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  1. Determinants of Success and Failure in Prehospital Endotracheal Intubation

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Lucas A.; Gallet, Charles G.; Kolb, Logan J.; Lohse, Christine M.; Russi, Christopher S.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction This study aimed to identify factors associated with successful endotracheal intubation (ETI) by a multisite emergency medical services (EMS) agency. Methods We collected data from the electronic prehospital record for all ETI attempts made from January through May 2010 by paramedics and other EMS crew members at a single multistate agency. If documentation was incomplete, the study team contacted the paramedic. Paramedics use the current National Association of EMS Physicians definition of an ETI attempt (laryngoscope blade entering the mouth). We analyzed patient and EMS factors affecting ETI. Results During 12,527 emergent ambulance responses, 200 intubation attempts were made in 150 patients. Intubation was successful in 113 (75%). A crew with paramedics was more than three times as likely to achieve successful intubation as a paramedic/emergency medical technician-Basic crew (odds ratio [OR], 3.30; p=0.03). A small tube (≤7.0 inches) was associated with a more than 4-fold increased likelihood of successful ETI compared with a large tube (≥7.5 inches) (OR, 4.25; p=0.01). After adjustment for these features, compared with little or no view of the glottis, a partial or entire view of the glottis was associated with a nearly 13-fold (OR, 12.98; p=0.001) and a nearly 40-fold (OR, 39.78; p<0.001) increased likelihood of successful intubation, respectively. Conclusion Successful ETI was more likely to be accomplished when a paramedic was partnered with another paramedic, when some or all of the glottis was visible and when a smaller endotracheal tube was used. PMID:27625734

  2. Determinants of Success and Failure in Prehospital Endotracheal Intubation

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Lucas A.; Gallet, Charles G.; Kolb, Logan J.; Lohse, Christine M.; Russi, Christopher S.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction This study aimed to identify factors associated with successful endotracheal intubation (ETI) by a multisite emergency medical services (EMS) agency. Methods We collected data from the electronic prehospital record for all ETI attempts made from January through May 2010 by paramedics and other EMS crew members at a single multistate agency. If documentation was incomplete, the study team contacted the paramedic. Paramedics use the current National Association of EMS Physicians definition of an ETI attempt (laryngoscope blade entering the mouth). We analyzed patient and EMS factors affecting ETI. Results During 12,527 emergent ambulance responses, 200 intubation attempts were made in 150 patients. Intubation was successful in 113 (75%). A crew with paramedics was more than three times as likely to achieve successful intubation as a paramedic/emergency medical technician-Basic crew (odds ratio [OR], 3.30; p=0.03). A small tube (≤7.0 inches) was associated with a more than 4-fold increased likelihood of successful ETI compared with a large tube (≥7.5 inches) (OR, 4.25; p=0.01). After adjustment for these features, compared with little or no view of the glottis, a partial or entire view of the glottis was associated with a nearly 13-fold (OR, 12.98; p=0.001) and a nearly 40-fold (OR, 39.78; p<0.001) increased likelihood of successful intubation, respectively. Conclusion Successful ETI was more likely to be accomplished when a paramedic was partnered with another paramedic, when some or all of the glottis was visible and when a smaller endotracheal tube was used.

  3. Intubation Success through I-Gel® and Intubating Laryngeal Mask Airway® Using Flexible Silicone Tubes: A Randomised Noninferiority Trial

    PubMed Central

    Bhardwaj, Neerja; Sen, Indu Mohini; Sondekoppam, Rakesh V.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. The study aims to test whether flexible silicone tubes (FST) improve performance and provide similar intubation success through I-Gel as compared to ILMA. Our trial is registered in CTRI and the registration number is “CTRI/2016/06/006997.” Methods. One hundred and twenty ASA status I-II patients scheduled for elective surgical procedures needing tracheal intubation were randomised to endotracheal intubation using FST through either I-Gel or ILMA. In the ILMA group (n = 60), intubation was attempted through ILMA using FST and, in the I-Gel group (n = 60), FST was inserted through I-Gel airway. Results. Successful intubation was achieved in 36.67% (95% CI 24.48%–48.86%) on first attempt through I-Gel (n = 22/60) compared to 68.33% (95% CI 56.56%–80.1%) in ILMA (n = 41/60) (p = 0.001). The overall intubation success rate was also lower with I-Gel group [58.3% (95% CI 45.82%–70.78%); n = 35] compared to ILMA [90% (95% CI 82.41%–97.59%); n = 54] (p < 0.001). The number of attempts, ease of intubation, and time to intubation were longer with I-Gel compared to ILMA. There were no differences in the other secondary outcomes. Conclusion. The first pass success rate and overall success of FST through an I-Gel airway were inferior to those of ILMA. PMID:27478436

  4. Video laryngoscopy improves intubation success and reduces esophageal intubations compared to direct laryngoscopy in the medical intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Tracheal intubation in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) can be challenging as patients often have anatomic and physiologic characteristics that make intubation particularly difficult. Video laryngoscopy (VL) has been shown to improve first attempt success compared to direct laryngoscopy (DL) in many clinical settings and may be an option for ICU intubations. Methods All intubations performed in this academic medical ICU during a 13-month period were entered into a prospectively collected quality control database. After each intubation, the operator completed a standardized form evaluating multiple aspects of the intubation including: patient demographics, difficult airway characteristics (DACs), method and device(s) used, medications used, outcomes and complications of each attempt. Primary outcome was first attempt success. Secondary outcomes were grade of laryngoscopic view, ultimate success, esophageal intubations, and desaturation. Multivariate logistic regression was performed for first attempt and ultimate success. Results Over the 13-month study period (January 2012-February 2013), a total of 234 patients were intubated using VL and 56 patients were intubated with DL. First attempt success for VL was 184/234 (78.6%; 95% CI 72.8 to 83.7) while DL was 34/56 patients (60.7%; 95% CI 46.8 to 73.5). Ultimate success for VL was 230/234 (98.3%; 95% CI 95.1 to 99.3) while DL was 52/56 patients (91.2%; 95% CI 81.3 to 97.2). In the multivariate regression model, VL was predictive of first attempt success with an odds ratio of 7.67 (95% CI 3.18 to 18.45). VL was predictive of ultimate success with an odds ratio of 15.77 (95% CI 1.92 to 129). Cormack-Lehane I or II view occurred 199/234 times (85.8%; 95% CI 79.5 to 89.1) and a median POGO (Percentage of Glottic Opening) of 82% (IQR 60 to 100) with VL, while Cormack-Lehane I or II view occurred 34/56 times (61.8%; 95% CI 45.7 to 71.9) and a median POGO of 45% (IQR 0 to 78%) with DL. VL reduced the esophageal

  5. [Successful surgical treatment of tracheal rupture caused by endotracheal intubation].

    PubMed

    Baranyai, Zsolt; Kocsis, Akos; Jósa, Valéria

    2010-06-01

    Rupture of the trachea is a rare complication of endotracheal intubation. The most common cause of the injury is the overinflation of the cuff. The authors present the case of a 45-year-old male in whom a 6 cm long trachea lesion was perceived during the operation due to a meso-hypopharyngeal tumor. Primary intervention resulted in successful reconstruction and full recovery. The case demonstrates the importance of prompt diagnosis and adequate therapy that helped in preventing an assumingly life-long complication or even death.

  6. Evaluation of the Effect of Tracheal Tube Orientation on Success of Intubation through Intubating Laryngeal Mask Airway

    PubMed Central

    Chhatrapati, Swati; Auti, Subhhash Sadashiv; Aswar, Swapnil Ganesh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Polyvinyl Chloride Endotracheal Tube (PVC ETT) can be used as an alternative to Fastrach Silicone Wire-Reinforced Tube (FTST) for intubation through Intubating Laryngeal Mask Airway (ILMA) as the latter is expensive and has low volume high pressure cuff. Aim To evaluate the effects of orientation of PVC ETT (normal curve and reverse curve) on the success of intubation through ILMA, haemodynamic response and postoperative sore throat. Materials and Methods Sixty healthy adult patients of ASA physical status I & II scheduled for elective surgery under general anaesthesia requiring endotracheal intubation were randomly divided into two groups. In Normal (N) group (n=30), the tracheal tube was inserted with its natural curve following the 90° curvature of ILMA. In Reverse (R) group (n=30), the tracheal tube was inserted with its natural curve directed opposite to the curvature of ILMA. The time taken to intubate, number of attempts, and maneuvers required for successful endotracheal intubation along with haemodynamics and oxygen saturation were noted. Postoperative sore throat was evaluated using a Verbal Analogue Scale (VAS) (0-10). Qualitative data was analysed by Chi-Square test and Fisher’s exact test. Quantitative data was analysed by unpaired t-test and Mann-Whitney test. Results Placement of ILMA was successful in all patients. Total Intubation Time (mean±SD) in Group N was 12.53±1.78 seconds and in Group R was 11.97±1.33 seconds (p>0.05). Tracheal intubation through ILMA was successful in all patients. First attempt success rate in R Group (26 patients, 86.7%) was higher than N Group (22 patients, 73.3%) (p>0.05). Four patients (13.3%) in R Group and 8 patients (26.7%) in N Group required 2nd step of Chandy’s maneuver during second attempt for successful intubation. Incidence of sore throat 6 hours postoperatively was statistically significant (median value 2.00 in N Group vs. 0.00 in R Group) between two groups. Conclusion PVC ETT with

  7. A randomized comparison of the use of an optical compared with a rigid laryngoscope on the success rate of novices performing tracheal intubation.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Gildasio S; Fitzgerald, Paul C; Beckerly, Rena; McCarthy, Robert J

    2011-03-01

    Proficiency in tracheal intubation is a difficult skill to acquire, especially when using a rigid laryngoscope. We compared success in tracheal intubation by novices using an optical laryngoscope with that achieved with a rigid laryngoscope. After structured training in laryngoscopy and 5 consecutive successful intubation attempts using both the optical and rigid laryngoscope on a high-fidelity mannequin, trainees were randomly assigned to perform their first 2 tracheal intubations using either an optical or rigid laryngoscope using the standard Macintosh blade. The success rate for intubation was higher using the optical laryngoscope (23 of 30 attempts) compared with the rigid laryngoscope (8 of 30 attempts, P < 0.001). Intubation time was shorter using the optical laryngoscope (35 seconds; 95% confidence interval, 27-44 seconds) compared with the rigid laryngoscope (75 seconds; 95% confidence interval, 59-90 seconds) in successfully intubated patients (P < 0.001). Our study demonstrated greater successful tracheal intubation and reduced intubation time during the first two attempted intubations by novices using an optical compared with a rigid laryngoscope. PMID:21233492

  8. The Importance of First Pass Success When Performing Orotracheal Intubation in the Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Sakles, John C.; Chiu, Stephen; Mosier, Jarrod; Walker, Corrine; Stolz, Uwe

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The goal of this study was to determine the association of first pass success with the incidence of adverse events (AEs) during emergency department (ED) intubations. Methods This was a retrospective analysis of prospectively collected continuous quality improvement data based on orotracheal intubations performed in an academic ED over a 4-year period. Following each intubation, the operator completed a data form regarding multiple aspects of the intubation, including patient and operator characteristics, method of intubation, device used, the number of attempts required, and AEs. Numerous AEs were tracked and included events such as witnessed aspiration, oxygen desaturation, esophageal intubation, hypotension, dysrhythmia, and cardiac arrest. Multivariable logistic regression was used to assess the relationship between the primary predictor variable of interest, first pass success, and the outcome variable, the presence of one or more AEs, after controlling for various other potential risk factors and confounders. Results Over the 4-year study period, there were 1,828 orotracheal intubations. If the intubation was successful on the first attempt, the incidence of one or more AEs was 14.2% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 12.4% to 16.2%). In cases requiring two attempts, the incidence of one or more AEs was 47.2% (95% CI = 41.8% to 52.7%); in cases requiring three attempts, the incidence of one or more AEs was 63.6% (95% CI = 53.7% to 72.6%); and in cases requiring four or more attempts, the incidence of one or more AEs was 70.6% (95% CI = 56.2.3% to 82.5%). Multivariable logistic regression showed that more than one attempt at tracheal intubation was a significant predictor of one or more AEs (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 7.52, 95% CI = 5.86 to 9.63). Conclusions When performing orotracheal intubation in the ED, first pass success is associated with a relatively small incidence of AEs. As the number of attempts increases, the incidence of AEs increases

  9. Comparison of success rate of intubation through Air-Q with ILMA using two different endotracheal tubes

    PubMed Central

    Malhotra, SK; Bharath, KV; Saini, Vikas

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Air-Q™ is a newly introduced airway device, which can be used to facilitate endotracheal intubation. The primary aim of this study was to assess whether use of two different endotracheal tubes (ETTs) (standard polyvinyl chloride [PVC] and reinforced PVC) increases the success rate of blind intubation through Air-Q™ (Group Q) when compared with intubating laryngeal mask airway (ILMA- Fastrach™) keeping ILMA as control (Group I). Methods: One hundred and twenty patients aged between 18 and 60 years with American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status I-II, undergoing elective surgery under general anaesthesia, were enrolled into this prospective, randomised, case–control study to compare the success rate of tracheal intubation between ILMA (Fastrach™) and Air-Q™ intubating laryngeal airway. Those patients with anticipated difficult airway were excluded from the study. All the recruited patients completed the study. Reinforced PVC ETT was used in both airway devices to secure intubation. Since standard PVC tube is recommended for use in Air-Q, when first intubation attempt failed, second or third attempt was made with standard PVC ETT. Total of three attempts were made for each procedure: Whereas in ILMA group, only reinforced tube was used in all three attempts. Results: The overall success rate after three attempts was more with Air-Q (96.6%) in our study compared with ILMA (91.6%) but no significant difference was seen between the groups (P = 0.43). Conclusion: The present study shows that when intubation with reinforced tube fails, the success rate with use of conventional PVC tube is more with Air-Q when compared with ILMA. PMID:27141106

  10. Helping Rural Schools Achieve Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Susan

    2003-01-01

    Senator Collins of Maine plans to fight for proper federal funding of the Rural Education Achievement Program (REAP) that allows rural schools to combine federal funding sources. Collins, and Senator Dianne Feinstein, will soon introduce legislation that will eliminate inequities in the current Social Security law that penalize teachers and other…

  11. Teaching for Successful Intelligence Raises School Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sternberg, Robert J.; Torff, Bruce; Grigorenko, Elena

    1998-01-01

    A "successful intelligence" intervention improved school achievement for a group of 225 ethnically diverse third-graders, both on performance assessments measuring analytical, creative, and practical achievements and on conventional multiple-choice memory assessments. Teaching for triarchic thinking facilitates factual recall, because learning…

  12. Implementing Strategies to Achieve Successful Student Transitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Regional Education Board (SREB), 2010

    2010-01-01

    This is the fourth in a series of eight newsletters highlighting best practices presented at the 2009 HSTW Staff Development Conference in Atlanta. These newsletters contain information about successful actions schools across the nation are taking to join hands-on and heads-on learning in ways that increase student motivation and achievement. This…

  13. Achieving success: moving beyond the comfort level.

    PubMed

    Manji, I

    1993-11-01

    Understanding the stages of growth, saturation and transition is the first step to setting meaningful career goals. While this concept is fairly new in dentistry, it is not new in other commercial enterprises. Business managers and owners have known for decades that growth stagnates after a period of time. At that point, a new infusion of energy and a reformation of the business's objectives and methods are needed to launch forward into the next phase of growth. Transition management in dentistry represents periods of growth that are followed by saturation and a comparatively rapid changeover to a new practice form. Saturation occurs when the clinical capacity of a practice is exceeded by the needs of a growing patient base. The key transitions in the career of a dentist are those from school to practising, and practising to retirement. A great number of dentists (due to low motivation, the comfort level or poor management skills) never reach the saturation point during their practising career. For these dentists, starting out and retirement are the only transitions that will ever apply to them. Dentists evaluating transition options must first identify which career stage they belong to since their objectives will be different at each stage. Dentists in the growth phase should focus on practice management and achieving saturation before attempting a transition. Since transitions like start-up, retirement, partnerships, associateships and buy-ins have pivotal roles in the life cycle of a practice, transitions must be managed carefully to achieve successful results.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Achieving Successful School-University Collaboration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borthwick, Arlene C.; Stirling, Terry; Nauman, April D.; Cook, Dale L.

    2003-01-01

    Investigated essential elements required to establish and maintain successful school-university partnerships as reported by principals, teachers, and university coordinators involved in both voluntary and mandated partnerships. Results identified five factors representing different perspectives on key elements for successful partnerships, with…

  15. Neurotic Fear of Success, Fear of Failure and Need Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boardman, Susan K.; And Others

    Neurotic fear of success is conceptually connected to achievement motivation and achievement related conflicts. To investigate the relationship between individuals identified as success-fearers, or failure-fearers, and those high in achievement motivation, 426 college students completed Cohen's Fear of Success Scale, Mandler-Sarason's Test Anxiety…

  16. Leadership Strategies: Achieving Personal and Professional Success.

    PubMed

    Menaker, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    Physicians and allied health staff in healthcare are finding themselves in situations characterized by uncertainty, chaos, and ambiguity, with high levels of burnout. A major influence is an aging U.S. population, resulting in increasing cost and reimbursement pressures. Medical group practices need leaders who have the capability to thrive in this environment. This article presents an integrated leadership model offering strategies and insights gained from keeping a journal for 40 years. Strategies to be shared include leading self through learning, leading others by developing relationships, leading organizations by achieving excellence, and achieving work-life integration and synergy. PMID:27443052

  17. Achieving Successful School-University Collaboration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borthwick, Arlene C.; Stirling, Terry; Cook, Dale

    This study investigated participant perceptions of essential elements for establishing and maintaining successful school-university partnerships for school improvement, noting differences in perceptions of participants involved in voluntary partnerships versus those involved in partnerships required by the school district (schools placed on…

  18. The Australian Incident Monitoring Study. Difficult intubation: an analysis of 2000 incident reports.

    PubMed

    Williamson, J A; Webb, R K; Szekely, S; Gillies, E R; Dreosti, A V

    1993-10-01

    The first 2000 incidents reported to the Australian Incident Monitoring Study were analysed with respect to the incidence and circumstances of problems with endotracheal intubation; 85 (4%) indicated difficulties with intubation. One third of these were emergency cases, one third involved an initially unassisted trainee and one fifth were outside normal working hours. Failure to predict a difficult intubation was reported in one third of the cases, with another quarter presenting serious difficulty despite preoperative prediction. Difficulties with ventilation were experienced in 1 in 7 of the 85 reports; there was one cardiac arrest, but no death. Endotracheal intubation was not achieved in one fifth of the cases. The commonest complications reported amongst the 85 incidents were oesophageal intubation (18 cases), arterial desaturation (15 cases), and reflux of gastric contents (7 cases). Emergency trans-tracheal airways were required in 5 cases. Obesity, limited neck mobility and mouth opening, and inadequate assistance together accounted for two thirds of all the contributing factors. The most successful intubation aid in this series was a gum elastic bougie. A capnograph contributed to management in 28% and a pulse oximeter in 12% of the cases in which they were used. The most serious desaturations were associated with accidental oesophageal intubation. These data suggest a lack of reliable preoperative assessment techniques and skills for the prediction of difficult intubations. They also suggest the need for a greater emphasis on ensuring that the necessary equipment is available, and on teaching and learning drills for difficult intubation and any associated difficulty with ventilation.

  19. Helping Students Improve Academic Achievement and School Success Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brigman, Greg; Campbell, Chari

    2003-01-01

    This article describes a study evaluating the impact of school-counselor-led interventions on student academic achievement and school success behavior. A group counseling and classroom guidance model called student success skills (SSS) was the primary intervention. The focus of the SSS model was on three sets of skills identified in several…

  20. The Relationship Between Simultaneous-Successive Processing and Academic Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merritt, Frank M.; McCallum, R. Steve

    1984-01-01

    Investigates the relationship between simultaneous-successive information processing and academic achievement among 157 college students. Notes that high levels of simultaneous and successive processing are related systematically to high grade-point averages and that higher simultaneous processing apparently is related to high ACT performance. (SB)

  1. Dexmedetomidine premedication for fiberoptic intubation in patients of temporomandibular joint ankylosis: A randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Kumkum; Jain, Manish; Gupta, Prashant K.; Rastogi, Bhawna; Saxena, Sanjeev K.; Manngo, Aman

    2012-01-01

    Background: Fiberoptic intubation is the gold standard technique for difficult airway management in patients of temporomandibular joint. This study was aimed to evaluate the clinical efficacy and safety of dexmedetomidine as premedication with propofol infusion for fiberoptic intubation. Methods: Consent was obtained from 46 adult patients of temporomandibular joint ankylosis, scheduled for gap arthroplasty. They were enrolled for thisdouble-blind, randomized, prospective clinical trial with two treatment groups – Group D and Group P, of 23 patients each. Group D patients had received premedication of dexmedetomidine 1 μg/kg infused over 10 min followed by sedative propofol infusion and the control Group P patients were given only propofol infusion to achieve sedation. Condition achieved at endoscopy, intubating conditions, hemodynamic changes and postoperative events were evaluated as primary outcome. Results: The fiberoptic intubation was successful with satisfactory endoscopic and intubating condition in all patients. Dexmedetomidine premedication has provided satisfactory conditions for fiberoptic intubation and attenuated the hemodynamic response of fiberoptic intubation than the propofol group. Conclusion: Fiberoptic intubation was found to be easier with dexmedetomidine premedication along with sedative infusion of propofol with complete amnesia of the procedure, hemodynamic stability and preservation of patent airway. PMID:23162393

  2. Building Capability, Empowering Students, and Achieving Success: The Financial Empowerment for Student Success Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broun, Dan

    2014-01-01

    The Financial Empowerment for Student Success (FESS) Initiative was a two-year initiative focused on increasing student success through the provision of financial services. Achieving the Dream, Inc. and MDC, Inc. joined together, with funding from the Bank of America Charitable Foundation, to support three Achieving the Dream Leader Colleges to…

  3. The Intubating Laryngeal Mask Airway Facilitates Tracheal Intubation in the Lateral Position

    PubMed Central

    Komatsu, Ryu; Nagata, Osamu; Sessler, Daniel I.; Ozaki, Makoto

    2005-01-01

    Although the difficulty of tracheal intubation in the lateral position has not been systematically evaluated, airway loss during surgery in a laterally positioned patient may have hazardous consequences. We explored whether the intubating laryngeal mask airway (ILMA) facilitates tracheal intubation in patients with normal airway anatomy, i.e., Mallampati grade ≤ 3 and thyromental distance ≥ 5 cm, positioned in the lateral position. And we evaluated whether this technique can be used as a rescue when the airway is lost mid-case in laterally positioned patients with respect to success rate and intubation time. Anesthesia was induced with propofol, fentanyl, and vecuronium in 50 patients undergoing spine surgery for lumbar disk herniation (Lateral) and 50 undergoing other surgical procedures (Supine). Patients having disk surgery (Lateral) were positioned on their right or left sides before induction of general anesthesia, and intubation was performed in that position. Patients in control group (Supine) were anesthetized in supine position, and intubation was performed in that position. Intubation was performed blindly via an ILMA in both groups. The time required for intubation and number and types of adjusting maneuvers employed were recorded. Data were compared by Mann-Whitney U, Fisher’s exact, chi-square, or unpaired t-tests, as appropriate. Data presented as mean (SD). Demographic and airway measures were similar in the two groups, except for mouth opening which was slightly wider in patients in the lateral position: 5.1 (0.9) vs. 4.6 (0.7) cm. The time required for intubation was similar in each group (≈25 s), as was intubation success (96%). We conclude that blind intubation via an ILMA offers a frequent success rate and a clinically acceptable intubation time (< one min) even in the lateral position. Summary Blind intubation via the intubating laryngeal mask airway (ILMA) offers a high success rate and a clinically acceptable intubation time even in

  4. An economical model for mastering the art of intubation with different video laryngoscopes.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, Jitin N

    2014-07-01

    Video laryngoscope (VL) provides excellent laryngeal exposure in patients when anaesthesiologists encounter difficulty with direct laryngoscopy. Videolaryngoscopy, like flexible fibreoptic laryngoscopy demands a certain level of training by practitioners to become dexterous at successful intubation with a given instrument. Due to their cost factors, VLs are not easily available for training purposes to all the students, paramedics and emergency medical services providers in developing countries. We tried to develop a cost-effective instrument, which can work analogous to various available VLs. An inexpensive and easily available instrument was used to create an Airtraq Model for VL guided intubation training on manikin. Using this technique, successful intubation of manikin could be achieved. The Airtraq Model mimics the Airtraq Avant(®) and may be used for VL guided intubation training for students as well as paramedics, and decrease the time and shorten the learning curve for Airtraq(®) as well as various other VLs.

  5. Air-Q intubating laryngeal airway: A study of the second generation supraglottic airway device

    PubMed Central

    Attarde, Viren Bhaskar; Kotekar, Nalini; Shetty, Sarika M

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Air-Q intubating laryngeal mask airway (ILA) is used as a supraglottic airway device and as a conduit for endotracheal intubation. This study aims to assess the efficacy of the Air-Q ILA regarding ease of insertion, adequacy of ventilation, rate of successful intubation, haemodynamic response and airway morbidity. Methods: Sixty patients presenting for elective surgery at our Medical College Hospital were selected. Following adequate premedication, baseline vital parameters, pulse rate and blood pressure were recorded. Air-Q size 3.5 for patients 50-70 kg and size 4.5 for 70-100 kg was selected. After achieving adequate intubating conditions, Air-Q ILA was introduced. Confirming adequate ventilation, appropriate sized endotracheal tube was advanced through the Air-Q blindly to intubate the trachea. Placement of the endotracheal tube in trachea was confirmed. Results: Air-Q ILA was successfully inserted in 88.3% of patients in first attempt and 11.7% patients in second attempt. Ventilation was adequate in 100% of patients. Intubation was successful in 76.7% of patients with Air-Q ILA. 23.3% of patients were intubated by direct laryngoscopy following failure with two attempts using Air-Q ILA. Post-intubation the change in heart rate was statistically significant (P < 0.0001). 10% of patients were noted to have a sore throat and 5% of patients had mild airway trauma. Conclusion: Air-Q ILA is a reliable device as a supraglottic airway ensuring adequate ventilation as well as a conduit for endotracheal intubation. It benefits the patient by avoiding the stress of direct laryngoscopy and is also superior alternative device for use in a difficult airway. PMID:27212722

  6. A flexible solution for emergency intubation difficulties.

    PubMed

    Nocera, A

    1996-05-01

    The inability to correctly position the patient may cause difficulty during oral endotracheal intubation. Examples of such circumstances include cases of suspected cervical spine injury and cases of restricted access to the patient in the prehospital environment. The Eschmann tracheal tube introducer, more commonly called the "gum elastic bougie", is a valuable aid to oral intubation. The case reported herein, of a successful bougie-assisted oral intubation in the prehospital setting, highlights the usefulness of the technique. Physicians considering the use of the gum elastic bougie for intubation difficulties after rapid sequence induction should seek specific training in the use of the instrument.

  7. Achieving esthetic success while avoiding extensive tooth reduction.

    PubMed

    McMaster, Douglas E

    2014-06-01

    This case report demonstrates the importance of both careful diagnosis and thorough patient education when planning treatment for a worn and actively chipping dentition. At presentation, the patient had assumed that porcelain crowns would be needed to restore her teeth. Historically, her wear had been attributed to nocturnal bruxism. However, after a diagnostic work-up, her attrition was determined to be the result of an aberrant tooth position, which resulted in a constricted envelope of function. This diagnosis provided the opportunity to orthodontically reposition the teeth, and then achieve normal function and esthetic success with either indirect porcelain adhesively retained or additive direct resin restorations instead of more invasive, cohesively retained porcelain crowns. During orthodontic treatment, the teeth were restored with direct resin. No further restorative treatment was needed. This case has been successful for more than 6 years post-treatment, without the use of a protective appliance.

  8. Complications of tracheal intubation in critically ill pediatric cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, Suhail Sarwar; Janarthanan, S.; Harish, M. M.; Chaudhari, Harish; Prabu, R. Natesh; Divatia, Jigeeshu V.; Kulkarni, Atul Prabhakar

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: The oncologists are treating cancer more aggressively, leading to increase in number of pediatric admissions to the ICU. Due to anatomical and physiological differences, pediatric patients are at high risk of complications during intubation. We evaluated the incidence of complications during intubations in pediatric patients in our ICU. Subjects and Methods: We performed retrospective analysis of complications occurring during intubation in 42 pediatric patients. All intubations were orotracheal. We recorded number of attempts at intubation, need for use of intubation adjuncts and complications during laryngoscopy and intubation. The incidence of difficult intubation, hypoxia, and severe cardiovascular collapse was also noted. Results: Complications occurred during 13 (31%) intubations. Hypoxia and severe cardiovascular collapse occurred in during 7 (16.7%) intubations each, while 4 patients (9.5%) (n=4) had cardiac arrest during intubation. Thirty three (78.6%) intubations were successful in first attempt and difficult intubation was recorded in 4 patients. Conclusion: Critically ill pediatric cancer patients have a high rate of complications during intubation. PMID:27555695

  9. Attitudes, achievement and success accompanying general chemistry curriculum changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Elizabeth Ann

    2003-10-01

    The University of Missouri-St. Louis Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry has been engaged for several years in efforts to improve the teaching of introductory chemistry, by the incorporation of techniques that have been reported in the literature of science education to have been successful at other institutions. The present study is an analysis of the extent to which these changes in pedagogy have been successful in achieving the Department's goals of decreasing attrition and improving student content knowledge. Secondarily, we wished to determine the extent to which student views about science and the learning of science were altered as a result of these changes. Analysis of data from five semesters of the courses shows that more students were successful in passing the course than before the changes, and that they possessed a higher degree of content knowledge. Additionally, most students expressed increased satisfaction with the modified course. This experiment showed that it is possible to improve retention without sacrificing student content knowledge. During the experiment, we also assessed the degree to which students changed their opinions about the nature of science and its study. It was found that student views were not substantially modified by their experiences in introductory chemistry.

  10. Evaluation of the Truview™ EVO2 laryngoscope for nasotracheal intubation

    PubMed Central

    Raveendra, U. S.; Mehandale, Sripada G.; Shetty, Sumalatha R.; Kamath, Manjunath R.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The Truview™ EVO2 laryngoscope, with its unique optical lens system and blade tip angulation, has proved its usefulness in providing adequate laryngeal exposure and intubation via the oral route. However, the same has not been evaluated for nasotracheal intubation. Aim: We evaluated the suitability of the Truview™ EVO2 laryngoscope for nasotracheal intubation. Methods: Fifty ASA grade I and II elective surgical patients were studied. Patients aged below 15 years or having difficult airway were excluded. Under standard anesthesia protocol, nasotracheal intubation was performed using a Truview™ EVO2 laryngoscope and, in cases of inability to complete intubation in three attempts, the Macintosh laryngoscope was used. Time taken for intubation, use of Magill's forceps and need for optimization maneuvers were noted. The primary outcome was percentage of successful intubation, while hemodynamic changes and duration of intubation were taken as secondary outcomes. Results: Majority (94%) could be intubated successfully with the Truview™ EVO2 laryngoscope. Average time taken for intubation was 50.1 s. The hemodynamic changes were not clinically significant. Regression analysis revealed lack of association between duration of intubation and hemodynamic changes. There were no serious complications. Conclusion: The Truview™ EVO2 laryngoscope is a useful tool in performing nasotracheal intubation, ensuring a high level of success rate among patients with normal airway anatomy. PMID:23492842

  11. The intubation scoop (i-scoop) - a new type of laryngoscope for difficult and normal airways.

    PubMed

    Raymondos, K; Seidel, T; Sander, B; Gerdes, A; Goetz, F; Helmstädter, V; Panning, B; Dieck, T

    2014-09-01

    The i-scoop is an intubation device with a curved guiding bar with laterally located lenses at its tip, rather than a blade. Twenty-five anaesthesiologists intubated a manikin that simulated first a normal and then a difficult airway. All participants were able to intubate the difficult airway with a good view of the glottis using the i-scoop. None was able to intubate using seven other laryngoscopes (Macintosh laryngoscope, GlideScope(®) GVL and AVL, McGrath(®) (Series 5/MAC), C-MAC(®) , A.P. Advance(™) ). Intubation was successful only with the Airtraq(®) (n = 10), the Airway Scope (n = 5), the C-MAC D-Blade (n = 2), the A.P. Advance DAB (n = 1) and the GlideScope DL Trainer (n = 1) (p < 0.001, success rate of i-scoop vs all 12 laryngoscopes combined). In contrast to all other videolaryngoscopes, intubation of the normal airway with the i-scoop was achieved even faster than with the Macintosh laryngoscope (p < 0.02). The i-scoop outperformed all other laryngoscopes in both difficult and normal airways, and therefore has potential as an easier and safer alternative to present devices.

  12. Malaria in Turkey: successful control and strategies for achieving elimination.

    PubMed

    Özbilgina, Ahmet; Topluoglu, Seher; Es, Saffet; Islek, Elif; Mollahaliloglu, Salih; Erkoc, Yasin

    2011-01-01

    Turkey is located in the middle of Asia, Africa and Europe, close to Caucasia, Balkans and Middle East in subtropical climate zone. Malaria has been known since the early ages of human history and it was one of the leading diseases in Anatolian history, as well. Today, chloroquine-sensitive Plasmodium vivax is the only agent of autochthonous malaria cases in Turkey. The other Plasmodium species identified are isolated from imported cases of malaria. The most common vector of malaria in Turkey is Anopheles sacharovi followed by An. superpictus, An. maculipennis and An. subalpinus. In 2009, pre-elimination stage of Malaria Program was started due to dramatic decline in the number of malaria cases in Turkey (Total, 84; 38 autochthonous cases only in 26 foci in south-eastern Anatolia, and 46 imported cases; incidence: 0.1/100,000). As there were no detected cases of new autochthonous malaria in the first 8 months of 2010, elimination stage was started. The role of the persistent policies and successful applications of the Ministry of Health, such as the strict control of the patients using anti-malarial drugs especially chloroquine, avoidance of resistant insecticides, facilitation of access to patients via Health Transformation Program (HTP), establishment of close contact with the patients' families, and improvement of reporting and surveillance system, was essential. In addition, improvement maintained in the motivations and professional rights of malaria workers, as well in the coordination of field studies and maintenance of a decline or termination in vector-to-person transmission were all achieved with the insistent policies of the Ministry of Health. Other factors that probably contributed to elimination studies include lessening of military operations in south-eastern Anatolia and the lowering of malaria cases in neighbouring countries in recent years. Free access to health services concerning malaria is still successfully conducted throughout the country

  13. A Framework for Achieving e-Business Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kumar, U.; Maheshwari, M.; Kumar, V.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents the findings of an empirical study of critical factors associated with e-business success. An a priori model relating the success factors to e-business success is developed. The study uses the "balanced scorecard" methodology to measure the success of e-business organizations, as the authors believe that financial measures are…

  14. [Difficult intubation: should follow the recommendations].

    PubMed

    Bensghir, M; Bouhabba, N; Fjouji, S; Haimeur, C; Azendour, H

    2014-03-01

    Intubation and ventilation impossible mask is a dramatic situation with potentially serious consequences. We report the case of a patient of 43 years, followed for a goiter, which was scheduled for a total thyroidectomy under general anesthesia. Preoperative evaluation is not noted signs of compression or tracheal deviation, and there were no criteria predictive of intubation or difficult mask ventilation. The induction of anesthesia was standard. Mask ventilation was effective allowing paralysis. The standard laryngoscopy showed a score of Cormack and Lehane grade IV. Several attempts at intubation were made leading to a situation of intubation and ventilation impossible mask with deep desaturation. A tracheostomy was done urgently. The patient was operated on, six months later, with a fiber optic intubation. Through this case, the authors draw attention to the difficulty of achieving an emergency tracheotomy in the presence of goiter and emphasize the need for integration of different modes of learning and retention of management skills of the upper airway.

  15. ALMA Achieves Major Milestone With Antenna-Link Success

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-03-01

    The Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), an international telescope project, reached a major milestone on March 2, when two ALMA prototype antennas were first linked together as an integrated system to observe an astronomical object. The milestone achievement, technically termed "First Fringes," came at the ALMA Test Facility (ATF) on the grounds of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory's (NRAO) Very Large Array (VLA) radio telescope in New Mexico. NRAO is a facility of the National Science Foundation (NSF), managed by Associated Universities, Incorporated (AUI). AUI also is designated by NSF as the North American Executive for ALMA. ALMA Test Facility ALMA Test Facility, New Mexico: VertexRSI antenna, left; AEC antenna, right. CREDIT: Drew Medlin, NRAO/AUI/NSF Click on image for page of graphics and full information Faint radio waves emitted by the planet Saturn were collected by the two ALMA antennas, then processed by new, state-of-the-art electronics to turn the two antennas into a single, high-resolution telescope system, called an interferometer. Such pairs of antennas are the basic building blocks of multi-antenna imaging systems such as ALMA and the VLA. In such a system, each antenna is combined electronically with every other antenna to form a multitude of pairs. Each pair contributes unique information that is used to build a highly-detailed image of the astronomical object under observation. When completed in 2012, ALMA will have 66 antennas. The successful Saturn observation began at 7:13 p.m., U.S. Mountain Time Friday (0213 UTC Saturday). The planet's radio emissions at a frequency of 104 GigaHertz (GHz) were tracked by the ALMA system for more than an hour. "Our congratulations go to the dedicated team of scientists, engineers and technicians who produced this groundbreaking achievement for ALMA. Much hard work and many long hours went into this effort, and we appreciate it all. This team should be very proud today," said NRAO

  16. CHARACTERISTICS OF SUCCESSFUL SCHOOL ACHIEVERS FROM A SEVERELY DEPRIVED ENVIRONMENT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DAVIDSON, HELEN H.; AND OTHERS

    THE FOCUS IS ON PERSONALITY TRAITS OF YOUNG CHILDREN WHO ACHIEVE IN SCHOOL DESPITE ENVIRONMENTAL HANDICAPS. THE SUBJECTS WERE TEN "GOOD" AND TEN "POOR" ACHIEVERS FROM THE FOURTH GRADE IN A SCHOOL LOCATED IN A SEVERELY DEPRESSED URBAN AREA. THE CHILDREN WERE CHOSEN ON THE BASIS OF ACHIEVEMENT SCORES AND TEACHER RECOMMENDATIONS. ALTHOUGH ALL SCORED…

  17. The Relationship between Simultaneous-Successive Processing and Academic Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merritt, Frank M.; McCallum, Steve

    The Luria-Das Information Processing Model of human learning holds that information is analysed and coded within the brain in either a simultaneous or a successive fashion. Simultaneous integration refers to the synthesis of separate elements into groups, often with spatial characteristics; successive integration means that information is…

  18. Success and Interactive Learning: Sailing toward Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Midcap, Richard; Seitzer, Joan; Holliday, Randy; Childs, Amy; Bowser, Dana

    2008-01-01

    Success and Interactive Learning's (SAIL) front-loaded retention activities and unique financial incentives have combined to improve retention, persistence, and success of first-time college students. Its effectiveness has been validated through a comparison of retention rates and aggregate quality-point averages of SAIL cohorts with those rates…

  19. Multiple Intelligences and Student Achievement: Success Stories from Six Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Linda; Campbell, Bruce

    This book examines educational programs that have used multiple intelligences (MI) theory for 5 or more years, and addresses such questions as: "How have MI programs affected student achievement?" and "Where and how were those results achieved?" Six schools (two elementary, two middle-level, and two high schools), which serve a variety of student…

  20. Achieving succession planning and implementation: one healthcare network's story.

    PubMed

    Capuano, Terry Ann; MacKenzie, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Frequent transitions in leadership can cause inefficiency, inconsistency, and lack of alignment with priorities and strategy. Retaining management talent and collaboratively planning their succession can help ensure organizational survival. Succession planning, in healthcare and other industries, addresses some of these concerns; however, there is a dearth of descriptive articles emphasizing "how to." This article demonstrates one healthcare network's comprehensive system for succession planning and implementation. Leaders looking to plan their human resource processes for organizational sustainability would be able to emulate and adapt practices for their networks.

  1. Achieving succession planning and implementation: one healthcare network's story.

    PubMed

    Capuano, Terry Ann; MacKenzie, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Frequent transitions in leadership can cause inefficiency, inconsistency, and lack of alignment with priorities and strategy. Retaining management talent and collaboratively planning their succession can help ensure organizational survival. Succession planning, in healthcare and other industries, addresses some of these concerns; however, there is a dearth of descriptive articles emphasizing "how to." This article demonstrates one healthcare network's comprehensive system for succession planning and implementation. Leaders looking to plan their human resource processes for organizational sustainability would be able to emulate and adapt practices for their networks. PMID:24409581

  2. Orchestrating ACO success: how top performers achieve shared savings.

    PubMed

    Harris, John M; Elizondo, Idette; Brown, Amanda M

    2016-03-01

    Leaders of the top-performing accountable care organizations in the Medicare Shared Savings Program attribute the success of their organizations in large part to seven strategies: Seek action-oriented leadership. Transform primary care physician practices. Keep patients out of the emergency department. Ensure all transitions are smooth. Make effective use of available data. Share information on physician performance. Keep patients engaged.

  3. Defining and Achieving Student Success: University Faculty and Student Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dean, Anne M.; Camp, William G.

    The question of how agricultural education students and faculty define and hope to foster student success was studied at a large southeastern land-grant university with a college of agriculture that included 1,497 students and 193 faculty. The study questions were explored in 2 focus groups containing a total of 7 faculty members and 8 focus…

  4. Achieving Solution Success: An Investigation of User Participation Approaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattia, Angela Marie

    2009-01-01

    User participation and its relationship to system success have been discussed in the information systems (IS) literature from many theoretical and practical perspectives. In reality, most of this discussion is grounded in empirical research that has yielded mixed results on the importance of user participation and its relationship to system…

  5. Achieving Success in Obtaining Grant Funding as a Research Scholar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cherubini, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    The process of writing successful grant proposals has received not so dubious attention in the last several decades. This article provides contextual significance resulting from a review of literature spanning 1975 to 2013. I identify essential vocabulary stemming from the literature review to familiarize the reader with the terminology associated…

  6. An Analysis of How Multicultural Adult Orphans Achieve Economic Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simonee, Saundra W.

    2014-01-01

    Successful multicultural adult orphans who were not adopted pose an interesting challenge in their history, their physical, psychological, social emotional and personal identity development. One must understand their journey from orphanhood to adulthood and their current prominent status in life to build a contextualized personal story (Banks,…

  7. Reading First: Student Achievement, Teacher Empowerment, National Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2008

    2008-01-01

    This publication highlights the Reading First program as the academic cornerstone of the No Child Left Behind Act, and cites state achievement data indicating that Reading First students from nearly every grade and subgroup have made gains in reading proficiency. Restoration of full funding for the program has been requested for Fiscal Year 2009.

  8. Orchestrating ACO success: how top performers achieve shared savings.

    PubMed

    Harris, John M; Elizondo, Idette; Brown, Amanda M

    2016-03-01

    Leaders of the top-performing accountable care organizations in the Medicare Shared Savings Program attribute the success of their organizations in large part to seven strategies: Seek action-oriented leadership. Transform primary care physician practices. Keep patients out of the emergency department. Ensure all transitions are smooth. Make effective use of available data. Share information on physician performance. Keep patients engaged. PMID:27183758

  9. Nutrigerontology: a key for achieving successful ageing and longevity.

    PubMed

    Aiello, Anna; Accardi, Giulia; Candore, Giuseppina; Carruba, Giuseppe; Davinelli, Sergio; Passarino, Giuseppe; Scapagnini, Giovanni; Vasto, Sonya; Caruso, Calogero

    2016-01-01

    During the last two centuries the average lifespan has increased at a rate of approximately 3 months/year in both sexes, hence oldest old people are becoming the population with the fastest growth in Western World. Although the average life expectancy is increasing dramatically, the healthy lifespan is not going at the same pace. This underscores the importance of studies on the prevention of age-related diseases, in order to satisfactorily decrease the medical, economic and social problems associated to advancing age, related to an increased number of individuals not autonomous and affected by invalidating pathologies. In particular, data from experimental studies in model organisms have consistently shown that nutrient signalling pathways are involved in longevity, affecting the prevalence of age-related loss of function, including age-related diseases. Accordingly, nutrigerontology is defined as the scientific discipline that studies the impact of nutrients, foods, macronutrient ratios, and diets on lifespan, ageing process, and age-related diseases. To discuss the potential relevance of this new science in the attainment of successful ageing and longevity, three original studies performed in Sicily with local foods and two reviews have been assembled in this series. Data clearly demonstrate the positive effects of nutraceuticals, functional foods and Mediterranean Diet on several biological parameters. In fact, they could represent a prevention for many age-related diseases, and, although not a solution for this social plague, at least a remedy to alleviate it. Thus, the possibility to create a dietary pattern, based on the combined strategy of the use of both nutraceuticals and functional foods should permit to create a new therapeutic strategy, based not only on a specific bioactive molecule or on a specific food but on a integrated approach that, starting from the local dietary habits, can be led to a "nutrafunctional diet" applicable worldwide. PMID

  10. Retrograde and submental intubation.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, Cyrus A; Dhaliwal, Sukhdeep S

    2010-03-01

    Direct laryngoscopy remains the technique of choice for placing an endotracheal tube (ETT). However, alternative techniques are needed for the difficult airway or unsuccessful intubation. Retrograde intubation may be used in adult or pediatric patients, whether awake, sedated, or obtunded. Contraindications include nonpalpable neck landmarks, pretracheal mass, severe flexion deformities of the neck, tracheal stenosis, coagulopathies, and infections. Submental intubation allows simultaneous access to the dental occlusion and nasal pyramid without the morbidity associated with tracheostomy. Contraindications include patients who require long periods of assisted ventilation and a severe traumatic wound on the floor of mouth. Complications include localized infection and sepsis, poor wound healing or scarring, and postoperative salivary fistula.

  11. Evaluation of a single-use intubating videoscope (Ambu aScope ™) in three airway training manikins for oral intubation, nasal intubation and intubation via three supraglottic airway devices.

    PubMed

    Scutt, S; Clark, N; Cook, T M; Smith, C; Christmas, T; Coppel, L; Crewdson, K

    2011-04-01

    We compared the Ambu aScope™ with a conventional fibrescope in two simulated settings. First, 22 volunteers performed paired oral and nasal fibreoptic intubations in three different manikins: the Laerdal Airway Trainer, Bill 1 and the Airsim (a total of 264 intubations). Second, 21 volunteers intubated the Airway Trainer manikin via three supraglottic airways: classic and intubating laryngeal mask airways and i-gel (a total of 66 intubations). Performance of the aScope was good with few failures and infrequent problems. In the first study, choice of fibrescope had an impact on the number of user-reported problems (p=0.004), and user-assessed ratings of ease of endoscopy (p<0.001) and overall usefulness (p<0.001), but not on time to intubate (p=0.19), or ease of railroading (p=0.72). The manikin chosen and route of endoscopy had more consistent effects on performance: best performance was via the nasal route in the Airway Trainer manikin. In the second study, the choice of fibrescope did not significantly affect any performance outcome (p=0.3), but there was a significant difference in the speed of intubation between the devices (p=0.02) with the i-gel the fastest intubation conduit (mean (SD) intubation time i-gel 18.5 (6.8) s, intubating laryngeal mask airway = 24.1 (11.2) s, classic laryngeal mask airway = 31.4 (32.5) s, p=0.02). We conclude that the aScope performs well in simulated fibreoptic intubation and (if adapted for untimed use) would be a useful training tool for both simulated fibreoptic intubation and conduit-assisted intubation. The choice of manikin and conduit are also important in the success of such training. This manikin study does not predict performance in humans and a clinical study is required.

  12. Obstructive Fibrinous Tracheal Pseudomembrane After Tracheal Intubation: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Hyeon Hui; Kim, Jin Woo; Kang, Ji Young; Kim, Ju Sang; Kim, Myung Sook; Kim, Seung Su; Kim, Yong Hyun; Moon, Hwa Sik

    2010-01-01

    Obstructive fibrinous tracheal pseudomembrane is a rare, but potentially fatal complication associated with endotracheal intubation. It has been known that the formation of tracheal pseudomembrane is related with intracuff pressure during endotracheal intubation or infectious cause. But in the patient described in this case, pseudomembrane formation in the trachea was associated with subglottic epithelial trauma or caustic injuries to the trachea caused by aspirated gastric contents during intubation rather than tracheal ischemia due to high cuff pressure. We report a patient with obstructive fibrinous tracheal pseudomembrane after endotracheal intubation who presented with dyspnea and stridor and was treated successfully with mechanical removal using rigid bronchoscopy. PMID:20808687

  13. The Achievement Gap: Factors That Influenced the Achievement of Successful Black Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morton, Kwame R., Sr.

    2011-01-01

    The academic underperformance of Black students when compared to their White peers has confounded educators nationwide. This discrepancy in academic performance commonly referred to as the achievement gap has become a national crisis which has led to one of the most significant educational reforms undertaken in the United States of America in the…

  14. Patients' Perceptions of the Causes of Their Success and Lack of Success in Achieving Their Potential in Spinal Cord Rehabilitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belciug, Marian P.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the patients' perception of the causes of their success and lack of success in achieving their potential in rehabilitation and their emotional reactions to the outcome of their rehabilitation. Thirty-five patients with spinal cord injury who were participating in the Rehabilitation Program at Hamilton…

  15. Electrochemically controlled in-tube solid phase microextraction of naproxen from urine samples using an experimental design.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi, Seyyed Hamid; Manbohi, Ahmad; Heydar, Kourosh Tabar

    2015-01-21

    A new in-tube solid phase microextraction approach named electrochemically controlled in-tube solid phase microextraction (EC in-tube SPME) has been reported. In this approach, in which electrochemistry and in-tube SPME were combined, the total analysis time was decreased and the sensitivity was increased. After electropolymerization of pyrrole on the inner surface of a stainless steel tube, the polypyrrole (PPy)-coated in-tube SPME was coupled on-line to high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) to achieve automated in-tube SPME-HPLC analysis. After the completion of the EC-in-tube SPME-HPLC system, the PPy-coated tube was used as a working electrode for the uptake of naproxen. It was found that the extraction efficiency could be significantly enhanced using the constant potential. Plackett-Burman design was employed for screening, to determine the variables significantly affecting the extraction efficiency. The significant factors were then optimized using a Box-Behnken design. The linear range and detection limit (S/N = 3) were 0.5-1000 and 0.07 μg L(-1), respectively. Urine samples were successfully analyzed by the proposed method.

  16. IT Project Success w\\7120 and 7123 NPRs to Achieve Project Success

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walley, Tina L.

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews management techniques to assure information technology development project success. Details include the work products, the work breakdown structure (WBS), system integration, verification and validation (IV&V), and deployment and operations. An example, the NASA Consolidated Active Directory (NCAD), is reviewed.

  17. Using Achieving the Dream to Meet Accreditation Requirements. Principles and Practices of Student Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manning, Terri Mulkins

    2009-01-01

    The fundamental concepts of Achieving the Dream--using evidence to develop and evaluate strategies for improving student learning and success--are also important to successful efforts to meet accreditation requirements. Following the Achieving the Dream approach can help community colleges organize and document improvement efforts in ways that are…

  18. Failed fibreoptic intubation: 70° rigid nasendoscope and Frova introducer to the rescue

    PubMed Central

    Vinayagam, Stalin; Prakash, MVS Satya; Kundra, Pankaj; Gopalakrishnan, Surianarayana

    2016-01-01

    Endotracheal intubation was successfully accomplished with 70° rigid nasendoscope under video guidance in two patients in whom repeated attempts to secure airway with flexible fibreoptic bronchoscope were unsuccessful. Both patients had compromised airway (laryngeal papillomatosis and a huge thyroid swelling) and were uncooperative. Frova intubating introducer was used along with 70° rigid nasendoscope to accomplish tracheal intubation under video guidance. PMID:27512168

  19. Engaging Faculty in the Achieving the Dream Initiative. Principles and Practices of Student Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birnback, Lara; Friedman, Will

    2009-01-01

    Stakeholder engagement is critical to the success of Achieving the Dream. Broad-based support for the college's student success agenda and institutional change efforts requires engaging faculty, staff, students, community members, and others in the change process. These stakeholders can bring to light critical obstacles to student success and help…

  20. The Intubating Laryngeal Mask Airway Allows Tracheal Intubation When the Cervical Spine Is Immobilized by a Rigid Collar

    PubMed Central

    Komatsu, Ryu; Nagata, Osamu; Kamata, Kotoe; Yamagata, Katsuyuki; Sessler, Daniel I.; Ozaki, Makoto

    2005-01-01

    Summary An intubating laryngeal mask airway (ILMA) facilitates tracheal intubation with the neck in neutral position, which is similar to the neck position maintained by a rigid cervical collar. However, a cervical collar virtually obliterates neck movement, even the small movements that normally facilitate airway insertion. We therefore tested the hypothesis that the ILMA facilitates tracheal intubation even in patients wearing a rigid cervical collar. In 50 cervical spine surgery patients with a rigid Philadelphia collar in place and 50 general surgery patients under general anaesthesia, we performed blind tracheal intubation via an ILMA. The time required for intubation, intubation success rate, and numbers and type of adjusting manoeuvres employed were recorded. Inter-incisor distance was significantly smaller (4.1 [0.8] cm vs. 4.6 [0.7] cm, mean [SD], P<0.01) and Mallampati scores were significantly greater (P<0.001) in the collared patients. ILMA insertion took longer (30 [25] vs. 22 [6] seconds), more patients required 2 insertion attempts (15 vs. 3; P<0.005), and ventilation adequacy with ILMA was worse (P<0.05) in collared patients. However, there were no significant differences between the collared and control patients in terms of total time required for intubation (60 [41] vs. 50 [30] seconds), number of intubation attempts, overall intubation success rate (96 vs. 98%), or the incidence of intubation complications. Blind intubation through an ILMA is thus a reasonable strategy for controlling the airway in patients who are immobilized with a rigid cervical collar, especially when urgency precludes a fiberoptic approach. PMID:15321932

  1. Why achievement motivation predicts success in business but failure in politics: the importance of personal control.

    PubMed

    Winter, David G

    2010-12-01

    Several decades of research have established that implicit achievement motivation (n Achievement) is associated with success in business, particularly in entrepreneurial or sales roles. However, several political psychology studies have shown that achievement motivation is not associated with success in politics; rather, implicit power motivation often predicts political success. Having versus lacking control may be a key difference between business and politics. Case studies suggest that achievement-motivated U.S. presidents and other world leaders often become frustrated and thereby fail because of lack of control, whereas power-motivated presidents develop ways to work with this inherent feature of politics. A reevaluation of previous research suggests that, in fact, relationships between achievement motivation and business success only occur when control is high. The theme of control is also prominent in the development of achievement motivation. Cross-national data are also consistent with this analysis: In democratic industrialized countries, national levels of achievement motivation are associated with strong executive control. In countries with low opportunity for education (thus fewer opportunities to develop a sense of personal control), achievement motivation is associated with internal violence. Many of these manifestations of frustrated achievement motivation in politics resemble authoritarianism. This conclusion is tested by data from a longitudinal study of 113 male college students, showing that high initial achievement motivation combined with frustrated desires for control is related to increases in authoritarianism (F-scale scores) during the college years. Implications for the psychology of leadership and practical politics are discussed.

  2. Efficacy of intubation performed by trainees on patients in the lateral position

    PubMed Central

    Goh, Sin Yee; Thong, Sze Ying; Chen, Yufan; Kong, Andrew Seun

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Anaesthetists may be called upon to emergently secure the airway of a laterally positioned patient. Intubating a patient’s trachea in the lateral position may be difficult due to unfamiliarity. This exploratory study aimed to investigate the success rate of lateral intubation performed by novices in a controlled setting. METHODS In this observational study, all patients who presented for elective surgery requiring the lateral position with planned lateral intubation at Singapore General Hospital were included. The trainee assigned to each patient had no prior indication of the proposed lateral intubation until the start of the case. Verbal instructions were given before the start of and during the procedure. The consultant anaesthetist in attendance could intervene at any point to prevent patient harm or if the trainee requested assistance. Time to intubation, adjuncts used and complications encountered were recorded. RESULTS A total of 44 consecutive patients were included in this study. The trainees completed 42 of the 44 lateral intubations, with 41 being successfully performed on the first attempt. All patients were intubated successfully in a lateral position within two attempts. The mean duration of intubation was 57.3 ± 36.4 seconds. There was no difference between left and right lateral intubation. Other than one episode of transient desaturation on pulse oximetry, there were no complications. CONCLUSION Lateral intubation by trainees had a high success rate when supervised by an experienced operator. Intubation of patients in unconventional positions using routine airway equipment should be included in airway training for trainees. PMID:26768062

  3. [Application of Non-intubated Anesthesia in VATS].

    PubMed

    Dai, Xiaotan; Song, Pingping; Zhang, Baijiang

    2016-05-20

    Tracheal intubation general anesthesia technique is widely used in video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) because it can improve the safety of VATS, but the complications of tracheal intubation can not be avoided. How to develop a "minimally invasive" surgery (including micro anesthesia) has become a hot topic in the field of minimally invasive surgery. Along with the progress of the anesthesia management technology and the risk management in the operation, the technology of non-intubated anesthesia was successfully applied to VATS, namely using local anesthesia to maintain patients intraoperative independent ventilation and intraoperative only mild sedation or fully conscious state of implementation of thoracoscope surgery, therefore is also called awake VATS. The anesthesia method not only reduces the anesthesia injury of tracheal intubation, but also conforms to the idea of rapid rehabilitation surgery. Based on non-intubated anesthesia in VATS in the brief history of development, the anesthesia selection, operation advantages and risks are reviewed in this paper. PMID:27215461

  4. [Application of Non-intubated Anesthesia in VATS].

    PubMed

    Dai, Xiaotan; Song, Pingping; Zhang, Baijiang

    2016-05-20

    Tracheal intubation general anesthesia technique is widely used in video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) because it can improve the safety of VATS, but the complications of tracheal intubation can not be avoided. How to develop a "minimally invasive" surgery (including micro anesthesia) has become a hot topic in the field of minimally invasive surgery. Along with the progress of the anesthesia management technology and the risk management in the operation, the technology of non-intubated anesthesia was successfully applied to VATS, namely using local anesthesia to maintain patients intraoperative independent ventilation and intraoperative only mild sedation or fully conscious state of implementation of thoracoscope surgery, therefore is also called awake VATS. The anesthesia method not only reduces the anesthesia injury of tracheal intubation, but also conforms to the idea of rapid rehabilitation surgery. Based on non-intubated anesthesia in VATS in the brief history of development, the anesthesia selection, operation advantages and risks are reviewed in this paper.

  5. Awake tracheal intubation using the Airtraq laryngoscope: a case series.

    PubMed

    Dimitriou, V K; Zogogiannis, I D; Liotiri, D G

    2009-08-01

    The Airtraq laryngoscope (AL) is a new single use indirect laryngoscope designed to facilitate tracheal intubation in anaesthetised patients either with normal or difficult airway anatomy. It is designed to provide a view of the glottis without alignment of the oral, pharyngeal and tracheal axes. We report four cases of successful awake tracheal intubation using the AL. The first case is a patient with severe ankylosing spondylitis and the other three cases with anticipated difficult airway. An awake intubation under sedation and topical airway anaesthesia was chosen. We consider that the AL can be used effectively to accomplish an awake intubation in patients with a suspected or known difficult airway and may be a useful alternative where other methods for awake intubation have failed or are not available.

  6. The Impact of Reading Success Academy on High School Reading Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burlison, Kelly; Chave, Josh

    2014-01-01

    The study explores the effectiveness of the Reading Success Academy on the reading achievement of the selected group of ninth-grade students in a comprehensive high school. We examine in what ways the Reading Success Academy may improve the reading proficiency rates and amount of reading growth of ninth-grade students. The results indicate that…

  7. Arts Achieve, Impacting Student Success in the Arts: Preliminary Findings after One Year of Implementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mastrorilli, Tara M.; Harnett, Susanne; Zhu, Jing

    2014-01-01

    The "Arts Achieve: Impacting Student Success in the Arts" project involves a partnership between the New York City Department of Education (NYCDOE) and five of the city's premier arts organizations. "Arts Achieve" provides intensive and targeted professional development to arts teachers over a three-year period. The goal…

  8. Factors Influencing Successful Achievement in Contrasting Design and Technology Activities in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkinson, Stephanie

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the relationship between such factors as learning style, gender, prior experience, and successful achievement in contrasting modules taken by a cohort of thirty design and technology trainee teachers during their degree programme at a University in the North East of England. Achievement data were collected…

  9. In-tube solid-phase microextraction coupled to capillary LC for carbamate analysis in water samples.

    PubMed

    Gou, Y; Pawliszyn, J

    2000-07-01

    Recently, the on-line sample preparation technique, intube solid-phase microextraction (SPME), was successfully implemented with a Hewlett-Packard 1100 HPLC system for analysis of carbamates in water samples. This paper describes the coupling of in-tube SPME to capillary LC and explores its utility as a sample preparation method in that format, relative to conventional LC. The Hewlett-Packard HPLC system was upgraded to a capillary LC system using commercially available accessories from LC Packings. The combination of in-tube SPME with a capillary LC system was expected to build on the merits of both in-tube SPME and the capillary LC to generate a sensitive method with an easy, effective, and efficient sample preparation. Due to the relatively large effective injection volume of the in-tube SPME technique (30-45 microL), on-column focusing was employed in order to achieve good chromatographic efficiency. Excellent sensitivity was achieved with very good method precision. For all carbamates studied, the RSD of retention time was between 0.5 and 0.8% under 4 microL/min microgradient conditions. The RSD of peak area counts was between 1.5 and 4.6%. The detection limits for all carbamates studied were less than 0.3 microg/L and, for carbaryl, just 0.02 microg/L (20 ppt). Compared with the conventional in-tube SPME/LC method, the LODs were lowered for carbaryl, propham, methiocarb, promecarb, chlorpropham, and barban, by factors of 24, 45, 42, 81, 62, and 56, respectively. The optimized method was successfully applied to the analysis of carbamates in surface water samples.

