Science.gov

Sample records for achieve stable temperatures

  1. Carboxylate-based molecular magnet: One path toward achieving stable quantum correlations at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz, C.; Soares-Pinto, D. O.; Brandão, P.; dos Santos, A. M.; Reis, M. S.

    2016-02-01

    The control of quantum correlations in solid-state systems by means of material engineering is a broad avenue to be explored, since it makes possible steps toward the limits of quantum mechanics and the design of novel materials with applications on emerging quantum technologies. In this context, this letter explores the potential of molecular magnets to be prototypes of materials for quantum information technology. More precisely, we engineered a material and from its geometric quantum discord we found significant quantum correlations up to 9540 K (even without entanglement); and, in addition, a pure singlet state occupied up to around 80 K (above liquid nitrogen temperature). These results could only be achieved due to the carboxylate group promoting a metal-to-metal huge magnetic interaction.

  2. An evolutionary method to achieve stable superpixel tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xi, Wenxing; Tang, Xinyi

    2014-11-01

    Object tracking is a hot and hard problem in the computer vision study area.We deal with large objects,which are challenged in many aspects,such as the factors of lighting, size, posture, disturbance, occlusion, and so on.The superpixel tracking method has been proposed to deal with this problem. Unlike many other approaches, it is robust in all the mentioned aspects to some extent. It is very flexible to deal with non-rigid objects just like the meanshift of color histogram does,but can be more advanced, since it takes advantage of the segmented local color histogram. Here we first introduce the adaptive superpixel tracking algorithm, which is comprised by two parts, modeling and confidence mapping using the color features of superpixels.We model them by clustering, just like the "bags of words" method does, and build the cluster confidence.The model is adaptive since it just learns from some latest tracked frames, which can accumulate errors and lead to drift easily. So we propose a refined model, which incorporates the kalman filter's ideas to this problem, by integrating the current model and the new model as an evolutionary one, to better adapt to the object variation and disturbance in subsequent frames, thus achieve more stable tracking. The evolutionary model is achieved by reclustering the cluster centers of the two models, to make new cluster centers and new cluster confidences. We allocate different weight to them, if the current model gets more weight, then the evolutionary model will be more stable, otherwise it will be more adaptive. Finally we give some experiment comparisons between the evolutionary model and the adaptive one. For most cases, when the scene of the object is stable, namely there is no big sudden light change or color change, the evolutionary model outperforms the adaptive one. The reason is that the adaptive one easily learns from other objects. But when the scene suffers big sudden change, the evolutionary model can't quickly adapt

  3. Achieving a Strongly Temperature-Dependent Casimir Effect

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, Alejandro W.; Woolf, David; Capasso, Federico; McCauley, Alexander P.; Joannopoulos, John D.; Johnson, Steven G.

    2010-08-06

    We propose a method of achieving large temperature T sensitivity in the Casimir force that involves measuring the stable separation between dielectric objects immersed in a fluid. We study the Casimir force between slabs and spheres using realistic material models, and find large >2 nm/K variations in their stable separations (hundreds of nanometers) near room temperature. In addition, we analyze the effects of Brownian motion on suspended objects, and show that the average separation is also sensitive to changes in T. Finally, this approach also leads to rich qualitative phenomena, such as irreversible transitions, from suspension to stiction, as T is varied.

  4. Stable Vanadium Isotope Fractionation at High Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prytulak, J.; Parkinson, I. J.; Savage, P. S.; Nielsen, S. G.; Halliday, A. N.

    2011-12-01

    Vanadium is a redox sensitive transition metal existing in multiple valence states at terrestrial conditions. Stable vanadium isotopes (reported as δ51V in % relative to an Alfa Aesar standard [1]) are a potentially powerful tracer of oxidation-reduction processes. However, the determination of δ51V is analytically challenging, primarily due to the extreme abundance ratio between the only two stable isotopes (51V/50V ~ 400) and, also, significant isobaric interferences of 50Ti and 50Cr on the minor 50V isotope. We have developed the first method able to determine δ51V to a precision (2 s.d. ~ 0.15%, [1,2]) that enables application of this isotope system to geological processes. To usefully investigate high temperature processes using vanadium isotopes, knowledge of the isotope composition and range of values present in the ambient mantle is required. Here we discuss the first δ51V measured in igneous materials encompassing peridotites, MORB, and primitive mantle-derived melts such as picrites. This first dataset provides a preliminary reconnaissance of the magnitude of natural fractionation. We find little isotope fractionation in suites of peridotites and MORB (< 0.5 %). However, the small but analytically significant variation appears to be related to secondary processes, with extremely altered peridotites consistently displaying slightly heavier isotope compositions. We find no resolvable δ51V variation between fresh MORB glass and fresh peridotite. Intriguingly, a suite of subduction-related peridotites from the Mariana forearc, previously characterized for fO2 [3], do not display the predicted co-variation between δ51V and fO2, but instead also have compositions identical to MORB glass. This nominally supports recent indications that there is limited difference in the oxygen fugacity of the MORB source and the subarc mantle wedge [e.g., 4, 5]. Finally, we observe large δ51V variations (~ 2 %) in a suite of evolving lavas from Hekla volcano, Iceland

  5. Polymeric foams stable at high temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riccitiello, S. R.; Harrison, E. S.; Delano, C. B.

    1976-01-01

    Crosslinked poly(N-arylenebenzimidazoles) are stable up to 370 C. Polymers are made by mixing appropriate stoichiometric amounts of tetramine and aromatic dicarboxylic acid anhydride with phenol or alkyl-substituted phenol.

  6. Achieving High-Temperature Ferromagnetic Topological Insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katmis, Ferhat

    Topological insulators (TIs) are insulating materials that display conducting surface states protected by time-reversal symmetry, wherein electron spins are locked to their momentum. This unique property opens new opportunities for creating next-generation electronic and spintronic devices, including TI-based quantum computation. Introducing ferromagnetic order into a TI system without compromising its distinctive quantum coherent features could lead to a realization of several predicted novel physical phenomena. In particular, achieving robust long-range magnetic order at the TI surface at specific locations without introducing spin scattering centers could open up new possibilities for devices. Here, we demonstrate topologically enhanced interface magnetism by coupling a ferromagnetic insulator (FMI) to a TI (Bi2Se3); this interfacial ferromagnetism persists up to room temperature, even though the FMI (EuS) is known to order ferromagnetically only at low temperatures (<17 K). The induced magnetism at the interface resulting from the large spin-orbit interaction and spin-momentum locking feature of the TI surface is found to greatly enhance the magnetic ordering (Curie) temperature of the TI/FMI bilayer system. Due to the short range nature of the ferromagnetic exchange interaction, the time-reversal symmetry is broken only near the surface of a TI, while leaving its bulk states unaffected. The topological magneto-electric response originating in such an engineered TI could allow for an efficient manipulation of the magnetization dynamics by an electric field, providing an energy efficient topological control mechanism for future spin-based technologies. Work supported by MIT MRSEC through the MRSEC Program of NSF under award number DMR-0819762, NSF Grant DMR-1207469, the ONR Grant N00014-13-1-0301, and the STC Center for Integrated Quantum Materials under NSF grant DMR-1231319.

  7. Temperature Compensated Sapphire Resonator for Ultra-Stable Oscillator Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dick, G. J.; Santiago, D. G.; Wang, R. T.

    1994-01-01

    We report on the design and test of a whispering gallery sapphire resonator for which the dominant microwave mode family shows frequency-stable, compensated operation for temperatures above 77 kelvin.

  8. Metal stable isotopes in low-temperature systems: A primer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bullen, T.D.; Eisenhauer, A.

    2009-01-01

    Recent advances in mass spectrometry have allowed isotope scientists to precisely determine stable isotope variations in the metallic elements. Biologically infl uenced and truly inorganic isotope fractionation processes have been demonstrated over the mass range of metals. This Elements issue provides an overview of the application of metal stable isotopes to low-temperature systems, which extend across the borders of several science disciplines: geology, hydrology, biology, environmental science, and biomedicine. Information on instrumentation, fractionation processes, data-reporting terminology, and reference materials presented here will help the reader to better understand this rapidly evolving field.

  9. Mind the bubbles: achieving stable measurements of maximum hydraulic conductivity through woody plant samples

    PubMed Central

    Espino, Susana; Schenk, H. Jochen

    2011-01-01

    The maximum specific hydraulic conductivity (kmax) of a plant sample is a measure of the ability of a plants’ vascular system to transport water and dissolved nutrients under optimum conditions. Precise measurements of kmax are needed in comparative studies of hydraulic conductivity, as well as for measuring the formation and repair of xylem embolisms. Unstable measurements of kmax are a common problem when measuring woody plant samples and it is commonly observed that kmax declines from initially high values, especially when positive water pressure is used to flush out embolisms. This study was designed to test five hypotheses that could potentially explain declines in kmax under positive pressure: (i) non-steady-state flow; (ii) swelling of pectin hydrogels in inter-vessel pit membranes; (iii) nucleation and coalescence of bubbles at constrictions in the xylem; (iv) physiological wounding responses; and (v) passive wounding responses, such as clogging of the xylem by debris. Prehydrated woody stems from Laurus nobilis (Lauraceae) and Encelia farinosa (Asteraceae) collected from plants grown in the Fullerton Arboretum in Southern California, were used to test these hypotheses using a xylem embolism meter (XYL'EM). Treatments included simultaneous measurements of stem inflow and outflow, enzyme inhibitors, stem-debarking, low water temperatures, different water degassing techniques, and varied concentrations of calcium, potassium, magnesium, and copper salts in aqueous measurement solutions. Stable measurements of kmax were observed at concentrations of calcium, potassium, and magnesium salts high enough to suppress bubble coalescence, as well as with deionized water that was degassed using a membrane contactor under strong vacuum. Bubble formation and coalescence under positive pressure in the xylem therefore appear to be the main cause for declining kmax values. Our findings suggest that degassing of water is essential for achieving stable and precise

  10. Outcomes of patients with myelodysplastic syndromes who achieve stable disease after treatment with hypomethylating agents.

    PubMed

    Nazha, Aziz; Sekeres, Mikkael A; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Barnard, John; Al Ali, Najla H; Roboz, Gail J; Steensma, David P; DeZern, Amy E; Zimmerman, Cassie; Jabbour, Elias J; Zell, Katrina; List, Alan F; Kantarjian, Hagop M; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw P; Komrokji, Rami S

    2016-02-01

    Treatment with hypomethylating agents (HMAs) improves overall survival (OS) in patients who achieve a response of stable disease (SD) or better (complete remission [CR], partial remission [PR], or hematologic improvement [HI]). It is not well established if patients who achieve SD at 4-6 months of therapy should be offered different therapies to optimize their response or continue with the same regimen. Clinical data were obtained from the MDS Clinical Research Consortium database. SD was defined as no evidence of progression and without achievement of any other responses. Of 291 patients treated with AZA or DAC, 55% achieved their best response (BR) at 4-6 months. Among patients with SD at 4-6 months, 29 (20%) achieved a better response at a later treatment time point. Younger patients with lower bone marrow blast percentages, and intermediate risk per IPSS-R were more likely to achieve a better response (CR, PR, or HI) after SD at 4-6 months. Patients with SD who subsequently achieved CR had superior OS compared to patients who remained with SD (28.1 vs. 14.4 months, respectively, p=.04). In conclusion, patients treated with HMAs who achieves CR after a SD status had longer survival with continuous treatment after 6 months. PMID:26777537

  11. Outcomes of patients with myelodysplastic syndromes who achieve stable disease after treatment with hypomethylating agents

    PubMed Central

    Nazha, Aziz; Sekeres, Mikkael A.; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Barnard, John; Al Ali, Najla H.; Roboz, Gail J.; Steensma, David P.; DeZern, Amy E.; Zimmerman, Cassie; Jabbour, Elias J.; Zell, Katrina; List, Alan F.; Kantarjian, Hagop M.; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw P.; Komrokji, Rami S.

    2016-01-01

    Treatment with hypomethylating agents (HMAs) improves overall survival (OS) in patients who achieve a response of stable disease (SD) or better (complete remission [CR], partial remission [PR], or hematologic improvement [HI]). It is not well established if patients who achieve SD at 4–6 months of therapy should be offered different therapies to optimize their response or continue with the same regimen. Clinical data were obtained from the MDS Clinical Research Consortium database. SD was defined as no evidence of progression and without achievement of any other responses. Of 291 patients treated with AZA or DAC, 55% achieved their best response (BR) at 4–6 months. Among patients with SD at 4–6 months, 29 (20%) achieved a better response at a later treatment time point. Younger patients with lower bone marrow blast percentages, and intermediate risk per IPSS-R were more likely to achieve a better response (CR, PR, or HI) after SD at 4–6 months. Patients with SD who subsequently achieved CR had superior OS compared to patients who remained with SD (28.1 vs. 14.4 months, respectively, p =.04). In conclusion, patients treated with HMAs who achieves CR after a SD status had longer survival with continuous treatment after 6 months. PMID:26777537

  12. Temperature Compensated Sapphire Resonator for Ultra-Stable Oscillator Capability at Temperatures Above 77 Kelvin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dick, G.; Santiago, D.; Wang, R.

    1994-01-01

    We report on the design and test of a whispering gallery sapphire resonator for which the dominant (WGH xxxsubn11) microwave mode family shows frequency-stable, compensated operation for temperatures above 77 Kelvin. The resonator makes possible a new ultra-stable oscillator (USO) capability that promises performance improvements over the best available crystal quartz oscillators in a compact cryogenic package. A mechanical compensation mechanism, enabled by the difference between copper and sapphire expansion coefficients, tunes the resonator to cancel the temperature variation of sapphire's dielectric constant.

  13. Use a linear model to achieve stable composition control in a naphtha splitter

    SciTech Connect

    Karpe, P.

    1997-01-01

    The following two points using dual composition control in a naphtha splitter are emphasized: while literature provides general guidelines for design of control systems for distillation columns, each column is unique in terms of dynamic and steady state behavior. Multivariable control analytical tools, such as RGA and SVD, coupled with rigorous steady state simulations, can be effectively employed to achieve stable control in columns beset with severe loop interactions, and often in the absence of on-line analyzers, linear models representing the first order approximations of distillation columns can yield significant benefits. Such models are simple to understand, readily acceptable to operators, do not require special expertise to maintain, and therefore, offer high degree of reliability.

  14. A stable room-temperature sodium-sulfur battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Shuya; Xu, Shaomao; Agrawral, Akanksha; Choudhury, Snehashis; Lu, Yingying; Tu, Zhengyuan; Ma, Lin; Archer, Lynden A.

    2016-06-01

    High-energy rechargeable batteries based on earth-abundant materials are important for mobile and stationary storage technologies. Rechargeable sodium-sulfur batteries able to operate stably at room temperature are among the most sought-after platforms because such cells take advantage of a two-electron-redox process to achieve high storage capacity from inexpensive electrode materials. Here we report a room-temperature sodium-sulfur battery that uses a microporous carbon-sulfur composite cathode, and a liquid carbonate electrolyte containing the ionic liquid 1-methyl-3-propylimidazolium-chlorate tethered to SiO2 nanoparticles. We show that these cells can cycle stably at a rate of 0.5 C (1 C=1675, mAh g-1) with 600 mAh g-1 reversible capacity and nearly 100% Coulombic efficiency. By means of spectroscopic and electrochemical analysis, we find that the particles form a sodium-ion conductive film on the anode, which stabilizes deposition of sodium. We also find that sulfur remains interred in the carbon pores and undergo solid-state electrochemical reactions with sodium ions.

  15. A stable room-temperature sodium-sulfur battery.

    PubMed

    Wei, Shuya; Xu, Shaomao; Agrawral, Akanksha; Choudhury, Snehashis; Lu, Yingying; Tu, Zhengyuan; Ma, Lin; Archer, Lynden A

    2016-01-01

    High-energy rechargeable batteries based on earth-abundant materials are important for mobile and stationary storage technologies. Rechargeable sodium-sulfur batteries able to operate stably at room temperature are among the most sought-after platforms because such cells take advantage of a two-electron-redox process to achieve high storage capacity from inexpensive electrode materials. Here we report a room-temperature sodium-sulfur battery that uses a microporous carbon-sulfur composite cathode, and a liquid carbonate electrolyte containing the ionic liquid 1-methyl-3-propylimidazolium-chlorate tethered to SiO2 nanoparticles. We show that these cells can cycle stably at a rate of 0.5 C (1 C=1675, mAh g(-1)) with 600 mAh g(-1) reversible capacity and nearly 100% Coulombic efficiency. By means of spectroscopic and electrochemical analysis, we find that the particles form a sodium-ion conductive film on the anode, which stabilizes deposition of sodium. We also find that sulfur remains interred in the carbon pores and undergo solid-state electrochemical reactions with sodium ions. PMID:27277345

  16. A stable room-temperature sodium–sulfur battery

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Shuya; Xu, Shaomao; Agrawral, Akanksha; Choudhury, Snehashis; Lu, Yingying; Tu, Zhengyuan; Ma, Lin; Archer, Lynden A.

    2016-01-01

    High-energy rechargeable batteries based on earth-abundant materials are important for mobile and stationary storage technologies. Rechargeable sodium–sulfur batteries able to operate stably at room temperature are among the most sought-after platforms because such cells take advantage of a two-electron-redox process to achieve high storage capacity from inexpensive electrode materials. Here we report a room-temperature sodium–sulfur battery that uses a microporous carbon–sulfur composite cathode, and a liquid carbonate electrolyte containing the ionic liquid 1-methyl-3-propylimidazolium-chlorate tethered to SiO2 nanoparticles. We show that these cells can cycle stably at a rate of 0.5 C (1 C=1675, mAh g−1) with 600 mAh g−1 reversible capacity and nearly 100% Coulombic efficiency. By means of spectroscopic and electrochemical analysis, we find that the particles form a sodium-ion conductive film on the anode, which stabilizes deposition of sodium. We also find that sulfur remains interred in the carbon pores and undergo solid-state electrochemical reactions with sodium ions. PMID:27277345

  17. Achieving ultra-high temperatures with a resistive emitter array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danielson, Tom; Franks, Greg; Holmes, Nicholas; LaVeigne, Joe; Matis, Greg; McHugh, Steve; Norton, Dennis; Vengel, Tony; Lannon, John; Goodwin, Scott

    2016-05-01

    The rapid development of very-large format infrared detector arrays has challenged the IR scene projector community to also develop larger-format infrared emitter arrays to support the testing of systems incorporating these detectors. In addition to larger formats, many scene projector users require much higher simulated temperatures than can be generated with current technology in order to fully evaluate the performance of their systems and associated processing algorithms. Under the Ultra High Temperature (UHT) development program, Santa Barbara Infrared Inc. (SBIR) is developing a new infrared scene projector architecture capable of producing both very large format (>1024 x 1024) resistive emitter arrays and improved emitter pixel technology capable of simulating very high apparent temperatures. During earlier phases of the program, SBIR demonstrated materials with MWIR apparent temperatures in excess of 1400 K. New emitter materials have subsequently been selected to produce pixels that achieve even higher apparent temperatures. Test results from pixels fabricated using the new material set will be presented and discussed. A 'scalable' Read In Integrated Circuit (RIIC) is also being developed under the same UHT program to drive the high temperature pixels. This RIIC will utilize through-silicon via (TSV) and Quilt Packaging (QP) technologies to allow seamless tiling of multiple chips to fabricate very large arrays, and thus overcome the yield limitations inherent in large-scale integrated circuits. Results of design verification testing of the completed RIIC will be presented and discussed.

  18. Achieving cryogenic temperatures in deep space using a coating.

    PubMed

    Youngquist, Robert C; Nurge, Mark A

    2016-03-15

    There is a current need to develop coatings that can reject more than 99% of the sun's irradiance to enable cryogenic storage and superconductor operation in space. Such a coating is proposed, composed of broadband scatterers on a metallic reflecting layer, yielding a surface that backscatters most of the solar spectrum yet still emits far-IR radiation. A model is presented with results, showing that a properly designed coating may potentially backscatter more than 99.9% of the sun's energy and allowing temperatures below 50 K to be achieved. PMID:26977640

  19. Effect of implant variables on temperatures achieved during ferromagnetic hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Tompkins, D T; Partington, B P; Steeves, R A; Bartholow, S D; Paliwal, B R

    1992-01-01

    Effects of ferromagnetic implant variables on steady-state temperature were studied in both in vitro (phantom) and in vivo (rabbit hind limb musculature) models. Thermoseed implant variables included: (1) the presence and number of thermoseed sleeves; (2) variations in thermoseed alignment within the oscillating electromagnetic field; (3) generator power levels of 300 W, 600 W, and 1200 W; and (4) separation of thermoseed tracks by 0.8 cm versus 1 cm. When the thermoseeds were aligned parallel to the electromagnetic field, temperature distributions in the in vivo model using bare thermoseeds and thermoseeds encased in a single sleeve (0.1 mm wall thickness) of polyethylene tubing were statistically higher than in tests performed with thermoseeds encased in a double sleeve (0.25 mm over 0.1 mm wall thickness) of tubing (p = 0.006). Nonetheless, average steady-state temperatures above a therapeutic minimum (greater than or equal to 42 degrees C) were achieved at all generator power levels using thermoseeds encased in a double sleeve of tubing and aligned parallel to the electromagnetic field. Gross misalignment of thermoseeds with the electromagnetic field was partly compensated for by utilizing higher generator power levels. Thermoseed tracks separated by 0.8 cm and aligned parallel to the electromagnetic field yielded average steady-state temperatures that were 0.4-2.2 degrees C higher than those obtained with a thermoseed track separation of 1 cm. PMID:1573313

  20. Stable same-sex friendships with higher achieving partners promote mathematical reasoning in lower achieving primary school children.

    PubMed

    DeLay, Dawn; Laursen, Brett; Kiuru, Noona; Poikkeus, Anna-Maija; Aunola, Kaisa; Nurmi, Jari-Erik

    2015-11-01

    This study was designed to investigate friend influence over mathematical reasoning in a sample of 374 children in 187 same-sex friend dyads (184 girls in 92 friendships; 190 boys in 95 friendships). Participants completed surveys that measured mathematical reasoning in the 3rd grade (approximately 9 years old) and 1 year later in the 4th grade (approximately 10 years old). Analyses designed for dyadic data (i.e., longitudinal actor-partner interdependence model) indicated that higher achieving friends influenced the mathematical reasoning of lower achieving friends, but not the reverse. Specifically, greater initial levels of mathematical reasoning among higher achieving partners in the 3rd grade predicted greater increases in mathematical reasoning from 3rd grade to 4th grade among lower achieving partners. These effects held after controlling for peer acceptance and rejection, task avoidance, interest in mathematics, maternal support for homework, parental education, length of the friendship, and friendship group norms on mathematical reasoning. PMID:26402901

  1. A thermally stable, durable and temperature-dependent oleophobic surface of a polymethylsilsesquioxane film.

    PubMed

    Urata, Chihiro; Masheder, Benjamin; Cheng, Dalton F; Hozumi, Atsushi

    2013-04-25

    Polymethylsilsesquioxane (PMSQ) films prepared by a simple sol-gel reaction of methyltriethoxysilane were found to possess thermally stable, durable, and temperature-dependent oleophobic properties under high temperature (~350 °C) conditions. PMID:23493793

  2. Platinum thin film resistors as accurate and stable temperature sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diehl, W.

    1984-01-01

    The measurement characteristics of thin-Pt-film temperature sensors fabricated using advanced methods are discussed. The limitations of wound-wire Pt temperature sensors and the history of Pt-film development are outlined, and the commonly used film-deposition, structuring, and trimming methods are presented in a table. The development of a family of sputtered film resistors is described in detail and illustrated with photographs of the different types. The most commonly used tolerances are reported as + or - 0.3 C + 0.5 percent of the temperature measured.

  3. High Temperature Stable Nanocrystalline SiGe Thermoelectric Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Sherwin (Inventor); Matejczyk, Daniel Edward (Inventor); Determan, William (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method of forming a nanocomposite thermoelectric material having microstructural stability at temperatures greater than 1000 C. The method includes creating nanocrystalline powder by cryomilling. The method is particularly useful in forming SiGe alloy powder.

  4. Temperature maxima in stable two-dimensional shock waves

    SciTech Connect

    Kum, O.; Hoover, W.G.; Hoover, C.G.

    1997-07-01

    We use molecular dynamics to study the structure of moderately strong shock waves in dense two-dimensional fluids, using Lucy{close_quote}s pair potential. The stationary profiles show relatively broad temperature maxima, for both the longitudinal and the average kinetic temperatures, just as does Mott-Smith{close_quote}s model for strong shock waves in dilute three-dimensional gases. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  5. Formation temperature of ultra-stable glasses and application to ethylbenzene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tournier, Robert F.

    2015-11-01

    Ultra-stable thin glass films are obtained when they are deposited at a temperature Td below the glass transition temperature Tg. An enthalpy excess Δɛ × ΔHm is frozen during deposition inducing an isothermal liquid-glass transition temperature Tsg equal to Td and a liquid-to-liquid transition temperature Tgf above Tg depending on Δɛ. The enthalpy excess, the ultra-stable glass enthalpy saving, and the optimum deposition temperature Tsg leading to the maximum density, are predicted for ethylbenzene, knowing only the molar melting heat ΔHm of crystals, their melting temperature Tm, Tg, and the specific heat jump at Tg.

  6. Stable dual-wavelength erbium fiber laser for temperature measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, S.; Lopez-Amo, M.

    2015-09-01

    In this work, a new stable dual-wavelength erbium fiber ring laser is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. This configuration is made by creating two symmetrical laser cavities with similar optical power. This topology allows the performance of two laser emission lines in single-longitudinal mode and with a power instability lower than 0.23 dB, and an optical signal-to-noise ratio higher than 40 dB for all the emitted wavelengths. The sensing capability of the FBGs enables this source to be also used as sensor-network multiplexing scheme. The system offers a better stability and higher optical signal to noise ratios than similar configurations.

  7. A new high temperature stable bipolar VLSI metallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drobny, V. F.; Early, S. R.

    1988-01-01

    High performance bipolar analog/digital circuits require metallization capable of with-standing several hour anneals in the temperature range of 400 500° C without causing any device degradation. A new VSi2/Ti: W/Pd/Rh/Au metallization scheme for use in bipolar circuits is described. This metallization scheme (which evolved from Pd2Si/Ti:W/ Pd/Au metallization) offers high electrical conductivity, high electromigration and corrosion resistances and is capable of withstanding long anneals at temperatures up to 500° C without degradation of minority carrier devices. The metallization integrity and majority carrier devices are not affected up to 600° C.

  8. Room temperature synthesis of high temperature stable lanthanum phosphate–yttria nano composite

    SciTech Connect

    Sankar, Sasidharan; Raj, Athira N.; Jyothi, C.K.; Warrier, K.G.K.; Padmanabhan, P.V.A.

    2012-07-15

    Graphical abstract: A facile aqueous sol–gel route involving precipitation–peptization mechanism followed by electrostatic stabilization is used for synthesizing nanocrystalline composite containing lanthanum phosphate and yttria. Highlights: ► A novel lanthanum phosphate–Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} nano composite is synthesized for the first time using a modified facile sol gel process. ► The composite becomes crystalline at 600 °C and X-ray diffraction pattern is indexed for monoclinic LaPO{sub 4} and cubic yttria. ► The composite synthesized was tested up to 1300 °C and no reaction between the phases of the constituents is observed with the morphologies of the phases being retained. -- Abstract: A facile aqueous sol–gel route involving precipitation–peptization mechanism followed by electrostatic stabilization is used for synthesizing nanocrystalline composite containing lanthanum phosphate and yttria. Lanthanum phosphate (80 wt%)–yttria (20 wt%) nano composite (LaPO{sub 4}–20%Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}), has an average particle size of ∼70 nm after heat treatment of precursor at 600 °C. TG–DTA analysis reveals that stable phase of the composite is formed on heating the precursor at 600 °C. The TEM images of the composite show rod shape morphology of LaPO{sub 4} in which yttria is acquiring near spherical shape. Phase identification of the composite as well as the phase stability up to 1300 °C was carried out using X-ray diffraction technique. With the phases being stable at higher temperatures, the composite synthesized should be a potential material for high temperature applications like thermal barrier coatings and metal melting applications.

  9. Thermally Stable Ultra-Low Temperature Oxidation Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Szanyi, Janos; Peden, Charles HF; Howden, Ken; Kim, Chang H.; Oh, Se H.; Schmieg, Steven J.

    2014-12-09

    This annual reports describes recent results of a CRADA between General Motors Company (GM) and Battelle/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). In the CRADA, we are investigating a number of candidate low temperature oxidation catalysts as fresh materials, and after realistic laboratory- and engine-aging. These studies will lead to a better understanding of fundamental characteristics and various aging factors that impact the long-term performance of catalysts, while also providing an assessment of the appropriateness of the laboratory conditions in realistically reproducing the effects of actual engine aging conditions.

  10. A Temperature-Stable Cryo-System for High-Temperature Superconducting MR In-Vivo Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lin, In-Tsang; Yang, Hong-Chang; Chen, Jyh-Horng

    2013-01-01

    To perform a rat experiment using a high-temperature superconducting (HTS) surface resonator, a cryostat is essential to maintain the rat's temperature. In this work, a compact temperature-stable HTS cryo-system, keeping animal rectal temperature at 37.4°C for more than 3 hours, was successfully developed. With this HTS cryo-system, a 40-mm-diameter Bi2Sr2Ca2Cu3Ox (Bi-2223) surface resonator at 77 K was demonstrated in a 3-Tesla MRI system. The proton resonant frequency (PRF) method was employed to monitor the rat's temperature. Moreover, the capacity of MR thermometry in the HTS experiments was evaluated by correlating with data from independent fiber-optic sensor temperature measurements. The PRF thermal coefficient was derived as 0.03 rad/°C and the temperature-monitoring architecture can be implemented to upgrade the quality and safety in HTS experiments. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the HTS surface resonator at 77 K was higher than that of a professionally made copper surface resonator at 300 K, which has the same geometry, by a 3.79-fold SNR gain. Furthermore, the temperature-stable HTS cryo-system we developed can obtain stable SNR gain in every scan. A temperature-stable HTS cryo-system with an external air-blowing circulation system is demonstrated. PMID:23637936

  11. Extremely Stable Polypyrrole Achieved via Molecular Ordering for Highly Flexible Supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yan; Zhu, Minshen; Pei, Zengxia; Huang, Yang; Geng, Huiyuan; Zhi, Chunyi

    2016-01-27

    The cycling stability of flexible supercapacitors with conducting polymers as electrodes is limited by the structural breakdown arising from repetitive counterion flow during charging/discharging. Supercapacitors made of facilely electropolymerized polypyrrole (e-PPy) have ultrahigh capacitance retentions of more than 97, 91, and 86% after 15000, 50000, and 100000 charging/discharging cycles, respectively, and can sustain more than 230000 charging/discharging cycles with still approximately half of the initial capacitance retained. To the best of our knowledge, such excellent long-term cycling stability was never reported. The fully controllable electropolymerization shows superiority in molecular ordering, favoring uniform stress distribution and charge transfer. Being left at ambient conditions for even 8 months, e-PPy supercapacitors completely retain the good electrochemical performance. The extremely stable supercapacitors with excellent flexibility and scalability hold considerable promise for the commerical application of flexible and wearable electronics. PMID:26741145

  12. Stable partial nitritation for low-strength wastewater at low temperature in an aerobic granular reactor.

    PubMed

    Isanta, Eduardo; Reino, Clara; Carrera, Julián; Pérez, Julio

    2015-09-01

    Partial nitritation for a low-strength wastewater at low temperature was stably achieved in an aerobic granular reactor. A bench-scale granular sludge bioreactor was operated in continuous mode treating an influent of 70 mg N-NH4(+) L(-1) to mimic pretreated municipal nitrogenous wastewater and the temperature was progressively decreased from 30 to 12.5 °C. A suitable effluent nitrite to ammonium concentrations ratio to a subsequent anammox reactor was maintained stable during 300 days at 12.5 °C. The average applied nitrogen loading rate at 12.5 °C was 0.7 ± 0.3 g N L(-1) d(-1), with an effluent nitrate concentration of only 2.5 ± 0.7 mg N-NO3(-) L(-1). The biomass fraction of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) in the granular sludge decreased from 19% to only 1% in 6 months of reactor operation at 12.5 °C. Nitrobacter spp. where found as the dominant NOB population, whereas Nitrospira spp. were not detected. Simulations indicated that: (i) NOB would only be effectively repressed when their oxygen half-saturation coefficient was higher than that of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria; and (ii) a lower specific growth rate of NOB was maintained at any point in the biofilm (even at 12.5 °C) due to the bulk ammonium concentration imposed through the control strategy. PMID:26001281

  13. Temperature stable mid-infrared GaInAsSb/GaSb Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Lasers (VCSELs).

    PubMed

    Ikyo, A B; Marko, I P; Hild, K; Adams, A R; Arafin, S; Amann, M-C; Sweeney, S J

    2016-01-01

    GaInAsSb/GaSb based quantum well vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs) operating in mid-infrared spectral range between 2 and 3 micrometres are of great importance for low cost gas monitoring applications. This paper discusses the efficiency and temperature sensitivity of the VCSELs emitting at 2.6 μm and the processes that must be controlled to provide temperature stable operation. We show that non-radiative Auger recombination dominates the threshold current and limits the device performance at room temperature. Critically, we demonstrate that the combined influence of non-radiative recombination and gain peak-cavity mode de-tuning determines the overall temperature sensitivity of the VCSELs. The results show that improved temperature stable operation around room temperature can only be achieved with a larger gain peak-cavity mode de-tuning, offsetting the significant effect of increasing non-radiative recombination with increasing temperature, a physical effect which must be accounted for in mid-infrared VCSEL design. PMID:26781492

  14. Temperature stable mid-infrared GaInAsSb/GaSb Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Lasers (VCSELs)

    PubMed Central

    Ikyo, A. B.; Marko, I. P.; Hild, K.; Adams, A. R.; Arafin, S.; Amann, M.-C.; Sweeney, S. J.

    2016-01-01

    GaInAsSb/GaSb based quantum well vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs) operating in mid-infrared spectral range between 2 and 3 micrometres are of great importance for low cost gas monitoring applications. This paper discusses the efficiency and temperature sensitivity of the VCSELs emitting at 2.6 μm and the processes that must be controlled to provide temperature stable operation. We show that non-radiative Auger recombination dominates the threshold current and limits the device performance at room temperature. Critically, we demonstrate that the combined influence of non-radiative recombination and gain peak – cavity mode de-tuning determines the overall temperature sensitivity of the VCSELs. The results show that improved temperature stable operation around room temperature can only be achieved with a larger gain peak – cavity mode de-tuning, offsetting the significant effect of increasing non-radiative recombination with increasing temperature, a physical effect which must be accounted for in mid-infrared VCSEL design. PMID:26781492

  15. Temperature stable mid-infrared GaInAsSb/GaSb Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Lasers (VCSELs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikyo, A. B.; Marko, I. P.; Hild, K.; Adams, A. R.; Arafin, S.; Amann, M.-C.; Sweeney, S. J.

    2016-01-01

    GaInAsSb/GaSb based quantum well vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs) operating in mid-infrared spectral range between 2 and 3 micrometres are of great importance for low cost gas monitoring applications. This paper discusses the efficiency and temperature sensitivity of the VCSELs emitting at 2.6 μm and the processes that must be controlled to provide temperature stable operation. We show that non-radiative Auger recombination dominates the threshold current and limits the device performance at room temperature. Critically, we demonstrate that the combined influence of non-radiative recombination and gain peak - cavity mode de-tuning determines the overall temperature sensitivity of the VCSELs. The results show that improved temperature stable operation around room temperature can only be achieved with a larger gain peak - cavity mode de-tuning, offsetting the significant effect of increasing non-radiative recombination with increasing temperature, a physical effect which must be accounted for in mid-infrared VCSEL design.

  16. Phase Transformation Behavior at Low Temperature in Hydrothermal Treatment of Stable and Unstable Titania Sol

    PubMed

    So; Park; Kim; Moon

    1997-07-15

    Nanosize titania sol was prepared from titanium tetraisopropoxide (TTIP) and conditions for the formation of stable sol were identified. As the H+/TTIP mole ratio decreased and H2O/TTIP mole ratio increased, stable sol was likely to be formed. The size and crystallinity remained unchanged after hydrothermal treatment of the stable sol at between 160 and 240°C. However, hydrothermal treatment of unstable sol produced rod-like particles and crystallinity of particles was changed from anatase to rutile. This difference in phase transformation at low hydrothermal treatment temperature was likely to be caused by the fact that stable sol remained to be stable even after hydrothermal treatment, while unstable sol had a tendency to be aggregated. PMID:9268523

  17. Rheologically stable, nontoxic, high-temperature, water-based drilling fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Elward-Berry, J.; Darby, J.B.

    1997-09-01

    An exceptionally stable, high-temperature, water-based drilling fluid has been developed based on a fundamental redesign of drilling fluid components and functions, while still using commercially available materials. Rheological stability was characterized by extensive Fann 50C low-shear-rate viscosity vs. temperature studies and supporting viscoelastic rheological data. The fluid has been used in offshore and land applications, at temperatures as high as 420 F and densities as high as 15.5 lbm/gal.

  18. What would it take to achieve the Paris temperature targets?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanderson, Benjamin M.; O'Neill, Brian C.; Tebaldi, Claudia

    2016-07-01

    The 2015 Paris Agreement aims to limit warming to 2 or 1.5°C above preindustrial level, although combined Intended Nationally Determined Contributions (INDCs) are likely insufficient to achieve these targets. We propose a set of idealized emission pathways consistent with the targets. If countries reduce emissions in line with their INDCs, the 2°C threshold could be avoided only if net zero greenhouse gas emissions (GHGEs) are achieved by 2085 and late century negative emissions are considerably in excess of those assumed in Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) 2.6 (net -5 Gt CO2/yr, compared with -1.5 Gt CO2/yr in RCP2.6). More aggressive near-term reductions would allow 2°C to be avoided with less end-of-century carbon removal capacity. A 10% cut in GHGEs by 2030 (relative to 2015) could likely achieve 2°C with RCP2.6 level negative emissions. The 1.5°C target requires GHGEs to be reduced by almost a third by 2030 and net zero by 2050, while a 50 year overshoot of 1.5°C allows net zero GHGEs by 2060.

  19. High-Temperature Adhesives for Thermally Stable Aero-Assist Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberts, Kenneth; Ou, Runqing

    2013-01-01

    Aero-assist technologies are used to control the velocity of exploration vehicles (EVs) when entering Earth or other planetary atmospheres. Since entry of EVs in planetary atmospheres results in significant heating, thermally stable aero-assist technologies are required to avoid the high heating rates while maintaining low mass. Polymer adhesives are used in aero-assist structures because of the need for high flexibility and good bonding between layers of polymer films or fabrics. However, current polymer adhesives cannot withstand temperatures above 400 C. This innovation utilizes nanotechnology capabilities to address this need, leading to the development of high-temperature adhesives that exhibit high thermal conductivity in addition to increased thermal decomposition temperature. Enhanced thermal conductivity will help to dissipate heat quickly and effectively to avoid temperature rising to harmful levels. This, together with increased thermal decomposition temperature, will enable the adhesives to sustain transient high-temperature conditions.

  20. Facile production of stable silicon nanoparticles: laser chemistry coupled to in situ stabilization via room temperature hydrosilylation.

    PubMed

    Malumbres, A; Martínez, G; Hueso, J L; Gracia, J; Mallada, R; Ibarra, A; Santamaría, J

    2015-05-14

    Stable, alkyl-terminated, light-emitting silicon nanoparticles have been synthesized in a continuous process by laser pyrolysis of a liquid trialkyl-silane precursor selected as a safer alternative to gas silane (SiH4). Stabilization was achieved by in situ reaction using a liquid collection system instead of the usual solid state filtration. The alkene contained in the collection liquid (1-dodecene) reacted with the newly formed silicon nanoparticles in an unusual room-temperature hydrosilylation process. It was achieved by the presence of fluoride species, also produced during laser pyrolysis from the decomposition of sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) selected as a laser sensitizer. This process directly rendered alkyl-passivated silicon nanoparticles with consistent morphology and size (<3 nm), avoiding the use of costly post-synthetic treatments. PMID:25898392

  1. Facile production of stable silicon nanoparticles: laser chemistry coupled to in situ stabilization via room temperature hydrosilylation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malumbres, A.; Martínez, G.; Hueso, J. L.; Gracia, J.; Mallada, R.; Ibarra, A.; Santamaría, J.

    2015-04-01

    Stable, alkyl-terminated, light-emitting silicon nanoparticles have been synthesized in a continuous process by laser pyrolysis of a liquid trialkyl-silane precursor selected as a safer alternative to gas silane (SiH4). Stabilization was achieved by in situ reaction using a liquid collection system instead of the usual solid state filtration. The alkene contained in the collection liquid (1-dodecene) reacted with the newly formed silicon nanoparticles in an unusual room-temperature hydrosilylation process. It was achieved by the presence of fluoride species, also produced during laser pyrolysis from the decomposition of sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) selected as a laser sensitizer. This process directly rendered alkyl-passivated silicon nanoparticles with consistent morphology and size (<3 nm), avoiding the use of costly post-synthetic treatments.Stable, alkyl-terminated, light-emitting silicon nanoparticles have been synthesized in a continuous process by laser pyrolysis of a liquid trialkyl-silane precursor selected as a safer alternative to gas silane (SiH4). Stabilization was achieved by in situ reaction using a liquid collection system instead of the usual solid state filtration. The alkene contained in the collection liquid (1-dodecene) reacted with the newly formed silicon nanoparticles in an unusual room-temperature hydrosilylation process. It was achieved by the presence of fluoride species, also produced during laser pyrolysis from the decomposition of sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) selected as a laser sensitizer. This process directly rendered alkyl-passivated silicon nanoparticles with consistent morphology and size (<3 nm), avoiding the use of costly post-synthetic treatments. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr01031d

  2. Achieving Stable Nitritation for Mainstream Deammonification by Combining Free Nitrous Acid-Based Sludge Treatment and Oxygen Limitation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dongbo; Wang, Qilin; Laloo, Andrew; Xu, Yifeng; Bond, Philip L.; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2016-01-01

    Stable nitritation is a critical bottleneck for achieving autotrophic nitrogen removal using the energy-saving mainstream deammonification process. Herein we report a new strategy to wash out both the Nitrospira sp. and Nitrobacter sp. from the treatment of domestic-strength wastewater. The strategy combines sludge treatment using free nitrous acid (FNA) with dissolved oxygen (DO) control in the nitritation reactor. Initially, the nitrifying reactor achieved full conversion of NH4+ to NO3−. Then, nitrite accumulation at ~60% was achieved in the reactor when 1/4 of the sludge was treated daily with FNA at 1.82 mg N/L in a side-stream unit for 24 h. Fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) revealed FNA treatment substantially reduced the abundance of nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB) (from 23.0 ± 4.3 to 5.3 ± 1.9%), especially that of Nitrospira sp. (from 15.7 ± 3.9 to 0.4 ± 0.1%). Nitrite accumulation increased to ~80% when the DO concentration in the mainstream reactor was reduced from 2.5–3.0 to 0.3–0.8 mg/L. FISH revealed the DO limitation further reduced the abundance of NOB (to 2.1 ± 1.0%), especially that of Nitrobacter sp. (from 4.9 ± 1.2 to 1.8 ± 0.8%). The strategy developed removes a major barrier for deammonification in low-strength domestic wastewater. PMID:27151247

  3. Achieving Stable Nitritation for Mainstream Deammonification by Combining Free Nitrous Acid-Based Sludge Treatment and Oxygen Limitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dongbo; Wang, Qilin; Laloo, Andrew; Xu, Yifeng; Bond, Philip L.; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2016-05-01

    Stable nitritation is a critical bottleneck for achieving autotrophic nitrogen removal using the energy-saving mainstream deammonification process. Herein we report a new strategy to wash out both the Nitrospira sp. and Nitrobacter sp. from the treatment of domestic-strength wastewater. The strategy combines sludge treatment using free nitrous acid (FNA) with dissolved oxygen (DO) control in the nitritation reactor. Initially, the nitrifying reactor achieved full conversion of NH4+ to NO3‑. Then, nitrite accumulation at ~60% was achieved in the reactor when 1/4 of the sludge was treated daily with FNA at 1.82 mg N/L in a side-stream unit for 24 h. Fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) revealed FNA treatment substantially reduced the abundance of nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB) (from 23.0 ± 4.3 to 5.3 ± 1.9%), especially that of Nitrospira sp. (from 15.7 ± 3.9 to 0.4 ± 0.1%). Nitrite accumulation increased to ~80% when the DO concentration in the mainstream reactor was reduced from 2.5–3.0 to 0.3–0.8 mg/L. FISH revealed the DO limitation further reduced the abundance of NOB (to 2.1 ± 1.0%), especially that of Nitrobacter sp. (from 4.9 ± 1.2 to 1.8 ± 0.8%). The strategy developed removes a major barrier for deammonification in low-strength domestic wastewater.

  4. Achieving Stable Nitritation for Mainstream Deammonification by Combining Free Nitrous Acid-Based Sludge Treatment and Oxygen Limitation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dongbo; Wang, Qilin; Laloo, Andrew; Xu, Yifeng; Bond, Philip L; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2016-01-01

    Stable nitritation is a critical bottleneck for achieving autotrophic nitrogen removal using the energy-saving mainstream deammonification process. Herein we report a new strategy to wash out both the Nitrospira sp. and Nitrobacter sp. from the treatment of domestic-strength wastewater. The strategy combines sludge treatment using free nitrous acid (FNA) with dissolved oxygen (DO) control in the nitritation reactor. Initially, the nitrifying reactor achieved full conversion of NH4(+) to NO3(-). Then, nitrite accumulation at ~60% was achieved in the reactor when 1/4 of the sludge was treated daily with FNA at 1.82 mg N/L in a side-stream unit for 24 h. Fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) revealed FNA treatment substantially reduced the abundance of nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB) (from 23.0 ± 4.3 to 5.3 ± 1.9%), especially that of Nitrospira sp. (from 15.7 ± 3.9 to 0.4 ± 0.1%). Nitrite accumulation increased to ~80% when the DO concentration in the mainstream reactor was reduced from 2.5-3.0 to 0.3-0.8 mg/L. FISH revealed the DO limitation further reduced the abundance of NOB (to 2.1 ± 1.0%), especially that of Nitrobacter sp. (from 4.9 ± 1.2 to 1.8 ± 0.8%). The strategy developed removes a major barrier for deammonification in low-strength domestic wastewater. PMID:27151247

  5. Development of high temperature stable Ohmic and Schottky contacts on n-gallium nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanna, Rohit

    In this work the effort was made to towards develop and investigate high temperature stable Ohmic and Schottky contacts for n type GaN. Various borides and refractory materials were incorporated in metallization scheme to best attain the desired effect of minimal degradation of contacts when placed at high temperatures. This work focuses on achieving a contact scheme using different borides which include two Tungsten Borides (namely W2B, W2B 5), Titanium Boride (TiB2), Chromium Boride (CrB2) and Zirconium Boride (ZrB2). Further a high temperature metal namely Iridium (Ir) was evaluated as a potential contact to n-GaN, as part of continuing improved device technology development. The main goal of this project was to investigate the most promising boride-based contact metallurgies on GaN, and finally to fabricate a High Electron Mobility Transistor (HEMT) and compare its reliability to a HEMT using present technology contact. Ohmic contacts were fabricated on n GaN using borides in the metallization scheme of Ti/Al/boride/Ti/Au. The characterization of the contacts was done using current-voltage measurements, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES) measurements. The contacts formed gave specific contact resistance of the order of 10-5 to 10-6 Ohm-cm2. A minimum contact resistance of 1.5x10-6 O.cm 2 was achieved for the TiB2 based scheme at an annealing temperature of 850-900°C, which was comparable to a regular ohmic contact of Ti/Al/Ni/Au on n GaN. When some of borides contacts were placed on a hot plate or in hot oven for temperature ranging from 200°C to 350°C, the regular metallization contacts degraded before than borides ones. Even with a certain amount of intermixing of the metallization scheme the boride contacts showed minimal roughening and smoother morphology, which, in terms of edge acuity, is crucial for very small gate devices. Schottky contacts were also fabricated and characterized using all the five boride

  6. High- and low-temperature-stable thermite composition for producing high-pressure, high-velocity gases

    DOEpatents

    Halcomb, Danny L.; Mohler, Jonathan H.

    1990-10-16

    A high- and low-temperature-stable thermite composition for producing high-pressure and high-velocity gases comprises an oxidizable metal, an oxidizing reagent, and a high-temperature-stable gas-producing additive selected from the group consisting of metal carbides and metal nitrides.

  7. Alternate method for achieving temperature control in the -160 to +90 Celcius range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Kenneth R. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A single-pass method for accurate and precise temperature control in the -160 to +90 C range is discussed. The method exhibited minimal set-point overshoot during temperature transitions. Control to +/-2 C with transitions between set-points of 7 C per minute were achieved. The method uses commercially available temperature controllers and a gaseous nitrogen/liquid nitrogen mixer to dampen the amplitude of cold temperature spikes caused by liquid nitrogen pulsing.

  8. Structure-to-glass transition temperature relationships in high temperature stable condensation polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alston, W. B.; Gratz, R. F.

    1985-01-01

    The presence of a hexafluoroisopropylidene (6F) connecting group in aryl dianhydrides used to prepare aromatic condensation polyimides provides high glass transition temperature (T sub g) polyimides with excellent thermo-oxidative stability. The purpose of this study was to determine if a trifluorophenyl-ethylidene (3F) connecting group would have a similar effect on the T sub g of aromatic condensation polyimides. A new dianhydride containing the 3F connecting group was synthesized. This dianhydride and an aromatic diamine also containing the 3F connecting group were used together and in various combinations with known diamines or known dianhydrides, respectively, to prepare new 3F containing condensation polyimides. Known polyimides, including some with the 6F connecting linkage, were also prepared for comparison purposes. The new 3F containing polymers and the comparison polymers were prepared by condensation polymerization via the traditional amic-acid polymerization method in N,N-dimethylacetamide solvent. The solutions were characterized by determining their inherent viscosities and then were thermally converted into polyimide films under nitrogen atmosphere at 300 to 500 C, usually 350 C. The T sub g's of the films and resin discs were then determined by thermomechanical analysis and were correlated as a function of the final processing temperatures of the films and resin discs. The results showed that similarities existed in the T sub g's depending on the nature of the connecting linkage in the monomers used to prepare the condensation polyimides.

  9. Stable oxygen isotope reconstruction of ambient temperature during the collapse of a cod (Gadus morhua) fishery.

    PubMed

    Jones, J Brin; Campana, Steven E

    2009-09-01

    Changing environmental conditions set against a backdrop of high exploitation can result in severe consequences for commercially harvested stocks. The collapse of the Eastern Scotian Shelf cod (Gadus morhua L.) off eastern Canada was primarily due to overexploitation but may have been exacerbated by a widespread temperature decline. Recent studies have called for accurate determination of ambient temperature (the actual temperature exposure history of the fish) before discarding environmental conditions as a factor in the collapse. We used the stable oxygen isotope composition of otoliths (delta18O(oto)) to reconstruct the ambient temperature history of Eastern Scotian Shelf cod from 1970 to 2000 in order to determine whether the stock experienced the temperature decline or shifted their distribution to avoid it. To correct delta18O(oto) for seawater isotope content (deltaO(w)), we generated a new meta-equation for the relationship between delta18O(w) (per mil) and salinity (S, in psu) on the Eastern Scotian Shelf: delta18O(w) = 0.539 x S - 18.790. The ambient temperature series revealed that the large-scale geographic distribution of mature cod remained constant through the cooling period, although their ambient temperature was cooler than expected in warmer periods and warmer than expected in cooler periods, indicating small-scale thermoregulatory movement. Although the mean hydrographic temperature was 4 degrees C, mature cod usually inhabited the coldest available waters (mean ambient temperature = 3 degrees C), while the juveniles usually inhabited warmer waters (mean ambient temperature = 5.5 degrees C). Length-at-age was significantly related to ambient temperature, especially in the early years of growth, and therefore declining ambient temperatures were at least partially responsible for declines in asymptotic length (up to age 8 yr). The most active thermoregulatory movement occurred during a moderate warming period; therefore extreme warming events (such

  10. New technique for fabrication of low loss high temperature stable high reflectivity FBG sensor arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihailov, Stephen J.; Grobnic, Dan; Walker, Robert B.; Hnatovsky, Cyril A.; Ding, Huimin; Coulas, David; Lu, Ping

    2016-05-01

    Fiber Bragg gratings (FBG) arrays in silica based optical fibers are increasingly used in applications involving system monitoring in extreme high temperature environments. Where operational temperatures are < 600 °C, traditional UVlaser inscribed FBGs are not appropriate since the induced Type I index change is erased. Instead two competing FBG technologies exist: 1) regenerative FBGs resulting from high temperature annealing of a UV-laser written grating in a hydrogen loaded fiber and 2) FBGs written with femtosecond infrared pulse duration radiation (fs-IR), either using the point-by-point method or using the phase mask approach. Regenerative gratings possess low reflectivity and are cumbersome to produce, requiring high temperature processing in an oxygen free environment. Multiple pulse Type II femtosecond IR laser induced gratings made with a phase mask, while having very good thermal stability, also tend to have high insertion loss (~ 1dB/grating) limiting the number of gratings that can be concatenated in a sensor array. Recently it has been shown that during multiple pulse type II thermally stable fs-IR FBG production, two competing process occur: an initial induced fs-IR type I FBG followed by a thermally stable high insertion loss type II FBG. In this paper, we show that if only a type I FBG is written using type II intensity conditions but limited numbers of pulses and then annealed above 600 °C, the process results in a type II grating that is stable up to 1000 °C with very low insertion loss ideal for an FBG sensor array.

  11. A technique to achieve uniform stress distribution in compressive creep testing of advanced ceramics at high temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, K.C.; Stevens, C.O.; Brinkman, C.R.; Holshauser, N.E.

    1996-05-01

    A technique to achieve stable and uniform uniaxial compression is offered for creep testing of advanced ceramic materials at elevated temperatures, using an innovative self-aligning load-train assembly. Excellent load-train alignment is attributed to the inherent ability of a unique hydraulic universal coupler to maintain self-aligning. Details of key elements, design concept, and pricniples of operation of the self-aligning coupler are described. A method of alignment verification using a strain-gaged specimen is then discussed. Results of verification tests indicate that bending below 1.5% is routinely achievable usin the load-train system. A successful compression creep test is demonstrated using a dumbbell-shpaed Si nitride specimen tested at 1300 C for over 4000 h.

  12. [Startup, stable operation and process failure of EBPR system under the low temperature and low dissolved oxygen condition].

    PubMed

    Ma, Juan; Li, Lu; Yu, Xiao-Jun; Wei, Xue-Fen; Liu, Juan-Li

    2015-02-01

    A sequencing batch reactor (SBR) was started up and operated with alternating anaerobic/oxic (An/O) to perform enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) under the condition of 13-16 degrees C. The results showed that under the condition of low temperature, the EBPR system was successfully started up in a short time (<6 d). The reactor achieved a high and stable phosphorus removal performance with an influent phosphate concentration of 20 mg x L(-1) and the dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration of 2 mg x L(-1). The effluent phosphate concentration was lower than 0.5 mg x L(-1). It was found that decreasing DO had an influence on the steady operation of EBPR system. As DO concentration of aerobic phase decreased from 2 mg x L(-1) to 1 mg x L(-1), the system could still perform EBPR and the phosphorus removal efficiency was greater than 97.4%. However, the amount of phosphate released during anaerobic phase was observed to decrease slightly compared with that of 2 mg x L(-1) DO condition. Moreover, the phosphorus removal performance of the system deteriorated immediately and the effluent phosphate concentration couldn't meet the national integrated wastewater discharge standard when DO concentration was further lowered to 0.5 mg x L(-1). The experiments of increasing DO to recover phosphorus removal performance of the EBPR suggested the process failure resulted from low DO was not reversible in the short-term. It was also found that the batch tests of anoxic phosphorus uptake using nitrite and nitrate as electron acceptors had an impact on the stable operation of EBPR system, whereas the resulting negative influence could be recovered within 6 cycles. In addition, the mixed liquid suspended solids (MLSS) of the EBPR system remained stable and the sludge volume index (SVI) decreased to a certain extend in a long run, implying long-term low temperature and low DO condition favored the sludge sedimentation. PMID:26031088

  13. Low-Temperature Photochemically Activated Amorphous Indium-Gallium-Zinc Oxide for Highly Stable Room-Temperature Gas Sensors.

    PubMed

    Jaisutti, Rawat; Kim, Jaeyoung; Park, Sung Kyu; Kim, Yong-Hoon

    2016-08-10

    We report on highly stable amorphous indium-gallium-zinc oxide (IGZO) gas sensors for ultraviolet (UV)-activated room-temperature detection of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The IGZO sensors fabricated by a low-temperature photochemical activation process and exhibiting two orders higher photocurrent compared to conventional zinc oxide sensors, allowed high gas sensitivity against various VOCs even at room temperature. From a systematic analysis, it was found that by increasing the UV intensity, the gas sensitivity, response time, and recovery behavior of an IGZO sensor were strongly enhanced. In particular, under an UV intensity of 30 mW cm(-2), the IGZO sensor exhibited gas sensitivity, response time and recovery time of 37%, 37 and 53 s, respectively, against 750 ppm concentration of acetone gas. Moreover, the IGZO gas sensor had an excellent long-term stability showing around 6% variation in gas sensitivity over 70 days. These results strongly support a conclusion that a low-temperature solution-processed amorphous IGZO film can serve as a good candidate for room-temperature VOCs sensors for emerging wearable electronics. PMID:27430635

  14. Mean annual temperatures of mid-latitude regions derived from stable hydrogen isotopes of wood lignin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anhäuser, Tobias; Greule, Markus; Bowen, Gabriel J.; Keppler, Frank

    2016-04-01

    Tree rings are widely used climate archives providing annual resolutions on centennial to millennial timescales. Besides plant physiological parameters such as tree-ring width or maximum latewood density, stable isotope compositions (expressed as δ values) complement or even broaden the potential of the climate archive tree rings. A considerable wood constituent are ether-bonded methoxyl groups as part of lignin which can be used for stable hydrogen isotope studies. The δ²H value of the lignin methoxyl groups reflects the δ²H value of the tree source water as a result of a large uniform fractionation. Hence, this relation can be used to infer δ²H values of precipitation which are in temperate regions primarily controlled by temperature. Here, we measured δ²H values of lignin methoxyl groups (n = 111) of tree rings from various species collected along a ~3500 km north-south transect across Europe with mean annual temperatures (MAT) ranging from ‑4 to +17 °C. We found a significant linear correlation between δ²H values of the lignin methoxyl groups and MAT (R² = 0.81, p < 0.01). We used this relationship to predict MATs from randomly collected wood samples and found general agreement between predicted and observed MATs for the mid-latitudes on a global scale. Thus our results indicate that δ²H values of lignin methoxyl groups are a promising tool for mid-latitude temperature reconstruction of the Holocene.

  15. Late Paleocene Arctic Ocean shallow-marine temperatures from mollusc stable isotopes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bice, Karen L.; Arthur, Michael A.; Marincovich, Louie, Jr.

    1996-01-01

    Late Paleocene high-latitude (80°N) Arctic Ocean shallow-marine temperatures are estimated from molluscan δ18O time series. Sampling of individual growth increments of two specimens of the bivalve Camptochlamys alaskensis provides a high-resolution record of shell stable isotope composition. The heavy carbon isotopic values of the specimens support a late Paleocene age for the youngest marine beds of the Prince Creek Formation exposed near Ocean Point, Alaska. The oxygen isotopic composition of regional freshwater runoff is estimated from the mean δ18O value of two freshwater bivalves collected from approximately coeval fluviatile beds. Over a 30 – 34‰ range of salinity, values assumed to represent the tolerance of C. alaskensis, the mean annual shallow-marine temperature recorded by these individuals is between 11° and 22°C. These values could represent maximum estimates of the mean annual temperature because of a possible warm-month bias imposed on the average δ18O value by slowing or cessation of growth in winter months. The amplitude of the molluscan δ18O time series probably records most of the seasonality in shallow-marine temperature. The annual temperature range indicated is approximately 6°C, suggesting very moderate high-latitude marine temperature seasonality during the late Paleocene. On the basis of analogy with modern Chlamys species, C. alaskensis probably inhabited water depths of 30–50 m. The seasonal temperature range derived from δ18O is therefore likely to be damped relative to the full range of annual sea surface temperatures. High-resolution sampling of molluscan shell material across inferred growth bands represents an important proxy record of seasonality of marine and freshwater conditions applicable at any latitude. If applied to other regions and time periods, the approach used here would contribute substantially to the paleoclimate record of seasonality.

  16. Synthesis and characterization of thermally stable palladium-based composite membranes for high temperature applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu El Hawa, Hani W.

    In this thesis, the inert gas leak evolution problem in electroless-plated palladium-based composite membranes has been revisited. Palladium was doped with a higher melting point element such as ruthenium or platinum and the rate of increase of the nitrogen leak in the temperature range of 500-600 ºC was determined. The results showed that doping Pd with Pt or Ru significantly reduces the leak growth rate compared to a pure Pd membrane by almost one order of magnitude. The addition of Ru to Pd was sufficient to lower the leak growth rate, though the hydrogen permeance stability was not improved. The Pd-Pt alloy membrane, despite having a lower hydrogen permeance, had a stable hydrogen flux at higher temperatures. The influence of high temperature annealing (> 640 ºC) on the thermal stability of pure Pd composite membranes was also investigated in order to correlate between thermal stability and microstructural evolution. Pure Pd composite membranes were subjected to different high temperature annealing processes. It was found that employing such heat treatments improved the thermal stability of the membranes when operated at lower temperatures; evidenced by a suppression of the rate at which hydrogen selectivity towards nitrogen declined over time. SEM images of the microstructural evolution as a function of temperature revealed that porosity, which is typically present in as-deposited electroless plated films, is significantly reduced after heat treatment. Thermal stability was also evaluated in actual steam methane reforming (SMR) environments. Thin film (˜5.0 microm thick) Pd-Ru and Pd-Au composite membranes were fabricated and used to carry out SMR over commercial Ni or Ru based catalysts at temperatures > 480 °C and pressures up to 2.9 MPa. The conversions obtained (≥ 80%) were significantly higher than the thermodynamic equilibrium predicted (< 35%) for the feed composition at these process conditions. The long term operation (> 500 hours) revealed the

  17. Ladder polymers for use as high temperature stable resins or coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Mary Ann (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    An object of the invention is to synthesize a new class of ladder and partial ladder polymers. In accordance with the invention, the new class of ladder and partial ladder polymers are synthesized by polymerizing a bis-dienophile with a bis-diene. Another object of the invention is to provide a fabricated, electrically conducting, void free composite comprising the new class of the ladder and partial ladder polymers described above. The novelty of the invention relates to a new class of ladder and partial ladder polymers and a process for synthesizing these polymers. These polymers are soluble in common organic solvents and are characterized with a unique dehydration property at temperatures of 300 to 400 C to provide thermo-oxidatively stable pentiptycene units along the polymeric backbone. These polymers are further characterized with high softening points and good thermo-oxidative stability properties. Thus these polymers have potential as processable, matrix resins for high temperature composite applications.

