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Sample records for achieve sufficient accuracy

  1. Achieving Climate Change Absolute Accuracy in Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wielicki, Bruce A.; Young, D. F.; Mlynczak, M. G.; Thome, K. J; Leroy, S.; Corliss, J.; Anderson, J. G.; Ao, C. O.; Bantges, R.; Best, F.; Bowman, K.; Brindley, H.; Butler, J. J.; Collins, W.; Dykema, J. A.; Doelling, D. R.; Feldman, D. R.; Fox, N.; Huang, X.; Holz, R.; Huang, Y.; Jennings, D.; Jin, Z.; Johnson, D. G.; Jucks, K.; Kato, S.; Kratz, D. P.; Liu, X.; Lukashin, C.; Mannucci, A. J.; Phojanamongkolkij, N.; Roithmayr, C. M.; Sandford, S.; Taylor, P. C.; Xiong, X.

    2013-01-01

    The Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) mission will provide a calibration laboratory in orbit for the purpose of accurately measuring and attributing climate change. CLARREO measurements establish new climate change benchmarks with high absolute radiometric accuracy and high statistical confidence across a wide range of essential climate variables. CLARREO's inherently high absolute accuracy will be verified and traceable on orbit to Système Internationale (SI) units. The benchmarks established by CLARREO will be critical for assessing changes in the Earth system and climate model predictive capabilities for decades into the future as society works to meet the challenge of optimizing strategies for mitigating and adapting to climate change. The CLARREO benchmarks are derived from measurements of the Earth's thermal infrared spectrum (5-50 micron), the spectrum of solar radiation reflected by the Earth and its atmosphere (320-2300 nm), and radio occultation refractivity from which accurate temperature profiles are derived. The mission has the ability to provide new spectral fingerprints of climate change, as well as to provide the first orbiting radiometer with accuracy sufficient to serve as the reference transfer standard for other space sensors, in essence serving as a "NIST [National Institute of Standards and Technology] in orbit." CLARREO will greatly improve the accuracy and relevance of a wide range of space-borne instruments for decadal climate change. Finally, CLARREO has developed new metrics and methods for determining the accuracy requirements of climate observations for a wide range of climate variables and uncertainty sources. These methods should be useful for improving our understanding of observing requirements for most climate change observations.

  2. Is yield increase sufficient to achieve food security in China?

    PubMed

    Wei, Xing; Zhang, Zhao; Shi, Peijun; Wang, Pin; Chen, Yi; Song, Xiao; Tao, Fulu

    2015-01-01

    Increasing demand for food, driven by unprecedented population growth and increasing consumption, will keep challenging food security in China. Although cereal yields have substantially improved during the last three decades, whether it will keep thriving to meet the increasing demand is not known yet. Thus, an integrated analysis on the trends of crop yield and cultivated area is essential to better understand current state of food security in China, especially on county scale. So far, yield stagnation has extensively dominated the main cereal-growing areas across China. Rice yield is facing the most severe stagnation that 53.9% counties tracked in the study have stagnated significantly, followed by maize (42.4%) and wheat (41.9%). As another important element for production sustainability, but often neglected is the planted area patterns. It has been further demonstrated that the loss in productive arable land for rice and wheat have dramatically increased the pressure on achieving food security. Not only a great deal of the planted areas have stagnated since 1980, but also collapsed. 48.4% and 54.4% of rice- and wheat-growing counties have lost their cropland areas to varying degrees. Besides, 27.6% and 35.8% of them have retrograded below the level of the 1980s. The combined influence (both loss in yield and area) has determined the crop sustainable production in China to be pessimistic for rice and wheat, and consequently no surprise to find that more than half of counties rank a lower level of production sustainability. Therefore, given the potential yield increase in wheat and maize, as well as substantial area loss of rice and wheat, the possible targeted adaptation measures for both yield and cropping area is required at county scale. Moreover, policies on food trade, alongside advocation of low calorie diets, reducing food loss and waste can help to enhance food security. PMID:25680193

  3. Is yield increase sufficient to achieve food security in China?

    PubMed

    Wei, Xing; Zhang, Zhao; Shi, Peijun; Wang, Pin; Chen, Yi; Song, Xiao; Tao, Fulu

    2015-01-01

    Increasing demand for food, driven by unprecedented population growth and increasing consumption, will keep challenging food security in China. Although cereal yields have substantially improved during the last three decades, whether it will keep thriving to meet the increasing demand is not known yet. Thus, an integrated analysis on the trends of crop yield and cultivated area is essential to better understand current state of food security in China, especially on county scale. So far, yield stagnation has extensively dominated the main cereal-growing areas across China. Rice yield is facing the most severe stagnation that 53.9% counties tracked in the study have stagnated significantly, followed by maize (42.4%) and wheat (41.9%). As another important element for production sustainability, but often neglected is the planted area patterns. It has been further demonstrated that the loss in productive arable land for rice and wheat have dramatically increased the pressure on achieving food security. Not only a great deal of the planted areas have stagnated since 1980, but also collapsed. 48.4% and 54.4% of rice- and wheat-growing counties have lost their cropland areas to varying degrees. Besides, 27.6% and 35.8% of them have retrograded below the level of the 1980s. The combined influence (both loss in yield and area) has determined the crop sustainable production in China to be pessimistic for rice and wheat, and consequently no surprise to find that more than half of counties rank a lower level of production sustainability. Therefore, given the potential yield increase in wheat and maize, as well as substantial area loss of rice and wheat, the possible targeted adaptation measures for both yield and cropping area is required at county scale. Moreover, policies on food trade, alongside advocation of low calorie diets, reducing food loss and waste can help to enhance food security.

  4. A New Laparoscopic Surgical Procedure to Achieve Sufficient Mesorectal Excision in Upper Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ohigashi, Seiji; Taketa, Takashi; Sudo, Kazuki; Shiozaki, Hironori; Onodera, Hisashi

    2011-01-01

    Objective. Mesorectal excision corresponding to the location of a tumor, termed tumor-specific mesorectal excision (TSME), is commonly performed for resection of upper rectal cancer. We devised a new laparoscopic procedure for sufficient TSME with rectal transection followed by mesorectal excision. Operative Technique. After mobilization of the sigmoid colon and ligation of inferior mesenteric vessels, we dissected the mesorectum along the layer of the planned total mesorectal excision. The rectal wall was carefully separated from the mesorectum at the appropriate anal side from the tumor. After the rectum was isolated and transected using an endoscopic linear stapler, the rectal stump drew immediately toward the anal side, enabling the mesorectum to be identified clearly. In this way, sufficient TSME can be performed easily and accurately. This technique has been successfully conducted on 19 patients. Conclusion. This laparoscopic technique is a feasible and reliable procedure for achieving sufficient TSME. PMID:22312519

  5. 3D imaging: how to achieve highest accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luhmann, Thomas

    2011-07-01

    The generation of 3D information from images is a key technology in many different areas, e.g. in 3D modeling and representation of architectural or heritage objects, in human body motion tracking and scanning, in 3D scene analysis of traffic scenes, in industrial applications and many more. The basic concepts rely on mathematical representations of central perspective viewing as they are widely known from photogrammetry or computer vision approaches. The objectives of these methods differ, more or less, from high precision and well-structured measurements in (industrial) photogrammetry to fully-automated non-structured applications in computer vision. Accuracy and precision is a critical issue for the 3D measurement of industrial, engineering or medical objects. As state of the art, photogrammetric multi-view measurements achieve relative precisions in the order of 1:100000 to 1:200000, and relative accuracies with respect to retraceable lengths in the order of 1:50000 to 1:100000 of the largest object diameter. In order to obtain these figures a number of influencing parameters have to be optimized. These are, besides others: physical representation of object surface (targets, texture), illumination and light sources, imaging sensors, cameras and lenses, calibration strategies (camera model), orientation strategies (bundle adjustment), image processing of homologue features (target measurement, stereo and multi-image matching), representation of object or workpiece coordinate systems and object scale. The paper discusses the above mentioned parameters and offers strategies for obtaining highest accuracy in object space. Practical examples of high-quality stereo camera measurements and multi-image applications are used to prove the relevance of high accuracy in different applications, ranging from medical navigation to static and dynamic industrial measurements. In addition, standards for accuracy verifications are presented and demonstrated by practical examples

  6. The use of Jatropha curcas to achieve a self sufficient water distribution system: A case study in rural Senegal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archer, Alexandra

    The use of Jatropha curcas as a source of oil for fueling water pumps holds promise for rural communities struggling to achieve water security in arid climates. The potential for use in developing communities as an affordable, sustainable fuel source has been highly recommended for many reasons: it is easily propagated, drought resistant, grows rapidly, and has high-oil-content seeds, as well as medicinal and economic potential. This study uses a rural community in Senegal, West Africa, and calculates at what level of Jatropha curcas production the village is able to be self-sufficient in fueling their water system to meet drinking, sanitation and irrigation requirements. The current water distribution system was modelled to represent irrigation requirements for nine different Jatropha curcas cultivation and processing schemes. It was found that a combination of using recycled greywater for irrigation and a mechanical press to maximize oil recovered from the seeds of mature Jatropha curcas trees, would be able to operate the water system with no diesel required.

  7. Design considerations for achieving high accuracy with the SHOALS bathymetric lidar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guenther, Gary C.; Thomas, Robert W. L.; LaRocque, Paul E.

    1996-11-01

    The ultimate accuracy of depths from an airborne laser hydrography system depends both on careful hardware design aimed at producing the best possible accuracy and precision of recorded data, along with insensitivity to environmental effects, and on post-flight data processing software which corrects for a number of unavoidable biases and provides for flexible operator interaction to handle special cases. The generic procedure for obtaining a depth from an airborne lidar pulse involves measurement of the time between the surface return and the bottom return. In practice, because both of these return times are biased due to a number of environmental and hardware effects, it is necessary to apply various correctors in order to obtain depth estimates which are sufficiently accurate to meet International Hydrographic Office standards. Potential false targets, also of both environmental and hardware origin, must be discriminated, and wave heights must be removed. It is important to have a depth confidence value matched to accuracy and to have warnings about or automatic deletion of pulses with questionable characteristics. Techniques, procedures, and algorithms developed for the SHOALS systems are detailed here.

  8. 50% duty cycle may be inappropriate to achieve a sufficient chest compression depth when cardiopulmonary resuscitation is performed by female or light rescuers

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chang Jae; Chung, Tae Nyoung; Bae, Jinkun; Kim, Eui Chung; Choi, Sung Wook; Kim, Ok Jun

    2015-01-01

    Objective Current guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation recommend chest compressions (CC) during 50% of the duty cycle (DC) in part because of the ease with which individuals may learn to achieve it with practice. However, no consideration has been given to a possible interaction between DC and depth of CC, which has been the subject of recent study. Our aim was to determine if 50% DC is inappropriate to achieve sufficient chest compression depth for female and light rescuers. Methods Previously collected CC data, performed by senior medical students guided by metronome sounds with various down-stroke patterns and rates, were included in the analysis. Multiple linear regression analysis was performed to determine the association between average compression depth (ACD) with average compression rate (ACR), DC, and physical characteristics of the performers. Expected ACD was calculated for various settings. Results DC, ACR, body weight, male sex, and self-assessed physical strength were significantly associated with ACD in multivariate analysis. Based on our calculations, with 50% of DC, only men with ACR of 140/min or faster or body weight over 74 kg with ACR of 120/min can achieve sufficient ACD. Conclusion A shorter DC is independently correlated with deeper CC during simulated cardiopulmonary resuscitation. The optimal DC recommended in current guidelines may be inappropriate for achieving sufficient CD, especially for female or lighter-weight rescuers.

  9. Accuracy of Self-Reported College GPA: Gender-Moderated Differences by Achievement Level and Academic Self-Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caskie, Grace I. L.; Sutton, MaryAnn C.; Eckhardt, Amanda G.

    2014-01-01

    Assessments of college academic achievement tend to rely on self-reported GPA values, yet evidence is limited regarding the accuracy of those values. With a sample of 194 undergraduate college students, the present study examined whether accuracy of self-reported GPA differed based on level of academic performance or level of academic…

  10. Is the current prevention strategy based on vaccination coverage and epidemiological surveillance sufficient to achieve measles and rubella elimination in Europe?

    PubMed

    Plans-Rubio, Pedro

    2014-07-01

    Elimination of measles and rubella in Europe is a feasible objective, but it requires achieving a maintaining a high prevalence of protected individuals in order to prevent cases and outbreaks from imported cases. The epidemiology of measles and rubella in Europe in the period 2003-2013 suggests that we are far away from the elimination target for measles, while the situation is better for rubella. In this situation, a new preventive strategy based on serological surveillance systems should be developed in Europe in order to identify and immunise individuals in population groups without sufficient herd immunity against measles and rubella.

  11. Phase noise in pulsed Doppler lidar and limitations on achievable single-shot velocity accuracy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcnicholl, P.; Alejandro, S.

    1992-01-01

    The smaller sampling volumes afforded by Doppler lidars compared to radars allows for spatial resolutions at and below some sheer and turbulence wind structure scale sizes. This has brought new emphasis on achieving the optimum product of wind velocity and range resolutions. Several recent studies have considered the effects of amplitude noise, reduction algorithms, and possible hardware related signal artifacts on obtainable velocity accuracy. We discuss here the limitation on this accuracy resulting from the incoherent nature and finite temporal extent of backscatter from aerosols. For a lidar return from a hard (or slab) target, the phase of the intermediate frequency (IF) signal is random and the total return energy fluctuates from shot to shot due to speckle; however, the offset from the transmitted frequency is determinable with an accuracy subject only to instrumental effects and the signal to noise ratio (SNR), the noise being determined by the LO power in the shot noise limited regime. This is not the case for a return from a media extending over a range on the order of or greater than the spatial extent of the transmitted pulse, such as from atmospheric aerosols. In this case, the phase of the IF signal will exhibit a temporal random walk like behavior. It will be uncorrelated over times greater than the pulse duration as the transmitted pulse samples non-overlapping volumes of scattering centers. Frequency analysis of the IF signal in a window similar to the transmitted pulse envelope will therefore show shot-to-shot frequency deviations on the order of the inverse pulse duration reflecting the random phase rate variations. Like speckle, these deviations arise from the incoherent nature of the scattering process and diminish if the IF signal is averaged over times greater than a single range resolution cell (here the pulse duration). Apart from limiting the high SNR performance of a Doppler lidar, this shot-to-shot variance in velocity estimates has a

  12. What level of accuracy is achievable for preclinical dose painting studies on a clinical irradiation platform?

    PubMed

    Trani, Daniela; Reniers, Brigitte; Persoon, Lucas; Podesta, Mark; Nalbantov, Georgi; Leijenaar, Ralph T H; Granzier, Marlies; Yaromina, Ala; Dubois, Ludwig; Verhaegen, Frank; Lambin, Philippe

    2015-05-01

    in a rat tumor model on a clinical platform, with a high accuracy achieved in the delivery of complex dose distributions. Our work demonstrates the technical feasibility of this approach and enables future investigations on the therapeutic effect of preclinical dose painting strategies using a state-of-the-art clinical platform.

  13. Simvastatin Hydroxy Acid Fails to Attain Sufficient Central Nervous System Tumor Exposure to Achieve a Cytotoxic Effect: Results of a Preclinical Cerebral Microdialysis Study.

    PubMed

    Patel, Yogesh T; Jacus, Megan O; Davis, Abigail D; Boulos, Nidal; Turner, David C; Vuppala, Pradeep K; Freeman, Burgess B; Gilbertson, Richard J; Stewart, Clinton F

    2016-04-01

    3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors were potent hits against a mouse ependymoma cell line, but their effectiveness against central nervous system tumors will depend on their ability to cross the blood-brain barrier and attain a sufficient exposure at the tumor. Among 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A inhibitors that had activity in vitro, we prioritized simvastatin (SV) as the lead compound for preclinical pharmacokinetic studies based on its potential for central nervous system penetration as determined from in silico models. Furthermore, we performed systemic plasma disposition and cerebral microdialysis studies of SV (100 mg/kg, p.o.) in a murine model of ependymoma to characterize plasma and tumor extracellular fluid (tECF) pharmacokinetic properties. The murine dosage of SV (100 mg/kg, p.o.) was equivalent to the maximum tolerated dose in patients (7.5 mg/kg, p.o.) based on equivalent plasma exposure of simvastatin acid (SVA) between the two species. SV is rapidly metabolized in murine plasma with 15 times lower exposure compared with human plasma. SVA exposure in tECF was <33.8 ± 11.9 µg/l per hour, whereas the tumor to plasma partition coefficient of SVA was <0.084 ± 0.008. Compared with in vitro washout IC50 values, we did not achieve sufficient exposure of SVA in tECF to suggest tumor growth inhibition; therefore, SV was not carried forward in subsequent preclinical efficacy studies. PMID:26802130

  14. Referential Communication Accuracy of Mother-Child Pairs and Children's Later Scholastic Achievement: A Follow-Up Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDevitt, Teresa M.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    The relationship between the referential communication accuracy of mothers and their 4-year-old children and the children's achievement in vocabulary and mathematics at age 12 was examined in 47 American and 44 Japanese mother-child pairs. Positive correlations were found in both cultures. (Author/BN)

  15. The Effects of Individual or Group Guidelines on the Calibration Accuracy and Achievement of High School Biology Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bol, Linda; Hacker, Douglas J.; Walck, Camilla C.; Nunnery, John A.

    2012-01-01

    A 2 x 2 factorial design was employed in a quasi-experiment to investigate the effects of guidelines in group or individual settings on the calibration accuracy and achievement of 82 high school biology students. Significant main effects indicated that calibration practice with guidelines and practice in group settings increased prediction and…

  16. FcRn binding is not sufficient for achieving systemic therapeutic levels of immunoglobulin G after oral delivery of enteric-coated capsules in cynomolgus macaques.

    PubMed

    Muzammil, Salman; Mabus, John R; Cooper, Philip R; Brezski, Randall J; Bement, Courtney B; Perkinson, Rob; Huebert, Norman D; Thompson, Suzanne; Levine, Dalia; Kliwinski, Connie; Bradley, Dino; Hornby, Pamela J

    2016-06-01

    Although much speculation has surrounded intestinally expressed FcRn as a means for systemic uptake of orally administered immunoglobulin G (IgG), this has not been validated in translational models beyond neonates or in FcRn-expressing cells in vitro. Recently, IgG1 intestinal infusion acutely in anesthetized cynomolgus resulted in detectable serum monoclonal antibody (mAb) levels. In this study, we show that IgG2 has greater protease resistance to intestinal enzymes in vitro and mice in vivo, due to protease resistance in the hinge region. An IgG2 mAb engineered for FcRn binding, was optimally formulated, lyophilized, and loaded into enteric-coated capsules for oral dosing in cynomolgus. Small intestinal pH 7.5 was selected for enteric delivery based on gastrointestinal pH profiling of cynomolgus by operator-assisted IntelliCap System(®). Milling of the lyophilized IgG2 M428L FcRn-binding variant after formulation in 10 mmol/L histidine, pH 5.7, 8.5% sucrose, 0.04% PS80 did not alter the physicochemical properties nor the molecular integrity compared to the batch released in PBS. Size 3 hard gel capsules (23.2 mg IgG2 M428L ~3 mg/kg) were coated with hydroxypropyl methylcellulose acetate succinate for rapid dissolution at pH 7.5 in small intestine and FcRn binding of encapsulated mAb confirmed. Initial capsule dosing by endoscopic delivery into the small intestine achieved 0.2 + 0.1 ng/mL (n = 5) peak at 24 h. Weekly oral capsule dosing for 6 weeks achieved levels of 0.4 + 0.2 ng/mL and, despite increasing the dose and frequency, remained below 1 ng/mL. In conclusion, lyophilized milled mAb retains FcRn binding and molecular integrity for small intestinal delivery. The low systemic exposure has demonstrated the limitations of intestinal FcRn in non-human primates and the unfeasibility of employing this for therapeutic levels of mAb. Local mAb delivery with limited systemic exposure may be sufficient as a therapeutic for intestinal diseases. PMID

  17. You are so beautiful... to me: seeing beyond biases and achieving accuracy in romantic relationships.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Brittany C; Vazire, Simine

    2014-09-01

    Do romantic partners see each other realistically, or do they have overly positive perceptions of each other? Research has shown that realism and positivity co-exist in romantic partners' perceptions (Boyes & Fletcher, 2007). The current study takes a novel approach to explaining this seemingly paradoxical effect when it comes to physical attractiveness--a highly evaluative trait that is especially relevant to romantic relationships. Specifically, we argue that people are aware that others do not see their partners as positively as they do. Using both mean differences and correlational approaches, we test the hypothesis that despite their own biased and idiosyncratic perceptions, people have 2 types of partner-knowledge: insight into how their partners see themselves (i.e., identity accuracy) and insight into how others see their partners (i.e., reputation accuracy). Our results suggest that romantic partners have some awareness of each other's identity and reputation for physical attractiveness, supporting theories that couple members' perceptions are driven by motives to fulfill both esteem- and epistemic-related needs (i.e., to see their partners positively and realistically). PMID:25133729

  18. Achieving sub-pixel geolocation accuracy in support of MODIS land science

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wolfe, R.E.; Nishihama, M.; Fleig, A.J.; Kuyper, J.A.; Roy, D.P.; Storey, J.C.; Patt, F.S.

    2002-01-01

    The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) was launched in December 1999 on the polar orbiting Terra spacecraft and since February 2000 has been acquiring daily global data in 36 spectral bands-29 with 1 km, five with 500 m, and two with 250 m nadir pixel dimensions. The Terra satellite has on-board exterior orientation (position and attitude) measurement systems designed to enable geolocation of MODIS data to approximately 150 m (1??) at nadir. A global network of ground control points is being used to determine biases and trends in the sensor orientation. Biases have been removed by updating models of the spacecraft and instrument orientation in the MODIS geolocation software several times since launch and have improved the MODIS geolocation to approximately 50 m (1??) at nadir. This paper overviews the geolocation approach, summarizes the first year of geolocation analysis, and overviews future work. The approach allows an operational characterization of the MODIS geolocation errors and enables individual MODIS observations to be geolocated to the sub-pixel accuracies required for terrestrial global change applications. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. a Method to Achieve Large Volume, High Accuracy Photogrammetric Measurements Through the Use of AN Actively Deformable Sensor Mounting Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargeant, B.; Robson, S.; Szigeti, E.; Richardson, P.; El-Nounu, A.; Rafla, M.

    2016-06-01

    When using any optical measurement system one important factor to consider is the placement of the sensors in relation to the workpiece being measured. When making decisions on sensor placement compromises are necessary in selecting the best placement based on the shape and size of the object of interest and the desired resolution and accuracy. One such compromise is in the distance the sensors are placed from the measurement surface, where a smaller distance gives a higher spatial resolution and local accuracy and a greater distance reduces the number of measurements necessary to cover a large area reducing the build-up of errors between measurements and increasing global accuracy. This paper proposes a photogrammetric approach whereby a number of sensors on a continuously flexible mobile platform are used to obtain local measurements while the position of the sensors is determined by a 6DoF tracking solution and the results combined to give a single set of measurement data within a continuous global coordinate system. The ability of this approach to achieve both high accuracy measurement and give results over a large volume is then tested and areas of weakness to be improved upon are identified.

  20. Clinical decision support systems for improving diagnostic accuracy and achieving precision medicine.

    PubMed

    Castaneda, Christian; Nalley, Kip; Mannion, Ciaran; Bhattacharyya, Pritish; Blake, Patrick; Pecora, Andrew; Goy, Andre; Suh, K Stephen

    2015-01-01

    As research laboratories and clinics collaborate to achieve precision medicine, both communities are required to understand mandated electronic health/medical record (EHR/EMR) initiatives that will be fully implemented in all clinics in the United States by 2015. Stakeholders will need to evaluate current record keeping practices and optimize and standardize methodologies to capture nearly all information in digital format. Collaborative efforts from academic and industry sectors are crucial to achieving higher efficacy in patient care while minimizing costs. Currently existing digitized data and information are present in multiple formats and are largely unstructured. In the absence of a universally accepted management system, departments and institutions continue to generate silos of information. As a result, invaluable and newly discovered knowledge is difficult to access. To accelerate biomedical research and reduce healthcare costs, clinical and bioinformatics systems must employ common data elements to create structured annotation forms enabling laboratories and clinics to capture sharable data in real time. Conversion of these datasets to knowable information should be a routine institutionalized process. New scientific knowledge and clinical discoveries can be shared via integrated knowledge environments defined by flexible data models and extensive use of standards, ontologies, vocabularies, and thesauri. In the clinical setting, aggregated knowledge must be displayed in user-friendly formats so that physicians, non-technical laboratory personnel, nurses, data/research coordinators, and end-users can enter data, access information, and understand the output. The effort to connect astronomical numbers of data points, including '-omics'-based molecular data, individual genome sequences, experimental data, patient clinical phenotypes, and follow-up data is a monumental task. Roadblocks to this vision of integration and interoperability include ethical, legal

  1. Peaks, plateaus, numerical instabilities, and achievable accuracy in Galerkin and norm minimizing procedures for solving Ax=b

    SciTech Connect

    Cullum, J.

    1994-12-31

    Plots of the residual norms generated by Galerkin procedures for solving Ax = b often exhibit strings of irregular peaks. At seemingly erratic stages in the iterations, peaks appear in the residual norm plot, intervals of iterations over which the norms initially increase and then decrease. Plots of the residual norms generated by related norm minimizing procedures often exhibit long plateaus, sequences of iterations over which reductions in the size of the residual norm are unacceptably small. In an earlier paper the author discussed and derived relationships between such peaks and plateaus within corresponding Galerkin/Norm Minimizing pairs of such methods. In this paper, through a set of numerical experiments, the author examines connections between peaks, plateaus, numerical instabilities, and the achievable accuracy for such pairs of iterative methods. Three pairs of methods, GMRES/Arnoldi, QMR/BCG, and two bidiagonalization methods are studied.

  2. The mechanism behind the environmental kuznets curve for carbon dioxide is unlikely to be sufficient to achieve the 2°C goal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornhuber, Kai; Reusser, Dominik E.; Costa, Luis; Kropp, Jürgen P.; Rybski, Diego

    2015-04-01

    Pollution may increase with the income per capita up to a maximum, above which it decreases with the further increase in income per capita, i.e. following an inverse U-shape in the pollution vs. income per capita. Such a behaviour is called the Environmental Kuznets Curves (EKC). In a previous presentation, we reviewed EKC for CO2 exploring its relation between CO2 per capita and the Human Development Index (HDI) between 1990 and 2013. We find evidence for a reduction in CO2 emissions per capita in highly developed countries. We present an updated model according to which the emissions per capita of a country are composed of a component related to the actual state of development and a component related to the change of development. The model leads to four distinct cases of which two have EKC shape and two imply saturation. This outcome is in line with previously suggested qualitative relations. Based on the past trend in parameters of the less extreme version of the EKC curve, we formulate a scenario for the future and contrast it against the RCP scenarios. We find that the mechanisms behind the EKC are unlikely to be sufficient to limit global warming below the 2°C target.

  3. The Current Recommended Vitamin D Intake Guideline for Diet and Supplements During Pregnancy Is Not Adequate to Achieve Vitamin D Sufficiency for Most Pregnant Women

    PubMed Central

    Field, Catherine J.; Kaplan, Bonnie J.; Rabi, Doreen M.; Maggiore, Jack A.; O’Beirne, Maeve; Hanley, David A.; Eliasziw, Misha; Dewey, Deborah; Weinberg, Amy; Ross, Sue J.

    2016-01-01

    Background The aims of this study were to determine if pregnant women consumed the recommended vitamin D through diet alone or through diet and supplements, and if they achieved the current reference range vitamin D status when their reported dietary intake met the current recommendations. Methods Data and banked blood samples collected in second trimester from a subset of 537 women in the APrON (Alberta Pregnant Outcomes and Nutrition) study cohort were examined. Frozen collected plasma were assayed using LC-MS/MS (liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry) to determine 25(OH)D2, 25(OH)D3, 3-epi-25(OH)D3 concentrations. Dietary data were obtained from questionnaires including a Supplement Intake Questionnaire and a 24-hour recall of the previous day’s diet. Results Participants were 87% Caucasian; mean (SD) age of 31.3 (4.3); BMI 25.8 (4.7); 58% were primiparous; 90% had education beyond high school; 80% had a family income higher than CAN $70,000/year. 25(OH)D2, 25(OH)D3, and 3-epi-25(OH)D3) were identified in all of the 537 plasma samples;3-epi-25(OH)D3 contributed 5% of the total vitamin D. The median (IQR) total 25(OH)D (D2+D3) was 92.7 (30.4) nmol/L and 20% of women had 25(OH)D concentration < 75 nmol/L. The median (IQR) reported vitamin D intake from diet and supplements was 600 (472) IU/day. There was a significant relationship between maternal reported dietary vitamin D intake (diet and supplement) and 25(OH)D and 3-epi-25(OH)D3 concentrations in an adjusted linear regression model. Conclusions We demonstrated the current RDA (600 IU/ day) may not be adequate to achieve vitamin D status >75 nmol/L in some pregnant women who are residing in higher latitudes (Calgary, 51°N) in Alberta, Canada and the current vitamin D recommendations for Canadian pregnant women need to be re-evaluated. PMID:27367800

  4. Cognitive Processing Profiles of School-Age Children Who Meet Low-Achievement, IQ-Discrepancy, or Dual Criteria for Underachievement in Oral Reading Accuracy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Santen, Frank W.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the cognitive processing profiles of school-age children (ages 7 to 17) who met criteria for underachievement in oral reading accuracy based on three different methods: 1) use of a regression-based IQ-achievement discrepancy only (REGonly), 2) use of a low-achievement cutoff only (LAonly), and 3) use of a…

  5. Linear Discriminant Analysis Achieves High Classification Accuracy for the BOLD fMRI Response to Naturalistic Movie Stimuli.

    PubMed

    Mandelkow, Hendrik; de Zwart, Jacco A; Duyn, Jeff H

    2016-01-01

    Naturalistic stimuli like movies evoke complex perceptual processes, which are of great interest in the study of human cognition by functional MRI (fMRI). However, conventional fMRI analysis based on statistical parametric mapping (SPM) and the general linear model (GLM) is hampered by a lack of accurate parametric models of the BOLD response to complex stimuli. In this situation, statistical machine-learning methods, a.k.a. multivariate pattern analysis (MVPA), have received growing attention for their ability to generate stimulus response models in a data-driven fashion. However, machine-learning methods typically require large amounts of training data as well as computational resources. In the past, this has largely limited their application to fMRI experiments involving small sets of stimulus categories and small regions of interest in the brain. By contrast, the present study compares several classification algorithms known as Nearest Neighbor (NN), Gaussian Naïve Bayes (GNB), and (regularized) Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) in terms of their classification accuracy in discriminating the global fMRI response patterns evoked by a large number of naturalistic visual stimuli presented as a movie. Results show that LDA regularized by principal component analysis (PCA) achieved high classification accuracies, above 90% on average for single fMRI volumes acquired 2 s apart during a 300 s movie (chance level 0.7% = 2 s/300 s). The largest source of classification errors were autocorrelations in the BOLD signal compounded by the similarity of consecutive stimuli. All classifiers performed best when given input features from a large region of interest comprising around 25% of the voxels that responded significantly to the visual stimulus. Consistent with this, the most informative principal components represented widespread distributions of co-activated brain regions that were similar between subjects and may represent functional networks. In light of these

  6. Linear Discriminant Analysis Achieves High Classification Accuracy for the BOLD fMRI Response to Naturalistic Movie Stimuli.

    PubMed

    Mandelkow, Hendrik; de Zwart, Jacco A; Duyn, Jeff H

    2016-01-01

    Naturalistic stimuli like movies evoke complex perceptual processes, which are of great interest in the study of human cognition by functional MRI (fMRI). However, conventional fMRI analysis based on statistical parametric mapping (SPM) and the general linear model (GLM) is hampered by a lack of accurate parametric models of the BOLD response to complex stimuli. In this situation, statistical machine-learning methods, a.k.a. multivariate pattern analysis (MVPA), have received growing attention for their ability to generate stimulus response models in a data-driven fashion. However, machine-learning methods typically require large amounts of training data as well as computational resources. In the past, this has largely limited their application to fMRI experiments involving small sets of stimulus categories and small regions of interest in the brain. By contrast, the present study compares several classification algorithms known as Nearest Neighbor (NN), Gaussian Naïve Bayes (GNB), and (regularized) Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) in terms of their classification accuracy in discriminating the global fMRI response patterns evoked by a large number of naturalistic visual stimuli presented as a movie. Results show that LDA regularized by principal component analysis (PCA) achieved high classification accuracies, above 90% on average for single fMRI volumes acquired 2 s apart during a 300 s movie (chance level 0.7% = 2 s/300 s). The largest source of classification errors were autocorrelations in the BOLD signal compounded by the similarity of consecutive stimuli. All classifiers performed best when given input features from a large region of interest comprising around 25% of the voxels that responded significantly to the visual stimulus. Consistent with this, the most informative principal components represented widespread distributions of co-activated brain regions that were similar between subjects and may represent functional networks. In light of these

  7. Linear Discriminant Analysis Achieves High Classification Accuracy for the BOLD fMRI Response to Naturalistic Movie Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Mandelkow, Hendrik; de Zwart, Jacco A.; Duyn, Jeff H.

    2016-01-01

    Naturalistic stimuli like movies evoke complex perceptual processes, which are of great interest in the study of human cognition by functional MRI (fMRI). However, conventional fMRI analysis based on statistical parametric mapping (SPM) and the general linear model (GLM) is hampered by a lack of accurate parametric models of the BOLD response to complex stimuli. In this situation, statistical machine-learning methods, a.k.a. multivariate pattern analysis (MVPA), have received growing attention for their ability to generate stimulus response models in a data-driven fashion. However, machine-learning methods typically require large amounts of training data as well as computational resources. In the past, this has largely limited their application to fMRI experiments involving small sets of stimulus categories and small regions of interest in the brain. By contrast, the present study compares several classification algorithms known as Nearest Neighbor (NN), Gaussian Naïve Bayes (GNB), and (regularized) Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) in terms of their classification accuracy in discriminating the global fMRI response patterns evoked by a large number of naturalistic visual stimuli presented as a movie. Results show that LDA regularized by principal component analysis (PCA) achieved high classification accuracies, above 90% on average for single fMRI volumes acquired 2 s apart during a 300 s movie (chance level 0.7% = 2 s/300 s). The largest source of classification errors were autocorrelations in the BOLD signal compounded by the similarity of consecutive stimuli. All classifiers performed best when given input features from a large region of interest comprising around 25% of the voxels that responded significantly to the visual stimulus. Consistent with this, the most informative principal components represented widespread distributions of co-activated brain regions that were similar between subjects and may represent functional networks. In light of these

  8. Strategies for Achieving High Sequencing Accuracy for Low Diversity Samples and Avoiding Sample Bleeding Using Illumina Platform

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Abhishek; Skrzypczak, Magdalena; Ginalski, Krzysztof; Rowicka, Maga

    2015-01-01

    analysis can be repeated from saved sequencing images using the Long Template Protocol to increase accuracy. PMID:25860802

  9. Achieving plane wave accuracy in linear-scaling density functional theory applied to periodic systems: A case study on crystalline silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skylaris, Chris-Kriton; Haynes, Peter D.

    2007-10-01

    Linear-scaling methods for density functional theory promise to revolutionize the scope and scale of first-principles quantum mechanical calculations. Crystalline silicon has been the system of choice for exploratory tests of such methods in the literature, yet attempts at quantitative comparisons under linear-scaling conditions with traditional methods or experimental results have not been forthcoming. A detailed study using the ONETEP code is reported here, demonstrating for the first time that plane wave accuracy can be achieved in linear-scaling calculations on periodic systems.

  10. Necessary, but also Sufficient?

    PubMed

    Martens, Sascha

    2016-07-01

    Cell biologists are equipped with a plethora of techniques and approaches to unravel the fascinating inner working of the cell. Among these, biochemistry has the ability to define the machinery that is both necessary and sufficient for a given process and, therefore, to define its core mechanism. PMID:27142894

  11. Self-Sufficiency Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alaska State Dept. of Education, Juneau. Div. of Adult and Vocational Education.

    These instructional materials were developed as a supplement to the "Alaska State Model Curriculum in Renewable Natural Resources/Agriculture." The topics covered focus on competencies from the curriculum for which materials were not readily available to Alaskan teachers and provide information that may not be sufficiently covered by existing…

  12. Achieving Accuracy Requirements for Forest Biomass Mapping: A Data Fusion Method for Estimating Forest Biomass and LiDAR Sampling Error with Spaceborne Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montesano, P. M.; Cook, B. D.; Sun, G.; Simard, M.; Zhang, Z.; Nelson, R. F.; Ranson, K. J.; Lutchke, S.; Blair, J. B.

    2012-01-01

    The synergistic use of active and passive remote sensing (i.e., data fusion) demonstrates the ability of spaceborne light detection and ranging (LiDAR), synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and multispectral imagery for achieving the accuracy requirements of a global forest biomass mapping mission. This data fusion approach also provides a means to extend 3D information from discrete spaceborne LiDAR measurements of forest structure across scales much larger than that of the LiDAR footprint. For estimating biomass, these measurements mix a number of errors including those associated with LiDAR footprint sampling over regional - global extents. A general framework for mapping above ground live forest biomass (AGB) with a data fusion approach is presented and verified using data from NASA field campaigns near Howland, ME, USA, to assess AGB and LiDAR sampling errors across a regionally representative landscape. We combined SAR and Landsat-derived optical (passive optical) image data to identify forest patches, and used image and simulated spaceborne LiDAR data to compute AGB and estimate LiDAR sampling error for forest patches and 100m, 250m, 500m, and 1km grid cells. Forest patches were delineated with Landsat-derived data and airborne SAR imagery, and simulated spaceborne LiDAR (SSL) data were derived from orbit and cloud cover simulations and airborne data from NASA's Laser Vegetation Imaging Sensor (L VIS). At both the patch and grid scales, we evaluated differences in AGB estimation and sampling error from the combined use of LiDAR with both SAR and passive optical and with either SAR or passive optical alone. This data fusion approach demonstrates that incorporating forest patches into the AGB mapping framework can provide sub-grid forest information for coarser grid-level AGB reporting, and that combining simulated spaceborne LiDAR with SAR and passive optical data are most useful for estimating AGB when measurements from LiDAR are limited because they minimized

  13. Sufficient Statistics: an Example

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quirein, J.

    1973-01-01

    The feature selection problem is considered resulting from the transformation x = Bz where B is a k by n matrix of rank k and k is or = to n. Such a transformation can be considered to reduce the dimension of each observation vector z, and in general, such a transformation results in a loss of information. In terms of the divergence, this information loss is expressed by the fact that the average divergence D sub B computed using variable x is less than or equal to the average divergence D computed using variable z. If D sub B = D, then B is said to be a sufficient statistic for the average divergence D. If B is a sufficient statistic for the average divergence, then it can be shown that the probability of misclassification computed using variable x (of dimension k is or = to n) is equal to the probability of misclassification computed using variable z. Also included is what is believed to be a new proof of the well known fact that D is or = to D sub B. Using the techniques necessary to prove the above fact, it is shown that the Brattacharyya distance as measured by variable x is less than or equal to the Brattacharyya distance as measured by variable z.

  14. Characterizations of linear sufficient statistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, B. C., Jr.; Redner, R.; Decell, H. P., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    A necessary and sufficient condition is developed such that there exists a continous linear sufficient statistic T for a dominated collection of totally finite measures defined on the Borel field generated by the open sets of a Banach space X. In particular, corollary necessary and sufficient conditions are given so that there exists a rank K linear sufficient statistic T for any finite collection of probability measures having n-variate normal densities. In this case a simple calculation, involving only the population means and covariances, determines the smallest integer K for which there exists a rank K linear sufficient statistic T (as well as an associated statistic T itself).

  15. Characterizations of linear sufficient statistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, B. C., Jr.; Reoner, R.; Decell, H. P., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    A surjective bounded linear operator T from a Banach space X to a Banach space Y must be a sufficient statistic for a dominated family of probability measures defined on the Borel sets of X. These results were applied, so that they characterize linear sufficient statistics for families of the exponential type, including as special cases the Wishart and multivariate normal distributions. The latter result was used to establish precisely which procedures for sampling from a normal population had the property that the sample mean was a sufficient statistic.

  16. ["The prize goes to self-sufficiency"].

    PubMed

    Trias, M

    1993-12-01

    The Colombian family planning organization Profamilia was recognized at the 1993 annual meeting of the Western Hemisphere Region of the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) for its efforts to achieve financial self-sufficiency. Because of the announced termination of annual assistance from the US Agency for International Development (USAID), one of Profamilia's most significant external donors, the pressure to achieve self-sufficiency has intensified. Funds will be made available to Profamilia before the termination of assistance to improve infrastructure, equipment, and training. A large quantity of contraceptives will also be provided, and a new endowment will be created by USAID from which Profamilia may use the earnings. Profamilia's strategy for achieving self-sufficiency consists of five specific tactics. Recuperation refers to a cautious but sustained increase in family planning fees. Diversification refers to the medical and surgical activities apart from family planning that Profamilia will carry out for profit. The social marketing program will be expanded and improved. The fourth tactic involves a series of unrelated mechanisms to generate income, and the fifth refers to reduction of all nonessential expenditures. The measures will be made without hurting the quality of Profamilia's services or improving the average socioeconomic profile of users, who will continue to belong primarily to the less favored classes. The continued assistance of the IPPF is especially important to Profamilia as it prepares for the change. PMID:12287890

  17. ["The prize goes to self-sufficiency"].

    PubMed

    Trias, M

    1993-12-01

    The Colombian family planning organization Profamilia was recognized at the 1993 annual meeting of the Western Hemisphere Region of the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) for its efforts to achieve financial self-sufficiency. Because of the announced termination of annual assistance from the US Agency for International Development (USAID), one of Profamilia's most significant external donors, the pressure to achieve self-sufficiency has intensified. Funds will be made available to Profamilia before the termination of assistance to improve infrastructure, equipment, and training. A large quantity of contraceptives will also be provided, and a new endowment will be created by USAID from which Profamilia may use the earnings. Profamilia's strategy for achieving self-sufficiency consists of five specific tactics. Recuperation refers to a cautious but sustained increase in family planning fees. Diversification refers to the medical and surgical activities apart from family planning that Profamilia will carry out for profit. The social marketing program will be expanded and improved. The fourth tactic involves a series of unrelated mechanisms to generate income, and the fifth refers to reduction of all nonessential expenditures. The measures will be made without hurting the quality of Profamilia's services or improving the average socioeconomic profile of users, who will continue to belong primarily to the less favored classes. The continued assistance of the IPPF is especially important to Profamilia as it prepares for the change.

  18. A localized orbital analysis of the thermochemical errors in hybrid density functional theory: achieving chemical accuracy via a simple empirical correction scheme.

    PubMed

    Friesner, Richard A; Knoll, Eric H; Cao, Yixiang

    2006-09-28

    This paper describes an empirical localized orbital correction model which improves the accuracy of density functional theory (DFT) methods for the prediction of thermochemical properties for molecules of first and second row elements. The B3LYP localized orbital correction version of the model improves B3LYP DFT atomization energy calculations on the G3 data set of 222 molecules from a mean absolute deviation (MAD) from experiment of 4.8 to 0.8 kcal/mol. The almost complete elimination of large outliers and the substantial reduction in MAD yield overall results comparable to the G3 wave-function-based method; furthermore, the new model has zero additional computational cost beyond standard DFT calculations. The following four classes of correction parameters are applied to a molecule based on standard valence bond assignments: corrections to atoms, corrections to individual bonds, corrections for neighboring bonds of a given bond, and radical environmental corrections. Although the model is heuristic and is based on a 22 parameter multiple linear regression to experimental errors, each of the parameters is justified on physical grounds, and each provides insight into the fundamental limitations of DFT, most importantly the failure of current DFT methods to accurately account for nondynamical electron correlation.

  19. The coarse pointing assembly for SILEX program or how to achieve outstanding pointing accuracy with simple hardware associated with consistent control laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buvat, Daniel; Muller, Gerard; Peyrot, Patrick

    1991-06-01

    Attention is given to the coarse pointing assembly (CPA) for the SILEX program, designed on the basis of 10 years of MATRA experience in very accurate drive mechanisms successfully conducted by the SPOT 1 and 2 flights as well as EURECA IOC. The basic key design feature of the mechanism is a 1200-step stepper motor driven in microstepping with harmonic defects compensation. This allows very low torque noise associated with a high accuracy (0.01 deg). The direct drive principle avoids backlash and permits a linear control of the output shaft of each drive. The only parts susceptible to possible wear are the ball bearings, which have a design margin of greater than 1000 for 10 yr of service life. In order to meet the dynamic performances required by SILEX, a closed loop active damping system is added to each drive unit. Two accelerometers used in a differential way sense the hinge microvibrations and an active damping loop reduces their Q factor down to a few dB. All CPA electrical parts (including motor, optical encoder, and accelerometer) are redundant to avoid single point of failure.

  20. Energy Strategic Planning & Sufficiency Project

    SciTech Connect

    Retziaff, Greg

    2005-03-30

    This report provides information regarding options available, their advantages and disadvantages, and the costs for pursuing activities to advance Smith River Rancheria toward an energy program that reduces their energy costs, allows greater self-sufficiency and stimulates economic development and employment opportunities within and around the reservation. The primary subjects addressed in this report are as follows: (1) Baseline Assessment of Current Energy Costs--An evaluation of the historical energy costs for Smith River was conducted to identify the costs for each component of their energy supply to better assess changes that can be considered for energy cost reductions. (2) Research Viable Energy Options--This includes a general description of many power generation technologies and identification of their relative costs, advantages and disadvantages. Through this research the generation technology options that are most suited for this application were identified. (3) Project Development Considerations--The basic steps and associated challenges of developing a generation project utilizing the selected technologies are identified and discussed. This included items like selling to third parties, wheeling, electrical interconnections, fuel supply, permitting, standby power, and transmission studies. (4) Energy Conservation--The myriad of federal, state and utility programs offered for low-income weatherization and utility bill payment assistance are identified, their qualification requirements discussed, and the subsequent benefits outlined. (5) Establishing an Energy Organization--The report includes a high level discussion of formation of a utility to serve the Tribal membership. The value or advantages of such action is discussed along with some of the challenges. (6) Training--Training opportunities available to the Tribal membership are identified.

  1. Evaluating Whole Chemical Mixtures and Sufficient Similarity

    EPA Science Inventory

    This powerpoint presentation supports apresentation describing dose-response assessment for complex chemical mixtures including deriving reference doses for mixtures evaluating sufficient similarity among chemical mixtures.

  2. Impact of CCD camera SNR on polarimetric accuracy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhenyue; Wang, Xia; Pacheco, Shaun; Liang, Rongguang

    2014-11-10

    A comprehensive charge-coupled device (CCD) camera noise model is employed to study the impact of CCD camera signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) on polarimetric accuracy. The study shows that the standard deviations of the measured degree of linear polarization (DoLP) and angle of linear polarization (AoLP) are mainly dependent on the camera SNR. With increase in the camera SNR, both the measurement errors and the standard deviations caused by the CCD camera noise decrease. When the DoLP of the incident light is smaller than 0.1, the camera SNR should be at least 75 to achieve a measurement error of less than 0.01. When the input DoLP is larger than 0.5, a SNR of 15 is sufficient to achieve the same measurement accuracy. An experiment is carried out to verify the simulation results.

  3. Some existence and sufficient conditions of optimality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Assefi, T.

    1976-01-01

    The role of the existence and sufficiency conditions in the field of optimal control was briefly described. The existence theorems are discussed for general nonlinear systems. However, the sufficiency conditions pertain to "nearly" linear systems with integral convex costs. Moreover, a brief discussion of linear systems with multiple-cost functions is presented.

  4. Redundant causation from a sufficient cause perspective.

    PubMed

    Gatto, Nicolle M; Campbell, Ulka B

    2010-08-02

    Sufficient causes of disease are redundant when an individual acquires the components of two or more sufficient causes. In this circumstance, the individual still would have become diseased even if one of the sufficient causes had not been acquired. In the context of a study, when any individuals acquire components of more than one sufficient cause over the observation period, the etiologic effect of the exposure (defined as the absolute or relative difference between the proportion of the exposed who develop the disease by the end of the study period and the proportion of those individuals who would have developed the disease at the moment they did even in the absence of the exposure) may be underestimated. Even in the absence of confounding and bias, the observed effect estimate represents only a subset of the etiologic effect. This underestimation occurs regardless of the measure of effect used.To some extent, redundancy of sufficient causes is always present, and under some circumstances, it may make a true cause of disease appear to be not causal. This problem is particularly relevant when the researcher's goal is to characterize the universe of sufficient causes of the disease, identify risk factors for targeted interventions, or construct causal diagrams. In this paper, we use the sufficient component cause model and the disease response type framework to show how redundant causation arises and the factors that determine the extent of its impact on epidemiologic effect measures.

  5. Redundant causation from a sufficient cause perspective.

    PubMed

    Gatto, Nicolle M; Campbell, Ulka B

    2010-01-01

    Sufficient causes of disease are redundant when an individual acquires the components of two or more sufficient causes. In this circumstance, the individual still would have become diseased even if one of the sufficient causes had not been acquired. In the context of a study, when any individuals acquire components of more than one sufficient cause over the observation period, the etiologic effect of the exposure (defined as the absolute or relative difference between the proportion of the exposed who develop the disease by the end of the study period and the proportion of those individuals who would have developed the disease at the moment they did even in the absence of the exposure) may be underestimated. Even in the absence of confounding and bias, the observed effect estimate represents only a subset of the etiologic effect. This underestimation occurs regardless of the measure of effect used.To some extent, redundancy of sufficient causes is always present, and under some circumstances, it may make a true cause of disease appear to be not causal. This problem is particularly relevant when the researcher's goal is to characterize the universe of sufficient causes of the disease, identify risk factors for targeted interventions, or construct causal diagrams. In this paper, we use the sufficient component cause model and the disease response type framework to show how redundant causation arises and the factors that determine the extent of its impact on epidemiologic effect measures. PMID:20678223

  6. Necessary and sufficient factors in classical conditioning.

    PubMed

    Damianopoulos, E N

    1982-01-01

    The issue of necessary and sufficient factors (pairing-contiguity vs. contingency-correlation) in classical (Pavlovian) excitatory conditioning is examined: first, in terms of definitional (logical) and manipulational requirements of "necessary" and "sufficient"; second, in terms of Boolean logic test models indicating experimental and control manipulations in tests of pairing and contingency as necessary and sufficient factors; and, third, by a selective review of reference experiments showing appropriate experimental and control manipulations of pairing and contingency indicated in the Boolean logic test models. Results of examination show pairing-contiguity as the sole necessary and sufficient factor for excitatory conditioning, while contingency-correlation is conceptualized as a modulating factor controlling minimal-maximal effects of pairing-contiguity. Reservations and diagnostic experiments are indicated to assess effects of uncontrolled conditioned stimulus--unconditioned stimulus (--CS--US) probability characteristics (e.g., p (CS--US)/p (--CS--US) in truly random (TR) schedule manipulations). Similar analysis of conditioned inhibition reveals insufficient evidence to support a choice among current alternatives.