  10. Bicanalicular versus monocanalicular intubation after failed probing in congenital nasolacrimal duct obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Rajabi, Mohammad Taher; Zavarzadeh, Najmeh; Mahmoudi, Alireza; Johari, Mohammad Karim; Hosseini, Seyedeh Simindokht; Abrishami, Yalda; Rajabi, Mohammad Bagher

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the clinical outcomes of different intubation techniques in the cases of failed primary probing. METHODS This retrospective study was performed on 338 patients with the diagnosis of congenital nasolacrimal duct obstruction with age 1-4y that had failed primary probing. Intubation was performed under light sedation in operating room and the stent was left 3mo in place. Clinical outcome was investigated 3mo after tube removal. RESULTS Bicanalicular intubation method had higher complete and relative success rates compared to monocanalicular intubation (P=0.00). In addition, Monoka intubation had better outcomes compared to Masterka technique (P=0.046). No difference was found between genders but the higher the age, the better the outcomes with bicanalicular technique rather than monocanalicular. CONCLUSION Overall success rate of bicanalicular intubation is superior to monocanalicular technique especially in older ages. Also, based upon our clinical outcomes, Masterka intubation is not recommended in cases of failed probing. PMID:27803865

  11. Appropriate Head Position for Nasotracheal Intubation by Using Lightwand Device (Trachlight)

    PubMed Central

    Manabe, Yozo; Iwamoto, Shigeru; Seto, Mika; Sugiyama, Kazuna

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between the head position and the subsequent ease of nasotracheal intubation by using the lightwand device Trachlight (TL). Patients requiring nasotracheal intubation were subdivided into 3 groups according to the intubated head position (group S: sniffing position; group E: extension position; and group N: neutral position). The number of attempts, the total intubation time, and the failures of the TL intubation were recorded. Intubation difficulty by means of TL was assessed by the ordinal 6-point scale. Of the 300 patients enrolled in the study, TL intubation was successful in 91.3% of them. There was no significant difference in the success rate of the first attempt between the groups. No correlation between the ordinal scale and the head position was observed. The total intubation time and the ratio of “unsuccessful” cases were not significantly different among the 3 groups. TL is an effective alternative for patients who require nasotracheal intubation. Our study did not determine the most favorable head position for nasotracheal intubation with the TL, so we recommend that nasotracheal intubation with TL be started with the head in the neutral position and then changed to a more appropriate position, if necessary, on an individual basis. PMID:24932977

  12. Achievement motivation, anxiety and academic success in first year Master of Nursing students.

    PubMed

    McEwan, L; Goldenberg, D

    1999-07-01

    Forty-one first semester master level nursing students from three Canadian universities participated in this descriptive correlational study to identify the influence of achievement motivation and anxiety on their academic success. Academic success was determined by their first semester grade point average (GPA). Participants had high achieving tendencies (M = 73.5) and academic ability (M = 81.9), supporting Atkinson's (1957, 1964) achievement motivation theory which was used as the framework. While state anxiety was negatively correlated, trait anxiety was the only valid predictor of academic success. Academic ability and inherent anxiety had a greater potential for predicting students who would succeed, which has implications for nurse educators, administrators and researchers. However, the need to assess both cognitive and non-cognitive variables to determine master level nursing students' ability to succeed is recommended.

  13. Submental intubation in maxillofacial fracture: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    It can be challenging to create a safe airway in maxilla facial fracture and some skull surgeries. In this case study, the patient experienced jaw fractures that disturbed the dental occlusion and associated fracture of the base of the skull. Neither nasal nor oral intubation was possible based on the side effects of tracheotomy; therefore, submental intubation was applied successfully. The procedure and results are presented in the text. PMID:27429940

  14. Neurological deterioration during intubation in cervical spine disorders

    PubMed Central

    Durga, Padmaja; Sahu, Barada Prasad

    2014-01-01

    Anaesthesiologists are often involved in the management of patients with cervical spine disorders. Airway management is often implicated in the deterioration of spinal cord function. Most evidence on neurological deterioration resulting from intubation is from case reports which suggest only association, but not causation. Most anaesthesiologists and surgeons probably believe that the risk of spinal cord injury (SCI) during intubation is largely due to mechanical compression produced by movement of the cervical spine. But it is questionable that the small and brief deformations produced during intubation can produce SCI. Difficult intubation, more frequently encountered in patients with cervical spine disorders, is likely to produce greater movement of spine. Several alternative intubation techniques are shown to improve ease and success, and reduce cervical spine movement but their role in limiting SCI is not studied. The current opinion is that most neurological injuries during anaesthesia are the result of prolonged deformation, impaired perfusion of the cord, or both. To prevent further neurological injury to the spinal cord and preserve spinal cord function, minimizing movement during intubation and positioning for surgery are essential. The features that diagnose laryngoscopy induced SCI are myelopathy present on recovery, short period of unconsciousness, autonomic disturbances following laryngoscopy, cranio-cervical junction disease or gross instability below C3. It is difficult to accept or refute the claim that neurological deterioration was induced by intubation. Hence, a record of adequate care at laryngoscopy and also perioperative period are important in the event of later medico-legal proceedings. PMID:25624530

  15. Identifying Predictors of College Success through an Examination of AVID Graduates' College Preparatory Achievements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watt, Karen M.; Huerta, Jeffery J.; Alkan, Ersan

    2011-01-01

    This mixed-methods research investigates the high school college preparatory achievements and college success of 50 high school graduates who participated in Advancement Via Individual Determination (AVID) and belonged to groups underrepresented in higher education. High performance on the Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) and…

  16. Closing the Math Achievement Gap: Institutions Find Success with MyMathLab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Pearl

    2012-01-01

    Institutions find success with Pearson Education's MyMathLab. The Department of Mathematical Sciences at the University of Memphis (UM) reported a narrowing of the achievement gap between Black and White students. According to the study conducted by UM professors and titled "The Effectiveness of Blended Instruction in Postsecondary General…

  17. Indicators of Success in Achieving the El Centro College Goals, 1997-2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    El Centro Coll., Dallas, TX.

    This is a report on indicators of success in achieving community college goals at El Centro College (Texas). The report provides statistics from 1997-2000 and focuses on the progress of nine goals: (1) institutionalizing service beyond expectation--according to student satisfaction surveys, campus changes that have occurred between 1996 and 1999…

  18. The Achieving Success Everyday Group Counseling Model: Fostering Resiliency in Middle School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, Joy; Steen, Sam

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses a group counseling intervention used to develop and foster resiliency in middle school students by implementing the Achieving Success Everyday (ASE) group counseling model. The authors aimed to discover what impact this group counseling intervention, which focused on resiliency characteristics, would have on students'…

  19. Student Success Skills: An Evidence-Based Cognitive and Social Change Theory for Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lemberger, Matthew E.; Brigman, Greg; Webb, Linda; Moore, Molly M.

    2012-01-01

    An overview of the Student Success Skills program is offered, including descriptions of the curricular structure, extant research support related to SSS effectiveness for academic achievement and improved school behaviors, and a theory of change for student development. Recent research has demonstrated the value of the SSS program as it connects…

  20. Reading for Success: The Effectiveness of Literacy Interventions for Increasing Student Achievement in Core Academic Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrell, Margaret A.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this action research study was to utilize quantitative and qualitative data to measure the effects of Tier 2 and Tier 3 literacy interventions as they affect student achievement in the secondary school setting. The research questions addressed performance of students who were enrolled in Reading for Success as compared to a cohort…

  1. High School Success: An Effective Intervention for Achievement and Dropout Prevention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowder, Christopher Michael

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this mixed-design study was to use quantitative and qualitative research to explore the effects of High School Success (a course for at-risk ninth graders) and its effectiveness on student achievement, attendance, and dropout prevention. The research questions address whether there is a significant difference between at-risk ninth…

  2. Developing a Latino Mentoring Program: Project MALES (Mentoring to Achieve Latino Educational Success)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sáenz, Victor B.; Ponjuan, Luis; Segovia, Jorge, Jr.; Del Real Viramontes, José

    2015-01-01

    This chapter highlights the development of Project MALES (Mentoring to Achieve Latino Educational Success). At the center of Project MALES is a mentoring program that aims to cultivate an engaged support network for males of color at the University of Texas at Austin and across surrounding communities. Specifically, there is a discussion of the…

  3. Food for Thought, Health for Success: Pursuing Policy that Supports Student Wellness and Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groginsky, Scott; Trujillo, Tara

    2009-01-01

    As schools work to ensure that all students have the skills and competencies to succeed in work and life, and with growing expectations for success on standardized assessments at the federal, state and local levels, education leaders increasingly understand the importance of student wellness to achieving these goals. This report outlines why…

  4. Success Despite Socioeconomics: A Case Study of a High-Achieving, High-Poverty School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tilley, Thomas Brent; Smith, Samuel J.; Claxton, Russell L.

    2012-01-01

    This case study of a high-achieving, high-poverty school describes the school's leadership, culture, and programs that contributed to its success. Data were collected from two surveys (the School Culture Survey and the Vanderbilt Assessment of Leadership in Education), observations at the school site, and interviews with school personnel. The…

  5. Collaborating with Parents for Early School Success: The Achieving-Behaving-Caring Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McConaughy, Stephanie H.; Kay, Pam; Welkowitz, Julie A.; Hewitt, Kim; Fitzgerald, Martha D.

    2007-01-01

    The Achieving-Behaving-Caring (ABC) Program is an evidence-based approach to addressing the needs of elementary students at risk for emotional and behavioral difficulties and promoting successful home-school collaboration. This practical guide demonstrates how classroom teachers and parents can work together to boost individual children's…

  6. ALAS: Achievement for Latinos through Academic Success. What Works Clearinghouse Intervention Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2006

    2006-01-01

    "ALAS," an acronym for "Achievement for Latinos through Academic Success" that means "wings" in Spanish, is a middle school (or junior high school) intervention designed to address student, school, family, and community factors that affect dropping out. Each student is assigned a counselor who monitors attendance, behavior, and academic…

  7. Success in Higher Education: The Challenge to Achieve Academic Standing and Social Position

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Life, James

    2015-01-01

    When students look at their classmates in the classroom, consciously or unconsciously, they see competitors both for academic recognition and social success. How do they fit in relation to others and how do they succeed in achieving both? Traditional views on the drive to succeed and the fear of failure are well known as motivators for achieving…

  8. Achievement Motivation, Anxiety and Academic Success in First Year Master of Nursing Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McEwan, Lynn; Goldenberg, Dolly

    1999-01-01

    A study of 41 graduate nursing students found they had high achievement motivation and academic ability. Trait anxiety was the only valid predictor of academic success. Academic ability and inherent anxiety had greater potential for predicting students who would succeed. (Author/SK)

  9. Achieving professional success in US government, academia, and industry: an EMGS commentary.

    PubMed

    Poirier, Miriam C; Schwartz, Jeffrey L; Aardema, Marilyn J

    2014-08-01

    One of the goals of the EMGS is to help members achieve professional success in the fields they have trained in. Today, there is greater competition for jobs in genetic toxicology, genomics, and basic research than ever before. In addition, job security and the ability to advance in one's career is challenging, regardless of whether one works in a regulatory, academic, or industry environment. At the EMGS Annual Meeting in Monterey, CA (September, 2013), the Women in EMGS Special Interest Group held a workshop to discuss strategies for achieving professional success. Presentations were given by three speakers, each representing a different employment environment: Government (Miriam C. Poirier), Academia (Jeffrey L. Schwartz), and Industry (Marilyn J. Aardema). Although some differences in factors or traits affecting success in the three employment sectors were noted by each of the speakers, common factors considered important for advancement included networking, seeking out mentors, and developing exceptional communication skills. PMID:24788591

  10. Achieving professional success in US government, academia, and industry: an EMGS commentary.

    PubMed

    Poirier, Miriam C; Schwartz, Jeffrey L; Aardema, Marilyn J

    2014-08-01

    One of the goals of the EMGS is to help members achieve professional success in the fields they have trained in. Today, there is greater competition for jobs in genetic toxicology, genomics, and basic research than ever before. In addition, job security and the ability to advance in one's career is challenging, regardless of whether one works in a regulatory, academic, or industry environment. At the EMGS Annual Meeting in Monterey, CA (September, 2013), the Women in EMGS Special Interest Group held a workshop to discuss strategies for achieving professional success. Presentations were given by three speakers, each representing a different employment environment: Government (Miriam C. Poirier), Academia (Jeffrey L. Schwartz), and Industry (Marilyn J. Aardema). Although some differences in factors or traits affecting success in the three employment sectors were noted by each of the speakers, common factors considered important for advancement included networking, seeking out mentors, and developing exceptional communication skills.

  11. Visions of success and achievement in recreation-related USDA Forest Service NEPA processes

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, Marc J.; Blahna, Dale J.; Cerveny, Lee K.; Mortimer, Michael J.

    2009-07-15

    The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) is incorporated into the planning and decision-making culture of all natural resource agencies in the U.S. Yet, we know little about how the attitudes and internal interactions of interdisciplinary (ID) teams engaged in NEPA processes influence process outcomes. We conducted a web-based survey of 106 ID team leaders involved with environmental analyses (EA) or environmental impact statements (EIS) for projects dealing with recreation and travel management on national forests. We explore how they define success in these processes and identify factors most powerfully associated with perceptions of positive outcomes. The survey revealed a tremendous diversity in definitions of success. Strong correlations between the perceived importance of particular indicators of success and their achievement suggest that pre-conceived notions may often help to shape process outcomes. Regression analyses revealed the following factors as the best predictors of ID team leaders' perception of an 'excellent outcome': achievement of the agency mission, whether compromise had taken place between the interested parties, team satisfaction and harmony, timely process completion, and project implementation. Yet, respondents consistently ranked compromise with interested parties and team member satisfaction among the least important measures of successful NEPA processes. Results suggest that clarifying appropriate measures of success in NEPA processes across the agency could make ID team performance more consistent. The research also suggests that greater attention to ID team interactions, both internally and between teams and interested publics, could result in better outcomes.

  12. A comparison of Trachway intubating stylet and Airway Scope for tracheal intubation by novice operators: a manikin study.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Kuang-Yi; Chau, Siu-Wah; Su, Miao-Pei; Shih, Chih-Kai; Lu, I-Cheng; Cheng, Kuang-I

    2012-08-01

    The Trachway is a recently developed intubation device that resembles an illuminating stylet and incorporates a video-assisted system. This study evaluated the use of this system for tracheal intubation by novice operators. This randomized cross-over study compared the Trachway and the Airway Scope in simulated routine and difficult intubation scenarios. The difficult scenario was simulated by increasing the tongue volume of the manikin. The primary outcome measure in both airway scenarios was the time required for a successful tracheal intubation. For each scenario, the success rate, ease of intubation and operator preference were recorded for the two devices and compared. Average intubation time did not differ significantly between the Trachway and Airway Scope for the normal airway scenario (11.2 ± 6.5 vs. 9.8 ± 4.3 seconds, respectively; p = 0.07), but was significantly longer using the Trachway than with the Airway Scope on the difficult airway scenario (17.1 ± 11.1 vs. 9.5 ± 4.1 seconds, respectively; p < 0.001). The overall success rates of the Trachway and Airway Scope (96.3% and 98.6%, respectively) did not differ significantly (p = 0.13). Preference for the Airway Scope was greater in both scenarios, and particularly in the difficult airway scenario (p < 0.001). Although the devices are comparable in terms of ease of use and intubation time in normal scenarios, the ease of using the Airway Scope makes it more suitable for inexperienced operators in difficult intubation scenarios.

  13. Pregnancy in end-stage renal disease patients on dialysis: how to achieve a successful delivery

    PubMed Central

    Manisco, Gianfranco; Potì’, Marcello; Maggiulli, Giuseppe; Di Tullio, Massimo; Losappio, Vincenzo; Vernaglione, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    Pregnancy in women with chronic kidney disease has always been considered as a challenging event both for the mother and the fetus. Over the years, several improvements have been achieved in the outcome of pregnant chronic renal patients with increasing rates of successful deliveries. To date, evidence suggests that the stage of renal failure is the main predictive factor of worsening residual kidney function and complications in pregnant women. Moreover, the possibility of success of the pregnancy depends on adequate depurative and pharmacological strategies in patients with end-stage renal disease. In this paper, we propose a review of the current literature about this topic presenting our experience as well. PMID:26034591

  14. An improved simple method of mouse lung intubation

    PubMed Central

    MacDonald, Kelvin D.; Chang, Herng-Yu Sucie; Mitzner, Wayne

    2009-01-01

    Given the ubiquitous use of mice to study lung disease, it is curious that more investigators do not use repeated intubation to study mechanical and cellular changes in individual mice. One of the reasons for this limited use of intubation is that it is relatively difficult, despite there being several published studies that describe ways to achieve it. In this paper, we describe a complete procedure, including novel approaches that simplify this intubation, so that it can be routinely accomplished with relatively little training. The technique can also be set up with relatively little expense and expertise. This should make it possible for any laboratory to routinely carry out this intubation, thereby allowing longitudinal studies in individual mice and potentially increasing the statistical power by using each mouse as its own control. PMID:19150857

  15. Parental Involvement and Adolescents' Educational Success: The Roles of Prior Achievement and Socioeconomic Status.

    PubMed

    Benner, Aprile D; Boyle, Alaina E; Sadler, Sydney

    2016-06-01

    Parental educational involvement in primary and secondary school is strongly linked to students' academic success; however; less is known about the long-term effects of parental involvement. In this study, we investigated the associations between four aspects of parents' educational involvement (i.e., home- and school-based involvement, educational expectations, academic advice) and young people's proximal (i.e., grades) and distal academic outcomes (i.e., educational attainment). Attention was also placed on whether these relations varied as a function of family socioeconomic status or adolescents' prior achievement. The data were drawn from 15,240 10th grade students (50 % females; 57 % White, 13 % African American, 15 % Latino, 9 % Asian American, and 6 % other race/ethnicity) participating in the Education Longitudinal Study of 2002. We observed significant links between both school-based involvement and parental educational expectations and adolescents' cumulative high school grades and educational attainment. Moderation analyses revealed that school-based involvement seemed to be particularly beneficial for more disadvantaged youth (i.e., those from low-SES families, those with poorer prior achievement), whereas parents' academic socialization seemed to better promote the academic success of more advantaged youth (i.e., those from high-SES families, those with higher prior achievement). These findings suggest that academic interventions and supports could be carefully targeted to better support the educational success of all young people.

  16. Value of real life (in situ) simulation training for tracheal intubation skills in medical undergraduates during short duration anesthesia rotation

    PubMed Central

    Minai, Fauzia; Shafiq, Faraz; Ul Haq, Muhammad Irfan

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims: Skill of a successful endotracheal intubation needs to be acquired by training and attaining several competencies simultaneously. It becomes more challenging when we have to deliver the key concepts in a limited period of time. The medium fidelity simulator is a valuable tool of training for such scenarios. For this purpose we aim to compare the efficacy of structured training in endotracheal intubation between real life simulation and the conventional teaching method. Materials and Methods: The year 4 medical students had their attachment in anaesthesia for a period of 6 months from Jun — Dec 2009 were randomly divided into Group (Gp) A who had conventional teaching and Group B who were taught by four simulated sessions of endotracheal intubation. Performance of both the groups was observed by a person blinded to the study against a checklist on a 7 point rating scale in anaesthetized patient. Results: Total 57 students, 29 in Gp A and 28 in Gp B were rotated in the anaesthesia during the study period. Evaluation of the individual component tasks revealed that simulated group achieved a significant difference in the scoring for laryngoscope and intubation technique. (P = 0.026, 0.012) The comparison of overall competence again showed that the 64.3% of student in Gp B achieved an excellent score in comparison to Gp A in which only 41.4% achieved excellent. (P = 0.049). Similarly the lesser number of students in Gp B (14.3%) require remediation as compared to the Gp A, in which the requirement was 40% (P=0.04). Conclusion: We conclude that all essential skills components of tracheal intubation in correct flow and sequence are acquired more efficiently by real life simulated training. PMID:25425771

  17. Electrochemically controlled in-tube solid phase microextraction.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi, Seyyed Hamid; Manbohi, Ahmad; Heydar, Kourosh Tabar

    2015-01-01

    We report a new in-tube solid phase microextraction approach named electrochemically controlled in-tube solid phase microextraction (EC in-tube SPME). This approach, which combined electrochemistry and in-tube SPME, led to decrease in total analysis time and increase in sensitivity. At first, pyrrole was elctropolymerized on the inner surface of a stainless steel tube. Then, the polypyrrole (PPy)-coated in-tube SPME was coupled on-line to liquid chromatography (HPLC) to achieve automated in-tube SPME-HPLC analysis. After the completion of EC-in-tube SPME-HPLC setup, the PPy-coated tube was used as working electrode for uptake of diclofenac as target analyte. Extraction ability of the tube in presence and in absence of applied electrical field was investigated. It was found that, under the same extraction conditions, the extraction efficiency could be greatly enhanced by using the constant potential. Important factors are also optimized. The detection limit (S/N=3) and precision were 0.1 μg L(-1) and 4.4%, respectively.

  18. Stories of Success: Understanding Academic Achievement of Hispanic Students in Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Amanda

    A review of the literature shows that there is much evidence to suggest the challenges facing Hispanic students in American public schools. Hispanic enrollment in K--12 public schools has increased from 6 to 19% in the last thirty years, yet schools have not made adequate adjustments to accommodate this changing population. Issues such as remedial tracking and cultural differences have led to low high school graduate rates for Hispanic students and inequities in schooling experiences (Gay, 2000). Particularly in the area of science, Hispanic students struggle with academic success (Cole & Espinoza, 2008). Despite these obstacles, some Hispanic students are academically successful (Rochin & Mello, 2007; Merisotis & Kee, 2006). This dissertation tells the stories of these Hispanic students who have been successful in science in secondary public schools. This study followed a grounded theory methodology and utilized individual interviews to collect data about Hispanics who have demonstrated achievement in the area of science. Through the analysis of these interviews, factors were identified which may have contributed to the success of these Hispanics in the field of science. Implications for future practice in public schools are also discussed.

  19. Comparison of the Bonfils and Levitan optical stylets for tracheal intubation: a clinical study.

    PubMed

    Webb, A; Kolawole, H; Leong, S; Loughnan, T E; Crofts, T; Bowden, C

    2011-11-01

    The Bonfils and Levitan FPS scopes are rigid fibreoptic stylets that may assist routine or difficult intubation. This study compared the effectiveness of each in patients with predicted normal airways when used by specialist anaesthetists with no prior experience using optical stylets. Twelve anaesthetists and 324 elective surgical patients participated. Six anaesthetists were randomised to first intubate 20 patients with the Levitan scope (Phase 1) followed by a further seven patients with the Bonfils scope (Phase 2). The other six participating anaesthetists undertook their first 20 intubations with the Bonfils (Phase 1), followed by seven intubations with the Levitan (Phase 2). Outcomes recorded were success rate, total time to intubation, number of attempts, ease of intubation score and incidence of complications. Overall failure rates were similar for the two scopes with 5.6% of patients not intubated after three attempts. Median total times to intubation were similar for the Levitan (44 seconds) and Bonfils (36 seconds) (P = 0.11). Participants using the Bonfils in Phase 1 had significantly higher chance of success on first attempt (73%) compared to Levitan users during Phase 1 (57%) (P = 0.008). These differences were not significant in the second phase and ease of intubation scores were similar for both scopes (P = 0.9). This study showed the two scopes were comparable but the high failure rate amongst novice users demonstrated the importance of familiarity and skill development prior to their introduction to a difficult airway cart. PMID:22165364

  20. Quality improvement in diabetes--successful in achieving better care with hopes for prevention.

    PubMed

    Haw, J Sonya; Narayan, K M Venkat; Ali, Mohammed K

    2015-09-01

    Diabetes affects 29 million Americans and is associated with billions of dollars in health expenditures and lost productivity. Robust evidence has shown that lifestyle interventions in people at high risk for diabetes and comprehensive management of cardiometabolic risk factors like glucose, blood pressure, and lipids can delay the onset of diabetes and its complications, respectively. However, realizing the "triple aim" of better health, better care, and lower cost in diabetes has been hampered by low adoption of lifestyle interventions to prevent diabetes and poor achievement of care goals for those with diabetes. To achieve better care, a number of quality improvement (QI) strategies targeting the health system, healthcare providers, and/or patients have been evaluated in both controlled trials and real-world programs, and have shown some successes, though barriers still impede wider adoption, effectiveness, real-world feasibility, and scalability. Here, we summarize the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness data regarding QI strategies in diabetes care and discuss the potential role of quality monitoring and QI in trying to implement primary prevention of diabetes more widely and effectively. Over time, achieving better care and better health will likely help bend the ever-growing cost curve. PMID:26495771

  1. Where Are the Academically Successful Puerto Rican Students? Five Success Factors of High Achieving Puerto Rican High School Students. JSRI Working Paper No. 61

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antrop-Gonzalez, Rene; Velez, William; Garrett, Tomas

    2003-01-01

    High achieving Puerto Rican high school students are largely missing not only from urban high schools, but also from the educational research. The purpose of this article, then, is to describe the five success factors that ten low-income urban high school students from this ethnic group attributed to their high academic achievement. These success…

  2. Polyandrous females benefit by producing sons that achieve high reproductive success in a competitive environment.

    PubMed

    Firman, Renée C

    2011-09-22

    Females of many taxa often copulate with multiple males and incite sperm competition. On the premise that males of high genetic quality are more successful in sperm competition, it has been suggested that females may benefit from polyandry by accruing 'good genes' for their offspring. Laboratory studies have shown that multiple mating can increase female fitness through enhanced embryo viability, and have exposed how polyandry influences the evolution of the ejaculate. However, such studies often do not allow for both female mate choice and male-male competition to operate simultaneously. Here, I took house mice (Mus domesticus) from selection lines that had been evolving with (polygamous) and without (monogamous) sperm competition for 16 generations and, by placing them in free-ranging enclosures for 11 weeks, forced them to compete for access to resources and mates. Parentage analyses revealed that female reproductive success was not influenced by selection history, but there was a significant paternity bias towards males from the polygamous selection lines. Therefore, I show that female house mice benefit from polyandry by producing sons that achieve increased fitness in a semi-natural environment.

  3. Seldinger technique for nasal intubation: a case series.

    PubMed

    Abrons, Ron O; Vansickle, Ryan A; Ouanes, Jean-Pierre P

    2016-11-01

    Nasotracheal intubation can be both challenging and traumatic, especially in cases of atypical anatomy. We present a series of 3 such cases in which an endotracheal tube introducer (bougie) was used to facilitate successful, atraumatic, nasotracheal intubation via Seldinger technique. The technique described can guide a nasotracheal tube through narrow nasal passages, small pharyngeal spaces, and past acute laryngeal approach angles, all without transoral manipulation of the tube. The technique is easy to perform, uses a routine skill set, and can be advantageous in numerous clinical scenarios. PMID:27687457

  4. Tracheobronchial injuries following endotracheal intubation.

    PubMed

    Gibbaoui, H; Abu-Zidan, F M; Yaman, M

    2011-05-01

    We report two rare cases of tracheobronchial injury (TBI) following endotracheal intubation. Both intubations were easy and performed by experienced anaesthetists. The injuries for both cases were possibly caused by the tip of an endotracheal tube. A 27-year-old woman regurgitated copiously during induction of general anaesthesia for a Caesarean section. She had a full-thickness TBI 2 cm above the carina, which was repaired through an open thoracotomy. A 68-year-old woman undergoing left mastectomy was intubated with a 7.5-mm endotracheal tube for general anaesthesia. 24 hours after extubation, the patient developed widespread subcutaneous emphysema. There was no associated respiratory distress, and the patient was treated conservatively. The fragile tracheal tissue associated with pregnancy and old age was possibly a contributing factor for injury. Both patients recovered well. Surgical and non-surgical methods can be safely used after careful consideration of the patient's clinical, radiological and endoscopic findings. PMID:21633761

  5. Comparison of blind intubation through supraglottic devices and direct laryngoscopy by novices: a simulation manikin study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young Yong; Kang, Gu Hyun; Kim, Won Hee; Choi, Hyun Young; Jang, Yong Soo; Lee, Young Jae; Kim, Jae Guk; Kim, Hyeongtae; Kim, Gyoung Yong

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to compare intubation performance between blind intubation through supraglottic airway devices and direct laryngoscopy by novices under manikin simulation. We hypothesized that the intubation time by novices using supraglottic airway devices was superior to that with the Macintosh laryngoscope (MCL). Methods A prospective, randomized crossover study was conducted with 95 participants, to evaluate i-gel, air-Q, LMA Fastrach, and MCL devices. Primary outcomes were the intubation time and the success rate for intubation. Results The i-gel showed the shortest insertion and tube passing time among the four devices; the i-gel and air-Q also showed the shortest total intubation time (all P<0.0083; i-gel vs. air-Q, P=0.03). The i-gel and MCL showed the highest cumulative success rate (all P<0.0083; i-gel vs. MCL, P=0.12). Conclusion Blind intubation through the i-gel showed almost equal intubation performance compared to direct laryngoscopy. PMID:27752621

  6. Airway Management in a Patient with Severe Ankylosing Spondylitis Causing Bamboo Spine: Use of Aintree Intubation Catheter.

    PubMed

    Ul Haq, Muhammad Irfan; Shamim, Faisal; Lal, Shankar; Shafiq, Faraz

    2015-12-01

    Management of a case of ankylosing spondylitis can be very challenging as the airway and the central neuraxial blockade are extremely difficult to handle. Fiberoptic intubation may lead to predictable success in the face of difficult airway. We are presenting a new technique of fiberoptic intubation in a young patient, suffering from severe ankylosing spondylitis, came for total hip replacement surgery. There was anticipated difficult airway due to severe limitation in neck movement and it was successfully managed by using Aintree Intubation Catheter (AIC) with intubating fiberoptic bronchoscope. PMID:26691367

  7. Parker Flex-It stylet is as effective as GlideRite Rigid stylet for orotracheal intubation by Glidescope

    PubMed Central

    Sheta, Saad A.; Abdelhalim, Ashraf A.; ElZoughari, Ismail A.; AlZahrani, Tariq A.; Al-Saeed, Abdulhamid H.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate Parker Flex-It stylet as an alternative to GlideRite Rigid stylet to aid tracheal intubation with the Glidescope. Methods: This prospective randomized trial was conducted at King Abdulaziz University Hospital, College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia between May and December 2014. Sixty American Society of Anesthesiologists I-II patients were randomly assigned to one of 2 equal groups receiving intubation by Glidescope using either GlideRite Rigid stylet (Group GS) or Parker Flex-It stylet (Group PS). The total intubation time, ease of intubation, incidences of successful intubation at first attempt, number of intubation attempts, use of optimization maneuvers, and possible complications were recorded. Results: No significant differences between both groups regarding the total intubation time (p=0.08) was observed. Intubation was significantly easier in group PS compared with group GS as measured by visual analogue scale (p=0.001) with no significant differences between the groups regarding the rate of successful tracheal intubation from first attempt (p=0.524). However, the number of attempts at intubation and usage of external laryngeal manipulation were similar in both groups (p>0.05). The incidence of sore throat, dysphagia, hoarseness, and trauma were significantly higher in group GS (p<0.05). Conclusion: Parker Flex-It stylet is as effective as GlideRite Rigid stylet when used by experienced operators in patients with normal airways using Glidescope; however, it is easier and less traumatic. PMID:26620987

  8. Comparison of GlideScope Videolaryngoscopy to Direct Laryngoscopy for Intubation of a Pediatric Simulator by Novice Physicians.

    PubMed

    Rabiner, Joni E; Auerbach, Marc; Avner, Jeffrey R; Daswani, Dina; Khine, Hnin

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To compare novice clinicians' performance using GlideScope videolaryngoscopy (GVL) to direct laryngoscopy (DL). Methods. This was a prospective, randomized crossover study. Incoming pediatric interns intubated pediatric simulators in four normal and difficult airway scenarios with GVL and DL. Primary outcomes included time to intubation and rate of successful intubation. Interns rated their satisfaction of the devices and chose the preferred device. Results. Twenty-five interns were included. In the normal airway scenario, there were no differences in mean time for intubation with GVL or DL (61.4 versus 67.4 seconds, P = NS) or number of successful intubations (19 versus 18, P = NS). In the difficult airway scenario, interns took longer to intubate with GVL than DL (87.7 versus 61.3 seconds, P = 0.018), but there were no differences in successful intubations (14 versus 15, P = NS). There was a trend towards higher satisfaction for GVL than DL (7.3 versus 6.4, P = NS), and GVL was chosen as the preferred device by a majority of interns (17/25, 68%). Conclusions. For novice clinicians, GVL does not improve time to intubation or intubation success rates in a pediatric simulator model of normal and difficult airway scenarios. Still, these novice clinicians overall preferred GVL.

  9. Using the Achieving Success Everyday (ASE) Group Model to Promote Self-Esteem and Academic Achievement for English as a Second Language (ESL) Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shi, Qi; Steen, Sam

    2012-01-01

    The Achieving Success Everyday (ASE) group model is used to promote self-esteem and academic performance of English as a second language (ESL) students. The findings from the preliminary data indicated that the participants' self-esteem was significantly improved after participation in the group. There was no significant improvement in the total…

  10. Design for a three-dimensional printed laryngoscope blade for the intubation of rats.

    PubMed

    Vongerichten, Anna; Aristovich, Kirill; dos Santos, Gustavo Sato; McEvoy, Andrew W; Holder, David S

    2014-04-01

    Endotracheal intubation of rats is a common technique that is best carried out with a laryngoscope blade. The blade allows direct visualization of the trachea during intubation, reducing the risk of accidental intubation of the esophagus. Laryngoscope blades for use in rats are not commercially available, however. Three-dimensional (3D) printers have recently become available and can be used to produce small plastic items simply and reliably based on an established design. The authors created a design for a laryngoscope blade to be printed with a 3D printer and polylactide filament material. Using the printed laryngoscope blade, the authors successfully intubated 35 rats. The presented design may be used by any experimenter with access to a 3D printer to fabricate the same laryngoscope blade for their intubation procedures. PMID:24651789

  11. The Determination of the Relationship between Academic Achievement in Nursing Courses and Success on the Registered Nurse Licensure Examination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millican, Julie E.

    The objective of a study was to determine if academic achievement in nursing courses could be used to predict success on the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN). It investigated the relationship between NCLEX outcomes and academic achievement in theory and clinical courses and the relationship between NCLEX…

  12. Development of content: influences on girls' junior high school volleyball success in practice and achievement.

    PubMed

    Pellett, T L; Nix, C L

    1996-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the success of practice by lower- and higher-skilled girls in Grades 7 and 8 in response to different tasks (extension, refinement, and application) throughout an 11-day instructional and practice period for volleyball. More highly skilled girls were more successful than those lower in skill for all skills (forearm pass, set, serve) and tasks. Girls had nearly equal success in practice for different tasks. PMID:8668479

  13. Black Hegemony, a Significant Influence in the School Success of High-Achieving African Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Jean C.

    This is an interpretive study of the influence of Black Hegemony on the academic success of three successful African Americans: Clifton L. Taulbert, Henry Louis Gates, Jr., and Margaret Morgan Lawrence. All three spent their youth in southern communities strongly influenced by Jim Crow laws and customs, and their academic accomplishments were…

  14. Mind the Gaps: How College Readiness Narrows Achievement Gaps in College Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ACT, Inc., 2010

    2010-01-01

    This report discusses factors that contribute to lower college success rates among underrepresented racial/ethnic minority students and students from lower-income families. The report also shows that "racial/ethnic and family income gaps in college success rates narrow substantially among students who are ready for college." Everyone needs to…

  15. Most Likely to Achieve: Predicting Early Success of the Practical Nurse Student

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cline, April P.

    2013-01-01

    It is important that practical nurse (PN) educators be able to identify which students are likely to be successful in their programs. However, the majority of literature related to predicting success of nursing students has been done on baccalaureate nursing students in the university setting. This study sought to determine whether the same…

  16. Reducing the Gap: Success for All and the Achievement of African American Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madden, Nancy A.

    2006-01-01

    "Success for All" is a comprehensive reform model, which applies cooperative learning, tutoring, family support services, and extensive professional development to help high-poverty schools succeed with their pupils. A review of research on "Success for All" with African American students focuses on evidence that the model reduces the achievement…

  17. Successful Girls? Complicating Post-Feminist, Neoliberal Discourses of Educational Achievement and Gender Equality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ringrose, Jessica

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines how an ongoing educational panic over failing boys has contributed to a new celebratory discourse about successful girls. Rather than conceive of this shift as an anti-feminist feminist backlash, the paper examines how the successful girl discourse is postfeminist, and how liberal feminist theory has contributed to narrowly…

  18. Nasotracheal intubation with MacGrath videolaryngoscope using Schroeder directional stylet: Case series

    PubMed Central

    Das, Bikramjit; Ahmed, Syed Moied; Raza, Nadeem

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims: MacGrath videolaryngoscope is one of the recent videolaryngoscopes, which can be used to facilitate nasotracheal intubations using Scroeder directional stylet. Material and Methods: 15 patients, American Society of Anesthesiologists Grades I-II, undergoing tonsillectomy, requiring nasotracheal intubation were included. All patients were intubated with MacGrath videolaryngoscope and Schroeder stylet. Primary outcome measures were duration and ease of intubation. Overall success rate, number of attempts, modified Cormack-Lehane (C-L) grading, and complications were also recorded. Results: All 15 intubations were successful during first laryngoscopy attempt. C-L Grade I views were obtained in 14 patients (93%) and Grade II view in one patient (7%). The time required to obtain the best C-L view was 9.4 ± 1.5 s. The time taken to complete tracheal intubation was 34.27 ± 3.38 s. Average numerical rating scale for tracheal intubation was 8.7 ± 0.9. Minor complications occurred in four patients (26.7%). Conclusions: MacGrath videolaryngoscope produces excellent laryngoscopic views in patients with normal airways. Impaction of tracheal tube on posterior nasopharyngeal wall can be overcome by Schroeder stylet. PMID:25948909

  19. Increasing Postsecondary Education Access and Success: Raising Achievement through Outreach Programs. Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broton, Katie

    2009-01-01

    Closing the achievement gap depends on highly effective public schools, strong community support, and family involvement. Raising the overall rates of achievement in Minnesota is a vital part of this goal. Research has shown that pre-college outreach programs improve college access for underrepresented groups, including low-income,…

  20. Achieving a Doctorate: Metalearning and Research Development Programmes Supporting Success for International Distance Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisker, Gina; Robinson, Gillian; Trafford, Vernon; Lilly, Jaki; Warnes, Mark

    2004-01-01

    Most studies on metalearning and metacognition have focused on undergraduates where reflective and active awareness of learning practices and achievements, or metalearning, has been seen to be useful, indeed essential for the learning achievement of undergraduates (Biggs et al., 2001; Veenman & Verheig, 2003). This paper reports on the latest…

  1. Student Achievement in Identified Workforce Clusters: Understanding Factors that Influence Student Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Amico, Mark M.; Morgan, Grant B.; Robertson, Thashundray C.

    2011-01-01

    This study blends elements from two South Carolina Technical College System initiatives--Achieving the Dream and a workforce cluster strategy. Achieving the Dream is a national non-profit organization created to help technical and community college students succeed, particularly low-income students and students of color. This initiative, combined…

  2. A comparative study of effect of sevoflurane on intubating conditions with rocuronium in neurosurgical patients

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Saikat; Purohit, Shobha; Bhatia, Sonali; Kalra, Poonam; Sharma, Satya Prakash

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims: Rocuronium may not always be the preferred relaxant for rapid sequence intubation. When 2% sevoflurane is used in conjunction with rocuronium, it may reduce the time required for achieving complete skeletal muscle relaxation with the intubating dose of rocuronium. Methods: This study was prospective, randomised, double-blind in nature and compared the effect of sevoflurane on intubation time and intubating conditions when used along with rocuronium. Thirty adult patients belonging to American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status Grades 1 and 2, of either gender aged between 30 and 65 years undergoing neurosurgical operations were randomly allocated into two equal groups: Group R received 0.8 mg/kg rocuronium, and Group RS received 0.8 mg/kg of rocuronium with 2% sevoflurane. Onset time of intubation was assessed using train-of-four stimuli. The intubating conditions were compared using the Cooper scoring system and the haemodynamic responses were compared between the two groups. Results: The onset time of intubation was 101.73 ± 10.28 s in Group R and 60.4 ± 4.1 s in Group RS (P < 0.001), with excellent intubating conditions in both groups and without any adverse effects. Significant differences in heart rate and mean arterial pressure were seen immediately after intubation, at 1 and 3 min (P < 0.05) between the two groups. Conclusion: Rocuronium 0.8 mg/kg along with 2% sevoflurane provides excellent intubating conditions within 60–66 s from its administration. PMID:26903669

  3. A New Video Laryngoscope - An Aid in Intubation and Teaching.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Marshal B; Ward, Denham S; Berci, George

    2003-01-01

    In recent decades, video techniques have been employed in the majority of endoscopic procedures because of several distinct advantages provided. These include the following: The displayed anatomy is magnified. Recognition of the anatomical structures and anomalies is easier, and manipulation of airway devices is facilitated. When assistance is required, the operator and assistant can coordinate their movements because each sees exactly the same image on the video monitor. As a result, video techniques have become the method of choice in teaching. The Video Macintosh Intubating Laryngoscope System (VMS) was designed employing a standard Macintosh blade and laryngoscope handle. A camera was incorporated into the handle with a short image and light bundle. The magnified anatomy is displayed on an 8-inch monitor, which is attached to a swivel arm on a small cart. Observation and manipulation can be performed in one axis. 235 patients were studied and were divided into two groups: Group A (n=217) where intubation was thought unlikely to be difficult, and Group B (n=18) where difficulty with intubation was anticipated. External laryngeal manipulation (ELM) was required in 22 of the 217 Group A patients (10%). All intubations but one in this group were successful. In the second group (B) of 18 patients who had anatomical conditions that suggested that direct laryngoscopy might be challenging, all 18 cases required ELM but all were successfully intubated using the VMS. The improved coordination afforded by an image on a video monitor seen by both the assistant providing laryngeal manipulation and the anesthesiologist handling the laryngoscope results in a significant advantage over the conventional laryngoscope technique. As a consequence the learning curve is short. In our view, video laryngoscopy will become the method of choice in teaching. PMID:27175418

  4. [Fiberoptic tracheal intubation through a laryngeal mask airway in a pediatric patient with treacher collins syndrome].

    PubMed

    Ogata, Tokiko; Saito, Tomoyuki; Tachikawa, Mayumi; Arai, Takero; Okuda, Yasuhisa

    2013-12-01

    A 6-month-old girl with Treacher Collins syndrome was scheduled for tracheotomy because of severe airway obstruction. During slow induction of anesthesia with inhalation of sevoflurane, assisted mask ventilation was successfully performed using oropharyngeal airway. Either direct laryngoscope or GlideScope Video Laryngoscope could not reveal any part of the epiglottis (Cormack and Lehane grade 4). Even fiberoptic bronchoscopic examination assisted by GlideScope Video Laryngoscope gave a poor view of the pharynx on the video monitor. Laryngeal mask airway (LMA) was inserted easily and allowed adequate ventilation, through which fiberoptic intubation was successfully achieved. We cut the LMA short in order to pass the 3 mm tracheal tube until the glottis through it.

  5. Fiberoptic intubation with patients in sitting position.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yu-Yung; Chien, Jui-Teng; Huang, Shen-Jer

    2007-09-01

    Flexible fiberoptic endoscope is the most valuable tool for anesthesiologists to manage difficult airways. Correctly positioning of the patient during fiberoptic intubation aids the clinician to rapidly secure the airway, because it not only saves time, but also minimizes the risk of repeated attempts of intubation with possible serious consequences in the wake. In general, fiberoptic intubation is carried out with the patient in the supine position, but there are situations in which the intubation requires the subjects to be in the sitting position. The sitting position also changes the position of performing anesthesiologist relative to the patient, presenting an inverse view contrary to that of traditional laryngoscopy. We can often obtain a superior view from fiberoptic intubation. Fiberoptic intubation in the sitting position can be applied to all patients, as long as there is no contraindication of having a patient be sat. PMID:17972620

  6. Evaluation of Achieving Collegiate Excellence and Success Program: Student Outcomes Year One, Grades 11 and 12. Evaluation Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolanin, Natalie; Modarresi, Shahpar

    2015-01-01

    The Office of Shared Accountability in Montgomery County (Maryland) Public Schools (MCPS) is conducting a multiyear evaluation of the "Achieving Collegiate Excellence and Success" (ACES) program. ACES is a collaboration between MCPS, Montgomery College (MC), and the Universities at Shady Grove (USG) to create a seamless pathway from high…

  7. Helping Middle School Girls at Risk for School Failure Recover Their Confidence and Achieve School Success: An Experimental Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mann, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Middle school girls who are at risk have experienced a disproportionate number of intense and disruptive traumatic life events. Such events can adversely affect healthy development and often contribute to higher levels of school failure and problem behavior. Few programs focus on helping at-risk middle school girls achieve school success through…

  8. The Relationship of Self-Esteem to Grades, Achievement Scores, and Other Factors Critical to School Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiggins, James D.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Examined self-esteem related to earned grades, achievement test scores, and other factors among all regular fifth- and sixth-grade students in one intermediate school. Findings seemed to reaffirm importance of self-esteem to academic school success. School Form of the Self-Esteem Inventory scores were more predictive of grades than were composite…

  9. Examining the Role, Values, and Legal Policy Issues Facing Public Library Resources in Supporting Students to Achieve Academic Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Achinewhu-Nworgu, Elizabeth; Azaiki, Steve; Nworgu, Queen Chioma

    2016-01-01

    This paper aims to present the role, values, and legal policy issues facing public Library resources in supporting students to achieve academic success. Research indicates that majority of people that own or work in the Library tend to ignore some of the vital roles, values and legal policy issues paramount to libraries. Some of these issues are…

  10. Differential Validity and Utility of Successive and Simultaneous Approaches to the Development of Equivalent Achievement Tests in French and English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, W. Todd; Gierl, Mark J.; Tardif, Claudette; Lin, Jie; Rinaldi, Christina

    2003-01-01

    Described in this paper are the first three activities of a research program designed to assess the differential validity and utility of successive and simultaneous approaches to the development of equivalent achievement tests in the French and English languages. Two teams of multilingual/multicultural French-English teachers used the simultaneous…

  11. Ergonomics of novices and experts during simulated endotracheal intubation.

    PubMed

    de Laveaga, Adam; Wadman, Michael C; Wirth, Laura; Hallbeck, M Susan

    2012-01-01

    Endotracheal Intubation (ETI) is an airway procedure commonly used to secure the airway for a variety of medical conditions. Proficiency in ETI procedures requires significant clinical experience and insufficient data currently exists describing the physical ergonomics of successful direct laryngoscopy. The research objectives of this study were to examine how ETI time, error and practitioner biomechanics varied among clinical experience levels and hospital bed heights. The participant population included novice and expert personnel, differentiated by their exposure to ETI procedures. Participants used a standard laryngoscope and blade to perform ETI trials on an airway manikin trainer at predesigned hospital bed heights. Participants were evaluated based on ETI time and accuracy, as well as wrist postures and muscle utilization. Hospital bed height did not affect task completion time, error rates or muscle utilization. Expert participants exhibited less ulnar deviation and forearm supination during task trials, as well as a higher utilization of the bicep brachii and anterior deltoid muscles. Expert grasped instrumentation differently, requiring less wrist manipulation required to achieve ideal instrument positions. By encouraging ergonomic best-practices in hand and arm postures during ETI training, the opportunity exists to improve patient safety and reduce the learning curve associated with ETI procedures.

  12. Exploring the Role and Influence of Expectations in Achieving VLE Benefit Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Stephen; Fearon, Colm

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate the role and influence of expectations management in realising benefit success when adopting a virtual learning environment (VLE). Based on a discussion of findings from a further and higher education college in the UK, a conceptual expectations management model is developed that explores the factors…

  13. A Plan for Academic Success: Helping Academically Dismissed Students Achieve Their Goals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cherry, Lynn; Coleman, Lindy

    2010-01-01

    This article describes a unique process which allows a select few students who have been dismissed for academic deficiency the opportunity to create a Plan for Academic Success (Plan), which, if accepted, reverses the academic dismissal for one semester. If the Plan is accepted, the individual student assumes responsibility for taking action to…

  14. Investigating Leadership Practices in Successful Schools Serving ELA Learners with a Focus on Mathematics Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holloway, Susan

    2013-01-01

    This study defines and analyzes the successful leadership practice of a principal of an urban K-8 school serving English Language Learners in the western United States during the 2012-2013 academic year. Focusing on the self-identified leadership practice of a school leader evidenced to positively affect student learning, this study seeks to…

  15. Achieving the Dream: A Look at Hispanic Student Success at Community Colleges in Texas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Audrey R.

    2013-01-01

    In the last decade, higher education institutions have come under attack for their inability to enhance graduation rates. Although community colleges are known for their open-door enrollment policy, they are currently challenged to improve student success. This study was designed to determine which strategies have been most effective in…

  16. Guide to Success for Organisations in Achieving Employment Outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giddy, Kristine; Lopez, Jessica; Redman, Anne

    2009-01-01

    Helping Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander job-seekers find and keep a job has been the focus of recent reforms announced by the Australian Government. This guide describes seven essential characteristics of employment service organisations that lead to successful employment outcomes for their Indigenous clients. Based on a selection of…

  17. The Interplay between Educational Achievement, Occupational Success, and Well-Being

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samuel, Robin; Bergman, Manfred Max; Hupka-Brunner, Sandra

    2013-01-01

    Many studies have examined the effect of life events, education, and income on well-being. Conversely, research concerning well-being as a predictor of life course outcomes is sparse. Diener's suggestion "to inquire about the effects of well-being on future behavior and success" has, with some exceptions, not yet come to fruition. This article…

  18. Research Considerations and Theoretical Application for Best Practices in Higher Education: Latina/os Achieving Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castellanos, Jeanett; Gloria, Alberta M.

    2007-01-01

    This scholarly article addresses the Latina/o undergraduate experiences proposing a (re)definition of educational success. Discussing strength-based practices of "familia", mentorship, cultural congruity, and professional development from a psychosociocultural (PSC) approach, the article presents practical recommendations and directions for…

  19. High Enrollment Course Success Factors in Virtual School: Factors Influencing Student Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Feng; Cavanaugh, Cathy

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a study of success factors in high enrollment courses in a K-12 virtual school learning environment. The influence of variables: time student spent in the learning management system (LMS), number of times logged into the LMS, teacher comment, participation in free or reduced lunch programs, student status in the virtual school…

  20. The Study Experiences of the High Achievers in a Competitive Academic Environment: A Cost of Success?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nordmo, Ivar; Samara, Akylina

    2009-01-01

    The present paper is a case study that explores the study experiences and possible costs of success for the students accepted into the professional program in psychology at the University of Bergen in Norway. In this highly competitive environment, between 500 and 1000 students compete for 36 places during the introduction year. The study is based…

  1. How One Historically Underperforming Rural and Highly Diverse High School Achieved a Successful Turnaround

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maxwell, Gerri M.; Huggins, Kristin S.; Scheurich, James J.

    2010-01-01

    "Central High School," a rural school composed largely of students of color from low income homes, experienced a quick, remarkable turnaround of student academic success, measured by State and Federal accountability standards. This turnaround began with an external restructuring grant initiative that required a state-approved external consultant.…

  2. Gender Differences in Planning, Attention, Simultaneous, and Successive (PASS) Cognitive Processes and Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naglieri, Jack A.; Rojahn, Johannes

    2001-01-01

    Examined 1,100 boys and 1,100 girls who matched the U.S. population using the Planning, Attention, Simultaneous, Successive (PASS) cognitive-processing theory, built on the neuropsychological work of A.R. Luria (1973). Results illustrate that the PASS theory offers a useful way to examine gender differences in cognitive performance. (BF)

  3. Latino Achievement: Identifying Models That Foster Success. Research Monograph Series. RM04194

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gandara, Patricia

    2004-01-01

    This monograph describes the current educational status of Latino students in the United States and, based on the extant research, attempts to explain their relatively low educational performance. The research finds many structural and socio-cultural barriers to academic achievement for this group, including poverty, poor schooling, language …

  4. The Experience of Achievement Academy Students: What Their Experience Can Tell Us about Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calleroz White, James

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to answer the question, "What are the experiences of students who have completed the Achievement Academy program?" In collecting data to answer this question, a series of clarifying questions also emerged: "What are the cultural, academic, and personal costs and benefits associated with being a part of…

  5. Saving for Success: Financial Education and Savings Goal Achievement in Individual Development Accounts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grinstead, Mary L.; Mauldin, Teresa; Sabia, Joseph J.; Koonce, Joan; Palmer, Lance

    2011-01-01

    Using microdata from the American Dream Demonstration, the current study examines factors associated with savings and savings goal achievement (indicated by a matched withdrawal) among participants of individual development account (IDA) programs. Multinomial logit results show that hours of participation in financial education programs, higher…

  6. School Counseling to Close the Achievement Gap: A Social Justice Framework for Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holcomb-McCoy, Cheryl

    2007-01-01

    School counselors can play a powerful role in closing the achievement gap when they incorporate the principles of social justice into their practice. In this much-needed resource for preservice and inservice counselors, the author addresses factors (such as racism, sexism, heterosexism, and classism) that can contribute to academic failure, and…

  7. Leveraging Quality Improvement to Achieve Student Learning Assessment Success in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glenn, Nancy Gentry

    2009-01-01

    Mounting pressure for transformational change in higher education driven by technology, globalization, competition, funding shortages, and increased emphasis on accountability necessitates that universities implement reforms to demonstrate responsiveness to all stakeholders and to provide evidence of student achievement. In the face of the demand…

  8. Lessons in Literacy: Case Studies of Successful Strategies for Raising Achievement in Multilingual Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Bernard, Ed.

    The group of case studies details ways in which elementary, middle, and secondary schools in Bradford (England) have responded to recent developments in literacy education and developed whole- school approaches to improving achievement in literacy within multilingual school populations. Case study titles include: "The Literacy Lesson: A Guide"…

  9. Strategies for Success: Links to Increased Mathematics Achievement Scores of English-Language Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pray, Lisa; Ilieva, Vessela

    2011-01-01

    This research investigates the link between mathematic teachers' use of English-language learner (ELL) strategies and the mathematics achievement of their students who are ELLs. Interviews and observations of mathematic teachers who taught ELLs were used to document instructional strategies use. The findings from the interviews and observations…

  10. Urban Professional Development Working to Create Successful Teachers and Achieving Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yost, Deborah S.; Vogel, Robert

    2007-01-01

    With the advent of No Child Left Behind Act of 2001, schools are being held accountable for measurable increases in student academic achievement as evidenced by performance on standardized tests. This movement has significant implications for the professional development of teachers who are ultimately responsible for ensuring that their…

  11. Marked for Success: Secondary School Performance and University Achievement in Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Comer, Keith; Broght, Erik; Sampson, Kaylene

    2011-01-01

    Building on Shulruf, Hattie and Tumen (2008), this work examines the capacity of various National Certificate in Educational Achievement (NCEA)-derived models to predict first-year performance in Biological Sciences at a New Zealand university. We compared three models: (1) the "best-80" indicator as used by several New Zealand…

  12. The Achievement Gap among Newcomer Immigrant Adolescents: Life Stressors Hinder Latina/o Academic Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patel, Sita G.; Barrera, Alinne Z.; Strambler, Michael J.; Muñoz, Ricardo F.; Macciomei, Erynn

    2016-01-01

    This study compares life stressors and school outcomes among newcomer immigrant adolescents from Latin America, Asia, and the Caribbean. Participants attended a predominantly low-income, urban international public high school in the northeast. The Latina/o students were exposed to more life stressors and had lower attendance and achievement than…

  13. Closing the Achievement Gap: Principles for Improving the Educational Success of All Students. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Wendy

    This digest reviews educational policies and practices that have been proven effective in closing the achievement gap, offering a list of resources with detailed information about them. The digest focuses on state and district roles (e.g., developing and implementing educational goals, rigorous standards, and accountability standards and providing…

  14. Achievement Goals and Persistence across Tasks: The Roles of Failure and Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sideridis, Georgios D.; Kaplan, Avi

    2011-01-01

    The focus of this study is on the role of achievement goals in students' persistence. The authors administered 5 puzzles to 96 college students: 4 unsolvable and 1 relatively easy (acting as a hope probe). They examined whether and how persistence may deteriorate as a function of failing the puzzles, as well as whether and how persistence may…

  15. Sustaining Success toward Closing the Achievement Gap: A Case Study of One Urban High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cabrera, Kimberly Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    Since the introduction of the Coleman Report (1966), the focus on closing the achievement gap has been a critical component of educational policy for political leaders and field research by educators. The economic crisis which California and the nation at large currently face creates a challenging situation in attempting to narrow the gap.…

  16. A mentoring program to help junior faculty members achieve scholarship success.

    PubMed

    Kohn, Harold

    2014-03-12

    The University of North Carolina Eshelman School of Pharmacy launched the Bill and Karen Campbell Faculty Mentoring Program (CMP) in 2006 to support scholarship-intensive junior faculty members. This report describes the origin, expectations, principles, and best practices that led to the introduction of the program, reviews the operational methods chosen for its implementation, provides information about its successes, and analyzes its strengths and limitations.

  17. GlideScope Video Laryngoscope for Difficult Intubation in Emergency Patients: a Quasi-Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi, Koorosh; Ebrahimi, Mohsen; Hashemian, Amir Masoud; Sarshar, Saeed; Rahimi-Movaghar, Vafa

    2015-12-01

    Macintosh direct laryngoscope has been the most widely used device for tracheal intubation. GlideScope video laryngoscope (GVL) has been recently introduced as an alternative device for performing intubation; however, its validity in emergency settings has not been thoroughly evaluated. The aim of this study was to compare Macintosh direct laryngoscope versus GVL for emergency endotracheal intubation. This quasi-randomized clinical trial was performed on 97 patients referred to Imam Reza Hospital whom all needed emergency intubation in 2011. Patients were divided into two groups of the easy airway and difficult airway; intubation was performed for patients with direct laryngoscopy or GVL. Then, the patients were evaluated in terms of demographic characteristics, successful intubation rate and intubation time. Data was analyzed by SPSS software 16. There was no significant difference in demographic characteristics of the patients in both easy airway and difficult airway groups who intubated with direct laryngoscopy and GVL methods (P>0.05). In difficult airway group, a significant difference was found in successful intubation at the first attempt (60.9% vs. 87.5%; P=0.036), overall intubation time (32.7 ± 14.58 vs. 22.5±7.88; P<0.001) and first attempt intubation time (28.43 ± 12.51 vs. 21.48±7.8; P=0.001) between direct laryngoscopy and GVL. These variables were not significantly different between two methods in easy airway group. According to the results, GVL can be a useful alternative to direct laryngoscopy in emergency situations and especially in cases with a difficult airway.

  18. Recipe for Success: An Updated Parents' Guide to Improving Colorado Schools and Student Achievement. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taher, Bonnie; Durr, Pamela

    This guide describes ways that parents can help improve student achievement and school quality. It answers such questions as how to choose the right early-education opportunity for a preschooler, how to make sure a 5-year-old is ready for school, how to help a daughter do well in school, how to work with a daughter's or son's teachers, how to help…

  19. Airtraq, LMA CTrach and Macintosh Laryngoscopes in Tracheal Intubation Training: A Randomized Comparative Manikin Study

    PubMed Central

    Saraçoğlu, Ayten; Dal, Didem; Baygın, Ömer; Göğüş, Fevzi Yılmaz

    2016-01-01

    Objective Training students on simulators before allowing their direct contact with patients is well accepted. There is no clinical or manikin-based simulation study in the literature comparing tracheal intubation with Airtraq, laryngeal mask airway (LMA) CTrach and Macintosh laryngoscopes performed by medical students having no prior intubation experience. Methods After obtaining written informed consents, 123 participants were included in the study. The participants were asked to intubate the manikin five times with each device randomly. After all the participants had completed their fifth intubations, the measurements were performed. The primary outcome variables were the first-attempt success rate and the time for a successful intubation, while the secondary outcome variables were to determine the scores of dental trauma, the difficulty visual analogue scale and the optimization manoeuvres. Results The LMA CTrach group revealed a significantly higher number of intubation attempts. The mean time for a successful intubation was the longest in the LMA CTrach group (17.66±8.22 s, p<0.05). Students defined the Airtraq as the easiest to use and the Macintosh laryngoscope as the most difficult device to use and learn. Dental trauma severity was significantly lower in the Airtraq group than in the other groups (p<0.05), and it was found to be 0 in 81.1% in the Airtraq group. The head extension optimization manoeuvre rate was significantly higher with the Macintosh laryngoscope than with the Airtraq laryngoscope (p<0.05). Conclusion This study, in which different types of laryngoscopes were compared, revealed that the Airtraq laryngoscope has advantages, such as shorter intubation duration, less additional optimization manoeuvres, less dental trauma intensity and is easier to learn compared with the LMA CTrach and Macintosh laryngoscopes. PMID:27366562

  20. Enhancing physics demonstration shows: where physics and the arts meet to achieve success

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, Donna; Uher, Tim

    2015-04-01

    Physics demonstrations are widely used by universities in undergraduate education and public outreach to engage students and teach physics concepts. At the University of Maryland, the Physics is Phun public demonstration programs are a vehicle for public outreach with longstanding success (dating back to 1982). A recent program, ``Out of the Dark,'' presented the evolution of the fields of electricity and magnetism by merging physics demonstrations with history and performing arts. In this session, we will discuss methods by which these outside fields can be utilized in a demonstration program. We will also discuss the outcomes of these methods in enhancing engagement of audience members and undergraduate majors alike.

