography, it often follows that initially, only amplitude-based data are utilized due to unstable or unreliable phase measurements. As systems progress, stable phase maps can also be acquired, enabling more advanced, phase-dependent post-processing techniques. Here we report an investigation of the stability requirements for a class of phase-dependent post-processing techniques – numerical defocus and aberration correction with further extensions to techniques such as Doppler, phase-variance, and optical coherence elastography. Mathematical analyses and numerical simulations over a variety of instabilities are supported by experimental investigations. PMID:25321004

  19. Issues of Stability and Ground Motion in ILC

    SciTech Connect

    Seryi, Andrei; Hendrickson, Linda; White, Glen; /SLAC

    2006-02-03

    Stability of International Linear Collider is determined by the stability of the site, additional noises of beamline component, energy and kicker jitter, and performance of train-to-train and intratrain feedback. Stability goals in terms of the beam jitter at the end of the linac, in BDS and at the IP are discussed in this paper, and translated to stability goals for the site and for component jitter. Present status of stability studies is reviewed and feasibility of achieving the stability goals is discussed.

  20. Race, School Achievement, and Educational Inequality: Toward a Student-Based Inquiry Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiggan, Greg

    2007-01-01

    Over the past four decades, there have been numerous discussions on student achievement and school failure. Within this time, the debate over the causes and consequences of racial differences in achievement has been at the heart of the nation's social and political life. The author discusses the major developments in achievement research over the…

  1. Plutonium inventories for stabilization and stabilized materials

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, A.K.

    1996-05-01

    The objective of the breakout session was to identify characteristics of materials containing plutonium, the need to stabilize these materials for storage, and plans to accomplish the stabilization activities. All current stabilization activities are driven by the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 94-1 (May 26, 1994) and by the recently completed Plutonium ES&H Vulnerability Assessment (DOE-EH-0415). The Implementation Plan for accomplishing stabilization of plutonium-bearing residues in response to the Recommendation and the Assessment was published by DOE on February 28, 1995. This Implementation Plan (IP) commits to stabilizing problem materials within 3 years, and stabilizing all other materials within 8 years. The IP identifies approximately 20 metric tons of plutonium requiring stabilization and/or repackaging. A further breakdown shows this material to consist of 8.5 metric tons of plutonium metal and alloys, 5.5 metric tons of plutonium as oxide, and 6 metric tons of plutonium as residues. Stabilization of the metal and oxide categories containing greater than 50 weight percent plutonium is covered by DOE Standard {open_quotes}Criteria for Safe Storage of Plutonium Metals and Oxides{close_quotes} December, 1994 (DOE-STD-3013-94). This standard establishes criteria for safe storage of stabilized plutonium metals and oxides for up to 50 years. Each of the DOE sites and contractors with large plutonium inventories has either started or is preparing to start stabilization activities to meet these criteria.

  2. High capacity embedding with indexed data recovery using adjunctive numerical relations in multimedia signal covers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, James C.; Agaian, Sos S.

    2013-05-01

    We introduce a technique for covertly embedding data throughout an audio file using redundant number system decomposition across non-standard digital bit-lines. This bit-line implementation integrates an index recoverable embedded algorithm with an extended bit level representation that achieves a high capacity data channel within an audio multimedia file. It will be shown this new steganography method has minimal aural distortive affects while preserving both first and second order cover statistics, making it less susceptible to most steganalysis attacks. Our research approach involves reviewing the common numerical methods used in common binary-based algorithms. We then describe basic concepts and challenges when attempting to implement complex embedding algorithms that are based on redundant number systems. Finally, we introduce a novel class of numerical based multiple bit-line decomposition systems, which we define as Adjunctive Numerical Representations. The system is primarily described using basic PCM techniques in uncompressed audio files however extended applications for alternate multimedia is addressed. This new embedding system will not only provide the statistical stability required for effective steganography but will also give us an improvement in the embedding capacity in this class of multimedia carrier files. This novelty of our approach is demonstrated by an ability to embed high capacity covert data while simultaneously providing a means for rapid, indexed data recovery.

  3. Efficiency and Accuracy Verification of the Explicit Numerical Manifold Method for Dynamic Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, X. L.; Wang, Y.; Fu, G. Y.; Ma, G. W.

