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Sample records for achieve optimum growth

  1. Electrodialysis simulation to achieve optimum current density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrmann, Cal C.

    1993-01-01

    Electrodialysis is used to remove salts from waste or other water streams, to yield a concentrated brine and a substatially deionized product water. During the electrodialysis process, the boundary layer adjacent to the ion selective membrane can become depleted of ions, resulting in severe pH changes sometimes accompanied by precipitation, and power losses, by a process known as water splitting. In order to optimize the applied electric current density, to achieve maximum deionization without exceeding the limiting current at any point along the path, a simulation program has been created to plot ion concentrations and fluxes, and cell current densities and voltages along the electrodialysis path. A means for tapering the current density along the path is recommended.

  2. Achieving optimum loop shapes in quaternary Pr-Co alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branagan, D. J.; Kramer, M. J.; Tang, Yali; McCallum, R. W.

    2000-05-01

    The magnetic properties and microstructures of a quaternary Pr-Co-Ti-C alloy were investigated. After heat treating at 800 °C, the quaternary alloy developed high coercivity (16.7 kOe) and high energy product (8.6 MGOe). Hysteretic loop shapes exhibiting single-phase magnetic character were achieved which was a problem which previously plagued development of Pr-Co alloys. The optimum microstructure contained 75-100 nm Pr1Co5 hard magnetic grains, 75-100 nm Pr1Co2 second phases, and <10 nm TiC grain boundary precipitates. The important factors in achieving optimum loop shapes in Pr-Co alloys were examined in detail.

  3. Nutritional requirements of the BY series of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains for optimum growth.

    PubMed

    Hanscho, Michael; Ruckerbauer, David E; Chauhan, Neha; Hofbauer, Harald F; Krahulec, Stefan; Nidetzky, Bernd; Kohlwein, Sepp D; Zanghellini, Juergen; Natter, Klaus

    2012-11-01

    Among the vast variety of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains, the BY family is particularly important because the widely used deletion collections are based on this background. Here we demonstrate that some standard growth media recipes require substantial modifications to provide optimum growth conditions for auxotrophic BY strains and to avoid growth arrest before glucose is depleted. In addition to the essential supplements that are required to satisfy auxotrophic requirements, we found the four amino acids phenylalanine, glutamic acid, serine, and threonine to be indispensable for optimum growth, despite the fact that BY is 'prototrophic' for these amino acids. Interestingly, other widely used S. cerevisiae strains, such as strains of the CEN.PK family, are less sensitive to lack of the described supplements. Furthermore, we found that the concentration of inositol in yeast nitrogen base is too low to support fast proliferation of yeast cultures until glucose is exhausted. Depletion of inositol during exponential growth induces characteristic changes, namely a decrease in glucose uptake and maximum specific growth rate, increased cell size, reduced viability, and accumulation of lipid storage pools. Thus, several of the existing growth media recipes need to be revised to achieve optimum growth conditions for BY-derived strains.

  4. The Growth Patterns of General Medical Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shen, Linjun

    This longitudinal study investigates the growth of medical achievement as a multilevel process and emphasizes the structure of the growth. Subjects were students in all 15 U.S. osteopathic medical schools, a total of 1,060 (78 percent of the 1987 osteopathic cohort). Students took appropriate portions of the National Board of Osteopathic Medical…

  5. Student Achievement and National Economic Growth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramirez, Francisco O.; Luo, Xiaowei; Schofer, Evan; Meyer, John W.

    2006-01-01

    Educational policy around the world has increasingly focused on improving aggregate student achievement as a means to increase economic growth. In the last two decades, attention has focused especially on the importance of achievement in science and mathematics. Yet, the policy commitments involved have not been based on research evidence. The…

  6. Mathematics Coursework Regulates Growth in Mathematics Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ma, Xin; Wilkins, Jesse L. M.

    2007-01-01

    Using data from the Longitudinal Study of American Youth (LSAY), we examined the extent to which students' mathematics coursework regulates (influences) the rate of growth in mathematics achievement during middle and high school. Graphical analysis showed that students who started middle school with higher achievement took individual mathematics…

  7. Optimum temperature for the growth performance of juvenile orange-spotted grouper ( Epinephelus coioides H.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Xiangzhi; Xie, Shouqi; Su, Yongquan; Cui, Yibo

    2008-02-01

    Effects of water temperature (17, 21, 25, 30 and 35°C) and body size (14.75-281.41 g initial body weight) on food consumption, growth, feed conversion, and dry matter content in orange-spotted grouper fed to satiation were investigated. The combined effect of temperature ( T, °C) and body weight ( W, g) on maximum food consumption ( C max, g/day) was described as: ln C max=-7.411+0.828 ln W+0.317 T-0.004 7 T 2, and the optimum feeding temperature was 33.9°C. The combined effect of temperature and body weight on growth ( G) was described as: ln G=-4.461-0.208ln W+0.394 T-0.006 3 T 2. The optimum growth temperature was 31.4°C, whereas overall growth rates were high at 25, 30 and 35 °C. Feed conversion efficiencies ( FCE, %), increasing first and then decreasing with increasing temperature, averaged from 1.8 to 2.1 in terms of dry weight of food fish. The optimum temperature for FCE tended to be lower than that for growth or feeding. Dry matter content increased with both increasing water temperature (17, 25, 30 and 35°C) and body weight, and the combined effect of temperature and body weight on dry matter content ( DM, %) was described as: ln DM=3.232+0.01 4 ln W-0.004 4 T+0.001 2 Tln W.

  8. Optimum temperature for growth and preferred temperatures of age-0 lake trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edsall, Thomas A.; Cleland, Joshua

    2000-01-01

    This study was performed to determine the thermal preferences and optimum temperature for growth of age-0 lake trout Salvelinus namaycush to help predict the thermal habitat they select when they leave the spawning grounds and to assess the risk posed to them in the Great Lakes by piscivorus, nonnative fishes whose thermal habitat preferences are known. The test fish were hatched in the laboratory from eggs taken from wild fish, acclimated to 5, 10, 15, and 18°C, and fed to excess with commercial trout food for 47 d. The test fish grew at all of the temperatures, and the specific growth rate was highest at about 12.5°C (3.8% wet body weight/d). Fish used in the growth study were also tested in a vertical thermal gradient tank and had a final thermal preferendum between 10.1°C and 10.2°C. These results, which generally agreed with those of an earlier laboratory study of the temperature preference of age-1 lake trout and the limited information on thermal habitat use by age-0 lake trout in the Great Lakes, indicated age-0 lake trout would tend to seek temperatures near 10°C, or as high as 12.5°C, during summer if food was abundant. Published information on thermal habitat use of age-1 and adult alewives Alosa pseudoharengus and rainbow smelt Osmerus mordax indicated they would be expected to co-occur with age-0 lake trout during much of the time when the lake trout were small enough to be eaten by these two introduced piscivores.

  9. Exploring optimum growth window for high quality InAs/GaInSb superlattice materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haugan, H. J.; Brown, G. J.; Kim, M.; Mahalingam, K.; Elhamri, S.; Mitchel, W. C.; Grazulis, L.

    2013-06-01

    We report ternary growth studies to develop a largely strained InAs/InGaSb superlattice (SL) material for very long wavelength infrared (VLWIR) detection. We select a SL structure of 47.0 Å InAs/21.5 Å In0.25Ga0.75Sb that theoretically designed for the greatest possible detectivity, and tune growth conditions for the best possible material quality. Since material quality of grown SLs is largely influenced by extrinsic defects such as nonradiative recombination centers and residual background dopings in the grown layers, we investigate the effect of growth temperature (Tg) on the spectral responses and charge carrier transports using photoconductivity and temperature-dependent Hall effect measurements. Results indicate that molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) growth process we developed produces a consistent gap near 50 meV within a range of few meV, but SL spectral sensing determined by photoresponse (PR) intensity is very sensitive to the minor changes in Tg. For the SLs grown from 390 to 470 °C, a PR signal gradually increases as Tg increases from 400 to 440 °C by reaching a maximum at 440 °C. Outside this growth window, the SL quality deteriorates very rapidly. All SLs grown for this study were n-type, but the mobility varied in a variety of range between 11,300 and 21 cm2/Vs. The mobility of the SL grown at 440 °C was approximately 10,000 V/cm2 with a sheet carrier concentration of 5 × 1011 cm-2, but the mobility precipitously dropped to 21 cm2/Vs at higher temperatures. Using the knowledge we learned from this growth set, other growth parameters for the MBE ternary SL growth should be further adjusted in order to achieve high performance of InAs/InGaSb materials suitable for VLWIR detection.

  10. Optimum scratch assay condition to evaluate connective tissue growth factor expression for anti-scar therapy.

    PubMed

    Moon, Heekyung; Yong, Hyeyoung; Lee, Ae-Ri Cho

    2012-02-01

    To evaluate a potential anti-scar therapy, we first need to have a reliable in vitro wound model to understand dermal fibroblast response upon cell injury and how cytokine levels are changed upon different wound heal phases. An in vitro wound model with different scratch assay conditions on primary human foreskin fibroblast monolayer cultures was prepared and cytokine levels and growth properties were evaluated with the aim of determining optimum injury conditions and observation time. Morphological characteristics of differently scratched fibroblasts from 0 to 36 h post injury (1 line, 2 lines and 3 lines) were investigated. The expression of connective tissue growth factor, CTGF, which is a key mediator in hyper-tropic scarring, and relative intensity of CTGF as a function of time were determined by western blot and gelatin Zymography. After injury (1 line), CTGF level was increased more than 2-fold within 1 h and continuously increased up to 3-fold at 6 h and was leveled down to reach normal value at 36 h, at which cell migration was complete. In more serious injury (2 lines), higher expression of CTGF was observed. The down regulation of CTGF expression after CTGF siRNA/lipofectamine transfection in control, 1 line and 2 lines scratch conditions were 40%, 75% and 55%, respectively. As a model anti-CTGF based therapy, CTGF siRNA with different ratios of linear polyethyleneimine (PEI) complexes (1:1, 1:5, 1:10, 1:20 and 1:30) were prepared and down-regulation efficacy of CTGF was evaluated with our optimized scratch assay, which is 1 line injury at 6 h post injury observation time. As the cationic linear PEI ratio increased, the down regulation efficacy was increased from 20% (1:20) to 55% (1:30). As CTGF level was increased to the highest at 6 h and leveled down afterwards, CTGF level at 6 h could provide the most sensitive response upon CTGF siRNA transfection. The scratch assay in the present study can be employed as a useful experimental tool to differentiate

  11. The Role of Academic Achievement Growth in School Track Recommendations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caro, Daniel H.; Lenkeit, Jenny; Lehmann, Rainer; Schwippert, Knut

    2009-01-01

    Students in Germany are tracked into different forms of secondary schooling based on teachers' recommendations. The literature shows that school tracking is largely affected by academic achievement levels, but neglects the influence of individual achievement growth. The authors used data from the Berlin study ELEMENT (N = 2242) to characterize…

  12. Documenting Reading Achievement and Growth for Students Taking Alternate Assessments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tindal, Gerald; Nese, Joseph F. T.; Farley, Dan; Saven, Jessica L.; Elliott, Stephen N.

    2016-01-01

    Students with disabilities have been included in state accountability systems for more than a decade; however, only in the past few years have alternate assessments of alternate achievement standards (AA-AAS) become stable enough to allow examination of these students' achievement growth. Using data from Oregon's AA-AAS in Reading during the…

  13. Parent involvement and science achievement: A latent growth curve analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Ursula Yvette

    This study examined science achievement growth across elementary and middle school and parent school involvement using the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study - Kindergarten Class of 1998--1999 (ECLS-K). The ECLS-K is a nationally representative kindergarten cohort of students from public and private schools who attended full-day or half-day kindergarten class in 1998--1999. The present study's sample (N = 8,070) was based on students that had a sampling weight available from the public-use data file. Students were assessed in science achievement at third, fifth, and eighth grades and parents of the students were surveyed at the same time points. Analyses using latent growth curve modeling with time invariant and varying covariates in an SEM framework revealed a positive relationship between science achievement and parent involvement at eighth grade. Furthermore, there were gender and racial/ethnic differences in parents' school involvement as a predictor of science achievement. Findings indicated that students with lower initial science achievement scores had a faster rate of growth across time. The achievement gap between low and high achievers in earth, space and life sciences lessened from elementary to middle school. Parents' involvement with school usually tapers off after elementary school, but due to parent school involvement being a significant predictor of eighth grade science achievement, later school involvement may need to be supported and better implemented in secondary schooling.

  14. Growth mindset tempers the effects of poverty on academic achievement.

    PubMed

    Claro, Susana; Paunesku, David; Dweck, Carol S

    2016-08-01

    Two largely separate bodies of empirical research have shown that academic achievement is influenced by structural factors, such as socioeconomic background, and psychological factors, such as students' beliefs about their abilities. In this research, we use a nationwide sample of high school students from Chile to investigate how these factors interact on a systemic level. Confirming prior research, we find that family income is a strong predictor of achievement. Extending prior research, we find that a growth mindset (the belief that intelligence is not fixed and can be developed) is a comparably strong predictor of achievement and that it exhibits a positive relationship with achievement across all of the socioeconomic strata in the country. Furthermore, we find that students from lower-income families were less likely to hold a growth mindset than their wealthier peers, but those who did hold a growth mindset were appreciably buffered against the deleterious effects of poverty on achievement: students in the lowest 10th percentile of family income who exhibited a growth mindset showed academic performance as high as that of fixed mindset students from the 80th income percentile. These results suggest that students' mindsets may temper or exacerbate the effects of economic disadvantage on a systemic level. PMID:27432947

  15. Growth mindset tempers the effects of poverty on academic achievement.

    PubMed

    Claro, Susana; Paunesku, David; Dweck, Carol S

    2016-08-01

    Two largely separate bodies of empirical research have shown that academic achievement is influenced by structural factors, such as socioeconomic background, and psychological factors, such as students' beliefs about their abilities. In this research, we use a nationwide sample of high school students from Chile to investigate how these factors interact on a systemic level. Confirming prior research, we find that family income is a strong predictor of achievement. Extending prior research, we find that a growth mindset (the belief that intelligence is not fixed and can be developed) is a comparably strong predictor of achievement and that it exhibits a positive relationship with achievement across all of the socioeconomic strata in the country. Furthermore, we find that students from lower-income families were less likely to hold a growth mindset than their wealthier peers, but those who did hold a growth mindset were appreciably buffered against the deleterious effects of poverty on achievement: students in the lowest 10th percentile of family income who exhibited a growth mindset showed academic performance as high as that of fixed mindset students from the 80th income percentile. These results suggest that students' mindsets may temper or exacerbate the effects of economic disadvantage on a systemic level.

  16. Effects of Teacher Professional Learning Activities on Student Achievement Growth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akiba, Motoko; Liang, Guodong

    2016-01-01

    The authors examined the effects of six types of teacher professional learning activities on student achievement growth over 4 years using statewide longitudinal survey data collected from 467 middle school mathematics teachers in 91 schools merged with 11,192 middle school students' mathematics scores in a standardized assessment in Missouri. The…

  17. Parent Involvement and Science Achievement: A Latent Growth Curve Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Ursula Yvette

    2011-01-01

    This study examined science achievement growth across elementary and middle school and parent school involvement using the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Kindergarten Class of 1998-1999 (ECLS-K). The ECLS-K is a nationally representative kindergarten cohort of students from public and private schools who attended full-day or half-day…

  18. Growth in Mathematics Achievement: Analysis with Classification and Regression Trees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ma, Xin

    2005-01-01

    A recently developed statistical technique, often referred to as classification and regression trees (CART), holds great potential for researchers to discover how student-level (and school-level) characteristics interactively affect growth in mathematics achievement. CART is a host of advanced statistical methods that statistically cluster…

  19. Oil in the economic development of Nigeria (optimum utilization of oil revenues in economic growth)

    SciTech Connect

    Nnaji, G.I.

    1987-01-01

    Nigeria's economy experienced stunted growth in 1973-84 period in spite of the huge inflow of oil revenues. This dissertation addresses the issue of optimal utilization of oil revenues to promote Nigeria's economic growth. The study begins by reviewing the behavior of the oil market and the experiences of some industrialized oil-exporting countries (Netherlands, Britain and Norway), focusing on the general problems of managing oil income. Drawing from above experiences, it examines the general performance of Nigeria's economy in 1973-84 period. Evidences of retarded economic growth, rising inflation, unemployment, and massive imports, all suggest Nigeria's inability to expand its productive capacity, and inefficient utilization of oil income. To address the above problem, a dynamic optimization model is developed showing the optimal conditions for allocating oil revenues to different uses. Most of the findings are consistent with stylized facts about the economony, but specifically raise issues about the tight structure of production and its consequences, rising unemployment, low marginal propensity to save from non-oil income and dependence on oil revenues.

  20. Standardization of doctoral study in agricultural and extension education: is the field of study mature enough for achievement of the optimum degree of order?

    PubMed

    Briers, G E; Lindner, J R; Shinn, G C; Wingenbach, G W; Baker, M T

    2010-01-01

    Agricultural and extension education--or some derivative name--is a field of study leading to the doctoral degree in universities around the world. Is there are body of knowledge or a taxonomy of the knowledge--e.g., a knowledge domain--that one should possess with a doctorate in agricultural and extension education? The purpose of this paper was to synthesize the work of researchers who attempted to define the field of study, with a taxonomy comprising the knowledge domains (standards) and knowledge objects--structured interrelated sets of data, knowledge, and wisdom--of the field of study. Doctoral study in agricultural and extension education needs a document that provides for rules and guidelines--rules and guidelines that in turn provide for common and repeated use--all leading to achievement of an optimum degree of order in the context of academic, scholarly, and professional practice in agricultural and extension education. Thus, one would know in broad categories the knowledge, skills, and abilities possessed by one who holds a doctoral degree in agricultural and extension education. That is, there would exist a standard for doctoral degrees in agricultural and extension education. A content analysis of three previous attempts to categorize knowledge in agricultural and extension education served as the primary technique to create a new taxonomy--or to confirm an existing taxonomy--for doctoral study in agricultural and extension education. The following coalesced as nine essential knowledge domains for a doctorate in agricultural and extension education: (1) history, philosophy, ethics, and policy; (2) agricultural/rural development; (3) organizational development and change management; (4) planning, needs assessment, and evaluation; (5) learning theory; (6) curriculum development and instructional design; (7) teaching methods and delivery strategies; (8) research methods and tools; and, (9) scholarship and communications.

  1. Differential Growth Trajectories for Achievement among Children Retained in First Grade: A Growth Mixture Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Qi; Hughes, Jan N.; Kwok, Oi-Man

    2014-01-01

    The authors investigated the differential effect of retention on the development of academic achievement from grades 1 to 5 on children retained in grade 1 over 6 years. Growth mixture model (GMM) analyses supported the existence of two distinct trajectory groups of retained children for both reading and math among 125 ethnically and…

  2. Incorporating Student Mobility in Achievement Growth Modeling: A Cross-Classified Multiple Membership Growth Curve Model.

    PubMed

    Grady, Matthew W; Beretvas, S Natasha

    2010-05-28

    Multiple membership random effects models (MMREMs) have been developed for use in situations where individuals are members of multiple higher level organizational units. Despite their availability and the frequency with which multiple membership structures are encountered, no studies have extended the MMREM approach to hierarchical growth curve modeling (GCM). This study introduces a cross-classified multiple membership growth curve model (CCMM-GCM) for modeling, for example, academic achievement trajectories in the presence of student mobility. Real data are used to demonstrate and compare growth curve model estimates using the CCMM-GCM and a conventional GCM that ignores student mobility. Results indicate that the CCMM-GCM represents a promising option for modeling growth for multiple membership data structures.

  3. Seasonal Variation in Shell Calcification of Planktonic Foraminifera in the NE Atlantic Reveals Species-Specific Response to Temperature, Productivity, and Optimum Growth Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Weinkauf, Manuel F. G.; Kunze, José G.; Waniek, Joanna J.; Kučera, Michal

    2016-01-01

    Using shells collected from a sediment trap series in the Madeira Basin, we investigate the effects of seasonal variation of temperature, productivity, and optimum growth conditions on calcification in three species of planktonic Foraminifera. The series covers an entire seasonal cycle and reflects conditions at the edge of the distribution of the studied species, manifesting more suitable growth conditions during different parts of the year. The seasonal variation in seawater carbonate saturation at the studied site is negligible compared to other oceanic regions, allowing us to assess the effect of parameters other than carbonate saturation. Shell calcification is quantified using weight and size of individual shells. The size–weight scaling within each species is robust against changes in environmental parameters, but differs among species. An analysis of the variation in calcification intensity (size-normalized weight) reveals species-specific response patterns. In Globigerinoides ruber (white) and Globigerinoides elongatus, calcification intensity is correlated with temperature (positive) and productivity (negative), whilst in Globigerina bulloides no environmental forcing is observed. The size–weight scaling, calcification intensity, and response of calcification intensity to environmental change differed between G. ruber (white) and G. elongatus, implying that patterns extracted from pooled analyses of these species may reflect their changing proportions in the samples. Using shell flux as a measure of optimum growth conditions, we observe significant positive correlation with calcification intensity in G. elongatus, but negative correlation in G. bulloides. The lack of a consistent response of calcification intensity to optimum growth conditions is mirrored by the results of shell size analyses. We conclude that calcification intensity in planktonic Foraminifera is affected by factors other than carbonate saturation. These factors include temperature

  4. Seasonal Variation in Shell Calcification of Planktonic Foraminifera in the NE Atlantic Reveals Species-Specific Response to Temperature, Productivity, and Optimum Growth Conditions.

    PubMed

    Weinkauf, Manuel F G; Kunze, José G; Waniek, Joanna J; Kučera, Michal

    2016-01-01

    Using shells collected from a sediment trap series in the Madeira Basin, we investigate the effects of seasonal variation of temperature, productivity, and optimum growth conditions on calcification in three species of planktonic Foraminifera. The series covers an entire seasonal cycle and reflects conditions at the edge of the distribution of the studied species, manifesting more suitable growth conditions during different parts of the year. The seasonal variation in seawater carbonate saturation at the studied site is negligible compared to other oceanic regions, allowing us to assess the effect of parameters other than carbonate saturation. Shell calcification is quantified using weight and size of individual shells. The size-weight scaling within each species is robust against changes in environmental parameters, but differs among species. An analysis of the variation in calcification intensity (size-normalized weight) reveals species-specific response patterns. In Globigerinoides ruber (white) and Globigerinoides elongatus, calcification intensity is correlated with temperature (positive) and productivity (negative), whilst in Globigerina bulloides no environmental forcing is observed. The size-weight scaling, calcification intensity, and response of calcification intensity to environmental change differed between G. ruber (white) and G. elongatus, implying that patterns extracted from pooled analyses of these species may reflect their changing proportions in the samples. Using shell flux as a measure of optimum growth conditions, we observe significant positive correlation with calcification intensity in G. elongatus, but negative correlation in G. bulloides. The lack of a consistent response of calcification intensity to optimum growth conditions is mirrored by the results of shell size analyses. We conclude that calcification intensity in planktonic Foraminifera is affected by factors other than carbonate saturation. These factors include temperature

  5. Seasonal Variation in Shell Calcification of Planktonic Foraminifera in the NE Atlantic Reveals Species-Specific Response to Temperature, Productivity, and Optimum Growth Conditions.

    PubMed

    Weinkauf, Manuel F G; Kunze, José G; Waniek, Joanna J; Kučera, Michal

    2016-01-01

    Using shells collected from a sediment trap series in the Madeira Basin, we investigate the effects of seasonal variation of temperature, productivity, and optimum growth conditions on calcification in three species of planktonic Foraminifera. The series covers an entire seasonal cycle and reflects conditions at the edge of the distribution of the studied species, manifesting more suitable growth conditions during different parts of the year. The seasonal variation in seawater carbonate saturation at the studied site is negligible compared to other oceanic regions, allowing us to assess the effect of parameters other than carbonate saturation. Shell calcification is quantified using weight and size of individual shells. The size-weight scaling within each species is robust against changes in environmental parameters, but differs among species. An analysis of the variation in calcification intensity (size-normalized weight) reveals species-specific response patterns. In Globigerinoides ruber (white) and Globigerinoides elongatus, calcification intensity is correlated with temperature (positive) and productivity (negative), whilst in Globigerina bulloides no environmental forcing is observed. The size-weight scaling, calcification intensity, and response of calcification intensity to environmental change differed between G. ruber (white) and G. elongatus, implying that patterns extracted from pooled analyses of these species may reflect their changing proportions in the samples. Using shell flux as a measure of optimum growth conditions, we observe significant positive correlation with calcification intensity in G. elongatus, but negative correlation in G. bulloides. The lack of a consistent response of calcification intensity to optimum growth conditions is mirrored by the results of shell size analyses. We conclude that calcification intensity in planktonic Foraminifera is affected by factors other than carbonate saturation. These factors include temperature

  6. Achievement Gaps: An Examination of Differences in Student Achievement and Growth. The Full Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCall, Martha S.; Hauser, Carl; Cronin, John; Kingsbury, G. Gage; Houser, Ronald

    2006-01-01

    The difference between the academic performance of poor students and wealthier students and between minority students and their non-minority peers is commonly known as the achievement gap. The current study examines the achievement gap using a large sample of students from a wide variety of school districts across the United States. It examines…

  7. The Impact of Linking Distinct Achievement Test Scores on the Interpretation of Student Growth in Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Airola, Denise Tobin

    2011-01-01

    Changes to state tests impact the ability of State Education Agencies (SEAs) to monitor change in performance over time. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the Standardized Performance Growth Index (PGIz), a proposed statistical model for measuring change in student and school performance, across transitions in tests. The PGIz is a…

  8. Growth and gaps in mathematics achievement of students with and without disabilities on a statewide achievement test.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Joseph J; Schulte, Ann C; Elliott, Stephen N; Nese, Joseph F T; Tindal, Gerald

    2015-02-01

    This study estimated mathematics achievement growth trajectories in a statewide sample of 92,045 students with and without disabilities over Grades 3 to 7. Students with disabilities (SWDs) were identified in seven exceptionality categories. Students without disabilities (SWoDs) were categorized as General Education (GE) or Academically/Intellectually Gifted (AIG). Students in all groups showed significant growth that decelerated over grades as well as significant variability in achievement by student group, both at the initial assessment in Grade 3 and in rates of growth over time. Race/ethnicity, gender, parental education, free/reduced lunch status, and English language proficiency were also significant predictors of achievement. Effect size estimates showed substantial year-to-year growth that decreased over grades. Sizeable achievement gaps that were relatively stable over grades were observed between SWoDs and students in specific exceptionality categories. Our study also demonstrated the importance of statistically controlling for variation related to student demographic characteristics. Additional research is needed that expands on these results with the same and additional exceptionality groups. PMID:25636260

  9. Growth and gaps in mathematics achievement of students with and without disabilities on a statewide achievement test.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Joseph J; Schulte, Ann C; Elliott, Stephen N; Nese, Joseph F T; Tindal, Gerald

    2015-02-01

    This study estimated mathematics achievement growth trajectories in a statewide sample of 92,045 students with and without disabilities over Grades 3 to 7. Students with disabilities (SWDs) were identified in seven exceptionality categories. Students without disabilities (SWoDs) were categorized as General Education (GE) or Academically/Intellectually Gifted (AIG). Students in all groups showed significant growth that decelerated over grades as well as significant variability in achievement by student group, both at the initial assessment in Grade 3 and in rates of growth over time. Race/ethnicity, gender, parental education, free/reduced lunch status, and English language proficiency were also significant predictors of achievement. Effect size estimates showed substantial year-to-year growth that decreased over grades. Sizeable achievement gaps that were relatively stable over grades were observed between SWoDs and students in specific exceptionality categories. Our study also demonstrated the importance of statistically controlling for variation related to student demographic characteristics. Additional research is needed that expands on these results with the same and additional exceptionality groups.

  10. Determination of radial growth rate of colonies of Sclerotium rolfsii F-6656 for the evaluation of culture medium, optimum incubation temperature, osmo- and halotolerance.

    PubMed

    Fariña, J I; Siñeriz, F; Molina, O E; Perotti, N I

    1996-01-01

    The measurement of the colony radial growth rate (Kr) on solid medium of colonies of Sclerotium rolfsii Proimi F-6656 for the evaluation of scleroglucan production medium and other different media, incubation temperature and tolerance to diverse concentrations of sucrose and NaCl were studied. The optimum growth temperature observed was 30 degrees C. The Kr value reached on the Production Medium used (0.66 mm.h-1) showed no differences compared with those of the other media tested, indicating that all the requirements for growth were provided. Poor growth was only observed on Soil Extract Agar. The fungus tolerated concentrations of sucrose from 0.15 to 1.17 M, on both Czapek and production medium. Growth was limited by the highest concentrations of sucrose tested (0.88 and 1.17 M), as indicated by a slower increase in colony size. Addition of 0.86 M NaCl to the production medium and YM agar did not inhibit growth completely, but decreased the radial growth rate considerably (80 and 70% respectively). PMID:9017854

  11. An optimum world population.

    PubMed

    Willey, D

    2000-01-01

    The optimum population of the world is the one that is most likely to make the option of a good quality of life available to everyone everywhere, both now and in the future. Establishing a consensus about the size of such a population would be an important step towards achieving it. Estimates of an optimum involve three main steps. First, estimate the maximum (carrying capacity) assuming a specified lifestyle. The main criteria are the maintenance of biodiversity, the availability of freshwater, and the availability of land--for agriculture, forestry and artificial systems but above all for the conversion of energy. (In applying the criteria, there are always two questions to ask: 'What is the maximum amount of consumption that the biosphere can stand?' and 'What is an adequate share of such consumption per person?') Second, convert the maximum (two to three billion) into an optimum by applying a far wider range of criteria, including personal liberty, mobility, recreation and political representation. Third, consider just two criteria (economies of scale and technological innovation) in order to ensure that the optimum (one to two billion) has not fallen below the minimum (half to one billion). The estimates are so low because of the need for a huge increase in median per capita consumption if everyone is to have the option of an adequate material standard of living. Opinion-formers are likely not to take much notice of such estimates, but it is probable that minds will be concentrated by an energy shock some time during the next decade. Achieving an optimum world population will not solve the world's major problems, but it would make them solvable. PMID:10824524

  12. Achieving and documenting closure in plant growth facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knott, W. M.; Sager, John C.; Wheeler, Ray

    1992-01-01

    As NASA proceeds with its effort to develop a Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) that will provide life support to crews during long duration space missions, it must address the question of facility and system closure. The concept of closure as it pertains to CELSS and engineering specifications, construction problems and monitoring procedures used in the development and operation of a closed plant growth facility for the CELSS program are described. A plant growth facility is one of several modules required for a CELSS. A prototype of this module at Kennedy Space Center is the large (7m tall x 3.5m diameter) Biomass Production Chamber (BPC), the central facility of the CELSS Breadboard Project. The BPC is atmospherically sealed to a leak rate of approximately 5 percent of its total volume per 24 hours. This paper will discuss the requirements for atmospheric closure in the facility, present CO2 and trace gas data from initial tests of the BPC with and without plants, and describe how the chamber was sealed atmospherically. Implications that research conducted in this type of facility will have for the CELSS program are discussed.

  13. Exploring Gains in Reading and Mathematics Achievement among Regular and Exceptional Students Using Growth Curve Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shin, Tacksoo; Davison, Mark L.; Long, Jeffrey D.; Chan, Chi-Keung; Heistad, David

    2013-01-01

    Using four-wave longitudinal reading and mathematics data (4th to 7th grades) from a large urban school district, growth curve modeling was used as a tool for examining three research questions: Are achievement gaps closing in reading and mathematics? What are the associations between prior-achievement and growth across the reading and mathematics…

  14. Once, Sometimes, or Always in Special Education: Mathematics Growth and Achievement Gaps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schulte, Ann C.; Stevens, Joseph J.

    2015-01-01

    This study used a statewide longitudinal sample to examine mathematics achievement gaps and growth in students with and without disabilities and to examine the impact of different methods of determining disability group membership on achievement gaps and growth. When disability status was determined on the basis of special education placement each…

  15. High-Achieving and Average Students' Reading Growth: Contrasting School and Summer Trajectories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rambo-Hernandez, Karen E.; McCoach, D. Betsy

    2015-01-01

    Much is unknown about how initially high-achieving students grow academically, especially given the measurement issues inherent in assessing growth for the highest performing students. This study compared initially high-achieving and average students' growth in reading (in a cohort of third-grade students from 2,000 schools) over 3 years.…

  16. Growth and Achievement Trends of Advanced Placement (AP) Exams in American High Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Judson, Eugene; Hobson, Angela

    2015-01-01

    This exploratory study examined and compared overall trends in growth and student achievement of the Advanced Placement (AP) program. Using data from the past two decades, analyses indicated there has been steady and extensive growth of AP participation, particularly among underclassmen and some minority groups. However, overall achievement, as…

  17. Optimum connection management scheduling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadar, Ivan

    2000-08-01

    Connection Management plays a key role in both distributed 'local' network-centric and 'globally' connected info- centric systems. The role of Connection Management is to provide seamless demand-based sharing of the information products. For optimum distributed information fusion performance, these systems must minimize communications delays and maximize message throughput, and at the same time take into account relative-sensors-targets geometrical constraints and data pedigree. In order to achieve overall distributed 'network' effectiveness, these systems must be adaptive, and be able to distribute data s needed in real- time. A system concept will be described which provides optimum capacity-based information scheduling. A specific example, based on a satellite channel, is used to illustrate simulated performance results and their effects on fusion systems performance.

  18. The niacin required for optimum growth can be synthesized from L-tryptophan in growing mice lacking tryptophan-2,3-dioxygenase.

    PubMed

    Terakata, Miki; Fukuwatari, Tsutomu; Kadota, Eri; Sano, Mitsue; Kanai, Masaaki; Nakamura, Toshikazu; Funakoshi, Hiroshi; Shibata, Katsumi

    2013-07-01

    In mammals, nicotinamide (Nam) is biosynthesized from l-tryptophan (l-Trp). The enzymes involved in the initial step of the l-Trp→Nam pathway are l-Trp-2,3-dioxygenase (TDO) and indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase (IDO). We aimed to determine whether tdo-knockout (tdo(-/-)) mice fed a diet without preformed niacin can synthesize enough Nam to sustain optimum growth. Wild-type (WT) and tdo(-/-) mice were fed a chemically defined 20% casein diet with or without preformed niacin (30 mg nicotinic acid/kg) for 28 d. Body weight, food intake, and liver NAD concentrations did not differ among the groups. In the groups of mice fed the niacin-free diet, urinary concentrations of the upstream metabolites kynurenine (320% increase, P < 0.0001), kynurenic acid (270% increase, P < 0.0001), xanthurenic acid (770% increase, P < 0.0001), and 3-hydroxyanthranilic acid (3-HA; 450% increase, P < 0.0001) were higher in the tdo(-/-) mice than in the WT mice, while urinary concentrations of the downstream metabolite quinolinic acid (QA; 50% less, P = 0.0010) and the sum of Nam and its catabolites (10% less, P < 0.0001) were lower in the tdo(-/-) mice than in the WT mice. These findings show that the kynurenine formed in extrahepatic tissues by IDO and subsequent enzymes can be metabolized up to 3-HA, but not into QA. However, the tdo(-/-) mice sustained optimum growth even when fed the niacin-free diet for 1 mo, suggesting they can synthesize the minimum necessary amount of Nam from l-Trp, because the liver can import blood kynurenine formed in extrahepatic tissues and metabolize it into Nam via NAD and the resulting Nam is then distributed back into extrahepatic tissues.

  19. Effects of Above-Optimum Growth Temperature and Cell Morphology on Thermotolerance of Listeria monocytogenes Cells Suspended in Bovine Milk

    PubMed Central

    Rowan, Neil J.; Anderson, John G.

    1998-01-01

    The thermotolerances of two different cell forms of Listeria monocytogenes (serotype 4b) grown at 37 and 42.8°C in commercially pasteurized and laboratory-tyndallized whole milk (WM) were investigated. Test strains, after growth at 37 or 42.8°C, were suspended in WM at concentrations of approximately 1.5 × 108 to 3.0 × 108 cells/ml and were then heated at 56, 60, and 63°C for various exposure times. Survival was determined by enumeration on tryptone-soya-yeast extract agar and Listeria selective agar, and D values (decimal reduction times) and Z values (numbers of degrees Celsius required to cause a 10-fold change in the D value) were calculated. Higher average recovery and higher D values (i.e., seen as a 2.5- to 3-fold increase in thermotolerance) were obtained when cells were grown at 42.8°C prior to heat treatment. A relationship was observed between thermotolerance and cell morphology of L. monocytogenes. Atypical Listeria cell types (consisting predominantly of long cell chains measuring up to 60 μm in length) associated with rough (R) culture variants were shown to be 1.2-fold more thermotolerant than the typical dispersed cell form associated with normal smooth (S) cultures (P ≤ 0.001). The thermal death-time (TDT) curves of R-cell forms contained a tail section in addition to the shoulder section characteristic of TDT curves of normal single to paired cells (i.e., S form). The factors shown to influence the thermoresistance of suspended Listeria cells (P ≤ 0.001) were as follows: growth and heating temperatures, type of plating medium, recovery method, and cell morphology. Regression analysis of nonlinear data can underestimate survival of L. monocytogenes; the end point recovery method was shown to be a better method for determining thermotolerance because it takes both shoulders and tails into consideration. Despite their enhanced heat resistance, atypical R-cell forms of L. monocytogenes were unable to survive the low-temperature, long

  20. ''Optimum productivity'': a geneticist's view

    SciTech Connect

    Libby, W.J.

    1980-01-01

    Both ''optimum'' and ''productivity'' are explored in a social context with a long time dimension. Renewability, flexibility, and diversity are important concepts in long-term planning to achieve optimum productivity. Various possible genetic contributions, including complementary clones, quantitative genetic engineering, resistant trees and plantations, elimination of inbreeding, single-gene genetic engineering, and agri-forestry, are suggested for long-term sustained or increased productivity.

  1. Parent Involvement and Science Achievement: A Cross-Classified Multilevel Latent Growth Curve Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Ursula Y.; Hull, Darrell M.

    2014-01-01

    The authors examined science achievement growth at Grades 3, 5, and 8 and parent school involvement at the same time points using the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Kindergarten Class of 1998-1999. Data were analyzed using cross-classified multilevel latent growth curve modeling with time invariant and varying covariates. School-based…

  2. Promising Practices in Professional Growth & Support: "Case Study of Achievement First"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Resource Strategies, 2013

    2013-01-01

    Four organizations with promising practices in teacher Professional Growth & Support have significantly raised outcomes for low-income students. The charter management networks, Achievement First and Aspire Public Schools, and the two reform organizations, Teach Plus and Agile Mind, have successfully increased student achievement with a…

  3. The Groove of Growth: How Early Gains in Math Ability Influence Adolescent Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watts, Tyler W.; Duncan, Greg J.; Siegler, Robert S.; Davis-Kean, Pamela E.

    2014-01-01

    A number of studies, both small scale and of nationally-representative student samples, have reported substantial associations between school entry math ability and later elementary school achievement. However, questions remain regarding the persistence of the association between early growth in math ability and later math achievement due to the…

  4. Reading and math achievement profiles and longitudinal growth trajectories of children with an autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xin; Christiano, Elizabeth R A; Yu, Jennifer W; Wagner, Mary; Spiker, Donna

    2015-02-01

    This study examined the reading and math achievement profiles and longitudinal growth trajectories of a nationally representative sample of children ages 6 through 9 with an autism spectrum disorder. Four distinct achievement profiles were identified: higher-achieving (39%), hyperlexia (9%), hypercalculia (20%) and lower-achieving (32%). Children with hypercalculia and lower-achieving profiles were more likely to be from low socioeconomic families and had lower functional cognitive skills than the higher-achieving profile. All four profiles lost ground in passage comprehension over time. Slower improvement occurred for the higher-achieving group on letter-word identification, the hyperlexia group on conversation abilities and the hypercalculia group on calculation and functional cognitive skills relative to the lower-achieving group.

  5. Predictors of early growth in academic achievement: the head-toes-knees-shoulders task

    PubMed Central

    McClelland, Megan M.; Cameron, Claire E.; Duncan, Robert; Bowles, Ryan P.; Acock, Alan C.; Miao, Alicia; Pratt, Megan E.

    2014-01-01

    Children's behavioral self-regulation and executive function (EF; including attentional or cognitive flexibility, working memory, and inhibitory control) are strong predictors of academic achievement. The present study examined the psychometric properties of a measure of behavioral self-regulation called the Head-Toes-Knees-Shoulders (HTKS) by assessing construct validity, including relations to EF measures, and predictive validity to academic achievement growth between prekindergarten and kindergarten. In the fall and spring of prekindergarten and kindergarten, 208 children (51% enrolled in Head Start) were assessed on the HTKS, measures of cognitive flexibility, working memory (WM), and inhibitory control, and measures of emergent literacy, mathematics, and vocabulary. For construct validity, the HTKS was significantly related to cognitive flexibility, working memory, and inhibitory control in prekindergarten and kindergarten. For predictive validity in prekindergarten, a random effects model indicated that the HTKS significantly predicted growth in mathematics, whereas a cognitive flexibility task significantly predicted growth in mathematics and vocabulary. In kindergarten, the HTKS was the only measure to significantly predict growth in all academic outcomes. An alternative conservative analytical approach, a fixed effects analysis (FEA) model, also indicated that growth in both the HTKS and measures of EF significantly predicted growth in mathematics over four time points between prekindergarten and kindergarten. Results demonstrate that the HTKS involves cognitive flexibility, working memory, and inhibitory control, and is substantively implicated in early achievement, with the strongest relations found for growth in achievement during kindergarten and associations with emergent mathematics. PMID:25071619

  6. Predictors of early growth in academic achievement: the head-toes-knees-shoulders task.

    PubMed

    McClelland, Megan M; Cameron, Claire E; Duncan, Robert; Bowles, Ryan P; Acock, Alan C; Miao, Alicia; Pratt, Megan E

    2014-01-01

    Children's behavioral self-regulation and executive function (EF; including attentional or cognitive flexibility, working memory, and inhibitory control) are strong predictors of academic achievement. The present study examined the psychometric properties of a measure of behavioral self-regulation called the Head-Toes-Knees-Shoulders (HTKS) by assessing construct validity, including relations to EF measures, and predictive validity to academic achievement growth between prekindergarten and kindergarten. In the fall and spring of prekindergarten and kindergarten, 208 children (51% enrolled in Head Start) were assessed on the HTKS, measures of cognitive flexibility, working memory (WM), and inhibitory control, and measures of emergent literacy, mathematics, and vocabulary. For construct validity, the HTKS was significantly related to cognitive flexibility, working memory, and inhibitory control in prekindergarten and kindergarten. For predictive validity in prekindergarten, a random effects model indicated that the HTKS significantly predicted growth in mathematics, whereas a cognitive flexibility task significantly predicted growth in mathematics and vocabulary. In kindergarten, the HTKS was the only measure to significantly predict growth in all academic outcomes. An alternative conservative analytical approach, a fixed effects analysis (FEA) model, also indicated that growth in both the HTKS and measures of EF significantly predicted growth in mathematics over four time points between prekindergarten and kindergarten. Results demonstrate that the HTKS involves cognitive flexibility, working memory, and inhibitory control, and is substantively implicated in early achievement, with the strongest relations found for growth in achievement during kindergarten and associations with emergent mathematics. PMID:25071619

  7. Modeling stability of growth between mathematics and science achievement during middle and high school.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xin; Ma, Lingling

    2004-04-01

    In this study, the authors introduced a multivariate multilevel model to estimate the consistency among students and schools in the rates of growth between mathematics and science achievement during the entire middle and high school years with data from the Longitudinal Study of American Youth (LSAY). There was no evident consistency in the rates of growth between mathematics and science achievement among students, and this inconsistency was not much influenced by student characteristics and school characteristics. However, there was evident consistency in the average rates of growth between mathematics and science achievement among schools, and this consistency was influenced by student characteristics and school characteristics. Major school-level variables associated with parental involvement did not show any significant impacts on consistency among either students or schools. Results call for educational policies that promote collaboration between mathematics and science departments or teachers.

  8. Promiscuous plasmid replication in thermophiles: Use of a novel hyperthermophilic replicon for genetic manipulation of Clostridium thermocellum at its optimum growth temperature

    DOE PAGES

    Groom, Joseph; Chung, Daehwan; Olson, Daniel G.; Lynd, Lee R.; Guss, Adam M.; Westpheling, Janet

    2016-01-29

    Clostridium thermocellum is a leading candidate for the consolidated bioprocessing of lignocellulosic biomass for the production of fuels and chemicals. A limitation to the engineering of this strain is the availability of stable replicating plasmid vectors for homologous and heterologous expression of genes that provide improved and/or novel pathways for fuel production. Current vectors relay on replicons from mesophilic bacteria and are not stable at the optimum growth temperature of C. thermocellum. To develop more thermostable genetic tools for C. thermocellum, we constructed vectors based on the hyperthermophilic Caldicellulosiruptor bescii replicon pBAS2. Autonomously replicating shuttle vectors based on pBAS2 reproduciblymore » transformed C. thermocellum at 60 °C and were maintained in multiple copy. Promoters, selectable markers and plasmid replication proteins from C. bescii were functional in C. thermocellum. Phylogenetic analyses of the proteins contained on pBAS2 revealed that the replication initiation protein RepL is unique among thermophiles. Lastly, these results suggest that pBAS2 may be a broadly useful replicon for other thermophilic Firmicutes.« less

  9. Incorporating Student Mobility in Achievement Growth Modeling: A Cross-Classified Multiple Membership Growth Curve Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grady, Matthew W.; Beretvas, S. Natasha

    2010-01-01

    Multiple membership random effects models (MMREMs) have been developed for use in situations where individuals are members of multiple higher level organizational units. Despite their availability and the frequency with which multiple membership structures are encountered, no studies have extended the MMREM approach to hierarchical growth curve…

  10. Growth in Reading Achievement of Students with Disabilities, Ages 7 to 17

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wei, Xin; Blackorby, Jose; Schiller, Ellen

    2011-01-01

    Using data from the Special Education Elementary Longitudinal Study (SRI International, 2002), this study estimated reading growth trajectories in a nationally representative sample of 3,421 students with disabilities ages 7 to 17 representing 11 federal disability categories. Reading achievement in all disability categories increased with age,…

  11. A Longitudinal Assessment of Early Acceleration of Students in Mathematics on Growth in Mathematics Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ma, X.

    2005-01-01

    Early acceleration of students in mathematics (in the form of early access to formal abstract algebra) has been a controversial educational issue. The current study examined the rate of growth in mathematics achievement of accelerated gifted, honors, and regular students across the entire secondary years (Grades 7-12), in comparison to their…

  12. Precollege science achievement growth: Racial-ethnic and gender differences in cognitive and psychosocial constructs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, Patricia Ann

    The purpose of this study was to gain a more complete understanding of the differences in science, mathematics and engineering education among racial-ethnic and gender subgroups by exploring factors related to precollege science achievement growth rates. Using Hierarchical Linear Modeling (HLM) and multi-wave, longitudinal data from the first three waves of the National Education Longitudinal Study of 1988--1994 (NELS:88/94), this study examined precollege science achievement growth rates during the 8th to 10th grade period and the 10th to 12th grade period for African American males, African American females, Latino males, Latina females, Asian American males, Asian American females, White males and White females. For the 8th--10th grade period, previous grades were significantly and positively related to science achievement growth for all subgroups; and socio-economic status and high school program were significantly and positively related to science achievement growth for all subgroups except one (Latino males, and Asian American males respectively). For the 10th--12th grade period, the quantity of science courses completed (science units) was the only variable that was statistically significant for more than one racial-ethnic by gender subgroup. Science units taken were significantly and positively related to 10 th--12th grade growth rates for all racial-ethnic by gender subgroups except Latino males. Locus-of-control was the only cognitive or psychosocial factor included from Eccles, Adler, Futterman, Goff, Kaczala, Meece and Midgley's (1983) theoretical framework for achievement behaviors that appeared to exhibit any pattern across race-ethnicities. Locus-of-control was positively related to 8th--10 th grade science achievement growth for females across all racial-ethnic subgroups, as well as for African American males. However, for both the 8 th--10th grade and 10th--12 th grade periods, there was no consistency across racial-ethnic or gender subgroups in

  13. Cognitive predictors of achievement growth in mathematics: a 5-year longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Geary, David C

    2011-11-01

    The study's goal was to identify the beginning of 1st grade quantitative competencies that predict mathematics achievement start point and growth through 5th grade. Measures of number, counting, and arithmetic competencies were administered in early 1st grade and used to predict mathematics achievement through 5th (n = 177), while controlling for intelligence, working memory, and processing speed. Multilevel models revealed intelligence and processing speed, and the central executive component of working memory predicted achievement or achievement growth in mathematics and, as a contrast domain, word reading. The phonological loop was uniquely predictive of word reading and the visuospatial sketch pad of mathematics. Early fluency in processing and manipulating numerical set size and Arabic numerals, accurate use of sophisticated counting procedures for solving addition problems, and accuracy in making placements on a mathematical number line were uniquely predictive of mathematics achievement. Use of memory-based processes to solve addition problems predicted mathematics and reading achievement but in different ways. The results identify the early quantitative competencies that uniquely contribute to mathematics learning.

  14. A Study of the Effects of the Accelerated Reader Program on Fifth Grade Students' Reading Achievement Growth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melton, Cindy M.; Smothers, Bobbie C.; Anderson, Eugene; Fulton, Ray; Replogle, William H.; Thomas, Lisa

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the reading achievement growth of fifth grade students following a year of participation in the Accelerated Reader program with the reading achievement growth of fifth grade students who did not participate in the Accelerated Reader program. The Terra Nova standardized achievement test was used as the…

  15. Optimum propeller wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanderson, R. J.; Archer, R. D.

    1983-12-01

    The Prandtl-Betz-Theodorsen theory of heavily loaded airscrews has been adapted to the design of propeller windmills which are to be optimized for maximum power coefficient. It is shown that the simpler, light-loading, constant-area wake assumption can generate significantly different 'optimum' performance and geometry, and that it is therefore not appropriate to the design of propeller wind turbines when operating in their normal range of high-tip-speed-to-wind-speed ratio. Design curves for optimum power coefficient are presented and an example of the design of a typical two-blade optimum rotor is given.

  16. Perceived social support and academic achievement: cross-lagged panel and bivariate growth curve analyses.

    PubMed

    Mackinnon, Sean P

    2012-04-01

    As students transition to post-secondary education, they experience considerable stress and declines in academic performance. Perceived social support is thought to improve academic achievement by reducing stress. Longitudinal designs with three or more waves are needed in this area because they permit stronger causal inferences and help disentangle the direction of relationships. This study uses a cross-lagged panel and a bivariate growth curve analysis with a three-wave longitudinal design. Participants include 10,445 students (56% female; 12.6% born outside of Canada) transitioning to post-secondary education from ages 15-19. Self-report measures of academic achievement and a generalized measure of perceived social support were used. An increase in average relative standing in academic achievement predicted an increase in average relative standing on perceived social support 2 years later, but the reverse was not true. High levels of perceived social support at age 15 did not protect against declines in academic achievement over time. In sum, perceived social support appears to have no bearing on adolescents' future academic performance, despite commonly held assumptions of its importance.

  17. Using hierarchical linear growth models to evaluate protective mechanisms that mediate science achievement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Secker, Clare Elaine

    The study of students at risk is a major topic of science education policy and discussion. Much research has focused on describing conditions and problems associated with the statistical risk of low science achievement among individuals who are members of groups characterized by problems such as poverty and social disadvantage. But outcomes attributed to these factors do not explain the nature and extent of mechanisms that account for differences in performance among individuals at risk. There is ample theoretical and empirical evidence that demographic differences should be conceptualized as social contexts, or collections of variables, that alter the psychological significance and social demands of life events, and affect subsequent relationships between risk and resilience. The hierarchical linear growth models used in this dissertation provide greater specification of the role of social context and the protective effects of attitude, expectations, parenting practices, peer influences, and learning opportunities on science achievement. While the individual influences of these protective factors on science achievement were small, their cumulative effect was substantial. Meta-analysis conducted on the effects associated with psychological and environmental processes that mediate risk mechanisms in sixteen social contexts revealed twenty-two significant differences between groups of students. Positive attitudes, high expectations, and more intense science course-taking had positive effects on achievement of all students, although these factors were not equally protective in all social contexts. In general, effects associated with authoritative parenting and peer influences were negative, regardless of social context. An evaluation comparing the performance and stability of hierarchical linear growth models with traditional repeated measures models is included as well.

  18. Predicting long-term growth in students' mathematics achievement: the unique contributions of motivation and cognitive strategies.

    PubMed

    Murayama, Kou; Pekrun, Reinhard; Lichtenfeld, Stephanie; Vom Hofe, Rudolf

    2013-01-01

    This research examined how motivation (perceived control, intrinsic motivation, and extrinsic motivation), cognitive learning strategies (deep and surface strategies), and intelligence jointly predict long-term growth in students' mathematics achievement over 5 years. Using longitudinal data from six annual waves (Grades 5 through 10; Mage  = 11.7 years at baseline; N = 3,530), latent growth curve modeling was employed to analyze growth in achievement. Results showed that the initial level of achievement was strongly related to intelligence, with motivation and cognitive strategies explaining additional variance. In contrast, intelligence had no relation with the growth of achievement over years, whereas motivation and learning strategies were predictors of growth. These findings highlight the importance of motivation and learning strategies in facilitating adolescents' development of mathematical competencies.

  19. Optimum Cassegrain baffle systems.

    PubMed

    Hales, W L

    1992-09-01

    Formulas are developed for the precise calculation of optimum stray-light baffles for Cassegrain optical systems, including systems having extreme optical curvatures such as those in infrared missile guidance systems. Minimum diffraction and maximum optical efficiency are the primary considerations.

  20. Expert meeting on Child Growth and Micronutrient Deficiencies--New Initiatives for Developing Countries to Achieve Millennium Development Goals: executive summary report.