  1. Mismatched partners that achieve postpairing behavioral similarity improve their reproductive success

    PubMed Central

    Laubu, Chloé; Dechaume-Moncharmont, François-Xavier; Motreuil, Sébastien; Schweitzer, Cécile

    2016-01-01

    Behavioral similarity between partners is likely to promote within-pair compatibility and to result in better reproductive success. Therefore, individuals are expected to choose a partner that is alike in behavioral type. However, mate searching is very costly and does not guarantee finding a matching partner. If mismatched individuals pair, they may benefit from increasing their similarity after pairing. We show in a monogamous fish species—the convict cichlid—that the behavioral similarity between mismatched partners can increase after pairing. This increase resulted from asymmetrical adjustment because only the reactive individual became more alike its proactive partner, whereas the latter did not change its behavior. The mismatched pairs that increased their similarity not only improved their reproductive success but also raised it up to the level of matched pairs. While most studies assume that assortative mating results from mate choice, our study suggests that postpairing adjustment could be an alternative explanation for the high behavioral similarity between partners observed in the field. It also explains why interindividual behavioral differences can be maintained within a given population. PMID:26973869

  2. Career inflection points of women who successfully achieved the hospital CEO position.

    PubMed

    Sexton, Donald W; Lemak, Christy Harris; Wainio, Joyce Anne

    2014-01-01

    Women are significantly underrepresented in hospital CEO positions, and this gender disparity has changed little over the past few decades. The purpose of this study was to analyze the career trajectories of successful female healthcare executives to determine factors that generated inflections in their careers. Using qualitative research methodology, we studied the career trajectories of 20 women who successfully ascended into a hospital CEO position. Our findings revealed 25 inflection points related to education and training, experience, career management, family, networking, and mentorship and sponsorship. We found substantial differences in the career inflection points by functional background. Inflections were more pronounced early in the careers of women in healthcare management, while clinical and administrative support executives experienced more inflections later as they took on responsibilities outside of their professional roles. Only two inflections were common among all the executives: completing a graduate degree and obtaining experience as a chief operating officer. More importantly, our findings show that organizational support factors are critical for the career advancement of women. We conclude with recommendations for individuals in an effort to enhance their career trajectories. We also provide recommended activities for organizations to support the careers of women in healthcare leadership. PMID:25647957

  3. Mismatched partners that achieve postpairing behavioral similarity improve their reproductive success.

    PubMed

    Laubu, Chloé; Dechaume-Moncharmont, François-Xavier; Motreuil, Sébastien; Schweitzer, Cécile

    2016-03-01

    Behavioral similarity between partners is likely to promote within-pair compatibility and to result in better reproductive success. Therefore, individuals are expected to choose a partner that is alike in behavioral type. However, mate searching is very costly and does not guarantee finding a matching partner. If mismatched individuals pair, they may benefit from increasing their similarity after pairing. We show in a monogamous fish species-the convict cichlid-that the behavioral similarity between mismatched partners can increase after pairing. This increase resulted from asymmetrical adjustment because only the reactive individual became more alike its proactive partner, whereas the latter did not change its behavior. The mismatched pairs that increased their similarity not only improved their reproductive success but also raised it up to the level of matched pairs. While most studies assume that assortative mating results from mate choice, our study suggests that postpairing adjustment could be an alternative explanation for the high behavioral similarity between partners observed in the field. It also explains why interindividual behavioral differences can be maintained within a given population. PMID:26973869

  4. Obesity and Cecal Intubation Time

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Deepanshu; Goyal, Abhinav; Uribe, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: Obesity is a much-debated factor with conflicting evidence regarding its association with cecum intubation rates during colonoscopy. We aimed to identify the association between cecal intubation (CI) time and obesity by eliminating confounding factors. Methods: A retrospective chart review of subjects undergoing outpatient colonoscopy was conducted. The population was categorized by sex and obesity (body mass index [BMI, kg/m2]: I, <24.9; II, 25 to 29.9; III, ≥30). CI time was used as a marker for a difficult colonoscopy. Mean CI times (MCT) were compared for statistical significance using analysis of variance tests. Results: A total of 926 subjects were included. Overall MCT was 15.7±7.9 minutes, and it was 15.9±7.9 and 15.5±7.9 minutes for men and women, respectively. MCT among women for BMI category I, II, and III was 14.4±6.5, 15.5±8.3, and 16.2±8.1 minutes (p=0.55), whereas for men, it was 16.3±8.9, 15.9±8.0, and 15.6±7.2 minutes (p=0.95), respectively. Conclusions: BMI had a positive association with CI time for women, but had a negative association with CI for men. PMID:26867549

  5. The Development of Computational Biology in South Africa: Successes Achieved and Lessons Learnt

    PubMed Central

    Mulder, Nicola J.; Christoffels, Alan; de Oliveira, Tulio; Gamieldien, Junaid; Hazelhurst, Scott; Joubert, Fourie; Kumuthini, Judit; Pillay, Ché S.; Snoep, Jacky L.; Tastan Bishop, Özlem; Tiffin, Nicki

    2016-01-01

    Bioinformatics is now a critical skill in many research and commercial environments as biological data are increasing in both size and complexity. South African researchers recognized this need in the mid-1990s and responded by working with the government as well as international bodies to develop initiatives to build bioinformatics capacity in the country. Significant injections of support from these bodies provided a springboard for the establishment of computational biology units at multiple universities throughout the country, which took on teaching, basic research and support roles. Several challenges were encountered, for example with unreliability of funding, lack of skills, and lack of infrastructure. However, the bioinformatics community worked together to overcome these, and South Africa is now arguably the leading country in bioinformatics on the African continent. Here we discuss how the discipline developed in the country, highlighting the challenges, successes, and lessons learnt. PMID:26845152

  6. GRAIL project management: Launching on cost, schedule, and spec and achieving full mission success

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, R. L.; Zuber, M. T.; Lehman, D. H.; Hoffman, T. L.

    The Gravity Recovery And Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) project, a NASA Discovery Program mission with a cost cap, was launched September 10, 2011, on spec, on time and under budget. Led by Principal Investigator (PI) Dr. Maria T. Zuber of MIT and managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, with Lockheed Martin as spacecraft contractor and the late Sally Ride as Education and Public Outreach Lead, GRAIL completed its Prime Mission in May 2012, successfully meeting its objectives-to precisely map the gravitational field of the Moon to reveal its internal structure “ from crust to core,” determine its thermal evolution, and extend this knowledge to other planets. This paper updates last year's IEEE Aerospace Conference paper [1], summarizing key development challenges and accomplishments through completion of the Primary Mission, and reporting progress in the Extended Mission.

  7. The Development of Computational Biology in South Africa: Successes Achieved and Lessons Learnt.

    PubMed

    Mulder, Nicola J; Christoffels, Alan; de Oliveira, Tulio; Gamieldien, Junaid; Hazelhurst, Scott; Joubert, Fourie; Kumuthini, Judit; Pillay, Ché S; Snoep, Jacky L; Tastan Bishop, Özlem; Tiffin, Nicki

    2016-02-01

    Bioinformatics is now a critical skill in many research and commercial environments as biological data are increasing in both size and complexity. South African researchers recognized this need in the mid-1990s and responded by working with the government as well as international bodies to develop initiatives to build bioinformatics capacity in the country. Significant injections of support from these bodies provided a springboard for the establishment of computational biology units at multiple universities throughout the country, which took on teaching, basic research and support roles. Several challenges were encountered, for example with unreliability of funding, lack of skills, and lack of infrastructure. However, the bioinformatics community worked together to overcome these, and South Africa is now arguably the leading country in bioinformatics on the African continent. Here we discuss how the discipline developed in the country, highlighting the challenges, successes, and lessons learnt.

  8. [Combined Use of a Videolaryngoscope and a Transilluminating Device for Intubation with Two Difficult Airways].

    PubMed

    Saima, Shunsuke; Asai, Takashi; Kimura, Rie; Terada, Satoshi; Arai, Takerou; Okuda, Yasuhisa

    2015-10-01

    Videolaryngoscope is useful in patients with difficult airways, but it may not be in some patients. We report the use of a lighted stylet to facilitate tracheal intubation in 2 patients in whom laryngoscopy with a videolaryngoscope was difficult. Case 1: A 52-year-old female with loose teeth and lockjaw presented for a scoliosis surgery under general anesthesia. Laryngoscopy using a blade 3 of a Glide-Scope® (Laerdal Medical Corporation, New York, NY, USA) videolaryngoscope (GVL) showed a Cormack-Lehanne grade 3 view. Bag mask ventilation was easily achieved. By using the Trachilight™ (Saturn Biomedical System Burnaby, BC, Canada) with the GVL, we could intubate the trachea succesfully. Case 2: A 16-year-old male with a history of difficult tracheal intubation due to a limited cervical spine movement presented for an external fixation of a femur under general anesthesia. After induction of anaesthesia, bag mask ventilation was easily achieved but the GVL laryngoscopy did not provide a good view of the glottis (Cormack-Lehanne grade 3). Combined use of the Trachilight™ with the GVL, facilitated tracheal intubation. The Trachilight™ is a recognized aid to facilitate trachal intubation but the device is now commercially not available. Neverthless, we believe that a lighted stylet is potentially useful for tracheal intubation when the view of the glottis with a videolaryngoscopy is not ideal. PMID:26742405

  9. Combustion Module-2 Achieved Scientific Success on Shuttle Mission STS-107

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Over, Ann P.

    2004-01-01

    The familiar teardrop shape of a candle is caused by hot, spent air rising and cool fresh air flowing behind it. This type of airflow obscures many of the fundamental processes of combustion and is an impediment to our understanding and modeling of key combustion controls used for manufacturing, transportation, fire safety, and pollution. Conducting experiments in the microgravity environment onboard the space shuttles eliminates these impediments. NASA Glenn Research Center's Combustion Module-2 (CM-2) and its three experiments successfully flew on STS-107/Columbia in the SPACEHAB module and provided the answers for many research questions. However, this research also opened up new questions. The CM-2 facility was the largest and most complex pressurized system ever flown by NASA and was a precursor to the Glenn Fluids and Combustion Facility planned to fly on the International Space Station. CM-2 operated three combustion experiments: Laminar Soot Processes (LSP), Structure of Flame Balls at Low Lewis-Number (SOFBALL), and Water Mist Fire Suppression Experiment (Mist). Although Columbia's mission ended in tragedy with the loss of her crew and much data, most of the CM-2 results were sent to the ground team during the mission.

  10. Arytenoid dislocation after uneventful endotracheal intubation: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Tak Kyu; Ryu, Chang Hwan; Park, Yu Na; Kim, Nam Woo

    2016-01-01

    Arytenoid dislocation is an unusual complication of endotracheal intubation. We reported a case of a 48-year-old female with arytenoid dislocation after uneventful endotracheal intubation, which was successfully treated with arytenoid reduction. The patient complained of persistent hoarseness until the fourth day after an uneventful gynecologic surgery under general anesthesia. On laryngoscopic examination, paralyzed left vocal cord with minimal arytenoid movement was observed. An anteromedial dislocation of the left arytenoid cartilage was suspected and surgical reduction was performed by the laryngologist. The hoarseness was immediately resolved after surgical intervention. Anesthesiologists should be careful not to cause laryngeal trauma in anesthetized patients. In addition, early diagnosis and prompt surgical reduction are essential for a better prognosis for arytenoid dislocation. PMID:26885311

  11. Achieving success: assessing the role of and building a business case for technology in healthcare.

    PubMed

    Neumann, C L; Blouin, A S; Byrne, E M

    1999-01-01

    As the healthcare market continues to evolve, technology will play an increasingly important role in an integrated delivery system's ability to provide high-quality, cost-effective care. Healthcare leaders must be proactive and forward thinking about their technology investments. The financial investment for technology innovation can be significant. Therefore, it is important that healthcare executives deliberately design the role of technology and develop a consistent method for evaluating, identifying, and prioritizing technology investments. The article begins by describing technology's role in a healthcare organization as a window to the organization, a key driver of business strategy, and a high-performance enabler, and it develops a seven-step process for building a business case to ensure that an organization's technology investments are wise, well-reasoned, and will provide value to its customers. In addition, the article discusses the importance of combining people and process reengineering with new technology to exponentially increase the value to an organization. Healthcare leaders must understand the multiple roles of technology and consistently develop a business case when making technology investment decisions. Organizations driven by such an understanding will have a robust infrastructure of enabling technology designed to integrate people and process elements with technology to achieve the goals and initiatives of the organization. These organizations will lead the healthcare industry into the next millennium.

  12. How to successfully achieve salt restriction in dialysis patients? What are the outcomes?

    PubMed

    Ok, Ercan

    2010-01-01

    Despite the fact that dietary salt restriction is the most logical measure to prevent accumulation of salt and water in patients without renal function, it is not applied in most dialysis centers. In this review, the reasons for this unlucky development are analyzed. First, it appears that many dialysis patients are slightly overhydrated, but this is often not noticed and, if so, the deleterious effects in the long run are not appreciated. These consist not only of 'drug-resistant' hypertension, but also dilatation of the cardiac compartments leading to preventable cardiovascular events. Second, there are practical reasons why salt restriction is neglected. It is very difficult to buy salt-poor food. Salt consumption is an addiction, which can be overcome, but time and efforts are needed to achieve that. Suggestions are made how to reach that goal. Finally, examples are given how cardiac damage (often considered irreversible) can be improved or even cured by a 'volume control' strategy, whose crucial part is serious salt restriction.

  13. A comparative evaluation of the Airtraq and King Vision video laryngoscope as an intubating aid in adult patients.

    PubMed

    Ali, Qazi Ehsan; Amir, Syed Hussain; Jamil, Shaista; Ahmad, Sarfaraz

    2015-01-01

    Airtraq has been shown to improve ease of intubation in patients with normal and difficult airway. King Vision video laryngoscope is a newly introduced intubating device with an attached monitor. We here hypothesized that the King Vision video laryngoscope with channeled blade performs better during intubation as compared to Airtraq. In this study, we performed a comparison between the King Vision video laryngoscope and the Airtraq with regard to time needed for intubation, number of attempts required to intubate, and complications. Fifty ASA grade I and II adult patients posted for a routine surgical procedure were randomly divided into two groups of 25 patients each. All patients were anesthetized using similar techniques. The time required to intubate patients was significantly shorter when the King Vision video laryngoscope with channeled blade was used as compared to the Airtraq (p < 0.05). The number of attempts to successfully intubate patients was also significantly lower (p < 0.05) for the King Vision video laryngoscope than for the Airtraq. The use of the Kings Vision video laryngoscope with channeled blade should be encouraged in difficult intubation situations in adult patients with a mouth opening of more than 18 mm.

  14. Methods and complications of nasoenteral intubation.

    PubMed

    Halloran, Owen; Grecu, Bianca; Sinha, Ashish

    2011-01-01

    Nasoenteral intubation is among the most common procedures performed by clinicians across all medical specialties. The most common technique for nasoenteral intubation is blind passage, as it does not require the use of sophisticated or expensive medical equipment. Unfortunately, blind placement too frequently results in trauma and is a source of significant morbidity and mortality. It is apparent that altered mental status, a preexisting endotracheal tube, and critical illness put a patient in a higher risk group for malposition and complications. Nasoenteral intubation should be attempted only with an understanding of the possibility for difficult placement and the potential complications that can arise from trauma or malposition.

  15. The Fast and Easy Way for Double-Lumen Tube Intubation: Individual Angle-Modification

    PubMed Central

    Min, Jeong Jin; Lee, Jong-Hwan; Kang, Se Hee; Kim, Eunhee; Lee, Sangmin M.; Cho, Jong Ho; Kim, Hong Kwan

    2016-01-01

    To find the faster and easier way than the existing intubating technique for double-lumen tube, we modified the angle of double-lumen tube according to an individual’s upper airway anatomy and compared the time needed and the number of attempts for successful intubation between individually angle-modified and non-modified double-lumen tubes. Adult patients undergoing elective thoracic surgery were randomly allocated in either non-angle-modified (Group N, n = 54) or angle-modified (Group M, n = 54) groups. During mask ventilation in the sniffing position, angle-modification was performed in Group M as follows: the distal tip of the tube was placed at the level of the cricoid cartilage and the shaft was bent at the intersection of the oral and pharyngeal axes estimated from the patient’s surface anatomy. The time needed and the number of attempts for successful intubation and Cormack and Lehane (C-L) grade were recorded. Overall median intubation time (sec) was significantly shorter in Group M than in Group N [10.2 vs. 15.1, P<0.001]. In addition, Group M showed the shorter median intubation time (sec) in C-L grades I-III [8.2 vs. 11.1 in C-L grade I, (P = 0.003), 10.3 vs. 15.3 in II, (P = 0.001), and 11.8 vs. 27.9 in III, (P<0.001), respectively]. Moreover, all intubation was successfully performed at the first attempt in patients with C-L grades I-III in Group M (P = 0.027). Our study showed an individual angle-modification would be useful for the fast and easy intubation of double-lumen tube in patients with C-L grades I-III. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02190032 PMID:27537372

  16. An analysis of perfusion technology preadmission factors effects on academic success, perfusion certification achievement, and career placement.

    PubMed

    Palmer, David A

    2007-12-01

    This retrospective study was designed to evaluate the contribution of grade point average (GPA) and the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised (WAIS-R) practical scores toward predicting perfusion academic success, career placement as a clinical perfusionist, and certification success or failure. The files of 95 students enrolled in the perfusion technology program at Carlow University-University of Pittsburgh Medical Center School of Cardiovascular Perfusion (CARLOW-UPMC) from 1995 through 2005 were reviewed to obtain admission and academic data. The independent variables used were WAIS-R practical results of the picture completion (PC), picture arrangement (PA), block design (BD), object assembly (OA) and digit symbol (DS) tests, undergraduate grade point average (UGPA), science grade point average (SGPA), and anatomy and physiology grade point average (APGPA). The dependent variables used were perfusion grade point average (PGPA), career placement status as a clinical perfusionist (CAREER), and success or failure on the American Board of Cardiovascular Perfusion (ABCP) certification examination. The research plan consisted of logistic and multiple linear regression analyses to determine which of the WAIS-R and GPA independent variables were significantly associated with the dependent variables. UGPA, SGPA, and APGPA all correlate at the 5% level with success achieving high PGPA. WAIS-R measures were not significant indicators of academic success. PGPA, UGPA, SGPA, and APGPA did not significantly correlate with any of the tested WAIS-R scores. PC, BD, and OA scores correlate well with CAREER. OA and DS scores correlate at the p = 0.05 level with ABCP certification success.

  17. Pulmonary Delivery of Vancomycin Dry Powder Aerosol to Intubated Rabbits.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Bradley P; El-Gendy, Nashwa; Kuehl, Christopher; Berkland, Cory

    2015-08-01

    Antibiotic multiresistant pneumonia is a risk associated with long-term mechanical ventilation. Vancomycin is commonly prescribed for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections; however, current formulations of vancomycin are only given intravenously. High doses of vancomycin have been associated with severe renal toxicity. In this study, we characterized dry powder vancomyin as a potential inhaled therapeutic aerosol and compared pharmacokinetic profiles of iv and pulmonary administered vancomycin in intubated rabbits through an endotracheal tube system. Cascade impaction studies indicated that using an endotracheal tube, which bypasses deposition in the mouth and throat, increased the amount of drug entering the lung. Bypassing the endotracheal tube with a catheter further enhanced drug deposition in the lung. Interestingly, intubated rabbits administered 1 mg/kg vancomycin via inhalation had similar AUC to rabbits that were administered 1 mg/kg vancomycin via a single bolus iv infusion; however, inhalation of vancomycin reduced Cmax and increased Tmax, indicating that inhaled vancomycin resulted in more sustained pulmonary levels of vancomycin. Collectively, these results suggested that dry powder vancomycin can successfully be delivered by pulmonary inhalation in intubated patients. Furthermore, as inhaled vancomycin is delivered locally to the site of pulmonary infection, this delivery route could reduce the total dose required for therapeutic efficacy and simultaneously reduce the risk of renal toxicity by eliminating the high levels of systemic drug exposure required to push the pulmonary dose to therapeutic thresholds during iv administration.

  18. Comparison of Transcanalicular Multidiode Laser Dacryocystorhinostomy with and without Silicon Tube Intubation

    PubMed Central

    Yildirim, Yildiray; Kar, Taner; Topal, Tuncay; Cesmeci, Enver; Kaya, Abdullah; Colakoglu, Kadir; Aksoy, Yakup; Sonmez, Murat

    2016-01-01

    Aim. To compare the surgical outcomes of surgery with and without bicanalicular silicon tube intubation for the treatment of patients who have primary uncomplicated nasolacrimal duct obstruction. Methods. This retrospective study is comprised of 113 patients with uncomplicated primary nasolacrimal duct obstruction. There were 2 groups in the study: Group 1 (n = 58) patients underwent transcanalicular diode laser dacryocystorhinostomy surgery with bicanalicular silicon tube intubation and Group 2 (n = 55) patients underwent transcanalicular diode laser dacryocystorhinostomy surgery without bicanalicular silicon tube intubation. The follow-up period was 18.42 ± 2.8 months for Group 1 and 18.8 ± 2.1 months for Group 2. Results. Success was defined by irrigation of the lacrimal system without regurgitation and by the absence of epiphora. Success rates were 84.4% for Group 1 and 63.6% for Group 2 (P = 0.011). Statistically a significant difference was found between the two groups. Conclusion. The results of the study showed that transcanalicular diode laser dacryocystorhinostomy surgery with bicanalicular silicon tube intubation was more successful than the other method of surgery. Consequently, the application of silicone tube intubation in transcanalicular diode laser dacryocystorhinostomy surgery is recommended. PMID:27127644

  19. Nasotracheal intubation of a patient with restricted mouth opening using a McGrath MAC X-Blade and Magill forceps.

    PubMed

    Arslan, Zehra İpek; Ozdal, P; Ozdamar, D; Agır, H; Solak, M

    2016-10-01

    We experienced a case of successful nasotracheal intubation using the X-Blade of the McGrath MAC in a 28-year-old woman with a 2.5-cm mouth opening. She had no teeth on the right side, her neck movement was limited, her mandibular protrusion was grade C, and her Mallampati could not be evaluated. Her tongue was fixed to the left wall during a previous surgery. We evaluated the awake glottic view using the McGrath MAC X-Blade and topical oral anesthesia. We obtained a Cormack-Lehane grade II view and then decided to administer general anesthesia. Intubation was attempted with a Macintosh laryngoscope, but we could not insert the scope deeply enough and there was no area in which to insert the Magill forceps or endotracheal tube. We then used the X-Blade 3 of the McGrath MAC and obtained a sufficient area in which to insert the tube and manipulate the Magill forceps. A laryngoscopic view was achieved in 7 s and nasotracheal intubation was performed in 16 s with a 7.0-mm spiral tube using the Magill forceps. McGrath MAC X-Blade can be used with the Magill forceps in patients with restricted mouth opening with careful patient selection, in experienced hands.

  20. Evaluation of Endotracheal Intubation with a Flexible Fiberoptic Bronchoscope in Lateral Patient Positioning: A Prospective Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hui; Wang, Wu; Lu, Ya-Ping; Wang, Yan; Chen, Li-Hua; Lei, Li-Pei; Fang, Xiang-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Background: There is an unmet need for a reliable method of airway management for patients in the lateral position. This prospective randomized controlled two-center study was designed to evaluate the feasibility of intubation using a flexible fiberoptic bronchoscope in the lateral position during surgery. Methods: Seventy-two patients scheduled for elective nonobstetric surgery in the lateral decubitus position requiring tracheal intubation under general anesthesia at Lishui Central Hospital of Zhejiang Province and Jiaxing First Hospital of Zhejiang Province from April 1, 2015, to September 30, 2015, were enrolled in this study. Patients were randomly assigned to the supine position group (Group S, n = 38) and the lateral position group (Group L, n = 34). Experienced anesthetists performed tracheal intubation with a fiberoptic bronchoscope after general anesthesia. The time required for intubation, intubation success rates, and hemodynamic changes was recorded. Between-group differences were assessed using the Student's t-test, Mann–Whitney U-test, or Chi-square test. Results: The median total time to tracheal intubation was significantly longer in Group S (140.0 [135.8, 150.0] s) compared to Group L (33.0 [24.0, 38.8] s) (P < 0.01). The first-attempt intubation success rate was significantly higher in Group L (97%) compared to Group S (16%). Hemodynamic changes immediately after intubation were more exaggerated in Group S compared to Group L (P = 0.02). Conclusion: Endotracheal intubation with a flexible fiberoptic bronchoscope may be an effective and timesaving technique for patients in the lateral position. Trial Registration: Chinese Clinical Trial Register, ChiCTR-IIR-16007814; http://www.chictr.org.cn/showproj.aspx?proj=13183. PMID:27569229

  1. The Reciprocal Relations between Self-Concept, Motivation and Achievement: Juxtaposing Academic Self-Concept and Achievement Goal Orientations for Mathematics Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seaton, Marjorie; Parker, Philip; Marsh, Herbert W.; Craven, Rhonda G.; Yeung, Alexander Seeshing

    2014-01-01

    Research suggests that motivated students and those with high academic self-concepts perform better academically. Although substantial evidence supports a reciprocal relation between academic self-concept and achievement, there is less evidence supporting a similar relation between achievement goal orientations and achievement. There is also a…

  2. Nasotracheal intubation in patients with limited mouth opening: a comparison between fibreoptic intubation and the Trachway®.

    PubMed

    Lee, M C; Tseng, K Y; Shen, Y C; Lin, C H; Hsu, C W; Hsu, H J; Lu, I C; Cheng, K I

    2016-01-01

    In patients with limited mouth opening, traditional laryngoscopy and videolaryngoscopes are not useful when performing nasotracheal intubation. Eighty patients with limited mouth opening who required nasotracheal intubation were randomly assigned to either fibreoptic intubation (n = 40) or the Trachway(®) (n = 40). Using the modified nasal intubation difficulty scale, 22 (55%) patients who received fibreoptic intubation were categorised as no difficulty compared with 40 (100%) patients in the Trachway group (p < 0.001). Mean (SD) total intubation time was 71.8 (23.3) s in patients who received fibreoptic intubation compared with 35.4 (9.8) s in the Trachway group (p < 0.001). We conclude that the Trachway technique for nasotracheal intubation is quicker and easier compared with fibreoptic intubation in patients with limited mouth opening.

  3. Achieving successful evidence-based practice implementation in juvenile justice: The importance of diagnostic and evaluative capacity.

    PubMed

    Walker, Sarah Cusworth; Bumbarger, Brian K; Phillippi, Stephen W

    2015-10-01

    Evidence-based programs (EBPs) are an increasingly visible aspect of the treatment landscape in juvenile justice. Research demonstrates that such programs yield positive returns on investment and are replacing more expensive, less effective options. However, programs are unlikely to produce expected benefits when they are not well-matched to community needs, not sustained and do not reach sufficient reach and scale. We argue that achieving these benchmarks for successful implementation will require states and county governments to invest in data-driven decision infrastructure in order to respond in a rigorous and flexible way to shifting political and funding climates. We conceptualize this infrastructure as diagnostic capacity and evaluative capacity: Diagnostic capacity is defined as the process of selecting appropriate programing and evaluative capacity is defined as the ability to monitor and evaluate progress. Policy analyses of Washington State, Pennsylvania and Louisiana's program implementation successes are used to illustrate the benefits of diagnostic and evaluate capacity as a critical element of EBP implementation. PMID:26141970

  4. Remifentanil for endotracheal intubation in premature infants: A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Badiee, Zohreh; Vakiliamini, Mazyar; Mohammadizadeh, Majid

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Endotracheal intubation is a common procedure in neonatal care. The objective of this study was to determine whether the premedication with remifentanil before intubation has analgesic effects in newborn infants. Methods: A total of 40 premature infants who needed endotracheal intubation for intubation-surfactant-extubation method were randomly assigned in two groups of an equal number at two university hospitals. The control group was given 10 μg/kg atropine IV infusions in 1 min and then 2 ml normal saline. In the case group, the atropine was given with the same method and then remifentanil was administered 2 μg/kg IV infusions in 2 min. Findings: For remifentanil and control groups, the mean birth weight were 1761 ± 64 and 1447 ± 63 grams (P = 0.29), and the mean gestational ages were 31.69 ± 3.5 and 30.56 ± 2.8 weeks (P = 0.28), respectively. Using premature infant pain profile score, infants who received remifentanil felt significantly less pain than the control group (15.1 ± 1.6 vs. 7.5 ± 1.4; P < 0.001). There were no significant differences in the duration of endotracheal intubation procedure (20.8 ± 6 vs. 22.8 ± 7.3 s; P = 0.33), the number of attempts for successful intubation and oxygen desaturation between groups. Conclusion: Premedication with remifentanil has good analgesic effects for endotracheal intubation in premature infants without significant derangements in mean blood pressure and oxygen saturation. PMID:24991608

  5. Comparison of tracheal intubation with the Airway Scope or Clarus Video System in patients with cervical collars.

    PubMed

    Kim, J K; Kim, J A; Kim, C S; Ahn, H J; Yang, M K; Choi, S J

    2011-08-01

    Tracheal intubations with the Airway Scope or the Clarus Video System, a new rigid fibrescope, were compared in 140 patients whose necks were immobilised by cervical collars. The time for intubation, success rate, number of attempts and number of optimisation manoeuvres were assessed. Mean (SD) intubation time was longer with the Airway Scope (30.4 (16.5) s) than with the Clarus Video System (18.9 (15.2) s; p = 0.003) and the median (IQR [range]) number of optimisation manoeuvres was also marginally different; 0 (0-1 [0-2]) with the Airway Scope, 0 (0-0 [0-2]) with the Clarus Video System; p = 0.004. The tracheas of 67 (95.7%) and 66 (94.3%) patients were successfully intubated with the Airway Scope and the Clarus Video System, respectively (p = 1.0). The number of attempts, vital signs and complications were not different between devices. The Clarus Video System was comparable to the Airway Scope in the success rate for tracheal intubation, but provided faster and easier intubations than the Airway Scope in patients with cervical collars.

  6. Laryngeal complications by orotracheal intubation: Literature review

    PubMed Central

    Mota, Luiz Alberto Alves; de Cavalho, Glauber Barbosa; Brito, Valeska Almeida

    2012-01-01

    Sumamry Introduction: The injuries caused for the orotracheal intubation are common in our way and widely told by literature. Generally the pipe rank of or consequence of its permanence in the aerial ways of the patient is caused by accidents in. It has diverse types of larynx injuries, caused for multiple mechanisms. Objective: To verify, in literature, the main causes of laryngeal complications after- orotracheal intubation and its mechanisms of injury. Revision of Literature: The searched databases had been LILACS, BIREME and SCIELO. Were updated, books and theses had been used, delimiting itself the period enters 1953 the 2009. The keywords used for the search of articles had been: complications, injuries, larynx, intubation, endotracheal, orotracheal, granulomas, stenosis. 59 references had been selected. The used criteria of inclusion for the choice of articles had been the ones that had shown to the diverse types of injuries caused for the orotracheal intubation and its pathophysiology. Final Considerations: This revision of literature was motivated by the comment in the practical clinic of a great number of laryngeal sequels in patients submitted to the orotracheal intubation. Of that is ahead important the knowledge, for the professionals of the area of health, the types of complications and its causes, with intention to prevent them, adopting measured of prevention of these injuries. PMID:25991942

  7. Out-of-Hospital Endotracheal Intubation Experience and Patient Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Henry E.; Balasubramani, G. K.; Cook, Lawrence J.; Lave, Judith R.; Yealy, Donald M.

    2011-01-01

    Study objective Previous studies suggest improved patient outcomes for providers who perform high volumes of complex medical procedures. Out-of-hospital tracheal intubation is a difficult procedure. We seek to determine the association between rescuer procedural experience and patient survival after out-of-hospital tracheal intubation. Methods We analyzed probabilistically linked Pennsylvania statewide emergency medicine services, hospital discharge, and death data of patients receiving out-of-hospital tracheal intubation. We defined tracheal intubation experience as cumulative tracheal intubation during 2000 to 2005; low=1 to 10 tracheal intubations, medium=11 to 25 tracheal intubations, high=26 to 50 tracheal intubations, and very high=greater than 50 tracheal intubations. We identified survival on hospital discharge of patients intubated during 2003 to 2005. Using generalized estimating equations, we evaluated the association between patient survival and out-of-hospital rescuer cumulative tracheal intubation experience, adjusted for clinical covariates. Results During 2003 to 2005, 4,846 rescuers performed tracheal intubation. These individuals performed tracheal intubation on 33,117 patients during 2003 to 2005 and 62,586 patients during 2000 to 2005. Among 21,753 cardiac arrests, adjusted odds of survival was higher for patients intubated by rescuers with very high tracheal intubation experience; adjusted odds ratio (OR) versus low tracheal intubation experience: very high 1.48 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.15 to 1.89), high 1.13 (95% CI 0.98 to 1.31), and medium 1.02 (95% CI 0.91 to 1.15). Among 8,162 medical nonarrests, adjusted odds of survival were higher for patients intubated by rescuers with high and very high tracheal intubation experience; adjusted OR versus low tracheal intubation experience: very high 1.55 (95% CI 1.08 to 2.22), high 1.29 (95% CI 1.04 to 1.59), and medium 1.16 (95% CI 0.97 to 1.38). Among 3,202 trauma nonarrests, survival was not

  8. [Awake Nasotracheal Intubation for a 4-Year-old Boy with an Oral Penetrating Toothbrush Injury].

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Naoya; Ando, Kokichi; Saito, Kazutomo; Toyama, Hiroaki; Fudeta, Hiroto; Yamauchi, Masanori

    2015-09-01

    We report a case of an oral penetrating injury caused by a toothbrush in a 4-year-old 17-kg boy. The toothbrush was lodged in the right cervical region through the oral cavity, and emergency surgery for removal was planned under general anesthesia. Although mask ventilation was not possible because of the protruding toothbrush handle, awake nasotracheal intubation was successfully performed with a fiber-scope and intravenous fentanyl 25 μg. We conclude that appropriate analgesics could facilitate awake intubation in pediatric patients.

  9. [Tracheal rupture: delayed diagnosis with endobronchial intubation].

    PubMed

    Besmer, I; Schüpfer, G; Stulz, P; Jöhr, M

    2001-03-01

    Tracheobroncheal rupture is a rare complication of intubation techniques using a stylet. In this case report the patient was intubated by an emergency physician in a preclinical setting after a motor vehicle accident. Iatrogenic tracheal laceration was masked by inappropriate position of the endobronchial tube. By chance ventilation was maintained to both lungs by flow through the Murphy's eye of the tube and the lumen of the tube. In correcting the deep tube position after a chest x-ray laceration of the trachea was unmasked and ventilation problems occurred immediately. The tube was replaced under fiberoptical control and the patient was managed for surgical repair using a jet ventilation technique. In this case two complications of endobronchial intubation occurred, but the deep tube placement opposed the effects of the tracheal laceration. This was probably life saving for the patient during emergency transfer by helicopter after the accident. The anaesthesiological management during tracheal repair is discussed.

  10. Tracheal intubation with volatile induction and target bispectral index of 25 versus 40: A randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Khandelwal, Purva; Gombar, Kanti Kumar; Ahuja, Vanita; Gombar, Satinder

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: A target bispectral index (BIS) value of 40 is considered adequate for depth of anesthesia, but no consensus exists regarding BIS value for tracheal intubation without neuromuscular blocking drugs. The aim of this randomized, double-blinded study was to compare the total duration from sevoflurane induction to tracheal intubation at a BIS value of 25 or 40. Material and Methods: This study was a prospective, randomized and observer-blinded clinical trial. After approval of the Institutional Ethics Committee and written informed consent, 80 patients of American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status I-II, aged 20-60 years, of either sex, requiring general anesthesia with tracheal intubation were enrolled. The patients were randomized to either Group BIS40-intubation at a target BIS value of 40 ± 5 or group BIS25-intubation at a target BIS value of 25 ± 5. The intubating conditions, hemodynamic, and adverse effects were observed in both the groups. Results: This study showed that the total time required from induction to tracheal intubation was 4.9 ± 0.9 min in group BIS40 as compared to 6.3 ± 0.5 min in group BIS25 (P = 0.001) using two-tailed sample t-test. The mean intubation score was 6.5 ± 0.9 in group BIS40, and 5.1 ± 0.7 in group BIS25 (P = 0.001) using Mann-Whitney U-test. Conclusion: The time to achieve target BIS value of 25 was greater as compared to target BIS value of 40 during sevoflurane induction but provided better intubating conditions in the absence of neuromuscular agents. PMID:27625484

  11. Achievement Emotions as Predictors of High School Science Success among African-American and European American Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowe, Marilyn Louise Simmons

    2012-01-01

    The literature includes few studies of the interrelations of achievement goals and achievement emotions with respect to minority students and science achievement. The objective of this study was to test the control-value theory (CVT) of achievement emotions to determine if the eight discrete achievement emotions would be predictive of test scores…

  12. Visible, safe and certain endotracheal intubation using endoscope system and inhalation anesthesia for rats.

    PubMed

    Konno, Kenjiro; Shiotani, Yumi; Itano, Naoki; Ogawa, Teppei; Hatakeyama, Mika; Shioya, Kyoko; Kasai, Noriyuki

    2014-10-01

    Anesthesia strongly influences laboratory animals, and it can also greatly affect the experimental data. Rats rank only second to mice in the number used in research fields, such as organ transplantation, regenerative medicine and imaging. Therefore, appropriate and effective anesthesia, including the protocol of the endotracheal intubation and inhalation anesthesia, is crucial. Hence, we evaluated these methods in this study. Twelve Wistar rats were intraperitoneally injected with M/M/B: 0.3/4/5, comprising of medetomidine, midazolam and butorphanol at a dose of 0.3 mg/kg + 4.0 mg/kg + 5.0 mg/kg body weight/rat, respectively. An endotracheal tube was then intubated into the trachea. After intubation, the rats were connected to the inhalation anesthesia circuit using isoflurane, and vital signs were measured until 30 min after connection. All intubations were successfully finished within 1 min, and the values of the vital signs were normal and stable. In addition, histopathological observation of the trachea and lungs showed no trauma. These results suggest that this visible endotracheal intubation method is simple, reliable, safe and favorable with regard to the rats' welfare. PMID:25030602

  13. Visible, safe and certain endotracheal intubation using endoscope system and inhalation anesthesia for rats.

    PubMed

    Konno, Kenjiro; Shiotani, Yumi; Itano, Naoki; Ogawa, Teppei; Hatakeyama, Mika; Shioya, Kyoko; Kasai, Noriyuki

    2014-10-01

    Anesthesia strongly influences laboratory animals, and it can also greatly affect the experimental data. Rats rank only second to mice in the number used in research fields, such as organ transplantation, regenerative medicine and imaging. Therefore, appropriate and effective anesthesia, including the protocol of the endotracheal intubation and inhalation anesthesia, is crucial. Hence, we evaluated these methods in this study. Twelve Wistar rats were intraperitoneally injected with M/M/B: 0.3/4/5, comprising of medetomidine, midazolam and butorphanol at a dose of 0.3 mg/kg + 4.0 mg/kg + 5.0 mg/kg body weight/rat, respectively. An endotracheal tube was then intubated into the trachea. After intubation, the rats were connected to the inhalation anesthesia circuit using isoflurane, and vital signs were measured until 30 min after connection. All intubations were successfully finished within 1 min, and the values of the vital signs were normal and stable. In addition, histopathological observation of the trachea and lungs showed no trauma. These results suggest that this visible endotracheal intubation method is simple, reliable, safe and favorable with regard to the rats' welfare.

  14. Prior esophagogastroduodenoscopy does not affect the cecal intubation time at bidirectional endoscopies

    PubMed Central

    Öner, Osman Zekai; Demirci, Rojbin Karakoyun; Gündüz, Umut Rıza; Aslaner, Arif; Koç, Ümit; Bülbüller, Nurullah

    2013-01-01

    Bidirectional endoscopy (BE) is often used to assess patients for the reason of anemia or to screen asymptomatic population for malignancy. Limited clinical data favors to perform first the upper gastrointestinal system endoscopy, but its effect to the duration of colonoscopy is yet to be determined. The aim of this retrospective study is to evaluate the effect of upper gastrointestinal system endoscopy on the time to achieve cecal intubation during colonoscopy in patients undergoing BE. Patients of four endoscopists at similar experience levels were retrospectively identified and categorized into the upper gastrointestinal system endoscopy before colonoscopy group (group 1) or the colonoscopy only group (group 2). The demographics, clinical data and the time to achieve cecal intubation for each patient were analyzed. The mean time to achieve cecal intubation in the first group that included 319 cases was 8.4 ± 0.93 minutes and the mean time in the second group that included 1672 cases was 8.56 ± 1.16 minutes. There was no statistically significant difference between the groups. There was also no significant difference between the Group 1 and Group 2 when compared according to which of the four endoscopists performed the procedures. Performing the upper gastrointestinal system endoscopy prior to colonoscopy did not affect the time to achieve cecal intubation. Considering that performing the upper gastrointestinal system endoscopy prior to the colonoscopy is more advantageous in terms of patient comfort and analgesic requirement, beginning to BE with it seems more favorable. PMID:23936601

  15. The Path to Career Success: High School Achievement, Certainty of Career Choice, and College Readiness Make a Difference. Issues In College Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ACT, Inc., 2009

    2009-01-01

    It is essential for all students to be ready for college and career when they graduate from high school. Postsecondary educators expect high school graduates to be prepared academically for success in postsecondary education, which in turn influences success in the work world. Employers continue to call for workers to have the tools needed to…

  16. Achieving College Success: The Impact of the College Success/STEM Program on Students' Matriculation to and Persistence in College. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lane, Brett; Souvanna, Phomdaen

    2014-01-01

    This College Success Research Brief is one of a series of briefs documenting the implementation and impact of Mass Insight's College Success/STEM program. The research briefs are intended to share key findings, highlight ongoing questions and lines of inquiry, and inform the thinking of practitioners and policymakers on how to scale up efforts to…

  17. Achieving Success in Small Business: A Self-Instruction Program for Small Business Owner-Managers. Success in Small Business: Luck or Pluck?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg. Div. of Vocational-Technical Education.

    This self-instructional module on success in small business is the first in a set of twelve modules designed for small business owner-managers. Competency objectives for this module are (1) ability to evaluate chances of success based upon one's personality and knowledge of good business practices and (2) ability to determine one's commitment to…

  18. Highly Robust Nanopore-Based Dual-Signal-Output Ion Detection System for Achieving Three Successive Calibration Curves.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xuemei; Hou, Ruizuo; Gao, Pengcheng; Miao, Mao; Lou, Xiaoding; Liu, Bifeng; Xia, Fan

    2016-02-16

    In recent years, artificial stimuli-responsive bioinspired nanopores have attracted a lot of attention due to their unique property of confined spaces and flexibility in terms of shapes and sizes. Most of the nanopore systems demonstrated their transmembrane properties and applications in target detections. However, almost all of the nanopores can be used only once due to either the irreversible reactions between targets and probes or the plugged nanopores not easily being unplugged again. In this work, we propose a dual-signal-output nanopore system that could detect the cations (Hg(2+)) inducing the plugged nanopores. The detection system is highly recoverable by the anions (S(2-)) inducing the unplugged nanopores. More importantly, as far as we know, it is seldom reported for the same nanopores to achieve successive calibration curves for three times by subsequent reversible plug-unplug processes, which strongly demonstrates the high robustness of this novel nanopore-detection system. In addition, unlike monitoring the plug-unplug phenomena by only one type of signal, we combined the ionic current signal with the fluorescence output and could directly observe that the change of ionic current does in fact correspond to the plug-unplug of the nanopores by the target stimuli. PMID:26754059

  19. Intubation of a Paediatric Manikin in Tongue Oedema and Face-to-Face Simulations by Novice Personnel: a Comparison of Glidescope, Airtraq and Direct Laryngoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Arslan, Zehra İpek; Turna, Canan; Gümüş, Nevin Esra; Toker, Kamil; Solak, Mine

    2016-01-01

    Objective Glidescope and Airtraq were designed for facilitating intubation and for teaching regarding the airway anatomy. We aimed to evaluate their efficacy in normal airway, tongue oedema and face-to-face orotracheal intubation models when used by novice personnel. Methods After the local human research ethics committee approval, 36 medical students who were in the beginning of their third year were enrolled in this study. After watching a video regarding intubation using one of these devices, the students intubated a paediatric manikin with a Glidescope or Airtraq via the normal airway, tongue oedema and face-to-face approach. Results Although the insertion and intubation times were similar among the groups, the intubation success rate of the Glidescope was higher in the normal airway (100% vs 67%) and tongue oedema (89% vs. 50%) compared with the Airtraq (p=0.008 and p=0.009). The success rates with the paediatric manikin by the face-to-face approach were similar among the groups (50%) (p=0.7). The need for manoeuvres in the Glidescope was lower in the normal and tongue oedema models (p=0.02 and p=0.002). In addition, oesophageal intubation was low in the control and tongue oedema models with the Glidescope (p=0.03 and p<0.001). Conclusion Novice personnel could more easily intubate the trachea with the Glidescope than with the Airtraq. Intubation with the Glidescope was superior to that with the Airtraq in the normal and tongue oedema models. The face-to-face intubation success rates were both low with both the Glidescope and Airtraq groups. PMID:27366561

  20. Comparison of intubation times using a manikin with an immobilized cervical spine: Macintosh laryngoscope vs. GlideScope vs. fiberoptic bronchoscope

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Jung-In; Ha, Sang Ook; Koo, Min Seok; Kwon, Miyoung; Kim, Jieun; Jeon, Jin; Park, So Hee; Shim, Sangwoo; Chang, Youjin; Park, Taejin

    2015-01-01

    Objective Airway management in patients with suspected cervical spine injury is classified as a “difficult airway.” The best device for managing difficult airways is not known. Therefore, we conducted an intubation study simulating patients with cervical spine injury using three devices: a conventional Macintosh laryngoscope, a video laryngoscope (GlideScope), and a fiberoptic bronchoscope (MAF-TM). Success rates, intubation time, and complication rates were compared. Methods Nine physician experts in airway management participated in this study. Cervical immobilization was used to simulate a difficult airway. Each participant performed intubation using airway devices in a randomly chosen order. We measured the time to vocal cord visualization, time to endotracheal tube insertion, and total tracheal intubation time. Success rates and dental injury rates were compared between devices. Results Total tracheal intubation time using the Macintosh laryngoscope, GlideScope, and fiberoptic bronchoscope was 13.3 (range, 11.1 to 20.1), 14.9 (range, 12.7 to 22.3), and 19.4 seconds (range, 14.1 to 32.5), respectively. Total tracheal intubation time differed significantly among the devices (P=0.009). Success rates for the Macintosh laryngoscope, GlideScope, and fiberoptic bronchoscope were 98%, 96%, and 100%, respectively, and dental injury rates were 5%, 19%, and 0%, respectively. Conclusion The fiberoptic bronchoscope required longer intubation times than the other devices. However, this device had the best success rate with the least incidence of dental injury. PMID:27752604

  1. Pulmonary delivery of vancomycin dry powder aerosol to intubated rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Bradley P.; El-Gendy, Nashwa; Kuehl, Christopher; Berkland, Cory

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic multi-resistant pneumonia is a risk associated with long term mechanical ventilation. Vancomycin is commonly prescribed for methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus infections; however, current formulations of vancomycin are only given intravenously. High doses of vancomycin have been associated with severe renal toxicity. In this study we characterized dry powder vancomyin as a potential inhaled therapeutic aerosol and compared pharmacokinetic profiles of i.v. and pulmonary administered vancomycin in intubated rabbits using a novel endotracheal tube catheter system. Cascade Impaction studies indicated that using an endotracheal tube, which bypasses deposition the mouth and throat, increased the amount of drug entering the lung. Drug deposition in the lung was further enhanced by using an endotracheal tube catheter, which did not alter the aerosol fine particle fraction. Interestingly, intubated rabbits administered 1 mg/kg vancomycin via inhalation had similar AUC to rabbits that were administered 1 mg/kg vancomycin via a single bolus i.v. infusion; however, inhalation of vancomycin reduced Cmax and increased Tmax, suggesting that inhaled vancomycin resulted in more sustained pulmonary levels of vancomycin. Collectively, these results suggested that dry powder vancomycin can successfully be delivered by pulmonary inhalation in intubated patients. Furthermore, as inhaled vancomycin is delivered locally to the site of pulmonary infection, this delivery route could reduce the total dose required for therapeutic efficacy and simultaneously reduce the risk of renal toxicity by eliminating the high levels of systemic drug exposure required to push the pulmonary dose to therapeutic thresholds during i.v. administration. PMID:25915095

  2. Narrowing the Achievement Gap and Sustaining Success: A Qualitative Study of the Norms, Practices, and Programs of a Successful High School with Urban Characteristics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Senesac, Donald Raymond

    2010-01-01

    The academic achievement gap is the manifestation of differential learning outcomes for students typified by membership in an ethnic minority sub group or economically disadvantaged sub group. Addressing the achievement gap has become vital for the nation as a whole, and even more critical for the state of California because the majority of…

  3. A Study of Home Environment, Academic Achievement and Teaching Aptitude on Training Success of Pre-Service Elementary Teachers of India

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rani, Sunita; Siddiqui, M. A.

    2015-01-01

    The primary intend of the study was to explore the relationship of Arts, Science and Commerce stream and training success and the influence of Home Environment, Academic Achievement and Teaching Aptitude on training success of ETE trainees. The study analyzed the numerical data from a survey of 380 teacher trainees of three DIETs of Delhi, India.…

  4. Selective lung intubation during paediatric thoracic surgeries.

    PubMed

    Mixa, V; Nedomova, B; Rygl, M

    2016-01-01

    Selective lung intubation is a necessary prerequisite for the completion of most interventions comprising thoracotomy and thoracoscopy. In paediatric care, our site uses Univent tubes for children up to the age of three years and double-lumen tubes (DLT) for children from 6-8 years of age. In younger children, we usually use regular endotracheal intubation, with the lung being held in the hemithorax position being operated on using a surgical retractor. The article presents the analysis of 860 thoracic surgeries, of which 491 comprised selective intubation (Univent 57 cases, DLT 434 cases). The use of the aforementioned devices is connected with certain complications. Univent tube can be connected with intraoperative dislocation of the obturating balloon (29.8%) and balloon perforation (5.2%). DLT insertion may be connected with failure of tube fitting. In 84 cases we had to repeat DLT insertion (20.6%). In 8 cases we were not able to insert DLT at all (1.8%). Standard use of selective intubation methods in paediatric patients from two years of age improved the conditions for surgical interventions (Tab. 2, Fig. 2, Ref. 19). PMID:27546541

  5. The Superintendent Beliefs and Leadership Practices in a School District that Has Successfully Increased the Achievement of Traditionally Marginalized Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fairbanks-Schutz, Jo-Ellen M.

    2010-01-01

    Superintendent leadership can influence student achievement and with the alarming gap between the academic achievement of traditionally marginalized students and their peers, superintendents have an ethical duty to lead their districts in closing these achievement gaps. Spillane, Halverson, and Diamond (2001) suggested that to have a more complete…

  6. Addition of a video camera system improves the ease of Airtraq(®) tracheal intubation during chest compression.

    PubMed

    Kohama, Hanako; Komasawa, Nobuyasu; Ueki, Ryusuke; Itani, Motoi; Nishi, Shin-ichi; Kaminoh, Yoshiroh

    2012-04-01

    Recent resuscitation guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation emphasize that rescuers should perform tracheal intubation with minimal interruption of chest compressions. We evaluated the use of video guidance to facilitate tracheal intubation with the Airtraq (ATQ) laryngoscope during chest compression. Eighteen novice physicians in our anesthesia department performed tracheal intubation on a manikin using the ATQ with a video camera system (ATQ-V) or with no video guidance (ATQ-N) during chest compression. All participants were able to intubate the manikin using the ATQ-N without chest compression, but five failed during chest compression (P < 0.05). In contrast, all participants successfully secured the airway with the ATQ-V, with or without chest compression. Concurrent chest compression increased the time required for intubation with the ATQ-N (without chest compression 14.8 ± 4.5 s; with chest compression, 28.2 ± 10.6 s; P < 0.05), but not with the ATQ-V (without chest compression, 15.9 ± 5.8 s; with chest compression, 17.3 ± 5.3 s; P > 0.05). The ATQ video camera system improves the ease of tracheal intubation during chest compressions.

  7. Pushed monocanalicular intubation versus probing as a primary management for congenital nasolacrimal obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Elsawaby, Emad Abdelaal; El Essawy, Rania Assem; Abdelbaky, Sameh Hassan; Ismail, Yomna Magdy

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Evaluation of efficiency, complications, and advantages of pushed monocanalicular intubation using Masterka® tube versus simple probing in patients with congenital nasolacrimal duct obstruction (CNLDO). Patients and methods This is a case-controlled study that included 60 eyes (of 53 patients); 30 eyes underwent probing and 30 eyes intubation using the Masterka tube as a primary treatment for CNLDO. The children were aged between 6 months and 36 months at the time of surgery, with no previous nasolacrimal surgical procedure, and had one or more of the following clinical signs of nasolacrimal duct obstruction: epiphora, mucous discharge, and/or increased tear lake. Results We defined success by absence of epiphora, mucous discharge, or increased tear lake 1 month after tube removal. The overall success rate in the probing group was 80%, while it was 83.3% in the intubation group. Conclusion Pushed monocanalicular intubation is an effective method for treatment of CNLDO; it requires only mask inhalation anesthesia and could be considered as an appropriate alternative procedure with imperceptible complications. PMID:27660407

  8. Pushed monocanalicular intubation versus probing as a primary management for congenital nasolacrimal obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Elsawaby, Emad Abdelaal; El Essawy, Rania Assem; Abdelbaky, Sameh Hassan; Ismail, Yomna Magdy

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Evaluation of efficiency, complications, and advantages of pushed monocanalicular intubation using Masterka® tube versus simple probing in patients with congenital nasolacrimal duct obstruction (CNLDO). Patients and methods This is a case-controlled study that included 60 eyes (of 53 patients); 30 eyes underwent probing and 30 eyes intubation using the Masterka tube as a primary treatment for CNLDO. The children were aged between 6 months and 36 months at the time of surgery, with no previous nasolacrimal surgical procedure, and had one or more of the following clinical signs of nasolacrimal duct obstruction: epiphora, mucous discharge, and/or increased tear lake. Results We defined success by absence of epiphora, mucous discharge, or increased tear lake 1 month after tube removal. The overall success rate in the probing group was 80%, while it was 83.3% in the intubation group. Conclusion Pushed monocanalicular intubation is an effective method for treatment of CNLDO; it requires only mask inhalation anesthesia and could be considered as an appropriate alternative procedure with imperceptible complications.

  9. A Climate for Academic Success: How School Climate Distinguishes Schools That Are Beating the Achievement Odds. Full Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voight, Adam; Austin, Gregory; Hanson, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    This report, written by WestEd's Adam Voight, Gregory Austin, and Thomas Hanson, describes a study that examines what makes successful schools different from other schools. Rather than define success in absolute terms, this study's definition is based on whether or not a school is performing better than predicted given the characteristics of the…

  10. Independence Training and School Achievement: A Study of Parental Attitudes and Expectations as Related to Children's Elementary School Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyman, W. C.; And Others

    In this study of the relationship between factors in the home and school achievement, teachers' ratings and student scores on a standard achievement test were examined in light of parental expectations for the child's independence behavior, the child's personal qualities, and his future work values. Mothers of 441 fifth graders were interviewed…

  11. Intubation by paramedics using the ILMA or AirTraq, KingVision, and Macintosh laryngoscopes in vehicle-entrapped patients: a manikin study.

    PubMed

    Gaszynska, Ewelina; Samsel, Piotr; Stankiewicz-Rudnicki, Michał; Wieczorek, Andrzej; Gaszynski, Tomasz

    2014-02-01

    Four devices were compared in a simulated scenario of a vehicle-entrapped patient: standard Macintosh laryngoscope, intubating laryngeal mask (ILMA), AirTraq optical laryngoscope, and KingVision videolaryngoscope. A group of 30 final-year paramedic students intubated a manikin placed in a sitting position under a desk simulating the roof of a car. Time of endotracheal intubation and success ratio were recorded. The baseline time of intubation was measured in a manikin lying down flat on the ground. The mean time to intubation was 13.9±6.6, 24.7±4.7, 25.2±3.7, and 23.9±4.2 s; the first attempt success ratios for devices were 29/30, 18/30, 6/30, and 18/30; and the baseline time of intubation was 14.3±6.5, 16.7±4.7, 22.9±12.6, and 18.1±5.0 s for ILMA, Macintosh laryngoscope, Airtraq, and KingVision, respectively. In emergency situations with very limited access to the patient, ILMA is the most effective device for intubation by paramedics.

  12. Achievement Emotions as Predictors of High School Science Success Among African-American and European American Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowe, Marilyn Louise Simmons

    The literature includes few studies of the interrelations of achievement goals and achievement emotions with respect to minority students and science achievement. The objective of this study was to test the control-value theory (CVT) of achievement emotions to determine if the eight discrete achievement emotions would be predictive of test scores on the High School Graduation Test (GHSGT)-Science for African-American compared to European-American science students. Convenience cluster sampling was employed to select 160 students who were all juniors in the same public high school at the time that they took the GHSGT-Science. The central research question for this study aimed to uncover whether any of the eight achievement emotions identified in CVT would contribute significantly to the predictability of science achievement as measured by GHSGT-Science scores. Data were collected using a nonexperimental, cross sectional design survey. Data were analyzed using a hierarchal, forced entry, multiple regression analysis. Key results indicated that the eight achievement emotions were predictive of GHSGT-Science score outcomes. Positive social change at the individual level could reflect a boost in confidence for African American science students and help decrease the achievement gap in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) endeavors between European Americans and African-American students. Educators may consider the importance of achievement emotions in science outcomes by including social emotional learning (SEL) as a part of the regular science curriculum. Future researchers should repeat the study in a school district where the population is available to support the desired cluster sample of equal parts European Americans to African Americans and male to female students.

  13. Encountering unexpected difficult airway: relationship with the intubation difficulty scale

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Wonuk; Kim, Hajung; Kim, Kyongsun; Ro, Young-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Background An unexpected difficult intubation can be very challenging and if it is not managed properly, it may expose the encountered patient to significant risks. The intubation difficulty scale (IDS) has been used as a validated method to evaluate a global degree of intubation difficulty. The aims of this study were to evaluate the prevalence and characteristics of unexpected difficult intubation using the IDS. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 951 patients undergoing elective surgery in a single medical center. Patients expected to have a difficult intubation or who had history of difficult intubation were excluded. Each patient was assessed by the IDS scoring system with seven variables. Total prevalence of difficult intubation and the contributing individual factors were further analyzed. Results For the 951 patients, the difficult intubation cases presenting IDS > 5 was 5.8% of total cases (n = 55). The prevalence of Cormack-Lehane Grade 3 or 4 was 16.2% (n = 154). Most of the difficult intubation cases were managed by simple additional maneuvers and techniques such as stylet application, additional lifting force and laryngeal pressure. Conclusions Unexpected difficult airway was present in 5.8% of patients and most was managed effectively. Among the components of IDS, the Cormack-Lehane grade was most sensitive for predicting difficult intubation. PMID:27274369

  14. Methemoglobinemia precipitated by benzocaine used during intubation

    PubMed Central

    Collazo, Ruth; Fenves, Andrew Z.; Schwartz, John

    2014-01-01

    Methemoglobinemia is a rare cause of tissue hypoxia that can quickly become fatal without immediate recognition and prompt treatment. It refers to an increase in methemoglobin in the red blood cells, which can be due to genetic deficiency of the enzymes responsible for reducing hemoglobin or can develop after exposure to oxidizing agents or xenobiotics. Local anesthetics, particularly benzocaine, have long been implicated in the formation of methemoglobin. Benzocaine is used for teething pain as well as before invasive procedures such as intubation and transesophageal echocardiogram. In this case report, we describe a patient with acute appendicitis who developed severe methemoglobinemia following use of benzocaine during an emergent intubation. Our objective is to increase awareness of this rare but potentially fatal complication associated with the use of this anesthetic. PMID:24688201

  15. Post intubation tracheal stenosis in children.

    PubMed

    Caruselli, Marco; Amici, Mirco; Galante, Dario; Paut, Olivier; De Francisci, Giovanni; Carboni, Laura

    2014-08-12

    Many authors have reported that tracheal stenosis is a complication that can follow tracheal intubation in both adults and children. The symptoms, when they do appear, can be confused with asthma, with subsequent treatment providing only mild and inconsistent relief. We report here the case of an 8 year old girl admitted to our hospital for whooping cough that was not responding to therapy. PMID:25635215

  16. An improved method for oesophageal intubation.

    PubMed Central

    Bramhall, S. R.; Veitch, P. S.; Gourevitch, D.; Wicks, A. C.

    1993-01-01

    The authors describe a method of inserting an Atkinson tube using a flexible upper gastrointestinal endoscope which does not require the use of X-ray screening. A retrospective review of 50 patients intubated by this technique has been undertaken and the results presented. Of the lesions, 40% were squamous cell carcinoma and 40% adenocarcinoma, with 84% being situated in the lower third of the oesophagus; 94% of patients only required one intubation. The two major complications of the procedure are tube displacement and oesophageal leak; a tube displacement rate of 13% was recorded, comparable with other series. Eleven patients (20.8%) were found to have an oesophageal leak, but this resulted in death in only three patients (6%). The reasons for these figures are explained. An operative mortality rate of 12% is comparable with series using other methods. The authors conclude that this method of intubation is as safe as Atkinson's original method but has the advantage that X-ray screening is not required. PMID:7686732

  17. A new video laryngoscope-an aid to intubation and teaching.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Marshal B; Ward, Denham S; Berci, George

    2002-12-01

    In recent decades, video techniques have been employed in the majority of endoscopic procedures because of several distinct advantages provided. These include the following: The displayed anatomy is magnified. Recognition of the anatomical structures and anomalies is easier, and manipulation of airway devices is facilitated. When assistance is required, the operator and assistant can coordinate their movements because each sees exactly the same image on the video monitor. As a result, video techniques have become the method of choice in teaching. The Video Macintosh Intubating Laryngoscope System (VMS) was designed employing a standard Macintosh blade and laryngoscope handle. A camera was incorporated into the handle with a short image and light bundle. The magnified anatomy is displayed on an 8-inch monitor, which is attached to a swivel arm on a small cart. Observation and manipulation can be performed in one axis.A total of 235 patients were studied and were divided into two groups: Group A (n = 217), in whom intubation was thought unlikely to be difficult, and Group B (n = 18), in whom difficulty with intubation was anticipated. External laryngeal manipulation (ELM) was required in 22 of the 217 Group A patients (10%). All intubations but one in this group were successful. In the second group (B) of 18 patients who had anatomical conditions that suggested that direct laryngoscopy might be challenging, all 18 cases required ELM but all were successfully intubated using the VMS. The improved coordination afforded by an image on a video monitor seen by both the assistant providing laryngeal manipulation and the anesthesiologist handling the laryngoscope results in a significant advantage over the conventional laryngoscope technique. As a consequence, the learning curve is short. In our view, video laryngoscopy will become the method of choice in teaching. PMID:12565125

  18. Tips and Troubleshooting for Use of the GlideScope Video Laryngoscope for Emergency Endotracheal Intubation.

    PubMed

    Bacon, Emily R; Phelan, Michael P; Doyle, D John

    2015-09-01

    Video laryngoscopy (VL) is still a relatively novel advancement in airway management that offers many potential benefits over direct laryngoscopy. These advantages include decreased time to intubation in difficulty airways, unique opportunities in teaching as the video screen allows for real time teaching points, increased first pass success, particularly with novice operators, and decreased cervical spine motion during intubation. Despite the advantages, the intubation procedure itself has some subtle but significant differences from direct laryngoscopy that change the expected motion as well as troubleshooting techniques, which might discourage the use of the GlideScope by practitioners less familiar with the product. With the hope of generating confidence in the video laryngoscopy procedure, we have compiled some basic tips that we have found helpful when intubating with the GlideScope. These tips include inserting the blade to the left of midline to improve space allowed for the endotracheal tube itself, backing the scope up a small amount to improve the view, holding the tube close to the connector to improve maneuverability, and withdrawing the tube with your thumb to improve advancement through the cords. We hope that, with these tips, in conjunction with ample practice, clinicians can gain comfort and experience with all the tools at our disposal in an effort to provide the best possible care for our patients. PMID:26008581

  19. Effects of different dosages of oxycodone and fentanyl on the hemodynamic changes during intubation

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ki-Bum; Ann, Junggun; Lee, Haemi

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the effectiveness of oxycodone compared with fentanyl for attenuating the hemodynamic response during endotracheal intubation. Methods: This study was conducted from June 2014 to February 2015 on healthy adults undergoing general anesthesia at the Yeungnam University Hospital, Daegu, Republic of Korea. Ninety-five patients were randomly assigned to one of 3 groups to receive the following drugs; Group F: fentanyl 2 µg/kg; Group O/70: oxycodone 140 µg/kg; Group O/100: oxycodone 200 µg/kg. Five minutes after injection of the study drug, general anesthesia was induced with propofol 1.5 mg/kg and rocuronium 0.8 mg/kg. The mean blood pressure (MBP), heart rate (HR), peripheral oxygen saturation (SpO2), and bispectral index (BIS) were compared before administration of the study drug (T1), just before endotracheal intubation (T2), one minute after endotracheal intubation (T3), and 7.5 minutes after endotracheal intubation (T4). Complications were assessed. Results: The 2 oxycodone groups showed no significant differences in MBP, HR, SpO2, and BIS compared to Group F at the time points assessed. The incidence of complications was comparable among the groups. Conclusions: Oxycodone could successfully be used to attenuate the sympathetic response during anesthetic induction. The hemodynamic profiles and incidence of complications were clinically similar among the groups, but Group O/70 tended to show a lower rate of complications of apnea. PMID:27464860

  20. An innovative approach to orotracheal intubations: the Alexandrou Angle of Intubation position.

    PubMed

    Alexandrou, Nikolaos A; Yeh, Benson; Barbara, Paul; Leber, Mark; Marshall, Lewis W

    2011-01-01

    Visualization of the vocal cords is paramount during orotracheal intubations. We employed a novel patient position in this derivation study. The Alexandrou Angle of Intubation (AAI) position is defined as a 20°-30° incline where the supine patient's head is elevated in relation to the body and legs. Our study participants were blinded to the goals of the research as well as our novel technique. Using intubation manikins, our participants ranked their preference for visualizing the vocal cords between the Flat, Trendelenburg, and AAI positions. A majority (58.8%) of our study participants preferred the AAI for visualizing the vocal cords over the other two positions. Future studies will reveal whether AAI will play a significant role in emergent airway management.