    2015-05-01

    The original numerical manifold method (NMM) employs an implicit time integration scheme to achieve higher computational accuracy, but its efficiency is relatively low, especially when the open-close iterations of contact are involved. To improve its computational efficiency, a modified version of the NMM based on an explicit time integration algorithm is proposed in this study. The lumped mass matrix, internal force and damping vectors are derived for the proposed explicit scheme. A calibration study on P-wave propagation along a rock bar is conducted to investigate the efficiency and accuracy of the developed explicit numerical manifold method (ENMM) for wave propagation problems. Various considerations in the numerical simulations are discussed, and parametric studies are carried out to obtain an insight into the influencing factors on the efficiency and accuracy of wave propagation. To further verify the capability of the proposed ENMM, dynamic stability assessment for a fractured rock slope under seismic effect is analysed. It is shown that, compared to the original NMM, the computational efficiency of the proposed ENMM can be significantly improved.

  4. Attitude stability of a spinning spacecraft during appendage deployment/retraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitz-Coy, Norman; Fullerton, Wayne

    1994-01-01

    The work presented is motivated by the need for a national satellite rescue policy, not the ad hoc policy now in place. In studying different approaches for a national policy, the issue of capture and stabilization of a tumbling spacecraft must be addressed. For a rescue mission involving a tumbling spacecraft, it may be advantageous to have a rescue vehicle which is compact and 'rigid' during the rendezvous/capture phase. After capture, passive stabilization techniques could be utilized as an efficient means of detumbling the resulting system (i.e., both the rescue vehicle and captures spacecraft). Since the rescue vehicle is initially compact and 'rigid,' significant passive stabilization through energy dissipation can only be achieved through the deployment of flexible appendages. Once stabilization is accomplished, retraction of the appendages before maneuvering the system to its final destination may also prove advantageous. It is therefore of paramount interest that we study the effect of appendage deployment/retraction on the attitude stability of a spacecraft. Particular interest should be paid to appendage retraction, since if this process is destabilizing, passive stabilization as proposed may not be useful. Over the past three decades, it has been an 'on-again-off-again affair' with the problem of spacecraft appendage deployment. In most instances, these studies have been numerical simulations of specific spacecraft configurations for which there were specific concerns. The primary focus of these studies was the behavior of the appendage during deployment; the effects of appendage retraction was considered only in one of these studies. What is missing in the literature is a thorough study of the effects of appendage deployment/retraction on the attitude stability of a spacecraft. This paper presents a rigorous analysis of the stability of a spinning spacecraft during the deployment or the retraction of an appendage. The analysis is simplified such that

  5. Velocity shear stabilization of centrifugally confined plasma.

    PubMed

    Huang, Y M; Hassam, A B

    2001-12-01

    A magnetized, centrifugally confined plasma is subjected to a 3D MHD stability test. Ordinarily, the system is expected to be grossly unstable to "flute" interchanges of field lines. Numerical simulation shows though that the system is stable on account of velocity shear. This allows consideration of a magnetically confined plasma for thermonuclear fusion that has a particularly simple coil configuration. PMID:11736455

  6. Non-Linear Spring Equations and Stability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fay, Temple H.; Joubert, Stephan V.

    2009-01-01

    We discuss the boundary in the Poincare phase plane for boundedness of solutions to spring model equations of the form [second derivative of]x + x + epsilonx[superscript 2] = Fcoswt and the [second derivative of]x + x + epsilonx[superscript 3] = Fcoswt and report the results of a systematic numerical investigation on the global stability of…

  7. Developments in Cylindrical Shell Stability Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Starnes, James H., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    Today high-performance computing systems and new analytical and numerical techniques enable engineers to explore the use of advanced materials for shell design. This paper reviews some of the historical developments of shell buckling analysis and design. The paper concludes by identifying key research directions for reliable and robust methods development in shell stability analysis and design.

  8. Stability Test for Transient-Temperature Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, W.

    1984-01-01

    Graphical test helps assure numerical stability of calculations of transient temperature or diffusion in composite medium. Rectangular grid forms basis of two-dimensional finite-difference model for heat conduction or other diffusion like phenomena. Model enables calculation of transient heat transfer among up to four different materials that meet at grid point.

  9. Sawtooth stabilization by energetic trapped particles

    SciTech Connect

    White, R.B.; Rutherford, P.H.; Colestock, P.; Bussac, M.N.

    1988-03-01

    Recent experiments involving high power radio-frequency heating of a tokamak plasma show strong suppression of the sawtooth oscillation. A high energy trapped particle population is shown to have a strong stabilizing effect on the internal resistive kink mode. Numerical calculations are in reasonable agreement with experiment. 13 refs., 2 figs.