    PubMed

    Usfar, Avita A; Achadi, Endang L; Martorell, Reynaldo; Hadi, Hamam; Thaha, Razak; Jus'at, Idrus; Atmarita; Martianto, Drajat; Ridwan, Hardinsyah; Soekirman

    2009-01-01

    Undernutrition in early childhood has long-term physical and intellectual consequences. Improving child growth should start before the age of two years and be an integrated effort between all sectors, covering all aspects such as diet and nutrient intake, disease reduction, optimum child care, and improved environmental sanitation. To discuss these issues, the Indonesian Danone Institute Foundation organized an expert meeting on Child Growth and Micronutrient Deficiencies: New Initiatives for Developing Countries to Achieve Millennium Development Goals. The objective of the meeting was to have a retrospective view on child growth: lessons learned from programs to overcome under-nutrition in the developed countries and to relate the situation to the Indonesian context, as well as to discuss implications for future programs. Recommendations derived from the meeting include focus intervention on the window of opportunity group, re-activation of the Integrated Health Post at the village level, improvement of infant and young child feeding, expand food fortification intervention programs, strengthen supplementation programs with multi-micronutrient, and strengthening public and private partnership on food related programs.

  1. Gender Differences in Growth in Mathematics Achievement: Three-Level Longitudinal and Multilevel Analyses of Individual, Home, and School Influences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ai, Xiaoxia

    2002-01-01

    Focuses on gender differences in growth in mathematics achievement in relation to various social-psychological factors such as attitude towards mathematics, self-esteem, parents' academic encouragement, mathematics teachers' expectations, and peer influence. Results indicate that gender differences in growth in mathematics varied by the student's…

  2. Optimum hovering wing planform.

    PubMed

    Nabawy, Mostafa R A; Crowther, William J

    2016-10-01

    Theoretical analysis is used to identify the optimum wing planform of a flapping/revolving wing in hover. This solution is of interest as a benchmark to which hovering wing geometries driven by broader multidisciplinary evolutionary or engineering constraints can be compared. Furthermore, useful insights into the aerodynamic performance of untwisted hovering wings are delivered. It is shown that profile power is minimised by using an untwisted elliptical planform whereas induced power is minimised by a more highly tapered planform similar to that of a hummingbird. PMID:27329340

  3. Determining optimum age of Holstein dairy calves when adding chopped alfalfa hay to meal starter diets based on measures of growth and performance.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, S M; Ghorbani, G R; Rezamand, P; Khorvash, M

    2016-04-01

    The present study was conducted to determine the optimum age of Holstein dairy calves for an effective inclusion of alfalfa hay (AH) in starter feed on performance, apparent digestibility and feeding behavior. A total of 40 Holstein dairy calves (20 female and 20 male) were used in a completely randomized design in which calves were randomly assigned to one of four different dietary treatments including control (CON) calves fed starter feed without any forage and three treatments consisting of the same starter feed plus 15% chopped AH fed when calves were at the 2nd (AH2), 4th (AH4) or 6th (AH6) week of age. Calves were individually housed and bedded with sand that was replaced every other day. Feed and water were available ad libitum throughout the experiment. Calves were fed milk at 10% of birth BW twice daily until d 57. The study concluded when calves were 73 days old. Starter intake was recorded daily and BW was measured weekly. Data were analyzed as a complete randomized design by MIXED procedures of SAS. Results demonstrate that calves receiving AH treatments numerically consumed more starter feed (0.62 v. 0.78, 0.71 and 0.65 kg/day for CON, AH2, AH4 and AH6, respectively) and had greater average daily gain (ADG) compared with CON (0.48 v. 0.57, 0.49 and 0.49 kg/day for CON, AH2, AH4 and AH6), although the significant difference was observed only between AH2 and CON. Among AH treatments, calves in AH2 had better performance than AH6 in several cases including starter intake, ADG. No detectable differences were observed, however, in apparent dry matter, organic matter or CP digestibility among treatments. Ruminal pH and NH3 concentrations, measured on weeks 4, 6, 8 and 10, were lower for calves fed CON compared with other treatments, with ammonia concentrations decreasing over time. Calves in the AH treatments spent more time eating and ruminating compared with CON. Calves fed CON, however, spent more time on laying down compared with other treatments

  4. Optimum Suction Distribution for Transition Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balakumar, P.; Hall, P.

    1996-01-01

    The optimum suction distribution which gives the longest laminar region for a given total suction is computed. The goal here is to provide the designer with a method to find the best suction distribution subject to some overall constraint applied to the suction. We formulate the problem using the Lagrangian multiplier method with constraints. The resulting non-linear system of equations is solved using the Newton-Raphson technique. The computations are performed for a Blasius boundary layer on a flat-plate and crossflow cases. For the Blasius boundary layer, the optimum suction distribution peaks upstream of the maximum growth rate region and remains flat in the middle before it decreases to zero at the end of the transition point. For the stationary and travelling crossflow instability, the optimum suction peaks upstream of the maximum growth rate region and decreases gradually to zero.

  5. What is Optimum Variability?

    PubMed

    Schuldberg, David

    2015-10-01

    Guastello (2015a) opened the call for articles for this issue with Goldberger (1991) and colleagues' findings of chaotic variability in healthy heart rate, noting, 'the principle of healthy variability has extended to other biomedical and psychological phenomena.' He suggests a dialectical underpinning for optimal variability involving 'a combination of the minimum entropy or free energy principle that pushes in a downward direction, and Ashby's Law of Requisite Variety that pushes in an upward direction.' Each of the papers in this issue addresses optimal variability across a variety of health-related areas. The present article surveys these seven papers in relation to five conceptual questions about optimal variability: (a) Is variability a positive or a negative, and how are positive things related to health? (b) How shall we define and measure variability? (c) What constitutes an optimum, and how do we locate one? (d) What is the relationship between optimum variability and health? Finally, it touches on (e) What are underlying principles and phenomena behind healthy variability, and can they inform our vocabulary for health? The paper concludes by discussing practical approaches to dealing with optimization. PMID:26375940

  6. Proportion of corn silage in diets of feedlot steers fed to achieve stepwise increases in growth.

    PubMed

    Rossi, J E; Loerch, S C

    2001-06-01

    Two experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of proportion of dietary corn silage during periods of feed restriction on performance of steers. In Exp. 1, Simmental x Angus steer calves (n = 107; initial BW = 273 +/- 3.8 kg) were allotted to 12 pens with eight or nine steers/pen and four pens/treatment. Periods of growth were 273 to 366 kg BW (Period 1), 367 to 501 kg BW (Period 2), and 502 to 564 kg BW (Period 3). In two of the dietary regimens, steers were given ad libitum access to feed throughout the experiment and were fed either a 15% corn silage diet in each period or an 85, 50, and 15% corn silage diet in Periods 1, 2, and 3; respectively. In the third feeding regimen, a programmed intake feeding regimen was used. Steers were fed a 15% corn silage diet in each period. However, feed intake was restricted to achieve a predicted gain of 1.13 kg/d in Period 1 and 1.36 kg/d in Period 2, and feed was offered for ad libitum consumption in Period 3. For the entire experiment, ADG was similar (P = 0.41) among treatments and feed efficiency was lower (P < 0.10) for steers in the corn silage regimen than for steers in the programmed intake and ad libitum regimens. In Exp. 2, Simmental x Angus steer calves (n = 106; initial BW = 233 +/- 2 kg) were allotted by BW to 12 pens (three pens/treatment) and fed in three periods similar to those described in Exp. 1. Four feeding regimens were investigated: 1) AL; steers were offered a 15% corn silage diet for ad libitum consumption in all three periods; 2) PI; DMI was programmed to achieve gains as described in Exp. 1; 3) CS-HLL; programmed intake as described above except diets contained 85, 15, and 15% corn silage in Periods 1, 2, and 3, respectively; and 4) CS-HIL; same feeding regimens as CS-HLL, except diets contained 85, 50, and 15% corn silage in Periods 1, 2, and 3, respectively. Steers were given ad libitum access to feed in Period 3. Overall ADG was lower (P < 0.05) for steers in the CS-HLL and CS

  7. Understanding the mathematics and science achievement and growth trajectories of high ability high school students using hierarchical linear modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belen-Ferrer, Bellasanta

    2009-12-01

    This study used longitudinal data and individual, family, and academic-related matriculation variables to examine trends in initial status and growth trajectories in overall academics, mathematics, and science achievement among 224 high ability high school Asian students. Results indicate that females have an advantage in both initial status and growth rates in overall academics and science. None of the family variables entered in the models were found to be significantly related to overall academics grade point average. All available matriculation variables entered into the models explained less than or at most about half the variance in initial achievement status and growth rate in overall academics and science but not in mathematics. These results strongly imply that other factors, notably family and school and/or classroom-related variables, not measured by the ones used in the models could explain the expected variance in initial status and growth rate of the students especially in Mathematics.

  8. Growth Trajectories of Mathematics Achievement: Longitudinal Tracking of Student Academic Progress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mok, Magdalena M. C.; McInerney, Dennis M.; Zhu, Jinxin; Or, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Background: A number of methods to investigate growth have been reported in the literature, including hierarchical linear modelling (HLM), latent growth modelling (LGM), and multidimensional scaling applied to longitudinal profile analysis (LPAMS). Aims: This study aimed at modelling the mathematics growth of students over a span of 6 years from…

  9. Predicting Long-Term Growth in Students' Mathematics Achievement: The Unique Contributions of Motivation and Cognitive Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murayama, Kou; Pekrun, Reinhard; Lichtenfeld, Stephanie; vom Hofe, Rudolf

    2013-01-01

    This research examined how motivation (perceived control, intrinsic motivation, and extrinsic motivation), cognitive learning strategies (deep and surface strategies), and intelligence jointly predict long-term growth in students' mathematics achievement over 5 years. Using longitudinal data from six annual waves (Grades 5 through 10;…

  10. Estimating Correlates of Growth between Mathematics and Science Achievement via a Multivariate Multilevel Design with Latent Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ma, Lingling; Ma, Xin

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to improve a multivariate multilevel model in the research literature which estimates the consistency in the rates of growth between mathematics and science achievement among students and schools. We introduced a new multivariate multilevel model via a latent variable approach. Data from the Longitudinal Study…

  11. Measuring Opportunity to Learn and Achievement Growth: Key Research Issues with Implications for the Effective Education of All Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliott, Stephen N.

    2015-01-01

    The related constructs of opportunity to learn (OTL) and achievement growth are fundamental aspects of the current large-scale assessment and accountability system in operation in the United States. For purposes of this article, OTL is defined as the degree to which a teacher dedicates instructional time and content coverage to the intended…

  12. Optimum blending gives best pool octane

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, W.E.

    1986-01-20

    Optimum blending of gasoline components can increase the pool octane by 0.1 to 0.5 numbers. To achieve the optimum octane blending scheme, accurate octane blending values must be obtained. These blending values can be developed from an interaction blending study or from generalized predicted interaction coefficients. Many refiners are blending in a non-optimum fashion so that there are some cheap octanes available for the taking by simply changing to an optimum blending scheme. A study of 1984 gasoline compositions indicated that many refiners were blending in a non-optimum fashion and that ''pool octane'' could have been increased almost 0.5 octane. The term pool octane usually refers to the weighted average octane of all of the gasoline components. It can be calculated by multiplying the octane of each component by its fraction of the pool and adding the results. If the components are blended into two or more grades, a second pool octane could be calculated by multiplying the octane of each grade, before any lead antiknock addition, by its fraction of the total pool. The second pool octane will differ from the first because the components do not blend linearly. The octane of a 50:50 blend of two components may be higher or lower than the average of the octanes of the two components.

  13. Does Growth Rate in Oral Reading Fluency Matter in Predicting Reading Comprehension Achievement?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Young-Suk; Petscher, Yaacov; Schatschneider, Christopher; Foorman, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we examined the relationship of growth trajectories of oral reading fluency, vocabulary, phonological awareness, letter-naming fluency, and nonsense word reading fluency from 1st grade to 3rd grade with reading comprehension in 1st, 2nd, and 3rd grades. Data from 12,536 children who were followed from kindergarten to 3rd grade…

  14. Connection and Regulation at Home and in School: Predicting Growth in Achievement for Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gregory, Anne; Weinstein, Rhona S.

    2004-01-01

    Qualities of adolescent-adult relationships across home and school environments are examined as predictors of academic growth in mathematics. An ethnically diverse sample of adolescents was drawn from the National Educational Longitudinal Study, 1988. In separate analyses, adolescents' perceptions of (a) connection with parents and teachers and…

  15. Birth Weight, Math and Reading Achievement Growth: A Multilevel between-Sibling, between-Families Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goosby, Bridget J.; Cheadle, Jacob E.

    2009-01-01

    We used multilevel covariance structure analysis to study the relationship between birth weight, family context and youth math and reading comprehension growth from approximately ages 5 through 14 within and between families. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth Child Sample, we examined the relationship between birth weight…

  16. A General Multivariate Latent Growth Model with Applications to Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bianconcini, Silvia; Cagnone, Silvia

    2012-01-01

    The evaluation of the formative process in the University system has been assuming an ever increasing importance in the European countries. Within this context, the analysis of student performance and capabilities plays a fundamental role. In this work, the authors propose a multivariate latent growth model for studying the performances of a…

  17. Cultivating a Growth Mindset in Students at a High-Achieving High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fegley, Alan D.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this EPP is to develop a plan for changing the mindset of a large number of Haddonfield Memorial High School (HMHS) students from a fixed mindset to a growth mindset. HMHS is by most conventional measures a high performing school. Typically 100% of the students graduate with 96% of the students attending two or four year colleges…

  18. Entrepreneurship Education in Delta State Tertiary Institution as a Means of Achieving National Growth and Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osakwe, Regina N.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined entrepreneurship education in Delta Sate tertiary institutions as a means of national growth and development. Two research questions were asked to guide the study. The population comprised all the 1,898 academic staff in eight tertiary institutions in the state. A sample of 800 lecturers was drawn through the multi stage and…

  19. DASEES: A Tripartite Decision Analysis Framework to Achieve Sustainable Environment, Economy & Society Growth and Management Goals

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many of Societies management and growth decisions are often made without a balanced consideration of pertinent factors from environmental, economic and societal perspectives. All three of these areas are key players in many of the decisions facing societies as they strive to ope...

  20. Measuring the Impact of Substance Abuse on Student Academic Achievement and Academic Growth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rattermann, Mary Jo

    2014-01-01

    This research presents data linking the impact of substance disorder to academic achievement, using data gathered at a recovery high school. Recovery schools provide recovery supports and a high-quality education to students with substance use disorders. The Global Appraisal of Individual Needs -- Short Screener and the Northwest Evaluation…

  1. Utilizing Precision Teaching To Measure Growth of Reading Comprehension Skills in Low Achieving Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nitti, Joanne M.

    A practicum addressed the problem of reading comprehension skills in low achieving students by monitoring their progress utilizing precision teaching. Based on referrals from classroom teachers, guidance counselors, and parents, five students ranging in ability levels from kindergarten through grade 8 were accepted into the program for one or more…

  2. Perceived Social Support and Academic Achievement: Cross-Lagged Panel and Bivariate Growth Curve Analyses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mackinnon, Sean P.

    2012-01-01

    As students transition to post-secondary education, they experience considerable stress and declines in academic performance. Perceived social support is thought to improve academic achievement by reducing stress. Longitudinal designs with three or more waves are needed in this area because they permit stronger causal inferences and help…

  3. Emotions, Self-Regulated Learning, and Achievement in Mathematics: A Growth Curve Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahmed, Wondimu; van der Werf, Greetje; Kuyper, Hans; Minnaert, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was twofold: (a) to investigate the developmental trends of 4 academic emotions (anxiety, boredom, enjoyment, and pride) and (b) to examine whether changes in emotions are linked to the changes in students' self-regulatory strategies (shallow, deep, and meta-cognitive) and achievement in mathematics. Four hundred…

  4. Predictors of Early Growth in Academic Achievement: The Head-Toes-Knees-Shoulders Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClelland, Megan M.; Cameron, Claire E.; Duncan, Robert; Bowles, Ryan P.; Acock, Alan C.; Miao, Alicia; Pratt, Megan E.

    2014-01-01

    Children's behavioral self-regulation and executive function (EF; including attentional or cognitive flexibility, working memory, and inhibitory control) are strong predictors of academic achievement. The present study examined the psychometric properties of a measure of behavioral self-regulation called the Head-Toes-Knees-Shoulders (HTKS) by…

  5. The optimum hypersonic wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trimmer, L. L.; Cary, A., Jr.; Voisinet, R. L. P.

    1986-01-01

    The capabilities of existing hypersonic wind tunnels in the U.S. are assessed to form a basis for recommendations for a new, costly facility which would provide data for modeling the hypervelocity aerodynamics envisioned for the new generation of aerospace vehicles now undergoing early studies. Attention is given to the regimes, both entry and aerodynamic, which the new vehicles will encounter, and the shortcomings of data generated for the Orbiter before flight are discussed. The features of foreign-gas, impulse, aeroballistic range, arc-heated and combustion-heated facilities are examined, noting that in any hypersonic wind tunnel the flow must be preheated to prevent liquefaction upon expansion in the test channel. The limitations of the existing facilities and the identification of the regimes which must be studied lead to a description of the characteristics of an optimum hypersonic wind tunnel, including the operations and productivity, the instrumentation, the nozzle design and the flow quality. Three different design approaches are described, each costing at least $100 million to achieve workability.

  6. Intrauterine-like growth rates can be achieved with premixed parenteral nutrition solution in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Rigo, Jacques; Senterre, Thibault

    2013-12-01

    Growth failure in neonatal intensive care units is a major challenge for pediatricians and neonatologists. The use of early "aggressive" parenteral nutrition (PN), with >2.5 g/(kg ·d) of amino acids and at least 40 kcal/(kg ·d) of energy from the first day of life, has been shown to provide nutritional intakes in the range recommended by international guidelines, reducing nutritional deficit and the incidence of postnatal growth restriction in preterm infants. However, nutritional practices and adherence to recommendations may vary in different hospitals. Two ready-to-use (RTU), premixed parenteral solutions (PSs) designed for preterm infants have been prospectively evaluated: a binary RTU premixed PS from our hospital pharmacy and a commercially premixed 3-chamber bag (Baxter Healthcare). These premixed PSs provide nitrogen and energy intakes in the range of the most recent recommendations, reducing or eliminating the early cumulative nutritional deficit in very-low-birth-weight infants, and avoiding the development of postnatal growth restriction. A further rationale for RTU premixed PSs is that preterm infants require balanced PN that contains not only amino acids and energy but also minerals and electrolytes from the first day of life in order to reduce the incidence of metabolic disorders frequently reported in extremely-low-birth-weight infants during the early weeks of life.

  7. Intrauterine-like growth rates can be achieved with premixed parenteral nutrition solution in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Rigo, Jacques; Senterre, Thibault

    2013-12-01

    Growth failure in neonatal intensive care units is a major challenge for pediatricians and neonatologists. The use of early "aggressive" parenteral nutrition (PN), with >2.5 g/(kg ·d) of amino acids and at least 40 kcal/(kg ·d) of energy from the first day of life, has been shown to provide nutritional intakes in the range recommended by international guidelines, reducing nutritional deficit and the incidence of postnatal growth restriction in preterm infants. However, nutritional practices and adherence to recommendations may vary in different hospitals. Two ready-to-use (RTU), premixed parenteral solutions (PSs) designed for preterm infants have been prospectively evaluated: a binary RTU premixed PS from our hospital pharmacy and a commercially premixed 3-chamber bag (Baxter Healthcare). These premixed PSs provide nitrogen and energy intakes in the range of the most recent recommendations, reducing or eliminating the early cumulative nutritional deficit in very-low-birth-weight infants, and avoiding the development of postnatal growth restriction. A further rationale for RTU premixed PSs is that preterm infants require balanced PN that contains not only amino acids and energy but also minerals and electrolytes from the first day of life in order to reduce the incidence of metabolic disorders frequently reported in extremely-low-birth-weight infants during the early weeks of life. PMID:24108133

  8. Isometric Scaling in Developing Long Bones Is Achieved by an Optimal Epiphyseal Growth Balance

    PubMed Central

    Stern, Tomer; Aviram, Rona; Rot, Chagai; Galili, Tal; Sharir, Amnon; Kalish Achrai, Noga; Keller, Yosi; Shahar, Ron; Zelzer, Elazar

    2015-01-01

    One of the major challenges that developing organs face is scaling, that is, the adjustment of physical proportions during the massive increase in size. Although organ scaling is fundamental for development and function, little is known about the mechanisms that regulate it. Bone superstructures are projections that typically serve for tendon and ligament insertion or articulation and, therefore, their position along the bone is crucial for musculoskeletal functionality. As bones are rigid structures that elongate only from their ends, it is unclear how superstructure positions are regulated during growth to end up in the right locations. Here, we document the process of longitudinal scaling in developing mouse long bones and uncover the mechanism that regulates it. To that end, we performed a computational analysis of hundreds of three-dimensional micro-CT images, using a newly developed method for recovering the morphogenetic sequence of developing bones. Strikingly, analysis revealed that the relative position of all superstructures along the bone is highly preserved during more than a 5-fold increase in length, indicating isometric scaling. It has been suggested that during development, bone superstructures are continuously reconstructed and relocated along the shaft, a process known as drift. Surprisingly, our results showed that most superstructures did not drift at all. Instead, we identified a novel mechanism for bone scaling, whereby each bone exhibits a specific and unique balance between proximal and distal growth rates, which accurately maintains the relative position of its superstructures. Moreover, we show mathematically that this mechanism minimizes the cumulative drift of all superstructures, thereby optimizing the scaling process. Our study reveals a general mechanism for the scaling of developing bones. More broadly, these findings suggest an evolutionary mechanism that facilitates variability in bone morphology by controlling the activity of

  9. Isometric Scaling in Developing Long Bones Is Achieved by an Optimal Epiphyseal Growth Balance.

    PubMed

    Stern, Tomer; Aviram, Rona; Rot, Chagai; Galili, Tal; Sharir, Amnon; Kalish Achrai, Noga; Keller, Yosi; Shahar, Ron; Zelzer, Elazar

    2015-08-01

    One of the major challenges that developing organs face is scaling, that is, the adjustment of physical proportions during the massive increase in size. Although organ scaling is fundamental for development and function, little is known about the mechanisms that regulate it. Bone superstructures are projections that typically serve for tendon and ligament insertion or articulation and, therefore, their position along the bone is crucial for musculoskeletal functionality. As bones are rigid structures that elongate only from their ends, it is unclear how superstructure positions are regulated during growth to end up in the right locations. Here, we document the process of longitudinal scaling in developing mouse long bones and uncover the mechanism that regulates it. To that end, we performed a computational analysis of hundreds of three-dimensional micro-CT images, using a newly developed method for recovering the morphogenetic sequence of developing bones. Strikingly, analysis revealed that the relative position of all superstructures along the bone is highly preserved during more than a 5-fold increase in length, indicating isometric scaling. It has been suggested that during development, bone superstructures are continuously reconstructed and relocated along the shaft, a process known as drift. Surprisingly, our results showed that most superstructures did not drift at all. Instead, we identified a novel mechanism for bone scaling, whereby each bone exhibits a specific and unique balance between proximal and distal growth rates, which accurately maintains the relative position of its superstructures. Moreover, we show mathematically that this mechanism minimizes the cumulative drift of all superstructures, thereby optimizing the scaling process. Our study reveals a general mechanism for the scaling of developing bones. More broadly, these findings suggest an evolutionary mechanism that facilitates variability in bone morphology by controlling the activity of

  10. PLATEAUING COSMIC RAY DETECTORS TO ACHIEVE OPTIMUM OPERATING VOLTAGE

    SciTech Connect

    Knoff, E.N.; Peterson, R.S.

    2008-01-01

    Through QuarkNet, students across the country have access to cosmic ray detectors in their high school classrooms. These detectors operate using a scintillator material and a photomultiplier tube (PMT). A data acquisition (DAQ) board counts cosmic ray hits from the counters. Through an online e-Lab, students can analyze and share their data. In order to collect viable data, the PMTs should operate at their plateau voltages. In these plateau ranges, the number of counts per minute remains relatively constant with small changes in PMT voltage. We sought to plateau the counters in the test array and to clarify the plateauing procedure itself. In order to most effectively plateau the counters, the counters should be stacked and programmed to record the number of coincident hits as well as their singles rates. We also changed the threshold value that a signal must exceed in order to record a hit and replateaued the counters. For counter 1, counter 2, and counter 3, we found plateau voltages around 1V. The singles rate plateau was very small, while the coincidence plateau was very long. The plateau voltages corresponded to a singles rate of 700–850 counts per minute. We found very little effect of changing the threshold voltages. Our chosen plateau voltages produced good performance studies on the e-Lab. Keeping in mind the nature of the experiments conducted by the high school students, we recommend a streamlined plateauing process. Because changing the threshold did not drastically affect the plateau voltage or the performance study, students should choose a threshold value, construct plateau graphs, and analyze their data using a performance study. Even if the counters operate slightly off their plateau voltage, they should deliver good performance studies and return reliable results.

  11. Achieving optimum post mine reclamation results through computer aided design

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, M.; Irvin, R.; Metcalf, D.

    1997-12-31

    Recent technological advances have made it possible to map and model disturbed mine areas to plan the most cost effective manner in which to reclaim post mine land. The process not only can reduce the cost to reclaim each acre, but also enhances regulatory compliance. Results from a 21 acre test at Texas Utilities Mining Company`s Martin Lake-Oak Hill Mine have shown a significant reduction in dozer hours per acre to complete reclamation. A larger, more conclusive project has been completed at TUMCO`s Monticello-Winfield North Mine. The new project includes approximately 350 acres of the C-Area final pit. Results of this project have resulted in substantial cost savings versus conventional reclamation planning methods.

  12. Achieving pH control in microalgal cultures through fed-batch addition of stoichiometrically-balanced growth media

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Lack of accounting for proton uptake and secretion has confounded interpretation of the stoichiometry of photosynthetic growth of algae. This is also problematic for achieving growth of microalgae to high cell concentrations which is necessary to improve productivity and the economic feasibility of commercial-scale chemical production systems. Since microalgae are capable of consuming both nitrate and ammonium, this represents an opportunity to balance culture pH based on a nitrogen feeding strategy that does not utilize gas-phase CO2 buffering. Stoichiometry suggests that approximately 36 weight%N-NH4+ (balance nitrogen as NO3-) would minimize the proton imbalance and permit high-density photoautotrophic growth as it does in higher plant tissue culture. However, algal media almost exclusively utilize nitrate, and ammonium is often viewed as ‘toxic’ to algae. Results The microalgae Chlorella vulgaris and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii exclusively utilize ammonium when both ammonium and nitrate are provided during growth on excess CO2. The resulting proton imbalance from preferential ammonium utilization causes the pH to drop too low to sustain further growth when ammonium was only 9% of the total nitrogen (0.027 gN-NH4+/L). However, providing smaller amounts of ammonium sequentially in the presence of nitrate maintained the pH of a Chlorella vulgaris culture for improved growth on 0.3 gN/L to 5 gDW/L under 5% CO2 gas-phase supplementation. Bioreactor pH dynamics are shown to be predictable based on simple nitrogen assimilation as long as there is sufficient CO2 availability. Conclusions This work provides both a media formulation and a feeding strategy with a focus on nitrogen metabolism and regulation to support high-density algal culture without buffering. The instability in culture pH that is observed in microalgal cultures in the absence of buffers can be overcome through alternating utilization of ammonium and nitrate. Despite the highly regulated

  13. Assessing the Effects of a School-Wide Data-Based Decision-Making Intervention on Student Achievement Growth in Primary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Geel, Marieke; Keuning, Trynke; Visscher, Adrie J.; Fox, Jean-Paul

    2016-01-01

    Despite growing international interest in the use of data to improve education, few studies examining the effects on student achievement are yet available. In the present study, the effects of a two-year data-based decision-making intervention on student achievement growth were investigated. Fifty-three primary schools participated in the project,…

  14. Optimum windmill-site matching

    SciTech Connect

    Salameh, Z.M.; Safari, I. )

    1992-12-01

    In this paper a methodology for the selection of the optimum windmill for a specific site is developed. The selection windmill for a specific site is developed. The selection is based on finding the capacity factors (CF) of the available windmills. This is done by using long term wind speed data recorded at different hours of the day for many years. This data is then used to generate mean wind speeds for a typical day in a month. Probability density functions for the mean wind speeds for the different hours of the day are generated with the manufacturer's specifications on windmills used to calculate the capacity factors for the windmills. The windmill with the highest average capacity factor for the specific site is the optimum one and to be recommended.

  15. Ewe lambs with higher breeding values for growth achieve higher reproductive performance when mated at age 8 months.

    PubMed

    Nieto, C A Rosales; Ferguson, M B; Macleay, C A; Briegel, J R; Wood, D A; Martin, G B; Thompson, A N

    2013-09-15

    We studied the relationships among growth, body composition and reproductive performance in ewe lambs with known phenotypic values for depth of eye muscle (EMD) and fat (FAT) and Australian Sheep Breeding Values for post-weaning live weight (PWT) and depth of eye muscle (PEMD) and fat (PFAT). To detect estrus, vasectomized rams were placed with 190 Merino ewe lambs when on average they were 157 days old. The vasectomized rams were replaced with entire rams when the ewe lambs were, on average, 226 days old. Lambs were weighed every week and blood was sampled on four occasions for assay of ghrelin, leptin and ß-hydroxybutyrate. Almost 90% of the lambs attained puberty during the experiment, at an average live weight of 41.4 kg and average age of 197 days. Ewe lambs with higher values for EMD (P < 0.001), FAT (P < 0.01), PWT (P < 0.001), PEMD (P < 0.05) and PFAT (P < 0.05) were more likely to achieve puberty by 251 days of age. Thirty-six percent of the lambs conceived and, at the estimated date of conception, the average live weight was 46.9 ± 0.6 kg and average age was 273 days. Fertility, fecundity and reproductive rate were positively related to PWT (P < 0.05) and thus live weight at the start of mating (P < 0.001). Reproductive performance was not correlated with blood concentrations of ghrelin, leptin or ß-hydroxybutyrate. Many ewe lambs attained puberty, as detected by vasectomized rams, but then failed to become pregnant after mating with entire rams. Nevertheless, we can conclude that in ewe lambs mated at 8 months of age, higher breeding values for growth, muscle and fat are positively correlated with reproductive performance, although the effects of breeding values and responses to live weight are highly variable.

  16. Atlas based kinematic optimum design of the Stewart parallel manipulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Zhufeng; Tang, Xiaoqiang; Wang, Liping; Sun, Dengfeng

    2015-01-01

    Optimum design is a key approach to make full use of potential advantages of a parallel manipulator. The optimum design of multi-parameter parallel manipulators(more than three design parameters), such as Stewart manipulator, relies on analysis based and algorithm based optimum design methods, which fall to be accurate or intuitive. To solve this problem and achieve both accurate and intuition, atlas based optimum design of a general Stewart parallel manipulator is established, with rational selection of design parameters. Based on the defined spherical usable workspace(SUW), primary kinematic performance indices of the Stewart manipulator, involving workspace and condition number are introduced and analyzed. Then, corresponding performance atlases are drawn with the established non-dimensional design space, and impact of joint distribution angles on the manipulator performance is analyzed and illustrated. At last, an example on atlas based optimum design of the Stewart manipulator is accomplished to illustrate the optimum design process, considering the end-effector posture. Deduced atlases can be flexibly applied to both quantitative and qualitative analysis to get the desired optimal design for the Stewart manipulator with respect to related performance requirements. Besides, the established optimum design method can be further applied to other multi-parameter parallel manipulators.

  17. A Longitudinal Study on State Mathematics and Reading Assessments: Comparisons of Growth Models on Students' Achievement Scores

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiu, Pui Chi

    2012-01-01

    This study examines student growth on mathematics and reading assessments across academic years (Spring 2006 through Spring 2009) using three different growth models: hierarchical linear model (HLM), value-added model (VAM), and student growth percentile model (SGP). Comparisons across these three growth models were conducted to investigate the…

  18. Optimum constrained image restoration filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riemer, T. E.; Mcgillem, C. D.

    1974-01-01

    The filter was developed in Hilbert space by minimizing the radius of gyration of the overall or composite system point-spread function subject to constraints on the radius of gyration of the restoration filter point-spread function, the total noise power in the restored image, and the shape of the composite system frequency spectrum. An iterative technique is introduced which alters the shape of the optimum composite system point-spread function, producing a suboptimal restoration filter which suppresses undesirable secondary oscillations. Finally this technique is applied to multispectral scanner data obtained from the Earth Resources Technology Satellite to provide resolution enhancement. An experimental approach to the problems involving estimation of the effective scanner aperture and matching the ERTS data to available restoration functions is presented.

  19. Optimum constrained image restoration filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riemer, T. E.; Mcgillem, C. D.

    1977-01-01

    The research described centered on development of an optimum image restoration filter (IRF) minimizing the radius of gyration of the corrected or composite system point-spread function (P-SF) subject to contraints, and reducing 2-dimensional spatial smearing or blurring of an image. The constraints are imposed on the radius of gyration of the IRF P-SF, the total restored image noise power, and the shape of the composite system frequency spectrum. The image degradation corresponds to mapping many points from the original image into a single resolution element. The P-SF is obtained as solution to a set of simultaneous differential equations obeying nonlinear integral constraints. Truncation errors due to edge effects are controlled by constraining the radius of gyration of the IRF P-SF. An iterative technique suppresses sidelobes of the composite system P-SF.

  20. Swarms: Optimum aggregations of spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayer, H. L.

    1980-01-01

    Swarms are aggregations of spacecraft or elements of a space system which are cooperative in function, but physically isolated or only loosely connected. For some missions the swarm configuration may be optimum compared to a group of completely independent spacecraft or a complex rigidly integrated spacecraft or space platform. General features of swarms are induced by considering an ensemble of 26 swarms, examples ranging from Earth centered swarms for commercial application to swarms for exploring minor planets. A concept for a low altitude swarm as a substitute for a space platform is proposed and a preliminary design studied. The salient design feature is the web of tethers holding the 30 km swarm in a rigid two dimensional array in the orbital plane. A mathematical discussion and tutorial in tether technology and in some aspects of the distribution of services (mass, energy, and information to swarm elements) are included.

  1. The Effects of a Growth Mindset Intervention on the Beliefs about Intelligence, Effort Beliefs, Achievement Goal Orientations, and Academic Self-Efficacy of LD Students with Reading Difficulties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldridge, Mary Caufield

    2010-01-01

    The overall purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a "growth mindset" intervention on the beliefs about intelligence, effort beliefs, achievement goals, and academic self-efficacy of learning disabled (LD) students with reading difficulties. The treatment group consisted of 12 high school LD students with reading difficulties. This…

  2. Native Language Proficiency, English Literacy, Academic Achievement, and Occupational Attainment in Limited-English-Proficient Students: A Latent Growth Modeling Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guglielmi, R. Sergio

    2008-01-01

    The hypothesis that native language (L1) proficiency promotes English acquisition and overall academic achievement, a key theoretical assumption underlying bilingual education, was tested using latent growth modeling of data from 899 limited-English-proficient (LEP) eighth graders who were followed for 12 years in the National Education…

  3. Optimum design of uncooled staring infrared camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yingwen; Pan, Debin; Liu, Aidong; Geng, Anbing; Li, Yong; He, Jun

    2006-02-01

    Several models of target acquisition range prediction of the uncooled staring camera and their advantages are proposed in the paper. NVTherm is used to evaluate the modulation transfer function, minimum resolvable temperature difference and target acquisition range. The analysis result shows that the performance of the detector is the key factor to limit the performance of the uncooled staring camera. The target acquisition range of the uncooled infrared camera can be improved by increasing effective focus length (EFL) of optical component, decreasing its F/# or reducing the pixel pitch of the detector. The detection range of 1.09 km can be achieved under the condition of 75 mm EFL and F/0.8. When the EFL changes from 75mm to 150 mm under the condition of F/0.8 and 45μm pixel pitch, the detection range of 2.36 km, recognition range of 0.47 km and identification range of 0.24 km have been gotten. When the pixel pitch is reduced to 35μm, the detection range is 2.59 km. Furthermore, when 2 x 2 microscan is adopted in the camera design, then the pixel pitch will change from 35μm to 17.5μm. Although the infrared camera becomes an optical performance limited system, its performance improves a lot to get the detection range of 2.94 km. The field test shows that the detection range to a 1.7 m x 0.45 m target is 2.2 km under the condition of F/0.8, 150mm EFL and 45 μm pixel pitch, achieving good matches with the evaluation value of 2.36 km through NVTherm. An optimum uncooled infrared design is achieved using the NVTherm software which shortens the design cycle.

  4. Implementation of optimum solar electricity generating system

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Balbir Singh Mahinder Karim, Samsul Ariffin A.; Sivapalan, Subarna; Najib, Nurul Syafiqah Mohd; Menon, Pradeep

    2014-10-24

    Under the 10{sup th} Malaysian Plan, the government is expecting the renewable energy to contribute approximately 5.5% to the total electricity generation by the year 2015, which amounts to 98MW. One of the initiatives to ensure that the target is achievable was to establish the Sustainable Energy Development Authority of Malaysia. SEDA is given the authority to administer and manage the implementation of the feed-in tariff (FiT) mechanism which is mandated under the Renewable Energy Act 2011. The move to establish SEDA is commendable and the FiT seems to be attractive but there is a need to create awareness on the implementation of the solar electricity generating system (SEGS). In Malaysia, harnessing technologies related to solar energy resources have great potential for implementation. However, the main issue that plagues the implementation of SEGS is the intermittent nature of this source of energy. The availability of sunlight is during the day time, and there is a need for electrical energy storage system, so that there is electricity available during the night time as well. The meteorological condition such as clouds, haze and pollution affects the SEGS as well. The PV based SEGS is seems to be promising electricity generating system that can contribute towards achieving the 5.5% target and will be able to minimize the negative effects of utilizing fossil fuels for electricity generation on the environment. Malaysia is committed to Kyoto Protocol, which emphasizes on fighting global warming by achieving stabilization of greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere at a level that would prevent dangerous anthropogenic interference with the climate system. In this paper, the technical aspects of the implementation of optimum SEGS is discussed, especially pertaining to the positioning of the PV panels.

  5. Implementation of optimum solar electricity generating system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Balbir Singh Mahinder; Sivapalan, Subarna; Najib, Nurul Syafiqah Mohd; Menon, Pradeep; Karim, Samsul Ariffin A.

    2014-10-01

    Under the 10th Malaysian Plan, the government is expecting the renewable energy to contribute approximately 5.5% to the total electricity generation by the year 2015, which amounts to 98MW. One of the initiatives to ensure that the target is achievable was to establish the Sustainable Energy Development Authority of Malaysia. SEDA is given the authority to administer and manage the implementation of the feed-in tariff (FiT) mechanism which is mandated under the Renewable Energy Act 2011. The move to establish SEDA is commendable and the FiT seems to be attractive but there is a need to create awareness on the implementation of the solar electricity generating system (SEGS). In Malaysia, harnessing technologies related to solar energy resources have great potential for implementation. However, the main issue that plagues the implementation of SEGS is the intermittent nature of this source of energy. The availability of sunlight is during the day time, and there is a need for electrical energy storage system, so that there is electricity available during the night time as well. The meteorological condition such as clouds, haze and pollution affects the SEGS as well. The PV based SEGS is seems to be promising electricity generating system that can contribute towards achieving the 5.5% target and will be able to minimize the negative effects of utilizing fossil fuels for electricity generation on the environment. Malaysia is committed to Kyoto Protocol, which emphasizes on fighting global warming by achieving stabilization of greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere at a level that would prevent dangerous anthropogenic interference with the climate system. In this paper, the technical aspects of the implementation of optimum SEGS is discussed, especially pertaining to the positioning of the PV panels.

  6. Evidence of a Differential Effect of Ability Grouping on the Reading Achievement Growth of Language-Minority Hispanics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Joseph P.

    2008-01-01

    Ability grouping is sometimes thought to exacerbate inequality by increasing achievement gaps; however, ability grouping may in fact benefit a fast growing and often marginalized student population: children from non-English-speaking home environments. The level-appropriate, small-group instruction received in reading ability groups may be…

  7. Growth in Literacy and Numeracy Achievement: Evidence and Explanations of a Summer Slowdown in Low Socio-Economic Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vale, Colleen; Weaven, Mary; Davies, Anne; Hooley, Neil; Davidson, Kristy; Loton, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The phenomenon of summer slide or setback has gained a great deal of attention in the USA. It is understood to account for as much as 80% of the difference in achievement for students between low and high socio-economic families over their elementary schooling. In a mixed method longitudinal study of reforms in low socio-economic school…

  8. Math and Science Achievement in English Language Learners: Multivariate Latent Growth Modeling of Predictors, Mediators, and Moderators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guglielmi, R. Sergio

    2012-01-01

    The effectiveness of various strategies for educating the growing U.S. population of English language learners (ELLs) has attracted a great deal of controversy. Bilingual education theory posits that retention and continued development of native language (L1) skills facilitate academic achievement through two mediating mechanisms. First, L1…

  9. Viewing How STEM Project-Based Learning Influences Students' Science Achievement through the Implementation Lens: A Latent Growth Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erdogan, Niyazi; Navruz, Bilgin; Younes, Rayya; Capraro, Robert M.

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies on professional development programs indicate these programs, when sustained, have a positive impact on student achievement; however, many of these studies have failed to use longitudinal data. The purpose of this study is to understand how one particular instructional practice (STEM PBL) used consistently influences student…

  10. Optimum harvest maturity for Leymus chinensis seed.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jixiang; Wang, Yingnan; Qi, Mingming; Li, Xiaoyu; Yang, Chunxue; Wang, Yongcui; Mu, Chunsheng

    2016-01-01

    Timely harvest is critical to achieve maximum seed viability and vigour in agricultural production. However, little information exists concerning how to reap the best quality seeds of Leymus chinensis, which is the dominant and most promising grass species in the Songnen Grassland of Northern China. The objective of this study was to investigate and evaluate possible quality indices of the seeds at different days after peak anthesis. Seed quality at different development stages was assessed by the colours of the seed and lemmas, seed weight, moisture content, electrical conductivity of seed leachate and germination indices. Two consecutive years of experimental results showed that the maximum seed quality was recorded at 39 days after peak anthesis. At this date, the colours of the seed and lemmas reached heavy brown and yellow, respectively. The seed weight was highest and the moisture content and the electrical conductivity of seed leachate were lowest. In addition, the seed also reached its maximum germination percentage and energy at this stage, determined using a standard germination test (SGT) and accelerated ageing test (AAT). Thus, Leymus chinensis can be harvested at 39 days after peak anthesis based on the changes in parameters. Colour identification can be used as an additional indicator to provide a more rapid and reliable measure of optimum seed maturity; approximately 10 days after the colour of the lemmas reached yellow and the colour of the seed reached heavy brown, the seed of this species was suitable for harvest. PMID:27170257

  11. Improve filtration for optimum equipment reliability

    SciTech Connect

    Cervera, S.M.

    1996-01-01

    The introduction 20 years ago of the American Petroleum Institute Standard API-614 as a purchase specification for lubrication, shaft sealing and control oil systems, had a considerable impact and did much to improve system reliability at that time. Today, however, these recommendations regarding filter rating and flushing cleanliness are outdated. Much research in the tribology field correlates clearance size particulate contamination with accelerated component wear, fatigue and performance degradation. Some of these studies demonstrate that by decreasing the population of clearance size particulate in lubrication oils, component life increases exponentially. Knowing the dynamic clearances of a piece of machinery makes it possible, using the ISO 4406 Cleanliness Code, to determine what cleanliness level will minimize contamination-related component wear/fatigue and thus help optimize machinery performance and reliability. Data obtained by the author through random sampling of rotating equipment lube and seal oil systems indicate that the API-614 standard, as it pertains to filtration and flushing, is insufficient to ensure that particulate contamination is maintained to within the levels necessary to achieve optimum equipment reliability and safety, without increasing operating cost. Adopting and practicing the guidelines presented should result in the following benefits: (1) the frequency of bearing, oil pump, mechanical seal, fluid coupling, gearbox and hydraulic control valve failures would be minimized; (2) the mean time between planned maintenance (MTBPM) would be increased. The result will be a substantial increase in safety and cost savings to the operator.

  12. Optimum harvest maturity for Leymus chinensis seed

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jixiang; Wang, Yingnan; Qi, Mingming; Li, Xiaoyu; Yang, Chunxue; Wang, Yongcui

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Timely harvest is critical to achieve maximum seed viability and vigour in agricultural production. However, little information exists concerning how to reap the best quality seeds of Leymus chinensis, which is the dominant and most promising grass species in the Songnen Grassland of Northern China. The objective of this study was to investigate and evaluate possible quality indices of the seeds at different days after peak anthesis. Seed quality at different development stages was assessed by the colours of the seed and lemmas, seed weight, moisture content, electrical conductivity of seed leachate and germination indices. Two consecutive years of experimental results showed that the maximum seed quality was recorded at 39 days after peak anthesis. At this date, the colours of the seed and lemmas reached heavy brown and yellow, respectively. The seed weight was highest and the moisture content and the electrical conductivity of seed leachate were lowest. In addition, the seed also reached its maximum germination percentage and energy at this stage, determined using a standard germination test (SGT) and accelerated ageing test (AAT). Thus, Leymus chinensis can be harvested at 39 days after peak anthesis based on the changes in parameters. Colour identification can be used as an additional indicator to provide a more rapid and reliable measure of optimum seed maturity; approximately 10 days after the colour of the lemmas reached yellow and the colour of the seed reached heavy brown, the seed of this species was suitable for harvest. PMID:27170257

  13. Third and Final Shuttle Mission of the Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment Conducted: Highest Supercooling Ever Recorded Achieved

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glicksman, Martin E.; Malarik, Diane C.

    1999-01-01

    Dendrites describe the treelike crystal morphology commonly assumed in metals and alloys that freeze from supercooled or supersaturated melts. There remains a high level of engineering interest in dendritic solidification because the size, shape, and orientation of the dendrites determine the final microstructure of a material. It is the microstructure that then determines the physical properties of cast or welded products. Although it is well known that dendritic growth is controlled by the transport of latent heat from the moving solid-liquid interface, an accurate and predictive model has not yet been developed. The effects of gravity-induced convection on the transfer of heat from the interface have prevented adequate testing, under terrestrial conditions, of solidification models. The Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE) constituted a series of three microgravity experiments flown aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia. The apparatus was used to grow and record dendrite solidification in the absence of gravity-induced convective heat transfer, thereby producing a wealth of benchmark-quality data for testing solidification models and theories.

  14. Hype, harmony and human factors: applying user-centered design to achieve sustainable telehealth program adoption and growth.

    PubMed

    Rossos, P G; St-Cyr, O; Purdy, B; Toenjes, C; Masino, C; Chmelnitsky, D

    2015-01-01

    Despite decades of international experience with the use of information and communication technologies in healthcare delivery, widespread telehealth adoption remains limited and progress slow. Escalating health system challenges related to access, cost and quality currently coincide with rapid advancement of affordable and reliable internet based communication technologies creating unprecedented opportunities and incentives for telehealth. In this paper, we will describe how Human Factors Engineering (HFE) and user-centric elements have been incorporated into the establishment of telehealth within a large academic medical center to increase acceptance and sustainability. Through examples and lessons learned we wish to increase awareness of HFE and its importance in the successful implementation, innovation and growth of telehealth programs.

  15. Nuclear Symbiosis - A Means to Achieve Sustainable Nuclear Growth while Limiting the Spread of Sensititive Nuclear Technology

    SciTech Connect

    David Shropshire

    2009-09-01

    Global growth of nuclear energy in the 21st century is creating new challenges to limit the spread of nuclear technology without hindering adoption in countries now considering nuclear power. Independent nuclear states desire autonomy over energy choices and seek energy independence. However, this independence comes with high costs for development of new indigenous fuel cycle capabilities. Nuclear supplier states and expert groups have proposed fuel supply assurance mechanisms such as fuel take-back services, international enrichment services and fuel banks in exchange for recipient state concessions on the development of sensitive technologies. Nuclear states are slow to accept any concessions to their rights under the Non-Proliferation Treaty. To date, decisions not to develop indigenous fuel cycle capabilities have been driven primarily by economics. However, additional incentives may be required to offset a nuclear state’s perceived loss of energy independence. This paper proposes alternative economic development incentives that could help countries decide to forgo development of sensitive nuclear technologies. The incentives are created through a nuclear-centered industrial complex with “symbiotic” links to indigenous economic opportunities. This paper also describes a practical tool called the “Nuclear Materials Exchange” for identifying these opportunities.

  16. Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waag, Andreas

    , molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) delivers high quality ZnMgO-ZnO quantum well structures. Other thin film techniques such as PLD or MOCVD are also widely used. The main problem at present is to consistently achieve reliable p-type doping. For this topic, see also Chap. 5. In the past years, there have been numerous publications on p-type doping of ZnO, as well as ZnO p-n junctions and light emitting diodes (LEDs). However, a lot of these reports are in one way or the other inconsistent or at least incomplete. It is quite clear from optical data that once a reliable hole injection can be achieved, high brightness ZnO LEDs should be possible. In contrast to that expectation, none of the LEDs reported so far shows efficient light emission, as would be expected from a reasonable quality ZnO-based LED. See also Chap. 13. As a matter of fact, there seems to be no generally accepted and reliable technique for p-type doping available at present. The reason for this is the unfavorable position of the band structure of ZnO relative to the vacuum level, with a very low lying valence band. See also Fig. 5.1. This makes the incorporation of electrically active acceptors difficult. Another difficulty is the huge defect density in ZnO. There are many indications that defects play a major role in transport and doping. In order to solve the doping problem, it is generally accepted that the quality of the ZnO material grown by the various techniques needs to be improved. Therefore, the optimization of ZnO epitaxy is thought to play a key role in the further development of this material system. Besides being used as an active material in optoelectronic devices, ZnO plays a major role as transparent contact material in thin film solar cells. Polycrystalline, heavily n-type doped ZnO is used for this, combining a high electrical conductivity with a good optical transparency. In this case, ZnO thin films are fabricated by large area growth techniques such as sputtering. For this and other

  17. Towards optimum demodulation of bandwidth-limited and low SNR square-wave subcarrier signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feria, Y.; Hurd, W.

    1995-01-01

    The optimum phase detector is presented for tracking square-wave subcarriers that have been bandwidth limited to a finite number of harmonics. The phase detector is optimum in the sense that the loop signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is maximized and, hence, the rms phase tracking error is minimized. The optimum phase detector is easy to implement and achieves substantial improvement. Also presented are the optimum weights to combine the signals demodulated from each of the harmonics. The optimum weighting provides SNR improvement of 0.1 to 0.15 dB when the subcarrier loop SNR is low (15 dB) and the number of harmonics is high (8 to 16).

  18. Optimum viewing distance for target acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holst, Gerald C.

    2015-05-01

    Human visual system (HVS) "resolution" (a.k.a. visual acuity) varies with illumination level, target characteristics, and target contrast. For signage, computer displays, cell phones, and TVs a viewing distance and display size are selected. Then the number of display pixels is chosen such that each pixel subtends 1 min-1. Resolution of low contrast targets is quite different. It is best described by Barten's contrast sensitivity function. Target acquisition models predict maximum range when the display pixel subtends 3.3 min-1. The optimum viewing distance is nearly independent of magnification. Noise increases the optimum viewing distance.

  19. Optimum Detection of Frequency-Hopped Signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Unjeng; Levitt, Barry; Polydoros, Andreas; Simon, Marvin K.

    1992-01-01

    This paper derives and analyzes optimum and near-optimum structures for detecting frequency-hopped (FH) signals with arbitrary modulation in additive white Gaussian noise. The principalmodulation formats considered are M-ary frequency-shift-keying (MFSK) with fast frequency hopping(FFH) wherein a single tone is transmitted per hop, and slow frequency hopping (SFH) with multipleMFSK tones (data symbols) per hop. The SFH detection category has not previously been addressedin the open literature and its analysis is generally more complex than FFH.

  20. Method for Determining Optimum Injector Inlet Geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, Huu P. (Inventor); Myers, W. Neill (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A method for determining the optimum inlet geometry of a liquid rocket engine swirl injector includes obtaining a throttleable level phase value, volume flow rate, chamber pressure, liquid propellant density, inlet injector pressure, desired target spray angle and desired target optimum delta pressure value between an inlet and a chamber for a plurality of engine stages. The method calculates the tangential inlet area for each throttleable stage. The method also uses correlation between the tangential inlet areas and delta pressure values to calculate the spring displacement and variable inlet geometry of a liquid rocket engine swirl injector.

  1. Optimum Stack Position Within a Bottle-shaped Thermoacoustic Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassett, Elwin; Andersen, Bonnie

    2009-10-01

    Thermoacoustics involves turning heat energy into acoustic energy, or using sound to pump heat. A thermoacoustic engine with a transducer could be used, for example, to convert solar energy incident on a satellite into sound and then into electricity. This research focused on the optimization of stack placement within a bottle-shaped 1.4 kHz engine to achieve maximum acoustic pressure. The prime mover consisted of two connected cylinders: the bottle neck, 5 cm long and 1 cm in radius, and a cavity, 10 cm long and 2 cm in radius, with the stack located within the middle of the neck. Sound intensity is a function of both pressure and velocity; therefore, maximum intensity should be found in between their nodes. However, a phase shift is introduced for the velocity due to the thermoacoustic effect and the optimum position will not be exactly between the nodes. Therefore, 9 different stack positions within the neck were tested to determine the optimum location. The optimum was found to be 39% away from the closed end of the neck, which improved acoustic pressure by 50%. Further testing is planned, to verify the results and test different configurations.

  2. Modeling and optimum time performance for concurrent processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mielke, Roland R.; Stoughton, John W.; Som, Sukhamoy

    1988-01-01

    The development of a new graph theoretic model for describing the relation between a decomposed algorithm and its execution in a data flow environment is presented. Called ATAMM, the model consists of a set of Petri net marked graphs useful for representing decision-free algorithms having large-grained, computationally complex primitive operations. Performance time measures which determine computing speed and throughput capacity are defined, and the ATAMM model is used to develop lower bounds for these times. A concurrent processing operating strategy for achieving optimum time performance is presented and illustrated by example.

  3. Inverse design of nonlinearity in energy harvesters for optimum damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghandchi Tehrani, Maryam; Elliott, S. J.