  1. Reducing nasopharyngeal trauma: the urethral catheter-assisted nasotracheal intubation technique.

    PubMed

    Wong, Allen; Subar, Paul; Witherell, Heidi; Ovodov, Konstantin J

    2011-01-01

    Nasal intubation is an advantageous approach for dental procedures performed in the hospital, ambulatory surgery center, or dental office, when possible. Although many who provide anesthesia services are familiar and comfortable with nasal intubation techniques, some are reluctant and uncomfortable because of lack of experience or fear of nasopharyngeal bleeding and trauma. It has been observed from experiences in various settings that many approaches may be adapted to the technique of achieving nasal intubation. The technique that is described in this paper suggests a minimally invasive approach that introduces the nasoendotracheal tube through the nasopharyngeal pathway to the oropharynx in an expedient manner while preserving the nasopharyngeal structures, thus lessening nasal bleeding and trauma to soft tissues. The technique uses a common urethral catheter and can be incorporated along with current intubation armamentaria. As with all techniques, some limitations to the approach have been identified and are described in this paper. Cases with limited mouth opening, neck injury, and difficult airways may necessitate alternative methods. However, the short learning curve along with the many benefits of this technique offers the anesthesia professional additional options for excellent patient care.

  2. An observational study of the feasibility of Airtraq guided intubations with Ring Adair Elvin tubes in pediatric population with cleft lip and palate

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Ashima; Durga, Padmaja; Gurajala, Indira; Ramchandran, Gopinath

    2015-01-01

    Context: The airway management requires refined skills and technical help when associated with cleft lip and palate. Airtraq has improved our airway management skills and has been successfully used for rescue intubation in difficult pediatric airways. Aims: This study was to evaluate the efficacy of Airtraq as the primary intubation device in patients with cleft lip and palate. The study adheres to the STrengthening the Reporting of OBservational Studies Epidemiology Statement. Subjects and Methods: A total of 85 children posted consecutively for lip and palate repair were enrolled. Children were intubated with Ring Adair Elvin (RAE) tube using size 1 and 2 of Airtraq device. The design of Airtraq has an anatomical limitation to hold RAE tubes. The preformed bend of the tube was straightened with a malleable stylet. The intubations were assessed for device manipulations and time taken for glottis visualization and intubation, airway complications such as bleeding, laryngospasm and failed intubations. Statistical Analysis Used: The outcome data were reported as numbers and percentages or range with identified median value, where applicable. Results: The success rate of Airtraq guided intubations was 98.21%. The cumulative insertion times and intubation times were 31.50 ± 12.57 s and 48.04 ± 35.73 s respectively. Airtraq manipulations were applied in 25.45% subjects. Conclusions: The presence of cleft lip or palate did not hamper the insertion of Airtraq. The use of malleable stylet to facilitate the loading of the preformed tube into the guide channel is a simple and efficacious improvisation. Airtraq can be utilized as a primary intubation device in children with orofacial clefts. PMID:26712974

  3. School Improvement in Petersburg: A Comprehensive Three-Year Study of the Partnership for Achieving Successful Schools Initiative Model IV Intervention. Final Evaluation Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Joanna; Smith, Karen; Marr, Linda; Wyshynski, Laura

    2005-01-01

    Dr. Jo Lynne DeMary, Virginia's state superintendent of public instruction, requested that the Appalachia Educational Laboratory at Edvantia work in partnership with the Virginia Department of Education and Petersburg City Schools to design and test the Partnership for Achieving Successful Schools Initiative (PA+SS) Model IV Intervention. The goal…

  4. Using School Reform Models to Improve Reading Achievement: A Longitudinal Study of Direct Instruction and Success for All in an Urban District

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Steven M.; Nunnery, John A.; Goldfeder, Elizabeth; McDonald, Aaron; Rachor, Robert; Hornbeck, Matthew; Fleischman, Steve

    2004-01-01

    This research examined the effectiveness in an urban school district of 2 of the most widely used Comprehensive School Reform (CSR) programs-Direct Instruction (DI), implemented in 9 district elementary schools, and Success for All (SFA), implemented in 2 elementary schools. In examining impacts on student achievement and school change outcomes…

  5. Picturing Success: Young Femininities and the (Im)Possibilities of Academic Achievement in Selective, Single-Sex Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allan, Alexandra

    2010-01-01

    Over the last decade it is young women who have come to be widely understood as the bearers of educational qualifications. It is girls who are now seen to have "the world at their feet" and to be able to attain the glittering prizes of academic success associated with elite universities and top occupations. And it is upper-middle-class girls, in…

  6. A Validation Study of the Planning, Attention, Simultaneous, and Successive (PASS) Theory and Its Relationship to Reading Achievement in Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Justin Moore

    2010-01-01

    This study set out to determine if the Planning, Attention, Simultaneous, Successive (PASS) cognitive processing model, a model previously investigated with children, would hold its factorial structure with adults. A collection of PASS experimental tasks were analyzed through Maximum Likelihood Factor Analysis. A four-factor solution consistent…

  7. Syntheses of Research and Practice: Implications for Achieving Schooling Success for Children at Risk. Publication Series #93-5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alves-Zervos, K. L., Ed.; Shafer, J. R., Ed.

    This six-article document examines the research base that can be used in formulating plans to improve the chances of schooling success for all students. Each article summarizes well-confirmed knowledge in a particular area, giving attention first to the research literature, and then to the tested experiences and practices of leading professionals.…

  8. Giving Students a Chance to Achieve: Getting Off to a Fast and Successful Start in Grade Nine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bottoms, Gene; Timberlake, Allison

    2007-01-01

    Students who successfully complete grade nine are substantially more likely to graduate from high school than are students who fail the freshman year. However, many middle grades students are not academically prepared for ninth grade. This report addresses five questions that can help school leaders ensure that middle grades students know the…

  9. A Methodology to Assist Faculty in Developing Successful Approaches for Achieving Learner Centered Information Systems Curriculum Outcomes: Team Based Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, Teresa A.; Longenecker, Herbert E., Jr.; Landry, Jeffrey P.; Lusk, C. Scott; Saulnier, Bruce M.

    2008-01-01

    All industries face the interrelated challenges of identifying and training the critical skills needed to be successful in the workplace. Specifically of interest to the information systems field is that any newly trained IS professional has to be equipped to solve increasingly difficult problems with great confidence and competence. In this paper…

  10. Effects of Resource Allocation on Student Academic Achievement and Self-Perceptions of Success in an Urban Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Kimberly

    2014-01-01

    Civil Rights legislation, now 50 years old, "de facto" segregation based on socioeconomic factors, such as poverty and ethnicity in urban areas translates into the surrounding schools, with a legacy of limited funding, reduced services, and teachers with limited training to successfully engage students in high poverty areas. This study…

  11. Addressing Achievement Gaps: Advancing Success for Black Men in College. Policy Notes. Volume 22, Number 1, Spring 2015

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yaffe, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    This issue of ETS Policy Notes (Vol. 22, No. 1) provides highlights from a recent symposium sponsored by ETS and the Children Defense Fund (CDF), "Advancing Success for Black Men in College," held on June 23, 2014, in Washington, DC. The symposium is part of a two-conference series: It was the 18th of ETS's "Addressing Achievement…

  12. Achieving High Grades at "A" Level English Literature: An Investigation into Factors that Contribute to Schools' Successes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daw, Peter

    1996-01-01

    Draws on a report produced by the Suffolk schools concerning the factors that seem to underlie success at "A" level English literature at six schools. Suggests that the factors of greatest significance were the subject expertise and commitment of staff; the balance of teaching methods used; and the pupil's experience of a challenging English…

  13. Interdisciplinary collaboration: the slogan that must be achieved for models of delivering critical care to be successful.

    PubMed

    Irwin, Richard S; Flaherty, Helen M; French, Cynthia T; Cody, Shawn; Chandler, M Willis; Connolly, Ann; Lilly, Craig M

    2012-12-01

    There is wide acceptance of the concept that interdisciplinary collaboration is an essential building block for successful health-care teams. This belief is grounded in our understanding of how teams function to address complex care needs that change with acute illness or injury. This general agreement has been validated in studies that have reported favorable outcomes associated with successfully implementing interdisciplinary models of health-care delivery in non-critical care settings. The very short time frames over which the care needs of critically ill or injured adults change and the team approach taken by nearly all ICUs strongly suggest that interdisciplinary collaboration is also beneficial in this setting. In this commentary, we define interdisciplinary collaboration and share the story of how we successfully redesigned and transformed our system-wide, interdisciplinary collaborative model for delivering critical care in order to share the lessons we learned as the process evolved with those who are about to embark on a similar challenge. We anticipate that those health-care systems that successfully implement interdisciplinary collaboration will be ahead of the curve in providing high-quality care at as low a cost as possible. Such institutions will also potentially be better positioned for improving teaching and providing a better foundation for critical care research in their institutions. PMID:23208334

  14. History of neonatal resuscitation - part 3: endotracheal intubation.

    PubMed

    Obladen, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Endotracheal intubation to resuscitate neonates was used by Scheel in 1798. A century before endotracheal anesthesia was developed, inventive obstetricians constructed devices for endotracheal intubation of infants and mastered their insertion, localization, and airtight sealing. Fell's laryngoscope, Magill's intubation forceps and tissue-friendly materials were significant contributions of the 20th century to endotracheal intubation of the newborn. The striking absence of scientific studies on the most efficient resuscitation techniques for neonates can be explained by the difficulty to adjust for the personal skills of the resuscitator.

  15. A Positive Psychological Viewpoint for Success at School--10 Characteristic Strengths of the Finnish High-Achieving Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salmela, Mari; Uusiautti, Satu

    2015-01-01

    People who exploit their strengths flourish; they are not only engaged with their goals, but also to their well-being and the content of life. In this study, interest focused on the high-achieving students in the Finnish general upper secondary education, in other words, on straight-A graduates' characteristic strengths. This was a narrative study…

  16. Explaining the Success of High-Achieving 2nd-Generation Latino Students at Elite Colleges and Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kula, Stacy M.

    2013-01-01

    Latinos represent the largest minority population in the US, yet are one of the most underserved groups in the educational system. As such, they have been the focus of much attention by educational researchers. However, there is little work enabling researchers to understand how many factors might interactively support achievement. Moreover, the…

  17. Striving for Success: A Qualitative Exploration of Competing Theories of High-Achieving Black College Students' Academic Motivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffin, Kimberly

    2006-01-01

    Research on the academic performance of Black students has focused on low-achievers, framing their academic motivation as maladaptive and driven by externally (e.g., competition or compliance) rather than internally (e.g., love of learning) generated forces. This qualitative study challenges this mono-dimensional deficit framework, examining the…

  18. Early Reading Success and Its Relationship to Reading Achievement and Reading Volume: Replication of "10 Years Later"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sparks, Richard L.; Patton, Jon; Murdoch, Amy

    2014-01-01

    Cunningham and Stanovich reported a longitudinal investigation over 10 years that examined the unique influence of exposure to print in explaining individual differences on various measures of reading achievement and declarative (general) knowledge. The present study replicated their investigation with a larger number of participants and…

  19. The Effect of Poverty on the Achievement of Urban African American Male Students Successfully Completing High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welch, Amy L.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of poverty on the achievement of African American male high school students attending the same large Midwest urban school district. Cumulative grade point average (GPA) at the tenth grade level were compared to the level of poverty provided through census data of African American male tenth…

  20. Challenge and Success: A Qualitative Study of the Career Development of Highly Achieving Women With Physical and Sensory Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noonan, Brigid M.; Gallor, Susanna M.; Hensler-McGinnis, Nancy F.; Fassinger, Ruth E.; Wang, Shihwe; Goodman, Jennifer

    2004-01-01

    This qualitative study examined the career development experiences of 17 highly achieving women with physical and sensory disabilities. Interviews were conducted and data were analyzed using modified grounded theory strategies (A. L. Strauss & J. Corbin, 1998). The emergent theoretical model was conceptualized as a system of influences organized…

  1. The Mayor's Plan for Achieving Success in the DCPS: Is the Implementation Likely to Match the Vision?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council of the Great City Schools, 2007

    2007-01-01

    The Mayor Adrian Fenty's achievement plan for the District of Columbia Public Schools (DCPS) is divided into four major parts. The first section outlines the philosophical foundation undergirding the plan. The second section outlines the plan's goals and strategies. In preparing this commentary, the Council of the Great City Schools assessed how…

  2. Daily Practices Elementary Principals Utilize to Increase Student Reading Achievement: A Case Study of Successful Michigan Elementary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Susan L.

    2010-01-01

    This case study examined three K-5 schools, one 3-5 school, and two K-2 schools that implemented Michigan's Behavior and Learning Support Initiative (MiBLSi) and showed improvement trends in third grade reading achievement as measured by MEAP results over four years. Each of the six schools completed the three years of MiBLSi training and are…

  3. A Phenomenological Investigation of Student Achievement: Perceptions of Academic Success as Told by Single African American and Hispanic Mothers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Shawn M.

    2010-01-01

    A number of factors seem to contribute to low student achievement in the organization of education. Some of these factors exist prior to children reaching school age. It seems as though a vast quantity of minority students struggle academically. Research supports the belief that socioeconomic status, ethnicity, and single-parent families have an…

  4. Achieving Business Success by Developing Clients and Community: Lessons from Leading Companies, Emerging Economies and a Nine Year Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernardez, Mariano

    2005-01-01

    Empirical evidence and recent revisions of conventional business doctrine indicate that companies that actively promote social performance and develop their clients' markets and skills as part of business strategy have a better chance of achieving sustainable profitability and growth than those that do not. This article discusses how landmark…

  5. Submental intubation with intubating laryngeal mask airway as conduit: An airway option for oral submucous fibrosis release

    PubMed Central

    Mohambourame, Aruloli; Sameer, Mohamed; Hemanth Kumar, V. R.; Ramamirtham, Muthukumaran

    2015-01-01

    The main anesthetic concern with oral submucous fibrosis is progressive restriction of mouth opening due to fibrosis producing difficult airway. Securing airway by nasotracheal intubation and tracheostomy are associated with potential complications. Flexible fiberoscope is not available in all the institutes. Submental intubation using intubating laryngeal mask airway is an acceptable alternative technique in such situations. It also provides an unobstructed surgical field. PMID:25886429

  6. Obstetric Anaesthetists' Association and Difficult Airway Society guidelines for the management of difficult and failed tracheal intubation in obstetrics*

    PubMed Central

    Mushambi, M C; Kinsella, S M; Popat, M; Swales, H; Ramaswamy, K K; Winton, A L; Quinn, A C

    2015-01-01

    The Obstetric Anaesthetists' Association and Difficult Airway Society have developed the first national obstetric guidelines for the safe management of difficult and failed tracheal intubation during general anaesthesia. They comprise four algorithms and two tables. A master algorithm provides an overview. Algorithm 1 gives a framework on how to optimise a safe general anaesthetic technique in the obstetric patient, and emphasises: planning and multidisciplinary communication; how to prevent the rapid oxygen desaturation seen in pregnant women by advocating nasal oxygenation and mask ventilation immediately after induction; limiting intubation attempts to two; and consideration of early release of cricoid pressure if difficulties are encountered. Algorithm 2 summarises the management after declaring failed tracheal intubation with clear decision points, and encourages early insertion of a (preferably second-generation) supraglottic airway device if appropriate. Algorithm 3 covers the management of the ‘can't intubate, can't oxygenate’ situation and emergency front-of-neck airway access, including the necessity for timely perimortem caesarean section if maternal oxygenation cannot be achieved. Table 1 gives a structure for assessing the individual factors relevant in the decision to awaken or proceed should intubation fail, which include: urgency related to maternal or fetal factors; seniority of the anaesthetist; obesity of the patient; surgical complexity; aspiration risk; potential difficulty with provision of alternative anaesthesia; and post-induction airway device and airway patency. This decision should be considered by the team in advance of performing a general anaesthetic to make a provisional plan should failed intubation occur. The table is also intended to be used as a teaching tool to facilitate discussion and learning regarding the complex nature of decision-making when faced with a failed intubation. Table 2 gives practical considerations of how

  7. A comparison of dexmedetomidine plus ketamine combination with dexmedetomidine alone for awake fiberoptic nasotracheal intubation: A randomized controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Sunil Kumar; Joshiraj, Bandi; Chaudhary, Lalita; Hayaran, Nitin; Kaur, Manpreet; Jain, Aruna

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims: We designed a study to compare the effectiveness of dexmedetomidine plus ketamine combination with dexmedetomidine alone in search of an ideal sedation regime, which would achieve better intubating conditions, hemodynamic stability, and sedation for awake fiberoptic nasotracheal intubation. Materials and Methods: A total of 60 adult patients of age group 18-60 years with American Society of Anesthesiologists I and II posted for elective surgery under general anesthesia were randomly divided into two groups of 30 each in this prospective randomized controlled double-blinded study. Groups I and II patients received a bolus dose of dexmedetomidine at 1 mcg/kg over 10 min followed by a continuous infusion of dexmedetomidine at 0.5 mcg/kg/h. Upon completion of the dexmedetomidine bolus, Group I patients received 15 mg of ketamine and an infusion of ketamine at 20 mg/h followed by awake fiberoptic nasotracheal intubation, while Group II patients upon completion of dexmedetomidine bolus received plain normal saline instead of ketamine. Hemodynamic variables like heart rate (HR) and mean arterial pressure (MAP), oxygen saturation, electrocardiogram changes, sedation score (modified Observer assessment of alertness/sedation score), intubation score (vocal cord movement and coughing), grimace score, time taken for intubation, amount of lignocaine used were noted during the course of study. Patient satisfaction score and level of recall were assessed during the postoperative visit the next day. Results: Group I patients maintained a stable HR and MAP (<10% fall when compared with the baseline value). Sedation score (3.47 vs. 3.93) and patient satisfaction score were better in Group I patients. There was no significant difference in intubation scores, grimace scores, oxygen saturation and level of recall when compared between the two groups (P > 0.05). Conclusion: The use of dexmedetomidine plus ketamine combination in awake fiberoptic nasotracheal

  8. Geospatial Analysis of Pediatric EMS Run Density and Endotracheal Intubation

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Matthew; Loker, William; Warden, Craig

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The association between geographic factors, including transport distance, and pediatric emergency medical services (EMS) run clustering on out-of-hospital pediatric endotracheal intubation is unclear. The objective of this study was to determine if endotracheal intubation procedures are more likely to occur at greater distances from the hospital and near clusters of pediatric calls. Methods This was a retrospective observational study including all EMS runs for patients less than 18 years of age from 2008 to 2014 in a geographically large and diverse Oregon county that includes densely populated urban areas near Portland and remote rural areas. We geocoded scene addresses using the automated address locator created in the cloud-based mapping platform ArcGIS, supplemented with manual address geocoding for remaining cases. We then use the Getis-Ord Gi spatial statistic feature in ArcGIS to map statistically significant spatial clusters (hot spots) of pediatric EMS runs throughout the county. We then superimposed all intubation procedures performed during the study period on maps of pediatric EMS-run hot spots, pediatric population density, fire stations, and hospitals. We also performed multivariable logistic regression to determine if distance traveled to the hospital was associated with intubation after controlling for several confounding variables. Results We identified a total of 7,797 pediatric EMS runs during the study period and 38 endotracheal intubations. In univariate analysis we found that patients who were intubated were similar to those who were not in gender and whether or not they were transported to a children’s hospital. Intubated patients tended to be transported shorter distances and were older than non-intubated patients. Increased distance from the hospital was associated with reduced odds of intubation after controlling for age, sex, scene location, and trauma system entry status in a multivariate logistic regression. The

  9. Fluoroscopy assisted tracheal intubation in a case of anticipated difficult airway: Fail safe devices can also fail

    PubMed Central

    Arulvelan, Appavoo; Soumya, Madhusudhan; Santhosh, Kannath

    2015-01-01

    Difficulty in airway management is the most important cause of major anesthesia-related morbidity and mortality. Unexpected difficulties may arise even with proper preanesthesia planning. Here, we report a case of anticipated difficult airway primarily planned for flexible fibreoptic bronchoscope assisted intubation, but due to unexpected failure of light source, fluoroscopy was used, and the airway was successfully secured. PMID:26240555

  10. Comparison of three videolaryngoscopes: Pentax Airway Scope, C-MAC, Glidescope vs the Macintosh laryngoscope for tracheal intubation.

    PubMed

    Teoh, W H L; Saxena, S; Shah, M K; Sia, A T H

    2010-11-01

    We compared the intubating characteristics of the Pentax Airway Scope, the C-MAC and the Glidescope with those of the Macintosh laryngoscope in 400 patients without predictors of difficult intubation. We found shorter intubation times with the Airway Scope (mean (SD) 20.6 (11.5) s) compared with the C-MAC (31.9 (17.6) s) and Glidescope (31.2 (15.0) s), p < 0.001. The median (IQR [range]) score for ease of intubation was significantly lower (better) with the Airway Scope (0 (0-8.75 [0-60])) than with the C-MAC (10 (0-20 [0-90])) or Glidescope (0 (0-20 [0-80])), p < 0.001. Ease of blade insertion in the C-MAC (0 (0-0 [0-30])) was superior to that of the Airway Scope (0 (0-0 [0-70])), Macintosh (0 (0-0 [0-80])) or Glidescope (0 (0-10 [0-60])), p = 0.006. More patients had a grade 1 laryngeal view with the Airway Scope (97%) compared with the C-MAC (87%), Glidescope (78%), or Macintosh (58%), p < 0.001. There were no grade 3 laryngeal views with the Airway Scope. The three videolaryngoscopes had comparable first attempt successful intubation rates: 95% for the Airway Scope, 93% for the C-MAC and 91% for the Glidescope.

  11. Evidence-based strategies of graduate students to achieve success in a hybrid Web-based course.

    PubMed

    Kumrow, David E

    2007-03-01

    Web-based hybrid courses are gaining in popularity in institutions of higher learning for both undergraduate and graduate nursing education. The purpose of this study was to examine how predictive the five self-regulatory resource management strategies of time management, study environment, effort regulation, help seeking, and peer learning are in determining whether a student will be successful academically within a hybrid learning environment. The sample consisted of 38 graduate nursing students enrolled in two sections--one hybrid and the other lecture--of a health care economics course at a major, public, urban, 4-year university. The results of the study revealed that students in the hybrid section had significantly higher end-of-course grades and a significantly higher favorable rating (affective behavior) of their method of instruction. Of the five resource management strategies examined, only help seeking showed a significant correlation with end-of-course grades in both sections.

  12. SUBMUCOSAL DISSECTION OF THE RETROPHARYNGEAL SPACE DURING NASAL INTUBATION.

    PubMed

    Hakim, Mumin; Cartabuke, Richard S; Krishna, Senthil G; Veneziano, Giorgio; Syed, Ahsan; Lind, Meredith N Merz; Tobias, Qoseph D

    2015-10-01

    Various complications have been reported with nasal endotracheal intubation including bleeding, epistaxis, bacteremia, damage to intranasal structures, and even intracranial penetration. We present two cases that required general anesthesia for dental surgery. Submucosal dissection of the retropharyngeal tissues occurred during attempted nasal endotracheal intubation. Previous reports of this complication are reviewed, treatment strategies presented, and potential maneuvers to prevent this complication suggested. PMID:26860021

  13. Predictors for an unsuccessful INtubation-SURfactant-Extubation procedure: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The INtubation-SURfactant-Extubation (INSURE) is a procedure that is increasingly being used to treat the respiratory distress syndrome in preterm infants. The objective of this study was to identify predictors for an unsuccessful INSURE procedure. Methods The neonates included were less than 32 weeks’ gestation, treated with surfactant in the neonatal intensive care unit, and born 1998–2010. INSURE was defined as surfactant administration during intubation for less than 2 hours without the need for mechanical ventilation. INSURE success was defined as no re-intubation within 72 hours after INSURE, and INSURE failure was defined as re-intubation within 72 hours after INSURE. An unsuccessful INSURE procedure was either INSURE failure or mechanical ventilation for more than 24 hours immediately after surfactant administration. All predictors were defined a priori and were present before surfactant administration. Multivariate logistic regression was performed. Results In total, 322 neonates were included: 31% (n = 100) had INSURE success, 10% (n = 33) had INSURE failure, 49% (n = 158) needed mechanical ventilation for more than 24 hours, and the remaining 10% (n = 31) needed mechanical ventilation for less than 24 hours. Predictors for INSURE failure were low gestational age and hemoglobin below 8.5 mmol/l. Predictors for mechanical ventilation for more than 24 hours were low gestational age, Apgar at 5 minutes below 7, oxygen need above 50%, CO2 pressure above 7 kPa (~53 mmHg), pH below 7.3, lactate above 2.5 mmol/l, need for inotropes, and surfactant administration shortly after birth, whereas preeclampsia reduced the risk. Conclusions We identified specific predictors associated with an unsuccessful INSURE procedure. Keeping high-risk neonates with one or several predictors intubated and treated with mechanical ventilation after surfactant may prevent a re-intubation procedure. PMID:24947477

  14. Successful PGD for late infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis achieved by combined chromosome and TPP1 gene analysis.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jiandong; Cram, David Stephen; Wu, Wei; Cai, Lingbo; Yang, Xiaoyu; Sun, Xueping; Cui, Yugui; Liu, Jiayin

    2013-08-01

    Late infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (NCL-2) is a severe debilitating autosomal recessive disease caused by mutations in TPP1. There are no effective treatments, resulting in early childhood death. A couple with two affected children presented for reproductive genetic counselling and chose to undertake IVF and preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) to avoid the possibility of another affected child. However, DNA testing revealed only one mutation in the proband inherited from mother. Linkage analysis identified five informative linked short tandem repeat markers to aid the genetic diagnosis. Following IVF, five cleavage-stage embryos were biopsied and blastomeres were first subjected to whole-genome amplification, then a series of down-stream molecular genetic analyses to diagnose TPP1 genotype and finally array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) to assess the chromosomal ploidy of each embryo. Two unaffected euploid embryos were identified for transfer. One was transferred on day 5 resulting in an ongoing pregnancy. Confirmatory prenatal diagnosis by amniocentesis showed concordance of the embryo and fetal diagnosis. As far as is known, this is the first successful report of PGD for NCL-2 using double-factor PGD with simultaneous single-gene testing and array CGH to identify an unaffected and chromosomally normal embryo for transfer.

  15. Faculty and student perceptions of the success of a hybrid-PBL dental curriculum in achieving curriculum reform benchmarks.

    PubMed

    Whitney, Eli M; Walton, Joanne N

    2010-12-01

    The dental education literature identifies eleven benchmark reform agenda curriculum qualities. The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which the University of British Columbia D.M.D. curriculum was perceived by students and faculty as achieving these benchmarks and to note any differences in perceptions within and between the student and faculty groups. A WebEval survey consisting of twenty-one questions was delivered online in November 2007 to faculty members and D.M.D. students. The response rate was similar (~60 percent) for both students and faculty members. Comparisons were made between faculty members and students as well as within each group. For the faculty, we looked at the influence of appointment, focus, and teaching experience. For students, we looked at the influence of the year in the program, gender, and program track. Some differences (p<0.05) were identified within the faculty and student groups; however, there were many more differences between the faculty and the students, especially in areas related to curriculum redesign, collaborations with other health professions, preparation for independent practice, and creating a trust-based clinic environment. Faculty members were more optimistic about curriculum progress than were students. Improved communication of curriculum goals and explicit efforts at creating a safe and supportive learning environment could diminish these differences over time.

  16. Faculty and student perceptions of the success of a hybrid-PBL dental curriculum in achieving curriculum reform benchmarks.

    PubMed

    Whitney, Eli M; Walton, Joanne N

    2010-12-01

    The dental education literature identifies eleven benchmark reform agenda curriculum qualities. The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which the University of British Columbia D.M.D. curriculum was perceived by students and faculty as achieving these benchmarks and to note any differences in perceptions within and between the student and faculty groups. A WebEval survey consisting of twenty-one questions was delivered online in November 2007 to faculty members and D.M.D. students. The response rate was similar (~60 percent) for both students and faculty members. Comparisons were made between faculty members and students as well as within each group. For the faculty, we looked at the influence of appointment, focus, and teaching experience. For students, we looked at the influence of the year in the program, gender, and program track. Some differences (p<0.05) were identified within the faculty and student groups; however, there were many more differences between the faculty and the students, especially in areas related to curriculum redesign, collaborations with other health professions, preparation for independent practice, and creating a trust-based clinic environment. Faculty members were more optimistic about curriculum progress than were students. Improved communication of curriculum goals and explicit efforts at creating a safe and supportive learning environment could diminish these differences over time. PMID:21123500

  17. An analysis of predictors of enrollment and successful achievement for girls in high school Advanced Placement physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Depalma, Darlene M.

    A problem within science education in the United States persists. U.S students rank lower in science than most other students from participating countries on international tests of achievement (National Center for Education Statistics, 2003). In addition, U.S. students overall enrollment rate in high school Advanced Placement (AP) physics is still low compared to other academic domains, especially for females. This problem is the background for the purpose of this study. This investigation examined cognitive and motivational variables thought to play a part in the under-representation of females in AP physics. Cognitive variables consisted of mathematics, reading, and science knowledge, as measured by scores on the 10th and 11th grade Florida Comprehensive Assessment Tests (FCAT). The motivational factors of attitude, stereotypical views toward science, self-efficacy, and epistemological beliefs were measured by a questionnaire developed with questions taken from previously proven reliable and valid instruments. A general survey regarding participation in extracurricular activities was also included. The sample included 12th grade students from two high schools located in Seminole County, Florida. Of the 106 participants, 20 girls and 27 boys were enrolled in AP physics, and 39 girls and 20 boys were enrolled in other elective science courses. Differences between males and females enrolled in AP physics were examined, as well as differences between females enrolled in AP physics and females that chose not to participate in AP physics, in order to determine predictors that apply exclusively to female enrollment in high school AP physics and predictors of an anticipated science related college major. Data were first analyzed by Exploratory Factor Analysis, followed by Analysis of Variance (ANOVA), independent t-tests, univariate analysis, and logistic regression analysis. One overall theme that emerged from this research was findings that refute the ideas that

  18. A novel approach to manage patients with compromised airway. Videoscopic assisted retromolar intubation.

    PubMed

    Boker, Abdulaziz M

    2013-03-01

    Aids to difficult airway management are essential for safe practice of anesthesia particularly for high-risk patients. This case series described a novel approach of combined use of complementing tools (videolaryngeoscopic assisted retromolar intubation) to enhance airway management of a subset of various high-risk patients with extremely difficult airway. It also addressed the rational for the combination of such approaches as well as the advantages and disadvantages of this technique. In all of the 4 patients, the use of the combined approach resulted in a successful intubation without the need for surgical airway. This technique showed many advantages making it possible to use in cases with life threatening airway obstruction. PMID:23475097

  19. Comparison of the single-use Ambu(®) aScope™ 2 vs the conventional fibrescope for tracheal intubation in patients with cervical spine immobilisation by a semirigid collar*.

    PubMed

    Krugel, V; Bathory, I; Frascarolo, P; Schoettker, P

    2013-01-01

    Fibreoptic intubation remains a key technique for the management of difficult intubation. We randomly compared the second generation single-use Ambu(®) aScope™ 2 videoscope with a standard re-usable flexible intubating fibrescope in 50 tracheal intubations in patients with a difficult airway simulated by a semirigid collar. All patients' tracheas were intubated successfully with the aScope 2 or the re-usable fibrescope. The median (IQR [range]) time to intubate was significantly longer with the aScope 2 70 (55-97 [41?-226]) s vs 50 (40-59 [27-175]) s, p = 0.0003) due to an increased time to see the carina. Quality of vision was significantly lower with the aScope 2 (excellent 24 (48%) vs 49 (98%), p = 0.0001; good 22 (44%) vs 1 (2%), p = 0.0001; poor 4 (8%) vs 0, p = 0.12) but with no difference in the subjective ease to intubate (easy score of 31 (62%) vs 38 (76%), p = 0.19; intermediate 12 (24%) vs 7 (14%), p = 0.31; difficult 7 (14%) vs 5 (5%), p = 0.76). The longer times to intubate and the poorer scores for quality of vision do not support the use of the single-use aScope 2 videoscope as an alternative to the re-usable fibrescope.

  20. Iatrogenic post-intubation tracheal rupture treated conservatively without intubation: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Prunet, Bertrand; Lacroix, Guillaume; Asencio, Yves; Cathelinaud, Olivier; Avaro, Jean-Philippe; Goutorbe, Philippe

    2008-01-01

    Background Tracheal rupture is a rare but life-threatening complication that most commonly occurrs after blunt trauma to the chest, but which may also complicate tracheal intubation. We report a case of post-intubation tracheal rupture after cataract surgery under general anesthesia treated conservatively. Case presentation Four hours after extubation, a 67 year-old woman developed subcutaneous emphysema of the facial, bilateral laterocervical and upper anterior chest. Tracheobronchial fiberendoscopy showed a posterior tracheal transmural rupture 4 cm long located 2.5 cm above the carina that opened in inspiration. The location of the lesion and features of the patient favoured conservative treatment with antibiotic cover. The patient made a full and uncomplicated recovery and was discharged fourteen days after the original injury. Conclusion Two therapeutic strategies are currently employed for post-intubation tracheal rupture: a non-surgical strategy for small injuries and a surgical strategy for larger injuries. This case report presented the non-surgical therapeutic strategy of a large tracheal injury. PMID:18945364

  1. Intubation performance using different laryngoscopes while wearing chemical protective equipment: a manikin study

    PubMed Central

    Schröder, H; Zoremba, N; Rossaint, R; Deusser, K; Stoppe, C; Coburn, M; Rieg, A; Schälte, G

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to compare visualisation of the vocal cords and performance of intubation by anaesthetists using four different laryngoscopes while wearing full chemical protective equipment. Setting Medical simulation center of a university hospital, department of anaesthesiology. Participants 42 anaesthetists (15 females and 27 males) completed the trial. The participants were grouped according to their professional education as anaesthesiology residents with experience of <2 years or <5 years, or as anaesthesiology specialists with experience of >5 years. Interventions In a manikin scenario, participants performed endotracheal intubations with four different direct and indirect laryngoscopes (Macintosh (MAC), Airtraq (ATQ), Glidescope (GLS) and AP Advance (APA)), while wearing chemical protective gear, including a body suit, rubber gloves, a fire helmet and breathing apparatus. Primary and secondary outcome measures With respect to the manikin, setting time to complete ‘endotracheal intubation’ was defined as primary end point. Glottis visualisation (according to the Cormack-Lehane score (CLS) and impairments caused by the protective equipment, were defined as secondary outcome measures. Results The times to tracheal intubation were calculated using the MAC (31.4 s; 95% CI 26.6 to 36.8), ATQ (37.1 s; 95% CI 28.3 to 45.9), GLS (35.4 s; 95% CI 28.7 to 42.1) and APA (23.6 s; 95% CI 19.1 to 28.1), respectively. Intubation with the APA was significantly faster than with all the other devices examined among the total study population (p<0.05). A significant improvement in visualisation of the vocal cords was reported for the APA compared with the GLS. Conclusions Despite the restrictions caused by the equipment, the anaesthetists intubated the manikin successfully within adequate time. The APA outperformed the other devices in the time to intubation, and it has been evaluated as an easily manageable device for anaesthetists with varying

  2. Failed tracheal intubation during obstetric general anaesthesia: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Kinsella, S M; Winton, A L; Mushambi, M C; Ramaswamy, K; Swales, H; Quinn, A C; Popat, M

    2015-11-01

    We reviewed the literature on obstetric failed tracheal intubation from 1970 onwards. The incidence remained unchanged over the period at 2.6 (95% CI 2.0 to 3.2) per 1000 anaesthetics (1 in 390) for obstetric general anaesthesia and 2.3 (95% CI 1.7 to 2.9) per 1000 general anaesthetics (1 in 443) for caesarean section. Maternal mortality from failed intubation was 2.3 (95% CI 0.3 to 8.2) per 100000 general anaesthetics for caesarean section (one death per 90 failed intubations). Maternal deaths occurred from aspiration or hypoxaemia secondary to airway obstruction or oesophageal intubation. There were 3.4 (95% CI 0.7 to 9.9) front-of-neck airway access procedures (surgical airway) per 100000 general anaesthetics for caesarean section (one procedure per 60 failed intubations), usually carried out as a late rescue attempt with poor maternal outcomes. Before the late 1990s, most cases were awakened after failed intubation; since the late 1990s, general anaesthesia has been continued in the majority of cases. When general anaesthesia was continued, a laryngeal mask was usually used but with a trend towards use of a second-generation supraglottic airway device. A prospective study of obstetric general anaesthesia found that transient maternal hypoxaemia occurred in over two-thirds of cases of failed intubation, usually without sequelae. Pulmonary aspiration occurred in 8% but the rate of maternal intensive care unit admission after failed intubation was the same as that after uneventful general anaesthesia. Poor neonatal outcomes were often associated with preoperative fetal compromise, although failed intubation and lowest maternal oxygen saturation were independent predictors of neonatal intensive care unit admission.

  3. Difficult fiber-optic intubation in a patient with giant neck masses: The role of McCoy laryngoscope in elevating compressed laryngeal aperture.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Lijen; Chen, Hung-Shu; Tan, Ping-Heng; Liu, Ping-Hsin; Hsieh, Shao-Wei; Hung, Kuo-Chuan

    2013-12-01

    Airway management in patients with giant neck masses is usually a challenge to anesthesiologists. A giant neck mass could compress the airway and thus impede endotracheal intubation. We encountered a situation where the giant neck masses of a patient pushed the epiglottis posteriorly toward the posterior pharyngeal wall and compressed the laryngeal aperture narrowing after anesthetic induction, causing direct laryngoscopic intubation and sequential fiber-optic intubation failed. The neck masses twisted the aryepiglottic fold tortuously and clogged the laryngeal aperture tightly, making a flexible fiber-optic bronchoscope unable to pass through the laryngeal aperture. Later, we utilized a McCoy laryngoscope alternately to lift the compressed larynx up and away from the posterior pharyngeal wall, creating a passage and completing endotracheal intubation successfully with the aid of a gum elastic bougie. Our case suggested that the tilting tip blade of the McCoy laryngoscope could lever the tongue base up against the tumor mass compression to improve laryngeal views and facilitate endotracheal intubation when a difficult fiber-optic intubation was encountered on a compressed laryngeal aperture.

  4. Comparison of the efficacy of lornoxicam and fentanyl in attenuating the hemodynamic response to laryngoscopy and intubation

    PubMed Central

    Swarnamba, U. N.; Veena, K.; Shaikh, Safiya I.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Laryngoscopy and intubation elicits huge spectrum of stress response which is hazardous in high-risk patients. Many drugs and techniques have been used to attenuate the stress response. Lornoxicam 16 mg is a potent nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug agent with analgesic potency equivalent to morphine 10 mg, fentanyl 100 μg and tramadol 100 mg. Lornoxicam has been found to attenuate stress response in some studies. We compared the lornoxicam with fentanyl in attenuating stress response. Materials and Methods: A double blind randomized controlled study was conducted on 60 adult patients of American Society of Anesthesiologist physical status 1 and 2. Group L (n = 30) receives injection lornoxicam 16 mg intravenous 30 min before induction, Group F (n = 30) receives injection fentanyl 2 μg/kg during induction. Systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) were recorded baseline (BL), before induction, every minute up to 5 min and at 10 min after intubation. Results: After intubation, there is a gradual decrease in SBP and DBP in both groups. The MAP was also comparable between the two groups except at 5 min and 10 min during which MAP recovered toward BL in Group L where as it remained low in Group F which was statistically significant (P < 0.05). Both the drugs have successfully attenuated the HR response. Conclusion: Lornoxicam successfully attenuated the hemodynamic response to laryngoscopy and endotracheal intubation and is equally efficacious as fentanyl. PMID:27746536

  5. Success Stories. Celebration of Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Royce and Royce, Lancaster, PA.

    This publication contains stories about 10 outstanding Pennsylvania citizens who realize that a high quality education is essential to meeting life's challenges. These stories describe how 10 men and women faced great obstacles and overcame seemingly impossible barriers to become contributing and productive members of the Commonwealth of…

  6. [Management of panfacial fractures--also an intubation problem].

    PubMed

    Prochno, T; Dornberger, I; Esser, U

    1996-01-01

    Conventional oro- or nasotracheal intubation represents an obstacle in cases of panfacial fractures or elective operations of the facial skeleton above the Le Fort I level because of the intermaxillary fixation that often becomes necessary. Until recently, protection of the airway required tracheotomy with its well-known disadvantages of the usual intubations, which could compromise surgical strategies. A useful alternative method for protecting the airway involves the submental route for intubation and was first described in 1986 by Altemir. We present our experience with submandibular transmylohoid intubation in 14 patients. The technique is relatively simple and includes only a small risk potential. The cosmetic result of the extraoral incision required is good to excellent.

  7. Comparison of four techniques of nasogastric tube insertion in anaesthetised, intubated patients: A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, Mohan Chandra; Dolai, Sujata; Ghosh, Santanu; Mistri, Pallab Kumar; Roy, Rajiv; Basu, Sekhar Ranjan; Das, Sabyasachi

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims: Insertion of nasogastric tubes (NGTs) in anaesthetised, intubated patients with a conventional method is sometimes difficult. Different techniques of NGT insertion have been tried with varying degree of success. The aim of this prospective, randomised, open-label study was to evaluate three modified techniques of NGT insertion comparing with the conventional method in respect of success rate, time taken for insertion and the adverse events. Methods: In the operation theatre of general surgery, the patients were randomly allocated into four groups: Group C (control group, n = 54), Group W (ureteral guide wire group, n = 54), Group F (neck flexion with lateral pressure, n = 54) and Group R (reverse Sellick's manoeuvre, n = 54). The number of attempts for successful NGT insertion, time taken for insertion and adverse events were noted. Results: All the three modified techniques were found more successful than the conventional method on the first attempt. The least time taken for insertion was noted in the reverse Sellick's method. However, on intergroup analysis, neck flexion and reverse Sellick's methods were comparable but significantly faster than the other two methods with respect to time taken for insertion. Conclusion: Reverse Sellick's manoeuver, neck flexion with lateral neck pressure and guide wire-assisted techniques are all better alternatives to the conventional method for successful, quick and reliable NGT insertion with permissible adverse events in anaesthetised, intubated adult patients. Further studies after eliminating major limitations of the present study are warranted to establish the superiority of any one of these modified techniques. PMID:25624535

  8. Factors Associated with Intubation Time and ICU Stay After CABG

    PubMed Central

    Flegler, Suzanny; Paro, Flavia Marini

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The aim of this study was to identify factors associated with intubation time and intensive care unit stay after coronary artery bypass grafting with cardiopulmonary bypass. METHODS This was a retrospective study, whose data collection was performed in the hospital charts of 160 patients over 18 years, who underwent surgery from September 2009 to July of 2013 in a hospital in the state of Espirito Santo, Brazil. RESULTS The mean age of the subjects was 61.44±8.93 years old and 68.8% were male. Subjects had a mean of 5.17±8.42 days of intensive care unit stay and mean intubation time of 10.99±8.41 hours. We observed statistically significant positive correlation between the following variables: patients' age and intubation time; patients' age and intensive care unit stay; intubation time and intensive care unit stay. CONCLUSION In conclusion, the study showed that older patients had longer intubation time and increased intensive care unit stay. Furthermore, patients with longer intubation time had increased intensive care unit stay. PMID:26934403

  9. Prediction of difficult tracheal intubation in thyroid surgery.

    PubMed

    Bouaggad, Abderrahmane; Nejmi, Sif Eddine; Bouderka, Moulay Ahmed; Abbassi, Omar

    2004-08-01

    The incidence of difficult endotracheal intubation (DEI) for patients undergoing thyroidectomy has rarely been studied, and evaluation of factors linked to DEI is limited to a few studies. We undertook this prospective study to investigate the incidence of DEI in the presence of goiter (an enlargement of the thyroid gland) and to evaluate factors linked to DEI. We studied 320 consecutive patients scheduled for thyroidectomy. DEI was evaluated by an intubation difficulty scale. The trachea was intubated by an unassisted anesthesiologist, and the intubation difficulty scale was calculated. A univariate analysis was performed to identify potential factors predicting DEI, followed by a multivariate analysis. DEI was reported in 17 patients. The rate of easy tracheal intubation was 36.9%; the rate for patients who had minor difficulty of intubation was 57.8%. Sex (male), body mass index, Mallampati class, thyromental distance, neck mobility, Cormack grade, cancerous goiter, and tracheal deviation or compression were identified in the univariate analysis as potential DEI risk factors. With multivariate analysis, two criteria were recognized as independent for DEI (Cormack Grade III or IV and cancerous goiter). We conclude that the large goiter is not associated with a more frequent DEI. However, the presence of a cancerous goiter is a major factor for predicting DEI.

  10. Successful pregnancy achieved by intracytoplasmic sperm injection using cryopreserved electroejaculate sperm in a couple both with spinal cord injury: a case report.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shee-Uan; Shieh, Jen-Yi; Wang, Yen-Ho; Lu, Thomas; Ho, Hong-Nerng; Yang, Yu-Shih

    2005-09-01

    Anejaculation and poor semen quality are 2 major causes of infertility in men with spinal cord injury (SCI). The low motility of retrieved sperm often results in use of intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) to achieve fertilization. Pregnancy is a challenging event for women with SCI. Herein we report a pregnancy after ICSI with cryopreserved electroejaculate sperm for a couple both with SCI. The husband had T10 paraplegia with a neurogenic bladder. He underwent 2 electroejaculations. The concentration of sperm was 0.1 x 10(6)/mL to 0.3 x 10(6)/mL, with a motility of 5% to 20%. ICSI was considered the best choice for the couple. His wife had L2 paraplegia with cauda equina syndrome. She underwent controlled ovarian hyperstimulation, and 10 oocytes were retrieved. Eight mature oocytes were injected using thawed sperm, which resulted in 5 normal zygotes. Conception was achieved by the transfer of 4 embryos into the uterus. A healthy female baby was delivered vaginally at 39 weeks of gestation. This woman had never undergone any other assisted reproductive technology (ART) procedures. With the advancement of ART and prenatal care, this couple achieved a successful pregnancy. The use of cryopreserved electroejaculated sperm for ICSI can avoid the inconvenience or cost to the patient of repeated electroejaculations.

  11. Central sensitization does not identify patients with carpal tunnel syndrome who are likely to achieve short-term success with physical therapy.

    PubMed

    Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César; Cleland, Joshua A; Ortega-Santiago, Ricardo; de-la-Llave-Rincon, Ana Isabel; Martínez-Perez, Almudena; Pareja, Juan A

    2010-11-01

    The aim of the current study was to identify whether hyperexcitability of the central nervous system is a prognostic factor for individuals with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) likely to experience rapid and clinical self-reported improvement following a physical therapy program including soft tissue mobilization and nerve slider neurodynamic interventions. Women presenting with clinical and electrophysiological findings of CTS were involved in a prospective single-arm trial. Participants underwent a standardized examination and then a physical therapy session. The physical therapy sessions included both soft tissue mobilization directed at the anatomical sites of potential median nerve entrapment and a passive nerve slider neurodynamic technique targeted to the median nerve. Pressure pain thresholds (PPT) over the median, radial and ulnar nerves, C5-C6 zygapophyseal joint, carpal tunnel and tibialis anterior muscle were assessed bilaterally. Additionally, thermal detection and pain thresholds were measured over the carpal tunnel and thenar eminence bilaterally to evaluate central nervous system excitability. Subjects were classified as responders (having achieved a successful outcome) or non-responders based on self-perceived recovery. Variables were entered into a stepwise logistic regression model to determine the most accurate variables for determining prognosis. Data from 72 women were included in the analysis, of which 35 experienced a successful outcome (48.6%). Three variables including PPT over the C5-C6 joint affected side <137 kPa, HPT carpal tunnel affected side <39.6º and general health >66 points were identified. If 2 out of 3 variables were present (LR + 14.8), the likelihood of success increased from 48.6 to 93.3%. We identified 3 factors that may be associated with a rapid clinical response to both soft tissue mobilization and nerve slider neurodynamic techniques targeted to the median nerve in women presenting with CTS. Our results support that

  12. Applying SE Methods Achieves Project Success to Evaluate Hammer and Fixed Cutter Grinders Using Multiple Varieties and Moistures of Biomass Feedstock for Ethanol Production

    SciTech Connect

    Larry R. Zirker; Christopher T. Wright, PhD; R. Douglas Hamelin

    2008-06-01

    Applying basic systems engineering (SE) tools to the mission analysis phases of a 2.5-million dollar biomass pre-processing project for the U.S. Department of Energy directly assisted the project principal investigator understand the complexity and identify the gaps of a moving-target project and capture the undefined technical/functional requirements and deliverables from the project team and industrial partners. A creative application of various SE tools by non-aerospace systems engineers developed an innovative “big picture” product that combined aspects of mission analysis with a project functional flow block diagram, providing immediate understanding of the depth and breath of the biomass preprocessing effort for all team members, customers, and industrial partners. The “big picture” diagram became the blue print to write the project test plan, and provided direction to bring the project back on track and achieve project success.

  13. Failed intubation of an unanticipated postintubation tracheal stenosis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Park, Soo-Yong

    2016-01-01

    Encountering a patient with unanticipated laryngotracheal stenosis (LTS) during anesthetic induction is challenging for an anesthesiologist. Because routine history taking and pre-anesthetic evaluation cannot rule out the possibility of LTS, other measures should be taken. Perioperative airway maintenance is considered crucial for avoiding complications such as airway edema, bleeding, obstruction, collapse, and ultimately respiratory failure and arrest. We report an unanticipated tracheal stenosis discovered during anesthetic induction that hindered endotracheal intubation. Because airway maintenance was difficult, we postponed surgery until determining the cause of the difficult entry, considered possible therapeutic approaches (both anesthetic and surgical), and provided successful surgery with a continuous epidural block. PMID:27064682

  14. Carrots and Sticks: A Comprehensive Business Model for the Successful Achievement of Energy Efficiency Resource Standards Environmental Energy Technologies DivisionMarch 2011

    SciTech Connect

    Satchwell, Andrew; Cappers, Peter; Goldman, Charles

    2011-03-22

    Energy efficiency resource standards (EERS) are a prominent strategy to potentially achieve rapid and aggressive energy savings goals in the U.S. As of December 2010, twenty-six U.S. states had some form of an EERS with savings goals applicable to energy efficiency (EE) programs paid for by utility customers. The European Union has initiated a similar type of savings goal, the Energy End-use Efficiency and Energy Services Directive, where it is being implemented in some countries through direct partnership with regulated electric utilities. U.S. utilities face significant financial disincentives under traditional regulation which affects the interest of shareholders and managers in aggressively pursuing cost-effective energy efficiency. Regulators are considering some combination of mandated goals ('sticks') and alternative utility business model components ('carrots' such as performance incentives) to align the utility's business and financial interests with state and federal energy efficiency public policy goals. European countries that have directed their utilities to administer EE programs have generally relied on non-binding mandates and targets; in the U.S., most state regulators have increasingly viewed 'carrots' as a necessary condition for successful achievement of energy efficiency goals and targets. In this paper, we analyze the financial impacts of an EERS on a large electric utility in the State of Arizona using a pro-forma utility financial model, including impacts on utility earnings, customer bills and rates. We demonstrate how a viable business model can be designed to improve the business case while retaining sizable ratepayer benefits. Quantifying these concerns and identifying ways they can be addressed are crucial steps in gaining the support of major stakeholder groups - lessons that can apply to other countries looking to significantly increase savings targets that can be achieved from their own utility-administered EE programs.

  15. Intravenous lidocaine as a suppressant of coughing during tracheal intubation.

    PubMed

    Yukioka, H; Yoshimoto, N; Nishimura, K; Fujimori, M

    1985-12-01

    Effects of intravenously administered lidocaine on cough suppression during tracheal intubation under general anesthesia were evaluated in two studies. In study 1, 100 patients received either a placebo or 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, or 2.0 mg/kg lidocaine intravenously 1 min before tracheal intubation. All visible coughs were classified as coughing. The incidence of coughing decreased as the dose of lidocaine increased. A dose of 1 mg/kg or more of intravenous lidocaine suppressed the cough reflex significantly (P less than 0.01). Coughing was suppressed completely by 2 mg/kg of intravenous lidocaine. In study 2, 108 patients received 2 mg/kg lidocaine intravenously or a placebo 1, 3, 5, 7, 10, or 15 min before intubation. The same criteria for determining whether a patient did or did not cough during tracheal intubation were used as in study 1. The incidence of coughing decreased significantly (P less than 0.01) when 2 mg/kg of lidocaine was injected intravenously between 1 and 5 min before our attempting intubation. Cough reflex was suppressed completely by plasma concentrations of lidocaine in excess of 3 micrograms/ml. PMID:4061901

  16. Achieving high treatment success for multidrug-resistant TB in Africa: initiation and scale-up of MDR TB care in Ethiopia—an observational cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Meressa, Daniel; Hurtado, Rocío M; Andrews, Jason R; Diro, Ermias; Abato, Kassim; Daniel, Tewodros; Prasad, Paritosh; Prasad, Rebekah; Fekade, Bekele; Tedla, Yared; Yusuf, Hanan; Tadesse, Melaku; Tefera, Dawit; Ashenafi, Abraham; Desta, Girma; Aderaye, Getachew; Olson, Kristian; Thim, Sok; Goldfeld, Anne E

    2015-01-01

    Background In Africa, fewer than half of patients receiving therapy for multidrug-resistant TB (MDR TB) are successfully treated, with poor outcomes reported for HIV-coinfected patients. Methods A standardised second-line drug (SLD) regimen was used in a non-governmental organisation–Ministry of Health (NGO-MOH) collaborative community and hospital-based programme in Ethiopia that included intensive side effect monitoring, adherence strategies and nutritional supplementation. Clinical outcomes for patients with at least 24 months of follow-up were reviewed and predictors of treatment failure or death were evaluated by Cox proportional hazards models. Results From February 2009 to December 2014, 1044 patients were initiated on SLD. 612 patients with confirmed or presumed MDR TB had ≥24 months of follow-up, 551 (90.0%) were confirmed and 61 (10.0%) were suspected MDR TB cases. 603 (98.5%) had prior TB treatment, 133 (21.7%) were HIV coinfected and median body mass index (BMI) was 16.6. Composite treatment success was 78.6% with 396 (64.7%) cured, 85 (13.9%) who completed treatment, 10 (1.6%) who failed, 85 (13.9%) who died and 36 (5.9%) who were lost to follow-up. HIV coinfection (adjusted HR (AHR): 2.60, p<0.001), BMI (AHR 0.88/kg/m2, p=0.006) and cor pulmonale (AHR 3.61, p=0.003) and confirmed MDR TB (AHR 0.50, p=0.026) were predictive of treatment failure or death. Conclusions We report from Ethiopia the highest MDR TB treatment success outcomes so far achieved in Africa, in a setting with severe resource constraints and patients with advanced disease. Intensive treatment of adverse effects, nutritional supplementation, adherence interventions and NGO-MOH collaboration were key strategies contributing to success. We argue these approaches should be routinely incorporated into programmes. PMID:26506854

  17. Primary Treatment of Nasolacrimal Duct Obstruction with Nasolacrimal Duct Intubation in Children Less than Four Years Old

    PubMed Central

    Repka, Michael X.; Melia, B. Michele; Beck, Roy W.; Atkinson, C. Scott; Chandler, Danielle L.; Holmes, Jonathan M.; Khammar, Alexander; Morrison, David; Quinn, Graham E.; Silbert, David I.; Ticho, Benjamin H.; Wallace, David K.; Weakley, David R.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To report the outcome of nasolacrimal duct intubation as the primary treatment of congenital nasolacrimal duct obstruction (NLDO) in children less than 4 years of age. Methods 182 eyes of 139 children receiving intubation with planned tube retention for 2 to 5 months were enrolled in a prospective, non-randomized observational multicenter study (19 sites). Children were aged 6 to <45 months at the time of surgery, with no prior nasolacrimal surgical procedure, and had at least one of the following clinical signs of NLDO: epiphora, mucous discharge and/or increased tear lake. Results Treatment success was defined as absence of epiphora, mucous discharge and increased tear lake at the outcome visit one month after tube removal. The surgical outcome was assessed in 150 eyes (82% of cohort). The proportion of eyes treated successfully was 91% (95% confidence interval = 86% to 95%). The outcome dye disappearance test was normal in 125 (86%) eyes, indeterminate in 13 (9%), and abnormal in 7 (5%) of the 145 eyes tested. Monocanalicular tubes were used in 74% of cases. The tube was removed prior to the planned minimum retention time of months in 61 eyes (41%). For 23 eyes the early removal was due to inadvertent displacement by the patient. Conclusion In children 6 to <45 months of age, nasolacrimal duct intubation in a non-randomized and non-comparative trial was a successful primary treatment of NLDO in about 90% of cases not lost to follow up. PMID:18595756

  18. Premedication for endotracheal intubation in the newborn infant

    PubMed Central

    Barrington, KJ

    2011-01-01

    Endotracheal intubation, a common procedure in newborn care, is associated with pain and cardiorespiratory instability. The use of premedication reduces the adverse physiological responses of bradycardia, systemic hypertension, intracranial hypertension and hypoxia. Perhaps more importantly, premedication decreases the pain and discomfort associated with the procedure. All newborn infants, therefore, should receive analgesic premedication for endotracheal intubation except in emergency situations. Based on current evidence, an optimal protocol for premedication is to administer a vagolytic (intravenous [IV] atropine 20 μg/kg), a rapid-acting analgesic (IV fentanyl 3 μg/kg to 5 μg/kg; slow infusion) and a short-duration muscle relaxant (IV succinylcholine 2 mg/kg). Intubations should be performed or supervised by trained staff, with close monitoring of the infant throughout. PMID:22379381

  19. Transoral tracheal intubation of rodents using a fiberoptic laryngoscope.

    PubMed

    Costa, D L; Lehmann, J R; Harold, W M; Drew, R T

    1986-06-01

    A fiberoptic laryngoscope which allows direct visualization of the deep pharynx and epiglottis has been developed for transoral tracheal intubation of small laboratory mammals. The device has been employed in the intubation and instillation of a variety of substances into the lungs of rats, and with minor modification, has had similar application in mice, hamsters, and guinea pigs. The simplicity and ease of handling of the laryngoscope permits one person to intubate large numbers of enflurane anesthetized animals either on an open counter top or in a glove-box, as may be required for administration of carcinogenic materials. Instillation of 7Be-labeled carbon particles into the lungs of mice, hamsters, rats, and guinea pigs resulted in reasonably consistent interlobal distribution of particles for each test animal species with minimal tracheal deposition. However, actual lung tissue doses of carbon exhibited some species dependence.

  20. Dental trauma prevention during endotracheal intubation--review of literature.

    PubMed

    Mańka-Malara, Katarzyna; Gawlak, Dominika; Hovhannisyan, Anahit; Klikowska, Marta; Kostrzewa-Janicka, Jolanta

    2015-01-01

    Endotracheal intubation is a procedure performed during general anaesthesia with the use of an endotracheal tube in order to maintain a patent airway. This routinely used procedure is connected with a risk of complications within the region of the masticatory system. Trauma of teeth, their surrounding structures and the soft tissue of the oral cavity is observed in app. 1.38 per 1000 procedures. The main causes of this damage are the surgical skills and experience of the surgeon, the anatomical conditions present and the mode of conducting the procedure. In order to reduce the risk of postoperative complications, patients with a high risk of sustaining an injury during endotracheal intubation should be equipped with elastic mouthguards, which reduces the possibility of damage. The scoring in a scale of endotracheal intubation difficulty should be used for qualification for the use of such mouthguards. PMID:26401748

  1. Developing competency in interns for endotracheal intubation: An educational article

    PubMed Central

    Makwana, Harsha Dhirubhai; Suthar, Nilay N; Gajjar, Mehul P; Thakor, Advait V

    2016-01-01

    Background: Our existing undergraduate curriculum lacks developing competency for endotracheal intubation. Even though it is a lifesaving procedure, interns are exposed only during their posting in anesthesia or emergency medicine and so, when need arises, they fail to perform endotracheal intubation and it leads to catastrophes. Aims and Objectives: The aim of this study was to develop competency in interns for endotracheal intubation. Materials and Methods: A study was conducted on fifty interns of medical college. Lecture and demonstration were used for cognitive domain and one-to-one training and practice on manikin for affective and psychomotor domains, respectively. Live demonstration on patients was done whenever possible. Gain in knowledge was evaluated by pre- and post-test using standardized validated questionnaire. Skills were assessed by direct observation of procedural skill on manikin, split in steps: Laryngoscopy, intubation, and ventilation. Session was evaluated using feedback questionnaire and Likert scale. Results: Interns showed mean marks of 8.12 ± 1.63 in pretest compared to 13.86 ± 1.06 of posttest with a gain of 34.8% (P = 0.0001), which is highly significant. Twenty-two percent interns completed all steps correctly in the first attempt, 62% in the second attempt, while 16% required third attempt to correctly complete all steps. Conclusion: This training developed competency for basic knowledge and practice of endotracheal intubation in interns adequately on manikin. Training for endotracheal intubation should be carried out at the beginning of internship before they go for clinical practice and repeated during their rotation of Anesthesia and Emergency Medicine Department, so they can retain their competency for it and can do later on whenever required. PMID:27563588

  2. [The case of haemangiofibroma after prolonged intubation in 12-years old child].

    PubMed

    Grzegorowski, Michał; Wojnowski, Waldemar; Ryglewicz, Michał

    2002-01-01

    Authors presented a case of haemangiofibroma of larynx after prolonged intubation in 12 years old girl. We pay attention mechanism of larynx injury after prolonged intubation. In our opinion endoscopy is a very valuable method of child larynx examination.