  18. Spatial modeling of the highest daily maximum temperature in Korea via max-stable processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Youngsaeng; Yoon, Sanghoo; Murshed, Md. Sharwar; Kim, Maeng-Ki; Cho, ChunHo; Baek, Hee-Jeong; Park, Jeong-Soo

    2013-11-01

    This paper examines the annual highest daily maximum temperature (DMT) in Korea by using data from 56 weather stations and employing spatial extreme modeling. Our approach is based on max-stable processes (MSP) with Schlather’s characterization. We divide the country into four regions for a better model fit and identify the best model for each region. We show that regional MSP modeling is more suitable than MSP modeling for the entire region and the pointwise generalized extreme value distribution approach. The advantage of spatial extreme modeling is that more precise and robust return levels and some indices of the highest temperatures can be obtained for observation stations and for locations with no observed data, and so help to determine the effects and assessment of vulnerability as well as to downscale extreme events.

  19. High-coercivity, thermally stable and low unblocking temperature magnetic phase: Implications for Archeomagnetic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, G. A.; Gallet, Y.; Trindade, R. I.; Genevey, A.; Berquo, T. S.; Neumann, R.; Le Goff, M.

    2013-05-01

    The thermoremanent magnetization in baked clay archeological materials provide very useful information on the time evolution of the Earth's magnetic field over the past few millennia. In these materials, a thermally stable magnetic phase characterized by high coercivities (>400 mT) and low unblocking temperatures (~200 degrees Celsius) has recently been recognized in European bricks, tiles, kilns and hearth samples. Both the identification and the origin of this phase remain, however, poorly constrained. The very same high-coercivity, thermally stable, low unblocking temperature (HCSLT) magnetic phase has been identified in Brazilian bricks fragments dated of the past five centuries. We report here a large set of measurements on a selected collection of samples showing variable contributions of the HCSLT phase. These measurements include low-field magnetic susceptibility vs. temperature curves, hysteresis loops, isothermal remanent magnetization (IRM) acquisition, thermal demagnetization of the three-axis IRM, first order reversal curves (FORC), low-temperature magnetization experiments (remanent magnetization curves and alternating current susceptibility), Mössbauer spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. Results show the coexistence of low-coercivity magnetic minerals (magnetite and titanomagnetite) and high-coercivity minerals (hematite, HCSLT phase and, in some cases, goethite). We note that the HCSLT magnetic phase is always found in association with hematite. We further observe that the Mössbauer spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction spectra, and the FORC diagrams are also very similar to results previously obtained from annealed clays in which nontronite or iron-rich montmorillonite was transformed into Al-substituted hematite by heating. The HCSLT magnetic phase is thus confidently identified as being hematite with Al substitution. Moreover, considering the abundance of montmorillonite in clay mining settings, we suggest that the widespread occurrence of HCSLT in

  20. Frequency characteristics of an inherently stable Nd:YAG laser operated at liquid helium temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Scholz, Matthias; Kovalchuk, Evgeny; Peters, Achim

    2009-07-10

    We report on frequency measurements of a free-running Nd:YAG laser operating at temperatures down to 6.5 K using a femtosecond laser frequency comb. Due to lower thermal expansion and thermo-optic effects as well as reduced electron-phonon interactions in Nd:YAG at cryogenic temperatures, a laser frequency stability on the order of 10{sup -11} at {tau} < or = 30s has been achieved. Within a one-week measurement period, absolute frequency deviations were lower than 1.85 MHz. This is up to a 100-fold improvement of frequency stability compared to any existing free-running solid-state laser.

  1. Thermally Stable Nanocatalyst for High Temperature Reactions: Pt-Mesoporous Silica Core-Shell Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Joo, Sang Hoon; Park, J.Y.; Tsung, C.-K.; Yamada, Y.; Yang, P.; Somorjai, G.A.

    2008-10-25

    Recent advances in colloidal synthesis enabled the precise control of size, shape and composition of catalytic metal nanoparticles, allowing their use as model catalysts for systematic investigations of the atomic-scale properties affecting catalytic activity and selectivity. The organic capping agents stabilizing colloidal nanoparticles, however, often limit their application in high-temperature catalytic reactions. Here we report the design of a high-temperature stable model catalytic system that consists of Pt metal core coated with a mesoporous silica shell (Pt{at}mSiO{sub 2}). While inorganic silica shells encaged the Pt cores up to 750 C in air, the mesopores directly accessible to Pt cores made the Pt{at}mSiO{sub 2} nanoparticles as catalytically active as bare Pt metal for ethylene hydrogenation and CO oxidation. The high thermal stability of Pt{at}mSiO{sub 2} nanoparticles permitted high-temperature CO oxidation studies, including ignition behavior, which was not possible for bare Pt nanoparticles because of their deformation or aggregation. The results suggest that the Pt{at}mSiO{sub 2} nanoparticles are excellent nanocatalytic systems for high-temperature catalytic reactions or surface chemical processes, and the design concept employed in the Pt{at}mSiO{sub 2} core-shell catalyst can be extended to other metal-metal oxide compositions.

  2. STABLE HIGH CONDUCTIVITY BILAYERED ELECTROLYTES FOR LOW TEMPERATURE SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELLS

    SciTech Connect

    Eric D. Wachsman

    2000-10-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are the future of energy production in America. They offer great promise as a clean and efficient process for directly converting chemical energy to electricity while providing significant environmental benefits (they produce negligible CO, HC, or NOx and, as a result of their high efficiency, produce about one-third less CO{sub 2} per kilowatt hour than internal combustion engines). Unfortunately, the current SOFC technology, based on a stabilized zirconia electrolyte, must operate in the region of 1000 C to avoid unacceptably high ohmic losses. These high temperatures demand (a) specialized (expensive) materials for the fuel cell interconnects and insulation, (b) time to heat up to the operating temperature and (c) energy input to arrive at the operating temperature. Therefore, if fuel cells could be designed to give a reasonable power output at lower temperatures tremendous benefits may be accrued, not the least of which is reduced cost. The problem is, at lower temperatures the conductivity of the conventional stabilized zirconia electrolyte decreases to the point where it cannot supply electrical current efficiently to an external load. The primary objectives of the proposed research is to develop a stable high conductivity (>0.05 S cm{sup -1} at 550 C) electrolyte for lower temperature SOFCs. This objective is specifically directed toward meeting the lowest (and most difficult) temperature criteria for the 21st Century Fuel Cell Program. Meeting this objective provides a potential for future transportation applications of SOFCs, where their ability to directly use hydrocarbon fuels could permit refueling within the existing transportation infrastructure. In order to meet this objective we are developing a functionally gradient bilayer electrolyte comprised of bismuth oxide on the air side and ceria on the fuel side. Bismuth oxide and doped ceria are among the highest ionic conducting electrolytes and in fact bismuth oxide based

  3. Highly stable concentrated nanoemulsions by the phase inversion composition method at elevated temperature.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lijie; Li, Chao; Xu, Jian; Hao, Jingcheng; Sun, Dejun

    2012-10-16

    Oil-in-water nanoemulsions were produced in the system water/Span 80-Tween 80/paraffin oil via the phase inversion composition (PIC) method at elevated temperature. With the increase of preparation temperature from 20 to 70 °C, we found that the emulsion droplet diameter decreases from 10.3 μm to 51 nm, proving the formation of nanoemulsions. The viscosity of nanoemulsions clearly increases with droplet volume fraction, φ, but the droplet size changes less. Significantly, at φ ≤ 0.5, the size distribution of nanoemulsions can be kept unchangeable more than 5 months. These results proved that the highly viscous paraffin oil can hardly be dispersed by the PIC method at 25 °C, but the increase in preparation temperature makes it possible for producing monodisperse nanoemulsions. Once the nanoemulsion is produced, the stability against Ostwald ripening is outstanding due to the extremely low solubility of the paraffin oil in the continuous phase. The highly stable nanoemulsions are of great importance in practical applications. PMID:22985401

  4. Intermediate and stable redox states of cytochrome c studied by low temperature resonance Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Cartling, B

    1983-01-01

    Stabilized intermediate redox states of cytochrome c are generated by radiolytic reduction of initially oxidized enzyme in glass matrices at liquid nitrogen temperature. In the intermediate states the heme group is reduced by hydrated electrons, whereas the protein conformation is restrained close to its oxidized form by the low-temperature glass matrix. The intermediate and stable redox states of cytochrome c at neutral and alkaline pH are studied by low-temperature resonance Raman spectroscopy using excitations in resonance with the B (Soret) and Q1 (beta) optical transitions. The assignments of the cytochrome c resonance Raman bands are discussed. The observed spectral characteristics of the intermediate states as well as of the alkaline transition in the oxidized state are interpreted in terms of oxidation-state marker modes, spin-state marker modes, heme iron--axial ligand stretching modes, totally symmetric in-plane porphyrin modes, nontotally symmetric in-plane modes, and out-of-plane modes. PMID:6311300

  5. Partitioning of Evapotranspiration Using a Stable Water Isotope Technique in a High Temperature Agricultural Production System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, X.; Liang, L.; Wang, L.; Jenerette, D.; Grantz, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    Agricultural production in the hot and arid low desert systems of southern California relies heavily on irrigation. A better understanding of how much and to what extent the irrigation water is transpired by crops relative to being lost through evaporation will contribute to better management of increasingly limited agricultural water resources. In this study, we examined the evapotranspiration (ET) partitioning over a field of forage sorghum (S. bicolor) during a growing season with several irrigation cycles. In several field campaigns we used continuous measurements of near-surface variations in the stable isotopic composition of water vapor (δ2H). We employed custom built transparent chambers coupled with a laser-based isotope analyzer and used Keeling plot and mass balance methods for surface flux partitioning. The preliminary results show that δT is more enriched than δE in the early growing season, and becomes less enriched than δE later in the season as canopy cover increases. There is an increase in the contribution of transpiration to ET as (1) leaf area index increases, and (2) as soil surface moisture declines. These results are consistent with theory, and extend these measurements to an environment that experiences extreme soil surface temperatures. The data further support the use of chamber based methods with stable isotopic analysis for characterization of ET partitioning in challenging field environments.

  6. Development of Room Temperature Stable Formulation of Formoterol Fumarate/Beclomethasone HFA pMDI

    PubMed Central

    Purohit, D.; Trehan, A.; Arora, V.

    2009-01-01

    The primary aim of present investigation was to develop and formulate room temperature stable formulation of formoterol fumarate and beclomethasone dipropionate with extra fine part size of hydrofluoroalkane pressurized metered dose inhalers. Particle size distribution of hydrofluoroalkane pressurized metered dose inhalers was evaluated using Twin Stage Glass Impinger and Anderson Cascade Impactor. A tetrafluoroethane and/or heptafluoropropane were evaluated for preparation of hydrofluoroalkane pressurized metered dose inhalers. The fine particle fractions delivered from hydrofluoroalkane propellant suspension pressurized metered dose inhalers can be predicted on the basis of formulation parameters and is dependent of metering chamber of valve and orifice size of actuators. The results presented in investigation showed the importance of formulation excipients with formulation of pressurized metered dose inhalers viz, canister, valve and actuators used in formulations.

  7. High Temperature Stable Separator for Lithium Batteries Based on SiO₂ and Hydroxypropyl Guar Gum.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Diogo Vieira; Loeffler, Nicholas; Kim, Guk-Tae; Passerini, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    A novel membrane based on silicon dioxide (SiO₂) and hydroxypropyl guar gum (HPG) as binder is presented and tested as a separator for lithium-ion batteries. The separator is made with renewable and low cost materials and an environmentally friendly manufacturing processing using only water as solvent. The separator offers superior wettability and high electrolyte uptake due to the optimized porosity and the good affinity of SiO₂ and guar gum microstructure towards organic liquid electrolytes. Additionally, the separator shows high thermal stability and no dimensional-shrinkage at high temperatures due to the use of the ceramic filler and the thermally stable natural polymer. The electrochemical tests show the good electrochemical stability of the separator in a wide range of potential, as well as its outstanding cycle performance. PMID:26512701

  8. STABLE HIGH CONDUCTIVITY BILAYERED ELECTROLYTES FOR LOW TEMPERATURE SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELLS

    SciTech Connect

    Eric D. Wachsman; Keith L. Duncan

    2001-09-30

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are the future of energy production in America. They offer great promise as a clean and efficient process for directly converting chemical energy to electricity while providing significant environmental benefits (they produce negligible hydrocarbons, CO, or NO{sub x} and, as a result of their high efficiency, produce about one-third less CO{sub 2} per kilowatt hour than internal combustion engines). Unfortunately, the current SOFC technology, based on a stabilized zirconia electrolyte, must operate in the region of 1000 C to avoid unacceptably high ohmic losses. These high temperatures demand (a) specialized (expensive) materials for the fuel cell interconnects and insulation, (b) time to heat up to the operating temperature and (c) energy input to arrive at the operating temperature. Therefore, if fuel cells could be designed to give a reasonable power output at low to intermediate1 temperatures tremendous benefits may be accrued. At low temperatures, in particular, it becomes feasible to use ferritic steel for interconnects instead of expensive and brittle ceramic materials such as those based on LaCrO{sub 3}. In addition, sealing the fuel cell becomes easier and more reliable; rapid start-up is facilitated; thermal stresses (e.g., those caused by thermal expansion mismatches) are reduced; radiative losses ({approx}T{sup 4}) become minimal; electrode sintering becomes negligible and (due to a smaller thermodynamic penalty) the SOFC operating cycle (heating from ambient) would be more efficient. Combined, all these improvements further result in reduced initial and operating costs. The problem is, at lower temperatures the conductivity of the conventional stabilized zirconia electrolyte decreases to the point where it cannot supply electrical current efficiently to an external load. The primary objectives of the proposed research are to develop a stable high conductivity (> 0.05 S cm{sup -1} at {le} 550 C) electrolyte for lower

  9. High-temperature stable, iron-based core-shell catalysts for ammonia decomposition.

    PubMed

    Feyen, Mathias; Weidenthaler, Claudia; Güttel, Robert; Schlichte, Klaus; Holle, Ulrich; Lu, An-Hui; Schüth, Ferdi

    2011-01-10

    High-temperature, stable core-shell catalysts for ammonia decomposition have been synthesized. The highly active catalysts, which were found to be also excellent model systems for fundamental studies, are based on α-Fe(2)O(3) nanoparticles coated by porous silica shells. In a bottom-up approach, hematite nanoparticles were firstly obtained from the hydrothermal reaction of ferric chlorides, L-lysine, and water with adjustable average sizes of 35, 47, and 75 nm. Secondly, particles of each size could be coated by a porous silica shell by means of the base-catalyzed hydrolysis of tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS) with cetyltetramethylammonium bromide (CTABr) as porogen. After calcination, TEM, high-resolution scanning electron microscopy (HR-SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX), XRD, and nitrogen sorption studies confirmed the successful encapsulation of hematite nanoparticles inside porous silica shells with a thickness of 20 nm, thereby leading to composites with surface areas of approximately 380 m(2)  g(-1) and iron contents between 10.5 and 12.2 wt %. The obtained catalysts were tested in ammonia decomposition. The influence of temperature, iron oxide core size, possible diffusion limitations, and dilution effects of the reagent gas stream with noble gases were studied. The catalysts are highly stable at 750 °C with a space velocity of 120,000 cm(3)  g(cat)(-1)  h(-1) and maintained conversions of around 80 % for the testing period time of 33 h. On the basis of the excellent stability under reaction conditions up to 800 °C, the system was investigated by in situ XRD, in which body-centered iron was determined, in addition to FeN(x), as the crystalline phase under reaction conditions above 650 °C. PMID:21207578

  10. An effective method for the preparation of high temperature stable anatase TiO2 photocatalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fagan, Rachel; Synnott, Damian W.; McCormack, Declan E.; Pillai, Suresh C.

    2016-05-01

    An efficient, rapid and straightforward method for the preparation of nitrogen and fluorine (N, F) codoped high temperature stable anatase using a microwave pre-treatment is reported. Using a single source, ammonium fluoride (NH4F) for both nitrogen and fluorine, effective doping of the precursor titanium isopropoxide (TTIP) was possible. These samples were characterised for their structural and optical properties using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier Transform IR (FTIR), Raman spectroscopy and UV-vis spectroscopy. In terms of the anatase to rutile transition enhancement using a novel microwave assisted technique, the sample prepared in a composition of 1:8 TiO2: NH4F at 1200 °C was seen to be most effective, having stable anatase present at 57.1% compared to undoped TiO2 being 100% rutile from 900 °C. This method involves the production of ammonium oxofluorotitanates (NH4TiOF3) at low temperatures. The inclusion of these intermediates greatly reduces the particle size growth and delays the anatase to rutile transition. The photocatalytic activity of these materials was studied by analysing the degradation of an organic dye, rhodamine 6G as a model system and the rate constant was calculated by pseudo-first-order kinetics. These results showed that the doped sample (0.0225 min-1) was three times more active than the undoped sample (0.0076 min-1) and over seven times faster than the commercial TiO2 photocatalyst standard Degussa P-25 calcined at 1200 °C (0.0030 min-1). The formation of intermediate compounds, oxofluorotitanates, was identified as the major reason for a delay in the anatase to rutile transition.

  11. High-Temperature-Stable and Regenerable Catalysts: Platinum Nanoparticles in Aligned Mesoporous Silica Wells

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Chaoxian; Maligal-Ganesh, Raghu V.; Li, Tao; Wi, Zhiyuan; Guo, Zhiyong; Brashler, Kyle T.; Goes, Shannon; Li, Xinle; Goh, Tian Wei; Winans, Randall E.; Huang, Wenyu

    2013-08-22

    We report the synthesis, structural characterization, thermal stability study, and regeneration of nanostructured catalysts made of 2.9 nm Pt nanoparticles sandwiched between a 180 nm SiO2 core and a mesoporous SiO2 shell. The SiO2 shell consists of 2.5 nm channels that are aligned perpendicular to the surface of the SiO2 core. The nanostructure mimics Pt nanoparticles that sit in mesoporous SiO2 wells (Pt@MSWs). By using synchrotron-based small-angle X-ray scattering, we were able to prove the ordered structure of the aligned mesoporous shell. By using high-temperature cyclohexane dehydrogenation as a model reaction, we found that the Pt@MSWs of different well depths showed stable activity at 500 °C after the induction period. Conversely, a control catalyst, SiO2-sphere-supported Pt nanoparticles without a mesoporous SiO2 shell (Pt/SiO2), was deactivated. We deliberately deactivated the Pt@MSWs catalyst with a 50 nm deep well by using carbon deposition induced by a low H2/cyclohexane ratio. The deactivated Pt@MSWs catalyst was regenerated by calcination at 500 °C with 20 % O2 balanced with He. After the regeneration treatments, the activity of the Pt@MSWs catalyst was fully restored. Our results suggest that the nanostructured catalysts—Pt nanoparticles confined inside mesoporous SiO2 wells—are stable and regenerable for treatments and reactions that require high temperatures.

  12. High-temperature-stable and regenerable catalysts: platinum nanoparticles in aligned mesoporous silica wells.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Chaoxian; Maligal-Ganesh, Raghu V; Li, Tao; Qi, Zhiyuan; Guo, Zhiyong; Brashler, Kyle T; Goes, Shannon; Li, Xinle; Goh, Tian Wei; Winans, Randall E; Huang, Wenyu

    2013-10-01

    We report the synthesis, structural characterization, thermal stability study, and regeneration of nanostructured catalysts made of 2.9 nm Pt nanoparticles sandwiched between a 180 nm SiO2 core and a mesoporous SiO2 shell. The SiO2 shell consists of 2.5 nm channels that are aligned perpendicular to the surface of the SiO2 core. The nanostructure mimics Pt nanoparticles that sit in mesoporous SiO2 wells (Pt@MSWs). By using synchrotron-based small-angle X-ray scattering, we were able to prove the ordered structure of the aligned mesoporous shell. By using high-temperature cyclohexane dehydrogenation as a model reaction, we found that the Pt@MSWs of different well depths showed stable activity at 500 °C after the induction period. Conversely, a control catalyst, SiO2 -sphere-supported Pt nanoparticles without a mesoporous SiO2 shell (Pt/SiO2 ), was deactivated. We deliberately deactivated the Pt@MSWs catalyst with a 50 nm deep well by using carbon deposition induced by a low H2 /cyclohexane ratio. The deactivated Pt@MSWs catalyst was regenerated by calcination at 500 °C with 20 % O2 balanced with He. After the regeneration treatments, the activity of the Pt@MSWs catalyst was fully restored. Our results suggest that the nanostructured catalysts-Pt nanoparticles confined inside mesoporous SiO2 wells-are stable and regenerable for treatments and reactions that require high temperatures. PMID:24039118

  13. Recoil Induced Room Temperature Stable Frenkel Pairs in a-Hafnium Upon Thermal Neutron Capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butz, Tilman; Das, Satyendra K.; Dey, Chandi C.; Ghoshal, Shamik

    2013-11-01

    Ultrapure hafnium metal (110 ppm zirconium) was neutron activated with a thermal neutron flux of 6:6 · 1012 cm-2s-1 in order to obtain 181Hf for subsequent time differential perturbed angular correlation (TDPAC) experiments using the nuclear probe 181Hf(β-) 181Ta. Apart from the expected nuclear quadrupole interaction (NQI) signal for a hexagonal close-packed (hcp) metal, three further discrete NQIs were observed with a few percent fraction each. The TDPAC spectra were recorded for up to 11 half lives with extreme statistical accuracy. The fitted parameters vary slightly within the temperature range between 248 K and 373 K. The signals corresponding to the three additional sites completely disappear after `annealing' at 453 K for one minute. Based on the symmetry of the additional NQIs and their temperature dependencies, they are tentatively attributed to Frenkel pairs produced by recoil due to the emission of a prompt 5:694 MeV -ray following thermal neutron capture and reported by the nuclear probe in three different positions. These Frenkel pairs are stable up to at least 373 K.

  14. Low cost stable air electrode material for high temperature solid oxide electrolyte electrochemical cells

    DOEpatents

    Kuo, L.J.H.; Singh, P.; Ruka, R.J.; Vasilow, T.R.; Bratton, R.J.

    1997-11-11

    A low cost, lanthanide-substituted, dimensionally and thermally stable, gas permeable, electrically conductive, porous ceramic air electrode composition of lanthanide-substituted doped lanthanum manganite is provided which is used as the cathode in high temperature, solid oxide electrolyte fuel cells and generators. The air electrode composition of this invention has a much lower fabrication cost as a result of using a lower cost lanthanide mixture, either a natural mixture or an unfinished lanthanide concentrate obtained from a natural mixture subjected to incomplete purification, as the raw material in place of part or all of the higher cost individual lanthanum. The mixed lanthanide primarily contains a mixture of at least La, Ce, Pr, and Nd, or at least La, Ce, Pr, Nd and Sm in its lanthanide content, but can also include minor amounts of other lanthanides and trace impurities. The use of lanthanides in place of some or all of the lanthanum also increases the dimensional stability of the air electrode. This low cost air electrode can be fabricated as a cathode for use in high temperature, solid oxide fuel cells and generators. 4 figs.

  15. Hyper-stable organo-EuIII luminophore under high temperature for photo-industrial application

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Ayako; Nakanishi, Takayuki; Kitagawa, Yuichi; Seki, Tomohiro; Ito, Hajime; Fushimi, Koji; Hasegawa, Yasuchika

    2016-01-01

    Novel organo-EuIII luminophores, Eu(hfa)x(CPO)y and Eu(hfa)x(TCPO)y (hfa: hexafluoroacetylacetonate, CPO: 4-carboxyphenyl diphenyl phosphine oxide, TCPO: 4,4′,4″-tricarboxyphenyl phosphine oxide), were synthesized by the complexation of EuIII ions with hfa moieties and CPO or TCPO ligands. The thermal and luminescent stabilities of the luminophores are extremely high. The decomposition temperature of Eu(hfa)x(CPO)y and Eu(hfa)x(TCPO)y were determined as 200 and 450 °C, respectively. The luminescence of Eu(hfa)x(TCPO)y under UV light irradiation was observed even at a high temperature, 400 °C. The luminescent properties of Eu(hfa)x(CPO)y and Eu(hfa)x(TCPO)y were estimated from emission spectra, quantum yields and lifetime measurements. The energy transfer efficiency from hfa moieties to EuIII ions in Eu(hfa)x(TCPO)y was 59%. The photosensitized luminescence of hyper-stable Eu(hfa)x(TCPO)y at 400 °C is demonstrated for future photonic applications. PMID:27074731

  16. Low cost stable air electrode material for high temperature solid oxide electrolyte electrochemical cells

    DOEpatents

    Kuo, Lewis J. H.; Singh, Prabhakar; Ruka, Roswell J.; Vasilow, Theodore R.; Bratton, Raymond J.

    1997-01-01

    A low cost, lanthanide-substituted, dimensionally and thermally stable, gas permeable, electrically conductive, porous ceramic air electrode composition of lanthanide-substituted doped lanthanum manganite is provided which is used as the cathode in high temperature, solid oxide electrolyte fuel cells and generators. The air electrode composition of this invention has a much lower fabrication cost as a result of using a lower cost lanthanide mixture, either a natural mixture or an unfinished lanthanide concentrate obtained from a natural mixture subjected to incomplete purification, as the raw material in place of part or all of the higher cost individual lanthanum. The mixed lanthanide primarily contains a mixture of at least La, Ce, Pr, and Nd, or at least La, Ce, Pr, Nd and Sm in its lanthanide content, but can also include minor amounts of other lanthanides and trace impurities. The use of lanthanides in place of some or all of the lanthanum also increases the dimensional stability of the air electrode. This low cost air electrode can be fabricated as a cathode for use in high temperature, solid oxide fuel cells and generators.

  17. Laboratory investigation of a thermally stable boundary layer subject to a step change in wall temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Buren, Tyler; Williams, Owen J.; Smits, Alexander J.

    2014-11-01

    Thermally stable boundary layers with a step change in boundary condition are seen in industrial applications (e.g. plate heat exchangers) as well as in nature (e.g. onshore breezes). Previous studies indicate that bulk indicators of stability are often insufficient to describe the local state of turbulence because the local flow strongly depends on its upstream history. Experiments were conducted to gain further insight into these flows. A low-speed wind tunnel was used to generate a rough-wall boundary layer at up to Reθ = 1500 . After a development length of approximately 22 δ , the downstream half of the tunnel wall was heated, creating a step change in wall temperature of up to 135° C . Particle image velocimetry and a thermocouple rake were used to measure the fluctuating velocity field and mean temperature profile at three locations downstream of the step change. We examine the rate of growth of the internal boundary layer and the corresponding evolution of the turbulent stresses in relation to changes in mean local stratification. This work was supported by the Princeton University Cooperative Institute for Climate Science.

  18. Hyper-stable organo-EuIII luminophore under high temperature for photo-industrial application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Ayako; Nakanishi, Takayuki; Kitagawa, Yuichi; Seki, Tomohiro; Ito, Hajime; Fushimi, Koji; Hasegawa, Yasuchika

    2016-04-01

    Novel organo-EuIII luminophores, Eu(hfa)x(CPO)y and Eu(hfa)x(TCPO)y (hfa: hexafluoroacetylacetonate, CPO: 4-carboxyphenyl diphenyl phosphine oxide, TCPO: 4,4‧,4″-tricarboxyphenyl phosphine oxide), were synthesized by the complexation of EuIII ions with hfa moieties and CPO or TCPO ligands. The thermal and luminescent stabilities of the luminophores are extremely high. The decomposition temperature of Eu(hfa)x(CPO)y and Eu(hfa)x(TCPO)y were determined as 200 and 450 °C, respectively. The luminescence of Eu(hfa)x(TCPO)y under UV light irradiation was observed even at a high temperature, 400 °C. The luminescent properties of Eu(hfa)x(CPO)y and Eu(hfa)x(TCPO)y were estimated from emission spectra, quantum yields and lifetime measurements. The energy transfer efficiency from hfa moieties to EuIII ions in Eu(hfa)x(TCPO)y was 59%. The photosensitized luminescence of hyper-stable Eu(hfa)x(TCPO)y at 400 °C is demonstrated for future photonic applications.

  19. STABLE HIGH CONDUCTIVITY BILAYERED ELECTROLYTES FOR LOW TEMPERATURE SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELLS

    SciTech Connect

    Eric D. Wachsman; Keith L. Duncan

    2002-03-31

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are the future of energy production in America. They offer great promise as a clean and efficient process for directly converting chemical energy to electricity while providing significant environmental benefits (they produce negligible hydrocarbons, CO, or NO{sub x} and, as a result of their high efficiency, produce about one-third less CO{sub 2} per kilowatt hour than internal combustion engines). Unfortunately, the current SOFC technology, based on a stabilized zirconia electrolyte, must operate in the region of 1000 C to avoid unacceptably high ohmic losses. These high temperatures demand (a) specialized (expensive) materials for the fuel cell interconnects and insulation, (b) time to heat up to the operating temperature and (c) energy input to arrive at the operating temperature. Therefore, if fuel cells could be designed to give a reasonable power output at low to intermediate temperatures tremendous benefits may be accrued. At low temperatures, in particular, it becomes feasible to use ferritic steel for interconnects instead of expensive and brittle ceramic materials such as those based on LaCrO{sub 3}. In addition, sealing the fuel cell becomes easier and more reliable; rapid startup is facilitated; thermal stresses (e.g., those caused by thermal expansion mismatches) are reduced; radiative losses ({approx}T{sup 4}) become minimal; electrode sintering becomes negligible and (due to a smaller thermodynamic penalty) the SOFC operating cycle (heating from ambient) would be more efficient. Combined, all these improvements further result in reduced initial and operating costs. The problem is, at lower temperatures the conductivity of the conventional stabilized zirconia electrolyte decreases to the point where it cannot supply electrical current efficiently to an external load. The primary objectives of the proposed research is to develop a stable high conductivity (> 0.05 S cm{sup -1} at {le} 550 C) electrolyte for lower

  20. Instrument for stable high temperature Seebeck coefficient and resistivity measurements under controlled oxygen partial pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Ihlefeld, Jon F.; Brown-Shaklee, Harlan James; Sharma, Peter Anand

    2015-04-28

    The transport properties of ceramic materials strongly depend on oxygen activity, which is tuned by changing the partial oxygen pressure (pO2) prior to and during measurement. Within, we describe an instrument for highly stable measurements of Seebeck coefficient and electrical resistivity at temperatures up to 1300 K with controlled oxygen partial pressure. An all platinum construction is used to avoid potential materials instabilities that can cause measurement drift. Two independent heaters are employed to establish a small temperature gradient for Seebeck measurements, while keeping the average temperature constant and avoiding errors associated with pO2-induced drifts in thermocouple readings. Oxygen equilibrium is monitored using both an O2 sensor and the transient behavior of the resistance as a proxy. A pO2 range of 10-25–100 atm can be established with appropriate gas mixtures. Seebeck measurements were calibrated against a high purity platinum wire, Pt/Pt–Rh thermocouple wire, and a Bi2Te3 Seebeck coefficient Standard Reference Material. To demonstrate the utility of this instrument for oxide materials we present measurements as a function of pO2 on a 1 % Nb-doped SrTiO3 single crystal, and show systematic changes in properties consistent with oxygen vacancy defect chemistry. Thus, an approximately 11% increase in power factor over a pO2 range of 10-19–10-8 atm at 973 K for the donor-doped single crystals is observed.

  1. Instrument for stable high temperature Seebeck coefficient and resistivity measurements under controlled oxygen partial pressure

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ihlefeld, Jon F.; Brown-Shaklee, Harlan James; Sharma, Peter Anand

    2015-04-28

    The transport properties of ceramic materials strongly depend on oxygen activity, which is tuned by changing the partial oxygen pressure (pO2) prior to and during measurement. Within, we describe an instrument for highly stable measurements of Seebeck coefficient and electrical resistivity at temperatures up to 1300 K with controlled oxygen partial pressure. An all platinum construction is used to avoid potential materials instabilities that can cause measurement drift. Two independent heaters are employed to establish a small temperature gradient for Seebeck measurements, while keeping the average temperature constant and avoiding errors associated with pO2-induced drifts in thermocouple readings. Oxygen equilibriummore » is monitored using both an O2 sensor and the transient behavior of the resistance as a proxy. A pO2 range of 10-25–100 atm can be established with appropriate gas mixtures. Seebeck measurements were calibrated against a high purity platinum wire, Pt/Pt–Rh thermocouple wire, and a Bi2Te3 Seebeck coefficient Standard Reference Material. To demonstrate the utility of this instrument for oxide materials we present measurements as a function of pO2 on a 1 % Nb-doped SrTiO3 single crystal, and show systematic changes in properties consistent with oxygen vacancy defect chemistry. Thus, an approximately 11% increase in power factor over a pO2 range of 10-19–10-8 atm at 973 K for the donor-doped single crystals is observed.« less

  2. Immobilization of actinides in stable mineral type and ceramic materials (high temperature synthesis)

    SciTech Connect

    Starkov, O.; Konovalov, E.

    1996-05-01

    Alternative vitrification technologies are being developed in the world for the immobilization of high radioactive waste in materials with improved thermodynamic stability, as well as improved chemical and thermal stability and stability to radiation. Oxides, synthesized in the form of analogs to rock-forming minerals and ceramics, are among those materials that have highly stable properties and are compatible with the environment. In choosing the appropriate material, we need to be guided by its geometric stability, the minimal number of cations in the structure of the material and the presence of structural elements in the mineral that are isomorphs of uranium and thorium, actinoids found in nature. Rare earth elements, yttrium, zirconium and calcium are therefore suitable. The minerals listed in the table (with the exception of the zircon) are pegatites by origin, i.e. they are formed towards the end of the magma crystallization of silicates form the residual melt, enriched with Ta, Nb, Ti, Zr, Ce, Y, U and Th. Uranium and thorium in the form of isomorphic admixtures form part of the lattice of the mineral. These minerals, which are rather simple in composition and structure and are formed under high temperatures, may be viewed as natural physio-chemical systems that are stable and long-lived in natural environments. The similarity of the properties of actinoids and lanthanoids plays an important role in the geochemistry of uranium and thorium; however, uranium (IV) is closer to the {open_quotes}heavy{close_quotes} group of lanthanoids (the yttrium group) while thorium (IV) is closer to the {open_quotes}light{close_quotes} group (the cerium group). That is why rare earth minerals contain uranium and thorium in the form of isomorphic admixtures.

  3. A method for achieving monotonic frequency-temperature response for langasite surface-acoustic-wave high-temperature sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaoming, Bao; Yabing, Ke; Yanqing, Zheng; Lina, Cheng; Honglang, Li

    2016-02-01

    To achieve the monotonic frequency-temperature response for a high-temperature langasite (LGS) surface-acoustic-wave (SAW) sensor in a wide temperature range, a method utilizing two substrate cuts with different propagation angles on the same substrate plane was proposed. In this method, the theory of effective permittivity is adopted to calculate the temperature coefficients of frequency (TCF), electromechanical coupling coefficients (k2), and power flow angle (PFA) for different propagation angles on the same substrate plane, and then the two substrate cuts were chosen to have large k2 and small PFA, as well as the difference in their TCFs (ΔTCF) to always have the same sign of their values. The Z-cut LGS substrate plane was taken as an example, and the two suitable substrate cuts with propagation angles of 74 and 80° were chosen to derive a monotonic frequency-temperature response for LGS SAW sensors at -50 to 540 °C. Experiments on a LGS SAW sensor using the above two substrate cuts were designed, and its measured frequency-temperature response at -50 to 540 °C agreed well with the theory, demonstrating the high accuracy of the proposed method.

  4. Characterizing Groundwater Flowpaths with Fiber-Optic Distributed Temperature Sensing and Stable Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peri, L.; Gryczkowski, L.; Zheng, Y.; Liu, J.; Wang, S.; Wu, B.; Yao, Y.; Huang, X.; Wei, H.; Liu, C.; Hu, Y.; Wu, X.; Yu, L.

    2012-12-01

    The Heihe River basin of Northern China experiences high demand for scarce water. The upper watershed consists of alpine mountains and glaciers while the lower watershed is the arid Gobi Desert. The middle basin is important for agriculture production and has an extensive network of irrigation canals that reduce flow in the Heihe River. The lower watershed therefore receives reduced flow which is impacting fragile desert environments. Sustainably managing water resources in the basin while allowing for continued agriculture requires enhanced understanding of watershed function and behavior. A hydrologic model is being developed of the middle basin to help address these issues. The identification of groundwater and surface water interactions is an important component for an accurate model. Fiber-optic Distributed Temperature Sensing (DTS) is being used in 2012 to help identify these processes. Stable isotope differences (deuterium and O-18) are also being used in areas of potential groundwater discharge identified by DTS to improve understanding of flowpaths within the watershed. This interactive study promotes future sustainable water resource management to restore desert ecosystems.

  5. Cu-Cu direct bonding achieved by surface method at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utsumi, Jun; Ichiyanagi, Yuko

    2014-02-01

    The metal bonding is a key technology in the processes for the microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) devices and the semiconductor devices to improve functionality and higher density integration. Strong adhesion between surfaces at the atomic level is crucial; however, it is difficult to achieve close bonding in such a system. Cu films were deposited on Si substrates by vacuum deposition, and then, two Cu films were bonded directly by means of surface activated bonding (SAB) at room temperature. The two Cu films, with the surface roughness Ra about 1.3nm, were bonded by using SAB at room temperature, however, the bonding strength was very weak in this method. In order to improve the bonding strength between the Cu films, samples were annealed at low temperatures, between 323 and 473 K, in air. As the result, the Cu-Cu bonding strength was 10 times higher than that of the original samples without annealing.

  6. Cu-Cu direct bonding achieved by surface method at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Utsumi, Jun; Ichiyanagi, Yuko

    2014-02-20

    The metal bonding is a key technology in the processes for the microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) devices and the semiconductor devices to improve functionality and higher density integration. Strong adhesion between surfaces at the atomic level is crucial; however, it is difficult to achieve close bonding in such a system. Cu films were deposited on Si substrates by vacuum deposition, and then, two Cu films were bonded directly by means of surface activated bonding (SAB) at room temperature. The two Cu films, with the surface roughness Ra about 1.3nm, were bonded by using SAB at room temperature, however, the bonding strength was very weak in this method. In order to improve the bonding strength between the Cu films, samples were annealed at low temperatures, between 323 and 473 K, in air. As the result, the Cu-Cu bonding strength was 10 times higher than that of the original samples without annealing.

  7. Achievement of high nuclear spin polarization using lanthanides as low-temperature NMR relaxation agents.

    PubMed

    Peat, David T; Horsewill, Anthony J; Köckenberger, Walter; Perez Linde, Angel J; Gadian, David G; Owers-Bradley, John R

    2013-05-28

    Many approaches are now available for achieving high levels of nuclear spin polarization. One of these methods is based on the notion that as the temperature is reduced, the equilibrium nuclear polarization will increase, according to the Boltzmann distribution. The main problem with this approach is the length of time it may take to approach thermal equilibrium at low temperatures, since nuclear relaxation times (characterized by the spin-lattice relaxation time T1) can become very long. Here, we show, by means of relaxation time measurements of frozen solutions, that selected lanthanide ions, in the form of their chelates with DTPA, can act as effective relaxation agents at low temperatures. Differential effects are seen with the different lanthanides that were tested, holmium and dysprosium showing highest relaxivity, while gadolinium is ineffective at temperatures of 20 K and below. These observations are consistent with the known electron-spin relaxation time characteristics of these lanthanides. The maximum relaxivity occurs at around 10 K for Ho-DTPA and 20 K for Dy-DTPA. Moreover, these two agents show only modest relaxivity at room temperature, and can thus be regarded as relaxation switches. We conclude that these agents can speed up solid state NMR experiments by reducing the T1 values of the relevant nuclei, and hence increasing the rate at which data can be acquired. They could also be of value in the context of a simple low-cost method of achieving several-hundred-fold improvements in polarization for experiments in which samples are pre-polarized at low temperatures, then rewarmed and dissolved immediately prior to analysis. PMID:23588269

  8. Black Phosphorus Based Field Effect Transistors with Simultaneously Achieved Near Ideal Subthreshold Swing and High Hole Mobility at Room Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xinke; Ang, Kah-Wee; Yu, Wenjie; He, Jiazhu; Feng, Xuewei; Liu, Qiang; Jiang, He; Dan Tang; Wen, Jiao; Lu, Youming; Liu, Wenjun; Cao, Peijiang; Han, Shun; Wu, Jing; Liu, Wenjun; Wang, Xi; Zhu, Deliang; He, Zhubing

    2016-04-01

    Black phosphorus (BP) has emerged as a promising two-dimensional (2D) material for next generation transistor applications due to its superior carrier transport properties. Among other issues, achieving reduced subthreshold swing and enhanced hole mobility simultaneously remains a challenge which requires careful optimization of the BP/gate oxide interface. Here, we report the realization of high performance BP transistors integrated with HfO2 high-k gate dielectric using a low temperature CMOS process. The fabricated devices were shown to demonstrate a near ideal subthreshold swing (SS) of ~69 mV/dec and a room temperature hole mobility of exceeding >400 cm2/Vs. These figure-of-merits are benchmarked to be the best-of-its-kind, which outperform previously reported BP transistors realized on traditional SiO2 gate dielectric. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis further reveals the evidence of a more chemically stable BP when formed on HfO2 high-k as opposed to SiO2, which gives rise to a better interface quality that accounts for the SS and hole mobility improvement. These results unveil the potential of black phosphorus as an emerging channel material for future nanoelectronic device applications.

  9. Black Phosphorus Based Field Effect Transistors with Simultaneously Achieved Near Ideal Subthreshold Swing and High Hole Mobility at Room Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xinke; Ang, Kah-Wee; Yu, Wenjie; He, Jiazhu; Feng, Xuewei; Liu, Qiang; Jiang, He; Dan Tang; Wen, Jiao; Lu, Youming; Liu, Wenjun; Cao, Peijiang; Han, Shun; Wu, Jing; Liu, Wenjun; Wang, Xi; Zhu, Deliang; He, Zhubing

    2016-01-01

    Black phosphorus (BP) has emerged as a promising two-dimensional (2D) material for next generation transistor applications due to its superior carrier transport properties. Among other issues, achieving reduced subthreshold swing and enhanced hole mobility simultaneously remains a challenge which requires careful optimization of the BP/gate oxide interface. Here, we report the realization of high performance BP transistors integrated with HfO2 high-k gate dielectric using a low temperature CMOS process. The fabricated devices were shown to demonstrate a near ideal subthreshold swing (SS) of ~69 mV/dec and a room temperature hole mobility of exceeding >400 cm2/Vs. These figure-of-merits are benchmarked to be the best-of-its-kind, which outperform previously reported BP transistors realized on traditional SiO2 gate dielectric. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis further reveals the evidence of a more chemically stable BP when formed on HfO2 high-k as opposed to SiO2, which gives rise to a better interface quality that accounts for the SS and hole mobility improvement. These results unveil the potential of black phosphorus as an emerging channel material for future nanoelectronic device applications. PMID:27102711

  10. Black Phosphorus Based Field Effect Transistors with Simultaneously Achieved Near Ideal Subthreshold Swing and High Hole Mobility at Room Temperature.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinke; Ang, Kah-Wee; Yu, Wenjie; He, Jiazhu; Feng, Xuewei; Liu, Qiang; Jiang, He; Dan Tang; Wen, Jiao; Lu, Youming; Liu, Wenjun; Cao, Peijiang; Han, Shun; Wu, Jing; Liu, Wenjun; Wang, Xi; Zhu, Deliang; He, Zhubing

    2016-01-01

    Black phosphorus (BP) has emerged as a promising two-dimensional (2D) material for next generation transistor applications due to its superior carrier transport properties. Among other issues, achieving reduced subthreshold swing and enhanced hole mobility simultaneously remains a challenge which requires careful optimization of the BP/gate oxide interface. Here, we report the realization of high performance BP transistors integrated with HfO2 high-k gate dielectric using a low temperature CMOS process. The fabricated devices were shown to demonstrate a near ideal subthreshold swing (SS) of ~69 mV/dec and a room temperature hole mobility of exceeding >400 cm(2)/Vs. These figure-of-merits are benchmarked to be the best-of-its-kind, which outperform previously reported BP transistors realized on traditional SiO2 gate dielectric. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis further reveals the evidence of a more chemically stable BP when formed on HfO2 high-k as opposed to SiO2, which gives rise to a better interface quality that accounts for the SS and hole mobility improvement. These results unveil the potential of black phosphorus as an emerging channel material for future nanoelectronic device applications. PMID:27102711

  11. Mixed salts of LiTFSI and LiBOB for stable LiFePO4-based batteries at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xilin; Xu, Wu; Engelhard, Mark H.; Zheng, Jianming; Zhang, Yaohui; Ding, Fei; Qian, Jiangfeng; Zhang, Ji-Guang

    2014-01-01

    To achieve stable long-term cycling stability at elevated temperatures, mixed salts of LiTFSI and LiBOB are used to replace LiPF6 salt in non-aqueous electrolytes for LiFePO4-based batteries. It is found that adding LiBOB in LiTFSI-based electrolytes effectively prevents the severe corrosion to Al current collectors that often is observed in LiTFSI-based electrolytes, which have high thermal stability. The cells using LiTFSI-LiBOB-based electrolytes demonstrate superior high temperature (60 °C) stability and very similar room temperature performance (i.e., cycling stability and rate capability) when compared to cells using the LiPF6-based electrolyte.

  12. A new method for achieving enhanced dielectric response over a wide temperature range

    PubMed Central

    Maurya, Deepam; Sun, Fu-Chang; Pamir Alpay, S.; Priya, Shashank

    2015-01-01

    We report a novel approach for achieving high dielectric response over a wide temperature range. In this approach, multilayer ceramic heterostructures with constituent compositions having strategically tuned Curie points (TC) were designed and integrated with varying electrical connectivity. Interestingly, these multilayer structures exhibited different dielectric behavior in series and parallel configuration due to variations in electrical boundary conditions resulting in the differences in the strength of the electrostatic coupling. The results are explained using nonlinear thermodynamic model taking into account electrostatic interlayer interaction. We believe that present work will have huge significance in design of high performance ceramic capacitors. PMID:26477391

  13. A new method for achieving enhanced dielectric response over a wide temperature range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurya, Deepam; Sun, Fu-Chang; Pamir Alpay, S.; Priya, Shashank

    2015-10-01

    We report a novel approach for achieving high dielectric response over a wide temperature range. In this approach, multilayer ceramic heterostructures with constituent compositions having strategically tuned Curie points (TC) were designed and integrated with varying electrical connectivity. Interestingly, these multilayer structures exhibited different dielectric behavior in series and parallel configuration due to variations in electrical boundary conditions resulting in the differences in the strength of the electrostatic coupling. The results are explained using nonlinear thermodynamic model taking into account electrostatic interlayer interaction. We believe that present work will have huge significance in design of high performance ceramic capacitors.

  14. A new method for achieving enhanced dielectric response over a wide temperature range

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Maurya, Deepam; Sun, Fu -Chang; Pamir Alpay, S.; Priya, Shashank

    2015-10-19

    We report a novel approach for achieving high dielectric response over a wide temperature range. In this approach, multilayer ceramic heterostructures with constituent compositions having strategically tuned Curie points (TC) were designed and integrated with varying electrical connectivity. Interestingly, these multilayer structures exhibited different dielectric behavior in series and parallel configuration due to variations in electrical boundary conditions resulting in the differences in the strength of the electrostatic coupling. The results are explained using nonlinear thermodynamic model taking into account electrostatic interlayer interaction. We believe that present work will have huge significance in design of high performance ceramic capacitors.

  15. Effect of the sintering temperature and time on the structure and phase composition of temperature stable hard magnetic materials of the REM-Fe-Co-B system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davydova, E. A.; Piskorskii, V. P.; Moiseeva, N. S.; Chabina, E. B.

    2015-11-01

    The structure, the phase composition, and the distribution of alloying elements in the structure of temperature stable hard magnetic materials of the REM-Fe-Co-B system (REM = rare-earth metals), which are prepared under different manufacturing conditions, namely, at different sintering temperatures and times, have been studied. The phase composition, the local chemical composition of phases, the volume fraction of pores, and the manufacturing conditions that allow one to prepare the structure ensuring high magnetic properties have been determined.

  16. Stable silylenes.

    PubMed

    Haaf, M; Schmedake, T A; West, R

    2000-10-01

    The field of stable silylene research has grown dramatically since the first isolation of a stable silylene in 1994. Prior to 1994, silylenes existed only as reactive intermediates, isolable only in low-temperature matrixes. Since then, several stable silylenes have been synthesized, some in fact showing remarkable thermal stability. This Account highlights the developments in stable silylene chemistry, including theoretical and experimental studies attempting to explain the remarkable stability of the silylenes as well as the rapidly expanding reaction chemistry of the stable silylenes. PMID:11041835

  17. Near-Surface Motion in the Nocturnal, Stable Boundary Layer Observed with Fibre-Optic Distributed Temperature Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeeman, Matthias J.; Selker, John S.; Thomas, Christoph K.

    2015-02-01

    The evolution of cold air layers near the surface was investigated for a night with stable conditions near the surface. Spatial air temperature observations at 276 co-located vertical profiles were made using high-resolution fibre-optic based distributed temperature sensing (DTS) in a quasi three-dimensional geometry oriented along a shallow depression in the landscape and analysed for patterns in near-surface flow. Temperature stratification was observed to be interrupted by transient temperature structures on the scale of metres for which the flow direction and velocity could be quantified. The high spatial resolution and large spatial domain of the DTS revealed temperature structures in a level of detail that exceeded the capability of traditional point observations of air temperature at low wind speeds. Further, composition techniques were applied to describe wave-like motions in the opposite direction of the mean flow, at intervals of approximately 200 s (5 mHz). The DTS technique delivered tomography on a scale of tens of metres. The spatial observations at high spatial (fractions of a metre) and temporal (sec) resolution provided new opportunities for detection and quantification of surface-flow features and description of complicated scale interactions. High-resolution DTS is therefore a valuable addition to experimental research on stable and weak-wind boundary layers near the surface.

  18. Stable carbon isotope fractionation of six strongly fractionating microorganisms is not affected by growth temperature under laboratory conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penger, Jörn; Conrad, Ralf; Blaser, Martin

    2014-09-01

    Temperature is the major driving force for many biological as well as chemical reactions and may impact the fractionation of stable carbon isotopes. Thus, a good correlation between temperature and fractionation is observed in many chemical systems that are controlled by an equilibrium isotope effect. In contrast, biological systems that are usually controlled by a kinetic isotope effect are less well studied with respect to temperature effects and have shown contrasting results. We studied three different biological pathways (methylotrophic methanogenesis, hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis, acetogenesis by the acetyl-CoA pathway) which are characterized by very strong carbon isotope enrichment factors (-50‰ to -83‰). The microorganisms (Methanosarcina barkeri, Methanosarcina acetivorans, Methanolobus zinderi, Methanothermobacter marburgensis, Methanothermobacter thermoautotrophicus, Thermoanaerobacter kivui) exhibiting these pathways were grown at different temperatures ranging between 25 and 68 °C, and the fractionation factors were determined from 13C/12C isotope discrimination during substrate depletion and product formation. Our experiments showed that the fractionation factors were different for the different metabolic pathways but were not much affected by the different growth temperatures. Slight variations were well within the standard errors of replication and regression analysis. Our results showed that temperature had no significant effect on the fractionation of stable carbon isotopes during anaerobic microbial metabolism with relatively strong isotope fractionation.

  19. Ambient and high-temperature stable fracture tests in ceramics: Applications to yttria-partially-stabilized zirconia

    SciTech Connect

    Pastor, J.Y.; Planas, J.; Elices, M. . Dept. de Ciencia de Materiales Ciudad Univ., Madrid . ETS de Ingenieros de Caminos)

    1993-11-01

    A new technique that provides stable fracture tests in brittle ceramic materials at room and at high temperature is presented. This technique uses the crack mouth opening displacement signal from a laser extensometer to feed the servo control of a hydraulic testing machine. In this way it is possible to obtain--in addition to the fracture toughness--the fracture energy and the R-curve, in a single test.

  20. Bulk and stable isotopic compositions of carbonate minerals in Martian meteorite Allan Hills 84001: no proof of high formation temperature.

    PubMed

    Treiman, A H; Romanek, C S

    1998-07-01

    Understanding the origin of carbonate minerals in the Martian meteorite Allan Hills (ALH) 84001 is crucial to evaluating the hypothesis that they contain traces of ancient Martian life. Using arguments based on chemical equilibria among carbonates and fluids, an origin at >650 degrees C (inimical to life) has been proposed. However, the bulk and stable isotopic compositions of the carbonate minerals are open to multiple interpretations and so lend no particular support to a high-temperature origin. Other methods (possibly less direct) will have to be used to determine the formation temperature of the carbonates in ALH84001. PMID:11543073

  1. Bulk and Stable Isotopic Compositions of Carbonate Minerals in Martian Meteorite Allan Hills 84001: No Proof of High Formation Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treiman, Allan H.; Romanek, Christopher S.

    1998-01-01

    Understanding the origin of carbonate minerals in the Martian meteorite Allan Hills (ALH) 84001 is crucial to evaluating the hypothesis that they contain traces of ancient Martian life. Using arguments based on chemical equilibria among carbonates and fluids, an origin at greater than 650 C (inimical to life) has been proposed. However, the bulk and stable isotopic compositions of the carbonate minerals are open to multiple interpretations and so lend no particular support to a high-temperature origin. Other methods (possibly less direct) will have to be used to determine the formation temperature of the carbonates in ALH 84001.

  2. Antarctic seawater temperature evaluation based on stable isotope measurements on Adamussium colbecki shells: kinetic effects vs. isotopic equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trevisiol, A.; Bergamasco, A.; Montagna, P.; Sprovieri, M.; Taviani, M.

    2013-10-01

    A year-long controlled growth experiment of 60 specimens of the Antarctic bivalve Adamussium colbecki was conducted in Terra Nova Bay (Ross Sea) to evaluate its reliability as a suitable archive of water mass properties. Nine shells were sub-sampled for stable oxygen and carbon isotope analysis to study the inter and intra specimen variations. Slow-growing A. colbecki precipitate their calcitic shells close to the expected oxygen and carbon isotopic equilibrium, whereas the fast-growing individuals are strongly influenced by biogenetic and kinetic effects. The equation of Kim and O'Neil (1997) is considered a fair approximation for the δ18O-temperature relationship in slow-growing individuals. The reconstructed temperature is closer to the mean experimental summer temperature than the annual one. This fact is interpreted as reflecting a possible winter decrease of shell growth, the salinity variation and the corrections for negative temperature on calibrating the δ18O-temperature relationship. Our results support the hypothesis that A. colbecki might represent a good archive for encoding Antarctic Shelf water summer temperature information. Further improvements in adopting A. colbecki as a paleotemperature archive will require the evaluation of the seasonal variability in shell growth rate through culturing slow-growing A. colbecki individuals at near-freezing temperatures to calibrate a species-specific δ18O-temperature equation.

  3. CFTR: Temperature-dependent cysteine reactivity suggests different stable conformers of the conduction pathway

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xuehong; Dawson, David C.

    2011-01-01

    Cysteine scanning has been widely used to identify pore-lining residues in mammalian ion channels, including the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). These studies, however, have been typically conducted at room temperature rather than human body temperature. Reports of substantial effects of temperature on gating and anion conduction in CFTR channels as well as an unexpected pattern of cysteine reactivity in the sixth transmembrane segment (TM6), prompted us to investigate the effect of temperature on the reactivity of cysteines engineered into TM6 of CFTR. We compared reaction rates at temperatures ranging from 22°C to 37°C for cysteines placed on either side of an apparent size-selective, accessibility barrier previously defined by comparing reactivity toward channel-permeant and channel-impermeant, thiol-directed reagents. The results indicate that reactivity of cysteines at three positions extracellular to the position of the accessibility barrier, 334, 336 and 337, is highly temperature dependent, such that at 37°C cysteines at these positions were highly reactive toward MTSES−, whereas at 22°C the reaction rates ranged from two to six-fold slower to undetectable. An activation energy of 157 kJ/mole for the reaction at 337 is consistent with the hypothesis that, at physiological temperature, the extracellular portion of the CFTR pore can adopt conformations that differ significantly from those accessible at room temperature. However, the position of the accessibility barrier defined empirically by applying channel-permeant and channel-impermeant reagents to the extracellular aspect of the pore is not altered. The results illuminate previous scanning results and indicate that assay temperature is a critical variable in studies designed to use chemical modification to test structural models for the CFTR anion conduction pathway. PMID:22014307

  4. Achievement of Prolonged Oxygen Detection in Room-Temperature Ionic Liquids on Mechanically Polished Platinum Screen-Printed Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Junqiao; Arrigan, Damien W M; Silvester, Debbie S

    2016-05-17

    The demonstration of prolonged amperometric detection of oxygen in room-temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) was achieved by the use of mechanical polishing to activate platinum screen-printed electrodes (Pt-SPEs). The RTILs studied were 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ([C2mim][NTf2]) and N-butyl-N-methyl-pyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ([C4mpyrr][NTf2]). It was found that voltammetry on polished Pt-SPEs exhibited less deterioration (in terms of voltammogram shapes, stability of peak currents, and appearance of contaminant peaks) from long-term consecutive cycling under 100% vol oxygen flow in both RTILs. The detection capability of these RTIL/Pt-SPE systems, initially subjected to long-term consecutive voltammetric cycling, was also investigated by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and long-term chronoamperometry (LTCA). Current versus concentration plots were linear on both unpolished and polished electrodes for 10-100% vol O2 (using CV) and 0.1-5% vol O2 (using LTCA). However, sensitivities and limits of detection (LODs) from CV were found to improve significantly on polished electrodes compared to unpolished electrodes, particularly in [C2mim][NTf2], but also moderately in [C4mpyrr][NTf2]. The lowest LODs (of ca. 0.1% vol O2) were found on polished SPEs using LTCA, with the most stable responses observed in [C4mpyrr][NTf2]. Calibration graphs could not be obtained on unpolished electrodes in both RTILs using LTCA. The results show that polishing markedly improves the analytical performances of Pt-SPEs for oxygen sensing in RTILs. The reusability of such disposable Pt-SPEs, after the surfaces had been experimentally fouled, was also demonstrated through the use of polishing. Mechanical polishing of Pt-SPE devices offers a viable approach to performance improvement for amperometric gas sensing. PMID:27063949

  5. Ultrathin titania coating for high-temperature stable SiO2/Pt nanocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Reddy, A Satyanarayana; Kim, Sunmi; Jeong, Hu Young; Jin, Sookyoung; Qadir, Kamran; Jung, Kyoungmin; Jung, Chan Ho; Yun, Jung Yeul; Cheon, Jae Yeong; Yang, Jun-Mo; Joo, Sang Hoon; Terasaki, Osamu; Park, Jeong Young

    2011-08-01

    The facile synthesis of silica supported platinum nanoparticles with ultrathin titania coating to enhance metal-support interactions suitable for high temperature reactions is reported, as thermal and structure stability of metal nanoparticles is important for catalytic reactions. PMID:21701753

  6. Enthalpy and high temperature relaxation kinetics of stable vapor-deposited glasses of toluene

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharya, Deepanjan; Sadtchenko, Vlad

    2014-09-07

    Stable non-crystalline toluene films of micrometer and nanometer thicknesses were grown by vapor deposition at distinct rates and probed by fast scanning calorimetry. Fast scanning calorimetry is shown to be extremely sensitive to the structure of the vapor-deposited phase and was used to characterize simultaneously its kinetic stability and its thermodynamic properties. According to our analysis, transformation of vapor-deposited samples of toluene during heating with rates in excess 10{sup 5} K s{sup −1} follows the zero-order kinetics. The transformation rate correlates strongly with the initial enthalpy of the sample, which increases with the deposition rate according to sub-linear law. Analysis of the transformation kinetics of vapor-deposited toluene films of various thicknesses reveal a sudden increase in the transformation rate for films thinner than 250 nm. The change in kinetics seems to correlate with the surface roughness scale of the substrate. The implications of these findings for the formation mechanism and structure of vapor-deposited stable glasses are discussed.

  7. Stable microwave radiometry system for long term monitoring of deep tissue temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stauffer, Paul R.; Rodriques, Dario B.; Salahi, Sara; Topsakal, Erdem; Oliveira, Tiago R.; Prakash, Aniruddh; D'Isidoro, Fabio; Reudink, Douglas; Snow, Brent W.; Maccarini, Paolo F.

    2013-02-01

    Background: There are numerous clinical applications for non-invasive monitoring of deep tissue temperature. We present the design and experimental performance of a miniature radiometric thermometry system for measuring volume average temperature of tissue regions located up to 5cm deep in the body. Methods: We constructed a miniature sensor consisting of EMI-shielded log spiral microstrip antenna with high gain onaxis and integrated high-sensitivity 1.35GHz total power radiometer with 500 MHz bandwidth. We tested performance of the radiometry system in both simulated and experimental multilayer phantom models of several intended clinical measurement sites: i) brown adipose tissue (BAT) depots within 2cm of the skin surface, ii) 3-5cm deep kidney, and iii) human brain underlying intact scalp and skull. The physical models included layers of circulating tissue-mimicking liquids controlled at different temperatures to characterize our ability to quantify small changes in target temperature at depth under normothermic surface tissues. Results: We report SAR patterns that characterize the sense region of a 2.6cm diameter receive antenna, and radiometric power measurements as a function of deep tissue temperature that quantify radiometer sensitivity. The data demonstrate: i) our ability to accurately track temperature rise in realistic tissue targets such as urine refluxed from prewarmed bladder into kidney, and 10°C drop in brain temperature underlying normothermic scalp and skull, and ii) long term accuracy and stability of +0.4°C over 4.5 hours as needed for monitoring core body temperature over extended surgery or monitoring effects of brown fat metabolism over an extended sleep/wake cycle. Conclusions: A non-invasive sensor consisting of 2.6cm diameter receive antenna and integral 1.35GHz total power radiometer has demonstrated sufficient sensitivity to track clinically significant changes in temperature of deep tissue targets underlying normothermic surface

  8. Stable Microwave Radiometry System for Long Term Monitoring of Deep Tissue Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Stauffer, Paul R.; Rodriques, Dario B.; Salahi, Sara; Topsakal, Erdem; Oliveira, Tiago R.; Prakash, Aniruddh; D'Isidoro, Fabio; Reudink, Douglas; Snow, Brent W.; Maccarini, Paolo F.