  10. Methods to achieve sub-100-nm contact hole lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindsay, Tracy K.; Kavanagh, Robert J.; Pohlers, Gerd; Kanno, Takafumi; Bae, Young C.; Barclay, George G.; Kanagasabapathy, Subbareddy; Mattia, Joseph

    2003-06-01

    There are numerous methods being explored by lithographers to achieve contact holes below 100nm. Regarding optical impact on contact hole imaging, very high numerical aperture tools are becoming available at 193nm (as high as 0.9) and various optical extension techniques such as assist features, focus drilling, phase shift masks, and off-axis illumination are being employed to improve the aerial image. In this paper, the impact of the ArF photoresist is investigated. Polymers capable of thermal reflow of larger (~140nm) to smaller (90nm and below) contact holes are presented. Improved materials to achieve the properties necessary for good contact hole imaging for standard single layer resist (SLR) processing are also discussed. State-of-the-art ultra-thin resists (UTR) for contact holes and 193nm bi-layer resist systems are also studied as viable techniques to achieving very small contact holes.

  11. Straightening: existence, uniqueness and stability

    PubMed Central

    Destrade, M.; Ogden, R. W.; Sgura, I.; Vergori, L.

    2014-01-01

    One of the least studied universal deformations of incompressible nonlinear elasticity, namely the straightening of a sector of a circular cylinder into a rectangular block, is revisited here and, in particular, issues of existence and stability are addressed. Particular attention is paid to the system of forces required to sustain the large static deformation, including by the application of end couples. The influence of geometric parameters and constitutive models on the appearance of wrinkles on the compressed face of the block is also studied. Different numerical methods for solving the incremental stability problem are compared and it is found that the impedance matrix method, based on the resolution of a matrix Riccati differential equation, is the more precise. PMID:24711723

  12. Stability of large DC power systems using switching converters, with application to the international space station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manners, B.; Gholdston, E. W.; Karimi, K.; Lee, F. C.; Rajagopalan, J.; Panov, Y.

    1996-01-01

    As space direct current (dc) power systems continue to grow in size, switching power converters are playing an ever larger role in power conditioning and control. When designing a large dc system using power converters of this type, special attention must be placed on the electrical stability of the system and of the individual loads on the system. In the design of the electric power system (EPS) of the International Space Station (ISS), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and its contractor team led by Boeing Defense & Space Group has placed a great deal of emphasis on designing for system and load stability. To achieve this goal, the team has expended considerable effort deriving a dear concept on defining system stability in both a general sense and specifically with respect to the space station. The ISS power system presents numerous challenges with respect to system stability, such as high power, complex sources and undefined loads. To complicate these issues, source and load components have been designed in parallel by three major subcontractors (Boeing, Rocketdyne, and McDonnell Douglas) with interfaces to both sources and loads being designed in different countries (Russia, Japan, Canada, Europe, etc.). These issues, coupled with the program goal of limiting costs, have proven a significant challenge to the program. As a result, the program has derived an impedance specification approach for system stability. This approach is based on the significant relationship between source and load impedances and the effect of this relationship on system stability. This approach is limited in its applicability by the theoretical and practical limits on component designs as presented by each system segment. As a result, the overall approach to system stability implemented by the ISS program consists of specific hardware requirements coupled with extensive system analysis and hardware testing. Following this approach, the ISS program plans to begin

  13. Stability of large DC power systems using switching converters, with application to the International Space Station

    SciTech Connect

    Gholdston, E.W.; Karimi, K.; Lee, F.C.; Rajagopalan, J.; Panov, Y.; Manners, B.

    1996-12-31

    As space direct current (dc) power systems continue to grow in size, switching power converters are playing an ever larger role in power conditioning and control. When designing a large dc system using power converters are playing an ever larger role in power conditioning and control.When designing a large dc system using power converters of this type, special attention must be placed on the electrical stability of the system and of the individual loads on the system. In the design of the electric power system (EPS) of the International Space Station (ISS), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and its contractor team led by Boeing Defense and Space Group has placed a great deal of emphasis on designing for system and load stability. To achieve this goal, the team has expended considerable effort deriving a clear concept on defining system stability in both a general sense and specifically with respect to the space station. The ISS power system presents numerous challenges with respect to system stability, such as high power, complex sources and undefined loads. As a result, the program has derived an impedance specification approach for system stability. This approach is based on the significant relationship between source and load impedances and the effect of this relationship on system stability. This approach is limited in its applicability by the theoretical and practical limits on component designs as presented by each system segment. As a result, the overall approach to system stability implemented by the ISS program consists of specific hardware requirements coupled with extensive system analysis and hardware testing.