  3. Efficacy and complications of submental tracheal intubation compared with tracheostomy in maxillofacial trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Kita, Ryosuke; Kikuta, Toshihiro; Takahashi, Masahiro; Ootani, Taishi; Takaoka, Masao; Matsuda, Michitaka; Tsurushima, Hiroki; Yoshioka, Izumi

    2016-01-01

    Submental tracheal intubation is a technique for use in patients with maxillofacial trauma. The purpose of this retrospective study was to evaluate the efficacy and complications of this technique compared with tracheostomy. Twenty-five patients underwent submental tracheal intubation since 2001. Submental tracheal intubation was performed in cases needing intermaxillary fixation complicated by a nasal pyramid or anterior skull base fracture. No severe perioperative or long-term complications were noted. Intra- and postoperative complications were observed in three patients. In one case, the tube was accidentally dislodged into the right main bronchus during submental tracheal intubation. Two patients developed skin infections. Submental scarring was undetectable, except for one patient with slight scarring. Submental tracheal intubation avoids the complications associated with tracheostomy and the difficulty of nasal intubation during intubation and surgery. Therefore, submental tracheal intubation is useful in the intraoperative management of patients with complex maxillofacial trauma. (J Oral Sci 58, 23-28, 2016). PMID:27021536

  4. Extended anaesthesia and nasotracheal intubation of a red kangaroo (Macropus rufus).

    PubMed

    Bauquier, S H; Golder, F J

    2010-11-01

    Anaesthesia requires maintenance of a patent airway. Nasotracheal intubation of a red kangaroo (Macropus rufus) was performed when the inability to open the animal’s mouth prevented orotracheal intubation. Nasotracheal intubation was easy to perform, secured the airway and permitted delivery of supplemental oxygen, isoflurane and intermittent positive pressure ventilation.

  5. Determination of the utility of the Intubation Difficulty Scale for use with indirect laryngoscopes.

    PubMed

    McElwain, J; Simpkin, A; Newell, J; Laffey, J G

    2011-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the Intubation Difficulty Scale is meaningful when used with indirect laryngoscopes. Data were analysed from previously published clinical trials from our group that compared the indirect laryngoscopes with the Macintosh laryngoscope. For each laryngoscope type, the Intubation Difficulty Scale score obtained for each tracheal intubation was correlated with data for duration of the intubation attempt and with the user rated difficulty of the intubation attempt. The strengths of the correlations between these indices were then compared for tracheas intubated with the Macintosh vs the indirect laryngoscopes. The Intubation Difficulty Scale performed well when compared with data for duration and user rated difficulty of the intubation attempts for the both direct and indirect laryngoscopy. However, the correlation between the Intubation Difficulty Scale score and both user rated difficulty (p = 0.001) and the duration of tracheal intubation (p = 0.003) were significantly stronger for the Macintosh laryngoscope compared with the indirect laryngoscopes. In contrast, the correlation between user rated difficulty scores and the data for duration of tracheal intubation was not different between the device types. The Intubation Difficulty Scale performs less well with indirect laryngoscopes than with the Macintosh laryngoscope. These findings suggest the need for caution with the use of this score with indirect laryngoscopes.

  6. Emergency airway management by paramedics: comparison between standard endotracheal intubation, laryngeal mask airway, and I-gel.

    PubMed

    Leventis, Charalampos; Chalkias, Athanasios; Sampanis, Michail A; Foulidou, Xanthipi; Xanthos, Theodoros

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether briefly trained paramedics would be able to successfully intubate by endotracheal intubation (ETI) and using the laryngeal mask airway (LMA) and the I-gel in a manikin model. After the completion of a questionnaire, a brief educational session, and presentation of ETI, LMA, and I-gel, 72 paramedics were randomly allocated to intubate an adult manikin. The success rate for I-gel was higher than that for LMA (P<0.001) and ETI (P<0.001), and the insertion time for I-gel was significantly shorter than that for LMA (P<0.001) or during ETI (P<0.001). There was a statistically significant association between the experience level of paramedics and insertion time only for the LMA (P=0.012). In addition, the mean insertion time values were significantly affected by the accuracy of the answers to the theoretical questions (P<0.05 for all questions). Paramedics should lay greater emphasis on airway management using supraglottic devices, especially I-gel because of its shorter time of insertion. PMID:24300244

  7. Effects of an elevated position on time to tracheal intubation by novice intubators using Macintosh laryngoscopy or videolaryngoscopy: randomized crossover trial

    PubMed Central

    Wai, Abraham K. C.; Graham, Colin A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the time to tracheal intubation using Glidescope videolaryngoscopy (GVL) compared to that of standard laryngoscopy, by using a Macintosh blade (SLM) in a human patient simulator in supine and elevated (ramped) positions. Methods In this randomized crossover design, novice intubators (first-year medical students), using both laryngoscopic techniques, attempted tracheal intubation on a human patient simulator with a “normal airway” anatomy (Cormack-Lehane grade I). The simulator was placed in both supine and ramped positions using a commercial mattress system. The mean time to intubation and complications were compared between GVL and SLM in both positions. The percentage of glottic opening (POGO, GVL only) was estimated during intubation in the ramped and supine positions. The primary outcome was time to intubation, and the secondary outcomes included complication rates such as esophageal intubation and dental trauma. Results There was no difference in the mean time to intubation in either position (P=0.33). The SLM intubation was significantly faster than GVL (mean difference, 1.5 minutes; P<0.001). The mean POGO score for GVL improved by 8% in the ramped position compared to that in supine position (P=0.018). The esophageal intubation rate for SLM was 15% to 17% compared to 1.3% for GVL; dental trauma occurred in 53% to 56% of GVL, compared to 2% to 6% for SLM (P<0.001, respectively). Conclusion Novices had shorter intubation times using standard laryngoscopy with a SLM compared to GVL in both supine and ramped positions. GVL resulted in fewer esophageal intubations, but more dental trauma than standard laryngoscopy.

  8. [A case of endotracheal intubation in prone position utilizing PENTAX-Airwayscope for morbidly obese patient].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Hiroto; Nakajima, Waka; Aoyagi, Mitsuo; Takahashi, Minori; Kuzuta, Toshimichi; Osaki, Mami

    2012-04-01

    We experienced the airway management of a morbidly obese patient in prone position utilizing PENTAX-Airwayscope (AWS) which is a novel airway device for endotracheal intubation. A 29-year-old man, who was 150 kg in weight and 51.9 kg x m(-2) in body mass index, was scheduled for the discectomy for lumbar disc herniation. After the topical anesthesia with lidocaine spray, the patient lay on his stomach by himself on the table. Following the induction of general anesthesia with ketamine and dexmedetomidine in prone position, an anatomically curved blade (INTLOCK) was inserted to his oral cavity first, then the body of AWS was attached. With the patient breathing spontaneously, we successfully inserted the reinforced endotracheal tube. After the maintenance of anesthesia with continuous infusion of dexmedetomidine, ketamin and remifentanil, the patient awoke clearly without pain and endotracheal tube was removed safely in the prone position. Although the prone position is not the standard position for endotracheal intubation under general anesthesia, our technique could be performed in emergency situations.

  9. Can sugammadex save a patient in a simulated 'cannot intubate, cannot ventilate' situation?

    PubMed

    Bisschops, M M A; Holleman, C; Huitink, J M

    2010-09-01

    Recent studies have shown that the use of high dose rocuronium followed by sugammadex provides a faster time to recovery from neuromuscular blockade following rapid sequence induction than suxamethonium. In a manikin-based 'cannot intubate, cannot ventilate' simulation, we studied the total time taken for anaesthetic teams to prepare and administer sugammadex from the time of their initial decision to use the drug. The mean (SD) total time to administration of sugammadex was 6.7 (1.5) min, following which a further 2.2 min (giving a total 8.9 min) should be allowed to achieve a train-of-four ratio of 0.9. Four (22%) teams gave the correct dose, 10 (56%) teams gave a dose that was lower than recommended, four (22%) teams gave a dose that was higher than recommended, six (33%) teams administered sugammadex in a single dose, and 12 (67%) teams gave multiple doses. Our simulation highlights that sugammadex might not have saved this patient in a 'cannot intubate, cannot ventilate' situation, and that difficulties and delays were encountered when identifying, preparing and administering the correct drug dose.

  10. Tubeless video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) under non-intubated, intravenous anesthesia with spontaneous ventilation and no placement of chest tube postoperatively

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Fei; Liu, Jun; Li, Shuben; Yin, Weiqiang; Xin, Xu; Shao, Wenlong

    2016-01-01

    Background To assess the feasibility and safety of tubeless video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) under non-intubated, intravenous anesthesia with spontaneous ventilation and no placement of a chest tube postoperatively compared with VATS under intubated anesthesia with single-lung mechanical ventilation. Methods A total of 91 patients undergoing tubeless VATS (60 sympathectomies, 22 bullae resections, and 9 mediastinal tumor resections) between December 2012 and December 2015 were included. Additionally, 82 patients were treated by VATS by the same team while under intubated general anesthesia (52 sympathectomies, 19 bullae resections, and 11 mediastinal tumor resections). Comprehensive early outcome data, including intraoperative and postoperative variables, were compared between the subgroups. Results In total, 89 patients in the tubeless group underwent an effective operation and exhibited good postoperative recovery, while 2 (one sympathectomy and one bullae resection) had their operation aborted for some reason. The tubeless group showed advantages in the postoperative fasting time, the mean duration of the postoperative hospital stay, and postoperative pain scores, while no significant difference was found in intraoperative blood loss, the operation time or postoperative complications between the tubeless group and the intubated group. Furthermore, 83% (49/59) of sympathectomies, 81% (17/21) of bullae resections, and 56% (5/9) of mediastinal tumor resections were achieved via day surgery. Conclusions In this study, our experience has shown that tubeless VATS is a safe and feasible surgery with certain advantages in selected patients with thoracic disease and that we can achieve day surgery in these cases. PMID:27621880

  11. Lessons in Success: A Multi-Campus Study of Factors Influencing Academic Accomplishment among High-Achieving African American Students at Private Liberal Arts Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Ryan A.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the academic experiences of highly successful African-American male graduates of small, private liberal arts colleges using a qualitative approach. Fourteen highly successful alumni from selective, private colleges were purposefully selected for the study, including seven African-American males and seven…

  12. Use of laryngeal mask airway for non-endotracheal intubated anesthesia for patients with pectus excavatum undergoing thoracoscopic Nuss procedure

    PubMed Central

    Du, Xiaojun; Mao, Songsong; Cui, Jianxiu; Ma, Jue; Zhang, Guangyan; Zheng, Yong; Zhou, Haiyu; Xie, Liang; Zhang, Dongkun; Shi, Ruiqing

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of the present study was to determine the safety and feasibility of the use of laryngeal mask airway (LMA) for non-endotracheal intubated anesthesia for patients with pectus excavatum (PE) undergoing thoracoscopic Nuss procedure. Methods Between July 2015 and December 2015, 30 selected patients with PE were planned to undergo a thoracoscopic Nuss procedure using LMA for non-endotracheal intubated anesthesia in the Guangdong General Hospital. The clinical data were analyzed to evaluate the safety and feasibility of this technique. Results Of the 30 selected patients, two were female, the mean age was 16.04±5.09 years and the average Haller index was 3.37±0.88. A total of 27 cases (90%) succeeded at the first attempt, one patient required conversion to an endotracheal tube (ETT) because of continuous air leak. The peripheral O2 saturation (SpO2), end-tidal carbon dioxide (EtCO2) values, heart rate (HR), and mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) remained stable throughout the procedure in all cases. All of the 30 patients were successfully corrected without requiring conversion to an open surgery. Two patients experienced postoperative nausea and one reported a sore throat. Neither gastro-esophageal reflux nor in-hospital mortality occurred. Conclusions The use of LMA for non-endotracheal intubated anesthesia for selected patients with PE undergoing thoracoscopic Nuss procedure is clinically safe and technically feasible. PMID:27621860

  13. Identifying and Managing a Malpositioned Endotracheal Tube Bite Block in an Orotracheally Intubated Patient: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Chou, Hui-Ling; Ruan, Sheng-Yuan; Wu, Huey-Dong

    2016-03-01

    The universal bite block is increasingly used in orotracheally intubated patients. Here, we report a case of pilot tube dysfunction caused by a malpositioned universal bite block in an orotracheally intubated patient. We summarize the key points on identifying and managing a malpositioned universal bite block from this case and literature review.A 74-year-old woman was emergently intubated during an episode of hyperkalemia-related cardiac arrest. A universal bite block was used for fixing the endotracheal tube. After her condition stabilized, ventilator weaning was attempted; however, a positive cuff-leak test result was observed.The cuff-leak test revealed a lack of elasticity of the pilot balloon, which was completely deflated after 2 mL of air was removed. Pilot tube dysfunction was highly suspected. The bite block was slightly pulled out, and 8 mL of air was aspirated from the pilot tube. The patient was successfully extubated without stridor and respiratory distress.Our case highlighted that a malpositioned bite block may obstruct the pilot tube, causing unfavorable consequences. While fixing the bite block on an endotracheal tube, it is crucial to ensure that the takeoff point of the pilot tube is located within the C-notch of the bite block.

  14. Use of laryngeal mask airway for non-endotracheal intubated anesthesia for patients with pectus excavatum undergoing thoracoscopic Nuss procedure

    PubMed Central

    Du, Xiaojun; Mao, Songsong; Cui, Jianxiu; Ma, Jue; Zhang, Guangyan; Zheng, Yong; Zhou, Haiyu; Xie, Liang; Zhang, Dongkun; Shi, Ruiqing

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of the present study was to determine the safety and feasibility of the use of laryngeal mask airway (LMA) for non-endotracheal intubated anesthesia for patients with pectus excavatum (PE) undergoing thoracoscopic Nuss procedure. Methods Between July 2015 and December 2015, 30 selected patients with PE were planned to undergo a thoracoscopic Nuss procedure using LMA for non-endotracheal intubated anesthesia in the Guangdong General Hospital. The clinical data were analyzed to evaluate the safety and feasibility of this technique. Results Of the 30 selected patients, two were female, the mean age was 16.04±5.09 years and the average Haller index was 3.37±0.88. A total of 27 cases (90%) succeeded at the first attempt, one patient required conversion to an endotracheal tube (ETT) because of continuous air leak. The peripheral O2 saturation (SpO2), end-tidal carbon dioxide (EtCO2) values, heart rate (HR), and mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) remained stable throughout the procedure in all cases. All of the 30 patients were successfully corrected without requiring conversion to an open surgery. Two patients experienced postoperative nausea and one reported a sore throat. Neither gastro-esophageal reflux nor in-hospital mortality occurred. Conclusions The use of LMA for non-endotracheal intubated anesthesia for selected patients with PE undergoing thoracoscopic Nuss procedure is clinically safe and technically feasible.

  15. Keeping Middle Grades Students on the Path to Success in High School: Increasing Engagement and Achievement in SREB States. Challenge to Lead Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Marilyn; Collins, Crystal

    2009-01-01

    This report documents the stall of progress in middle grades reading and math achievement. It analyzes results on state assessments and the National Assessment of Education Progress (NAEP) and indicates steps that will help states regain progress in achievement. It also lays out five specific strategies states can use to keep middle grades…

  16. Reading Achievement: Characteristics Associated with Success and Failure: Abstracts of Doctoral Dissertations Published in "Dissertation Abstracts International," July through December 1980 (Vol. 41 Nos. 1 through 6).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ERIC Clearinghouse on Reading and Communication Skills, Urbana, IL.

    This collection of abstracts is part of a continuing series providing information on recent doctoral dissertations. The 30 titles deal with a variety of topics, including the following: (1) the effect of a series of lessons based on real life experiences for improving reading achievement; (2) reading achievement and the transition from letter to…

  17. The Role of Stanford Achievement Test 10[TM] Subtests in Sixth Grade as a Predictor of Success on ACT's Eighth Grade Explore Exam[TM

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potts, Jeffrey D.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if there was a predictive correlation between a specific sixth grade achievement test known as the Stanford Achievement Test 10 and the eighth grade college readiness assessment instrument known as the Explore Exam for a group of North Texas students. Following an assessment during sixth grade, via the…

  18. Comparison of laryngeal mask airway use with endotracheal intubation during anesthesia of western lowland gorillas (Gorilla gorilla gorilla).

    PubMed

    Cerveny, Shannon N; D'Agostino, Jennifer J; Davis, Michelle R; Payton, Mark E

    2012-12-01

    The laryngeal mask airway is an alternative to endotracheal intubation that achieves control of the airway by creating a seal around the larynx with an inflatable cuff. This study compared use of the laryngeal mask airway with endotracheal intubation in anesthetized western lowland gorillas (Gorilla gorilla gorilla). Eight adult gorillas were immobilized for routine and diagnostic purposes for a total of nine anesthetic events. During each anesthetic event, gorillas were either intubated (n = 4; group A) or fitted with a laryngeal mask airway (n= 5; group B). Time required to place each airway device, physiologic parameters, and arterial blood gas were measured and compared between the two groups. There were no significant differences between the two groups for time required to place airway device, heart rate, hemoglobin oxygen saturation, end-tidal carbon dioxide, arterial partial pressure of carbon dioxide, or arterial pH between the two groups. Mean arterial partial pressure of oxygen was significantly greater in group B, 15 (group A: 94 +/- 44 mm Hg; group B: 408 +/- 36 mm Hg; P= 0.0025) and 45 (group A: 104 +/- 21 mm Hg; group B: 407 +/- 77 mm Hg; P = 0.0026) min after airway device placement. Mean respiratory rate was significantly greater in group A at multiple time points. Mean arterial pressure (group A: 129 +/- 16 mm Hg; group B: 60 +/- 8 mm Hg) and diastolic blood pressure (group A: 115 +/- 21 mm Hg; group B: 36 +/- 10 mm Hg) were significantly greater in group A at the time of airway device placement. The laryngeal mask airway maintained oxygenation and ventilation effectively in all gorillas and is a useful alternative to endotracheal intubation in western lowland gorillas.

  19. Intragastric intubation of alcohol during the perinatal period.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Sandra J; Lawrence, Charles R

    2008-01-01

    Animal models of fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) have been instrumental in isolating alcohol as a teratogen and demonstrating behavioral and neural effects. There are a number of different models for rodents with various strengths and weaknesses. A three-trimester model of FASD is described here; the model uses intragastric intubation of both pregnant dams and pups to mimic alcohol exposure across all three trimesters in humans. The model does not use expensive equipment and is relatively easy to accomplish. The model allows excellent control of alcohol dose and uses an oral route of administration. There are no undernutrition effects with the doses used here. A drawback of the model is the stress of the intubation procedures and ways in which to minimize this stress are discussed. In addition, a method to measure blood alcohol levels is described.

  20. Truview EVO2 and standard Macintosh laryngoscope for tracheal intubation during cardiopulmonary resuscitation: a comparative randomized crossover study.

    PubMed

    Gaszynska, Ewelina; Gaszynski, Tomasz

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the performance of the Truview EVO2 laryngoscope in manikin-simulated cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and no-CPR scenarios with standard intubation technique. Participants performed 4 scenarios in random order: endotracheal intubation (ETI) using Macintosh laryngoscope (MCL), Truview EVO2 laryngoscope in no-CPR patient scenario, and intubation during uninterrupted chest compressions using both laryngoscopes. The participants were directed to make 3 attempts in each scenario. Primary outcomes were time to tracheal intubation (TTI) and intubation success, whereas secondary outcomes were cumulative success ratio and the number of esophageal intubation (EI). TTI and success ratios were reported per attempt. Thirty paramedics completed the study. Median TTI with Truview EVO2 with CPR was 36 (interquartile range [IQR] 29.00-52.00), 22.5 (IQR 18.33-35.00), and 18 (IQR 11.00-23.00) seconds; MCL with CPR was 23 (IQR 18.92-36.90), 16.8 (IQR 14.00-22.31), and 14.5 (IQR 11.12-16.36) seconds; Truview EVO2 without CPR was 28.6 (IQR 24.02-38.34), 21.7 (IQR 17.00-25.00), and 13 (IQR 11.90-17.79) seconds; MCL without CPR was 17 (IQR 13.23-22.29), 13 (IQR 12.09-15.26), and 12.4 (IQR 10.08-19.84) seconds for first, second, and third attempts, respectively. The P values for differences in TTI between Truview EVO2 and MCL were P < 0.0001, P = 0.0540, and P = 0.7550 in CPR scenario and P = 0.0080, P = 0.1570, and P = 0.7652 in no-CPR scenario for first, second, and third attempts, respectively. The success ratios for each of the scenarios were as follows: in CPR scenario it was 0.73 versus 0.53 (P = 0.0558), 0.83 versus 0.76 (P = 0.2633), and 1 versus 0.8 (P = 0.0058); in no-CPR scenario it was 0.63 versus 0.73 (P = 0.2068), 0.86 versus 0.86, and 0.97 versus 1 (P = 0.1637) for Truview EVO2 vs MCL in first, second, and third attempts, respectively. The cumulative success ratio related to the time of ETI

  1. Evaluation of a smartphone camera system to enable visualization and image transmission to aid tracheal intubation with the Airtraq(®) laryngoscope.

    PubMed

    Lee, Delice Weishan; Thampi, Swapna; Yap, Eric Peng Huat; Liu, Eugene Hern Choon

    2016-06-01

    Using three-dimensional printing, we produced adaptors to attach a smartphone with camera to the eyepiece of the Airtraq(®) laryngoscope. This low-cost system enabled a team to simultaneously view the laryngoscopy process on the smartphone screen, and also enabled image transmission. We compared the Airtraq(®) with the smartphone Airtraq(®) system in a crossover study of trainee anesthesiologists performing tracheal intubation in a manikin. We also evaluated the smartphone Airtraq(®) system for laryngoscopy and tracheal intubation in 30 patients, including image transmission to and communication with a remote instructor. In the manikin study, the smartphone Airtraq(®) system enabled instruction where both trainee and instructor could view the larynx simultaneously, and did not substantially increase the time required for intubation. In the patient study, we were able to view the larynx in all 30 patients, and the remote instructor was able to receive the images and to respond on correctness of laryngoscopy and tracheal tube placement. Tracheal intubation was successful within 90s in 19 (63 %) patients. In conclusion, use of a smartphone with the Airtraq(®) may facilitate instruction and communication of laryngoscopy with the Airtraq(®), overcoming some of its limitations. PMID:26825311

  2. Nasolacrimal recanalization as an alternative to external dacryocystorhinostomy for treating failed nasolacrimal duct intubation.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jiaxu; Qian, Tingting; Wei, Anji; Sun, Zhongmou; Wu, Dan; Chen, Yihe; Marmalidou, Anna; Lu, Yi; Sun, Xinghuai; Liu, Zuguo; Amparo, Francisco; Xu, Jianjiang

    2016-07-01

    To compare the surgical duration and clinical outcomes of nasolacrimal recanalization versus external dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR) in the treatment of failed nasolacrimal duct intubation.This is a retrospective, comparative, and interventional study. We evaluated the outcomes of 66 consecutive patients undergoing either nasolacrimal recanalization (n = 32) or DCR (n = 34) in a tertiary lacrimal disease referral center. Length of surgical duration, clinical outcomes, and rate of recurrence at 18 months postoperatively were compared.The mean surgical duration was 18.5 minutes (range, 15-25 minutes) for nasolacrimal recanalization and 48.2 minutes (range, 45-61 minutes) for DCR, respectively (P < 0.001). The rate of success was 84.4% in the recanalization group and 85.3% in the DCR group, respectively (P = 0.91). The time to recurrence was 2.6 ± 1.1 months in the recanalization group and 5.6 ± 2.1 months in the DCR group (P < 0.001). Five failed cases in each group received a secondary DCR surgery with the same resolution rate (40%). The absence of ocular discharge at baseline was a significant predictor for a successful outcome in the recanalization group (P = 0.04) but not in the DCR group (P = 0.63).Nasolacrimal recanalization is an effective, safe, and time-saving alternative to DCR for the treatment of failed nasolacrimal duct intubation. Clinicians should be cautious in patients with discharge.

  3. Achieving Successful Employment Outcomes with the Use of Assistive Technology. Report from the Study Group, Institute on Rehabilitation Issues (24th, Washington, DC, May 1998).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Radtke, Jean, Ed.

    Developed as a result of an institute on rehabilitation issues, this document is a guide to assistive technology as it affects successful competitive employment outcomes for people with disabilities. Chapter 1 offers basic information on assistive technology including basic assumptions, service provider approaches, options for technology…

  4. Social Security. Little Success Achieved in Rehabilitating Disabled Beneficiaries. Report to the Chairman, Subcommittee on Social Security, Committee on Ways and Means, House of Representatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC. Div. of Human Resources.

    The relationship between the Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) Program and vocational rehabilitation (VR) programs was reviewed. Focus was on the extent to which VR services are successful in returning SSDI beneficiaries to productive employment. The review was carried out in 10 states with widely varying practices in referring SSDI…

  5. Addressing Achievement Gaps: Black Male Teens--Moving to Success in the High School Years. Policy Notes. Volume 21, Number 3, Winter 2013

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yaffe, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    This issue of ETS Policy Notes (Vol. 21, No. 3) provides highlights from the symposium, "Black Male Teens: Moving to Success in the High School Years" held on June 24, 2013, in Washington, DC. The third in a series of four symposia cosponsored by ETS and the Children's Defense Fund (CDF), the seminar examined the education and status of…

  6. Failure Is Not an Option: How Principals, Teachers, Students and Parents from Ohio's High-Achieving, High-Poverty Schools Explain Their Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagelskamp, Carolin; DiStasi, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    Why do some schools in high-poverty communities produce remarkable stories of success while others fail? This study, conducted by Public Agenda and sponsored by the Ohio Business Roundtable, the Ohio Department of Education and The Ohio State University, attempts to shed light on this fundamentally important question by talking directly to…

  7. Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery segmentectomy by non-intubated or intubated anesthesia: a comparative analysis of short-term outcome

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Zhihua; Yin, Weiqiang; Pan, Hui; Zhang, Xin; Xu, Xin; Shao, Wenlong; Chen, Hanzhang

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to reveal the short-term outcomes of video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) segmentectomy without tracheal intubation compared with intubated general anesthesia with one-lung ventilation (OLV). Methods We performed a retrospective review of our institutional database of consecutive 140 patients undergoing VATS anatomical segmentectomy from July 2011 to June 2015. Among them, 48 patients were treated without tracheal intubation using a combination of thoracic epidural anesthesia (TEA), intrathoracic vagal blockade, and sedation (non-intubated group). The other 92 patients were treated with intubated general anesthesia (intubated group). Safety and feasibility was evaluated by comparing the perioperative profiles and short-term outcomes of these two groups. Results Two groups had comparable surgical durations, intraoperative blood loss, postoperative chest tube drainage volume, and numbers of dissected lymph nodes (P>0.05). Patients who underwent non-intubated segmentectomy had higher peak end-tidal carbon dioxide (EtCO2) during operation (44.81 vs. 33.15 mmHg, P<0.001), less white blood cell changes before and after surgery (△WBC) (6.08×109 vs. 7.75×109, P=0.004), earlier resumption of oral intake (6.76 vs. 17.58 hours, P<0.001), shorter duration of postoperative chest tube drainage (2.25 vs. 3.16 days, P=0.047), less cost of anesthesia (¥5,757.19 vs. ¥7,401.85, P<0.001), and a trend toward shorter postoperative hospital stay (6.04 vs. 7.83 days, P=0.057). One patient (2.1%) in the non-intubated group required conversion to intubated OLV since a significant mediastinal movement. In the intubated group, there was one patient (1.1%) required conversion to thoracotomy due to uncontrolled bleeding. The incidence difference of postoperative complications between groups was not significant (P=0.248). There was no in-hospital death in either group. Conclusions Compared with intubated general anesthesia, non-intubated

  8. Minimizing Trauma to the Upper Airway: A Ferret Model of Neonatal Intubation

    PubMed Central

    Kircher, Sara S; Murray, Len E; Juliano, Michael L

    2009-01-01

    Our objective was to determine whether an adult ferret can be intubated as many as 10 times per training session without resulting in trauma to the upper airway. In this program, 8 male ferrets rotated through intubation laboratories, limiting the use of each animal to once every 3 mo. Animals were examined by the veterinary staff after intubations to assess for trauma to upper airway tissue. Each examination was given a trauma grade of 0 for no visible signs of trauma, 1 if erythema of the larynx was present, 2 if visible excoriation of the mucus membranes was present, and 3 if bleeding (frank hemorrhage) was observed. The number of intubation attempts was restricted to 10 per animal per training session. A total of 170 intubations were completed on the ferrets during a 12-mo period. The average number of intubations per laboratory was 8.1 intubations per ferret. In addition, 1.8% of the intubations resulted in erythema (score, 1) after training, and 0.6% of the intubations resulted in excoriation (score, 2). Frank hemorrhage (score, 3) was not noted. The overall percentage of intubations resulting in any trauma during a training session was 0.02%. None of the animals have experienced any major complications to date. This ongoing training program has been used to teach neonatal intubation skills to emergency medicine residents for the past 12 mo. Ensuring the health and safety of the ferrets was paramount. Our results suggest that as many as 10 intubation attempts per session can be performed safely on each ferret without causing excessive trauma. PMID:19930827

  9. A Qualitative Study: The Impact of Selected Non-Cognitive Variables on the Academic Success and Achievement of Culturally Diverse Academic Scholarship Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Linda Louise

    2009-01-01

    The study examined whether select non-cognitive variables such as, (Sedlacek, 1989, 1991, 1993, 2004; Tracey & Sedlacek 1984, 1985, 1987, 1989) impacted the academic achievement, retention and graduation rates of culturally diverse academic scholarship students at a predominantly white higher education institutions. The subjects of the study were…

  10. March toward Excellence: School Success and Minority Student Achievement in Department of Defense Schools. A Report to the National Education Goals Panel. Lessons from the States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smrekar, Claire; Guthrie, James W.; Owens, Debra E.; Sims, Pearl G.

    This study examined how Department of Defense (DoD) schools have attained high achievement levels among all students, emphasizing Hispanics and African Americans. Researchers investigated organizational and governmental structures linking the daily operations of DoD schools and districts to policy-setting authorities; the nature and quality of…

  11. Reading Achievement: Characteristics Associated with Success and Failure: Abstracts of Doctoral Dissertations Published in "Dissertation Abstracts International," January through June 1980 (Vol. 40 Nos. 7 through 12).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ERIC Clearinghouse on Reading and Communication Skills, Urbana, IL.

    This collection of abstracts is part of a continuing series providing information on recent doctoral dissertations. The 25 titles deal with a variety of topics, including the following: (1) reading comprehension and visual creativity; (2) family interaction and reading achievement in high school males; (3) conceptual tempo, Piagetian level of…

  12. Making a Way to Success: Self-Authorship and Academic Achievement of First-Year African American Students at Historically Black Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strayhorn, Terrell L.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to estimate the relationship between academic achievement in college, as defined by first-year grade point average (GPA), and self-authorship among African American first-year students at an HBCU (N = 140), using hierarchical linear regression techniques. A single research question guided this investigation: What is…

  13. Reading Achievement: Characteristics Associated with Success and Failure: Abstracts of Doctoral Dissertations Published in "Dissertation Abstracts International," July through September 1978 (Vol. 39 Nos. 1 through 3).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ERIC Clearinghouse on Reading and Communication Skills, Urbana, IL.

    This collection of abstracts is part of a continuing series providing information on recent doctoral dissertations. The 25 titles deal with a variety of topics, including the following: reading achievement as it relates to child dependency, the development of phonological coding, short-term memory and associative learning, variables available in…

  14. Reading Achievement: Characteristics Associated with Success and Failure: Abstracts of Doctoral Dissertations Published in "Dissertation Abstracts International," July through December 1983 (Vol. 44 Nos. 1 through 6).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ERIC Clearinghouse on Reading and Communication Skills, Urbana, IL.

    This collection of abstracts is part of a continuing series providing information on recent doctoral dissertations. The 28 titles deal with a variety of topics, including the following: (1) prekindergarten screening and first grade reading achievement; (2) the influence of the instructional environment on children's acquisition of reading; (3)…

  15. Successful Family Engagement in the Classroom: What Teachers Need to Know and Be Able to Do to Engage Families in Raising Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spielberg, Lela

    2011-01-01

    There is widespread agreement that family engagement leads to increased student achievement, reduced drop-out rates, and a host of other positive outcomes for kids. Teachers are rarely trained or supported in engaging families, and, according to the 2005 MetLife Survey of the American Teacher, find family engagement to be their biggest challenge.…

  16. The Language of Success: A Case Study of the Academic Achievement of ESL Students Who Thrive in Spite of Language Barriers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sylvain, Martine Sabine

    2010-01-01

    There is a widening gap between the academic achievement of English as a second language (ESL) students and the rest of the school population as students reach higher levels of education. ESL students face the challenge of not only learning the language and their subjects but also adapting to the demands of different cultures. In spite of these…

  17. An Examination of the Influence of Inquiry-Based Laboratory Activities and Success on Standards Based Achievement Tests in a Suburban High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vilardi, Virginia A.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether there is a difference in high school students' achievement and retention on standardized tests between students who participate in inquiry-based laboratory activities and those that participate in traditional style laboratory activities. Additionally, student and teacher opinions of…

  18. Evaluation of safety and usefulness of submental intubation in panfacial trauma surgery

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Submental intubation has been advocated as an alternative to classical tracheostomy for certain indicated panfacial trauma surgeries. Surgeons should have various options for airway management in maxillofacial trauma patients. Most maxillofacial injuries involve occlusal derangements, which might require intraoperative occlusal corrections; hence, orotracheal intubation is not ideal. Maxillofacial surgeons generally prefer nasotracheal intubation; however, in cases with concomitant skull base fracture or nasal bone fracture, nasotracheal intubation might not be suitable; in these situations, tracheostomy is typically performed. However, the possible complications of tracheostomy are well known. Due to trauma situations and to avoid the complications of tracheostomy, submental intubation would be an ideal alternative procedure in selected maxillofacial trauma surgery patients. This study aimed to evaluate the safety and usefulness of a submental intubation technique for panfacial trauma surgery. Moreover, we intended to share our experience of submental intubation and to recommend this simple, safe procedure for certain panfacial trauma surgeries. Materials and Methods In five panfacial trauma patients, we performed submental intubation for airway management; the mean time required for the procedure was only eight minutes. Results We were able to execute this procedure safely in a short time without any intraoperative or postoperative complications. Conclusion Submental intubation is a safe and simple technique for airway management in indicated panfacial trauma surgery patients. PMID:27162750

  19. A simple technique to reduce epistaxis and nasopharyngeal trauma during nasotracheal intubation in a child with factor IX deficiency having dental restoration.

    PubMed

    Delgado, Anita V; Sanders, John C

    2004-10-01

    Epistaxis and airway trauma are often associated with nasotracheal intubation. We describe a patient with Factor IX deficiency who required nasotracheal intubation. An inexpensive, nonproprietary, rapid technique was used to reduce the trauma of intubation.

  20. A prospective, randomised, clinical study to compare the use of McGrath®, Truview® and Macintosh laryngoscopes for endotracheal intubation by novice and experienced Anaesthesiologists

    PubMed Central

    Bakshi, Sumitra G; Vanjari, Vinayak S; Divatia, Jigeeshu V

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims: Video laryngoscopy has been recommended as an alternative during difficult conventional direct laryngoscopy using the Macintosh blade (MAC). However, successful visualisation of the larynx and tracheal intubation using some of the indirect laryngoscopes or video laryngoscopes (VL) requires hand-eye coordination. We conducted this study to determine whether non-channel VLs are easy to use for novices and whether there is any association between expertise with MAC and ease of tracheal intubation with VLs. Methods: Anaesthesiologists participating in the study were divided into three groups: Group novice to intubation (NTI), Group novice to videoscope (NVL)- experienced with MAC, novice to VLs and Group expert (EXP) experienced in all. Group NTI, NVL received prior mannequin training. VLs- Truview® and McGrath series 5 (MGR) were compared with MAC. One hundred and twenty six adult patients with normal airway were randomised to both, the intubating anaesthesiologist and laryngoscope. The time taken to intubate (TTI) and participants’ rating of the ease of use was recorded on a scale of 1–10 (10-most difficult). Results: In Group NTI, there was no difference in mean TTI with the three scopes (P = 0.938). In Group NVL, TTI was longer with the VLs than MAC (P < 0.001). In Group EXP, TTI with VL took 20 s more (P < 0.001). There was significant difference in participants’ rating of ease of use of laryngoscope in Group NVL (P = 0.001) but not in the NTI (P = 0.205), EXP (P = 0.529) groups. A high failure was seen with MGR in Group NTI and NVL. Conclusion: In Group NTI, TTI and the ease of use were similar for all scopes. Expertise with standard direct laryngoscopy does not translate to expertise with VLs. Separate training and experience with VLs is required. PMID:26257415

  1. A randomised clinical trial comparing the flexible fibrescope and the Pentax Airway Scope (AWS)(®) for awake oral tracheal intubation.

    PubMed

    Mendonca, C; Mesbah, A; Velayudhan, A; Danha, R

    2016-08-01

    We compared awake fibreoptic intubation with awake intubation using the Pentax Airway Scope(®) in 40 adult patients. Sedation was achieved using a target-controlled remifentanil infusion of 1-5 ng.ml(-1) and midazolam. The airway was anaesthetised with lidocaine spray and gargle. The total procedure time - a composite of sedation time, topical anaesthesia time and intubation time - was recorded. The operator's impression of the ease of the procedure and the patients' reported comfort were recorded on a 0-100 mm visual analogue scale. The median (IQR [range]) for total procedure time was 900 (739-1059 [616-1215]) s with the fibrescope and 651 (601-720 [498-900]) s with the Pentax Airway Scope (p = 0.0001). The median (IQR [range]) intubation time was 420 (283-480 [120-608]) s with the fibrescope and 183 (144-220 [107-420]) s with the Pentax Airway Scope (p = 0.0002). The median (IQR [range]) visual analogue scores for the operator's ease of intubation for the fibrescope and Pentax Airway Scope were 83.6 (72.0-98.0 [49.0-100.0]) and 86.8 (84.0-91.0 [61.0-100.0]), respectively (p = 0.3507). The median (IQR [range]) visual analogue score for patient comfort was 85.5 (81.0-97.0 [69.0-100.0]) and 79.4 (74.0-85.0 [59.0-100.0]) for the fibrescope and Pentax Airway Scope, respectively (p = 0.06). Total procedure time was significantly shorter with the Pentax Airway Scope compared with the fibrescope, with no difference in procedure difficulty or patient discomfort.

  2. Risk Factors for Mortality and Endotracheal Intubation after Methadone Intoxication.

    PubMed

    Hassanian-Moghaddam, Hossein; Soltaninejad, Kambiz; Shadnia, Shahin; Kabir, Ali; Movahedi, Mitra; Mirafzal, Amirhossein

    2016-03-01

    This was a retrospective chart review to evaluate various risk factors associated with in-hospital mortality and intubation risk in acute methadone overdose. All patients admitted to an academic hospital in Tehran, Iran, during a 10-year period (2000-2009) constituted the study sample. Exclusion criteria were significant comorbidities and age under 18 years. Outcome variables were in-hospital mortality and being intubated during admission. A total of 802 patients were enrolled in the study. There were 15 (1.8%) deaths due to methadone overdose or its complications. The number of yearly admissions was 15 patients in 2000, 16 in 2001, 16 in 2002, 18 in 2003, 23 in 2004, 38 in 2005, 59 in 2006, 110 in 2007, 206 in 2008 and 301 in 2009. Based on logistic regression analysis, the most important independent variable predicting mortality was length of admission in toxicology ward [OR (95% CI): 1.6 (1.1-2.3)]. For the prediction of intubation, independent variables were Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score of 5-9 [OR (95% CI): 356.5 (9.8-12907.4)] in the emergency department (ED), miosis in the ED [356.9 (1.4-87872.5)] and respiratory rate in the ED [1.5 (1.1-2.1)]. Linear regression model for length of hospitalization showed patient age as the most important variable for prediction of this outcome. Despite a relatively low mortality rate, the increasing number of methadone-poisoned patients requires special attention to this common intoxication. Careful disposition of patients from ED to ordinary wards or intensive care units and also from higher to lower levels of care should be considered in methadone overdose. PMID:26301535

  3. Endotracheal Intubation in Patients Treated for Prehospital Status Epilepticus

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Joseph B.; Nicholas, Katherine S.; Varelas, Panayiotis N.; Harsh, Donna M.; Durkalski, Valerie; Silbergleit, Robert; Wang, Henry E.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Limited data describe the frequency, timing, or indications for endotracheal intubation (ETI) in patients with status epilepticus. A better understanding of the characteristics of patients with status epilepticus requiring airway interventions could inform clinical care. We sought to characterize ETI use in patients with prehospital status epilepticus. Methods This study was a secondary analysis of the Rapid Anticonvulsant Medication Prior to Arrival Trial, a multi-center, randomized trial comparing intravenous lorazepam to intramuscular midazolam for prehospital status epilepticus treatment. Subjects received ETI in the prehospital, Emergency Department (ED), or inpatient setting at the discretion of caregivers. Results Of 1023 enrollments, 218 (21 %) received ETI. 204 (93.6 %) of the ETIs were performed in the hospital and 14 (6.4 %) in the prehospital setting. Intubated patients were older (52 vs 41 years, p < 0.001), and men underwent ETI more than women (26 vs 21 %, p = 0.047). Patients with ongoing seizures on ED arrival had a higher rate of ETI (32 vs 16 %, p < 0.001), as did those who received rescue anti-seizure medication (29 vs 20 %, p = 0.004). Mortality was higher for intubated patients (7 vs 0.4 %, p < 0.001). Most ETI (n = 133, 62 %) occurred early (prior to or within 30 min after ED arrival), and late ETI was associated with higher mortality (14 vs 3 %, p = 0.002) than early ETI. Conclusions ETI is common in patients with status epilepticus, particularly among the elderly or those with refractory seizures. Any ETI and late ETI are both associated with higher mortality. PMID:25623785

  4. Transorbital endotracheal intubation: a nonstandard approach to a difficult airway.

    PubMed

    Waldron, Nathan H; Stolp, Bryant W; Ogilvie, Michael P; Powers, David B; Shaughnessy, Michael R

    2016-11-01

    We present the case report of a 49-year-old gentleman with a history of adenoid cystic carcinoma of the left nare status post curative bifrontal craniotomy, left lateral rhinotomy and medial maxillectomy, adjuvant radiotherapy, and orbital exenteration for optic neuropathy, complicated by medial wall dehiscence. His course was also complicated by severe radiation trismus, for which he was scheduled to undergo bilateral mandibular coronoidectomies. Given his limited mouth opening, the surgeon requested a nasal endotracheal tube. Because of concerns of traumatizing his nare, we utilized a flexible fiberoptic bronchoscope to perform asleep transorbital intubation. Airway management in patients with severe trismus may require ingenuity. PMID:27687400

  5. Sedation options for intubated intensive care unit patients.

    PubMed

    Lacoske, Jennifer

    2015-03-01

    A common requirement for intubated patients in the intensive care unit (ICU) is sedation and pain management to facilitate patient safety and timely, atraumatic healing. The Society of Critical Care Medicine guidelines for management of pain, sedation, and delirium in adult ICU patients provide assessment scales for pain, sedation, and delirium; medications for sedation and pain management, and protocols for weaning sedation, are discussed. Proficient assessment skills, pharmacologic knowledge of medications administered to provide sedation, and an understanding of the importance of nonpharmacologic interventions can help the registered nurse provide patient advocacy, safety, and improved outcomes.

  6. The morphology of islets within the porcine donor pancreas determines the isolation result: successful isolation of pancreatic islets can now be achieved from young market pigs.

    PubMed

    Krickhahn, Mareike; Bühler, Christoph; Meyer, Thomas; Thiede, Arnulf; Ulrichs, Karin

    2002-01-01

    Clinical islet allotransplantation has become an increasingly efficient "routine" therapy in recent years. Shortage of human donor organs leads to porcine pancreatic islets as a potential source for islet xenotransplantation. Yet it is still very difficult to isolate sufficient numbers of intact porcine islets, particularly from young market pigs. In the following study islets were successfully isolated from retired breeders [4806 +/- 720 islet equivalents per gram organ (IEQ/g); n = 25; 2-3 years old; RB] and also from young hybrid pigs [2868 +/- 260 IEQ/g; n = 65; 4-6 months old; HY] using LiberasePI and a modified version of Ricordi's digestion-filtration technique. As expected, isolations from RB showed significantly better results (p < 0.002). A retrospective histological analysis of almost all donor pancreases showed that the majority of organs from RB (80%) contained mainly large islets (diameter > 200 microm), in contrast to only 35% of all pancreases from HY. Remarkably, the islet size in situ, regardless whether detected in RB or HY, strongly determined the isolation result. A donor organ with predominantly large islets resulted in significantly higher numbers of IEQs compared with a donor organ with predominantly small islets [RB(Large Islets): 5680 +/- 3,318 IEQ/g (n= 20); RB(Small Islets): 1353 +/- 427 IEQ/g (n = 5); p < 0.02]. In addition, isolation results were strongly influenced by the quality of the LiberasePI batch, and therefore single batch testing is invariably required. Purification was performed using Ficoll or OptiPrep density gradient centrifugation manually or in the COBE cell processor. Although islet purity was highest when OptiPrep was used, final islet yields did not differ between the different purification methods. Our study demonstrates that islet size in situ is an extremely critical parameter for highly successful islet isolation; consequently, we are now performing a morphological screening of each donor organ prior to the

  7. An unexpected difficult intubation in a patient with myasthenia gravis undergoing video-assisted transcervical thymectomy

    PubMed Central

    Grasso, Nadia; Celestre, Chiara; Borrata, Francesco; Migliore, Marcello

    2013-01-01

    Although there are different methods to evaluate predictive parameters of difficult intubation in apparently normal patients, sometimes this event is unpredictable.We herein report a clinical case of difficult intubation during anaesthesia for video-assisted thymectomy in non-thymomatous myasthenia gravis. PMID:23749836

  8. The efficacy of combined regional nerve blocks in awake orotracheal fiberoptic intubation

    PubMed Central

    Chatrath, Veena; Sharan, Radhe; Jain, Payal; Bala, Anju; Ranjana; Sudha

    2016-01-01

    Aims of Study: To evaluate the efficacy, hemodynamic changes, and patient comfort during awake fiberoptic intubation done under combined regional blocks. Materials and Methods: In the present observational study, 50 patients of American Society of Anesthesiologists ( ASA) Grade I–II, Mallampati Grade I–IV were given nerve blocks - bilateral glossopharyngeal nerve block, bilateral superior laryngeal nerve block, and recurrent laryngeal nerve block before awake fiberoptic intubation using 2% lidocaine. Results: Procedure was associated with minimal increases in hemodynamic parameters during the procedure and until 3 min after it. Most of the intubations were being carried out within 3 min. Patient comfort was satisfactory with 90% of patients having favorable grades. Discussion: The most common cause of mortality and serious morbidity due to anesthesia is from airway problems. One-third of all anesthetic deaths are due to failure to intubate and ventilate. Awake flexible fiberoptic intubation under local anesthesia is now an accepted technique for managing such situations. In awake patient's anatomy, muscle tone, airway protection, and ventilation are preserved, but it is essential to sufficiently anesthetize the upper airway before the performance of awake fiberoptic bronchoscope-guided intubation to ensure patient comfort and cooperation for which in our study we used the nerve block technique. Conclusion: A properly performed technique of awake fiberoptic intubation done under combined regional nerve blocks provides good intubating conditions, patient comfort and safety and results in minimal hemodynamic changes. PMID:27212757

  9. An Invertebrate Warburg Effect: A Shrimp Virus Achieves Successful Replication by Altering the Host Metabolome via the PI3K-Akt-mTOR Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Su, Mei-An; Huang, Yun-Tzu; Chen, I-Tung; Lee, Der-Yen; Hsieh, Yun-Chieh; Li, Chun-Yuan; Ng, Tze Hann; Liang, Suh-Yuen; Lin, Shu-Yu; Huang, Shiao-Wei; Chiang, Yi-An; Yu, Hon-Tsen; Khoo, Kay-Hooi; Chang, Geen-Dong; Lo, Chu-Fang; Wang, Han-Ching

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we used a systems biology approach to investigate changes in the proteome and metabolome of shrimp hemocytes infected by the invertebrate virus WSSV (white spot syndrome virus) at the viral genome replication stage (12 hpi) and the late stage (24 hpi). At 12 hpi, but not at 24 hpi, there was significant up-regulation of the markers of several metabolic pathways associated with the vertebrate Warburg effect (or aerobic glycolysis), including glycolysis, the pentose phosphate pathway, nucleotide biosynthesis, glutaminolysis and amino acid biosynthesis. We show that the PI3K-Akt-mTOR pathway was of central importance in triggering this WSSV-induced Warburg effect. Although dsRNA silencing of the mTORC1 activator Rheb had only a relatively minor impact on WSSV replication, in vivo chemical inhibition of Akt, mTORC1 and mTORC2 suppressed the WSSV-induced Warburg effect and reduced both WSSV gene expression and viral genome replication. When the Warburg effect was suppressed by pretreatment with the mTOR inhibitor Torin 1, even the subsequent up-regulation of the TCA cycle was insufficient to satisfy the virus's requirements for energy and macromolecular precursors. The WSSV-induced Warburg effect therefore appears to be essential for successful viral replication. PMID:24945378

  10. Addressing the Achilles' Heel in the HIV Care Continuum for the Success of a Test-and-Treat Strategy to Achieve an AIDS-Free Generation

    PubMed Central

    Nachega, Jean B.; Uthman, Olalekan A.; del Rio, Carlos; Mugavero, Michael J.; Rees, Helen; Mills, Edward J.

    2014-01-01

    Mathematical models and recent data from ecological, observational, and experimental studies show that antiretroviral therapy (ART) is effective for both treatment and prevention of HIV, validating the treatment as prevention (TasP) approach. Data from a variety of settings, including resource-rich and -limited sites, show that patient attrition occurs at each stage of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) treatment cascade, starting with the percent unaware of their HIV infection in a population and linkage to care after diagnosis, assessment of ART readiness, receipt of ART, and finally long-term virologic suppression. Therefore, in order to implement TasP, we must first define practical and effective linkage to care, acceptability of treatment, and adherence and retention monitoring strategies, as well as the cost-effectiveness of such strategies. Ending this pandemic will require the combination of political will, resources, and novel effective interventions that are not only feasible and cost effective but also likely to be used in combination across successive steps on the HIV treatment cascade. PMID:24926028

  11. The therapeutic value of atropine for critical care intubation.

    PubMed

    Jones, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies of atropine during critical care intubation (CCI) have revealed that neonates frequently experience bradycardia, are infrequently affected by ventricular arrhythmias and conduction disturbances and deaths have not been reported in a series of studies. The indiscriminate use of atropine is unlikely to alter the outcome during neonatal CCI other than reducing the frequency of sinus tachycardia. In contrast, older children experience a similar frequency of bradycardia to neonates and are more frequently affected by ventricular arrhythmias and conduction disturbances. Mortality during CCI is in the order of 0.5%. Atropine has a beneficial effect on arrhythmias and conduction disturbances and may reduce paediatric intensive care unit mortality. The use of atropine for children >1 month of age may positively influence outcomes beyond a reduction in the frequency of sinus bradycardia. There is indirect evidence that atropine should be used for intubation during sepsis. Atropine should be considered when using suxamethonium. The reliance on heart rate as the sole measure of haemodynamic function during CCI is no longer justifiable. Randomised trials of atropine for mortality during CCI in general intensive care unit populations are unlikely to happen. As such, future research should be focused on establishing of a gold standard for haemodynamic decompensation for CCI. Cardiac output or blood pressure are the most likely candidates. The 'lost beat score' requires development but has the potential to be developed to provide an estimation of risk of haemodynamic decompensation from ECG data in real time during CCI.

  12. Endotracheal suctioning in intubated newborns: an integrative literature review.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Roberta Lins; Tsuzuki, Lucila Midori; Carvalho, Marcos Giovanni Santos

    2015-01-01

    Evidence-based practices search for the best available scientific evidence to support problem solving and decision making. Because of the complexity and amount of information related to health care, the results of methodologically sound scientific papers must be integrated by performing literature reviews. Although endotracheal suctioning is the most frequently performed invasive procedure in intubated newborns in neonatal intensive care units, few Brazilian studies of good methodological quality have examined this practice, and a national consensus or standardization of this technique is lacking. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to review secondary studies on the subject to establish recommendations for endotracheal suctioning in intubated newborns and promote the adoption of best-practice concepts when conducting this procedure. An integrative literature review was performed, and the recommendations of this study are to only perform endotracheal suctioning in newborns when there are signs of tracheal secretions and to avoid routinely performing the procedure. In addition, endotracheal suctioning should be conducted by at least two people, the suctioning time should be less than 15 seconds, the negative suction pressure should be below 100 mmHg, and hyperoxygenation should not be used on a routine basis. If indicated, oxygenation is recommended with an inspired oxygen fraction value that is 10 to 20% greater than the value of the previous fraction, and it should be performed 30 to 60 seconds before, during and 1 minute after the procedure. Saline instillation should not be performed routinely, and the standards for invasive procedures must be respected.

  13. Clinical dysphagia risk predictors after prolonged orotracheal intubation

    PubMed Central

    de Medeiros, Gisele Chagas; Sassi, Fernanda Chiarion; Mangilli, Laura Davison; Zilberstein, Bruno; de Andrade, Claudia Regina Furquim

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To elucidate independent risk factors for dysphagia after prolonged orotracheal intubation. METHODS: The participants were 148 consecutive patients who underwent clinical bedside swallowing assessments from September 2009 to September 2011. All patients had received prolonged orotracheal intubations and were admitted to one of several intensive care units of a large Brazilian school hospital. The correlations between the conducted water swallow test results and dysphagia risk levels were analyzed for statistical significance. RESULTS: Of the 148 patients included in the study, 91 were male and 57 were female (mean age, 53.64 years). The univariate analysis results indicated that specific variables, including extraoral loss, multiple swallows, cervical auscultation, vocal quality, cough, choking, and other signs, were possible significant high-risk indicators of dysphagia onset. The multivariate analysis results indicated that cervical auscultation and coughing were independent predictive variables for high dysphagia risk. CONCLUSIONS: Patients displaying extraoral loss, multiple swallows, cervical auscultation, vocal quality, cough, choking and other signs should benefit from early swallowing evaluations. Additionally, early post-extubation dysfunction recognition is paramount in reducing the morbidity rate in this high-risk population. PMID:24473554

  14. Endotracheal suctioning in intubated newborns: an integrative literature review

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, Roberta Lins; Tsuzuki, Lucila Midori; Carvalho, Marcos Giovanni Santos

    2015-01-01

    Evidence-based practices search for the best available scientific evidence to support problem solving and decision making. Because of the complexity and amount of information related to health care, the results of methodologically sound scientific papers must be integrated by performing literature reviews. Although endotracheal suctioning is the most frequently performed invasive procedure in intubated newborns in neonatal intensive care units, few Brazilian studies of good methodological quality have examined this practice, and a national consensus or standardization of this technique is lacking. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to review secondary studies on the subject to establish recommendations for endotracheal suctioning in intubated newborns and promote the adoption of best-practice concepts when conducting this procedure. An integrative literature review was performed, and the recommendations of this study are to only perform endotracheal suctioning in newborns when there are signs of tracheal secretions and to avoid routinely performing the procedure. In addition, endotracheal suctioning should be conducted by at least two people, the suctioning time should be less than 15 seconds, the negative suction pressure should be below 100 mmHg, and hyperoxygenation should not be used on a routine basis. If indicated, oxygenation is recommended with an inspired oxygen fraction value that is 10 to 20% greater than the value of the previous fraction, and it should be performed 30 to 60 seconds before, during and 1 minute after the procedure. Saline instillation should not be performed routinely, and the standards for invasive procedures must be respected. PMID:26465249

  15. Pediatric laryngoscopes and intubation aids old and new.

    PubMed

    Doherty, Jane S; Froom, Stephen R; Gildersleve, Christopher D

    2009-07-01

    This review summarizes the evolution of the pediatric laryngoscope using some of the established landmarks in the history of anesthesia. Children were rarely intubated before 1940 though the subsequent 30 years saw a proliferation of pediatric laryngoscopes in part driven by the developments in pediatric anesthesia and surgery, manufacturing techniques and materials and a change in airway management philosophy exemplified by Jackson Rees's argument against the notion that intubation was to be avoided in children. A perspective on the present day describes the modifications to popular straight and curved blade laryngoscopes and the development of new devices that enhance direct visualization of the larynx. There are an ever-increasing number of laryngoscope devices that assist in indirect visualization of the larynx such as rigid optical stylets and flexible fiber-optic scopes. Images from many of these devices may be enhanced by digital camera or real-time video technology. The prospect of future laryngoscope development is glimpsed in the arrival of light emitting diode light source technology and questions remain regarding the consequences of equipment disposability and at the fidelity of disposable equipment manufacture.

  16. Pediatric and neonatal intubation training gap analysis: instruction, assessment, and technology.

    PubMed

    Klotz, Jessica J; Dooley-Hash, Suzanne L; House, Joseph B; Andreatta, Pamela B

    2014-12-01

    Summary statement: Intubating adult patients presents numerous challenges for clinicians. Procedural complexities associated with performing pediatric and neonatal intubation, along with a lower frequency of a need for intubating pediatric and neonatal patients, further amplifies the difficulties associated with acquiring and maintaining relevant clinical skills. Clinicians must develop and maintain competency through training and continuing medical education. A systematic review was conducted through June 2012 to examine current instructional methods, assessment tools, and training models in pediatric and neonatal intubation training. Variability among the included literature on instruction, assessment, and models used to support training makes direct comparison problematic. The results of this review emphasize the need for improvement of current instructional methods to promote competency acquisition; development of valid, reliable assessment tools to evaluate clinician competency; and identification of a superior training model to promote acquisition and maintenance of skills associated with intubation of pediatric patients. PMID:25503532

  17. Poisonings Associated with Intubation: US National Poison Data System Exposures 2000-2013.

    PubMed

    Beauchamp, G A; Giffin, S L; Horowitz, B Z; Laurie, A L; Fu, R; Hendrickson, R G

    2016-06-01

    Patients may be intubated after exposure to a variety of substances because of respiratory failure, CNS sedation, pulmonary pathology, or cardiovascular instability. However, there is little data describing the types of substances that are associated with endotracheal intubation or the rates of intubation after these exposures. Evaluation of this association may inform future research on intubation after exposures to specific substances and guide poison prevention education. Our objective was to determine which exposures were commonly associated with intubation using the data from National Poison Data System (NPDS). The NPDS tracks data from potential exposures to substances reported to all American Association of Poison Control Centers. We performed a retrospective analysis of NPDS data from January 1st, 2000 to December 31st, 2013 to identify human exposures to substances that were associated with endotracheal intubation. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze the data. There were 93,474 single substance exposures and 228,507 multiple substance exposures that were associated with intubation. The most common exposures to substances that were associated with intubation were atypical antipsychotics (7.4 %) for single exposures and benzodiazepines (27.4 %) for multiple exposures. Within each age group, the most common known exposures to substances were for patients under 6 years, clonidine for single and multiple exposures; for patients aged 6-12 years, clonidine for single exposures and atypical antipsychotics for multiple exposures; for patients aged 13-19 years, atypical antipsychotics for single and multiple exposures; and for patients over 19 years, atypical antipsychotics for single exposures and benzodiazepines for multiple exposures. From 2000-2013, the exposures to substances most commonly associated with intubation varied by single versus multiple exposures and by age. This study helps clarify the exposures to substances that are associated with

  18. Comparative Efficacy of the Air-Q Intubating Laryngeal Airway during General Anesthesia in Pediatric Patients: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Eun Jin; Choi, Geun Joo; Kang, Hyun; Baek, Chong Wha; Jung, Yong Hun; Woo, Young Cheol; Bang, Si Ra

    2016-01-01

    Air-Q® (air-Q) is a supraglottic airway device which can be used as a guidance of intubation in pediatric as well as in adult patients. We evaluated the efficacy and safety of air-Q compared to other airway devices during general anesthesia in pediatric patients by conducting a systematic review and meta-analysis. A total of 10 studies including 789 patients were included in the final analysis. Compared with other supraglottic airway devices, air-Q showed no evidence for a difference in leakage pressure and insertion time. The ease of insertion was significantly lower than other supraglottic airway devices. The success rate of intubation was significantly lower than other airway devices. However, fiberoptic view was better through the air-Q than other supraglottic airway devices. Therefore, air-Q could be a safe substitute for other airway devices and may provide better fiberoptic bronchoscopic view. PMID:27419134

  19. Dangerous blind tracheal intubation attempt due to fiberscope non-availability in a pediatric patient with retropharyngeal abscess caused by a large fish bone.

    PubMed

    Li, Bi-Lian; Xu, Ying-Yi; Jiang, Yan-Fang; Liu, Wen-Xing; Kuang, Xiao-Hua; Ni, Jin

    2015-01-01

    In China, foods containing bones are sometimes fed to young infants. Occasionally, this practice results in bone aspiration and retropharyngeal abscess, a potentially life-threatening infection in the deep space of the neck that can compromise the airway. The main concern in managing patients with retropharyngeal abscess is airway management. In China, not all hospitals and operating rooms are equipped with fiberscopes, particularly pediatric-size fiberscopes. Emergency airway management can be dangerous when a fiberscope is unavailable. We present the case of a 21-month-old baby girl with a retropharyngeal abscess secondary to fish bone ingestion. During an attempted blind tracheal intubation due to fiberscope non-availability, the abscess ruptured, and the pus released from it obstructed the airway. The patient was successfully treated despite the inadequate resources and dangerous complication. We recommend a detailed preoperative airway assessment and preparation for fiberscopic tracheal intubation in such patients to prevent this dangerous complication. PMID:26550391

  20. Is it ethical to practice intubations on the deceased?

    PubMed

    Hudson, T S

    2000-03-01

    One-third to one-half of emergency departments in the United States and Australia perform endotracheal intubations (ETI's) on the newly dead. Sixty-three percent of emergency medicine and 58% of neonatal critical care training programs allowed procedures to be performed on patients after death; only 10% of these programs required family consent for this practice. This article reviews the arguments for and against this ethical issue. A case study is included to highlight the issue's complexity, and to assist readers in identifying their beliefs (and those of their institutions) about the tissue. An overview of ethically related terms, definitions, and theories and a decision-making model are included to establish a knowledgeable baseline for dealing with any ethical issue. PMID:10824014

  1. Prediction of endotracheal intubation outcome in opioid-poisoned patients: A clinical approach to bispectral monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Eizadi-Mood, Nastaran; Yaraghi, Ahmad; Alikhasi, Mahsa; Jabalameli, Mitra; Farsaei, Shadi; Sabzghabaee, Ali Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Some opioid-poisoned patients do not respond appropriately to naloxone; consequently, intubation is required. Although various measures have been used to evaluate the level of consciousness of poisoned patients, no study has assessed the role of the bispectral index (BIS) to ascertain the depth of anesthesia in opioid-poisoned patients who require endotracheal intubation. OBJECTIVE: To compare BIS scores between opioid-poisoned patients with and without intubation, and to determine the BIS cut-off point for endotracheal intubation in these patients. METHODS: In the present cross-sectional study, conducted in an Iranian university referral hospital for poisoning emergencies between 2012 and 2013, opioid-poisoned patients (n=41) were divided into two groups according to their requirement for endotracheal intubation. BIS analyses were performed at the time of admission and at the time of intubation for those who required it. In addition, electromyography and signal quality index were evaluated for all patients at the time of admission, and cardiorespiratory monitoring was performed during the hospitalization period. Using ROC curves, and sensitivity and specificity analyses, the optimal BIS cut-off point for prediction of intubation of these patients was determined. RESULTS: The optimal cut-off point for prediction of intubation was BIS ≤78, which had a sensitivity of 86.7% (95% CI 66.1 to 98.8) and specificity of 88.5% (95% CI 73.9% to 98.8%); the positive and negative predictive values were 81.2 % and 92%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: BIS may be considered an acceptable index to determine the need for intubation in opioid-poisoned patients whose response to naloxone is inadequate. PMID:26078616

  2. Fiberoptic intubation through laryngeal mask airway for management of difficult airway in a child with Klippel–Feil syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Ravi; Mane, Rajesh S.; Patil, Manjunath C.; Suresh, S. N.