  7. Towards an English Language "Sufficiency" Test.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yule, George

    1980-01-01

    While proficiency tests make a positive statement about the language ability of those who pass, it says nothing about those who don't. Since the proficiency test's questions are too general, a "sufficiency" test was developed to determine if students had "enough" English to meet the needs that motivated their study. (PJM)

  8. Sufficiency, Intimacy and the Good Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Donald L.

    Our capacity to provide food and shelter is freeing us from the constant burden of keeping the wolf away from the door. We are increasingly able to give our attention to other values. This type of sufficiency provides time and circumstances for developing intimate relationships. Intimate relationships are characterized by revelation of one's…

  9. Self-sufficiency, free trade and safety.

    PubMed

    Rautonen, Jukka

    2010-01-01

    The relationship between free trade, self-sufficiency and safety of blood and blood components has been a perennial discussion topic in the blood service community. Traditionally, national self-sufficiency has been perceived as the ultimate goal that would also maximize safety. However, very few countries are, or can be, truly self-sufficient when self-sufficiency is understood correctly to encompass the whole value chain from the blood donor to the finished product. This is most striking when plasma derived medicines are considered. Free trade of blood products, or competition, as such can have a negative or positive effect on blood safety. Further, free trade of equipment and reagents and several plasma medicines is actually necessary to meet the domestic demand for blood and blood derivatives in most countries. Opposing free trade due to dogmatic reasons is not in the best interest of any country and will be especially harmful for the developing world. Competition between blood services in the USA has been present for decades. The more than threefold differences in blood product prices between European blood services indicate that competition is long overdue in Europe, too. This competition should be welcomed but carefully and proactively regulated to avoid putting safe and secure blood supply at risk.

  10. Increasing urban water self-sufficiency: new era, new challenges.

    PubMed

    Rygaard, Martin; Binning, Philip J; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen

    2011-01-01

    Urban water supplies are traditionally based on limited freshwater resources located outside the cities. However, a range of concepts and techniques to exploit alternative water resources has gained ground as water demands begin to exceed the freshwater available to cities. Based on 113 cases and 15 in-depth case studies, solutions used to increase water self-sufficiency in urban areas are analyzed. The main drivers for increased self-sufficiency were identified to be direct and indirect lack of water, constrained infrastructure, high quality water demands and commercial and institutional pressures. Case studies demonstrate increases in self-sufficiency ratios to as much as 80% with contributions from recycled water, seawater desalination and rainwater collection. The introduction of alternative water resources raises several challenges: energy requirements vary by more than a factor of ten amongst the alternative techniques, wastewater reclamation can lead to the appearance of trace contaminants in drinking water, and changes to the drinking water system can meet tough resistance from the public. Public water-supply managers aim to achieve a high level of reliability and stability. We conclude that despite the challenges, self-sufficiency concepts in combination with conventional water resources are already helping to reach this goal.

  11. Sufficient separability criteria and linear maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewenstein, Maciej; Augusiak, Remigiusz; Chruściński, Dariusz; Rana, Swapan; Samsonowicz, Jan

    2016-04-01

    We study families of positive and completely positive maps acting on a bipartite system CM⊗CN (with M ≤N ). The maps have a property that, when applied to any state (of a given entanglement class), result in a separable state or, more generally, a state of another certain entanglement class (e.g., Schmidt number ≤k ). This allows us to derive useful families of sufficient separability criteria. Explicit examples of such criteria have been constructed for arbitrary M ,N , with a special emphasis on M =2 . Our results can be viewed as generalizations of the known facts that in the sufficiently close vicinity of the completely depolarized state (the normalized identity matrix), all states are separable (belong to "weakly" entangled classes). Alternatively, some of our results can be viewed as an entanglement classification for a certain family of states, corresponding to mixtures of the completely polarized state with pure states, partial transposes, and/or local transformations thereof.

  12. CSM and the myth of self-sufficiency.

    PubMed

    Harvey, P D

    1984-01-01

    The author of this letter asserts that self-sufficiency should not be regarded as a goal for contraceptive social marketing programs. Rather, the emphasis should be on increasing the number and effectiveness of social marketing programs. There will be a need for subsidized family planning programs as long as there is poverty. The only way a social marketing program can achieve financial self-sufficiency is to price contraceptives beyond the reach of the intended beneficiaries of the program. At present, condom buyers in Bangladesh spend about US$1/year for contraceptives purchased through the social marketing program; this amount is equivalent to 1 day's wage. Although contraceptive social marketing programs may seem expensive, their tremendous success in reaching ever growing numbers of rural and urban constantly reduces the cost for each couple supplied with contraception. Moreover, unlike most other family planning programs, contraceptive social marketing projects do recover at least a small part of their costs through sales. PMID:12313291

  13. [Vitamin sufficiency of young basketball players].

    PubMed

    Vrzhesinskaia, O A; Pereverzeva, O G; Beketova, N A; Isaeva, V A; Kharitonchik, L A; Kodentsova, V M; Martinchik, A N; Baturin, A K

    2004-01-01

    The investigation of vitamin sufficiency of young basket-ball players 14-16 years old (17 girls and 14 boys) has been carried out 59-77 per cent of the children had the deficiency of B group vitamins, 24-54 per cent--vitamin E insufficiency, most of them (82-100 per cent)--deficit of carotenoids while they were sufficiently vitamins C and A supplied. The girls were supplied with vitamins better than boys. There was no one adequately supplied with all vitamins among boys while 12 per cent of girls had adequately sufficiency. The girls had deficit of 1-2 vitamins more often whereas the combined insufficiency of 3-4 vitamins took place in 1.8-2.3 fold more frequently among boys. Daily intake of multivitamin containing 10 vitamins in daily recommended doses, lipoic acid, methionin and 9 minerals by boys lead to their blood plasma vitamin C, E, B-2 and beta-carotene level increase. Vitamin C insufficiency disappeared. Deficit of beta-carotene and vitamin B-6 became 1.5 fold rarely, vitamin B-2--2 fold, vitamin E--6 fold. Thus daily intake of recommended doses of vitamins eliminates biochemical signs of vitamin deficiency.

  14. Measurement of the parity violating 6S-7S transition amplitude in cesium achieved within 2×10-13 atomic-unit accuracy by stimulated-emission detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guéna, J.; Lintz, M.; Bouchiat, M. A.

    2005-04-01

    We exploit the process of asymmetry amplification by stimulated emission which provides an original method for parity violation (PV) measurements in a highly forbidden atomic transition. The method involves measurements of a chiral, transient, optical gain of a cesium vapor on the 7S-6P3/2 transition, probed after it is excited by an intense, linearly polarized, collinear laser, tuned to resonance for one hyperfine line of the forbidden 6S-7S transition in a longitudinal electric field. We report here a 3.5-fold increase of the one-second-measurement sensitivity and subsequent reduction by a factor of 3.5 of the statistical accuracy compared with our previous result [J. Guéna , Phys. Rev. Lett. 90, 143001 (2003)]. Decisive improvements to the setup include an increased repetition rate, better extinction of the probe beam at the end of the probe pulse, and, for the first time to our knowledge, the following: a polarization-tilt magnifier, quasisuppression of beam reflections at the cell windows, and a Cs cell with electrically conductive windows. We also present real-time tests of systematic effects and consistency checks on the data, as well as a 1% accurate measurement of the electric field seen by the atoms, from atomic signals. PV measurements performed in seven different vapor cells agree within the statistical error. Our present result is compatible with the more precise result of Wood within our present relative statistical accuracy of 2.6%, corresponding to a 2×10-13 atomic-unit uncertainty in E1pv . Theoretical motivations for further measurements are emphasized and we give a brief overview of a recent proposal that would allow the uncertainty to be reduced to the 0.1% level by creating conditions where asymmetry amplification is much greater.

  15. Speed-Accuracy Response Models: Scoring Rules Based on Response Time and Accuracy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maris, Gunter; van der Maas, Han

    2012-01-01

    Starting from an explicit scoring rule for time limit tasks incorporating both response time and accuracy, and a definite trade-off between speed and accuracy, a response model is derived. Since the scoring rule is interpreted as a sufficient statistic, the model belongs to the exponential family. The various marginal and conditional distributions…

  16. Improving Speaking Accuracy through Awareness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dormer, Jan Edwards

    2013-01-01

    Increased English learner accuracy can be achieved by leading students through six stages of awareness. The first three awareness stages build up students' motivation to improve, and the second three provide learners with crucial input for change. The final result is "sustained language awareness," resulting in ongoing…

  17. Sufficient dimension reduction for longitudinally measured predictors.

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, Ruth M; Forzani, Liliana; Bura, Efstathia

    2012-09-28

    We propose a method to combine several predictors (markers) that are measured repeatedly over time into a composite marker score without assuming a model and only requiring a mild condition on the predictor distribution. Assuming that the first and second moments of the predictors can be decomposed into a time and a marker component via a Kronecker product structure that accommodates the longitudinal nature of the predictors, we develop first-moment sufficient dimension reduction techniques to replace the original markers with linear transformations that contain sufficient information for the regression of the predictors on the outcome. These linear combinations can then be combined into a score that has better predictive performance than a score built under a general model that ignores the longitudinal structure of the data. Our methods can be applied to either continuous or categorical outcome measures. In simulations, we focus on binary outcomes and show that our method outperforms existing alternatives by using the AUC, the area under the receiver-operator characteristics (ROC) curve, as a summary measure of the discriminatory ability of a single continuous diagnostic marker for binary disease outcomes.

  18. Trial of a self-sufficient cottage

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, Iwane )

    1991-01-01

    Environmental disturbances, including air pollution, are increasing all over the world. In order to investigate the possibility of reducing these disturbances, a fully self-sufficient prototype cottage was built in the countryside. The cottage is not equipped with an external electric power supply nor tap water from the main. The cottage possesses a solar cell array system linked to lead-acid batteries to supply electricity and a well with a domestic pump operated by the electricity generated. A rainwater tank provides water for nonpotable uses. Additional equipment and ideas have been implemented in the cottage to promote energy saving; these are also described in detail in this paper. Experimental results on the effect of heat storage panels used for space heating are also given.

  19. Policy Capacity Is Necessary but Not Sufficient

    PubMed Central

    Gen, Sheldon; Wright, Amy Conley

    2015-01-01

    Policy capacity focuses on the managerial and organizational abilities to inform policy decisions with sound research and analysis, and facilitate policy implementation with operational efficiency. It stems from a view of the policy process that is rational and positivistic, in which optimal policy choices can be identified, selected, and implemented with objectivity. By itself, however, policy capacity neglects the political aspects of policy-making that can dominate the process, even in health policies. These technical capabilities are certainly needed to advance reforms in health policies, but they are not sufficient. Instead, they must be complemented with public engagement and policy advocacy to ensure support from the public that policies are meant to serve. PMID:26673469

  20. The self-sufficient solar house Freiburg

    SciTech Connect

    Goetzberger, A.; Stahl, W.; Bopp, G.; Heinzel, A.; Voss, K.

    1994-12-31

    The Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems has built a Self-Sufficient Solar House (SSSH) in Freiburg, Germany. The aim of the project is to provide the entire energy demand for heating, domestic hot water, electricity and cooking by the sun. The combination of highly efficient solar systems with conventional means to save energy is the key to the successful operation of the house. With transparent insulation of building walls utilizing winter insulation the heating demand of the building is almost zero. Small size seasonal high energy storage is accomplished by electrolysis of water and pressurized storage of hydrogen and oxygen. The energy for electricity and hydrogen generation is supplied by solar cells. Hydrogen can be reconverted to electricity with a fuel cell or used for cooking. It also serves as a back-up for low temperature heat. There are provisions for short-term storage of electricity and optimal routing of energy. The SSSH is occupied by a family. An intensive measurement program is being carried out. The data are used for the validation of the dynamic simulation calculations, which formed the basis for planning the SSSH. 28 refs., 42 figs., 9 tabs.

  1. Sufficient trial size to inform clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Manski, Charles F; Tetenov, Aleksey

    2016-09-20

    Medical research has evolved conventions for choosing sample size in randomized clinical trials that rest on the theory of hypothesis testing. Bayesian statisticians have argued that trials should be designed to maximize subjective expected utility in settings of clinical interest. This perspective is compelling given a credible prior distribution on treatment response, but there is rarely consensus on what the subjective prior beliefs should be. We use Wald's frequentist statistical decision theory to study design of trials under ambiguity. We show that ε-optimal rules exist when trials have large enough sample size. An ε-optimal rule has expected welfare within ε of the welfare of the best treatment in every state of nature. Equivalently, it has maximum regret no larger than ε We consider trials that draw predetermined numbers of subjects at random within groups stratified by covariates and treatments. We report exact results for the special case of two treatments and binary outcomes. We give simple sufficient conditions on sample sizes that ensure existence of ε-optimal treatment rules when there are multiple treatments and outcomes are bounded. These conditions are obtained by application of Hoeffding large deviations inequalities to evaluate the performance of empirical success rules. PMID:27601679

  2. Sufficient condition for Gaussian departure in turbulence.

    PubMed

    Tordella, Daniela; Iovieno, Michele; Bailey, Peter Roger

    2008-01-01

    The interaction of two isotropic turbulent fields of equal integral scale but different kinetic energy generates the simplest kind of inhomogeneous turbulent field. In this paper we present a numerical experiment where two time decaying isotropic fields of kinetic energies E1 and E2 initially match over a narrow region. Within this region the kinetic energy varies as a hyperbolic tangent. The following temporal evolution produces a shearless mixing. The anisotropy and intermittency of velocity and velocity derivative statistics is observed. In particular the asymptotic behavior in time and as a function of the energy ratio E_{1}E_{2}-->infinity is discussed. This limit corresponds to the maximum observable turbulent energy gradient for a given E1 and is obtained through the limit E_{2}-->0 . A field with E_{1}E_{2}-->infinity represents a mixing which could be observed near a surface subject to a very small velocity gradient separating two turbulent fields, one of which is nearly quiescent. In this condition the turbulent penetration is maximum and reaches a value equal to 1.2 times the nominal mixing layer width. The experiment shows that the presence of a turbulent energy gradient is sufficient for the appearance of intermittency and that during the mixing process the pressure transport is not negligible with respect to the turbulent velocity transport. These findings may open the way to the hypothesis that the presence of a gradient of turbulent energy is the minimal requirement for Gaussian departure in turbulence.

  3. Compact diffraction grating laser wavemeter with sub-picometer accuracy and picowatt sensitivity using a webcam imaging sensor.

    PubMed

    White, James D; Scholten, Robert E

    2012-11-01

    We describe a compact laser wavelength measuring instrument based on a small diffraction grating and a consumer-grade webcam. With just 1 pW of optical power, the instrument achieves absolute accuracy of 0.7 pm, sufficient to resolve individual hyperfine transitions of the rubidium absorption spectrum. Unlike interferometric wavemeters, the instrument clearly reveals multimode laser operation, making it particularly suitable for use with external cavity diode lasers and atom cooling and trapping experiments. PMID:23206048

  4. Compact diffraction grating laser wavemeter with sub-picometer accuracy and picowatt sensitivity using a webcam imaging sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, James D.; Scholten, Robert E.

    2012-11-01

    We describe a compact laser wavelength measuring instrument based on a small diffraction grating and a consumer-grade webcam. With just 1 pW of optical power, the instrument achieves absolute accuracy of 0.7 pm, sufficient to resolve individual hyperfine transitions of the rubidium absorption spectrum. Unlike interferometric wavemeters, the instrument clearly reveals multimode laser operation, making it particularly suitable for use with external cavity diode lasers and atom cooling and trapping experiments.

  5. Energy Strategic Planning & Self-Sufficiency Project

    SciTech Connect

    Greg Retzlaff

    2005-03-30

    This report provides information regarding options available, their advantages and disadvantages, and the costs for pursuing activities to advance Smith River Rancheria toward an energy program that reduces their energy costs, allows greater self-sufficiency and stimulates economic development and employment opportunities within and around the reservation. The primary subjects addressed in this report are as follow: (1) Baseline Assessment of Current Energy Costs--An evaluation of the historical energy costs for Smith River was conducted to identify the costs for each component of their energy supply to better assess changes that can be considered for energy cost reductions. (2) Research Viable Energy Options--This includes a general description of many power generation technologies and identification of their relative costs, advantages and disadvantages. Through this research the generation technology options that are most suited for this application were identified. (3) Project Development Considerations--The basic steps and associated challenges of developing a generation project utilizing the selected technologies are identified and discussed. This included items like selling to third parties, wheeling, electrical interconnections, fuel supply, permitting, standby power, and transmission studies. (4) Energy Conservation--The myriad of federal, state and utility programs offered for low-income weatherization and utility bill payment assistance are identified, their qualification requirements discussed, and the subsequent benefits outlined. (5) Establishing an Energy Organization--The report includes a high level discussion of formation of a utility to serve the Tribal membership. The value or advantages of such action is discussed along with some of the challenges. (6) Training--Training opportunities available to the Tribal membership are identified.

  6. Silver Coating for High-Mass-Accuracy Imaging Mass Spectrometry of Fingerprints on Nanostructured Silicon.

    PubMed

    Guinan, Taryn M; Gustafsson, Ove J R; McPhee, Gordon; Kobus, Hilton; Voelcker, Nicolas H

    2015-11-17

    Nanostructure imaging mass spectrometry (NIMS) using porous silicon (pSi) is a key technique for molecular imaging of exogenous and endogenous low molecular weight compounds from fingerprints. However, high-mass-accuracy NIMS can be difficult to achieve as time-of-flight (ToF) mass analyzers, which dominate the field, cannot sufficiently compensate for shifts in measured m/z values. Here, we show internal recalibration using a thin layer of silver (Ag) sputter-coated onto functionalized pSi substrates. NIMS peaks for several previously reported fingerprint components were selected and mass accuracy was compared to theoretical values. Mass accuracy was improved by more than an order of magnitude in several cases. This straightforward method should form part of the standard guidelines for NIMS studies for spatial characterization of small molecules.

  7. 3D Surface Reconstruction of Plant Seeds by Volume Carving: Performance and Accuracies

    PubMed Central

    Roussel, Johanna; Geiger, Felix; Fischbach, Andreas; Jahnke, Siegfried; Scharr, Hanno

    2016-01-01

    We describe a method for 3D reconstruction of plant seed surfaces, focusing on small seeds with diameters as small as 200 μm. The method considers robotized systems allowing single seed handling in order to rotate a single seed in front of a camera. Even though such systems feature high position repeatability, at sub-millimeter object scales, camera pose variations have to be compensated. We do this by robustly estimating the tool center point from each acquired image. 3D reconstruction can then be performed by a simple shape-from-silhouette approach. In experiments we investigate runtimes, theoretically achievable accuracy, experimentally achieved accuracy, and show as a proof of principle that the proposed method is well sufficient for 3D seed phenotyping purposes. PMID:27375628

  8. Relative Accuracy Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan; Wang, Hongzhi; Yang, Zhongsheng; Li, Jianzhong

    2014-01-01

    The quality of data plays an important role in business analysis and decision making, and data accuracy is an important aspect in data quality. Thus one necessary task for data quality management is to evaluate the accuracy of the data. And in order to solve the problem that the accuracy of the whole data set is low while a useful part may be high, it is also necessary to evaluate the accuracy of the query results, called relative accuracy. However, as far as we know, neither measure nor effective methods for the accuracy evaluation methods are proposed. Motivated by this, for relative accuracy evaluation, we propose a systematic method. We design a relative accuracy evaluation framework for relational databases based on a new metric to measure the accuracy using statistics. We apply the methods to evaluate the precision and recall of basic queries, which show the result's relative accuracy. We also propose the method to handle data update and to improve accuracy evaluation using functional dependencies. Extensive experimental results show the effectiveness and efficiency of our proposed framework and algorithms. PMID:25133752

  9. Accuracy of Teacher Prediction of Elementary Student Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaines, Margie L.; Davis, Margaret

    Whether teachers, in the absence of standardized test scores, can adequately identify students who require remedial services or are at risk of failing a literacy test was studied. During the 1987-88 school year 22 fourth-grade teachers were asked to identify which of 530 students of various ethnic backgrounds would score in the top or bottom…

  10. A new adaptive GMRES algorithm for achieving high accuracy

    SciTech Connect

    Sosonkina, M.; Watson, L.T.; Kapania, R.K.; Walker, H.F.

    1996-12-31

    GMRES(k) is widely used for solving nonsymmetric linear systems. However, it is inadequate either when it converges only for k close to the problem size or when numerical error in the modified Gram-Schmidt process used in the GMRES orthogonalization phase dramatically affects the algorithm performance. An adaptive version of GMRES (k) which tunes the restart value k based on criteria estimating the GMRES convergence rate for the given problem is proposed here. The essence of the adaptive GMRES strategy is to adapt the parameter k to the problem, similar in spirit to how a variable order ODE algorithm tunes the order k. With FORTRAN 90, which provides pointers and dynamic memory management, dealing with the variable storage requirements implied by varying k is not too difficult. The parameter k can be both increased and decreased-an increase-only strategy is described next followed by pseudocode.

  11. Towards Arbitrary Accuracy Inviscid Surface Boundary Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyson, Rodger W.; Hixon, Ray

    2002-01-01

    Inviscid nonlinear surface boundary conditions are currently limited to third order accuracy in time for non-moving surfaces and actually reduce to first order in time when the surfaces move. For steady-state calculations it may be possible to achieve higher accuracy in space, but high accuracy in time is required for efficient simulation of multiscale unsteady phenomena. A surprisingly simple technique is shown here that can be used to correct the normal pressure derivatives of the flow at a surface on a Cartesian grid so that arbitrarily high order time accuracy is achieved in idealized cases. This work demonstrates that nonlinear high order time accuracy at a solid surface is possible and desirable, but it also shows that the current practice of only correcting the pressure is inadequate.

  12. Spacecraft attitude determination accuracy from mission experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brasoveanu, D.; Hashmall, J.

    1994-01-01

    This paper summarizes a compilation of attitude determination accuracies attained by a number of satellites supported by the Goddard Space Flight Center Flight Dynamics Facility. The compilation is designed to assist future mission planners in choosing and placing attitude hardware and selecting the attitude determination algorithms needed to achieve given accuracy requirements. The major goal of the compilation is to indicate realistic accuracies achievable using a given sensor complement based on mission experience. It is expected that the use of actual spacecraft experience will make the study especially useful for mission design. A general description of factors influencing spacecraft attitude accuracy is presented. These factors include determination algorithms, inertial reference unit characteristics, and error sources that can affect measurement accuracy. Possible techniques for mitigating errors are also included. Brief mission descriptions are presented with the attitude accuracies attained, grouped by the sensor pairs used in attitude determination. The accuracies for inactive missions represent a compendium of missions report results, and those for active missions represent measurements of attitude residuals. Both three-axis and spin stabilized missions are included. Special emphasis is given to high-accuracy sensor pairs, such as two fixed-head star trackers (FHST's) and fine Sun sensor plus FHST. Brief descriptions of sensor design and mode of operation are included. Also included are brief mission descriptions and plots summarizing the attitude accuracy attained using various sensor complements.

  13. Measure of the accuracy of navigational sensors for autonomous path tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motazed, Ben

    1994-02-01

    Outdoor mobile robot path tracking for an extended period of time and distance is a formidable task. The difficulty lies in the ability of robot navigation systems to reliably and accurately report on the position and orientation of the vehicle. This paper addresses the accurate navigation of mobile robots in the context of non-line of sight autonomous convoying. Dead-reckoning, GPS and vision based autonomous road following navigational schemes are integrated through a Kalman filter formulation to derive mobile robot position and orientation. The accuracy of these navigational schemes and their sufficiency to achieve autonomous path tracking for long duration are examined.

  14. 39 CFR 491.3 - Sufficient legal form.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... AND THE POSTAL RATE COMMISSION § 491.3 Sufficient legal form. No document purporting to garnish employee wages shall be deemed sufficient unless it can be determined from the face of the document that it... 39 Postal Service 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Sufficient legal form. 491.3 Section 491.3...

  15. 39 CFR 491.3 - Sufficient legal form.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... AND THE POSTAL RATE COMMISSION § 491.3 Sufficient legal form. No document purporting to garnish employee wages shall be deemed sufficient unless it can be determined from the face of the document that it... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sufficient legal form. 491.3 Section 491.3...

  16. 39 CFR 491.3 - Sufficient legal form.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... AND THE POSTAL RATE COMMISSION § 491.3 Sufficient legal form. No document purporting to garnish employee wages shall be deemed sufficient unless it can be determined from the face of the document that it... 39 Postal Service 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Sufficient legal form. 491.3 Section 491.3...

  17. 39 CFR 491.3 - Sufficient legal form.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... AND THE POSTAL RATE COMMISSION § 491.3 Sufficient legal form. No document purporting to garnish employee wages shall be deemed sufficient unless it can be determined from the face of the document that it... 39 Postal Service 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Sufficient legal form. 491.3 Section 491.3...

  18. Sample size planning for the coefficient of variation from the accuracy in parameter estimation approach.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Ken

    2007-11-01

    The accuracy in parameter estimation approach to sample size planning is developed for the coefficient of variation, where the goal of the method is to obtain an accurate parameter estimate by achieving a sufficiently narrow confidence interval. The first method allows researchers to plan sample size so that the expected width of the confidence interval for the population coefficient of variation is sufficiently narrow. A modification allows a desired degree of assurance to be incorporated into the method, so that the obtained confidence interval will be sufficiently narrow with some specified probability (e.g., 85% assurance that the 95 confidence interval width will be no wider than to units). Tables of necessary sample size are provided for a variety of scenarios that may help researchers planning a study where the coefficient of variation is of interest plan an appropriate sample size in order to have a sufficiently narrow confidence interval, optionally with somespecified assurance of the confidence interval being sufficiently narrow. Freely available computer routines have been developed that allow researchers to easily implement all of the methods discussed in the article.

  19. GEOSPATIAL DATA ACCURACY ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The development of robust accuracy assessment methods for the validation of spatial data represent's a difficult scientific challenge for the geospatial science community. The importance and timeliness of this issue is related directly to the dramatic escalation in the developmen...

  20. Classification accuracy improvement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kistler, R.; Kriegler, F. J.

    1977-01-01

    Improvements made in processing system designed for MIDAS (prototype multivariate interactive digital analysis system) effects higher accuracy in classification of pixels, resulting in significantly-reduced processing time. Improved system realizes cost reduction factor of 20 or more.

  1. Accuracy potentials for large space antenna structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedgepeth, J. M.

    1980-01-01

    The relationships among materials selection, truss design, and manufacturing techniques in the interest of surface accuracies for large space antennas are discussed. Among the antenna configurations considered are: tetrahedral truss, pretensioned truss, and geodesic dome and radial rib structures. Comparisons are made of the accuracy achievable by truss and dome structure types for a wide variety of diameters, focal lengths, and wavelength of radiated signal, taking into account such deforming influences as solar heating-caused thermal transients and thermal gradients.

  2. Overlay accuracy fundamentals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandel, Daniel; Levinski, Vladimir; Sapiens, Noam; Cohen, Guy; Amit, Eran; Klein, Dana; Vakshtein, Irina

    2012-03-01

    Currently, the performance of overlay metrology is evaluated mainly based on random error contributions such as precision and TIS variability. With the expected shrinkage of the overlay metrology budget to < 0.5nm, it becomes crucial to include also systematic error contributions which affect the accuracy of the metrology. Here we discuss fundamental aspects of overlay accuracy and a methodology to improve accuracy significantly. We identify overlay mark imperfections and their interaction with the metrology technology, as the main source of overlay inaccuracy. The most important type of mark imperfection is mark asymmetry. Overlay mark asymmetry leads to a geometrical ambiguity in the definition of overlay, which can be ~1nm or less. It is shown theoretically and in simulations that the metrology may enhance the effect of overlay mark asymmetry significantly and lead to metrology inaccuracy ~10nm, much larger than the geometrical ambiguity. The analysis is carried out for two different overlay metrology technologies: Imaging overlay and DBO (1st order diffraction based overlay). It is demonstrated that the sensitivity of DBO to overlay mark asymmetry is larger than the sensitivity of imaging overlay. Finally, we show that a recently developed measurement quality metric serves as a valuable tool for improving overlay metrology accuracy. Simulation results demonstrate that the accuracy of imaging overlay can be improved significantly by recipe setup optimized using the quality metric. We conclude that imaging overlay metrology, complemented by appropriate use of measurement quality metric, results in optimal overlay accuracy.

  3. Struggle for Self-Sufficiency: Impact of Welfare Reform on Families with Children in Kansas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kansas Action for Children, Inc., Topeka.

    Since Congress passed the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act in 1996, Kansas has dramatically reduced its welfare roles. Noting that achieving self-sufficiency is the real measure of success in combating poverty, this study examines welfare reform efforts in Kansas. To gather information, United Way member agencies and…

  4. Accuracy and consistency of modern elastomeric pumps.

    PubMed

    Weisman, Robyn S; Missair, Andres; Pham, Phung; Gutierrez, Juan F; Gebhard, Ralf E

    2014-01-01

    Continuous peripheral nerve blockade has become a popular method of achieving postoperative analgesia for many surgical procedures. The safety and reliability of infusion pumps are dependent on their flow rate accuracy and consistency. Knowledge of pump rate profiles can help physicians determine which infusion pump is best suited for their clinical applications and specific patient population. Several studies have investigated the accuracy of portable infusion pumps. Using methodology similar to that used by Ilfeld et al, we investigated the accuracy and consistency of several current elastomeric pumps. PMID:25140510

  5. Design and performance of a new high accuracy combined small sample neutron/gamma detector

    SciTech Connect

    Menlove, H.; Davidson, D.; Verplancke, J.; Vermeulen, P.; Wagner, H.G.; Wellum, R.; Brandelise, B.; Mayer, K.

    1993-08-01

    This paper describes the design of an optimized combined neutron and gamma detector installed around a measurement well protruding from the floor of a glove box. The objective of this design was to achieve an overall accuracy for the plutonium element concentration in gram-sized samples of plutonium oxide powder approaching the {approximately}0.1--0.2% accuracies routinely achieved by inspectors` chemical analysis. The efficiency of the clam-shell neutron detector was increased and the flat response zone extended in axial and radial directions. The sample holder introduced from within the glove box was designed to form the upper reflector, while two graphite half-shells fitted around the thin neck of the high-resolution LEGE detector replaced the lower plug. The Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM) in Geel prepared special plutonium oxide test samples whose plutonium concentration was determined to better than 0.05%. During a three week initial performance test in July 1992 at ITU Karlsruhe and in long term tests, it was established that the target accuracy can be achieved provided sufficient care is taken to assure the reproducibility of sample bottling and sample positioning. The paper presents and discusses the results of all test measurements.

  6. Design and performance of a new high accuracy combined small sample neutron/gamma detector

    SciTech Connect

    Menlove, H.; Davidson, D.; Verplancke, J.; Vermeulen, P.; Wagner, H.G.; Wellum, R.; Brandelise, B.; Mayer, K.

    1993-12-31

    This paper describes the design of an optimized combined neutron and gamma detector installed around a measurement well protruding from the floor of a glove box. The objective of this design was to achieve an overall accuracy for the plutonium element concentration in gram-sized samples of plutonium oxide powder approaching the {approximately}0.1--0.2% accuracies routinely achieved by inspectors` chemical analysis. The efficiency of the clam-shell neutron detector was increased and the flat response zone extended in axial and radial directions. The sample holder introduced from within the glove box was designed to form the upper reflector, while two graphite half-shells fitted around the thin neck of the high-resolution LEGe detector replaced the lower plug. The Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM) in Geel prepared special plutonium oxide test samples whose plutonium concentration was determined to better than 0.05%. During a three week initial performance test in July 1992 at ITU Karlsruhe and in long term tests, it was established that the target accuracy can be achieved provided sufficient care is taken to assure the reproducibility of sample bottling and sample positioning. The paper presents and discusses the results of all test measurements.

  7. Pointing knowledge accuracy of the star tracker based ATP system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Shinhak; Ortiz, Gerardo G.; Alexander, James W.

    2005-04-01

    The pointing knowledge for the deep space optical communications should be accurate and the estimate update rate needs to be sufficiently higher to compensate the spacecraft vibration. Our objective is to meet these two requirements, high accuracy and update rate, using the combinations of star trackers and inertial sensors. Star trackers are very accurate and provide absolute pointing knowledge with low update rate depending on the star magnitude. On the other hand, inertial sensors provide relative pointing knowledge with high update rates. In this paper, we describe how the star tracker and inertial sensor measurements are combined to reduce the pointing knowledge jitter. This method is based on the 'iterative averaging' of the star tracker and gyro measurements. Angle sensor measurements are to fill in between the two gyro measurements for higher update rate and the total RMS error (or jitter) increases in RSS (Root-Sum-Squared) sense. The estimated pointing jitter is on the order of 150 nrad which is well below the typical requirements of the deep space optical communications. This 150 nrad jitter can be achieved with 8 cm diameter of telescope aperture. Additional expectations include 1/25 pixel accuracy per star, SIRTF class gyros (ARW = 0.0001 deg/root-hr), 5 Hz star trackers with ~5.0 degree FOV, detector of 1000 by 1000 pixels, and stars of roughly 9 to 9.5 magnitudes.

  8. Accuracy of a bistatic scattering substitution technique for calibration of focused receivers

    PubMed Central

    Rich, Kyle T.; Mast, T. Douglas

    2015-01-01

    A recent method for calibrating single-element, focused passive cavitation detectors (PCD) compares bistatic scattering measurements by the PCD and a reference hydrophone. Here, effects of scatterer properties and PCD size on frequency-dependent receive calibration accuracy are investigated. Simulated scattering from silica and polystyrene spheres was compared for small hydrophone and spherically focused PCD receivers to assess the achievable calibration accuracy as a function of frequency, scatterer size, and PCD size. Good agreement between measurements was found when the scatterer diameter was sufficiently smaller than the focal beamwidth of the PCD; this relationship was dependent on the scatterer material. For conditions that result in significant disagreement between measurements, the numerical methods described here can be used to correct experimental calibrations. PMID:26627816

  9. Improving the Perception of Self-Sufficiency towards Creative Drama

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pekdogan, Serpil; Korkmaz, Halil Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of a Creative Drama Based Perception of Self-sufficiency Skills Training Program on 2nd grade bachelor degree students' (who are attending a preschool teacher training program) perception of self-sufficiency. This is a quasi-experimental study. Totally 50 students were equally divided into…

  10. 27 CFR 25.174 - Bond not sufficient.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Bond not sufficient. 25.174 Section 25.174 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS BEER Tax on Beer Prepayment of Tax § 25.174 Bond not sufficient. When...

  11. 27 CFR 25.174 - Bond not sufficient.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Bond not sufficient. 25.174 Section 25.174 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL BEER Tax on Beer Prepayment of Tax § 25.174 Bond not sufficient. When...

  12. 27 CFR 25.174 - Bond not sufficient.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Bond not sufficient. 25.174 Section 25.174 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS BEER Tax on Beer Prepayment of Tax § 25.174 Bond not sufficient. When...

  13. 27 CFR 25.174 - Bond not sufficient.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Bond not sufficient. 25.174 Section 25.174 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL BEER Tax on Beer Prepayment of Tax § 25.174 Bond not sufficient. When...

  14. 27 CFR 25.174 - Bond not sufficient.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Bond not sufficient. 25.174 Section 25.174 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS BEER Tax on Beer Prepayment of Tax § 25.174 Bond not sufficient. When...

  15. 24 CFR 242.2 - Program financial self-sufficiency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Program financial self-sufficiency... self-sufficiency and actuarial soundness; i.e., to avoid mortgage defaults and claims for insurance... AUTHORITIES MORTGAGE INSURANCE FOR HOSPITALS General Eligibility Requirements § 242.2 Program financial...

  16. Critical thinking and accuracy of nurses' diagnoses.

    PubMed

    Lunney, Margaret

    2003-01-01

    Interpretations of patient data are complex and diverse, contributing to a risk of low accuracy nursing diagnoses. This risk is confirmed in research findings that accuracy of nurses' diagnoses varied widely from high to low. Highly accurate diagnoses are essential, however, to guide nursing interventions for the achievement of positive health outcomes. Development of critical thinking abilities is likely to improve accuracy of nurses' diagnoses. New views of critical thinking serve as a basis for critical thinking in nursing. Seven cognitive skills and ten habits of mind are identified as dimensions of critical thinking for use in the diagnostic process. Application of the cognitive skills of critical thinking illustrates the importance of using critical thinking for accuracy of nurses' diagnoses. Ten strategies are proposed for self-development of critical thinking abilities.

  17. Optimal design of robot accuracy compensators

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuang, H.; Roth, Z.S. . Robotics Center and Electrical Engineering Dept.); Hamano, Fumio . Dept. of Electrical Engineering)

    1993-12-01

    The problem of optimal design of robot accuracy compensators is addressed. Robot accuracy compensation requires that actual kinematic parameters of a robot be previously identified. Additive corrections of joint commands, including those at singular configurations, can be computed without solving the inverse kinematics problem for the actual robot. This is done by either the damped least-squares (DLS) algorithm or the linear quadratic regulator (LQR) algorithm, which is a recursive version of the DLS algorithm. The weight matrix in the performance index can be selected to achieve specific objectives, such as emphasizing end-effector's positioning accuracy over orientation accuracy or vice versa, or taking into account proximity to robot joint travel limits and singularity zones. The paper also compares the LQR and the DLS algorithms in terms of computational complexity, storage requirement, and programming convenience. Simulation results are provided to show the effectiveness of the algorithms.

  18. ACCURACY OF CO2 SENSORS

    SciTech Connect

    Fisk, William J.; Faulkner, David; Sullivan, Douglas P.

    2008-10-01

    Are the carbon dioxide (CO2) sensors in your demand controlled ventilation systems sufficiently accurate? The data from these sensors are used to automatically modulate minimum rates of outdoor air ventilation. The goal is to keep ventilation rates at or above design requirements while adjusting the ventilation rate with changes in occupancy in order to save energy. Studies of energy savings from demand controlled ventilation and of the relationship of indoor CO2 concentrations with health and work performance provide a strong rationale for use of indoor CO2 data to control minimum ventilation rates1-7. However, this strategy will only be effective if, in practice, the CO2 sensors have a reasonable accuracy. The objective of this study was; therefore, to determine if CO2 sensor performance, in practice, is generally acceptable or problematic. This article provides a summary of study methods and findings ? additional details are available in a paper in the proceedings of the ASHRAE IAQ?2007 Conference8.

  19. Accuracy of Pressure Sensitive Paint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Tianshu; Guille, M.; Sullivan, J. P.

    2001-01-01

    Uncertainty in pressure sensitive paint (PSP) measurement is investigated from a standpoint of system modeling. A functional relation between the imaging system output and luminescent emission from PSP is obtained based on studies of radiative energy transports in PSP and photodetector response to luminescence. This relation provides insights into physical origins of various elemental error sources and allows estimate of the total PSP measurement uncertainty contributed by the elemental errors. The elemental errors and their sensitivity coefficients in the error propagation equation are evaluated. Useful formulas are given for the minimum pressure uncertainty that PSP can possibly achieve and the upper bounds of the elemental errors to meet required pressure accuracy. An instructive example of a Joukowsky airfoil in subsonic flows is given to illustrate uncertainty estimates in PSP measurements.

  20. High-accuracy EUV reflectometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinze, U.; Fokoua, M.; Chichkov, B.

    2007-03-01

    Developers and users of EUV-optics need precise tools for the characterization of their products. Often a measurement accuracy of 0.1% or better is desired to detect and study slow-acting aging effect or degradation by organic contaminants. To achieve a measurement accuracy of 0.1% an EUV-source is required which provides an excellent long-time stability, namely power stability, spatial stability and spectral stability. Naturally, it should be free of debris. An EUV-source particularly suitable for this task is an advanced electron-based EUV-tube. This EUV source provides an output of up to 300 μW at 13.5 nm. Reflectometers benefit from the excellent long-time stability of this tool. We design and set up different reflectometers using EUV-tubes for the precise characterisation of EUV-optics, such as debris samples, filters, multilayer mirrors, grazing incidence optics, collectors and masks. Reflectivity measurements from grazing incidence to near normal incidence as well as transmission studies were realised at a precision of down to 0.1%. The reflectometers are computer-controlled and allow varying and scanning all important parameters online. The concepts of a sample reflectometer is discussed and results are presented. The devices can be purchased from the Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V.

  1. Constructors, Sufficient Completeness, and Deadlock Freedom of Rewrite Theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocha, Camilo; Meseguer, José

    Sufficient completeness has been throughly studied for equational specifications, where function symbols are classified into constructors and defined symbols. But what should sufficient completeness mean for a rewrite theory R = (Σ,E,R) with equations E and non-equational rules R describing concurrent transitions in a system? This work argues that a rewrite theory naturally has two notions of constructor: the usual one for its equations E, and a different one for its rules R. The sufficient completeness of constructors for the rules R turns out to be intimately related with deadlock freedom, i.e., R has no deadlocks outside the constructors for R. The relation between these two notions is studied in the setting of unconditional order-sorted rewrite theories. Sufficient conditions are given allowing the automatic checking of sufficient completeness, deadlock freedom, and other related properties, by propositional tree automata modulo equational axioms such as associativity, commutativity, and identity. They are used to extend the Maude Sufficient Completeness Checker from the checking of equational theories to that of both equational and rewrite theories. Finally, the usefulness of the proposed notion of constructors in proving inductive theorems about the reachability rewrite relation →_R associated to a rewrite theory R (and also about the joinability relation downarrow_R) is both characterized and illustrated with an example.

  2. Ultrahigh accuracy imaging modality for super-localization microscopy.

    PubMed

    Chao, Jerry; Ram, Sripad; Ward, E Sally; Ober, Raimund J

    2013-04-01

    Super-localization microscopy encompasses techniques that depend on the accurate localization of individual molecules from generally low-light images. The obtainable localization accuracies, however, are ultimately limited by the image detector's pixelation and noise. We present the ultrahigh accuracy imaging modality (UAIM), which allows users to obtain accuracies approaching the accuracy that is achievable only in the absence of detector pixelation and noise, and which we found can experimentally provide a >200% accuracy improvement over conventional low-light imaging. PMID:23455923

  3. High accuracy OMEGA timekeeping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imbier, E. A.

    1982-01-01

    The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) operates a worldwide satellite tracking network which uses a combination of OMEGA as a frequency reference, dual timing channels, and portable clock comparisons to maintain accurate epoch time. Propagational charts from the U.S. Coast Guard OMEGA monitor program minimize diurnal and seasonal effects. Daily phase value publications of the U.S. Naval Observatory provide corrections to the field collected timing data to produce an averaged time line comprised of straight line segments called a time history file (station clock minus UTC). Depending upon clock location, reduced time data accuracies of between two and eight microseconds are typical.

  4. Accuracy of NHANES periodontal examination protocols.

    PubMed

    Eke, P I; Thornton-Evans, G O; Wei, L; Borgnakke, W S; Dye, B A

    2010-11-01

    This study evaluates the accuracy of periodontitis prevalence determined by the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) partial-mouth periodontal examination protocols. True periodontitis prevalence was determined in a new convenience sample of 454 adults ≥ 35 years old, by a full-mouth "gold standard" periodontal examination. This actual prevalence was compared with prevalence resulting from analysis of the data according to the protocols of NHANES III and NHANES 2001-2004, respectively. Both NHANES protocols substantially underestimated the prevalence of periodontitis by 50% or more, depending on the periodontitis case definition used, and thus performed below threshold levels for moderate-to-high levels of validity for surveillance. Adding measurements from lingual or interproximal sites to the NHANES 2001-2004 protocol did not improve the accuracy sufficiently to reach acceptable sensitivity thresholds. These findings suggest that NHANES protocols produce high levels of misclassification of periodontitis cases and thus have low validity for surveillance and research.

  5. Towards Experimental Accuracy from the First Principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polyansky, O. L.; Lodi, L.; Tennyson, J.; Zobov, N. F.

    2013-06-01

    Producing ab initio ro-vibrational energy levels of small, gas-phase molecules with an accuracy of 0.10 cm^{-1} would constitute a significant step forward in theoretical spectroscopy and would place calculated line positions considerably closer to typical experimental accuracy. Such an accuracy has been recently achieved for the H_3^+ molecular ion for line positions up to 17 000 cm ^{-1}. However, since H_3^+ is a two-electron system, the electronic structure methods used in this study are not applicable to larger molecules. A major breakthrough was reported in ref., where an accuracy of 0.10 cm^{-1} was achieved ab initio for seven water isotopologues. Calculated vibrational and rotational energy levels up to 15 000 cm^{-1} and J=25 resulted in a standard deviation of 0.08 cm^{-1} with respect to accurate reference data. As far as line intensities are concerned, we have already achieved for water a typical accuracy of 1% which supersedes average experimental accuracy. Our results are being actively extended along two major directions. First, there are clear indications that our results for water can be improved to an accuracy of the order of 0.01 cm^{-1} by further, detailed ab initio studies. Such level of accuracy would already be competitive with experimental results in some situations. A second, major, direction of study is the extension of such a 0.1 cm^{-1} accuracy to molecules containg more electrons or more than one non-hydrogen atom, or both. As examples of such developments we will present new results for CO, HCN and H_2S, as well as preliminary results for NH_3 and CH_4. O.L. Polyansky, A. Alijah, N.F. Zobov, I.I. Mizus, R. Ovsyannikov, J. Tennyson, L. Lodi, T. Szidarovszky and A.G. Csaszar, Phil. Trans. Royal Soc. London A, {370}, 5014-5027 (2012). O.L. Polyansky, R.I. Ovsyannikov, A.A. Kyuberis, L. Lodi, J. Tennyson and N.F. Zobov, J. Phys. Chem. A, (in press). L. Lodi, J. Tennyson and O.L. Polyansky, J. Chem. Phys. {135}, 034113 (2011).

  6. Increasing Accuracy in Computed Inviscid Boundary Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyson, Roger

    2004-01-01

    A technique has been devised to increase the accuracy of computational simulations of flows of inviscid fluids by increasing the accuracy with which surface boundary conditions are represented. This technique is expected to be especially beneficial for computational aeroacoustics, wherein it enables proper accounting, not only for acoustic waves, but also for vorticity and entropy waves, at surfaces. Heretofore, inviscid nonlinear surface boundary conditions have been limited to third-order accuracy in time for stationary surfaces and to first-order accuracy in time for moving surfaces. For steady-state calculations, it may be possible to achieve higher accuracy in space, but high accuracy in time is needed for efficient simulation of multiscale unsteady flow phenomena. The present technique is the first surface treatment that provides the needed high accuracy through proper accounting of higher-order time derivatives. The present technique is founded on a method known in art as the Hermitian modified solution approximation (MESA) scheme. This is because high time accuracy at a surface depends upon, among other things, correction of the spatial cross-derivatives of flow variables, and many of these cross-derivatives are included explicitly on the computational grid in the MESA scheme. (Alternatively, a related method other than the MESA scheme could be used, as long as the method involves consistent application of the effects of the cross-derivatives.) While the mathematical derivation of the present technique is too lengthy and complex to fit within the space available for this article, the technique itself can be characterized in relatively simple terms: The technique involves correction of surface-normal spatial pressure derivatives at a boundary surface to satisfy the governing equations and the boundary conditions and thereby achieve arbitrarily high orders of time accuracy in special cases. The boundary conditions can now include a potentially infinite number

  7. Quantification is Neither Necessary Nor Sufficient for Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mari, Luca; Maul, Andrew; Torres Irribarra, David; Wilson, Mark

    2013-09-01

    Being an infrastructural, widespread activity, measurement is laden with stereotypes. Some of these concern the role of measurement in the relation between quality and quantity. In particular, it is sometimes argued or assumed that quantification is necessary for measurement; it is also sometimes argued or assumed that quantification is sufficient for or synonymous with measurement. To assess the validity of these positions the concepts of measurement and quantitative evaluation should be independently defined and their relationship analyzed. We contend that the defining characteristic of measurement should be the structure of the process, not a feature of its results. Under this perspective, quantitative evaluation is neither sufficient nor necessary for measurement.

  8. Sufficiency, justice, and the pursuit of health extension.

    PubMed

    Farrelly, Colin

    2007-12-01

    According to one account of distributive justice, called the Sufficiency View, justice only requires that we bring everyone above some critical threshold of well-being and nothing more. This account of justice no doubt explains why some people believe it is unfair to invest scarce public funds into combating aging. In this paper I show why the sufficiency view is wrong. Furthermore, I argue that the real injustice occurs when we disparage or ignore all potential avenues of extending healthy living. We must be both ambitious and imaginative in our attitudes towards health extension.

  9. Intellectual Freedom and Economic Sufficiency as Educational Entitlements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morse, Jane Fowler

    2001-01-01

    Using the theories of John Stuart Mill and Karl Marx, this article supports the educational entitlements of intellectual freedom and economic sufficiency. Explores these issues in reference to their implications for teaching, the teaching profession and its training. Concludes that ideas cannot be controlled by the interests of the dominant class.…

  10. The First Amendment at Its Bicentennial: Necessary but Not Sufficient?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teeter, Dwight L., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Questions whether an eighteenth-century protection for freedom of the press (the First Amendment) is sufficient for the challenges that the nation's press faces in the twentieth century. Examines prior restraints and seditious libel. Finds instances in which those abuses are alive and well and potentially threatening. (PRA)

  11. 40 CFR 350.13 - Sufficiency of assertions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... submitter uses it, and competitors cannot easily duplicate the specific use of this chemical through their... title does not contain sufficient information to enable competitors to determine the specific chemical... competitors cannot readily discover the specific chemical identity by analysis of the submitter's products...

