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Sample records for achieve optimal glycemic

  1. Barriers to achieving optimal glycemic control in a multi-ethnic society: a US focus.

    PubMed

    Dagogo-Jack, Samuel; Funnell, Martha M; Davidson, Jaime

    2006-08-01

    The increasing prevalence of diabetes is particularly apparent in certain ethnic groups, such as African and Hispanic Americans. These groups generally also have poorer glycemic control and outcomes. To better understand the issues surrounding these problems and possible methods to overcome them we performed a literature review from the past 15 years on barriers to glycemic control with a focus on US data. The literature reveals that barriers may be inherent (eg, genetic, cultural, and language/communication) or acquired (eg, those associated with changes in lifestyle and socioeconomic factors). Healthcare interventions that take into consideration cultural and population-specific characteristics can reduce the prevalence and severity of diabetes and its resulting complications. Implementing such strategies will require suitable education for patients and providers, the availability of culturally-sensitive, patient-centered healthcare teams, the creation of collaborative relationships between providers and patients, better use of community resources, and assistance for patients to make informed decisions about available treatment options. There is also evidence suggesting that at the same level of glucose control Hispanics and African Americans have the same degree of complications as whites; therefore, good control is essential for the future well-being of all patients. Addressing these issues may help to decrease the ethnic disparities that currently exist in diabetes care.

  2. Breaking down patient and physician barriers to optimize glycemic control in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ross, Stuart A

    2013-09-01

    Approximately half of patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) do not achieve globally recognized blood glucose targets, despite the availability of a wide range of effective glucose-lowering therapies. Failure to maintain good glycemic control increases the risk of diabetes-related complications and long-term health care costs. Patients must be brought under glycemic control to improve treatment outcomes, but existing barriers to optimizing glycemic control must first be overcome, including patient nonadherence to treatment, the failure of physicians to intensify therapy in a timely manner, and inadequacies in the health care system itself. The reasons for such barriers include treatment side effects, complex treatment regimens, needle anxiety, poor patient education, and the absence of an adequate patient care plan; however, newer therapies and devices, combined with comprehensive care plans involving adequate patient education, can help to minimize barriers and improve treatment outcomes.

  3. A global study of the unmet need for glycemic control and predictor factors among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus who have achieved optimal fasting plasma glucose control on basal insulin

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Engels; Colagiuri, Stephen; Gaàl, Zsolt; Lavalle, Fernando; Mkrtumyan, Ashot; Nikonova, Elena; Tentolouris, Nikolaos; Vidal, Josep; Davies, Melanie

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background This study used data from different sources to identify the extent of the unmet need for postprandial glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) after the initiation of basal insulin therapy in Europe, Asia Pacific, the United States, and Latin America. Methods Different levels of evidence were used as available for each country/region, with data extracted from seven randomized controlled trials (RCTs), three clinical trial registries (CTRs), and three electronic medical record (EMR) databases. Glycemic status was categorized as “well controlled” (glycated hemoglobin [HbA1c] at target [<7%]), “residual hyperglycemia” (fasting plasma glucose [FPG] but not HbA1c at target [FPG <7.2/7.8 mmol/L, <130/140 mg/dL, depending on country‐specific recommendations]), or “uncontrolled” (both FPG and HbA1c above target). Predictor factors were identified from the RCT data set using logistic regression analysis. Results RCT data showed that 16.9% to 28.0%, 42.7% to 54.4%, and 16.9% to 38.1% of patients with T2DM had well‐controlled glycemia, residual hyperglycemia, and uncontrolled hyperglycemia, respectively. In CTRs, respective ranges were 21.8% to 33.6%, 31.5% to 35.6%, and 30.7% to 46.8%, and in EMR databases were 4.4% to 21.0%, 23.9% to 31.8%, and 53.6% to 63.8%. Significant predictor factors of residual hyperglycemia identified from RCT data included high baseline HbA1c (all countries/regions except Brazil), high baseline FPG (United Kingdom/Japan), longer duration of diabetes (Brazil), and female sex (Europe/Latin America). Conclusions Irrespective of intrinsic differences between data sources, 24% to 54% of patients with T2DM globally had residual hyperglycemia with HbA1c not at target, despite achieving FPG control, indicating a significant unmet need for postprandial glycemic control. PMID:27606888

  4. Achieving glycemic control in special populations in hospital: perspectives in practice.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Alice Y Y

    2014-04-01

    Achieving and maintaining glycemic control in patients with diabetes admitted to hospital is challenging because of the many competing factors of nutrition, pharmacotherapy and other patient-related and systemic factors. For patients receiving enteral or parenteral feeding, eating irregularly or receiving glucocorticoid therapy, the challenges are even greater. The basic principles to follow when managing glycemia in these populations are as follows: 1) Recognition of those at risk for hyperglycemia; 2) frequent bedside glucose monitoring; 3) a proactive approach with routine insulin administration based on the predicted glucose patterns; 4) constant reassessment of the glycemic status and titration of the routine insulin accordingly.

  5. Utility of different glycemic control metrics for optimizing management of diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Kohnert, Klaus-Dieter; Heinke, Peter; Vogt, Lutz; Salzsieder, Eckhard

    2015-01-01

    The benchmark for assessing quality of long-term glycemic control and adjustment of therapy is currently glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c). Despite its importance as an indicator for the development of diabetic complications, recent studies have revealed that this metric has some limitations; it conveys a rather complex message, which has to be taken into consideration for diabetes screening and treatment. On the basis of recent clinical trials, the relationship between HbA1c and cardiovascular outcomes in long-standing diabetes has been called into question. It becomes obvious that other surrogate and biomarkers are needed to better predict cardiovascular diabetes complications and assess efficiency of therapy. Glycated albumin, fructosamin, and 1,5-anhydroglucitol have received growing interest as alternative markers of glycemic control. In addition to measures of hyperglycemia, advanced glucose monitoring methods became available. An indispensible adjunct to HbA1c in routine diabetes care is self-monitoring of blood glucose. This monitoring method is now widely used, as it provides immediate feedback to patients on short-term changes, involving fasting, preprandial, and postprandial glucose levels. Beyond the traditional metrics, glycemic variability has been identified as a predictor of hypoglycemia, and it might also be implicated in the pathogenesis of vascular diabetes complications. Assessment of glycemic variability is thus important, but exact quantification requires frequently sampled glucose measurements. In order to optimize diabetes treatment, there is a need for both key metrics of glycemic control on a day-to-day basis and for more advanced, user-friendly monitoring methods. In addition to traditional discontinuous glucose testing, continuous glucose sensing has become a useful tool to reveal insufficient glycemic management. This new technology is particularly effective in patients with complicated diabetes and provides the opportunity to characterize

  6. Analysis of alternatives for insulinizing patients to achieve glycemic control and avoid accompanying risks of hypoglycemia.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jialin; Xiong, Qianyin; Miao, Jun; Zhang, Yao; Xia, Libing; Lu, Meiqin; Zhang, Binhua; Chen, Yueping; Zhang, Ansu; Yu, Cui; Wang, Li-Zhuo

    2015-05-01

    The aims of the present study were to explore the efficacy of glycemic control and the risks of hypoglycemia with different methods of insulin therapy, and to provide reference data for the clinical treatment of diabetes. In this retrospective study, hospitalized patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes between March and December 2014, in the Department of Endocrinology in the First Affiliated Hospital of Wannan Medical College, were divided into three groups, including an intensive insulin analogue therapy group, a premixed insulin analogue treatment group and a premixed human insulin therapy group. The efficacy of glycemic control and the incidence of hypoglycemia were determined in each of the insulin treatment groups. Compared with the other treatment groups, the intensive insulin analogue therapy group was associated with superior blood glucose control, shorter time to reach standard insulin regimen, shorter hospitalization time, fewer fluctuations in blood glucose levels and lower insulin dosage on discharge from hospital. However, this treatment was also associated with a high risk of hypoglycemia. In conclusion, when combined with the effective prevention of hypoglycemia and appropriate nursing care (especially in hospital care), intensive insulin analogue therapy may provide the greatest benefit to patients.

  7. Achieving glycemic control in elderly patients with type 2 diabetes: a critical comparison of current options

    PubMed Central

    Du, Ye-Fong; Ou, Horng-Yih; Beverly, Elizabeth A; Chiu, Ching-Ju

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is increasing in the elderly. Because of the unique characteristics of elderly people with T2DM, therapeutic strategy and focus should be tailored to suit this population. This article reviews the guidelines and studies related to older people with T2DM worldwide. A few important themes are generalized: 1) the functional and cognitive status is critical for older people with T2DM considering their life expectancy compared to younger counterparts; 2) both severe hypoglycemia and persistent hyperglycemia are deleterious to older adults with T2DM, and both conditions should be avoided when determining therapeutic goals; 3) recently developed guidelines emphasize the avoidance of hypoglycemic episodes in older people, even in the absence of symptoms. In addition, we raise the concern of glycemic variability, and discuss the rationale for the selection of current options in managing this patient population. PMID:25429208

  8. A Mixed Methods Study Exploring the Factors and Behaviors That Affect Glycemic Control Following a Structured Education Program: The Irish DAFNE Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casey, Dympna; O'Hara, Mary Clare; Meehan, Ben; Byrne, Molly; Dinneen, Sean F.; Murphy, Kathy

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To explain the factors affecting glycemic control (measured by HbA1c) following the Dose Adjustment for Normal Eating (DAFNE) program. Background: DAFNE is a structured education program designed to assist persons with type 1 diabetes mellitus achieve optimal glycemic control. However, not all participants reach this goal. Few studies…

  9. Translational Geroscience: Emphasizing function to achieve optimal longevity

    PubMed Central

    Seals, Douglas R.; Melov, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Among individuals, biological aging leads to cellular and organismal dysfunction and an increased risk of chronic degenerative diseases and disability. This sequence of events in combination with the projected increases in the number of older adults will result in a worldwide healthcare burden with dire consequences. Superimposed on this setting are the adults now reaching traditional retirement ages--the baby boomers--a group that wishes to remain active, productive and physically and cognitively fit as they grow older. Together, these conditions are producing an unprecedented demand for increased healthspan or what might be termed “optimal longevity”—to live long, but well. To meet this demand, investigators with interests in the biological aspects of aging from model organisms to human epidemiology (population aging) must work together within an interactive process that we describe as translational geroscience. An essential goal of this new investigational platform should be the optimization and preservation of physiological function throughout the lifespan, including integrative physical and cognitive function, which would serve to increase healthspan, compress morbidity and disability into a shorter period of late-life, and help achieve optimal longevity. To most effectively utilize this new approach, we must rethink how investigators and administrators working at different levels of the translational research continuum communicate and collaborate with each other, how best to train the next generation of scientists in this new field, and how contemporary biological-biomedical aging research should be organized and funded. PMID:25324468

  10. In situ application of hydrogel-type fibrin-islet composite optimized for rapid glycemic control by subcutaneous xenogeneic porcine islet transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung-Sik; Lim, Jong-Hyung; Nam, Hye-Young; Lim, Hyun-Ju; Shin, Jun-Seop; Shin, Jin-Young; Ryu, Ju-Hee; Kim, Kwangmeyung; Kwon, Ick-Chan; Jin, Sang-Man; Kim, Hang-Rae; Kim, Sang-Joon; Park, Chung-Gyu

    2012-09-10

    Maximum engraftment of transplanted islets is essential for the clinical application of a subcutaneous site. Significant barriers to the current approaches are associated with their low effectiveness, complexity and unproven biosafety. Here, we evaluated and optimized a fibrin-islet composite for effective glycemic control in a subcutaneous site whose environment is highly hypoxic due to low vascularization potential. In the setting of xenogeneic porcine islet transplantation into the subcutaneous space of a diabetic mouse, the in vivo islet functions were greatly affected by the concentrations of fibrinogen and thrombin. The optimized hydrogel-type fibrin remarkably reduced the marginal islet mass to approximately one tenth that of islets without fibrin. This marginal islet mass was comparable to that in the setting of the subcapsular space of the kidney, which is a highly vascularized organ. Highly vascularized structures were generated inside and on the outer surface of the grafts. A hydrogel-type fibrin-islet composite established early diabetic control within an average of 3.4days after the transplantation. In the mechanistic studies, fibrin promoted local angiogenesis, enhanced islet viability and prevented fragmentation of islets into single cells. In conclusion, in situ application of hydrogel-type fibrin-islet composite may be a promising modality in the clinical success of subcutaneous islet transplantation.

  11. Optimized Delivery System Achieves Enhanced Endomyocardial Stem Cell Retention

    PubMed Central

    Behfar, Atta; Latere, Jean-Pierre; Bartunek, Jozef; Homsy, Christian; Daro, Dorothee; Crespo-Diaz, Ruben J.; Stalboerger, Paul G.; Steenwinckel, Valerie; Seron, Aymeric; Redfield, Margaret M.; Terzic, Andre

    2014-01-01

    Background Regenerative cell-based therapies are associated with limited myocardial retention of delivered stem cells. The objective of this study is to develop an endocardial delivery system for enhanced cell retention. Methods and Results Stem cell retention was simulated in silico using one and three-dimensional models of tissue distortion and compliance associated with delivery. Needle designs, predicted to be optimal, were accordingly engineered using nitinol – a nickel and titanium alloy displaying shape memory and super-elasticity. Biocompatibility was tested with human mesenchymal stem cells. Experimental validation was performed with species-matched cells directly delivered into Langendorff-perfused porcine hearts or administered percutaneously into the endocardium of infarcted pigs. Cell retention was quantified by flow cytometry and real time quantitative polymerase chain reaction methodology. Models, computing optimal distribution of distortion calibrated to favor tissue compliance, predicted that a 75°-curved needle featuring small-to-large graded side holes would ensure the highest cell retention profile. In isolated hearts, the nitinol curved needle catheter (C-Cath) design ensured 3-fold superior stem cell retention compared to a standard needle. In the setting of chronic infarction, percutaneous delivery of stem cells with C-Cath yielded a 37.7±7.1% versus 10.0±2.8% retention achieved with a traditional needle, without impact on biocompatibility or safety. Conclusions Modeling guided development of a nitinol-based curved needle delivery system with incremental side holes achieved enhanced myocardial stem cell retention. PMID:24326777

  12. Using tailored methodical approaches to achieve optimal science outcomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wingate, Lory M.

    2016-08-01

    The science community is actively engaged in research, development, and construction of instrumentation projects that they anticipate will lead to new science discoveries. There appears to be very strong link between the quality of the activities used to complete these projects, and having a fully functioning science instrument that will facilitate these investigations.[2] The combination of using internationally recognized standards within the disciplines of project management (PM) and systems engineering (SE) has been demonstrated to lead to achievement of positive net effects and optimal project outcomes. Conversely, unstructured, poorly managed projects will lead to unpredictable, suboptimal project outcomes ultimately affecting the quality of the science that can be done with the new instruments. The proposed application of these two specific methodical approaches, implemented as a tailorable suite of processes, are presented in this paper. Project management (PM) is accepted worldwide as an effective methodology used to control project cost, schedule, and scope. Systems engineering (SE) is an accepted method that is used to ensure that the outcomes of a project match the intent of the stakeholders, or if they diverge, that the changes are understood, captured, and controlled. An appropriate application, or tailoring, of these disciplines can be the foundation upon which success in projects that support science can be optimized.

  13. Understanding basic carbohydrate counting, glycemic index, and glycemic load for improved glycemic control in Hispanic patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Lidia Guadalupe Compeán; Berry, Diane C; Ruiz, Octelina Castillo; González, Eunice Reséndiz; Pérez, Paulina Aguilera; Rivas, Elva Del Ángel

    2014-01-01

    Hispanic patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus generally have poor glycemic control. Constant hyperglycemia in individuals with type 2 diabetes can cause microvascular and macrovascular complications that lead to early morbidity and mortality. Good glycemic control requires a balance between diet, exercise, and medication, but dietary balance is difficult to achieve for many patients. Of the macronutrients, carbohydrates mostly affect blood glucose levels. Basic carbohydrate counting, glycemic index, and glycemic load are important tools for patients to master to control their blood glucose levels.

  14. Toward achieving optimal response: understanding and managing antidepressant side effects

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Karen; Posternak, Michael; Jonathan, E. Alpert

    2008-01-01

    The safety and tolerability of antidepressants have improved considerably over the past two decades, Nevertheless, antidepressant side effects are still common and problematic. The majority of patients treated with contemporary agents experience one or more bothersome side effects. These side effects often create barriers to achieving depressive remission, as well as to preventing relapse and recurrence. Clinicians tend to underestimate the prevalence of side effects, and as many as one quarter of patients discontinue their antidepressants because of difficult-to-tolerate side effects; others may continue on antidepressant therapy but experience diminished quality of life related to troublesome side effects. This article reviews the prevalence of side effects, the impact of side effects on treatment adherence, and methodological issues including the challenge of distinguishing side effects from residual depressive symptoms, discontinuation effects, and general medical problems. In addition, we address the most common side effects such as sexual dysfunction, gastrointestinal problems, sleep disturbance, apathy, and fatigue, and offer strategies for management that may help patients achieve optimal response to pharmacotherapy. PMID:19170398

  15. Sodium–glucose cotransporter-2 inhibitor combination therapy to optimize glycemic control and tolerability in patients with type 2 diabetes: focus on dapagliflozin–metformin

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Stanley S; Katz, Arie

    2016-01-01

    In type 2 diabetes (T2D), early combination therapy using agents that target a number of the underlying pathophysiologic defects contributing to hyperglycemia may improve patient outcomes. For many patients, the combination of metformin with a sodium–glucose cotransporter-2 (SGLT-2) inhibitor may be a good option because these agents have complementary mechanisms of action, neutral-to-positive effects on body weight, and a low risk of hypoglycemia. This review focuses on the combination of metformin with dapagliflozin, a member of the SGLT-2 inhibitor class of antidiabetes agents. In clinical trials, the combination of dapagliflozin with metformin produced significant and sustained reductions in glycated hemoglobin and body weight in a broad range of adult patients with T2D, including those initiating pharmacotherapy and those with more advanced disease. These reductions were accompanied by modest decreases in blood pressure. Dapagliflozin as add-on therapy to metformin was well tolerated and associated with low rates of hypoglycemia. Genital infections and, in some studies, urinary tract infections were more frequent with dapagliflozin than with placebo. Early combination therapy with dapagliflozin and metformin may be a safe and appropriate treatment option that enables patients with T2D to achieve individualized glycemic goals as either initial combination therapy in treatment-naïve patients or as dapagliflozin add-on in patients inadequately controlled with metformin therapy. PMID:27042132

  16. Glycemic control and outcome related to cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed

    Thiessen, Steven; Vanhorebeek, Ilse; Van den Berghe, Greet

    2015-06-01

    Perioperative hyperglycemia, aggravated by cardiopulmonary bypass, is associated with adverse outcome in adult and pediatric patients. Whereas hyperglycemia was originally perceived as an adaptive response to surgical stress, it is now clear that glycemic control is a strategy to reduce adverse outcomes after cardiac surgery and cardiopulmonary bypass. The optimal blood glucose target, whether or not glycemic control should be initiated already intraoperatively, and whether or not perioperative glucose administration affects the impact of glycemic control on ischemia-reperfusion damage remain open questions. Hypoglycemia, the risk of which is increased with glycemic control, is also associated with adverse outcomes. However, it remains controversial whether brief episodes of hypoglycemia, rapidly corrected during glycemic control, have adverse effects on outcome. This review gives an overview of the currently available literature on glycemic control during and after cardiac surgery and focuses on the indicated open questions about this intervention for this specific patient population.

  17. Glycemic index and disease.

    PubMed

    Pi-Sunyer, F Xavier

    2002-07-01

    It has been suggested that foods with a high glycemic index are detrimental to health and that healthy people should be told to avoid these foods. This paper takes the position that not enough valid scientific data are available to launch a public health campaign to disseminate such a recommendation. This paper explores the glycemic index and its validity and discusses the effect of postprandial glucose and insulin responses on food intake, obesity, type 1 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. Presented herein are the reasons why it is premature to recommend that the general population avoid foods with a high glycemic index.

  18. [Dapagliflozin: Beyond glycemic control in the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Sanz-Serra, Pol; Pedro-Botet, Juan; Flores-Le Roux, Juana A; Benaiges, David; Chillarón, Juan J

    2015-01-01

    Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) have a high or very high cardiovascular risk. The clinical practice guidelines focus on the need to achieve optimal glycemic control, and strategies for a multifactorial therapeutic approach have shown significant cardiovascular benefits in these patients. Inhibitors of sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT-2) are a new class of orally administered drugs in the treatment of T2DM, which act by inhibiting reabsorption of glucose in the renal proximal tubule with consequent glycosuric effect and lowering of blood glucose. Dapagliflozin, SGLT-2 inhibitor marketed in Europe and Australia, has been shown to achieve glycosylated hemoglobin reductions similar to other oral agents, as well as beneficial effects on major comorbidities associated with T2DM. Therefore, it is considered of interest to review the clinical efficacy of this new oral hypoglycemic on glycemic control, risk of hypoglycemia, and its impact on body weight, blood pressure, lipid profile and renal function.

  19. The glycemic index.

    PubMed

    Wolever, T M

    1990-01-01

    Different starchy foods produce different glycemic responses when fed individually, and there is evidence that this also applies in the context of the mixed meal. Methods of processing, and other factors unrelated to the nutrient composition of foods may also have major effects on the glycemic response. The reason for differences in glycemic response appears to relate to the rate at which the foods are digested and the many factors influencing this. The glycemic index (GI) is a system of classification in which the glycemic responses of foods are indexed against a standard (white bread). This allows the results of different investigators to be pooled. GI values also depend upon a number of nonfood-related variables. The method of calculation of the glycemic response area is most important, but the method of blood sampling and length of time of studies also may have effects. Variability of glycemic responses arises from day-to-day variation in the same subject and variation between different subjects. There is less variability between the GI values of different subjects than there is within the same subject from day to day. Therefore, the mean GI values of foods are independent of the glucose tolerance status of the subjects being tested. Potentially clinically useful starchy foods producing relatively flat glycemic responses have been identified, including legumes, pasta, barley, bulgur, parboiled rice and whole grain breads such as pumpernickel. Specific incorporation of these foods into diets have been associated with reduced blood glucose, insulin, and lipid levels. Low-GI foods may influence amino acid metabolism although the implications of these are unknown. In addition, low GI foods increase colonic fermentation. The physiologic and metabolic implications of this relate to increased bacterial urea utilization, and to the production and absorption of short chain fatty acids in the colon. The application of the GI to therapeutic diets should be in the context

  20. Multidisciplinary optimization for engineering systems: Achievements and potential

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sobieszczanski-Sobieski, Jaroslaw

    1989-01-01

    The currently common sequential design process for engineering systems is likely to lead to suboptimal designs. Recently developed decomposition methods offer an alternative for coming closer to optimum by breaking the large task of system optimization into smaller, concurrently executed and, yet, coupled tasks, identified with engineering disciplines or subsystems. The hierarchic and non-hierarchic decompositions are discussed and illustrated by examples. An organization of a design process centered on the non-hierarchic decomposition is proposed.

  1. Aircraft optimization by a system approach: Achievements and trends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sobieszczanski-Sobieski, Jaroslaw

    1992-01-01

    Recently emerging methodology for optimal design of aircraft treated as a system of interacting physical phenomena and parts is examined. The methodology is found to coalesce into methods for hierarchic, non-hierarchic, and hybrid systems all dependent on sensitivity analysis. A separate category of methods has also evolved independent of sensitivity analysis, hence suitable for discrete problems. References and numerical applications are cited. Massively parallel computer processing is seen as enabling technology for practical implementation of the methodology.

  2. Achieving Optimal Privacy in Trust-Aware Social Recommender Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dokoohaki, Nima; Kaleli, Cihan; Polat, Huseyin; Matskin, Mihhail

    Collaborative filtering (CF) recommenders are subject to numerous shortcomings such as centralized processing, vulnerability to shilling attacks, and most important of all privacy. To overcome these obstacles, researchers proposed for utilization of interpersonal trust between users, to alleviate many of these crucial shortcomings. Till now, attention has been mainly paid to strong points about trust-aware recommenders such as alleviating profile sparsity or calculation cost efficiency, while least attention has been paid on investigating the notion of privacy surrounding the disclosure of individual ratings and most importantly protection of trust computation across social networks forming the backbone of these systems. To contribute to addressing problem of privacy in trust-aware recommenders, within this paper, first we introduce a framework for enabling privacy-preserving trust-aware recommendation generation. While trust mechanism aims at elevating recommender's accuracy, to preserve privacy, accuracy of the system needs to be decreased. Since within this context, privacy and accuracy are conflicting goals we show that a Pareto set can be found as an optimal setting for both privacy-preserving and trust-enabling mechanisms. We show that this Pareto set, when used as the configuration for measuring the accuracy of base collaborative filtering engine, yields an optimized tradeoff between conflicting goals of privacy and accuracy. We prove this concept along with applicability of our framework by experimenting with accuracy and privacy factors, and we show through experiment how such optimal set can be inferred.

  3. Gout: optimizing treatment to achieve a disease cure.

    PubMed

    Bernal, José Antonio; Quilis, Neus; Andrés, Mariano; Sivera, Francisca; Pascual, Eliseo

    2016-03-01

    Gout is one of the most common inflammatory arthritides. The disease is due to the deposition of monosodium urate crystals. These deposits are reversible with proper treatment, suggesting that gout is a curable disease. The main aim in gout is to lower serum uric acid levels to a pre-established target; there are different urate-lowering drugs (xanthine oxidase inhibitors, uricosurics and uricases) through which this can be achieved. Proper treatment of gout also involves correct management of acute flares and their prevention. To ensure treatment adherence it is necessary to explain to the patient what the objectives are.

  4. Gout: optimizing treatment to achieve a disease cure

    PubMed Central

    Bernal, José Antonio; Quilis, Neus; Andrés, Mariano; Sivera, Francisca; Pascual, Eliseo

    2016-01-01

    Gout is one of the most common inflammatory arthritides. The disease is due to the deposition of monosodium urate crystals. These deposits are reversible with proper treatment, suggesting that gout is a curable disease. The main aim in gout is to lower serum uric acid levels to a pre-established target; there are different urate-lowering drugs (xanthine oxidase inhibitors, uricosurics and uricases) through which this can be achieved. Proper treatment of gout also involves correct management of acute flares and their prevention. To ensure treatment adherence it is necessary to explain to the patient what the objectives are. PMID:26977282

  5. Concurrently adjusting interrelated control parameters to achieve optimal engine performance

    DOEpatents

    Jiang, Li; Lee, Donghoon; Yilmaz, Hakan; Stefanopoulou, Anna

    2015-12-01

    Methods and systems for real-time engine control optimization are provided. A value of an engine performance variable is determined, a value of a first operating condition and a value of a second operating condition of a vehicle engine are detected, and initial values for a first engine control parameter and a second engine control parameter are determined based on the detected first operating condition and the detected second operating condition. The initial values for the first engine control parameter and the second engine control parameter are adjusted based on the determined value of the engine performance variable to cause the engine performance variable to approach a target engine performance variable. In order to cause the engine performance variable to approach the target engine performance variable, adjusting the initial value for the first engine control parameter necessitates a corresponding adjustment of the initial value for the second engine control parameter.

  6. Faculty Sense of Academic Optimism and Its Relationship to Students' Achievement in Well Performing High Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cromartie, Michael Tyrone

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the organizational characteristics and behaviors that contribute to sustaining a culture of academic optimism as a mechanism of student achievement. While there is a developing research base identifying both the individual elements of academic optimism as well as the academic optimism construct itself as…

  7. Standardization and optimization of CT protocols to achieve low dose.

    PubMed

    Trattner, Sigal; Pearson, Gregory D N; Chin, Cynthia; Cody, Dianna D; Gupta, Rajiv; Hess, Christopher P; Kalra, Mannudeep K; Kofler, James M; Krishnam, Mayil S; Einstein, Andrew J

    2014-03-01

    The increase in radiation exposure due to CT scans has been of growing concern in recent years. CT scanners differ in their capabilities, and various indications require unique protocols, but there remains room for standardization and optimization. In this paper, the authors summarize approaches to reduce dose, as discussed in lectures constituting the first session of the 2013 UCSF Virtual Symposium on Radiation Safety and Computed Tomography. The experience of scanning at low dose in different body regions, for both diagnostic and interventional CT procedures, is addressed. An essential primary step is justifying the medical need for each scan. General guiding principles for reducing dose include tailoring a scan to a patient, minimizing scan length, use of tube current modulation and minimizing tube current, minimizing tube potential, iterative reconstruction, and periodic review of CT studies. Organized efforts for standardization have been spearheaded by professional societies such as the American Association of Physicists in Medicine. Finally, all team members should demonstrate an awareness of the importance of minimizing dose.

  8. Multiphase Nano-Composite Coatings for Achieving Energy Optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Nainaparampil, Jose

    2012-03-26

    UES Inc. and ANL teamed in this work to develop novel coating systems for the protection of surfaces from thermal degradation mainly in two applications; Machining and Die casting. These coatings were specifically designed for the purpose by incorporating required material phases and the overall architecture, which led to reduce the energy usage and increase efficiency of the operations. Following the UES/ANL's feasibility work, the coatings were developed utilizing High power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPMS) and Large area filtered arc deposition (LAFAD) techniques. Toughness, hardness and oxidation resistance: contrasting qualities have been mixed in the right proportion to attain the suitable material characteristic for the cause. Hafnium diboride (HfB2) based materials provided such a system and its properties were tamed to attain the right combination of toughness and hardness by working on the microstructure and architecture of coatings. An effective interfacing material (graded concentrations of topcoat) was also achieved in this work to provide the required adhesion between the substrate and the coating. Combination of an appropriate bond coat and a functional top coat provided the present thermal degradation resistant coating for cutting tools and die-casting applications. Laboratory level performance tests and industrial level application tests by partner companies (Beta Site Testing) were used for the development of these coatings.

  9. Glycemic variability: Clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Satya Krishna, Surabhi Venkata; Kota, Sunil K.; Modi, Kirtikumar D.

    2013-01-01

    Glycemic control and its benefits in preventing microvascular diabetic complications are convincingly proved by various prospective trials. Diabetes control and complications trial (DCCT) had reported variable glycated hemoglobin (HbA1C) as a cause of increased microvascular complications in conventional glycemic control group versus intensive one. However, in spite of several indirect evidences, its link with cardiovascular events or macrovascular complications is still not proved. Glycemic variability (GV) is one more tool to explain relation between hyperglycemia and increased cardiovascular risk in diabetic patients. In fact GV along with fasting blood sugar, postprandial blood sugar, HbA1C, and quality of life has been proposed to form glycemic pentad, which needs to be considered in diabetes management. Postprandial spikes in blood glucose as well as hypoglycemic events, both are blamed for increased cardiovascular events in Type 2 diabetics. GV includes both these events and hence minimizing GV can prevent future cardiovascular events. Modern diabetes management modalities including improved sulfonylureas, glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1)-based therapy, newer basal insulins, and modern insulin pumps address the issue of GV effectively. This article highlights mechanism, clinical implications, and measures to control GV in clinical practice. PMID:23961476

  10. Glycemic index, glycemic load and childhood obesity: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Rouhani, Mohammad Hossein; Kelishadi, Roya; Hashemipour, Mahin; Esmaillzadeh, Ahmad; Azadbakht, Leila

    2014-01-01

    Background: Several evidences have been reported so far in terms of the relationship between obesity and glycemic index and glycemic load in children. However, the number of review studies that have dealt with recent findings is quite low. The purpose of present study is to review the existing evidences in this regard. Materials and Methods: First of all, the phrases: “Glycaemic index”, “Glycaemic load”, “Glycemic index” OR “Glycemic load” accompanied by one of the words: “Adolescent”, “Young”, “Youth” “Children” OR “Child” were searched in texts of articles existing in ISI and PUBMED databases which were obtained out of 1001 articles. Among these, some articles, which reviewed the relationship of obesity with glycemic index and glycemic load, were selected. Finally, 20 articles were studied in current review study. Results: The majority of cross-sectional studies have found children's obesity directly linked with glycemic index and glycemic load; however, cohort studies found controversial results. Also, the intervention studies indicate the negative effect of glycemic index and glycemic load on obesity in children. Conclusion: Published evidences reported inconsistent results. It seems that existing studies are not sufficient and more studies are needed in this regard. PMID:24627855

  11. Knowledge Visualizations: A Tool to Achieve Optimized Operational Decision Making and Data Integration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    and pedigree possess additive implications toward the quality of the data utilized within the DSS. F. SUMMARY Decision - making theories such as...VISUALIZATIONS: A TOOL TO ACHIEVE OPTIMIZED OPERATIONAL DECISION MAKING AND DATA INTEGRATION by Paul C. Hudson Jeffrey A. Rzasa June 2015 Thesis...TOOL TO ACHIEVE OPTIMIZED OPERATIONAL DECISION MAKING AND DATA INTEGRATION 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6. AUTHOR(S) Paul C. Hudson, and Jeffrey A. Rzasa

  12. The Effects of Academic Optimism on Student Academic Achievement in Alabama

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bevel, Raymona King

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the research was to determine the effects of academic optimism on student academic achievement through measuring the individual and collective effects of academic emphasis, collective efficacy, and faculty trust in clients. Data for this study were obtained from the School Academic Optimism Scale and the reading section of the…

  13. Collective Responsibility, Academic Optimism, and Student Achievement in Taiwan Elementary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Hsin-Chieh

    2012-01-01

    Previous research indicates that collective efficacy, faculty trust in students and parents, and academic emphasis together formed a single latent school construct, called academic optimism. In the U.S., academic optimism has been proven to be a powerful construct that could effectively predict student achievement even after controlling for…

  14. Early glycemic control in critically ill patients with burn injury.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Claire V; Coffey, Rebecca; Cook, Charles H; Gerlach, Anthony T; Miller, Sidney F

    2011-01-01

    Glucose management in patients with burn injury is often difficult because of their hypermetabolic state with associated hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, and insulin resistance. Recent studies suggest that time to glycemic control is associated with improved outcomes. The authors sought to determine the influence of early glycemic control on the outcomes of critically ill patients with burn injury. A retrospective analysis was performed at the Ohio State University Medical Center. Patients hospitalized with burn injury were enrolled if they were admitted to the intensive care unit between March 1, 2006, and February 28, 2009. Early glycemic control was defined as the achievement of a mean daily blood glucose of ≤150 mg/dl for at least two consecutive days by postburn day 3. Forty-six patients made up the study cohort with 26 achieving early glycemic control and 20 who did not. The two groups were similar at baseline with regard to age, pre-existing diabetes, APACHE II score and burn size and depth. There were no differences in number of surgical interventions, infectious complications, or length of stay between patients who achieved or failed early glycemic control. Failure of early glycemic control was, however, associated with significantly higher mortality both by univariate (35.0 vs 7.7%, P = .03) and multivariate analyses (hazard ratio 6.754 [1.16-39.24], P = .03) adjusting for age, TBSA, and inhalation injury. Failure to achieve early glycemic control in patients with burn injury is associated with an increased risk of mortality. However, further prospective controlled trials are needed to establish causality of this association.

  15. Restricted and Repetitive Behaviors in Individuals with a History of ASDs Who Have Achieved Optimal Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Troyb, Eva; Orinstein, Alyssa; Tyson, Katherine; Eigsti, Inge-Marie; Naigles, Letitia; Fein, Deborah

    2014-01-01

    Studies of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) suggest that restricted and repetitive behaviors (RRBs) are particularly difficult to remediate. We examined present and past RRBs in 34 individuals who achieved optimal outcomes (OOs; lost their ASD diagnosis), 45 high-functioning individuals with ASD (HFA) and 34 typically developing (TD) peers. The OO…

  16. Academic Optimism, Organizational Citizenship Behaviors, and Student Achievement at Charter Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guvercin, Mustafa

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship among academic optimism, Organizational Citizenship Behaviors (OCBs), and student achievement in college preparatory charter schools. A purposeful sample of elementary school teachers from college preparatory charter schools (N = 226) in southeast Texas was solicited to complete the…

  17. Use of a Batch Reactive Distillation with Dynamic Optimization Strategy to Achieve Industrial Grade Ethyl Acetate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konakom, Kwantip; Saengchan, Aritsara; Kittisupakorn, Paisan; Mujtaba, Iqbal M.

    2011-08-01

    Industrial grade ethyl acetate is available with minimum purity of 85.0%. It is mostly produced by an ethanol esterification in a distillation process on both batch and continuous modes. However, researches on high purity production with short operating time are rarely achieved. Therefore, the objective in this work is to study an approach to produce ethyl acetate of 90.0% by 8 hours using a batch reactive distillation column. Based on open-loop simulations, the distillation with constant reflux ratio cannot achieve the product specification. Thus, the dynamic optimization strategy is proposed to handle this problem. For the process safety—preventing the dried column and fractured, a minimum reflux ratio must be determined in advance and then an optimal reflux profile is calculated to achieve optimal product yield. Simulation results show that the industrial grade ethyl acetate can be produced by the dynamic optimization programming with two or more time intervals. Besides, the increasing of time intervals can produce more distillate product.

  18. Top 10 Facts to Know About Inpatient Glycemic Control.

    PubMed

    Horton, William B; Subauste, Jose S

    2016-02-01

    Uncontrolled hyperglycemia in hospitalized patients with or without a previous diagnosis of diabetes is associated with adverse outcomes and longer lengths of hospital stay. It is estimated that one-third of hospitalized patients will experience significant hyperglycemia, and the cost associated with hospitalization for patients with diabetes accounts for half of all health care expenditures for this disease. Optimizing glycemic control should be a priority for all health care providers in the inpatient setting. Appropriate management strategies should include identification of appropriate glycemic targets, prevention of hypoglycemia, initiation of appropriate basal-plus-bolus insulin regimens, and planning for the transition from inpatient to outpatient therapy before hospital discharge.

  19. Robust, integrated computational control of NMR experiments to achieve optimal assignment by ADAPT-NMR.

    PubMed

    Bahrami, Arash; Tonelli, Marco; Sahu, Sarata C; Singarapu, Kiran K; Eghbalnia, Hamid R; Markley, John L

    2012-01-01

    ADAPT-NMR (Assignment-directed Data collection Algorithm utilizing a Probabilistic Toolkit in NMR) represents a groundbreaking prototype for automated protein structure determination by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. With a [(13)C,(15)N]-labeled protein sample loaded into the NMR spectrometer, ADAPT-NMR delivers complete backbone resonance assignments and secondary structure in an optimal fashion without human intervention. ADAPT-NMR achieves this by implementing a strategy in which the goal of optimal assignment in each step determines the subsequent step by analyzing the current sum of available data. ADAPT-NMR is the first iterative and fully automated approach designed specifically for the optimal assignment of proteins with fast data collection as a byproduct of this goal. ADAPT-NMR evaluates the current spectral information, and uses a goal-directed objective function to select the optimal next data collection step(s) and then directs the NMR spectrometer to collect the selected data set. ADAPT-NMR extracts peak positions from the newly collected data and uses this information in updating the analysis resonance assignments and secondary structure. The goal-directed objective function then defines the next data collection step. The procedure continues until the collected data support comprehensive peak identification, resonance assignments at the desired level of completeness, and protein secondary structure. We present test cases in which ADAPT-NMR achieved results in two days or less that would have taken two months or more by manual approaches.

  20. The glycemic index: physiological significance.

    PubMed

    Esfahani, Amin; Wong, Julia M W; Mirrahimi, Arash; Srichaikul, Korbua; Jenkins, David J A; Kendall, Cyril W C

    2009-08-01

    The glycemic index (GI) is a physiological assessment of a food's carbohydrate content through its effect on postprandial blood glucose concentrations. Evidence from trials and observational studies suggests that this physiological classification may have relevance to those chronic Western diseases associated with overconsumption and inactivity leading to central obesity and insulin resistance. The glycemic index classification of foods has been used as a tool to assess potential prevention and treatment strategies for diseases where glycemic control is of importance, such as diabetes. Low GI diets have also been reported to improve the serum lipid profile, reduce C-reactive protein (CRP) concentrations, and aid in weight control. In cross-sectional studies, low GI or glycemic load diets (mean GI multiplied by total carbohydrate) have been associated with higher levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), with reduced CRP concentrations, and, in cohort studies, with decreased risk of developing diabetes and cardiovascular disease. In addition, some case-control and cohort studies have found positive associations between dietary GI and risk of various cancers, including those of the colon, breast, and prostate. Although inconsistencies in the current findings still need to be resolved, sufficient positive evidence, especially with respect to renewed interest in postprandial events, suggests that the glycemic index may have a role to play in the treatment and prevention of chronic diseases.

  1. Achievements and challenges in automated parameter, shape and topology optimization for divertor design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baelmans, M.; Blommaert, M.; Dekeyser, W.; Van Oevelen, T.

    2017-03-01

    Plasma edge transport codes play a key role in the design of future divertor concepts. Their long simulation times in combination with a large number of control parameters turn the design into a challenging task. In aerodynamics and structural mechanics, adjoint-based optimization techniques have proven successful to tackle similar design challenges. This paper provides an overview of achievements and remaining challenges with these techniques for complex divertor design. It is shown how these developments pave the way for fast sensitivity analysis and improved design from different perspectives.

  2. Reply #1 to: Glycemic Choreoballism

    PubMed Central

    Cosentino, Carlos; Torres, Luis; Nuñez, Yesenia; Suarez, Rafael; Velez, Miriam; Flores, Martha

    2016-01-01

    In Response To: Lee D, Ahn TB. Glycemic choreoballism. Tremor Other Hyperkinet Mov. 2016; 6. doi: 10.7916/D8QJ7HNF Original Article: Cosentino C, Torres L, Nuñez Y, et al. Hemichorea/hemiballism associated with hyperglycemia: report of twenty cases. Tremor Other Hyperkinet Mov. 2016; 6. doi: 10.7916/D8DN454P PMID:28071768

  3. Reply #1 to: Glycemic Choreoballism.

    PubMed

    Cosentino, Carlos; Torres, Luis; Nuñez, Yesenia; Suarez, Rafael; Velez, Miriam; Flores, Martha

    2016-01-01

    In Response To: Lee D, Ahn TB. Glycemic choreoballism. Tremor Other Hyperkinet Mov. 2016; 6. doi: 10.7916/D8QJ7HNF Original Article: Cosentino C, Torres L, Nuñez Y, et al. Hemichorea/hemiballism associated with hyperglycemia: report of twenty cases. Tremor Other Hyperkinet Mov. 2016; 6. doi: 10.7916/D8DN454P.

  4. The glycemic index: methodology and use.

    PubMed

    Kendall, Cyril W C; Augustin, Livia S A; Emam, Azadeh; Josse, Andrea R; Saxena, Nishta; Jenkins, David J A

    2006-01-01

    The glycemic index concept owes much to the dietary fiber hypothesis that fiber would reduce the rate of nutrient absorption and increase the value of carbohydrate foods in the maintenance of health and treatment of disease. However, properties and components of food other than its fiber content contribute to the glycemic and endocrine responses postprandially. The aim of the glycemic index classification of foods was therefore to assist in the physiological classification of carbohydrate foods which, it was hoped, would be of relevance in the prevention and treatment of chronic diseases such as diabetes. Over the past two decades low glycemic index diets have been reported to improve glycemic control in diabetic subjects, to reduce serum lipids in hyperlipidemic subjects and possibly to aid in weight control. In large cohort studies, low glycemic index or glycemic load diets (glycemic index multiplied by total carbohydrate) have also been associated with higher levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, reduced C-reactive protein concentrations and with a decreased risk of developing diabetes and cardiovascular disease. More recently, some case-control and cohort studies have also found positive associations between the dietary glycemic index and the risk of colon, breast and other cancers. While the glycemic index concept continues to be debated and there remain inconsistencies in the data, sufficient positive findings have emerged to suggest that the glycemic index is an aspect of diet of potential importance in the treatment and prevention of chronic diseases.

  5. Vitamin D Daily short-term Supplementation does not Affect Glycemic Outcomes of Patients with Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Chrysostomou, Stavri

    2017-01-27

    There is currently insufficient evidence of a beneficial effect to recommend vitamin D supplementation for optimizing glycemic status in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Taking into consideration the significant extra-skeletal effect of vitamin D on pancreatic β-cell function and insulin secretion and the large number of scientific evidence supporting the inverse association between vitamin D status and hyperglycemia, this review article aims to examine whether vitamin D supplementation therapies are beneficial to patients with T2DM considering specific factors through randomized controlled trials (RCTs). EBSCOhost and Medline databases were searched from the beginning of 2009 until the end of 2014 for RCTs in patients with T2DM. Parameters, such as baseline vitamin D levels, frequency/dosage of supplementation, length of the study and type of supplementation, were independently assessed, based on their effect on glycemic status. Although all different types of supplementation were safe and effective in the achievement of vitamin D sufficiency in a dose-dependent way, the impact on glycemic status was different. 14 RCTs were included with daily supplementations ranging from 400-11.200 IU/daily, 40.000-50.000 IU/weekly and 100.000-300.000 IU/intramuscularly or once given, for a period from 8 to 24 weeks. Daily supplementation of vitamin D (up to 11.200 IU) showed no effect, whereas combined supplementation, with calcium (≥300 mg), and with vitamin D doses similar to the RDA, showed positive effects. Additionally, high weekly doses of vitamin D (40.000-50.000 IU) were effective on glycemic outcomes but available data are limited.

  6. Trace elements, oxidative stress and glycemic control in young people with type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ching-Chiang; Huang, Hsiu-Hua; Hu, Chiung-Wen; Chen, Bai-Hsiun; Chong, Inn-Wen; Chao, Yu-Ying; Huang, Yeou-Lih

    2014-01-01

    Trace elements and oxidative stress are associated with glycemic control and diabetic complications in type 1 diabetes mellitus. In this study, we analyzed the levels of serum copper, zinc, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, and malondialdehyde (MDA) and urinary MDA and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) in 33 type 1 diabetic patients with optimal and suboptimal glycemic control (HbA1C<9.0%) and 40 patients with poor glycemic control (HbA1C≥9%) and 27 age- and sex-matched non-diabetic controls to evaluate the differences between these markers in different glycemic control states. Diabetic patients, especially poor-glycemic-control subjects (HbA1C≥9%), exhibited significantly lower levels of serum zinc and increased levels of serum copper (and, therefore, increased serum copper-to-zinc ratios), serum SOD, blood MDA, and urinary MDA and 8-OHdG, relative to non-diabetic subjects. Furthermore, significant correlations existed in these patients between the serum copper, serum copper-to-zinc ratio, and urinary MDA (all p<0.001) and the levels of urinary 8-OHdG (p=0.007) and HbA1C. Our results suggest that high serum copper levels and oxidative stress correlate with glycemic control. Therefore, strict glycemic control, decreased oxidative stress, and a lower copper concentration might prevent diabetic complications in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus.

  7. Physiological geroscience: targeting function to increase healthspan and achieve optimal longevity.

    PubMed

    Seals, Douglas R; Justice, Jamie N; LaRocca, Thomas J

    2016-04-15

    Most nations of the world are undergoing rapid and dramatic population ageing, which presents great socio-economic challenges, as well as opportunities, for individuals, families, governments and societies. The prevailing biomedical strategy for reducing the healthcare impact of population ageing has been 'compression of morbidity' and, more recently, to increase healthspan, both of which seek to extend the healthy period of life and delay the development of chronic diseases and disability until a brief period at the end of life. Indeed, a recently established field within biological ageing research, 'geroscience', is focused on healthspan extension. Superimposed on this background are new attitudes and demand for 'optimal longevity' - living long, but with good health and quality of life. A key obstacle to achieving optimal longevity is the progressive decline in physiological function that occurs with ageing, which causes functional limitations (e.g. reduced mobility) and increases the risk of chronic diseases, disability and mortality. Current efforts to increase healthspan centre on slowing the fundamental biological processes of ageing such as inflammation/oxidative stress, increased senescence, mitochondrial dysfunction, impaired proteostasis and reduced stress resistance. We propose that optimization of physiological function throughout the lifespan should be a major emphasis of any contemporary biomedical policy addressing global ageing. Effective strategies should delay, reduce in magnitude or abolish reductions in function with ageing (primary prevention) and/or improve function or slow further declines in older adults with already impaired function (secondary prevention). Healthy lifestyle practices featuring regular physical activity and ideal energy intake/diet composition represent first-line function-preserving strategies, with pharmacological agents, including existing and new pharmaceuticals and novel 'nutraceutical' compounds, serving as potential

  8. Evaluation of glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in Chinese communities: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Shan, Shan; Gu, Liubao; Lou, Qinglin; Ouyang, Xiaojun; Yu, Yun; Wu, Haidi; Bian, Rongwen

    2017-02-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the glycemic levels in Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and to explore the factors related to the results of glycemic control. A total of 2454 T2DM patients from 11 communities were examined for glycosylated hemoglobin levels and glycemic control options. Potential factors related to the results of glycemic control were analyzed using logistic regression. Of all the patients, 55.3 % achieved the glycemic control target of HbA1c < 7 %. Multivariate analysis showed that male sex (OR 1.345, 95 % CI 1.022-1.769; P = 0.034), higher levels of fasting blood glucose (OR 1.954, 95 % CI 1.778-2.147; P < 0.001), and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (OR 1.181, 95 % CI 1.020-1.367; P = 0.026) were significantly associated with poor glycemic control. The complexity of antidiabetics was also associated with poor glycemic control (P < 0.05). Compared to diet and exercise, insulin injection was most strongly associated with poor glycemic control (OR 6.210, 95 % CI 4.054-9.514; P < 0.001). Male patients with higher levels of total cholesterol, lower levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, or longer diabetic durations showed poor glycemic control, which was not found in female patients. Glycemic control was not satisfactory in T2DM patients of Nanjing communities. Various factors are associated with poor results of glycemic control.

  9. Optimal microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) device for achieving high pyroelectric response of AlN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kebede, Bemnnet; Coutu, Ronald A.; Starman, LaVern

    2014-03-01

    This paper discusses research being conducted on aluminum nitride (AlN) as a pyroelectric material for use in detecting applications. AlN is being investigated because of its high pyroelectric coefficient, thermal stability, and high Curie temperature. In order to determine suitability of the pyroelectric properties of AlN for use as a detector, testing of several devices was conducted. These devices were fabricated using microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) fabrication processes; the devices were also designed to allow for voltage and current measurements. The deposited AlN films used were 150 nm - 300 nm in thickness. Thin-films were used to rapidly increase the temperature response after the thermal stimulus was applied to the pyroelectric material. This is important because the pyroelectric effect is directly proportional to the rate of temperature change. The design used was a face-electrode bridge that provides thermal isolation which minimizes heat loss to the substrate, thereby increasing operation frequency of the pyroelectric device. A thermal stimulus was applied to the pyroelectric material and the response was measured across the electrodes. A thermal imaging camera was used to monitor the changes in temperature. Throughout the testing process, the annealing temperatures, type of layers, and thicknesses were also varied. These changes resulted in improved MEMS designs, which were fabricated to obtain an optimal design configuration for achieving a high pyroelectric response. A pyroelectric voltage response of 38.9 mVp-p was measured without filtering, 12.45 mVp-p was measured in the infrared (IR) region using a Si filter, and 6.38 mVp-p was measured in the short wavelength IR region using a long pass filter. The results showed that AlN's pyroelectric properties can be used in detecting applications.

  10. Glycemic Targets in Diabetes Care: Emerging Clarity after Accord

    PubMed Central

    Buse, John B.

    2015-01-01

    Through the 1990s convincing evidence emerged from studies involving relatively recent onset diabetes that glycemic control achieving glycated hemoglobin A1c levels of approximately 7% was associated with improved microvascular outcomes. Based on advocacy groups' statements encouraging lower targets and recognition of cardiovascular disease as the leading cause of death in diabetes, the Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes (ACCORD) study was funded in 1999 to explore more intensive targets and techniques in the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Most surprisingly, intensive management targeting normal levels of glycemia was associated with increased mortality and the ACCORD trial was terminated early in 2008. Post hoc analyses have allowed the emergence of some clarity around the role of glycemic management and targets in diabetes care and are the subject of this review. PMID:26330660

  11. Robust Airfoil Optimization to Achieve Consistent Drag Reduction Over a Mach Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Wu; Huyse, Luc; Padula, Sharon; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We prove mathematically that in order to avoid point-optimization at the sampled design points for multipoint airfoil optimization, the number of design points must be greater than the number of free-design variables. To overcome point-optimization at the sampled design points, a robust airfoil optimization method (called the profile optimization method) is developed and analyzed. This optimization method aims at a consistent drag reduction over a given Mach range and has three advantages: (a) it prevents severe degradation in the off-design performance by using a smart descent direction in each optimization iteration, (b) there is no random airfoil shape distortion for any iterate it generates, and (c) it allows a designer to make a trade-off between a truly optimized airfoil and the amount of computing time consumed. For illustration purposes, we use the profile optimization method to solve a lift-constrained drag minimization problem for 2-D airfoil in Euler flow with 20 free-design variables. A comparison with other airfoil optimization methods is also included.

  12. Glycemic control and antidiabetic drugs in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients with renal complications

    PubMed Central

    Huri, Hasniza Zaman; Lim, Lay Peng; Lim, Soo Kun

    2015-01-01

    Background Good glycemic control can delay the progression of kidney diseases in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients with renal complications. To date, the association between antidiabetic agents and glycemic control in this specific patient population is not well established. Purpose This study aimed to identify antidiabetic regimens as well as other factors that associated with glycemic control in T2DM patients with different stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Patients and methods This retrospective, cross-sectional study involved 242 T2DM inpatients and outpatients with renal complications from January 2009 to March 2014 and was conducted in a tertiary teaching hospital in Malaysia. Glycated hemoglobin (A1C) was used as main parameter to assess patients’ glycemic status. Patients were classified to have good (A1C <7%) or poor glycemic control (A1C ≥7%) based on the recommendations of the American Diabetes Association. Results Majority of the patients presented with CKD stage 4 (43.4%). Approximately 55.4% of patients were categorized to have poor glycemic control. Insulin (57.9%) was the most commonly prescribed antidiabetic medication, followed by sulfonylureas (43%). Of all antidiabetic regimens, sulfonylureas monotherapy (P<0.001), insulin therapy (P=0.005), and combination of biguanides with insulin (P=0.038) were found to be significantly associated with glycemic control. Other factors including duration of T2DM (P=0.004), comorbidities such as anemia (P=0.024) and retinopathy (P=0.033), concurrent medications such as erythropoietin therapy (P=0.047), α-blockers (P=0.033), and antigouts (P=0.003) were also correlated with A1C. Conclusion Identification of factors that are associated with glycemic control is important to help in optimization of glucose control in T2DM patients with renal complication. PMID:26300627

  13. Glycemic index and heart disease.

    PubMed

    Leeds, Anthony R

    2002-07-01

    A diet high in carbohydrates with high glycemic indexes (GI) and glycemic load were linked to risk of coronary heart disease development in women in a large prospective study. Two cross-sectional studies showed that low-GI diets are associated with high HDL-cholesterol concentrations, especially in women. In a tightly controlled study of patients with type 2 diabetes, serum total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and apolipoprotein B concentrations fell more significantly after a low-GI diet than after a high-GI diet. In the same study, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 concentrations were reduced by 58% after the low-GI diet. Insulin-stimulated glucose uptake by adipocytes was significantly higher in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery after 4 wk of consuming a low-GI diet than after consuming a high-GI diet. The effects of low-GI diets may be mediated by changes in postprandial fatty acid concentrations or by hormonal signals from adipocytes, but a possible association of low-GI diets with some other dietary factor such as chromium must not be excluded. Proof of the clinical value of low-GI diets awaits prospective trials, which should include short-term observations covering periods of metabolic stress induced by surgery as well as long-term trials with clinical endpoints.

  14. Patient Age, Ethnicity, Medical History, and Risk Factor Profile, but Not Drug Insurance Coverage, Predict Successful Attainment of Glycemic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Teoh, Hwee; Braga, Manoela F.B.; Casanova, Amparo; Drouin, Denis; Goodman, Shaun G.; Harris, Stewart B.; Langer, Anatoly; Tan, Mary K.; Ur, Ehud; Yan, Andrew T.; Zinman, Bernard; Leiter, Lawrence A.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To identify factors in patients with type 2 diabetes and A1C >7.0% associated with attainment of A1C ≤7.0%. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We used a prospective registry of 5,280 Canadian patients in primary care settings enrolled in a 12-month glycemic pharmacotherapy optimization strategy based on national guidelines. RESULTS At close out, median A1C was 7.1% (vs. 7.8% at baseline) with 48% of subjects achieving A1C ≤7.0% (P < 0.0001). Older patients of Asian or black origin, those with longer diabetes duration, those with lower baseline A1C, BMI, LDL cholesterol, and blood pressure, and those on angiotensin receptor blockers and a lower number of antihyperglycemic agents, were more likely to achieve A1C ≤7.0% at some point during the study (all P < 0.0235). Access to private versus public drug coverage did not impact glycemic target realization. CONCLUSIONS Patient demography, cardiometabolic health, and ongoing pharmacotherapy, but not access to private drug insurance coverage, contribute to the care gap in type 2 diabetes. PMID:20823344

  15. A Study of the Relationships between Distributed Leadership, Teacher Academic Optimism and Student Achievement in Taiwanese Elementary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, I-Hua

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relationships between distributed leadership, teachers' academic optimism and student achievement in learning. The study targeted public elementary schools in Taiwan and adopted stratified random sampling to investigate 1500 teachers. Teachers' perceptions were collected by a self-report scale. In…

  16. Should Schools Be Optimistic? An Investigation of the Association between Academic Optimism of Schools and Student Achievement in Primary Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boonen, Tinneke; Pinxten, Maarten; Van Damme, Jan; Onghena, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Academic emphasis, collective efficacy, and faculty trust in students and parents (3 school characteristics positively associated with student achievement) are assumed to form a higher order latent construct, "academic optimism" (Hoy, Tarter, & Woolfolk Hoy, 2006a, 2006b). The aim of the present study is to corroborate the latent…

  17. The Relationship of Mental Pressure with Optimism and Academic Achievement Motivation among Second Grade Male High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sarouni, Ali Sedigh; Jenaabadi, Hossein; Pourghaz, Abdulwahab

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to examine the relationship of mental pressure with optimism and academic achievement motivation among second grade second period male high school students. This study followed a descriptive-correlational method. The sample included 200 second grade second period male high school students in Sooran. Data collection tools in…

  18. Navy Strategy for Achieving Information Dominance, 2013-2017. Optimizing Navy’s Primacy in the Maritime and Information Domains

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    and resources to optimize decision making and maximize warfighting effects, Navy Information Dominance has become a leading Service priority. In 2009...This Strategy for Achieving Information Dominance provides the framework through which the Navy s information capabilities will be mainstreamed into...the Navy s culture as a distinct warfighting discipline. The strategy focuses on the three fundamental Information Dominance capabilities of Assured

  19. Academic Optimism and Collective Responsibility: An Organizational Model of the Dynamics of Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Jason H.

    2013-01-01

    This study was designed to examine the construct of academic optimism and its relationship with collective responsibility in a sample of Taiwan elementary schools. The construct of academic optimism was tested using confirmatory factor analysis, and the whole structural model was tested with a structural equation modeling analysis. The data were…

  20. Achieving Consistent Near-Optimal Pattern Recognition Accuracy Using Particle Swarm Optimization to Pre-Train Artificial Neural Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nikelshpur, Dmitry O.

    2014-01-01

    Similar to mammalian brains, Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) are universal approximators, capable of yielding near-optimal solutions to a wide assortment of problems. ANNs are used in many fields including medicine, internet security, engineering, retail, robotics, warfare, intelligence control, and finance. "ANNs have a tendency to get…

  1. Glycemic response of mashed potato containing high-viscocity hydroxypropylmethylcellulose.

    PubMed

    Lightowler, Helen J; Henry, C Jeya K

    2009-08-01

    Potatoes generally have one of the highest glycemic index values of any food. Relatively small differences in the glycemic response (GR) of regularly consumed starch foods have shown beneficial effects on health. Lowering the GR of a potato-based meal has potentially wide-reaching health benefits. High-viscosity hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (HV-HPMC) is a modified cellulose dietary fiber extensively used in the food industry. We hypothesized that the GR of a high-glycemic index product such as mashed potato would be lower with the addition of HV-HPMC. In a nonblind, randomized, repeat-measure, crossover controlled trial, 15 healthy adults consumed portions of mashed potato with different doses (0%, 1%, 2%, and 4%) of a specially selected and optimized HV-HPMC and a reference food (glucose) on separate occasions. Five subjects were excluded from the final analysis due to noncompliance with study procedures. Capillary blood glucose was measured in fasted subjects and at 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, and 120 minutes after starting to eat. For each sample, the incremental area under the blood glucose response curve was calculated and the GR determined. There was a significant lowering effect of HV-HPMC on GR (P < .001) of mashed potato. Glycemic responses for all mashed potato samples with the HV-HPMC were significantly lower than the standard mashed potato: 1% level (P < .05), 2% level (P < .05), and 4% level (P < .05). However, there was no significant effect of the HV-HPMC dose on GR. We conclude that addition of select HV-HPMC to mashed potato blunts GR.

  2. Identifying older diabetic patients at risk of poor glycemic control

    PubMed Central

    Incalzi, Raffaele Antonelli; Corsonello, Andrea; Pedone, Claudio; Corica, Francesco; Carosella, Luciana; Mazzei, Bruno; Perticone, Francesco; Carbonin, PierUgo

    2002-01-01

    Background Optimal glycemic control prevents the onset of diabetes complications. Identifying diabetic patients at risk of poor glycemic control could help promoting dedicated interventions. The purpose of this study was to identify predictors of poor short-term and long-term glycemic control in older diabetic in-patients. Methods A total of 1354 older diabetic in-patients consecutively enrolled in a multicenter study formed the training population (retrospective arm); 264 patients consecutively admitted to a ward of general medicine formed the testing population (prospective arm). Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) was measured on admission and one year after the discharge in the testing population. Independent correlates of a discharge glycemia ≥ 140 mg/dl in the training population were assessed by logistic regression analysis and a clinical prediction rule was developed. The ability of the prediction rule and that of admission HbA1c to predict discharge glycemia ≥ 140 mg/dl and HbA1c > 7% one year after discharge was assessed in the testing population. Results Selected admission variables (diastolic arterial pressure < 80 mmHg, glycemia = 143–218 mg/dl, glycemia > 218 mg/dl, history of insulinic or combined hypoglycemic therapy, Charlson's index > 2) were combined to obtain a score predicting a discharge fasting glycemia ≥ 140 mg/dl in the training population. A modified score was obtained by adding 1 if admission HbA1c exceeded 7.8%. The modified score was the best predictor of both discharge glycemia ≥ 140 mg/dl (sensitivity = 79%, specificity = 63%) and 1 year HbA1c > 7% (sensitivity = 72%, specificity = 71%) in the testing population. Conclusion A simple clinical prediction rule might help identify older diabetic in-patients at risk of both short and long term poor glycemic control. PMID:12194701

  3. Optimizing insulin therapy in pregnant women with type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Gottlieb, Peter A; Frias, Juan P; Peters, Kelly A; Chillara, Bhavani; Garg, Satish K

    2002-01-01

    Pregnancy complicated by type 1 diabetes mellitus is associated with an increased risk of complications in the mother and infant. Normal or near normal glycemic control prior to and during pregnancy reduces many of these risks to levels observed in the general population. This degree of glycemic control is generally achievable only with intensive insulin therapy: multiple daily injections (MDI) or continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) via an insulin pump. These therapeutic regimens have been found to result in comparable glycemic control, although CSII provides increased flexibility in terms of patient lifestyle, and may reduce the incidence of hypoglycemia. Frequent home blood glucose monitoring is imperative during pregnancy in order to optimize glycemic control and reduce the risk of hypoglycemia. Furthermore, insulin requirements change significantly over the course of pregnancy. The new short-acting insulin analogs, insulin lispro and insulin aspart, have pharmacodynamic properties which make them ideal for use during pregnancy. Although the number of published studies evaluating the use of insulin lispro during pregnancy is limited, the majority support its safety. No studies of insulin aspart in pregnancy have been published in full. In addition to optimization of glycemic control, frequent assessment for development and/or progression of microvascular complications is necessary during pregnancy.

  4. A review of glycemic efficacy of liraglutide once daily in achieving glycated hemoglobin targets compared with exenatide twice daily, or sitagliptin once daily in the treatment of type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Alshali, Khalid Z.; Karawagh, Abdullah M.

    2016-01-01

    Incretin-based therapies such as glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists (RA) and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors have gained prominence in recent years for the treatment of type 2 diabetes (T2D). Such therapies offer the potential to stimulate endogenous insulin activity in proportion to circulating glucose levels; thereby, lowering the risk of hypoglycemic episodes. The synthetic GLP-1 RA exenatide, the human GLP-1 RA liraglutide, and the DPP-4 inhibitor sitagliptin are the first agents in their respective classes to be approved for the treatment of T2D and their efficacy and safety has been studied extensively in clinical trials. This article reviewed the efficacy of liraglutide once daily in achieving clinical guidelines-recommended glycated hemoglobin A1c levels in patients with T2D compared with exenatide twice daily, or sitagliptin once daily, based on published literature, with an aim to elucidate the preferred choice of incretin-related therapy in treating uncontrolled T2D. PMID:27464858

  5. Relation of Dietary Glycemic Index and Glycemic Load to Coronary Artery Calcium in Asymptomatic Korean Adults.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yuni; Chang, Yoosoo; Ryu, Seungho; Cho, Juhee; Kim, Mi Kyung; Ahn, Younjhin; Lee, Jung Eun; Sung, Eunju; Kim, Boyoung; Ahn, Jiin; Kim, Chan-Won; Rampal, Sanjay; Zhao, Di; Zhang, Yiyi; Pastor-Barriuso, Roberto; Lima, Joao A C; Chung, Eun Chul; Shin, Hocheol; Guallar, Eliseo

    2015-08-15

    The relation between glycemic index, glycemic load, and subclinical coronary atherosclerosis is unknown. The aim of the study was to evaluate the associations between energy-adjusted glycemic index, glycemic load, and coronary artery calcium (CAC). This study was cross-sectional analysis of 28,429 asymptomatic Korean men and women (mean age 41.4 years) without a history of diabetes or cardiovascular disease. All participants underwent a health screening examination between March 2011 and April 2013, and dietary intake over the preceding year was estimated using a validated food frequency questionnaire. Cardiac computed tomography was used for CAC scoring. The prevalence of detectable CAC (CAC score >0) was 12.4%. In multivariable-adjusted models, the CAC score ratios (95% confidence intervals) comparing the highest to the lowest quintile of glycemic index and glycemic load were 1.74 (1.08 to 2.81; p trend = 0.03) and 3.04 (1.43 to 6.46; p trend = 0.005), respectively. These associations did not differ by clinical subgroups, including the participants at low cardiovascular risk. In conclusion, these findings suggest that high dietary glycemic index and glycemic load were associated with a greater prevalence and degree of CAC, with glycemic load having a stronger association.

  6. Adherence to Glycemic Monitoring in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Patton, Susana R.

    2015-01-01

    Glucose monitoring either by self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) or continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) plays an important role in diabetes management and in reducing risk for diabetes-related complications. However, despite evidence supporting the role of glucose monitoring in better patient health outcomes, studies also reveal relatively poor adherence rates to SMBG and CGM use and numerous patient-reported barriers. Fortunately, some promising intervention strategies have been identified that promote at least short-term improvements in patients’ adherence to SMBG. These include education, problem solving, contingency management, goal setting, cognitive behavioral therapy, and motivational interviewing. Specific to CGM, interventions to promote greater use among patients are currently under way, yet one pilot study provides data suggesting better maintenance of CGM use in patients showing greater readiness for behavior change. The purpose of this review is to summarize the literature specific to glucose monitoring in patients with diabetes focusing specifically on current adherence rates, barriers to monitoring, and promising intervention strategies that may be ready to deploy now in the clinic setting to promote greater patient adherence to glucose monitoring. Yet, to continue to help patients with diabetes adhere to glucose monitoring, future research is needed to identify the treatment strategies and the intervention schedules that most likely lead to long-term maintenance of optimal glycemic monitoring levels. PMID:25591853

  7. Nutrition Support Team-Led Glycemic Control Program for Critically Ill Patients.

    PubMed

    Dickerson, Roland N; Maish, George O; Minard, Gayle; Brown, Rex O

    2014-08-01

    Glycemic control is an important component of the metabolic management of the critically ill patient. Nutrition support teams are frequently challenged by complicated patients who exhibit multiple concurrent etiologies for hyperglycemia. Nutrition support teams can serve in a pivotal role in the development and evaluation of safe and effective techniques for achieving glycemic control. This review describes the efforts of a nutrition support team in achieving safe and effective glycemic control at their institution. Identification of target blood glucose concentration range, development, initiation, monitoring of a continuous intravenous insulin infusion algorithm, nursing adherence to the algorithm, modification of the algorithm based on the presence of conditions that alter insulin metabolism and glucose homeostasis, and transition of the patient who receives continuous enteral nutrition from a continuous intravenous insulin infusion to intermittent subcutaneous insulin therapy are discussed.

  8. Optimal Experience and Reading Achievement in Virtual Environments among College Level Developmental Readers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burgess, Melissa L.

    2010-01-01

    In this mixed methods study the potential for developmental readers to experience optimal experience (flow) within the multi-user virtual environment, "Second Life," was examined. In an educational context, "Second Life" provided a space for constructivist learning, socialization, exploration, discovery and creativity. The communicative, social…

  9. Study of optimal extraction conditions for achieving high yield and antioxidant activity of tomato seed oil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tomato seeds resulting from tomato processing by-product have not been effectively utilized as value-added products. This study investigated the kinetics of oil extraction from tomato seeds and sought to optimize the oil extraction conditions. The oil was extracted by using hexane as solvent for 0 t...

  10. Optimization of Composite Material System and Lay-up to Achieve Minimum Weight Pressure Vessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mian, Haris Hameed; Wang, Gang; Dar, Uzair Ahmed; Zhang, Weihong

    2013-10-01

    The use of composite pressure vessels particularly in the aerospace industry is escalating rapidly because of their superiority in directional strength and colossal weight advantage. The present work elucidates the procedure to optimize the lay-up for composite pressure vessel using finite element analysis and calculate the relative weight saving compared with the reference metallic pressure vessel. The determination of proper fiber orientation and laminate thickness is very important to decrease manufacturing difficulties and increase structural efficiency. In the present work different lay-up sequences for laminates including, cross-ply [ 0 m /90 n ] s , angle-ply [ ±θ] ns , [ 90/±θ] ns and [ 0/±θ] ns , are analyzed. The lay-up sequence, orientation and laminate thickness (number of layers) are optimized for three candidate composite materials S-glass/epoxy, Kevlar/epoxy and Carbon/epoxy. Finite element analysis of composite pressure vessel is performed by using commercial finite element code ANSYS and utilizing the capabilities of ANSYS Parametric Design Language and Design Optimization module to automate the process of optimization. For verification, a code is developed in MATLAB based on classical lamination theory; incorporating Tsai-Wu failure criterion for first-ply failure (FPF). The results of the MATLAB code shows its effectiveness in theoretical prediction of first-ply failure strengths of laminated composite pressure vessels and close agreement with the FEA results. The optimization results shows that for all the composite material systems considered, the angle-ply [ ±θ] ns is the optimum lay-up. For given fixed ply thickness the total thickness of laminate is obtained resulting in factor of safety slightly higher than two. Both Carbon/epoxy and Kevlar/Epoxy resulted in approximately same laminate thickness and considerable percentage of weight saving, but S-glass/epoxy resulted in weight increment.

  11. Effect of green tea catechins on the postprandial glycemic response to starches differing in amylose content.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Wang, Mingzhu; Peng, Shanli; Zhang, Genyi

    2011-05-11

    The effect of tea polyphenols (TPLs), specifically tea catechins, on the postprandial glycemic response to cooked starches differing in amylose contents was investigated. The in vivo test using a mouse model showed a moderate reduction of the postprandial glycemic response to co-cooked normal (containing 27.8% amylose) or waxy corn starch with 10% TPLs (dry weight of starch), while an augmented glycemic response with a delayed blood glucose peak was observed when high amylose corn starch (HAC, containing 79.4% amylose) was used as the starch component. Enzyme kinetics results demonstrated that TPLs noncompetitively inhibit the digestion of waxy or normal corn starch, while the digestion rate of HAC starch was increased in the presence of TPLs, which supports the observed postprandial glycemic responses. Further studies using X-ray powder diffraction showed that the diffraction intensity (area under the diffraction curves) of normal and HAC starch was increased by 45% and 74%, respectively, whereas no change was observed for waxy corn starch. Consistently, dynamic laser light scattering studies using a solution of pure amylose showed an increased hydrodynamic radius of amylose molecules from ∼54 nm to ∼112 nm in the presence of TPLs. These experimental results indicate that there might exist an interaction between TPLs and amylose, which facilitates the association of amylose molecules to form a special nonordered structure that can produce a high and sustained postprandial glycemic response. Thus, a combination of tea polyphenols and specific starches could be used to manipulate postprandial glycemic response for glycemic control and optimal health.

  12. Need for optimizing catalyst loading for achieving affordable microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Singh, Inderjeet; Chandra, Amreesh

    2013-08-01

    Microbial fuel cell (MFC) technology is a promising technology for electricity production together with simultaneous water treatment. Catalysts play an important role in deciding the MFC performance. In most reports, effect of catalyst - both type and quantity is not optimized. In this paper, synthesis of nanorods of MnO2-catalyst particles for application in Pt-free MFCs is reported. The effect of catalyst loading i.e., weight ratio, with respect to conducting element and binder has been optimized by employing large number of combinations. Using simple theoretical model, it is shown that too high (or low) concentration of catalysts result in loss of MFC performance. The operation of MFC has been investigated using domestic wastewater as source of bio-waste for obtaining real world situation. Maximum power density of ∼61 mW/m(2) was obtained when weight ratio of catalyst and conducting species was 1:1. Suitable reasons are given to explain the outcomes.

  13. Tight glycemic control in the ICU - is the earth flat?

    PubMed

    Steil, Garry M; Agus, Michael S D

    2014-06-27

    Tight glycemic control in the ICU has been shown to reduce mortality in some but not all prospective randomized control trials. Confounding the interpretation of these studies are differences in how the control was achieved and underlying incidence of hypoglycemia, which can be expected to be affected by the introduction of continuous glucose monitoring (CGM). In this issue of Critical Care, a consensus panel provides a list of the research priorities they believe are needed for CGM to become routine practice in the ICU. We reflect on these recommendations and consider the implications for using CGM today.

  14. Improvement of Glycemic Control in Insulin-Dependent Diabetics with Depression by Concomitant Treatment with Antidepressants

    PubMed Central

    Radojkovic, Jana; Sikanic, Natasa; Bukumiric, Zoran; Tadic, Marijana; Kostic, Nada; Babic, Rade

    2016-01-01

    Background It is still disputable whether negative effects of comorbid depression in diabetics can be diminished by successful treatment of depression. The primary aim of this study was to assess whether addition of antidepressants to existing insulin treatment would further improve glycemic control in these patients. A secondary objective was to assess whether such treatment impairs their lipid and inflammatory status. Material/Methods Total of 192 patients with poorly controlled diabetes (defined as HbA1c ≥8%) in the absence of any uncontrolled medical condition entered the 6-month run-in phase with optimization of diabetic therapy. Depression status was screened at the end of this phase by BDI-II depression testing. Patients with BDI-II ≥14 and psychiatric confirmation of depression (58 patients) entered the 6-month interventional phase with SSRI class antidepressants. Results Fifty patients completed the study. During the run-in phase, HbA1c dropped from 10.0±1.8% to 8.5±1.2% (p<0.001), and during the interventional phase it dropped from 8.5±1.2% to 7.7±0.7% (p<0.001). BDI-II scores improved significantly from 30.4±13.2 to 23.5±11.0 (p=0.02) during the interventional phase. A positive linear correlation between improvement in depression scale and improvement in glycemic control was observed (R2=0.139, p=0.008). Lipid profile and inflammatory status did not change significantly during the interventional phase. Conclusions Patients with poorly controlled diabetes and comorbid depression might benefit from screening and treatment of depression with SSRI antidepressants by achieving an incremental effect on glycoregulation. This therapy did not have any adverse effects on lipid profile or inflammatory status. PMID:27329213

  15. Understanding the Glycemic Index and Glycemic Load and Their Practical Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazarim, Fernanda Lorenzi; Stancanelli, Mirtes; Brenzikofer, Rene; de Macedo, Denise Vaz

    2009-01-01

    We have introduced the study of synthesis pathways using two experiments: 1--the determination of the glycemic index (GI) of some foods and the effects of fiber and fat on the GI; 2--the determination of blood glucose levels after the ingestion of meals with high and low glycemic loads (GL). After a practice assembly, when the foods and meals that…

  16. Optimized atomistic force fields for aqueous solutions of Magnesium and Calcium Chloride: Analysis, achievements and limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elfgen, Roman; Hülsmann, Marco; Krämer, Andreas; Köddermann, Thorsten; Kirschner, Karl N.; Reith, Dirk

    2016-10-01

    Molecular simulations are an important tool in the study of aqueous salt solutions. To predict the physical properties accurately and reliably, the molecular models must be tailored to reproduce experimental data. In this work, a combination of recent global and local optimization tools is used to derive force fields for MgCl2 (aq) and CaCl2 (aq). The molecular models for the ions are based on a Lennard-Jones (LJ) potential with a superimposed point charge. The LJ parameters are adjusted to reproduce the bulk density and shear viscosity of the different solutions at 1 bar and temperatures of 293.15, 303.15, and 318.15 K. It is shown that the σ-value of chloride consistently has the strongest influence on the system properties. The optimized force field for MgCl2 (aq) provides both properties in good agreement with the experimental data over a wide range of salt concentrations. For CaCl2 (aq), a compromise was made between the bulk density and shear viscosity, since reproducing the two properties requires two different choices of the LJ parameters. This is demonstrated by studying metamodels of the simulated data, which are generated to visualize the correlation between the parameters and observables by using projection plots. Consequently, in order to derive a transferable force field, an error of ˜3% on the bulk density has to be tolerated to yield the shear viscosity in satisfactory agreement with experimental data.