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents the inverse design method for the nonlinearity in an energy harvester in order to achieve an optimum damping. A single degree-of-freedom electromechanical oscillator is considered as an energy harvester, which is subjected to a harmonic base excitation. The harvester has a limited throw due to the physical constraint of the device, which means that the amplitude of the relative displacement between the mass of the harvester and the base cannot exceed a threshold when the device is driven at resonance and beyond a particular amplitude. This physical constraint requires the damping of the harvester to be adjusted for different excitation amplitudes, such that the relative displacement is controlled and maintained below the limit. For example, the damping can be increased to reduce the amplitude of the relative displacement. For high excitation amplitudes, the optimum damping is, therefore, dependent on the amplitude of the base excitation, and can be synthesised by a nonlinear function. In this paper, a nonlinear function in the form of a bilinear is considered to represent the damping model of the device. A numerical optimisation using Matlab is carried out to fit a curve to the amplitude-dependent damping in order to determine the optimum bilinear model. The nonlinear damping is then used in the time-domain simulations and the relative displacement and the average harvested power are obtained. It is demonstrated that the proposed nonlinear damping can maintain the relative displacement of the harvester at its maximum level for a wide range of excitation, therefore providing the optimum condition for power harvesting.

  4. Fast optimum decoding for nonadditive readable watermarking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baitello, Riccardo; Barni, Mauro; Bartolini, Franco; Caldelli, Roberto; De Rosa, Alessia

    2001-08-01

    Watermarking algorithms for copyright protection are usually classified as belonging to one of two classes: detectable and readable. The aim of this paper is to present a possible approach for transforming an optimum, detectable technique previously proposed by the authors into a readable one. Similarly to what has been done previously by other authors we embed multiple copies of the watermark into the image, letting their relative positions in the frequency domain to be related to the informative message. The main drawback of this approach is that all copies of the watermark have to be detected without knowing their positions, i.e. all possible positions (many tenth thousands in our case) have to be tested, which is a prohibitive task from the point of view of the computational cost. Correlation based watermark detectors can overcome this problem by exploiting the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) algorithm, but they are not optimum in the case of non additive watermarks. In this paper we demonstrate how the formula of the optimum watermark detector can be re-conducted to a correlation structure, thus allowing us to use the FFT for testing the watermark presence at all possible positions: in this way a fast optimum decoding system is obtained.

  5. Optimum Building Shapes for Energy Conservation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berkoz, Esher Balkan

    1977-01-01

    An approach to optimum building shape design is summarized that is based on local climate and is especially important for heat control in lower cost construction with temperature-responsive thermal characteristics. The study was supported by Istanbul Technical University. For journal availability see HE 508 931. (Author/LBH)

  6. Common Core: Teaching Optimum Topic Exploration (TOTE)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karge, Belinda Dunnick; Moore, Roxane Kushner

    2015-01-01

    The Common Core has become a household term and yet many educators do not understand what it means. This article explains the historical perspectives of the Common Core and gives guidance to teachers in application of Teaching Optimum Topic Exploration (TOTE) necessary for full implementation of the Common Core State Standards. An effective…

  7. Suppressing Nitrite-oxidizing Bacteria Growth to Achieve Nitrogen Removal from Domestic Wastewater via Anammox Using Intermittent Aeration with Low Dissolved Oxygen

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Bin; Bao, Peng; Wei, Yan; Zhu, Guibing; Yuan, Zhiguo; Peng, Yongzhen

    2015-01-01

    Achieving nitrogen removal from domestic wastewater using anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) has the potential to make wastewater treatment energy-neutral or even energy-positive. The challenge is to suppress the growth of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB). This study presents a promising method based on intermittent aeration with low dissolved oxygen to limit NOB growth, thereby providing an advantage to anammox bacteria to form a partnership with the ammonium-oxidizing bacteria (AOB). The results showed that NOB was successfully suppressed using that method, with the relative abundance of NOB maintained between 2.0–2.6%, based on Fluorescent in-situ Hybridization. Nitrogen could be effectively removed from domestic wastewater with anammox at a temperature above 20 °C, with an effluent total nitrogen (TN) concentration of 6.6 ± 2.7 mg/L, while the influent TN and soluble chemical oxygen demand were 62.6 ± 3.1 mg/L and 88.0 ± 8.1 mg/L, respectively. PMID:26354321

  8. Optimum Projection Angle for Attaining Maximum Distance in a Soccer Punt Kick

    PubMed Central

    Linthorne, Nicholas P.; Patel, Dipesh S.

    2011-01-01

    To produce the greatest horizontal distance in a punt kick the ball must be projected at an appropriate angle. Here, we investigated the optimum projection angle that maximises the distance attained in a punt kick by a soccer goalkeeper. Two male players performed many maximum-effort kicks using projection angles of between 10° and 90°. The kicks were recorded by a video camera at 100 Hz and a 2 D biomechanical analysis was conducted to obtain measures of the projection velocity, projection angle, projection height, ball spin rate, and foot velocity at impact. The player’s optimum projection angle was calculated by substituting mathematical equations for the relationships between the projection variables into the equations for the aerodynamic flight of a soccer ball. The calculated optimum projection angles were in agreement with the player’s preferred projection angles (40° and 44°). In projectile sports even a small dependence of projection velocity on projection angle is sufficient to produce a substantial shift in the optimum projection angle away from 45°. In the punt kicks studied here, the optimum projection angle was close to 45° because the projection velocity of the ball remained almost constant across all projection angles. This result is in contrast to throwing and jumping for maximum distance, where the projection velocity the athlete is able to achieve decreases substantially with increasing projection angle and so the optimum projection angle is well below 45°. Key points The optimum projection angle that maximizes the distance of a punt kick by a soccer goalkeeper is about 45°. The optimum projection angle is close to 45° because the projection velocity of the ball is almost the same at all projection angles. This result is in contrast to throwing and jumping for maximum distance, where the optimum projection angle is well below 45° because the projection velocity the athlete is able to achieve decreases substantially with increasing

  9. OPTIMUM PLASMA STATES FOR NEXT STEP TOKAMAKS

    SciTech Connect

    LIN-LIU,YR; STAMBAUGH,RD

    2002-11-01

    OAK A271 OPTIMUM PLASMA STATES FOR NEXT STEP TOKAMAKS. The dependence of the ideal ballooning {beta} limit on aspect ratio, A, and elongation {kappa} is systematically explored for nearly 100% bootstrap current driven tokamak equilibria in a wide range of the shape parameters (A = 1.2-7.0, {kappa} = 1.5-6.0 with triangularity {delta} = 0.5). The critical {beta}{sub N} is shown to be optimal at {kappa} = 3.0-4.0 for all A studied and increases as A decreases with a dependence close to A{sup -0.5}. The results obtained can be used as a theoretical basis for the choice of optimum aspect ratio and elongation of next step burning plasma tokamaks or tokamak reactors.

  10. Active magnetic bearings for optimum turbomachinery design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hustak, J.; Kirk, R. G.; Schoeneck, K. A.

    1985-01-01

    The design and shop test results are given for a high speed eight stage centrifugal compressor supported by active magnetic bearings. A brief summary of the rotor dynamics analysis is presented with specific attention given to design considerations for optimum rotor stability. The concerns for retrofit of magnetic bearings in existing machinery are discussed with supporting analysis of a four stage centrifugal compressor. Recommendations are given on design and analysis requirements for successful machinery operation of either retrofit or new design turbomachinery.

  11. Web-dendritic ribbon growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilborn, R. B., Jr.; Faust, J. W., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    A web furnace was constructed for pulling dendritic-web samples. The effect of changes in the furnace thermal geometry on the growth of dendritic-web was studied. Several attempts were made to grow primitive dendrites for use as the dendritic seed crystals for web growth and to determine the optimum twin spacing in the dendritic seed crystal for web growth. Mathematical models and computer programs were used to determine the thermal geometries in the susceptor, crucible melt, meniscus, and web. Several geometries were determined for particular furnace geometries and growth conditions. The information obtained was used in conjunction with results from the experimental growth investigations in order to achieve proper conditions for sustained pulling of two dendrite web ribbons. In addition, the facilities for obtaining the following data were constructed: twin spacing, dislocation density, web geometry, resistivity, majority charge carrier type, and minority carrier lifetime.

  12. The Application of Various Nonlinear Models to Describe Academic Growth Trajectories: An Empirical Analysis Using Four-Wave Longitudinal Achievement Data from a Large Urban School District

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shin, Tacksoo

    2012-01-01

    This study introduced various nonlinear growth models, including the quadratic conventional polynomial model, the fractional polynomial model, the Sigmoid model, the growth model with negative exponential functions, the multidimensional scaling technique, and the unstructured growth curve model. It investigated which growth models effectively…

  13. Development of Non-Optimum Factors for Launch Vehicle Propellant Tank Bulkhead Weight Estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, K. Chauncey; Wallace, Matthew L.; Cerro, Jeffrey A.

    2012-01-01

    Non-optimum factors are used during aerospace conceptual and preliminary design to account for the increased weights of as-built structures due to future manufacturing and design details. Use of higher-fidelity non-optimum factors in these early stages of vehicle design can result in more accurate predictions of a concept s actual weights and performance. To help achieve this objective, non-optimum factors are calculated for the aluminum-alloy gores that compose the ogive and ellipsoidal bulkheads of the Space Shuttle Super-Lightweight Tank propellant tanks. Minimum values for actual gore skin thicknesses and weld land dimensions are extracted from selected production drawings, and are used to predict reference gore weights. These actual skin thicknesses are also compared to skin thicknesses predicted using classical structural mechanics and tank proof-test pressures. Both coarse and refined weights models are developed for the gores. The coarse model is based on the proof pressure-sized skin thicknesses, and the refined model uses the actual gore skin thicknesses and design detail dimensions. To determine the gore non-optimum factors, these reference weights are then compared to flight hardware weights reported in a mass properties database. When manufacturing tolerance weight estimates are taken into account, the gore non-optimum factors computed using the coarse weights model range from 1.28 to 2.76, with an average non-optimum factor of 1.90. Application of the refined weights model yields non-optimum factors between 1.00 and 1.50, with an average non-optimum factor of 1.14. To demonstrate their use, these calculated non-optimum factors are used to predict heavier, more realistic gore weights for a proposed heavy-lift launch vehicle s propellant tank bulkheads. These results indicate that relatively simple models can be developed to better estimate the actual weights of large structures for future launch vehicles.

  14. Optimum design of concrete cable-stayed bridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, Alberto M. B.; Simões, Luís M. C.; Negrão, João H. J. O.

    2016-05-01

    The design of cable-stayed bridges involves a significant number of design variables and design objectives. The concrete cable-stayed bridge optimization is formulated here as a multi-objective optimization problem with objectives of minimum cost, minimum deflections and minimum stresses. A numerical method is developed to obtain the optimum design of such structures. This numerical method includes: structural analysis, sensitivity analysis and optimization. The structural analysis accounts for all the relevant effects (concrete time-dependent effects, construction stages and geometrical nonlinear effects). The structural response to changes in the design variables is achieved by a discrete direct sensitivity analysis procedure, and an entropy-based approach was used for structural optimization. The features and applicability of the proposed method are demonstrated by numerical examples concerning the optimization of a real-sized concrete cable-stayed bridge.

  15. Optimum performance of suppressed carrier receivers with Costas loop tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, M. K.; Lindsey, W. C.

    1977-01-01

    The performance of suppressed carrier receivers with Costas loop tracking is optimized by proper choice of loop arm filter bandwidth. In particular, it is shown that for a variety of passive arm filter types, there exists, for a given data rate and data signal-to-noise ratio, an optimum filter bandwidth in the sense of minimizing the loop's squaring loss. For the linear theory case, this is equivalent to minimizing the loop's tracking jitter. When symbol synchronization is known, it is shown that by replacing the passive arm filters with active filters, i.e., integrate-and-dump circuits, one can achieve an improvement in carrier-to-noise ratio of as much as 4 to 6 dB depending on the passive arm filter type used for comparison and the value of data signal-to-noise ratio.

  16. Simpler Alternative to an Optimum FQPSK-B Viterbi Receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Dennis; Simon, Marvin; Yan, Tsun-Yee

    2003-01-01

    A reduced-complexity alternative to an optimum FQPSK-B Viterbi receiver has been invented. As described, the reduction in complexity is achieved at the cost of only a small reduction in power performance [performance expressed in terms of a bit-energy-to-noise-energy ratio (Eb/N0) for a given bit-error rate (BER)]. The term "FQPSK-B" denotes a baseband-filtered version of Feher quadrature-phase-shift keying, which is a patented, bandwidth-efficient phase-modulation scheme named after its inventor. Heretofore, commercial FQPSK-B receivers have performed symbol-by-symbol detection, in each case using a detection filter (either the proprietary FQPSK-B filter for better BER performance, or a simple integrate-and-dump filter with degraded performance) and a sample-and-hold circuit.

  17. Incorporating spatial criteria in optimum reserve network selection.

    PubMed Central

    Onal, Hayri; Briers, Robert A

    2002-01-01

    Considering the spatial location of sites that are to be selected for inclusion in a protected reserve network may be necessary to facilitate dispersal and long-term persistence of species in the selected sites. This paper presents an integer programming (IP) approach to the reserve network selection problem where spatial considerations based on intersite distances are taken into account when selecting reserve sites. The objective is to reduce the fragmentation of preserved sites and design a compact reserve network. Two IP formulations are developed which minimize the sum of pairwise distances and the maximum intersite distance between all sites in the reserve network, respectively, while representing all species under consideration. This approach is applied to a pond invertebrate dataset consisting of 131 sites containing 256 species in Oxfordshire, UK. The results show that significant reductions in reserve fragmentation can be achieved, compared with spatially unrestricted optimum reserve selection, at the expense of a small loss in reserve efficiency. PMID:12495486

  18. Within-field variability in optimum nitrogen rate for corn linked to soil moisture variability

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Understanding the interaction between yield response to N and other growth-limiting factors is essential to improving spatially dependent N fertilizer applications. Our objective was to evaluate the impact of soil water content variability on the economic optimum N rate (EONR) for corn (Zea mays L.)...

  19. Method of thermally processing superplastically formed aluminum-lithium alloys to obtain optimum strengthening

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anton, Claire E. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Optimum strengthening of a superplastically formed aluminum-lithium alloy structure is achieved via a thermal processing technique which eliminates the conventional step of solution heat-treating immediately following the step of superplastic forming of the structure. The thermal processing technique involves quenching of the superplastically formed structure using static air, forced air or water quenching.

  20. The optimum finger spacing in human swimming.

    PubMed

    Minetti, Alberto E; Machtsiras, Georgios; Masters, Jonathan C

    2009-09-18

    Competitive swimmers spread fingers during the propulsive stroke. Due to the inherent inefficiency of human swimming, the question is: does this strategy enhance performance or is it just a more comfortable hand posture? Here we show, through computational fluid dynamics (CFD) of a 3D model of the hand, that an optimal finger spacing (12 degrees , roughly corresponding to the resting hand posture) increases the drag coefficient (+8.8%), which is 'functionally equivalent' to a greater hand palm area, thus a lower stroke frequency can produce the same thrust, with benefits to muscle, hydraulic and propulsive efficiencies. CFD, through flow visualization, provides an explanation for the increased drag associated with the optimum finger spacing. PMID:19651409

  1. Optimum frequency assignment for satellite SCPC systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okinaka, H.; Yasuda, Y.; Hirata, Y.

    A technique for deriving a quasi-optimum solution for IM-minimum channel allocation for single-level SCPC systems is presented. Two types of IM products are considered as the dominant components in an RF band. The third order IM product is proportional to the product of the power of concerned carriers, allowing a weighting function to be defined for calculating the IM noise. An IM minimum channel allocation technique can then be used to reduce the IM noise occurring in the carrier slots through frequency assignment. The worst carrier is automatically deleted with an initial channel allocation and the process is iterated until the maximum noise reduction is obtained. The first two or three carriers are assigned to unused frequency slots with low noise. The method is also viable when dealing with a larger number of carriers.

  2. The ELLIPSO (tm) system: Elliptical low orbits for mobile communications and other optimum system elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castiel, David

    1991-01-01

    On 5 Nov. 1990, Ellipsat filed with the FCC the first application to provide voice communication services via low earth orbiting (LEO) satellites. The proposed system, ELLIPSO, aims at achieving end-user costs comparable to those in the cellular industry. On 3 Jun. 1991 Ellipsat filed for the second complement of its system. Ellipsat was also the first company to propose combined position determination and mobile voice services via low-earth orbiting satellites. Ellipsat is still the only proponent of elliptical orbits for any commercial system in the United States. ELLIPSO uses a spectrum efficient combination of FDMA and CDMA techniques. Ellipsat's strategy is to tailor required capacity to user demand, reduce initial system costs and investment risks, and allow the provision of services at affordable end-user prices. ELLIPSO offers optimum features in all the components of its system, elliptical orbits, small satellites, integrated protocol and signalling system, integrated end-user electronics, novel marketing approach based on the cooperation with the tenets of mobile communications, end-user costs that are affordable, and a low risk approach as deployment is tailored to the growth of its customer base. The efficient design of the ELLIPSO constellation and system allows estimated end-user costs in the $.50 per minute range, five to six times less than any other system of comparable capability.

  3. The ELLIPSO (tm) system: Elliptical low orbits for mobile communications and other optimum system elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castiel, David

    1991-09-01

    On 5 Nov. 1990, Ellipsat filed with the FCC the first application to provide voice communication services via low earth orbiting (LEO) satellites. The proposed system, ELLIPSO, aims at achieving end-user costs comparable to those in the cellular industry. On 3 Jun. 1991 Ellipsat filed for the second complement of its system. Ellipsat was also the first company to propose combined position determination and mobile voice services via low-earth orbiting satellites. Ellipsat is still the only proponent of elliptical orbits for any commercial system in the United States. ELLIPSO uses a spectrum efficient combination of FDMA and CDMA techniques. Ellipsat's strategy is to tailor required capacity to user demand, reduce initial system costs and investment risks, and allow the provision of services at affordable end-user prices. ELLIPSO offers optimum features in all the components of its system, elliptical orbits, small satellites, integrated protocol and signalling system, integrated end-user electronics, novel marketing approach based on the cooperation with the tenets of mobile communications, end-user costs that are affordable, and a low risk approach as deployment is tailored to the growth of its customer base. The efficient design of the ELLIPSO constellation and system allows estimated end-user costs in the $.50 per minute range, five to six times less than any other system of comparable capability.

  4. The Effects of Middle School Bullying and Victimization on Adjustment through High School: Growth Modeling of Achievement, School Attendance, and Disciplinary Trajectories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldman, Marissa A.; Ojanen, Tiina; Gesten, Ellis L.; Smith-Schrandt, Heather; Brannick, Michael; Wienke Totura, Christine M.; Alexander, Lizette; Scanga, David; Brown, Ken

    2014-01-01

    The current 5-year longitudinal study examined the effects of middle school bullying and victimization on adolescent academic achievement, disciplinary referrals, and school attendance through high school (N = 2030; 1016 both boys and girls). Greater engagement in bullying behaviors was concurrently associated with lower achievement and school…

  5. Fatty acid as structure directing agent for controlled secondary growth of CoFe2O4 nanoparticles to achieve mesoscale assemblies: A facile approach for developing hierarchical structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saikia, K.; Kaushik, S. D.; Sen, D.; Mazumder, S.; Deb, P.

    2016-08-01

    Mesoscale hierarchical assemblies have emerged out as a new class of structures between fine dimension nanoparticles and bulk structures, having distinctly different physical properties from either side. Controlling the self-assembly process of primary nanoparticles and subsequent secondary growth mechanism is the key aspect for achieving such ordered structures. In this work, we introduce a new insight on achieving hierarchical assemblies of CoFe2O4 nanoparticles based on the temporal stability of the primary nanoparticles, where, the growth and stability of the primary particles are controlled by using oleic acid. It is found that the developed particles, at a critical concentration of oleic acid, prefer a secondary growth process, rather than promoting their individual growth. Domination of the attractive hydrophobic interaction over steric repulsion among the primary particles at this critical concentration of oleic acid is found to be the key factor for the initial aggregation of the primary particles, which eventually leads to the formation of spherical hierarchical assemblies via oriented attachment. It is also realized that the extremely well or poor stability conditions of the primary particles do not allow this secondary growth process. Estimated values of Co2+ distribution factor show that the cation distribution factor of CoFe2O4 system is not affected by the nature of dominant growth processes, when these are controlled. Interestingly, magnetic measurements reflect the stronger interparticle interaction in the hierarchical system and high magnetic moment values at low magnetic field.

  6. Optimum coding techniques for MST radars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sulzer, M. P.; Woodman, R. F.

    1986-01-01

    The optimum coding technique for MST (mesosphere stratosphere troposphere) radars is that which gives the lowest possible sidelobes in practice and can be implemented without too much computing power. Coding techniques are described in Farley (1985). A technique mentioned briefly there but not fully developed and not in general use is discussed here. This is decoding by means of a filter which is not matched to the transmitted waveform, in order to reduce sidelobes below the level obtained with a matched filter. This is the first part of the technique discussed here; the second part consists of measuring the transmitted waveform and using it as the basis for the decoding filter, thus reducing errors due to imperfections in the transmitter. There are two limitations to this technique. The first is a small loss in signal to noise ratio (SNR), which usually is not significant. The second problem is related to incomplete information received at the lowest ranges. An appendix shows a technique for handling this problem. Finally, it is shown that the use of complementary codes on transmission and nonmatched decoding gives the lowest possible sidelobe level and the minimum loss in SNR due to mismatch.

  7. Optimum folding pathways for growing protein chains.

    PubMed

    Senturk, Serife; Baday, Sefer; Arkun, Yaman; Erman, Burak

    2007-11-26

    The folding of a protein is studied as it grows residue by residue from the N-terminus and enters an environment that stabilizes the folded state. This mode of folding of a growing chain is different from refolding where the full chain folds from a disordered initial configuration to the native state. We propose a sequential dynamic optimization method that computes the evolution of optimum folding pathways as amino acid residues are added to the peptide chain one by one. The dynamic optimization formulation is deterministic and uses Newton's equations of motion and a Go-type potential that establishes the native contacts and excluded volume effects. The method predicts the optimal energy-minimizing path among all the alternative feasible pathways. As two examples, the folding of the chicken villin headpiece, a 36-residue protein, and chymotrypsin inhibitor 2 (CI2), a 64-residue protein, are studied. Results on the villin headpiece show significant differences from the refolding of the same chain studied previously. Results on CI2 mostly agree with the results of refolding experiments and computational work.

  8. Optimum color filters for CCD digital cameras.

    PubMed

    Engelhardt, K; Seitz, P

    1993-06-01

    A procedure for the definition of optimum spectral transmission curves for any solid-state (especially silicon-based CCD) color camera is presented. The design of the target curves is based on computer simulation of the camera system and on the use of test colors with known spectral reflectances. Color errors are measured in a uniform color space (CIELUV) and by application of the Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage color difference formula. Dielectric filter stacks were designed by simulated thermal annealing, and a stripe filter pattern was fabricated with transmission properties close to the specifications. Optimization of the color transformation minimizes the residual average color error and an average color error of ~1 just noticeable difference should be feasible. This means that color differences on a side-to-side comparison of original and reproduced color are practically imperceptible. In addition, electrical cross talk within the solid-state imager can be compensated by adapting the color matrixing coefficients. The theoretical findings of this work were employed for the design and fabrication of a high-resolution digital CCD color camera with high calorimetric accuracy. PMID:20829908

  9. Natural sniffing gives optimum odour perception for humans.

    PubMed

    Laing, D G

    1983-01-01

    The characteristics of human sniffing episodes during odour perception have been described in an earlier paper, where it has been suggested that the techniques used by individuals may be close to those providing optimum perception. To investigate this suggestion, threshold and intensity tests with butanol, cyclohexanone, and pentyl acetate have been carried out on twenty-one subjects. Olfactory responses obtained by using natural sniffing techniques were compared with those where the number of sniffs, interval between sniffs, and size of sniffs were varied. The results indicate that it is very difficult to improve on the efficiency of sniffing techniques of individuals and that a single natural sniff provides as much information about the presence and intensity of an odour as do seven or more sniffs. A single natural sniff and the first sniff of a a natural sniffing episode were shown to have similar characteristics and most significantly both were unaffected by changes in the concentration and type of odour. Overall, the results indicate that humans achieve optimum odour perception during threshold and intensity measures with their natural multiple-sniff technique or with a single sniff. For the 'average' human this occurs with a sniff of inhalation rate 30 1 min-1, volume 200 cm3, and duration 0.4 s. The use of several sniffs in a sniffing episode appears to be a confirmatory action rather than a necessary one, except for the perception of odour mixtures where several sniffs are likely to be needed to aid discrimination of the components. Data from the present and earlier study provide the information necessary for the development of a standard olfactometer and standard procedures for measuring the olfactory responses of humans. PMID:6657430

  10. The use of ECDIS equipment to achieve an optimum value for energy efficiency operation index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acomi, N.; Acomi, O. C.; Stanca, C.

    2015-11-01

    To reduce air pollution produced by ships, the International Maritime Organization has developed a set of technical, operational and management measures. The subject of our research addresses the operational measures for minimizing CO2 air emissions and the way how the emission value could be influenced by external factors regardless of ship-owners’ will. This study aims to analyse the air emissions for a loaded voyage leg performed by an oil tanker. The formula that allows us to calculate the predicted Energy Efficiency Operational Index involves the estimation of distance and fuel consumption, while the quantity of cargo is known. The electronic chart display and information system, ECDIS Simulation Software, will be used for adjusting the passage plan in real time, given the predicted severe environmental conditions. The distance will be determined using ECDIS, while the prediction of the fuel consumption will consider the sea trial and the vessel experience records. That way it will be possible to compare the estimated EEOI value in the case of great circle navigation in adverse weather condition with the estimated EEOI value for weather navigation.

  11. Slow release of growth factors and thrombospondin-1 in Choukroun's platelet-rich fibrin (PRF): a gold standard to achieve for all surgical platelet concentrates technologies.

    PubMed

    Dohan Ehrenfest, David M; de Peppo, Giuseppe M; Doglioli, Pierre; Sammartino, Gilberto

    2009-02-01

    Platelet concentrates for surgical topical applications are nowadays often used, but quantification of the long-term growth factor release from these preparations in most cases is impossible. Indeed, in most protocols, platelets are massively activated and there is no significant fibrin matrix to support growth factor release and cell migration. Choukroun's platelet-rich fibrin (PRF), a second generation platelet concentrate, is a leucocyte- and platelet-rich fibrin biomaterial. Here, we show that this dense fibrin membrane releases high quantities of three main growth factors (Transforming Growth Factor b-1 (TGFbeta-1), platelet derived growth factor AB, PDGF-AB; vascular endothelial growth factor, VEGF) and an important coagulation matricellular glycoprotein (thrombospondin-1, TSP-1) during 7 days. Moreover, the comparison between the final released amounts and the initial content of the membrane (after forcible extraction) allows us to consider that the leucocytes trapped in the fibrin matrix continue to produce high quantities of TGFbeta-1 and VEGF during the whole experimental time.

  12. On the optimum fields and bounds for heat and mass transport in two turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitanov, Nikolay

    2011-12-01

    The optimum theory of turbulence is one of the few tools for obtaining analytical results for transport of heat, mass or momentum by turbulent flows. This is achieved by asymptotic theory which is valid for large values of the characteristic numbers of the investigated fluid system. For small and intermediate values of the Reynolds, Rayleigh or Taylor numbers we have to solve numerically the Euler-Lagrange equations of the corresponding variational problems. Below we discuss numerical results from the application of the Howard-Busse method of the optimum theory of turbulence to two problems: convective heat transport in non-rotating and rotating fluid layer and mass transport in pipe flow. We obtain profiles of the optimum fields and discuss the evolution of the thickness of the boundary layers as well as present our first results about the lower bound on the mass transport in a pipe flow.

  13. Study on Ply Orientation Optimum Design for Composite Material Structure Based on Genetic Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lei; Ma, Ai-Jun

    2016-05-01

    To find the optimum design of ply orientation for composite material structure, we proposed a method based on genetic algorithm and executed on a composite frame case. Firstly we gave the descriptions of the structure including solid model and mechanical property of the material and then created the finite element model of composite frame and set a static load step to get the displacement of cared node. Then we created the optimization mathematical model and used genetic algorithm to find the global optimal solution of the optimization problem, and finally achieved the best layer angle of the composite material case. The ply orientation optimum design made a good performance as the results showed that the objective function dropped by 16.6%. This case can might provide a reference for ply orientation optimum design of similar composite structure.

  14. A Study of Optimum Population Levels—A Progress Report*

    PubMed Central

    Singer, S. Fred

    1972-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore different approaches and to develop a methodology that will allow a calculation of “optimum levels of population.” The discussion is specialized to the United States, but the methodology should be broad enough to handle other countries, including less-developed countries. The study is based on economics, but with major inputs from the areas of technology, natural resources management, environmental effects, and demography. The general approach will be to develop an index for quality of life (IQL or Q-index) and to maximize this index as a function of level and distribution of population. The technique consists of a reshuffling of national income accounts so as to be able to go from the Gross National Product (GNP) to the index for quality of life, plus a careful discussion of what is and what is not to be included. The initial part of the study consists of a projection of the index for quality of life as population level increases and as population distribution changes, under the assumption of various technologies, particularly as these relate to the consumption of minerals, energy, and other natural resources. One would expect that as economic growth continues, an increasing fraction of expenditures would be for the diseconomics produced by population growth and economic growth. This study should be useful by providing a rational base for governmental policies regarding population, both in the United States and abroad. Another application of the study is to technology assessment, by measurement of the impact on economic well-being through the introduction of new technologies. Therefore, one can gauge the necessary and desirable investments in certain new technologies. In general, mathematical models resulting from this study can become useful diagnostic tools to analyze the consequences of various public and private policy decisions. PMID:4509346

  15. Optimum shape of a blunt forebody in hypersonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maestrello, L.; Ting, L.

    1989-01-01

    The optimum shape of a blunt forebody attached to a symmetric wedge or cone is determined. The length of the forebody, its semi-thickness or base radius, the nose radius and the radius of the fillet joining the forebody to the wedge or cone are specified. The optimum shape is composed of simple curves. Thus experimental models can be built readily to investigate the utilization of aerodynamic heating for boundary layer control. The optimum shape based on the modified Newtonian theory can also serve as the preliminary shape for the numerical solution of the optimum shape using the governing equations for a compressible inviscid or viscous flow.

  16. Family and Contextual Socioeconomic Effects across Seasons: When Do They Matter for the Achievement Growth of Young Children? WCER Working Paper No. 2007-5, August 2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benson, James G.; Borman, Geoffrey D.

    2007-01-01

    Researchers have disagreed about the extent to which differences in achievement based on socioeconomic status (SES) accumulate during the school year as compared to the summer, and the literature has not fully assessed the contributions of social contexts--in the form of both school and neighborhood poverty concentration and racial and ethnic…

  17. 1 + 1 Is Not Always 2: Variation in the Relations between Mathematics Self-Efficacy Development and Longitudinal Mathematics Achievement Growth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shanley, Lina

    2015-01-01

    Preparing every student to be college and career ready by the time they graduate from high school has become a national policy priority. Although a variety of academic skills are required for postsecondary success, mathematics achievement is a particularly influential factor in college and career readiness (Pellegrino & Hilton, 2012). Research…

  18. The Economic Benefits of Closing Educational Achievement Gaps: Promoting Growth and Strengthening the Nation by Improving the Educational Outcomes of Children of Color

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Robert G.; Oakford, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Our nation is currently experiencing growing levels of income and wealth inequality, which are contributing to longstanding racial and ethnic gaps in education outcomes and other areas. This report quantifies the economic benefits of closing one of the most harmful racial and ethnic gaps: the educational achievement gap that exists between black…

  19. The Relationship of Leadership Styles, Gender and Years of Experience of Middle School Principals in North Carolina on Achievement and Growth Trends on the End of Grade Exams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Morris, Jr.

    2009-01-01

    Leadership is an ever changing process and principals play a key role in the instructional focus of a school which often times created success in instruction (Riordan, 2003). Principals face different challenges today while improving schools and student academic achievement. The perceptions of an effective school leader has changed over the years…

  20. Linking Student Achievement Growth to Professional Development Participation and Changes in Instruction: A Longitudinal Study of Elementary Students and Teachers in Title I Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Desimone, Laura; Smith, Thomas M.; Phillips, Kristie J. R.

    2013-01-01

    Background/Context: Most reforms in elementary education rely on teacher learning and improved instruction to increase student learning. This study increases our understanding of which types of professional development effectively change teaching practice in ways that boost student achievement. Purpose/Objective/Research Question/Focus of Study:…

  1. Inhibition of growth of nonproteolytic Clostridium botulinum type B in sous vide cooked meat products is achieved by using thermal processing but not nisin.

    PubMed

    Lindström, M; Mokkila, M; Skyttä, E; Hyytiä-Trees, E; Lähteenmäki, L; Hielm, S; Ahvenainen, R; Korkeala, H

    2001-06-01

    The safety of refrigerated processed foods of extended durability (REPFEDs) with respect to nonproteolytic Clostridium botulinum is under continuous evaluation. In the present study, mild (P7.0(85.0) values 0 to 2 min [P, pasteurization value; z-value 7.0 degrees C; reference temperature 85.0 degrees C]) and increased (P7.0(85.0) values 67 to 515 min) heat treatments were evaluated in relation to survival of nonproteolytic C. botulinum type B spores in sous vide processed ground beef and pork cubes. The use of two concentrations of nisin in inhibition of growth and toxin production by nonproteolytic C. botulinum in the same products was also evaluated. A total of 96 samples were heat processed and analyzed for C. botulinum by BoNT/B gene-specific polmerase chain reaction and for botulinum toxin by a mouse bioassay after storage of 14 to 28 days at 4 and 8 degrees C. Predictably, after mild processing all samples of both products showed botulinal growth, and one ground beef sample became toxic at 8 degrees C. The increased heat processing, equivalent to 67 min at 85 degrees C. resulted in growth but not toxin production of C. botulinum in one ground beef sample in 21 days at 8 degrees C: in the pork cube samples no growth was detected. The increased heating of both products resulted in higher sensory quality than the milder heat treatment. Nisin did not inhibit the growth of nonproteolytic C. botulinum in either product; growth was detected in both products at 4 and 8 degrees C, and ground beef became toxic with all nisin levels within 21 to 28 days at 8 degrees C. Aerobic and lactic acid bacterial counts were reduced by the addition of nisin at 4 degrees C. The study demonstrates that the mild processing temperatures commonly employed in sous vide technology do not eliminate nonproteolytic C. botulinum type B spores. The intensity of each heat treatment needs to be carefully evaluated individually for each product to ensure product safety in relation to

  2. Optimum viscous flow in pressure-swirl atomizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amini, Ghobad; Pereira, Aaron; Yun, Sangsig; Li, Xianguo

    2013-11-01

    Due to their simple configuration and reliable operation, pressure-swirl atomizers are widely used in applications such as combustion, painting, humidification, and sprinkling. The liquid is swirled by entering into the atomizer tangentially and its surface area is increased as discharges in a large spray angle. Understanding the effects of nozzle geometry and inlet flow condition on the discharge coefficient and spray angle is very important in nozzle design. To this end, the flow field inside a pressure-swirl atomizer has been studied theoretically. The main body of the liquid is taken to be moving in circles round the axis. Within the boundary layer, containing transverse and longitudinal velocity components, the retarded liquid is slowed down by viscosity and driven towards the exit orifice by pressure gradient. The swirling motion of liquid creates a low pressure zone near the nozzle axis and leads to the formation of a helical air-core. Through studying the growth of the boundary layer from nozzle entry to the orifice exit, the portions of the outflow exits the orifice from boundary layer current and also from the main body of the swirling liquid are specified. For a given range of pressure drop values, the optimum nozzle geometry and liquid flowrate are predicted. Additionally, the reason of increasing the flow by increasing liquid viscosity or decreasing orifice diameter is explained. A series of experiments and numerical modeling have also been carried out to support the theoretical results.

  3. Searching for an optimum solution to the Bangladesh arsenic crisis.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, Bruce K; Caldwell, John C; Mitra, S N; Smith, Wayne

    2003-05-01

    Searching for an optimum solution to the Bangladesh arsenic crisis: Thirty years ago Bangladesh experienced very high levels of infant and child mortality, much of it due to water-borne disease in deltaic conditions where surface water was highly polluted. In what appeared to be one of the great public health achievements, 95% of the population were converted to drinking bacteria-free tubewell water from underground aquifers. Recently, it has been shown that perhaps 20% of this water is arsenic contaminated and alternatives to tubewell water have been sought. This paper reports on two national surveys collaboratively carried out in 2000 by the Health Transition Centre, Australian National University and Mitra and Associates, Dhaka: A census of tubewells and a household survey of tubewell use and arseniosis. The study found that the tubewell revolution has been promoted not only by health considerations but also by the demand for a household water facility and the desire by women to reduce workloads associated with using surface water. Because of this, and because the population had absorbed the message about safe tubewell water, it is argued that the movement away from the use of tubewell water should be as limited as possible, even if this means using safe tubewells which are often found in the neighbourhood. To enable such a move the most urgent need is not changing the source of water but comprehensive national water testing providing essential information to households about which wells are safe and which are not.

  4. Searching for an optimum solution to the Bangladesh arsenic crisis.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, Bruce K; Caldwell, John C; Mitra, S N; Smith, Wayne

    2003-05-01

    Searching for an optimum solution to the Bangladesh arsenic crisis: Thirty years ago Bangladesh experienced very high levels of infant and child mortality, much of it due to water-borne disease in deltaic conditions where surface water was highly polluted. In what appeared to be one of the great public health achievements, 95% of the population were converted to drinking bacteria-free tubewell water from underground aquifers. Recently, it has been shown that perhaps 20% of this water is arsenic contaminated and alternatives to tubewell water have been sought. This paper reports on two national surveys collaboratively carried out in 2000 by the Health Transition Centre, Australian National University and Mitra and Associates, Dhaka: A census of tubewells and a household survey of tubewell use and arseniosis. The study found that the tubewell revolution has been promoted not only by health considerations but also by the demand for a household water facility and the desire by women to reduce workloads associated with using surface water. Because of this, and because the population had absorbed the message about safe tubewell water, it is argued that the movement away from the use of tubewell water should be as limited as possible, even if this means using safe tubewells which are often found in the neighbourhood. To enable such a move the most urgent need is not changing the source of water but comprehensive national water testing providing essential information to households about which wells are safe and which are not. PMID:12697199

  5. Optimum contribution selection for conserved populations with historic migration

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In recent decades, local varieties of domesticated animal species have been frequently crossed with economically superior breeds which has resulted in considerable genetic contributions from migrants. Optimum contribution selection by maximizing gene diversity while constraining breeding values of the offspring or vice versa could eventually lead to the extinction of local breeds with historic migration because maximization of gene diversity or breeding values would be achieved by maximization of migrant contributions. Therefore, other objective functions are needed for these breeds. Results Different objective functions and side constraints were compared with respect to their ability to reduce migrant contributions, to increase the genome equivalents originating from native founders, and to conserve gene diversity. Additionally, a new method for monitoring the development of effective size for breeds with incomplete pedigree records was applied. Approaches were compared for Vorderwald cattle, Hinterwald cattle, and Limpurg cattle. Migrant contributions could be substantially decreased for these three breeds, but the potential to increase the native genome equivalents is limited. Conclusions The most promising approach was constraining migrant contributions while maximizing the conditional probability that two alleles randomly chosen from the offspring population are not identical by descent, given that both descend from native founders. PMID:23153196

  6. Importance of growth temperature on achieving lattice-matched and strained InAlN/GaN heterostructure by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeganathan, K.; Shimizu, M.

    2014-09-01

    We investigate the role of growth temperature on the optimization of lattice-matched In0.17Al0.83N/GaN heterostructure and its structural evolutions along with electrical transport studies. The indium content gradually reduces with the increase of growth temperature and approaches lattice-matched with GaN having very smooth and high structural quality at 450°C. The InAlN layers grown at high growth temperature (480°C) retain very low Indium content of ˜ 4 % in which cracks are mushroomed due to tensile strain while above lattice matched (>17%) layers maintain crack-free compressive strain nature. The near lattice-matched heterostructure demonstrate a strong carrier confinement with very high two-dimensional sheet carrier density of ˜2.9 × 1013 cm-2 with the sheet resistance of ˜450 Ω/□ at room temperature as due to the manifestation of spontaneous polarization charge differences between InAlN and GaN layers.

  7. Importance of growth temperature on achieving lattice-matched and strained InAlN/GaN heterostructure by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Jeganathan, K.; Shimizu, M.

    2014-09-15

    We investigate the role of growth temperature on the optimization of lattice-matched In{sub 0.17}Al{sub 0.83}N/GaN heterostructure and its structural evolutions along with electrical transport studies. The indium content gradually reduces with the increase of growth temperature and approaches lattice-matched with GaN having very smooth and high structural quality at 450ºC. The InAlN layers grown at high growth temperature (480ºC) retain very low Indium content of ∼ 4 % in which cracks are mushroomed due to tensile strain while above lattice matched (>17%) layers maintain crack-free compressive strain nature. The near lattice-matched heterostructure demonstrate a strong carrier confinement with very high two-dimensional sheet carrier density of ∼2.9 × 10{sup 13} cm{sup −2} with the sheet resistance of ∼450 Ω/□ at room temperature as due to the manifestation of spontaneous polarization charge differences between InAlN and GaN layers.

  8. Aiming Optimum Space Radiation Protection using Regolith.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuda, Daisuke; Nagamatsu, Aiko; Indo, Hiroko; Iwashita, Yoichiro; Suzuki, Hiromi; Shimazu, Toru; Yano, Sachiko; Tanigaki, Fumiaki; Ishioka, Noriaki; Mukai, Chiaki; Majima, Hideyuki J.

    Radiation protection of space radiation is very important factor in manned space activity on the moon. At the construction of lunar base, low cost radiation shielding would be achieved using regolith that exists on the surface of the moon. We studied radiation shielding ability of regolith as answer the question, how much of depth would be necessary to achieve minimum radiation protection. We estimated the shielding ability of regolith against each atomic number of space radiation particles. Using stopping power data of ICRU REPORT49 and 73, we simulated the approximate expression (function of the energy of the atomic nucleus as x and the atomic number as Z) of the stopping power for the space proton particle (nucleus of H) against silicon dioxide (SiO2), aluminum oxide (Al2O3), and iron (Fe), which are the main components of regolith. Based on the expression, we applied the manipulation to the other particles of space radiation to up to argon particle (Ar). These simulated expressions complied well the data of ICRU REPORT49 and 73 except alpha particle (nucleus of He). The simulation values of stop-ping power of ten elements from potassium to nickel those we had no data in ICRU REPORT were further simulated. Using the obtained expressions, the relationship between the radiation absorbed dose and depth of a silicon dioxide was obtained. The space radiation relative dose with every depth in the moon could be estimated by this study.

  9. 50 CFR 600.310 - National Standard 1-Optimum Yield.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false National Standard 1-Optimum Yield. 600.310 Section 600.310 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MAGNUSON-STEVENS ACT PROVISIONS National Standards § 600.310 National Standard 1—Optimum Yield....

  10. 50 CFR 600.310 - National Standard 1-Optimum Yield.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false National Standard 1-Optimum Yield. 600.310 Section 600.310 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MAGNUSON-STEVENS ACT PROVISIONS National Standards § 600.310 National Standard 1—Optimum Yield....

  11. 50 CFR 600.310 - National Standard 1-Optimum Yield.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false National Standard 1-Optimum Yield. 600.310 Section 600.310 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MAGNUSON-STEVENS ACT PROVISIONS National Standards § 600.310 National Standard 1—Optimum Yield....

  12. 50 CFR 600.310 - National Standard 1-Optimum Yield.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false National Standard 1-Optimum Yield. 600.310 Section 600.310 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MAGNUSON-STEVENS ACT PROVISIONS National Standards § 600.310 National Standard 1—Optimum Yield....

  13. Selecting the optimum coke pushing sequence

    SciTech Connect

    V.T. Krivoshein; A.V. Makarov

    2007-01-15

    The sequence of pushing coke ovens is one of the most important aspects of battery operation. The sequence must satisfy a number of technical and process conditions: (1) achieve maximum heating-wall life by avoiding destructive expansion pressure in freshly charged ovens and during pushing of the finished coke; (2) ensure uniform brickwork temperature and prevent overheating by compensating for the high thermal flux in freshly charged ovens due to accumulated heat in adjacent ovens that are in the second half of the coking cycle; (3) ensure the most favorable working conditions and safety for operating personnel; (4) provide additional opportunities for repair personnel to perform various types of work, such as replacing coke-machine rails, without interrupting coal production; (5) perform the maximum number of coke-machine operations simultaneously: pushing, charging, and cleaning doors, frames, and standpipe elbows; and (6) reduce electricity consumption by minimizing idle travel of coke machines.

  14. How To Achieve Good Library Acoustics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiens, Janet

    2003-01-01

    Discusses how to create a good acoustical environment for college libraries, focusing on requirements related to the HVAC system and lighting, and noting the importance of good maintenance. A sidebar looks at how to design and achieve the most appropriate HVAC and lighting systems for optimum library acoustics. (SM)

  15. Dynamic load management and optimum sizing of stand-alone hybrid PV/wind system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplani, E.; Ntafogiannis, P.; Pappas, K.; Diamantopoulos, N.

    2015-12-01

    Simulation algorithms for the sizing of stand-alone hybrid PV/Wind systems are a powerful tool in evaluating the optimum configuration that would cover the energy demand with a predefined reliability level at the lowest cost. Several parameters such as the interval of the simulation (day, day-night, hourly) and the consumption profile may significantly affect the optimum configuration. This paper examines the effect of these parameters within an optimum sizing simulation algorithm developed. The effect of these parameters was particularly evident at low battery capacities, which involve optimum configurations resulting in minimum cost. Furthermore, shift-able loads in the hourly-based weekly profile assumed in this study were identified, and a dynamic load management functionality was developed. In this approach, loads that could be shifted through time were dynamically allocated during periods of excess energy production by the hybrid PV/Wind system. The results showed an increase in system reliability from 95% to 97% when load shifting was introduced. Finally, sizing the system for only the static (non-shift-able loads) proved to withstand the addition of the extra shift-able loads while retaining the 95% reliability level when the load management functionality was introduced. Thus, a smaller installation with lower cost is achieved.

  16. Determining the Optimum Power Load in Jump Squat Using the Mean Propulsive Velocity

    PubMed Central

    Loturco, Irineu; Nakamura, Fabio Yuzo; Tricoli, Valmor; Kobal, Ronaldo; Cal Abad, Cesar Cavinato; Kitamura, Katia; Ugrinowitsch, Carlos; Gil, Saulo; Pereira, Lucas Adriano; González-Badillo, Juan José

    2015-01-01

    The jump squat is one of the exercises most frequently used to improve lower body power production, which influences sports performance. However, the traditional determination of the specific workload at which power production is maximized (i.e., optimum power load) is time-consuming and requires one-repetition maximum tests. Therefore, the aim of this study was to verify whether elite athletes from different sports would produce maximum mean propulsive power values at a narrow range of mean propulsive velocities, resulting in similar jump heights. One hundred and nine elite athletes from several individual/team sport disciplines underwent repetitions at maximal velocity with progressive loads, starting at 40% of their body mass with increments of 10% to determine the individual optimum power zone. Results indicated that regardless of sport discipline, the athletes’ optimum mean propulsive power was achieved at a mean propulsive velocity close to 1.0 m.s−1 (1.01 ± 0.07 m.s−1) and at a jump height close to 20 cm (20.47 ± 1.42 cm). Data were narrowly scattered around these values. Therefore, jump squat optimum power load can be determined simply by means of mean propulsive velocity or jump height determination in training/testing settings, allowing it to be implemented quickly in strength/power training. PMID:26444293

  17. Optimum testing of multiple hypotheses in quantum detection theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuen, H. P.; Kennedy, R. S.; Lax, M.

    1975-01-01

    The problem of specifying the optimum quantum detector in multiple hypotheses testing is considered for application to optical communications. The quantum digital detection problem is formulated as a linear programming problem on an infinite-dimensional space. A necessary and sufficient condition is derived by the application of a general duality theorem specifying the optimum detector in terms of a set of linear operator equations and inequalities. Existence of the optimum quantum detector is also established. The optimality of commuting detection operators is discussed in some examples. The structure and performance of the optimal receiver are derived for the quantum detection of narrow-band coherent orthogonal and simplex signals. It is shown that modal photon counting is asymptotically optimum in the limit of a large signaling alphabet and that the capacity goes to infinity in the absence of a bandwidth limitation.

  18. Performance characteristics of aerodynamically optimum turbines for wind energy generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohrbach, C.; Worobel, R.

    1975-01-01

    This paper presents a brief discussion of the aerodynamic methodology for wind energy generator turbines, an approach to the design of aerodynamically optimum wind turbines covering a broad range of design parameters, some insight on the effect on performance of nonoptimum blade shapes which may represent lower fabrication costs, the annual wind turbine energy for a family of optimum wind turbines, and areas of needed research. On the basis of the investigation, it is concluded that optimum wind turbines show high performance over a wide range of design velocity ratios; that structural requirements impose constraints on blade geometry; that variable pitch wind turbines provide excellent power regulation and that annual energy output is insensitive to design rpm and solidity of optimum wind turbines.

  19. Linear programming model for optimum resource allocation in rural systems

    SciTech Connect

    Devadas, V.

    1997-07-01

    The article presents a model for optimum resource allocation in a rural system. Making use of linear programming, the objective function of the linear programming model is to maximize the revenue of the rural system, and optimum resource allocation is made subject to a number of energy- and nonenergy-related constraints relevant to the rural system. The model also quantifies the major yields as well as the by-products of different sectors of the rural economic system.

  20. Daily energy balance in growth hormone receptor/binding protein (GHR−/−) gene-disrupted mice is achieved through an increase in dark-phase energy efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Longo, Kenneth A.; Berryman, Darlene E.; Kelder, Bruce; Charoenthongtrakul, Soratree; DiStefano, Peter S.; Geddes, Brad J.; Kopchick, John

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this study was to examine factors that contribute to energy balance in female GHR −/− mice. We measured energy intake, energy expenditure (EE), fuel utilization, body mass (Mb) changes and physical activity in 17 month-old female GHR −/− mice and their age-matched wild type littermates. The GHR −/− mice were smaller, consumed more food per unit Mb, had greater EE per unit Mb and had an increase in 24-h EE/Mb that was similar to the increase in their surface-area-to-volume ratio. Locomotor activity (LMA) was reduced in the GHR −/− mice, but the energetic cost associated with their LMA was greater than in wild type controls. Furthermore, Mb and LMA were independent explanatory covariates of most of the variance in EE, and when adjusted for Mb and LMA, the GHR −/− mice had higher EE during both the light and dark phases of the daily cycle. Respiratory quotient was lower in GHR −/− mice during the light phase, which indicated a greater utilization of lipid relative to carbohydrate in these mice. Additionally, GHR −/− mice had higher ratios of caloric intake to EE at several intervals during the dark phase, and this effect was greater and more sustained in the final three hours of the dark phase. Therefore, we conclude that GHR −/− mice are able to overcome the substantial energetic challenges of dwarfism through several mechanisms that promote stable Mb. Relative to wild type mice, the GHR −/− mice consumed more calories per unit Mb, which offset the disproportionate increase in their daily energy expenditure. While GHR −/− mice oxidized a greater proportion of lipid during the light phase in order to meet their energy requirements, they achieved greater energy efficiency and storage during the dark phase through a combination of higher energy consumption and lower LMA. PMID:19747867

  1. Achieving scale strategies for sustained competitive performance.

    PubMed

    Grube, Mark E; Gish, Ryan S; Tkach, Sasha N

    2008-05-01

    Growth to achieve scale requires the following strategic initiatives: Having a clear understanding of what the organization is and what it wants to become. Ensuring a structured and rigorous growth process. Leveraging size to achieve benefits of scale. Recognizing the importance of physicians, ambulatory care, and primary care. Establishing and maintaining accountability as growth occurs.

  2. Optimum 3D Matrix Stiffness for Maintenance of Cancer Stem Cells Is Dependent on Tissue Origin of Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jabbari, Esmaiel; Sarvestani, Samaneh K.; Daneshian, Leily; Moeinzadeh, Seyedsina

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The growth and expression of cancer stem cells (CSCs) depend on many factors in the tumor microenvironment. The objective of this work was to investigate the effect of cancer cells’ tissue origin on the optimum matrix stiffness for CSC growth and marker expression in a model polyethylene glycol diacrylate (PEGDA) hydrogel without the interference of other factors in the microenvironment. Methods Human MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 breast carcinoma, HCT116 colorectal and AGS gastric carcinoma, and U2OS osteosarcoma cells were used. The cells were encapsulated in PEGDA gels with compressive moduli in the 2-70 kPa range and optimized cell seeding density of 0.6x106 cells/mL. Micropatterning was used to optimize the growth of encapsulated cells with respect to average tumorsphere size. The CSC sub-population of the encapsulated cells was characterized by cell number, tumorsphere size and number density, and mRNA expression of CSC markers. Results The optimum matrix stiffness for growth and marker expression of CSC sub-population of cancer cells was 5 kPa for breast MCF7 and MDA231, 25 kPa for colorectal HCT116 and gastric AGS, and 50 kPa for bone U2OS cells. Conjugation of a CD44 binding peptide to the gel stopped tumorsphere formation by cancer cells from different tissue origin. The expression of YAP/TAZ transcription factors by the encapsulated cancer cells was highest at the optimum stiffness indicating a link between the Hippo transducers and CSC growth. The optimum average tumorsphere size for CSC growth and marker expression was 50 μm. Conclusion The marker expression results suggest that the CSC sub-population of cancer cells resides within a niche with optimum stiffness which depends on the cancer cells’ tissue origin. PMID:26168187

  3. Determining optimum pumping rates for creation of hydraulic barriers to ground-water pollutant migration

    SciTech Connect

    Shafer, J.M.

    1984-04-01

    In certain ground-water flow regimes control of the migration of pollutants can be achieved by hydraulic barriers created by ground-water withdrawal and/or injection. However, for complicated flow domains and situations where multiple wells may be installed, the determination of pumping rates to achieve a pollution control objective can be difficult. A nonlinear programming (NLP) algorithm is coupled to a two-dimensional, steady-state, ground-water flow model and an advective transport model for determination of optimum pumping rates for creation of hydraulic barriers. This technique is a screening tool for the selection of pumping rates to be subsequently confirmed with more detailed simulation. Two example applications of this technique are presented. The first example shows how NLP can be used to determine pumping rates required to develop a stagnation point. Optimum pumping rates for eight wells arranged in a circular configuration are determined so as to reduce the ground-water velocity to near zero over a precise region within a nonhomogeneous aquifer. The second example involves the determination of optimum steady-state pumping rates for six wells in a nonhomogeneous flow domain where the objective is the control (i.e., steering) of the trajectory of a contaminant plume. 17 references, 10 figures, 5 tables.