  14. Vertically stabilized elongated cross-section tokamak

    DOEpatents

    Sheffield, George V.

    1977-01-01

    This invention provides a vertically stabilized, non-circular (minor) cross-section, toroidal plasma column characterized by an external separatrix. To this end, a specific poloidal coil means is added outside a toroidal plasma column containing an endless plasma current in a tokamak to produce a rectangular cross-section plasma column along the equilibrium axis of the plasma column. By elongating the spacing between the poloidal coil means the plasma cross-section is vertically elongated, while maintaining vertical stability, efficiently to increase the poloidal flux in linear proportion to the plasma cross-section height to achieve a much greater plasma volume than could be achieved with the heretofore known round cross-section plasma columns. Also, vertical stability is enhanced over an elliptical cross-section plasma column, and poloidal magnetic divertors are achieved.

  15. Numerical discretization for nonlinear diffusion filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mustaffa, I.; Mizuar, I.; Aminuddin, M. M. M.; Dasril, Y.

    2015-05-01

    Nonlinear diffusion filters are famously used in machine vision for image denoising and restoration. This paper presents a study on the effects of different numerical discretization of nonlinear diffusion filter. Several numerical discretization schemes are presented; namely semi-implicit, AOS, and fully implicit schemes. The results of these schemes are compared by visual results, objective measurement e.g. PSNR and MSE. The results are also compared to a Daubechies wavelet denoising method. It is acknowledged that the two preceding scheme have already been discussed in literature, however comparison to the latter scheme has not been made. The semi-implicit scheme uses an additive operator splitting (AOS) developed to overcome the shortcoming of the explicit scheme i.e., stability for very small time steps. Although AOS has proven to be efficient, from the nonlinear diffusion filter results with different discretization schemes, examples shows that implicit schemes are worth pursuing.

  16. Numerically controlled oscillator for the Fermilab booster

    SciTech Connect

    Crisp, J.L.; Ducar, R.J.

    1989-04-01

    In order to improve the stability of the Fermilab Booster low level rf system, a numerically controlled oscillator system is being constructed. Although the system has not been implemented to date, the design is outlined in this paper. The heart of the new system consists of a numerically synthesized frequency generator manufactured by the Sciteq Company. The 3 Ghz/sec rate and 30 to 53 MHz range of the Booster frequency program required the design of a CAMAC based, fast-cycling (1 MHz), 65K X 32 bit, digital function generator. A 1 MHz digital adder and 12 bit analog to digital converter will be used to correct small program errors by phase locking the oscillator to the beam. 6 refs., 1 fig.

  17. Numerical simulation of supersonic boundary layer transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guo, Y.; Adams, N. A.; Sandham, N. D.; Kleiser, L.

    1994-01-01

    The present contribution reviews some of the recent progress obtained at our group in the direct numerical simulation (DNS) of compressible boundary layer transition. Elements of the different simulation approaches and numerical techniques employed are surveyed. Temporal and spatial simulations, as well as comparisons with results obtained from Parabolized Stability Equations, are discussed. DNS results are given for flat plate boundary layers in the Mach number range 1.6 to 4.5. A temporal DNS at Mach 4.5 has been continued through breakdown all the way to the turbulent stage. In addition results obtained with a recently developed extended temporal DNS approach are presented, which takes into account some nonparallel effects of a growing boundary layer. Results from this approach are quite close to those of spatial DNS, while preserving the efficiency of the temporal DNS.

  18. High-stability detectors for radioastronomical receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teuber, Ute; Schmidt, Axel

    The increased bandwidths of radioastronomical receivers has increased the detector stability requirements. A detector with a short-term stability of 0.01 percent, required in a receiver with a 9 mm wavelength receiver, could not be achieved using previously available detectors and dc amplifiers. This paper describes a switched detector which meets these requirements, and presents resulting rms values as a function of integration time.

  19. Stabilized vortices in layered Kerr media

    SciTech Connect

    Montesinos, Gaspar D.; Perez-Garcia, Victor M.; Michinel, Humberto; Salgueiro, Jose R.

