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Sample records for achieve satisfactory outcomes

  1. Delayed presentation is no barrier to satisfactory outcome in the management of open tibial fractures.

    PubMed

    Ashford, Robert U; Mehta, Janak A; Cripps, Robin

    2004-04-01

    The management of open tibial fractures is a challenge to all orthopaedic trauma surgeons. The major goals are fracture union, uncomplicated soft tissue healing and return to pre-injury level of function. The geographical isolation and vastness of the Northern Territory of Australia complicates the management of these injuries by adding a significant delay to treatment. Forty-five patients sustained 48 open tibial fractures over the 30-month period of the study. Twelve received primary surgical treatment within 6h of injury but 33 were treated more than 6h after injury. The mean time to treatment in this latter group was 12h 15min (median 9h 45min, range 6-37h). The majority of injuries were high energy, with 23 patients having multiple injuries and 29 fractures (60%) being classified as AO C3 with 35 (73%) having Gustilo III soft tissue injuries. There was a mean time to union of 7.5 months and an overall complication rate of 42.2%. Thirteen patients (29%) required additional (late) surgical procedures subsequent to definitive fracture and soft tissue management. The zone of injury infection rate was 12.5%. The high incidence of open tibial fractures places a large financial burden on the state. However, despite the absence of a plastic surgical service and delays in presentation, satisfactory outcomes can be obtained by the application of the established surgical principles of thorough debridement, soft tissue management and fracture stabilisation. PMID:15037377

  2. The Impact of Leadership Practices on the Academic Achievement of Elementary Students in Satisfactory Schools and Unsatisfactory Schools in Georgia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Our nation's k-12 schools are faced with numerous critical challenges: elevating academic achievement, recruitment and retention of high-caliber teachers, improving teacher quality, and meeting the mandates of the "No Child Left Behind" ("NCLB") legislation and state standards (Simpson, Lacava, & Graner, 2004; & (Kowalski, 2009). Today's school…

  3. A Better Leveled Playing Field for Assessing Satisfactory Job Performance of Superintendents on the Basis of High-Stakes Testing Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, I. Phillip; Cox, Edward P.; Buckman, David G.

    2014-01-01

    To assess satisfactory job performance of superintendents on the basis of school districts' high-stakes testing outcomes, existing teacher models were reviewed and critiqued as potential options for retrofit. For these models, specific problems were identified relative to the choice of referent groups. An alternate referent group (statewide…

  4. Two syringe spinal anesthesia technique for cesarean section: A controlled randomized study of a simple way to achieve more satisfactory block and less hypotension

    PubMed Central

    Keera, Amr Aly Ismail; Elnabtity, Ali Mohamed Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background: Multiple trials have been tried to prevent hypotension during spinal anesthesia. However, the drug choice and mode of administration is still a matter of debate. Objectives: To compare the outcome of spinal injection of hyperbaric bupivacaine and fentanyl separately to standard injection of mixed fentanyl with hyperbaric bupivacaine. Settings and Design: A randomized, controlled clinical trial. Patients and Methods: One hundred twenty-four parturient scheduled for elective cesarean section were randomly allocated into two groups, each 62 parturient: Group M received spinal anesthesia using 10 mg bupivacaine 0.5% premixed with 25 μg fentanyl in the same syringe and Group S received 25 μg fentanyl in one syringe and 10 mg bupivacaine 0.5% without barbotage in a second syringe. Results: Patients with intraoperative pain that was controllable without the need for a shift to general anesthesia was significantly lower in Group S (3.2%) than in Group M (16.1%). The frequency of hypotension was significantly lower in Group S compared to Group M (P < 0.05). Time till the onset of sensory block was nonsignificantly shorter with nonsignificantly higher mean level of maximal sensory block in Group S compared to Group M (P > 0.05). There was no significant difference in the time till occurrence of hypotension, duration of hypotension, mean dose of ephedrine used for the treatment of hypotension and frequency of patients developed itching between the groups (P > 0.05). Conclusion: Separate intrathecal injection of fentanyl and hyperbaric bupivacaine provided a significant improvement in the quality of sensory block and significant reduction of the frequency of hypotension compared to injection of mixed medications. PMID:27212767

  5. Surgical treatment achieves better outcome in severe traumatic pericallosal aneurysm: case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Sui, Mingxing; Mei, Qiyong; Sun, Kehua

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic pericallosal aneurysm (TPA) is typically seldom yet potentially lethal. Because of its rarity, also complicated by the unpredictable delayed-onset, TPA is more difficult to be diagnosed promptly. Due to the sporadic reports and diverse opinions on the priority of surgical treatment, a consensus about effective management of TPA has not been reached. Here we report a 55 year-old male patient with TPA, who received an emergent craniotomy to clip the pseudoaneurysm and remove the hematoma under intense intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring. A satisfactory clinical outcome was achieved at a 3-month follow-up. Thereafter, a review was conducted to evaluate the outcomes of different managing modalities. PMID:25932088

  6. The Effectiveness of CASAs in Achieving Positive Outcomes for Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Litzelfelner, Pat

    2000-01-01

    Evaluated effectiveness of court-appointed special advocates (CASAs) in achieving positive outcomes for children in the child welfare system, using data from court and CASA program files on 200 children. Found that CASAs may have reduced the number of placements and court continuances children experienced. More services were provided to children…

  7. Closing the achievement gap: the association of racial climate with achievement and behavioral outcomes.

    PubMed

    Mattison, Erica; Aber, Mark S

    2007-09-01

    This study investigated the relationship between school racial climate and students' self-reports of academic and discipline outcomes, including whether racial climate mediated and/or moderated the relationship between race and outcomes. Using the Racial Climate Survey-High School Version (M. Aber et al., unpublished), data were gathered from African American (n = 382) and European American students (n = 1456) regarding their perceptions of racial climate. About 18% of the respondents were low-income and approximately 50% were male. Positive perceptions of the racial climate were associated with higher student achievement and fewer discipline problems. Further, race moderated the relationship between racial climate and both achievement and discipline outcomes. Finally, racial differences in students' grades and discipline outcomes were associated with differences in perceptions of racial climate. Results suggest careful attention should be given to the racial climate of secondary schools, particularly for adolescents who perceive schools as unfair. PMID:17587175

  8. Motivational Climates, Achievement Goals, and Physical Education Outcomes: A Longitudinal Test of Achievement Goal Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halvari, Hallgeir; Skjesol, Knut; Bagoien, Tor Egil

    2011-01-01

    The present research tested the longitudinal relations over a school-year between motivational climates, achievement goals, and five physical education outcomes, namely intrinsic motivation, perceived competence, positive attitude, exertion, and attendance in physical education. The results showed that students' mastery goals measured early in the…

  9. Achieving Good Perioperative Outcomes After Pancreaticoduodenectomy in a Low-Volume Setting: A 25-Year Experience

    PubMed Central

    Chedid, Aljamir D.; Chedid, Marcio F.; Winkelmann, Leonardo V.; Filho, Tomaz J. M. Grezzana; Kruel, Cleber D. P.

    2015-01-01

    Perioperative mortality following pancreaticoduodenectomy has improved over time and is lower than 5% in selected high-volume centers. Based on several large literature series on pancreaticoduodenectomy from high-volume centers, some defend that high annual volumes are necessary for good outcomes after pancreaticoduodenectomy. We report here the outcomes of a low annual volume pancreaticoduodenectomy series after incorporating technical expertise from a high-volume center. We included all patients who underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy performed by a single surgeon (ADC.) as treatment for periampullary malignancies from 1981 to 2005. Outcomes of this series were compared to those of 3 high-volume literature series. Additionally, outcomes for first 10 cases in the present series were compared to those of all 37 remaining cases in this series. A total of 47 pancreaticoduodenectomies were performed over a 25-year period. Overall in-hospital mortality was 2 cases (4.3%), and morbidity occurred in 23 patients (48.9%). Both mortality and morbidity were similar to those of each of the three high-volume center comparison series. Comparison of the outcomes for the first 10 to the remaining 37 cases in this series revealed that the latter 37 cases had inferior mortality (20% versus 0%; P = 0.042), less tumor-positive margins (50 versus 13.5%; P = 0.024), less use of intraoperative blood transfusions (90% versus 32.4%; P = 0.003), and tendency to a shorter length of in-hospital stay (20 versus 15.8 days; P = 0.053). Accumulation of surgical experience and incorporation of expertise from high-volume centers may enable achieving satisfactory outcomes after pancreaticoduodenectomy in low-volume settings whenever referral to a high-volume center is limited. PMID:25875555

  10. SOARing Into Strategic Planning: Engaging Nurses to Achieve Significant Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Wadsworth, Barbara; Felton, Fiona; Linus, Rita

    2016-01-01

    In 2013, a new system chief nursing officer engaged the nursing leaders and staff in an Appreciative Inquiry process utilizing strengths, opportunities, aspirations, and results (SOAR), and a Journey of Excellence to assess and understand the current environment. The ultimate goal was to engage all nurses in strategic planning and goal setting to connect their patient care to the system strategic initiatives. This work led to the creation of a nursing vision, a revised professional practice model and greater council alignment, resulting in significant positive change and ongoing advancement throughout the system. The shared decision-making structure was key to the process with a direct connection of each council's goals, leading to the successful achievement of 34 of the 36 goals in 2 years. This article outlines the process, tools, and staff engagement strategies used to achieve system-wide success. This methodology has improved the outcomes across the organization in both small and system-wide work groups. This work can easily be replicated and adapted to help disparate staffs brought together through mergers or acquisitions to become aligned as a new team. This process, model, and framework, provides structure and results in significant outcomes that recognizes and celebrates the work of individual entities while aligning future strategies and goals. PMID:27584888

  11. Social-Emotional Factors Affecting Achievement Outcomes Among Disadvantaged Students: Closing the Achievement Gap.

    PubMed

    Becker, Bronwyn E; Luthar, Suniya S

    2002-01-01

    Despite concentrated efforts at improving inferior academic outcomes among disadvantaged students, a substantial achievement gap between the test scores of these students and others remains (Jencks & Phillips, 1998; National Center for Education Statistics, 2000a, 2000b; Valencia & Suzuki, 2000). Existing research used ecological models to document social-emotional factors at multiple levels of influence that undermine academic performance. This article integrates ideas from various perspectives in a comprehensive and interdisciplinary model that will inform policy makers, administrators, and schools about the social-emotional factors that act as both risk and protective factors for disadvantaged students' learning and opportunities for academic success. Four critical social-emotional components that influence achievement performance (academic and school attachment, teacher support, peer values, and mental health) are reviewed. PMID:23255834

  12. Social–Emotional Factors Affecting Achievement Outcomes Among Disadvantaged Students: Closing the Achievement Gap

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Bronwyn E.; Luthar, Suniya S.

    2012-01-01

    Despite concentrated efforts at improving inferior academic outcomes among disadvantaged students, a substantial achievement gap between the test scores of these students and others remains (Jencks & Phillips, 1998; National Center for Education Statistics, 2000a, 2000b; Valencia & Suzuki, 2000). Existing research used ecological models to document social–emotional factors at multiple levels of influence that undermine academic performance. This article integrates ideas from various perspectives in a comprehensive and interdisciplinary model that will inform policy makers, administrators, and schools about the social–emotional factors that act as both risk and protective factors for disadvantaged students’ learning and opportunities for academic success. Four critical social–emotional components that influence achievement performance (academic and school attachment, teacher support, peer values, and mental health) are reviewed. PMID:23255834

  13. 34 CFR 668.34 - Satisfactory progress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Satisfactory progress. 668.34 Section 668.34 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION STUDENT ASSISTANCE GENERAL PROVISIONS Student Eligibility § 668.34 Satisfactory progress. (a) If a student is enrolled...

  14. Guidelines for Special Educators: Achieving Socially Valid Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carpenter, C. Dale; Bloom, Lisa A.; Boat, Mary B.

    1999-01-01

    Suggests quality indicators for special-education practices that result in socially valid outcomes such as high self-esteem, self-determination, individual empowerment, and joy. Discusses social validity, criteria for determining socially valid outcomes, and practices that promote these outcomes. (Author/DB)

  15. Secondary Student Motivation Orientations and Standards-Based Achievement Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Luanna H.; McClure, John; Walkey, Frank; Weir, Kirsty F.; McKenzie, Lynanne

    2009-01-01

    Background: Individual student characteristics such as competence motivation, achievement values, and goal orientations have been related in meaningful ways to task attainment. The standards-based National Certificate of Educational Achievement (NCEA) was developed in New Zealand with the intention of strengthening connections between student…

  16. Student Achievement Outcomes Comprehensive School Reform: A Canadian Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, John A.; Scott, Garth; Sibbald, Timothy M.

    2012-01-01

    The authors conducted a third-party study of the student achievement effects of Struggling Schools, a user-generated approach to Comprehensive School Reform (CSR). The design was a quasiexperimental, pre-post matched sample (N = 180) with school as unit of analysis, drawing on 3 years of achievement data from standardized external assessments.…

  17. Longitudinal Outcomes for Mathematics Achievement for Students with Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Judge, Sharon; Watson, Silvana M. R.

    2011-01-01

    Using longitudinal data from the first 6 waves of the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Kindergarten Cohort (ECLS-K), the authors examined mathematics achievement and growth trajectories by learning disability (LD) subgroups. The 2-level (time-student) growth curve model showed that lower levels of mathematics achievement were already evident at…

  18. School Nurse Case Management: Achieving Health and Educational Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonaiuto, Maria M.

    2007-01-01

    Educators and health care professionals alike understand that healthy students are likely to be successful learners. The goal of school nurse case management is to support students so that they are ready to learn. This article describes the outcomes of a 4-year process improvement project designed to show the impact of school nurse case management…

  19. Creating Effective Board-CEO Relationships and Fundraising to Achieve Successful Student Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Frances L.

    2011-01-01

    More and more accountability and successful educational outcomes are being demanded of colleges. Achieving successful outcomes requires strong and courageous leadership at all levels of the institution, but getting the faculty to improve teaching and learning outcomes very often requires a president/chief executive officer (CEO) who not only…

  20. Connecting Social Disorganization Theory to African-American Outcomes to Explain the Achievement Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madyun, Na'im H.

    2011-01-01

    African-American student achievement outcomes have been and continue to be a critical concern for education researchers. Much of the framing of African-American student outcomes centers on what is known as achievement gaps that exist between African-American and White students. Unfortunately, these gaps have remained roughly the same since the…

  1. Students' Achievement Values, Goal Orientations, and Interest: Definitions, Development, and Relations to Achievement Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wigfield, Allan; Cambria, Jenna

    2010-01-01

    Students' achievement task values, goal orientations, and interest are motivation-related constructs which concern students' purposes and reasons for doing achievement activities. The authors review the extant research on these constructs and describe and compare many of the most frequently used measures of these constructs. They also discuss…

  2. [Challenges and Outcomes of the Process for Achieving Certification].

    PubMed

    Kadosaka, Yoshihiko; Suzuki, Reiko; Yoshika, Masamichi; Tsuta, Koji

    2016-02-01

    Clinical laboratory tests have been indispensable for medical services in recent years, and such a situation is associated with the offering of accurate test results by clinical laboratory units. A large number of facilities wishing to achieve ISO 15189 Certification follow preparatory procedures with support from consulting companies. However, in our facility, a limited budget did not allow us to use such services. As a solution, we participated in the Future Lab Session in OSAKA (FLS), a support group for the achievement of ISO 15189 Certification, when it was organized. Aiming to extensively cover and fulfill its responsibility for all processes, including clinical interpretations of the results obtained through patient preparation, in order to continuously offer high-quality test results to clinicians, our clinical laboratory unit underwent examination for certification, and consequently realized the necessity of third-party evaluation. The provision of laboratory services, fully complying with these standards, contributes to medical safety, in addition to accuracy improvement. Although the certification and its maintenance are costly, it is sufficiently cost-effective to achieve it, when focusing on improved efficiency and the enhanced quality and safety of medical services after work standardization. PMID:27311281

  3. Achieving better health care outcomes for children in foster care.

    PubMed

    Mekonnen, Robin; Noonan, Kathleen; Rubin, David

    2009-04-01

    This article reviews the challenges health care systems face as they attempt to improve health care outcomes for children in foster care. It discusses several of the promising health care strategies occurring outside the perimeter of child welfare and identifies some of the key impasses in working alongside efforts in child welfare reform. The authors posit that the greatest impasse in establishing a reasonable quality of health care for these children is placement instability, in which children move frequently among multiple homes and in and out of the child welfare system. The authors propose potential strategies in which efforts to improve placement stability can serve as a vehicle for multidisciplinary reform across the health care system. PMID:19358924

  4. Getting to Outcomes: A Best Practice Process to Help Schools Achieve Desired Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maras, Melissa A.; Wandersman, Abe; Splett, Joni Williams; Flaspohler, Paul; Weist, Mark

    2012-01-01

    This article describes Getting to Outcomes (GTO), a 10-step framework for accountability designed to facilitate effective implementation of evidence-based programs and improvement of home-grown practices (Getting to Outcomes and GTO are trademarks registered by the University of South Carolina and RAND; Wandersman, Imm, Chinman, & Kaftarian, 1999,…

  5. Do Student Achievement Outcomes Differ across Teacher Preparation Programs? An Analysis of Teacher Education in Louisiana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gansle, Kristin A.; Noell, George H.; Burns, Jeanne M.

    2012-01-01

    Achievement outcomes for students taught by recent program completers of Louisiana's teacher preparation programs (TPPs) are examined using hierarchical linear modeling of State student achievement data in English language arts, reading, mathematics, science, and social studies. The current year's achievement in each content area is predicted…

  6. Boredom in Achievement Settings: Exploring Control-Value Antecedents and Performance Outcomes of a Neglected Emotion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pekrun, Reinhard; Goetz, Thomas; Daniels, Lia M.; Stupnisky, Robert H.; Perry, Raymond P.

    2010-01-01

    The linkages of achievement-related boredom with students' appraisals and performance outcomes were examined in a series of 5 exploratory, cross-sectional, and predictive investigations. Studies 1 and 2 assessed students' boredom in a single achievement episode (i.e., state achievement boredom); Studies 3, 4, and 5 focused on their habitual…

  7. Individual Differences in Achievement Goals: A Longitudinal Study of Cognitive, Emotional, and Achievement Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniels, Lia M.; Haynes, Tara L.; Stupnisky, Robert H.; Perry, Raymond P.; Newall, Nancy E.; Pekrun, Reinhard

    2008-01-01

    Within achievement goal theory debate remains regarding the adaptiveness of certain combinations of goals. Assuming a multiple-goals perspective, we used cluster analysis to classify 1002 undergraduate students according to their mastery and performance-approach goals. Four clusters emerged, representing different goal combinations: high…

  8. Conservation Covenants on Private Land: Issues with Measuring and Achieving Biodiversity Outcomes in Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzsimons, James A.; Carr, C. Ben

    2014-09-01

    Conservation covenants and easements have become essential tools to secure biodiversity outcomes on private land, and to assist in meeting international protection targets. In Australia, the number and spatial area of conservation covenants has grown significantly in the past decade. Yet there has been little research or detailed policy analysis of conservation covenanting in Australia. We sought to determine how conservation covenanting agencies were measuring the biodiversity conservation outcomes achieved on covenanted properties, and factors inhibiting or contributing to measuring these outcomes. In addition, we also investigated the drivers and constraints associated with actually delivering the biodiversity outcomes, drawing on detailed input from covenanting programs. Although all conservation covenanting programs had the broad aim of maintaining or improving biodiversity in their covenants in the long term, the specific stated objectives of conservation covenanting programs varied. Programs undertook monitoring and evaluation in different ways and at different spatial and temporal scales. Thus, it was difficult to determine the extent Australian conservation covenanting agencies were measuring the biodiversity conservation outcomes achieved on covenanted properties on a national scale. Lack of time available to covenantors to undertake management was one of the biggest impediments to achieving biodiversity conservation outcomes. A lack of financial resources and human capital to monitor, knowing what to monitor, inconsistent monitoring methodologies, a lack of benchmark data, and length of time to achieve outcomes were all considered potential barriers to monitoring the biodiversity conservation outcomes of conservation covenants.

  9. Achievement for All: Improving Psychosocial Outcomes for Students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humphrey, Neil; Lendrum, Ann; Barlow, Alexandra; Wigelsworth, Michael; Squires, Garry

    2013-01-01

    Students with special educational needs and disabilities (SEND) are at a greatly increased risk of experiencing poor psychosocial outcomes. Developing effective interventions that address the cause of these outcomes has therefore become a major policy priority in recent years. We report on a national evaluation of the Achievement for All (AfA)…

  10. Does Providing Transition Services Early Enable Students with ASD to Achieve Better Vocational Outcomes as Adults?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cimera, Robert Evert; Burgess, Sloane; Wiley, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated whether receiving transition services early (i.e., by age 14) promoted better vocational outcomes than receiving transition services later (i.e., by age 16) for young adults with ASD. To do this, the outcomes achieved by two matched groups were examined--453 young adults from states requiring transition services be…

  11. Student-Level Analysis of Year 1 (2003-2004) Achievement Outcomes for Tennessee Charter Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Steven M.; McDonald, Aaron J.; Gallagher, Brenda McSparrin

    2005-01-01

    This report presents student-level achievement results for the four charter schools that began operation in Tennessee during the 2003-04 academic year. To conduct a rigorous and valid analysis of student achievement outcomes at these schools, we employed a matched program-control design at the student level, whereby each charter school student was…

  12. The Relationships between Teacher Empowerment, Teachers' Sense of Responsibility for Student Outcomes, and Student Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Barbara N.; Crossland, Barbara J.

    Relationships between the level of teachers' perceived empowerment, the degree of teachers' perceived responsibility for student outcomes, and student achievement were studied with 271 elementary school teachers. The Responsibility for Student Achievement Scale (RSA) (T. Guskey, 1981) and the School Participant Empowerment Scales (SPES) (P. Short…

  13. 34 CFR 668.34 - Satisfactory academic progress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Satisfactory academic progress. 668.34 Section 668.34... Satisfactory academic progress. (a) Satisfactory academic progress policy. An institution must establish a reasonable satisfactory academic progress policy for determining whether an otherwise eligible student...

  14. 38 CFR 21.8360 - Satisfactory conduct and cooperation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Children of Vietnam Veterans and Veterans with Covered Service in Korea-Spina Bifida and Covered Birth Defects Satisfactory Conduct and Cooperation § 21.8360 Satisfactory conduct and cooperation....

  15. 38 CFR 21.8360 - Satisfactory conduct and cooperation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Children of Vietnam Veterans and Veterans with Covered Service in Korea-Spina Bifida and Covered Birth Defects Satisfactory Conduct and Cooperation § 21.8360 Satisfactory conduct and cooperation....

  16. 38 CFR 21.8360 - Satisfactory conduct and cooperation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Children of Vietnam Veterans and Veterans with Covered Service in Korea-Spina Bifida and Covered Birth Defects Satisfactory Conduct and Cooperation § 21.8360 Satisfactory conduct and cooperation....

  17. Working together to achieve the best outcomes for equine health and welfare.

    PubMed

    2016-03-19

    Gill Harris reports from this year's National Equine Forum where a key theme was the importance of collaboration and effective communication in achieving the best outcomes for the health and welfare of the horse and the future of equestrianism in the UK. PMID:26993448

  18. Birth Outcomes and Academic Achievement in Childhood: A Population Record Linkage Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Elizabeth A.; Harris, Felicity; Laurens, Kristin R.; Green, Melissa J.; Brinkman, Sally; Lenroot, Rhoshel K.; Carr, Vaughan J.

    2014-01-01

    Poor academic performance during childhood predicts later adverse outcomes, and could be targeted for improvement if detected early. This study used population-based record linkage to examine the association between early life risk factors and academic achievement at two different stages of development using two different cohorts: a kindergarten…

  19. A Comparison of Mathematics Achievement Outcomes among Three Instruction Programs for Pacific Island Elementary Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernardo, Jonathan Christian Amor

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the mathematics achievement outcomes of 3rd grade students from some Pacific Island elementary schools that use 1 of 3 different modes of instruction: Direct Instruction (DI), Success for All (SFA), and noncomprehensive school reform (non-CSR). The need for this research stems from the large proportion of…

  20. The Role of Teachers' Support in Predicting Students' Motivation and Achievement Outcomes in Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Tao; Solmon, Melinda A.; Gu, Xiangli

    2012-01-01

    Examining how teachers' beliefs and behaviors predict students' motivation and achievement outcomes in physical education is an area of increasing research interest. Guided by the expectancy-value model and self-determination theory, the major purpose of this study was to examine the predictive strength of teachers' autonomy, competence, and…

  1. Discrepancies between Student Perception and Achievement of Learning Outcomes in a Flipped Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Sickle, Jenna

    2016-01-01

    In a college algebra course that used flipped/inverted pedagogy, students achieved learning outcomes at a significantly higher rate, as evidenced by results on the final exam. At the same time, student perception on a number of measures decreased significantly, including how interested students were in the course and whether the instructor…

  2. Major Field Achievement Test in Business: Guidelines for Improved Outcome Scores--Part I

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLaughlin, J. Patrick; White, Jason T.

    2007-01-01

    Outcomes measurements have always been an important part of proving to outside constituencies how you "measure up" to other schools with your business programs. A common nationally-normed exam that is used is the Major Field Achievement Test in Business from Educational Testing Services. Our paper discusses some guidelines that we are "pilot…

  3. Exposure to Childhood Sexual and Physical Abuse and Subsequent Educational Achievement Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boden, Joseph M.; Horwood, L. John; Fergusson, David M.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: This paper examined the relationship between exposure to sexual and physical abuse (CSA and CPA) in childhood and later educational achievement outcomes in late adolescence and early adulthood in a birth cohort of over 1,000 children studied to age 25. Method: Retrospective data on CSA and CPA were gathered at ages 18 and 21 and used to…

  4. Family Background and Academic Achievement: Does Self-Efficacy Mediate Outcomes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiser, Dana A.; Riggio, Heidi R.

    2010-01-01

    Research indicates both family background and self-efficacy influence academic outcomes; however, family background also impacts self-efficacy development. The purpose of the current study was to establish whether self-efficacy mediates the relationship between family background and academic achievement. Results indicated family background…

  5. Emotional Design in Multimedia: Does Gender and Academic Achievement Influence Learning Outcomes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kumar, Jeya Amantha; Muniandy, Balakrishnan; Yahaya, Wan Ahmad Jaafar Wan

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed as a preliminary study (N = 33) to explore the effects of gender and academic achievement (Cumulative Grade Point Average-CGPA) on polytechnic students' learning outcomes when exposed to Multimedia Learning Environments (MLE) designed to induce emotions. Three designs namely positive (PosD), neutral (NeuD) and negative…

  6. 38 CFR 21.6362 - Satisfactory conduct and cooperation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Satisfactory conduct and cooperation. 21.6362 Section 21.6362 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS... Pension Recipients Satisfactory Conduct and Cooperation § 21.6362 Satisfactory conduct and...

  7. 38 CFR 21.6362 - Satisfactory conduct and cooperation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Satisfactory conduct and cooperation. 21.6362 Section 21.6362 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS... Pension Recipients Satisfactory Conduct and Cooperation § 21.6362 Satisfactory conduct and...

  8. 38 CFR 21.6362 - Satisfactory conduct and cooperation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Satisfactory conduct and cooperation. 21.6362 Section 21.6362 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS... Pension Recipients Satisfactory Conduct and Cooperation § 21.6362 Satisfactory conduct and...

  9. 38 CFR 21.6362 - Satisfactory conduct and cooperation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Satisfactory conduct and cooperation. 21.6362 Section 21.6362 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS... Pension Recipients Satisfactory Conduct and Cooperation § 21.6362 Satisfactory conduct and...

  10. The Role of Self-Efficacy, Task Value, and Achievement Goals in Predicting Learning Strategies, Task Disengagement, Peer Relationship, and Achievement Outcome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liem, Arief Darmanegara; Lau, Shun; Nie, Youyan

    2008-01-01

    Adopting a combination of expectancy-value and achievement goal theories, this study examined the role of self-efficacy, task value, and achievement goals in students' learning strategies, task disengagement, peer relationship, and English achievement outcome. A sample of 1475 Year-9 students participated in the study. A structural equation model…

  11. Achievement for All: improving psychosocial outcomes for students with special educational needs and disabilities.

    PubMed

    Humphrey, Neil; Lendrum, Ann; Barlow, Alexandra; Wigelsworth, Michael; Squires, Garry

    2013-04-01

    Students with special educational needs and disabilities (SEND) are at a greatly increased risk of experiencing poor psychosocial outcomes. Developing effective interventions that address the cause of these outcomes has therefore become a major policy priority in recent years. We report on a national evaluation of the Achievement for All (AfA) programme that was designed to improve outcomes for students with SEND through: (1) academic assessment, tracking and intervention, (2) structured conversations with parents, and (3) developing provision to improve wider outcomes (e.g. positive relationships). Using a quasi-experimental, pre-test-post-test control group design, we assessed the impact of AfA on teacher ratings of the behaviour problems, positive relationships and bullying of students with SEND over an 18-month period. Participants were 4758 students with SEND drawn from 323 schools across England. Our main impact analysis demonstrated that AfA had a significant impact on all three response variables when compared to usual practice. Hierarchical linear modelling of data from the intervention group highlighted a range of school-level contextual factors and implementation activities and student-level individual differences that moderated the impact of AfA on our study outcomes. The implications of our findings are discussed, and study strengths and limitations are noted. PMID:23380579

  12. 38 CFR 21.362 - Satisfactory conduct and cooperation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... cooperation. 21.362 Section 21.362 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS.... Chapter 31 Conduct and Cooperation § 21.362 Satisfactory conduct and cooperation. (a) General. The... satisfactory conduct and cooperation in developing and implementing a program of rehabilitation services...

  13. 38 CFR 21.362 - Satisfactory conduct and cooperation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... cooperation. 21.362 Section 21.362 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS.... Chapter 31 Conduct and Cooperation § 21.362 Satisfactory conduct and cooperation. (a) General. The... satisfactory conduct and cooperation in developing and implementing a program of rehabilitation services...

  14. 38 CFR 21.362 - Satisfactory conduct and cooperation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... cooperation. 21.362 Section 21.362 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS.... Chapter 31 Conduct and Cooperation § 21.362 Satisfactory conduct and cooperation. (a) General. The... satisfactory conduct and cooperation in developing and implementing a program of rehabilitation services...

  15. 38 CFR 21.362 - Satisfactory conduct and cooperation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... cooperation. 21.362 Section 21.362 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS.... Chapter 31 Conduct and Cooperation § 21.362 Satisfactory conduct and cooperation. (a) General. The... satisfactory conduct and cooperation in developing and implementing a program of rehabilitation services...

  16. 38 CFR 21.362 - Satisfactory conduct and cooperation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... cooperation. 21.362 Section 21.362 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS.... Chapter 31 Conduct and Cooperation § 21.362 Satisfactory conduct and cooperation. (a) General. The... satisfactory conduct and cooperation in developing and implementing a program of rehabilitation services...

  17. 38 CFR 21.8360 - Satisfactory conduct and cooperation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    .... If an eligible child fails to meet these requirements for satisfactory conduct or cooperation, the VR... child reentrance to a vocational training program unless the reasons for unsatisfactory conduct or... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Satisfactory conduct...

  18. Does aggregate school-wide achievement mediate fifth grade outcomes for former early childhood education participants?

    PubMed

    Curenton, Stephanie M; Dong, Nianbo; Shen, Xiangjin

    2015-07-01

    This study used a multilevel mediation model to test the theory that former early childhood education (ECE) attendees' 5th grade achievement is mediated by the aggregate school-wide achievement of their elementary school. Aggregate school-wide achievement was defined as the percentage of 5th graders in a school who were at/above academic proficiency in reading or math. Research questions were: (a) Do ECE program participants have better achievement at 5th grade compared with their matched peers who did not participate in an ECE program?; and (b) Is the association between ECE attendance and 5th grade academic performance mediated by school-wide achievement? Results indicated that children who attended prekindergarten (pre-K) and child care outperformed their matched peers who had not attended ECE programs; conversely, those children who did not attend ECE actually outperformed their Head Start counterparts. Mediation analyses indicated that aggregate school-wide achievement at 5th grade partially mediated the association between former ECE attendance and 5th grade performance; however, these mediated effects were small. Overall, the size of the total effects of ECE and the 5th grade academic outcomes were consistent with prior studies. This research confirms the long-term effects of pre-K and child care until 5th grade. PMID:26098581

  19. From Headline to Hard Grind: The Importance of Understanding Public Administration in Achieving Health Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    O’Flynn, Janine

    2016-01-01

    Many public policy programs fail to translate ambitious headlines to on-the-ground action. The reasons for this are many and varied, but for public administration and management scholars a large part of the gap between ambition and achievement is the challenge associated with the operation of the machinery of government itself, and how it relates to the other parties that it relies on to fulfill these outcomes. In their article, Carey and Friel set out key reasons why public health scholars should seek to better understand important ideas in public administration. In commenting on their contribution, I draw out two critical questions that are raised by this discussion: (i) what are boundaries and what forms do they take? and (ii) why work across boundaries? Expanding on these key questions extends the points made by Carey and Friel on the importance of understanding public administration and will better place public health scholars and practitioners to realise health outcomes.

  20. Achieving the Desired Transformation: Thoughts on Next Steps for Outcomes-Based Medical Education.

    PubMed

    Holmboe, Eric S; Batalden, Paul

    2015-09-01

    Since the introduction of the outcomes-based medical education (OBME) movement, progress toward implementation has been active but challenging. Much of the angst and criticism has been directed at the approaches to assessment that are associated with outcomes-based or competency frameworks, particularly defining the outcomes. In addition, these changes to graduate medical education (GME) are concomitant with major change in health care systems--specifically, changes to increase quality and safety while reducing cost. Every sector, from medical education to health care delivery and financing, is in the midst of substantial change and disruption.The recent release of the Institute of Medicine's report on the financing and governance of GME highlights the urgent need to accelerate the transformation of medical education. One source of continued tension within the medical education community arises from the assumption that the much-needed increases in value and improvement in health care can be achieved by holding the current educational structures and architecture of learning in place while concomitantly withdrawing resources. The authors of this Perspective seek to reframe the important and necessary debate surrounding the current challenges to implementing OBME. Building on recent change and service theories (e.g., Theory U and coproduction), they propose several areas of redirection, including reexamination of curricular models and greater involvement of learners, teachers, and regulators in cocreating new training models, to help facilitate the desired transformation in medical education. PMID:26083400

  1. Estimating the population benefit of radiotherapy: using demand models to estimate achievable cancer outcomes.

    PubMed

    Hanna, T P; Shafiq, J

    2015-02-01

    The measurement of population benefits is important for priority setting, economic evaluation and quality improvement. It also informs advocacy. In this article, the use of demand models to estimate the achievable benefit of cancer therapy is reviewed. Achievable benefit refers to the treatment benefit achievable under optimal conditions. The population benefit of radiotherapy has been used as an example. Demand models provide a means of estimating the optimal proportion of patients with treatment indications when guidelines are followed. They may be used to estimate achievable benefit. The choice of end point should reflect the range of benefits associated with the treatment of interest. In some cases, further model development is needed if a pre-existing demand model is used. The benefit of treatment for each indication is estimated using a systematic review process. The highest level of evidence is used to define the benefit for each indication. In cases where multiple sources of the same level and quality of evidence exist, a meta-analysis is carried out. Population-based effectiveness data sources are considered, but three major challenges to their use are: (i) generalisability of the observed outcomes, (ii) data resolution and (iii) confounding and bias. The population benefit determined from this process describes the population proportion achieving a benefit due to the use of guideline-based treatment, compared with no use of that treatment. Sensitivity analysis provides a means for modelling the effect of model uncertainties. The predominant uncertainty is most often due to uncertainty in indication proportion. Preference-sensitive treatment decisions are a common example. The described approach to estimating the achievable benefit of cancer therapy is robust to model uncertainties, rapidly adaptable and is transparent. However, estimates rely on the quality of model data sources and may be affected by model assumptions. Models should be developed for a

  2. Learning science in a cooperative setting: Academic achievement and affective outcomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazarowitz, Reuven; Hertz-Lazarowitz, Rachel; Baird, J. Hugh

    A learning unit in earth science was taught to high school students, using a jigsaw-group mastery learning approach. The sample consisted of 73 students in the experimental group and 47 students who learned the topic in an individualized mastery learning approach. The study lasted 5 weeks. Pretests and posttests on academic achievement and affective outcomes were administered. Data were treated with an analysis of covariance. The results show that students of the experimental group achieved significantly higher on academic outcomes, both normative and objective scores. On the creative essay test, the differences in number of ideas and total essay score were not significant between the groups, although the mean scores for number of words were higher for the individualized mastery learning group. On the affective domain, jigsaw-group mastery learning students scored significantly higher on self-esteem, number of friends, and involvement in the classroom. No differences were found in cohesiveness, cooperation, competition, and attitudes toward the subject learned. The results are discussed through the evaluation and comparison of the two methods of instruction used in this study.The cooperative learning movement began in junior high schools as part of the desegregation process, aiming at facilitating positive ethnic relations and increasing academic achievement and social skills among diverse students (Aronson, Stephan, Sikes, Blaney, & Snapp, 1978; Sharan & Hertz-Lazarowitz, 1980; Slavin, 1980). However, elementary teachers quickly recognized the potential of cooperative methods, and such methods were adopted freely in elementary schools before becoming widespread on the junior and senior high level. It has only been during the past few years that application of cooperative learning has been studied extensively with these older students.Cooperative learning methods generally involve heterogeneous groups working together on tasks that are deliberately structured to

  3. Learning science in a cooperative setting: Academic achievement and affective outcomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazarowitz, Reuven; Hertz-Lazarowitz, Rachel; Baird, J. Hugh

    A learning unit in earth science was taught to high school students, using a jigsaw-group mastery learning approach. The sample consisted of 73 students in the experimental group and 47 students who learned the topic in an individualized mastery learning approach. The study lasted 5 weeks. Pretests and posttests on academic achievement and affective outcomes were administered. Data were treated with an analysis of covariance. The results show that students of the experimental group achieved significantly higher on academic outcomes, both normative and objective scores. On the creative essay test, the differences in number of ideas and total essay score were not significant between the groups, although the mean scores for number of words were higher for the individualized mastery learning group. On the affective domain, jigsaw-group mastery learning students scored significantly higher on self-esteem, number of friends, and involvement in the classroom. No differences were found in cohesiveness, cooperation, competition, and attitudes toward the subject learned. The results are discussed through the evaluation and comparison of the two methods of instruction used in this study.The cooperative learning movement began in junior high schools as part of the desegregation process, aiming at facilitating positive ethnic relations and increasing academic achievement and social skills among diverse students (Aronson, Stephan, Sikes, Blaney, & Snapp, 1978; Sharan & Hertz-Lazarowitz, 1980; Slavin, 1980). However, elementary teachers quickly recognized the potential of cooperative methods, and such methods were adopted freely in elementary schools before becoming widespread on the junior and senior high level. It has only been during the past few years that application of cooperative learning has been studied extensively with these older students.Cooperative learning methods generally involve heterogeneous groups working together on tasks that are deliberately structured to

  4. Can Research Design Explain Variation in Head Start Research Results? A Meta-Analysis of Cognitive and Achievement Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shager, Hilary M.; Schindler, Holly S.; Magnuson, Katherine A.; Duncan, Greg J.; Yoshikawa, Hirokazu; Hart, Cassandra M. D.

    2013-01-01

    This study explores the extent to which differences in research design explain variation in Head Start program impacts. We employ meta-analytic techniques to predict effect sizes for cognitive and achievement outcomes as a function of the type and rigor of research design, quality and type of outcome measure, activity level of control group, and…

  5. Socially oriented achievement goals of Chinese university students in Singapore: structure and relationships with achievement motives, goals and affective outcomes.