  4. A wavelet-based scheme for optimum measurement/monitoring of dynamic responses of structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahdavi, S. H.; Razak, H. A.

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents an optimum measurement for the dynamic responses of structures from the operation of integration to respective derivation of acceleration's data using free-scaled wavelet functions. For this purpose, the numerical approach of integration and derivation has been developed for displacement measurement or determination of the third-order derivative (known as quantity of the jerk) from acquired accelerations. A simple improved algorithm is developed in order to optimally measure the dynamic quantities particularly, using Chebyshev and Haar wavelet functions. It is deduced that, stable measurement of dynamic quantities is independently achieved from the structural materials through a satisfactory optimum algorithm; that is capable of online monitoring, while emphasizing on maximum accuracy of the measurement with less computational time.

  5. Optimum Design of LLC Resonant Converter using Inductance Ratio (Lm/Lr)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palle, Kowstubha; Krishnaveni, K.; Ramesh Reddy, Kolli

    2016-07-01

    The main benefits of LLC resonant dc/dc converter over conventional series and parallel resonant converters are its light load regulation, less circulating currents, larger bandwidth for zero voltage switching, and less tuning of switching frequency for controlled output. An unique analytical tool, called fundamental harmonic approximation with peak gain adjustment is used for designing the converter. In this paper, an optimum design of the converter is proposed by considering three different design criterions with different values of inductance ratio (Lm/Lr) to achieve good efficiency at high input voltage. The optimum design includes the analysis in operating range, switching frequency range, primary side losses of a switch and stability. The analysis is carried out with simulation using the software tools like MATLAB and PSIM. The performance of the optimized design is demonstrated for a design specification of 12 V, 5 A output operating with an input voltage range of 300-400 V using FSFR 2100 IC of Texas instruments.

  6. Optimum orientation versus orientation averaging description of cluster radioactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seif, W. M.; Ismail, M.; Refaie, A. I.; Amer, Laila H.

    2016-07-01

    While the optimum-orientation concept is frequently used in studies on cluster decays involving deformed nuclei, the orientation-averaging concept is used in most alpha decay studies. We investigate the different decay stages in both the optimum-orientation and the orientation-averaging pictures of the cluster decay process. For decays of 232,233,234U and 236,238Pu isotopes, the quantum knocking frequency and penetration probability based on the Wentzel–Kramers–Brillouin approximation are used to find the decay width. The obtained decay width and the experimental half-life are employed to estimate the clusters preformation probability. We found that the orientation-averaged decay width is one or two orders of magnitude less than its value along the non-compact optimum orientation. Correspondingly, the extracted preformation probability based on the averaged decay width increases with the same orders of magnitude compared to its value obtained considering the optimum orientation. The cluster preformation probabilities estimated by the two considered schemes are in more or less comparable agreement with the Blendowske–Walliser (BW) formula based on the preformation probability of α ({S}α {{a}{{v}}{{e}}}) obtained from the orientation-averaging scheme. All the results, including the optimum-orientation ones, deviate substantially from the BW law based on {S}α {{o}{{p}}{{t}}} that was estimated from the optimum-orientation scheme. To account for the nuclear deformations, it is more relevant to calculate the decay width by averaging over the different possible orientations of the participating deformed nuclei, rather than considering the corresponding non-compact optimum orientation.

  7. Optimum orientation versus orientation averaging description of cluster radioactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seif, W. M.; Ismail, M.; Refaie, A. I.; Amer, Laila H.

    2016-07-01

    While the optimum-orientation concept is frequently used in studies on cluster decays involving deformed nuclei, the orientation-averaging concept is used in most alpha decay studies. We investigate the different decay stages in both the optimum-orientation and the orientation-averaging pictures of the cluster decay process. For decays of 232,233,234U and 236,238Pu isotopes, the quantum knocking frequency and penetration probability based on the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin approximation are used to find the decay width. The obtained decay width and the experimental half-life are employed to estimate the clusters preformation probability. We found that the orientation-averaged decay width is one or two orders of magnitude less than its value along the non-compact optimum orientation. Correspondingly, the extracted preformation probability based on the averaged decay width increases with the same orders of magnitude compared to its value obtained considering the optimum orientation. The cluster preformation probabilities estimated by the two considered schemes are in more or less comparable agreement with the Blendowske-Walliser (BW) formula based on the preformation probability of α ({S}α {{a}{{v}}{{e}}}) obtained from the orientation-averaging scheme. All the results, including the optimum-orientation ones, deviate substantially from the BW law based on {S}α {{o}{{p}}{{t}}} that was estimated from the optimum-orientation scheme. To account for the nuclear deformations, it is more relevant to calculate the decay width by averaging over the different possible orientations of the participating deformed nuclei, rather than considering the corresponding non-compact optimum orientation.

  8. Modeling the optimum conditions for the formation of defect-free CVD graphene on copper melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseev, N. I.

    2014-09-01

    The nucleation and growth of nuclei of graphene (graphene islets) on the surfaces of copper melts during catalytic CVD, i.e., the catalytic decomposition of a gas-phase carbon support, is considered. It is shown that on a copper melt the optimum combination of conditions for the preservation of islets with almost perfect hexagonal shape and the necessary conditions of the CVD-process are reached at the same time. The average distance between the islets and the dimensionless parameter that determines changes in the shape of islets is calculated. The maximum rate of decomposition of the carbon support at which this parameter simultaneously promotes the growth of defect-free islets and the maximum possible rate of growth of the graphene monolayer is determined.

  9. Digital Parallel Processor Array for Optimum Path Planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kremeny, Sabrina E. (Inventor); Fossum, Eric R. (Inventor); Nixon, Robert H. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    The invention computes the optimum path across a terrain or topology represented by an array of parallel processor cells interconnected between neighboring cells by links extending along different directions to the neighboring cells. Such an array is preferably implemented as a high-speed integrated circuit. The computation of the optimum path is accomplished by, in each cell, receiving stimulus signals from neighboring cells along corresponding directions, determining and storing the identity of a direction along which the first stimulus signal is received, broadcasting a subsequent stimulus signal to the neighboring cells after a predetermined delay time, whereby stimulus signals propagate throughout the array from a starting one of the cells. After propagation of the stimulus signal throughout the array, a master processor traces back from a selected destination cell to the starting cell along an optimum path of the cells in accordance with the identity of the directions stored in each of the cells.

  10. Hydrofoils: optimum lift-off speed for sailboats.

    PubMed

    Baker, R M

    1968-12-13

    For a hydrofoil sailboat there is a unique optimum lift-off speed. Before this speed is reached, if there are no parasitic vertical hydrofoil appendages, the submerged or partially submerged hydrofoils increase drag and degrade performance. As soon as this speed is reached and the hydrofoils are fully and promptly deployed, the performance of a hydrofoil-borne craft is significantly improved. At speeds exceeding optimum lift-off speed, partially submerged hydrofoils impair performance if there is no significant effect of loading on the hydrofoil lift-to-drag ratio.

  11. Optimum control of closed ecological systems: mathematical aspects.

    PubMed

    Bartsev, S I

    1999-01-01

    Optimum control of a closed ecological system (CES) is not possible without adequate CES description and appropriate evaluation of factors, which act upon the system and introduce additional errors and uncertainties into the forecast of the CES state. The statement about key significance of stationary state consideration for further CES development is supported. In this article some of the disturbing stationary state factors and the contribution of them to CES state formation are considered. An approach to outlining the optimum set of chemical elements--the balance of which has to be calculated--is presented. An example of the minimum description of CES stationary state is considered.

  12. Optimum control forces for multibody systems with intermittent motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ider, Sitki Kemal; Amirouche, F. M. L.

    1989-01-01

    The objective is to address the continuity of motion when a dynamical system is suddenly subjected to constraint conditions. Motion discontinuity due to the initial constraint violation is avoided by prior control forces that adjust the motion and yield velocity and acceleration consistent at the point of application of the constraint. The optimum control forces are determined for a specified control interval. The method proposed provides an optimum adjustment of the system's motion and assures that the stresses developed at the system components are kept within acceptable limits. The procedures developed will be illustrated making use of inequality constraints applied to obstacle avoidance problems in robotics.

  13. Optimum subsonic, high-angle-of-attack nacelles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luidens, R. W.; Stockman, N. O.; Diedrich, J. H.

    1979-01-01

    The optimum design of nacelles that operate over a wide range of aerodynamic conditions and their inlets is described. For low speed operation the optimum internal surface velocity distributions and skin friction distributions are described for three categories of inlets: those with BLC, and those with blow in door slots and retractable slats. At cruise speed the effect of factors that reduce the nacelle external surface area and the local skin friction is illustrated. These factors are cruise Mach number, inlet throat size, fan-face Mach number, and nacelle contour. The interrelation of these cruise speed factors with the design requirements for good low speed performance is discussed.

  14. Design for sequentially timed all-optical mapping photography with optimum temporal performance.

    PubMed

    Tamamitsu, Miu; Nakagawa, Keiichi; Horisaki, Ryoichi; Iwasaki, Atsushi; Oishi, Yu; Tsukamoto, Akira; Kannari, Fumihiko; Sakuma, Ichiro; Goda, Keisuke

    2015-02-15

    A recently developed ultrafast burst imaging method known as sequentially timed all-optical mapping photography (STAMP) [Nat. Photonics8, 695 (2014)10.1038/nphoton.2014.163] has been shown effective for studying a diverse range of complex ultrafast phenomena. Its all-optical image separation circumvents mechanical and electronic restrictions that traditional burst imaging methods have long struggled with, hence realizing ultrafast, continuous, burst-type image recording at a fame rate far beyond what is achievable with conventional methods. In this Letter, considering various design parameters and limiting factors, we present an optimum design for STAMP in terms of temporal properties including exposure time and frame rate. Specifically, we first derive master equations that can be used to predict the temporal performance of a STAMP system and then analyze them to realize optimum conditions. This Letter serves as a general guideline for the camera parameters of a STAMP system with optimum temporal performance that is expected to be of use for tackling problems in science that are previously unsolvable with conventional imagers.

  15. Time-optimum packet scheduling for many-to-one routing in wireless sensor networks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Song, W.-Z.; Yuan, F.; LaHuser, R.

    2007-01-01

    This paper studies the WSN application scenario with periodical traffic from all sensors to a sink. We present a time-optimum and energy-efficient packet scheduling algorithm and its distributed implementation. We first give a general many-to-one packet scheduling algorithm for wireless networks, and then prove that it is time-optimum and costs max(2N(u1) - 1, N(u 0) -1) time slots, assuming each node reports one unit of data in each round. Here N(u0) is the total number of sensors, while N(u 1) denotes the number of sensors in a sink's largest branch subtree. With a few adjustments, we then show that our algorithm also achieves time-optimum scheduling in heterogeneous scenarios, where each sensor reports a heterogeneous amount of data in each round. Then we give a distributed implementation to let each node calculate its duty-cycle locally and maximize efficiency globally. In this packet scheduling algorithm, each node goes to sleep whenever it is not transceiving, so that the energy waste of idle listening is also eliminated. Finally, simulations are conducted to evaluate network performance using the Qualnet simulator. Among other contributions, our study also identifies the maximum reporting frequency that a deployed sensor network can handle. ??2006 IEEE.

  16. Time-optimum packet scheduling for many-to-one routing in wireless sensor networks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Song, W.-Z.; Yuan, F.; LaHusen, R.; Shirazi, B.

    2007-01-01

    This paper studies the wireless sensor networks (WSN) application scenario with periodical traffic from all sensors to a sink. We present a time-optimum and energy-efficient packet scheduling algorithm and its distributed implementation. We first give a general many-to-one packet scheduling algorithm for wireless networks, and then prove that it is time-optimum and costs [image omitted], N(u0)-1) time slots, assuming each node reports one unit of data in each round. Here [image omitted] is the total number of sensors, while [image omitted] denotes the number of sensors in a sink's largest branch subtree. With a few adjustments, we then show that our algorithm also achieves time-optimum scheduling in heterogeneous scenarios, where each sensor reports a heterogeneous amount of data in each round. Then we give a distributed implementation to let each node calculate its duty-cycle locally and maximize efficiency globally. In this packet-scheduling algorithm, each node goes to sleep whenever it is not transceiving, so that the energy waste of idle listening is also mitigated. Finally, simulations are conducted to evaluate network performance using the Qualnet simulator. Among other contributions, our study also identifies the maximum reporting frequency that a deployed sensor network can handle.

  17. The optimum plasma density for plasma wakefield excitation in the blowout regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, W.; An, W.; Zhou, M.; Joshi, C.; Huang, C.; Mori, W. B.

    2010-08-01

    The optimum plasma density for achieving the largest wakefield accelerating gradient in a plasma wakefield accelerator (PWFA) for a given electron beam driver parameters (fixed charge, spot size and duration) is analyzed. It is found that the peak beam current Ip (charge per unit time) plays an important role in determining the optimum density. We show that for narrow beams of low peak current (IpLtIA≈17 kA and σrLtσz), the prediction from linear theory (Lu et al 2005 Phys. Plasma 12 063101) that k_p\\sigma_z=\\sqrt{2} or np (cm-3)≈5.6×1019/σz2 (μm) for a bi-Gaussian bunch of length σz and spot size σr, works well for obtaining the maximum accelerating gradient. However, for narrow beams of high peak current (IpgsimIA and σrLtσz), the optimum density can be an order of magnitude larger than that predicted by linear theory. In this regime, we show that a new condition np~nb0 should be used for 1lsimσz/σrlsim10, where nb0 is the peak beam density. Theoretical arguments for this new condition are given and the predictions are confirmed by particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations.

  18. On the optimum signal constellation design for high-speed optical transport networks.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tao; Djordjevic, Ivan B

    2012-08-27

    In this paper, we first describe an optimum signal constellation design algorithm, which is optimum in MMSE-sense, called MMSE-OSCD, for channel capacity achieving source distribution. Secondly, we introduce a feedback channel capacity inspired optimum signal constellation design (FCC-OSCD) to further improve the performance of MMSE-OSCD, inspired by the fact that feedback channel capacity is higher than that of systems without feedback. The constellations obtained by FCC-OSCD are, however, OSNR dependent. The optimization is jointly performed together with regular quasi-cyclic low-density parity-check (LDPC) code design. Such obtained coded-modulation scheme, in combination with polarization-multiplexing, is suitable as both 400 Gb/s and multi-Tb/s optical transport enabling technology. Using large girth LDPC code, we demonstrate by Monte Carlo simulations that a 32-ary signal constellation, obtained by FCC-OSCD, outperforms previously proposed optimized 32-ary CIPQ signal constellation by 0.8 dB at BER of 10(-7). On the other hand, the LDPC-coded 16-ary FCC-OSCD outperforms 16-QAM by 1.15 dB at the same BER.

  19. Optimum angle-cut of collimator for dense objects in high-energy proton radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hai-Bo; Zheng, Na

    2016-02-01

    The use of minus identity lenses with an angle-cut collimator can achieve high contrast images in high-energy proton radiography. This article presents the principles of choosing the angle-cut aperture of the collimator for different energies and objects. Numerical simulation using the Monte Carlo code Geant4 has been implemented to investigate the entire radiography for the French test object. The optimum angle-cut apertures of the collimators are also obtained for different energies. Supported by NSAF (11176001) and Science and Technology Developing Foundation of China Academy of Engineering Physics (2012A0202006)

  20. Increasing the range accuracy of three-dimensional ghost imaging ladar using optimum slicing number method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xu; Zhang, Yong; Xu, Lu; Yang, Cheng-Hua; Wang, Qiang; Liu, Yue-Hao; Zhao, Yuan

    2015-12-01

    The range accuracy of three-dimensional (3D) ghost imaging is derived. Based on the derived range accuracy equation, the relationship between the slicing number and the range accuracy is analyzed and an optimum slicing number (OSN) is determined. According to the OSN, an improved 3D ghost imaging algorithm is proposed to increase the range accuracy. Experimental results indicate that the slicing number can affect the range accuracy significantly and the highest range accuracy can be achieved if the 3D ghost imaging system works with OSN. Project supported by the Young Scientist Fund of the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61108072).

  1. An analytical solution to obtain the optimum source location using multiple direction finders on a spherical surface. [for lightning detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orville, Richard E., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    An analytical solution is presented for determining the optimum location of a radiating source on the surface of a sphere, given multiple bearings. The bearings are assumed to have small errors of the order of 0-10 deg. The optimum location is found by minimizing the sum of the squares of the perpendicular great-circle distances from the source to the bearing lines. This is achieved analytically through an eigenvalue approach, rather than the usual iterative, numerical approach. Bearings of different weight are taken into account by approximating the distance from each direction finder to the source. The result is general and may have wide application. Since it is simple and nearly as fast as the triangulation technique for source location, it is now used in the SUNY-Albany East Coast Lightning Detection Network to compute the optimum location for lightning in real time.

  2. Trends in mechanical fasteners. [considering optimum metric fastener system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, J. B.

    1972-01-01

    Some of the specialty fasteners which are enjoying increasing usage are: thread rolling screws, self drilling and tapping screws, locking screws, tamperproof fasteners, and flanged bolts and nuts. The development of an optimum metric fastener system is recommended for future fastener manufacturing.

  3. Optimum Design of Aerospace Structural Components Using Neural Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berke, L.; Patnaik, S. N.; Murthy, P. L. N.

    1993-01-01

    The application of artificial neural networks to capture structural design expertise is demonstrated. The principal advantage of a trained neural network is that it requires a trivial computational effort to produce an acceptable new design. For the class of problems addressed, the development of a conventional expert system would be extremely difficult. In the present effort, a structural optimization code with multiple nonlinear programming algorithms and an artificial neural network code NETS were used. A set of optimum designs for a ring and two aircraft wings for static and dynamic constraints were generated using the optimization codes. The optimum design data were processed to obtain input and output pairs, which were used to develop a trained artificial neural network using the code NETS. Optimum designs for new design conditions were predicted using the trained network. Neural net prediction of optimum designs was found to be satisfactory for the majority of the output design parameters. However, results from the present study indicate that caution must be exercised to ensure that all design variables are within selected error bounds.

  4. Optimum mix of conservation and solar energy in buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Balcomb, J.D.

    1980-01-01

    A methodology is developed for optimally allocating resources between conservation and solar strategies in building design. Formulas are presented for a constrained optimum in which the initial investment is limited. The procedure is amenable to hand analysis if tables are available which give the Solar Savings Fraction as a function of the Load Collector Ratio for the locality. A numerical example is given.

  5. An Application of Calculus: Optimum Parabolic Path Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atasever, Merve; Pakdemirli, Mehmet; Yurtsever, Hasan Ali

    2009-01-01

    A practical and technological application of calculus problem is posed to motivate freshman students or junior high school students. A variable coefficient of friction is used in modelling air friction. The case in which the coefficient of friction is a decreasing function of altitude is considered. The optimum parabolic path for a flying object…

  6. Optimum Onager: The Classical Mechanics of a Classical Siege Engine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denny, Mark

    2009-01-01

    The onager is a throwing weapon of classical antiquity, familiar to both the ancient Greeks and Romans. Here we analyze the dynamics of onager operation and derive the optimum angle for launching a projectile to its maximum range. There is plenty of scope for further considerations about increasing onager range, and so by thinking about how this…

  7. The Optimum Conditions of Foreign Languages in Primary Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giannikas, Christina Nicole

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the paper is to review the primary language learning situation in Europe and shed light on the benefits it carries. Early language learning is the biggest policy development in education and has developed in rapid speed over the past 30 years; this article considers the effects and advantages of the optimum condition of an early start,…

  8. Selection of Wavelengths for Optimum Precision in Simultaneous Spectrophotometric Determinations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiTusa, Michael R.; Schilt, Alfred A.

    1985-01-01

    Although many textbooks include a description of simultaneous determinations employing absorption spectrophotometry and treat the mathematics necessary for analytical quantitations, treatment of analytical wavelength selection has been mostly qualitative. Therefore, a general method for selecting wavelengths for optimum precision in simultaneous…

  9. Global optimum path planning for a redundant space robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Om P.; Xu, Yangsheng

    1991-12-01

    Robotic manipulators will play a significant role in the maintenance and repair of space stations and satellites, and other future space missions. Robot path planning and control for the above applications should be optimum, since any inefficiency in the planning may considerably risk the success of the space mission. This paper presents a global optimum path planning scheme for redundant space robotic manipulators to be used in such missions. In this formulation, a variational approach is used to minimize the objective functional. Two optimum path planning problems are considered: first, given the end-effector trajectory, find the optimum trajectories of the joints, and second, given the terminal conditions of the end-effector, find the optimum trajectories for the end-effector and the joints. It is explicitly assumed that the gravity is zero in, and the robotic manipulator is mounted on a completely free-flying base (spacecraft) and the attitude control (reaction wheels or thrust jets) is off. Linear and angular momentum conditions for this system lead to a set of mixed holonomic an nonholonomic constraints. These equations are adjoined to the objective functional using a Lagrange multiplier technique. The formulation leads to a system of Differential and Algebraic Equations (DAEs) and a set of terminal conditions. A numerical scheme is presented for forward integration of the above system of DAEs, and an iterative shooting method is used to satisfy the terminal conditions. This approach is significant since most space robots that have been developed so far are redundant. The kinematic redundancy of space robots offers efficient control and provides the necessary dexterity for extra-vehicular activity or avoidance of potential obstacles in space stations.

  10. Optimum primary and supplementary signals optimizing the seismic data resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyapkin, Yuriy K.

    2001-03-01

    Often in practice, when generating seismic waves on a line, even with a wide-band source, numerous natural and technical obstacles cause a low resolution of reflection seismograms. In this case, the economy of the survey should be taken into consideration and rather than ignoring preexisting data, generating additional signal to complement the preexisting data should be tried. This paper describes how this can be done to optimize the resolution of the combined data. The new approach requires a fundamental change in the field technique such that records with different spectral characteristics (RDSC) are now generated from each source-receiver pair. These coincident records share a common reflectivity series, but differ from each other in wavelets and noise. A comprehensive theory for optimum processing (deconvolution) of any available suite of the RDSC is developed. The solution for the problem is a particular case of multichannel Wiener filtering. It can be thought of as two successive procedures. The first is optimum frequency-dependent weighted stacking of the RDSC. The second is single-channel zero-phase Wiener deconvolution filtering of the previous output. This representation enables suggested multichannel filtering to be easily implemented. The effectiveness of the method as well as its advantage over straight summing of the RDSC, followed by single-channel Wiener deconvolution filtering, are corroborated theoretically and demonstrated with field data. Furthermore, a solution is suggested for the problem to evaluate the spectrum of an optimum supplementary signal. The signal contributes to the available set of the RDSC and yields either maximum resolution with limited energy expenses or a certain desired resolution with minimum, but unrestricted energy expenses at the output of the optimum procedure. The optimum distribution of the spectral energy of a primary signal along the frequency axis is a particular case of the above problem with no preexisting data.

  11. Optimum design for pipe-support allocation against seismic loading

    SciTech Connect

    Hara, Fumio; Iwasaki, Akira

    1996-12-01

    This paper deals with the optimum design methodology of a piping system subjected to a seismic design loading to reduce its dynamic response by selecting the location of pipe supports and whereby reducing the number of pipe supports to be used. The author employs the Genetic Algorithm for obtaining a reasonably optimum solution of the pipe support location, support capacity and number of supports. The design condition specified by the support location, support capacity and the number of supports to be used is encored by an integer number string for each of the support allocation candidates and they prepare many strings for expressing various kinds of pipe-support allocation state. Corresponding to each string, the authors evaluate the seismic response of the piping system to the design seismic excitation and apply the Genetic Algorithm to select the next generation candidates of support allocation to improve the seismic design performance specified by a weighted linear combination of seismic response magnitude, support capacity and the number of supports needed. Continuing this selection process, they find a reasonably optimum solution to the seismic design problem. They examine the feasibility of this optimum design method by investigating the optimum solution for 5, 7 and 10 degree-of-freedom models of piping system, and find that this method can offer one a theoretically feasible solution to the problem. They will be, thus, liberated from the severe uncertainty of damping value when the pipe support guaranties the design capacity of damping. Finally, they discuss the usefulness of the Genetic Algorithm for the seismic design problem of piping systems and some sensitive points when it will be applied to actual design problems.

  12. Detection and qualification of optimum antibacterial and cytotoxic activities of silver-doped bioactive glasses.

    PubMed

    Gholipourmalekabadi, Mazaher; Nezafati, Nader; Hajibaki, Leila; Mozafari, Masoud; Moztarzadeh, F; Hesaraki, Saeed; Samadikuchaksaraei, Ali

    2015-08-01

    This study aims to detect the optimum antibacterial activity of silver-doped bioactive glasses (Ag-BGs) for prevention of post-transplant infections in tissue engineering. The results have shown that the Ag-BG samples had broad-spectrum antibacterial efficacy in an Ag concentration-dependent manner. The 2% Ag-BG had the highest effect during the first 10 min to 72 h. The minimum inhibitory concentration of 2% Ag-BG was estimated to be 2 mg/ml for Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) and 2.66 mg/ml for Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus). A concentration of 0.5% Ag-BG repressed growth of E. coli after 1 h, but did not have any detectable antibacterial effect for longer periods. Evaluation of the effects of prepared Ag-BG on human osteoblast cells viability showed that 1 and 2% samples changed the cell proliferation rate in masses of more than 3.33 and 2 mg/ml, respectively. Moreover, in a typical manner, the release of Ag ions from the glass structure started immediately, continued steadily and affected bacterial growth when it reached its critical concentration in the medium. This systematic study can illustrate the optimum antibacterial property of the Ag-BG samples in masses of 3.33 and 2 mg/ml for 1 and 2% Ag, respectively, for prevention of post-transplant infections. PMID:26224350

  13. Graded Achievement, Tested Achievement, and Validity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brookhart, Susan M.

    2015-01-01

    Twenty-eight studies of grades, over a century, were reviewed using the argument-based approach to validity suggested by Kane as a theoretical framework. The review draws conclusions about the meaning of graded achievement, its relation to tested achievement, and changes in the construct of graded achievement over time. "Graded…

  14. Optimum design point for a closed-cycle OTEC system

    SciTech Connect

    Ikegami, Yasuyuki; Uehara, Haruo

    1994-12-31

    Performance analysis is performed for optimum design point of a closed-cycle Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) system. Calculations are made for an OTEC model plant with a gross power of 100 MW, which was designed by the optimization method proposed by Uehara and Ikegami for the design conditions of 21 C--29 C warm sea water temperature and 4 C cold sea water temperature. Ammonia is used as working fluid. Plate type evaporator and condenser are used as heat exchangers. The length of the cold sea water pipe is 1,000 m. This model plant is a floating-type OTEC plant. The objective function of optimum design point is defined as the total heat transfer area of heat exchangers per the annual net power.

  15. An experimental study of an aerodynamically optimum windmill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishida, Y.; Toda, N.; Hoshino, H.; Noguchi, M.

    1982-08-01

    Aerodynamic characteristics of an optimum horizontal axis windmill are described. The windmill, rated at 20 KW at 8 m/s with a two bladed rotor of 14m diameter, is designed so as to vary the geometry of the blade in such a way that the aerodynamic efficiency becomes maximum. The combined blade element momentum theory is used as an analytical tool. To check the design method and get some useful aerodynamic data, a wind tunnel test of a 1/7th scale model (2m diameter) is performed in a low speed tunnel, whose test section is 35.75 sq m. Two models, whose blades have the same optimum chord distribution but have different planforms, are tested. Measurements are made of the efficiency, torque, axial drag force and initial torque for various combinations of the pitch angle and the tip speed ratio. The yaw characteristics of the windmill are also measured.

  16. A methodology for selecting optimum organizations for space communities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ragusa, J. M.

    1978-01-01

    This paper suggests that a methodology exists for selecting optimum organizations for future space communities of various sizes and purposes. Results of an exploratory study to identify an optimum hypothetical organizational structure for a large earth-orbiting multidisciplinary research and applications (R&A) Space Base manned by a mixed crew of technologists are presented. Since such a facility does not presently exist, in situ empirical testing was not possible. Study activity was, therefore, concerned with the identification of a desired organizational structural model rather than the empirical testing of it. The principal finding of this research was that a four-level project type 'total matrix' model will optimize the effectiveness of Space Base technologists. An overall conclusion which can be reached from the research is that application of this methodology, or portions of it, may provide planning insights for the formal organizations which will be needed during the Space Industrialization Age.

  17. Parallel operation of NH3 screw compressors - the optimum way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pijnenburg, B.; Ritmann, J.

    2015-08-01

    The use of more smaller industrial NH3 screw compressors operating in parallel seems to offer the optimum way when it comes to fulfilling maximum part load efficiency, increased redundancy and other highly requested features in the industrial refrigeration industry today. Parallel operation in an optimum way can be selected to secure continuous operation and can in most applications be configured to ensure lower overall operating economy. New compressors are developed to meet requirements for flexibility in operation and are controlled in an intelligent way. The intelligent control system keeps focus on all external demands, but yet striving to offer always the lowest possible absorbed power, including in future scenarios with connection to smart grid.

  18. Optimum detection of an optical image on a photoelectric surface.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helstrom, C. W.; Wang, L.

    1973-01-01

    The image-detecting performance of an optimum counting detector is compared with that of a threshold detector and that of a detector basing its decisions on the total number of photoelectrons from a finite area of the image. The illuminance of the image is assumed to have a Gaussian spatial distribution. The optimum detector works with the pristine datum (and not with the photoelectric response) which is the spatiotemporal electromagnetic field at the aperture of the observing optical instrument. It is shown that little is to be gained by using details of the illuminance distribution beyond the crude knowledge of its breadth as embodied in a simple counter of emitted photoelectrons. All three detectors exhibit accordingly about the same reliability.

  19. Optimum Production Control and Workforce Scheduling of Machining Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Tian-Syung; Lo, Chih-Yao; Hou, Cheng-I.

    Through the proposed model in this study, the production control with the consideration of workforce scheduling for advanced manufacturing systems becomes realistically and concretely solvable. This study not only meditates the concept of balancing machine productivity and human ability into the objective, but also implements Calculus of Variations to optimize the profit for a deterministic production quantity. In addition, the optimum solutions of dynamic productivity control and workforce scheduling are comprehensively provided. Moreover, the decision criteria for selecting the optimum solution and the sensitivity analysis of the critical variables are fully discussed. This study definitely contributes the applicable strategy to control the productivity and workforce in manufacturing and provides the valuable tool to conclusively optimize the profit of a machining project for operations research in today`s manufacturing industry with profound insight.

  20. General solutions of optimum problems in nonstationary flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miele, Angelo

    1955-01-01

    A general method concerning optimum problems in nonstationary flight is developed and discussed. Best flight techniques are determined for the following conditions: climb with minimum time, climb with minimum fuel consumption, steepest climb, descending and gliding flight with maximum time or with maximum distance. Optimum distributions of speed with altitude are derived assuming constant airplane weight and neglecting curvatures and squares of path inclination in the projection of the equation of motion on the normal to the flight path. The results of this paper differ from the well-known results obtained by neglecting accelerations with one exception, namely the case of gliding with maximum range. The paper is concluded with criticisms and remarks concerning the physical nature of the solutions and their usefulness for practical applications.

  1. Design of helicopter rotor blades for optimum dynamic characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, D. A.; Ko, T.; Korn, A. E.; Rossow, M. P.

    1983-01-01

    The possibilities and limitations of tailoring blade mass and stiffness distributions to give an optimum blade design in terms of weight, inertia, and dynamic characteristics are discussed. The extent that changes in mass of stiffness distribution can be used to place rotor frequencies at desired locations is determined. Theoretical limits to the amount of frequency shift are established. Realistic constraints on blade properties based on weight, mass, moment of inertia, size, strength, and stability are formulated. The extent that the hub loads can be minimized by proper choice of E1 distribution, and the minimum hub loads which can be approximated by a design for a given set of natural frequencies are determined. Aerodynamic couplings that might affect the optimum blade design, and the relative effectiveness of mass and stiffness distribution on the optimization procedure are investigated.

  2. Implementation of an optimum profile guidance system on STOLAND

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flanagan, P. F.

    1978-01-01

    The implementation on the STOLAND airborne digital computer of an optimum profile guidance system for the augmentor wing jet STOL research aircraft is described. Major tasks were to implement the guidance and control logic to airborne computer software and to integrate the module with the existing STOLAND navigation, display, and autopilot routines. The optimum profile guidance system comprises an algorithm for synthesizing mimimum fuel trajectories for a wide range of starting positions in the terminal area and a control law for flying the aircraft automatically along the trajectory. The avionics software developed is described along with a FORTRAN program that was constructed to reflect the modular nature and algorthms implemented in the avionics software.

  3. The Population of Small Comets: Optimum Techniques for Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schleicher, D.; AHearn, M.; Stewart, I. A. F.; Randall, C.; Brandt, J.

    1999-01-01

    The goals of this project were: (1) to present evidence to the scientific community for the importance of the small comet population and (2) to develop techniques for optimum detection in order to characterize the population. The work has been carried out by D. Schleicher (Lowell Observatory), M. A'Hearn and Y. Fernandez (University of Maryland), I.A.F. Stewart, C. Randall, and J. Brandt (University of Colorado).

  4. Development and application of optimum sensitivity analysis of structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barthelemy, J. F. M.; Hallauer, W. L., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    The research focused on developing an algorithm applying optimum sensitivity analysis for multilevel optimization. The research efforts have been devoted to assisting NASA Langley's Interdisciplinary Research Office (IRO) in the development of a mature methodology for a multilevel approach to the design of complex (large and multidisciplinary) engineering systems. An effort was undertaken to identify promising multilevel optimization algorithms. In the current reporting period, the computer program generating baseline single level solutions was completed and tested out.

  5. Generating AN Optimum Treatment Plan for External Beam Radiation Therapy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabus, Irwin

    1990-01-01

    The application of linear programming to the generation of an optimum external beam radiation treatment plan is investigated. MPSX, an IBM linear programming software package was used. All data originated from the CAT scan of an actual patient who was treated for a pancreatic malignant tumor before this study began. An examination of several alternatives for representing the cross section of the patient showed that it was sufficient to use a set of strategically placed points in the vital organs and tumor and a grid of points spaced about one half inch apart for the healthy tissue. Optimum treatment plans were generated from objective functions representing various treatment philosophies. The optimum plans were based on allowing for 216 external radiation beams which accounted for wedges of any size. A beam reduction scheme then reduced the number of beams in the optimum plan to a number of beams small enough for implementation. Regardless of the objective function, the linear programming treatment plan preserved about 95% of the patient's right kidney vs. 59% for the plan the hospital actually administered to the patient. The clinician, on the case, found most of the linear programming treatment plans to be superior to the hospital plan. An investigation was made, using parametric linear programming, concerning any possible benefits derived from generating treatment plans based on objective functions made up of convex combinations of two objective functions, however, this proved to have only limited value. This study also found, through dual variable analysis, that there was no benefit gained from relaxing some of the constraints on the healthy regions of the anatomy. This conclusion was supported by the clinician. Finally several schemes were found that, under certain conditions, can further reduce the number of beams in the final linear programming treatment plan.

  6. Automated optimum design of wing structures. Deterministic and probabilistic approaches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, S. S.

    1982-01-01

    The automated optimum design of airplane wing structures subjected to multiple behavior constraints is described. The structural mass of the wing is considered the objective function. The maximum stress, wing tip deflection, root angle of attack, and flutter velocity during the pull up maneuver (static load), the natural frequencies of the wing structure, and the stresses induced in the wing structure due to landing and gust loads are suitably constrained. Both deterministic and probabilistic approaches are used for finding the stresses induced in the airplane wing structure due to landing and gust loads. A wing design is represented by a uniform beam with a cross section in the form of a hollow symmetric double wedge. The airfoil thickness and chord length are the design variables, and a graphical procedure is used to find the optimum solutions. A supersonic wing design is represented by finite elements. The thicknesses of the skin and the web and the cross sectional areas of the flanges are the design variables, and nonlinear programming techniques are used to find the optimum solution.

  7. Spatial optimum collocation model of urban land and its algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Xiangqiang; Li, Xinyun

    2007-06-01

    Optimizing the allocation of urban land is that layout and fix position the various types of land-use in space, maximize the overall benefits of urban space (including economic, social, environment) using a certain method and technique. There is two problems need to deal with in optimizing the allocation of urban land in the technique: one is the quantitative structure, the other is the space structure. In allusion to these problems, according to the principle of spatial coordination, a kind of new optimum collocation model about urban land was put forward in this text. In the model, we give a target function and a set of "soft" constraint conditions, and the area proportions of various types of land-use are restricted to the corresponding allowed scope. Spatial genetic algorithm is used to manipulate and calculate the space of urban land, the optimum spatial collocation scheme can be gradually approached, in which the three basic operations of reproduction, crossover and mutation are all operated on the space. Taking the built-up areas of Jinan as an example, we did the spatial optimum collocation experiment of urban land, the spatial aggregation of various types is better, and an approving result was got.

  8. Optimum threshold selection method of centroid computation for Gaussian spot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xuxu; Li, Xinyang; Wang, Caixia

    2015-10-01

    Centroid computation of Gaussian spot is often conducted to get the exact position of a target or to measure wave-front slopes in the fields of target tracking and wave-front sensing. Center of Gravity (CoG) is the most traditional method of centroid computation, known as its low algorithmic complexity. However both electronic noise from the detector and photonic noise from the environment reduces its accuracy. In order to improve the accuracy, thresholding is unavoidable before centroid computation, and optimum threshold need to be selected. In this paper, the model of Gaussian spot is established to analyze the performance of optimum threshold under different Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) conditions. Besides, two optimum threshold selection methods are introduced: TmCoG (using m % of the maximum intensity of spot as threshold), and TkCoG ( usingμn +κσ n as the threshold), μn and σn are the mean value and deviation of back noise. Firstly, their impact on the detection error under various SNR conditions is simulated respectively to find the way to decide the value of k or m. Then, a comparison between them is made. According to the simulation result, TmCoG is superior over TkCoG for the accuracy of selected threshold, and detection error is also lower.

  9. Optimum design of structures subject to general periodic loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reiss, Robert; Qian, B.

    1989-01-01

    A simplified version of Icerman's problem regarding the design of structures subject to a single harmonic load is discussed. The nature of the restrictive conditions that must be placed on the design space in order to ensure an analytic optimum are discussed in detail. Icerman's problem is then extended to include multiple forcing functions with different driving frequencies. And the conditions that now must be placed upon the design space to ensure an analytic optimum are again discussed. An important finding is that all solutions to the optimality condition (analytic stationary design) are local optima, but the global optimum may well be non-analytic. The more general problem of distributing the fixed mass of a linear elastic structure subject to general periodic loads in order to minimize some measure of the steady state deflection is also considered. This response is explicitly expressed in terms of Green's functional and the abstract operators defining the structure. The optimality criterion is derived by differentiating the response with respect to the design parameters. The theory is applicable to finite element as well as distributed parameter models.

  10. Optimum profit model considering production, quality and sale problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chung-Ho; Lu, Chih-Lun

    2011-12-01

    Chen and Liu ['Procurement Strategies in the Presence of the Spot Market-an Analytical Framework', Production Planning and Control, 18, 297-309] presented the optimum profit model between the producers and the purchasers for the supply chain system with a pure procurement policy. However, their model with a simple manufacturing cost did not consider the used cost of the customer. In this study, the modified Chen and Liu's model will be addressed for determining the optimum product and process parameters. The authors propose a modified Chen and Liu's model under the two-stage screening procedure. The surrogate variable having a high correlation with the measurable quality characteristic will be directly measured in the first stage. The measurable quality characteristic will be directly measured in the second stage when the product decision cannot be determined in the first stage. The used cost of the customer will be measured by adopting Taguchi's quadratic quality loss function. The optimum purchaser's order quantity, the producer's product price and the process quality level will be jointly determined by maximising the expected profit between them.

  11. Optimum moisture levels for biodegradation of mortality composting envelope materials.

    PubMed

    Ahn, H K; Richard, T L; Glanville, T D

    2008-01-01

    Moisture affects the physical and biological properties of compost and other solid-state fermentation matrices. Aerobic microbial systems experience different respiration rates (oxygen uptake and CO2 evolution) as a function of moisture content and material type. In this study the microbial respiration rates of 12 mortality composting envelope materials were measured by a pressure sensor method at six different moisture levels. A wide range of respiration (1.6-94.2mg O2/g VS-day) rates were observed for different materials, with alfalfa hay, silage, oat straw, and turkey litter having the highest values. These four envelope materials may be particularly suitable for improving internal temperature and pathogen destruction rates for disease-related mortality composting. Optimum moisture content was determined based on measurements across a range that spans the maximum respiration rate. The optimum moisture content of each material was observed near water holding capacity, which ranged from near 60% to over 80% on a wet basis for all materials except a highly stabilized soil compost blend (optimum around 25% w.b.). The implications of the results for moisture management and process control strategies during mortality composting are discussed.

  12. Optimum Damping in a Non-Linear Base Isolation System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jangid, R. S.

    1996-02-01

    Optimum isolation damping for minimum acceleration of a base-isolated structure subjected to earthquake ground excitation is investigated. The stochastic model of the El-Centro1940 earthquake, which preserves the non-stationary evolution of amplitude and frequency content of ground motion, is used as an earthquake excitation. The base isolated structure consists of a linear flexible shear type multi-storey building supported on a base isolation system. The resilient-friction base isolator (R-FBI) is considered as an isolation system. The non-stationary stochastic response of the system is obtained by the time dependent equivalent linearization technique as the force-deformation of the R-FBI system is non-linear. The optimum damping of the R-FBI system is obtained under important parametric variations; i.e., the coefficient of friction of the R-FBI system, the period and damping of the superstructure; the effective period of base isolation. The criterion selected for optimality is the minimization of the top floor root mean square (r.m.s.) acceleration. It is shown that the above parameters have significant effects on optimum isolation damping.

  13. Physical Meaning of the Optimum Measurement Process in Quantum Detection Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osaki, Masao; Kozuka, Haruhisa; Hirota, Osamu

    1996-01-01

    The optimum measurement processes are represented as the optimum detection operators in the quantum detection theory. The error probability by the optimum detection operators goes beyond the standard quantum limit automatically. However the optimum detection operators are given by pure mathematical descriptions. In order to realize a communication system overcoming the standard quantum limit, we try to give the physical meaning of the optimum detection operators.

  14. Optimum exposure conditions for computed radiography depending on fixed pattern noise and efficiency of imaging plate-scanner systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ewert, U.; Heyne, K.; Zscherpel, U.; Jechow, M.; Bavendiek, K.

    2011-06-23

    The presently active standards on Computed Radiography (CR) need a major revision. It was observed by many users that the image quality for class B of EN 14784-2 is not achievable under the same exposure conditions as used for film exposure. A mathematical model was developed and tested, which allows the calculation of the image quality, proven by image quality indicators (IQI), depending on the fixed pattern noise and the efficiency of the used imaging plate (IP) scanner system. All tested IP scanner systems provide a fixed correlation between the measured signal/noise ratio (SNR) and the grey values in the digital images. The maximum achievable SNR{sub max} depends on the fixed pattern noise of the plate (high dose limit). Depending on the exposure dose an optimum visibility of IQIs can be predicted by calculation and measured considering the attenuation coefficient for calculation of the contrast/noise ratio (CNR). The diameter of the just visible wire is proportional to 1/sqrt(CNR). The optimum tube voltage for best visibility of IQIs and maximum CNR depend on the exposure dose. The optimum tube voltage for best visibility is achieved only at exposures with high dose. A dose dependant optimal tube voltage was not observed for film radiography.

  15. Scale effect and optimum relations for sea surface planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sedov, L.

    1947-01-01

    From the general dimensional and mechanical similarity theory it follows that a condition of steady motion of a given shape\\bottom with constant speed on the surface of water is determined by four nondimensional parameters. By considering the various systems of independent parameters which are applied in theory and practice and special tests, there is determined their mutual relations and their suitability as planning characteristics. In studying the scale effect on the basis of the Prnndtl formula for the friction coefficient for a turbulent condition the order of magnitude is given of the error in applying the model data to full scale in the case of a single-step bottom For a bottom of complicated shape it is shown how from the test data of the hydrodynamic characteristics for one speed with various loads, or one load with various speeds, there may be obtained by simple computation with good approximation the hydrodynamic characteristics for a different speed or for a different load. (These considerations may be of use in solving certain problems on the stability of planning.) This permits extrapolating the curve of resistance against speed for large speeds inaccessible in the tank tests or for other loads which were not tested. The data obtained by computation are in good agreement with the test results. Problems regarding the optimum trim angle or the optimum width in the case of planning of a flat plate are considered from the point of view of the minimum resistance for a given load on the water and planning speeds. Formulas and graphs are given for the optimum value of the planning coefficient and the corresponding values of the trim angle and width of the flat plate.

  16. Optimum value of original events on the PEPT technique

    SciTech Connect

    Sadremomtaz, Alireza; Taherparvar, Payvand

    2011-12-26

    Do Positron emission particle tracking (PEPT) has been used to track the motion of a single radioactively labeled tracer particle within a bed of similar particles. In this paper, the effect of the original event fraction on the results precise in two experiments has been reviewed. Results showed that the algorithm can no longer distinguish some corrupt trajectories, in addition to; further iteration reduces the statistical significance of the sample without improving its quality. Results show that the optimum value of trajectories depends on the type of experiment.

  17. Determination of optimum electrolyte composition for molten carbonate fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yuh, C.Y.; Pigeaud, A.

    1987-01-01

    The objective of this study is to determine the optimum electrolyte composition for molten carbonate fuel cells. To accomplish this, the contractor will provide: (1) Comprehensive reports of on-going efforts to optimize carbonate composition. (2) A list of characteristics affected by electrolyte composition variations (e.g. ionic conductivity, vapor pressure, melting range, gas solubility, exchange current densities on NiO, corrosion and cathode dissolution effects). (3) Assessment of the overall effects that these characteristics have on state-of-the-art cell voltage and lifetime.

  18. Determination of optimum electrolyte composition for molten carbonate fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yuh, C.Y.; Pigeaud, A.

    1988-03-01

    The objective of this study is to determine the optimum electrolyte composition for molten carbonate fuel cells. To accomplish this, the contractor will provide: (1) Comprehensive reports of on-going efforts to optimize carbonate composition. (2) A list of characteristics affected by electrolyte composition variations (e.g. ionic conductivity, vapor pressure, melting range, gas solubility, exchange current densities on NiO, corrosion and cathode dissolution effects). (3) Assessment of the overall effects that these characteristics have on state-of-the-art cell voltage and lifetime.

  19. Determination of optimum electrolyte composition for molten carbonate fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yuh, C.Y.; Pigeaud, A.

    1987-01-01

    The objective of this study is to determine the optimum electrolyte composition for molten carbonate fuel cells. To accomplish this, the contractor will provide: (1) Comprehensive reports of on-going efforts to optimize carbonate composition. (2) A list of characteristics affected by electrolyte composition variations (e.g. ionic conductivity, vapor pressure, melting range, gas solubility, exchange current densities on NiO, corrosion and cathode dissolution effects). (3) Assessment of the overall effects that these characteristics have state-of-the-art cell voltage and lifetime.

  20. Determination of optimum electrolyte composition for molten carbonate fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yuh, C.Y.; Pigeaud, A.

    1988-06-01

    The objective of this study is to determine the optimum electrolyte composition for molten carbonate fuel cells. To accomplish this, the contractor will provide: (1) Comprehensive reports of on-going efforts to optimize carbonate composition. (2) A list of characteristics affected by electrolyte composition variations (e.g. ionic conductivity, vapor pressure, melting range, gas solubility, exchange current densities on NiO, corrosion and cathode dissolution effects). (3) Assessment of the overall effects that these characteristics have on state-of-the-art cell voltage and lifetime.

  1. Optimum Value of Original Events on the Pept Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadremomtaz, Alireza; Taherparvar, Payvand

    2011-12-01

    Do Positron emission particle tracking (PEPT) has been used to track the motion of a single radioactively labeled tracer particle within a bed of similar particles. In this paper, the effect of the original event fraction on the results precise in two experiments has been reviewed. Results showed that the algorithm can no longer distinguish some corrupt trajectories, in addition to; further iteration reduces the statistical significance of the sample without improving its quality. Results show that the optimum value of trajectories depends on the type of experiment.

  2. Researches of Optimum Leaf Area Index Dynamicmodels for Rape(brassica Napus L.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Hongxin; Zhang, Chunlei; Li, Guangming; Zhang, Baojun; Zhao, Suolao; Wang, Baoqing; Jin, Zhiqing; Zhu, Dawei; Zhu, Juanjuan; Wei, Xiufang

    The objectives of developing optimum leaf area index dynamic models for rape (OLAIDM) was to develop Rape Cultivation Simulation-Optimization- Decision Making System(Rape-CSODS) , to design its planting , to regulate and control its growth and development, and to fulfill its high yield, good quality, high benefits and standard production eventually. The OLAIDM were developed based on field experiments with 3 cultivars, 6 sowing dates, 2 types of plant pattern and 4 sites from 2002 to 2007 in middle and lower valley of Yangtze river in China and relative data from references of rape researches, employed ideas of R/WCSODS (Rice/Wheat Cultivation Simulation- Optimization-Decision Making System), and in the same time, the OLAIMR and its parameters also were assessed, calibrated and tested. The average absolute deviation(de), correlation coefficients(r) and the standard errors of their absolute deviation(Sde) of between the observed and simulated values for LAI of two cultivars in Wuhan and Nanjing were -0.03~0.1533, 0.9707~0.9997 and0.1332~0.4032, respectively. 1:1 line of them were in Fig. 1 to 4. Multi-factors such as the ramification types, cultivars, and light et al. were taken into account in this study, therefore, the OLAIDM with general adaptability, clear yield aim, mechanism, and dynamic characteristic can simulate optimum LAI dynamic for rape under different sites, cultivars and ramification types, and yielding levels.

  3. The 'pH optimum anomaly' of intracellular enzymes of Ferroplasma acidiphilum.

    PubMed

    Golyshina, Olga V; Golyshin, Peter N; Timmis, Kenneth N; Ferrer, Manuel

    2006-03-01

    A wide range of microorganisms, the so-called acidophiles, inhabit acidic environments and grow optimally at pH values between 0 and 3. The intracellular pH of these organisms is, however, close to neutrality or slightly acidic. It is to be expected that enzymatic activities dedicated to extracellular functions would be adapted to the prevailing low pH of the environment (0-3), whereas intracellular enzymes would be optimally active at the near-neutral pH of the cytoplasm (4.6-7.0). The genes of several intracellular or cell-bound enzymes, a carboxylesterase and three alpha-glucosidases, from Ferroplasma acidiphilum, a cell wall-lacking acidophilic archaeon with a growth optimum at pH 1.7, were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli, and their products purified and characterized. The Ferroplasmaalpha-glucosidases exhibited no sequence similarity to known glycosyl hydrolases. All enzymes functioned and were stable in vitro in the pH range 1.7-4.0, and had pH optima much lower than the mean intracellular pH of 5.6. This 'pH optimum anomaly' suggests the existence of yet-undetected cellular compartmentalization providing cytoplasmic pH patchiness and low pH environments for the enzymes we have analysed.

  4. High degree decentralization for the optimum thermoeconomic design of a combined cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Benelmir, R. . Lab. d'Energetique et automatique); Evans, R.B. . George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering); Spakovsky, M.R. Von . Dept. de mecanique)

    1992-01-01

    Decentralized design methods will always greatly facilitate the optimum design of large engineering systems whenever a High Degree of Decentralization (HDD) is achieved. HDD allows the optimization of each component by itself without significantly sacrificing the overall system optimum. In this paper, a primary engineering component costing expression is introduced, resulting in a significant HDD - called Primary Decentralized Thermoeconomic Design - for the design of gas turbine cycles with or without a steam power bottoming cycle. This costing expression is a compromise between simplicity and a representative model for engineering component costing. A requirement for such an expression is that it provides a balance not only between the capital cost expenditures and the dissipation of exergy, but also between the capital cost and the dissipation of heat removal capacity. In fact, additional exergy dissipation always results in the dissipation of more heat, which must be removed from the overall power generation cycle. Applied to a combined cycle (a gas and steam turbine cycle), such decentralization serves to show how the steam power bottoming cycle assists the gas turbine cycle. This approach produces a significant HDD which allows engineers to study many more possible improvements in combined cycles than could otherwise be considered.

  5. A Parallel Approach To Optimum Actuator Selection With a Genetic Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, James L.

    2000-01-01

    Recent discoveries in smart technologies have created a variety of aerodynamic actuators which have great potential to enable entirely new approaches to aerospace vehicle flight control. For a revolutionary concept such as a seamless aircraft with no moving control surfaces, there is a large set of candidate locations for placing actuators, resulting in a substantially larger number of combinations to examine in order to find an optimum placement satisfying the mission requirements. The placement of actuators on a wing determines the control effectiveness of the airplane. One approach to placement Maximizes the moments about the pitch, roll, and yaw axes, while minimizing the coupling. Genetic algorithms have been instrumental in achieving good solutions to discrete optimization problems, such as the actuator placement problem. As a proof of concept, a genetic has been developed to find the minimum number of actuators required to provide uncoupled pitch, roll, and yaw control for a simplified, untapered, unswept wing model. To find the optimum placement by searching all possible combinations would require 1,100 hours. Formulating the problem and as a multi-objective problem and modifying it to take advantage of the parallel processing capabilities of a multi-processor computer, reduces the optimization time to 22 hours.