  17. Oxidative stress and glycemic regulation.

    PubMed

    Ceriello, A

    2000-02-01

    Oxidative stress is an acknowledged pathogenetic mechanism in diabetic complications. Hyperglycemia is a widely known cause of enhanced free radical concentration, whereas oxidative stress involvement in glycemic regulation is still debated. Glucose transport is a cascade of events starting from the interaction of insulin with its own receptor at the plasma membrane and ending with intracellular glucose metabolism. In this complex series of events, each step plays an important role and can be inhibited by a negative effect of oxidative stress. Several studies show that an acute increase in the blood glucose level may impair the physiological homeostasis of many systems in living organisms. The mechanisms through which acute hyperglycemia exerts these effects may be identified in the production of free radicals. It has been suggested that insulin resistance may be accompanied by intracellular production of free radicals. In adipocytes cultured in vitro, insulin increases the production of hydrogen peroxide, which has been shown to mimic the action of insulin. These data allow us to hypothesize that a vicious circle between hyperinsulinemia and free radicals could be operating: insulin resistance might cause elevated plasma free radical concentrations, which, in turn, might be responsible for a deterioration of insulin action, with hyperglycemia being a contributory factor. Data supporting this hypothesis are available. Vitamin E improves insulin action in healthy, elderly, and non-insulin-dependent diabetic subjects. Similar results can be obtained by vitamin C administration.

  18. Effect of carbohydrate counting using bolus calculators on glycemic control in type 1 diabetes patients during continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Eijiro; Okada, Shuichi; Nakajima, Yasuyo; Bastie, Claire C; Tagaya, Yuko; Osaki, Aya; Shimoda, Yoko; Shibusawa, Ryo; Saito, Tsugumichi; Ozawa, Atsushi; Yamada, Masanobu

    2016-11-29

    The present study examined the long-term efficacy of insulin pump therapy for type 1 diabetes patients when carried out using carbohydrate counting with bolus calculators for 1 year. A total of 22 type 1 diabetes patients who had just started continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion were examined and divided into two groups: one that was educated about carbohydrate counting using bolus calculators (n = 14); and another that did not use bolus calculators (n = 8). After 1 year, the hemoglobin A1c levels of the patient group that used bolus calculators decreased persistently and significantly (P = 0.0297), whereas those of the other group did not. The bodyweight, total daily dose of insulin and bolus percentage of both groups did not change. Carbohydrate counting using bolus calculators is necessary to achieve optimal and persistent glycemic control in patients undergoing continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion.

  19. Alliance for a Healthy Border: factors related to weight reduction and glycemic success.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaohui; Ghaddar, Suad; Brown, Cynthia; Pagán, José A; Balboa, Marvelia

    2012-04-01

    We examined the factors related to success in achieving weight reduction and glycemic control in Alliance for a Healthy Border (AHB), a chronic disease prevention program implemented from 2006 to 2009 through 12 federally qualified community health centers serving primarily Hispanics in communities located along the US-Mexico border region. We analyzed data from Phase I of AHB using logistic regression to examine the determinants of success in achieving weight reduction and glycemic control among the participants in AHB programs. Factors affecting weight reduction success were sex, age, employment status, income, insurance, diabetes, baseline body mass index (BMI), smoking status, family history of diabetes, session type, program duration, and physical activity changes. Factors affecting achievement of glycemic success included sex, age, employment status, diabetes, baseline BMI, family history of diabetes, program duration, and physical activity changes. We found that the AHB interventions were more successful in reducing participants' HbA1c level than BMI. In addition to sociodemographic factors, participants with better baseline health conditions (ie, participants without diabetes or family history of diabetes, normal BMI, former smokers) were more likely to achieve success after the interventions. Of the 4 key features defining each of the 12 interventions, session type and program duration were associated with success. Within a relatively short time period, physical activity improvements had a stronger effect on weight reduction and glycemic success than improvements in dietary habits. The effectiveness of diabetes and cardiovascular disease prevention programs can be improved substantially by considering these factors during program design and structure.

  20. Metal-binding sites are designed to achieve optimal mechanical and signaling properties

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Anindita; Bahar, Ivet

    2010-01-01

    Many proteins require bound metals to achieve their function. We take advantage of increasing structural data on metal-binding proteins to elucidate three properties: the involvement of metal-binding sites in the global dynamics of the protein, predicted by elastic network models, their exposure/burial to solvent, and their signal-processing properties indicated by Markovian stochastics analysis. Systematic analysis of a dataset of 145 structures reveals that the residues that coordinate metal ions enjoy remarkably efficient and precise signal transduction properties. These properties are rationalized in terms of their physical properties: participation in hinge sites that control the softest modes collectively accessible to the protein and occupancy of central positions minimally exposed to solvent. Our observations suggest that metal-binding sites may have been evolutionary selected to achieve optimum allosteric communication. They also provide insights into basic principles for designing metal-binding sites, which are verified to be met by recently designed de novo metal-binding proteins. PMID:20826340

  1. Comparison between a novel and conventional artificial pancreas for perioperative glycemic control using a closed-loop system.

    PubMed

    Namikawa, Tsutomu; Munekage, Masaya; Kitagawa, Hiroyuki; Yatabe, Tomoaki; Maeda, Hiromichi; Tsukamoto, Yuuki; Hirano, Kenichi; Asano, Takuji; Kinoshita, Yoshihiko; Hanazaki, Kazuhiro

    2017-03-01

    This clinical study aimed to compare a novel and conventional artificial pancreas (AP) used in surgical patients for perioperative glycemic control, with respect to usability, blood glucose measurements, and glycemic control characteristics. From July in 2010 to March in 2015, 177 patients underwent perioperative glycemic control using a novel AP. Among them, 166 patients were eligible for inclusion in this study. Intensive insulin therapy (IIT) targeting a blood glucose range of 80-110 mg/dL was implemented in 82 patients (49 %), and the remaining 84 patients (51 %) received a less-intensive regime of insulin therapy. Data were collected prospectively and were reviewed or analyzed retrospectively. A comparison study of 324 patients undergoing IIT for glycemic control using a novel (n = 82) or conventional AP (n = 242) was conducted retrospectively. All patients had no hypoglycemia. The comparison study revealed no significant differences in perioperative mean blood glucose level, achievement rates for target blood glucose range, and variability in blood glucose level achieved with IIT between the novel AP and conventional AP groups. The usability, performance with respect to blood glucose measurement, and glycemic control characteristics of IIT were comparable between novel and conventional AP systems. However, the novel AP was easier to manipulate than the conventional AP due to its smaller size, lower weight, and shorter time for preparation. In the near future, this novel AP system might be accepted worldwide as a safe and useful device for use in perioperative glycemic control.

  2. Achieving high lipid productivity of a thermotolerant microalga Desmodesmus sp. F2 by optimizing environmental factors and nutrient conditions.

    PubMed

    Ho, Shih-Hsin; Chang, Jo-Shu; Lai, Yen-Ying; Chen, Ching-Nen Nathan

    2014-03-01

    The optimal conditions for cultivating the thermotolerant lipid-rich microalga Desmodesmus sp. F2 to achieve maximal lipid productivity were determined in this study. The conditions were light intensity, 700μmol/m(2)s; temperature, 35°C; cultivation nitrogen source, nitrate; initial nitrogen level, 6.6mM nitrogen. Carbon dioxide (2.5%, 0.2 vvm) was pumped into the cultures continuously. In the pre-optimized conditions, the maximal lipid productivity of this microalga was 113mg/L/d, which was raised to 263mg/L/d in the optimized conditions. This level of lipid productivity of microalgae is the highest ever reported in the literature. Fatty acid composition of the lipid produced by Desmodesmus sp. F2 in the optimal conditions was determined, in which C16 and C18 species accounted for 95% of the fatty acids. Saturated, monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids accounted for 38.9%, 33.1% and 22.6%, respectively. Based on the analysis, this lipid quality makes it a good feedstock for biodiesel production.

  3. High direct drive illumination uniformity achieved by multi-parameter optimization approach: a case study of Shenguang III laser facility.

    PubMed

    Tian, Chao; Chen, Jia; Zhang, Bo; Shan, Lianqiang; Zhou, Weimin; Liu, Dongxiao; Bi, Bi; Zhang, Feng; Wang, Weiwu; Zhang, Baohan; Gu, Yuqiu

    2015-05-04

    The uniformity of the compression driver is of fundamental importance for inertial confinement fusion (ICF). In this paper, the illumination uniformity on a spherical capsule during the initial imprinting phase directly driven by laser beams has been considered. We aim to explore methods to achieve high direct drive illumination uniformity on laser facilities designed for indirect drive ICF. There are many parameters that would affect the irradiation uniformity, such as Polar Direct Drive displacement quantity, capsule radius, laser spot size and intensity distribution within a laser beam. A novel approach to reduce the root mean square illumination non-uniformity based on multi-parameter optimizing approach (particle swarm optimization) is proposed, which enables us to obtain a set of optimal parameters over a large parameter space. Finally, this method is applied to improve the direct drive illumination uniformity provided by Shenguang III laser facility and the illumination non-uniformity is reduced from 5.62% to 0.23% for perfectly balanced beams. Moreover, beam errors (power imbalance and pointing error) are taken into account to provide a more practical solution and results show that this multi-parameter optimization approach is effective.

  4. Optimization of Oxidation Temperature for Commercially Pure Titanium to Achieve Improved Corrosion Resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bansal, Rajesh; Singh, J. K.; Singh, Vakil; Singh, D. D. N.; Das, Parimal

    2017-03-01

    Thermal oxidation of commercially pure titanium (cp-Ti) was carried out at different temperatures, ranging from 200 to 900 °C to achieve optimum corrosion resistance of the thermally treated surface in simulated body fluid. Scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy techniques were used to characterize the oxides and assess their protective properties exposed in the test electrolyte. Maximum resistance toward corrosion was observed for samples oxidized at 500 °C. This was attributed to the formation of a composite layer of oxides at this temperature comprising Ti2O3 (titanium sesquioxide), anatase and rutile phases of TiO2 on the surface of cp-Ti. Formation of an intact and pore-free oxide-substrate interface also improved its corrosion resistance.

  5. Optimization of Oxidation Temperature for Commercially Pure Titanium to Achieve Improved Corrosion Resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bansal, Rajesh; Singh, J. K.; Singh, Vakil; Singh, D. D. N.; Das, Parimal

    2017-02-01

    Thermal oxidation of commercially pure titanium (cp-Ti) was carried out at different temperatures, ranging from 200 to 900 °C to achieve optimum corrosion resistance of the thermally treated surface in simulated body fluid. Scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy techniques were used to characterize the oxides and assess their protective properties exposed in the test electrolyte. Maximum resistance toward corrosion was observed for samples oxidized at 500 °C. This was attributed to the formation of a composite layer of oxides at this temperature comprising Ti2O3 (titanium sesquioxide), anatase and rutile phases of TiO2 on the surface of cp-Ti. Formation of an intact and pore-free oxide-substrate interface also improved its corrosion resistance.

  6. [Glycemic variability and continuous monitoring of glycemia].

    PubMed

    Prázný, Martin; Soupal, Jan

    2014-09-01

    Blood glucose levels are not constant in ther human body even in physiological status. It fluctuates depending on food intake, exercise, psychological and other factors. Normally it fluctuates between 3.9 to 7.5 mmol/l and in fasting in the standard conditions it does not exceed even more narrow range 3.9 to 5.5 mmol/l. Fluctuations are more pronounced in patient with diabetes. Hyperglycemia is a common and basic pathology in diabetes, however, antidiabetic drug often cause hypoglycemia, both increasing the range for glucose fluctuations. The level of glucose fluctuation is called glycemic variability (GV). Glycemic variability is now a favorite target of scientific research in dia-betology. Increased glycemic variability is associated with hypoglycemia, possibly may contribute to chronic dia-betes complications and negatively influences quality of life of diabetic patients. Last but not least, thanks to the new technology of continuous glucose monitoring, we can better describe and measure it. Finally, glycemic variability emerges as a potentially important therapeutical target.Key words: continuous glucose monitoring - glycemic variability - insulin pump - sensor augmented pump.

  7. Achieving optimal essential fatty acid status in vegetarians: current knowledge and practical implications.

    PubMed

    Davis, Brenda C; Kris-Etherton, Penny M

    2003-09-01

    Although vegetarian diets are generally lower in total fat, saturated fat, and cholesterol than are nonvegetarian diets, they provide comparable levels of essential fatty acids. Vegetarian, especially vegan, diets are relatively low in alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) compared with linoleic acid (LA) and provide little, if any, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). Clinical studies suggest that tissue levels of long-chain n-3 fatty acids are depressed in vegetarians, particularly in vegans. n-3 Fatty acids have numerous physiologic benefits, including potent cardioprotective effects. These effects have been demonstrated for ALA as well as EPA and DHA, although the response is generally less for ALA than for EPA and DHA. Conversion of ALA by the body to the more active longer-chain metabolites is inefficient: < 5-10% for EPA and 2-5% for DHA. Thus, total n-3 requirements may be higher for vegetarians than for nonvegetarians, as vegetarians must rely on conversion of ALA to EPA and DHA. Because of the beneficial effects of n-3 fatty acids, it is recommended that vegetarians make dietary changes to optimize n-3 fatty acid status.

  8. THE CONTENT OF MICROELEMENTS IN BLOOD SERUM AND ERYTHROCYTES IN CHILDREN WITH DIABETES MELLITUS TYPE I DEPENDING ON LEVEL OF GLYCEMIC CONTROL.

    PubMed

    Gluschenko, N; Vasylyshyn, Kh; Roschupkin, A; Lekishvili, S; Gladchenko, O

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate the content of chromium, cobalt and nickel in serum and erythrocytes in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus, depending on the level of glycemic control. The study was conducted on 68 children with type 1 diabetes mellitus. The patients were divided into four groups based on glycemic control. Group I was composed of 9 children with optimal level of glycemic control. Group II - 25 children with suboptimal level of glycemic control. Group III - 34 children with a high risk to life level of glycemic control. Group IV (control group) consisted of 30 healthy children. Compensation state of type 1 diabetes was evaluated according to ISPAD (Consensus for the Management of Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus in Children and Adolescens 2000). The content of trace elements in biological agents was determined by atomic absorbtion spectrophotometry method with C-115M1 mass-spectrophotometer, manufactured by «Selmi» enterprise (Ukraine). It is found that there is a decrease in serum concentrations of chromium and erythrocyte content of cobalt in patients with optimal level of glycemic control. The deficiency of chromium is accompanied by the deficiency of cobalt in patients with suboptimal level of glycemic control. The lower levels of cobalt and nickel are recorded simultaneously, but there is theexcess of chromium in the erythrocytes of these patients. Patients, who suffer from 1 type diabetes mellitus and high risk for life level of glycemic control have considerable polideficiency of cobalt, nickel and chromium in serum.The increasing level of chromium was recorded only in the erythrocytes. The level of glycemic control and the duration of 1 type diabetes mellitus are important in the forecasting of the development of chronic diabetic complications. It is found that the duration of 1 type diabetes mellitus influences the levels of cobalt and nickel in serum mostly, while the level of glycemic control influences the chromium content.

  9. Glycemic goals in diabetes: trade-off between glycemic control and iatrogenic hypoglycemia.

    PubMed

    Cryer, Philip E

    2014-07-01

    The selection of a glycemic goal in a person with diabetes is a compromise between the documented upside of glycemic control-the partial prevention or delay of microvascular complications-and the documented downside of glycemic control-the recurrent morbidity and potential mortality of iatrogenic hypoglycemia. The latter is not an issue if glycemic control is accomplished with drugs that do not cause hypoglycemia or with substantial weight loss. However, hypoglycemia becomes an issue if glycemic control is accomplished with a sulfonylurea, a glinide, or insulin, particularly in the setting of absolute endogenous insulin deficiency with loss of the normal decrease in circulating insulin and increase in glucagon secretion and attenuation of the sympathoadrenal response as plasma glucose concentrations fall. Then the selection of a glycemic goal should be linked to the risk of hypoglycemia. A reasonable individualized glycemic goal is the lowest A1C that does not cause severe hypoglycemia and preserves awareness of hypoglycemia, preferably with little or no symptomatic or even asymptomatic hypoglycemia, at a given stage in the evolution of the individual's diabetes.

  10. Isometric Scaling in Developing Long Bones Is Achieved by an Optimal Epiphyseal Growth Balance.

    PubMed

    Stern, Tomer; Aviram, Rona; Rot, Chagai; Galili, Tal; Sharir, Amnon; Kalish Achrai, Noga; Keller, Yosi; Shahar, Ron; Zelzer, Elazar

    2015-08-01

    One of the major challenges that developing organs face is scaling, that is, the adjustment of physical proportions during the massive increase in size. Although organ scaling is fundamental for development and function, little is known about the mechanisms that regulate it. Bone superstructures are projections that typically serve for tendon and ligament insertion or articulation and, therefore, their position along the bone is crucial for musculoskeletal functionality. As bones are rigid structures that elongate only from their ends, it is unclear how superstructure positions are regulated during growth to end up in the right locations. Here, we document the process of longitudinal scaling in developing mouse long bones and uncover the mechanism that regulates it. To that end, we performed a computational analysis of hundreds of three-dimensional micro-CT images, using a newly developed method for recovering the morphogenetic sequence of developing bones. Strikingly, analysis revealed that the relative position of all superstructures along the bone is highly preserved during more than a 5-fold increase in length, indicating isometric scaling. It has been suggested that during development, bone superstructures are continuously reconstructed and relocated along the shaft, a process known as drift. Surprisingly, our results showed that most superstructures did not drift at all. Instead, we identified a novel mechanism for bone scaling, whereby each bone exhibits a specific and unique balance between proximal and distal growth rates, which accurately maintains the relative position of its superstructures. Moreover, we show mathematically that this mechanism minimizes the cumulative drift of all superstructures, thereby optimizing the scaling process. Our study reveals a general mechanism for the scaling of developing bones. More broadly, these findings suggest an evolutionary mechanism that facilitates variability in bone morphology by controlling the activity of

  11. Identification and Treatment of Pathophysiological Comorbidities of Autism Spectrum Disorder to Achieve Optimal Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Frye, Richard E.; Rossignol, Daniel A.

    2016-01-01

    the optimal treatments for these abnormalities. PMID:27330338

  12. Incretin therapies: effects beyond glycemic control.

    PubMed

    Mudaliar, Sunder; Henry, Robert R

    2009-07-01

    Impaired insulin secretion plays a major role in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus, and progressive loss of beta-cell function is a pathophysiologic hallmark of type 2 diabetes. Recent science has elaborated on the role of the incretin hormones on beta-cell function and insulin secretion, as well as the role that incretin-based pharmacotherapies may have on glycemic control and beta-cell function, possibly altering the progressive loss of beta-cell function and possibly reversing/halting disease progression. However, incretin-based therapies may also have benefits extending beyond glycemic control and insulin secretion. In this review we examine some of those "beyond-glycemic" benefits, including presentation of data on weight reduction, blood pressure lowering, beneficial changes in the lipid profile, and improvements in myocardial and endothelial function. We investigate how those effects may help ameliorate the cardiovascular burden in patients with diabetes.

  13. Effectiveness of increasing the frequency of posaconazole syrup administration to achieve optimal plasma concentrations in patients with haematological malignancy.

    PubMed

    Park, Wan Beom; Cho, Joo-Youn; Park, Sang-In; Kim, Eun Jung; Yoon, Seonghae; Yoon, Seo Hyun; Lee, Jeong-Ok; Koh, Youngil; Song, Kyoung-Ho; Choe, Pyoeng Gyun; Yu, Kyung-Sang; Kim, Eu Suk; Bang, Su Mi; Kim, Nam Joong; Kim, Inho; Oh, Myoung-Don; Kim, Hong Bin; Song, Sang Hoon

    2016-07-01

    Few data are available on whether adjusting the dose of posaconazole syrup is effective in patients receiving anti-cancer chemotherapy. The aim of this prospective study was to analyse the impact of increasing the frequency of posaconazole administration on optimal plasma concentrations in adult patients with haematological malignancy. A total of 133 adult patients receiving chemotherapy for acute myeloid leukaemia or myelodysplastic syndrome who received posaconazole syrup 200 mg three times daily for fungal prophylaxis were enrolled in this study. Drug trough levels were measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. In 20.2% of patients (23/114) the steady-state concentration of posaconazole was suboptimal (<500 ng/mL) on Day 8. In these patients, the frequency of posaconazole administration was increased to 200 mg four times daily. On Day 15, the median posaconazole concentration was significantly increased from 368 ng/mL [interquartile range (IQR), 247-403 ng/mL] to 548 ng/mL (IQR, 424-887 ng/mL) (P = 0.0003). The median increase in posaconazole concentration was 251 ng/mL (IQR, 93-517 ng/mL). Among the patients with initially suboptimal levels, 79% achieved the optimal level unless the steady-state level was <200 ng/mL. This study shows that increasing the administration frequency of posaconazole syrup is effective for achieving optimal levels in patients with haematological malignancy undergoing chemotherapy.

  14. Influence of glycemic index and glycemic load of the diet on the risk of overweight and adiposity in childhood

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Kellen Cristine; Nobre, Luciana Neri; Vicente, Sofia Emanuelle de Castro Ferreira; Moreira, Lidiane Lopes; Lessa, Angelina do Carmo; Lamounier, Joel Alves

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To investigate the association between the glycemic index and the glycemic load of the diet with the risk of overweight and high adiposity in children with 5 years of age. Methods: Cross-sectional study nested in a cohort of 232 children born and living in Diamantina (MG, Brazil). Parents and/or guardians provided the food intake data, using a semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire, past history and socioeconomic conditions. Anthropometric and fatness data were collected from the children. The dietary glycemic index and the glycemic load were calculated from the food intake. The glycemic index and glycemic load effect on overweight and adiposity in children was assessed by the Poisson regression (p<0.05). Results: The prevalence of overweight by body mass index was 17.3%, and high adiposity was observed in 3.4% and 6.9% by triceps skinfold and subscapular skinfold, respectively. No difference was reported between the mean body mass index, triceps skinfold and subscapular skinfold according to the glycemic index and glycemic load tertiles; however, the overweight group presented a higher carbohydrate intake (p=0.04). No association was found between glycemic index and glycemic load with overweight and adiposity among the children assessed. Conclusions: The glycemic index and glycemic load of the diet were not identified as risk factors for overweight and adiposity in this cross-sectional study. PMID:27215968

  15. Verification of glycemic profiles using continuous glucose monitoring: cases with steroid use, liver cirrhosis, enteral nutrition, or late dumping syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kishimoto, Miyako; Noda, Mitsuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Glycemic control is often difficult to achieve in patients with diabetes, especially in the presence of comorbid diseases or conditions such as steroid-use or liver cirrhosis, or in patients receiving enteral nutrition. Moreover, reactive hypoglycemia due to late dumping syndrome in people having undergone gastrectomy is also a matter of concern. Empirically and theoretically, the typical glycemic profiles associated with these conditions have been determined; however, what actually happens during a 24-h span is still somewhat obscure. In order to verify and provide information about the 24-h glycemic profiles associated with these conditions, 8 patients with the 4 above-mentioned conditions were monitored using a continuous glucose monitoring system (CGMS). For all 8 patients, CGMS provided detailed information regarding the 24-h glycemic profiles. The CGM results showed typical glycemic patterns for each condition, and we were moreover able to observe the effects of various practical treatments. Based on these cases, we conclude that the CGMS is highly useful for determining the glycemic patterns of patients with the aforementioned conditions in a practical setting; and this system may be used to monitor the treatment success of such cases.

  16. Dietary carbohydrate intake, glycemic index, and glycemic load and endometrial cancer risk: a prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Helen G; Kitahara, Cari M; Murray, Liam J; Dodd, Kevin W; Black, Amanda; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z; Cantwell, Marie M

    2014-01-01

    Endometrial cancer risk has been directly associated with glycemic load. However, few studies have investigated this link, and the etiological role of specific dietary carbohydrate components remains unclear. Our aim was to investigate associations of carbohydrate intake, glycemic index, and glycemic load with endometrial cancer risk in the US Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial. Recruitment took place in 1993-2001. Over a median of 9.0 years of follow-up through 2009, 386 women developed endometrial cancer among 36,115 considered in the analysis. Dietary intakes were assessed using a 124-item diet history questionnaire. Cox proportional hazards models were applied to calculate hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals. Significant inverse associations were detected between endometrial cancer risk and total available carbohydrate intake (hazard ratio (HR) = 0.66, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.49, 0.90), total sugars intake (HR = 0.71, 95% CI: 0.52, 0.96), and glycemic load (HR = 0.63, 95% CI: 0.46, 0.84) when women in the highest quartile of intake were compared with those in the lowest. These inverse associations were strongest among overweight and obese women. No associations with endometrial cancer risk were observed for glycemic index or dietary fiber. Our findings contrast with previous evidence and suggest that high carbohydrate intakes and glycemic loads are protective against endometrial cancer development. Further clarification of these associations is warranted.

  17. Practice of strict glycemic control in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Marcus J; de Graaff, Mart J; Royakkers, Annic A N M; van Braam Houckgeest, Floris; van der Sluijs, Johannes P; Kieft, Hans; Spronk, Peter E

    2008-11-01

    Blood glucose control aiming at normoglycemia, frequently referred to as "strict glycemic control", decreases mortality and morbidity of critically ill patients. We searched the medical literature for export opinions, surveys, and clinical reports on blood glucose control in intensive care medicine. While strict glycemic control has been recommended standard of care for critically ill patients, the risk of severe hypoglycemia with strict glycemic control is frequently mentioned by experts. Some rationalize this risk, though others strongly point out the high incidence of hypoglycemia to be (one) reason not to perform strict glycemic control. Implementation of strict glycemic control is far from complete in intensive care units across the world. Frequently local guidelines accept higher blood glucose levels than those with strict glycemic control. Only a minority of retrieved manuscripts are on blood glucose regimens with the lower targets as with strict glycemic control. Hypoglycemia certainly is encountered with blood glucose control, in particular with strict glycemic control. Reports show intensive care-nurses can adequately and safely perform strict glycemic control. Implementation of strict glycemic control is far from complete, at least in part because of the feared risks of hypoglycemia. The preference for hyperglycemia over intermittent hypoglycemia is irrational, however, because there is causal evidence of harm for the former but only associative evidence of harm for the latter. For several reasons it is wise to have strict glycemic control being a nurse-based strategy.

  18. The effect of glycemic control on CEA, CA 19-9, amylase and lipase levels

    PubMed Central

    Ata, Naim; Dal, Kürşat; Kucukazman, Metin; Karakaya, Serdar; Unsal, Oktay; Dagdeviren, Murat; Akın, Kadir O.; Baser, Salih; Beyan, Esin; Ertugrul, Derun T.

    2015-01-01

    Background Diabetes mellitus is closely related to pancreas cancer. In this study we aimed to investigate the effect of hyperglycemia on tumor and inflammation markers, as well as pancreatic exocrine functions. Methods A total of 98 consecutive diabetic patients with poor glycemic control, and 50 healthy controls were included in the study. We measured hsCRP, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), CA19-9, CEA, amylase and lipase in addition to routine biochemistry tests, before and after euglycemia was achieved. Results Fasting blood glucose, HbA1c, CA19-9, CEA, hsCRP, ESR, triglycerides, AST, ALT, GGT, ALP, total cholesterol and LDL-C levels decreased significantly with the regulation of glycemic control. Amylase and lipase levels increased with the regulation of glycemic control. After glycemic control, CA19-9 and CEA levels were still higher, whereas amylase and lipase levels were still lower in the diabetic group compared with the control group. Basal HbA1c showed significant correlation with CA19-9, CEA, amylase and lipase. Conclusions We propose to repeat observations of tumor markers after hyperglycemia is resolved, in order to avoid unnecessary invasive tests. Our data also suggest that pancreatic exocrine function was improved with lowering blood glucose in a short period of time. PMID:28352671

  19. Cross-sectional study of glycemic control among adults with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Amarasekara, Amarasekara Appuhamillage Thamara Dilhani; Fongkaew, Warunee; Wimalasekera, Savithri Wasundara; Turale, Sue; Chanprasit, Chawapornpan

    2015-06-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a chronic condition, a global concern, and a serious issue in Sri Lanka, where there is little data regarding the influence of dietary control, exercise, and adherence to medication behaviors among adults diabetes. In this cross-sectional, descriptive study, we identified current factors influencing glycemic control and glycemic control behavior among adults with diabetes. A total of 230 people attending diabetes clinics in a tertiary hospital and a primary care institute were administered the self-report Diabetes Information Form, assessing their socioeconomic and medical information and glycemic control behaviors. Data were analyzed by frequency distribution, percentages, mean scores, and standard deviation. The results indicated that most participants had not achieved the recommended fasting blood glucose level (< 126 mg/dL). Although dietary control was practised by 72%, regular exercise was not practised by 85%, and while 77% reported adhering to regular medication, they still had poor glycemic control. The findings highlight the need for health professionals to adopt new strategies for diabetes education to overcome issues related to misconceptions and barriers in providing diabetes care in Sri Lanka.

  20. Lipid Encapsulation Provides Insufficient Total-Tract Digestibility to Achieve an Optimal Transfer Efficiency of Fatty Acids to Milk Fat

    PubMed Central

    Bainbridge, Melissa; Kraft, Jana

    2016-01-01

    Transfer efficiencies of rumen-protected n-3 fatty acids (FA) to milk are low, thus we hypothesized that rumen-protection technologies allow for biohydrogenation and excretion of n-3 FA. The objectives of this study were to i) investigate the ruminal protection and post-ruminal release of the FA derived from the lipid-encapsulated echium oil (EEO), and ii) assess the bioavailability and metabolism of the EEO-derived FA through measuring the FA content in plasma lipid fractions, feces, and milk. The EEO was tested for rumen stability using the in situ nylon bag technique, then the apparent total-tract digestibility was assessed in vivo using six Holstein dairy cattle. Diets consisted of a control (no EEO); 1.5% of dry matter (DM) as EEO and 1.5% DM as encapsulation matrix; and 3% DM as EEO. The EEO was rumen-stable and had no effect on animal production. EEO-derived FA were incorporated into all plasma lipid fractions, with the highest proportion of n-3 FA observed in cholesterol esters. Fecal excretion of EEO-derived FA ranged from 7–14%. Biohydrogenation products increased in milk, plasma, and feces with EEO supplementation. In conclusion, lipid-encapsulation provides inadequate digestibility to achieve an optimal transfer efficiency of n-3 FA to milk. PMID:27741299

  1. Cassava Flour Substitution Modulates Glycemic Responses and Glycemic Index of Wheat Breads in Apparent Healthy Volunteers.

    PubMed

    Okafor, Ebelechukwu N; Erukainure, Ochuko L; Ozumba, Augusta U; Adewale, Chris O; Kayode, Funmi O; Asieba, Godfrey O; Adesegha, Olubukola I; Elemo, Gloria N

    2017-07-04

    Different carbohydrate foods produce different glycemic responses even with little or no difference in macronutrient composition. Cassava constitutes one of the major staples in Nigeria. Four blends of cassava-wheat bread samples with 0, 10, 15, and 20% cassava flour inclusion were fed individually to groups of healthy human volunteers. Subjects were studied on separate occasions in the morning after a 10-12-hr overnight fast. Blood glucose responses were measured at intervals of 30 min over a period of 2 hr. Glucose was used as a reference food. There were normal glucose responses to the bread samples studied. Increase in cassava incorporation led to less significant glycemic responses. The glycemic index values ranged from 91-94. Results from this study indicate that the inclusion of cassava flour in bread production might not pose a threat to blood glucose response of individuals.

  2. Effect of the glycemic index of carbohydrates on Acne vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Rebecca C; Lee, Stephen; Choi, James Y J; Atkinson, Fiona S; Stockmann, Karola S; Petocz, Peter; Brand-Miller, Jennie C

    2010-10-01

    Acne vulgaris may be improved by dietary factors that increase insulin sensitivity. We hypothesized that a low-glycemic index diet would improve facial acne severity and insulin sensitivity. Fifty-eight adolescent males (mean age ± standard deviation 16.5 ± 1.0 y and body mass index 23.1 ± 3.5 kg/m(2)) were alternately allocated to high or low glycemic index diets. Severity of inflammatory lesions on the face, insulin sensitivity (homeostasis modeling assessment of insulin resistance), androgens and insulin-like growth factor-1 and its binding proteins were assessed at baseline and at eight weeks, a period corresponding to the school term. Forty-three subjects (n = 23 low glycemic index and n = 20 high glycemic index) completed the study. Diets differed significantly in glycemic index (mean ± standard error of the mean, low glycemic index 51 ± 1 vs. high glycemic index 61 ± 2, p = 0.0002), but not in macronutrient distribution or fiber content. Facial acne improved on both diets (low glycemic index -26 ± 6%, p = 0.0004 and high glycemic index -16 ± 7%, p = 0.01), but differences between diets did not reach significance. Change in insulin sensitivity was not different between diets (low glycemic index 0.2 ± 0.1 and high glycemic index 0.1 ± 0.1, p = 0.60) and did not correlate with change in acne severity (Pearson correlation r = -0.196, p = 0.244). Longer time frames, greater reductions in glycemic load or/and weight loss may be necessary to detect improvements in acne among adolescent boys.

  3. The role of parent-adolescent attachment in the glycemic control of adolescents with Type 1 diabetes: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Tziporah; Shields, Cleveland G

    2009-09-01

    This pilot study explored the associations between parent and adolescent reports of adolescent attachment and glycemic control in adolescents with Type 1 diabetes. We hypothesized that more secure attachment would correlate with more optimal diabetes control. Thirty-one families completed written self-report questionnaires about adolescent attachment, demographic data, and diabetes control. Adolescents and parents reported on their perceptions of adolescents' attachment to mothers and fathers. Mean HbA1c for the sample was 7.6% (SD = 1.14). Mothers' perceptions of adolescents' attachment were significantly correlated with adolescents' hemoglobin A1c (r = -.42, p = .022), indicating that maternal perceptions of more secure attachment was associated with better glycemic control. Neither fathers' perceptions nor adolescents' reports of attachment was significantly correlated with glycemic control. Attachment appears to be associated with glycemic control in this population though the mechanisms are unclear. Mothers' perceptions of attachment had the strongest associations with control, not adolescent reports. Further research is needed to understand the mechanisms through which parent reports of adolescent attachment are associated with glycemic control.

  4. Influence of high glycemic index and glycemic load diets on blood pressure during adolescence.

    PubMed

    Gopinath, Bamini; Flood, Victoria M; Rochtchina, Elena; Baur, Louise A; Smith, Wayne; Mitchell, Paul

    2012-06-01

    We aimed to prospectively examine the association between the glycemic index and glycemic load of foods consumed and the dietary intakes of carbohydrates, sugars, fiber, and principal carbohydrate-containing food groups (eg, breads, cereals, and sugary drinks) with changes in blood pressure during adolescence. A total of 858 students aged 12 years at baseline (422 girls and 436 boys) were examined from 2004-2005 to 2009-2011. Dietary data were assessed from validated semiquantitative food frequency questionnaires. Blood pressure was measured using a standard protocol. In girls, after adjusting for age, ethnicity, parental education, parental history of hypertension, baseline height, baseline blood pressure, change in body mass index, and time spent in physical and sedentary activities, each 1-SD (1-SD = 7.10 g/d) increase in baseline dietary intake of total fiber was associated with a 0.96-, 0.62-, and 0.75-mmHg decrease in mean systolic (P = 0.02), diastolic (P = 0.01), and arterial blood pressures (P = 0.002), respectively, 5 years later. In girls, each 1-SD increase in dietary glycemic index, glycemic load, carbohydrate, and fructose was concurrently related to increases of 1.81 (P = 0.001), 4.02 (P = 0.01), 4.74 (P = 0.01), and 1.80 mm Hg (P = 0.03) in systolic blood pressure, respectively, >5 years. Significant associations between carbohydrate nutrition variables and blood pressure were not observed among boys. Excessive dietary intake of carbohydrates, specifically from high glycemic index/glycemic load foods, could adversely influence blood pressure, particularly in girls, whereas fiber-rich diets may be protective against elevated blood pressure during adolescence.

  5. Ethnic Variability in Glycemic Response to Sucrose and Isomaltulose.

    PubMed

    Tan, Wei Shuan Kimberly; Tan, Sze-Yen; Henry, Christiani Jeyakumar

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the glycemic response of Caucasians and Asians to two disaccharides of different glycemic index (GI), and to examine if ethnic groups that showed the largest glycemic response to sucrose would benefit the most when it is replaced with isomaltulose. Forty healthy participants (10 Chinese; 10 Malays; 10 Caucasians; and 10 Indians) consumed beverages containing 50 g of sucrose or isomaltulose on two separate occasions using a randomized crossover design. Capillary blood glucose was measured in a fasted state and at 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, and 120 min after beverage ingestion. Glycemic response to sucrose was significantly higher in Malays compared to Caucasians (p = 0.041), but did not differ between Caucasians vs. Chinese (p = 0.145) or vs. Indians (p = 0.661). When sucrose was replaced with isomaltulose, glycemic responses were significantly reduced in all ethnic groups, with the largest reduction in glycemic response being observed in Malays. Malays, who had the greatest glycemic response to sucrose, also showed the greatest improvement in glycemic response when sucrose was replaced with isomaltulose. This implies that Malays who are more susceptible to type 2 diabetes mellitus may benefit from strategies that replace high GI carbohydrate with lower GI alternatives to assist in glycemic control.

  6. Glycemic Control in the Burn Intensive Care Unit: Focus on the Role of Anemia in Glucose Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Mann, Elizabeth A.; Mora, Alejandra G.; Pidcoke, Heather F.; Wolf, Steven E.; Wade, Charles E.

    2009-01-01

    Glycemic control with intensive insulin therapy (IIT) has received widespread adoption secondary to findings of improved clinical outcomes and survival in the burn population. Severe burn as a model for trauma is characterized by a hypermetabolic state, hyperglycemia, and insulin resistance. In this article, we review the findings of a burn center research facility in terms of understanding glucose management. The conferred benefits from IIT, our findings of poor outcomes associated with glycemic variability, advantages from preserved diurnal variation of glucose and insulin, and impacts of glucometer error and hematocrit correction factor are discussed. We conclude with direction for further study and the need for a reliable continuous glucose monitoring system. Such efforts will further the endeavor for achieving adequate glycemic control in order to assess the efficacy of target ranges and use of IIT. PMID:20144386

  7. Prediction of the optimum surface orientation angles to achieve maximum solar radiation using Particle Swarm Optimization in Sabha City Libya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansour, F. A.; Nizam, M.; Anwar, M.

    2017-02-01

    This research aims to predict the optimum surface orientation angles in solar panel installation to achieve maximum solar radiation. Incident solar radiation is calculated using koronakis mathematical model. Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) is used as computational method to find optimum angle orientation for solar panel installation in order to get maximum solar radiation. A series of simulation has been carried out to calculate solar radiation based on monthly, seasonally, semi-yearly and yearly period. South-facing was calculated also as comparison of proposed method. South-facing considers azimuth of 0°. Proposed method attains higher incident predictions than South-facing that recorded 2511.03 kWh/m2for monthly. It were about 2486.49 kWh/m2, 2482.13 kWh/m2and 2367.68 kWh/m2 for seasonally, semi-yearly and yearly. South-facing predicted approximately 2496.89 kWh/m2, 2472.40 kWh/m2, 2468.96 kWh/m2, 2356.09 kWh/m2for monthly, seasonally, semi-yearly and yearly periods respectively. Semi-yearly is the best choice because it needs twice adjustments of solar panel in a year. Yet it considers inefficient to adjust solar panel position in every season or monthly with no significant solar radiation increase than semi-yearly and solar tracking device still considers costly in solar energy system. PSO was able to predict accurately with simple concept, easy and computationally efficient. It has been proven by finding the best fitness faster.

  8. Dietary carbohydrate intake, glycemic load, glycemic index and ovarian cancer risk in African-American women

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Bo; Moorman, Patricia G.; Alberg, Anthony J.; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S.; Bondy, Melissa; Cote, Michelle L.; Funkhouser, Ellen; Peters, Edward S.; Schwartz, Ann G.; Terry, Paul; Schildkraut, Joellen M.; Bandera, Elisa V.

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiologic evidence regarding the association between carbohydrate intake, glycemic load and glycemic index and risk of ovarian cancer has been mixed. Little is known about their impact on ovarian cancer risk in African-American women. Associations between carbohydrate quantity and quality and ovarian cancer risk were investigated among 406 cases and 609 controls using data from the African American Cancer Epidemiology Study (AACES). AACES is an ongoing population-based case-control study of ovarian cancer in African Americans in the US. Cases were identified through rapid case ascertainment and age- and site-matched controls were identified by random-digit-dialing. Dietary information over the year preceding diagnosis or the reference date was obtained using a food frequency questionnaire. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) adjusted for covariates. The ORs comparing the highest quartile of total carbohydrate intake and total sugars intake versus the lowest quartile were 1.57 (95% CI 1.08, 2.28; p-trend=0.03) and 1.61 (95% CI 1.12, 2.30; p-trend<0.01) respectively. A suggestion of an inverse association was found for fiber intake. Higher glycemic load was positively associated with the risk of ovarian cancer (OR 1.18 for each 10 units/1,000 kcal; 95% CI 1.04, 1.33). No associations were observed for starch or glycemic index. Our findings suggest that high intake of total sugars and glycemic load are associated with greater risk of ovarian cancer in African-American women. PMID:26669283

  9. Use of allopurinol with low-dose 6-mercaptopurine in inflammatory bowel disease to achieve optimal active metabolite levels: A review of four cases and the literature

    PubMed Central

    Witte, Todd N; Ginsberg, Allen L

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: At least one-third of patients with inflammatory bowel disease do not respond or are intolerant to therapy with 6-mercaptopurine (6-MP). A subgroup fails to attain optimal levels of 6-thioguanine nucleotide (6-TGN) and instead shunts to 6-methylmercaptopurine nucleotide (6-MMPN). PATIENTS AND METHODS: A retrospective chart review was conducted, and four patients are described who had been previously unable to achieve optimal 6-TGN metabolite levels until allopurinol was added to their treatment. RESULTS: All four patients achieved optimal 6-TGN levels and undetectable 6-MMPN with a mean 6-MP dose of 0.49 mg/kg. Three achieved steroid-free clinical remission. Two of those three patients had normalization of liver enzymes; one patient had baseline normal liver enzymes despite an initial 6-MMPN level of 27,369 pmol/8×108 red blood cells. Two patients experienced reversible leukopenia. CONCLUSIONS: Combination allopurinol and low-dose 6-MP is an effective means to achieve optimal metabolite levels and steroid-free clinical remission in previously refractory patients. Caution is advised. PMID:18299738

  10. Overcoming barriers to glycemic control in African Americans with type-2 diabetes: benefits of insulin therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Merville C.

    2007-01-01

    A disproportionate number of African-American men and women are affected by obesity and diabetes. The documented rate of poor glycemic control in the African-American population may contribute to the high rate of morbidity and mortality due to diabetes observed in these patients. Since the benefits of strict glycemic control have been demonstrated in multiple large trials, the aim of treatment should be to achieve the goals set forth by the American Diabetes Association. Insulin remains an essential therapeutic agent for helping patients achieve glycemic control and preventing long-term comorbidities. However, barriers to insulin therapy exist for both the physician and patient. Strategies to counter this resistance include identifying barriers to treatment, restoring the patient's sense of control, utilizing simple regimens, and reviewing the benefits of insulin and the risk of hypoglycemia. In treating African-American patients with diabetes, providers of various racial and ethnic backgrounds may maximize treatment efficacy by attempting to understand and practice culturally competent care. PMID:17722663

  11. Relation between Breast Cancer and High Glycemic Index or Glycemic Load: A Meta-analysis of Prospective Cohort Studies.

    PubMed

    Mullie, Patrick; Koechlin, Alice; Boniol, Mathieu; Autier, Philippe; Boyle, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the commonest form of cancer in women worldwide. It has been suggested that chronic hyperinsulinemia associated with insulin resistance plays a role in breast cancer etiology. To test the hyperinsulinemia hypothesis, a dietary pattern associated with a high glycemic index and glycemic load, both proxies for chronic hyperinsulinemia, should be associated with an increased risk of breast cancer. A meta-analysis restricted to prospective cohort studies was undertaken using a random effects model with tests for statistical significance, publication bias and heterogeneity. The metric for analysis was the risk of breast cancer in the highest relative to the lowest glycemic index and glycemic load dietary pattern. A dietary pattern with a high glycemic index was associated with a summary relative risk (SRR) of 1.05 (95% CI: 1.00, 1.11), and a high glycemic load with a SRR of 1.06 (95% CI: 1.00, 1.13). Adjustments for body mass index [BMI], physical activity and other lifestyle factors did not influence the SRR, nor did menopausal status and estrogen receptor status of the tumor. In conclusion, the current evidence supports a modest association between a dietary pattern with high glycemic index or glycemic load and the risk of breast cancer.

  12. A Randomized Trial about Glycemic Index and Glycemic Load Improves Outcomes among Adults with Type 2 Diabetes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Carla K.; Gutschall, Melissa

    2009-01-01

    Glycemic index (GI) represents the postprandial glucose response of carbohydrate foods, and glycemic load (GL) represents the quantity and quality of carbohydrate consumed. A diet lower in GI and GL may improve diabetes management. A 9-week intervention regarding GI and GL was evaluated among adults in the age range of 40-70 years who had had type…

  13. Group of Signs: A New Method to Evaluate Glycemic Variability

    PubMed Central

    Zaccardi, Francesco; Stefano, Paola Di; Busetto, Elena; Federici, Marco Orsini; Manto, Andrea; Infusino, Fabio; Lanza, Gaetano Antonio; Pitocco, Dario; Ghirlanda, Giovanni

    2008-01-01

    Background Glycemic variability is an important parameter used to resolve potential clinical problems in diabetic patients. It is known that glycemic variability generates oxidative stress and potentially contributes to the development of macro- and microvascular complications in diabetes. By controlling glycemic variability, it is possible to reduce these complications and to set the therapy for all patients with diabetes. The aims of this study were to (1) propose a new standardized, objective, and flexible approach to measure glycemic variability by a continuous glucose monitoring system (CGMS)—the group of signs (GOS) method; (2) compare the correlation between mean amplitude of glucose excursion (MAGE), a well-known index of glycemic variability calculated by the physician and the MAGE defined with the GOS method, in order to validate the GOS; and (3) suggest new indexes of glycemic variability. Methods We tested the GOS algorithm on data collected by a CGMS every 5 minutes for 24 hours on 50 patients. Consequently, for 8 patients we calculated and compared the physician's MAGE in the standard way and by the GOS method. Results Comparison between the two methods has shown high correlations, from a minimum correlation of 86% to a maximum of 98%, with p values <0.01 (Pearson test). Conclusions Preliminary data suggest that the proposed algorithm is a valid, efficient, and reliable method able to calculate the standard MAGE on CGMS data systematically and to create other alternative glycemic variability indexes. PMID:19885294

  14. Development of perioperative glycemic control using an artificial endocrine pancreas.

    PubMed

    Hanazaki, Kazuhiro; Namikawa, Tsutomu

    2013-01-01

    It is well known that tight glycemic control (TGC) in patients with diabetes mellitus is the most important to reduce complications, such as nephropathy, neuropathy, and retinopathy. Also, surgical stress induced hyperglycemia leading to glucose toxicity is the main cause of infectious complications after surgery. Recently perioperative TGC has been proven an effective method to reduce postoperative infectious complications and accelerate enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS), with the main purpose of short staying hospital. However, conventional TGC with open-loop glycemic control system is likely to induce not only occurrence of hypoglycemia but also unstable glycemic control. To solve these problems, we have involved introduction of novel glycemic control using an artificial pancreas (AP) with closed-loop glycemic control system since 2006. To date, this novel perioperative glycemic control was performed in more than 400 surgical patients. As a result, we established stable and safe TGC using an AP to improve surgical outcomes without hypoglycemia. In this paper, we report current scientific evidence focusing on perioperative glycemic control using an AP.

  15. Glycemic index, glycemic load, wellness and beauty: the state of the art.

    PubMed

    Berra, Bruno; Rizzo, Angela Maria

    2009-01-01

    The glycemic index (GI) is a ranking system for carbohydrates' effect on blood glucose levels. It compares available carbohydrates gram for gram in individual foods, providing a numerical, evidence-based index of postprandial glycemia. The glycemic load (GL) is a ranking system for carbohydrate content in food portions based on their GI and the portion size. These two markers increasingly are being used to prevent typical diseases of the Western world, including type 2 diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease, obesity, metabolic syndrome, and acne. Data on the efficacy of GI and GL in the treatment of Western population diseases are discussed and critically evaluated, with a particular focus on acne and other skin disorders.

  16. Lower glycemic load meals reduce diurnal glycemic oscillations in women with risk factors for gestational diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Kizirian, Nathalie V; Goletzke, Janina; Brodie, Shannon; Atkinson, Fiona S; Markovic, Tania P; Ross, Glynis P; Buyken, Anette; Brand-Miller, Jennie P

    2017-01-01

    Objective Maternal glycemia plays a key role in fetal growth. We hypothesized that lower glycemic load (GL) meals (lower glycemic index, modestly lower carbohydrate) would substantially reduce day-long glucose variability in women at risk of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Research design and methods A crossover study of 17 women (mean±SD age 34.8±4 years; gestational weeks 29.3±1.3; body mass index 23.8±4.7 kg/m2) who consumed a low GL or a high GL diet in random order, 1-day each, over 2 consecutive days. Diets were energy-matched and fiber-matched with 5 meals per 24 hours. All food was provided. Continuous glucose monitoring was used to assess diurnal glycemia. Results Maternal glucose levels were 51% lower on the low GL day with lower incremental area under the curve (iAUC±SEM 549±109 vs 1120±198 mmol/L min, p=0.015). Glycemic variability was significantly lower on the low GL day, as demonstrated by a lower average SD (0.7±0.1 vs 0.9±0.1, p<0.001) and lower mean amplitude of glycemic excursions (2.1±0.2 vs 2.7±0.2 mmol/L, p<0.001). Conclusions A lower GL meal plan in pregnancy acutely halves day-long maternal glucose levels and reduces glucose variability, providing further evidence to support the utility of a low GL diet in pregnancy.

  17. Glycemic index, glycemic load and mammographic breast density: the EPIC Florence longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Masala, Giovanna; Assedi, Melania; Bendinelli, Benedetta; Ermini, Ilaria; Occhini, Daniela; Sieri, Sabina; Brighenti, Furio; Del Turco, Marco Rosselli; Ambrogetti, Daniela; Palli, Domenico

    2013-01-01

    A few studies have evaluated the association between diet and mammographic breast density (MBD) and results are inconsistent. MBD, a well-recognized risk factor for breast cancer, has been proposed as a marker of cumulative exposure to hormones and growth factors. Diets with a high glycemic index (GI) or glycemic load (GL) may increase breast cancer risk, via an effect on the insulin-like growth factor axis. We have investigated the association between carbohydrate intake, GI, GL and MBD in a prospective study. We identified a large series of women, in the frame of the EPIC-Florence cohort, with a mammogram taken five years after enrolment, when detailed information on dietary and lifestyle habits and anthropometric measurements had been collected. Mammograms have been retrieved (1,668, 83%) and MBD assessed according to Wolfe's classification. We compared women with high MBD (P2+DY Wolfe's categories) with those with low MBD (N1+P1) through logistic models adjusted for age, education, body mass index, menopause, number of children, breast feeding, physical activity, non-alcohol energy, fibers, saturated fat and alcohol. A direct association between GL and high MBD emerged in the highest quintile of intake in comparison with the lowest quintile (OR = 1.73, 95%CI 1.13-2.67, p for trend = 0.048) while no association with glycemic index was evident. These results were confirmed after exclusion of women reporting to be on a diet or affected with diabetes, and when Hormone Replacement Therapy at the date of mammographic examination used to assess MBD was considered. The effect was particularly evident among leaner women, although no interaction was found. A positive association was suggested for increasing simple sugar and total carbohydrates intakes limited to the highest quintiles. In this Italian population we observed an association between glycemic load, total and rapidly absorbed carbohydrates and high MBD. These novel results warrant further investigations.

  18. Hyperglycemia, hypoglycemia and glycemic variability in the elderly: a fatal triad?

    PubMed

    Monami, Matteo; Aleffi, Sara

    2016-06-22

    Diabetes mellitus is one of the most important causes of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality; the incidence of chronic complications of diabetes appears to be closely related to the degree of hyperglycaemia. However, results of clinical trials showed that intensive treatment of hyperglycaemia prevents microvascular complications, but has little or no effect on the incidence of cardiovascular events. Different hypoglycaemic drugs show different effects on cardiovascular risk. However, those trials have shown a neutral effect on cardiovascular mortality. This paradoxical result could be explained with the frequent use, in the past, of glucose-lowering agents capable of increasing the risk of hypoglicemia, glycemic variability and weight gain. In conclusion, an adequate glycemic control, in particular in elderly patients, should be achieved, whenever possible, using agents not inducing hypogycemia, glucose fluctuations, and weight gain. In fact, hypoglycaemia and glucose variability should be considered as independent cardiovascular risk factors to a similar extent to hyperglycemia. In this article, the author will review literature supporting the hypothesis that hyperglycemia, hypoglycaemia and glycemic variability are a fatal triad capable of increasing morbidity and mortality in patients with diabetes mellitus.

  19. The effects of hormonal contraceptives on glycemic regulation

    PubMed Central

    Cortés, Manuel E.; Alfaro, Andrea A.

    2014-01-01

    A number of side effects have been linked to the use of hormonal contraceptives, among others, alterations in glucose levels. Hence, the objective of this mini-review is to show the main effects of hormonal contraceptive intake on glycemic regulation. First, the most relevant studies on this topic are described, then the mechanisms that might be accountable for this glycemic regulation impairment as exerted by hormonal contraceptives are discussed. Finally, we briefly discuss the ethical responsibility of health professionals to inform about the potential risks on glycemic homeostasis regarding hormonal contraceptive intake. PMID:25249703

  20. Improved glycemic control in mice lacking Sglt1 and Sglt2.

    PubMed

    Powell, David R; DaCosta, Christopher M; Gay, Jason; Ding, Zhi-Ming; Smith, Melinda; Greer, Jennifer; Doree, Deon; Jeter-Jones, Sabrina; Mseeh, Faika; Rodriguez, Lawrence A; Harris, Angela; Buhring, Lindsey; Platt, Kenneth A; Vogel, Peter; Brommage, Robert; Shadoan, Melanie K; Sands, Arthur T; Zambrowicz, Brian

    2013-01-15

    Sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) is the major, and SGLT1 the minor, transporter responsible for renal glucose reabsorption. Increasing urinary glucose excretion (UGE) by selectively inhibiting SGLT2 improves glycemic control in diabetic patients. We generated Sglt1 and Sglt2 knockout (KO) mice, Sglt1/Sglt2 double-KO (DKO) mice, and wild-type (WT) littermates to study their relative glycemic control and to determine contributions of SGLT1 and SGLT2 to UGE. Relative to WTs, Sglt2 KOs had improved oral glucose tolerance and were resistant to streptozotocin-induced diabetes. Sglt1 KOs fed glucose-free high-fat diet (G-free HFD) had improved oral glucose tolerance accompanied by delayed intestinal glucose absorption and increased circulating glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), but had normal intraperitoneal glucose tolerance. On G-free HFD, Sglt2 KOs had 30%, Sglt1 KOs 2%, and WTs <1% of the UGE of DKOs. Consistent with their increased UGE, DKOs had lower fasting blood glucose and improved intraperitoneal glucose tolerance than Sglt2 KOs. In conclusion, 1) Sglt2 is the major renal glucose transporter, but Sglt1 reabsorbs 70% of filtered glucose if Sglt2 is absent; 2) mice lacking Sglt2 display improved glucose tolerance despite UGE that is 30% of maximum; 3) Sglt1 KO mice respond to oral glucose with increased circulating GLP-1; and 4) DKO mice have improved glycemic control over mice lacking Sglt2 alone. These data suggest that, in patients with type 2 diabetes, combining pharmacological SGLT2 inhibition with complete renal and/or partial intestinal SGLT1 inhibition may improve glycemic control over that achieved by SGLT2 inhibition alone.

  1. Language and Verbal Memory in Individuals with a History of Autism Spectrum Disorders Who Have Achieved Optimal Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tyson, Katherine; Kelley, Elizabeth; Fein, Deborah; Orinstein, Alyssa; Troyb, Eva; Barton, Marianne; Eigsti, Inge-Marie; Naigles, Letitia; Schultz, Robert T.; Stevens, Michael; Helt, Molly; Rosenthal, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Some individuals who lose their autism spectrum disorder diagnosis may continue to display subtle weaknesses in language. We examined language and verbal memory in 44 individuals with high-functioning autism (HFA), 34 individuals with "optimal outcomes" (OO) and 34 individuals with typical development (TD). The OO group scored in the…

  2. Exquisite Moments: Achieving Optimal Flow in Three Activity-Based Groups Regardless of Early-Childhood Adversity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomson, Paula; Jaque, S. Victoria

    2016-01-01

    Flow experiences (also known as optimal performance) occur when people engage in activities they enjoy. The authors discuss such events in their study that examined a number of healthy, active individuals (performing artists, athletes, and others engaged in a range of recreational activities) and divided these into three groups based on adverse…

  3. Academic Abilities in Children and Adolescents with a History of Autism Spectrum Disorders Who Have Achieved Optimal Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Troyb, Eva; Orinstein, Alyssa; Tyson, Katherine; Helt, Molly; Eigsti, Inge-Marie; Stevens, Michael; Fein, Deborah

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the academic abilities of children and adolescents who were once diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder, but who no longer meet diagnostic criteria for this disorder. These individuals have achieved social and language skills within the average range for their ages, receive little or no school support, and are referred to…

  4. Is fructose the optimal low glycemic index sweetener?

    PubMed

    Bantle, John P

    2006-01-01

    Fructose is a monosaccharide which is abundant in nature. It is the sweetest naturally occurring carbohydrate. The availability of fructose increased substantially when it became possible in the 1960s to economically produce high fructose syrups from corn starch and other starches. Such high fructose syrups are now used to sweeten soft drinks, fruit drinks, baked goods, jams, syrups and candies. The most recent data available suggest that fructose consumption is increasing worldwide. Fructose presently accounts for about 10% of average total energy intake in the United States. Studies in both healthy and diabetic subjects demonstrated that fructose produced a smaller postprandial rise in plasma glucose and serum insulin than other common carbohydrates. Substitution of dietary fructose for other carbohydrates produced a 13% reduction in mean plasma glucose in a study of type-1 and type-2 diabetic subjects. However, there is concern that fructose may aggravate lipemia, particularly in men. In one study, daylong plasma triglycerides (estimated by determining the area under response curves) in healthy men was 32% greater during a high fructose diet than during a high glucose diet. There is also concern that fructose may be a factor contributing to the growing worldwide prevalence of obesity. Increasing fructose consumption is temporally associated with the increase in obesity. Moreover, on theoretical grounds, dietary fructose might increase energy intake. Fructose stimulates insulin secretion less than does glucose and glucose-containing carbohydrates. Since insulin increases leptin release, lower circulating insulin and leptin after fructose ingestion might inhibit appetite less than consumption of other carbohydrates and lead to increased energy intake. However, there is not yet any convincing experimental evidence that dietary fructose does increase energy intake. Although evidence that fructose has adverse effects is limited, adding fructose in large amounts to the diet may be undesirable, particularly for men. Fructose that occurs naturally in fruits and vegetables is a modest component of energy intake and should not be of concern.

  5. Effect of macronutrients and fiber on postprandial glycemic responses and meal glycemic index and glycemic load value determinations.

    PubMed

    Meng, Huicui; Matthan, Nirupa R; Ausman, Lynne M; Lichtenstein, Alice H

    2017-02-15

    Background: The potential confounding effect of different amounts and proportions of macronutrients across eating patterns on meal or dietary glycemic index (GI) and glycemic load (GL) value determinations has remained partially unaddressed.Objective: The study aimed to determine the effects of different amounts of macronutrients and fiber on measured meal GI and GL values.Design: Four studies were conducted during which participants [n = 20-22; women: 50%; age: 50-80 y; body mass index (in kg/m(2)): 25-30)] received food challenges containing different amounts of the variable nutrient in a random order. Added to the standard 50 g available carbohydrate from white bread was 12.5, 25, or 50 g carbohydrate; 12.5, 25, or 50 g protein; and 5.6, 11.1, or 22.2 g fat from rice cereal, tuna, and unsalted butter, respectively, and 4.8 or 9.6 g fiber from oat cereal. Arterialized venous blood was sampled for 2 h, and measured meal GI and GL and insulin index (II) values were calculated by using the incremental area under the curve (AUCi) method.Results: Adding carbohydrate to the standard white-bread challenge increased glucose AUCi (P < 0.0001), measured meal GI (P = 0.0066), and mean GL (P < 0.0001). Adding protein (50 g only) decreased glucose AUCi (P = 0.0026), measured meal GI (P = 0.0139), and meal GL (P = 0.0140). Adding fat or fiber had no significant effect on these variables. Adding carbohydrate (50 g), protein (50 g), and fat (11.1 g) increased the insulin AUCi or II; fiber had no effect.Conclusions: These data indicate that uncertainty in the determination of meal GI and GL values is introduced when carbohydrate-containing foods are consumed concurrently with protein (equal amount of carbohydrate challenge) but not with carbohydrate-, fat-, or fiber-containing foods. Future studies are needed to evaluate whether this uncertainty also influences the prediction of average dietary GI and GL values for eating patterns. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials

  6. Consumption of a high glycemic load but not a high glycemic index diet is marginally associated with oxidative stress in young women.

    PubMed

    Arikawa, Andrea Y; Jakits, Holly E; Flood, Andrew; Thomas, William; Gross, Myron; Schmitz, Kathryn H; Kurzer, Mindy S

    2015-01-01

    Research studies have suggested that chronic consumption of high glycemic index foods may lead to chronically high oxidative stress. This is important because oxidative stress is suspected to be an early event in the etiology of many disease processes. We hypothesized that dietary glycemic index and glycemic load were positively associated with oxidative stress assessed by plasma F2-isoprostanes in healthy, premenopausal women (body mass index [BMI] = 24.7 ± 4.8 kg/m(2) and age 25.3 ± 3.5 years, mean ± SD). We measured plasma F2-isoprostanes in 306 healthy premenopausal women at the baseline visit for the Women In Steady Exercise Research study, using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Dietary glycemic index and load were calculated from the National Cancer Institute Diet History Questionnaire, and participants were divided into quartiles of dietary glycemic index and of glycemic load. Plasma F2-isoprostanes were compared across quartile groups of dietary glycemic index and glycemic load using linear regression models. Plasma F2-isoprostanes (pg/mL) increased with quartile of glycemic load (test for linear trend, P = .033), and also increased with quartile of glycemic index in participants with BMI ≥ 25 (P = .035) but not in those with BMI <25 (P = .924). After adjustment for BMI, alcohol consumption and total energy intake, both these positive trends remained marginally significant (P = .123 for quartiles of glycemic index and P = .065 for quartiles of glycemic load).

  7. Glycemic management in ESRD and earlier stages of CKD.

    PubMed

    Williams, Mark E; Garg, Rajesh

    2014-02-01

    The management of hyperglycemia in patients with kidney failure is complex, and the goals and methods regarding glycemic control in chronic kidney disease (CKD) are not clearly defined. Although aggressive glycemic control seems to be advantageous in early diabetic nephropathy, outcome data supporting tight glycemic control in patients with advanced CKD (including end-stage renal disease [ESRD]) are lacking. Challenges in the management of such patients include therapeutic inertia, monitoring difficulties, and the complexity of available treatments. In this article, we review the alterations in glucose homeostasis that occur in kidney failure, current views on the value of glycemic control and issues with its determination, and more recent approaches to monitor or measure glycemic control. Hypoglycemia and treatment options for patients with diabetes and ESRD or earlier stages of CKD also are addressed, discussing the insulin and noninsulin agents that currently are available, along with their indications and contraindications. The article provides information to help clinicians in decision making in order to provide individualized glycemic goals and appropriate therapy for patients with ESRD or earlier stages of CKD.

  8. SU-E-T-387: Achieving Optimal Patient Setup Imaging and Treatment Workflow Configurations in Multi-Room Proton Centers

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, H; Prado, K; Langen, K; Yi, B; Mehta, M; Regine, W; D'Souza, W

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To simulate patient flow in proton treatment center under uncertainty and to explore the feasibility of treatment preparation rooms to improve patient throughput and cyclotron utilization. Methods: Three center layout scenarios were modeled: (S1: In-Tx room imaging) patient setup and imaging (planar/volumetric) performed in treatment room, (S2: Patient setup in preparation room) each treatment room was assigned with preparation room(s) that was equipped with lasers only for patient setup and gross patient alignment, and (S3: Patient setup and imaging in preparation room) preparation room(s) was equipped with laser and volumetric imaging for patient setup, gross and fine patient alignment. A 'snap' imaging was performed in treatment room. For each scenario, the number of treatment rooms and the number of preparation rooms serving each treatment room were varied. We examined our results (average of 100 16-hour (two shifts) working days) by evaluating patient throughput and cyclotron utilization. Results: When the number of treatment rooms increased ([from, to]) [1, 5], daily patient throughput increased [32, 161], [29, 184] and [27, 184] and cyclotron utilization increased [13%, 85%], [12%, 98%], and [11%, 98%] for scenarios S1, S2 and S3 respectively. However, both measures plateaued after 4 rooms. With the preparation rooms, the throughput and the cyclotron utilization increased by 14% and 15%, respectively. Three preparation rooms were optimal to serve 1-3 treatment rooms and two preparation rooms were optimal to serve 4 or 5 treatment rooms. Conclusion: Patient preparation rooms for patient setup may increase throughput and decrease the need for additional treatment rooms (cost effective). Optimal number of preparation rooms serving each gantry room varies as a function of treatment rooms and patient setup scenarios. A 5th treatment room may not be justified by throughput or utilization.

  9. The Glycemic Indices in Dialysis Evaluation (GIDE) study: Comparative measures of glycemic control in diabetic dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Williams, Mark E; Mittman, Neal; Ma, Lin; Brennan, Julia I; Mooney, Ann; Johnson, Curtis D; Jani, Chinu M; Maddux, Franklin W; Lacson, Eduardo

    2015-10-01

    The validity of hemoglobin A1c (HgbA1c) is undergoing increasing scrutiny in the advanced CKD/ESRD (chronic kidney disease/end-stage renal disease) population, where it appears to be discordant from other glycemic indices. In the Glycemic Indices in Dialysis Evaluation (GIDE) Study, we sought to assess correlation of HgbA1c with casual glucose, glycated albumin, and serum fructosamine in a large group of diabetic patients on dialysis. From 26 dialysis facilities in the United States, 1758 diabetic patients (hemodialysis = 1476, peritoneal dialysis = 282) were enrolled in the first quarter of 2013. The distributions of HgbA1c and the other glycemic indices were analyzed. Intra-patient coefficients of variation and correlations among the four glycemic indices were determined. Patients with low HgbA1c values were both on higher erythropoietin (ESA) doses and more anemic. Serum glucose exhibited the highest intra-patient variability over a 3-month period; variability was modest among the other glycemic indices, and least with HgbA1c. Statistical analyses inclusive of all glycemic markers indicated modest to strong correlations. HgbA1c was more likely to be in the target range than glycated albumin or serum fructosamine, suggesting factors which may or may not be directly related to glycemic control, including anemia, ESA management, and iron administration, in interpreting HgbA1c values. These initial results from the GIDE Study clarify laboratory correlations among glycemic indices and add to concerns about reliance on HgbA1c in patients with diabetes and advanced kidney disease.

  10. Tight Glycemic Control in Critically Ill Children.

    PubMed

    Agus, Michael S D; Wypij, David; Hirshberg, Eliotte L; Srinivasan, Vijay; Faustino, E Vincent; Luckett, Peter M; Alexander, Jamin L; Asaro, Lisa A; Curley, Martha A Q; Steil, Garry M; Nadkarni, Vinay M

    2017-02-23

    Background In multicenter studies, tight glycemic control targeting a normal blood glucose level has not been shown to improve outcomes in critically ill adults or children after cardiac surgery. Studies involving critically ill children who have not undergone cardiac surgery are lacking. Methods In a 35-center trial, we randomly assigned critically ill children with confirmed hyperglycemia (excluding patients who had undergone cardiac surgery) to one of two ranges of glycemic control: 80 to 110 mg per deciliter (4.4 to 6.1 mmol per liter; lower-target group) or 150 to 180 mg per deciliter (8.3 to 10.0 mmol per liter; higher-target group). Clinicians were guided by continuous glucose monitoring and explicit methods for insulin adjustment. The primary outcome was the number of intensive care unit (ICU)-free days to day 28. Results The trial was stopped early, on the recommendation of the data and safety monitoring board, owing to a low likelihood of benefit and evidence of the possibility of harm. Of 713 patients, 360 were randomly assigned to the lower-target group and 353 to the higher-target group. In the intention-to-treat analysis, the median number of ICU-free days did not differ significantly between the lower-target group and the higher-target group (19.4 days [interquartile range {IQR}, 0 to 24.2] and 19.4 days [IQR, 6.7 to 23.9], respectively; P=0.58). In per-protocol analyses, the median time-weighted average glucose level was significantly lower in the lower-target group (109 mg per deciliter [IQR, 102 to 118]; 6.1 mmol per liter [IQR, 5.7 to 6.6]) than in the higher-target group (123 mg per deciliter [IQR, 108 to 142]; 6.8 mmol per liter [IQR, 6.0 to 7.9]; P<0.001). Patients in the lower-target group also had higher rates of health care-associated infections than those in the higher-target group (12 of 349 patients [3.4%] vs. 4 of 349 [1.1%], P=0.04), as well as higher rates of severe hypoglycemia, defined as a blood glucose level below 40 mg per

  11. The impact of measurement frequency on the domains of glycemic control in the critically ill--a Monte Carlo simulation.

    PubMed

    Krinsley, James S; Bruns, David E; Boyd, James C

    2015-03-01

    The role of blood glucose (BG) measurement frequency on the domains of glycemic control is not well defined. This Monte Carlo mathematical simulation of glycemic control in a cohort of critically ill patients modeled sets of 100 patients with simulated BG-measuring devices having 5 levels of measurement imprecision, using 2 published insulin infusion protocols, for 200 hours, with 3 different BG-measurement intervals-15 minutes (Q15'), 1 hour (Q1h), and 2 hours (Q2h)-resulting in 1,100,000 BG measurements for 3000 simulated patients. The model varied insulin sensitivity, initial BG value and rate of gluconeogenesis. The primary outcomes included rates of hyperglycemia (BG > 180 mg/dL), hypoglycemia (BG < 70 and 40 mg/dL), proportion of patients with elevated glucose variability (within-patient coefficient of variation [CV] > 20%), and time in range (BG ranges 80-150 mg/dL and 80-180 mg/dL). Percentages of hyperglycemia, hypoglycemia at both thresholds, and patients with elevated glucose variability as well as time outside glycemic targets were substantially higher in simulations with measurement interval Q2h compared to those with measurement interval Q1h and moderately higher in simulations with Q1h than in those with Q15'. Higher measurement frequency mitigated the deleterious effect of high measurement imprecision, defined as CV ≥ 15%. This Monte Carlo simulation suggests that glycemic control in critically ill patients is more optimal with a BG measurement interval no longer than 1h, with further benefit obtained with use of measurement interval of 15'. These findings have important implications for the development of glycemic control standards.

  12. Using ant colony optimization on the quadratic assignment problem to achieve low energy cost in geo-distributed data centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osei, Richard

    There are many problems associated with operating a data center. Some of these problems include data security, system performance, increasing infrastructure complexity, increasing storage utilization, keeping up with data growth, and increasing energy costs. Energy cost differs by location, and at most locations fluctuates over time. The rising cost of energy makes it harder for data centers to function properly and provide a good quality of service. With reduced energy cost, data centers will have longer lasting servers/equipment, higher availability of resources, better quality of service, a greener environment, and reduced service and software costs for consumers. Some of the ways that data centers have tried to using to reduce energy costs include dynamically switching on and off servers based on the number of users and some predefined conditions, the use of environmental monitoring sensors, and the use of dynamic voltage and frequency scaling (DVFS), which enables processors to run at different combinations of frequencies with voltages to reduce energy cost. This thesis presents another method by which energy cost at data centers could be reduced. This method involves the use of Ant Colony Optimization (ACO) on a Quadratic Assignment Problem (QAP) in assigning user request to servers in geo-distributed data centers. In this paper, an effort to reduce data center energy cost involves the use of front portals, which handle users' requests, were used as ants to find cost effective ways to assign users requests to a server in heterogeneous geo-distributed data centers. The simulation results indicate that the ACO for Optimal Server Activation and Task Placement algorithm reduces energy cost on a small and large number of users' requests in a geo-distributed data center and its performance increases as the input data grows. In a simulation with 3 geo-distributed data centers, and user's resource request ranging from 25,000 to 25,000,000, the ACO algorithm was able

  13. Dyadic measures of the parent-child relationship during the transition to adolescence and glycemic control in children with type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Barbara J; Holmbeck, Grayson; Iannotti, Ronald J; McKay, Siripoom V; Lochrie, Amanda; Volkening, Lisa K; Laffel, Lori

    2009-06-01

    To identify aspects of family behavior associated with glycemic control in youth with type 1 diabetes mellitus during the transition to adolescence, the authors studied 121 9- to 14-year-olds (M = 12.1 yrs) and their parents, who completed the Diabetes Family Conflict Scale (DFCS) and the Diabetes Family Responsibility Questionnaire (DFRQ). From the DFRQ, the authors derived 2 dyadic variables, frequency of agreement (exact parent and child concurrence about who was responsible for a task) and frequency of discordance (opposite parent and child reports about responsibility). The authors divided the cohort into Younger (n = 57, M = 10.6 yrs) and Older (n = 64, M = 13.5 yrs) groups. Family conflict was significantly related to glycemic control in the entire cohort and in both the Younger and Older groups. However, only in the Younger group was Agreement related to glycemic control, with higher Agreement associated with better glycemic control. Findings suggest that Agreement about sharing of diabetes responsibilities may be an important target for family-based interventions aiming to optimize glycemic control in preteen youth.

  14. ACHIEVING NEW SOURCE PERFORMANCE STANDARDS (NSPS) EMISSION STANDARDS THROUGH INTEGRATION OF LOW-NOx BURNERS WITH AN OPTIMIZATION PLAN FOR BOILER COMBUSTION

    SciTech Connect

    Wayne Penrod; David Moyeda

    2003-07-01

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate the use of an Integrated Combustion Optimization System to achieve NO{sub x} emissions levels in the range of 0.15 to 0.22 lb/MMBtu while simultaneously enabling increased power output. The project consists of the integration of low-NO{sub x} burners and advanced overfire air technology with various process measurement and control devices on the Holcomb Station Unit 1 boiler. The project includes the use of sophisticated neural networks or other artificial intelligence technologies and complex software that can optimize several operating parameters, including NO{sub x} emissions, boiler efficiency, and CO emissions. The program is being performed in three phases. In Phase I, the boiler is being equipped with sensors that can be used to monitor furnace conditions and coal flow to permit improvements in boiler operation. In Phase II, the boiler will be equipped with burner modifications designed to reduce NO{sub x} emissions and automated coal flow dampers to permit on-line fuel balancing. In Phase III, the boiler will be equipped with an overfire air system to permit deep reductions in NO{sub x} emissions to be achieved. Integration of the overfire air system with the improvements made in Phases I and II will permit optimization of the boiler performance, output, and emissions. During this reporting period, efforts were focused on completion of Phase I and Phase II activities. The low-NO{sub x} burner modifications, the coal flow dampers, and the coal flow monitoring system were procured and installed during a boiler outage in March 2003. During this reporting period, optimization tests were performed to evaluate system performance and identify optimum operating conditions for the installed equipment. The overfire air system process design activities and preliminary engineering design were completed.