    2013-01-01

    Background There are numerous clinical applications for non-invasive monitoring of deep tissue temperature. We present the design and experimental performance of a miniature radiometric thermometry system for measuring volume average temperature of tissue regions located up to 5cm deep in the body. Methods We constructed a miniature sensor consisting of EMI-shielded log spiral microstrip antenna with high gain on-axis and integrated high-sensitivity 1.35GHz total power radiometer with 500 MHz bandwidth. We tested performance of the radiometry system in both simulated and experimental multilayer phantom models of several intended clinical measurement sites: i) brown adipose tissue (BAT) depots within 2cm of the skin surface, ii) 3–5cm deep kidney, and iii) human brain underlying intact scalp and skull. The physical models included layers of circulating tissue-mimicking liquids controlled at different temperatures to characterize our ability to quantify small changes in target temperature at depth under normothermic surface tissues. Results We report SAR patterns that characterize the sense region of a 2.6cm diameter receive antenna, and radiometric power measurements as a function of deep tissue temperature that quantify radiometer sensitivity. The data demonstrate: i) our ability to accurately track temperature rise in realistic tissue targets such as urine refluxed from prewarmed bladder into kidney, and 10°C drop in brain temperature underlying normothermic scalp and skull, and ii) long term accuracy and stability of ∓0.4°C over 4.5 hours as needed for monitoring core body temperature over extended surgery or monitoring effects of brown fat metabolism over an extended sleep/wake cycle. Conclusions A non-invasive sensor consisting of 2.6cm diameter receive antenna and integral 1.35GHz total power radiometer has demonstrated sufficient sensitivity to track clinically significant changes in temperature of deep tissue targets underlying normothermic surface

  9. Temperature-stable lithium niobate electro-optic Q-switch for improved cold performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jundt, Dieter H.

    2014-10-01

    Lithium niobate (LN) is commonly used as an electro optic (EO) Q-switch material in infrared targeting lasers because of its relatively low voltage requirements and low cost compared to other crystals. A common challenge is maintaining good performance at the sub-freezing temperatures often experienced during flight. Dropping to low temperature causes a pyro-electric charge buildup on the optical faces that leads to birefringence non-uniformity and depolarization resulting in poor hold-off and premature lasing. The most common solution has been to use radioactive americium to ionize the air around the crystal and bleed off the charge, but the radioactive material requires handling and disposal procedures that can be problematic. We have developed a superior solution that is now being implemented by multiple defense system suppliers. By applying a low level thermo-chemical reduction to the LN crystal optical faces we induce a small conductivity that allows pyro-charges to dissipate. As the material gets more heavily treated, the capacity to dissipate charges improves, but the corresponding optical absorption also increases, causing insertion loss. Even though typical high gain targeting laser systems can tolerate a few percent of added loss, the thermo-chemical processing needs to be carefully optimized. We describe the results of our process optimization to minimize the insertion loss while still giving effective charge dissipation. Treatment is performed at temperatures below 500°C and a conductivity layer less than 0.5mm in depth is created that is uniform across the optical aperture. Because the conductivity is thermally activated, the charge dissipation is less effective at low temperature, and characterization needs to be performed at cold temperatures. The trade-off between optical insertion loss and potential depolarization due to low temperature operation is discussed and experimental results on the temperature dependence of the dissipation time and the

  10. Role of Wind and Sea Surface Temperature Over Moisture Source Region in Determining the Stable Isotopic Ratios in Rainwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahul, P.; Ghosh, P.

    2012-12-01

    Rainwater stable isotope ratio is controlled by several factors such as distance from the coast, latitudinal location, altitudes, temperature and amount of rainfall (Dansgard 1964;Rozanski 1993). Amount of rainfall plays a significant role in controlling the distribution of stable isotopes especially in the tropics experiencing seasonal precipitation from monsoonal wind circulation. In recent years with more observations on rainfall stable isotopes being documented from tropical regions, the effect of parameters like wind, sea surface temperature, drop size distribution on stable isotopic composition of rainwater are better understood (Wright et al 2001;Vochon et al 2009; Rao et al 2006; Srivastava et al 2012). The isotopic compositions of 2010 ISMR (Indian Summer Monsoon Rainfall) from Bangalore, India along with a few other observations of similar kind retrieved from the literatures are studied for amount effect relationship. Bangalore region provide nice opportunity to understand the different monsoonal influence due to its location ( ~300 km ) from coastal boundaries in east and west. The air parcel back trajectories obtained from NOAA HYSPLIT shows Arabian Sea region as the prominent source of moisture for the rainfall occurring during Southwest Monsoon (SWM). In this study we investigated the role of Sea Surface temperature (SST) and wind conditions over the moisture source and its effect on the intra seasonal variability of rainfall isotopic composition recorded at Bangalore region. The isotope analysis of δ18O in rainwater during the Indian summer monsoon rainfall shows a range of values from 2.77‰ to -9.07‰ over a period covering June to September. The observations fail to establish any relationship between stable isotope ratio and rainfall amount. We observed that the temporal variability of SST and wind over Arabian Sea region having strong role in driving the isotopic composition of rainwater. The relationship between SST and isotope ratio is found

  11. Kinetic Fractionation Of Heavy Stable Isotopes At Earth Surface Temperatures: Complexity And Systematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, T.

    2003-04-01

    Many applications of heavy stable isotopes are aimed at the oceans, ground water and surface water. In these environments, Cr, Fe, Cu, Zn, Se, and Mo isotope variations have been observed, and in most cases are generated by kinetic isotope effects (KIE's). Whereas equilibrium isotope effects are thermodynamic quantities that are insensitive to reaction mechanisms, KIE's depend strongly on reaction mechanisms and conditions. For example, the rates of reactions, the speciation of dissolved elements, and transient effects can all greatly affect the sizes of KIE's. Accurate interpretations of measured heavy stable isotope variations thus depend on sufficient understanding of variability in KIE's. Complexity in KIE's arises when they are induced by reactions consisting of multiple reaction steps arranged in series and possibly with branches. Paradoxically, a reaction can have a small KIE even though a single step within it has a large KIE. The key to understanding this, as explained in the carbon and sulfur isotope literature, is to consider the sizes and isotopic compositions of the intermediate species between steps. Intermediates consumed by relatively fast steps have low concentrations and short residence times, and tend to become strongly enriched in heavier isotopes. This reduces the size of the overall KIE. However, this situation takes some time to be established, and in the very early stages of reactions, "start-up effects" may be observed, with anomalously large KIE's. In the face of such complexity, laboratory and field experiments are both needed to develop understanding of KIE systematics. Simple laboratory experiments provide insight into the likely dependence of KIE's on reaction mechanisms and conditions. More complex laboratory experiments (e.g., sediment microcosms) can mimic natural conditions somewhat and provide estimates of naturally relevant KIE's. Finally, in-situ measurement of KIE's in natural settings are needed to determine naturally relevant

  12. Stable room-temperature ferromagnetic phase at the FeRh(100) surface.

    PubMed

    Pressacco, Federico; Uhlίř, Vojtěch; Gatti, Matteo; Bendounan, Azzedine; Fullerton, Eric E; Sirotti, Fausto

    2016-01-01

    Interfaces and low dimensionality are sources of strong modifications of electronic, structural, and magnetic properties of materials. FeRh alloys are an excellent example because of the first-order phase transition taking place at ~400 K from an antiferromagnetic phase at room temperature to a high temperature ferromagnetic one. It is accompanied by a resistance change and volume expansion of about 1%. We have investigated the electronic and magnetic properties of FeRh(100) epitaxially grown on MgO by combining spectroscopies characterized by different probing depths, namely X-ray magnetic circular dichroism and photoelectron spectroscopy. We find that the symmetry breaking induced at the Rh-terminated surface stabilizes a surface ferromagnetic layer involving five planes of Fe and Rh atoms in the nominally antiferromagnetic phase at room temperature. First-principles calculations provide a microscopic description of the structural relaxation and the electron spin-density distribution that support the experimental findings. PMID:26935274

  13. Stable room-temperature ferromagnetic phase at the FeRh(100) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pressacco, Federico; Uhlίř, Vojtěch; Gatti, Matteo; Bendounan, Azzedine; Fullerton, Eric E.; Sirotti, Fausto

    2016-03-01

    Interfaces and low dimensionality are sources of strong modifications of electronic, structural, and magnetic properties of materials. FeRh alloys are an excellent example because of the first-order phase transition taking place at ~400 K from an antiferromagnetic phase at room temperature to a high temperature ferromagnetic one. It is accompanied by a resistance change and volume expansion of about 1%. We have investigated the electronic and magnetic properties of FeRh(100) epitaxially grown on MgO by combining spectroscopies characterized by different probing depths, namely X-ray magnetic circular dichroism and photoelectron spectroscopy. We find that the symmetry breaking induced at the Rh-terminated surface stabilizes a surface ferromagnetic layer involving five planes of Fe and Rh atoms in the nominally antiferromagnetic phase at room temperature. First-principles calculations provide a microscopic description of the structural relaxation and the electron spin-density distribution that support the experimental findings.

  14. Thermocouples of tantalum and rhenium alloys for more stable vacuum-high temperature performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, J. F. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    Thermocouples of the present invention provide stability and performance reliability in systems involving high temperatures and vacuums by employing a bimetallic thermocouple sensor wherein each metal of the sensor is selected from a group of metals comprising tantalum and rhenium and alloys containing only those two metals. The tantalum, rhenium thermocouple sensor alloys provide bare metal thermocouple sensors having advantageous vapor pressure compatibilities and performance characteristics. The compatibility and physical characteristics of the thermocouple sensor alloys of the present invention result in improved emf, temperature properties and thermocouple hot junction performance. The thermocouples formed of the tantalum, rhenium alloys exhibit reliability and performance stability in systems involving high temperatures and vacuums and are adaptable to space propulsion and power systems and nuclear environments.

  15. Precise and millidegree stable temperature control for fluorescence imaging: Application to phase transitions in lipid membranes

    PubMed Central

    Farkas, Elaine R.; Webb, Watt W.

    2010-01-01

    We present the design of a custom temperature-controlled chamber suitable for water or oil immersion fluorescence microscopy and its application to phase behavior in lipid bilayer vesicles. The apparatus is self-contained and portable, suitable for multiuser microscopy facilities. It offers a higher temperature resolution and stability than any comparable commercial apparatus, on the order of millidegrees. We demonstrate the utility of the system in the study of miscibility transitions in model membranes. The temperature-dependent phase behavior of model membrane systems that display liquid-ordered (Lo) phase coexistence with the liquid-disordered (Ld) phase is relevant to understanding the existence of heterogeneities in biological cell plasma membranes, ubiquitously termed “lipid rafts.” PMID:20886984

  16. Stable room-temperature ferromagnetic phase at the FeRh(100) surface

    PubMed Central

    Pressacco, Federico; Uhlίř, Vojtěch; Gatti, Matteo; Bendounan, Azzedine; Fullerton, Eric E.; Sirotti, Fausto

    2016-01-01

    Interfaces and low dimensionality are sources of strong modifications of electronic, structural, and magnetic properties of materials. FeRh alloys are an excellent example because of the first-order phase transition taking place at ~400 K from an antiferromagnetic phase at room temperature to a high temperature ferromagnetic one. It is accompanied by a resistance change and volume expansion of about 1%. We have investigated the electronic and magnetic properties of FeRh(100) epitaxially grown on MgO by combining spectroscopies characterized by different probing depths, namely X-ray magnetic circular dichroism and photoelectron spectroscopy. We find that the symmetry breaking induced at the Rh-terminated surface stabilizes a surface ferromagnetic layer involving five planes of Fe and Rh atoms in the nominally antiferromagnetic phase at room temperature. First-principles calculations provide a microscopic description of the structural relaxation and the electron spin-density distribution that support the experimental findings. PMID:26935274

  17. High-Q energy trapping of temperature-stable shear waves with Lamé cross-sectional polarization in a single crystal silicon waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabrizian, R.; Daruwalla, A.; Ayazi, F.

    2016-03-01

    A multi-port electrostatically driven silicon acoustic cavity is implemented that efficiently traps the energy of a temperature-stable eigen-mode with Lamé cross-sectional polarization. Dispersive behavior of propagating and evanescent guided waves in a ⟨100⟩-aligned single crystal silicon waveguide is used to engineer the acoustic energy distribution of a specific shear eigen-mode that is well known for its low temperature sensitivity when implemented in doped single crystal silicon. Such an acoustic energy trapping in the central region of the acoustic cavity geometry and far from substrate obviates the need for narrow tethers that are conventionally used for non-destructive and high quality factor (Q) energy suspension in MEMS resonators; therefore, the acoustically engineered waveguide can simultaneously serve as in-situ self-oven by passing large uniformly distributed DC currents through its body and without any concern about perturbing the mode shape or deforming narrow supports. Such a stable thermo-structural performance besides large turnover temperatures than can be realized in Lamé eigen-modes make this device suitable for implementation of ultra-stable oven-controlled oscillators. 78 MHz prototypes implemented in arsenic-doped single crystal silicon substrates with different resistivity are transduced by in- and out-of-plane narrow-gap capacitive ports, showing high Q of ˜43k. The low resistivity device shows an overall temperature-induced frequency drift of 200 ppm over the range of -20 °C to 80 °C, which is ˜15× smaller compared to overall frequency drift measured for the similar yet high resistivity device in the same temperature range. Furthermore, a frequency tuning of ˜2100 ppm is achieved in high resistivity device by passing 45 mA DC current through its body. Continuous operation of the device under such a self-ovenizing current over 10 days did not induce frequency instability or degradation in Q.

  18. Method of preparing high-temperature-stable thin-film resistors

    DOEpatents

    Raymond, Leonard S.

    1983-01-01

    A chemical vapor deposition method for manufacturing tungsten-silicide thin-film resistors of predetermined bulk resistivity and temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR). Gaseous compounds of tungsten and silicon are decomposed on a hot substrate to deposit a thin-film of tungsten-silicide. The TCR of the film is determined by the crystallinity of the grain structure, which is controlled by the temperature of deposition and the tungsten to silicon ratio. The bulk resistivity is determined by the tungsten to silicon ratio. Manipulation of the fabrication parameters allows for sensitive control of the properties of the resistor.

  19. Method of preparing high-temperature-stable thin-film resistors

    DOEpatents

    Raymond, L.S.

    1980-11-12

    A chemical vapor deposition method for manufacturing tungsten-silicide thin-film resistors of predetermined bulk resistivity and temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR) is disclosed. Gaseous compounds of tungsten and silicon are decomposed on a hot substrate to deposit a thin-film of tungsten-silicide. The TCR of the film is determined by the crystallinity of the grain structure, which is controlled by the temperature of deposition and the tungsten to silicon ratio. The bulk resistivity is determined by the tungsten to silicon ratio. Manipulation of the fabrication parameters allows for sensitive control of the properties of the resistor.

  20. Thermocouples of molybdenum and iridium alloys for more stable vacuum-high temperature performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, J. F. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    Thermocouples providing stability and performance reliability in systems involving high temperatures and vacuums by employing a bimetallic thermocouple sensor are described. Each metal of the sensor is selected from a group of metals comprising molybdenum and iridium and alloys containing only those two metals. The molybdenum, iridium thermocouple sensor alloys provide bare metal thermocouple sensors having advantageous vapor pressure compatibility and performance characteristics. The compatibility and physical characteristics of the thermocouple sensor alloys result in improved emf, temperature properties and thermocouple hot junction performance.

  1. Stable Isotope Composition of Carbonates Formed in Low-Temperature Terrestrial Environments as Martian Analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Socki, R. A.; Gibson, E. K., Jr.; Perry, E. C., Jr.; Galindo, C.; Golden, D. C.; Ming, D. W.; McKay, G. A.

    2004-03-01

    We report the C and O isotope composition of carbonate minerals that formed in two low-temperature environments. Results show an overall depletion of ^18O and ^13C as a function of the extent of meteoric diagenesis. These data are used as analogs to carbonates that have been found in ALH84001.

  2. Correlation between Pd metal thickness and thermally stable perpendicular magnetic anisotropy features in [Co/Pd]n multilayers at annealing temperatures up to 500 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Gwang Guk; Lee, Ja Bin; Yang, Seung Mo; Kim, Jae Hong; Chung, Woo Seong; Yoon, Kap Soo; Hong, Jin Pyo

    2015-02-01

    We examine highly stable perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) features of [Co/Pd]10 multilayers (MLs) versus Pd thickness at various ex-situ annealing temperatures. Thermally stable PMA characteristics were observed up to 500 °C, confirming the suitability of these systems for industrial applications at this temperature. Experimental observations suggest that the choice of equivalent Co and Pd layer thicknesses in a ML configuration ensures thermally stable PMA features, even at higher annealing temperatures. X-ray diffraction patterns and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy images were obtained to determine thickness, post-annealing PMA behavior, and to explore the structural features that govern these findings.

  3. Thermally Stable Ohmic Contacts on Silicon Carbide Developed for High- Temperature Sensors and Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okojie, Robert S.

    2001-01-01

    The NASA aerospace program, in particular, requires breakthrough instrumentation inside the combustion chambers of engines for the purpose of, among other things, improving computational fluid dynamics code validation and active engine behavioral control (combustion, flow, stall, and noise). This environment can be as high as 600 degrees Celsius, which is beyond the capability of silicon and gallium arsenide devices. Silicon-carbide- (SiC-) based devices appear to be the most technologically mature among wide-bandgap semiconductors with the proven capability to function at temperatures above 500 degrees Celsius. However, the contact metalization of SiC degrades severely beyond this temperature because of factors such as the interdiffusion between layers, oxidation of the contact, and compositional and microstructural changes at the metal/semiconductor interface. These mechanisms have been proven to be device killers. Very costly and weight-adding packaging schemes that include vacuum sealing are sometimes adopted as a solution.

  4. Temperature stable low loss PTFE/rutile composites using secondary polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajesh, S.; Murali, K. P.; Ratheesh, R.

    2011-07-01

    Rutile filled PTFE composites have been fabricated through Sigma Mixing, Extrusion, Calendering and Hot pressing (SMECH) process. Dielectric constant (\\varepsilonr') and loss tangent (tan δ) of filled composites at microwave frequency region were measured by waveguide cavity perturbation technique using a Vector Network Analyzer. The temperature coefficient of dielectric constant (tau_{\\varepsilonr'}) was measured in the 0-100°C temperature range. In order to tailor the temperature coefficient of dielectric constant of the composite, thermoplastic Poly (ether ether ketone) (PEEK) has been used as a secondary polymer. Flexible laminate having a dielectric constant, \\varepsilonr'˜10.4, loss tangent tan δ˜0.0045 and tau_{\\varepsilonr'}˜-40 ppm/K was realized in Polytetrafluroethylene (PTFE)/rutile composites with the addition of 8 wt% PEEK. The reduction in tau_{\\varepsilonr'} is mainly attributed to the positive tau_{\\varepsilonr'} of PEEK and increased interface region in the composites as a result of the PEEK addition.

  5. Stable room-temperature ferromagnetic phase at the FeRh(100) surface

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Pressacco, Federico; Uhlir, Vojtech; Gatti, Matteo; Bendounan, Azzedine; Fullerton, Eric E.; Sirotti, Fausto

    2016-03-03

    Interfaces and low dimensionality are sources of strong modifications of electronic, structural, and magnetic properties of materials. FeRh alloys are an excellent example because of the first-order phase transition taking place at ~400 K from an antiferromagnetic phase at room temperature to a high temperature ferromagnetic one. It is accompanied by a resistance change and volume expansion of about 1%. We have investigated the electronic and magnetic properties of FeRh(100) epitaxially grown on MgO by combining spectroscopies characterized by different probing depths, namely X-ray magnetic circular dichroism and photoelectron spectroscopy. Furthermore, we find that the symmetry breaking induced at themore » Rh-terminated surface stabilizes a surface ferromagnetic layer involving five planes of Fe and Rh atoms in the nominally antiferromagnetic phase at room temperature. First-principles calculations provide a microscopic description of the structural relaxation and the electron spin-density distribution that support the experimental findings.« less

  6. Observing the morphology of single-layered embedded silicon nanocrystals by using temperature-stable TEM membranes

    PubMed Central

    Hiller, Daniel; Laube, Jan; Zacharias, Margit; Kübel, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Summary We use high-temperature-stable silicon nitride membranes to investigate single layers of silicon nanocrystal ensembles by energy filtered transmission electron microscopy. The silicon nanocrystals are prepared from the precipitation of a silicon-rich oxynitride layer sandwiched between two SiO2 diffusion barriers and subjected to a high-temperature annealing. We find that such single layers are very sensitive to the annealing parameters and may lead to a significant loss of excess silicon. In addition, these ultrathin layers suffer from significant electron beam damage that needs to be minimized in order to image the pristine sample morphology. Finally we demonstrate how the silicon nanocrystal size distribution develops from a broad to a narrow log-normal distribution, when the initial precipitation layer thickness and stoichiometry are below a critical value. PMID:25977867

  7. Observing the morphology of single-layered embedded silicon nanocrystals by using temperature-stable TEM membranes.

    PubMed

    Gutsch, Sebastian; Hiller, Daniel; Laube, Jan; Zacharias, Margit; Kübel, Christian

    2015-01-01

    We use high-temperature-stable silicon nitride membranes to investigate single layers of silicon nanocrystal ensembles by energy filtered transmission electron microscopy. The silicon nanocrystals are prepared from the precipitation of a silicon-rich oxynitride layer sandwiched between two SiO2 diffusion barriers and subjected to a high-temperature annealing. We find that such single layers are very sensitive to the annealing parameters and may lead to a significant loss of excess silicon. In addition, these ultrathin layers suffer from significant electron beam damage that needs to be minimized in order to image the pristine sample morphology. Finally we demonstrate how the silicon nanocrystal size distribution develops from a broad to a narrow log-normal distribution, when the initial precipitation layer thickness and stoichiometry are below a critical value. PMID:25977867

  8. Seasonal variation of water level, water and soil temperature, chemistry, and stable isotopes in hyporheic zone of Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, W. H.; Lee, J. Y.

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of study was to evaluate interaction between groundwater and stream water in hyporheic zone using water level, water temperature, soil temperature, chemistry, and stable isotopes. We installed seven piezometers (IYHW1 to 7) in the streambed that across stream in every 10 m and in depth of 0.85 to 1.54 m, a device that measure stage level nearby IYHW1, and devices that measure soil temperature in every 10 cm down to 50 cm nearby each piezometer was installed. We monitored water level and water temperature every hour from automatic transducers at the piezometers and the stage level, and soil temperatures were monitored every two hours. We took samples from the hyporheic water, stream water, and nearby groundwater to analysis chemical and isotopic compositions. The water level difference between stream water and hyporheic waters indicated that groundwater was downwelling in wet season and upwelling in dry season. The groundwater temperature remained steady in different seasons, but the stream water represented a frequent fluctuation with large amplitude. The hyporheic waters and soil temperature represented intermediate variation characteristics. The chemical compositions were not able to indicate in interaction of groundwater and stream water because no distinctive difference in seasonal variation in waters. The quantity of isotopic compositions of oxygen and hydrogen determined from using mixing ratio indicated that downwelling in wet season and upwelling in dry season. This research was supported by Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Education (NRF-2011-0007232).

  9. Epoxide-functionalization of polyethyleneimine for synthesis of stable carbon dioxide adsorbent in temperature swing adsorption.

    PubMed

    Choi, Woosung; Min, Kyungmin; Kim, Chaehoon; Ko, Young Soo; Jeon, Jae Wan; Seo, Hwimin; Park, Yong-Ki; Choi, Minkee

    2016-01-01

    Amine-containing adsorbents have been extensively investigated for post-combustion carbon dioxide capture due to their ability to chemisorb low-concentration carbon dioxide from a wet flue gas. However, earlier studies have focused primarily on the carbon dioxide uptake of adsorbents, and have not demonstrated effective adsorbent regeneration and long-term stability under such conditions. Here, we report the versatile and scalable synthesis of a functionalized-polyethyleneimine (PEI)/silica adsorbent which simultaneously exhibits a large working capacity (2.2 mmol g(-1)) and long-term stability in a practical temperature swing adsorption process (regeneration under 100% carbon dioxide at 120 °C), enabling the separation of concentrated carbon dioxide. We demonstrate that the functionalization of PEI with 1,2-epoxybutane reduces the heat of adsorption and facilitates carbon dioxide desorption (>99%) during regeneration compared with unmodified PEI (76%). Moreover, the functionalization significantly improves long-term adsorbent stability over repeated temperature swing adsorption cycles due to the suppression of urea formation and oxidative amine degradation. PMID:27572662

  10. Temperature-stable polymeric fluid-loss reducer tolerant to high electrolyte contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Son, A.J.; Ballard, T.M.; Loftin, R.E.

    1987-09-01

    The suitability of a synthetic copolymer for drilling deep, hot wells was demonstrated through laboratory and field testing. The polymer provided fluid-loss control at 400/sup 0/F (204/sup 0/C) to clay-free saturated-salt laboratory muds and to low-solids, nondispersed field muds contaminated with drill solids and sodium and calcium salts. High-temperature/high-pressure (HTHP) filtrate was kept at less than or equal to 15 cm/sup 3//30 min after 400/sup 0/F (204/sup 0/C) heat-aging of a 19-lbm/gal (2277-kg/m/sup 3/) saturated-salt mud. Weighted (> 18-lbm/gal (>2157-kg/m/sup 3/)) potassium muds treated with the polymer showed heat stability and solids and green-cement tolerance. The polymer was successfully field-tested in two offshore wells where bottomhole temperatures (BHT's) reached 400/sup 0/F (204/sup 0/C) and salt and calcium chloride flows were encountered.

  11. Stable Isotope Composition of Carbonates Formed in Low-Temperature Terrestrial Environments as Martian Analogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Socki, Richard A.; Gibson, Everett K., Jr.; Perry, Eugene C., Jr.; Galindo, Charles; Golden, D. C.; Ming, Douglas W.; McKay, Gordon A.

    2004-01-01

    We examine the carbon and oxygen isotope composition of carbonate minerals that formed in two low-temperature terrestrial environments. Field locations were chosen to represent environments where microcrystalline carbonates (caliches) form. Samples include caliche crusts collected from the tsekel zone of N. Yucatan, Mexico, as well as carbonate mud from the edge of a near-by salt pan, representing both ancient and modern-precipitated carbonates. Additional field samples of surface-coating caliche were collected from two volcanic fields in Arizona. Preliminary results indicate that there is an overall depletion of 18O and 13C as a function of the extent of meteoric diagenesis. These data are used as terrestrial analogs to gauge whether carbonates that have been found within Martian meteorites could possibly have formed under these or similar conditions on Mars.

  12. Compact, temperature-stable multi-gigahertz passively modelocked semiconductor disk laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yan-Rong; Guoyu, He-Yang; Zhang, Peng; Tian, Jin-Rong

    2015-08-01

    We present a compact passively mode-locked semiconductor disk laser at 1045 nm. The gain chip without any post processing consists of 16 compressively strained InGaAs symmetrical step quantum wells in the active region. 3-GHz repetition rate, 4.9-ps pulse duration, and 30-mW average output power are obtained with 1.4 W of 808-nm incident pump power. The temperature stability of the laser is demonstrated to have an ideal shift rate of 0.035 nm/K of the lasing wavelength. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61177047) and the Key Project of the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61235010).

  13. The Influence of Temperature, pH, and Growth Rate on the Stable Isotope Composition of Calcite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watkins, J. M.; Hunt, J. D.; Ryerson, F. J.; DePaolo, D. J.

    2014-12-01

    The oxygen isotope composition of carbonate minerals varies with temperature as well as other environmental variables. For carbonates that precipitate slowly, under conditions that approach thermodynamic equilibrium, the temperature-dependence of 18O uptake is the dominant signal and the measured 18O content can be used as a paleotemperature proxy. In the more common case where carbonate minerals grow in a regime where they are not in isotopic equilibrium with their host solution, their stable isotope compositions are a convolution of the effects of multiple environmental variables. We present results from inorganic calcite growth experiments demonstrating the occurrence of non-equilibrium oxygen isotope effects that vary systematically with pH and crystal growth rate. We have developed an isotopic ion-by-ion crystal growth model that quantifies the competing roles of temperature, pH, and growth rate, and provides a general description of calcite-water oxygen isotope fractionation under non-equilibrium conditions. The model predicts that (1) there are both equilibrium and kinetic contributions to calcite oxygen isotopes at biogenic growth rates, (2) calcite does not inherit the stable isotopic composition of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), (3) for oxygen isotopes there is a kinetically controlled variation of about 1‰ per pH unit between pH=7.7 and 9.3 at constant growth rate for inorganic calcite as well as the foraminifera Orbulina universa, and (4) extreme light isotope enrichments in calcite in alkaline environments are likely due to disequilibrium among DIC species in aqueous solution. The experimental and modeling approaches can be extended to carbon isotope as well as clumped isotope uptake into calcite but additional data are needed to constrain the kinetic fractionation factors for carbon isotopes and doubly-substituted isotopologues. The results will be discussed in the context of separating the relative influence of inorganic and biologic processes

  14. Body temperature stability achieved by the large body mass of sea turtles.

    PubMed

    Sato, Katsufumi

    2014-10-15

    To investigate the thermal characteristics of large reptiles living in water, temperature data were continuously recorded from 16 free-ranging loggerhead turtles, Caretta caretta, during internesting periods using data loggers. Core body temperatures were 0.7-1.7°C higher than ambient water temperatures and were kept relatively constant. Unsteady numerical simulations using a spherical thermodynamic model provided mechanistic explanations for these phenomena, and the body temperature responses to fluctuating water temperature can be simply explained by a large body mass with a constant thermal diffusivity and a heat production rate rather than physiological thermoregulation. By contrast, body temperatures increased 2.6-5.1°C in 107-152 min during their emergences to nest on land. The estimated heat production rates on land were 7.4-10.5 times the calculated values in the sea. The theoretical prediction that temperature difference between body and water temperatures would increase according to the body size was confirmed by empirical data recorded from several species of sea turtles. Comparing previously reported data, the internesting intervals of leatherback, green and loggerhead turtles were shorter when the body temperatures were higher. Sea turtles seem to benefit from a passive thermoregulatory strategy, which depends primarily on the physical attributes of their large body masses. PMID:25147244

  15. Fe-O stable isotope pairs elucidate a high-temperature origin of Chilean iron oxide-apatite deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilenker, Laura D.; Simon, Adam C.; Reich, Martin; Lundstrom, Craig C.; Gajos, Norbert; Bindeman, Ilya; Barra, Fernando; Munizaga, Rodrigo

    2016-03-01

    Iron oxide-apatite (IOA) ore deposits occur globally and can host millions to billions of tons of Fe in addition to economic reserves of other metals such as rare earth elements, which are critical for the expected growth of technology and renewable energy resources. In this study, we pair the stable Fe and O isotope compositions of magnetite samples from several IOA deposits to constrain the source reservoir of these elements in IOAs. Since magnetite constitutes up to 90 modal% of many IOAs, identifying the source of Fe and O within the magnetite may elucidate high-temperature and/or lower-temperature processes responsible for their formation. Here, we focus on the world-class Los Colorados IOA in the Chilean iron belt (CIB), and present data for magnetite from other Fe oxide deposits in the CIB (El Laco, Mariela). We also report Fe and O isotopic values for other IOA deposits, including Mineville, New York (USA) and the type locale, Kiruna (Sweden). The ranges of Fe isotopic composition (δ56Fe, 56Fe/54Fe relative to IRMM-14) of magnetite from the Chilean deposits are: Los Colorados, δ56Fe (±2σ) = 0.08 ± 0.03‰ to 0.24 ± 0.08‰; El Laco, δ56Fe = 0.20 ± 0.03‰ to 0.53 ± 0.03‰; Mariela, δ56Fe = 0.13 ± 0.03‰. The O isotopic composition (δ18O, 18O/16O relative to VSMOW) of the same Chilean magnetite samples are: Los Colorados, δ18O (±2σ) = 1.92 ± 0.08‰ to 3.17 ± 0.03‰; El Laco, δ18O = 4.00 ± 0.10‰ to 4.34 ± 0.10‰; Mariela, δ18O = (1.48 ± 0.04‰). The δ18O and δ56Fe values for Kiruna magnetite yield an average of 1.76 ± 0.25‰ and 0.16 ± 0.07‰, respectively. The Fe and O isotope data from the Chilean IOAs fit unequivocally within the range of magnetite formed by high-temperature magmatic or magmatic-hydrothermal processes (i.e., δ56Fe 0.06-0.49‰ and δ18O = 1.0-4.5‰), consistent with a high-temperature origin for Chilean IOA deposits. Additionally, minimum formation temperatures calculated by using the measured Δ18O

  16. Temperature dependence of the stable carbon isotope composition of gas- and particle phase components of β-pinene ozonolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gensch, Iulia; Hohaus, Thorsten; Saathoff, Harald; Kammer, Beatrix; Laumer, Werner; Steitz, Bettina; Wegener, Robert; Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid

    2010-05-01

    The AIDA SOA09 campaign took place from 2-27 November 2009 in the AIDA aerosol and cloud simulation chamber of Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe with the goal to investigate mechanistic aspects of the ozonolysis of α- and β-pinene as well as the partitioning of semivolatile reaction products. Experiments were conducted in the temperature range between 243 K and 303 K at atmospheric pressure utilizing cyclohexane as OH scavenger. During all β-pinene experiments, gas-phase samples were collected in parallel with aerosol samples to subsequently analyze their stable carbon isotope composition. Compound specific carbon isotopic analysis was performed with a GC-IRMS system. From the temporal behaviour of the δ13C of β-pinene a kinetic isotope effect (KIE) of 1.00339 was derived, in agreement with literature data at 303 K. Furthermore, the KIE was found to intensify with decreasing temperature. Nopinone, the major oxidation product of β-pinene was found in both the gas- and particle phase. The temperature dependence of the isotopic fractionation of nopinone between the phases will be discussed together with possible applications of the results in atmospheric studies of secondary organic aerosol formation.

  17. High Temperature Stable Separator for Lithium Batteries Based on SiO2 and Hydroxypropyl Guar Gum

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Diogo Vieira; Loeffler, Nicholas; Kim, Guk-Tae; Passerini, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    A novel membrane based on silicon dioxide (SiO2) and hydroxypropyl guar gum (HPG) as binder is presented and tested as a separator for lithium-ion batteries. The separator is made with renewable and low cost materials and an environmentally friendly manufacturing processing using only water as solvent. The separator offers superior wettability and high electrolyte uptake due to the optimized porosity and the good affinity of SiO2 and guar gum microstructure towards organic liquid electrolytes. Additionally, the separator shows high thermal stability and no dimensional-shrinkage at high temperatures due to the use of the ceramic filler and the thermally stable natural polymer. The electrochemical tests show the good electrochemical stability of the separator in a wide range of potential, as well as its outstanding cycle performance. PMID:26512701

  18. Silanization of Low-Temperature-Plasma Synthesized Silicon Quantum Dots for Production of a Tunable, Stable, Colloidal Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, I. E.; Shircliff, R. A.; Macauley, C.; Smith, D. K.; Lee, B. G.; Agrawal, S.; Stradins, P.; Collins, R. T.

    2012-02-16

    We present a method for grafting silanes onto low-temperature-plasma synthesized silicon quantum dots. The resulting solution of dots is characterized with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy, and determined to be a colloidal suspension. The silane is attached at a single point on the quantum dot surface to avoid cross-linking and multilayer formation, and photoluminescence spectroscopy shows the colloidal suspension of dots is stable for over two months in air. The hydroxyl-terminated surfaces required for silanization are created by wet chemical etch, which can be used to tune the luminescence of the silicon dots in the green- to red-wavelength range. We find, however, that the wet etch cannot move the emission into the blue-wavelength range and discuss this observation in terms of the nature of etching process and origin of the emission. In addition, we discuss the photoluminescence quantum yield in the context of other passivation and synthetic techniques.

  19. Late Holocene stable-isotope based winter temperature records from ice wedges in the Northeast Siberian Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opel, Thomas; Meyer, Hanno; Laepple, Thomas; Dereviagin, Alexander Yu.

    2016-04-01

    The Arctic is currently undergoing an unprecedented warming. This highly dynamic response on changes in climate forcing and the global impact of the Arctic water, carbon and energy balances make the Arctic a key region to study past, recent and future climate changes. Recent proxy-based temperature reconstructions indicate a long-term cooling over the past about 8 millennia that is mainly related to a decrease in solar summer insolation and has been reversed only by the ongoing warming. Climate model results on the other hand show no significant change or even a slight warming over this period. This model-proxy data mismatch might be caused by a summer bias of the used climate proxies. Ice wedges may provide essential information on past winter temperatures for a comprehensive seasonal picture of Holocene Arctic climate variability. Polygonal ice wedges are a widespread permafrost feature in the Arctic tundra lowlands. Ice wedges form by the repeated filling of thermal contraction cracks with snow melt water, which quickly refreezes at subzero ground temperatures and forms ice veins. As the seasonality of frost cracking and infill is generally related to winter and spring, respectively, the isotopic composition of wedge ice is indicative of past climate conditions during the annual cold season (DJFMAM, hereafter referred to as winter). δ18O of ice is interpreted as proxy for regional surface air temperature. AMS radiocarbon dating of organic remains in ice-wedge samples provides age information to generate chronologies for single ice wedges as well as regionally stacked records with an up to centennial resolution. In this contribution we seek to summarize Holocene ice-wedge δ18O based temperature information from the Northeast Siberian Arctic. We strongly focus on own work in the Laptev Sea region but consider as well literature data from other regional study sites. We consider the stable-isotope composition of wedge ice, ice-wedge dating and chronological

  20. Thermal Signatures of Plasmonic Fano Interferences: Toward the Achievement of Nanolocalized Temperature Manipulation.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Christopher L; Bigelow, Nicholas W; Masiello, David J

    2014-04-17

    A consequence of thermal diffusion is that heat, even when applied to a localized region of space, has the tendency to produce a temperature change that is spatially uniform throughout a material with a thermal conductivity that is much larger than that of its environment. This implies that the degree of spatial correlation between the heat power supplied and the temperature change that it induces is likely to be small. Here, we show, via theory and simulation, that through a Fano interference, temperature changes can be both localized and controllably directed within certain plasmon-supporting metal nanoparticle assemblies. This occurs even when all particles are composed of the same material and contained within the same diffraction-limited spot. These anomalous thermal properties are compared and contrasted across three different nanosystems, the coupled nanorod-antenna, the heterorod dimer, and the nanocube on a substrate, known to support both spatial and spectral Fano interferences. We conclude that the presence of a Fano resonance is not sufficient by itself to induce a controllably nanolocalized temperature change. However, when present in a nanosystem of the right composition and morphology, temperature changes can be manipulated with nanoscale precision, despite thermal diffusion. PMID:26269978

  1. Monin-Obukhov similarity functions of the structure parameter of temperature and tke dissipation rate in the stable boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartogensis, O. K.; Debruin, H. A. R.

    2003-04-01

    Point source scintillometers have proven to be a good alternative method to obtain fluxes of heat and momentum in the stable boundary layer (SBL) (De Bruin et al., 2002 and Hartogensis et al, 2002). The main advantage over the traditional eddy-covariance method is that turbulent fluxes can be obtained over short averaging intervals (˜ 1 minute and less) and close to the surface (less than 1 m), which are necessary conditions for measuring the often non-stationary and shallow SBL. A disadvantage is that Monin-Obukhov similarity theory (MOST) has to be applied to determine fluxes of heat and momentum from the scintillometer measurements of the structure parameter of temperature, C_T^2, and the TKE dissipiation rate, ɛ, respectively. It is the objective of this study to re-evaluate the MOST functions that have been proposed in the literature so far. In this sense it corroborates on work by Businger and his contemporaries in the seventies and recent studies by Frenzen and Vogel (2001), and Pahlow et al. (2001). The found MOST relations are based on 20 Hz eddy-covariance data of several field experiments, collected with the same instrumentation. Data-sets are included of the CASES-99 experiment, which is unique for its wide stable-stability-range, the RAPID-99 experiment, which contains daytime stable conditions over an irrigated alfalfa field, and the MATADOR-2002 experiment, which took place in extreme dry conditions over bare soil. This study distinguishes itself from previous studies in that C_T^2 and ɛ are calculated over varying flux averaging intervals determined with ogives (Oncley et al, 1996) and multi-resolution decomposition (Vickers and Mahrt, 2003). These methods ensure that the averaging period are just long enough to include all turbulent flux, but at the same time are kept as short as possible to limit non-stationary influences. Special attention will be given to the behavior of the MOST function of ɛ, φ_ɛ, in the near neutral region. It is

  2. Acid-, water- and high-temperature-stable ruthenium complexes for the total catalytic deoxygenation of glycerol to propane.

    PubMed

    Taher, Deeb; Thibault, Michelle E; Di Mondo, Domenico; Jennings, Michael; Schlaf, Marcel

    2009-10-01

    The ruthenium aqua complexes [Ru(H(2)O)(2)(bipy)(2)](OTf)(2), [cis-Ru(6,6'-Cl(2)-bipy)(2)(OH(2))(2)](OTf)(2), [Ru(H(2)O)(2)(phen)(2)](OTf)(2), [Ru(H(2)O)(3)(2,2':6',2''-terpy)](OTf)(2) and [Ru(H(2)O)(3)(Phterpy)](OTf)(2) (bipy = 2,2'-bipyridine; OTf(-) = triflate; phen = phenanthroline; terpy = terpyridine; Phterpy = 4'-phenyl-2,2':6',2''-terpyridine) are water- and acid-stable catalysts for the hydrogenation of aldehydes and ketones in sulfolane solution. In the presence of HOS(O)(2)CF(3) (triflic acid) as a dehydration co-catalyst they directly convert 1,2-hexanediol to n-hexanol and hexane. The terpyridine complexes are stable and active as catalysts at temperatures > or = 250 degrees C and in either aqueous sulfolane solution or pure water convert glycerol into n-propanol and ultimately propane as the final reaction product in up to quantitative yield. For the terpy complexes the active catalyst is postulated to be a carbonyl species [(4'-R-2,2':6',2''-terpy)Ru(CO)(H(2)O)(2)](OTf)(2) (R = H, Ph) formed by the decarbonylation of aldehydes (hexanal for 1,2-hexanediol and 3-hydroxypropanal for glycerol) generated in the reaction mixture through acid-catalyzed dehydration. The structure of the dimeric complex [{(4'-phenyl-2,2':6',2''-terpy)Ru(CO)}(2)(mu-OCH(3))(2)](OTf)(2) has been determined by single crystal X-ray crystallography (Space group P1 (a = 8.2532(17); b = 12.858(3); c = 14.363(3) A; alpha = 64.38(3); beta = 77.26(3); gamma = 87.12(3) degrees, R = 4.36 %). PMID:19693757

  3. When ruthenia met titania: Achieving extraordinary catalytic activity at low temperature by nanostructuring of oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Graciani, J.; Stacchiola, D.; Yang, F.; Evans, J.; Vidal, A. B.; Rodriguez, J. A.; Sanz, J. F.

    2015-09-09

    Nanostructured RuOx/TiO2(110) catalysts have a remarkable catalytic activity for CO oxidation at temperatures in the range of 350–375 K. Furthermore, the RuO2(110) surface has no activity. The state-of-the-art DFT calculations indicate that the main reasons for such an impressive improvement in the catalytic activity are: (i) a decrease of the diffusion barrier of adsorbed O atoms by around 40%, from 1.07 eV in RuO2(110) to 0.66 eV in RuOx/TiO2(110), which explains the shift of the activity to lower temperatures and (ii) a lowering of the barrier by 20% for the association of adsorbed CO and O species to give CO2 (the main barrier for the CO oxidation reaction) passing from around 0.7 eV in RuO2(110) to 0.55 eV in RuOx/TiO2(110). We show that the catalytic properties of ruthenia are strongly modified when supported as nanostructures on titania, attaining higher activity at temperatures 100 K lower than that needed for pure ruthenia. As in other systems consisting of ceria nanostructures supported on titania, nanostructured ruthenia shows strongly modified properties compared to the pure oxide, consolidating the fact that the nanostructuring of oxides is a main way to attain higher catalytic activity at lower temperatures.

  4. When ruthenia met titania: Achieving extraordinary catalytic activity at low temperature by nanostructuring of oxides

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Graciani, J.; Stacchiola, D.; Yang, F.; Evans, J.; Vidal, A. B.; Rodriguez, J. A.; Sanz, J. F.

    2015-09-09

    Nanostructured RuOx/TiO2(110) catalysts have a remarkable catalytic activity for CO oxidation at temperatures in the range of 350–375 K. Furthermore, the RuO2(110) surface has no activity. The state-of-the-art DFT calculations indicate that the main reasons for such an impressive improvement in the catalytic activity are: (i) a decrease of the diffusion barrier of adsorbed O atoms by around 40%, from 1.07 eV in RuO2(110) to 0.66 eV in RuOx/TiO2(110), which explains the shift of the activity to lower temperatures and (ii) a lowering of the barrier by 20% for the association of adsorbed CO and O species to give CO2more » (the main barrier for the CO oxidation reaction) passing from around 0.7 eV in RuO2(110) to 0.55 eV in RuOx/TiO2(110). We show that the catalytic properties of ruthenia are strongly modified when supported as nanostructures on titania, attaining higher activity at temperatures 100 K lower than that needed for pure ruthenia. As in other systems consisting of ceria nanostructures supported on titania, nanostructured ruthenia shows strongly modified properties compared to the pure oxide, consolidating the fact that the nanostructuring of oxides is a main way to attain higher catalytic activity at lower temperatures.« less

  5. Stable compactifications

    SciTech Connect

    Accetta, F.S.; Gleiser, M.; Holman, R.; Kolb, E.W.

    1986-03-01

    We show that compactifications of theories with extra dimensions are unstable if due to monopole configurations of an antisymmetric tensor field balanced against one-loop Casimir corrections. In the case of ten dimensional supergravity, it is possible, at least for a portion of the phase space, to achieve a stable compactification without fine-tuning by including the contribution of fermionic condensates to the monopole configurations. 23 refs., 2 figs.

  6. Superconductivity achieved at over liquid nitrogen temperature by (mixed rare earths)-Ba-Cu oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishio, Kohji; Kuwahara, Kazuyuki; Kitazawa, Koichi; Fueki, Kazuo; Nakamura, Osamu

    1987-05-01

    Superconducting oxides were fabricated by reaction of powders of BaCO3, CuO and mixed rare earth (RE) carbonates at compositions expressed as (RE)1Ba2Cu3O(9-y). Two types of incompletely separated raw materials of mixed rare earths, namely, heavy rare earths (HRE) and medium rare earths (MRE), were examined. The zero-resistivity critical temperatures were observed at 92.5 K for the (HRE)-Ba-Cu-O and 85.0 K for the (MRE)-Ba-Cu-O systems, respectively, both of which were well above the boiling point of liquid nitrogen.

  7. Integrated Operating Scenario to Achieve 100-Second, High Electron Temperature Discharge on EAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Jinping; Gong, Xianzu; Wan, Baonian; Liu, Fukun; Wang, Mao; Xu, Handong; Hu, Chundong; Wang, Liang; Li, Erzhong; Zeng, Long; Ti, Ang; Shen, Biao; Lin, Shiyao; Shao, Linming; Zang, Qing; Liu, Haiqing; Zhang, Bin; Sun, Youwen; Xu, Guosheng; Liang, Yunfeng; Xiao, Bingjia; Hu, Liqun; Li, Jiangang; EAST Team

    2016-05-01

    Stationary long pulse plasma of high electron temperature was produced on EAST for the first time through an integrated control of plasma shape, divertor heat flux, particle exhaust, wall conditioning, impurity management, and the coupling of multiple heating and current drive power. A discharge with a lower single null divertor configuration was maintained for 103 s at a plasma current of 0.4 MA, q95 ≈7.0, a peak electron temperature of >4.5 keV, and a central density ne(0)∼2.5×1019 m‑3. The plasma current was nearly non-inductive (Vloop <0.05 V, poloidal beta ∼ 0.9) driven by a combination of 0.6 MW lower hybrid wave at 2.45 GHz, 1.4 MW lower hybrid wave at 4.6 GHz, 0.5 MW electron cyclotron heating at 140 GHz, and 0.4 MW modulated neutral deuterium beam injected at 60 kV. This progress demonstrated strong synergy of electron cyclotron and lower hybrid electron heating, current drive, and energy confinement of stationary plasma on EAST. It further introduced an example of integrated “hybrid” operating scenario of interest to ITER and CFETR. supported by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Foundation of China (Nos. 2015GB102000 and 2014GB103000)

  8. Employing low-temperature barriers to achieve strain-relaxed and high-performance GaN-based LEDs.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zhiting; Wang, Haiyan; Wang, Wenliang; Lin, Yunhao; Yang, Meijuan; Chen, Shuqi; Li, Guoqiang

    2016-05-30

    The epitaxial structure design of low-temperature barriers has been adopted to promote strain relaxation in multiple quantum well (MQWs) and achieve high-efficient GaN-based light-emitting diodes (LEDs). With these barriers, the relaxation value of wells increases from 0 to 4.59%. The strain-relaxed mechanism of low-temperature barriers is also discussed. The LED chip with the barriers grown at the TMIn flow of 75 sccm and the growth temperature of 830 °C has an optimal strain relaxation value of 1.53% in wells, and exhibits the largest light output power of 63.83 mW at the injection current of 65 mA, which is higher than that of conventional LED (51.89 mW) by 23%. In-depth studies reveal that the optimal low-temperature barriers remarkably promote the strain relaxation in wells without forming large density of crystalline defects. This achievement of high-efficiency LEDs sheds light on the future solid-state lighting applications. PMID:27410111

  9. How Stable Is Stable?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baehr, Marie

    1994-01-01

    Provides a problem where students are asked to find the point at which a soda can floating in some liquid changes its equilibrium between stable and unstable as the soda is removed from the can. Requires use of Newton's first law, center of mass, Archimedes' principle, stable and unstable equilibrium, and buoyant force position. (MVL)

  10. Old and stable soil organic matter is not necessarily chemically recalcitrant: Implications for modeling concepts and temperature sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Kleber, M.; Nico, P.S.; Plante, A.; Filley, T.; Kramer, M.; Swanston, C.; Sollins, P.

    2010-03-01

    Soil carbon turnover models generally divide soil carbon into pools with varying intrinsic decomposition rates. Although these decomposition rates are modified by factors such as temperature, texture, and moisture, they are rationalized by assuming chemical structure is a primary controller of decomposition. In the current work, we use near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy in combination with differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and alkaline cupric oxide (CuO) oxidation to explore this assumption. Specifically, we examined material from the 2.3-2.6 kg L{sup -1} density fraction of three soils of different type (Oxisol, Alfisol, Inceptisol). The density fraction with the youngest {sup 14}C age (Oxisol, 107 years) showed the highest relative abundance of aromatic groups and the lowest O-alkyl C/aromatic C ratio as determined by NEXAFS. Conversely, the fraction with the oldest C (Inceptisol, 680 years) had the lowest relative abundance of aromatic groups and highest O-alkyl C/aromatic C ratio. This sample also had the highest proportion of thermally labile materials as measured by DSC, and the highest ratio of substituted fatty acids to lignin phenols as indicated by CuO oxidation. Therefore, the organic matter of the Inceptisol sample, with a {sup 14}C age associated with 'passive' pools of carbon (680 years), had the largest proportion of easily metabolizable organic molecules with low thermodynamic stability, whereas the organic matter of the much younger Oxisol sample (107 years) had the highest proportion of supposedly stable organic structures considered more difficult to metabolize. Our results demonstrate that C age is not necessarily related to molecular structure or thermodynamic stability, and we suggest that soil carbon models would benefit from viewing turnover rate as codetermined by the interaction between substrates, microbial actors, and abiotic driving variables. Furthermore, assuming that old carbon is composed of

  11. Temperatures Achieved in Human and Canine Neocortex During Intraoperative Passive or Active Focal Cooling

    PubMed Central

    Han, Rowland H.; Yarbrough, Chester K.; Patterson, Edward E.; Yang, Xiao-Feng; Miller, John W.; Rothman, Steven M.; D'Ambrosio, Raimondo

    2015-01-01

    Focal cortical cooling inhibits seizures and prevents acquired epileptogenesis in rodents. To investigate the potential clinical utility of this treatment modality, we examined the thermal characteristics of canine and human brain undergoing active and passive surface cooling in intraoperative settings. Four patients with intractable epilepsy were treated in a standard manner. Before the resection of a neocortical epileptogenic focus, multiple intraoperative studies of active (custom-made cooled irrigation-perfused grid) and passive (stainless steel probe) cooling were performed. We also actively cooled the neocortices of two dogs with perfused grids implanted for 2 hours. Focal surface cooling of the human brain causes predictable depth-dependent cooling of the underlying brain tissue. Cooling of 0.6–2°C was achieved both actively and passively to a depth of 10–15 mm from the cortical surface. The perfused grid permitted comparable and persistent cooling of canine neocortex when the craniotomy was closed. Thus, the human cortex can easily be cooled with the use of simple devices such as a cooling grid or a small passive probe. These techniques provide pilot data for the design of a permanently implantable device to control intractable epilepsy. PMID:25902001

  12. Temperatures achieved in human and canine neocortex during intraoperative passive or active focal cooling.

    PubMed

    Smyth, Matthew D; Han, Rowland H; Yarbrough, Chester K; Patterson, Edward E; Yang, Xiao-Feng; Miller, John W; Rothman, Steven M; D'Ambrosio, Raimondo

    2015-06-01

    Focal cortical cooling inhibits seizures and prevents acquired epileptogenesis in rodents. To investigate the potential clinical utility of this treatment modality, we examined the thermal characteristics of canine and human brain undergoing active and passive surface cooling in intraoperative settings. Four patients with intractable epilepsy were treated in a standard manner. Before the resection of a neocortical epileptogenic focus, multiple intraoperative studies of active (custom-made cooled irrigation-perfused grid) and passive (stainless steel probe) cooling were performed. We also actively cooled the neocortices of two dogs with perfused grids implanted for 2 hours. Focal surface cooling of the human brain causes predictable depth-dependent cooling of the underlying brain tissue. Cooling of 0.6-2°C was achieved both actively and passively to a depth of 10-15 mm from the cortical surface. The perfused grid permitted comparable and persistent cooling of canine neocortex when the craniotomy was closed. Thus, the human cortex can easily be cooled with the use of simple devices such as a cooling grid or a small passive probe. These techniques provide pilot data for the design of a permanently implantable device to control intractable epilepsy. PMID:25902001

  13. Stable kilo-hertz electro-optically Q-switched Tm,Ho:YAP laser at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C.; Zhao, S.; Li, Y.; Yang, K.; Li, M.; Li, G.; Li, D.; Li, T.; Qiao, W.; Feng, T.; Chen, X.; Zheng, L.; Su, L.; Xu, J.

    2016-07-01

    A diode-pumped Tm,Ho:YAP laser utilizing a self-made LiNbO3 (LN) electro-optically modulator (EOM) at room temperature is demonstrated for the first time. A minimum pulse duration of 107.4 ns was obtained at a pulse repetition rate (PRR) of 200 Hz, giving a maximum single pulse energy of 1.65 mJ. At a PRR of 1 kHz, pulse duration of 145.8 ns was achieved under the absorbed pump power of 7.4 W, corresponding to a maximum single pulse energy of 0.546 mJ, and the pulse to pulse amplitude instabilities were measured to be about 4.6% and 5.83% for PRRs of 200 Hz and 1 kHz, respectively.

  14. Stable isotope geochemical study of Pamukkale travertines: New evidences of low-temperature non-equilibrium calcite-water fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kele, Sándor; Özkul, Mehmet; Fórizs, István; Gökgöz, Ali; Baykara, Mehmet Oruç; Alçiçek, Mehmet Cihat; Németh, Tibor

    2011-06-01

    In this paper we present the first detailed geochemical study of the world-famous actively forming Pamukkale and Karahayit travertines (Denizli Basin, SW-Turkey) and associated thermal waters. Sampling was performed along downstream sections through different depositional environments (vent, artificial channel and lake, terrace-pools and cascades of proximal slope, marshy environment of distal slope). δ 13C travertine values show significant increase (from + 6.1‰ to + 11.7‰ PDB) with increasing distance from the spring orifice, whereas the δ 18O travertine values show only slight increase downstream (from - 10.7‰ to - 9.1‰ PDB). Mainly the CO 2 outgassing caused the positive downstream shift (~ 6‰) in the δ 13C travertine values. The high δ 13C values of Pamukkale travertines located closest to the spring orifice (not affected by secondary processes) suggest the contribution of CO 2 liberated by thermometamorphic decarbonation besides magmatic sources. Based on the gradual downstream increase of the concentration of the conservative Na +, K +, Cl -, evaporation was estimated to be 2-5%, which coincides with the moderate effect of evaporation on the water isotope composition. Stable isotopic compositions of the Pamukkale thermal water springs show of meteoric origin, and indicate a Local Meteoric Water Line of Denizli Basin to be between the Global Meteoric Water Line (Craig, 1961) and Western Anatolian Meteoric Water Line (Şimşek, 2003). Detailed evaluation of several major and trace element contents measured in the water and in the precipitated travertine along the Pamukkale MM section revealed which elements are precipitated in the carbonate or concentrated in the detrital minerals. Former studies on the Hungarian Egerszalók travertine (Kele et al., 2008a, b, 2009) had shown that the isotopic equilibrium is rarely maintained under natural conditions during calcite precipitation in the temperature range between 41 and 67 °C. In this paper

  15. Rapid tenderisation of lamb M. longissimus with very fast chilling depends on rapidly achieving sub-zero temperatures.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Robin; Rosenvold, Katja; North, Michael; Kemp, Robert; Warner, Robyn; Geesink, Geert

    2012-09-01

    A study was undertaken to determine whether variations within the defined temperature-by-time profile for very fast chilling (VFC), might explain variations in tenderness found with VFC. Loins from 32 lambs were subjected to one of five cooling regimes; defined by the average temperature between the meat surface and centre reached at a specific time post mortem. These were: -0.3 °C at 22 h (Control), 2.6 °C at 1.5 h (Fast(supra-zero)), 0.7 °C at 5.5 h (Slow(supra-zero)), -1.6 °C at 1.5 h (Fast(sub-zero)) and -2.3 °C at 5.5 h (Slow(sub-zero)), respectively. Shear force values considered very tender by consumers (less than 50 N, MIRINZ tenderometer) were found 2 days post mortem in Fast(sub-zero) loins only. Both time and temperature at the end of the cooling period contributed to variations in shear force. To achieve low shear force, the loins needed to be cooled to less than 0 °C at 1.5 h post mortem. PMID:22551870

  16. Complete genome sequence of a low-temperature active and alkaline-stable endoglucanase-producing Paenibacillus sp. strain IHB B 3084 from the Indian Trans-Himalayas.

    PubMed

    Dhar, Hena; Swarnkar, Mohit Kumar; Rana, Aditi; Kaushal, Kanishak; Singh, Anil Kumar; Kasana, Ramesh Chand; Gulati, Arvind

    2016-07-20

    A genome of 5.88Mb with 46.83% G+C content is reported for an endoglucanase-producing bacterium Paenibacillus sp. strain IHB B 3084 isolated from the cold environments of the Indian Trans-Himalayas. The psychrotrophic bacterium produces low-temperature active and alkaline-stable endoglucanases of industrial importance. The genomic data has provided insight into genomic basis of cellulase production and survival of the bacterium in the cold environments. PMID:27114323

  17. Highly oriented {delta}-Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin films stable at room temperature synthesized by reactive magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Lunca Popa, P.; Kerdsongpanya, S.; Lu, J.; Eklund, P.; Sonderby, S.; Bonanos, N.

    2013-01-28

    We report the synthesis by reactive magnetron sputtering and structural characterization of highly (111)-oriented thin films of {delta}-Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3}. This phase is obtained at a substrate temperature of 150-200 Degree-Sign C in a narrow window of O{sub 2}/Ar ratio in the sputtering gas (18%-20%). Transmission electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction reveal a polycrystalline columnar structure with (111) texture. The films are stable from room temperature up to 250 Degree-Sign C in vacuum and 350 Degree-Sign C in ambient air.

  18. Fragile-to-fragile liquid transition at Tg and stable-glass phase nucleation rate maximum at the Kauzmann temperature TK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tournier, Robert F.

    2014-12-01

    An undercooled liquid is unstable. The driving force of the glass transition at Tg is a change of the undercooled-liquid Gibbs free energy. The classical Gibbs free energy change for a crystal formation is completed including an enthalpy saving. The crystal growth critical nucleus is used as a probe to observe the Laplace pressure change Δp accompanying the enthalpy change -Vm×Δp at Tg where Vm is the molar volume. A stable glass-liquid transition model predicts the specific heat jump of fragile liquids at T≤Tg, the Kauzmann temperature TK where the liquid entropy excess with regard to crystal goes to zero, the equilibrium enthalpy between TK and Tg, the maximum nucleation rate at TK of superclusters containing magic atom numbers, and the equilibrium latent heats at Tg and TK. Strong-to-fragile and strong-to-strong liquid transitions at Tg are also described and all their thermodynamic parameters are determined from their specific heat jumps. The existence of fragile liquids quenched in the amorphous state, which do not undergo liquid-liquid transition during heating preceding their crystallization, is predicted. Long ageing times leading to the formation at TK of a stable glass composed of superclusters containing up to 147 atom, touching and interpenetrating, are evaluated from nucleation rates. A fragile-to-fragile liquid transition occurs at Tg without stable-glass formation while a strong glass is stable after transition.

  19. Self-Assembly of Glycine on Cu (001): Does the Ground-state Structure at 0 K is Always Stable at Room Temperature?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Lifang; Xu, Jing; Lin, Zheshuai; Meng, Sheng; Wang, Enge

    2015-03-01

    Glycine on Cu(001) is used as an example to illustrate the critical role of molecular polarity and finite temperature effect in self-assembly of bio-molecules at a metal surface. A unified picture for glycine self-assembly on Cu(001) is derived based on full polarity compensation considerations. Temperature plays a non-trivial role: the ground-state structure at 0 K is absent at room temperature, where intermolecular hydrogen bonding overweighs competing molecule-substrate interactions. The unique p(2 ×4) structure predicted as the most stable structure was confirmed by ab initio molecular dynamics simulations, whose scanning tunneling microscopy images and anisotropic free-electron-like dispersion are in excellent agreement with experiments. Moreover, the rich self-assembling patterns including the heterochiral and homochiral phases, and their interrelationships are entirely governed by the same mechanism.

  20. A step toward the development of high-temperature stable ionic liquid-in-oil microemulsions containing double-chain anionic surface active ionic liquid.