  12. Leadership, the Logic of Sufficiency and the Sustainability of Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bottery, Mike

    2012-01-01

    The notion of sufficiency has not yet entered mainstream educational thinking, and it still has to make its mark upon educational leadership. However, a number of related concepts--particularly those of sustainability and complexity theory--are beginning to be noticed. This article examines these two concepts and uses them to critique the…

  13. Exploring Necessary and Sufficient Conditions in Dynamic Geometry Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leung, Allen; Chan, Yip-Cheung

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes a possible dragging experiment in a dynamic geometry environment (DGE) that explores a necessary and sufficient condition for cyclic quadrilateral. The dragging modalities identified by Arzarello, Olivero, Paola, and Robutti (2002) and the functions of variation realized in DGE discussed by Leung (2003) will be used as tools…

  14. The Indochinese in America: Progress Towards Self Sufficiency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finck, John

    Despite suspicion in some quarters that refugee resettlement has been unduly expensive, evidence indicates that the Indochinese have made steady progress toward self-sufficiency. The majority of Hmong refugees in Providence, Rhode Island, for example, which has been "heavily impacted" by the large number of Indochinese who have become its newest…

  15. Prediction of Rate Constants for Catalytic Reactions with Chemical Accuracy.

    PubMed

    Catlow, C Richard A

    2016-08-01

    Ex machina: A computational method for predicting rate constants for reactions within microporous zeolite catalysts with chemical accuracy has recently been reported. A key feature of this method is a stepwise QM/MM approach that allows accuracy to be achieved while using realistic models with accessible computer resources.

  16. Enhancement of detection accuracy of fiber Bragg grating sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeh, Thomas; Schweizer, Hans; Meixner, Andreas; Purde, Andreas; Koch, Alexander W.

    2004-06-01

    Over the course of the last few years, several readout techniques for fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors have been proposed. However, all of them suffer from specific restrictions concerning response speed, accuracy, sensor multiplexibility and cost. In the past, it was often assumed that diffraction grating spectrometers were suitable only for FBG applications with modest resolution. The achievable pixel resolution is nowadays in the range of several tens of pm. For FBG sensors with typical temperature coefficients of 5 pm/K and strain coefficients of 0.7 pm/μɛ this resolution is not sufficient for the majority of applications. We present a discussion on different methods for the subpixel registration of FBG spectra and we introduce a novel detection algorithm: the linear phase operator technique (LPO). Even under extreme noisy conditions LPO ensures a significant resolution enhancement by a factor of three compared to conventional algorithms and is shown to be very efficient in its implementation. The efficiencies of several conventional algorithms and LPO is compared by simulations and by means of a test bench. With slight efforts LPO is adaptable to further applications like spectrometer based Fabry-Perot sensors and other sensors with CCD detectors.

  17. Hydrodynamic modeling of Singapore's coastal waters: Nesting and model accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, G. M. Jahid; van Maren, Dirk Sebastiaan; Ooi, Seng Keat

    2016-01-01

    The tidal variation in Singapore's coastal waters is influenced by large-scale, complex tidal dynamics (by interaction of the Indian Ocean and the South China Sea) as well as monsoon-driven low frequency variations, requiring a model with large spatial coverage. Close to the shores, the complex topography, influenced by headlands and small islands, requires a high resolution model to simulate tidal dynamics. This can be achieved through direct nesting or multi-scale nesting, involving multiple model grids. In this paper, we investigate the effect of grid resolution and multi-scale nesting on the tidal dynamics in Singapore's coastal waters, by comparing model results with observations using different statistical techniques. The results reveal that the intermediate-scale model is generally sufficiently accurate (equal to or better than the most refined model), but also that the most refined model is only more accurate when nested in the intermediate scale model (requiring multi-scale nesting). This latter is the result of the complex tidal dynamics around Singapore, where the dominantly diurnal tidal currents are decoupled from the semi-diurnal water level variations. Furthermore, different techniques to quantify model accuracy (harmonic analysis, basic statistics and more complex statistics) are inconsistent in determining which model is more accurate.

  18. Food self-sufficiency across scales: how local can we go?

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Prajal; Lüdeke, Matthias K B; Reusser, Dominik E; Kropp, Juergen P

    2014-08-19

    This study explores the potential for regions to shift to a local food supply using food self-sufficiency (FSS) as an indicator. We considered a region food self-sufficient when its total calorie production is enough to meet its demand. For future scenarios, we considered population growth, dietary changes, improved feed conversion efficiency, climate change, and crop yield increments. Starting at the 5' resolution, we investigated FSS from the lowest administrative levels to continents. Globally, about 1.9 billion people are self-sufficient within their 5' grid, while about 1 billion people from Asia and Africa require cross-continental agricultural trade in 2000. By closing yield gaps, these regions can achieve FSS, which also reduces international trade and increases a self-sufficient population in a 5' grid to 2.9 billion. The number of people depending on international trade will vary between 1.5 and 6 billion by 2050. Climate change may increase the need for international agricultural trade by 4% to 16%. PMID:25062356

  19. New analytical algorithm for overlay accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ham, Boo-Hyun; Yun, Sangho; Kwak, Min-Cheol; Ha, Soon Mok; Kim, Cheol-Hong; Nam, Suk-Woo

    2012-03-01

    The extension of optical lithography to 2Xnm and beyond is often challenged by overlay control. With reduced overlay measurement error budget in the sub-nm range, conventional Total Measurement Uncertainty (TMU) data is no longer sufficient. Also there is no sufficient criterion in overlay accuracy. In recent years, numerous authors have reported new method of the accuracy of the overlay metrology: Through focus and through color. Still quantifying uncertainty in overlay measurement is most difficult work in overlay metrology. According to the ITRS roadmap, total overlay budget is getting tighter than former device node as a design rule shrink on each device node. Conventionally, the total overlay budget is defined as the square root of square sum of the following contributions: the scanner overlay performance, wafer process, metrology and mask registration. All components have been supplying sufficiently performance tool to each device nodes, delivering new scanner, new metrology tools, and new mask e-beam writers. Especially the scanner overlay performance was drastically decreased from 9nm in 8x node to 2.5nm in 3x node. The scanner overlay seems to reach the limitation the overlay performance after 3x nod. The importance of the wafer process overlay as a contribution of total wafer overlay became more important. In fact, the wafer process overlay was decreased by 3nm between DRAM 8x node and DRAM 3x node. We develop an analytical algorithm for overlay accuracy. And a concept of nondestructive method is proposed in this paper. For on product layer we discovered the layer has overlay inaccuracy. Also we use find out source of the overlay error though the new technique. In this paper, authors suggest an analytical algorithm for overlay accuracy. And a concept of non-destructive method is proposed in this paper. For on product layers, we discovered it has overlay inaccuracy. Also we use find out source of the overlay error though the new technique. Furthermore

  20. Resource Utilization and Site Selection for a Self-Sufficient Martian Outpost

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barker, Donald; Chamitoff, Gregory; James, George

    1998-01-01

    As a planet with striking similarities to Earth, Mars is an important focus for scientific research aimed at understanding the processes of planetary evolution and the formation of our solar system. Fortunately, Mars is also a planet with abundant natural resources, including assessible materials that can be used to support human life and to sustain a self-sufficient martian outpost. Resources required include water, breathable air, food, shelter, energy, and fuel. Through a mission design based on in situ resource development, we can establish a permanent outpost on Mars beginning with the first manned mission. This paper examines the potential for supporting the first manned mission with the objective of achieving self-sufficiency through well-understood resource development and a program of rigorous scientific research aimed at extending that capability. We examine the potential for initially extracting critical resources from the martian environment, and discuss the scientific investigations required to identify additional resources in the atmosphere, on the surface, and within the subsurface. We also discuss our current state of knowledge of Mars, technical considerations of resource utilization, and using unmanned missions' data for selecting an optimal site. The primary goal of achieving self-sufficiency on Mars would accelerate the development of human colonization beyond Earth, while providing a robust and permanent martian base from which humans can explore and conduct long-term research on planetary evolution, the solar system, and life itself.

  1. Reticence, Accuracy and Efficacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oreskes, N.; Lewandowsky, S.

    2015-12-01

    James Hansen has cautioned the scientific community against "reticence," by which he means a reluctance to speak in public about the threat of climate change. This may contribute to social inaction, with the result that society fails to respond appropriately to threats that are well understood scientifically. Against this, others have warned against the dangers of "crying wolf," suggesting that reticence protects scientific credibility. We argue that both these positions are missing an important point: that reticence is not only a matter of style but also of substance. In previous work, Bysse et al. (2013) showed that scientific projections of key indicators of climate change have been skewed towards the low end of actual events, suggesting a bias in scientific work. More recently, we have shown that scientific efforts to be responsive to contrarian challenges have led scientists to adopt the terminology of a "pause" or "hiatus" in climate warming, despite the lack of evidence to support such a conclusion (Lewandowsky et al., 2015a. 2015b). In the former case, scientific conservatism has led to under-estimation of climate related changes. In the latter case, the use of misleading terminology has perpetuated scientific misunderstanding and hindered effective communication. Scientific communication should embody two equally important goals: 1) accuracy in communicating scientific information and 2) efficacy in expressing what that information means. Scientists should strive to be neither conservative nor adventurous but to be accurate, and to communicate that accurate information effectively.

  2. [Challenges and Outcomes of the Process for Achieving Certification].

    PubMed

    Kadosaka, Yoshihiko; Suzuki, Reiko; Yoshika, Masamichi; Tsuta, Koji

    2016-02-01

    Clinical laboratory tests have been indispensable for medical services in recent years, and such a situation is associated with the offering of accurate test results by clinical laboratory units. A large number of facilities wishing to achieve ISO 15189 Certification follow preparatory procedures with support from consulting companies. However, in our facility, a limited budget did not allow us to use such services. As a solution, we participated in the Future Lab Session in OSAKA (FLS), a support group for the achievement of ISO 15189 Certification, when it was organized. Aiming to extensively cover and fulfill its responsibility for all processes, including clinical interpretations of the results obtained through patient preparation, in order to continuously offer high-quality test results to clinicians, our clinical laboratory unit underwent examination for certification, and consequently realized the necessity of third-party evaluation. The provision of laboratory services, fully complying with these standards, contributes to medical safety, in addition to accuracy improvement. Although the certification and its maintenance are costly, it is sufficiently cost-effective to achieve it, when focusing on improved efficiency and the enhanced quality and safety of medical services after work standardization. PMID:27311281

  3. Efficiency, sufficiency, and recent change in Newfoundland subsistence horticulture

    SciTech Connect

    Omohundro, J.T.

    1986-09-01

    Traditional Newfoundland horticulture has been a subordinate and compensatory element of the subsistence sphere in a plural economy centered on fishing. Criticized as inefficient and ruinous to the land, this tuber-rootbrassica gardening has in fact been a valuable contribution to diet, is relatively efficient, and compensates for the inadequacies of land and weather. Field data from the Great Northern Peninsula, where some traditional practices persist, demonstrate that the practices conserve time and labor, and substitute massive applications of materials to assure a yield sufficient for household needs. The inefficiency in the tradition may be understood as a response to the constraints upon household labor and follows a kind of Leibig's law of the minimum. Recent changes in gardening practices reveal the dynamics of horticulture in the household's mixed economic strategy. As cash and land have become more common, they have been used to further reduce time while maintaining sufficiency.

  4. Retinal flow is sufficient for steering during observer rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Li; Warren, William H Jr

    2002-01-01

    How do people control locomotion while their eyes are simultaneously rotating? A previous study found that during simulated rotation, they can perceive a straight path of self-motion from the retinal flow pattern, despite conflicting extraretinal information, on the basis of dense motion parallax and reference objects. Here we report that the same information is sufficient for active control ofjoystick steering. Participants steered toward a target in displays that simulated a pursuit eye movement. Steering was highly inaccurate with a textured ground plane (motion parallax alone), but quite accurate when an array of posts was added (motion parallax plus reference objects). This result is consistent with the theory that instantaneous heading is determined from motion parallax, and the path of self-motion is determined by updating heading relative to environmental objects. Retinal flow is thus sufficient for both perceiving self-motion and controlling self-motion with a joystick; extraretinal and positional information can also contribute, but are not necessary.

  5. Entrepreneurship by any other name: self-sufficiency versus innovation.

    PubMed

    Parker Harris, Sarah; Caldwell, Kate; Renko, Maija

    2014-01-01

    Entrepreneurship has been promoted as an innovative strategy to address the employment of people with disabilities. Research has predominantly focused on the self-sufficiency aspect without fully integrating entrepreneurship literature in the areas of theory, systems change, and demonstration projects. Subsequently there are gaps in services, policies, and research in this field that, in turn, have limited our understanding of the support needs and barriers or facilitators of entrepreneurs with disabilities. A thorough analysis of the literature in these areas led to the development of two core concepts that need to be addressed in integrating entrepreneurship into disability employment research and policy: clarity in operational definitions and better disability statistics and outcome measures. This article interrogates existing research and policy efforts in this regard to argue for a necessary shift in the field from focusing on entrepreneurship as self-sufficiency to understanding entrepreneurship as innovation. PMID:25225770

  6. Entrepreneurship by any other name: self-sufficiency versus innovation.

    PubMed

    Parker Harris, Sarah; Caldwell, Kate; Renko, Maija

    2014-01-01

    Entrepreneurship has been promoted as an innovative strategy to address the employment of people with disabilities. Research has predominantly focused on the self-sufficiency aspect without fully integrating entrepreneurship literature in the areas of theory, systems change, and demonstration projects. Subsequently there are gaps in services, policies, and research in this field that, in turn, have limited our understanding of the support needs and barriers or facilitators of entrepreneurs with disabilities. A thorough analysis of the literature in these areas led to the development of two core concepts that need to be addressed in integrating entrepreneurship into disability employment research and policy: clarity in operational definitions and better disability statistics and outcome measures. This article interrogates existing research and policy efforts in this regard to argue for a necessary shift in the field from focusing on entrepreneurship as self-sufficiency to understanding entrepreneurship as innovation.

  7. Reassessing Rogers' necessary and sufficient conditions of change.

    PubMed

    Watson, Jeanne C

    2007-09-01

    This article reviews the impact of Carl Rogers' postulate about the necessary and sufficient conditions of therapeutic change on the field of psychotherapy. It is proposed that his article (see record 2007-14630-002) made an impact in two ways; first, by acting as a spur to researchers to identify the active ingredients of therapeutic change; and, second, by providing guidelines for therapeutic practice. The role of the necessary and sufficient conditions in process-experiential therapy, an emotion-focused therapy for individuals, and their limitations in terms of research and practice are discussed. It is proposed that although the conditions are necessary and important in promoting clients' affect regulation, they do not take sufficient account of other moderating variables that affect clients' response to treatment and may need to be balanced with more structured interventions. Notwithstanding, Rogers highlighted a way of interacting with clients that is generally acknowledged as essential to effective psychotherapy practice. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved).

  8. China's campaign for petroleum self-sufficiency well under way

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-09

    China's petrochemical expansion boom is in full swing. With what some measure as the world's fastest growing economy, China's consumer products demand is growing at a voracious pace, spurring sky rocketing demand for basic and intermediate petrochemicals. So Beijing has embarked on a massive expansion of the nation's petrochemical industry to accommodate that growth. For the next 3 years at least, China will have to rely on imports for about half of its petrochemical supplies. China's rate of self-sufficiency by 1995 is expected to be 50--60% for ethylene, 60--70% for plastics, 70--80% for synthetic fibers, and 50--60% for synthetic rubber. For many key petrochemicals, China envisions accomplishing no less than self-sufficiency by the turn of the century. But to get to that point, Beijing must import foreign technology and capital needed for a wholesale upgrading and expansion of its petrochemical sector. In getting there, it must overcome conflicts involving projects pursued independently by certain local or provincial governments as well as by various state owned companies and agencies. And it must contend with an international petrochemical market still struggling to recover from a downturn that might not be able to absorb the loss of a major market as China moves toward self-sufficiency. The paper discusses capacity and expansion plans, especially for ethylene.

  9. Predictive sufficiency and the use of stored internal state

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musliner, David J.; Durfee, Edmund H.; Shin, Kang G.

    1994-01-01

    In all embedded computing systems, some delay exists between sensing and acting. By choosing an action based on sensed data, a system is essentially predicting that there will be no significant changes in the world during this delay. However, the dynamic and uncertain nature of the real world can make these predictions incorrect, and thus, a system may execute inappropriate actions. Making systems more reactive by decreasing the gap between sensing and action leaves less time for predictions to err, but still provides no principled assurance that they will be correct. Using the concept of predictive sufficiency described in this paper, a system can prove that its predictions are valid, and that it will never execute inappropriate actions. In the context of our CIRCA system, we also show how predictive sufficiency allows a system to guarantee worst-case response times to changes in its environment. Using predictive sufficiency, CIRCA is able to build real-time reactive control plans which provide a sound basis for performance guarantees that are unavailable with other reactive systems.

  10. Reassessing Rogers' necessary and sufficient conditions of change.

    PubMed

    Watson, Jeanne C

    2007-09-01

    This article reviews the impact of Carl Rogers' postulate about the necessary and sufficient conditions of therapeutic change on the field of psychotherapy. It is proposed that his article (see record 2007-14630-002) made an impact in two ways; first, by acting as a spur to researchers to identify the active ingredients of therapeutic change; and, second, by providing guidelines for therapeutic practice. The role of the necessary and sufficient conditions in process-experiential therapy, an emotion-focused therapy for individuals, and their limitations in terms of research and practice are discussed. It is proposed that although the conditions are necessary and important in promoting clients' affect regulation, they do not take sufficient account of other moderating variables that affect clients' response to treatment and may need to be balanced with more structured interventions. Notwithstanding, Rogers highlighted a way of interacting with clients that is generally acknowledged as essential to effective psychotherapy practice. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:22122251

  11. Speed versus accuracy in collective decision making.

    PubMed

    Franks, Nigel R; Dornhaus, Anna; Fitzsimmons, Jon P; Stevens, Martin

    2003-12-01

    We demonstrate a speed versus accuracy trade-off in collective decision making. House-hunting ant colonies choose a new nest more quickly in harsh conditions than in benign ones and are less discriminating. The errors that occur in a harsh environment are errors of judgement not errors of omission because the colonies have discovered all of the alternative nests before they initiate an emigration. Leptothorax albipennis ants use quorum sensing in their house hunting. They only accept a nest, and begin rapidly recruiting members of their colony, when they find within it a sufficient number of their nest-mates. Here we show that these ants can lower their quorum thresholds between benign and harsh conditions to adjust their speed-accuracy trade-off. Indeed, in harsh conditions these ants rely much more on individual decision making than collective decision making. Our findings show that these ants actively choose to take their time over judgements and employ collective decision making in benign conditions when accuracy is more important than speed.

  12. Speed versus accuracy in collective decision making.

    PubMed Central

    Franks, Nigel R; Dornhaus, Anna; Fitzsimmons, Jon P; Stevens, Martin

    2003-01-01

    We demonstrate a speed versus accuracy trade-off in collective decision making. House-hunting ant colonies choose a new nest more quickly in harsh conditions than in benign ones and are less discriminating. The errors that occur in a harsh environment are errors of judgement not errors of omission because the colonies have discovered all of the alternative nests before they initiate an emigration. Leptothorax albipennis ants use quorum sensing in their house hunting. They only accept a nest, and begin rapidly recruiting members of their colony, when they find within it a sufficient number of their nest-mates. Here we show that these ants can lower their quorum thresholds between benign and harsh conditions to adjust their speed-accuracy trade-off. Indeed, in harsh conditions these ants rely much more on individual decision making than collective decision making. Our findings show that these ants actively choose to take their time over judgements and employ collective decision making in benign conditions when accuracy is more important than speed. PMID:14667335

  13. Field Accuracy Test of Rpas Photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barry, P.; Coakley, R.

    2013-08-01

    Baseline Surveys Ltd is a company which specialises in the supply of accurate geospatial data, such as cadastral, topographic and engineering survey data to commercial and government bodies. Baseline Surveys Ltd invested in aerial drone photogrammetric technology and had a requirement to establish the spatial accuracy of the geographic data derived from our unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) photogrammetry before marketing our new aerial mapping service. Having supplied the construction industry with survey data for over 20 years, we felt that is was crucial for our clients to clearly understand the accuracy of our photogrammetry so they can safely make informed spatial decisions, within the known accuracy limitations of our data. This information would also inform us on how and where UAV photogrammetry can be utilised. What we wanted to find out was the actual accuracy that can be reliably achieved using a UAV to collect data under field conditions throughout a 2 Ha site. We flew a UAV over the test area in a "lawnmower track" pattern with an 80% front and 80% side overlap; we placed 45 ground markers as check points and surveyed them in using network Real Time Kinematic Global Positioning System (RTK GPS). We specifically designed the ground markers to meet our accuracy needs. We established 10 separate ground markers as control points and inputted these into our photo modelling software, Agisoft PhotoScan. The remaining GPS coordinated check point data were added later in ArcMap to the completed orthomosaic and digital elevation model so we could accurately compare the UAV photogrammetry XYZ data with the RTK GPS XYZ data at highly reliable common points. The accuracy we achieved throughout the 45 check points was 95% reliably within 41 mm horizontally and 68 mm vertically and with an 11.7 mm ground sample distance taken from a flight altitude above ground level of 90 m.The area covered by one image was 70.2 m × 46.4 m, which equals 0.325 Ha. This finding has shown

  14. Sleep budgets in a globalizing world: biocultural interactions influence sleep sufficiency among Egyptian families.

    PubMed

    Worthman, Carol M; Brown, Ryan A

    2013-02-01

    Declines in self-reported sleep quotas with globalizing lifestyle changes have focused attention on their possible role in rising global health problems such as obesity or depression. Cultural factors that act across the life course and support sleep sufficiency have received scant attention, nor have the potential interactions of cultural and biological factors in age-related changes in sleep behavior been systematically investigated. This study examines the effects of cultural norms for napping and sleeping arrangements along with sleep schedules, age, and gender on sleep budgets among Egyptian households. Data were collected in 2000 from 16 households with 78 members aged 3-56 years at two sites in Egypt (Cairo and an agrarian village). Each participant provided one week of continuous activity records and details of each sleep event. Records showed that nighttime sleep onsets were late and highly variable. Napping was common and, along with wake time flexibility, played a key role in maintaining sleep sufficiency throughout the life course into later middle age. Cosleeping was prevalent and exhibited contrasting associations with reduced duration and sufficiency of both nocturnal and total sleep, and with earlier, more regular, and less disrupted sleep. Daily sleep quotas met published guidelines and showed age-related changes similar to existing reports, but differed in how they were achieved. Cultural norms organizing sleep practices by age and gender appear to tap their intrinsic biological properties as well. Moreover, flexibility in how sleep was achieved contributed to sleep sufficiency. The findings suggest how biocultural dynamics can play key roles in sleep patterns that sustain favorable sleep quotas from infancy onwards in populations pursuing globalizing contemporary lifestyles. PMID:22651897

  15. Sleep budgets in a globalizing world: biocultural interactions influence sleep sufficiency among Egyptian families.

    PubMed

    Worthman, Carol M; Brown, Ryan A

    2013-02-01

    Declines in self-reported sleep quotas with globalizing lifestyle changes have focused attention on their possible role in rising global health problems such as obesity or depression. Cultural factors that act across the life course and support sleep sufficiency have received scant attention, nor have the potential interactions of cultural and biological factors in age-related changes in sleep behavior been systematically investigated. This study examines the effects of cultural norms for napping and sleeping arrangements along with sleep schedules, age, and gender on sleep budgets among Egyptian households. Data were collected in 2000 from 16 households with 78 members aged 3-56 years at two sites in Egypt (Cairo and an agrarian village). Each participant provided one week of continuous activity records and details of each sleep event. Records showed that nighttime sleep onsets were late and highly variable. Napping was common and, along with wake time flexibility, played a key role in maintaining sleep sufficiency throughout the life course into later middle age. Cosleeping was prevalent and exhibited contrasting associations with reduced duration and sufficiency of both nocturnal and total sleep, and with earlier, more regular, and less disrupted sleep. Daily sleep quotas met published guidelines and showed age-related changes similar to existing reports, but differed in how they were achieved. Cultural norms organizing sleep practices by age and gender appear to tap their intrinsic biological properties as well. Moreover, flexibility in how sleep was achieved contributed to sleep sufficiency. The findings suggest how biocultural dynamics can play key roles in sleep patterns that sustain favorable sleep quotas from infancy onwards in populations pursuing globalizing contemporary lifestyles.

  16. HIV testing strategies: test performance is important, but not sufficient.

    PubMed

    Cota, Gláucia Fernandes; de Abreu Ferrari, Teresa Cristina; de Sousa, Marcos Roberto

    2011-02-01

    Minimum accuracy of HIV diagnostic tests is considered the pillar on which testing strategies for all settings must be based. Systematic reviews and meta-analyses have shown that performance of the same test in different settings may vary according to several factors, resulting in different confidence intervals for sensitivity and specificity. Prevalence of HIV infection may influence observed test accuracy. The purpose of this article is to use the knowledge from meta-analyses of general diagnostic tests to inform the specific field of HIV diagnostic strategies. We propose the 'Bayesian' thinking: considering the pretest probability (i.e., prevalence, risk factors) and understanding test limitations to estimate a post-test probability of HIV diagnosis. Cost-effectiveness analysis, patient preferences and ethical issues must also be considered in HIV testing strategies.

  17. A PC parallel port button box provides millisecond response time accuracy under Linux.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Neil

    2006-02-01

    For psychologists, it is sometimes necessary to measure people's reaction times to the nearest millisecond. This article describes how to use the PC parallel port to receive signals from a button box to achieve millisecond response time accuracy. The workings of the parallel port, the corresponding port addresses, and a simple Linux program for controlling the port are described. A test of the speed and reliability of button box signal detection is reported. If the reader is moderately familiar with Linux, this article should provide sufficient instruction for him or her to build and test his or her own parallel port button box. This article also describes how the parallel port could be used to control an external apparatus.

  18. Graded Achievement, Tested Achievement, and Validity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brookhart, Susan M.

    2015-01-01

    Twenty-eight studies of grades, over a century, were reviewed using the argument-based approach to validity suggested by Kane as a theoretical framework. The review draws conclusions about the meaning of graded achievement, its relation to tested achievement, and changes in the construct of graded achievement over time. "Graded…

  19. The Autonomous House: A Bio-Hydrogen Based Energy Self-Sufficient Approach

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shang-Yuan; Chu, Chen-Yeon; Cheng, Ming-jen; Lin, Chiu-Yue

    2009-01-01

    In the wake of the greenhouse effect and global energy crisis, finding sources of clean, alternative energy and developing everyday life applications have become urgent tasks. This study proposes the development of an “autonomous house” emphasizing the use of modern green energy technology to reduce environmental load, achieve energy autonomy and use energy intelligently in order to create a sustainable, comfortable living environment. The houses’ two attributes are: (1) a self-sufficient energy cycle and (2) autonomous energy control to maintain environmental comfort. The autonomous house thus combines energy-conserving, carbon emission-reducing passive design with active elements needed to maintain a comfortable environment. PMID:19440531

  20. The autonomous house: a bio-hydrogen based energy self-sufficient approach.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shang-Yuan; Chu, Chen-Yeon; Cheng, Ming-Jen; Lin, Chiu-Yue

    2009-04-01

    In the wake of the greenhouse effect and global energy crisis, finding sources of clean, alternative energy and developing everyday life applications have become urgent tasks. This study proposes the development of an "autonomous house" emphasizing the use of modern green energy technology to reduce environmental load, achieve energy autonomy and use energy intelligently in order to create a sustainable, comfortable living environment. The houses' two attributes are: (1) a self-sufficient energy cycle and (2) autonomous energy control to maintain environmental comfort. The autonomous house thus combines energy-conserving, carbon emission-reducing passive design with active elements needed to maintain a comfortable environment.

  1. Geometric derivations of minimal sets of sufficient multiview constraints

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomas, Orrin H.; Oshel, Edward R.

    2012-01-01

    Geometric interpretations of four of the most common determinant formulations of multiview constraints are given, showing that they all enforce the same geometry and that all of the forms commonly in use in the machine vision community are a subset of a more general form. Generalising the work of Yi Ma yields a new general 2 x 2 determinant trilinear and 3 x 3 determinant quadlinear. Geometric descriptions of degenerate multiview constraints are given, showing that it is necessary, but insufficient, that the determinant equals zero. Understanding the degeneracies leads naturally into proofs for minimum sufficient sets of bilinear, trilinear and quadlinear constraints for arbitrary numbers of conjugate observations.

  2. Technology for human self-sufficiency in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, John L.

    1988-01-01

    A proposed Pathfinder program would determine the critical human and technology requirements for human self-sufficiency and productivity on manned and long-duration missions to the moon and Mars. Human health would require countermeasures against weightlessness, protection from space radiation and habitats conducive to psychological well-being. Life support systems would need regeneration of expendable resources, power systems for plant life support and processing; and microbial contaminant control. Operational performance requirements include extravehicular activities suit, interactive systems for shared control between humans and computers, and human-centered semi-autonomous systems.

  3. Sufficient conditions for a memory-kernel master equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chruściński, Dariusz; Kossakowski, Andrzej

    2016-08-01

    We derive sufficient conditions for the memory-kernel governing nonlocal master equation which guarantee a legitimate (completely positive and trace-preserving) dynamical map. It turns out that these conditions provide natural parametrizations of the dynamical map being a generalization of the Markovian semigroup. This parametrization is defined by the so-called legitimate pair—monotonic quantum operation and completely positive map—and it is shown that such a class of maps covers almost all known examples from the Markovian semigroup, the semi-Markov evolution, up to collision models and their generalization.

  4. Is recurrent processing necessary and/or sufficient for consciousness?

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Naotsugu; van Boxtel, Jeroen J A

    2010-09-01

    Abstract Abstract While we agree with Lamme's general framework, we are not so convinced by his mapping between psychological concepts with their underlying neuronal mechanisms. Specifically, we doubt if recurrent processing is either necessary or sufficient for consciousness. A gist of a scene may be consciously perceived by purely feedforward, without recurrent, processing. Neurophysiological studies of perceptual suppression show recurrent processing in visual cortex for consciously invisible objects. While the neuronal correlates of attention and consciousness remain to be clarified, we agree with Lamme that these two processes are independent, evinced by our recent demonstration of opposing effects of attention and consciousness. PMID:24168345

  5. Landsat classification accuracy assessment procedures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mead, R. R.; Szajgin, John

    1982-01-01

    A working conference was held in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, 12-14 November, 1980 dealing with Landsat classification Accuracy Assessment Procedures. Thirteen formal presentations were made on three general topics: (1) sampling procedures, (2) statistical analysis techniques, and (3) examples of projects which included accuracy assessment and the associated costs, logistical problems, and value of the accuracy data to the remote sensing specialist and the resource manager. Nearly twenty conference attendees participated in two discussion sessions addressing various issues associated with accuracy assessment. This paper presents an account of the accomplishments of the conference.

  6. From Support to Self-Sufficiency: How Successful Are Programs in Advancing the Financial Independence and Well-Being of Welfare Recipients?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, D. A.

    2001-01-01

    Reviews recent evaluation research findings about welfare recipients from a perspective of support-to-self-sufficiency rather than the welfare-to-work viewpoint that denominates the evaluation literature. Recent research suggests that many families have moved from welfare to work, but few of these families have achieved financial self-sufficiency.…

  7. Accuracy Potential and Applications of MIDAS Aerial Oblique Camera System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madani, M.

    2012-07-01

    Airborne oblique cameras such as Fairchild T-3A were initially used for military reconnaissance in 30s. A modern professional digital oblique camera such as MIDAS (Multi-camera Integrated Digital Acquisition System) is used to generate lifelike three dimensional to the users for visualizations, GIS applications, architectural modeling, city modeling, games, simulators, etc. Oblique imagery provide the best vantage for accessing and reviewing changes to the local government tax base, property valuation assessment, buying & selling of residential/commercial for better decisions in a more timely manner. Oblique imagery is also used for infrastructure monitoring making sure safe operations of transportation, utilities, and facilities. Sanborn Mapping Company acquired one MIDAS from TrackAir in 2011. This system consists of four tilted (45 degrees) cameras and one vertical camera connected to a dedicated data acquisition computer system. The 5 digital cameras are based on the Canon EOS 1DS Mark3 with Zeiss lenses. The CCD size is 5,616 by 3,744 (21 MPixels) with the pixel size of 6.4 microns. Multiple flights using different camera configurations (nadir/oblique (28 mm/50 mm) and (50 mm/50 mm)) were flown over downtown Colorado Springs, Colorado. Boresight fights for 28 mm nadir camera were flown at 600 m and 1,200 m and for 50 mm nadir camera at 750 m and 1500 m. Cameras were calibrated by using a 3D cage and multiple convergent images utilizing Australis model. In this paper, the MIDAS system is described, a number of real data sets collected during the aforementioned flights are presented together with their associated flight configurations, data processing workflow, system calibration and quality control workflows are highlighted and the achievable accuracy is presented in some detail. This study revealed that the expected accuracy of about 1 to 1.5 GSD (Ground Sample Distance) for planimetry and about 2 to 2.5 GSD for vertical can be achieved. Remaining systematic

  8. Sequences Sufficient for Programming Imprinted Germline DNA Methylation Defined

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yoon Jung; Herman, Herry; Gao, Ying; Lindroth, Anders M.; Hu, Benjamin Y.; Murphy, Patrick J.; Putnam, James R.; Soloway, Paul D.

    2012-01-01

    Epigenetic marks are fundamental to normal development, but little is known about signals that dictate their placement. Insights have been provided by studies of imprinted loci in mammals, where monoallelic expression is epigenetically controlled. Imprinted expression is regulated by DNA methylation programmed during gametogenesis in a sex-specific manner and maintained after fertilization. At Rasgrf1 in mouse, paternal-specific DNA methylation on a differential methylation domain (DMD) requires downstream tandem repeats. The DMD and repeats constitute a binary switch regulating paternal-specific expression. Here, we define sequences sufficient for imprinted methylation using two transgenic mouse lines: One carries the entire Rasgrf1 cluster (RC); the second carries only the DMD and repeats (DR) from Rasgrf1. The RC transgene recapitulated all aspects of imprinting seen at the endogenous locus. DR underwent proper DNA methylation establishment in sperm and erasure in oocytes, indicating the DMD and repeats are sufficient to program imprinted DNA methylation in germlines. Both transgenes produce a DMD-spanning pit-RNA, previously shown to be necessary for imprinted DNA methylation at the endogenous locus. We show that when pit-RNA expression is controlled by the repeats, it regulates DNA methylation in cis only and not in trans. Interestingly, pedigree history dictated whether established DR methylation patterns were maintained after fertilization. When DR was paternally transmitted followed by maternal transmission, the unmethylated state that was properly established in the female germlines could not be maintained. This provides a model for transgenerational epigenetic inheritance in mice. PMID:22403732

  9. Photon underproduction crisis: Are QSOs sufficient to resolve it?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaire, Vikram; Srianand, Raghunathan

    2015-07-01

    We investigate the recent claim of `photon underproduction crisis' by Kollmeier et al. which suggests that the known sources of ultraviolet (UV) radiation may not be sufficient to generate the inferred H I photoionization rate (Γ _{H I}) in the low-redshift intergalactic medium. Using the updated QSO emissivities from the recent studies and our cosmological radiative transfer code developed to estimate the UV background, we show that the QSO contributions to Γ _{H I} is higher by a factor ˜2 as compared to the previous estimates. Using self-consistently computed combinations of star formation rate density and dust attenuation, we show that a typical UV escape fraction of 4 per cent from star-forming galaxies should be sufficient to explain the inferred Γ _{H I} by Kollmeier et al. Interestingly, we find that the contribution from QSOs alone can explain the recently inferred Γ _{H I} by Shull et al. which used the same observational data but different simulation. Therefore, we conclude that the crisis is not as severe as it was perceived before and there seems no need to look for alternate explanations such as low luminosity hidden QSOs or decaying dark matter particles.

  10. Perinatal tolerance to proinsulin is sufficient to prevent autoimmune diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Jhala, Gaurang; Chee, Jonathan; Trivedi, Prerak M.; Selck, Claudia; Gurzov, Esteban N.; Graham, Kate L.; Thomas, Helen E.; Kay, Thomas W.H.; Krishnamurthy, Balasubramanian

    2016-01-01

    High-affinity self-reactive thymocytes are purged in the thymus, and residual self-reactive T cells, which are detectable in healthy subjects, are controlled by peripheral tolerance mechanisms. Breakdown in these mechanisms results in autoimmune disease, but antigen-specific therapy to augment natural mechanisms can prevent this. We aimed to determine when antigen-specific therapy is most effective. Islet autoantigens, proinsulin (PI), and islet-specific glucose-6-phosphatase catalytic subunit-related protein (IGRP) were expressed in the antigen-presenting cells (APCs) of autoimmune diabetes-prone nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice in a temporally controlled manner. PI expression from gestation until weaning was sufficient to completely protect NOD mice from diabetes, insulitis, and development of insulin autoantibodies. Insulin-specific T cells were significantly diminished, were naive, and did not express IFN-γ when challenged. This long-lasting effect from a brief period of treatment suggests that autoreactive T cells are not produced subsequently. We tracked IGRP206–214-specific CD8+ T cells in NOD mice expressing IGRP in APCs. When IGRP was expressed only until weaning, IGRP206–214-specific CD8+ T cells were not detected later in life. Thus, anti-islet autoimmunity is determined during early life, and autoreactive T cells are not generated in later life. Bolstering tolerance to islet antigens in the perinatal period is sufficient to impart lasting protection from diabetes.

  11. Perinatal tolerance to proinsulin is sufficient to prevent autoimmune diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Jhala, Gaurang; Chee, Jonathan; Trivedi, Prerak M.; Selck, Claudia; Gurzov, Esteban N.; Graham, Kate L.; Thomas, Helen E.; Kay, Thomas W.H.; Krishnamurthy, Balasubramanian

    2016-01-01

    High-affinity self-reactive thymocytes are purged in the thymus, and residual self-reactive T cells, which are detectable in healthy subjects, are controlled by peripheral tolerance mechanisms. Breakdown in these mechanisms results in autoimmune disease, but antigen-specific therapy to augment natural mechanisms can prevent this. We aimed to determine when antigen-specific therapy is most effective. Islet autoantigens, proinsulin (PI), and islet-specific glucose-6-phosphatase catalytic subunit-related protein (IGRP) were expressed in the antigen-presenting cells (APCs) of autoimmune diabetes-prone nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice in a temporally controlled manner. PI expression from gestation until weaning was sufficient to completely protect NOD mice from diabetes, insulitis, and development of insulin autoantibodies. Insulin-specific T cells were significantly diminished, were naive, and did not express IFN-γ when challenged. This long-lasting effect from a brief period of treatment suggests that autoreactive T cells are not produced subsequently. We tracked IGRP206–214-specific CD8+ T cells in NOD mice expressing IGRP in APCs. When IGRP was expressed only until weaning, IGRP206–214-specific CD8+ T cells were not detected later in life. Thus, anti-islet autoimmunity is determined during early life, and autoreactive T cells are not generated in later life. Bolstering tolerance to islet antigens in the perinatal period is sufficient to impart lasting protection from diabetes. PMID:27699217

  12. Accuracy testing of a new intraoral 3D camera.

    PubMed

    Mehl, A; Ender, A; Mörmann, W; Attin, T

    2009-01-01

    Surveying intraoral structures by optical means has reached the stage where it is being discussed as a serious clinical alternative to conventional impression taking. Ease of handling and, more importantly, accuracy are important criteria for the clinical suitability of these systems. This article presents a new intraoral camera for the Cerec procedure. It reports on a study investigating the accuracy of this camera and its potential clinical indications. Single-tooth and quadrant images were taken with the camera and the results compared to those obtained with a reference scanner and with the previous 3D camera model. Differences were analyzed by superimposing the data records. Accuracy was higher with the new camera than with the previous model, reaching up to 19 microm in single-tooth images. Quadrant images can also be taken with sufficient accuracy (ca 35 microm) and are simple to perform in clinical practice, thanks to built-in shake detection in automatic capture mode.

  13. MSEBAG: a dynamic classifier ensemble generation based on `minimum-sufficient ensemble' and bagging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lei; Kamel, Mohamed S.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a dynamic classifier system, MSEBAG, which is characterised by searching for the 'minimum-sufficient ensemble' and bagging at the ensemble level. It adopts an 'over-generation and selection' strategy and aims to achieve a good bias-variance trade-off. In the training phase, MSEBAG first searches for the 'minimum-sufficient ensemble', which maximises the in-sample fitness with the minimal number of base classifiers. Then, starting from the 'minimum-sufficient ensemble', a backward stepwise algorithm is employed to generate a collection of ensembles. The objective is to create a collection of ensembles with a descending fitness on the data, as well as a descending complexity in the structure. MSEBAG dynamically selects the ensembles from the collection for the decision aggregation. The extended adaptive aggregation (EAA) approach, a bagging-style algorithm performed at the ensemble level, is employed for this task. EAA searches for the competent ensembles using a score function, which takes into consideration both the in-sample fitness and the confidence of the statistical inference, and averages the decisions of the selected ensembles to label the test pattern. The experimental results show that the proposed MSEBAG outperforms the benchmarks on average.

  14. Test Expectancy Affects Metacomprehension Accuracy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thiede, Keith W.; Wiley, Jennifer; Griffin, Thomas D.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Theory suggests that the accuracy of metacognitive monitoring is affected by the cues used to judge learning. Researchers have improved monitoring accuracy by directing attention to more appropriate cues; however, this is the first study to more directly point students to more appropriate cues using instructions regarding tests and…

  15. Sufficient conditions for thermal rectification in general graded materials.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Emmanuel

    2011-03-01

    We address a fundamental problem for the advance of phononics: the search of a feasible thermal diode. We establish sufficient conditions for the existence of thermal rectification in general graded materials. By starting from simple assumptions satisfied by the usual anharmonic models that describe heat conduction in solids, we derive an expression for the rectification. The analytical formula shows how to increase the rectification, and the conditions to avoid its decay with the system size, a problem present in the recurrent model of diodes given by the sequential coupling of two or three different parts. Moreover, for these graded systems, we show that the regimes of nondecaying rectification and of normal conductivity do not overlap. Our results indicate the graded systems as optimal materials for a thermal diode, the basic component of several devices of phononics.

  16. Do safety issues of plasma products constrain self-sufficiency?

    PubMed

    Savidge, G F

    1994-12-01

    The ultimate responsibility for selecting and administering plasma products to patients rests with the prescribing physician, and it is for him/her to choose the safest product available. However, liability for a product with a full licence rests exclusively with the licence holder. After the problems of HIV and hepatitis C the safety of plasma-derived products has become of paramount importance. Particularly in the public sector, financial, strategic and political obstacles may adversely influence the quantity, quality and safety of plasma collection. The safety of blood products can be substantially enhanced by the harmonization of technical standards across both public and private sectors, thus supporting EC Directive 89/381. Additionally, the goal of European rather than national self-sufficiency should be encouraged.

  17. Variational necessary and sufficient stability conditions for inviscid shear flow

    PubMed Central

    Hirota, M.; Morrison, P. J.; Hattori, Y.

    2014-01-01

    A necessary and sufficient condition for linear stability of inviscid parallel shear flow is formulated by developing a novel variational principle, where the velocity profile is assumed to be monotonic and analytic. It is shown that unstable eigenvalues of Rayleigh's equation (which is a non-self-adjoint eigenvalue problem) can be associated with positive eigenvalues of a certain self-adjoint operator. The stability is therefore determined by maximizing a quadratic form, which is theoretically and numerically more tractable than directly solving Rayleigh's equation. This variational stability criterion is based on the understanding of Kreĭn signature for continuous spectra and is applicable to other stability problems of infinite-dimensional Hamiltonian systems. PMID:25484600

  18. Commentary: is the paradigm for humiliation sufficiently complex?

    PubMed

    Altshul, Victor A

    2010-01-01

    The authors Torres and Bergner present a simple, elegant paradigm for understanding the phenomenon of humiliation. They suggest it may have universal applicability and may be of heuristic value for clinicians and policy-makers involved in forensic and social arenas. They offer case examples to illustrate its utility. It is open to question, however, whether the paradigm is sufficiently complex to encompass all the variables in actual situations. In real life, the evolution of humiliation is a highly complicated, often messy process that takes place over time and often results in intense feelings of humiliation in more than one person, often affecting several persons. The authors' examples are reexamined from alternate assumptions about what may have happened in each case. An additional case example illustrates a high degree of interpersonal complexity, suggesting that actual situations may be too unwieldy to allow for simple analysis by the paradigm. PMID:20542940

  19. Geothermal resource requirements for an energy self-sufficient spaceport

    SciTech Connect

    Kruger, P.; Fioravanti, M.; Duchane, D.; Vaughan, A.

    1997-01-01

    Geothermal resources in the southwestern United States provide an opportunity for development of isolated spaceports with local energy self-sufficiency. Geothermal resources can provide both thermal energy and electrical energy for the spaceport facility infrastructure and production of hydrogen fuel for the space vehicles. In contrast to hydrothermal resources by which electric power is generated for sale to utilities, hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal resources are more wide-spread and can be more readily developed at desired spaceport locations. This paper reviews a dynamic model used to quantify the HDR resources requirements for a generic spaceport and estimate the necessary reservoir size and heat extraction rate. The paper reviews the distribution of HDR resources in southern California and southern New Mexico, two regions where a first developmental spaceport is likely to be located. Finally, the paper discusses the design of a HDR facility for the generic spaceport and estimates the cost of the locally produced power.

  20. Nonpetroleum mobility fuels and military-energy self-sufficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Freiwald, D.A.; Barattino, W.J.

    1981-01-01

    Nonpetroleum hydrocarbon fuels will likely serve as transition fuels for a few decades after petroleum sources become scarce. But nonpetroleum hydrocarbon fuels are ultimately either nonrenewable (e.g., coal and oil shale synfuels) or are inefficient to produce. Nuclear sources (supplemented by solar, geothermal, etc., as available) for electric power generation and hydrogen production provide a combination that can be used for military energy needs including mobility fuels, namely liquid hydrogen. This approach can give the military energy self-sufficiency for stationary needs as well as ground vehicles, ships, and aircraft. System integration concepts are discussed, and concepts for a methodology to evaluate source-to-use pathways for different classes of military bases are outlined.

  1. Are coarse scales sufficient for fast detection of visual threat?

    PubMed

    Mermillod, Martial; Droit-Volet, Sylvie; Devaux, Damien; Schaefer, Alexandre; Vermeulen, Nicolas

    2010-10-01

    It has recently been suggested that low-spatial-frequency information would provide rapid visual cues to the amygdala for basic but ultrarapid behavioral responses to dangerous stimuli. The present behavioral study investigated the role of different spatial-frequency channels in visually detecting dangerous stimuli belonging to living or nonliving categories. Subjects were engaged in a visual detection task involving dangerous stimuli, and subjects' behavioral responses were assessed in association with their fear expectations (induced by an aversive 90-dB white noise). Our results showed that, despite its crudeness, low-spatial-frequency information could constitute a sufficient signal for fast recognition of visual danger in a context of fear expectation. In addition, we found that this effect tended to be specific for living entities. These results were obtained despite a strong perceptual bias toward faster recognition of high-spatial-frequency stimuli under supraliminal perception durations.

  2. Meeting local energy needs: resources for self-sufficiency. [Monograph

    SciTech Connect

    Freedburg, M.

    1981-01-01

    The private sector, state and local governments, agencies, and the community itself will be the arenas for energy fund raising in the 1980s. This report surveys and describes these arenas, with references and key contacts accompanying each section. It explores two basic types of funding: (1) grants for community energy ventures of all kinds and (2) financing for consumers, both renters and homeowners, to purchase conservation measures. Grants are not going to be available in sufficient amounts to meet the need, but conservation loans are cost-effective in most parts of the country because they can be paid back through savings. Access to loans for low-income groups can be made available by grassroots funding, pension funds, bond financing, community-development funds, and other mechanisms. 59 references.

  3. [Vitamin-antioxidant sufficiency of winter sports athletes].

    PubMed

    Beketova, N A; Kosheleva, O V; Pereverzeva, O G; Vrzhesinskaia, O A; Kodentsova, V M; Solntseva, T N; Khanfer'ian, R A

    2013-01-01

    The sufficiency of 169 athletes (six disciplines: bullet shooting, biathlon, bobsleigh, skeleton, freestyle skiing, snowboarding) with vitamins A, E, C, B2, and beta-carotene has been investigated in April-September 2013. All athletes (102 juniors, mean age--18.5 +/- 0.3 years, and 67 adult high-performance athletes, mean age--26.8 +/- 0.7 years) were sufficiently supplied with vitamin A (70.7 +/- 1.7 mcg/dl). Mean blood serum retinol level was 15% higher the upper limit of the norm (80 mcg/dl) in biathletes while median reached 90.9 mcg/dl. Blood serum level of tocopherols (1.22 +/- 0.03 mg/dl), ascorbic acid (1.06 +/- 0.03 mg/dl), riboflavin (7.1 +/- 0.4 ng/ml), and beta-carotene (25.1 +/- 1.7 mcg/dl) was in within normal range, but the incidence of insufficiency of vitamins E, C, B2, and carotenoid among athletes varied in the range of 0-25, 0-17, 15-67 and 42-75%, respectively. 95% of adults and 80% of younger athletes were sufficiently provided with vitamin E. Vitamin E level in blood serum of juniors involved in skeleton and biathlon was lower by 51 and 72% (p < 0.05), than this parameter in adult athletes. Vitamin A, C and B2, and beta-carotene blood serum level did not significantly differ in junior and adult athletes. Women were better supplied with vitamins C, B2, and beta-carotene: a reduced blood serum level of these micronutrients in women was detected 2-3 fold rare (p < 0.10) than among men. Blood serum concentration of vitamin C (1.20 +/- 0.05 mg/dl) and beta-carotene (32.0 +/- 3.9 mcg/dl) in women was greater by 15 and 54% (p < 0.05) than in men. In general, the biathletes were better provided with vitamins compared with other athletes. The vast majority (80%) were optimally provided by all three antioxidants (beta-carotene and vitamins E and C). In other sports, the relative quantity of athletes sufficiently supplied with these essential nutrients did not exceed 56%. The quota of supplied with all antioxidants among bullet shooters (31.1%) and

  4. Are coarse scales sufficient for fast detection of visual threat?

    PubMed

    Mermillod, Martial; Droit-Volet, Sylvie; Devaux, Damien; Schaefer, Alexandre; Vermeulen, Nicolas

    2010-10-01

    It has recently been suggested that low-spatial-frequency information would provide rapid visual cues to the amygdala for basic but ultrarapid behavioral responses to dangerous stimuli. The present behavioral study investigated the role of different spatial-frequency channels in visually detecting dangerous stimuli belonging to living or nonliving categories. Subjects were engaged in a visual detection task involving dangerous stimuli, and subjects' behavioral responses were assessed in association with their fear expectations (induced by an aversive 90-dB white noise). Our results showed that, despite its crudeness, low-spatial-frequency information could constitute a sufficient signal for fast recognition of visual danger in a context of fear expectation. In addition, we found that this effect tended to be specific for living entities. These results were obtained despite a strong perceptual bias toward faster recognition of high-spatial-frequency stimuli under supraliminal perception durations. PMID:20817781

  5. A Theory of School Achievement: A Quantum View

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phelps, James L.