    PubMed

    Chang, Weining C; Wong, Kaishi

    2008-10-01

    Contemporary literature on culture, self, and motivations (Markus & Kitayama, 1991) suggests that in collectivistic cultures, individual achievement is interdependent of one's social others. We proposed that this cultural characteristic could be exemplified in the achievement goal orientation and tested the notion with university students in a collectivistic community-Singapore. A socially oriented achievement goal construct was developed by taking into consideration the significant social others in the students' lives. A measuring instrument was established with a sample of Singaporean Chinese university students (N = 196; 144 females and 52 males); its relationships to achievement motives, goals, and consequences were examined. Although the socially oriented achievement goal items were originally constructed from four categories of social others, confirmatory factor analysis suggested a unifactor structure. Results showed that the socially oriented goal was related positively with students' performance goal, mastery goal, and competitive motive; it bore no relationship to mastery motive, work ethic, and interest in learning; and it predicted negatively future engagement. After the effects of mastery and performance goals were controlled for, the socially oriented goal did not predict test anxiety. PMID:22022792

  6. 38 CFR 21.8360 - Satisfactory conduct and cooperation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Satisfactory conduct and cooperation. 21.8360 Section 21.8360 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AND EDUCATION Vocational Training and Rehabilitation for Certain Children of Vietnam Veterans...

  7. 34 CFR 668.34 - Satisfactory academic progress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... graduate students, and educational programs established by the institution; (3) The policy provides that a... EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION STUDENT ASSISTANCE GENERAL PROVISIONS Student Eligibility § 668.34... reasonable satisfactory academic progress policy for determining whether an otherwise eligible student...

  8. 34 CFR 668.34 - Satisfactory academic progress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... graduate students, and educational programs established by the institution; (3) The policy provides that a... EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION STUDENT ASSISTANCE GENERAL PROVISIONS Student Eligibility § 668.34... reasonable satisfactory academic progress policy for determining whether an otherwise eligible student...

  9. 34 CFR 668.34 - Satisfactory academic progress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... graduate students, and educational programs established by the institution; (3) The policy provides that a... EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION STUDENT ASSISTANCE GENERAL PROVISIONS Student Eligibility § 668.34... reasonable satisfactory academic progress policy for determining whether an otherwise eligible student...

  10. 16 CFR 1105.3 - A more satisfactory standard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false A more satisfactory standard. 1105.3 Section 1105.3 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS CONTRIBUTIONS TO COSTS OF PARTICIPANTS IN DEVELOPMENT OF CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY STANDARDS § 1105.3 A...

  11. 16 CFR 1105.3 - A more satisfactory standard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false A more satisfactory standard. 1105.3 Section 1105.3 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS CONTRIBUTIONS TO COSTS OF PARTICIPANTS IN DEVELOPMENT OF CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY STANDARDS § 1105.3 A...

  12. 41 CFR 102-117.110 - What is satisfactory service?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... MANAGEMENT Business Rules To Consider Before Shipping Freight or Household Goods § 102-117.110 What is... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What is satisfactory service? 102-117.110 Section 102-117.110 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal...

  13. Juxtaposing Math Self-Efficacy and Self-Concept as Predictors of Long-Term Achievement Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Philip David; Marsh, Herbert W.; Ciarrochi, Joseph; Marshall, Sarah; Abduljabbar, Adel Salah

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we tested the hypothesis that self-efficacy and self-concept reflect different underlying processes and both are critical to understanding long-term achievement outcomes. Although both types of self-belief are well established in educational psychology, research comparing and contrasting their relationship with achievement has been…

  14. Do marginal investments made by NHS healthcare commissioners in the UK produce the outcomes they hope to achieve? Observational study

    PubMed Central

    O'Cathain, Alicia; Sampson, Fiona; Strong, Mark; Pickin, Mark; Goyder, Elizabeth; Dixon, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of targeted marginal annual investments by local healthcare commissioners on the outcomes they expected to achieve with these investments. Design Controlled before and after study. Setting: 152 commissioning organisations (primary care trusts) in England. Methods National surveys of commissioning managers in 2009 and 2010 to identify: the largest marginal investments made in four key conditions/services (diabetes, coronary heart disease, chronic pulmonary airways disease and emergency and urgent care) in 2008/2009 and 2009/2010; the outcomes commissioners expected to achieve with these investments; and the processes commissioners used to develop these investments. Collation of routinely available data on outcomes commissioners expected from these investments over the period 2007/2008 to 2010/2011. Results 51% (77/152) of commissioners agreed to participate in the survey in 2009 and 60% (91/152) in 2010. Around half reported targeted marginal investments in each condition/service each year. Routine data on many of the outcomes they expected to achieve through these investments were not available. Also, commissioners expected some outcomes to be achieved beyond the time scale of our study. Therefore, only a limited number of outcomes of investments were tested. Outcomes included directly standardised emergency admission rates for the four conditions/services, and the percentage of patients with diabetes with glycated haemoglobin <7. There was no evidence that targeted marginal investments reduced emergency admission rates. There was evidence of an improvement in blood glucose management for diabetes for commissioners investing to improve diabetes care but this was compromised by a change in how the outcome was measured in different years. This investment was unlikely to be cost-effective. Conclusions Commissioners made marginal investments in specific health conditions and services with the aim of improving a wide range of outcomes

  15. Academic abilities in children and adolescents with a history of autism spectrum disorders who have achieved optimal outcomes.

    PubMed

    Troyb, Eva; Orinstein, Alyssa; Tyson, Katherine; Helt, Molly; Eigsti, Inge-Marie; Stevens, Michael; Fein, Deborah

    2014-04-01

    This study examines the academic abilities of children and adolescents who were once diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder, but who no longer meet diagnostic criteria for this disorder. These individuals have achieved social and language skills within the average range for their ages, receive little or no school support, and are referred to as having achieved "optimal outcomes." Performance of 32 individuals who achieved optimal outcomes, 41 high-functioning individuals with a current autism spectrum disorder diagnosis (high-functioning autism), and 34 typically developing peers was compared on measures of decoding, reading comprehension, mathematical problem solving, and written expression. Groups were matched on age, sex, and nonverbal IQ; however, the high-functioning autism group scored significantly lower than the optimal outcome and typically developing groups on verbal IQ. All three groups performed in the average range on all subtests measured, and no significant differences were found in performance of the optimal outcome and typically developing groups. The high-functioning autism group scored significantly lower on subtests of reading comprehension and mathematical problem solving than the optimal outcome group. These findings suggest that the academic abilities of individuals who achieved optimal outcomes are similar to those of their typically developing peers, even in areas where individuals who have retained their autism spectrum disorder diagnoses exhibit some ongoing difficulty. PMID:24096312

  16. Executive functioning in individuals with a history of ASDs who have achieved optimal outcomes.

    PubMed

    Troyb, Eva; Rosenthal, Michael; Eigsti, Inge-Marie; Kelley, Elizabeth; Tyson, Katherine; Orinstein, Alyssa; Barton, Marianne; Fein, Deborah

    2014-01-01

    Executive functioning (EF) is examined among children and adolescents once diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD), but who no longer meet diagnostic criteria. These individuals have average social and language skills, receive minimal school support and are considered to have achieved "optimal outcomes" (OOs). Since residual impairments in these individuals might be expected in deficits central to autism, and in developmentally advanced skills, EF was examined in 34 individuals who achieved OOs, 43 individuals with high-functioning autism (HFA), and 34 typically developing (TD) peers. Groups were matched on age (M = 13.49), gender, and nonverbal IQ (NVIQ) but differed on verbal IQ (VIQ; HFA < TD, OO). On direct assessment, all three groups demonstrated average EF; however, the OO and HFA groups exhibited more impulsivity and less efficient planning and problem-solving than the TD group, and more HFA participants exhibited below average inhibition than did OO and TD participants. Parent-report measures revealed average EF among the OO and TD groups; however, the OO group exhibited more difficulty than the TD group on set-shifting and working memory. HFA participants demonstrated more difficulty on all parent-reported EF domains, with a clinical impairment in attention-shifting. Results suggest that EF in OO appears to be within the average range, even for functions that were impaired among individuals with HFA. Despite their average performance, however, the OO and TD groups differed on measures of impulsivity, set-shifting, problem-solving, working memory, and planning, suggesting that the OO group does not have the above-average EF scores of the TD group despite their high-average IQs. PMID:23731181

  17. Extreme masking: achieving predictable outcomes in challenging situations with lithium disilicate bonded restorations.

    PubMed

    Hatai, Yugo

    2014-01-01

    In contemporary dentistry, we have a vast range of materials to choose from, and metal free restorations have become the premier materials for achieving the ultimate in both esthetics and durability. Metal-free restorations are utilized with more conservative preparations to preserve the vital natural dentition, and have proven to be superior alternatives to traditional porcelain-fused-to-metal (PFM) restorations in many cases. There are always "pros and cons" when selecting materials, and to make the best choice it is essential for dental professionals to plan precisely and understand their options in any clinical situation. Selecting suitable materials and techniques involves consideration of the following factors: - Esthetic zone. - Required strength based on the patient's occlusion/dental habits. - Preparation reduction. - Position of the margin. - Type of restoration/preparation. - The treating clinician's philosophy. - Stump shade. Final shade. One of the most significant challenges in the metal-free dentistry is the reproduction of natural dentition without the influence of a "negative stump" - a very dark or metal core showing through the final restorations. There are many factors to be considered when working on such a case, and controlling the opacity of the coping and crown is the key to success. This article presents a unique "outside of the box" technique that provides consistent, predictable and durable restorations, which provide the best possible esthetic outcome. PMID:24765627

  18. Restricted and Repetitive Behaviors in Individuals with a History of ASDs Who Have Achieved Optimal Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Troyb, Eva; Orinstein, Alyssa; Tyson, Katherine; Eigsti, Inge-Marie; Naigles, Letitia; Fein, Deborah

    2014-01-01

    Studies of Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs) suggest that Restricted and Repetitive Behaviors (RRBs) are particularly difficult to remediate. We examined present and past RRBs in 34 individuals who achieved optimal outcomes (OOs; lost their ASD diagnosis), 45 high-functioning individuals with ASD (HFA) and 34 typically developing (TD) peers. The OO group exhibited minimal residual RRBs at the time of the study. All OO participants were reported to have at least one RRB in early childhood and almost 90% met the RRB cutoff for ASD in early childhood, but RRBs were not more present in the OO than the TD group at the time of the study. History of RRBs in the HFA and OO groups differed only in oversensitivity to noise and insistence on sameness. Reports of current behavior indicated that RRB’s had almost totally disappeared in the OO group. Thus, although RRB’s were present in the OO group in childhood, they resolved along with social and communication deficits. PMID:25030967

  19. Transforming Course Evaluations into a Meaningful Measure of Student Outcomes Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCullough, Christopher A.

    2008-01-01

    Over the past few years, the author had the good fortune to engage many faculty and administrators in conversations about student outcomes assessment. The author has discovered that many faculty and administrators associate course valuations with student outcomes assessment measures. He also found that no items about student learning outcomes are…

  20. A Student Outcomes Typology for Community Colleges: Identifying Achievers with Longitudinal Cohort Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boughan, Karl; Clagett, Craig A.

    A study was conducted by Prince George's Community College, in Maryland, to determine outcomes after 4 years for the 2,643 first-time students who entered the college in fall 1990. The analysis was based on an outcomes typology developed at the college which defines outcomes as award and transfer; transfer without an award; award without transfer;…

  1. Generating Outcome Measurements: Achievement and Attitudes. A Guide to Educational Outcome Measurements and Their Uses. Seminar No. 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mushkin, Selma J.; Billings, Bradley B.

    This guide is essentially designed as a teaching aid for those who would inform planners, officials of educational ministries, school administrators, principals, and teachers about educational outcome measurements. In outline and graphic form, the guide presents topics for discussion in a seminar dealing with how to obtain information on…

  2. Longitudinal Outcomes of Start Time Delay on Sleep, Behavior, and Achievement in High School

    PubMed Central

    Thacher, Pamela V.; Onyper, Serge V.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: To establish whether sleep, health, mood, behavior, and academics improved after a 45-minute delay in high school start time, and whether changes persisted longitudinally. Methods: We collected data from school records and student self-report across a number of domains at baseline (May 2012) and at two follow-up time points (November 2012 and May 2013), at a public high school in upstate New York. Students enrolled during academic years (AY) 2011–2012 and 2012–2013 completed the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index; the DASS-21; the “Owl-Lark” Scale; the Daytime Sleepiness Index; and a brief self-report of health. Reports from school records regarding attendance, tardiness, disciplinary violations, and academic performance were collected for AY 2010–2011 through 2013–2014. Results: Students delayed but did not extend their sleep period; we found lasting improvements in tardiness and disciplinary violations after the start-time delay, but no changes to other variables. At the first follow-up, students reported 20 minutes longer sleep, driven by later rise times and stable bed times. At the second follow-up, students maintained later rise times but delayed bedtimes, returning total sleep to baseline levels. A delay in rise time, paralleling the delay in the start time that occurred, resulted in less tardiness and decreased disciplinary incidents, but larger improvements to sleep patterns may be necessary to affect health, attendance, sleepiness, and academic performance. Conclusions: Later start times improved tardiness and disciplinary issues at this school district. A delay in start time may be a necessary but not sufficient means to increase sleep time and may depend on preexisting individual differences. Commentary: A commentary on this article appears in this issue on page 267. Citation: Thacher PV, Onyper SV. Longitudinal outcomes of start time delay on sleep, behavior, and achievement in high school. SLEEP 2016;39(2):271–281. PMID

  3. Comparing the performance of English mental health providers in achieving patient outcomes.

    PubMed

    Moran, Valerie; Jacobs, Rowena

    2015-09-01

    Evidence on provider payment systems that incorporate patient outcomes is limited for mental health care. In England, funding for mental health care services is changing to a prospective payment system with a future objective of linking some part of provider payment to outcomes. This research examines performance of mental health providers offering hospital and community services, in order to investigate if some are delivering better outcomes. Outcomes are measured using the Health of the Nation Outcome Scales (HoNOS) - a clinician-rated routine outcome measure (CROM) mandated for national use. We use data from the Mental Health Minimum Data Set (MHMDS) - a dataset on specialist mental health care with national coverage - for the years 2011/12 and 2012/13 with a final estimation sample of 305,960 observations with follow-up HoNOS scores. A hierarchical ordered probit model is used and outcomes are risk adjusted with independent variables reflecting demographic, need, severity and social indicators. A hierarchical linear model is also estimated with the follow-up total HoNOS score as the dependent variable and the baseline total HoNOS score included as a risk-adjuster. Provider performance is captured by a random effect that is quantified using Empirical Bayes methods. We find that worse outcomes are associated with severity and better outcomes with older age and social support. After adjusting outcomes for various risk factors, variations in performance are still evident across providers. This suggests that if the intention to link some element of provider payment to outcomes becomes a reality, some providers may gain financially whilst others may lose. The paper contributes to the limited literature on risk adjustment of outcomes and performance assessment of providers in mental health in the context of prospective activity-based payment systems. PMID:26218853

  4. The Secondary Head of Department and the Achievement of Exceptional Student Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dinham, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore the role of the secondary Head of Department (HoD) in leading teams producing exceptional education outcomes in Years 7-10 in New South Wales (NSW, Australia) government schools. Design/methodology/approach: Sites where exceptional educational outcomes were believed to be occurring were selected…

  5. Can Cooperative Learning Achieve the Four Learning Outcomes of Physical Education? A Review of Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casey, Ashley; Goodyear, Victoria A.

    2015-01-01

    Physical learning, cognitive learning, social learning, and affective learning are positioned as the legitimate learning outcomes of physical education. It has been argued that these four learning outcomes go toward facilitating students' engagement with the physically active life (Bailey et al., 2009; Kirk, 2013). With Cooperative Learning…

  6. Achieving Faculty Buy-In: Motivation Performance in Learning Outcome Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sujitparapitaya, Sutee

    2014-01-01

    Despite the great value of student learning outcome assessment (SLOA), faculty have not fully embraced the assessment movement, and many remain locked in debates on its merits. To gain faculty buy-in and explain why many faculty were motivated to engage in outcome assessment, the modified CANE (Commitment And Necessary Effort) model was used to…

  7. The Effects of Physical Activity and Physical Fitness on Children's Achievement and Cognitive Outcomes: A Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fedewa, Alicia L.; Ahn, Soyeon

    2011-01-01

    It is common knowledge that physical activity leads to numerous health and psychological benefits. However, the relationship between children's physical activity and academic achievement has been debated in the literature. Some studies have found strong, positive relationships between physical activity and cognitive outcomes, while other studies…

  8. It's Not Just "What" You Say: Verbal and Nonverbal Skills Help Leaders Address Challenges and Achieve Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zoller, Kendall; Lahera, Antonia Issa; Normore, Anthony H.

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a story about two school leaders in a large Southern California urban district who used skills developed in a university school leadership program to create rapport, empathy, and trust while leading through challenging situations and achieving actionable outcomes. In addition to developing relationships in support of…

  9. 20 CFR 411.575 - How does the EN request payment for milestones or outcome payment months achieved by a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... outcome payment months achieved by a beneficiary who assigned a ticket to the EN? The EN (or State VR... provided as described in the IWP/IPE. (a) Milestone payments. (1) We will pay the EN (or State VR agency... VR agency's) elected payment system in effect at the time the beneficiary assigned a ticket to the...

  10. 20 CFR 411.575 - How does the EN request payment for milestones or outcome payment months achieved by a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... outcome payment months achieved by a beneficiary who assigned a ticket to the EN? The EN (or State VR... provided as described in the IWP/IPE. (a) Milestone payments. (1) We will pay the EN (or State VR agency... VR agency's) elected payment system in effect at the time the beneficiary assigned a ticket to the...

  11. 20 CFR 411.575 - How does the EN request payment for milestones or outcome payment months achieved by a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... outcome payment months achieved by a beneficiary who assigned a ticket to the EN? The EN (or State VR... provided as described in the IWP/IPE. (a) Milestone payments. (1) We will pay the EN (or State VR agency... VR agency's) elected payment system in effect at the time the beneficiary assigned a ticket to the...

  12. 20 CFR 411.575 - How does the EN request payment for milestones or outcome payment months achieved by a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... outcome payment months achieved by a beneficiary who assigned a ticket to the EN? The EN (or State VR... provided as described in the IWP/IPE. (a) Milestone payments. (1) We will pay the EN (or State VR agency... VR agency's) elected payment system in effect at the time the beneficiary assigned a ticket to the...

  13. Total Quality Management as a Philosophical and Organizational Framework To Achieve Outcomes-Based Education and Effective Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valesky, Thomas C.; And Others

    The educational establishment is under a great deal of pressure to improve and to prove to its critics that it has done so. This paper develops three concepts to support its thesis: effective schools, the change process, and outcomes-based education (OBE). To achieve effective schools, major change must take place. Yet change is not easy for…

  14. Schooling and Cognitive Achievements of Children in Morocco: Can the Government Improve Outcomes? World Bank Discussion Papers, No. 264.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khandker, Shahidur R.; And Others

    This paper uses data from the Morocco Living Standard Survey in an econometric investigation of the relative effectiveness of supply- and demand-side factors in determining educational outcomes. A wide range of factors are examined that may be responsible for differences in grade completion levels and achievement among sexes, regions, and urban…

  15. Challenges to the Development and Implementation of Public Policies to Achieve Animal Welfare Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Margaret

    2011-01-01

    Simple Summary Many countries have enacted legislation to protect animals. In the 1800's the primary concern was to protect animals from cruelty but more recent legislative changes also seek to ensure that human beings uphold a duty of care towards those animals for which they are responsible. Today animal welfare concerns all aspects of our interaction with other animals. Although, the diversity of views in society can present challenges, the whole community needs to be engaged in the development and implementation of policies and initiatives so as to achieve sustainable improvements in animal welfare. Abstract Although there is a long-established tradition of concern for the welfare of animals, it was not until the mid 1800's that governments sought to enact legislation to protect animals from cruelty. In the 1950's, questions concerning animal welfare re-emerged and in the ensuing years have been an on-going focus of government activities. These developments occurred against a backdrop of significant social change but there are important differences in what now underpins and informs these considerations. In the formulation and implementation of public policies, governments look for a course of action that represents and protects the interests of the community; the process may be challenging with competing interests but the final determination seeks a middle ground that best meets the needs and interests of the community as a whole. When policy development concerns our relationship with other animals, the complexity of this relationship presents particular challenges not only to the formulation of policies but also to the evaluation of outcomes. Notably, the depth of feelings and diversity of views in our community reflect the complex social, cultural and personal dimensions of this relationship. The use of animals for scientific purposes remains one of the most contentious animal welfare issues primarily because when animals are used for these purposes, accepted

  16. Does Aggregate School-Wide Achievement Mediate Fifth Grade Outcomes for Former Early Childhood Education Participants?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curenton, Stephanie M.; Dong, Nianbo; Shen, Xiangjin

    2015-01-01

    This study used a multilevel mediation model to test the theory that former early childhood education (ECE) attendees' 5th grade achievement is mediated by the aggregate school-wide achievement of their elementary school. Aggregate school-wide achievement was defined as the percentage of 5th graders in a school who were at/above academic…

  17. Dominant Achievement Goals of Older Workers and Their Relationship with Motivation-Related Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Lange, Annet H.; Van Yperen, Nico W.; Van der Heijden, Beatrice I. J. M.; Bal, P. Matthijs

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to increase our insight into older employees' achievement motivation by examining the prevalence of dominant achievement goals among a "unique" group of 172 Dutch workers who remained active after their post-statutory retirement age. Moreover, we investigated how their dominant achievement goals were linked to…

  18. A novel corrective approach to achieve satisfactory function of a 'sunk' colostomy.

    PubMed

    Siddique, K; Prud'Homme, G; Samuel, N; Avil-Griffiths, K; Offori, T

    2016-05-01

    Introduction Creation of gastrointestinal stomas is a common colorectal procedure associated with early or late complications, some of which demand advanced technical skills and expertise for optimal management. Case History A 63-year-old male underwent a defunctioning loop colostomy for locally advanced rectal cancer with liver metastasis. Three months later, he had developed a skinfold over his stoma that resulted in a horizontal skin crease traversing through the stoma, causing the stoma to 'sink' leading to obliteration of the stomal opening. This scenario led to ineffective attachment of a stoma appliance, resulting in painful peristomal ulcers. After excision of the anterior abdominal wall, assessment of colostomy opening was carried out, followed by closure of the subcutaneous tissues and drain fixation. An elevated colostomy with an adequate functional opening was seen after wound closure. The patient made an uneventful recovery and was discharged home. After 3 weeks, he had a fully opened, normally functioning colostomy and peristomal ulcers were almost healed. Conclusions This case highlights the challenges of stoma management, its related risks, avoidance of delay in chemotherapy, a patient wish for early return to work, and the novel approach we adopted to deal with these issues. PMID:27087345

  19. Achievements in mental health outcome measurement in Australia: Reflections on progress made by the Australian Mental Health Outcomes and Classification Network (AMHOCN)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Australia’s National Mental Health Strategy has emphasised the quality, effectiveness and efficiency of services, and has promoted the collection of outcomes and casemix data as a means of monitoring these. All public sector mental health services across Australia now routinely report outcomes and casemix data. Since late-2003, the Australian Mental Health Outcomes and Classification Network (AMHOCN) has received, processed, analysed and reported on outcome data at a national level, and played a training and service development role. This paper documents the history of AMHOCN’s activities and achievements, with a view to providing lessons for others embarking on similar exercises. Method We conducted a desktop review of relevant documents to summarise the history of AMHOCN. Results AMHOCN has operated within a framework that has provided an overarching structure to guide its activities but has been flexible enough to allow it to respond to changing priorities. With no precedents to draw upon, it has undertaken activities in an iterative fashion with an element of ‘trial and error’. It has taken a multi-pronged approach to ensuring that data are of high quality: developing innovative technical solutions; fostering ‘information literacy’; maximising the clinical utility of data at a local level; and producing reports that are meaningful to a range of audiences. Conclusion AMHOCN’s efforts have contributed to routine outcome measurement gaining a firm foothold in Australia’s public sector mental health services. PMID:22640939

  20. Outcomes of patients with myelodysplastic syndromes who achieve stable disease after treatment with hypomethylating agents.

    PubMed

    Nazha, Aziz; Sekeres, Mikkael A; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Barnard, John; Al Ali, Najla H; Roboz, Gail J; Steensma, David P; DeZern, Amy E; Zimmerman, Cassie; Jabbour, Elias J; Zell, Katrina; List, Alan F; Kantarjian, Hagop M; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw P; Komrokji, Rami S

    2016-02-01

    Treatment with hypomethylating agents (HMAs) improves overall survival (OS) in patients who achieve a response of stable disease (SD) or better (complete remission [CR], partial remission [PR], or hematologic improvement [HI]). It is not well established if patients who achieve SD at 4-6 months of therapy should be offered different therapies to optimize their response or continue with the same regimen. Clinical data were obtained from the MDS Clinical Research Consortium database. SD was defined as no evidence of progression and without achievement of any other responses. Of 291 patients treated with AZA or DAC, 55% achieved their best response (BR) at 4-6 months. Among patients with SD at 4-6 months, 29 (20%) achieved a better response at a later treatment time point. Younger patients with lower bone marrow blast percentages, and intermediate risk per IPSS-R were more likely to achieve a better response (CR, PR, or HI) after SD at 4-6 months. Patients with SD who subsequently achieved CR had superior OS compared to patients who remained with SD (28.1 vs. 14.4 months, respectively, p=.04). In conclusion, patients treated with HMAs who achieves CR after a SD status had longer survival with continuous treatment after 6 months. PMID:26777537

  1. Outcomes of patients with myelodysplastic syndromes who achieve stable disease after treatment with hypomethylating agents

    PubMed Central

    Nazha, Aziz; Sekeres, Mikkael A.; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Barnard, John; Al Ali, Najla H.; Roboz, Gail J.; Steensma, David P.; DeZern, Amy E.; Zimmerman, Cassie; Jabbour, Elias J.; Zell, Katrina; List, Alan F.; Kantarjian, Hagop M.; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw P.; Komrokji, Rami S.

    2016-01-01

    Treatment with hypomethylating agents (HMAs) improves overall survival (OS) in patients who achieve a response of stable disease (SD) or better (complete remission [CR], partial remission [PR], or hematologic improvement [HI]). It is not well established if patients who achieve SD at 4–6 months of therapy should be offered different therapies to optimize their response or continue with the same regimen. Clinical data were obtained from the MDS Clinical Research Consortium database. SD was defined as no evidence of progression and without achievement of any other responses. Of 291 patients treated with AZA or DAC, 55% achieved their best response (BR) at 4–6 months. Among patients with SD at 4–6 months, 29 (20%) achieved a better response at a later treatment time point. Younger patients with lower bone marrow blast percentages, and intermediate risk per IPSS-R were more likely to achieve a better response (CR, PR, or HI) after SD at 4–6 months. Patients with SD who subsequently achieved CR had superior OS compared to patients who remained with SD (28.1 vs. 14.4 months, respectively, p =.04). In conclusion, patients treated with HMAs who achieves CR after a SD status had longer survival with continuous treatment after 6 months. PMID:26777537

  2. School Factors Explaining Achievement on Cognitive and Affective Outcomes: Establishing a Dynamic Model of Educational Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Creemers, Bert; Kyriakides, Leonidas

    2010-01-01

    The dynamic model of educational effectiveness defines school level factors associated with student outcomes. Emphasis is given to the two main aspects of policy, evaluation, and improvement in schools which affect quality of teaching and learning at both the level of teachers and students: a) teaching and b) school learning environment. Five…

  3. Achieving Course Objectives and Student Learning Outcomes: Seeking Student Feedback on Their Progress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Song, Danni; Loyle-Langholz, Anne; Higbee, Jeanne L.; Zhou, Zhou

    2013-01-01

    Most postsecondary faculty in the United States include course goals or objectives as key components of their syllabi. In addition to individual course objectives, many institutions have identified institution-wide student learning outcomes (SLOs). This paper describes one faculty member's attempts to elicit feedback from students regarding their…

  4. Narrowing the Field: Achieve Engagement Outcomes Faster by Targeting Potential Alumni Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coolman, Jason

    2013-01-01

    Traditional alumni relations programs are about prompting graduates to do something--anything--for or with the institution. In this article, the author proposes something different: an outcome-oriented alumni relations programming model, which the author calls "strategic advancement," that focuses on smaller, targeted sets of graduates…

  5. Educational Attainment of Foster Youth: Achievement and Graduation Outcomes for Children in State Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burley, Mason; Halpern, Mina

    This report summarizes findings from a statewide analysis of the educational attainment of foster youth in Washington's public school system. It analyzes various factors related to educational success, comparing the outcomes of youth in long-term foster care with the state's school-age population. The report merges data from the child welfare…

  6. Differences in Teachers' Perceptions of the Causes of Positive Versus Negative Student Achievement Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guskey, Thomas R.

    Past research on teachers' causal attributions has shown little relation between perceptions of responsibility for positive versus negative student learning outcomes. In this study, Weiner's model for causal attributions was employed to explore these perceived attributional differences. Data were gathered from 184 teachers from two metropolitan…

  7. Using a Triad Leadership Model at the System Level to Achieve Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Batcheller, Joyce

    2016-06-01

    Nurses must partner with physicians and other health professionals in redesigning healthcare. What do nurse executives need to learn to participate and lead as part of a highly functioning executive triad? In this column, a former system chief nursing officer will share personal experiences and highlights of outcomes that were improved. PMID:27214330

  8. Students' Motivational Profiles and Achievement Outcomes in Physical Education: A Self-Determination Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boiche, Julie C. S.; Sarrazin, Philippe G.; Pelletier, Luc G.; Grouzet, Frederick M. E.; Chanal, Julien P.

    2008-01-01

    Previous studies in education have inspected the relations between students' autonomous versus controlled motivation and relevant outcomes. In most of those studies a global index of self-determined motivation was created. The purpose of this article was to examine (a) how the different types of motivation proposed by Self-Determination Theory…

  9. Guide to Success for Organisations in Achieving Employment Outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giddy, Kristine; Lopez, Jessica; Redman, Anne

    2009-01-01

    Helping Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander job-seekers find and keep a job has been the focus of recent reforms announced by the Australian Government. This guide describes seven essential characteristics of employment service organisations that lead to successful employment outcomes for their Indigenous clients. Based on a selection of…

  10. The effects of physical activity and physical fitness on children's achievement and cognitive outcomes: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Fedewa, Alicia L; Ahn, Soyeon

    2011-09-01

    It is common knowledge that physical activity leads to numerous health and psychological benefits. However; the relationship between children's physical activity and academic achievement has been debated in the literature. Some studies have found strong, positive relationships between physical activity and cognitive outcomes, while other studies have reported small, negative associations. This study was a comprehensive, quantitative synthesis of the literature, using a total of 59 studies from 1947 to 2009 for analysis. Results indicated a significant and positive effect of physical activity on children's achievement and cognitive outcomes, with aerobic exercise having the greatest effect. A number of moderator variables were also found to play a significant role in this relationship. Findings are discussed in light of improving children's academic performance and changing school-based policy. PMID:21957711

  11. Student achievement outcomes in a scaling urban standards-based science reform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geier, Robert R.

    This work examines the effects on achievement of a multifaceted reform supporting standards based science teaching in urban middle schools. Several project-based inquiry science curriculum units were introduced to the Detroit public schools, supported by aligned professional development, learning technologies, and administrative policy. The units scaled to over 20,000 students in 26 schools over 6 years, producing unique large-scale longitudinal achievement data on curriculum reform. Chapters include a review of achievement studies on scaling reforms, an examination of the impact of the inquiry curriculum units on state standardized test results, and an investigation of the effect of scaling and teacher experience on student learning. Two cohorts of 7th and 8th graders that participated in the curricula are compared with the remainder of the district population using state standardized test results. Both the initial (n = 760) and scaled up (n = 1,043) cohorts show higher science content understanding and process skills, and significantly higher pass rates. The effect does not attenuate with scaling, is greater for students who experience an inquiry curriculum in both 7th and 8th grade, and reduces the gender gap in achievement for urban African-American boys. Scaling effects as the curriculum innovation matured over 4--6 years are examined using pretest/posttest assessments for two curricula involving 6,396 and 5,043 students respectively. There is no attenuation in student achievement as the innovation scales and outside support fades. Student achievement shows significant gains in the first two years of curriculum enactment, before reaching a stable plateau. By contrast, individual teachers show yearly improvement in student achievement on average as they gain experience with curricula. The absence of a plateau suggests that stability of teacher staffing and administrative support for reform are important for maintaining and improving achievement. Together, the

  12. Achievable Convergence Angle and the Effect of Preparation Design on the Clinical Outcome of Full Veneer Crowns in Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Soukup, Jason W.; Snyder, Christopher J.; Karls, Tina L.; Riehl, Jessica

    2012-01-01

    Summary It is widely accepted that the convergence angle of a full veneer crown preparation should be as close to parallel as possible to attain adequate retention/resistance. The shape of the dog’s canine tooth limits the veterinary dentists’ ability to achieve the recommended convergence angle. However, the clinically achievable convergence angle of the canine tooth in dogs has not been evaluated. In addition, the convergence angle and other physical properties of a preparation, such as height and base diameter, have been shown to affect the retention/resistance of full veneer crowns, in vitro. This effect has not been evaluated clinically in the dog. Physical properties of 32 stone dies from full veneer crowns of canine teeth were studied to evaluate the clinically achievable convergence angle and the potential effect physical properties of the preparation had on the clinical outcome of the restoration. The clinically achievable convergence angle was much higher than the current recommendation. There was an association, albeit not statistically significant, between physical properties of a preparation (convergence angle, height, base diameter) and the clinical outcome of the restoration. PMID:21916370

  13. Interdisciplinary mathematics and science: Characteristics, forms, and related effect sizes for student achievement and affective outcomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurley, Marlene M.

    1999-12-01

    This study provides an analytic description of quasi-experimental studies that may either support or deny the wisdom of educational reform through interdisciplinary mathematics and science. Interdisciplinarity is examined on two dimensions, the philosophic and the pedagogic, and by two methodologies, meta-analytic and qualitative, in a search for greater understanding of the definitions, forms, characteristics, and effects from studies of interdisciplinary mathematics and science. Thirty-four studies were collected from a search of the literature that spanned the century, the grade levels, and included many forms of interdisciplinarity. Several research questions were asked: (1) What forms of interdisciplinarity, philosophically and practically, are represented by the studies? (2) What are their qualitative effects in school settings? (3) What are the characteristics of interdisciplinary quasi-experimental research? (4) What achievement effects typify the interdisciplinary comparative studies? (5) What factors account for variation in these achievement effects? (6) What claims or criticisms regarding interdisciplinarity are supported or refuted by the qualitative analysis of forms and effects and the quantitative meta-analytic study? Results from this study support the concerns that terms of interdisciplinarity are used without regard for context and that there is a trend toward a great diversity of ideas regarding the nature of interdisciplinary education. Student achievement data were provided by the 34 studies for mathematics and/or science. The mean effect sizes for student achievement were computed as: mathematics achievement, .27 (SE = .09); science achievement, .37 (SE = .12). Curricular materials developed by teachers were significantly less related to student achievement than materials developed by researchers or commercially. The methods of integration employed by the 34 studies formed a continuum from sequenced instructional integration to total

  14. Including Emotional Intelligence in Pharmacy Curricula to Help Achieve CAPE Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Michael H; Fierke, Kerry K; Sucher, Brandon J; Janke, Kristin K

    2015-05-25

    The importance of emotional intelligence (EI) for effective teamwork and leadership within the workplace is increasingly apparent. As suggested by the 2013 CAPE Outcomes, we recommend that colleges and schools of pharmacy consider EI-related competencies to build self-awareness and professionalism among students. In this Statement, we provide two examples of the introduction of EI into pharmacy curricula. In addition, we provide a 4-phase process based on recommendations developed by EI experts for structuring and planning EI development. Finally, we make 9 recommendations' to inform the process of including EI in pharmacy curricula. PMID:26089557

  15. Including Emotional Intelligence in Pharmacy Curricula to Help Achieve CAPE Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Fierke, Kerry K.; Sucher, Brandon J.; Janke, Kristin K.

    2015-01-01

    The importance of emotional intelligence (EI) for effective teamwork and leadership within the workplace is increasingly apparent. As suggested by the 2013 CAPE Outcomes, we recommend that colleges and schools of pharmacy consider EI-related competencies to build self-awareness and professionalism among students. In this Statement, we provide two examples of the introduction of EI into pharmacy curricula. In addition, we provide a 4-phase process based on recommendations developed by EI experts for structuring and planning EI development. Finally, we make 9 recommendations’ to inform the process of including EI in pharmacy curricula. PMID:26089557

  16. What Works Clearinghouse Quick Review: "KIPP Middle Schools: Impacts on Achievement and Other Outcomes, Final Report"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2013

    2013-01-01

    This study examined whether attending a Knowledge is Power Program (KIPP) middle school improved students' reading, math, social studies, and science achievement for up to 4 years following enrollment. The study reported that students attending KIPP middle schools scored statistically significantly higher than matched students on all of the state…

  17. SMS-Based Learning in Tertiary Education: Achievement and Attitudinal Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz, Yaacov J.

    2013-01-01

    SMS delivery platforms are being increasingly used at the university level to enhance student achievement as well as traits and attitudes related to the learning process. SMS delivery provides access to learning materials without being limited by space or time and sophisticated technological advances in SMS delivery have led to enhanced learner…

  18. Impacts of Comprehensive Reading Instruction on Diverse Outcomes of Low- and High-Achieving Readers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guthrie, John T.; McRae, Angela; Coddington, Cassandra S.; Klauda, Susan Lutz; Wigfield, Allan; Barbosa, Pedro

    2009-01-01

    Low-achieving readers in Grade 5 often lack comprehension strategies, domain knowledge, word recognition skills, fluency, and motivation to read. Students with such multiple reading needs seem likely to benefit from instruction that supports each of these reading processes. The authors tested this expectation experimentally by comparing the…

  19. BOY SCOUT 5 A DAY ACHIEVEMENT BADGE: OUTCOME RESULTS OF A TROOP & INTERNET INTERVENTION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective: A Boy Scout Five-A-Day Achievement Badge program (SAD), with both troop and Internet-based activities was developed and implemented, and its effect on fruit-juice (FJ) and low-fat vegetable (LV) consumption and psychosocial mediators evaluated. Methods: The nine-week program included 20 ...

  20. 5 A DAY ACHIEVEMENT BADGE FOR AFRICAN AMERICAN BOY SCOUTS: PILOT OUTCOME RESULTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Boy Scouts are an important channel to complement school-based programs to enable boys to eat more fruit, 100% juice, and vegetables (FJV) for chronic disease prevention. The "5 a Day Achievement Badge" program was presented on a pilot study basis to African-American Boy Scout troops in Houston. Tro...

  1. Student-Level Analysis of Year 2 (2004-2005) Achievement Outcomes for Tennessee Charter Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Steven M.; McDonald, Aaron J.; McSparrin-Gallagher, Brenda; Slawson, Deborah L.