  15. Technology for monitoring shot-level light source performance data to achieve high-optimization of lithography processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moriya, Masato; Ochiai, Hideyuki; Watabe, Yoshinobu; Ishida, Keisuke; Masuda, Hiroyuki; Sasaki, Youichi; Kumazaki, Takahito; Kurosu, Akihiko; Ohta, Takeshi; Kakizaki, Kouji; Matsunaga, Takashi; Mizoguchi, Hakaru

    2014-03-01

    Gigaphoton has developed a new monitoring system that provides shot-level light source performance data to FDC systems during exposure time. The system provides basic monitoring data (e.g. Energy, Wavelength, Bandwidth, etc.) and beam performance data, such as Beam Profile, Pointing, Divergence, Polarization can also be monitored using a new metrology tool called the Beam Performance Monitor (BPM) module. During exposure time the system automatically identifies the start and end timing of the wafer and each shot based on the burst of firing signals from the scanner, and stores the measured data in sequence. The stored data is sorted by wafer or by shot, and sent to REDeeM Piece which in turn converts the data to the user's protocol and send it to the FDC system. The user also has the option to directly view or download the stored data using a GUI. Through this monitoring system, users can manage light sources data at the shot or reticle level to facilitate optimization of performance and running cost of the light source for each process. This monitoring system can be easily retrofitted to Gigaphoton's current ArF laser light sources. The beam splitter of the BPM was specially designed to bend only a small fraction of the source beam, so we are able to simply install the BPM without the need for special optical alignment.

  16. Imaging Live Cells at the Nanometer-Scale with Single-Molecule Microscopy: Obstacles and Achievements in Experiment Optimization for Microbiology

    PubMed Central

    Haas, Beth L.; Matson, Jyl S.; DiRita, Victor J.; Biteen, Julie S.

    2015-01-01

    Single-molecule fluorescence microscopy enables biological investigations inside living cells to achieve millisecond- and nanometer-scale resolution. Although single-molecule-based methods are becoming increasingly accessible to non-experts, optimizing new single-molecule experiments can be challenging, in particular when super-resolution imaging and tracking are applied to live cells. In this review, we summarize common obstacles to live-cell single-molecule microscopy and describe the methods we have developed and applied to overcome these challenges in live bacteria. We examine the choice of fluorophore and labeling scheme, approaches to achieving single-molecule levels of fluorescence, considerations for maintaining cell viability, and strategies for detecting single-molecule signals in the presence of noise and sample drift. We also discuss methods for analyzing single-molecule trajectories and the challenges presented by the finite size of a bacterial cell and the curvature of the bacterial membrane. PMID:25123183

  17. Factors associated with glycemic control in adult type 1 diabetes patients treated with insulin pump therapy.

    PubMed

    Matejko, Bartłomiej; Skupien, Jan; Mrozińska, Sandra; Grzanka, Małgorzata; Cyganek, Katarzyna; Kiec-Wilk, Beata; Malecki, Maciej T; Klupa, Tomasz

    2015-02-01

    Continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) by insulin pump seems to improve glycemia and quality of life as compared to conventional insulin therapy in type 1 diabetes (T1DM). However, while many T1DM subjects achieve excellent glycemic control, some others cannot reach recommended goals. In a retrospective analysis, we searched for factors associated with glycemic control in T1DM patients treated with insulin pump therapy. Data from 192 patients (133 women and 59 men) treated with personal insulin pumps at the Department of Metabolic Diseases, University Hospital, Krakow, Poland were analyzed. Sources of information included medical records, memory read-outs from insulin pumps and data from glucose meters. Univariate, multivariate linear and logistic regression analysis for the association with hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) level were performed. The mean age of the subjects was 28.9 (±11.2) years, the mean duration of T1DM-14.6 (±7.6) years, mean body mass index-23.5 (±3.1) kg/m2. The mean HbA1c level in the entire study group was 7.4% (57 mmol/mol). In the multivariate linear regression analysis, HbA1c correlated with the mean number of daily blood glucose measurements, number of hypoglycemic episodes per 100 blood glucose measurements, age at the examination, and continuous glucose monitoring system use. Multivariate logistic regression analysis for reaching the therapeutic target of HbA1c<7.0% (53 mmol/mol) showed that the independent predictors of achieving this goal included the same four variables. In a large clinical observation, we identified that patient-related and technological factors associated with glycemic control in adult pump-treated T1DM subjects.

  18. Dietary glycemic index and glycemic load and their relationship to cardiovascular risk factors in Chinese children.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinyu; Zhu, Yanna; Cai, Li; Ma, Lu; Jing, Jin; Guo, Li; Jin, Yu; Ma, Yinghua; Chen, Yajun

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the cross-sectional associations between dietary glycemic index (GI) and glycemic load (GL) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors in Chinese children. A total of 234 Chinese schoolchildren aged 8-11 years in Guangdong participated in the study. Dietary intake was assessed via a 3-day dietary record. Seven established cardiovascular indicators were analyzed in this study: fasting plasma glucose (FPG), fasting triglycerides (TG), total cholesterol (TC), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), systolic blood pressure, and diastolic blood pressure. Higher dietary GI was significantly associated with higher TG levels (P = 0.037) and lower HDL-C levels (P = 0.005) after adjusting for age, sex, nutritional intake, physical activity, and body mass index z score. LDL-C was found to differ across tertiles of dietary GL. The middle tertile tended to show the highest level of LDL-C. TC, FPG, and blood pressure were independent of both dietary GI and GL. Our findings suggest that higher dietary GI is differentially associated with some CVD risk factors, including lower HDL-C and higher TG, in school-aged children from south China.

  19. [Glycemic, insulinemic index, glycemic load of soy beverage with low and high content of carbohydrates].

    PubMed

    Torres y Torres, Nimbe; Palacios-González, Berenice; Noriega-López, Lilia; Tovar-Palacio, Armando R

    2006-01-01

    Consumption of soy has increased in Western countries due to the benefits on health and the attitude of the people to consume natural products as alternative to the use of pharmacological therapies. However, there is no evidence whether the consumption of 25 g of soy protein as recommended by the Food and Drug Administration has some effect on glucose absorption and consequently on insulin secretion. The aim of the present study was to determine glycemic index (GI), insulinemic index (InIn), and glycemic load (GL) of several soy beverages containing low or high concentration of carbohydrates, and compare them with other foods such as peanuts, whole milk, soluble fiber and a mixed meal on GI and InIn. The results showed that soy beverages had low or moderate GI, depending of the presence of other compounds like carbohydrates and fiber. Consumption of soy beverages with low concentration of carbohydrates produced the lowest insulin secretion. Therefore, these products can be recommended in obese and diabetic patients. Finally soy beverages should contain low maltodextrins concentration and be added of soluble fiber.

  20. Carbohydrate Intake, Glycemic Index, Glycemic Load, and Stroke: A Meta-analysis of Prospective Cohort Studies.

    PubMed

    Cai, Xianlei; Wang, Chen; Wang, Shan; Cao, Gaoyang; Jin, Chao; Yu, Jiawei; Li, Xiuyang; Yan, Jing; Wang, Fudi; Yu, Wei; Ding, Fang

    2015-07-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate associations between carbohydrate intake/glycemic index (GI)/glycemic load (GL) and stroke risk. A literature search of MEDLINE, Embase, Web of Science, and CBM databases was performed to retrieve eligible studies published up to March 2014. Pooled relative risks (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used to evaluate the strength of this association. Publication bias was assessed by the Egger's regression asymmetry test and Begg's rank correlation test with Begg's funnel plot. All analyses were conducted using software STATA 12.0 (StataCorp LP, College Station, TX) and SAS version 9.1 (SAS Institute Inc, Cary, NC). We identified 7 prospective studies that met the inclusion criteria and processed data from cohort studies to update available evidence. There were 25 independent estimates and 225 000 participants free of diabetes from 6 different countries; 3046 stroke events were included; and the follow-up range was 5 to 18 years. High GI was not associated with risk of stroke events (pooled RR = 1.10; 95% CI: 0.99-1.21); GL was a risk factor for stroke (pooled RR = 1.19; 95% CI: 1.05-1.36). There was no significant association between high carbohydrate intake and stroke risk (RR = 1.12; 95% CI: 0.93-1.35). A daily high GL diet is the risk factor of stroke event, and further researches need to verify the meta-analyses results and study associated mechanisms.

  1. Dietary Glycemic Index, Dietary Glycemic Load, Blood Lipids, and Coronary Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Denova-Gutiérrez, Edgar; Huitrón-Bravo, Gerardo; Talavera, Juan O.; Castañón, Susana; Gallegos-Carrillo, Katia; Flores, Yvonne; Salmerón, Jorge

    2010-01-01

    Objective. To examine the associations of dietary glycemic index (GI) and dietary glycemic load (GL) with blood lipid concentrations and coronary heart disease (CHD) in nondiabetic participants in the Health Worker Cohort Study (HWCS). Materials and Methods. A cross-sectional analysis was performed, using data from adults who participated in the HWCS baseline assessment. We collected information on participants' socio-demographic conditions, dietary patterns and physical activity via self-administered questionnaires. Dietary GI and dietary GL were measured using a validated food frequency questionnaire. Anthropometric and clinical measurements were assessed with standardized procedures. CHD risk was estimated according to the sex-specific Framingham prediction algorithms. Results. IIn the 5,830 individuals aged 20 to 70 who were evaluated, dietary GI and GL were significantly associated with HDL-C, LDL-C, LDL-C/HDL-C ratio, and triglycerides serum levels. Subjects with high dietary GI have a relative risk of 1.56 (CI 95%; 1.13–2.14), and those with high dietary GL have a relative risk of 2.64 (CI 95%; 1.15–6.58) of having an elevated CHD risk than those who had low dietary GI and GL. Conclusions. Our results suggest that high dietary GI and dietary GL could have an unfavorable effect on serum lipid levels, which are in turn associated with a higher CHD risk. PMID:20700407

  2. [The glycemic index of some foods common in Mexico].

    PubMed

    Frati-Munari, A C; Roca-Vides, R A; López-Pérez, R J; de Vivero, I; Ruiz-Velazco, M

    1991-01-01

    To investigate the increase of glycemia due to the ingestion of usual food in Mexico, portions with 50 g of carbohydrate form white corn tortilla, yellow corn tortilla, spaghetti, rice, potatoes, beans brown and black, nopal (prickle pear cactus) and peanuts, compared with white bread, were given to 21 healthy and 27 non-insulin-dependent diabetic subjects. Serum glucose and insulin were measured every 30 min for 180 min long. Glycemic index was obtained as: (area under curve of glucose with test food/area under curve of glucose with white bread) X 100. A corrected index was calculated subtracting the area corresponding to initial values. Insulin index was obtained similarly. Each sample was studied 14-18 times. Glycemic and insulin indexes of white and yellow corn tortilla, spaghetti, rice and potatoes were not different from bread (P greater than 0.05). Corrected glycemic indexes of brown beans (54 +/- 15, +/- SE) and black beans (43 +/- 17) were low (p less than 0.05), as well as corrected insulin indexes (69 +/- 11 and 64 +/- 10 respectively, (P less than 0.02). Peanuts had low glycemic (33 +/- 17, P less than 0.01), but normal insulin index. Nopal had very low glycemic and insulin indexes (10 +/- 17 and 10 +/- 16, P less than 0.0001). These data might be useful in prescribing diets for diabetic subjects.

  3. ACHIEVING NEW SOURCE PERFORMANCE STANDARDS (NSPS) EMISSION STANDARDS THROUGH INTEGRATION OF LOW-NOx BURNERS WITH AN OPTIMIZATION PLAN FOR BOILER COMBUSTION

    SciTech Connect

    Wayne Penrod; David Moyeda

    2003-04-01

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate the use of an Integrated Combustion Optimization System to achieve NO{sub x} emissions levels in the range of 0.15 to 0.22 lb/MMBtu while simultaneously enabling increased power output. The project consists of the integration of low-NO{sub x} burners and advanced overfire air technology with various process measurement and control devices on the Holcomb Station Unit 1 boiler. The project includes the use of sophisticated neural networks or other artificial intelligence technologies and complex software that can optimize several operating parameters, including NO{sub x} emissions, boiler efficiency, and CO emissions. The program is being performed in three phases. In Phase I, the boiler is being equipped with sensors that can be used to monitor furnace conditions and coal flow to permit improvements in boiler operation. In Phase II, the boiler will be equipped with burner modifications designed to reduce NO{sub x} emissions and automated coal flow dampers to permit on-line fuel balancing. In Phase III, the boiler will be equipped with an overfire air system to permit deep reductions in NO{sub x} emissions to be achieved. Integration of the overfire air system with the improvements made in Phases I and II will permit optimization of the boiler performance, output, and emissions. During this reporting period, efforts were focused on Phase I and Phase II activities. The furnace sensors were procured and installed in February 2003. Baseline testing was performed following the sensor installation. The low-NO{sub x} burner modifications, the coal flow dampers, and the coal flow monitoring system were procured and installed during a boiler outage in March 2003. Process design activities were performed to support design of the equipment installed and to develop specifications for the overfire air system. The overfire air system preliminary engineering design was initiated.

  4. Pollution by metals: Is there a relationship in glycemic control?

    PubMed

    González-Villalva, Adriana; Colín-Barenque, Laura; Bizarro-Nevares, Patricia; Rojas-Lemus, Marcela; Rodríguez-Lara, Vianey; García-Pelaez, Isabel; Ustarroz-Cano, Martha; López-Valdez, Nelly; Albarrán-Alonso, Juan Carlos; Fortoul, Teresa I

    2016-09-01

    There are evidences of environmental pollution and health effects. Metals are pollutants implicated in systemic toxicity. One of the least studied effects, but which is currently becoming more important, is the effect of metals on glycemic control. Metals have been implicated as causes of chronic inflammation and oxidative stress and are associated to obesity, hyperglycemia and even diabetes. Arsenic, iron, mercury, lead, cadmium and nickel have been studied as a risk factor for hyperglycemia and diabetes. There is another group of metals that causes hypoglycemia such as vanadium, chromium, zinc and magnesium by different mechanisms. Zinc, magnesium and chromium deficiency is associated with increased risk of diabetes. This review summarizes some metals involved in glycemic control and pretends to alert health professionals about considering environmental metals as an important factor that could explain the poor glycemic control in patients. Further studies are needed to understand this poorly assessed problem.

  5. Type 2 diabetes mellitus, glycemic control, and cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Onitilo, Adedayo A; Stankowski, Rachel V; Berg, Richard L; Engel, Jessica M; Glurich, Ingrid; Williams, Gail M; Doi, Suhail A

    2014-03-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is characterized by prolonged hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance, and progressive hyperglycemia. Disease management relies on glycemic control through diet, exercise, and pharmacological intervention. The goal of the present study was to examine the effects of glycemic control and the use of glucose-lowering medication on the risk of breast, prostate, and colon cancer. Patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus (N=9486) between 1 January 1995 and 31 December 2009 were identified and data on glycemic control (hemoglobin A1c, glucose), glucose-lowering medication use (insulin, metformin, sulfonylurea), age, BMI, date of diabetes diagnosis, insurance status, comorbidities, smoking history, location of residence, and cancer diagnoses were electronically abstracted. Cox proportional hazards regression modeling was used to examine the relationship between glycemic control, including medication use, and cancer risk. The results varied by cancer type and medication exposure. There was no association between glycemic control and breast or colon cancer; however, prostate cancer risk was significantly higher with better glycemic control (hemoglobin A1c ≤ 7.0%). Insulin use was associated with increased colon cancer incidence in women, but not with colon cancer in men or breast or prostate cancer risk. Metformin exposure was associated with reduced breast and prostate cancer incidence, but had no association with colon cancer risk. Sulfonylurea exposure was not associated with risk of any type of cancer. The data reported here support hyperinsulinemia, rather than hyperglycemia, as a major diabetes-related factor associated with increased risk of breast and colon cancer. In contrast, hyperglycemia appears to be protective in the case of prostate cancer.

  6. Spatio-temporal optimization of agricultural practices to achieve a sustainable development at basin level; framework of a case study in Colombia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uribe, Natalia; corzo, Gerald; Solomatine, Dimitri

    2016-04-01

    The flood events present during the last years in different basins of the Colombian territory have raised questions on the sensitivity of the regions and if this regions have common features. From previous studies it seems important features in the sensitivity of the flood process were: land cover change, precipitation anomalies and these related to impacts of agriculture management and water management deficiencies, among others. A significant government investment in the outreach activities for adopting and promoting the Colombia National Action Plan on Climate Change (NAPCC) is being carried out in different sectors and regions, having as a priority the agriculture sector. However, more information is still needed in the local environment in order to assess were the regions have this sensitivity. Also the continuous change in one region with seasonal agricultural practices have been pointed out as a critical information for optimal sustainable development. This combined spatio-temporal dynamics of crops cycle in relation to climate change (or variations) has an important impact on flooding events at basin areas. This research will develop on the assessment and optimization of the aggregated impact of flood events due to determinate the spatio-temporal dynamic of changes in agricultural management practices. A number of common best agricultural practices have been identified to explore their effect in a spatial hydrological model that will evaluate overall changes. The optimization process consists on the evaluation of best performance in the agricultural production, without having to change crops activities or move to other regions. To achieve this objectives a deep analysis of different models combined with current and future climate scenarios have been planned. An algorithm have been formulated to cover the parametric updates such that the optimal temporal identification will be evaluated in different region on the case study area. Different hydroinformatics

  7. Glycemic index, glycemic load and invasive breast cancer incidence in postmenopausal women: The PREDIMED study.

    PubMed

    Castro-Quezada, Itandehui; Sánchez-Villegas, Almudena; Martínez-González, Miguel Á; Salas-Salvadó, Jordi; Corella, Dolores; Estruch, Ramón; Schröder, Helmut; Álvarez-Pérez, Jacqueline; Ruiz-López, María D; Artacho, Reyes; Ros, Emilio; Bulló, Mónica; Sorli, Jose V; Fitó, Montserrat; Ruiz-Gutiérrez, Valentina; Toledo, Estefanía; Buil-Cosiales, Pilar; García Rodríguez, Antonio; Lapetra, José; Pintó, Xavier; Salaverría, Itziar; Tur, Josep A; Romaguera, Dora; Tresserra-Rimbau, Anna; Serra-Majem, Lluís

    2016-11-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the prospective associations between dietary glycemic index (GI) and glycemic load (GL) and the risk for invasive breast cancer incidence in postmenopausal women at high cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. This study was conducted within the framework of the PREvención con DIeta MEDiterránea (PREDIMED) study, a nutritional intervention trial for primary cardiovascular prevention. We included 4010 women aged between 60 and 80 years who were initially free from breast cancer but at high risk for CVD disease. Dietary information was collected using a validated 137-item food frequency questionnaire. We assigned GI values using the International Tables of GI and GL values. Cases were ascertained through yearly consultation of medical records and through consultation of the National Death Index. Only cases confirmed by results from cytology tests or histological evaluation were included. We estimated multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios for invasive breast cancer risk across tertiles of energy-adjusted dietary GI/GL using Cox regression models. We repeated our analyses using yearly repeated measures of GI/GL intakes. No associations were found between baseline dietary GI/GL and invasive breast cancer incidence. The multivariable hazard ratio and 95% confidence interval (CI) for the top tertile of dietary GI was 1.02 (95% CI: 0.42-2.46) and for dietary GL was 1.00 (95% CI: 0.44-2.30) when compared with the bottom tertile. Repeated-measures analyses yielded similar results. In sensitivity analyses, no significant associations were observed for women with obesity or diabetes. Dietary GI and GL did not appear to be associated with an increased risk for invasive breast cancer in postmenopausal women at high CVD risk.

  8. Optimism

    PubMed Central

    Carver, Charles S.; Scheier, Michael F.; Segerstrom, Suzanne C.

    2010-01-01

    Optimism is an individual difference variable that reflects the extent to which people hold generalized favorable expectancies for their future. Higher levels of optimism have been related prospectively to better subjective well-being in times of adversity or difficulty (i.e., controlling for previous well-being). Consistent with such findings, optimism has been linked to higher levels of engagement coping and lower levels of avoidance, or disengagement, coping. There is evidence that optimism is associated with taking proactive steps to protect one's health, whereas pessimism is associated with health-damaging behaviors. Consistent with such findings, optimism is also related to indicators of better physical health. The energetic, task-focused approach that optimists take to goals also relates to benefits in the socioeconomic world. Some evidence suggests that optimism relates to more persistence in educational efforts and to higher later income. Optimists also appear to fare better than pessimists in relationships. Although there are instances in which optimism fails to convey an advantage, and instances in which it may convey a disadvantage, those instances are relatively rare. In sum, the behavioral patterns of optimists appear to provide models of living for others to learn from. PMID:20170998

  9. Vascularized tissue-engineered chambers promote survival and function of transplanted islets and improve glycemic control.

    PubMed

    Knight, K R; Uda, Y; Findlay, M W; Brown, D L; Cronin, K J; Jamieson, E; Tai, T; Keramidaris, E; Penington, A J; Rophael, J; Harrison, L C; Morrison, W A

    2006-03-01

    We have developed a chamber model of islet engraftment that optimizes islet survival by rapidly restoring islet-extracellular matrix relationships and vascularization. Our aim was to assess the ability of syngeneic adult islets seeded into blood vessel-containing chambers to correct streptozotocin-induced diabetes in mice. Approximately 350 syngeneic islets suspended in Matrigel extracellular matrix were inserted into chambers based on either the splenic or groin (epigastric) vascular beds, or, in the standard approach, injected under the renal capsule. Blood glucose was monitored weekly for 7 weeks, and an intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test performed at 6 weeks in the presence of the islet grafts. Relative to untreated diabetic animals, glycemic control significantly improved in all islet transplant groups, strongly correlating with islet counts in the graft (P<0.01), and with best results in the splenic chamber group. Glycemic control deteriorated after chambers were surgically removed at week 8. Immunohistochemistry revealed islets with abundant insulin content in grafts from all groups, but with significantly more islets in splenic chamber grafts than the other treatment groups (P<0.05). It is concluded that hyperglycemia in experimental type 1 diabetes can be effectively treated by islets seeded into a vascularized chamber functioning as a "pancreatic organoid."

  10. Improving Glycemic Control and Insulin Ordering Efficiency for Hospitalized Patients With Diabetes Through Carbohydrate Counting.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Kristina K; Reiland, Sarah A; Meara, John G O; Brown, Julie K; Fedraw, Leslie A; Mapes, David L

    2016-01-01

    Glycemic control in hospitalized patients is challenging but important for optimal outcomes. Insulin dosing through carbohydrate counting may address patient, provider, and institutional factors that complicate hospital glycemic management. On two surgical units at a tertiary care teaching hospital, we pilot tested postmeal insulin dosing based on carbohydrate counting (plus basal insulin) rather than the current process of ordering scheduled premeal insulin without knowledge of the patient's consumption. Analysis assessed hyperglycemia, hypoglycemia, insulin orders, and nurse and provider satisfaction and confidence. On general surgery, mean glucose level improved from 188 to 137 mg/dl (p < .001). On cardiovascular surgery, mean glucose improved only mildly from 177 to 175 mg/dl (p < .28). No hypoglycemia was reported. Efficiency of mealtime insulin dosing improved through reduced average number of insulin orders per meal from 1.1 to 0.09. Process satisfaction improved for providers (preintervention, 60%; postintervention, 100%), general surgery nurses (preintervention, 72%; postintervention, 100%), and cardiovascular surgery nurses (preintervention, 69%; postintervention, 84%). Confidence in insulin dose accuracy improved for providers (preintervention, 50%; postintervention, 100%), general surgery nurses (preintervention, 59%; postintervention, 100%), and cardiovascular surgery nurses (preintervention, 48%; postintervention, 84%). Carbohydrate counting is effective and efficient and improved staff satisfaction and confidence in hospital mealtime insulin dosing.

  11. The Risks and Benefits of Implementing Glycemic Control Guidelines in Frail Elders with Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sei J.; Boscardin, W. John; Cenzer, Irena Stijacic; Huang, Elbert S.; Rice-Trumble, Kathy; Eng, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES To determine the hypo- and hyper-glycemic outcomes associated with implementing the American Geriatrics Society (AGS) guideline for Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c)<8% in frail older patients with diabets. DESIGN/SETTING Guideline Implementation in PACE (Program of All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly) PARTICIPANTS All patients in the Before (10/02–12/04, n=338), Early (1/05–6/06, n=289) and Late phases of guideline implementation (7/06–12/08, n=385) with a diagnosis of diabetes mellitus and at least one HbA1c measurement. INTERVENTION Clinician education in 2005 with annual monitoring of the proportion of each clinician’s patients with diabetes with HbA1c<8%. MEASUREMENTS Hypoglycemia (Blood sugar or BS<50), hyperglycemia (BS>400) and severe hypoglycemia (Emergency room or ER visit for hypoglycemia) RESULTS Before, Early and Late groups were similar in mean age, race/ethnicity, comorbidity and functional dependency. Antihyperglycemic medication use increased with more patients using metformin (28% Before versus 42% Late, p<0.001) and insulin (23% Before versus 34% Late, p<0.001), with more patients achieving the AGS glycemic target of HbA1c<8% (74% Before versus 84% Late, p<0.001). Episodes of hyperglycemia (per 100 person-years) decreased dramatically (159 Before versus 46 Late, p<0.001) and episodes of hypoglycemia were unchanged (10.1 versus 9.3, p=0.50). Episodes of severe hypoglycemia were increased in the Early period (1.1 Before versus 2.9 Early, p=0.03). CONCLUSION Implementing the AGS glycemic control guideline for frail elders led to fewer hyperglycemic episodes, but more severe hypoglycemic episodes requiring ER visits in the Early implementation period. Future glycemic control guideline implementation efforts should be coupled with close monitoring for severe hypoglycemia in the early implementation period. PMID:21480838

  12. Strategy to Achieve Highly Porous/Biocompatible Macroscale Cell Blocks, Using a Collagen/Genipin-bioink and an Optimal 3D Printing Process.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong Bok; Lee, Hyeongjin; Kim, Geun Hyung

    2016-11-30

    Recently, a three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting process for obtaining a cell-laden structure has been widely applied because of its ability to fabricate biomimetic complex structures embedded with and without cells. To successfully obtain a cell-laden porous block, the cell-delivering vehicle, bioink, is one of the significant factors. Until now, various biocompatible hydrogels (synthetic and natural biopolymers) have been utilized in the cell-printing process, but a bioink satisfying both biocompatibility and print-ability requirements to achieve a porous structure with reasonable mechanical strength has not been issued. Here, we propose a printing strategy with optimal conditions including a safe cross-linking procedure for obtaining a 3D porous cell block composed of a biocompatible collagen-bioink and genipin, a cross-linking agent. To obtain the optimal processing conditions, we modified the 3D printing machine and selected an optimal cross-linking condition (∼1 mM and 1 h) of genipin solution. To show the feasibility of the process, 3D pore-interconnected cell-laden constructs were manufactured using osteoblast-like cells (MG63) and human adipose stem cells (hASCs). Under these processing conditions, a macroscale 3D collagen-based cell block of 21 × 21 × 12 mm(3) and over 95% cell viability was obtained. In vitro biological testing of the cell-laden 3D porous structure showed that the embedded cells were sufficiently viable, and their proliferation was significantly higher; the cells also exhibited increased osteogenic activities compared to the conventional alginate-based bioink (control). The results indicated the fabrication process using the collagen-bioink would be an innovative platform to design highly biocompatible and mechanically stable cell blocks.

  13. Achieving New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) Emission Standards Through Integration of Low-NOx Burners with an Optimization Plan for Boiler Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Wayne Penrod

    2006-12-31

    The objective of this project was to demonstrate the use of an Integrated Combustion Optimization System to achieve NO{sub X} emission levels in the range of 0.15 to 0.22 lb/MMBtu while simultaneously enabling increased power output. The project plan consisted of the integration of low-NO{sub X} burners and advanced overfire air technology with various process measurement and control devices on the Holcomb Station Unit 1 boiler. The plan included the use of sophisticated neural networks or other artificial intelligence technologies and complex software to optimize several operating parameters, including NO{sub X} emissions, boiler efficiency, and CO emissions. The program was set up in three phases. In Phase I, the boiler was equipped with sensors that can be used to monitor furnace conditions and coal flow to permit improvements in boiler operation. In Phase II, the boiler was equipped with burner modifications designed to reduce NO{sub X} emissions and automated coal flow dampers to permit on-line fuel balancing. In Phase III, the boiler was to be equipped with an overfire air system to permit deep reductions in NO{sub X} emissions. Integration of the overfire air system with the improvements made in Phases I and II would permit optimization of boiler performance, output, and emissions. This report summarizes the overall results from Phases I and II of the project. A significant amount of data was collected from the combustion sensors, coal flow monitoring equipment, and other existing boiler instrumentation to monitor performance of the burner modifications and the coal flow balancing equipment.

  14. Glycemic control in diabetic patients served by community health centers.

    PubMed

    Maizlish, Neil A; Shaw, Beryl; Hendry, Khati

    2004-01-01

    The Community Health Center Network measured the prevalence of glycemic control in diabetic patients at 7 community health centers as part of its clinical quality improvement program. A cross-sectional survey was carried out in a random sample of 1817 diabetic patients having 1 or more encounters from October 1, 2000 to September 30, 2001. Computerized laboratory results for hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) tests were available for half the sample. Manual review of medical charts was carried out for the rest. The proportion of diabetic patients with 1 or more HbA1c tests in the measurement year was 91% (CI95%: 90-93%) and poor glycemic control (HbA1c > 9%) occurred in 27% (CIM%: 25-30%). The mean of the most recent test was 7.8%. The frequency of testing varied significantly by clinic from 79% to 94% and increased with the number of encounters. Poor glycemic control also varied significantly by clinic (17-48%) and was significantly better in females and older patients. Measures of glycemic control were not associated with ethnicity or insurance status in multivariate analyses. A high proportion of diabetic patients received appropriate care, and this care was not associated with ethnicity or insurance status. The data warehouse was an essential tool for the clinical quality improvement program.

  15. Boost glycemic control in teen diabetics through 'family focused teamwork'.

    PubMed

    2003-09-01

    While family conflict during the teenaged years is typical, it can have long-term health consequences when it involves an adolescent with diabetes. However, researchers at Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston have developed a low-cost intervention that aims to remove conflict from disease management responsibilities--and a new study shows that it can boost glycemic control as well.

  16. Optimal and safe standard doses of midazolam and propofol to achieve patient and doctor satisfaction with dental treatment: A prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Nonaka, Mutsumi; Nishimura, Akiko; Gotoh, Kinuko; Oka, Shuichirou; Iijima, Takehiko

    2017-01-01

    Background The incidences of morbidity and mortality caused by pharmacosedation for dental treatment have not yet reached zero. Adverse events are related to inappropriate respiratory management, mostly originating from an overdose of sedatives. Since sedation is utilized for the satisfaction of both the dentist and the patient, the optimal dose should be minimized to prevent adverse events. We attempted to define the optimal doses of midazolam and propofol required to achieve high levels of patient and dentist satisfaction. Methods One thousand dental patients, including those undergoing third molar extractions, were enrolled in this study. A dose of 1 mg of midazolam was administered at 1-minute intervals until adequate sedation was achieved. Propofol was then infused continuously to maintain the sedation level. Both the patients and the dentists were subsequently interviewed and asked to complete a questionnaire. A multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to examine the factors that contributed to patient and dentist satisfaction. Results The peak midazolam dose resulting in the highest percentage of patient satisfaction was 3 mg. Both a lower dose and a higher dose reduced patient satisfaction. Patient satisfaction increased with an increasing dosage of propofol up until 4 mg/kg/hr, reaching a peak of 78.6%. The peak midazolam dose resulting in the highest percentage of dentist satisfaction (78.8%) was 2 mg. Incremental propofol doses reduced dentist satisfaction, in contrast to their effect on patient satisfaction. The strongest independent predictors of patient satisfaction and dentist satisfaction were no intraoperative memory (OR, 5.073; 95% CI, 3.532–7.287; P<0.001) and unintentional movements by the patient (OR, 0.035; 95% CI, 0.012–0.104; P<0.001), respectively. No serious adverse events were reported. Conclusion We found that 3 mg of midazolam and 3 mg/kg/hr of propofol may be the optimal doses for maximizing both patient and dentist

  17. The intriguing effects of time to glycemic goal in newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes after short-term intensive insulin therapy.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Lin; Xu, Mingtong; Lin, Xiuhong; Tang, Juying; Qi, Yiqin; Wan, Yan; Pan, Xiaofang; Chen, Xiaoyun; Ren, Meng; Yan, Li

    2016-08-31

    Short-term intensive insulin therapy is effective for type 2 diabetes because it offers the potential to achieve excellent glycemic control and improve β-cell function. We observed that the time to glycemic goal (TGG) was adjustable. Original data of 138 newly diagnosed type 2 diabetic patients received intensive insulin therapy by continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion for 2-3 weeks were retrospectively collected. Subjects underwent an intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT) and an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) pre and post treatment. The glycemic goal was achieved within 6 (4-8) days. Patients were divided into two groups by TGG above (TGG-slow) and below (TGG-fast) the median value. Patients in both groups had significantly better glycemic control. Compared with TGG-fast, TGG-slow required a few more total insulin and performed more improvement of HOMA-β and IVGTT-AUCIns, but less improvement of HOMA-IR and QUICKI. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that TGG was always an explanatory variable for the changes (HOMA-β, IVGTT-AUCIns, HOMA-IR and QUICKI). The hypoglycemia prevalence was lower in TGG-slow (1.48% vs. 3.40%, P<0.01). Multivariate logistic regression analysis indicated that individuals in TGG-slow had a lower risk of hypoglycemia (adjusted OR, 0.700; 95% CI, 0.567-0.864; P<0.05). Multiple linear regression analysis confirmed that the ratio of the incremental insulin to glucose responses over the first 30 min during OGTT (ΔIns30/ΔG30), average insulin dose before achieving targets, initial insulin dose and LDL-c were independent predictors for TGG. It is intriguing to hypothesize that patients with fast time to glycemic goal benefit more in improving insulin sensitivity, but patients with slow time benefit more in improving β-cell function and reducing the risk of hypoglycemia.

  18. Effect of Poor Glycemic Control in Newly Diagnosed Patients with Smear-Positive Pulmonary Tuberculosis and Type-2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Mahishale, Vinay; Avuthu, Sindhuri; Patil, Bhagyashri; Lolly, Mitchelle; Eti, Ajith; Khan, Sujeer

    2017-01-01

    Background: There is growing evidence that diabetes mellitus (DM) is an important risk factor for tuberculosis (TB). A significant number of DM patients have poor glycemic control. This study was carried out to find the impact of poor glycemic control on newly diagnosed smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis patients with type-2 diabetes mellitus in a tertiary care hospital. Methods: In a hospital-based prospective study, newly diagnosed smear-positive pulmonary TB with DM patients were classified as poorly controlled diabetes (HBA1C≥7%) and optimal control diabetics (HbA1c<7%). Patients were started on anti-TB treatment and followed for 2 years for severity and treatment outcome. ANOVA was used for numerical variables in the univariable analysis. Logistic regression analysis was used for multivariable analysis of treatment outcome. The significance level was kept at a P≤0.05. Results: A total of 630 individuals who met the inclusion criteria were analyzed; of which 423 patients had poor glycemic control (PGC) and 207 patients had optimal glycemic control (OGC). The average HbA1c was 10±2.6 and 5±1.50 in the PGC and OGC groups, respectively. The mean symptom score was significantly higher in the PGC group compared with patients in the OGC group (4.55±0.80 vs. 2.70±0.82, P<0.001). PGC was associated with more extensive lung disease, lung cavitation, and positive sputum smear at the baseline. In PGC, sputum smears were significantly more likely to remain positive after 2 months of treatment. PGC patients had significantly higher rates of treatment failure (adj. OR 0.72, 95% CI 0.58-0.74, P<0.001) and relapse (adj. OR 2.83, 95% CI 2.60-2.92, P<0.001). Conclusion: Poor glycemic control is associated with an increased risk of advanced and more severe TB disease in the form of lung cavitations, positive sputum smear, and slower smear conversion. It has a profound negative effect on treatment completion, cure, and relapse rates in patients with pulmonary

  19. Characterization of Factors Affecting Attainment of Glycemic Control in Asian Americans With Diabetes in a Culturally Specific Program

    PubMed Central

    Le, Hung; Wong, Sophia; Iftikar, Tracy; Keenan, Hillary; King, George L.; Hsu, William C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to examine the effectiveness of a culturally specific pilot clinic for Asian Americans (AA) in reaching glycemic target and to characterize factors affecting the attainment of glycemic control in comparison with white counterparts. Methods This electronic health record review included all new AA patients with type 2 diabetes (n = 109) in a culturally specific program and a randomly selected sample of new white patients with type 2 diabetes (n = 218) in the adult clinic within the same time period and diabetes center. Results AA and whites had a comparable proportion of patients with A1C ≤7% (32.1%, 34.9%; P = .621) at baseline and after 12 months of care (48.6%, 56.0%; P = .210), with a similar A1C decline (−0.9% ± 1.6%, −0.8% ± 1.7%, P = .710) by 12 months. Factors associated with the lack of success in reaching target in AA but not in whites included older age, lower educational attainment, less likelihood of having health insurance, and a need for more educational visits. The percentage of AA reaching A1C ≤7%, as compared to whites, worsened among those with highest initial A1C when stratified by ascending quartiles (96.7% vs 85.2%, P = .101; 61.9% vs 58.9%, P = .813; 24.0% vs 37.7%, P = .230; 15.2% vs 35.4%, P = .044). Conclusion While a culturally specific diabetes program in a specialty setting achieved a similar glycemic outcome for AA compared with whites, reasons for not reaching glycemic target differed. The findings suggest that the elimination of diabetes disparities requires not only culturally and linguistically specific programs, but must also identify and address the socio-environmental differences unique to each population. PMID:23771841

  20. Pharmacodynamic effects of cangrelor and clopidogrel: the platelet function substudy from the cangrelor versus standard therapy to achieve optimal management of platelet inhibition (CHAMPION) trials.

    PubMed

    Angiolillo, Dominick J; Schneider, David J; Bhatt, Deepak L; French, William J; Price, Matthew J; Saucedo, Jorge F; Shaburishvili, Tamaz; Huber, Kurt; Prats, Jayne; Liu, Tiepu; Harrington, Robert A; Becker, Richard C

    2012-07-01

    Cangrelor is an intravenous antagonist of the P2Y(12) receptor characterized by rapid, potent, predictable, and reversible platelet inhibition. However, cangrelor was not superior to clopidogrel in reducing the incidence of ischemic events in the cangrelor versus standard therapy to achieve optimal management of platelet inhibition (CHAMPION) trials. A prospectively designed platelet function substudy was performed in a selected cohort of patients to provide insight into the pharmacodynamic effects of cangrelor, particularly in regard to whether cangrelor therapy may interfere with the inhibitory effects of clopidogrel. This pre-defined substudy was conducted in a subset of patients from the CHAMPION-PCI trial (n = 230) comparing cangrelor with 600 mg of clopidogrel administered before percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) and from the CHAMPION-PLATFORM trial (n = 4) comparing cangrelor at the time of PCI and 600 mg clopidogrel given after the PCI. Pharmacodynamic measures included P2Y12 reaction units (PRU) assessed by VerifyNow P2Y12 testing (primary endpoint marker), platelet aggregation by light transmittance aggregometry following 5 and 20 μmol/L adenosine diphosphate stimuli, and markers of platelet activation determined by flow cytometry. The primary endpoint was the percentage of patients who achieved <20 % change in PRU between baseline and >10 h after PCI. The main trial was stopped early limiting enrollment in the platelet substudy. A total of 167 patients had valid pharmacodynamic assessments for the primary endpoint. The percent of individuals achieving <20 % change in PRU between baseline and >10 h after PCI was higher with cangrelor + clopidogrel (32/84, 38.1 %) compared with placebo + clopidogrel (21/83, 25.3 %), but this was not statistically significant (difference:12.79 %, 95 % CI: -1.18 %, 26.77 %;p = 0.076). All pharmacodynamic markers as well as the prevalence of patients with high on-treatment platelet reactivity were significantly lower

  1. In vitro starch digestibility and expected glycemic index of pound cakes baked in two-cycle microwave-toaster and conventional oven.

    PubMed

    García-zaragoza, Francisco J; Sánchez-Pardo, María E; Ortiz-Moreno, Alicia; Bello-Pérez, Luis A

    2010-11-01

    Bread baking technology has an important effect on starch digestibility measured as its predicted glycemic index tested in vitro. The aim of this work was to evaluate the changes in predicted glycemic index of pound cake baked in a two-cycle microwave toaster and a conventional oven. The glycemic index was calculated from hydrolysis index values by the Granfeldt method. Non-significant differences (P > 0.05) were found in hydrolysis index (60.67 ± 3.96 for the product baked in microwave oven and 65.94 ± 4.09 for the product baked in conventional oven) and predicted glycemic index content (60.5 for product baked in microwave oven and 65 for the product baked in conventional oven) in freshly-baked samples. Results clearly demonstrate that the baking pound cake conventional process could be replicated using a two-cycle multifunction microwave oven, reducing the traditional baking time. Further research is required in order to achieve pound cake crumb uniformity.

  2. Properties of starch from potatoes differing in glycemic index.

    PubMed

    Lin Ek, Kai; Wang, Shujun; Brand-Miller, Jennie; Copeland, Les

    2014-10-01

    Potatoes are a popular source of dietary carbohydrate worldwide and are generally considered to be a high glycemic index (GI) food. Potato starch characteristics play a key role in determining their rate of digestion and resulting glycemic response. Starches isolated from seven potato cultivars with different GI values, including a low GI cultivar (Carisma), were examined for relative crystallinity, granule size distribution, amylopectin chain length, and thermal and pasting properties. Starch from the Carisma cultivar was more thermally stable and more resistant to gelatinization, with significantly higher (p < 0.05) pasting temperature and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) gelatinization onset, peak and conclusion temperatures, compared to the other cultivars. Differences between the potatoes in the other properties measured did not align with the GI ranking. Thermal analysis and starch pasting properties may be useful indicators for preliminary identification of potato cultivars that are digested slowly and have a lower GI.

  3. Effects of glycemic control on refraction in diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hai-Yan; Luo, Guo-Chun; Guo, Jiang; Liang, Zhen

    2010-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the effects of glycemic control on refraction in diabetic patients. METHODS Twenty newly diagnosed diabetic patients were included in this study. The random blood glucose, HbA1c levels, fasting C-peptide and postprandial 2h C-peptide were measured before treatment. The patients with random blood glucose higher than 12.0mmol/L and HbA1c level higher than 10.0% were selected. Refraction, intraocular pressure, radius of the anterior corneal curvature, depth of the anterior chamber, lens thickness, vitreous length, and axial length were measured on admission and at the end of week 1, 2, 3 and 4 during glycemic control. RESULTS A transient hyperopic change occurred in all the patients receiving glycemic control. The maximum hyperopic change was 1.60D (range 0.50±3.20D). Recovery of the previous refraction occurred between two and four weeks after insulin treatment. There was a positive correlation between the maximum hyperopic changes and the HbA1c levels on admission (r=0.84, P<0.05). There was a positive correlation between the maximum hyperopic changes and the daily rate of blood glucose reduction over the first 7 days of the treatment (r=0.53, P<0.05). During transient hyperopia, no significant changes were observed in the intraocular pressure, radius of the anterior corneal curvature, depth of the anterior chamber, lens thickness, vitreous length and axial length. CONCLUSION Transient hyperopic changes occur after glycemic control in diabetic patients with severe hyperglycemia. The degrees of transient hyperopia are highly dependent on HbA1c levels before treatment and the rate of reduction of the blood glucose level. PMID:22553542

  4. Effects of Glycemic Regulation on Chronic Postischemia Pain

    PubMed Central

    Ross-Huot, Marie-Christine; Laferrière, André; Gi, Cho Min; Khorashadi, Mina; Schricker, Thomas; Coderre, Terence J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injuries consist of enhanced oxidative and inflammatory responses along with microvascular dysfunction following prolonged ischemia and reperfusion. Since I/R injuries induce chronic postischemia pain (CPIP) in laboratory animals, it is possible that surgical procedures utilizing prolonged ischemia may result in chronic postoperative pain. Glycemic modulation during ischemia and reperfusion could impact pain following I/R injury, as glucose triggers oxidative, inflammatory and thrombotic reactions, whereas insulin has anti-oxidative, anti-inflammatory and vasodilatory properties. Methods 110 rats underwent a 3-h period of ischemia followed by reperfusion to produce CPIP. CPIP rats had previously been divided into 6 groups with differing glycemic-modulation paradigms: 1) normal feeding; 2) fasting; 3) fasting with normal saline administration; 4) fasting with dextrose administration; 5) normal feeding with insulin administration; and 6) normal feeding with dextrose and insulin administration. Blood glucose levels were assessed during ischemia and reperfusion in these separate groups of rats, and they were tested for mechanical and cold allodynia over the following 21 days (on days 2, 5, 7, 9, 12 and 21 post-I/R injury). Results I/R injury in rats with normoglycemia or relative hyperglycemia (groups 1, 4) led to significant mechanical and cold allodynia; conversely, relative hypoglycemia associated with insulin treatment or fasting (groups 2, 3, and 5) reduced allodynia induced by I/R injury. Importantly, insulin treatment did not reduce allodynia when administered to fed rats given dextrose (group 6). Conclusion Our results suggest that glycemic levels at the time of I/R injury significantly modulate postinjury pain thresholds in CPIP rats. Strict glycemic control during I/R injury significantly reduces CPIP pain and, and conversely, hyperglycemia significantly enhances it, which could have potential clinical applications

  5. Pups of dams fed low-fat diet during pregnancy and lactation showed strong preference for high-fat diet to achieve optimal growth.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Yoko; Sato, Akie

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the causes why pups of dams fed a low-fat high-carbohydrate diet (LFD) showed a strong preference for fat, three groups of dams were fed one of three diets during pregnancy and lactation: the LFD, a control diet (CTD) or a high-fat low-carbohydrate diet (HFD). After weaning, pups of each of the three groups were divided into two equal subgroups (Pair 1 and Pair 2), for a total of six pup subgroups. Each subgroup was placed on a two-choice diet program of the LFD and the HFD (Pair 1), or the LFD and a HFDLE (with cellulose added to maintain the same energy concentration as the LFD) (Pair 2), for 3 wk. Although the energy intake of dams fed the LFD during the nursing period was lower than that of the HFD group, no significant difference in body weight was observed among the three groups. At weaning, the body weight of pups nursed by dams fed the LFD was lower than that of the other groups. In Pair 1, the HFD intake ratio of the LFD and the HFD groups during the self-selection period was higher than that of the CTD group. In Pair 2, the HFDLE intake ratio of the LFD and the CTD groups was lower than that of the HFD group. At the end of the self-selection period, no significant difference in body weight was observed among the three groups of Pair 1. However, in Pair 2, the body weight of the LFD group was lower than that of the other groups. Therefore, it was supposed that pups of dams fed the LFD showed strong preference for the HFD containing high energy in order to achieve optimal growth.

  6. Non-High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol in Children with Diabetes: Proposed Treatment Recommendations Based on Glycemic Control, Body Mass Index, Age, Sex, and Generally Accepted Cut Points.

    PubMed

    Schwab, K Otfried; Doerfer, Jürgen; Hungele, Andreas; Scheuing, Nicole; Krebs, Andreas; Dost, Axel; Rohrer, Tilman R; Hofer, Sabine; Holl, Reinhard W

    2015-12-01

    Percentile-based non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels were analyzed by glycemic control, weight, age, and sex of children with type 1 diabetes (n = 26,358). Ten percent of all children and 25% of overweight adolescent girls require both immediate lipid-lowering medication and lifestyle changes to achieve non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels <120 mg/dL and cardiovascular risk reduction.

  7. Relationships among different glycemic variability indices obtained by continuous glucose monitoring.

    PubMed

    Saisho, Yoshifumi; Tanaka, Chihiro; Tanaka, Kumiko; Roberts, Rachel; Abe, Takayuki; Tanaka, Masami; Meguro, Shu; Irie, Junichiro; Kawai, Toshihide; Itoh, Hiroshi

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the relationships among indices of glycemic variability obtained by continuous glucose monitoring (CGM). CGM was performed in 88 patients with diabetes (20 type 1 and 68 type 2 diabetes, age 59 ± 15 years) admitted to our hospital (Keio University Hospital, Tokyo, Japan) between 2010 and 2012. Mean glucose, glucose standard deviation (SDglu) and other glycemic indices such as index of glycemic control (ICG), J-index, mean of daily differences (MODD), continuous overlapping net glycemic action 1 (CONGA1), mean amplitude of glycemic excursions (MAGE) and M value were calculated from CGM data, and the correlations among these indices were assessed. There were strong correlations between SDglu and the indices MAGE, CONGA1, MODD and M value (all r > 0.8, P < 0.05). On the other hand, mean glucose was strongly correlated with J index and M value (both r > 0.8, P < 0.05). SDglu and other glycemic variability indices were more strongly correlated with hypoglycemia than was mean glucose, and the combination of mean glucose and SDglu was useful for predicting hypoglycemia in patients with diabetes. In this study, we demonstrated the characteristics of various glycemic variability indices in relation to mean glucose and SDglu. This information will help physicians to understand the characteristics of various glycemic variability indices and to select an appropriate index for their purpose. Our results also underpin the importance of glycemic variability in relation to risk of hypoglycemia in patients with diabetes.

  8. [Indicators of glycemic control --hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), glycated albumin (GA), and 1,5-anhydroglucitol (1,5-AG)].

    PubMed

    Sato, Asako

    2014-01-01

    The clinical goal of diabetes management is a good quality of life that is not different from that of a healthy subjects. To fulfill the goal, prevention of complications is needed under good glycemic control. Although blood glucose measurement is essential for glycemic control, there are diurnal variations in blood glucose levels. An indicator of long-term glycemic control is necessary. HbA1c is the gold standard measurement for the assessment of glycemic control, and worldwide large scale clinical studies of diabetes complications have greatly valued HbA1c as an indicator of glycemic control. In addition, recently, HbA1c was recommended for use in the diagnosis of diabetes in Japan and in the United States. Although HbA1c is used widely and internationally, international standardization of the HbA1c value has not been achieved. In Japan, from April 2014, it has been decided to adopt the National Glycohemoglobin Standardization Program (NGSP) value, which is used by many countries globally, as the first step toward internationalization. Recently, cardiovascular disease in diabetic patients has been increasing in Japan. Relationships between postprandial hyperglycemia and cardiovascular disease have been noted. Therefore, the correction of postprandial hyperglycemia is one of the important goals of glycemic control to prevent cardiovascular disease. HbA1c or glycated albumin (GA) results from the glycation of hemoglobin or serum albumin and represents 2-month or 2-week glycemia, respectively. In addition, the glycation speed of GA is ten times faster than HbA1c, so GA is likely to reflect the variation in blood glucose and postprandial hyperglycemia in combination with HbA1c and its value. 1,5-anhydroglucitol (AG) is a marker of glycemia-induced glycosuria, since reabsorption of filtered 1,5-AG in the proximal tubule is competitively inhibited by glucose. It is an indicator to identify rapid changes in hyperglycemia. Understanding the characteristics of the

  9. Glibenclamide or metformin combined with honey improves glycemic control in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Erejuwa, Omotayo Owomofoyon; Sulaiman, Siti Amrah; Wahab, Mohd Suhaimi Ab; Sirajudeen, Kuttulebbai Nainamohammed Salam; Salleh, Md Salzihan Md; Gurtu, Sunil

    2011-03-14

    Diabetes mellitus is associated with deterioration of glycemic control and progressive metabolic derangements. This study investigated the effect of honey as an adjunct to glibenclamide or metformin on glycemic control in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Diabetes was induced in rats by streptozotocin. The diabetic rats were randomized into six groups and administered distilled water, honey, glibenclamide, glibenclamide and honey, metformin or metformin and honey. The animals were treated orally once daily for four weeks. The diabetic control rats showed hypoinsulinemia (0.27 ± 0.01 ng/ml), hyperglycemia (22.4 ± 1.0 mmol/L) and increased fructosamine (360.0 ± 15.6 µmol/L). Honey significantly increased insulin (0.41 ± 0.06 ng/ml), decreased hyperglycemia (12.3 ± 3.1 mmol/L) and fructosamine (304.5 ± 10.1 µmol/L). Although glibenclamide or metformin alone significantly (p < 0.05) reduced hyperglycemia, glibenclamide or metformin combined with honey produced significantly much lower blood glucose (8.8 ± 2.9 or 9.9 ± 3.3 mmol/L, respectively) compared to glibenclamide or metformin alone (13.9 ± 3.4 or 13.2 ± 2.9 mmol/L, respectively). Similarly, glibenclamide or metformin combined with honey produced significantly (p < 0.05) lower fructosamine levels (301.3 ± 19.5 or 285.8 ± 22.6 µmol/L, respectively) whereas glibenclamide or metformin alone did not decrease fructosamine (330.0 ± 29.9 or 314.6 ± 17.9 µmol/L, respectively). Besides, these drugs or their combination with honey increased insulin levels. Glibenclamide or metformin combined with honey also significantly reduced the elevated levels of creatinine, bilirubin, triglycerides, and VLDL cholesterol. These results indicate that combination of glibenclamide or metformin with honey improves glycemic control, and provides additional metabolic benefits, not achieved with either glibenclamide or metformin alone.

  10. Pilot Study of the SPRINT Glycemic Control Protocol in a Hungarian Medical Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Benyo, Balazs; Illyés, Attila; Némedi, Noémi Szabó; Le Compte, Aaron J.; Havas, Attila; Kovacs, Levente; Fisk, Liam; Shaw, Geoffrey M.; Chase, J. Geoffrey

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Stress-induced hyperglycemia increases morbidity and mortality. Tight control can reduce mortality but has proven difficult to achieve. The SPRINT (Specialized Relative Insulin and Nutrition Tables) protocol is the only protocol that reduced both mortality and hypoglycemia by modulating both insulin and nutrition, but it has not been tested in independent hospitals. Methods SPRINT was used for 12 adult intensive care unit patients (949 h) at Kálmán Pándy Hospital (Gyula, Hungary) as a clinical practice assessment. Insulin recommendations (0–6 U/h) were administered via constant infusion rather than bolus delivery. Nutrition was administered per local standard protocol, weaning parenteral to enteral nutrition, but was modulated per SPRINT recommendations. Measurement was every 1 to 2 h, per protocol. Glycemic performance is assessed by percentage of blood glucose (BG) measurements in glycemic bands for the cohort and per patient. Safety from hypoglycemia is assessed by numbers of patients with BG < 2.2 (severe) and %BG < 3.0 and < 4.0 mmol/liter (moderate and light). Clinical effort is assessed by measurements per day. Results are median (interquartile range). Results There were 742 measurements over 1088 h of control (16.4 measurements/day), which is similar to clinical SPRINT results (16.2/day). Per-patient hours of control were 65 (50–95) h. Initial per-patient BG was 10.5 (7.9–11.2) mmol/liter. All patients (100%) reached 6.1 mmol/liter. Cohort BG was 6.3 (5.5–7.5) mmol/liter, with 42.2%, 65.1% and 77.6% of BG in the 4.0–6.1, 4.0–7.0, and 4.0–8.0 mmol/liter bands. Per-patient, median percentage time in these bands was 40.2 (26.7–51.5)%, 62.5 (46.0–75.7)%, and 74.7 (61.6.8–87.8)%, respectively. No patients had BG < 2.2 mmol/liter, and the %BG < 4.0 mmol/liter was 1.9%. These results were achieved using 3.0 (3.0–5.0) U/h of insulin with 7.4 (4.4–10.2) g/h of dextrose administration (all sources) for the cohort. Per

  11. Vasculogenesis and Diabetic Erectile Dysfunction: How Relevant Is Glycemic Control?

    PubMed

    Castela, Angela; Gomes, Pedro; Silvestre, Ricardo; Guardão, Luísa; Leite, Liliana; Chilro, Rui; Rodrigues, Ilda; Vendeira, Pedro; Virag, Ronald; Costa, Carla

    2017-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a complication of diabetes, condition responsible for causing endothelial dysfunction (EDys) and hampering repair mechanisms. However, scarce information is available linking vasculogenesis mediated by Endothelial Progenitor Cells (EPCs) and diabetes-associated ED. Furthermore, it remains to be elucidated if glycemic control plays a role on EPCs functions, EPCs modulators, and penile vascular health. We evaluated the effects of diabetes and insulin therapy on bone marrow (BM) and circulating EPCs, testosterone, and systemic/penile Stromal Derived Factor-1 alpha (SDF-1α) expression. Male Wistar rats were divided into groups: age-matched controls, 8-weeks streptozotocin-induced type 1 diabetics, and insulin-treated 8-weeks diabetics. EPCs were identified by flow cytometry for CD34/CD133/VEGFR2/CXCR4 antigens. Systemic SDF-1α and testosterone levels were evaluated by ELISA. Penile SDF-1α protein expression was assessed, in experimental and human diabetic cavernosal samples, by immunohistochemical techniques. Diabetic animals presented a reduction of BM-derived EPCs and an increase in putative circulating endothelial cells (CECs) sloughed from vessels wall. These alterations were rescued by insulin therapy. In addition, glycemic control promoted an increase in systemic testosterone and SDF-1α levels, which were significantly decreased in animals with diabetes. SDF-1α protein expression was reduced in experimental and human cavernosal diabetic samples, an effect prevented by insulin in treated animals. Insulin administration rescued the effects of diabetes on BM function, CECs levels, testosterone, and plasmatic/penile SDF-1α protein expression. This emphasizes the importance of glycemic control in the prevention of diabetes-induced systemic and penile EDys, by the amelioration of endothelial damage, and increase in protective pathways. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 82-91, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Glycemic Control and Urinary Incontinence in Women with Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Karter, Andrew J.; Thai, Julie N.; Van Den Eeden, Stephen K.; Huang, Elbert S.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Although many studies have shown that diabetes increases the risk for urinary incontinence, it is unclear whether poor glycemic control in women with diabetes is associated with incontinence. This study aims to determine the relationship between the hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) level and urinary incontinence in a large, diverse cohort of older women. Methods We examined 6026 older women who responded to a survey (62% response rate) and were enrolled in the Diabetes and Aging Study, an ethnically stratified random sample of patients with diabetes enrolled in Kaiser Permanente Northern California. Our primary independent variable was the mean of all HbA1c measurements in the year preceding the survey. Outcomes included the presence/absence of incontinence and limitations in daily activities due to incontinence. We used modified Poisson regression and ordinal logistic regression models to account for age, race, body mass index, parity, diabetes treatment, duration of diabetes, and comorbidity. Results Sixty-five percent of women reported incontinence (mean age 59±10 years). After adjustment, HbA1c levels were not associated with the presence or absence of incontinence. However, among women reporting incontinence, HbA1c ≥9% was associated with more limitations due to incontinence than HbA1c <6% (adjusted odds ratio 1.67, 95% confidence interval: 1.09–2.57). Conclusion In this cross-sectional analysis, HbA1c level is not associated with the presence or absence of incontinence. However, for women with incontinence, poor glycemic control (HbA1c ≥9%) is associated with more limitations in daily activities due to incontinence. Longitudinal studies are needed to determine whether improving glycemic control to HbA1c <9% leads to fewer limitations in daily activities due to incontinence. PMID:24032999

  13. Effect of Fructose on Glycemic Control in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Cozma, Adrian I.; Sievenpiper, John L.; de Souza, Russell J.; Chiavaroli, Laura; Ha, Vanessa; Wang, D. David; Mirrahimi, Arash; Yu, Matt E.; Carleton, Amanda J.; Di Buono, Marco; Jenkins, Alexandra L.; Leiter, Lawrence A.; Wolever, Thomas M.S.; Beyene, Joseph; Kendall, Cyril W.C.; Jenkins, David J.A.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The effect of fructose on cardiometabolic risk in humans is controversial. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of controlled feeding trials to clarify the effect of fructose on glycemic control in individuals with diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library (through 22 March 2012) for relevant trials lasting ≥7 days. Data were aggregated by the generic inverse variance method (random-effects models) and expressed as mean difference (MD) for fasting glucose and insulin and standardized MD (SMD) with 95% CI for glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and glycated albumin. Heterogeneity was assessed by the Cochran Q statistic and quantified by the I2 statistic. Trial quality was assessed by the Heyland methodological quality score (MQS). RESULTS Eighteen trials (n = 209) met the eligibility criteria. Isocaloric exchange of fructose for carbohydrate reduced glycated blood proteins (SMD −0.25 [95% CI −0.46 to −0.04]; P = 0.02) with significant intertrial heterogeneity (I2 = 63%; P = 0.001). This reduction is equivalent to a ∼0.53% reduction in HbA1c. Fructose consumption did not significantly affect fasting glucose or insulin. A priori subgroup analyses showed no evidence of effect modification on any end point. CONCLUSIONS Isocaloric exchange of fructose for other carbohydrate improves long-term glycemic control, as assessed by glycated blood proteins, without affecting insulin in people with diabetes. Generalizability may be limited because most of the trials were <12 weeks and had relatively low MQS (<8). To confirm these findings, larger and longer fructose feeding trials assessing both possible glycemic benefit and adverse metabolic effects are required. PMID:22723585

  14. Impact of Glycemic Control on Heart Rate Variability in Youth with Type 1 Diabetes: The SEARCH CVD Study

    PubMed Central

    Jaiswal, Mamta; Fingerlin, Tasha E.; Urbina, Elaine M.; Wadwa, R. Paul; Talton, Jennifer W.; D'Agostino, Ralph B.; Hamman, Richard F.; Daniels, Stephen R.; Marcovina, Santica M.; Dolan, Larry M.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Aim: This study explored the role of glycemic control on cardiac autonomic function, measured by heart rate variability (HRV), in youth with type 1 diabetes. Patients and Methods: A retrospective cohort of 345 youth with type 1 diabetes (mean age, 18.5 years; duration, 10 years) participating in the SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth study were enrolled in the ancillary SEARCH Cardiovascular Disease (CVD) study. Anthropometric, metabolic, and HRV parameters were collected at the current research visit. Glycemic control over time was assessed by the mean glycated hemoglobin (A1c) levels collected over the past 6 years. Multiple linear regression analysis assessed the association between A1c over time and HRV parameters, independent of demographic and CVD risk factors. Participants were categorized into four glycemic control categories based on their mean A1c over time: Group 1, optimal (mean A1c, ≤7.4%); Group 2 (mean A1c, 7.5–8.4%); Group 3 (mean A1c, 8.5–9.4%), and Group 4, poor (mean A1c, ≥9.5%), and a linear trend was explored across these categories. Results: For every 1% increase in the average A1c over 6 years there was a 5% decrease in the SD of the normal RR interval (SDNN) (P=0.02) and 7% decrease in the root mean square successive difference of the RR interval (RMSSD) (P=0.02), independent of demographic and traditional CVD risk factors. A dose–response relationship between worsening glucose control categories and measures of overall reduced HRV was found. Conclusions: Chronic hyperglycemia is the main determinant of early cardiac autonomic dysfunction, manifested as reduced overall HRV and parasympathetic loss, among youth with type 1 diabetes. PMID:24010960

  15. GLYCEMIC INDEX, CHOLECYSTOKININ, SATIETY AND DISINHIBITION: IS THERE AN UNAPPRECIATED PARADOX FOR OVERWEIGHT WOMEN?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The clinical utility of a low glycemic index (GI) diet for appetite and food intake control is controversial. Complicating the issue is psychological and behavioral influences related to eating. The aim of the present study was to investigate the satiety and glycemic response to high and low GI meal...

  16. The Potential of an in Vitro Digestion Method for Predicting Glycemic Response of Foods and Meals

    PubMed Central

    Argyri, Konstantina; Athanasatou, Adelais; Bouga, Maria; Kapsokefalou, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Increased interest in glycemic response derives from its linkage with chronic diseases, including obesity and type 2 diabetes. Our objective was to develop an in vitro method that predicts glycemic response. We proposed a simulated gastrointestinal digestion protocol that uses the concentration of dialyzable glucose (glucose in the soluble low molecular weight fraction of digests) as an index for the prediction of glycemic response. For protocol evaluation, dialyzable glucose from 30 foods or meals digested in vitro were compared with published values for their glycemic index (GI) (nine foods), glycemic load (GL) (16 foods) and glycemic response (14 meals). The correlations were significant when comparing dialyzable glucose with GL (Spearman’s rho = 0.953, p < 0.001), GI (Spearman’s rho = 0.800, p = 0.010) and glycemic response (Spearman’s rho = 0.736, p = 0.003). These results demonstrate that despite limitations associated with in vitro approaches, the proposed protocol may be a useful tool for predicting glycemic response of foods or meals.

  17. Glycemic carbohydrate and health: background and synopsis of the symposium.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Shuichi

    2003-05-01

    Carbohydrates are global foodstuffs and important energy sources. They also influence many physiologic functions, including brain function and physical performance and are ultimately related to human health. In 1998, ILSI Japan formed a team to conduct research on "The Medical and Nutritional Aspects of Sugars." The research included studies of several new aspects of the metabolic characteristics and physiologic effects of sugars. This paper presents some highlights of our research, including the background of the project, the metabolic characteristics of sugars, and the effect of sugars on glycemic response, memory, and appetite and food intake in humans, etc.

  18. Children's glycemic control: mother's knowledge and socioeconomic status.

    PubMed

    Al-Odayani, Abdulrahman Nasser; Alsharqi, Omar Zayyan; Ahmad, Alaeddin Mohammad Khalaf; Khalaf Ahmad, Ala'eddin Mohammad; Al-Borie, Hussein Mohammad; Qattan, Ameerah M N

    2013-10-29

    The present study was designed to examine the role of socioeconomic status (SES) of the mother's knowledge about different aspects of diabetes and the glycemic control of type 1 children with diabetes. Samples were taken from successive admissions to the outpatient diabetes clinics in Prince Sultan Medical Military City (PSMMC), Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. A well designed questionnaire covering different aspects including demographic data, educational background, and socioeconomic status of the care providers was used to collect information from mothers of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) children. The questionnaire was designed on the basis of the Michigan diabetes knowledge scale and also on the basis of food habits of Saudi Arabia and it was validated. The questionnaire was completed after interviewing the mothers during visits to the PSMMC hospital. Every mother was asked with those particular questions. Glycemic control was assessed by glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c). The socio-demographic data of mothers was recorded by self-report. It was found that, there was significant variation in the knowledge of diabetes among mothers with different ages (P 0.05). No significant results were observed between family income and diabetes knowledge (p>0.05).However, a positive relationship was observed with higher income and higher knowledge. There was a significant association between mothers knowledge of diabetes and HbA1C level (r = -0.1739, p.<0.05) indicating that, higher knowledge ultimately leads to greater control of HbA1c level. A significant association was also observed between education and HbA1c level (r=-02538, p<0.05) with children of mothers with higher level of education showing a better control of glycated haemoglobin levels. However, no significant association was found between monthly family income and HbA1C level. In conclusion, the current study illustrated that, mothers with more knowledge of diabetes and with better education were maintaining a better

  19. Endoplasmic reticulum stress and Nrf2 repression in circulating cells of type 2 diabetic patients without the recommended glycemic goals.

    PubMed

    Mozzini, C; Garbin, U; Stranieri, C; Pasini, A; Solani, E; Tinelli, I A; Cominacini, L; Fratta Pasini, A M

    2015-03-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress plays a role in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), with activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR) and ER apoptosis in β-cells. The aim of the study is investigating the role of the prolonged glycemic, inflammatory, and oxidative impairment as possible UPR and ER apoptosis inductors in triggering the ER stress response and the protective nuclear erythroid-related factor 2 (Nrf2)/antioxidant-related element (ARE) activation in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of T2DM patients without glycemic target. Oxidative stress markers (oxidation product of phospholipid 1-palmitoyl-2-arachidonoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphorylcholine [oxPAPC], and malondialdehyde [MDA]), the UPR and ER apoptosis, the activation of the pro-inflammatory nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kB) with its inhibitory protein inhibitor-kBα, and the expression of the protective Nrf2 and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) were evaluated in PBMC of 15 T2DM patients and 15 healthy controls (C). OxPAPC concentrations (in PBMC and plasma), MDA levels (in plasma), the expressions of the glucose-regulated protein 78 kDa (or BiP) as representative of UPR, and of the CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein homologous protein as representative of ER apoptosis were significantly higher (p < 0.01) in T2DM with respect to C. IkBα expression was significantly lower (p < 0.01) in T2DM as well as Nrf2 and HO-1. In vitro experiments demonstrated that hyperglycemic conditions, if prolonged, were NF-kB inductors, without a corresponding Nrf2/ARE response. In PBMC of T2DM without glycemic target achievement, there is an activation of the UPR and of the ER apoptosis, which may be related to the chronic exposure to hyperglycemia, to the augmented inflammation, and to the augmented oxidative stress, without a corresponding Nrf2/ARE defense activation.

  20. Effects of Carbohydrate and Dietary Fiber Intake, Glycemic Index and Glycemic Load on HDL Metabolism in Asian Populations.

    PubMed

    Yanai, Hidekatsu; Katsuyama, Hisayuki; Hamasaki, Hidetaka; Abe, Shinichi; Tada, Norio; Sako, Akahito

    2014-10-01

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL) is a lipoprotein which has anti-atherogenic property by reverse cholesterol transport from the peripheral tissues to liver. Low HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) levels are associated with the development of coronary artery diseases (CADs). Various epidemiological studies have suggested that the development of CAD increase in individuals with less than 40 mg/dL of HDL-C. In spite of accumulation of evidences which suggest a significant association between low HDL-C and cardiovascular diseases, effects of dietary factors on HDL metabolism remained largely unknown. There may be interracial differences in effects of dietary factors on HDL metabolism. Here we reviewed published articles about effects of carbohydrate and dietary fiber intake, glycemic index (GI) and glycemic load (GL), on HDL-C metabolism, regarding meta-analyses and clinical studies performed in Asian population as important articles. Low carbohydrate intake, GI and GL may be beneficially associated with HDL metabolism. Dietary fiber intake may be favorably associated with HDL metabolism in Asian populations.

  1. White bread enriched with polyphenol extracts shows no effect on glycemic response or satiety, yet may increase postprandial insulin economy in healthy participants.

    PubMed

    Coe, Shelly; Ryan, Lisa

    2016-02-01

    Extracts from different plant sources have been shown to modify starch digestion from carbohydrate-rich foods and lower resulting glycemia. It was hypothesized that extracts rich in polyphenols, added to white bread, would improve the glycemic response and insulin response and increase satiety in healthy participants. An in vitro dose-response analysis was performed to determine the optimal dose of a variety of extracts (baobab fruit extract, green tea extract, grape seed extract, and resveratrol) for reducing rapidly digestible starch in white bread. The 2 extracts with the greatest sugar reducing potential were then used for the human study in which 13 volunteers (9 female and 4 male) were recruited for a crossover trial of 3 different meals. On separate days, participants consumed a control white bread, white bread with green tea extract (0.4%), and white bread with baobab fruit extract (1.88%). Glycemic response, insulin response, and satiety were measured 3 hours postprandially. Although enriched breads did not reduce glycemic response or hunger, white bread with added baobab fruit extract significantly (P < .05) reduced the total (0-180 minutes) and segmental insulin area under the curve at 0 to 90, 0 to 120, and 0 to 150 minutes, and therefore reduced the amount of insulin needed for a given blood glucose response. This preliminary research suggests that there is potential for baobab fruit extract added into white bread to improve insulin economy in healthy adults.

  2. Relationship between vitamin D and glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Olt, Serdar

    2015-01-01

    Herein I investigated the impact of vitamin D on glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. 128 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus were enrolled in this study (mean (S.D) age: 57.7±10 years, 26.6% were female). It was collected clinical and laboratory characteristics of patients from hospital records retrospectively. Patients were divided into two groups according to the HBA1c values: good glycemic control (HbA1c≤7%) and poor glycemic control (HbA1c>7%). It was compared 25 hydroxyvitamin (OH) D and other collected laboratory parameters between the two groups. The vitamin D deficiency rate was 98.3%. In the result with ROC curve analyzes and Mann Whitney U test vitamin D was'nt significantly associated with glycemic control (P value >0.05). Among other parameters result with ROC curve analyzes and student t test RDW-CV was found to be significantly associated with glycemic control (P value <0.05). Although high level of vitamin D deficiency, present study indicated that vitamin D was'nt significantly related to glycemic control in type 2 diyabetes mellitus. Even so RDW-CV was significantly related to glycemic control.

  3. Intensive glycemic control after heart transplantation is safe and effective for diabetic and non-diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Cristina; Wallia, Amisha; Gupta, Suruchi; Schmidt, Kathleen; Malekar-Raikar, Shilpa; Johnson Oakes, Diana; Aleppo, Grazia; Grady, Kathleen; McGee, Edwin; Cotts, William; Andrei, Adin-Cristian; Molitch, Mark E

    2013-01-01

    Some studies have shown increased mortality, infection, and rejection rates among diabetic (DM) compared to non-diabetic (non-DM) patients undergoing heart transplant (HT). This is a retrospective chart review of adult patients (DM, n = 26; non-DM, n = 66) undergoing HT between June 1, 2005, and July 31, 2009. Glycemic control used intravenous (IV) and subcutaneous (SQ) insulin protocols with a glucose target of 80-110 mg/dL. There were no significant differences between DM and non-DM patients in mean glucose levels on the IV and SQ insulin protocols. Severe hypoglycemia (glucose <40 mg/dL) did not occur on the IV protocol and was experienced by only 3 non-DM patients on the SQ protocol. Moderate hypoglycemia (glucose >40 and <60 mg/dL) occurred in 17 (19%) patients on the IV protocol and 24 (27%) on the SQ protocol. There were no significant differences between DM and non-DM patients within 30 d of surgery in all-cause mortality, treated HT rejection episodes, reoperation, prolonged ventilation, 30-d readmissions, ICU readmission, number of ICU hours, hospitalization days after HT, or infections. This study demonstrates that DM and non-DM patients can achieve excellent glycemic control post-HT with IV and SQ insulin protocols with similar surgical outcomes and low hypoglycemia rates.

  4. The effect of three snack bars on glycemic response in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Miller, Carla K; Gabbay, Robert A; Dillon, Judith; Apgar, Joan; Miller, Debra

    2006-05-01

    Many consumers prefer convenient, portable, and preportioned snack foods. Foods with a lower glycemic response are associated with reduced risk for chronic disease. The glycemic index and glycemic load of three nationally available snack bars were determined. Ten subjects, with mean age (+/-standard deviation) of 29+/-7 years and mean body mass index (+/-standard deviation) of 25.3+/-3.2, were tested on four occasions on nonconsecutive days. After an overnight fast, subjects consumed 50 g of available carbohydrate as a glucose beverage or as a portion of one of three bars: SmartZone nutrition bar (The Hershey Co, Hershey, PA), ZonePerfect nutrition bar (Abbott Laboratories, Abbott Park, IL), or SlimFast meal bar (SlimFast Foods Co, West Palm Beach, FL). Blood glucose was tested at 0, 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, and 120 minutes after consumption. Incremental area under the glucose response curve was calculated for each test bar and compared with that of the glucose beverage to determine glycemic index. The glycemic index (+/-standard error of the mean) for SmartZone was 10.9+/-3.9 and was significantly less (P<0.05) than that of ZonePerfect (43.7+/-7.3) or SlimFast (63.8+/-13.0). The glycemic loads (+/-standard error of the mean) for the SmartZone (2.0+/-0.7) and ZonePerfect (8.3+/-1.4) bars were significantly less (P<0.05) than the glycemic load of the SlimFast bar (21.1+/-4.3). Although the long-term impact of snack foods with a lower glycemic load requires further research, the SmartZone and ZonePerfect bars provide a lower glycemic response for consumers.

  5. Periprocedural glycemic control in patients with diabetes mellitus undergoing coronary angiography with possible percutaneous coronary intervention.

    PubMed

    Shah, Binita; Berger, Jeffrey S; Amoroso, Nicholas S; Mai, Xingchen; Lorin, Jeffrey D; Danoff, Ann; Schwartzbard, Arthur Z; Lobach, Iryna; Guo, Yu; Feit, Frederick; Slater, James; Attubato, Michael J; Sedlis, Steven P

    2014-05-01

    Periprocedural hyperglycemia is an independent predictor of mortality in patients who underwent percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). However, periprocedural management of blood glucose is not standardized. The effects of routinely continuing long-acting glucose-lowering medications before coronary angiography with possible PCI on periprocedural glycemic control have not been investigated. Patients with diabetes mellitus (DM; n = 172) were randomized to continue (Continue group; n = 86) or hold (Hold group; n = 86) their clinically prescribed long-acting glucose-lowering medications before the procedure. The primary end point was glucose level on procedural access. In a subset of patients (no DM group: n = 25; Continue group: n = 25; and Hold group: n = 25), selected measures of platelet activity that change acutely were assessed. Patients with DM randomized to the Continue group had lower blood glucose levels on procedural access compared with those randomized to the Hold group (117 [97 to 151] vs 134 [117 to 172] mg/dl, p = 0.002). There were two hypoglycemic events in the Continue group and none in the Hold group, and no adverse events in either group. Selected markers of platelet activity differed across the no DM, Continue, and Hold groups (leukocyte platelet aggregates: 8.1% [7.2 to 10.4], 8.7% [6.9 to 11.4], 10.9% [8.6 to 14.7], p = 0.007; monocyte platelet aggregates: 14.0% [10.3 to 16.3], 20.8% [16.2 to 27.0], 22.5% [15.2 to 35.4], p <0.001; soluble p-selectin: 51.9 ng/ml [39.7 to 74.0], 59.1 ng/ml [46.8 to 73.2], 72.2 ng/ml [58.4 to 77.4], p = 0.014). In conclusion, routinely continuing clinically prescribed long-acting glucose-lowering medications before coronary angiography with possible PCI help achieve periprocedural euglycemia, appear safe, and should be considered as a strategy for achieving periprocedural glycemic control.