    2012-01-01

    In most school achievement research, the relationships between achievement and explanatory variables follow the Newton and Einstein concept/principle and the viewpoint of the macro-observer: Deterministic measures based on the mean value of a sufficiently large number of schools. What if the relationships between achievement and explanatory…

  6. India's baseline plan for nuclear energy self-sufficiency.

    SciTech Connect

    Bucher, R .G.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2009-01-01

    India's nuclear energy strategy has traditionally strived for energy self-sufficiency, driven largely by necessity following trade restrictions imposed by the Nuclear Suppliers Group (NSG) following India's 'peaceful nuclear explosion' of 1974. On September 6, 2008, the NSG agreed to create an exception opening nuclear trade with India, which may create opportunities for India to modify its baseline strategy. The purpose of this document is to describe India's 'baseline plan,' which was developed under constrained trade conditions, as a basis for understanding changes in India's path as a result of the opening of nuclear commerce. Note that this treatise is based upon publicly available information. No attempt is made to judge whether India can meet specified goals either in scope or schedule. In fact, the reader is warned a priori that India's delivery of stated goals has often fallen short or taken a significantly longer period to accomplish. It has been evident since the early days of nuclear power that India's natural resources would determine the direction of its civil nuclear power program. It's modest uranium but vast thorium reserves dictated that the country's primary objective would be thorium utilization. Estimates of India's natural deposits vary appreciably, but its uranium reserves are known to be extremely limited, totaling approximately 80,000 tons, on the order of 1% of the world's deposits; and nominally one-third of this ore is of very low uranium concentration. However, India's roughly 300,000 tons of thorium reserves account for approximately 30% of the world's total. Confronted with this reality, the future of India's nuclear power industry is strongly dependent on the development of a thorium-based nuclear fuel cycle as the only way to insure a stable, sustainable, and autonomous program. The path to India's nuclear energy self-sufficiency was first outlined in a seminal paper by Drs. H. J. Bhabha and N. B. Prasad presented at the Second

  7. Vibrational Spectroscopy of HD{sup +} with 2-ppb Accuracy

    SciTech Connect

    Koelemeij, J. C. J.; Roth, B.; Wicht, A.; Ernsting, I.; Schiller, S.

    2007-04-27

    By measurement of the frequency of a vibrational overtone transition in the molecular hydrogen ion HD{sup +}, we demonstrate the first optical spectroscopy of trapped molecular ions with submegahertz accuracy. We use a diode laser, locked to a stable frequency comb, to perform resonance-enhanced multiphoton dissociation spectroscopy on sympathetically cooled HD{sup +} ions at 50 mK. The achieved 2-ppb relative accuracy is a factor of 150 higher than previous results for HD{sup +}, and the measured transition frequency agrees well with recent high-accuracy ab initio calculations, which include high-order quantum electrodynamic effects. We also show that our method bears potential for achieving considerably higher accuracy and may, if combined with slightly improved theoretical calculations, lead to a new and improved determination of the electron-proton mass ratio.

  8. Assessment of the Thematic Accuracy of Land Cover Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höhle, J.

    2015-08-01

    Several land cover maps are generated from aerial imagery and assessed by different approaches. The test site is an urban area in Europe for which six classes (`building', `hedge and bush', `grass', `road and parking lot', `tree', `wall and car port') had to be derived. Two classification methods were applied (`Decision Tree' and `Support Vector Machine') using only two attributes (height above ground and normalized difference vegetation index) which both are derived from the images. The assessment of the thematic accuracy applied a stratified design and was based on accuracy measures such as user's and producer's accuracy, and kappa coefficient. In addition, confidence intervals were computed for several accuracy measures. The achieved accuracies and confidence intervals are thoroughly analysed and recommendations are derived from the gained experiences. Reliable reference values are obtained using stereovision, false-colour image pairs, and positioning to the checkpoints with 3D coordinates. The influence of the training areas on the results is studied. Cross validation has been tested with a few reference points in order to derive approximate accuracy measures. The two classification methods perform equally for five classes. Trees are classified with a much better accuracy and a smaller confidence interval by means of the decision tree method. Buildings are classified by both methods with an accuracy of 99% (95% CI: 95%-100%) using independent 3D checkpoints. The average width of the confidence interval of six classes was 14% of the user's accuracy.

  9. On necessity and sufficiency in counseling and psychotherapy (revisited).

    PubMed

    Lazarus, Arnold A

    2007-09-01

    It seems to me that Carl Rogers (see record 2007-14639-002) was far too ambitious in trying to specify general conditions of necessity and sufficiency that would be relevant to the entire spectrum of problems and the diverse expectancies and personalities of the people who seek our help. Rogers' position and orientation almost totally overlook the array of problems under the rubric of "response deficits" that stem from misinformation and missing information and call for active correction, training, and retraining. Rogers also paid scant attention to problems with significant biological determinants. Nevertheless, as exemplified by his seminal 1957 article and many other articles and books, Rogers made major contributions within the domain of the therapeutic alliance. Today, the scientific emphasis looks at accountability, the need to establish various treatments of choice, and the need to understand their presumed mechanisms. Treatment efficacy and generalizability across different methodologies are now considered key issues. The efficacy narrowing and clinically self-limiting consequences of adhering to one particular school of thought are now self-evident to most. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved).

  10. Arterial Stiffening Provides Sufficient Explanation for Primary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Pettersen, Klas H.; Bugenhagen, Scott M.; Nauman, Javaid; Beard, Daniel A.; Omholt, Stig W.

    2014-01-01

    Hypertension is one of the most common age-related chronic disorders, and by predisposing individuals for heart failure, stroke, and kidney disease, it is a major source of morbidity and mortality. Its etiology remains enigmatic despite intense research efforts over many decades. By use of empirically well-constrained computer models describing the coupled function of the baroreceptor reflex and mechanics of the circulatory system, we demonstrate quantitatively that arterial stiffening seems sufficient to explain age-related emergence of hypertension. Specifically, the empirically observed chronic changes in pulse pressure with age and the impaired capacity of hypertensive individuals to regulate short-term changes in blood pressure arise as emergent properties of the integrated system. The results are consistent with available experimental data from chemical and surgical manipulation of the cardio-vascular system. In contrast to widely held opinions, the results suggest that primary hypertension can be attributed to a mechanogenic etiology without challenging current conceptions of renal and sympathetic nervous system function. PMID:24853828

  11. Abundant Inverse Regression using Sufficient Reduction and its Applications

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyunwoo J.; Smith, Brandon M.; Adluru, Nagesh; Dyer, Charles R.; Johnson, Sterling C.; Singh, Vikas

    2016-01-01

    Statistical models such as linear regression drive numerous applications in computer vision and machine learning. The landscape of practical deployments of these formulations is dominated by forward regression models that estimate the parameters of a function mapping a set of p covariates, x, to a response variable, y. The less known alternative, Inverse Regression, offers various benefits that are much less explored in vision problems. The goal of this paper is to show how Inverse Regression in the “abundant” feature setting (i.e., many subsets of features are associated with the target label or response, as is the case for images), together with a statistical construction called Sufficient Reduction, yields highly flexible models that are a natural fit for model estimation tasks in vision. Specifically, we obtain formulations that provide relevance of individual covariates used in prediction, at the level of specific examples/samples — in a sense, explaining why a particular prediction was made. With no compromise in performance relative to other methods, an ability to interpret why a learning algorithm is behaving in a specific way for each prediction, adds significant value in numerous applications. We illustrate these properties and the benefits of Abundant Inverse Regression (AIR) on three distinct applications. PMID:27796010

  12. Sufficient conditions of endemic threshold on metapopulation networks.

    PubMed

    Takaguchi, Taro; Lambiotte, Renaud

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we focus on susceptible-infected-susceptible dynamics on metapopulation networks, where nodes represent subpopulations, and where agents diffuse and interact. Recent studies suggest that heterogeneous network structure between elements plays an important role in determining the threshold of infection rate at the onset of epidemics, a fundamental quantity governing the epidemic dynamics. We consider the general case in which the infection rate at each node depends on its population size, as shown in recent empirical observations. We first prove that a sufficient condition for the endemic threshold (i.e., its upper bound), previously derived based on a mean-field approximation of network structure, also holds true for arbitrary networks. We also derive an improved condition showing that networks with the rich-club property (i.e., high connectivity between nodes with a large number of links) are more prone to disease spreading. The dependency of infection rate on population size introduces a considerable difference between this upper bound and estimates based on mean-field approximations, even when degree-degree correlations are considered. We verify the theoretical results with numerical simulations.

  13. On necessity and sufficiency in counseling and psychotherapy (revisited).

    PubMed

    Lazarus, Arnold A

    2007-09-01

    It seems to me that Carl Rogers (see record 2007-14639-002) was far too ambitious in trying to specify general conditions of necessity and sufficiency that would be relevant to the entire spectrum of problems and the diverse expectancies and personalities of the people who seek our help. Rogers' position and orientation almost totally overlook the array of problems under the rubric of "response deficits" that stem from misinformation and missing information and call for active correction, training, and retraining. Rogers also paid scant attention to problems with significant biological determinants. Nevertheless, as exemplified by his seminal 1957 article and many other articles and books, Rogers made major contributions within the domain of the therapeutic alliance. Today, the scientific emphasis looks at accountability, the need to establish various treatments of choice, and the need to understand their presumed mechanisms. Treatment efficacy and generalizability across different methodologies are now considered key issues. The efficacy narrowing and clinically self-limiting consequences of adhering to one particular school of thought are now self-evident to most. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:22122247

  14. Sufficient Conditions for Efficient Classical Simulation of Quantum Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahimi-Keshari, Saleh; Ralph, Timothy C.; Caves, Carlton M.

    2016-04-01

    We provide general sufficient conditions for the efficient classical simulation of quantum-optics experiments that involve inputting states to a quantum process and making measurements at the output. The first condition is based on the negativity of phase-space quasiprobability distributions (PQDs) of the output state of the process and the output measurements; the second one is based on the negativity of PQDs of the input states, the output measurements, and the transition function associated with the process. We show that these conditions provide useful practical tools for investigating the effects of imperfections in implementations of boson sampling. In particular, we apply our formalism to boson-sampling experiments that use single-photon or spontaneous-parametric-down-conversion sources and on-off photodetectors. Considering simple models for loss and noise, we show that above some threshold for the probability of random counts in the photodetectors, these boson-sampling experiments are classically simulatable. We identify mode mismatching as the major source of error contributing to random counts and suggest that this is the chief challenge for implementations of boson sampling of interesting size.

  15. Noise limitations on monopulse accuracy in a multibeam antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loraine, J.; Wallington, J. R.

    A multibeam system allowing target tracking using monopulse processing switched from beamset to beamset is considered. Attention is given to the accuracy of target angular position estimation. An analytical method is used to establish performance limits under low SNR conditions for a multibeam system. It is shown that, in order to achieve accuracies comparable to those of conventional monopulse systems, much higher SNRs are needed.

  16. When Does Choice of Accuracy Measure Alter Imputation Accuracy Assessments?

    PubMed

    Ramnarine, Shelina; Zhang, Juan; Chen, Li-Shiun; Culverhouse, Robert; Duan, Weimin; Hancock, Dana B; Hartz, Sarah M; Johnson, Eric O; Olfson, Emily; Schwantes-An, Tae-Hwi; Saccone, Nancy L

    2015-01-01

    Imputation, the process of inferring genotypes for untyped variants, is used to identify and refine genetic association findings. Inaccuracies in imputed data can distort the observed association between variants and a disease. Many statistics are used to assess accuracy; some compare imputed to genotyped data and others are calculated without reference to true genotypes. Prior work has shown that the Imputation Quality Score (IQS), which is based on Cohen's kappa statistic and compares imputed genotype probabilities to true genotypes, appropriately adjusts for chance agreement; however, it is not commonly used. To identify differences in accuracy assessment, we compared IQS with concordance rate, squared correlation, and accuracy measures built into imputation programs. Genotypes from the 1000 Genomes reference populations (AFR N = 246 and EUR N = 379) were masked to match the typed single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) coverage of several SNP arrays and were imputed with BEAGLE 3.3.2 and IMPUTE2 in regions associated with smoking behaviors. Additional masking and imputation was conducted for sequenced subjects from the Collaborative Genetic Study of Nicotine Dependence and the Genetic Study of Nicotine Dependence in African Americans (N = 1,481 African Americans and N = 1,480 European Americans). Our results offer further evidence that concordance rate inflates accuracy estimates, particularly for rare and low frequency variants. For common variants, squared correlation, BEAGLE R2, IMPUTE2 INFO, and IQS produce similar assessments of imputation accuracy. However, for rare and low frequency variants, compared to IQS, the other statistics tend to be more liberal in their assessment of accuracy. IQS is important to consider when evaluating imputation accuracy, particularly for rare and low frequency variants. PMID:26458263

  17. Assessing and Ensuring GOES-R Magnetometer Accuracy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kronenwetter, Jeffrey; Carter, Delano R.; Todirita, Monica; Chu, Donald

    2016-01-01

    The GOES-R magnetometer accuracy requirement is 1.7 nanoteslas (nT). During quiet times (100 nT), accuracy is defined as absolute mean plus 3 sigma. During storms (300 nT), accuracy is defined as absolute mean plus 2 sigma. To achieve this, the sensor itself has better than 1 nT accuracy. Because zero offset and scale factor drift over time, it is also necessary to perform annual calibration maneuvers. To predict performance, we used covariance analysis and attempted to corroborate it with simulations. Although not perfect, the two generally agree and show the expected behaviors. With the annual calibration regimen, these predictions suggest that the magnetometers will meet their accuracy requirements.

  18. ACCURACY LIMITATIONS IN LONG TRACE PROFILOMETRY.

    SciTech Connect

    TAKACS,P.Z.; QIAN,S.

    2003-08-25

    As requirements for surface slope error quality of grazing incidence optics approach the 100 nanoradian level, it is necessary to improve the performance of the measuring instruments to achieve accurate and repeatable results at this level. We have identified a number of internal error sources in the Long Trace Profiler (LTP) that affect measurement quality at this level. The LTP is sensitive to phase shifts produced within the millimeter diameter of the pencil beam probe by optical path irregularities with scale lengths of a fraction of a millimeter. We examine the effects of mirror surface ''macroroughness'' and internal glass homogeneity on the accuracy of the LTP through experiment and theoretical modeling. We will place limits on the allowable surface ''macroroughness'' and glass homogeneity required to achieve accurate measurements in the nanoradian range.

  19. Complex interferometry potential in case of sufficiently stable diagnostic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalal, M.

    2016-06-01

    Classical interferometry is one of the key methods among active optical diagnostics. Its more advanced version, which allows recording and subsequent reconstruction of up to three sets of data using just one data object —a complex interferogram—was developed in the past and became known as complex interferometry. Employing this diagnostics, not only the usual phase shift, but also the amplitude of the probing beam as well as the fringe contrast (leading directly to the phase shift time derivative) can be reconstructed simultaneously from such a complex interferogram. In this paper it will be demonstrated that even in the case of a not particularly good diagnostic beam quality these three quantities can be reconstructed with a high degree of accuracy provided both the diagnostic beam as well as the corresponding optical line feature a reasonable stability. Such stability requirement is important as in an ideal case four shots need to be gradually recorded (one by one): the signal complex interferogram, the reference interferogram as well as the intensity structures of the signal and reference part of the diagnostic beam. Two examples of complex interferograms obtained in experiments will be analyzed: the laser produced plasma (spark in the air) and the high pressure gas jet. A general ray-tracing based iterative algorithm will be outlined in order to increase a precision of the index of refraction spatial profile taking into account refraction effects (omitted in the Abel inversion) and employing the original reconstructed phase shift and amplitude.

  20. Solving Nonlinear Euler Equations with Arbitrary Accuracy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyson, Rodger W.

    2005-01-01

    A computer program that efficiently solves the time-dependent, nonlinear Euler equations in two dimensions to an arbitrarily high order of accuracy has been developed. The program implements a modified form of a prior arbitrary- accuracy simulation algorithm that is a member of the class of algorithms known in the art as modified expansion solution approximation (MESA) schemes. Whereas millions of lines of code were needed to implement the prior MESA algorithm, it is possible to implement the present MESA algorithm by use of one or a few pages of Fortran code, the exact amount depending on the specific application. The ability to solve the Euler equations to arbitrarily high accuracy is especially beneficial in simulations of aeroacoustic effects in settings in which fully nonlinear behavior is expected - for example, at stagnation points of fan blades, where linearizing assumptions break down. At these locations, it is necessary to solve the full nonlinear Euler equations, and inasmuch as the acoustical energy is of the order of 4 to 5 orders of magnitude below that of the mean flow, it is necessary to achieve an overall fractional error of less than 10-6 in order to faithfully simulate entropy, vortical, and acoustical waves.

  1. Ultrasonic flowmeters undergo accuracy, repeatability tests

    SciTech Connect

    Grimley, T.A.

    1996-12-23

    Two commercially available multipath ultrasonic flowmeters have undergone tests at Gas Research Institute`s metering research facility (MRF) at Southwest Research institute in San Antonio. The tests were conducted in baseline and disturbed-flow installations to assess baseline accuracy and repeatability over a range of flowrates and pressures. Results show the test meters are capable of accuracies within a 1% tolerance and with repeatability of better than 0.25% when the flowrate is greater than about 5% of capacity. The data also indicates that pressure may have an effect on meter error. Results further suggest that both the magnitude and character of errors introduced by flow disturbances are a function of meter design. Shifts of up to 0.6% were measured for meters installed 10D from a tee (1D = 1 pipe diameter). Better characterization of the effects of flow disturbances on measurement accuracy is needed to define more accurately the upstream piping requirements necessary to achieve meter performance within a specified tolerance. The paper discusses reduced station costs, test methods, baseline tests, effect of pressure, speed of sound, and disturbance tests.

  2. Sufficiently Important Difference for Common Cold: Severity Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Bruce; Harahan, Brian; Brown, David; Zhang, Zhengjun; Brown, Roger

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE We undertook a study to estimate the sufficiently important difference (SID) for the common cold. The SID is the smallest benefit that an intervention would require to justify costs and risks. METHODS Benefit-harm tradeoff interviews (in-person and telephone) assessed SID in terms of overall severity reduction using evidence-based simple-language scenarios for 4 common cold treatments: vitamin C, the herbal medicine echinacea, zinc lozenges, and the unlicensed antiviral pleconaril. RESULTS Response patterns to the 4 scenarios in the telephone and in-person samples were not statistically distinguishable and were merged for most analyses. The scenario based on vitamin C led to a mean SID of 25% (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.23–0.27). For the echinacea-based scenario, mean SID was 32% (95% CI, 0.30–0.34). For the zinc-based scenario, mean SID was 47% (95% CI, 0.43–0.51). The scenario based on preliminary antiviral trials provided a mean SID of 57% (95% CI, 0.53–0.61). Multivariate analyses suggested that (1) between-scenario differences were substantive and reproducible in the 2 samples, (2) presence or severity of illness did not predict SID, and (3) SID was not influenced by age, sex, tobacco use, ethnicity, income, or education. Despite consistencies supporting the model and methods, response patterns were diverse, with wide spreads of individual SID values within and among treatment scenarios. CONCLUSIONS Depending on treatment specifics, people want an on-average 25% to 57% reduction in overall illness severity to justify costs and risks of popular cold treatments. Randomized trial evidence does not support benefits this large. This model and these methods should be further developed for use in other disease entities. PMID:17548849

  3. Low but Sufficient Anidulafungin Exposure in Critically Ill Patients

    PubMed Central

    van Wanrooy, Marjolijn J. P.; Rodgers, Michael G. G.; Uges, Donald R. A.; Arends, Jan P.; Zijlstra, Jan G.; van der Werf, Tjip S.; Kosterink, Jos G. W.

    2014-01-01

    The efficacy of anidulafungin is driven by the area under the concentration-time curve (AUC)/MIC ratio. Patients in intensive care may be at risk for underexposure. In critically ill patients with an invasive Candida infection, the anidulafungin exposure and a possible correlation with disease severity or plasma protein levels were explored. Concentration-time curves were therefore obtained at steady state. Anidulafungin concentrations were measured with a validated liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method. The MIC values of the Candida species were determined with the Etest. The target AUC/MIC ratio was based on European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) data. Twenty patients were included. The patients received a maintenance dose of 100 mg once daily after a loading dose of 200 mg on the first day. The mean (±standard deviation) AUC, maximum concentration of drug in plasma (Cmax), and minimum concentration of drug in plasma (Cmin) were 69.8 ± 24.1 mg · h/liter, 4.7 ± 1.4 mg/liter, and 2.2 ± 0.8 mg/liter, respectively. The MIC values of all cultured Candida species were below the EUCAST MIC breakpoints. The exposure to anidulafungin in relation to the MIC that was determined appeared sufficient in all patients. The anidulafungin exposure was low in our critically ill patients. However, combined with the low MICs of the isolated Candida strains, the lower exposure observed in comparison to the exposure in the general patient population resulted in favorable AUC/MIC ratios, based on EUCAST data. No correlation was observed between anidulafungin exposure and disease severity or plasma protein concentrations. In patients with less-susceptible Candida albicans or glabrata strains, we recommend considering determining the anidulafungin exposure to ensure adequate exposure. (This trial has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT01047267.) PMID:24165173

  4. [Effect of vitamin sufficiency on adaptation syndrome in growing rats].

    PubMed

    Sidorova, Iu S; Beketova, N A; Vrzhesinskaia, O A; Kodentsova, V M; Kosheleva, O V; Zorin, S N; Selifanov, A V; Mazo, V K

    2014-01-01

    The influence of vitamin supply of growing male -Wistar rats (n=21) with an initial body weight 53,5±0,9 g on their resistance to a single distress induced by the electric shock has been investigated. Control rats within 21 days received a complete semisynthetic diet,providingadequate amounts of vitamins. Combined vitamin deficiency in experimental rats was caused by 5-fold decrease of vitamin mixture amount in the feed and the total vitamin E exclusion from the mixture. On the 21st day, one day before the end of the experiment, both groups of rats were subjected to stress impact (electrocutaneous irritation on paws, 0,4 mA for 8 sec) and then animals were placed in metabolic cages to collect urine. By the end of the experiment, the animals with the combined vitamin deficiency lag behind in growth. Vitamin B2, A, B1 and E liver content decreased in experimental rats by 1,6, 2,3, 4,4 and 15 fold accordingly. Retinol plasma concentration was significantly reduced by 18%, α-tocopherol level - by 5 fold, urinary excretionof riboflavin and 4-pyridoxic acid (vitamin B6 metabolite) was significantly reduced by 6,5 and 2,46 times accordingly. MDA blood plasma concentration and the urinary ratio of oxidized and not oxidized form of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxy-guanosine did not differ in both groups of rats. Urinary excretion of stress biomarker corticosterone in rats with combined vitamin deficit was 2,5-fold higher than in control rats. Thus, reducing of vitamins supply resulted in an increase of urine corticosterone in stressed rats, that characterized the intensity of general adaptation syndrome. This fact shows the importance of optimal sufficiency with vitamins in nonspecific (general) resistance to stress.

  5. The effect of morphology on spelling and reading accuracy: a study on Italian children

    PubMed Central

    Angelelli, Paola; Marinelli, Chiara Valeria; Burani, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    In opaque orthographies knowledge of morphological information helps in achieving reading and spelling accuracy. In transparent orthographies with regular print-to-sound correspondences, such as Italian, the mappings of orthography onto phonology and phonology onto orthography are in principle sufficient to read and spell most words. The present study aimed to investigate the role of morphology in the reading and spelling accuracy of Italian children as a function of school experience to determine whether morphological facilitation was present in children learning a transparent orthography. The reading and spelling performances of 15 third-grade and 15 fifth-grade typically developing children were analyzed. Children read aloud and spelled both low-frequency words and pseudowords. Low-frequency words were manipulated for the presence of morphological structure (morphemic words vs. non-derived words). Morphemic words could also vary for the frequency (high vs. low) of roots and suffixes. Pseudo-words were made up of either a real root and a real derivational suffix in a combination that does not exist in the Italian language or had no morphological constituents. Results showed that, in Italian, morphological information is a useful resource for both reading and spelling. Typically developing children benefitted from the presence of morphological structure when they read and spelled pseudowords; however, in processing low-frequency words, morphology facilitated reading but not spelling. These findings are discussed in terms of morpho-lexical access and successful cooperation between lexical and sublexical processes in reading and spelling. PMID:25477855

  6. Precision and accuracy in diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Jones, Derek K

    2010-04-01

    This article reviews some of the key factors influencing the accuracy and precision of quantitative metrics derived from diffusion magnetic resonance imaging data. It focuses on the study pipeline beginning at the choice of imaging protocol, through preprocessing and model fitting up to the point of extracting quantitative estimates for subsequent analysis. The aim was to provide the newcomers to the field with sufficient knowledge of how their decisions at each stage along this process might impact on precision and accuracy, to design their study/approach, and to use diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging in the clinic. More specifically, emphasis is placed on improving accuracy and precision. I illustrate how careful choices along the way can substantially affect the sample size needed to make an inference from the data.

  7. MIMO OFDM radar IRCI free range reconstruction with sufficient cyclic prefix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Xiang-gen; Zhang, Tianxian; Kong, Lingjiang

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, we propose MIMO OFDM radar with sufficient cyclic prefix (CP), where all OFDM pulses transmitted from different transmitters share the same frequency band and are orthogonal to each other for every subcarrier in the discrete frequency domain. The orthogonality is not affected by time delays from transmitters. Thus, our proposed MIMO OFDM radar has the same range resolution as single transmitter radar and achieves full spatial diversity. Orthogonal designs are used to achieve this orthogonality across the transmitters, with which it is only needed to design OFDM pulses for the first transmitter. We also propose a joint pulse compression and pulse coherent integration for range reconstruction. In order to achieve the optimal SNR for the range reconstruction, we apply the paraunitary filterbank theory to design the OFDM pulses. We then propose a modified iterative clipping and filtering (MICF) algorithm for the designs of OFDM pulses jointly, when other important factors, such as peak-to-average power ratio (PAPR) in time domain, are also considered. With our proposed MIMO OFDM radar, there is no interference for the range reconstruction not only across the transmitters but also across the range cells in a swath called inter-range-cell interference (IRCI) free that is similar to our previously proposed CP based OFDM radar for single transmitter. Simulations are presented to illustrate our proposed theory and show that the CP based MIMO OFDM radar outperforms the existing frequency-band shared MIMO radar with polyphase codes and also frequency division MIMO radar.

  8. Accuracy in optical overlay metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bringoltz, Barak; Marciano, Tal; Yaziv, Tal; DeLeeuw, Yaron; Klein, Dana; Feler, Yoel; Adam, Ido; Gurevich, Evgeni; Sella, Noga; Lindenfeld, Ze'ev; Leviant, Tom; Saltoun, Lilach; Ashwal, Eltsafon; Alumot, Dror; Lamhot, Yuval; Gao, Xindong; Manka, James; Chen, Bryan; Wagner, Mark

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we discuss the mechanism by which process variations determine the overlay accuracy of optical metrology. We start by focusing on scatterometry, and showing that the underlying physics of this mechanism involves interference effects between cavity modes that travel between the upper and lower gratings in the scatterometry target. A direct result is the behavior of accuracy as a function of wavelength, and the existence of relatively well defined spectral regimes in which the overlay accuracy and process robustness degrades (`resonant regimes'). These resonances are separated by wavelength regions in which the overlay accuracy is better and independent of wavelength (we term these `flat regions'). The combination of flat and resonant regions forms a spectral signature which is unique to each overlay alignment and carries certain universal features with respect to different types of process variations. We term this signature the `landscape', and discuss its universality. Next, we show how to characterize overlay performance with a finite set of metrics that are available on the fly, and that are derived from the angular behavior of the signal and the way it flags resonances. These metrics are used to guarantee the selection of accurate recipes and targets for the metrology tool, and for process control with the overlay tool. We end with comments on the similarity of imaging overlay to scatterometry overlay, and on the way that pupil overlay scatterometry and field overlay scatterometry differ from an accuracy perspective.

  9. Application of nitrogen sufficiency conversion strategy for microalgae-based ammonium-rich wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinghan; Zhou, Wenguang; Yang, Haizhen; Ruan, Roger

    2016-10-01

    Ammonium ([Formula: see text]-N)-rich wastewater, a main cause for eutrophication, can serve as a promising medium for fast microalgae cultivation with efficient [Formula: see text]-N removal. To achieve this goal, a well-controlled three-stage treatment process was developed. Two trophic modes (mixotrophy and heterotrophy) in Stage 1 and Stage 2, with two nitrogen availability conditions (N sufficient and N deprived) in Stage 2, and different [Formula: see text]-N concentrations in Stage 3 were compared to investigate the effects of nitrogen sufficiency conversion on indigenous strain UMN266 for [Formula: see text]-N removal. Results showed that mixotrophic cultures in the first two stages with N deprivation in Stage 2 was the optimum treatment strategy, and higher [Formula: see text]-N concentration in Stage 3 facilitated both microalgal growth and [Formula: see text]-N removal, with average and maximum biomass productivity of 55.3 and 161.0 mg L(-1) d(-1), and corresponding removal rates of 4.2 and 15.0 mg L(-1) d(-1), respectively, superior to previously published results. Observations of intracellular compositions confirmed the optimum treatment strategy, discovering excellent starch accumulating property of strain UMN266 as well. Combination of bioethanol production with the proposed three-stage process using various real wastewater streams at corresponding stages was suggested for future application.

  10. Application of nitrogen sufficiency conversion strategy for microalgae-based ammonium-rich wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinghan; Zhou, Wenguang; Yang, Haizhen; Ruan, Roger

    2016-10-01

    Ammonium ([Formula: see text]-N)-rich wastewater, a main cause for eutrophication, can serve as a promising medium for fast microalgae cultivation with efficient [Formula: see text]-N removal. To achieve this goal, a well-controlled three-stage treatment process was developed. Two trophic modes (mixotrophy and heterotrophy) in Stage 1 and Stage 2, with two nitrogen availability conditions (N sufficient and N deprived) in Stage 2, and different [Formula: see text]-N concentrations in Stage 3 were compared to investigate the effects of nitrogen sufficiency conversion on indigenous strain UMN266 for [Formula: see text]-N removal. Results showed that mixotrophic cultures in the first two stages with N deprivation in Stage 2 was the optimum treatment strategy, and higher [Formula: see text]-N concentration in Stage 3 facilitated both microalgal growth and [Formula: see text]-N removal, with average and maximum biomass productivity of 55.3 and 161.0 mg L(-1) d(-1), and corresponding removal rates of 4.2 and 15.0 mg L(-1) d(-1), respectively, superior to previously published results. Observations of intracellular compositions confirmed the optimum treatment strategy, discovering excellent starch accumulating property of strain UMN266 as well. Combination of bioethanol production with the proposed three-stage process using various real wastewater streams at corresponding stages was suggested for future application. PMID:26979571

  11. Measuring what latent fingerprint examiners consider sufficient information for individualization determinations.

    PubMed

    Ulery, Bradford T; Hicklin, R Austin; Roberts, Maria Antonia; Buscaglia, JoAnn

    2014-01-01

    Latent print examiners use their expertise to determine whether the information present in a comparison of two fingerprints (or palmprints) is sufficient to conclude that the prints were from the same source (individualization). When fingerprint evidence is presented in court, it is the examiner's determination--not an objective metric--that is presented. This study was designed to ascertain the factors that explain examiners' determinations of sufficiency for individualization. Volunteer latent print examiners (n = 170) were each assigned 22 pairs of latent and exemplar prints for examination, and annotated features, correspondence of features, and clarity. The 320 image pairs were selected specifically to control clarity and quantity of features. The predominant factor differentiating annotations associated with individualization and inconclusive determinations is the count of corresponding minutiae; other factors such as clarity provided minimal additional discriminative value. Examiners' counts of corresponding minutiae were strongly associated with their own determinations; however, due to substantial variation of both annotations and determinations among examiners, one examiner's annotation and determination on a given comparison is a relatively weak predictor of whether another examiner would individualize. The extensive variability in annotations also means that we must treat any individual examiner's minutia counts as interpretations of the (unknowable) information content of the prints: saying "the prints had N corresponding minutiae marked" is not the same as "the prints had N corresponding minutiae." More consistency in annotations, which could be achieved through standardization and training, should lead to process improvements and provide greater transparency in casework.

  12. Comparing Science Achievement Constructs: Targeted and Achieved

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrara, Steve; Duncan, Teresa

    2011-01-01

    This article illustrates how test specifications based solely on academic content standards, without attention to other cognitive skills and item response demands, can fall short of their targeted constructs. First, the authors inductively describe the science achievement construct represented by a statewide sixth-grade science proficiency test.…

  13. Orbit accuracy assessment for Seasat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schutz, B. E.; Tapley, B. D.

    1980-01-01

    Laser range measurements are used to determine the orbit of Seasat during the period from July 28, 1978, to Aug. 14, 1978, and the influence of the gravity field, atmospheric drag, and solar radiation pressure on the orbit accuracy is investigated. It is noted that for the orbits of three-day duration, little distinction can be made between the influence of different atmospheric models. It is found that the special Seasat gravity field PGS-S3 is most consistent with the data for three-day orbits, but an unmodeled systematic effect in radiation pressure is noted. For orbits of 18-day duration, little distinction can be made between the results derived from the PGS gravity fields. It is also found that the geomagnetic field is an influential factor in the atmospheric modeling during this time period. Seasat altimeter measurements are used to determine the accuracy of the altimeter measurement time tag and to evaluate the orbital accuracy.

  14. Increasing the range accuracy of three-dimensional ghost imaging ladar using optimum slicing number method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xu; Zhang, Yong; Xu, Lu; Yang, Cheng-Hua; Wang, Qiang; Liu, Yue-Hao; Zhao, Yuan

    2015-12-01

    The range accuracy of three-dimensional (3D) ghost imaging is derived. Based on the derived range accuracy equation, the relationship between the slicing number and the range accuracy is analyzed and an optimum slicing number (OSN) is determined. According to the OSN, an improved 3D ghost imaging algorithm is proposed to increase the range accuracy. Experimental results indicate that the slicing number can affect the range accuracy significantly and the highest range accuracy can be achieved if the 3D ghost imaging system works with OSN. Project supported by the Young Scientist Fund of the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61108072).

  15. Mobility and Reading Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waters, Theresa Z.

    A study examined the effect of geographic mobility on elementary school students' achievement. Although such mobility, which requires students to make multiple moves among schools, can have a negative impact on academic achievement, the hypothesis for the study was that it was not a determining factor in reading achievement test scores. Subjects…

  16. Student Achievement Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bertolini, Katherine; Stremmel, Andrew; Thorngren, Jill

    2012-01-01

    Effective practices for education are essential to insure public investment in our schools provides the maximum yield for our students, communities, states, and nation. The challenge has been defining and measuring terms such as effective, proficient, and sufficient when we examine instructional practice, student outcomes and funding equity. This…

  17. Food Self-Sufficiency across scales: How local can we go?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Prajal; Lüdeke, Matthias K. B.; Reusser, Dominik E.; Kropp, Jürgen P.

    2013-04-01

    "Think global, act local" is a phrase often used in sustainability debates. Here, we explore the potential of regions to go for local supply in context of sustainable food consumption considering both the present state and the plausible future scenarios. We analyze data on the gridded crop calories production, the gridded livestock calories production, the gridded feed calories use and the gridded food calories consumption in 5' resolution. We derived these gridded data from various sources: Global Agro-ecological Zone (GAEZ v3.0), Gridded Livestock of the World (GLW), FAOSTAT, and Global Rural-Urban Mapping Project (GRUMP). For scenarios analysis, we considered changes in population, dietary patterns and possibility of obtaining the maximum potential yield. We investigate the food self-sufficiency multiple spatial scales. We start from the 5' resolution (i.e. around 10 km x 10 km in the equator) and look at 8 levels of aggregation ranging from the plausible lowest administrative level to the continental level. Results for the different spatial scales show that about 1.9 billion people live in the area of 5' resolution where enough calories can be produced to sustain their food consumption and the feed used. On the country level, about 4.4 billion population can be sustained without international food trade. For about 1 billion population from Asia and Africa, there is a need for cross-continental food trade. However, if we were able to achieve the maximum potential crop yield, about 2.6 billion population can be sustained within their living area of 5' resolution. Furthermore, Africa and Asia could be food self-sufficient by achieving their maximum potential crop yield and only round 630 million populations would be dependent on the international food trade. However, the food self-sufficiency status might differ under consideration of the future change in population, dietary patterns and climatic conditions. We provide an initial approach for investigating the

  18. Accuracy and Precision of an IGRT Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Webster, Gareth J. Rowbottom, Carl G.; Mackay, Ranald I.

    2009-07-01

    Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) can potentially improve the accuracy of delivery of radiotherapy treatments by providing high-quality images of patient anatomy in the treatment position that can be incorporated into the treatment setup. The achievable accuracy and precision of delivery of highly complex head-and-neck intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans with an IGRT technique using an Elekta Synergy linear accelerator and the Pinnacle Treatment Planning System (TPS) was investigated. Four head-and-neck IMRT plans were delivered to a semi-anthropomorphic head-and-neck phantom and the dose distribution was measured simultaneously by up to 20 microMOSFET (metal oxide semiconductor field-effect transmitter) detectors. A volumetric kilovoltage (kV) x-ray image was then acquired in the treatment position, fused with the phantom scan within the TPS using Syntegra software, and used to recalculate the dose with the precise delivery isocenter at the actual position of each detector within the phantom. Three repeat measurements were made over a period of 2 months to reduce the effect of random errors in measurement or delivery. To ensure that the noise remained below 1.5% (1 SD), minimum doses of 85 cGy were delivered to each detector. The average measured dose was systematically 1.4% lower than predicted and was consistent between repeats. Over the 4 delivered plans, 10/76 measurements showed a systematic error > 3% (3/76 > 5%), for which several potential sources of error were investigated. The error was ultimately attributable to measurements made in beam penumbrae, where submillimeter positional errors result in large discrepancies in dose. The implementation of an image-guided technique improves the accuracy of dose verification, particularly within high-dose gradients. The achievable accuracy of complex IMRT dose delivery incorporating image-guidance is within {+-} 3% in dose over the range of sample points. For some points in high-dose gradients

  19. Data Accuracy in Citation Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyce, Bert R.; Banning, Carolyn Sue

    1979-01-01

    Four hundred eighty-seven citations of the 1976 issues of the Journal of the American Society for Information Science and the Personnel and Guidance Journal were checked for accuracy: total error was 13.6 percent and 10.7 percent, respectively. Error categories included incorrect author name, article/book title, journal title; wrong entry; and…

  20. Drawing accuracy measured using polygons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carson, Linda; Millard, Matthew; Quehl, Nadine; Danckert, James

    2013-03-01

    The study of drawing, for its own sake and as a probe into human visual perception, generally depends on ratings by human critics and self-reported expertise of the drawers. To complement those approaches, we have developed a geometric approach to analyzing drawing accuracy, one whose measures are objective, continuous and performance-based. Drawing geometry is represented by polygons formed by landmark points found in the drawing. Drawing accuracy is assessed by comparing the geometric properties of polygons in the drawn image to the equivalent polygon in a ground truth photo. There are four distinct properties of a polygon: its size, its position, its orientation and the proportionality of its shape. We can decompose error into four components and investigate how each contributes to drawing performance. We applied a polygon-based accuracy analysis to a pilot data set of representational drawings and found that an expert drawer outperformed a novice on every dimension of polygon error. The results of the pilot data analysis correspond well with the apparent quality of the drawings, suggesting that the landmark and polygon analysis is a method worthy of further study. Applying this geometric analysis to a within-subjects comparison of accuracy in the positive and negative space suggests there is a trade-off on dimensions of error. The performance-based analysis of geometric deformations will allow the study of drawing accuracy at different levels of organization, in a systematic and quantitative manner. We briefly describe the method and its potential applications to research in drawing education and visual perception.

  1. Teachers' Judgements of Students' Foreign-Language Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhu, Mingjing; Urhahne, Detlef

    2015-01-01

    Numerous studies have been conducted on the accuracy of teacher judgement in different educational areas such as mathematics, language arts and reading. Teacher judgement of students' foreign-language achievement, however, has been rarely investigated. The study aimed to examine the accuracy of teacher judgement of students' foreign-language…

  2. MAPPING SPATIAL THEMATIC ACCURACY WITH FUZZY SETS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thematic map accuracy is not spatially homogenous but variable across a landscape. Properly analyzing and representing spatial pattern and degree of thematic map accuracy would provide valuable information for using thematic maps. However, current thematic map accuracy measures (...

  3. The Cross-Validational Accuracy of Sample Regressions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rozeboom, William W.

    1981-01-01

    Browne's definitive but complex formulas for the cross-validational accuracy of an OSL-estimated regression equation in the random-effects sampling model are here reworked to achieve greater perspicuity and extended to include the fixed-effects sampling model. (Author)

  4. High accuracy flexural hinge development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, I.; Ortiz de Zárate, I.; Migliorero, G.

    2005-07-01

    This document provides a synthesis of the technical results obtained in the frame of the HAFHA (High Accuracy Flexural Hinge Assembly) development performed by SENER (in charge of design, development, manufacturing and testing at component and mechanism levels) with EADS Astrium as subcontractor (in charge of doing an inventory of candidate applications among existing and emerging projects, establishing the requirements and perform system level testing) under ESA contract. The purpose of this project has been to develop a competitive technology for a flexural pivot, usuable in highly accurate and dynamic pointing/scanning mechanisms. Compared with other solutions (e.g. magnetic or ball bearing technologies) flexural hinges are the appropriate technology for guiding with accuracy a mobile payload over a limited angular ranges around one rotation axes.

  5. General Achievement Trends: Oklahoma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  6. General Achievement Trends: Georgia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  7. General Achievement Trends: Nebraska

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  8. General Achievement Trends: Arkansas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  9. General Achievement Trends: Maryland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  10. General Achievement Trends: Maine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  11. General Achievement Trends: Iowa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  12. General Achievement Trends: Texas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  13. General Achievement Trends: Hawaii

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  14. General Achievement Trends: Kansas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  15. General Achievement Trends: Florida

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  16. General Achievement Trends: Massachusetts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  17. General Achievement Trends: Tennessee

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  18. General Achievement Trends: Alabama

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  19. General Achievement Trends: Virginia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  20. General Achievement Trends: Michigan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  1. General Achievement Trends: Colorado

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  2. Inverting the Achievement Pyramid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White-Hood, Marian; Shindel, Melissa

    2006-01-01

    Attempting to invert the pyramid to improve student achievement and increase all students' chances for success is not a new endeavor. For decades, educators have strategized, formed think tanks, and developed school improvement teams to find better ways to improve the achievement of all students. Currently, the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) is…

  3. Achievement Test Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Dept. of Education, Columbus. Trade and Industrial Education Service.

    The Ohio Trade and Industrial Education Achievement Test battery is comprised of seven basic achievement tests: Machine Trades, Automotive Mechanics, Basic Electricity, Basic Electronics, Mechanical Drafting, Printing, and Sheet Metal. The tests were developed by subject matter committees and specialists in testing and research. The Ohio Trade and…

  4. School Effects on Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nichols, Robert C.

    The New York State Education Department conducts a Pupil Evaluation Program (PEP) in which each year all third, sixth, and ninth grade students in the state are given a series of achievement tests in reading and mathematics. The data accumulated by the department includes achievement test scores, teacher characteristics, building and curriculum…

  5. Heritability of Creative Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piffer, Davide; Hur, Yoon-Mi

    2014-01-01

    Although creative achievement is a subject of much attention to lay people, the origin of individual differences in creative accomplishments remain poorly understood. This study examined genetic and environmental influences on creative achievement in an adult sample of 338 twins (mean age = 26.3 years; SD = 6.6 years). Twins completed the Creative…

  6. Confronting the Achievement Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, David

    2007-01-01

    This article talks about the large achievement gap between children of color and their white peers. The reasons for the achievement gap are varied. First, many urban minorities come from a background of poverty. One of the detrimental effects of growing up in poverty is receiving inadequate nourishment at a time when bodies and brains are rapidly…

  7. Achieving Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abowitz, Kathleen Knight

    2011-01-01

    Public schools are functionally provided through structural arrangements such as government funding, but public schools are achieved in substance, in part, through local governance. In this essay, Kathleen Knight Abowitz explains the bifocal nature of achieving public schools; that is, that schools are both subject to the unitary Public compact of…

  8. Municipal water consumption forecast accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fullerton, Thomas M.; Molina, Angel L.

    2010-06-01

    Municipal water consumption planning is an active area of research because of infrastructure construction and maintenance costs, supply constraints, and water quality assurance. In spite of that, relatively few water forecast accuracy assessments have been completed to date, although some internal documentation may exist as part of the proprietary "grey literature." This study utilizes a data set of previously published municipal consumption forecasts to partially fill that gap in the empirical water economics literature. Previously published municipal water econometric forecasts for three public utilities are examined for predictive accuracy against two random walk benchmarks commonly used in regional analyses. Descriptive metrics used to quantify forecast accuracy include root-mean-square error and Theil inequality statistics. Formal statistical assessments are completed using four-pronged error differential regression F tests. Similar to studies for other metropolitan econometric forecasts in areas with similar demographic and labor market characteristics, model predictive performances for the municipal water aggregates in this effort are mixed for each of the municipalities included in the sample. Given the competitiveness of the benchmarks, analysts should employ care when utilizing econometric forecasts of municipal water consumption for planning purposes, comparing them to recent historical observations and trends to insure reliability. Comparative results using data from other markets, including regions facing differing labor and demographic conditions, would also be helpful.

  9. Measuring What Latent Fingerprint Examiners Consider Sufficient Information for Individualization Determinations

    PubMed Central

    Ulery, Bradford T.; Hicklin, R. Austin; Roberts, Maria Antonia; Buscaglia, JoAnn

    2014-01-01

    Latent print examiners use their expertise to determine whether the information present in a comparison of two fingerprints (or palmprints) is sufficient to conclude that the prints were from the same source (individualization). When fingerprint evidence is presented in court, it is the examiner's determination—not an objective metric—that is presented. This study was designed to ascertain the factors that explain examiners' determinations of sufficiency for individualization. Volunteer latent print examiners (n = 170) were each assigned 22 pairs of latent and exemplar prints for examination, and annotated features, correspondence of features, and clarity. The 320 image pairs were selected specifically to control clarity and quantity of features. The predominant factor differentiating annotations associated with individualization and inconclusive determinations is the count of corresponding minutiae; other factors such as clarity provided minimal additional discriminative value. Examiners' counts of corresponding minutiae were strongly associated with their own determinations; however, due to substantial variation of both annotations and determinations among examiners, one examiner's annotation and determination on a given comparison is a relatively weak predictor of whether another examiner would individualize. The extensive variability in annotations also means that we must treat any individual examiner's minutia counts as interpretations of the (unknowable) information content of the prints: saying “the prints had N corresponding minutiae marked” is not the same as “the prints had N corresponding minutiae.” More consistency in annotations, which could be achieved through standardization and training, should lead to process improvements and provide greater transparency in casework. PMID:25372036

  10. 76 FR 39115 - Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Transformation Initiative Family Self-Sufficiency...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-05

    ... Family Self-Sufficiency Demonstration Small Grants. Description of the need for information and proposed... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Transformation Initiative Family Self-Sufficiency Demonstration Small Grants AGENCY: Office of Policy Development and Research, HUD. ACTION:...

  11. Sampling sufficiency for analyzing taxonomic relatedness of periphytic ciliate communities using an artificial substratum in coastal waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Henglong; Zhang, Wei; Jiang, Yong; Zhu, Mingzhuang; Al-Rasheid, Khaled A. S.

    2012-08-01

    Taxonomic relatedness measures of ciliated protozoan communities have successively been used as useful indicators for assessing water quality in marine ecosystems with a number of desirable properties. Sampling sufficiency for analyzing taxonomic relatedness indices of periphytic ciliate communities was studied in coastal waters of the Yellow Sea, northern China, from May to June, 2010. Samples were collected at two depths of 1 m and 3 m using an artificial substratum (glass slides), and were analyzed based on different sampling strategies (slide replicates). For achieving a dissimilarity of < 10%, more slide replicates were required with shortening community ages: 3-10 slide replicates were sufficient for the young (1-7 days) communities while 2-4 slide replicates were for the mature (10-28 days). The standard errors of four taxonomic relatedness indices due to the sample sizes were increased only in the young communities with shortening colonization times. For achieving a standard error of < 10%, 1 slide replicate was generally sufficient for the mature communities, whereas 4-10 were required for the young. These findings suggested that low slide replicates were required for measuring taxonomic relatedness indices compared to analyzing the community patterns, and that these indices were more sensitive to the sample sizes of a young community than a mature one of periphytic ciliates in marine ecosystems.

  12. Interpersonal Deception: V. Accuracy in Deception Detection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burgoon, Judee K.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Investigates the influence of several factors on accuracy in detecting truth and deceit. Found that accuracy was much higher on truth than deception, novices were more accurate than experts, accuracy depended on type of deception and whether suspicion was present or absent, suspicion impaired accuracy for experts, and questions strategy…

  13. Sufficiency of Longitudinal Moment of Inertia for Haptic Cylinder Length Judgments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cabe, Patrick A.