    2006-01-01

    This report presents student-level achievement results for two groups of schools in Tennessee: (a) four charter schools that began operation in 2003-2004; and (b) three new charter schools that were established in 2004-2005. These two cohorts were therefore completing their second and first academic years, respectively, at the time the achievement…

  2. Differences between African American and European American First-Year College Students in the Relationship between Self-Efficacy, Outcome Expectations, and Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeFreitas, Stacie Craft

    2012-01-01

    First-year African American and European American college students were surveyed to examine ethnic differences in how their social cognitive beliefs (self-efficacy and outcome expectations) influenced their academic achievement. It was hypothesized that outcome expectations may better explain academic achievement for African Americans due to the…

  3. Can developing countries achieve adequate improvements in child health outcomes without engaging the private sector?

    PubMed Central

    Bustreo, Flavia; Harding, April; Axelsson, Henrik

    2003-01-01

    The private sector exerts a significant and critical influence on child health outcomes in developing countries, including the health of poor children. This article reviews the available evidence on private sector utilization and quality of care. It provides a framework for analysing the private sector's influence on child health outcomes. This influence goes beyond service provision by private providers and nongovernmental organizations (NGOs). Pharmacies, drug sellers, private suppliers, and food producers also have an impact on the health of children. Many governments are experimenting with strategies to engage the private sector to improve child health. The article analyses some of the most promising strategies, and suggests that a number of constraints make it hard for policy-makers to emulate these approaches. Few experiences are clearly described, monitored, and evaluated. The article suggests that improving the impact of child health programmes in developing countries requires a more systematic analysis of how to engage the private sector most effectively. The starting point should include the evaluation of the presence and potential of the private sector, including actors such as professional associations, producer organizations, community groups, and patients' organizations. PMID:14997241

  4. Inductive approach towards a phenomenologically more satisfactory unififed field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Rayski, J.; Rayski J.M. Jnr.

    1985-11-01

    A unified field theory constituting a fusion of the ideas of supersymmetries with general relativity and gauge theory is investigated. A Lagrangian formalism is constructed step by step; the last step consists in a marriage with Kaluza's idea of a multidimensional space-time. Our aim is not to achieve a full local supersymmetry in eleven dimensions, but rather to attain a compromise with the symmetries of the fundamental interactions either known phenomenologically, or only suspected to exist in nature.

  5. Integrating empowerment evaluation and quality improvement to achieve healthcare improvement outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Wandersman, Abraham; Alia, Kassandra Ann; Cook, Brittany; Ramaswamy, Rohit

    2015-01-01

    While the body of evidence-based healthcare interventions grows, the ability of health systems to deliver these interventions effectively and efficiently lags behind. Quality improvement approaches, such as the model for improvement, have demonstrated some success in healthcare but their impact has been lessened by implementation challenges. To help address these challenges, we describe the empowerment evaluation approach that has been developed by programme evaluators and a method for its application (Getting To Outcomes (GTO)). We then describe how GTO can be used to implement healthcare interventions. An illustrative healthcare quality improvement example that compares the model for improvement and the GTO method for reducing hospital admissions through improved diabetes care is described. We conclude with suggestions for integrating GTO and the model for improvement. PMID:26178332

  6. The role of the hospital registry in achieving outcome benchmarks in cancer care.

    PubMed

    Greene, Frederick L; Gilkerson, Sharon; Tedder, Paige; Smith, Kathy

    2009-06-15

    The hospital registry is a valuable tool for evaluating quality benchmarks in cancer care. As payment for performance standards are adopted, the registry will assume a more dynamic and economically important role in the hospital setting. At Carolinas Medical Center, the registry has been a key instrument in the comparison of state and national benchmarks and for program improvement in meeting standards in the care of breast and colon cancer. One of the significant successes of the American College of Surgeons Commission on Cancer (CoC) Hospital Approvals Program is the support of hospital registries, especially in small and midsized community hospitals throughout the United States. To become a member of the Hospital Approvals Program, a registry must be staffed appropriately and include analytic data for patients who have their primary diagnosis or treatment at the facility 1. The current challenge for most hospitals is to prove that the registry has specific worth when many facets of care are not compensated. Unfortunately a small number of hospitals have disbanded their registries because of the short-sighted decision that the registry and its personnel are a drain on the hospital system and do not generate revenue. In the present era of meeting benchmarks for care as a prelude to being paid by third party and governmental agencies 2,3, a primary argument is that the registry can be revenue-enhancing by quantifying specific outcomes in cancer care. Without having appropriate registry and abstract capability, the hospital leadership cannot measure the specific outcome benchmarks required in the era of "pay for performance" or "pay for participation". PMID:19466739

  7. Teacher- versus peer-mediated instruction: an ecobehavioral analysis of achievement outcomes.

    PubMed Central

    Greenwood, C R; Dinwiddie, G; Terry, B; Wade, L; Stanley, S O; Thibadeau, S; Delquadri, J C

    1984-01-01

    In three experiments, we compared the effects of instructional arrangements that varied in: teacher versus peer mediators, methods used, levels of student academic responding generated, and content taught and tested. Instructional arrangements (i.e., tasks, structure, teacher position, teacher behavior) and students' levels of academic responding were measured by an observation system which served as an index of the independent variables. Students' accuracy on weekly spelling, arithmetic, and vocabulary tests and pre- and post-standardized achievement tests (Experiments 2 and 3 only) were the dependent variables. Results indicated that the classwide peer tutoring, compared to the teacher's procedure, produced more student academic responding and higher weekly test scores, regardless of treatment order or subject matter content (Experiment 1). The four lowest performing students in each class, in particular, benefited from peer tutoring, often performing as well as the other students. These findings were replicated in Experiments 2 and 3 wherein content taught/tested was also manipulated. Standardized test score gains were higher in those areas in which peer tutoring was used longest. Issues related to the functional analysis of instruction and achievement gain are discussed. Images Figure 2 Figure 4 PMID:6526770

  8. The effect of workshop groups on achievement goals and performance in biology: An outcome evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Born, Wendi Kay

    This two-year quasi-experiment evaluated the effect of peer-led workshop groups on performance of minority and majority undergraduate biology students in a three-course series and investigated motivational explanations for performance differences. The workshop intervention used was modeled after a program pioneered by Treisman (1992) at the University of California. Majority volunteers randomly assigned to workshops (n = 61) performed between 1/2 and 1 standard deviation better than those assigned to the control group (n = 60; p < .05) in each quarter without spending more time studying. During Quarter 1, workshop minority students (n = 25) showed a pattern of increasing exam performance in comparison to historic control minority students (n = 21), who showed a decreasing pattern (p < .05). Although sex differences in biology performance were a focus of investigation, none were detected. Motivational predictions derived from the hierarchical model of approach and avoidance achievement motivation (Elliot & Church, 1997) were partially supported. Self-report survey measures of achievement goals, modeled after those used by Elliot and colleagues, were requested from all enrolled students. Volunteers (n = 121) reported higher average levels of approach and avoidance goals than nonvolunteers (n = 439; p < .05) and the relationship of goals to performance was moderated by volunteer status. Performance of volunteers was negatively related to avoidance of failure goals (r = .41, p < .01) and unrelated to performance approach goals. Performance of nonvolunteers was unrelated to avoidance of failure goals and positively related to performance approach goals (r = .28, p < .01). Mastery goals were unrelated to performance for all students. Results were inconsistent with Dweck and Leggett's (1988) theory of mastery vs. performance orientation, but were similar to results found by Elliot and colleagues. Contrary to hypotheses, motivational goals did not mediate performance for

  9. Data Assimilation Techniques for Ionospheric Reference Scenarios - project overview and achieved outcomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerzen, Tatjana; Wilken, Volker; Hoque, Mainul; Minkwitz, David; Schlueter, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    generated 3D ionosphere reconstructions as well as the final IRSs are validated with independent GNSS slant TEC (Total Electron Content) data, vertical sounding observations and JASON 1 and 2 derived vertical TEC. This presentation gives an overview about the DAIS project and the achieved results. We outline the assimilation approach, show the reconstruction and the validation results and finally address open questions.

  10. Vocational Rehabilitation Experiences among Individuals Who Achieved a Supported Employment Outcome: A Longitudinal Study of the Vocational Rehabilitation Service Program. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tashjian, Michael D.; Schmidt-Davis, Holly

    This report contains findings from a descriptive study of the characteristics, services, and outcomes of consumers who achieved a supported employment (SE) outcome after exiting Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) services. Data were obtained through case file abstraction, consumer interviews, and an extended service provider interview of 259 SE…

  11. 20 CFR 411.555 - Can the EN keep the milestone and outcome payments even if the beneficiary does not achieve all...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Can the EN keep the milestone and outcome payments even if the beneficiary does not achieve all outcome months? 411.555 Section 411.555 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION THE TICKET TO WORK AND SELF-SUFFICIENCY PROGRAM Employment...

  12. 20 CFR 411.555 - Can the EN keep the milestone and outcome payments even if the beneficiary does not achieve all...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... not achieve all outcome months? (a) Yes. The EN (or State VR agency acting as an EN) can keep each milestone and outcome payment for which the EN (or State VR agency acting as an EN) is eligible, even though... make or deny to an EN (or a State VR agency acting as an EN) may be subject to adjustment...

  13. 20 CFR 411.555 - Can the EN keep the milestone and outcome payments even if the beneficiary does not achieve all...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... not achieve all outcome months? (a) Yes. The EN (or State VR agency acting as an EN) can keep each milestone and outcome payment for which the EN (or State VR agency acting as an EN) is eligible, even though... make or deny to an EN (or a State VR agency acting as an EN) may be subject to adjustment...

  14. 20 CFR 411.555 - Can the EN keep the milestone and outcome payments even if the beneficiary does not achieve all...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... not achieve all outcome months? (a) Yes. The EN (or State VR agency acting as an EN) can keep each milestone and outcome payment for which the EN (or State VR agency acting as an EN) is eligible, even though... make or deny to an EN (or a State VR agency acting as an EN) may be subject to adjustment...

  15. 20 CFR 411.555 - Can the EN keep the milestone and outcome payments even if the beneficiary does not achieve all...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... not achieve all outcome months? (a) Yes. The EN (or State VR agency acting as an EN) can keep each milestone and outcome payment for which the EN (or State VR agency acting as an EN) is eligible, even though... make or deny to an EN (or a State VR agency acting as an EN) may be subject to adjustment...

  16. Oxygen Supplementation to Stabilize Preterm Infants in the Fetal to Neonatal Transition: No Satisfactory Answer

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Cuevas, Isabel; Cernada, Maria; Nuñez, Antonio; Escobar, Javier; Kuligowski, Julia; Chafer-Pericas, Consuelo; Vento, Maximo

    2016-01-01

    Fetal life elapses in a relatively low oxygen environment. Immediately after birth with the initiation of breathing, the lung expands and oxygen availability to tissue rises by twofold, generating a physiologic oxidative stress. However, both lung anatomy and function and the antioxidant defense system do not mature until late in gestation, and therefore, very preterm infants often need respiratory support and oxygen supplementation in the delivery room to achieve postnatal stabilization. Notably, interventions in the first minutes of life can have long-lasting consequences. Recent trials have aimed to assess what initial inspiratory fraction of oxygen and what oxygen targets during this transitional period are best for extremely preterm infants based on the available nomogram. However, oxygen saturation nomogram informs only of term and late preterm infants but not on extremely preterm infants. Therefore, the solution to this conundrum may still have to wait before a satisfactory answer is available. PMID:27148504

  17. Oxygen Supplementation to Stabilize Preterm Infants in the Fetal to Neonatal Transition: No Satisfactory Answer.

    PubMed

    Torres-Cuevas, Isabel; Cernada, Maria; Nuñez, Antonio; Escobar, Javier; Kuligowski, Julia; Chafer-Pericas, Consuelo; Vento, Maximo

    2016-01-01

    Fetal life elapses in a relatively low oxygen environment. Immediately after birth with the initiation of breathing, the lung expands and oxygen availability to tissue rises by twofold, generating a physiologic oxidative stress. However, both lung anatomy and function and the antioxidant defense system do not mature until late in gestation, and therefore, very preterm infants often need respiratory support and oxygen supplementation in the delivery room to achieve postnatal stabilization. Notably, interventions in the first minutes of life can have long-lasting consequences. Recent trials have aimed to assess what initial inspiratory fraction of oxygen and what oxygen targets during this transitional period are best for extremely preterm infants based on the available nomogram. However, oxygen saturation nomogram informs only of term and late preterm infants but not on extremely preterm infants. Therefore, the solution to this conundrum may still have to wait before a satisfactory answer is available. PMID:27148504

  18. Intellectual, neuropsychological, and achievement outcomes in children six to eight years after recovery from Haemophilus influenzae meningitis.

    PubMed

    Taylor, H G; Michaels, R H; Mazur, P M; Bauer, R E; Liden, C B

    1984-08-01

    Twenty-four grade school children who had sustained an earlier episode of Haemophilus influenzae type b meningitis were tested, along with a group of 24 school-aged siblings. Evaluations consisted of tests of IQ, academic achievement, and neuropsychological skills. Parents completed forms rating each child's behavioral adjustment and temperament. Available school-administered standardized achievement tests were also obtained. Information relating to the episode of meningitis was extracted from the medical charts of each child who had had meningitis in order to investigate the relationship of these parameters to developmental outcome. Results showed that, compared with nearest-age siblings, children who had had meningitis scored lower on performance IQ and full-scale IQ. The group that had had meningitis also performed more poorly on several neuropsychological tasks. However, the groups did not differ in verbal IQ, and they performed comparably on all academic measures. Significant behavioral adjustment problems were absent from both groups, and there were no notable differences in temperament. Although findings support the existence of postmeningitis sequelae, the selective nature of the deficiencies observed indicate that prognosis for children in the age range examined may be better than that suggested by earlier studies. PMID:6611537

  19. Maternal obesity and metabolic risk to the offspring: why lifestyle interventions may have not achieved the desired outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Catalano, P; deMouzon, SH

    2015-01-01

    Obesity during pregnancy is associated with an increased risk of short- and long-term metabolic dysfunction in the mother and her offspring. Both higher maternal pregravid body mass index (kg m−2) and excessive gestational weight gain (GWG) have been associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes such as gestational diabetes, preeclampsia and fetal adiposity. Multiple lifestyle intervention trials consisting of weight management using various diets, increased physical activity and behavioral modification techniques have been employed to avoid excessive GWG and improve perinatal outcomes. These randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have achieved modest success in decreasing excessive GWG, although the decrease in GWG was often not within the current Institute of Medicine guidelines. RCTs have generally not had any success with decreasing the risk of maternal gestational diabetes (GDM), preeclampsia or excessive fetal growth often referred to as macrosomia. Although the lack of success for these trials has been attributed to lack of statistical power and poor compliance with study protocols, our own research suggests that maternal pregravid and early pregnancy metabolic condition programs early placenta function and gene expression. These alterations in maternal/placental function occur in the first trimester of pregnancy prior to when most intervention trials are initiated. For example, maternal accrural of adipose tissue relies on prior activation of genes controlling lipogenesis and low-grade inflammation in early pregnancy. These metabolic alterations occur prior to any changes in maternal phenotype. Therefore, trials of lifestyle interventions before pregnancy are needed to demonstrate the safety and efficacy for both the mother and her offspring. PMID:25777180

  20. Assessment of Local HOx and ROx Measurement Techniques: Achievements, Challenges, and Future Directions - Outcomes from the International HOx Workshop 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofzumahaus, Andreas; Heard, Dwayne

    2016-04-01

    Measurements of HOx radicals are an important tool for the investigation of tropospheric chemistry in field campaigns and simulation chamber experiments. The measured data allow us to test chemical models simulating the atmospheric concentrations of OH, HO2 and RO2, and help to improve chemical mechanisms used in regional and global models for predictions of the atmospheric chemical composition. In Spring 2015, an international, IGAC-endorsed workshop took place at Forschungszentrum Jülich, Germany, to assess the performance and reliability of current HOx measurement techniques. Fifteen international groups from Germany, UK, Ireland, France, Finland, USA, China and Japan came together to discuss achievements, challenges and future directions of laser-based, mass-spectrometry based, and chemical techniques. Following the discussions, a working group was established to guide the community in the near future in making progress on continued improvement in HOx measurements. Three goals will be persued: the development of a common calibration unit, the development of procedures to investigate and, if necessary, eliminate possible measurement artefacts, and planning for future instrumental intercomparisons. This poster contribution will give an overview of the workshop, its outcome and planned activites.

  1. 46 CFR 177.310 - Satisfactory service as a design basis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Satisfactory service as a design basis. 177.310 Section 177.310 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Hull Structure § 177.310 Satisfactory service as...

  2. The Differentiated Outcome Hypothesis or, When Will We Stop Using Conventional Achievement as the Sole Criterion for Evaluating Unconventional Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuckman, Bruce W.

    The differentiated outcome hypothesis posits that the maximum effects of an educational program are realized along those dimensions emphasized in the program or in those central to the persons involved. The idea that educational programs employing unconventional means should be examined on outcomes that are consistent with those means is derived…

  3. The Impact of a Proficiency-Based Assessment and Reassessment of Learning Outcomes System on Student Achievement and Attitudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Posner, Michael A.

    2011-01-01

    This research compares a student-centered, proficiency-based assessment and reassessment of learning outcomes (PARLO) system to traditional assessment in a college-level introductory statistics class. The PARLO class was assessed on learning outcomes using a three-tiered proficiency scale and given the opportunity to resubmit assignments to…

  4. Title III Accountability Policies and Outcomes for K-12: Annual Measurable Achievement Objectives for English Language Learner Students in Southeast Region States. Issues & Answers. REL 2011-No. 105

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Kimberly S.; Dufford-Melendez, Kathleen

    2011-01-01

    This report details Title III accountability policies and outcomes for K-12 English language learner (ELL) students for school year 2007/08 in the six Southeast Region states (Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, North Carolina, and South Carolina) under the Title III annual measurable achievement objectives (AMAO) provision of the No Child…

  5. Graduate Management Admission Test Outcomes and the Academic Achievement: A Study on Masters of Business Administration Students at Makerere University, Uganda

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wamala, Robert; Kizito, Saint Omala; Kakumba, Umar

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates whether the outcomes of the Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) can predict the academic achievement of enrollees in masters programs. The study is based on administrative data of 516 Masters of Business Administration (MBA) enrollees at the College of Business and Management Science, Makerere University in the 2011…

  6. Benefits of Career and Technical Student Organizations' on Female and Racial Minority Students' Psychosocial and Achievement Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aragon, Steven R.; Alfeld, Corinne; Hansen, David M.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine to what extent do CTSOs affect student psychosocial and achievement outcomes (above and beyond stand-alone CTE programs) when controlling for gender and race. Using a cross-sectional descriptive research design, a total of 5,677 students from 10 states were surveyed regarding their high school…

  7. A Comparison of the Influences of Different Training Approaches on Trainees' Perceptions of Self-Efficacy to Achieve Training Outcomes among Bankers in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, WenRou

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the influences of the classroom training and the structured on-the-job training (S-OJT) approaches on trainees' self-efficacy to achieve the training outcomes among bankers in Taiwan. Based on the conditions for training effectiveness identified in the literature, the study examined whether trainees with…

  8. "I Am a Scientist": How Setting Conditions That Enhance Focused Concentration Positively Relate to Student Motivation and Achievement Outcomes in Inquiry-Based Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellwood, Robin B.

    2013-01-01

    This research investigated how student social interactions within two approaches to an inquiry-based science curriculum could be related to student motivation and achievement outcomes. This qualitative case study consisted of two cases, Off-Campus and On-Campus, and used ethnographic techniques of participant observation. Research participants…

  9. The Economic Benefits of Closing Educational Achievement Gaps: Promoting Growth and Strengthening the Nation by Improving the Educational Outcomes of Children of Color

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Robert G.; Oakford, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Our nation is currently experiencing growing levels of income and wealth inequality, which are contributing to longstanding racial and ethnic gaps in education outcomes and other areas. This report quantifies the economic benefits of closing one of the most harmful racial and ethnic gaps: the educational achievement gap that exists between black…

  10. Feelings and Performance in the First Year at University: Learning-Related Emotions as Predictors of Achievement Outcomes in Mathematics and Statistics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niculescu, Alexandra C.; Templelaar, Dirk; Leppink, Jimmie; Dailey-Hebert, Amber; Segers, Mien; Gijselaers, Wim

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: This study examined the predictive value of four learning-related emotions--Enjoyment, Anxiety, Boredom and Hopelessness for achievement outcomes in the first year of study at university. Method: We used a large sample (N = 2337) of first year university students enrolled over three consecutive academic years in a mathematics and…

  11. Connections between Teacher Perceptions of School Effectiveness and Student Outcomes in Idaho's Low-Achieving Schools. REL 2014-012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Caitlin; Parsley, Danette

    2014-01-01

    Policymakers and practitioners frequently use teacher surveys to inform decisions on school improvement efforts in low-achieving schools. There is little empirical evidence on how the results of these surveys relate to student outcomes. This study provides information on how perception data from a teacher survey in Idaho is correlated with three…

  12. Comparing Dichotomous and Trichotomous Approaches to Achievement Goal Theory: An Example Using Motivational Regulations as Outcome Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barkoukis, Vassilis; Ntoumanis, Nikos; Nikitaras, Nikitas

    2007-01-01

    Background: It is commonly assumed that there is conceptual equivalence between the task and ego achievement goals proposed by Nicholl's (1989) dichotomous achievement goal theory (Nicholls, 1989), and the mastery and performance approach goals advanced by Elliot's (1997) trichotomous hierarchical model of approach and avoidance achievement…

  13. College Expectations for All? The Early Adult Outcomes of Low-Achieving Adolescents Who Expect to Earn a Bachelor's Degree

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Anne; Gardner, Margo

    2016-01-01

    Critics of the college-for-all ethos argue that it encourages low-achieving adolescents to develop unrealistically high expectations. This argument posits that low-achievers waste time and money, and risk disappointment and self-recrimination, pursuing college when they are unlikely to complete it. The present study uses two national data…

  14. The Enabling Role of Education in the Lives of Young People with Disabilities in India: Achieved and Desired Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singal, Nidhi; Jeffery, Roger; Jain, Aanchal; Sood, Neeru

    2011-01-01

    In India, the last few years have seen an increase in the school enrolment rates of children with disabilities; however, there are continuing concerns about the outcomes of these efforts, especially in terms of employment. This paper presents the findings of a qualitative enquiry into how young people (aged 15-30 years) with various impairments…

  15. Views from the Field: Conservation Educators' and Practitioners' Perceptions of Education as a Strategy for Achieving Conservation Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ardoin, Nicole M.; Heimlich, Joe E.

    2013-01-01

    This article presents data from a mixed-methods study that collected data through surveys (n = 656), interviews (n = 15), and discussion groups (n = 75) to explore the use of social strategies such as education and outreach by non-governmental organizations and government agencies to reach outcomes related to biodiversity conservation and resource…

  16. The Effect of an English Language Learner Program on Student Achievement Outcomes in Language, Reading, and Math

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Jennifer L.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the reading, math, and language proficiency outcomes of 4th-grade through 7th-grade students with limited English proficiency following nearly two years or more of instruction in the English Language Learner Program (ELL) and concurrent general education studies. The maximum accrual for this study was…

  17. Identification with Academics and Motivation to Achieve in School: How the Structure of the Self Influences Academic Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osborne, Jason W.; Jones, Brett D.

    2011-01-01

    Authors since William James ("1892/1968") have implied that the structure of the self-concept can influence motivation and outcomes in particular domains. The value or importance an individual places on a domain influences how motivated that individual is to expend effort in that domain, ultimately influencing the positivity or negativity of the…

  18. The validity and consistency of findings across international studies of mathematics and science achievement: A comparison of outcomes from IAEP2 and TIMSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Leary, Michael

    The investigation reported in this dissertation was prompted by discrepancies between the performance of Irish students on two international tests of science achievement: the Second International Assessment of Educational Progress (IAEP2) administered in 1991 and the Third International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) administered in 1995. While average science achievement for Irish 13-year-olds was reported to be at the low end of the distribution for the 20 participating countries in IAEP2, it was around the middle of the distribution for the 40 or so countries that participated in TIMSS in the early grades of secondary schooling. Initial comparisons suggested that there were also discrepancies in outcomes for some of the 11 other countries that participated in both surveys e.g. France, Portugal, and Switzerland. Such discrepancies were not as apparent in mathematics. The study set out to answer two interrelated questions: What accounts for the apparent inconsistency of Irish science performance in the two international assessments? And which of the reported findings provides the more accurate reflection of science achievement in Ireland? Following a review of design and implementation factors affecting the outcomes of international comparative studies, nine hypotheses were posited to account for differences in the relative performance of Ireland and other countries across IAEP2 and TIMSS. Analyses relevant to the hypotheses led to the conclusion that population definition, test-curriculum overlap, the use of aggregated scales, and the form in which items were presented all contributed to the differences between the outcomes of the two surveys. When these issues are taken into account, science achievement in Ireland does not turn out to be at the low level suggested by initial interpretations of the IAEP2 data. A number of implications of the study for future international comparative studies of student achievement are outlined.

  19. "I am a scientist": How setting conditions that enhance focused concentration positively relate to student motivation and achievement outcomes in inquiry-based science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellwood, Robin B.

    This research investigated how student social interactions within two approaches to an inquiry-based science curriculum could be related to student motivation and achievement outcomes. This qualitative case study consisted of two cases, Off-Campus and On-Campus, and used ethnographic techniques of participant observation. Research participants included eight eighth grade girls, aged thirteen to fourteen years old. Data sources included formal and informal participant interviews, participant journal reflections, curriculum artifacts including quizzes, worksheets, and student-generated research posters, digital video and audio recordings, photographs, and researcher field notes. Data were transcribed verbatim and coded, then collapsed into emergent themes using NVIVO 9. The results of this research illustrate how setting conditions that promote focused concentration and communicative interactions can be positively related to student motivation and achievement outcomes in inquiry-based science. Participants in the Off-Campus case experienced more frequent states of focused concentration and out performed their peers in the On-Campus case on forty-six percent of classroom assignments. Off-Campus participants also designed and implemented a more cognitively complex research project, provided more in-depth analyses of their research results, and expanded their perceptions of what it means to act like a scientist to a greater extent than participants in the On-Campus case. These results can be understood in relation to Flow Theory. Student interactions that promoted the criteria necessary for initiating flow, which included having clearly defined goals, receiving immediate feedback, and maintaining a balance between challenges and skills, fostered enhanced student motivation and achievement outcomes. This research also illustrates the positive gains in motivation and achievement outcomes that emerge from student experiences with extended time in isolated areas referred to

  20. Translating school health research to policy. School outcomes related to the health environment and changes in mathematics achievement.

    PubMed

    Snelling, Anastasia M; Belson, Sarah Irvine; Watts, Erin; George, Stephanie; Van Dyke, Hugo; Malloy, Elizabeth; Kalicki, Michelle

    2015-10-01

    This paper describes an exploration of the relationship between mathematic achievement and the school health environment relative to policy-driven changes in the school setting, specifically with regard to physical education/physical activity. Using school-level data, the authors seek to understand the relationship between mathematics achievement and the school health environment and physical education minutes. This work provides a description of the aspects of the school health environment, an exploration of the interrelationships between school health and student achievement, and an assessment of the effects of the school health policy and practice on student performance and health status. Based on these findings, we identify additional research necessary to describe the relationship between obesity and learning in children. PMID:26050913

  1. Achievement and Climate Outcomes for the Knowledge Is Power Program in an Inner-City Middle School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Steven M.; McDonald, Aaron J.; Alberg, Marty; McSparrin-Gallagher, Brenda

    2007-01-01

    This study was designed to examine the effects of a whole school reform, the Knowledge is Power Program (KIPP), specifically designed to raise academic achievement of at-risk urban middle school students by establishing an extended school day and year, a rigorous curriculum, after-school access to teachers, and increased family-school connections.…

  2. The Validity of Goal Achievement as an Outcome Measure in Physical Rehabilitation Day Hospitals for Older People

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kneebone, Ian I.; Hurn, Jane S.; Raisbeck, Elizabeth; Cropley, Mark; Khoshnaw, Hiro; Milton, Jane E.

    2010-01-01

    Physical rehabilitation day hospitals are widely used community-based services designed to meet the medical and rehabilitation needs of older people. While there is evidence for the effectiveness of these services, concerns about the shortcomings of how this is measured have led to the recommendation that the achievement of individually tailored…

  3. Perceived Teacher Factors in Relation to Students' Achievement-Related Outcomes in Science Classrooms in Elementary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sakiz, Gönül

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to investigate the roles that perceived teacher affective support (PTAS), perceived teacher mastery goal orientation (PTMGO), academic emotions, self-efficacy and behavioural engagement play on students' science achievement in elementary school science classrooms. The potential relations of different levels of…

  4. Achieving Equitable Outcomes. A Supporting Paper to Australia's National Strategy for Vocational Education and Training, 1998-2003.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Australian National Training Authority, Brisbane.

    This paper is one of five supporting papers to "A Bridge to the Future: Australia's National Strategy for VET 1998-2003" (ED 420 764). Although some equity client groups in Australia are now relatively well represented in vocational education and training (VET), patterns of enrollment and achievement are not uniform. To respond to this situation…

  5. Evaluation of Achieving Collegiate Excellence and Success Program: Student Outcomes Year One, Grades 11 and 12. Evaluation Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolanin, Natalie; Modarresi, Shahpar

    2015-01-01

    The Office of Shared Accountability in Montgomery County (Maryland) Public Schools (MCPS) is conducting a multiyear evaluation of the "Achieving Collegiate Excellence and Success" (ACES) program. ACES is a collaboration between MCPS, Montgomery College (MC), and the Universities at Shady Grove (USG) to create a seamless pathway from high…

  6. Academic Abilities in Children and Adolescents with a History of Autism Spectrum Disorders Who Have Achieved Optimal Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Troyb, Eva; Orinstein, Alyssa; Tyson, Katherine; Helt, Molly; Eigsti, Inge-Marie; Stevens, Michael; Fein, Deborah

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the academic abilities of children and adolescents who were once diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder, but who no longer meet diagnostic criteria for this disorder. These individuals have achieved social and language skills within the average range for their ages, receive little or no school support, and are referred to…

  7. Variability in ESL Outcomes: The Influence of Age on Arrival and Length of Residence on Achievement in High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roessingh, Hetty

    2008-01-01

    This article integrates findings from earlier research (Roessingh & Kover, 2003; Roessingh, Kover, & Watt, 2005) linking distinct patterns of achievement for diverse age-on-arrival (AOA) cohorts of ESL learners on the grade 12 Alberta English language arts (ELA) examination to their vocabulary and reading comprehension scores on a standardized…

  8. Manual for the Minnesota Satisfactoriness Scales. Minnesota Studies in Vocational Rehabilitation: XXVII.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, Dennis L.; And Others

    Intended as a manual for the Minnesota Satisfaction Scales, this monograph describes the development of the 28-item questionnaire designed to be completed by a worker's supervisor to assess the satisfactoriness of an employee. The scales were developed from supervisor ratings of 2,373 workers, and norms are provided for the occupational groups of…

  9. The rationale for patient-reported outcomes surveillance in cancer and a reproducible method for achieving it.

    PubMed

    Smith, Tenbroeck G; Castro, Kathleen M; Troeschel, Alyssa N; Arora, Neeraj K; Lipscomb, Joseph; Jones, Shelton M; Treiman, Katherine A; Hobbs, Connie; McCabe, Ryan M; Clauser, Steven B

    2016-02-01

    Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) measure quality of life, symptoms, patient functioning, and patient perceptions of care; they are essential for gaining a full understanding of cancer care and the impact of cancer on people's lives. Repeatedly captured facility-level and/or population-level PROs (PRO surveillance) could play an important role in quality monitoring and improvement, benchmarking, advocacy, policy making, and research. This article describes the rationale for PRO surveillance and the methods of the Patient Reported Outcomes Symptoms and Side Effects Study (PROSSES), which is the first PRO study to use the American College of Surgeons Commission on Cancer's Rapid Quality Reporting System to identify patients and manage study data flow. The American Cancer Society, the National Cancer Institute, the Commission on Cancer, and RTI International collaborated on PROSSES. PROSSES was conducted at 17 cancer programs that participated in the National Cancer Institute Community Cancer Centers Program among patients diagnosed with locoregional breast or colon cancer. The methods piloted in PROSSES were successful as demonstrated by high eligibility (93%) and response (61%) rates. Differences in clinical and demographic characteristics between respondents and nonrespondents were mostly negligible, with the exception that non-white individuals were somewhat less likely to respond. These methods were consistent across cancer centers and reproducible over time. If repeated and expanded, they could provide PRO surveillance data from patients with cancer on a national scale. PMID:26619031

  10. Impact of the Positive Action program on school-level indicators of academic achievement, absenteeism, and disciplinary outcomes: A matched-pair, cluster randomized, controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Frank; Vuchinich, Samuel; Acock, Alan; Washburn, Isaac; Beets, Michael; Li, Kin-Kit

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports the effects of a comprehensive elementary school-based social-emotional and character education program on school-level achievement, absenteeism, and disciplinary outcomes utilizing a matched-pair, cluster randomized, controlled design. The Positive Action Hawai‘i trial included 20 racially/ethnically diverse schools (mean enrollment = 544) and was conducted from the 2002-03 through the 2005-06 academic years. Using school-level archival data, analyses comparing change from baseline (2002) to one-year post trial (2007) revealed that intervention schools scored 9.8% better on the TerraNova (2nd ed.) test for reading and 8.8% on math; 20.7% better in Hawai‘i Content and Performance Standards scores for reading and 51.4% better in math; and that intervention schools reported 15.2% lower absenteeism and fewer suspensions (72.6%) and retentions (72.7%). Overall, effect sizes were moderate to large (range 0.5-1.1) for all of the examined outcomes. Sensitivity analyses using permutation models and random-intercept growth curve models substantiated results. The results provide evidence that a comprehensive school-based program, specifically developed to target student behavior and character, can positively influence school-level achievement, attendance, and disciplinary outcomes concurrently. PMID:20414477

  11. Long-term outcomes of patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma who achieved complete remission after sorafenib therapy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims Sorafenib is currently the sole molecular targeted agent that improves overall survival in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Despite the efficacy of sorafenib, the response rate varies in patients with advanced HCC. We retrospectively analyzed a series of Korean patients with advanced HCC with complete remission (CR) after sorafenib therapy. Methods In total, 523 patients with advanced HCC were treated with sorafenib in 3 large tertiary referral hospitals in Korea. A survey was conducted to collect data on patients who experienced CR after sorafenib monotherapy, and their medical records and follow-up data were analyzed. The tumor response and recurrence rates were assessed by radiologic study, based on modified response evaluation criteria in solid tumors. Results Seven patients with advanced HCC experienced CR after sorafenib therapy. The median time to tumor disappearance and the median disease-free survival time were 3 months and 9 months, respectively. HCC recurrence was identified in three cases (42.9%). Of these, two patients discontinued sorafenib before or after achieving CR and the other patient continued sorafenib after achieving CR. HCC recurred at 3, 10, and 42 months after CR in these three patients. Three patients needed dose reduction for toxicity and adverse events. Conclusions Though CR was achieved after sorafenib therapy in patients with advanced HCC, the recurrence rate was relatively high. Subsequent strategies to reduce a chance of recurrence after sorafenib therapy are required to investigate. PMID:26527250

  12. Direct Oral Anticoagulants for the Management of Thromboembolic Disorders: The Importance of Adherence and Persistence in Achieving Beneficial Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Amin, Alpesh; Marrs, Joel C

    2016-10-01

    Anticoagulation therapy is central to the management of thromboembolic disorders, and the use of direct oral anticoagulants offers several advantages over standard therapy with parenteral heparins and vitamin K antagonists. In phase III clinical trials, the direct oral anticoagulants (given once or twice daily) all demonstrated favorable benefit-risk profiles compared with conventional standard therapy for the treatment and secondary prevention of venous thromboembolism and for stroke prevention in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation. In clinical practice, many factors may influence overall clinical outcomes in patients receiving anticoagulant therapy, including adherence and persistence to the prescribed therapy, which becomes particularly important during long-term therapy. When choosing an anticoagulant for an individual patient, the pharmacological and clinical profile of the anticoagulant, its dosing regimen, and the patient's clinical characteristics (eg, renal function and comorbidities) and preferences should be considered. This review examines the rationale for and clinical evidence of the selected dosing regimens of the direct oral anticoagulants for the treatment of venous thromboembolism and stroke prevention in nonvalvular atrial fibrillation. The potential influence of dosing strategies (eg, once- or twice-daily dosing) and other factors on patient adherence and therapy persistence are also discussed. PMID:26316518

  13. Is the structural diversity of tripeptides sufficient for developing functional food additives with satisfactory multiple bioactivities?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jian-Hui; Liu, Yong-Le; Ning, Jing-Heng; Yu, Jian; Li, Xiang-Hong; Wang, Fa-Xiang

    2013-05-01

    Multifunctional peptides have attracted increasing attention in the food science community because of their therapeutic potential, low toxicity and rapid intestinal absorption. However, previous study demonstrated that the limited structural variations make it difficult to optimize dipeptide molecules in a good balance between desirable and undesirable properties (F. Tian, P. Zhou, F. Lv, R. Song, Z. Li, J. Pept. Sci. 13 (2007) 549-566). In the present work, we attempt to answer whether the structural diversity is sufficient for a tripeptide to have satisfactory multiple bioactivities. Statistical test, structural examination and energetic analysis confirm that peptides of three amino acids long can bind tightly to human angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) and thus exert significant antihypertensive efficacy. Further quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) modeling and prediction of all 8000 possible tripeptides reveal that their ACE-inhibitory potency exhibits a good (positive) relationship to antioxidative activity, but has only a quite modest correlation with bitterness. This means that it is possible to find certain tripeptide entities possessing the optimal combination of strong ACE-inhibitory potency, high antioxidative activity and weak bitter taste, which are the promising candidates for developing multifunctional food additives with satisfactory multiple bioactivities. The marked difference between dipeptide and tripeptide can be attributed to the fact that the structural diversity of peptides increases dramatically with a slight change in sequence length.

  14. Enhanced loading regimen of teicoplanin is necessary to achieve therapeutic pharmacokinetics levels for the improvement of clinical outcomes in patients with renal dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Ueda, T; Takesue, Y; Nakajima, K; Ichiki, K; Doita, A; Wada, Y; Tsuchida, T; Takahashi, Y; Ishihara, M; Ikeuchi, H; Uchino, M; Kimura, T

    2016-09-01

    We evaluated the clinical efficacy and safety of teicoplanin according to the pharmacokinetics (PK) therapeutic level achieved in patients with renal dysfunction. Target trough concentration (Cmin) was ≥15-30 μg/ml which has been recommended in patients with normal renal function. Adult patients (estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) <60 ml/min/1.73 m(2)) who were treated by teicoplanin were included in the study. We adopted two types of regimen for the initial 3 days: the conventional regimen, and the enhanced loading regimen (10 mg/kg twice daily on the 1st day, followed by 6.7-10 mg/kg once daily for the 2nd and 3rd days]. Two hundred and eighty-eight patients were evaluated for safety, and 106 patients with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections were evaluated for clinical efficacy. A significantly higher success rate was obtained in patients who achieved the target initial Cmin compared with those that did not (75.0 % vs 50.0 %, p = 0.008). In a multivariate analysis, initial Cmin ≥15 μg/ml was an independent factor for clinical success (adjusted odds ratio: 4.20, 95 % confidence interval: 1.34-13.15). In patients with 15-30 μg/ml of maximal Cmin during therapy, nephrotoxicity occurred in 13.1 %, and hepatotoxicity in 2.6 %, and these incidences were not significantly higher compared with those patients with <15 μg/ml. In conclusion, achievement of Cmin of 15-30 μg/ml without delay was necessary to improve clinical outcomes for the treatment by teicoplanin in patients with renal dysfunction. Further investigation is required regarding the optimal loading regimen to achieve the therapeutic levels in those patients. PMID:27278654

  15. Using optimal combination of teaching-learning methods (open book assignment and group tutorials) as revision exercises to improve learning outcome in low achievers in biochemistry.