    2005-03-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the possibility of stabilizing beams with angular momentum propagating in Kerr media against filamentation and collapse. Very long propagation distances can be achieved by combining the choice of an appropriate layered medium with alternating focusing and defocusing nonlinearities with the presence of an incoherent guiding beam which is itself stabilized in this medium. The applicability of the results to the field of matter waves is also discussed.

  20. Numerical modeling of waveguide heated microwave plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Venkateswaran, S.; Schwer, D.A.; Merkle, C.L.

    1993-12-01

    Waveguide-heated microwave plasmas for space propulsion applications are analyzed by a two-dimensional numerical solution of the combined Navier-Stokes and Maxwell equations. Two waveguide configurations -- one purely transmitting and the other with a reflecting end wall -- are considered. Plasma stability and absorption characteristics are studied and contrasted with the characteristic of resonant cavity heated plasmas. In addition, preliminary estimates of the overall efficiency and the thrust and specific impulse of the propulsion system are also made. The computational results are used to explain experimental trends and to better understand the working of these devices.

  1. Numerical simulation of swept-wing flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, Helen L.

    1991-01-01

    Efforts of the last six months to computationally model the transition process characteristics of flow over swept wings are described. Specifically, the crossflow instability and crossflow/Tollmien-Schlichting wave interactions are analyzed through the numerical solution of the full 3D Navier-Stokes equations including unsteadiness, curvature, and sweep. This approach is chosen because of the complexity of the problem and because it appears that linear stability theory is insufficient to explain the discrepancies between different experiments and between theory and experiment. The leading edge region of a swept wing is considered in a 3D spatial simulation with random disturbances as the initial conditions.

  2. A Numerical Study of Feathering Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Wing-Kit; Wang, Hsiang-Hsu

    2016-06-01

    The stability of a spiral shock of self-gravitating, magnetized interstellar medium is studied by performing two-dimensional numerical simulations of a local patch of tight-winding spiral arm. As previously suggested by the linear studies, two types of instabilities are identified, namely, wiggle instability and feathering instability. The former instability occurs in the hydrodynamics limit and results in short wavelength perturbations. On the other hand, the feathering instability requires both self-gravitating and magnetic fields and results in wider structures.

  3. Direct Numerical Simulation of the Leidenfrost Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanguy, Sebastien; Rueda Villegas, Lucia; Fluid Mechanics Institute of Toulouse Team

    2015-11-01

    The development of numerical methods for the direct numerical simulation of two-phase flows with phase changes, is the main topic of this study. We propose a novel numerical method which allows dealing with both evaporation and boiling at the interface between a liquid and a gas. For instance it can occur for a Leidenfrost droplet; a water drop levitating above a hot plate which temperature is much higher than the boiling temperature. In this case, boiling occurs in the film of saturated vapor which is entrapped between the bottom of the drop and the plate, whereas the top of the water droplet evaporates in contact of ambient air. Thus, boiling and evaporation can occur simultaneously on different regions of the same liquid interface or occur successively at different times of the history of an evaporating droplet. Usual numerical methods are not able to perform computations in these transient regimes, therefore, we propose in this paper a novel numerical method to achieve this challenging task. Finally, we present several accurate validations against experimental results on Leidenfrost Droplets to strengthen the relevance of this new method.

  4. Numerical flow modeling of power plant windboxes

    SciTech Connect

    LaRose, J.A.; Hopkins, M.W.

    1995-12-31

    Numerical flow modeling has become an increasingly important design and analysis tool for improving the air distribution to power plant burners. Uniform air distribution allows the burners to perform as designed to achieve the lowest possible emissions and best fuel burn-out. Modifications can be made internal to the existing windbox to improve the burner-to-burner and burner peripheral air distributions. These modifications can include turning vanes, flow splitters, perforated plate, and burner shrouding. Numerical modeling allows the analysis of design trade-offs between adding flow resistance, fan power, and windbox modification construction cost. Numerical modeling has advantages over physical modeling in that actual geometric scales and air temperatures are used. Advantages over a field data based study include the ability to quickly and cheaply analyze a variety of design options without actually modifying the windbox, and the availability of significantly more data with which to interpret the results. Costs to perform a numerical study are generally one-half to one-third of the cost to perform a physical flow model and can be one-forth of the cost to perform a field study. The continued development of affordable, high speed, large memory workstations and reliable, commercially available computation fluid dynamics (CFD) software allows practical analyses of power plant windboxes. This paper discusses (1) the impact of air distribution on burner performance, (2) the methodology used to perform numerical flow modeling of power plant windboxes, and (3) the results from several windbox analyses including available post-modification observations.