  6. Low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol is a residual risk factor associated with long-term clinical outcomes in diabetic patients with stable coronary artery disease who achieve optimal control of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Ogita, Manabu; Miyauchi, Katsumi; Miyazaki, Tadashi; Naito, Ryo; Konishi, Hirokazu; Tsuboi, Shuta; Dohi, Tomotaka; Kasai, Takatoshi; Yokoyama, Takayuki; Okazaki, Shinya; Kurata, Takeshi; Daida, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is recognized an independent risk factor for coronary artery disease (CAD) and mortality. Clinical trials have shown that statins significantly reduce cardiovascular events in diabetic patients. However, residual cardiovascular risk persists despite the achievement of target low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels with statin. High-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) is an established coronary risk factor that is independent of LDL-C levels. We evaluated the impact of HDL-C on long-term mortality in diabetic patients with stable CAD who achieved optimal LDL-C. We enrolled 438 consecutive diabetic patients who were scheduled for percutaneous coronary intervention between 2004 and 2007 at our institution. We identified 165 patients who achieved target LDL-C <100 mg/dl. Patients were stratified into two groups according to HDL-C levels (low HDL-C group, baseline HDL-C <40 mg/dl; high HDL-C group, ≥40 mg/dl). Major adverse cardiac events (MACE) that included all-cause death, acute coronary syndrome, and target lesion revascularization were evaluated between the two groups. The median follow-up period was 946 days. The rate of MACE was significantly higher in diabetic patients with low-HDL-C who achieved optimal LDL-C (6.9 vs 17.9 %, log-rank P = 0.030). Multivariate Cox regression analysis showed that HDL-C is significantly associated with clinical outcomes (adjusted hazard ratio for MACE 1.33, 95 % confidence interval 1.01-1.75, P = 0.042). Low HDL-C is a residual risk factor that is significantly associated with long-term clinical outcomes among diabetic patients with stable CAD who achieve optimal LDL-C levels.

  7. Appraising Reading Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ediger, Marlow

    To determine quality sequence in pupil progress, evaluation approaches need to be used which guide the teacher to assist learners to attain optimally. Teachers must use a variety of procedures to appraise student achievement in reading, because no one approach is adequate. Appraisal approaches might include: (1) observation and subsequent…

  8. High-performance n-type organic semiconductors: incorporating specific electron-withdrawing motifs to achieve tight molecular stacking and optimized energy levels.

    PubMed

    Yun, Sun Woo; Kim, Jong H; Shin, Seunghoon; Yang, Hoichang; An, Byeong-Kwan; Yang, Lin; Park, Soo Young

    2012-02-14

    Novel π–conjugated cyanostilbene-based semiconductors (Hex-3,5-TFPTA and Hex-4-TFPTA) with tight molecular stacking and optimized energy levels are synthesized. Hex-4-TFPTA exhibits high-performance n-type organic field-effect transistor (OFET) properties with electron mobilities as high as 2.14 cm2 V−1s−1 and on-off current ratios

  9. Effect of tighter glycemic control on cardiac function, exercise capacity, and muscle strength in heart failure patients with type 2 diabetes: a randomized study

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Roni; Wiggers, Henrik; Thomsen, Henrik Holm; Bovin, Ann; Refsgaard, Jens; Abrahamsen, Jan; Møller, Niels; Bøtker, Hans Erik; Nørrelund, Helene

    2016-01-01

    Objectives In patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) and heart failure (HF), the optimal glycemic target is uncertain, and evidence-based data are lacking. Therefore, we performed a randomized study on the effect of optimized glycemic control on left ventricular function, exercise capacity, muscle strength, and body composition. Design and methods 40 patients with T2D and HF (left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) 35±12% and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) 8.4±0.7% (68±0.8 mmol/mol)) were randomized to either 4-month optimization (OPT group) or non-optimization (non-OPT group) of glycemic control. Patients underwent dobutamine stress echocardiography, cardiopulmonary exercise test, 6 min hall-walk test (6-MWT), muscle strength examination, and dual X-ray absorptiometry scanning at baseline and at follow-up. Results 39 patients completed the study. HbA1c decreased in the OPT versus the non-OPT group (8.4±0.8% (68±9 mmol/mol) to 7.6±0.7% (60±7 mmol/mol) vs 8.3±0.7% (67±10 mmol/mol) to 8.4±1.0% (68±11 mmol/mol); p<0.001). There was no difference between the groups with respect to changes in myocardial contractile reserve (LVEF (p=0.18)), oxygen consumption (p=0.55), exercise capacity (p=0.12), and 6-MWT (p=0.84). Muscle strength decreased in the non-OPT compared with the OPT group (37.2±8.1 to 34.8±8.3 kg vs 34.9±10.2 to 35.4±10.7 kg; p=0.01), in line with a non-significant decrease in lean (p=0.07) and fat (p=0.07) tissue mass in the non-OPT group. Hypoglycemia and fluid retention did not differ between groups. Conclusions 4 months of optimization of glycemic control was associated with preserved muscle strength and lean body mass in patients with T2D and HF compared with lenient control, and had no deleterious effect on left ventricular contractile function and seemed to be safe. Trial registration number NCT01213784; pre-results. PMID:27158520

  10. Glycemic Variation in Tumor Patients with Total Parenteral Nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jin-Cheng; Dai, Yuan-Yuan; Wang, Li-Ming; Xie, Yi-Bin; Zhou, Hai-Yan; Li, Guo-Hui

    2015-01-01

    Background: Hyperglycemia is associated with poor clinical outcomes and mortality in several patients. However, studies evaluating hyperglycemia variation in tumor patients receiving total parenteral nutrition (TPN) are scarce. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between glycemia and tumor kinds with TPN by monitoring glycemic variation in tumor patients. Methods: This retrospective clinical trial selected 312 patients with various cancer types, whose unique nutrition treatment was TPN during the monitoring period. All patients had blood glucose (BG) values assessed at least six times daily during the TPN infusion. The glycemic variation before and after TPN was set as the indicator to evaluate the factors influencing BG. Results: The clinical trial lasted 7.5 ± 3.0 days adjusted for age, gender, family cancer history and blood types. There were six cancer types: Hepatic carcinoma (HC, 21.8%), rectal carcinoma (17.3%), colon carcinoma (CC, 14.7%), gastric carcinoma (29.8%), pancreatic carcinoma (11.5%), and duodenal carcinoma (DC, 4.8%). The patients were divided into diabetes and nondiabetes groups. No statistical differences in TPN glucose content between diabetes and nondiabetes groups were found; however, the tumor types affected by BG values were obvious. With increasing BG values, DC, HC and CC were more represented than other tumor types in this sequence in diabetic individuals, as well as in the nondiabetic group. BG was inclined to be more easily influenced in the nondiabetes group. Other factors did not impact BG values, including gender, body mass index, and TPN infusion duration time. Conclusions: When tumor patients are treated with TPN, BG levels should be monitored according to different types of tumors, besides differentiating diabetes or nondiabetes patients. Special BG control is needed for DC, HC and CC in both diabetic and nondiabetic patients. If BG overtly increases, positive measurements are needed to control BG values. The

  11. Effect of improving glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus on low-density lipoprotein size, electronegative low-density lipoprotein and lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 distribution.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Quesada, José L; Vinagre, Irene; de Juan-Franco, Elena; Sánchez-Hernández, Juan; Blanco-Vaca, Francisco; Ordóñez-Llanos, Jordi; Pérez, Antonio

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of intensified hypoglycemic therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus on the distribution of lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2) activity between high-density lipoprotein and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and its relation with the lipid profile and other qualitative properties of LDL. Forty-two patients with type 2 diabetes on the basis of poor glycemic control and normal or near normal LDL cholesterol were recruited. Lifestyle counseling and pharmacologic hypoglycemic therapy were intensified to improve glycemic control, but lipid-lowering therapy was unchanged. At 4 ± 2 months, glycosylated hemoglobin had decreased by a mean of 2.1%, but the only effect on the lipid profile were statistically significant decreases in nonesterified fatty acids and apolipoprotein B concentration. LDL size increased and the proportion of electronegative LDL decreased significantly. In parallel, total Lp-PLA2 activity decreased significantly, promoting a redistribution of Lp-PLA2 activity toward a higher proportion in high-density lipoprotein. Improvements in glycemic control led to more marked changes in Lp-PLA2 activity and distribution in patients with diabetes who had not received previous lipid-lowering therapy. In conclusion, optimizing glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes promotes atheroprotective changes, including larger LDL size, decreased electronegative LDL, and a higher proportion of Lp-PLA2 activity in high-density lipoprotein.

  12. Ultralong, small-diameter TiOTiO₂ nanotubes achieved by an optimized two-step anodization for efficient dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoyan; Sun, Lidong; Zhang, Sam; Wang, Xiu

    2014-02-12

    An optimized two-step anodization is developed to fabricate ultralong, small-diameter TiO2 nanotubes, that is, with tube length of up to 31 μm and pore diameter of about 35 nm in this work. This overcomes the length limitation of small diameter tubes that usually presents in conventional one-step anodization. The small tubes with lengths of 23 μm yield a conversion efficiency of 5.02% in dye-sensitized solar cells under nonoptimized conditions.

  13. Factors associated with improved glycemic control following continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes uncontrolled with bolus-basal insulin regimens: an analysis from the OpT2mise randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Metzger, Muriel; Castañeda, Javier; Reznik, Yves; Giorgino, Francesco; Conget, Ignacio; Aronson, Ronnie; de Portu, Simona; Runzis, Sarah; Lee, Scott W; Cohen, Ohad

    2017-04-04

    This analysis investigated factors associated with the decrease in HbA1c in patients receiving continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) in the OpT2mise randomized trial. In this study, patients with type 2 diabetes and HbA1C >8% following multiple daily injections (MDI) optimization were randomized to receive CSII (n = 168) or MDI (n = 163) for 6 months. Patient-related and treatment-related factors associated with decreased HbA1c in the CSII arm were identified by univariate and multivariate analyses. CSII produced a significantly greater reduction in HbA1c than MDI, and the treatment difference increased with baseline HbA1c . In the CSII arm, the only factors significantly associated with decreased HbA1C were higher baseline HbA1C (P<0.001), geographical region (P<0.001), higher educational level (P=0.012), higher total cholesterol level (P=0.002), lower variability of baseline glucose values on continuous glucose monitoring (P<0.001), and the decrease in average fasting self-monitored blood glucose at 6 months (P<0.001). These findings suggest that CSII offers an option to improve glycemic control in a broad range of type 2 diabetes patients in whom control cannot be achieved with MDI. OpT2mise ClinicalTrials.gov number: NCT01182493 (https://clinicaltrials.gov/).

  14. Effect of very high-fat diets on body weight, lipoproteins, and glycemic status in the obese.

    PubMed

    Samaha, Frederick F

    2005-11-01

    Given the increased prevalence of obesity in the United States, despite reduced fat intake, there has been increasing interest in the effect of dietary fat on body weight, lipoproteins, and glycemic status. Despite predictions from epidemiologic and physiologic studies, recent prospective trials have demonstrated equivalent weight loss on high-fat versus low-fat diets. Nevertheless, the type of dietary fat consumed has substantially different effects on lipoproteins. Saturated fat raises high-density lipoprotein cholesterol but has unfavorable effects on total cholesterol, and has been associated with increased cardiovascular events. In contrast, unsaturated fats, and particularly omega-3 fatty acids, have the combined benefits of lowering serum cholesterol and raising high-density lipoprotein, as well as favorable effects on insulin resistance and inflammation; they also lower cardiovascular events in high-risk patients. Although current national guidelines modestly liberalize unsaturated fat consumption, important questions still remain about the optimal percentage of unsaturated fats in the diet.

  15. Almond consumption improved glycemic control and lipid profiles in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Almond consumption is associated with ameliorations in obesity, hyperlipidemia, hypertension, and hyperglycemia. The hypothesis of this 12-wk randomized crossover clinical trial was that almond consumption would improve glycemic control and decrease risk to cardiovascular disease in 20 Chinese type ...

  16. Veganism Is a Viable Alternative to Conventional Diet Therapy for Improving Blood Lipids and Glycemic Control.

    PubMed

    Trepanowski, John F; Varady, Krista A

    2015-01-01

    The American Diabetes Association (ADA) and the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) have each outlined a set of dietary recommendations aimed at improving glycemic control and blood lipids, respectively. However, traditional vegan diets (low-fat diets that proscribe animal product consumption) are also effective at improving glycemic control, and dietary portfolios (vegan diets that contain prescribed amounts of plant sterols, viscous fibers, soy protein, and nuts) are also effective at improving blood lipids. The purpose of this review was to compare the effects of traditional vegan diets and dietary portfolios with ADA and NCEP diets on body weight, blood lipids, blood pressure, and glycemic control. The main findings are that traditional vegan diets appear to improve glycemic control better than ADA diets in individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), while dietary portfolios have been consistently shown to improve blood lipids better than NCEP diets in hypercholesterolemic individuals.

  17. Dietary glycemic index and glycemic load and risk of colorectal cancer: results from the EPIC-Italy study.

    PubMed

    Sieri, S; Krogh, V; Agnoli, C; Ricceri, F; Palli, D; Masala, G; Panico, S; Mattiello, A; Tumino, R; Giurdanella, M C; Brighenti, F; Scazzina, F; Vineis, P; Sacerdote, C

    2015-06-15

    A carbohydrate-rich diet, resulting in high blood glucose and insulin, has been hypothesized as involved in colorectal cancer etiology. We investigated dietary glycemic index (GI) and glycemic load (GL), in relation to colorectal cancer, in the prospectively recruited EPIC-Italy cohort. After a median 11.7 years, 421 colorectal cancers were diagnosed among 47,749 recruited adults. GI and GL were estimated from validated food frequency questionnaires. Multivariable Cox modeling estimated hazard ratios (HRs) for associations between colorectal cancer and intakes of total, high GI and low GI carbohydrate and GI and GL. The adjusted HR of colorectal cancer for highest versus lowest GI quartile was 1.35; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.03-1.78; p trend 0.031. Increasing high GI carbohydrate intake was also significantly associated with increasing colorectal cancer risk (HR 1.45; 95% CI 1.04-2.03; p trend 0.034), whereas increasing low GI carbohydrate was associated with reducing risk (HR 0.73; 95% CI 0.54-0.98; p trend 0.033). High dietary GI and high GI carbohydrate were associated with increased risks of cancer at all colon sites (HR 1.37; 95% CI 1.00-1.88, HR 1.80; 95% CI 1.22-2.65, respectively), whereas high GI carbohydrate and high GL were associated with increased risk of proximal colon cancer (HR 1.94; 95% CI 1.18-3.16, HR 2.01; 95% CI 1.08-3.74, respectively). After stratification for waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), cancer was significantly associated with GI, and high GI carbohydrate, in those with high WHR. These findings suggest that high dietary GI and high carbohydrate intake from high GI foods are associated with increased risk of colorectal cancer.

  18. The effect of the glycemic index of an evening meal on the metabolic responses to a standard high glycemic index breakfast and subsequent exercise in men.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Emma; Williams, Clyde; Nute, Maria; Swaile, Peter; Tsui, Monica

    2005-06-01

    The present study investigated the effect of the glycemic index of an evening meal on responses to a standard high glycemic index (HGI) breakfast the following morning. The metabolic responses to exercise 3 h after breakfast were also investigated. Seven active males completed 2 trials. In each trial, participants were provided with an evening meal on day 1, which was composed of either HGI or LGI (high or low glycemic index) carbohydrates. On day 2, participants were provided with a standard HGI breakfast and then performed a 60 min run at 65% VO(2max) 3 h later. Plasma glucose and serum insulin concentrations following breakfast were higher in the HGI trial compared to the LGI trial (P < 0.05). During exercise, there were no differences in substrate utilization. The results suggest that consuming a single LGI evening meal can improve glucose tolerance at breakfast but the metabolic responses to subsequent exercise were not affected.

  19. Effect of hypolipidemic treatment on glycemic profile in patients with mixed dyslipidemia

    PubMed Central

    Kei, Anastazia; Liberopoulos, Evangelos; Elisaf, Moses

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To assess the effect of different hypolipidemic treatment strategies on glycemic profile in mixed dyslipidemia patients. METHODS: This is a prespecified analysis of a prospective, randomized, open-label, blinded end point (PROBE) study (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01010516). Patients (n = 100) with mixed dyslipidemia on a standard statin dose who had not achieved lipid targets were randomized to switch to the highest dose of rosuvastatin (40 mg/d) or to add-on-statin extended release nicotinic acid (ER-NA)/laropiprant (LRPT) or to add-on-statin micronised fenofibrate for a total of 3 mo. Fasting plasma glucose (FPG), glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) index and lipid profile were evaluated at baseline and 3 mo after treatment intervention. RESULTS: FPG increased in add-on ER-NA/LRPT and rosuvastatin monotherapy groups by 9.7% and 4.4%, respectively (P < 0.01 between the 2 groups and compared with baseline), while it did not significantly change in the add-on fenofibrate group. Similarly, HbA1c increased by 0.3% in add-on ER-NA/LRPT group and by 0.2% in the rosuvastatin monotherapy group (P < 0.01 for all comparisons vs baseline and for the comparison between the 2 groups), while no significant change was reported in the add-on fenofibrate group. HOMA-IR increased by 65% in add-on ER-NA/LRPT and by 14% in rosuvastatin monotherapy group, while it decreased by 6% in the add-on fenofibrate group (P < 0.01 vs baseline and for all comparisons among the groups). Non-HDL-C decreased in all groups (by 23.7%, 24.7% and 7% in the rosuvastatin, ER-NA/LRPT and fenofibrate group, respectively, P < 0.01 for all vs baseline and P < 0.01 for all vs with fenofibrate group). CONCLUSION: Both addition of ER-NA/LRPT and switch to the highest dose of rosuvastatin deteriorated glycemic profile in patients with mixed dyslipidemia, while add-on fenofibrate seems to increase insulin sensitivity. PMID:24379928

  20. Effect of current glycemic control on qualitative body composition in sedentary ambulatory Type 2 diabetics

    PubMed Central

    Solanki, Jayesh Dalpatbhai; Makwana, Amit H.; Mehta, Hemant B.; Kamdar, Panna; Gokhale, Pradnya A.; Shah, Chinmay J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Obesity and Type 2 diabetes mellitus are on rise with cause–effect relationship. Diabetics monitor blood sugar, neglecting qualitative body composition, leaving residual threat of ectopic fat unattended. We tried to correlate glycemic triad with parameters of body composition derived objectively by bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA). Materials and Methods: A sample of 78 under treatment sedentary Type 2 diabetics of either sex with known glycemic and lipidemic control from our city. Following baseline assessment measurement was done by instrument Omron Karada Scan (Model HBF-510, China) using the principle of tetra poplar BIA to derive parameters of body composition. We tried to correlate glycemic triad with these parameters, both directly as well as after defining them as per established cutoff norms. Results: We found poor glycemic control in the study group (20% for Hb1AC), high body mass index, subcutaneous fat, visceral fat (VF), total body fat (TBF), and lesser mass of skeletal muscle in Type 2 diabetics. However, there were small, insignificant, and inconsistent difference of these parameters while directly correlating with the fasting blood sugar, postprandial blood sugar, and glycosylated hemoglobin. On qualitative assessment, the impact of glycemic control as per standard norms, the risk of high VF, high TBF, low skeletal muscle mass was though high (between 1 and 2) in Type 2 diabetics with poor glycemic control as compared to good glycemics, but each strength lacks statistical significance. Conclusion: BIA reveals that Type 2 diabetics have more ectopic fat on expense of skeletal muscle that do not correlate with current glycemic status, both quantitatively and qualitatively. Measurement of body composition can be included and subjects can be motivated for lifestyle modification strategies while managing metabolic derangements of Type 2 diabetes. PMID:27185972

  1. Frequency and predictors of suboptimal glycemic control in an African diabetic population

    PubMed Central

    Kibirige, Davis; Akabwai, George Patrick; Kampiire, Leaticia; Kiggundu, Daniel Ssekikubo; Lumu, William

    2017-01-01

    Background Persistent suboptimal glycemic control is invariably associated with onset and progression of acute and chronic diabetic complications in diabetic patients. In Uganda, studies documenting the magnitude and predictors of suboptimal glycemic control in adult ambulatory diabetic patients are limited. This study aimed at determining the frequency and predictors of suboptimal glycemic control in adult diabetic patients attending three urban outpatient diabetic clinics in Uganda. Methods In this hospital-based cross-sectional study, eligible ambulatory adult diabetic patients attending outpatient diabetic clinics of three urban hospitals were consecutively enrolled over 11 months. Suboptimal glycemic control was defined as glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) level ≥7%. Multivariable analysis was applied to determine the predictors. Results The mean age of the study participants was 52.2±14.4 years, and the majority of them were females (283, 66.9%). The median (interquartile range) HbA1c level was 9% (6.8%–12.4%). Suboptimal glycemic control was noted in 311 study participants, accounting for 73.52% of the participants. HbA1c levels of 7%–8%, 8.1%–9.9%, and ≥10% were noted in 56 (13.24%), 76 (17.97%), and 179 (42.32%) study participants, respectively. The documented predictors of suboptimal glycemic control were metformin monotherapy (odds ratio: 0.36, 95% confidence interval: 0.21–0.63, p<0.005) and insulin therapy (odds ratio: 2.41, 95% confidence interval: 1.41–4.12, p=0.001). Conclusion Suboptimal glycemic control was highly prevalent in this study population with an association to metformin monotherapy and insulin therapy. Strategies aimed at improving glycemic control in diabetes care in Uganda should be enhanced. PMID:28260942

  2. Association between depression and glycemic control among type 2 diabetes patients in Lima, Peru

    PubMed Central

    Crispín‐Trebejo, Brenda; Bernabé‐Ortiz, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Introduction There is limited and controversial information regarding the potential impact of depression on glycemic control. This study aims to evaluate the association between depression and poor glycemic control. In addition, the prevalence of depression and rates of poor glycemic control were determined. Methods Cross‐sectional study performed in the endocrinology unit of two hospitals of ESSALUD in Peru. The outcome of interest was poor glycemic control, evaluated by glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c: < 7% versus ≥ 7%), whereas the exposure of interest was depression defined as 15 or more points in the Patient Health Questionnaire‐9 tool. The association of interest was evaluated using Poisson regression models with robust standard errors reporting prevalence ratios (PR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) adjusting for potential confounders. Results A total of 277 participants, 184 (66.4%) males, mean age 59.0 (SD: 4.8), and 7.1 (SD: 6.8) years of disease were analyzed. Only 31 participants (11.2%; 95% CI: 7.5%–14.9%) had moderately severe or severe depression, whereas 70 (25.3%; 95% CI 20.3%–30.8%) had good glycemic control. Depression increased the probability of having poor glycemic control (PR = 1.32; 95% CI 1.15–1.51) after adjusting for several potential confounders. Conclusions There is an association between depression and poor glycemic control among type 2 diabetes patients. Our results suggest that early detection of depression might be important to facilitate appropriate glycemic control and avoid further metabolic complications. PMID:26037488

  3. Beyond glycemic control in diabetes mellitus: effects of incretin-based therapies on bone metabolism.

    PubMed

    Ceccarelli, Elena; Guarino, Elisa G; Merlotti, Daniela; Patti, Aurora; Gennari, Luigi; Nuti, Ranuccio; Dotta, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) and osteoporosis (OP) are common disorders with a significant health burden, and an increase in fracture risk has been described both in type 1 (T1DM) and in type 2 (T2DM) diabetes. The pathogenic mechanisms of impaired skeletal strength in diabetes remain to be clarified in details and they are only in part reflected by a variation in bone mineral density. In T2DM, the occurrence of low bone turnover together with a decreased osteoblast activity and compromised bone quality has been shown. Of note, some antidiabetic drugs (e.g., thiazolidinediones, insulin) may deeply affect bone metabolism. In addition, the recently introduced class of incretin-based drugs (i.e., GLP-1 receptor agonists and DPP-4 inhibitors) is expected to exert potentially beneficial effects on bone health, possibly due to a bone anabolic activity of GLP-1, that can be either direct or indirect through the involvement of thyroid C cells. Here we will review the established as well as the putative effects of incretin hormones and of incretin-based drugs on bone metabolism, both in preclinical models and in man, taking into account that such therapeutic strategy may be effective not only to achieve a good glycemic control, but also to improve bone health in diabetic patients.

  4. Effect of glycemic index meals on recovery and subsequent endurance capacity.

    PubMed

    Wong, S H; Chen, Y J; Fung, W M; Morris, J G

    2009-12-01

    This study examined the effect of ingesting a high or low glycemic index (GI) meal during a short-term recovery period on endurance running capacity. On two occasions, seven men (age 30.0+/-2.6 yr, body mass 60.7+/-1.4 kg, VO (2max) 62.1+/-2.2 ml.kg (-1).min (-1)) ran at 70% VO (2max) on a level treadmill for 90 min (R1), followed by a 4 h recovery (REC) and a further exhaustive run at the same speed (R2). Twenty minutes after R1, each subject consumed an isoenergetic meal containing either high GI (HGI, GI=77) or low GI (LGI, GI=37) carbohydrate providing 1.5 g CHO.kg (-1) BM. During REC, subjects also ingested a prescribed volume of water equal to 150% of their BM loss during R1. The duration of R2 in the HGI trial was 15% longer than in the LGI trial (HGI: 86.6+/-10.7 min vs. LGI: 75.2+/-8.1 min, p<0.05). The subjects also achieved complete rehydration after REC on both occasions. In conclusion, the consumption of a HGI meal during a 4 h recovery improved endurance capacity in a subsequent run; however, the precise mechanism(s) by which this takes place is yet to be clarified.

  5. Effect of glycemic load on eating behavior self-efficacy during weight loss.

    PubMed

    Karl, J Philip; Cheatham, Rachel A; Das, Sai Krupa; Hyatt, Raymond R; Gilhooly, Cheryl H; Pittas, Anastassios G; Lieberman, Harris R; Lerner, Debra; Roberts, Susan B; Saltzman, Edward

    2014-09-01

    High eating behavior self-efficacy may contribute to successful weight loss. Diet interventions that maximize eating behavior self-efficacy may therefore improve weight loss outcomes. However, data on the effect of diet composition on eating behavior self-efficacy are sparse. To determine the effects of dietary glycemic load (GL) on eating behavior self-efficacy during weight loss, body weight and eating behavior self-efficacy were measured every six months in overweight adults participating in a 12-mo randomized trial testing energy-restricted diets differing in GL. All food was provided during the first six months and self-selected thereafter. Total mean weight loss did not differ between groups, and GL-level had no significant effect on eating behavior self-efficacy. In the combined cohort, individuals losing the most weight reported improvements in eating behavior self-efficacy, whereas those achieving less weight loss reported decrements in eating behavior self-efficacy. Decrements in eating behavior self-efficacy were associated with subsequent weight regain when diets were self-selected. While GL does not appear to influence eating behavior self-efficacy, lesser amounts of weight loss on provided-food energy restricted diets may deter successful maintenance of weight loss by attenuating improvements in eating behavior self-efficacy.

  6. Impact of hyperbaric oxygen on diabetic ulcers is unaffected by glycemic control.

    PubMed

    Bakhtiani, Parkash; Bahktiani, Parkash; Mansuri, Owaise; Yadav, Abhijeet; Osuoha, Chima; Knight, Patty; Baynosa, Richard; McLafferty, Robert; Jakoby, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO2) therapy is an established intervention for treating chronic diabetic lower extremity ulcers, but the impact of glycemic control on its efficacy has not been determined. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of blood glucose control at initiation of HBO2 treatment on wound healing. Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) was measured at start of HBO2 therapy for 22 patients undergoing treatment of chronic lower extremity ulcers at two regional wound care centers. Patients with HbA1c < 7.5% were stratified into a "good glycemic control" group (n = 12, mean HbA1c 6.5 ± 0.8%), and patients with HbA1c ≥ 7.5% were stratified into a "poor glycemic control" group (n = 10, mean HbA1c 8.8 ± 1.4%, p = 0.004 compared to "good glycemic control group"). After 20 HBO2 sessions over 30 days in addition to standard wound care interventions, there was no difference in wound healing between the two glycemic control groups as indicated by. reduction from baseline in ulcer surface area, depth, or volume. The diabetic lower extremity wound response to HBO2 therapy is unaffected by glycemic control prior to treatment, and HBO2 treatment should not be delayed for suboptimal blood glucose control.

  7. An Elevated Glycemic Gap is Associated with Adverse Outcomes in Diabetic Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Wen-I; Lin, Chin-Sheng; Lee, Chien-Hsing; Wu, Ya-Chieh; Chang, Wei-Chou; Hsu, Chin-Wang; Wang, Jen-Chun; Tsai, Shih-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Acute hyperglycemia is a frequent finding in patients presenting to the emergency department (ED) with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). The prognostic role of hyperglycemia in diabetic patients with AMI remains controversial. We retrospectively reviewed patients’ medical records to obtain demographic data, clinical presentation, major adverse cardiac events (MACEs), several clinical scores and laboratory data, including the plasma glucose level at initial presentation and HbA1c levels. The glycemic gap, which represents changes in serum glucose levels during the index event, was calculated from the glucose level upon ED admission minus the HbA1c-derived average glucose (ADAG). We enrolled 331 patients after the review of medical records. An elevated glycemic gap between admission serum glucose levels and ADAG were associated with an increased risk of mortality in patients. The glycemic gap showed superior discriminative power regarding the development of MACEs when compared with the admission glucose level. The calculation of the glycemic gap may increase the discriminative powers of established clinical scoring systems in diabetic patients presenting to the ED with AMI. In conclusion, the glycemic gap could be used as an adjunct parameter to assess the severity and prognosis of diabetic patients presenting with AMI. However, the usefulness of the glycemic gap should be further explored in prospective longitudinal studies. PMID:27291987

  8. Do Cinnamon Supplements Have a Role in Glycemic Control in Type 2 Diabetes? A Narrative Review.

    PubMed

    Costello, Rebecca B; Dwyer, Johanna T; Saldanha, Leila; Bailey, Regan L; Merkel, Joyce; Wambogo, Edwina

    2016-11-01

    Cinnamon (Cinnamomum sp) has been suggested to help patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) achieve better glycemic control, although conclusions from meta-analyses are mixed. To evaluate whether the use of cinnamon dietary supplements by adults with T2DM had clinically meaningful effects on glycemic control, as measured by changes in fasting plasma glucose (FPG) or hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), a comprehensive PubMed literature search was performed. Eleven randomized controlled trials were identified that met our inclusion criteria that enrolled 694 adults with T2DM receiving hypoglycemic medications or not. In 10 of the studies, participants continued to take their hypoglycemic medications during the cinnamon intervention period. Studies ranged from 4 to 16 weeks in duration; seven studies were double-blind. Cinnamon doses ranged from 120 to 6,000 mg/day. The species of cinnamon used varied: seven used Cinnamomum cassia or Cinnamomum aromaticum, one used Cinnamomum zeylanicum, and three did not disclose the species. Because of the heterogeneity of the studies, a meta-analysis was not conducted. All 11 of the studies reported some reductions in FPG during the cinnamon intervention, and of the studies measuring HbA1c very modest decreases were also apparent with cinnamon, whereas changes in the placebo groups were minimal. However, only four studies achieved the American Diabetes Association treatment goals (FPG <7.2 mmol/L [130 mg/dL] and/or HbAlc <7.0). We conclude that cinnamon supplements added to standard hypoglycemic medications and other lifestyle therapies had modest effects on FPG and HbA1c. Until larger and more rigorous studies are available, registered dietitian nutritionists and other health care professionals should recommend that patients continue to follow existing recommendations of authoritative bodies for diet, lifestyle changes, and hypoglycemic drugs.

  9. Metabolic memory phenomenon in diabetes mellitus: Achieving and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Berezin, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) exhibits raised prevalence worldwide. There is a large body of evidence regarding the incidence of DM closely associates with cardiovascular (CV) complications. In this context, hyperglycaemia, oxidant stress, and inflammation are key factors that contribute in CV events and disease in type1 and type 2 DM, even when metabolic control was optimal and/or intensive glycemic control was implemented. It has been suggested that the effect of poor metabolic control or even transient episodes of hyperglycemia in DM associates in particularly with worsening ability of endogenous vasoreparative systems that are mediated epigenetic changes in several cells (progenitor cells, stem cells, mononuclears, immune cells), and thereby lead to so called "vascular glycemic memory" or "metabolic memory". Both terms are emphasized the fact that prior glucose control has sustained effects that persist even after return to more usual glycemic control. The mechanisms underlying the cellular "metabolic memory" induced by high glucose remain unclear. The review is discussed pathophysiology and clinical relevance of "metabolic" memory phenomenon in DM. The role of oxidative stress, inflammation, and epigenetics in DM and its vascular complications are highlighted. The effects of several therapeutic approaches are discussed.

  10. Impact of Glycemic and Blood Pressure Variability on Surrogate Measures of Cardiovascular Outcomes in Type 2 Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Di Flaviani, Alessandra; Picconi, Fabiana; Di Stefano, Paola; Giordani, Ilaria; Malandrucco, Ilaria; Maggio, Paola; Palazzo, Paola; Sgreccia, Fabrizio; Peraldo, Carlo; Farina, Fabrizio; Frajese, Gaetano; Frontoni, Simona

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The effect of glycemic variability (GV) on cardiovascular risk has not been fully clarified in type 2 diabetes. We evaluated the effect of GV, blood pressure (BP), and oxidative stress on intima-media thickness (IMT), left ventricular mass index (LVMI), flow-mediated dilation (FMD), and sympathovagal balance (low frequency [LF]/high frequency [HF] ratio) in 26 type 2 diabetic patients (diabetes duration 4.41 ± 4.81 years; HbA1c 6.70 ± 1.25%) receiving diet and/or metformin treatment, with no hypotensive treatment or complications. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) data were used to calculate mean amplitude of glycemic excursion (MAGE), continuous overall net glycemic action (CONGA)-2, mean blood glucose (MBG), mean postprandial glucose excursion (MPPGE), and incremental area under the curve (IAUC). Blood pressure (BP), circadian rhythm, and urinary 15-F2t-isoprostane (8-iso-prostaglandin F2α [PGF2α]) were also evaluated. Subjects were divided into dipper (D) and nondipper (ND) groups according to ΔBP. RESULTS IMT and LVMI were increased in ND versus D (0.77 ± 0.08 vs. 0.68 ± 0.13 [P = 0.04] and 67 ± 14 vs. 55 ± 11 [P = 0.03], respectively). MBG, MAGE, and IAUC were significantly associated with LF/HF ratio at night (r = 0.50, P = 0.01; r = 0.40, P = 0.04; r = 0.41, P = 0.04, respectively), MPPGE was negatively associated with FMD (r = −0.45, P = 0.02), and CONGA-2 was positively associated with LVMI (r = 0.55, P = 0.006). The Δsystolic BP was negatively associated with IMT (r = −0.43, P = 0.03) and with LVMI (r = −0.52, P = 0.01). Urinary 8-iso-PGF2α was positively associated with LVMI (r = 0.68 P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS An impaired GV and BP variability is associated with endothelial and cardiovascular damage in short-term diabetic patients with optimal metabolic control. Oxidative stress is the only independent predictor of increased LV mass and correlates with glucose and BP variability. PMID:21610126

  11. Oral magnesium supplementation improves glycemic control and lipid profile in children with type 1 diabetes and hypomagnesaemia

    PubMed Central

    Shahbah, Doaaa; Hassan, Tamer; Morsy, Saeed; Saadany, Hosam El; Fathy, Manar; Al-Ghobashy, Ashgan; Elsamad, Nahla; Emam, Ahmed; Elhewala, Ahmed; Ibrahim, Boshra; Gebaly, Sherief El; Sayed, Hany El; Ahmed, Hanan

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Dietary supplementation with magnesium (Mg) in addition to classical therapies for diabetes may help in prevention or delaying of diabetic complications. We aimed to evaluate the status of serum Mg in children with type 1 diabetes and assessing its relationship to glycemic control and lipid profile. Then evaluating the effect of oral Mg supplementation on glycemic control and lipid parameters. We included 71 children at Pediatric Endocrinology Outpatient Clinic, Zagazig University, Egypt with type 1 diabetes and assessed HBA1c, lipid profile, and serum Mg at the start of study. Patients with serum Mg level < 1.7 mg/dL were given 300 mg Mg oxide for 3 months. After that we reevaluated HBA1c, lipid profile, and serum Mg in all patients. The study included 71 patients with type 1 diabetes (32 males and 39 females); their mean age was 9.68 ± 3.99 years. The mean serum Mg level was 1.83 ± .27 mg/dL. Hypomagnesemia was detected in 28.2% study patients. Serum Mg was found to be positively correlated with high density lipoprotein, mean corpuscular volume and platelet count (P < 0.001), and negatively correlated with age, HbA1c, triglycerides, total cholesterol, low density lipoprotein, and duration of diabetes (P < 0.001). There was significant reduction in HBA1c in group given Mg supplementation. HBA1c was initially 10.11% ± 0.87%. After 3 months of oral Mg supplementation it is reduced to 7.88% ± 0.42% (P < 0.001). There was statistically significant difference in lipid parameters in hypomagnesemic diabetic patients before and after Mg supplementation with significant reduction in serum triglycerides, LDL, and total cholesterol following Mg supplementation with P < 0.001. Although HDL shows a significant increase after Mg supplementation in hypomagnesemic diabetic children with P < 0.001. Correction of hypomagnesemia in type 1 diabetic children with oral Mg supplements is associated with optimization of glycemic

  12. Assessing inpatient glycemic control: what are the next steps?

    PubMed

    Cook, Curtiss B; Wellik, Kay E; Kongable, Gail L; Shu, Jianfen

    2012-03-01

    Despite the emergence of glucometrics (i.e., systematic analysis of data on blood glucose levels of inpatients) as a subject of high interest, there remains a lack of standardization on how glucose parameters are measured and reported. This dilemma must be resolved before a national benchmarking process can be developed that will allow institutions to track and compare inpatient glucose control performance against established guidelines and that can also be supported by quality care organizations. In this article, we review some of the questions that need to be resolved through consensus and review of the evidence, and discuss some of the limitations in analyzing and reporting inpatient glucose data that must be addressed (or at least accepted as limitations) before hospitals can commit resources to gathering, compiling, and presenting inpatient glucose statistics as a health care quality measure. Standards must include consensus on which measures to report, the unit of analysis, definitions of targets for hyperglycemia treatment, a definition of hypoglycemia, determination of how data should be gathered (from chart review or from laboratory information systems), and which type of sample (blood or point of care) should be used for analysis of glycemic control. Hospitals and/or their representatives should be included in the discussion. For inpatient glucose control to remain a focus of interest, further dialogue and consensus on the topic are needed.

  13. Variable classifications of glycemic index determined by glucose meters.

    PubMed

    Lin, Meng-Hsueh Amanda; Wu, Ming-Chang; Lin, Jenshinn

    2010-07-01

    THE STUDY EVALUATED AND COMPARED THE DIFFERENCES OF GLUCOSE RESPONSES, INCREMENTAL AREA UNDER CURVE (IAUC), GLYCEMIC INDEX (GI) AND THE CLASSIFICATION OF GI VALUES BETWEEN MEASURED BY BIOCHEMICAL ANALYZER (FUJI AUTOMATIC BIOCHEMISTRY ANALYZER (FAA)) AND THREE GLUCOSE METERS: Accue Chek Advantage (AGM), BREEZE 2 (BGM), and Optimum Xceed (OGM). Ten healthy subjects were recruited for the study. The results showed OGM yield highest postprandial glucose responses of 119.6 +/- 1.5, followed by FAA, 118.4 +/- 1.2, BGM, 117.4 +/- 1.4 and AGM, 112.6 +/- 1.3 mg/dl respectively. FAA reached highest mean IAUC of 4156 +/- 208 mg x min/dl, followed by OGM (3835 +/- 270 mg x min/dl), BGM (3730 +/- 241 mg x min/dl) and AGM (3394 +/- 253 mg x min/dl). Among four methods, OGM produced highest mean GI value than FAA (87 +/- 5) than FAA, followed by BGM and AGM (77 +/- 1, 68 +/- 4 and 63 +/- 5, p<0.05). The results suggested that the AGM, BGM and OGM are more variable methods to determine IAUC, GI and rank GI value of food than FAA. The present result does not necessarily apply to other glucose meters. The performance of glucose meter to determine GI value of food should be evaluated and calibrated before use.

  14. Rice: a high or low glycemic index food?

    PubMed

    Miller, J B; Pang, E; Bramall, L

    1992-12-01

    We determined the glycemic (GI) and insulin-index (II) values for 12 rice products, using eight healthy subjects. The products were brown and white versions of three commercial varieties of rice [two varieties with normal amylose content (20%) and the other with 28% amylose], a waxy rice (0-2% amylose), a converted rice, a quick-cooking brown rice, puffed rice cakes, rice pasta, and rice bran. The GI of the rices ranged from 64 +/- 9 to 93 +/- 11, where glucose = 100. The high amylose rice gave a lower GI and II (P < 0.01) than did the normal-amylose and waxy-rice varieties. The converted rice and most other rice products gave a high GI. Insulin indices correlated positively with GI (r = 0.75, P < 0.05), although they were lower than expected. These results indicate that many varieties of rice, whether white, brown, or parboiled, should be classified as high GI foods. Only high-amylose varieties are potentially useful in low-GI diets.

  15. Glycemic index of local foods and diets: the Mediterranean experience.

    PubMed

    Riccardi, Gabriele; Clemente, Gennaro; Giacco, Rosalba

    2003-05-01

    The Mediterranean diet is a healthful eating pattern associated with the prevention of coronary heart disease (CHD). Its main features are moderate intake of total fat (predominantly monounsaturated fat), low consumption of saturated fat and cholesterol-rich foods, and high intake of starch. Although this type of diet has beneficial effects on lipid metabolism, its high carbohydrate content might not be ideal for patients with diabetes or other conditions associated with insulin resistance (e.g., metabolic syndrome), who are known to be at particular risk of CHD. We therefore evaluated the glycemic response to starchy foods based on wheat (typical of the Italian diet) in patients with type 2 diabetes and identified certain characteristics of foods explaining their effects on postprandial glucose response. We found that spaghetti and potato dumplings, because of their low blood glucose response, represent a valid alternative to other starchy foods typical of the Mediterranean diet. Food structure plays an important role in determining the accessibility of starch to digestion, thus influencing the postprandial blood glucose response, which modulates plasma insulin and lipid levels.

  16. Low Glycemic Index Carbohydrates versus All Types of Carbohydrates for Treating Diabetes in Pregnancy: A Randomized Clinical Trial to Evaluate the Effect of Glycemic Control.

    PubMed

    Perichart-Perera, Otilia; Balas-Nakash, Margie; Rodríguez-Cano, Ameyalli; Legorreta-Legorreta, Jennifer; Parra-Covarrubias, Adalberto; Vadillo-Ortega, Felipe

    2012-01-01

    Background. Due to the higher prevalence of obesity and diabetes mellitus (DM), more pregnant women complicated with diabetes are in need of clinical care. Purpose. Compare the effect of including only low glycemic index (GI) carbohydrates (CHO) against all types of CHO on maternal glycemic control and on the maternal and newborn's nutritional status of women with type 2 DM and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Methods. Women (n = 107, ≤29 weeks of gestation) were randomly assigned to one of two nutrition intervention groups: moderate energy and CHO restriction (Group 1: all types of CHO, Group 2: low GI foods). Results. No baseline differences in clinical data were observed. Capillary glucose concentrations throughout pregnancy were similar between groups. Fewer women in Group 2 exceeded weight gain recommendations. Higher risk of prematurity was observed in women in Group 2. No differences in glycemic control were observed between women with type 2 DM and those with GDM. Conclusions. Inclusion of low GI CHO as part of a comprehensive nutrition intervention is equally effective in improving glycemic control as compared to all types of CHO. This strategy had a positive effect in preventing excessive maternal weight gain but increased the risk of prematurity.

  17. Low Glycemic Index Carbohydrates versus All Types of Carbohydrates for Treating Diabetes in Pregnancy: A Randomized Clinical Trial to Evaluate the Effect of Glycemic Control

    PubMed Central

    Perichart-Perera, Otilia; Balas-Nakash, Margie; Rodríguez-Cano, Ameyalli; Legorreta-Legorreta, Jennifer; Parra-Covarrubias, Adalberto; Vadillo-Ortega, Felipe

    2012-01-01

    Background. Due to the higher prevalence of obesity and diabetes mellitus (DM), more pregnant women complicated with diabetes are in need of clinical care. Purpose. Compare the effect of including only low glycemic index (GI) carbohydrates (CHO) against all types of CHO on maternal glycemic control and on the maternal and newborn's nutritional status of women with type 2 DM and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Methods. Women (n = 107, ≤29 weeks of gestation) were randomly assigned to one of two nutrition intervention groups: moderate energy and CHO restriction (Group 1: all types of CHO, Group 2: low GI foods). Results. No baseline differences in clinical data were observed. Capillary glucose concentrations throughout pregnancy were similar between groups. Fewer women in Group 2 exceeded weight gain recommendations. Higher risk of prematurity was observed in women in Group 2. No differences in glycemic control were observed between women with type 2 DM and those with GDM. Conclusions. Inclusion of low GI CHO as part of a comprehensive nutrition intervention is equally effective in improving glycemic control as compared to all types of CHO. This strategy had a positive effect in preventing excessive maternal weight gain but increased the risk of prematurity. PMID:23251152

  18. Effects of diets differing in glycemic index and glycemic load on cardiovascular risk factors: review of randomized controlled-feeing trials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Despite a considerable amount of data available on the relationship between dietary glycemic index (GI) or load (GL) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors, in aggregate, the area remains unsettled. The aim of the present review was to summarize the effect of diets differing in GI/GL on CVD r...

  19. Accuracy of Continuous Glucose Monitoring Measurements in Normo-Glycemic Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Akintola, Abimbola A.; Noordam, Raymond; Jansen, Steffy W.; de Craen, Anton J.; Ballieux, Bart E.; Cobbaert, Christa M.; Mooijaart, Simon P.; Pijl, Hanno; Westendorp, Rudi G.; van Heemst, Diana

    2015-01-01

    Background The validity of continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) is well established in diabetic patients. CGM is also increasingly used for research purposes in normo-glycemic individuals, but the CGM validity in such individuals is unknown. We studied the accuracy of CGM measurements in normo-glycemic individuals by comparing CGM-derived versus venous blood-derived glucose levels and measures of glycemia and glycemic variability. Methods In 34 healthy participants (mean age 65.7 years), glucose was simultaneously measured every 10 minutes, via both an Enlite® CGM sensor, and in venous blood sampled over a 24-hour period. Validity of CGM-derived individual glucose measurements, calculated measures of glycemia over daytime (09:00h-23:00h) and nighttime (23:00h-09:00h), and calculated measures of glycemic variability (e.g. 24h standard deviation [SD]) were assessed by Pearson correlation coefficients, mean absolute relative difference (MARD) and paired t-tests. Results The median correlation coefficient between CGM and venous glucose measurements per participant was 0.68 (interquartile range: 0.40–0.78), and the MARD was 17.6% (SD = 17%). Compared with venous sampling, the calculated measure of glycemia during daytime was 0.22 mmol/L higher when derived from CGM, but no difference was observed during nighttime. Most measures of glycemic variability were lower with CGM than with venous blood sampling (e.g., 24h SD: 1.07 with CGM and 1.26 with venous blood; p-value = 0.004). Conclusion In normo-glycemic individuals, CGM-derived glucose measurements had good agreement with venous glucose levels. However, the measure of glycemia was higher during the day and most measures of glycemic variability were lower when derived from CGM. PMID:26445499

  20. Anxiety Symptoms in Adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes: Association with Blood Glucose Monitoring and Glycemic Control

    PubMed Central

    Herzer, Michele

    2010-01-01

    Objective To examine the prevalence of anxiety symptoms and their association with blood glucose monitoring (BGM) and glycemic control in adolescents with type 1 diabetes. Methods 276 adolescents and their caregivers completed measures of anxiety symptoms. Adolescents completed a measure of depressive symptoms. Demographic and family characteristics were obtained from caregiver report. Diabetes duration, regimen type, BGM frequency, and glycemic control were also collected. Results Trait anxiety symptoms that suggest further clinical assessment is needed were present in 17% of adolescents; the rate was 13% for state anxiety symptoms. Higher levels of state anxiety symptoms were associated with less frequent BGM F(14, 261) = 6.35, p < .0001, R2 = .25, and suboptimal glycemic control, F(15, 260) = 7.97, p < .0001, R2 = .32. State anxiety symptoms were correlates of BGM frequency and glycemic control independent of depressive symptoms. Conclusions State anxiety symptoms are associated with less frequent BGM and suboptimal glycemic control in adolescents with type 1 diabetes. PMID:19684117

  1. Family system dynamics and type 1 diabetic glycemic variability: a vector-auto-regressive model.

    PubMed

    Günther, Moritz Philipp; Winker, Peter; Böttcher, Claudia; Brosig, Burkhard

    2013-06-01

    Statistical approaches rooted in econometric methodology, so far foreign to the psychiatric and psychological realms have provided exciting and substantial new insights into complex mind-body interactions over time and individuals. Over 120 days, this structured diary study explored the mutual interactions of emotions within a classic 3-person family system with its Type 1 diabetic adolescent's daily blood glucose variability. Glycemic variability was measured through daily standard deviations of blood glucose determinations (at least 3 per day). Emotions were captured individually utilizing the self-assessment manikin on affective valence (negative-positive), activation (calm-excited), and control (dominated-dominant). Auto- and cross-correlating the stationary absolute (level) values of the mutually interacting parallel time series data sets through vector autoregression (VAR, grounded in econometric theory) allowed for the formulation of 2 concordant models. Applying Cholesky Impulse Response Analysis at a 95% confidence interval, we provided evidence for an adolescent being happy, calm, and in control to exhibit less glycemic variability and hence diabetic derailment. A nondominating mother and a happy father seemed to also reduce glycemic variability. Random shocks increasing glycemic variability affected only the adolescent and her father: In 1 model, the male parent felt in charge; in the other, he calmed down while his daughter turned sad. All reactions to external shocks lasted for less than 4 full days. Extant literature on affect and glycemic variability in Type 1 diabetic adolescents as well as challenges arising from introducing econometric theory to the field were discussed.

  2. Interaction between amylose and tea polyphenols modulates the postprandial glycemic response to high-amylose maize starch.

    PubMed

    Chai, Yanwei; Wang, Mingzhu; Zhang, Genyi

    2013-09-11

    High-amylose maize starch (HAM) is a common source material to make resistant starch with its high content of amylose (>70%). In the current investigation, the self-assembly of amylose in the presence of bioactive tea polyphenols (TPLs) and resulting slow digestion property of starch were explored. The experimental results using a mouse model showed a slow digestion property can be achieved with an extended and moderate glycemic response to HAM starch cocooked with TPLs. Further studies using a dilute aqueous amylose solution (0.1%, w/v) revealed an increased hydrodynamic radius of amylose molecules, indicating that TPLs could bridge them together, leading to increased molecular sizes. On the other hand, the bound TPLs interrupted the normal process of amylose recrystallizaiton evidenced by a decreased viscosity and storage modulus (G') of HAM (5%) gel, a rough surface of the cross-section of HAM film, and decreased short-range orders examined by Fourier transform infrared spectral analysis. Single-step degradation curves in the thermal gravimetric profile demonstrated the existence of a self-assembled amylose-TPL complex, which is mainly formed through hydrogen bonding interaction according to the results of iodine binding and X-ray powder diffraction analysis. Collectively, the amylose-TPL complexation influences the normal self-assembling process of amylose, leading to a low-ordered crystalline structure, which is the basis for TPLs' function in modulating the digestion property of HAM starch to produce a slowly digestible starch material that is beneficial to postprandial glycemic control and related health effects.

  3. Diabetic nephropathy: new approaches for improving glycemic control and reducing risk.

    PubMed

    Schernthaner, Guntram; Schernthaner, Gerit Holger

    2013-01-01

    Nephropathy is a common consequence of diabetes, with a high prevalence in patients with type 1 (15%-25%) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM; 30%-40%). Nephropathy is associated with a poor prognosis and high economic burden. The risk of developing nephropathy increases with the duration of diabetes, and early diagnosis and treatment of risk factors for nephropathy (e.g., tight control of glycemia and hypertension) can reduce the development and progression of diabetic nephropathy. Advances in our understanding of the mechanisms of renal complications associated with diabetes and the etiology of nephropathy have identified additional risk factors for nephropathy, and novel therapeutic options are being explored. This review discusses the pathophysiology of diabetic nephropathy and common risk factors. Furthermore, we discuss emerging treatments for T2DM that could potentially slow or prevent the progression of diabetic nephropathy. The use of incretin-based therapies, such as the dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) analogs, is growing in patients with T2DM, due to their efficacy and tolerability profiles. As renal safety is a key factor when choosing treatment options to manage patients with T2DM, drugs that are suitable for use in patients with varying degrees of renal impairment without a requirement for dose adjustment, such as the DPP-4 inhibitor linagliptin, are of particular use. The ongoing advances in T2DM therapy may allow optimization of glycemic control in a wide range of patients, thereby helping to reduce the increasing morbidity and mortality associated with diabetic nephropathy.

  4. Carbohydrate intake, glycemic index and prostate cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Vidal, Adriana C.; Williams, Christina D.; Allott, Emma H.; Howard, Lauren E.; Grant, Delores J.; McPhail, Megan; Sourbeer, Katharine N.; Pao-Hwa, Lin; Boffetta, Paolo; Hoyo, Cathrine; Freedland, Stephen J.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Reported associations between dietary carbohydrate and prostate cancer (PC) risk are poorly characterized by race. METHODS We analyzed the association between carbohydrate intake, glycemic index (GI), and PC risk in a study of white (N=262) and black (N=168) veterans at the Durham VA Hospital. Cases were 156 men with biopsy-confirmed PC and controls (N=274) had a PSA test but were not recommended for biopsy. Diet was assessed before biopsy with a self-administered food frequency questionnaire. Logistic regression models were used to estimate PC risk. RESULTS In multivariable analyses, higher carbohydrate intake, measured as percent of energy from carbohydrates, was associated with reduced PC risk (3rd vs. 1st tertile, OR=0.41, 95%CI 0.21–0.81, p=0.010), though this only reached significance in white men (p-trend=0.029). GI was unrelated to PC risk among all men, but suggestively linked with reduced PC risk in white men (p-trend=0.066) and increased PC risk in black men (p-trend=0.172), however the associations were not significant. Fiber intake was not associated with PC risk (all p-trends >0.55). Higher carbohydrate intake was associated with reduced risk of high-grade (p-trend=0.016), but not low-grade PC (p-trend=0.593). CONCLUSIONS Higher carbohydrate intake may be associated with reduced risk of overall and high-grade PC. Future larger studies are needed to confirm these findings. PMID:25417840

  5. Barley cultivar, kernel composition, and processing affect the glycemic index.

    PubMed

    Aldughpassi, Ahmed; Abdel-Aal, El-Sayed M; Wolever, Thomas M S

    2012-09-01

    Barley has a low glycemic index (GI), but it is unknown whether its GI is affected by variation in carbohydrate composition in different cultivars and by food processing and food form. To examine the effect of these factors on GI, 9 barley cultivars varying in amylose and β-glucan content were studied in 3 experiments in separate groups of 10 healthy participants. In Expt. 1, 3 barley cultivars underwent 2 levels of processing: hull removal [whole-grain (WG)] and bran, germ, and crease removal [white pearled (WP)]. GI varied by cultivar (CDC Fibar vs. AC Parkhill, [mean ± SEM]: 26 ± 3 vs. 53 ± 4, respectively; P < 0.05) and pearling (WG vs. WP: 26 ± 4 vs. 35 ± 3, respectively; P < 0.05) with no cultivar × pearling interaction. In Expt. 2, the GI of 7 WG cultivars ranged from 21 ± 4 to 36 ± 8 (P = 0.09). In Expt. 3, WG and WP AC Parkhill and Celebrity cultivars were ground and made into wet pasta. The GI of AC Parkhill pasta (69 ± 3) was similar to that of Celebrity pasta (64 ± 4) but, unlike in Expt. 1, the GI of WP pasta (61 ± 3) was less than that of WG pasta (72 ± 4) (P < 0.05). Pooled data from Expts. 1 and 2 showed that GI was correlated with total fiber (r = -0.75, P = 0.002) but not with measures of starch characteristics. We conclude that the GI of barley is influenced by cultivar, processing, and food form but is not predicted by its content of amylose or other starch characteristics.

  6. Long–Term Effects of Energy-Restricted Diets Differing in Glycemic Load on Metabolic Adaptation and Body Composition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A randomized controlled trial of high glycemic load (HG) and low glycemic load (LG) diets with food provided for 6 months and self-administered for 6 additional months at 30% caloric restriction (CR) was performed in 29 overweight adults (mean+/-SD, age 35+/-5y; BMI 27.5+/-1.5 kg/m2). Total energy e...

  7. Effects of a Psychoeducational Group on Mood and Glycemic Control in Adults with Diabetes and Visual Impairments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trozzolino, Linda; Thompson, Pamela S.; Tansman, Mara S.; Azen, Stanley P.

    2003-01-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of a 12-week psychoeducational group therapy program in improving mood and glycemic control in 48 adults with diabetes and visual impairments. Participants made statistically significant gains in glycemic control. There was a significant positive relationship between control and improvement in depression, but…

  8. Epigenetic Changes in Endothelial Progenitors as a Possible Cellular Basis for Glycemic Memory in Diabetic Vascular Complications.

    PubMed

    Rajasekar, Poojitha; O'Neill, Christina L; Eeles, Lydia; Stitt, Alan W; Medina, Reinhold J

    2015-01-01

    The vascular complications of diabetes significantly impact the quality of life and mortality in diabetic patients. Extensive evidence from various human clinical trials has clearly established that a period of poor glycemic control early in the disease process carries negative consequences, such as an increase in the development and progression of vascular complications that becomes evident many years later. Importantly, intensive glycemic control established later in the disease process cannot reverse or slow down the onset or progression of diabetic vasculopathy. This has been named the glycemic memory phenomenon. Scientists have successfully modelled glycemic memory using various in vitro and in vivo systems. This review emphasizes that oxidative stress and accumulation of advanced glycation end products are key factors driving glycemic memory in endothelial cells. Furthermore, various epigenetic marks have been proposed to closely associate with vascular glycemic memory. In addition, we comment on the importance of endothelial progenitors and their role as endogenous vasoreparative cells that are negatively impacted by the diabetic milieu and may constitute a "carrier" of glycemic memory. Considering the potential of endothelial progenitor-based cytotherapies, future studies on their glycemic memory are warranted to develop epigenetics-based therapeutics targeting diabetic vascular complications.

  9. The Importance of Social Support on Glycemic Control in Low-Income Latinos with Type 2 Diabetes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rotberg, Britt; Junqueira, Yasmine; Gosdin, Lucas; Mejia, Roberto; Umpierrez, Guillermo E.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The U.S. Latino population exhibits poorer glycemic control than the white population, leading to more frequent health complications and greater disease severity. Social support has been shown a significant factor in health and well-being. Purpose: To determine the association between glycemic control and social support in patients…

  10. Epigenetic Changes in Endothelial Progenitors as a Possible Cellular Basis for Glycemic Memory in Diabetic Vascular Complications

    PubMed Central

    Rajasekar, Poojitha; O'Neill, Christina L.; Eeles, Lydia; Stitt, Alan W.; Medina, Reinhold J.

    2015-01-01

    The vascular complications of diabetes significantly impact the quality of life and mortality in diabetic patients. Extensive evidence from various human clinical trials has clearly established that a period of poor glycemic control early in the disease process carries negative consequences, such as an increase in the development and progression of vascular complications that becomes evident many years later. Importantly, intensive glycemic control established later in the disease process cannot reverse or slow down the onset or progression of diabetic vasculopathy. This has been named the glycemic memory phenomenon. Scientists have successfully modelled glycemic memory using various in vitro and in vivo systems. This review emphasizes that oxidative stress and accumulation of advanced glycation end products are key factors driving glycemic memory in endothelial cells. Furthermore, various epigenetic marks have been proposed to closely associate with vascular glycemic memory. In addition, we comment on the importance of endothelial progenitors and their role as endogenous vasoreparative cells that are negatively impacted by the diabetic milieu and may constitute a “carrier” of glycemic memory. Considering the potential of endothelial progenitor-based cytotherapies, future studies on their glycemic memory are warranted to develop epigenetics-based therapeutics targeting diabetic vascular complications. PMID:26106624

  11. Interactions between Starch, Lipids, and Proteins in Foods: Microstructure Control for Glycemic Response Modulation.

    PubMed

    Parada, Javier; Santos, Jose L

    2016-10-25

    In real food, starch is usually forming part of a matrix with lipids and proteins. However, research on this ternary system and interactions between such food components has been scarce so far. The control of food microstructure is crucial to determine the product properties, including sensorial and nutritionals ones. This paper reviews the microstructural principles of interactions between starch, lipids, and proteins in foods as well as their effect on postprandial glycemic response, considering human intrinsic differences on postprandial glycemic responses. Several lines of research support the hypothesis that foods without rapidly digestible starch will not mandatorily generate the lowest postprandial glycemic response, highlighting that the full understanding of food microstructure, which modulates starch digestion, plays a key role on food design from a nutritional viewpoint.

  12. Diabetes and cardiovascular disease: changing the focus from glycemic control to improving long-term survival.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cecilia C Low; Reusch, Jane E B

    2012-11-06

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is the fifth-leading cause of death worldwide and contributes to leading causes of death, cancer and cardiovascular disease, including CAD, stroke, peripheral vascular disease, and other vascular disease. While glycemic management remains a cornerstone of DM care, the co-management of hypertension, atherosclerosis, cardiovascular risk reduction, and prevention of long-term consequences associated with DM are now well recognized as essential to improve long-term survival. Clinical trial evidence substantiates the importance of glycemic control, low-density cholesterol-lowering therapy, blood pressure lowering, control of albuminuria, and comprehensive approaches targeting multiple risk factors to reduce cardiovascular risk. This article presents a review of the role of DM in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and cardiac dysfunction, recent evidence on the degree of glycemic control and mortality, and available evidence for a multifaceted approach to improve long-term outcomes for patients.

  13. The Glycemic Index of Rice and Rice Products: A Review, and Table of GI Values.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Bhupinder; Ranawana, Viren; Henry, Jeyakumar

    2016-01-01

    Rice is the principle staple and energy source for nearly half the world's population and therefore has significant nutrition and health implications. Rice is generally considered a high glycemic index (GI) food, however, this depends on varietal, compositional, processing, and accompaniment factors. Being a major contributor to the glycemic load in rice eating populations, there is increasing concern that the rising prevalence of insulin resistance is as a result of the consumption of large amounts of rice. Devising ways and means of reducing the glycemic impact of rice is therefore imperative. This review gathers studies examining the GI of rice and rice products and provides a critical overview of the current state of the art. A table collating published GI values for rice and rice products is also included.

  14. Improved Glycemic Control in Intensively Treated Adult Subjects with Type 1 Diabetes Using Insulin Guidance Software

    PubMed Central

    Bookout, Tevin R.; McFann, Kim K.; Kelly, William C.; Beatson, Christie; Ellis, Samuel L.; Gutin, Raymond S.; Gottlieb, Peter A.

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Management of type 1 diabetes could be significantly improved with the availability of computerized insulin algorithms for home use. Methods This was a 1-year open label randomized control trial involving 123 adult subjects with type 1 diabetes (hemoglobin A1c values 7.5–11%) assigned to either the insulin guidance software (ACCU-CHEK® [Roche, Indianapolis, IN] Advisor) for personal data assistant (experimental group) or the control group. The primary aim of the study was to see if subjects using insulin dosing advisor software will improve glucose control over 1 year. The principal end point was an improvement in A1c at 6 and 12 months by ≥0.4%. Results Baseline demographics were similar in the two groups. Mean A1c was 8.54 ± 0.11% in the control group and 8.42 ± 0.11% (P = 0.4265) in the experimental group. The mean A1c was significantly lower from 3 to 12 months in the experimental group (P < 0.02). A1c reduction of ≥0.6% was maintained at 12 months in the experimental group. Also, a significantly higher number of subjects achieved A1c <7.5% in the experimental group from 3 to 9 months. Within target range glycemia (70–150 mg/dL) was higher in the experimental group at 3–9 months without any change in insulin dose or weight. Above target range glycemia was lower in the experimental group throughout the study. Frequency of testing per day was higher in the experimental group. Nocturnal hypoglycemia was not different between groups; however, the experimental group experienced more severe hypoglycemic events. Conclusions This is the first report that shows improved glycemic control can be maintained over 12 months in patients with type 1 diabetes by using Advisor with no change in insulin dose and weight. PMID:18715213

  15. A High Legume Low Glycemic Index Diet Improves Serum Lipid Profiles in Men

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhiying; Lanza, Elaine; Kris-Etherton, Penny M.; Colburn, Nancy H.; Bagshaw, Deborah; Rovine, Michael J.; Ulbrecht, Jan S.; Bobe, Gerd; Chapkin, Robert S.; Hartman, Terryl J.

    2012-01-01

    Clinical studies have shown that fiber consumption facilitates weight loss and improves lipid profiles; however, the beneficial effects of high fermentable fiber low glycemic index (GI) diets under conditions of weight maintenance are unclear. In the Legume Inflammation Feeding Experiment, a randomized controlled cross-over feeding study, 64 middle-aged men who had undergone colonoscopies within the previous 2 years received both a healthy American (HA) diet (no legume consumption, fiber consumption = 9 g/1,000 kcal, and GI = 69) and a legume enriched (1.5 servings/1,000 kcal), high fiber (21 g/1,000 kcal), low GI (GI = 38) diet (LG) in random order. Diets were isocaloric and controlled for macronutrients including saturated fat; they were consumed each for 4 weeks with a 2–4 week break separating dietary treatments. Compared to the HA diet, the LG diet led to greater declines in both fasting serum total cholesterol (TC) and low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) (P <0.001 and P <0.01, respectively). Insulin-resistant (IR) subjects had greater reductions in high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C; P <0.01), and triglycerides (TAG)/HDL-C (P = 0.02) after the LG diet, compared to the HA diet. Insulin-sensitive (IS) subjects had greater reductions in TC (P <0.001), LDL-C (P <0.01), TC/HDL-C (P <0.01), and LDL-C/HDL-C (P = 0.02) after the LG diet, compared to the HA diet. In conclusion, a high legume, high fiber, low GI diet improves serum lipid profiles in men, compared to a healthy American diet. However, IR individuals do not achieve the full benefits of the same diet on cardiovascular disease (CVD) lipid risk factors. PMID:20734238

  16. Effect of the carbohydrate counting method on glycemic control in patients with type 1 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The importance of achieving and maintaining an appropriate metabolic control in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM1) has been established in many studies aiming to prevent the development of chronic complications. The carbohydrate counting method can be recommended as an additional tool in the nutritional treatment of diabetes, allowing patients with DM1 to have more flexible food choices. This study aimed to evaluate the influence of nutrition intervention and the use of multiple short-acting insulin according to the carbohydrate counting method on clinical and metabolic control in patients with DM1. Methods Our sample consisted of 51 patients with DM1, 32 females, aged 25.3 ± 1.55 years. A protocol of nutritional status evaluation was applied and laboratory analysis was performed at baseline and after a three-month intervention. After the analysis of the food records, a balanced diet was prescribed using the carbohydrate counting method, and short-acting insulin was prescribed based on the total amount of carbohydrate per meal (1 unit per 15 g of carbohydrate). Results A significant decrease in A1c levels was observed from baseline to the three-month evaluation after the intervention (10.40 ± 0.33% and 9.52 ± 0.32%, respectively, p = 0.000). It was observed an increase in daily insulin dose after the intervention (0.99 ± 0.65 IU/Kg and 1.05 ± 0.05 IU/Kg, respectively, p = 0.003). No significant differences were found regarding anthropometric evaluation (BMI, waist, hip or abdominal circumferences and waist to hip ratio) after the intervention period. Conclusions The use of short-acting insulin based on the carbohydrate counting method after a short period of time resulted in a significant improvement of the glycemic control in patients with DM1 with no changes in body weight despite increases in the total daily insulin doses. PMID:20716374

  17. Ethnic Disparities in Glycemic Control Among Rural Older Adults with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Quandt, Sara A.; Bell, Ronny A.; Snively, Beverly M.; Smith, Shannon L.; Stafford, Jeanette M.; Wetmore, Lindsay K.; Arcury, Thomas A.

    2006-01-01

    Glycemic control is a predictor of diabetes-related morbidity and mortality. However, little is known about how well older adults in rural communities, with limited access to self-care resources and specialty care practitioners, control their diabetes. Even less is known about whether minority, older, rural adults are at increased risk for poor glycemic control. We analyzed data from a cross-sectional survey of randomly selected older (≥65 years) adults with type 2 diabetes in rural North Carolina. Participants (N=693) were men and women from three ethnic groups: African American, Native American, and White. Capillary blood samples were collected for HbA1C analysis. HbA1C levels (<7%, 7%–<8%, and ≥8%) were compared across ethnic and gender groups. Two multiple logistic regression models (model 1: personal characteristics; model 2: personal and health characteristics) were used to evaluate potential predictors of HbA1C ≥7%. Overall, 36.4% had HbA1C ≥7%. Native Americans and African-American men had the highest proportion at levels of poor glycemic control (≥7%), and African-American women and White men had the lowest. In bivariate analysis, ethnicity, living arrangements, use of medications for diabetes, having a diabetes-related healthcare visit in the past year, and duration of diabetes were significantly associated with glycemic control. In multivariate analysis (model 1), being Native American, having low income without Medicaid, and being married were associated with poor glycemic control. Adding health characteristics (model 2), longer diabetes duration and diabetes medication therapy were significant predictors. These data indicate that older ethnic minorities in rural communities are at increased risk for diabetes complications and need diabetes management strategies to improve glycemic control. PMID:16259490

  18. The effects of glycemic control on seizures and seizure-induced excitotoxic cell death

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Epilepsy is the most common neurological disorder after stroke, affecting more than 50 million persons worldwide. Metabolic disturbances are often associated with epileptic seizures, but the pathogenesis of this relationship is poorly understood. It is known that seizures result in altered glucose metabolism, the reduction of intracellular energy metabolites such as ATP, ADP and phosphocreatine and the accumulation of metabolic intermediates, such as lactate and adenosine. In particular, it has been suggested that the duration and extent of glucose dysregulation may be a predictor of the pathological outcome of status. However, little is known about neither the effects of glycemic control on brain metabolism nor the effects of managing systemic glucose concentrations in epilepsy. Results In this study, we examined glycemic modulation of kainate-induced seizure sensitivity and its neuropathological consequences. To investigate the relationship between glycemic modulation, seizure susceptibility and its neuropathological consequences, C57BL/6 mice (excitotoxin cell death resistant) were subjected to hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia, followed by systemic administration of kainic acid to induce seizures. Glycemic modulation resulted in minimal consequences with regard to seizure severity but increased hippocampal pathology, irrespective of whether mice were hypoglycemic or hyperglycemic prior to kainate administration. Moreover, we found that exogenous administration of glucose following kainic acid seizures significantly reduced the extent of hippocampal pathology in FVB/N mice (excitotoxin cell death susceptible) following systemic administration of kainic acid. Conclusion These findings demonstrate that modulation of the glycemic index can modify the outcome of brain injury in the kainate model of seizure induction. Moreover, modulation of the glycemic index through glucose rescue greatly diminishes the extent of seizure-induced cell death following kainate

  19. Long–Term Effects of High-and Low-Glycemic Load Energy-Restricted Diets on Metabolic Adaptation and the Composition of Weight Loss

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of high glycemic load (HG) and low glycemic load (LG) diets on resting metabolic rate (RMR) and body composition changes in response to caloric restriction (CR) remains controversial. Objective To examine the effects of two CR diets differing primarily in glycemic load on RMR and the % o...

  20. The individual and combined effects of glycemic index and protein on glycemic response, hunger, and energy intake.

    PubMed

    Makris, Angela P; Borradaile, Kelley E; Oliver, Tracy L; Cassim, Nida G; Rosenbaum, Diane L; Boden, Guenther H; Homko, Carol J; Foster, Gary D

    2011-12-01

    Although high protein and low glycemic index (GI) foods are thought to promote satiety, little is known about the effects of GI, protein, and their interaction on hunger and energy intake several hours following a mixed meal. This study investigated the long term effects of GI, protein, and their combined effects on glucose, insulin, hunger, and energy intake in healthy, sedentary, overweight, and obese adults (BMI of 30.9 ± 3.7 kg/m(2)). Sixteen individuals participated separately in four testing sessions after an overnight fast. The majority (75%) were non-Hispanic Blacks. Each consumed one of four breakfast meals (high GI/low protein, high GI/high protein, low GI/low protein, low GI/high protein) in random order. Visual analog scales (VAS) and blood samples were taken at baseline, 15 min, and at 30 min intervals over 4 h following the meal. After 4 h, participants were given the opportunity to consume food ad libitum from a buffet style lunch. Meals containing low GI foods produced a smaller glucose (P < 0.002) and insulin (P = 0.0001) response than meals containing high GI foods. No main effects for protein or interactions between GI and protein were observed in glucose or insulin responses, respectively. The four meals had no differential effect on observed energy intake or self-reported hunger, satiety, and prospective energy intake. Low GI meals produced the smallest postprandial increases in glucose and insulin. There were no effects for GI, protein, or their interaction on appetite or energy intake 4 h after breakfast.

  1. Thin sheets achieve optimal wrapping of liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulsen, Joseph; Démery, Vincent; Davidovitch, Benny; Santangelo, Christian; Russell, Thomas; Menon, Narayanan

    2015-03-01

    A liquid drop can wrap itself in a sheet using capillary forces [Py et al., PRL 98, 2007]. However, the efficiency of ``capillary origami'' at covering the surface of a drop is hampered by the mechanical cost of bending the sheet. Thinner sheets deform more readily by forming small-scale wrinkles and stress-focussing patterns, but it is unclear how coverage efficiency competes with mechanical cost as thickness is decreased, and what wrapping shapes will emerge. We place a thin (~ 100 nm) polymer film on a drop whose volume is gradually decreased so that the sheet covers an increasing fraction of its surface. The sheet exhibits a complex sequence of axisymmetric and polygonal partially- and fully- wrapped shapes. Remarkably, the progression appears independent of mechanical properties. The gross shape, which neglects small-scale features, is correctly predicted by a simple geometric approach wherein the exposed area is minimized. Thus, simply using a thin enough sheet results in maximal coverage.

  2. Hope matters to the glycemic control of adolescents and young adults with type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Santos, Fábio R M; Sigulem, Daniel; Areco, Kelsy C N; Gabbay, Monica A L; Dib, Sergio A; Bernardo, Viviane

    2015-05-01

    This study investigated the association of hope and its factors with depression and glycemic control in adolescents and young adults with type 1 diabetes. A total of 113 patients were invited to participate. Significant negative correlations were found between hope and HbA1c and also between hope and depression. Hope showed a significant association with HbA1c and depression in the stepwise regression model. Among the hope factors, "inner positive expectancy" was significantly associated with HbA1c and depression. This study supports that hope matters to glycemic control and depression. Intervention strategies focusing on hope should be further explored.

  3. Low-glycemic load decreases postprandial insulin and glucose and increases postprandial ghrelin in white but not black women.