    2010-01-01

    Many studies invoke moment of inertia (I[subscript ii]) as necessary and sufficient information to perceive cylinder length via wielding, yet some assert that I[subscript ii] is neither necessary (weight, "m", or static moment, M, are sufficient) nor sufficient for length judgments ("m" or M is necessary). Mathematical expressions for I[subscript…

  14. COMPASS time synchronization and dissemination—Toward centimetre positioning accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, ZhengBo; Zhao, Lu; Wang, ShiGuang; Zhang, JianWei; Wang, Bo; Wang, LiJun

    2014-09-01

    In this paper we investigate methods to achieve highly accurate time synchronization among the satellites of the COMPASS global navigation satellite system (GNSS). Owing to the special design of COMPASS which implements several geo-stationary satellites (GEO), time synchronization can be highly accurate via microwave links between ground stations to the GEO satellites. Serving as space-borne relay stations, the GEO satellites can further disseminate time and frequency signals to other satellites such as the inclined geo-synchronous (IGSO) and mid-earth orbit (MEO) satellites within the system. It is shown that, because of the accuracy in clock synchronization, the theoretical accuracy of COMPASS positioning and navigation will surpass that of the GPS. In addition, the COMPASS system can function with its entire positioning, navigation, and time-dissemination services even without the ground link, thus making it much more robust and secure. We further show that time dissemination using the COMPASS-GEO satellites to earth-fixed stations can achieve very high accuracy, to reach 100 ps in time dissemination and 3 cm in positioning accuracy, respectively. In this paper, we also analyze two feasible synchronization plans. All special and general relativistic effects related to COMPASS clocks frequency and time shifts are given. We conclude that COMPASS can reach centimeter-level positioning accuracy and discuss potential applications.

  15. Measuring Diagnoses: ICD Code Accuracy

    PubMed Central

    O'Malley, Kimberly J; Cook, Karon F; Price, Matt D; Wildes, Kimberly Raiford; Hurdle, John F; Ashton, Carol M

    2005-01-01

    Objective To examine potential sources of errors at each step of the described inpatient International Classification of Diseases (ICD) coding process. Data Sources/Study Setting The use of disease codes from the ICD has expanded from classifying morbidity and mortality information for statistical purposes to diverse sets of applications in research, health care policy, and health care finance. By describing a brief history of ICD coding, detailing the process for assigning codes, identifying where errors can be introduced into the process, and reviewing methods for examining code accuracy, we help code users more systematically evaluate code accuracy for their particular applications. Study Design/Methods We summarize the inpatient ICD diagnostic coding process from patient admission to diagnostic code assignment. We examine potential sources of errors at each step and offer code users a tool for systematically evaluating code accuracy. Principle Findings Main error sources along the “patient trajectory” include amount and quality of information at admission, communication among patients and providers, the clinician's knowledge and experience with the illness, and the clinician's attention to detail. Main error sources along the “paper trail” include variance in the electronic and written records, coder training and experience, facility quality-control efforts, and unintentional and intentional coder errors, such as misspecification, unbundling, and upcoding. Conclusions By clearly specifying the code assignment process and heightening their awareness of potential error sources, code users can better evaluate the applicability and limitations of codes for their particular situations. ICD codes can then be used in the most appropriate ways. PMID:16178999

  16. Student Achievement and Motivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flammer, Gordon H.; Mecham, Robert C.

    1974-01-01

    Compares the lecture and self-paced methods of instruction on the basis of student motivation and achieveme nt, comparing motivating and demotivating factors in each, and their potential for motivation and achievement. (Authors/JR)

  17. Determining gas-meter accuracy

    SciTech Connect

    Valenti, M.

    1997-03-01

    This article describes how engineers at the Metering Research Facility are helping natural-gas companies improve pipeline efficiency by evaluating and refining the instruments used for measuring and setting prices. Accurate metering of natural gas is more important than ever as deregulation subjects pipeline companies to competition. To help improve that accuracy, the Gas Research Institute (GRI) in Chicago has sponsored the Metering Research Facility (MRF) at the Southwest Research Institute (SWRI) in San Antonio, Tex. The MRF evaluates and improves the performance of orifice, turbine, diaphragm, and ultrasonic meters as well as the gas-sampling methods that pipeline companies use to measure the flow of gas and determine its price.

  18. On the Traceability of Accuracy of Ultrasonic Flowmeter

    SciTech Connect

    Yasushi Takeda

    2006-07-01

    Time-of-flight ultrasonic flowmeters have been widely used these days in industry. It is however in suspicion if its high accuracy is traceable to the national standard. It was made clear why traceability cannot be guaranteed from a fluid mechanical point of view. The main reason is a difference of flow configuration between the flow standard and the measurement position on-site. The concept of 'Facility Factor' is introduced and it is concluded that the 'Profile Factor' is not sufficient for correcting the meter reading. It is discussed that measurement of velocity profile on-site is essentially required. (author)

  19. Presynaptic Spontaneous Activity Enhances the Accuracy of Latency Coding.

    PubMed

    Levakova, Marie; Tamborrino, Massimiliano; Kostal, Lubomir; Lansky, Petr

    2016-10-01

    The time to the first spike after stimulus onset typically varies with the stimulation intensity. Experimental evidence suggests that neural systems use such response latency to encode information about the stimulus. We investigate the decoding accuracy of the latency code in relation to the level of noise in the form of presynaptic spontaneous activity. Paradoxically, the optimal performance is achieved at a nonzero level of noise and suprathreshold stimulus intensities. We argue that this phenomenon results from the influence of the spontaneous activity on the stabilization of the membrane potential in the absence of stimulation. The reported decoding accuracy improvement represents a novel manifestation of the noise-aided signal enhancement. PMID:27557098

  20. Presynaptic Spontaneous Activity Enhances the Accuracy of Latency Coding.

    PubMed

    Levakova, Marie; Tamborrino, Massimiliano; Kostal, Lubomir; Lansky, Petr

    2016-10-01

    The time to the first spike after stimulus onset typically varies with the stimulation intensity. Experimental evidence suggests that neural systems use such response latency to encode information about the stimulus. We investigate the decoding accuracy of the latency code in relation to the level of noise in the form of presynaptic spontaneous activity. Paradoxically, the optimal performance is achieved at a nonzero level of noise and suprathreshold stimulus intensities. We argue that this phenomenon results from the influence of the spontaneous activity on the stabilization of the membrane potential in the absence of stimulation. The reported decoding accuracy improvement represents a novel manifestation of the noise-aided signal enhancement.

  1. Minimal sufficient positive-operator valued measure on a separable Hilbert space

    SciTech Connect

    Kuramochi, Yui

    2015-10-15

    We introduce a concept of a minimal sufficient positive-operator valued measure (POVM), which is the least redundant POVM among the POVMs that have the equivalent information about the measured quantum system. Assuming the system Hilbert space to be separable, we show that for a given POVM, a sufficient statistic called a Lehmann-Scheffé-Bahadur statistic induces a minimal sufficient POVM. We also show that every POVM has an equivalent minimal sufficient POVM and that such a minimal sufficient POVM is unique up to relabeling neglecting null sets. We apply these results to discrete POVMs and information conservation conditions proposed by the author.

  2. Accuracy testing of steel and electric groundwater-level measuring tapes: Test method and in-service tape accuracy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fulford, Janice M.; Clayton, Christopher S.

    2015-10-09

    The calibration device and proposed method were used to calibrate a sample of in-service USGS steel and electric groundwater tapes. The sample of in-service groundwater steel tapes were in relatively good condition. All steel tapes, except one, were accurate to ±0.01 ft per 100 ft over their entire length. One steel tape, which had obvious damage in the first hundred feet, was marginally outside the accuracy of ±0.01 ft per 100 ft by 0.001 ft. The sample of in-service groundwater-level electric tapes were in a range of conditions—from like new, with cosmetic damage, to nonfunctional. The in-service electric tapes did not meet the USGS accuracy recommendation of ±0.01 ft. In-service electric tapes, except for the nonfunctional tape, were accurate to about ±0.03 ft per 100 ft. A comparison of new with in-service electric tapes found that steel-core electric tapes maintained their length and accuracy better than electric tapes without a steel core. The in-service steel tapes could be used as is and achieve USGS accuracy recommendations for groundwater-level measurements. The in-service electric tapes require tape corrections to achieve USGS accuracy recommendations for groundwater-level measurement.

  3. Accuracy testing of steel and electric groundwater-level measuring tapes: Test method and in-service tape accuracy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fulford, Janice M.; Clayton, Christopher S.

    2015-01-01

    The calibration device and proposed method were used to calibrate a sample of in-service USGS steel and electric groundwater tapes. The sample of in-service groundwater steel tapes were in relatively good condition. All steel tapes, except one, were accurate to ±0.01 ft per 100 ft over their entire length. One steel tape, which had obvious damage in the first hundred feet, was marginally outside the accuracy of ±0.01 ft per 100 ft by 0.001 ft. The sample of in-service groundwater-level electric tapes were in a range of conditions—from like new, with cosmetic damage, to nonfunctional. The in-service electric tapes did not meet the USGS accuracy recommendation of ±0.01 ft. In-service electric tapes, except for the nonfunctional tape, were accurate to about ±0.03 ft per 100 ft. A comparison of new with in-service electric tapes found that steel-core electric tapes maintained their length and accuracy better than electric tapes without a steel core. The in-service steel tapes could be used as is and achieve USGS accuracy recommendations for groundwater-level measurements. The in-service electric tapes require tape corrections to achieve USGS accuracy recommendations for groundwater-level measurement.

  4. Pulse oximetry: accuracy of methods of interpreting graphic summaries.

    PubMed

    Lafontaine, V M; Ducharme, F M; Brouillette, R T

    1996-02-01

    Although pulse oximetry has been used to determine the frequency and extent of hemoglobin desaturation during sleep, movement artifact can result in overestimation of desaturation unless valid desaturations can be identified accurately. Therefore, we determined the accuracy of pulmonologists' and technicians' interpretations of graphic displays of desaturation events, derived an objective method for interpreting such events, and validated the method on an independent data set. Eighty-seven randomly selected desaturation events were classified as valid (58) or artifactual (29) based on cardiorespiratory recordings (gold standard) that included pulse waveform and respiratory inductive plethysmography signals. Using oximetry recordings (test method), nine pediatric pulmonologists and three respiratory technicians ("readers") averaged 50 +/- 11% (SD) accuracy for event classification. A single variable, the pulse amplitude modulation range (PAMR) prior to desaturation, performed better in discriminating valid from artifactual events with 76% accuracy (P < 0.05). Following a seminar on oximetry and the use of the PAMR method, the readers' accuracy increased to 73 +/- 2%. In an independent set of 73 apparent desaturation events (74% valid, 26% artifactual), the PAMR method of assessing oximetry graphs yielded 82% accuracy; transcutaneous oxygen tension records confirmed a drop in oxygenation during 49 of 54 (89%) valid desaturation events. In conclusion, the most accurate method (91%) of assessing desaturation events requires recording of the pulse and respiratory waveforms. However, a practical, easy-to-use method of interpreting pulse oximetry recordings achieved 76-82% accuracy, which constitutes a significant improvement from previous subjective interpretations.

  5. School children sufficiently apply life supporting first aid: a prospective investigation

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction The usefulness of CPR training in schools has been questioned because young students may not have the physical and cognitive skills needed to correctly perform such complex tasks correctly. Methods In pupils, who received six hours of CPR training from their teachers during a standard school semester at four months post training the following outcome parameters were assessed: CPR effectiveness, AED deployment, accuracy in checking vital signs, correctness of recovery position, and whether the ambulance service was effectively notified. Possible correlations of age, gender, body mass index (BMI), and outcome parameters were calculated. Results Of 147 students (mean age 13 ± 2 years), 86% performed CPR correctly. Median depth of chest compressions was 35 mm (inter quartile range (IQR) 31 to 41), and the median number of compressions per minute was 129 bpm (IQR 108 to 143). Sixty nine percent of the students tilted the mannequin head sufficiently for mouth to mouth resuscitation, and the median air volume delivered was 540 ml (IQR 0 to 750). Scores on other life supporting techniques were at least 80% or higher. Depth of chest compressions showed a correlation with BMI (r = 0.35; P < 0.0001), body weight (r = 0.38; P < 0.0001), and body height (r = 0.31; P = 0.0002) but not with age. All other outcomes were found to be unrelated to gender, age, or BMI. Conclusions Students as young as 9 years are able to successfully and effectively learn basic life support skills including AED deployment, correct recovery position and emergency calling. As in adults, physical strength may limit depth of chest compressions and ventilation volumes but skill retention is good. PMID:19646229

  6. Knowledge discovery by accuracy maximization.

    PubMed

    Cacciatore, Stefano; Luchinat, Claudio; Tenori, Leonardo

    2014-04-01

    Here we describe KODAMA (knowledge discovery by accuracy maximization), an unsupervised and semisupervised learning algorithm that performs feature extraction from noisy and high-dimensional data. Unlike other data mining methods, the peculiarity of KODAMA is that it is driven by an integrated procedure of cross-validation of the results. The discovery of a local manifold's topology is led by a classifier through a Monte Carlo procedure of maximization of cross-validated predictive accuracy. Briefly, our approach differs from previous methods in that it has an integrated procedure of validation of the results. In this way, the method ensures the highest robustness of the obtained solution. This robustness is demonstrated on experimental datasets of gene expression and metabolomics, where KODAMA compares favorably with other existing feature extraction methods. KODAMA is then applied to an astronomical dataset, revealing unexpected features. Interesting and not easily predictable features are also found in the analysis of the State of the Union speeches by American presidents: KODAMA reveals an abrupt linguistic transition sharply separating all post-Reagan from all pre-Reagan speeches. The transition occurs during Reagan's presidency and not from its beginning.

  7. High accuracy time transfer synchronization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, Paul J.; Koppang, Paul A.; Chalmers, David; Davis, Angela; Kubik, Anthony; Powell, William M.

    1995-01-01

    In July 1994, the U.S. Naval Observatory (USNO) Time Service System Engineering Division conducted a field test to establish a baseline accuracy for two-way satellite time transfer synchronization. Three Hewlett-Packard model 5071 high performance cesium frequency standards were transported from the USNO in Washington, DC to Los Angeles, California in the USNO's mobile earth station. Two-Way Satellite Time Transfer links between the mobile earth station and the USNO were conducted each day of the trip, using the Naval Research Laboratory(NRL) designed spread spectrum modem, built by Allen Osborne Associates(AOA). A Motorola six channel GPS receiver was used to track the location and altitude of the mobile earth station and to provide coordinates for calculating Sagnac corrections for the two-way measurements, and relativistic corrections for the cesium clocks. This paper will discuss the trip, the measurement systems used and the results from the data collected. We will show the accuracy of using two-way satellite time transfer for synchronization and the performance of the three HP 5071 cesium clocks in an operational environment.

  8. Knowledge discovery by accuracy maximization

    PubMed Central

    Cacciatore, Stefano; Luchinat, Claudio; Tenori, Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    Here we describe KODAMA (knowledge discovery by accuracy maximization), an unsupervised and semisupervised learning algorithm that performs feature extraction from noisy and high-dimensional data. Unlike other data mining methods, the peculiarity of KODAMA is that it is driven by an integrated procedure of cross-validation of the results. The discovery of a local manifold’s topology is led by a classifier through a Monte Carlo procedure of maximization of cross-validated predictive accuracy. Briefly, our approach differs from previous methods in that it has an integrated procedure of validation of the results. In this way, the method ensures the highest robustness of the obtained solution. This robustness is demonstrated on experimental datasets of gene expression and metabolomics, where KODAMA compares favorably with other existing feature extraction methods. KODAMA is then applied to an astronomical dataset, revealing unexpected features. Interesting and not easily predictable features are also found in the analysis of the State of the Union speeches by American presidents: KODAMA reveals an abrupt linguistic transition sharply separating all post-Reagan from all pre-Reagan speeches. The transition occurs during Reagan’s presidency and not from its beginning. PMID:24706821

  9. High accuracy time transfer synchronization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Paul J.; Koppang, Paul A.; Chalmers, David; Davis, Angela; Kubik, Anthony; Powell, William M.

    1995-05-01

    In July 1994, the U.S. Naval Observatory (USNO) Time Service System Engineering Division conducted a field test to establish a baseline accuracy for two-way satellite time transfer synchronization. Three Hewlett-Packard model 5071 high performance cesium frequency standards were transported from the USNO in Washington, DC to Los Angeles, California in the USNO's mobile earth station. Two-Way Satellite Time Transfer links between the mobile earth station and the USNO were conducted each day of the trip, using the Naval Research Laboratory(NRL) designed spread spectrum modem, built by Allen Osborne Associates(AOA). A Motorola six channel GPS receiver was used to track the location and altitude of the mobile earth station and to provide coordinates for calculating Sagnac corrections for the two-way measurements, and relativistic corrections for the cesium clocks. This paper will discuss the trip, the measurement systems used and the results from the data collected. We will show the accuracy of using two-way satellite time transfer for synchronization and the performance of the three HP 5071 cesium clocks in an operational environment.

  10. Evaluation of clinical thermometers for accuracy and reliability.

    PubMed

    Latman, N S; Hans, P; Nicholson, L; DeLee Zint, S; Lewis, K; Shirey, A

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the accuracy and reliability of a wide range of clinical thermometry instruments and technologies. In a historical sense, the purpose of this study was to determine if the improvements in speed, ease of use, and safety realized in the last 100 years have been offset by a loss of accuracy and/or reliability. In view of current events, the purpose was to determine if the new generation of electronic, digital clinical thermometers could be used to replace the traditional glass/mercury thermometers. Nine clinical thermometers representing electronic, digital oral, and predictive oral; electronic, digital infrared tympanic; and liquid crystal urinary technologies were evaluated. Accuracy was determined by comparing the temperatures obtained from these test instruments with those of the reference, glass/mercury oral thermometer. Reliability was determined by test-retest evaluation. All of the thermometers evaluated were significantly less accurate when compared with the reference thermometer in this study. All of the test instruments significantly underestimated higher temperatures and overestimated lower temperatures. This study indicated that the improvements in safety, speed, and ease of use of the newer clinical thermometers have been offset by a loss in accuracy and reliability. It also indicated that the current generation of electronic, digital clinical thermometers, in general, may not be sufficiently accurate or reliable to replace the traditional glass/mercury thermometers.

  11. Key technologies for high-accuracy large mesh antenna reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meguro, Akira; Harada, Satoshi; Watanabe, Mitsunobu

    2003-12-01

    Nippon Telephone and Telegram Corporation (NTT) continues to develop the modular mesh-type deployable antenna. Antenna diameter can be changed from 5 m to about 20 m by changing the number of modules used with surface accuracy better than 2.4 mm RMS (including all error factors) with sufficient deployment reliability. Key technologies are the antenna's structural design, the deployment mechanism, the design tool, the analysis tool, and modularized testing/evaluation methods. This paper describes our beam steering mechanism. Tests show that it yields a beam pointing accuracy of better than 0.1°. Based on the S-band modular mesh antenna reflector, the surface accuracy degradation factors that must be considered in designing the new antenna are partially identified. The influence of modular connection errors on surface accuracy is quantitatively estimated. Our analysis tool SPADE is extended to include the addition of joint gaps. The addition of gaps allows non-linear vibration characteristics due to gapping in deployment hinges to be calculated. We intend to design a new type of mesh antenna reflector. Our new goal is an antenna for Ku or Ka band satellite communication. For this mission, the surface shape must be 5 times more accurate than is required for an S-band antenna.

  12. Time required to achieve homogeneity in swine feed mixtures.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, G J; Miller, E; King, M T; Perfetti, G A; Warner, C R; Adamo, N C; Sporn, E M

    1982-03-01

    FD&C Red No. 3 was mixed with 20 kg pig feed to give a concentration of 0.1%. A mixing time of 30 min was sufficient to achieve homogeneity for this mixture. For larger amounts or more flocculent types of additives, a longer time may be required. Ammoniated glycyrrhizin was mixed with 8 separate batches of pig feed at a concentration of 1%; 1 h was sufficient mixing time.

  13. Ascertainment of medicaid payment for delivery on the iowa birth certificate: is accuracy sufficient for timely policy and program relevant analysis?

    PubMed

    Kane, Debra J; Sappenfield, William M

    2014-05-01

    The Iowa Department of Public Health annually links Medicaid claims data to the birth certificate. Because the latest version of the birth certificate provides more timely and less costly information on delivery payment source, we were interested in assessing the validity and reliability of the birth certificate payment source compared to Medicaid paid claims. We linked Medicaid paid claims to birth certificates for calendar years 2007-2009 (n = 120,626). We measured reliability by Kappa statistic and validity by sensitivity, specificity, predictive value positive and negative. We examined reliability and validity overall and by maternal characteristics (e.g. age, race, ethnicity, education). The Kappa statistic for the birth certificate payment source indicated substantial agreement (0.78; 95 % CL 0.78-0.79). Sensitivity and specificity were also high, 86.3 % (95 % CL 86.0-86 6 %) and 91.9 % (95 % CL 91.7-92.1 %), respectively. The predictive value positive was 87.0 %. The predictive value negative was 91.4 %. Kappa and specificity were lower among women of racial and ethnic minorities, women younger than age 24, and women with less education. The overall Kappa, sensitivity and specificity generally suggest the birth certificate payment source is as valid and reliable as the linked data source. The birth certificate payment source is less valid and reliable for women of racial and ethnic minorities, women younger than age 24, and those with less education. Consequently caution should be exercised when using the birth certificate payment source for monitoring service use by the Medicaid population within specific population subgroups.

  14. Sufficient conditions for the avoidance of spectral dispersion in optical prisms.

    PubMed

    Lin, Psang Dain

    2016-07-01

    Prisms are common optical elements consisting of only flat boundary surfaces. Two conditions need to be fulfilled to avoid chromatic aberration for a prism, namely, no mutual image tilt and no mutual image shift for different wavelengths. Mutual image tilt occurs when the unit directional vector of the exit ray varies as a function of the prism's refractive index, resulting in spectral dispersion. In a previous study by the present group [Appl. Opt.45, 3951 (2006)APOPAI0003-693510.1364/AO.45.003951], it was shown that when the rays enter and exit a prism perpendicularly, image reorientation is achieved without spectral dispersion. The present study derives a further sufficient condition to avoid spectral dispersion caused by refraction. The condition explains the ability of Dove prisms and solid glass corner cubes to produce the required image orientation even when the entrance and exit rays are not normal to the respective boundary surfaces. In general, the proposed condition provides a useful analytical guideline for avoiding spectral dispersion in a wide variety of optical systems. PMID:27409681

  15. Strategies for regeneration of nicotinamide coenzymes emphasizing self-sufficient closed-loop recycling systems.

    PubMed

    Hummel, Werner; Gröger, Harald

    2014-12-10

    Biocatalytic reduction reactions depending on nicotinamide coenzymes require an additional reaction to regenerate the consumed cofactor. For preparative application the preferred method is the simultaneous coupling of an in situ regeneration reaction. There are different strategically advantageous routes to achieve this goal. The standard method uses a second enzyme and a second co-substrate, for example formate and formate dehydrogenase or glucose and glucose dehydrogenase. Alternatively, a second substrate is employed which is converted by the same enzyme used for the primary reaction. For example, alcohol dehydrogenase catalyzed reactions are often coupled with excess 2-propanol which is oxidized to acetone during the regeneration of NAD(P)H. A third method utilizes a reaction-internal sequence by the direct coupling of an oxidizing and a reducing enzyme reaction. Neither an additional substrate nor a further regenerating enzyme are required for the recycling reaction. This kind of "closed-loop" or "self-sufficient" redox process for cofactor regeneration has been used rarely so far. Its most intriguing advantage is that even redox reactions with unstable precursors can be realized provided that this compound is produced in situ by an opposite redox reaction. This elegant method is applicable in special cases only but increasing numbers of examples have been published during the last years.

  16. Sufficient conditions for the avoidance of spectral dispersion in optical prisms.

    PubMed

    Lin, Psang Dain

    2016-07-01

    Prisms are common optical elements consisting of only flat boundary surfaces. Two conditions need to be fulfilled to avoid chromatic aberration for a prism, namely, no mutual image tilt and no mutual image shift for different wavelengths. Mutual image tilt occurs when the unit directional vector of the exit ray varies as a function of the prism's refractive index, resulting in spectral dispersion. In a previous study by the present group [Appl. Opt.45, 3951 (2006)APOPAI0003-693510.1364/AO.45.003951], it was shown that when the rays enter and exit a prism perpendicularly, image reorientation is achieved without spectral dispersion. The present study derives a further sufficient condition to avoid spectral dispersion caused by refraction. The condition explains the ability of Dove prisms and solid glass corner cubes to produce the required image orientation even when the entrance and exit rays are not normal to the respective boundary surfaces. In general, the proposed condition provides a useful analytical guideline for avoiding spectral dispersion in a wide variety of optical systems.

  17. Systems mechanobiology: tension-inhibited protein turnover is sufficient to physically control gene circuits.

    PubMed

    Dingal, P C Dave P; Discher, Dennis E

    2014-12-01

    Mechanotransduction pathways convert forces that stress and strain structures within cells into gene expression levels that impact development, homeostasis, and disease. The levels of some key structural proteins in the nucleus, cytoskeleton, or extracellular matrix have been recently reported to scale with tissue- and cell-level forces or mechanical properties such as stiffness, and so the mathematics of mechanotransduction becomes important to understand. Here, we show that if a given structural protein positively regulates its own gene expression, then stresses need only inhibit degradation of that protein to achieve stable, mechanosensitive gene expression. This basic use-it-or-lose-it module is illustrated by application to meshworks of nuclear lamin A, minifilaments of myosin II, and extracellular matrix collagen fibers—all of which possess filamentous coiled-coil/supercoiled structures. Past experiments not only suggest that tension suppresses protein degradation mediated and/or initiated by various enzymes but also that transcript levels vary with protein levels because key transcription factors are regulated by these structural proteins. Coupling between modules occurs within single cells and between cells in tissue, as illustrated during embryonic heart development where cardiac fibroblasts make collagen that cardiomyocytes contract. With few additional assumptions, the basic module has sufficient physics to control key structural genes in both development and disease. PMID:25468352

  18. Cochrane diagnostic test accuracy reviews.

    PubMed

    Leeflang, Mariska M G; Deeks, Jonathan J; Takwoingi, Yemisi; Macaskill, Petra

    2013-10-07

    In 1996, shortly after the founding of The Cochrane Collaboration, leading figures in test evaluation research established a Methods Group to focus on the relatively new and rapidly evolving methods for the systematic review of studies of diagnostic tests. Seven years later, the Collaboration decided it was time to develop a publication format and methodology for Diagnostic Test Accuracy (DTA) reviews, as well as the software needed to implement these reviews in The Cochrane Library. A meeting hosted by the German Cochrane Centre in 2004 brought together key methodologists in the area, many of whom became closely involved in the subsequent development of the methodological framework for DTA reviews. DTA reviews first appeared in The Cochrane Library in 2008 and are now an integral part of the work of the Collaboration.

  19. Increasing Accuracy in Environmental Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacksier, Tracey; Fernandes, Adelino; Matthew, Matt; Lehmann, Horst

    2016-04-01

    Human activity is increasing the concentrations of green house gases (GHG) in the atmosphere which results in temperature increases. High precision is a key requirement of atmospheric measurements to study the global carbon cycle and its effect on climate change. Natural air containing stable isotopes are used in GHG monitoring to calibrate analytical equipment. This presentation will examine the natural air and isotopic mixture preparation process, for both molecular and isotopic concentrations, for a range of components and delta values. The role of precisely characterized source material will be presented. Analysis of individual cylinders within multiple batches will be presented to demonstrate the ability to dynamically fill multiple cylinders containing identical compositions without isotopic fractionation. Additional emphasis will focus on the ability to adjust isotope ratios to more closely bracket sample types without the reliance on combusting naturally occurring materials, thereby improving analytical accuracy.

  20. Normal fertilization in men with high antibody sperm binding by the addition of sufficient unbound sperm in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, F; Gutlay-Yeo, A L; Meldrum, D R

    1989-12-01

    A high incidence of fertilization failure has been reported in men with over 70% of their sperm bound with isoantibodies. In three men with greater than 80% antisperm antibody binding with IgG and IgA immunoglobulins, a normal rate of fertilization (29/46 oocytes; 63%) was achieved by adding a sufficient number of motile sperm to provide at least 50,000 unbound sperm per oocyte. This method appears to be simpler and more effective than attempting to separate unbound sperm in vitro.

  1. Achieving Global Ocean Color Climate Data Records

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franz, Bryan

    2010-01-01

    Ocean color, or the spectral distribution of visible light upwelling from beneath the ocean surface, carries information on the composition and concentration of biological constituents within the water column. The CZCS mission in 1978 demonstrated that quantitative ocean color measurements could be. made from spaceborne sensors, given sufficient corrections for atmospheric effects and a rigorous calibration and validation program. The launch of SeaWiFS in 1997 represents the beginning of NASA's ongoing efforts to develop a continuous ocean color data record with sufficient coverage and fidelity for global change research. Achievements in establishing and maintaining the consistency of the time-series through multiple missions and varying instrument designs will be highlighted in this talk, including measurements from NASA'S MODIS instruments currently flying on the Terra and Aqua platforms, as well as the MERIS sensor flown by ESA and the OCM-2 sensor recently launched by ISRO.

  2. Improving Accuracy of Image Classification Using GIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, R. K.; Prasad, T. S.; Bala Manikavelu, P. M.; Vijayan, D.

    The Remote Sensing signal which reaches sensor on-board the satellite is the complex aggregation of signals (in agriculture field for example) from soil (with all its variations such as colour, texture, particle size, clay content, organic and nutrition content, inorganic content, water content etc.), plant (height, architecture, leaf area index, mean canopy inclination etc.), canopy closure status and atmospheric effects, and from this we want to find say, characteristics of vegetation. If sensor on- board the satellite makes measurements in n-bands (n of n*1 dimension) and number of classes in an image are c (f of c*1 dimension), then considering linear mixture modeling the pixel classification problem could be written as n = m* f +, where m is the transformation matrix of (n*c) dimension and therepresents the error vector (noise). The problem is to estimate f by inverting the above equation and the possible solutions for such problem are many. Thus, getting back individual classes from satellite data is an ill-posed inverse problem for which unique solution is not feasible and this puts limit to the obtainable classification accuracy. Maximum Likelihood (ML) is the constraint mostly practiced in solving such a situation which suffers from the handicaps of assumed Gaussian distribution and random nature of pixels (in-fact there is high auto-correlation among the pixels of a specific class and further high auto-correlation among the pixels in sub- classes where the homogeneity would be high among pixels). Due to this, achieving of very high accuracy in the classification of remote sensing images is not a straight proposition. With the availability of the GIS for the area under study (i) a priori probability for different classes could be assigned to ML classifier in more realistic terms and (ii) the purity of training sets for different thematic classes could be better ascertained. To what extent this could improve the accuracy of classification in ML classifier

  3. The predictive accuracy of intertemporal-choice models.

    PubMed

    Arfer, Kodi B; Luhmann, Christian C

    2015-05-01

    How do people choose between a smaller reward available sooner and a larger reward available later? Past research has evaluated models of intertemporal choice by measuring goodness of fit or identifying which decision-making anomalies they can accommodate. An alternative criterion for model quality, which is partly antithetical to these standard criteria, is predictive accuracy. We used cross-validation to examine how well 10 models of intertemporal choice could predict behaviour in a 100-trial binary-decision task. Many models achieved the apparent ceiling of 85% accuracy, even with smaller training sets. When noise was added to the training set, however, a simple logistic-regression model we call the difference model performed particularly well. In many situations, between-model differences in predictive accuracy may be small, contrary to long-standing controversy over the modelling question in research on intertemporal choice, but the simplicity and robustness of the difference model recommend it to future use.

  4. Quality--a radiology imperative: interpretation accuracy and pertinence.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joseph K T

    2007-03-01

    Physicians as a group have neither consistently defined nor systematically measured the quality of medical practice. To referring clinicians and patients, a good radiologist is one who is accessible, recommends appropriate imaging studies, and provides timely consultation and reports with high interpretation accuracy. For determining the interpretation accuracy of cases with pathologic or surgical proof, the author proposes tracking data on positive predictive value, disease detection rates, and abnormal interpretation rates for individual radiologists. For imaging studies with no pathologic proof or adequate clinical follow-up, the author proposes measuring the concordance and discordance of the interpretations within a peer group. The monitoring of interpretation accuracy can be achieved through periodic imaging, pathologic correlation, regular peer review of randomly selected cases, or subscription to the ACR's RADPEER system. Challenges facing the implementation of an effective peer-review system include physician time, subjectivity in assessing discordant interpretations, lengthy and equivocal interpretations, and the potential misassignment of false-positive interpretations.

  5. High accuracy wavelength calibration for a scanning visible spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Scotti, Filippo; Bell, Ronald E.

    2010-10-15

    Spectroscopic applications for plasma velocity measurements often require wavelength accuracies {<=}0.2 A. An automated calibration, which is stable over time and environmental conditions without the need to recalibrate after each grating movement, was developed for a scanning spectrometer to achieve high wavelength accuracy over the visible spectrum. This method fits all relevant spectrometer parameters using multiple calibration spectra. With a stepping-motor controlled sine drive, an accuracy of {approx}0.25 A has been demonstrated. With the addition of a high resolution (0.075 arc sec) optical encoder on the grating stage, greater precision ({approx}0.005 A) is possible, allowing absolute velocity measurements within {approx}0.3 km/s. This level of precision requires monitoring of atmospheric temperature and pressure and of grating bulk temperature to correct for changes in the refractive index of air and the groove density, respectively.

  6. High Accuracy Wavelength Calibration For A Scanning Visible Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Filippo Scotti and Ronald Bell

    2010-07-29

    Spectroscopic applications for plasma velocity measurements often require wavelength accuracies ≤ 0.2Â. An automated calibration for a scanning spectrometer has been developed to achieve a high wavelength accuracy overr the visible spectrum, stable over time and environmental conditions, without the need to recalibrate after each grating movement. The method fits all relevant spectrometer paraameters using multiple calibration spectra. With a steping-motor controlled sine-drive, accuracies of ~0.025 Â have been demonstrated. With the addition of high resolution (0.075 aresec) optical encoder on the grading stage, greater precision (~0.005 Â) is possible, allowing absolute velocity measurements with ~0.3 km/s. This level of precision requires monitoring of atmospheric temperature and pressure and of grating bulk temperature to correct for changes in the refractive index of air and the groove density, respectively.

  7. Sample Size Planning for the Standardized Mean Difference: Accuracy in Parameter Estimation via Narrow Confidence Intervals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelley, Ken; Rausch, Joseph R.

    2006-01-01

    Methods for planning sample size (SS) for the standardized mean difference so that a narrow confidence interval (CI) can be obtained via the accuracy in parameter estimation (AIPE) approach are developed. One method plans SS so that the expected width of the CI is sufficiently narrow. A modification adjusts the SS so that the obtained CI is no…

  8. Iowa Women of Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohrn, Deborah Gore, Ed.

    1993-01-01

    This issue of the Goldfinch highlights some of Iowa's 20th century women of achievement. These women have devoted their lives to working for human rights, education, equality, and individual rights. They come from the worlds of politics, art, music, education, sports, business, entertainment, and social work. They represent Native Americans,…

  9. Achieving Peace through Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarken, Rodney H.

    While it is generally agreed that peace is desirable, there are barriers to achieving a peaceful world. These barriers are classified into three major areas: (1) an erroneous view of human nature; (2) injustice; and (3) fear of world unity. In a discussion of these barriers, it is noted that although the consciousness and conscience of the world…

  10. Increasing Male Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Barbara Talbert

    2008-01-01

    The No Child Left Behind legislation has brought greater attention to the academic performance of American youth. Its emphasis on student achievement requires a closer analysis of assessment data by school districts. To address the findings, educators must seek strategies to remedy failing results. In a mid-Atlantic district of the Unites States,…

  11. Leadership Issues: Raising Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horsfall, Chris, Ed.

    This document contains five papers examining the meaning and operation of leadership as a variable affecting student achievement in further education colleges in the United Kingdom. "Introduction" (Chris Horsfall) discusses school effectiveness studies' findings regarding the relationship between leadership and effective schools, distinguishes…

  12. Achievements or Disasters?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwin, MacArthur

    2000-01-01

    Focuses on policy issues that have affected arts education in the twentieth century, such as: interest in discipline-based arts education, influence of national arts associations, and national standards and coordinated assessment. States that whether the policy decisions are viewed as achievements or disasters are for future determination. (CMK)

  13. Achieving True Consensus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Napier, Rod; Sanaghan, Patrick

    2002-01-01

    Uses the example of Vermont's Middlebury College to explore the challenges and possibilities of achieving consensus about institutional change. Discusses why, unlike in this example, consensus usually fails, and presents four demands of an effective consensus process. Includes a list of "test" questions on successful collaboration. (EV)

  14. School Students' Science Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shymansky, James; Wang, Tzu-Ling; Annetta, Leonard; Everett, Susan; Yore, Larry D.

    2013-01-01

    This paper is a report of the impact of an externally funded, multiyear systemic reform project on students' science achievement on a modified version of the Third International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) test in 33 small, rural school districts in two Midwest states. The systemic reform effort utilized a cascading leadership strategy…

  15. Essays on Educational Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ampaabeng, Samuel Kofi

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation examines the determinants of student outcomes--achievement, attainment, occupational choices and earnings--in three different contexts. The first two chapters focus on Ghana while the final chapter focuses on the US state of Massachusetts. In the first chapter, I exploit the incidence of famine and malnutrition that resulted to…

  16. Assessing Handwriting Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ediger, Marlow

    Teachers in the school setting need to emphasize quality handwriting across the curriculum. Quality handwriting means that the written content is easy to read in either manuscript or cursive form. Handwriting achievement can be assessed, but not compared to the precision of assessing basic addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division facts.…

  17. Intelligence and Educational Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deary, Ian J.; Strand, Steve; Smith, Pauline; Fernandes, Cres

    2007-01-01

    This 5-year prospective longitudinal study of 70,000+ English children examined the association between psychometric intelligence at age 11 years and educational achievement in national examinations in 25 academic subjects at age 16. The correlation between a latent intelligence trait (Spearman's "g"from CAT2E) and a latent trait of educational…

  18. Explorations in achievement motivation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helmreich, Robert L.

    1982-01-01

    Recent research on the nature of achievement motivation is reviewed. A three-factor model of intrinsic motives is presented and related to various criteria of performance, job satisfaction and leisure activities. The relationships between intrinsic and extrinsic motives are discussed. Needed areas for future research are described.

  19. NCLB: Achievement Robin Hood?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bracey, Gerald W.

    2008-01-01

    In his "Wall Street Journal" op-ed on the 25th of anniversary of "A Nation At Risk", former assistant secretary of education Chester E. Finn Jr. applauded the report for turning U.S. education away from equality and toward achievement. It was not surprising, then, that in mid-2008, Finn arranged a conference to examine the potential "Robin Hood…

  20. Achieving All Our Ambitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartley, Tricia

    2009-01-01

    National learning and skills policy aims both to build economic prosperity and to achieve social justice. Participation in higher education (HE) has the potential to contribute substantially to both aims. That is why the Campaign for Learning has supported the ambition to increase the proportion of the working-age population with a Level 4…

  1. INTELLIGENCE, PERSONALITY AND ACHIEVEMENT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MUIR, R.C.; AND OTHERS

    A LONGITUDINAL DEVELOPMENTAL STUDY OF A GROUP OF MIDDLE CLASS CHILDREN IS DESCRIBED, WITH EMPHASIS ON A SEGMENT OF THE RESEARCH INVESTIGATING THE RELATIONSHIP OF ACHIEVEMENT, INTELLIGENCE, AND EMOTIONAL DISTURBANCE. THE SUBJECTS WERE 105 CHILDREN AGED FIVE TO 6.3 ATTENDING TWO SCHOOLS IN MONTREAL. EACH CHILD WAS ASSESSED IN THE AREAS OF…

  2. SALT and Spelling Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Joan

    A study investigated the effects of suggestopedic accelerative learning and teaching (SALT) on the spelling achievement, attitudes toward school, and memory skills of fourth-grade students. Subjects were 20 male and 28 female students from two self-contained classrooms at Kennedy Elementary School in Rexburg, Idaho. The control classroom and the…

  3. Appraising Reading Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ediger, Marlow

    To determine quality sequence in pupil progress, evaluation approaches need to be used which guide the teacher to assist learners to attain optimally. Teachers must use a variety of procedures to appraise student achievement in reading, because no one approach is adequate. Appraisal approaches might include: (1) observation and subsequent…

  4. Some aspects of achieving an ultimate accuracy during insertion device magnetic measurements by a Hall probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasserman, I. B.; Strelnikov, N. O.; Xu, J. Z.

    2013-02-01

    An extensive test of a new Senis 2-axis Hall probe was done at the Advanced Photon Source using the Undulator A device and calibration system. This new probe has clear advantages compared with previously used Bell and Sentron Hall probes: very stable zero offset (less than the noise of 0.026 G) and compensated planar Hall effect. It can be used with proper calibration even for first and second field integral measurements. A comparison with reference measurements by long stretched coil shows that the difference in the first field integral measurement results for a 2.4-m-long Undulator A device is between 17 G cm for the best of four Hall probes used for the test and 51 G cm for the worst of them for all gap ranges from 10.5 mm to 150 mm.

  5. Some aspects of achieving an ultimate accuracy during insertion device magnetic measurements by a Hall probe.

    PubMed

    Vasserman, I B; Strelnikov, N O; Xu, J Z

    2013-02-01

    An extensive test of a new Senis 2-axis Hall probe was done at the Advanced Photon Source using the Undulator A device and calibration system. This new probe has clear advantages compared with previously used Bell and Sentron Hall probes: very stable zero offset (less than the noise of 0.026 G) and compensated planar Hall effect. It can be used with proper calibration even for first and second field integral measurements. A comparison with reference measurements by long stretched coil shows that the difference in the first field integral measurement results for a 2.4-m-long Undulator A device is between 17 G cm for the best of four Hall probes used for the test and 51 G cm for the worst of them for all gap ranges from 10.5 mm to 150 mm.

  6. Some aspects of achieving an ultimate accuracy during insertion device magnetic measurements by a Hall probe

    SciTech Connect

    Vasserman, I. B.; Xu, J. Z.; Strelnikov, N. O.

    2013-02-15

    An extensive test of a new Senis 2-axis Hall probe was done at the Advanced Photon Source using the Undulator A device and calibration system. This new probe has clear advantages compared with previously used Bell and Sentron Hall probes: very stable zero offset (less than the noise of 0.026 G) and compensated planar Hall effect. It can be used with proper calibration even for first and second field integral measurements. A comparison with reference measurements by long stretched coil shows that the difference in the first field integral measurement results for a 2.4-m-long Undulator A device is between 17 G cm for the best of four Hall probes used for the test and 51 G cm for the worst of them for all gap ranges from 10.5 mm to 150 mm.

  7. Use of model calibration to achieve high accuracy in analysis of computer networks

    DOEpatents

    Frogner, Bjorn; Guarro, Sergio; Scharf, Guy

    2004-05-11

    A system and method are provided for creating a network performance prediction model, and calibrating the prediction model, through application of network load statistical analyses. The method includes characterizing the measured load on the network, which may include background load data obtained over time, and may further include directed load data representative of a transaction-level event. Probabilistic representations of load data are derived to characterize the statistical persistence of the network performance variability and to determine delays throughout the network. The probabilistic representations are applied to the network performance prediction model to adapt the model for accurate prediction of network performance. Certain embodiments of the method and system may be used for analysis of the performance of a distributed application characterized as data packet streams.

  8. Combining independent, weighted P-values: achieving computational stability by a systematic expansion with controllable accuracy.

    PubMed

    Alves, Gelio; Yu, Yi-Kuo

    2011-01-01

    Given the expanding availability of scientific data and tools to analyze them, combining different assessments of the same piece of information has become increasingly important for social, biological, and even physical sciences. This task demands, to begin with, a method-independent standard, such as the P-value, that can be used to assess the reliability of a piece of information. Good's formula and Fisher's method combine independent P-values with respectively unequal and equal weights. Both approaches may be regarded as limiting instances of a general case of combining P-values from m groups; P-values within each group are weighted equally, while weight varies by group. When some of the weights become nearly degenerate, as cautioned by Good, numeric instability occurs in computation of the combined P-values. We deal explicitly with this difficulty by deriving a controlled expansion, in powers of differences in inverse weights, that provides both accurate statistics and stable numerics. We illustrate the utility of this systematic approach with a few examples. In addition, we also provide here an alternative derivation for the probability distribution function of the general case and show how the analytic formula obtained reduces to both Good's and Fisher's methods as special cases. A C++ program, which computes the combined P-values with equal numerical stability regardless of whether weights are (nearly) degenerate or not, is available for download at our group website http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/CBBresearch/Yu/downloads/CoinedPValues.html.

  9. Improving IMES Localization Accuracy by Integrating Dead Reckoning Information

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Kenjiro; Arie, Hiroaki; Wang, Wei; Kaneko, Yuto; Sakamoto, Yoshihiro; Schmitz, Alexander; Sugano, Shigeki

    2016-01-01

    Indoor positioning remains an open problem, because it is difficult to achieve satisfactory accuracy within an indoor environment using current radio-based localization technology. In this study, we investigate the use of Indoor Messaging System (IMES) radio for high-accuracy indoor positioning. A hybrid positioning method combining IMES radio strength information and pedestrian dead reckoning information is proposed in order to improve IMES localization accuracy. For understanding the carrier noise ratio versus distance relation for IMES radio, the signal propagation of IMES radio is modeled and identified. Then, trilateration and extended Kalman filtering methods using the radio propagation model are developed for position estimation. These methods are evaluated through robot localization and pedestrian localization experiments. The experimental results show that the proposed hybrid positioning method achieved average estimation errors of 217 and 1846 mm in robot localization and pedestrian localization, respectively. In addition, in order to examine the reason for the positioning accuracy of pedestrian localization being much lower than that of robot localization, the influence of the human body on the radio propagation is experimentally evaluated. The result suggests that the influence of the human body can be modeled. PMID:26828492

  10. Necessary and sufficient condition for average consensus of networked multi-agent systems with heterogeneous time delays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakurama, Kazunori; Nakano, Kazushi

    2015-04-01

    This paper deals with an average-consensus problem of networked multi-agent systems with heterogeneous time delays. First, a necessary and sufficient condition is derived for multi-agent systems to achieve average consensus. This condition is represented in the form of an algebraic condition by using the delay-transition and the delay-weighted Laplacians. Second, a performance criterion is introduced to evaluate multi-agent systems that do not achieve average consensus. The criterion is represented in terms of the norms with respect to the above Laplacians. These results imply that the introduced Laplacians play important roles in analysing multi-agent systems with heterogeneous time delays. The validity of the analysis results is demonstrated by simulations with six-agent systems.

  11. Project ACHIEVE final report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-13

    Project ACHIEVE was a math/science academic enhancement program aimed at first year high school Hispanic American students. Four high schools -- two in El Paso, Texas and two in Bakersfield, California -- participated in this Department of Energy-funded program during the spring and summer of 1996. Over 50 students, many of whom felt they were facing a nightmare future, were given the opportunity to work closely with personal computers and software, sophisticated calculators, and computer-based laboratories -- an experience which their regular academic curriculum did not provide. Math and science projects, exercises, and experiments were completed that emphasized independent and creative applications of scientific and mathematical theories to real world problems. The most important outcome was the exposure Project ACHIEVE provided to students concerning the college and technical-field career possibilities available to them.

  12. Martial arts striking hand peak acceleration, accuracy and consistency.

    PubMed

    Neto, Osmar Pinto; Marzullo, Ana Carolina De Miranda; Bolander, Richard P; Bir, Cynthia A

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this paper was to investigate the possible trade-off between peak hand acceleration and accuracy and consistency of hand strikes performed by martial artists of different training experiences. Ten male martial artists with training experience ranging from one to nine years volunteered to participate in the experiment. Each participant performed 12 maximum effort goal-directed strikes. Hand acceleration during the strikes was obtained using a tri-axial accelerometer block. A pressure sensor matrix was used to determine the accuracy and consistency of the strikes. Accuracy was estimated by the radial distance between the centroid of each subject's 12 strikes and the target, whereas consistency was estimated by the square root of the 12 strikes mean squared distance from their centroid. We found that training experience was significantly correlated to hand peak acceleration prior to impact (r(2)=0.456, p =0.032) and accuracy (r(2)=0. 621, p=0.012). These correlations suggest that more experienced participants exhibited higher hand peak accelerations and at the same time were more accurate. Training experience, however, was not correlated to consistency (r(2)=0.085, p=0.413). Overall, our results suggest that martial arts training may lead practitioners to achieve higher striking hand accelerations with better accuracy and no change in striking consistency.

  13. Range accuracy analysis of streak tube imaging lidar systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Guangchao; Fan, Rongwei; Chen, Zhaodong; Yuan, Wei; Chen, Deying; He, Ping

    2016-02-01

    Streak tube imaging lidar (STIL) is an active imaging system that has a high range accuracy and a wide range gate with the use of a pulsed laser transmitter and streak tube receiver to produce 3D range images. This work investigates the range accuracy performance of STIL systems based on a peak detection algorithm, taking into account the effects of blurring of the image. A theoretical model of the time-resolved signal distribution, including the static blurring width in addition to the laser pulse width, is presented, resulting in a modified range accuracy analysis. The model indicates that the static blurring width has a significant effect on the range accuracy, which is validated by both the simulation and experimental results. By using the optimal static blurring width, the range accuracies are enhanced in both indoor and outdoor experiments, with a stand-off distance of 10 m and 1700 m, respectively, and corresponding, best range errors of 0.06 m and 0.25 m were achieved in a daylight environment.

  14. Research of measuring accuracy of laser tracker system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Jianfei; Liang, Zhiyong; Zhang, Haixin; Yan, Yonggang

    2006-11-01

    This paper presents the achievement of a China NSFC project. The Laser Tracker System (LTS) is a portable 3D large size measuring system. The measuring conditions such as time and temperature can greatly affect the measuring accuracy of LTS. This paper pays a great attention to study how the time and temperature affect the measuring accuracy of LTS. Coordinate Measuring Machine (CMM) is employed as a high-level measuring instrument to validate LTS. The experiments have been done to find how the time and temperature affect the measuring accuracy of LTS. The experiments show the LTS can work well with the highest measuring accuracy just after three-hour warm-up. However, the LTS becomes unstable and the measuring accuracy decreases after 10 hours. The LTS needs calibration and compensation every 10 hours. The experiments show that the measuring error can be up to 29.6μm when the measuring temperature is 30.5°C even if the measuring error is less than 5.9μm while the temperature is between 20°C and 23.8°C. The research provides a very useful guidance for application of LTS.