  5. Direct numerical simulation of hot jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacob, Marc C.

    1993-01-01

    The ultimate motivation of this work is to investigate the stability of two dimensional heated jets and its implications for aerodynamic sound generation from data obtained with direct numerical simulations (DNS). As pointed out in our last report, these flows undergo two types of instabilities, convective or absolute, depending on their temperature. We also described the limits of earlier experimental and theoretical studies and explained why a numerical investigation could give us new insight into the physics of these instabilities. The aeroacoustical interest of these flows was also underlined. In order to reach this goal, we first need to succeed in the DNS of heated jets. Our past efforts have been focused on this issue which encountered several difficulties. Our numerical difficulties are directly related to the physical problem we want to investigate since these absolutely or almost absolutely unstable flows are by definition very sensitive to the smallest disturbances and are very likely to reach nonlinear saturation through a numerical feedback mechanism. As a result, it is very difficult to compute a steady laminar solution using a spatial DNS. A steady state was reached only for strongly co-flowed jets, but these flows are almost equivalent to two independent mixing layers. Thus they are far from absolute instability and have much lower growth rates.

  6. Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation (NAS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, V. L.; Ballhaus, W. F., Jr.; Bailey, F. R.

    1983-01-01

    The history of the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation Program, which is designed to provide a leading-edge capability to computational aerodynamicists, is traced back to its origin in 1975. Factors motivating its development and examples of solutions to successively refined forms of the governing equations are presented. The NAS Processing System Network and each of its eight subsystems are described in terms of function and initial performance goals. A proposed usage allocation policy is discussed and some initial problems being readied for solution on the NAS system are identified.

  7. Lags in Minority Achievement Defy Traditional Explanations. The Achievement Gap.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Viadero, Debra; Johnston, Robert C.

    2000-01-01

    This second in a four-part series on why academic achievement gaps exist notes that standard explanations for why minority students trail behind non-Hispanic whites are not good enough, suggesting that no single explanation for the gap exists, but instead a multitude of factors are influential. Poverty, though not the single most important cause,…

  8. Central Iowa Low Achiever Mathematics Project - Low Achiever Motivational Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmerman, Joseph T.

    The materials in this booklet are designed especially for the low achieving student in mathematics. Containing some materials from a course in general mathematics, the booklet is intended to be used in conjunction with conventional textbook materials and is designed to serve as a source of new ideas for teachers and to relieve the teacher of much…

  9. Capsule-train stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryngelson, Spencer H.; Freund, Jonathan B.

    2016-07-01

    Elastic capsules flowing in small enough tubes, such as red blood cells in capillaries, are well known to line up into regular single-file trains. The stability of such trains in somewhat wider channels, where this organization is not observed, is studied in a two-dimensional model system that includes full coupling between the viscous flow and suspended capsules. A diverse set of linearly amplifying disturbances, both long-time asymptotic (modal) and transient (nonmodal) perturbations, is identified and analyzed. These have a range of amplification rates and their corresponding forms are wavelike, typically dominated by one of five principal perturbation classes: longitudinal and transverse translations, tilts, and symmetric and asymmetric shape distortions. Finite-amplitude transiently amplifying perturbations are shown to provide a mechanism that can bypass slower asymptotic modal linear growth and precipitate the onset of nonlinear effects. Direct numerical simulations are used to verify the linear analysis and track the subsequent transition of the regular capsule trains into an apparently chaotic flow.

  10. Numerical simulation of electrospray in the cone-jet mode.

    PubMed

    Herrada, M A; López-Herrera, J M; Gañán-Calvo, A M; Vega, E J; Montanero, J M; Popinet, S

    2012-08-01

    We present a robust and computationally efficient numerical scheme for simulating steady electrohydrodynamic atomization processes (electrospray). The main simplification assumed in this scheme is that all the free electrical charges are distributed over the interface. A comparison of the results with those calculated with a volume-of-fluid method showed that the numerical scheme presented here accurately describes the flow pattern within the entire liquid domain. Experiments were performed to partially validate the numerical predictions. The simulations reproduced accurately the experimental shape of the liquid cone jet, providing correct values of the emitted electric current even for configurations very close to the cone-jet stability limit. PMID:23005852

  11. Optimal Recursive Digital Filters for Active Bending Stabilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orr, Jeb S.