  6. Optimum Duty Cycle of Unsteady Plasma Aerodynamic Actuation for NACA0015 Airfoil Stall Separation Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Min; Yang, Bo; Peng, Tianxiang; Lei, Mingkai

    2016-06-01

    Unsteady dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma aerodynamic actuation technology is employed to suppress airfoil stall separation and the technical parameters are explored with wind tunnel experiments on an NACA0015 airfoil by measuring the surface pressure distribution of the airfoil. The performance of the DBD aerodynamic actuation for airfoil stall separation suppression is evaluated under DBD voltages from 2000 V to 4000 V and the duty cycles varied in the range of 0.1 to 1.0. It is found that higher lift coefficients and lower threshold voltages are achieved under the unsteady DBD aerodynamic actuation with the duty cycles less than 0.5 as compared to that of the steady plasma actuation at the same free-stream speeds and attack angles, indicating a better flow control performance. By comparing the lift coefficients and the threshold voltages, an optimum duty cycle is determined as 0.25 by which the maximum lift coefficient and the minimum threshold voltage are obtained at the same free-stream speed and attack angle. The non-uniform DBD discharge with stronger discharge in the positive half cycle due to electrons deposition on the dielectric slabs and the suppression of opposite momentum transfer due to the intermittent discharge with cutoff of the negative half cycle are responsible for the observed optimum duty cycle. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 21276036), Liaoning Provincial Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 2015020123) and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities of China (No. 3132015154)

  7. Improvement of lightweight floating ceiling design with optimum stiffener and isolator locations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, C. K.; Ng, C. F.

    2009-11-01

    In this paper, a new design concept of a lightweight floating ceiling with a special arrangement of stiffener beams and isolators is proposed to enhance vibration isolation performance. The key design parameters of resonant frequency of bending and mode shape factor on vibration transmission are determined with some simple formulae. Structural vibrations and noise radiation are evaluated with finite element models (FEM) for various designs. The optimum ceiling designs are applied in a studio, and field measurements with reliable frequency range of 30-400 Hz are conducted to confirm the theoretical results. The analyses ascertain that four design features ensure the optimum vibration isolation performance: the stiffener beams must be installed at the nodal line of fundamental bending resonance of the plate; smaller panels should be applied instead of a large panel covering the whole area of the ceiling, and joints should be free; the isolators should be placed at the nodal point of the bending mode of the plate; and the fundamental bending resonance frequency must not match the modal critical frequency. The proposed stiffened wooden panel design achieved a noise and vibration reduction of 20 dB in the frequency range of 40-100 Hz, and was better than the performance of a concrete floating floor.

  8. Optimum receiver array design for magnetic induction tomography.

    PubMed

    Gürsoy, Doga; Scharfetter, Hermann

    2009-05-01

    Magnetic induction tomography (MIT) is an imaging modality that aims at mapping the distribution of the electrical conductivity inside the body. Eddy currents are induced in the body by magnetic induction and the resulting fields are measured by an array of receiver coils. In MIT, the location of the receivers affects the quality of the image reconstruction. In this paper, a fast deterministic algorithm was applied to obtain optimum receiver array designs for a given specific excitation. The design strategy is based on the iterative exclusion of receiver locations, which yield poor conductivity information, from the space spanning all possible locations until a feasible design is reached. The applicability of "regionally focused" MIT designs that increase the image resolution at a particular region was demonstrated. Currently used design geometries and the corresponding reconstructed images were compared to the images obtained by optimized designs. The eigenvalue analysis of the Hessian matrix showed that the algorithm tends to maintain identical conductivity information content sensed by the receivers. Although the method does not guarantee finding the optimum design globally, the results demonstrate the practical usability of this algorithm in MIT experimental designs.

  9. Optimum band selection for landslide studies in temperate environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramli, Mohammad F.; Petley, David; Murphy, William; Inkpen, Rob

    2003-03-01

    The problems associated with the selection of the optimum band combination have been recognised since the early days of the Landsat MSS. Although this instrument consists of only four bands, it was soon realised that the number of bands would increase as the technology advanced. Obviously, to generate and analyse every combination of bands is potentially time-consuming. Various statistical methods of choosing the band combination containing the most information for environmental and geological studies such as optimum index factor, maximum variance-covariance determinant, and principal component analysis have been introduced. In order to evaluate the applicability of these methods to landslide studies, the eleven band Airborne Thematic Mapper (ATM) imagery of the inland slopes of Stonebarrow Hill in West Dorset, England was used. These slopes are extensively mantled with relict landslide features. The best band combination results obtained from these methods are evaluated against the visually checked imagery, where all possible bands are generated and classified in terms of texture and colour. The ability to express the texture and colour in the composite imagery that might be related to the landslide features are crucial in landslide studies.The results showed that all these statistical methods are not suitable to be used in landslides study. However, from early visual classification results showed that two combinations of three bands from three different wavelengths produced the best composite image.

  10. Carbon sequestration, optimum forest rotation and their environmental impact

    SciTech Connect

    Kula, Erhun; Gunalay, Yavuz

    2012-11-15

    Due to their large biomass forests assume an important role in the global carbon cycle by moderating the greenhouse effect of atmospheric pollution. The Kyoto Protocol recognises this contribution by allocating carbon credits to countries which are able to create new forest areas. Sequestrated carbon provides an environmental benefit thus must be taken into account in cost-benefit analysis of afforestation projects. Furthermore, like timber output carbon credits are now tradable assets in the carbon exchange. By using British data, this paper looks at the issue of identifying optimum felling age by considering carbon sequestration benefits simultaneously with timber yields. The results of this analysis show that the inclusion of carbon benefits prolongs the optimum cutting age by requiring trees to stand longer in order to soak up more CO{sub 2}. Consequently this finding must be considered in any carbon accounting calculations. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbon sequestration in forestry is an environmental benefit. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It moderates the problem of global warming. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It prolongs the gestation period in harvesting. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This paper uses British data in less favoured districts for growing Sitka spruce species.

  11. Optimum flywheel sizing for parallel and series hybrid vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Aceves, S.M.; Smith, J.R.

    1996-12-20

    Flywheels have the possibility of providing high turnaround efficiency and high specific power output. These characteristics are very important for the successful manufacture of parallel and series hybrid vehicles, which have the potential for providing high fuel economy and very low emissions with range and performance comparable to today`s light-duty vehicles. Flywheels have a high specific power output, but relatively low specific energy output. Therefore, it is of importance to determine energy and power requirements for flywheels applied to light-duty vehicles. Vehicle applications that require an energy storage system with high power and low energy are likely to benefit from a flywheel. In this paper, a vehicle simulation code and a flywheel model are applied to the calculation of optimum flywheel energy storage capacity for a parallel and a series hybrid vehicle. A conventional vehicle is also evaluated as a base-case, to provide an indication of the fuel economy gains that can be obtained with flywheel hybrid vehicles. The results of the analysis indicate that the optimum flywheel energy storage capacity is relatively small. This results in a low weight unit that has a significant power output and high efficiency. Emissions generated by the hybrid vehicles are not calculated, but have the potential of being significantly lower than the emissions from the conventional car.

  12. Refining mimicry: phenotypic variation tracks the local optimum.

    PubMed

    Mérot, Claire; Le Poul, Yann; Théry, Marc; Joron, Mathieu

    2016-07-01

    Müllerian mimicry between chemically defended preys is a textbook example of natural selection favouring phenotypic convergence onto a shared warning signal. Studies of mimicry have concentrated on deciphering the ecological and genetic underpinnings of dramatic switches in mimicry association, producing a well-known mosaic distribution of mimicry patterns across geography. However, little is known about the accuracy of resemblance between natural comimics when the local phenotypic optimum varies. In this study, using analyses of wing shape, pattern and hue, we quantify multimodal phenotypic similarity between butterfly comimics sharing the so-called postman pattern in different localities with varying species composition. We show that subtle but consistent variation between populations of the localized species, Heliconius timareta thelxinoe, enhance resemblance to the abundant comimics which drive the mimicry in each locality. Those results suggest that rarer comimics track the changes in the phenotypic optimum caused by gradual changes in the composition of the mimicry community, providing insights into the process by which intraspecific diversity of mimetic pattern may arise. Furthermore, our results suggest a multimodal evolution of similarity, with coordinated convergence in different features of the phenotype such as wing outline, pattern and hue. Finally, multilocus genotyping allows estimating local hybridization rates between H. timareta and comimic H. melpomene in different populations, raising the hypothesis that mimicry refinement between closely related comimics may be enhanced by adaptive introgression at loci modifying the accuracy of resemblance.

  13. Determination of optimum oven cooking procedures for lean beef products.

    PubMed

    Rodas-González, Argenis; Larsen, Ivy L; Uttaro, Bethany; Juárez, Manuel; Parslow, Joyce; Aalhus, Jennifer L

    2015-11-01

    In order to determine optimum oven cooking procedures for lean beef, the effects of searing at 232 or 260°C for 0, 10, 20 or 30 min, and roasting at 160 or 135°C on semimembranosus (SM) and longissimus lumborum (LL) muscles were evaluated. In addition, the optimum determined cooking method (oven-seared for 10 min at 232°C and roasted at 135°C) was applied to SM roasts varying in weight from 0.5 to 2.5 kg. Mainly, SM muscles seared for 0 or 10 min at 232°C followed by roast at 135°C had lower cooking loss, higher external browning color, more uniform internal color, and were more tender and flavorful (P < 0.05). Roast weights ≥1 kg had lesser cooking loss, more uniform internal color and tender compared to 0.5 kg (P < 0.05). Consequently, roasting at low temperature without searing is the recommended oven cooking procedure; with best response from muscle roast weight ≥1 kg.

  14. New constraints in absorptive capacity and the optimum rate of petroleum output

    SciTech Connect

    El Mallakh, R

    1980-01-01

    Economic policy in four oil-producing countries is analyzed within a framework that combines a qualitative assessment of the policy-making process with an empirical formulation based on historical and current trends in these countries. The concept of absorptive capacity is used to analyze the optimum rates of petroleum production in Iran, Iraq, Saudi Arabia, and Kuwait. A control solution with an econometric model is developed which is then modified for alternative development strategies based on analysis of factors influencing production decisions. The study shows the consistencies and inconsistencies between the goals of economic growth, oil production, and exports, and the constraints on economic development. Simulation experiments incorporated a number of the constraints on absorptive capacity. Impact of other constraints such as income distribution and political stability is considered qualitatively. (DLC)

  15. Optimum mirror shapes and supports for light weight mirrors subjected to self-weight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Myung K.; Richard, Ralph M.; Vukobratovich, Daniel

    1989-11-01

    A parametric design study of light weight mirror shapes with various support conditions was performed utilizing the finite element program NASTRAN. Improvements in the mirror performance were made based on the following design criteria: (1) minimization of the optical surface wavefront variations, (2) minimization of the self-weight directly related to cost of manufacturing, and (3) optimal location of support points. A preprocessor to automatically generate a finite element model for each mirror geometry was developed in order to obtain the structural deformations systematically. Additionally, a postprocessor, which prepares an input data file for FRINGE (an optical computer code) was developed for generating the optical deflections that lead to the surface wavefront variations. Procedures and modeling techniques to achieve the optimum (the lightest and stiffest mirror shape due to self-weight) are addressed.

  16. An unusual case of chronic neuropathic pain responds to an optimum frequency of intravenous ketamine infusions.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, A C

    2001-05-01

    The effective treatment of patients suffering from a variety of difficult pain syndromes, including phantom pain and other neuropathic pains, remains a clinical challenge. Neuropathic pain has been shown to respond to drugs that block the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor, such as ketamine and amantidine. A 44-year-old woman with a previous right-sided forequarter amputation presented to the Palliative Medicine Team complaining of neuropathic pain in her left arm, which was neurologically intact. The pain was treated with repeated infusions of intravenous ketamine. Twenty-one infusions were given over a period of four months. The pain intensity experienced by the patient lessened as the frequency of the ketamine infusions increased. This finding has not been described previously and supports the theory that there may be an optimum frequency of ketamine infusions to achieve adequate pain control. PMID:11369165

  17. Optimum matching of direct-coupled electromechanical loads to a photovoltaic generator

    SciTech Connect

    Khouzam, K.; Khouzam, L. . School of Electrical and Electronic Systems Engineering)

    1993-09-01

    The objective of the paper is to present a general mathematical formulation for matching electromechanical loads connected to a photovoltaic array. An optimization method is then used to solve the matching problem with the objective of maximizing the gross mechanical energy. The analysis is extended to obtain the sizing of the array and the battery in the direct-coupled system. Results show that optimum matching can be achieved by carefully selecting the PV array rated parameters with respect to the load parameters. The rated power of the array is twice that of the load. The field constant that maximizes the gross mechanical energy can be obtained given the parameters of the load and the array temperature. The separately excited motor offers higher matching performance compared to the series motor. The rotodynamic load offers better matching compared to the viscous friction load.

  18. Genomic-Based Optimum Contribution in Conservation and Genetic Improvement Programs with Antagonistic Fitness and Productivity Traits

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Molano, Enrique; Pong-Wong, Ricardo; Banos, Georgios

    2016-01-01

    Animal selection for genetic improvement of productivity may lead to an increase in inbreeding through the use of techniques that enhance the reproductive capability of selected animals. Therefore, breeding strategies aim to balance maintaining genetic variability and acceptable fitness levels with increasing productivity. The present study demonstrates the effectiveness of genomic-based optimum contribution strategies at addressing this objective when fitness and productivity are genetically antagonistic traits. Strategies are evaluated in directional selection (increasing productivity) or conservation (maintaining fitness) scenarios. In the former case, substantial rates of genetic gain can be achieved while greatly constraining the rate of increase in inbreeding. Under a conservation approach, inbreeding depression can be effectively halted while also achieving a modest rate of genetic gain for productivity. Furthermore, the use of optimum contribution strategies when combined with a simple non-random mating scheme (minimum kinship method) showed an additional delay in the increase of inbreeding in the short term. In conclusion, genomic-based optimum contribution methods can be effectively used to control inbreeding and inbreeding depression, and still allow genetic gain for productivity traits even when fitness and productivity are antagonistically correlated. PMID:26941779

  19. Feasibility study and optimum loading pattern of a multi-ring inflatable intravaginal applicator

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Keyur J.; Yaparpalvi, Ravindra; Hong, Linda; Mynampati, Dinesh; Tomé, Wolfgang A.; Kalnicki, Shalom

    2013-01-01

    Purpose A cylinder applicator is the standard treatment device for intravaginal brachytherapy. However, they are limited in their ability to simultaneously spare the organs at risk (OAR), and reduce the hot spot in the vaginal mucosa, while achieving adequate dose conformality. This study aims to compare the dosimetric characteristics of single and multi-channel cylinders, and utilizes volume point dose optimizations to investigate the feasibility and optimum loading method for a multi-ring inflatable intravaginal applicator. Material and methods Studies were designed to: (1) test the feasibility of multi-ring applicators, (2) compare dose distributions between different multi-channel applicators and loading patterns, (3) test non-uniform prescription depths around the multi-ring cylinder. Results Compared to a cylinder with a single central channel, a cylinder with 6 lumina arranged around the periphery, providing the lumina had adequate distance to the cylinder surface, could reduce dose beyond the prescription depth. However, when the number of outer lumina increased from 6 to 12, no further dose reduction could be achieved and the high dose volume close to the surface of the cylinder increased. Moreover, an additional ring, with lumina further away from the surface, provided increased dose shaping capabilities, allowing for individualized dose distributions. Conclusions Dose could be reduced to normal tissue and the inner mucosa, and better conformity was seen to unique anatomical shapes. A modified peripheral loading pattern provided the optimum dose distribution, yielding good conformity, dose sparing at adjacent organs, and dose reduction in the high dose region of the vaginal mucosa. PMID:23878554

  20. Optimum stacking of seismic records with irregular noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyapkin, Yuriy; Ursin, Bjorn

    2005-09-01

    Conventional straight stacking has proved to be an effective tool to extract the signal from a multichannel seismic record. However, it maximizes the signal-to-noise ratio only when a rather simple and generally rare model of the record is true. For this reason, some authors try to optimize stacking using more complicated record models. They assume that either the signal amplitudes are allowed to vary from trace to trace in any manner with the noise variances being constant or vice versa. However, in practice, it is commonly the case that these model assumptions are seriously violated. Then, methods based on them become ineffective or even deleterious. We show that these methods produce signal estimates distorted to a considerable extent right up to being absolutely uncorrelated with the sought-for actual signal. This fact motivates our search for new methods for better estimating seismic signals. We therefore introduce a more realistic model that supposes a signal with an identical shape on each trace to be embedded in spatially uncorrelated irregular noise. The signal amplitudes and the noise autocorrelations are allowed to vary across the traces in an arbitrary manner. Given this model, a solution to the maximum likelihood estimation of the signal shape is derived. The effectiveness of the method is highly dependent on the accuracy of determining the signal amplitudes and the noise autocorrelations prior to stacking. We therefore supply the method with estimates of the required parameters. When the noise autocorrelations are trace independent to within a scale factor, the variance, the method becomes much easier to embody and yields the well-known optimum weighted stack (OWS). We compare the performance of the OWS theoretically with that of the straight stack and show that the optimum procedure has obvious advantages over the conventional one. This paper is mainly focused on further developing the OWS. With the complicated record model used, the shortcomings of

  1. Optimum quantisers for a Gaussian input probability density and for the magnitude-error distortion measure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demaret, J. C.

    1975-01-01

    The parameters of non-uniform and uniform quantizers up to ten bits of quantization, optimum for a Gaussian input probability and for the magnitude-error distortion criterion are computed. Optimum quantizers must be understood as quantizers with minimum distortion. The numerical method used for the optimization converges relatively rapidly. The comparison between optimum non-uniform quantizers and optimum uniform quantizers is made.

  2. MT's algorithm: A new algorithm to search for the optimum set of modulation indices for simultaneous range, command, and telemetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Tien Manh

    1989-01-01

    MT's algorithm was developed as an aid in the design of space telecommunications systems when utilized with simultaneous range/command/telemetry operations. This algorithm provides selection of modulation indices for: (1) suppression of undesired signals to achieve desired link performance margins and/or to allow for a specified performance degradation in the data channel (command/telemetry) due to the presence of undesired signals (interferers); and (2) optimum power division between the carrier, the range, and the data channel. A software program using this algorithm was developed for use with MathCAD software. This software program, called the MT program, provides the computation of optimum modulation indices for all possible cases that are recommended by the Consultative Committee on Space Data System (CCSDS) (with emphasis on the squarewave, NASA/JPL ranging system).

  3. Optimum periodicity of repeated contractile actions applied in mass transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Sungsook; Lee, Sang Joon

    2015-01-01

    Dynamically repeated periodic patterns are abundant in natural and artificial systems, such as tides, heart beats, stock prices, and the like. The characteristic repeatability and periodicity are expected to be optimized in effective system-specific functions. In this study, such optimum periodicity is experimentally evaluated in terms of effective mass transport using one-valve and multi-valve systems working in contractile fluid flows. A set of nanoscale gating functions is utilized, operating in nanocomposite networks through which permeates selectively pass under characteristic contractile actions. Optimized contractile periodicity exists for effective energy impartment to flow in a one-valve system. In the sequential contractile actions for a multi-valve system, synchronization with the fluid flow is critical for effective mass transport. This study provides fundamental understanding on the various repeated periodic patterns and dynamic repeatability occurring in nature and mechanical systems, which are useful for broad applications.

  4. Optimum detection of an optical image on a photoelectric surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helstrom, C. W.; Wang, L.

    1972-01-01

    The detection of an optical image in the presence of uniform background light is based on a likelihood ratio formed of the numbers of photoelectrons emitted from small elements of a photoelectric surface onto which the image is focused. When diffraction is negligible and the surface has unit quantum efficiency, this detector is equipollent with the optimum detector of the image forming light. Its performance is compared with that of the threshold detector and that of a detector basing its decisions on the total number of photoelectrons from a finite area of the image. The illuminance of the image is postulated to have a Gaussian spatial distribution. All three detectors exhibit nearly the same reliability.

  5. Parametric Study of Water Rocket for Optimum Flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ota, Takayuki; Umemura, Akira

    Parametric study is conducted to find the optimum condition of water rocket for long flight, provided that the tank volume is prescribed. The parameters considered in the present study are the initial air pressure, water volume fraction, empty rocket mass, launching angle and bottle diameter which significantly affect the flight performance of water rocket. First, we calculate the temporal changes in tank pressure, water and air issue speeds and thrust, on the basis of a simple physical model which has been experimentally validated. Then, this model is incorporated into the equation of motion to calculate the ballistic flight of water rocket with various parameter values. As a result, it is found that PET bottles in the market are one of the most suitable for use as the pressure tank of water rocket.

  6. Optimum design of 2D micro-angle sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qinggang; Zhao, Heng; Lou, Xiaona; Jiang, Ningchuan; Hu, Xiaotang

    2008-12-01

    To improve dynamic measurement performance and resolution, an optimum design on two-dimensional (2D) micro-angle sensor based on optical internal-reflection method via critical-angle refractive index measurement is presented in the paper. The noise signals were filtered effectively by modulating laser-driven and demodulating in signal proceeding. The system's accuracy and response speed are improved further by using 16-bit high-precision AD converter and MSP430 CPU which present with a high-speed performance during signals processes such as fitting angle-voltage curve through specific arithmetic, full range and zero point calibration, filter, scaling transformation etc. The experiment results indicated that, dynamic signal measurement range can be up to +/-600arcsec, the measurement resolution can be better than 0.1arcsec, and the repeatability could be better than +/-0.5arcsec.

  7. Optimum Pulse Shape Design for UWB Systems with Timing Jitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Wilaiporn; Kunaruttanapruk, Suwich; Jitapunkul, Somchai

    This paper proposes a novel technique in designing the optimum pulse shape for ultra wideband (UWB) systems under the presence of timing jitter. In the UWB systems, pulse transmission power and timing jitter tolerance are crucial keys to communications success. While there is a strong desire to maximize both of them, one must be traded off against the other. In the literature, much effort has been devoted to separately optimize each of them without considering the drawback to the other. In this paper, both factors are jointly considered. The proposed pulse attains the adequate power to survive the noise floor and at the same time provides good resistance to the timing jitter. The proposed pulse also meets the power spectral mask restriction as prescribed by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) for indoor UWB systems. Simulation results confirm the advantages of the proposed pulse over other previously known UWB pulses. Parameters of the proposed optimization algorithm are also investigated in this paper.

  8. Optimum survival strategies against zombie infestations - a population dynamics approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mota, Bruno

    2014-03-01

    We model a zombie infestation by three coupled ODEs that jointly describe the time evolution of three populations: regular humans, zombies, and survivors (humans that have survived at least one zombie encounter). This can be generalized to take into account more levels of expertise and/or skill degradation. We compute the fixed points, and stability thereof, that correspond to one of three possible outcomes: human extinction, zombie extermination or, if one allows for a human non-zero birth-rate, co-habitation. We obtain analytically the optimum strategy for humans in terms of the model's parameters (essentially, whether to flee and hide, or fight). Zombies notwithstanding, this can also be seen as a toy model for infections of immune system cells, such as CD4+ T cells in AIDS, and macrophages in tuberculosis, whereby cells are both the target of infection, and mediate the acquired immunity response against the same infection. I thank FAPERJ for financial support.

  9. A Decision Support System for Optimum Use of Fertilizers

    SciTech Connect

    Hoskinson, Reed Louis; Hess, John Richard; Fink, Raymond Keith

    1999-07-01

    The Decision Support System for Agriculture (DSS4Ag) is an expert system being developed by the Site-Specific Technologies for Agriculture (SST4Ag) precision farming research project at the INEEL. DSS4Ag uses state-of-the-art artificial intelligence and computer science technologies to make spatially variable, site-specific, economically optimum decisions on fertilizer use. The DSS4Ag has an open architecture that allows for external input and addition of new requirements and integrates its results with existing agricultural systems’ infrastructures. The DSS4Ag reflects a paradigm shift in the information revolution in agriculture that is precision farming. We depict this information revolution in agriculture as an historic trend in the agricultural decision-making process.

  10. A Decision Support System for Optimum Use of Fertilizers

    SciTech Connect

    R. L. Hoskinson; J. R. Hess; R. K. Fink

    1999-07-01

    The Decision Support System for Agriculture (DSS4Ag) is an expert system being developed by the Site-Specific Technologies for Agriculture (SST4Ag) precision farming research project at the INEEL. DSS4Ag uses state-of-the-art artificial intelligence and computer science technologies to make spatially variable, site-specific, economically optimum decisions on fertilizer use. The DSS4Ag has an open architecture that allows for external input and addition of new requirements and integrates its results with existing agricultural systems' infrastructures. The DSS4Ag reflects a paradigm shift in the information revolution in agriculture that is precision farming. We depict this information revolution in agriculture as an historic trend in the agricultural decision-making process.

  11. Optimum Actuator Selection with a Genetic Algorithm for Aircraft Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, James L.

    2004-01-01

    The placement of actuators on a wing determines the control effectiveness of the airplane. One approach to placement maximizes the moments about the pitch, roll, and yaw axes, while minimizing the coupling. For example, the desired actuators produce a pure roll moment without at the same time causing much pitch or yaw. For a typical wing, there is a large set of candidate locations for placing actuators, resulting in a substantially larger number of combinations to examine in order to find an optimum placement satisfying the mission requirements and mission constraints. A genetic algorithm has been developed for finding the best placement for four actuators to produce an uncoupled pitch moment. The genetic algorithm has been extended to find the minimum number of actuators required to provide uncoupled pitch, roll, and yaw control. A simplified, untapered, unswept wing is the model for each application.

  12. Optimum lattice arrangement developed from a rigorous analytical basis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deyoung, J.

    1976-01-01

    The spanwise vortex-lattice arrangement is mathematically established by lattice solutions of the slender wing which are shown to be analogous to the chordwise vortex-lattice thin wing solution. Solutions for any number N of panels wing theory lift and induced drag and thin wing theory lift and moment are predicted exactly. As N approaches infinity, the slender wing elliptic spanwise loading and thin wing cotangent chordwise loading are predicted, which proves there is mathematical convergence of the vortex-lattice method to the exact answer. Based on this planform spanwise lattice arrangement, an A-vortex-lattice spanwise system is developed for an arbitrary aspect ratio A. This A-lattice has the optimum characteristic of predicting lift accurately for any value of N.

  13. Optimum intermediate fibers for reducing interconnection loss: exact solution.

    PubMed

    Yablon, Andrew D; Sumetsky, M

    2007-03-15

    We derive an exact analytical solution for a transmission line of N single-mode intermediate optical fibers that minimize the interconnection loss between any two dissimilar fiber modes that are well described by that paraxial scalar wave equation. Our solution shows that N optimum intermediate fibers reduce the original interconnection loss by a factor of least 1/(N+1) and that the total interconnection loss is only a function of N and the original direct interconnection loss. Our solution is not restricted to axisymmetric fibers or mode fields and therefore could be useful for reducing the interconnection loss between microstructured optical fibers, between certain slab waveguides, or between fibers and optical sources or detectors.

  14. Design of composite laminates for optimum frequency response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kayikci, Rengin; Sonmez, Fazil O.

    2012-04-01

    In this study, natural frequency response of symmetrically laminated composite plates was optimized. An analytical model accounting for bending-twisting effects was used to determine the laminate natural frequency. Two different problems, fundamental frequency maximization and frequency separation maximization, were considered. Fiber orientation angles were chosen as design variables. Because of the existence of numerous local optimums, a global search algorithm, a variant of simulated annealing, was utilized to find the optimal designs. Results were obtained for different plate aspect ratios. Effects of the number of design variables and the range of values they may take on the optimal frequency were investigated. Problems in which fiber angles showed uncertainty were considered. Optimal frequency response of laminates subjected to static loads was also investigated.

  15. Optimum hot water temperature for absorption solar cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Lecuona, A.; Ventas, R.; Venegas, M.; Salgado, R.; Zacarias, A.

    2009-10-15

    The hot water temperature that maximizes the overall instantaneous efficiency of a solar cooling facility is determined. A modified characteristic equation model is used and applied to single-effect lithium bromide-water absorption chillers. This model is based on the characteristic temperature difference and serves to empirically calculate the performance of real chillers. This paper provides an explicit equation for the optimum temperature of vapor generation, in terms of only the external temperatures of the chiller. The additional data required are the four performance parameters of the chiller and essentially a modified stagnation temperature from the detailed model of the thermal collector operation. This paper presents and discusses the results for small capacity machines for air conditioning of homes and small buildings. The discussion highlights the influence of the relevant parameters. (author)

  16. Optimum periodicity of repeated contractile actions applied in mass transport

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Sungsook; Lee, Sang Joon

    2015-01-01

    Dynamically repeated periodic patterns are abundant in natural and artificial systems, such as tides, heart beats, stock prices, and the like. The characteristic repeatability and periodicity are expected to be optimized in effective system-specific functions. In this study, such optimum periodicity is experimentally evaluated in terms of effective mass transport using one-valve and multi-valve systems working in contractile fluid flows. A set of nanoscale gating functions is utilized, operating in nanocomposite networks through which permeates selectively pass under characteristic contractile actions. Optimized contractile periodicity exists for effective energy impartment to flow in a one-valve system. In the sequential contractile actions for a multi-valve system, synchronization with the fluid flow is critical for effective mass transport. This study provides fundamental understanding on the various repeated periodic patterns and dynamic repeatability occurring in nature and mechanical systems, which are useful for broad applications. PMID:25622949

  17. The optimum choice of gate width for neutron coincidence counting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croft, S.; Henzlova, D.; Favalli, A.; Hauck, D. K.; Santi, P. A.

    2014-11-01

    In the measurement field of international nuclear safeguards, passive neutron coincidence counting is used to quantify the spontaneous fission rate of certain special nuclear materials. The shift register autocorrelation analysis method is the most commonly used approach. However, the Feynman-Y technique, which is more commonly applied in reactor noise analysis, provides an alternative means to extract the correlation information from a pulse train. In this work we consider how to select the optimum gate width for each of these two time-correlation analysis techniques. The optimum is considered to be that which gives the lowest fractional precision on the net doublets rate. Our theoretical approach is approximate but is instructional in terms of revealing the key functional dependence. We show that in both cases the same performance figure of merit applies so that common design criteria apply to the neutron detector head. Our prediction is that near optimal results, suitable for most practical applications, can be obtained from both techniques using a common gate width setting. The estimated precision is also comparable in the two cases. The theoretical expressions are tested experimentally using 252Cf spontaneous fission sources measured in two thermal well counters representative of the type in common use by international inspectorates. Fast accidental sampling was the favored method of acquiring the Feynman-Y data. Our experimental study confirmed the basic functional dependences predicted although experimental results when available are preferred. With an appropriate gate setting Feynman-Y analysis provides an alternative to shift register analysis for safeguards applications which is opening up new avenues of data collection and data reduction to explore.

  18. Motivating Vocational Education Personnel to Their Optimum Growth Potential. Competency-Based Administrator Education Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oscarson, David J.; Finch, Curtis R.

    One of a set of seven instructional materials designed for competency-based vocational education administrator education, this module is intended to acquaint the student with the basic underlying theories of motivation and to provide insight into various methods of applying these theories to motivate school personnel. Following introductory…

  19. Comparing Science Achievement Constructs: Targeted and Achieved

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrara, Steve; Duncan, Teresa

    2011-01-01

    This article illustrates how test specifications based solely on academic content standards, without attention to other cognitive skills and item response demands, can fall short of their targeted constructs. First, the authors inductively describe the science achievement construct represented by a statewide sixth-grade science proficiency test.…

  20. Mobility and Reading Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waters, Theresa Z.

    A study examined the effect of geographic mobility on elementary school students' achievement. Although such mobility, which requires students to make multiple moves among schools, can have a negative impact on academic achievement, the hypothesis for the study was that it was not a determining factor in reading achievement test scores. Subjects…

  1. Study of optimum nozzle exit position (NXP) in a steam ejector refrigeration system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Jingming; Ma, H. B.

    2013-07-01

    A steam ejector refrigeration system with a movable primary nozzle was developed to study the optimum nozzle exit position (NXP) in the ejector system. Three nozzles and two diffusers were fabricated to investigate the nozzle and diffuser effect on the optimum NXP. Experimental results show that an optimum NXP exists for an ejector system. In addition, the effects of boiler temperature and evaporator temperature on the system coefficient of performance (COP) were studied. The results indicate that the optimum NXP is not related to the operating temperature and the nozzle dimension and diffuser size. The investigation provides a better understanding of optimum NXP in a steam ejector refrigeration system.

  2. Using School-Level Student Achievement to Engage in Formative Evaluation: Comparative School-Level Rates of Oral Reading Fluency Growth Conditioned by Initial Skill for Second Grade Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cummings, Kelli D.; Stoolmiller, Michael L.; Baker, Scott K.; Fien, Hank; Kame'enui, Edward J.

    2015-01-01

    We present a method for data-based decision making at the school level using student achievement data. We demonstrate the potential of a national assessment database [i.e., the University of Oregon DIBELS Data System (DDS)] to provide comparative levels of school-level data on average student achievement gains. Through the DDS as a data source,…

  3. Optimum conditions for prebiotic evolution in extraterrestrial environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbas, Ousama H.

    The overall goal of the dissertation was to devise synthetic pathways leading to the production of peptides and amino acids from smaller organic precursors. To this end, eight different zeolites were tested in order to determine their catalytic potential in the conversion of amino acids to peptides. The zeolites tested were either synthetic or naturally occurring. Acidic solutions of amino acids were prepared with or without zeolites and their reactivity was monitored over a four-week time interval. The kinetics and feasibility of peptide synthesis from selected amino acid combinations was investigated via the paper chromatography technique. Nine different amino acids were tested. The nature and extent of product were measured at constant time intervals. It was found that two ZSM-5 synthetic zeolites as well as the Fisher Scientific zeolite mix without alumina salts may have a catalytic potential in the conversion of amino acids to peptides. The conversion was verified by matching the paper chromatogram of the experimental product with that of a known peptide. The experimental results demonstrate that the optimum solvent system for paper chromatographic analysis of the zeolite-catalyzed self-assembly of the amino acids L-aspartic acid, L- asparagine, L-histidine, and L-serine is a 50:50 mixture of 1-butanol and acetone by volume. For the amino acids L-alanine, L-glycine, and L-valine, the optimum solvent was found to be a 30:70 mixture of ammonia and propanol by volume. A mathematical model describing the distance traveled (spot position) versus reaction time was constructed for the zeolite-catalyzed conversion of L- leucine and L-tyrosine and was found to approximately follow the function f(t) = 25 ln t. Two case studies for prebiotic synthesis leading to the production of amino acids or peptides in extraterrestrial environments were discussed: one involving Saturn's moon Titan, and the other involving Jupiter's moon Europa. In the Titan study, it was determined

  4. Antagonistic but complementary actions of phytochromes A and B allow optimum seedling De-etiolation

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, H.; Xu, Yong; Quail, P.H. |

    1997-06-01

    Using dichromatic radiation, we show that the actions of phytochromes A and B (phyA and phyB) in Arabidopsis thaliana are antagonistic in mediating red and far-red radiation effects on seedling de-etiolation and yet act in a complementary manner to regulate de-etiolation, irrespective of spectral composition. At low phytochrome photoequilibria inhibition of hypocotyl extension was strong, because of the action of a far-red high-irradiance response mediated by phyA. At high phytochrome photoequilibria inhibition of hypocotyl extension was also strong, because of the action of phyB. At intermediate photoequilibria hypocotyl inhibition was less strong. In their natural environment, this dual action will strongly retard hypocotyl growth and promote cotyledon opening and expansion both in open daylight and under dense vegetation. Overlapping action by phyA and phyB will substantially promote de-etiolation in sparse vegetation. The antagonistic and complementary actions of phyA and phyB, therefore, allow the optimum regulation of seedling growth after emergence from the soil.

  5. Optimum Cavity Radius Within a Bottle-Shaped Thermoacoustic Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bridge, Justin; Andersen, Bonnie

    2009-10-01

    Heat energy can be used to generate acoustic energy due to thermoacoustic interactions. These engines can be used to create sound waves without any moving parts, like pistons, and could be used in space to convert solar energy into electricity. This research focused on the optimization of the geometry of bottle-shaped resonators used for thermoacoustic prime movers. These resonators have the advantage of non-harmonic overtones compared with half-wave resonators. The resonators for this research were constructed of concentric cylinders consisting of a neck piece and a cavity. The dimensions were approximately 5 cm with an ID of 2 cm for the neck and 10 cm long with IDs varying from about 2 cm to 12 cm for the cavity, producing operating frequencies ranging from approximately 1.2 to 1.5 kHz, following a theoretical model. Twelve different cavity radii were tested. The optimal cavity radius of 2.06 cm had an onset time that was 27 s faster and an onset temperature difference that was lower by 12 C than the smallest cavity (a half-wave resonator). Future research will explore the quality factor and optimum stack to surface area ratio of the engines.

  6. Selecting sprouts of brassicaceae for optimum phytochemical composition.

    PubMed

    Baenas, Nieves; Moreno, Diego A; García-Viguera, Cristina

    2012-11-14

    Cruciferous foods (Brassicaceae spp.) are rich in nutrients and bioactive compounds. Edible sprouts are becoming popular fresh foods and, therefore, the phytochemical profiling of nine varieties of Brassicaceae (broccoli, kohlrabi, red cabbage, rutabaga, turnip, turnip greens, radish, garden cress, and white mustard) was evaluated for this purpose. The glucosinolates in seeds were significantly higher than in sprouts, and day 8 of germination was considered the optimum for consumption. The sprouts with higher concentrations of glucosinolates in 8-day-old sprouts were white mustard, turnip, and kohlrabi (∼815, ∼766, and ∼653 mg 100 g⁻¹ FW, respectively). Red cabbage and radish presented great total glucosinolates content (∼516 and ∼297 mg 100 g⁻¹ FW, respectively, in 8-day-old sprouts) and also higher total phenolic contents, biomass, and antioxidant capacity. The selection of the best performers in terms of germination quality and phytochemical composition is the key to optimize new fresh foods enriched in health-bioactive compounds. Further research on the bioavailability of the bioactive compounds in Brassica foods will allow backing of recommendations for dietarily effective dosages for nutrition and health. PMID:23061899

  7. Optimum design of a gearbox for low vibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Inoue, Katsumi; Townsend, Dennis P.; Coy, John J.

    1992-01-01

    A computer program was developed for designing a low vibration gearbox. The code is based on a finite element shell analysis, a modal analysis, and a structural optimization method. In the finite element analysis, a triangular shell element with 18 degrees-of-freedom is used. In the optimization method, the overall vibration energy of the gearbox is used as the objective function and is minimized at the exciting frequency by varying the finite element thickness. Modal analysis is used to derive the sensitivity of the vibration energy with respect to the design variable. The sensitivity is representative of both eigenvalues and eigenvectors. The optimum value is computed by the gradient projection method and a unidimensional search procedure under the constraint condition of constant weight. The computer code is applied to a design problem derived from an experimental gearbox in use at the NASA Lewis Research Center. The top plate and two side plates of the gearbox are redesigned and the contribution of each surface to the total vibration is determined. Results show that optimization of the top plate alone is effective in reducing total gearbox vibration.

  8. Calculation of optimum emulsifier mixtures for phase inversion emulsification*.

    PubMed

    Förster, T; Rybinski, W V; Tesmann, H; Wadle, A

    1994-04-01

    Synopsis The phase inversion emulsification is a convenient method of preparing fine-disperse and long-term stable oil-in-water emulsions, which are stabilized with nonionic emulsifiers. On the basis of EACN-values (equivalent alkane carbon numbers) the calculation of phase inversion in concentrates (CAPICO) is possible, which yields emulsifier and oil mixing ratios corresponding to a given phase inversion temperature (PIT). The CAPICO-method is illustrated for the example of a cosmetic oil-in-water lotion containing an oil mixture, glyceryl monostearate and a fatty alcohol ethoxylate. Of special interest is the influence of silicone oils on the PIT. At a constant emulsifier oil ratio the complete phase behaviour of this emulsion system is represented in a temperature/water content graph. Optimum emulsification results are obtained if during PIT emulsification a microemulsion or a lamellar phase is passed. The emulsions were characterized by particle sizing, and emulsion stability against sedimentation was evaluated by ultrasonic velocity changes. A fine-disperse and long-term stable oil-in-water emulsion was prepared by a time and energy-saving two-step hot-cold process.

  9. Selecting sprouts of brassicaceae for optimum phytochemical composition.

    PubMed

    Baenas, Nieves; Moreno, Diego A; García-Viguera, Cristina

    2012-11-14

    Cruciferous foods (Brassicaceae spp.) are rich in nutrients and bioactive compounds. Edible sprouts are becoming popular fresh foods and, therefore, the phytochemical profiling of nine varieties of Brassicaceae (broccoli, kohlrabi, red cabbage, rutabaga, turnip, turnip greens, radish, garden cress, and white mustard) was evaluated for this purpose. The glucosinolates in seeds were significantly higher than in sprouts, and day 8 of germination was considered the optimum for consumption. The sprouts with higher concentrations of glucosinolates in 8-day-old sprouts were white mustard, turnip, and kohlrabi (∼815, ∼766, and ∼653 mg 100 g⁻¹ FW, respectively). Red cabbage and radish presented great total glucosinolates content (∼516 and ∼297 mg 100 g⁻¹ FW, respectively, in 8-day-old sprouts) and also higher total phenolic contents, biomass, and antioxidant capacity. The selection of the best performers in terms of germination quality and phytochemical composition is the key to optimize new fresh foods enriched in health-bioactive compounds. Further research on the bioavailability of the bioactive compounds in Brassica foods will allow backing of recommendations for dietarily effective dosages for nutrition and health.

  10. Optimum Heart Rate to Minimize Pulsatile External Cardiac Power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pahlevan, Niema; Gharib, Morteza

    2011-11-01

    The workload on the left ventricle is composed of steady and pulsatile components. Clinical investigations have confirmed that an abnormal pulsatile load plays an important role in the pathogenesis of left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) and progression of LVH to congestive heart failure (CHF). The pulsatile load is the result of the complex dynamics of wave propagation and reflection in the compliant arterial vasculature. We hypothesize that aortic waves can be optimized to reduce the left ventricular (LV) pulsatile load. We used an in-vitro experimental approach to investigate our hypothesis. A unique hydraulic model was used for in-vitro experiments. This model has physical and dynamical properties similar to the heart-aorta system. Different compliant models of the artificial aorta were used to test the hypothesis under various aortic rigidities. Our results indicate that: i) there is an optimum heart rate that minimizes LV pulsatile power (this is in agreement with our previous computational study); ii) introducing an extra reflection site at the specific location along the aorta creates constructive wave conditions that reduce the LV pulsatile power.

  11. Optimum dimensions of power solenoids for magnetic suspension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaznacheyev, B. A.

    1985-01-01

    Design optimization of power solenoids for controllable and stabilizable magnetic suspensions with force compensation in a wind tunnel is shown. It is assumed that the model of a levitating body is a sphere of ferromagnetic material with constant magnetic permeability. This sphere, with a radius much smaller than its distance from the solenoid above, is to be maintained in position on the solenoid axis by balance of the vertical electromagnetic force and the force of gravitation. The necessary vertical (axial) force generated by the solenoid is expressed as a function of relevant system dimensions, solenoid design parameters, and physical properties of the body. Three families of curves are obtained which depict the solenoid power for a given force as a function of the solenoid length with either outside radius or inside radius as a variable parameter and as a function of the outside radius with inside radius as a variable parameter. The curves indicate the optimum solenoid length and outside radius, for minimum power, corresponding to a given outside radius and inside radius, respectively.

  12. Determining optimum climate drivers for weather risk projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavez, Erik; Kilian, Markus; Lucarini, Valerio

    2016-04-01

    In spite of the exponential increase of available data, the uncertainties of projections of weather variability, especially at local scale, have not decreased. This poses important challenges for the design of weather risk management strategies in various vulnerable sectors such as energy or agricultural production. This paper focuses on a two step methodology to enable projection of local weather risk in future climate scenarios. First, we focus on the optimum selection of drivers of regional weather patterns in order to project local weather variability risk estimates in future climate scenarios. This is carried out through the use of stochastic downscaling enabling conditional modelling of pixel-level distributions of weather variables as a function of inter-annual and inter-decadal climate variability drivers. Secondly, a statistical and physically-based climate model selection methodology is developed in order to produce a sub-ensemble of inter-annual and decadal variability drivers dataset that allows accurate and robust projection of weather variability. The case study of South Eastern Africa will be used. Datasets retrieved from CMIP5 repository in three RCP scenarios (historical, 8.5 and 2.5) are used as well as observed historical weather data.

  13. Optimum Construction of Heating Coil for Domestic Induction Cooker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Dola; Bandyopadhyay, Atanu; Sadhu, Pradip Kumar; Pal, Nitai

    2010-10-01

    The design and optimization of the parameters of heating coil is very important for the analytical analysis of high frequency inverter fed induction cooker. Moreover, accurate prediction of high frequency winding loss (i.e., losses due to skin and proximity effects) is necessary as the induction cooker used in power electronics applications. At high frequency current penetration in the induction coil circuit is very difficult for conducting wire due to skin-effect. To eradicate the skin effect heating coil is made up of bundle conductor i.e., litz wire. In this paper inductances and AC resistances of a litz-wire are calculated and optimized by considering the input parameters like wire type, shape, number of strand, number of spiral turn, number of twist per feet of heating coil and operating frequency. A high frequency half bridge series resonant mirror inverter circuit is used in this paper and taking the optimum values of inductance and ac resistance the circuit is simulated through PSPICE simulations. It has been noticed that the results are feasible enough for real implementation.

  14. Optimum frequency for subsurface-imaging synthetic-aperture radar

    SciTech Connect

    Brock, B.C.; Patitz, W.E.

    1993-05-01

    A subsurface-imaging synthetic-aperture radar (SISAR) has potential for application in areas as diverse as non-proliferation programs for nuclear weapons to environmental monitoring. However, most conventional synthetic-aperture radars operate at higher microwave frequencies which do not significantly penetrate below the soil surface. This study attempts to provide a basis for determining optimum frequencies and frequency ranges which will allow synthetic-aperture imaging of buried targets. Since the radar return from a buried object must compete with the return from surface clutter, the signal-to-clutter ratio is an appropriate measure of performance for a SISAR. A parameter-based modeling approach is used to model the complex dielectric constant of the soil from measured data obtained from the literature. Theoretical random-surface scattering models, based on statistical solutions to Maxwell's equations, are used to model the clutter. These models are combined to estimate the signal-to-clutter ratio for canonical targets buried in several soil configurations. Initial results indicate that the HF spectrum (3--30 MHz), although it could be used to detect certain targets under some conditions, has limited practical value for use with SISAR, while the upper vhf through uhf spectrum ([approximately]100 MHz--1 GHz) shows the most promise for a general purpose SISAR system. Recommendations are included for additional research.

  15. Optimum cooking conditions for shrimp and Atlantic salmon.

    PubMed

    Brookmire, Lauren; Mallikarjunan, P; Jahncke, M; Grisso, R

    2013-02-01

    The quality and safety of a cooked food product depends on many variables, including the cooking method and time-temperature combinations employed. The overall heating profile of the food can be useful in predicting the quality changes and microbial inactivation occurring during cooking. Mathematical modeling can be used to attain the complex heating profile of a food product during cooking. Studies were performed to monitor the product heating profile during the baking and boiling of shrimp and the baking and pan-frying of salmon. Product color, texture, moisture content, mass loss, and pressed juice were evaluated during the cooking processes as the products reached the internal temperature recommended by the FDA. Studies were also performed on the inactivation of Salmonella cocktails in shrimp and salmon. To effectively predict inactivation during cooking, the Bigelow, Fermi distribution, and Weibull distribution models were applied to the Salmonella thermal inactivation data. Minimum cooking temperatures necessary to destroy Salmonella in shrimp and salmon were determined. The heating profiles of the 2 products were modeled using the finite difference method. Temperature data directly from the modeled heating profiles were then used in the kinetic modeling of quality change and Salmonella inactivation during cooking. The optimum cooking times for a 3-log reduction of Salmonella and maintaining 95% of quality attributes are 100, 233, 159, 378, 1132, and 399 s for boiling extra jumbo shrimp, baking extra jumbo shrimp, boiling colossal shrimp, baking colossal shrimp, baking Atlantic salmon, and pan frying Atlantic Salmon, respectively.

  16. Dexmedetomidine provides optimum conditions during awake fiberoptic intubation in simulated cervical spine injury patients

    PubMed Central

    Chopra, Pooja; Dixit, Madhu Bala; Dang, Aashish; Gupta, Vibhuti

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: We undertook this study to assess if a small-dose of dexmedetomidine (DEX) for conscious sedation during awake fiberoptic intubation (AFOI) in simulated cervical spine injury (CSI) patients provides optimum conditions and fulfills the need of postintubation neurological examination required in such patients. The aim was to assess the efficacy of DEX on arousability and patient's comfort during AFOI in simulated CSI patients. Material and Methods: In this prospective, randomized double-blind study, 100 American Society of Anesthesiologists Grade I-II patients aged between 18 and 65 years scheduled for elective surgery under general anesthesia underwent AFOI under conscious sedation with DEX. After locally anesthetizing the airway and applying a cervical collar, patients either received DEX 1 μg/kg over 10 min followed by 0.7 μg/kg/h maintenance infusion or normal saline in the same dose and rate during AFOI. Targeted sedation (Ramsay sedation score [RSS] ≥2) during AFOI was maintained with midazolam [MDZ] in both groups. Statistical Analysis was performed using unpaired Student's t-test, Chi-square test, Mann-Whitney test and Wilcoxon-w test. Results: The total number of patients requiring MDZ and the mean dose of MDZ required to achieve targeted sedation (RSS ≥2) was significantly less in DEX group compared to the placebo group (P < 0.001). Similarly, patient satisfaction score, heart rate, systolic, diastolic and mean arterial pressure and respiratory parameters were significantly better in DEX group (P < 0.001). Postintubation arousability in the two groups was comparable (P = 0.29). Conclusions: Dexmedetomidine provides optimum sedation without compromising airway or hemodynamic instability with better patient tolerance and satisfaction for AFOI. It also preserves patient arousability for the postintubation neurological assessment. PMID:27006542

  17. Optimum coil insertion speed of various coils in brain aneurysm embolization in vitro.

    PubMed

    Konishi, Yoshifumi; Takeuchi, Masataka; Fukasaku, Kazuaki

    2016-10-01

    A coil must comprise material with shape memory to perform optimal coil embolization. To achieve this, the alloy characteristics of the coil (hardness, shape, and thickness) must be understood. In this experiment, a catheter was fixed in the bright position and the movement of the coil was observed under a constant rate of insertion; the optimal insertion rate during clinical use was investigated. The first coil insertion speed was evaluated using simulated aneurysms in an in vivo arterial model. The results showed that the insertion force relates to the deployment shape of the coil, that the feedback through the force indicator using sound is very effective, and that the recorder is useful for analysis of coil embolization. The inserted coils during aneurysm embolization were able to wind uniformly within the aneurysm due to a variety of factors (guiding or micro-catheter position and kick-back phenomenon such as delivery wire). Optimal speed is achieved with proper coil design, which allows the coil to be inserted into the aneurysm. The shape and size of the aneurysm can help determine the necessary size and design of the coil that should be used during the optimal speed range. Aneurysm wall and coil characteristics are considered, along with the friction state of the coil (hardness, shape, and thickness), leading to improvements in safety during the insertion procedure at optimum speed. PMID:27353635

  18. Optimum coil insertion speed of various coils in brain aneurysm embolization in vitro.

    PubMed

    Konishi, Yoshifumi; Takeuchi, Masataka; Fukasaku, Kazuaki

    2016-10-01

    A coil must comprise material with shape memory to perform optimal coil embolization. To achieve this, the alloy characteristics of the coil (hardness, shape, and thickness) must be understood. In this experiment, a catheter was fixed in the bright position and the movement of the coil was observed under a constant rate of insertion; the optimal insertion rate during clinical use was investigated. The first coil insertion speed was evaluated using simulated aneurysms in an in vivo arterial model. The results showed that the insertion force relates to the deployment shape of the coil, that the feedback through the force indicator using sound is very effective, and that the recorder is useful for analysis of coil embolization. The inserted coils during aneurysm embolization were able to wind uniformly within the aneurysm due to a variety of factors (guiding or micro-catheter position and kick-back phenomenon such as delivery wire). Optimal speed is achieved with proper coil design, which allows the coil to be inserted into the aneurysm. The shape and size of the aneurysm can help determine the necessary size and design of the coil that should be used during the optimal speed range. Aneurysm wall and coil characteristics are considered, along with the friction state of the coil (hardness, shape, and thickness), leading to improvements in safety during the insertion procedure at optimum speed.

  19. Growth of hexagonal and cubic InN nanowires using MOCVD with different growth temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Seok-Hyo; Ra, Yong-Ho; Lee, Young-Min; Song, Ki-Young; Cha, Jun-Ho; Lim, Hong-Chul; Kim, Dong-Wook; Suthan Kissinger, N. J.; Lee, Cheul-Ro

    2010-07-01

    We have performed a detailed investigation of the metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) growth and characterization of InN nanowires formed on Si(1 1 1) substrates under nitrogen rich conditions. The growth of InN nanowires has been demonstrated by using an ion beam sputtered (˜10 nm) Au seeding layer prior to the initiation of growth. We tried to vary the growth temperature and pressure in order to obtain an optimum growth condition for InN nanowires. The InN nanowires were grown on the Au+In solid solution droplets caused by annealing in a nitrogen ambient at 700 °C. By applying this technique, we have achieved the formation of InN nanowires that are relatively free of dislocations and stacking faults. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed wires with diameters of 90-200 nm and lengths varying between 3 and 5 μm. Hexagonal and cubic structure is verified by high resolution X-ray diffraction (HR-XRD) spectrum. Raman measurements show that these wurtzite InN nanowires have sharp peaks E2 (high) at 491 cm -1 and A 1 (LO) at 591 cm -1.

  20. Function of aspartic acid residues in optimum pH control of L-arabinose isomerase from Lactobacillus fermentum.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zheng; Li, Sha; Feng, Xiaohai; Zhan, Yijing; Xu, Hong

    2014-05-01

    L-Arabinose isomerase (L-AI) catalyzes the isomerization of L-arabinose to L-ribulose and D-galactose to D-tagatose. Most reported L-AIs exhibit neutral or alkaline optimum pH, which is less beneficial than acidophilic ones in industrial D-tagatose production. Lactobacillus fermentum L-AI (LFAI) is a thermostable enzyme that can achieve a high conversion rate for D-galactose isomerization. However, its biocatalytic activity at acidic conditions can still be further improved. In this study, we report the single- and multiple-site mutagenesis on LFAI targeting three aspartic acid residues (D268, D269, and D299). Some of the lysine mutants, especially D268K/D269K/D299K, exhibited significant optimum pH shifts (from 6.5 to 5.0) and enhancement of pH stability (half-life time increased from 30 to 62 h at pH 6.0), which are more favorable for industrial applications. With the addition of borate, D-galactose was isomerized into D-tagatose by D268K/D269K/D299K at pH 5.0, resulting in a high conversion rate of 62 %. Based on the obtained 3.2-Å crystal structure of LFAI, the three aspartic acid residues were found to be distant from the active site and possibly did not participate in substrate catalysis. However, they were proven to possess similar optimum pH control ability in other L-AI, such as that derived from Escherichia coli. This study sheds light on the essential residues of L-AIs that can be modified for desired optimum pH and better pH stability, which are useful in D-tagatose bioproduction.