  15. Accuracy evaluation of 3D lidar data from small UAV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tulldahl, H. M.; Bissmarck, Fredrik; Larsson, Hâkan; Grönwall, Christina; Tolt, Gustav

    2015-10-01

    A UAV (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle) with an integrated lidar can be an efficient system for collection of high-resolution and accurate three-dimensional (3D) data. In this paper we evaluate the accuracy of a system consisting of a lidar sensor on a small UAV. High geometric accuracy in the produced point cloud is a fundamental qualification for detection and recognition of objects in a single-flight dataset as well as for change detection using two or several data collections over the same scene. Our work presented here has two purposes: first to relate the point cloud accuracy to data processing parameters and second, to examine the influence on accuracy from the UAV platform parameters. In our work, the accuracy is numerically quantified as local surface smoothness on planar surfaces, and as distance and relative height accuracy using data from a terrestrial laser scanner as reference. The UAV lidar system used is the Velodyne HDL-32E lidar on a multirotor UAV with a total weight of 7 kg. For processing of data into a geographically referenced point cloud, positioning and orientation of the lidar sensor is based on inertial navigation system (INS) data combined with lidar data. The combination of INS and lidar data is achieved in a dynamic calibration process that minimizes the navigation errors in six degrees of freedom, namely the errors of the absolute position (x, y, z) and the orientation (pitch, roll, yaw) measured by GPS/INS. Our results show that low-cost and light-weight MEMS based (microelectromechanical systems) INS equipment with a dynamic calibration process can obtain significantly improved accuracy compared to processing based solely on INS data.

  16. Accuracy analysis and design of A3 parallel spindle head

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Yanbing; Zhang, Biao; Sun, Yupeng; Zhang, Yuan

    2016-03-01

    As functional components of machine tools, parallel mechanisms are widely used in high efficiency machining of aviation components, and accuracy is one of the critical technical indexes. Lots of researchers have focused on the accuracy problem of parallel mechanisms, but in terms of controlling the errors and improving the accuracy in the stage of design and manufacturing, further efforts are required. Aiming at the accuracy design of a 3-DOF parallel spindle head(A3 head), its error model, sensitivity analysis and tolerance allocation are investigated. Based on the inverse kinematic analysis, the error model of A3 head is established by using the first-order perturbation theory and vector chain method. According to the mapping property of motion and constraint Jacobian matrix, the compensatable and uncompensatable error sources which affect the accuracy in the end-effector are separated. Furthermore, sensitivity analysis is performed on the uncompensatable error sources. The sensitivity probabilistic model is established and the global sensitivity index is proposed to analyze the influence of the uncompensatable error sources on the accuracy in the end-effector of the mechanism. The results show that orientation error sources have bigger effect on the accuracy in the end-effector. Based upon the sensitivity analysis results, the tolerance design is converted into the issue of nonlinearly constrained optimization with the manufacturing cost minimum being the optimization objective. By utilizing the genetic algorithm, the allocation of the tolerances on each component is finally determined. According to the tolerance allocation results, the tolerance ranges of ten kinds of geometric error sources are obtained. These research achievements can provide fundamental guidelines for component manufacturing and assembly of this kind of parallel mechanisms.

  17. High accuracy broadband infrared spectropolarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnaswamy, Venkataramanan

    Mueller matrix spectroscopy or Spectropolarimetry combines conventional spectroscopy with polarimetry, providing more information than can be gleaned from spectroscopy alone. Experimental studies on infrared polarization properties of materials covering a broad spectral range have been scarce due to the lack of available instrumentation. This dissertation aims to fill the gap by the design, development, calibration and testing of a broadband Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FT-IR) spectropolarimeter. The instrument operates over the 3-12 mum waveband and offers better overall accuracy compared to the previous generation instruments. Accurate calibration of a broadband spectropolarimeter is a non-trivial task due to the inherent complexity of the measurement process. An improved calibration technique is proposed for the spectropolarimeter and numerical simulations are conducted to study the effectiveness of the proposed technique. Insights into the geometrical structure of the polarimetric measurement matrix is provided to aid further research towards global optimization of Mueller matrix polarimeters. A high performance infrared wire-grid polarizer is characterized using the spectropolarimeter. Mueller matrix spectrum measurements on Penicillin and pine pollen are also presented.

  18. Astrophysics with Microarcsecond Accuracy Astrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unwin, Stephen C.

    2008-01-01

    Space-based astrometry promises to provide a powerful new tool for astrophysics. At a precision level of a few microarcsonds, a wide range of phenomena are opened up for study. In this paper we discuss the capabilities of the SIM Lite mission, the first space-based long-baseline optical interferometer, which will deliver parallaxes to 4 microarcsec. A companion paper in this volume will cover the development and operation of this instrument. At the level that SIM Lite will reach, better than 1 microarcsec in a single measurement, planets as small as one Earth can be detected around many dozen of the nearest stars. Not only can planet masses be definitely measured, but also the full orbital parameters determined, allowing study of system stability in multiple planet systems. This capability to survey our nearby stellar neighbors for terrestrial planets will be a unique contribution to our understanding of the local universe. SIM Lite will be able to tackle a wide range of interesting problems in stellar and Galactic astrophysics. By tracing the motions of stars in dwarf spheroidal galaxies orbiting our Milky Way, SIM Lite will probe the shape of the galactic potential history of the formation of the galaxy, and the nature of dark matter. Because it is flexibly scheduled, the instrument can dwell on faint targets, maintaining its full accuracy on objects as faint as V=19. This paper is a brief survey of the diverse problems in modern astrophysics that SIM Lite will be able to address.

  19. Accuracy assessment of fluoroscopy-transesophageal echocardiography registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Pencilla; Seslija, Petar; Bainbridge, Daniel; Guiraudon, Gerard M.; Jones, Doug L.; Chu, Michael W.; Holdsworth, David W.; Peters, Terry M.

    2011-03-01

    This study assesses the accuracy of a new transesophageal (TEE) ultrasound (US) fluoroscopy registration technique designed to guide percutaneous aortic valve replacement. In this minimally invasive procedure, a valve is inserted into the aortic annulus via a catheter. Navigation and positioning of the valve is guided primarily by intra-operative fluoroscopy. Poor anatomical visualization of the aortic root region can result in incorrect positioning, leading to heart valve embolization, obstruction of the coronary ostia and acute kidney injury. The use of TEE US images to augment intra-operative fluoroscopy provides significant improvements to image-guidance. Registration is achieved using an image-based TEE probe tracking technique and US calibration. TEE probe tracking is accomplished using a single-perspective pose estimation algorithm. Pose estimation from a single image allows registration to be achieved using only images collected in standard OR workflow. Accuracy of this registration technique is assessed using three models: a point target phantom, a cadaveric porcine heart with implanted fiducials, and in-vivo porcine images. Results demonstrate that registration can be achieved with an RMS error of less than 1.5mm, which is within the clinical accuracy requirements of 5mm. US-fluoroscopy registration based on single-perspective pose estimation demonstrates promise as a method for providing guidance to percutaneous aortic valve replacement procedures. Future work will focus on real-time implementation and a visualization system that can be used in the operating room.

  20. Ground Truth Sampling and LANDSAT Accuracy Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, J. W.; Gunther, F. J.; Campbell, W. J.

    1982-01-01

    It is noted that the key factor in any accuracy assessment of remote sensing data is the method used for determining the ground truth, independent of the remote sensing data itself. The sampling and accuracy procedures developed for nuclear power plant siting study are described. The purpose of the sampling procedure was to provide data for developing supervised classifications for two study sites and for assessing the accuracy of that and the other procedures used. The purpose of the accuracy assessment was to allow the comparison of the cost and accuracy of various classification procedures as applied to various data types.

  1. Achieving effective supervision.

    PubMed

    Kavanagh, David J; Spence, Susan H; Wilson, Jill; Crow, Natasha

    2002-09-01

    Supervision probably does have benefits both for the maintenance and improvement of clinical skills and for job satisfaction, but the data are very thin and almost non-existent in the area of alcohol and other drugs services. Because of the potential complexity of objectives and roles in supervision, a structured agreement appears to be an important part of the effective supervision relationship. Because sessions can degenerate easily into unstructured socialization, agendas and session objectives may also be important. While a working alliance based on mutual respect and trust is an essential base for the supervision relationship, procedures for direct observation of clinical skills, demonstration of new procedures and skills practice with detailed feedback appear critical to supervision's impact on practice. To ensure effective supervision, there needs not only to be a minimum of personnel and resources, but also a compatibility with the values and procedures of management and staff, access to supervision training and consultation and sufficient incentives to ensure it continues. PMID:12270075

  2. High accuracy wall thickness loss monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gajdacsi, Attila; Cegla, Frederic

    2014-02-01

    Ultrasonic inspection of wall thickness in pipes is a standard technique applied widely in the petrochemical industry. The potential precision of repeat measurements with permanently installed ultrasonic sensors however significantly surpasses that of handheld sensors as uncertainties associated with coupling fluids and positional offsets are eliminated. With permanently installed sensors the precise evaluation of very small wall loss rates becomes feasible in a matter of hours. The improved accuracy and speed of wall loss rate measurements can be used to evaluate and develop more effective mitigation strategies. This paper presents an overview of factors causing variability in the ultrasonic measurements which are then systematically addressed and an experimental setup with the best achievable stability based on these considerations is presented. In the experimental setup galvanic corrosion is used to induce predictable and very small wall thickness loss. Furthermore, it is shown that the experimental measurements can be used to assess the effect of reduced wall loss that is produced by the injection of corrosion inhibitor. The measurements show an estimated standard deviation of about 20nm, which in turn allows us to evaluate the effect and behaviour of corrosion inhibitors within less than an hour.

  3. Time and position accuracy using codeless GPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, C. E.; Jefferson, D. C.; Lichten, S. M.; Thomas, J. B.; Vigue, Y.; Young, L. E.

    1994-01-01

    The Global Positioning System has allowed scientists and engineers to make measurements having accuracy far beyond the original 15 meter goal of the system. Using global networks of P-Code capable receivers and extensive post-processing, geodesists have achieved baseline precision of a few parts per billion, and clock offsets have been measured at the nanosecond level over intercontinental distances. A cloud hangs over this picture, however. The Department of Defense plans to encrypt the P-Code (called Anti-Spoofing, or AS) in the fall of 1993. After this event, geodetic and time measurements will have to be made using codeless GPS receivers. However, there appears to be a silver lining to the cloud. In response to the anticipated encryption of the P-Code, the geodetic and GPS receiver community has developed some remarkably effective means of coping with AS without classified information. We will discuss various codeless techniques currently available and the data noise resulting from each. We will review some geodetic results obtained using only codeless data, and discuss the implications for time measurements. Finally, we will present the status of GPS research at JPL in relation to codeless clock measurements.

  4. Does achievement motivation mediate the semantic achievement priming effect?

    PubMed

    Engeser, Stefan; Baumann, Nicola

    2014-10-01

    The aim of our research was to understand the processes of the prime-to-behavior effects with semantic achievement primes. We extended existing models with a perspective from achievement motivation theory and additionally used achievement primes embedded in the running text of excerpts of school textbooks to simulate a more natural priming condition. Specifically, we proposed that achievement primes affect implicit achievement motivation and conducted pilot experiments and 3 main experiments to explore this proposition. We found no reliable positive effect of achievement primes on implicit achievement motivation. In light of these findings, we tested whether explicit (instead of implicit) achievement motivation is affected by achievement primes and found this to be the case. In the final experiment, we found support for the assumption that higher explicit achievement motivation implies that achievement priming affects the outcome expectations. The implications of the results are discussed, and we conclude that primes affect achievement behavior by heightening explicit achievement motivation and outcome expectancies. PMID:24820250

  5. Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Orbit Determination Accuracy Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slojkowski, Steven E.

    2014-01-01

    LRO definitive and predictive accuracy requirements were easily met in the nominal mission orbit, using the LP150Q lunar gravity model. center dot Accuracy of the LP150Q model is poorer in the extended mission elliptical orbit. center dot Later lunar gravity models, in particular GSFC-GRAIL-270, improve OD accuracy in the extended mission. center dot Implementation of a constrained plane when the orbit is within 45 degrees of the Earth-Moon line improves cross-track accuracy. center dot Prediction accuracy is still challenged during full-Sun periods due to coarse spacecraft area modeling - Implementation of a multi-plate area model with definitive attitude input can eliminate prediction violations. - The FDF is evaluating using analytic and predicted attitude modeling to improve full-Sun prediction accuracy. center dot Comparison of FDF ephemeris file to high-precision ephemeris files provides gross confirmation that overlap compares properly assess orbit accuracy.

  6. Accuracy of surface registration compared to conventional volumetric registration in patient positioning for head-and-neck radiotherapy: A simulation study using patient data

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Youngjun; Li, Ruijiang; Na, Yong Hum; Xing, Lei; Lee, Rena

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: 3D optical surface imaging has been applied to patient positioning in radiation therapy (RT). The optical patient positioning system is advantageous over conventional method using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) in that it is radiation free, frameless, and is capable of real-time monitoring. While the conventional radiographic method uses volumetric registration, the optical system uses surface matching for patient alignment. The relative accuracy of these two methods has not yet been sufficiently investigated. This study aims to investigate the theoretical accuracy of the surface registration based on a simulation study using patient data. Methods: This study compares the relative accuracy of surface and volumetric registration in head-and-neck RT. The authors examined 26 patient data sets, each consisting of planning CT data acquired before treatment and patient setup CBCT data acquired at the time of treatment. As input data of surface registration, patient’s skin surfaces were created by contouring patient skin from planning CT and treatment CBCT. Surface registration was performed using the iterative closest points algorithm by point–plane closest, which minimizes the normal distance between source points and target surfaces. Six degrees of freedom (three translations and three rotations) were used in both surface and volumetric registrations and the results were compared. The accuracy of each method was estimated by digital phantom tests. Results: Based on the results of 26 patients, the authors found that the average and maximum root-mean-square translation deviation between the surface and volumetric registrations were 2.7 and 5.2 mm, respectively. The residual error of the surface registration was calculated to have an average of 0.9 mm and a maximum of 1.7 mm. Conclusions: Surface registration may lead to results different from those of the conventional volumetric registration. Only limited accuracy can be achieved for patient

  7. Accuracy of TCP performance models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwefel, Hans Peter; Jobmann, Manfred; Hoellisch, Daniel; Heyman, Daniel P.

    2001-07-01

    Despite the fact that most of todays' Internet traffic is transmitted via the TCP protocol, the performance behavior of networks with TCP traffic is still not well understood. Recent research activities have lead to a number of performance models for TCP traffic, but the degree of accuracy of these models in realistic scenarios is still questionable. This paper provides a comparison of the results (in terms of average throughput per connection) of three different `analytic' TCP models: I. the throughput formula in [Padhye et al. 98], II. the modified Engset model of [Heyman et al. 97], and III. the analytic TCP queueing model of [Schwefel 01] that is a packet based extension of (II). Results for all three models are computed for a scenario of N identical TCP sources that transmit data in individual TCP connections of stochastically varying size. The results for the average throughput per connection in the analytic models are compared with simulations of detailed TCP behavior. All of the analytic models are expected to show deficiencies in certain scenarios, since they neglect highly influential parameters of the actual real simulation model: The approach of Model (I) and (II) only indirectly considers queueing in bottleneck routers, and in certain scenarios those models are not able to adequately describe the impact of buffer-space, neither qualitatively nor quantitatively. Furthermore, (II) is insensitive to the actual distribution of the connection sizes. As a consequence, their prediction would also be insensitive of so-called long-range dependent properties in the traffic that are caused by heavy-tailed connection size distributions. The simulation results show that such properties cannot be neglected for certain network topologies: LRD properties can even have counter-intuitive impact on the average goodput, namely the goodput can be higher for small buffer-sizes.

  8. Dorsal Hippocampal CREB Is Both Necessary and Sufficient for Spatial Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sekeres, Melanie J.; Neve, Rachael L.; Frankland, Paul W.; Josselyn, Sheena A.

    2010-01-01

    Although the transcription factor CREB has been widely implicated in memory, whether it is sufficient to produce spatial memory under conditions that do not normally support memory formation in mammals is unknown. We found that locally and acutely increasing CREB levels in the dorsal hippocampus using viral vectors is sufficient to induce robust…

  9. 33 CFR 115.30 - Sufficiency of State authority for bridges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... for bridges. 115.30 Section 115.30 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES BRIDGE LOCATIONS AND CLEARANCES; ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES § 115.30 Sufficiency of State authority for bridges. An opinion of the attorney general of the State as to the sufficiency of...

  10. 33 CFR 115.30 - Sufficiency of State authority for bridges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... for bridges. 115.30 Section 115.30 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES BRIDGE LOCATIONS AND CLEARANCES; ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES § 115.30 Sufficiency of State authority for bridges. An opinion of the attorney general of the State as to the sufficiency of...

  11. 33 CFR 115.30 - Sufficiency of State authority for bridges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... for bridges. 115.30 Section 115.30 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES BRIDGE LOCATIONS AND CLEARANCES; ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES § 115.30 Sufficiency of State authority for bridges. An opinion of the attorney general of the State as to the sufficiency of...

  12. 33 CFR 115.30 - Sufficiency of State authority for bridges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... for bridges. 115.30 Section 115.30 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES BRIDGE LOCATIONS AND CLEARANCES; ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES § 115.30 Sufficiency of State authority for bridges. An opinion of the attorney general of the State as to the sufficiency of...

  13. 33 CFR 115.30 - Sufficiency of State authority for bridges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... for bridges. 115.30 Section 115.30 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES BRIDGE LOCATIONS AND CLEARANCES; ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES § 115.30 Sufficiency of State authority for bridges. An opinion of the attorney general of the State as to the sufficiency of...

  14. 29 CFR 780.513 - What employment in growing and harvesting is sufficient.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... qualifying for this exemption even if in some past season he was employed in growing and harvesting such... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What employment in growing and harvesting is sufficient....513 What employment in growing and harvesting is sufficient. To qualify for exemption the...

  15. 29 CFR 780.513 - What employment in growing and harvesting is sufficient.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... qualifying for this exemption even if in some past season he was employed in growing and harvesting such... 29 Labor 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What employment in growing and harvesting is sufficient....513 What employment in growing and harvesting is sufficient. To qualify for exemption the...

  16. 29 CFR 780.513 - What employment in growing and harvesting is sufficient.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... qualifying for this exemption even if in some past season he was employed in growing and harvesting such... 29 Labor 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What employment in growing and harvesting is sufficient....513 What employment in growing and harvesting is sufficient. To qualify for exemption the...

  17. 29 CFR 780.513 - What employment in growing and harvesting is sufficient.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... qualifying for this exemption even if in some past season he was employed in growing and harvesting such... 29 Labor 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What employment in growing and harvesting is sufficient....513 What employment in growing and harvesting is sufficient. To qualify for exemption the...

  18. 29 CFR 780.513 - What employment in growing and harvesting is sufficient.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... qualifying for this exemption even if in some past season he was employed in growing and harvesting such... 29 Labor 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What employment in growing and harvesting is sufficient....513 What employment in growing and harvesting is sufficient. To qualify for exemption the...

  19. 25 CFR 26.23 - What is an Individual Self-Sufficiency Plan (ISP)?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What is an Individual Self-Sufficiency Plan (ISP)? 26.23 Section 26.23 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR HUMAN SERVICES JOB PLACEMENT AND TRAINING PROGRAM General Applicability § 26.23 What is an Individual Self-Sufficiency Plan...

  20. IS A GRANDMAL SEIZURE NECESSARY AND SUFFICIENT FOR THE EFFICACY OF ELECTRO CONVULSIVE THERAPY?

    PubMed Central

    Verghese, Abraham

    2000-01-01

    This paper highlights the recent research findings which suggest that the old teaching that a grandma! seizure is both necessary and sufficient for the efficacy of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is not correct. It is necessary; but not sufficient. The stimulus intensity should be adjusted so that it is far above the seizure threshold in order to get maximum efficacy of ECT. PMID:21407909

  1. IS COMPTON COOLING SUFFICIENT TO EXPLAIN EVOLUTION OF OBSERVED QUASI-PERIODIC OSCILLATIONS IN OUTBURST SOURCES?

    SciTech Connect

    Mondal, Santanu; Chakrabarti, Sandip K.; Debnath, Dipak E-mail: chakraba@bose.res.in

    2015-01-01

    In outburst sources, quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) frequency is known to evolve in a certain way: in the rising phase, it monotonically goes up until a soft intermediate state is achieved. In the propagating oscillatory shock model, oscillation of the Compton cloud is thought to cause QPOs. Thus, in order to increase QPO frequency, the Compton cloud must collapse steadily in the rising phase. In decline phases, the exact opposite should be true. We investigate cause of this evolution of the Compton cloud. The same viscosity parameter that increases the Keplerian disk rate also moves the inner edge of the Keplerian component, thereby reducing the size of the Compton cloud and reducing the cooling timescale. We show that cooling of the Compton cloud by inverse Comptonization is enough for it to collapse sufficiently so as to explain the QPO evolution. In the two-component advective flow configuration of Chakrabarti-Titarchuk, centrifugal force-induced shock represents the boundary of the Compton cloud. We take the rising phase of 2010 outburst of Galactic black hole candidate H 1743-322 and find an estimation of variation of the α parameter of the sub-Keplerian flow to be monotonically rising from 0.0001 to 0.02, well within the range suggested by magnetorotational instability. We also estimate the inward velocity of the Compton cloud to be a few meters per second, which is comparable to what is found in several earlier studies of our group by empirically fitting the shock locations with the time of observations.

  2. High accuracy localization of long term evolution based on a new multiple carrier noise model.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wah Ching; Hung, Faan Hei; Tsang, Kim Fung; Wu, Chung Kit; Chi, Hao Ran; Chui, Kwok Tai; Lau, Wing Hong

    2014-11-27

    A high accuracy localization technique using Long Term Evolution (LTE) based on a new and accurate multiple carrier noise model has been developed. In the noise consideration, the LTE multiple carriers phase noise has been incorporated so that a new and accurate noise model is achieved. An experiment was performed to characterize the phase noise of carriers at 2 GHz. The developed noise model was incorporated into LTE localization analysis in a high traffic area in Hong Kong to evaluate the accuracy of localization. The evaluation and analysis reveals that the new localization method achieves an improvement of about 10% accuracy comparing to existing widely adopted schemes.

  3. Effects of coating material on the fabrication accuracy of focused ion beam machining of insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joe, Hang-Eun; Park, Jae-Hyeong; Kim, Seong Hyeon; Kim, Gyuho; Jun, Martin B. G.; Min, Byung-Kwon

    2015-09-01

    Focused ion beam (FIB) machining of insulators is a crucial process in the rapid prototyping of nanodevices for optical applications. A conductive material is generally coated on the insulator prior to FIB machining to achieve high fabrication accuracy. In this paper, we report on the effects on machining accuracy of four coating materials: Pt, Ni, Ag, and Co. The dimensional accuracy at channel sidewalls was improved by selecting a coating material that induces charge-carrier generation in a small range. The geometric and electrical characteristics of the FIB-machined surfaces were evaluated to elucidate the association between the fabrication accuracy and the range of charge-carrier distribution.

  4. Improving the performance of E-beam 2nd writing in mask alignment accuracy and pattern faultless for CPL technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Booky; Hung, Richard; Lin, Orson; Wu, Yuan-Hsun; Kozuma, Makoto; Shih, Chiang-Lin; Hsu, Michael; Hsu, Stephen D.

    2005-01-01

    The chromeless phase lithography (CPL) is a potential technology for low k1 optical image. For the CPL technology, we can control the local transmission rate to get optimized through pitch imaging performance. The CPL use zebra pattern to manipulate the pattern local transmission as a tri-tone structure in mask manufacturing. It needs the 2nd level writing to create the zebra pattern. The zebra pattern must be small enough not to be printed out and the 2nd writing overlay accuracy must keep within 40nm. The request is a challenge to E-beam 2nd writing function. The focus of this paper is in how to improve the overlay accuracy and get a precise pattern to form accurate pattern transmission. To fulfill this work several items have been done. To check the possibility of contamination in E-Beam chamber by the conductive layer coating we monitor the particle count in the E-Beam chamber before and after the coated blank load-unload. The conductivity of our conductive layer has been checked to eliminate the charging effect by optimizing film thickness. The dimension of alignment mark has also been optimized through experimentation. And finally we checked the PR remain to ensure sufficient process window in our etching process. To verify the performance of our process we check the 3D SEM picture. Also we use AIMs to prove the resolution improvement capability in CPL compared to the traditional methods-Binary mask and Half Tone mask. The achieved overlay accuracy and process can provide promising approach for NGL reticle manufacturing of CPL technology.

  5. Accuracy in determining voice source parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonov, A. S.; Sorokin, V. N.

    2014-11-01

    The paper addresses the accuracy of an approximate solution to the inverse problem of retrieving the shape of a voice source from a speech signal for a known signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). It is shown that if the source is found as a function of time with the A.N. Tikhonov regularization method, the accuracy of the found approximation is worse than the accuracy of speech signal recording by an order of magnitude. In contrast, adequate parameterization of the source ensures approximate solution accuracy comparable with the accuracy of the problem data. A corresponding algorithm is considered. On the basis of linear (in terms of data errors) estimates of approximate parametric solution accuracy, parametric models with the best accuracy can be chosen. This comparison has been carried out for the known voice source models, i.e., model [17] and the LF model [18]. The advantages of the latter are shown. Thus, for SNR = 40 dB, the relative accuracy of an approximate solution found with this algorithm is about 1% for the LF model and about 2% for model [17] as compared to an accuracy of 7-8% in the regularization method. The role of accuracy estimates found in speaker identification problems is discussed.

  6. Multisensor Arrays for Greater Reliability and Accuracy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Immer, Christopher; Eckhoff, Anthony; Lane, John; Perotti, Jose; Randazzo, John; Blalock, Norman; Ree, Jeff

    2004-01-01

    Arrays of multiple, nominally identical sensors with sensor-output-processing electronic hardware and software are being developed in order to obtain accuracy, reliability, and lifetime greater than those of single sensors. The conceptual basis of this development lies in the statistical behavior of multiple sensors and a multisensor-array (MSA) algorithm that exploits that behavior. In addition, advances in microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) and integrated circuits are exploited. A typical sensor unit according to this concept includes multiple MEMS sensors and sensor-readout circuitry fabricated together on a single chip and packaged compactly with a microprocessor that performs several functions, including execution of the MSA algorithm. In the MSA algorithm, the readings from all the sensors in an array at a given instant of time are compared and the reliability of each sensor is quantified. This comparison of readings and quantification of reliabilities involves the calculation of the ratio between every sensor reading and every other sensor reading, plus calculation of the sum of all such ratios. Then one output reading for the given instant of time is computed as a weighted average of the readings of all the sensors. In this computation, the weight for each sensor is the aforementioned value used to quantify its reliability. In an optional variant of the MSA algorithm that can be implemented easily, a running sum of the reliability value for each sensor at previous time steps as well as at the present time step is used as the weight of the sensor in calculating the weighted average at the present time step. In this variant, the weight of a sensor that continually fails gradually decreases, so that eventually, its influence over the output reading becomes minimal: In effect, the sensor system "learns" which sensors to trust and which not to trust. The MSA algorithm incorporates a criterion for deciding whether there remain enough sensor readings that

  7. Effects of accuracy motivation and anchoring on metacomprehension judgment and accuracy.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qin

    2012-01-01

    The current research investigates how accuracy motivation impacts anchoring and adjustment in metacomprehension judgment and how accuracy motivation and anchoring affect metacomprehension accuracy. Participants were randomly assigned to one of six conditions produced by the between-subjects factorial design involving accuracy motivation (incentive or no) and peer performance anchor (95%, 55%, or no). Two studies showed that accuracy motivation did not impact anchoring bias, but the adjustment-from-anchor process occurred. Accuracy incentive increased anchor-judgment gap for the 95% anchor but not for the 55% anchor, which induced less certainty about the direction of adjustment. The findings offer support to the integrative theory of anchoring. Additionally, the two studies revealed a "power struggle" between accuracy motivation and anchoring in influencing metacomprehension accuracy. Accuracy motivation could improve metacomprehension accuracy in spite of anchoring effect, but if anchoring effect is too strong, it could overpower the motivation effect. The implications of the findings were discussed.

  8. Achieving closure at Fernald

    SciTech Connect

    Bradburne, John; Patton, Tisha C.

    2001-02-25

    When Fluor Fernald took over the management of the Fernald Environmental Management Project in 1992, the estimated closure date of the site was more than 25 years into the future. Fluor Fernald, in conjunction with DOE-Fernald, introduced the Accelerated Cleanup Plan, which was designed to substantially shorten that schedule and save taxpayers more than $3 billion. The management of Fluor Fernald believes there are three fundamental concerns that must be addressed by any contractor hoping to achieve closure of a site within the DOE complex. They are relationship management, resource management and contract management. Relationship management refers to the interaction between the site and local residents, regulators, union leadership, the workforce at large, the media, and any other interested stakeholder groups. Resource management is of course related to the effective administration of the site knowledge base and the skills of the workforce, the attraction and retention of qualified a nd competent technical personnel, and the best recognition and use of appropriate new technologies. Perhaps most importantly, resource management must also include a plan for survival in a flat-funding environment. Lastly, creative and disciplined contract management will be essential to effecting the closure of any DOE site. Fluor Fernald, together with DOE-Fernald, is breaking new ground in the closure arena, and ''business as usual'' has become a thing of the past. How Fluor Fernald has managed its work at the site over the last eight years, and how it will manage the new site closure contract in the future, will be an integral part of achieving successful closure at Fernald.

  9. Spacecraft attitude determination accuracy from mission experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brasoveanu, D.; Hashmall, J.; Baker, D.

    1994-01-01

    This document presents a compilation of the attitude accuracy attained by a number of satellites that have been supported by the Flight Dynamics Facility (FDF) at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). It starts with a general description of the factors that influence spacecraft attitude accuracy. After brief descriptions of the missions supported, it presents the attitude accuracy results for currently active and older missions, including both three-axis stabilized and spin-stabilized spacecraft. The attitude accuracy results are grouped by the sensor pair used to determine the attitudes. A supplementary section is also included, containing the results of theoretical computations of the effects of variation of sensor accuracy on overall attitude accuracy.

  10. Supplementary Education: The Hidden Curriculum of High Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Edmund W., Ed.; Bridglall, Beatrice L., Ed.; Meroe, Aundra Saa, Ed.

    2004-01-01

    In this book, the editors argue that while access to schools that enable and expect academic achievement is a necessary ingredient for the education of students, schools alone may not be sufficient to ensure universally high levels of academic development. Supplemental educational experiences may also be needed. The idea of supplementary education…

  11. Accuracy and consistency of weights provided by home bathroom scales

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Self-reported body weight is often used for calculation of Body Mass Index because it is easy to collect. Little is known about sources of error introduced by using bathroom scales to measure weight at home. The objective of this study was to evaluate the accuracy and consistency of digital versus dial-type bathroom scales commonly used for self-reported weight. Methods Participants brought functioning bathroom scales (n = 18 dial-type, n = 43 digital-type) to a central location. Trained researchers assessed accuracy and consistency using certified calibration weights at 10 kg, 25 kg, 50 kg, 75 kg, 100 kg, and 110 kg. Data also were collected on frequency of calibration, age and floor surface beneath the scale. Results All participants reported using their scale on hard surface flooring. Before calibration, all digital scales displayed 0, but dial scales displayed a mean absolute initial weight of 0.95 (1.9 SD) kg. Digital scales accurately weighed test loads whereas dial-type scale weights differed significantly (p < 0.05). Imprecision of dial scales was significantly greater than that of digital scales at all weights (p < 0.05). Accuracy and precision did not vary by scale age. Conclusions Digital home bathroom scales provide sufficiently accurate and consistent weights for public health research. Reminders to zero scales before each use may further improve accuracy of self-reported weight. PMID:24341761

  12. Accuracy in prescriptions compounded by pharmacy students.

    PubMed

    Shrewsbury, R P; Deloatch, K H

    1998-01-01

    Most compounded prescriptions are not analyzed to determine the accuracy of the employed instruments and procedures. The assumption is that the compounded prescription will be +/- 5% the labeled claim. Two classes of School of Pharmcacy students who received repeated instruction and supervision on proper compounding techniques and procedures were assessed to determine their accuracy of compounding a diphenhydramine hydrochloride prescription. After two attempts, only 62% to 68% of the students could compound the prescription within +/- 5% the labeled claim; but 84% to 96% could attain an accuracy of +/- 10%. The results suggest that an accuracy of +/- 10% labeled claim is the least variation a pharmacist can expect when extemporaneously compounding prescriptions.

  13. Measures of Diagnostic Accuracy: Basic Definitions

    PubMed Central

    Šimundić, Ana-Maria

    2009-01-01

    Diagnostic accuracy relates to the ability of a test to discriminate between the target condition and health. This discriminative potential can be quantified by the measures of diagnostic accuracy such as sensitivity and specificity, predictive values, likelihood ratios, the area under the ROC curve, Youden's index and diagnostic odds ratio. Different measures of diagnostic accuracy relate to the different aspects of diagnostic procedure: while some measures are used to assess the discriminative property of the test, others are used to assess its predictive ability. Measures of diagnostic accuracy are not fixed indicators of a test performance, some are very sensitive to the disease prevalence, while others to the spectrum and definition of the disease. Furthermore, measures of diagnostic accuracy are extremely sensitive to the design of the study. Studies not meeting strict methodological standards usually over- or under-estimate the indicators of test performance as well as they limit the applicability of the results of the study. STARD initiative was a very important step toward the improvement the quality of reporting of studies of diagnostic accuracy. STARD statement should be included into the Instructions to authors by scientific journals and authors should be encouraged to use the checklist whenever reporting their studies on diagnostic accuracy. Such efforts could make a substantial difference in the quality of reporting of studies of diagnostic accuracy and serve to provide the best possible evidence to the best for the patient care. This brief review outlines some basic definitions and characteristics of the measures of diagnostic accuracy.

  14. Achievement Goals and Achievement Emotions: A Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Chiungjung

    2011-01-01

    This meta-analysis synthesized 93 independent samples (N = 30,003) in 77 studies that reported in 78 articles examining correlations between achievement goals and achievement emotions. Achievement goals were meaningfully associated with different achievement emotions. The correlations of mastery and mastery approach goals with positive achievement…

  15. "Battleship Numberline": A Digital Game for Improving Estimation Accuracy on Fraction Number Lines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lomas, Derek; Ching, Dixie; Stampfer, Eliane; Sandoval, Melanie; Koedinger, Ken

    2011-01-01

    Given the strong relationship between number line estimation accuracy and math achievement, might a computer-based number line game help improve math achievement? In one study by Rittle-Johnson, Siegler and Alibali (2001), a simple digital game called "Catch the Monster" provided practice in estimating the location of decimals on a number line.…

  16. On the geolocation accuracy of COSMO-SkyMed products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitti, Davide O.; Nutricato, Raffaele; Lorusso, Rino; Lombardi, Nunzia; Bovenga, Fabio; Bruno, Maria F.; Chiaradia, Maria T.; Milillo, Giovanni

    2015-10-01

    Accurate geolocation of SAR data is nowadays strongly required because of the increasing number of high resolution SAR sensors available as for instance from TerraSAR-X / TanDEM-X and COSMO-SkyMed space-borne missions. Both stripmap and spotlight acquisition modes provide from metric to sub metric spatial resolution which demands the ability to ensure a geolocation accuracy of the same order of magnitude. Geocoding quality depends on several factors and in particular on the knowledge of the actual values of the satellite position along the orbit, and the delay introduced by the additional path induced by changes in the refractivity index due to the presence of the atmosphere (the so called Atmospheric Path Delay or APD). No definitive results are reported yet in the scientific literature, concerning the best performances achievable by the COSMO-SkyMed constellation in terms of geolocation accuracy. Preliminary studies have shown that sub-pixel geolocation accuracies are hardly achievable with COSMO-SkyMed data. The present work aims at inspecting the origin of the geolocation error sources in COSMO-SkyMed Single-look Complex Slant (SCS) products, and to investigate possible strategies for their compensation or mitigation. Five different test sites have been selected in Italy and Argentina, where up to 30 corner reflectors are installed, pointing towards ascending or descending passes. Experimental results are presented and discussed.

  17. Localization accuracy of sphere fiducials in computed tomography images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobler, Jan-Philipp; Díaz Díaz, Jesus; Fitzpatrick, J. Michael; Lexow, G. Jakob; Majdani, Omid; Ortmaier, Tobias

    2014-03-01

    In recent years, bone-attached robots and microstereotactic frames have attracted increasing interest due to the promising targeting accuracy they provide. Such devices attach to a patient's skull via bone anchors, which are used as landmarks during intervention planning as well. However, as simulation results reveal, the performance of such mechanisms is limited by errors occurring during the localization of their bone anchors in preoperatively acquired computed tomography images. Therefore, it is desirable to identify the most suitable fiducials as well as the most accurate method for fiducial localization. We present experimental results of a study focusing on the fiducial localization error (FLE) of spheres. Two phantoms equipped with fiducials made from ferromagnetic steel and titanium, respectively, are used to compare two clinically available imaging modalities (multi-slice CT (MSCT) and cone-beam CT (CBCT)), three localization algorithms as well as two methods for approximating the FLE. Furthermore, the impact of cubic interpolation applied to the images is investigated. Results reveal that, generally, the achievable localization accuracy in CBCT image data is significantly higher compared to MSCT imaging. The lowest FLEs (approx. 40 μm) are obtained using spheres made from titanium, CBCT imaging, template matching based on cross correlation for localization, and interpolating the images by a factor of sixteen. Nevertheless, the achievable localization accuracy of spheres made from steel is only slightly inferior. The outcomes of the presented study will be valuable considering the optimization of future microstereotactic frame prototypes as well as the operative workflow.

  18. Halo abundance matching: accuracy and conditions for numerical convergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klypin, Anatoly; Prada, Francisco; Yepes, Gustavo; Heß, Steffen; Gottlöber, Stefan

    2015-03-01

    Accurate predictions of the abundance and clustering of dark matter haloes play a key role in testing the standard cosmological model. Here, we investigate the accuracy of one of the leading methods of connecting the simulated dark matter haloes with observed galaxies- the halo abundance matching (HAM) technique. We show how to choose the optimal values of the mass and force resolution in large volume N-body simulations so that they provide accurate estimates for correlation functions and circular velocities for haloes and their subhaloes - crucial ingredients of the HAM method. At the 10 per cent accuracy, results converge for ˜50 particles for haloes and ˜150 particles for progenitors of subhaloes. In order to achieve this level of accuracy a number of conditions should be satisfied. The force resolution for the smallest resolved (sub)haloes should be in the range (0.1-0.3)rs, where rs is the scale radius of (sub)haloes. The number of particles for progenitors of subhaloes should be ˜150. We also demonstrate that the two-body scattering plays a minor role for the accuracy of N-body simulations thanks to the relatively small number of crossing-times of dark matter in haloes, and the limited force resolution of cosmological simulations.

  19. Accuracy of land surface elevation from CALIPSO mission data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xiaomei; Hu, Yongxiang

    2015-03-01

    We assess the accuracy of land surface elevation retrieved from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) mission through comparisons with the U.S. Geological Survey National Elevation Dataset (NED), Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), and the altimetry product from the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System onboard the Ice, Cloud, and Land Elevation Satellite (ICESat). The vertical accuracy of the CALIPSO-derived land surface elevation was tested against these three datasets for about 16 million lidar shots over the continental United States. The results show that the CALIPSO-derived elevation was highly correlated with the elevation result from the NED, SRTM, and ICESat datasets. The overall absolute vertical accuracies of the CALIPSO-derived land surface elevation expressed as the root mean square error (RMSE) are 5.58 and 5.90 m when compared with the SRTM and NED results, respectively. Lower accuracy of the CALIPSO-derived land surface elevation was achieved by comparison with the ICESat results (8.35-m RMSE), primarily due to the several kilometers distance between the CALIPSO and ICESat ground footprints. The results show that the variability in terrain, vegetation, canopy, and footprint size can all influence comparisons between the CALIPSO-derived elevation and the results obtained from NED, SRTM, and ICESat datasets.

  20. Gender-Specific Barriers to Self-Sufficiency among Former Supplemental Security Income Drug Addiction and Alcoholism Beneficiaries: Implications for Welfare-To-Work Programs and Services

    PubMed Central

    Hogan, Sean R; Unick, George J.; Speiglman, Richard; Norris, Jean C.

    2011-01-01

    This study examines barriers to economic self-sufficiency among a panel of 219 former Supplemental Security Income (SSI) drug addiction and alcoholism (DA&A) recipients following elimination of DA&A as an eligibility category for SSI disability benefits. Study participants were comprehensively surveyed at six measurement points following the policy change. Generalized estimating equations were used to examine full-sample and gender-specific barriers to economic self-sufficiency. Results indicate that access to transportation, age, and time are the strongest predictors of achieving self-sufficiency for both men and women leaving the welfare system. Gender-specific barriers are also identified. Future research needs to assess the generalizability of these results to other public assistance recipients. PMID:21625301

  1. Entrepreneur achievement. Liaoning province.

    PubMed

    Zhao, R

    1994-03-01

    This paper reports the successful entrepreneurial endeavors of members of a 20-person women's group in Liaoning Province, China. Jing Yuhong, a member of the Family Planning Association at Shileizi Village, Dalian City, provided the basis for their achievements by first building an entertainment/study room in her home to encourage married women to learn family planning. Once stocked with books, magazines, pamphlets, and other materials on family planning and agricultural technology, dozens of married women in the neighborhood flocked voluntarily to the room. Yuhong also set out to give these women a way to earn their own income as a means of helping then gain greater equality with their husbands and exert greater control over their personal reproductive and social lives. She gave a section of her farming land to the women's group, loaned approximately US$5200 to group members to help them generate income from small business initiatives, built a livestock shed in her garden for the group to raise marmots, and erected an awning behind her house under which mushrooms could be grown. The investment yielded $12,000 in the first year, allowing each woman to keep more than $520 in dividends. Members then soon began going to fairs in the capital and other places to learn about the outside world, and have successfully ventured out on their own to generate individual incomes. Ten out of twenty women engaged in these income-generating activities asked for and got the one-child certificate.

  2. Chimeric self-sufficient P450cam-RhFRed biocatalysts with broad substrate scope

    PubMed Central

    Robin, Aélig; Köhler, Valentin; Jones, Alison; Ali, Afruja; Kelly, Paul P; O'Reilly, Elaine; Turner, Nicholas J

    2011-01-01

    Summary A high-throughput screening protocol for evaluating chimeric, self-sufficient P450 biocatalysts and their mutants against a panel of substrates was developed, leading to the identification of a number of novel biooxidation activities. PMID:22238522

  3. Assessing sufficiency of thermal riverscapes for resilient salmon and steelhead populations

    EPA Science Inventory

    Resilient salmon populations require river networks that provide water temperature regimes sufficient to support a diversity of salmonid life histories across space and time. Efforts to protect, enhance and restore watershed thermal regimes for salmon may target specific location...

  4. HEPEX - achievements and challenges!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappenberger, Florian; Ramos, Maria-Helena; Thielen, Jutta; Wood, Andy; Wang, Qj; Duan, Qingyun; Collischonn, Walter; Verkade, Jan; Voisin, Nathalie; Wetterhall, Fredrik; Vuillaume, Jean-Francois Emmanuel; Lucatero Villasenor, Diana; Cloke, Hannah L.; Schaake, John; van Andel, Schalk-Jan

    2014-05-01

    HEPEX is an international initiative bringing together hydrologists, meteorologists, researchers and end-users to develop advanced probabilistic hydrological forecast techniques for improved flood, drought and water management. HEPEX was launched in 2004 as an independent, cooperative international scientific activity. During the first meeting, the overarching goal was defined as: "to develop and test procedures to produce reliable hydrological ensemble forecasts, and to demonstrate their utility in decision making related to the water, environmental and emergency management sectors." The applications of hydrological ensemble predictions span across large spatio-temporal scales, ranging from short-term and localized predictions to global climate change and regional modeling. Within the HEPEX community, information is shared through its blog (www.hepex.org), meetings, testbeds and intercompaison experiments, as well as project reportings. Key questions of HEPEX are: * What adaptations are required for meteorological ensemble systems to be coupled with hydrological ensemble systems? * How should the existing hydrological ensemble prediction systems be modified to account for all sources of uncertainty within a forecast? * What is the best way for the user community to take advantage of ensemble forecasts and to make better decisions based on them? This year HEPEX celebrates its 10th year anniversary and this poster will present a review of the main operational and research achievements and challenges prepared by Hepex contributors on data assimilation, post-processing of hydrologic predictions, forecast verification, communication and use of probabilistic forecasts in decision-making. Additionally, we will present the most recent activities implemented by Hepex and illustrate how everyone can join the community and participate to the development of new approaches in hydrologic ensemble prediction.

  5. Accuracy of Carbohydrate Counting in Adults.

    PubMed

    Meade, Lisa T; Rushton, Wanda E

    2016-07-01

    In Brief This study investigates carbohydrate counting accuracy in patients using insulin through a multiple daily injection regimen or continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion. The average accuracy test score for all patients was 59%. The carbohydrate test in this study can be used to emphasize the importance of carbohydrate counting to patients and to provide ongoing education. PMID:27621531

  6. Scientific Sources' Perception of Network News Accuracy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Barbara; Singletary, Michael

    Recent polls seem to indicate that many Americans rely on television as a credible and primary source of news. To test the accuracy of this news, a study examined three networks' newscasts of science news, the attitudes of the science sources toward reporting in their field, and the factors related to accuracy. The Vanderbilt News Archives Index…

  7. Accuracy of Parent Identification of Stuttering Occurrence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Einarsdottir, Johanna; Ingham, Roger

    2009-01-01

    Background: Clinicians rely on parents to provide information regarding the onset and development of stuttering in their own children. The accuracy and reliability of their judgments of stuttering is therefore important and is not well researched. Aim: To investigate the accuracy of parent judgements of stuttering in their own children's speech…

  8. Accuracy assessment of GPS satellite orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schutz, B. E.; Tapley, B. D.; Abusali, P. A. M.; Ho, C. S.

    1991-01-01

    GPS orbit accuracy is examined using several evaluation procedures. The existence is shown of unmodeled effects which correlate with the eclipsing of the sun. The ability to obtain geodetic results that show an accuracy of 1-2 parts in 10 to the 8th or better has not diminished.

  9. Stereotype Accuracy: Toward Appreciating Group Differences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Yueh-Ting, Ed.; And Others

    The preponderance of scholarly theory and research on stereotypes assumes that they are bad and inaccurate, but understanding stereotype accuracy and inaccuracy is more interesting and complicated than simpleminded accusations of racism or sexism would seem to imply. The selections in this collection explore issues of the accuracy of stereotypes…

  10. The Homogeneity of School Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cahan, Sorel

    Since the measurement of school achievement involves the administration of achievement tests to various grades on various subjects, both grade level and subject matter contribute to within-school achievement variations. To determine whether achievement test scores vary most among different fields within a grade level, or within fields among…

  11. Comparative study of application accuracy of two frameless neuronavigation systems: experimental error assessment quantifying registration methods and clinically influencing factors.

    PubMed

    Paraskevopoulos, Dimitrios; Unterberg, Andreas; Metzner, Roland; Dreyhaupt, Jens; Eggers, Georg; Wirtz, Christian Rainer

    2010-04-01

    This study aimed at comparing the accuracy of two commercial neuronavigation systems. Error assessment and quantification of clinical factors and surface registration, often resulting in decreased accuracy, were intended. Active (Stryker Navigation) and passive (VectorVision Sky, BrainLAB) neuronavigation systems were tested with an anthropomorphic phantom with a deformable layer, simulating skin and soft tissue. True coordinates measured by computer numerical control were compared with coordinates on image data and during navigation, to calculate software and system accuracy respectively. Comparison of image and navigation coordinates was used to evaluate navigation accuracy. Both systems achieved an overall accuracy of <1.5 mm. Stryker achieved better software accuracy, whereas BrainLAB better system and navigation accuracy. Factors with conspicuous influence (P<0.01) were imaging, instrument replacement, sterile cover drape and geometry of instruments. Precision data indicated by the systems did not reflect measured accuracy in general. Surface matching resulted in no improvement of accuracy, confirming former studies. Laser registration showed no differences compared to conventional pointers. Differences between the two systems were limited. Surface registration may improve inaccurate point-based registrations but does not in general affect overall accuracy. Accuracy feedback by the systems does not always match with true target accuracy and requires critical evaluation from the surgeon.

  12. Astrometric accuracy of aperture making interferometry with JWST-NIRISS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thatte, Deepashri; Greenbaum, Alexandra; Martel, André; Sivaramakrishnan, Anand; Artigau, Étienne

    2015-09-01

    JWST/NIRISS has a non-redundant aperture mask (NRM) for use with its F380M, F430M, F480M and F277W filters. In addition to high-resolution imaging with moderate contrast, the NRM provides better astrometric accuracy over a wide field of view than regular imaging. We investigate the accuracy achievable with the NRM by using an image-plane algorithm to analyze the PSFs of a point source that were obtained at a fixed pixel location with sub-pixel dithers during the second Cryo-Vacuum test campaign of the Integrated Science Instrument Module at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. Astrometry of brown dwarfs with the NRM will be sensitive to the presence of terrestrial planets and can be used to probe the architecture of planetary systems around these objects.

  13. Simultaneously improving the sensitivity and absolute accuracy of CPT magnetometer.

    PubMed

    Liang, Shang-Qing; Yang, Guo-Qing; Xu, Yun-Fei; Lin, Qiang; Liu, Zhi-Heng; Chen, Zheng-Xiang

    2014-03-24

    A new method to improve the sensitivity and absolute accuracy simultaneously for coherent population trapping (CPT) magnetometer based on the differential detection method is presented. Two modulated optical beams with orthogonal circular polarizations are applied, in one of which two magnetic resonances are excited simultaneously by modulating a 3.4GHz microwave with Larmor frequency. When a microwave frequency shift is introduced, the difference in the power transmitted through the cell in each beam shows a low noise resonance. The sensitivity of 2pT/Hz @ 10Hz is achieved. Meanwhile, the absolute accuracy of ± 0.5nT within the magnetic field ranging from 20000nT to 100000nT is realized.