    2013-01-01

    In the design of flight control systems for large flexible boosters, it is common practice to utilize active feedback control of the first lateral structural bending mode so as to suppress transients and reduce gust loading. Typically, active stabilization or phase stabilization is achieved by carefully shaping the loop transfer function in the frequency domain via the use of compensating filters combined with the frequency response characteristics of the nozzle/actuator system. In this paper we present a new approach for parameterizing and determining optimal low-order recursive linear digital filters so as to satisfy phase shaping constraints for bending and sloshing dynamics while simultaneously maximizing attenuation in other frequency bands of interest, e.g. near higher frequency parasitic structural modes. By parameterizing the filter directly in the z-plane with certain restrictions, the search space of candidate filter designs that satisfy the constraints is restricted to stable, minimum phase recursive low-pass filters with well-conditioned coefficients. Combined with optimal output feedback blending from multiple rate gyros, the present approach enables rapid and robust parametrization of autopilot bending filters to attain flight control performance objectives. Numerical results are presented that illustrate the application of the present technique to the development of rate gyro filters for an exploration-class multi-engined space launch vehicle.

  12. Optimal subinterval selection approach for power system transient stability simulation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kim, Soobae; Overbye, Thomas J.

    2015-10-21

    Power system transient stability analysis requires an appropriate integration time step to avoid numerical instability as well as to reduce computational demands. For fast system dynamics, which vary more rapidly than what the time step covers, a fraction of the time step, called a subinterval, is used. However, the optimal value of this subinterval is not easily determined because the analysis of the system dynamics might be required. This selection is usually made from engineering experiences, and perhaps trial and error. This paper proposes an optimal subinterval selection approach for power system transient stability analysis, which is based on modalmore » analysis using a single machine infinite bus (SMIB) system. Fast system dynamics are identified with the modal analysis and the SMIB system is used focusing on fast local modes. An appropriate subinterval time step from the proposed approach can reduce computational burden and achieve accurate simulation responses as well. As a result, the performance of the proposed method is demonstrated with the GSO 37-bus system.« less

  13. Optimal subinterval selection approach for power system transient stability simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Soobae; Overbye, Thomas J.

    2015-10-21

    Power system transient stability analysis requires an appropriate integration time step to avoid numerical instability as well as to reduce computational demands. For fast system dynamics, which vary more rapidly than what the time step covers, a fraction of the time step, called a subinterval, is used. However, the optimal value of this subinterval is not easily determined because the analysis of the system dynamics might be required. This selection is usually made from engineering experiences, and perhaps trial and error. This paper proposes an optimal subinterval selection approach for power system transient stability analysis, which is based on modal analysis using a single machine infinite bus (SMIB) system. Fast system dynamics are identified with the modal analysis and the SMIB system is used focusing on fast local modes. An appropriate subinterval time step from the proposed approach can reduce computational burden and achieve accurate simulation responses as well. As a result, the performance of the proposed method is demonstrated with the GSO 37-bus system.

  14. Numerical Propulsion System Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naiman, Cynthia

    2006-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center, in partnership with the aerospace industry, other government agencies, and academia, is leading the effort to develop an advanced multidisciplinary analysis environment for aerospace propulsion systems called the Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS). NPSS is a framework for performing analysis of complex systems. The initial development of NPSS focused on the analysis and design of airbreathing aircraft engines, but the resulting NPSS framework may be applied to any system, for example: aerospace, rockets, hypersonics, power and propulsion, fuel cells, ground based power, and even human system modeling. NPSS provides increased flexibility for the user, which reduces the total development time and cost. It is currently being extended to support the NASA Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate Fundamental Aeronautics Program and the Advanced Virtual Engine Test Cell (AVETeC). NPSS focuses on the integration of multiple disciplines such as aerodynamics, structure, and heat transfer with numerical zooming on component codes. Zooming is the coupling of analyses at various levels of detail. NPSS development includes capabilities to facilitate collaborative engineering. The NPSS will provide improved tools to develop custom components and to use capability for zooming to higher fidelity codes, coupling to multidiscipline codes, transmitting secure data, and distributing simulations across different platforms. These powerful capabilities extend NPSS from a zero-dimensional simulation tool to a multi-fidelity, multidiscipline system-level simulation tool for the full development life cycle.