    2014-01-01

    The ideal airway management modality in pediatric patients with syndromes like Klippel-Feil syndrome is a great challenge and is technically difficult for an anesthesiologist. Half of the patients present with the classic triad of short neck, low hairline, and fusion of cervical vertebra. Numerous associated anomalies like scoliosis or kyphosis, cleft palate, respiratory problems, deafness, genitourinary abnormalities, Sprengel's deformity (wherein the scapulae ride high on the back), synkinesia, cervical ribs, and congenital heart diseases may further add to the difficulty. Fiberoptic bronchoscopy alone can be technically difficult and patient cooperation also becomes very important, which is difficult in pediatric patients. Fiberoptic bronchoscopy with the aid of supraglottic airway devices is a viable alternative in the management of difficult airway in children. We report a case of Klippel-Feil syndrome in an 18-month-old girl posted for cleft palate surgery. Imaging of spine revealed complete fusion of the cervical vertebrae with hypoplastic C3 and C6 vertebrae and thoracic kyphosis. We successfully managed airway in this patient by fiberoptic intubation through classic laryngeal mask airway (LMA). After intubation, we used second smaller endotracheal tube (ETT) to stabilize and elongate the first ETT while removing the LMA. PMID:25191201

  3. Fetal Endoscopic Tracheal Intubation: A New Fetoscopic Procedure to Ensure Extrauterine Tracheal Permeability in a Case with Congenital Cervical Teratoma.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Martinez, Rogelio; Moreno-Alvarez, Oscar; Garcia, Maritza; Méndez, Antonio; Pineda, Hugo; Cruz-Martinez, Miriam Alejandra; Cruz, Miriam A; Martinez-Morales, Cecilia

    2015-01-01

    Congenital neck masses are associated with high perinatal mortality and morbidity secondary to airway obstruction due to a mass effect of the tumor with subsequent neonatal asphyxia and/or neonatal death. Currently, the only technique designed to establish a secure neonatal airway is the ex utero intrapartum treatment (EXIT) procedure, which involves neonatal tracheal intubation while fetal oxygenation is maintained by the uteroplacental circulation in a partial fetal delivery under maternal general anesthesia. We present a case with a giant cervical teratoma and huge displacement and compression of the fetal trachea that was treated successfully at 35 weeks of gestation with a novel fetoscopic procedure to ensure extrauterine tracheal permeability by means of a fetal endoscopic tracheal intubation (FETI) before delivery. The procedure consisted of a percutaneous fetal tracheoscopy under maternal epidural anesthesia using an 11-Fr exchange catheter covering the fetoscope that allowed a conduit to introduce a 3.0-mm intrauterine orotracheal cannula under ultrasound guidance. After FETI, a conventional cesarean section was performed uneventfully with no need for an EXIT procedure. This report is the first to illustrate that in cases with large neck tumors involving fetal airways, FETI is feasible and could potentially replace an EXIT procedure by allowing prenatal airway control.

  4. Intubation Difficile Chez le Brule de la Face et du Cou a la Phase de Sequelles

    PubMed Central

    Siah, S.; El Wali, A.; Ababou, K.; Nassim Sabah, T.; Drissi, N.K.; Ihrai, I.

    2006-01-01

    Summary L'intubation trachéale chez le brûlé de la face et du cou au stade de séquelles peut être difficile voire impossible chez certains patients. La technique de ventilation à l'aide d'un masque laryngé ou d'intubation avec un fibroscope bronchique permet de résoudre la plupart des problèmes d'intubation difficile. Les Auteurs rapportent deux observations chez deux patientes porteuses de séquelles de brûlures de la face et du cou. PMID:21991028

  5. Time Management: Strategies for Achieving Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cvach, Peggy A.

    Intended for adults with learning disabilities, this paper offers time management strategies in a work-sheet format. The paper, which was written with the assistance of adults with learning disabilities, explains setting goals, planning, organizing time, and avoiding stress. Guidelines for goal setting include: focus on the present; set goals that…

  6. [Air-Q® intubating laryngeal airway as a conduit for tracheal intubation in a patient with Apert syndrome: a case report].

    PubMed

    Nishimoto, Kenta; Kariya, Nobutaka; Iwasaki, Yohei; Shii, Hiromi; Sugi, Takashi; Tatara, Tsuneo; Hirose, Munetaka

    2014-10-01

    We present a case of an 18-year-old male who underwent strabismus operation under general anesthesia. In his childhood, tracheostomy had been performed for the repair of cleft lip and palate. His Mallampati classification was IV and preoperative endoscopic examination revealed megaloglossia and severe airway narrowing. For possible difficult airway, intubating laryngeal airway (air-Q®, size 2.5) was used for tracheal intubation. Following insertion of air-Q®, trachea was intubated via air-Q® guided with fiberscope. The patient was ventilated via tracheal tube with the air-Q® remaining in place during the operation. air-Q® can be effectively utilized for airway management for an adult Apert syndrome patient

  7. The difficult intraoperative nasogastric tube intubation: A review of the literature and a novel approach.

    PubMed

    Ching, Yiu-Hei; Socias, Stephanie M; Ciesla, David J; Karlnoski, Rachel A; Camporesi, Enrico M; Mangar, Devanand

    2014-01-01

    Nasogastric tube intubation of a patient under general anesthesia with an endotracheal tube in place can pose a challenge to the most experienced anesthesiologist. Physiologic and pathologic variations in a patient's functional anatomy can present further difficulty. While numerous techniques to the difficult nasogastric tube intubation have been described, there is no consensus for a standard approach. Therefore, selecting the most appropriate approach requires a working knowledge of the techniques available, mindful consideration of individual patient and clinical factors, and the operator's experience and preference. This article reviews the relevant literature regarding various approaches to the difficult nasogastric tube intubation with descriptions of techniques and results from comparative studies if available. Additionally, we present a novel approach using a retrograde technique for the difficult intraoperative nasogastric tube intubation.

  8. Nasotracheal intubation with three indirect laryngoscopes assisted by standard or modified Magill forceps.

    PubMed

    Staar, S; Biesler, I; Müller, D; Pförtner, R; Mohr, C; Groeben, H

    2013-05-01

    We assessed the effect of modifying standard Magill forceps on the laryngeal introduction of an Eschmann stylet during nasotracheal intubations with three indirect laryngoscopes (Airtraq™, C-MAC(®) or GlideScope(®)) in patients with predicted difficult intubation. We allocated 50 participants to each laryngoscope. The stylet was advanced by one forceps followed by the other (standard or modified), with each sequence allocated to 25/50 for each laryngoscope. There were no differences in rates of failed tracheal intubation with the allocated laryngoscopes: 6/50, 5/50 and 5/50, respectively. An Eschmann stylet was advanced into the trachea less often with the standard forceps (65% vs 93%, p < 0.0001). Mean (SD) time for stylet advancement was longer with the standard forceps, 38 (30) vs 19 (19) s, p < 0.0001. In conclusion, the modified Magill forceps facilitated nasotracheal intubation, independent of the type of indirect laryngoscope. PMID:23480441

  9. Safe intubation in Morquio-Brailsford syndrome: A challenge for the anesthesiologist.

    PubMed

    Chaudhuri, Souvik; Duggappa, Arun Kumar Handigodu; Mathew, Shaji; Venkatesh, Sandeep

    2013-04-01

    Morquio-Brailsford syndrome is a type of mucopolysaccharidoses. It is a rare disease with features of short stature, atlantoaxial instability with risk of cord damage, odontoid hypoplasia, pectus carinatum, spine deformities, hepatomegaly, and restrictive lung disease. Neck movements during intubation are associated with the risk of quadriparesis due to cervical instability. This, along with the distortion of the airway anatomy due to deposition of mucopolysaccharides makes airway management arduous. We present our experience in management of difficult airway in a 3-year-old girl with Morquio-Brailsford syndrome posted for magnetic resonance imaging and computerized tomography scan of a suspected unstable cervical spine. As utmost sagacity during intubation is required, the child was intubated inside operation theatre in the presence of experienced anesthesiologists and then shifted to the peripheral location. Intubation was done with an endotracheal tube railroaded over a pediatric fibreoptic bronchoscope passed through the lumen of a classic laryngeal mask airway, keeping head in neutral position. PMID:23878456

  10. Nasotracheal intubation with three indirect laryngoscopes assisted by standard or modified Magill forceps.

    PubMed

    Staar, S; Biesler, I; Müller, D; Pförtner, R; Mohr, C; Groeben, H

    2013-05-01

    We assessed the effect of modifying standard Magill forceps on the laryngeal introduction of an Eschmann stylet during nasotracheal intubations with three indirect laryngoscopes (Airtraq™, C-MAC(®) or GlideScope(®)) in patients with predicted difficult intubation. We allocated 50 participants to each laryngoscope. The stylet was advanced by one forceps followed by the other (standard or modified), with each sequence allocated to 25/50 for each laryngoscope. There were no differences in rates of failed tracheal intubation with the allocated laryngoscopes: 6/50, 5/50 and 5/50, respectively. An Eschmann stylet was advanced into the trachea less often with the standard forceps (65% vs 93%, p < 0.0001). Mean (SD) time for stylet advancement was longer with the standard forceps, 38 (30) vs 19 (19) s, p < 0.0001. In conclusion, the modified Magill forceps facilitated nasotracheal intubation, independent of the type of indirect laryngoscope.

  11. Submental intubation: alternative short-term airway management in maxillofacial trauma

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ravi Raja; Vyloppilli, Suresh; Thangavelu, Annamala; Joseph, Benny; Ahsan, Auswaf

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To assess submental route intubation as an alternative technique to a tracheostomy in the management of the airway in cranio-maxillofacial trauma, along with an assessment of its morbidity and complications. Materials and Methods Submental intubation was performed in 17 patients who had maxillofacial panfacial trauma and management was done under general anesthesia during a period of one year from 2013 to 2014 at Departments of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery and Dentistry, the Malankara Orthodox Syrian Church Medical College, Kochi, India. Results In all 17 cases, the technique of submental intubation was found to be simple and reliable. Hypertrophic scars were noted in three cases, orocutaneous fistula and mucocele in one case each. All these complications were managed comfortably without significant morbidity to the patient. Conclusion Submental intubation is a good technique that can be used regularly in the management of the airway in cranio-maxillofacial trauma, but with some manageable complications. PMID:27429937

  12. Continuous posterior lumbar plexus and continuous parasacral and intubation with lighted stylet for ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Imbelloni, Luiz Eduardo; Lucena, Neli

    2015-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis is characterized by progressive ossification of the spinal column with resultant stiffness. Ankylosing spondylitis can present significant challenges to the anaesthetist as a consequence of the potential difficult airway and performing neuraxial blockade. We describe a case of intubation with lighted stylet, and use of the continuous lumbosacral plexus for THA and postoperative analgesia with an elastomeric pump. Key words: Airways difficult anticipated, anesthesia, ankoylosing spondylitis, arthroplasty, conduction, continuous lumbosacral plexus, hip, infusion pumps, intubation awake, replacement. PMID:25886430

  13. Effect of cisatracurium versus atracurium on intraocular pressure in patients undergoing tracheal intubation for general anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Jabalameli, Mitra; Soltani, Hassan Ali; Hashemi, Jalal; Rahimi, Mojtaba

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Increase in intraocular pressure (IOP) following tracheal intubation during general anesthesia can be troublesome. We compared the influence of two muscle relaxants, cisatracurium and atracurium, on IOP in patients undergoing general anesthesia. METHODS: This randomized, double-blind, comparative trial was conducted on 90 candidates for elective non-ophthalmic surgery under general anesthesia. Patients were 18 to 60 years old with the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) class of I or II. Anesthesia was induced with fentanyl (1.5 mg/kg) and sodium thiopental (5 mg/kg). Patients received atracurium (0.5 mg/kg) or cisatracurium (0.15 mg/kg) two minutes prior to tracheal intubation. IOP, systolic (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP), and heart rate (HR) were measured at baseline (before medication), after medication (before intubation), and 2, 5, and 10 minutes after intubation. RESULTS: In both groups IOP decreased after administration of muscle relaxants (-3.3 ± 3.6 mmHg), then increased 2 minutes after intubation (5.5 ± 4.4 mmHg), but decreased 5 (-3.3 ± 3.3 mmHg) and 10 (-0.5 ± 2.6 mmHg) minutes after intubation. IOP and SBP were significantly higher in the atracurium compared with the cisatracurium group after 2 (p < 0.001 and 0.002, respectively), 5 (p < 0.001 and 0.012, respectively), and 10 (p = 0.02 and 0.048, respectively) minutes after intubation. CONCLUSIONS: Compared with atracurium, administration of cisatracurium can better prevent the increase of IOP following tracheal intubation in general anesthesia. The observed difference might be related to different effects on hemodynamic variables. Application of these results in patients under ophthalmic surgery is warranted. PMID:22247724

  14. Non-intubated laparoscopic repair of giant Morgagni's hernia for a young man.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Miao; Wang, Heng; Liu, Dong; Pan, Xuefeng; Wu, Wenbin; Hu, Zhengqun; Zhang, Hui

    2016-08-01

    An asymptomatic patient was admitted as his chest photograph and computed tomography scans showed a giant Morgagni's hernia (MH). And it was repaired by laparoscopic approach under epidural anesthesia without endotracheal intubation. The hernia content of omentum was repositioned back into the abdominal cavity, and the diaphragmatic defect was repaired with composite mesh. Which indicated that non-intubated laparoscopic mesh repair via epidural anesthesia is reliable and satisfactory for MH. PMID:27621903

  15. Non-intubated laparoscopic repair of giant Morgagni’s hernia for a young man

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Miao; Wang, Heng; Liu, Dong; Pan, Xuefeng; Wu, Wenbin; Hu, Zhengqun

    2016-01-01

    An asymptomatic patient was admitted as his chest photograph and computed tomography scans showed a giant Morgagni’s hernia (MH). And it was repaired by laparoscopic approach under epidural anesthesia without endotracheal intubation. The hernia content of omentum was repositioned back into the abdominal cavity, and the diaphragmatic defect was repaired with composite mesh. Which indicated that non-intubated laparoscopic mesh repair via epidural anesthesia is reliable and satisfactory for MH.

  16. Role of melatonin in attenuation of haemodynamic responses to laryngoscopy and intubation

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Priyamvada; Jethava, Durga; Choudhary, Ruchika; Jethava, Dharam Das

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Laryngoscopy and endotracheal intubation are considered as potent stimuli which lead to an increase in heart rate and blood pressure. Melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine) has been studied for pre-operative anxiolysis and sedation in Intensive Care Unit. We made a hypothesis that melatonin can provide haemodynamic stability during laryngoscopy and intubation when given 120 min before the procedure. Methods: Sixty American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status Grade I and II patients of either gender, 20–45 years old, 40–65 kg body weight, scheduled to undergo elective surgical procedures under general anaesthesia were assigned into two equal groups - Group C (control) and Group M (melatonin). They received oral placebo or melatonin tablets 6 mg, respectively, 120 min before surgery. The haemodynamic parameters were recorded preoperatively, during laryngoscopy and endotracheal intubation and thereafter at 1, 3, 5 and 10 min. Unpaired t-test was used for between-group comparison of ratio and interval scale data. For within-group comparison of ratio and interval scale data, repeated-measures ANOVA and post hoc Bonferroni t-tests were used. Results: It was observed that in the control group, there was a significant increase in heart rate and blood pressure at laryngoscopy and intubation and persisted till 10 min post-intubation. In melatonin group, there was an insignificant increase in heart rate at the time of laryngoscopy and intubation which however settled within 1 min post-intubation. Conclusion: Melatonin is an effective drug for attenuation of cardiovascular responses to laryngoscopy and endotracheal intubation. PMID:27761033

  17. Non-intubated laparoscopic repair of giant Morgagni’s hernia for a young man

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Miao; Wang, Heng; Liu, Dong; Pan, Xuefeng; Wu, Wenbin; Hu, Zhengqun

    2016-01-01

    An asymptomatic patient was admitted as his chest photograph and computed tomography scans showed a giant Morgagni’s hernia (MH). And it was repaired by laparoscopic approach under epidural anesthesia without endotracheal intubation. The hernia content of omentum was repositioned back into the abdominal cavity, and the diaphragmatic defect was repaired with composite mesh. Which indicated that non-intubated laparoscopic mesh repair via epidural anesthesia is reliable and satisfactory for MH. PMID:27621903

  18. Strengths and weaknesses of in-tube solid-phase microextraction: A scoping review.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Amado, M; Prieto-Blanco, M C; López-Mahía, P; Muniategui-Lorenzo, S; Prada-Rodríguez, D

    2016-02-01

    In-tube solid-phase microextraction (in-tube SPME or IT-SPME) is a sample preparation technique which has demonstrated over time its ability to couple with liquid chromatography (LC), as well as its advantages as a miniaturized technique. However, the in-tube SPME perspectives in the forthcoming years depend on solutions that can be brought to the environmental, industrial, food and biomedical analysis. The purpose of this scoping review is to examine the strengths and weaknesses of this technique during the period 2009 to 2015 in order to identify research gaps that should be addressed in the future, as well as the tendencies that are meant to strengthen the technique. In terms of methodological aspects, this scoping review shows the in-tube SPME strengths in the coupling with LC (LC-mass spectrometry, capillary LC, ultra-high-pressure LC), in the new performances (magnetic IT-SPME and electrochemically controlled in-tube SPME) and in the wide range of development of coatings and capillaries. Concerning the applicability, most in-tube SPME studies (around 80%) carry out environmental and biomedical analyses, a lower number food analyses and few industrial analyses. Some promising studies in proteomics have been performed. The review makes a critical description of parameters used in the optimization of in-tube SPME methods, highlighting the importance of some of them (i.e. type of capillary coatings). Commercial capillaries in environmental analysis and laboratory-prepared capillaries in biomedical analysis have been employed with good results. The most consolidated configuration is in-valve mode, however the cycle mode configuration is frequently chosen for biomedical analysis. This scoping review revealed that some aspects such as the combination of in-tube SPME with other sample treatment techniques for the analysis of solid samples should be developed in depth in the near future.

  19. Non-intubated video-assisted thoracic surgery management of secondary spontaneous pneumothorax

    PubMed Central

    Bolufer, Sergio; Navarro-Martinez, Jose; Lirio, Francisco; Corcoles, Juan Manuel; Rodriguez-Paniagua, Jose Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Secondary spontaneous pneumothorax (SSP) is serious entity, usually due to underlying disease, mainly chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Its morbidity and mortality is high due to the pulmonary compromised status of these patients, and the recurrence rate is almost 50%, increasing mortality with each episode. For persistent or recurrent SSP, surgery under general anesthesia (GA) and mechanical ventilation (MV) with lung isolation is the gold standard, but ventilator-induced damages and dependency, and postoperative pulmonary complications are frequent. In the last two decades, several groups have reported successful results with non-intubated video-assisted thoracic surgery (NI-VATS) with thoracic epidural anesthesia (TEA) and/or local anesthesia under spontaneous breathing. Main benefits reported are operative time, operation room time and hospital stay reduction, and postoperative respiratory complications decrease when comparing to GA, thus encouraging for further research in these moderate to high risk patients many times rejected for the standard regimen. There are also reports of special situations with satisfactory results, as in contralateral pneumonectomy and lung transplantation. The aim of this review is to collect, analyze and discuss all the available evidence, and seek for future lines of investigation. PMID:26046045

  20. Non-intubated video-assisted thoracic surgery: where does evidence stand?

    PubMed Central

    Tacconi, Federico

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, non-intubated video-assisted thoracic surgery (NIVATS) strategies are gaining popularity worldwide. The main goal of this surgical practice is to achieve an overall improvement of patients’ management and outcome thanks to the avoidance of side-effects related to general anesthesia (GA) and one-lung ventilation. The spectrum of expected benefits is multifaceted and includes reduced postoperative morbidity, faster discharge, decreased hospital costs and a globally reduced perturbation of patients’ well-being status. We have conducted a literature search to evaluate the available evidence on this topic. Meta-analysis of collected results was also done where appropriate. Despite some fragmentation of data and potential biases, the available data suggest that NIVATS operations can reduce operative morbidity and hospital stay when compared to equipollent procedures performed under GA. Larger, well designed prospective studies are thus warranted to assess the effectiveness of NIVATS as far as to investigate comprehensively the various outcomes. Multi-institutional and multidisciplinary cooperation will be welcome to establish uniform study protocols and to help address the questions that are to be answered yet. PMID:27195134

  1. Awake nasotracheal fiberoptic intubation and self-positioning followed by anesthesia induction in prone patients

    PubMed Central

    Heng, Lei; Wang, Ming-Yu; Sun, Hou-Liang; Zhu, Shan-Shan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Anesthesia followed by placement in the prone position takes time and may result in complications. This study aimed to evaluate the feasibility of awake nasotracheal fiberoptic intubation and self-positioning followed by anesthesia induction in prone-positioned patients under general anesthesia. Sixty-two patients (ASA physical status I–II) scheduled for awake nasotracheal fiberoptic intubation and prone self-positioning before surgery under general anesthesia were selected. Patient preparation began with detailed preoperative counseling regarding the procedure. Premedication with sedative and antisialagogue was followed by airway anesthesia with topical lidocaine; then, awake nasotracheal fiberoptic intubation was carried out. The patients then positioned themselves comfortably before induction of general anesthesia. The changes in systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), heart rate (HR), incidence of coughing or gagging, and rate pressure product (RPP) were assessed. Statistical analysis was performed with repeated-measures one-way analysis of variance. Fifty-eight of the 62 patients completed prone self-positioning smoothly. Compared with values before intubation, SBP, DBP, HR, and RPP were slightly increased after intubation, although the difference was not statistically significant (P > 0.05). One patient had moderate coughing and 1 patient had gagging during prone self-positioning, which were tolerable. These findings indicated that awake nasotracheal fiberoptic intubation and self-positioning followed by induction of anesthesia is safe and feasible alternative to routine prone positioning after induction of general anesthesia. PMID:27512858

  2. A comparison of cocaine, lidocaine with epinephrine, and oxymetazoline for prevention of epistaxis on nasotracheal intubation.

    PubMed

    Katz, R I; Hovagim, A R; Finkelstein, H S; Grinberg, Y; Boccio, R V; Poppers, P J

    1990-01-01

    The alpha-adrenergic agonist oxymetazoline was compared to cocaine and to lidocaine with epinephrine with respect to prevention of epistaxis on nasotracheal intubation. The nares of three groups of 14 patients each were topically pretreated with 4% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine (group 1), 10% cocaine (group 2), or 0.05% oxymetazoline (group 3) prior to nasotracheal intubation. After intubation, epistaxis was estimated on a scale of 0 to 3, with 0 indicating no bleeding, 1 representing blood on the nasotracheal tube only, 2 indicating blood pooling in the pharynx, and 3 representing blood in the pharynx sufficient to impede intubation. Only 29% of the patients in group 1 displayed no bleeding, whereas 57% of those in group 2 and 86% of those in group 3 had no bleeding. Nonparametric analysis showed a statistically significant difference (p less than 0.013) between oxymetazoline and lidocaine with epinephrine. In addition, heart rate (HR) and blood pressure (BP) were examined prior to administration of the medications; at 5 minutes, 10 minutes, and 15 minutes after administration of the medications; and after intubation. No significant differences were noted (p greater than 0.05) between the medications except for a slightly higher systolic BP for cocaine than for lidocaine with epinephrine at 15 minutes. The results of this double-blind, randomized trial demonstrate that the alpha-adrenergic agonist oxymetazoline is as effective as cocaine, and more effective than lidocaine with epinephrine, for the prevention of epistaxis associated with nasotracheal intubation.

  3. Intravenous lidocaine as a suppressant of coughing during tracheal intubation in elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Yukioka, H; Hayashi, M; Terai, T; Fujimori, M

    1993-08-01

    The effects of intravenously administered lidocaine on cough suppression in elderly patients over the age of 60 yr during tracheal intubation under general anesthesia were evaluated in two studies. In the first study, 100 patients received a placebo of either 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, or 2.0 mg/kg lidocaine intravenously 1 min before tracheal intubation. All visible coughs were classified as coughing. The incidence of coughing decreased as the dose of lidocaine increased. A dose of 1.5 mg/kg or more of intravenous lidocaine suppressed the cough reflex significantly (P < 0.01). In the second study, 108 patients received 2 mg/kg lidocaine intravenously or a placebo 1, 3, 5, 7, 10, or 15 min before intubation. The same criteria for determining whether a patient did or did not cough during tracheal intubation were used as in Study 1. The incidence of coughing decreased significantly (P < 0.01) when 2 mg/kg lidocaine was injected intravenously between 1 min and 3 min before attempting intubation. The cough reflex was almost entirely suppressed by plasma concentrations of lidocaine in excess of 4 micrograms/mL. The results suggest that intravenous administration of lidocaine is effective in suppressing the cough reflex during tracheal intubation in elderly patients under general anesthesia, but that relatively high plasma concentrations of lidocaine may be required for suppression of coughing. PMID:8346830

  4. End-tidal carbon dioxide detection in emergency intubation in four groups of patients.

    PubMed

    Sanders, K C; Clum, W B; Nguyen, S S; Balasubramaniam, S

    1994-01-01

    A prospective clinical trial was conducted at a level I trauma center to assess the efficacy of end-tidal carbon dioxide (CO2) detection in four groups of patients requiring emergency intubation because of cardiac arrest, major trauma, respiratory failure, or the need for airway protection. A semiquantitative, colorimetric FEF end-tidal CO2 detector (Fenem, Inc, New York, NY) was used to evaluate endotracheal versus esophageal intubation. This disposable, bedside detector registers three ranges of CO2 concentration: "A" (purple) indicates low levels and probable esophageal intubation; "B" (beige) indicates moderate levels and probable tracheal intubation with hypocarbia; "C" (yellow) indicates high levels and tracheal intubation. Clinical observation, patient response, chest x-ray films, and arterial blood gas results were used to corroborate placement of the endotracheal tube. The FEF detector was found to be 100% reliable for confirming tracheal placement when registering levels in the B and C ranges and 100% reliable for detecting esophageal intubation when registering levels in the A range. In conclusion, the FEF CO2 detector is a reliable and useful adjunct for airway management of diverse groups of patients in the emergency setting.

  5. Difficult endotracheal intubation secondary to tracheal deviation and stenosis in a patient with severe kyphoscoliosis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sang Hyun; Jo, Jun-ho

    2016-01-01

    We report on a case of difficult endotracheal intubation in a patient with marked tracheal deviation at an angle of 90 degrees combined with stenosis due to kyphoscoliosis with vertebral body fusion. After induction of general anesthesia, a proper laryngeal view was easily obtained using a videolaryngoscope. But a tracheal tube could not be advanced more than 3 cm beyond the vocal cords due to resistance, despite various attempts, including the use of small size tubes, full rotation of the tube tip, and fiberoptic bronchoscopy. Ultimately, the airway was successfully secured by placing a tube tip above the area of resistance and by additionally packing saline-soaked gauzes around the tracheal inlet to minimize gas leakage and to fasten the tube in the trachea. PMID:27482317

  6. Unusual Displacement of a Mobilised Dental Bridge during Orotracheal Intubation

    PubMed Central

    Feltracco, Paolo; Barbieri, Stefania; Salvaterra, Francesca; Tiano, Letizia; Gaudio, Rosa Maria; Galligioni, Helmut; Ori, Carlo; Avato, Francesco Maria

    2011-01-01

    Dental trauma during tracheal intubation mostly happens in case of poor dentition, restricted mouth opening, and/or difficult laryngoscopy. 57-year-old man undergoing laparoscopic radiofrequency ablation of unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma had his dental work detached at induction of anesthesia. Oropharyngeal direct view, manual inspection, fibreoptic nosendoscopy, tracheobronchoscopy, and fiberoptic inspection of the esophagus and stomach were unsuccessful in locating the dislodged bridge. While other possible exams were considered, such as lateral and AP x-ray of head and neck, further meticulous manual “sweepings” of the mouth were performed, and by moving the first and second fingers below the soft palate deep towards the posterolateral wall of the pharynx, feeling consistent with a dental prosthesis was detected in the right pharyngeal recess. Only after pulling the palatopharyngeal arch upward was it possible to grasp it and extract it out with the aid of a Magill Catheter Forceps. Even though the preexisting root and bridge deficits were well reported by the consultant dentist, the patient was fully reimbursed. The lack of appropriate documentation of the advanced periodontal disease in the anesthesia records, no mention of potential risks on anesthesia consent, and insufficient protective measures during airway instrumentation reinforced the reimbursement claim. PMID:22606394

  7. Two administration methods for inhaled salbutamol in intubated patients

    PubMed Central

    Garner, S; Wiest, D; Bradley, J; Habib, D

    2002-01-01

    Aims: To compare serum concentrations and effects on respiratory mechanics and haemodynamics of salbutamol administered by small volume nebuliser (SVN) and metered dose inhaler (MDI) plus spacer. Methods: Blinded, randomised, crossover study in 12 intubated infants and children (mean age 17.8 months) receiving inhaled salbutamol therapy. Subjects received salbutamol as 0.15 mg/kg by SVN and four puffs (400 µg) by MDI plus spacer at a four hour interval in random order. Passive respiratory mechanics were measured by a single breath/single occlusion technique, and serum salbutamol concentrations by liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry at 30 minutes, 1, 2, and 4 hours after each dose. Haemodynamics (heart rate and blood pressure) were recorded at each measurement time. Results: There was no difference in percentage change in respiratory mechanics or haemodynamics between the two methods of administration. Mean area under the curve (AUC0–4) was 5.86 for MDI plus spacer versus 4.93 ng/ml x h for SVN. Conclusions: Serum concentrations and effects on respiratory mechanics and haemodynamics of salbutamol were comparable with the two administration methods under the conditions studied. Future studies are needed to determine the most effective and safe combination of dose and administration method of inhaled salbutamol in mechanically ventilated infants and children. PMID:12089124

  8. Unusual Displacement of a Mobilised Dental Bridge during Orotracheal Intubation.

    PubMed

    Feltracco, Paolo; Barbieri, Stefania; Salvaterra, Francesca; Tiano, Letizia; Gaudio, Rosa Maria; Galligioni, Helmut; Ori, Carlo; Avato, Francesco Maria

    2011-01-01

    Dental trauma during tracheal intubation mostly happens in case of poor dentition, restricted mouth opening, and/or difficult laryngoscopy. 57-year-old man undergoing laparoscopic radiofrequency ablation of unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma had his dental work detached at induction of anesthesia. Oropharyngeal direct view, manual inspection, fibreoptic nosendoscopy, tracheobronchoscopy, and fiberoptic inspection of the esophagus and stomach were unsuccessful in locating the dislodged bridge. While other possible exams were considered, such as lateral and AP x-ray of head and neck, further meticulous manual "sweepings" of the mouth were performed, and by moving the first and second fingers below the soft palate deep towards the posterolateral wall of the pharynx, feeling consistent with a dental prosthesis was detected in the right pharyngeal recess. Only after pulling the palatopharyngeal arch upward was it possible to grasp it and extract it out with the aid of a Magill Catheter Forceps. Even though the preexisting root and bridge deficits were well reported by the consultant dentist, the patient was fully reimbursed. The lack of appropriate documentation of the advanced periodontal disease in the anesthesia records, no mention of potential risks on anesthesia consent, and insufficient protective measures during airway instrumentation reinforced the reimbursement claim.

  9. Effective Bolus Dose of Sufentanil to Attenuate Cardiovascular Responses in Laryngoscopic Double-Lumen Endobronchial Intubation

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Byung-Hee; Lee, Yong-Cheol

    2016-01-01

    Background Sufentanil is a potent opioid analgesic frequently used in clinical anesthesia. Double-lumen endobronchial intubation induces profound cardiovascular responses in comparison with ordinary endotracheal intubation because of the larger tube diameter and direct irritation of the carina. Objectives The purpose of this study was to determine the effective bolus dose of sufentanil to attenuate hemodynamic changes in response to laryngoscopic double-lumen endobronchial intubation. Patients and Methods We randomly assigned 72 patients aged 18 - 65 years and with an American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status of 1 or 2 to one of four sufentanil dose groups: NS, S0.1, S0.2, or S0.3. The respective doses for the groups were as follows: normal saline, 0.1 mcg/kg of sufentanil, 0.2 mcg/kg of sufentanil, and 0.3 mcg/kg of sufentanil. Blood pressure and heart rate were recorded during the pre-anesthesia period at baseline, pre-intubation, immediate post-intubation, and every minute during 5 minutes after intubation. Results Baseline mean arterial pressures in the NS, S0.1, S0.2, and S0.3 groups were 89.8 ± 12.1, 89.2 ± 10.9, 88.8 ± 13.6, and 90.7 ± 11.1, respectively. At immediate post-intubation, the mean arterial pressures in the NS, S0.1, S0.2, and S0.3 groups were 129.7 ± 14.7, 120.7 ± 14.2, 120.8 ± 17.2, and 96.7 ± 10.4, respectively. At immediate post-intubation, the mean arterial pressure in the NS, S0.1, and S0.2 groups significantly increased from baseline (P < 0.001), but the S0.3 group showed no difference. In the time point comparison at immediate post- intubation, the S0.3 group had a significantly lower mean arterial pressure than did the NS, S0.1, and S0.2 groups (P < 0.001). Conclusions We found that 0.3 mcg/kg of sufentanil attenuates cardiovascular responses to double-lumen endobronchial intubation without adverse effects. PMID:27252903

  10. Attenuation of Hemodynamic Responses to Intubation by Gabapentin in Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery: a Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Marashi, Seyed Mojtaba; Saeedinia, Seyed Mostafa; Sadeghi, Mostafa; Movafegh, Ali; Marashi, Shaqayeq

    2015-12-01

    A varieties of medications have been suggested to prevent hemodynamic instabilities following laryngoscopy and endotracheal intubation. This study was conducted to determine the beneficial effects of gabapentin on preventing hemodynamic instabilities associated with intubation in patients who were a candidate for coronary artery bypass surgery (CABG). This double blinded randomized, parallel group clinical trial was carried out on 58 normotensive patients scheduled for elective CABG under general anesthesia with endotracheal intubation in Shariati Hospital. Patients were randomly allocated to two groups of 29 patients that received 1200 mg of gabapentin in two dosages (600 mg, 8 hours before anesthesia induction and 600 mg, 2 hours before anesthesia induction) as gabapentin group or received talc powder as placebo (placebo group). Heart rate, mean arterial pressure, systolic and diastolic blood pressure were measured immediately before intubation, during intubation, immediately after intubation, 1 and 2 minutes after tracheal intubation. Inter-group comparisons significantly showed higher systolic and diastolic blood pressure, mean arterial pressure and heart rate immediately before intubation, during intubation, immediately after intubation, 1 and 2 minutes after tracheal intubation in the placebo group in comparison to gabapentin group. The median of anxiety verbal analog scale (VAS) at the pre-induction room in gabapentin and placebo groups were 2 and 4, respectively that was significantly lower in the former group (P. value =0.04 ); however, regarding median of pain score no difference was observed between them (P. value =0.07). Gabapentin (1200 mg) given preoperatively can effectively attenuate the hemodynamic response to laryngoscopy, intubation and also reduce preoperative related anxiety in patients who were a candidate for CABG.

  11. Comparison of the ease of tracheal intubation by postgraduate residents of anesthesiology using Airtraq™ and Macintosh laryngoscopes: An observational study

    PubMed Central

    Yallapragada, Srivishnu Vardhan; Parasa, Mrunalini; Vemuri, Nagendra Nath; Shaik, Mastan Saheb

    2016-01-01

    Context: Airtraq™ (Prodol Meditec, Vizcaya, Spain) is a recently developed laryngoscope, which facilitates easy visualization of glottis through a matrix of sequentially arranged lenses and mirrors. In this observatory study, we sought to compare the ease of tracheal intubation with Airtraq™ and Macintosh laryngoscope when performed by 2nd year postgraduate residents of Anesthesiology in NRI Medical College, Mangalagiri. Aims: To compare the ease of tracheal intubation by Airtraq™ laryngoscope with that by Macintosh laryngoscope among the 2nd year postgraduate residents of anesthesiology in terms of time taken for intubation and the rise of rate-pressure product (RPP) with intubation. Settings and Design: Prospective randomized observational study. Subjects and Methods: Eighty adult and healthy patients with an easy airway, scheduled for general anesthesia were allocated into two groups A, and M. Patients in Group A were intubated with Airtraq™ laryngoscope and those in Group M were intubated with Macintosh laryngoscope by the 2nd year postgraduate residents of anesthesiology. The time taken for intubation, the RPPs at baseline, after induction of general anesthesia, postintubation, at 3 and 5 min after intubation, the rise of RPP to intubation and the occurrence of a sore throat were compared between the two groups. Statistical Analysis Used: Descriptive and inferential statistical methods were used to analyze the data. Results: The mean time for intubation in Macintosh group was 28.18 s and was 40.98 s in Airtraq group. The mean rise of RPP to intubation was 4644.83 in Airtraq group and 2829.27 in Macintosh group. The incidence of a sore throat was equal in both the groups. Conclusions: The time for intubation and the sympathetic response to airway instrumentation were more with Airtraq™ laryngoscope than with Macintosh laryngoscope. PMID:27212753

  12. Inverting the Achievement Pyramid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White-Hood, Marian; Shindel, Melissa

    2006-01-01

    Attempting to invert the pyramid to improve student achievement and increase all students' chances for success is not a new endeavor. For decades, educators have strategized, formed think tanks, and developed school improvement teams to find better ways to improve the achievement of all students. Currently, the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) is…

  13. Catastrophic neurological complications of emergent endotracheal intubation: report of 2 cases.

    PubMed

    Oppenlander, Mark E; Hsu, Forrest D; Bolton, Patrick; Theodore, Nicholas

    2015-05-01

    Although exceedingly rare, catastrophic neurological decline may result from endotracheal intubation of patients with preexisting cervical spine disease. The authors report on 2 cases of quadriplegia resulting from emergent endotracheal intubation in the intensive care unit. A 68-year-old man with ankylosing spondylitis became quadriplegic after emergent intubation. A new C6-7 fracturedislocation was identified, and the patient underwent emergent open reduction and C4-T2 posterior fixation and fusion. The patient remained quadriplegic and ultimately died of pneumonia 1 year later. This is the first report with radiographic documentation of a cervical fracture-dislocation resulting from intubation in a patient with ankylosing spondylitis. A 73-year-old man underwent posterior C6-T1 decompression and fixation for a C6-7 fracture. On postoperative Day 12, emergent intubation for respiratory distress resulted in C6-level quadriplegia. Imaging revealed acute spondyloptosis at C6-7, and the patient underwent emergent open reduction with revision and extension of posterior fusion from C-3 to T-2. He remained quadriplegic and ventilator dependent. Five days after the second operation, care was withdrawn. This is the first report of intubation as a cause of significant neurological decline related to disruption of a recently fixated cervical fracture. Risk factors are identified and pertinent literature is reviewed for cases of catastrophic neurological complications after emergent endotracheal intubation. Strategies for obtaining airway control in patients with cervical spine pathology are also identified. Awareness of the potential dangers of airway management in patients with cervical spine pathology is critical for all involved subspecialty team members.

  14. Attenuation of Hemodynamic Responses to Laryngoscopy and Tracheal Intubation: Propacetamol versus Lidocaine—A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kord Valeshabad, Ali; Nabavian, Omid; Nourijelyani, Keramat; Kord, Hadi; Vafainejad, Hossein; Kord Valeshabad, Reza; Reza Feili, Ali; Rezaei, Mehdi; Darabi, Hamed; Koohkan, Mohammad; Golbinimofrad, Poorya; Jafari, Samira

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the effects of propacetamol on attenuating hemodynamic responses subsequent laryngoscopy and tracheal intubation compared to lidocaine. In this randomized clinical trial, 62 patients with the American Anesthesiologists Society (ASA) class I/II who required laryngoscopy and tracheal intubation for elective surgery were assigned to receive propacetamol 2 g/I.V./infusion (group P) or lidocaine 1.5 mg/kg (group L) prior to laryngoscopy. Systolic and diastolic blood pressures (SBP, DBP), mean arterial pressure (MAP), and heart rate (HR) were recorded at baseline, before laryngoscopy and within nine minutes after intubation. In both groups P and L, MAP increased after laryngoscopy and the changes were statistically significant (P < 0.001). There were significant changes of HR in both groups after intubation (P < 0.02), but the trend of changes was different between two groups (P < 0.001). In group L, HR increased after intubation and its change was statistically significant within 9 minutes after intubation (P < 0.001), while in group P, HR remained stable after intubation (P = 0.8). Propacetamol 2 gr one hour prior intubation attenuates heart rate responses after laryngoscopy but is not effective to prevent acute alterations in blood pressure after intubation. PMID:24822063

  15. Retrospective evaluation of airway management with blind awake intubation in temporomandibular joint ankylosis patients: A review of 48 cases

    PubMed Central

    Sankar, Duraiswamy; Krishnan, Radhika; Veerabahu, Muthusubramanian; Vikraman, Bhaskara Pandian; Nathan, J. A.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim was to determine the morbidity or mortality associated with the blind awake intubation technique in temporomandibular ankylosis patients. Settings and Design: A total of 48 cases with radiographically and clinically confirmed cases of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis were included in the study for evaluation of anesthetic management and its complications. Materials and Methods: Airway assessment was done with standard proforma including Look externally, evaluate 3-3-2 rule, Mallampati classification, Obstruction, Neck mobility (LEMON) score assessment in all TMJ ankylosis patients. The intubation was carried out with the standard departmental anesthetic protocol in all the patients. The preoperative difficulty assessment and postoperative outcome were recorded. Results: Blind awake intubation was done in 92% of cases, 6% of cases were intubated by fiberoptic awake intubation, and 2% patient required surgical airway. Ninety-eight percent of the patients were cooperative during the awake intubation. The frequent complications encountered during the blind awake intubation were epistaxis and sore throat. Conclusion: In an anesthetic setup, where fiberoptic intubation is not available, blind awake intubation could be considered in the anesthetic management algorithm. PMID:27563608

  16. Attenuation of Hemodynamic Responses to Laryngoscopy and Tracheal Intubation: Propacetamol versus Lidocaine-A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Kord Valeshabad, Ali; Nabavian, Omid; Nourijelyani, Keramat; Kord, Hadi; Vafainejad, Hossein; Kord Valeshabad, Reza; Reza Feili, Ali; Rezaei, Mehdi; Darabi, Hamed; Koohkan, Mohammad; Golbinimofrad, Poorya; Jafari, Samira

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the effects of propacetamol on attenuating hemodynamic responses subsequent laryngoscopy and tracheal intubation compared to lidocaine. In this randomized clinical trial, 62 patients with the American Anesthesiologists Society (ASA) class I/II who required laryngoscopy and tracheal intubation for elective surgery were assigned to receive propacetamol 2 g/I.V./infusion (group P) or lidocaine 1.5 mg/kg (group L) prior to laryngoscopy. Systolic and diastolic blood pressures (SBP, DBP), mean arterial pressure (MAP), and heart rate (HR) were recorded at baseline, before laryngoscopy and within nine minutes after intubation. In both groups P and L, MAP increased after laryngoscopy and the changes were statistically significant (P < 0.001). There were significant changes of HR in both groups after intubation (P < 0.02), but the trend of changes was different between two groups (P < 0.001). In group L, HR increased after intubation and its change was statistically significant within 9 minutes after intubation (P < 0.001), while in group P, HR remained stable after intubation (P = 0.8). Propacetamol 2 gr one hour prior intubation attenuates heart rate responses after laryngoscopy but is not effective to prevent acute alterations in blood pressure after intubation. PMID:24822063

  17. Prehospital intubation of the moderately injured patient: a cause of morbidity? A matched-pairs analysis of 1,200 patients from the DGU Trauma Registry

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Hypoxia and hypoxemia can lead to an unfavorable outcome after severe trauma, by both direct and delayed mechanisms. Prehospital intubation is meant to ensure pulmonary gas exchange. Limited evidence exists regarding indications for intubation after trauma. The aim of this study was to analyze prehospital intubation as an independent risk factor for the posttraumatic course of moderately injured patients. Therefore, only patients who, in retrospect, would not have required intubation were included in the matched-pairs analysis to evaluate the risks related to intubation. Methods The data of 42,248 patients taken from the trauma registry of the German Association for Trauma Surgery (Deutsche Gesellschaft für Unfallchirurgie (DGU)) were analyzed. Patients who met the following criteria were included: primary admission to a hospital; Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) of 13 to 15; age 16 years or older; maximum injury severity per body region (AIS) ≤ 3; no administration of packed red blood cell units in the emergency trauma room; admission between 2005 and 2008; and documented data regarding intubation. The intubated patients were then matched with not-intubated patients. Results The study population included 600 matched pairs that met the inclusion criteria. The results indicated that prehospital intubation was associated with a prolonged rescue time (not intubated, 64.8 minutes; intubated, 82.3 minutes; P ≤ 0.001) and a higher volume replacement (not intubated, 911.3 ml; intubated, 1,573.8 ml; P ≤ 0.001). In the intubated patients, coagulation parameters, such as the prothrombin time ratio (PT) and platelet count, declined, as did the hemoglobin value (PT not intubated: 92.3%; intubated, 85.7%; P ≤ 0.001; hemoglobin not intubated, 13.4 mg/dl; intubated, 12.2 mg/dl; P ≤ 0.001). Intubation at the scene resulted in an elevated sepsis rate (not intubated, 1.5%; intubated, 3.7%; P ≤ 0.02) and an elevated prevalence of multiorgan failure (MOF) and organ

  18. Comparison of three manual ventilation devices using an intubated mannequin

    PubMed Central

    Hussey, S; Ryan, C; Murphy, B

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To compare three devices for manual neonatal ventilation. Design: Participants performed a two minute period of ventilation using a self inflating device, an anaesthesia bag with attached manometer, and a Neopuff device. An intubated neonatal mannequin, approximating a 1 kg infant with functional lungs, was used for the study. Target ventilation variables included a rate of 40 breaths per minute, peak inspiratory pressure (PIP) of 20 cm H2O, and positive end expiratory pressure (PEEP) of 4 cm H2O. The circuit was attached to a laptop computer for data recording. Results: Thirty five participants were enrolled, including consultant neonatologists, paediatricians, and anaesthetists, paediatric and anaesthetic registrars, and neonatal nurses. The maximum PIP recorded using the self inflating bag, anaesthetic bag, and Neopuff device were 75.9, 35.5, and 22.4 cm H2O respectively. There were significant differences between the devices for mean PIP (30.7, 18.1, and 20.1 cm H2O), mean PEEP (0.2, 2.8, and 4.4 cm H2O), mean airway pressure (7.6, 8.5, and 10.9 cm H2O), % total breaths ⩽ 21 cm H2O PIP (39%, 92%, and 98%), and % total breaths ⩾ 30 cm H2O PIP (45%, 0, and 0). There was no difference between doctors and allied health professionals for the variables examined. Conclusion: The anaesthetic bag with manometer and Neopuff device both facilitate accurate and reproducible manual ventilation. Self inflating devices without modifications are not as consistent by comparison and should incorporate a manometer and a PEEP device, particularly when used for resuscitation of very low birthweight infants. PMID:15499138

  19. Tissue distribution of lidocaine in critical care patients after intubation.

    PubMed

    Moriya, Fumio; Hashimoto, Yoshiaki

    2003-11-26

    We investigated tissue distribution of lidocaine in 33 patients after endotracheal intubation with Xylocaine jelly that contains 2% lidocaine hydrochloride. Blood levels of monoethylglycinexylidide (MEGX), an active metabolite of lidocaine, were also determined. Five patients (Group A) were alive on arrival and six patients (Group B) resumed heartbeats after cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). The survival times for Groups A and B ranged from 3 to 72 h. The remaining 22 patients (Group C) did not survive cardiopulmonary arrest on arrival (CPAOA). Systemic distribution of lidocaine was measured in nine patients from Group C. The liver-to-kidney lidocaine ratios and cerebrum-to-cerebrospinal fluid lidocaine ratios were: Group A, 0.1-0.7 and 1.4-3.6, respectively; Group B, 0.2-0.8 and 1.2-2.3, respectively; Group C, 0.1-17 and 0.2-1.0, respectively. MEGX was detected in all blood samples from Group A and only two samples from Group B. No MEGX was detected in samples from Group C. Our results indicate that the absorption of tracheal lidocaine during natural circulation results in a cerebrum-to-cerebrospinal fluid lidocaine ratio of 1.2 or more, whereas absorption during artificial circulation by cardiac massage gives a ratio of 1.0 or less. The cerebrum-to-cerebrospinal fluid lidocaine ratio may be a more useful index to estimate circulatory dynamics of patients during CPR than the liver-to-kidney lidocaine ratio. MEGX was not a useful parameter for monitoring circulatory changes during cardiac massage.

  20. Attenuation of pressor response following intubation: Efficacy of nitro-glycerine lingual spray

    PubMed Central

    Kumari, Indira; Naithani, Udita; Dadheech, Vinod Kumar; Pradeep, D. S.; Meena, Khemraj; Verma, Devendra

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: The role of nitro-glycerine (NTG) lingual spray for attenuation of the hemodynamic response associated with intubation is not much investigated. We conducted this study to evaluate the efficacy of NTG lingual pump or pen spray in attenuation of intubation induced hemodynamic responses and to elucidate the optimum dose. Material and Methods: In a prospective randomized controlled trial, 90 adult patients of ASA I, II, 18-60 year posted for elective general surgery under general anesthesia with intubation were randomly allocated to three groups as Group C (control) - receiving no NTG spray, Group N1 – receiving 1 NTG spray and Group N2 – receiving 2 NTG spray one minute before intubation. Systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate were recorded at baseline, just before intubation (i.e., 60 s just after induction and NTG spray), immediately after intubation, at 1, 2, 5 and 10 min after intubation. Results: Incidence of hypertension was significantly higher in Group C (60%, n = 18) as compared to Group N1 and N2 (10%, n = 3 each), P < 0.01. Mean value of SBP, DBP and MAP showed a significant rise as compared to baseline, following intubation in control group (15.31% in SBP, 12.12% in DBP, 17.77% in MAP) that persisted till 5 min, while no significant rise was observed in Group N1 and N2. There was a trend toward fall in blood pressure in Group N2 (4.95% fall in SBP, 4.72% fall in MAP) 1-min following spray, which was clinically insignificant. Mean value of SBP, DBP and MAP was significantly higher in Group C than in Group N1, which was in turn greater than Group N2 (Group C > N1> N2), P < 0.05. However, incidence of tachycardia was comparable in three groups (70% in group C, 63.33% in Group N1 and 67.77% in Group N2, P > 0.05). Conclusions: We concluded that the NTG lingual spray in dose of 0.4 mg (1 spray) or 0.8 mg (2 sprays) was effective in attenuation of intubation induced

  1. Development of a new system for guidewire-assisted tracheal intubation: manikin and cadaver evaluation.

    PubMed

    Dhara, S S; McGlone, D J; Skinner, M W

    2016-01-01

    Guided intubation using a tracheal tube and semi-rigid introducer is associated with technical difficulties, failure and traumatic complications. We describe the development of a new system of guidewire-assisted tracheal intubation that may circumvent these problems. A reinforced silicone tracheal tube was modified with a guide channel built inside its wall, and a nitinol non-kinking guidewire was matched to this channel. Both anterograde and retrograde tracheal intubation were evaluated in a test rig, an airway manikin and then in preserved and fresh cadavers. There was minimal resistance to passage of the guidewire through the guide channel when the modified tube was in an anatomical configuration, in contrast to moderate resistance when an Airway Exchange Catheter was passed through a PVC tracheal tube. Intubation using the new equipment required increased force in the manikin and preserved cadavers, but minimal force in fresh cadavers. Resistance to tracheal tube advancement in preserved cadavers was overcome by withdrawal followed by 90° rotation, but this manoeuvre was not required in fresh cadavers. We suggest that the combination of the modified tracheal tube and matching guidewire may allow easy and reliable single-step guided tracheal intubation when used in patients.

  2. [Difficult intubation due to facial malformations in a child. The laryngeal mask as an aid].

    PubMed

    Golisch, W; Hönig, J F; Lange, H; Braun, U

    1994-11-01

    Variations in anatomy of the bony and soft-tissue structures of the neck and facial cranium due to trauma, disease, or dysmorphic syndromes may lead to severe intubation problems. These patients are admitted for mandibulofacial and otolaryngologic surgery. It is important to inspect the patient's outer and inner pharyngeal structures carefully during preoperative assessment, as suggested by Mallampati. The observer estimates the facility of intubation by inspection of the faucial pillars, soft palate, and uvula. Unfortunately, even careful examination does not predict every case of difficult intubation, so that unexpected problems may occur. There may also be difficulties in ventilating these patients with a face mask. Safe intubation is possible in these cases using the laryngeal mask airway (LMA), laryngoscopy with a rigid optical aid, and the fibreoptic bronchoscope. Case report. We report a 14-month-old girl with Goldenhar's syndrome (oculo-auricular dysplasia) who presented for soft-palate surgery. This syndrome belongs to the group of cranio-mandibular-facial malformations; the main symptoms are congenital unilateral malformations in the area of the 1st and 2nd branchial arches. The patient's jaw was hypoplastic with aplasia of the temporo-mandibular joint, which led to asymmetry of the lower face and an extremely short mandible. Additionally, we observed a large tongue in relation to the small jaw. Macrostomia is part of the syndrome, and may lead to underestimation of intubation problems.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. [A case of subglottic stenosis with bridging granuloma after intubation with double-lumen endotracheal tube].

    PubMed

    Ito, Yosuke; Nakata, Yoko; Nakamura, Sakiko; Nagaya, Kei

    2013-08-01

    We present a case of subglottic stenosis with rare bridging granuloma after intubation with double-lumen endotracheal tube. An 81-year-old woman was diagnosed with the lung tumor and scheduled for the thoracoscopic surgery. We induced anesthesia with propofol, remifentanil and rocuronium. A 35 Fr double-lumen intratracheal tube was inserted to the trachea with some resistance, when the tube passed through the glottis. A few days later, she suffered from respiratory discomfort. An otolaryngologist examined her larynx and subglottis. Laryngoscopic examination revealed bridging granuloma leading to tracheal stenosis. Tracheostomy and resection of granuloma were performed, and her symptom improved. If we feel resistance in intubating a double-lumen endotracheal tube in a patient with a history of intubation with a tracheal tube, we should operate gently adjusting the size of the tracheal tube.

  4. Dexmedetomidine provides optimum conditions during awake fiberoptic intubation in simulated cervical spine injury patients

    PubMed Central

    Chopra, Pooja; Dixit, Madhu Bala; Dang, Aashish; Gupta, Vibhuti

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: We undertook this study to assess if a small-dose of dexmedetomidine (DEX) for conscious sedation during awake fiberoptic intubation (AFOI) in simulated cervical spine injury (CSI) patients provides optimum conditions and fulfills the need of postintubation neurological examination required in such patients. The aim was to assess the efficacy of DEX on arousability and patient's comfort during AFOI in simulated CSI patients. Material and Methods: In this prospective, randomized double-blind study, 100 American Society of Anesthesiologists Grade I-II patients aged between 18 and 65 years scheduled for elective surgery under general anesthesia underwent AFOI under conscious sedation with DEX. After locally anesthetizing the airway and applying a cervical collar, patients either received DEX 1 μg/kg over 10 min followed by 0.7 μg/kg/h maintenance infusion or normal saline in the same dose and rate during AFOI. Targeted sedation (Ramsay sedation score [RSS] ≥2) during AFOI was maintained with midazolam [MDZ] in both groups. Statistical Analysis was performed using unpaired Student's t-test, Chi-square test, Mann-Whitney test and Wilcoxon-w test. Results: The total number of patients requiring MDZ and the mean dose of MDZ required to achieve targeted sedation (RSS ≥2) was significantly less in DEX group compared to the placebo group (P < 0.001). Similarly, patient satisfaction score, heart rate, systolic, diastolic and mean arterial pressure and respiratory parameters were significantly better in DEX group (P < 0.001). Postintubation arousability in the two groups was comparable (P = 0.29). Conclusions: Dexmedetomidine provides optimum sedation without compromising airway or hemodynamic instability with better patient tolerance and satisfaction for AFOI. It also preserves patient arousability for the postintubation neurological assessment. PMID:27006542

  5. Difficult Airway Society 2015 guidelines for management of unanticipated difficult intubation in adults.

    PubMed

    Frerk, C; Mitchell, V S; McNarry, A F; Mendonca, C; Bhagrath, R; Patel, A; O'Sullivan, E P; Woodall, N M; Ahmad, I

    2015-12-01

    These guidelines provide a strategy to manage unanticipated difficulty with tracheal intubation. They are founded on published evidence. Where evidence is lacking, they have been directed by feedback from members of the Difficult Airway Society and based on expert opinion. These guidelines have been informed by advances in the understanding of crisis management; they emphasize the recognition and declaration of difficulty during airway management. A simplified, single algorithm now covers unanticipated difficulties in both routine intubation and rapid sequence induction. Planning for failed intubation should form part of the pre-induction briefing, particularly for urgent surgery. Emphasis is placed on assessment, preparation, positioning, preoxygenation, maintenance of oxygenation, and minimizing trauma from airway interventions. It is recommended that the number of airway interventions are limited, and blind techniques using a bougie or through supraglottic airway devices have been superseded by video- or fibre-optically guided intubation. If tracheal intubation fails, supraglottic airway devices are recommended to provide a route for oxygenation while reviewing how to proceed. Second-generation devices have advantages and are recommended. When both tracheal intubation and supraglottic airway device insertion have failed, waking the patient is the default option. If at this stage, face-mask oxygenation is impossible in the presence of muscle relaxation, cricothyroidotomy should follow immediately. Scalpel cricothyroidotomy is recommended as the preferred rescue technique and should be practised by all anaesthetists. The plans outlined are designed to be simple and easy to follow. They should be regularly rehearsed and made familiar to the whole theatre team. PMID:26556848

  6. Difficult Airway Society 2015 guidelines for management of unanticipated difficult intubation in adults†

    PubMed Central

    Frerk, C.; Mitchell, V. S.; McNarry, A. F.; Mendonca, C.; Bhagrath, R.; Patel, A.; O'Sullivan, E. P.; Woodall, N. M.; Ahmad, I.

    2015-01-01

    These guidelines provide a strategy to manage unanticipated difficulty with tracheal intubation. They are founded on published evidence. Where evidence is lacking, they have been directed by feedback from members of the Difficult Airway Society and based on expert opinion. These guidelines have been informed by advances in the understanding of crisis management; they emphasize the recognition and declaration of difficulty during airway management. A simplified, single algorithm now covers unanticipated difficulties in both routine intubation and rapid sequence induction. Planning for failed intubation should form part of the pre-induction briefing, particularly for urgent surgery. Emphasis is placed on assessment, preparation, positioning, preoxygenation, maintenance of oxygenation, and minimizing trauma from airway interventions. It is recommended that the number of airway interventions are limited, and blind techniques using a bougie or through supraglottic airway devices have been superseded by video- or fibre-optically guided intubation. If tracheal intubation fails, supraglottic airway devices are recommended to provide a route for oxygenation while reviewing how to proceed. Second-generation devices have advantages and are recommended. When both tracheal intubation and supraglottic airway device insertion have failed, waking the patient is the default option. If at this stage, face-mask oxygenation is impossible in the presence of muscle relaxation, cricothyroidotomy should follow immediately. Scalpel cricothyroidotomy is recommended as the preferred rescue technique and should be practised by all anaesthetists. The plans outlined are designed to be simple and easy to follow. They should be regularly rehearsed and made familiar to the whole theatre team. PMID:26556848

  7. Comparison between dexmedetomidine and fentanyl on intubation conditions during awake fiberoptic bronchoscopy: A randomized double-blind prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Mondal, Sudeshna; Ghosh, Sarmila; Bhattacharya, Susmita; Choudhury, Brojen; Mallick, Suchismita; Prasad, Anu

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims: Various drugs are used for providing favorable intubation conditions during awake fiberoptic intubation (AFOI). However, most of them cause respiratory depression and airway obstruction leading to hypoxemia. The aim of this study was to compare intubation conditions, and incidence of desaturation between dexmedetomidine and fentanyl group during AFOI. Material and Methods: This randomized double-blind prospective study was conducted on a total of 60 patients scheduled for elective laparotomies who were randomly allocated into two groups: Group A received dexmedetomidine 1 mcg/kg and Group B received fentanyl 2 mcg/kg over 10 min. Patients in both groups received glycopyrrolate 0.2 mg intravenous, nebulization with 2% lidocaine 4 ml over 20 min and 10% lidocaine spray before undergoing AFOI. Adequacy of intubation condition was evaluated by cough score and post-intubation score. Incidence of desaturation, hemodynamic changes and sedation using Ramsay sedation scale (RSS) were noted and compared between two groups. Results: Cough Score (1-4), post-intubation Score (1-3) and RSS (1-6) were significantly favorable (P < 0.0001) along with minimum hemodynamic responses to intubation (P < 0.05) and less oxygen desaturation (P < 0.0001) in Group A than Group B. Conclusion: Dexmedetomidine is more effective than fentanyl in producing better intubation conditions, sedation along with hemodynamic stability and less desaturation during AFOI. PMID:25948903

  8. Achieving Despite Adversity: Why Are Some Schools Successful in Spite of the Obstacles They Face? A Study of the Characteristics of Effective and Less Effective Elementary Schools in West Virginia Using Qualitative and Quantitative Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Mary F.