    PubMed

    Rajappa, Medha; Bobby, Zachariah; Nandeesha, H; Suryapriya, R; Ragul, Anithasri; Yuvaraj, B; Revathy, G; Priyadarssini, M

    2016-07-01

    Graduate medical students of India are taught Biochemistry by didactic lectures and they hardly get any opportunity to clarify their doubts and reinforce the concepts which they learn in these lectures. We used a combination of teaching-learning (T-L) methods (open book assignment followed by group tutorials) to study their efficacy in improving the learning outcome. About 143 graduate medical students were classified into low (<50%: group 1, n = 23), medium (50-75%: group 2, n = 74), and high (>75%: group 3, n = 46) achievers, based on their internal assessment marks. After the regular teaching module on the topics "Vitamins and Enzymology", all the students attempted an open book assignment without peer consultation. Then all the students participated in group tutorials. The effects on the groups were evaluated by pre and posttests at the end of each phase, with the same set of MCQs. Gain from group tutorials and overall gain was significantly higher in the low achievers, compared to other groups. High and medium achievers obtained more gain from open book assignment, than group tutorials. The overall gain was significantly higher than the gain obtained from open book assignment or group tutorials, in all three groups. All the three groups retained the gain even after 1 week of the exercise. Hence, optimal use of novel T-L methods (open book assignment followed by group tutorials) as revision exercises help in strengthening concepts in Biochemistry in this oft neglected group of low achievers in graduate medical education. © 2016 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 44(4):321-325, 2016. PMID:26891594

  16. Patient’s Perceptions Regarding Orthodontic Needs and Satisfactory Level with the Procedure

    PubMed Central

    Farishta, Saibel

    2015-01-01

    Background: In order to keep the patients satisfied with Orthodontic treatment and to address the growing concern among new orthodontic patients, this study was undertaken to evaluate patient’s perceptions of their orthodontic treatment needs and the satisfactory level with the procedure. Methodology: This cross-sectional study was conducted among a sample of 362 patients who had received orthodontic treatment. Questionnaires included information factors that encouraged them to take orthodontic treatment, painful experience of orthodontic therapy, and also to know the effectiveness of the treatment. Student’s t-test and ANOVA test were used to analyze results at P = 0.05. Results: Most of the participants faced problems due to their dentition (60.2%), followed by mastication 23.6%. It was found that most of the study subjects were motivated by orthodontist to receive the treatment (29.7%). When the participants were asked about the complications faced by them during the procedure and the most common answer was a longer duration of the treatment (23.3%). Pain was also a common factor faced by the participants (15.9%). Significant results were seen according to gender and age. Conclusion: The study concluded that problems in the dentition were the main factor to seek orthodontic treatment and most of the subjects were convinced by the specialist to undergo orthodontic therapy. Many problems faced during the treatment, but still majority gave a positive response to the treatment. PMID:26435623

  17. Long term outcome of Ph+ CML patients achieving complete cytogenetic remission with interferon based therapy moving from interferon to imatinib era.

    PubMed

    Malagola, Michele; Breccia, Massimo; Skert, Cristina; Cancelli, Valeria; Soverini, Simona; Iacobucci, Ilaria; Cattina, Federica; Liberati, Anna Maria; Tiribelli, Mario; Annunziata, Mario; Trabacchi, Elena; De Vivo, Antonio; Castagnetti, Fausto; Martinelli, Giovanni; Fogli, Miriam; Stagno, Fabio; Pica, Gianmatteo; Iurlo, Alessandra; Pregno, Patrizia; Abruzzese, Elisabetta; Pardini, Simonetta; Bocchia, Monica; Russo, Sabina; Pierri, Ivana; Lunghi, Monia; Barulli, Sara; Merante, Serena; Mandelli, Franco; Alimena, Giuliana; Rosti, Gianatonio; Baccarani, Michele; Russo, Domenico

    2014-02-01

    Interferon α (IFNα) prolongs survival of CML patients achieving CCyR and potentially synergizes with TKIs. We report on the molecular status and long term outcome of 121 patients who were treated in Italy between 1986 and 2000 with IFNα based therapy and who obtained CCyR. After a median follow up of 16.5 years, 74 (61%) patients were switched to standard imatinib: 48 (65%) lost the CCyR on IFNα, and 36 (75%) are alive and in CCyR; 26 (35%) were switched to imatinib when they were still in CCyR on IFNα, and all 26 are alive and in CCyR. Forty-seven patients (39%) were never switched to imatinib: 24 (51%) continued and 23 (49%) discontinued IFNα, respectively, and 39/47 (83%) are alive and in CCyR. At last follow-up, the BCR-ABL transcripts level was available in 96/101 living patients (95%) The BCR-ABL:ABL ratio was between 0.1 and 0.01% (MR(3.0) ) in 17%, and less than 0.01% (MR(4.0) ) in 81% of patients. No patient was completely molecular negative (MR(4.5) or MR(5.0) ). The OS at 10 and 20 years is 92 and 84%, respectively. This study confirms that CCyR achieved with IFNα and maintained with or without imatinib or any other therapy significantly correlates with long term survival in CML patients who mostly have MR(4.0) . Complete molecular response (MR(4.5) or MR(5.0) ) seems to be unnecessary for such a long survival. This study further supports development of studies testing the clinical effect of the combinations of TKIs with IFNα. PMID:24122886

  18. Proximal Opening Wedge Osteotomy Provides Satisfactory Midterm Results With a Low Complication Rate.

    PubMed

    Oravakangas, Rami; Leppilahti, Juhana; Laine, Vesa; Niinimäki, Tuukka

    2016-01-01

    Hallux valgus is one of the most common foot deformities. Proximal opening wedge osteotomy is used for the treatment of moderate and severe hallux valgus with metatarsus primus varus. However, hypermobility of the first tarsometatarsal joint can compromise the results of the operation, and a paucity of midterm results are available regarding proximal open wedge osteotomy surgery. The aim of the present study was to assess the midterm results of proximal open wedge osteotomy in a consecutive series of patients with severe hallux valgus. Thirty-one consecutive adult patients (35 feet) with severe hallux valgus underwent proximal open wedge osteotomy. Twenty patients (35.5%) and 23 feet (34.3%) were available for the final follow-up examination. The mean follow-up duration was 5.8 (range 4.6 to 7.0) years. The radiologic measurements and American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society hallux-metatarsophalangeal-interphalangeal scores were recorded pre- and postoperatively, and subjective questionnaires were completed and foot scan analyses performed at the end of the follow-up period. The mean hallux valgus angle decreased from 38° to 23°, and the mean intermetatarsal angle correction decreased from 17° to 10°. The mean improvement in the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society hallux metatarsophalangeal-interphalangeal score increased from 52 to 84. Two feet (5.7%) required repeat surgery because of recurrent hallux valgus. No nonunions were identified. Proximal open wedge osteotomy provided satisfactory midterm results in the treatment of severe hallux valgus, with a low complication rate. The potential instability of the first tarsometatarsal joint does not seem to jeopardize the midterm results of the operation. PMID:26905255

  19. Title III Accountability Policies and Outcomes for K-12: Annual Measurable Achievement Objectives for English Language Learner Students in Southeast Region States. Summary. Issues & Answers. REL 2011-No. 105

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Kimberly S.; Dufford-Melendez, Kathleen

    2011-01-01

    This report details Title III accountability policies and outcomes for K-12 English language learner (ELL) students for school year 2007/08 in the six Southeast Region states (Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, North Carolina, and South Carolina) under the Title III annual measurable achievement objectives (AMAO) provision of the No Child…

  20. Impact of a Social-Emotional and Character Development Program on School-Level Indicators of Academic Achievement, Absenteeism, and Disciplinary Outcomes: A Matched-Pair, Cluster-Randomized, Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Frank; Flay, Brian; Vuchinich, Samuel; Acock, Alan; Washburn, Isaac; Beets, Michael; Li, Kin-Kit

    2010-01-01

    This article reports the effects of a comprehensive elementary school-based social-emotional and character education program on school-level achievement, absenteeism, and disciplinary outcomes utilizing a matched-pair, cluster-randomized, controlled design. The "Positive Action" Hawai'i trial included 20 racially/ethnically diverse schools (M…

  1. "Breakthrough" 1981 Eight Months Later. A Summary of the Presentations, Recommendations, and Outcomes of the 1981 Breakthrough Conference, to Assist Minority Women and Men and Nonminority Women Achieve Leadership Positions in Wisconsin's Vocational, Technical, and Adult Education System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grengg, Dolores A., Ed.; Thompson, Mary B., Ed.

    These proceedings consist of a summary of the presentations, recommendations, and outcomes of a conference held to assist minority women and men and nonminority women achieve leadership positions in Wisconsin's vocational, technical, and adult education (VTAE) system. Following a brief introduction and copy of the conference agenda, summaries are…

  2. 12 CFR 225.84 - What are the consequences of failing to maintain a satisfactory or better rating under the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false What are the consequences of failing to maintain a satisfactory or better rating under the Community Reinvestment Act at all insured depository institution subsidiaries? 225.84 Section 225.84 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE...

  3. Tracking Achievement Gaps and Assessing the Impact of NCLB on the Gaps: An In-Depth Look into National and State Reading and Math Outcome Trends

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Jaekyung

    2006-01-01

    This study offers systematic trend analyses of NAEP national and state-level public school fourth and eighth graders' reading and math achievement results during pre-NCLB (1990-2001) and post-NCLB (2002-2005) periods. It compares post-NCLB trends in reading and math achievement with pre-NCLB trends among different racial and socioeconomic groups…

  4. Does Entry Route Really Affect Academic Outcome? Academic Achievement of Traditional versus Non Traditional Entrants to BN(Hons) Pre-Registration Nursing Programmes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brimble, Mandy J.

    2015-01-01

    International trends for pre-registration nurse education at degree level alongside "widening access" initiatives mean that academic achievement of students entering via different educational routes is of interest to both higher and further education institutions. This article examines the academic achievement of students undertaking a…

  5. If I Read Better, Will I Score Higher ?: The Relationship between Oral Reading Fluency Instruction and Standardized Reading Achievement Test Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waldron, Chad H.

    2008-01-01

    The research study examined whether a difference existed between the reading achievement scores of an experimental group and a control group in standardized reading achievement. This difference measured the effect of systematic oral reading fluency instruction with repeated readings. Data from the 4Sight Pennsylvania Benchmark Reading Assessments…

  6. The Effects of Single-Gender Math Classroom Activities on the Achievement and Behavior Outcomes of Fifth-Grade Girls and Boys at a Public Elementary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaussee, Erik P.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine single-gender schools and/or classes as a method of improving student achievement and gaining greater satisfaction in school. The paper will further examine the effects of single-gender classes on student achievement, the academic gender gap, and the attitudes of students and teachers. It will also look at…

  7. Effects of Traditional and Nontraditional Forms of Parental Involvement on School-Level Achievement Outcome: An HLM Study Using SASS 2007-2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shen, Jianping; Washington, Alandra L.; Bierlein Palmer, Louann; Xia, Jiangang

    2014-01-01

    The authors examined parental involvement's (PI) impact on school performance. The hierarchical linear modeling method was applied to national Schools and Staffing Survey 2007-2008 data. They found that PI variables explained significant variance for the outcomes of (a) meeting adequate yearly progress (AYP) and (b) being free from sanctions.…

  8. Long-Term (Six Years) Clinical Outcome Discrimination of Patients in the Vegetative State Could be Achieved Based on the Operational Architectonics EEG Analysis: A Pilot Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Fingelkurts, Andrew A.; Fingelkurts, Alexander A.; Bagnato, Sergio; Boccagni, Cristina; Galardi, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Electroencephalogram (EEG) recordings are increasingly used to evaluate patients with disorders of consciousness (DOC) or assess their prognosis outcome in the short-term perspective. However, there is a lack of information concerning the effectiveness of EEG in classifying long-term (many years) outcome in chronic DOC patients. Here we tested whether EEG operational architectonics parameters (geared towards consciousness phenomenon detection rather than neurophysiological processes) could be useful for distinguishing a very long-term (6 years) clinical outcome of DOC patients whose EEGs were registered within 3 months post-injury. The obtained results suggest that EEG recorded at third month after sustaining brain damage, may contain useful information on the long-term outcome of patients in vegetative state: it could discriminate patients who remain in a persistent vegetative state from patients who reach a minimally conscious state or even recover a full consciousness in a long-term perspective (6 years) post-injury. These findings, if confirmed in further studies, may be pivotal for long-term planning of clinical care, rehabilitative programs, medical-legal decisions concerning the patients, and policy makers. PMID:27347266

  9. Do Typical RCTs of Education Interventions Have Sufficient Statistical Power for Linking Impacts on Teacher Practice and Student Achievement Outcomes? NCEE 2009-4065

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schochet, Peter Z.

    2009-01-01

    For RCTs of education interventions, it is often of interest to estimate associations between student and mediating teacher practice outcomes, to examine the extent to which the study's conceptual model is supported by the data, and to identify specific mediators that are most associated with student learning. This paper develops statistical power…

  10. Achieving the "triple aim" for inborn errors of metabolism: a review of challenges to outcomes research and presentation of a new practice-based evidence framework.

    PubMed

    Potter, Beth K; Chakraborty, Pranesh; Kronick, Jonathan B; Wilson, Kumanan; Coyle, Doug; Feigenbaum, Annette; Geraghty, Michael T; Karaceper, Maria D; Little, Julian; Mhanni, Aizeddin; Mitchell, John J; Siriwardena, Komudi; Wilson, Brenda J; Syrowatka, Ania

    2013-06-01

    Across all areas of health care, decision makers are in pursuit of what Berwick and colleagues have called the "triple aim": improving patient experiences with care, improving health outcomes, and managing health system impacts. This is challenging in a rare disease context, as exemplified by inborn errors of metabolism. There is a need for evaluative outcomes research to support effective and appropriate care for inborn errors of metabolism. We suggest that such research should consider interventions at both the level of the health system (e.g., early detection through newborn screening, programs to provide access to treatments) and the level of individual patient care (e.g., orphan drugs, medical foods). We have developed a practice-based evidence framework to guide outcomes research for inborn errors of metabolism. Focusing on outcomes across the triple aim, this framework integrates three priority themes: tailoring care in the context of clinical heterogeneity; a shift from "urgent care" to "opportunity for improvement"; and the need to evaluate the comparative effectiveness of emerging and established therapies. Guided by the framework, a new Canadian research network has been established to generate knowledge that will inform the design and delivery of health services for patients with inborn errors of metabolism and other rare diseases. PMID:23222662

  11. Achieving Successful Employment Outcomes with the Use of Assistive Technology. Report from the Study Group, Institute on Rehabilitation Issues (24th, Washington, DC, May 1998).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Radtke, Jean, Ed.

    Developed as a result of an institute on rehabilitation issues, this document is a guide to assistive technology as it affects successful competitive employment outcomes for people with disabilities. Chapter 1 offers basic information on assistive technology including basic assumptions, service provider approaches, options for technology…

  12. Understanding the Effect of KIPP as It Scales: Volume I, Impacts on Achievement and Other Outcomes. Final Report of KIPP's "Investing in Innovation Grant Evaluation"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuttle, Christina Clark; Gleason, Philip; Knechtel, Virginia; Nichols-Barrer, Ira; Booker, Kevin; Chojnacki, Gregory; Coen, Thomas; Goble, Lisbeth

    2015-01-01

    KIPP (Knowledge is Power Program) is a national network of public charter schools whose stated mission is to help underserved students enroll in and graduate from college. Prior studies (see Tuttle et al. 2013) have consistently found that attending a KIPP middle school positively affects student achievement, but few have addressed longer-term…

  13. Understanding the Effect of KIPP as It Scales: Volume I, Impacts on Achievement and Other Outcomes. Final Report of KIPP's Investing in Innovation Grant Evaluation. Executive Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuttle, Christina Clark; Gleason, Philip; Knechtel, Virginia; Nichols-Barrer, Ira; Booker, Kevin; Chojnacki, Gregory; Coen, Thomas; Goble, Lisbeth

    2015-01-01

    KIPP (Knowledge is Power Program) is a national network of public charter schools whose stated mission is to help underserved students enroll in and graduate from college. Prior studies (see Tuttle et al. 2013) have consistently found that attending a KIPP middle school positively affects student achievement, but few have addressed longer-term…

  14. Do Goals Lead to Outcomes or Can It Be the Other Way Around?: Causal Ordering of Mastery Goals, Metacognitive Strategies, and Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Ronnel B.; McInerney, Dennis M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Goal theory research has mostly focused on the unidirectional effects of goals on learning strategies and academic achievement. Reciprocal relationships have mostly been neglected. Aims: The primary aim of this study was to examine the reciprocal relations and causal ordering of mastery goals, metacognitive strategy use, and academic…

  15. Predicting Academic Outcomes for Third Grade Students: Examining the Reading Achievement of Diverse Students Using the Diagnostic Lens of the Dynamic Indicators of Basic Early Literacy Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adderley, Zhivago Trevino

    2013-01-01

    Despite the billions of dollars spent in the last forty years, America's efforts toward closing the achievement gaps among diverse learners and their receptive counterparts have not been realized. Limitations noted in previous research discussed the need to examine the unique contributions of diverse learner variables as a way of determining their…

  16. Achievement, Engagement, and Behavior Outcomes of At-Risk Youth Following Participation in a Required Ninth-Grade Academic Support Study Center Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, Jeffrey P.

    2012-01-01

    Overall, pretest-posttest results for achievement, behavior, and engagement for at-risk boys not eligible (n = 13) and eligible (n = 9) for participation in the free or reduced price lunch program who completed a school-year long academic support study center program were not statistically different over time and end of school year for cumulative…

  17. Examining the Relationship between Treatment Outcomes for Academic Achievement and Social Skills in School-Age Children with Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rutherford, Laura E.; DuPaul, George J.; Jitendra, Asha K.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between treatment-induced changes in academic achievement and social skills in elementary school-age children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder. A sample of 123 children in grades 1 through 4 with symptoms of inattention, impulsivity and/or hyperactivity, and significant…

  18. Achieving an Undetectable PSA After Radiotherapy for Biochemical Progression After Radical Prostatectomy Is an Independent Predictor of Biochemical Outcome-Results of a Retrospective Study

    SciTech Connect

    Wiegel, Thomas Lohm, Gunnar; Bottke, Dirk; Hoecht, Stefan; Miller, Kurt; Siegmann, Alessandra; Schostak, Martin; Neumann, Konrad; Hinkelbein, Wolfgang

    2009-03-15

    Purpose: Salvage radiotherapy (SRT) is commonly used to treat patients with biochemical failure after radical prostatectomy (RP). Retrospective series have demonstrated biochemical response in approximately 60-75% of patients, but only a significantly lower rate of patients achieves a response with a decrease of the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) to a value below the limits of detectability. Therefore, long-term response at 10 years is only about 20-25% in all of these patients. The purpose of this study was to determine prognostic factors with impact on achieving the undetectable PSA range after SRT and to define the role of this end point. Methods and Materials: Between 1997 and 2004, 162 patients received SRT at the Charite Universitaetsmedizin, Berlin. No patient had hormonal treatment before SRT and 90% of the patients (143) had a SRT dose of 66 Gy. We analyzed the impact of nine potential risk factors on achieving an undetectable PSA after RT and on biochemical relapse-free survival (bNED) after SRT. Results: Median follow-up time was 41.5 months and median PSA pre-RT was 0.33 ng/mL. Calculated bNED for 3.5 years was 54%. A total of 60% of the patients achieved an undetectable PSA after SRT. Univariate analysis demonstrated statistically significant predictors of biochemical progression after SRT: Gleason score (p = 0.01), PSA pre-SRT (p = 0.031), tumor stage (p = 0.047), and persistent detectable PSA after RT (p < 0.00005). In multivariate analysis, margin status (p = 0.017) and PSA pre-SRT (p = 0.002) were significant predictors of an undetectable PSA after SRT. The most significant independent predictor of bNED was 'PSA undetectable after RT' (p < 0.0005) with a hazard ratio of 8.4, thus leading to a calculated bNED at 3.5 years of 75% compared with only 18% for those patients, who did not achieve an undetectable PSA after SRT. The rate of severe Grade 3-4 side effects was below 2.5%. Conclusions: The study represents one of the largest retrospective

  19. Similar Clinical and Surgical Outcomes Achieved with Early Compared to Late Anti-TNF Induction in Mild-to-Moderate Ulcerative Colitis: A Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Fedorak, Darryl K.; Dieleman, Levinus A.; Halloran, Brendan P.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Biologic agents targeting tumor necrosis factor alpha are effective in the management of ulcerative colitis (UC), but their use is often postponed until after failure of other treatment modalities. Objectives. We aim to determine if earlier treatment with infliximab or adalimumab alters clinical and surgical outcomes in UC patients. Methods. A retrospective cohort study was conducted evaluating UC outpatients treated with infliximab or adalimumab from 2003 to 2014. Patients were stratified by time to first anti-TNF exposure; early initiation was defined as starting treatment within three years of diagnosis. Primary outcomes were colectomy, UC-related hospitalization, and clinical secondary loss of response. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to assess time to the primary outcomes. Results. 115 patients were included (78 infliximab, 37 adalimumab). Median follow-up was 175.6 weeks (IQR 72.4–228.4 weeks). Fifty-seven (49.6%) patients received early anti-TNF therapy; median time to treatment in this group was 38.1 (23.3–91.0) weeks compared to 414.0 (254.0–561.3) weeks in the late initiator cohort (p < 0.0001). Patients treated with early anti-TNF therapy had more severe endoscopic disease at induction (mean Mayo endoscopy subscore 2.46 (SD ± 0.66) versus 1.86 (±0.67), p < 0.001) and trended towards increased risk of colectomy (17.5% versus 8.6%, p = 0.16) and UC-related hospitalization (43.9% versus 27.6%, p = 0.07). In multivariate regression analysis, early anti-TNF induction was not associated with colectomy (HR 2.02 [95% CI: 0.57–7.20]), hospitalization (HR 1.66 [0.84–3.30]), or secondary loss of response (HR 0.86 [0.52–1.42]). Conclusions. Anti-TNF therapy is initiated earlier in patients with severe UC but earlier treatment does not prevent hospitalization, colectomy, or secondary loss of response. PMID:27478817

  20. Predictors and outcomes of sustained, intermittent or never achieving remission in patients with recent onset inflammatory polyarthritis: results from the Norfolk Arthritis Register

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Michael J.; Diffin, Janet; Scirè, Carlo A.; Lunt, Mark; MacGregor, Alex J.; Symmons, Deborah P. M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. Early remission is the current treatment strategy for patients with inflammatory polyarthritis (IP) and RA. Our objective was to identify baseline factors associated with achieving remission: sustained (SR), intermittent (IR) or never (NR) over a 5-year period in patients with early IP. Methods. Clinical and demographic data of patients with IP recruited to the Norfolk Arthritis Register (NOAR) were obtained at baseline and years 1, 2, 3 and 5. Remission was defined as no tender or swollen joints (out of 51). Patients were classified as NR or PR, respectively, if they were in remission at: no assessment or ⩾3 consecutive assessments after baseline, and IR otherwise. Ordinal regression and a random effects model, respectively, were used to examine the association between baseline factors, remission group and HAQ scores over time. Results. A total of 868 patients (66% female) were included. Of these, 54%, 34% and 12% achieved NR, IR and SR, respectively. In multivariate analysis, female sex (odds ratio, OR 0.47, 95% CI: 0.35, 0.63), higher tender joint count (OR = 0.94, 95% CI: 0.93, 0.96), higher HAQ (OR = 0.59, 95% CI: 0.48, 0.74), being obese (OR = 0.70, 95% CI: 0.50, 0.99), hypertensive (OR = 0.67, 95% CI: 0.50, 0.90) or depressed (OR = 0.74, 95% CI: 0.55, 1.00) at baseline were independent predictors of being in a lower remission group. IR and SR were associated with lower HAQ scores over time and lower DAS28 at year 5. Conclusion. Women with higher tender joint count and disability at baseline, depression, obesity and hypertension were less likely to achieve remission. This information could help when stratifying patients for more aggressive therapy. PMID:27220594

  1. Postmastectomy Radiation Improves the Outcome of Patients With Locally Advanced Breast Cancer Who Achieve a Pathologic Complete Response to Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    McGuire, Sean E.; Gonzalez-Angulo, Ana M.; Huang, Eugene H.; Tucker, Susan L.; Kau, S.-W.C.; Yu, T.-K.; Strom, Eric A.; Oh, Julia L.; Woodward, Wendy A.; Tereffe, Welela; Hunt, Kelly K.; Kuerer, Henry M.; Sahin, Aysegul A.; Hortobagyi, Gabriel N.; Buchholz, Thomas A. . E-mail: tbuchhol@mdanderson.org

    2007-07-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the role of postmastectomy radiation therapy in women with breast cancer who achieved a pathologic complete response (pCR) to neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively identified 226 patients treated at our institution who achieved a pCR at surgery after receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Of these, the 106 patients without inflammatory breast cancer who were treated with mastectomy were analyzed. The patients' clinical stages at diagnosis were I in 2%, II in 31%, IIIA in 30%, IIIB in 25%, and IIIC in 11% (American Joint Committee on Cancer 2003 system). Of the patients, 92% received anthracycline-based chemotherapy, and 38% also received a taxane. A total of 72 patients received postmastectomy radiation therapy, and 34 did not. The actuarial rates of local-regional recurrence (LRR) and survival of the two groups were compared using the log-rank test. Results: The median follow-up of surviving patients was 62 months. Use of radiation therapy did not affect the 10-year rates of LRR for patients with Stage I or II disease (the 10-year LRR rates were 0% for both groups). However, the 10-year LRR rate for patients with Stage III disease was significantly improved with radiation therapy (7.3% {+-} 3.5% with vs. 33.3% {+-} 15.7% without; p 0.040). Within this cohort, use of radiation therapy was also associated with improved disease-specific and overall survival. Conclusion: Postmastectomy radiation therapy provides a significant clinical benefit for breast cancer patients who present with clinical Stage III disease and achieve a pCR after neoadjuvant chemothearpy.

  2. Long-Term Treatment Outcomes of Patients Infected With Hepatitis C Virus: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of the Survival Benefit of Achieving a Sustained Virological Response

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, Bryony; Saleem, Jawaad; Heath, Katherine; Cooke, Graham S.; Hill, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Background. Achievement of a sustained virologic response (SVR) after treatment for Hepatitis C infection is associated with improved outcomes. This meta-analysis aimed to determine the impact of SVR on long-term mortality risk compared with nonresponders in a range of populations. Methods. An electronic search identified all studies assessing all-cause mortality in SVR and non-SVR patients. Eligible articles were stratified into general, cirrhotic, and populations coinfected with human immunodeficiency virus. The adjusted hazard ratio (95% confidence interval [CI]) for mortality in patients achieving SVR vs non-SVR, and pooled estimates for the 5-year mortality in each group were calculated. Results. 31 studies (n = 33 360) were identified as suitable for inclusion. Median follow-up time was 5.4 years (interquartile range, 4.9–7.5) across all studies. The adjusted hazard ratio of mortality for patients achieving SVR vs non-SVR was 0.50 (95% CI, .37–.67) in the general population, 0.26 (95% CI, .18–.74) in the cirrhotic group, and 0.21 (.10–.45) in the coinfected group. The pooled 5-year mortality rates were significantly lower for patients achieving SVR compared with non-SVR in all 3 populations. Conclusions. The results suggest that there is a significant survival benefit of achieving an SVR compared with unsuccessful treatment in a range of populations infected with hepatitis C virus. PMID:25987643

  3. Transforming the Patient Role to Achieve Better Outcomes Through a Patient Empowerment Program: A Randomized Wait-List Control Trial Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Plaksin, Joseph; Zabar, Sondra; Wallach, Andrew; Sawicki, Chester; Kundrod, Sarita; Kalet, Adina

    2016-01-01

    Background In the patient-centered medical home model of health care, both health care providers (HCPs) and patients must understand their respective roles and responsibilities, view the other as a partner, and use communication skills that promote shared decision making. This is particularly necessary in chronic conditions where outcomes depend on behavior change and in underserved populations where the burden of chronic disease is high. Objective The objectives of this study are to determine if a Patient Empowerment Program (PEP) (1) is acceptable to patients and feasible across multiple clinical sites; (2) will increase patient preference for control in medical decision making, improve patient perceptions of patient-HCP communication, and increase patient activation; (3) is associated with an increase in diabetes self-management behaviors; and (4) has an effect on hemoglobin A 1c(HbA 1c) level. Methods This study recruited English-speaking adult patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus from three urban clinical sites in New York City and randomized them to an immediate intervention group that completed the PEP intervention or a deferred intervention group that served as a wait-list control and completed the PEP intervention after 3-4 months. The PEP intervention consists of two facilitated small group sessions. Session 1 focuses on defining HCP and patient roles in the medical encounter by introducing ideal communication behaviors in each role and by providing both positive and negative examples of patient-HCP encounters. Session 2 focuses on practicing communication skills by role-playing with actors who serve as standardized health care providers. After the role play, participants set goals for their own health care and for future interactions with their HCPs. Outcome measures include the Patient Activation Measure; Ask, Understand, Remember Assessment; Krantz Health Opinion Survey; SF-12v2 Health Survey; Diabetes Self-Management Questionnaire; and HbA 1c. These

  4. Preparation of LiFePO{sub 4} with inverse opal structure and its satisfactory electrochemical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Junbiao . E-mail: ljb01@mails.tsinghua.edu.cn; Tang Zilong; Zhang Zhongtai; Shen Wanci

    2005-12-08

    Phase pure, well-crystallized and homogeneous LiFePO{sub 4} powder with inverse opal structure was obtained by calcining the precursors of Li{sup +}, Fe{sup 2+} and PO{sub 4} {sup 3-} in the presence of organic template of poly(styrene-methyl methacrylate-acrylic acid) latex micro-spheres under nitrogen atmosphere. The resultant products were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), chemical titration, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and Land 2001A electrochemical measurement system. Results indicated that after the decomposition of organic template, inverse opal structure and conductive carbon were left in the resultant products. With the large specific surface area resulting from inverse opal structure and with the conductive carbon, the products delivered satisfactory capacity and superior rate capability at room temperature, i.e., over 100 mAh/g at the high current density of 5.9C.

  5. A study of the problem of designing airplanes with satisfactory inherent damping of the dutch roll oscillation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, John P; Mckinney, Marion O , Jr

    1954-01-01

    Considerable interest has recently been shown in means of obtaining satisfactory stability of the dutch roll oscillation for modern high-performance airplanes without resort to complicated artificial stabilizing devices. One approach to this problem is to lay out the airplane in the earliest stages of design so that it will have the greatest practicable inherent stability of the lateral oscillation. The present report presents some preliminary results of a theoretical analysis to determine the design features that appear most promising in providing adequate inherent stability. These preliminary results cover the case of fighter airplanes at subsonic speeds. The investigation indicated that it is possible to design fighter airplanes to have substantially better inherent stability than most current designs. Since the use of low-aspect-ratio swept-back wings is largely responsible for poor dutch roll stability, it is important to design the airplane with the maximum aspect ratio and minimum sweep that will permit attainment of the desired performance. The radius of gyration in roll should be kept as low as possible and the nose-up inclination of the principal longitudinal axis of inertia should be made as great as practicable. (author)

  6. Essays on Educational Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ampaabeng, Samuel Kofi

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation examines the determinants of student outcomes--achievement, attainment, occupational choices and earnings--in three different contexts. The first two chapters focus on Ghana while the final chapter focuses on the US state of Massachusetts. In the first chapter, I exploit the incidence of famine and malnutrition that resulted to…

  7. Minority Achievement Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prince George's Community Coll., Largo, MD. Office of Institutional Research and Analysis.

    This report summarizes the achievements of Prince George's Community College (PGCC) with regard to minority outcomes. Table 1 summarizes the undergraduate enrollment trends for African Americans as well as total minorities from fall 1994 through fall 1998. Both the headcount number of African American students and the proportion of African…

  8. Dermal Fillers: Tips to Achieve Successful Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Vedamurthy, Maya; Vedamurthy, Amar

    2008-01-01

    Fillers have become a common aesthetic treatment for several cosmetic problems. Several types of fillers are available from different sources and of different longevities. It is important that the treating physician be aware of the different techniques of administration and their possible side effects. This article reviews the available literature on the subject. PMID:20300346

  9. The Impact of Instructional Technology Practices on Student Academic Performance of Selected Satisfactory and Unsatisfactory Elementary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grant, Terry L.

    2011-01-01

    The nation's K-12 schools are faced with critical challenges that are complex, complicated, and unprecedented (NCLB, 2001; Education Alliance, 2005; & Kowalski, 2009). The key challenges facing schools are elevating academic achievement; meeting No Child Left Behind (2001) standards (NCLB); South Carolina standards; the recruitment and retention…

  10. Cost analysis and outcomes of simple elbow dislocations

    PubMed Central

    Panteli, Michalis; Pountos, Ippokratis; Kanakaris, Nikolaos K; Tosounidis, Theodoros H; Giannoudis, Peter V

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the management, clinical outcome and cost implications of three different treatment regimes for simple elbow dislocations. METHODS: Following institutional board approval, we performed a retrospective review of all consecutive patients treated for simple elbow dislocations in a Level I trauma centre between January 2008 and December 2010. Based on the length of elbow immobilisation (LOI), patients were divided in three groups (Group I, < 2 wk; Group II, 2-3 wk; and Group III, > 3 wk). Outcome was considered satisfactory when a patient could achieve a pain-free range of motion ≥ 100° (from 30° to 130°). The associated direct medical costs for the treatment of each patient were then calculated and analysed. RESULTS: We identified 80 patients who met the inclusion criteria. Due to loss to follow up, 13 patients were excluded from further analysis, leaving 67 patients for the final analysis. The mean LOI was 14 d (median 15 d; range 3-43 d) with a mean duration of hospital engagement of 67 d (median 57 d; range 10-351 d). Group III (prolonged immobilisation) had a statistically significant worse outcome in comparison to Group I and II (P = 0.04 and P = 0.01 respectively); however, there was no significant difference in the outcome between groups I and II (P = 0.30). No statistically significant difference in the direct medical costs between the groups was identified. CONCLUSION: The length of elbow immobilization doesn’t influence the medical cost; however immobilisation longer than three weeks is associated with persistent stiffness and a less satisfactory clinical outcome. PMID:26301180

  11. Eye Movement Models of Academic Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dillon, Ronna F.

    Current pscyhometric assessments, which are based on test score predictors providing information only on products of performance, fail to account for satisfactory amounts of variance in academic achievement or other criterion measures of interest. To corroborate and extend previous work on information processing measures, by examining the…

  12. Superintendent Tenure and Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    A correlational research design was used to examine the influence of superintendent tenure on student achievement in rural Appalachian Kentucky school districts. Superintendent tenure was compared to aggregated student achievement scores for 2011 and to changes in students' learning outcomes over the course of the superintendents' tenure. The…

  13. 49 CFR 385.413 - What happens if a motor carrier receives a proposed safety rating that is less than Satisfactory?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What happens if a motor carrier receives a proposed safety rating that is less than Satisfactory? 385.413 Section 385.413 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER...

  14. First-Year Pre-Service Teachers in Taiwan--Do They Enter the Teacher Program with Satisfactory Scientific Literacy and Attitudes Toward Science?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chin, Chi-Chin

    2005-01-01

    Scientific literacy and attitudes toward science play an important role in human daily lives. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether first-year pre-service teachers in colleges in Taiwan have a satisfactory level of scientific literacy. The domains of scientific literacy selected in this study include: (1) science content; (2) the…

  15. Pell Grants as Performance-Based Aid? An Examination of Satisfactory Academic Progress Requirements in the Nation's Largest Need-Based Aid Program. A CAPSEE Working Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schudde, Lauren; Scott-Clayton, Judith

    2014-01-01

    The Federal Pell Grant Program is the nation's largest need-based grant program. While students' initial eligibility for the Pell is based on financial need, renewal of the award is contingent on their making satisfactory academic progress (SAP)--meeting minimum academic standards similar to those proposed in models of performance-based…

  16. 17 CFR 240.15c3-1d - Satisfactory Subordination Agreements (Appendix D to 17 CFR 240.15c3-1).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... scheduled; (B) Failure to pay when due other money obligations of a specified material amount; (C) Discovery... Agreements (Appendix D to 17 CFR 240.15c3-1). 240.15c3-1d Section 240.15c3-1d Commodity and Securities...-Counter Markets § 240.15c3-1d Satisfactory Subordination Agreements (Appendix D to 17 CFR 240.15c3-1)....

  17. 17 CFR 240.15c3-1d - Satisfactory Subordination Agreements (Appendix D to 17 CFR 240.15c3-1).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... scheduled; (B) Failure to pay when due other money obligations of a specified material amount; (C) Discovery... Agreements (Appendix D to 17 CFR 240.15c3-1). 240.15c3-1d Section 240.15c3-1d Commodity and Securities...-Counter Markets § 240.15c3-1d Satisfactory Subordination Agreements (Appendix D to 17 CFR 240.15c3-1)....

  18. 17 CFR 240.15c3-1d - Satisfactory Subordination Agreements (Appendix D to 17 CFR 240.15c3-1).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Agreements (Appendix D to 17 CFR 240.15c3-1). 240.15c3-1d Section 240.15c3-1d Commodity and Securities...-Counter Markets § 240.15c3-1d Satisfactory Subordination Agreements (Appendix D to 17 CFR 240.15c3-1). (a... (D). (2) Certain Definitions. For purposes of 17 CFR 240.15c3-1 and this Appendix (D): (i)...

  19. [Medical care support intervention to the patient and family who has chosen a terminal care at home - an influence of satisfactory experience on the culture of terminal care].

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Kaoru; Ishikawa, Mariko; Kouketsu, Nobuko; Ozaki, Mitsuyo; Tomita, Ikue; Hong, Youngjae; Miura, Hisayuki; Nishikawa, Mitsunori; Yokoe, Yuriko; Nakashima, Kazumitsu

    2010-12-01

    The National Center for Geriatrics and Gerontology in Japan implemented a home medical care support system for aged patients in April 2009. In this study, we report a case of terminal care system where a medical care intervention was carried out by a close coordination of visiting nurses and other staffs with a "at-home terminal care" brochure on hand, and we discussed how this system was brought forward satisfactory and how it affected this culture. PMID:21368543

  20. Enriching the Hierarchical Model of Achievement Motivation: Autonomous and Controlling Reasons Underlying Achievement Goals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michou, Aikaterini; Vansteenkiste, Maarten; Mouratidis, Athanasios; Lens, Willy

    2014-01-01

    Background: The hierarchical model of achievement motivation presumes that achievement goals channel the achievement motives of need for achievement and fear of failure towards motivational outcomes. Yet, less is known whether autonomous and controlling reasons underlying the pursuit of achievement goals can serve as additional pathways between…

  1. Reading Requirements for Satisfactory Careers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levin, Beatrice J.

    Career education is a wholistic concept which includes both job satisfaction and the imaginative use of leisure. It aims to facilitate education of all students so they may appropriately choose and prepare not only for their life's work but for all aspects of living. Since career education emphasizes the importance of developing vocational and…

  2. Project ACHIEVE final report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-13

    Project ACHIEVE was a math/science academic enhancement program aimed at first year high school Hispanic American students. Four high schools -- two in El Paso, Texas and two in Bakersfield, California -- participated in this Department of Energy-funded program during the spring and summer of 1996. Over 50 students, many of whom felt they were facing a nightmare future, were given the opportunity to work closely with personal computers and software, sophisticated calculators, and computer-based laboratories -- an experience which their regular academic curriculum did not provide. Math and science projects, exercises, and experiments were completed that emphasized independent and creative applications of scientific and mathematical theories to real world problems. The most important outcome was the exposure Project ACHIEVE provided to students concerning the college and technical-field career possibilities available to them.