  15. Confidence in Numerical Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Hemez, Francois M.

    2015-02-23

    This PowerPoint presentation offers a high-level discussion of uncertainty, confidence and credibility in scientific Modeling and Simulation (M&S). It begins by briefly evoking M&S trends in computational physics and engineering. The first thrust of the discussion is to emphasize that the role of M&S in decision-making is either to support reasoning by similarity or to “forecast,” that is, make predictions about the future or extrapolate to settings or environments that cannot be tested experimentally. The second thrust is to explain that M&S-aided decision-making is an exercise in uncertainty management. The three broad classes of uncertainty in computational physics and engineering are variability and randomness, numerical uncertainty and model-form uncertainty. The last part of the discussion addresses how scientists “think.” This thought process parallels the scientific method where by a hypothesis is formulated, often accompanied by simplifying assumptions, then, physical experiments and numerical simulations are performed to confirm or reject the hypothesis. “Confidence” derives, not just from the levels of training and experience of analysts, but also from the rigor with which these assessments are performed, documented and peer-reviewed.

  16. Molecular laser stabilization and benchtop simulation for LISA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubert, Halloin; Jeannin, Olivier; Argence, Bérengère; Turazza, Oscar; Acef, Ouali; Auger, Gérard; Plagnol, Eric

    In a nutshell, the expected performance of LISA relies on two main technical challenges: the ability for the spacecrafts to precisely follow the free-flying masses and the outstanding precision of the phase shift measurement. This latter constraint requires frequency stabilized lasers and efficient numerical algorithms to account for the redundant, delayed noise propagation, thus canceling laser phase noise by many orders of magnitude (TDI methods). Recently involved in the technical developments for LISA, the goal of our team at APC (France) is to contribute on these two subjects: frequency reference for laser stabilization and benchtop simulation of the interferometer. In the present design of LISA, two stages of laser stabilization are used (not accounting for the "post-processed" TDI algorithm): laser pre-stabilization on a frequency reference and lock on the ultra stable distance between spacecrafts (arm-locking). While the foreseen (and deeply studied) laser reference consists of a Fabry-Perot cavity, other techniques may be suitable for LISA or future metrology missions. In particular, locking to a molecular reference (namely iodine in the case of the LISA Nd:YAG laser) is an interesting alternative. It offers the required performance with very good long-term stability (absolute frequency reference) though the reference can be slightly tuned to account for arm-locking. This technique is currently being investigated by our team and optimized for LISA (compactness, vacuum compatibility, ease of use and initialization, etc.). Ongoing results and prospects to increase the performance of the system will be presented at this session. Beyond the laser pre-stabilization, it is also desirable to test interferometric algorithms and devices, such as Time Delay Interferometry, arm-locking and phasemeters. To achieve this goal, we are currently designing an optical benchtop experiment representative of LISA measurements, that will be implemented in the near future. The

  17. On the boundary conditions in slope stability analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chugh, Ashok K.

    2003-09-01

    Boundary conditions can affect computed factor of safety results in two- and three-dimensional stability analyses of slopes. Commonly used boundary conditions in two- and three-dimensional slope stability analyses via limit-equilibrium and continuum-mechanics based solution procedures are described. A sample problem is included to illustrate the importance of boundary conditions in slope stability analyses. The sample problem is solved using two- and three-dimensional numerical models commonly used in engineering practice.

  18. Workshop on Feedback Stabilization of MHD Stabilities

    SciTech Connect

    McGuire, K.; Kugel, H.; La Haye, R.; Mauel, M.; Nevins, W.; Prager, S.

    1996-12-31

    The feedback stabilization of MHD instabilities is an area of research that is critical for improving the performance and economic attractiveness of magnetic confinement devices. A Workshop dedicated to feedback stabilization of MHD instabilities was held from December 11-13, 1996 at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton NJ, USA. The resulting presentations, conclusions, and recommendations are summarized.

  19. Collocation Method for Numerical Solution of Coupled Nonlinear Schroedinger Equation

    SciTech Connect

    Ismail, M. S.

    2010-09-30

    The coupled nonlinear Schroedinger equation models several interesting physical phenomena presents a model equation for optical fiber with linear birefringence. In this paper we use collocation method to solve this equation, we test this method for stability and accuracy. Numerical tests using single soliton and interaction of three solitons are used to test the resulting scheme.

  20. Numerical and Calculation Abilities in Children with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colomer, Carla; Re, Anna M.; Miranda, Ana; Lucangeli, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the specific numerical and calculation abilities of 28 children with ADHD without comorbid mathematical learning disabilities (LD), ranging from the 1st to the 5th grade of primary school, and to examine the stability or the development of the arithmetic profile. Our results showed that a high percentage of…