    PubMed

    Rao, Vishal Govind; Banerjee, Chiranjib; Ghosh, Surajit; Mandal, Sarthak; Kuchlyan, Jagannath; Sarkar, Nilmoni

    2013-06-20

    Owing to their fascinating properties and wide range of potential applications, interest in nonaqueous microemulsions has escalated in the past decade. In the recent past, nonaqueous microemulsions containing ionic liquids (ILs) have been utilized in performing chemical reactions, preparation of nanomaterials, synthesis of nanostructured polymers, and drug delivery systems. The most promising fact about IL-in-oil microemulsions is their high thermal stability compared to that of aqueous microemulsions. Recently, surfactant-like properties of surface active ionic liquids (SAILs) have been used for preparation of microemulsions with high-temperature stability and temperature insensitivity. However, previously described methods present a limited possibility of developing IL-in-oil microemulsions with a wide range of thermal stability. With our previous work, we introduced a novel method of creating a huge number of IL-in-oil microemulsions (Rao, V. G.; Ghosh, S.; Ghatak, C.; Mandal, S.; Brahmachari, U.; Sarkar, N. J. Phys. Chem. B2012, 116, 2850-2855), composed of a SAIL as a surfactant, room-temperature ionic liquids as a polar phase, and benzene as a nonpolar phase. The use of benzene as a nonpolar solvent limits the application of the microemulsions to temperatures below 353 K. To overcome this limitation, we have synthesized N,N-dimethylethanolammonium 1,4-bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate (DAAOT), which was used as a surfactant. DAAOT in combination with isopropyl myristate (IPM, as an oil phase) and ILs (as a polar phase) produces a huge number of high-temperature stable IL-in-oil microemulsions. By far, this is the first report of a huge number of high-temperature stable IL-in-oil microemulsions. In particular, we demonstrate the wide range of thermal stability of [C6mim][TF2N]/DAAOT/IPM microemulsions by performing a phase behavior study, dynamic light scattering measurements, and (1)H NMR measurements and by using coumarin-480 (C-480) as a fluorescent probe

  1. Temperature variability at Dürres Maar, Germany during the Migration Period and at High Medieval Times, inferred from stable carbon isotopes of Sphagnum cellulose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moschen, R.; Kühl, N.; Peters, S.; Vos, H.; Lücke, A.

    2011-09-01

    This paper presents a high resolution reconstruction of local growing season temperature (GST) anomalies at Dürres Maar, Germany, spanning the last two millennia. The GST anomalies were derived from a stable carbon isotope time series of cellulose chemically extracted from Sphagnum leaves (δ13Ccellulose) separated from a kettle-hole peat deposit of several metres thickness. The temperature reconstruction is based on the Sphagnum δ13Ccellulose/temperature dependency observed in calibration studies. Reconstructed GST anomalies show considerable centennial and decadal scale variability. A cold and presumably wet phase with below-average temperature is reconstructed between the 4th and 7th century AD which is in accordance with the so called European Migration Period, marking the transition from the Late Roman Period to the Early Middle Ages. At High Medieval Times, the amplitude in the reconstructed temperature variability is most likely overestimated; nevertheless, above-average temperatures are obvious during this time span, which are followed by a temperature decrease. On the contrary, a pronounced Late Roman Climate Optimum, often described as similarly warm or even warmer as medieval times, could not be detected. The temperature signal of the Little Ice Age (LIA) is not preserved in Dürres Maar due to considerable peat cutting that takes place in the first half of the 19th century. The local GST anomalies show a remarkable agreement to northern hemispheric temperature reconstructions based on tree-ring datasets and are also in accordance with climate reconstructions on the basis of lake sediments, glacier advances and retreats, and historical datasets. Most notably, e.g., during the Early Middle Ages and at High Medieval Times, temperatures were neither low nor high in general. Rather high frequency temperature variability with multiple narrow intervals of below- and above-average temperatures at maximum lasting a few decades are reconstructed. Especially the

  2. Temperature variability at Dürres Maar, Germany during the migration period and at high medieval times, inferred from stable carbon isotopes of Sphagnum cellulose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moschen, R.; Kühl, N.; Peters, S.; Vos, H.; Lücke, A.

    2011-02-01

    This paper presents a high resolution reconstruction of local growing season temperature (GST) anomalies at Dürres Maar, Germany, spanning the last two millennia. The GST anomalies were derived from a stable carbon isotope time series of cellulose chemically extracted from Sphagnum leaves (δ13Ccellulose) separated from a kettle-hole peat deposit of several metres thickness. The temperature reconstruction is based on the Sphagnum δ13Ccellulose /temperature dependency observed in calibration studies. Reconstructed GST anomalies show considerable centennial and decadal scale variability. A cold and presumably also wet phase with below-average temperature is reconstructed between the 4th and 7th century AD which is in accordance with the so called European Migration Period marking the transition from the Late Roman Period to the Early Middle Ages. At High Medieval Times above-average temperatures are obvious followed by a temperature decrease. On the contrary, a pronounced Late Roman Climate Optimum, often described as similar warm or even warmer as medieval times, could not be detected. The temperature signal of the Little Ice Age (LIA) is not preserved in Dürres Maar due to considerable peat cutting that takes place in the first half of the 19th century. The local GST anomalies show a remarkable agreement to northern hemispheric temperature reconstructions based on tree-ring data sets and are also in accordance with climate reconstructions on the basis of lake sediments, glacier advances and retreats, and historical data sets. Most notably, e.g. during the Early Middle Ages and at High Medieval Times, temperatures were not low or high in general. Rather high frequency temperature variability with multiple narrow intervals of below- and above-average temperatures at maximum lasting a few decades are reconstructed. Especially the agreements between our estimated GST anomalies and the NH temperature reconstructions derived from tree-ring chronologies indicate the

  3. Lidar Observation of Aerosol and Temperature Stratification over Urban Area During the Formation of a Stable Atmospheric PBL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolev, I.; Parvanov, O.; Kaprielov, B.; Mitev, V.; Simeonov, V.; Grigorov, I.

    1992-01-01

    In recent years, the processes in the atmospheric planetary boundary layer (PBL) over urban areas were intensely investigated, due to ecological problems related to the air, soil, and water pollution. New pollution sources in new residential districts, when in contradiction to the microclimate and topography requirements of that region, create a number of considerable hazards and problems. The present study is a continuation of our preceding investigations and aims at revealing the aerosol structure and stratification during the transition after sunset as measured by two lidars. Such observation of the nocturnal, stable PBL formation over an urban area in Bulgaria has not been reported before. The lidars' high time and spatial resolutions allow the changes of the internal structure of the PBL's part located above the surface layer to be observed.

  4. Investigation of Line Width Narrowing and Spectral Jumps of Single Stable Defect Centers in ZnO at Cryogenic Temperature.

    PubMed

    Neitzke, Oliver; Morfa, Anthony; Wolters, Janik; Schell, Andreas W; Kewes, Günter; Benson, Oliver

    2015-05-13

    Finding new solid state defect centers in novel host materials is crucial for realizing integrated hybrid quantum photonic devices. We present a preparation method for defect centers with photostable bright single photon emission in zinc oxide, a material with promising properties in terms of processability, availability, and applications. A detailed optical study reveals a complex dynamic of intensity fluctuations at room temperature. Measurements at cryogenic temperatures show very sharp (<60 GHz) zero phonon lines (ZPLs) at 580 nm to  620 nm (≈ 2.0 eV) with frozen out fast fluctuations. Remaining discrete jumps of the ZPL, which depend on the excitation power, are observed. The low temperature results will narrow down speculations on the origin of visible-near-infrared (NIR) wavelength defect emission in zinc oxide and provide a basis for improved theoretical models. PMID:25816112

  5. Spring-Summer Temperatures Since AD 1780 Reconstructed from Stable Oxygen Isotope Ratios in White Spruce Tree-Rings from the Mackenzie Delta, Northwestern Canada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, Trevor J.; Pisaric, Michael F. J.; Field, Robert D.; Kokelj, Steven V.; Edwards, Thomas W. D.; deMontigny, Peter; Healy, Richard; LeGrande, Allegra N.

    2013-01-01

    High-latitude delta(exp 18)O archives deriving from meteoric water (e.g., tree-rings and ice-cores) can provide valuable information on past temperature variability, but stationarity of temperature signals in these archives depends on the stability of moisture source/trajectory and precipitation seasonality, both of which can be affected by atmospheric circulation changes. A tree-ring delta(exp 18)O record (AD 1780-2003) from the Mackenzie Delta is evaluated as a temperature proxy based on linear regression diagnostics. The primary source of moisture for this region is the North Pacific and, thus, North Pacific atmospheric circulation variability could potentially affect the tree-ring delta(exp 18)O-temperature signal. Over the instrumental period (AD 1892-2003), tree-ring delta(exp 18)O explained 29% of interannual variability in April-July minimum temperatures, and the explained variability increases substantially at lower-frequencies. A split-period calibration/verification analysis found the delta(exp 18)O-temperature relation was time-stable, which supported a temperature reconstruction back to AD 1780. The stability of the delta(exp 18)O-temperature signal indirectly implies the study region is insensitive to North Pacific circulation effects, since North Pacific circulation was not constant over the calibration period. Simulations from the NASA-GISS ModelE isotope-enabled general circulation model confirm that meteoric delta(exp 18)O and precipitation seasonality in the study region are likely insensitive to North Pacific circulation effects, highlighting the paleoclimatic value of tree-ring and possibly other delta(exp 18)O records from this region. Our delta(exp 18)O-based temperature reconstruction is the first of its kind in northwestern North America, and one of few worldwide, and provides a long-term context for evaluating recent climate warming in the Mackenzie Delta region.

  6. High-temperature synthesis of highly hydrothermal stable mesoporous silica and Fe-SiO{sub 2} using ionic liquid as a template

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Hong; Wang, Mengyang; Hu, Hongjiu; Liang, Yuguang; Wang, Yong; Cao, Weiran; Wang, Xiaohong

    2011-03-15

    Mesoporous silicas and Fe-SiO{sub 2} with worm-like structures have been synthesized using a room temperature ionic liquid, 1-hexadecane-3-methylimidazolium bromide, as a template at a high aging temperature (150-190 {sup o}C) with the assistance of NaF. The hydrothermal stability of mesoporous silica was effectively improved by increasing the aging temperature and adding NaF to the synthesis gel. High hydrothermally stable mesoporous silica was obtained after being aged at 190 {sup o}C in the presence of NaF, which endured the hydrothermal treatment in boiling water at least for 10 d or steam treatment at 600 {sup o}C for 6 h. The ultra hydrothermal stability could be attributed to its high degree of polymerization of silicate. Furthermore, highly hydrothermal stable mesoporous Fe-SiO{sub 2} has been synthesized, which still remained its mesostructure after being hydrothermally treated at 100 {sup o}C for 12 d or steam-treated at 600 {sup o}C for 6 h. -- Graphical abstract: Worm-like mesoporous silica and Fe-SiO{sub 2} with high hydrothermal stability have been synthesized using ionic liquid 1-hexadecane-3-methylimidazolium bromide as a template under the assistance of NaF at high temperature. Display Omitted Research highlights: {yields} Increasing aging temperature improved the hydrothermal stability of materials. {yields}Addition of NaF enhanced the polymerization degree of silicates. {yields} Mesoporous SiO{sub 2} and Fe-SiO{sub 2} obtained have remarkable hydrothermal stability.

  7. Study of the translational diffusion of the benzophenone ketyl radical in comparison with stable molecules in room temperature ionic liquids by transient grating spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Nishiyama, Y.; Fukuda, M.; Terazima, M.; Kimura, Y.

    2008-04-28

    Transient grating (TG) spectroscopy has been applied to the photoinduced hydrogen-abstraction reaction of benzophenone (BP) in various kinds of room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs). After the photoexcitation of BP in RTILs, the formation of a benzophenone ketyl radical (BPK) was confirmed by the transient absorption method, and the TG signal was analyzed to determine the diffusion coefficients of BPK and BP. For comparison, diffusion coefficients of carbon monoxide (CO), diphenylacetylene (DPA), and diphenylcyclopropenone (DPCP) in various RTILs were determined by the TG method using the photodissociation reaction of DPCP. While the diffusion coefficients of the stable molecules BP, DPA, and DPCP were always larger than those predicted by the Stokes-Einstein (SE) relation in RTILs, that of BPK was much smaller than those of the stable molecules and relatively close to that predicted by the SE relation in all solvents. For the smallest molecule CO, the deviation from the SE relation was evident. The diffusion coefficients of stable molecules are better represented by a power law of the inverse of the viscosity when the exponent was less than unity. The ratios of the diffusion coefficient of BP to that of BPK were larger in RTILs (2.7-4.0) than those (1.4-2.3) in conventional organic solvents. The slow diffusion of BPK in RTILs was discussed in terms of the fluctuation of the local electric field produced by the surrounding solvent ions.

  8. Separation of drainage runoff during rainfall-runoff episodes using the stable isotope method and drainage water temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zajíček, Antonín; Kvítek, Tomáš; Pomije, Tomáš

    2014-05-01

    Stabile isotopes of 2H 18O and drainage water temperature were used as natural tracers for separation rainfall-runoff event hydrograph on several tile drained catchments located in Bohemian-Moravian Highland, Czech Republic. Small agricultural catchments with drainage systems built in slopes are typical for foothill areas in the Czech and Moravian highland. Often without permanent surface runoff, the drainage systems represent an important portion of runoff and nitrogen leaching out of the catchment. The knowledge of the drainage runoff formation and the origin of its components are prerequisites for formulation of measures leading to improvement of the drainage water quality and reduction of nutrient leaching from the drained catchments. The results have proved presence of event water in the drainage runoff during rainfall-runoff events. The proportion of event water observed in the drainage runoff varied between 15 - 60 % in the summer events and 0 - 50 % in winter events, while the sudden water temperature change was between 0,1 - 4,2 °C (2 - 35 %). The comparison of isotope separation of the drainage runoff and monitoring the drainage water temperature have demonstrated that in all cases of event water detected in the runoff, a rapid change in the drainage water temperature was observed as well. The portion of event water in the runoff grows with the growing change in water temperature. Using component mixing model, it was demonstrated that water temperature can be successfully used at least as a qualitative and with some degree of inaccuracy as a quantitative tracer as well. The drawback of the non-conservative character of this tracer is compensated by both its economic and technical accessibility. The separation results also resemble results of separations at small streams. Together with a similarly high speed of the discharge reaction to beginning of precipitation, it is obvious that the mechanism of surface runoff formation and drainage runoff formation

  9. High-speed highly temperature stable 980 nm VCSELs operating at 25 Gb/s at up to 85 °C for short reach optical interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mutig, Alex; Lott, James A.; Blokhin, Sergey A.; Moser, Philip; Wolf, Philip; Hofmann, Werner; Nadtochiy, Alexey M.; Bimberg, Dieter

    2011-03-01

    The progressive penetration of optical communication links into traditional copper interconnect markets greatly expands the applications of vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs) for the next-generation of board-to-board, moduleto- module, chip-to-chip, and on-chip optical interconnects. Stability of the VCSEL parameters at high temperatures is indispensable for such applications, since these lasers typically reside directly on or near integrated circuit chips. Here we present 980 nm oxide-confined VCSELs operating error-free at bit rates up to 25 Gbit/s at temperatures as high as 85 °C without adjustment of the drive current and peak-to-peak modulation voltage. The driver design is therefore simplified and the power consumption of the driver electronics is lowered, reducing the production and operational costs. Small and large signal modulation experiments at various temperatures from 20 up to 85 °C for lasers with different oxide aperture diameters are presented in order to analyze the physical processes controlling the performance of the VCSELs. Temperature insensitive maximum -3 dB bandwidths of around 13-15 GHz for VCSELs with aperture diameters of 10 μm and corresponding parasitic cut-off frequencies exceeding 22 GHz are observed. Presented results demonstrate the suitability of our VCSELs for practical high speed and high temperature stable short-reach optical links.

  10. Low-temperature carbonate concretions in the Martian meteorite ALH84001: evidence from stable isotopes and mineralogy.

    PubMed

    Valley, J W; Eiler, J M; Graham, C M; Gibson, E K; Romanek, C S; Stolper, E M

    1997-03-14

    The martian meteorite ALH84001 contains small, disk-shaped concretions of carbonate with concentric chemical and mineralogical zonation. Oxygen isotope compositions of these concretions, measured by ion microprobe, range from delta18O = +9.5 to +20.5 per thousand. Most of the core of one concretion is homogeneous (16.7 +/- 1.2 per thousand) and over 5 per thousand higher in delta18O than a second concretion. Orthopyroxene that hosts the secondary carbonates is isotopically homogeneous (delta18O = 4.6 +/- 1.2 per thousand). Secondary SiO2 has delta18O = 20.4 per thousand. Carbon isotope ratios measured from the core of one concretion average delta13C = 46 +/- 8 per thousand, consistent with formation on Mars. The isotopic variations and mineral compositions offer no evidence for high temperature (>650 degrees C) carbonate precipitation and suggest non-equilibrium processes at low temperatures (< approximately 300 degrees C). PMID:9054355

  11. Stable platinum nanoparticles on specific MgAl2O4 spinel facets at high temperatures in oxidizing atmospheres.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei-Zhen; Kovarik, Libor; Mei, Donghai; Liu, Jun; Wang, Yong; Peden, Charles H F

    2013-01-01

    The development of thermally stable, nanometer-sized precious metal-based catalysts remains a daunting challenge. Such materials, especially those based on the use of costly platinum metal, are essential and, to date, non-replaceable for a large number of industrially important catalytic processes. Here we report a well-defined cuboctahedral MgAl2O4 spinel support material that is capable of stabilizing platinum particles in the range of 1-3 nm on its relatively abundant {111} facets during extremely severe aging at 800 °C in air for 1 week. The aged catalysts retain platinum dispersions of 15.9% with catalytic activities for methanol oxidation being ~80% of that of fresh ones, whereas a conventional Pt/γ-Al2O3 catalyst is severely sintered and nearly inactive. We reveal the origin of the markedly superior ability of spinel {111} facets, resulting from strong interactions between spinel surface oxygens and epitaxial platinum {111} facets, inspiring the rational design of anti-sintering supported platinum group catalysts. PMID:24064958

  12. Stress-induced VO{sub 2} films with M2 monoclinic phase stable at room temperature grown by inductively coupled plasma-assisted reactive sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Okimura, Kunio; Watanabe, Tomo; Sakai, Joe

    2012-04-01

    We report on growth of VO{sub 2} films with M2 monoclinic phase stable at room temperature under atmospheric pressure. The films were grown on quartz glass and Si substrates by using an inductively coupled plasma-assisted reactive sputtering method. XRD-sin{sup 2}{Psi} measurements revealed that the films with M2 phase are under compressive stress in contrast to tensile stress of films with M1 phase. Scanning electron microscopy observations revealed characteristic crystal grain aspects with formation of periodical twin structure of M2 phase. Structural phase transition from M2 to tetragonal phases, accompanied by a resistance change, was confirmed to occur as the temperature rises. Growth of VO{sub 2} films composed of M2 phase crystalline is of strong interest for clarifying nature of Mott transition of strongly correlated materials.

  13. Paleo-shade: woody cover, stable isotopes, soil temperature, and soil organic matter in tropical ecosystems (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerling, T. E.; Andanje, S.; Kimutai, D.; Levin, N. E.; Mace, W. D.; Macharia, A. N.; Passey, B. H.; Remien, C.; Wynn, J. G.

    2010-12-01

    The δ13C value of soil carbon is directly related to the fraction of C4 biomass in soils because of the difference in isotope discrimination between plants using the C3 (trees, shrubs, and herbs) and C4 (primarily tropical grasses) photosynthetic pathways. Almost all woody plants use the C3 photosynthetic pathway, and therefore the fraction of woody cover in tropical ecosystems has an important influence on the fraction of C4 biomass in soils. Surveys of tropical ecosystems from East Africa and Australia show that little C4 biomass is evident until woody cover fraction falls below 0.5. This is due to several factors, including the shading effect of woody cover and retention of soil moisture; these decrease the daily maximum ground surface temperature and decrease water stress. Thus, C3 photosynthesis is favored relative to C4 photosynthesis in well-shaded environments compared to nearby open environments. Between 0.0 and 0.5 fraction woody cover, the δ13C of soil organic matter is strongly correlated with the fraction of woody cover. However, as the woody cover approaches 0, in some semi-arid ecosystems a significant fraction of C3 herbaceous plants are present. Thus some “grasslands” may have a significant fraction of C3 herbaceous cover. Paleosols are an indicator of the fraction of C4 biomass because of their preserved δ13C values in organic matter and in pedogenic carbonate. This δ13C signal can be used as an indicator of “paleo-shade” or fraction of woody-cover in the geological record. Δ47C values of paleosols for much of the past 4 Ma in the Turkana Basin in northern Kenya and the Awash Basin in Ethiopia indicate ecosystems similar to modern grasslands to woody grasslands (using the UNESCO classification for tropical ecosystems); these are commonly known as savannas. Thus some of the most important localities documenting hominin evolution show strong evidence for a savanna environment. This interpretation is supported by independent evidence

  14. Investigating temperature effects on methane production and oxidation in the rice ecosystem using stable carbon and hydrogen isotope ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, A. L.; Sithole, A.; Shearer, M. J.; Hanson, E.; Fisher, A.; Khalil, A. K.

    2010-12-01

    Irrigated rice is a major agricultural source of methane emissions that contributes about 15% of global atmospheric methane (CH4). Our work investigates the relationships between temperature and CH4 production, oxidation, and flux in the rice ecosystem. This is central to understanding the response of the global CH4 emissions from rice under a changing climate. Temperatures were regulated in sixteen rice plots grown in a research greenhouse using four waterbath-temperature control systems held at 20°C, 24°C, 28°C, and 32°C over the course of a growing season. Belowground porewater samples were collected from each treatment weekly and CH4 was extracted into headspace N2 after vigorous shaking. Weekly flux samples were collected using acrylic static flux chambers placed over the rice plots. CH4 concentrations below and aboveground were measured using gas chromatography-flame ionization detection. The carbon (δ13C) and hydrogen (δD) isotopic composition of CH4 was measured using continuous-flow gas chromatography isotope ratio mass spectrometry. Results show that CH4 flux ranged from near zero to 30-60 mg/m2/hr in mid-season corresponding to a rise in porewater CH4 to 8-12 mg/L. Early season CH4 fluxes were larger in elevated temperature treatments but this difference was smaller, or even reversed in some cases, in the late season. Similar trends were observed in CH4 porewater concentration profiles. Results from isotopic measurements show mean belowground δ13C values between -44‰ and -52‰ relative to VPDB and δD values between -290‰ and -320‰ relative to VSMOW. Emitted CH4 had mean δ13C values which ranged from -50‰ to -60‰ VPDB. We integrate these results and interpret them using an empirically-driven concentration and isotope model to understand CH4 dynamics and to examine the effect of temperature on mechanisms that control CH4 emissions.

  15. Tree-ring stable carbon isotope-based May-July temperature reconstruction over Nanwutai, China, for the past century and its record of 20th century warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yu; Wang, Yanchao; Li, Qiang; Song, Huiming; Linderholm, Hans W.; Leavitt, Steven W.; Wang, Ruiyuan; An, Zhisheng

    2014-06-01

    Growth anomaly of trees in some regions was detected under current episode of rapid warming. This raises a dilemma for temperature reconstructions by using tree-ring width which is believed to be the most important proxy on inter-annual temperature reconstruction during the past millenniums. Here we employed the tree-ring δ13C to reconstruct temperature variations for exploring their potential on capturing signals of rapid warming, and to test how its difference with the tree-ring width based reconstruction. In this study the mean May-July temperature (TM-J) was reconstructed over the past century by tree-ring δ13C of Chinese pine trees growing in the Nanwutai region. The explained variance of the reconstruction was 43.3% (42.1% after adjusting the degrees of freedom). Compared to a ring-width temperature reconstruction (May-July) from the same site, the tree-ring δ13C-based temperature reconstruction offered two distinct advantages: 1) it captured a wider range of temperature variability, i.e., at least May-July, even over a longer part of the year, January-September; and 2) the reconstruction preserved more low-frequency climate information than that of ring width did. The 20th century warming was well represented in the Nanwutai tree-ring δ13C temperature reconstruction, which implied that stable carbon isotope of tree rings potentially represents temperature variations during historical episodes of rapid warming. A spatial correlation analysis showed that our temperature reconstruction represented climate variations over the entire Loess Plateau in north-central China. Significant positive correlations (p < 0.1) were found between the temperature reconstruction and ENSO, as well as SSTs in the Pacific and Indian Oceans. The reconstruction showed the periodicities of 22.78-, 4.16-, 3.45-3.97- and 2.04-2.83-year quasi-cycles at a 95% confidence level. Our results suggested that temperature variability in the Nanwutai region may be linked to Pacific and Indian

  16. Planktic foraminiferal stable-isotopes across the EECO: investigating the coupling between temperature and the exogenic carbon pool (ODP Site 1263, Walvis Ridge)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrader, Cindy; Lauretano, Vittoria; Zachos, James C.; Lourens, Lucas J.

    2016-04-01

    The Late Paleocene to Early Eocene warming trend is characterized by a gradual temperature rise of 5-6° C resulting in the Early Eocene Climatic Optimum "EECO". This warming trend was punctuated by several so-called "hyperthermals", which were geologically brief (<200kyr) episodes of extreme warmth. Recently, a new, ˜4.7 million year (Myr) long, high-resolution benthic foraminiferal stable isotope record of ODP Site 1263 has been presented, which encompasses the peak of the early Eocene "hothouse" (˜49.5 - 54.2 Ma). This record confirms the presence of hyperthermals during and at the termination of the EECO as was previously found for ODP Site 1258. In addition, the record reveals a highly significant linear relationship between ∂18O and ∂13C for these events, similar as for their early Eocene counterparts. This indicates a strong coupling between global warming and the release of isotopically light carbon into the ocean-atmosphere system throughout the EECO. Whilst the coupling between temperature changes and perturbations in the exogenic carbon pool remain stable on short-term time scales, they do not for the long-term trends at ˜52 Ma when a rapid 13C enrichment in carbon data is not accompanied by changes in the oxygen record. It was hypothesized that enhanced carbonate and organic carbon burial rates might be responsible for this shift in average isotopic values during a temporary reduced efficiency of the biological pump. Such a scenario may explain the elevated atmospheric pCO2 as well as increased weathering rates and runoff. To test this hypothesis, we will present our first (preliminary) stable isotopic results of two planktic foraminiferal species derived from the same samples of ODP Site 1263, which portray changes in surface water (Acarinina ssp.) and thermocline waters (Subbotina ssp.).

  17. A temperature control method for shortening thermal cycling time to achieve rapid polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in a disposable polymer microfluidic device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bu, Minqiang; Perch-Nielsen, Ivan R.; Sørensen, Karen S.; Skov, Julia; Sun, Yi; Duong Bang, Dang; Pedersen, Michael E.; Hansen, Mikkel F.; Wolff, Anders

    2013-07-01

    We present a temperature control method capable of effectively shortening the thermal cycling time of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in a disposable polymer microfluidic device with an external heater and a temperature sensor. The method employs optimized temperature overshooting and undershooting steps to achieve a rapid ramping between the temperature steps for DNA denaturation, annealing and extension. The temperature dynamics within the microfluidic PCR chamber was characterized and the overshooting and undershooting parameters were optimized using the temperature-dependent fluorescence signal from Rhodamine B. The method was validated with the PCR amplification of mecA gene (162 bp) from methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bacterium (MRSA), where the time for 30 cycles was reduced from 50 min (without over- and undershooting) to 20 min.

  18. Low-temperature carbonate concretions in the martian meteorite ALH84001: Evidence from stable isotopes and mineralogy

    SciTech Connect

    Valley, J.W.; Eiler, J.M.; Stolper, E.M.

    1997-03-14

    The martian meteorite ALH84001 contains small, disk-shaped concentrations of carbonate with concentric chemical and mineralogical zonation. Oxygen isotope compositions of these concretions, measured by ion microprobe, range from {delta}{sup 18}O = +9.5 to +20.5{per_thousand}. Most of the core of one concretion is homogeneous (16.7 {+-} 1.2{per_thousand}) and over 5{per_thousand} higher in ({delta}{sup 18}O = 4.6 {+-} 1.2{per_thousand}). Secondary SiO{sub 2} has {delta}{sup 18}O = 20.4{per_thousand}. Carbon isotope ratios measured from the core of one concretion average {delta}{sup 13}C = 46 {+-} 8{per_thousand}, consistent with formation on Mars. The isotopic variations and mineral compositions offer no evidence for high temperature (>650{degrees}C) carbonate precipitation and suggest non-equilibrium processes at low temperatures (<{approximately} 300{degrees}C). 44 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Iron oxide nanoparticles grafted with sulfonated copolymers are stable in concentrated brine at elevated temperatures and weakly adsorb on silica.

    PubMed

    Bagaria, Hitesh G; Xue, Zheng; Neilson, Bethany M; Worthen, Andrew J; Yoon, Ki Youl; Nayak, Susheela; Cheng, Victoria; Lee, Jae Ho; Bielawski, Christopher W; Johnston, Keith P

    2013-04-24

    Magnetic nanoparticles that can be transported in subsurface reservoirs at high salinities and temperatures are expected to have a major impact on enhanced oil recovery, carbon dioxide sequestration, and electromagnetic imaging. Herein we report a rare example of steric stabilization of iron oxide (IO) nanoparticles (NPs) grafted with poly(2-acrylamido-2-methylpropanesulfonate-co-acrylic acid) (poly(AMPS-co-AA)) that not only display colloidal stability in standard American Petroleum Institute (API) brine (8% NaCl + 2% CaCl2 by weight) at 90 °C for 1 month but also resist undesirable adsorption on silica surfaces (0.4% monolayer NPs). Because the AMPS groups interacted weakly with Ca(2+), they were sufficiently well solvated to provide steric stabilization. The PAA groups, in contrast, enabled covalent grafting of the poly(AMPS-co-AA) chains to amine-functionalized IO NPs via formation of amide bonds and prevented polymer desorption even after a 40,000-fold dilution. The aforementioned methodology may be readily adapted to stabilize a variety of other functional inorganic and organic NPs at high salinities and temperatures. PMID:23527819

  20. Gradual crossover in molecular organization of stable liquid H2O at moderately high pressure and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koga, Yoshikata; Westh, Peter; Yoshida, Koh; Inaba, Akira; Nakazawa, Yasuhiro

    2014-09-01

    Using the literature raw data of the speed of sound and the specific volume, the isothermal compressibility, κT, a second derivative thermodynamic quantity of G, was evaluated for liquid H2O in the pressure range up to 350 MPa and the temperature to 50 °C. We then obtained its pressure derivative, dκT/dp, a third derivative numerically without using a fitting function to the κT data. On taking yet another p-derivative at a fixed T graphically without resorting to any fitting function, the resulting d2κT/dp2, a fourth derivative, showed a weak but clear step anomaly, with the onset of the step named point X and its end point Y. In analogy with another third and fourth derivative pair in binary aqueous solutions of glycerol, dαp/dxGly and d2αp/dxGly2, at 0.1 MPa (αp is the thermal expansivity and xGly the mole fraction of solute glycerol) in our recent publication [J. Solution Chem. 43, 663-674 (2014); DOI:10.1007/s10953-013-0122-7], we argue that there is a gradual crossover in the molecular organization of pure H2O from a low to a high p-regions starting at point X and ending at Y at a fixed T. The crossover takes place gradually spanning for about 100 MPa at a fixed temperature. The extrapolated temperature to zero p seems to be about 70 - 80 °C for points X and 90 - 110 °C for Y. Furthermore, the mid-points of X and Y seem to extrapolate to the triple point of liquid, ice Ih and ice III. Recalling that the zero xGly extrapolation of point X and Y for binary aqueous glycerol at 0.1 MPa gives about the same T values respectively, we suggest that at zero pressure the region below about 70 °C the hydrogen bond network is bond-percolated, while above about 90 °C there is no hydrogen bond network. Implication of these findings is discussed.

  1. Gradual crossover in molecular organization of stable liquid H{sub 2}O at moderately high pressure and temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Koga, Yoshikata; Westh, Peter; Yoshida, Koh; Inaba, Akira; Nakazawa, Yasuhiro

    2014-09-15

    Using the literature raw data of the speed of sound and the specific volume, the isothermal compressibility, κ{sub T}, a second derivative thermodynamic quantity of G, was evaluated for liquid H{sub 2}O in the pressure range up to 350 MPa and the temperature to 50 ºC. We then obtained its pressure derivative, dκ{sub T}/dp, a third derivative numerically without using a fitting function to the κ{sub T} data. On taking yet another p-derivative at a fixed T graphically without resorting to any fitting function, the resulting d{sup 2}κ{sub T}/dp{sup 2}, a fourth derivative, showed a weak but clear step anomaly, with the onset of the step named point X and its end point Y. In analogy with another third and fourth derivative pair in binary aqueous solutions of glycerol, dα{sub p}/dx{sub Gly} and d{sup 2}α{sub p}/dx{sub Gly}{sup 2}, at 0.1 MPa (α{sub p} is the thermal expansivity and x{sub Gly} the mole fraction of solute glycerol) in our recent publication [J. Solution Chem. 43, 663-674 (2014); DOI:10.1007/s10953-013-0122-7], we argue that there is a gradual crossover in the molecular organization of pure H{sub 2}O from a low to a high p-regions starting at point X and ending at Y at a fixed T. The crossover takes place gradually spanning for about 100 MPa at a fixed temperature. The extrapolated temperature to zero p seems to be about 70 – 80 °C for points X and 90 – 110 °C for Y. Furthermore, the mid-points of X and Y seem to extrapolate to the triple point of liquid, ice Ih and ice III. Recalling that the zero x{sub Gly} extrapolation of point X and Y for binary aqueous glycerol at 0.1 MPa gives about the same T values respectively, we suggest that at zero pressure the region below about 70 °C the hydrogen bond network is bond-percolated, while above about 90 ºC there is no hydrogen bond network. Implication of these findings is discussed.

  2. Production of stable hydrosols of crystalline TiO2 nanoparticles synthesized at relatively low temperatures in diverse media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burunkaya, Esin; Akarsu, Murat; Erdem Çamurlu, H.; Kesmez, Ömer; Yeşil, Zerin; Asiltürk, Meltem; Arpaç, Ertuğrul

    2013-01-01

    TiO2 hydrosols were obtained by dispersing nanoparticles synthesized from titanium ethoxide as precursor via reflux method without any further thermal treatment. In this study, the reaction parameters such as solvent, type of catalyst, temperature and duration of the synthesis of TiO2 nanoparticles were extensively investigated. The crystalline nanoparticles obtained without calcination have particle size in range of 3.3 nm and 5 nm, and BET surface area of up to 182 m2/g. Transparent TiO2 hydrosols were prepared in both water and non-polar solvent without use of any additional dispersing agent. The synthesized nanoparticles exhibited photocatalytic activity against Rhodamine B dye.

  3. Long-term stable, low-temperature remote silicate phosphor thick films printed on a glass substrate.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jun Sik; Kwon, Oh Hyeon; Jang, Jin Woo; Lee, Sung Hyun; Han, Sung Jun; Lee, Joo Hong; Cho, Yong Soo

    2015-04-13

    A critical step in providing better phosphor solution for white light emitting diode (LED) is to utilize inexpensive silicate phosphors with strong thermal stability. Here, we demonstrate yellow silicate phosphor-embedded glass thick films with a high luminous efficacy of ∼32 lm/W at 200 mA as a nonconventional remote-phosphor approach. The simple screen-printing process of a paste consisting of (Ba,Sr,Ca)₂SiO₄:Eu²⁺ phosphor and a low softening point glass creates a planar remote structure on a regular soda lime silicate glass with controllable film thickness and location (top vs bottom) of the phosphor layer. The glass matrix provides promising densification and adhesion with the substrate at the optimal low temperature of 410 °C, with the long-term stability in luminous efficacy over 500 h of operation. The proposed phosphor structure has important implications to overcome current limitations as phosphors. PMID:25761285

  4. Identification of Stable Processing Parameters in Ti-6Al-4V Alloy from a Wide Temperature Range Across β Transus and a Large Strain Rate Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quan, Guo-Zheng; Wen, Hai-Rong; Pu, Shi-Ao; Zou, Zhen-Yu; Wu, Dong-Sen

    2015-11-01

    The hot workability of Ti-6Al-4V alloy was investigated according to the measured stress-strain data and their derived forms from a series of hot compressions at the temperatures of 1,023-1,323 K and strain rates of 0.01-10 s-1 with a height reduction of 60%. As the true strain was 0.3, 0.5, 0.7 and 0.9, respectively, the response maps of strain rate sensitivity (m-value), power dissipation efficiency (η-value) and instability parameter (ξ-value) to temperature and strain rate were developed on the basis of dynamic material model (DMM). Then the processing map was obtained by superimposition of the power dissipation and the instability maps. According to the processing map, the stable regions (η > 0 and ξ > 0) and unstable regions (η < 0 or ξ < 0) were clarified clearly. Further, the stable regions (temperatures of 1,198-1,248 K and strain rates of 0.01-0.1 s-1) with higher η value (> 0.3) corresponding to the ideal deformation mechanisms involving globularization and superplasticity were identified and recommended. The microstructures of the deformed samples were then observed by microscopy. And homogeneous microstructures with refined grains were found in the recommended parameter domains. The optimal working parameter domains identified by processing map and validated by microstructure observations contribute to the design in reasonable hot forming process of Ti-6Al-4V alloy without resorting to expensive and time-consuming trial-and-error methods.

  5. Antarctic notothenioid fish: what are the future consequences of 'losses' and 'gains' acquired during long-term evolution at cold and stable temperatures?

    PubMed

    Beers, Jody M; Jayasundara, Nishad

    2015-06-01

    Antarctic notothenioids dominate the fish fauna of the Southern Ocean. Evolution for millions of years at cold and stable temperatures has led to the acquisition of numerous biochemical traits that allow these fishes to thrive in sub-zero waters. The gain of antifreeze glycoproteins has afforded notothenioids the ability to avert freezing and survive at temperatures often hovering near the freezing point of seawater. Additionally, possession of cold-adapted proteins and membranes permits them to sustain appropriate metabolic rates at exceptionally low body temperatures. The notothenioid genome is also distinguished by the disappearance of traits in some species, losses that might prove costly in a warmer environment. Perhaps the best-illustrated example is the lack of expression of hemoglobin in white-blooded icefishes from the family Channichthyidae. Loss of key elements of the cellular stress response, notably the heat shock response, has also been observed. Along with their attainment of cold tolerance, notothenioids have developed an extreme stenothermy and many species perish at temperatures only a few degrees above their habitat temperatures. Thus, in light of today's rapidly changing climate, it is critical to evaluate how these extreme stenotherms will respond to rising ocean temperatures. It is conceivable that the remarkable cold specialization of notothenioids may ultimately leave them vulnerable to future thermal increases and threaten their fitness and survival. Within this context, our review provides a current summary of the biochemical losses and gains that are known for notothenioids and examines these cold-adapted traits with a focus on processes underlying thermal tolerance and acclimation capacity. PMID:26085661

  6. Improved immunogenicity of individual influenza vaccine components delivered with a novel dissolving microneedle patch stable at room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Vassilieva, Elena V.; Kalluri, Haripriya; McAllister, Devin; Taherbhai, Misha T.; Esser, E. Stein; Pewin, Winston P.; Pulit-Penaloza, Joanna A.; Prausnitz, Mark R.; Compans, Richard W.; Skountzou, Ioanna

    2015-01-01

    Prevention of seasonal influenza epidemics and pandemics relies on widespread vaccination coverage to induce protective immunity. In addition to a good antigenic match with the circulating viruses, the effectiveness of individual strains represented in the trivalent vaccines depends on their immunogenicity. In this study we evaluated the immunogenicity of H1N1, H3N2 and B seasonal influenza virus vaccine strains delivered individually with a novel dissolving microneedle patch and the stability of this formulation during storage at 25°C. Our data demonstrate that all strains retained their antigenic activity after incorporation in the dissolving patches as measured by SRID assay and immune responses to vaccination in BALB/c mice. After a single immunization all three antigens delivered with microneedle patches induced superior neutralizing antibody titers compared to intramuscular immunization. Cutaneous antigen delivery was especially beneficial for the less immunogenic B strain. Mice immunized with dissolving microneedle patches encapsulating influenza A/Brisbane/59/07 (H1N1) vaccine were fully protected against lethal challenge by homologous mouse-adapted influenza virus. All vaccine components retained activity during storage at room temperature for at least three months as measured in vitro by SRID assay and in vivo by mouse immunization studies. Our data demonstrate that dissolving microneedle patches are a promising advance for influenza cutaneous vaccination due to improved immune responses using less immunogenic influenza antigens and enhanced stability. PMID:25895053

  7. Improved immunogenicity of individual influenza vaccine components delivered with a novel dissolving microneedle patch stable at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Vassilieva, Elena V; Kalluri, Haripriya; McAllister, Devin; Taherbhai, Misha T; Esser, E Stein; Pewin, Winston P; Pulit-Penaloza, Joanna A; Prausnitz, Mark R; Compans, Richard W; Skountzou, Ioanna

    2015-08-01

    Prevention of seasonal influenza epidemics and pandemics relies on widespread vaccination coverage to induce protective immunity. In addition to a good antigenic match with the circulating viruses, the effectiveness of individual strains represented in the trivalent vaccines depends on their immunogenicity. In this study, we evaluated the immunogenicity of H1N1, H3N2, and B seasonal influenza virus vaccine strains delivered individually with a novel dissolving microneedle patch and the stability of this formulation during storage at 25 °C. Our data demonstrate that all strains retained their antigenic activity after incorporation in the dissolving patches as measured by single radial diffusion (SRID) assay and immune responses to vaccination in BALB/c mice. After a single immunization, all three antigens delivered with microneedle patches induced superior neutralizing antibody titers compared to intramuscular immunization. Cutaneous antigen delivery was especially beneficial for the less immunogenic B strain. Mice immunized with dissolving microneedle patches encapsulating influenza A/Brisbane/59/07 (H1N1) vaccine were fully protected against lethal challenge by homologous mouse-adapted influenza virus. All vaccine components retained activity during storage at room temperature for at least 3 months as measured in vitro by SRID assay and in vivo by mouse immunization studies. Our data demonstrate that dissolving microneedle patches are a promising advance for influenza cutaneous vaccination due to improved immune responses using less immunogenic influenza antigens and enhanced stability. PMID:25895053

  8. Comparison of experimental and analytical temperatures achieved by DT-18 and PC-1 shipping containers during hypothetical thermal accident tests

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, J.C.

    1992-03-01

    Temperatures were monitored at various locations on DT-18 and PC-1 shipping packages during furnace tests at the Y-12 Plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The furnace tests are intended to simulate hypothetical thermal accident conditions specified in Title 10 CFR, Pt. 71.73 (c)(3). Maximum temperatures of the outer containers ranged from 750 to 965{degrees}C while typical maximum temperatures recorded on the inner containers were 60 to 77{degrees}C. One exceptionally high temperature of 196{degrees}C occurred on the PC-1 inner container. Heating 7.1 models of both the DT-18 and PC-1 packages were developed. Models with and without heat generation in the inner containers were developed for each shipping package. The models with heat generation are intended to simulate condensation and convection of hot vapors generated during the heating of the Celotex{trademark} insulating material used in the packages. In general, the analytical models calculate temperatures for the outer containers which agree well with the test data. The HEATING models with and without heat generation bound the inner container test data. These findings are significant in that they lead to the conclusion that heat is transferred to the inner containers through a mechanism other than conduction alone. The high temperature of 196{degrees}C recorded at the PC-1 inner container is within 4{degrees}C of the maximum temperature calculated by the PC-1 HEATING model with heat generation.

  9. High-power temperature-stable GaInNAs distributed Bragg reflector laser emitting at 1180  nm.

    PubMed

    Korpijärvi, Ville-Markus; Viheriälä, Jukka; Koskinen, Mervi; Aho, Antti T; Guina, Mircea

    2016-02-15

    We report a single-mode 1180 nm distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) laser diode with a high output power of 340 mW. For the fabrication, we employed novel nanoimprint lithography that ensures cost-effective, large-area, conformal patterning and does not require regrowth. The output characteristics exhibited outstanding temperature insensitivity with a power drop of only 30% for an increase of the mount temperature from 20°C to 80°C. The high temperature stability was achieved by using GaInNAs/GaAs quantum wells (QWs), which exhibit improved carrier confinement compared to standard InGaAs/GaAs QWs. The corresponding characteristic temperatures were T0=110  K and T1=160  K. Moreover, we used a large detuning between the peak wavelength of the material gain at room temperature and the lasing wavelength determined by the DBR. In addition to good temperature characteristics, GaInNAs/GaAs QWs exhibit relatively low lattice strain with direct impact on improving the lifetime of laser diodes at this challenging wavelength range. The single-mode laser emission could be tuned by changing the mount temperature (0.1 nm/°C) or the drive current (0.5 pm/mA). The laser showed no degradation in a room-temperature lifetime test at 900 mA drive current. These compact and efficient 1180 nm laser diodes are instrumental for the development of compact frequency-doubled yellow-orange lasers, which have important applications in medicine and spectroscopy. PMID:26872156

  10. Characterization of thermally stable Brønsted acid sites on alumina-supported niobium oxide after calcination at high temperatures.

    PubMed

    Kitano, Tomoyuki; Shishido, Tetsuya; Teramura, Kentaro; Tanaka, Tsunehiro

    2013-08-01

    Thermally stable Brønsted acid sites were generated on alumina-supported niobium oxide (Nb2O5/Al2O3) by calcination at high temperatures, such as 1123 K. The results of structural characterization by using Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, TEM, scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), and energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis indicated that the Nb2O5 monolayer domains were highly dispersed over alumina at low Nb2O5 loadings, such as 5 wt%, and no Brønsted acid sites were presents. The coverage of Nb2O5 monolayer domains over Al2O3 increased with increasing Nb2O5 loading and almost-full coverage was obtained at a loading of 16 wt%. A sharp increase in the number of hydroxy groups, which acted as Brønsted acid sites, was observed at this loading level. The relationship between the acidic properties and the structure of the material suggested that the bridging hydroxy groups (Nb-O(H)-Nb), which were formed at the boundaries between the domains of the Nb2O5 monolayer, acted as thermally stable Brønsted acid sites. PMID:23784806

  11. Stable Cu2O nanocrystals grown on functionalized graphene sheets and room temperature H2S gas sensing with ultrahigh sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Lisha; Shen, Fangping; Tian, Xike; Wang, Donghong; Zhang, Ting; Chen, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Stable Cu2O nanocrystals of around 3 nm were uniformly and densely grown on functionalized graphene sheets (FGS), which act as molecular templates instead of surfactants for controlled nucleation; the distribution density of nanocrystals can be easily controlled by FGS with different C/O ratios. The nanocomposite displays improved stability of the crystalline phase in wet air, which is attributed to finite-size effects that the high-symmetry crystalline phase is to be more stable at smaller size. Meanwhile, we conjecture that the oxygen adsorbed on the interfacial surface prefers to extract electrons from FGS, thus the interfacial bonding also makes a contribution in alleviating the process of corrosion to some extent. More importantly, the Cu2O-FGS nanocomposite based sensor realizes room temperature sensing to H2S with fantastic sensitivity (11%); even at the exposed concentration of 5 ppb, the relative resistance changes show good linearity with the logarithm of the concentration. The enhancement of sensitivity is attributed to the synergistic effect of Cu2O and FGS; on the one hand, surfactant-free capped Cu2O nanocrystals display higher surface activity to adsorb gas molecules, and on the other hand, FGS acting as conducting network presents greater electron transfer efficiency. These observations show that the Cu2O-FGS nanocomposite based sensors have potential applications for monitoring air pollution at room temperature with low cost and power consumption.Stable Cu2O nanocrystals of around 3 nm were uniformly and densely grown on functionalized graphene sheets (FGS), which act as molecular templates instead of surfactants for controlled nucleation; the distribution density of nanocrystals can be easily controlled by FGS with different C/O ratios. The nanocomposite displays improved stability of the crystalline phase in wet air, which is attributed to finite-size effects that the high-symmetry crystalline phase is to be more stable at smaller size. Meanwhile

  12. Room-temperature ferromagnetism in Cr-doped Si achieved by controlling atomic structure, Cr concentration, and carrier densities: A first-principles study

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Xin-Yuan; Yang, Zhong-Qin; Zhu, Yan; Li, Yun

    2015-04-28

    By using first-principles calculations, we investigated how to achieve a strong ferromagnetism in Cr-doped Si by controlling the atomic structure and Cr concentration as well as carrier densities. We found that the configuration in which the Cr atom occupies the tetrahedral interstitial site can exist stably and the Cr atom has a large magnetic moment. Using this doping configuration, room-temperature ferromagnetism can be achieved in both n-type and p-type Si by tuning Cr concentration and carrier densities. The results indicate that the carrier density plays a crucial role in realizing strong ferromagnetism in diluted magnetic semiconductors.

  13. Reconstructing Changes in Deep Ocean Temperature and Global Carbon Cycle during the Early Eocene Warming Trend: High-Resolution Benthic Stable Isotope Records from the SE Atlantic.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauretano, V.; Zachos, J. C.; Lourens, L. J.

    2014-12-01

    From the late Paleocene to the early Eocene, Earth's surface temperatures generally rose, resulting in an increase of at least 5°C in the deep ocean and culminating in the Early Eocene Climatic Optimum (EECO). This long-term warming was punctuated by a series of short-lived global warming events known as "hyperthermals", of which the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) represents the most extreme example. At least two other short-term episodes have been identified as hyperthermals: the ETM2 (or Elmo event) at about 53.7 Myr and the ETM3 (or X-event) at about 52.5 Myr. These transient events are marked by prominent carbon isotope excursions (CIEs), recorded in marine and continental sedimentary sequences and driven by fast and massive injections of 13C-depleted carbon into the ocean-atmosphere system. Recently, evidence has indicated the presence of a regular series of hyperthermal events following the peak in temperatures of the EECO. However, continuous records are needed to investigate short- and long- term changes in the climate system throughout the Early Eocene warming trend. Here, we present new high-resolution benthic stable isotope records of the Early Eocene from ODP Site 1263, (Walvis Ridge, SE Atlantic). The carbon and oxygen records document changes in deep-sea temperature and global carbon cycle encompassing the Early Eocene hyperthermal events and the EECO interval. The transition phase to the post-EECO events is distinct by the decoupling of carbon and oxygen isotopes on the long-term scale. Spectral and wavelet analyses suggest the influence of orbital forcing, specifically long and short eccentricity cycles.

  14. Mineralisation of amethyst-bearing geodes in Ametista do Sul (Brazil) from low-temperature sedimentary brines: evidence from monophase liquid inclusions and stable isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilg, H. Albert; Krüger, Yves; Taubald, Heinrich; van den Kerkhof, Alfons M.; Frenz, Martin; Morteani, Giulio

    2014-10-01

    Fluid inclusion studies in combination with hydrogen, oxygen and sulphur isotope data provide novel insights into the genesis of giant amethyst-bearing geodes in Early Cretaceous Paraná continental flood basalts at Amestita do Sul, Brazil. Monophase liquid inclusions in colourless quartz, amethyst, calcite, barite and gypsum were analysed by microthermometry after stimulating bubble nucleation using single femtosecond laser pulses. The salinity of the fluid inclusions was determined from ice-melting temperatures and a combination of prograde and retrograde homogenisation temperatures via the density maximum of the aqueous solutions. Four mineralisation stages are distinguished. In stage I, celadonite, chalcedony and pyrite formed under reducing conditions in a thermally stable environment. Low δ34SV-CDT values of pyrite (-25 to -32 ‰) suggest biogenic sulphate reduction by organotrophic bacteria. During the subsequent stages II (amethyst, goethite and anhydrite), III (early subhedral calcite) and IV (barite, late subhedral calcite and gypsum), the oxidation state of the fluid changed towards more oxidising conditions and microbial sulphate reduction ceased. Three distinct modes of fluid salinities around 5.3, 3.4 and 0.3 wt% NaCl-equivalent characterise the mineralisation stages II, III and IV, respectively. The salinity of the stage I fluid is unknown due to lack of fluid inclusions. Variation in homogenisation temperatures and in δ18O values of amethyst show evidence of repeated pulses of ascending hydrothermal fluids of up to 80-90 °C infiltrating a basaltic host rock of less than 45 °C. Colourless quartz and amethyst formed at temperatures between 40 and 80 °C, while the different calcite generations and late gypsum precipitated at temperatures below 45 °C. Calculated oxygen isotope composition of the amethyst-precipitating fluid in combination with δD values of amethyst-hosted fluid inclusions (-59 to -51 ‰) show a significant 18O-shift from the

  15. On the Achievement of Nanostructured Interstitial Free Steel by Four-Layer Accumulative Roll Bonding Process at Room Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamaati, Roohollah; Toroghinejad, Mohammad Reza; Amirkhanlou, Sajjad; Edris, Hossein

    2015-09-01

    In this study, the four-layer accumulative roll bonding (ARB) process at room temperature for nanostructuring the interstitial free (IF) steel was used for the first time. Hardness and tensile tests were performed and the microstructure was characterized using scanning transmission electron microscopy. It was found that the grain size decreased into the nanostructured domain after fourth cycle, reaching grain sizes of smaller than 100 nm. The stored energy was retained in the material until the continuous dynamic recrystallization led to nanostructuring of the IF steel. The dislocation density was measured by microhardness indentation size effect using the Nix-Gao model. The results indicated that an increase in the number of ARB cycles leads to increase in the dislocation density. The dislocation density increased from 2.02 × 109 cm-2 for initial sample to 9.47 × 109 cm-2 after fourth cycle. The yield strength of the IF steel after fourth cycle was 10.8 times (909 MPa) higher than that of the initial sample (84 MPa). Finally, the contribution of individual mechanisms such as the grain refinement, dislocation, and precipitation in strengthening of the IF steel were evaluated.

  16. Infrared spectra, Raman spectra, microwave dielectric properties and simulation for effective permittivity of temperature stable ceramics AMoO4-TiO2 (A = Ca, Sr).

    PubMed

    Guo, Jing; Zhou, Di; Wang, Lu; Wang, Hong; Shao, Tao; Qi, Ze M; Yao, Xi

    2013-02-01

    In this work, temperature stable microwave dielectric materials (1 - x)AMoO(4)-xTiO(2) (A = Ca, Sr) were prepared by a solid state reaction method. The phase composition, sintering behaviors, microstructures, microwave dielectric properties, effective permittivity and vibrational phonon modes were investigated. The X-ray diffraction pattern and scanning electron microscope analysis indicated that the AMoO(4) (A = Ca, Sr) phase could coexist with the TiO(2) phase. The effective dielectric constants of the AMoO(4)-TiO(2) composites were calculated by the finite element method (FEM), compared with the measured values and the numerical results obtained by the classical mixing rules. The correlation between the dielectric properties and the crystal structures were studied using IR and Raman spectroscopy. The infrared spectra were analyzed using the classical harmonic oscillator model, and revealed that the external vibration modes of AMoO(4) (A = Ca, Sr) had the most significant influence on the dielectric constant. The Raman spectra showed that there were strong interactions in the [MoO(4)] tetrahedron due to the sharp and intense Raman modes. Finally, the low-firing (900 °C) microwave dielectric ceramics were obtained with 3 wt% H(3)BO(3)-CuO addition (BCu), and they possess good microwave dielectric properties with ε(r) = 10.6-13, high Q×f values (40 700-72 050 GHz), and near-zero temperature coefficients of resonant frequency (TCF or τ(f) values). These results also show that (1 - x)AMoO(4)-xTiO(2)-BCu (A = Ca, Sr) ceramics are good candidates for microwave electronic device applications. PMID:23124534

  17. Microwave Dielectric Properties of Temperature-Stable BaLn2(MoO4)4-TiO2 (Ln = Ce, Nd, and Sm) Ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wen-Bo; Xi, Hai-Hong; Zhou, Di

    2015-11-01

    A series of temperature-stable microwave dielectric ceramics (1 - x)Ba Ln2(MoO4)4- xTiO2 (Ln = Ce, Nd, and Sm; 0.4 ≤ x ≤0.55) were prepared by solid-state reaction. Sintering behavior, phase composition, microstructure, and microwave dielectric properties were investigated. X-ray powder diffraction and scanning electron microscopy revealed that the main phases of the BaLn2(MoO4)4-TiO2 ceramics were the monoclinic BaLn2(MoO4)4 phase and the rutile TiO2 phase. Study of the materials' microwave dielectric properties revealed that the permittivity ( ɛ r) and the temperature coefficient of the resonant frequency ( τ f) increased gradually with increasing x value whereas quality factors ( Q × f) decreased. For BaLn2(MoO4)4-TiO2 (Ln = Ce and Nd), τ f values could be adjusted to near zero, relative permittivity ( ɛ r) was 13.2-14.3, and Q × f values were between 11,950 and 45,720 GHz (at 9.11-9.83 GHz) when x = 0.45 to 0.55. For BaSm2(MoO4)4-TiO2, excellent microwave dielectric properties were obtained when x = 0.4 to 0.5, τ f values could be adjusted to near zero, ɛ r was 13.1-13.9, and Q × f values were between 25,520 and 63,130 GHz (at 9.31-10.11 GHz).

  18. Formation of hierarchical CuO microcabbages as stable bionic superhydrophobic materials via a room-temperature solution-immersion process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jinping; Huang, Xintang; Li, Yuanyuan; Li, Zikun; Chi, Qingbo; Li, Guangyun

    2008-11-01

    A new hierarchical CuO architecture consisting of densely packed nanoplates and nanoribbons was directly fabricated on Cu foils via a room-temperature solution-immersion process. The architectures resembled cabbages both in the shape and structure, and the plates and ribbons served as the leafstalks and leaves of cabbages, respectively. By carefully monitoring the growth stages, it was found that self-assembled CuO nanoplates could be firstly formed on the Cu foils, and then CuO tiny flexible nanoribbons were grown from the edges of fresh plates. The effect of NaOH concentration on the morphology of CuO structures was discussed. Importantly, stable superhydrophobicity (contact angle CA = 155°), independent of pH value of the water droplets, was successfully observed for CuO microcabbages after modification. The wettability of other CuO micro- and nanoscale hierarchical surface structures fabricated using various NaOH concentrations was also presented. The realization of superhydrophobic bionic surfaces with a new hierarchical morphology of CuO will shed new insights in both the synthesis and application fields.

  19. Effects of Mild Water Stress and Diurnal Changes in Temperature and Humidity on the Stable Oxygen and Hydrogen Isotopic Composition of Leaf Water in Cornus stolonifera L. 1

    PubMed Central

    Flanagan, Lawrence B.; Ehleringer, James R.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper we make comparisons between the observed stable isotopic composition of leaf water and the predictions of the Craig-Gordon model of isotopic enrichment when plants (Cornus stolonifera L.) were exposed to natural, diurnal changes in temperature and humidity in a glasshouse. In addition, we determined the effects of mild water stress on the isotopic composition of leaf water. The model predicted different patterns of diurnal change for the oxygen and hydrogen isotopic composition of leaf water. The observed leaf water isotopic composition followed qualitatively similar patterns of diurnal change to those predicted by the model. At midday, however, the model always predicted a higher degree of heavy isotope enrichment than was actually observed in leaves. There was no effect of mild water stress on the hydrogen isotopic composition of leaf water. For the oxygen isotopic composition of leaf water, there was either no significant difference between control and water-stressed plants or the stressed plants had lower δ18O values, despite the enriched stem water isotopic composition observed for the stressed plants. PMID:16668385

  20. Palaeo-equatorial temperatures and carbon-cycle evolution at the Triassic- Jurassic boundary: A stable isotope perspective from shallow-water carbonates from the UAE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honig, M. R.; John, C. M.

    2013-12-01

    The Triassic-Jurassic boundary was marked by global changes including carbon-cycle perturbations and the opening of the Atlantic Ocean. These changes were accompanied by one of the major extinction events of the Phanerozoic. The carbon-cycle perturbations have been recorded in carbon isotope curves from bulk carbonates, organic carbon and fossil wood in several Tethyan locations and have been used for chemostratigraphic purposes. Here we present data from shallow-marine carbonates deposited on a homoclinal Middle Eastern carbonate ramp (United Arab Emirates). Our site was located at the equator throughout the Late Triassic and the Early Jurassic, and this study provides the first constraints of environmental changes at the low-latitudes for the Triassic-Jurassic boundary. Shallow-marine carbonate depositional systems are extremely sensitive to palaeoenvironmental changes and their usefulness for chemostratigraphy is being debated. However, the palaeogeographic location of the studied carbonate ramp gives us a unique insight into a tropical carbonate factory at a time of severe global change. Stable isotope measurements (carbon and oxygen) are being carried out on micrite, ooids and shell material along the Triassic-Jurassic boundary. The stable isotope results on micrite show a prominent negative shift in carbon isotope values of approximately 2 ‰ just below the inferred position of the Triassic-Jurassic boundary. A similar isotopic trend is also observed across the Tethys but with a range of amplitudes (from ~2 ‰ to ~4 ‰). These results seem to indicate that the neritic carbonates from our studied section can be used for chemostratigraphic purposes, and the amplitudes of the carbon isotope shifts provide critical constraints on the magnitude of carbon-cycle perturbations at low latitudes across the Triassic-Jurassic boundary. Seawater temperatures across the Triassic-Jurassic boundary will be constrained using the clumped isotope palaeo-thermometer applied

  1. Achieving nitritation at low temperatures using free ammonia inhibition on Nitrobacter and real-time control in an SBR treating landfill leachate.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hongwei; Peng, Yongzhen; Wang, Shuying; Ma, Juan

    2015-04-01

    Free ammonia (FA) inhibition on nitrite-oxidized bacteria (NOB) and real-time control are used to achieve nitrogen removal from landfill leachate via nitrite pathway at low temperatures in sequencing batch reactor. The inhibition of FA on NOB activity during the aerobic period was prolonged using real-time control. The degree of nitrite accumulation was monitored along with variations of the ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and NOB population using fluorescence in situ hybridization techniques. It is demonstrated that the end-point of ammonia oxidization is detected from the on-line measured dissolved oxygen, oxidization-reduction potential, and pH signals, which could avoid the loss the FA inhibition on NOB caused by excess aeration. At low temperature (13.0-17.6°C), the level of nitrite pathway rapidly increased from 19.8% to 90%, suggesting that nitritation was successfully started up at low temperature by applying syntrophic association of the FA inhibition and real-time control, and then this high level of nitrite pathway was stably maintained for as long as 233 days. Mechanism analysis shows that the establishment of nitritation was primarily the result of predominant ammonia-oxidizing bacteria developed in the nitrifying bacteria population compared to NOB. This was mainly due to a gradual reduction of nitrite amount that is available to provide energy for the growth of NOB, eventually leading to the elimination of NOB from the bacterial clusters in sequencing batch reactor sludge system. PMID:25872722

  2. Ca-rich Ca-Al-oxide, high-temperature-stable sorbents prepared from hydrotalcite precursors: synthesis, characterization, and CO2 capture capacity.