    PubMed

    Brownley, Kimberly A; Heymen, Steve; Hinderliter, Alan L; Galanko, Joseph; Macintosh, Beth

    2012-07-01

    Alterations in appetite hormones favoring increased postprandial satiety have been implicated in both the glycemic control and potential weight-loss benefits of a low-glycemic diet. Racial differences exist in dietary glycemic load and appetite hormone concentrations. This study examined the impact of glycemic load on appetite hormones in 20 black women [10 normal weight, BMI = 22.8 ± 1.42 (mean ± SD); 10 obese, BMI = 35.1 ± 2.77] and 20 white women (10 normal weight, BMI = 22.9 ± 1.45; 10 obese, BMI = 34.3 ± 2.77). Each woman completed two 4.5-d weight-maintenance, mixed-macronutrient, high-glycemic vs. low-glycemic load diets that concluded with a test meal of identical composition. Blood samples collected before and serially for 3 h after each test meal were assayed for plasma ghrelin and serum insulin and glucose concentrations. Compared with the high-glycemic load meal, the low-glycemic load meal was associated with lower insulin(AUC) (P = 0.02), glucose(AUC) (P = 0.01), and urge to eat ratings (P = 0.05) but with higher ghrelin(AUC) (P = 0.008). These results suggest the satiating effect of a low-glycemic load meal is not directly linked to enhanced postprandial suppression of ghrelin. Notably, these effects were significant among white but not black women, suggesting that black women may be less sensitive than white women to the glucoregulatory effects of a low-glycemic load. These findings add to a growing literature demonstrating racial differences in postprandial appetite hormone responses. If reproducible, these findings have implications for individualized diet prescription for the purposes of glucose or weight control in women.

  4. Effects of Low Glycemic Index Diets on Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Jinhua; Heng, Weijun; Gao, Jianbo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Studies of the effects of low glycemic index (LGI) diets on gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) have reported conflicting findings. The aim of the study was to evaluate the results of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that investigated the effects of LGI diets with and without added dietary fiber (DF) on maternal and neonatal outcomes in GDM patients. We searched the MEDLINE, EMBASE, EBSCO, Springer, Ovid, and Cochrane Library databases for studies of the effects of LGI diets in GDM patients. We performed a meta-analysis of the effects of the LGI diets with and without added dietary fiber (DF) on GDM outcomes. Risk ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using random- and fixed-effects models. Five RCTs involving 302 participants were included in our meta-analysis. No statistically significant differences in the risks of cesarean section delivery, large for gestational age, and small for gestational age were observed. The risk of macrosomia in the LGI groups was significantly lower (RR = 0.27; 95% CI: 0.10–0.71; P = 0.008) than that in the control groups. Our subgroup analysis of the effects of DF showed that LGI diets with an increased level of DF, relative to the control diet, reduced the risk of macrosomia beyond that of the LGI diets alone (RR: 0.17 vs 0.47, respectively). The subgroup analysis also showed that LGI diets in which the level of DF was approximately equivalent to that in the control diets significantly reduced the risk of insulin usage (RR = 0.69; 95% CI: 0.52–0.92; P = 0.01). The LGI diets reduced the risk of macrosomia in GDM patients, and LGI diets with added DF reduced the risk of macrosomia further. The LGI diets with levels of DF approximately equivalent to that in the control diets reduced the risk of insulin usage in GDM patients. PMID:27258511

  5. Taking a low glycemic index multi-nutrient supplement as breakfast improves glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Li, Di; Zhang, Peiwen; Guo, Honghui; Ling, Wenhua

    2014-12-10

    Dietary therapy is the mainstay of treatment for diabetes. This study examined the effect of a low glycemic index (GI) multi-nutrient supplement, consumed in place of breakfast, on glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). A total of 71 participants were randomized at a 2:1 ratio into either a breakfast replacement group or a normal breakfast group for a 12-week interventional study. The primary outcome measure was change in hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c). Nutrition status and somatometry were studied as secondary outcomes. The breakfast replacement group displayed a -0.2% absolute reduction in HbA1c (95% CI (confidence interval), -0.38% to -0.07%, p = 0.004), while the HbA1c of the control group increased 0.3% (95% CI, 0.1% to 0.5%, p = 0.005). The baseline Mini Nutritional Assessment score for both groups was 26.0 and no significant changes occurred following intervention. However, there was a statistically significant difference in body mass index between the treatment and control groups (p = 0.032) due to the weight gain in the control group (increased 0.5 kg, 95% CI was 0.2 to 0.9, p = 0.007). These data suggest that breakfast replacement with a low GI multi-nutrient supplement can improve glycemic and weight control in T2DM.

  6. Taking a Low Glycemic Index Multi-Nutrient Supplement as Breakfast Improves Glycemic Control in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Li, Di; Zhang, Peiwen; Guo, Honghui; Ling, Wenhua

    2014-01-01

    Dietary therapy is the mainstay of treatment for diabetes. This study examined the effect of a low glycemic index (GI) multi-nutrient supplement, consumed in place of breakfast, on glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). A total of 71 participants were randomized at a 2:1 ratio into either a breakfast replacement group or a normal breakfast group for a 12-week interventional study. The primary outcome measure was change in hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c). Nutrition status and somatometry were studied as secondary outcomes. The breakfast replacement group displayed a −0.2% absolute reduction in HbA1c (95% CI (confidence interval), −0.38% to −0.07%, p = 0.004), while the HbA1c of the control group increased 0.3% (95% CI, 0.1% to 0.5%, p = 0.005). The baseline Mini Nutritional Assessment score for both groups was 26.0 and no significant changes occurred following intervention. However, there was a statistically significant difference in body mass index between the treatment and control groups (p = 0.032) due to the weight gain in the control group (increased 0.5 kg, 95% CI was 0.2 to 0.9, p = 0.007). These data suggest that breakfast replacement with a low GI multi-nutrient supplement can improve glycemic and weight control in T2DM. PMID:25514391

  7. Eight Weeks of Cosmos caudatus (Ulam Raja) Supplementation Improves Glycemic Status in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shi-Hui; Ismail, Amin; Anthony, Joseph; Ng, Ooi Chuan; Hamid, Azizah Abdul; Barakatun-Nisak, Mohd Yusof

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. Optimizing glycemic control is crucial to prevent type 2 diabetes related complications. Cosmos caudatus is reported to have promising effect in improving plasma blood glucose in an animal model. However, its impact on human remains ambiguous. This study was carried out to evaluate the effectiveness of C. caudatus on glycemic status in patients with type 2 diabetes. Materials and Methods. In this randomized controlled trial with two-arm parallel-group design, a total of 101 subjects with type 2 diabetes were randomly allocated to diabetic-ulam or diabetic controls for eight weeks. Subjects in diabetic-ulam group consumed 15 g of C. caudatus daily for eight weeks while diabetic controls abstained from taking C. caudatus. Both groups received the standard lifestyle advice. Results. After 8 weeks of supplementation, C. caudatus significantly reduced serum insulin (-1.16 versus +3.91), reduced HOMA-IR (-1.09 versus +1.34), and increased QUICKI (+0.05 versus -0.03) in diabetic-ulam group compared with the diabetic controls. HbA1C level was improved although it is not statistically significant (-0.76% versus -0.37%). C. caudatus was safe to consume. Conclusions. C. caudatus supplementation significantly improves insulin resistance and insulin sensitivity in patients with type 2 diabetes.

  8. Exploration of Low-Glycemic-Impact Sugars and Polyols, using SRC, DSC, and RVA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The anti-plasticizing action of the high sucrose concentration in a cookie formula inhibits both gluten development during dough mixing and starch gelatinization/pasting during baking. If alternative sugars and polyols with lower glycemic impact are used to replace sucrose, the resulting absence of ...

  9. Association between Social Relationship and Glycemic Control among Older Japanese: JAGES Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Kawachi, Ichiro; Kondo, Katsunori; Kondo, Naoki; Nagamine, Yuiko; Tani, Yukako; Shirai, Kokoro; Tazuma, Susumu

    2017-01-01

    Aim The present study examined whether social support, informal socializing and social participation are associated with glycemic control in older people. Methods Data for this population-based cross-sectional study was obtained from the Japan Gerontological Evaluation Study (JAGES) 2010 linked to the annual health check-up data in Japan. We analyzed 9,554 individuals aged ≥65 years without the certification of needed long-term care. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to assess the effect of social support, informal socializing and social participations on glycemic control. The outcome measure was HbA1c ≥8.4%. Results 1.3% of the participants had a level of HbA1c over 8.4%. Better glycemic control was significantly associated with meeting with friends one to four times per month (odds ratio [OR] 0.51, 95% confidence interval [CI]0.30–0.89, compared to meeting with friends a few times per year or less) and participation in sports groups (OR 0.50, 95% CI 0.26–0.97) even after adjusting for other variables. Meeting with friends more than twice per week, receiving social support, and being married were not associated with better control of diabetes. Conclusions Meeting with friends occasionally is associated with better glycemic control among older people. PMID:28060887

  10. Progressive zinc-induced changes in glycemic responses in lean and obese LAIN-cp rats

    SciTech Connect

    Zwick, D.; Frimpong, N.A.; Tulp, O.L. )

    1991-03-15

    The effect of diet and phenotype on glycemic status was studied in 9-17 week (wk) old female LAIN-cp rats fed isoenergetic diets containing 0, 20 (control), or 100 ppm Zn. At 9, 13 and 17 wks of age, fasting glucose (FG) of obese > lean. At age 13 wks, Fg of obese + 0 ppm Zn < control obese, and by 17 weeks, lean + 0 ppm Zn < controls, consistent with both diet and phenotype effects on FG. Four point glucose tolerance tests were determined via both intraperitoneal (ipGTT) and oral (OGT) routes at periodic intervals. ipGTT glycemic responses of control obese > lean at all ages, and at both 13 and 17 weeks, obese rats fed both 0 ppm and 100 ppm Zn diets had greater glycemic excursions at +30, +60, and +120 minutes than obese controls, and the glycemic excursions became progressively more impaired as the dietary regimens progressed. In contrast, the corresponding plasma glucoses following ipGTT in lean rats fed 0 or 100 ppm Zn diets and the OGT responses of all rats of both phenotypes remained similar to lean controls at those point. Plasma insulin concentrations of obese 0 ppm Zn < controls following ipGTT, and became progressively more impaired in obese rats fed 0 ppm Zn diet as the duration of treatment continued. These observations suggest that the progressive deterioration of glucose homeostasis when fed diets deficient or excessive in Zn content may be due to impaired pancreatic secretion and/or release of insulin.

  11. Determination of Factors Effected Dietary Glycemic Index in Turkish University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gumus, Huseyin; Akdevelioglu, Yasemin; Bulduk, Sidika

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to determine how factors such as smoking, regular activity, etc. affected dietary glycemic index in university students. Methods: This study was carried out at Gazi University, Ankara, Turkey. The participants were 577 randomly selected Turkish healthy female university students aged 17-32 years. The survey included a questionnaire that…

  12. Determinants of glycemic control in youth with type 2 diabetes at randomization in the TODAY study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of this study was to investigate insulin sensitivity and secretion indices and determinants of glycemic control in youth with recent-onset type 2 diabetes (T2DM) at randomization in the TODAY study, the largest study of youth with T2DM to date. We examined estimates of insulin sensitivit...

  13. Effect of cooling of cooked white rice on resistant starch content and glycemic response.

    PubMed

    Sonia, Steffi; Witjaksono, Fiastuti; Ridwan, Rahmawati

    2015-01-01

    Cooling of cooked starch is known to cause starch retrogradation which increases resistant starch content. This study aimed to determine the effect of cooling of cooked white rice on resistant starch content and glycemic response in healthy subjects. Resistant starch contents were analyzed on freshly cooked white rice (control rice), cooked white rice cooled for 10 hours at room temperature (test rice I), and cooked white rice cooled for 24 hours at 4°C then reheated (test rice II). The results showed that resistant starch contents in control rice, test rice I, and test rice II were 0.64 g/100 g, 1.30 g/100 g, and 1.65 g/100 g, respectively. Test rice II had higher resistant starch content than test rice I, hence used in the clinical study along with control rice to characterize glycemic response in 15 healthy adults. The clinical study was a randomized, single-blind crossover study. In the clinical study, test rice II significantly lowered glycemic response compared with control rice (125±50.1 vs 152±48.3 mmol.min/L, respectively; p=0.047). In conclusion, cooling of cooked white rice increased resistant starch content. Cooked white rice cooled for 24 hours at 4°C then reheated lowered glycemic response compared with freshly cooked white rice.

  14. Impact of food processing on the glycemic index (GI) of potato products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Potatoes are one of the most popular carbohydrate foods in industrialized and some developing countries. However, contradicting arguments and misconceptions on potatoes as a high glycemic index (GI) food is directly affecting potato consumption during the past years. Potato varieties, maturity level...

  15. Estimated glycemic index and dietary fiber content of cookies elaborated with extruded wheat bran.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Pérez, Faviola; Salazar-García, María Guadalupe; Romero-Baranzini, Ana Lourdes; Islas-Rubio, Alma Rosa; Ramírez-Wong, Benjamín

    2013-03-01

    The increasing demand for high-fiber products has favored the design of numerous bakery products rich in fiber such as bread, cookies, and cakes. The objective of this study was to evaluate the dietary fiber and estimated glycemic index of cookies containing extruded wheat bran. Wheat bran was subjected to extrusion process under three temperature profiles: TP1;(60, 75, 85 and 100 °C), TP2;(60, 80, 100 and 120 °C), and TP3;(60, 80, 110 and 140 °C) and three moisture contents: (15, 23, and 31 %). Cookies were elaborated using extruded wheat bran (30 %), separated into two fractions (coarse and fine). The dietary fiber content of cookies elaborated with extruded wheat bran was higher than the controls; C0 (100 % wheat flour) and C1 (30 % of no extruded bran coarse fraction) and C2 (30 % of no extruded bran fine fraction). The higher values of dietary fiber were observed on cookies from treatments 5 (TP1, 31 % moisture content and coarse fraction) and 11 (TP2, 31 % moisture content and coarse fraction). The estimated glycemic index of cookies ranged from 68.54 to 80.16. The dietary fiber content of cookies was increased and the lowest glycemic index corresponded to the cookies elaborated with extruded wheat bran. Cookie made with the treatment 11 had a better dietary fiber content and lower estimated glycemic index.

  16. Association of Exercise Stages of Change with Glycemic Control in Individuals with Type 2 Diabetes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Natarajan, Sundar; Clyburn, Ernest B.; Brown, Ronald T.

    2002-01-01

    Investigated the distribution of diabetic patients' stages of change to follow an exercise regimen, examining whether later stages of change were associated with better glycemic control. Data on participants from a primary care clinic (who were predominantly black, female, and indigent) indicated that over half of were in pre-contemplation,…

  17. Dietary hyperglycemia, glycemic index and age-related metabolic retinal diseases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The glycemic index (GI) indicates how fast blood glucose is raised after consuming a carbohydrate-containing food. Human metabolic studies indicate that GI is related to patho-physiological responses after meals. Compared with a low-GI meal, a high-GI meal is characterized with hyperglycemia during ...

  18. Glycemic index treatment using Japanese foods in a girl with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kumada, Tomohiro; Hiejima, Ikuko; Nozaki, Fumihito; Hayashi, Anri; Fujii, Tatsuya

    2013-05-01

    We introduced a low glycemic index treatment using Japanese ethnic foods to a 13-year-old girl with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome caused by tuberous sclerosis complex. She had previously refused the modified Atkins diet within 2 weeks of diet treatment because of its restrictiveness. The low glycemic index treatment was implemented by limiting the daily carbohydrate intake to 50 g of foods with a glycemic index of less than 50 relative to that of glucose, which included udon, soba, and unpolished Japonica rice with natto. One month after the initiation of the diet therapy, the clusters of tonic seizures for 30 to 60 minutes during sleep were reduced from two or three times per week to once or twice per month, and the frequent myoclonic seizures in the awake state disappeared. She has been on the diet therapy for more than 1 year, and the efficacy of the diet has been sustained. Low glycemic index treatment should be considered for patients with medication-resistant epilepsy who cannot tolerate restrictive diet therapies. Japanese ethnic foods can be used for this diet therapy.

  19. Postprandial lipid responses to standard carbohydrate challenges used to determine glycemic index values

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Prior studies assessing metabolic effects of different types of carbohydrate have focused on their glycemic response. Not considered has been the response of postprandial cardiometabolic risk indicators. This study assessed the postprandial lipid responses to two forms of carbohydrates used as ref...

  20. Exploration of functionality of low glycemic impact sugars and polyols using DSC, RVA, and cookie baking

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Consumers' interest in healthy cookies is increasing, including expectations for prebiotic nutritional benefits and low glycemic impact. Plasticization of flour polymers is critical to mixing and baking for baked goods. However, concentrated sugar solutions act as anti-plasticizers compared to wat...

  1. Acute effects of dietary glycemic index on antioxidant capacity in nutrient-controlled feeding study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oxidative stress, caused by an imbalance between antioxidant capacity and reactive oxygen species, may be an early event in a metabolic cascade elicited by a high glycemic index (GI) diet, ultimately increasing the risk for cardiovascular disease and diabetes. We conducted a feeding study to evalua...

  2. Informing food choices and health outcomes by use of the dietary glycemic index

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Considerable epidemiologic evidence links consuming lower glycemic index (GI) diets with good health, particularly upon aging. The GI is a kinetic parameter that reflects the ability of carbohydrate (CHO) contained in consumed foods to raise blood glucose in vivo. Newer nutritional, clinical, and ex...

  3. Estimating the reliability of glycemic index values and potential sources of methodological and biological variability

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: The utility of glycemic index (GI) values for chronic disease risk management remains controversial. While absolute GI value determinations for individual foods have been shown to vary significantly in individuals with diabetes, there is a dearth of data on the reliability of GI value de...

  4. Glycemic Control in a Clinic-Based Sample of Diabetics in M'Bour Senegal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BeLue, Rhonda; Ndiaye, Khadidiatou; NDao, Fatou; Ba, Fatou Niass Niang; Diaw, Mor

    2016-01-01

    Background: Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) including Senegal is faced with a significant and increasing burden of type 2 diabetes. However, little information is available about diabetes management among Senegalese diabetics. Purpose: The current study aims to describe the level of glycemic control among a convenience sample of diabetics who receive…

  5. Hindbrain DPP-IV inhibition improves glycemic control and promotes negative energy balance.

    PubMed

    Mietlicki-Baase, Elizabeth G; McGrath, Lauren E; Koch-Laskowski, Kieran; Krawczyk, Joanna; Pham, Tram; Lhamo, Rinzin; Reiner, David J; Hayes, Matthew R

    2017-05-01

    The beneficial glycemic and food intake-suppressive effects of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) have made this neuroendocrine system a leading target for pharmacological approaches to the treatment of diabetes and obesity. One strategy to increase the activity of endogenous GLP-1 is to prevent the rapid degradation of the hormone by the enzyme dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (DPP-IV). However, despite the expression of both DPP-IV and GLP-1 in the brain, and the clear importance of central GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) signaling for glycemic and energy balance control, the metabolic effects of central inhibition of DPP-IV activity are unclear. To test whether hindbrain DPP-IV inhibition suppresses blood glucose, feeding, and body weight gain, the effects of 4th intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of the FDA-approved DPP-IV inhibitor sitagliptin were evaluated. Results indicate that hindbrain delivery of sitagliptin improves glycemic control in a GLP-1R-dependent manner, suggesting that this effect is due at least in part to increased endogenous brainstem GLP-1 activity after sitagliptin administration. Furthermore, 4th ICV injection of sitagliptin reduced 24h body weight gain and energy intake, with a selective suppression of high-fat diet, but not chow, intake. These data reveal a novel role for hindbrain GLP-1R activation in glycemic control and also demonstrate that DPP-IV inhibition in the caudal brainstem promotes negative energy balance.

  6. Physician and patient management of type 2 diabetes and factors related to glycemic control in Spain

    PubMed Central

    Yurgin, Nicole Rae; Boye, Kristina Secnik; Dilla, Tatiana; Suriñach, Núria Lara; Llach, Xavier Badia

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess current treatment patterns, blood glucose test strip usage, and treatment compliance in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in primary care centers in Spain, and to assess factors related to glycemic control. We conducted a retrospective chart review of patients with T2DM and measured treatment compliance using the Morisky-Green questionnaire. 294 patients were included in the study from a population of patients attending 30 primary care centers throughout Spain. Results showed that the majority of patients were treated with oral monotherapy (36%) and oral combination therapy (35%). Less than half of the patients had good glycemic control (HbA1c ≤ 6.5%). Half of the patients treated pharmacologically reported good compliance with treatment. Logistic regression analyses performed to identify factors associated with glycemic control showed that high body mass index (BMI) and poor compliance were the strongest predictors of poor HbA1c control (OR: 2.198 and 1.789, respectively, p < 0.05). In conclusion, in the course of managing diabetes, physicians and patients should attempt to improve compliance and lower BMI, which could lead to better glycemic control. PMID:19920948

  7. Revisiting tight glycemic control in perioperative and critically ill patients: when one size may not fit all.

    PubMed

    Abdelmalak, Basem B; Lansang, M Cecilia

    2013-09-01

    Glycemic control has received intense scrutiny in the last decade as an important aspect of patient care. Earlier studies suggested that tight glycemic control (target level of 80 - 110 mg/dL) improved outcomes in intensive care unit (ICU) patients. Subsequent trials did not confirm the same benefit. Moreover, increased mortality was found in association with such tight control compared with a less strict target. As a result, tight glucose control has become less popular. The interaction between diabetic status and outcomes in relation to glucose control strategies and/or chronic glycemic state in perioperative and critically ill patients was examined. Tight glucose control appears to be more beneficial in patients without diabetes than in those with known diabetes. It also may be more beneficial in improving outcomes in surgical rather than nonsurgical ICU patients, and in decreasing sepsis rather than mortality. Tight glycemic control was associated with a high incidence of hypoglycemia, which may offset some of its potential benefits. Tight glycemic control in the perioperative and intensive care settings should not be totally abandoned either as a clinical practice or as a subject of future research. Beneficial effects of tight glycemic control may be demonstrated when the appropriate glycemic targets are matched to the appropriate population.

  8. Glycemic response to carob (ceratonia siliqua L) in healthy subjects and with the in vitro hydrolysis index.

    PubMed

    Milek Dos Santos, Luciana; Tomzack Tulio, Lindamir; Fuganti Campos, Leticia; Ramos Dorneles, Marcelo; Carneiro Hecke Krüger, Claudia

    2014-09-12

    The purpose of this study was to determine the in vivo glycemic index of carob tablets with healthy subjects and to determine the in vitro glycemic index of carob tablets and carob flour by the hydrolysis index. Seven healthy volunteers consumed portions of carob tablets containing 26g of available carbohydrate. Their capillary blood was taken at intervals after carob or glucose consumption. The glycemic hydrolysis index by an in vitro technique was based in the release of glucose after enzymatic treatment of carob tablets and carob flour. The determination of the fiber content was performed using the enzymatic- gravimetric method. By the in vivo determination, the estimated glycemic index of carob tablets could be considered low (≤ 55). By the in vitro determination, the estimated glycemic index ranged from 40.1+0.02 of carob tablets to 40.6+0.05 of carob flour. The total fiber values obtained for carob flour samples were from 42.6% ± 0.49 to 42.9% ± 0.68 with no statistical significant differences between samples. Carob tablets and carob flour could be classified as low glycemic index food and low glycemic load food. Carob flour is a high fiber food, containing mainly high levels of insoluble fiber.

  9. The role of genetic factors and kidney and liver function in glycemic control in type 2 diabetes patients on long-term metformin and sulphonylurea cotreatment.

    PubMed

    Klen, Jasna; Goričar, Katja; Janež, Andrej; Dolžan, Vita

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the influence of genetic polymorphisms of metformin transporters on long-term glycemic control and lipid status in type 2 diabetes patients in the everyday clinical setting. In total 135 patients treated with combination of metformin and sulphonylurea for at least 6 months were genotyped for SLC22A1 rs628031 and SLC47A1 rs2289669 polymorphisms. Relatively good blood glucose control with median HbA1c 6.9 (6.4-7.6) % was achieved on prescribed metformin dosage of 2550 (2000-2550) mg per day. Only 28 (20.7%) patients experienced mild hypoglycemia events, while no severe hypoglycemia events were observed. Most patients had normal or mildly impaired renal function. Parameters indicating renal function were not correlated with fasting glucose, HbA1c, or lipid parameters. Rs628031 and rs2289669 had minor allele frequencies of 0.385 and 0.355, respectively, and were not associated with HbA1c levels. Rs628031 was marginally associated with risk for hypoglycemia events (P = 0.046; OR = 0.51; 95% CI 0.26-0.99), while significant correlation was observed between rs2289669 and total cholesterol levels (P = 0.018). In conclusion, in patients on long-term metformin and sulphonylurea combination treatment, metformin transporters polymorphisms do not play a major role in glycemic control; however, they may influence lipid status.

  10. The Role of Genetic Factors and Kidney and Liver Function in Glycemic Control in Type 2 Diabetes Patients on Long-Term Metformin and Sulphonylurea Cotreatment

    PubMed Central

    Klen, Jasna; Janež, Andrej; Dolžan, Vita

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the influence of genetic polymorphisms of metformin transporters on long-term glycemic control and lipid status in type 2 diabetes patients in the everyday clinical setting. In total 135 patients treated with combination of metformin and sulphonylurea for at least 6 months were genotyped for SLC22A1 rs628031 and SLC47A1 rs2289669 polymorphisms. Relatively good blood glucose control with median HbA1c 6.9 (6.4–7.6) % was achieved on prescribed metformin dosage of 2550 (2000–2550) mg per day. Only 28 (20.7%) patients experienced mild hypoglycemia events, while no severe hypoglycemia events were observed. Most patients had normal or mildly impaired renal function. Parameters indicating renal function were not correlated with fasting glucose, HbA1c, or lipid parameters. Rs628031 and rs2289669 had minor allele frequencies of 0.385 and 0.355, respectively, and were not associated with HbA1c levels. Rs628031 was marginally associated with risk for hypoglycemia events (P = 0.046; OR = 0.51; 95% CI 0.26–0.99), while significant correlation was observed between rs2289669 and total cholesterol levels (P = 0.018). In conclusion, in patients on long-term metformin and sulphonylurea combination treatment, metformin transporters polymorphisms do not play a major role in glycemic control; however, they may influence lipid status. PMID:25025077

  11. Peri-procedural Glycemic Control in Patients with Diabetes Mellitus Undergoing Coronary Angiography with Possible Percutaneous Coronary Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Binita; Berger, Jeffrey S.; Amoroso, Nicholas S.; Mai, Xingchen; Lorin, Jeffrey D.; Danoff, Ann; Schwartzbard, Arthur Z.; Lobach, Iryna; Guo, Yu; Feit, Frederick; Slater, James; Attubato, Michael J.; Sedlis, Steven P.

    2014-01-01

    Peri-procedural hyperglycemia is an independent predictor of mortality in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). However, peri-procedural management of blood glucose is not standardized. The effects of routinely continuing long-acting glucose-lowering medications prior to coronary angiography with possible PCI on peri-procedural glycemic control have not been investigated. Patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) (n=172) were randomized to continue (Continue group; n=86) or hold (Hold group; n=86) their clinically prescribed long-acting glucose-lowering medications prior to procedure. The primary endpoint was glucose level on procedural access. In a subset of patients (no DM group, n=25, Continue group, n=25, and Hold group, n=25), selected measures of platelet activity that change acutely were assessed. Patients with DM randomized to the Continue group had lower blood glucose levels on procedural access compared with those randomized to the Hold group (117 [97–151] vs 134 [117–172] mg/dL, p=0.002). There were 2 hypoglycemic events in the Continue group and none in the Hold group, and no adverse events in either group. Selected markers of platelet activity differed across the no DM, Continue, and Hold groups (leukocyte platelet aggregates: 8.1% [7.2–10.4], 8.7% [6.9–11.4], 10.9% [8.6–14.7], p=0.007; monocyte platelet aggregates: 14.0% [10.3–16.3], 20.8% [16.2–27.0], 22.5% [15.2–35.4], p<0.001; soluble p-selectin: 51.9ng/mL [39.7–74.0], 59.1ng/mL [46.8–73.2], 72.2ng/mL [58.4–77.4], p=0.014). In conclusion, routinely continuing clinically prescribed long-acting glucose-lowering medications prior to coronary angiography with possible PCI helps achieve peri-procedural euglycemia, appears safe, and should be considered as a strategy for achieving peri-procedural glycemic control. PMID:24630791

  12. Plasma adiponectin concentrations are associated with dietary glycemic index in Malaysian patients with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Loh, Beng-In; Sathyasuryan, Daniel Robert; Mohamed, Hamid Jan Jan

    2013-01-01

    Adiponectin, an adipocyte-derived hormone has been implicated in the control of blood glucose and chronic inflammation in type 2 diabetes. However, limited studies have evaluated dietary factors on plasma adiponectin levels, especially among type 2 diabetic patients in Malaysia. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of dietary glycemic index on plasma adiponectin concentrations in patients with type 2 diabetes. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 305 type 2 diabetic patients aged 19-75 years from the Penang General Hospital, Malaysia. Socio-demographic information was collected using a standard questionnaire while dietary details were determined by using a pre-validated semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire. Anthropometry measurement included weight, height, BMI and waist circumference. Plasma adiponectin concentrations were measured using a commercial ELISA kit. Data were analyzed using multiple linear regression. After multivariate adjustment, dietary glycemic index was inversely associated with plasma adiponectin concentrations (β =-0.272, 95% CI -0.262, - 0.094; p<0.001). It was found that in individuals who consumed 1 unit of foods containing high dietary glycemic index that plasma adiponectin level reduced by 0.3 μg/mL. Thirty two percent (31.9%) of the variation in adiponectin concentrations was explained by age, sex, race, smoking status, BMI, waist circumference, HDL-C, triglycerides, magnesium, fiber and dietary glycemic index according to the multiple linear regression model (R2=0.319). These results support the hypothesis that dietary glycemic index influences plasma adiponectin concentrations in patients with type 2 diabetes. Controlled clinical trials are required to confirm our findings and to elucidate the underlying mechanism.

  13. Glucose sensor evaluation of glycemic instability in pediatric type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Alemzadeh, Ramin; Loppnow, Cindy; Parton, Elaine; Kirby, Midge

    2003-01-01

    Maintaining blood glucose (BG) levels within the target range can be an elusive goal in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM). To identify factor(s) that may contribute to glycemic instability, we analyzed the Continuous Glucose Monitoring System (CGMS) (Medtronic MiniMed, Northridge, CA) profiles of a group of children with type 1 DM and a history of frequent BG fluctuations and hypoglycemia. A total of 30 (17 girls, 13 boys) pediatric patients with a history of frequent BG fluctuations and hypoglycemia (mean age, 10.5 +/- 0.7 years; duration, 5.0 +/- 0.6 years), on three to four injections of insulin daily or insulin pump therapy, were evaluated by the CGMS. The mean BG (MBG), absolute means of daily differences (MODD), mean amplitude of glycemic excursion (MAGE), and number of hypoglycemic events (BG <60 mg/dL) for 48 h were calculated in each patient. There was a significant correlation between MBG and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) (r(2) = 0.22, p < 0.009). There was also a significant correlation between severity of lipohypertrophy and glycemic control (HbA1c) (r(2) = 0.20, p < 0.01). The MODD values had a positive correlation with the severity of injection site lipohypertrophy (r(2) = 0.37, p < 0.0003). The MAGE values had a positive correlation with bolus:basal insulin ratio (r(2) = 0.22, p < 0.009) and number of hypoglycemic events (r(2) = 0.21, p < 0.008), independent of age, MBG, and glycemic control. The 48-h CGMS profile can help characterize day-to-day and within-day BG variability and identify factors influencing glycemic instability in pediatric type 1 DM.

  14. Prevalence of microalbuminuria in relation to glycemic control in type-2 diabetic patients in Mymensingh.

    PubMed

    Hasan, M J; Muqueet, A; Sharmeen, A; Hoque, M R

    2015-01-01

    Microalbuminuria is a renal marker of generalized vascular endothelial damage and early atherosclerosis. Patients with microalbuminuria are at increased risk of microvascular and macrovascular complications of diabetes mellitus like myocardial infarction, stroke and nephropathy. Poor glycemic control increases the risk of microalbuminuria. This study was conducted to determine the frequency of microalbuminuria in type 2 diabetes and compare the frequency of microalbuminuria in poor and good glycemic control in type 2 diabetes. One Hundred and twenty two type 2 diabetic patients were included in the study. Data on age, gender, duration of diabetes, microalbuminuria and HbA1c were recorded. Urine and blood samples were collected and analyzed for microalbuminuria, blood glucose and HbA1c. All patients of both genders with type 2 diabetes for over 2 years were selected in this study. Patients with other causes of proteinuria were excluded. Out of 120 cases 93(77.5%) were male and 27(22.5%) were female. Mean age of patients was 57.8±14.7 years and average duration of diabetes was 9.2 years. Microalbuminuria was found 76.9% of male and 23.1% of female. Patients with poor glycemic control and good glycemic control have frequency of microalbuminuria of 55% and 54% respectively. Uncontrolled diabetes is strongly associated with prevalence of microalbuminuria. Screening for microalbuminuria and HbA1c test should be done both in newly and already diagnosed type 2 diabetic patients as an early marker of renal dysfunction and glycemic control.

  15. Glycemic index of starch affects nitrogen retention in grower pigs.

    PubMed

    Drew, M D; Schafer, T C; Zijlstra, R T

    2012-04-01

    Three studies were performed to examine the effect of starch and protein digestion rates on N retention in grower pigs. In Exp. 1, the glycemic index (GI) of corn, a malting barley, and a slow-rumen-degradable barley (SRD-barley) were measured using 6 barrows (BW = 18.0 ± 0.5 kg). The GI of malting barley was greater (P < 0.05) than that of SRD-barley (71.1 vs. 49.4), and the GI of both barley cultivars was less (P < 0.05) than that of corn (104.8). In Exp. 2, the standardized ileal digestibility of AA and DE content of the 3 ingredients were determined using 5 ileal-cannulated barrows (BW = 20.7 ± 2.3). The apparent total-tract energy digestibility values of corn (86.1%) and malting barley (85.7%) were greater (P < 0.05) than that of SRD-barley (82.3%). The standardized ileal digestibility of Lys was 94.0, 92.6, and 92.4% for corn, malting barley, and SRD-barley, respectively, and did not differ among grains. In Exp. 3, 6 diets were formulated to equal DE (3.40 Mcal/kg), standardized ileal digestibility of Lys (8.6 g/kg), starch (424.9 g/kg), and digestible CP (180.0 g/kg) using the values obtained in Exp. 2. Three GI [high (corn), medium (malting barley), and low (SRD-barley)] and 2 rates of protein digestion [rapid (soy protein hydrolysate) and slow (soy protein isolate)] were tested in a 3 × 2 factorial arrangement with 36 barrows (BW = 32.2 ± 2.5 kg). Pigs were fed 3.0 times the maintenance energy requirement daily in 2 meals for 2 wk and were housed in metabolic crates to collect feces and urine separately. At the end of the study, intestinal contents were collected from 4 equal-length segments of the small intestine. The percentage of unabsorbed CP in segment 1 relative to dietary CP was greater (P < 0.05) for the soy protein isolate diet than for the soy protein hydrolysate diet (170.3 vs. 116.5%). The percentages of unabsorbed starch in segments 1 and 2 were greater (P < 0.05) for the SRD-barley diet than for the malting barley or corn diet. Nitrogen

  16. DIETARY HYPERGLYCEMIA, GLYCEMIC INDEX AND METABOLIC RETINAL DISEASES

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Chung-Jung; Taylor, Allen

    2014-01-01

    The glycemic index (GI) indicates how fast blood glucose is raised after consuming a carbohydrate-containing food. Human metabolic studies indicate that GI is related to patho-physiological responses after meals. Compared with a low-GI meal, a high-GI meal is characterized with hyperglycemia during the early postprandial stage (0~2 h) and a compensatory hyperlipidemia associated with counter-regulatory hormone responses during late postprandial stage (4~6 h). Over the past three decades, several human health disorders have been related to GI. The strongest relationship suggests that consuming low-GI foods prevents diabetic complications. Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a complication of diabetes. In this aspect, GI appears to be useful as a practical guideline to help diabetic people choose foods. Abundant epidemiological evidence also indicates positive associations between GI and risk for type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and more recently, age-related macular degeneration (AMD) in people without diabetes. Although data from randomized controlled intervention trials are scanty, these observations are strongly supported by evolving molecular mechanisms which explain the pathogenesis of hyperglycemia. This wide range of evidence implies that dietary hyperglycemia is etiologically related to human aging and diseases, including DR and AMD. In this context, these diseases can be considered metabolic retinal diseases. Molecular theories that explain hyperglycemic pathogenesis involve a mitochondria-associated pathway and four glycolysis-associated pathways, including advanced glycation end products formation, protein kinase C activation, polyol pathway, and hexosamine pathway. While the four glycolysis-associated pathways appear to be universal for both normoxic and hypoxic conditions, the mitochondria-associated mechanism appears to be most relevant to the hyperglycemic, normoxic pathogenesis. For diseases that affect tissues with highly active metabolism and that

  17. Multi-Scale Glycemic Variability: A Link to Gray Matter Atrophy and Cognitive Decline in Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Xingran; Abduljalil, Amir; Manor, Brad D.; Peng, Chung-Kang; Novak, Vera

    2014-01-01

    Objective Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) accelerates brain aging and cognitive decline. Complex interactions between hyperglycemia, glycemic variability and brain aging remain unresolved. This study investigated the relationship between glycemic variability at multiple time scales, brain volumes and cognition in type 2 DM. Research Design and Methods Forty-three older adults with and 26 without type 2 DM completed 72-hour continuous glucose monitoring, cognitive tests and anatomical MRI. We described a new analysis of continuous glucose monitoring, termed Multi-Scale glycemic variability (Multi-Scale GV), to examine glycemic variability at multiple time scales. Specifically, Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition was used to identify five unique ultradian glycemic variability cycles (GVC1–5) that modulate serum glucose with periods ranging from 0.5–12 hrs. Results Type 2 DM subjects demonstrated greater variability in GVC3–5 (period 2.0–12 hrs) than controls (P<0.0001), during the day as well as during the night. Multi-Scale GV was related to conventional markers of glycemic variability (e.g. standard deviation and mean glycemic excursions), but demonstrated greater sensitivity and specificity to conventional markers, and was associated with worse long-term glycemic control (e.g. fasting glucose and HbA1c). Across all subjects, those with greater glycemic variability within higher frequency cycles (GVC1–3; 0.5–2.0 hrs) had less gray matter within the limbic system and temporo-parietal lobes (e.g. cingulum, insular, hippocampus), and exhibited worse cognitive performance. Specifically within those with type 2 DM, greater glycemic variability in GVC2–3 was associated with worse learning and memory scores. Greater variability in GVC5 was associated with longer DM duration and more depression. These relationships were independent of HbA1c and hypoglycemic episodes. Conclusions Type 2 DM is associated with dysregulation of glycemic variability over multiple

  18. Does a patient-managed insulin intensification strategy with insulin glargine and insulin glulisine provide similar glycemic control as a physician-managed strategy? Results of the START (Self-Titration With Apidra to Reach Target) Study: a randomized noninferiority trial.

    PubMed

    Harris, Stewart B; Yale, Jean-François; Berard, Lori; Stewart, John; Abbaszadeh, Babak; Webster-Bogaert, Susan; Gerstein, Hertzel C

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Diabetes self-management is universally regarded as a foundation of diabetes care. We determined whether comparable glycemic control could be achieved by self-titration versus physician titration of a once-daily bolus insulin dose in patients with type 2 diabetes who are unable to achieve optimal glycemia control with a basal insulin. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Patients with type 2 diabetes, an HbA1c level >7% (53 mmol/mol), and either nocturnal hypoglycemia episodes or an insufficient basal insulin glargine level (with or without oral agents) to achieve a fasting plasma glucose level ≤6 mmol/L (108 mg/dL) were studied. Participants all had bolus insulin glulisine added at breakfast and were allocated to either algorithm-guided patient self-titration or physician titration. The primary outcome was an HbA1c level ≤7% (53 mmol/mol) without severe hypoglycemia. RESULTS After a mean (SD) follow-up of 159.4 days (36.2 days), 28.4% of participants in the self-titration arm vs. 21.2% in the physician titration arm achieved an HbA1c level of ≤7% (53 mmol/mol) without severe hypoglycemia (between-group absolute difference 7.2%; 95% CI -3.2 to 17.7). The lower end of this 95% confidence interval was within the predetermined noninferiority boundary of -5% (P noninferiority = 0.011). CONCLUSIONS In stable patients with type 2 diabetes who are receiving doses of basal insulin glargine who require bolus insulin, a simple bolus insulin patient-managed titration algorithm is as effective as a physician-managed algorithm.

  19. Glycemic Excursions in Type 1 Diabetes in Pregnancy: A Semiparametric Statistical Approach to Identify Sensitive Time Points during Gestation

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Resmi; Khoury, Jane; Altaye, Mekibib; Dolan, Lawrence

    2017-01-01

    Aim. To examine the gestational glycemic profile and identify specific times during pregnancy that variability in glucose levels, measured by change in velocity and acceleration/deceleration of blood glucose fluctuations, is associated with delivery of a large-for-gestational-age (LGA) baby, in women with type 1 diabetes. Methods. Retrospective analysis of capillary blood glucose levels measured multiple times daily throughout gestation in women with type 1 diabetes was performed using semiparametric mixed models. Results. Velocity and acceleration/deceleration in glucose levels varied across gestation regardless of delivery outcome. Compared to women delivering LGA babies, those delivering babies appropriate for gestational age exhibited significantly smaller rates of change and less variation in glucose levels between 180 days of gestation and birth. Conclusions. Use of innovative statistical methods enabled detection of gestational intervals in which blood glucose fluctuation parameters might influence the likelihood of delivering LGA baby in mothers with type 1 diabetes. Understanding dynamics and being able to visualize gestational changes in blood glucose are a potentially useful tool to assist care providers in determining the optimal timing to initiate continuous glucose monitoring. PMID:28280744

  20. Effect of low glycemic index food and postprandial exercise on blood glucose level, oxidative stress and antioxidant capacity.

    PubMed

    Kasuya, Noriaki; Ohta, Shoichiro; Takanami, Yoshikazu; Kawai, Yukari; Inoue, Yutaka; Murata, Isamu; Kanamoto, Ikuo

    2015-04-01

    Low glycemic index (GI) food and postprandial exercise are non-drug therapies for improving postprandial hyperglycemia. The present randomized, crossover study investigated the effect of low GI food combined with postprandial exercise on postprandial blood glucose level, oxidative stress and antioxidant capacity. A total of 13 healthy subjects were each used in four experiments: i) rice only (control), ii) salad prior to rice (LGI), iii) exercise following rice (EX) and iv) salad prior to rice and exercise following rice (MIX). The blood glucose level, oxidative stress and antioxidant capacity were then measured. At 60 min after the meal, the blood glucose level was observed to be increased in the MIX group compared with that in the LGI group. Furthermore, at 180 min, the antioxidant capacity was found to be reduced in the MIX group compared with those of the LGI and EX groups. These findings suggest that low GI food combined with postprandial exercise does not improve postprandial hyperglycemia. It may be necessary to establish optimal timing and intensity when combining low GI food with postprandial exercise to improve postprandial hyperglycemia.

  1. Effect of low glycemic index food and postprandial exercise on blood glucose level, oxidative stress and antioxidant capacity

    PubMed Central

    KASUYA, NORIAKI; OHTA, SHOICHIRO; TAKANAMI, YOSHIKAZU; KAWAI, YUKARI; INOUE, YUTAKA; MURATA, ISAMU; KANAMOTO, IKUO

    2015-01-01

    Low glycemic index (GI) food and postprandial exercise are non-drug therapies for improving postprandial hyperglycemia. The present randomized, crossover study investigated the effect of low GI food combined with postprandial exercise on postprandial blood glucose level, oxidative stress and antioxidant capacity. A total of 13 healthy subjects were each used in four experiments: i) rice only (control), ii) salad prior to rice (LGI), iii) exercise following rice (EX) and iv) salad prior to rice and exercise following rice (MIX). The blood glucose level, oxidative stress and antioxidant capacity were then measured. At 60 min after the meal, the blood glucose level was observed to be increased in the MIX group compared with that in the LGI group. Furthermore, at 180 min, the antioxidant capacity was found to be reduced in the MIX group compared with those of the LGI and EX groups. These findings suggest that low GI food combined with postprandial exercise does not improve postprandial hyperglycemia. It may be necessary to establish optimal timing and intensity when combining low GI food with postprandial exercise to improve postprandial hyperglycemia. PMID:25780409

  2. A systematic review on the effect of sweeteners on glycemic response and clinically relevant outcomes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The major metabolic complications of obesity and type 2 diabetes may be prevented and managed with dietary modification. The use of sweeteners that provide little or no calories may help to achieve this objective. Methods We did a systematic review and network meta-analysis of the comparative effectiveness of sweetener additives using Bayesian techniques. MEDLINE, EMBASE, CENTRAL and CAB Global were searched to January 2011. Randomized trials comparing sweeteners in obese, diabetic, and healthy populations were selected. Outcomes of interest included weight change, energy intake, lipids, glycated hemoglobin, markers of insulin resistance and glycemic response. Evidence-based items potentially indicating risk of bias were assessed. Results Of 3,666 citations, we identified 53 eligible randomized controlled trials with 1,126 participants. In diabetic participants, fructose reduced 2-hour blood glucose concentrations by 4.81 mmol/L (95% CI 3.29, 6.34) compared to glucose. Two-hour blood glucose concentration data comparing hypocaloric sweeteners to sucrose or high fructose corn syrup were inconclusive. Based on two ≤10-week trials, we found that non-caloric sweeteners reduced energy intake compared to the sucrose groups by approximately 250-500 kcal/day (95% CI 153, 806). One trial found that participants in the non-caloric sweetener group had a decrease in body mass index compared to an increase in body mass index in the sucrose group (-0.40 vs 0.50 kg/m2, and -1.00 vs 1.60 kg/m2, respectively). No randomized controlled trials showed that high fructose corn syrup or fructose increased levels of cholesterol relative to other sweeteners. Conclusions Considering the public health importance of obesity and its consequences; the clearly relevant role of diet in the pathogenesis and maintenance of obesity; and the billions of dollars spent on non-caloric sweeteners, little high-quality clinical research has been done. Studies are needed to determine the role

  3. Impact of postoperative glycemic control and nutritional status on clinical outcomes after total pancreatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Hao-Jun; Jin, Chen; Fu, De-Liang

    2017-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the impact of glycemic control and nutritional status after total pancreatectomy (TP) on complications, tumor recurrence and overall survival. METHODS Retrospective records of 52 patients with pancreatic tumors who underwent TP were collected from 2007 to 2015. A series of clinical parameters collected before and after surgery, and during the follow-up were evaluated. The associations of glycemic control and nutritional status with complications, tumor recurrence and long-term survival were determined. Risk factors for postoperative glycemic control and nutritional status were identified. RESULTS High early postoperative fasting blood glucose (FBG) levels (OR = 4.074, 95%CI: 1.188-13.965, P = 0.025) and low early postoperative prealbumin levels (OR = 3.816, 95%CI: 1.110-13.122, P = 0.034) were significantly associated with complications after TP. Postoperative HbA1c levels over 7% (HR = 2.655, 95%CI: 1.299-5.425, P = 0.007) were identified as one of the independent risk factors for tumor recurrence. Patients with postoperative HbA1c levels over 7% had much poorer overall survival than those with HbA1c levels less than 7% (9.3 mo vs 27.6 mo, HR = 3.212, 95%CI: 1.147-8.999, P = 0.026). Patients with long-term diabetes mellitus (HR = 15.019, 95%CI: 1.278-176.211, P = 0.031) and alcohol history (B = 1.985, SE = 0.860, P = 0.025) tended to have poor glycemic control and lower body mass index levels after TP, respectively. CONCLUSION At least 3 mo are required after TP to adapt to diabetes and recover nutritional status. Glycemic control appears to have more influence over nutritional status on long-term outcomes after TP. Improvement in glycemic control and nutritional status after TP is important to prevent early complications and tumor recurrence, and improve survival. PMID:28127200

  4. Extended Prandial Glycemic Profiles of Foods as Assessed Using Continuous Glucose Monitoring Enhance the Power of the 120-Minute Glycemic Index

    PubMed Central

    Chlup, Rudolf; Peterson, Karolina; Zapletalová, Jana; Kudlová, Pavla; Sečkař, Pavel

    2010-01-01

    Background The glycemic index (GI) is routinely measured 120 minutes after food intake (GI120). The purpose of this prospective open label study was to assess (1) the dynamics of glycemia over the 210 minutes following food consumption and (2) the evolution of GIs based on 120-, 150-, 180-, and 210-minute glycemic profiles. Method Twenty healthy subjects (mean ± SE; 21.9 ± 1.39 years of age; body mass index 23.6 ± 0.63 kg/m2; 7 men and 13 women) completed the study. Each subject consumed 10 different foods with known GI120 on three separate occasions at four different times of day according to a defined meal plan over a 9-day period; 32 meals were evaluated. The GIs for intervals of 120, 150, 180 and 210 minutes after food consumption were determined using a continuous glucose monitoring system (CGMS) to measure glycemia. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test was applied to compare the GIs. Results Glycemia returned to baseline within 120 minutes for honey and tomato soup; within 210 minutes for white bread, choco-rice cookies, fish and potatoes, wafers, and meat ravioli with cheese; and later for dark chocolate, apricot dumplings, and choco-wheat cookies. The extended GIs were higher than the respective GI120s in eight of the foods. Conclusions The 120-minute glycemic index fails to fully account for changes in glycemia after ingestion of a mixed meal because glycemia remains above baseline for a longer period. The CGMS is a convenient method to determine the glucose response/GIs over intervals extended up to 210 minutes, which is adequate time for the absorption of most foods. PMID:20513328

  5. Glycemic control influences lung membrane diffusion and oxygen saturation in exercise-trained subjects with type 1 diabetes: alveolar-capillary membrane conductance in type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Wheatley, Courtney M; Baldi, James C; Cassuto, Nicholas A; Foxx-Lupo, William T; Snyder, Eric M

    2011-03-01

    Lung diffusing capacity (DLCO) is influenced by alveolar-capillary membrane conductance (D (M)) and pulmonary capillary blood volume (V (C)), both of which can be impaired in sedentary type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) subjects due to hyperglycemia. We sought to determine if T1DM, and glycemic control, affected DLNO, DLCO, D (M), V (C) and SaO(2) during maximal exercise in aerobically fit T1DM subjects. We recruited 12 T1DM subjects and 18 non-diabetic subjects measuring DLNO, DLCO, D (M), and V (C) along with SaO(2) and cardiac output (Q) at peak exercise. The T1DM subjects had significantly lower DLCO/Q and D (M)/Q with no difference in Q, DLNO, DLCO, D (M), or V (C) (DLCO/Q = 2.1 ± 0.4 vs. 1.7 ± 0.3, D (M)/Q = 2.8 ± 0.6 vs. 2.4 ± 0.5, non-diabetic and T1DM, p < 0.05). In addition, when considering all subjects there was a relationship between DLCO/Q and SaO(2) at peak exercise (r = 0.46, p = 0.01). Within the T1DM group, the optimal glycemic control group (HbA1c <7%, n = 6) had higher DLNO, DLCO, and D (M)/Q than the poor glycemic control subjects (HbA1c ≥ 7%, n = 6) at peak exercise (DLCO = 38.3 ± 8.0 vs. 28.5 ± 6.9 ml/min/mmHg, DLNO = 120.3 ± 24.3 vs. 89.1 ± 21.0 ml/min/mmHg, D (M)/Q = 3.8 ± 0.8 vs. 2.7 ± 0.2, optimal vs. poor control, p < 0.05). There was a negative correlation between HbA1c with DLCO, D (M) and D (M)/Q at peak exercise (DLCO: r = -0.70, p = 0.01; D (M): r = -0.70, p = 0.01; D (M)/Q: r = -0.68, p = 0.02). These results demonstrate that there is a reduction in lung diffusing capacity in aerobically fit athletes with T1DM at peak exercise, but suggests that maintaining near-normoglycemia potentially averts lung diffusion impairments.

  6. Supported Telemonitoring and Glycemic Control in People with Type 2 Diabetes: The Telescot Diabetes Pragmatic Multicenter Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Wild, Sarah H.; Hanley, Janet; Lewis, Stephanie C.; McKnight, John A.; Padfield, Paul L.; Parker, Richard A.; Pinnock, Hilary; Sheikh, Aziz; McKinstry, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Background Self-monitoring of blood glucose among people with type 2 diabetes not treated with insulin does not appear to be effective in improving glycemic control. We investigated whether health professional review of telemetrically transmitted self-monitored glucose results in improved glycemic control in people with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes. Methods and Findings We performed a randomized, parallel, investigator-blind controlled trial with centralized randomization in family practices in four regions of the United Kingdom among 321 people with type 2 diabetes and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) >58 mmol/mol. The supported telemonitoring intervention involved self-measurement and transmission to a secure website of twice-weekly morning and evening glucose for review by family practice clinicians who were not blinded to allocation group. The control group received usual care, with at least annual review and more frequent reviews for people with poor glycemic or blood pressure control. HbA1c assessed at 9 mo was the primary outcome. Intention-to-treat analyses were performed. 160 people were randomized to the intervention group and 161 to the usual care group between June 6, 2011, and July 19, 2013. HbA1c data at follow-up were available for 146 people in the intervention group and 139 people in the control group. The mean (SD) HbA1c at follow-up was 63.0 (15.5) mmol/mol in the intervention group and 67.8 (14.7) mmol/mol in the usual care group. For primary analysis, adjusted mean HbA1c was 5.60 mmol/mol / 0.51% lower (95% CI 2.38 to 8.81 mmol/mol/ 95% CI 0.22% to 0.81%, p = 0·0007). For secondary analyses, adjusted mean ambulatory systolic blood pressure was 3.06 mmHg lower (95% CI 0.56–5.56 mmHg, p = 0.017) and mean ambulatory diastolic blood pressure was 2.17 mmHg lower (95% CI 0.62–3.72, p = 0.006) among people in the intervention group when compared with usual care after adjustment for baseline differences and minimization strata. No significant

  7. Impact of Long-Term Poor and Good Glycemic Control on Metabolomics Alterations in Type 1 Diabetic People

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Tumpa; Kudva, Yogish C.; Persson, Xuan-Mai T.; Schenck, Louis A.; Ford, G. Charles; Singh, Ravinder J.; Carter, Rickey

    2016-01-01

    Context: Poor glycemic control in individuals with type 1 diabetes (T1D) is associated with both micro- and macrovascular complications, but good glycemic control does not fully prevent the risk of these complications. Objective: The objective of the study was to determine whether T1D with good glycemic control have persistent abnormalities of metabolites and pathways that exist in T1D with poor glycemic control. Design: We compared plasma metabolites in T1D with poor (glycated hemoglobin ≥ 8.5%, T1D[−] and good (glycated hemoglobin < 6.5%, T1D[+]) glycemic control with nondiabetic controls (ND). Setting: The study was conducted at the clinical research unit. Patients or Other Participants: T1D with poor (n = 14), T1D(−) and good, T1D(+) (n = 15) glycemic control and matched (for age, sex, and body mass index) ND participants were included in the study. Intervention(s): There were no intervention. Main Outcome Measure(s): Comparison of qualitative and quantitative profiling of metabolome was performed. Results: In T1D(−), 347 known metabolites belonging to 38 metabolic pathways involved in cholesterol, vitamin D, tRNA, amino acids (AAs), bile acids, urea, tricarboxylic acid cycle, immune response, and eicosanoids were different from ND. In T1D(+),154 known metabolites belonging to 26 pathways including glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, bile acids, tRNA biosynthesis, AAs, branch-chain AAs, retinol, and vitamin D metabolism remained altered from ND. Targeted measurements of AA metabolites, trichloroacetic acid, and free fatty acids showed directional changes similar to the untargeted metabolomics approach. Conclusions: Comprehensive metabolomic profiling identified extensive metabolomic abnormalities in T1D with poor glycemic control. Chronic good glycemic control failed to normalize many of these perturbations, suggesting a potential role for these persistent abnormalities in many complications in T1D. PMID:26796761

  8. First pilot trial of the STAR-Liege protocol for tight glycemic control in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Penning, Sophie; Le Compte, Aaron J; Moorhead, Katherine T; Desaive, Thomas; Massion, Paul; Preiser, Jean-Charles; Shaw, Geoffrey M; Chase, J Geoffrey

    2012-11-01

    Tight glycemic control (TGC) has shown benefits in ICU patients, but been difficult to achieve consistently due to inter- and intra- patient variability that requires more adaptive, patient-specific solutions. STAR (Stochastic TARgeted) is a flexible model-based TGC framework accounting for patient variability with a stochastically derived maximum 5% risk of blood glucose (BG) below 72 mg/dL. This research describes the first clinical pilot trial of the STAR approach and the post-trial analysis of the models and methods that underpin the protocol. The STAR framework works with clinically specified targets and intervention guidelines. The clinically specified glycemic target was 125 mg/dL. Each trial was 24 h with BG measured 1-2 hourly. Two-hourly measurement was used when BG was between 110-135 mg/dL for 3 h. In the STAR approach, each intervention leads to a predicted BG level and outcome range (5-95th percentile) based on a stochastic model of metabolic patient variability. Carbohydrate intake (all sources) was monitored, but not changed from clinical settings except to prevent BG<100 mg/dL when no insulin was given. Insulin infusion rates were limited (6 U/h maximum), with limited increases based on current infusion rate (0.5-2.0 U/h), making this use of the STAR framework an insulin-only TGC approach. Approval was granted by the Ethics Committee of the Medical Faculty of the University of Liege (Liege, Belgium). Nine patient trials were undertaken after obtaining informed consent. There were 205 measurements over all 9 trials. Median [IQR] per-patient results were: BG: 138.5 [130.6-146.0]mg/dL; carbohydrate administered: 2-11 g/h; median insulin:1.3 [0.9-2.4]U/h with a maximum of 6.0 [4.7-6.0]U/h. Median [IQR] time in the desired 110-140 mg/dL band was: 50.0 [31.2-54.2]%. Median model prediction errors ranged: 10-18%, with larger errors due to small meals and other clinical events. The minimum BG was 63 mg/dL and no other measurement was below 72 mg/dL, so

  9. α-2-Macroglobulin in Saliva Is Associated with Glycemic Control in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Aitken, Juan Pablo; Ortiz, Carolina; Morales-Bozo, Irene; Rojas-Alcayaga, Gonzalo; Baeza, Mauricio; Beltran, Caroll

    2015-01-01

    Background. Subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) require an adequate glycemic control to avoid diabetic complications. Currently, saliva biomarkers are used as a diagnostic tool and can be indicative of the degree of progression and control of various diseases. Several studies indicate that α-2-macroglobulin levels are elevated in diabetic patients. Methods. 120 subjects with DM2 were enrolled and classified into two groups according to their glycemic control (percentage of glycated hemoglobin-A1c (HbA1c), <7% adequate glycemic control group; >7% inadequate glycemic control group). The relationship between α-2-macroglobulin levels from saliva samples and HbA1c was subsequently evaluated. Results. We found a positive correlation between α-2-macroglobulin and HbA1c (r = 0.778 and P < 0.0001). Area under the receivers operating characteristic (ROC) curve of α-2-macroglobulin indicated a positive discrimination threshold of α-2-macroglobulin (AUC = 0.903, CI 95%: 0.847–0.959, P < 0.0001) to diagnose glycemic control. Conclusions. Our data strongly suggest that the level of saliva α-2-macroglobulin is an indicator for the degree of glycemic control in diabetic patients and represents a promising alternative method to evaluate this parameter. PMID:25821337

  10. Longitudinal relationships between glycemic status and body mass index in a multiethnic study: evidence from observational and genetic epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Ishola, Adeola F; Gerstein, Hertzel C; Engert, James C; Mohan, Viswanathan; Diaz, Rafael; Anand, Sonia S; Meyre, David

    2016-08-02

    We investigated the relationship between glycemic status and BMI and its interaction with obesity single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a multi-ethnic longitudinal cohort at high-risk for dysglycemia. We studied 17 394 participants from six ethnicities followed-up for 3.3 years. Twenty-three obesity SNPs were genotyped and an unweighted genotype risk score (GRS) was calculated. Glycemic status was defined using an oral glucose tolerance test. Linear regression models were adjusted for age, sex and population stratification. Normal glucose tolerance (NGT) to dysglycemia transition was associated with baseline BMI and BMI change. Impaired fasting glucose/impaired glucose tolerance to type 2 diabetes transition was associated with baseline BMI but not BMI change. No simultaneous significant main genetic effects and interactions between SNPs/GRS and glycemic status or transition on BMI level and BMI change were observed. Our data suggests that the interplay between glycemic status and BMI trajectory may be independent of the effects of obesity genes. This implies that individuals with different glycemic statuses may be combined together in genetic association studies on obesity traits, if appropriate adjustments for glycemic status are performed. Implementation of population-wide weight management programs may be more beneficial towards individuals with NGT than those at a later disease stage.

  11. Graded Achievement, Tested Achievement, and Validity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brookhart, Susan M.

    2015-01-01

    Twenty-eight studies of grades, over a century, were reviewed using the argument-based approach to validity suggested by Kane as a theoretical framework. The review draws conclusions about the meaning of graded achievement, its relation to tested achievement, and changes in the construct of graded achievement over time. "Graded…

  12. Glycemic Response to Corn Starch Modified with Cyclodextrin Glycosyltransferase and its Relationship to Physical Properties.

    PubMed

    Dura, A; Yokoyama, W; Rosell, C M

    2016-09-01

    Corn starch was modified with cyclodextrin glycosyltransferase (CGTase) below the gelatinization temperature. The porous granules with or without CGTase hydrolysis products may be used as an alternative to modified corn starches in foods applications. The amount and type of hydrolysis products were determined, containing mainly β-cyclodextrin (CD), which will influence pasting behavior and glycemic response in mice. Irregular surface and small holes were observed by microscopic analysis and differences in pasting properties were observed in the presence of hydrolysis products. Postprandial blood glucose in mice fed gelatinized enzymatically modified starch peaked earlier than their ungelatinized counterparts. However, in ungelatinized enzymatically modified starches, the presence of β- CD may inhibit the orientation of amylases slowing hydrolysis, which may help to maintain lower blood glucose levels. Significant correlations were found between glycemic curves and viscosity pattern of starches.

  13. Metabolic and Glycemic Sequelae of Sleep Disturbances in Children and Adults

    PubMed Central

    Koren, Dorit; O'Sullivan, Katie L.; Mokhlesi, Babak

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity in adults and children has increased greatly in the past three decades, as have metabolic sequelae, such as insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Sleep disturbances are increasingly recognized as contributors to this widespread epidemic in adults, and data are emerging in children as well. The categories of sleep disturbances that contribute to obesity and its glycemic co-morbidities include the following: (1) alterations of sleep duration, chronic sleep restriction and excessive sleep; (2) alterations in sleep architecture; (3) sleep fragmentation; (4) circadian rhythm disorders and disruption (i.e., shift work); and (5) obstructive sleep apnea. This article reviews current evidence supporting the contributions that these sleep disorders play in the development of obesity, insulin resistance, and T2DM as well as possibly influences on glycemic control in type 1 diabetes, with a special focus on data in pediatric populations. PMID:25398202

  14. Metabolic and glycemic sequelae of sleep disturbances in children and adults.

    PubMed

    Koren, Dorit; O'Sullivan, Katie L; Mokhlesi, Babak

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity in adults and children has increased greatly in the past three decades, as have metabolic sequelae, such as insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Sleep disturbances are increasingly recognized as contributors to this widespread epidemic in adults, and data are emerging in children as well. The categories of sleep disturbances that contribute to obesity and its glycemic co-morbidities include the following: (1) alterations of sleep duration, chronic sleep restriction and excessive sleep; (2) alterations in sleep architecture; (3) sleep fragmentation; (4) circadian rhythm disorders and disruption (i.e., shift work); and (5) obstructive sleep apnea. This article reviews current evidence supporting the contributions that these sleep disorders play in the development of obesity, insulin resistance, and T2DM as well as possibly influences on glycemic control in type 1 diabetes, with a special focus on data in pediatric populations.

  15. Role of glycemic elements of Cynodon dactylon and Musa paradisiaca in diabetes management.

    PubMed

    Rai, Prashant Kumar; Jaiswal, Dolly; Rai, Nilesh K; Pandhija, Shiwani; Rai, A K; Watal, Geeta

    2009-09-01

    The study defined the scientific evaluation of glycemic elements of extracts of Cynodon dactylon and Musa paradisiaca. A dose of 500 mg/kg body weight (bw) of C. dactylon produced maximum falls of 23.2% and 22.8% in blood glucose levels of normoglycemic rats during studies of fasting blood glucose and glucose tolerance, respectively, whereas the same dose of M. paradisiaca produced a rise of 34.9% and 18.4%. In diabetic rats during glucose tolerance tests, a fall of 27.8% and a rise of 17.5% were observed with the same dose of C. dactylon and M. paradisiaca, respectively. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy used for detection of glycemic elements present in both the extracts indicated that C. dactylon was rich in magnesium (Mg), whereas M. paradisiaca was rich in potassium (K) and sodium (Na), comparatively, suggesting thereby the defined roles of these elements in diabetes management.

  16. Glycemic index of American-grown jasmine rice classified as high.

    PubMed

    Truong, Teresa H; Yuet, Wei Cheng; Hall, Micki D

    2014-06-01

    The primary objective was to determine the glycemic index (GI) of jasmine rice grown in the United States (US). Secondary objective was to compare the GI of US grown jasmine rice to those grown in Thailand. Twelve healthy subjects were served all four brands of jasmine rice and a reference food (glucose), each containing 50 g of available carbohydrate. Fingerstick blood glucose was measured at 0, 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, and 120 min after consumption following a fasting state. The GI was calculated using the standard equation. The GI values for test foods ranged from 96 to 116 and were all classified as high GI foods. No difference in GI was found between American-grown and Thailand-grown jasmine rice. Although not statistically significant, observations show glycemic response among Asian American participants may be different. GI should be considered when planning meals with jasmine rice as the main source carbohydrate.

  17. Glycemic index of grain amaranth, wheat and rice in NIDDM subjects.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, A; Sarojini, G; Nirmala, G; Nirmalamma, N; Satyanarayana, D

    1997-01-01

    Glycemic index of grain amaranth, wheat and rice preparations was studied in non-insulin dependent diabetic subjects. Diets containing 50 g carbohydrate equivalent were given and post-prandial blood glucose estimated at different intervals. Glycemic index calculated for different experimental diets showed that GI of amaranth-wheat composite flour diet (25:75) was the least (65.6%) followed by wheat diet (65.7%), rice diet (69.2%), amaranth-wheat flour 50:50 (75.5%), and popped amaranth in milk (97.3%). Therefore 25:75 combination of amaranth and wheat, wheat and rice can be considered low GI food, 50:50 grain amaranth and wheat medium GI food and popped amaranth and milk combination high GI food.

  18. Community Interventions to Improve Glycemic Control in African Americans With Type 2 Diabetes: A Systemic Review

    PubMed Central

    Smalls, Brittany L.; Walker, Rebekah J.; Bonilha, Heather S.; Campbell, Jennifer A.; Egede, Leonard E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to conduct a systematic review of published community interventions to evaluate different components of community interventions and their ability to positively impact glycemic control in African Americans with T2DM. Methods: Medline, PsychInfo, and CINAHL were searched for potentially eligible studies published from January 2000 through January 2012. The following inclusion criteria were established for publications: (1) describe a community intervention, not prevention; (2) specifically indicate, in data analysis and results, the impact of the community intervention on African American adults, 18 years and older; (3) measure glycemic control (HbA1C) as an outcome measure; and (4) involve patients in a community setting, which excludes hospitals and hospital clinics. Results: Thirteen studies out of 9,233 articles identified in the search met the predetermined inclusion criteria. There were 5 randomized control trials and 3 reported improved glycemic control in the intervention group compared to the control group at the completion of the study. Of the 8 studies that were not randomized control trials, 6 showed a statistically significant change in HbA1C. Conclusion: In general, the community interventions assessed led to significant reductions in HbA1C in African Americans with type 2 diabetes. Community health workers did not have a greater impact on glycemic control in this sample. The findings of this study provides insight for designing community-based interventions in the future, such as including use of multiple delivery methods, consideration of mobile device software, nutritionist educator, and curriculum-based approaches. PMID:26156923

  19. Dietary energy density but not glycemic load is associated with gestational weight gain

    PubMed Central

    Deierlein, Andrea L.; Siega-Riz, Anna Maria; Herring, Amy

    2009-01-01

    Background The majority of pregnant women are gaining outside of the recommended weight gain ranges. Excessive weight gains have been linked to pregnancy complications and long term maternal and child health outcomes. Objective To examine the impact of dietary glycemic load and energy density on total gestational weight gain and weight gain ratio (observed weight gain/expected weight gain). Design Data are from 1231 women with singleton pregnancies who participated in the Pregnancy, Infection, and Nutrition Cohort Study. Dietary information was collected at 26–29 weeks gestation using a semi-quantified food frequency questionnaire. Linear regression models were used to estimate the associations between glycemic load (in quartiles) and energy density (in quartiles) with total gestational weight gain and weight gain ratio. Results Dietary patterns of pregnant women significantly differed across many sociodemographic and behavioral characteristics, with the greatest contrasts seen for glycemic load. After adjustment for covariates, in comparison to women in the first quartile, consuming a mean dietary energy density of 0.77 kcal/g (reference), women in the second quartile, consuming a mean energy density of 0.95 kcal/g, gained an excess of 0.91 kg (95% CI: 0.02–1.79) and women in the third quartile, consuming a mean energy density of 1.09 kcal/g, gained an excess of 1.47 kg (95% CI: 0.58–2.36). All other comparisons of energy intakes were not statistically significant. Glycemic load was not associated with total gestational weight gain or weight gain ratio. Conclusions Dietary energy density is a modifiable factor that may assist pregnant women in managing gestational weight gains. PMID:18779285

  20. Evaluation of a novel artificial pancreas: closed loop glycemic control system with continuous blood glucose monitoring.

    PubMed

    Tsukamoto, Yuuki; Kinoshita, Yoshihiko; Kitagawa, Hiroyuki; Munekage, Masaya; Munekage, Eri; Takezaki, Yuka; Yatabe, Tomoaki; Yamashita, Koichi; Yamazaki, Rie; Okabayashi, Takehiro; Tarumi, Masatoshi; Kobayashi, Masaki; Mishina, Suguru; Hanazaki, Kazuhiro

    2013-04-01

    A closed-loop glycemic control system using an artificial pancreas has been applied with many clinical benefits in Japan since 1987. To update this system incorporating user-friendly features, we developed a novel artificial pancreas (STG-55). The purpose of this study was to evaluate STG-55 for device usability, performance of blood glucose measurement, glycemic control characteristics in vivo in animal experiments, and evaluate its clinical feasibility. There are several features for usability improvement based on the design concepts, such as compactness, display monitor, batteries, guidance function, and reduction of the preparation time. All animal study data were compared with a clinically available artificial pancreas system in Japan (control device: STG-22). We examined correlations of both blood glucose levels between two groups (STG-55 vs. control) using Clarke's error grid analysis, and also compared mean glucose infusion rate (GIR) during glucose clamp. The results showed strong correlation in blood glucose concentrations (Pearson's product-moment correlation coefficient: 0.97; n = 1636). Clarke's error grid analysis showed that 98.4% of the data fell in Zones A and B, which represent clinically accurate or benign errors, respectively. The difference in mean GIRs was less than 0.2 mg/kg/min, which was considered not significant. Clinical feasibility study demonstrated sufficient glycemic control maintaining target glucose range between 80 and 110 (mg/dL), and between 140 and 160 without any hypoglycemia. In conclusion, STG-55 was a clinically acceptable artificial pancreas with improved interface and usability. A closed-loop glycemic control system with STG-55 would be a useful tool for surgical and critical patients in intensive care units, as well as diabetic patients.

  1. Sputum glucose and glycemic control in cystic fibrosis-related diabetes: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Van Sambeek, Lindsey; Cowley, Elise S; Newman, Dianne K; Kato, Roberta

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis-related diabetes affects up to half of cystic fibrosis patients and is associated with increased mortality and more frequent pulmonary exacerbations. However, it is unclear to what degree good glycemic control might mitigate these risks and clinical outcomes have not previously been studied in relation to glucose from the lower airways, the site of infection and CF disease progression. We initially hypothesized that diabetic cystic fibrosis patients with glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA(1c)) > 6.5% have worse pulmonary function, longer and more frequent exacerbations and also higher sputum glucose levels than patients with HbA(1c) ≤ 6.5% or cystic fibrosis patients without diabetes. To test this, we analyzed spontaneously expectorated sputum samples from 88 cystic fibrosis patients. The median sputum glucose concentration was 0.70 mM (mean, 4.75 mM; range, 0-64.6 mM). Sputum glucose was not correlated with age, sex, body mass index, diabetes diagnosis, glycemic control, exacerbation frequency or length, or pulmonary function. Surprisingly, sputum glucose was highest in subjects with normal glucose tolerance, suggesting the dynamics of glycemic control, sputum glucose and pulmonary infections are more complex than previously thought. Two-year mean HbA(1c) was positively correlated with the length of exacerbation admission (p < 0.01), and negatively correlated with measures of pulmonary function (p < 0.01). While total number of hospitalizations for exacerbations were not significantly different, subjects with an HbA(1c) > 6.5% were hospitalized on average 6 days longer than those with HbA(1c) ≤ 6.5% (p < 0.01). Current clinical care guidelines for cystic fibrosis-related diabetes target HbA(1c) ≤ 7% to limit long-term microvascular damage, but more stringent glycemic control (HbA(1c) ≤ 6.5%) may further reduce the short-term pulmonary complications.

  2. Diabetes management at the end of life: transitioning from tight glycemic control to comfort.

    PubMed

    Tice, Martha A

    2006-05-01

    Tight glycemic control has become the standard of care for prevention of the long-term side effects of diabetes mellitus. When individuals with diabetes approach the end of life from advanced cancer or another chronic illness, they often become anorexic. The result is an increased risk for hypoglycemic episodes. It is appropriate to shift the goal of therapy from tight control of blood sugar to maintaining comfort and enhancing quality of life.

  3. IMPROVING GLYCEMIC CONTROL SAFELY IN CRITICAL CARE PATIENTS A COLLABORATIVE SYSTEMS APPROACH IN NINE HOSPITALS.

    PubMed

    Maynard, Gregory A; Holdych, Janet; Kendall, Heather; Harrison, Karen; Montgomery, Patricia A; Kulasa, Kristen

    2017-02-22

    Objective Safely improve glycemic control in the critical care units of nine hospitals. Methods Critical care adult inpatients from nine hospitals with ≥ 4 point-of-care (POC) blood glucose (BG) readings over ≥ 2 days were targeted by collaborative improvement efforts to reduce hyper- and hypo-glycemia. Balanced glucometric goals for each hospital were set targeting improvement from baseline, or goals deemed desirable from Society of Hospital Medicine (SHM) benchmarking data. Collaborative interventions included standardized insulin infusion protocols, hypoglycemia prevention bundles, audit and feedback, education, and measure-vention (coupling measurement of patients "off protocol" with concurrent interventions to correct suboptimal care). Results All sites improved glycemic control. Six reached pre-specified levels of improvement of the day-weighted mean (DWM) BG. The DWM BG for the cohort decreased by 7.7 mg/dL [95% CI 7.0 - 8.4] to 151.3 mg/dL. Six of nine sites showed improvement in the percent ICU days with severe hyperglycemia (any BG > 299 mg/dL). ICU severe hyperglycemic days declined from 8.6% to 7.2% for the cohort [RR 0.84, 95% CI 0.80 - 0.88]. Patient days with any BG < 70 mg / dL were reduced by 0.4% [95% CI 0.06 - 0.6%] from 4.5% to 4.1% for a small but statistically significant reduction in hypoglycemia. Seven of nine sites showed improvement. Conclusion Multi-hospital improvements in ICU glycemic control, severe hyperglycemia, and hypoglycemia are feasible. Balanced goals for glycemic control and hypoglycemia in the ICU using SHM benchmarks and metrics enhanced successful improvement efforts with good staff acceptance and sustainability.