    A study of West Virginia elementary schools examined why similar types of elementary students differ greatly in academic achievement. In the first phase of the study, a comparison of 33 high- and 33 low-achieving elementary schools in West Virginia found that low-achieving schools had 2.5 times more low-income students than high-achieving schools,…

  9. Evaluation of intubating conditions after rocuronium bromide in adults induced with propofol or thiopentone sodium

    PubMed Central

    Md Shahnawaz, Moazzam; Shahjahan, Bano; Sarwar, Siddiqui Suhail

    2011-01-01

    Aim: The aims of present study were to compare the propofol and rocuronium with thiopentone and rocuronium in terms of clinically satisfactory intubating conditions and to co-relate intubating conditions with degree of paralysis in adductor pollicis muscle using train of four ratio (TOFR). The intubating conditions were evaluated after rocuronium bromide 0.6 mg kg-1 at 60 s. Materials and Methods: 60 patients of ASA grades I-II of either sex, age 18-50 years, undergoing various elective surgical procedures were randomly divided into two groups, propofol rocuronium (PR group) and thiopentone rocuronium (TR group) of 30 patients in each. In the PR group, patients received propofol 2.5 mg kg-1 and rocuronium 0.6 mg kg-1; in TR group, patients received thiopentone 5 mg kg-1 and rocuronium 0.6 mg kg-1. In all patients the intubating conditions were evaluated by the observer at 60 s. TOFR was measured at the time of intubation by an assistant. Results: In the PR group the number of the patients placed in intubating conditions grades I, II, III and IV were 40%, 36.67%, 13.33% and 10% and their mean TOFR were 31.8±17.9%, 61.8±;14.6%, 61.7±27.9%, and 78.3±5.7% respectively. While in theTR group the number of patients placed in intubating condition grade I, II, and III were 60%, 26.67%, and 13.33% and their mean TOFR , 41.2±28.3%, 68.0±10.9% and 78.7±6.8%, respectively. There was no patient in grade lV in theTR group. Conclusion: The clinical intubating conditions and degree of paralysis of adductor pollicis muscle after rocuronium 0.6 mg kg-1 at 60 s in adults induced with propofol or thiopentone sodium are comparable. PMID:21772683

  10. Comparison of McGrath Series 3 and Macintosh Laryngoscopes for Tracheal Intubation in Patients With Normal Airway by Inexperienced Anesthetists

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zi-Jia; Yi, Jie; Guo, Wen-Juan; Ma, Chao; Huang, Yu-Guang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Difficult and failed intubations account for the major causes of morbidity and mortality in current anesthetic practice. Several devices including McGrath Series 3 videolaryngoscope are available which may facilitate tracheal intubation by improving view of the larynx compared with Macintosh blade laryngoscopy. But no studies demonstrate whether McGrath Series 3 performs better than Macintosh laryngoscope in normal airway intubations by inexperienced anesthetists so far. We therefore designed this randomized controlled study to compare McGrath with Macintosh in routine tracheal intubation performed by inexperienced anesthetists. In total, 180 adult patients with normal-appearing airways requiring orotracheal intubation for elective surgery were randomly allocated to be intubated by 9 inexperienced anesthetists with McGrath or Macintosh. The primary outcome was time to intubation. Ease of intubation was assessed by a 5-point ordinal scale. Intubation attempts/failures, best laryngoscopy view using the Cormack–Lehane grade, associated complications and hemodynamic changes during intubation were recorded. We found that there was no significant difference between McGrath and Macintosh in the median time to intubation (P = 0.46); the Cormack–Lehane views attained using McGrath were superior (P < 0.001); the difference of ease of intubation was statistically significant (P = 0.01). No serious trauma occurred in both groups. And there was statistically significant difference in the systolic blood pressure changes between 2 groups (P < 0.05). We demonstrated that in orotracheal intubation in patients with normal airway by inexperienced anesthetists, McGrath compared with the Macintosh allows superior glottis views, greater ease of intubation, less complications, and hemodynamic changes with noninferior intubation time. And it remained a potential selection for inexperienced anesthetists in uncomplicated intubation. PMID:26765472

  11. Comparison of McGrath Series 3 and Macintosh Laryngoscopes for Tracheal Intubation in Patients With Normal Airway by Inexperienced Anesthetists: A Randomized Study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zi-Jia; Yi, Jie; Guo, Wen-Juan; Ma, Chao; Huang, Yu-Guang

    2016-01-01

    Difficult and failed intubations account for the major causes of morbidity and mortality in current anesthetic practice. Several devices including McGrath Series 3 videolaryngoscope are available which may facilitate tracheal intubation by improving view of the larynx compared with Macintosh blade laryngoscopy. But no studies demonstrate whether McGrath Series 3 performs better than Macintosh laryngoscope in normal airway intubations by inexperienced anesthetists so far. We therefore designed this randomized controlled study to compare McGrath with Macintosh in routine tracheal intubation performed by inexperienced anesthetists.In total, 180 adult patients with normal-appearing airways requiring orotracheal intubation for elective surgery were randomly allocated to be intubated by 9 inexperienced anesthetists with McGrath or Macintosh. The primary outcome was time to intubation. Ease of intubation was assessed by a 5-point ordinal scale. Intubation attempts/failures, best laryngoscopy view using the Cormack-Lehane grade, associated complications and hemodynamic changes during intubation were recorded.We found that there was no significant difference between McGrath and Macintosh in the median time to intubation (P = 0.46); the Cormack-Lehane views attained using McGrath were superior (P < 0.001); the difference of ease of intubation was statistically significant (P = 0.01). No serious trauma occurred in both groups. And there was statistically significant difference in the systolic blood pressure changes between 2 groups (P < 0.05).We demonstrated that in orotracheal intubation in patients with normal airway by inexperienced anesthetists, McGrath compared with the Macintosh allows superior glottis views, greater ease of intubation, less complications, and hemodynamic changes with noninferior intubation time. And it remained a potential selection for inexperienced anesthetists in uncomplicated intubation.

  12. Determination of anabolic steroids in human urine by automated in-tube solid-phase microextraction coupled with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Saito, Keita; Yagi, Katsuharu; Ishizaki, Atsushi; Kataoka, Hiroyuki

    2010-09-01

    A simple, rapid and sensitive method was developed for determining the presence of seven anabolic steroids (boldenone, nandrolone, testosterone, methyltestosterone, epiandrosterone, androsterone, and atnozolol) in human urine. Glucuronide-conjugates of these compounds were hydrolyzed with beta-glucuronidase. The anabolic steroids were analyzed by on-line in-tube solid-phase microextraction (SPME) coupled with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). The steroids were separated within 14 min by high performance liquid chromatography using a Chromolith RP-18e column and 5 mM ammonium formate/methanol (35/65, v/v) as a mobile phase at a flow rate of 1.0 mL/min. Electrospray ionization conditions in the positive ion mode were optimized for the MS detection of these compounds. The optimum in-tube SPME conditions were 20 draw/eject cycles with a sample size of 40 microL using a Supel-Q PLOT capillary column for the extraction. The extracted compounds could be desorbed readily from the capillary column by flow of the mobile phase, and no carryover was observed. Using the in-tube SPME LC-MS with SIM mode detection, good linearity of the calibration curve (r>0.995) was obtained in the concentration range of 0.5-20 ng/mL, except for stanozolol. The detection limits (S/N=3) of anabolic steroids were in the range 9-182 pg/mL and the proposed method showed 20-33-fold higher sensitivity than the direct injection method. The within-day and between-day precisions were below 4.0% and 7.3% (n=5), respectively. This method was applied successfully to the analysis of urine samples without the interference peaks. The recovery rates of anabolic steroids spiked into urine samples were above 85%. This method is useful to analyze the urinary levels of these compounds in anti-doping tests.

  13. The effect of the exit condition on the performance of intube condensers

    SciTech Connect

    Rabas, T.J.; Arman, B.

    1995-07-01

    Data collected from the open literature plus some new, unpublished data will be used to show that the exit condition can change the flow regimes, introduce certain types of instabilities, and alter flooding velocities with intube condensation. The major orientations will be considered: horizontal, vertical with vapor downflow, and vertical with vapor upflow (refluxing).

  14. [Anterior cervical spine hyperostosis--a rare cause of difficult intubation in emergency].

    PubMed

    Stefan, Monica; Ciupilan, Corina; Mella, Corina; Scutariu, M D

    2011-01-01

    DISH (Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis) of cervical spine is a rare condition which causes dysphagia in 23% of cases and occasionally dyspnea. The authors report the case of a 74 years old male, known with progressive dysphagia and recurrent episodes of dysphonia and dyspnea, who suffered a sudden episode of respiratory distress that need finaly tracheotomy after ineffective attempts of orotracheal intubation. PMID:22276454

  15. Comparison of the intubating laryngeal mask airway and laryngeal tube placement during manual in-line stabilisation of the neck.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, R; Nagata, O; Kamata, K; Yamagata, K; Sessler, D I; Ozaki, M

    2005-02-01

    We compared the placement of the laryngeal tube (LT) with the intubating laryngeal mask airway (ILMA) in 51 patients whose necks were stabilised by manual in-line traction. Following induction of anaesthesia and neuromuscular blockade, the LT and ILMA were inserted consecutively in a randomised, crossover design. Using pressure-controlled ventilation (20 cmH(2)O inspiratory pressure), we measured insertion attempts, time to establish positive-pressure ventilation, tidal volume, gastric insufflation, and minimum airway pressure at which gas leaked around the cuff. Data were compared using Wilcoxon signed-rank tests; p < 0.05 was considered significant. Insertion was found to be more difficult with the LT (successful at first attempt in 16 patients) than with the ILMA (successful at first attempt in 42 patients, p < 0.0001). Time required for insertion was longer for the LT (28 [23-35] s, median [interquartile range]) than for the ILMA (20 [15-25] s, p = 0.0009). Tidal volume was less for the LT (440 [290-670] ml) than for the ILMA (630 [440-750] ml, p = 0.013). Minimum airway pressure at which gas leak occurred and incidence of gastric insufflation were similar with two devices. In patients whose necks were stabilised with manual in-line traction, insertion of the ILMA was easier and quicker than insertion of the LT and tidal volume was greater with the ILMA than the LT.

  16. Comparison of Mallampati test with lower jaw protrusion maneuver in predicting difficult laryngoscopy and intubation

    PubMed Central

    Ul Haq, Muhammad Irfan; Ullah, Hameed

    2013-01-01

    Background: Failure to maintain a patent airway is one of the commonest causes of anesthesia-related morbidity and mortality. Many protocols, algorithms, and different combinations of tested methods for airway assessment have been developed to predict difficult laryngoscopy and intubation. The reported incidence of a difficult intubation varies from 1.5% to 13%. The objective of this study was to compare Mallampati test (MT) with lower jaw protrusion (LJP) maneuver in predicting difficult laryngoscopy and intubation. Materials and Methods: Seven hundred and sixty patients were included in the study. All the patients underwent MT and LJP maneuver for their airway assessment. After a standardized technique of induction of anesthesia, primary anesthetist performed laryngoscopy and graded it according to the grades described by Cormack and Lehane. Sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) were calculated for both these tests with 95% confidence interval (CI) using conventional laryngoscopy as gold standard. Area under curve was also calculated for both, MT and LJP maneuver. A P < 0.05 was taken as significant. Results: LJP maneuver had higher sensitivity (95.9% vs. 27.1%), NPV (98.7% vs. 82.0%), and accuracy (90.1% vs. 80.3%) when compared to MT in predicting difficult laryngoscopy and intubation. Both tests, however, had similar specificity and PPV. There was marked difference in the positive and negative likelihood ratio between LJP and MT. Similarly, the area under the curve favored LJP maneuver over MT. Conclusion: The results of this study show that LJP maneuver is a better test to predict difficult laryngoscopy and tracheal intubation. We recommend the addition of this maneuver to the routine preoperative evaluation of airway. PMID:24106353

  17. In-tube extraction of volatile organic compounds from aqueous samples: an economical alternative to purge and trap enrichment.

    PubMed

    Laaks, Jens; Jochmann, Maik A; Schilling, Beat; Schmidt, Torsten C

    2010-09-15

    A novel in-tube extraction device (ITEX 2) for headspace sampling was evaluated for GC/MS analysis of aqueous samples. Twenty compounds of regulatory and drinking water quality importance were analyzed, including halogenated hydrocarbons, BTEX compounds (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylenes), fuel oxygenates, geosmin, and 2-methylisoborneol. Five commercially available sorbent traps were compared for their compound specific extraction yield. On the basis of the results, a mixed bed trap was prepared and evaluated. The extraction parameters were optimized to yield maximum sensitivity within the time of a GC run, to avoid unnecessary downtime of the system. Method detection limits of 1-10 ng L(-1) were achieved for volatile organic compounds (VOCs), which is much lower than demands by regulatory limit values. The performance of the ITEX system is similar to that of purge and trap systems, but it requires lower sample volumes and is less prone to contamination, much simpler, more flexible, and affordable. Average relative standard deviations below 10% were achieved for all analytes, and recoveries from spiked tap water samples were between 90% and 103%, mostly. The extraction is nonexhaustive, removing a fraction of 7% to 55% of the target compounds, depending on the air-water partitioning coefficients. The method was also tested with nonsynthetic samples, including tap, pond, and reservoir water and different soft drinks.

  18. Achieving True Consensus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Napier, Rod; Sanaghan, Patrick

    2002-01-01

    Uses the example of Vermont's Middlebury College to explore the challenges and possibilities of achieving consensus about institutional change. Discusses why, unlike in this example, consensus usually fails, and presents four demands of an effective consensus process. Includes a list of "test" questions on successful collaboration. (EV)

  19. Double-lumen tube intubation using video laryngoscopy causes a milder cardiovascular response compared to classic direct laryngoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Wei; Tian, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether there is a clinically relevant difference between the circulatory responses to double-lumen tube intubation (DLTI) with the GlideScope video laryngoscope versus the Macintosh direct laryngoscope. Methods: Eighty adult patients requiring double-lumen tubes for thoracic surgery were randomly and equally allocated to either a Macintosh direct laryngoscope group (DL group, n = 40) or a Glide Scope video laryngoscope group (GS group, n = 40). DLTI was performed after airway evaluations and induction of anesthesia. Systolic blood pressure (SBP) and heart rate (HR) were recorded before induction (baseline values), immediately before intubation (post-induction values), at intubation and after intubation. Rate-pressure-product (RPP), and the areas under SBP- and HR-time curves were calculated. All data obtained by the two devices were compared. Results: After laryngoscope insertion, SBP of DL and GS groups changed significantly differently (13.1% vs. 4.6%, P< 0.001), while HR changed similarly (17.2% vs. 14.6%, P = 0.074). One minute after intubation, both SBP and HR significantly increased in both groups (SBP: 11.6% vs. 11.9%; HR: 18.4% vs. 10.8%), but there were no significant differences between the two groups. RPP significantly increased in both groups after laryngoscope insertion (32.6%, P=0.001; 18.2%, P=0.002), and there was a significant difference between the two groups (P =0.001). Throughout intubation, the areas under SBP-time curves had a significant difference between the two groups (P = 0.042), while those under HR-time curves did not differ significantly (P=0.06). Conclusion: The intubation response was most significant upon laryngoscope insertion during the whole intubation process. The GlideScope video laryngoscope induced milder circulatory fluctuations than the Macintosh direct laryngoscope did, suggesting that DLTI using video laryngoscopy can help reduce the cardiovascular response to intubation. PMID:27022341

  20. [Intubation Using a Double-lumen Tube with a Combination of Fiberoptic Bronchoscope and the Glidescope in a Patient with Difficult Airway].

    PubMed

    Tateura, Nao; Sato, Hiromi; Arai, Takero; Asai, Takashi; Okuda, Yasuhisa

    2015-08-01

    A 54-year-old man with lung cancer was scheduled for thoracoscopic upper lobe resection under general anesthesia. About half a year previously, he had undergone surgery for oropharyngeal cancer and tongue cancer. As a result of the surgery, elasticity of the neck skin bending of the neck were restricted (Mallampati classification IV). A narrow-bored tracheostomy tube (speech cannula) was inserted. In the operating room, the tip of a 5.0 mm ID standard tube was inserted from the tracheostomy tube, and connected to a breathing circuit. Anesthesia was induced with inhalation of sevoflurane, followed by intravenous propofol, fentanyl, and rocuronium. Four anesthesiologists were required to intubate the trachea. One person held the tracheal tube placed in the tracheotomy tube. The second person performed jaw thrusting. The third person inserted the Glidescope to shift the transplanted tongue to the side. It was then possible for the forth anesthesiologist to manage to see the glottis using a fiberoptic bronchoscope, and a double-lumen tube (DLT) could be inserted to the trachea orally. Inserting a DLT over the fiberoptic bronchoscope is a blind method, but we felt that combined with a variety of tools such as video laryngoscope, the success rate in intubation will increase. PMID:26442413

  1. Success in a Hurry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Harold L., Sr.

    2015-01-01

    Although a young program, the North Carolina A&T Honors Program illustrates how quickly and successfully honors can achieve its goals of providing a quality education to its high-achieving students, and how these students can benefit academically and personally from the experiences that honors provides for them. This article provides a brief…

  2. Determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in food samples by automated on-line in-tube solid-phase microextraction coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography-fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Ishizaki, A; Saito, K; Hanioka, N; Narimatsu, S; Kataoka, H

    2010-08-27

    A simple and sensitive automated method, consisting of in-tube solid-phase microextraction (SPME) coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography-fluorescence detection (HPLC-FLD), was developed for the determination of 15 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in food samples. PAHs were separated within 15 min by HPLC using a Zorbax Eclipse PAH column with a water/acetonitrile gradient elution program as the mobile phase. The optimum in-tube SPME conditions were 20 draw/eject cycles of 40 microL of sample using a CP-Sil 19CB capillary column as an extraction device. Low- and high-molecular weight PAHs were extracted effectively onto the capillary coating from 5% and 30% methanol solutions, respectively. The extracted PAHs were readily desorbed from the capillary by passage of the mobile phase, and no carryover was observed. Using the in-tube SPME HPLC-FLD method, good linearity of the calibration curve (r>0.9972) was obtained in the concentration range of 0.05-2.0 ng/mL, and the detection limits (S/N=3) of PAHs were 0.32-4.63 pg/mL. The in-tube SPME method showed 18-47 fold higher sensitivity than the direct injection method. The intra-day and inter-day precision (relative standard deviations) for a 1 ng/mL PAH mixture were below 5.1% and 7.6% (n=5), respectively. This method was applied successfully to the analysis of tea products and dried food samples without interference peaks, and the recoveries of PAHs spiked into the tea samples were >70%. Low-molecular weight PAHs such as naphthalene and pyrene were detected in many foods, and carcinogenic benzo[a]pyrene, at relatively high concentrations, was also detected in some black tea samples. This method was also utilized to assess the release of PAHs from tea leaves into the liquor.

  3. Determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in food samples by automated on-line in-tube solid-phase microextraction coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography-fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Ishizaki, A; Saito, K; Hanioka, N; Narimatsu, S; Kataoka, H

    2010-08-27

    A simple and sensitive automated method, consisting of in-tube solid-phase microextraction (SPME) coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography-fluorescence detection (HPLC-FLD), was developed for the determination of 15 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in food samples. PAHs were separated within 15 min by HPLC using a Zorbax Eclipse PAH column with a water/acetonitrile gradient elution program as the mobile phase. The optimum in-tube SPME conditions were 20 draw/eject cycles of 40 microL of sample using a CP-Sil 19CB capillary column as an extraction device. Low- and high-molecular weight PAHs were extracted effectively onto the capillary coating from 5% and 30% methanol solutions, respectively. The extracted PAHs were readily desorbed from the capillary by passage of the mobile phase, and no carryover was observed. Using the in-tube SPME HPLC-FLD method, good linearity of the calibration curve (r>0.9972) was obtained in the concentration range of 0.05-2.0 ng/mL, and the detection limits (S/N=3) of PAHs were 0.32-4.63 pg/mL. The in-tube SPME method showed 18-47 fold higher sensitivity than the direct injection method. The intra-day and inter-day precision (relative standard deviations) for a 1 ng/mL PAH mixture were below 5.1% and 7.6% (n=5), respectively. This method was applied successfully to the analysis of tea products and dried food samples without interference peaks, and the recoveries of PAHs spiked into the tea samples were >70%. Low-molecular weight PAHs such as naphthalene and pyrene were detected in many foods, and carcinogenic benzo[a]pyrene, at relatively high concentrations, was also detected in some black tea samples. This method was also utilized to assess the release of PAHs from tea leaves into the liquor. PMID:20637468

  4. Pneumothorax after tracheostomy closure with successful nonsurgical management.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bradley H; Sarah, Gabriel E; Rosbe, Kristina W; Alemi, Sean

    2016-06-01

    A 3-year-old girl presented for routine closure of her tracheostomy site. She was intubated easily for the procedure, and the wound was closed with a drain in place. In recovery, the mother noticed fullness in the patient's submandibular region, and on examination, the girl had subcutaneous emphysema in the neck bilaterally. She returned to the operating room for exploration, and air was released from the surgical site. The wound was again closed with a drain in place, and the patient was extubated uneventfully. After arriving to the pediatric intensive care unit for monitoring, the patient acutely developed respiratory distress and was found to have pneumomediastinum and pneumothorax and was emergently intubated. She was observed closely, and the following day, the pneumothorax improved, and she successfully extubated without further complication. PMID:27185690

  5. Tracheal laceration as a complication of out-of-hospital emergency tracheal intubation in a patient with COPD.

    PubMed

    Üzümcügil, Filiz; Babaoğlu, Gülçin; Denizci, Ezgi; Sarıcaoğlu, Fatma; Kanbak, Meral

    2015-01-01

    Tracheobronchial injuries related to emergency endotracheal intubations are reported to be associated with an increased risk of mortality. Many mechanical risk factors may become more frequent in an emergency setting leading to such injuries. Aside from these factors that may complicate endotracheal intubation, this procedure is not recommended a priori for ventilation due to the resulting interruptions in external chest compressions, by 2010 cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and external chest compression guidelines. We present a 78-year-old woman with known chronic obstructive pulmonary disease who had a tracheal laceration after emergency endotracheal intubation during CPR. Thorax computed tomography revealed an overinflated tube cuff. The trachea was repaired surgically; however, our patient died on the fourth postoperative day due to multiple-organ failure. Prehospital providers must remain especially vigilant to priorities in airway management during CPR and aware of the dangers associated with field tracheal intubation under less than ideal conditions.

  6. Submental intubation in paediatric oral and maxillofacial surgery: Review of the literature and report of four cases

    PubMed Central

    Taiwo, Olanrewaju Abdurrazaq; Ibikunle, Adebayo Aremu; Braimah, Ramat Oyebunmi; Suleiman, Musa Kallamu

    2015-01-01

    Several oral and maxillofacial surgery procedures require the simultaneous use of the oropharyngeal space by both the surgeons and the anaesthetists. This poses a lot of challenges especially in optimally securing the airway. Nasotracheal intubation or tracheostomy with their significant morbidity might even be contraindicated in these scenarios owing to several factors elucidated in the literature. Submental endotracheal intubation might be the last resort in adequately protecting the airway without interfering with the surgery. It also permits concurrent access to the dental occlusion and nasal pyramid without the risk associated with nasal intubation and morbidity of tracheostomy. Contraindications include patients who require long periods of assisted ventilation and a severe traumatic wound on the floor of the mouth. Complications include localised infection and sepsis, poor wound healing or scarring, and post-operative salivary fistula. The rationale for this study is to describe the indications, contraindications and the technique of submental endotracheal intubation as performed in our hospital. PMID:26712300

  7. Success in Primary School. Success in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Academy for Educational Development, 2010

    2010-01-01

    A quality education system is not measured solely by national test scores, but by whether all students are successful in primary school. This simply stated goal is surprisingly difficult to achieve where substantial numbers of children are at risk of failing to complete a primary education. This paper explores the challenges and the diverse…

  8. Evaluation of the Hemodynamic Response to Endotracheal Intubation Comparing the Airtraq® with Macintosh Laryngoscopes in Cardiac Surgical Patients

    PubMed Central

    Gavrilovska-Brzanov, Aleksandra; Jarallah, Mohhamed Al; Cogliati, Andrea; Mojsova-Mijovska, Maja; Mijuskovic, Dragan; Slaveski, Dimce

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Cardiac patients are more prone to develop hemodynamic instability on induction of anesthesia and endotracheal intubation. The Airtraq® optical laryngoscope is a single-use rigid video laryngoscope that has been developed to facilitate tracheal intubation. There are limited studies comparing differences in the circulatory responses to Airtraq® and direct Macintosh larynngoscopy in cardiac patients. Aim: The purpose of our study was to evaluate whether there was clinically significant difference between the hemodynamic response to orotracheal intubation guided by either of the two devices (Airtraq® and Macintosh laryngoscopes) in patients who underwent coronary artery bypass grafting surgery. Material and methods: In this clinical study we analyzed the hemodynamic response to endotracheal intubation performed with Airtraq® or Macintosh laryngoscopes in patients who underwent elective coronary artery bypass graft surgery under general anesthesia. Results: We analyzed: blood pressure (systolic, diastolic, mean), heart rate and peripheral oxygen saturation (all notified before induction in anesthesia, immediately after induction, at the time of intubation and thereafter one and five minutes after intubation). We also recorded the maximal values of blood pressure and heart rate, as well as calculated the product of heart rate and systolic blood pressure. There were statistically significant differences in the hemodynamic response between the groups. At the time of intubation, there was significant inter-group difference in heart rate, systolic, diastolic and mean blood pressure. Endotracheal intubation with Macintosh laryngoscope was accompanied by significant increase in blood pressure and heart rate compared to Airtraq® group. Conclusion: The Airtraq® laryngoscope performed better than the Macintosh laryngoscope in terms of hemodynamic to the patient undergoing routine coronary artery bypass graft surgery. PMID:26635435

  9. Associations Between Prolonged Intubation and Developing Post-extubation Dysphagia and Aspiration Pneumonia in Non-neurologic Critically Ill Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min Jung; Park, Young Sook; Song, You Hong

    2015-01-01

    Objective To identify the associations between the duration of endotracheal intubation and developing post-extubational supraglottic and infraglottic aspiration (PEA) and subsequent aspiration pneumonia. Methods This was a retrospective observational study from January 2009 to November 2014 of all adult patients who had non-neurologic critical illness, required endotracheal intubation and were referred for videofluoroscopic swallowing study. Demographic information, intensive care unit (ICU) admission diagnosis, severity of critical illness, duration of endotracheal intubation, length of stay in ICU, presence of PEA and severity of dysphagia were reviewed. Results Seventy-four patients were enrolled and their PEA frequency was 59%. Patients with PEA had significantly longer endotracheal intubation durations than did those without (median [interquartile range]: 15 [9-21] vs. 10 [6-15] days; p=0.02). In multivariate logistic regression analysis, the endotracheal intubation duration was significantly associated with PEA (odds ratio, 1.09; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.01-1.18; p=0.04). Spearman correlation analysis of intubation duration and dysphagia severity showed a positive linear association (r=0.282, p=0.02). The areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUCs) of endotracheal intubation duration for developing PEA and aspiration pneumonia were 0.665 (95% CI, 0.542-0.788; p=0.02) and 0.727 (95% CI, 0.614-0.840; p=0.001), respectively. Conclusion In non-neurologic critically ill patients, the duration of endotracheal intubation was independently associated with PEA development. Additionally, the duration was positively correlated with dysphagia severity and may be helpful for identifying patients who require a swallowing evaluation after extubation. PMID:26605174

  10. [Sedated non-intubated bilateral thoracoscopic sympathectomy R3-R4].

    PubMed

    Mier-Odriozola, José Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Non-intubated thoracic surgery entails procedures performed through regional anesthesia method in awake or mildly sedated, spontaneously ventilating patients. This method represents advantages for the cardiovascular system, and reduces the orotracheal trauma, postoperative atelectasis, and pneumonia. It also possibly reduces costs. Other theoretical advantages are: easier acceptance of surgery, attenuated stress hormone and immune response, and possibly a better survival in oncological surgery. We show a 34-year-old woman with sever palmar-axillary hyperhidrosis. We performed the procedure with local anesthesia (ropivacaine 2 mg/ml) 5 ml in each wound trocar; 20 ml inside the thoracic cavity. The patient was mildly sedated with fentanyl and dexmedetomidine. The procedure was very simple, the patient was included in an outpatient program 90 minutes after the surgery. We conclude that sympathectomy with a non-intubated patient is safe and could be the beginning of other kinds of more complex procedures. PMID:27160623

  11. [Preclinical management of accidental methadone intoxication of a 4-year-old girl. Antagonist or intubation?].

    PubMed

    Hainer, C; Bernhard, M; Gries, A

    2004-10-01

    We report on the preclinical management of a 4-year-old child who was found in a comatose condition with respiratory failure after accidental ingestion of methadone. Emergency airway management was carried out with endotracheal intubation instead of administering the antagonist naloxone. The child could be extubated 12 h later and was released from hospital after 3 days with no neurological symptoms. The authors attempt to formulate an algorithm for the preclinical management of opioid intoxication with reference to the literature and own experience. Endotracheal intubation seems to be superior to the use of the antagonist naloxone, especially in a critical situation. This is the only way to ensure a rapid oxygenation with adequate airway protection and with the simultaneous avoidance of the side-effects of naloxone. A restrictive and critical administration of the opioid antagonist naloxone is recommended when there is suspicion of opioid ingestion but no signs of intoxication. PMID:15278196

  12. Arytenoid dislocation related to an uneventful endotracheal intubation: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Senoglu, Nimet; Oksuz, Hafize; Ugur, Nadiye; Dogan, Zafer; Kahraman, Ali

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Invasive methods currently applied to the respiratory tract may result in impaired movement of the cricoarytenoid joint with hoarseness and immobility of the vocal ligament. Hoarseness after tracheal intubation is reported as a high incidence in patients who receive general anaesthesia. In most cases, the symptoms are temporary and improve within several days. We report this case for emphasizing that early diagnosis of arytenoid cartilage dislocation is important even in nontraumatic cases. Case presentation We present the case of a 19-year-old Caucasian male who developed arytenoid cartilage dislocation associated with uneventful endotracheal intubation and anesthesia. Conclusion Arytenoid subluxation should be considered whenever any of the symptoms mentioned occur following endolaryngeal manipulation, and they become persistent, as recovery becomes difficult if appropriate treatment is not started immediately. PMID:18937836

  13. [Tracheal resection for post-intubation subglottic stenosis in a patient with granulomatosis with polyanaiitis (Wegener)].

    PubMed

    Stoica, Radu; Negru, Irina; Matache, Radu; MirunaTodor

    2014-01-01

    Granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA or Wegener) is a systemic autoimmune disease with inflammation of small- and medium-size vessels. It can affect practically any organ or system, but renal, respiratory andjoint systems are most frequently damaged. Positive pANCA antibodies can raise the suspicion of diagnosis. Subglottic stenosis is relatively frequent, in a quarter of patients, especially in the third decade women. The case presented is of an 80-year-old woman, recently diagnosed with pulmonary, renal and systemic manifestations of GPA and with a subglottic stenosis rapidly evolving towards endotracheal intubation, tracheostomy with mechanical ventilation and renal failure. Further evolution has been favorable under corticoid therapy. After weaning from the mechanical ventilation and30 days after the suppression of the tracheostomy, the patient developed a tracheal stenosis with mixed etiology, secondary to vasculitis and prolonged intubation with tracheostomy. Tracheal resection with termino-terminal anastomosis was performed in emergency with simple post-operative evolution and without late complications.

  14. [Tracheal resection for post-intubation subglottic stenosis in a patient with granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegener)].

    PubMed

    Stoica, Radu; Negru, Irina; Matache, Radu; MirunaTodor

    2014-01-01

    Granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA or Wegener) is a systemic autoimmune disease with inflammation of small- and medium-size vessels. It can affect practically any organ or system, but renal, respiratory andjoint systems are most frequently damaged. Positive pANCA antibodies can raise the suspicion of diagnosis. Subglottic stenosis is relatively frequent, in a quarter of patients, especially in the third decade women. The case presented is of an 80-year-old woman, recently diagnosed with pulmonary, renal and systemic manifestations of GPA and with a subglottic stenosis rapidly evolving towards endotracheal intubation, tracheostomy with mechanical ventilation and renal failure. Further evolution has been favorable under corticoid therapy. After weaning from the mechanical ventilation and30 days after the suppression of the tracheostomy, the patient developed a tracheal stenosis with mixed etiology, secondary to vasculitis and prolonged intubation with tracheostomy. Tracheal resection with termino-terminal anastomosis was performed in emergency with simple post-operative evolution and without late complications.

  15. [Endoscopic diagnosis, treatment and prevention of intubation related injuries of the larynx and trachea in neurosurgical patients].

    PubMed

    Gasanov, A L; Levitskaia, N N; Pinchuk, T P; Danielian, Sh N; Petrikov, S S; Efremenko, S V

    2013-01-01

    The goal of the study was to assess of efficacy of endoscopic diagnosis, prevention and treatment of intubation related larynx and tracheal injuries in patients with acute neurosurgical pathology and prolonged mechanical ventilation. 199 patients with different neurosurgical pathology were enrolled in the study group. Mean age was 50 +/- 14. Control group consisted of 399 patient. Mean age was 43 +/- 12. Clinical state of patient from both group were similar. Endoscopic method in the study group included revision of airways via nasal route with tracheostomy tube inserted. Larynx and tracheal injuries by endoscopy were identified in 42 patients (33.6%) in the study group and in 12 patients (7.6) in the control group. Such injuries weren't mentioned in 83 patients in study group and in 146 patients of the control group. Tracheal stenosis was developed in the study group in 0,8% of patients, which is by 7,9 times lower than in the control group (6.3%). We consider that this result was achieved due to our approach to treatment and prevention of tracheal stenosis.

  16. Successful systems sustaining change.

    PubMed

    Bullas, Sheila; Bryant, John

    2007-01-01

    Much has been published on the success and particularly the failure of IT projects; still failures are commonplace. This prospective study focused from the outset on assessing risk of failure and addressing critical success factors. The aim was to apply existing methods in a challenging acute care hospital where success demanded rapid achievement of sustainable improvements in clinical and administrative processes. The implementations were part of the English National Programme for IT. The desired outcomes required the integration of accepted tools and techniques to provide a pragmatic approach to systems implementation: Lean, Six Sigma, PRINCE2 and Benefits Management. The outcome and further insights into success and failure of IT projects in healthcare are described. In particular lessons are identified related to the business need for the project and the successful achievement of the required benefits and business change.

  17. I-gel Laryngeal Mask Airway Combined with Tracheal Intubation Attenuate Systemic Stress Response in Patients Undergoing Posterior Fossa Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Chaoliang; Chai, Xiaoqing; Kang, Fang; Huang, Xiang; Hou, Tao; Tang, Fei; Li, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Background. The adverse events induced by intubation and extubation may cause intracranial hemorrhage and increase of intracranial pressure, especially in posterior fossa surgery patients. In this study, we proposed that I-gel combined with tracheal intubation could reduce the stress response of posterior fossa surgery patients. Methods. Sixty-six posterior fossa surgery patients were randomly allocated to receive either tracheal tube intubation (Group TT) or I-gel facilitated endotracheal tube intubation (Group TI). Hemodynamic and respiratory variables, stress and inflammatory response, oxidative stress, anesthesia recovery parameters, and adverse events during emergence were compared. Results. Mean arterial pressure and heart rate were lower in Group TI during intubation and extubation (P < 0.05 versus Group TT). Respiratory variables including peak airway pressure and end-tidal carbon dioxide tension were similar intraoperative, while plasma β-endorphin, cortisol, interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, malondialdehyde concentrations, and blood glucose were significantly lower in Group TI during emergence relative to Group TT. Postoperative bucking and serious hypertensions were seen in Group TT but not in Group TI. Conclusion. Utilization of I-gel combined with endotracheal tube in posterior fossa surgery patients is safe which can yield more stable hemodynamic profile during intubation and emergence and lower inflammatory and oxidative response, leading to uneventful recovery. PMID:26273146

  18. Changes in intraocular pressure following administration of suxamethonium and endotracheal intubation: Influence of dexmedetomidine premedication

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Chandan Kumar; Ray, Manjushree; Sen, Anjana; Hajra, Bimal; Mukherjee, Dipankar; Ghanta, Anil Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Background: Use of suxamethonium is associated with an increase in intraocular pressure (IOP) and may be harmful for patients with penetrating eye injuries. The purpose of our study was to observe the efficacy of dexmedetomidine for prevention of rise in IOP associated with the administration of suxamethonium and endotracheal intubation. Methods: Sixty-six American Society of Anaesthesiologists I or II patients undergoing general anaesthesia for non-ophthalmic surgery were included in this randomized, prospective, clinical study. Patients were allocated into three groups to receive 0.4 μg/kg dexmedetomidine (group D4), 0.6 μg/kg dexmedetomidine (group D6) or normal saline (group C) over a period of 10 min before induction. IOP, heart rate and mean arterial pressure were recorded before and after the premedication, after induction, after suxamethonium injection and after endotracheal intubation. Results: Fall in IOP was observed following administration of dexmedetomidine. IOP increased in all three groups after suxamethonium injection and endotracheal intubation, but it never crossed the baseline value in group D4 as well as in group D6. Fall in mean arterial pressure was noticed after dexmedetomidine infusion, especially in the D6 group. Conclusion: Dexmedetomidine (0.6 μg/kg as well as 0.4 μg/kg body weight) effectively prevents rise of IOP associated with administration of suxamethonium and endotracheal intubation. However, dexmedetomidine 0.6 μg/kg may cause significant hypotension. Thus, dexmedetomidine 0.4 μg/kg may be preferred for prevention of rise in IOP. PMID:22223900

  19. Identification of Legionella Pneumophila in Intubated Patients With TaqMan Real Time PCR

    PubMed Central

    Divan Khosroshahi, Nader; Naserpour Farivar, Taghi; Johari, Pouran

    2015-01-01

    Background: Legionellaceae contains Legionella genus with over 52 species and 64 serogroups. It is one of the most important causes of respiratory disease in human. More than 30% of hospital-acquired pneumonia is caused by Legionella. Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is an infection acquired in hospital wards, particularly in intensive care unit (ICU). This disease approximately affects 9% to 20% of intubated patients. Mortality in these patients varies between 8% and 76%. Legionella is one of the important factors for infection in intubated patients. Objectives: The present study was aimed to investigate the use of molecular methods in diagnosis of infection caused by Legionella pneumophila. Materials and Methods: In this study, 109 samples of lung secretions collected from intubated patients admitted to ICU wards of four university hospitals in a three-month period were examined. Cultivation and Real time Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) methods were used to assess L. pneumophila colonization in these samples. Results: Eleven samples had positive results using real time PCR analysis of 16s rRNA gene fragments specific for L. pneumophila, but according to culture method on specific buffered charcoal-yeast extract medium (BCYE), no positive cases were detected. Of the total positive cases, six were males, one female and four infants. The seven adults aged 40-65 years. Conclusions: Using molecular methods in diagnosis of infection caused by L. pneumophila has a great value because of its high specificity and rapid diagnosis potency. PMID:25834717

  20. Effectiveness of Synchronized Noninvasive Ventilation to Prevent Intubation in Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    Ramos-Navarro, Cristina; Sanchez-Luna, Manuel; Sanz-López, Ester; Maderuelo-Rodriguez, Elena; Zamora-Flores, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Background  Noninvasive ventilation is being increasingly used on preterm infants to reduce ventilator lung injury and bronchopulmonary dysplasia. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of synchronized nasal intermittent positive pressure ventilation (SNIPPV) to prevent intubation in premature infants. Methods  Prospective observational study of SNIPPV use on preterm infants of less than 32 weeks' gestation. All patients were managed using a prospective protocol intended to reduce invasive mechanical ventilation (iMV) use. Previous respiratory status, as well as respiratory outcomes and possible secondary side effects were analyzed. Results  SNIPPV was used on 78 patients: electively to support extubation on 25 ventilator-dependent patients and as a rescue therapy after nasal continuous positive airway pressure failure on 53 patients. For 92% of patients in the elective group and 66% in the rescue group, iMV was avoided over the following 72 hours. No adverse effects were detected, and all patients were in a stable condition even if intubation was eventually needed. Conclusions  The application of SNIPPV in place of or to remove mechanical ventilation avoids intubation in 74.4% of preterm infants with respiratory failure. No adverse effects were detected. PMID:27500013

  1. Effectiveness of Synchronized Noninvasive Ventilation to Prevent Intubation in Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    Ramos-Navarro, Cristina; Sanchez-Luna, Manuel; Sanz-López, Ester; Maderuelo-Rodriguez, Elena; Zamora-Flores, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Background Noninvasive ventilation is being increasingly used on preterm infants to reduce ventilator lung injury and bronchopulmonary dysplasia. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of synchronized nasal intermittent positive pressure ventilation (SNIPPV) to prevent intubation in premature infants. Methods Prospective observational study of SNIPPV use on preterm infants of less than 32 weeks' gestation. All patients were managed using a prospective protocol intended to reduce invasive mechanical ventilation (iMV) use. Previous respiratory status, as well as respiratory outcomes and possible secondary side effects were analyzed. Results SNIPPV was used on 78 patients: electively to support extubation on 25 ventilator-dependent patients and as a rescue therapy after nasal continuous positive airway pressure failure on 53 patients. For 92% of patients in the elective group and 66% in the rescue group, iMV was avoided over the following 72 hours. No adverse effects were detected, and all patients were in a stable condition even if intubation was eventually needed. Conclusions The application of SNIPPV in place of or to remove mechanical ventilation avoids intubation in 74.4% of preterm infants with respiratory failure. No adverse effects were detected. PMID:27500013

  2. Striving for the Best: New Mexico's Need to Strengthen Parent Involvement in Public Schools. NCLB and Recommendations Regarding the Vital Role of Parents and Guardians in Achieving Student and School Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Appleseed, 2008

    2008-01-01

    Parent involvement in New Mexico, and around the nation, is an essential element in the success of students and their schools. This simple point anchors the federal law known as the "No Child Left Behind Act of 2001" ("NCLB"). NCLB establishes state, district and school requirements designed to promote more effective parent involvement. The belief…

  3. Measuring Success: Using Assessments and Accountability To Raise Student Achievement. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Education Reform of the Committee on Education and the Workforce. House of Representatives, One Hundred Seventh Congress, First Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Education and the Workforce.

    The Subcommittee on Education Reform of the House Committee on Education and the Workforce met to hear testimony on using assessments and accountability to raise student achievement. Statements were given by: (1) Major Owens, Congressman from New York; (2) Michael Castle, Congressman from Delaware, Committee Chairman; (3) Edward B. Rust, Jr.,…

  4. On the Road to Success: How States Collaborate and Use Data to Improve Student Outcomes. A Working Paper by the Achieving the Dream Cross-State Data Work Group

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Chris; Borcoman, Gabriela; Chappell-Long, Cheryl; Coperthwaite, Corby A.; Glenn, Darrell; Hutchinson, Tony; Hughes, John; Jenkins, Rick; Jovanovich, Donna; Keller, Jonathan; Klimczak, Benjamin; Schneider, Bill; Stewart, Carmen; Stuart, Debra; Yeager, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Enrollment is rising across the nation's community colleges, but completion rates remain untenably low. Reformers are focusing on the importance of using comprehensive, high-quality data on student progress and completion to bring about change. A core tenet of Achieving the Dream: Community Colleges Count has been to embed a culture of…

  5. Effect of Intravenous Acetaminophen (Paracetamol) on Hemodynamic Parameters Following Endotracheal Tube Intubation and Postoperative Pain in Caesarian Section Surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Soltani, Ghasem; Molkizadeh, Amirmasoud; Amini, Shahram

    2015-01-01

    Background: Use of analgesics, especially opioids, before delivery during cesarean section for preventing hemodynamic changes after endotracheal intubation and postoperative analgesia is limited due to their adverse effects on the neonate. Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of intravenous acetaminophen (paracetamol) in blunting hemodynamic responses to endotracheal intubation and postoperative pain in parturient undergoing cesarean section by general anesthesia. Patients and Methods: Eighty parturients undergoing cesarean section by general anesthesia were randomly divided to receive either 15 mg/kg intravenous paracetamol (n = 40) or normal saline (n = 40) fifteen minutes before endotracheal intubation. Mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) and pulse rates were compared at baseline and after intubation at one minute interval for five minutes between the two groups. The patients were also compared for postoperative pain intensity and analgesic requirement. Results: Patients in the saline group experienced more pain in the recovery room (VAS 7.0 ± 1.24 vs. 6.15 ± 2.27; P value = 0.041) and required more fentanyl intraoperatively (150 µg vs. 87.7 ± 75; P value < 0.01) and meperidine postoperatively (12.88 ± 20.84 mg vs. 1.35 ± 5.73; P value = 0.002) than the paracetamol group. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) changes were similar after intubation in the both groups (P value = 0.71), however, pulse rates showed greater changes following intubation in the saline group (P value = 0.01). Conclusions: Intravenous acetaminophen administered before caesarean section reduced tachycardia after intubation, narcotic drugs administration during and after the operation and reduced pain in PACU. PMID:26705524

  6. Receta para el Exito. Una Guia Actualizada para Padres sobre el Mejoramiento de las Escuelas de Colorado y Logros Estudiantiles (Recipe for Success: An Updated Parents' Guide to Improving Colorado Schools and Student Achievement).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taher, Bonnie; Durr, Pamela

    This Spanish language guide describes ways that parents can help improve student achievement and school quality. It answers such questions as: how to choose the right early-education opportunity for a preschooler; how to make sure a 5-year-old is ready for school; how to help a daughter do well in school; how to work with a daughter's or son's…

  7. Capitol Success.

    PubMed

    Sorrel, Amy Lynn

    2015-08-01

    This legislative session, medicine resolved to ensure physicians can give their patients the best care possible. The hard work paid off in significant victories that largely build on the Texas Medical Association's 2013 legislative successes. PMID:26263520

  8. Capitol Success.

    PubMed

    Sorrel, Amy Lynn

    2015-08-01

    This legislative session, medicine resolved to ensure physicians can give their patients the best care possible. The hard work paid off in significant victories that largely build on the Texas Medical Association's 2013 legislative successes.

  9. Preoperative Intubation and Lack of Enteral Nutrition are Associated with Prolonged Stay After Arterial Switch Operation.

    PubMed

    Iliopoulos, Ilias; Burke, Redmond; Hannan, Robert; Bolivar, Juan; Cooper, David S; Zafar, Farhan; Rossi, Anthony

    2016-08-01

    Mortality for the arterial switch operation (ASO) has diminished significantly over the past few decades. Some patients do, however, continue to have protracted and complicated courses after surgery. We attempted to determine which preoperative factors were best associated with prolonged hospital stay after ASO. We retrospectively reviewed all patients that underwent an ASO over a 10-year period. Outcomes of patients with postoperative stays (POS) >14 days (long stay group-LS) were compared with those patients with POS < 7 days (short stay group-SS). The following variables were evaluated: age at surgery, weight, septostomy performed (BAS) and management the day prior to surgery including use of prostaglandin E1 (PGE1), inotropes, intubation status and the establishment of enteral feeds. The SS group had 25 patients and the LS group had 32 patients. Both groups (SS vs. LS) were similar in PGE1 use (48 vs. 69 %), BAS (76 vs. 59 %), age at surgery (6 vs. 7 days) and preoperative inotropes (12 vs. 38 %). The SS group had significantly higher incidence of preoperative feeding (80 vs. 31 %, p < 0.001) and less frequent intubation (12 vs. 47 %, p < 0.001). Patients who are intubated and have not yet begun to receive enteral feeds at the time of their ASO are more likely to have prolonged POS. It is unclear if prolonged stays were a result of operating on patients with worse preoperative hemodynamics or a consequence of a preoperative management strategy that did not allow for extubation and establishment of feeds prior to surgery. PMID:27084382

  10. Clinical prognostic indicators of dysphagia following prolonged orotracheal intubation in ICU patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The development of postextubation swallowing dysfunction is well documented in the literature with high prevalence in most studies. However, there are relatively few studies with specific outcomes that focus on the follow-up of these patients until hospital discharge. The purpose of our study was to determine prognostic indicators of dysphagia in ICU patients submitted to prolonged orotracheal intubation (OTI). Methods We conducted a retrospective, observational cohort study from 2010 to 2012 of all patients over 18 years of age admitted to a university hospital ICU who were submitted to prolonged OTI and subsequently received a bedside swallow evaluation (BSE) by a speech pathologist. The prognostic factors analyzed included dysphagia severity rate at the initial swallowing assessment and at hospital discharge, age, time to initiate oral feeding, amount of individual treatment, number of orotracheal intubations, intubation time and length of hospital stay. Results After we excluded patients with neurologic diseases, tracheostomy, esophageal dysphagia and those who were submitted to surgical procedures involving the head and neck, our study sample size was 148 patients. The logistic regression model was used to examine the relationships between independent variables. In the univariate analyses, we found that statistically significant prognostic indicators of dysphagia included dysphagia severity rate at the initial swallowing assessment, time to initiate oral feeding and amount of individual treatment. In the multivariate analysis, we found that dysphagia severity rate at the initial swallowing assessment remained associated with good treatment outcomes. Conclusions Studies of prognostic indicators in different populations with dysphagia can contribute to the design of more effective procedures when evaluating, treating, and monitoring individuals with this type of disorder. Additionally, this study stresses the importance of the initial assessment

  11. The correlation between anthropometric indices and hemodynamic changes after laryngoscopy and endotracheal intubation

    PubMed Central

    Safavi, Mohammadreza; Honarmand, Azim; Dasgerdi, Elham Ghorbani; Sharifi, Ghasem Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cardiovascular hemodynamic changes after laryngoscopy and endotracheal intubations can cause serious complications. This study was carried out to evaluate the correlation between the anthropometric indices and hemodynamic changes after laryngoscopy and endotracheal intubation (EI). Materials and Methods: This descriptive–analytical pilot study was carried out in 2012, in the Kashani Hospital, Isfahan, Iran. After obtaining written informed consent from 130 patients who fulfilled the inclusion criteria, they were enrolled in the study. The recorded data included were, age, weight, height, neck circumference (NC), waist-to-hip ratio (W/H ratio) and body mass index (BMI). The heart rate (HR), systolic blood pressure (SAP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), and mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) were recorded at baseline (before injection of the anesthetic drugs), just before laryngoscopy, and one, three, five, and ten minutes after EI. Results: The best cut-off points for BMI, NC, and W/H ratio, for prediction of significant cardiovascular changes after EI were, 26.56 kg/m2, 38 cm, and 0.82, respectively. There was a significant correlation between BMI and HR changes in the first and fifth minutes and also in MAP in the third and fifth minutes after EI (P < 0.05). Moreover, there was a significant correlation between NC and MAP in the fifth minute (P < 0.05). The W/H ratio was significantly related to the DBP in the tenth minute and MAP in the fifth and tenth minutes (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Based on the results of this study, among the anthropometric indices, the BMI, NC, and W/H ratio were significantly correlated with cardiovascular changes after laryngoscopy and tracheal intubation. PMID:27110542

  12. The effect of nitroglycerin on response to tracheal intubation. Assessment by radionuclide angiography

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, A.P.; Camporesi, E.M.; Sell, T.L.; Croughwell, N.; Silva, R.; Jones, R.H.; McIntyre, R.W.; Stanley, T.E.; Reves, J.G. )

    1989-06-01

    The effect of intravenous (IV) nitroglycerin (NTG) on perioperative myocardial ischemia as detected by single pass radionuclide angiocardiography was studied in 20 patients scheduled for elective coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). Ten patients, selected at random, received IV NTG 1 microgram.kg-1.min-1 (NTG group) and 10 others, IV saline (control group). Anesthetic induction consisted of midazolam 0.2 mg.kg-1, vecuronium 0.1 mg.kg-1, and 50% N{sub 2}O in O{sub 2}. ECG leads I, II, and V5 were monitored for ST segment changes. Single pass radionuclide angiocardiography (RNA) was performed at 5 times: prior to induction, prior to tracheal intubation, and at 1, 3.5, and 6 min following intubation. The presence of new regional wall motion abnormalities (RWMA) was determined from each RNA study as compared with the preinduction measurement. Apart from one patient in the control group who developed a new v wave after intubation, there was no evidence of ischemia by pulmonary capillary wedge pressure. No ECG evidence of ischemia was detected in any patient. Despite this, new regional wall motion abnormalities were observed in 3 patients in the control group and 1 patient in the NTG group. Blood pressure and heart rate responses of patients with new RWMA were not significantly different from other patients. The low incidence of ischemia in this population precludes a definitive statement regarding the efficacy of IV NTG, but the lower incidence of RWMA in the NTG group suggests a protective effect.

  13. Complete colonoscopy: impact of patients' demographics and anthropometry on caecal intubation time

    PubMed Central

    Akere, Adegboyega; Otegbayo, Jesse Abiodun

    2016-01-01

    Background and aim Factors that affect caecal intubation during colonoscopy include age and sex of the patient, quality of bowel preparation, prior abdominal or pelvic surgery and pelvic inflammatory disease, among others. The aim of this prospective study was to evaluate the effects of patients' demography such as age and sex, as well as anthropometry (height, weight and body mass index (BMI)) on caecal intubation time (CIT). Patients and methods All consecutive patients referred for colonoscopy over a period of 6 months were recruited into the study. Prior to the procedure, patients' demographic data as well as history of prior abdominal or pelvic surgery were recorded. The height and weight of each patient were taken, and the BMI calculated. CIT was measured from the time of insertion of the colonoscope into the anal canal to the time when the base of the caecum was intubated. Results A total of 167 patients comprising 99 (59.3%) males and 68 (40.7%) females were studied. The mean CIT of the procedures was 912.5±477.1 s with a range of 180–3180 s. It was more prolonged in patients older than 65 years of age, in males and in those with prior abdominal/pelvic surgery, although no significant difference was observed among the groups. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that increased BMI and non-usage of additional manoeuvres independently reduced CIT. Conclusions Older age, male gender, prior abdominal/pelvic surgery, use of additional manoeuvres and lower BMI were found to prolong CIT. PMID:27110381

  14. Effort and volume dependence of forced-deflation flow-volume relationships in intubated infants.

    PubMed

    Hammer, J; Newth, C J

    1996-01-01

    The application of negative pressure to the airway opening [called the forced-deflation (FD) technique] allows the examination of maximal expiratory flow-volume curves in intubated infants who are unable to generate a voluntary maximal expiratory maneuver. We explored the questions of effort and volume dependence of flows generated by FD in 18 intubated, sedated, and paralyzed infants [age 10.6 +/- 2.0 (SE) mo; weight 7.2 +/- 0.7 kg] with normal lungs. Effort dependence was assessed by isovolume pressure-flow curves that were constructed in 10 infants from repeated FD maneuvers from total lung capacity (defined as +40 cmH2O) by varying airway opening pressures from 0 (barometric pressure) to -100 cmH2O at intervals of 20 cmH2O. The effect of volume history was assessed by initiating FD maneuvers from different inspiratory volumes delineated by the inspiratory pressures +10, +20, +30, and +40 cmH2O. We compared maximal expiratory flows at isovolume points [50, 25, and 10% forced vital capacity (FVC) of the standard +40/-40 cmH2O FD maneuver] and found that flow limitation consistently occurred in all infants at and below 25% FVC with -40 cmH2O or greater airway opening pressure. We found no significant influence of volume history on maximal flows at and below 25% FVC. Under well-controlled study conditions, we demonstrated excellent reproducibility of maximal expiratory flows at low lung volumes, analogous to those of voluntary forced expiratory maneuvers in adults and older children. This information may be helpful in setting standards for performance and interpretation of FD maneuvers in intubated infants. PMID:8847326

  15. Early laryngeal outcome of prolonged intubation using an anatomical tube: a double blind, randomised study.

    PubMed

    Nordang, Leif; Lindholm, Carl-Eric; Larsson, Jan; Linder, Arne

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this study was to study the short-term impact on larynx by a newly designed anatomical tube. A prospective randomised trial of a newly designed anatomical tube versus a standard endotracheal tube in patients operated under general anaesthesia for at least 12 h. Seventy adults were included and randomised to either type of tube. The patients were evaluated by means of fibre-optic laryngoscopy and VAS-rating of symptoms on two occasions in the first post-operative week. The evaluating investigators and the patients were blinded to the type of tube used. 27 cases and 23 controls had complete data for evaluation. Age, gender and intubation times were comparable. Symptoms such as hoarseness, coughing, and pain were rated above 30 % of maximum during at least one of the first post-operative days by 21 and 19 patients, respectively. At the first examination (within 24 h), 38 % of patients in the anatomical tube group stated no hoarseness; compared to 13 % of the controls (p = 0.057). Fibre-optic laryngoscopy showed some kind of pathology in all the patients examined within 24 h of extubation. After 3-6 days, seven patients with the anatomical tube and four patients in the control group showed complete resolution of the lesions, and the changes were limited to redness in the vocal process area in another seven and four, respectively. The differences between the groups did not attain statistical significance. The study shows considerable short-term laryngeal morbidity after prolonged intubation, and the anatomical tube only showed an advantage concerning hoarseness. Further improvement of the endotracheal tubes and intubation routines are still needed.

  16. Comparison of Fentanyl and Clonidine for Attenuation of the Haemodynamic Response to Laryngocopy and Endotracheal Intubation

    PubMed Central

    Sameenakousar; Mahesh; Srinivasan, K.V.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Laryngoscopy and tracheal intubation after the induction of anaesthesia, are nearly always associated with sympathetic hyperactivity. To ‘blunt’ this pressor response, various methods have been tried, but very few studies have been done to assess the effects of fentanyl orI.V. clonidine on the haemodynamic response during laryngoscopy and tracheal intubation. The purpose of this study was to compare these agents, to find the drug which was best suited for this purpose and the most favourable time for its administration. Methods: This was a prospective study which involved 3 groups of patients. The patients in group-1 (control) were given normal saline and the groups 2 and 3 were given i.v. fentanyl and clonidine respectively. Each group had 50 patients who presented for elective, non-cardiovascular surgeries. All the patients were ASA-1 or ASA-II and were operated in PESIMSR, Kuppam. Results: The heart rate rise was 48.07% in the control group, whereas it was significantly lower in the fentanyl (II) 27.75% and the clonidine groups (III) 12.57% (p<0.001). In the control group, the systolic blood pressure increased maximally after 5 minutes (42.62%) i.e., immediately after the laryngoscopy and the intubation. It decreased gradually over 10 minutes (17.39%). With the administration of fentanyl, the maximum increase as compared to the preinduction value was 9.91%, but it was only 7.38% in the clonidine group. Both, when they were compared with the control, showed a significant suppression (P<.001), with clonidine showing better results. The maximum increase in the diastolic blood pressure was 30.12% in the control group (P<.001) at 5 min and it was 18.22%, and 6.15% in the fentanyl and the clonidine groups respectively, with clonidine faring better again (P<.001). Interpretation and Conclusion: Clonidine showed better attenuation of the sympathetic response, which is statistically highly significant and it remained so till the end of 10 minutes

  17. [Orotracheal intubation of patients with acromegaly using the AirTraq laryngoscope].

    PubMed

    Castañeda Pascual, M; Navarro García, C; Batllori Gastón, M; Anadón Senac, María P; Arrondo Nicolás, J; Martín Vizcaíno, M P

    2011-01-01

    An excess of growth hormone is responsible for the phenotypical characteristics of acromegaly. Tissue hypertrophy and growth also affect the airway, potentially making perioperative management difficult. If tests to foresee the likelihood of difficult airway have limitations affecting their sensitivity, specificity and predictive value even in the normal population, their reliability in patients with acromegaly is still more doubtful. At this time, videoassisted or optical laryngoscopes can offer a way to facilitate intubation in these patients. We report 3 cases in which the AirTraq optical laryngoscope was used to gain a full view of the vocal cords in acromegalic patients scheduled for pituitary surgery by the transsphenoidal route.

  18. Non-intubated simultaneous en bloc resection of pulmonary nodule and rib chondrosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Miao; Wang, Heng; Wu, Wenbin; Liu, Dong; Li, Min; Hu, Zhengqun

    2016-01-01

    Adequate surgical resection was required for patients with rib chondrosarcoma. A 61-year-old woman was presented with a palpable chest wall mass. Computed tomography (CT) of the chest revealed an isolated pulmonary nodule about 0.9 cm, and a giant rib tumor about 12 cm × 9 cm which penetrated through the 7th rib into thorax. CT reconstruction and simulated surgery was utilized for disease-free surgical margin (R0 resection), then a simultaneous en bloc resection of pulmonary nodule and rib tumor was performed along with chest wall reconstruction under local anesthesia and intravenous sedation without endotracheal intubation. And the recovery was encouragingly uneventful. PMID:27761448

  19. Comparison of the GlideRite to the conventional malleable stylet for endotracheal intubation by the Macintosh laryngoscope: a simulation study using manikins

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Yong Tack; Lee, Hyun Jung; Na, Ji Ung; Shin, Dong Hyuk; Han, Sang Kuk; Lee, Jeong Hun; Choi, Pil Cho

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare the effectiveness of the GlideRite stylet with the conventional malleable stylet (CMS) in endotracheal intubation (ETI) by the Macintosh laryngoscope. Methods This study is a randomized, crossover, simulation study. Participants performed ETI using both the GlideRite stylet and the CMS in a normal airway model and a tongue edema model (simulated difficult airway resulting in lower percentage of glottic opening [POGO]). Results In both the normal and tongue edema models, all 36 participants successfully performed ETI with the two stylets on the first attempt. In the normal airway model, there was no difference in time required for ETI (TETI) or in ease of handling between the two stylets. In the tongue edema model, the TETI using the CMS increased as the POGO score decreased (POGO score was negatively correlated with TETI for the CMS, Spearman’s rho=-0.518, P=0.001); this difference was not seen with the GlideRite (rho=-0.208, P=0.224). The TETI was shorter with the GlideRite than with the CMS, however, this difference was not statistically significant (15.1 vs. 18.8 seconds, P=0.385). Ease of handling was superior with the GlideRite compared with the CMS (P=0.006). Conclusion Performance of the GlideRite and the CMS were not different in the normal airway model. However, in the simulated difficult airway model with a low POGO score, the GlideRite performed better than the CMS for direct laryngoscopic intubation. PMID:27752609

  20. On-line electrochemically controlled in-tube solid phase microextraction of inorganic selenium followed by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Asiabi, Hamid; Yamini, Yadollah; Seidi, Shahram; Shamsayei, Maryam; Safari, Meysam; Rezaei, Fatemeh

    2016-05-30

    In this work, for the first time, a rapid, simple and sensitive microextraction procedure is demonstrated for the matrix separation, preconcentration and determination of inorganic selenium species in water samples using an electrochemically controlled in-tube solid phase microextraction (EC-in-tube SPME) followed by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry (HG-AAS). In this approach, in which EC-in-tube SPME and HG-AAS system were combined, the total analysis time, was decreased and the accuracy, repeatability and sensitivity were increased. In addition, to increases extraction efficiency, a novel nanostructured composite coating consisting of polypyrrole (PPy) doped with ethyleneglycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA) was prepared on the inner surface of a stainless-steel tube by a facile electrodeposition method. To evaluate the offered setup and the new PPy-EGDMA coating, it was used to extract inorganic selenium species in water samples. Extraction of inorganic selenium species was carried out by applying a positive potential through the inner surface of coated in-tube under flow conditions. Under the optimized conditions, selenium was detected in amounts as small as 4.0 parts per trillion. The method showed good linearity in the range of 0.012-200 ng mL(-1), with coefficients of determination better than 0.9996. The intra- and inter-assay precisions (RSD%, n = 5) were in the range of 2.0-2.5% and 2.7-3.2%, respectively. The validated method was successfully applied for the analysis of inorganic selenium species in some water samples and satisfactory results were obtained.