    PubMed

    Chang, Po-Hsueh; Chang, Yen-Po; Chen, San-Yuan; Yu, Ching-Tsung; Chyou, Yau-Pin

    2011-12-16

    We present the design and synthesis of Ca-rich Ca-Al-O oxides, with Ca(2+)/Al(3+) ratios of 1:1, 3:1, 5:1, and 7:1, which were prepared by hydrothermal decomposition of coprecipitated hydrotalcite-like Ca-Al-CO(3) precursors, for high-temperature CO(2) adsorption at 500-700 °C. In situ X-ray diffraction measurements indicate that the coprecipitated, Ca-rich, hydrotalcite-like powders with Ca(2+)/Al(3+) ratios of 5:1 and 7:1 contained Ca(OH)(2) and layered double hydroxide (LDH) phases. Upon annealing, LDH was first destroyed at approximately 200 °C to form an amorphous matrix, and then at 450-550 °C, the Ca(OH)(2) phase was converted into a CaO matrix with incorporated Al(3+) to form a homogeneous solid solution without a disrupted lattice structure. CaO nanocrystals were grown by thermal treatment of the weakly crystalline Ca-Al-O oxide matrix. Thermogravimetric analysis indicates that a CO(2) adsorption capacity of approximately 51 wt. % can be obtained from Ca-rich Ca-Al-O oxides prepared by calcination of 7:1 Ca-Al-CO(3) LDH phases at 600-700 °C. Furthermore, a relatively high CO(2) capture capability can be achieved, even with gas flows containing very low CO(2) concentrations (CO(2)/N(2) = 10 %). Approximately 95.6 % of the initial CO(2) adsorption capacity of the adsorbent is retained after 30 cycles of carbonation-calcination. TEM analysis indicates that carbonation-promoted CaCO(3) formation in the Ca-Al-O oxide matrix at 600 °C, but a subsequent desorption in N(2) at 700 °C, caused the formation CaO nanocrystals of approximately 10 nm. The CaO nanocrystals are widely distributed in the weakly crystalline Ca-Al-O oxide matrix and are present during the carbonation-calcination cycles. This demonstrates that Ca-Al-O sorbents that developed through the synthesis and calcination of Ca-rich Ca-Al LDH phases are suitable for long-term cyclic operation in severe temperature environments. PMID:22072595

  3. Methods for passivating silicon devices at low temperature to achieve low interface state density and low recombination velocity while preserving carrier lifetime

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Zhizhang; Rohatgi, Ajeet

    1995-01-01

    A new process has been developed to achieve a very low SiO.sub.x /Si interface state density D.sub.it, low recombination velocity S (<2 cm/s), and high effective carrier lifetime T.sub.eff (>5 ms) for oxides deposited on silicon substrates at low temperature. The technique involves direct plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD), with appropriate growth conditions, followed by a photo-assisted rapid thermal annealing (RTA) process. Approximately 500-A-thick SiO.sub.x layers are deposited on Si by PECVD at 250.degree. C. with 0.02 W/cm.sup.-2 rf power, then covered with SiN or an evaporated thin aluminum layer, and subjected to a photo-assisted anneal in forming gas ambient at 350.degree. C., resulting in an interface state density D.sub.it in the range of about 1-4.times.10.sup.10 cm.sup.-2 eV.sup.-1, which sets a record for the lowest interface state density D.sub.it for PECVD oxides fabricated to date. Detailed analysis shows that the PECVD deposition conditions, photo-assisted anneal, forming gas ambient, and the presence of an aluminum layer on top of the oxides during the anneal, all contributed to this low value of interface state density D.sub.it. Detailed metal-oxide semiconductor analysis and model calculations show that such a low recombination velocity S is the result of moderately high positive oxide charge (5.times.10.sup.11 -1.times.10.sup.12 cm.sup.-2) and relatively low midgap interface state density (1.times.10.sup.10 -4.times.10.sup.10 cm.sup.-2 eV.sup.-1). Photo-assisted anneal was found to be superior to furnace annealing, and a forming gas ambient was better than a nitrogen ambient for achieving a very low surface recombination velocity S.

  4. Thermally Stable, Latent Olefin Metathesis Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Renee M; Fedorov, Alexey; Keitz, Benjamin K; Grubbs, Robert H

    2011-12-26

    Highly thermally stable N-aryl,N-alkyl N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) ruthenium catalysts were designed and synthesized for latent olefin metathesis. These catalysts showed excellent latent behavior toward metathesis reactions, whereby the complexes were inactive at ambient temperature and initiated at elevated temperatures, a challenging property to achieve with second generation catalysts. A sterically hindered N-tert-butyl substituent on the NHC ligand of the ruthenium complex was found to induce latent behavior toward cross-metathesis reactions, and exchange of the chloride ligands for iodide ligands was necessary to attain latent behavior during ring-opening metathesis polymerization (ROMP). Iodide-based catalysts showed no reactivity toward ROMP of norbornene-derived monomers at 25 °C, and upon heating to 85 °C gave complete conversion of monomer to polymer in less than 2 hours. All of the complexes were very stable to air, moisture, and elevated temperatures up to at least 90 °C, and exhibited a long catalyst lifetime in solution at elevated temperatures. PMID:22282652

  5. Plasma-on-chip device for stable irradiation of cells cultured in media with a low-temperature atmospheric pressure plasma.

    PubMed

    Okada, Tomohiro; Chang, Chun-Yao; Kobayashi, Mime; Shimizu, Tetsuji; Sasaki, Minoru; Kumagai, Shinya

    2016-09-01

    We have developed a micro electromechanical systems (MEMS) device which enables plasma treatment for cells cultured in media. The device, referred to as the plasma-on-chip, comprises microwells and microplasma sources fabricated together in a single chip. The microwells have through-holes between the microwells and microplasma sources. Each microplasma source is located on the backside of each microwells. The reactive components generated by the microplasma sources pass through the through-holes and reach cells cultured in the microwells. In this study, a plasma-on-chip device was modified for a stable plasma treatment. The use of a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) technique allowed a stable plasma treatment up to 3 min. The plasma-on-chip with the original electrode configuration typically had the maximum stable operation time of around 1 min. Spectral analysis of the plasma identified reactive species such as O and OH radicals that can affect the activity of cells. Plasma treatment was successfully performed on yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and green algae (Chlorella) cells. While no apparent change was observed with yeast, the treatment degraded the activity of the Chlorella cells and decreased their fluorescence. The device has the potential to help understand interactions between plasma and cells. PMID:27059851

  6. Well-posed two-temperature constitutive equations for stable dense fluid shock waves using molecular dynamics and generalizations of Navier-Stokes-Fourier continuum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoover, Wm. G.; Hoover, Carol G.

    2010-04-01

    Guided by molecular dynamics simulations, we generalize the Navier-Stokes-Fourier constitutive equations and the continuum motion equations to include both transverse and longitudinal temperatures. To do so we partition the contributions of the heat transfer, the work done, and the heat flux vector between the longitudinal and transverse temperatures. With shockwave boundary conditions time-dependent solutions of these equations converge to give stationary shockwave profiles. The profiles include anisotropic temperature and can be fitted to molecular dynamics results, demonstrating the utility and simplicity of a two-temperature description of far-from-equilibrium states.

  7. Stable isotopes in mineralogy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Neil, J.R.

    1977-01-01

    Stable isotope fractionations between minerals are functions of the fundamental vibrational frequencies of the minerals and therefore bear on several topics of mineralogical interest. Isotopic compositions of the elements H, C, O, Si, and S can now be determined routinely in almost any mineral. A summary has been made of both published and new results of laboratory investigations, analyses of natural materials, and theoretical considerations which bear on the importance of temperature, pressure, chemical composition and crystal structure to the isotopic properties of minerals. It is shown that stable isotope studies can sometimes provide evidence for elucidating details of crystal structure and can be a powerful tool for use in tracing the reaction paths of mineralogical reactions. ?? 1977 Springer-Verlag.

  8. Piezoelectricity above the Curie temperature? Combining flexoelectricity and functional grading to enable high-temperature electromechanical coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Mbarki, R.; Baccam, N.; Dayal, Kaushik; Sharma, P.

    2014-03-24

    Most technologically relevant ferroelectrics typically lose piezoelectricity above the Curie temperature. This limits their use to relatively low temperatures. In this Letter, exploiting a combination of flexoelectricity and simple functional grading, we propose a strategy for high-temperature electromechanical coupling in a standard thin film configuration. We use continuum modeling to quantitatively demonstrate the possibility of achieving apparent piezoelectric materials with large and temperature-stable electromechanical coupling across a wide temperature range that extends significantly above the Curie temperature. With Barium and Strontium Titanate, as example materials, a significant electromechanical coupling that is potentially temperature-stable up to 900 °C is possible.

  9. Examining the large-scale convergence of photosynthesis-weighted tree leaf temperatures through stable oxygen isotope analysis of multiple data sets.

    PubMed

    Song, Xin; Barbour, Margaret M; Saurer, Matthias; Helliker, Brent R

    2011-12-01

    The idea that photosynthesis-weighted tree canopy leaf temperature (T(canδ)) can be resolved through analysis of oxygen isotope composition in tree wood cellulose (δ(18) O(wc)) has led to the observation of boreal-to-subtropical convergence of T(canδ) to c. 20°C. To further assess the validity of the large-scale convergence of T(canδ), we used the isotope approach to perform calculation of T(canδ) for independent δ(18) O(wc) data sets that have broad coverage of climates. For the boreal-to-subtropical data sets, we found that the deviation of T(canδ) from the growing season temperature systemically increases with the decreasing mean annual temperature. Across the whole data sets we calculated a mean T(canδ) of 19.48°C and an SD of 2.05°C, while for the tropical data set, the mean T(canδ) was 26.40 ± 1.03°C, significantly higher than the boreal-to-subtropical mean. Our study thus offers independent isotopic support for the concept that boreal-to-subtropical trees display conserved T(canδ) near 20°C. The isotopic analysis cannot distinguish between the possibility that leaf temperatures are generally elevated above ambient air temperatures in cooler environments and the possibility that leaf temperature equals air temperature, whereas the leaf/air temperature at which photosynthesis occurs has a weighted average of near 20°C in cooler environments. Future work will separate these potential explanations. PMID:21899555

  10. Sol-gel low-temperature synthesis of stable anatase-type TiO2 nanoparticles under different conditions and its photocatalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Behnajady, Mohammad A; Eskandarloo, Hamed; Modirshahla, Nasser; Shokri, Mohammad

    2011-01-01

    In this work, TiO(2) nanoparticles in anatase phase was prepared by sol-gel low temperature method from titanium tetra-isopropoxide (TTIP) as titanium precursor in the presence of acetic acid (AcOH). The effects of synthesis parameters such as AcOH and water ratios, sol formation time, synthesis and calcination temperature on the photocatalytic activity of TiO(2) nanoparticles were evaluated. The resulting nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction, UV-Vis reflectance spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller techniques. Photocatalytic activity of anatase TiO(2) nanoparticles determined in the removal of C. I. Acid Red 27 (AR27) under UV light irradiation. Results indicate that with increasing AcOH/TTIP molar ratio from 1 to 10, sol formation time from 1 to 3 h and synthesis temperature from 0 to 25°C, increases crystallite size of synthesized nanoparticles. It was found that optimal conditions for low temperature preparation of anatase-type TiO(2) nanoparticles with high photocatalytic activity were as follows: TTIP:AcOH:water molar ratio 1:1:200, sol formation time 1 h, synthesis temperature 0°C and calcination temperature 450°C. PMID:21668867

  11. Crystallization temperatures and stable isotope compositions of Mississippi valley-type carbonates and sulfides of the Trenton Limestone, Wyandot County, Ohio

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haefner, R.J.; Mancuso, J.J.; Frizado, J.P.; Shelton, K.L.; Gregg, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    This study provides the first quantitative data on crystallization temperatures and isotopic compositions of Mississippi Valley-type mineralization in northwest Ohio. Samples of Trenton Limestone sulfides and associated carbonates were obtained from drill cores penetrating the Wyandot fracture zone, Wyandot County, Ohio. -Authors

  12. Exfoliated β-Ga2O3 nano-belt field-effect transistors for air-stable high power and high temperature electronics.

    PubMed

    Kim, Janghyuk; Oh, Sooyeoun; Mastro, Michael A; Kim, Jihyun

    2016-06-21

    This study demonstrated the exfoliation of a two-dimensional (2D) β-Ga2O3 nano-belt and subsequent processing into a thin film transistor structure. This mechanical exfoliation and transfer method produces β-Ga2O3 nano-belts with a pristine surface as well as a continuous defect-free interface with the SiO2/Si substrate. This β-Ga2O3 nano-belt based transistor displayed an on/off ratio that increased from approximately 10(4) to 10(7) over the operating temperature range of 20 °C to 250 °C. No electrical breakdown was observed in our measurements up to VDS = +40 V and VGS = -60 V between 25 °C and 250 °C. Additionally, the electrical characteristics were not degraded after a month-long storage in ambient air. The demonstration of high-temperature/high-voltage operation of quasi-2D β-Ga2O3 nano-belts contrasts with traditional 2D materials such as transition metal dichalcogenides that intrinsically have limited temperature and power operational envelopes owing to their narrow bandgap. This work motivates the application of 2D β-Ga2O3 to high power nano-electronic devices for harsh environments such as high temperature chemical sensors and photodetectors as well as the miniaturization of power circuits and cooling systems in nano-electronics. PMID:27230724

  13. Stable platinum nanoparticles on specific MgAl2O4 spinel facets at high temperatures in oxidizing atmospheres

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Wei-Zhen; Kovarik, Libor; Mei, Donghai; Liu, Jun; Wang, Yong; Peden, Charles H. F.

    2013-09-25

    The development of thermally stable, nanometer-sized precious metal-based catalysts remains a daunting challenge. Such materials, especially those based on the use of costly platinum metal, are essential and, to date, non-replaceable for a large number of industrially important catalytic processes. Here we report a well-defined cuboctahedral MgAl2O4 spinel support material that is capable of stabilizing platinum particles in the range of 1–3 nm on its relatively abundant {111} facets during extremely severe aging at 800 °C in air for 1 week. The aged catalysts retain platinum dispersions of 15.9% with catalytic activities for methanol oxidation being ~80% of that of fresh ones, whereas a conventional Pt/γ-Al2O3 catalyst is severely sintered and nearly inactive. Finally, we reveal the origin of the markedly superior ability of spinel {111} facets, resulting from strong interactions between spinel surface oxygens and epitaxial platinum {111} facets, inspiring the rational design of anti-sintering supported platinum group catalysts.

  14. Field calibration of stable isotopes (δ18O) in coccoliths : Toward an accurate carbonate record-based reconstruction of the photic zone temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candelier, Y.; Minoletti, F.; Hermoso, M.; Probert, I.

    2010-12-01

    Oxygen-isotopes from biogenic carbonates have been widely used to estimate SSTs during the Cenozoic. The full potential of coccolithophores for reconstructing past temperatures is still unexploited owing to two major issues: their minute size that prevents their isotopic analyzes at the specific level as done for foraminifera, and the large range of interspecific isotopic offsets (~ 5‰) ascribed to the vital effect (Ziveri et al., 2003). To test the suitability of applying in vitro data for the truly pelagic natural record, we established new coccolithophorid δ18O-temperature calibrations from sediments that we compared to empirical thermodependance equations from previous culture experiments. In this respect, we focused on two foremost coccolithophore species: Calcidicus leptoporus and Gephyrocapsa oceanica. We successfully obtained monospecific fractions of those taxa by applying a microfiltering protocol (Minoletti et al., 2009) on Holocene sediments for which the temperature of the photic zone water has been directly measured. For G. oceanica, the constant offset (δcGo-δceq) of ~ +1.5‰ with respect to equilibrium is in a good agreement with previous culture experiments (~ +1.6‰; Ziveri et al., 2003). Conversely, for C. leptoporus, although the relation between temperature and oxygen-isotopic fractionation is also well-behaved between 16 and 27°C, we found a significant discrepancy with previous cultures (-2.8‰; Dudley et al., 1986). This difference could be the result of growing conditions in the lab that may not mimate the natural environment (seawater chemistry such as pH, nutrient level, cell concentration, …). We generated new isotopic results of preliminary temperature-controlled experiments for C. leptoporus in constrained conditions close to the natural environment. We measured an isotopic offset comparable to the one from our sedimentologic study. Hence, we suggest a new correction of -1.2‰ for C. leptoporus, which may be more

  15. High-resolution distributed temperature sensing: a new tool to study the space-time dynamics of transient cold-air pools in the weak-wind stable boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, C. K.; Selker, J. S.; Zeeman, M. J.

    2011-12-01

    We present a novel approach to observing the two-dimensional thermal structure of atmospheric near-surface turbulent and non-turbulent flows by measuring air temperatures in a vertical plane at a high resolution (0.25 m, every approximately 2 s) using distributed temperature sensing (DTS). Air temperature observations obtained from a fiber optics array of approximate dimensions 8 by 8 m and sonic anemometer data from two levels were collected for a period of 23 days over a short grass field located in the flat bottom of a wide valley with moderate surface heterogeneity. In addition to evaluating the DTS technique to resolve the rapidly changing gradients and small-scale perturbations associated with turbulence in the atmosphere for convective and stable boundary layers, the objective was to analyze the space-time dynamics of transient cold-air pools in the stable boundary layer. The time response and precision of the fiber temperatures were adequate to resolve individual sub-meter sized turbulent and non-turbulent structures of time scales >= 3 s and enabled calculation of meaningful sensible heat fluxes when combined with vertical wind observations. The small turbulence scales associated with strong vertical shear and low measurement heights pose limitations to the technique. The top of the transient cold-air pool was highly non-stationary. The thermal structure of the near-surface air is generally a superposition of various perturbations of different time and length scales, whereas no preferred scales were identified. Vertical length scales for turbulence in the strongly stratified transient cold-air pool directly derived from the DTS data agreed well with buoyancy length scales parameterized using the vertical velocity variance and the Brunt-Vaisala frequency, while scales for weak stratification disagreed. The high-resolution DTS technique opens a new window into spatially sampling geophysical fluid flows including turbulent energy exchange with a broad

  16. Effect of thermally stable Cu- and Mg-rich aluminides on the high temperature strength of an AlSi12CuMgNi alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Asghar, Z.

    2014-02-15

    The internal architecture of an AlSi12CuMgNi piston alloy, revealed by synchrotron tomography, consists of three dimensional interconnected hybrid networks of Cu-rich aluminides, Mg-rich aluminides and eutectic/primary Si embedded in an α-Al matrix. The strength at room temperature and at 300°C is studied as a function of solution treatment time at 490°C and compared with results previously reported for an AlSi12Ni alloy. The addition of 1 wt% Cu and 1 wt% Mg to AlSi12CuMgNi increases the room temperature strength by precipitation hardening while the strength at 300°C is similar for both alloys in as-cast condition. The strength of AlSi12CuMgNi decreases with solution treatment time and stabilizes at 4 h solution treatment. The effect of solution treatment time on the strength of the AlSi12CuMgNi alloy is less pronounced than for the AlSi12Ni alloy both at room temperature and at 300°C. - Highlights: • The 3D microstructure of AlSi12CuMgNi is revealed by synchrotron tomography. • An imaging analysis procedure to segment phases with similar contrasts is presented. • 1 wt% Cu and Mg results in the formation of 3D networks of rigid phases. • AlSi12CuMgNi is stronger than AlSi12Ni owing to the stability of the 3D networks.

  17. Spectral reflectance data of a high temperature stable solar selective coating based on MoSi2 -Si3N4.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Pinilla, D; Rodríguez-Palomo, A; Álvarez-Fraga, L; Céspedes, E; Prieto, J E; Muñoz-Martín, A; Prieto, C

    2016-06-01

    Data of optical performance, thermal stability and ageing are given for solar selective coatings (SSC) based on a novel MoSi2-Si3N4 absorbing composite. SSC have been prepared as multilayer stacks formed by silver as metallic infrared reflector, a double layer composite and an antireflective layer (doi: 10.1016/j.solmat.2016.04.001 [1]). Spectroscopic reflectance data corresponding to the optical performance of samples after moderate vacuum annealing at temperatures up to 600 °C and after ageing test of more than 200 h with several heating-cooling cycles are shown here. PMID:27182544

  18. Spectral reflectance data of a high temperature stable solar selective coating based on MoSi2–Si3N4

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Pinilla, D.; Rodríguez-Palomo, A.; Álvarez-Fraga, L.; Céspedes, E.; Prieto, J.E.; Muñoz-Martín, A.; Prieto, C.

    2016-01-01

    Data of optical performance, thermal stability and ageing are given for solar selective coatings (SSC) based on a novel MoSi2–Si3N4 absorbing composite. SSC have been prepared as multilayer stacks formed by silver as metallic infrared reflector, a double layer composite and an antireflective layer (doi: 10.1016/j.solmat.2016.04.001 [1]). Spectroscopic reflectance data corresponding to the optical performance of samples after moderate vacuum annealing at temperatures up to 600 °C and after ageing test of more than 200 h with several heating–cooling cycles are shown here. PMID:27182544

  19. Molecular cloning, characterization, and dye-decolorizing ability of a temperature- and pH-stable laccase from Bacillus subtilis X1.

    PubMed

    Guan, Zheng-Bing; Zhang, Ning; Song, Chen-Meng; Zhou, Wen; Zhou, Lin-Xi; Zhao, Hong; Xu, Cheng-Wen; Cai, Yu-Jie; Liao, Xiang-Ru

    2014-02-01

    Laccases from fungal origin are typically unstable at high temperatures and alkaline conditions. This characteristic limits their practical applications. In this study, a new bacterial strain exhibiting laccase activity was isolated from raw fennel honey samples and identified as Bacillus subtilis X1. The CotA-laccase gene was cloned from strain X1 and efficiently expressed in Escherichia coli in a biologically active form. The purified recombinant laccase demonstrated an extensive pH range for catalyzing substrates and high stability toward alkaline pH and high temperatures. No loss of laccase activity was observed at pH 9.0 after 10 days of incubation, and approximately 21 % of the initial activity was detected after 10 h at 80 °C. Two anthraquinonic dyes (reactive blue 4 and reactive yellow brown) and two azo dyes (reactive red 11 and reactive brilliant orange) could be partially decolorized by purified laccase in the absence of a mediator. The decolorization process was efficiently promoted when methylsyringate was present, with more than 90 % of color removal occurring in 3 h at pH 7.0 or 9.0. These unusual properties indicated a high potential of the novel CotA-laccase for industrial applications. PMID:24218183

  20. Stable solid and aqueous H2CO3 from CO2 and H2O at high pressure and high temperature

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongbo; Zeuschner, Janek; Eremets, Mikhail; Troyan, Ivan; Willams, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Carbonic acid (H2CO3) forms in small amounts when CO2 dissolves in H2O, yet decomposes rapidly under ambient conditions of temperature and pressure. Despite its fleeting existence, H2CO3 plays an important role in the global carbon cycle and in biological carbonate-containing systems. The short lifetime in water and presumed low concentration under all terrestrial conditions has stifled study of this fundamental species. Here, we have examined CO2/H2O mixtures under conditions of high pressure and high temperature to explore the potential for reaction to H2CO3 inside celestial bodies. We present a novel method to prepare solid H2CO3 by heating CO2/H2O mixtures at high pressure with a CO2 laser. Furthermore, we found that, contrary to present understanding, neutral H2CO3 is a significant component in aqueous CO2 solutions above 2.4 GPa and 110 °C as identified by IR-absorption and Raman spectroscopy. This is highly significant for speciation of deep C–O–H fluids with potential consequences for fluid-carbonate-bearing rock interactions. As conditions inside subduction zones on Earth appear to be most favorable for production of aqueous H2CO3, a role in subduction related phenomena is inferred. PMID:26813580

  1. Stable solid and aqueous H2CO3 from CO2 and H2O at high pressure and high temperature.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongbo; Zeuschner, Janek; Eremets, Mikhail; Troyan, Ivan; Willams, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Carbonic acid (H2CO3) forms in small amounts when CO2 dissolves in H2O, yet decomposes rapidly under ambient conditions of temperature and pressure. Despite its fleeting existence, H2CO3 plays an important role in the global carbon cycle and in biological carbonate-containing systems. The short lifetime in water and presumed low concentration under all terrestrial conditions has stifled study of this fundamental species. Here, we have examined CO2/H2O mixtures under conditions of high pressure and high temperature to explore the potential for reaction to H2CO3 inside celestial bodies. We present a novel method to prepare solid H2CO3 by heating CO2/H2O mixtures at high pressure with a CO2 laser. Furthermore, we found that, contrary to present understanding, neutral H2CO3 is a significant component in aqueous CO2 solutions above 2.4 GPa and 110 °C as identified by IR-absorption and Raman spectroscopy. This is highly significant for speciation of deep C-O-H fluids with potential consequences for fluid-carbonate-bearing rock interactions. As conditions inside subduction zones on Earth appear to be most favorable for production of aqueous H2CO3, a role in subduction related phenomena is inferred. PMID:26813580

  2. Stable solid and aqueous H2CO3 from CO2 and H2O at high pressure and high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongbo; Zeuschner, Janek; Eremets, Mikhail; Troyan, Ivan; Willams, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Carbonic acid (H2CO3) forms in small amounts when CO2 dissolves in H2O, yet decomposes rapidly under ambient conditions of temperature and pressure. Despite its fleeting existence, H2CO3 plays an important role in the global carbon cycle and in biological carbonate-containing systems. The short lifetime in water and presumed low concentration under all terrestrial conditions has stifled study of this fundamental species. Here, we have examined CO2/H2O mixtures under conditions of high pressure and high temperature to explore the potential for reaction to H2CO3 inside celestial bodies. We present a novel method to prepare solid H2CO3 by heating CO2/H2O mixtures at high pressure with a CO2 laser. Furthermore, we found that, contrary to present understanding, neutral H2CO3 is a significant component in aqueous CO2 solutions above 2.4 GPa and 110 °C as identified by IR-absorption and Raman spectroscopy. This is highly significant for speciation of deep C-O-H fluids with potential consequences for fluid-carbonate-bearing rock interactions. As conditions inside subduction zones on Earth appear to be most favorable for production of aqueous H2CO3, a role in subduction related phenomena is inferred.

  3. Low temperature synthesis of CaO-SiO2 glasses having stable liquid-liquid immiscibility by sol-gel process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P.

    1990-01-01

    Calcium silicate glass compositions lying within the liquid-liquid immiscibility dome of the phase diagram, which could not have been prepared by the conventional melting method, were synthesized by the sol-gel process. Hydrolysis and polycondensation of tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) solutions containing up to 20 mol percent calcium nitrate resulted in the formation of clear and transparent gels. The gel formation time decreased with increase in water:TEOS mole ratio, calcium content, and the reaction temperature. Smaller values of gel times in the presence of calcium nitrate are probably caused by lowering of the ionic charge on the sol particles by the salt present. The gelation activation energy, E(sub gel), was evaluated from temperature dependence of the gel time. Presence of Ca(2+) ions or the water:TEOS mole ratio did not have an appreciable effect on the value of E(sub gel). Presence of glycerol in the solution helped in the formation of crack-free monolithic gel specimens. Chemical and structural changes occurring in the gels, as a function of the heat treatments, have been monitored using DTA, TGA, IR-spectroscopy, x ray diffraction, surface area and pore size distribution measurements.

  4. Low temperature synthesis of CaO-SiO2 glasses having stable liquid-liquid immiscibility by the sol-gel process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, N. P.

    1992-01-01

    Calcium silicate glass compositions lying within the liquid-liquid immiscibility dome of the phase diagram, which could not have been prepared by the conventional melting method, were synthesized by the sol-gel process. Hydrolysis and polycondensation of tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) solutions containing up to 20 mol percent calcium nitrate resulted in the formation of clear and transparent gels. The gel formation time decreased with increase in water: TEOS mole ratio, calcium content, and the reaction temperature. Smaller values of gel times in the presence of calcium nitrate are probably caused by lowering of the ionic charge on the sol particles by the salt present. The gelation activation energy, E(sub gel), was evaluated from temperature dependence of the gel time. Presence of Ca(2+) ions or the water:TEOS mole ratio did not have an appreciable effect on the value of E(sub gel). Presence of glycerol in the solution helped in the formation of crack-free monolithic gel specimens. Chemical and structural changes occurring in the gels, as a function of the heat treatments, have been monitored using DTA, TGA, IR-spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, surface area and pore size distribution measurements.

  5. Wide temperature window of magnetostructural transition achieved in Mn0.4Fe0.6NiSi1-xGax by a two-step isostructural alloying process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J.; Zhang, H. G.; Liu, E. K.; Yue, M.; Lu, Q. M.; Wang, W. H.; Wu, G. H.; Zhang, J. X.

    2016-05-01

    A new approach has been proposed in this work, which provides an effective way for tuning the structural transition in MM'X systems with relatively high transition temperature. With this method, a temperature window as wide as 275 K for the magnetostructural transition has been achieved in the MnNiSi alloy system. The maximum magnetic entropy change of the system is as high as 13.3 J/kgK, which, together with the large temperature window, enables the Mn0.4Fe0.6NiSi1-xGax system to be a promising candidate for magnetic refrigerant applications.

  6. Deciphering influences of temperature, moisture sources, post-deposition effects and stratospheric inputs in records of stable isotopes in East Antarctic snow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Touzeau, Alexandra; Fourré, Elise; Baroni, Mélanie; Curran, Mark; Ekaykin, Alexey; Magand, Olivier; Moy, Andrew; McConnell, Joe; Landais, Amaelle

    2015-04-01

    The oxygen and deuterium isotopic composition of ice represent a prodigal source of information for the reconstruction of past climate. Their widespread use relies upon the straightforward relationship between the oxygen or deuterium isotopic composition in the snow precipitated and the inversion temperature (or the local temperature). However, between the precipitation of the snow and the solidification of ice, several mechanisms may affect the initial composition of the snow, thereby rendering the climatic signal less perceptible. During deposition or shortly after deposition, the wind may blow away and redeposit the uncompact snow, and therefore affect the chronology of the record. Various origins of the moisture source, including possible stratospheric inputs in very low accumulation sites, may also affect water isotopic composition. Finally, after deposition, the isotopic signal is also modified by diffusion of isotopes in the solid phase, local sublimation and condensation with associated fractionation, and water vapor transport between snow layers. In order to assess the effect of these mechanisms on the snow isotopic composition, we compare the results of the analysis of five snow pits from the East Antarctica plateau: two from Vostok, one from Dome C, one from S2 and one from Aurora Basin (ABN). For each snow pit, snow was sampled every three cm over a depth of about three meters. The ratios of 18O/16O, 17O/16O and D/H were determined for each sample and additional 10Be profiles were obtained for some profiles. Because the different water isotopes are affected differently by equilibrium and diffusive processes and because stratospheric inputs are expected to leave a significant signature in 10Be and 17Oexcess, the combination of the different isotopic profiles is a useful tool for inferring the origin of δ18O or δD variations in the top 3 m of the ice sheet. Using the relationships observed between δ18O, d-excess, 17O-excess and 10Be, we are able to

  7. Multilayer ceramic capacitors based on relaxor BaTiO3-Bi(Zn1/2Ti1/2)O3 for temperature stable and high energy density capacitor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Nitish; Ionin, Aleksey; Ansell, Troy; Kwon, Seongtae; Hackenberger, Wesley; Cann, David

    2015-06-01

    The need for miniaturization without compromising cost and performance continues to motivate research in advanced capacitor devices. In this report, multilayer ceramic capacitors based on relaxor BaTiO3-Bi(Zn1/2Ti1/2)O3 (BT-BZT) were fabricated and characterized. In bulk ceramic embodiments, BT-BZT has been shown to exhibit relative permittivities greater than 1000, high resistivities (ρ > 1 GΩ-cm at 300 °C), and negligible saturation up to fields as high as 150 kV/cm. Multilayer capacitor embodiments were fabricated and found to exhibit similar dielectric and resistivity properties. The energy density for the multilayer ceramics reached values of ˜2.8 J/cm3 at room temperature at an applied electric field of ˜330 kV/cm. This represents a significant improvement compared to commercially available multilayer capacitors. The dielectric properties were also found to be stable over a wide range of temperatures with a temperature coefficient of approximately -2000 ppm/K measured from 50 to 350 °C, an important criteria for high temperature applications. Finally, the compatibility of inexpensive Ag-Pd electrodes with these ceramics was also demonstrated, which can have implications on minimizing the device cost.

  8. Thermal design and test results for SUNLITE ultra-stable reference cavity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amundsen, Ruth M.

    1991-01-01

    SUNLITE (Stanford University-NASA Laser In-Space Technology Experiment) is a space-based experiment which uses a reference cavity to provide a stable frequency reference for a terahertz laser oscillator. Thermal stability of the cavity is a key factor in attaining a stable narrow-linewidth laser beam. The mount which is used to support and align the cavity will provide thermal isolation from the environment. The baseline requirement for thermal stability of the cavity is 0.025 C/min, but the design is directed toward achieving stability well beyond this requirement to improve the science data gained. A prototype of the cavity mount was fabricated and tested to characterize the thermal performance. The thermal vacuum test involved stable high-resolution temperature measurements and stable baseplate temperature control over long durations. Based on test data, the cavity mount design satisfies the severe requirement for the cavity thermal stability.

  9. Multi-stable cylindrical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirrera, Alberto; Lachenal, Xavier; Daynes, Stephen; Weaver, Paul M.; Chenchiah, Isaac V.

    2013-11-01

    We present a cylindrical lattice structure that mimics the behaviour of the virus bacteriophage T4 in having two (or more) stable states which differ in their radii and length. While the virus achieves bistability through molecular mechanisms we use composite materials to exploit the interplay between pre-stress, material properties and structural geometry. We demonstrate (computationally) that multi-stability is a robust phenomenon. We also show (analytically) that it is possible to choose the design variables so that the energy is independent of the radius, thus resulting in every state of the structure being stable.

  10. Development of a new highly conductive and thermomechanically stable complex membrane based on sulfonated polyimide/ionic liquid for high temperature anhydrous fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deligöz, Hüseyin; Yılmazoğlu, Mesut

    The paper deals with the synthesis and characterization of a new type of acid doped highly conductive complex membrane based on sulfonated polyimide (sPI) and ionic liquid (IL) for high temperature anhydrous fuel cells. For this purpose, 2,4-diaminobenzene sulfonic acid (2,4-DABSA) is reacted with benzophenontetracarboxylic dianhydride (BTDA) to yield sulfonated poly(amic acid) (sPAA) intermediate. Subsequently, IL is added into sPAA to form an interaction between sulfonic acid and imidazolium group of IL followed by acid doping. The ionic conductivity of acid doped sPI/IL complex polymer membrane is higher than that of IL containing composite membranes reported in the literature (5.59 × 10 -2 S cm -1 at 180 °C). Furthermore, dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) results of acid doped sPI/IL complex membrane show that the mechanical strength of the complex product is slightly changed until 350 °C due to the formation of ionic interactions between sulfonic acid groups of sPI and imidazolium groups of IL. Consequently, the ionic interaction not only provides high ionic conductivity with excellent thermomechanical properties (the storage module of 0.91 GPa at 300 °C) but also results in a positive effect in long term conductivity stability by blocking IL migration through the membrane.

  11. Pressure-temperature-fluid constraints for the Emmaville-Torrington emerald deposit, New South Wales, Australia: Fluid inclusion and stable isotope studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loughrey, Lara; Marshall, Dan; Jones, Peter; Millsteed, Paul; Main, Arthur

    2012-06-01

    The Emmaville-Torrington emeralds were first discovered in 1890 in quartz veins hosted within a Permian metasedimentary sequence, consisting of meta-siltstones, slates and quartzites intruded by pegmatite and aplite veins from the Moule Granite. The emerald deposit genesis is consistent with a typical granite-related emerald vein system. Emeralds from these veins display colour zonation alternating between emerald and clear beryl. Two fluid inclusion types are identified: three-phase (brine+vapour+halite) and two-phase (vapour+liquid) fluid inclusions. Fluid inclusion studies indicate the emeralds were precipitated from saline fluids ranging from approximately 33 mass percent NaCl equivalent. Formational pressures and temperatures of 350 to 400 °C and approximately 150 to 250 bars were derived from fluid inclusion and petrographic studies that also indicate emerald and beryl precipitation respectively from the liquid and vapour portions of a two-phase (boiling) system. The distinct colour zonations observed in the emerald from these deposits is the first recorded emerald locality which shows evidence of colour variation as a function of boiling. The primary three-phase and primary two-phase FITs are consistent with alternating chromium-rich `striped' colour banding. Alternating emerald zones with colourless beryl are due to chromium and vanadium partitioning in the liquid portion of the boiling system. The chemical variations observed at Emmaville-Torrington are similar to other colour zoned emeralds from other localities worldwide likely precipitated from a boiling system as well.

  12. Study of the oxidation effects on isothermal solidification based high temperature stable Pt/In/Au and Pt/In/Ag thick film interconnections on LTCC substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Duguta Suresh; Suri, Nikhil; Khanna, P. K.; Sharma, R. P.

    2016-03-01

    The objective of the presented paper is to determine the oxidized phase compositions of indium lead-free solders during solidification at 190 ° C under room environment with the help of X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDX). Many lead-free solders alloys available oxidizes and have poor wetting properties. The oxidation of pure indium solder foil, Au, Pt, and Ag alloys were identified and investigated, in the process of isothermal solidification based solder joints construction at room environment and humidity. Both EDX and XRD characterization techniques were performed to trace out the amount of oxide levels and variety of oxide formations at solder interface respectively. The paper also aims to report the isothermal solidification technique to provide interconnections to pads on Low temperature co-fired ceramic (LTCC) substrate. It also elaborates advantages of isothermal solidification over the other methods of interconnection. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) used to identify the oxidized spots on the surface of Pt, Ag substrates and In solder. The identified oxides were reported.

  13. Stable Fly Research

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Adult stable flies feed on the blood of humans, pets and livestock, inflicting painful bites. Stable flies need one and sometimes two bloodmeals each day to develop their eggs. Unlike mosquitoes where only the females bloodfeed, both male and female stable flies require blood to reproduce. Stable fl...

  14. Broad Negative Thermal Expansion Operation-Temperature Window Achieved by Adjusting Fe-Fe Magnetic Exchange Coupling in La(Fe,Si)13 Compounds.

    PubMed

    Li, Shaopeng; Huang, Rongjin; Zhao, Yuqiang; Li, Wen; Wang, Wei; Huang, Chuanjun; Gong, Pifu; Lin, Zheshuai; Li, Laifeng

    2015-08-17

    Cubic La(Fe,Si)13-based compounds have been recently developed as promising negative thermal expansion(NTE) materials, but the narrow NTE operation-temperature window(∼110 K) restricts their actual applications. In this work, we demonstrate that the NTE operation-temperature window of LaFe(13-x)Si(x) can be significantly broadened by adjusting Fe-Fe magnetic exchange coupling as x ranges from 2.8 to 3.1. In particular, the NTE operation-temperature window of LaFe10.1Si2.9 is extended to 220 K. More attractively, the coefficients of thermal expansion of LaFe10.0Si3.0 and LaFe9.9Si3.1 are homogeneous in the NTE operation-temperature range of about 200 K, which is much valuable for the stability of fabricating devices. The further experimental characterizations combined with first-principles studies reveal that the tetragonal phase is gradually introduced into the cubic phase as the Si content increases, hence modifies the Fe-Fe interatomic distance. The reduction of the overall Fe-Fe magnetic exchange interactions contributes to the broadness of NTE operation-temperature window for LaFe(13-x)Si(x). PMID:26196377

  15. Stable topological insulators achieved using high energy electron beams

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Lukas; Konczykowski, Marcin; Deng, Haiming; Korzhovska, Inna; Begliarbekov, Milan; Chen, Zhiyi; Papalazarou, Evangelos; Marsi, Marino; Perfetti, Luca; Hruban, Andrzej; Wołoś, Agnieszka; Krusin-Elbaum, Lia

    2016-01-01

    Topological insulators are potentially transformative quantum solids with metallic surface states which have Dirac band structure and are immune to disorder. Ubiquitous charged bulk defects, however, pull the Fermi energy into the bulk bands, denying access to surface charge transport. Here we demonstrate that irradiation with swift (∼2.5 MeV energy) electron beams allows to compensate these defects, bring the Fermi level back into the bulk gap and reach the charge neutrality point (CNP). Controlling the beam fluence, we tune bulk conductivity from p- (hole-like) to n-type (electron-like), crossing the Dirac point and back, while preserving the Dirac energy dispersion. The CNP conductance has a two-dimensional character on the order of ten conductance quanta and reveals, both in Bi2Te3 and Bi2Se3, the presence of only two quantum channels corresponding to two topological surfaces. The intrinsic quantum transport of the topological states is accessible disregarding the bulk size. PMID:26961901

  16. Achieving fast and stable failure detection in WDM Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Donghui; Zhou, Zhiyu; Zhang, Hanyi

    2005-02-01

    In dynamic networks, the failure detection time takes a major part of the convergence time, which is an important network performance index. To detect a node or link failure in the network, traditional protocols, like Hello protocol in OSPF or RSVP, exchanges keep-alive messages between neighboring nodes to keep track of the link/node state. But by default settings, it can get a minimum detection time in the measure of dozens of seconds, which can not meet the demands of fast network convergence and failure recovery. When configuring the related parameters to reduce the detection time, there will be notable instability problems. In this paper, we analyzed the problem and designed a new failure detection algorithm to reduce the network overhead of detection signaling. Through our experiment we found it is effective to enhance the stability by implicitly acknowledge other signaling messages as keep-alive messages. We conducted our proposal and the previous approaches on the ASON test-bed. The experimental results show that our algorithm gives better performances than previous schemes in about an order magnitude reduction of both false failure alarms and queuing delay to other messages, especially under light traffic load.

  17. Stable topological insulators achieved using high energy electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Lukas; Konczykowski, Marcin; Deng, Haiming; Korzhovska, Inna; Begliarbekov, Milan; Chen, Zhiyi; Papalazarou, Evangelos; Marsi, Marino; Perfetti, Luca; Hruban, Andrzej; Wołoś, Agnieszka; Krusin-Elbaum, Lia

    2016-03-01

    Topological insulators are potentially transformative quantum solids with metallic surface states which have Dirac band structure and are immune to disorder. Ubiquitous charged bulk defects, however, pull the Fermi energy into the bulk bands, denying access to surface charge transport. Here we demonstrate that irradiation with swift (~2.5 MeV energy) electron beams allows to compensate these defects, bring the Fermi level back into the bulk gap and reach the charge neutrality point (CNP). Controlling the beam fluence, we tune bulk conductivity from p- (hole-like) to n-type (electron-like), crossing the Dirac point and back, while preserving the Dirac energy dispersion. The CNP conductance has a two-dimensional character on the order of ten conductance quanta and reveals, both in Bi2Te3 and Bi2Se3, the presence of only two quantum channels corresponding to two topological surfaces. The intrinsic quantum transport of the topological states is accessible disregarding the bulk size.

  18. Stable topological insulators achieved using high energy electron beams.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lukas; Konczykowski, Marcin; Deng, Haiming; Korzhovska, Inna; Begliarbekov, Milan; Chen, Zhiyi; Papalazarou, Evangelos; Marsi, Marino; Perfetti, Luca; Hruban, Andrzej; Wołoś, Agnieszka; Krusin-Elbaum, Lia

    2016-01-01

    Topological insulators are potentially transformative quantum solids with metallic surface states which have Dirac band structure and are immune to disorder. Ubiquitous charged bulk defects, however, pull the Fermi energy into the bulk bands, denying access to surface charge transport. Here we demonstrate that irradiation with swift (∼2.5 MeV energy) electron beams allows to compensate these defects, bring the Fermi level back into the bulk gap and reach the charge neutrality point (CNP). Controlling the beam fluence, we tune bulk conductivity from p- (hole-like) to n-type (electron-like), crossing the Dirac point and back, while preserving the Dirac energy dispersion. The CNP conductance has a two-dimensional character on the order of ten conductance quanta and reveals, both in Bi2Te3 and Bi2Se3, the presence of only two quantum channels corresponding to two topological surfaces. The intrinsic quantum transport of the topological states is accessible disregarding the bulk size. PMID:26961901

  19. Importance of growth temperature on achieving lattice-matched and strained InAlN/GaN heterostructure by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Jeganathan, K.; Shimizu, M.

    2014-09-15

    We investigate the role of growth temperature on the optimization of lattice-matched In{sub 0.17}Al{sub 0.83}N/GaN heterostructure and its structural evolutions along with electrical transport studies. The indium content gradually reduces with the increase of growth temperature and approaches lattice-matched with GaN having very smooth and high structural quality at 450ºC. The InAlN layers grown at high growth temperature (480ºC) retain very low Indium content of ∼ 4 % in which cracks are mushroomed due to tensile strain while above lattice matched (>17%) layers maintain crack-free compressive strain nature. The near lattice-matched heterostructure demonstrate a strong carrier confinement with very high two-dimensional sheet carrier density of ∼2.9 × 10{sup 13} cm{sup −2} with the sheet resistance of ∼450 Ω/□ at room temperature as due to the manifestation of spontaneous polarization charge differences between InAlN and GaN layers.

  20. Magnetotelluric Data, Stable Distributions and Stable Regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chave, A. D.

    2013-12-01

    The author has noted for many years that the residuals from robust or bounded influence estimates of the magnetotelluric response function are systematically long tailed compared to a Gaussian or Rayleigh distribution. Consequently, the standard statistical model of a Gaussian core contaminated by a fraction of outlying data is not really valid. However, the typical result is an improvement on ordinary least squares, and has become standard in the electromagnetic induction community. A recent re-evaluation of the statistics of magnetotelluric response function estimation has shown that, in almost all cases, the residuals are alpha stable rather than Gaussian. Alpha stable distributions are characterized by four parameters: a shape parameter lying on (0, 2], a skewness parameter, a scale parameter and a location parameter, and cannot be expressed in closed form except for a few special cases. When the shape parameter is 2, the result is Gaussian, but when it is smaller the resulting distribution has infinite variance. Typical magnetotelluric residuals are alpha stable with a shape parameter lying between 1 and 2. This suggests that robust methods improve response function estimates by eliminating data corresponding to the largest stable residuals while leaving the bulk of the population alone. A better statistical approach is based on stable regression that directly accommodates the actual residual distribution without eliminating the most extreme ones. This paper will introduce such an algorithm, and illustrate its functionality with a variety of magnetotelluric data. Further work remains to produce a robust stable regression algorithm that will eliminate real outliers such as lightning strikes or instrument problems without affecting the bulk stable population. Stable distributions are intimately associated with fractional derivative physical processes. Since the Maxwell equations and the constitutive relations pertaining to the earth do not contain any fractional

  1. Ambient-Temperature Spin-State Switching Achieved by Protonation of the Amino Group in [Fe(H2Bpz2)2(bipy-NH2)].

    PubMed

    Luo, Yang-Hui; Nihei, Masayuki; Wen, Gao-Ju; Sun, Bai-Wang; Oshio, Hiroki

    2016-08-15

    Magnetism of a complex [Fe(H2Bpz2)2(bipy-NH2)] (H2Bpz2 = dihydrobis(1-pyrazolyl)borate, bipy-NH2 = 4,4'-diamino-2,2'-bipyridine) has been altered from paramagnetic to spin-crossover (SCO) behavior, through protonation of one amino group of bipy-NH2 with CF3SO3H. Complete SCO transition, both in solid state and in solution, occurs at ambient temperature. PMID:27472267

  2. Angina Pectoris (Stable Angina)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pressure High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Angina Pectoris (Stable Angina) Updated:Aug 24,2016 You may have heard the term “angina pectoris” or “stable angina” in your doctor’s office, but ...

  3. Approach to inherently stable interfaces for ceramic matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Besmann, T.M.; Kupp, E.R.; Stinton, D.P.; Shanmugham, S.

    1996-09-01

    Virtually all ceramic matrix composites require and interface coating between the fibers and matrix to achieve the desired mechanical performance. To date, the most effective interface materials for non- oxide matrix composites have been carbon and boron nitride. They are, however, susceptible to oxidation at elevated temperatures, and thus under many envisioned operating environments they will fail, possibly allowing oxidation of the fibers as well, adversely affecting mechanical behavior. Current efforts are directed toward developing stable interface coating, which include oxides and silicon carbide with appropriate thermomechanical properties.

  4. Stable electroosmotically driven actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sritharan, Deepa; Motsebo, Mylene; Tumbic, Julia; Smela, Elisabeth

    2013-04-01

    We have previously presented "nastic" actuators based on electroosmotic (EO) pumping of fluid in microchannels using high electric fields for potential application in soft robotics. In this work we address two challenges facing this technology: applying EO to meso-scale devices and the stability of the pumping fluid. The hydraulic pressure achieved by EO increases with as 1/d2, where d is the depth of the microchannel, but the flow rate (which determines the stroke and the speed) is proportional to nd, where n is the number of channels. Therefore to get high force and high stroke the device requires a large number of narrow channels, which is not readily achievable using standard microfabrication techniques. Furthermore, for soft robotics the structure must be soft. In this work we present a method of fabricating a three-dimensional porous elastomer to serve as the array of channels based on a sacrificial sugar scaffold. We demonstrate the concept by fabricating small pumps. The flexible devices were made from polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and comprise the 3D porous elastomer flanked on either side by reservoirs containing electrodes. The second issue addressed here involves the pumping fluid. Typically, water is used for EO, but water undergoes electrolysis even at low voltages. Since EO takes place at kV, these systems must be open to release the gases. We have recently reported that propylene carbonate (PC) is pumped at a comparable rate as water and is also stable for over 30 min at 8 kV. Here we show that PC is, however, degraded by moisture, so future EO systems must prevent water from reaching the PC.

  5. Ultra Stable Microwave Radiometers for Future Sea Surface Salinity Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, William J.; Tanner, Alan B.; Pellerano, Fernando A.; Horgan, Kevin A.

    2005-01-01

    The NASA Earth Science System Pathfinder (ESSP) mission Aquarius will measure global sea surface salinity with 100-km spatial resolution every 8 days with an average monthly salinity accuracy of 0.2 psu (parts per thousand). This requires an L-band low-noise radiometer with the long-term calibration stability of less than 0.1 K over 8 days. This three-year research program on ultra stable radiometers has addressed the radiometer requirements and configuration necessary to achieve this objective for Aquarius and future ocean salinity missions. The system configuration and component performance have been evaluated with radiometer testbeds at both JPL and GSFC. The research has addressed several areas including component characterization as a function of temperature, a procedure for the measurement and correction for radiometer system non-linearity, noise diode calibration versus temperature, low noise amplifier performance over voltage, and temperature control requirements to achieve the required stability. A breadboard radiometer, utilizing microstrip-based technologies, has been built to demonstrate this long-term stability. This report also presents the results of the radiometer test program, a detailed radiometer noise model, and details of the operational switching sequence optimization that can be used to achieve the low noise and stability requirements. Many of the results of this research have been incorporated into the Aquarius radiometer design and will allow this instrument to achieve its goals.

  6. High-temperature geothermal cableheads

    SciTech Connect

    Coquat, J.A.; Eifert, R.W.

    1981-11-01

    Two high-temperature, corrosion-resistant logging cableheads which use metal seals and a stable fluid to achieve proper electrical terminations and cable-sonde interfacings are described. A tensile bar provides a calibrated yield point, and a cone assembly anchors the cable armor to the head. Electrical problems of the sort generally ascribable to the cable-sonde interface were absent during demonstration hostile-environment loggings in which these cableheads were used.

  7. Purification and characterization of a temperature- and pH-stable laccase from the spores of Bacillus vallismortis fmb-103 and its application in the degradation of malachite green.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chong; Zhang, Shuang; Diao, Hanwen; Zhao, Haizhen; Zhu, Xiaoyu; Lu, Fengxia; Lu, Zhaoxin

    2013-06-12

    Malachite green residue can affect aquaculture food safety. Bioremediation of contaminated water by enzyme treatment is an environmentally friendly and economical way to remove contaminating substances. In the present study, a temperature- and pH-stable laccase was purified from the spores of Bacillus ballismortis fmb-103 and was used to degrade malachite green. The laccase from fmb-103 (fmb-L103) was purified 15.2-fold to homogeneity (389.9 mU/mg protein with respect to ABTS as a substrate) by precipitation with 30-80% (NH4)2SO4, DEAE-Sephadex A-50 ion exchange chromatography, and Sephadex G-100 chromatography. fmb-L103 is a nonblue laccase with a molecular weight of 55.0 kDa and Cu content of 2.5 (mol:mol). fmb-L103 retained more than 50% activity after 10 h at 70 °C and demonstrated broad pH stability in both acidic and alkaline conditions. The effects of inhibitors and metal ions on fmb-L103 activity were also examined. A kinetic study revealed that ABTS was a suitable substrate with a Km of 22.7 μmol and a Vmax of 3.32 μmol/mL/min. fmb-L103 can efficiently degrade malachite green after a 48 h treatment period in combination with a mediator, without the appearance of leucomalachite green. PMID:23706133

  8. Nanostructure templating using low temperature atomic layer deposition

    DOEpatents

    Grubbs, Robert K.; Bogart, Gregory R.; Rogers, John A.

    2011-12-20

    Methods are described for making nanostructures that are mechanically, chemically and thermally stable at desired elevated temperatures, from nanostructure templates having a stability temperature that is less than the desired elevated temperature. The methods comprise depositing by atomic layer deposition (ALD) structural layers that are stable at the desired elevated temperatures, onto a template employing a graded temperature deposition scheme. At least one structural layer is deposited at an initial temperature that is less than or equal to the stability temperature of the template, and subsequent depositions made at incrementally increased deposition temperatures until the desired elevated temperature stability is achieved. Nanostructure templates include three dimensional (3D) polymeric templates having features on the order of 100 nm fabricated by proximity field nanopatterning (PnP) methods.

  9. Low energy stable plasma calibration facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frederick-Frost, K. M.; Lynch, K. A.

    2007-07-01

    We have designed and fabricated a low energy plasma calibration facility for testing and calibration of rocket-borne charged-particle detectors and for the investigation of plasma sheath formation in an environment with ionospheric plasma energies, densities, and Debye lengths. We describe the vacuum system and associated plasma source, which was modified from a Naval Research Laboratory design [Bowles et al. Rev. Sci. Instrum. 67, 455 (1996)]. Mechanical and electrical modifications to this cylindrical microwave resonant source are outlined together with a different method of operating the magnetron that achieves a stable discharge. This facility produces unmagnetized plasmas with densities from 1×103/cm3to6×105/cm3, electron temperatures from 0.1to1.7eV, and plasma potentials from 0.5to8V depending on varying input microwave power and neutral gas flow. For the range of input microwave power explored (350-600W), the energy density of the plasma remains constant because of an inverse relationship between density and temperature. This relationship allows a wide range of Debye lengths (0.3-8.4cm) to be investigated, which is ideal for simulating the ionospheric plasma sheaths we explore.

  10. Simulating Martian Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchanan, Randy K.

    2003-09-01

    The Mars Electrostatic Chamber (MEC) was designed to provide for research and testing relative to future missions to Mars. Environmental characteristics of Mars were emulated, including pressure, atmospheric composition, and temperature. Existing and newly acquired hardware were integrated with a centralized controller to bring about successful near-autonomous operation and temperature control. The MEC is principally comprised of systems that control atmospheric pressure, atmospheric content, and chamber temperature. The temperature control system is used to replicate temperatures within actual minimum and maximum values as would be experienced on Mars. Cryogenic liquid/gaseous nitrogen supplies as well as various heating techniques were used to obtain this temperature range. Fundamental to the stabilization of temperature within the chamber was the instrumentation of multiple temperature measurements and optimal control of extremely cold nitrogen. Through testing and characterization, cooling design modifications, and controller instrumentation revisions, the cryogenic supply was successfully throttled by a programmable controller system with appropriate programming. Stable temperature control was ultimately achieved and automated diurnal cycling provided.

  11. Development and validation of an universal interface for compound-specific stable isotope analysis of chlorine (37Cl/35Cl) by GC-high-temperature conversion (HTC)-MS/IRMS.

    PubMed

    Renpenning, Julian; Hitzfeld, Kristina L; Gilevska, Tetyana; Nijenhuis, Ivonne; Gehre, Matthias; Richnow, Hans-Hermann

    2015-03-01

    A universal application of compound-specific isotope analysis of chlorine was thus far limited by the availability of suitable analysis techniques. In this study, gas chromatography in combination with a high-temperature conversion interface (GC-HTC), converting organic chlorine in the presence of H2 to gaseous HCl, was coupled to a dual-detection system, combining an ion trap mass spectrometer (MS) and isotope-ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS). The combination of the MS/IRMS detection enabled a detailed characterization, optimization, and online monitoring of the high-temperature conversion process via ion trap MS as well as a simultaneous chlorine isotope analysis by the IRMS. Using GC-HTC-MS/IRMS, chlorine isotope analysis at optimized conversion conditions resulted in very accurate isotope values (δ(37)Cl(SMOC)) for measured reference material with known isotope composition, including chlorinated ethylene, chloromethane, hexachlorocyclohexane, and trichloroacetic acids methyl ester. Respective detection limits were determined to be <15 nmol Cl on column with achieved precision of <0.3‰. PMID:25647449

  12. Li2OHCl Crystalline Electrolyte for Stable Metallic Lithium Anodes

    SciTech Connect

    Hood, Zachary D; Hood, Zachary; Wang, Hui; Samuthira Pandian, Amaresh; Keum, Jong Kahk; Liang, Chengdu

    2016-01-01

    In a classic example of stability from instability, we show that Li2OHCl solid electrolyte forms a stable solid electrolyte interface (SEI) with metallic lithium anode. The Li2OHCl solid electrolyte can be readily achieved through simple mixing of air-stable LiOH and LiCl precursors with a mild processing temperature under 400 C. Additionally, we show that continuous, dense Li2OHCl membranes can be fabricated at temperatures less than 400 C, standing in great contrast to current processing temperatures of over 1600 C for most oxide-based solid electrolytes. The ionic conductivity and Arrhenius activation energy were explored for the LiOH-LiCl system of crystalline solid electrolytes where Li2OHCl with increased crystal defects was found to have the highest ionic conductivity and reasonable Arrhenius activation energy. The Li2OHCl solid electrolyte displays stability against metallic lithium, even in extreme conditions past the melting point of lithium metal. To understand this excellent stability, we show that SEI formation is critical in stabilizing the interface between metallic lithium and the Li2OHCl solid electrolyte.

  13. Li2OHCl crystalline electrolyte for stable metallic lithium anodes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hood, Zachary D.; Wang, Hui; Samuthira Pandian, Amaresh; Keum, Jong Kahk; Liang, Chengdu

    2016-01-22

    In a classic example of stability from instability, we show that Li2OHCl solid electrolyte forms a stable solid electrolyte interface (SEI) with metallic lithium anode. The Li2OHCl solid electrolyte can be readily achieved through simple mixing of air-stable LiOH and LiCl precursors with a mild processing temperature under 400 °C. Additionally, we show that continuous, dense Li2OHCl membranes can be fabricated at temperatures less than 400 °C, standing in great contrast to current processing temperatures of over 1600 °C for most oxide-based solid electrolytes. The ionic conductivity and Arrhenius activation energy were explored for the LiOH-LiCl system of crystalline solidmore » electrolytes where Li2OHCl with increased crystal defects was found to have the highest ionic conductivity and reasonable Arrhenius activation energy. The Li2OHCl solid electrolyte displays stability against metallic lithium, even in extreme conditions past the melting point of lithium metal. Furthermore, to understand this excellent stability, we show that SEI formation is critical in stabilizing the interface between metallic lithium and the Li2OHCl solid electrolyte.« less

  14. Graded Achievement, Tested Achievement, and Validity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brookhart, Susan M.

    2015-01-01

    Twenty-eight studies of grades, over a century, were reviewed using the argument-based approach to validity suggested by Kane as a theoretical framework. The review draws conclusions about the meaning of graded achievement, its relation to tested achievement, and changes in the construct of graded achievement over time. "Graded…

  15. Stable coherent states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zipfel, Antonia; Thiemann, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    We analyze the stability under time evolution of complexifier coherent states (CCS) in one-dimensional mechanical systems. A system of coherent states is called stable if it evolves into another coherent state. It turns out that a system can only possess stable CCS if the classical evolution of the variable z =e-i Lχ Cq for a given complexifier C depends only on z itself and not on its complex conjugate. This condition is very restrictive in general so that only a few systems exist that obey this condition. However, it is possible to access a wider class of models that in principle may allow for stable coherent states associated with certain regions in the phase space by introducing action-angle coordinates.

  16. The Stable Pairing Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenwell, Raymond N.; Seabold, Daniel E.

    2014-01-01

    The Gale-Shapley stable marriage theorem is a fascinating piece of twentieth-century mathematics that has many practical applications--from labor markets to school admissions--yet is accessible to secondary school mathematics students. David Gale and Lloyd Shapley were both mathematicians and economists who published their work on the Stable…

  17. Stable isotope studies

    SciTech Connect

    Ishida, T.

    1992-01-01

    The research has been in four general areas: (1) correlation of isotope effects with molecular forces and molecular structures, (2) correlation of zero-point energy and its isotope effects with molecular structure and molecular forces, (3) vapor pressure isotope effects, and (4) fractionation of stable isotopes. 73 refs, 38 figs, 29 tabs.

  18. Development of a New Generation of Stable, Tunable, and Catalytically Active Nanoparticles Produced by the Helium Nanodroplet Deposition Method.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qiyuan; Ridge, Claron J; Zhao, Shen; Zakharov, Dmitri; Cen, Jiajie; Tong, Xiao; Connors, Eoghan; Su, Dong; Stach, Eric A; Lindsay, C Michael; Orlov, Alexander

    2016-08-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are revolutionizing many areas of science and technology, often delivering unprecedented improvements to properties of the conventional materials. However, despite important advances in NPs synthesis and applications, numerous challenges still remain. Development of alternative synthetic method capable of producing very uniform, extremely clean and very stable NPs is urgently needed. If successful, such method can potentially transform several areas of nanoscience, including environmental and energy related catalysis. Here we present the first experimental demonstration of catalytically active NPs synthesis achieved by the helium nanodroplet isolation method. This alternative method of NPs fabrication and deposition produces narrowly distributed, clean, and remarkably stable NPs. The fabrication is achieved inside ultralow temperature, superfluid helium nanodroplets, which can be subsequently deposited onto any substrate. This technique is universal enough to be applied to nearly any element, while achieving high deposition rates for single element as well as composite core-shell NPs. PMID:27409518

  19. Stable local oscillator module.

    SciTech Connect

    Brocato, Robert Wesley

    2007-11-01

    This report gives a description of the development of a Stable Local Oscillator (StaLO) multi-chip module (MCM). It is a follow-on report to SAND2006-6414, Stable Local Oscillator Microcircuit. The StaLO accepts a 100MHz input signal and produces output signals at 1.2, 3.3, and 3.6 GHz. The circuit is built as a multi-chip module (MCM), since it makes use of integrated circuit technologies in silicon and lithium niobate as well as discrete passive components. This report describes the development of an MCM-based version of the complete StaLO, fabricated on an alumina thick film hybrid substrate.