  4. A quality improvement model for optimizing care of the diabetic end-stage renal disease patient.

    PubMed

    Mahnensmith, Rex L; Zorzanello, Mary; Hsu, Yueh-Han; Williams, Mark E

    2010-01-01

    Persons with diabetes mellitus whose kidney disease progresses to end-stage requiring dialysis have poorer outcomes compared to nondiabetic patients who commence maintenance dialysis. In the diabetic patient without renal failure, sustained strict glycemic, lipid, and blood pressure (BP) control can retard or thwart diabetic complications such as retinopathy, neuropathy, coronary disease, and peripheral vascular disease. Achieving these outcomes requires multidisciplinary collaborative care. Best care of the diabetic person requires a dedicated clinician who knows the patient well, who closely follows the course of clinical problems, who provides frequent assessments and interventions, and who also directs care to other agencies, clinics, and specialized clinicians who provide expert focused evaluations and interventions aimed at specific clinical concerns. Diabetic patients who reach end-stage renal disease (ESRD) have even greater clinical need of a dedicated principal care clinician than the diabetic patient who has minimal or moderate kidney disease. The diabetic patient with ESRD exhibits greater fluctuations in glucose and BP due to dialysis-related diet patterns and fluid balances and has more active cardiovascular problems due to the combined influences of calcium, phosphorus, and lipid imbalances. These problems warrant exceptional care that includes frequent surveillance and monitoring with timely interventions if patient outcomes are to be improved. We present here a quality improvement model for optimizing care of the diabetic dialysis patient that relies on a dedicated practitioner who can evaluate and intervene on the multiple variables within and beyond the dialysis clinic that impact the patient's health. We present three detailed clinical care pathways that the dedicated clinician can follow. We believe that patient outcomes can be improved with this approach that provides customized problem-focused care, collaborates with the dialysis

  5. Higher glycemic index and glycemic load diet is associated with increased risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Eslamian, Ghazaleh; Jessri, Mahsa; Hajizadeh, Bahareh; Ibiebele, Torukiri I; Rashidkhani, Bahram

    2013-09-01

    Several studies have indicated the association between intake of foods high in dietary glycemic index (GI) and glycemic load (GL) with an increased risk of digestive tract cancers. We hypothesized that GI and GL may be associated with risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) in a high-risk population in Iran. In total, we interviewed 47 cases with incident of ESCC and 96 frequency-matched hospital controls, then calculated the average dietary GI and GL via a validated food frequency questionnaire. Dietary GL was calculated as a function of GI, carbohydrate content, and frequency of intake of certain foods. Dietary GI and GL levels were significantly higher among the ESCC cases compared with the controls (P < .05). After adjustment for potential confounders, those in the highest tertile of dietary GI had 2.95 times higher risk of ESCC compared with those in the lowest (95% confidence interval, 1.68-3.35; P for trend = .002). In addition, being in the highest tertile of dietary GL was positively associated with an ESCC risk (odds ratio, 3.49; 95% confidence interval, 2.98-4.41; P for trend = .001). Findings of the present study indicate that diets with high GI and GL might have potentially unfavorable effects on ESCC risk and suggest a possible role for excess circulating insulin and related insulin-like growth factor 1 in esophageal cancer development.

  6. The association between dietary glycemic index, glycemic load and diet quality indices in Iranian adults: results from Isfahan Healthy Heart Program.

    PubMed

    Azadbakht, Leila; Mohammadifard, Noushin; Akhavanzanjani, Mohsen; Taheri, Marzieh; Golshahi, Jafar; Haghighatdoost, Fahimeh

    2016-01-01

    To assess the association between dietary glycemic index (GI), glycemic load (GL) and dietary quality indices in Iranian adults. This cross section was conducted among 1571 Iranian adults aged  ≥19 years. GI, GL and diet quality indices were estimated by 24-h recall and DDS was calculated using a validated 48-item food frequency questionnaire. Participants who were in the top tertile of GI had lower healthy eating index (HEI) (57.2 ± 7.8 versus 55.6 ± 8.7; p < 0.001), dietary diversity score (DDS) (3.6 ± 0.9 versus 3.3 ± 1.1; p < 0.001) and nutrient adequacy ratios (NARs) for Zn, Ca, vitamin C and B2. Individuals in the lowest tertile of GL had lower HEI, MAR and NARs for Zn, vitamin B2, B3, B6, B12, vitamin D. Both GI and GL were positively related to dietary diversity score (DED) (p < 0.001). The inverse associations for GI and GL with diet quality indices may suggest the relevance of carbohydrate source in determining the diet quality indices.

  7. The association between glycemic control and microalbuminuria in Type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Showail, Anwar Ali; Ghoraba, Medhat

    2016-05-01

    Microalbuminuria is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular and renal out- come in a patient with Type 2 diabetes. The evidence that intensive glycemic control reduces the microvascular complications of diabetes is based almost exclusively on prevention of micro- albuminuria. To evaluate the association between microalbuminuria and glycemic control and other factors in Type 2 diabetes, we studied retrospectively 551 patients with Type 2 diabetes. The patients were divided into two groups: 175 patients with microalbuminuria in the case group and 376 with normal urine albumin-creatinine ratio in the control group. Our data indicated that there was a significant association between the uncontrolled glycemia and development of microalbuminuria and that was more obvious if HbA1c level was >11%. Our data also indicate that there was a statistical significant association between male gender, age, the systolic and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) levels, and the microalbuminuria in crude odds ratios (ORs). We conclude that there was a clear association between the glycemic control and microalbuminuria, and microalbuminuria was associated with older age, male gender, and systolic and DBP in crude ORs.

  8. Socioeconomic status and glycemic control in adult patients with type 2 diabetes: a mediation analysis

    PubMed Central

    Houle, Janie; Lauzier-Jobin, François; Beaulieu, Marie-Dominique; Meunier, Sophie; Coulombe, Simon; Côté, José; Lespérance, François; Chiasson, Jean-Louis; Bherer, Louis; Lambert, Jean

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study is to examine the contribution of health behaviors (self-management and coping), quality of care, and individual characteristics (depressive symptoms, self-efficacy, illness representations) as mediators in the relationship between socioeconomic status (SES) and glycemic control. Methods A sample of 295 adult patients with type 2 diabetes was recruited at the end of a diabetes education course. Glycemic control was evaluated through glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c). Living in poverty and education level were used as indicators of SES. Results Bootstrapping analysis showed that the significant effects of poverty and education level on HbA1c were mediated by avoidance coping and depressive symptoms. The representation that diabetes is unpredictable significantly mediated the relationship between living in poverty and HbA1c, while healthy diet mediated the relationship between education level and HbA1c. Conclusions To improve glycemic control among patients with low SES, professionals should regularly screen for depression, offering treatment when needed, and pay attention to patients' illness representations and coping strategies for handling stress related to their chronic disease. They should also support patients in improving their self-management skills for a healthy diet. PMID:27239316

  9. Pathogenesis and glycemic management of type 2 diabetes mellitus: a physiological approach.

    PubMed

    Ismail-Beigi, Faramarz

    2012-04-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2DM) is an incompletely understood chronic, progressive multifactorial disease with insulin resistance and decreased β-cell function playing dominant roles in its genesis.  The worldwide incidence of the disease is rapidly increasing to pandemic proportions.  The increase in incidence of T2DM is attributable to changes in lifestyle, diet and obesity, but other causes remain to be defined.  The disease is a major cause of early mortality due to atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease (CVD), and is the leading cause of blindness, leg amputations, and chronic renal disease.  Hyperglycemia inT2DM becomes manifest once insulin secretion is no longer adequate for the metabolic demands of the individual. The approach to glycemic management of the disease is increasingly based on understanding the underlying pathophysiology.  Efforts to maintain and preserve β-cell function during the earlier phases of the disease may have important implications in prevention of subsequent complications of T2DM.  Finally, the approach to glycemic management of the disease should be individualized by considering the psycho-socio-economic condition of each patient, and glycemic targets should reflect presence of comorbid conditions, age of the patient, the stage of their disease in terms of duration, presence of macro- and micro-vascular complications, and propensity for severe hypoglycemia.

  10. Association between Responsible Pet Ownership and Glycemic Control in Youths with Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) a chronic characterized by an absolute insulin deficiency requires conscientious patient self-management to maintain glucose control within a normal range. Family cohesion and adaptability, positive coping strategies, social support and adequate self-regulatory behavior are found to favorably influence glycemic control. Our hypothesis was that the responsible care of a companion animal is associated with these positive attributes and correlated with the successful management of a chronic illness such as type 1 diabetes. We recruited 223 youths between 9 and 19 years of age from the Pediatric Diabetes clinic at the University of Massachusetts Medical School, reviewed the status of their glycemic control (using three consecutive A1c values) and asked them questions about the presence of a pet at home, and their level of involvement with its care. Multivariate analyses show that children who care actively for one or more pets at home are 2.5 times more likely to have control over their glycemic levels than children who do not care for a pet, adjusting for duration of disease, socio-economic status, age and self-management [1.1 to 5.8], pWald = 0.032. A separate model involving the care of a petdog only yielded comparable results (ORa = 2.6 [1.1 to 5.9], pWald = 0.023). PMID:27104736

  11. Association between Responsible Pet Ownership and Glycemic Control in Youths with Type 1 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Maranda, Louise; Gupta, Olga T

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) a chronic characterized by an absolute insulin deficiency requires conscientious patient self-management to maintain glucose control within a normal range. Family cohesion and adaptability, positive coping strategies, social support and adequate self-regulatory behavior are found to favorably influence glycemic control. Our hypothesis was that the responsible care of a companion animal is associated with these positive attributes and correlated with the successful management of a chronic illness such as type 1 diabetes. We recruited 223 youths between 9 and 19 years of age from the Pediatric Diabetes clinic at the University of Massachusetts Medical School, reviewed the status of their glycemic control (using three consecutive A1c values) and asked them questions about the presence of a pet at home, and their level of involvement with its care. Multivariate analyses show that children who care actively for one or more pets at home are 2.5 times more likely to have control over their glycemic levels than children who do not care for a pet, adjusting for duration of disease, socio-economic status, age and self-management [1.1 to 5.8], pWald = 0.032. A separate model involving the care of a petdog only yielded comparable results (ORa = 2.6 [1.1 to 5.9], pWald = 0.023).

  12. Higher glycemic load diet is associated with poorer nutrient intake in women with gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Louie, Jimmy Chun Yu; Markovic, Tania P; Ross, Glynis P; Foote, Deborah; Brand-Miller, Jennie C

    2013-04-01

    Changes in the quality and quantity of carbohydrate foods may compromise nutrient intake in women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). We hypothesized that glycemic index, glycemic load (GL), carbohydrate intake, grains, and cereal product consumption would be associated with nutrient adequacy. Eighty-two women with GDM (61% of Asian background, 34% whites) completed a 3-day food record following their routine group nutrition education session. Nutrient intakes were compared to Nutrient Reference Values (NRV) for Australia and New Zealand. Nutrient intake across energy-adjusted tertiles of glycemic index, GL, carbohydrate intake, and intake of grains and cereal products were assessed. The majority of women (66%-99%) did not meet the NRV for fiber, folate, vitamin D, iodine, and iron, and exceeded NRV for saturated fat and sodium. Higher dietary GL was associated with lower intakes of total, monounsaturated, and polyunsaturated fat; vitamin E; and potassium (all P < .001). Higher grain intake was not significantly associated with intake of any micronutrients. In Australian women with GDM, high dietary GL predicts greater risk of poor nutrition.

  13. 24-Hour Glucose Profiles on Diets Varying in Protein Content and Glycemic Index

    PubMed Central

    van Baak, Marleen A.

    2014-01-01

    Evidence is increasing that the postprandial state is an important factor contributing to the risk of chronic diseases. Not only mean glycemia, but also glycemic variability has been implicated in this effect. In this exploratory study, we measured 24-h glucose profiles in 25 overweight participants in a long-term diet intervention study (DIOGENES study on Diet, Obesity and Genes), which had been randomized to four different diet groups consuming diets varying in protein content and glycemic index. In addition, we compared 24-h glucose profiles in a more controlled fashion, where nine other subjects followed in random order the same four diets differing in carbohydrate content by 10 energy% and glycemic index by 20 units during three days. Meals were provided in the lab and had to be eaten at fixed times during the day. No differences in mean glucose concentration or glucose variability (SD) were found between diet groups in the DIOGENES study. In the more controlled lab study, mean 24-h glucose concentrations were also not different. Glucose variability (SD and CONGA1), however, was lower on the diet combining a lower carbohydrate content and GI compared to the diet combining a higher carbohydrate content and GI. These data suggest that diets with moderate differences in carbohydrate content and GI do not affect mean 24-h or daytime glucose concentrations, but may result in differences in the variability of the glucose level in healthy normal weight and overweight individuals. PMID:25093276

  14. The effect of dietary glycemic index on weight maintenance in overweight subjects: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Philippou, Elena; Neary, Nicola M; Chaudhri, Owais; Brynes, Audrey E; Dornhorst, Anne; Leeds, Anthony R; Hickson, Mary; Frost, Gary S

    2009-02-01

    Evidence suggests that a low-glycemic index (LGI) diet has a satiating effect and thus may enhance weight maintenance following weight loss. This study was conducted at Hammersmith Hospital, London, UK, and assessed the effect of altering diet GI on weight-loss maintenance. It consisted of a weight-loss phase and a 4-month randomized weight maintenance phase. Subjects were seen monthly to assess dietary compliance and anthropometrics. Appetite was assessed bimonthly by visual analogue scales while meal challenge postprandial insulin and glucose concentrations were assessed before and after the intervention. Following a median weight loss of 6.1 (interquartile range: 5.2-7.1) % body weight, subjects were randomized to a high-glycemic index (HGI) (n = 19) or LGI (n = 23) diet. Dietary composition differed only in GI (HGI group: 63.7 +/- 9.4; LGI group: 49.7 +/- 5.7, P < 0.001) and glycemic load (HGI group: 136.8 +/- 56.3; LGI group: 89.7 +/- 27.5, P < 0.001). Groups did not differ in body weight (weight change over 4 months, HGI group: 0.3 +/- 1.9 kg; LGI group: -0.7 +/- 2.9 kg, P = 0.3) or other anthropometric measurements. This pilot study suggests that in the setting of healthy eating, changing the diet GI does not appear to significantly affect weight maintenance.

  15. [Glycemic response to consumption of a cereals and legume (Phaseolus vulgaris) bar on healthy individuals].

    PubMed

    Zambrano, Rosaura; Granito, Marisela; Valero, Yolmar

    2013-06-01

    The objective of this work was to formulate a cereals and legume (Phaseolus vulgaris) bar and assess its impact on the glycemic response of healthy individuals, in order to contribute to the healthy food supply beneficial to consumers. A mixture of cereals (corn and oats) and different percentages (20 and 30%) of Phaseolus vulgaris was used to formulate the bar. Additionally, a legume cereal bar without legumes (bar control) was prepared. The bar with 30% of Phaseolus vulgaris was selected through sensory evaluation, being scored with better flavor and texture. This combination of cereals and legumes aminoacid improves complementation and reaches the formulation criteria previously established. Chemical characterization indicated a higher protein content in the bar with 30% of Phaseolus vulgaris (13.55%) relative to the bar control (8.5%). The contents of fat, ash and dietary fiber did not differ between the two bars evaluated. However, the soluble fiber and resistant starch of the selected bar was a 32.05% and 18.67%, respectively, than in the control bar; this may contribute to decreasing the rate of glucose uptake. The selected bar presented a low glycemic index (49) and intermediate glycemic load (12.0) in healthy volunteers, which could lead to a possible reduction in the rate of absorption of glucose into the bloodstream, associated with a carbohydrate content of slow absorption. This bar represents a proposal of a healthy snack for the consumer.

  16. Impact of Type 2 Diabetes Susceptibility Variants on Quantitative Glycemic Traits Reveals Mechanistic Heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Dimas, Antigone S.; Lagou, Vasiliki; Barker, Adam; Knowles, Joshua W.; Mägi, Reedik; Hivert, Marie-France; Benazzo, Andrea; Rybin, Denis; Jackson, Anne U.; Stringham, Heather M.; Song, Ci; Fischer-Rosinsky, Antje; Boesgaard, Trine Welløv; Grarup, Niels; Abbasi, Fahim A.; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Hao, Ke; Yang, Xia; Lecoeur, Cécile; Barroso, Inês; Bonnycastle, Lori L.; Böttcher, Yvonne; Bumpstead, Suzannah; Chines, Peter S.; Erdos, Michael R.; Graessler, Jurgen; Kovacs, Peter; Morken, Mario A.; Narisu, Narisu; Payne, Felicity; Stancakova, Alena; Swift, Amy J.; Tönjes, Anke; Bornstein, Stefan R.; Cauchi, Stéphane; Froguel, Philippe; Meyre, David; Schwarz, Peter E.H.; Häring, Hans-Ulrich; Smith, Ulf; Boehnke, Michael; Bergman, Richard N.; Collins, Francis S.; Mohlke, Karen L.; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Quertemous, Thomas; Lind, Lars; Hansen, Torben; Pedersen, Oluf; Walker, Mark; Pfeiffer, Andreas F.H.; Spranger, Joachim; Stumvoll, Michael; Meigs, James B.; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laakso, Markku; Langenberg, Claudia; Dupuis, Josée; Watanabe, Richard M.; Florez, Jose C.; Ingelsson, Erik; McCarthy, Mark I.; Prokopenko, Inga

    2014-01-01

    Patients with established type 2 diabetes display both β-cell dysfunction and insulin resistance. To define fundamental processes leading to the diabetic state, we examined the relationship between type 2 diabetes risk variants at 37 established susceptibility loci, and indices of proinsulin processing, insulin secretion, and insulin sensitivity. We included data from up to 58,614 nondiabetic subjects with basal measures and 17,327 with dynamic measures. We used additive genetic models with adjustment for sex, age, and BMI, followed by fixed-effects, inverse-variance meta-analyses. Cluster analyses grouped risk loci into five major categories based on their relationship to these continuous glycemic phenotypes. The first cluster (PPARG, KLF14, IRS1, GCKR) was characterized by primary effects on insulin sensitivity. The second cluster (MTNR1B, GCK) featured risk alleles associated with reduced insulin secretion and fasting hyperglycemia. ARAP1 constituted a third cluster characterized by defects in insulin processing. A fourth cluster (TCF7L2, SLC30A8, HHEX/IDE, CDKAL1, CDKN2A/2B) was defined by loci influencing insulin processing and secretion without a detectable change in fasting glucose levels. The final group contained 20 risk loci with no clear-cut associations to continuous glycemic traits. By assembling extensive data on continuous glycemic traits, we have exposed the diverse mechanisms whereby type 2 diabetes risk variants impact disease predisposition. PMID:24296717

  17. In vitro colonic fermentation and glycemic response of different kinds of unripe banana flour.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Elizabete Wenzel; Dan, Milana C T; Cardenette, Giselli H L; Goñi, Isabel; Bello-Pérez, Luis Arturo; Lajolo, Franco M

    2010-12-01

    This work aimed to study the in vitro colonic fermentation profile of unavailable carbohydrates of two different kinds of unripe banana flour and to evaluate their postprandial glycemic responses. The unripe banana mass (UBM), obtained from the cooked pulp of unripe bananas (Musa acuminata, Nanicão variety), and the unripe banana starch (UBS), obtained from isolated starch of unripe banana, plantain type (Musa paradisiaca) in natura, were studied. The fermentability of the flours was evaluated by different parameters, using rat inoculum, as well as the glycemic response produced after the ingestion by healthy volunteers. The flours presented high concentration of unavailable carbohydrates, which varied in the content of resistant starch, dietary fiber and indigestible fraction (IF). The in vitro colonic fermentation of the flours was high, 98% for the UBS and 75% for the UBM when expressed by the total amount of SCFA such as acetate, butyrate and propionate in relation to lactulose. The increase in the area under the glycemic curve after ingestion of the flours was 90% lower for the UBS and 40% lower for the UBM than the increase produced after bread intake. These characteristics highlight the potential of UBM and UBS as functional ingredients. However, in vivo studies are necessary in order to evaluate the possible benefit effects of the fermentation on intestinal health.

  18. Effect of Added Carbohydrates on Glycemic and Insulin Responses to Children’s Milk Products

    PubMed Central

    Brand-Miller, Jennie; Atkinson, Fiona; Rowan, Angela

    2013-01-01

    Powdered milk products for children (Growing Up Milk Powders or GUMPs) containing added carbohydrates such as glucose and sucrose are now well established in parts of Asia. We surveyed GUMPs in Malaysia and Indonesia to determine the content of added carbohydrates. The ingredient lists and nutrition information panels were used to calculate the percentage of declared carbohydrates contributed by added carbohydrates and a subset of seven products was tested for their glycemic index (GI) and insulin responses in healthy adults. The glycemic load for each product was calculated. In total, 58 products (n = 24 in Malaysia and n = 34 in Indonesia) were surveyed. Added carbohydrate content (excluding fibre) ranged from 0 to 21.5 g per serve. Milk powders without added sources of carbohydrate had similar GI values to standard liquid whole milk. Products containing maltodextrins, corn or glucose syrups increased the GI by more than 2-fold, and glycemic load (GL) by 7-fold compared to milk powders with no added carbohydrates. Insulin responses were significantly but not strongly correlated with glucose responses (r = 0.32, p < 0.006). Children’s milk powders containing higher levels of added carbohydrate ingredients elicit higher glucose and insulin responses than liquid or powdered whole milk. PMID:23306187

  19. Optimal therapy of type 2 diabetes: a controversial challenge

    PubMed Central

    Dardano, Angela; Penno, Giuseppe; Del Prato, Stefano; Miccoli, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is one of the most common chronic disorders in older adults and the number of elderly diabetic subjects is growing worldwide. Nonetheless, the diagnosis of T2DM in elderly population is often missed or delayed until an acute metabolic emergency occurs. Accumulating evidence suggests that both aging and environmental factors contribute to the high prevalence of diabetes in the elderly. Clinical management of T2DM in elderly subjects presents unique challenges because of the multifaceted geriatric scenario. Diabetes significantly lowers the chances of “successful” aging, notably it increases functional limitations and impairs quality of life. In this regard, older diabetic patients have a high burden of comorbidities, diabetes-related complications, physical disability, cognitive impairment and malnutrition, and they are more susceptible to the complications of dysglycemia and polypharmacy. Several national and international organizations have delivered guidelines to implement optimal therapy in older diabetic patients based on individualized treatment goals. This means appreciation of the heterogeneity of the disease as generated by life expectancy, functional reserve, social support, as well as personal preference. This paper will review current treatments for achieving glycemic targets in elderly diabetic patients, and discuss the potential role of emerging treatments in this patient population. PMID:24753144

  20. Glycemic responses to sweetened dried and raw cranberries in humans with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Ted; Luebke, Justin L; Morcomb, Erin F; Carrell, Emily J; Leveranz, Megan C; Kobs, Lisa; Schmidt, Travis P; Limburg, Paul J; Vorsa, Nicholi; Singh, Ajay P

    2010-10-01

    This study assessed the metabolic response to sweetened dried cranberries (SDC), raw cranberries (RC), and white bread (WB) in humans with type 2 diabetes. Development of palatable cranberry preparations associated with lower glycemic responses may be useful for improving fruit consumption and glycemic control among those with diabetes. In this trial, type 2 diabetics (n= 13) received WB (57 g, 160 cal, 1 g fiber), RC (55 g, 21 cal, 1 g fiber), SDC (40 g, 138 cal, 2.1 g fiber), and SDC containing less sugar (SDC-LS, 40 g, 113 cal, 1.8 g fiber + 10 g polydextrose). Plasma glucose (mmol/L) peaked significantly at 60 min for WB, and at 30 min for RC, SDC, and SDC-LS at 9.6 ± 0.4, 7.0 ± 0.4, 9.6 ± 0.5, and 8.7 ± 0.5, respectively, WB remained significantly elevated from the other treatments at 120 min. Plasma insulin (pmol/mL) peaked at 60 min for WB and SDC and at 30 min for RC and SDC-LS at 157 ± 15, 142 ± 27, 61 ± 8, and 97 ± 11, respectively. Plasma insulin for SDC-LS was significantly lower at 60 min than either WB or SDC. Insulin area under the curve (AUC) values for RC and SDC-LS were both significantly lower than WB or SDC. Phenolic content of SDC and SDC-LS was determined following extraction with 80% acetone prior to high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and electronspray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and found to be rich in 5-caffeoylquinic cid, quercetin-3-galactoside, and quercetin-3-galactoside, and the proanthocyanidin dimer epicatechin. In conclusion, SDC-LS was associated with a favorable glycemic and insulinemic response in type 2 diabetics. Practical Application: This study compares phenolic content and glycemic responses among different cranberry products. The study seeks to expand the palatable and portable healthy food choices for persons with type 2 diabetes. The novel use of polydextrose as a bulking agent making possible a reduction in caloric content and potential glycemic response is also characterized in this study.

  1. Variation in Patient Profiles and Outcomes in US and Non-US Subgroups of the Cangrelor Versus Standard Therapy to Achieve Optimal Management of Platelet Inhibition (CHAMPION) PHOENIX Trial

    PubMed Central

    Vaduganathan, Muthiah; Harrington, Robert A.; Stone, Gregg W.; Steg, Ph. Gabriel; Gibson, C. Michael; Hamm, Christian W.; Price, Matthew J.; Prats, Jayne; Deliargyris, Efthymios N.; Mahaffey, Kenneth W.; White, Harvey D.

    2016-01-01

    Background— The Cangrelor Versus Standard Therapy to Achieve Optimal Management of Platelet Inhibition (CHAMPION) PHOENIX trial demonstrated superiority of cangrelor in reducing ischemic events at 48 hours in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention compared with clopidogrel. Methods and Results— We analyzed all patients included in the modified intention-to-treat analysis in US (n=4097; 37.4%) and non-US subgroups (n=6845; 62.6%). The US cohort was older, had a higher burden of cardiovascular risk factors, and had more frequently undergone prior cardiovascular procedures. US patients more frequently underwent percutaneous coronary intervention for stable angina (77.9% versus 46.2%). Almost all US patients (99.1%) received clopidogrel loading doses of 600 mg, whereas 40.5% of non-US patients received 300 mg. Bivalirudin was more frequently used in US patients (56.7% versus 2.9%). At 48 hours, rates of the primary composite end point were comparable in the US and non-US cohorts (5.5% versus 5.2%; P=0.53). Cangrelor reduced rates of the primary composite end point compared with clopidogrel in US (4.5% versus 6.4%; odds ratio 0.70 [95% confidence interval 0.53–0.92]) and in non-US patients (4.8% versus 5.6%; odds ratio 0.85 [95% confidence interval 0.69–1.05]; interaction P=0.26). Similarly, rates of the key secondary end point, stent thrombosis, were reduced by cangrelor in both regions. Rates of Global Use of Strategies to Open Occluded Arteries (GUSTO)–defined severe bleeding were low and not significantly increased by cangrelor in either region. Conclusions— Despite broad differences in clinical profiles and indications for percutaneous coronary intervention by region in a large global cardiovascular clinical trial, cangrelor consistently reduced rates of ischemic end points compared with clopidogrel without an excess in severe bleeding in both the US and non-US subgroups. Clinical Trial Registration— URL: http

  2. The Acute Effects of Interval-Type Exercise on Glycemic Control in Type 2 Diabetes Subjects: Importance of Interval Length. A Controlled, Counterbalanced, Crossover Study

    PubMed Central

    Jakobsen, Ida; Solomon, Thomas P. J.

    2016-01-01

    Interval-type exercise is effective for improving glycemic control, but the optimal approach is unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine the importance of the interval length on changes in postprandial glycemic control following a single exercise bout. Twelve subjects with type 2 diabetes completed a cross-over study with three 1-hour interventions performed in a non-randomized but counter-balanced order: 1) Interval walking consisting of repeated cycles of 3 min slow (aiming for 54% of Peak oxygen consumption rate [VO2peak]) and 3 min fast (aiming for 89% of VO2peak) walking (IW3); 2) Interval walking consisting of repeated cycles of 1 min slow and 1 min fast walking (IW1) and 3) No walking (CON). The exercise interventions were matched with regards to walking speed, and VO2 and heart rate was assessed throughout all interventions. A 4-hour liquid mixed meal tolerance test commenced 30 min after each intervention, with blood samples taken regularly. IW3 and IW1 resulted in comparable mean VO2 and heart rates. Overall mean postprandial blood glucose levels were lower after IW3 compared to CON (10.3±3.0 vs. 11.1±3.3 mmol/L; P < 0.05), with no significant differences between IW1 (10.5±2.8 mmol/L) and CON or IW3 and IW1 (P > 0.05 for both). Conversely blood glucose levels at specific time points during the MMTT differed significantly following both IW3 and IW1 as compared to CON. Our findings support the previously found blood glucose lowering effect of IW3 and suggest that reducing the interval length, while keeping the walking speed and time spend on fast and slow walking constant, does not result in additional improvements. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02257190 PMID:27695119

  3. Effects of High vs Low Glycemic Index of Dietary Carbohydrate on Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors and Insulin Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Sacks, Frank M.; Carey, Vincent J.; Anderson, Cheryl A. M.; Miller, Edgar R.; Copeland, Trisha; Charleston, Jeanne; Harshfield, Benjamin J.; Laranjo, Nancy; McCarron, Phyllis; Swain, Janis; White, Karen; Yee, Karen; Appel, Lawrence J.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Foods that have similar carbohydrate content can differ in the amount they raise blood glucose. The effects of this property, called the glycemic index, on risk factors for cardiovascular disease and diabetes are not well understood. OBJECTIVE To determine the effect of glycemic index and amount of total dietary carbohydrate on risk factors for cardiovascular disease and diabetes. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Randomized crossover-controlled feeding trial conducted in research units in academic medical centers, in which 163 overweight adults (systolic blood pressure, 120–159 mm Hg) were given 4 complete diets that contained all of their meals, snacks, and calorie-containing beverages, each for 5 weeks, and completed at least 2 study diets. The first participant was enrolled April 1, 2008; the last participant finished December 22, 2010. For any pair of the 4 diets, there were 135 to 150 participants contributing at least 1 primary outcome measure. INTERVENTIONS (1) A high–glycemic index (65% on the glucose scale), high-carbohydrate diet (58% energy); (2) a low–glycemic index (40%), high-carbohydrate diet; (3) a high–glycemic index, low-carbohydrate diet (40% energy); and (4) a low–glycemic index, low-carbohydrate diet. Each diet was based on a healthful DASH-type diet. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES The 5 primary outcomes were insulin sensitivity, determined from the areas under the curves of glucose and insulin levels during an oral glucose tolerance test; levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, and triglycerides; and systolic blood pressure. RESULTS At high dietary carbohydrate content, the low– compared with high–glycemic index level decreased insulin sensitivity from 8.9 to 7.1 units (−20%, P = .002); increased LDL cholesterol from 139 to 147 mg/dL (6%, P ≤ .001); and did not affect levels of HDL cholesterol, triglycerides, or blood pressure. At low carbohydrate content, the

  4. Glycemic index, glycemic load, dietary carbohydrate, and dietary fiber intake and risk of liver and biliary tract cancers in Western Europeans

    PubMed Central

    Fedirko, V.; Lukanova, A.; Bamia, C.; Trichopolou, A.; Trepo, E.; Nöthlings, U.; Schlesinger, S.; Aleksandrova, K.; Boffetta, P.; Tjønneland, A.; Johnsen, N. F.; Overvad, K.; Fagherazzi, G.; Racine, A.; Boutron-Ruault, M. C.; Grote, V.; Kaaks, R.; Boeing, H.; Naska, A.; Adarakis, G.; Valanou, E.; Palli, D.; Sieri, S.; Tumino, R.; Vineis, P.; Panico, S.; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. B(as).; Siersema, P. D.; Peeters, P. H.; Weiderpass, E.; Skeie, G.; Engeset, D.; Quirós, J. R.; Zamora-Ros, R.; Sánchez, M. J.; Amiano, P.; Huerta, J. M.; Barricarte, A.; Johansen, D.; Lindkvist, B.; Sund, M.; Werner, M.; Crowe, F.; Khaw, K. T.; Ferrari, P.; Romieu, I.; Chuang, S. C.; Riboli, E.; Jenab, M.

    2013-01-01

    Background The type and quantity of dietary carbohydrate as quantified by glycemic index (GI) and glycemic load (GL), and dietary fiber may influence the risk of liver and biliary tract cancers, but convincing evidence is lacking. Patients and methods The association between dietary GI/GL and carbohydrate intake with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC; N = 191), intrahepatic bile duct (IBD; N = 66), and biliary tract (N = 236) cancer risk was investigated in 477 206 participants of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition cohort. Dietary intake was assessed by country-specific, validated dietary questionnaires. Hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals were estimated from proportional hazard models. HBV/HCV status was measured in a nested case–control subset. Results Higher dietary GI, GL, or increased intake of total carbohydrate was not associated with liver or biliary tract cancer risk. For HCC, divergent risk estimates were observed for total sugar = 1.43 (1.17–1.74) per 50 g/day, total starch = 0.70 (0.55–0.90) per 50 g/day, and total dietary fiber = 0.70 (0.52–0.93) per 10 g/day. The findings for dietary fiber were confirmed among HBV/HCV-free participants [0.48 (0.23–1.01)]. Similar associations were observed for IBD [dietary fiber = 0.59 (0.37–0.99) per 10 g/day], but not biliary tract cancer. Conclusions Findings suggest that higher consumption of dietary fiber and lower consumption of total sugars are associated with lower HCC risk. In addition, high dietary fiber intake could be associated with lower IBD cancer risk. PMID:23123507

  5. Dietary glycemic index, but not glycemic load, is positively associated with serum homocysteine concentration in free-living young Japanese women.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Kentaro; Sasaki, Satoshi; Uenishi, Kazuhiro

    2014-01-01

    It has been suggested that diets which enhance diurnal insulin secretion, such as a high glycemic index (GI) and glycemic load (GL) diet, can be expected to increase homocysteine levels. We investigated the hypothesis that dietary GI and GL are positively associated with serum homocysteine concentration in a group of free-living young Japanese women. This preliminary cross-sectional study included 1050 female Japanese dietetic students aged 18 to 22 years. Dietary intake was assessed using a validated, self-administered, comprehensive diet history questionnaire. Fasting blood samples were collected and serum homocysteine concentrations were measured. Adjustment was made for survey year, region, municipality level, current smoking, current alcohol consumption, dietary supplement use, physical activity, body mass index, energy intake, and intakes of B vitamins (folate, vitamin B6, vitamin B12, and riboflavin). After adjustment for nondietary confounding factors, both dietary GI and GL were positively associated with homocysteine concentration (both P for trend=.001). The positive association between dietary GI and homocysteine concentration remained after further adjustment for intakes of B vitamins. Mean (95% confidence interval) values of serum homocysteine concentration for each quintile of dietary GI were 6.9 (6.7-7.2), 7.1 (6.8-7.3), 7.0 (6.7-7.2), 7.4 (7.2-7.7), and 7.3 (7.0-7.6) μmol/L, respectively (P for trend = .04). Conversely, there was no association between dietary GL and homocysteine concentration after further adjustment for intakes of B vitamins (P for trend = .40). To conclude, in a group of free-living young Japanese women, dietary GI, but not GL, was independently and positively associated with serum homocysteine concentration.

  6. The polyphenol-rich baobab fruit (Adansonia digitata L.) reduces starch digestion and glycemic response in humans.

    PubMed

    Coe, Shelly A; Clegg, Miriam; Armengol, Mar; Ryan, Lisa

    2013-11-01

    The baobab fruit (Adansonia digitata L.) is found throughout regions of Africa and is becoming increasingly recognized for its high nutrient and polyphenol content. Polyphenols have been beneficial for their effects on reducing the glycemic response (GR) and for improving various other metabolic parameters. Based on previous research, it was hypothesized that the baobab fruit extract would reduce starch digestion in vitro and would show potential for reducing the GR and for increasing satiety and diet-induced thermogenesis in humans. Six extracts of baobab from 6 different locations in Africa were measured for their antioxidant and polyphenol content using the ferric ion-reducing antioxidant power and the Folin-Ciocalteu methods, respectively. Baobab extract was baked into white bread at different doses to determine the optimal dose for reducing starch breakdown and sugar release from white bread after an in vitro digestion procedure. In vivo, baobab extract was consumed in solution at both a low-dose (18.5 g) and a high-dose (37 g) aqueous drink in 250 mL of water along with white bread, and resulting GR, satiety, and postprandial energy expenditure were measured. All extracts in this study were shown to be good sources of polyphenols. Baobab fruit extract added to white bread at 1.88 % significantly (P < .05) reduced rapidly digestible starch from white bread samples. In vivo, the baobab fruit extract at both low and high doses significantly (P < .05) reduced GR, although there was no significant effect on satiety or on energy expenditure.

  7. Leader as achiever.

    PubMed

    Dienemann, Jacqueline

    2002-01-01

    This article examines one outcome of leadership: productive achievement. Without achievement one is judged to not truly be a leader. Thus, the ideal leader must be a visionary, a critical thinker, an expert, a communicator, a mentor, and an achiever of organizational goals. This article explores the organizational context that supports achievement, measures of quality nursing care, fiscal accountability, leadership development, rewards and punishments, and the educational content and teaching strategies to prepare graduates to be achievers.

  8. Glycemic control and pregnancy outcomes in patients with diabetes in pregnancy: A retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Buhary, Badurudeen Mahmood; Almohareb, Ohoud; Aljohani, Naji; Alzahrani, Saad H.; Elkaissi, Samer; Sherbeeni, Suphia; Almaghamsi, Abdulrahman; Almalki, Mussa

    2016-01-01

    Context: Diabetes in pregnancy (DIP) is either pregestational or gestational. Aims: To determine the relationship between glycemic control and pregnancy outcomes in a cohort of DIP patients. Settings and Design: In this 12-month retrospective study, a total of 325 Saudi women with DIP who attended the outpatient clinics at a tertiary center Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, were included. Subjects and Methods: The patients were divided into two groups, those with glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) ≤6.5% (48 mmol/mol) and those with glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) above 6.5%. The two groups were compared for differences in maternal and fetal outcomes. Statistical Analysis Used: Independent Student's t-test and analysis of variance were performed for comparison of continuous variables and Chi-square test for frequencies. Odds ratio and 95% confidence intervals were calculated using logistic regression. Results: Patients with higher HbA1c were older (P = 0.0077), had significantly higher blood pressure, proteinuria (P < 0.0001), and were multiparous (P = 0.0269). They had significantly shorter gestational periods (P = 0.0002), more preterm labor (P < 0.0001), more perineal tears (P = 0.0406), more miscarriages (P < 0.0001), and more operative deliveries (P < 0.0001). Their babies were significantly of greater weight, had more Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) admissions, hypoglycemia, and macrosomia. Conclusions: Poor glycemic control during pregnancy is associated with adverse maternal and fetal outcomes (shortened gestational period, greater risk of miscarriage, increased likelihood of operative delivery, hypoglycemia, macrosomia, and increased NICU admission). Especially at risk are those with preexisting diabetes, who would benefit from earlier diabetes consultation and tighter glycemic control before conception. PMID:27366714

  9. Glycemic Effects of Rebaudioside A and Erythritol in People with Glucose Intolerance

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Dong Hee; Lee, Ji Hye; Kang, Myung Shin; Kim, Tae Hoon; Jeong, Su Jin; Kim, Sang Soo

    2016-01-01

    Background Rebaudioside A and erythritol are nonnutritive sweeteners. There have been several studies of their glycemic effects, but the outcomes remain controversial. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the glycemic effects of rebaudioside A and erythritol as a sweetener in people with glucose intolerance. Methods This trial evaluated the glycemic effect after 2 weeks of consumption of rebaudioside A and erythritol as sweeteners in a pre-diabetic population. The patients were evaluated for fructosamine, fasting plasma glucose, C-peptide, insulin, and 2-hour plasma glucose before and after consumption of sweetener. The primary outcome was a change in fructosamine levels from the baseline to the end of treatment. Secondary outcomes were the changes in levels of fasting plasma glucose and 2-hour plasma glucose. Results From the baseline to the end of experiment, the changes in fructosamine levels after consumption of rebaudioside A and erythritol, did not differ significantly (244.00±19.57 vs. 241.68±23.39 µmol/L, P=0.366). The change in levels from the baseline to end of the study for rebaudioside A and erythritol were fasting plasma glucose (102.56±10.72 vs. 101.32±9.20 mg/dL), 2-hour plasma glucose (154.92±54.53 vs. 141.92±42.22 mg/dL), insulin (7.56±4.29 vs. 7.20±5.12 IU/mL), and C-peptide (2.92±1.61 vs. 2.73±1.31 ng/mL), respectively, and also did not differ significantly (P>0.05 for all). Conclusion Our study suggests that consumption of rebaudioside A and erythritol does not alter the glucose homeostasis in people with glucose intolerance. PMID:27352150

  10. Effect of glycemic state on hospital mortality in critically ill surgical patients.

    PubMed

    Chi, Albert; Lissauer, Matthew E; Kirchoffner, Jill; Scalea, Thomas M; Johnson, Steven B

    2011-11-01

    Intensive insulin therapy can reduce mortality. Hypoglycemia related to intensive therapy may worsen outcomes. This study compared risk adjusted mortality for different glycemic states. A retrospective review of patients admitted to a surgical intensive care unit over 4 years was performed. Patients were divided into glycemic groups: HYPER (≥1 episode > 180 mg/dL, any <60), HYPO (≥1 episode < 60 mg/dL, any >180), BOTH (≥1 episode < 60 and ≥1 episode > 180 mg/dL), NORMO (all episodes 60-180 mg/dL), HYPER-Only (≥1 episode > 180, none <60 mg/dL), and HYPO-Only (≥1 episode < 60, none >180 mg/dL). Observed to expected Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) III mortality ratios (O/E) were studied. Number of adverse glycemic events was compared with mortality. Hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia occurred in 18 per cent and 50 per cent of patients. Mortality was 12.4 per cent (O/E = 0.88). BOTH had the highest O/E ratio (1.43) with HYPO the second highest (1.30). Groups excluding hypoglycemia (NORMO and HYPER-only) had the lowest O/E ratios: 0.56 and 0.88. Increasing number of hypoglycemic events were associated with increasing O/E ratio: 0.69 O/E for no events, 1.19 for 1-3 events, 1.35 for 4-6 events, 1.9 for 7-9 events, and 3.13 for ≥ 10 events. Ten or more hyperglycemic events were needed to significantly associate with worse mortality (O/E 1.53). Hyper- and hypoglycemia increase mortality compared with APACHE III expected mortality, with highest mortality risk if both are present. Hypoglycemia is associated with worse risk. Glucose control may need to be loosened to prevent hypoglycemia and reduce glucose variability.

  11. Body mass index and glycemic control influences lipoproteins in children with type 1 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Vaid, Shalini; Hanks, Lynae; Griffin, Russell; Ashraf, Ambika P.

    2017-01-01

    Background Patients with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus (T1DM) have an extremely high risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) morbidity and mortality. It is well-known that dyslipidemia is a subclinical manifestation of atherosclerosis. Objective To analyze presence and predicting factors of lipoprotein abnormalities prevalent in children with T1DM and whether race specific differences exists between non-Hispanic White (NHW) and non-Hispanic Black (NHB) in the lipoprotein characteristics. Methods A retrospective electronic chart review including 600 (123 NHB and 477 NHW ) T1DM patients, ages 7.85 ± 3.75 years who underwent lipoprotein analysis. Results Relative to NHW counterparts, NHB T1DM subjects had a higher HbA1c, total cholesterol (TC), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL), apoB 100, lipoprotein (a), and high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL), HDL-2 and -3. Body mass index (BMI) was positively associated with TC, LDL, apoB 100, and non-HDL and inversely associated with HDL, HDL-2, and HDL-3. HbA1c was positively associated with TC, LDL, apoB100, non-HDL, and HDL-3. Multilinear regression analysis demonstrated that HbA1c was positively associated with apoB 100 in both NHB and NHW, and BMI was a positive determinant of apoB 100 in NHW only. Conclusion Poor glycemic control and high BMI may contribute to abnormal lipoprotein profiles. Glycemic control (in NHB and NHW) and weight management (in NHW) may have significant implications in T1DM. ApoB100 concentrations in subjects with T1DM were determined by modifiable risk factors, BMI, HbA1C, and blood pressure, indicating the importance of adequate weight-, glycemic-, and blood pressure control for better diabetes care, and likely lower CVD risk. PMID:27678442

  12. Effect of proton pump inhibitors on glycemic control in patients with diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Takebayashi, Kohzo; Inukai, Toshihiko

    2015-01-01

    Gastrin is a linear peptide hormone which is secreted mostly in the stomach pyloric antrum G cells. Although the main role of this hormone is the promotion of the secretion of gastric acid from the stomach parietal cells, gastrin can also behave as a growth factor and stimulate gastric cell proliferation. It is also reported that gastrin promotes β cell neogenesis in the pancreatic ductal complex, modest pancreatic β cell replication, and improvement of glucose tolerance in animal models, in which the remodeling of pancreatic tissues is promoted. These findings suggest the possibility that gastrin has the potential to promote an increase of β cell mass in pancreas, and therefore that gastrin may improve glucose tolerance. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are wildly used clinically for the therapy of gastro-esophageal reflex disease, gastritis due to excess stomach acid, and gastric ulcers. PPIs indirectly elevate serum gastrin levels via a negative feedback effect. Recent evidence has revealed the beneficial effect of PPIs on glycemic control especially in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), probably via the elevation of the levels of serum gastrin, although the detailed mechanism remains unclear. In addition, the beneficial effects of a combination therapy of gastrin or a PPI with a glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist on glycemic control in animal models have been demonstrated. Although PPIs may be possible candidates for a new approach in the therapy of diabetes, a prospective, long-term, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study is needed to establish the effect of PPIs on glycemic control in a large number of patients with T2DM. PMID:26322158

  13. Oral salmon calcitonin improves fasting and postprandial glycemic control in lean healthy rats.

    PubMed

    Feigh, M; Nielsen, R H; Hansen, C; Henriksen, K; Christiansen, C; Karsdal, M A

    2012-02-01

    A novel oral form of salmon calcitonin (sCT) was recently demonstrated to improve both fasting and postprandial glycemic control and induce weight loss in diet-induced obese and insulin-resistant rats. To further explore the glucoregulatory efficacy of oral sCT, irrespective of obesity and metabolic dysfunction, the present study investigated the effect of chronic oral sCT treatment on fasting and postprandial glycemic control in male lean healthy rats. 20 male rats were divided equally into a control group receiving oral vehicle or an oral sCT (2 mg/kg) group. All rats were treated twice daily for 5 weeks. Body weight and food intake were monitored during the study period and fasting blood glucose, plasma insulin and insulin sensitivity were determined and an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) performed at study end. Compared with the vehicle group, rats receiving oral sCT had improved fasting glucose homeostasis and insulin resistance, as measured by homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR), with no change in body weight or fasting plasma insulin. In addition, the rats receiving oral sCT had markedly reduced glycemia and insulinemia during OGTT. This is the first report showing that chronic oral sCT treatment exerts a glucoregulatory action in lean healthy rats, irrespective of influencing body weight. Importantly, oral sCT seems to exert a dual treatment effect by improving fasting and postprandial glycemic control and insulin sensitivity. This and previous studies suggest oral sCT is a promising agent for the treatment of obesity-related insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes.

  14. Effect of Selenium Supplementation on Glycemic Control and Lipid Profiles in Patients with Diabetic Nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Bahmani, Fereshteh; Kia, Mahsa; Soleimani, Alireza; Asemi, Zatollah; Esmaillzadeh, Ahmad

    2016-08-01

    To our knowledge, data on the effects of selenium supplementation on glycemic control and lipid concentrations in patients with diabetic nephropathy (DN) are scarce. The current study was done to determine the effects of selenium supplementation on glycemic control and lipid concentrations in patients with DN. This was a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial in which 60 patients with DN were randomly allocated into two groups to receive either 200 μg of selenium supplements (n = 30) or placebo (n = 30) daily for 12 weeks. Blood sampling was performed for the quantification of glycemic indicators and lipid profiles at the onset of the study and after 12 weeks of intervention. Selenium supplementation for 12 weeks resulted in a significant decrease in serum insulin levels (P = 0.01), homeostasis model of assessment-estimated insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) (P = 0.02), homeostasis model of assessment-estimated B cell function (HOMA-B) (P = 0.009) and a significant rise in plasma glutathione peroxidase (GPx) (P = 0.001) compared with the placebo. Taking selenium supplements had no significant effects on fasting plasma glucose (FPG), quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (QUICKI) and lipid profiles compared with the placebo. Overall, our study demonstrated that selenium supplementation for 12 weeks among patients with DN had beneficial effects on plasma GPx, serum insulin levels, HOMA-IR, and HOMA-B, while it did not affect FPG, QUICKI, and lipid profiles.

  15. The effect of caloric restriction and glycemic load on measures of oxidative stress and antioxidants in humans: results from the calerie trial of human caloric restriction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Reducing oxidative stress and increasing antioxidant defense is suggested as one mechanism by which caloric restriction (CR) increases longevity in animals. A total of 46 moderately overweight volunteers (BMI: 25-30 kg/m2), ages 20-42 yr were randomized to either high glycemic (HG) or low glycemic ...

  16. Lifestyle and glycemic control in Japanese adults receiving diabetes treatment: an analysis of the 2009 Japan Society of Ningen Dock database.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Eiko; Moriyama, Kengo; Yamakado, Minoru

    2014-05-01

    We investigated the level of glycemic control in 7020 patients treated with diabetes medications. We found that the overall mean HbA1c was 7.3% (56 mmol/mol). Over half had HbA1c levels ≥7.0% (53 mmol/mol) and poorer glycemic control was associated with unhealthy lifestyle habits.

  17. Testing a self-determination theory process model for promoting glycemic control through diabetes self-management.

    PubMed

    Williams, Geoffrey C; McGregor, Holly A; Zeldman, Allan; Freedman, Zachary R; Deci, Edward L

    2004-01-01

    A longitudinal study tested the self-determination theory (SDT) process model of health behavior change for glycemic control within a randomized trial of patient activation versus passive education. Glycosylated hemoglobin for patients with Type 2 diabetes (n=159) was assessed at baseline, 6 months, and 12 months. Autonomous motivation and perceived competence were assessed at baseline and 6 months, and the autonomy supportiveness of clinical practitioners was assessed at 3 months. Perceptions of autonomy and competence were promoted by perceived autonomy support, and changes in perceptions of autonomy and competence, in turn, predicted change in glycemic control. Self-management behaviors mediated the relation between change in perceived competence and change in glycemic control. The self-determination process model fit the data well.

  18. Vitamin D Deficiency and Glycemic Status in Children and Adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Savastio, Silvia; Cadario, Francesco; Genoni, Giulia; Bellomo, Giorgio; Bagnati, Marco; Secco, Gioel; Picchi, Raffaella; Giglione, Enza; Bona, Gianni

    2016-01-01

    Background Vitamin D (25OHD) effects on glycemic control are unclear in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes. Aims of this study were to investigate 25OHD status among children with T1DM and its relationship with insulin sensitivity and glycemic status. Subjects and Methods A cross sectional study was carried out between 2008–2014. A total of 141 patients had a T1DM >12 months diagnosis and were enrolled in the present study. Of these 35 (24.8%) were migrants and 106 (75.2%) Italians (T2). We retrospectively analyzed data at the onset of the disease (T0)(64 subjects) and 12–24 months before the last visit (T1,124 subjects). Fasting glucose, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), 25OHD levels and daily insulin requirement were evaluated and Cholecalciferol 1000 IU/day supplementation for the management of vitamin D insufficiency (<75 nmol/L) was systematically added. Results A generalized 25OHD insufficiency was found at each study time, particularly in migrants. At T0, the 25OHD levels were inversely related to diabetic keto-acidosis (DKA) severity (p<0.05). At T1 and T2, subjects with 25OHD ≤25nmol/L (10 ng/mL) showed higher daily insulin requirement (p<0.05) and HbA1c values (p<0.01) than others vitamin D status. The 25OHD levels were negatively related with HbA1c (p<0.001) and daily insulin dose (p<0.05) during follow up. There was a significant difference in 25OHD (p<0.01) between subjects with different metabolic control (HbA1c <7.5%,7.5–8%,>8%), both at T1 and T2. In supplemented subjects, we found a significant increase in 25OHD levels (p<0.0001) and decrease of HbA1c (p<0.001) between T1 and T2, but this was not significant in the migrants subgroup. Multivariate regression analysis showed a link between HbA1c and 25OHD levels (p<0.001). Conclusions Children with T1DM show a generalized 25OHD deficiency that impact on metabolic status and glycemic homeostasis. Vitamin D supplementation improves glycemic control and should be considered as an

  19. Outpatient Glycemic Control with a Bionic Pancreas in Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Manasi; Magyar, Kendra L.; McKeon, Katherine; Goergen, Laura G.; Balliro, Courtney; Hillard, Mallory A.; Nathan, David M.; Damiano, Edward R.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND The safety and effectiveness of automated glycemic management have not been tested in multiday studies under unrestricted outpatient conditions. METHODS In two random-order, crossover studies with similar but distinct designs, we compared glycemic control with a wearable, bihormonal, automated, “bionic” pancreas (bionic-pancreas period) with glycemic control with an insulin pump (control period) for 5 days in 20 adults and 32 adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus. The automatically adaptive algorithm of the bionic pancreas received data from a continuous glucose monitor to control subcutaneous delivery of insulin and glucagon. RESULTS Among the adults, the mean plasma glucose level over the 5-day bionic-pancreas period was 138 mg per deciliter (7.7 mmol per liter), and the mean percentage of time with a low glucose level (<70 mg per deciliter [3.9 mmol per liter]) was 4.8%. After 1 day of automatic adaptation by the bionic pancreas, the mean (±SD) glucose level on continuous monitoring was lower than the mean level during the control period (133±13 vs. 159±30 mg per deciliter [7.4±0.7 vs. 8.8±1.7 mmol per liter], P<0.001) and the percentage of time with a low glucose reading was lower (4.1% vs. 7.3%, P = 0.01). Among the adolescents, the mean plasma glucose level was also lower during the bionic-pancreas period than during the control period (138±18 vs. 157±27 mg per deciliter [7.7±1.0 vs. 8.7±1.5 mmol per liter], P = 0.004), but the percentage of time with a low plasma glucose reading was similar during the two periods (6.1% and 7.6%, respectively; P = 0.23). The mean frequency of interventions for hypoglycemia among the adolescents was lower during the bionic-pancreas period than during the control period (one per 1.6 days vs. one per 0.8 days, P<0.001). CONCLUSIONS As compared with an insulin pump, a wearable, automated, bihormonal, bionic pancreas improved mean glycemic levels, with less frequent hypoglycemic episodes, among both

  20. Effect of low glycemic load diet on glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) in poorly-controlled diabetes patients.

    PubMed

    Ziaee, Amir; Afaghi, Ahmad; Sarreshtehdari, Majied

    2011-12-29

    Different carbohydrate diets have been administrated to diabetic patients to evaluate the glycemic response, while Poor-controlled diabetes is increasing world wide. To investigate the role of an alternative carbohydrate diet on glycemic control, we explored the effect of a low glycemic load (Low GL)-high fat diet on glycemic response and also glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) of poor-controlled diabetes patients. Hundred poorly-controlled diabetes patients, HbA1c > 8, age 52.8 ± 4.5 y, were administrated a low GL diet , GL = 67 (Energy 1800 kcal; total fat 36%; fat derived from olive oil and nuts 15%; carbohydrate 42%; protein 22%) for 10 weeks. Patients did their routine life style program during intervention. Fasting blood glucose and HbA1c before and after intervention with significant reduction were: 169 ± 17, 141 ± 12; 8.85% (73 mmol/mol) ± 0.22%, and 7.81% (62 mmol/mol) ± 0.27%; respectively (P < 0.001). Mean fasting blood glucose reduced by 28.1 ± 12.5 and HbA1c by 1.1% (11 mmol/mol) ± 0.3% (P=0.001). There was positive moderate correlation between HbA1c concentration before intervention and FBS reduction after intervention (P < 0.001, at 0.01 level, R =0.52), and strong positive correlation between FBS before intervention and FBS reduction (P < 0.001, at 0.01 level, R = 0.70). This study demonstrated that our alternative low glycemic load diet can be effective in glycemic control.

  1. Differentiating Approaches to Diabetes Self-Management of Multi-ethnic Rural Older Adults at the Extremes of Glycemic Control

    PubMed Central

    Brewer-Lowry, Aleshia Nichol; Arcury, Thomas A.; Bell, Ronny A.; Quandt, Sara A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: This study identified approaches to diabetes self-management that differentiate persons with well-controlled from poorly controlled diabetes. Previous research has focused largely on persons participating in self-management interventions. Design and Methods: In-depth qualitative interviews were conducted with 48 adults, drawn from a population-based sample aged 65 years or older with diabetes. The sample was stratified by sex and ethnic group (African American, American Indian, and White) from the low (A1C <6%) and high (A1C >8%) extremes of the glycemic control distribution. Case-based text analysis was guided by a model, including six self-management domains and four resource types (self-care, informal support, formal services, and medical care). Results: A “structured” approach to self-management differentiated respondents in good glycemic control from those in poor glycemic control. Those in good glycemic control were more likely to practice specific food behaviors to limit food consumption and practice regular blood glucose monitoring with specific target values. This approach was facilitated by a greater use of home aides to assist with diabetes care. Respondents in poor glycemic control demonstrated less structure, naming general food categories and checking blood glucose in reaction to symptoms. Implications: Results provide evidence that degree of structure differentiates self-management approaches of persons with good and poor glycemic control. Findings should provide a foundation for further research to develop effective self-management programs for older adults with diabetes. PMID:20110333

  2. Comparing Science Achievement Constructs: Targeted and Achieved

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrara, Steve; Duncan, Teresa

    2011-01-01

    This article illustrates how test specifications based solely on academic content standards, without attention to other cognitive skills and item response demands, can fall short of their targeted constructs. First, the authors inductively describe the science achievement construct represented by a statewide sixth-grade science proficiency test.…

  3. Low prevalence of glucokinase gene mutations in gestational diabetic patients with good glycemic control.

    PubMed

    Frigeri, H R; Santos, I C R; Réa, R R; Almeida, A C R; Fadel-Picheth, C M T; Pedrosa, F O; Souza, E M; Rego, F G M; Picheth, G

    2012-05-18

    Glucokinase (GCK) plays a key role in glucose homeostasis. Gestational diabetes mellitus increases the risk of gestational complications in pregnant women and fetuses. We screened for mutations in coding and flanking regions of the GCK gene in pregnant women with or without gestational diabetes in a Brazilian population. A sample of 200 pregnant women classified as healthy (control, N = 100) or with gestational diabetes (N = 100) was analyzed for mutations in the GCK gene. All gestational diabetes mellitus patients had good glycemic control maintained by diet alone and no complications during pregnancy. Mutations were detected by single-strand conformation polymorphism and DNA sequencing. Thirteen of the 200 subjects had GCK gene mutations. The mutations detected were in intron 3 (c.43331A>G, new), intron 6 (c.47702T>C, rs2268574), intron 9 (c.48935C>T, rs2908274), and exon 10 (c.49620G>A, rs13306388). None of these GCK mutations were found to be significantly associated with gestational diabetes mellitus. In summary, we report a low frequency of GCK mutations in a pregnant Brazilian population and describe a new intronic variation (c.43331A>G, intron 3). We conclude that mutations in GCK introns and in non-translatable regions of the GCK gene do not affect glycemic control and are not correlated with gestational diabetes mellitus.

  4. Actions of insulin beyond glycemic control: a perspective on insulin detemir.

    PubMed

    Tibaldi, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    The physiologic effects of insulin on carbohydrate metabolism in health in general and in diabetes are well known. Less understood, but far more intriguing, are the extrapancreatic effects of insulin that go beyond glycemic control to help sense, integrate, and maintain energy balance. Virtually every organ, including the brain, is a target for insulin action. When exogenous insulin is administered directly into the brains of experimental animals, the net effect is anorectic; however, patients with type 2 diabetes who transition to insulin therapy often gain weight--a tendency that opposes good glycemic control and overall therapeutic goals. After the brief review of extrapancreatic insulin--signaling pathways presented here, the physiologic impact of developing insulin resistance in relation to body weight is considered. Attention is then focused on insulin detemir, a longacting insulin analog that has consistently been associated with less weight gain than conventional formulations such as neutral protamine Hagedorn insulin. Mechanisms offered to explain this effect include the lower incidence of hypoglycemia and less within-patient variability associated with insulin detemir; however, recent observations and considerations of insulin-signaling pathways have shed light on other important properties of insulin detemir that may impart these weight-neutral effects. Namely, albumin binding, faster transport across the bloodbrain barrier, and preferential activity in brain and liver are characteristics of insulin detemir that potentially explain the observed weight benefit seen in clinical trials, as well as in the real-world practice setting.

  5. Glycemic control in hospitalized patients not in intensive care: beyond sliding-scale insulin.

    PubMed

    Nau, Konrad C; Lorenzetti, Rosemarie C; Cucuzzella, Mark; Devine, Timothy; Kline, Jonathan

    2010-05-01

    Glycemic control in hospitalized patients who are not in intensive care remains unsatisfactory. Despite persistent expert recommendations urging its abandonment, the use of sliding-scale insulin remains pervasive in U.S. hospitals. Evidence for the effectiveness of sliding-scale insulin is lacking after more than 40 years of use. New physiologic subcutaneous insulin protocols use basal, nutritional, and correctional insulin. The initial total daily dose of subcutaneous insulin is calculated using a factor of 0.3 to 0.6 units per kg body weight, with one half given as long-acting insulin (the basal insulin dose), and the other one half divided daily over three meals as short-acting insulin doses (nutritional insulin doses). A correctional insulin dose provides a final insulin adjustment based on the preprandial glucose value. This correctional dose resembles a sliding scale, but is only a small fine-tuning of therapy, as opposed to traditional sliding-scale insulin alone. Insulin sensitivity, nutritional intake, and total daily dosing review can alter the physiologic insulin-dosing schedule. Prospective trials have demonstrated reductions in hyperglycemic measurements, hypoglycemia, and adjusted hospital length of stay when physiologic subcutaneous insulin protocols are used. Transitions in care require special considerations and attention to glycemic control medications. Changing the sliding-scale insulin culture requires a multidisciplinary effort to improve patient safety and outcomes.

  6. Lowering the glycemic index of white bread using a white bean extract

    PubMed Central

    Udani, Jay K; Singh, Betsy B; Barrett, Marilyn L; Preuss, Harry G

    2009-01-01

    Background Phase 2® is a dietary supplement derived from the common white kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris). Phase 2 has been shown to inhibit alpha-amylase, the complex carbohydrate digesting enzyme, in vitro. The inhibition of alpha-amylase may result in the lowering of the effective Glycemic Index (GI) of certain foods. The objective of this study was to determine whether the addition of Phase 2 would lower the GI of a commercially available high glycemic food (white bread). Methods An open-label 6-arm crossover study was conducted with 13 randomized subjects. Standardized GI testing was performed on white bread with and without the addition of Phase 2 in capsule and powder form, each in dosages of 1500 mg, 2000 mg, and 3000 mg. Statistical analysis was performed by one-way ANOVA of all seven treatment groups using unadjusted multiple comparisons (t tests) to the white bread control. Results For the capsule formulation, the 1500 mg dose had no effect on the GI and the 2000 mg and 3000 mg capsule doses caused insignificant reductions in GI. For the powder, the 1500 mg and 2000 mg doses caused insignificant reductions in the GI, and the 3000 mg dose had a significant effect (-20.23 or 34.11%, p = 0.023) Conclusion Phase 2 white bean extract appears to be a novel and potentially effective method for reducing the GI of existing foods without modifying their ingredient profile. Trial Registration Trial Registration: ISRCTN50347345 PMID:19860922

  7. Glycemic index and quality evaluation of little millet (Panicum miliare) flakes with enhanced shelf life.

    PubMed

    Patil, Kavita B; Chimmad, Bharati V; Itagi, Sunanda

    2015-09-01

    Little millet is a minor cereal crop contains several nutraceutical components. Ready To Cook (RTC) flakes of the millet exhibited higher total dietary fiber content (22.40 %) compared to dehulled grain (15.80 %). One serving (30 g) of RTC flakes provided 2.25 g of protein, 0.13 g of fat, 0.13 g of total minerals, 9.67 mg of iron and zero trans fats. The flakes possessed a medium Glycemic Index (GI) of 52.11 ranging from 41.57 to 61.80 among normal volunteers. Glycemic Load (GL) of the flakes was a low of 9.24. The RTC flakes exhibited an acceptability index of 81.11. The flakes possessed a shelf life of more than 6 months with an acceptability index of 67.55, moisture content of 11.82 per cent and Free fatty acid content of 18.02 per cent at the end of sixth month of storage period.

  8. Characterisation, in vitro digestibility and expected glycemic index of commercial starches as uncooked ingredients.

    PubMed

    Romano, Annalisa; Mackie, Alan; Farina, Federica; Aponte, Maria; Sarghini, Fabrizio; Masi, Paolo

    2016-12-01

    In this study native starches as ingredients (corn, rice, wheat, tapioca and potato) were characterized for microstructure, physicochemical, functional and thermal properties, in vitro digestibility and glycemic index. There was a significant variation in the granule shape and size distribution of the starches. Particle size monomodal (corn, tapioca, potato) and bimodal (rice, wheat) distribution was observed amongst the starches. The potato starch showed the biggest size granules while the rice showed the smallest. The examined properties and nutritional characteristics of starches were significantly different. Thermal properties were studied using Differential Scanning Calorimeter (DSC). DSC results showed that the transition temperatures (58.8-78.7 °C) and enthalpies of gelatinization (2.3-8.2 J/g) of the starches appeared to be greatly influenced by microstructure and chemical composition (e.g. resistant starch). Nutritional properties such as slowly digestible starch and expected glycemic index values followed the order: rice > wheat > tapioca > corn > potato. In particular, the highest resistant starch was recorded for potato starch.

  9. Antioxidant alpha-tocopherol ameliorates glycemic control of GK rats, a model of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ihara, Y; Yamada, Y; Toyokuni, S; Miyawaki, K; Ban, N; Adachi, T; Kuroe, A; Iwakura, T; Kubota, A; Hiai, H; Seino, Y

    2000-05-04

    We have shown recently that oxidative stress by chronic hyperglycemia damages the pancreatic beta-cells of GK rats, a model of non-obese type 2 diabetes, which may worsen diabetic condition and suggested the administration of antioxidants as a supportive therapy. To determine if natural antioxidant alpha-tocopherol (vitamin E) has beneficial effects on the glycemic control of type 2 diabetes, GK rats were fed a diet containing 0, 20 or 500 mg/kg diet alpha-tocopherol. Intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test revealed a significant increment of insulin secretion at 30 min and a significant decrement of blood glucose levels at 30 and 120 min after glucose loading in the GK rats fed with high alpha-tocopherol diet. The levels of glycated hemoglobin A1c, an indicator of glycemic control, were also reduced. Vitamin E supplementation clearly ameliorated diabetic control of GK rats, suggesting the importance of not only dietary supplementation of natural antioxidants but also other antioxidative intervention as a supportive therapy of type 2 diabetic patients.

  10. Effect of preexercise meals with different glycemic indices and loads on metabolic responses and endurance running.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ya Jun; Wong, Stephen H; Wong, Chun Kwok; Lam, Ching Wan; Huang, Ya Jun; Siu, Parco M

    2008-06-01

    This study examined the effect of ingesting 3 isocaloric meals with different glycemic indices (GI) and glycemic loads (GL) 2 hr before exercise on metabolic responses and endurance running performance. Eight male runners completed 3 trials in a randomized order, separated by at least 7 days. Carbohydrate (CHO) content (%), GI, and GL were, respectively, 65%, 79, and 82 for the high-GI/high-GL meal (H-H); 65%, 40, and 42 for the low-GI/low-GL meal (L-L); and 36%, 78, and 44 for the high-GI/low-GL meal (H-L). Each trial consisted of a 1-hr run at 70% VO2max, followed by a 10-km performance run. Low-GL diets (H-L and L-L) were found to induce smaller metabolic changes during the postprandial period and during exercise, which were characterized by a lower CHO oxidation in the 2 trials (p < .05) and a concomitant, higher glycerol and free-fatty-acid concentration in the H-L trial (p < .05). There was no difference, however, in time to complete the preloaded 10-km performance run between trials. This suggests that the GL of the preexercise meal has an important role in determining subsequent metabolic responses.

  11. Preexercise carbohydrate ingestion, glucose kinetics, and muscle glycogen use: effect of the glycemic index.

    PubMed

    Febbraio, M A; Keenan, J; Angus, D J; Campbell, S E; Garnham, A P

    2000-11-01

    Eight trained men cycled at 70% peak oxygen uptake for 120 min followed by a 30-min performance cycle after ingesting either a high-glycemic index (HGI), low-glycemic index (LGI), or placebo (Con) meal 30 min before exercise. Ingestion of HGI resulted in an elevated (P<0.01) blood glucose concentration compared with LGI and Con. At the onset of exercise, blood glucose fell (P<0.05) such that it was lower (P<0.05) in HGI compared with LGI and Con at 15 and 30 min during exercise. Plasma insulin concentration was higher (P<0.01) throughout the rest period after ingestion of HGI compared with LGI and Con. Plasma free fatty acid concentrations were lower (P<0.05) throughout exercise in HGI compared with LGI and Con. The rates of [6,6-(2)H]glucose appearance and disappearance were higher (P<0.05) at rest after ingestion and throughout exercise in HGI compared with LGI and Con. Carbohydrate oxidation was higher (P<0.05) throughout exercise, whereas glycogen use tended (P = 0.07) to be higher in HGI compared with LGI and Con. No differences were observed in work output during the performance cycle when comparing the three trials. These results demonstrate that preexercise carbohydrate feeding with a HGI, but not a LGI, meal augments carbohydrate utilization during exercise but does not effect exercise performance.

  12. Physical activity, glycemic control, and diabetic peripheral neuropathy: a national sample.

    PubMed

    Loprinzi, Paul D; Hager, Kathy K; Ramulu, Pradeep Y

    2014-01-01

    To determine if physical activity and/or blood glycohemoglobin (HbA1c) are associated with the prevalence of peripheral neuropathy (PN) in a representative population of diabetics. Three hundred thirty-nine diabetic participants (40-85 yrs) taking part in 2003-2004 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey were studied. Participants were defined as having peripheral neuropathy if examination determined ≥1 insensate area in either foot. Moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) was objectively-measured using accelerometry. After adjustments, MVPA was not significantly associated with PN (OR=1.16; 95% CI: 0.48-2.78), nor was HbA1c (OR=0.55; 95% CI: 0.28-1.04). However, there was evidence of statistical interaction (OR=0.24; 95% CI: 0.06-0.87) between MVPA and HbA1c status, showing that diabetics engaging in higher levels of MVPA and having normal HgbA1c levels were less likely to have PN than what would be expected based on the individual effects of MVPA and HbA1c alone. Although MVPA was not directly associated with PN, these findings suggest that proper physical activity, coupled with good glycemic control, is associated with less neuropathy. Future longitudinal studies are required to evaluate whether physical activity and improved glycemic control may help prevent or slow the progression of diabetic end-organ damage, particularly diabetic neuropathy.

  13. Eating disinhibition and vagal tone moderate the postprandial response to glycemic load: a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Young, Hayley A.; Watkins, Heather

    2016-01-01

    Reducing the glycemic load (GL) of the diet may benefit appetite control but its utility is complicated by psychological influences on eating. Disinhibited behaviour, a risk factor for overconsumption, is characterized by reduced prefrontal cortex activity, which in turn modulates vagal tone; a phenomenon associated with glucoregulation. This double blind randomised controlled trial explored for the first time the influence of disinhibited eating and vagal tone (heart rate variability (HRV)) on hunger and the postprandial response to GL. Blood glucose (BG) and hunger were measured 30 and 150 min after consumption of water, glucose or isomaltulose (low glycemic sugar). After consuming glucose, independently of BMI or habitual diet, those with the highest levels of disinhibition had higher BG levels after thirty minutes (B = 0.192, 95% CI LL. 086, UL 0.297), and lower BG after one hundred and fifty minutes (B = −0.240, 95% CI LL −0.348, UL −0.131). BG was related to hunger but only in low disinhibited eaters. Disinhibited eaters were characterised by a reduced HRV which was related to greater BG excursions (B = 0.407, 95% CI LL 0.044, UL 1.134). These findings highlight novel mechanisms by which disinhibited eating leads to obesity and insulin resistance. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov NCT02827318. PMID:27761024

  14. The Consumption of Bicarbonate-Rich Mineral Water Improves Glycemic Control

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Shinnosuke; Goto, Yasuaki; Ito, Kyo; Hayasaka, Shinya; Kurihara, Shigeo; Soga, Tomoyoshi; Tomita, Masaru; Fukuda, Shinji

    2015-01-01

    Hot spring water and natural mineral water have been therapeutically used to prevent or improve various diseases. Specifically, consumption of bicarbonate-rich mineral water (BMW) has been reported to prevent or improve type 2 diabetes (T2D) in humans. However, the molecular mechanisms of the beneficial effects behind mineral water consumption remain unclear. To elucidate the molecular level effects of BMW consumption on glycemic control, blood metabolome analysis and fecal microbiome analysis were applied to the BMW consumption test. During the study, 19 healthy volunteers drank 500 mL of commercially available tap water (TW) or BMW daily. TW consumption periods and BMW consumption periods lasted for a week each and this cycle was repeated twice. Biochemical tests indicated that serum glycoalbumin levels, one of the indexes of glycemic controls, decreased significantly after BMW consumption. Metabolome analysis of blood samples revealed that 19 metabolites including glycolysis-related metabolites and 3 amino acids were significantly different between TW and BMW consumption periods. Additionally, microbiome analysis demonstrated that composition of lean-inducible bacteria was increased after BMW consumption. Our results suggested that consumption of BMW has the possible potential to prevent and/or improve T2D through the alterations of host metabolism and gut microbiota composition. PMID:26798400

  15. The Consumption of Bicarbonate-Rich Mineral Water Improves Glycemic Control.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Shinnosuke; Goto, Yasuaki; Ito, Kyo; Hayasaka, Shinya; Kurihara, Shigeo; Soga, Tomoyoshi; Tomita, Masaru; Fukuda, Shinji

    2015-01-01

    Hot spring water and natural mineral water have been therapeutically used to prevent or improve various diseases. Specifically, consumption of bicarbonate-rich mineral water (BMW) has been reported to prevent or improve type 2 diabetes (T2D) in humans. However, the molecular mechanisms of the beneficial effects behind mineral water consumption remain unclear. To elucidate the molecular level effects of BMW consumption on glycemic control, blood metabolome analysis and fecal microbiome analysis were applied to the BMW consumption test. During the study, 19 healthy volunteers drank 500 mL of commercially available tap water (TW) or BMW daily. TW consumption periods and BMW consumption periods lasted for a week each and this cycle was repeated twice. Biochemical tests indicated that serum glycoalbumin levels, one of the indexes of glycemic controls, decreased significantly after BMW consumption. Metabolome analysis of blood samples revealed that 19 metabolites including glycolysis-related metabolites and 3 amino acids were significantly different between TW and BMW consumption periods. Additionally, microbiome analysis demonstrated that composition of lean-inducible bacteria was increased after BMW consumption. Our results suggested that consumption of BMW has the possible potential to prevent and/or improve T2D through the alterations of host metabolism and gut microbiota composition.

  16. [Glycemic index of two varieties of pasta and two varieties of rice].

    PubMed

    Ridner, Edgardo; Di Sibio, Antonio

    2015-06-01

    The IG has been extensively studied as an indicator of the physiological effects of a carbohydrate meal with applications in the management and prevention of diabetes, dyslipidemia and obesity. A standard assay was performed to measure the glycemic index (GI) of two significant sources of carbohydrates following the World Health Organization (WHO) recommended methodology, determining the incremental area under the blood glucose response curve of a 50g carbohydrate portion of the test food compared to the same amount of carbohydrate from a glucose solution by the same subject measured in capillary whole blood before and 15, 30, 45, 60, 90 and 120 minutes after ingestion in a total of 9 subjects. The following results were obtained: Parboil rice: 73, Long Grain White Rice: 59; Pasta of durum wheat (Triticum durum): 71, Pasta of regular flour (Triticum aestivium): 38. This test confirms the low glycemic index of pasta made from durum wheat, and is the first measurement for pasta of common wheat flour properly characterized. It also indicates the values of the prevailing presentations of rice in the region, adding a reference for professionals and authorities.

  17. The Potential for Glycemic Control Monitoring and Screening for Diabetes at Dental Visits Using Oral Blood

    PubMed Central

    Rosedale, Mary T.; Pesce, Michael A.; Rindskopf, David M.; Kaur, Navjot; Juterbock, Caroline M.; Wolff, Mark S.; Malaspina, Dolores; Danoff, Ann

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. We examined the potential for glycemic control monitoring and screening for diabetes in a dental setting among adults (n = 408) with or at risk for diabetes. Methods. In 2013 and 2014, we performed hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) tests on dried blood samples of gingival crevicular blood and compared these with paired “gold-standard” HbA1c tests with dried finger-stick blood samples in New York City dental clinic patients. We examined differences in sociodemographics and diabetes-related risk and health care characteristics for 3 groups of at-risk patients. Results. About half of the study sample had elevated HbA1c values in the combined prediabetes and diabetes ranges, with approximately one fourth of those in the diabetes range. With a correlation of 0.991 between gingival crevicular and finger-stick blood HbA1c, measures of concurrence between the tests were extremely high for both elevated HbA1c and diabetes-range HbA1c levels. Persons already diagnosed with diabetes and undiagnosed persons aged 45 years or older could especially benefit from HbA1c testing at dental visits. Conclusions. Gingival crevicular blood collected at the dental visit can be used to screen for diabetes and monitor glycemic control for many at-risk patients. PMID:25713975

  18. Chromium supplements for glycemic control in type 2 diabetes: limited evidence of effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Costello, Rebecca B; Dwyer, Johanna T; Bailey, Regan L

    2016-07-01

    Some adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) believe that chromium-containing supplements will help control their disease, but the evidence is mixed. This narrative review examines the efficacy of chromium supplements for improving glycemic control as measured by decreases in fasting plasma glucose (FPG) or hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c). Using systematic search criteria, 20 randomized controlled trials of chromium supplementation in T2DM patients were identified. Clinically meaningful treatment goals were defined as an FPG of ≤7.2 mmol/dL, a decline in HbA1c to ≤7%, or a decrease of ≥0.5% in HbA1c. In only a few randomized controlled trials did FPG (5 of 20), HbA1c (3 of 14), or both (1 of 14) reach the treatment goals with chromium supplementation. HbA1c declined by ≥0.5% in 5 of 14 studies. On the basis of the low strength of existing evidence, chromium supplements have limited effectiveness, and there is little rationale to recommend their use for glycemic control in patients with existing T2DM. Future meta-analyses should include only high-quality studies with similar forms of chromium and comparable inclusion/exclusion criteria to provide scientifically sound recommendations for clinicians.