  1. Widespread formation of cherts during the early Eocene climate optimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muttoni, G.; Kent, D. V.

    2007-12-01

    Radiolarian cherts in the Tethyan realm of Jurassic age were recently interpreted as resulting from high biosiliceous productivity along upwelling zones in subequatorial paleolatitudes the locations of which were confirmed by revised paleomagnetic estimates. However, the widespread occurrence of cherts in the Eocene suggests that cherts may not always be reliable proxies of latitude and upwelling zones. In a new survey of the global spatiotemporal distribution of Cenozoic cherts in Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) and Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) sediment cores, we found that cherts occur most frequently in the Paleocene and early Eocene, with a peak in occurrences at ~50 Ma that is coincident with the time of highest bottom water temperatures of the early Eocene climatic optimum (EECO) when the global ocean was presumably characterized by reduced upwelling efficiency and biosiliceous productivity. Cherts occur less commonly during the subsequent Eocene global cooling trend. Primary paleoclimatic factors rather than secondary diagenetic processes seem therefore to control chert formation. This timing of peak Eocene chert occurrence, which is supported by detailed stratigraphic correlations, contradicts currently accepted models that involve an initial loading of large amounts of dissolved silica from enhanced weathering and/or volcanism in a supposedly sluggish ocean of the EECO, followed during the subsequent middle Eocene global cooling by more vigorous oceanic circulation and consequent upwelling that made this silica reservoir available for enhanced biosilicification, with the formation of chert as a result of biosilica transformation during diagenesis. Instead, we suggest that basin-basin fractionation by deep-sea circulation could have raised the concentration of EECO dissolved silica especially in the North Atlantic, where an alternative mode of silica burial involving widespread direct precipitation and/or absorption of silica by clay minerals could have

  2. Optimum Low Thrust Elliptic Orbit Transfer Using Numerical Averaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarzi, Zahi Bassem

    Low-thrust electric propulsion is increasingly being used for spacecraft missions primarily due to its high propellant efficiency. Since analytical solutions for general low-thrust transfers are not available, a simple and fast method for low-thrust trajectory optimization is of great value for preliminary mission planning. However, few low-thrust trajectory tools are appropriate for preliminary mission design studies. The method presented in this paper provides quick and accurate solutions for a wide range of transfers by using numerical orbital averaging to improve solution convergence and include orbital perturbations. Thus allowing preliminary trajectories to be obtained for transfers which involve many revolutions about the primary body. This method considers minimum fuel transfers using first order averaging to obtain the fuel optimum rates of change of the equinoctial orbital elements in terms of each other and the Lagrange multipliers. Constraints on thrust and power, as well as minimum periapsis, are implemented and the equations are averaged numerically using a Gaussian quadrature. The use of numerical averaging allows for more complex orbital perturbations to be added without great difficulty. Orbital perturbations due to solar radiation pressure, atmospheric drag, a non-spherical central body, and third body gravitational effects have been included. These perturbations have not been considered by previous methods using analytical averaging. Thrust limitations due to shadowing have also been considered in this study. To allow for faster convergence of a wider range of problems, the solution to a transfer which minimizes the square of the thrust magnitude is used as a preliminary guess for the minimum fuel problem. Thus, this method can be quickly applied to many different types of transfers which may include various perturbations. Results from this model are shown to provide a reduction in propellant mass required over previous minimum fuel solutions

  3. An integrated optimum design approach for high speed prop rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chattopadhyay, Aditi; Mccarthy, Thomas R.

    1995-01-01

    The objective is to develop an optimization procedure for high-speed and civil tilt-rotors by coupling all of the necessary disciplines within a closed-loop optimization procedure. Both simplified and comprehensive analysis codes are used for the aerodynamic analyses. The structural properties are calculated using in-house developed algorithms for both isotropic and composite box beam sections. There are four major objectives of this study. (1) Aerodynamic optimization: The effects of blade aerodynamic characteristics on cruise and hover performance of prop-rotor aircraft are investigated using the classical blade element momentum approach with corrections for the high lift capability of rotors/propellers. (2) Coupled aerodynamic/structures optimization: A multilevel hybrid optimization technique is developed for the design of prop-rotor aircraft. The design problem is decomposed into a level for improved aerodynamics with continuous design variables and a level with discrete variables to investigate composite tailoring. The aerodynamic analysis is based on that developed in objective 1 and the structural analysis is performed using an in-house code which models a composite box beam. The results are compared to both a reference rotor and the optimum rotor found in the purely aerodynamic formulation. (3) Multipoint optimization: The multilevel optimization procedure of objective 2 is extended to a multipoint design problem. Hover, cruise, and take-off are the three flight conditions simultaneously maximized. (4) Coupled rotor/wing optimization: Using the comprehensive rotary wing code CAMRAD, an optimization procedure is developed for the coupled rotor/wing performance in high speed tilt-rotor aircraft. The developed procedure contains design variables which define the rotor and wing planforms.

  4. Optimum dose of radiotherapy for chemodectomas of the middle ear

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J.A.; Elkon, D.; Lim, M.L.; Constable, W.C.

    1980-07-01

    Forty patients with chemodectomas of the middle ear were seen at the University of Virginia Hospital from 1932 to 1978. Surgery, post-operative radiotherapy or radiotherapy alone were the treatment modalities employed depending on the extent of the disease. These have been reviewed with regard to the clinical presentation and results of treatment with long term follow-up of 1 to 30 years. An attempt was made to determine the optimum dose of radiotherapy based on our data and reported cases in the literature. The majority of patients complaining of tinnitus, otalgia and pulsation obtained significant if not complete relief of symptoms. Cranial nerve defects, however, ofter persisted after therapy. Tumor was considered to be controlled if there was no increase in its size or progression of symptoms. Tumor control was obtained in eight of 10 early patients but only in two of seven more patients with advanced disease with total resection. Control rate with post-operative radiotherapy after subtotal resection was 85%. Radiotherapy alone was used for inoperable or recurrent tumors and control was obtained in 88% of them. In addition to our data, the radiation dose used in over 200 patients reported in the literature was analyzed. There was only a 2% recurrence rate in patients who received 4000 rad/4 weeks or higher. Twenty-two percent of patients treated with less than 4000 rad developed recurrence. The tendency is to use a lower dose of postoperative treatment and a higher dose for gross inoperable tumors. 4000 rad/4 weeks seems to be adequate for control of postoperative residual disease and no more than 5000 rad/5 weeks are required even for advanced inoperable cases. By keeping the dose below 5000 rad/5 weeks, the incidence of complications such as brain necrosis is greatly decreased.

  5. Optimum structure of multilayer regenerator with magnetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsukagoshi, T.; Matsumoto, K.; Hashimoto, T.; Kuriyama, T.; Nakagome, H.

    We investigated a layered structural regenerator (multilayer regenerator) with magnetic regenerator materials using a two-stage GM refrigerator. In this study we used Er 0.75Gd 0.25Ni which was expected to be placed in the high temperature part of the second regenerator. To confirm the effect of Er 0.75Gd 0.25Ni, the heat-exchange efficiency of the regenerator (regenerator efficiency) with Er 0.75Gd 0.25Ni, Er 3Co and Er 0.9Yb 0.1Ni, which were in the volumetric ratio x: (0.5 - x): 0.5 (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.5) was calculated as a function of x by computer simulation. We found that the regenerator efficiency increased when x (i.e. the amount of Er 0.75Gd 0.25Ni) was increased and an optimum value of x was ~ 0.25. We then made two kinds of second regenerator: a triple layer regenerator with Er 0.75Gd 0.25Ni, Er 3Co and Er 0.9Yb 0.1Ni, which were in the volumetric ratio 0.25:0.25:0.5, and a double layer regenerator with Er 3Co and Er 0.9Yb 0.1Ni, which were in the volumetric ratio 0.5:0.5. We compared their refrigeration performances experimentally. With the triple layer regenerator, the lowest temperature was 2.60 K at the second stage and the maximum refrigeration capacity at 4.2 K was 1.17 W. These results were superior to those with the double layer regenerator.

  6. General Achievement Trends: Oklahoma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  7. General Achievement Trends: Georgia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  8. General Achievement Trends: Nebraska

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  9. General Achievement Trends: Arkansas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  10. General Achievement Trends: Maryland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  11. General Achievement Trends: Maine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  12. General Achievement Trends: Iowa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  13. General Achievement Trends: Texas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  14. General Achievement Trends: Hawaii

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  15. General Achievement Trends: Kansas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  16. General Achievement Trends: Florida

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  17. General Achievement Trends: Massachusetts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  18. General Achievement Trends: Tennessee

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  19. General Achievement Trends: Alabama

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  20. General Achievement Trends: Virginia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  1. General Achievement Trends: Michigan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  2. General Achievement Trends: Colorado

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  3. Inverting the Achievement Pyramid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White-Hood, Marian; Shindel, Melissa

    2006-01-01

    Attempting to invert the pyramid to improve student achievement and increase all students' chances for success is not a new endeavor. For decades, educators have strategized, formed think tanks, and developed school improvement teams to find better ways to improve the achievement of all students. Currently, the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) is…

  4. Achievement Test Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Dept. of Education, Columbus. Trade and Industrial Education Service.

    The Ohio Trade and Industrial Education Achievement Test battery is comprised of seven basic achievement tests: Machine Trades, Automotive Mechanics, Basic Electricity, Basic Electronics, Mechanical Drafting, Printing, and Sheet Metal. The tests were developed by subject matter committees and specialists in testing and research. The Ohio Trade and…

  5. School Effects on Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nichols, Robert C.

    The New York State Education Department conducts a Pupil Evaluation Program (PEP) in which each year all third, sixth, and ninth grade students in the state are given a series of achievement tests in reading and mathematics. The data accumulated by the department includes achievement test scores, teacher characteristics, building and curriculum…

  6. Heritability of Creative Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piffer, Davide; Hur, Yoon-Mi

    2014-01-01

    Although creative achievement is a subject of much attention to lay people, the origin of individual differences in creative accomplishments remain poorly understood. This study examined genetic and environmental influences on creative achievement in an adult sample of 338 twins (mean age = 26.3 years; SD = 6.6 years). Twins completed the Creative…

  7. Confronting the Achievement Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, David

    2007-01-01

    This article talks about the large achievement gap between children of color and their white peers. The reasons for the achievement gap are varied. First, many urban minorities come from a background of poverty. One of the detrimental effects of growing up in poverty is receiving inadequate nourishment at a time when bodies and brains are rapidly…

  8. Achieving Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abowitz, Kathleen Knight

    2011-01-01

    Public schools are functionally provided through structural arrangements such as government funding, but public schools are achieved in substance, in part, through local governance. In this essay, Kathleen Knight Abowitz explains the bifocal nature of achieving public schools; that is, that schools are both subject to the unitary Public compact of…

  9. Our Lady of Hungary Catholic School, Indiana. School Achieves Double-Digit Growth with the Help of Interim and Classroom Formative Assessment Data. Case Study: Measures of Academic Progress & Professional Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northwest Evaluation Association, 2015

    2015-01-01

    In 2014, South Bend's Our Lady of Hungary Catholic School welcomed its third principal in four years: Kevin Goralczyk, an Indiana native and seasoned educator. Together with the parish's pastor, Reverend Kevin Bauman, Principal Goralczyk began exploring how OLH could raise its pre-K-8 student achievement and better support teachers and staff…

  10. Student Achievement and Motivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flammer, Gordon H.; Mecham, Robert C.

    1974-01-01

    Compares the lecture and self-paced methods of instruction on the basis of student motivation and achieveme nt, comparing motivating and demotivating factors in each, and their potential for motivation and achievement. (Authors/JR)

  11. Physiological Strategies to Improve the Performance of Spring Maize (Zea mays L.) Planted under Early and Optimum Sowing Conditions.

    PubMed

    Bakhtavar, Muhammad Amir; Afzal, Irfan; Basra, Shahzad Maqsood Ahmed; Ahmad, Azraf-Ul-Haq; Noor, Mehmood Ali

    2015-01-01

    Low temperature at stand establishment and high temperature at reproductive stage are involved in reduction of grain yield of spring maize. A field study was therefore conducted to evaluate different physiological strategies for improving performance of spring maize under temperature extremes. Seed priming and foliar spray with 3% moringa leaf extract (MLE) and 100 mg L-1 kinetin solution alone or in all possible combinations with each other at three growth stages (knee height, tasseling and grain filling stage) and hydropriming was compared with control. Seed priming plus foliar spray of MLE and kinetin significantly improved stand establishment especially under early sown crop as indicated by reduced mean emergence time (MET), improved emergence index (EI) and final emergence percentage (FEP). Similarly increased chlorophyll contents, crop growth rate, leaf area index, photosynthetic rate, transpiration rate, relative water content and decreased membrane permeability were recorded in both early and optimum sowing conditions in MLE priming plus foliar spray treatment. All these improvements were harvested in the form of increased yield and harvest index compared with control treatment. Overall crop sown at optimum time performed best but exogenous application of MLE through seed priming and foliar spray maximally improved the performance of early sown maize crop which is attributed more likely due to improved stand establishment, chlorophyll and phenolic contents, increased leaf area duration and grain filling period. It can be concluded that seed priming with MLE along with its foliar spray could increase production of maize under temperature extremes. PMID:25928295

  12. Physiological Strategies to Improve the Performance of Spring Maize (Zea mays L.) Planted under Early and Optimum Sowing Conditions.

    PubMed

    Bakhtavar, Muhammad Amir; Afzal, Irfan; Basra, Shahzad Maqsood Ahmed; Ahmad, Azraf-Ul-Haq; Noor, Mehmood Ali

    2015-01-01

    Low temperature at stand establishment and high temperature at reproductive stage are involved in reduction of grain yield of spring maize. A field study was therefore conducted to evaluate different physiological strategies for improving performance of spring maize under temperature extremes. Seed priming and foliar spray with 3% moringa leaf extract (MLE) and 100 mg L-1 kinetin solution alone or in all possible combinations with each other at three growth stages (knee height, tasseling and grain filling stage) and hydropriming was compared with control. Seed priming plus foliar spray of MLE and kinetin significantly improved stand establishment especially under early sown crop as indicated by reduced mean emergence time (MET), improved emergence index (EI) and final emergence percentage (FEP). Similarly increased chlorophyll contents, crop growth rate, leaf area index, photosynthetic rate, transpiration rate, relative water content and decreased membrane permeability were recorded in both early and optimum sowing conditions in MLE priming plus foliar spray treatment. All these improvements were harvested in the form of increased yield and harvest index compared with control treatment. Overall crop sown at optimum time performed best but exogenous application of MLE through seed priming and foliar spray maximally improved the performance of early sown maize crop which is attributed more likely due to improved stand establishment, chlorophyll and phenolic contents, increased leaf area duration and grain filling period. It can be concluded that seed priming with MLE along with its foliar spray could increase production of maize under temperature extremes.

  13. Physiological Strategies to Improve the Performance of Spring Maize (Zea mays L.) Planted under Early and Optimum Sowing Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Bakhtavar, Muhammad Amir; Afzal, Irfan; Basra, Shahzad Maqsood Ahmed; Ahmad, Azraf-ul-Haq; Noor, Mehmood Ali

    2015-01-01

    Low temperature at stand establishment and high temperature at reproductive stage are involved in reduction of grain yield of spring maize. A field study was therefore conducted to evaluate different physiological strategies for improving performance of spring maize under temperature extremes. Seed priming and foliar spray with 3% moringa leaf extract (MLE) and 100 mg L-1 kinetin solution alone or in all possible combinations with each other at three growth stages (knee height, tasseling and grain filling stage) and hydropriming was compared with control. Seed priming plus foliar spray of MLE and kinetin significantly improved stand establishment especially under early sown crop as indicated by reduced mean emergence time (MET), improved emergence index (EI) and final emergence percentage (FEP). Similarly increased chlorophyll contents, crop growth rate, leaf area index, photosynthetic rate, transpiration rate, relative water content and decreased membrane permeability were recorded in both early and optimum sowing conditions in MLE priming plus foliar spray treatment. All these improvements were harvested in the form of increased yield and harvest index compared with control treatment. Overall crop sown at optimum time performed best but exogenous application of MLE through seed priming and foliar spray maximally improved the performance of early sown maize crop which is attributed more likely due to improved stand establishment, chlorophyll and phenolic contents, increased leaf area duration and grain filling period. It can be concluded that seed priming with MLE along with its foliar spray could increase production of maize under temperature extremes. PMID:25928295

  14. Identifying Optimum Landscapes for Water Quality and Ecosystem Services in an Agricultural Watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalzell, B. J.; Pennington, D. N.; Mulla, D.; Polasky, S.; Taff, S.; Nelson, E.

    2011-12-01

    Many areas in the US fail to meet water quality standards. Management actions to improve water quality also impact other ecosystem services, both positively and negatively. We developed an integrated approach to analyze how to meet various levels of water quality while maximizing the net benefits of other ecosystem services in an agricultural watershed. We used the SWAT model (Soil and Water Assessment Tool) to predict crop yield, flow, sediment and phosphorus export and the InVEST (Integrated Valuation of Ecosystem Services and Tradeoffs) model to estimate market returns from agriculture production and non-market values from sediment and phosphorus reduction and from carbon sequestration. We applied these models to an agricultural watershed located in South Central Minnesota to find optimal landscape arrangement for a range of water quality goals. Results showed that the current landscape is near the economic optimum and that market returns from agricultural production dominate total economic returns, even when ecosystem services such as water quality and carbon sequestration are valued. We find that land use patterns that achieve 50% reductions in sediment and phosphorus result in significant annual losses in economic returns (averaging approximately 300/ha and 250/ha for sediment and phosphorus, respectively). When including non-market valuation of ecosystem services, 50% reductions in sediment and phosphorus result in declines in total watershed value an average of about 220/ha and 180/ha for sediment and phosphorus, respectively. However, compared to the current landscape, we show that marginal water quality improvements (10-15% reductions in sediment and phosphorus) could be achieved with no net loss in economic returns. Further, when ecosystem service valuation is included, reductions in sediment and phosphorus on the order of 15-20%, respectively, could be achieved with no net loss of total value. Landscape changes to achieve sediment and phosphorus

  15. Experimental determination of optimum gutter brush parameters and road sweeping criteria for different types of waste.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Wahab, Magd M; Wang, Chong; Vanegas-Useche, Libardo V; Parker, Graham A

    2011-06-01

    The removal ability of gutter brushes for road sweeping for various debris types and different sweeping parameters is studied through experimental tests. The brushing test rig used comprises two commercial gutter brushes, a concrete test bed, and an asphalt test road with a gutter of 0.25 cm width and 10° slope. The brush-surface contact area is determined by sweeping sand on the concrete test bed. Sweeping problems are identified and discussed, and sweeping criteria for the different debris types are suggested. Also, optimum sweeping parameters are proposed for each debris type. In addition, debris removal mechanisms are discussed and analysed. The results indicate that for large heavy debris such as stones and gravel, it is not difficult to achieve large removal forces, because the steel bristles are relatively stiff. Conversely, high removal forces are not needed for particles of millimetre or micron sizes, but bristle curvature has to be appropriate to remove particles from road concavities. Finally, it is found that mud, especially dry mud on a rough surface, is the hardest debris to sweep, requiring a brush with a large tilt angle and a very large penetration to produce large removal forces.

  16. Reactor beam calculations to determine optimum delivery of epithermal neutrons for treatment of brain tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Wheeler, F.J.; Nigg, D.W.; Capala, J.

    1997-10-01

    Studies were performed to assess theoretical tumor control probability (TCP) for brain-tumor treatment with boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) using epithermal neutron sources from reactors. The existing epithermal-neutron beams at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor Facility (BMRR), the Petten High Flux Reactor Facility (HWR) and the Finnish Research Reactor 1 (FIR1) have been analyzed and characterized using common analytical and measurement methods allowing for this inter-comparison. Each of these three facilities is unique and each offers an advantage in some aspect of BNCT, but none of these existing facilities excel in all neutron-beam attributes as related to BNCT. A comparison is therefore also shown for a near-optimum reactor beam which does not currently exist but which would be feasible with existing technology. This hypothetical beam is designated BNCT-1 and has a spectrum similar to the FIR-1, the mono-directionality of the HFR and the intensity of the BMRR. A beam very similar to the BNCT-1 could perhaps be achieved with modification of the BMRR, HFR, or FIR, and could certainly be realized in a new facility with today`s technology.

  17. The Synthesis of Optimum Homing Missile Guidance Systems with Statistical Inputs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Elwood C.; Smith, Gerald L.

    1959-01-01

    An analytical approach is presented which is applicable to the optimization of homing navigation guidance systems which are forced to operate in the presence of radar noise. The two primary objectives are to establish theoretical minimum miss distance performance and a method of synthesizing the optimum control system. The factors considered are: (1) target evasive maneuver, (2) radar glint noise, (3) missile maneuverability, and (4) the inherent time-varying character of the kinematics. Two aspects of the problem are considered. In the first, consideration is given only to minimization of the miss distance. The solution given cannot be achieved in practice because the required accelerations are too large. In the second, results are extended to the practical case where the limited acceleration capabilities of the missile are considered by placing a realistic restriction on the mean-square acceleration so that system operation is confined to the linear range. Although the exact analytical solution of the latter problem does not appear feasible, approximate solutions utilizing time-varying control systems can be found. One of these solutions - a range multiplication type control system - is studied in detail. It is shown that the minimum obtainable miss distance with a realistic restriction on acceleration is close to the absolute minimum for unlimited missile maneuverability. Furthermore, it is shown that there is an equivalence in performance between the homing and beam-rider type guidance systems. Consideration is given to the effect of changes in target acceleration, noise magnitude, and missile acceleration on the minimum miss distance.

  18. An optimum approximation of n-point correlation functions of random heterogeneous material systems

    SciTech Connect

    Baniassadi, M.; Garmestani, H.; Ahzi, S.; Remond, Y.

    2014-02-21

    An approximate solution for n-point correlation functions is developed in this study. In the approximate solution, weight functions are used to connect subsets of (n-1)-point correlation functions to estimate the full set of n-point correlation functions. In previous related studies, simple weight functions were introduced for the approximation of three and four-point correlation functions. In this work, the general framework of the weight functions is extended and derived to achieve optimum accuracy for approximate n-point correlation functions. Such approximation can be utilized to construct global n-point correlation functions for a system when there exist limited information about these functions in a subset of space. To verify its accuracy, the new formulation is used to approximate numerically three-point correlation functions from the set of two-point functions directly evaluated from a virtually generated isotropic heterogeneous microstructure representing a particulate composite system. Similarly, three-point functions are approximated for an anisotropic glass fiber/epoxy composite system and compared to their corresponding reference values calculated from an experimental dataset acquired by computational tomography. Results from both virtual and experimental studies confirm the accuracy of the new approximation. The new formulation can be utilized to attain a more accurate approximation to global n-point correlation functions for heterogeneous material systems with a hierarchy of length scales.

  19. Optimum Parameterization In Estimating Sub-diurnal Earth Rotation Parameters With Very Long Baseline Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendes Cerveira, P. J.; Böhm, J.; Weber, R.; Schuh, H.

    2006-08-01

    Project SPEED (Short Periodic and Episodic Earth Rotation Determination) aims at the investigation of quasi-periodic, a-periodic, and episodic variations of the Earth Rotation Parameters (ERP). Geophysical data of unprecedented resolution of atmospheric (AAM) and oceanic angular momentum (OAM) serve as reference. One first step consists in studying and minimizing the correlation between the ERP and unavoidable auxiliary parameters. The current procedure in most Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) software packages when estimating ERP with sub-diurnal resolution is based on piece-wise linear functions. Considering that a subsequent combination of results of different observing techniques, like VLBI and GPS, will be mandatory, the concept of this parameterization needs to be revisited. Adverse effects of too loose or too tight constraints on the ERP and their rates for time intervals when VLBI observations are rather sparse have been investigated. Generally, VLBI solutions require a considerable number of auxiliary parameters for optimally modeling the station clock and atmospheric refraction. Some VLBI analysis software packages use again a piece-wise linear representation of these parameters with a temporal resolution reaching the 20 minutes. Obviously, these auxiliary parameters use identical information contained in the observables, in the respective time intervals, as do the primary sub-diurnal ERP. One consequence are correlations of so far uninvestigated magnitude. This study investigates and presents several methods for achieving optimum parameterizations, which keep the ERP as little as possible affected by the choice of the auxiliary parameters.

  20. Analysis of optimum diameter of orbit of transmission line source in positron emission tomograph

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, S.; Amano, M.; Hirose, Y.; Muira, S.; Kanno, I.

    1989-02-01

    Accurate attenuation correction is one of the most important factors to achieve quantitative measurements in positron emission tomography (PET). A transmission scan is most commonly used technique for the attenuation correction in PET. A difficulty in transmission scan is relatively long period to obtain a data with good signal-to-noise ratio. Insufficient signal-to-noise ratio of the transmission data limits that of emission data. Several approaches were reported to improve the transmission data. Those were (1) optimizing of detector threshold, (2) processing delayed coincidence sinogram before subtraction, filtering of transmission sinogram before performing attenuation correction, and (3) rejection of random and scatter coincidence by using rotating line source and information of its position. In some of these methods, additional calculation time or processing hardware is needed. The authors have estimated a relationship between ring diameter of a transmission line source and signal to noise ratio of the transmission dat. This paper aimes to analyze optimum diameter of the orbit of transmission line source in concerning to signal to noise ratio in transmission data.

  1. Optimum weight design of functionally graded material gears

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Shikai; Zhang, He; Zhou, Jingtao; Song, Guohua

    2015-11-01

    Traditional gear weight optimization methods consider gear tooth number, module, face width or other dimension parameters of gear as design variables. However, due to the complicated form and geometric features peculiar to the gear, there will be large amounts of design parameters in gear design, and the influences of gear parameters changing on gear trains, transmission system and the whole equipment have to be taken into account, which increases the complexity of optimization problem. This paper puts forward to apply functionally graded materials (FGMs) to gears and then conduct the optimization. According to the force situation of gears, the material distribution form of FGM gears is determined. Then based on the performance parameters analysis of FGMs and the practical working demands for gears, a multi-objective optimization model is formed. Finally by using the goal driven optimization (GDO) method, the optimal material distribution is achieved, which makes gear weight and the maximum deformation be minimum and the maximum bending stress do not exceed the allowable stress. As an example, the applying of FGM to automotive transmission gear is conducted to illustrate the optimization design process and the result shows that under the condition of keeping the normal working performance of gear, the method achieves in greatly reducing the gear weight. This research proposes a FGM gears design method that is able to largely reduce the weight of gears by optimizing the microscopic material parameters instead of changing the macroscopic dimension parameters of gears, which reduces the complexity of gear weight optimization problem.

  2. [Fisheries biology of Nemipterus bathybius and its optimum catchable size in northern South China Sea].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuehui; Qiu, Yongsong; Du, Feiya

    2005-12-01

    Based on the investigation data in 1997-1999 and 1964-1965, this paper studied the population structure, stock density distribution and its seasonal variation, growth and mortality, as well as the feeding behaviour of Nemipterus bathybius (Snyber) in northern South China Sea. The results indicated that the body length of the samples was 4.2-21.5 cm, and body weight was 2.9-241 g, with the length of 9.6-14.0 cm and weight of 27 -59 g as predominant. The stock density was the highest (9.92 kg km(-2)) in spring and the lowest (5.53 kg x km(-2)) in summer, and had an obvious zonal distribution. Catch rate increased with the water depth in 60-150 m water zone. Macrura, fishes and cephalopods were the main foods of Nemipterus bathybius. The growth parameters of von Bertalanffy formula estimated with ELEFAN I in FiSAT II package were Linfinity = 22.39 cm, k = 0.44 a(-1), and t0 = -0.63 a. The natural mortality calculated with Pauly's empirical equation was M = 0.94, and the total mortality estimated by length-converted catch curve was Z = 2.65. Assessment with Beverton-Holt model indicated that the optimum catchable age and body length were 1.1 a and 12 cm, respectively. The stock was over-exploited, mainly due to the capture of under-size juveniles. It was suggested that the legal body length of Nemipterus bathybiu at its first capture in northern South China Sea should be 12 cm.

  3. Optimum poultry litter rates for maximum profit vs. yield in cotton production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton lint yield responds well to increasing rates of poultry litter fertilization, but little is known of how optimum rates for yield compare with optimum rates for profit. The objectives of this study were to analyze cotton lint yield response to poultry litter application rates, determine and co...

  4. Rotation Angle for the Optimum Tracking of One-Axis Trackers

    SciTech Connect

    Marion, W. F.; Dobos, A. P.

    2013-07-01

    An equation for the rotation angle for optimum tracking of one-axis trackers is derived along with equations giving the relationships between the rotation angle and the surface tilt and azimuth angles. These equations are useful for improved modeling of the solar radiation available to a collector with tracking constraints and for determining the appropriate motor revolutions for optimum tracking.

  5. Optimum management scheme to control nonpoint pollution in Korea.

    PubMed

    Hwang, D-H; Choi, J-Y

    2007-01-01

    Comprehensive measures to control nonpoint source were developed by the Office of the Prime Minister, Korea in March 2004. These management measures present the government's policies and directions relating to nonpoint source management by 2020. However, the government has encountered difficulties since the government implemented such policies without preparing legal and institutional arrangements associated with nonpoint source management practices. Particularly, there was no legal system to manage the workplaces and construction sites that discharge the polluted runoff. To provide legal arrangements to achieve efficient implementation of the government's nonpoint source management policies, amendments to the "Water Quality Preservation Act" were proposed in the congress in March 2005 and took effect from April 2006. Subsequently, the nationally mandated nonpoint source control system was to be applied to such industries and construction sites. This paper attempts to propose the scope of the nonpoint source control system and effective strategies applied to the construction sites and industrial workplaces in Korea.

  6. Toward Optimum Scale and TBC Adhesion on Single Crystal Superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L.

    1998-01-01

    Single crystal superalloys exhibit excellent cyclic oxidation resistance if their sulfur content is reduced from typical impurity levels of approximately 5 ppmw to below 0.5 ppmw. Excellent alumina scale adhesion was documented for PWA 1480 and PWA 1484 without yttrium additions. Hydrogen annealing produced effective desulfurization of PWA 1480 to less than 0.2 ppmw and was also used to achieve controlled intermediate levels. The direct relationship between cyclic oxidation behavior and sulfur content was shown. An adhesion criterion was proposed based on the total amount of sulfur available for interfacial segregation, e.g., less than or equal to 0.2 ppmw S will maximize adhesion for a 1 mm thick sample. PWA 1484, melt desulfurized to 0.3 ppmw S, also exhibited excellent cyclic oxidation resistance and encouraging TBC lives (10 mils of 8YSZ, plasma sprayed without a bond coat) in 1100 C cyclic oxidation tests.

  7. Multiple use of dialysers. Six uses is the optimum.

    PubMed

    Bourke, M A; Mathew, T H; Fazzalari, R A; Thirlwell, G; Disney, A P

    1984-01-01

    In-vivo small-molecule clearances, ultrafiltration rate, and priming volumes were measured in a modern hollow-fibre dialyser after three, six, and 12 uses in a study group of nine regular dialysis patients. A detailed costing of reuse was carried out in order to determine the most cost-beneficial number of uses. Dialyser performance was not affected by any measurable criteria up to 12 uses. A 50% reduction in dialyser cost can be achieved by a policy of three uses, and a 62.5% reduction with a six-use policy. It is recommended that six uses of a dialyser represents the most cost-beneficial decision. A survey of reuse in Australian dialysis units showed that 42% of these are using dialysers, and that there were large regional differences in reuse policy.

  8. Basis for selecting optimum antibiotic regimens for secondary peritonitis.

    PubMed

    Maseda, Emilio; Gimenez, Maria-Jose; Gilsanz, Fernando; Aguilar, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Adequate management of severely ill patients with secondary peritonitis requires supportive therapy of organ dysfunction, source control of infection and antimicrobial therapy. Since secondary peritonitis is polymicrobial, appropriate empiric therapy requires combination therapy in order to achieve the needed coverage for both common and more unusual organisms. This article reviews etiological agents, resistance mechanisms and their prevalence, how and when to cover them and guidelines for treatment in the literature. Local surveillances are the basis for the selection of compounds in antibiotic regimens, which should be further adapted to the increasing number of patients with risk factors for resistance (clinical setting, comorbidities, previous antibiotic treatments, previous colonization, severity…). Inadequate antimicrobial regimens are strongly associated with unfavorable outcomes. Awareness of resistance epidemiology and of clinical consequences of inadequate therapy against resistant bacteria is crucial for clinicians treating secondary peritonitis, with delicate balance between optimization of empirical therapy (improving outcomes) and antimicrobial overuse (increasing resistance emergence).

  9. Longitudinal Outcomes for Mathematics Achievement for Students with Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Judge, Sharon; Watson, Silvana M. R.

    2011-01-01

    Using longitudinal data from the first 6 waves of the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Kindergarten Cohort (ECLS-K), the authors examined mathematics achievement and growth trajectories by learning disability (LD) subgroups. The 2-level (time-student) growth curve model showed that lower levels of mathematics achievement were already evident at…

  10. Achieving Zero Net Migration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mann, Donald

    1984-01-01

    Unemployment in the United States can only be made worse by continued high levels of legal immigration. Especially serious is the threat from Latin America. We must help developing countries halt their population growth and impose a ceiling of 100,000 a year for total immigration to the United States. (RM)

  11. Bilingualism and Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Han, Wen-Jui

    2012-01-01

    Using the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Kindergarten Cohort, this study examines the role that bilingualism plays in children's academic developmental trajectories during their early school years, with particular attention on the school environment (N = 16,380). Growth-curve results showed that despite starting with lower math scores in…

  12. Iowa Women of Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohrn, Deborah Gore, Ed.

    1993-01-01

    This issue of the Goldfinch highlights some of Iowa's 20th century women of achievement. These women have devoted their lives to working for human rights, education, equality, and individual rights. They come from the worlds of politics, art, music, education, sports, business, entertainment, and social work. They represent Native Americans,…

  13. Achieving Peace through Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarken, Rodney H.

    While it is generally agreed that peace is desirable, there are barriers to achieving a peaceful world. These barriers are classified into three major areas: (1) an erroneous view of human nature; (2) injustice; and (3) fear of world unity. In a discussion of these barriers, it is noted that although the consciousness and conscience of the world…

  14. Increasing Male Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Barbara Talbert

    2008-01-01

    The No Child Left Behind legislation has brought greater attention to the academic performance of American youth. Its emphasis on student achievement requires a closer analysis of assessment data by school districts. To address the findings, educators must seek strategies to remedy failing results. In a mid-Atlantic district of the Unites States,…

  15. Leadership Issues: Raising Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horsfall, Chris, Ed.

    This document contains five papers examining the meaning and operation of leadership as a variable affecting student achievement in further education colleges in the United Kingdom. "Introduction" (Chris Horsfall) discusses school effectiveness studies' findings regarding the relationship between leadership and effective schools, distinguishes…

  16. Achievements or Disasters?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwin, MacArthur

    2000-01-01

    Focuses on policy issues that have affected arts education in the twentieth century, such as: interest in discipline-based arts education, influence of national arts associations, and national standards and coordinated assessment. States that whether the policy decisions are viewed as achievements or disasters are for future determination. (CMK)

  17. Achieving True Consensus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Napier, Rod; Sanaghan, Patrick

    2002-01-01

    Uses the example of Vermont's Middlebury College to explore the challenges and possibilities of achieving consensus about institutional change. Discusses why, unlike in this example, consensus usually fails, and presents four demands of an effective consensus process. Includes a list of "test" questions on successful collaboration. (EV)

  18. School Students' Science Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shymansky, James; Wang, Tzu-Ling; Annetta, Leonard; Everett, Susan; Yore, Larry D.

    2013-01-01

    This paper is a report of the impact of an externally funded, multiyear systemic reform project on students' science achievement on a modified version of the Third International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) test in 33 small, rural school districts in two Midwest states. The systemic reform effort utilized a cascading leadership strategy…

  19. Essays on Educational Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ampaabeng, Samuel Kofi

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation examines the determinants of student outcomes--achievement, attainment, occupational choices and earnings--in three different contexts. The first two chapters focus on Ghana while the final chapter focuses on the US state of Massachusetts. In the first chapter, I exploit the incidence of famine and malnutrition that resulted to…

  20. Assessing Handwriting Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ediger, Marlow

    Teachers in the school setting need to emphasize quality handwriting across the curriculum. Quality handwriting means that the written content is easy to read in either manuscript or cursive form. Handwriting achievement can be assessed, but not compared to the precision of assessing basic addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division facts.…

  1. Intelligence and Educational Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deary, Ian J.; Strand, Steve; Smith, Pauline; Fernandes, Cres

    2007-01-01

    This 5-year prospective longitudinal study of 70,000+ English children examined the association between psychometric intelligence at age 11 years and educational achievement in national examinations in 25 academic subjects at age 16. The correlation between a latent intelligence trait (Spearman's "g"from CAT2E) and a latent trait of educational…

  2. Explorations in achievement motivation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helmreich, Robert L.

    1982-01-01

    Recent research on the nature of achievement motivation is reviewed. A three-factor model of intrinsic motives is presented and related to various criteria of performance, job satisfaction and leisure activities. The relationships between intrinsic and extrinsic motives are discussed. Needed areas for future research are described.

  3. NCLB: Achievement Robin Hood?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bracey, Gerald W.

    2008-01-01

    In his "Wall Street Journal" op-ed on the 25th of anniversary of "A Nation At Risk", former assistant secretary of education Chester E. Finn Jr. applauded the report for turning U.S. education away from equality and toward achievement. It was not surprising, then, that in mid-2008, Finn arranged a conference to examine the potential "Robin Hood…

  4. Achieving All Our Ambitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartley, Tricia

    2009-01-01

    National learning and skills policy aims both to build economic prosperity and to achieve social justice. Participation in higher education (HE) has the potential to contribute substantially to both aims. That is why the Campaign for Learning has supported the ambition to increase the proportion of the working-age population with a Level 4…

  5. INTELLIGENCE, PERSONALITY AND ACHIEVEMENT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MUIR, R.C.; AND OTHERS

    A LONGITUDINAL DEVELOPMENTAL STUDY OF A GROUP OF MIDDLE CLASS CHILDREN IS DESCRIBED, WITH EMPHASIS ON A SEGMENT OF THE RESEARCH INVESTIGATING THE RELATIONSHIP OF ACHIEVEMENT, INTELLIGENCE, AND EMOTIONAL DISTURBANCE. THE SUBJECTS WERE 105 CHILDREN AGED FIVE TO 6.3 ATTENDING TWO SCHOOLS IN MONTREAL. EACH CHILD WAS ASSESSED IN THE AREAS OF…

  6. SALT and Spelling Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Joan

    A study investigated the effects of suggestopedic accelerative learning and teaching (SALT) on the spelling achievement, attitudes toward school, and memory skills of fourth-grade students. Subjects were 20 male and 28 female students from two self-contained classrooms at Kennedy Elementary School in Rexburg, Idaho. The control classroom and the…

  7. Appraising Reading Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ediger, Marlow

    To determine quality sequence in pupil progress, evaluation approaches need to be used which guide the teacher to assist learners to attain optimally. Teachers must use a variety of procedures to appraise student achievement in reading, because no one approach is adequate. Appraisal approaches might include: (1) observation and subsequent…

  8. Optimum Topical Delivery of Adrenergic Agonists to Oral Mucosa Vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Soref, Cheryl M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Identify an orotopical vehicle to deliver an α-adrenergic vasoconstrictor to submucosal vasculature that is readily palatable to cancer/bone marrow transplant patients that suppresses chemo-radiotherapy-associated oral mucositis. Methods A [3H] norepinephrine ligand binding assay was developed to quantify receptor binding in hamster oral mucosa. Vehicle components (alcohols, polyols, cellulose, PVP) were tested versus [3H] norepinephrine binding. Vehicle refinement was also done to mask phenylephrine bitter taste and achieve human subject acceptance. The optimized vehicle was tested with α-adrenergic active agents to suppress radiation-induced oral mucositis in mice. Results The ligand binding assay quantified dose- and time-dependent, saturable binding of [3H] norepinephrine. An ethanol:glycerol:propylene glycol:water (6:6:8:80) vehicle provided the best delivery and binding. Further vehicle modification (flavoring and sucralose) yielded a vehicle with excellent taste scores in humans. Addition of phenylephrine, norepinephrine or epinephrine to the optimized vehicle and painting into mouse mouths 20 min before 19 Gy irradiation conferred significant suppression of the weight loss (P < 0.001) observed in mice who received oral vehicle. Conclusion We identified a highly efficient vehicle for the topical delivery of phenylephrine to the oral mucosa of both hamster and human subjects. This will enable its testing to suppress oral mucositis in an upcoming human clinical trial. PMID:25079392

  9. Optimum selection of high performance mirror substrates for diamond finishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodard, Kenneth S.; Comstock, Lovell E.; Wamboldt, Leonard; Sutherland, James S.

    2016-05-01

    Due to advances in manufacturing processes, the substrate options for high performance diamond machined mirrors are expanding. Fewer compromises have to be made to achieve the needed weight, stiffness and finish while maintaining reasonable costs. In addition to the traditional mirror materials like aluminum and beryllium, there are some less common materials that can now be included in the trade space that fill the cost and performance continuum between wrought aluminum and beryllium mirrors. Aluminum and beryllium, respectively, had been the low cost/fair performance and very high cost/very high performance bounds for substrate selection. These additional substrates provide multiple near net shape blank options and processes, mostly within these bounds, that can be considered in a mirror cost versus performance trade analysis. This paper will include a summary of some advances in manufacturing processes that provide more substrate options for diamond machined mirrors with some sample performance analysis and data. This is merged with the traditional substrate options to illustrate the now larger mirror substrate trade space. Some benchmark structural analysis is provided to back up a generic mirror design trade study.

  10. Quality Mesh Smoothing via Local Surface Fitting and Optimum Projection

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun; Yu, Zeyun

    2011-01-01

    The smoothness and angle quality of a surface mesh are two important indicators of the “goodness” of the mesh for downstream applications such as visualization and numerical simulation. We present in this paper a novel surface mesh processing method not only to reduce mesh noise but to improve angle quality as well. Our approach is based on the local surface fitting around each vertex using the least square minimization technique. The new position of the vertex is obtained by finding the maximum inscribed circle (MIC) of the surrounding polygon and projecting the circle’s center onto the analytically fitted surface. The procedure above repeats until the maximal vertex displacement is less than a pre-defined threshold. The mesh smoothness is improved by a combined idea of surface fitting and projection, while the angle quality is achieved by utilizing the MIC-based projection scheme. Results on a variety of geometric mesh models have demonstrated the effectiveness of our method. PMID:21686314

  11. A Novel Method to Achieve Grain Refinement in Aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kui; Jiang, Haiyan; Wang, QuDong; Ye, Bing; Ding, Wenjiang

    2016-10-01

    A significant grain refinement of pure aluminum is achieved upon addition of TiCN nanoparticles (NPs). Unlike the conventional inoculation, NPs can induce the physical growth restriction through the formation of NP layer on the growing grain surface. An analytical model is developed to quantitatively account for the NP effects on grain growth. The NP-induced growth control can overcome the inherent limitations of inoculation and shed light on a potential method to achieve grain refinement.

  12. Project ACHIEVE final report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-13

    Project ACHIEVE was a math/science academic enhancement program aimed at first year high school Hispanic American students. Four high schools -- two in El Paso, Texas and two in Bakersfield, California -- participated in this Department of Energy-funded program during the spring and summer of 1996. Over 50 students, many of whom felt they were facing a nightmare future, were given the opportunity to work closely with personal computers and software, sophisticated calculators, and computer-based laboratories -- an experience which their regular academic curriculum did not provide. Math and science projects, exercises, and experiments were completed that emphasized independent and creative applications of scientific and mathematical theories to real world problems. The most important outcome was the exposure Project ACHIEVE provided to students concerning the college and technical-field career possibilities available to them.

  13. Optimum mating systems for the myostatin locus in cattle.

    PubMed

    Keele, J W; Fahrenkrug, S C

    2001-08-01

    Inactive myostatin (one or two copies) results in increased muscularity, increased yield of closely trimmed retail product, reduced fat content, increased lean growth efficiency, reduced quality grade, increased birth weight, and increased dystocia. Even though one or two copies of inactive myostatin reduces quality grade or marbling compared to zero copies, there is no decrease in meat tenderness. It may be possible to use mating systems to make the most of the advantages of inactive myostatin while minimizing the disadvantages. The objective of this study was to develop a method to compare mating systems among genotypes at the myostatin locus. Economic variables that influence the profitability of alternative mating systems are prices per unit of retail product for USDA quality grades Standard, Select, and Choice; cost of an assisted calving; and cost of genotyping. Because of variation in both economic variables and biological parameters, a single mating system is not expected to universally maximize profit. We identified seven mating systems that each yield maximum profit for different combinations of values for biological parameters and economic variables. Use of inactive myostatin was profitable as long as the price for Select was at least 80% of the Choice price and the price for Standard at least 60%. As the price for Select and Standard increase up to the Choice price, mating systems that produce a higher proportion of inactive myostatin alleles become more profitable. Profitable use of inactive myostatin depends either on retaining ownership of beef until it is fabricated into retail product or the development of specialty markets that place greater value on lean yield and less on marbling, unlike conventional U. S. markets.

  14. Optimum predictors of therapeutic outcome in HCV patients in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Aziz, Hafsa; Raza, Abida; Irfan, Javaid

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) constitutes a major public health issue in Pakistan. Interferon α and ribavirin is used widely in routine practice in HCV infected patients in Pakistan.Treatment prediction is an important tool in therapy management. The present study aims to evaluate trends of predictive variables of treatment outcome in patients with different genotypes. The analysis comprised of 921 patients infected with different HCV genotypes. All the patients received IFN α-2b combined with ribavirin for 24 weeks. Overall, 60.2% patients achieved Sustained virologic response (SVR). In females sustained virologic response (SVR) was higher in age group <40 years (77.2%) than ≥40-50 years (60%) but in male SVR was almost equal in both age groups. We also found higher SVR with low pretreatment viral load (72.4%, P < 0.0001). Sustained Virologic Response in genotype 3a was 63.1%, 3b was 55%, 1a was 36.3% and 1b was 35% 3a +3b was 55.0% and 1a+3a was 42.9%. According to multivariable logistic regression analysis age < 40 years (2.0; 95%CI, 1.49-2.84; P = 0.0001), low pretreatment RNA level<800,000 IU/ml (4.0; 95%CI, 2.64-6.17; P = 0.0001), early virologic response at week 12 (12.3; 95%CI, 8.18-18.58; P < 0.0001) and non-fatty liver (2.5; 95%CI, 3.6-6.2; P = 0.005) showed significance for SVR. Nucleotide substitution in 5'UTR before treatment failed to show any characteristic pattern that has correlation with sustained response. Subtype 3a showed 95% presence among patients with age <40 years while older patients showed 79.9%.

  15. Sustaining School Achievement in California's Elementary Schools after State Monitoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCabe, Molly

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the Academic Performance Index (API) and Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) achievement trends between 2004 and 2006 of 58 California public elementary schools after exiting state monitoring and investigated practices for sustaining consistent achievement growth. Statistical methods were used to analyze statewide achievement trends…

  16. Does achievement motivation mediate the semantic achievement priming effect?

    PubMed

    Engeser, Stefan; Baumann, Nicola

    2014-10-01

    The aim of our research was to understand the processes of the prime-to-behavior effects with semantic achievement primes. We extended existing models with a perspective from achievement motivation theory and additionally used achievement primes embedded in the running text of excerpts of school textbooks to simulate a more natural priming condition. Specifically, we proposed that achievement primes affect implicit achievement motivation and conducted pilot experiments and 3 main experiments to explore this proposition. We found no reliable positive effect of achievement primes on implicit achievement motivation. In light of these findings, we tested whether explicit (instead of implicit) achievement motivation is affected by achievement primes and found this to be the case. In the final experiment, we found support for the assumption that higher explicit achievement motivation implies that achievement priming affects the outcome expectations. The implications of the results are discussed, and we conclude that primes affect achievement behavior by heightening explicit achievement motivation and outcome expectancies. PMID:24820250

  17. Optimum pulse duration and radiant exposure for vascular laser therapy of dark port-wine skin: a theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Tunnell, James W; Wang, Lihong V; Anvari, Bahman

    2003-03-01

    Laser therapy for cutaneous hypervascular malformations such as port-wine stain birthmarks is currently not feasible for dark-skinned individuals. We study the effects of pulse duration, radiant exposure, and cryogen spray cooling (CSC) on the thermal response of skin, using a Monte Carlo based optical-thermal model. Thermal injury to the epidermis decreases with increasing pulse duration during irradiation at a constant radiant exposure; however, maintaining vascular injury requires that the radiant exposure also increase. At short pulse durations, only a minimal increase in radiant exposure is necessary for a therapeutic effect to be achieved because thermal diffusion from the vessels is minimal. However, at longer pulse durations the radiant exposure must be greatly increased. There exists an optimum pulse duration at which minimal damage to the epidermis and significant injury within the targeted vasculature occur. For example, the model predicts optimum pulse durations of approximately 1.5, 6, and 20 ms for vessel diameters of 40, 80, and 120 microm, respectively. Optimization of laser pulse duration and radiant exposure in combination with CSC may offer a means to treat cutaneous lesions in dark-skinned individuals. PMID:12638894

  18. Optimum Pulse Duration and Radiant Exposure for Vascular Laser Therapy of Dark port-wine Skin: A Theoretical Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tunnell, James W.; Wang, Lihong V.; Anvari, Bahman

    2003-03-01

    Laser therapy for cutaneous hypervascular malformations such as port-wine stain birthmarks is currently not feasible for dark-skinned individuals. We study the effects of pulse duration, radiant exposure, and cryogen spray cooling (CSC) on the thermal response of skin, using a Monte Carlo based optical-thermal model. Thermal injury to the epidermis decreases with increasing pulse duration during irradiation at a constant radiant exposure; however, maintaining vascular injury requires that the radiant exposure also increase. At short pulse durations, only a minimal increase in radiant exposure is necessary for a therapeutic effect to be achieved because thermal diffusion from the vessels is minimal. However, at longer pulse durations the radiant exposure must be greatly increased. There exists an optimum pulse duration at which minimal damage to the epidermis and significant injury within the targeted vasculature occur. For example, the model predicts optimum pulse durations of approximately 1.5, 6, and 20 ms for vessel diameters of 40, 80, and 120 μm, respectively. Optimization of laser pulse duration and radiant exposure in combination with CSC may offer a means to treat cutaneous lesions in dark-skinned individuals.

  19. Optimizing amorphous indium zinc oxide film growth for low residual stress and high electrical conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Mukesh; Sigdel, A. K.; Gennett, T.; Berry, J. J.; Perkins, J. D.; Ginley, D. S.; Packard, C. E.

    2013-10-01

    With recent advances in flexible electronics, there is a growing need for transparent conductors with optimum conductivity tailored to the application and nearly zero residual stress to ensure mechanical reliability. Within amorphous transparent conducting oxide (TCO) systems, a variety of sputter growth parameters have been shown to separately impact film stress and optoelectronic properties due to the complex nature of the deposition process. We apply a statistical design of experiments (DOE) approach to identify growth parameter-material property relationships in amorphous indium zinc oxide (a-IZO) thin films and observed large, compressive residual stresses in films grown under conditions typically used for the deposition of highly conductive samples. Power, growth pressure, oxygen partial pressure, and RF power ratio (RF/(RF + DC)) were varied according to a full-factorial test matrix and each film was characterized. The resulting regression model and analysis of variance (ANOVA) revealed significant contributions to the residual stress from individual growth parameters as well as interactions of different growth parameters, but no conditions were found within the initial growth space that simultaneously produced low residual stress and high electrical conductivity. Extrapolation of the model results to lower oxygen partial pressures, combined with prior knowledge of conductivity-growth parameter relationships in the IZO system, allowed the selection of two promising growth conditions that were both empirically verified to achieve nearly zero residual stress and electrical conductivities >1480 S/cm. This work shows that a-IZO can be simultaneously optimized for high conductivity and low residual stress.

  20. Optimum design of a multilayer beam partially treated with magnetorheological fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajamohan, Vasudevan; Sedaghati, Ramin; Rakheja, Subhash

    2010-06-01

    The modal damping characteristics of beams partially treated with magnetorheological (MR) fluid elements are studied using the modal strain energy approach and the finite element method. Different configurations of a sandwich beam partially treated with MR fluid are considered, including a beam with a cluster of MR fluid segments and a beam with arbitrarily located MR fluid segments. The significance of the location of the MR fluid segments on the modal damping factor is investigated under different end conditions. An optimization problem is formulated by combining finite element analysis with optimization algorithms based on sequential quadratic programming (SQP) and the genetic algorithm (GA) to identify optimal locations for MR fluid treatment to achieve maximum modal damping corresponding to the first five modes of flexural vibration, individually and simultaneously. The solutions of the optimization problem revealed that the GA converges to the global solutions rapidly compared to the SQP method, which in some modal configurations usually entraps in the local optimum. The results suggest that the optimal location of the MR fluid treatment is strongly related to the end conditions and also the mode of vibration. Furthermore, partial treatments with MR fluid can significantly alter the deflection modes of the beam. It has also been demonstrated that optimal locations of the MR fluid segments based on linear combination of the modal damping factors of the first five modes are identical to those obtained based on the first mode, irrespective of the end conditions. However, the optimal locations of the MR fluid segments, identified based on the logarithmic summation of the modal damping factors of the first five modes, would yield a more uniform shear energy distribution compared to that attained by considering individual modes or a linear summation of the individual modes.