  20. Handbook of stable strontium

    SciTech Connect

    Skoryna, S.C.

    1981-01-01

    This book presents information on the following topics: chemistry of strontium; biogeochemistry of strontium; uptake of stable strontium by plants and effects on plant growth; divalent cation-dependent deposits in paramecium; effects of strontium ion on the hydrolysis of ATP; stronium ions and membranes - screening versus binding at charged surfaces; mitochondrial granules in the liver of rats kept on stable strontium supplementation; divalent cations and regulation of cyclic nucleotides in nervous systems; strontium as the substitute for calcium in the excitation-contraction coupling of crayfish muscle fibers; hemodynamic effects of strontium in the dog; some mechanical characteristics of strontium-mediated contractions in heart muscle; effects of calcium, magnesium, and strontium on drug-receptor interactions; strontium and histamine secretion; and effects of strontium in human dental enamel.

  1. Stable Charged Cosmic Strings

    SciTech Connect

    Weigel, H.; Quandt, M.; Graham, N.

    2011-03-11

    We study the quantum stabilization of a cosmic string by a heavy fermion doublet in a reduced version of the standard model. We show that charged strings, obtained by populating fermionic bound state levels, become stable if the electroweak bosons are coupled to a fermion that is less than twice as heavy as the top quark. This result suggests that extraordinarily large fermion masses or unrealistic couplings are not required to bind a cosmic string in the standard model. Numerically we find the most favorable string profile to be a simple trough in the Higgs vacuum expectation value of radius {approx_equal}10{sup -18} m. The vacuum remains stable in our model, because neutral strings are not energetically favored.

  2. Stable charged cosmic strings.

    PubMed

    Weigel, H; Quandt, M; Graham, N

    2011-03-11

    We study the quantum stabilization of a cosmic string by a heavy fermion doublet in a reduced version of the standard model. We show that charged strings, obtained by populating fermionic bound state levels, become stable if the electroweak bosons are coupled to a fermion that is less than twice as heavy as the top quark. This result suggests that extraordinarily large fermion masses or unrealistic couplings are not required to bind a cosmic string in the standard model. Numerically we find the most favorable string profile to be a simple trough in the Higgs vacuum expectation value of radius ≈10(-18)  m. The vacuum remains stable in our model, because neutral strings are not energetically favored. PMID:21469786

  3. Thermally stable laminating resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, R. J.; Vaughan, R. W.; Burns, E. A.

    1972-01-01

    Improved thermally stable laminating resins were developed based on the addition-type pyrolytic polymerization. Detailed monomer and polymer synthesis and characterization studies identified formulations which facilitate press molding processing and autoclave fabrication of glass and graphite fiber reinforced composites. A specific resin formulation, termed P10P was utilized to prepare a Courtaulds HMS reinforced simulated airfoil demonstration part by an autoclave molding process.

  4. Stable and water-tolerant ionic liquid ferrofluids.

    PubMed

    Jain, Nirmesh; Zhang, Xiaoli; Hawkett, Brian S; Warr, Gregory G

    2011-03-01

    Ionic liquid ferrofluids have been prepared containing both bare and sterically stabilized 8-12 nm diameter superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles, which remain stable for several months in both protic ethylammonium and aprotic imidazolium room-temperature ionic liquids. These ferrofluids exhibit spiking in static magnetic fields similar to conventional aqueous and nonaqueous ferrofluids. Ferrofluid stability was verified by following the flocculation and settling behavior of dilute nanoparticle dispersions. Although bare nanoparticles showed excellent stability in some ILs, they were unstable in others, and exhibited limited water tolerance. Stability was achieved by incorporating a thin polymeric steric stabilization layer designed to be compatible with the IL. This confers the added benefit of imbuing the ILF with a high tolerance to water. PMID:21338083

  5. Forensic Stable Isotope Biogeochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerling, Thure E.; Barnette, Janet E.; Bowen, Gabriel J.; Chesson, Lesley A.; Ehleringer, James R.; Remien, Christopher H.; Shea, Patrick; Tipple, Brett J.; West, Jason B.

    2016-06-01

    Stable isotopes are being used for forensic science studies, with applications to both natural and manufactured products. In this review we discuss how scientific evidence can be used in the legal context and where the scientific progress of hypothesis revisions can be in tension with the legal expectations of widely used methods for measurements. Although this review is written in the context of US law, many of the considerations of scientific reproducibility and acceptance of relevant scientific data span other legal systems that might apply different legal principles and therefore reach different conclusions. Stable isotopes are used in legal situations for comparing samples for authenticity or evidentiary considerations, in understanding trade patterns of illegal materials, and in understanding the origins of unknown decedents. Isotope evidence is particularly useful when considered in the broad framework of physiochemical processes and in recognizing regional to global patterns found in many materials, including foods and food products, drugs, and humans. Stable isotopes considered in the larger spatial context add an important dimension to forensic science.

  6. A stable live bacterial vaccine.

    PubMed

    Kunda, Nitesh K; Wafula, Denis; Tram, Meilinn; Wu, Terry H; Muttil, Pavan

    2016-06-01

    Formulating vaccines into a dry form enhances its thermal stability. This is critical to prevent administering damaged and ineffective vaccines, and to reduce its final cost. A number of vaccines in the market as well as those being evaluated in the clinical setting are in a dry solid state; yet none of these vaccines have achieved long-term stability at high temperatures. We used spray-drying to formulate a recombinant live attenuated Listeria monocytogenes (Lm; expressing Francisella tularensis immune protective antigen pathogenicity island protein IglC) bacterial vaccine into a thermostable dry powder using various sugars and an amino acid. Lm powder vaccine showed minimal loss in viability when stored for more than a year at ambient room temperature (∼23°C) or for 180days at 40°C. High temperature viability was achieved by maintaining an inert atmosphere in the storage container and removing oxygen free radicals that damage bacterial membranes. Further, in vitro antigenicity was confirmed by infecting a dendritic cell line with cultures derived from spray dried Lm and detection of an intracellularly expressed protective antigen. A combination of stabilizing excipients, a cost effective one-step drying process, and appropriate storage conditions could provide a viable option for producing, storing and transporting heat-sensitive vaccines, especially in regions of the world that require them the most. PMID:27020530

  7. Dynamically stable magnetic suspension/bearing system

    DOEpatents

    Post, Richard F.

    1996-01-01

    A magnetic bearing system contains magnetic subsystems which act together to support a rotating element in a state of dynamic equilibrium. However, owing to the limitations imposed by Earnshaw's Theorem, the magnetic bearing systems to be described do not possess a stable equilibrium at zero rotational speed. Therefore, mechanical stabilizers are provided, in each case, to hold the suspended system in equilibrium until its speed has exceeded a low critical speed where dynamic effects take over, permitting the achievement of a stable equilibrium for the rotating object. A state of stable equilibrium is achieved above a critical speed by use of a collection of passive elements using permanent magnets to provide their magnetomotive excitation. The magnetic forces exerted by these elements, when taken together, levitate the rotating object in equilibrium against external forces, such as the force of gravity or forces arising from accelerations. At the same time, this equilibrium is made stable against displacements of the rotating object from its equilibrium position by using combinations of elements that possess force derivatives of such magnitudes and signs that they can satisfy the conditions required for a rotating body to be stably supported by a magnetic bearing system over a finite range of those displacements.

  8. Dynamically stable magnetic suspension/bearing system

    DOEpatents

    Post, R.F.

    1996-02-27

    A magnetic bearing system contains magnetic subsystems which act together to support a rotating element in a state of dynamic equilibrium. However, owing to the limitations imposed by Earnshaw`s Theorem, the magnetic bearing systems to be described do not possess a stable equilibrium at zero rotational speed. Therefore, mechanical stabilizers are provided, in each case, to hold the suspended system in equilibrium until its speed has exceeded a low critical speed where dynamic effects take over, permitting the achievement of a stable equilibrium for the rotating object. A state of stable equilibrium is achieved above a critical speed by use of a collection of passive elements using permanent magnets to provide their magnetomotive excitation. The magnetic forces exerted by these elements, when taken together, levitate the rotating object in equilibrium against external forces, such as the force of gravity or forces arising from accelerations. At the same time, this equilibrium is made stable against displacements of the rotating object from its equilibrium position by using combinations of elements that possess force derivatives of such magnitudes and signs that they can satisfy the conditions required for a rotating body to be stably supported by a magnetic bearing system over a finite range of those displacements. 32 figs.

  9. Structural and electrical properties of stable ni/cr thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Au, C. L.; Jackson, M. A.; Anderson, W. A.

    1987-07-01

    The electrical and structural properties of nickel-chrome (NiCr) thin film resistors were studied for the effect of post-deposition annealing on stability. The temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR) of sheet resistivities in the range of 100 to 200 Ω/□ could be improved by both air and vacuum annealing to achieve 5 ± 5 ppm/°C over the temperature range of -180° C to +100° C. With stability tests, air annealing proved to be more favorable for stable TCR. Studies via SIMS and ESCA identified surface segregation of Cr whereas TEM micrographs revealed correlating structural transformation of the films upon annealing. An intentional impurity, Si, played an important role in achieving a low TCR.

  10. Friend Influence on Achievement during Middle Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeLay, Dawn

    2013-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate friend influence on academic achievement and task avoidance during middle childhood in a sample of 794 participants in 397 stable same-sex friendship dyads (205 girl dyads and 192 boy dyads) from four municipalities in Finland: two in Central Finland, one in Western Finland, and one in Eastern Finland.…

  11. Stable predictive control horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estrada, Raúl; Favela, Antonio; Raimondi, Angelo; Nevado, Antonio; Requena, Ricardo; Beltrán-Carbajal, Francisco

    2012-04-01

    The stability theory of predictive and adaptive predictive control for processes of linear and stable nature is based on the hypothesis of a physically realisable driving desired trajectory (DDT). The formal theoretical verification of this hypothesis is trivial for processes with a stable inverse, but it is not for processes with an unstable inverse. The extended strategy of predictive control was developed with the purpose of overcoming methodologically this stability problem and it has delivered excellent performance and stability in its industrial applications given a suitable choice of the prediction horizon. From a theoretical point of view, the existence of a prediction horizon capable of ensuring stability for processes with an unstable inverse was proven in the literature. However, no analytical solution has been found for the determination of the prediction horizon values which guarantee stability, in spite of the theoretical and practical interest of this matter. This article presents a new method able to determine the set of prediction horizon values which ensure stability under the extended predictive control strategy formulation and a particular performance criterion for the design of the DDT generically used in many industrial applications. The practical application of this method is illustrated by means of simulation examples.

  12. 1 W of stable single-frequency output at 1.03 mum from a novel, monolithic, non-planar Yb:YAG ring laser operating at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Burdack, Peer; Fox, Thomas; Bode, Markus; Freitag, Ingo

    2006-05-15

    We demonstrate, for the first time to our knowledge, a longitudinally diode-pumped, monolithic ytterbium ion-doped YAG non-planar ring laser (NPRO). We achieved a continuous-wave (cw) single-frequency output power of 1 W with 45.0% slope efficiency and a beam quality factor of M(2)<1.1. In view of iodine frequency stabilization we have characterized the frequency tuning properties and have measured the relative intensity noise. Additionally, 6.1 mW second harmonic power at 515 nm was achieved using a periodically poled KTP crystal in a single-pass setup. PMID:19516588

  13. Low work function, stable thin films

    DOEpatents

    Dinh, Long N.; McLean, II, William; Balooch, Mehdi; Fehring, Jr., Edward J.; Schildbach, Marcus A.

    2000-01-01

    Generation of low work function, stable compound thin films by laser ablation. Compound thin films with low work function can be synthesized by simultaneously laser ablating silicon, for example, and thermal evaporating an alkali metal into an oxygen environment. For example, the compound thin film may be composed of Si/Cs/O. The work functions of the thin films can be varied by changing the silicon/alkali metal/oxygen ratio. Low work functions of the compound thin films deposited on silicon substrates were confirmed by ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS). The compound thin films are stable up to 500.degree. C. as measured by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Tests have established that for certain chemical compositions and annealing temperatures of the compound thin films, negative electron affinity (NEA) was detected. The low work function, stable compound thin films can be utilized in solar cells, field emission flat panel displays, electron guns, and cold cathode electron guns.

  14. Compensation of phonon-induced renormalization of vacuum Rabi splitting in large quantum dots: Towards temperature-stable strong coupling in the solid state with quantum dot-micropillars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopfmann, C.; Musiał, A.; Strauß, M.; Barth, A. M.; Glässl, M.; Vagov, A.; Strauß, M.; Schneider, C.; Höfling, S.; Kamp, M.; Axt, V. M.; Reitzenstein, S.

    2015-12-01

    We study experimentally the influence of temperature on the emission characteristics of quantum dot-micropillars in the strong coupling regime of cavity quantum electrodynamics (cQED). In particular, we investigate its impact on the vacuum Rabi splitting (VRS) and we address the important question of the temperature stability of the coherent coupling regime in a semiconductor system, which is relevant in view of both fundamental study and future applications. To study the temperature dependence we investigate an unprecedentedly large number of strong coupling cases (89) in a wide temperature range from 10 up to 50 K, which constitutes a good basis for statistical analysis. The experiment indicates a statistically significant increase of the VRS with temperature in contrast to an expected decrease of the VRS due to the dephasing induced by acoustic phonons. From the theoretical point of view, the phonon-induced renormalization of the VRS is calculated using a real-time path-integral approach for strongly confined quantum dots (QDs), which allows for a numerical exact treatment of the coupling between the QD and a continuum of longitudinal acoustic phonons. The absence of the expected decrease of the VRS with temperature in our experimental data can be attributed to a unique optical property of laterally extended I n0.4G a0.6As QDs used in this study. Their electronic structure facilitates an effective temperature-driven increase of the oscillator strength of the excitonic state by up to 40% in the given temperature range. This leads to enhanced light-matter interaction and overcompensates the phonon-related decrease of the VRS. The observed persistence of strong coupling in the presence of phonon-induced decoherence demonstrates the appealing possibility to counteract detrimental phonon effects in the cQED regime via engineering the electronic structure of QDs.

  15. Marginally Stable Nuclear Burning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strohmayer, Tod E.; Altamirano, D.

    2012-01-01

    Thermonuclear X-ray bursts result from unstable nuclear burning of the material accreted on neutron stars in some low mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs). Theory predicts that close to the boundary of stability oscillatory burning can occur. This marginally stable regime has so far been identified in only a small number of sources. We present Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) observations of the bursting, high- inclination LMXB 4U 1323-619 that reveal for the first time in this source the signature of marginally stable burning. The source was observed during two successive RXTE orbits for approximately 5 ksec beginning at 10:14:01 UTC on March 28, 2011. Significant mHz quasi- periodic oscillations (QPO) at a frequency of 8.1 mHz are detected for approximately 1600 s from the beginning of the observation until the occurrence of a thermonuclear X-ray burst at 10:42:22 UTC. The mHz oscillations are not detected following the X-ray burst. The average fractional rms amplitude of the mHz QPOs is 6.4% (3 - 20 keV), and the amplitude increases to about 8% below 10 keV.This phenomenology is strikingly similar to that seen in the LMXB 4U 1636-53. Indeed, the frequency of the mHz QPOs in 4U 1323-619 prior to the X-ray burst is very similar to the transition frequency between mHz QPO and bursts found in 4U 1636-53 by Altamirano et al. (2008). These results strongly suggest that the observed QPOs in 4U 1323-619 are, like those in 4U 1636-53, due to marginally stable nuclear burning. We also explore the dependence of the energy spectrum on the oscillation phase, and we place the present observations within the context of the spectral evolution of the accretion-powered flux from the source.

  16. Comparing Science Achievement Constructs: Targeted and Achieved

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrara, Steve; Duncan, Teresa

    2011-01-01

    This article illustrates how test specifications based solely on academic content standards, without attention to other cognitive skills and item response demands, can fall short of their targeted constructs. First, the authors inductively describe the science achievement construct represented by a statewide sixth-grade science proficiency test.…

  17. Varieties of Achievement Motivation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kukla, Andre; Scher, Hal

    1986-01-01

    A recent article by Nicholls on achievement motivation is criticized on three points: (1) definitions of achievement motives are ambiguous; (2) behavioral consequences predicted do not follow from explicit theoretical assumptions; and (3) Nicholls's account of the relation between his theory and other achievement theories is factually incorrect.…

  18. Motivation and School Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maehr, Martin L.; Archer, Jennifer

    Addressing the question, "What can be done to promote school achievement?", this paper summarizes the literature on motivation relating to classroom achievement and school effectiveness. Particular attention is given to how values, ideology, and various cultural patterns impinge on classroom performance and serve to enhance motivation to achieve.…

  19. Mobility and Reading Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waters, Theresa Z.

    A study examined the effect of geographic mobility on elementary school students' achievement. Although such mobility, which requires students to make multiple moves among schools, can have a negative impact on academic achievement, the hypothesis for the study was that it was not a determining factor in reading achievement test scores. Subjects…

  20. PASS and Reading Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirby, John R.

    Two studies examined the effectiveness of the PASS (Planning, Attention, Simultaneous, and Successive cognitive processes) theory of intelligence in predicting reading achievement scores of normally achieving children and distinguishing children with reading disabilities from normally achieving children. The first study dealt with predicting…

  1. Stable local oscillator microcircuit.

    SciTech Connect

    Brocato, Robert Wesley

    2006-10-01

    This report gives a description of the development of a Stable Local Oscillator (StaLO) Microcircuit. The StaLO accepts a 100MHz input signal and produces output signals at 1.2, 3.3, and 3.6 GHz. The circuit is built as a multi-chip module (MCM), since it makes use of integrated circuit technologies in silicon and lithium niobate as well as discrete passive components. The StaLO uses a comb generator followed by surface acoustic wave (SAW) filters. The comb generator creates a set of harmonic components of the 100MHz input signal. The SAW filters are narrow bandpass filters that are used to select the desired component and reject all others. The resulting circuit has very low sideband power levels and low phase noise (both less than -40dBc) that is limited primarily by the phase noise level of the input signal.

  2. Stable magnetic universes revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahamtan, T.; Halilsoy, M.

    2013-01-01

    Recent discovery of magnetars ( B˜1015 G) motivates us to consider magnetic universes in general relativity a new. A regular class of static, cylindrically symmetric pure magnetic field metrics is rederived in a different metric ansatz in all dimensions. Radial, time dependent perturbations show that for dimensions d>3 such spacetimes are stable at both near r≈0 and large radius r→∞. For d=3, however, simultaneous stability requirement at both, near and far radial distances can not be reconciled for time-dependent perturbations. We argue that this distinct property may be the cause for the absence of pure magnetic black holes in d=3. Restricted, numerical geodesics for neutral particles reveal a gravitational confinement around the center in the polar plane. Charged, time-like geodesics for d=4 are shown numerically to remain confined as well.

  3. Stable line defects in silicene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Dibyajyoti; Parida, Prakash; Pati, Swapan K.

    2015-11-01

    Line defects in two-dimensional (2D) materials greatly modulate various properties of their pristine form. Using ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations, we investigate the structural reconstructions of different kinds of grain boundaries in the silicene sheets. It is evident that depending upon the presence of silicon adatoms and edge shape of grain boundaries (i.e., armchair or zigzag), stable extended line defects (ELDs) can be introduced in a controlled way. Further studies show the stability of these line-defects in silicene, grown on Ag(111) surface at room-temperature. Importantly, unlike most of the 2D sheet materials such as graphene and hexagonal boron nitride, 5-5-8 line defects modify the nonmagnetic semimetallic pristine silicene sheet to spin-polarized metal. As ferromagnetically ordered magnetic moments remain strongly localized at the line defect, a one-dimensional spin channel gets created in silicene. Interestingly, these spin channels are quite stable because, unlike the edge of nanoribbons, structural reconstruction or contamination cannot destroy the ordering of magnetic moments here. Zigzag silicene nanoribbons with a 5-5-8 line defect also exhibit various interesting electronic and magnetic properties depending upon their width as well as the nature of the magnetic coupling between edge and defect spin states. Upon incorporation of other ELDs, such as 4-4-4 and 4-8 defects, 2D sheets and nanoribbons of silicene show a nonmagnetic metallic or semiconducting ground state. Highlighting the controlled formation of ELDs and consequent emergence of technologically important properties in silicene, we propose new routes to realize silicene-based nanoelectronic and spintronic devices.

  4. Economic Impact of Stable Flies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A dynamic model was created to estimate the economic impact of stable flies on livestock production. Based upon a nationwide average of 10 stable flies per animal for 3 months per year, the model estimates the impact of stable flies to be $543 million to the dairy industry, $1.34 billion to pasture ...

  5. Bi-stable optical actuator

    DOEpatents

    Holdener, Fred R.; Boyd, Robert D.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention is a bi-stable optical actuator device that is depowered in both stable positions. A bearing is used to transfer motion and smoothly transition from one state to another. The optical actuator device may be maintained in a stable position either by gravity or a restraining device.

  6. Stable umbral chromospheric structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henriques, V. M. J.; Scullion, E.; Mathioudakis, M.; Kiselman, D.; Gallagher, P. T.; Keenan, F. P.

    2015-02-01

    Aims: We seek to understand the morphology of the chromosphere in sunspot umbra. We investigate if the horizontal structures observed in the spectral core of the Ca II H line are ephemeral visuals caused by the shock dynamics of more stable structures, and examine their relationship with observables in the H-alpha line. Methods: Filtergrams in the core of the Ca II H and H-alpha lines as observed with the Swedish 1-m Solar Telescope are employed. We utilise a technique that creates composite images and tracks the flash propagation horizontally. Results: We find 0.̋15 wide horizontal structures, in all of the three target sunspots, for every flash where the seeing is moderate to good. Discrete dark structures are identified that are stable for at least two umbral flashes, as well as systems of structures that live for up to 24 min. We find cases of extremely extended structures with similar stability, with one such structure showing an extent of 5''. Some of these structures have a correspondence in H-alpha, but we were unable to find a one-to-one correspondence for every occurrence. If the dark streaks are formed at the same heights as umbral flashes, there are systems of structures with strong departures from the vertical for all three analysed sunspots. Conclusions: Long-lived Ca II H filamentary horizontal structures are a common and likely ever-present feature in the umbra of sunspots. If the magnetic field in the chromosphere of the umbra is indeed aligned with the structures, then the present theoretical understanding of the typical umbra needs to be revisited. Movies associated to Figs. 3 and 4 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  7. Stable superstring relics

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, S.; Coriano, C.; Faraggi, A.E. |

    1996-05-15

    The authors investigate the cosmological constraints on exotic stable matter states which arise in realistic free fermionic superstring models. These states appear in the superstring models due to a ``Wilson-line`` breaking of the unifying non-Abelian gauge symmetry. In the models that they consider the unifying SO(10) gauge symmetry is broken at the string level to SO(6) x SO(4), SU(5) x U(1) or SU(3) x SU(2) x U(1). The exotic matter states are classified according to the patterns of the SO(10) symmetry breaking. In SO(6) x XO(4) and SU(5) x U(1) type models one obtains fractionally charged states with Q{sub e.m.} = {+-}1/2. In SU(3) x SU(2) x U(1) type models one also obtains states with the regular charges under the Standard Model gauge group but with ``fractional`` charges under the U(1){sub z{prime}} symmetry. These states include down-like color triplets and electroweak doublets, as well as states which are Standard Model singlets. By analyzing the renormalizable and nonrenormalizable terms of the superpotential in a specific superstring model, the authors show that these exotic states can be stable. They investigate the cosmological constraints on the masses and relic density of the exotic states. They propose that, while the abundance and the masses of the fractionally charged states are highly constrained, the Standard Model-like states, and in particular the Standard Model singlet, are good dark matter candidates.

  8. A new intermediate for the production of flexible stable polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webster, J. A.

    1973-01-01

    Method of incorporating ether linkages into perfluoroalkylene segment of a dianydride intermediate yields intermediate that may be used in synthesis of flexible, stable polyimides for use as high-temperature, solvent-resistant sealants.

  9. Thermally Stable, Piezoelectric and Pyroelectric Polymeric Substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, Joycely O. (Inventor); St.Clair, Terry L. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A thermally stable, piezoelectric and pyroelectric polymeric substrate was prepared. This thermally stable, piezoelectric and pyroelectric polymeric substrate may be used to prepare electromechanical transducers, thermomechanical transducers, accelerometers. acoustic sensors, infrared sensors, pressure sensors, vibration sensors, impact sensors, in-situ temperature sensors, in-situ stress/strain sensors, micro actuators, switches, adjustable fresnel lenses, speakers, tactile sensors. weather sensors, micro positioners, ultrasonic devices, power generators, tunable reflectors, microphones, and hydrophones. The process for preparing these polymeric substrates includes: providing a polymeric substrate having a softening temperature greater than 1000 C; depositing a metal electrode material onto the polymer film; attaching a plurality of electrical leads to the metal electrode coated polymeric substrate; heating the metal electrode coated polymeric substrate in a low dielectric medium; applying a voltage to the heated metal electrode coated polymeric substrate to induce polarization; and cooling the polarized metal electrode coated polymeric electrode while maintaining a constant voltage.

  10. Production of highly concentrated, heat-stable hepatitis B surface antigen in maize.

    PubMed

    Hayden, Celine A; Egelkrout, Erin M; Moscoso, Alessa M; Enrique, Cristina; Keener, Todd K; Jimenez-Flores, Rafael; Wong, Jeffrey C; Howard, John A

    2012-10-01

    Plant-based oral vaccines are a promising emergent technology that could help alleviate disease burden worldwide by providing a low-cost, heat-stable, oral alternative to parenterally administered commercial vaccines. Here, we describe high-level accumulation of the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) at a mean concentration of 0.51%TSP in maize T1 seeds using an improved version of the globulin1 promoter. This concentration is more than fourfold higher than any previously reported lines. HBsAg expressed in maize seeds was extremely heat stable, tolerating temperatures up to 55 °C for 1 month without degradation. Optimal heat stability was achieved after oil extraction of ground maize material, either by supercritical fluid extraction or hexane treatment. The contributions of this material towards the development of a practical oral vaccine delivery system are discussed. PMID:22816734

  11. Highly stable aerosol generator

    DOEpatents

    DeFord, H.S.; Clark, M.L.

    1981-11-03

    An improved compressed air nebulizer has been developed such that a uniform aerosol particle size and concentration may be produced over long time periods. This result is achieved by applying a vacuum pressure to the makeup assembly and by use of a vent tube between the atmosphere and the makeup solution. By applying appropriate vacuum pressures to the makeup solution container and by proper positioning of the vent tube, a constant level of aspirating solution may be maintained within the aspirating assembly with aspirating solution continuously replaced from the makeup solution supply. This device may also be adapted to have a plurality of aerosol generators and only one central makeup assembly. 2 figs.

  12. Highly stable aerosol generator

    DOEpatents

    DeFord, Henry S.; Clark, Mark L.

    1981-01-01

    An improved compressed air nebulizer has been developed such that a uniform aerosol particle size and concentration may be produced over long time periods. This result is achieved by applying a vacuum pressure to the makeup assembly and by use of a vent tube between the atmosphere and the makeup solution. By applying appropriate vacuum pressures to the makeup solution container and by proper positioning of the vent tube, a constant level of aspirating solution may be maintained within the aspirating assembly with aspirating solution continuously replaced from the makeup solution supply. This device may also be adapted to have a plurality of aerosol generators and only one central makeup assembly.

  13. Stable Ischemic Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Kones, Richard; Rumana, Umme

    2016-01-01

    Classical angina refers to typical substernal discomfort triggered by effort or emotions, relieved with rest or nitroglycerin. The well-accepted pathogenesis is an imbalance between oxygen supply and demand. Goals in therapy are improvement in quality of life by limiting the number and severity of attacks, protection against future lethal events, and measures to lower the burden of risk factors to slow disease progression. New pathophysiological data, drugs, as well as conceptual and technological advances have improved patient care over the past decade. Behavioral changes to improve diets, increase physical activity, and encourage adherence to cardiac rehabilitation programs, are difficult to achieve but are effective. PMID:26567972

  14. Stable face representations

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Rob; Burton, A. Mike

    2011-01-01

    Photographs are often used to establish the identity of an individual or to verify that they are who they claim to be. Yet, recent research shows that it is surprisingly difficult to match a photo to a face. Neither humans nor machines can perform this task reliably. Although human perceivers are good at matching familiar faces, performance with unfamiliar faces is strikingly poor. The situation is no better for automatic face recognition systems. In practical settings, automatic systems have been consistently disappointing. In this review, we suggest that failure to distinguish between familiar and unfamiliar face processing has led to unrealistic expectations about face identification in applied settings. We also argue that a photograph is not necessarily a reliable indicator of facial appearance, and develop our proposal that summary statistics can provide more stable face representations. In particular, we show that image averaging stabilizes facial appearance by diluting aspects of the image that vary between snapshots of the same person. We review evidence that the resulting images can outperform photographs in both behavioural experiments and computer simulations, and outline promising directions for future research. PMID:21536553

  15. Unusually stable liquid foams.

    PubMed

    Rio, Emmanuelle; Drenckhan, Wiebke; Salonen, Anniina; Langevin, Dominique

    2014-03-01

    Obtaining stable liquid foams is an important issue in view of their numerous applications. In some of these, the liquid foam in itself is of interest, in others, the liquid foam acts as a precursor for the generation of solid foam. In this short review, we will make a survey of the existing results in the area. This will include foams stabilised by surfactants, proteins and particles. The origin of the stability is related to the slowing down of coarsening, drainage or coalescence, and eventually to their arrest. The three effects are frequently coupled and in many cases, they act simultaneously and enhance one another. Drainage can be arrested if the liquid of the foam either gels or solidifies. Coalescence is slowed down by gelified foam films, and it can be arrested if the films become very thick and/or rigid. These mechanisms are thus qualitatively easy to identify, but they are less easy to model in order to obtain quantitative predictions. The slowing down of coarsening requests either very thick or small films, and its arrest was observed in cases where the surface compression modulus was large. The detail of the mechanisms at play remains unclear. PMID:24342735

  16. Stable isotope laser spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, J. F.; Yaldaei, Ramil; Mckay, Christopher P.

    1989-01-01

    Recent advances in semiconductor laser technology have produced a reliable lightweight device ideally suited for a spacecraft high resolution molecular spectrometer. Lead-salt tunable diode lasers (TDL) emit in several spectral modes, each with a very narrow linewidth of -0.0003/cm. This spectral resolution is much narrower than typical Doppler broadened molecular linewidths in the mid-IR range. Thus it is possible to detect individual rotational lines within the vibrational band and measure their intensity, which can be used to determine gas concentration. The narrow spectral lines of any impurity gas tend to lie between the narrow lines of the gas of interest. This represents a major advantage over the accepted gas chromatograph mass spectrometer (GCMS) technique for measuring gas concentrations and isotope ratios. The careful and extensive gas purification procedures required to remove impurities for reliable GCMS measurements will not be required for an IR laser gas analysis. The infrared laser gas analysis technique is being developed to measure stable isotopic ratios of gases such as CO2, CH4, N2O, and NH3. This will eventually lead to development of instruments capable of in situ istopic measurements on planets such as Mars. The carbon (C-12, C-13) isotope ratio is indicative of the type of carbon fixation mechanisms (e.g., photosynthesis, respiration) in operation on a planet, while the nitrogen (N-14, N-15) isotope ratio can probably be used to date nitrogen-bearing Martian samples. The absorbance ratio of two adjacent lines of CO2 in the 2300/cm (4.3 micron) region of the spectrum was measured. The precision of the measurement is presently better than 1 percent and significant improvement is anticipated as rapid sweep-integration techniques and computer controlled data acquistion capabilities are incorporated.

  17. Stable isotope laser spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, J. F.; Yaldaei, Ramil; McKay, Christopher P.

    1989-03-01

    Recent advances in semiconductor laser technology have produced a reliable lightweight device ideally suited for a spacecraft high resolution molecular spectrometer. Lead-salt tunable diode lasers (TDL) emit in several spectral modes, each with a very narrow linewidth of -0.0003/cm. This spectral resolution is much narrower than typical Doppler broadened molecular linewidths in the mid-IR range. Thus it is possible to detect individual rotational lines within the vibrational band and measure their intensity, which can be used to determine gas concentration. The narrow spectral lines of any impurity gas tend to lie between the narrow lines of the gas of interest. This represents a major advantage over the accepted gas chromatograph mass spectrometer (GCMS) technique for measuring gas concentrations and isotope ratios. The careful and extensive gas purification procedures required to remove impurities for reliable GCMS measurements will not be required for an IR laser gas analysis. The infrared laser gas analysis technique is being developed to measure stable isotopic ratios of gases such as CO2, CH4, N2O, and NH3. This will eventually lead to development of instruments capable of in situ istopic measurements on planets such as Mars. The carbon (C-12, C-13) isotope ratio is indicative of the type of carbon fixation mechanisms (e.g., photosynthesis, respiration) in operation on a planet, while the nitrogen (N-14, N-15) isotope ratio can probably be used to date nitrogen-bearing Martian samples. The absorbance ratio of two adjacent lines of CO2 in the 2300/cm (4.3 micron) region of the spectrum was measured. The precision of the measurement is presently better than 1 percent and significant improvement is anticipated as rapid sweep-integration techniques and computer controlled data acquistion capabilities are incorporated.

  18. Electrochemically stable electrolytes

    DOEpatents

    Angell, Charles Austen; Zhang, Sheng-Shui; Xu, Kang

    1999-01-01

    This invention relates generally to inorganic ionic liquids which function as electrolytes and do not crystallize at ambient temperature. More specifically, this invention is directed to quasi-salt inorganic ionic liquids which comprise the reaction product of a strong Lewis acid with an inorganic halide-donating molecule. This invention is further directed to quasi-salt inorganic ionic liquid mixtures which comprise combinations of electrolyte additives and quasi-salt inorganic ionic liquids. These quasi-salt inorganic ionic liquid mixtures are useful electrolytes.

  19. Electrochemically stable electrolytes

    DOEpatents

    Angell, C.A.; Zhang, S.S.; Xu, K.

    1999-01-05

    This invention relates generally to inorganic ionic liquids which function as electrolytes and do not crystallize at ambient temperature. More specifically, this invention is directed to quasi-salt inorganic ionic liquids which comprise the reaction product of a strong Lewis acid with an inorganic halide-donating molecule. This invention is further directed to quasi-salt inorganic ionic liquid mixtures which comprise combinations of electrolyte additives and quasi-salt inorganic ionic liquids. These quasi-salt inorganic ionic liquid mixtures are useful electrolytes. 16 figs.

  20. Thermally stable macromolecules.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pezdirtz, G. F.; Johnston, N. J.

    1972-01-01

    Man-made polymers are compared with certain naturally occurring polymers which have long been used at elevated temperatures. The pyrolysis of model compounds is discussed together with aspects of thermogravimetric analysis, torsional braid analysis, and questions of chemical and radiation stability. Some structure-property relationships are examined, giving attention to asbestos, mica, graphite, and diamond. Questions of bond strengths are investigated along with the stability of ladder polymers and some fundamental concepts in the synthesis of aromatic and heteroaromatic polymers. The substances considered include aromatic single-strand polymers, heteroaromatic polymers, polymers obtained by addition polymerizations, and nonhydrogen-containing polymers. Future trends are also explored.

  1. Heritability of Creative Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piffer, Davide; Hur, Yoon-Mi

    2014-01-01

    Although creative achievement is a subject of much attention to lay people, the origin of individual differences in creative accomplishments remain poorly understood. This study examined genetic and environmental influences on creative achievement in an adult sample of 338 twins (mean age = 26.3 years; SD = 6.6 years). Twins completed the Creative…

  2. Confronting the Achievement Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, David

    2007-01-01

    This article talks about the large achievement gap between children of color and their white peers. The reasons for the achievement gap are varied. First, many urban minorities come from a background of poverty. One of the detrimental effects of growing up in poverty is receiving inadequate nourishment at a time when bodies and brains are rapidly…

  3. States Address Achievement Gaps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christie, Kathy

    2002-01-01

    Summarizes 2 state initiatives to address the achievement gap: North Carolina's report by the Advisory Commission on Raising Achievement and Closing Gaps, containing an 11-point strategy, and Kentucky's legislation putting in place 10 specific processes. The North Carolina report is available at www.dpi.state.nc.us.closingthegap; Kentucky's…

  4. Wechsler Individual Achievement Test.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Ronald L.

    1999-01-01

    This article describes the Wechsler Individual Achievement Test, a comprehensive measure of achievement for individuals in grades K-12. Eight subtests assess mathematics reasoning, spelling, reading comprehension, numerical operations, listening comprehension, oral expression, and written expression. Its administration, standardization,…

  5. Inverting the Achievement Pyramid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White-Hood, Marian; Shindel, Melissa

    2006-01-01

    Attempting to invert the pyramid to improve student achievement and increase all students' chances for success is not a new endeavor. For decades, educators have strategized, formed think tanks, and developed school improvement teams to find better ways to improve the achievement of all students. Currently, the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) is…

  6. Achievement Test Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Dept. of Education, Columbus. Trade and Industrial Education Service.

    The Ohio Trade and Industrial Education Achievement Test battery is comprised of seven basic achievement tests: Machine Trades, Automotive Mechanics, Basic Electricity, Basic Electronics, Mechanical Drafting, Printing, and Sheet Metal. The tests were developed by subject matter committees and specialists in testing and research. The Ohio Trade and…

  7. General Achievement Trends: Maryland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  8. General Achievement Trends: Arkansas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  9. General Achievement Trends: Idaho

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  10. General Achievement Trends: Nebraska

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  11. General Achievement Trends: Colorado

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  12. General Achievement Trends: Iowa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  13. General Achievement Trends: Hawaii

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  14. General Achievement Trends: Kentucky

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  15. General Achievement Trends: Florida

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  16. General Achievement Trends: Texas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  17. General Achievement Trends: Oregon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  18. General Achievement Trends: Virginia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  19. Honoring Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Digest: Essential Readings Condensed for Quick Review, 2004

    2004-01-01

    Is the concept of "honor roll" obsolete? The honor roll has always been a way for schools to recognize the academic achievement of their students. But does it motivate students? In this article, several elementary school principals share their views about honoring student achievement. Among others, Virginia principal Nancy Moga said that students…

  20. Aiming at Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez, Paul

    The Raising Quality and Achievement Program is a 3-year initiative to support further education (FE) colleges in the United Kingdom in their drive to improve students' achievement and the quality of provision. The program offers the following: (1) quality information and advice; (2) onsite support for individual colleges; (3) help with…

  1. Achieving Perspective Transformation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nowak, Jens

    Perspective transformation is a consciously achieved state in which the individual's perspective on life is transformed. The new perspective serves as a vantage point for life's actions and interactions, affecting the way life is lived. Three conditions are basic to achieving perspective transformation: (1) "feeling" experience, i.e., getting in…

  2. Achieving Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abowitz, Kathleen Knight

    2011-01-01

    Public schools are functionally provided through structural arrangements such as government funding, but public schools are achieved in substance, in part, through local governance. In this essay, Kathleen Knight Abowitz explains the bifocal nature of achieving public schools; that is, that schools are both subject to the unitary Public compact of…

  3. General Achievement Trends: Tennessee

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  4. Achievement-Based Resourcing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fletcher, Mike; And Others

    1992-01-01

    This collection of seven articles examines achievement-based resourcing (ABR), the concept that the funding of educational institutions should be linked to their success in promoting student achievement, with a focus on the application of ABR to postsecondary education in the United Kingdom. The articles include: (1) "Introduction" (Mick…

  5. Meteorological and pollutant profiles under very stable conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Wesely, M.L.; Coulter, R.L.

    1983-01-01

    The nocturnal boundary layer (NBL) can become very stable, with wind and temperature increasing rapidly with height and a local wind maximum often occurring near the top of the boundary layer. The wind speed, potential temperature, moisture, and ozone profiles in the NBL above flat terrain were studied by Argonne National Laboratory in the early morning and late evening during the Central Illinois Rainfall Convection Experiment (CIRCE) in July, 1979, with sensors carried aloft by a tethered kytoon. One aim was to examine closely the shape of profiles at heights of about 20 to 200 m by taking measurements at closely spaced height intervals. The tethered balloon was held at each level for a time sufficient for all sensors to come to equilibrium with the local atmosphere; this typically required 2 to 5 min at each level. It was possible to detect changes in spatial trends in profiles in real time, so that smaller height intervals could be used if the changes seemed important. As a result, greater resolution was achieved than is normally obtained with instruments attached to towers or to free balloons.

  6. Stable carbon and sulfur isotopes as records of the early biosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desmarais, David J.

    1989-01-01

    The abundance ratios of the stable isotopes of light elements such as carbon and sulfur can differ between various naturally-occurring chemical compounds. If coexisting compounds have achieved mutual chemical and isotopic equilibrium, then the relative isotopic composition can record the conditions at which equilibrium was last maintained. If coexisting chemical compounds indeed formed simultaneously but had not achieved mutual equilibrium, then their relative isotopic compositions often reflect the conditions and mechanisms associated with the kinetically controlled reactions responsible for their production. In the context of Mars, the stable isotopic compositions of various minerals might record not only the earlier environmental conditions of the planet, but also whether or not the chemistry of life ever occurred there. Two major geochemical reservoirs occur in Earth's crust, both for carbon and sulfur. In rocks formed in low temperature sedimentary environments, the oxidized forms of these elements tend to be enriched in the isotope having the larger mass, relative to the reduced forms. In sediments where the organics and sulfides were formed by biological processes, these isotopic contrasts were caused by the processes of biological CO2 fixation and dissimilatory sulfate reduction. Such isotopic contrasts between oxidized and reduced forms of carbon and sulfur are permitted by thermodynamics at ambient temperatures. However, nonbiological chemical reactions associated with the production of organic matter and the reduction of organics and sulfides are extremely slow at ambient temperatures. Thus the synthesis of organics and sulfides under ambient conditions illustrates life's profound role as a chemical catalyst that has altered the chemistry of Earth's crust. Because the stable isotopes of carbon and sulfur can reflect their chemistry, they are useful probes of the Martian surface.

  7. Shear-Triggered Crystallization and Light Emission of a Thermally Stable Organic Supercooled Liquid

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Thermodynamics drive crystalline organic molecules to be crystallized at temperatures below their melting point. Even though molecules can form supercooled liquids by rapid cooling, crystalline organic materials readily undergo a phase transformation to an energetically favorable crystalline phase upon subsequent heat treatment. Opposite to this general observation, here, we report molecular design of thermally stable supercooled liquid of diketopyrrolopyrrole (DPP) derivatives and their intriguing shear-triggered crystallization with dramatic optical property changes. Molten DPP8, one of the DPP derivatives, remains as stable supercooled liquid without crystallization through subsequent thermal cycles. More interestingly, under shear conditions, this supercooled liquid DPP8 transforms to its crystal phase accompanied by a 25-fold increase in photoluminescence (PL) quantum efficiency and a color change. By systematic investigation on supercooled liquid formation of crystalline DPP derivatives and their correlation with chemical structures, we reveal that the origin of this thermally stable supercooled liquid is a subtle force balance between aromatic interactions among the core units and van der Waals interactions among the aliphatic side chains acting in opposite directions. Moreover, by applying shear force to a supercooled liquid DPP8 film at different temperatures, we demonstrated direct writing of fluorescent patterns and propagating fluorescence amplification, respectively. Shear-triggered crystallization of DPP8 is further achieved even by living cell attachment and spreading, demonstrating the high sensitivity of the shear-triggered crystallization which is about 6 orders of magnitude more sensitive than typical mechanochromism observed in organic materials. PMID:27162955

  8. Biochemical and Spectroscopic Characterization of Highly Stable Photosystem II Supercomplexes from Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Crepin, Aurelie; Santabarbara, Stefano; Caffarri, Stefano

    2016-09-01

    Photosystem II (PSII) is a large membrane supercomplex involved in the first step of oxygenic photosynthesis. It is organized as a dimer, with each monomer consisting of more than 20 subunits as well as several cofactors, including chlorophyll and carotenoid pigments, lipids, and ions. The isolation of stable and homogeneous PSII supercomplexes from plants has been a hindrance for their deep structural and functional characterization. In recent years, purification of complexes with different antenna sizes was achieved with mild detergent solubilization of photosynthetic membranes and fractionation on a sucrose gradient, but these preparations were only stable in the cold for a few hours. In this work, we present an improved protocol to obtain plant PSII supercomplexes that are stable for several hours/days at a wide range of temperatures and can be concentrated without degradation. Biochemical and spectroscopic properties of the purified PSII are presented, as well as a study of the complex solubility in the presence of salts. We also tested the impact of a large panel of detergents on PSII stability and found that very few are able to maintain the integrity of PSII. Such new PSII preparation opens the possibility of performing experiments that require room temperature conditions and/or high protein concentrations, and thus it will allow more detailed investigations into the structure and molecular mechanisms that underlie plant PSII function. PMID:27432883

  9. Shear-Triggered Crystallization and Light Emission of a Thermally Stable Organic Supercooled Liquid.

    PubMed

    Chung, Kyeongwoon; Kwon, Min Sang; Leung, Brendan M; Wong-Foy, Antek G; Kim, Min Su; Kim, Jeongyong; Takayama, Shuichi; Gierschner, Johannes; Matzger, Adam J; Kim, Jinsang

    2015-05-27

    Thermodynamics drive crystalline organic molecules to be crystallized at temperatures below their melting point. Even though molecules can form supercooled liquids by rapid cooling, crystalline organic materials readily undergo a phase transformation to an energetically favorable crystalline phase upon subsequent heat treatment. Opposite to this general observation, here, we report molecular design of thermally stable supercooled liquid of diketopyrrolopyrrole (DPP) derivatives and their intriguing shear-triggered crystallization with dramatic optical property changes. Molten DPP8, one of the DPP derivatives, remains as stable supercooled liquid without crystallization through subsequent thermal cycles. More interestingly, under shear conditions, this supercooled liquid DPP8 transforms to its crystal phase accompanied by a 25-fold increase in photoluminescence (PL) quantum efficiency and a color change. By systematic investigation on supercooled liquid formation of crystalline DPP derivatives and their correlation with chemical structures, we reveal that the origin of this thermally stable supercooled liquid is a subtle force balance between aromatic interactions among the core units and van der Waals interactions among the aliphatic side chains acting in opposite directions. Moreover, by applying shear force to a supercooled liquid DPP8 film at different temperatures, we demonstrated direct writing of fluorescent patterns and propagating fluorescence amplification, respectively. Shear-triggered crystallization of DPP8 is further achieved even by living cell attachment and spreading, demonstrating the high sensitivity of the shear-triggered crystallization which is about 6 orders of magnitude more sensitive than typical mechanochromism observed in organic materials. PMID:27162955

  10. [Achievement of therapeutic objectives].

    PubMed

    Mantilla, Teresa

    2014-07-01

    Therapeutic objectives for patients with atherogenic dyslipidemia are achieved by improving patient compliance and adherence. Clinical practice guidelines address the importance of treatment compliance for achieving objectives. The combination of a fixed dose of pravastatin and fenofibrate increases the adherence by simplifying the drug regimen and reducing the number of daily doses. The good tolerance, the cost of the combination and the possibility of adjusting the administration to the patient's lifestyle helps achieve the objectives for these patients with high cardiovascular risk. PMID:25043543

  11. High temperature coefficient of resistance achieved by ion beam assisted sputtering with no heat treatment in V{sub y}M{sub 1−y}O{sub x} (M = Nb, Hf)

    SciTech Connect

    Vardi, Naor; Sharoni, Amos

    2015-11-15

    Thermal imaging based on room temperature bolometer sensors is a growing market, constantly searching for improved sensitivity. One important factor is the temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR), i.e., the sensitivity of the active material. Herein, the authors report the improved TCR properties attainable by the “ion beam assisted deposition” method for room temperature deposition. V{sub y}M{sub 1−y}O{sub x} (M = Nb, Hf) thin-film alloys were fabricated on 1 μm thermal SiO{sub 2} atop Si (100) substrates by reactive magnetron cosputtering at room temperature using a low energy ion source, aimed at the film, to insert dissociated oxygen species and increase film density. The authors studied the influence of deposition parameters such as oxygen partial pressure, V to M ratio, and power of the plasma source, on resistance and TCR. The authors show high TCR (up to −3.7% K{sup −1}) at 300 K, and excellent uniformity, but also an increase in resistance. The authors emphasize that samples were prepared at room temperature with no heat treatment, much simpler than common processes that require annealing at high temperatures. So, this is a promising fabrication route for uncooled microbolometers.

  12. Predicting Achievement and Motivation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uguroglu, Margaret; Walberg, Herbert J.

    1986-01-01

    Motivation and nine other factors were measured for 970 students in grades five through eight in a study of factors predicting achievement and predicting motivation. Results are discussed. (Author/MT)

  13. Attractiveness and School Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salvia, John; And Others

    1977-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to ascertain the relationship between rated attractiveness and two measures of school performance. Attractive children received significantly higher report cards and, to some degree, higher achievement test scores than their unattractive peers. (Author)

  14. Student Achievement and Motivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flammer, Gordon H.; Mecham, Robert C.

    1974-01-01

    Compares the lecture and self-paced methods of instruction on the basis of student motivation and achieveme nt, comparing motivating and demotivating factors in each, and their potential for motivation and achievement. (Authors/JR)

  15. Stable, Electroinactive Wetting Agent For Fuel Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prakash, Surya G.; Olah, George A.; Narayanan, Sekharipuram R.; Surampudi, Subbarao; Halpert, Gerald

    1994-01-01

    Straight-chain perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (C8 acid) identified as innocuous and stable wetting agent for use with polytetrafluoroethylene-containing electrodes in liquid-feed direct-oxidation fuel cells suggested for use in vehicles and portable power supplies. C8 acid in small concentrations in aqueous liquid solutions of methanol, trimethoxymethane, dimethoxymethane, and trioxane enables oxidation of these substances by use of commercially available electrodes of type designed originally for use with gases. This function specific to C8 acid molecule and not achieved by other related perfluorolkanesulfonic acids.

  16. Passive load alleviation bi-stable morphing concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arrieta, A. F.; Bilgen, O.; Friswell, M. I.; Hagedorn, P.

    2012-09-01

    In wind turbines, large loads caused by fluid structure interaction leading to fatigue failure and added robustness to withstand high bending stresses on the root of blades constitute important design bottlenecks. Implementation of morphing offers a potential solution for such challenges in wind turbine blades. In this letter, a passive load alleviating bi-stable morphing concept is proposed. A bi-stable specimen designed to have different stiffness and dynamic response characteristics on each stable state is devised as a compliant structure. Passive alleviation mechanisms require no active components to achieve the load alleviation objective, resulting in lighter and simpler designs in comparison to actively morphed solutions.

  17. Advanced thermally stable jet fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Schobert, H.H.

    1999-01-31

    The Pennsylvania State University program in advanced thermally stable coal-based jet fuels has five broad objectives: (1) Development of mechanisms of degradation and solids formation; (2) Quantitative measurement of growth of sub-micrometer and micrometer-sized particles suspended in fuels during thermal stressing; (3) Characterization of carbonaceous deposits by various instrumental and microscopic methods; (4) Elucidation of the role of additives in retarding the formation of carbonaceous solids; (5) Assessment of the potential of production of high yields of cycloalkanes by direct liquefaction of coal. Future high-Mach aircraft will place severe thermal demands on jet fuels, requiring the development of novel, hybrid fuel mixtures capable of withstanding temperatures in the range of 400--500 C. In the new aircraft, jet fuel will serve as both an energy source and a heat sink for cooling the airframe, engine, and system components. The ultimate development of such advanced fuels requires a thorough understanding of the thermal decomposition behavior of jet fuels under supercritical conditions. Considering that jet fuels consist of hundreds of compounds, this task must begin with a study of the thermal degradation behavior of select model compounds under supercritical conditions. The research performed by The Pennsylvania State University was focused on five major tasks that reflect the objectives stated above: Task 1: Investigation of the Quantitative Degradation of Fuels; Task 2: Investigation of Incipient Deposition; Task 3: Characterization of Solid Gums, Sediments, and Carbonaceous Deposits; Task 4: Coal-Based Fuel Stabilization Studies; and Task 5: Exploratory Studies on the Direct Conversion of Coal to High Quality Jet Fuels. The major findings of each of these tasks are presented in this executive summary. A description of the sub-tasks performed under each of these tasks and the findings of those studies are provided in the remainder of this volume

  18. Super Stable Ferroelectrics with High Curie Point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Zhipeng; Lu, Chengjia; Wang, Yuhang; Yang, Sinuo; Yu, Yuying; He, Hongliang

    2016-04-01

    Ferroelectric materials are of great importance in the sensing technology due to the piezoelectric properties. Thermal depoling behavior of ferroelectrics determines the upper temperature limit of their application. So far, there is no piezoelectric material working above 800 °C available. Here, we show Nd2Ti2O7 with a perovskite-like layered structure has good resistance to thermal depoling up to 1400 °C. Its stable behavior is because the material has only 180° ferroelectric domains, complex structure change at Curie point (Tc) and their sintering temperature is below their Tc, which avoided the internal stresses produced by the unit cell volume change at Tc. The phase transition at Tc shows a first order behavior which involving the tilting and rotation of the octahedron. The Curie – Weiss temperature is calculated, which might explain why the thermal depoling starts at about 1400 °C.

  19. Super Stable Ferroelectrics with High Curie Point

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Zhipeng; Lu, Chengjia; Wang, Yuhang; Yang, Sinuo; Yu, Yuying; He, Hongliang

    2016-01-01

    Ferroelectric materials are of great importance in the sensing technology due to the piezoelectric properties. Thermal depoling behavior of ferroelectrics determines the upper temperature limit of their application. So far, there is no piezoelectric material working above 800 °C available. Here, we show Nd2Ti2O7 with a perovskite-like layered structure has good resistance to thermal depoling up to 1400 °C. Its stable behavior is because the material has only 180° ferroelectric domains, complex structure change at Curie point (Tc) and their sintering temperature is below their Tc, which avoided the internal stresses produced by the unit cell volume change at Tc. The phase transition at Tc shows a first order behavior which involving the tilting and rotation of the octahedron. The Curie – Weiss temperature is calculated, which might explain why the thermal depoling starts at about 1400 °C. PMID:27053338

  20. Super Stable Ferroelectrics with High Curie Point.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhipeng; Lu, Chengjia; Wang, Yuhang; Yang, Sinuo; Yu, Yuying; He, Hongliang

    2016-01-01

    Ferroelectric materials are of great importance in the sensing technology due to the piezoelectric properties. Thermal depoling behavior of ferroelectrics determines the upper temperature limit of their application. So far, there is no piezoelectric material working above 800 °C available. Here, we show Nd2Ti2O7 with a perovskite-like layered structure has good resistance to thermal depoling up to 1400 °C. Its stable behavior is because the material has only 180° ferroelectric domains, complex structure change at Curie point (Tc) and their sintering temperature is below their Tc, which avoided the internal stresses produced by the unit cell volume change at Tc. The phase transition at Tc shows a first order behavior which involving the tilting and rotation of the octahedron. The Curie - Weiss temperature is calculated, which might explain why the thermal depoling starts at about 1400 °C. PMID:27053338

  1. The Effect of Student Mobility on Academic Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Dolores A.

    The impact of mobility on academic achievement has been the focus of many studies. The findings are generally consistent and suggest that mobility lowers student achievement, particularly when the students are from low-income, less educated families. For this study, 30 students, classified as either mobile or stable, were randomly selected from a…

  2. Documenting Reading Achievement and Growth for Students Taking Alternate Assessments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tindal, Gerald; Nese, Joseph F. T.; Farley, Dan; Saven, Jessica L.; Elliott, Stephen N.

    2016-01-01

    Students with disabilities have been included in state accountability systems for more than a decade; however, only in the past few years have alternate assessments of alternate achievement standards (AA-AAS) become stable enough to allow examination of these students' achievement growth. Using data from Oregon's AA-AAS in Reading during the…

  3. Gender Differences, Especially on Fifty College Board Achievement Tests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanley, Julian C.; Stumpf, Heinrich

    In a follow-up to findings published by H. Stumpf and J. Stanley (1996), the gender-related differences in enrollment in and scores on the College Board Achievement (SAT II) and Advanced Placement (AP) tests were studied. Differences in scores turned out to be rather stable from 1982 (for the Achievement tests) and 1984 (for the AP tests) through…

  4. Longitudinal Effects of Perceived Control on Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    You, Sukkyung; Hong, Sehee; Ho, Hsiu-Zu

    2011-01-01

    It is well established that perceived control plays an important role in student academic achievement, but little is known about its longitudinal stability, ethnic variation, and developmental effects on subsequent achievement during adolescence. Findings from this study indicated (a) perceived control remains stable during adolescence for each of…

  5. Complex effects of stable noise, sinusoidal vs stochastic low frequency whole-body vibration and dynamic muscular work in temporary hearing threshold shifts (TTS) at a dry-bulb temperature of 30/sup 0/C

    SciTech Connect

    Manninen, O.

    1982-01-01

    In the metal industry occupational loss of hearing occurred twice as often among those working with vibrating equipment than among those not exposed to vibration. Occupational loss of hearing also occurred frequently in miners. In the same pits, hearing loss occurred less often among those engaged in pit-propping and among other specialist workers. The generation and development of occupational hearing loss in miners is, in fact, said to depend critically upon vibration, to the effects of which coal-face workers are particularly exosed when drilling. No absolute conclusions can, however, be drawn from these observations, since in many cases the number of different environmental factors prevailing in production life is very large and varies in each stage of production. The aim of this study was, therefore, to examine under controlled laboratory conditions the temporary hearing thresholds (TTS) of subjects who, during dynamic muscular work, are exposed at slightly elevated ambient temperature to either noise or vibration separately or to combinations of these factors.

  6. Low-Loss Wide-Band Floating Electrode Type Unidirectional Transducer Filters and Ladder-Type Resonator Filters Using High-Temperature-Stable High Electromechanical Coupling Surface Acoustic Wave Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamanouchi, Kazuhiko; Ishii, Toru

    2003-05-01

    The important properties required for surface acoustic wave (SAW) substrates are large electromechanical coupling coefficients (k2), small temperature coefficient of frequency (TCF), low propagation loss, among other. LiNbO3 is a good SAW substrate because of its good properties and large size. We developed SiO2/rotated Y-cut, X-propagating LiNbO3 leaky SAW substrates with a large k2 (over 0.2) and zero TCF at a small thickness of SiO2 of H/λ=0.2 (H: SiO2 film thickness, λ: SAW wave-length) compared to those of other substrates and zero propagation attenuation in the case of metalized surface. In this paper, the theoretical and experimental results for SAW filters, resonators and resonator filters are described. The low-loss filters using floating electrode type unidirectional transducer (FEUDT) showed an insertion loss of below 1 dB at a center frequency of 400 MHz and bandwidth of 20 MHz. Also, the resonator showed the wide-band characteristics and resonator filters showed a bandwidth of 80 MHz at a center frequency of 500 MHz.

  7. Stable isotope composition of Earth's large lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasechko, S.; Gibson, J. J.; YI, Y.; Birks, S. J.; Sharp, Z. D.

    2011-12-01

    Lakes cover about three percent of Earth's continental area. Large lakes can significantly influence lake shore and regional climates by increasing specific humidity during evaporation and by moderating air temperatures. Stable isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen can be used to quantify lake evaporation, providing a supplementary and often cost-advantageous alternative to conventional hydrologic approaches that require over lake monitoring. Further, stable isotopes in lake sediments are an established tool in paleolimnology; however, interpreting changes to a lake's past isotope composition requires a comprehensive understanding of contemporary controls. Here, δ18O and δ2H values of water in modern lakes exceeding roughly five hundred square kilometres are compiled (n > 35). Voluminous and seasonally mixed lakes - such as the North American Great Lakes - have the most homogenous stable isotope compositions, while perennially-stratified and shallow lakes show greater variability. A rudimentary stable isotope mass balance is used to assess evaporation fluxes from large lakes on Earth. The approach taken simultaneously constrains evaporation outputs for both oxygen and hydrogen stable isotopes by accounting for lake effects on the overlying atmosphere. Model development highlights important considerations such as isotopic stratification (Tanganyika), disequilibrium isotopic mass balances (Baikal), and non-steady hydrologic balances. Further, the isotope composition of Earth's continental surface water reservoir is calculated. This value - weighted to volume - is δ18O = -7.5±1.7 per mille relative to standard mean ocean water. The compiled data may be a useful tracer of continental evaporate in global atmospheric water cycle studies and could be coupled to climate models capable of incorporating oxygen-18 and deuterium tracers to improve or validate calculations of lake effects on regional water cycling.

  8. High-temperature bearing lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, W. J.; Parker, R. J.; Zaretsky, E. V.

    1968-01-01

    Synthetic paraffinic oil lubricates ball bearings at temperatures in the 600 degrees F range. The lubricant contains antiwear and antifoam additives, is thermally stable in the high temperature range, but requires protection from oxygen.

  9. Properties of radiation stable, low viscosity impregnating resin for cryogenic insulation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhixiong; Zhang, Hao; Yang, Huihui; Chu, Xinxin; Song, Yuntao; Wu, Weiyue; Liu, Huajun; Li, Laifeng

    2011-06-01

    Impregnating resins in fusion magnet technology are required to be radiation stable, low viscosity, long usable life and high toughness. To meet these objectives, we developed a new epoxy based composite which consists of triglycidyl-p-aminophenol (TGPAP) epoxy resin and isopropylidenebisphenol bis[(2-glycidyloxy-3-n-butoxy)-1-propylether] (IPBE). The ratio of TGPAP to IPBE can be varied to achieve desired viscosity and working time. The boron-free glass fiber reinforced composites were prepared by vacuum pressure impregnation. The radiation resistance was evaluated by 60Co γ-ray irradiation of 1 MGy at ambient temperature. The mechanical properties of the composites have been measured at room temperature and at 77 K.