  14. Leveraging data analytics, patterning simulations and metrology models to enhance CD metrology accuracy for advanced IC nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rana, Narender; Zhang, Yunlin; Kagalwala, Taher; Hu, Lin; Bailey, Todd

    2014-04-01

    Integrated Circuit (IC) technology is changing in multiple ways: 193i to EUV exposure, planar to non-planar device architecture, from single exposure lithography to multiple exposure and DSA patterning etc. Critical dimension (CD) control requirement is becoming stringent and more exhaustive: CD and process window are shrinking., three sigma CD control of < 2 nm is required in complex geometries, and metrology uncertainty of < 0.2 nm is required to achieve the target CD control for advanced IC nodes (e.g. 14 nm, 10 nm and 7 nm nodes). There are fundamental capability and accuracy limits in all the metrology techniques that are detrimental to the success of advanced IC nodes. Reference or physical CD metrology is provided by CD-AFM, and TEM while workhorse metrology is provided by CD-SEM, Scatterometry, Model Based Infrared Reflectrometry (MBIR). Precision alone is not sufficient moving forward. No single technique is sufficient to ensure the required accuracy of patterning. The accuracy of CD-AFM is ~1 nm and precision in TEM is poor due to limited statistics. CD-SEM, scatterometry and MBIR need to be calibrated by reference measurements for ensuring the accuracy of patterned CDs and patterning models. There is a dire need of measurement with < 0.5 nm accuracy and the industry currently does not have that capability with inline measurments. Being aware of the capability gaps for various metrology techniques, we have employed data processing techniques and predictive data analytics, along with patterning simulation and metrology models, and data integration techniques to selected applications demonstrating the potential solution and practicality of such an approach to enhance CD metrology accuracy. Data from multiple metrology techniques has been analyzed in multiple ways to extract information with associated uncertainties and integrated to extract the useful and more accurate CD and profile information of the structures. This paper presents the optimization of

  15. The accuracy of human population maps for public health application

    PubMed Central

    Hay, S. I.; Noor, A. M.; Nelson, A.; Tatem, A. J.

    2011-01-01

    Summary OBJECTIVES Human population totals are used for generating burden of disease estimates at global, continental and national scales to help guide priority setting in international health financing. These exercises should be aware of the accuracy of the demographic information used. METHODS The analysis presented in this paper tests the accuracy of five large-area, public-domain human population distribution data maps against high spatial resolution population census data enumerated in Kenya in 1999. We illustrate the epidemiological significance, by assessing the impact of using these different human population surfaces in determining populations at risk of various levels of climate suitability for malaria transmission. We also describe how areal weighting, pycnophylactic interpolation and accessibility potential interpolation techniques can be used to generate novel human population distribution surfaces from local census information and evaluate to what accuracy this can be achieved. RESULTS We demonstrate which human population distribution surface performed best and which population interpolation techniques generated the most accurate bespoke distributions. Despite various levels of modelling complexity, the accuracy achieved by the different surfaces was primarily determined by the spatial resolution of the input population data. The simplest technique of areal weighting performed best. CONCLUSIONS Differences in estimates of populations at risk of malaria in Kenya of over 1 million persons can be generated by the choice of surface, highlighting the importance of these considerations in deriving per capita health metrics in public health. Despite focussing on Kenya the results of these analyses have general application and are discussed in this wider context. PMID:16185243

  16. Judging Students' Achievement Goal Orientations: Are Teacher Ratings Accurate?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dicke, Anna-Lena; Ludtke, Oliver; Trautwein, Ulrich; Nagy, Gabriel; Nagy, Nicole

    2012-01-01

    Using the theoretical framework of achievement goal theory, this study investigated the accuracy of teachers' judgments of their students' motivation. Self-report data were gathered on the mastery, performance-approach, and performance-avoidance goals of 1140 German secondary school students (mean age = 14.24) in five academic subjects (English,…

  17. The Role of Feedback on Studying, Achievement and Calibration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chu, Stephanie T. L.; Jamieson-Noel, Dianne L.; Winne, Philip H.

    One set of hypotheses examined in this study was that various types of feedback (outcome, process, and corrective) supply different information about performance and have different effects on studying processes and on achievement. Another set of hypotheses concerned students' calibration, their accuracy in predicting and postdicting achievement…

  18. Accuracy and precision of manual baseline determination.

    PubMed

    Jirasek, A; Schulze, G; Yu, M M L; Blades, M W; Turner, R F B

    2004-12-01

    Vibrational spectra often require baseline removal before further data analysis can be performed. Manual (i.e., user) baseline determination and removal is a common technique used to perform this operation. Currently, little data exists that details the accuracy and precision that can be expected with manual baseline removal techniques. This study addresses this current lack of data. One hundred spectra of varying signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), signal-to-baseline ratio (SBR), baseline slope, and spectral congestion were constructed and baselines were subtracted by 16 volunteers who were categorized as being either experienced or inexperienced in baseline determination. In total, 285 baseline determinations were performed. The general level of accuracy and precision that can be expected for manually determined baselines from spectra of varying SNR, SBR, baseline slope, and spectral congestion is established. Furthermore, the effects of user experience on the accuracy and precision of baseline determination is estimated. The interactions between the above factors in affecting the accuracy and precision of baseline determination is highlighted. Where possible, the functional relationships between accuracy, precision, and the given spectral characteristic are detailed. The results provide users of manual baseline determination useful guidelines in establishing limits of accuracy and precision when performing manual baseline determination, as well as highlighting conditions that confound the accuracy and precision of manual baseline determination.

  19. Anatomy-aware measurement of segmentation accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tizhoosh, H. R.; Othman, A. A.

    2016-03-01

    Quantifying the accuracy of segmentation and manual delineation of organs, tissue types and tumors in medical images is a necessary measurement that suffers from multiple problems. One major shortcoming of all accuracy measures is that they neglect the anatomical significance or relevance of different zones within a given segment. Hence, existing accuracy metrics measure the overlap of a given segment with a ground-truth without any anatomical discrimination inside the segment. For instance, if we understand the rectal wall or urethral sphincter as anatomical zones, then current accuracy measures ignore their significance when they are applied to assess the quality of the prostate gland segments. In this paper, we propose an anatomy-aware measurement scheme for segmentation accuracy of medical images. The idea is to create a "master gold" based on a consensus shape containing not just the outline of the segment but also the outlines of the internal zones if existent or relevant. To apply this new approach to accuracy measurement, we introduce the anatomy-aware extensions of both Dice coefficient and Jaccard index and investigate their effect using 500 synthetic prostate ultrasound images with 20 different segments for each image. We show that through anatomy-sensitive calculation of segmentation accuracy, namely by considering relevant anatomical zones, not only the measurement of individual users can change but also the ranking of users' segmentation skills may require reordering.

  20. The Social Accuracy Model of Interpersonal Perception: Assessing Individual Differences in Perceptive and Expressive Accuracy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biesanz, Jeremy C.

    2010-01-01

    The social accuracy model of interpersonal perception (SAM) is a componential model that estimates perceiver and target effects of different components of accuracy across traits simultaneously. For instance, Jane may be generally accurate in her perceptions of others and thus high in "perceptive accuracy"--the extent to which a particular…

  1. Attitude Towards Physics and Additional Mathematics Achievement Towards Physics Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veloo, Arsaythamby; Nor, Rahimah; Khalid, Rozalina

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to identify the difference in students' attitude towards Physics and Additional Mathematics achievement based on gender and relationship between attitudinal variables towards Physics and Additional Mathematics achievement with achievement in Physics. This research focused on six variables, which is attitude towards…

  2. The Impact of Reading Achievement on Overall Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Churchwell, Dawn Earheart

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between reading achievement and achievement in other subject areas. The purpose of this study was to determine if there was a correlation between reading scores as measured by the Standardized Test for the Assessment of Reading (STAR) and academic achievement in language arts, math, science, and social studies…

  3. Correlation, necessity, and sufficiency: Common errors in the scientific reasoning of undergraduate students for interpreting experiments.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Aaron B; Lam, Diane P; Soowal, Lara N

    2015-01-01

    Gaining an understanding of how science works is central to an undergraduate education in biology and biochemistry. The reasoning required to design or interpret experiments that ask specific questions does not come naturally, and is an essential part of the science process skills that must be learned for an understanding of how scientists conduct research. Gaps in these reasoning skills make it difficult for students to become proficient in reading primary scientific literature. In this study, we assessed the ability of students in an upper-division biochemistry laboratory class to use the concepts of correlation, necessity, and sufficiency in interpreting experiments presented in a format and context that is similar to what they would encounter when reading a journal article. The students were assessed before and after completion of a laboratory module where necessary vs. sufficient reasoning was used to design and interpret experiments. The assessment identified two types of errors that were commonly committed by students when interpreting experimental data. When presented with an experiment that only establishes a correlation between a potential intermediate and a known effect, students frequently interpreted the intermediate as being sufficient (causative) for the effect. Also, when presented with an experiment that tests only necessity for an intermediate, they frequently made unsupported conclusions about sufficiency, and vice versa. Completion of the laboratory module and instruction in necessary vs. sufficient reasoning showed some promise for addressing these common errors.

  4. Parametric Characterization of SGP4 Theory and TLE Positional Accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oltrogge, D.; Ramrath, J.

    2014-09-01

    Two-Line Elements, or TLEs, contain mean element state vectors compatible with General Perturbations (GP) singly-averaged semi-analytic orbit theory. This theory, embodied in the SGP4 orbit propagator, provides sufficient accuracy for some (but perhaps not all) orbit operations and SSA tasks. For more demanding tasks, higher accuracy orbit and force model approaches (i.e. Special Perturbations numerical integration or SP) may be required. In recent times, the suitability of TLEs or GP theory for any SSA analysis has been increasingly questioned. Meanwhile, SP is touted as being of high quality and well-suited for most, if not all, SSA applications. Yet the lack of truth or well-known reference orbits that haven't already been adopted for radar and optical sensor network calibration has typically prevented a truly unbiased assessment of such assertions. To gain better insight into the practical limits of applicability for TLEs, SGP4 and the underlying GP theory, the native SGP4 accuracy is parametrically examined for the statistically-significant range of RSO orbit inclinations experienced as a function of all orbit altitudes from LEO through GEO disposal altitude. For each orbit altitude, reference or truth orbits were generated using full force modeling, time-varying space weather, and AGIs HPOP numerical integration orbit propagator. Then, TLEs were optimally fit to these truth orbits. The resulting TLEs were then propagated and positionally differenced with the truth orbits to determine how well the GP theory was able to fit the truth orbits. Resultant statistics characterizing these empirically-derived accuracies are provided. This TLE fit process of truth orbits was intentionally designed to be similar to the JSpOC process operationally used to generate Enhanced GP TLEs for debris objects. This allows us to draw additional conclusions of the expected accuracies of EGP TLEs. In the real world, Orbit Determination (OD) programs aren't provided with dense optical

  5. The NASA High Accuracy Fuel Flowmeter (HAFF) Development Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hobart, H. F.

    1983-01-01

    The high accuracy fuel flowmeter development program is described. A flightworthy meter that measures mass flowrate of aircraft fuels to within + or - 0.25% of reading over a 50:1 range of flow is developed. A study of measurement techniques to achieve this goal yielded three candidates: (1) a dual turbine flowmeter with density and viscosity compensation; (2) an angular momentum flowmeter with a motor-driven, spring-restrained turbine and viscosity shroud; and (3) a vortex precission flowmeter with density and viscosity compensation. An experimental study of each technique was completed and the first two candidates were selected for prototype development.

  6. Discrimination in measures of knowledge monitoring accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Was, Christopher A.

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge monitoring predicts academic outcomes in many contexts. However, measures of knowledge monitoring accuracy are often incomplete. In the current study, a measure of students’ ability to discriminate known from unknown information as a component of knowledge monitoring was considered. Undergraduate students’ knowledge monitoring accuracy was assessed and used to predict final exam scores in a specific course. It was found that gamma, a measure commonly used as the measure of knowledge monitoring accuracy, accounted for a small, but significant amount of variance in academic performance whereas the discrimination and bias indexes combined to account for a greater amount of variance in academic performance. PMID:25339979

  7. High accuracy calibration of the fiber spectroradiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhifeng; Dai, Caihong; Wang, Yanfei; Chen, Binhua

    2014-11-01

    Comparing to the big-size scanning spectroradiometer, the compact and convenient fiber spectroradiometer is widely used in various kinds of fields, such as the remote sensing, aerospace monitoring, and solar irradiance measurement. High accuracy calibration should be made before the use, which involves the wavelength accuracy, the background environment noise, the nonlinear effect, the bandwidth, the stray light and et al. The wavelength lamp and tungsten lamp are frequently used to calibration the fiber spectroradiometer. The wavelength difference can be easily reduced through the software or calculation. However, the nonlinear effect and the bandwidth always can affect the measurement accuracy significantly.

  8. The use of low density high accuracy (LDHA) data for correction of high density low accuracy (HDLA) point cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rak, Michal Bartosz; Wozniak, Adam; Mayer, J. R. R.

    2016-06-01

    Coordinate measuring techniques rely on computer processing of coordinate values of points gathered from physical surfaces using contact or non-contact methods. Contact measurements are characterized by low density and high accuracy. On the other hand optical methods gather high density data of the whole object in a short time but with accuracy at least one order of magnitude lower than for contact measurements. Thus the drawback of contact methods is low density of data, while for non-contact methods it is low accuracy. In this paper a method for fusion of data from two measurements of fundamentally different nature: high density low accuracy (HDLA) and low density high accuracy (LDHA) is presented to overcome the limitations of both measuring methods. In the proposed method the concept of virtual markers is used to find a representation of pairs of corresponding characteristic points in both sets of data. In each pair the coordinates of the point from contact measurements is treated as a reference for the corresponding point from non-contact measurement. Transformation enabling displacement of characteristic points from optical measurement to their match from contact measurements is determined and applied to the whole point cloud. The efficiency of the proposed algorithm was evaluated by comparison with data from a coordinate measuring machine (CMM). Three surfaces were used for this evaluation: plane, turbine blade and engine cover. For the planar surface the achieved improvement was of around 200 μm. Similar results were obtained for the turbine blade but for the engine cover the improvement was smaller. For both freeform surfaces the improvement was higher for raw data than for data after creation of mesh of triangles.

  9. Accuracy assessment of the integration of GNSS and a MEMS IMU in a terrestrial platform.

    PubMed

    Madeira, Sergio; Yan, Wenlin; Bastos, Luísa; Gonçalves, José A

    2014-11-04

    MEMS Inertial Measurement Units are available at low cost and can replace expensive units in mobile mapping platforms which need direct georeferencing. This is done through the integration with GNSS measurements in order to achieve a continuous positioning solution and to obtain orientation angles. This paper presents the results of the assessment of the accuracy of a system that integrates GNSS and a MEMS IMU in a terrestrial platform. We describe the methodology used and the tests realized where the accuracy of the positions and orientation parameters were assessed using an independent photogrammetric technique employing cameras that integrate the mobile mapping system developed by the authors. Results for the accuracy of attitude angles and coordinates show that accuracies better than a decimeter in positions, and under a degree in angles, can be achieved even considering that the terrestrial platform is operating in less than favorable environments.

  10. Accuracy Assessment of the Integration of GNSS and a MEMS IMU in a Terrestrial Platform

    PubMed Central

    Madeira, Sergio; Yan, Wenlin; Bastos, Luísa; Gonçalves, José A.

    2014-01-01

    MEMS Inertial Measurement Units are available at low cost and can replace expensive units in mobile mapping platforms which need direct georeferencing. This is done through the integration with GNSS measurements in order to achieve a continuous positioning solution and to obtain orientation angles. This paper presents the results of the assessment of the accuracy of a system that integrates GNSS and a MEMS IMU in a terrestrial platform. We describe the methodology used and the tests realized where the accuracy of the positions and orientation parameters were assessed using an independent photogrammetric technique employing cameras that integrate the mobile mapping system developed by the authors. Results for the accuracy of attitude angles and coordinates show that accuracies better than a decimeter in positions, and under a degree in angles, can be achieved even considering that the terrestrial platform is operating in less than favorable environments. PMID:25375757

  11. Chemical modification of proteins to improve the accuracy of their relative molecular mass determination by electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Dolnik, Vladislav; Gurske, William A

    2011-10-01

    We studied the electrophoretic behavior of basic proteins (cytochrome c and histone III) and developed a carbamylation method that normalizes their electrophoretic size separation and improves the accuracy of their relative molecular mass determined electrophoretically. In capillary zone electrophoresis with cationic hitchhiking, native cytochrome c does not sufficiently bind cationic surfactants due to electrostatic repulsion between the basic protein and cationic surfactant. Carbamylation suppresses the strong positive charge of the basic proteins and results in more accurate relative molecular masses.

  12. A necessary and sufficient condition for deadlock-free adaptive routing in wormhole networks

    SciTech Connect

    Duato, J.

    1994-12-31

    Deadlock avoidance is a key issue in wormhole networks. A first approach consists of removing the cyclic dependencies between channels. Although this is a necessary and sufficient condition for deadlock-free deterministic routing, it is only a sufficient condition for deadlock-free adaptive routing. A more powerful approach only requires the absence of cyclic dependencies on a connected channel subset. The remaining channels can be used in almost any way. In this paper, we propose a necessary and sufficient condition for deadlock-free adaptive routing. This condition is the key for the design of maximally adaptive routing algorithms with minimum restrictions. Some examples are given, showing the application of the new theory. In particular, we propose a partially adaptive routing algorithm for k-ary n-cubes which doubles the throughput without increasing the hardware complexity significantly.

  13. Predictability of the appearance of anomalous waves at sufficiently small Benjamin-Feir indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruban, V. P.

    2016-05-01

    The numerical simulation of the nonlinear dynamics of random sea waves at sufficiently small Benjamin-Feir indices and its comparison with the linear dynamics (at the coincidence of spatial Fourier harmonics near a spectral peak at a certain time t p) indicate that the appearance of a rogue wave can be predicted in advance. If the linear approximation shows the presence of a sufficiently extensive and/or high group of waves in the near future after t p, an anomalous wave is almost necessarily formed in the nonlinear model. The interval of reliable forecasting covers several hundred wave periods, which can be quite sufficient in practice for, e.g., avoiding the meeting of a ship with a giant wave.

  14. Measuring the Accuracy of Diagnostic Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swets, John A.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the relative operating characteristic analysis of signal detection theory as a measure of diagnostic accuracy. Reports representative values of this measure in several fields. Compares how problems in these fields are handled. (CW)

  15. Empathic Embarrassment Accuracy in Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    PubMed

    Adler, Noga; Dvash, Jonathan; Shamay-Tsoory, Simone G

    2015-06-01

    Empathic accuracy refers to the ability of perceivers to accurately share the emotions of protagonists. Using a novel task assessing embarrassment, the current study sought to compare levels of empathic embarrassment accuracy among individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) with those of matched controls. To assess empathic embarrassment accuracy, we compared the level of embarrassment experienced by protagonists to the embarrassment felt by participants while watching the protagonists. The results show that while the embarrassment ratings of participants and protagonists were highly matched among controls, individuals with ASD failed to exhibit this matching effect. Furthermore, individuals with ASD rated their embarrassment higher than controls when viewing themselves and protagonists on film, but not while performing the task itself. These findings suggest that individuals with ASD tend to have higher ratings of empathic embarrassment, perhaps due to difficulties in emotion regulation that may account for their impaired empathic accuracy and aberrant social behavior. PMID:25732043

  16. Sun-pointing programs and their accuracy

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, J.C.

    1981-05-01

    Several sun-pointing programs and their accuracy are described. FORTRAN program listings are given. Program descriptions are given for both Hewlett-Packard (HP-67) and Texas Instruments (TI-59) hand-held calculators.

  17. Nicotine Activation of α4* Receptors: Sufficient for Reward, Tolerance, and Sensitization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tapper, Andrew R.; McKinney, Sheri L.; Nashmi, Raad; Schwarz, Johannes; Deshpande, Purnima; Labarca, Cesar; Whiteaker, Paul; Marks, Michael J.; Collins, Allan C.; Lester, Henry A.

    2004-11-01

    The identity of nicotinic receptor subtypes sufficient to elicit both the acute and chronic effects of nicotine dependence is unknown. We engineered mutant mice with α4 nicotinic subunits containing a single point mutation, Leu9' --> Ala9' in the pore-forming M2 domain, rendering α4* receptors hypersensitive to nicotine. Selective activation of α4* nicotinic acetylcholine receptors with low doses of agonist recapitulates nicotine effects thought to be important in dependence, including reinforcement in response to acute nicotine administration, as well as tolerance and sensitization elicited by chronic nicotine administration. These data indicate that activation of α4* receptors is sufficient for nicotine-induced reward, tolerance, and sensitization.

  18. Sufficient and necessary conditions for Lyapunov stability of genetic networks with SUM regulatory logic.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Guopeng; Huang, Jinhua; Tian, Fengxia; Liao, Xiaoxin

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, a nonlinear model for genetic regulator networks (GRNs) with SUM regulatory logic is presented. Four sufficient and necessary conditions of global asymptotical stability and global exponential stability for the equilibrium point of the GRNs are proposed, respectively. Specifically, three weak sufficient conditions and corresponding corollaries are derived by using comparing theorem and Dini derivative method. Then, a famous GRN model is used as the example to illustrate the effectiveness of our theoretical results. Comparing to the results in the previous literature, some novel ideas, study methods and interesting results are explored.

  19. Vibrationally averaged post Born-Oppenheimer isotopic dipole moment calculations approaching spectroscopic accuracy.

    PubMed

    Arapiraca, A F C; Jonsson, Dan; Mohallem, J R

    2011-12-28

    We report an upgrade of the Dalton code to include post Born-Oppenheimer nuclear mass corrections in the calculations of (ro-)vibrational averages of molecular properties. These corrections are necessary to achieve an accuracy of 10(-4) debye in the calculations of isotopic dipole moments. Calculations on the self-consistent field level present this accuracy, while numerical instabilities compromise correlated calculations. Applications to HD, ethane, and ethylene isotopologues are implemented, all of them approaching the experimental values. PMID:22225162

  20. Vibrationally averaged post Born-Oppenheimer isotopic dipole moment calculations approaching spectroscopic accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arapiraca, A. F. C.; Jonsson, Dan; Mohallem, J. R.

    2011-12-01

    We report an upgrade of the Dalton code to include post Born-Oppenheimer nuclear mass corrections in the calculations of (ro-)vibrational averages of molecular properties. These corrections are necessary to achieve an accuracy of 10-4 debye in the calculations of isotopic dipole moments. Calculations on the self-consistent field level present this accuracy, while numerical instabilities compromise correlated calculations. Applications to HD, ethane, and ethylene isotopologues are implemented, all of them approaching the experimental values.

  1. Cherokee Culture and School Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Anthony D.

    1980-01-01

    Compares the effect of cooperative and competitive behaviors of Cherokee and Anglo American elementary school students on academic achievement. Suggests changes in teaching techniques and lesson organization that might raise academic achievement while taking into consideration tribal traditions that limit scholastic achievement in an…

  2. Towards J/mol Accuracy for the Cohesive Energy of Solid Argon.

    PubMed

    Schwerdtfeger, Peter; Tonner, Ralf; Moyano, Gloria E; Pahl, Elke

    2016-09-26

    The cohesive energies of argon in its cubic and hexagonal closed packed structures are computed with an unprecedented accuracy of about 5 J mol(-1) (corresponding to 0.05 % of the total cohesive energy). The same relative accuracy with respect to experimental data is also found for the face-centered cubic lattice constant deviating by ca. 0.003 Å. This level of accuracy was enabled by using high-level theoretical, wave-function-based methods within a many-body decomposition of the interaction energy. Static contributions of two-, three-, and four-body fragments of the crystal are all individually converged to sub-J mol(-1) accuracy and complemented by harmonic and anharmonic vibrational corrections. Computational chemistry is thus achieving or even surpassing experimental accuracy for the solid-state rare gases. PMID:27593519

  3. Fitting magnetic field gradient with Heisenberg-scaling accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong-Liang; Wang, Huan; Jing, Li; Mu, Liang-Zhu; Fan, Heng

    2014-01-01

    The linear function is possibly the simplest and the most used relation appearing in various areas of our world. A linear relation can be generally determined by the least square linear fitting (LSLF) method using several measured quantities depending on variables. This happens for such as detecting the gradient of a magnetic field. Here, we propose a quantum fitting scheme to estimate the magnetic field gradient with N-atom spins preparing in W state. Our scheme combines the quantum multi-parameter estimation and the least square linear fitting method to achieve the quantum Cramér-Rao bound (QCRB). We show that the estimated quantity achieves the Heisenberg-scaling accuracy. Our scheme of quantum metrology combined with data fitting provides a new method in fast high precision measurements. PMID:25487218

  4. The Accuracy, Feasibility and Challenges of Sequencing Short Tandem Repeats Using Next-Generation Sequencing Platforms

    PubMed Central

    Zavodna, Monika; Bagshaw, Andrew; Brauning, Rudiger; Gemmell, Neil J.

    2014-01-01

    To date we have little knowledge of how accurate next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies are in sequencing repetitive sequences beyond known limitations to accurately sequence homopolymers. Only a handful of previous reports have evaluated the potential of NGS for sequencing short tandem repeats (microsatellites) and no empirical study has compared and evaluated the performance of more than one NGS platform with the same dataset. Here we examined yeast microsatellite variants from both long-read (454-sequencing) and short-read (Illumina) NGS platforms and compared these to data derived through Sanger sequencing. In addition, we investigated any locus-specific biases and differences that might have resulted from variability in microsatellite repeat number, repeat motif or type of mutation. Out of 112 insertion/deletion variants identified among 45 microsatellite amplicons in our study, we found 87.5% agreement between the 454-platform and Sanger sequencing in frequency of variant detection after Benjamini-Hochberg correction for multiple tests. For a subset of 21 microsatellite amplicons derived from Illumina sequencing, the results of short-read platform were highly consistent with the other two platforms, with 100% agreement with 454-sequencing and 93.6% agreement with the Sanger method after Benjamini-Hochberg correction. We found that the microsatellite attributes copy number, repeat motif and type of mutation did not have a significant effect on differences seen between the sequencing platforms. We show that both long-read and short-read NGS platforms can be used to sequence short tandem repeats accurately, which makes it feasible to consider the use of these platforms in high-throughput genotyping. It appears the major requirement for achieving both high accuracy and rare variant detection in microsatellite genotyping is sufficient read depth coverage. This might be a challenge because each platform generates a consistent pattern of non-uniform sequence

  5. Accuracy of the weighted essentially non-oscillatory conservative finite difference schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Don, Wai-Sun; Borges, Rafael

    2013-10-01

    In the reconstruction step of (2r-1) order weighted essentially non-oscillatory conservative finite difference schemes (WENO) for solving hyperbolic conservation laws, nonlinear weights αk and ωk, such as the WENO-JS weights by Jiang et al. and the WENO-Z weights by Borges et al., are designed to recover the formal (2r-1) order (optimal order) of the upwinded central finite difference scheme when the solution is sufficiently smooth. The smoothness of the solution is determined by the lower order local smoothness indicators βk in each substencil. These nonlinear weight formulations share two important free parameters in common: the power p, which controls the amount of numerical dissipation, and the sensitivity ε, which is added to βk to avoid a division by zero in the denominator of αk. However, ε also plays a role affecting the order of accuracy of WENO schemes, especially in the presence of critical points. It was recently shown that, for any design order (2r-1), ε should be of Ω(Δx2) (Ω(Δxm) means that ε⩾CΔxm for some C independent of Δx, as Δx→0) for the WENO-JS scheme to achieve the optimal order, regardless of critical points. In this paper, we derive an alternative proof of the sufficient condition using special properties of βk. Moreover, it is unknown if the WENO-Z scheme should obey the same condition on ε. Here, using same special properties of βk, we prove that in fact the optimal order of the WENO-Z scheme can be guaranteed with a much weaker condition ε=Ω(Δxm), where m(r,p)⩾2 is the optimal sensitivity order, regardless of critical points. Both theoretical results are confirmed numerically on smooth functions with arbitrary order of critical points. This is a highly desirable feature, as illustrated with the Lax problem and the Mach 3 shock-density wave interaction of one dimensional Euler equations, for a smaller ε allows a better essentially non-oscillatory shock capturing as it does not over-dominate over the size of

  6. How a GNSS Receiver Is Held May Affect Static Horizontal Position Accuracy.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Steven A; Ucar, Zennure; Bettinger, Pete; Merry, Krista

    2015-01-01

    understanding of antenna positioning within the receiver to achieve the greatest accuracy during data collection.

  7. How a GNSS Receiver Is Held May Affect Static Horizontal Position Accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, Steven A.; Ucar, Zennure; Bettinger, Pete; Merry, Krista

    2015-01-01

    understanding of antenna positioning within the receiver to achieve the greatest accuracy during data collection. PMID:25923667

  8. Students’ Achievement Goals, Learning-Related Emotions and Academic Achievement

    PubMed Central

    Lüftenegger, Marko; Klug, Julia; Harrer, Katharina; Langer, Marie; Spiel, Christiane; Schober, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    In the present research, the recently proposed 3 × 2 model of achievement goals is tested and associations with achievement emotions and their joint influence on academic achievement are investigated. The study was conducted with 388 students using the 3 × 2 Achievement Goal Questionnaire including the six proposed goal constructs (task-approach, task-avoidance, self-approach, self-avoidance, other-approach, other-avoidance) and the enjoyment and boredom scales from the Achievement Emotion Questionnaire. Exam grades were used as an indicator of academic achievement. Findings from CFAs provided strong support for the proposed structure of the 3 × 2 achievement goal model. Self-based goals, other-based goals and task-approach goals predicted enjoyment. Task-approach goals negatively predicted boredom. Task-approach and other-approach predicted achievement. The indirect effects of achievement goals through emotion variables on achievement were assessed using bias-corrected bootstrapping. No mediation effects were found. Implications for educational practice are discussed. PMID:27199836

  9. Classroom context, school engagement, and academic achievement in early adolescence.

    PubMed

    Dotterer, Aryn M; Lowe, Katie

    2011-12-01

    Classroom context and school engagement are significant predictors of academic achievement. These factors are especially important for academically at-risk students. Grounded in an ecological systems perspective, this study examined links between classroom context, school engagement, and academic achievement among early adolescents. We took a multidimensional approach to the measurement of classroom context and school engagement, incorporating both observational and self-reported assessments of various dimensions of classroom context (instruction quality, social/emotional climate, and student-teacher relationship) and school engagement (psychological and behavioral engagement). Using data from the NICHD Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development, we tested whether school engagement mediated the link between classroom context and academic achievement among 5th grade students, and whether these pathways were the same for students with previous achievement difficulties identified in 3rd grade. Participants included 1,014 children (50% female) in 5th grade (mean age = 11). The majority of the participants were white (77%) and 23% were children of color. Results indicated that psychological and behavioral engagement mediated the link between classroom context and academic achievement for students without previous achievement difficulties. However, for students with previous achievement difficulties psychological and behavioral engagement did not mediate the link between classroom context and academic achievement. These results suggest that improving classroom quality may not be sufficient to improve student engagement and achievement for students with previous achievement difficulties. Additional strategies may be needed for these students.

  10. Accuracy comparison among different machine learning techniques for detecting malicious codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narang, Komal

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, a machine learning based model for malware detection is proposed. It can detect newly released malware i.e. zero day attack by analyzing operation codes on Android operating system. The accuracy of Naïve Bayes, Support Vector Machine (SVM) and Neural Network for detecting malicious code has been compared for the proposed model. In the experiment 400 benign files, 100 system files and 500 malicious files have been used to construct the model. The model yields the best accuracy 88.9% when neural network is used as classifier and achieved 95% and 82.8% accuracy for sensitivity and specificity respectively.

  11. Operating a real time high accuracy positioning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, G.; Hanley, J.; Russell, D.; Vooght, A.

    2003-04-01

    The paper shall review the history and development of real time DGPS services prior to then describing the design of a high accuracy GPS commercial augmentation system and service currently delivering over a wide area to users of precise positioning products. The infrastructure and system shall be explained in relation to the need for high accuracy and high integrity of positioning for users. A comparison of the different techniques for the delivery of data shall be provided to outline the technical approach taken. Examples of the performance of the real time system shall be shown in various regions and modes to outline the current achievable accuracies. Having described and established the current GPS based situation, a review of the potential of the Galileo system shall be presented. Following brief contextual information relating to the Galileo project, core system and services, the paper will identify possible key applications and the main user communities for sub decimetre level precise positioning. The paper will address the Galileo and modernised GPS signals in space that are relevant to commercial precise positioning for the future and will discuss the implications for precise positioning performance. An outline of the proposed architecture shall be described and associated with pointers towards a successful implementation. Central to this discussion will be an assessment of the likely evolution of system infrastructure and user equipment implementation, prospects for new applications and their effect upon the business case for precise positioning services.

  12. Femoral nerve regeneration and its accuracy under different injury mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Aikeremujiang Muheremu; Ao, Qiang; Wang, Yu; Cao, Peng; Peng, Jiang

    2015-10-01

    Surgical accuracy has greatly improved with the advent of microsurgical techniques. However, complete functional recovery after peripheral nerve injury has not been achieved to date. The mechanisms hindering accurate regeneration of damaged axons after peripheral nerve injury are in urgent need of exploration. The present study was designed to explore the mechanisms of peripheral nerve regeneration after different types of injury. Femoral nerves of rats were injured by crushing or freezing. At 2, 3, 6, and 12 weeks after injury, axons were retrogradely labeled using 1,1'-dioctadecyl-3,3,3',3'-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate (Dil) and True Blue, and motor and sensory axons that had regenerated at the site of injury were counted. The number and percentage of Dil-labeled neurons in the anterior horn of the spinal cord increased over time. No significant differences were found in the number of labeled neurons between the freeze and crush injury groups at any time point. Our results confirmed that the accuracy of peripheral nerve regeneration increased with time, after both crush and freeze injury, and indicated that axonal regeneration accuracy was still satisfactory after freezing, despite the prolonged damage. PMID:26692867

  13. Prediction of OCR accuracy using simple image features

    SciTech Connect

    Blando, L.R.; Kanai, Junichi; Nartker, T.A.

    1995-04-01

    A classifier for predicting the character accuracy of a given page achieved by any Optical Character Recognition (OCR) system is presented. This classifier is based on measuring the amount of white speckle, the amount of character fragments, and overall size information in the page. No output from the OCR system is used. The given page is classified as either good quality (i.e., high OCR accuracy expected) or poor (i.e., low OCR accuracy expected). Six OCR systems processed two different sets of test data: a set of 439 pages obtained from technical and scientific documents and a set of 200 pages obtained from magazines. For every system, approximately 85% of the pages in each data set were correctly predicted. The performance of this classifier is also compared with the ideal-case performance of a prediction method based upon the number of reject markers in OCR generated text. In several cases, this method matched or exceeded the performance of the reject based approach.

  14. Evaluation of registration accuracy between Sentinel-2 and Landsat 8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barazzetti, Luigi; Cuca, Branka; Previtali, Mattia

    2016-08-01

    Starting from June 2015, Sentinel-2A is delivering high resolution optical images (ground resolution up to 10 meters) to provide a global coverage of the Earth's land surface every 10 days. The planned launch of Sentinel-2B along with the integration of Landsat images will provide time series with an unprecedented revisit time indispensable for numerous monitoring applications, in which high resolution multi-temporal information is required. They include agriculture, water bodies, natural hazards to name a few. However, the combined use of multi-temporal images requires an accurate geometric registration, i.e. pixel-to-pixel correspondence for terrain-corrected products. This paper presents an analysis of spatial co-registration accuracy for several datasets of Sentinel-2 and Landsat 8 images distributed all around the world. Images were compared with digital correlation techniques for image matching, obtaining an evaluation of registration accuracy with an affine transformation as geometrical model. Results demonstrate that sub-pixel accuracy was achieved between 10 m resolution Sentinel-2 bands (band 3) and 15 m resolution panchromatic Landsat images (band 8).

  15. Sample Size Planning for the Squared Multiple Correlation Coefficient: Accuracy in Parameter Estimation via Narrow Confidence Intervals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelley, Ken

    2008-01-01

    Methods of sample size planning are developed from the accuracy in parameter approach in the multiple regression context in order to obtain a sufficiently narrow confidence interval for the population squared multiple correlation coefficient when regressors are random. Approximate and exact methods are developed that provide necessary sample size…

  16. Accuracy Analysis of a Low-Cost Platform for Positioning and Navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, S.; Kuntzsch, C.; Schulze, M. J.; Eggert, D.; Sester, M.

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents an accuracy analysis of a platform based on low-cost components for landmark-based navigation intended for research and teaching purposes. The proposed platform includes a LEGO MINDSTORMS NXT 2.0 kit, an Android-based Smartphone as well as a compact laser scanner Hokuyo URG-04LX. The robot is used in a small indoor environment, where GNSS is not available. Therefore, a landmark map was produced in advance, with the landmark positions provided to the robot. All steps of procedure to set up the platform are shown. The main focus of this paper is the reachable positioning accuracy, which was analyzed in this type of scenario depending on the accuracy of the reference landmarks and the directional and distance measuring accuracy of the laser scanner. Several experiments were carried out, demonstrating the practically achievable positioning accuracy. To evaluate the accuracy, ground truth was acquired using a total station. These results are compared to the theoretically achievable accuracies and the laser scanner's characteristics.

  17. Rhetorically self-sufficient arguments in Western Australian parliamentary debates on Lesbian and Gay Law Reform.

    PubMed

    Summers, Mark

    2007-12-01

    Western Australia's Acts Amendment (Lesbian and Gay Law Reform) Bill 2001 delivered a measure of legal equality in such areas as property transfer, superannuation, inheritance and discrimination, and more controversially, adoption, lesbian access to IVF, lowering the age of consent for sex between men from 21 to 16, and incorporating information on homosexuality into high school sex education classes. This paper examines the use of various moral principles within parliamentary speeches supporting or opposing the legislation, and the extent to which they were treated by members as beyond question, or 'rhetorically self-sufficient'. The resources of 'equality', 'human rights', 'democracy', 'the interests of the majority' and 'the interests of children' were given a kind of beyond-question, self-sufficient status, but their use was able to be undermined in a number of ways, relating to members' management of what the Bill was 'about', and the flexibility of these social constructs. It is argued that rather than pitting one set of resources against another, members on both sides of the debate faced a rhetorical pressure to adopt and mobilize all of the same self-sufficient moral resources, due to the flexible, constructed and non-hierarchical, yet often rhetorically self-sufficient nature of common-sense moral principles.

  18. Community Service and University Roles: An Action Research Based on the Philosophy of Sufficiency Economy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nuangchalerm, Prasart; Chansirisira, Pacharawit

    2012-01-01

    This study employs action research to develop community service through university roles by applying the philosophy of sufficiency economy of His Majesty the King Bhumibol Adulyadej to fulfill villagers' way of life. Participatory learning, seminar, field trip and supervision were employed for strategic plan. Data were collected by participatory…

  19. Validation of the Employment Hope Scale: Measuring Psychological Self-Sufficiency among Low-Income Jobseekers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hong, Philip Young P.; Polanin, Joshua R.; Pigott, Therese D.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The Employment Hope scale (EHS) was designed to measure the empowerment-based self-sufficiency (SS) outcome among low-income job-seeking clients. This measure captures the psychological SS dimension as opposed to the more commonly used economic SS in workforce development and employment support practice. The study validates the EHS and…

  20. Effectiveness of Short-Term Training for Self-Sufficiency. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wonacott, Michael E.

    Reauthorization of welfare reform legislation has focused attention on the effectiveness of short-term training as a means for welfare recipients to attain self-sufficiency. Its effects on employment and earnings have been one focus of recent evaluations of federal programs. Although some Job Opportunities and Basic Skills programs produced…

  1. Necessary and sufficient conditions for the entanglement sudden death under amplitude damping and phase damping

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Jiehui; Zhu Shiyao

    2007-12-15

    By using principal minor method, which is developed from the Peres-Horodecki criterion for the separability of a quantum state, we derive the necessary and sufficient conditions for the entanglement sudden death of a two-qubit state under amplitude damping and phase damping.

  2. Pathway to Self-Sufficiency: Social and Economic Development Strategies of Native American Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Human Development Services (DHHS), Washington, DC.

    In fiscal year (FY) 1984 the Administration for Native Americans awarded 227 grants for social and economic development strategies (SEDS) which would help Native American communities move toward self-sufficiency. More than half the grants were primarily for economic development; approximately one-third were for improving tribal governments, and…

  3. Public and Private Incentives for Investment in Higher Education: Are They Sufficient, Especially for Black Males?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Appiah, Elizabeth N.

    2013-01-01

    The institutional costs of higher education have been rising. With diminishing public support per student, tuition and fees private costs have also been rising. But so have the real earnings of college graduates. Are there still sufficient incentives on efficiency grounds for additional public investment in higher education? And in particular,…

  4. The Family Self-Sufficiency Program: HUD's Best Kept Secret for Promoting Employment and Asset Growth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sard, Barbara

    This paper describes the Family Self-Sufficiency (FSS) program, an employment and savings incentive program for low-income families that have Section 8 vouchers or live in public housing. It consists of both case management services to help participants pursue employment and other goals and escrow accounts into which the public housing agency…

  5. 42 CFR 102.72 - Sufficient documentation for eligibility and benefits determinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Sufficient documentation for eligibility and benefits determinations. 102.72 Section 102.72 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES VACCINES SMALLPOX COMPENSATION PROGRAM Secretarial Determinations §...

  6. 42 CFR 102.72 - Sufficient documentation for eligibility and benefits determinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Sufficient documentation for eligibility and benefits determinations. 102.72 Section 102.72 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES VACCINES SMALLPOX COMPENSATION PROGRAM Secretarial Determinations §...

  7. 42 CFR 102.72 - Sufficient documentation for eligibility and benefits determinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Sufficient documentation for eligibility and benefits determinations. 102.72 Section 102.72 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES VACCINES SMALLPOX COMPENSATION PROGRAM Secretarial Determinations §...

  8. 42 CFR 102.72 - Sufficient documentation for eligibility and benefits determinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Sufficient documentation for eligibility and benefits determinations. 102.72 Section 102.72 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES VACCINES SMALLPOX COMPENSATION PROGRAM Secretarial Determinations §...

  9. 42 CFR 102.72 - Sufficient documentation for eligibility and benefits determinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Sufficient documentation for eligibility and benefits determinations. 102.72 Section 102.72 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES VACCINES SMALLPOX COMPENSATION PROGRAM Secretarial Determinations §...

  10. Investigation of Professional Self Sufficiency Levels of Physical Education and Sports Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saracaoglu, Asuman Seda; Ozsaker, Murat; Varol, Rana

    2012-01-01

    The present research aimed at detecting professional self sufficiency levels of physical education and sports teachers who worked in Izmir Province and at investigating them in terms of some variables. For data collection, Teacher's Sense of Efficacy Scale-developed by Moran and Woolfolk-Hoy (2001) and Turkish validity and reliability studies…

  11. Book, Film, Television: An International Comparison of National Self-Sufficiency in Three Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jokela, Mikko

    This study was conducted to compare national self-sufficiency in two media--book and film--to determine to what extent books and films in 39 countries are of domestic and foreign origin, and to find the direction of flow. Statistical findings are compared with findings from a 1973 study on the structure and origin of television programmes in 51…

  12. Sufficient conditions for oscillation of a nonlinear fractional nabla difference system.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei Nian; Sheng, Weihong

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we study the oscillation of nonlinear fractional nabla difference equations of the form [Formula: see text]where c and α are constants, [Formula: see text] is the Riemann-Liouville fractional nabla difference operator of order [Formula: see text] is a real number, and [Formula: see text]. Some sufficient conditions for oscillation are established. PMID:27512637

  13. Designing and Managing Public Housing Self-Sufficiency Programs: The Youngs Lake Commons Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kleit, Rachel Garshick

    2004-01-01

    This article evaluates an experimental public housing self-sufficiency program that encourages home ownership among low-income families. A quasi-experimental design, in combination with focus groups, records review, and key informant interviews, provides data to focus on four questions: (a) Do these programs simply accelerate move-outs for those…

  14. The Role of Workplace Support in Facilitating Self-Sufficiency among Single Mothers on Welfare.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Louise

    1994-01-01

    Explored model integrating human capital, family resource, employment, and psychosocial factors to explain variation in economic self-sufficiency among 851 single mothers on public assistance. Workplace support was most significant factor affecting degree to which mothers reduced their reliance on welfare as source of household income over…

  15. A Classroom Note on a Sufficient, but Unsatisfied, Condition for Goldbach's Conjecture to Be True

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skurnick, Ronald

    2011-01-01

    This classroom note is presented as a suggested exercise--not to have the class prove or disprove Goldbach's Conjecture, but to stimulate student discussions in the classroom regarding proof, as well as necessary, sufficient, satisfied, and unsatisfied conditions. Goldbach's Conjecture is one of the oldest unsolved problems in the field of number…

  16. 42 CFR 110.72 - Sufficient documentation for eligibility and benefits determinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Sufficient documentation for eligibility and benefits determinations. 110.72 Section 110.72 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES VACCINES COUNTERMEASURES INJURY COMPENSATION PROGRAM Secretarial...

  17. 42 CFR 110.72 - Sufficient documentation for eligibility and benefits determinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Sufficient documentation for eligibility and benefits determinations. 110.72 Section 110.72 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES VACCINES COUNTERMEASURES INJURY COMPENSATION PROGRAM Secretarial...

  18. 42 CFR 110.72 - Sufficient documentation for eligibility and benefits determinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Sufficient documentation for eligibility and benefits determinations. 110.72 Section 110.72 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES VACCINES COUNTERMEASURES INJURY COMPENSATION PROGRAM Secretarial...

  19. 42 CFR 110.72 - Sufficient documentation for eligibility and benefits determinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Sufficient documentation for eligibility and benefits determinations. 110.72 Section 110.72 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES VACCINES COUNTERMEASURES INJURY COMPENSATION PROGRAM Secretarial...

  20. ADC Mothers Reach Self-Sufficiency through Comprehensive Support and Family Development Services Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Randolph, Gayle C., II; McCarthy, Karen V.

    Families whose primary or sole means of financial support is derived from the welfare system are attempting to meet immediate survival needs in the same manner as families outside of the system. Project Self-Sufficiency is a program which dedicates time to building trusting relationships based on mutual respect and the belief that, with support,…

  1. On sufficient statistics of least-squares superposition of vector sets.

    PubMed

    Konagurthu, Arun S; Kasarapu, Parthan; Allison, Lloyd; Collier, James H; Lesk, Arthur M

    2015-06-01

    The problem of superposition of two corresponding vector sets by minimizing their sum-of-squares error under orthogonal transformation is a fundamental task in many areas of science, notably structural molecular biology. This problem can be solved exactly using an algorithm whose time complexity grows linearly with the number of correspondences. This efficient solution has facilitated the widespread use of the superposition task, particularly in studies involving macromolecular structures. This article formally derives a set of sufficient statistics for the least-squares superposition problem. These statistics are additive. This permits a highly efficient (constant time) computation of superpositions (and sufficient statistics) of vector sets that are composed from its constituent vector sets under addition or deletion operation, where the sufficient statistics of the constituent sets are already known (that is, the constituent vector sets have been previously superposed). This results in a drastic improvement in the run time of the methods that commonly superpose vector sets under addition or deletion operations, where previously these operations were carried out ab initio (ignoring the sufficient statistics). We experimentally demonstrate the improvement our work offers in the context of protein structural alignment programs that assemble a reliable structural alignment from well-fitting (substructural) fragment pairs. A C++ library for this task is available online under an open-source license.

  2. Faculty Sufficiency and AACSB Accreditation Compliance within a Global University: A Mathematical Modeling Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boronico, Jess; Murdy, Jim; Kong, Xinlu

    2014-01-01

    This manuscript proposes a mathematical model to address faculty sufficiency requirements towards assuring overall high quality management education at a global university. Constraining elements include full-time faculty coverage by discipline, location, and program, across multiple campus locations subject to stated service quality standards of…

  3. Role of input self-sufficiency in the economic and environmental sustainability of specialised dairy farms.

    PubMed

    Lebacq, T; Baret, P V; Stilmant, D

    2015-03-01

    Increasing input self-sufficiency is often viewed as a target to improve sustainability of dairy farms. However, few studies have specifically analysed input self-sufficiency, by including several technical inputs and without only focussing on animal feeding, in order to explore its impact on farm sustainability. To address this gap, our work has three objectives as follows: (1) identifying the structural characteristics required by specialised dairy farms located in the grassland area to be self-sufficient; (2) analysing the relationships between input self-sufficiency, environmental and economic sustainability; and (3) studying how the farms react to a decrease in milk price according to their self-sufficiency degree. Based on farm accounting databases, we categorised 335 Walloon specialised conventional dairy farms into four classes according to their level of input self-sufficiency. To this end, we used as proxy the indicator of economic autonomy - that is, the ratio between costs of inputs related to animal production, crop production and energy use and the total gross product. Classes were then compared using multiple comparison tests and canonical discriminant analysis. A total of 30 organic farms - among which 63% had a high level of economic autonomy - were considered separately and compared with the most autonomous class. We showed that a high degree of economic autonomy is associated, in conventional farms, with a high proportion of permanent grassland in the agricultural area. The most autonomous farms used less input - especially animal feeding - for a same output level, and therefore combined good environmental and economic performances. Our results also underlined that, in a situation of decrease in milk price, the least autonomous farms had more latitude to decrease their input-related costs without decreasing milk production. Their incomes per work unit were, therefore, less impacted by falling prices, but remained lower than those of more

  4. Achievement as Resistance: The Development of a Critical Race Achievement Ideology among Black Achievers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Dorinda J.