  3. The Impact of Buccal Bone Defects and Immediate Placement on the Esthetic Outcome of Maxillary Anterior Single-Tooth Implants.

    PubMed

    Kamperos, Georgios; Zambara, Ioanna; Petsinis, Vassileios; Zambaras, Dimitrios

    2016-08-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the impact of buccal bone defects and immediate placement on the esthetic outcome of maxillary anterior single-tooth implants. The archives of the Department of Dental Implants & Tissue Regeneration at Hygeia Hospital during a 5-year period (2010-2014) were retrospectively analyzed, in search of patients treated with a single-tooth implant after extraction of a maxillary incisor. The status of the buccal bone plate and the time of implant placement were recorded. The pink esthetic score (PES) of each case was evaluated, with a maximum score of 14. In total, 91 patients were included in the study. The mean PES was 10.5. The outcome was considered satisfactory (PES ≥ 8) in 89% and (almost) perfect (PES ≥ 12) in 35% of the cases. Immediate implant placement had no impact on PES (P > .05), even though it demonstrated slightly greater variability. On the other hand, buccal bone defects had a negative effect on PES (P < .0001). In conclusion, a satisfactory esthetic outcome can be achieved in single-tooth implants in the anterior maxilla. The presence of buccal bone defects is considered a negative prognostic factor, whereas immediate implant placement does not affect the esthetic outcome. PMID:27077689

  4. WWC Review of the Report "Staying on Track: Testing Higher Achievement's Long-Term Impact on Academic Outcomes and High School Choice." What Works Clearinghouse Single Study Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2014

    2014-01-01

    This study of 952 fifth and sixth graders in Washington, DC, and Alexandria, Virginia, found that students who were offered the "Higher Achievement" program had higher test scores in mathematical problem solving and were more likely to be admitted to and attend private competitive high schools. "Higher Achievement" is a…

  5. "I Gained a Skill and a Change in Attitude": A Case Study Describing How an Online Continuing Professional Education Course for Pharmacists Supported Achievement of Its Transfer-to-Practice Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marks, Pia Zeni; Jennings, Brad; Farrell, Barbara; Kennie-Kaulbach, Natalie; Jorgenson, Derek; Sharpe, Jane Pearson; Waite, Nancy

    2014-01-01

    The convenience and flexibility of online learning clearly make it an attractive option for learners in professional development contexts. There is less clarity, however, about how it fares as a vehicle for enabling the applied, practice-oriented outcomes typically associated with professional development learning. This paper presents a case study…

  6. Impact of stress on the satisfactory completion of a simulated crisis scenario by reactor operator and senior reactor operator requalification trainees at the Susquehanna Training Center

    SciTech Connect

    Wircenski, S.S.

    1985-01-01

    The sample of 21 requalification trainees used in this study involved four groups of trainees, who participated in the requalification training cycle from December 19, 1984, to January 16, 1985. The interference-response stress measurement was studied through the performance of tasks as measured by the instructor on the Trainee Scenario Evaluation Report. The direct-response stress measurement was examined through the measurement of heart beat and blood pressure of the trainees during the crisis scenarios as monitored by the Pollenex Digital Blood Pressure Machine. The reported-response stress measurement was studied through the trainee's self-evaluation on the Multiple Affect Adjective Check List (Anxiety Scale)-Today Form. The major findings are: (1) because of the satisfactory completion of the crisis scenario by all of the requalification trainees, the study was unable to draw a significant relationship between any single trainee characteristic and the satisfactory completion of a crisis scenario; (2) an overall pattern exists in the heart beat and blood pressure of the direct-response stress measurement and in the MAACL of the reported-response stress measurement; and (3) twelve pairs of variables compared the unusual event, the general emergency event, and following the scenario means with the baseline mean for significance. Those twelve pairs included a significant difference at the 0.05 level between six pairs.

  7. Double half-cone flap umbilicoplasty for proboscoid umbilical hernia in a 2 years old child with satisfactory results 2 years later

    PubMed Central

    Ashu, Eseme Ebai; Leroy, Guifo Marc; Aristide, Bang Guy; Joss, Bitang Mafok Louis; Bonaventure, Jemea; Patrick, Savom Eric; Myriam, Fotso Guegne

    2015-01-01

    Surgical repair of large umbilical hernias may present a challenging surgical problem; standard surgical techniques have proven to be inadequate for both closing the fascial defect of the umbilicus and providing a satisfactory cosmetic result. We describe here a case of double half-cone flap umbilicoplasty that was performed in a 2 years old boy. The case of a 2 years old child with proboscoid umbilical hernia. The protruding umbilical skin was excised sharply by two V-shaped cuts leaving two half cones, a short cephalic (0.5cm) and a long caudal (1cm). A classic herniotomy was carried out, with repair of the facial defect. The caudal half cone was sutured from its apex till half it's length upon itself with interrupted sutures and it was anchored deeply to the fascia. Then we inverted the cephalic half cone which was sutured to the caudal cone to form the new umbilicus. The early result was excellent with no complications and the result after 2years revealed a cosmetically satisfactory shape of the umbilicus. this technique provides a good solution for reconstruction of the protruding umbilical skin and it is easy to learn, easy to be taught and perform in surgical environments and may be applicable for any kind of umbilical reconstruction. PMID:26664545

  8. Achievement Goals and Discrete Achievement Emotions: A Theoretical Model and Prospective Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pekrun, Reinhard; Elliot, Andrew J.; Maier, Markus A.

    2006-01-01

    A theoretical model linking achievement goals to discrete achievement emotions is proposed. The model posits relations between the goals of the trichotomous achievement goal framework and 8 commonly experienced achievement emotions organized in a 2 (activity/outcome focus) x 2 (positive/negative valence) taxonomy. Two prospective studies tested…

  9. Pre-transplant achievement of negativity in minimal residual disease and French-American-British L1 morphology predict superior outcome after allogeneic transplant for Philadelphia chromosome positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia: an analysis of Southeast Asian patients.

    PubMed

    Ma, Liyuan; Hao, Siguo; Diong, Colin; Goh, Yeow-Tee; Gopalakrishnan, Sathish; Ho, Aloysius; Hwang, William; Koh, Liang-Piu; Koh, Mickey; Lim, Zi-Yi; Loh, Yvonne; Poon, Michelle; Tan, Lip-Kun; Tan, Patrick; Linn, Yeh-Ching

    2015-05-01

    To better understand predictive factors and improve the clinical outcome of allogeneic transplant for patients with Philadelphia positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia, we analyzed 67 Southeast Asian patients transplanted in our institutions. Multivariate analysis showed that disease status before transplant, year of transplant and, interestingly, French-American-British (FAB) subtype had a significant impact on overall survival (OS) and non-relapse mortality. Patients who were minimal residual disease (MRD) negative at transplant had a 3-year OS of 73% compared to those who were MRD positive (45%) and refractory (0%). The 3-year cumulative incidence of relapse was 18% and 36% for the MRD negative and positive groups, respectively. FAB L1 subtype had a significantly superior 3-year OS of 63% vs. 29% for L2 subtype. Pre-transplant use of a tyrosine kinase inhibitor significantly improved outcomes in univariate but not multivariate analysis, as it served to induce more patients into MRD negativity, which was the factor that directly improved transplant outcome. PMID:25139689

  10. Non-Verbal Reasoning Ability and Academic Achievement as Moderators of the Relation between Adverse Life Events and Emotional and Behavioural Problems in Early Adolescence: The Importance of Moderator and Outcome Specificity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flouri, Eirini; Tzavidis, Nikos

    2011-01-01

    This study was carried out to model the functional form of the effect of contextual risk (number of adverse life events) on emotional and behavioural problems in early adolescence, and to test how intelligence and academic achievement compare as moderators of this effect. The effect of number of adverse life events on emotional and behavioural…

  11. Can Social Support Protect Bullied Adolescents from Adverse Outcomes? A Prospective Study on the Effects of Bullying on the Educational Achievement and Mental Health of Adolescents at Secondary Schools in East London

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothon, Catherine; Head, Jenny; Klineberg, Emily; Stansfeld, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates the extent to which social support can have a buffering effect against the potentially adverse consequences of bullying on school achievement and mental health. It uses a representative multiethnic sample of adolescents attending East London secondary schools in three boroughs. Bullied adolescents were less likely to…

  12. On the Road to Success: How States Collaborate and Use Data to Improve Student Outcomes. A Working Paper by the Achieving the Dream Cross-State Data Work Group

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Chris; Borcoman, Gabriela; Chappell-Long, Cheryl; Coperthwaite, Corby A.; Glenn, Darrell; Hutchinson, Tony; Hughes, John; Jenkins, Rick; Jovanovich, Donna; Keller, Jonathan; Klimczak, Benjamin; Schneider, Bill; Stewart, Carmen; Stuart, Debra; Yeager, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Enrollment is rising across the nation's community colleges, but completion rates remain untenably low. Reformers are focusing on the importance of using comprehensive, high-quality data on student progress and completion to bring about change. A core tenet of Achieving the Dream: Community Colleges Count has been to embed a culture of…

  13. Do Charter Schools Improve Student Achievement?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Melissa A.; Gleason, Philip M.; Tuttle, Christina Clark; Silverberg, Marsha K.

    2015-01-01

    This article presents findings from a lottery-based study of the impacts of a broad set of 33 charter middle schools across 13 states on student achievement. To estimate charter school impacts, we compare test score outcomes of students admitted to these schools through the randomized admissions lotteries with outcomes of applicants who were not…

  14. First-year Pre-service Teachers in Taiwan—Do they enter the teacher program with satisfactory scientific literacy and attitudes toward science?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, Chi-Chin

    2005-10-01

    Scientific literacy and attitudes toward science play an important role in human daily lives. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether first-year pre-service teachers in colleges in Taiwan have a satisfactory level of scientific literacy. The domains of scientific literacy selected in this study include: (1) science content; (2) the interaction between science, technology and society (STS); (3) the nature of science; and (4) attitudes toward science. In this study, the instruments used were Chinese translations of the Test of Basic Scientific Literacy (TBSL) and the Test of Science-related Attitudes. Elementary education majors (n = 141) and science education majors (n = 138) from four teachers’ colleges responded to these instruments. The statistical results from the tests revealed that, in general, the basic scientific literacy of first-year pre-service teachers was at a satisfactory level. Of the six scales covered in this study, the pre-service teachers displayed the highest literacy in health science, STS, and life science. Literacy in the areas of the nature of science and earth science was rated lowest. The results also showed that science education majors scored significantly higher in physical science, life science, nature of science, science content, and the TBSL than elementary science majors. Males performed better than females in earth science, life science, science content, and the TBSL. Next, elementary education majors responded with more “don’t know” responses than science education majors. In general, the pre-service teachers were moderately positive in terms of attitudes toward science while science education majors had more positive attitudes toward science. There was no significant difference in attitudes between genders. Previous experience in science indicated more positive attitudes toward science. The results from stepwise regression revealed that STS, the nature of science, and attitudes toward science could explain 50

  15. Student Outcomes Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clagett, Craig A.

    Prince George's Community College (PGCC) created a Student Outcomes Report in December 1996 that measures course completion, retention, student achievement, program completion, transfer, and certification. Findings indicated that though the course pass rate was 75%, individual course completion ranged from 44% to 100%. Divisional pass rates ranged…

  16. Long-term outcomes of urinary tract reconstruction in patients with neurogenic urinary tract dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, E. U.; Singh, Gurpreet

    2013-01-01

    The advent of specialized spinal units and better understanding of the pathophysiology of neurogenic urinary tract dysfunction has made long-term survival of these patients a reality. This has, in turn, led to an increase in quality and choice of management modalities offered to these patients including complex anatomic urinary tract reconstructive procedures tailored to the unique needs of each individual with variable outcomes. We performed a literature review evaluating the long-term outcomes of these reconstructive procedures. To achieve this, we conducted a world-wide electronic literature search of long-term outcomes published in English. As the premise of this review is long-term outcomes, we have focused on pathologies where evidence of long-term outcome is available such as patients with spinal injuries and spina bifida. Therapeutic success following urinary tract reconstruction is usually measured by preservation of renal function, improvement in quality-of-life, the satisfactory achievement of agreed outcomes and the prevention of serious complications. Prognostic factors include neuropathic detrusor overactivity; sphincter dyssynergia; bladder over distension; high pressure storage and high leak point pressures; vesicoureteric reflex, stone formation and urinary tract infections. Although, the past decade has witnessed a reduction in the total number of bladder reconstructive surgeries in the UK, these procedures are essentially safe and effective; but require long-term clinical and functional follow-up/monitoring. Until tissue engineering and gene therapy becomes more mainstream, we feel there is still a place for urinary tract reconstruction in patients with neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction. PMID:24235796

  17. Graded Achievement, Tested Achievement, and Validity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brookhart, Susan M.

    2015-01-01

    Twenty-eight studies of grades, over a century, were reviewed using the argument-based approach to validity suggested by Kane as a theoretical framework. The review draws conclusions about the meaning of graded achievement, its relation to tested achievement, and changes in the construct of graded achievement over time. "Graded…

  18. Chronic stroke survivors achieve comparable outcomes following virtual task specific repetitive training guided by a wearable robotic orthosis (UL-EXO7) and actual task specific repetitive training guided by a physical therapist.

    PubMed

    Byl, Nancy N; Abrams, Gary M; Pitsch, Erica; Fedulow, Irina; Kim, Hyunchul; Simkins, Matt; Nagarajan, Srikantan; Rosen, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    Survivors post stroke commonly have upper limb impairments. Patients can drive neural reorganization, brain recovery and return of function with task specific repetitive training (TSRT). Fifteen community independent stroke survivors (25-75 years, >6 months post stroke, Upper Limb Fugl Meyer [ULFM] scores 16-39) participated in this randomized feasibility study to compare outcomes of upper limb TSRT guided by a robotic orthosis (bilateral or unilateral) or a physical therapist. After 6 weeks of training (18 h), across all subjects, there were significant improvements in depression, flexibility, strength, tone, pain and voluntary movement (ULFM) (p < 0.05; effect sizes 0.49-3.53). Each training group significantly improved ULFM scores and range of motion without significant group differences. Virtual or actual TSRT performed with a robotic orthosis or a physical therapist significantly reduced arm impairments around the shoulder and elbow without significant gains in fine motor hand control, activities of daily living or independence. PMID:23911077

  19. Developmental Outcome of Childhood Leukemia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coniglio, Susan J.; Blackman, James A.

    1995-01-01

    Literature on developmental and psychosocial outcomes of childhood leukemia is reviewed, focusing on preschool-age children. Studies are categorized in terms of outcome measures: intelligence/achievement, neuropsychological, memory/attention, and psychosocial tests. Evidence suggests that preschool children with leukemia are at high risk for…

  20. Functional outcome of supracondylar elbow fractures in children: a 3- to 5-year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Isa, Ahaoiza Diana; Furey, Andrew; Stone, Craig

    2014-01-01

    Background Long-term functional outcomes of supracondylar elbow fractures (SCEF) have not been well documented in the literature. We retrospectively evaluated functional outcomes of pediatric SCEF using the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) questionnaire. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the outcomes of patients who presented to our tertiary care pediatric emergency department with SCEF between January 2005 and December 2009. We reviewed their charts to assess several clinical parameters, including age, sex, Gartland classification of SCEF, weight, comorbidities, treatment intervention, physiotherapy and the extremity involved. The DASH questionnaire was administered in 2012. We performed a multiple linear regression analysis to determine the significance of these clinical parameters as they related to the DASH score for functional outcome. Results We included 94 patients with SCEF in our review. Pediatric SCEF had good functional outcomes based on the DASH questionnaire (mean score 0.77 ± 2.10). We obtained the following DASH scores: 0.45 ± 2.20 for type I, 1.09 ± 1.70 for type II and 1.43 ± 2.40 for type III fractures. There was no statistical difference in functional outcome, regardless of sex (p = 0.07), age at injury (p = 0.96), fracture type (p = 0.14), weight (p = 0.59), right/left extremity (p = 0.26) or surgery (p = 0.52). Conclusion Our results demonstrate that good functional outcomes can be expected with pediatric SCEF based on the DASH questionnaire, regardless of age at injury, sex, weight, right/left extremity or surgical/nonsurgical intervention, provided satisfactory reduction is achieved and maintained. PMID:25078928

  1. Variation in Patient Profiles and Outcomes in US and Non-US Subgroups of the Cangrelor Versus Standard Therapy to Achieve Optimal Management of Platelet Inhibition (CHAMPION) PHOENIX Trial

    PubMed Central

    Vaduganathan, Muthiah; Harrington, Robert A.; Stone, Gregg W.; Steg, Ph. Gabriel; Gibson, C. Michael; Hamm, Christian W.; Price, Matthew J.; Prats, Jayne; Deliargyris, Efthymios N.; Mahaffey, Kenneth W.; White, Harvey D.

    2016-01-01

    Background— The Cangrelor Versus Standard Therapy to Achieve Optimal Management of Platelet Inhibition (CHAMPION) PHOENIX trial demonstrated superiority of cangrelor in reducing ischemic events at 48 hours in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention compared with clopidogrel. Methods and Results— We analyzed all patients included in the modified intention-to-treat analysis in US (n=4097; 37.4%) and non-US subgroups (n=6845; 62.6%). The US cohort was older, had a higher burden of cardiovascular risk factors, and had more frequently undergone prior cardiovascular procedures. US patients more frequently underwent percutaneous coronary intervention for stable angina (77.9% versus 46.2%). Almost all US patients (99.1%) received clopidogrel loading doses of 600 mg, whereas 40.5% of non-US patients received 300 mg. Bivalirudin was more frequently used in US patients (56.7% versus 2.9%). At 48 hours, rates of the primary composite end point were comparable in the US and non-US cohorts (5.5% versus 5.2%; P=0.53). Cangrelor reduced rates of the primary composite end point compared with clopidogrel in US (4.5% versus 6.4%; odds ratio 0.70 [95% confidence interval 0.53–0.92]) and in non-US patients (4.8% versus 5.6%; odds ratio 0.85 [95% confidence interval 0.69–1.05]; interaction P=0.26). Similarly, rates of the key secondary end point, stent thrombosis, were reduced by cangrelor in both regions. Rates of Global Use of Strategies to Open Occluded Arteries (GUSTO)–defined severe bleeding were low and not significantly increased by cangrelor in either region. Conclusions— Despite broad differences in clinical profiles and indications for percutaneous coronary intervention by region in a large global cardiovascular clinical trial, cangrelor consistently reduced rates of ischemic end points compared with clopidogrel without an excess in severe bleeding in both the US and non-US subgroups. Clinical Trial Registration— URL: http

  2. Reciprocal Effects between Adolescent Externalizing Problems and Measures of Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmermann, Friederike; Schütte, Kerstin; Taskinen, Päivi; Köller, Olaf

    2013-01-01

    Student misbehavior is a pervasive problem and may seriously affect academic achievement. Previous research hints at different effects depending on whether achievement tests or achievement judgments are used as academic outcomes. Previous research also indicates that low achievement can conversely contribute to problem behavior and that low…

  3. Defining, constructing and assessing learning outcomes.

    PubMed

    Taylor, R M

    2009-08-01

    Learning outcomes define the veterinary curriculum and inform students about what they must be able to demonstrate to succeed. Stakeholder consultation during their development ensures that programme learning outcomes equip graduates to contribute to the veterinary profession. Effective learning outcomes form a hierarchy linking the programme, its courses and tasks. Clear outcomes direct students towards higher quality learning by indicating the achievements intended, but leave scope for emergent learning outcomes. Defined technical competencies fit within this overarching framework, complementing higher order learning. Mapping is used to align learning outcomes horizontally and vertically so students are systematically guided towards entry-level competence and professional independence. Constructively aligned learning and assessment tasks ensure learners spend the focused time required to sequentially develop programme outcomes. Assessment by staff, peers and other stakeholders certifies achievement of intended outcomes. Effective assessment also empowers students to define and achieve their own learning outcomes, so they develop the habits of autonomous life-long learning. Evaluation of the quality and consistency of achieved outcomes informs ongoing programme improvement. If we are going to achieve the objectives of this set of papers, i.e. to improve public health education globally (Rev. sci. tech. Off. int. Epiz. 28 [2] 2009), then it is essential that they be well defined in the learning outcomes statement of all veterinary schools. PMID:20128490

  4. Educational Achievement and Black-White Inequality. Statistical Analysis Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobson, Jonathan; Olsen, Cara; Rice, Jennifer King; Sweetland, Stephen

    This study explored relationships between black-white differences in educational achievement and black-white differences in various educational and economic outcomes. Three data sets examined the extent to which black-white differences in labor market outcomes, in educational attainment, and in mathematics and reading achievement were present for…

  5. Short to Mid-Term Term Surgical Outcome Study with Posterior Only Approach on Tuberculous Spondylodiscitis in an Elderly Population

    PubMed Central

    Kothari, Manish; Tikoo, Agnivesh; Nene, Abhay

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective study. Purpose To study short to mid-term outcome of surgically managed elderly patients of tuberculous spondylodiscitis with posterior only approach in terms of decision making and challenges in treatment, choice of implants and outcomes. Overview of Literature Tuberculous spondylodiscitis in the elderly is increasing due to longer survival rates. It presents with varied clinical manifestations needing surgical management. Management in tuberculous spondylodiscitis has been scarcely reported in the elderly, with a paucity of data on the choice of implants and approach. Methods Sixteen patients (five males, 11 females) older than 70-years-of-age culture and/or histopathology proven tuberculous spondylodiscitis were included in the study. All patients were operated using a single posterior approach. Pedicle screw with rods (PS/rods) or spinal loop with sublaminar wires (SL/SLW) were used for fixation. Clinical and surgical details were recorded. Sagittal correction achieved postoperatively and loss of correction at follow-up were noted. Results The mean age was 73.6 years (range, 70 to 80 years). The mean follow up was 44.5 months (range, 24 to 84 months). The mean immediate postoperative correction of sagittal deformity was 11.3 degrees; this correction was lost by a mean of 3.1 degrees at last follow-up. All 10 patients with deficit showed neurological recovery and all but one of the seven non-walkers were capable of independent ambulation at follow-up. Patients with SL/SLW and PS/rods had similar radiological outcome at final follow up. Conclusions Operative management gives satisfactory results in elderly patients with tuberculous spondylodiscitis. The posterior approach provides adequate exposure for decompression and rigid fixation, providing satisfactory clinical and radiological outcomes. SSL/SLW and pedicle screw rod construct both give similar radiological results if used appropriately in patients. PMID:27114766

  6. Using the 2 x 2 Framework of Achievement Goals to Predict Achievement Emotions and Academic Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Putwain, David W.; Sander, Paul; Larkin, Derek

    2013-01-01

    Previous work has established how achievement emotions are related to the trichotomous model of achievement goals, and how they predict academic performance. In our study we examine relations using an additional, mastery-avoidance goal, and whether outcome-focused emotions are predicted by mastery as well as performance goals. Results showed that…

  7. Emerging technologies for the detection of melanoma: achieving better outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Herman, Cila

    2012-01-01

    Every year around 2.5–3 million skin lesions are biopsied in the US, and a fraction of these – between 50,000 and 100,000 – are diagnosed as melanoma. Diagnostic instruments that allow early detection of melanoma are the key to improving survival rates and reducing the number of unnecessary biopsies, the associated morbidity, and the costs of care. Advances in technology over the past 2 decades have enabled the development of new, sophisticated test methods, which are currently undergoing laboratory and small-scale clinical testing. This review highlights and compares some of the emerging technologies that hold the promise of melanoma diagnosis at an early stage of the disease. The needs for detection at different levels (patient, primary care, specialized care) are discussed, and three broad classes of instruments are identified that are capable of satisfying these needs. Technical and clinical requirements on the diagnostic instruments are introduced to aid the comparison and evaluation of new technologies. White- and polarized-light imaging, spatial and spectroscopic multispectral methods, quantitative thermographic imaging, confocal microscopy, Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT), and Terahertz (THZ) imaging methods are highlighted in light of the criteria identified in the review. Based on the properties, possibilities, and limitations of individual methods, those best suited for a particular setting are identified. Challenges faced in development and wide-scale application of novel technologies are addressed. PMID:23204850

  8. Helping Students Pay for College--and Achieve Better Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MDRC, 2013

    2013-01-01

    America faces a two-pronged problem in higher education: increasing costs and low completion rates. Despite the recent expansion of federal Pell Grants, many students still are left with unmet financial needs and may drop out of college because of financial concerns, pressing work responsibilities, and fears of taking on too much debt. One idea…

  9. Motivational Profiles and Their Associations with Achievement Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shen, Bo; McCaughtry, Nate; Martin, Jeffrey J.; Fahlman, Mariane M.

    2009-01-01

    With the belief that theoretical integration in motivation may help us better understand motivational behavior, we designed this study to explore adolescents' motivational profiles and their associations with knowledge acquisition, leisure-time exercise behaviors, and cardiorespiratory fitness. Middle school students from a large urban inner-city…

  10. USING SUBSURFACE TRANSPORT RESEARCH TO ACHIEVE AGENCY OUTCOMES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gasoline leaks from underground storage tanks can cause ground water contamination because there are a number of organic chemicals in gasoline. These chemicals have varying properties that influence how far contamination extends from the release. Research on transport of these ...

  11. Raising African American Student Achievement: California Goals, Local Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    EdSource, 2008

    2008-01-01

    Although academic performance is a concern, African American students represent less than 8 percent of California's K-12 students, and at times get lost in California policy debates about improving student performance. Findings of this study indicate that: (1) California's African American students are concentrated in relatively few counties and…

  12. Using Toolkits to Achieve STEM Enterprise Learning Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watts, Carys A.; Wray, Katie

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the effectiveness of using several commercial tools in science, technology, engineering and maths (STEM) subjects for enterprise education at Newcastle University, UK. Design/methodology/approach: The paper provides an overview of existing toolkit use in higher education, before reviewing where and…

  13. [Clinical Outcomes of Cardiovascular Surgery in Jehovah's Witness Patients].

    PubMed

    Mukaihara, Kosuke; Yamashita, Masafumi; Toyohira, Hitoshi; Yotsumoto, Goichi; Fukumoto, Yoshihiro; Ueno, Takayuki; Matsumoto, Kazuhisa; Moriyama, Yukinori; Imoto, Yutaka

    2016-03-01

    Cardiovascular surgery in Jehovah's Witness is challenging for surgeons on the ground that they refuse blood transfusion. We report 11 cases of cardiovascular surgery. All of the patients underwent elective surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass. Two cases underwent minimally invasive procedures. The mean preoperative hemoglobin level was 13.0 g/dl, and hematopoietic medicines were preoperatively administrated in 4 patients. Although 10 patients recovered satisfactory without blood transfusion, 1 surgical case was lost due to uncontrollable postoperative bleeding. The clinical outcomes of the Jehovah's Witness patients are considered to be satisfactory. However, careful indication is recommended in high risk cases. PMID:27075280

  14. Comparing Science Achievement Constructs: Targeted and Achieved

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrara, Steve; Duncan, Teresa

    2011-01-01

    This article illustrates how test specifications based solely on academic content standards, without attention to other cognitive skills and item response demands, can fall short of their targeted constructs. First, the authors inductively describe the science achievement construct represented by a statewide sixth-grade science proficiency test.…

  15. Varieties of Achievement Motivation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kukla, Andre; Scher, Hal

    1986-01-01

    A recent article by Nicholls on achievement motivation is criticized on three points: (1) definitions of achievement motives are ambiguous; (2) behavioral consequences predicted do not follow from explicit theoretical assumptions; and (3) Nicholls's account of the relation between his theory and other achievement theories is factually incorrect.…

  16. Motivation and School Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maehr, Martin L.; Archer, Jennifer

    Addressing the question, "What can be done to promote school achievement?", this paper summarizes the literature on motivation relating to classroom achievement and school effectiveness. Particular attention is given to how values, ideology, and various cultural patterns impinge on classroom performance and serve to enhance motivation to achieve.…

  17. Mobility and Reading Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waters, Theresa Z.

    A study examined the effect of geographic mobility on elementary school students' achievement. Although such mobility, which requires students to make multiple moves among schools, can have a negative impact on academic achievement, the hypothesis for the study was that it was not a determining factor in reading achievement test scores. Subjects…

  18. PASS and Reading Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirby, John R.

    Two studies examined the effectiveness of the PASS (Planning, Attention, Simultaneous, and Successive cognitive processes) theory of intelligence in predicting reading achievement scores of normally achieving children and distinguishing children with reading disabilities from normally achieving children. The first study dealt with predicting…

  19. Six-month clinical outcomes after hyperopic correction with the SCHWIND AMARIS Total-Tech laser

    PubMed Central

    Arbelaez, María Clara; Vidal, Camila; Arba Mosquera, Samuel

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate postoperative clinical outcomes, and corneal High Order Aberrations, among eyes with hyperopia up to +5 D of spherical equivalent, that have undergone LASIK treatments using the SCHWIND AMARIS laser system. Methods At six-month follow-up, 100 eyes with preoperative hyperopia or hyperopic astigmatism up to +5 D of spherical equivalent were retrospectively analysed. Standard examinations, pre- and postoperative wavefront analysis with a corneal-wavefront-analyzer (OPTIKON Scout) were performed. Aberration-Free aspheric treatments were planned with Custom Ablation Manager software and ablations performed using the SCHWIND AMARIS flying-spot excimer laser system (both SCHWIND eye-tech-solutions). LASIK flaps were created using a LDV femtosecond laser (Ziemer Group) in all cases. Clinical outcomes were evaluated in terms of predictability, refractive outcome, safety, and wavefront aberration. Results At six month, 90 % of eyes achieved ≥ 20/25 UCVA and 44 % achieved ≥ 20/16 UCVA. Seventy-four percent of eyes were within ± 0.25D of spherical equivalent and 89 % within ± 0.50D, with 94 % within 0.50D of astigmatism. Mean spherical equivalent was −0.12 ± 0.51D and 0.50 ± 0.51D for the astigmatism. Fifty-two percent of eyes improved BSCVA vs. only 19 % losing lines of BSCVA. Predictability slope for refraction was 1.03 and intercept +0.01 D. On average, negative corneal spherical aberrations were significantly increased by the treatments, no other aberration terms changed from pre- to postoperative values. Conclusions LASIK for hyperopia and hyperopic astigmatism with SCHWIND AMARIS yields very satisfactory visual outcomes. Preoperative refractions were postoperatively reduced to subclinical values with no clinically relevant induction of corneal HOA.

  20. Distraction by a monotube fixator to achieve limb lengthening: predictive factors for tibia trauma

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Management of post trauma tibia bone gap varied with orthopedic surgeons’ experience and tools available. Study aims to determine predictive factors for distraction by a monotube fixator (DMF) outcome in post tibia trauma limb length discrepancy. Methods A prospective descriptive cross sectional study of post traumatized tibia bone gap and limb length discrepancy patients at tertiary hospitals. Patient’s informed consent and institutional ethical committee approval were obtained. Bio-data, clinical and healing indexes were documented. DMF was applied for patient that met inclusion criteria. The Statistic tests used included the Chi-square, the Student’s two-tailed t test, and the Wilcox on rank-sum test when appropriate. Mantel-Haenszel Common Odds Ratio (OR) and 95% confidence intervals for poor outcome potential risk factors were recorded. Bivariate correlation and logistic regression were evaluated. Significance level was set at a p value <0.05. Results Thirty-six patients with mean age, 37.2 ± 10.3 year and male/female ratio of 1:1.25 had DMF applied. Motorcycle accident accounted for 50.0% of patients and diaphyseal segment was most commonly affected 25 (69.4%). The mean bone lengthened was 10.1 ± 4.0 cm (range: 5-21 cm) and mean duration of bone transport was 105.6 ± 38.2 days. The means of rate of distraction, healing index and percentage of lengthening were 0.99 ± 0.14 mm/day, 15.6 ± 4.3 days/cm and 38.0 ± 14.3 respectively. The mean follow up was 9.7 ±4.9 months (range: 2–17.0). Per operative complications varied and outcome was satisfactory in 30 (83.3%). Obesity (p <0.0001), multiple surgery (p = 0.012) and transfusion (p = 0.001) correlated to poor outcome. Percentage lengthening ≥ 50%, bone gap >10 cm, anemia, blood transfusion, general anesthesia administration, distraction rate >1 mm/day, osteomyelitis and prolong partial weight bearing were significant predictive factors for poor

  1. Pediatric hydrocephalus outcomes: a review

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The outcome of pediatric hydrocephalus, including surgical complications, neurological sequelae and academic achievement, has been the matter of many studies. However, much uncertainty remains, regarding the very long-term and social outcome, and the determinants of complications and clinical outcome. In this paper, we review the different facets of outcome, including surgical outcome (shunt failure, infection and independence, and complications of endoscopy), clinical outcome (neurological, sensory, cognitive sequels, epilepsy), schooling and social integration. We then provide a brief review of the English-language literature and highlighting selected studies that provide information on the outcome and sequelae of pediatric hydrocephalus, and the impact of predictive variables on outcome. Mortality caused by hydrocephalus and its treatments is between 0 and 3%, depending on the duration of follow-up. Shunt event-free survival (EFS) is about 70% at one year and 40% at ten years. The EFS after endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV) appears better but likely benefits from selection bias and long-term figures are not available. Shunt infection affects between 5 and 8% of surgeries, and 15 to 30% of patients according to the duration of follow-up. Shunt independence can be achieved in 3 to 9% of patients, but the definition of this varies. Broad variations in the prevalence of cognitive sequelae, affecting 12 to 50% of children, and difficulties at school, affecting between 20 and 60%, attest of disparities among studies in their clinical evaluation. Epilepsy, affecting 6 to 30% of patients, has a serious impact on outcome. In adulthood, social integration is poor in a substantial number of patients but data are sparse. Few controlled prospective studies exist regarding hydrocephalus outcomes; in their absence, largely retrospective studies must be used to evaluate the long-term consequences of hydrocephalus and its treatments. This review aims to help to establish

  2. Developing a Motivational Model of College Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuckman, Bruce W.; Abry, Dennis

    This study involves developing a motivational model of college achievement. The predictor variables, which were procrastination tendency, self-efficacy, self-regulation, intrinsic value, outcome value, cognitive strategy, test anxiety, students grade goals, parent grade goals, and grade point average, as well as the criterion variable exam…

  3. Optimism versus Pessimism and Academic Achievement Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harpaz-Itay, Yifat; Kaniel, Shlomo

    2012-01-01

    This article integrates three central theories of optimism-pessimism (OP). The combination of the shared components of these theories--outcome expectancies, emotions, and behavioral intention--may produce an integrative academic achievement evaluation. Little has been written regarding the differentiation between general and domain-specific OP, a…

  4. Achieving Excellence in Preschool Literacy Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Justice, Laura M., Ed.; Vukelich, Carol, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    High-quality preschool programs are essential to improving children's outcomes in reading achievement and leveling language and literacy disparities among students from diverse backgrounds. Grounded in state-of-the-art research evidence, this practice-oriented book demonstrates how preschool professionals can create, evaluate, and sustain…

  5. Botulinum toxin treatment failures in cervical dystonia: causes, management, and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Jinnah, H A; Goodmann, Emily; Rosen, Ami R; Evatt, Marian; Freeman, Alan; Factor, Stewart

    2016-06-01

    Botulinum toxin (BoNT) is highly effective in the treatment of cervical dystonia (CD), yet a significant proportion of patients report low levels of satisfaction following treatment and fail to follow up for repeated treatments. The goal of this study was to determine the reasons that some patients have unsatisfactory responses. A total of 35 subjects who came to our center requesting alternative treatments due to unsatisfactory responses following BoNT treatment for CD were evaluated. Included were 26 women and 9 men with an average age of 57.1 years (range 25-82 years), and an average duration of illness of 12.5 years (range 1-55 years). Details of unsatisfactory BoNT treatments were methodically collected by a movement specialist using a standardized intake form, including provider subspecialty, product used, the number of satisfactory or unsatisfactory trials, doses given, specific muscles treated, the use of electromyographic guidance, side effects, and tests of resistance. The specialist then provided repeat treatments if indicated, and followed each case until the reasons for unsatisfactory outcomes could be determined. Multiple reasons for unsatisfactory outcomes were found. They included suboptimal BoNT doses, suboptimal muscle targeting, intolerable side effects, complex movement patterns, discordant perceptions, and incorrect diagnoses. Only one patient was functionally resistant to BoNT. Of 32 subjects who received repeat BoNT treatments, 25 (78 %) achieved satisfactory responses after revision of the original treatment plan. These results indicate that the majority of unsatisfactory responses to BoNT treatment of CD were caused by correctible factors and imply a need for improved education regarding optimal treatment methods. PMID:27113604

  6. Regulating Debilitating Emotions in the Context of Performance: Achievement Goal Orientations, Achievement-Elicited Emotions, and Socialization Contexts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tyson, Diana F.; Linnenbrink-Garcia, Lisa; Hill, Nancy E.

    2009-01-01

    A theoretical framework that incorporates emotional responses and emotion regulation into achievement goal theory is proposed as an alternative view to understanding the inconsistent pattern of findings linking achievement goal orientations to academic outcomes. In this critical review and synthesis, the relation of achievement goal orientations…

  7. Heritability of Creative Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piffer, Davide; Hur, Yoon-Mi

    2014-01-01

    Although creative achievement is a subject of much attention to lay people, the origin of individual differences in creative accomplishments remain poorly understood. This study examined genetic and environmental influences on creative achievement in an adult sample of 338 twins (mean age = 26.3 years; SD = 6.6 years). Twins completed the Creative…

  8. Confronting the Achievement Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, David

    2007-01-01

    This article talks about the large achievement gap between children of color and their white peers. The reasons for the achievement gap are varied. First, many urban minorities come from a background of poverty. One of the detrimental effects of growing up in poverty is receiving inadequate nourishment at a time when bodies and brains are rapidly…

  9. States Address Achievement Gaps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christie, Kathy

    2002-01-01

    Summarizes 2 state initiatives to address the achievement gap: North Carolina's report by the Advisory Commission on Raising Achievement and Closing Gaps, containing an 11-point strategy, and Kentucky's legislation putting in place 10 specific processes. The North Carolina report is available at www.dpi.state.nc.us.closingthegap; Kentucky's…

  10. Wechsler Individual Achievement Test.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Ronald L.

    1999-01-01

    This article describes the Wechsler Individual Achievement Test, a comprehensive measure of achievement for individuals in grades K-12. Eight subtests assess mathematics reasoning, spelling, reading comprehension, numerical operations, listening comprehension, oral expression, and written expression. Its administration, standardization,…

  11. Inverting the Achievement Pyramid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White-Hood, Marian; Shindel, Melissa

    2006-01-01

    Attempting to invert the pyramid to improve student achievement and increase all students' chances for success is not a new endeavor. For decades, educators have strategized, formed think tanks, and developed school improvement teams to find better ways to improve the achievement of all students. Currently, the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) is…

  12. Achievement Test Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Dept. of Education, Columbus. Trade and Industrial Education Service.