  10. Hygrothermally stable laminated composites with optimal coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haynes, Robert Andrew

    This work begins by establishing the necessary and sufficient conditions for hygrothermal stability of composite laminates. An investigation is performed into the range of coupling achievable from within all hygrothermally stable families. The minimum number of plies required to create an asymmetric hygrothermally stable stacking sequence is found to be five. Next, a rigorous and general approach for determining designs corresponding to optimal levels of coupling is established through the use of a constrained optimization procedure. Couplings investigated include extension-twist, bend-twist, extension-bend, shear-twist, and anticlastic. For extension-twist and bend-twist coupling, specimens from five- through ten-ply laminates are manufactured and tested to demonstrate hygrothermal stability and achievable levels of coupling. Nonlinear models and finite element analysis are developed, and predictions are verified through comparison with test results. Sensitivity analyses are performed to demonstrate the robustness of the hygrothermal stability and couplings to deviations in ply angle, typical of manufacturing tolerances. Comparisons are made with current state-of-the-art suboptimal layups, and significant increases in coupling over previously known levels are demonstrated.

  11. Room temperature phosphorescence from a guest molecule confined in the restrictive space of an organic-inorganic supramolecular assembly.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Yohei; Shimada, Tetsuya; Ramasamy, Elamparuthi; Ramamurthy, Vaidhyanathan; Takagi, Shinsuke

    2016-08-01

    Stable room-temperature phosphorescence of guest aromatic molecules was achieved by the effective suppression of oxygen quenching. The organic capsule (first wall) suppressed static oxygen quenching by enclosing a guest molecule, and dynamic quenching via the capsule opening-closing process was well suppressed and manipulated by the intercalation of this capsule into the restrictive space between clay nanosheets (second wall). PMID:27411736

  12. Explorations in achievement motivation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helmreich, Robert L.

    1982-01-01

    Recent research on the nature of achievement motivation is reviewed. A three-factor model of intrinsic motives is presented and related to various criteria of performance, job satisfaction and leisure activities. The relationships between intrinsic and extrinsic motives are discussed. Needed areas for future research are described.

  13. Achieving health care affordability.

    PubMed

    Payson, Norman C

    2002-10-01

    Not all plans are jumping headlong into the consumer-centric arena. In this article, the CEO of Oxford Health Plans discusses how advanced managed care can achieve what other consumer-centric programs seek to do--provide affordable, quality health care. PMID:12391815

  14. Issues in Achievement Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Eva L.

    This booklet is intended to help school personnel, parents, students, and members of the community understand concepts and research relating to achievement testing in public schools. The paper's sections include: (1) test use with direct effects on students (test of certification, selection, and placement); (2) test use with indirect effects on…

  15. Achieving Peace through Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarken, Rodney H.

    While it is generally agreed that peace is desirable, there are barriers to achieving a peaceful world. These barriers are classified into three major areas: (1) an erroneous view of human nature; (2) injustice; and (3) fear of world unity. In a discussion of these barriers, it is noted that although the consciousness and conscience of the world…

  16. Achieving All Our Ambitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartley, Tricia

    2009-01-01

    National learning and skills policy aims both to build economic prosperity and to achieve social justice. Participation in higher education (HE) has the potential to contribute substantially to both aims. That is why the Campaign for Learning has supported the ambition to increase the proportion of the working-age population with a Level 4…

  17. Intelligence and Educational Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deary, Ian J.; Strand, Steve; Smith, Pauline; Fernandes, Cres

    2007-01-01

    This 5-year prospective longitudinal study of 70,000+ English children examined the association between psychometric intelligence at age 11 years and educational achievement in national examinations in 25 academic subjects at age 16. The correlation between a latent intelligence trait (Spearman's "g"from CAT2E) and a latent trait of educational…

  18. SALT and Spelling Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Joan

    A study investigated the effects of suggestopedic accelerative learning and teaching (SALT) on the spelling achievement, attitudes toward school, and memory skills of fourth-grade students. Subjects were 20 male and 28 female students from two self-contained classrooms at Kennedy Elementary School in Rexburg, Idaho. The control classroom and the…

  19. NCLB: Achievement Robin Hood?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bracey, Gerald W.

    2008-01-01

    In his "Wall Street Journal" op-ed on the 25th of anniversary of "A Nation At Risk", former assistant secretary of education Chester E. Finn Jr. applauded the report for turning U.S. education away from equality and toward achievement. It was not surprising, then, that in mid-2008, Finn arranged a conference to examine the potential "Robin Hood…

  20. INTELLIGENCE, PERSONALITY AND ACHIEVEMENT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MUIR, R.C.; AND OTHERS

    A LONGITUDINAL DEVELOPMENTAL STUDY OF A GROUP OF MIDDLE CLASS CHILDREN IS DESCRIBED, WITH EMPHASIS ON A SEGMENT OF THE RESEARCH INVESTIGATING THE RELATIONSHIP OF ACHIEVEMENT, INTELLIGENCE, AND EMOTIONAL DISTURBANCE. THE SUBJECTS WERE 105 CHILDREN AGED FIVE TO 6.3 ATTENDING TWO SCHOOLS IN MONTREAL. EACH CHILD WAS ASSESSED IN THE AREAS OF…

  1. School Students' Science Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shymansky, James; Wang, Tzu-Ling; Annetta, Leonard; Everett, Susan; Yore, Larry D.

    2013-01-01

    This paper is a report of the impact of an externally funded, multiyear systemic reform project on students' science achievement on a modified version of the Third International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) test in 33 small, rural school districts in two Midwest states. The systemic reform effort utilized a cascading leadership strategy…

  2. Advancing Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walberg, Herbert J.

    2010-01-01

    For the last half century, higher spending and many modern reforms have failed to raise the achievement of students in the United States to the levels of other economically advanced countries. A possible explanation, says Herbert Walberg, is that much current education theory is ill informed about scientific psychology, often drawing on fads and…

  3. Essays on Educational Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ampaabeng, Samuel Kofi

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation examines the determinants of student outcomes--achievement, attainment, occupational choices and earnings--in three different contexts. The first two chapters focus on Ghana while the final chapter focuses on the US state of Massachusetts. In the first chapter, I exploit the incidence of famine and malnutrition that resulted to…

  4. Increasing Male Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Barbara Talbert

    2008-01-01

    The No Child Left Behind legislation has brought greater attention to the academic performance of American youth. Its emphasis on student achievement requires a closer analysis of assessment data by school districts. To address the findings, educators must seek strategies to remedy failing results. In a mid-Atlantic district of the Unites States,…

  5. Setting and Achieving Objectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knoop, Robert

    1986-01-01

    Provides basic guidelines which school officials and school boards may find helpful in negotiating, establishing, and managing objectives. Discusses characteristics of good objectives, specific and directional objectives, multiple objectives, participation in setting objectives, feedback on goal process and achievement, and managing a school…

  6. Schools Achieving Gender Equity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Revis, Emma

    This guide is designed to assist teachers presenting the Schools Achieving Gender Equity (SAGE) curriculum for vocational education students, which was developed to align gender equity concepts with the Kentucky Education Reform Act (KERA). Included in the guide are lesson plans for classes on the following topics: legal issues of gender equity,…

  7. Iowa Women of Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohrn, Deborah Gore, Ed.

    1993-01-01

    This issue of the Goldfinch highlights some of Iowa's 20th century women of achievement. These women have devoted their lives to working for human rights, education, equality, and individual rights. They come from the worlds of politics, art, music, education, sports, business, entertainment, and social work. They represent Native Americans,…

  8. Achievements or Disasters?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwin, MacArthur

    2000-01-01

    Focuses on policy issues that have affected arts education in the twentieth century, such as: interest in discipline-based arts education, influence of national arts associations, and national standards and coordinated assessment. States that whether the policy decisions are viewed as achievements or disasters are for future determination. (CMK)

  9. Minority Achievement Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prince George's Community Coll., Largo, MD. Office of Institutional Research and Analysis.

    This report summarizes the achievements of Prince George's Community College (PGCC) with regard to minority outcomes. Table 1 summarizes the undergraduate enrollment trends for African Americans as well as total minorities from fall 1994 through fall 1998. Both the headcount number of African American students and the proportion of African…

  10. Appraising Reading Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ediger, Marlow

    To determine quality sequence in pupil progress, evaluation approaches need to be used which guide the teacher to assist learners to attain optimally. Teachers must use a variety of procedures to appraise student achievement in reading, because no one approach is adequate. Appraisal approaches might include: (1) observation and subsequent…

  11. Stable Multibubble Sonoluminescence Bubble Patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Posakony, Gerald J.; Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Ahmed, Salahuddin

    2006-06-30

    Multibubble standing wave patterns can be generated from a flat piezoceramic transducer element propagating into water. By adding a second transducer positioned at 90 degrees from the transducer generating the standing wave, a 3-dimensional volume of stable single bubbles can be established. Further, the addition of the second transducer stabilizes the bubble pattern so that individual bubbles may be studied. The size of the bubbles and the separation of the standing waves depend on the frequency of operation. Two transducers, operating at frequencies above 500 kHz, provided the most graphic results for the configuration used in this study. At these frequencies stable bubbles exhibit a bright sonoluminescence pattern. Whereas stable SBSL is well-known, stable MBSL has not been previously reported. This paper includes discussions of the acoustic responses, standing wave patterns, and pictorial results of the separation of individual bubble of sonoluminescence in a multibubble sonoluminescence environment.

  12. Earthquakes in Stable Continental Crust.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Arch C.; Kanter, Lisa R.

    1990-01-01

    Discussed are some of the reasons for earthquakes which occur in stable crust away from familiar zones at the ends of tectonic plates. Crust stability and the reactivation of old faults are described using examples from India and Australia. (CW)

  13. Shelf-Stable Food Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... process of packing meat and poultry in glass bottles, corking them, and submerging them in boiling water. ... fsis.usda.gov. [ Top of Page ] Are any egg products shelf stable? Pasteurized, dried egg products can ...

  14. Hadamard Factorization of Stable Polynomials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loredo-Villalobos, Carlos Arturo; Aguirre-Hernández, Baltazar

    2011-11-01

    The stable (Hurwitz) polynomials are important in the study of differential equations systems and control theory (see [7] and [19]). A property of these polynomials is related to Hadamard product. Consider two polynomials p,q ∈ R[x]:p(x) = anxn+an-1xn-1+...+a1x+a0q(x) = bmx m+bm-1xm-1+...+b1x+b0the Hadamard product (p × q) is defined as (p×q)(x) = akbkxk+ak-1bk-1xk-1+...+a1b1x+a0b0where k = min(m,n). Some results (see [16]) shows that if p,q ∈R[x] are stable polynomials then (p×q) is stable, also, i.e. the Hadamard product is closed; however, the reciprocal is not always true, that is, not all stable polynomial has a factorization into two stable polynomials the same degree n, if n> 4 (see [15]).In this work we will give some conditions to Hadamard factorization existence for stable polynomials.

  15. Improvements in Cd stable isotope analysis achieved through use of liquid–liquid extraction to remove organic residues from Cd separates obtained by extraction chromatography† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5ja00115c Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Rehkämper, Mark; Kreissig, Katharina; Coles, Barry; van de Flierdt, Tina

    2016-01-01

    Organic compounds released from resins that are commonly employed for trace element separations are known to have a detrimental impact on the quality of isotopic analyses by MC-ICP-MS. A recent study highlighted that such effects can be particularly problematic for Cd stable isotope measurements (M. Gault-Ringold and C. H. Stirling, J. Anal. At. Spectrom., 2012, 27, 449–459). In this case, the final stage of sample purification commonly applies extraction chromatography with Eichrom TRU resin, which employs particles coated with octylphenyl-N,N-di-isobutyl carbamoylphosphine oxide (CMPO) dissolved in tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP). During chromatography, it appears that some of these compounds are eluted alongside Cd and cannot be removed by evaporation due to their high boiling points. When aliquots of the zero-ε reference material were processed through the purification procedure, refluxed in concentrated HNO3 and analyzed at minimum dilution (in 1 ml 0.1 M HNO3), they yielded Cd isotopic compositions (ε114/110Cd = 4.6 ± 3.4, 2SD, n = 4) that differed significantly from the expected value, despite the use of a double spike technique to correct for instrumental mass fractionation. This result was accompanied by a 35% reduction in instrumental sensitivity for Cd. With increasing dilution of the organic resin residue, both of these effects are reduced and they are insignificant when the eluted Cd is dissolved in ≥3 ml 0.1 M HNO3. Our results, furthermore, indicate that the isotopic artefacts are most likely related to anomalous mass bias behavior. Previous studies have shown that perchloric acid can be effective at avoiding such effects (Gault-Ringold and Stirling, 2012; K. C. Crocket, M. Lambelet, T. van de Flierdt, M. Rehkämper and L. F. Robinson, Chem. Geol., 2014, 374–375, 128–140), presumably by oxidizing the resin-derived organics, but there are numerous disadvantages to its use. Here we show that liquid–liquid extraction with n-heptane removes the

  16. Detonation of Meta-stable Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhl, Allen; Kuhl, Allen L.; Fried, Laurence E.; Howard, W. Michael; Seizew, Michael R.; Bell, John B.; Beckner, Vincent; Grcar, Joseph F.

    2008-05-31

    We consider the energy accumulation in meta-stable clusters. This energy can be much larger than the typical chemical bond energy (~;;1 ev/atom). For example, polymeric nitrogen can accumulate 4 ev/atom in the N8 (fcc) structure, while helium can accumulate 9 ev/atom in the excited triplet state He2* . They release their energy by cluster fission: N8 -> 4N2 and He2* -> 2He. We study the locus of states in thermodynamic state space for the detonation of such meta-stable clusters. In particular, the equilibrium isentrope, starting at the Chapman-Jouguet state, and expanding down to 1 atmosphere was calculated with the Cheetah code. Large detonation pressures (3 and 16 Mbar), temperatures (12 and 34 kilo-K) and velocities (20 and 43 km/s) are a consequence of the large heats of detonation (6.6 and 50 kilo-cal/g) for nitrogen and helium clusters respectively. If such meta-stable clusters could be synthesized, they offer the potential for large increases in the energy density of materials.

  17. Stable and Metastable Equilibria in the Pb-Cd System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Ying-Yu; Paik, J.-S.; Zhang, C.; Perepezko, J. H.; Chang, Y. A.

    2013-07-01

    Thermodynamic and phase diagram data in the Pb-Cd system are reevaluated. A substitutional solution model is used for the liquid and fcc and hcp phases. The stable and metastable equilibria of this system are calculated using the thermodynamic equations derived from equilibrium data. Besides the well-established eutectic reaction at 521 K (248 °C), one stable monotectic reaction at 548 K (275 °C) is found due to the existence of a stable liquid miscibility gap. The stable monotectic reaction has been missed in all previous evaluations. Experimental verifications of the stable and metastable phase equilibria are provided using droplet samples and undercooled liquid alloys. A differential thermal analysis (DTA) method is applied to determine the phase reaction temperatures using both traditional heating and cooling processes and a specially designed cycling process. Additional microstructural evidence is used to elucidate the nature of the phase reactions. The refined thermodynamic descriptions are based upon both the thermochemical and phase diagram stable and metastable data. The agreement between the calculated and experimental data is good. All experimental stable and metastable results are well explained by the new Pb-Cd phase diagram calculations within the experimental accuracy limits. Combined experimental and thermodynamic modeling procedures developed for determining the stable and metastable phase equilibria yield a highly reliable overall phase diagram assessment and a quantitative basis for the interpretation of non-equilibrium solidification processing.

  18. Project ACHIEVE final report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-13

    Project ACHIEVE was a math/science academic enhancement program aimed at first year high school Hispanic American students. Four high schools -- two in El Paso, Texas and two in Bakersfield, California -- participated in this Department of Energy-funded program during the spring and summer of 1996. Over 50 students, many of whom felt they were facing a nightmare future, were given the opportunity to work closely with personal computers and software, sophisticated calculators, and computer-based laboratories -- an experience which their regular academic curriculum did not provide. Math and science projects, exercises, and experiments were completed that emphasized independent and creative applications of scientific and mathematical theories to real world problems. The most important outcome was the exposure Project ACHIEVE provided to students concerning the college and technical-field career possibilities available to them.

  19. Achieving Goal Blood Pressure.

    PubMed

    Laurent, Stéphane

    2015-07-01

    Both monotherapy and combination therapy options are appropriate for antihypertensive therapy according to the 2013 European Society of Hypertension (ESH)/European Society of Cardiology (ESC) guidelines. Most patients require more than one agent to achieve blood pressure (BP) control, and adding a second agent is more effective than doubling the dose of existing therapy. The addition of a third agent may be required to achieve adequate BP reductions in some patients. Single-pill fixed-dose combinations (FDCs) allow multiple-drug regimens to be delivered without any negative impact on patient compliance or persistence with therapy. FDCs also have documented beneficial clinical effects and use of FDCs containing two or three agents is recommended by the 2013 ESH/ESC guidelines. PMID:26002423

  20. Dynamics and Correlations among Soft Excitations in Marginally Stable Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Le; Baity-Jesi, Marco; Müller, Markus; Wyart, Matthieu

    2015-06-01

    Marginal stability is the notion that stability is achieved, but only barely so. This property constrains the ensemble of configurations explored at low temperature in a variety of systems, including spin, electron, and structural glasses. A key feature of marginal states is a (saturated) pseudogap in the distribution of soft excitations. We examine how such pseudogaps appear dynamically by studying the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick (SK) spin glass. After revisiting and correcting the multi-spin-flip criterion for local stability, we show that stationarity along the hysteresis loop requires soft spins to be frustrated among each other, with a correlation diverging as C (λ )˜1 /λ , where λ is the stability of the more stable spin. We explain how this arises spontaneously in a marginal system and develop an analogy between the spin dynamics in the SK model and random walks in two dimensions. We discuss analogous frustrations among soft excitations in short range glasses and how to detect them experimentally. We also show how these findings apply to hard sphere packings.

  1. Dynamics and Correlations among Soft Excitations in Marginally Stable Glasses.

    PubMed

    Yan, Le; Baity-Jesi, Marco; Müller, Markus; Wyart, Matthieu

    2015-06-19

    Marginal stability is the notion that stability is achieved, but only barely so. This property constrains the ensemble of configurations explored at low temperature in a variety of systems, including spin, electron, and structural glasses. A key feature of marginal states is a (saturated) pseudogap in the distribution of soft excitations. We examine how such pseudogaps appear dynamically by studying the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick (SK) spin glass. After revisiting and correcting the multi-spin-flip criterion for local stability, we show that stationarity along the hysteresis loop requires soft spins to be frustrated among each other, with a correlation diverging as C(λ)∼1/λ, where λ is the stability of the more stable spin. We explain how this arises spontaneously in a marginal system and develop an analogy between the spin dynamics in the SK model and random walks in two dimensions. We discuss analogous frustrations among soft excitations in short range glasses and how to detect them experimentally. We also show how these findings apply to hard sphere packings. PMID:26197008

  2. Stable Ultrathin-Shell Double Emulsions for Controlled Release.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chun-Xia; Chen, Dong; Hui, Yue; Weitz, David A; Middelberg, Anton P J

    2016-06-01

    Double emulsions are normally considered as metastable systems and this limit in stability restricts their applications. To enhance their stability, the outer shell can be converted into a mechanically strong layer, for example, a polymeric layer, thus allowing improved performance. This conversion can be problematic for food and drug applications, as a toxic solvent is needed to dissolve the polymer in the middle phase and a high temperature is required to remove the solvent. This process can also be highly complex, for example, involving UV initiation of polymeric monomer crosslinking. In this study, we report the formation of biocompatible, water-in-oil-in-water (W/O/W) double emulsions with an ultrathin layer of fish oil. We demonstrate their application for the encapsulation and controlled release of small hydrophilic molecules. Without a trigger, the double emulsions remained stable for months, and the release of small molecules was extremely slow. In contrast, rapid release was achieved by osmolarity shock, leading to complete release within 2 h. This work demonstrates the significant potential of double emulsions, and provides new insights into their stability and practical applications. PMID:26934572

  3. Bilateral Comparison Between NPL and INMETRO Using a High-Temperature Fixed Point of Unknown Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machin, G.; Teixeira, R.; Lu, X.; Lowe, D.

    2015-03-01

    There is an on-going requirement to perform scale comparisons above the silver point with reduced uncertainties. Previous comparisons have been performed with high stability lamps or radiation thermometers, neither of which were able to achieve the required uncertainty. Ideally a set of driftless unknown temperature fixed points would be used to compare scales, but up to now such artifacts did not exist. This study develops blind high-temperature comparison artifacts based on doped versions of the high-temperature fixed point (HTFP) Ni-C (nominal temperature ). At INMETRO three HTFP blackbodies were constructed, one of pure Ni-C and two doped with different levels of Cu. To ascertain the effect of doping on the transition temperature, the cells were compared to the reference pure Ni-C cell. The doped cells were then transported to NPL and their temperatures measured. NPL was not informed of the INMETRO result ensuring that the measurements remained blind. The cells were then returned to INMETRO and re-measured to establish their stability. The temperatures measured at INMETRO and NPL were then compared and showed very good equivalence of the scale at the fixed-point temperatures. The results of the comparison of the NPL and INMETRO temperature scale, at nominally , are reported, along with evidence of the stability of the artifacts determined from repeat measurements. These promising results indicate that it may be possible to make HTFPs with altered temperatures which are stable enough to serve as comparison artifacts.

  4. Design of laser diode stable output system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bo; Cao, Rui-ming

    2008-03-01

    High-stability output's system of laser diode is introduced in this paper. The system which is based on the MCU of MSP430 has been designed light power feedback loop and coller of TEC. It includes stable current, protecting circuit, light power feedback loop, temperature controlling, power display and so on. It is also able to control and show the power at the real time. The power could be set by botton too. The software of slow start up, slow close and the protecting relay are adopted by MCU. DRV592 is introduced as PWM driver to control the current of TEC. The duty cycle is generate by MCU. In order to control temperature, it is changed to influence the current of TEC. The power that is sampled by photodiode which is integrated in the laser diode is controlled by the micro-processing. The laser is monitored by voltage control circuit and current control circuit at the real time.

  5. Stable nonlinear Mach-Zehnder fiber switch

    DOEpatents

    Digonnet, Michel J. F.; Shaw, H. John; Pantell, Richard H.; Sadowski, Robert W.

    1999-01-01

    An all-optical fiber switch is implemented within a short Mach-Zehnder interferometer configuration. The Mach-Zehnder switch is constructed to have a high temperature stability so as to minimize temperature gradients and other thermal effects which result in undesirable instability at the output of the switch. The Mach-Zehnder switch of the preferred embodiment is advantageously less than 2 cm in length between couplers to be sufficiently short to be thermally stable, and full switching is accomplished by heavily doping one or both of the arms between the couplers so as to provide a highly nonlinear region within one or both of the arms. A pump input source is used to affect the propagation characteristics of one of the arms to control the output coupling ratio of the switch. Because of the high nonlinearity of the pump input arm, low pump powers can be used, thereby alleviating difficulties and high cost associated with high pump input powers.

  6. Ultra-stable harmonically mode-locked erbium-doped waveguide laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanto, M. L.; Erdmann, R. K.; Wysocki, B. T.; Malowicki, J. E.; McEwen, T. A.

    2007-04-01

    Generation of stable pulses and a frequency stabilized optical comb are two key requirements for Fourier Based Arbitrary Waveform Generation (AWG) techniques. The longitudinal mode spacing of the laser must remain as stable as possible to permit effective isolation and processing of the modes for waveform synthesis. The short and long term temporal stability ultimately limits the system's precision as well as its operability in fielded systems. A packaged erbium-doped waveguide provided a highly compact gain medium for the harmonically mode-locked laser design. Stability was achieved by use of an intracavity etalon for frequency stabilization of the optical comb, a Pound-Drever- Hall (PDH) method, and an active bias feedback loop for low frequency noise suppression. The temperature was controlled to limit cavity length variation, and the contribution to stability of each method is quantitatively assessed. The system's stable operating time was increased from hours to greater than a day, and the timing jitter is demonstrated to be lower than that of commercially available erbium-doped fiber laser (EDFL) systems. Applications to optical signal synthesis and Laser Radar are briefly discussed.

  7. Purification and Characterization of Haloalkaline, Organic Solvent Stable Xylanase from Newly Isolated Halophilic Bacterium-OKH

    PubMed Central

    Sanghvi, Gaurav; Jivrajani, Mehul; Patel, Nirav; Jivrajani, Heta; Bhaskara, Govinal Badiger; Patel, Shivani

    2014-01-01

    A novel, alkali-tolerant halophilic bacterium-OKH with an ability to produce extracellular halophilic, alkali-tolerant, organic solvent stable, and moderately thermostable xylanase was isolated from salt salterns of Mithapur region, Gujarat, India. Identification of the bacterium was done based upon biochemical tests and 16S rRNA sequence. Maximum xylanase production was achieved at pH 9.0 and 37°C temperature in the medium containing 15% NaCl and 1% (w/v) corn cobs. Sugarcane bagasse and wheat straw also induce xylanase production when used as carbon source. The enzyme was active over a range of 0–25% sodium chloride examined in culture broth. The optimum xylanase activity was observed at 5% sodium chloride. Xylanase was purified with 25.81%-fold purification and 17.1% yield. Kinetic properties such as Km and Vmax were 4.2 mg/mL and 0.31 μmol/min/mL, respectively. The enzyme was stable at pH 6.0 and 50°C with 60% activity after 8 hours of incubation. Enzyme activity was enhanced by Ca2+, Mn2+, and Mg2+ but strongly inhibited by heavy metals such as Hg2+, Fe3+, Ni2+, and Zn2+. Xylanase was found to be stable in organic solvents like glutaraldehyde and isopropanol. The purified enzyme hydrolysed lignocellulosic substrates. Xylanase, purified from the halophilic bacterium-OKH, has potential biotechnological applications. PMID:27350996

  8. Results on Levy stable parametrizations of Bose-Einstein Correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Novak, Tamas

    2006-04-11

    Bose-Einstein correlations of identical charged-pion pairs produced in hadronic Z decays are analyzed in terms of various parametrizations. A good description is achieved using Levy stable distributions. The source function is reconstructed with the help of the {tau}-model.

  9. Highly Stable Silver Nanoplates for Surface Plasmon Resonance Biosensing

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Chuanbo; Lu, Zhenda; Chi, Miaofang; Liu, ying; Cheng, Quan; Yin, Yadong

    2012-01-01

    An SPR biosensor was developed by employing highly stable Au-protected Ag nanoplates (NP) as enhancers (see picture). Superior performance was achieved by depositing a thin and uniform coating of Au on the Ag surface while minimizing disruptive galvanic replacement and retaining the strong surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of the silver nanoplates.

  10. Variable temperature system using vortex tube cooling and fiber optic temperature measurement for low temperature magic angle spinning NMR.

    PubMed

    Martin, Rachel W; Zilm, Kurt W

    2004-06-01

    We describe the construction and operation of a variable temperature (VT) system for a high field fast magic angle spinning (MAS) probe. The probe is used in NMR investigations of biological macromolecules, where stable setting and continuous measurement of the temperature over periods of several days are required in order to prevent sample overheating and degradation. The VT system described is used at and below room temperature. A vortex tube is used to provide cooling in the temperature range of -20 to 20 degrees C, while a liquid nitrogen-cooled heat exchanger is used below -20 degrees C. Using this arrangement, the lowest temperature that is practically achievable is -140 degrees C. Measurement of the air temperature near the spinning rotor is accomplished using a fiber optic thermometer that utilizes the temperature dependence of the absorption edge of GaAs. The absorption edge of GaAs also has a magnetic field dependence that we have measured and corrected for. This dependence was calibrated at several field strengths using the well-known temperature dependence of the (1)H chemical shift difference of the protons in methanol. PMID:15140428

  11. Achieving Magnet status.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Beckie; Gates, Judy

    2005-01-01

    Magnet has become the gold standard for nursing excellence. It is the symbol of effective and safe patient care. It evaluates components that inspire safe care, including employee satisfaction and retention, professional education, and effective interdisciplinary collaboration. In an organization whose mission focuses on excellent patient care, Banner Thunderbird Medical Center found that pursuing Magnet status was clearly the next step. In this article, we will discuss committee selection, education, team building, planning, and the discovery process that define the Magnet journey. The road to obtaining Magnet status has permitted many opportunities to celebrate our achievements. PMID:16056158

  12. Enzymatic temperature change indicator

    DOEpatents

    Klibanov, Alexander M.; Dordick, Jonathan S.

    1989-01-21

    A temperature change indicator is described which is composed of an enzyme and a substrate for that enzyme suspended in a solid organic solvent or mixture of solvents as a support medium. The organic solvent or solvents are chosen so as to melt at a specific temperature or in a specific temperature range. When the temperature of the indicator is elevated above the chosen, or critical temperature, the solid organic solvent support will melt, and the enzymatic reaction will occur, producing a visually detectable product which is stable to further temperature variation.

  13. Stable superconducting magnet. [high current levels below critical temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boom, R. W. (Inventor)

    1967-01-01

    Operation of a superconducting magnet is considered. A method is described for; (1) obtaining a relatively high current in a superconducting magnet positioned in a bath of a gas refrigerant; (2) operating a superconducting magnet at a relatively high current level without training; and (3) operating a superconducting magnet containing a plurality of turns of a niobium zirconium wire at a relatively high current level without training.

  14. Trans-mediastinal gunshot wounds: are "stable" patients really stable?

    PubMed

    Nagy, Kimberly K; Roberts, Roxanne R; Smith, Robert F; Joseph, Kimberly T; An, Gary C; Bokhari, Faran; Barrett, John

    2002-10-01

    Gunshot wounds that traverse the mediastinum frequently cause serious injury to the cardiac, vascular, pulmonary, and digestive structures contained within. Most patients present with unstable vital signs signifying the need for emergency operation. An occasional patient will present with stable vital signs. Work-ups for such a patient may range from surgical exploration to radiographic and endoscopic testing to mere observation. We report our experience with diagnostic work-up of the stable patient with a transmediastinal gunshot wound. All stable patients who present to our urban level I trauma center following a transmediastinal gunshot wound undergo diagnostic work-up consisting of chest radiograph, cardiac ultrasound, angiography, esophagoscopy, barium swallow, and bronchoscopy. The work-up is dependent on the trajectory of the missile. Information on these patients is kept in a prospective database maintained by the trauma attending physicians. This database was analyzed and comparisons were made using Student's t-test and the Fisher exact c2 as appropriate. Over a 68-month period, 50 stable patients were admitted following a transmediastinal gunshot wound. All of these patients had a chest radiograph followed by one or more of the above tests. 8 patients (16%) were found to have a mediastinal injury (4 cardiac, 3 vascular, and 1 tracheo-esophageal) requiring urgent operation (group 1). The remaining 42 patients (84%) did not have a mediastinal injury (group 2). There was no difference between groups with respect to blood pressure, pulse, respiratory rate, pH, base deficit, or initial chest tube output. There was one death in each group, and three complications in group 2. Patients may appear stable following a transmediastinal gunshot wound, even when they have life-threatening injuries. There is no difference in vital signs, blood gas, or hemothorax to indicate which patients have serious injuries. We advocate continued aggressive work-up of these patients

  15. Heat stable alkaline phosphatase from thermophiles. Final report, March-October 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Combie, J.D.; Runnion, K.N.; Williamson, M.L.

    1994-07-01

    Alkaline phosphatase has been the most widely used enzyme for colorimetric immunoassays. The current potential for this enzyme lies in biosensors, fieldable assay kits, biotechnology applications, degradation of certain nerve agents and pesticides and detoxification of heavy metal waste streams. While the commercial source of this enzyme is predominantly from mammalian tissues, expanded commercial application is restricted by the enzyme's instability at elevated temperatures. Although alkaline phosphatases are ubiquitous in nature, two isolates out of 44 alkaline phosphatase producing isolates occurring in habitats at 50 deg C and above have been isolated possessing extremely stable enzymes. One enzyme retained 98% of original activity following boiling for 1 hr. The secretion of the enzyme by the organism is an added benefit promoting efficient and economical production capability. Procedures for the screening, isolation, and optimal growth and fermentation of organisms acquired from geothermal sources located in Yellowstone National Park, WY are described. Purification was most effectively achieved using size exclusion chromatography where 101% of the activity and 33% of the crude mother liquor protein were recovered. Although the presence of manganese in the assay buffer was observed to significantly elevate the enzyme's catalytic activity, a precipitate incompatibility with calcium chloride, a requirement for high temperature stability, prohibits its use. Bacteria, Fermentation, Alkaline phosphatase, Biosensors, Biotechnology, Heat stable enzymes, Biochemistry, Bioremediation, Thermophilic microorganisms.

  16. Synthesis of thermally stable polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, G. B.

    1978-01-01

    The reaction of bis triazo linediones with divinyl esters and substituted styrenes was investigated. Twenty new polymers were derived via reaction of two previously synthesized bis triazol linediones and four new bis atriazol linediones with eight styrenes. The structure and polymer properties of these thermally stable polymers was examined. The reaction of triazo linediones with enol esters was also considered.

  17. Bayesian stable isotope mixing models

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this paper we review recent advances in Stable Isotope Mixing Models (SIMMs) and place them into an over-arching Bayesian statistical framework which allows for several useful extensions. SIMMs are used to quantify the proportional contributions of various sources to a mixtur...

  18. Stable interactions via proper deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaparulin, D. S.; Lyakhovich, S. L.; Sharapov, A. A.

    2016-04-01

    A new method is proposed for switching on interactions that are compatible with global symmetries and conservation laws of the original free theory. The method is applied to the control of stability in Lagrangian and non-Lagrangian theories with higher derivatives. By way of illustration, a wide class of stable interactions is constructed for the Pais-Uhlenbeck oscillator.

  19. Stable Black Families. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gary, Lawrence E.; And Others

    This document is the final report of a study conducted to determine what factors contribute to strong Black family life and how these strong families solve problems, in order to add to the knowledge base on stable families so as to enhance practical intervention with families in need, and to identify models of self-help strategies used by stable…

  20. Recognizing outstanding achievements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speiss, Fred

    One function of any professional society is to provide an objective, informed means for recognizing outstanding achievements in its field. In AGU's Ocean Sciences section we have a variety of means for carrying out this duty. They include recognition of outstanding student presentations at our meetings, dedication of special sessions, nomination of individuals to be fellows of the Union, invitations to present Sverdrup lectures, and recommendations for Macelwane Medals, the Ocean Sciences Award, and the Ewing Medal.Since the decision to bestow these awards requires initiative and judgement by members of our section in addition to a deserving individual, it seems appropriate to review the selection process for each and to urge you to identify those deserving of recognition.

  1. Birefringence and Enhanced Stability in Stable Organic Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tianyi; Exarhos, Annemarie; Cheng, Kevin; Jia, Tiezheng; Walsh, Patrick; Kikkawa, Jay; Fakhraai, Zahra

    Stable glasses can be prepared by physical vapor depositing organic molecules onto a cold substrate at slow rates. These glasses have many exceptional properties such as high thermal stability, high density, and birefringence. Regardless of the molecular shape or intermolecular interactions, birefringence has been observed in various stable glasses produced at low temperatures (below 80% of the molecule's glass transition temperature, Tg) . Here we prepare stable glasses of an organic molecule, 9-(3,5-di(naphthalen-1-yl)phenyl)anthracene, that possesses a nearly isotropic shape and intrinsic fluorescence. Ellipsometry is used to show that all stable glasses prepared in the temperature range from 73% Tg to 97% Tgshow positive birefringence. Angle- and polarization- dependent photoluminescence measurements show isotropic molecular orientation in these optically birefringent glasses. Furthermore, the values of birefringence are strongly correlated with the enhanced density, implying a general origin of the observed anisotropy in stable glasses. This correlation can elucidate the role of packing in the formation of such high-density glasses. The authors would like to acknowledge Ethan Alguire and Joe Subotnik for simulation. Z.F. acknowledges funding from NSF CAREER (DMR-1350044). P.J.W. acknowledges funding from NSF (CHE-1152488). J.M.K acknowledges funding from NSF (DMR-1206270).

  2. Unencapsulated Air-stable Organic Field Effect Transistor by All Solution Processes for Low Power Vapor Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Linrun; Tang, Wei; Zhao, Jiaqing; Yang, Ruozhang; Hu, Wei; Li, Qiaofeng; Wang, Ruolin; Guo, Xiaojun

    2016-02-01

    With its excellent mechanical flexibility, low-cost and low-temperature processing, the solution processed organic field-effect transistor (OFET) is a promising platform technology for developing ubiquitous sensor applications in digital health, environment monitoring and Internet of Things. However, a contradiction between achieving low voltage operation and having stable performance severely hinder the technology to become commercially viable. This work shows that, by reducing the sub-gap density of states (DOS) at the channel for low operation voltage and using a proper low-k non-polar polymer dielectric layer, such an issue can be addressed. Stable electrical properties after either being placed for weeks or continuously prolonged bias stressing for hours in ambient air are achieved for all solution processed unencapsulated OFETs with the channel being exposed to the ambient air for analyte detection. The fabricated device presents a steep subthreshold swing less than 100 mV/decade, and an ON/OFF ratio of 106 at a voltage swing of 3 V. The low voltage and stable operation allows the sensor made of the OFET to be incorporated into a battery-powered electronic system for continuously reliable sensing of ammonia vapor in ambient air with very small power consumption of about 50 nW.

  3. Unencapsulated Air-stable Organic Field Effect Transistor by All Solution Processes for Low Power Vapor Sensing.

    PubMed

    Feng, Linrun; Tang, Wei; Zhao, Jiaqing; Yang, Ruozhang; Hu, Wei; Li, Qiaofeng; Wang, Ruolin; Guo, Xiaojun

    2016-01-01

    With its excellent mechanical flexibility, low-cost and low-temperature processing, the solution processed organic field-effect transistor (OFET) is a promising platform technology for developing ubiquitous sensor applications in digital health, environment monitoring and Internet of Things. However, a contradiction between achieving low voltage operation and having stable performance severely hinder the technology to become commercially viable. This work shows that, by reducing the sub-gap density of states (DOS) at the channel for low operation voltage and using a proper low-k non-polar polymer dielectric layer, such an issue can be addressed. Stable electrical properties after either being placed for weeks or continuously prolonged bias stressing for hours in ambient air are achieved for all solution processed unencapsulated OFETs with the channel being exposed to the ambient air for analyte detection. The fabricated device presents a steep subthreshold swing less than 100 mV/decade, and an ON/OFF ratio of 10(6) at a voltage swing of 3 V. The low voltage and stable operation allows the sensor made of the OFET to be incorporated into a battery-powered electronic system for continuously reliable sensing of ammonia vapor in ambient air with very small power consumption of about 50 nW. PMID:26861412

  4. Unencapsulated Air-stable Organic Field Effect Transistor by All Solution Processes for Low Power Vapor Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Linrun; Tang, Wei; Zhao, Jiaqing; Yang, Ruozhang; Hu, Wei; Li, Qiaofeng; Wang, Ruolin; Guo, Xiaojun

    2016-01-01

    With its excellent mechanical flexibility, low-cost and low-temperature processing, the solution processed organic field-effect transistor (OFET) is a promising platform technology for developing ubiquitous sensor applications in digital health, environment monitoring and Internet of Things. However, a contradiction between achieving low voltage operation and having stable performance severely hinder the technology to become commercially viable. This work shows that, by reducing the sub-gap density of states (DOS) at the channel for low operation voltage and using a proper low-k non-polar polymer dielectric layer, such an issue can be addressed. Stable electrical properties after either being placed for weeks or continuously prolonged bias stressing for hours in ambient air are achieved for all solution processed unencapsulated OFETs with the channel being exposed to the ambient air for analyte detection. The fabricated device presents a steep subthreshold swing less than 100 mV/decade, and an ON/OFF ratio of 106 at a voltage swing of 3 V. The low voltage and stable operation allows the sensor made of the OFET to be incorporated into a battery-powered electronic system for continuously reliable sensing of ammonia vapor in ambient air with very small power consumption of about 50 nW. PMID:26861412

  5. Achieving closure at Fernald

    SciTech Connect

    Bradburne, John; Patton, Tisha C.

    2001-02-25

    When Fluor Fernald took over the management of the Fernald Environmental Management Project in 1992, the estimated closure date of the site was more than 25 years into the future. Fluor Fernald, in conjunction with DOE-Fernald, introduced the Accelerated Cleanup Plan, which was designed to substantially shorten that schedule and save taxpayers more than $3 billion. The management of Fluor Fernald believes there are three fundamental concerns that must be addressed by any contractor hoping to achieve closure of a site within the DOE complex. They are relationship management, resource management and contract management. Relationship management refers to the interaction between the site and local residents, regulators, union leadership, the workforce at large, the media, and any other interested stakeholder groups. Resource management is of course related to the effective administration of the site knowledge base and the skills of the workforce, the attraction and retention of qualified a nd competent technical personnel, and the best recognition and use of appropriate new technologies. Perhaps most importantly, resource management must also include a plan for survival in a flat-funding environment. Lastly, creative and disciplined contract management will be essential to effecting the closure of any DOE site. Fluor Fernald, together with DOE-Fernald, is breaking new ground in the closure arena, and ''business as usual'' has become a thing of the past. How Fluor Fernald has managed its work at the site over the last eight years, and how it will manage the new site closure contract in the future, will be an integral part of achieving successful closure at Fernald.

  6. Development of stable lyophilized protein drug products.

    PubMed

    Remmele, Richard L; Krishnan, Sampathkumar; Callahan, William J

    2012-03-01

    Freeze drying, or lyophilization is widely used for biopharmaceuticals to improve the long term storage stability of labile molecules. This review examines general theory and practice of rational lyophilization of biopharmaceuticals. Formulation development involving the selection of appropriate excipients, their associated physical properties, and mechanism of action in achieving a stable drug product are primary considerations for a successful lyophilization program. There are several parameters considered critical on the basis of their relationship to lyophilization cycle development and protein product stability. This along with the importance of analytical methods to provide insight toward understanding properties of drug product stability and cake structure are discussed. Also, aspects of instability found in lyophilized biopharmaceutical products, their degradation pathways and control are elucidated. Finally, container-closure requirements and drug product handling are described in context of the caveats to avoid compromising drug product quality. PMID:22283723

  7. Ultra-Stable Superconducting-Maser Oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strayer, Donald M.; Dick, G. John

    1989-01-01

    Unprecedented stability of frequency in superconducting, triple-cavity ruby maser oscillator achieved by incorporation of amplitude-control subsystem. New design enhances ultra-stable measurements of time by reducing fluctuations to 2 X 10 to negative 19th power routinely, and to as little as 10 to negative 20th power in exceptional cases. Currents induced in superconducting pickup coil by changes in magnetic field in ruby. Currents from coil fed to superconducting quantum-interference device (SQUID) magnetometer, output used to generate control signal for electronically variable attenuator. Attenuator varies pump-signal amplitude in response to magnetic-field fluctuations in ruby. Very high feedback-loop gain used for sensitivity of control and adequate compensation of fluctuations.

  8. Ultra-stable oscillator with complementary transistors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleinberg, L. L. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A high frequency oscillator, having both good short and long term stability, is formed by including a piezoelectric crystal in the base circuit of a first bi-polar transistor circuit, the bi-polar transistor itself operated below its transitional frequency and having its emitter load chosen so that the input impedance, looking into the base thereof, exhibits a negative resistance in parallel with a capacitive reactance. Combined with this basic circuit is an auxiliary, complementary, second bi-polar transistor circuit of the same form with the piezoelectric crystal being common to both circuits. By this configuration small changes in quiescent current are substantially cancelled by opposite variations in the second bi-polar transistor circuit, thereby achieving from the oscillator a signal having its frequency of oscillation stable over long time periods as well as short time periods.

  9. Achievement Goals and Achievement Emotions: A Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Chiungjung

    2011-01-01

    This meta-analysis synthesized 93 independent samples (N = 30,003) in 77 studies that reported in 78 articles examining correlations between achievement goals and achievement emotions. Achievement goals were meaningfully associated with different achievement emotions. The correlations of mastery and mastery approach goals with positive achievement…

  10. Stable continuous-time autoregressive process driven by stable subordinator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyłomańska, Agnieszka; Gajda, Janusz

    2016-02-01

    In this paper we examine the continuous-time autoregressive moving average process driven by α-stable Lévy motion delayed by inverse stable subordinator. This process can be applied to high-frequency data with visible jumps and so-called "trapping-events". Those properties are often visible in financial time series but also in amorphous semiconductors, technical data describing the rotational speed of a machine working under various load regimes or data related to indoor air quality. We concentrate on the main characteristics of the examined subordinated process expressed in the language of the measures of dependence which are main tools used in statistical investigation of real data. However, because the analyzed system is based on the α-stable distribution therefore we cannot consider here the correlation (or covariance) as a main measure which indicates at the dependence inside the process. In the paper we examine the codifference, the more general measure of dependence defined for wide class of processes. Moreover we present the simulation procedure of the considered system and indicate how to estimate its parameters. The theoretical results we illustrate by the simulated data analysis.

  11. Research of high power and stable laser in portable Raman spectrometer based on SHINERS technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Yongsheng; Yin, Yu; Wu, Yulin; Ni, Xuxiang; Zhang, Xiuda; Yan, Huimin

    2013-08-01

    The intensity of Raman light is very weak, which is only from 10-12 to 10-6 of the incident light. In order to obtain the required sensitivity, the traditional Raman spectrometer tends to be heavy weight and large volume, so it is often used as indoor test device. Based on the Shell-Isolated Nanoparticle-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SHINERS) method, Raman optical spectrum signal can be enhanced significantly and the portable Raman spectrometer combined with SHINERS method will be widely used in various fields. The laser source must be stable enough and able to output monochromatic narrow band laser with stable power in the portable Raman spectrometer based on the SHINERS method. When the laser is working, the change of temperature can induce wavelength drift, thus the power stability of excitation light will be affected, so we need to strictly control the working temperature of the laser, In order to ensure the stability of laser power and output current, this paper adopts the WLD3343 laser constant current driver chip of Wavelength Electronics company and MCU P89LPC935 to drive LML - 785.0 BF - XX laser diode(LD). Using this scheme, the Raman spectrometer can be small in size and the drive current can be constant. At the same time, we can achieve functions such as slow start, over-current protection, over-voltage protection, etc. Continuous adjustable output can be realized under control, and the requirement of high power output can be satisfied. Max1968 chip is adopted to realize the accurate control of the laser's temperature. In this way, it can meet the demand of miniaturization. In term of temperature control, integral truncation effect of traditional PID algorithm is big, which is easy to cause static difference. Each output of incremental PID algorithm has nothing to do with the current position, and we can control the output coefficients to avoid full dose output and immoderate adjustment, then the speed of balance will be improved observably. Variable

  12. Remarks on search methods for stable, massive, elementary particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perl, Martin L.

    2001-11-01

    This paper was presented at the 69th birthday celebration of Professor Eugene Commins, honoring his research achievements. These remarks are about the experimental techniques used in the search for new stable, massive particles, particles at least as massive as the electron. A variety of experimental methods such as accelerator experiments, cosmic ray studies, searches for halo particles in the galaxy and searches for exotic particles in bulk matter are described. A summary is presented of the measured limits on the existence of new stable, massive particle. .

  13. Entrepreneur achievement. Liaoning province.

    PubMed

    Zhao, R

    1994-03-01

    This paper reports the successful entrepreneurial endeavors of members of a 20-person women's group in Liaoning Province, China. Jing Yuhong, a member of the Family Planning Association at Shileizi Village, Dalian City, provided the basis for their achievements by first building an entertainment/study room in her home to encourage married women to learn family planning. Once stocked with books, magazines, pamphlets, and other materials on family planning and agricultural technology, dozens of married women in the neighborhood flocked voluntarily to the room. Yuhong also set out to give these women a way to earn their own income as a means of helping then gain greater equality with their husbands and exert greater control over their personal reproductive and social lives. She gave a section of her farming land to the women's group, loaned approximately US$5200 to group members to help them generate income from small business initiatives, built a livestock shed in her garden for the group to raise marmots, and erected an awning behind her house under which mushrooms could be grown. The investment yielded $12,000 in the first year, allowing each woman to keep more than $520 in dividends. Members then soon began going to fairs in the capital and other places to learn about the outside world, and have successfully ventured out on their own to generate individual incomes. Ten out of twenty women engaged in these income-generating activities asked for and got the one-child certificate. PMID:12287775

  14. Stable isotopic analyses in paleoclimatic reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Wigand, P.E.

    1995-09-01

    Most traditional paleoclimatic proxy data have inherent time lags between climatic input and system response that constrain their use in accurate reconstruction of paleoclimate chronology, scaling of its variability, and the elucidation of the processes that determine its impact on the biotic and abiotic environment. With the exception of dendroclimatology, and studies of short-lived organisms and pollen recovered from annually varved lacustrine sediments, significant periods of time ranging from years, to centuries, to millennia may intervene between climate change and its first manifestation in paleoclimatic proxy data records. Reconstruction of past climate through changes in plant community composition derived from pollen sequences and plant remains from ancient woodrat middens, wet environments and dry caves all suffer from these lags. However, stable isotopic analyses can provide more immediate indication of biotic response to climate change. Evidence of past physiological response of organisms to changes in effective precipitation as climate varies can be provided by analyses of the stable isotopic content of plant macrofossils from various contexts. These analyses consider variation in the stable isotopic (hydrogen, oxygen and carbon) content of plant tissues as it reflects (1) past global or local temperature through changes in meteoric (rainfall) water chemistry in the case of the first two isotopes, and (2) plant stress through changes in plant respiration/transpiration processes under differing water availability, and varying atmospheric CO, composition (which itself may actually be a net result of biotic response to climate change). Studies currently being conducted in the Intermountain West indicate both long- and short-term responses that when calibrated with modem analogue studies have the potential of revealing not only the timing of climate events, but their direction, magnitude and rapidity.

  15. Chromium stable isotope fractionation during adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, A.; Johnson, T.; Bullen, T.

    2003-04-01

    Chromium is a common anthropogenic contaminant in ground water. It is redox-active; the two common valences in natural waters are Cr(VI), which is highly soluble and toxic, and Cr(III), which is relatively insoluble. Redox reactions control Cr mobility in aqueous solutions with Cr(VI) reduction to Cr(III) controlling the attenuation of Cr in groundwater. Our previous study demonstrated that abiotic Cr(VI) reduction causes an isotope fractionation of -3.5 permil (53Cr/52Cr) and isotopes can therefore be used to calculate the extent of reduction. In the present study, experiments were conducted to measure Cr isotope fractionation during Cr(VI) sorption on Al203. Sorption of Cr(VI) could be important as a small isotope fractionation may get amplified along the edges of a Cr(VI) contaminated plume. A previous study demonstrated a similar process with Fe isotopes on anion exchange resin. Initial solutions of 200 mg/l Cr(VI) (as K2Cr2O7) and 0.1 mM KCl were made up. Sufficient solid Al203 was added to achieve 50% sorption. After equilibration, the solution was extracted by centrifuging and filtering with a 0.2 micron filter. Al203 was then added again to result in a further 50% sorption of the remaining Cr(VI). This process was repeated 10 times to amplify any isotopic fractionation between dissolved and adsorbed Cr(VI). The instantaneous stable isotope fractionation was calculated based on the δ 53Cr values of the initial and final Cr(VI) solutions. The results show that the stable isotope values measured in the solutions after the ten steps were within the uncertainty of the isotope value of the initial solution. Therefore, no significant stable isotope fractionation occurred. We are presently conducting experiments with goethite and expect similar results. Therefore, any fractionation of chromium stable isotopes observed in contaminant plumes are a result of processes other than adsorption (i.e., reduction).

  16. High-detectivity nanowire photodetectors governed by bulk photocurrent dynamics with thermally stable carbide contacts.

    PubMed

    Zou, Rujia; Zhang, Zhenyu; Hu, Junqing; Sang, Liwen; Koide, Yauso; Liao, Meiyong

    2013-12-13

    Photodetectors fabricated from one-dimensional semiconductors are always dominated by the surface states due to their large surface-to-volume ratio. Therefore, the basic 5S requirements (high sensitivity, high signal-to-noise ratio, high spectral selectivity, high speed, and high stability) for practical photodetectors are difficult to satisfy. We report on high-temperature and high-detectivity solar-blind deep-ultraviolet (DUV) photodetectors based on β-Ga2O3 nanowires, in which the photoresponse behavior is dominated by the bulk instead of the surface states. Ohmic contact to the β-Ga2O3 nanowires was achieved by using a thermally stable tungsten carbide electrode. As a result, the DUV responsivity at 250 nm shows the highest values--4492 A W(-1) at room temperature (RT) and 3000 A W(-1) at 553 K (280 °C)--among the DUV photodetectors. The detectivity is as high as 1.26×10(16) cm Hz(1/2) W(-1) at RT, and still remains 4.1×10(14) cm Hz(1/2) W(-1) at as high a temperature as 553 K. The photocurrent dynamics from the β-Ga2O3 nanowire is discussed in terms of the bulk dominated photoresponse behavior. Other wide bandgap DUV detectors based on nanostructures could also be developed for high-temperature applications based on this work. PMID:24231924

  17. High-detectivity nanowire photodetectors governed by bulk photocurrent dynamics with thermally stable carbide contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Rujia; Zhang, Zhenyu; Hu, Junqing; Sang, Liwen; Koide, Yauso; Liao, Meiyong

    2013-12-01

    Photodetectors fabricated from one-dimensional semiconductors are always dominated by the surface states due to their large surface-to-volume ratio. Therefore, the basic 5S requirements (high sensitivity, high signal-to-noise ratio, high spectral selectivity, high speed, and high stability) for practical photodetectors are difficult to satisfy. We report on high-temperature and high-detectivity solar-blind deep-ultraviolet (DUV) photodetectors based on β-Ga2O3 nanowires, in which the photoresponse behavior is dominated by the bulk instead of the surface states. Ohmic contact to the β-Ga2O3 nanowires was achieved by using a thermally stable tungsten carbide electrode. As a result, the DUV responsivity at 250 nm shows the highest values—4492 A W-1 at room temperature (RT) and 3000 A W-1 at 553 K (280 ° C)—among the DUV photodetectors. The detectivity is as high as 1.26×1016 cm Hz1/2 W-1 at RT, and still remains 4.1×1014 cm Hz1/2 W-1 at as high a temperature as 553 K. The photocurrent dynamics from the β-Ga2O3 nanowire is discussed in terms of the bulk dominated photoresponse behavior. Other wide bandgap DUV detectors based on nanostructures could also be developed for high-temperature applications based on this work.

  18. The Homogeneity of School Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cahan, Sorel

    Since the measurement of school achievement involves the administration of achievement tests to various grades on various subjects, both grade level and subject matter contribute to within-school achievement variations. To determine whether achievement test scores vary most among different fields within a grade level, or within fields among…

  19. Phase stable RF transport system

    DOEpatents

    Curtin, Michael T.; Natter, Eckard F.; Denney, Peter M.

    1992-01-01

    An RF transport system delivers a phase-stable RF signal to a load, such as an RF cavity of a charged particle accelerator. A circuit generates a calibration signal at an odd multiple frequency of the RF signal where the calibration signal is superimposed with the RF signal on a common cable that connects the RF signal with the load. Signal isolating diplexers are located at both the RF signal source end and load end of the common cable to enable the calibration to be inserted and extracted from the cable signals without any affect on the RF signal. Any phase shift in the calibration signal during traverse of the common cable is then functionally related to the phase shift in the RF signal. The calibration phase shift is used to control a phase shifter for the RF signal to maintain a stable RF signal at the load.

  20. Stable maps and Quot schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popa, Mihnea; Roth, Mike

    2003-06-01

    In this paper we study the relationship between two different compactifications of the space of vector bundle quotients of an arbitrary vector bundle on a curve. One is Grothendieck's Quot scheme, while the other is a moduli space of stable maps to the relative Grassmannian. We establish an essentially optimal upper bound on the dimension of the two compactifications. Based on that, we prove that for an arbitrary vector bundle, the Quot schemes of quotients of large degree are irreducible and generically smooth. We precisely describe all the vector bundles for which the same thing holds in the case of the moduli spaces of stable maps. We show that there are in general no natural morphisms between the two compactifications. Finally, as an application, we obtain new cases of a conjecture on effective base point freeness for pluritheta linear series on moduli spaces of vector bundles.

  1. Treatment of stable angina pectoris.

    PubMed

    Palaniswamy, Chandrasekar; Aronow, Wilbert S

    2011-09-01

    Management of stable angina pectoris includes antianginal medications, medications to prevent progression of atherosclerosis, and aggressive treatment of causative risk factors. Antianginal medications commonly used include nitrates, beta-blockers, calcium channel blockers, and ranolazine. Antiplatelet agents, statins, and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors are used in patients with these problems to prevent progression of atherosclerosis and/or premature cardiovascular death. Aggressive risk factor control with diet; exercise; treatment of diabetes, hypertension, and dyslipidemia; and strategies to stop smoking and reduce weight should be a part of treatment strategy in all patients. Patients with stable angina who have symptoms refractory to medical treatment usually require coronary angiography, followed by either percutaneous or surgical revascularization. Recent mechanical techniques for the treatment of refractory angina include transmyocardial laser revascularization, enhanced external counterpulsation, and spinal cord stimulation. PMID:20861717

  2. Advanced Thermally Stable Jet Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    A. Boehman; C. Song; H. H. Schobert; M. M. Coleman; P. G. Hatcher; S. Eser

    1998-01-01

    The Penn State program in advanced thermally stable jet fuels has five components: 1) development of mechanisms of degradation and solids formation; 2) quantitative measurement of growth of sub-micrometer and micrometer-sized particles during thermal stressing; 3) characterization of carbonaceous deposits by various instrumental and microscopic methods; 4) elucidation of the role of additives in retarding the formation of carbonaceous solids; and 5) assessment of the potential of producing high yields of cycloalkanes and hydroaromatics from coal.

  3. Novel Stable Gel Polymer Electrolyte: Toward a High Safety and Long Life Li-Air Battery.

    PubMed

    Yi, Jin; Liu, Xizheng; Guo, Shaohua; Zhu, Kai; Xue, Hailong; Zhou, Haoshen

    2015-10-28

    Nonaqueous Li-air battery, as a promising electrochemical energy storage device, has attracted substantial interest, while the safety issues derived from the intrinsic instability of organic liquid electrolytes may become a possible bottleneck for the future application of Li-air battery. Herein, through elaborate design, a novel stable composite gel polymer electrolyte is first proposed and explored for Li-air battery. By use of the composite gel polymer electrolyte, the Li-air polymer batteries composed of a lithium foil anode and Super P cathode are assembled and operated in ambient air and their cycling performance is evaluated. The batteries exhibit enhanced cycling stability and safety, where 100 cycles are achieved in ambient air at room temperature. The feasibility study demonstrates that the gel polymer electrolyte-based polymer Li-air battery is highly advantageous and could be used as a useful alternative strategy for the development of Li-air battery upon further application. PMID:26452054

  4. Use of Spacecraft Data to Drive Regions on Mars where Liquid Water would be Stable

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lobitz, Brad; Wood, Byron L.; Averner, Maurice M.; McKay, Christopher P.; MacElroy, Robert D.

    2001-01-01

    Combining Viking pressure and temperature data with Mars Orbital Laser Altimeter (MOLA) topography data we have computed the fraction of the martian year during which pressure and temperature allow for liquid water to be stable on the martian surface. We find that liquid water would be stable within the Hellas and Argyre basin and over the northern lowlands equatorward of about 40 degrees. The location with the maximum period of stable conditions for liquid water is in the southeastern portion of Utopia Planitia where 34% of the year liquid water would be stable if it was present. Locations of stability appear to correlate with the distribution of valley networks.

  5. Use of spacecraft data to derive regions on Mars where liquid water would be stable.

    PubMed

    Lobitz, B; Wood, B L; Averner, M M; McKay, C P

    2001-02-27

    Combining Viking pressure and temperature data with Mars Orbital Laser Altimeter topography data, we have computed the fraction of the martian year during which pressure and temperature allow for liquid water to be stable on the martian surface. We find that liquid water would be stable within the Hellas and Argyre basin and over the northern lowlands equatorward of about 40 degrees. The location with the maximum period of stable conditions for liquid water is in the southeastern portion of Utopia Planitia, where 34% of the year liquid water would be stable if it were present. Locations of stability appear to correlate with the distribution of valley networks. PMID:11226204

  6. Use of spacecraft data to derive regions on Mars where liquid water would be stable

    PubMed Central

    Lobitz, Brad; Wood, Byron L.; Averner, Maurice M.; McKay, Christopher P.

    2001-01-01

    Combining Viking pressure and temperature data with Mars Orbital Laser Altimeter topography data, we have computed the fraction of the martian year during which pressure and temperature allow for liquid water to be stable on the martian surface. We find that liquid water would be stable within the Hellas and Argyre basin and over the northern lowlands equatorward of about 40°. The location with the maximum period of stable conditions for liquid water is in the southeastern portion of Utopia Planitia, where 34% of the year liquid water would be stable if it were present. Locations of stability appear to correlate with the distribution of valley networks. PMID:11226204

  7. HEPEX - achievements and challenges!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappenberger, Florian; Ramos, Maria-Helena; Thielen, Jutta; Wood, Andy; Wang, Qj; Duan, Qingyun; Collischonn, Walter; Verkade, Jan; Voisin, Nathalie; Wetterhall, Fredrik; Vuillaume, Jean-Francois Emmanuel; Lucatero Villasenor, Diana; Cloke, Hannah L.; Schaake, John; van Andel, Schalk-Jan

    2014-05-01

    HEPEX is an international initiative bringing together hydrologists, meteorologists, researchers and end-users to develop advanced probabilistic hydrological forecast techniques for improved flood, drought and water management. HEPEX was launched in 2004 as an independent, cooperative international scientific activity. During the first meeting, the overarching goal was defined as: "to develop and test procedures to produce reliable hydrological ensemble forecasts, and to demonstrate their utility in decision making related to the water, environmental and emergency management sectors." The applications of hydrological ensemble predictions span across large spatio-temporal scales, ranging from short-term and localized predictions to global climate change and regional modeling. Within the HEPEX community, information is shared through its blog (www.hepex.org), meetings, testbeds and intercompaison experiments, as well as project reportings. Key questions of HEPEX are: * What adaptations are required for meteorological ensemble systems to be coupled with hydrological ensemble systems? * How should the existing hydrological ensemble prediction systems be modified to account for all sources of uncertainty within a forecast? * What is the best way for the user community to take advantage of ensemble forecasts and to make better decisions based on them? This year HEPEX celebrates its 10th year anniversary and this poster will present a review of the main operational and research achievements and challenges prepared by Hepex contributors on data assimilation, post-processing of hydrologic predictions, forecast verification, communication and use of probabilistic forecasts in decision-making. Additionally, we will present the most recent activities implemented by Hepex and illustrate how everyone can join the community and participate to the development of new approaches in hydrologic ensemble prediction.