  1. Optimum design of bridges with superelastic-friction base isolators against near-field earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozbulut, Osman E.; Hurlebaus, Stefan

    2010-04-01

    The seismic response of a multi-span continuous bridge isolated with novel superelastic-friction base isolator (S-FBI) is investigated under near-field earthquakes. The isolation system consists of a flat steel-Teflon sliding bearing and a superelastic NiTi shape memory alloy (SMA) device. Sliding bearings limit the maximum seismic forces transmitted to the superstructure to a certain value that is a function of friction coefficient of sliding interface. Superelastic SMA device provides restoring capability to the isolation system together with additional damping characteristics. The key design parameters of an S-FBI system are the natural period of the isolated, yielding displacement of SMA device, and the friction coefficient of the sliding bearings. The goal of this study is to obtain optimal values for each design parameter by performing sensitivity analyses of the isolated bridge. First, a three-span continuous bridge is modeled as a two-degrees-of-freedom with S-FBI system. A neuro-fuzzy model is used to capture rate-dependent nonlinear behavior of SMA device. A time-dependent method which employs wavelets to adjust accelerograms to match a target response spectrum with minimum changes on the other characteristics of ground motions is used to generate ground motions used in the simulations. Then, a set of nonlinear time history analyses of the isolated bridge is performed. The variation of the peak response quantities of the isolated bridge is shown as a function of design parameters. Also, the influence of temperature variations on the effectiveness of S-FBI system is evaluated. The results show that the optimum design of the isolated bridge with S-FBI system can be achieved by a judicious specification of design parameters.

  2. Quantification of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 immunohistochemistry using the Ventana Image Analysis System: correlation with gene amplification by fluorescence in situ hybridization: the importance of instrument validation for achieving high (>95%) concordance rate.

    PubMed

    Dennis, Jake; Parsa, Rezvaneh; Chau, Donnie; Koduru, Prasad; Peng, Yan; Fang, Yisheng; Sarode, Venetia Rumnong

    2015-05-01

    The use of computer-based image analysis for scoring human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) immunohistochemistry (IHC) has gained a lot of interest recently. We investigated the performance of the Ventana Image Analysis System (VIAS) in HER2 quantification by IHC and its correlation with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). We specifically compared the 3+ IHC results using the manufacturer's machine score cutoffs versus laboratory-defined cutoffs with the FISH assay. Using the manufacturer's 3+ cutoff (VIAS score; 2.51 to 3.5), 181/536 (33.7%) were scored 3+, and FISH was positive in 147/181 (81.2%), 2 (1.1%) were equivocal, and 32 (17.6%) were FISH (-). Using the laboratory-defined 3+ cutoff (VIAS score 3.5), 52 (28.7%) cases were downgraded to 2+, of which 29 (55.7%) were FISH (-), and 23 (44.2%) were FISH (+). With the revised cutoff, there were improvements in the concordance rate from 89.1% to 97.0% and in the positive predictive value from 82.1% to 97.6%. The false-positive rate for 3+ decreased from 9.0% to 0.8%. Six of 175 (3.4%) IHC (-) cases were FISH (+). Three cases with a VIAS score 3.5 showed polysomy of chromosome 17. In conclusion, the VIAS may be a valuable tool for assisting pathologists in HER2 scoring; however, the positive cutoff defined by the manufacturer is associated with a high false-positive rate. This study highlights the importance of instrument validation/calibration to reduce false-positive results.

  3. Population growth and economic growth.

    PubMed

    Narayana, D L

    1984-01-01

    the exponential growth of population as the source of several complications for economic growth and human welfare. Stabilization of population by reducing fertility is conducive for improving the quality of population and also advances the longterm management of the population growth and work force utilization. The perspective of longterm economic management involves populatio n planning, control of environmental pollution, conservation of scarce resources, exploration of resources, realization of technological possibilities in agriculture and industry and in farm and factory, and achievement of economic growth and its equitable distribution.

  4. Population growth and economic growth.

    PubMed

    Narayana, D L

    1984-01-01

    the exponential growth of population as the source of several complications for economic growth and human welfare. Stabilization of population by reducing fertility is conducive for improving the quality of population and also advances the longterm management of the population growth and work force utilization. The perspective of longterm economic management involves populatio n planning, control of environmental pollution, conservation of scarce resources, exploration of resources, realization of technological possibilities in agriculture and industry and in farm and factory, and achievement of economic growth and its equitable distribution. PMID:12314595

  5. The Optimum Design of Hydrodynamic Lubrication Bearing for Minimization of the Total Life Cost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwatsubo, Takuzo; Yamabayashi, Jun

    This paper proposes an optimum design method of journal bearing for minimizing the total life cost which includes not only the initial cost but also the running cost. Journal bearing is one of the typical friction part and physically severe part in machine elements. Therefore, maintenance is required to prevent failure and to keep performance. For this object, the running cost by the maintenance is user's burden. Thus, the optimum design method of the bearing for minimization of the total life cost is required. In this research, the evaluation functions of the total life cost which contains the initial cost and the running cost of the bearing are discussed and the optimum design is proposed under the physical constrain, that is Thermo Hydrodynamic Lubrication theory (THL theory), and inequality constraints. Then design valuables of the optimum journal bearing are obtained.

  6. Optimum Projection Angle for Attaining Maximum Distance in a Rugby Place Kick

    PubMed Central

    Linthorne, Nicholas P.; Stokes, Thomas G.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of projection angle on the distance attained in a rugby place kick. A male rugby player performed 49 maximum-effort kicks using projection angles of between 20 and 50°. The kicks were recorded by a video camera at 50 Hz and a 2 D biomechanical analysis was conducted to obtain measures of the projection velocity and projection angle of the ball. The player’s optimum projection angle was calculated by substituting a mathematical expression for the relationship between projection velocity and projection angle into the equations for the aerodynamic flight of a rugby ball. We found that the player’s calculated optimum projection angle (30.6°, 95% confidence limits ± 1.9°) was in close agreement with his preferred projection angle (mean value 30.8°, 95% confidence limits ± 2.1°). The player’s calculated optimum projection angle was also similar to projection angles previously reported for skilled rugby players. The optimum projection angle in a rugby place kick is considerably less than 45° because the projection velocity that a player can produce decreases substantially as projection angle is increased. Aerodynamic forces and the requirement to clear the crossbar have little effect on the optimum projection angle. Key Points The optimum projection angle in a rugby place kick is about 30°. The optimum projection angle is considerably less than 45° because the projection velocity that a player can produce decreases substantially as projection angle is increased. Aerodynamic forces and the requirement to clear the crossbar have little effect on the optimum projection angle. PMID:24570626

  7. Optimum HRTEM image contrast at 20 kV and 80 kV--exemplified by graphene.

    PubMed

    Lee, Z; Meyer, J C; Rose, H; Kaiser, U

    2012-01-01

    The dependence of high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) image contrast of graphene on the adjustable parameters of an aberration-corrected microscope operated at 80 and 20 kV has been calculated and, for 80 kV, compared with measurements. We used density functional theory to determine the projected atom potential and obtained the image intensity by averaging over the energy distribution of the imaging electrons, as derived from the electron energy loss spectroscopy measurements. Optimum image contrast has been determined as a function of energy spread of the imaging electrons and chromatic aberration coefficient, showing that significant improvement of contrast can be achieved at 80 kV with the help of a monochromator, however at 20 kV only with chromatic aberration correction and bright atom contrast conditions.

  8. Computer simulator of coiled tubing wellbore cleanouts in deviated wells recommends optimum pump rate and fluid viscosity

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, I.C.

    1995-12-31

    Key factors in the efficient removal of sand fill from deviated wells are the proper selection of a fluid and the pump rates. The operation should be designed to (1) reduce or eliminate the formation of beds of particles in the annulus between the casing and tubing, (2) maintain the particles in suspension and (3) transport the fill to the surface. A new design tool for coiled tubing (CT) cleanouts in deviated wells has been developed. Based on a mechanistic model of particle transport in deviated wells, it predicts the conditions under which a particle bed is formed, calculates the depth of the bed and determines whether the bed slides upward, remains stationary or slides back down the well. Moreover, it calculates the minimum pump rate required to achieve complete suspension of the fill for different fluid viscosities, sand pick-up rates and deviation angles, thereby allowing a simple assessment of the optimum design parameters.

  9. Optimum Composition of CaO-SiO2-Al2O3-MgO Slag for Spring Steel Deoxidized by Si and Mn in Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hulin; Ye, Jiansong; Wu, Xiaoliang; Peng, Yongsheng; Fang, Yi; Zhao, Xinbing

    2016-04-01

    The relations between plasticity of inclusions and contents of oxygen, aluminum, and sulfur in molten steel were overall discussed by thermodynamics and FactSage software. Then, the optimum compositions of slag were obtained and the activities of components of refining slag system were analyzed. Finally, experiments were carried out based on the results of calculation. According to the relations, it could achieve better effect to improve basicity R ( R = CaO/SiO2 by mass pct) and C/ A ( C/ A = CaO/Al2O3 by mass pct) in the low melting temperature [≤1673 K (≤1400 °C)] region of refining slag as far as possible. For the CaO-SiO2-Al2O3-MgO slag, the optimum compositions are MgO: 5-9 pct, CaO: 47.4-50.2 pct, SiO2: 41.9-45.6 pct and Al2O3: ≤2.79 pct, respectively, in which the basicity is at the range of 1.0 to 1.19 and C/ A is above 9.0. It is proved by experiments that the plasticity of inclusions and the contents of [O], [Al], and [S] can be controlled effectively by the optimum composition of refining slag, and the high cleanness is achieved in spring wire rods.

  10. Deposition uniformity, particle nucleation and the optimum conditions for CVD in multi-wafer furnaces

    SciTech Connect

    Griffiths, S.K.; Nilson, R.H.

    1996-06-01

    A second-order perturbation solution describing the radial transport of a reactive species and concurrent deposition on wafer surfaces is derived for use in optimizing CVD process conditions. The result is applicable to a variety of deposition reactions and accounts for both diffusive and advective transport, as well as both ordinary and Knudsen diffusion. Based on the first-order approximation, the deposition rate is maximized subject to a constraint on the radial uniformity of the deposition rate. For a fixed reactant mole fraction, the optimum pressure and optimum temperature are obtained using the method of Lagrange multipliers. This yields a weak one-sided maximum; deposition rates fall as pressures are reduced but remain nearly constant at all pressures above the optimum value. The deposition rate is also maximized subject to dual constraints on the uniformity and particle nucleation rate. In this case, the optimum pressure, optimum temperature and optimum reactant fraction are similarly obtained, and the resulting maximum deposition rate is well defined. These results are also applicable to CVI processes used in composites manufacturing.

  11. Optimum selection of mechanism type for heavy manipulators based on particle swarm optimization method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yong; Chen, Genliang; Wang, Hao; Lin, Zhongqin

    2013-07-01

    The mechanism type plays a decisive role in the mechanical performance of robotic manipulators. Feasible mechanism types can be obtained by applying appropriate type synthesis theory, but there is still a lack of effective and efficient methods for the optimum selection among different types of mechanism candidates. This paper presents a new strategy for the purpose of optimum mechanism type selection based on the modified particle swarm optimization method. The concept of sub-swarm is introduced to represent the different mechanisms generated by the type synthesis, and a competitive mechanism is employed between the sub-swarms to reassign their population size according to the relative performances of the mechanism candidates to implement the optimization. Combining with a modular modeling approach for fast calculation of the performance index of the potential candidates, the proposed method is applied to determine the optimum mechanism type among the potential candidates for the desired manipulator. The effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed method is demonstrated through a case study on the optimum selection of mechanism type of a heavy manipulator where six feasible candidates are considered with force capability as the specific performance index. The optimization result shows that the fitness of the optimum mechanism type for the considered heavy manipulator can be up to 0.578 5. This research provides the instruction in optimum selection of mechanism types for robotic manipulators.

  12. Hardware-Based Non-Optimum Factors for Launch Vehicle Structural Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, K. Chauncey; Cerro, Jeffrey A.

    2010-01-01

    During aerospace vehicle conceptual and preliminary design, empirical non-optimum factors are typically applied to predicted structural component weights to account for undefined manufacturing and design details. Non-optimum factors are developed here for 32 aluminum-lithium 2195 orthogrid panels comprising the liquid hydrogen tank barrel of the Space Shuttle External Tank using measured panel weights and manufacturing drawings. Minimum values for skin thickness, axial and circumferential blade stiffener thickness and spacing, and overall panel thickness are used to estimate individual panel weights. Panel non-optimum factors computed using a coarse weights model range from 1.21 to 1.77, and a refined weights model (including weld lands and skin and stiffener transition details) yields non-optimum factors of between 1.02 and 1.54. Acreage panels have an average 1.24 non-optimum factor using the coarse model, and 1.03 with the refined version. The observed consistency of these acreage non-optimum factors suggests that relatively simple models can be used to accurately predict large structural component weights for future launch vehicles.

  13. Achieving closure at Fernald

    SciTech Connect

    Bradburne, John; Patton, Tisha C.

    2001-02-25

    When Fluor Fernald took over the management of the Fernald Environmental Management Project in 1992, the estimated closure date of the site was more than 25 years into the future. Fluor Fernald, in conjunction with DOE-Fernald, introduced the Accelerated Cleanup Plan, which was designed to substantially shorten that schedule and save taxpayers more than $3 billion. The management of Fluor Fernald believes there are three fundamental concerns that must be addressed by any contractor hoping to achieve closure of a site within the DOE complex. They are relationship management, resource management and contract management. Relationship management refers to the interaction between the site and local residents, regulators, union leadership, the workforce at large, the media, and any other interested stakeholder groups. Resource management is of course related to the effective administration of the site knowledge base and the skills of the workforce, the attraction and retention of qualified a nd competent technical personnel, and the best recognition and use of appropriate new technologies. Perhaps most importantly, resource management must also include a plan for survival in a flat-funding environment. Lastly, creative and disciplined contract management will be essential to effecting the closure of any DOE site. Fluor Fernald, together with DOE-Fernald, is breaking new ground in the closure arena, and ''business as usual'' has become a thing of the past. How Fluor Fernald has managed its work at the site over the last eight years, and how it will manage the new site closure contract in the future, will be an integral part of achieving successful closure at Fernald.

  14. Achievement Goals and Achievement Emotions: A Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Chiungjung

    2011-01-01

    This meta-analysis synthesized 93 independent samples (N = 30,003) in 77 studies that reported in 78 articles examining correlations between achievement goals and achievement emotions. Achievement goals were meaningfully associated with different achievement emotions. The correlations of mastery and mastery approach goals with positive achievement…

  15. Growth hormone and growth?

    PubMed

    Harvey, Steve

    2013-09-01

    Pituitary GH is obligatory for normal growth in mammals, but the importance of pituitary GH in avian growth is less certain. In birds, pituitary GH is biologically active and has growth promoting actions in the tibia-test bioassay. Its importance in normal growth is indicated by the growth suppression following the surgical removal of the pituitary gland or after the immunoneutralization of endogenous pituitary GH. The partial restoration of growth in some studies with GH-treated hypophysectomized birds also suggests GH dependency in avian growth, as does the dwarfism that occurs in some strains with GHR dysfunctions. Circulating GH concentrations are also correlated with body weight gain, being high in young, rapidly growing birds and low in slower growing older birds. Nevertheless, despite these observations, there is an extensive literature that concludes pituitary GH is not important in avian growth. This is based on numerous studies with hypophysectomized and intact birds that show only slight, transitory or absent growth responses to exogenous GH-treatment. Moreover, while circulating GH levels correlate with weight gain in young birds, this may merely reflect changes in the control of pituitary GH secretion during aging, as numerous studies involving experimental alterations in growth rate fail to show positive correlations between plasma GH concentrations and the alterations in growth rate. Furthermore, growth is known to occur in the absence of pituitary GH, as most embryonic development occurs prior to the ontogenetic appearance of pituitary somatotrophs and the appearance of GH in embryonic circulation. Early embryonic growth is also independent of the endocrine actions of pituitary GH, since removal of the presumptive pituitary gland does not impair early growth. Embryonic growth does, however, occur in the presence of extrapituitary GH, which is produced by most tissues and has autocrine or paracrine roles that locally promote growth and development

  16. Entrepreneur achievement. Liaoning province.

    PubMed

    Zhao, R

    1994-03-01

    This paper reports the successful entrepreneurial endeavors of members of a 20-person women's group in Liaoning Province, China. Jing Yuhong, a member of the Family Planning Association at Shileizi Village, Dalian City, provided the basis for their achievements by first building an entertainment/study room in her home to encourage married women to learn family planning. Once stocked with books, magazines, pamphlets, and other materials on family planning and agricultural technology, dozens of married women in the neighborhood flocked voluntarily to the room. Yuhong also set out to give these women a way to earn their own income as a means of helping then gain greater equality with their husbands and exert greater control over their personal reproductive and social lives. She gave a section of her farming land to the women's group, loaned approximately US$5200 to group members to help them generate income from small business initiatives, built a livestock shed in her garden for the group to raise marmots, and erected an awning behind her house under which mushrooms could be grown. The investment yielded $12,000 in the first year, allowing each woman to keep more than $520 in dividends. Members then soon began going to fairs in the capital and other places to learn about the outside world, and have successfully ventured out on their own to generate individual incomes. Ten out of twenty women engaged in these income-generating activities asked for and got the one-child certificate.

  17. Effects of ration and temperature on growth of age-0 Atlantic sturgeon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kelly, J.L.; Arnold, D.E.

    1999-01-01

    Our objective was to gain insight into the optimum temperature and ration for growth of age-0 Atlantic sturgeon Acipenser oxyrinchus in culture. We conducted two trials, each for 8 weeks. Trial 1 started with 60-g fish, trial 2 started with 0 3-g fish. Water temperatures of 15, 17, and 19??C were used separately in each trial. Rations (dry food, wet weight of fish) for 60-g fish were 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5% of biomass per day, for 0.3-g fish, rations were 3, 5, and 7% of biomass per day. We set up three tank replicates, of equal fish biomass, at each combination of temperature and ration. The highest growth rate in trial 1 (for 60-g fish) was 0.014/d at 15??C and the 1.5% ration, although this growth rate was not significantly different from the growth rate at 17??C and 1.5% ration or at 17??C and 1.0% ration. The highest growth rate in trial 2 (for 0.3-g fish) was 0.067/d at 19??C and the 7.0% ration. Instantaneous growth at these conditions was significantly different from all other combinations of temperature and ration. Although these results may not completely define the temperature and ration under which fish could achieve maximum growth rate, they provide a solid starting point for further development of Atlantic sturgeon culture.

  18. HEPEX - achievements and challenges!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappenberger, Florian; Ramos, Maria-Helena; Thielen, Jutta; Wood, Andy; Wang, Qj; Duan, Qingyun; Collischonn, Walter; Verkade, Jan; Voisin, Nathalie; Wetterhall, Fredrik; Vuillaume, Jean-Francois Emmanuel; Lucatero Villasenor, Diana; Cloke, Hannah L.; Schaake, John; van Andel, Schalk-Jan

    2014-05-01

    HEPEX is an international initiative bringing together hydrologists, meteorologists, researchers and end-users to develop advanced probabilistic hydrological forecast techniques for improved flood, drought and water management. HEPEX was launched in 2004 as an independent, cooperative international scientific activity. During the first meeting, the overarching goal was defined as: "to develop and test procedures to produce reliable hydrological ensemble forecasts, and to demonstrate their utility in decision making related to the water, environmental and emergency management sectors." The applications of hydrological ensemble predictions span across large spatio-temporal scales, ranging from short-term and localized predictions to global climate change and regional modeling. Within the HEPEX community, information is shared through its blog (www.hepex.org), meetings, testbeds and intercompaison experiments, as well as project reportings. Key questions of HEPEX are: * What adaptations are required for meteorological ensemble systems to be coupled with hydrological ensemble systems? * How should the existing hydrological ensemble prediction systems be modified to account for all sources of uncertainty within a forecast? * What is the best way for the user community to take advantage of ensemble forecasts and to make better decisions based on them? This year HEPEX celebrates its 10th year anniversary and this poster will present a review of the main operational and research achievements and challenges prepared by Hepex contributors on data assimilation, post-processing of hydrologic predictions, forecast verification, communication and use of probabilistic forecasts in decision-making. Additionally, we will present the most recent activities implemented by Hepex and illustrate how everyone can join the community and participate to the development of new approaches in hydrologic ensemble prediction.

  19. The Homogeneity of School Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cahan, Sorel

    Since the measurement of school achievement involves the administration of achievement tests to various grades on various subjects, both grade level and subject matter contribute to within-school achievement variations. To determine whether achievement test scores vary most among different fields within a grade level, or within fields among…

  20. Longitudinal effects of educational expectations and achievement attributions on adolescents' academic achievements.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kun-Shia; Cheng, Ying-Yao; Chen, Yi-Ling; Wu, Yuh-Yih

    2009-01-01

    This study used nationwide data from the Taiwan Education Panel Survey (TEPS) to examine the longitudinal effects of educational expectations and achievement attributions on the academic achievements of adolescents. The sample included 2,000 Taiwanese secondary school students, each of whom completed three waves of questionnaires and cognitive tests: the first in grade 7 (in 2001), the second in grade 9 (in 2003), and the third in grade 11 (in 2005). Through multilevel longitudinal analysis, the results showed: (1) educational expectations accounted for a moderate amount of the variance in academic achievements; (2) students with high educational expectations and effort attribution exhibited higher growth rates in their academic achievements; and (3) studentswith lower educational expectations and those attributing success to others showed significantly fewer academic achievements and significantly lower growth rates in such achievements. The results demonstrated that adolescents' educational expectations and achievement attributions play crucial roles in the long-term course of academic accomplishments. Implications for educational practice and further studies are also discussed.

  1. Verification of the optimum tropospheric parameters setting for the kinematic PPP analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, Y.; Ohta, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Kinematic GNSS analysis is useful for extraction of the crustal deformation phenomena between seconds to one day such as coseismic and postseismic deformation after a large earthquake. The kinematic GNSS analysis, however, have fundamental difficulties for the separation between unknown parameters such as the site coordinate and tropospheric parameters, caused by a strong correlation between each other. Thus, we focused on the improvement of the separation precision between coordinate time series of kinematic PPP and wet zenith tropospheric delay (WZTD) based on the comprehensive search of the parameter space. We used GIPSY-OASIS II Ver. 6.3 software for kinematic PPP processing of whole GEONET sites in 10 March 2011. We applied the every 6 hours nominal WZTD value as a priori information based on the ECMWF global numerical climate model. For the coordinate time series and tropospheric parameters, we assumed white noise and random walk stochastic process, respectively. These unknown parameters are very sensitive to assumed process noise for each stochastic process. Thus, we searched for the optimum two variable parameters; wet zenith tropospheric parameter (named as TROP) and its gradient (named as GRAD). We defined the optimum parameters, which minimized the standard deviation of coordinate time series.We firstly checked the spatial distribution of optimum pair of TROP and GRAD. Even though the optimum parameters showed the certain range (TROP: 2×10-8 ~ 6×10-7 (horizontal), 5.5×10-9 ~ 2×10-8 (vertical); GRAD: 2×10-10 ~ 6×10-9 (horizontal), 2×10-10 ~ 1×10-8 (vertical) (unit: km·s-½)), we found they showed the large diversity. It suggests there are strong heterogeneity of atmospheric state. We also estimated temporal variations of optimum TROP and GRAD in specific site. We analyzed the data through 2010 at GEONET 940098 station located in the most southern part of Kyusyu, Japan. Obtained time series of optimum GRAD showed clear annual variation, and the

  2. Evaluation of optimum profile modification curves of profile shifted spur gears based on vibration responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hui; Pang, Xu; Feng, Ranjiao; Wen, Bangchun

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, a mesh stiffness model is developed for profile shifted gears with addendum modifications and tooth profile modifications (TPMs). The time-varying mesh stiffness (TVMS), load sharing factor (LSF), loaded static transmission error (LSTE) and non-loaded static transmission error (NLSTE) of a profile shifted spur gear pair with TPMs are obtained by the analytical model. The optimum profile modification curve under different amounts of TPM is determined by analyzing the LSTE first. Then, considering the effect of NLSTE, finite element (FE) model of a geared rotor system is established. The system vibration responses under different TPM curves are analyzed and the optimum modification curve is further evaluated by amplitude frequency responses. The results show that the optimum modification curve is related to the amount of TPM and modification coefficients. The comparison of the optimum profile modification curves is evaluated by LSTE and vibration responses, which shows that the optimum modification curve should be determined by evaluating the vibration response of the geared rotor system in the low mesh frequency range.

  3. Organic growth factor requirements of some yeasts.

    PubMed

    Madan, M; Gulati, N

    1980-01-01

    Some sporogenous yeasts (Brettanomyces bruxellensis, Debaryomyces hansenii, Hansenula ciferrii, Hansenula polymorpha, Pichia polymorpha, Saccharomycopsis guttulata, and Saccharomyces chevalieri), isolated from various fruits have been examined for their organic growth factor requisites. H. ciferrii was completely deficient in thiamine, biotin, inositol, riboflavin, niacin, and partially deficient in pantothenic acid. It required an external supply of 0.1-1.0 ppm thiamine, 0.01-0.1 ppm biotin, 10.0 ppm inositol, 0.10 ppm niacin and riboflavin for its optimum growth. H. polymorpha showed partial deficiency only in xanthine. P. polymorpha gave indications of partial deficiencies in thiamine and biotin. S. guttulata was completely deficient in biotin, and partially deficient in adenine sulphate. It required 0.01 ppm biotin for optimum growth. S chevalieri was completely deficient in pyridoxine and partially deficient in thiamine. It required 0.1 ppm pyridoxine for maximum growth. D. hansenii and B bruxellensis were auxoautotrophic for the various growth factors studied. PMID:7242379

  4. Expert System Control of Plant Growth in an Enclosed Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, George; Lanoue, Mark; Bathel, Matthew; Ryan, Robert E.

    2008-01-01

    The Expert System is an enclosed, controlled environment for growing plants, which incorporates a computerized, knowledge-based software program that is designed to capture the knowledge, experience, and problem-solving skills of one or more human experts in a particular discipline. The Expert System is trained to analyze crop/plant status, to monitor the condition of the plants and the environment, and to adjust operational parameters to optimize the plant-growth process. This system is intended to provide a way to remotely control plant growth with little or no human intervention. More specifically, the term control implies an autonomous method for detecting plant states such as health (biomass) or stress and then for recommending and implementing cultivation and/or remediation to optimize plant growth and to minimize consumption of energy and nutrients. Because of difficulties associated with delivering energy and nutrients remotely, a key feature of this Expert System is its ability to minimize this effort and to achieve optimum growth while taking into account the diverse range of environmental considerations that exist in an enclosed environment. The plant-growth environment for the Expert System could be made from a variety of structures, including a greenhouse, an underground cavern, or another enclosed chamber. Imaging equipment positioned within or around the chamber provides spatially distributed crop/plant-growth information. Sensors mounted in the chamber provide data and information pertaining to environmental conditions that could affect plant development. Lamps in the growth environment structure supply illumination, and other additional equipment in the chamber supplies essential nutrients and chemicals.

  5. Noachian-Hesperian Transition and a Possible Climatic Optimum: Evidence from Landforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, J. M.; Howard, A. D.

    2004-01-01

    A climatic optimum? The often strong contrast between the pristine and degraded Noachian channels and craters might be due to a gradual climatic change superimposed upon an episode of mantling associated with early Hesperian volcanism. On the other hand, one or more episodes of volcanism or large impacts could have induced global warming and produced a relatively short-lived optimum for precipitation and runoff. The rapid cutoff of fluvial activity following the development of the later pristine fluvial features is consistent with this scenario. We discuss the changing style of erosion in the highlands during the Noachian and early Hesperian in a companion abstract to this workshop. Here we review the some of the morphologic evidence for a possible Noachian-Hesperian (N-H) climate optimum.

  6. Minimum and optimum light output of Macintosh size 3 laryngoscopy blades: a manikin study.

    PubMed

    Scholz, A; Farnum, N; Wilkes, A R; Hampson, M A; Hall, J E

    2007-02-01

    Illumination provided by laryngoscope blades varies widely. It is not known what the optimum level of illumination should be during laryngoscopy. So far, no published standards exist for light intensity provided by laryngoscopes. Fifty anaesthetists were recruited to perform laryngoscopy on a manikin with three different laryngoscopes attached to a variable voltage supply. Anaesthetists were asked to find the minimum and optimum level of light they would wish to have for intubation. This study demonstrated that anaesthetists can see the larynx at very low light levels. The optimum level was significantly greater than the minimum level. The vacuum bulb laryngoscopes provides a significant lower light output than halogen and xenon laryngoscopes. There is a large variation in illumination requirements amongst anaesthetists which may make setting standards difficult. A brighter laryngoscope, as suggested by some manufacturers, may not necessarily be a better one.

  7. Design and construct optimum dosimeter to detect airborne radon and thoron gas: Experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, Asaad H.; Jaafar, Mohamad S.

    2011-02-01

    Aim of this work is to design and select optimum dimension of a radon and thoron dosimeter within the measure optimum value of the calibration factor, using CR-39 Nuclear Track Detectors (NTDs). The results show that the best dimension to detect and measure real values of airborne radon and thoron concentrations is 6 cm and 7 cm for diameter and height, respectively. Calibration factors (K) for radon and thoron at this dimension were 2.68 ± 0.03 cm and 0.83 ± 0.01 cm, respectively, and these factors relatively depend on the detector efficiency. Therefore, the efficiency of CR-39NTDs to register alpha particles and their effects on the calibration factor estimated. It is found that the calibration factor increased exponentially with detector efficiency. Moreover, detector efficiency was equal to 80.3 ± 1.23% at the optimum dosimeter.

  8. Optimum design using VICONOPT, a buckling and strength constraint program for prismatic assemblies of anisotropic plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, R.; Williams, F. W.

    1992-01-01

    A computer program for obtaining the optimum (least mass) dimensions of the kind of prismatic assemblies of laminated, composite plates which occur in advanced aerospace construction is described. Rigorous buckling analysis (derived from exact member theory) and a tailored design procedure are used to produce designs which satisfy buckling and material strength constraints and configurational requirements. Analysis is two to three orders of magnitude quicker than FEM, keeps track of all the governing modes of failure and is efficiently adapted to give sensitivities and to maintain feasibility. Tailoring encourages convergence in fewer sizing cycles than competing programs and permits start designs which are a long way from feasible and/or optimum. Comparisons with its predecessor, PASCO, show that the program is more likely to produce an optimum, will do so more quickly in some cases, and remains accurate for a wider range of problems.

  9. A biogeography-based optimization for optimum discrete design of skeletal structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalili, Shahin; Hosseinzadeh, Yousef; Taghizadieh, Nasser

    2016-09-01

    This article presents a modified biogeography-based optimization (MBBO) algorithm for optimum design of skeletal structures with discrete variables. The main idea of the biogeography-based optimization (BBO) algorithm is based on the science of biogeography, in which each habitat is a possible solution for the optimization problem in the search space. This algorithm consists of two main operators: migration and mutation. The migration operator helps the habitats to exploit the search space, while the mutation operator guides habitats to escape from the local optimum. To enhance the performance of the standard algorithm, some modifications are made and an MBBO algorithm is presented. The performance of the MBBO algorithm is evaluated by optimizing five benchmark design examples, and the obtained results are compared with other methods in the literature. The numerical results demonstrate that the MBBO algorithm is able to show very competitive results and has merits in finding optimum designs.

  10. Optimum Design of Composite Sandwich Structures Subjected to Combined Torsion and Bending Loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiang; Li, Gangyan; Wang, Chun H.; You, Min

    2012-06-01

    This research is motivated by the increase use of composite sandwich structures in a wide range of industries such as automotive, aerospace and civil infrastructure. To maximise stiffness at minimum weight, the paper develops a minimum weight optimization method for sandwich structure under combined torsion and bending loads. We first extend the minimum-weight design of sandwich structures under bending load to the case of torsional deformation and then present optimum solutions for the combined requirements of both bending and torsional stiffness. Three design cases are identified for a sandwich structure required to meet multiple design constraints of torsion and bending stiffness. The optimum solutions for all three cases are derived. To illustrate the newly developed optimum design solutions, numerical examples are presented for sandwich structures made of either isotropic face skins or orthotropic composite face skins.

  11. Computer programs for generation and evaluation of near-optimum vertical flight profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorensen, J. A.; Waters, M. H.; Patmore, L. C.

    1983-01-01

    Two extensive computer programs were developed. The first, called OPTIM, generates a reference near-optimum vertical profile, and it contains control options so that the effects of various flight constraints on cost performance can be examined. The second, called TRAGEN, is used to simulate an aircraft flying along an optimum or any other vertical reference profile. TRAGEN is used to verify OPTIM's output, examine the effects of uncertainty in the values of parameters (such as prevailing wind) which govern the optimum profile, or compare the cost performance of profiles generated by different techniques. A general description of these programs, the efforts to add special features to them, and sample results of their usage are presented.

  12. Minimum-Weight Sandwich Structure Optimum Design Subjected to Torsional Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiang; Li, Gangyan; Wang, Chun H.; You, Min

    2012-04-01

    As one of the most valued structural engineering innovations developed by the composites industry, sandwich structures are now used extensively in automotive, aerospace and civil infrastructure due to the main advantage of lightweight. This paper develops a minimum weight optimization method for sandwich structure subjected to torsion load. The design process are identified for a sandwich structure required to meet the design constraint of torsion stiffness. The optimum solutions show that at optimum design the core weight accounts for 66.7% of the whole sandwich structure. To illustrate the newly developed optimum design solutions, numerical examples are presented for sandwich structures made of either isotropic face skins or orthotropic composite face skins. Agreement between the theoretical analysis and the examples results is good.

  13. Optimum conditions for cryoquenching of small tissue blocks in liquid coolants.

    PubMed

    Elder, H Y; Gray, C C; Jardine, A G; Chapman, J N; Biddlecombe, W H

    1982-04-01

    Three approaches were taken with the aim of defining the optimum conditions of rapid cryopreservation in liquid quenchants. In a theoretical approach, two mathematical models were used. The first is of value in defining the absolute maximum rates of cooling which could be achieved at various depths in the tissues. The second highlights the poor thermal properties of liquid coolants and therefore emphasizes the essential requirement for vigorous quenchant mixing and rapid specimen entry. Experimental work with thermocouples showed that fastest cooling rates occur at the leading edge of the object entering coolant. Of five quenchants investigated, cooling rates were in the order, propane greater than Freon 22 greater than Freon 12 greater than liquid nitrogen slush greater than liquid nitrogen. Other considerations, however, may affect the choice of quenchant. For a given quenchant, cooling rate is maximal near the equilibrium freezing point. The consequences of quenching in the presence of thermal gradients either within the coolant or in the gas layer above it are shown. Cooling rate was found to be approximately proportional to entry velocity at least up to approximately 2 m s-1 in our system. Stereological analysis of rapidly quenched, freeze-substituted tissue samples, of geometry which imposed an approximately unidirectional heat flow, revealed four zones: (i) a narrow surface layer (approximately 10 micrometers) of low image contrast and apparent of ice crystals; (ii) a zone of enhanced contrast with ice crystals whose size increased rapidly with depth from the surface (the 'slope'); (iii) a sharply defined zone (the 'ridge') of maximum ice crystal size beyond which there is (iv) an extensive 'plateau' with smaller ice crystals and no marked increase in size with depth. The 'ridge' of maximal ice-crystal damage was consistently found but varied considerably in depth from the surface (approximately 25-120 micrometers) between samples. The existence of the

  14. Residue mutations of xylanase in Aspergillus kawachii alter its optimum pH.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Jin; Han, Hongjuan; Sun, Baihui; Chen, Lei; Yu, Chengye; Peng, Rihe; Yao, Quanhong

    2016-01-01

    Aspergillus kawachii and Aspergillus niger have been traditionally used as molds for commercial microbial fermentation because of their capability to grow in extremely acidic environments and produce acid-stable enzymes. Endo-1,4-β-xylanase cleaves the glycosidic bonds in the xylan backbone, consequently reducing the degree of polymerization of the substrate. The amino acid sequences of xylanases from A. kawachii and A. niger only differ in one amino acid residue. However, the xylanases from A. kawachii and A. niger show different optimum pH values of 2.0 and 3.0, respectively. In this study, we synthesized the A. kawachii xylanase gene (XynC) on the basis of the bias codon of yeast and mutated the gene in the dominating region related to optimum pH shifting during gene synthesis. After the overexpression of this gene in Pichia pastoris G115, the mutant (Thr64Ser) enzyme (XynC-C) showed an optimum pH of 3.8, which indicated partial alkalinity compared with the original xylanase from A. kawachii. Similar to that of the enzyme with one residue mutation (Asp48Asn), the optimum pH of the enzyme with two residue mutations (Thr64Ser and Asp48Asn) shifted to 5.0. The result indicated that mutation Asp48 was more important than mutation Thr64 in optimum pH shifting. We proposed a model that explains the lower optimum pH of XynC-C than other members of the xylanase family G. XynC-C showed similar proteolytic resistance and Km and Vmax values for beechwood xylan to other xylanases.

  15. [Growth charts and intrauterine growth retardation].

    PubMed

    Gouyon, J-B; Ferdynus, C; Quantin, C

    2013-09-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction indicates that a fetus is unable to achieve its growth potential. The individual growth potential is approximated by customization of growth charts. Neonatal growth charts rely on body weight measures at birth while fetal growth charts rely on body weight estimated from biometric measurements of the fetus. The neonatal and fetal growth charts are not equivalent and have different meanings for epidemiologists and clinicians. Fetal growth charts also assess fetal growth velocity, but individual assessment of fetal weight may be flawed by lack of precision. Neonatal charts are constructed based on data obtained in the whole population or in a subgroup without gestational diseases. The two types of neonatal charts markedly differ at low gestational ages as 30% of preterm infants present intrauterine growth restriction, usually due to maternal diseases. Even if intrauterine growth restriction is a risk factor of fetal mortality, neonatal mortality, and short- and long-term morbidity, the predictive value of the charts (whether or not they are customized) at an individual level is low and may be improved by additional investigations.

  16. Purification, Characterization, and Optimum Conditions of Fermencin SD11, a Bacteriocin Produced by Human Orally Lactobacillus fermentum SD11.

    PubMed

    Wannun, Phirawat; Piwat, Supatcharin; Teanpaisan, Rawee

    2016-06-01

    Fermencin SD11, a bacteriocin produced by human orally Lactobacillus fermentum SD11, was purified, characterized, and optimized in conditions for bacterial growth and bacteriocin production. Fermencin SD11 was purified using three steps of ammonium sulfate precipitation, gel filtration chromatography, and reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. The molecular weight was found to be 33,000 Da using SDS-PAGE and confirmed as 33,593.4 Da by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Fermencin SD11 exhibited activity against a wide range of oral pathogens including cariogenic and periodontogenic pathogens and Candida. The active activity was stable between 60 - 80 °C in a pH range of 3.0 to 7.0. It was sensitive to proteolytic enzymes (proteinase K and trypsin), but it was not affected by α-amylase, catalase, lysozyme, and saliva. The optimum conditions for growth and bacteriocin production of L. fermentum SD11 were cultured at acidic with pH of 5.0-6.0 at 37 or 40 °C under aerobic or anaerobic conditions for 12 h. It is promising that L. fermentum SD11 and its bacteriocin may be an alternative approach for promoting oral health or prevention of oral diseases, e.g., dental caries and periodontitis, which would require further clinical trials. PMID:26892008

  17. Application of a computer model to predict optimum slaughter end points for different biological types of feeder cattle.

    PubMed

    Williams, C B; Bennett, G L

    1995-10-01

    A bioeconomic model was developed to predict slaughter end points of different genotypes of feeder cattle, where profit/rotation and profit/day were maximized. Growth, feed intake, and carcass weight and composition were simulated for 17 biological types of steers. Distribution of carcass weight and proportion in four USDA quality and five USDA yield grades were obtained from predicted carcass weights and composition. Average carcass value for each genotype was calculated from these distributions under four carcass pricing systems that varied from value determined on quality grade alone to value determined on yield grade alone. Under profitable market conditions, rotation length was shorter and carcass weights lighter when the producer's goal was maximum profit/day, compared with maximum profit/rotation. A carcass value system based on yield grade alone resulted in greater profit/rotation and in lighter and leaner carcasses than a system based on quality grade alone. High correlations ( > .97) were obtained between breed profits obtained with different sets of input/output prices and carcass price discount weight ranges. This suggests that breed rankings on the basis of breed profits may not be sensitive to changes in input/output market prices. Steers that were on a grower-stocker system had leaner carcasses, heavier optimum carcass weight, greater profits, and less variation in optimum carcass weights between genotypes than steers that were started on a high-energy finishing diet at weaning. Overall results suggest that breed choices may change with different carcass grading and value systems and postweaning production systems. This model has potential to provide decision support in marketing fed cattle.

  18. Attitude Towards Physics and Additional Mathematics Achievement Towards Physics Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veloo, Arsaythamby; Nor, Rahimah; Khalid, Rozalina

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to identify the difference in students' attitude towards Physics and Additional Mathematics achievement based on gender and relationship between attitudinal variables towards Physics and Additional Mathematics achievement with achievement in Physics. This research focused on six variables, which is attitude towards…

  19. The Impact of Reading Achievement on Overall Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Churchwell, Dawn Earheart

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between reading achievement and achievement in other subject areas. The purpose of this study was to determine if there was a correlation between reading scores as measured by the Standardized Test for the Assessment of Reading (STAR) and academic achievement in language arts, math, science, and social studies…

  20. Simulation of optimum parameters for GaN MSM UV photodetector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alhelfi, Mohanad A.; Ahmed, Naser M.; Hashim, M. R.; Al-Rawi, Ali Amer; Hassan, Z.

    2016-07-01

    In this study the optimum parameters of GaN M-S-M photodetector are discussed. The evaluation of the photodetector depends on many parameters, the most of the important parameters the quality of the GaN film and others depend on the geometry of the interdigited electrode. In this simulation work using MATLAB software with consideration of the reflection and absorption on the metal contacts, a detailed study involving various electrode spacings (S) and widths (W) reveals conclusive results in device design. The optimum interelectrode design for interdigitated MSM-PD has been specified and evaluated by effect on quantum efficiency and responsivity.

  1. Optimum design calculations for detectors based on ZnSe(Те,О) scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katrunov, K.; Ryzhikov, V.; Gavrilyuk, V.; Naydenov, S.; Lysetska, O.; Litichevskyi, V.

    2013-06-01

    Light collection in scintillators ZnSe(X), where X is an isovalent dopant, was studied using Monte Carlo calculations. Optimum design was determined for detectors of "scintillator—Si-photodiode" type, which can involve either one scintillation element or scintillation layers of large area made of small-crystalline grains. The calculations were carried out both for determination of the optimum scintillator shape and for design optimization of light guides, on the surface of which the layer of small-crystalline grains is formed.

  2. The screening effects of carbon nanotube arrays and its field emission optimum density

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Dan Liu, Lie

    2013-12-15

    In order to investigate the field emission optimum density of carbon nanotube (CNT) array, the screening effects of CNT array have been studied. It has been shown that the electric field in the vicinity of an individual nanotube of array can be notable distorted due to the screening action of the surrounding neighbors. The optimum normalized spacing s/l(as referred to the length) for the maximum emission current is inversely proportional to aspect ratio l/r and electric field strength for CNT arrays with a fixed dimension.

  3. Generation of optimum vertical profiles for an advanced flight management system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorensen, J. A.; Waters, M. H.

    1981-01-01

    Algorithms for generating minimum fuel or minimum cost vertical profiles are derived and examined. The option for fixing the time of flight is included in the concepts developed. These algorithms form the basis for the design of an advanced on-board flight management system. The variations in the optimum vertical profiles (resulting from these concepts) due to variations in wind, takeoff mass, and range-to-destination are presented. Fuel savings due to optimum climb, free cruise altitude, and absorbing delays enroute are examined.

  4. Longitudinal Analyses of Achievement Data from Durham County (NC) Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williamson, Gary L.; And Others

    A longitudinal study of achievement data from public schools in Durham County, North Carolina, was undertaken to examine individual growth curves as well as to chart the progress of educational institutions and the effects of aggregation on the study of growth. A two-level hierarchical linear model was used in the study to specify individual…

  5. The Relationship of Classroom Quality to Kindergarten Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burson, Susan J.

    2010-01-01

    This quantitative study focuses on the relationship between classroom quality and children's academic achievement. Specifically, it examines how classroom quality in three broad domains-- emotional climate, classroom management and instructional support--impact kindergarten achievement growth in mathematics and reading. The researcher collected…

  6. Relationships among Projective and Direct Verbal Measures of Achievement Motivation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, Satvir

    1979-01-01

    The ways in which projective and nonprojective verbal measures of achievement motivation elicit comparable and dissimilar responses in a "Third World" sample of entrepreneurs and farmers were explored as a test of McClelland's theory of economic growth. Results were generally consistent with the theory of achievement motivation. (Author/JKS)

  7. Cherokee Culture and School Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Anthony D.

    1980-01-01

    Compares the effect of cooperative and competitive behaviors of Cherokee and Anglo American elementary school students on academic achievement. Suggests changes in teaching techniques and lesson organization that might raise academic achievement while taking into consideration tribal traditions that limit scholastic achievement in an…

  8. [Preparation and optimum process of walnut peel activated carbon by zinc chloride as activating agent].

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-hong; Wang, Xing-wei; Zhao, Bo; Lü, Jun-fang; Kang, Ni-na; Zhang, Yao-jun

    2014-12-01

    Walnut peel as raw material, zinc chloride was used as activating agent for preparation walnut peel activated carbon in the muffle furnace in this experiment, using orthogonal design. Yield, the specific surface area and iodine number of walnut peel activated carbon were determined at all designed experimental conditions and the optimum technological condition of preparation was obtained. By analysis of aperture, infrared spectra and the content of acidic group in surface with Boehm, walnut peel activated carbon of prepared at the optimum condition was characterized. The results showed the optimum technological parameters of preparation: activation temperature (600 °C), activation time (1 h), the concentration of zinc chloride (50%), the particle size (60 mesh). The specific surface area of walnut peel activated carbon obtained at optimum condition was mounting to 1258.05 m2 · g(-1), the ratio of medium porous 32.18%. Therefore, walnut peel can be used in the preparation of the high-quality activated carbon of large surface area. Agricultural wastes, as walnut peel, not only were implemented recycle, but also didn't make any pollution. Meanwhile, a cheap adsorbent was provided and it was of great significance to open a new source of activated carbon.

  9. Method of controlling automatic transmission in accordance with determination of optimum gear ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Hattori, T.; Uriuhara, M.; Kasai, H.; Asagi, Y.; Ogawa, N.

    1987-02-17

    A method is described of controlling the gear changing operation in an automatic transmission having a gear transmission, a gear changing actuator assembly for changing gears in the gear transmission, a vehicle speed sensor for detecting a vehicle speed, an accelerator pedal, and an accelerator pedal sensor for detecting the extent of depression of the accelerator pedal. The automatic transmission also has an electronic control system responsive to signals from the vehicle speed sensor and the accelerator pedal sensor for determining an optimum gear position and controlling the gear changing actuator assembly to operate the gear transmission to select the optimum gear position. The method comprises: (a) detecting an extent of depression of the accelerator pedal from the accelerator pedal sensor, and a vehicle speed from the vehicle speed sensor; (b) determining an optimum gear position based on the extent of depression of the accelerator pedal and the vehicle speed; and (c) controlling the gear changing actuator assembly to operate the gear transmission to select a neutral position, for interrupting gear changing operation until the accelerator pedal is depressed, when the determined optimum gear position is lower than a currently selected gear position and when the extent of depression of the accelerator pedal is zero.

  10. Buried Object Detection Method Using Optimum Frequency Range in Extremely Shallow Underground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimoto, Tsuneyoshi; Abe, Touma

    2011-07-01

    We propose a new detection method for buried objects using the optimum frequency response range of the corresponding vibration velocity. Flat speakers and a scanning laser Doppler vibrometer (SLDV) are used for noncontact acoustic imaging in the extremely shallow underground. The exploration depth depends on the sound pressure, but it is usually less than 10 cm. Styrofoam, wood (silver fir), and acrylic boards of the same size, different size styrofoam boards, a hollow toy duck, a hollow plastic container, a plastic container filled with sand, a hollow steel can and an unglazed pot are used as buried objects which are buried in sand to about 2 cm depth. The imaging procedure of buried objects using the optimum frequency range is given below. First, the standardized difference from the average vibration velocity is calculated for all scan points. Next, using this result, underground images are made using a constant frequency width to search for the frequency response range of the buried object. After choosing an approximate frequency response range, the difference between the average vibration velocity for all points and that for several points that showed a clear response is calculated for the final confirmation of the optimum frequency range. Using this optimum frequency range, we can obtain the clearest image of the buried object. From the experimental results, we confirmed the effectiveness of our proposed method. In particular, a clear image of the buried object was obtained when the SLDV image was unclear.

  11. [Preparation and optimum process of walnut peel activated carbon by zinc chloride as activating agent].

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-hong; Wang, Xing-wei; Zhao, Bo; Lü, Jun-fang; Kang, Ni-na; Zhang, Yao-jun

    2014-12-01

    Walnut peel as raw material, zinc chloride was used as activating agent for preparation walnut peel activated carbon in the muffle furnace in this experiment, using orthogonal design. Yield, the specific surface area and iodine number of walnut peel activated carbon were determined at all designed experimental conditions and the optimum technological condition of preparation was obtained. By analysis of aperture, infrared spectra and the content of acidic group in surface with Boehm, walnut peel activated carbon of prepared at the optimum condition was characterized. The results showed the optimum technological parameters of preparation: activation temperature (600 °C), activation time (1 h), the concentration of zinc chloride (50%), the particle size (60 mesh). The specific surface area of walnut peel activated carbon obtained at optimum condition was mounting to 1258.05 m2 · g(-1), the ratio of medium porous 32.18%. Therefore, walnut peel can be used in the preparation of the high-quality activated carbon of large surface area. Agricultural wastes, as walnut peel, not only were implemented recycle, but also didn't make any pollution. Meanwhile, a cheap adsorbent was provided and it was of great significance to open a new source of activated carbon. PMID:25881437

  12. Students’ Achievement Goals, Learning-Related Emotions and Academic Achievement

    PubMed Central

    Lüftenegger, Marko; Klug, Julia; Harrer, Katharina; Langer, Marie; Spiel, Christiane; Schober, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    In the present research, the recently proposed 3 × 2 model of achievement goals is tested and associations with achievement emotions and their joint influence on academic achievement are investigated. The study was conducted with 388 students using the 3 × 2 Achievement Goal Questionnaire including the six proposed goal constructs (task-approach, task-avoidance, self-approach, self-avoidance, other-approach, other-avoidance) and the enjoyment and boredom scales from the Achievement Emotion Questionnaire. Exam grades were used as an indicator of academic achievement. Findings from CFAs provided strong support for the proposed structure of the 3 × 2 achievement goal model. Self-based goals, other-based goals and task-approach goals predicted enjoyment. Task-approach goals negatively predicted boredom. Task-approach and other-approach predicted achievement. The indirect effects of achievement goals through emotion variables on achievement were assessed using bias-corrected bootstrapping. No mediation effects were found. Implications for educational practice are discussed. PMID:27199836

  13. Growth kinetics of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in batch and fed-batch cultivation using sugarcane molasses and glucose syrup from cassava starch.

    PubMed

    Win, S S; Impoolsup, A; Noomhorm, A

    1996-02-01

    Growth kinetics of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in glucose syrup from cassava starch and sugarcane molasses were studied using batch and fed-batch cultivation. The optimum temperature and pH required for growth were 30 degrees C and pH 5.5, respectively. In batch culture the productivity and overall cell yield were 0.31 g L-1 h-1 and 0.23 g cells g-1 sugar, respectively, on glucose syrup and 0.22 g L-1 h-1 and 0.18 g cells g-1 sugar, respectively, on molasses. In fed-batch cultivation, a productivity of 3.12 g L-1 h-1 and an overall cell yield of 0.52 g cells g-1 sugar were achieved in glucose syrup cultivation and a productivity of 2.33 g L-1 h-1 and an overall cell yield of 0.46 g cells g-1 sugar were achieved in molasses cultivation by controlling the reducing sugar concentration at its optimum level obtained from the fermentation model. By using an on-line ethanol sensor combined with a porous Teflon tubing method in automating the feeding of substrate in the fed-batch culture, a productivity of 2.15 g L-1 h-1 with a yield of 0.47 g cells g-1 sugar was achieved using glucose syrup as substrate when ethanol concentration was kept at a constant level by automatic control.

  14. Achieving success: moving beyond the comfort level.

    PubMed

    Manji, I

    1993-11-01

    Understanding the stages of growth, saturation and transition is the first step to setting meaningful career goals. While this concept is fairly new in dentistry, it is not new in other commercial enterprises. Business managers and owners have known for decades that growth stagnates after a period of time. At that point, a new infusion of energy and a reformation of the business's objectives and methods are needed to launch forward into the next phase of growth. Transition management in dentistry represents periods of growth that are followed by saturation and a comparatively rapid changeover to a new practice form. Saturation occurs when the clinical capacity of a practice is exceeded by the needs of a growing patient base. The key transitions in the career of a dentist are those from school to practising, and practising to retirement. A great number of dentists (due to low motivation, the comfort level or poor management skills) never reach the saturation point during their practising career. For these dentists, starting out and retirement are the only transitions that will ever apply to them. Dentists evaluating transition options must first identify which career stage they belong to since their objectives will be different at each stage. Dentists in the growth phase should focus on practice management and achieving saturation before attempting a transition. Since transitions like start-up, retirement, partnerships, associateships and buy-ins have pivotal roles in the life cycle of a practice, transitions must be managed carefully to achieve successful results.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. The optimum order of a Markov chain model for daily rainfall in Nigeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimoh, O. D.; Webster, P.