    The Ohio Trade and Industrial Education Achievement Test battery is comprised of seven basic achievement tests: Machine Trades, Automotive Mechanics, Basic Electricity, Basic Electronics, Mechanical Drafting, Printing, and Sheet Metal. The tests were developed by subject matter committees and specialists in testing and research. The Ohio Trade and…

  13. General Achievement Trends: Maryland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  14. General Achievement Trends: Arkansas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  15. General Achievement Trends: Idaho

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  16. General Achievement Trends: Nebraska

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  17. General Achievement Trends: Colorado

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  18. General Achievement Trends: Iowa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  19. General Achievement Trends: Hawaii

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  20. General Achievement Trends: Kentucky

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  1. General Achievement Trends: Florida

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  2. General Achievement Trends: Texas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  3. General Achievement Trends: Oregon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  4. General Achievement Trends: Virginia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  5. Honoring Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Digest: Essential Readings Condensed for Quick Review, 2004

    2004-01-01

    Is the concept of "honor roll" obsolete? The honor roll has always been a way for schools to recognize the academic achievement of their students. But does it motivate students? In this article, several elementary school principals share their views about honoring student achievement. Among others, Virginia principal Nancy Moga said that students…

  6. Aiming at Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez, Paul

    The Raising Quality and Achievement Program is a 3-year initiative to support further education (FE) colleges in the United Kingdom in their drive to improve students' achievement and the quality of provision. The program offers the following: (1) quality information and advice; (2) onsite support for individual colleges; (3) help with…

  7. Achieving Perspective Transformation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nowak, Jens

    Perspective transformation is a consciously achieved state in which the individual's perspective on life is transformed. The new perspective serves as a vantage point for life's actions and interactions, affecting the way life is lived. Three conditions are basic to achieving perspective transformation: (1) "feeling" experience, i.e., getting in…

  8. Achieving Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abowitz, Kathleen Knight

    2011-01-01

    Public schools are functionally provided through structural arrangements such as government funding, but public schools are achieved in substance, in part, through local governance. In this essay, Kathleen Knight Abowitz explains the bifocal nature of achieving public schools; that is, that schools are both subject to the unitary Public compact of…

  9. General Achievement Trends: Tennessee

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  10. Achievement-Based Resourcing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fletcher, Mike; And Others

    1992-01-01

    This collection of seven articles examines achievement-based resourcing (ABR), the concept that the funding of educational institutions should be linked to their success in promoting student achievement, with a focus on the application of ABR to postsecondary education in the United Kingdom. The articles include: (1) "Introduction" (Mick…

  11. Management outcomes in splenic injury: a statewide trauma center review.

    PubMed Central

    Clancy, T V; Ramshaw, D G; Maxwell, J G; Covington, D L; Churchill, M P; Rutledge, R; Oller, D W; Cunningham, P R; Meredith, J W; Thomason, M H; Baker, C C

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Clinical pathways now highlight both observation and operation as acceptable initial therapeutic options for the management of patients with splenic injury. The purpose of this study was to evaluate treatment trends for splenic injury in all North Carolina trauma centers over a 6-year period. METHODS: Splenic injuries in adults over a 6-year period (January 1988-December 1993) were identified in the North Carolina Trauma Registry using ICD-9-CM codes. Patients were divided into four groups by method of management: 1) no spleen operation, 2) splenectomy, 3) definitive splenorrhaphy, and 4) splenorrhaphy failure followed by splenectomy. The authors examined age, mechanism of injury, admitting blood pressure, and severity of injury by trauma score and injury severity score. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Comparisons were made between adult (17-64 years of age) and geriatric (older than 65 years of age) patients and between patients with blunt and penetrating injury. Resource utilization (length of stay, hospital charges) and outcome (mortality) were compared. RESULTS: One thousand two hundred fifty-five patients were identified with splenic injury. Rate of splenic preservation increased over time and was achieved in more than 50% of patients through nonoperative management (40%) and splenorrhaphy (12%). Splenorrhaphy was not used commonly in either blunt or penetrating injury. Overall mortality was 13%. Geriatric patients had a higher mortality and resource utilization regardless of their mechanism of injury or method of management.CONCLUSIONS: Nonoperative management represents the prevailing method of splenic preservation in both the adult and geriatric population in North Carolina trauma center hospitals. Satisfactory outcomes and economic advantages accompany nonoperative management in this adult population. PMID:9242333

  12. Using Quality of Life to Evaluate Outcomes and Measure Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kober, Ralph; Eggleton, Ian R. C.

    2009-01-01

    Evaluating the outcomes achieved by service providers who assist people with intellectual disabilities is extremely important in terms of ascertaining whether service providers achieve their goals. Furthermore, knowledge of the outcomes achieved by service providers better equips those charged with managing them to make strategic decisions to…

  13. Student Outcomes: Annual Summary Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prince George's Community Coll., Largo, MD. Office of Institutional Research.

    Each year a study is conducted at Prince George's Community College (PGCC) to update student outcomes data using quantifiable measures of student achievement. Data for the 1989 study were obtained from the college's student information system, the University of Maryland (UM) system, and surveys of all 825 fiscal year 1988 graduates and 118 of…

  14. Prospects: Student Outcomes. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puma, Michael J.; Karweit, Nancy; Price, Cristofer; Ricciuti, Anne; Thompson, William; Vaden-Kiernan, Michael

    This report is one of a series presenting findings from "Prospects: The Congressionally Mandated Study of Educational Growth and Opportunity." This study, conducted in response to the 1988 Hawkins-Stafford Amendments, was a major effort to examine the effects of Chapter 1 on student achievement and other school-related educational outcomes. Data…

  15. [Achievement of therapeutic objectives].

    PubMed

    Mantilla, Teresa

    2014-07-01

    Therapeutic objectives for patients with atherogenic dyslipidemia are achieved by improving patient compliance and adherence. Clinical practice guidelines address the importance of treatment compliance for achieving objectives. The combination of a fixed dose of pravastatin and fenofibrate increases the adherence by simplifying the drug regimen and reducing the number of daily doses. The good tolerance, the cost of the combination and the possibility of adjusting the administration to the patient's lifestyle helps achieve the objectives for these patients with high cardiovascular risk. PMID:25043543

  16. Burns: Treatment and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Burd, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Burns can cause extensive and devastating injuries of the head and neck. Prevention of the initial injury must always be a priority, but once an injury has occurred, then prevention of progression of the damage together with survival of the patient must be the immediate goals. The acute care will have a major influence on the subsequent scarring, reconstructive need, and long-term outcome. In the majority of cases, the reconstruction will involve restoration of form and function to the soft tissues, and the methods used will depend very much on the extent of scarring locally and elsewhere in the body. In nearly all cases, a significant improvement in functional and aesthetic outcomes can be achieved, which, in conjunction with intensive psychosocial rehabilitation, can lead to high-quality patient outcomes. With the prospect of facial transplantation being a clinical reality, the reconstructive spectrum has opened up even further, and, with appropriate reconstruction and support, no patient should be left economically deprived or socially isolated after a burn injury. PMID:22550448

  17. Predicting Achievement and Motivation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uguroglu, Margaret; Walberg, Herbert J.

    1986-01-01

    Motivation and nine other factors were measured for 970 students in grades five through eight in a study of factors predicting achievement and predicting motivation. Results are discussed. (Author/MT)

  18. Attractiveness and School Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salvia, John; And Others

    1977-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to ascertain the relationship between rated attractiveness and two measures of school performance. Attractive children received significantly higher report cards and, to some degree, higher achievement test scores than their unattractive peers. (Author)

  19. Student Achievement and Motivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flammer, Gordon H.; Mecham, Robert C.

    1974-01-01

    Compares the lecture and self-paced methods of instruction on the basis of student motivation and achieveme nt, comparing motivating and demotivating factors in each, and their potential for motivation and achievement. (Authors/JR)

  20. Childhood Maltreatment and Educational Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Romano, Elisa; Babchishin, Lyzon; Marquis, Robyn; Fréchette, Sabrina

    2015-10-01

    Children (0-18 years) with maltreatment histories are vulnerable to experiencing difficulties across multiple domains of functioning, including educational outcomes that encompass not only academic achievement but also mental well-being. The current literature review adopted Slade and Wissow's model to examine (1) the link between childhood maltreatment and academic achievement, (2) the link between childhood maltreatment and mental health outcomes (i.e., emotional and behavioral difficulties), and (3) the bidirectional relationship between childhood academic achievement and mental health. In addition, we reviewed variables that might influence or help explain the link between childhood maltreatment and educational outcomes, drawing on developmental perspectives and Bronfenbrenner's ecological model. Finally, whenever possible, we presented findings specific to maltreated children in out-of-home care to highlight the unique challenges experienced by this population. Results indicated that children with maltreatment histories often experience impairments in both their academic performance (e.g., special education, grade retention, lower grades) and mental well-being (e.g., anxiety, low mood, aggression, social skills deficits, poor interpersonal relationships). These impairments appeared to be particularly pronounced among maltreated children in out-of-home care. Findings, albeit sparse, also indicated that mental health difficulties are negatively associated with children's academic achievement and, similarly, that academic achievement deficits are linked with mental health problems. The link between childhood maltreatment and educational outcomes may be partly explained through the disruption of key developmental processes in children, such as attachment, emotion regulation, and sense of agency. As well, maltreatment characteristics and the functioning of various systems in which children are embedded (e.g., family, school, child welfare) can serve to positively

  1. Evaluating stakeholder participation in water management: intermediary outcomes as potential indicators for future resource management outcomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, Gemma; Bloeschl, Guenter; Loucks, Daniel Pete

    2013-04-01

    Evaluation of participation programmes, projects and activities is essential to identify whether stakeholder involvement has been successful in achieving its aims. Aims may include an improvement in water resource management such as enhanced ecological functioning, an improvement in human wellbeing and economic conditions, or overcoming a conflict between interest groups. Evaluating against "interest-based" resource management criteria requires that a desirable outcome can be identified, agreed upon and be measured at the time of evaluation. In many water management situations where collaborative approaches are applied, multiple interests and objectives are present, or stakeholders have not yet identified their own positions and priorities. Even if a resource management objective has been identified and strategy agreed upon, resource management changes tend to emerge over longer timescales and evaluation frequently takes place before they can be recognised. Evaluating against resource management criteria may lead evaluators to conclude that a programme has failed because it has not achieved a resource management objective at the time of evaluation. This presents a critical challenge to researchers assessing the effectiveness of stakeholder participation programmes. One strategy to overcome this is to conduct "goal-free" evaluation to identify what the programme is actually achieving. An evaluation framework that includes intermediary outcomes that are both tangible achievements such as innovation, creation of new organisations, and shared information and knowledge, as well as intangible achievements such as trust and network development can be applied to more broadly assess a programme's success. Analysis of case-studies in the published literature for which a resource management outcome has been achieved shows that intermediary outcomes frequently precede resource management outcomes. They seem to emerge over shorter timescales than resource management outcomes

  2. 34 CFR 361.56 - Requirements for closing the record of services of an individual who has achieved an employment...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... individual who has achieved an employment outcome. 361.56 Section 361.56 Education Regulations of the Offices... closing the record of services of an individual who has achieved an employment outcome. The record of services of an individual who has achieved an employment outcome may be closed only if all of the...

  3. Implications of Student Health Problems on Achievement and Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    La Salle, Tamika P.; Hagermoser Sanetti, Lisa M.

    2016-01-01

    Healthy students are better learners. Establishing positive school climates where students are healthy, engaged, and prepared to learn is a critical component in increasing student engagement and closing the achievement gap. As such, educators need to be aware of the impact of education-related outcomes on student outcomes and schools' ability to…

  4. Competency Outcomes for Learning and Performance Assessment. Redesigning a BSN Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luttrell, Marjorie F.; Lenburg, Carrie B.; Scherubel, Janet C.; Jacob, Susan R.; Koch, Robert W.

    1999-01-01

    A baccalaureate nursing curriculum was redesigned around eight core competencies with measurable indicators for each performance-based competency outcome. Effective learning strategies to achieve outcomes and methods to document achievement were also outlined. (SK)

  5. Associations of Future Expectations, Negative Friends, and Academic Achievement in High-Achieving African American Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, Michael; Corprew, Charles S., III; Becker, Jonathan E.

    2009-01-01

    The relations of future expectations (general and academic) to academic outcomes were examined in a sample of 129 African American high-achieving adolescents (majority female participants, n = 92). This study was interested in the multidimensional nature of future expectations. Results from the study confirm the hypothesis that academic future…

  6. Project Achieve, 1990-91. Part I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY. Office of Research, Evaluation, and Assessment.

    First-year outcomes of the 1990-91 Project Achieve in 32 New York City public high schools are presented in this paper. The program aimed to reduce the dropout rate and improve at-risk student performance by expanding proven initiatives and support services for school-based decision-making committees. This report, the first of a two-part study,…

  7. Heart to Heart: Using Heart Rate Telemetry to Meet Physical Education Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deal, Tami Benham; Deal, Laurence O.

    1995-01-01

    Presents a foundation for establishing measurable physical education outcomes, demonstrating how heart rate telemetry can help measure and achieve such outcomes. After explaining heart rate telemetry function, the article examines student and teacher outcomes that could be included in school physical education outcomes and achieved using heart…

  8. Replantation: current concepts and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Bueno, Reuben A; Battiston, Bruno; Ciclamini, Davide; Titolo, Paolo; Panero, Bernardino; Tos, Pierluigi

    2014-07-01

    Techniques to improve the chance of successful replantation of digits are well established. Indications and contraindications for replantation are generally agreed on, but they continue to evolve as excellent outcomes are achieved at centers with experience and expertise. Form and function can be restored with avulsion injuries and distal amputations, with good results and high patient satisfaction. Increased financial pressure to control the costs of health care and increased accountability for evidence-based outcomes may lead to the regionalization of replantation care and shared decision making in recommending replantation or revision amputation. PMID:24996460

  9. Science Achievement for All: Improving Science Performance and Closing Achievement Gaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Julie K.; Ash, Gwynne

    2012-11-01

    This article addresses the serious and growing need to improve science instruction and science achievement for all students. We will describe the results of a 3-year study that transformed science instruction and student achievement at two high-poverty ethnically diverse public elementary schools in Texas. The school-wide intervention included purposeful planning, inquiry science instruction, and contextually rich academic science vocabulary development. In combination, these instructional practices rapidly improved student-science learning outcomes and narrowed achievement gaps across diverse student populations.

  10. Explorations in achievement motivation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helmreich, Robert L.

    1982-01-01

    Recent research on the nature of achievement motivation is reviewed. A three-factor model of intrinsic motives is presented and related to various criteria of performance, job satisfaction and leisure activities. The relationships between intrinsic and extrinsic motives are discussed. Needed areas for future research are described.

  11. Achieving health care affordability.

    PubMed

    Payson, Norman C

    2002-10-01

    Not all plans are jumping headlong into the consumer-centric arena. In this article, the CEO of Oxford Health Plans discusses how advanced managed care can achieve what other consumer-centric programs seek to do--provide affordable, quality health care. PMID:12391815

  12. Issues in Achievement Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Eva L.

    This booklet is intended to help school personnel, parents, students, and members of the community understand concepts and research relating to achievement testing in public schools. The paper's sections include: (1) test use with direct effects on students (test of certification, selection, and placement); (2) test use with indirect effects on…

  13. Achieving Peace through Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarken, Rodney H.

    While it is generally agreed that peace is desirable, there are barriers to achieving a peaceful world. These barriers are classified into three major areas: (1) an erroneous view of human nature; (2) injustice; and (3) fear of world unity. In a discussion of these barriers, it is noted that although the consciousness and conscience of the world…

  14. Achieving All Our Ambitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartley, Tricia

    2009-01-01

    National learning and skills policy aims both to build economic prosperity and to achieve social justice. Participation in higher education (HE) has the potential to contribute substantially to both aims. That is why the Campaign for Learning has supported the ambition to increase the proportion of the working-age population with a Level 4…

  15. Intelligence and Educational Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deary, Ian J.; Strand, Steve; Smith, Pauline; Fernandes, Cres

    2007-01-01

    This 5-year prospective longitudinal study of 70,000+ English children examined the association between psychometric intelligence at age 11 years and educational achievement in national examinations in 25 academic subjects at age 16. The correlation between a latent intelligence trait (Spearman's "g"from CAT2E) and a latent trait of educational…

  16. SALT and Spelling Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Joan

    A study investigated the effects of suggestopedic accelerative learning and teaching (SALT) on the spelling achievement, attitudes toward school, and memory skills of fourth-grade students. Subjects were 20 male and 28 female students from two self-contained classrooms at Kennedy Elementary School in Rexburg, Idaho. The control classroom and the…

  17. NCLB: Achievement Robin Hood?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bracey, Gerald W.

    2008-01-01

    In his "Wall Street Journal" op-ed on the 25th of anniversary of "A Nation At Risk", former assistant secretary of education Chester E. Finn Jr. applauded the report for turning U.S. education away from equality and toward achievement. It was not surprising, then, that in mid-2008, Finn arranged a conference to examine the potential "Robin Hood…

  18. INTELLIGENCE, PERSONALITY AND ACHIEVEMENT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MUIR, R.C.; AND OTHERS

    A LONGITUDINAL DEVELOPMENTAL STUDY OF A GROUP OF MIDDLE CLASS CHILDREN IS DESCRIBED, WITH EMPHASIS ON A SEGMENT OF THE RESEARCH INVESTIGATING THE RELATIONSHIP OF ACHIEVEMENT, INTELLIGENCE, AND EMOTIONAL DISTURBANCE. THE SUBJECTS WERE 105 CHILDREN AGED FIVE TO 6.3 ATTENDING TWO SCHOOLS IN MONTREAL. EACH CHILD WAS ASSESSED IN THE AREAS OF…

  19. School Students' Science Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shymansky, James; Wang, Tzu-Ling; Annetta, Leonard; Everett, Susan; Yore, Larry D.

    2013-01-01

    This paper is a report of the impact of an externally funded, multiyear systemic reform project on students' science achievement on a modified version of the Third International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) test in 33 small, rural school districts in two Midwest states. The systemic reform effort utilized a cascading leadership strategy…

  20. Advancing Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walberg, Herbert J.

    2010-01-01

    For the last half century, higher spending and many modern reforms have failed to raise the achievement of students in the United States to the levels of other economically advanced countries. A possible explanation, says Herbert Walberg, is that much current education theory is ill informed about scientific psychology, often drawing on fads and…

  1. Increasing Male Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Barbara Talbert

    2008-01-01

    The No Child Left Behind legislation has brought greater attention to the academic performance of American youth. Its emphasis on student achievement requires a closer analysis of assessment data by school districts. To address the findings, educators must seek strategies to remedy failing results. In a mid-Atlantic district of the Unites States,…

  2. Setting and Achieving Objectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knoop, Robert

    1986-01-01

    Provides basic guidelines which school officials and school boards may find helpful in negotiating, establishing, and managing objectives. Discusses characteristics of good objectives, specific and directional objectives, multiple objectives, participation in setting objectives, feedback on goal process and achievement, and managing a school…

  3. Schools Achieving Gender Equity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Revis, Emma

    This guide is designed to assist teachers presenting the Schools Achieving Gender Equity (SAGE) curriculum for vocational education students, which was developed to align gender equity concepts with the Kentucky Education Reform Act (KERA). Included in the guide are lesson plans for classes on the following topics: legal issues of gender equity,…

  4. Iowa Women of Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohrn, Deborah Gore, Ed.

    1993-01-01

    This issue of the Goldfinch highlights some of Iowa's 20th century women of achievement. These women have devoted their lives to working for human rights, education, equality, and individual rights. They come from the worlds of politics, art, music, education, sports, business, entertainment, and social work. They represent Native Americans,…

  5. Achievements or Disasters?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwin, MacArthur

    2000-01-01

    Focuses on policy issues that have affected arts education in the twentieth century, such as: interest in discipline-based arts education, influence of national arts associations, and national standards and coordinated assessment. States that whether the policy decisions are viewed as achievements or disasters are for future determination. (CMK)

  6. Appraising Reading Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ediger, Marlow

    To determine quality sequence in pupil progress, evaluation approaches need to be used which guide the teacher to assist learners to attain optimally. Teachers must use a variety of procedures to appraise student achievement in reading, because no one approach is adequate. Appraisal approaches might include: (1) observation and subsequent…

  7. The "Strategies-for-Achievement" Approach for Teaching Study Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuckman, Bruce W.

    An educational psychology-based study skills program called Strategies for Achievement was developed to teach learning and motivation strategies to college students. It involved teaching student four major achievement strategies: take reasonable risk, take responsibility for outcomes, search the environment (for information), and use feedback.…

  8. Cultural Identification and Academic Achievement among African American Males

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irving, Miles Anthony; Hudley, Cynthia

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between intercultural perceptions, identity, and academic achievement among African American males. Specifically, this study investigated the relationship of academic achievement, cultural mistrust, oppositional cultural attitudes, ethnic identity development and educational outcome expectations and value,…

  9. Closing Achievement Gaps: Revisiting Benjamin S. Bloom's "Learning for Mastery"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guskey, Thomas R.

    2007-01-01

    The problem of achievement gaps among different subgroups of students has been evident in education for many years. This manuscript revisits the work of renowned educator Benjamin S. Bloom, who saw reducing gaps in the achievement of various groups of students as a simple problem of reducing variation in student learning outcomes. Bloom observed…

  10. The Hispanic-Asian Achievement Gap in Elementary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez, Lina Maria

    2012-01-01

    There is little research of Hispanic and Asian children's educational outcomes; in particular, the achievement gap between these two racial/ethnic groups has not been fully explored. The objective of this investigation is to analyze the Hispanic-Asian achievement gap in elementary school using the ECLS-K, a longitudinal nationally…

  11. Narrowing the Achievement Gap: Perspectives and Strategies for Challenging Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Timar, Thomas B., Ed.; Maxwell-Jolly, Julie, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    This timely and thoughtful book provides multiple perspectives on closing achievement gaps. Closing persistent gaps in educational outcomes between different groups of students has been a central goal of educational policy for the past forty years. The commitment to close existing achievement gaps poses an unprecedented challenge to policy makers,…

  12. Achieving Goal Blood Pressure.

    PubMed

    Laurent, Stéphane

    2015-07-01

    Both monotherapy and combination therapy options are appropriate for antihypertensive therapy according to the 2013 European Society of Hypertension (ESH)/European Society of Cardiology (ESC) guidelines. Most patients require more than one agent to achieve blood pressure (BP) control, and adding a second agent is more effective than doubling the dose of existing therapy. The addition of a third agent may be required to achieve adequate BP reductions in some patients. Single-pill fixed-dose combinations (FDCs) allow multiple-drug regimens to be delivered without any negative impact on patient compliance or persistence with therapy. FDCs also have documented beneficial clinical effects and use of FDCs containing two or three agents is recommended by the 2013 ESH/ESC guidelines. PMID:26002423

  13. Development and Validation of a Multifactorial Treatment Outcome Measure for Eating Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Drew A.; Williamson, Donald A.; Duchmann, Erich G.; Gleaves, David H.; Barbin, Jane M.

    1999-01-01

    Developed a brief self-report inventory to evaluate treatment outcome for anorexia and bulimia nervosa, the Multifactorial Assessment of Eating Disorders, and evaluated the instrument in a series of studies involving 1,054 women. Results support a stable factor structure and satisfactory reliability and validity, and establish normative data. (SLD)

  14. Arthroscopically assisted anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with bone-patellar tendon-bone autograft without wound drainage: short- to middle-term outcome

    PubMed Central

    Witoński, Dariusz; Kęska, Rafał; Cyranowski, Rafał

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Several studies have suggested that anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) without wound drainage has no impact on long-term follow-up. Aim To investigate a prospective patient series as measured by the patient-administered disease-specific questionnaire Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS). Material and methods The study included 101 consecutive patients (71 men and 30 women) with a mean age of 30 years (SD 10, range: 15–62 years), who had undergone primary single incision arthroscopic bone-patellar tendon-bone autograft (BPTB) ACLR without wound drainage. All patients completed KOOS questionnaires, preoperatively and at a mean follow-up of 1.4 years (range: 0.4–3.4). Satisfactory clinical outcome (function recovery – FR) was defined as the lower threshold for the 95% CI of 18–34-year old males and corresponded to a KOOS score > 90 for Pain, 84 for Symptoms, 91 for Activities of Daily Living (ADL), 80 for Sports/Recreation, and 81 for Quality of Life (QOL). A non-satisfactory result was defined as treatment failure (TF) and corresponded to a QOL score < 44. Results All patients achieved 90° of knee flexion on the first postoperative day and full extension 2 weeks postoperatively. A full range of motion was achieved in less than 6 weeks postoperatively. No postoperative complications were reported. Score improvement at follow-up was observed in the KOOS subscales Pain, Symptoms and ADL. Criteria for FR were fulfilled by 52% of patients for Pain, 47% for Symptoms, 62% for ADL, 34% for Sports/Recreation and 15% for QOL, whereas criteria for TF were fulfilled by 29% of patients. Conclusions The study demonstrated that the primary ACLRs without wound drainage did not have any negative impact for patient-reported recovery. PMID:27458486

  15. Achieving Magnet status.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Beckie; Gates, Judy

    2005-01-01

    Magnet has become the gold standard for nursing excellence. It is the symbol of effective and safe patient care. It evaluates components that inspire safe care, including employee satisfaction and retention, professional education, and effective interdisciplinary collaboration. In an organization whose mission focuses on excellent patient care, Banner Thunderbird Medical Center found that pursuing Magnet status was clearly the next step. In this article, we will discuss committee selection, education, team building, planning, and the discovery process that define the Magnet journey. The road to obtaining Magnet status has permitted many opportunities to celebrate our achievements. PMID:16056158

  16. Incorporating Learning Outcomes into an Introductory Geotechnical Engineering Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fiegel, Gregg L.

    2013-01-01

    The article describes the process of incorporating a set of learning outcomes into a geotechnical engineering course. The outcomes were developed using Bloom's taxonomy and define the knowledge, skills, and abilities the students are expected to achieve upon completion of the course. Each outcome begins with an action-oriented verb corresponding…

  17. Making Sense of Bali: Unintended Outcomes of Study Abroad Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Bob; Thomas, Noel

    2005-01-01

    Study abroad programmes for teacher education students are increasingly being evaluated to determine their effectiveness in achieving intended outcomes. There is a danger, however, that such evaluations will ignore valuable but unintended and serendipitous outcomes of such programmes. This paper investigates an example of such an outcome, the…

  18. Can Unpredicted Outcomes Be Intended? The Role of Outcome-Beliefs in Children's Judgments of Intention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liao, Yu; Li, Hong; Deak, Gedeon O.

    2011-01-01

    An adult-like concept of intention includes a deliberate action to achieve a goal and a belief that one's action (if successful) will cause the desired outcome. For example, good outcomes caused by accident or by chance are not believed to be caused intentionally. In two experiments, we asked whether children understand this connection between…

  19. Clinical Outcomes of Percutaneous Endoscopic Surgery for Lumbar Discal Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Sang Woo; Kim, Seok Won; Lee, SeungMyung; Kim, Yong Hyun; Kim, Hyeun Sung

    2012-01-01

    Objective Discal cyst is rare and causes indistinguishable symptoms from lumbar disc herniation. The clinical manifestations and pathological features of discal cyst have not yet been completely known. Discal cyst has been treated with surgery or with direct intervention such as computed tomography (CT) guided aspiration and steroid injection. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the safety and efficacy of the percutaneous endoscopic surgery for lumbar discal cyst over at least 6 months follow-up. Methods All 8 cases of discal cyst with radiculopathy were treated by percutaneous endoscopic surgery by transforaminal approach. The involved levels include L5-S1 in 1 patient, L3-4 in 2, and L4-5 in 5. The preoperative magnetic resonance imaging and 3-dimensional CT with discogram images in all cases showed a connection between the cyst and the involved intervertebral disc. Over a 6-months period, self-reported measures were assessed using an outcome questionaire that incorporated total back-related medical resource utilization and improvement of leg pain [visual analogue scale (VAS) and Macnab's criteria]. Results All 8 patients underwent endoscopic excision of the cyst with additional partial discectomy. Seven patients obtained immediate relief of symptoms after removal of the cyst by endoscopic approach. There were no recurrent lesions during follow-up period. The mean preoperative VAS for leg pain was 8.25±0.5. At the last examination followed longer than 6 month, the mean VAS for leg pain was 2.25±2.21. According to MacNab' criteria, 4 patients (50%) had excellent results, 3 patients (37.5%) had good results; thus, satisfactory results were achieved in 7 patients (87.5%). However, one case had unsatisfactory result with persistent leg pain and another paresthesia. Conclusion The radicular symptoms were remarkably improved in most patients immediately after percutaneous endoscopic cystectomy by transforaminal approach. PMID:22737300

  20. Recognizing outstanding achievements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speiss, Fred

    One function of any professional society is to provide an objective, informed means for recognizing outstanding achievements in its field. In AGU's Ocean Sciences section we have a variety of means for carrying out this duty. They include recognition of outstanding student presentations at our meetings, dedication of special sessions, nomination of individuals to be fellows of the Union, invitations to present Sverdrup lectures, and recommendations for Macelwane Medals, the Ocean Sciences Award, and the Ewing Medal.Since the decision to bestow these awards requires initiative and judgement by members of our section in addition to a deserving individual, it seems appropriate to review the selection process for each and to urge you to identify those deserving of recognition.

  1. Achieving closure at Fernald

    SciTech Connect

    Bradburne, John; Patton, Tisha C.

    2001-02-25

    When Fluor Fernald took over the management of the Fernald Environmental Management Project in 1992, the estimated closure date of the site was more than 25 years into the future. Fluor Fernald, in conjunction with DOE-Fernald, introduced the Accelerated Cleanup Plan, which was designed to substantially shorten that schedule and save taxpayers more than $3 billion. The management of Fluor Fernald believes there are three fundamental concerns that must be addressed by any contractor hoping to achieve closure of a site within the DOE complex. They are relationship management, resource management and contract management. Relationship management refers to the interaction between the site and local residents, regulators, union leadership, the workforce at large, the media, and any other interested stakeholder groups. Resource management is of course related to the effective administration of the site knowledge base and the skills of the workforce, the attraction and retention of qualified a nd competent technical personnel, and the best recognition and use of appropriate new technologies. Perhaps most importantly, resource management must also include a plan for survival in a flat-funding environment. Lastly, creative and disciplined contract management will be essential to effecting the closure of any DOE site. Fluor Fernald, together with DOE-Fernald, is breaking new ground in the closure arena, and ''business as usual'' has become a thing of the past. How Fluor Fernald has managed its work at the site over the last eight years, and how it will manage the new site closure contract in the future, will be an integral part of achieving successful closure at Fernald.

  2. Achievement Goals and Achievement Emotions: A Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Chiungjung

    2011-01-01

    This meta-analysis synthesized 93 independent samples (N = 30,003) in 77 studies that reported in 78 articles examining correlations between achievement goals and achievement emotions. Achievement goals were meaningfully associated with different achievement emotions. The correlations of mastery and mastery approach goals with positive achievement…

  3. Entrepreneur achievement. Liaoning province.

    PubMed

    Zhao, R

    1994-03-01

    This paper reports the successful entrepreneurial endeavors of members of a 20-person women's group in Liaoning Province, China. Jing Yuhong, a member of the Family Planning Association at Shileizi Village, Dalian City, provided the basis for their achievements by first building an entertainment/study room in her home to encourage married women to learn family planning. Once stocked with books, magazines, pamphlets, and other materials on family planning and agricultural technology, dozens of married women in the neighborhood flocked voluntarily to the room. Yuhong also set out to give these women a way to earn their own income as a means of helping then gain greater equality with their husbands and exert greater control over their personal reproductive and social lives. She gave a section of her farming land to the women's group, loaned approximately US$5200 to group members to help them generate income from small business initiatives, built a livestock shed in her garden for the group to raise marmots, and erected an awning behind her house under which mushrooms could be grown. The investment yielded $12,000 in the first year, allowing each woman to keep more than $520 in dividends. Members then soon began going to fairs in the capital and other places to learn about the outside world, and have successfully ventured out on their own to generate individual incomes. Ten out of twenty women engaged in these income-generating activities asked for and got the one-child certificate. PMID:12287775

  4. Leadership, self-efficacy, and student achievement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grayson, Kristin

    This study examined the relationships between teacher leadership, science teacher self-efficacy, and fifth-grade science student achievement in diverse schools in a San Antonio, Texas, metropolitan school district. Teachers completed a modified version of the Leadership Behavior Description Question (LBDQ) Form XII by Stogdill (1969), the Science Efficacy and Belief Expectations for Science Teaching (SEBEST) by Ritter, Boone, and Rubba (2001, January). Students' scores on the Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) measured fifth-grade science achievement. At the teacher level of analysis multiple regressions showed the following relationships between teachers' science self-efficacy and teacher classroom leadership behaviors and the various teacher and school demographic variables. Predictors of teacher self efficacy beliefs included teacher's level of education, gender, and leadership initiating structure. The only significant predictor of teacher self-efficacy outcome expectancy was gender. Higher teacher self-efficacy beliefs predicted higher leadership initiating structure. At the school level of analysis, higher school levels of percentage of students from low socio-economic backgrounds and higher percentage of limited English proficient students predicted lower school student mean science achievement. These findings suggest a need for continued research to clarify relationships between teacher classroom leadership, science teacher self-efficacy, and student achievement especially at the teacher level of analysis. Findings also indicate the importance of developing instructional methods to address student demographics and their needs so that all students, despite their backgrounds, will achieve in science.

  5. Negotiating outcomes with patients and families.

    PubMed

    Zander, K S

    1996-09-01

    Negotiating outcomes is a complex skill that is crucial to attaining quality care, particularly in an environment characterized by an accelerated speed of care and regimented options for care. In this environment, patients and their families need a realistic view of achievable outcomes. Caregivers must be able to reformulate and renegotiate outcomes quickly with patients and their families. Caregivers act as a catalyst in the outcome-achievement process and, to be successful, seek new and creative strategies to accomplish this. Being a catalyst also involves determining the patients' personal feelings about their illnesses and the proposed interventions, assisting patients in planning how to translate their new knowledge into behaviors, and to build in feedback mechanisms. PMID:8920372

  6. Sense of Coherence and Academic Achievement of Domestic and International Students: A Comparative Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grayson, J. Paul

    2008-01-01

    Traditional models of educational outcomes relate academic achievement to university experiences controlling for background characteristics, like former levels of achievement. In these models, most of the variance in the outcome under consideration is explained not by experiences inside the university but by background characteristics, such as…

  7. The Homogeneity of School Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cahan, Sorel

    Since the measurement of school achievement involves the administration of achievement tests to various grades on various subjects, both grade level and subject matter contribute to within-school achievement variations. To determine whether achievement test scores vary most among different fields within a grade level, or within fields among…

  8. HEPEX - achievements and challenges!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappenberger, Florian; Ramos, Maria-Helena; Thielen, Jutta; Wood, Andy; Wang, Qj; Duan, Qingyun; Collischonn, Walter; Verkade, Jan; Voisin, Nathalie; Wetterhall, Fredrik; Vuillaume, Jean-Francois Emmanuel; Lucatero Villasenor, Diana; Cloke, Hannah L.; Schaake, John; van Andel, Schalk-Jan

    2014-05-01

    HEPEX is an international initiative bringing together hydrologists, meteorologists, researchers and end-users to develop advanced probabilistic hydrological forecast techniques for improved flood, drought and water management. HEPEX was launched in 2004 as an independent, cooperative international scientific activity. During the first meeting, the overarching goal was defined as: "to develop and test procedures to produce reliable hydrological ensemble forecasts, and to demonstrate their utility in decision making related to the water, environmental and emergency management sectors." The applications of hydrological ensemble predictions span across large spatio-temporal scales, ranging from short-term and localized predictions to global climate change and regional modeling. Within the HEPEX community, information is shared through its blog (www.hepex.org), meetings, testbeds and intercompaison experiments, as well as project reportings. Key questions of HEPEX are: * What adaptations are required for meteorological ensemble systems to be coupled with hydrological ensemble systems? * How should the existing hydrological ensemble prediction systems be modified to account for all sources of uncertainty within a forecast? * What is the best way for the user community to take advantage of ensemble forecasts and to make better decisions based on them? This year HEPEX celebrates its 10th year anniversary and this poster will present a review of the main operational and research achievements and challenges prepared by Hepex contributors on data assimilation, post-processing of hydrologic predictions, forecast verification, communication and use of probabilistic forecasts in decision-making. Additionally, we will present the most recent activities implemented by Hepex and illustrate how everyone can join the community and participate to the development of new approaches in hydrologic ensemble prediction.

  9. Could training executive function improve treatment outcomes for eating disorders?☆

    PubMed Central

    Juarascio, Adrienne S.; Manasse, Stephanie M.; Espel, Hallie M.; Kerrigan, Stephanie G.; Forman, Evan M.