  1. On-line electrochemically controlled in-tube solid phase microextraction of inorganic selenium followed by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Asiabi, Hamid; Yamini, Yadollah; Seidi, Shahram; Shamsayei, Maryam; Safari, Meysam; Rezaei, Fatemeh

    2016-05-30

    In this work, for the first time, a rapid, simple and sensitive microextraction procedure is demonstrated for the matrix separation, preconcentration and determination of inorganic selenium species in water samples using an electrochemically controlled in-tube solid phase microextraction (EC-in-tube SPME) followed by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry (HG-AAS). In this approach, in which EC-in-tube SPME and HG-AAS system were combined, the total analysis time, was decreased and the accuracy, repeatability and sensitivity were increased. In addition, to increases extraction efficiency, a novel nanostructured composite coating consisting of polypyrrole (PPy) doped with ethyleneglycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA) was prepared on the inner surface of a stainless-steel tube by a facile electrodeposition method. To evaluate the offered setup and the new PPy-EGDMA coating, it was used to extract inorganic selenium species in water samples. Extraction of inorganic selenium species was carried out by applying a positive potential through the inner surface of coated in-tube under flow conditions. Under the optimized conditions, selenium was detected in amounts as small as 4.0 parts per trillion. The method showed good linearity in the range of 0.012-200 ng mL(-1), with coefficients of determination better than 0.9996. The intra- and inter-assay precisions (RSD%, n = 5) were in the range of 2.0-2.5% and 2.7-3.2%, respectively. The validated method was successfully applied for the analysis of inorganic selenium species in some water samples and satisfactory results were obtained. PMID:27154830

  2. Many Paths to Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mero, Dianne

    2009-01-01

    A close look at the principals who make up the MetLife-NASSP Breakthrough Schools (BTS) Class of 2009 reveals a lot about desirable leadership traits. Each of the five middle level schools and the five high schools has achieved remarkable results while serving large numbers of economically challenged students. Behind each school's successes is a…

  3. Focus on Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frey, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Successful middle schools do not happen by accident--they happen through leadership. Principals promote a shared vision that empowers school staffs to set high standards and continuously improve student achievement. And these middle grade educators also try to help their adolescent students see the connection between their work in school and their…

  4. Teaching endotracheal intubation on the recently deceased: opinion of patients and families

    PubMed Central

    Mirzazadeh, Azim; Ostadrahimi, Nima; Ghalandarpoorattar, Seyedeh Mojgan; Asghari, Fariba

    2014-01-01

    This study was done to explore the views of patients and their companions concerning endotracheal intubation training on newly deceased patients and the necessity of obtaining their consent in this regard. In this cross-sectional descriptive analytical study, we used a questionnaire to collect data through structured interviews conducted by the researcher on patient discharge day. A convenient sample of over 18 year old patients hospitalized at a teaching hospital were enrolled, and after receiving patient consent, one of each patient’s companions was enrolled in the study as well. In this study, 150 of the approached patients agreed to participate (response rate = 85.0%); of those, 92 (61.3%) allowed their companions to be enrolled as well. Eighty-three persons (55.3%) in the patient group and 68 persons (73.9%) in the companion group agreed to have endotracheal intubation training on their own bodies after death. Among these consenting patients and companions, 75.9% (n = 63) and 91.2% (n = 62) believed it was necessary to acquire patient consent for this procedure. Obtaining relatives’ consent was thought to be necessary by 69.9% (n = 72) of the patients and 72.1% (n = 49) of the companions, even when there was patient prior consent. Therefore it seems that asking the patient’s consent for doing educational procedures on their dead body is crucial. PMID:25512826

  5. EHD enhancement of pool and in-tube boiling of alternate refrigerants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohadi, M. M.; Dessiatoun, S.; Singh, A.; Fanni, M. A.

    1993-08-01

    The electrohydrodynamic (EHD) is an active heat transfer augmentation technique which utilizes the effect of secondary motions generated through the application of an electrostatic potential to a dielectric fluid. Net result is better momentum and heat transfer between the fluid and the heat transfer wall through destabilization of the thermal boundary layer and better mixing of the fluid adjacent to the heat transfer surface. EHD enhancement of refrigerant/refrigerant oil mixtures heat transfer using the electrohydrodynamic (EHD) technique is the subject of a three-year experimental investigation in a project funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, effective June 1, 1993. For the interim period between November 1992 and June 1993 when the DOE funds became available, the Air-Conditioning and Refrigeration Technology Institute (ARTI) provided partial funding for our EHD research program with the aim of accomplishing three major tasks: (1) conduct a comprehensive search of the literature on EHD-enhanced, in-tube and external boiling heat transfer enhancement of alternate refrigerants; (2) design, fabricate, and instrument an in-tube, EHD-enhanced boiling/condensation test rig and perform preliminary testing of the setup; and (3) conduct experiments and document new findings on EHD-enhanced external boiling of alternate refrigerants/refrigerant mixtures in an existing pool boiling test rig apparatus. Description of tasks performed are described and results are discussed.

  6. [Tracheo-bronchial intubation for surgery of the esophagus via a thoracic approach].

    PubMed

    Bornet, J L; Desprats, R

    1977-01-01

    Tracheo-bronchial intubation using a double-lumen Carlens tube provides the surgeon with a mediastinal operating field free of any obstruction by the lung and provides greater surgical ease than that of an assistant retracting a constantly invasive lung with tracheal intubation. This anaesthetic technique involving the ventilation of only one lung during the endothoracic period of the surgical procedure has not been used routinely for extra-pulmonary surgery since the shunt which is created leads to a fear of dangerous hypoxia. The aim of this study involving 30 patients is to demonstrate that the blood oxygen saturation obtained by the careful ventilation of a single lung, that of the side on which the patient is lying, is perfectly acceptable and comparable with the preoperative oxygen saturation of the subject at rest. This is obtained at the price of an increase in insufflation pressures of the order of 100 percent. Re-expansion of the collapsed lung without visual confirmation after careful endobronchial aspiration makes it possible to prevent the development of areas of micro-atelectasia and to ensure the absence of any pulmonary postoperative complications. PMID:22287

  7. Management of difficult intubation in a patient with ankylosing spondylitis--a case report.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, N; Channa, A B; Mansoor, A; Hussain, A

    2005-06-01

    We describe a case of difficult intubation in a patient suffering from ankylosing spondylitis undergoing total hip replacement surgery. The anesthetic management of 42 year old patient with difficult airway is discussed. Failure of epidural anesthesia procedure necessitated general anesthesia. The problems of performing awake fibreoptic intubation and other alternative techniques to secure the airway are described. Cervical spine involvement in ankylosing spondylitis is of great concern for the anesthetist. Longstanding progressive course of this disease leads to fibrosis, ossification and ankylosis of entire spine and sacroiliac joints. Cervical spine mobility is decreased and in severe cases total fixity occurs in a flexed position. Patient may also have atlanto-occipital and temporo-mandibular joint involvement as well. Cricoarytenoid cartilages involvement may result in upper airway compromise. Furthermore cervical spine vertebrae are prone to fractures, especially on hyperextension and may lead to spinal cord transection and quadriplegia. In this case report we describe the airway management of such patient with fixed rigidity of cervical spine and thoracolumbar kyphosis.

  8. Triradiate caecal fold: Is it a useful landmark for caecal intubation in colonoscopy?

    PubMed Central

    Finlayson, Andrew; Chandra, Raaj; Hastie, Ian A; Jones, Ian T; Shedda, Susan; Hong, Michael K-Y; Yen, Aileen; Hayes, Ian P

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To determine the frequency of identification of the triradiate fold during colonoscopy and evaluate its reliability as a marker of caecal intubation. METHODS: One hundred consecutive patients undergoing colonoscopy in a tertiary hospital colorectal unit from May to September 2013 were studied. Video documentation of the caecum was recorded and shown to consultant colorectal surgeons on the unit. Each reviewer was asked through a series of questions to independently identify the triradiate fold. The main outcome was the frequency of visualisation of the triradiate fold in the caecum. RESULTS: The triradiate fold was seen on average in 18% of cases, but inter-observer agreement was poor. There were only four patients (4%) in which all reviewers agreed on the presence of a triradiate fold. In patients who had undergone previous appendicectomy, the appendiceal orifice was less frequently seen compared with patients who had not undergone appendicectomy. CONCLUSION: The triradiate fold is infrequently seen during colonoscopy and is therefore an unreliable landmark of caecal intubation. PMID:26421107

  9. Gargling with sodium azulene sulfonate reduces the postoperative sore throat after intubation of the trachea.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Junchi; Minami, Kouichiro; Horishita, Takafumi; Shiraishi, Munehiro; Okamoto, Takashi; Terada, Tadanori; Sata, Takeyoshi

    2005-07-01

    Postoperative sore throat (POST) is a complication that remains to be resolved in patients undergoing endotracheal intubation. In this study, we investigated whether preoperative gargling with sodium 1,4-dimethyl-7-isopropylazulene-3-sulfonate monohydrate (sodium azulene sulfonate, Azunol) reduces POST after endotracheal intubation. Forty patients scheduled for elective surgery under general anesthesia were randomized into Azunol and control groups. In the Azunol group, patients gargled with 4 mg Azunol diluted with 100 mL tap water (40 microg/mL). In the control group, patients gargled with 100 mL of tap water. After emergence from general anesthesia, the patients with POST were counted and POST was evaluated using a verbal analog pain scale. There were no significant differences between the two groups by age, height, body weight, gender distribution, or duration of anesthesia and surgery. In the control group, 13 patients (65%) complained of POST, which remained 24 h later in nine patients (45%). In the Azunol group, five patients (25%) also complained of POST, which completely disappeared by 24 h later. The incidence of POST and verbal analog pain scale scores in the Azunol group decreased significantly compared with the control group. We demonstrated that gargling with Azunol effectively attenuated POST with no adverse reactions.

  10. Success Counseling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boffey, D. Barnes; Boffey, David M.

    1993-01-01

    Describes success counseling, a counseling approach based on the principles of William Glasser's control theory and reality therapy that helps campers examine their wants and needs, evaluate their own behaviors, and see the connections between behavior and the ability to meet basic needs for love, power, fun, and freedom. Provides examples of…

  11. Better Hemodynamic Profile of Laryngeal Mask Airway Insertion Compared to Laryngoscopy and Tracheal Intubation

    PubMed Central

    Jarineshin, Hashem; Kashani, Saeed; Vatankhah, Majid; Abdulahzade Baghaee, Alireza; Sattari, Sahar; Fekrat, Fereydoon

    2015-01-01

    Background: Laryngoscopy and tracheal intubation can cause serious cardiovascular responses in patients such as hypertension, tachycardia, and arrhythmias. Alternative airway maintenance techniques may attenuate these hemodynamic stress responses. Objectives: This study aimed to compare the immediate hemodynamic effects of the insertion of laryngeal mask airway supreme (LMA-S) and classic (LMA-C) with laryngoscopy and Endotracheal Intubation (ETT). Patients and Methods: This study was a prospective, double-blind, and randomized clinical trial conducted on 150 patients aged 18 to 50 years with ASA I (American Society of Anesthesiologists), in the general operating room of Shahid Mohammadi hospital, Hormozgan university of medical sciences, Bandar Abbas, Iran. In the ETT group, endotracheal intubation was performed using the Macintosh laryngoscope; while for the LMA-C and LMA-S groups, LMA Classic and LMA Supreme were inserted, respectively. The induction and maintenance of anesthesia were similar in all patients. The hemodynamic parameters such as heart rate (HR), systolic blood pressure (SBP), and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) were measured before (baseline) and after induction of anesthesia at 4 different time points. The statistical analysis was done and P value less than 0.05 was considered significant. Results: Participants in all groups were similar in terms of gender, age, weight, height, and Mallampati class. The mean ± SD of SBPs (105.62 ± 12.12, 112.90 ± 12.2, and 112.48 ± 15.14 mm Hg, respectively for ETT, LMA-C, and LMA-S) and DBPs (64.64 ± 10.23, 73.78 ± 9.70, and 71.20 ± 12.27 mm Hg, respectively for ETT, LMA-C, and LMA-S) were significantly lower in the ETT group compared to LMA groups 5 minutes after device insertion (P < 0.01 for SBPs and P < 0.001 for DBPs); however these values were lower than the baseline values in all groups. There were no differences in the mean SBP and DBPs between the three groups at the other time points. The mean

  12. Success Sessions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazdowski, Walter P.

    Special Services for the Disadvantaged Students (SSDS) is a federally funded three-year college retention program initiated at a Texas community college. The program's objectives include improving reading and math levels, improving achievement of handicapped students, and increasing skills in English as a second language. To accomplish these…

  13. Attenuation of the hemodynamic response to laryngoscopy and tracheal intubation with fentanyl, lignocaine nebulization, and a combination of both: A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Abhyuday; Seth, Anita; Prakash, Smita; Deganwa, Mangilal; Gogia, Anoop Raj

    2016-01-01

    Background: The present study was undertaken to compare and evaluate the efficacy of intravenous (IV) fentanyl and lignocaine airway nebulization and a combination of both in attenuating the hemodynamic response to laryngoscopy and tracheal intubation. Materials and Methods: Ninety-six patients of either sex aged between 18 and 65 years of age, belonging to the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) health status Classes I and II, undergoing elective surgery requiring general anesthesia with endotracheal intubation were included in the study. Patients were randomly divided into three groups. Group F received IV fentanyl 2 μg/kg, Group L received nebulization with 3 mg/kg of 4% lignocaine, and Group FL received both nebulization with 3 mg/kg of 4% lignocaine and IV fentanyl 2 μg/kg before intubation. Hemodynamic parameters were noted before and immediately after induction, 1 min after intubation, and every minute after intubation for 10 min. Results: Hemodynamic response to laryngoscopy and intubation was not completely abolished in any of the groups. Nebulized lignocaine was least effective in attenuating hemodynamic response to intubation, and hemodynamic parameters were significantly high after intubation as compared to other groups. Fentanyl alone or in combination with nebulized lignocaine was most effective, and Group F and Group FL were comparable. The maximum increase in mean blood pressure after intubation from baseline in Groups F, L, and FL was 7.4%, 14.6%, and 5.4%, respectively. Conclusion: In our study, IV fentanyl 2 μg/kg administered 5 min before induction was found to be the most effective in attenuating the hemodynamic response. There was no advantage to the use of nebulized lignocaine in attenuating the hemodynamic response to laryngoscopy and intubation. PMID:27746569

  14. "Success"ful Reading Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    George, Carol J.

    1986-01-01

    The Success in Reading and Writing Program at a K-2 school in Fort Jackson, South Carolina, teaches children of varied races and abilities to read and write using newspapers, dictionaries, library books, magazines, and telephone directories. These materials help students develop language skills in a failure-free atmosphere. Includes two…

  15. Anesthetic management by laryngeal mask airway in a patient with a history of difficult intubation resulting in dental injuries.

    PubMed

    Asahi, Yoshinao; Fujii, Ryosuke; Usui, Naoko; Kagamiuchi, Hajime; Omichi, Shiro; Kotani, Junichiro

    2015-01-01

    Disabled patients may face respiratory problems during general anesthesia because of head and neck anomalies. We describe a case of dental treatment under general anesthesia using a laryngeal mask airway in a disabled patient who faced difficulty in endotracheal intubation on several occasions, 5 of which resulted in dental injuries. PMID:25849470

  16. Submandibular intubation as an alternative for intra-operative airway management in maxillofacial fractures - our institutional experience

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Praveer K; Jain, Abhineet; Behera, Bikram

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Airway management in anaesthesia for maxillofacial surgical procedures is tricky at times when the nasal/oral routes are contraindicated or are impossible. Tracheostomy as an alternative inherits its own complications. We present a case series of the submandibular route for tracheal intubation as an alternative. Methods: The procedure was performed in ten selected adult patients with maxillofacial/mandibular fractures associated with a fracture of skull base or nasal bone. All of them were medically stable with no need of intensive care or mechanical ventilation in post-operative period. Results: Submandibular intubation in all ten patients of panfacial fractures allowed uninterrupted surgical techniques with a secured airway. All patients were reverted to oro-tracheal tube at the end of surgery as immediate maxillomandibular fixation was not necessary. The patients were extubated after recovery from anaesthesia before they left the operating theatre. One patient in the post-operative period had a superficial infection of incision site that responded well to local treatment. No other complications were encountered in the intra-operative or post-operative period. Conclusion: In complex maxillofacial injuries, when oral or nasal intubation hampers surgeon's field of view, submandibular intubation offers an effective alternative to short-term tracheostomy along with small risk potential. There is a need to emphasise its regular application in such cases so that technique can be mastered by both surgeons and anaesthesiologist. PMID:27601740

  17. Submandibular intubation as an alternative for intra-operative airway management in maxillofacial fractures - our institutional experience

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Praveer K; Jain, Abhineet; Behera, Bikram

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Airway management in anaesthesia for maxillofacial surgical procedures is tricky at times when the nasal/oral routes are contraindicated or are impossible. Tracheostomy as an alternative inherits its own complications. We present a case series of the submandibular route for tracheal intubation as an alternative. Methods: The procedure was performed in ten selected adult patients with maxillofacial/mandibular fractures associated with a fracture of skull base or nasal bone. All of them were medically stable with no need of intensive care or mechanical ventilation in post-operative period. Results: Submandibular intubation in all ten patients of panfacial fractures allowed uninterrupted surgical techniques with a secured airway. All patients were reverted to oro-tracheal tube at the end of surgery as immediate maxillomandibular fixation was not necessary. The patients were extubated after recovery from anaesthesia before they left the operating theatre. One patient in the post-operative period had a superficial infection of incision site that responded well to local treatment. No other complications were encountered in the intra-operative or post-operative period. Conclusion: In complex maxillofacial injuries, when oral or nasal intubation hampers surgeon's field of view, submandibular intubation offers an effective alternative to short-term tracheostomy along with small risk potential. There is a need to emphasise its regular application in such cases so that technique can be mastered by both surgeons and anaesthesiologist.

  18. Anesthetic Management by Laryngeal Mask Airway in a Patient With a History of Difficult Intubation Resulting in Dental Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Asahi, Yoshinao; Fujii, Ryosuke; Usui, Naoko; Kagamiuchi, Hajime; Omichi, Shiro; Kotani, Junichiro

    2015-01-01

    Disabled patients may face respiratory problems during general anesthesia because of head and neck anomalies. We describe a case of dental treatment under general anesthesia using a laryngeal mask airway in a disabled patient who faced difficulty in endotracheal intubation on several occasions, 5 of which resulted in dental injuries. PMID:25849470

  19. [Rapid Sequence Intubation with the McGRATH MAC Videolaryngoscope in the Sitting Position for a Patient with Restricted Mouth Opening].

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Yukiyo; Komasawa, Nobuyasu; Matsunami, Sayuri; Kido, Haruki; Kusaka, Yusuke; Minami, Toshiaki

    2015-06-01

    Here we report successful rapid-sequence inubation with the McGRATH MAC videolaryngscope (McGRATH) in the face to face sitting position for a patient with severe ileus and restricted mouse opening. A 46-year-old woman with advanced bladder cancer had developed ileus. Ileus tube and octreotide did not relieve her symptoms, and emergency colostomy was planned. Due to the invasion of cancer to the spine and interior of the pelvis, she could not keep supine position and always kept sitting position. We decided to perform rapid-sequence intubation in the sitting position. First an anesthesiologist stood at face to face position to the patients, and the second anesthesiologist kept the head of the patient from the cranial side. After thiamylal and fentanyl administration, cricoid pressure was applied by the third anesthesiologist. Under the guide of the McGRATH's monitor, we could successfully insert the 7.0 mm internal diameter tracheal tube with a stylet uneventfully in the face to face sitting position. PMID:26437554

  20. Comparison of end-tidal carbon dioxide, oxygen saturation and clinical signs for the detection of oesophageal intubation.

    PubMed

    Vaghadia, H; Jenkins, L C; Ford, R W

    1989-09-01

    The reliability of various methods for detecting oesophageal intubation was assessed by means of a single blind study in rats. Both oesophagus and trachea were simultaneously intubated. The presence or absence of various clinical signs was noted during tracheal or oesophageal ventilation and arterial blood gases and end-tidal CO2 were measured. Oesophageal ventilation for one minute was associated with significant decreases (P less than 0.001) in pH, PaO2 and SaO2 and a significant (P less than 0.001) increase in PaCO2. Although mean PaO2 decreased by 70 per cent and mean SaO2 decreased by 31 per cent, 43 percent of rats failed to demonstrate a decrease in SaO2 below 85 per cent. Oxygen saturation was the least reliable method for detecting oesophageal intubation (sensitivity = 0.5, specificity = 0.9, positive predictive value (PPV) = 0.8). Chest movement was the most reliable clinical sign for detecting oesophageal intubation (sensitivity = 0.9, specificity = 1.0, PPV = 1.0). Oesophageal rattle was the second most reliable clinical sign (PPV = 0.9). Moisture condensation in the tracheal tube (PPV = 1.0) and abdominal distension (PPV = 0.9) were judged to be the least reliable because each had a high false negative rate of 0.3. The most reliable method for the early detection of oesophageal intubation in rats was end-tidal, CO2 (sensitivity 1.0, specificity = 1.0, PPV = 1.0). In addition, end-tidal CO2 when used in conjunction with the four clinical signs improved the reliability of these signs. PMID:2507183

  1. RETROGRADE INTUBATION VIA LARYNGEAL MASK AIRWAY IN A PAEDIATRIC PATIENT WITH FALLOT-TYPE VENTRICULAR SEPTAL DEFECT AND CLEFT PALATE DEFORMITY.

    PubMed

    Ciftci, Taner; Erbatur, Serkan

    2016-02-01

    We report the case ofa pediatric patient with tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) and cleft palate deformity with difficult intubation in which a laryngeal mask airway (LMA) was used and converted into an endotracheal tube through retrograde intubation. The patient with TOF was scheduled for repair of the congenital bilateral cleft lip and palate. Inhalational induction with 4% sevoflurane was started. Conventional tracheal intubation was impossible because the patient had a difficult airway, and the procedure could cause severe cyanosis and respiratory distress. An LMA was inserted to maintain ventilation and anesthesia and to facilitate intubation. Retrograde intubation and a catheter mount were used to convert the LMA into a conventional endotracheal tube without difficulty. Airway management for patients with TOF and cleft palate deformity is not clear. Retrograde intubation permits replacing an LMA with an endotracheal tube. This method enables maintaining the airway until the LMA is exchanged with an endotracheal tube. This technique seems useful to facilitate difficult airway intubation in pediatric patients with TOF and cleft palate deformity. PMID:27382820

  2. PATIENT-VENTILATION ASYNCHRONY CAUSING NEGATIVE PRESSURE PULMONARY EDEMA IN AN INTUBATED OBESE PATIENT.

    PubMed

    Siddik-Sayyid, Sahar M; AlFahel, Waseem; El-Khatib, Mohamad F

    2016-02-01

    Negative pressure pulmonary edema is a potentially life-threatening condition that may occur when a large negative intrathoracic pressure is generated against a 'physically' obstructed upper airway during emergence from anesthesia. We report a 35 year old male patient who is morbidly obese and undergoing laparoscopic gastric bypass who developed negative pressure pulmonary edema without any evidence of a 'physical' upper airway obstruction. In our patient, the negative pressure pulmonary edema occurred after complete reversal of neuromuscular blockade and during manual positive pressure ventilation with the endotracheal tube still in place and in the presence of an oral airway. Since the patient was still intubated and had an airway in place with no possibility for physical obstruction, we speculate that the occurrence of the negative pressure pulmonary edema was mainly due to a 'functional' obstruction secondary to the severe patient-ventilation asynchrony that ensued upon reversal of the neuromuscular blockade. PMID:27382824

  3. Can intravenous acetaminophen reduce the needs to more opioids to control pain in intubated patients?

    PubMed Central

    Mahshidfar, Babak; Sameti, Azadeh; Abbasi, Saeed; Farsi, Davood; Mofidi, Mani; Hafezimoghadam, Peyman; Rahimzadeh, Popak; Rezai, Mahdi

    2016-01-01

    Aims: To evaluate the effect of intravenous (IV) acetaminophen on reducing the need for morphine sulfate in intubated patients admitted to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU). Settings and Design: Current study was done as a clinical trial on the patients supported by mechanical ventilator. Subjects and Methods: Behavioral pain scale (BPS) scoring system was used to measure pain in the patients. All of the patients received 1 g, IV acetaminophen, every 6 h during the 1st and 3rd days of admission and placebo during the 2nd and 4th days. Total dose of morphine sulfate needed, its complications, and the BPS scores at the end of every 6 h interval were compared. Results: Totally forty patients were enrolled. The mean pain scores were significantly lower in the 2nd and 4th days (4.33 and 3.66, respectively; mean: 4.0) in which the patients had received just morphine sulfate compared to the 1st and 3rd days (7.36 and 3.93, respectively; mean: 5.65) in which the patients had received acetaminophen in addition to morphine sulfate too (P < 0.001). Cumulative dose of morphine sulfate used, was significantly higher in the 1st and 3rd days (8.92 and 3.15 mg, respectively; 12.07 mg in total) compared to the 2nd and 4th days (6.47 mg and 3.22 mg, respectively; 9.7 mg in total) (P = 0.035). Conclusion: In our study, IV acetaminophen had no effect on decreasing the BPSs and need of morphine sulfate in intubated patients admitted to ICU. PMID:27630458

  4. Can intravenous acetaminophen reduce the needs to more opioids to control pain in intubated patients?

    PubMed Central

    Mahshidfar, Babak; Sameti, Azadeh; Abbasi, Saeed; Farsi, Davood; Mofidi, Mani; Hafezimoghadam, Peyman; Rahimzadeh, Popak; Rezai, Mahdi

    2016-01-01

    Aims: To evaluate the effect of intravenous (IV) acetaminophen on reducing the need for morphine sulfate in intubated patients admitted to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU). Settings and Design: Current study was done as a clinical trial on the patients supported by mechanical ventilator. Subjects and Methods: Behavioral pain scale (BPS) scoring system was used to measure pain in the patients. All of the patients received 1 g, IV acetaminophen, every 6 h during the 1st and 3rd days of admission and placebo during the 2nd and 4th days. Total dose of morphine sulfate needed, its complications, and the BPS scores at the end of every 6 h interval were compared. Results: Totally forty patients were enrolled. The mean pain scores were significantly lower in the 2nd and 4th days (4.33 and 3.66, respectively; mean: 4.0) in which the patients had received just morphine sulfate compared to the 1st and 3rd days (7.36 and 3.93, respectively; mean: 5.65) in which the patients had received acetaminophen in addition to morphine sulfate too (P < 0.001). Cumulative dose of morphine sulfate used, was significantly higher in the 1st and 3rd days (8.92 and 3.15 mg, respectively; 12.07 mg in total) compared to the 2nd and 4th days (6.47 mg and 3.22 mg, respectively; 9.7 mg in total) (P = 0.035). Conclusion: In our study, IV acetaminophen had no effect on decreasing the BPSs and need of morphine sulfate in intubated patients admitted to ICU.

  5. Intubations and airway management: An overview of Hassles through third millennium

    PubMed Central

    Alanazi, Abdullah

    2015-01-01

    Background: The placement of a tube into a patient's trachea “the intubation” as we call is not as simple as it looks. It is a very tricky and tedious maneuver that entails skills to assess and perform. Nevertheless, often this is left to the chores of inefficient hands due to a paucity of the availability of experts. They seldom are able to complete the task and often wind up calling the attention of the unit. The present review is an attempt to describe the need to undertake intubation, the procedures and techniques, the complications, including morbidity and mortality and airway management. This overview includes explicit descriptions of the difficult airway which represents multifaceted interface amid patient factors, clinical setting, and skills of the practitioner. Materials and Methods: To accomplish the target, peer-reviewed English language articles published during third millennium up to 2013 were selected from Pub Med, Pub Med Central, Science Direct, Up-to-date, Med Line, comprehensive databases, Cochrane library, and the Internet (Google, Yahoo). Review of Literature: The review constituted a systematic search of literature on the requirements that necessitate the practice of intubation, different techniques that facilitate easy conduct of procedure, the complications, including, morbidity and mortality, and the airway management. Conclusion: Recording every single detail has been beyond the scope of this review, however; some aspects have been wrapped up in nutshell. Some areas of the review are too basic which the medics are well aware of and knowledgeable. Nevertheless, these are difficult to be dispensed with in consideration of their source to the awareness of a common man and a great majority of the patients. PMID:25949040

  6. Balloon laryngoplasty for subglottic stenosis caused by orotracheal intubation at a tertiary care pediatric hospital.

    PubMed

    Avelino, Melissa Gomes Ameloti; Fernandes, Edson Junior de Melo

    2014-01-01

    Introduction In recent years, there has been a reduction in mortality rates in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) due to the impact of modern technological advances in the perinatal field. As a consequence, prolonged orotracheal intubation is used more frequently, and there has been an increase in acquired subglottic stenosis (SGS) in children. Subglottic stenosis is a narrowing of the endolarynx and one of the most common causes of stridor and respiratory distress in children. The laryngoplasty balloon has proven effective in dealing with stenosis both as primary and secondary treatments, after open surgery, with the added advantage of being less invasive and not requiring external access. Materials and Methods This study involved children from pediatric intensive care units or NICUs suffering from respiratory distress and who presented an endoscopic diagnosis of Myer and Cotton grade I to III SGS. These patients underwent balloon laryngoplasty with different numbers of interventions depending on the response in each individual case. Results All the patients responded satisfactorily to the balloon laryngoplasty. None required tracheostomy after treatment and all remained asymptomatic even after 6-month follow-up. One patient required just 1 dilation, 4 required 2, 3 underwent the procedure 3 times, and another had 5 dilations. Conclusion The experience presented here is that of balloon laryngoplasty post-orotracheal intubation SGS with very satisfactory results at a tertiary care pediatric hospital. Although the number of patients is limited, our incidence corroborates other studies that demonstrate the efficacy and safety of balloon dilatation in the treatment of SGS.

  7. Achieving Results in MBA Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrett, Deborah J.

    2002-01-01

    Describes how Rice University's Jones Graduate School of Management achieves their mission for the communication program. Discusses three keys to the success of the program: individual coaching, integrated team instruction, and constant assessment of the students and the program. Presents an overview of the program. (SG)

  8. Does C-MAC® video laryngoscope improve the nasotracheal intubating conditions compared to Macintosh direct laryngoscope in paediatric patients posted for tonsillectomy surgeries?

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Vinuta V; Subramanya, Bala H; Kiranchand, N; Bhaskar, S Bala; Dammur, Srinivasalu

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: C-MAC® video laryngoscope (VL) with Macintosh blade has been found to improve Cormack-Lehane (C-L) laryngoscopic view as well as intubating conditions for orotracheal intubation. However, studies done on the performance of C-MAC® VL for nasotracheal intubation (NTI) are very few in number. Hence, we compared laryngoscopy and intubating conditions between Macintosh direct laryngoscope and C-MAC® VL for NTI. Methods: Sixty American Society of Anesthesiologists Physical Status I, II patients, aged 8–18 years, posted for tonsillectomy surgeries under general anaesthesia with NTI were randomised, into two groups. Patients in group 1 were intubated using Macintosh direct laryngoscope and group 2 with C-MAC® VL. C-L grading, time required for intubation, need for additional manoeuvres and haemodynamic changes during and after intubation were compared between the groups. Results: C-L grade 1 views were obtained in 26 and 29 patients in group 1 and group 2, respectively (86.7% vs. 96.7%). Remaining patients were having C-L grade 2 (13.3% vs. 3.3%). Duration of intubation was less than a minute in group 2 (93.3%). Need for additional manoeuvres (M1–M5) were more in group 1 (97% vs. 77%). M1 (external manipulation) was needed more in group 2 compared to group 1 (53.3% vs. 30%). Magill's forceps alone (M4) and M4 with additional external manipulation (M5) were needed more in group 1 compared to group 2 (60% vs. 16%). Conclusion: The overall performance of C-MAC® VL was better when compared to conventional direct Macintosh laryngoscope during NTI in terms of glottis visualisation, intubation time and need for additional manoeuvres. PMID:27761036

  9. Professional Development: Sorting through the Jumble to Achieve Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Week, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Few in the education field discount the eminently logical idea that teachers should be supported in the continuous improvement of their craft. But as a term for describing ongoing training investments in the teaching force, "professional development" has become both ubiquitous and all but meaningless. Though frequently invoked by lawmakers and…

  10. Mid-Childhood Immigrant Perspectives on Achieving College Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Litwicki, Mark J.

    2010-01-01

    This study extends what is known about the experience of mid-childhood immigration. Fifteen participants, college students who immigrated to the U.S. from Latin America between the ages of 8 and 16 and who had completed at least a semester of transferable college-level coursework, provided their narratives by way of an open-ended interview…

  11. Educating parents on gastrostomy devices: necessary components to achieve success.

    PubMed

    Kirk, Lisa; Shelley, Anita; Battles, Maureen; Latty, Cynthia

    2014-01-01

    Often parents leave the hospital without the education needed to care for their child's gastrostomy device. Lack of nurse knowledge and the use of various types of devices contribute to their confusion and inability to adequately educate parents. An enhanced methodology and process to standardize gastrostomy education were designed and implemented. Data results confirmed an improvement in the knowledge and competency of both staff nurses and parents. Empowering staff nurses with knowledge and the necessary resources and tools to confidently educate parents, along with a standardized process, has improved overall outcomes.

  12. The GOALS Program. Gaining Opportunities to Achieve Lifetime Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwich, Andy; Otto, Nonie

    Designed to support the development of well-rounded individuals, this resource guide integrates the World Cup and soccer into social studies, language arts, mathematics, science, and physical education. The objectives of the GOALS program are for students to: (1) recognize the importance of the World Cup and soccer throughout the world; (2)…

  13. Charting Success: Data Use and Student Achievement in Urban Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faria, Ann-Marie; Heppen, Jessica; Li, Yibing; Stachel, Suzanne; Jones, Wehmah; Sawyer, Katherine; Thomsen, Kerri; Kutner, Melissa; Miser, David; Lewis, Sharon; Casserly, Michael; Simon, Candace; Uzzell, Renata; Corcoran, Amanda; Palacios, Moses

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, interest has spiked in data-driven decision making in education--that is, using various types of student data to inform decisions in schools and classrooms. In October 2008, the Council of the Great City Schools and American Institutes for Research (AIR) launched a project funded by The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation that focused…

  14. Partnering with IT to Help Disadvantaged Students Achieve Academic Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Janet H.

    2012-01-01

    This case study will describe how the Stony Brook University Libraries instruction program partnered with another student support service (student computing office) to nurture a relationship with the Educational Opportunities Program (EOP) over several years to provide their students with the library research and computer skills needed to succeed…

  15. Achieving Success in Administration--Learning from Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Troisi, Nicholas F.; Kidd, David J.

    1990-01-01

    Few administrators fail to become leaders because they lack technical skills. The problem is lack of people skills and inability to exercise good judgment. Administrators can minimize failure by valuing honesty, objectivity, delegation, and feedback and by respecting chain of command and the limitations of power. Other potential pitfalls are…

  16. Student Services: Achieving Success for All Secondary Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maddy-Bernstein, Carolyn; Cunanan, Esmeralda S.

    This document, which is intended for high school student services personnel, administrators, and teachers, presents information that can be used to develop an efficient, coordinated, and comprehensive student services system to address the needs of diverse student populations. Chapter 1 contains background information on the following topics:…

  17. Graded Achievement, Tested Achievement, and Validity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brookhart, Susan M.

    2015-01-01

    Twenty-eight studies of grades, over a century, were reviewed using the argument-based approach to validity suggested by Kane as a theoretical framework. The review draws conclusions about the meaning of graded achievement, its relation to tested achievement, and changes in the construct of graded achievement over time. "Graded…

  18. Entrepreneur achievement. Liaoning province.

    PubMed

    Zhao, R

    1994-03-01

    This paper reports the successful entrepreneurial endeavors of members of a 20-person women's group in Liaoning Province, China. Jing Yuhong, a member of the Family Planning Association at Shileizi Village, Dalian City, provided the basis for their achievements by first building an entertainment/study room in her home to encourage married women to learn family planning. Once stocked with books, magazines, pamphlets, and other materials on family planning and agricultural technology, dozens of married women in the neighborhood flocked voluntarily to the room. Yuhong also set out to give these women a way to earn their own income as a means of helping then gain greater equality with their husbands and exert greater control over their personal reproductive and social lives. She gave a section of her farming land to the women's group, loaned approximately US$5200 to group members to help them generate income from small business initiatives, built a livestock shed in her garden for the group to raise marmots, and erected an awning behind her house under which mushrooms could be grown. The investment yielded $12,000 in the first year, allowing each woman to keep more than $520 in dividends. Members then soon began going to fairs in the capital and other places to learn about the outside world, and have successfully ventured out on their own to generate individual incomes. Ten out of twenty women engaged in these income-generating activities asked for and got the one-child certificate.

  19. Does the use of primary continuous positive airway pressure reduce the need for intubation and mechanical ventilation in infants ≤32 weeks’ gestation?

    PubMed Central

    Yee, Wendy H; Scotland, Jeanne; Pham, Yung; Finch, Robert

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ventilator-induced lung injury is a recognized risk factor for bronchopulmonary dysplasia. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether primary continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), defined as CPAP without previous endotracheal intubation for any indication, can reduce the need for intubation and mechanical ventilation in infants born at ≤32 weeks’ gestational age. METHODS: The literature was reviewed using the methodology for systematic reviews for the Consensus on Resuscitation Science adapted from the American Heart Association’s International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation. RESULTS: Fourteen studies were reviewed. Eleven studies provided varying degrees of supportive evidence (level of evidence 3 to 4) that the use of primary CPAP can reduce the need for intubation and mechanical ventilation. CONCLUSION: The use of CPAP as a primary intervention and mode of respiratory support is an option for infants ≤32 weeks’ gestation, but avoidance of intubation and mechanical ventilation is more likely in mature infants >27 weeks’ gestation. PMID:23204903

  20. A two-stage approach to induction and intubation of two infants with Pierre Robin Sequence using a LMA Classic™ and Air-Q®: two cases report.

    PubMed

    Templeton, T Wesley; Bryan, Yvon F

    2016-08-01

    The laryngeal mask airway (LMA) Classic™ and Air-Q® are supralaryngeal devices used for airway management in routine and difficult pediatric airways. We describe a novel two-stage technique of insertion of the LMA Classic™ awake prior to induction of anesthesia, to assure oxygenation and ventilation, and after induction removal and placement of the Air-Q® for intubation using the flexible fiberoptic bronchoscope. The LMA Classic's™ pliable design and relatively small size allow it to be easily placed in awake infants. In contrast, the Air-Q® is an excellent device for intubation because of its larger internal diameter and removable 9 mm adapter. Our goal was to reduce unpredictability and potentially increase the safety of induction of anesthesia and intubation in infants with Pierre Robin sequence. By using these devices in a two-stage approach we created a technique for consistent oxygenation, ventilation, and intubation in these infants.

  1. A two-stage approach to induction and intubation of two infants with Pierre Robin Sequence using a LMA Classic™ and Air-Q®: two cases report

    PubMed Central

    Templeton, T. Wesley

    2016-01-01

    The laryngeal mask airway (LMA) Classic™ and Air-Q® are supralaryngeal devices used for airway management in routine and difficult pediatric airways. We describe a novel two-stage technique of insertion of the LMA Classic™ awake prior to induction of anesthesia, to assure oxygenation and ventilation, and after induction removal and placement of the Air-Q® for intubation using the flexible fiberoptic bronchoscope. The LMA Classic's™ pliable design and relatively small size allow it to be easily placed in awake infants. In contrast, the Air-Q® is an excellent device for intubation because of its larger internal diameter and removable 9 mm adapter. Our goal was to reduce unpredictability and potentially increase the safety of induction of anesthesia and intubation in infants with Pierre Robin sequence. By using these devices in a two-stage approach we created a technique for consistent oxygenation, ventilation, and intubation in these infants. PMID:27482318

  2. Comparative Evaluation of the Sniffing Position with Simple Head Extension for Laryngoscopic View and Intubation Difficulty in Adults Undergoing Elective Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Smita; Rapsang, Amy G.; Mahajan, Saurabh; Bhattacharjee, Shameek; Singh, Rajvir; Gogia, Anoop R.

    2011-01-01

    The effect of patient position on mask ventilation, laryngoscopic view, intubation difficulty, and the stance adopted by the anesthesiologist during laryngoscopy and tracheal intubation was investigated in 546 anesthetized adults in this prospective, randomized study. Patients were randomly assigned to either the sniffing position group or the simple extension group. The distribution of Cormack grades was comparable between the two groups (P = 0.144). The IDS score [median (IQR)] was 0 (0–2) in the sniffing group and 1 (0–2) in the simple extension group; P = 0.002. There were significant differences between groups with regard to intensity of lifting force, external laryngeal manipulation, alternate techniques used, number of attempts, and the stance adopted by anesthesiologist. We conclude that the sniffing position is superior to simple head extension with regard to ease of intubation as assessed by IDS. An upright stance is adopted by more anesthesiologists performing intubation with patients in the sniffing position. PMID:22110497

  3. The AirView Study: Comparison of Intubation Conditions and Ease between the Airtraq-AirView and the King Vision.

    PubMed

    Schoettker, Patrick; Corniche, Jocelyn

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a study assessing the quality and speed of intubation between the Airtraq with its new iPhone AirView app and the King Vision in a manikin. The primary endpoint was reduction of time needed for intubation. Secondary endpoints included times necessary for intubation. 30 anaesthetists randomly performed 3 intubations with each device on a difficult airway manikin. Participants had a professional experience of 12 years: 60.0% possessed the Airtraq in their hospital, 46.7% the King Vision, and 20.0% both. Median time difference [IQR] to identify glottis (1.1 [-1.3; 3.9] P = 0.019), for tube insertion (2.1 [-2.6; 9.4] P = 0.002) and lung ventilation (2.8 [-2.4; 11.5] P = 0.001), was shorter with the Airtraq-AirView. Median time for glottis visualization was significantly shorter with the Airtraq-AirView (5.3 [4.0; 8.4] versus 6.4 [4.6; 9.1]). Cormack Lehane before intubation was better with the King Vision (P = 0.03); no difference was noted during intubation, for subjective device insertion or quality of epiglottis visualisation. Assessment of tracheal tube insertion was better with the Airtraq-AirView. The Airtraq-AirView allows faster identification of the landmarks and intubation in a difficult airway manikin, while clinical relevance remains to be studied. Anaesthetists assessed the intubation better with the Airtraq-AirView. PMID:26161393

  4. Effects of developmental alcohol exposure vs. intubation stress on BDNF and TrkB expression in the hippocampus and frontal cortex of neonatal rats.

    PubMed

    Boschen, K E; Criss, K J; Palamarchouk, V; Roth, T L; Klintsova, A Y

    2015-06-01

    Third trimester-equivalent alcohol exposure causes significant deficits in hippocampal and cortical neuroplasticity, resulting in alterations to dendritic arborization, hippocampal adult neurogenesis, and performance on learning tasks. The current study investigated the impact of neonatal alcohol exposure (postnatal days 4-9, 5.25 g/kg/day) on expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and the tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) receptor in the hippocampal and frontal cortex of infant Long-Evans rats. Levels of BDNF protein were increased in the hippocampus, but not frontal cortex, of alcohol-exposed rats 24h after the last dose, when compared with undisturbed (but not sham-intubated) control animals. BDNF protein levels showed a trend toward increase in hippocampus of sham-intubated animals as well, suggesting an effect of the intubation procedure. TrkB protein was increased in the hippocampus of alcohol-exposed animals compared to sham-intubated pups, indicating an alcohol-specific effect on receptor expression. In addition, expression of bdnf total mRNA in alcohol-exposed and sham-intubated pups was enhanced in the hippocampus; however, there was a differential effect of alcohol and intubation stress on exon I- and IV-specific mRNA transcripts. Further, plasma corticosterone was found to be increased in both alcohol-exposed and sham-intubated pups compared to undisturbed animals. Upregulation of BDNF could potentially represent a neuroprotective mechanism activated following alcohol exposure or stress. The results suggest that alcohol exposure and stress have both overlapping and unique effects on BDNF, and highlight the need for the stress of intubation to be taken into consideration in studies that implement this route of drug delivery.

  5. Development of a novel graphene/polyaniline electrodeposited coating for on-line in-tube solid phase microextraction of aldehydes in human exhaled breath condensate.

    PubMed

    Li, Yu; Xu, Hui

    2015-05-22

    In this work, we introduced a novel graphene/polyaniline (G/PANI) electrodeposited coating for on-line in-tube solid phase microextraction (IT-SPME) for the first time. The G/PANI coating was prepared on the internal surface of stainless steel tube by a facile in-situ electrodeposition method. The morphology and formation of the composite coating were confirmed by scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Some important experimental parameters that could affect the extraction and separation such as the coating thickness, internal diameter of tube, sampling flow rate as well as sample volume were optimized. The extraction performance of the IT-SPME coating was evaluated systematically. The coating exhibited enhanced mechanical stability, long lifespan, large specific surface area and good biocompatibility compared with polyaniline coating. The on-line IT-SPME method showed higher enrichment efficiency, faster analysis speed and higher automation level than off-line manual mode. Six aldehydes were determined simultaneously with low limits of detection of 0.02-0.04nmolL(-1) and good linearity (R(2)≥0.9920). The method has been applied successfully for the determination of aldehydes in human exhaled breath condensates with good recovery (70-120%) and satisfied reproducibility (relative standard deviation: 1.1-11.9%). This on-line IT-SPME method provides a promising approach for the determination of trace aldehydes with approving sensitivity in human exhaled breath condensates.

  6. Electroplating of nanostructured polyaniline-polypyrrole composite coating in a stainless-steel tube for on-line in-tube solid phase microextraction.

    PubMed

    Asiabi, Hamid; Yamini, Yadollah; Seidi, Shahram; Esrafili, Ali; Rezaei, Fatemeh

    2015-06-01

    In this work, a novel and efficient on-line in-tube solid phase microextraction method followed by high performance liquid chromatography was developed for preconcentration and determination of trace amounts of parabens. A nanostructured polyaniline-polypyrrole composite was electrochemically deposited on the inner surface of a stainless steel tube and used as the extraction phase. Several important factors that influence the extraction efficiency, including type of solid-phase coating, extraction and desorption times, flow rates of the sample solution and eluent, pH, and ionic strength of the sample solution were investigated and optimized. Under the optimal conditions, the limits of detection were in the range of 0.02-0.04 μg L(-1). This method showed good linearity for parabens in the range of 0.07-50 μg L(-1), with coefficients of determination better than 0.998. The intra- and inter-assay precisions (RSD%, n=3) were in the range of 5.9-7.0% and 4.4-5.7% at three concentration levels of 2, 10, and 20 μg L(-1), respectively. The extraction recovery values for the spiked samples were in the acceptable range of 80.3-90.2%. The validated method was successfully applied for analysis of methyl-, ethyl-, and propyl parabens in some water, milk, and juice samples.

  7. Successful Predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierrehumbert, R.

    2012-12-01

    In an observational science, it is not possible to test hypotheses through controlled laboratory experiments. One can test parts of the system in the lab (as is done routinely with infrared spectroscopy of greenhouse gases), but the collective behavior cannot be tested experimentally because a star or planet cannot be brought into the lab; it must, instead, itself be the lab. In the case of anthropogenic global warming, this is all too literally true, and the experiment would be quite exciting if it weren't for the unsettling fact that we and all our descendents for the forseeable future will have to continue making our home in the lab. There are nonetheless many routes though which the validity of a theory of the collective behavior can be determined. A convincing explanation must not be a"just-so" story, but must make additional predictions that can be verified against observations that were not originally used in formulating the theory. The field of Earth and planetary climate has racked up an impressive number of such predictions. I will also admit as "predictions" statements about things that happened in the past, provided that observations or proxies pinning down the past climate state were not available at the time the prediction was made. The basic prediction that burning of fossil fuels would lead to an increase of atmospheric CO2, and that this would in turn alter the Earth's energy balance so as to cause tropospheric warming, is one of the great successes of climate science. It began in the lineage of Fourier, Tyndall and Arrhenius, and was largely complete with the the radiative-convective modeling work of Manabe in the 1960's -- all well before the expected warming had progressed far enough to be observable. Similarly, long before the increase in atmospheric CO2 could be detected, Bolin formulated a carbon cycle model and used it to predict atmospheric CO2 out to the year 2000; the actual values come in at the high end of his predicted range, for

  8. Risk factors for development of postoperative sore throat and hoarseness after endotracheal intubation in women: a secondary analysis.

    PubMed

    Jaensson, Maria; Gupta, Anil; Nilsson, Ulrica G

    2012-08-01

    Postoperative sore throat and hoarseness are common and disturbing complications following endotracheal intubation, and women are more frequently affected by these symptoms. This study explores risk factors associated with postoperative sore throat and hoarseness in women following intubation. In this prospective cross-sectional study, 97 patients undergoing elective ear, nose, and throat surgery or plastic surgery were included. Eight different variables were analyzed to detect possible associations for the development of postoperative sore throat or hoarseness. For data analysis, the chi2 test and the odds ratio were used. Three variables were found to be significant risk factors for postoperative sore throat: age greater than 60 years (P = .01), the use of a throat pack (P = .04), and endotracheal tube No. 7.0 (size 7 mm; P = .02). The only risk factor found to be significantly associated with developing hoarseness was an endotracheal cuff pressure below 20 centimeters of water (P = .04). Larger studies are needed to confirm these risk factors.

  9. Partial attenuation of the pressor response to endotracheal intubation. A comparison of the effects of intravenous clonidine and fentanyl.

    PubMed

    Carabine, U A; Allen, R W; Moore, J

    1992-07-01

    In a randomized, double-blind placebo controlled study, intravenous clonidine, fentanyl and saline were compared for both their effect on the cardiovascular response to intubation, and early post-operative pain. The patients treated with fentanyl and clonidine were more sedated and the requirements for induction agents were lower compared to the control group. On intubation, both the active treatments resulted in a smaller increase in both heart rate and mean arterial pressure compared to the control group. There was no significant difference in recovery times in the three groups. Although the time to first request for analgesia was longer in the clonidine group compared to both the fentanyl and saline groups, the difference in morphine requirements between the groups was not significant. The differences between the two active treatments were not significant, and clonidine offered no additional benefits over fentanyl for this purpose. PMID:1628636

  10. Achieving closure at Fernald

    SciTech Connect

    Bradburne, John; Patton, Tisha C.

    2001-02-25

    When Fluor Fernald took over the management of the Fernald Environmental Management Project in 1992, the estimated closure date of the site was more than 25 years into the future. Fluor Fernald, in conjunction with DOE-Fernald, introduced the Accelerated Cleanup Plan, which was designed to substantially shorten that schedule and save taxpayers more than $3 billion. The management of Fluor Fernald believes there are three fundamental concerns that must be addressed by any contractor hoping to achieve closure of a site within the DOE complex. They are relationship management, resource management and contract management. Relationship management refers to the interaction between the site and local residents, regulators, union leadership, the workforce at large, the media, and any other interested stakeholder groups. Resource management is of course related to the effective administration of the site knowledge base and the skills of the workforce, the attraction and retention of qualified a nd competent technical personnel, and the best recognition and use of appropriate new technologies. Perhaps most importantly, resource management must also include a plan for survival in a flat-funding environment. Lastly, creative and disciplined contract management will be essential to effecting the closure of any DOE site. Fluor Fernald, together with DOE-Fernald, is breaking new ground in the closure arena, and ''business as usual'' has become a thing of the past. How Fluor Fernald has managed its work at the site over the last eight years, and how it will manage the new site closure contract in the future, will be an integral part of achieving successful closure at Fernald.

  11. Oral versus intubated feeding and the effect on glycaemic and insulinaemic responses, gastric emptying and satiety.

    PubMed

    Morey, S; Shafat, A; Clegg, M E

    2016-01-01

    Cephalic phase responses (CPR) are important in early initiation of digestion and maximal absorption of nutrients prior to ingestion. Bypassing CPR has been shown to have consequences on metabolic responses that may influence satiety. The aim of this study was to investigate if using gastric intubation to bypass oro-pharyngeal and oesophageal exposure would reduce CPR including insulin and blood glucose and whether these impact on gastric emptying and satiety. Ten male subjects were tested on 2 occasions, 3-7 days apart after an overnight fast, in randomized order. Subjects were cannulated and intubated with a gastric tube for both tests. For test one, subjects ate 400 ml soup with a spoon and for test two the soup was infused into the stomach at an equivalent rate. Subsequently measurements of glycaemic (GR) and insulinaemic responses (IR) from cannula samples, breath samples for measurement of gastric emptying using the [(13)C] sodium acetate breath test and visual analogue scales (VAS) for satiety were taken over 180 min. There were differences in IR over the first 15 min (Oral: 169.0 ± 22.1; Gastric 124.1 ± 18.8; t(9) = 2.67; p = 0.028) but no difference in GR. There were differences in gastric emptying half time (Oral: 85.0 ± 2.7; Gastric 79.4 ± 3.3; t(9) = 2.40; p = 0.04) and ascension time (Oral: 68.2 ± 2.2; Gastric 64.0 ± 2.2; t(9) = 2.57; p = 0.03) with food taking longer to empty from the stomach on the Oral test day than on the Gastric test day. There was no significant difference in the satiety ratings. This study demonstrated that bypassing oro-pharyngeal and oesophageal exposure decreases the normal physiological CPR with detriment to IR and gastric emptying.

  12. Evaluation of effectiveness of the using a pillow in children for dental rehabilitation under general anesthesia in term for facilitate intubation

    PubMed Central

    Canpolat, Dilek Günay; Yıldırım, Mustafa Denizhan; Cantekin, Kenan; Aki, Aynur

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective: Airway safety may be provided with endotracheal intubation especially for oral procedures because of some potential risks such as aspiration of secretion or foreign bodies. In this study, we aimed to determine whether placing a pillow under the occiput may facilitate endotracheal intubation in non-cooperative children whose extensive dental treatments were planned to take place under general anesthesia. Methods: The study was performed in Erciyes University, Faculty of Dentistry between March-July 2014. A total 150 ASA I-II children, between 3-9 years were included in this study. Pillow was folded under the occiput in Group 1 (n=75), patients lay on a flat surface in Group 2 (n=75) during the anesthesia induction and intubation period. Results: There were no statistically significant differences between groups regarding the demographic data (age, weight, gender) (p>0.05). Operation times were similar in both groups (p=0.329). The number of intubation attempts was smilar in both groups (p=0.412). The intubation time was longer in group one than in group two (p= 0.025). Conclusion: We concluded that, placing a pillow under the patients occiput provided longer intubation time without changing the number of attempts in the normal airway in non-cooperative children whose extensive dental treatments were planned to take place under general anesthesia. PMID:27022372

  13. A comparison of the Enk Fiberoptic Atomizer Set(™) with boluses of topical anaesthesia for awake fibreoptic intubation.

    PubMed

    Pirlich, N; Lohse, J A; Schmidtmann, I; Didion, N; Piepho, T; Noppens, R R

    2016-07-01

    We compared the Enk Fiberoptic Atomizer Set(™) with boluses of topical anaesthesia administered via the working channel during awake fibreoptic tracheal intubation in 96 patients undergoing elective surgery. Patients who received topical anaesthesia via the atomiser, compared with boluses via the fibreoptic scope, reported a better median (IQR [range]) level of comfort: 1 (1-3 [1-10]) vs. 4 (2-6 [1-10]), p < 0.0001; experienced a reduced total number of coughs: 6 (3-10 [0-34]) vs. 11 (6-13 [0-25]), p = 0.0055; and fewer distinct coughing episodes: 7% vs. 27% respectively, p = 0.0133. The atomiser technique was quicker: 5 (3-6 [2-12]) min vs. 6 (5-7 [2-15]) min, p = 0.0009; and required less topical lidocaine: 100 mg (100-100 [80-160]) vs. 200 mg (200-200 [200-200]), p < 0.0001. Four weeks after nasal intubation, the incidence of nasal pain was less in the atomiser group compared with the control group (8% vs. 50%, p = 0.0015). We conclude that the atomiser was superior to bolus application for awake fibreoptic tracheal intubation. PMID:27150724

  14. Small(pox) success?

    PubMed

    Birn, Anne-Emanuelle

    2011-02-01

    The 30th anniversary of the World Health Organization's (WHO) official certification of smallpox eradication was marked by a slew of events hailing the campaign's dramatic tale of technological and organizational triumph against an ancient scourge. Yet commemorations also serve as moments of critical reflection. This article questions the acclaim showered upon smallpox eradication as the single greatest public health success in history. It examines how and why smallpox eradication and WHO's concurrent social justice-oriented primary health care approach (following from the Declaration of Alma-Ata) became competing paradigms. It synthesizes critiques of eradication's shortcomings and debunks some of the myths surrounding the global eradication campaign as a public health priority and necessity, and as a Cold War victory of cooperation. The article concludes with thoughts on integrating technical and social-political aspects of health within the context of welfare states as the means to achieving widespread and enduring global public health success.

  15. Small(pox) success?

    PubMed

    Birn, Anne-Emanuelle

    2011-02-01

    The 30th anniversary of the World Health Organization's (WHO) official certification of smallpox eradication was marked by a slew of events hailing the campaign's dramatic tale of technological and organizational triumph against an ancient scourge. Yet commemorations also serve as moments of critical reflection. This article questions the acclaim showered upon smallpox eradication as the single greatest public health success in history. It examines how and why smallpox eradication and WHO's concurrent social justice-oriented primary health care approach (following from the Declaration of Alma-Ata) became competing paradigms. It synthesizes critiques of eradication's shortcomings and debunks some of the myths surrounding the global eradication campaign as a public health priority and necessity, and as a Cold War victory of cooperation. The article concludes with thoughts on integrating technical and social-political aspects of health within the context of welfare states as the means to achieving widespread and enduring global public health success. PMID:21340334

  16. Iridium: failures & successes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, CarissaBryce; Beard, Suzette

    2001-03-01

    This paper will provide an overview of the Iridium business venture in terms of the challenges faced, the successes achieved, and the causes of the ultimate failure of the venture — bankruptcy and system de-orbit. The paper will address technical, business, and policy issues. The intent of the paper is to provide a balanced and accurate overview of the Iridium experience, to aid future decision-making by policy makers, the business community, and technical experts. Key topics will include the history of the program, the objectives and decision-making of Motorola, the market research and analysis conducted, partnering strategies and their impact, consumer equipment availability, and technical issues — target performance, performance achieved, technical accomplishments, and expected and unexpected technical challenges. The paper will use as sources trade media and business articles on the Iridium program, technical papers and conference presentations, Wall Street analyst's reports, and, where possible, interviews with participants and close observers.

  17. Hyomental distance in the different head positions and hyomental distance ratio in predicting difficult intubation

    PubMed Central

    Kalezić, Nevena; Lakićević, Mirko; Miličić, Biljana; Stojanović, Marina; Sabljak, Vera; Marković, Dejan

    2016-01-01

    The hyomental distance ratio (HMDR) is the ratio between the hyomental distance (HMD) (the distance between the hyoid bone and the tip of the chin) at the extreme of head extension (HMDe) and the one in the neutral position (HMDn). The objective of the study was to examine the predictive value, sensitivity, and specificity of HMDe, HMDn, and HMDR in predicting difficult endotracheal intubation (DI). A prospective study included 262 patients that underwent elective surgical operations. The following parameters were observed as possible predictors of DI: HMDR, HMDe, HMDn, Mallampati score, and body mass index (BMI). The cut-off points for the DI predictors were HMDe <5.3 cm, HMDn ≤5.5 cm, and HMDR ≤1.2. The assessment that DI existed was made by the anesthesiologist while performing laryngoscopy by applying the Cormack-Lehane classification. DI was present in 13 patients (5%). No significant difference was observed in the frequency of DI with regard to the sex, age, and BMI of the patients. Our research indicated HMDR as the best predictor of DI with a sensitivity of 95.6% and specificity of 69.2%. HMDR can be used in the everyday work of anesthesiologists because HMDR values ≤1.2 may reliably predict DI.

  18. Magnetism-Enhanced Monolith-Based In-Tube Solid Phase Microextraction.

    PubMed

    Mei, Meng; Huang, Xiaojia; Luo, Qing; Yuan, Dongxin

    2016-02-01

    Monolith-based in-tube solid phase microextraction (MB/IT-SPME) has received wide attention because of miniaturization, automation, expected loading capacity, and environmental friendliness. However, the unsatisfactory extraction efficiency becomes the main disadvantage of MB/IT-SPME. To overcome this circumstance, magnetism-enhanced MB/IT-SPME (ME-MB/IT-SPME) was developed in the present work, taking advantage of magnetic microfluidic principles. First, modified Fe3O4 nanoparticles were mixed with polymerization solution and in situ polymerized in the capillary to obtain a magnetic monolith extraction phase. After that, the monolithic capillary column was placed inside a magnetic coil that allowed the exertion of a variable magnetic field. The effects of intensity of magnetic field, adsorption and desorption flow rate, volume of sample, and desorption solvent on the performance of ME-MB/IT-SPME were investigated in detail. The analysis of six steroid hormones in water samples by the combination of ME-MB/IT-SPME with high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection was selected as a paradigm for the practical evaluation of ME-MB/IT-SPME. The application of a controlled magnetic field resulted in an obvious increase of extraction efficiencies of the target analytes between 70% and 100%. The present work demonstrated that application of different magnetic forces in adsorption and desorption steps can effectively enhance extraction efficiency of MB/IT-SPME systems. PMID:26742590

  19. The use of a nasogastric tube to facilitate nasotracheal intubation: a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Lim, C-W; Min, S-W; Kim, C-S; Chang, J-E; Park, J-E; Hwang, J-Y

    2014-06-01

    During nasotracheal intubation, the tracheal tube passes through either the upper or lower pathway in the nasal cavity, and it has been reported to be safer that the tracheal tube passes though the lower pathway, just below the inferior turbinate. We evaluated the use of a nasogastric tube as a guide to facilitate tracheal tube passage through the lower pathway, compared with the 'conventional' technique (blind insertion of the tracheal tube into the nasal cavity). A total of 60 adult patients undergoing oral and maxillofacial surgery were included in the study. In 20 out of 30 patients (66.7%) with the nasogastric tube-guided technique, the tracheal tube passed through the lower pathway, compared with 8 out of 30 patients (26.7%) with the 'conventional' technique (p = 0.004). Use of the nasogastric tube-guided technique reduced the incidence and severity of epistaxis (p = 0.027), improved navigability (p = 0.034) and required fewer manipulations (p = 0.001) than the 'conventional' technique.

  20. Sore throat after operation: influence of tracheal intubation, intracuff pressure and type of cuff.

    PubMed

    Jensen, P J; Hommelgaard, P; Søndergaard, P; Eriksen, S

    1982-04-01

    One hundred and eighty-four patients were studied to elucidate the contribution of intracuff pressure and cuff type to the occurrence of sore throat and hoarseness after operation. The patients were allocated to one of the following groups: A = mask only; B = reusable Rüsch tube with intermittent cuff volume adjustment; C = reusable Rüsch tube without cuff volume adjustment; D = disposable Portex Blue Line tube with intermittent cuff volume adjustment; E = disposable Shiley Low Pressure tube with intermittent cuff volume adjustment. Nitrous oxide was a component of anaesthesia in all patients. Moderate or severe symptoms were recorded in 30-33% of the patients in groups C, D and E, contrasting with group B, in which these sequelae were seen in only 10% of patients (P less than 0.025). All sequelae occurred less frequently in group A than in any of the other groups (P less than 0.025). Women were more likely to develop sore throat after intubation than were men (P less than 0.01). A possible relationship between differences in cuff-trachea contact area is postulated.