  8. Structure of the thermally stable Zika virus.

    PubMed

    Kostyuchenko, Victor A; Lim, Elisa X Y; Zhang, Shuijun; Fibriansah, Guntur; Ng, Thiam-Seng; Ooi, Justin S G; Shi, Jian; Lok, Shee-Mei

    2016-05-19

    Zika virus (ZIKV), formerly a neglected pathogen, has recently been associated with microcephaly in fetuses, and with Guillian-Barré syndrome in adults. Here we present the 3.7 Å resolution cryo-electron microscopy structure of ZIKV, and show that the overall architecture of the virus is similar to that of other flaviviruses. Sequence and structural comparisons of the ZIKV envelope (E) protein with other flaviviruses show that parts of the E protein closely resemble the neurovirulent West Nile and Japanese encephalitis viruses, while others are similar to dengue virus (DENV). However, the contribution of the E protein to flavivirus pathobiology is currently not understood. The virus particle was observed to be structurally stable even when incubated at 40 °C, in sharp contrast to the less thermally stable DENV. This is also reflected in the infectivity of ZIKV compared to DENV serotypes 2 and 4 (DENV2 and DENV4) at different temperatures. The cryo-electron microscopy structure shows a virus with a more compact surface. This structural stability of the virus may help it to survive in the harsh conditions of semen, saliva and urine. Antibodies or drugs that destabilize the structure may help to reduce the disease outcome or limit the spread of the virus. PMID:27093288

  9. Stable Lithium Argon compounds under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaofeng; Hermann, Andreas; Peng, Feng; Lv, Jian; Wang, Yanchao; Wang, Hui; Ma, Yanming

    2015-11-01

    High pressure can fundamentally alter the bonding patterns of chemical elements. Its effects include stimulating elements thought to be “inactive” to form unexpectedly stable compounds with unusual chemical and physical properties. Here, using an unbiased structure search method based on CALYPSO methodology and density functional total energy calculations, the phase stabilities and crystal structures of Li-Ar compounds are systematically investigated at high pressure up to 300 GPa. Two unexpected LimArn compounds (LiAr and Li3Ar) are predicted to be stable above 112 GPa and 119 GPa, respectively. A detailed analysis of the electronic structure of LiAr and Li3Ar shows that Ar in these compounds attracts electrons and thus behaves as an oxidizing agent. This is markedly different from the hitherto established chemical reactivity of Ar. Moreover, we predict that the P4/mmm phase of Li3Ar has a superconducting transition temperature of 17.6 K at 120 GPa.

  10. Stable Lithium Argon compounds under high pressure

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaofeng; Hermann, Andreas; Peng, Feng; Lv, Jian; Wang, Yanchao; Wang, Hui; Ma, Yanming

    2015-01-01

    High pressure can fundamentally alter the bonding patterns of chemical elements. Its effects include stimulating elements thought to be “inactive” to form unexpectedly stable compounds with unusual chemical and physical properties. Here, using an unbiased structure search method based on CALYPSO methodology and density functional total energy calculations, the phase stabilities and crystal structures of Li−Ar compounds are systematically investigated at high pressure up to 300 GPa. Two unexpected LimArn compounds (LiAr and Li3Ar) are predicted to be stable above 112 GPa and 119 GPa, respectively. A detailed analysis of the electronic structure of LiAr and Li3Ar shows that Ar in these compounds attracts electrons and thus behaves as an oxidizing agent. This is markedly different from the hitherto established chemical reactivity of Ar. Moreover, we predict that the P4/mmm phase of Li3Ar has a superconducting transition temperature of 17.6 K at 120 GPa. PMID:26582083

  11. LP based approach to optimal stable matchings

    SciTech Connect

    Teo, Chung-Piaw; Sethuraman, J.

    1997-06-01

    We study the classical stable marriage and stable roommates problems using a polyhedral approach. We propose a new LP formulation for the stable roommates problem. This formulation is non-empty if and only if the underlying roommates problem has a stable matching. Furthermore, for certain special weight functions on the edges, we construct a 2-approximation algorithm for the optimal stable roommates problem. Our technique uses a crucial geometry of the fractional solutions in this formulation. For the stable marriage problem, we show that a related geometry allows us to express any fractional solution in the stable marriage polytope as convex combination of stable marriage solutions. This leads to a genuinely simple proof of the integrality of the stable marriage polytope. Based on these ideas, we devise a heuristic to solve the optimal stable roommates problem. The heuristic combines the power of rounding and cutting-plane methods. We present some computational results based on preliminary implementations of this heuristic.

  12. Neurotic-Stable Tendencies Among Japanese-American Sanseis and Caucasian Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Onoda, Lawrence

    1977-01-01

    This study examines neurotic-stable tendencies among Japanese-American Sanseis and Caucasian students. An investigation was also carried out on Sansei high achievers and underachievers, and Sansei males and females. (Author)

  13. How Stable Is Stable? Function versus Community Composition

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Ana; Huang, Suiying; Seston, Sherry; Xing, Jian; Hickey, Robert; Criddle, Craig; Tiedje, James

    1999-01-01

    The microbial community dynamics of a functionally stable, well-mixed, methanogenic reactor fed with glucose were analyzed over a 605-day period. The reactor maintained constant pH and chemical oxygen demand removal during this period. Thirty-six rrn clones from each of seven sampling events were analyzed by amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis (ARDRA) for the Bacteria and Archaea domains and by sequence analysis of dominant members of the community. Operational taxonomic units (OTUs), distinguished as unique ARDRA patterns, showed reproducible distribution for three sample replicates. The highest diversity was observed in the Bacteria domain. The 16S ribosomal DNA Bacteria clone library contained 75 OTUs, with the dominant OTU accounting for 13% of the total clones, but just 21 Archaea OTUs were found, and the most prominent OTU represented 50% of the clones from the respective library. Succession in methanogenic populations was observed, and two periods were distinguished: in the first, Methanobacterium formicicum was dominant, and in the second, Methanosarcina mazei and a Methanobacterium bryantii-related organism were dominant. Higher variability in Bacteria populations was detected, and the temporal OTU distribution suggested a chaotic pattern. Although dominant OTUs were constantly replaced from one sampling point to the next, phylogenetic analysis indicated that inferred physiologic changes in the community were not as dramatic as were genetic changes. Seven of eight dominant OTUs during the first period clustered with the spirochete group, although a cyclic pattern of substitution occurred among members within this order. A more flexible community structure characterized the second period, since a sequential replacement of a Eubacterium-related organism by an unrelated deep-branched organism and finally by a Propionibacterium-like species was observed. Metabolic differences among the dominant fermenters detected suggest that changes in carbon and

  14. Stable Isotope Evidence for Planetary Differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahar, A.; Mao, W. L.; Schauble, E. A.; Caracas, R.; Reagan, M. M.; Gleason, A. E.

    2015-12-01

    Planetary differentiation occurred at high temperature and varying oxygen fugacity, on bodies with varying compositions and internal pressures. The specific conditions at which bodies differentiated and the chemical fingerprints left by differentiation can be investigated by measuring stable isotope ratios in natural samples. Much can be learned by combining those data with experiments that systematically investigate the chemical and physical conditions within differentiating bodies. In this talk we focus on one variable in particular that has not been well defined with respect to stable isotope fractionation: pressure. We will present new iron isotope data on how pressure affects isotope fractionation factors for a number of iron compounds relative to silicate. The processes governing iron isotope fractionation in igneous rocks have been debated extensively over the past decade. Analyses of natural samples show that iron isotopes are fractionated at both the whole rock and mineral scales. This fractionation has been interpreted to be a result of several processes including a possible signature of high pressure core formation. We have collected new high pressure synchrotron nuclear resonant inelastic x-ray scattering data from Sector 16-ID-D at the Advanced Photon Source on 57Fe enriched Fe, FeO, FeHx and Fe3C. Our data show clear trends with pressure implying that not only does pressure have an effect on the iron isotope beta factors but also a fractionation amongst the alloys. This suggests that depending on the light element in the core, there will be a different resulting signature in the iron isotope record. We will discuss the likelihood of different light elements in the core based on these results, as well as the theoretical predictions for the same phases. Finally, we will present the fractionation expected between metal and silicate at high pressure and high temperature in order to determine if core formation would indeed leave an isotopic signature in

  15. Approximated Stable Inversion for Nonlinear Systems with Nonhyperbolic Internal Dynamics. Revised

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devasia, Santosh

    1999-01-01

    A technique to achieve output tracking for nonminimum phase nonlinear systems with non- hyperbolic internal dynamics is presented. The present paper integrates stable inversion techniques (that achieve exact-tracking) with approximation techniques (that modify the internal dynamics) to circumvent the nonhyperbolicity of the internal dynamics - this nonhyperbolicity is an obstruction to applying presently available stable inversion techniques. The theory is developed for nonlinear systems and the method is applied to a two-cart with inverted-pendulum example.

  16. Circadian Activity Rhythms, Time Urgency, and Achievement Concerns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watts, Barbara L.

    Many physiological and psychological processes fluctuate throughout the day in fairly stable, rhythmic patterns. The relationship between individual differences in circadian activity rhythms and a sense of time urgency were explored as well as a number of achievement-related variables. Undergraduates (N=308), whose circadian activity rhythms were…

  17. Containerless processing at high temperatures using acoustic levitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rey, C. A.; Merkley, D. R.; Hampton, S.; Devos, J.; Mapes-Riordan, D.; Zatarski, M.

    1991-01-01

    Advanced techniques are presented which facilitate the development of inert or reducing atmospheres in excess of 2000 K in order to improve processing of containerless capabilities at higher temperatures and to provide more contamination-free environments. Recent testing, in the laboratory and aboard the NASA KC-135 aircraft, of a high-temperature acoustic positioner demonstrated the effectiveness of a specimen motion damping system and of specimen spin control. It is found that stable positioning can be achieved under ambient and heated conditions, including the transient states of heat-up and cool-down. An incorporated high-temperature levitator was found capable of processing specimens of up to 6-mm diameter in a high-purity environment without the contaminating effects of a container at high temperatures and with relative quiescence.

  18. The Impact of Reading Achievement on Overall Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Churchwell, Dawn Earheart

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between reading achievement and achievement in other subject areas. The purpose of this study was to determine if there was a correlation between reading scores as measured by the Standardized Test for the Assessment of Reading (STAR) and academic achievement in language arts, math, science, and social studies…

  19. Attitude Towards Physics and Additional Mathematics Achievement Towards Physics Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veloo, Arsaythamby; Nor, Rahimah; Khalid, Rozalina

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to identify the difference in students' attitude towards Physics and Additional Mathematics achievement based on gender and relationship between attitudinal variables towards Physics and Additional Mathematics achievement with achievement in Physics. This research focused on six variables, which is attitude towards…

  20. Predicting Mathematics Achievement: The Influence of Prior Achievement and Attitudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hemmings, Brian; Grootenboer, Peter; Kay, Russell

    2011-01-01

    Achievement in mathematics is inextricably linked to future career opportunities, and therefore, understanding those factors that influence achievement is important. This study sought to examine the relationships among attitude towards mathematics, ability and mathematical achievement. This examination was also supported by a focus on gender…

  1. High Strength and Thermally Stable Nanostructured Magnesium Alloys and Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yuan-Wei

    Magnesium and its alloys are currently in the spotlight of global research because of the need to limit energy consumption and reduce the environmental impact. In particular, their low densities compared to other structural metals make them a very attractive alternative in the automobile and aerospace industries. However, their low strength compared to other structural materials (e.g. Al and steels) has limited their widespread application. This dissertation presents the results of developing and investigation of a high strength nanostructured magnesium-aluminum alloy and composite. The nanostructured magnesium alloy is prepared by cryomilling and consolidated by spark-plasma-sintering. Focused ion beam is used to prepare micropillars with different diameters ranging from 1.5 to 8 mum and micro-compression test is conducted by nanoindenter in order to evaluate the mechanical properties. The yield strength obtained in the present study is around three times higher than conventional magnesium alloys (120 MPa vs. 370 MPa). The yield strength of the nanostructured magnesium alloy is further improved through hot extrusion, resulting in a yield strength of 550 MPa and an ultimate strength of 580 MPa. The nanostructured magnesium alloy exhibits a strong size-dependence, and a significant improvement in strength is observed when the pillar diameter is reduced to below 3.5 mum. The deformation mechanisms of the compressed pillars were characterized using transmission electron microscopy. The size-induced strengthening is attributed to a less number of dislocation sources along with a higher activity of non-basal deformation mechanisms. We have also developed a high strength and thermally stable nanostructured magnesium composite by adding diamantane. A yield strength of 500 MPa is achieved, moreover, excellent thermal stability is demonstrated in the magnesium alloy containing diamantanes. The strength and grain size are thermally stable after annealing at 400°C for 100

  2. Sensing the Stable Boundary Layer in a Towing Tank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steeneveld, G. J.; Dobrovolschi, D.; Paci, A.; Eiff, O.; Lacaze, L.; Holtslag, A. A. M.

    2010-09-01

    Understanding and forecasting the stable atmospheric boundary layer (SBL) over land is a challenge for already several decades. Generally, the SBL covers two different regimes. The first regime is the weakly SBL, characterised by well defined wind driven turbulence. The second regime covers the very SBL with weak turbulence, and then additional processes become relevant, such as meandering motions, gravity waves, drainage flows, intermittent turbulence and radiation divergence. Especially in this regime this complexity limits the understanding of the SBL and its representation in numerical weather prediction, climate models and air pollution models. For calm conditions, these models typically overestimate near surface temperature and wind speed, with adverse effects for understanding polar climate and end users in agriculture, transportation, and air quality assessment. To improve our understanding of the SBL, we study SBL turbulence in the CNRM-GAME stratified water flume in Toulouse. This unique facility, particularly well suited for stratified flow and BL studies, provides novel laboratory observations that extend earlier efforts of field observations and wind tunnel studies. Among other things, laboratory observations have the advantage of statistical robustness due to repeatability of the experiment and provide access to an extensive set of data. Hence, a 3x3 m2 plate covered with LEGO of Lx=1.57 cm and Ly=3.57 cm, (roughness length = 0.0014 m, and roughness density =0.250, index of frontal area = 0.125) was towed at different velocities through the tank of 22 x 3 x 1.6 m. In this way we were able to achieve an SBL of ~10 cm with bulk Richardson numbers in the range between 0.05 and 0.25, and turbulence with a well-behaved inertial subrange. We focus on the estimation of the non-dimensional velocity and density profiles, on higher order turbulent statistics (important for plume dispersion), as well as on the turbulence spectral behaviour. Finally, we aim to

  3. Can 250 fusions per muon be achieved

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, S.E.

    1987-01-01

    Nuclear fusion of hydrogen isotopes can be induced by negative muons ( ) in reactions such as: + d + t + n + . This reaction is analagous to the nuclear fusion reaction achieved in stars in which hydrogen isotopes (such as deuterium, d, and tritium, t) at very high temperatures first penetrate the Coulomb repulsive barrier and then fuse together to produce an alpha particle ( ) and a neutron (n), releasing energy. The muon in general reappears after inducing fusion so that the reaction can be repeated many (N) times. Thus, the muon may serve as an effective catalyst for nuclear fusion. Muon-catalozed fusion is unique in that it proceeds rapidly in deuterium-tritium mixtures at relatively cold temperatures, e.g., room temperature. The need for plasma temperatures to initiate fusion is overcome by the presence of the muon.

  4. Fiber Optic Cable Thermal Preparation to Ensure Stable Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thoames Jr, William J.; Chuska, Rick F.; LaRocca, Frank V.; Switzer, Robert C.; Macmurphy, Shawn L.; Ott, Melanie N.

    2008-01-01

    Fiber optic cables are widely used in modern systems that must provide stable operation during exposure to changing environmental conditions. For example, a fiber optic cable on a satellite may have to reliably function over a temperature range of -50 C up to 125 C. While the system requirements for a particular application will dictate the exact method by which the fibers should be prepared, this work will examine multiple ruggedized fibers prepared in different fashions and subjected to thermal qualification testing. The data show that if properly conditioned the fiber cables can provide stable operation, but if done incorrectly, they will have large fluctuations in transmission.

  5. Stable Hemiaminals: 2-Aminopyrimidine Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Kwiecień, Anna; Ciunik, Zbigniew

    2015-01-01

    Stable hemiaminals can be obtained in the one-pot reaction between 2-aminopyrimidine and nitrobenzaldehyde derivatives. Ten new hemiaminals have been obtained, six of them in crystal state. The molecular stability of these intermediates results from the presence of both electron-withdrawing nitro groups as substituents on the phenyl ring and pyrimidine ring, so no further stabilisation by intramolecular interaction is required. Hemiaminal molecules possess a tetrahedral carbon atom constituting a stereogenic centre. As the result of crystallisation in centrosymmetric space groups both enantiomers are present in the crystal structure. PMID:26258772

  6. Staff detection with stable paths.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos Cardoso, Jaime; Capela, Artur; Rebelo, Ana; Guedes, Carlos; Pinto da Costa, Joaquim

    2009-06-01

    The preservation of musical works produced in the past requires their digitalization and transformation into a machine-readable format. The processing of handwritten musical scores by computers remains far from ideal. One of the fundamental stages to carry out this task is the staff line detection. We investigate a general-purpose, knowledge-free method for the automatic detection of music staff lines based on a stable path approach. Lines affected by curvature, discontinuities, and inclination are robustly detected. Experimental results show that the proposed technique consistently outperforms well-established algorithms. PMID:19372615

  7. Temperature-compensating dc restorer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, H. M.

    1980-01-01

    Circuit provides stable references restoration in addition to temperature compensation. Possible TV monitor applications include traffic and security surveillance systems, where cameras are subject to environmental extremes, as in unheated warehouses or outdoors.

  8. High temperature measuring device

    DOEpatents

    Tokarz, Richard D.

    1983-01-01

    A temperature measuring device for very high design temperatures (to 2,000.degree. C.). The device comprises a homogenous base structure preferably in the form of a sphere or cylinder. The base structure contains a large number of individual walled cells. The base structure has a decreasing coefficient of elasticity within the temperature range being monitored. A predetermined quantity of inert gas is confined within each cell. The cells are dimensionally stable at the normal working temperature of the device. Increases in gaseous pressure within the cells will permanently deform the cell walls at temperatures within the high temperature range to be measured. Such deformation can be correlated to temperature by calibrating similarly constructed devices under known time and temperature conditions.

  9. A highly thermal stable solid phase microextraction fiber prepared by an inorganic binder.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongmei; Ran, Fanpeng; Tao, Caihong; Zhao, Mengmeng; Jia, Yulong; Guo, Yong

    2016-04-28

    An easy method to prepare solid phase microextraction fibers by introducing an inorganic binder was demonstrated in this study, where MoS2 was selected as the extraction phase material because of its graphite-like layered structure with large specific adsorption area and good stability, and was then adhered to a stainless steel wire by acid aluminum phosphate binder with the spraying method. The as-prepared solid phase microextraction fiber coupled with gas chromatography was then used to extract some polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons target analytes including the low-volatile benzo(a)pyrene etc. from a standard sample. Comparing with the MoS2-epoxy resin and commercial polyacrylate fibers, the MoS2-acid aluminum phosphate fiber has a higher thermal stability because of highly thermal stable acid aluminum phosphate, which is durable for a long service life at a high temperature (320 °C), and has the advantage in the extraction of low-volatility analytes. After the optimization of adsorption and desorption factors (ionic strength, adsorption time and temperature, and desorption temperature), method detection limits of <0.1 μg L(-1) were achieved, and the calibration curves were all linear (R(2) ≥ 0.9981) within the range of 0.1-100 μg L(-1). The satisfying repeatability was also achieved, the RSD values of single-fiber were 3.49-5.81%, and the ones of fiber-to-fiber were 5.32-7.22%. As a result, the present fiber with good thermal stability can work at high temperature for a long service life, which is useful for the detection of low-volatility target analytes in practical applications. PMID:27046208

  10. Unusually Stable Spinae from a Freshwater Chlorobium sp

    PubMed Central

    Brooke, J. S.; Koval, S. F.; Beveridge, T. J.

    1995-01-01

    A green Chlorobium sp. with spinae, strain JSB1, was isolated from an enrichment culture previously obtained from Fayetteville Green Lake, N.Y. (J. S. Brooke, J. B. Thompson, T. J. Beveridge, and S. F. Koval, Arch. Microbiol. 157:319-322, 1992). Cells were gram-negative, nonmotile rods which contained bacteriochlorophyll c and chlorosomes. Spinae were best seen by transmission electron microscopy in thin sections of cells fixed in the presence of tannic acid. High-resolution scanning electron microscopy showed the spinae randomly distributed at the cell surface and at the junctions between cells. Spinae were physically sheared from cells and isolated from the culture supernatant by ultrafiltration. As observed by electron microscopy, spinae demonstrated unusual structural stability when exposed for 1 h at 37 deg C to chemical treatments such as hydrogen bond-breaking agents, detergents, metal-chelating agents, proteases, and organic solvents. They were stable for 1 h at 37 deg C over the pH range 2.3 to 9.9 and in 1 M HCl and 1 M NaOH. The structural integrity of the spinae was also maintained when spinae were subjected to harsher treatments of autoclaving in 2% (wt/vol) sodium dodecyl sulfate and exposure to dithiothreitol at pH 9 for 1 h at 100 deg C. Partially dissociated spinae were obtained after 5 h at 100 deg C in 1 M HCl and 1 M NaOH. In acid, the tubular spinae became amorphous structures, with no helical striations visible. In alkali, the spinae had dissociated into irregular aggregates of disks. Since both high temperature and extremes of pH were required to achieve partial dissociation of the spinae, the strength of the structure presumably comes from covalent bonding. PMID:16534897

  11. Persistence Length of Stable Microtubules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkins, Taviare; Mirigian, Matthew; Yasar, M. Selcuk; Ross, Jennifer

    2011-03-01

    Microtubules are a vital component of the cytoskeleton. As the most rigid of the cytoskeleton filaments, they give shape and support to the cell. They are also essential for intracellular traffic by providing the roadways onto which organelles are transported, and they are required to reorganize during cellular division. To perform its function in the cell, the microtubule must be rigid yet dynamic. We are interested in how the mechanical properties of stable microtubules change over time. Some ``stable'' microtubules of the cell are recycled after days, such as in the axons of neurons or the cilia and flagella. We measured the persistence length of freely fluctuating taxol-stabilized microtubules over the span of a week and analyzed them via Fourier decomposition. As measured on a daily basis, the persistence length is independent of the contour length. Although measured over the span of the week, the accuracy of the measurement and the persistence length varies. We also studied how fluorescently-labeling the microtubule affects the persistence length and observed that a higher labeling ratio corresponded to greater flexibility. National Science Foundation Grant No: 0928540 to JLR.

  12. Stable Imaging for Astronomy (SIA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaulieu, Mathilde; Ottogalli, Sebastien; Preis, Olivier; Bresson, Yves; Rivet, Jean-Pierre; Abe, Lyu; Vakili, Farrokh

    2014-07-01

    One of the most challenging fields of astronomical instrumentation is probably high-contrast imaging since it ultimately combines ultra-high sensitivity at low flux and the ability to cope with photon flux contrasts of several hundreds of millions or even more. These two aspects implicitly require that high-contrast instruments should be highly stable in the sense of the reproducibility of their measurements at different times, but also, continuously stable over time. In most high contrast instruments or experiments, their sensitivity is broken after at most tens of minutes of operation due to uncontrolled and unknown behaviour of the whole experiment regarding the environmental conditions. In this paper, we introduce a general approach of an exhaustive stability study for high-contrast imaging that has been initiated at Lagrange Laboratory, Observatoire de la Côte d'Azur (OCA). On a practical ground, one of the fundamental issues of this study is the metrology, which is the basis of all reproducible measurements. We describe a small experiment designed to understand the behaviour of one of our ultra-precise metrology tools (a commercial sub-nanometric 3-way interferometer) and derive the conditions under which its operation delivers reliable results. The approach will apply to the high-contrast imaging test-bench SPEED, under development at OCA.

  13. [Research Reports on Academic Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Latts, Sander; And Others

    1969-01-01

    Four counselors studied the relation between achievement and choice of major, achievement and motivation, counseling and motivation, and achievement and employment. To see if those with definite majors or career choices in mind did better than those without, 300 students were tested according to the certainty of their choice. No significant…

  14. Cherokee Culture and School Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Anthony D.

    1980-01-01

    Compares the effect of cooperative and competitive behaviors of Cherokee and Anglo American elementary school students on academic achievement. Suggests changes in teaching techniques and lesson organization that might raise academic achievement while taking into consideration tribal traditions that limit scholastic achievement in an…

  15. Students' Achievement Goals, Learning-Related Emotions and Academic Achievement.

    PubMed

    Lüftenegger, Marko; Klug, Julia; Harrer, Katharina; Langer, Marie; Spiel, Christiane; Schober, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    In the present research, the recently proposed 3 × 2 model of achievement goals is tested and associations with achievement emotions and their joint influence on academic achievement are investigated. The study was conducted with 388 students using the 3 × 2 Achievement Goal Questionnaire including the six proposed goal constructs (task-approach, task-avoidance, self-approach, self-avoidance, other-approach, other-avoidance) and the enjoyment and boredom scales from the Achievement Emotion Questionnaire. Exam grades were used as an indicator of academic achievement. Findings from CFAs provided strong support for the proposed structure of the 3 × 2 achievement goal model. Self-based goals, other-based goals and task-approach goals predicted enjoyment. Task-approach goals negatively predicted boredom. Task-approach and other-approach predicted achievement. The indirect effects of achievement goals through emotion variables on achievement were assessed using bias-corrected bootstrapping. No mediation effects were found. Implications for educational practice are discussed. PMID:27199836

  16. Students’ Achievement Goals, Learning-Related Emotions and Academic Achievement

    PubMed Central

    Lüftenegger, Marko; Klug, Julia; Harrer, Katharina; Langer, Marie; Spiel, Christiane; Schober, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    In the present research, the recently proposed 3 × 2 model of achievement goals is tested and associations with achievement emotions and their joint influence on academic achievement are investigated. The study was conducted with 388 students using the 3 × 2 Achievement Goal Questionnaire including the six proposed goal constructs (task-approach, task-avoidance, self-approach, self-avoidance, other-approach, other-avoidance) and the enjoyment and boredom scales from the Achievement Emotion Questionnaire. Exam grades were used as an indicator of academic achievement. Findings from CFAs provided strong support for the proposed structure of the 3 × 2 achievement goal model. Self-based goals, other-based goals and task-approach goals predicted enjoyment. Task-approach goals negatively predicted boredom. Task-approach and other-approach predicted achievement. The indirect effects of achievement goals through emotion variables on achievement were assessed using bias-corrected bootstrapping. No mediation effects were found. Implications for educational practice are discussed. PMID:27199836

  17. Mixture of Skewed α-Stable Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shojaei, S. R. Hosseini; Nassiri, V.; Mohammadian, Gh. R.; Mohammadpour, A.

    2011-03-01

    Expectation maximization (EM) algorithm and the Bayesian techniques are two approaches for statistical inference of mixture models [3, 4]. By noting the advantages of the Bayesian methods, practitioners prefer them. However, implementing Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithms can be very complicated for stable distributions, due to the non-analytic density or distribution function formulas. In this paper, we introduce a new class of mixture of heavy-tailed distributions, called mixture of skewed stable distributions. Skewed stable distributions belongs to the exponential family and they have analytic density representation. It is shown that skewed stable distributions dominate skew stable distribution functions and they can be used to model heavy-tailed data. The class of skewed stable distributions has an analytic representation for its density function and the Bayesian inference can be done similar to the exponential family of distributions. Finally, mixture of skewed stable distributions are compared to the mixture of stable distributions through a simulations study.

  18. A redox-stable efficient anode for solid-oxide fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Tao, Shanwen; Irvine, John T S

    2003-05-01

    Solid-oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) promise high efficiencies in a range of fuels. Unlike lower temperature variants, carbon monoxide is a fuel rather than a poison, and so hydrocarbon fuels can be used directly, through internal reforming or even direct oxidation. This provides a key entry strategy for fuel-cell technology into the current energy economy. Present development is mainly based on the yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolyte. The most commonly used anode materials are Ni/YSZ cermets, which display excellent catalytic properties for fuel oxidation and good current collection, but do exhibit disadvantages, such as low tolerance to sulphur and carbon deposition when using hydrocarbon fuels, and poor redox cycling causing volume instability. Here, we report a nickel-free SOFC anode, La0.75Sr0.25Cr0.5Mn0.5O3, with comparable electrochemical performance to Ni/YSZ cermets. The electrode polarization resistance approaches 0.2 Omega cm2 at 900 degrees C in 97% H2/3% H2O. Very good performance is achieved for methane oxidation without using excess steam. The anode is stable in both fuel and air conditions, and shows stable electrode performance in methane. Thus both redox stability and operation in low steam hydrocarbons have been demonstrated, overcoming two of the major limitations of the current generation of nickel zirconia cermet SOFC anodes. PMID:12692533

  19. Direct Covalent Biomolecule Immobilization on Plasma-Nanotextured Chemically Stable Substrates.

    PubMed

    Tsougeni, K; Petrou, P S; Awsiuk, K; Marzec, M M; Ioannidis, N; Petrouleas, V; Tserepi, A; Kakabakos, S E; Gogolides, E

    2015-07-15

    A new method for direct covalent immobilization of protein molecules (including antibodies) on organic polymers with plasma-induced random micronanoscale topography and stable-in-time chemical functionality is presented. This is achieved using a short (1-5 min) plasma etching and simultaneous micronanotexturing process, followed by a fast thermal annealing step, which induces accelerated hydrophobic recovery while preserving important chemical functionality created by the plasma. Surface-bound biomolecules resist harsh washing with sodium dodecyl sulfate and other detergents even at elevated temperatures, losing less than 40% of the biomolecules bound even at the harshest washing conditions. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, secondary-ion mass spectrometry, and electron paramagnetic resonance are used to unveil the chemical modification of the plasma-treated and stabilized surfaces. The nanotextured and chemically stabilized surfaces are used as substrates for the development of immunochemical assays for the sensitive detection of C-reactive protein and salmonella lipopolysaccharides through immobilization of the respective analyte-specific antibodies onto them. Such substrates are stable for a period of 1 year with ambient storage. PMID:26098201

  20. A long-term stable power supply µDMFC stack for wireless sensor node applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zonglin; Wang, Xiaohong; Li, Xiaozhao; Xu, Manqi; Liu, Litian

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, a passive, air-breathing four-cell micro direct methanol fuel cell (µDMFC) stack featuring a fuel delivery structure for long-term and stable power supply is designed, fabricated and tested. The fuel is reserved in a T-shaped tank and diffuses through the porous diffusion layer to the catalyst at the anode. A peak power density of 25.7 mW cm-2 and a maximum power output of 113 mW are achieved with 3 M methanol at room temperature, and the stack can produce 60 mW of power, even though only 5% fuel remains in the reservoir. Combined with a low-input dc-dc convertor, the stack can realize a stable and optional constant voltage output from 1 V-6 V. The stack successfully powered a heavy metal sensor node for water environment monitoring 12 d continuously, with consumption of 10 mL 5 M methanol solution. As such, it is believed to be applicable for powering wireless sensor nodes.

  1. Thermally stable crystalline mesoporous metal oxides with substantially uniform pores

    SciTech Connect

    Wiesner, Ulrich; Orilall, Mahendra Christopher; Lee, Jinwoo; DiSalvo, Jr., Francis J

    2015-01-27

    Highly crystalline metal oxide-carbon composites, as precursors to thermally stable mesoporous metal oxides, are coated with a layer of amorphous carbon. Using a `one-pot` method, highly crystalline metal oxide-carbon composites are converted to thermally stable mesoporous metal oxides, having highly crystalline mesopore walls, without causing the concomitant collapse of the mesostructure. The `one-pot` method uses block copolymers with an sp or sp 2 hybridized carbon containing hydrophobic block as structure directing agents which converts to a sturdy, amorphous carbon material under appropriate heating conditions, providing an in-situ rigid support which maintains the pores of the oxides intact while crystallizing at temperatures as high as 1000 deg C. A highly crystalline metal oxide-carbon composite can be heated to produce a thermally stable mesoporous metal oxide consisting of a single polymorph.

  2. Stable fly population dynamics in Eastern Nebraska in relation to climatic variables

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stable flies, Stomoxys calcitrans (L.), are among the most economically important arthropod pests of livestock in North America. In this study, we monitored the seasonal dynamics of a stable fly population in eastern Nebraska for five years. Models based upon temperature and precipitation were devel...

  3. Achievement as Resistance: The Development of a Critical Race Achievement Ideology among Black Achievers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Dorinda J.

    2008-01-01

    In this article, Dorinda Carter examines the embodiment of a critical race achievement ideology in high-achieving black students. She conducted a yearlong qualitative investigation of the adaptive behaviors that nine high-achieving black students developed and employed to navigate the process of schooling at an upper-class, predominantly white,…

  4. Stable density stratification solar pond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lansing, F. L. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A stable density-stratification solar pond for use in the collection and storage of solar thermal energy including a container having a first section characterized by an internal wall of a substantially cylindrical configuration and a second section having an internal wall of a substantially truncated conical configuration surmounting the first section in coaxial alignment therewith, the second section of said container being characterized by a base of a diameter substantially equal to the diameter of the first section and a truncated apex defining a solar energy acceptance opening is discussed. A body of immiscible liquids is disposed within the container and comprises a lower portion substantially filling the first section of the container and an upper portion substantially filling the second section of the container, said lower portion being an aqueous based liquid of a darker color than the upper portion and of a greater density. A protective cover plate is removably provided for covering the acceptance opening.

  5. Stable massive particles at colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Fairbairn, M.; Kraan, A.C.; Milstead, D.A.; Sjostrand, T.; Skands, P.; Sloan, T.; /Lancaster U.

    2006-11-01

    We review the theoretical motivations and experimental status of searches for stable massive particles (SMPs) which could be sufficiently long-lived as to be directly detected at collider experiments. The discovery of such particles would address a number of important questions in modern physics including the origin and composition of dark matter in the universe and the unification of the fundamental forces. This review describes the techniques used in SMP-searches at collider experiments and the limits so far obtained on the production of SMPs which possess various colour, electric and magnetic charge quantum numbers. We also describe theoretical scenarios which predict SMPs, the phenomenology needed to model their production at colliders and interactions with matter. In addition, the interplay between collider searches and open questions in cosmology such as dark matter composition are addressed.

  6. Dimensionally stable metallic hydride composition

    DOEpatents

    Heung, Leung K.

    1994-01-01

    A stable, metallic hydride composition and a process for making such a composition. The composition comprises a uniformly blended mixture of a metal hydride, kieselguhr, and a ballast metal, all in the form of particles. The composition is made by subjecting a metal hydride to one or more hydrogen absorption/desorption cycles to disintegrate the hydride particles to less than approximately 100 microns in size. The particles are partly oxidized, then blended with the ballast metal and the kieselguhr to form a uniform mixture. The mixture is compressed into pellets and calcined. Preferably, the mixture includes approximately 10 vol. % or more kieselguhr and approximately 50 vol. % or more ballast. Metal hydrides that can be used in the composition include Zr, Ti, V, Nb, Pd, as well as binary, tertiary, and more complex alloys of La, Al, Cu, Ti, Co, Ni, Fe, Zr, Mg, Ca, Mn, and mixtures and other combinations thereof. Ballast metals include Al, Cu and Ni.

  7. Stable light isotope biogeochemistry of hydrothermal systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Des Marais, D. J.

    1996-01-01

    The stable isotopic composition of the elements O, H, S and C in minerals and other chemical species can indicate the existence, extent, conditions and the processes (including biological activity) of hydrothermal systems. Hydrothermal alteration of the 18O/16O and D/H values of minerals can be used to detect fossil systems and delineate their areal extent. Water-rock interactions create isotopic signatures which indicate fluid composition, temperature, water-rock ratios, etc. The 18O/16O values of silica and carbonate deposits tend to increase with declining temperature and thus help to map thermal gradients. Measurements of D/H values can help to decipher the origin(s) of hydrothermal fluids. The 34S/32S and 13C/12C values of fluids and minerals reflect the origin of the S and C as well as oxygen fugacities and key redox processes. For example, a wide range of 34S/32S values which are consistent with equilibration below 100 degrees C between sulfide and sulfate can be attributed to sulfur metabolizing bacteria. Depending on its magnitude, the difference in the 13C/12C value of CO2 and carbonates versus organic carbon might be attributed either to equilibrium at hydrothermal temperatures or, if the difference exceeds 1% (10/1000), to organic biosynthesis. Along the thermal gradients of thermal spring outflows, the 13C/12C value of carbonates and 13C-depleted microbial organic carbon increases, principally due to the outgassing of relatively 13C-depleted CO2.

  8. Stable light isotope biogeochemistry of hydrothermal systems.

    PubMed

    Des Marais, D J

    1996-01-01

    The stable isotopic composition of the elements O, H, S and C in minerals and other chemical species can indicate the existence, extent, conditions and the processes (including biological activity) of hydrothermal systems. Hydrothermal alteration of the 18O/16O and D/H values of minerals can be used to detect fossil systems and delineate their areal extent. Water-rock interactions create isotopic signatures which indicate fluid composition, temperature, water-rock ratios, etc. The 18O/16O values of silica and carbonate deposits tend to increase with declining temperature and thus help to map thermal gradients. Measurements of D/H values can help to decipher the origin(s) of hydrothermal fluids. The 34S/32S and 13C/12C values of fluids and minerals reflect the origin of the S and C as well as oxygen fugacities and key redox processes. For example, a wide range of 34S/32S values which are consistent with equilibration below 100 degrees C between sulfide and sulfate can be attributed to sulfur metabolizing bacteria. Depending on its magnitude, the difference in the 13C/12C value of CO2 and carbonates versus organic carbon might be attributed either to equilibrium at hydrothermal temperatures or, if the difference exceeds 1% (10/1000), to organic biosynthesis. Along the thermal gradients of thermal spring outflows, the 13C/12C value of carbonates and 13C-depleted microbial organic carbon increases, principally due to the outgassing of relatively 13C-depleted CO2. PMID:9243011

  9. Sugar feeding in adult stable flies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Adult stable flies, (Stomoxys calcitrans (L.)), are known to feed readily on sugars in the laboratory. However, little is known concerning the extent of stable fly sugar feeding in wild populations. We examined the frequency of sugar feeding in stable flies in rural and urban environments. In additi...

  10. Uses of stable isotopes in fish ecology

    EPA Science Inventory

    Analyses of fish tissues (other than otoliths) for stable isotope ratios can provide substantial information on fish ecology, including physiological ecology. Stable isotopes of nitrogen and carbon frequently are used to determine the mix of diet sources for consumers. Stable i...

  11. Space stable thermal control coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harada, Y.

    1977-01-01

    Both pigment and paint studies were conducted to determine the effect of calcination conditions on optical properties of Zn2TiO4. Paint studies were concerned with the effects of spraying technique, of pigment to binder ratio, and of thickness on the properties of finished coatings. The results are reviewed in detail. Pigments prepared by calcination at 600 deg. to 800 deg. were evaluated. Low temperature syntheses were conducted to determine; (1) extent of ZnO + TiO2 reaction; and (2) the potential of higher peak reflectance with finer particle size powder obtained at lower temperatures.

  12. Magneto-hydrodynamically stable axisymmetric mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryutov, Dmitri

    2010-11-01

    The achievement of high beta (60%) plasma with near classical confinement in a linear axisymmetric magnetic configuration has sparked interest in the Gas Dynamic Trap concept. The significance of these results is that they can be projected directly to a neutron source for materials testing. The possibility of axisymmetric mirrors (AM) being magneto-hydrodynamically (MHD) stable is also of interest from a general physics standpoint (as it seemingly contradicts to well-established criteria of curvature-driven instabilities). The axial symmetry allows for much simpler and more reliable designs of mirror-based fusion facilities than the well-known quadrupole mirror configurations. In this tutorial, after a brief summary of classical results (in particular of the Rosenbluth-Longmire theory and of the energy principle as applied to AM) several approaches towards achieving MHD stabilization of the AM will be considered: 1) Employing the favorable field-line curvature in the end tanks; 2) Using the line-tying effect; 3) Setting the plasma in a slow or fast differential rotation; 4) Imposing a divertor configuration on the solenoidal magnetic field; 5) Controlling the plasma dynamics by the ponderomotive force; 6) Other techniques. Several of these approaches go beyond pure MHD and require accounting for finite Larmor radius effects and trapped particle modes. Some illuminative theoretical approaches for understanding axisymmetric mirror stability will be described. Wherever possible comparison of theoretical and experimental results on AM will be provided. The applicability of the various stabilization techniques to axisymmetric mirrors as neutron sources, hybrids, and pure-fusion reactors will be discussed and the constraints on the plasma parameters will be formulated. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  13. Analysis of printed organic MOSFET characteristics with a focus on the temperature dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zenitani, Hiroshi; Maiti, Tapas Kumar; Hayashi, Takuro; Tanimoto, Yuta; Sato, Kenshiro; Chen, Lei; Kikuchihara, Hideyuki; Miura-Mattausch, Mitiko; Jürgen Mattausch, Hans

    2016-04-01

    An experimental and theoretical investigation of the device characteristics of printed organic MOSFETs with a focus on the temperature dependence is reported. In particular, an anomalous behavior of the temperature dependence of the I ds-V gs characteristic is observed, which is found to be increased at higher temperature in MOSFETs fabricated with the printing technology. Our analysis suggests that the temperature dependence of the trap density and the carrier transport mechanism are the causes for this anomalous increase at higher temperature. The results obtained with the compact model HiSIM-Organic, developed based on the physics of carrier dynamics in organic materials, confirm these conclusions. Improving stable characteristics in circuit applications are demonstrated to be achievable at higher temperatures, due to these anomalous properties of organic MOSFETs fabricated by applying the printing technology.

  14. High-Temperature Experiments using a Resistively-Heated High-Pressure Membrane Diamond Anvil Cell

    SciTech Connect

    Jenei, Z; Visbeck, K; Cynn, H; Yoo, C; Evans, W

    2009-04-22

    A reliable high-performance heating method using resistive heaters and a membrane driven diamond anvil cell (mDAC) is presented. Two micro-heaters are mounted in a mDAC and use electrical power of less than 150 W to achieve sample temperatures up to 1200 K. For temperature measurement we use two K-type thermocouples mounted near the sample. The approach can be used for in-situ Raman spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction at high pressures and temperatures. A W-Re alloy gasket material permits stable operation of mDAC at high temperature. Using this method, we made an isothermal compression at 900 K to pressures in excess of 100 GPa and isobaric heating at 95 GPa to temperatures in excess of 1000 K. As an example, we present high temperature Raman spectroscopy measurements of nitrogen at high pressures.

  15. L-Band Transmit/Receive Module for Phase-Stable Array Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andricos, Constantine; Edelstein, Wendy; Krimskiy, Vladimir

    2008-01-01

    Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) has been shown to provide very sensitive measurements of surface deformation and displacement on the order of 1 cm. Future systematic measurements of surface deformation will require this capability over very large areas (300 km) from space. To achieve these required accuracies, these spaceborne sensors must exhibit low temporal decorrelation and be temporally stable systems. An L-band (24-cmwavelength) InSAR instrument using an electronically steerable radar antenna is suited to meet these needs. In order to achieve the 1-cm displacement accuracy, the phased array antenna requires phase-stable transmit/receive (T/R) modules. The T/R module operates at L-band (1.24 GHz) and has less than 1- deg absolute phase stability and less than 0.1-dB absolute amplitude stability over temperature. The T/R module is also high power (30 W) and power efficient (60-percent overall efficiency). The design is currently implemented using discrete components and surface mount technology. The basic T/R module architecture is augmented with a calibration loop to compensate for temperature variations, component variations, and path loss variations as a function of beam settings. The calibration circuit consists of an amplitude and phase detector, and other control circuitry, to compare the measured gain and phase to a reference signal and uses this signal to control a precision analog phase shifter and analog attenuator. An architecture was developed to allow for the module to be bidirectional, to operate in both transmit and receive mode. The architecture also includes a power detector used to maintain a transmitter power output constant within 0.1 dB. The use of a simple, stable, low-cost, and high-accuracy gain and phase detector made by Analog Devices (AD8302), combined with a very-high efficiency T/R module, is novel. While a self-calibrating T/R module capability has been sought for years, a practical and cost-effective solution has

  16. Role of stable eignmodes in ETG-driven turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Juhyung; Terry, Paul W.

    2008-11-01

    We investigate the role of the stable eigenmodes in the electron-temperature-gradient driven (ETG) turbulence. The low-wavenumber stable eigenmodes are thought to play a role in the dissipation mechanism leading to the saturation of CTEM [1] and ITG [2] turbulence. Based on the ETG slab fluid model [3], the condition and parameter regime for the saturation by the stable mode are analytically explored through statistical closure theory. In the simulation, the evolution of heat flux and turbulent energy are traced with the correlation of the stable and unstable modes. Possible effect of the stable mode saturation on zonal flow and magnetic fluctuation will be discussed. In the future, we will extend the analysis to the nonlocal ETG fluid model and kinetic model. [1] P. W. Terry, D. A. Baver, and S. Gupta, Phys. Plasmas 13, 022307 (2006). [2] R. Gatto, P. W. Terry, and D. A. Baver, Phys. Plasmas 13, 022306 (2006). [3] W. Horton et. al. Nuclear Fusion 45 (2005).

  17. Development of Stable Influenza Vaccine Powder Formulations: Challenges and Possibilities

    PubMed Central

    Amorij, J-P.; Huckriede, A.; Wilschut, J.; Frijlink, H. W.

    2008-01-01

    Influenza vaccination represents the cornerstone of influenza prevention. However, today all influenza vaccines are formulated as liquids that are unstable at ambient temperatures and have to be stored and distributed under refrigeration. In order to stabilize influenza vaccines, they can be brought into the dry state using suitable excipients, stabilizers and drying processes. The resulting stable influenza vaccine powder is independent of cold-chain facilities. This can be attractive for the integration of the vaccine logistics with general drug distribution in Western as well as developing countries. In addition, a stockpile of stable vaccine formulations of potential vaccines against pandemic viruses can provide an immediate availability and simple distribution of vaccine in a pandemic outbreak. Finally, in the development of new needle-free dosage forms, dry and stable influenza vaccine powder formulations can facilitate new or improved targeting strategies for the vaccine compound. This review represents the current status of dry stable inactivated influenza vaccine development. Attention is given to the different influenza vaccine types (i.e. whole inactivated virus, split, subunit or virosomal vaccine), the rationale and need for stabilized influenza vaccines, drying methods by which influenza vaccines can be stabilized (i.e. lyophilization, spray drying, spray-freeze drying, vacuum drying or supercritical fluid drying), the current status of dry influenza vaccine development and the challenges for ultimate market introduction of a stable and effective dry-powder influenza vaccine. PMID:18338241

  18. Dielectric Relaxation of Materials that Form Ultra-Stable Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richert, Ranko

    2015-03-01

    Physical vapor deposition of glass forming materials onto substrates at temperatures around 0.8 Tg produces glasses of high density and low enthalpy. Using interdigitated electrode cells as substrates, such stable glasses can be studied by dielectric spectroscopy in situ. This technique is applied to monitor the dynamics of stable films upon their conversion to the ordinary supercooled liquid state. The dielectric loss during transformation indicates that the softening proceeds by a growth front mechanism and generates the ordinary liquid state without forming intermediates. The same technique is also used to assess the residual dynamics of the stable glassy state. We observe that processes such as the Johari-Goldstein beta relaxation are strongly suppressed in this stable state, consistent with the relatively low fictive temperature of these glassy states. coauthors: Hai-Bin Yu, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85278; Michael Tylinski, and Mark D. Ediger, Department of Chemistry, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706.

  19. The Mechanics of Human Achievement

    PubMed Central

    Duckworth, Angela L.; Eichstaedt, Johannes C.; Ungar, Lyle H.

    2015-01-01

    Countless studies have addressed why some individuals achieve more than others. Nevertheless, the psychology of achievement lacks a unifying conceptual framework for synthesizing these empirical insights. We propose organizing achievement-related traits by two possible mechanisms of action: Traits that determine the rate at which an individual learns a skill are talent variables and can be distinguished conceptually from traits that determine the effort an individual puts forth. This approach takes inspiration from Newtonian mechanics: achievement is akin to distance traveled, effort to time, skill to speed, and talent to acceleration. A novel prediction from this model is that individual differences in effort (but not talent) influence achievement (but not skill) more substantially over longer (rather than shorter) time intervals. Conceptualizing skill as the multiplicative product of talent and effort, and achievement as the multiplicative product of skill and effort, advances similar, but less formal, propositions by several important earlier thinkers. PMID:26236393

  20. Magneto-hydrodynamically stable axisymmetric mirrorsa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryutov, D. D.; Berk, H. L.; Cohen, B. I.; Molvik, A. W.; Simonen, T. C.

    2011-09-01

    Making axisymmetric mirrors magnetohydrodynamically (MHD) stable opens up exciting opportunities for using mirror devices as neutron sources, fusion-fission hybrids, and pure-fusion reactors. This is also of interest from a general physics standpoint (as it seemingly contradicts well-established criteria of curvature-driven instabilities). The axial symmetry allows for much simpler and more reliable designs of mirror-based fusion facilities than the well-known quadrupole mirror configurations. In this tutorial, after a summary of classical results, several techniques for achieving MHD stabilization of the axisymmetric mirrors are considered, in particular: (1) employing the favorable field-line curvature in the end tanks; (2) using the line-tying effect; (3) controlling the radial potential distribution; (4) imposing a divertor configuration on the solenoidal magnetic field; and (5) affecting the plasma dynamics by the ponderomotive force. Some illuminative theoretical approaches for understanding axisymmetric mirror stability are described. The applicability of the various stabilization techniques to axisymmetric mirrors as neutron sources, hybrids, and pure-fusion reactors are discussed; and the constraints on the plasma parameters are formulated.

  1. Stable Isotope Spectroscopy for Diagnostic Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murnick, D. E.

    2000-06-01

    Isotopic tracers have been used in medical research for more than fifty years. Radioactive isotopes have been most used because of the high detection efficiencies possible. With increased awareness of the effects of low level radiation and radioactive waste management problems, the need for safe non radioactive tracers has become apparent. Rare stable isotopes of biologically active elements can be used for metabolic and pharmacokinetic studies provided that both sufficient detection sensitivity can be achieved and reliable cost effective instruments can be developed. High resolution optical spectroscopic methods which can determine isotopic ratios with high precision and accuracy are viable for research and clinical use. The study of 13C/12C ratios in CO2 for breath test diagnostics will be described in detail. Using the laser optogalvonic effect with isotopic lasers a specific medical diagnostic for h-pylori infection, has recently received FDA approval. Opportunities exist to study D/H ratios in water and 18O/16O ratios in CO2 and water for basic metabolism diagnostics and 15N/14N ratios in urine for liver function and related studies.

  2. Unmet Promise: Raising Minority Achievement. The Achievement Gap.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Robert C.; Viadero, Debra

    2000-01-01

    This first in a four-part series on why academic achievement gaps persist discusses how to raise minority achievement. It explains how earlier progress in closing the gap has stalled, while at the same time, the greater diversity of student populations and the rapid growth of the Hispanic population and of other ethnic groups have reshaped the…

  3. To Achieve or Not to Achieve: The Question of Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilmore, Beatrice

    Questionnaire and projective data from 323 women aged 18 to 50 were analyzed in order to study the relationships of need achievement and motive to avoid success to age, sex role ideology, and stage in the family cycle. Family background and educational variables were also considered. Level of need achievement was found to be significantly related…

  4. Mathematics Achievement in High- and Low-Achieving Secondary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohammadpour, Ebrahim; Shekarchizadeh, Ahmadreza

    2015-01-01

    This paper identifies the amount of variance in mathematics achievement in high- and low-achieving schools that can be explained by school-level factors, while controlling for student-level factors. The data were obtained from 2679 Iranian eighth graders who participated in the 2007 Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study. Of the…

  5. Tungsten Stable Isotope Compositions of Ferromanganese Crusts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, K.; Barling, J.; Hein, J. R.; Schauble, E. A.; Halliday, A. N.

    2014-12-01

    We report the first accurate and precise data for mass-dependent fractionation of tungsten (W) stable isotopes, using a double spike technique and MC-ICPMS. Results are expressed relative to the NIST 3136 W isotope standard as per mil deviations in 186W/184W (δ186W). Although heavy element mass-dependent fractionations are expected to be small, Tl and U both display significant low temperature isotopic fractionations. Theoretical calculations indicate that W nuclear volume isotopic effects should be smaller than mass-dependent fractionations at low temperatures. Hydrogenetic ferromanganese (Fe-Mn) crusts precipitate directly from seawater and have been used as paleoceanographic recorders of temporal changes in seawater chemistry. Crusts are strongly enriched in W and other metals, and are a promising medium for exploring W isotopic variability. Tungsten has a relatively long residence time in seawater of ~61,000 years, mainly as the tungstate ion (WO42-). Water depth profiles show conservative behaviour. During adsorption on Fe-Mn crusts, W species form inner-sphere complexes in the hexavalent (W6+) state. The major host phase is thought to be Mn oxides and the lighter W isotope is expected to be absorbed preferentially. Surface scrapings of 13 globally distributed hydrogenetic Fe-Mn crusts display δ186W from -0.08 to -0.22‰ (±0.03‰, 2sd). A trend toward lighter W isotope composition exists with increasing water depth (~1500 to ~5200m) and W concentration. One hydrothermal Mn-oxide sample is anomalously light and Mn nodules are both heavy and light relative to Fe-Mn crusts. Tungsten speciation depends on concentration, pH, and time in solution and is not well understood because of the extremely slow kinetics of the reactions. In addition, speciation of aqueous and/or adsorbed species might be sensitive to pressure, showing similar thermodynamic stability but different effective volumes. Thus, W stable isotopes might be used as a water-depth barometer in

  6. Method of Making Thermally Stable, Piezoelectric and Proelectric Polymeric Substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, Joycelyn O. (Inventor); St.Clair, Terry L. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A thermally stable, piezoelectric and pyroelectric polymeric substrate was prepared. This thermally stable, piezoelectric and pyroelectric polymeric substrate may be used to prepare electromechanical transducers, thermomechanical transducers, accelerometers, acoustic sensors, infrared sensors, pressure sensors, vibration sensors, impact sensors. in-situ temperature sensors, in-situ stress/strain sensors, micro actuators, switches, adjustable fresnel lenses, speakers, tactile sensors, weather sensors, micro positioners, ultrasonic devices, power generators, tunable reflectors, microphones, and hydrophones. The process for preparing these polymeric substrates includes: providing a polymeric substrate having a softening temperature greater than 100 C; depositing a metal electrode material onto the polymer film; attaching a plurality of electrical leads to the metal electrode coated polymeric substrate; heating the metal electrode coated polymeric substrate in a low dielectric medium: applying a voltage to the heated metal electrode coated polymeric substrate to induce polarization; and cooling the polarized metal electrode coated polymeric electrode while maintaining a constant voltage.

  7. System and circuitry to provide stable transconductance for biasing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garverick, Steven L. (Inventor); Yu, Xinyu (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    An amplifier system can include an input amplifier configured to receive an analog input signal and provide an amplified signal corresponding to the analog input signal. A tracking loop is configured to employ delta modulation for tracking the amplified signal, the tracking loop providing a corresponding output signal. A biasing circuit is configured to adjust a bias current to maintain stable transconductance over temperature variations, the biasing circuit providing at least one bias signal for biasing at least one of the input amplifier and the tracking loop, whereby the circuitry receiving the at least one bias signal exhibits stable performance over the temperature variations. In another embodiment the biasing circuit can be utilized in other applications.

  8. Affective Processes and Academic Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feshbach, Norma Deitch; Feshbach, Seymour

    1987-01-01

    Data indicate that for girls, affective dispositional factors (empathy, depressive affectivity, aggression, and self-concept) are intimately linked to cognitive development and academic achievement. (PCB)

  9. Attribution theory in science achievement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, Martin

    Recent research reveals consistent lags in American students' science achievement scores. Not only are the scores lower in the United States compared to other developed nations, but even within the United States, too many students are well below science proficiency scores for their grade levels. The current research addresses this problem by examining potential malleable factors that may predict science achievement in twelfth graders using 2009 data from the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP). Principle component factor analysis was conducted to determine the specific items that contribute to each overall factor. A series of multiple regressions were then analyzed and formed the predictive value of each of these factors for science achievement. All significant factors were ultimately examined together (also using multiple regression) to determine the most powerful predictors of science achievement, identifying factors that predict science achievement, the results of which suggested interventions to strengthen students' science achievement scores and encourage persistence in the sciences at the college level and beyond. Although there is a variety of research highlighting how students in the US are falling behind other developing nations in science and math achievement, as yet, little research has addressed ways of intervening to address this gap. The current research is a starting point, seeking to identify malleable factors that contribute to science achievement. More specifically, this research examined the types of attributions that predict science achievement in twelfth grade students.

  10. Stable vapor transportation of solid sources in MOVPE of III V compound semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shenai-Khatkhate, Deodatta V.; DiCarlo, Ronald L.; Marsman, Charles J.; Polcari, Robert F.; Ware, Robert A.; Woelk, Egbert

    2007-01-01

    Trimethylindium (TMI), in spite of being a solid, has remained the precursor of choice for the deposition of indium containing layers by MOVPE. However, maintaining stable TMI flows and constant concentrations in gas phase during the growth still continue to be a major concern in MOVPE. This issue is further compounded by lower TMI consumptions achieved as the MOVPE growth conditions become increasingly more aggressive to meet the industry demand of higher throughputs, e.g. at higher flow rates, or at reduced pressures or when TMI source is maintained at higher temperatures. In this paper, we report our new findings of improved TMI delivery (>90, and in some cases >95%) with excellent stability of TMI concentration throughout the cylinder lifetime. These results are achieved using standard fill capacity and under intentionally set aggressive conditions of pressure, temperature and flow. We report a novel delivery technology (Uni-Flo™ II cylinder) that is customer proven and comprises innovative improvements to our dip-tube-less cylinder design, Uni-Flo™ cylinder, and advancements in TMI packaging. In this report, TMI depletion rates are examined over an extensive range of operating parameters currently employed in MOVPE, viz. flow rates ranging from 100 to 1000 sccm, source temperatures between 17 and 30 °C, and reactor pressures in the range 300-1000 mbar. We report, significant improvements in TMI delivery (>95% depletion) at higher molar flux of TMI (>3 g/h) and an excellent reproducible dosimetry of TMI with no batch-to-batch variation, by using Uni-Flo™ II cylinder as the enabling solution to TMI delivery problems.

  11. High Frequency Stable Oscillate boiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fenfang; Gonzalez-Avila, Silvestre Roberto; Ohl, Claus Dieter

    2015-11-01

    We present an unexpected regime of resonant bubble oscillations on a thin metal film submerged in water, which is continuously heated with a focused CW laser. The oscillatory bubble dynamics reveals a remarkably stable frequency of several 100 kHz and is resolved from the side using video recordings at 1 million frames per second. The emitted sound is measured simultaneously and shows higher harmonics. Once the laser is switched on the water in contact with the metal layer is superheated and an explosively expanding cavitation bubble is generated. However, after the collapse a microbubble is nucleated from the bubble remains which displays long lasting oscillations. Generally, pinch-off from of the upper part of the microbubble is observed generating a continuous stream of small gas bubbles rising upwards. The cavitation expansion, collapse, and the jetting of gas bubbles are detected by the hydrophone and are correlated to the high speed video. We find the bubble oscillation frequency is dependent on the bubble size and surface tension. A preliminary model based on Marangoni flow and heat transfer can explain the high flow velocities observed, yet the origin of bubble oscillation is currently not well understood.

  12. Evolutionary routes to stable ownership.

    PubMed

    Hare, D; Reeve, H K; Blossey, B

    2016-06-01

    Ownership can evolve in potentially any species. Drawing on insights from across disciplines, we distinguish between possession and ownership and present species-neutral criteria for ownership, defined as respect for possession. We use a variant of the tug-of-war evolutionary game to demonstrate how ownership can evolve in the form of a new, biologically realistic strategy, Restraint With Retaliation (RWR). In our game, resource holding potential (RHP) is assumed to be equal between interactants, and resource holding asymmetry determines whether ownership is adaptive. RWR will be evolutionarily stable when the ratio of resource holdings between interactants is relatively low, but not when this ratio is sufficiently high. We offer RWR as one evolutionary route to ownership among many, and discuss how ownership unites previously described behavioural phenomena across taxa. We propose that some but not all mechanisms of territory formation and maintenance can be considered ownership, and show that territories are not the only resources that can be owned. We argue that ownership can be a powerful cooperative solution to tragedies of the commons and problems of collective action throughout the biological world. We advance recent scholarship that has begun to investigate the biological importance of ownership, and we call for a comprehensive account of its evolutionary logic and taxonomic distribution. We propose that ownership should be considered a fundamental, unifying biological phenomenon. PMID:26991035

  13. Localized temperature stability of low temperature cofired ceramics

    DOEpatents

    Dai, Steven Xunhu

    2013-11-26

    The present invention is directed to low temperature cofired ceramic modules having localized temperature stability by incorporating temperature coefficient of resonant frequency compensating materials locally into a multilayer LTCC module. Chemical interactions can be minimized and physical compatibility between the compensating materials and the host LTCC dielectrics can be achieved. The invention enables embedded resonators with nearly temperature-independent resonance frequency.

  14. General Achievement Trends: South Dakota

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  15. The Process of Science Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papanastasiou, Constantinos; Papanastasiou, Elena C.

    2002-01-01

    Investigates the science achievement of 8th grade students in Cyprus by using a structural equation model with three exogenous constructs--family's educational background, reinforcements, and school climate, and three endogenous constructs--teaching, student attitudes, and achievement. Proposes a model for the effects of family, school, student…

  16. Examination Regimes and Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cosentino de Cohen, Clemencia

    2010-01-01

    Examination regimes at the end of secondary school vary greatly intra- and cross-nationally, and in recent years have undergone important reforms often geared towards increasing student achievement. This research presents a comparative analysis of the relationship between examination regimes and student achievement in the OECD. Using a micro…

  17. School Size and Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riggen, Vicki

    2013-01-01

    This study examined whether a relationship between high school size and student achievement exists in Illinois public high schools in reading and math, as measured by the Prairie State Achievement Exam (PSAE), which is administered to all Illinois 11th-grade students. This study also examined whether the factors of socioeconomic status, English…

  18. Motivational Factors in School Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maehr, Martin L.

    A summary is presented of the literature on motivation relating to achievement in the classroom. Special attention is given to how values, ideology, and various cultural patterns may serve to enhance motivation to achieve in the classroom. In considering what determines motivation and personal investment in educational pursuits, the following…

  19. Parental Involvement and Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwin, Sarah Christine

    2015-01-01

    This research study examined the correlation between student achievement and parent's perceptions of their involvement in their child's schooling. Parent participants completed the Parent Involvement Project Parent Questionnaire. Results slightly indicated parents of students with higher level of achievement perceived less demand or invitations…

  20. General Achievement Trends: New Jersey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…