    2016-01-01

    Current gold standard treatments for eating disorders (EDs) lack satisfactory efficacy, and traditional psychological treatments do not directly address executive functioning deficits underpinning ED pathology. The goal of this paper is to explore the potential for enhancing ED treatment outcomes by improving executive functioning deficits that have been demonstrated to underlie eating pathology. To achieve our objective, we (1) review existing evidence for executive functioning deficits that underpin EDs and consider the extent to which these deficits could be targeted in neurocognitive training programs, (2) present the evidence for the one ED neurocognitive training program well-studied to date (Cognitive Remediation Therapy), (3) discuss the utility of neurocognitive training programs that have been developed for other psychiatric disorders with similar deficits, and (4) provide suggestions for the future development and research of neurocognitive training programs for EDs. Despite the fact that the body of empirical work on neurocognitive training programs for eating disorders is very small, we conclude that their potential is high given the combined evidence for the role of deficits in executive functioning in EDs, the initial promise of Cognitive Remediation Training, and the success in treating related conditions with neurocognitive training. Based on the evidence to date, it appears that the development and empirical evaluation of neurocognitive training programs for EDs is warranted. PMID:25777264

  10. The Impact of Reading Achievement on Overall Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Churchwell, Dawn Earheart

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between reading achievement and achievement in other subject areas. The purpose of this study was to determine if there was a correlation between reading scores as measured by the Standardized Test for the Assessment of Reading (STAR) and academic achievement in language arts, math, science, and social studies…

  11. Attitude Towards Physics and Additional Mathematics Achievement Towards Physics Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veloo, Arsaythamby; Nor, Rahimah; Khalid, Rozalina

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to identify the difference in students' attitude towards Physics and Additional Mathematics achievement based on gender and relationship between attitudinal variables towards Physics and Additional Mathematics achievement with achievement in Physics. This research focused on six variables, which is attitude towards…

  12. Predicting Mathematics Achievement: The Influence of Prior Achievement and Attitudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hemmings, Brian; Grootenboer, Peter; Kay, Russell

    2011-01-01

    Achievement in mathematics is inextricably linked to future career opportunities, and therefore, understanding those factors that influence achievement is important. This study sought to examine the relationships among attitude towards mathematics, ability and mathematical achievement. This examination was also supported by a focus on gender…

  13. Height and cognitive achievement among Indian children.

    PubMed

    Spears, Dean

    2012-03-01

    Taller children perform better on average on tests of cognitive achievement, in part because of differences in early-life health and net nutrition. Recent research documenting this height-achievement slope has primarily focused on rich countries. Using the India Human Development Survey, a representative sample of 40,000 households which matches anthropometric data to learning tests, this paper documents a height-achievement slope among Indian children. The height-achievement slope in India is more than twice as steep as in the U.S. An earlier survey interviewed some IHDS children's households eleven years before. Including matched early-life control variables reduces the apparent effect of height, but does not eliminate it; water, sanitation, and hygiene may be particularly important for children's outcomes. Being one standard deviation taller is associated with being 5 percentage points more likely to be able to write, a slope that falls only to 3.4 percentage points controlling for a long list of contemporary and early-life conditions. PMID:21907646

  14. [Research Reports on Academic Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Latts, Sander; And Others

    1969-01-01

    Four counselors studied the relation between achievement and choice of major, achievement and motivation, counseling and motivation, and achievement and employment. To see if those with definite majors or career choices in mind did better than those without, 300 students were tested according to the certainty of their choice. No significant…

  15. Cherokee Culture and School Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Anthony D.

    1980-01-01

    Compares the effect of cooperative and competitive behaviors of Cherokee and Anglo American elementary school students on academic achievement. Suggests changes in teaching techniques and lesson organization that might raise academic achievement while taking into consideration tribal traditions that limit scholastic achievement in an…

  16. Models and Methodologies Appropriate to the Study of Outcomes of Schooling in Ontario's Multicultural Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anisef, Paul; And Others

    This report explicates conceptual models of schools outcomes and related research methodologies in order to increase an understanding of the diversity and structure of desired outcomes. The complex interrelationship among models of education, desired outcomes, methods of achieving those outcomes, and methods of studying the results is approached…

  17. Students' Achievement Goals, Learning-Related Emotions and Academic Achievement.

    PubMed

    Lüftenegger, Marko; Klug, Julia; Harrer, Katharina; Langer, Marie; Spiel, Christiane; Schober, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    In the present research, the recently proposed 3 × 2 model of achievement goals is tested and associations with achievement emotions and their joint influence on academic achievement are investigated. The study was conducted with 388 students using the 3 × 2 Achievement Goal Questionnaire including the six proposed goal constructs (task-approach, task-avoidance, self-approach, self-avoidance, other-approach, other-avoidance) and the enjoyment and boredom scales from the Achievement Emotion Questionnaire. Exam grades were used as an indicator of academic achievement. Findings from CFAs provided strong support for the proposed structure of the 3 × 2 achievement goal model. Self-based goals, other-based goals and task-approach goals predicted enjoyment. Task-approach goals negatively predicted boredom. Task-approach and other-approach predicted achievement. The indirect effects of achievement goals through emotion variables on achievement were assessed using bias-corrected bootstrapping. No mediation effects were found. Implications for educational practice are discussed. PMID:27199836

  18. Students’ Achievement Goals, Learning-Related Emotions and Academic Achievement

    PubMed Central

    Lüftenegger, Marko; Klug, Julia; Harrer, Katharina; Langer, Marie; Spiel, Christiane; Schober, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    In the present research, the recently proposed 3 × 2 model of achievement goals is tested and associations with achievement emotions and their joint influence on academic achievement are investigated. The study was conducted with 388 students using the 3 × 2 Achievement Goal Questionnaire including the six proposed goal constructs (task-approach, task-avoidance, self-approach, self-avoidance, other-approach, other-avoidance) and the enjoyment and boredom scales from the Achievement Emotion Questionnaire. Exam grades were used as an indicator of academic achievement. Findings from CFAs provided strong support for the proposed structure of the 3 × 2 achievement goal model. Self-based goals, other-based goals and task-approach goals predicted enjoyment. Task-approach goals negatively predicted boredom. Task-approach and other-approach predicted achievement. The indirect effects of achievement goals through emotion variables on achievement were assessed using bias-corrected bootstrapping. No mediation effects were found. Implications for educational practice are discussed. PMID:27199836

  19. Academic Achievement in Children With Oral Clefts Versus Unaffected Siblings

    PubMed Central

    Wehby, George L.; Barron, Sheila; Romitti, Paul A.; Ansley, Timothy N.; Speltz, Matthew L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare academic achievement in children with oral-facial clefts (OFC) with their unaffected siblings. Methods 256 children with OFC were identified from the Iowa Registry for Congenital and Inherited Disorders, and 387 unaffected siblings were identified from birth certificates. These data were linked to Iowa Testing Programs achievement data. We compared academic achievement in children with OFC with their unaffected siblings using linear regression models, adjusted for potential confounders. In post hoc analyses, we explored modifiers of siblings’ academic performance. Results Achievement scores were similar between children with OFC and their siblings. Children with cleft palate only were significantly more likely to use special education than their unaffected siblings. Siblings’ academic achievement was inversely related to distance in birth order and age from the affected child. Conclusion Children with OFC and their siblings received similar achievement scores. Younger siblings, in particular, may share a vulnerability to poor academic outcomes. PMID:24993102

  20. Predicting performance of annual safety outcomes.

    PubMed

    Guria, J; Mara, K

    2001-05-01

    A control chart system was developed in an earlier paper to identify the occurrence of actual risk changes or deviation from the expected levels of road crash fatalities during the course of a year. This paper discusses the development of a prediction method for estimating number of fatalities during a year. The method then provides a mechanism for estimating the likelihood of meeting a pre-set target or any other outcome. At any point of time in a year, the attainability of a target for the year, depends not only on safety outcomes during the remainder of the year but also on outcomes up to that point in the year. High week to week variability would indicate that it can be difficult to achieve the intended maximum goal. The control charts developed earlier, indicate if the current trend differs from the expected trend or that required to achieve the target. This paper determines the probability of achieving the target given the past outcomes of the year. It also determines the level of outcome for the year based on the past trend and in the absence of any special programmes. The paper discusses the New Zealand application as an example. PMID:11235800

  1. Achievement as Resistance: The Development of a Critical Race Achievement Ideology among Black Achievers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Dorinda J.

    2008-01-01

    In this article, Dorinda Carter examines the embodiment of a critical race achievement ideology in high-achieving black students. She conducted a yearlong qualitative investigation of the adaptive behaviors that nine high-achieving black students developed and employed to navigate the process of schooling at an upper-class, predominantly white,…

  2. Does Children's Academic Achievement Improve when Single Mothers Marry?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagmiller, Robert L., Jr.; Gershoff, Elizabeth; Veliz, Philip; Clements, Margaret

    2010-01-01

    Promoting marriage, especially among low-income single mothers with children, is increasingly viewed as a promising public policy strategy for improving developmental outcomes for disadvantaged children. Previous research suggests, however, that children's academic achievement either does not improve or declines when single mothers marry. In this…

  3. Assessing Student Achievement in Physical Education for Teacher Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mercier, Kevin; Doolittle, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    While many teachers continue to ignore the practice of assessing student achievement in physical education, recent federal pressures to include student assessment data in teacher evaluation systems has shown that assessment of student outcomes is here to stay. Though there is a strong tradition of assessing teacher practice in physical education,…

  4. Black Males' Structural Conditions, Achievement Patterns, Normative Needs, and "Opportunities."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swanson, Dena Phillips; Cunningham, Michael; Spencer, Margaret Beale

    2003-01-01

    Examined the relations between normative developmental transitions, contextual influences, and life-stage outcomes, such as academic achievement, for African American males. Data from a longitudinal study in a large southeastern U.S. city indicated that negative stereotyping and tracking from early experience in educational settings affected black…

  5. The Achievement Attributions of Kindergarteners. Technical Report #39.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falbo, Toni

    This study investigated whether kindergarten children have consistent preferences in explaining success and failure outcomes and whether these attributional preferences are related to other variables known to be associated with achievement motivation. The 48 Hawaiian kindergarteners who served as subjects were asked to explain a fictional outcome…

  6. Reading First in Pennsylvania: Achievement Findings after Five Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bean, Rita; Draper, Jason; Turner, Greg; Zigmond, Naomi

    2010-01-01

    This article reports on the student achievement outcomes for third graders in Reading First (RF) schools in Pennsylvania over the five years of implementation for the group as a whole, for disaggregated groups of third graders, and for third graders who received reading instruction in RF schools for one, two, and three years. We also present a…

  7. The Role of Feedback on Studying, Achievement and Calibration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chu, Stephanie T. L.; Jamieson-Noel, Dianne L.; Winne, Philip H.

    One set of hypotheses examined in this study was that various types of feedback (outcome, process, and corrective) supply different information about performance and have different effects on studying processes and on achievement. Another set of hypotheses concerned students' calibration, their accuracy in predicting and postdicting achievement…

  8. Professional Development Schools and Student Learning and Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Pia Lindquist; Glass, Ronald David

    2011-01-01

    A central commitment for professional development schools (PDSs) is to link preservice teacher preparation and in-service teacher professional development with improved learning outcomes for pupils. PDSs are expected to improve student achievement in two primary ways: (1) by enriching and intensifying the learning environment through professional…

  9. Essays on Academic Achievement and Student Behavior in Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moussa, Wael Soheil

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation examines the student academic achievement through various mechanisms, put in place by the public school district, classroom student behavior, and negative external shocks to the students' living environment. I examine the impacts of various treatments on student short and long run academic outcomes such as math and English…

  10. Maternal Education and Children's Academic Achievement during Middle Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magnuson, Katherine

    2007-01-01

    Despite much evidence that links mothers' educational attainment to children's academic outcomes, studies have not established whether increases in mothers' education will improve their children's academic achievement. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth on children between the ages of 6 and 12, this study examined whether…

  11. Implicit Beliefs, Achievement Goals, and Procrastination: A Mediational Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howell, Andrew J.; Buro, Karen

    2009-01-01

    As a maladaptive behavioural outcome, procrastination should correlate with beliefs about ability and achievement goals that are themselves relatively maladaptive. Accordingly, procrastination should be predicted by entity as opposed to incremental implicit theories (i.e., viewing attributes such as ability as relatively fixed vs. malleable,…

  12. Educational Administration Program Quality and the Impact on Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrd, Jimmy K.; Slater, Robert O.; Brooks, John

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if there was a connection between quality of education obtained by superintendents in educational administration programs and school effectiveness as measured by student achievement. The best fitting model based on the model deviance test and accounting for the greatest variation in the outcome variable,…

  13. The Effects of Block Scheduling on High School Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Chance W.; Dugan, James J.; Winokur, Marc A.; Cobb, Brian R.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of block scheduling on high school student achievement in mathematics and reading was investigated in this study through the use of an ex post-facto, longitudinal research design. Specifically, student scores from 9th and 11th-grade standardized tests were matched and sorted by junior high and high school attended. Outcome measures…

  14. The Role of Achievement Strategies on Literacy Acquisition across Languages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgiou, George K.; Hirvonen, Riikka; Liao, Chen-Huei; Manolitsis, George; Parrila, Rauno; Nurmi, Jari-Erik

    2011-01-01

    We examined the importance of children's achievement strategies in different literacy outcomes in three languages varying in orthographic consistency: Chinese, English, and Greek. Eighty Chinese-speaking Taiwanese children, 51 English-speaking Canadian children and 70 Greek children were assessed on measures of phonological awareness, rapid…

  15. Gender, Bourdieu, and the Anomaly of Women's Achievement Redux.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mickelson, Roslyn Arlin

    2003-01-01

    Argues that focusing on gender differences in educational outcomes without considering race and social class obscures gender achievement relationships. Draws on Pierre Bourdieu's theory of practice for its insights into the ways that structure and human agency generate social behavior. Presents hypotheses to explain the anomaly of women's…

  16. Aligning Student Support with Achievement Goals. The Secondary Principals Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Louis, Karen Seashore; Gordon, Molly F.

    2005-01-01

    Many principals feel they lack the personnel necessary to raise student achievement to mandated levels. Yet, as school leaders seek to improve educational outcomes, one of the most underutilized groups remains student support professionals-the counselors, social workers, and nurses already on site. The authors offer a practical approach to…

  17. Organizational Health and Student Achievement in Tennessee Middle Level Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Christopher L.; Buehler, Alison E.; Stein, William L.; Dalton, John E.; Robinson, Teresa R.; Anfara, Vincent A., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    Although the successful middle level school was designed to address both the affective and cognitive development of young adolescents (NMSA 2003), academic achievement is the outcome of paramount importance in the current political context of accountability, high-stakes testing, and the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001. In their efforts to reform,…

  18. Institutional Outcomes Report, 2002-2003.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    William Rainey Harper Coll., Palatine, IL. Office of Planning and Research.

    This document presents the institutional outcomes for 2002-2003 for William Rainey Harper College. The document begins with the Presidents Introduction, which includes a list of accomplishments of the college. Some of these success are: (1) 90% retention rates for students involved in retention services and programs; (2) achieving a hiring…

  19. So, What's a Learning Outcome Anyway?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Battersby, Mark

    This report defines and explains the importance of the learning outcomes approach. According to the paper, this approach bases curriculum design, content, delivery and assessment on the application and integration of knowledge, skills and values -- a comprehensiveness that is not achieved with a competency approach. The report also discusses…

  20. Grades, Aspirations, and Postsecondary Education Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christofides, Louis N.; Hoy, Michael; Milla, Joniada; Stengos, Thanasis

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we exploit a rich longitudinal data set to explore the forces that, during high school, shape the development of aspirations to attend university and achieve academic success. We then investigate how these aspirations, along with grades and other variables, impact educational outcomes such as going to university and graduating. It…

  1. Effects of School Design on Student Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanner, C. Kenneth

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to compare student achievement with three school design classifications: movement and circulation, day lighting, and views. Design/methodology/approach: From a sample of 71 schools, measures of these three school designs, taken with a ten-point Likert scale, are compared to students' outcomes defined by six…

  2. Interpersonal Behavior, Laboratory Learning Environments, and Student Outcomes in Senior Biology Classes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, David; Fisher, Darrell; Fraser, Barry

    2000-01-01

    Investigates associations between students' (n=489) perceptions of their biology teacher's behavior and their laboratory learning environment with student attitudinal, performance, and achievement outcomes. Finds that associations between attitudinal outcomes and learning environment dimensions assessed by the Science Laboratory Environment…

  3. Are Reductions in Population Sodium Intake Achievable?

    PubMed Central

    Levings, Jessica L.; Cogswell, Mary E.; Gunn, Janelle Peralez

    2014-01-01

    The vast majority of Americans consume too much sodium, primarily from packaged and restaurant foods. The evidence linking sodium intake with direct health outcomes indicates a positive relationship between higher levels of sodium intake and cardiovascular disease risk, consistent with the relationship between sodium intake and blood pressure. Despite communication and educational efforts focused on lowering sodium intake over the last three decades data suggest average US sodium intake has remained remarkably elevated, leading some to argue that current sodium guidelines are unattainable. The IOM in 2010 recommended gradual reductions in the sodium content of packaged and restaurant foods as a primary strategy to reduce US sodium intake, and research since that time suggests gradual, downward shifts in mean population sodium intake are achievable and can move the population toward current sodium intake guidelines. The current paper reviews recent evidence indicating: (1) significant reductions in mean population sodium intake can be achieved with gradual sodium reduction in the food supply, (2) gradual sodium reduction in certain cases can be achieved without a noticeable change in taste or consumption of specific products, and (3) lowering mean population sodium intake can move us toward meeting the current individual guidelines for sodium intake. PMID:25325254

  4. The Mechanics of Human Achievement

    PubMed Central

    Duckworth, Angela L.; Eichstaedt, Johannes C.; Ungar, Lyle H.

    2015-01-01

    Countless studies have addressed why some individuals achieve more than others. Nevertheless, the psychology of achievement lacks a unifying conceptual framework for synthesizing these empirical insights. We propose organizing achievement-related traits by two possible mechanisms of action: Traits that determine the rate at which an individual learns a skill are talent variables and can be distinguished conceptually from traits that determine the effort an individual puts forth. This approach takes inspiration from Newtonian mechanics: achievement is akin to distance traveled, effort to time, skill to speed, and talent to acceleration. A novel prediction from this model is that individual differences in effort (but not talent) influence achievement (but not skill) more substantially over longer (rather than shorter) time intervals. Conceptualizing skill as the multiplicative product of talent and effort, and achievement as the multiplicative product of skill and effort, advances similar, but less formal, propositions by several important earlier thinkers. PMID:26236393

  5. Unmet Promise: Raising Minority Achievement. The Achievement Gap.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Robert C.; Viadero, Debra

    2000-01-01

    This first in a four-part series on why academic achievement gaps persist discusses how to raise minority achievement. It explains how earlier progress in closing the gap has stalled, while at the same time, the greater diversity of student populations and the rapid growth of the Hispanic population and of other ethnic groups have reshaped the…

  6. To Achieve or Not to Achieve: The Question of Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilmore, Beatrice

    Questionnaire and projective data from 323 women aged 18 to 50 were analyzed in order to study the relationships of need achievement and motive to avoid success to age, sex role ideology, and stage in the family cycle. Family background and educational variables were also considered. Level of need achievement was found to be significantly related…

  7. Mathematics Achievement in High- and Low-Achieving Secondary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohammadpour, Ebrahim; Shekarchizadeh, Ahmadreza

    2015-01-01

    This paper identifies the amount of variance in mathematics achievement in high- and low-achieving schools that can be explained by school-level factors, while controlling for student-level factors. The data were obtained from 2679 Iranian eighth graders who participated in the 2007 Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study. Of the…

  8. Incorporating learning outcomes into an introductory geotechnical engineering course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiegel, Gregg L.

    2013-06-01

    The article describes the process of incorporating a set of learning outcomes into a geotechnical engineering course. The outcomes were developed using Bloom's taxonomy and define the knowledge, skills, and abilities the students are expected to achieve upon completion of the course. Each outcome begins with an action-oriented verb corresponding to one of six levels of achievement in the cognitive domain (remember, understand, apply, analyse, evaluate, and create). The article includes a listing of outcomes articulated for several course topics. The article also summarises how the outcomes were linked to lesson plans and assignments. Example formative and summative assessment methods and results are presented with the results of teaching evaluations, which indicate that students value this approach to course design. The article concludes with a discussion of how the above approach has been implemented in upper-division courses. Outcomes are presented for a course on earth retention systems.

  9. Affective Processes and Academic Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feshbach, Norma Deitch; Feshbach, Seymour

    1987-01-01

    Data indicate that for girls, affective dispositional factors (empathy, depressive affectivity, aggression, and self-concept) are intimately linked to cognitive development and academic achievement. (PCB)

  10. Attribution theory in science achievement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, Martin

    Recent research reveals consistent lags in American students' science achievement scores. Not only are the scores lower in the United States compared to other developed nations, but even within the United States, too many students are well below science proficiency scores for their grade levels. The current research addresses this problem by examining potential malleable factors that may predict science achievement in twelfth graders using 2009 data from the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP). Principle component factor analysis was conducted to determine the specific items that contribute to each overall factor. A series of multiple regressions were then analyzed and formed the predictive value of each of these factors for science achievement. All significant factors were ultimately examined together (also using multiple regression) to determine the most powerful predictors of science achievement, identifying factors that predict science achievement, the results of which suggested interventions to strengthen students' science achievement scores and encourage persistence in the sciences at the college level and beyond. Although there is a variety of research highlighting how students in the US are falling behind other developing nations in science and math achievement, as yet, little research has addressed ways of intervening to address this gap. The current research is a starting point, seeking to identify malleable factors that contribute to science achievement. More specifically, this research examined the types of attributions that predict science achievement in twelfth grade students.

  11. Maternal employment and children's achievement in context: a meta-analysis of four decades of research.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Wendy A; Prause, Joann; Lucas-Thompson, Rachel; Himsel, Amy

    2008-01-01

    This meta-analysis of 68 studies (770 effect sizes) used random effects models to examine whether children's achievement differed depending on whether their mothers were employed. Four achievement outcomes were emphasized: formal tests of achievement and intellectual functioning, grades, and teacher ratings of cognitive competence. When all employment was compared with nonemployment for combined and separate achievement outcomes without moderators, effects were nonsignificant. Small beneficial effects of part-time compared with full-time employment were apparent for all achievement outcomes combined and for each individual achievement outcome. Significant sample-level moderators of the associations between maternal employment and achievement for all outcomes combined included family structure, race/ethnicity, and socioeconomic status; associations were positive when samples were majority 1-parent families and mixed 1- and 2-parent families, racially/ethnically diverse or international in composition, and not middle-upper class. Analyses of child gender indicated more positive effects for girls. Children's age was a significant moderator for the outcome of intellectual functioning. The identification of sample-level moderators of the relationship between maternal employment and children's achievement highlights the importance of social context in understanding work-family linkages. PMID:18193996

  12. Outward Bound Outcome Model Validation and Multilevel Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luo, Yuan-Chun

    2011-01-01

    This study was intended to measure construct validity for the Outward Bound Outcomes Instrument (OBOI) and to predict outcome achievement from individual characteristics and course attributes using multilevel modeling. A sample of 2,340 participants was collected by Outward Bound USA between May and September 2009 using the OBOI. Two phases of…

  13. General Achievement Trends: South Dakota

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  14. The Process of Science Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papanastasiou, Constantinos; Papanastasiou, Elena C.

    2002-01-01

    Investigates the science achievement of 8th grade students in Cyprus by using a structural equation model with three exogenous constructs--family's educational background, reinforcements, and school climate, and three endogenous constructs--teaching, student attitudes, and achievement. Proposes a model for the effects of family, school, student…

  15. Examination Regimes and Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cosentino de Cohen, Clemencia

    2010-01-01

    Examination regimes at the end of secondary school vary greatly intra- and cross-nationally, and in recent years have undergone important reforms often geared towards increasing student achievement. This research presents a comparative analysis of the relationship between examination regimes and student achievement in the OECD. Using a micro…

  16. School Size and Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riggen, Vicki

    2013-01-01

    This study examined whether a relationship between high school size and student achievement exists in Illinois public high schools in reading and math, as measured by the Prairie State Achievement Exam (PSAE), which is administered to all Illinois 11th-grade students. This study also examined whether the factors of socioeconomic status, English…

  17. Motivational Factors in School Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maehr, Martin L.

    A summary is presented of the literature on motivation relating to achievement in the classroom. Special attention is given to how values, ideology, and various cultural patterns may serve to enhance motivation to achieve in the classroom. In considering what determines motivation and personal investment in educational pursuits, the following…

  18. Parental Involvement and Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwin, Sarah Christine

    2015-01-01

    This research study examined the correlation between student achievement and parent's perceptions of their involvement in their child's schooling. Parent participants completed the Parent Involvement Project Parent Questionnaire. Results slightly indicated parents of students with higher level of achievement perceived less demand or invitations…

  19. General Achievement Trends: New Jersey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  20. General Achievement Trends: North Carolina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  1. Perils of Standardized Achievement Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haladyna, Thomas M.

    2006-01-01

    This article argues that the validity of standardized achievement test-score interpretation and use is problematic; consequently, confidence and trust in such test scores may often be unwarranted. The problem is particularly severe in high-stakes situations. This essay provides a context for understanding standardized achievement testing, then…

  2. Raising Boys' Achievement in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bleach, Kevan, Ed.

    This book offers insights into the range of strategies and good practice being used to raise the achievement of boys. Case studies by school-based practitioners suggest ideas and measures to address the issue of achievement by boys. The contributions are: (1) "Why the Likely Lads Lag Behind" (Kevan Bleach); (2) "Helping Boys Do Better in Their…

  3. Stress Correlates and Academic Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bentley, Donna Anderson; And Others

    An ongoing concern for educators is the identification of factors that contribute to or are associated with academic achievement; one such group of variables that has received little attention are those involving stress. The relationship between perceived sources of stress and academic achievement was examined to determine if reactions to stress…

  4. Achievement in Writing Geometry Proofs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Senk, Sharon L.

    In 1981 a nationwide assessment of achievement in writing geometry proofs was conducted by the Cognitive Development and Achievement in Secondary School Geometry project. Over 1,500 students in 11 schools in 5 states participated. This paper describes the sample, instruments, grading procedures, and selected results. Results include: (1) at the…

  5. Teaching the Low Level Achiever.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salomone, Ronald E., Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Intended for teachers of the English language arts, the articles in this issue offer suggestions and techniques for teaching the low level achiever. Titles and authors of the articles are as follows: (1) "A Point to Ponder" (Rachel Martin); (2) "Tracking: A Self-Fulfilling Prophecy of Failure for the Low Level Achiever" (James Christopher Davis);…

  6. Predicting Achievement in Foreign Language.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, Mary Elizabeth

    A review of research is inconclusive concerning the relationship between intelligence and language proficiency. A study of 10th grade students (n=35) examined scores on a high school entrance exam and achievement in foreign language after 1 year of study. Both math and reading showed a significant correlation with foreign language achievement; the…

  7. Measuring Course Learning Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keshavarz, Mohsen

    2011-01-01

    Accreditation criteria of programs require effective learning outcomes, assessment with documented procedures, tools, results, and actions to close the assessment loop with broad faculty involvement. This article describes a methodology for providing quantitative measurement of a course's learning outcomes. The methodology uses a linkage matrix…

  8. A Program Evaluation Model: Using Bloom's Taxonomy to Identify Outcome Indicators in Outcomes-Based Program Evaluations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNeil, Rita C.

    2011-01-01

    Outcomes-based program evaluation is a systematic approach to identifying outcome indicators and measuring results against those indicators. One dimension of program evaluation is assessing the level of learner acquisition to determine if learning objectives were achieved as intended. The purpose of the proposed model is to use Bloom's Taxonomy to…

  9. Asthma Outcomes: Pulmonary Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Tepper, Robert S.; Wise, Robert S.; Covar, Ronina; Irvin, Charles G.; Kercsmar, Carolyn M.; Kraft, Monica; Liu, Mark C.; O’Connor, George T.; Peters, Stephen P.; Sorkness, Ronald; Togias, Alkis

    2014-01-01

    Background Outcomes of pulmonary physiology have a central place in asthma clinical research. Objective At the request of National Institutes of Health (NIH) institutes and other federal agencies, an expert group was convened to provide recommendations on the use of pulmonary function measures as asthma outcomes that should be assessed in a standardized fashion in future asthma clinical trials and studies to allow for cross-study comparisons. Methods Our subcommittee conducted a comprehensive search of PubMed to identify studies that focused on the validation of various airway response tests used in asthma clinical research. The subcommittee classified the instruments as core (to be required in future studies), supplemental (to be used according to study aims and in a standardized fashion), or emerging (requiring validation and standardization). This work was discussed at an NIH-organized workshop in March 2010 and finalized in September 2011. Results A list of pulmonary physiology outcomes that applies to both adults and children older than 6 years was created. These outcomes were then categorized into core, supplemental, and emerging. Spirometric outcomes (forced expiratory volume in 1 second [FEV1], forced vital capacity [FVC], and FEV1/FVC) are proposed as core outcomes for study population characterization, for observational studies, and for prospective clinical trials. Bronchodilator reversibility and pre- and post-bronchodilator FEV1 also are core outcomes for study population characterization and observational studies. Conclusions The subcommittee considers pulmonary physiology outcomes of central importance in asthma and proposes spirometric outcomes as core outcomes for all future NIH-initiated asthma clinical research. PMID:22386510

  10. EXTENSIVE ROTATOR CUFF INJURIES: AN EVALUATION OF ARTHROSCOPIC REPAIR OUTCOMES

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Alberto Naoki; Fregoneze, Marcelo; Santos, Pedro Doneux; Silva, Luciana Andrade; Eduardo, Cesar Moreira Mariz Pinto Rodrigo Tormin Ortiz; Checchia, Sergio Luiz

    2015-01-01

    To assess the outcomes of the surgical treatment of extensive rotator cuff injuries through arthroscopy. Methods: Between June 1998 and October 2006, 61 patients with extensive rotator cuff injuries and submitted to surgical arthroscopy technique by the Shoulder and Elbow Group of the Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Santa Casa de Misericórdia Medical School were reassessed. The study included all patients with at least two tendons affected or with retraction at least on two tendons up to the glenoidal cavity edge and with at least 12 months of follow-up. Results: According to UCLA's evaluation criteria, 54 (89%) patients showed excellent or good outcomes; no fair outcome in none of the patients; and seven (11%) poor outcomes. A satisfaction rate of 92% was reported. Postoperative joint motion went from a mean lifting value of 93° to 141°, the mean lateral rotation went from 32° to 48° and the mean medial rotation went from L1 to T10. These differences were regarded as statistically significant. Conclusion: The arthroscopic repair of extensive rotator cuff injuries leads to satisfactory outcomes for most of the patients, with a high satisfaction degree. PMID:26998466

  11. Monitoring visual outcome of cataract surgery in India.

    PubMed Central

    Limburg, H.; Foster, A.; Vaidyanathan, K.; Murthy, G. V.

    1999-01-01

    Two simple methods of assessing visual outcome following cataract surgery were evaluated in India. The first used data obtained from standardized patient records of cataract surgery. The second used data from population-based rapid epidemiological assessments. Analysis of 4168 hospital and eye camp records showed that, with the available standard correction, a good outcome (visual acuity > or = 6/18) was achieved in 37.8%, a borderline outcome (visual acuity 6/246-6/60) in 45.6% and a poor outcome (visual acuity 6/60) in 16.6% of instances. Of 2401 aphakic/pseudophakic eyes examined in a cross-sectional population-based study, outcome was good in 43.5% and poor in 26.4%. For 776 eyes examined in a similar study in a different state, outcome was good in 49.9% and poor in 23.9%. These assessments indicate that outcome with available correction was poor in 15-25% of eyes following cataract surgery. Visual outcome is likely to improve when better correction for aphakia can be provided. Further assessment of the causes of poor visual outcome is needed. The visual outcome following cataract surgery could be monitored on a regular basis by ophthalmologists, using either of the methods evaluated, an exercise which in itself is likely to improve the outcome of surgery. When the proportion of poor outcomes is high (> 10%) further investigation into the causes is warranted. PMID:10427929

  12. Why Measure Outcomes?

    PubMed

    Kuhn, John E

    2016-01-01

    The concept of measuring the outcomes of treatment in health care was promoted by Ernest Amory Codman in the early 1900s, but, until recently, his ideas were generally ignored. The forces that have advanced outcome measurement to the forefront of health care include the shift in payers for health care from the patient to large insurance companies or government agencies, the movement toward assessing the care of populations not individuals, and the effort to find value (or cost-effective treatments) amid rising healthcare costs. No ideal method exists to measure outcomes, and the information gathered depends on the reason the outcome information is required. Outcome measures used in research are best able to answer research questions. The methods for assessing physician and hospital performance include process measures, patient-experience measures, structure measures, and measures used to assess the outcomes of treatment. The methods used to assess performance should be validated, be reliable, and reflect a patient's perception of the treatment results. The healthcare industry must measure outcomes to identify which treatments are most effective and provide the most benefit to patients. PMID:27049223

  13. Childhood Obesity and Cognitive Achievement.

    PubMed

    Black, Nicole; Johnston, David W; Peeters, Anna

    2015-09-01

    Obese children tend to perform worse academically than normal-weight children. If poor cognitive achievement is truly a consequence of childhood obesity, this relationship has significant policy implications. Therefore, an important question is to what extent can this correlation be explained by other factors that jointly determine obesity and cognitive achievement in childhood? To answer this question, we exploit a rich longitudinal dataset of Australian children, which is linked to national assessments in math and literacy. Using a range of estimators, we find that obesity and body mass index are negatively related to cognitive achievement for boys but not girls. This effect cannot be explained by sociodemographic factors, past cognitive achievement or unobserved time-invariant characteristics and is robust to different measures of adiposity. Given the enormous importance of early human capital development for future well-being and prosperity, this negative effect for boys is concerning and warrants further investigation. PMID:26123250

  14. Using Design To Achieve Sustainability

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sustainability is defined as meeting the needs of this generation without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their needs. This is a conditional statement that places the responsibility for achieving sustainability squarely in hands of designers and planners....

  15. Correlations among Six Learner Variables and the Performance of a Sample of Jamaican Eleventh-Graders on an Achievement Test on Respiration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soyibo, Kola; Pinnock, Jacqueline

    2005-01-01

    This study aimed at establishing if the level of performance of 500 Jamaican Grade 11 students on an achievement test on the concept of respiration was satisfactory (mean = 28 or 70% and above) or not (less than 70%); if there were statistically significant differences in their performance on the concept linked to their gender, cognitive abilities…

  16. How Many Pathways Underlie Socioeconomic Differences in the Development of Cognition and Achievement?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker-Drob, Elliot M.

    2013-01-01

    Children whose parents are more highly educated enjoy greater age-linked gains in cognitive abilities and academic achievement. Different researchers have typically focused on different outcomes, and the extent to which parental education relates to multiple child outcomes via a single developmental pathway has received little empirical attention.…

  17. Diversity and Leadership: A Study of High-Achieving Students of Color

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St. John, Edward P.; Rowley, Larry L.; Hu, Shouping

    2009-01-01

    Leadership development has long been considered an important outcome of higher education, but the patterns of leadership development among students of color have not been widely studied. This article develops a theory of leadership as an outcome of engaged learning. Findings from this study of high-achieving, low-income students of color include:…

  18. The Effect of Foster Care Experience and Characteristics on Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calix, Alexandra

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the effect of foster care experience and characteristics on educational outcomes. The typical strategy in examining the effect foster care has on educational outcomes is to compare the educational achievement of youth with foster care experience to that of their peers or to national norms. This strategy fails to take selection…

  19. The Development of Emotions in Preschool Children during Achievement-Oriented Striving.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Klaus

    An attempt was made to document the beginning of children's ability to make cognitive-emotional discriminations between skill-dependent outcomes and chance-dependent outcomes of performance on tasks. Children between the ages of 2 and 5 years were administered structurally similar achievement games and effect games. It was thought that as soon as…

  20. Teaching to the Tails: Teacher Performance Pay and the Distribution of Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loyalka, Prashant; Sylvia, Sean; Liu, Chengfang; Chu, James; Rozelle, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Growing evidence suggests that teachers in developing countries often have weak or misaligned incentives for improving student outcomes. In response, policymakers and researchers have proposed performance pay as a way to improve student outcomes by tying concrete measures like achievement scores to teacher pay. While evidence from randomized…

  1. Cognitive Abilities and Motivational Processes in High School Students' Situational Engagement and Achievement in Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lau, Shun; Roeser, Robert W.

    2002-01-01

    Building on R. Snow's two pathways to achievement outcomes (1989), examined how cognitive and motivational factors associated with the performance and commitment pathways respectively contributed to prediction of outcomes in science for 491 high school students. Results are consistent with Snow's conjecture that factors related to both pathways…

  2. Patterns of School Readiness Forecast Achievement and Socioemotional Development at the End of Elementary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sabol, Terri J.; Pianta, Robert C.

    2012-01-01

    A person-oriented approach examined patterns of functioning in social and executive function domains at 54 months and in turn forecasted 5th-grade socioemotional and achievement outcomes for 944 children. Six distinct profiles of 54-month school readiness patterns predicted outcomes in 5th grade with indications of cross-domain association between…

  3. Evaluating Counseling Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smyer, Michael A.; Intrieri, Robert C.

    1990-01-01

    Defines the range of interventions considered under the rubric of counseling for the elderly. Uses evaluation of treatments for depression among the elderly to exemplify the current state of outcome-evaluation research. (Author)

  4. Improving Student Achievement in Math and Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Nancy G.; Hamsa, Irene Schulz; Heath, Panagiota; Perry, Robert; White, Stacy J.

    1998-01-01

    As the new millennium approaches, a long anticipated reckoning for the education system of the United States is forthcoming, Years of school reform initiatives have not yielded the anticipated results. A particularly perplexing problem involves the lack of significant improvement of student achievement in math and science. Three "Partnership" projects represent collaborative efforts between Xavier University (XU) of Louisiana, Southern University of New Orleans (SUNO), Mississippi Valley State University (MVSU), and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Stennis Space Center (SSC), to enhance student achievement in math and science. These "Partnerships" are focused on students and teachers in federally designated rural and urban empowerment zones and enterprise communities. The major goals of the "Partnerships" include: (1) The identification and dissemination of key indices of success that account for high performance in math and science; (2) The education of pre-service and in-service secondary teachers in knowledge, skills, and competencies that enhance the instruction of high school math and science; (3) The development of faculty to enhance the quality of math and science courses in institutions of higher education; and (4) The incorporation of technology-based instruction in institutions of higher education. These goals will be achieved by the accomplishment of the following objectives: (1) Delineate significant ?best practices? that are responsible for enhancing student outcomes in math and science; (2) Recruit and retain pre-service teachers with undergraduate degrees in Biology, Math, Chemistry, or Physics in a graduate program, culminating with a Master of Arts in Curriculum and Instruction; (3) Provide faculty workshops and opportunities for travel to professional meetings for dissemination of NASA resources information; (4) Implement methodologies and assessment procedures utilizing performance-based applications of higher order

  5. Peer Group Influence on Educational Outcomes: A Quantitative Synthesis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ide, Judith K.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    A research synthesis of the influence of peer groups on elementary and high school students' achievement and educational/occupational aspirations is presented. Strength of the peer influence-outcome relationship was higher in urban settings and when peer influence was determined by individuals reporting achievement levels of their best friends.…

  6. Enhancing Student Outcomes through Mentoring, Peer Counselling and Parental Involvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sottie, Cynthia Akorfa; Dubus, Nicole; Sossou, Marie-Antoinette

    2013-01-01

    The government of Ghana has designed various initiatives to achieve the Millennium Development Goals on education and the Education for All goals. Despite these initiatives, student outcomes continue to be poorer than desired. Although access to education has improved, student dropout remains a problem and student scores on achievement tests…

  7. Lags in Minority Achievement Defy Traditional Explanations. The Achievement Gap.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Viadero, Debra; Johnston, Robert C.

    2000-01-01

    This second in a four-part series on why academic achievement gaps exist notes that standard explanations for why minority students trail behind non-Hispanic whites are not good enough, suggesting that no single explanation for the gap exists, but instead a multitude of factors are influential. Poverty, though not the single most important cause,…

  8. Central Iowa Low Achiever Mathematics Project - Low Achiever Motivational Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmerman, Joseph T.

    The materials in this booklet are designed especially for the low achieving student in mathematics. Containing some materials from a course in general mathematics, the booklet is intended to be used in conjunction with conventional textbook materials and is designed to serve as a source of new ideas for teachers and to relieve the teacher of much…

  9. Predicting the outcome of roulette.

    PubMed

    Small, Michael; Tse, Chi Kong

    2012-09-01

    There have been several popular reports of various groups exploiting the deterministic nature of the game of roulette for profit. Moreover, through its history, the inherent determinism in the game of roulette has attracted the attention of many luminaries of chaos theory. In this paper, we provide a short review of that history and then set out to determine to what extent that determinism can really be exploited for profit. To do this, we provide a very simple model for the motion of a roulette wheel and ball and demonstrate that knowledge of initial position, velocity, and acceleration is sufficient to predict the outcome with adequate certainty to achieve a positive expected return. We describe two physically realizable systems to obtain this knowledge both incognito and in situ. The first system relies only on a mechanical count of rotation of the ball and the wheel to measure the relevant parameters. By applying these techniques to a standard casino-grade European roulette wheel, we demonstrate an expected return of at least 18%, well above the -2.7% expected of a random bet. With a more sophisticated, albeit more intrusive, system (mounting a digital camera above the wheel), we demonstrate a range of systematic and statistically significant biases which can be exploited to provide an improved guess of the outcome. Finally, our analysis demonstrates that even a very slight slant in the roulette table leads to a very pronounced bias which could be further exploited to substantially enhance returns. PMID:23020489

  10. Predicting the outcome of roulette

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Small, Michael; Tse, Chi Kong

    2012-09-01

    There have been several popular reports of various groups exploiting the deterministic nature of the game of roulette for profit. Moreover, through its history, the inherent determinism in the game of roulette has attracted the attention of many luminaries of chaos theory. In this paper, we provide a short review of that history and then set out to determine to what extent that determinism can really be exploited for profit. To do this, we provide a very simple model for the motion of a roulette wheel and ball and demonstrate that knowledge of initial position, velocity, and acceleration is sufficient to predict the outcome with adequate certainty to achieve a positive expected return. We describe two physically realizable systems to obtain this knowledge both incognito and in situ. The first system relies only on a mechanical count of rotation of the ball and the wheel to measure the relevant parameters. By applying these techniques to a standard casino-grade European roulette wheel, we demonstrate an expected return of at least 18%, well above the -2.7% expected of a random bet. With a more sophisticated, albeit more intrusive, system (mounting a digital camera above the wheel), we demonstrate a range of systematic and statistically significant biases which can be exploited to provide an improved guess of the outcome. Finally, our analysis demonstrates that even a very slight slant in the roulette table leads to a very pronounced bias which could be further exploited to substantially enhance returns.