    1996-11-01

    Markov type models are often used to describe the occurrence of daily rainfall. Although models of Order 1 have been successfully employed, there remains uncertainty concerning the optimum order for such models. This paper is concerned with estimation of the optimum order of Markov chains and, in particular, the use of objective criteria of the Akaike and Bayesian Information Criteria (AIC and BIC, respectively). Using daily rainfall series for five stations in Nigeria, it has been found that the AIC and BIC estimates vary with month as well as the value of the rainfall threshold used to define a wet day. There is no apparent system to this variation, although AIC estimates are consistently greater than or equal to BIC estimates, with values of the latter limited to zero or unity. The optimum order is also investigated through generation of synthetic sequences of wet and dry days using the transition matrices of zero-, first- and second-order Markov chains. It was found that the first-order model is superior to the zero-order model in representing the characteristics of the historical sequence as judged using frequency duration curves. There was no discernible difference between the model performance for first- and second-order models. There was no seasonal varation in the model performance, which contrasts with the optimum models identified using AIC and BIC estimates. It is concluded that caution is needed with the use of objective criteria for determining the optimum order of the Markov model and that the use of frequency duration curves can provide a robust alternative method of model identification. Comments are also made on the importance of record length and non-stationarity for model identification

  16. Fitting optimum order of Markov chain models for daily rainfall occurrences in Peninsular Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deni, Sayang Mohd; Jemain, Abdul Aziz; Ibrahim, Kamarulzaman

    2009-06-01

    The analysis of the daily rainfall occurrence behavior is becoming more important, particularly in water-related sectors. Many studies have identified a more comprehensive pattern of the daily rainfall behavior based on the Markov chain models. One of the aims in fitting the Markov chain models of various orders to the daily rainfall occurrence is to determine the optimum order. In this study, the optimum order of the Markov chain models for a 5-day sequence will be examined in each of the 18 rainfall stations in Peninsular Malaysia, which have been selected based on the availability of the data, using the Akaike’s (AIC) and Bayesian information criteria (BIC). The identification of the most appropriate order in describing the distribution of the wet (dry) spells for each of the rainfall stations is obtained using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov goodness-of-fit test. It is found that the optimum order varies according to the levels of threshold used (e.g., either 0.1 or 10.0 mm), the locations of the region and the types of monsoon seasons. At most stations, the Markov chain models of a higher order are found to be optimum for rainfall occurrence during the northeast monsoon season for both levels of threshold. However, it is generally found that regardless of the monsoon seasons, the first-order model is optimum for the northwestern and eastern regions of the peninsula when the level of thresholds of 10.0 mm is considered. The analysis indicates that the first order of the Markov chain model is found to be most appropriate for describing the distribution of wet spells, whereas the higher-order models are found to be adequate for the dry spells in most of the rainfall stations for both threshold levels and monsoon seasons.

  17. South Greenland Ice-Sheet Response to the Mid-Pliocene Climatic Optimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, A. E.; Mathias, A.; Hatfield, R. G.; Winsor, K.; Stoner, J. S.

    2014-12-01

    The last time atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration approached present day levels was likely during the mid-Pliocene climate optimum 3.3-3.0 Ma. Estimates of sea level from the mid-Pliocene optimum vary widely and contain a significant component of glacial isostasy and dynamic topography, precluding a firm estimate of global ice volume. Here we present new data constraining the southern Greenland ice sheet (GIS) across the mid-Pliocene optimum from IODP Site U1307 located on the Eirik Ridge south of Greenland. Magnetic susceptibility dramatically decreases at ~3.3 Ma, recovering at ~3.05 Ma. Magnetic parameters on silt-size grains (Mrs/Ms) show this decrease likely reflects the loss of silt sourced from the Precambrian terranes of south Greenland, which would suggest the loss of the south GIS. The sand fraction reflects the degree of iceberg rafting with increases at an ~40 ka period. Planktic oxygen isotopes decrease during iceberg rafting events to values lower than the Holocene. An extended interval of low sand occurs from ~3.3 Ma to ~3.2 Ma, which suggests cessation of iceberg rafting. Planktic oxygen isotopes increase during this interval. Assuming a relatively warm climate, this increase could reflect the incursion of high 18-O subtropical waters into the Labrador Sea. The return of iceberg rafted sediments after ~3.2 Ma suggests the regrowth of the GIS with marine-terminating margins. Our new preliminary record points to a GIS collapse during the mid-Pliocene climatic optimum, but that ice-free conditions only lasted for ~100 ka before the return of a volatile ice sheet for the remainder of the mid-Pliocene climatic optimum.

  18. Mycotoxin production and predictive modelling kinetics on the growth of Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus isolates in whole black peppercorns (Piper nigrum L).

    PubMed

    Yogendrarajah, Pratheeba; Vermeulen, An; Jacxsens, Liesbeth; Mavromichali, Evangelia; De Saeger, Sarah; De Meulenaer, Bruno; Devlieghere, Frank

    2016-07-01

    The growth and mycotoxin production of three Aspergillus flavus isolates and an Aspergillus parasiticus isolate were studied in whole black peppercorns (Piper nigrum L.) using a full factorial design with seven water activity (aw) (0.826-0.984) levels and three temperatures (22, 30 and 37°C). Growth rates and lag phases were estimated using linear regression. Diverse secondary models were assessed for their ability to describe the radial growth rate as a function of individual and combined effect of aw and temperature. Optimum radial growth rate ranged from 0.75±0.04 to 2.65±0.02mm/day for A. flavus and 1.77±0.10 to 2.50±0.10mm/day for A. parasiticus based on the Rosso cardinal estimations. Despite the growth failure of some isolates at marginal conditions, all the studied models showed good performance to predict the growth rates. Validation of the models was performed on independently derived data. The bias factors (0.73-1.03), accuracy factors (0.97-1.36) and root mean square error (0.050-0.278) show that the examined models are conservative predictors of the colony growth rate of both fungal species in black peppers. The Rosso cardinal model can be recommended to describe the individual aw effect while the extended Gibson model was the best model for describing the combined effect of aw and temperature on the growth rate of both fungal species in peppercorns. Temperature optimum ranged from 30 to 33°C, while aw optimum was 0.87-0.92 as estimated by multi-factorial cardinal model for both species. The estimated minimum temperature and aw for A. flavus and A. parasiticus for growth were 11-16°C and 0.73-0.76, respectively, hence, achieving these conditions should be considered during storage to prevent the growth of these mycotoxigenic fungal species in black peppercorns. Following the growth study, production of mycotoxins (aflatoxins B1, B2, G1, G2, sterigmatocystin and O-methyl sterigmatocystin (OMST)) was quantified using LC-MS/MS. Very small

  19. Mycotoxin production and predictive modelling kinetics on the growth of Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus isolates in whole black peppercorns (Piper nigrum L).

    PubMed

    Yogendrarajah, Pratheeba; Vermeulen, An; Jacxsens, Liesbeth; Mavromichali, Evangelia; De Saeger, Sarah; De Meulenaer, Bruno; Devlieghere, Frank

    2016-07-01

    The growth and mycotoxin production of three Aspergillus flavus isolates and an Aspergillus parasiticus isolate were studied in whole black peppercorns (Piper nigrum L.) using a full factorial design with seven water activity (aw) (0.826-0.984) levels and three temperatures (22, 30 and 37°C). Growth rates and lag phases were estimated using linear regression. Diverse secondary models were assessed for their ability to describe the radial growth rate as a function of individual and combined effect of aw and temperature. Optimum radial growth rate ranged from 0.75±0.04 to 2.65±0.02mm/day for A. flavus and 1.77±0.10 to 2.50±0.10mm/day for A. parasiticus based on the Rosso cardinal estimations. Despite the growth failure of some isolates at marginal conditions, all the studied models showed good performance to predict the growth rates. Validation of the models was performed on independently derived data. The bias factors (0.73-1.03), accuracy factors (0.97-1.36) and root mean square error (0.050-0.278) show that the examined models are conservative predictors of the colony growth rate of both fungal species in black peppers. The Rosso cardinal model can be recommended to describe the individual aw effect while the extended Gibson model was the best model for describing the combined effect of aw and temperature on the growth rate of both fungal species in peppercorns. Temperature optimum ranged from 30 to 33°C, while aw optimum was 0.87-0.92 as estimated by multi-factorial cardinal model for both species. The estimated minimum temperature and aw for A. flavus and A. parasiticus for growth were 11-16°C and 0.73-0.76, respectively, hence, achieving these conditions should be considered during storage to prevent the growth of these mycotoxigenic fungal species in black peppercorns. Following the growth study, production of mycotoxins (aflatoxins B1, B2, G1, G2, sterigmatocystin and O-methyl sterigmatocystin (OMST)) was quantified using LC-MS/MS. Very small

  20. Achievement as Resistance: The Development of a Critical Race Achievement Ideology among Black Achievers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Dorinda J.

    2008-01-01

    In this article, Dorinda Carter examines the embodiment of a critical race achievement ideology in high-achieving black students. She conducted a yearlong qualitative investigation of the adaptive behaviors that nine high-achieving black students developed and employed to navigate the process of schooling at an upper-class, predominantly white,…

  1. Cloning, expression, and purification of a synthetic human growth hormone in Escherichia coli using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Zamani, Mozhdeh; Berenjian, Aydin; Hemmati, Shiva; Nezafat, Navid; Ghoshoon, Mohammad Bagher; Dabbagh, Fatemeh; Mohkam, Milad; Ghasemi, Younes

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to achieve high-level production of the human growth hormone (hGH) in the prokaryotic expression system. In this regard, we performed cloning, expression, and purification of a synthetic hGH gene in BL21 (DE3) strain of E. coli. The hGH production was determined by SDS-PAGE and western blotting techniques, and then the protein concentration was determined by the Bradford assay. To gain insight into the effect of different nutrients on the growth of E. coli and hGH production, in a preliminary assessment nine different types of the basal medium were analyzed. The highest growth of E. coli and hGH production were observed in TB and SOB media. Accordingly, design of experiments was employed for screening the most significant nutrients, and central composite face design was applied for the optimization. The optimum medium consisted of yeast extract (10 g/L), tryptone (10 g/L), and K2HPO4 (2 g/L). The optimum hGH concentration was 391 mg/L, which was 3-fold higher than the hGH concentration in the LB basal medium (119 mg/L). This production rate is the highest hGH concentration reported in the IPTG-inducible expression systems.

  2. Simulation and optimum design of hybrid solar-wind and solar-wind-diesel power generation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Wei

    Solar and wind energy systems are considered as promising power generating sources due to its availability and topological advantages in local power generations. However, a drawback, common to solar and wind options, is their unpredictable nature and dependence on weather changes, both of these energy systems would have to be oversized to make them completely reliable. Fortunately, the problems caused by variable nature of these resources can be partially overcome by integrating these two resources in a proper combination to form a hybrid system. However, with the increased complexity in comparison with single energy systems, optimum design of hybrid system becomes more complicated. In order to efficiently and economically utilize the renewable energy resources, one optimal sizing method is necessary. This thesis developed an optimal sizing method to find the global optimum configuration of stand-alone hybrid (both solar-wind and solar-wind-diesel) power generation systems. By using Genetic Algorithm (GA), the optimal sizing method was developed to calculate the system optimum configuration which offers to guarantee the lowest investment with full use of the PV array, wind turbine and battery bank. For the hybrid solar-wind system, the optimal sizing method is developed based on the Loss of Power Supply Probability (LPSP) and the Annualized Cost of System (ACS) concepts. The optimization procedure aims to find the configuration that yields the best compromise between the two considered objectives: LPSP and ACS. The decision variables, which need to be optimized in the optimization process, are the PV module capacity, wind turbine capacity, battery capacity, PV module slope angle and wind turbine installation height. For the hybrid solar-wind-diesel system, minimization of the system cost is achieved not only by selecting an appropriate system configuration, but also by finding a suitable control strategy (starting and stopping point) of the diesel generator. The

  3. The Mechanics of Human Achievement

    PubMed Central

    Duckworth, Angela L.; Eichstaedt, Johannes C.; Ungar, Lyle H.

    2015-01-01

    Countless studies have addressed why some individuals achieve more than others. Nevertheless, the psychology of achievement lacks a unifying conceptual framework for synthesizing these empirical insights. We propose organizing achievement-related traits by two possible mechanisms of action: Traits that determine the rate at which an individual learns a skill are talent variables and can be distinguished conceptually from traits that determine the effort an individual puts forth. This approach takes inspiration from Newtonian mechanics: achievement is akin to distance traveled, effort to time, skill to speed, and talent to acceleration. A novel prediction from this model is that individual differences in effort (but not talent) influence achievement (but not skill) more substantially over longer (rather than shorter) time intervals. Conceptualizing skill as the multiplicative product of talent and effort, and achievement as the multiplicative product of skill and effort, advances similar, but less formal, propositions by several important earlier thinkers. PMID:26236393

  4. Mathematics Achievement in High- and Low-Achieving Secondary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohammadpour, Ebrahim; Shekarchizadeh, Ahmadreza

    2015-01-01

    This paper identifies the amount of variance in mathematics achievement in high- and low-achieving schools that can be explained by school-level factors, while controlling for student-level factors. The data were obtained from 2679 Iranian eighth graders who participated in the 2007 Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study. Of the…

  5. Growth Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... gland problem or disease. The pituitary gland makes growth hormone, which stimulates the growth of bone and other ... of it may be very short. Treatment with growth hormone can stimulate growth. People can also have too ...

  6. Attribution theory in science achievement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, Martin

    Recent research reveals consistent lags in American students' science achievement scores. Not only are the scores lower in the United States compared to other developed nations, but even within the United States, too many students are well below science proficiency scores for their grade levels. The current research addresses this problem by examining potential malleable factors that may predict science achievement in twelfth graders using 2009 data from the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP). Principle component factor analysis was conducted to determine the specific items that contribute to each overall factor. A series of multiple regressions were then analyzed and formed the predictive value of each of these factors for science achievement. All significant factors were ultimately examined together (also using multiple regression) to determine the most powerful predictors of science achievement, identifying factors that predict science achievement, the results of which suggested interventions to strengthen students' science achievement scores and encourage persistence in the sciences at the college level and beyond. Although there is a variety of research highlighting how students in the US are falling behind other developing nations in science and math achievement, as yet, little research has addressed ways of intervening to address this gap. The current research is a starting point, seeking to identify malleable factors that contribute to science achievement. More specifically, this research examined the types of attributions that predict science achievement in twelfth grade students.

  7. Chloride-selective electrodes based on "two-wall" aryl-extended calix[4]pyrroles: combining hydrogen bonds and anion-π interactions to achieve optimum performance.

    PubMed

    Sabek, Jad; Adriaenssens, Louis; Guinovart, Tomàs; Parra, Enrique J; Rius, F Xavier; Ballester, Pablo; Blondeau, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    The performance of chloride-selective electrodes based on "two-wall" aryl-extended calix[4]pyrroles and multiwall carbon nanotubes is presented. The calix[4]pyrrole receptors bear two phenyl groups at opposite meso-positions. When the meso-phenyl groups are decorated with strong electron-withdrawing substituents, attractive anion-π interactions may exist between the receptor's aromatic walls and the sandwiched anion. These anion-π interactions are shown to significantly affect the selectivity of the electrodes. Calix[4]pyrrole, bearing a p-nitro withdrawing group on each of the meso-phenyl rings, afforded sensors that display anti-Hofmeister behavior against the lipophilic salicylate and nitrate anions. Based on the experimental data, a series of principles that help in predicting the suitability of synthetic receptors for use as anion-specific ionophores is discussed. Finally, the sensors deliver excellent results in the direct detection of chloride in bodily fluids.

  8. Bridging the Design-Manufacturing-Materials Data Gap: Material Properties for Optimum Design and Manufacturing Performance in Light Vehicle Steel-Intensive Body Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuidema, Blake K.

    2012-09-01

    As safety and fuel economy regulations become increasingly more challenging around the world, light vehicle manufacturers are facing increasing pressure to reduce the weight of their vehicles cost effectively while maintaining or improving safety performance. Optimum light vehicle steel body structure weight and performance are achieved when the constraints of design, manufacturing, and material properties are considered simultaneously. ArcelorMittal has invested heavily over the past several years to close the gap between material property knowledge and the inter-relation between material performance and design and manufacturing efficiency. Knowledge gained through this process is presented and the importance of achieving this simultaneous 3-way optimization is illustrated by a lightweight steel door design example from ArcelorMittal's S-in motion catalog of lightweight steel solutions.

  9. Enhancing the branching ratios in the dissociation channels for O(16)O(16)O(18) molecule by designing optimum laser pulses: A study using stochastic optimization.

    PubMed

    Talukder, Srijeeta; Sen, Shrabani; Shandilya, Bhavesh K; Sharma, Rahul; Chaudhury, Pinaki; Adhikari, Satrajit

    2015-10-14

    We propose a strategy of using a stochastic optimization technique, namely, simulated annealing to design optimum laser pulses (both IR and UV) to achieve greater fluxes along the two dissociating channels (O(18) + O(16)O(16) and O(16) + O(16)O(18)) in O(16)O(16)O(18) molecule. We show that the integrated fluxes obtained along the targeted dissociating channel is larger with the optimized pulse than with the unoptimized one. The flux ratios are also more impressive with the optimized pulse than with the unoptimized one. We also look at the evolution contours of the wavefunctions along the two channels with time after the actions of both the IR and UV pulses and compare the profiles for unoptimized (initial) and optimized fields for better understanding the results that we achieve. We also report the pulse parameters obtained as well as the final shapes they take. PMID:26472365

  10. An iterative method for obtaining the optimum lightning location on a spherical surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Gao; Qiming, MA

    1991-01-01

    A brief introduction to the basic principles of an eigen method used to obtain the optimum source location of lightning is presented. The location of the optimum source is obtained by using multiple direction finders (DF's) on a spherical surface. An improvement of this method, which takes the distance of source-DF's as a constant, is presented. It is pointed out that using a weight factor of signal strength is not the most ideal method because of the inexact inverse signal strength-distance relation and the inaccurate signal amplitude. An iterative calculation method is presented using the distance from the source to the DF as a weight factor. This improved method has higher accuracy and needs only a little more calculation time. Some computer simulations for a 4DF system are presented to show the improvement of location through use of the iterative method.

  11. A correlation polarimeter for noise-like signals. [optimum estimation of linearly polarized electromagnetic wave

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohlson, J. E.

    1976-01-01

    Optimum estimation (tracking) of the polarization plane of a linearly polarized electromagnetic wave is determined when the signal is a narrow-band Gaussian random process with a polarization plane angle which is also a Gaussian random process. This model is compared to previous work and is applicable to space communication. The estimator performs a correlation operation similar to an amplitude-comparison monopulse angle tracker, giving the name correlation polarimeter. Under large signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), the estimator is causal. Performance of the causal correlation polarimeter is evaluated for arbitrary SNR. Optimum precorrelation filtering is determined. With low SNR, the performance of this system is far better than that of previously developed systems. Practical implementation is discussed. A scheme is given to reduce the effect of linearly polarized noise.

  12. The optimum discrete running approximation of multidimensional time-limited signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kida, Yuichi; Kida, Takuro

    2009-08-01

    In this paper, we present an integrated discussion of the space-limited but approximately band-limited ndimensional running discrete approximation that minimizes various continuous worst-case measures of error, simultaneously. Firstly, we introduce the optimum approximation using a fixed finite number of sample values and a running approximation that scans the sample values along the time-axis. Secondly, we derive another filter bank having both the set of extended number of transmission paths and a cutoff frequency over the actual Nyquist frequency. Thirdly, we obtain a continuous space-limited n-dimensional interpolation functions satisfying condition called extended discrete orthogonality. Finally, we derive a set of signals and discrete FIR filter bank that satisfy two conditions of the optimum approximation.

  13. Optimum principle for a vehicular traffic network: minimum probability of congestion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerner, Boris S.

    2011-03-01

    We introduce an optimum principle for a vehicular traffic network with road bottlenecks. This network breakdown minimization (BM) principle states that the network optimum is reached when link flow rates are assigned in the network in such a way that the probability for spontaneous occurrence of traffic breakdown in at least one of the network bottlenecks during a given observation time reaches the minimum possible value. Based on numerical simulations with a stochastic three-phase traffic flow model, we show that in comparison to the well-known Wardrop's principles, the application of the BM principle permits considerably greater network inflow rates at which no traffic breakdown occurs and, therefore, free flow remains in the whole network.

  14. Pattern drilling exploration: Optimum pattern types and hole spacings when searching for elliptical shaped targets

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Drew, L.J.

    1979-01-01

    In this study the selection of the optimum type of drilling pattern to be used when exploring for elliptical shaped targets is examined. The rhombic pattern is optimal when the targets are known to have a preferred orientation. Situations can also be found where a rectangular pattern is as efficient as the rhombic pattern. A triangular or square drilling pattern should be used when the orientations of the targets are unknown. The way in which the optimum hole spacing varies as a function of (1) the cost of drilling, (2) the value of the targets, (3) the shape of the targets, (4) the target occurrence probabilities was determined for several examples. Bayes' rule was used to show how target occurrence probabilities can be revised within a multistage pattern drilling scheme. ?? 1979 Plenum Publishing Corporation.

  15. Optimum three-dimensional atmospheric entry from the analytical solution of Chapman's exact equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Busemann, A.; Vinh, N. X.; Culp, R. D.

    1974-01-01

    The general solution for the optimum three-dimensional aerodynamic control of a lifting vehicle entering a planetary atmosphere is developed. A set of dimensionless variables, modified Chapman variables, is introduced. The resulting exact equations of motion, referred to as Chapman's exact equations, have the advantage that they are completely free of the physical characteristics of the vehicle. Furthermore, a completely general lift-drag relationship is used in the derivation. The results obtained apply to any type of vehicle of arbitrary weight, dimensions and shape, having an arbitrary drag polar, and entering any planetary atmosphere. The aerodynamic controls chosen are the lift coefficient and the bank angle. General optimum control laws for these controls are developed. Several earlier particular solutions are shown to be special cases of this general result. Results are valid for both free and constrained terminal position.

  16. Design of multi-tubular heat exchangers for optimum efficiency of heat dissipation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bo; Cheng, Geng Dong; Jiang, Lei

    2008-08-01

    The optimum design of compact heat exchangers made of a linear metal cellular material is presented. A novel representation of the cylindrical multi-tubular configuration is used. The aim is to maximize the heat dissipation rate while minimizing the prescribed flow pressure by optimizing the multi-tube configuration. The optimum distribution of cellular material for square-cell morphology (cell density and size over given cylindrical cross-section) is found using a structural topology optimization approach. The optimized thermal performance is compared using numerical analysis including both axial temperature fields and variations within the cross-sectional area. The results for the effects of different cross-section shapes, thermal boundary conditions and flow rates are discussed and compared. Interestingly, the present formulation leads to a non-uniform distribution of cellular structures which mimic natural biomaterials. Based on these results, design guidelines for a compact multi-tubular heat exchanger are presented.

  17. Optimum Temperature for Storage of Fruit and Vegetables with Reference to Chilling Injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murata, Takao

    Cold storage is an important technique for preserving fresh fruit and vegetables. Deterioration due to ripening, senescence and microbiological disease can be retarded by storage at optimum temperature being slightly above the freezing point of tissues of fruit and vegetables. However, some fruit and vegetables having their origins in tropical or subtropical regions of the world are subject to chilling injury during transportation, storage and wholesale distribution at low temperature above freezing point, because they are usually sensitive to low temperature in the range of 15&digC to 0°C. This review will focus on the recent informations regarding chilling injury of fruit and vegetables, and summarize the optimum temperature for transportation and storage of fruit and vegetables in relation to chilling injury.

  18. Optimum structural sizing of conventional cantilever and joined wing configurations using equivalent beam models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hajela, P.; Chen, J. L.

    1986-01-01

    The present paper describes an approach for the optimum sizing of single and joined wing structures that is based on representing the built-up finite element model of the structure by an equivalent beam model. The low order beam model is computationally more efficient in an environment that requires repetitive analysis of several trial designs. The design procedure is implemented in a computer program that requires geometry and loading data typically available from an aerodynamic synthesis program, to create the finite element model of the lifting surface and an equivalent beam model. A fully stressed design procedure is used to obtain rapid estimates of the optimum structural weight for the beam model for a given geometry, and a qualitative description of the material distribution over the wing structure. The synthesis procedure is demonstrated for representative single wing and joined wing structures.

  19. Another Look at the Optimum Frequencies for a Water Vapor Radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Resch, G. M.

    1984-01-01

    A water vapor radiometer is used to estimate the columnar content of atmospheric water vapor or equivalently the line-of-sight path delay due to water vapor. Two measurement channels are used in order to separate the effects of the liquid and vapor phases of water. The efficiency of the path delay or columnar vapor estimate is dependent on the choice of on-line frequency channel. Previous analysis of this problem has suggested frequencies from 20.3 to 21 GHz. The frequency that yields the minimum error in the inversion algorithm is shown here to be both site and season dependent. Hence, the concept of an optimum frequency must represent an averaging process over the entire range of meteorological conditions that is expected. For a range of sites and condition representing a cross section of the continental United States the optimum on-line frequency seems to be 20.6 GHz.

  20. A literature review on optimum and preferred joint angles in automotive sitting posture.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Susanne; Amereller, Maximilian; Franz, Matthias; Kaiser, Ralf; Schwirtz, Ansgar

    2014-03-01

    In this study, a survey of the scientific literature in the field of optimum and preferred human joint angles in automotive sitting posture was conducted by referring to thirty different sources published between 1940 and today. The strategy was to use only sources with numerical angle data in combination with keywords. The aim of the research was to detect commonly used joint angles in interior car design. The main analysis was on data measurement, usability and comparability of the different studies. In addition, the focus was on the reasons for the differently described results. It was found that there is still a lack of information in methodology and description of background. Due to these reasons published data is not always usable to design a modern ergonomic car environment. As a main result of our literature analysis we suggest undertaking further research in the field of biomechanics and ergonomics to work out scientific based and objectively determined "optimum" joint angles in automotive sitting position.

  1. Optimum design of fibrous laminated plates with sectionally-varied fiber orientation angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miki, Mitsunori; Sugiyama, Yoshihiko; Ohba, Ichiro

    1993-03-01

    This paper deals with the optimum design of fibrous laminated composite plates. The plates are subjected to any concentrated and/or distributed loads and they are optimized under the constraint that the strain energy or the maximum deflection of the plates is minimized for the given thickness. The design variables are the fiber orientation angles of the small sections of the plates. Thus, the optimum fiber orientation becomes curvilinear. The deflection analysis is performed by using the Rayleigh-Ritz method and the complexity in developing the analytical formulation for the sectional plate is reduced by using the symbolic calculation system, Mathematica. The optimizer has a SUMT-type algorism. The calculated results show that the laminated plate with the sectionally-optimized fiber orientation angles yield a considerable improvement in the strain energy and maximum deflection.

  2. a Study of Optimum Design and Analysis with D.O.E for Automotive Seat Frame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, H. J.; Cho, Y. H.; Lee, D. S.; Oh, J. C.; Kwon, Y. D.

    In modern times, development trend of automobiles is the tendency to prefer the high fuel efficiency of automobile. Also, the structure of seat that takes 4% of automobile's weight is the target to be secured the stability enough and attain the lightweight, To meet this, the characteristics of load to be applied to seat structure must be analyzed from the initial time, and it must be considered and designed material, thickness, distance to be assembled with recliner and condition of section through the calculation of numerical value. This study performed to reduce stress and moments to be occurred to seat frame through keep the optimum condition with D.O.E for cushion frame of seat due to passenger inertia weight at the rear Collision of automobile, This study looked for optimum values with Minitab and analyzed the cushion frame of seat with LS-DYNA, FEA tool, according to those Factor.

  3. Optimum design of composite laminates with thermal effects. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markham, L. R.; Herakovich, C. T.

    1976-01-01

    An analytical approach to determine an optimum laminate for a variety of thermal and mechanical loading combinations is presented. The analysis is performed for a linear elastic material under static mechanical and uniform thermal loadings. The problem is restricted to a unit width and length laminate with angle orientations resulting in an orthotropic, symmetric, and balanced configuration. An objective function defining total strain energy, is formulated and an optimum laminate design determined subject to constraints on stiffness, average coefficient of thermal expansion, and strength. The objective function is formulated in terms of the orientation angles, number of plies, and material properties. The method presented has, in varying degrees, shown that the design of a laminate can be accomplished using strain energy minimization as the primary criteria. The results of various combinations of applied constraints in the optimized design process are presented and discussed.

  4. Perils of Standardized Achievement Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haladyna, Thomas M.

    2006-01-01

    This article argues that the validity of standardized achievement test-score interpretation and use is problematic; consequently, confidence and trust in such test scores may often be unwarranted. The problem is particularly severe in high-stakes situations. This essay provides a context for understanding standardized achievement testing, then…

  5. Poor Results for High Achievers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bui, Sa; Imberman, Scott; Craig, Steven

    2012-01-01

    Three million students in the United States are classified as gifted, yet little is known about the effectiveness of traditional gifted and talented (G&T) programs. In theory, G&T programs might help high-achieving students because they group them with other high achievers and typically offer specially trained teachers and a more advanced…

  6. Parental Involvement and Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwin, Sarah Christine

    2015-01-01

    This research study examined the correlation between student achievement and parent's perceptions of their involvement in their child's schooling. Parent participants completed the Parent Involvement Project Parent Questionnaire. Results slightly indicated parents of students with higher level of achievement perceived less demand or invitations…

  7. Examination Regimes and Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cosentino de Cohen, Clemencia

    2010-01-01

    Examination regimes at the end of secondary school vary greatly intra- and cross-nationally, and in recent years have undergone important reforms often geared towards increasing student achievement. This research presents a comparative analysis of the relationship between examination regimes and student achievement in the OECD. Using a micro…

  8. General Achievement Trends: New Jersey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  9. Teaching the Low Level Achiever.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salomone, Ronald E., Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Intended for teachers of the English language arts, the articles in this issue offer suggestions and techniques for teaching the low level achiever. Titles and authors of the articles are as follows: (1) "A Point to Ponder" (Rachel Martin); (2) "Tracking: A Self-Fulfilling Prophecy of Failure for the Low Level Achiever" (James Christopher Davis);…

  10. Family Status and School Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chalker, Rhoda N.; Horns, Virginia

    This study tested the hypothesis that there is no significant difference in reading achievement among children in grades 2 through 5 related to family structure. Researchers administered the Stanford Achievement Test to 119 students in an Alabama city suburban school system. Of the sample, 69 children lived in intact families and 50 lived in…

  11. General Achievement Trends: North Carolina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  12. Classroom Composition and Achievement Gains.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leiter, Jeffrey

    1983-01-01

    Third-grade students in high ability groups in mathematics achieved greater gains than students in low ability groups. The opposite results occurred in reading achievement. Possible reasons for this difference include different instructional techniques for reading and math and the effect of home environment on learning. (IS)

  13. Raising Boys' Achievement in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bleach, Kevan, Ed.

    This book offers insights into the range of strategies and good practice being used to raise the achievement of boys. Case studies by school-based practitioners suggest ideas and measures to address the issue of achievement by boys. The contributions are: (1) "Why the Likely Lads Lag Behind" (Kevan Bleach); (2) "Helping Boys Do Better in Their…

  14. School Size and Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riggen, Vicki

    2013-01-01

    This study examined whether a relationship between high school size and student achievement exists in Illinois public high schools in reading and math, as measured by the Prairie State Achievement Exam (PSAE), which is administered to all Illinois 11th-grade students. This study also examined whether the factors of socioeconomic status, English…

  15. Stress Correlates and Academic Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bentley, Donna Anderson; And Others

    An ongoing concern for educators is the identification of factors that contribute to or are associated with academic achievement; one such group of variables that has received little attention are those involving stress. The relationship between perceived sources of stress and academic achievement was examined to determine if reactions to stress…

  16. Protein engineering of Aspergillus awamori glucoamylase to increase its pH optimum.

    PubMed

    Fang, T Y; Ford, C

    1998-05-01

    To increase the pH optimum of glucoamylase (GA), five mutations-S411G, S411A, S411C, S411H and S411D--were designed to destabilize the carboxylate ion form of Glu400, the catalytic base, by removing or weakening the hydrogen bond between Ser411 and Glu400, and thereby raising its pK. The substitution of alanine, histidine and aspartate were also designed to study the additional effects of polarity and both positive and negative charges, respectively. S411G GA had catalytic efficiencies like those of wild-type GA for isomaltose, maltose and maltoheptaose hydrolysis at pH 4.4, while S411A and S411C GAs had 54-74% and S411H and S411D GAs had only about 6-12% of wild-type catalytic efficiencies. All five mutations increased the pH optimum in the enzyme-substrate complex, mainly by raising pK1 values. S411A is the best performing and most industrially promising of the pH mutants isolated to date. S411A GA increased the pH optimum by 0.8 units for both maltose and maltoheptaose hydrolysis while maintaining a high level of activity and catalytic efficiency. In hydrolysis of 28% DE 10 maltodextrin, S411A GA had a pH optimum of 7 compared with pH 5.6 for wild-type GA, and had higher initial rates of glucose production than wild-type GA at all pH values tested above pH 6.6. PMID:9681871

  17. Dynamic programming and direct interaction for the optimum design of skeletal towers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, G. C.; Doyle, W. S.

    1978-01-01

    A computer technique is proposed for automatically designing tower structures. Dynamic programming was used to find the optimum geometric configuration of the structural members, while the member sizes were proportioned by direct iteration. Tower structures are particularly suited to this method of automatic design since the rapidity of the analysis and design depends primarily upon substructuring. Substructuring of towers was comparatively simple because interaction between adjacent substructures is simulated with reasonable accuracy. Typical examples are presented to illustrate the method.

  18. Optimising multistage dairy cattle breeding schemes including genomic selection using decorrelated or optimum selection indices

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The prediction of the outcomes from multistage breeding schemes is especially important for the introduction of genomic selection in dairy cattle. Decorrelated selection indices can be used for the optimisation of such breeding schemes. However, they decrease the accuracy of estimated breeding values and, therefore, the genetic gain to an unforeseeable extent and have not been applied to breeding schemes with different generation intervals and selection intensities in each selection path. Methods A grid search was applied in order to identify optimum breeding plans to maximise the genetic gain per year in a multistage, multipath dairy cattle breeding program. In this program, different values of the accuracy of estimated genomic breeding values and of their costs per individual were applied, whereby the total breeding costs were restricted. Both decorrelated indices and optimum selection indices were used together with fast multidimensional integration algorithms to produce results. Results In comparison to optimum indices, the genetic gain with decorrelated indices was up to 40% less and the proportion of individuals undergoing genomic selection was different. Additionally, the interaction between selection paths was counter-intuitive and difficult to interpret. Independent of using decorrelated or optimum selection indices, genomic selection replaced traditional progeny testing when maximising the genetic gain per year, as long as the accuracy of estimated genomic breeding values was ≥ 0.45. Overall breeding costs were mainly generated in the path "dam-sire". Selecting males was still the main source of genetic gain per year. Conclusion Decorrelated selection indices should not be used because of misleading results and the availability of accurate and fast algorithms for exact multidimensional integration. Genomic selection is the method of choice when maximising the genetic gain per year but genotyping females may not allow for a reduction in

  19. Optimum systems design with random input and output applied to solar water heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Malek, L. L.

    1980-03-01

    Solar water heating systems are evaluated. Models were developed to estimate the percentage of energy supplied from the Sun to a household. Since solar water heating systems have random input and output queueing theory, birth and death processes were the major tools in developing the models of evaluation. Microeconomics methods help in determining the optimum size of the solar water heating system design parameters, i.e., the water tank volume and the collector area.

  20. Optimum Platinum Loading In Pt/SnO2 CO-Oxidizing Catalysts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schryer, David R.; Upchurch, Billy T.; Davis, Patricia P.; Brown, Kenneth G.; Schryer, Jacqueline

    1991-01-01

    Platinum on tin oxide (Pt/SnO2) good catalyst for oxidation of carbon monoxide at or near room temperature. Catalytic activity peaks at about 17 weight percent Pt. Catalysts with platinum loadings as high as 46 percent fabricated by technique developed at Langley Research Center. Work conducted to determine optimum platinum loading for this type of catalyst. Major application is removal of unwanted CO and O2 in CO2 lasers.

  1. Determination of the optimum working range from a calibration curve for colorimetric analysis with an "autoanalyzer".

    PubMed

    Whitehead, D

    1973-02-01

    A study has been made of the types and distribution of errors in determining the optimum working range from a calibration curve for automated analysis. Three error equations are derived for the fitting of a linear, quadratic or cubic curve, involving a thorough statistical analysis of the data. The errors from a set of silica and alumina standards, requiring a quadratic and cubic fit respectively, compare favourably with replicate analyses of standard rocks done on a previous occasion. PMID:18961254

  2. Single-junction solar cells with the optimum band gap for terrestrial concentrator applications

    DOEpatents

    Wanlass, Mark W.

    1994-01-01

    A single-junction solar cell having the ideal band gap for terrestrial concentrator applications. Computer modeling studies of single-junction solar cells have shown that the presence of absorption bands in the direct spectrum has the effect of "pinning" the optimum band gap for a wide range of operating conditions at a value of 1.14.+-.0.02 eV. Efficiencies exceeding 30% may be possible at high concentration ratios for devices with the ideal band gap.

  3. Optimum step design for centering of pistons moving in an incompressible fluid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Etsion, I.; Hamrock, B. J.

    1976-01-01

    Hydrodynamic effects are analyzed for a stepped piston moving within a tight clearance tube filled with an incompressible fluid. Hydrostatic effects are analyzed and a complete solution is obtained and an optimum step design for centering of the piston is suggested. The axial speed resulting from an axial driving force is calculated, and some experimental results for pistons falling in a water-filled tube are presented.

  4. Random vibrations of quadratic damping systems. [optimum damping analysis for automobile suspension system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sireteanu, T.

    1974-01-01

    An oscillating system with quadratic damping subjected to white noise excitation is replaced by a nonlinear, statistically equivalent system for which the associated Fokker-Planck equation can be exactly solved. The mean square responses are calculated and the optimum damping coefficient is determined with respect to the minimum mean square acceleration criteria. An application of these results to the optimization of automobile suspension damping is given.

  5. Optimum design of wide-bandwidth, low-noise photodiode amplifiers. Volume 1: Bandwidth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, D. K.

    A circuit with video applications was tested. A reversed biased junction is a parallel combination of resistance and capacitance, which varies with the applied reverse voltage. The complete equivalent circuit model includes these components in parallel with a current generator. For optimum response at high frequency critical damping is necessary. The circuit allows the use of an amplifier with a wider open loop bandwidth than one compensated for unity gain, with a corresponding increase in system bandwidth.

  6. Which lamp will be optimum to eye? Incandescent, fluorescent or LED etc

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Liang; Zhang, Xiao-Wei

    2014-01-01

    Low frequency flicker, high frequency flicker, strong light, strong blue light, infrared, ultraviolet, electromagnetic radiation, ripple flicker and dimming flicker produced by different lamps have negative impact on vision, eyes and health. Negative impact on eyes resulting in myopia or cataract etc: the solution is to remove all the negative factors by applying upright lighting technology and that is optimum to vision, eyes and health. PMID:24634884

  7. Investigation of optimum conditions and costs estimation for degradation of phenol by solar photo-Fenton process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gar Alalm, Mohamed; Tawfik, Ahmed; Ookawara, Shinichi

    2014-11-01

    In this study, solar photo-Fenton reaction using compound parabolic collectors reactor was assessed for removal of phenol from aqueous solution. The effect of irradiation time, initial concentration, initial pH, and dosage of Fenton reagent were investigated. H2O2 and aromatic intermediates (catechol, benzoquinone, and hydroquinone) were quantified during the reaction to study the pathways of the oxidation process. Complete degradation of phenol was achieved after 45 min of irradiation when the initial concentration was 100 mg/L. However, increasing the initial concentration up to 500 mg/L inhibited the degradation efficiency. The dosage of H2O2 and Fe+2 significantly affected the degradation efficiency of phenol. The observed optimum pH for the reaction was 3.1. Phenol degradation at different concentration was fitted to the pseudo-first order kinetic according to Langmuir-Hinshelwood model. Costs estimation for a large scale reactor based was performed. The total costs of the best economic condition with maximum degradation of phenol are 2.54 €/m3.

  8. Determination of the optimum-size californium-252 neutron source for borehole capture gamma-ray analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Senftle, F.E.; Macy, R.J.; Mikesell, J.L.

    1979-01-01

    The fast- and thermal-neutron fluence rates from a 3.7 ??g 252Cf neutron source in a simulated borehole have been measured as a function of the source-to-detector distance using air, water, coal, iron ore-concrete mix, and dry sand as borehole media. Gamma-ray intensity measurements were made for specific spectral lines at low and high energies for the same range of source-to-detector distances in the iron ore-concrete mix and in coal. Integral gamma-ray counts across the entire spectrum were also made at each source-to-detector distance. From these data, the specific neutron-damage rate, and the critical count-rate criteria, we show that in an iron ore-concrete mix (low hydrogen concentration), 252Cf neutron sources of 2-40 ??g are suitable. The source size required for optimum gamma-ray sensitivity depends on the energy of the gamma ray being measured. In a hydrogeneous medium such as coal, similar measurements were made. The results show that sources from 2 to 20 ??g are suitable to obtain the highest gamma-ray sensitivity, again depending on the energy of the gamma ray being measured. In a hydrogeneous medium, significant improvement in sensitivity can be achieved by using faster electronics; in iron ore, it cannot. ?? 1979 North-Holland Publishing Co.

  9. Methodology for Selection of Optimum Light Stringers in Functionally Graded Panels Designed for Prescribed Fundamental Frequency or Buckling Load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birman, Victor; Byrd, Larry W.

    2008-02-01

    The interest to functionally graded materials (FGM) and structures has been generated by their potential advantages, including enhanced thermal properties, reduced or eliminated delamination concerns, a potential for an improved stress distribution, etc. Various aspects of the processing, design, micromechanics and analysis of FGM have been outlined in a number of reviews, mentioned here are [1-3]. In particular, functionally graded panels may be advantageous compared to their conventional counterparts in numerous applications. However, a typical FGM panel is asymmetric about its middle plane resulting in lower buckling loads and fundamental frequencies as well as higher stresses and deformations than the counterpart with a symmetric distribution of the same constituents. The reduced stiffness of FGM panels can be compensated by reinforcing them with stringers. For example, metallic stringers at the metal-rich surface of a FGM ceramic-metal panel may provide an efficient solution enabling a designer to increase both buckling loads as well as natural frequencies. The list of studies on optimization of FGM is extensive as could be anticipated for such tailored structural elements. For example, recent papers by Batra and his collaborators present optimization of the natural frequencies of a FGM plate through material grading [4] and through the graded fiber orientation [5]. The present paper is concerned with an optimum design of the system of stringers for a specified FGM panel. The task is to design the lightest system of stringers enabling the panel to achieve prescribed buckling loads or fundamental frequency.

  10. Optimum-AIV: A planning and scheduling system for spacecraft AIV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arentoft, M. M.; Fuchs, Jens J.; Parrod, Y.; Gasquet, Andre; Stader, J.; Stokes, I.; Vadon, H.

    1991-01-01

    A project undertaken for the European Space Agency (ESA) is presented. The project is developing a knowledge based software system for planning and scheduling of activities for spacecraft assembly, integration, and verification (AIV). The system extends into the monitoring of plan execution and the plan repair phase. The objectives are to develop an operational kernel of a planning, scheduling, and plan repair tool, called OPTIMUM-AIV, and to provide facilities which will allow individual projects to customize the kernel to suit its specific needs. The kernel shall consist of a set of software functionalities for assistance in initial specification of the AIV plan, in verification and generation of valid plans and schedules for the AIV activities, and in interactive monitoring and execution problem recovery for the detailed AIV plans. Embedded in OPTIMUM-AIV are external interfaces which allow integration with alternative scheduling systems and project databases. The current status of the OPTIMUM-AIV project, as of Jan. 1991, is that a further analysis of the AIV domain has taken place through interviews with satellite AIV experts, a software requirement document (SRD) for the full operational tool was approved, and an architectural design document (ADD) for the kernel excluding external interfaces is ready for review.

  11. Determining the optimum replacement policy for Holstein dairy herds in Iran.

    PubMed

    Kalantari, A S; Mehrabani-Yeganeh, H; Moradi, M; Sanders, A H; De Vries, A

    2010-05-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the optimum replacement policy for Holstein dairy herds in Iran using a dynamic programming model. Cows were described in terms of state variables that included milk production class, parity, pregnancy status, and month in milk with a 1-mo stage length. The objective function maximized the net present value of cows over a 15-yr planning horizon. Markov simulation was used to estimate expected herd dynamics under the optimal decision plan determined by dynamic programming. Stochastic elements included probabilities of pregnancy and abortion, production level, and involuntary culling. The optimum annual culling rate was estimated to be 31.4%, and cows had an expected herd life (time from first calving until culling) of 3.18 yr. High replacement cost and low carcass value resulted in only 2.87% voluntary culling (i.e., optimal model-based replacement). Assuming a heat detection rate of 0.4, cows averaged 2.8 services per lactation under the optimal policy. Sensitivity analyses were carried out to evaluate the effect of milk price, herd-average production, feed cost, heifer price, and carcass value on optimum replacement decisions. Herd-average production, replacement cost, and risk of involuntary culling were important factors affecting the optimal culling policy. Changes in the price of feed, calves, and milk and the probability of pregnancy had no considerable effect on the optimal policy considering the market situation in Iran during 2008.

  12. Study on Optimum Capacity of Battery Energy Storage System for Wind Power Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senjyu, Tomonobu; Kikunaga, Yasuaki; Yona, Atsushi; Funabashi, Toshihisa

    Generally, the battery is built with wind power generator to level the output power fluctuation of wind power generator, since output power fluctuation of wind power generator is large. However, if large battery is installed in power system, the capital cost for wind power system will increase. Hence, the smallest size of battery should be determined to save the capital cost. This paper evaluates the effect of the output power leveling by introducing battery, and optimal size of battery is determined. A generated power output of a wind generator is easily calculated by real wind speed data only. However, battery charge/discharge actions are changed by control parameters for battery, it is difficult to decided the optimum battery system capacity. In this paper, output power fluctuation of wind power generator with battery system is calculated and estimated, so that the power output deviation is less than specific value, then minimum capital cost is decided by optimum battery capacity. The proposed technique determines the optimum size and control parameters for installed battery.

  13. Power budget improvement for long-haul WDM transmission with optimum placement of SOAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Surinder; Kaler, R. S.

    2008-05-01

    Sufficient power margin is investigated for ten-channels WDM transmission over 68,908 km by using cascaded in-line semiconductor optical amplifier for the differential phase-shift keying (DPSK) modulation format for the first time. For this, we used the structural optimization and placement scheme of semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOAs) for long-haul WDM transmission. The SOA model for in-line amplifier has low crosstalk, ASE noise power and low noise figure with sufficient gain. The impact of noise figure, amplification factor, ASE noise power, optical gain and crosstalk with signal input power for the SOA model has been illustrated, which shows that 400 mA is the optimum bias current. We observed that the optimized optical filter bandwidth for the 100 GHz channel spacing is 0.4 nm. We observe that as we decrease the channel spacing, the quality of signal is degraded. We show that the optimum span scheme-1 is used up to a transmission distance of 68,908 km with good quality for power margin more than 24 dB. This placement scheme of SOAs shows good power budget for long transmission distance. We show the optical spectrum and clear eye diagram at the transmission distance of 68,908 km for optimum span schemes. Finally, we investigate the maximum transmission distance with decrease in channel spacing, i.e., 20 and 50 GHz.

  14. A methodology to determine the optimum WRF-ARW configuration over Andalusia (Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porras, Ignasi; Domingo-Dalmau, Anna; Picanyol, Miquel; Arasa, Raúl; Ángeles González-Serrano, M.°

    2016-04-01

    There is an inherent uncertainty in NWP modelling results. The objective of this study is to present a methodology to find the optimum Weather Research and Forecast (WRF-ARW) configuration which reduces this uncertainty. The project is located over a coastal region in Andalusia (South Spain). Different dynamical (diffusion and damping options) and physical (microphysics, long- and short-wave radiation, cumulus and planetary boundary layer schemes) configurations have been tested in order to evaluate the sensitivity of the model. We have also studied the influence of different vertical levels distributions as well as the impact of different high resolution elevation (ASTER and SRTM) and land use (CLC2006 and CCI-LC) data inputs. Finally, we have realized experiments using 3-dimensional variation data assimilation. Each configuration has been modelled for four chosen months in 2014. Each month selected belongs to a different season. The best configuration has been selected using the results from a numerical deterministic validation (RMSE,MB,MAGE). The optimum configuration is the one which reduces the uncertainty in all the meteorological variables evaluated. The optimum configuration obtained has been validated using a two years period (2012 and 2013). We have done a numerical deterministic validation and also a categorical validation for the wind speed using the Beaufort scale as categories. A significant reduction in the model uncertainty is found comparing the results of the final configuration and the results of WRF default configuration.

  15. Toward Optimum Configuration of Circumferential Groove Casing Treatment in Transonic Compressor Rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hah, Chunill

    2011-01-01

    The current paper first reviews experimental and numerical investigations to understand flow physics and to develop optimum configurations of circumferential grooves in compressor rotors. Circumferential grooves are used mainly to increase stall margin in axial compressors with small decrease in aerodynamic efficiency. Although circumferential groove casing treatment has been used widely, flow mechanisms of the circumferential grooves at near stall conditions are not well understood yet. Detailed time-dependent flow measurement inside tip gap in a high speed compressor is still a big challenge even though significant advance has been made in non-intrusive flow measurement technique. Therefore numerical approaches have been used to study relevant flow physics. However, optimum design of circumferential grooves to a given compressor with the computational tools is not practical yet. In the present paper, various investigations to study flow physics of circumferential groove casing treatment in axial compressor are reviewed first. Possible missing flow physics are identified and future research efforts for the optimum design are discussed.

  16. Global optimum protein threading with gapped alignment and empirical pair score functions.

    PubMed

    Lathrop, R H; Smith, T F

    1996-02-01

    We describe a branch-and-bound search algorithm for finding the exact global optimum gapped sequence-structure alignment ("threading") between a protein sequence and a protein core or structural model, using an arbitrary amino acid pair score function (e.g. contact potentials, knowledge-based potentials, potentials of mean force, etc.). The search method imposes minimal conditions on how structural environments are defined or the form of the score function, and allows arbitrary sequence-specific functions for scoring loops and active site residues. Consequently the search method can be used with many different score functions and threading methodologies; this paper illustrates five from the literature. On a desktop workstation running LISP, we have found the global optimum protein sequence-structure alignment in NP-hard search spaces as large as 9.6 x 10(31), at rates ranging as high as 6.8 x 10(28) equivalent threadings per second (most of which are pruned before they ever are examined explicitly). Continuing the procedure past the global optimum enumerates successive candidate threadings in monotonically increasing score order. We give efficient algorithms for search space size, uniform random sampling, segment placement probabilities, mean, standard deviation and partition function. The method should prove useful for structure prediction, as well as for critical evaluation of new pair score functions. PMID:8568903

  17. Endocrine Control of Exaggerated Trait Growth in Rhinoceros Beetles.

    PubMed

    Zinna, R; Gotoh, H; Brent, C S; Dolezal, A; Kraus, A; Niimi, T; Emlen, D; Lavine, L C

    2016-08-01

    Juvenile hormone (JH) is a key insect growth regulator frequently involved in modulating phenotypically plastic traits such as caste determination in eusocial species, wing polymorphisms in aphids, and mandible size in stag beetles. The jaw morphology of stag beetles is sexually-dimorphic and condition-dependent; males have larger jaws than females and those developing under optimum conditions are larger in overall body size and have disproportionately larger jaws than males raised under poor conditions. We have previously shown that large males have higher JH titers than small males during development, and ectopic application of fenoxycarb (JH analog) to small males can induce mandibular growth similar to that of larger males. What remains unknown is whether JH regulates condition-dependent trait growth in other insects with extreme sexually selected structures. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that JH mediates the condition-dependent expression of the elaborate horns of the Asian rhinoceros beetle, Trypoxylus dichotomus. The sexually dimorphic head horn of this beetle is sensitive to nutritional state during larval development. Like stag beetles, male rhinoceros beetles receiving copious food produce disproportionately large horns for their body size compared with males under restricted diets. We show that JH titers are correlated with body size during the late feeding and early prepupal periods, but this correlation disappears by the late prepupal period, the period of maximum horn growth. While ectopic application of fenoxycarb during the third larval instar significantly delayed pupation, it had no effect on adult horn size relative to body size. Fenoxycarb application to late prepupae also had at most a marginal effect on relative horn size. We discuss our results in context of other endocrine signals of condition-dependent trait exaggeration and suggest that different beetle lineages may have co-opted different physiological signaling mechanisms to

  18. Mathematics anxiety and mathematics achievement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, Brian F.; Wither (Post.), David P.

    2003-09-01

    This paper is a distillation of the major result from the 1998 Ph.D. thesis of the late David Wither. It details a longitudinal study over five years of the relationship between mathematics anxiety and mathematics achievement. It starts from the already well documented negative correlation between the two, and seeks to establish one of the three hypotheses—that mathematics anxiety causes an impairment of mathematics achievement; that lack of mathematics achievement causes mathematics anxiety; or that there is a third underlying cause of the two.

  19. Position-selective growth of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes for application of electronic-measuring nanoprobes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuyama, Hiroki; Iwata, Nobuyuki; Yamamoto, Hiroshi

    2007-03-01

    Position-selective growth of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and vertically aligned CNTs (VACNTs) on patterned metal electrodes have been prepared by thermal chemical vapor deposition (TCVD) and DC plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). We propose newly a position-controlling method of CNTs by controlling not only a position of Ni as catalysts but also the morphology of Mo as underlayers for the catalysts. The position-selective growth of CNTs was achieved at the edges of the patterned metal by TCVD. The morphologies of the Mo underlayer at the selected area were rough and porous. No CNTs grew on smooth Mo surfaces. The minimum width of selectively grown CNTs, ca. 2.6 μm, was approximately one-eightieth of the patterned metal, 200 μm. VACNTs were synthesized by a PECVD method, however, the VACNTs grew up all over the patterned metal. The Ni catalysts formed into fine particles on rough surfaces of the Mo underlayer. Then the selective growth was achieved by Ni fine particles formed only at the edges of the metal pattern. The results of PECVD suggest that the plasma promoted the Ni catalysts to become fine particles on smooth surfaces of Mo. Conclusively a position-controlling method of CNTs was demonstrated in the optimum conditions of the TCVD.

  20. Cell growth and alpha-amylase production characteristics of Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Dercová, K; Augustín, J; Krajcová, D

    1992-01-01

    Growth, differential rate of alpha-amylase synthesis and production characteristics of Bacillus subtilis DP 1 (isolate from starch materials) in comparison with 10 Bacillus strains were examined in batch fermentation. The effect of the carbon and nitrogen source was evaluated with regard to cell growth and enzyme production. The pH optimum of enzyme activity was 6.5 and temperature optimum of 60 degrees C.