  19. Which Achievement Gap?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Sharon; Medrich, Elliott; Fowler, Donna

    2007-01-01

    From the halls of Congress to the local elementary school, conversations on education reform have tossed around the term "achievement gap" as though people all know precisely what that means. As it's commonly used, "achievement gap" refers to the differences in scores on state or national achievement tests between various…

  20. Prospective Optimization.

    PubMed

    Sejnowski, Terrence J; Poizner, Howard; Lynch, Gary; Gepshtein, Sergei; Greenspan, Ralph J

    2014-05-01

    Human performance approaches that of an ideal observer and optimal actor in some perceptual and motor tasks. These optimal abilities depend on the capacity of the cerebral cortex to store an immense amount of information and to flexibly make rapid decisions. However, behavior only approaches these limits after a long period of learning while the cerebral cortex interacts with the basal ganglia, an ancient part of the vertebrate brain that is responsible for learning sequences of actions directed toward achieving goals. Progress has been made in understanding the algorithms used by the brain during reinforcement learning, which is an online approximation of dynamic programming. Humans also make plans that depend on past experience by simulating different scenarios, which is called prospective optimization. The same brain structures in the cortex and basal ganglia that are active online during optimal behavior are also active offline during prospective optimization. The emergence of general principles and algorithms for goal-directed behavior has consequences for the development of autonomous devices in engineering applications.

  1. Prospective Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Sejnowski, Terrence J.; Poizner, Howard; Lynch, Gary; Gepshtein, Sergei; Greenspan, Ralph J.

    2014-01-01

    Human performance approaches that of an ideal observer and optimal actor in some perceptual and motor tasks. These optimal abilities depend on the capacity of the cerebral cortex to store an immense amount of information and to flexibly make rapid decisions. However, behavior only approaches these limits after a long period of learning while the cerebral cortex interacts with the basal ganglia, an ancient part of the vertebrate brain that is responsible for learning sequences of actions directed toward achieving goals. Progress has been made in understanding the algorithms used by the brain during reinforcement learning, which is an online approximation of dynamic programming. Humans also make plans that depend on past experience by simulating different scenarios, which is called prospective optimization. The same brain structures in the cortex and basal ganglia that are active online during optimal behavior are also active offline during prospective optimization. The emergence of general principles and algorithms for goal-directed behavior has consequences for the development of autonomous devices in engineering applications. PMID:25328167

  2. Prevalence of diabetic peripheral neuropathy and relation to glycemic control therapies at baseline in the BARI 2D cohort

    PubMed Central

    Pop-Busui, Rodica; Lu, Jiang; Lopes, Neuza; Jones, Teresa L. Z.

    2009-01-01

    We evaluated the associations between glycemic therapies and prevalence of diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) at baseline among participants in the Bypass-Angioplasty-Revascularization-Investigation-2-Diabetes (BARI 2D) trial on medical and revascularization therapies for coronary artery disease (CAD) and on insulin-sensitizing versus insulin-providing treatments for diabetes. 2368 patients with type 2 diabetes and CAD were evaluated. DPN was defined as clinical examination score >2 using the Michigan Neuropathy Screening Instrument (MNSI). DPN odds ratios across different groups of glycemic therapy were evaluated by multiple logistic regression, adjusted for multiple covariates including age, sex, HbA1c, diabetes duration. 51% BARI 2D subjects with valid baseline characteristics and MNSI scores had DPN. After adjusting for all variables, use of insulin was significantly associated with DPN (OR1.57, 1.15, 2.13). Patients on sulfonylurea or combination of sulfonylurea/metformin/TZD had marginally higher rates of DPN than the metformin/TZD group. This cross-sectional study in a cohort of patients with type 2 diabetes and CAD showed association of insulin use with higher DPN prevalence, independent of disease duration, glycemic control and other characteristics. The causality between a glycemic control strategy and DPN cannot be evaluated in this cross-sectional study, but continued assessment of DPN and randomized therapies in BARI 2D trial may provide further explanations on the development of DPN. PMID:19335534

  3. Orange pomace improves postprandial glycemic responses: an acute, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, crossover trial in overweight men

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Orange pomace (OP), a fiber-rich byproduct of juice production, has the potential for being formulated into a variety of food products. We hypothesized that OP would diminish postprandial glycemic responses to a high carbohydrate/fat breakfast and lunch. We conducted an acute, randomized, placebo-co...

  4. Exploration of Functionality of Low-Glycemic-Impact Sugars and Polyols using DSC, RVA, SRC, and Cookie Baking

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Consumers’ growing interest in healthy cookies includes expectations for prebiotic nutritional benefits and low glycemic impact. The anti-plasticizing action of the high sucrose concentration in a cookie formula inhibits gluten development during dough mixing and starch gelatinization/pasting durin...

  5. Cfh genotype interacts with dietary glycemic index to modulate age-related macular degeneration-like features in mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of visual impairment worldwide. Genetics and diet contribute to the relative risk for developing AMD, but their interactions are poorly understood. Genetic variations in Complement Factor H (CFH), and dietary glycemic index (GI) are major ris...

  6. Mobile bag starch prececal disappearance and postprandial glycemic response of four forms of barley in horses.

    PubMed

    Philippeau, C; Varloud, M; Julliand, V

    2014-05-01

    To determine prececal starch digestibili-ty and estimate glucose uptake from the digestion of 4 forms of barley in the small intestine, 4 mature cecally fistulated geldings (449 ± 41 kg BW) fed a 62:38 (wt/wt) meadow hay:concentrate diet at 1.7 kg DM/100 kg BW were included in a 4 × 4 Latin square design experiment. During each period, horses received 80% DM of their concentrate as 1 of the 4 forms of a same batch of barley, whole grain, 2.5 mm ground, steam flaked, and pelleted. Hay was offered in 2 equal meals and concentrate in 2 unequal meals. The starch supply in the morning meal amounted 2.7 g starch/kg BW. At each period, mobile bag DM and starch disappearance was determined. Except for ground barley, each form of barley was 4 mm ground before being introduced in the bag. Nylon bags containing each substrate were intubated in the horse receiving the pelleted barley. Bags were collected in the cecum for 10 h postintubation. At each period, postprandial glycemia was measured on blood samples collected on the 4 horses via an indwelling jugular catheter just before the concentrate morning meal and for 8 h. No hay in the morning meal was given the day of the measurements. Whole blood glucose was analyzed with a portable blood glucose meter. Mobile bag prececal DM disappearance and starch disappearance depended (P < 0.01) on barley form. Prececal starch disappearance of whole barley was the lowest but no difference (P > 0.05) was detected among the 3 processed grains. No significant effect of barley form was found whatever the glycemic parameters. No significant correlation was reported between glycemic parameters and the amount of prececal mobile bag disappeared starch calculated as the starch intake in the morning meal by the mobile bag starch disappearance. To conclude, the whole form of barley exhibited the lowest prececal mobile bag starch disappearance whereas, in relationship with large individual variations, no significant variation has been shown in

  7. A High Dietary Glycemic Index Increases Total Mortality in a Mediterranean Population at High Cardiovascular Risk

    PubMed Central

    Castro-Quezada, Itandehui; Sánchez-Villegas, Almudena; Estruch, Ramón; Salas-Salvadó, Jordi; Corella, Dolores; Schröder, Helmut; Álvarez-Pérez, Jacqueline; Ruiz-López, María Dolores; Artacho, Reyes; Ros, Emilio; Bulló, Mónica; Covas, María-Isabel; Ruiz-Gutiérrez, Valentina; Ruiz-Canela, Miguel; Buil-Cosiales, Pilar; Gómez-Gracia, Enrique; Lapetra, José; Pintó, Xavier; Arós, Fernando; Fiol, Miquel; Lamuela-Raventós, Rosa María; Martínez-González, Miguel Ángel; Serra-Majem, Lluís

    2014-01-01

    Objective Different types of carbohydrates have diverse glycemic response, thus glycemic index (GI) and glycemic load (GL) are used to assess this variation. The impact of dietary GI and GL in all-cause mortality is unknown. The objective of this study was to estimate the association between dietary GI and GL and risk of all-cause mortality in the PREDIMED study. Material and Methods The PREDIMED study is a randomized nutritional intervention trial for primary cardiovascular prevention based on community-dwelling men and women at high risk of cardiovascular disease. Dietary information was collected at baseline and yearly using a validated 137-item food frequency questionnaire (FFQ). We assigned GI values of each item by a 5-step methodology, using the International Tables of GI and GL Values. Deaths were ascertained through contact with families and general practitioners, review of medical records and consultation of the National Death Index. Cox regression models were used to estimate multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (HR) and their 95% CI for mortality, according to quartiles of energy-adjusted dietary GI/GL. To assess repeated measures of exposure, we updated GI and GL intakes from the yearly FFQs and used Cox models with time-dependent exposures. Results We followed 3,583 non-diabetic subjects (4.7 years of follow-up, 123 deaths). As compared to participants in the lowest quartile of baseline dietary GI, those in the highest quartile showed an increased risk of all-cause mortality [HR = 2.15 (95% CI: 1.15–4.04); P for trend  = 0.012]. In the repeated-measures analyses using as exposure the yearly updated information on GI, we observed a similar association. Dietary GL was associated with all-cause mortality only when subjects were younger than 75 years. Conclusions High dietary GI was positively associated with all-cause mortality in elderly population at high cardiovascular risk. PMID:25250626

  8. Safety and efficacy of saxagliptin for glycemic control in non-critically ill hospitalized patients

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Rajesh; Schuman, Brooke; Hurwitz, Shelley; Metzger, Cheyenne; Bhandari, Shreya

    2017-01-01

    Objective To evaluate whether saxagliptin is non-inferior to basal-bolus insulin therapy for glycemic control in patients with controlled type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) admitted to hospital with non-critical illnesses. Research design and methods This was an open-label, randomized controlled clinical trial. Patients received either saxagliptin or basal-bolus insulin, both with correctional insulin doses. The main study outcome was the mean daily blood glucose (BG) after the first day of randomization. Results Of 66 patients completing the study, 33 (age 69±10 years, 40% men) were randomized to saxagliptin and 33 (age 67±10 years, 52% men) to basal-bolus insulin therapy. The mean daily BG was 149.8±22.0 mg/dL in the saxagliptin group and 146.9±30.5 mg/dL in the insulin group (p=0.59). With an observed group difference of 2.9 mg/dL and an a priori margin of 20 mg/dL, inferiority of saxagliptin was rejected in favor of non-inferiority (p=0.007). There was no significant difference in the percentage of high or low BG values. The insulin group received a higher number of insulin injections (2.3±1.7/day vs 1.2±1.9/day; p<0.001) as well as a higher daily insulin dose (13.3±12.9 units/day vs 2.4±3.3 units/day; p<0.001) than did the saxagliptin group. Continuous BG monitoring showed that glycemic variability was lower in the saxagliptin group as compared to the insulin group. Patient satisfaction scores were similar in the two groups. Conclusions We conclude that saxagliptin use is non-inferior to basal-bolus insulin in non-critically ill hospitalized patients with T2DM controlled on 0–2 oral agents without insulin. Saxagliptin use may decrease glycemic variability in these patients. Trial registration number NCT02182895.

  9. Is glycemic index of food a feasible predictor of appetite, hunger, and satiety?

    PubMed

    Niwano, Yoshimi; Adachi, Takashi; Kashimura, Jun; Sakata, Takashi; Sasaki, Hajime; Sekine, Kazunori; Yamamoto, Satoshi; Yonekubo, Akie; Kimura, Shuichi

    2009-06-01

    This review assesses the feasibility of using glycemic index (GI) as a predictor of appetite, hunger and satiety by surveying published human intervention studies. We also discuss the relationship between GI and two appetite/satiety control hormones, leptin and ghrelin. Ingestion of high-GI food increased hunger and lowered satiety in short-term human intervention studies. This effect may be attributed to the rapid decline in blood glucose level following a hyperinsulinemic response caused by a sharp and transient increase in blood glucose level that occurs after the ingestion of high-GI food, which is defined as the glucostatic theory. However, appetite, hunger and satiety after the ingestion of foods with varying GI were inconsistent among long-term human intervention studies. From the few relevant long-term studies available, we selected two recent well-designed examples for analysis, but they failed to elicit clear differences in glycemic and insulinemic responses between high- and low-GI meals (consisting of a combination of different foods or key carbohydrate-rich foods incorporated into habitual diets). One of the reasons that these studies could not predict glycemic response to mixed meals is presumably that the GI of each particular food was not reflected in that of the mixed meals as a whole. Thus, it is difficult to conclude that the GI values of foods or mixed meals are a valid long-term predictor for appetite, hunger and satiety. Both insulin and insulin-mediated glucose uptake and metabolism in adipose tissue affect blood leptin concentration and its diurnal pattern. Circulating ghrelin level is suppressed by carbohydrate-rich meals, presumably via glycemia and insulinemia. Accordingly, low-GI foods may not necessarily increase satiety or suppress appetite and/or hunger because of the lack of insulin-mediated leptin stimulation and ghrelin suppression. However, insulin-mediated leptin stimulation and ghrelin suppression per se is not consistent among

  10. Metabolic and inflammatory responses to the common sweetener stevioside and a glycemic challenge in horses with equine metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Elzinga, S E; Rohleder, B; Schanbacher, B; McQuerry, K; Barker, V D; Adams, A A

    2017-02-04

    Extracts derived from the leaves of the stevia plant (stevioside) are commonly used as sweeteners for humans and horses. Stevioside appears to be safe for human consumption, including for individuals with insulin dysregulation. In the horse, the safety or metabolic effects of stevioside on normal animals or on those with metabolic dysfunction are unknown. Furthermore, the inflammatory response to a glycemic challenge or to stevioside in horses is not well defined. Therefore, the objective of this study was to measure the effects of stevioside and a glycemic challenge on insulin, glucose, and inflammatory responses in horses with a common metabolic dysfunction (equine metabolic syndrome or EMS) compared with non-EMS controls. To accomplish this, 15 horses were selected; 8 EMS and 7 age-matched controls. An oral sugar test was performed using Karo corn syrup (karo) or stevioside in a random crossover design. Horses were given 0.15 mL/kg body weight of karo or its equivalent grams of sugar in stevia dissolved in water. Blood samples were collected by jugular venipuncture before administration of either stevia or karo and at 60 and 240 min after administration. Serum was used for glucose and insulin determination and plasma for isolation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) for inflammatory cytokine analysis via flow cytometry and reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR). Stevia appeared to stimulate lower glycemic and insulinemic responses when compared to karo, in particular in EMS horses. EMS and control horses had inverse inflammatory responses to administration of either stevia or karo with EMS horses having a proinflammatory response (P ≤ 0.05). These data provide evidence as to why horses with EMS may be predisposed to developing laminitis, potentially as a result of an exaggerated inflammatory response to glycemic and insulinemic responses. Furthermore, the data provide new avenues for exploring mechanisms behind the syndrome, in particular when using a

  11. Effect of traditional Arabic coffee consumption on the glycemic index of Khalas dates tested in healthy and diabetic subjects.

    PubMed

    Alkaabi, Juma; Al-Dabbagh, Bayan; Saadi, Hussein; Gariballa, Salah; Yasin, Javed

    2013-01-01

    The consumption of dates with coffee is common among Arabs and may affect postprandial hyperglycemia ex-cursion. The study aimed to determine the effect of coffee on the glycemic index of a common variety of dates (Khalas) tested in healthy and type 2 diabetes mellitus individuals. Study subjects were thirteen healthy volunteers (mean age: 40.2±6.7 years) and ten diabetic participants with a mean HbA1c of 6.6±(0.7%) and a mean age of 40.8±5.7 years. Each subject participated in five days of tests with 50 g of glucose and 50 g equivalent of available carbohydrates from the dates (with/without coffee). Capillary glucose was measured in the healthy subjects at 0, 15, 30, 45, 60, 90 and 120 min, and for the diabetics at 0, 30, 60, 90, 120, 150 and 180 min. Glycemic indices were determined as ratios of the incremental areas under the response curves for the interventions. Statistical analyses were performed using the independent samples and paired t-tests. Mean±SE glycemic indices of the Khalas dates for the healthy individuals were 55.1±7.7 and 52.7±6.2 without and with coffee consumption, respectively. Similar values were observed for those with diabetes (53.0±6.0 and 41.5±5.4). Differences between glycemic indices of Khalas with or without coffee were not significant (p=0.124). There were no significant differences in glycemic index between the diabetic and healthy subjects (p=0.834 and p=0.202 without and with coffee respectively). In conclusion, at least in the short term, coffee does not adversely affect capillary glucose levels following Khalas dates consumption in healthy and diabetic volunteers.

  12. The glycemic response to fibre rich foods and their relationship with gastric emptying and motor functions: an MRI study.

    PubMed

    Gopirajah, R; Raichurkar, Keshav Prakash; Wadhwa, Rajkumar; Anandharamakrishnan, C

    2016-09-14

    The chief motor functions of human stomach, namely receiving, storing, mixing and emptying, influence the absorption of ingested food and hence determine the glycemic response to the meal. However, among these functions, the gastric emptying pattern of the stomach is essentially regulated by the meal characteristics such as particle size, volume, nutrient composition and viscosity. Understanding the complex relationship between the stomach motor functions and the physicochemical characteristics of meal on glycemic control needs more attention in the formulation of functional foods. Hence, the objective of this study is to employ the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique in ten healthy human volunteers to elucidate the relationship between the motor functions of the stomach and the glycemic response to fibre rich foods. For this, wheat and oat based breakfast meals were selected as fibre rich foods with low (0.042 Pa s) and high (0.266 Pa s) viscosity, respectively. Although wheat meal had a lower viscosity compared to oatmeal, the gastric emptying was found to be delayed for the former due to its high caloric density. This was reflected in the glycemic response as well, with wheat meal having a lower area under the curve (AUC) value than oatmeal. The antral contraction frequency is significantly reduced (P < 0.05) with delayed gastric emptying in the case of high nutrient wheat meal. Overall, the study demonstrated the synergistic effect of gastric emptying, stomach motor functions and physicochemical characteristics of food on the glycemic response to a meal. This information will aid in the development of functional foods with specific end applications.

  13. 'No delays achiever'.

    PubMed

    2007-05-01

    The latest version of the NHS Institute for Innovation and Improvement's 'no delays achiever', a web based tool created to help NHS organisations achieve the 18-week target for GP referrals to first treatment, is available at www.nodelaysachiever.nhs.uk.

  14. Vicarious Achievement Orientation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leavitt, Harold J.; And Others

    This study tests hypotheses about achievement orientation, particularly vicarious achievement. Undergraduate students (N=437) completed multiple-choice questionnaires, indicating likely responses of one person to the success of another. The sex of succeeder and observer, closeness of relationship, and setting (medical school or graduate school of…

  15. Heritability of Creative Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piffer, Davide; Hur, Yoon-Mi

    2014-01-01

    Although creative achievement is a subject of much attention to lay people, the origin of individual differences in creative accomplishments remain poorly understood. This study examined genetic and environmental influences on creative achievement in an adult sample of 338 twins (mean age = 26.3 years; SD = 6.6 years). Twins completed the Creative…

  16. Confronting the Achievement Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, David

    2007-01-01

    This article talks about the large achievement gap between children of color and their white peers. The reasons for the achievement gap are varied. First, many urban minorities come from a background of poverty. One of the detrimental effects of growing up in poverty is receiving inadequate nourishment at a time when bodies and brains are rapidly…

  17. Achievement-Based Resourcing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fletcher, Mike; And Others

    1992-01-01

    This collection of seven articles examines achievement-based resourcing (ABR), the concept that the funding of educational institutions should be linked to their success in promoting student achievement, with a focus on the application of ABR to postsecondary education in the United Kingdom. The articles include: (1) "Introduction" (Mick…

  18. States Address Achievement Gaps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christie, Kathy

    2002-01-01

    Summarizes 2 state initiatives to address the achievement gap: North Carolina's report by the Advisory Commission on Raising Achievement and Closing Gaps, containing an 11-point strategy, and Kentucky's legislation putting in place 10 specific processes. The North Carolina report is available at www.dpi.state.nc.us.closingthegap; Kentucky's…

  19. Gear optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderplaats, G. N.; Chen, Xiang; Zhang, Ning-Tian

    1988-01-01

    The use of formal numerical optimization methods for the design of gears is investigated. To achieve this, computer codes were developed for the analysis of spur gears and spiral bevel gears. These codes calculate the life, dynamic load, bending strength, surface durability, gear weight and size, and various geometric parameters. It is necessary to calculate all such important responses because they all represent competing requirements in the design process. The codes developed here were written in subroutine form and coupled to the COPES/ADS general purpose optimization program. This code allows the user to define the optimization problem at the time of program execution. Typical design variables include face width, number of teeth and diametral pitch. The user is free to choose any calculated response as the design objective to minimize or maximize and may impose lower and upper bounds on any calculated responses. Typical examples include life maximization with limits on dynamic load, stress, weight, etc. or minimization of weight subject to limits on life, dynamic load, etc. The research codes were written in modular form for easy expansion and so that they could be combined to create a multiple reduction optimization capability in future.

  20. Colonic Fermentation of Unavailable Carbohydrates from Unripe Banana and its Influence over Glycemic Control.

    PubMed

    Dan, Milana C T; Cardenette, Giselli H L; Sardá, Fabiana A H; Giuntini, Eliana Bistriche; Bello-Pérez, Luis Arturo; Carpinelli, Ângelo R; Lajolo, Franco M; Menezes, Elizabete Wenzel

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the colonic fermentation of unavailable carbohydrates from unripe banana (mass - UBM - and starch - UBS) over parameters related to glucose and insulin response in rats. Wistar male rats were fed either a control diet, a UBM diet (5 % resistant starch - RS) or a UBS diet (10 % RS) for 28 days. In vivo (oral glucose tolerance test) and in vitro (cecum fecal fermentation, pancreatic islet insulin secretion) analyses were performed. The consumption of UBM and UBS diets by Wistar rats for 28 days improved insulin/glucose ratio. Also, pancreatic islets isolated from the test groups presented significant lower insulin secretion compared to the control group, when the same in vitro glucose stimulation was done. Total short chain fatty acids produced were higher in both experimental groups in relation to the control group. These findings suggest that UBM and UBS diets promote colonic fermentation and can influence glycemic control, improving insulin sensitivity in rats.

  1. Sorghum flour fractions: correlations among polysaccharides, phenolic compounds, antioxidant activity and glycemic index.

    PubMed

    Moraes, Érica Aguiar; Marineli, Rafaela da Silva; Lenquiste, Sabrina Alves; Steel, Caroline Joy; de Menezes, Cícero Beserra; Queiroz, Valéria Aparecida Vieira; Maróstica Júnior, Mário Roberto

    2015-08-01

    Nutrients composition, phenolic compounds, antioxidant activity and estimated glycemic index (EGI) were evaluated in sorghum bran (SB) and decorticated sorghum flour (DSF), obtained by a rice-polisher, as well as whole sorghum flour (WSF). Correlation between EGI and the studied parameters were determined. SB presented the highest protein, lipid, ash, β-glucan, total and insoluble dietary fiber contents; and the lowest non-resistant and total starch contents. The highest carbohydrate and resistant starch contents were in DSF and WSF, respectively. Phenolic compounds and antioxidant activities were concentrated in SB. The EGI values were: DSF 84.5 ± 0.41; WSF 77.2 ± 0.33; and SB 60.3 ± 0.78. Phenolic compounds, specific flavonoids and antioxidant activities, as well as total, insoluble and soluble dietary fiber and β-glucans of sorghum flour samples were all negatively correlated to EGI. RS content was not correlated to EGI.

  2. Fasts, feasts and festivals in diabetes-1: Glycemic management during Hindu fasts

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Sanjay; Bajaj, Sarita; Gupta, Yashdeep; Agarwal, Pankaj; Singh, S. K.; Julka, Sandeep; Chawla, Rajeev; Agrawal, Navneet

    2015-01-01

    This communication is the first of a series on South Asian fasts, festivals, and diabetes, designed to spread awareness and stimulate research on this aspect of diabetes and metabolic care. It describes the various fasts observed as part of Hindu religion and offers a classification scheme for them, labeling them as infrequent and frequent. The infrequent fasts are further sub-classified as brief and prolonged, to facilitate a scientific approach to glycemic management during these fasts. Pre-fast counseling, non-pharmacological therapy, pharmacological modification, and post-fast debriefing are discussed in detail. All available drug classes and molecules are covered in this article, which provides guidance about necessary changes in dosage and timing of administration. While in no way exhaustive, the brief review offers a basic framework which diabetes care professionals can use to counsel and manage persons in their care who wish to observe various Hindu fasts. PMID:25729681

  3. Potential Overtreatment of Diabetes Mellitus in Older Adults With Tight Glycemic Control

    PubMed Central

    Lipska, Kasia J.; Ross, Joseph S.; Miao, Yinghui; Shah, Nilay D.; Lee, Sei J.; Steinman, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE In older adults with multiple serious comorbidities and functional limitations, the harms of intensive glycemic control likely exceed the benefits. OBJECTIVES To examine glycemic control levels among older adults with diabetes mellitus by health status and to estimate the prevalence of potential overtreatment of diabetes. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Cross-sectional analysis of the data on 1288 older adults (≥65 years) with diabetes from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) from 2001 through 2010 who had a hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) measurement. All analyses incorporated complex survey design to produce nationally representative estimates. EXPOSURES Health status categories: very complex/poor, based on difficulty with 2 or more activities of daily living or dialysis dependence; complex/intermediate, based on difficulty with 2 or more instrumental activities of daily living or presence of 3 or more chronic conditions; and relatively healthy if none of these were present. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Tight glycemic control (HbA1c level, <7%) and use of diabetes medications likely to result in hypoglycemia (insulin or sulfonylureas). RESULTS Of 1288 older adults with diabetes, 50.7% (95% CI, 46.6%–54.8%), representing 3.1 million (95% CI, 2.7–3.5), were relatively healthy, 28.1% (95% CI, 24.8%–31.5%), representing 1.7 million (95% CI, 1.4–2.0), had complex/intermediate health, and 21.2% (95% CI, 18.3%–24.4%), representing 1.3 million (95% CI, 1.1–1.5), had very complex/poor health. Overall, 61.5% (95% CI, 57.5%–65.3%), representing 3.8 million (95% CI, 3.4–4.2), had an HbA1c level of less than 7%; this proportion did not differ across health status categories (62.8% [95% CI, 56.9%–68.3%]) were relatively healthy, 63.0% (95% CI, 57.0%–68.6%) had complex/intermediate health, and 56.4% (95% CI, 49.7%–62.9%) had very complex/poor health (P = .26). Of the older adults with an HbA1c level of less than 7%, 54.9% (95

  4. Non-nutritive sweeteners: no class effect on the glycemic or appetite responses to ingested glucose

    PubMed Central

    Bryant, Charlotte E.; Wasse, Lucy K.; Astbury, Nerys; Nandra, Gurinder; McLaughlin, John T.

    2014-01-01

    There is considerable interest in whether non-nutritive sweeteners are sensed in the gastrointestinal tract to modulate appetitive or absorptive responses to ingested carbohydrate. We determined the effect of a panel of non-nutritive sweeteners, aspartame, saccharin and acesulfame-K, delivered in doses that would be consumed in normal usage. Each was given in combination with glucose, assessing their effect on glycemic responses and appetite in ten healthy human subjects. There was no additional effect of aspartame or saccharin on the blood glucose response to oral glucose at any time point, although acesulfame-K exerted a small effect. However, none had an effect on perceptions of hunger or fullness. We conclude that there is no consistent evidence that non-nutrient sweeteners, when acutely consumed with glucose in dietetically relevant doses, have a class effect in modulating blood glucose in healthy human subjects. However, acesulfame-K may require further exploration. PMID:24595225

  5. Continuous Glucose Monitoring for Evaluation of Glycemic Excursions after Gastric Bypass

    PubMed Central

    Halperin, Florencia; Patti, Mary Elizabeth; Skow, Megan; Bajwa, Muhammad; Goldfine, Allison B.

    2011-01-01

    Background. Hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia with neuroglycopenia is a rare complication of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB). We hypothesized that continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) would be useful to characterize glycemic variability after RYGB. Methods. CGM and mixed meal tolerance testing (MMTT) were performed on sixteen post-RYGB subjects, ten with a history of neuroglycopenia on medical treatment and six asymptomatic controls. Results. 9 of 10 subjects with neuroglycopenia developed hypoglycemia defined by glucose <70 mg/dL on CGM, and 3 of 9 on MMTT. In asymptomatic subjects, 3 of 6 had asymptomatic hypoglycemia during CGM, and 3 of 5 on MMTT. Therefore, the sensitivity and specificity to detect clinically significant hypoglycemia was 90% and 50% for CGM and 33% and 40% for MMTT. Conclusions. Asymptomatic hypoglycemia after RYGB is more frequent than commonly recognized. For clinicians evaluating patients for postbypass neuroglycopenia, CGM may be a valuable diagnostic tool. PMID:21331295

  6. Biopsychosocial pathways linking subjective socioeconomic disadvantage to glycemic control in youths with type I diabetes.

    PubMed

    Zilioli, Samuele; Ellis, Deborah A; Carré, Justin M; Slatcher, Richard B

    2017-04-01

    Older adolescent and young adults (OAYA) with type 1 diabetes (T1D) living in contexts of socio-economic disadvantage (SED) suffer disproportionately from poor glycemic control and related health complications. Although SED may convey a variety of risks, it may exacerbate diabetes-related stress levels, which in turn may account for observed disparities in health outcomes. The primary goal of the present study was to investigate the relationship between subjective SED, diabetes-related perceived stress, and diurnal cortisol secretion in urban OAYA with T1D. A secondary goal was to determine if cortisol was related to measures of blood glucose (HbA1c and mean blood glucose). Analyses were conducted among OAYA ages 17-20 years (n=61) affected by T1D, who provided daily saliva samples for four days, measures of glycemic control (i.e., HbA1c and mean blood glucose assessed via Continuous Glucose Monitor), and completed psychosocial questionnaires. We found that subjective SED was associated with a flatter diurnal cortisol rhythm via diabetes-related stress. Flattened cortisol rhythm was, in turn, associated with higher levels of HbA1c, but not with mean blood glucose assessed via Continuous Glucose Monitor. These results represent some of the first empirical evidence on how distal social factors (i.e., subjective SED) and proximal psychological processes (diabetes-related perceived stress) are connected to condition-relevant biological mechanisms (i.e., elevated HbA1c), via broad biological pathways implicated in health (i.e., flatter cortisol slope).

  7. In vitro starch digestibility and in vivo glycemic response of foxtail millet and its products.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xin; Chen, Jing; Molla, Mohammad Mainuddin; Wang, Chao; Diao, Xianmin; Shen, Qun

    2016-01-01

    Foxtail millet, as a leading variety in arid and semi-arid areas of Asia and Africa, can provide broad potential benefits to human health. However, its digestion properties have not been reported. So in this study, the in vitro starch digestibilities and in vivo glycemic indices (GI) of foxtail millet and pure millet products were investigated. The results showed that starch digestibility of the foxtail millet flour is obviously lower than that of wheat flour. However, deproteinization and heating significantly increased its rapidly digestible starch and decreased its slowly digestible starch and resistant starch. The GIs of pure millet products were in the following order: millet porridge (93.6 ± 11.3) > millet steamed bread (89.6 ± 8.8) > No. 1 millet pancake (75.0% millet flour and 25.0% extrusion flour, 83.0 ± 9.6) > No. 2 millet pancake (without extrusion flour, 76.2 ± 10.7) > cooked millet (64.4 ± 8.5). They were significantly positively correlated with the rapidly digestible starch (r = 0.959), degree of gelatinization (r = 0.967) and estimated glycemic index (r = 0.988). Both in vitro and in vivo tests suggested that boiling, steaming and extrusion enhanced the formation of digestible starch and subsequently increased the GI values. Additionally, the No. 1 millet pancake and cooked millet had a relatively gentle stimulation on β-cell. Therefore, foxtail millet, especially the cooked millet, may serve as a potential source of nutraceutical and functional food that could delay the development of type 2 diabetes.

  8. Sustainability of Improved Glycemic Control After Diabetes Self-Management Education.

    PubMed

    Nicoll, Katie G; Ramser, Kristie L; Campbell, Jennifer D; Suda, Katie J; Lee, Marilyn D; Wood, G Christopher; Sumter, Robert; Hamann, Gale L

    2014-08-01

    Objective. The purpose of this study was to evaluate glycemic control as measured by A1C during a 2-year period after patients received diabetes self-management education (DSME). Methods. Patients who completed DSME in 2009 and received medical follow-up with A1C measurements for at least 2 years after DSME were included in the evaluation. Primary endpoints were changes in A1C from before to immediately after, 1 year after, and 2 years after DSME. Secondary outcomes included the effects of the following factors on change in A1C: sex, duration of diabetes, uncontrolled diabetes (A1C ≥ 9%), health insurance coverage, and self-reported education level. Results. Forty-three patients were included in the evaluation. Mean A1C before DSME was 10.2 ± 3.7%. Mean A1C after DSME was 7.8 ± 2.2% (P < 0.0001), a 23.5% reduction. Mean A1C at 1 and 2 years after DSME was 7.8 ± 2.1% for each year and remained unchanged from just after DSME to 1 and 2 years after DSME (P > 0.05). Patients with a duration of diabetes of < 1 year had a significantly greater reduction in mean A1C than those with a duration of diabetes ≥ 1 year (28.7 and 20.2%, respectively, P = 0.001). Conclusion. DSME improved glycemic control to a substantial degree, and the effect was sustained for up to 2 years. Although the reduction in A1C was significant for all patients receiving DSME, there was a significantly greater reduction for patients who had a duration of diabetes of < 1 year than for those with a duration of diabetes > 1 year.

  9. Effect of Wheat Flour Noodles with Bombyx mori Powder on Glycemic Response in Healthy Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Suk, Wanhee; Kim, JiEun; Kim, Do-Yeon; Lim, Hyunjung; Choue, Ryowon

    2016-01-01

    Recent trial results suggest that the consumption of a low glycemic index (GI) diet is beneficial in the prevention of high blood glucose levels. Identifying active hypoglycemic substances in ordinary foods could be a significant benefit to the management of blood glucose. It has been hypothesized that noodles with Bombyx mori powder are a low GI food. We evaluated GI and changes in postprandial glucose levels following consumption of those noodles and compared them with those following consumption of plain wheat flour noodles (control) and glucose (reference) in healthy subjects. Thirteen males (age: 34.2±4.5 years, body mass index: 23.2±1.1 kg/m2) consumed 75 g carbohydrate portions of glucose and the 2 kinds of noodle after an overnight fast. Capillary blood was measured at time 0 (fasting), 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, 120, and 180 min from the start of each food intake. The GI values were calculated by taking the ratio of the incremental area under the blood glucose response curve (IAUC) for the noodles and glucose. There was a significant difference in postprandial glucose concentrations at 30 and 45 min between the control noodles and the noodles with Bombyx mori powder: the IAUC and GI for the noodles with Bombyx mori powder were significantly lower than those for glucose and plain wheat flour noodles. The wheat flour noodles with Bombyx mori powder could help prevent an increase in postprandial glucose response and possibly provide an alternative to other carbohydrate staple foods for glycemic management. PMID:27752491

  10. Glycemic and insulinemic response to selected snack bars in trained versus sedentary individuals.

    PubMed

    Trompers, Willeke; Perry, Tracy L; Rose, Meredith C; Rehrer, Nancy J

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether glycemic index (GI) is influenced by training state. Participants were tested in a randomized order: twice with a reference solution containing 50 g glucose and once each with 2 commercially available snack bars (Griffin's Fruitli bar and Peak Fuel's Summit bar) containing 50 g available carbohydrate. Eleven of the participants (6 men and 5 women, M + or - SD age 20.8 + or - 2.0 yr) were endurance trained (ET; VO(2max) 57.5 + or - 8.4 ml x kg(-1) x min(-1) ), and 9 participants (2 men and 7 women, M + or - SD age 22.4 + or - 1.8 yr) were sedentary (SE; VO(2max) 43.7 + or - 9.1 ml x kg(-1) x min(-1) ). After an overnight fast, participants consumed either the glucose solution or snack bar, with blood samples taken before eating and at 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, and 120 min after eating began. The mean incremental area under the curve (IAUC) of the glucose reference was 31% lower (95% CI 3-52%, p = .03), and the Fruitli bar 38% lower (95% CI 0-61%, p = .05) in ET than in SE participants. There was a trend for the IAUC for the Summit bar to be 35% lower in ET than in SE participants (95% CI -7% to 61% p = .09). There was no significant interaction between training state and test food. The GIs of the Fruitli and Summit bars was not significantly different between ET and SE participants (p = .65 and .54, respectively). ET participants had a lower glycemic response than SE participants; however, training state did not influence GI.

  11. Association of dietary quality indices with glycemic status in korean patients with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jiyoung; Cho, Youngyun; Park, Youngmi; Sohn, Cheongmin; Rha, Miyong; Lee, Moon-Kyu; Jang, Hak C

    2013-07-01

    The present study was performed to evaluate the relationship between dietary quality indices including the Diet Quality Index-International (DQI-I), Alternate Healthy Eating Index (AHEI), and Healthy Diet Indicator (HDI) and glycemic status in Korean patients with type 2 diabetes. A total of 110 consecutive outpatients with type 2 diabetes who visited 2 university hospitals in Seoul and Seongnam from April 2004 to November 2006 were enrolled as subjects. At the time of enrollment, anthropometric parameters, dietary habits, experience of exercise, and metabolic parameters were obtained. Experienced registered dietitians collected one-day dietary intake using the 24-hour recall method. The mean scores for DQI-I, AHEI, and HDI were 68.9 ± 8.2, 39.4 ± 8.9, and 5.0 ± 1.3, respectively. After adjustment for age, body mass index, and energy intake, DQI-I and HDI were found to have a significant correlation with hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) (r = -0.21, p < 0.05; r = -0.28, p < 0.05), fasting plasma glucose (r = -0.21, p < 0.05; r = -0.23, p < 0.05), and postprandial 2-h glucose (r = -0.30, p < 0.05; r = -0.26, p < 0.05, respectively). However, AHEI did not have a significant correlation with HbA1c. In conclusion, the DQI-I and HDI may be useful tools in assessing diet quality and adherence to dietary recommendations in Korean patients with type 2 diabetes. Future research is required to determine whether the dietary quality indices have predictive validity for dietary and glycemic changes following diet education in a clinical setting.

  12. Urine Albumin Excretion as a Marker of Acute Glycemic Changes in Isolated Postprandial Hyperglycemia

    PubMed Central

    Shilpasree, Alagilawada S; Patil, Vidya S; Patil, Vijayetha P; Ingleshwar, Deepti G

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Postprandial hyperglycemia is a major risk factor for the development of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs), and Most of the times it occurs in patients with normal glycemic control diagnosed by fasting blood glucose (FBG) and glycated hemoglobin levels. Urine albumin excretion (UAE) is an independent predictor of CVD risk. Aim: To estimate UAE in isolated postprandial hyperglycemia (IPPHG) patients and to assess the relationship of UAE with FBG and postprandial blood glucose (PPBG) levels. Settings and Design: A cross-sectional study was carried out in 318 patients with Type II diabetes in the age group 30–60 years for 6 months. Materials and Methods: Patients were divided into five groups based on their FBG and PPBG values. UAE and lipid profile were measured in all the groups. Statistical Analysis: UAE and lipid profile in different groups were compared using ANOVA. Regression analysis was used to predict the variation of UAE with FBG, PPBG, and total cholesterol (TC). Results: Patients with IPPHG had significantly higher albumin excretion compared to normoglycemia (NG) group [P < 0.0001]. In impaired glucose tolerance and isolated fasting hyperglycemia groups, it did not differ significantly from NG group [P = 0.206 and P = 0.173]. Lipid profile did not show any significant difference between the groups. On regression analysis, PPBG but not FBG or TC correlated positively with UAE. Conclusion: UAE is easy, less expensive, and Widely available method done on spot urine samples which predicts the acute glycemic changes and increased risk of developing CVDs in patients with IPPHG. PMID:28042215

  13. Serum Magnesium Concentrations in the Canadian Population and Associations with Diabetes, Glycemic Regulation, and Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Bertinato, Jesse; Wang, Kuan Chiao; Hayward, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    Total serum magnesium (Mg) concentration (SMC) is commonly used to assess Mg status. This study reports current SMCs of Canadians and their associations with demographic factors, diabetes, and measures of glycemic control and insulin resistance using results from the Canadian Health Measures Survey cycle 3 (2012–2013). Associations were examined in adults aged 20–79 years using linear mixed models. Mean SMCs and percentile distributions for 11 sex-age groups between 3 and 79 years (n = 5561) are reported. SMCs were normally distributed and differences (p < 0.05) among sex and age groups were small. Between 9.5% and 16.6% of adult sex-age groups had a SMC below the lower cut-off of a population-based reference interval (0.75–0.955 mmol·L−1) established in the United States population as part of the NHANES I conducted in 1971–1974. Having diabetes was associated with 0.04 to 0.07 mmol·L−1 lower SMC compared to not having diabetes in the various models. Body mass index, glycated hemoglobin, serum glucose and insulin concentrations, and homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance were negatively associated with SMC. This is the first study to report SMCs in a nationally representative sample of the Canadian population. A substantial proportion of Canadians are hypomagnesaemic in relation to a population-based reference interval, and SMC was negatively associated with diabetes and indices of glycemic control and insulin resistance. PMID:28304338

  14. Reductions in regimen distress are associated with improved management and glycemic control over time.

    PubMed

    Hessler, Danielle; Fisher, Lawrence; Glasgow, Russell E; Strycker, Lisa A; Dickinson, L Miriam; Arean, Patricia A; Masharani, Umesh

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Cross-sectional and longitudinal associations among regimen distress (RD), self-management, and glycemic control were undertaken to explore mechanisms of operation among these variables. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS In a behavioral randomized control trial (RCT) to reduce RD, 392 adults with type 2 diabetes were assessed for RD, diet, exercise, medication adherence, and HbA1c at baseline and at 4 and 12 months. Associations among RD, self-management, and HbA1c were examined in cross-sectional analyses at baseline, in prospective analyses using baseline values to predict change over time, and in time-varying analyses. RESULTS At baseline, greater RD and poorer medication adherence were independently associated with higher HbA1c (P = 0.05 and P < 0.001, respectively), and greater RD was associated with poorer medication adherence (P = 0.03). No consistent pattern of significant prospective associations was found. Significant time-varying findings showed that decreases in RD were associated with improvements in medication adherence (P < 0.01), physical activity (P < 0.001), and HbA1c (P = 0.02) over time following intervention. Changes in self-management were not associated with changes in HbA1c over time. CONCLUSIONS In the context of an RCT to reduce distress, RD, self-management, and HbA1c were interrelated in cross-sectional and time-varying analyses. Decreases in RD were associated with improvements in both self-management and HbA1c over 12 months. Findings point to the complex and likely multifaceted pathways of association among these key constructs, with results indicating significant linkages between RD and both self-management and glycemic control over time.

  15. The Impact of Food Viscosity on Eating Rate, Subjective Appetite, Glycemic Response and Gastric Emptying Rate

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yong; Hsu, Walter H.; Hollis, James H.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the impact of rheological properties of food on postprandial appetite and glycemic response helps to design novel functional products. It has been shown that solid foods have a stronger satiating effect than their liquid equivalent. However, whether a subtle change in viscosity of a semi-solid food would have a similar effect on appetite is unknown. Fifteen healthy males participated in the randomized cross-over study. Each participant consumed a 1690 kJ portion of a standard viscosity (SV) and a high viscosity (HV) semi-solid meal with 1000 mg acetaminophen in two separate sessions. At regular intervals during the three hours following the meal, subjective appetite ratings were measured and blood samples collected. The plasma samples were assayed for insulin, glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP), glucose and acetaminophen. After three hours, the participants were provided with an ad libitum pasta meal. Compared with the SV meal, HV was consumed at a slower eating rate (P = 0.020), with postprandial hunger and desire to eat being lower (P = 0.019 and P<0.001 respectively) while fullness was higher (P<0.001). In addition, consuming the HV resulted in lower plasma concentration of GIP (P<0.001), higher plasma concentration of glucose (P<0.001) and delayed gastric emptying as revealed by the acetaminophen absorption test (P<0.001). However, there was no effect of food viscosity on insulin or food intake at the subsequent meal. In conclusion, increasing the viscosity of a semi-solid food modulates glycemic response and suppresses postprandial satiety, although the effect may be short-lived. A slower eating rate and a delayed gastric emptying rate can partly explain for the stronger satiating properties of high viscous semi-solid foods. PMID:23818981

  16. Chemical composition and glycemic index of Brazilian pine (Araucaria angustifolia) seeds.

    PubMed

    Cordenunsi, Beatriz Rosana; De Menezes Wenzel, Elizabete; Genovese, Maria Inés; Colli, Célia; De Souza Gonçalves, Alessandra; Lajolo, Franco Maria

    2004-06-02

    The seeds of Parana pine (Araucaria brasiliensis syn. Araucaria angustifolia), named pinhão, are consumed after cooking and posterior dehulling, or they are used to prepare a flour employed in regional dishes. Native people that live in the South of Brazil usually consume baked pinhão. As a result of cooking, the white seeds become brown on the surface due to the migration of some tinted compounds present in the seed coat. In this work, the proximate composition, minerals, flavonoids, and glycemic index (GI) of cooked and raw pinhão seeds were compared. No differences in moisture, lipids, soluble fiber, and total starch after boiling were found. However, the soluble sugars and P, Cu, and Mg contents decreased, probably as a consequence of leaching in the cooking water. Also, the boiling process modified the profile of the phenolic compounds in the seeds. No flavonols were detected in raw pinhão seeds. The internal seed coat had a quercetin content five times higher than that of the external seed coat; also, quercetin migrated into the seed during cooking. The internal seed coat had a high content of total phenolics, and seeds cooked in normal conditions (with the seed coat) showed a total phenolics content five times higher than that of seeds cooked without the seed coat. Cooking was then extremely favorable to pinhão seeds bioactive compounds content. The carbohydrate availability was evaluated in a short-term assay in humans by the GI. The GI of pinhão seeds cooked with the coat (67%) was similar to that of the seeds cooked without a coat (62%) and lower than bread, showing that cooking does not interfere with starch availability. The low glycemic response can be partly due to its high content of resistant starch (9% of the total starch).

  17. Achievability for telerobotic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kress, Reid L.; Draper, John V.; Hamel, William R.

    2001-02-01

    Methods are needed to improve the capabilities of autonomous robots to perform tasks that are difficult for contemporary robots, and to identify those tasks that robots cannot perform. Additionally, in the realm of remote handling, methods are needed to assess which tasks and/or subtasks are candidates for automation. We are developing a new approach to understanding the capability of autonomous robotic systems. This approach uses formalized methods for determining the achievability of tasks for robots, that is, the likelihood that an autonomous robot or telerobot can successfully complete a particular task. Any autonomous system may be represented in achievability space by the volume describing that system's capabilities within the 3-axis space delineated by perception, cognition, and action. This volume may be thought of as a probability density with achievability decreasing as the distance from the centroid of the volume increases. Similarly, any task may be represented within achievability space. However, as tasks have more finite requirements for perception, cognition, and action, each may be represented as a point (or, more accurately, as a small sphere) within achievability space. Analysis of achievability can serve to identify, a priori, the survivability of robotic systems and the likelihood of mission success; it can be used to plan a mission or portions of a mission; it can be used to modify a mission plan to accommodate unpredicted occurrences; it can also serve to identify needs for modifications to robotic systems or tasks to improve achievability. .

  18. Achieving real-time performance in FIESTA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkinson, William; Happell, Nadine; Miksell, Steve; Quillin, Robert; Carlisle, Candace

    1988-01-01

    The Fault Isolation Expert System for TDRSS Applications (FIESTA) is targeted for operation in a real-time online environment. Initial stages of the prototype development concentrated on acquisition and representation of the knowledge necessary to isolate faults in the TDRSS Network. Recent efforts focused on achieving real-time performance including: a discussion of the meaning of FIESTA real-time requirements, determination of performance levels (benchmarking) and techniques for optimization. Optimization techniques presented include redesign of critical relations, filtering of redundant data and optimization of patterns used in rules. Results are summarized.

  19. Walking behaviour and glycemic control in type 2 diabetes: seasonal and gender differences-Study design and methods

    PubMed Central

    Dasgupta, Kaberi; Chan, Cathy; Da Costa, Deborah; Pilote, Louise; De Civita, Mirella; Ross, Nancy; Strachan, Ian; Sigal, Ronald; Joseph, Lawrence

    2007-01-01

    Background The high glucose levels typically occurring among adults with type 2 diabetes contribute to blood vessel injury and complications such as blindness, kidney failure, heart disease, and stroke. Higher physical activity levels are associated with improved glycemic control, as measured by hemoglobin A1C. A 1% absolute increase in A1C is associated with an 18% increased risk for heart disease or stroke. Among Canadians with type 2 diabetes, we postulate that declines in walking associated with colder temperatures and inclement weather may contribute to annual post-winter increases in A1C levels. Methods During this prospective cohort study being conducted in Montreal, Quebec, Canada, 100 men and 100 women with type 2 diabetes will undergo four assessments (once per season) over a one-year period of observation. These assessments include (1) use of a pedometer with a concealed viewing window for a two-week period to measure walking (2) a study centre visit during which venous blood is sampled for A1C, anthropometrics are assessed, and questionnaires are completed for measurement of other factors that may influence walking and/or A1C (e.g. food frequency, depressive symptomology, medications). The relationship between spring-fall A1C difference and winter-summer difference in steps/day will be examined through multivariate linear regression models adjusted for possible confounding. Interpretation of findings by researchers in conjunction with potential knowledge "users" (e.g. health professionals, patient groups) will guide knowledge translation efforts. Discussion Although we cannot alter weather patterns to favour active lifestyles, we can design treatment strategies that take seasonal and weather-related variations into account. For example, demonstration of seasonal variation of A1C levels among Canadian men and women with T2D and greater understanding of its determinants could lead to (1) targeting physical activity levels to remain at or exceed peak

  20. Culture and Achievement Motivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maehr, Martin L.

    1974-01-01

    A framework is suggested for the cross-cultural study of motivation that stresses the importance of contextual conditions in eliciting achievement motivation and emphasizes cultural relativity in the definition of the concept. (EH)

  1. Achieving Salary Equity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nevill, Dorothy D.

    1975-01-01

    Three techniques are outlined for use by higher education institutions to achieve salary equity: salary prediction (using various statistical procedures), counterparting (comparing salaries of persons of similar rank), and grievance procedures. (JT)

  2. A comparative study on starch digestibility, glycemic index and resistant starch of pigmented ('Njavara' and 'Jyothi') and a non-pigmented ('IR 64') rice varieties.

    PubMed

    Deepa, G; Singh, Vasudeva; Naidu, K Akhilender

    2010-12-01

    In vitro starch digestibility and glycemic indices of three rice varieties- 'Njavara', 'Jyothi' (pigmented rice verities) and 'IR 64' (non-pigmented rice) with similar amylose content were studied. Starch digestibility studies showed differences in glycemic response in three types of rice. The rate of starch hydrolysis was maximum (67.3%) in 'Njavara' rice compared to other two rice varieties. 'Njavara' exhibited the lowest kinetic constant (k) indicating inherent resistance to enzymatic hydrolysis. The glycemic load (GL) and glycemic index (GI) of 'Njavara' were similar to 'Jyothi' and 'IR 64'. Resistant starch content was high in pigmented rice varieties compared to 'IR 64'. The resistant starch content of dehusked and cooked rice increased with the storage time at refrigeration temperature (4°C). 'Njavara' is an easily digestible rice and can be used for baby and geriatric foods.

  3. Optimally Stopped Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinci, Walter; Lidar, Daniel A.

    2016-11-01

    We combine the fields of heuristic optimization and optimal stopping. We propose a strategy for benchmarking randomized optimization algorithms that minimizes the expected total cost for obtaining a good solution with an optimal number of calls to the solver. To do so, rather than letting the objective function alone define a cost to be minimized, we introduce a further cost-per-call of the algorithm. We show that this problem can be formulated using optimal stopping theory. The expected cost is a flexible figure of merit for benchmarking probabilistic solvers that can be computed when the optimal solution is not known and that avoids the biases and arbitrariness that affect other measures. The optimal stopping formulation of benchmarking directly leads to a real-time optimal-utilization strategy for probabilistic optimizers with practical impact. We apply our formulation to benchmark simulated annealing on a class of maximum-2-satisfiability (MAX2SAT) problems. We also compare the performance of a D-Wave 2X quantum annealer to the Hamze-Freitas-Selby (HFS) solver, a specialized classical heuristic algorithm designed for low-tree-width graphs. On a set of frustrated-loop instances with planted solutions defined on up to N =1098 variables, the D-Wave device is 2 orders of magnitude faster than the HFS solver, and, modulo known caveats related to suboptimal annealing times, exhibits identical scaling with problem size.

  4. Impact of Glycemic Control and Metformin Use on the Recurrence and Progression of Non-Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer in Patients with Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine the potential relationships of glycemic control and use of metformin with non-muscle invasive bladder cancer characteristics. We reviewed data from 645 patients with non-muscle invasive bladder cancer between January 2004 and May 2015. We analyzed the association of pre and post-operative glycemic control and use of metformin with clinical characteristics of bladder tumors. We also analyzed the association of glycemic control and use of metformin with recurrence-free and progression-free survivals. Diabetes mellitus patients showed decreased recurrence-free survival (hazard ratio 1.42; 95% confidence interval 1.1–1.9; P = 0.021) and progression-free survival (hazard ratio 1.79; 95% confidence interval 1.1–2.8; P = 0.013). Diabetes mellitus patients with a HbA1c ≥ 7.0% demonstrated a higher rate of progression (P = 0.026). Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that progression-free survival rate was associated with poor baseline glycemic control (P = 0.026) and post-operative glycemic control (P = 0.025). However, use of metformin had no impact on the recurrence (P = 1.00) and progression (P = 0.282). In conclusion, poor baseline and post-operative glycemic control was related with shorter progression-free survival of patients with non-muscle invasive bladder cancer. Use of metformin had no impact on the recurrence and progression. Therefore, tight glycemic control and close follow-up for bladder tumor may be beneficial in patients with poor glycemic control. PMID:27510392

  5. Peer Support Training Improved the Glycemic Control, Insulin Management, and Diabetic Behaviors of Patients with Type 2 Diabetes in Rural Communities of Central China: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Kaiqin; Ren, Yanlei; Luo, Zhongmei; Du, Kun; Zhang, Xiaoqin; Zhang, Qiong

    2016-01-01

    Background The efficacy of peer support in Chinese diabetes patients is still uncertain. The purpose of this study was to observe the effects of a peer support program on the outcomes of patients with type 2 diabetes who received community-based insulin therapy in rural communities of central China. Material/Methods Two hundred and eight eligible patients with type 2 diabetes were randomly assigned into the traditional training group (control group, n=111) and peer support intervention group (peer group, n=97) between June 2013 and January 2014 in 2 rural communities of Jingzhou area, China. Both groups received 3-month traditional training, followed by another 4-month traditional training or peer support training, respectively. At baseline and 7 months after treatment, the blood glycemic level was evaluated by biochemical detection. Capacities of self-management and knowledge related to insulin usage were assessed by questionnaire survey. Results Ninety-seven and ninety patients completed this study in the control group and peer group, respectively. There was no significant difference in age, gender, diabetes duration, insulin usage time, and complications between the 2 groups at baseline (P>0.05). Compared with the control group, peer group patients achieved a more significant decrease in blood glycosylated hemoglobin levels (P<0.05), increase in knowledge related to insulin usage, and increase of diabetes self-management ability (P<0.05). Conclusions Peer support intervention effectively improves outcomes of patients with type 2 diabetes in rural communities of central China. PMID:26808489

  6. Effect of glycemic control on corneal nerves and peripheral neuropathy in streptozotocin-induced diabetic C57Bl/6J mice.

    PubMed

    Yorek, Matthew S; Obrosov, Alexander; Shevalye, Hanna; Lupachyk, Sergey; Harper, Matthew M; Kardon, Randy H; Yorek, Mark A

    2014-09-01

    We sought to determine the impact that duration of hyperglycemia and control has on corneal nerve fiber density in relation to standard diabetic neuropathy endpoints. Control and streptozotocin-diabetic C57Bl/6J mice were analyzed after 4, 8, 12, and 20 weeks. For the 20-week time point, five groups of mice were compared: control, untreated diabetic, and diabetic treated with insulin designated as having either poor glycemic control, good glycemic control, or poor glycemic control switched to good glycemic control. Hyperglycemia was regulated by use of insulin-releasing pellets. Loss of corneal nerves in the sub-epithelial nerve plexus or corneal epithelium progressed slowly in diabetic mice requiring 20 weeks to reach statistical significance. In comparison, slowing of motor and sensory nerve conduction velocity developed rapidly with significant difference compared with control mice observed after 4 and 8 weeks of hyperglycemia, respectively. In diabetic mice with good glycemic control, average blood glucose levels over the 20-week experimental period were lowered from 589 ± 2 to 251 ± 9 mg/dl. All diabetic neuropathy endpoints examined were improved in diabetic mice with good glycemic control compared with untreated diabetic mice. However, good control of blood glucose was not totally sufficient in preventing diabetic neuropathy.

  7. Weighing the evidence of low glycemic index dietary intervention for the management of gestational diabetes mellitus: an Asian perspective.

    PubMed

    Mohd Yusof, Barakatun-Nisak; Firouzi, Somayyeh; Mohd Shariff, Zalilah; Mustafa, Norlaila; Mohamed Ismail, Nor Azlin; Kamaruddin, Nor Azmi

    2014-03-01

    This review aims to evaluate the effectiveness of low glycemic index (GI) dietary intervention for the treatment of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), specifically from the Asian perspective. A systematic review of the literature using multiple databases without time restriction was conducted. Three studies were retrieved based upon a priori inclusion criteria. While there was a trend towards improvement, no significant differences were observed in overall glycemic control and pregnancy outcomes in GDM women. However, a tendency for lower birth weight and birth centile if the intervention began earlier was noted. Low GI diets were well accepted and had identical macro-micronutrient compositions as the control diets. However, due to genetic, environment and especially food pattern discrepancies between Western countries and Asians, these results may not be contributed to Asian context. Clearly, there are limited studies focusing on the effect of low GI dietary intervention in women with GDM, particularly in Asia.

  8. Large-scale association analyses identify new loci influencing glycemic traits and provide insight into the underlying biological pathways.

    PubMed

    Scott, Robert A; Lagou, Vasiliki; Welch, Ryan P; Wheeler, Eleanor; Montasser, May E; Luan, Jian'an; Mägi, Reedik; Strawbridge, Rona J; Rehnberg, Emil; Gustafsson, Stefan; Kanoni, Stavroula; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J; Yengo, Loïc; Lecoeur, Cecile; Shungin, Dmitry; Sanna, Serena; Sidore, Carlo; Johnson, Paul C D; Jukema, J Wouter; Johnson, Toby; Mahajan, Anubha; Verweij, Niek; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Shah, Sonia; Smith, Albert V; Sennblad, Bengt; Gieger, Christian; Salo, Perttu; Perola, Markus; Timpson, Nicholas J; Evans, David M; Pourcain, Beate St; Wu, Ying; Andrews, Jeanette S; Hui, Jennie; Bielak, Lawrence F; Zhao, Wei; Horikoshi, Momoko; Navarro, Pau; Isaacs, Aaron; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; Stirrups, Kathleen; Vitart, Veronique; Hayward, Caroline; Esko, Tõnu; Mihailov, Evelin; Fraser, Ross M; Fall, Tove; Voight, Benjamin F; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Chen, Han; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Morris, Andrew P; Rayner, Nigel W; Robertson, Neil; Rybin, Denis; Liu, Ching-Ti; Beckmann, Jacques S; Willems, Sara M; Chines, Peter S; Jackson, Anne U; Kang, Hyun Min; Stringham, Heather M; Song, Kijoung; Tanaka, Toshiko; Peden, John F; Goel, Anuj; Hicks, Andrew A; An, Ping; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Franco-Cereceda, Anders; Folkersen, Lasse; Marullo, Letizia; Jansen, Hanneke; Oldehinkel, Albertine J; Bruinenberg, Marcel; Pankow, James S; North, Kari E; Forouhi, Nita G; Loos, Ruth J F; Edkins, Sarah; Varga, Tibor V; Hallmans, Göran; Oksa, Heikki; Antonella, Mulas; Nagaraja, Ramaiah; Trompet, Stella; Ford, Ian; Bakker, Stephan J L; Kong, Augustine; Kumari, Meena; Gigante, Bruna; Herder, Christian; Munroe, Patricia B; Caulfield, Mark; Antti, Jula; Mangino, Massimo; Small, Kerrin; Miljkovic, Iva; Liu, Yongmei; Atalay, Mustafa; Kiess, Wieland; James, Alan L; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Palmer, Colin N A; Doney, Alex S F; Willemsen, Gonneke; Smit, Johannes H; Campbell, Susan; Polasek, Ozren; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Hercberg, Serge; Dimitriou, Maria; Bolton, Jennifer L; Fowkes, Gerard R; Kovacs, Peter; Lindström, Jaana; Zemunik, Tatijana; Bandinelli, Stefania; Wild, Sarah H; Basart, Hanneke V; Rathmann, Wolfgang; Grallert, Harald; Maerz, Winfried; Kleber, Marcus E; Boehm, Bernhard O; Peters, Annette; Pramstaller, Peter P; Province, Michael A; Borecki, Ingrid B; Hastie, Nicholas D; Rudan, Igor; Campbell, Harry; Watkins, Hugh; Farrall, Martin; Stumvoll, Michael; Ferrucci, Luigi; Waterworth, Dawn M; Bergman, Richard N; Collins, Francis S; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Watanabe, Richard M; de Geus, Eco J C; Penninx, Brenda W; Hofman, Albert; Oostra, Ben A; Psaty, Bruce M; Vollenweider, Peter; Wilson, James F; Wright, Alan F; Hovingh, G Kees; Metspalu, Andres; Uusitupa, Matti; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Kyvik, Kirsten O; Kaprio, Jaakko; Price, Jackie F; Dedoussis, George V; Deloukas, Panos; Meneton, Pierre; Lind, Lars; Boehnke, Michael; Shuldiner, Alan R; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Morris, Andrew D; Toenjes, Anke; Peyser, Patricia A; Beilby, John P; Körner, Antje; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laakso, Markku; Bornstein, Stefan R; Schwarz, Peter E H; Lakka, Timo A; Rauramaa, Rainer; Adair, Linda S; Smith, George Davey; Spector, Tim D; Illig, Thomas; de Faire, Ulf; Hamsten, Anders; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Kivimaki, Mika; Hingorani, Aroon; Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka M; Saaristo, Timo E; Boomsma, Dorret I; Stefansson, Kari; van der Harst, Pim; Dupuis, Josée; Pedersen, Nancy L; Sattar, Naveed; Harris, Tamara B; Cucca, Francesco; Ripatti, Samuli; Salomaa, Veikko; Mohlke, Karen L; Balkau, Beverley; Froguel, Philippe; Pouta, Anneli; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Wareham, Nicholas J; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; McCarthy, Mark I; Franks, Paul W; Meigs, James B; Teslovich, Tanya M; Florez, Jose C; Langenberg, Claudia; Ingelsson, Erik; Prokopenko, Inga; Barroso, Inês

    2012-09-01

    Through genome-wide association meta-analyses of up to 133,010 individuals of European ancestry without diabetes, including individuals newly genotyped using the Metabochip, we have increased the number of confirmed loci influencing glycemic traits to 53, of which 33 also increase type 2 diabetes risk (q < 0.05). Loci influencing fasting insulin concentration showed association with lipid levels and fat distribution, suggesting impact on insulin resistance. Gene-based analyses identified further biologically plausible loci, suggesting that additional loci beyond those reaching genome-wide significance are likely to represent real associations. This conclusion is supported by an excess of directionally consistent and nominally significant signals between discovery and follow-up studies. Functional analysis of these newly discovered loci will further improve our understanding of glycemic control.

  9. Large-scale association analyses identify new loci influencing glycemic traits and provide insight into the underlying biological pathways

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Robert A; Lagou, Vasiliki; Welch, Ryan P; Wheeler, Eleanor; Montasser, May E; Luan, Jian’an; Mägi, Reedik; Strawbridge, Rona J; Rehnberg, Emil; Gustafsson, Stefan; Kanoni, Stavroula; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J; Yengo, Loïc; Lecoeur, Cecile; Shungin, Dmitry; Sanna, Serena; Sidore, Carlo; Johnson, Paul C D; Jukema, J Wouter; Johnson, Toby; Mahajan, Anubha; Verweij, Niek; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Shah, Sonia; Smith, Albert V; Sennblad, Bengt; Gieger, Christian; Salo, Perttu; Perola, Markus; Timpson, Nicholas J; Evans, David M; Pourcain, Beate St; Wu, Ying; Andrews, Jeanette S; Hui, Jennie; Bielak, Lawrence F; Zhao, Wei; Horikoshi, Momoko; Navarro, Pau; Isaacs, Aaron; O’Connell, Jeffrey R; Stirrups, Kathleen; Vitart, Veronique; Hayward, Caroline; Esko, Tönu; Mihailov, Evelin; Fraser, Ross M; Fall, Tove; Voight, Benjamin F; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Chen, Han; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Morris, Andrew P; Rayner, Nigel W; Robertson, Neil; Rybin, Denis; Liu, Ching-Ti; Beckmann, Jacques S; Willems, Sara M; Chines, Peter S; Jackson, Anne U; Kang, Hyun Min; Stringham, Heather M; Song, Kijoung; Tanaka, Toshiko; Peden, John F; Goel, Anuj; Hicks, Andrew A; An, Ping; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Franco-Cereceda, Anders; Folkersen, Lasse; Marullo, Letizia; Jansen, Hanneke; Oldehinkel, Albertine J; Bruinenberg, Marcel; Pankow, James S; North, Kari E; Forouhi, Nita G; Loos, Ruth J F; Edkins, Sarah; Varga, Tibor V; Hallmans, Göran; Oksa, Heikki; Antonella, Mulas; Nagaraja, Ramaiah; Trompet, Stella; Ford, Ian; Bakker, Stephan J L; Kong, Augustine; Kumari, Meena; Gigante, Bruna; Herder, Christian; Munroe, Patricia B; Caulfield, Mark; Antti, Jula; Mangino, Massimo; Small, Kerrin; Miljkovic, Iva; Liu, Yongmei; Atalay, Mustafa; Kiess, Wieland; James, Alan L; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Palmer, Colin N A; Doney, Alex S F; Willemsen, Gonneke; Smit, Johannes H; Campbell, Susan; Polasek, Ozren; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Hercberg, Serge; Dimitriou, Maria; Bolton, Jennifer L; Fowkes, Gerard R; Kovacs, Peter; Lindström, Jaana; Zemunik, Tatijana; Bandinelli, Stefania; Wild, Sarah H; Basart, Hanneke V; Rathmann, Wolfgang; Grallert, Harald; Maerz, Winfried; Kleber, Marcus E; Boehm, Bernhard O; Peters, Annette; Pramstaller, Peter P; Province, Michael A; Borecki, Ingrid B; Hastie, Nicholas D; Rudan, Igor; Campbell, Harry; Watkins, Hugh; Farrall, Martin; Stumvoll, Michael; Ferrucci, Luigi; Waterworth, Dawn M; Bergman, Richard N; Collins, Francis S; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Watanabe, Richard M; de Geus, Eco J C; Penninx, Brenda W; Hofman, Albert; Oostra, Ben A; Psaty, Bruce M; Vollenweider, Peter; Wilson, James F; Wright, Alan F; Hovingh, G Kees; Metspalu, Andres; Uusitupa, Matti; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Kyvik, Kirsten O; Kaprio, Jaakko; Price, Jackie F; Dedoussis, George V; Deloukas, Panos; Meneton, Pierre; Lind, Lars; Boehnke, Michael; Shuldiner, Alan R; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Morris, Andrew D; Toenjes, Anke; Peyser, Patricia A; Beilby, John P; Körner, Antje; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laakso, Markku; Bornstein, Stefan R; Schwarz, Peter E H; Lakka, Timo A; Rauramaa, Rainer; Adair, Linda S; Smith, George Davey; Spector, Tim D; Illig, Thomas; de Faire, Ulf; Hamsten, Anders; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Kivimaki, Mika; Hingorani, Aroon; Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka M; Saaristo, Timo E; Boomsma, Dorret I; Stefansson, Kari; van der Harst, Pim; Dupuis, Josée; Pedersen, Nancy L; Sattar, Naveed; Harris, Tamara B; Cucca, Francesco; Ripatti, Samuli; Salomaa, Veikko; Mohlke, Karen L; Balkau, Beverley; Froguel, Philippe; Pouta, Anneli; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Wareham, Nicholas J; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; McCarthy, Mark I; Franks, Paul W; Meigs, James B; Teslovich, Tanya M; Florez, Jose C; Langenberg, Claudia; Ingelsson, Erik; Prokopenko, Inga; Barroso, Inês

    2012-01-01

    Through genome-wide association meta-analyses of up to 133,010 individuals of European ancestry without diabetes, including individuals newly genotyped using the Metabochip, we have raised the number of confirmed loci influencing glycemic traits to 53, of which 33 also increase type 2 diabetes risk (q < 0.05). Loci influencing fasting insulin showed association with lipid levels and fat distribution, suggesting impact on insulin resistance. Gene-based analyses identified further biologically plausible loci, suggesting that additional loci beyond those reaching genome-wide significance are likely to represent real associations. This conclusion is supported by an excess of directionally consistent and nominally significant signals between discovery and follow-up studies. Functional follow-up of these newly discovered loci will further improve our understanding of glycemic control. PMID:22885924

  10. Defective production of interleukin-1 beta in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: Restoration by proper glycemic control.

    PubMed

    Kousathana, Foteini; Georgitsi, Marianna; Lambadiari, Vaia; Giamarellos-Bourboulis, Evangelos J; Dimitriadis, George; Mouktaroudi, Maria

    2017-02-01

    The underlying immune defect of susceptibility in diabetes mellitus type 2 to infections remains unknown. The qualitative changes in cytokine biosynthesis by circulating mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and its modulation by glycemic control were investigated. PBMCs were isolated from 39 patients and 25 controls. They were stimulated with purified ligands and heat-killed bacteria in the absence/presence of glucose and NLPR3 inflammasome ligands. Experiments were repeated after 3 and 6months. Cytokine production was measured in cell supernatants; pro-interleukin(IL)-1 β was measured in cell lysates. Gene expression of IL-1β and activity of caspase-1 were measured as well. Adequate release of interleukin (IL)-1β was found in 42.9% of patients compared to 90% of controls (p: 0.0001). This was related with down-regulation of the NLRP3 inflammasome since gene expression of IL-1β remained unaltered whereas both the ratio of IL-1β to the intracellular pro-IL-1β and the activity of caspase-1 was lower in patients than controls. Addition of glucose did not modify defective IL-1β production. IL-6 production was increased after stimulation with Pam3Cys, phytohemagglutinin and C. albicans. After proper glycemic control, release of IL-1β was increased and of IL-6 decreased; cells of patients with improved glycemic control responded better to LPS stimulation under increased concentrations of glucose. It is concluded that diabetes type 2 is characterized by defective production of IL-1β from circulating monocytes due to impaired activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome and increased production of the anti-inflammatory IL-6. Defects are restored with proper glycemic control.

  11. Prevalence of diabetic peripheral neuropathy and relation to glycemic control therapies at baseline in the BARI 2D cohort.

    PubMed

    Pop-Busui, Rodica; Lu, Jiang; Lopes, Neuza; Jones, Teresa L Z

    2009-03-01

    We evaluated the associations between glycemic therapies and prevalence of diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) at baseline among participants in the Bypass Angioplasty Revascularization Investigation 2 Diabetes (BARI 2D) trial on medical and revascularization therapies for coronary artery disease (CAD) and on insulin-sensitizing vs. insulin-providing treatments for diabetes. A total of 2,368 patients with type 2 diabetes and CAD was evaluated. DPN was defined as clinical examination score >2 using the Michigan Neuropathy Screening Instrument (MNSI). DPN odds ratios across different groups of glycemic therapy were evaluated by multiple logistic regression adjusted for multiple covariates including age, sex, hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), and diabetes duration. Fifty-one percent of BARI 2D subjects with valid baseline characteristics and MNSI scores had DPN. After adjusting for all variables, use of insulin was significantly associated with DPN (OR = 1.57, 95% CI: 1.15-2.13). Patients on sulfonylurea (SU) or combination of SU/metformin (Met)/thiazolidinediones (TZD) had marginally higher rates of DPN than the Met/TZD group. This cross-sectional study in a cohort of patients with type 2 diabetes and CAD showed association of insulin use with higher DPN prevalence, independent of disease duration, glycemic control, and other characteristics. The causality between a glycemic control strategy and DPN cannot be evaluated in this cross-sectional study, but continued assessment of DPN and randomized therapies in BARI 2D trial may provide further explanations on the development of DPN.

  12. Current topics in glycemic control by wearable artificial pancreas or bedside artificial pancreas with closed-loop system.

    PubMed

    Hanazaki, Kazuhiro; Munekage, Masaya; Kitagawa, Hiroyuki; Yatabe, Tomoaki; Munekage, Eri; Shiga, Mai; Maeda, Hiromichi; Namikawa, Tsutomu

    2016-09-01

    The incidence of diabetes is increasing at an unprecedented pace and has become a serious health concern worldwide during the last two decades. Despite this, adequate glycemic control using an artificial pancreas has not been established, although the 21st century has seen rapid developments in this area. Herein, we review current topics in glycemic control for both the wearable artificial pancreas for type 1 and type 2 diabetic patients and the bedside artificial pancreas for surgical diabetic patients. In type 1 diabetic patients, nocturnal hypoglycemia associated with insulin therapy remains a serious problem that could be addressed by the recent development of a wearable artificial pancreas. This smart phone-like device, comprising a real-time, continuous glucose monitoring system and insulin pump system, could potentially significantly reduce nocturnal hypoglycemia compared with conventional glycemic control. Of particular interest in this space are the recent inventions of a low-glucose suspend feature in the portable systems that automatically stops insulin delivery 2 h following a glucose sensor value <70 mg/dL and a bio-hormonal pump system consisting of insulin and glucagon pumps. Perioperative tight glycemic control using a bedside artificial pancreas with the closed-loop system has also proved safe and effective for not only avoiding hypoglycemia, but also for reducing blood glucose level variability resulting in good surgical outcomes. We hope that a more sophisticated artificial pancreas with closed-loop system will now be taken up for routine use worldwide, providing enormous relief for patients suffering from uncontrolled hyperglycemia, hypoglycemia, and/or variability in blood glucose concentrations.

  13. Glycemic Control in the Burn Intensive Care Unit: Focus on the Role of Anemia in Glucose Measurement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-11-01

    1319 Glycemic Control in the Burn Intensive Care Unit: Focus on the Role of Anemia in Glucose Measurement MAJ Elizabeth A. Mann, R.N., M.S...outcomes and survival in the burn population. Severe burn as a model for trauma is characterized by a hypermetabolic state, hyperglycemia, and insulin...resistance. In this article, we review the findings of a burn center research facility in terms of understanding glucose management. The conferred

  14. Treating the whole patient for optimal management of type 2 diabetes: considerations for insulin therapy.

    PubMed

    Campos, Carlos

    2007-08-01

    Primary care physicians are responsible for providing healthcare to most patients with type 2 diabetes. In this role, it is critical that physicians utilize a whole-patient treatment approach that includes lifestyle modifications and pharmacotherapy aimed to achieve glycemic control, in addition to the management of any comorbid conditions or risk factors for cardiovascular complications of diabetes. Due to the progressive nature of the disease, most patients with type 2 diabetes will eventually require insulin to achieve and maintain glycemic control, because of both increased insulin resistance and diminished secretory capacity of the pancreatic beta cells. Thus, physicians need to be knowledgeable about and comfortable with the use of insulin, as well as with educating patients and discussing any potential barriers to insulin therapy. The use of a stepwise approach--beginning with basal insulin therapy and adding prandial insulin if necessary--is simple, effective, and appropriate for use in many patients.

  15. In vitro digestibility and glycemic response of potato starch is related to granule size and degree of gelatinization.