  11. The Value of Full Correction: Achieving Excellent and Affordable Results.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Julie Bass

    2016-01-01

    Patients often come to medical aesthetic offices with hopes to fully correct lost facial volume and achieve a natural appearance. Unfortunately, the cost per syringe of dermal filler can be a barrier to desired outcomes. Many aesthetic practitioners do the best they can with the amount of product the patient can afford, often falling short of the "wow" effect for the patient. This article describes what one office implemented to solve the conundrum of affordability while still allowing offices to cover its own financial realities. This tool can help patients achieve beautiful, natural, and affordable outcomes while helping offices advance in manufacturer's tiers, improve word-of-mouth advertising, and increase job satisfaction. PMID:27606585

  12. The science achievement of various subgroups on alternative assessment formats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrenz, Frances; Huffman, Douglas; Welch, Wayne

    2001-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the science achievement outcomes for different subgroups of students using different assessment formats. A nationally representative sample of approximately 3,500 ninth grade science students from 13 high schools throughout the United States completed a series of science assessments designed to measure their level of achievement on the national science education standards. All of the schools were using a curriculum designed to meet the standards. The assessments included a multiple-choice test, a written open-ended test, a hands-on lab skills test, and a hands-on full investigation. The results show that the student outcomes on the different assessment formats are more highly correlated for higher achieving students than for lower achieving students. Patterns for different cultural groups also vary by assessment format. There were no differences found for sex. The results support the notion that different assessment formats assess different competencies and that the achievement of students from different subgroups varies by assessment format.

  13. Cardiac surgery outcomes.

    PubMed

    Halpin, Linda S; Barnett, Scott D; Beachy, Jim

    2003-01-01

    Accrediting organizations and payers are demanding valid and reliable data that demonstrate the value of services. Federal agencies, healthcare industry groups, and healthcare watchdog groups are increasing the demand for public access to outcomes data. A new and growing outcomes dynamic is the information requested by prospective patients in an increasingly consumer-oriented business. Patients demand outcomes, and resources are developing to meet these demands. Physicians are increasingly confronted with requests for information about their mortality and morbidity rates, malpractice suits, and disciplinary actions received. For example, in Virginia, prospective patients have access to data provided by the nonprofit group Virginia Health Information. After numerous resolutions by the Virginia Senate since 1999, the prospective Virginia medical consumer now has access to several annual publications: Virginia Hospitals: A Consumer's Guide, 1999 Annual Report and Strategic Plan Update, and the 1999 Industry Report: Virginia Hospitals and Nursing Facilities. Consumers have access to cardiac outcomes data stratified by hospital, gender, and cardiac service line (cardiac surgery, noninvasive cardiology, and invasive cardiology). This is particularly relevant to IHI because Virginia Health Information specifically targets cardiac care. IHI has a sizable investment in cardiovascular outcomes and has found outcomes measurement and research are key to providing quality care. IHI's goal is to move from an outcomes management model to a disease management model. The hope is to incorporate all aspects of the patient's continuum of care, from preoperative and diagnostic services through cardiac interventions to postoperative rehabilitation. Furthermore, every step along the way will be supported with functional status and quality of life assessments. Although these goals are ambitious and expensive, the return on investment is high. PMID:14618772

  14. Therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest: outcome predictors

    PubMed Central

    Leão, Rodrigo Nazário; Ávila, Paulo; Cavaco, Raquel; Germano, Nuno; Bento, Luís

    2015-01-01

    Objective The determination of coma patient prognosis after cardiac arrest has clinical, ethical and social implications. Neurological examination, imaging and biochemical markers are helpful tools accepted as reliable in predicting recovery. With the advent of therapeutic hypothermia, these data need to be reconfirmed. In this study, we attempted to determine the validity of different markers, which can be used in the detection of patients with poor prognosis under hypothermia. Methods Data from adult patients admitted to our intensive care unit for a hypothermia protocol after cardiac arrest were recorded prospectively to generate a descriptive and analytical study analyzing the relationship between clinical, neurophysiological, imaging and biochemical parameters with 6-month outcomes defined according to the Cerebral Performance Categories scale (good 1-2, poor 3-5). Neuron-specific enolase was collected at 72 hours. Imaging and neurophysiologic exams were carried out in the 24 hours after the rewarming period. Results Sixty-seven patients were included in the study, of which 12 had good neurological outcomes. Ventricular fibrillation and electroencephalographic theta activity were associated with increased likelihood of survival and improved neurological outcomes. Patients who had more rapid cooling (mean time of 163 versus 312 minutes), hypoxic-ischemic brain injury on magnetic resonance imaging or neuron-specific enolase > 58ng/mL had poor neurological outcomes (p < 0.05). Conclusion Hypoxic-ischemic brain injury on magnetic resonance imaging and neuron-specific enolase were strong predictors of poor neurological outcomes. Although there is the belief that early achievement of target temperature improves neurological prognoses, in our study, there were increased mortality and worse neurological outcomes with earlier target-temperature achievement. PMID:26761469

  15. Hypofractionated stereotactic radiosurgery for treatment of cerebral arteriovenous malformations: outcome analysis with use of the modified arteriovenous malformation scoring system.

    PubMed

    Chen, Joseph C T; Mariscal, Luis; Girvigian, Michael R; Vanefsky, Marc A; Glousman, Brandon N; Miller, Michael J; Feng, Lei; Rahimian, Javad

    2016-07-01

    Radiosurgery has long been an accepted modality for definitive treatment of cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVM). Efforts to improve the therapeutic ratio for this indication include use of staged volume procedures and hypofractionation. This study reviews our experience with a cohort of patients treated with hypofractionated radiosurgery. Over a 3year period, 38 patients harboring 39 cerebral AVM were treated with hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy. Seventeen of these patients presented due to hemorrhage, four were asymptomatic unruptured lesions and the remainder were symptomatic unruptured lesions. The median AVM volume was 11.43 cc and median modified Radiosurgery-Based Arteriovenous Malformation Score (mRBAS) was 2.02. The median follow-up was 7.32years. Four patients harboring four AVM were lost to follow-up before a result could be ascertained leaving 35 AVM for analysis. Excellent outcomes (AVM obliteration without new deficits) occurred in 17 of 34 (50%) patients and in 18 of 35 (51%) AVM treated. AVM obliteration was seen in 26 of 35 (74%) lesions treated. Two patients died during the follow-up period (6%). A poor result (major deficit without obliteration) was seen in one patient. Of 19 patients harboring AVM with mRBAS >2.0, an excellent outcome was achieved in eight (42%). Hypofractionation for cerebral AVM can result in satisfactory obliteration rates, but with risk of significant complications commensurate with mRBAS. Further study of this technique will be needed to ascertain the degree of incremental improvement, if any, over other radiosurgery treatment methods. PMID:26947340

  16. Midwives and abortion care: a model for achieving competency.

    PubMed

    Levi, Amy; Angel James, Evelyn; Taylor, Diana

    2012-01-01

    Throughout history, the care of women's reproductive health needs has included termination of unwanted pregnancy. Unfortunately, access to safe first-trimester abortion is restricted by a lack of skilled providers. In an effort to provide data-based evidence and increase access to first-trimester abortion care in California, the University of California, San Francisco, under the auspices of the Health Workforce Pilot Program, developed a competency-based training model to increase the number of certified nurse-midwives, nurse practitioners, and physician assistants who can provide uterine aspiration. This article describes the training program, which uses a curriculum comprising both self-directed didactic material and supervised clinical experience with a minimum of 40 procedures. Successful completion of the program requires passing a written examination and satisfactory achievement of a competency-based clinical assessment. Thirty-eight trainees have completed the training to date, achieving competency following an average of 6 training days. Competency development in the clinical area is monitored by both the trainer and the trainee, using daily and final competency assessments in 4 domains: patient comfort, procedural completeness, speed, and ability to identify problems. Analysis of complications is used to identify concerns about clinician safety. The availability of a competency-based training curriculum for uterine aspiration has the potential to increase the number of first-trimester abortion providers by making training available to experienced clinicians, including nurse-midwives, who would like to provide this care. PMID:22594867

  17. Potential-Based Achievement Goals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliot, Andrew; Murayama, Kou; Kobeisy, Ahmed; Lichtenfeld, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    Background: Self-based achievement goals use one's own intrapersonal trajectory as a standard of evaluation, and this intrapersonal trajectory may be grounded in one's past (past-based goals) or one's future potential (potential-based goals). Potential-based goals have been overlooked in the literature to date. Aims: The primary aim of the present…

  18. The Racial Academic Achievement Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Toneka M.

    2008-01-01

    Closing the racial academic achievement gap is a problem that must be solved in order for future society to properly function. Minorities including African-American and Latino students' standardized test scores are much lower than white students. By the end of fourth grade, African American, Latino, and poor students of all races are two years…

  19. The Achievement-Assessment Link

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, Virginia; Husid, Whitney

    2011-01-01

    The recent recession, school budget cuts, and predictions of school libraries' demise because of technology advances put pressure on school librarians to prove the utility, relevance, and value of school libraries to student learning. While national studies document that school libraries increase student achievement, school librarians must…

  20. Cooperative Learning and Student Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slavin, Robert E.

    1988-01-01

    Research evidence shows that cooperative learning strategies are not equally effective, though most positively affect self-esteem, intergroup relations, and the ability to work with others. To produce achievement gains, these methods must include both a group goal and individual accountability. Includes 19 references. (MLH)

  1. Curricular Diversity and Academic Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Reginald

    1991-01-01

    Educational achievement should be intellectually and philosophically divorced from cultural affirmation, which is merely a byproduct of the inclusion of diverse voices in the search for truth. A model based on the relationship between the valuation of oneself by others and by oneself is presented to explain differential effects of schooling on…

  2. School Readiness and Later Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, Greg J.; Dowsett, Chantelle J.; Claessens, Amy; Magnuson, Katherine; Huston, Aletha C.; Klebanov, Pamela; Pagani, Linda S.; Feinstein, Leon; Engel, Mimi; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne; Sexton, Holly; Duckworth, Kathryn; Japel, Crista

    2007-01-01

    Using 6 longitudinal data sets, the authors estimate links between three key elements of school readiness--school-entry academic, attention, and socioemotional skills--and later school reading and math achievement. In an effort to isolate the effects of these school-entry skills, the authors ensured that most of their regression models control for…

  3. Teacher Certification and Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moss, Patricia Lewis

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this mixed-method study was to determine if there is a significant difference between the achievement of students who are taught by traditionally prepared teachers and that of students who are taught by alternatively prepared teachers. The study further addressed the perspectives of both groups of teachers regarding selected…

  4. Achieving Safety through Security Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridgway, John

    Whilst the achievement of safety objectives may not be possible purely through the administration of an effective Information Security Management System (ISMS), your job as safety manager will be significantly eased if such a system is in place. This paper seeks to illustrate the point by drawing a comparison between two of the prominent standards within the two disciplines of security and safety management.

  5. School Desegregation and Black Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Thomas; And Others

    Seven papers commissioned by the National Institute of Education in order to clarify the state of recent knowledge about the effects of school desegregation on the academic achievement of black students are contained in this report. The papers, which analyze 19 "core" empirical studies on this topic, include: (1) "What Have Black Children Gained…

  6. Graders' Mathematics Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bond, John B.; Ellis, Arthur K.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this experimental study was to investigate the effects of metacognitive reflective assessment instruction on student achievement in mathematics. The study compared the performance of 141 students who practiced reflective assessment strategies with students who did not. A posttest-only control group design was employed, and results…

  7. Epistemological Beliefs and Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arslantas, Halis Adnan

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to identify the relationship between teacher candidates' epistemological beliefs and academic achievement. The participants of the study were 353 teacher candidates studying their fourth year at the Education Faculty. The Epistemological Belief Scale was used which adapted to Turkish through reliability and validity work by…

  8. Measuring and Recording Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Universities UK, 2004

    2004-01-01

    The Measuring and Recording Student Achievement Scoping Group was established by Universities UK and the Standing Conference of Principals (SCOP), with the support of the Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE) in October 2003 to review the recommendations from the UK Government White Paper "The Future of Higher Education" relating…

  9. Academic Achievement in Effective Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basque, Marc; Bouchamma, Yamina

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to identify predictors of achievement in mathematics in elementary schools in New Brunswick (Canada). Data Collection: Both teachers and school leaders (N = 111) completed a questionnaire on their practices and on school functioning. Findings: Multiple regression analyses revealed that the students'…

  10. Adequacy, Litigation, and Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glenn, William

    2008-01-01

    The court system has been an increasingly important forum in the attempts to remedy the persistent achievement gaps in American education. In the past twenty years, school finance adequacy litigation has replaced desegregation as the most widely used legal strategy in these efforts. Despite the widespread use of adequacy litigation, few…

  11. Achieving a sustainable service advantage.

    PubMed

    Coyne, K P

    1993-01-01

    Many managers believe that superior service should play little or no role in competitive strategy; they maintain that service innovations are inherently copiable. However, the author states that this view is too narrow. For a company to achieve a lasting service advantage, it must base a new service on a capability gap that competitors cannot or will not copy. PMID:10123422

  12. Goal Setting to Achieve Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Rich

    2012-01-01

    Both districts and individual schools have a very clear set of goals and skills for their students to achieve and master. In fact, except in rare cases, districts and schools develop very detailed goals they wish to pursue. In most cases, unfortunately, only the teachers and staff at a particular school or district-level office are aware of the…

  13. Florida's Fit to Achieve Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sander, Allan N.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Describes Florida's "Fit to Achieve," a cardiovascular fitness education program for elementary students. Children are taught responsibility for their own cardiovascular fitness through proper exercise, personal exercise habits, and regular aerobic exercise. The program stresses collaborative effort between physical educators and classroom…

  14. Believing and Achieving. Issue Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jerald, Craig D.

    2007-01-01

    This research brief takes a look at the role of teacher efficacy-how teachers' beliefs in their own abilities affect student achievement. The brief examines the influence of perceived efficacy and building teacher confidence (social persuasion, collegiality, and shared decision making). It concludes by asserting that more positive steps must be…

  15. Washington State's Student Achievement Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pettitt, Maureen; Prince, David

    2010-01-01

    This article describes Washington State's Student Achievement Initiative, an accountability system implemented in 2005-06 that measures students' gains in college readiness, college credits earned, and degree or certificate completion. The goal of the initiative is to increase educational attainment by focusing on the critical momentum points…

  16. Achieving Ideological Change within Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Dennis R.

    Psychologists who are interested in the nature of ideology and the achievement of social change generally focus their primary theoretical and empirical attention on those people outside academia who are trying to change or to prevent change in one political sphere or another. There may be some value in looking at psychology and psychologists as…

  17. Five Standards and Student Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doherty, R. William; Hilberg, R. Soleste; Pinal, America; Tharp, Roland G.

    2003-01-01

    Two studies examine the influence of the Standards for Effective Pedagogy on student achievement gains. Participants were 15 teachers and 266 students (grades 3 to 5) in a public elementary school serving predominantly low-income Latino English Language Learners (ELLs). Implications for teaching practice and research are discussed. (Author/VWL)

  18. Socioeconomic Determinants of Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomul, Ekber; Savasci, Havva Sebile

    2012-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the relationship between academic achievement and the socioeconomic characteristics of elementary school 7th grade students in Burdur. The population of the study are 7th grade students who had education at elementary schools in Burdur in the 2007-2008 academic year. Two staged sampling was chosen as suitable for the…

  19. Mobility and the Achievement Gap.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skandera, Hanna; Sousa, Richard

    2002-01-01

    Research indicates that low achievement scores relate significantly to high school mobility rates. One explanation for this relationship is curricular inconsistency. Some suggest that school choice could contribute to a solution by breaking the link between a child's home address and school address, thus allowing students to remain at one school…

  20. The Widening Income Achievement Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reardon, Sean F.

    2013-01-01

    Has the academic achievement gap between high-income and low-income students changed over the last few decades? If so, why? And what can schools do about it? Researcher Sean F. Reardon conducted a comprehensive analysis of research to answer these questions and came up with some striking findings. In this article, he shows that income-related…

  1. School Districts and Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chingos, Matthew M.; Whitehurst, Grover J.; Gallaher, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    School districts are a focus of education reform efforts in the United States, but there is very little existing research about how important they are to student achievement. We fill this gap in the literature using 10 years of student-level, statewide data on fourth- and fifth-grade students in Florida and North Carolina. A variance decomposition…

  2. Can Judges Improve Academic Achievement?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greene, Jay P.; Trivitt, Julie R.

    2008-01-01

    Over the last 3 decades student achievement has remained essentially unchanged in the United States, but not for a lack of spending. Over the same period a myriad of education reforms have been suggested and per-pupil spending has more than doubled. Since the 1990s the education reform attempts have frequently included judicial decisions to revise…

  3. Meeting a Math Achievement Crisis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jennings, Lenora; Likis, Lori

    2005-01-01

    An urban community spotlighted declining mathematics achievement and took some measures, in which the students' performance increased substantially. The Benjamin Banneker Charter Public School in Cambridge, Massachusetts, engaged the entire community and launched the campaign called "Math Everywhere", which changed Benjamin Banneker's culture as…

  4. The Relationship between Parent Expectations and Postschool Outcomes of Adolescents with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doren, Bonnie; Gau, Jeff M.; Lindstrom, Lauren E.

    2012-01-01

    A secondary analysis was conducted of the National Longitudinal Transition Study-2 to examine (a) main effects of parents' school and postschool outcome expectations on the actual outcomes achieved, (b) demographic moderators, and (c) adolescent autonomy as a mediator of parent expectations and outcomes. Parent expectations were found to…

  5. Adjudicating outcomes: fundamentals.

    PubMed

    Vannabouathong, Christopher; Saccone, Michel; Sprague, Sheila; Schemitsch, Emil H; Bhandari, Mohit

    2012-07-18

    The adjudication of outcomes has rarely been reported in the orthopaedic literature, although this process is commonly used and reported in clinical trials of other medical disciplines. Adjudication of outcomes provides more reliable and valid outcome assessment, especially when the outcome is subjective as in the case of fracture-healing. The successful implementation of adjudication in a clinical trial is an important and complex process. The process requires a substantial infrastructure of research personnel to oversee data collection at the clinical sites. The development of an adjudication charter specific to the study is a critical aspect of adjudication as it outlines the adjudication committee membership as well as their roles and responsibilities and defines the adjudication process and the decision rules. Web-based adjudication has facilitated the process as it allows rapid, efficient, and timely adjudication. This article provides an overview of the adjudication process, along with details on the common pearls and pitfalls associated with this method of outcomes assessment. PMID:22810452

  6. Improving Education Outcomes in the Slovak Republic. OECD Economics Department Working Papers, No. 578

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carey, David

    2007-01-01

    Improving education outcomes is vital for achieving convergence with GDP per capita levels in Western European countries and for reducing income inequality. While some education outcomes are favourable, such as the low secondary-school drop-out rate, others have room for improvement: education achievement is below the OECD average and strongly…

  7. A Framework for Credit. Framework Guidelines 2. Learning Outcomes, Units and Modules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Further Education Development Agency, London (England).

    This document refines and develops a 1992 proposal by Great Britain's Further Education Unit (FEU) that all kinds of student achievement be documented within a common framework involving the following procedures: describing adult learners' achievements in terms of learning outcomes; grouping the learning outcomes into coherent units; defining the…

  8. Robert E. Slaughter Research Award Studies 1975. Research Report. Number 3. Effectiveness of Model Office, Cooperative Office Education, and Office Procedures Courses Based on Employee Satisfaction and Satisfactoriness Eighteen Months after Graduation. [AND] A Study of the Content in Selected Textbooks for the Commonly Offered Basic Business Courses in Secondary Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLean, Gary N.; Jones, L. Eugene

    The two studies which received the 1975 Robert E. Slaughter Research Award in Business and Office Education are summarized in the document. The first paper, entitled "Effectiveness of Model Office, Cooperative Office Education, and Office Procedures Courses Based on Employee Satisfaction and Satisfactoriness Eighteen Months After Graduation,"…

  9. Simulation: improving patient outcomes.

    PubMed

    Smith, Abi; Siassakos, Dimitrios; Crofts, Joanna; Draycott, Tim

    2013-06-01

    Effective training has been shown to improve perinatal care and outcome, decrease litigation claims and reduce midwifery sick leave. To be effective, training should be incentivised, in a realistic context, and delivered to inter-professional teams similar to those delivering actual care. Teamwork training is a useful addition, but it should be based on the characteristics of effective teamwork as derived from the study of frontline teams. Implementation of simulation and teamwork training is challenging, with constraints on staff time, facilities and finances. Local adoption and adaptation of effective programmes can help keep costs down, and make them locally relevant whilst maintaining effectiveness. Training programmes need to evolve continually in line with new evidence. To do this, it is vital to monitor outcomes and robustly evaluate programmes for their impact on patient care and outcome, not just on participants. PMID:23721770

  10. Outcomes in a Cohort of Patients Started on Antiretroviral Treatment and Followed up for a Decade in an Urban Clinic in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Castelnuovo, Barbara; Kiragga, Agnes; Musaazi, Joseph; Sempa, Joseph; Mubiru, Frank; Wanyama, Jane; Wandera, Bonnie; Kamya, Moses Robert; Kambugu, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Background Short-medium term studies from sub-Saharan Africa show that, despite high early mortality, substantial loss to program, and high rates toxicity, patients on antiretroviral treatment have achieved outcomes comparable to those in developed settings. However, these studies were unable to account for long term outcomes of patients as they stayed longer on treatment. Objectives We aim to describe ten years outcomes of one of the first cohort of HIV positive patients started on antiretroviral treatment (ART) in Sub-Saharan Africa. Methods We report 10-years outcomes including mortality, retention, CD4-count response, virological outcomes, ART regimens change from a prospective cohort of 559 patients initiating ART and followed up for 10 years Uganda. Results Of 559 patients, 69.1% were female, median age (IQR) was 38 (33–44) years, median CD4-count (IQR) 98 (21–163) cell/μL; 74% were started on stavudine, lamivudine and nevirapine, 26% on zidovudine, lamivudine and efavirenz. After 10 years 361 (65%) patients were still in the study; 127 (22.7%) had died; 30 (5%) were lost to follow-up; 27 (5%) transferred; 18 (3%) withdrew consent. The probability of death was high in the first year (0.15, 95%, CI 0.12–0.18). The median CD4 count increased from 98 to 589 cell/μL (IQR: 450–739 cell/μL) with a median increase of 357 cells/μL (IQR: 128–600 cells/μL); 7.4% never attained initial viral suppression and of those who did 31.7% experienced viral failure. Three hundred and two patients had at least one drug substitution while on first line after a median of 40 months; 66 (11.9%) of the patients were switched to a second line PI-based regimen due to confirmed treatment failure. Conclusions Despite the high rate of early mortality due to advanced disease at presentation the outcomes from this cohort are encouraging, particularly the remarkable and incremental immune-recovery and a satisfactory rate of virologic suppression. PMID:26642214

  11. Teachers, Technology and Training: A New Year's Resolution for 2006: Closing the Achievement Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donlevy, Jim

    2006-01-01

    Recognizing the glaring discrepancies in outcomes for many poor and minority children, the New York State Regents hosted an Education Summit in November 2005 with the theme of Closing the Achievement Gap. Leaders in business, government and education were in attendance and rallied to more thoroughly understand the achievement gap and produce…

  12. Promising Practices in Professional Growth & Support: "Case Study of Achievement First"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Resource Strategies, 2013

    2013-01-01

    Four organizations with promising practices in teacher Professional Growth & Support have significantly raised outcomes for low-income students. The charter management networks, Achievement First and Aspire Public Schools, and the two reform organizations, Teach Plus and Agile Mind, have successfully increased student achievement with a…

  13. Academic Achievement for Fifth-Grade Students in Elementary and Intermediate School Settings: Grade Span Configurations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Combs, Julie P.; Clark, David; Moore, George W.; Onwuegbuzie, Anthony J.; Edmonson, Stacey L.; Slate, John R.

    2011-01-01

    Few researchers have addressed student achievement outcomes as a function of grade configurations for older elementary-aged students. Thus, this study was designed to determine differences between students' Grade 5 reading and mathematics achievement in elementary schools (K-5) as compared to intermediate schools (Grade 5, 5-6) for 5 academic…

  14. Goal Self-Concordance Moderates the Relationship between Achievement Goals and Indicators of Academic Adjustment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaudreau, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    This study examined whether the good or bad outcomes associated with mastery- and performance-approach achievement goals depend on the extent to which these goals are pursued for self-concordant reasons. A sample of 220 undergraduate students completed measures of achievement goals, goal self-concordance, academic satisfaction, and academic…

  15. Racial Pride and Religiosity among African American Boys: Implications for Academic Motivation and Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler-Barnes, Sheretta T.; Williams, Terrinieka T.; Chavous, Tabbye M.

    2012-01-01

    The persistent underachievement among African American boys has led to increased empirical inquiry, yet little research considers within-group variation in achievement nor positive youth characteristics that help explain positive achievement outcomes. This study conceptualized culturally-based factors (racial pride and religiosity) as adolescent…

  16. Predicting College Grades: The Value of Achievement Goals in Supplementing Ability Measures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, John W.

    2007-01-01

    Achievement goal theory is an important theoretical framework for understanding achievement motivation. In previous studies, a mastery orientation has been shown to be related to students' interest, while a performance orientation has been found to be predictive of academic performance outcomes such as course grades. In this study, the two mastery…

  17. The Effects of Single-Sex and Coeducational Secondary Schooling on Girls' Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daly, Peter

    1996-01-01

    The effect of coeducational and single-sex secondary schooling on female students' academic achievement was examined. Reexamination of earlier survey data from Northern Ireland studied six outcomes related to student performance on public examinations. Results indicated a small achievement advantage for single-sex schooling (not significant…

  18. School Readiness Factors for Predicting High and Low Achieving Students in First Grade

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davion, Edward, Jr.

    2011-01-01

    When analyzed according to race and ethnicity, poverty level, parental education level, as well as other related factors in schools in America, academic achievement disparities negatively impact educational outcomes for poor children and children of color on a consistent basis. At all educational levels, academic achievement and attainments of…

  19. Cooperative Learning (CL) and Academic Achievement of Asian Students: A True Story

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thanh, Pham Thi Hong; Gillies, Robyn; Renshaw, Peter

    2008-01-01

    This paper reviews research examining the effects of CL strategies on the academic achievement of Asian students. Fourteen studies are included in the review. Sample characteristics, measures, findings, and effects are reported in a table. Achievement outcomes are found mixed with 50 per cent of the studies reporting neutral and negative findings…

  20. Banned and Punished: A Study of Disciplinary Consequences and Reading Achievement among Middle School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Erica M.

    2014-01-01

    The impact that removal of students from the educational setting has on student reading achievement (and later life outcomes) was the impetus for this study which sought to identify whether a relationship existed between an increasingly greater frequency of out of school suspension (OSS days) and reading achievement for middle school students.…

  1. School Readiness, Full-Day Kindergarten, and Student Achievement: An Empirical Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Le, Vi-Nhuan; Kirby, Sheila Nataraj; Barney, Heather; Setodji, Claude Messan; Gershwin, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    This study uses data from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Kindergarten Class of 1998-1999 (ECLS-K) to examine how children's skills and knowledge at kindergarten entry predict their achievement in later grades. It extends previous research by examining longer-term achievement outcomes, namely test scores at the end of fifth grade, and…

  2. Finding Ways to Effectively Use Year 12 Achievement Data to Inform Practice in Secondary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Italiano, Frank; Hine, Gregory

    2014-01-01

    This action research explored how Year 12 achievement data were used by school personnel to inform practice within seven Catholic secondary schools. Deputy Principals of Curriculum from participating schools were interviewed regarding their perceptions of the improvement of Year 12 student achievement outcomes, and their insights into how to…

  3. Does Private School Competition Affect Public School Achievement? An Analysis of North Carolina Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Eric S.

    This report describes a study conducted to determine if there were any applicable effects from private-school competition on public-school student achievement in North Carolina. The study examined multiple student outcomes, including elementary and secondary student achievement results, student dropout rates, and high school student achievement…

  4. Raising Minority Academic Achievement: The Department of Defense Model. Pedagogical Inquiry and Praxis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bridglall, Beatrice L.; Gordon, Edmund W.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes U.S. Department of Defense Schools, an education system with significant outcomes that may be pertinent to raising academic achievement among minority students. A research group examined the high achievement of African American and Hispanic students in Department of Defense Education Activity (DoDEA) schools. Results find that…

  5. Metacognition, Achievement Goals, Study Strategies and Academic Achievement: Pathways to Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vrugt, Anneke; Oort, Frans J.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to develop and test a model of effective self-regulated learning. Based on effort expenditure we discerned effective self-regulators and less effective self-regulators. The model comprised achievement goals (mastery, performance-approach and -avoidance goals), metacognition (metacognitive knowledge, regulation and…

  6. Academic Achievement in Early Adolescence: The Influence of Cognitive and Non-Cognitive Variables.

    PubMed

    Veas, Alejandro; Castejón, Juan-Luis; Gilar, Raquel; Miñano, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    The present study examined the predictive effects of intellectual ability, self-concept, goal orientations, learning strategies, popularity and parent involvement on academic achievement. Hierarchical regression analysis and path analysis were performed among a sample of 1398 high school students (mean age = 12.5; SD =.67) from eight education centers from the province of Alicante (Spain). Cognitive and non-cognitive variables were measured using validated questionnaires, whereas academic achievement was assessed using end-of-term grades obtained by students in nine subjects. The results revealed significant predictive effects of all of the variables. The model proposed had a satisfactory fit, and all of the hypothesized relationships were significant. These findings support the importance of including non-cognitive variables along with cognitive variables when predicting a model of academic achievement. PMID:26649925

  7. Long-term outcome of epilepsy surgery: a retrospective study in a population of 379 cases.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shengkun; Lin, Zhiguo; Liu, Li; Pu, Song; Wang, Haiyang; Wang, Jiabin; Xie, Chuncheng; Yang, Changlin; Li, Meng; Shen, Hong

    2014-03-01

    We evaluated the long-term outcome of epilepsy surgery in drug-resistant epilepsy patients, and investigated preoperative factors associated with postoperative long-term surgical outcome. We performed a retrospective study of 379 patients who received epilepsy surgeries from 2000 to 2010. Patients had completed a minimum of 2-year and up to 12-year follow-up. Preoperative evaluations, surgical outcomes and clinical data of patients were collected and analyzed. We found that the epilepsy surgery was effective in drug-resistant patients and the long-term outcome of epilepsy surgery was satisfactory. The bipolar electro-coagulation could improve the surgical outcome when the epileptogenic focus was on the functional cortex. Results of the 2-year follow-up showed that preoperative seizure characteristics including the history of febrile seizure, seizure frequency, and location, quantity and range of seizure foci were significantly associated with the surgical outcome. The surgery procedure including the surgery type and the extent of resection also affected outcome. Abnormal head or hippocampus MRI, inconsistent results of preoperative investigations, seizure types, and pathology type might also be predictors of long-term surgical outcome. PMID:24461543

  8. Didacticism and Educational Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnes, Geraint

    2006-01-01

    This note provides an analysis of the determinants of educational outcomes at age 16, and of subsequent pathways as school pupils transit toward the labour market. There is some evidence that examination results tend to be better where nondidactic teaching methods are used, but there is little evidence to suggest that teaching method has an…

  9. Assessing Instructional Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Eva L.; O'Neil, Harold F.

    This paper presents a discussion of outcome assessment that puts into context how measurement has evolved to its present state. Several types of testing and assessment options are considered against a background of validity. Criterion-referenced measurement is discussed extensively in terms of history, field study, identity problems, intellectual…

  10. Experiences and Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marden, Nicole Y.; Ulman, Leslie G.; Wilson, Fiona S.; Velan, Gary M.

    2013-01-01

    Online formative assessments have become increasingly popular; however, formal evidence supporting their educational benefits is limited. This study investigated the impact of online feedback quizzes on the learning experiences and outcomes of undergraduate students enrolled in an introductory physiology course. Four quiz models were tested, which…

  11. Beyond Academic Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ladwig, James G.

    2010-01-01

    This chapter attempts to survey contemporary debates and research on outcomes of schooling that have been grouped together under the convenient label "nonacademic". This is not an affirmative labeling. As the nomenclature indicates, it is not a label that groups together things that share like properties. Rather, this is a label of distinction, a…

  12. HRD and Performance Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1997

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on human resource development (HRD) and performance outcomes. "Going to the Next Level of Growth: Employing Systems Thinking to Make Effective Interventions" (Carol Ann Zulauf, Joseph A. Ilacqua) shows how a systems view enables organizations to find the most effective point for interventions…

  13. HRD & Business Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1996

    These four papers were presented at a symposium on human resource development (HRD) and business outcomes moderated by Barbara L. Swanson at the 1996 conference of the Academy of Human Resource Development. "Incorporating Continuous Learning into a Cultural Change Process" (Carol Ann Zulauf, Joseph A. Ilacqua), focuses on best practices at…

  14. Outcomes-Based Outrage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zlatos, Bill

    1993-01-01

    If outcomes-based education is the darling of education reformers, it is the devil to conservative parents, taxpayer groups, and legislators who oppose it. Despite some initial successes in several states, critics charge that the states pushing OBE have no evidence that it works. Costs are another factor. So far, the ultraconservatives are…

  15. Mentoring Phases and Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chao, Georgia T.

    1997-01-01

    Data from 178 proteges supported Kram's model of mentoring phases: initiation, cultivation, separation, and redefinition. Data from 82 current and 69 former proteges were compared to those from 93 who were never mentored. Mentees had better career outcomes, organizational socialization, and job satisfaction; those not mentored had slightly higher…

  16. Virtual simulation of the postsurgical cosmetic outcome in patients with Pectus Excavatum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilaça, João L.; Moreira, António H. J.; L-Rodrigues, Pedro; Rodrigues, Nuno; Fonseca, Jaime C.; Pinho, A. C. M.; Correia-Pinto, Jorge

    2011-03-01

    Pectus excavatum is the most common congenital deformity of the anterior chest wall, in which several ribs and the sternum grow abnormally. Nowadays, the surgical correction is carried out in children and adults through Nuss technic. This technic has been shown to be safe with major drivers as cosmesis and the prevention of psychological problems and social stress. Nowadays, no application is known to predict the cosmetic outcome of the pectus excavatum surgical correction. Such tool could be used to help the surgeon and the patient in the moment of deciding the need for surgery correction. This work is a first step to predict postsurgical outcome in pectus excavatum surgery correction. Facing this goal, it was firstly determined a point cloud of the skin surface along the thoracic wall using Computed Tomography (before surgical correction) and the Polhemus FastSCAN (after the surgical correction). Then, a surface mesh was reconstructed from the two point clouds using a Radial Basis Function algorithm for further affine registration between the meshes. After registration, one studied the surgical correction influence area (SCIA) of the thoracic wall. This SCIA was used to train, test and validate artificial neural networks in order to predict the surgical outcome of pectus excavatum correction and to determine the degree of convergence of SCIA in different patients. Often, ANN did not converge to a satisfactory solution (each patient had its own deformity characteristics), thus invalidating the creation of a mathematical model capable of estimating, with satisfactory results, the postsurgical outcome.

  17. Clinical Outcomes and Complications of Cortical Button Distal Biceps Repair: A Systematic Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Pantazis, Konstantinos

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the clinical outcomes and complications of the cortical button distal biceps fixation method. Material and Methods. All methods followed the PRISMA guidelines. Included studies had to describe clinical outcomes and complications after acute distal biceps repair with cortical button fixation. Eligibility criteria also included English language, more than 5 cases with minimum follow-up of 6 months, and preferably usage of at least one relevant clinical score (MEPS, ASES, and/or DASH) for final outcome. A loss of at least 30° in motion—flexion, extension, pronation, or supination—and a loss of at least 30% of strength were considered an unsatisfactory result. Results. The review identified 7 articles including 105 patients (mean age 43.6 years) with 106 acute distal biceps ruptures. Mean follow-up was 26.3 months. Functional outcome of ROM regarding flexion/extension and pronation/supination was satisfactory in 94 (89.5%) and 86 (82%) patients in respect. Averaged flexion and supination strength had been reported in 6/7 studies (97 patients) and were satisfactory in 82.4% of them. The most common complication was transient nerve palsy (14.2%). The overall reoperation rate was 4.8% (5/105 cases). Conclusion. Cortical button fixation for acute distal biceps repair is a reproducible operation with good clinical results. Most of the complications can be avoided with appropriate surgical technique. PMID:27525303

  18. Pancreatic cancer-improved care achievable

    PubMed Central

    Buanes, Trond A

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is one of the most aggressive cancers, and the decline in mortality observed in most other cancer diseases, has so far not taken place in pancreatic cancer. Complete tumor resection is a requirement for potential cure, and the reorganization of care in the direction of high patient-volume centers, offering multimodal treatment, has improved survival and Quality of Life. Also the rates and severity grade of complications are improving in high-volume pancreatic centers. One of the major problems worldwide is underutilization of surgery in resectable pancreatic cancer. Suboptimal investigation, follow up and oncological treatment outside specialized centers are additional key problems. New chemotherapeutic regimens like FOLFIRINOX have improved survival in patients with metastatic disease, and different adjuvant treatment options result in well documented survival benefit. Neoadjuvant treatment is highly relevant, but needs further evaluation. Also adjuvant immunotherapy, in the form of vaccination with synthetic K-Ras-peptides, has been shown to produce long term immunological memory in cytotoxic T-cells in long term survivors. Improvement in clinical outcome is already achievable and further progress is expected in the near future for patients treated with curative as well as palliative intention. PMID:25132756

  19. Gay men seeking surrogacy to achieve parenthood.

    PubMed

    Norton, Wendy; Hudson, Nicky; Culley, Lorraine

    2013-09-01

    Assisted reproduction technologies have developed at an extraordinary rate in recent years. This, combined with the changing landscape of legal, technical and social possibilities, enables gay men to consider their options for fatherhood as new opportunities emerge for them to create families. Media coverage of gay celebrities embracing surrogacy as a way of having a family and high-profile legal cases have raised awareness of surrogacy across the world. However, gay fatherhood achieved through assisted reproduction is a highly under-researched area, both in the UK and internationally. The research that currently exists on gay fatherhood is largely related to gay men who become parents through processes such as adoption and fostering and children conceived through previous heterosexual relationships. Much of this evidence has centred on parenting experiences, the outcomes for children or the legal perspectives. This paper outlines the different types of surrogacy and the legal issues facing gay men who choose this route to parenthood, summarizes the limited research on gay men and surrogacy and discusses gaps in the current knowledge base. PMID:23664815

  20. Academic Achievement of University Students with Dyslexia.

    PubMed

    Olofsson, Åke; Taube, Karin; Ahl, Astrid

    2015-11-01

    Broadened recruitment to higher education is on the agenda in many countries, and it is also widely recognized that the number of dyslexic students entering higher education is increasing. In Sweden, as in many other European countries, higher education institutions are required to accommodate students with dyslexia. The present study focuses on the study outcome for 50 students with diagnosed dyslexia, mainly in teacher education and nurses' training, at three universities in Northern Sweden. The students trusted their own ability to find information on the Internet but mistrusted their own abilities in reading course books and articles in English and in taking notes. The mean rate of study was 23.5 European Credit Transfer and Accumulation System credits per semester, which is slightly below the national baseline of 26.7. The results show that more than half of the students are examined at a normal rate of study but that about one fifth have a very low rate of study. Messages Most students with dyslexia can compensate for their reading problems. Taking notes during lessons and reading in foreign language may be especially difficult for students with dyslexia. Diagnoses should distinguish between reading comprehension and word decoding. More than half of the students with dyslexia can achieve at a normal rate of study. One-fifth of the students with dyslexia may need a longer period of study than other students. PMID:26459832