    PubMed

    Parada, Javier; Aguilera, José M

    2009-01-01

    Starch granule microstructure affects the digestion of starch and its nutritional impact; however, the exact relationship between both factors is not clear. This study reports quantitative relationships between granule size (length and polygonal area), degree of gelatinization (DG), in vitro digestibility (by enzymatic methods), and glycemic response of potato starch granules gelatinized to various extents by heating at several constant temperatures in the range of 55 to 65 degrees C. DG measured by differential scanning calorimetry was closely related with heating temperature (R(2)= 0.997), size parameters of granules (measured by image analysis), in vitro digestion, and in vivo glycemic response (R(2) of adjusted models > 0.9); shape parameters of granules (measured by image analysis) were not related with DG. Results demonstrate that DG of starch strongly affects its digestibility in vitro, and may influence the postpandrial glycemic response. Future studies should be performed to investigate the effect of potato starch gelatinization on the nutritional impact at other temperatures and in more complex matrices.

  16. Long-term effects of provided low and high glycemic load low energy diets on mood and cognition.

    PubMed

    Cheatham, Rachel A; Roberts, Susan B; Das, Sai Krupa; Gilhooly, Cheryl H; Golden, Julie K; Hyatt, Raymond; Lerner, Debra; Saltzman, Edward; Lieberman, Harris R

    2009-09-07

    Energy-restricted low glycemic load diets are being used increasingly for weight loss. However, the long-term effects of such regimens on mood and cognitive performance are not known. We assessed the effects of low glycemic load (LG) and high glycemic load (HG) energy-restricted diets on mood and cognitive performance during 6 months of a randomized controlled trial when all food was provided. Subjects were 42 healthy overweight adults (age 35+/-5 years; BMI 27.8+/-1.6 kg/m(2)) with a mean weight loss of 8.7+/-5.0% that did not differ significantly by diet randomization. Mood was assessed by using the Profile of Mood States (POMS) questionnaire. Cognitive performance was assessed by using computerized tests of simple reaction time, vigilance, learning, short-term memory and attention, and language-based logical reasoning. Worsening mood outcome over time was observed in the HG diet group compared to the LG for the depression subscale of POMS (p=0.009 after including hunger as a covariate). There was no significant change over time in any cognitive performance values. These findings suggest a negative effect of an HG weight loss diet on sub-clinical depression but, in contrast to a previous suggestion, provide no support for differential effects of LG versus HD diets on cognitive performance.

  17. Tight glycemic control using an artificial endocrine pancreas may play an important role in preventing infection after pancreatic resection.

    PubMed

    Hanazaki, Kazuhiro

    2012-08-07

    It is well known that perioperative hyperglycemia is the main cause of infectious complications after surgery. To improve perioperative glycemic control, we wish to highlight and comment on an interesting paper published recently by the Annals of Surgery entitled: "Early postoperative hyperglycemia is associated with postoperative complications after pancreatoduodenectomy (PD)" by Eshuis et al. The authors concluded that early postoperative glucose levels more than 140 mg/dL was significantly associated with complications after PD. Since we recommend that perioperative tight glycemic control (TGC) is an effective method to prevent postoperative complications including surgical site infection after distal, proximal, and total pancreatic resection, we support strongly this conclusion drawn in this article. However, if early postoperative glucose control in patients undergoing PD was administrated by conventional method such as sliding scale approach as described in this article, it is difficult to maintain TGC. Therefore, we introduce a novel perioperative glycemic control using an artificial endocrine pancreas against pancreatogenic diabetes after pancreatic resection including PD.

  18. Manipulation of glycemic response with isomaltulose in a milk-based drink does not affect cognitive performance in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Dye, Louise; Gilsenan, Mary B; Quadt, Frits; Martens, Vanessa E G; Bot, Arjen; Lasikiewicz, Nicola; Camidge, Diana; Croden, Fiona; Lawton, Clare

    2010-04-01

    Previous research suggests that glucoregulation and nutrient interventions, which alter circulating glucose, impact cognitive function. To examine the effect of modulating glycemic response using isomaltulose on cognitive function 24 healthy male adult participants consumed energy and macronutrient-matched milk-based drinks containing 50 g isomaltulose, 50 g sucrose or a water control in a counterbalanced within-subject design. Interstitial glucose was measured continuously in 12 subjects and all provided 9 capillary measures on each test day. A 30-min cognitive test battery was administered before and twice (+35 and +115 min) after drink ingestion. Immediate, delayed, recognition, verbal and working memory, and psychomotor performance were assessed. Glycemic profiles induced by the drinks differed significantly during the first but not the second post-drink test battery. Neither administration of the sucrose nor isomaltulose drinks produced consistent effects on verbal or working memory, or psychomotor performance. This study used isomaltulose as an investigative tool to lower glycemic response. Importantly, it demonstrates a lack of effect of modulating glucose on cognitive performance based on reliable, continuously measured glycemia. It refutes the hypothesis that glycemia is associated with cognitive performance and questions the suggestion that isomaltulose has an effect on cognitive performance.

  19. Relationship between Processing Method and the Glycemic Indices of Ten Sweet Potato (Ipomoea batatas) Cultivars Commonly Consumed in Jamaica.

    PubMed

    Bahado-Singh, Perceval S; Riley, Cliff K; Wheatley, Andrew O; Lowe, Henry I C

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of different traditional cooking methods on glycemic index (GI) and glycemic response of ten Sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) cultivars commonly eaten in Jamaica. Matured tubers were cooked by roasting, baking, frying, or boiling then immediately consumed by the ten nondiabetic test subjects (5 males and 5 females; mean age of 27 ± 2 years). The GI varied between 41 ± 5-93 ± 5 for the tubers studied. Samples prepared by boiling had the lowest GI (41 ± 5-50 ± 3), while those processed by baking (82 ± 3-94 ± 3) and roasting (79 ± 4-93 ± 2) had the highest GI values. The study indicates that the glycemic index of Jamaican sweet potatoes varies significantly with the method of preparation and to a lesser extent on intravarietal differences. Consumption of boiled sweet potatoes could minimize postprandial blood glucose spikes and therefore, may prove to be more efficacious in the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  20. Effects of prebiotic inulin-type fructans on structure, quality, sensory acceptance and glycemic response of gluten-free breads.

    PubMed

    Capriles, Vanessa D; Arêas, José A G

    2013-01-01

    The effect of adding increasing levels of prebiotic inulin-type fructans (ITFs) (0, 4, 8, 10 and 12%) on the sensory and nutritional quality of gluten-free bread (GFB) was assessed. ITFs can provide structure and gas retention during baking, thus improving GFB quality by yielding better specific volume, softer crumb, improved crust and crumb browning with enhanced sensory acceptance. During baking, approximately one-third of the ITFs was lost. The addition of 12% ITFs to the basic formulation is required in order to obtain GFB enriched with 8% ITFs (4 g of fructans per 50 g bread serving size), levels that can provide health benefits. 12% ITFs-addition level decreased GFB glycemic index (from 71 to 48) and glycemic load (from 12 to 8). Prebiotic ITFs are a promising improver for GFB that can provide nutritional (11% dietary fiber content, low glycemic response) and functional benefits to patients with celiac disease, since ITFs are prebiotic ingredients that can also increase calcium absorption.

  1. Preexercise high and low glycemic index meals and cycling performance in untrained females: randomized, cross-over trial of efficacy.

    PubMed

    Moore, Laura; Szpalek, Hannah M; McNaughton, Lars R

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the effects of high and low glycemic index (GI) carbohydrate preexercise meals (2.5 g CHO/kg body mass) on cycle performance in untrained females. Ten females, cycled at 60% VO(2 max) to exhaustion, on two occasions. After fasting, subjects ate an isocaloric, high glycemic index (HGI)/low glycemic index (LGI) meal in a random order. Blood samples were taken at rest/postprandial/during and after exercise and blood glucose and lactate were measured. Ingestion of the LGI meal resulted in a performance time of 67.4 ± 8.4 min versus an HGI time of 48.9 ± 10.0 min (p = 0.02). Fifteen minutes after the HGI meal there was a significant increase (p < 0.001) in glucose levels, which was not seen in the LGI trial. Twenty minutes into the HGI exercise trial, there was a large decline in blood glucose concentration beyond resting levels. Based on this work, we found that untrained female participants should utilize LGI meals preexercise for endurance activities rather than HGI meals.

  2. SALT and Spelling Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Joan

    A study investigated the effects of suggestopedic accelerative learning and teaching (SALT) on the spelling achievement, attitudes toward school, and memory skills of fourth-grade students. Subjects were 20 male and 28 female students from two self-contained classrooms at Kennedy Elementary School in Rexburg, Idaho. The control classroom and the…

  3. Iowa Women of Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohrn, Deborah Gore, Ed.

    1993-01-01

    This issue of the Goldfinch highlights some of Iowa's 20th century women of achievement. These women have devoted their lives to working for human rights, education, equality, and individual rights. They come from the worlds of politics, art, music, education, sports, business, entertainment, and social work. They represent Native Americans,…

  4. Schools Achieving Gender Equity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Revis, Emma

    This guide is designed to assist teachers presenting the Schools Achieving Gender Equity (SAGE) curriculum for vocational education students, which was developed to align gender equity concepts with the Kentucky Education Reform Act (KERA). Included in the guide are lesson plans for classes on the following topics: legal issues of gender equity,…

  5. Achieving Peace through Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarken, Rodney H.

    While it is generally agreed that peace is desirable, there are barriers to achieving a peaceful world. These barriers are classified into three major areas: (1) an erroneous view of human nature; (2) injustice; and (3) fear of world unity. In a discussion of these barriers, it is noted that although the consciousness and conscience of the world…

  6. Explorations in achievement motivation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helmreich, Robert L.

    1982-01-01

    Recent research on the nature of achievement motivation is reviewed. A three-factor model of intrinsic motives is presented and related to various criteria of performance, job satisfaction and leisure activities. The relationships between intrinsic and extrinsic motives are discussed. Needed areas for future research are described.

  7. Increasing Male Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Barbara Talbert

    2008-01-01

    The No Child Left Behind legislation has brought greater attention to the academic performance of American youth. Its emphasis on student achievement requires a closer analysis of assessment data by school districts. To address the findings, educators must seek strategies to remedy failing results. In a mid-Atlantic district of the Unites States,…

  8. Cognitive Processes and Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, Dennis; Randhawa, Bikkar S.

    For a group of 165 fourth- and fifth-grade students, four achievement test scores were correlated with success on nine tests designed to measure three cognitive functions: sustained attention, successive processing, and simultaneous processing. This experiment was designed in accordance with Luria's model of the three functional units of the…

  9. Graders' Mathematics Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bond, John B.; Ellis, Arthur K.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this experimental study was to investigate the effects of metacognitive reflective assessment instruction on student achievement in mathematics. The study compared the performance of 141 students who practiced reflective assessment strategies with students who did not. A posttest-only control group design was employed, and results…

  10. Achieving All Our Ambitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartley, Tricia

    2009-01-01

    National learning and skills policy aims both to build economic prosperity and to achieve social justice. Participation in higher education (HE) has the potential to contribute substantially to both aims. That is why the Campaign for Learning has supported the ambition to increase the proportion of the working-age population with a Level 4…

  11. Improving Educational Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York University Education Quarterly, 1979

    1979-01-01

    This is a slightly abridged version of the report of the National Academy of Education panel, convened at the request of HEW Secretary Joseph Califano and Assistant Secretary for Education Mary F. Berry, to study recent declines in student achievement and methods of educational improvement. (SJL)

  12. The Achievement Club

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Ibram

    2009-01-01

    When Gabrielle Carpenter became a guidance counselor in Northern Virginia nine years ago, she focused on the academic achievement gap and furiously tried to close it. At first, she was compelled by tremendous professional interest. However, after seeing her son lose his zeal for school, Carpenter joined forces with other parents to form an…

  13. Achievement in Problem Solving

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friebele, David

    2010-01-01

    This Action Research Project is meant to investigate the effects of incorporating research-based instructional strategies into instruction and their subsequent effect on student achievement in the area of problem-solving. The two specific strategies utilized are the integration of manipulatives and increased social interaction on a regular basis.…

  14. Essays on Educational Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ampaabeng, Samuel Kofi

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation examines the determinants of student outcomes--achievement, attainment, occupational choices and earnings--in three different contexts. The first two chapters focus on Ghana while the final chapter focuses on the US state of Massachusetts. In the first chapter, I exploit the incidence of famine and malnutrition that resulted to…

  15. Advancing Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walberg, Herbert J.

    2010-01-01

    For the last half century, higher spending and many modern reforms have failed to raise the achievement of students in the United States to the levels of other economically advanced countries. A possible explanation, says Herbert Walberg, is that much current education theory is ill informed about scientific psychology, often drawing on fads and…

  16. NCLB: Achievement Robin Hood?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bracey, Gerald W.

    2008-01-01

    In his "Wall Street Journal" op-ed on the 25th of anniversary of "A Nation At Risk", former assistant secretary of education Chester E. Finn Jr. applauded the report for turning U.S. education away from equality and toward achievement. It was not surprising, then, that in mid-2008, Finn arranged a conference to examine the…

  17. Canagliflozin Slows Progression of Renal Function Decline Independently of Glycemic Effects.

    PubMed

    Heerspink, Hiddo J L; Desai, Mehul; Jardine, Meg; Balis, Dainius; Meininger, Gary; Perkovic, Vlado

    2017-01-01

    Sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibition with canagliflozin decreases HbA1c, body weight, BP, and albuminuria, implying that canagliflozin confers renoprotection. We determined whether canagliflozin decreases albuminuria and reduces renal function decline independently of its glycemic effects in a secondary analysis of a clinical trial in 1450 patients with type 2 diabetes receiving metformin and randomly assigned to either once-daily canagliflozin 100 mg, canagliflozin 300 mg, or glimepiride uptitrated to 6-8 mg. End points were annual change in eGFR and albuminuria over 2 years of follow-up. Glimepiride, canagliflozin 100 mg, and canagliflozin 300 mg groups had eGFR declines of 3.3 ml/min per 1.73 m(2) per year (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 2.8 to 3.8), 0.5 ml/min per 1.73 m(2) per year (95% CI, 0.0 to 1.0), and 0.9 ml/min per 1.73 m(2) per year (95% CI, 0.4 to 1.4), respectively (P<0.01 for each canagliflozin group versus glimepiride). In the subgroup of patients with baseline urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio ≥30 mg/g, urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio decreased more with canagliflozin 100 mg (31.7%; 95% CI, 8.6% to 48.9%; P=0.01) or canagliflozin 300 mg (49.3%; 95% CI, 31.9% to 62.2%; P<0.001) than with glimepiride. Patients receiving glimepiride, canagliflozin 100 mg, or canagliflozin 300 mg had reductions in HbA1c of 0.81%, 0.82%, and 0.93%, respectively, at 1 year and 0.55%, 0.65%, and 0.74%, respectively, at 2 years. In conclusion, canagliflozin 100 or 300 mg/d, compared with glimepiride, slowed the progression of renal disease over 2 years in patients with type 2 diabetes, and canagliflozin may confer renoprotective effects independently of its glycemic effects.

  18. Acarbose improves glycemic control and reduces body weight: Subanalysis data of South Asia region.

    PubMed

    Kalra, S; Sahay, R K; Schnell, O; Sheu, W H H; Grzeszczak, W; Watada, H; Soegondo, S; Yamamoto, N; Weng, J; Rathod, R

    2013-10-01

    Alpha-glucosidase inhibitors (AGIs) are widely used especially in Asian countries as a treatment option for type 2 diabetes patients with high postprandial glycaemia. However, data from South Asia region is very limited. In order to examine the effect of AGI in real-life setting, 10 PMS/NIS from all over the world from the launch of acarbose to date were pooled in one database and exploratory analysis was performed for glycemic parameters and weight. In total 62,905 patients were pooled from 21 countries and regions. Mean follow up (± SD) was 12.2 ± 4.8 weeks (range 0.1-108.9). From South Asia region (India and Pakistan), 8,738 Asian patients were enrolled. Mean PPG decreased from 240.0 and 261.1 mg/dl at baseline by 70.26 ± 65.10 and 82.96 ± 56.59 mg/dl at the last visit in total and South Asian populations, respectively (n = 53,883; n = 7,991, P < 0.0001 for both). Mean FPG decreased from 171.6 and 176.5 mg/dl at baseline by 38.48 ± 47.83 and 49.59 ± 41.41 mg/dl at the last visit in total and South Asian populations, respectively (n = 56,672; n = 7,837, P < 0.0001 for both). Mean HbA1c decreased from 8.4 and 8.4% at baseline by 1.11 ± 1.31% and 0.91 ± 0.93% at the last visit in total and South Asian populations, respectively (n = 38,843; n = 2,343, P < 0.0001 for both). Mean relative reduction of body weight (BW) was 1.40 ± 3.28% and 1.10 ± 3.39% at the last visit for mean baseline BW 73.6 and 74.2 kg in total and South Asian populations, respectively (n = 54,760; n = 7,718, P < 0.0001 for both). Consistent with RCT meta-analyses, post-hoc analysis of real-life data showed acarbose treatment improved glycaemic control and reduced the BW. Acarbose treatment in real life setting showed significant reductions in all glycemic parameters and BW in Asian patients from South Asia region.

  19. CEBAF Accelerator Achievements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Y. C.; Drury, M.; Hovater, C.; Hutton, A.; Krafft, G. A.; Poelker, M.; Reece, C.; Tiefenback, M.

    2011-05-01

    In the past decade, nuclear physics users of Jefferson Lab's Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) have benefited from accelerator physics advances and machine improvements. As of early 2011, CEBAF operates routinely at 6 GeV, with a 12 GeV upgrade underway. This article reports highlights of CEBAF's scientific and technological evolution in the areas of cryomodule refurbishment, RF control, polarized source development, beam transport for parity experiments, magnets and hysteresis handling, beam breakup, and helium refrigerator operational optimization.

  20. In vitro hydrolytic digestion, glycemic response in dogs, and true metabolizable energy content of soluble corn fibers.

    PubMed

    de Godoy, M R C; Knapp, B K; Parsons, C M; Swanson, K S; Fahey, George C

    2014-06-01

    The objective of this research was to measure in vitro hydrolytic digestion, glycemic and insulinemic responses in dogs, and true ME (TMEn) content of select soluble corn fibers (SCF) in roosters. The first generation (G1) SCF included hydrochloric acid-treated corn syrup (G1-CS-HCl), an SCF with an increased total dietary fiber (TDF) content (G1-SCF-HCl), an SCF that was spray-dried (G1-SCF-SD), and a hydrogenated SCF (G1-SCF-hydrog). The second generation (G2) SCF included those prepared using phosphoric acid catalyzation in both a liquid [G2-SCF-phos (Lq)] and powder [G2-SCF-phos (Pw)] form, and SCF that were prepared using hydrochloric acid catalyzation in both a liquid [G2-SCF-HCl (Lq)] and powder [G2-SCF-HCl (Pw)] form. Also, in the G2 set of samples were SCF prepared using the same method, but in 3 separate batches, all of which contained 70% TDF and 15% sugars. Two were in liquid form [G2-SCF-phos+HCl (Lq1)] and [G2-SCF-phos+HCl (Lq2)], and one in powder form ([G2-SCF-phos+HCl (Pw)]. A lower sugar form (80% TDF and 5% sugar) of SCF was also evaluated (G2-SCF-low sugar). Glucose was the major free sugar and bound monosaccharide in all SCF except for G1-SCF-hydrog that had greater concentrations of sorbitol. All SCF had intermediate to low amounts of monosaccharides released as a result of in vitro hydrolytic digestion, with glucose being the primary sugar component released. The G1-SCF were more digestible in vitro (approximately 50%) compared to G2-SCF (approximately 32%). All SCF had attenuated glycemic responses in adult dogs compared to a maltodextrin control (P < 0.05). The G2-SCF, on average, had lower glycemic responses and TMEn values in roosters than G1-SCF. All SCF had low free sugar concentrations with varying degrees of resistance to digestion, reduced caloric content, and attenuated glycemic and insulinemic responses in adult dogs. These ingredients are potential candidates for inclusion in reduced calorie and low glycemic canine diets.

  1. Markers of beta cell failure predict poor glycemic response to GLP-1 receptor agonist therapy in type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Angus G; McDonald, Timothy J; Shields, Beverley M; Hill, Anita V; Hyde, Christopher J; Knight, Bridget A; Hattersley, Andrew T

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess whether clinical characteristics and simple biomarkers of beta cell failure are associated with individual variation in glycemic response to GLP-1 receptor agonist therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes. Research Design and Methods We prospectively studied 620 participants with type 2 diabetes and HbA1c ≥58mmol/mol (7.5%) commencing GLP-1 receptor agonist therapy as part of their usual diabetes care and assessed response to therapy over 6 months. We assessed the association between baseline clinical measurements associated with beta cell failure and glycemic response (HbA1c change 0 to 6 months, primary outcome) with change in weight (0 to 6 months) as a secondary outcome using linear regression and ANOVA with adjustment for baseline HbA1c and co-treatment change. Results Reduced glycemic response to GLP-1R agonists was associated with longer duration diabetes, insulin co-treatment, lower fasting C-peptide, lower post meal urine C-peptide creatinine ratio and positive GAD or IA2 islet autoantibodies (p≤0.01 for all). Participants with positive autoantibodies or severe insulin deficiency (fasting C-peptide ≤0.25nmol/L) had markedly reduced glycemic response to GLP-1RA therapy (autoantibodies: mean HbA1c change -5.2 vs -15.2 mmol/mol (-0.5 vs -1.4%), p=0.005 C-peptide <0.25nmol/L: mean change -2.1 vs -15.3mmol/mol (-0.2 vs -1.4%), p=0.002). These markers were predominantly present in insulin treated participants and were not associated with weight change. Conclusions Clinical markers of low beta cell function are associated with reduced glycemic response to GLP-1R agonist therapy. C-peptide and islet autoantibodies represent potential biomarkers for the stratification of GLP-1R agonist therapy in insulin treated diabetes. PMID:26242184

  2. Sleep Pattern, Duration and Quality in Relation with Glycemic Control in People with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Gozashti, Mohammad Hossein; Eslami, Nazanin; Radfar, Mohammad Hadi; Pakmanesh, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Sleep disturbances have been shown to be associated with diabetes control, but the relation between planned wakings or napping with glycemic indices has not been evaluated yet. This study evaluated the relation between sleep quality, duration, and pattern, including daytime napping of people with diabetes and their glycemic control. A cross-sectional correlation research design was used for this study. We enrolled 118 people with type 2 diabetes receiving oral agents without major complications at the Shahid Bahonar Center, Kerman. The age, weight, height, serum HbA1c, as well as other glycemic indices and lipid profile were measured. BMI was also calculated. All participants were requested to fill in the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) questionnaire to evaluate their sleep quality. In addition, they were inquired about their sleep schedule during day and night. Pearson correlation and multiple regression analyses were conducted to examine the correlation between HbA1c and sleep pattern variables. The variables were also compared between participants with or without napping using t-test. All analyses were performed with the SPSS version 19 (SPSS, Chicago, IL, USA). The mean age was 58±11 years and mean HbA1c (%) was 7.8±11 (62±13 mmol/mol). Sleep duration and the number of sleep segments significantly predicted HbA1c (F (2,114)=5.232, P=0.007, R2=0.084). A one-hour increment in sleep duration was associated with a 0.174% (1.4 mmol/mol) decrement in HbA1c. PSQI score did not contribute to the regression model. Moreover, participants who napped (66%) had a lower HbA1c (7.6±1) compared to others (8.1±1.3) (P=0.04). We concluded that napping and segmented sleep are associated with a better glycemic control in type 2 diabetes and there is a linear correlation between sleep duration and better glycemic control. PMID:27853334

  3. Faculty achievement tracking tool.

    PubMed

    Pettus, Sarah; Reifschneider, Ellen; Burruss, Nancy

    2009-03-01

    Faculty development and scholarship is an expectation of nurse educators. Accrediting institutions, such as the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education, the National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission, and the Higher Learning Commission, all have criteria regarding faculty achievement. A faculty achievement tracking tool (FATT) was developed to facilitate documentation of accreditation criteria attainment. Based on criteria from accrediting organizations, the roles that are addressed include scholarship, service, and practice. Definitions and benchmarks for the faculty as an aggregate are included. Undergoing reviews from different accrediting organizations, the FATT has been used once for accreditation of the undergraduate program and once for accreditation of the graduate program. The FATT is easy to use and has become an excellent adjunct for the preparation for accreditation reports. In addition, the FATT may be used for yearly evaluations, advancement, and merit.

  4. Project ACHIEVE final report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-13

    Project ACHIEVE was a math/science academic enhancement program aimed at first year high school Hispanic American students. Four high schools -- two in El Paso, Texas and two in Bakersfield, California -- participated in this Department of Energy-funded program during the spring and summer of 1996. Over 50 students, many of whom felt they were facing a nightmare future, were given the opportunity to work closely with personal computers and software, sophisticated calculators, and computer-based laboratories -- an experience which their regular academic curriculum did not provide. Math and science projects, exercises, and experiments were completed that emphasized independent and creative applications of scientific and mathematical theories to real world problems. The most important outcome was the exposure Project ACHIEVE provided to students concerning the college and technical-field career possibilities available to them.

  5. Glycemic Response and Fermentation of Crystalline Short Linear α-Glucans from Debranched Waxy Maize Starch.

    PubMed

    Brewer, Lauren R; Weber, Casey; Haub, Mark; Cai, Liming; Shi, Yong-Cheng

    2015-11-04

    The glycemic index (GI) is used to rank foods based on postprandial blood glucose response. GI test requires that 50 g of available carbohydrate be used. Available carbohydrate is often calculated as total carbohydrate minus dietary fiber; yet, AOAC fiber methods do not always include resistant starch (RS). The objective of this study was to examine GI response and fermentation properties of crystalline short-chain α-glucan (CSCA), which has high RS content, but no total dietary fiber (TDF) content as measured by AOAC method 991.43. Using the standard GI method, 10 adults were fed 50 g of waxy maize starch and CSCA, consumed alone and in mixed formulation. Breath hydrogen was also determined over 6 h. Fifty grams of CSCA was not entirely available in vivo, and breath hydrogen testing indicated that CSCA was as likely to ferment. Products high in RS, but with no TDF, would yield reduced GI values, and this calls for the need of a method to define available carbohydrate.

  6. Glycemic index and postprandial blood glucose response to Japanese strawberry jam in normal adults.

    PubMed

    Kurotobi, Tomoka; Fukuhara, Kimiaki; Inage, Hiroko; Kimura, Shuichi

    2010-01-01

    We investigated in 30 healthy adults the glycemic index (GI) of five strawberry jams made from various sugar compositions. The jam containing the highest ratio of glucose showed a high GI, while that containing a high ratio of fructose, a jam made from polydextrose, showed a low GI. There was a high correlation (r=0.969, p=0.006) between the GI and the predicted GI calculated from the sugar composition of the jams. Moreover, the influence on postprandial blood glucose response after an intake of only 20 g of jam and one slice of bread with 20 g jam was measured in 8 healthy adults. The blood glucose level after an intake of 20 g of the high GI jam containing the high glucose ratio was higher than that of other jams at 15 min, but there was no significant difference after 30 min. Regardless of whether the GI was low or high, differences in the jams were not observed in the postprandial blood glucose level or the area under the curve after eating either one slice of bread (60 g) or one slice of bread with less than 20 g of jam.

  7. Preserving Mafa expression in diabetic islet β-cells improves glycemic control in vivo.

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, Taka-aki; Kaneto, Hideaki; Kawashima, Satoshi; Miyatsuka, Takeshi; Tochino, Yoshihiro; Yoshikawa, Atsushi; Imagawa, Akihisa; Miyazaki, Jun-ichi; Gannon, Maureen; Stein, Roland; Shimomura, Iichiro

    2015-03-20

    The murine Mafa transcription factor is a key regulator of postnatal islet β-cell activity, affecting insulin transcription, insulin secretion, and β-cell mass. Human MAFA expression is also markedly decreased in islet β-cells of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients. Moreover, levels are profoundly reduced in db/db islet β-cells, a mouse model of T2DM. To examine the significance of this key islet β-cell-enriched protein to glycemic control under diabetic conditions, we generated transgenic mice that conditionally and specifically produced Mafa in db/db islet β-cells. Sustained expression of Mafa resulted in significantly lower plasma glucose levels, higher plasma insulin, and augmented islet β-cell mass. In addition, there was increased expression of insulin, Slc2a2, and newly identified Mafa-regulated genes involved in reducing β-cell stress, like Gsta1 and Gckr. Importantly, the levels of human GSTA1 were also compromised in T2DM islets. Collectively, these results illustrate how consequential the reduction in Mafa activity is to islet β-cell function under pathophysiological conditions.

  8. Molecular variants and derivatives of insulin for improved glycemic control in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Bhatnagar, Sonika; Srivastava, Deepa; Jayadev, M S K; Dubey, A K

    2006-07-01

    Insulin is a historic molecule. It presents many first instances, such as the first protein to be fully sequenced, one of the first proteins to be crystallized in pure form, one among the early proteins whose structure was investigated using X-ray crystallography, the first protein to be chemically synthesized and the first Biotech drug. Therefore, the development of insulin in the early years is intricately intertwined with the progress in molecular and structural biology. In recent years, development of a range of insulin analogs has led to better control of glucose levels, thus preventing secondary complications and improving the quality of life in diabetic patients. Such analogs were obtained by modification of the native insulin sequence. They vary with regard to their pharmacokinetic profile, stability, tissue specificity and mode of administration. In addition, alterations involving incorporation of various chemical moieties in insulin and its co-crystallization with insoluble derivatives are used to modulate the time-action profile of the drug. This article traces the development of molecular variants and derivatives of insulin. It discusses future directions for further improvement in their properties to produce still better insulin therapeutics for tight glycemic control.

  9. Management of diabetes mellitus in individuals with chronic kidney disease: therapeutic perspectives and glycemic control

    PubMed Central

    Betônico, Carolina C R; Titan, Silvia M O; Correa-Giannella, Maria Lúcia C; Nery, Márcia; Queiroz, Márcia

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic options for diabetes treatment and their potential side effects, in addition to analyzing the risks and benefits of tight glycemic control in patients with diabetic kidney disease. For this review, a search was performed using several pre-defined keyword combinations and their equivalents: “diabetes kidney disease” and “renal failure” in combination with “diabetes treatment” and “oral antidiabetic drugs” or “oral hypoglycemic agents.” The search was performed in PubMed, Endocrine Abstracts and the Cochrane Library from January 1980 up to January 2015. Diabetes treatment in patients with diabetic kidney disease is challenging, in part because of progression of renal failure-related changes in insulin signaling, glucose transport and metabolism, favoring both hyperglycemic peaks and hypoglycemia. Additionally, the decline in renal function impairs the clearance and metabolism of antidiabetic agents and insulin, frequently requiring reassessment of prescriptions. The management of hyperglycemia in patients with diabetic kidney disease is even more difficult, requiring adjustment of antidiabetic agents and insulin doses. The health team responsible for the follow-up of these patients should be vigilant and prepared to make such changes; however, unfortunately, there are few guidelines addressing the nuances of the management of this specific population. PMID:26872083

  10. Polyunsaturated fatty acids and type 2 diabetes: impact on the glycemic control mechanism.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Olívia Gonçalves Leão; da Silva, Bárbara Pereira; Rocha, Daniela Mayumi Usuda Prado; Lopes, Lílian Lelis; Alfenas, Rita de Cássia Gonçalves

    2016-02-06

    There is a growing mortality related to co-morbidities associated with diabetes mellitus (DM). Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) intake has been associated with low cardiometabolic risk and reduction of inflammatory process. The objective of this paper is to review the impact of PUFA intake on glycemic control in diabetic patients, as well as elucidate the possible mechanisms involved. Medline/PubMed electronic database was searched to identify studies published within the last 5 years regarding the effect of PUFA intake on glucose metabolism in type 2 diabetics. The search terms used were: "polyunsaturated fatty acid (s)", "PUFA", and "diabetes." We included only intervetion studies that assessed the effects of PUFA intake on glucose metabolism - fasting glucose, serum insulin, HbA1c and HOMA-IR assessment- in type 2 diabetics. Initially, 48 articles were identified, which 1 was not available and 41 did not match the inclusion criteria. Within the selected studies, 3 showed an improvement on fasting blood glucose, 2 showed an increase on fasting glycemia and there was no effect of the intervention in only 1. Based on the analyzed clinical intervention studies, supplementation of 0,42-5,2 g PUFA/day for at least 8 weeks may be an alternative treatment for T2DM, particularly to Asian people.

  11. A low glycemic index meal before exercise improves endurance running capacity in men.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ching-Lin; Williams, Clyde

    2006-10-01

    This study investigated the effects of ingesting a low (LGI) or high (HGI) glycemic index carbohydrate (CHO) meal 3 h prior to exercise on endurance running capacity. Eight male recreational runners undertook two trials (LGI or HGI) which were randomized and separated by 7 d. After an overnight fast (12 h) the subjects ingested either a LGI or HGI meal 3 h prior to running at 70% VO2max until exhaustion. The meals contained 2 g/kg body mass CHO and were isocaloric and iso-macronutrient with calculated GI values 77 and 37 for the HGI and LGI respectively. The run times for the LGI and HGI trials were 108.8 +/- 4.1 min and 101.4 +/- 5.2 min respectively (P = 0.038). Fat oxidation rates were higher during exercise after the LGI meal than after the HGI meal (P < 0.05). In summary, ingestion of a LGI meal 3 h before exercise resulted in a greater endurance capacity than after the ingestion of a HGI meal.

  12. The effects of pre-exercise glycemic index food on running capacity.

    PubMed

    Karamanolis, I A; Laparidis, K S; Volaklis, K A; Douda, H T; Tokmakidis, S P

    2011-09-01

    This study examined the effects of pre-exercise food on different glycemic indexes (GI) on exercise metabolism and endurance running capacity. 9 subjects performed 3 exercise trials on different days 15 min after ingesting: lentils, (LGI), potatoes, (HGI), and placebo. Each subject ingested an equal amount of each food (1 g/kg body mass) and ran on a level treadmill for 5 min at 60%, 45 min at 70% and then at 80% of VO (2max) until exhaustion. Serum glucose concentrations were higher ( P<0.01) 15 min after the HGI trial compared to the LGI and placebo trials. In addition, serum glucose levels were higher ( P<0.05) during the LGI trial at the time of exhaustion compared to the HGI and placebo trials. Plasma insulin levels, 15 min after ingestion, were higher ( P<0.001) in the HGI trial as compared to the LGI and placebo trials. Exercise time was longer during the LGI trial ( P<0.05) compared to the placebo, but the time to exhaustion in the HGI condition did not differ from the placebo (LGI: 90.0 ± 7.9; HGI: 81.8 ± 5; placebo: 73.0 ± 6.4 min). These results suggest that lentils, the LGI food, ingested 15 min before prolonged exercise maintained euglycemia during exercise and enhanced endurance running capacity.

  13. Glycemic Control in Kenyan Children and Adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Ngwiri, Thomas; Were, Fred; Predieri, Barbara; Ngugi, Paul; Iughetti, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    Background. Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is the most common endocrine disorder in children and adolescents worldwide. While data about prevalence, treatment, and complications are recorded in many countries, few data exist for Sub-Saharan Africa. The aim of this study was to determine the degree of control in patients with T1DM aged 1–19 years over a 6-month period in 3 outpatient Kenyan clinics. It also sought to determine how control was influenced by parameters of patient and treatment. Methods. Eighty-two children and adolescents with T1DM were included in the study. Clinical history regarding duration of illness, type and dose of insulin, and recent symptoms of hypoglycemia/hyperglycemia were recorded. Glycaemia, HbA1c, and ketonuria were tested. HbA1c of 8.0% and below was defined as the cut-off for acceptable control. Results. The median HbA1c for the study population was 11.1% (range: 6.3–18.8). Overall, only 28% of patients had reasonable glycemic control as defined in this study. 72% therefore had poor control. It was also found that age above 12 years was significantly associated with poor control. Conclusions. African children and with T1DM are poorly controlled particularly in adolescents. Our data strongly support the necessity of Kenya children to receive more aggressive management and follow-up. PMID:26494998

  14. Management of diabetes mellitus in individuals with chronic kidney disease: therapeutic perspectives and glycemic control.

    PubMed

    Betônico, Carolina C R; Titan, Silvia M O; Correa-Giannella, Maria Lúcia C; Nery, Márcia; Queiroz, Márcia

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic options for diabetes treatment and their potential side effects, in addition to analyzing the risks and benefits of tight glycemic control in patients with diabetic kidney disease. For this review, a search was performed using several pre-defined keyword combinations and their equivalents: "diabetes kidney disease" and "renal failure" in combination with "diabetes treatment" and "oral antidiabetic drugs" or "oral hypoglycemic agents." The search was performed in PubMed, Endocrine Abstracts and the Cochrane Library from January 1980 up to January 2015. Diabetes treatment in patients with diabetic kidney disease is challenging, in part because of progression of renal failure-related changes in insulin signaling, glucose transport and metabolism, favoring both hyperglycemic peaks and hypoglycemia. Additionally, the decline in renal function impairs the clearance and metabolism of antidiabetic agents and insulin, frequently requiring reassessment of prescriptions. The management of hyperglycemia in patients with diabetic kidney disease is even more difficult, requiring adjustment of antidiabetic agents and insulin doses. The health team responsible for the follow-up of these patients should be vigilant and prepared to make such changes; however, unfortunately, there are few guidelines addressing the nuances of the management of this specific population.

  15. The effect of glycemic index on plasma glucose and lactate levels during incremental exercise.

    PubMed

    Stannard, S R; Constantini, N W; Miller, J C

    2000-03-01

    Consumption of low glycemic index (GI) foods before submaximal endurance exercise may be beneficial to performance. To test whether this may also be true for high intensity exercise, 10 trained cyclists began an incremental exercise test to exhaustion 65 min after consuming equal carbohydrate portions of glucose (HGI), pasta (LGI), and a noncarbohydrate control (PL). Time to fatigue did not differ significantly (p = 0.05) between treatments. Plasma glucose concentration was significantly lower after LGI vs. HGI from 15 to 45 min of rest postprandial. During exercise, plasma glucose concentration was significantly lower after HGI vs. LGI from 200 W until exhaustion. Plasma lactate concentration following HGI was significantly higher than PL from 30 min of rest postprandial through to the end of the 200-W workload. Plasma lactate concentration following LGI was significantly lower than after HGI from 45 min of rest postprandial through to the end of the 100-W workload. At higher exercise intensities, there was no significant difference in plasma lactate levels between treatments. These findings suggest that a high GI carbohydrate meal (1 g/kg body wt) 65 min prior to exercise decreases plasma glucose and increases plasma lactate levels compared to a low GI meal, but not enough to be detrimental to incremental exercise performance.

  16. Liquid and solid carbohydrate foods: comparative effects on glycemic and insulin responses, and satiety.

    PubMed

    Ranawana, Viren; Henry, C Jeya K

    2011-02-01

    It is speculated that the physical form (liquid or solid) of the food substrate has an independent effect on the body's satiety mechanisms. Using a balanced and controlled design, the objective of the present study was to determine the glycemic response (GR), insulin response (IR) and subjective feelings of satiety to two solid (rice [BR] and spaghetti) and two liquid (orange juice and a sugar-sweetened fruit drink [SSD]) foods. Ten healthy participants consumed volume (576 ml) and carbohydrate (50 g) matched portions of the above test foods following a 12-h fast. Blood samples were obtained for the ensuing 120 min for glucose and insulin determination. The subjects also completed visual analog scales (VAS) providing data on subjective feelings of hunger, fullness and satiety. Although there were some significant differences in the total incremental areas under the curve for the GR and IR to liquids and solids, there were notable distinctions in the pattern of the response curves. The BR and SSD elicited significantly different levels of subjective hunger, fullness and satiety. The VAS ratings for all four treatments were at or below baseline by 30 min post-consumption. There were no associations between the GR/IR and VAS ratings. Although the GR and IR were not different between liquids and solids, their differential response patterns could have an impact on satiety and merits further investigation.

  17. A low-glycemic index diet and exercise intervention reduces TNF(alpha) in isolated mononuclear cells of older, obese adults.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Karen R; Haus, Jacob M; Solomon, Thomas P J; Patrick-Melin, Aimee J; Cook, Marc; Rocco, Michael; Barkoukis, Hope; Kirwan, John P

    2011-06-01

    Low-glycemic index diets and exercise independently improve glucose tolerance and reduce diabetes risk. However, the combined effect of a low-glycemic index diet and exercise on inflammation and glucose metabolism is not known. Therefore, we randomized 28 insulin-resistant adults (age: 66 ± 1 y; BMI: 34.2 ± 0.7 kg · m(-2)) to a 12-wk, low (LGI = 40) or high- (HGI = 80) glycemic index diet plus aerobic exercise (5 d · wk(-1), 60 min · d(-1), 80-85% heart rate(max)) intervention. All food and fluids were provided during the study. Inflammation was assessed from cytokine (TNFα and IL-6) secretion using peripheral blood mononuclear cells (MNC) stimulated overnight with LPS. Glycemic response was determined following ingestion of a 75-g glucose solution. Fasting blood samples were collected for additional cytokine [TNFα, IL-6, and monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1)] analysis. Both interventions decreased BMI (P < 0.001), fasting plasma glucose (P = 0.01), and insulin (P = 0.02). The glycemic response was reduced only in the LGI group (P = 0.04). Plasma and MNC-derived TNFα secretion were reduced in the LGI group (P = 0.02) but increased in the HGI group (P = 0.02). Secretion of IL-6 from MNC and plasma IL-6 and MCP-1 concentrations were reduced in the LGI group. The change in MNC-derived TNFα (r = 0.43; P = 0.04) and plasma MCP-1 (r = 0.44; P = 0.04) correlated with decreases in the glycemic response. These data highlight the importance of diet composition in the treatment and prevention of inflammation and hyperglycemia. A low-glycemic index diet has antiinflammatory and antidiabetogenic effects when combined with exercise in older, obese prediabetics.

  18. Differences in glycemic control across world regions: a post-hoc analysis in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus on dual antidiabetes drug therapy

    PubMed Central

    Brath, H; Paldánius, P M; Bader, G; Kolaczynski, W M; Nilsson, P M

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This post-hoc analysis of the EDGE (Effectiveness of Diabetes control with vildaGliptin and vildagliptin/mEtformin) study assessed inter-regional differences in baseline characteristics and response to treatment intensification with dual oral antidiabetes drugs (OADs) in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Methods: Patients with T2DM inadequately controlled with first-line monotherapy were assigned to receive a dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitor, vildagliptin, or comparator OADs as add-on dual therapy. The primary effectiveness end point (PEP) was achieving glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) reduction >0.3% without hypoglycemia, peripheral edema, discontinuation owing to gastrointestinal events or weight gain ⩾5% at 12 months. The secondary effectiveness end point (SEP) was achieving HbA1c of <7% without hypoglycemia or weight gain ⩾3% at 12 months. Results: Baseline characteristics of patients (N=43 791), including mean HbA1c (8.2%), varied across regions. Baseline age (62.3 years) and T2DM duration (6.3 years) were greater in patients from Europe than those from India and the Middle East (age: 51.8 and 52.1 years; T2DM duration: 4.3 and 4.2 years, respectively). The probability of achieving PEP with dual therapy was higher in India (odds ratio (OR): 1.5), Latin America (OR: 1.2) and Middle East (OR: 2.0) than in Europe (OR: 0.8) and East Asia (OR: 0.3). Achievement of SEP in patients receiving dual therapy was greater in Latin America (OR: 1.7) and Middle East (OR: 1.7). Vildagliptin add-on therapy allowed more patients to achieve SEP across regions. Women aged ⩾45 years less often attained glycemic target (HbA1c<7%) without significant weight gain ⩾5% compared with women aged <45 years (OR: 0.876, 95% confidence interval: 0.774, 0.992; P=0.037). Conclusions: Baseline HbA1c and T2DM duration differed considerably across all regions. Treatment intensification with second OAD, particularly with a DPP-4 inhibitor vildagliptin, resulted

  19. Language Barriers, Physician-Patient Language Concordance, and Glycemic Control Among Insured Latinos with Diabetes: The Diabetes Study of Northern California (DISTANCE)

    PubMed Central

    Schillinger, Dean; Warton, E. Margaret; Adler, Nancy; Moffet, Howard H.; Schenker, Yael; Salgado, M. Victoria; Ahmed, Ameena; Karter, Andrew J.

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT BACKGROUND A significant proportion of US Latinos with diabetes have limited English proficiency (LEP). Whether language barriers in health care contribute to poor glycemic control is unknown. OBJECTIVE To assess the association between limited English proficiency (LEP) and glycemic control and whether this association is modified by having a language-concordant physician. DESIGN Cross-sectional, observational study using data from the 2005–2006 Diabetes Study of Northern California (DISTANCE). Patients received care in a managed care setting with interpreter services and self-reported their English language ability and the Spanish language ability of their physician. Outcome was poor glycemic control (glycosylated hemoglobin A1c > 9%). KEY RESULTS The unadjusted percentage of patients with poor glycemic control was similar among Latino patients with LEP (n = 510) and Latino English-speakers (n = 2,683), and higher in both groups than in whites (n = 3,545) (21% vs 18% vs. 10%, p < 0.005). This relationship differed significantly by patient-provider language concordance (p < 0.01 for interaction). LEP patients with language-discordant physicians (n = 115) were more likely than LEP patients with language-concordant physicians (n = 137) to have poor glycemic control (27.8% vs 16.1% p = 0.02). After controlling for potential demographic and clinical confounders, LEP Latinos with language-concordant physicians had similar odds of poor glycemic control as Latino English speakers (OR 0.89; CI 0.53–1.49), whereas LEP Latinos with language-discordant physicians had greater odds of poor control than Latino English speakers (OR 1.76; CI 1.04–2.97). Among LEP Latinos, having a language discordant physician was associated with significantly poorer glycemic control (OR 1.98; CI 1.03–3.80). CONCLUSIONS Language barriers contribute to health disparities among Latinos with diabetes. Limited English proficiency is an independent

  20. Low glycemic index treatment for seizure control in Angelman syndrome: A case series from the Center for Dietary Therapy of Epilepsy at the Massachusetts General Hospital.

    PubMed

    Grocott, Olivia R; Herrington, Katherine S; Pfeifer, Heidi H; Thiele, Elizabeth A; Thibert, Ronald L

    2017-03-01

    The low glycemic index treatment, a dietary therapy that focuses on glycemic index and reduced carbohydrate intake, has been successful in reducing seizure frequency in the general epilepsy population. Epilepsy is a common feature of Angelman syndrome and seizures are often refractory to multiple medications, especially in those with maternal deletions. Dietary therapy has become a more frequently used option for treating epilepsy, often in combination with other antiepileptic drugs, due to its efficacy and favorable side effect profile. This study aimed to assess the effectiveness of the low glycemic index treatment for seizure control in Angelman syndrome. Through a retrospective medical record review of 23 subjects who utilized the low glycemic index treatment at the Clinic and Center for Dietary Therapy of Epilepsy at the Massachusetts General Hospital, we found that the high level of seizure control and favorable side effect profile make the low glycemic index treatment a viable treatment for seizures in Angelman syndrome. The majority of subjects in our cohort experienced some level of seizure reduction after initiating the diet, 5 (22%) maintained complete seizure freedom, 10 (43%) maintained seizure freedom except in the setting of illness or non-convulsive status epilepticus, 7 (30%) had a decrease in seizure frequency, and only 1 (4%) did not have enough information to determine seizure control post-initiation. The low glycemic index treatment monotherapy was successful for some subjects in our cohort but most subjects used an antiepileptic drug concurrently. Some subjects were able to maintain the same level of seizure control on a liberalized version of the low glycemic index treatment which included a larger amount of low glycemic carbohydrates. No correlation between the level of carbohydrate restriction and level of seizure control was found. Few subjects experienced side effects and those that did found them to be mild and easily treated. The

  1. Self-efficacy, self-care behaviors and glycemic control among type-2 diabetes patients attending two private clinics in Yangon, Myanmar.

    PubMed

    Wynn Nyunt, Sandhi; Howteerakul, Nopporn; Suwannapong, Nawarat; Rajatanun, Thitipat

    2010-07-01

    This cross-sectional study aimed to estimate the prevalence of glycemic control and its associated factors among type-2 diabetes patients attending two private clinics in Yangon, Myanmar. Two hundred sixty-six diabetes patients attending two private diabetes clinics in Yangon during February and March, 2009 were included in the study. The participants completed a structured questionnaire. HbA(1c) was used as the index for glycemic control. The prevalence of successful glycemic control (HbA(1c) < or =7%) was 27.1%. The median HbA(1c) value was 7.8%. About 62.0% of patients had high self-efficacy levels, and 30.8% had good self-care behavior. Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed four variables associated with glycemic control: age > or =60 years (OR 2.46, 95% CI 1.17-5.21), taking one oral hypoglycemic agent (OHA) (OR 2.56, 95% CI 1.26-5.19), being overweight (OR 2.01, 95% CI 1.02-3.95) and having a high self-efficacy level (OR 5.29, 95% CI 2.20-12.75). Interventions to increase diabetic patient self-efficacy levels and self-care behavior, especially related to diet and exercise, are needed to reduce poor glycemic control.

  2. The impact of knowledge about diabetes, resilience and depression on glycemic control: a cross-sectional study among adolescents and young adults with type 1 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study is to evaluate the relationship between glycemic control and the factors of knowledge about diabetes, resilience, depression and anxiety among Brazilian adolescents and young adults with type 1 diabetes. Methods This cross-sectional study included 85 adolescents and young adults with type 1 diabetes, aged between 11–22 years, with an average age of 17.7 ± 3.72 years. Glycemic control degree was evaluated through HbA1c. To assess psychosocial factors, the following questionnaires were used: resilience (Resilience Scale, RS) and anxiety and depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, HADS). The Diabetes Knowledge Assessment Scale (DKNA) was used to assess knowledge about diabetes. Results Significant correlations were found between HbA1c and resilience, anxiety and depression. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that the only variable which presented significant association with the value of HbA1c was depression. Conclusions Depression has a significant association with higher HbA1c levels, as demonstrated in a regression analysis. The results suggest that depression, anxiety and resilience should be considered in the design of a multidisciplinary approach to type 1 diabetes, as these factors were significantly correlated with glycemic control. Glycemic control was not correlated with knowledge of diabetes, suggesting that theoretical or practical understanding of this disease is not by itself significantly associated with appropriate glycemic control (HbA1c ≤ 7.5%). PMID:24289093

  3. Achieving optimal outcomes with all-zirconia crowns.

    PubMed

    Christensen, John Juel

    2014-01-01

    All-zirconia crowns are enjoying an unprecedented popularity. Dental laboratories are acquiring new equipment and adopting novel techniques, some of which require a learning curve. As a result, some crowns fabricated by computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing technology may come back to the dentist with unsatisfactory features. Dentists should carefully examine each crown under magnification prior to delivery to the patient. The dentist and dental laboratory should establish a close partnership with clear communication to yield the most favorable outcome for the patient.

  4. Earning the Stamp of Approval: How To Achieve Optimal Usability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Makar, Susan

    2003-01-01

    Describes the redesign of the Web site at the virtual library of the NIST (National Institute of Standards and Technology). Discusses usability problems with the original site, including navigation difficulties; focus groups to determine user needs; usability testing for the new Web site; and the importance of customer input. (LRW)

  5. Achieving closure at Fernald

    SciTech Connect

    Bradburne, John; Patton, Tisha C.

    2001-02-25

    When Fluor Fernald took over the management of the Fernald Environmental Management Project in 1992, the estimated closure date of the site was more than 25 years into the future. Fluor Fernald, in conjunction with DOE-Fernald, introduced the Accelerated Cleanup Plan, which was designed to substantially shorten that schedule and save taxpayers more than $3 billion. The management of Fluor Fernald believes there are three fundamental concerns that must be addressed by any contractor hoping to achieve closure of a site within the DOE complex. They are relationship management, resource management and contract management. Relationship management refers to the interaction between the site and local residents, regulators, union leadership, the workforce at large, the media, and any other interested stakeholder groups. Resource management is of course related to the effective administration of the site knowledge base and the skills of the workforce, the attraction and retention of qualified a nd competent technical personnel, and the best recognition and use of appropriate new technologies. Perhaps most importantly, resource management must also include a plan for survival in a flat-funding environment. Lastly, creative and disciplined contract management will be essential to effecting the closure of any DOE site. Fluor Fernald, together with DOE-Fernald, is breaking new ground in the closure arena, and ''business as usual'' has become a thing of the past. How Fluor Fernald has managed its work at the site over the last eight years, and how it will manage the new site closure contract in the future, will be an integral part of achieving successful closure at Fernald.

  6. The effect of moderate glycemic energy bar consumption on blood glucose and mood in dancers.

    PubMed

    Brown, Derrick; Wyon, Matthew

    2014-03-01

    Ingesting quality carbohydrates has been shown to be essential for dancers. Given that most dance classes take place in the morning, it has been recommended that dancers eat a well-balanced breakfast containing carbohydrates, fats, and protein as a means of fuelling this activity. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of a moderate glycemic index energy (MGI) bar or a fasting condition on dancers' blood glucose levels and perceived pleasure-displeasure response during the first dance class of the day. In a randomized counterbalanced design, 10 female preprofessional dance students took their regular scheduled contemporary dance class, on four separate occasions. On each occasion, they consumed either a commercially prepared carbohydrate (CHO)-dense energy bar (47.3 g CHO) or water (FAST). Plasma glucose responses and pleasure-displeasure affect were measured before and at two time points during the class. Dancers who consumed the MGI bar had significantly greater peak blood glucose levels at all time points than those who fasted (p<0.05). Regarding affective state measures, participants who had breakfast had significantly greater pleasure scores than those who only ingested water(p<0.05). In conclusion, results suggest that CHO with an MGI value positively impacts blood glucose concentrations during a dance class. Further, we conclude that skipping breakfast can have an unfavorable effect on the pleasure-displeasure state of dancers. These findings highlight the impact of breakfast on how one feels, as well as the physiological and metabolic benefits of CHO as an exogenous energy source in dancers.

  7. Sucralose Affects Glycemic and Hormonal Responses to an Oral Glucose Load

    PubMed Central

    Pepino, M. Yanina; Tiemann, Courtney D.; Patterson, Bruce W.; Wice, Burton M.; Klein, Samuel

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Nonnutritive sweeteners (NNS), such as sucralose, have been reported to have metabolic effects in animal models. However, the relevance of these findings to human subjects is not clear. We evaluated the acute effects of sucralose ingestion on the metabolic response to an oral glucose load in obese subjects. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Seventeen obese subjects (BMI 42.3 ± 1.6 kg/m2) who did not use NNS and were insulin sensitive (based on a homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance score ≤2.6) underwent a 5-h modified oral glucose tolerance test on two separate occasions preceded by consuming either sucralose (experimental condition) or water (control condition) 10 min before the glucose load in a randomized crossover design. Indices of β-cell function, insulin sensitivity (SI), and insulin clearance rates were estimated by using minimal models of glucose, insulin, and C-peptide kinetics. RESULTS Compared with the control condition, sucralose ingestion caused 1) a greater incremental increase in peak plasma glucose concentrations (4.2 ± 0.2 vs. 4.8 ± 0.3 mmol/L; P = 0.03), 2) a 20 ± 8% greater incremental increase in insulin area under the curve (AUC) (P < 0.03), 3) a 22 ± 7% greater peak insulin secretion rate (P < 0.02), 4) a 7 ± 4% decrease in insulin clearance (P = 0.04), and 5) a 23 ± 20% decrease in SI (P = 0.01). There were no significant differences between conditions in active glucagon-like peptide 1, glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide, glucagon incremental AUC, or indices of the sensitivity of the β-cell response to glucose. CONCLUSIONS These data demonstrate that sucralose affects the glycemic and insulin responses to an oral glucose load in obese people who do not normally consume NNS. PMID:23633524

  8. The Association of English Ability and Glycemic Control among Latinos with Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Baig, Arshiya A.; Locklin, Cara A.; Foley, Edward; Ewigman, Bernard; Meltzer, David O.; Huang, Elbert S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Language barriers may be significant contributors to diabetes disparities. We sought to assess the association of English speaking ability with glycemic control among Latinos with diabetes. Methods We analyzed 167 Latinos from a cross-sectional survey of adults with type 2 diabetes. The main outcome was HbA1c ≥7.0%. The main predictor was self-reported English speaking ability. Adjusted analyses accounted for age, gender, education, annual income, health insurance status, duration of diabetes, birth in the U.S., and years in the U.S. Results In unadjusted analyses, point estimates for the odds of having a high HbA1c revealed a U-shaped curve with English speaking ability. Those who spoke English very well (OR=2.32, 95% CI, 1.00–5.41) or not at all (OR=4.11, 95% CI 1.35–12.54) had higher odds of having an elevated HbA1c than those who spoke English well, although this was only statistically significant for those who spoke no English. In adjusted analyses, the U-shaped curve persisted with the highest odds among those who spoke English very well (OR=3.20, 95% CI 1.05–9.79) or not at all (OR 4.95, 95% CI 1.29–18.92). Conclusions The relationship between English speaking ability and diabetes management is more complex than previously described. Interventions aimed at improving diabetes outcomes may need to be tailored to specific subgroups within the Latino population. PMID:24620445

  9. The benefits of tight glycemic control in critical illness: Sweeter than assumed?

    PubMed

    Gardner, Andrew John

    2014-12-01

    Hyperglycemia has long been observed amongst critically ill patients and associated with increased mortality and morbidity. Tight glycemic control (TGC) is the clinical practice of controlling blood glucose (BG) down to the "normal" 4.4-6.1 mmol/L range of a healthy adult, aiming to avoid any potential deleterious effects of hyperglycemia. The ground-breaking Leuven trials reported a mortality benefit of approximately 10% when using this technique, which led many to endorse its benefits. In stark contrast, the multi-center normoglycemia in intensive care evaluation-survival using glucose algorithm regulation (NICE-SUGAR) trial, not only failed to replicate this outcome, but showed TGC appeared to be harmful. This review attempts to re-analyze the current literature and suggests that hope for a benefit from TGC should not be so hastily abandoned. Inconsistencies in study design make a like-for-like comparison of the Leuven and NICE-SUGAR trials challenging. Inadequate measures preventing hypoglycemic events are likely to have contributed to the increased mortality observed in the NICE-SUGAR treatment group. New technologies, including predictive models, are being developed to improve the safety of TGC, primarily by minimizing hypoglycemia. Intensive Care Units which are unequipped in trained staff and monitoring capacity would be unwise to attempt TGC, especially considering its yet undefined benefit and the deleterious nature of hypoglycemia. International recommendations now advise clinicians to ensure critically ill patients maintain a BG of <10 mmol/L. Despite encouraging evidence, currently we can only speculate and remain optimistic that the benefit of TGC in clinical practice is sweeter than assumed.

  10. Dietary fiber and the glycemic index: a background paper for the Nordic Nutrition Recommendations 2012

    PubMed Central

    Øverby, Nina Cecilie; Sonestedt, Emily; Laaksonen, David E.; Birgisdottir, Bryndis Eva

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to review recent data on dietary fiber (DF) and the glycemic index (GI), with special focus on studies from the Nordic countries regarding cardiometabolic risk factors, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, cancer, and total mortality. In this study, recent guidelines and scientific background papers or updates on older reports on DF and GI published between 2000 and 2011 from the US, EU, WHO, and the World Cancer Research Fund were reviewed, as well as prospective cohort and intervention studies carried out in the Nordic countries. All of the reports support the role for fiber-rich foods and DF as an important part of a healthy diet. All of the five identified Nordic papers found protective associations between high intake of DF and health outcomes; lower risk of cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, colorectal and breast cancer. None of the reports and few of the Nordic papers found clear evidence for the GI in prevention of risk factors or diseases in healthy populations, although association was found in sub-groups, e.g. overweight and obese individuals and suggestive for prevention of type 2 diabetes. It was concluded that DF is associated with decreased risk of different chronic diseases and metabolic conditions. There is not enough evidence that choosing foods with low GI will decrease the risk of chronic diseases in the population overall. However, there is suggestive evidence that ranking food based on their GI might be of use for overweight and obese individuals. Issues regarding methodology, validity and practicality of the GI remain to be clarified. PMID:23538683

  11. Use of a Uniform Treatment Algorithm Abolishes Racial Disparities in Glycemic Control

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Mary K.; Ziemer, David C.; Caudle, Jane; Kolm, Paul; Phillips, Lawrence S.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to compare glycemic control between blacks and whites in a setting where patient and provider behavior is assessed, and where a uniform treatment algorithm is used to guide care. Methods This observational cohort study was conducted in 3542 patients (3324 blacks, 218 whites) with type 2 diabetes with first and 1-year follow-up visits to a municipal diabetes clinic; a subset had 2-year follow-up. Patient adherence and provider management were determined. The primary endpoint was A1c. Results At presentation, A1c was higher in blacks than whites (8.9% vs 8.3%; P < .001), even after adjusting for demographic and clinical characteristics. During 1 year of follow-up, patient adherence to scheduled visits and medications was comparable in both groups, and providers intensified medications with comparable frequency and amount. After 1 year, A1c differences decreased but remained significant (7.7% vs 7.3%; P = .029), even in multivariable analysis (P = .003). However, after 2 years, A1c differences were no longer observed by univariate (7.6% vs 7.5%; P = .51) or multivariable analysis (P = .18). Conclusions Blacks have higher A1c than whites at presentation, but differences narrow after 1 year and disappear after 2 years of care in a setting where patient and provider behavior are comparable and that emphasizes uniform intensification of therapy. Presumably, racial disparities at presentation reflected prior inequalities in management. Use of uniform care algorithms nationwide should help to reduce disparities in diabetes outcomes. PMID:18669807

  12. Acute effects of dietary glycemic index on antioxidant capacity in a nutrient-controlled feeding study.

    PubMed

    Botero, Diego; Ebbeling, Cara B; Blumberg, Jeffrey B; Ribaya-Mercado, Judy D; Creager, Mark A; Swain, Janis F; Feldman, Henry A; Ludwig, David S

    2009-09-01

    Oxidative stress, caused by an imbalance between antioxidant capacity and reactive oxygen species, may be an early event in a metabolic cascade elicited by a high glycemic index (GI) diet, ultimately increasing the risk for cardiovascular disease and diabetes. We conducted a feeding study to evaluate the acute effects of low-GI compared with high-GI diets on oxidative stress and cardiovascular disease risk factors. The crossover study comprised two 10-day in-patient admissions to a clinical research center. For the admissions, 12 overweight or obese (BMI: 27-45 kg/m(2)) male subjects aged 18-35 years consumed low-GI or high-GI diets controlled for potentially confounding nutrients. On day 7, after an overnight fast and then during a 5-h postprandial period, we assessed total antioxidant capacity (total and perchloric acid (PCA) protein-precipitated plasma oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) assay) and oxidative stress status (urinary F(2alpha)-isoprostanes (F(2)IP)). On day 10, we measured cardiovascular disease risk factors. Under fasting conditions, total antioxidant capacity was significantly higher during the low-GI vs. high-GI diet based on total ORAC (11,736 +/- 668 vs. 10,381 +/- 612 micromol Trolox equivalents/l, P = 0.002) and PCA-ORAC (1,276 +/- 96 vs. 1,210 +/- 96 micromol Trolox equivalents/l, P = 0.02). Area under the postprandial response curve also differed significantly between the two diets for total ORAC and PCA-ORAC. No diet effects were observed for the other variables. Enhancement in plasma total antioxidant capacity occurs within 1 week on a low-GI diet, before changes in other risk factors, raising the possibility that this phenomenon may mediate, at least in part, the previously reported effects of GI on health.

  13. Comparative effects of energy restriction and resveratrol intake on glycemic control improvement.

    PubMed

    Milton-Laskibar, I; Aguirre, L; Macarulla, M T; Etxeberria, U; Milagro, F I; Martínez, J A; Contreras, J; Portillo, M P

    2017-02-20

    Resveratrol (RSV) has been proposed as an energy restriction mimetic. This study aimed to compare the effects of RSV and energy restriction on insulin resistance induced by an obesogenic diet. Any additive effect of both treatments was also analyzed. Rats were fed a high-fat high-sucrose diet for 6 weeks. They were then distributed in four experimental groups which were either fed a standard control diet (C), or treated with RSV (30 mg/kg/d), or submitted to energy restriction (R, 15%), or treated with RSV and submitted to energy restriction (RR). A glucose tolerance test was performed, and serum glucose, insulin, fructosamine, adiponectin, and leptin concentrations determined. Muscle triacylglycerol content and protein expression of insulin receptor (IRβ), protein kinase B (Akt), Akt substrate of 160 kDa (AS160) and glucose transporter 4 (GLUT-4) were measured. In RSV rats, fructosamine concentrations were reduced, HOMA-IR remained unchanged, but glucose tolerance was improved, without changes in phosphorylation of IRβ, Akt, and AS160 or in GLUT-4 protein expression. Rats under energy restriction showed an improvement in all the markers related to glycemic control, as well as increased phosphorylation of AS160 and protein expression of GLUT-4. In rats from RR group the results were similar to R group, with the exception of IRβ and Akt phosphorylation, which were increased. In conclusion, mild energy restriction is more efficient than intake of RSV within a standard balanced diet, and acts by means of a different mechanism from that of RSV. No additive effects between RSV and energy restriction were observed. © 2016 BioFactors, 2016.

  14. Change in food choices following a glycemic load intervention in adults with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Miller, Carla K; Gutshcall, Melissa Davis; Mitchell, Diane C

    2009-02-01

    The glycemic index (GI) reflects the postprandial glucose response of carbohydrate-containing foods, and adoption of a lower-GI diet may be beneficial in diabetes management. The purpose of this study was to evaluate change in food-group intake by participants after completing an intervention that included instruction about carbohydrate and the GI using a quasi-experimental design. Recruitment occurred from February to August 2005 and September to December 2006. Individuals 40 to 70 years old with type 2 diabetes for 1 year or longer were randomly assigned to an immediate (n=55) or delayed (n=48) treatment group. A 9-week group-based intervention regarding the quantity and type of carbohydrate for diabetes management was provided. Three sets of 24-hour dietary recalls were used to assess food-group intake. Foods were divided into nine main food groups and 166 subgroups based on the Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2005 and the United States Department of Agriculture's Food Guide Pyramid. Analysis of variance was used to examine between-group differences and paired t test compared maintenance of change for the immediate group. Change in dietary GI was significantly different between groups upon completion of the intervention by the immediate group (P<0.05). Participants consumed significantly more servings of whole fruit and nonfat dairy products following the intervention and fewer servings of vegetable fats (all P<0.05). Only whole-fruit consumption significantly declined in the immediate group during the maintenance period (P<0.05). Nutrition education can facilitate adoption of a lower-GI diet among free-living people with diabetes. Maintaining dietary change likely requires further intervention and support.

  15. Which Foods May Be Addictive? The Roles of Processing, Fat Content, and Glycemic Load

    PubMed Central

    Schulte, Erica M.; Avena, Nicole M.; Gearhardt, Ashley N.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We propose that highly processed foods share pharmacokinetic properties (e.g. concentrated dose, rapid rate of absorption) with drugs of abuse, due to the addition of fat and/or refined carbohydrates and the rapid rate the refined carbohydrates are absorbed into the system, indicated by glycemic load (GL). The current study provides preliminary evidence for the foods and food attributes implicated in addictive-like eating. Design Cross-sectional. Setting University (Study One) and community (Study Two). Participants 120 undergraduates participated in Study One and 384 participants recruited through Amazon MTurk participated in Study Two. Measurements In Study One, participants (n = 120) completed the Yale Food Addiction Scale (YFAS) followed by a forced-choice task to indicate which foods, out of 35 foods varying in nutritional composition, were most associated with addictive-like eating behaviors. Using the same 35 foods, Study Two utilized hierarchical linear modeling to investigate which food attributes (e.g., fat grams) were related to addictive-like eating behavior (at level one) and explored the influence of individual differences for this association (at level two). Results In Study One, processed foods, higher in fat and GL, were most frequently associated with addictive-like eating behaviors. In Study Two, processing was a large, positive predictor for whether a food was associated with problematic, addictive-like eating behaviors. BMI and YFAS symptom count were small-to-moderate, positive predictors for this association. In a separate model, fat and GL were large, positive predictors of problematic food ratings. YFAS symptom count was a small, positive predictor of the relationship between GL and food ratings. Conclusion The current study provides preliminary evidence that not all foods are equally implicated in addictive-like eating behavior, and highly processed foods, which may share characteristics with drugs of abuse (e.g. high dose

  16. Assessment of an educational intervention in the management of non-critical inpatient glycemic control.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Huelgas, R; Lopez-Carmona, M D; Jansen-Chaparro, S; Sobrino, B; Chaves, M; Martin-Gallardo, P; Garcia-Fernandez, C; Bernal-Lopez, M R

    2014-01-01

    In hospitalized diabetic patients, the recommended insulin therapy is basal bolus plus correction-dose regimen instead of sliding-scale insulin. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of the implementation of a new protocol based on basal bolus therapy on managing diabetes in a university hospital setting. We performed a cross-sectional study before and 12 months after a 4-month intervention period to implement a basal bolus regimen in hospitalized patients. Non-critical patients admitted into the hospital for at least 72 h were included. Changes in prescribing habits, glucose control and incidence of hypoglycemia were evaluated. An increase in the use of the new protocol and a decrease in sliding scale were observed after the intervention. In the pre-intervention group, a total of 59.2% glucose readings were between 70 and 180 mg/dL versus 57.1% after the intervention, without observing statistical differences. Significant reductions in hypoglycemia between pre- and post-intervention (13.04 vs. 4.08%, p = 0.0215) were observed. The percentage of hospitalized diabetic patients who had HbA1c was 10.43 and 4.08% in pre- and post-intervention phases, respectively. The protocol showed beneficial outcomes in terms of fewer hypoglycemia episodes and reflected a change in prescription habits, but it did not improve glycemic control. Furthermore, the percentage of patients who had an HbA1c test during their hospitalization remained very low after the intervention. This fact may seriously limit the correct management of hyperglycemia after the hospital discharge.

  17. EFFECT OF CHRONIC INGESTION OF WINE ON THE GLYCEMIC, LIPID AND BODY WEIGHT HOMEOSTASIS IN MICE

    PubMed Central

    de BRITO-FILHO, Sebastião Barreto; de MOURA, Egberto Gaspar; dos SANTOS, Orlando José; SAUAIA-FILHO, Euler Nicolau; AMORIM, Elias; SANTANA, Ewaldo Eder Carvalho; BARROS-FILHO, Allan Kardec Dualibe; SANTOS, Rennan Abud Pinheiro

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: The health benefits associated with moderate wine consumption, as with ethanol and phenolic compounds, include different mechanisms still little understandable. Aim: Evaluate glycemic and weight variations, and the deposit of triglycerides, cholesterol and liver glycogen with red wine consumption. Methods: 60 ApoE knockout mice were divided into three groups of 20: Wine Group (WG), Ethanol Group (EG) and Water Group (WAG). They received daily: WG 50 ml of wine and 50 ml water; EG 6 ml ethanol and WAG 94 ml of water. All groups were followed for four months. The food intake was monitored daily, in the period from eight to ten hours and held every five days. The measurement of water intake was also made every five days. The weighing of the animals took place every ten days. Results: The WG had higher weight increase as compared to the other groups. The concentration of hepatic triglyceride was higher in WG (57%) and the EG group was lower (31.6%, p<0.01) than the control. The concentration of cholesterol was lower in the WG (23.6%), as well as EG (24.5%, p<0.05). The concentration of glycogen was higher in WG (16%) and fasting blood glucose was higher in EG compared to the other groups but not both demonstrated a statistically significant difference. Conclusion: The WG increased triglyceride and WAG decreased cholesterol. The triglyceride may be increased due to the high caloric value of wine or some unknown property that led to significant increase in subcutaneous andretroperitoneal fat in mice. PMID:27759775

  18. High Dietary Glycemic Load is Associated With Increased Risk of Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zelenskiy, Svetlana; Thompson, Cheryl L.; Tucker, Thomas C.; Li, Li

    2014-01-01

    High dietary glycemic load (GL) has been inconsistently associated with risk of colon cancer. We analyzed data for 1,093 incident cases and 1,589 controls in a population-based case-control study of colon cancer to further clarify the GL-colon cancer relationship. GL was assessed using a self-administered food frequency questionnaire. Cases had a significantly higher GL intake (mean = 136.4, SD = 24.5) than controls (mean = 132.8, SD = 25.2) (P = 0.0003). In a multivariate unconditional logistic regression model, the odds ratios (ORs) for colon cancer increased significantly with increasing GL: compared to the bottom quartile of GL, the ORs (95% CI) for the 2nd through the upper quartiles were 1.38 (1.06, 1.80), 1.67 (1.30, 2.13), and 1.61 (1.25, 2.07), respectively (Ptrend < 0.0001). Stratified analyses showed that the association was more pronounced among older participants [ORs (95% CI) for the 2nd through the upper quartiles were 1.35 (0.91, 2.00), 1.87 (1.29, 2.71), 2.02 (1.39, 2.95), respectively] than among younger participants [ORs were 1.46 (1.02, 2.10), 1.53 (1.09, 2.15), and 1.35 (0.96, 1.91), respectively] (Pint = 0.02). Our results provide support for the hypothesis that a diet with high GL increases the risk of colon cancer. PMID:24611536

  19. Birth defects in pregestational diabetes: Defect range, glycemic threshold and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Gabbay-Benziv, Rinat; Reece, E Albert; Wang, Fang; Yang, Peixin

    2015-04-15

    Currently, 60 million women of reproductive age (18-44 years old) worldwide, and approximately 3 million American women have diabetes mellitus, and it has been estimated that this number will double by 2030. Pregestational diabetes mellitus (PGD) is a significant public health problem that increases the risk for structural birth defects affecting both maternal and neonatal pregnancy outcome. The most common types of human structural birth defects associated with PGD are congenital heart defects and central nervous system defects. However, diabetes can induce birth defects in any other fetal organ. In general, the rate of birth defects increases linearly with the degree of maternal hyperglycemia, which is the major factor that mediates teratogenicity of PGD. Stringent prenatal care and glycemic control are effective means to reduce birth defects in PGD pregnancies, but cannot reduce the incidence of birth defects to the rate of that is seen in the nondiabetic population. Studies in animal models have revealed that PGD induces oxidative stress, which activates cellular stress signalling leading to dysregulation of gene expression and excess apoptosis in the target organs, including the neural tube and embryonic heart. Activation of the apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1)-forkhead transcription factor 3a (FoxO3a)-caspase 8 pathway causes apoptosis in the developing neural tube leading to neural tube defects (NTDs). ASK1 activates the c-Jun-N-Terminal kinase 1/2 (JNK1/2), which leads to activation of the unfolded protein response and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Deletion of the ASK1 gene, the JNK1 gene, or the JNK2 gene, or inhibition of ER stress by 4-Phenylbutyric acid abrogates diabetes-induced apoptosis and reduces the formation of NTDs. Antioxidants, such as thioredoxin, which inhibits the ASK1-FoxO3a-caspase 8 pathway or ER stress inhibitors, may prevent PGD-induced birth defects.

  20. Smoking, Central Adiposity, and Poor Glycemic Control Increase Risk of Hearing Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Cruickshanks, Karen J.; Nondahl, David M.; Dalton, Dayna S.; Fischer, Mary E.; Klein, Barbara E.K.; Klein, Ronald; Nieto, F. Javier; Schubert, Carla R.; Tweed, Ted S.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To determine associations between smoking, adiposity, diabetes, and other cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors and the 15-yr incidence of hearing impairment (HI). Design The Epidemiology of Hearing Loss Study (EHLS) is a longitudinal population-based cohort study (1993–95 to 2009–2010). Setting Beaver Dam, WI. Participants Participants in the Beaver Dam Eye Study (1988–90; residents of Beaver Dam, WI ages 43–84 years in 1987–88) were eligible for the EHLS. There were 1925 participants with normal hearing at baseline. Measurements 15-year cumulative incidence of HI (pure-tone average (PTA) of hearing thresholds at 0.5, 1, 2 and 4 kHz > 25 decibels Hearing Level (dB HL) in either ear). Cigarette smoking, exercise, and other factors were ascertained by questionnaire. Blood pressure, waist circumference, body mass index and glycosylated hemoglobin were measured. Results Follow-up examinations (≥1) were obtained from 87.2% (n=1678; mean baseline age 61 years). The 15-year cumulative incidence of HI was 56.8%. Adjusting for age and sex, current smoking (Hazard Ratio (HR) =1.31, p=0.048), education (<16 yrs; HR=1.35, p=0.01), waist circumference (HR=1.08 per 10 cm, p=0.017), and poorly controlled diabetes (HR=2.03, p=0.048) were associated with increased risk of HI. Former smokers and people with better controlled diabetes were not at increased risk. Conclusion Smoking, central adiposity and poorly controlled diabetes predicted incident HI. These well-known CVD risk factors, suggest vascular changes may contribute to HI in aging. Interventions targeting reductions in smoking and adiposity, and improved glycemic control in people with diabetes, may help to prevent or delay the onset of HI. PMID:25953199