    2008-01-01

    In this article, Dorinda Carter examines the embodiment of a critical race achievement ideology in high-achieving black students. She conducted a yearlong qualitative investigation of the adaptive behaviors that nine high-achieving black students developed and employed to navigate the process of schooling at an upper-class, predominantly white,…

  5. Evidence mapping for decision making: feasibility versus accuracy – when to abandon high sensitivity in electronic searches

    PubMed Central

    Buchberger, Barbara; Krabbe, Laura; Lux, Beate; Mattivi, Jessica Tajana

    2016-01-01

    Background: Mapping the evidence is a relatively new methodological approach and may be helpful for the development of research questions and decisions about their relevance and priority. However, the amount of data available today leads to challenges for scientists sometimes being confronted with literature searches retrieving over 30,000 results for screening. Objectives: We conducted an evidence mapping of the topic “diabetes and driving” to investigate its suitability for an evidence-based national clinical guideline. In addition, we compared a highly sensitive search with a highly specific one. Methods: Based on a systematic review, our database searches were limited to publications from 2002 to present in English and German language. Results: Due to the strongly focused topic and the limits, our sensitive search identified a manageable number of references including sufficient evidence to answer our research question. Using the specific search strategy, we achieved a reduction of citations by 25%, concurrently identifying 88% of relevant references. Conclusions: Evidence mapping with the intention of gaining an overview of a research field does not require high level accuracy in contrary to systematic reviews. Keeping this distinction in mind, a mass of extraneous information will be avoided by using specific instead of highly sensitive search strategies. PMID:27499726

  6. Expected accuracy of tilt measurements on a novel hexapod-based digital zenith camera system: a Monte-Carlo simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirt, Christian; Papp, Gábor; Pál, András; Benedek, Judit; Szũcs, Eszter

    2014-08-01

    Digital zenith camera systems (DZCS) are dedicated astronomical-geodetic measurement systems for the observation of the direction of the plumb line. A DZCS key component is a pair of tilt meters for the determination of the instrumental tilt with respect to the plumb line. Highest accuracy (i.e., 0.1 arc-seconds or better) is achieved in practice through observation with precision tilt meters in opposite faces (180° instrumental rotation), and application of rigorous tilt reduction models. A novel concept proposes the development of a hexapod (Stewart platform)-based DZCS. However, hexapod-based total rotations are limited to about 30°-60° in azimuth (equivalent to ±15° to ±30° yaw rotation), which raises the question of the impact of the rotation angle between the two faces on the accuracy of the tilt measurement. The goal of the present study is the investigation of the expected accuracy of tilt measurements to be carried out on future hexapod-based DZCS, with special focus placed on the role of the limited rotation angle. A Monte-Carlo simulation study is carried out in order to derive accuracy estimates for the tilt determination as a function of several input parameters, and the results are validated against analytical error propagation. As the main result of the study, limitation of the instrumental rotation to 60° (30°) deteriorates the tilt accuracy by a factor of about 2 (4) compared to a 180° rotation between the faces. Nonetheless, a tilt accuracy at the 0.1 arc-second level is expected when the rotation is at least 45°, and 0.05 arc-second (about 0.25 microradian) accurate tilt meters are deployed. As such, a hexapod-based DZCS can be expected to allow sufficiently accurate determination of the instrumental tilt. This provides supporting evidence for the feasibility of such a novel instrumentation. The outcomes of our study are not only relevant to the field of DZCS, but also to all other types of instruments where the instrumental tilt

  7. Accuracy analysis of a spectral element atmospheric model using a fully implicit solution framework

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Katherine J; Taylor, Mark; Drake, John B

    2010-01-01

    A fully implicit (FI) time integration method has been implemented into a spectral finite element shallow water equation model on a sphere, and it is compared to existing fully explicit leapfrog and semi-implicit methods for a suite of test cases. This experiment is designed to determine the time step sizes that minimize simulation time while maintaining sufficient accuracy for these problems. For test cases without an analytical solution from which to compare, it is demonstrated that time step sizes 30 to 60 times larger than the gravity wave stability limits and 6 to 20 times larger than the advective scale stability limits are possible using the FI method without a loss in accuracy, depending on the problem being solved. For a steady-state test case, the FI method produces error within machine accuracy limits as with existing methods, but using an arbitrarily large time step size.

  8. Sampling Molecular Conformers in Solution with Quantum Mechanical Accuracy at a Nearly Molecular-Mechanics Cost.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Marta; Micciarelli, Marco; Laio, Alessandro; Baroni, Stefano

    2016-09-13

    We introduce a method to evaluate the relative populations of different conformers of molecular species in solution, aiming at quantum mechanical accuracy, while keeping the computational cost at a nearly molecular-mechanics level. This goal is achieved by combining long classical molecular-dynamics simulations to sample the free-energy landscape of the system, advanced clustering techniques to identify the most relevant conformers, and thermodynamic perturbation theory to correct the resulting populations, using quantum-mechanical energies from density functional theory. A quantitative criterion for assessing the accuracy thus achieved is proposed. The resulting methodology is demonstrated in the specific case of cyanin (cyanidin-3-glucoside) in water solution.

  9. Sampling Molecular Conformers in Solution with Quantum Mechanical Accuracy at a Nearly Molecular-Mechanics Cost.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Marta; Micciarelli, Marco; Laio, Alessandro; Baroni, Stefano

    2016-09-13

    We introduce a method to evaluate the relative populations of different conformers of molecular species in solution, aiming at quantum mechanical accuracy, while keeping the computational cost at a nearly molecular-mechanics level. This goal is achieved by combining long classical molecular-dynamics simulations to sample the free-energy landscape of the system, advanced clustering techniques to identify the most relevant conformers, and thermodynamic perturbation theory to correct the resulting populations, using quantum-mechanical energies from density functional theory. A quantitative criterion for assessing the accuracy thus achieved is proposed. The resulting methodology is demonstrated in the specific case of cyanin (cyanidin-3-glucoside) in water solution. PMID:27494227

  10. Accuracy of stream habitat interpolations across spatial scales

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sheehan, Kenneth R.; Welsh, Stuart

    2013-01-01

    Stream habitat data are often collected across spatial scales because relationships among habitat, species occurrence, and management plans are linked at multiple spatial scales. Unfortunately, scale is often a factor limiting insight gained from spatial analysis of stream habitat data. Considerable cost is often expended to collect data at several spatial scales to provide accurate evaluation of spatial relationships in streams. To address utility of single scale set of stream habitat data used at varying scales, we examined the influence that data scaling had on accuracy of natural neighbor predictions of depth, flow, and benthic substrate. To achieve this goal, we measured two streams at gridded resolution of 0.33 × 0.33 meter cell size over a combined area of 934 m2 to create a baseline for natural neighbor interpolated maps at 12 incremental scales ranging from a raster cell size of 0.11 m2 to 16 m2 . Analysis of predictive maps showed a logarithmic linear decay pattern in RMSE values in interpolation accuracy for variables as resolution of data used to interpolate study areas became coarser. Proportional accuracy of interpolated models (r2 ) decreased, but it was maintained up to 78% as interpolation scale moved from 0.11 m2 to 16 m2 . Results indicated that accuracy retention was suitable for assessment and management purposes at various scales different from the data collection scale. Our study is relevant to spatial modeling, fish habitat assessment, and stream habitat management because it highlights the potential of using a single dataset to fulfill analysis needs rather than investing considerable cost to develop several scaled datasets.

  11. On the use of Numerical Weather Models for improving SAR geolocation accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitti, D. O.; Chiaradia, M.; Nutricato, R.; Bovenga, F.; Refice, A.; Bruno, M. F.; Petrillo, A. F.; Guerriero, L.

    2013-12-01

    Precise estimation and correction of the Atmospheric Path Delay (APD) is needed to ensure sub-pixel accuracy of geocoded Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) products, in particular for the new generation of high resolution side-looking SAR satellite sensors (TerraSAR-X, COSMO/SkyMED). The present work aims to assess the performances of operational Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) Models as tools to routinely estimate the APD contribution, according to the specific acquisition beam of the SAR sensor for the selected scene on ground. The Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) has been selected for this purpose. It is a finite-difference, primitive equation, three-dimensional non-hydrostatic mesoscale model, originally developed at Colorado State University [1]. In order to appreciate the improvement in target geolocation when accounting for APD, we need to rely on the SAR sensor orbital information. In particular, TerraSAR-X data are well-suited for this experiment, since recent studies have confirmed the few centimeter accuracy of their annotated orbital records (Science level data) [2]. A consistent dataset of TerraSAR-X stripmap images (Pol.:VV; Look side: Right; Pass Direction: Ascending; Incidence Angle: 34.0÷36.6 deg) acquired in Daunia in Southern Italy has been hence selected for this study, thanks also to the availability of six trihedral corner reflectors (CR) recently installed in the area covered by the imaged scenes and properly directed towards the TerraSAR-X satellite platform. The geolocation of CR phase centers is surveyed with cm-level accuracy using differential GPS (DGPS). The results of the analysis are shown and discussed. Moreover, the quality of the APD values estimated through NWP models will be further compared to those annotated in the geolocation grid (GEOREF.xml), in order to evaluate whether annotated corrections are sufficient for sub-pixel geolocation quality or not. Finally, the analysis will be extended to a limited number of

  12. Accuracy of polyp localization at colonoscopy

    PubMed Central

    O’Connor, Sam A.; Hewett, David G.; Watson, Marcus O.; Kendall, Bradley J.; Hourigan, Luke F.; Holtmann, Gerald

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Accurate documentation of lesion localization at the time of colonoscopic polypectomy is important for future surveillance, management of complications such as delayed bleeding, and for guiding surgical resection. We aimed to assess the accuracy of endoscopic localization of polyps during colonoscopy and examine variables that may influence this accuracy. Patients and methods: We conducted a prospective observational study in consecutive patients presenting for elective, outpatient colonoscopy. All procedures were performed by Australian certified colonoscopists. The endoscopic location of each polyp was reported by the colonoscopist at the time of resection and prospectively recorded. Magnetic endoscope imaging was used to determine polyp location, and colonoscopists were blinded to this image. Three experienced colonoscopists, blinded to the endoscopist’s assessment of polyp location, independently scored the magnetic endoscope images to obtain a reference standard for polyp location (Cronbach alpha 0.98). The accuracy of colonoscopist polyp localization using this reference standard was assessed, and colonoscopist, procedural and patient variables affecting accuracy were evaluated. Results: A total of 155 patients were enrolled and 282 polyps were resected in 95 patients by 14 colonoscopists. The overall accuracy of polyp localization was 85 % (95 % confidence interval, CI; 60 – 96 %). Accuracy varied significantly (P < 0.001) by colonic segment: caecum 100 %, ascending 77 % (CI;65 – 90), transverse 84 % (CI;75 – 92), descending 56 % (CI;32 – 81), sigmoid 88 % (CI;79 – 97), rectum 96 % (CI;90 – 101). There were significant differences in accuracy between colonoscopists (P < 0.001), and colonoscopist experience was a significant independent predictor of accuracy (OR 3.5, P = 0.028) after adjustment for patient and procedural variables. Conclusions: Accuracy of

  13. Asymptotic accuracy of two-class discrimination

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, T.K.; Baird, H.S.

    1994-12-31

    Poor quality-e.g. sparse or unrepresentative-training data is widely suspected to be one cause of disappointing accuracy of isolated-character classification in modern OCR machines. We conjecture that, for many trainable classification techniques, it is in fact the dominant factor affecting accuracy. To test this, we have carried out a study of the asymptotic accuracy of three dissimilar classifiers on a difficult two-character recognition problem. We state this problem precisely in terms of high-quality prototype images and an explicit model of the distribution of image defects. So stated, the problem can be represented as a stochastic source of an indefinitely long sequence of simulated images labeled with ground truth. Using this sequence, we were able to train all three classifiers to high and statistically indistinguishable asymptotic accuracies (99.9%). This result suggests that the quality of training data was the dominant factor affecting accuracy. The speed of convergence during training, as well as time/space trade-offs during recognition, differed among the classifiers.

  14. Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Orbit Determination Accuracy Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slojkowski, Steven E.

    2014-01-01

    Results from operational OD produced by the NASA Goddard Flight Dynamics Facility for the LRO nominal and extended mission are presented. During the LRO nominal mission, when LRO flew in a low circular orbit, orbit determination requirements were met nearly 100% of the time. When the extended mission began, LRO returned to a more elliptical frozen orbit where gravity and other modeling errors caused numerous violations of mission accuracy requirements. Prediction accuracy is particularly challenged during periods when LRO is in full-Sun. A series of improvements to LRO orbit determination are presented, including implementation of new lunar gravity models, improved spacecraft solar radiation pressure modeling using a dynamic multi-plate area model, a shorter orbit determination arc length, and a constrained plane method for estimation. The analysis presented in this paper shows that updated lunar gravity models improved accuracy in the frozen orbit, and a multiplate dynamic area model improves prediction accuracy during full-Sun orbit periods. Implementation of a 36-hour tracking data arc and plane constraints during edge-on orbit geometry also provide benefits. A comparison of the operational solutions to precision orbit determination solutions shows agreement on a 100- to 250-meter level in definitive accuracy.

  15. Accuracy metrics for judging time scale algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglas, R. J.; Boulanger, J.-S.; Jacques, C.

    1994-01-01

    Time scales have been constructed in different ways to meet the many demands placed upon them for time accuracy, frequency accuracy, long-term stability, and robustness. Usually, no single time scale is optimum for all purposes. In the context of the impending availability of high-accuracy intermittently-operated cesium fountains, we reconsider the question of evaluating the accuracy of time scales which use an algorithm to span interruptions of the primary standard. We consider a broad class of calibration algorithms that can be evaluated and compared quantitatively for their accuracy in the presence of frequency drift and a full noise model (a mixture of white PM, flicker PM, white FM, flicker FM, and random walk FM noise). We present the analytic techniques for computing the standard uncertainty for the full noise model and this class of calibration algorithms. The simplest algorithm is evaluated to find the average-frequency uncertainty arising from the noise of the cesium fountain's local oscillator and from the noise of a hydrogen maser transfer-standard. This algorithm and known noise sources are shown to permit interlaboratory frequency transfer with a standard uncertainty of less than 10(exp -15) for periods of 30-100 days.

  16. The Mechanics of Human Achievement

    PubMed Central

    Duckworth, Angela L.; Eichstaedt, Johannes C.; Ungar, Lyle H.

    2015-01-01

    Countless studies have addressed why some individuals achieve more than others. Nevertheless, the psychology of achievement lacks a unifying conceptual framework for synthesizing these empirical insights. We propose organizing achievement-related traits by two possible mechanisms of action: Traits that determine the rate at which an individual learns a skill are talent variables and can be distinguished conceptually from traits that determine the effort an individual puts forth. This approach takes inspiration from Newtonian mechanics: achievement is akin to distance traveled, effort to time, skill to speed, and talent to acceleration. A novel prediction from this model is that individual differences in effort (but not talent) influence achievement (but not skill) more substantially over longer (rather than shorter) time intervals. Conceptualizing skill as the multiplicative product of talent and effort, and achievement as the multiplicative product of skill and effort, advances similar, but less formal, propositions by several important earlier thinkers. PMID:26236393

  17. Mathematics Achievement in High- and Low-Achieving Secondary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohammadpour, Ebrahim; Shekarchizadeh, Ahmadreza

    2015-01-01

    This paper identifies the amount of variance in mathematics achievement in high- and low-achieving schools that can be explained by school-level factors, while controlling for student-level factors. The data were obtained from 2679 Iranian eighth graders who participated in the 2007 Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study. Of the…

  18. An automated method for the evaluation of the pointing accuracy of sun-tracking devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgartner, Dietmar J.; Rieder, Harald E.; Pötzi, Werner; Freislich, Heinrich; Strutzmann, Heinz

    2016-04-01

    The accuracy of measurements of solar radiation (direct and diffuse radiation) depends significantly on the accuracy of the operational sun-tracking device. Thus rigid targets for instrument performance and operation are specified for international monitoring networks, such as e.g., the Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN) operating under the auspices of the World Climate Research Program (WCRP). Sun-tracking devices fulfilling these accuracy targets are available from various instrument manufacturers, however none of the commercially available systems comprises a secondary accuracy control system, allowing platform operators to independently validate the pointing accuracy of sun-tracking sensors during operation. Here we present KSO-STREAMS (KSO-SunTRackEr Accuracy Monitoring System), a fully automated, system independent and cost-effective method for evaluating the pointing accuracy of sun-tracking devices. We detail the monitoring system setup, its design and specifications and results from its application to the sun-tracking system operated at the Austrian RADiation network (ARAD) site Kanzelhöhe Observatory (KSO). Results from KSO-STREAMS (for mid-March to mid-June 2015) show that the tracking accuracy of the device operated at KSO lies well within BSRN specifications (i.e. 0.1 degree accuracy). We contrast results during clear-sky and partly cloudy conditions documenting sun-tracking performance at manufacturer specified accuracies for active tracking (0.02 degrees) and highlight accuracies achieved during passive tracking i.e. periods with less than 300 W m‑2 direct radiation. Furthermore we detail limitations to tracking surveillance during overcast conditions and periods of partial solar limb coverage by clouds.

  19. An automated method for the evaluation of the pointing accuracy of sun-tracking devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgartner, Dietmar J.; Rieder, Harald E.; Pötzi, Werner; Freislich, Heinrich; Strutzmann, Heinz

    2016-04-01

    The accuracy of measurements of solar radiation (direct and diffuse radiation) depends significantly on the accuracy of the operational sun-tracking device. Thus rigid targets for instrument performance and operation are specified for international monitoring networks, such as e.g., the Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN) operating under the auspices of the World Climate Research Program (WCRP). Sun-tracking devices fulfilling these accuracy targets are available from various instrument manufacturers, however none of the commercially available systems comprises a secondary accuracy control system, allowing platform operators to independently validate the pointing accuracy of sun-tracking sensors during operation. Here we present KSO-STREAMS (KSO-SunTRackEr Accuracy Monitoring System), a fully automated, system independent and cost-effective method for evaluating the pointing accuracy of sun-tracking devices. We detail the monitoring system setup, its design and specifications and results from its application to the sun-tracking system operated at the Austrian RADiation network (ARAD) site Kanzelhöhe Observatory (KSO). Results from KSO-STREAMS (for mid-March to mid-June 2015) show that the tracking accuracy of the device operated at KSO lies well within BSRN specifications (i.e. 0.1 degree accuracy). We contrast results during clear-sky and partly cloudy conditions documenting sun-tracking performance at manufacturer specified accuracies for active tracking (0.02 degrees) and highlight accuracies achieved during passive tracking i.e. periods with less than 300 W m-2 direct radiation. Furthermore we detail limitations to tracking surveillance during overcast conditions and periods of partial solar limb coverage by clouds.

  20. Decreased interoceptive accuracy following social exclusion.

    PubMed

    Durlik, Caroline; Tsakiris, Manos

    2015-04-01

    The need for social affiliation is one of the most important and fundamental human needs. Unsurprisingly, humans display strong negative reactions to social exclusion. In the present study, we investigated the effect of social exclusion on interoceptive accuracy - accuracy in detecting signals arising inside the body - measured with a heartbeat perception task. We manipulated exclusion using Cyberball, a widely used paradigm of a virtual ball-tossing game, with half of the participants being included during the game and the other half of participants being ostracized during the game. Our results indicated that heartbeat perception accuracy decreased in the excluded, but not in the included, participants. We discuss these results in the context of social and physical pain overlap, as well as in relation to internally versus externally oriented attention. PMID:25701592

  1. Social class, contextualism, and empathic accuracy.

    PubMed

    Kraus, Michael W; Côté, Stéphane; Keltner, Dacher

    2010-11-01

    Recent research suggests that lower-class individuals favor explanations of personal and political outcomes that are oriented to features of the external environment. We extended this work by testing the hypothesis that, as a result, individuals of a lower social class are more empathically accurate in judging the emotions of other people. In three studies, lower-class individuals (compared with upper-class individuals) received higher scores on a test of empathic accuracy (Study 1), judged the emotions of an interaction partner more accurately (Study 2), and made more accurate inferences about emotion from static images of muscle movements in the eyes (Study 3). Moreover, the association between social class and empathic accuracy was explained by the tendency for lower-class individuals to explain social events in terms of features of the external environment. The implications of class-based patterns in empathic accuracy for well-being and relationship outcomes are discussed. PMID:20974714

  2. Attribution theory in science achievement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, Martin

    Recent research reveals consistent lags in American students' science achievement scores. Not only are the scores lower in the United States compared to other developed nations, but even within the United States, too many students are well below science proficiency scores for their grade levels. The current research addresses this problem by examining potential malleable factors that may predict science achievement in twelfth graders using 2009 data from the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP). Principle component factor analysis was conducted to determine the specific items that contribute to each overall factor. A series of multiple regressions were then analyzed and formed the predictive value of each of these factors for science achievement. All significant factors were ultimately examined together (also using multiple regression) to determine the most powerful predictors of science achievement, identifying factors that predict science achievement, the results of which suggested interventions to strengthen students' science achievement scores and encourage persistence in the sciences at the college level and beyond. Although there is a variety of research highlighting how students in the US are falling behind other developing nations in science and math achievement, as yet, little research has addressed ways of intervening to address this gap. The current research is a starting point, seeking to identify malleable factors that contribute to science achievement. More specifically, this research examined the types of attributions that predict science achievement in twelfth grade students.

  3. Portfolio of Research in Welfare and Family Self-Sufficiency: FY 2014. OPRE Report 2015-15

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Administration for Children & Families, 2015

    2015-01-01

    The Division of Economic Independence within the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation (OPRE) has primary responsibility for welfare and family self-sufficiency research. OPRE's research in the area of welfare and family self-sufficiency is designed to expand knowledge about effective programs to promote employment, self-sufficiency, and…

  4. Is Transducer Hygiene sufficient when Vaginal Probes are used in the Clinical Routine?

    PubMed

    Merz, E

    2016-04-01

    special virucidal wipes on the probes is considered low-level disinfection. Primarily quaternary ammonia compounds are employed for this procedure. This method is easily applicable, has good cleaning characteristics, is effective against HPV and has high skin tolerance. However, it has the disadvantage of not removing all microorganisms during the disinfection process. Immersion procedures are high-level disinfection methods during which the transducer head is dipped in a special fluid for a certain amount of time. The disinfectants used for this include e. g. preparations based on glutaraldehyde or succinic aldehyde. However, in practice immersion disinfection has a number of disadvantages 13: 1. The procedure cannot be validated. 2. The probe permanently attached to the device must be placed in a separate holder and disinfected for at least 15 minutes. This is impracticable in routine operations in a clinic, outpatient facility or practice with a high number of examinations. 3. After this disinfection method, the probe has to be thoroughly rinsed with potable or higher-quality water in order to remove remnants of allergenic or locally toxic substances. 4. Frequently examinations take place in small interior areas with poor ventilation, thus under some circumstances posing an inhalant-related health hazard. 5. The required virucidal effect is frequently not achieved within 15 minutes 13. Furthermore, extended probe contact with liquid disinfecting agents in the long run results in increased wear of the transducer head membrane.Therefore it was interesting to note that in 2009 a fully-automatic disinfection system for ultrasound probes was introduced to the market (Trophon(EPR). This product, developed in Australia, promised relatively rapid high-level disinfection (HLD). During this software-controlled, mechanical disinfection procedure, the entire ultrasound probe (transducer head and handle) is placed in a sealed disinfection chamber, then hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is

  5. Is Transducer Hygiene sufficient when Vaginal Probes are used in the Clinical Routine?

    PubMed

    Merz, E

    2016-04-01

    special virucidal wipes on the probes is considered low-level disinfection. Primarily quaternary ammonia compounds are employed for this procedure. This method is easily applicable, has good cleaning characteristics, is effective against HPV and has high skin tolerance. However, it has the disadvantage of not removing all microorganisms during the disinfection process. Immersion procedures are high-level disinfection methods during which the transducer head is dipped in a special fluid for a certain amount of time. The disinfectants used for this include e. g. preparations based on glutaraldehyde or succinic aldehyde. However, in practice immersion disinfection has a number of disadvantages 13: 1. The procedure cannot be validated. 2. The probe permanently attached to the device must be placed in a separate holder and disinfected for at least 15 minutes. This is impracticable in routine operations in a clinic, outpatient facility or practice with a high number of examinations. 3. After this disinfection method, the probe has to be thoroughly rinsed with potable or higher-quality water in order to remove remnants of allergenic or locally toxic substances. 4. Frequently examinations take place in small interior areas with poor ventilation, thus under some circumstances posing an inhalant-related health hazard. 5. The required virucidal effect is frequently not achieved within 15 minutes 13. Furthermore, extended probe contact with liquid disinfecting agents in the long run results in increased wear of the transducer head membrane.Therefore it was interesting to note that in 2009 a fully-automatic disinfection system for ultrasound probes was introduced to the market (Trophon(EPR). This product, developed in Australia, promised relatively rapid high-level disinfection (HLD). During this software-controlled, mechanical disinfection procedure, the entire ultrasound probe (transducer head and handle) is placed in a sealed disinfection chamber, then hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is

  6. Size-Dependent Accuracy of Nanoscale Thermometers.

    PubMed

    Alicki, Robert; Leitner, David M

    2015-07-23

    The accuracy of two classes of nanoscale thermometers is estimated in terms of size and system-dependent properties using the spin-boson model. We consider solid state thermometers, where the energy splitting is tuned by thermal properties of the material, and fluorescent organic thermometers, in which the fluorescence intensity depends on the thermal population of conformational states of the thermometer. The results of the theoretical model compare well with the accuracy reported for several nanothermometers that have been used to measure local temperature inside living cells.

  7. Predictive accuracy in the neuroprediction of rearrest

    PubMed Central

    Aharoni, Eyal; Mallett, Joshua; Vincent, Gina M.; Harenski, Carla L.; Calhoun, Vince D.; Sinnott-Armstrong, Walter; Gazzaniga, Michael S.; Kiehl, Kent A.

    2014-01-01

    A recently published study by the present authors (Aharoni et al., 2013) reported evidence that functional changes in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) within a sample of 96 criminal offenders who were engaged in a Go/No-Go impulse control task significantly predicted their rearrest following release from prison. In an extended analysis, we use discrimination and calibration techniques to test the accuracy of these predictions relative to more traditional models and their ability to generalize to new observations in both full and reduced models. Modest to strong discrimination and calibration accuracy were found, providing additional support for the utility of neurobiological measures in predicting rearrest. PMID:24720689

  8. The accuracy of Halley's cometary orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, D. W.

    The accuracy of a scientific computation depends in the main on the data fed in and the analysis method used. This statement is certainly true of Edmond Halley's cometary orbit work. Considering the 420 comets that had been seen before Halley's era of orbital calculation (1695 - 1702) only 24, according to him, had been observed well enough for their orbits to be calculated. Two questions are considered in this paper. Do all the orbits listed by Halley have the same accuracy? and, secondly, how accurate was Halley's method of calculation?

  9. Phase space correlation to improve detection accuracy.

    PubMed

    Carroll, T L; Rachford, F J

    2009-09-01

    The standard method used for detecting signals in radar or sonar is cross correlation. The accuracy of the detection with cross correlation is limited by the bandwidth of the signals. We show that by calculating the cross correlation based on points that are nearby in phase space rather than points that are simultaneous in time, the detection accuracy is improved. The phase space correlation technique works for some standard radar signals, but it is especially well suited to chaotic signals because trajectories that are adjacent in phase space move apart from each other at an exponential rate.

  10. Final Technical Report: Increasing Prediction Accuracy.

    SciTech Connect

    King, Bruce Hardison; Hansen, Clifford; Stein, Joshua

    2015-12-01

    PV performance models are used to quantify the value of PV plants in a given location. They combine the performance characteristics of the system, the measured or predicted irradiance and weather at a site, and the system configuration and design into a prediction of the amount of energy that will be produced by a PV system. These predictions must be as accurate as possible in order for finance charges to be minimized. Higher accuracy equals lower project risk. The Increasing Prediction Accuracy project at Sandia focuses on quantifying and reducing uncertainties in PV system performance models.

  11. Is self-sufficiency financially viable and ethically justifiable?--a commercial viewpoint.

    PubMed

    Christie, R B

    1994-12-01

    Manufacturers of blood products have to maintain the highest possible standards for plasma screening and good manufacturing practices to ensure maximum purity and viral safety. The private sector companies have much experience in implementing and complying with national and international regulations. These requirements involve considerable cost in the areas of (1) plasma collection facilities, (2) research and clinical research, (3) manufacture, and (4) quality control. Total self-sufficiency would mean the loss of many existing resources. An alternative would be a collaboration between the public and private sectors to meet the needs of all patients who require plasma derived products. The current definition of self-sufficiency suggests that it is not financially viable.

  12. The necessary and sufficient conditions of therapeutic personality change: Reactions to Rogers' 1957 article.

    PubMed

    Samstag, Lisa Wallner

    2007-09-01

    Carl Rogers' article (see record 2007-14639-002) on the necessary and sufficient conditions for personality change has had a significant impact on the field of psychotherapy and psychotherapy research. He emphasized the client as arbiter of his or her own subjective experience and tested his hypothesized therapist-offered conditions of change using recorded sessions. This aided in demystifying the therapeutic process and led to a radical shift in the listening stance of the therapist. I briefly outline my views regarding the influence of the ideas presented in this work, describe the intellectual and cultural context of the times, and discuss a number of ways in which the therapist-offered conditions for psychological transformation are neither necessary nor sufficient. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved).

  13. Stable dynamics in forced systems with sufficiently high/low forcing frequency.

    PubMed

    Bartuccelli, M; Gentile, G; Wright, J A

    2016-08-01

    We consider parametrically forced Hamiltonian systems with one-and-a-half degrees of freedom and study the stability of the dynamics when the frequency of the forcing is relatively high or low. We show that, provided the frequency is sufficiently high, Kolmogorov-Arnold-Moser (KAM) theorem may be applied even when the forcing amplitude is far away from the perturbation regime. A similar result is obtained for sufficiently low frequency, but in that case we need the amplitude of the forcing to be not too large; however, we are still able to consider amplitudes which are outside of the perturbation regime. In addition, we find numerically that the dynamics may be stable even when the forcing amplitude is very large, well beyond the range of validity of the analytical results, provided the frequency of the forcing is taken correspondingly low. PMID:27586604

  14. Is self-sufficiency financially viable and ethically justifiable?--a commercial viewpoint.

    PubMed

    Christie, R B

    1994-12-01

    Manufacturers of blood products have to maintain the highest possible standards for plasma screening and good manufacturing practices to ensure maximum purity and viral safety. The private sector companies have much experience in implementing and complying with national and international regulations. These requirements involve considerable cost in the areas of (1) plasma collection facilities, (2) research and clinical research, (3) manufacture, and (4) quality control. Total self-sufficiency would mean the loss of many existing resources. An alternative would be a collaboration between the public and private sectors to meet the needs of all patients who require plasma derived products. The current definition of self-sufficiency suggests that it is not financially viable. PMID:7795138

  15. Stable dynamics in forced systems with sufficiently high/low forcing frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartuccelli, M.; Gentile, G.; Wright, J. A.

    2016-08-01

    We consider parametrically forced Hamiltonian systems with one-and-a-half degrees of freedom and study the stability of the dynamics when the frequency of the forcing is relatively high or low. We show that, provided the frequency is sufficiently high, Kolmogorov-Arnold-Moser (KAM) theorem may be applied even when the forcing amplitude is far away from the perturbation regime. A similar result is obtained for sufficiently low frequency, but in that case we need the amplitude of the forcing to be not too large; however, we are still able to consider amplitudes which are outside of the perturbation regime. In addition, we find numerically that the dynamics may be stable even when the forcing amplitude is very large, well beyond the range of validity of the analytical results, provided the frequency of the forcing is taken correspondingly low.

  16. Linear stable unity-feedback system - Necessary and sufficient conditions for stability under nonlinear plant perturbations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desoer, C. A.; Kabuli, M. G.

    1989-01-01

    The authors consider a linear (not necessarily time-invariant) stable unity-feedback system, where the plant and the compensator have normalized right-coprime factorizations. They study two cases of nonlinear plant perturbations (additive and feedback), with four subcases resulting from: (1) allowing exogenous input to Delta P or not; 2) allowing the observation of the output of Delta P or not. The plant perturbation Delta P is not required to be stable. Using the factorization approach, the authors obtain necessary and sufficient conditions for all cases in terms of two pairs of nonlinear pseudostate maps. Simple physical considerations explain the form of these necessary and sufficient conditions. Finally, the authors obtain the characterization of all perturbations Delta P for which the perturbed system remains stable.

  17. Sufficiency of Mesolimbic Dopamine Neuron Stimulation for the Progression to Addiction.

    PubMed

    Pascoli, Vincent; Terrier, Jean; Hiver, Agnès; Lüscher, Christian

    2015-12-01

    The factors causing the transition from recreational drug consumption to addiction remain largely unknown. It has not been tested whether dopamine (DA) is sufficient to trigger this process. Here we use optogenetic self-stimulation of DA neurons of the ventral tegmental area (VTA) to selectively mimic the defining commonality of addictive drugs. All mice readily acquired self-stimulation. After weeks of abstinence, cue-induced relapse was observed in parallel with a potentiation of excitatory afferents onto D1 receptor-expressing neurons of the nucleus accumbens (NAc). When the mice had to endure a mild electric foot shock to obtain a stimulation, some stopped while others persevered. The resistance to punishment was associated with enhanced neural activity in the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) while chemogenetic inhibition of the OFC reduced compulsivity. Together, these results show that stimulating VTA DA neurons induces behavioral and cellular hallmarks of addiction, indicating sufficiency for the induction and progression of the disease.

  18. Sufficiency of Mesolimbic Dopamine Neuron Stimulation for the Progression to Addiction.

    PubMed

    Pascoli, Vincent; Terrier, Jean; Hiver, Agnès; Lüscher, Christian

    2015-12-01

    The factors causing the transition from recreational drug consumption to addiction remain largely unknown. It has not been tested whether dopamine (DA) is sufficient to trigger this process. Here we use optogenetic self-stimulation of DA neurons of the ventral tegmental area (VTA) to selectively mimic the defining commonality of addictive drugs. All mice readily acquired self-stimulation. After weeks of abstinence, cue-induced relapse was observed in parallel with a potentiation of excitatory afferents onto D1 receptor-expressing neurons of the nucleus accumbens (NAc). When the mice had to endure a mild electric foot shock to obtain a stimulation, some stopped while others persevered. The resistance to punishment was associated with enhanced neural activity in the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) while chemogenetic inhibition of the OFC reduced compulsivity. Together, these results show that stimulating VTA DA neurons induces behavioral and cellular hallmarks of addiction, indicating sufficiency for the induction and progression of the disease. PMID:26586182

  19. Featural information is sufficient to produce a left cheek bias for happiness perception.

    PubMed

    Low, Jia Y; Lindell, Annukka K

    2016-08-01

    People perceive the left cheek as more emotionally expressive than the right. Both configural and featural information enable the evaluation of emotional expressions; whether they make equivalent contributions to the left cheek bias is undetermined. As scrambling faces disrupts configural processing whilst leaving featural information intact, we investigated whether configural information is necessary, or featural information is sufficient, to induce a left cheek bias for emotion perception. Eighty-one participants (65 F, 16 M) viewed two types of left and right cheek image pairs - normal, scrambled - and indicated which image appeared happier (half mirror-reversed to control for perceptual biases). Results indicated a left cheek bias for both normal and scrambled faces, irrespective of mirror reversal. As scrambling faces disrupts configural processing, the fact that the left cheek was perceived as more expressive even when scrambled confirms that differences between the cheeks' featural information are sufficient to induce the left cheek bias. PMID:27363004

  20. The necessary and sufficient conditions of therapeutic personality change: Reactions to Rogers' 1957 article.

    PubMed

    Samstag, Lisa Wallner

    2007-09-01

    Carl Rogers' article (see record 2007-14639-002) on the necessary and sufficient conditions for personality change has had a significant impact on the field of psychotherapy and psychotherapy research. He emphasized the client as arbiter of his or her own subjective experience and tested his hypothesized therapist-offered conditions of change using recorded sessions. This aided in demystifying the therapeutic process and led to a radical shift in the listening stance of the therapist. I briefly outline my views regarding the influence of the ideas presented in this work, describe the intellectual and cultural context of the times, and discuss a number of ways in which the therapist-offered conditions for psychological transformation are neither necessary nor sufficient. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:22122256

  1. Retrocausal Effects as a Consequence of Quantum Mechanics Refined to Accommodate the Principle of Sufficient Reason

    SciTech Connect

    Stapp, Henry P.

    2011-05-10

    The principle of sufficient reason asserts that anything that happens does so for a reason: no definite state of affairs can come into being unless there is a sufficient reason why that particular thing should happen. This principle is usually attributed to Leibniz, although the first recorded Western philosopher to use it was Anaximander of Miletus. The demand that nature be rational, in the sense that it be compatible with the principle of sufficient reason, conflicts with a basic feature of contemporary orthodox physical theory, namely the notion that nature's response to the probing action of an observer is determined by pure chance, and hence on the basis of absolutely no reason at all. This appeal to pure chance can be deemed to have no rational fundamental place in reason-based Western science. It is argued here, on the basis of the other basic principles of quantum physics, that in a world that conforms to the principle of sufficient reason, the usual quantum statistical rules will naturally emerge at the pragmatic level, in cases where the reason behind nature's choice of response is unknown, but that the usual statistics can become biased in an empirically manifest way when the reason for the choice is empirically identifiable. It is shown here that if the statistical laws of quantum mechanics were to be biased in this way then the basically forward-in-time unfolding of empirical reality described by orthodox quantum mechanics would generate the appearances of backward-time-effects of the kind that have been reported in the scientific literature.

  2. Getting to necessary and sufficient-developing accident scenarios for risk assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Mahn, J.A.

    1996-05-01

    This paper presents a simple, systematic approach for developing accident scenarios using generic accident types. Result is a necessary and sufficient set of accident scenarios that can be used to establish the safety envelope for a facility or operation. Us of this approach along with the methodology of SAND95-0320 will yield more consistent accident analyses between facilities and provide a sound basis for allocating limited risk reduction resources.

  3. Chinmo is sufficient to induce male fate in somatic cells of the adult Drosophila ovary.

    PubMed

    Ma, Qing; de Cuevas, Margaret; Matunis, Erika L

    2016-03-01

    Sexual identity is continuously maintained in specific differentiated cell types long after sex determination occurs during development. In the adult Drosophila testis, the putative transcription factor Chronologically inappropriate morphogenesis (Chinmo) acts with the canonical male sex determinant DoublesexM (Dsx(M)) to maintain the male identity of somatic cyst stem cells and their progeny. Here we find that ectopic expression of chinmo is sufficient to induce a male identity in adult ovarian somatic cells, but it acts through a Dsx(M)-independent mechanism. Conversely, the feminization of the testis somatic stem cell lineage caused by loss of chinmo is enhanced by expression of the canonical female sex determinant Dsx(F), indicating that chinmo acts in parallel with the canonical sex determination pathway to maintain the male identity of testis somatic cells. Consistent with this finding, ectopic expression of female sex determinants in the adult testis disrupts tissue morphology. The miRNA let-7 downregulates chinmo in many contexts, and ectopic expression of let-7 in the adult testis is sufficient to recapitulate the chinmo loss-of-function phenotype, but we find no apparent phenotypes upon removal of let-7 in the adult ovary or testis. Our finding that chinmo is necessary and sufficient to promote a male identity in adult gonadal somatic cells suggests that the sexual identity of somatic cells can be reprogrammed in the adult Drosophila ovary as well as in the testis. PMID:26811385

  4. Quantum Markov chains, sufficiency of quantum channels, and Rényi information measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, Nilanjana; Wilde, Mark M.

    2015-12-01

    A short quantum Markov chain is a tripartite state {ρ }{ABC} such that system A can be recovered perfectly by acting on system C of the reduced state {ρ }{BC}. Such states have conditional mutual information I(A;B| C) equal to zero and are the only states with this property. A quantum channel {N} is sufficient for two states ρ and σ if there exists a recovery channel using which one can perfectly recover ρ from {N}(ρ ) and σ from {N}(σ ). The relative entropy difference D(ρ \\parallel σ )-D({N}(ρ )\\parallel {N}(σ )) is equal to zero if and only if {N} is sufficient for ρ and σ. In this paper, we show that these properties extend to Rényi generalizations of these information measures which were proposed in (Berta et al 2015 J. Math. Phys. 56 022205; Seshadreesan et al 2015 J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 48 395303), thus providing an alternate characterization of short quantum Markov chains and sufficient quantum channels. These results give further support to these quantities as being legitimate Rényi generalizations of the conditional mutual information and the relative entropy difference. Along the way, we solve some open questions of Ruskai and Zhang, regarding the trace of particular matrices that arise in the study of monotonicity of relative entropy under quantum operations and strong subadditivity of the von Neumann entropy.

  5. Vimentin is sufficient and required for wound repair and remodeling in alveolar epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Rogel, Micah R.; Soni, Pritin N.; Troken, James R.; Sitikov, Albert; Trejo, Humberto E.; Ridge, Karen M.

    2011-01-01

    The physiological and pathophysiological implications of the expression of vimentin, a type III intermediate filament protein, in alveolar epithelial cells (AECs) are unknown. We provide data demonstrating that vimentin is regulated by TGFβ1, a major cytokine released in response to acute lung injury and that vimentin is required for wound repair and remodeling of the alveolar epithelium. Quantitative real-time PCR shows a 16-fold induction of vimentin mRNA in TGFβ1-treated transformed AECs. Luciferase assays identify a Smad-binding element in the 5′ promoter of vimentin responsible for TGFβ1-induced transcription. Notably, TGFβ1 induces vimentin protein expression in AECs, which is associated with a 2.5-fold increase in cell motility, resulting in increased rates of migration and wound closure. These effects are independent of cell proliferation. TGFβ1-mediated vimentin protein expression, cell migration, and wound closure are prevented by a pharmacological inhibitor of the Smad pathway and by expression of Ad-shRNA against vimentin. Conversely, overexpression of mEmerald-vimentin is sufficient for increased cell-migration and wound-closure rates. These results demonstrate that vimentin is required and sufficient for increased wound repair in an in vitro model of lung injury.—Rogel, M. R., Soni, P. N., Troken, J. R., Sitikov, A., Trejo, H. E., Ridge, K. M. Vimentin is sufficient and required for wound repair and remodeling in alveolar epithelial cells. PMID:21803859

  6. A novel class of self-sufficient cytochrome P450 monooxygenases in prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    De Mot, René; Parret, Annabel H A

    2002-11-01

    The Bacillus cytochrome P450 BM3 integrates an entire P450 system in one polypeptide and represents a convenient prokaryotic model for microsomal P450s. This self-sufficient class II P450 is also present in actinomycetes and fungi. By genome analysis we have identified additional homologues in the pathogenic species Bacillus anthracis and Bacillus cereus, and in Ralstonia metallidurans. This analysis also revealed a novel class of putative self-sufficient P450s, P450 PFOR, comprising a class I P450 that is related to Rhodococcus erythropolis CYP116, and a phthalate family oxygenase reductase (PFOR) module. P450 PFOR genes are found in a Rhodococcus strain, three pathogenic Burkholderia species and in the R. metallidurans strain that possesses a P450 BM3 homologue. Co-evolution of P450 and reductase domains is apparent in both types of self-sufficient enzymes. The new class of P450 enzymes is of potential interest for various biotechnological applications. PMID:12419614

  7. Perils of Standardized Achievement Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haladyna, Thomas M.

    2006-01-01

    This article argues that the validity of standardized achievement test-score interpretation and use is problematic; consequently, confidence and trust in such test scores may often be unwarranted. The problem is particularly severe in high-stakes situations. This essay provides a context for understanding standardized achievement testing, then…

  8. Poor Results for High Achievers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bui, Sa; Imberman, Scott; Craig, Steven

    2012-01-01

    Three million students in the United States are classified as gifted, yet little is known about the effectiveness of traditional gifted and talented (G&T) programs. In theory, G&T programs might help high-achieving students because they group them with other high achievers and typically offer specially trained teachers and a more advanced…

  9. Parental Involvement and Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwin, Sarah Christine

    2015-01-01

    This research study examined the correlation between student achievement and parent's perceptions of their involvement in their child's schooling. Parent participants completed the Parent Involvement Project Parent Questionnaire. Results slightly indicated parents of students with higher level of achievement perceived less demand or invitations…

  10. Examination Regimes and Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cosentino de Cohen, Clemencia

    2010-01-01

    Examination regimes at the end of secondary school vary greatly intra- and cross-nationally, and in recent years have undergone important reforms often geared towards increasing student achievement. This research presents a comparative analysis of the relationship between examination regimes and student achievement in the OECD. Using a micro…

  11. General Achievement Trends: New Jersey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  12. Teaching the Low Level Achiever.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salomone, Ronald E., Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Intended for teachers of the English language arts, the articles in this issue offer suggestions and techniques for teaching the low level achiever. Titles and authors of the articles are as follows: (1) "A Point to Ponder" (Rachel Martin); (2) "Tracking: A Self-Fulfilling Prophecy of Failure for the Low Level Achiever" (James Christopher Davis);…

  13. Family Status and School Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chalker, Rhoda N.; Horns, Virginia

    This study tested the hypothesis that there is no significant difference in reading achievement among children in grades 2 through 5 related to family structure. Researchers administered the Stanford Achievement Test to 119 students in an Alabama city suburban school system. Of the sample, 69 children lived in intact families and 50 lived in…

  14. General Achievement Trends: North Carolina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  15. Classroom Composition and Achievement Gains.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leiter, Jeffrey

    1983-01-01

    Third-grade students in high ability groups in mathematics achieved greater gains than students in low ability groups. The opposite results occurred in reading achievement. Possible reasons for this difference include different instructional techniques for reading and math and the effect of home environment on learning. (IS)

  16. Raising Boys' Achievement in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bleach, Kevan, Ed.

    This book offers insights into the range of strategies and good practice being used to raise the achievement of boys. Case studies by school-based practitioners suggest ideas and measures to address the issue of achievement by boys. The contributions are: (1) "Why the Likely Lads Lag Behind" (Kevan Bleach); (2) "Helping Boys Do Better in Their…

  17. School Size and Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riggen, Vicki

    2013-01-01

    This study examined whether a relationship between high school size and student achievement exists in Illinois public high schools in reading and math, as measured by the Prairie State Achievement Exam (PSAE), which is administered to all Illinois 11th-grade students. This study also examined whether the factors of socioeconomic status, English…

  18. Stress Correlates and Academic Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bentley, Donna Anderson; And Others

    An ongoing concern for educators is the identification of factors that contribute to or are associated with academic achievement; one such group of variables that has received little attention are those involving stress. The relationship between perceived sources of stress and academic achievement was examined to determine if reactions to stress…

  19. Metrical Patterns of Words and Production Accuracy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Richard G.; Goffman, Lisa

    1995-01-01

    This study examined the influence of metrical patterns (syllable stress and serial position) of words on the production accuracy of 20 children (ages 22 months to 28 months). Among results were that one-fourth of the initial unstressed syllables were omitted and that consonant omissions, though few, tended to occur in the initial position.…

  20. The Accuracy of Academic Gender Stereotypes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beyer, Sylvia

    1999-01-01

    Assessed the accuracy of academic gender stereotypes by asking 265 college students to estimate the percentage of male and female students and their grade point averages (GPAs) and comparing these to the actual percentage of male and female students and GPAs. Results show the inaccuracies of academic gender stereotypes. (SLD)

  1. Accuracy of Digital vs. Conventional Implant Impressions

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang J.; Betensky, Rebecca A.; Gianneschi, Grace E.; Gallucci, German O.

    2015-01-01

    The accuracy of digital impressions greatly influences the clinical viability in implant restorations. The aim of this study is to compare the accuracy of gypsum models acquired from the conventional implant impression to digitally milled models created from direct digitalization by three-dimensional analysis. Thirty gypsum and 30 digitally milled models impressed directly from a reference model were prepared. The models were scanned by a laboratory scanner and 30 STL datasets from each group were imported to an inspection software. The datasets were aligned to the reference dataset by a repeated best fit algorithm and 10 specified contact locations of interest were measured in mean volumetric deviations. The areas were pooled by cusps, fossae, interproximal contacts, horizontal and vertical axes of implant position and angulation. The pooled areas were statistically analysed by comparing each group to the reference model to investigate the mean volumetric deviations accounting for accuracy and standard deviations for precision. Milled models from digital impressions had comparable accuracy to gypsum models from conventional impressions. However, differences in fossae and vertical displacement of the implant position from the gypsum and digitally milled models compared to the reference model, exhibited statistical significance (p<0.001, p=0.020 respectively). PMID:24720423

  2. Bullet trajectory reconstruction - Methods, accuracy and precision.

    PubMed

    Mattijssen, Erwin J A T; Kerkhoff, Wim

    2016-05-01

    Based on the spatial relation between a primary and secondary bullet defect or on the shape and dimensions of the primary bullet defect, a bullet's trajectory prior to impact can be estimated for a shooting scene reconstruction. The accuracy and precision of the estimated trajectories will vary depending on variables such as, the applied method of reconstruction, the (true) angle of incidence, the properties of the target material and the properties of the bullet upon impact. This study focused on the accuracy and precision of estimated bullet trajectories when different variants of the probing method, ellipse method, and lead-in method are applied on bullet defects resulting from shots at various angles of incidence on drywall, MDF and sheet metal. The results show that in most situations the best performance (accuracy and precision) is seen when the probing method is applied. Only for the lowest angles of incidence the performance was better when either the ellipse or lead-in method was applied. The data provided in this paper can be used to select the appropriate method(s) for reconstruction and to correct for systematic errors (accuracy) and to provide a value of the precision, by means of a confidence interval of the specific measurement. PMID:27044032

  3. 47 CFR 65.306 - Calculation accuracy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Calculation accuracy. 65.306 Section 65.306 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) INTERSTATE RATE OF RETURN PRESCRIPTION PROCEDURES AND METHODOLOGIES Exchange Carriers § 65.306 Calculation...

  4. Accuracy of Information Processing under Focused Attention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bastick, Tony

    This paper reports the results of an experiment on the accuracy of information processing during attention focused arousal under two conditions: single estimation and double estimation. The attention of 187 college students was focused by a task requiring high level competition for a monetary prize ($10) under severely limited time conditions. The…

  5. Accuracy Assessment for AG500, Electromagnetic Articulograph

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yunusova, Yana; Green, Jordan R.; Mefferd, Antje

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The goal of this article was to evaluate the accuracy and reliability of the AG500 (Carstens Medizinelectronik, Lenglern, Germany), an electromagnetic device developed recently to register articulatory movements in three dimensions. This technology seems to have unprecedented capabilities to provide rich information about time-varying…

  6. Seasonal Effects on GPS PPP Accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saracoglu, Aziz; Ugur Sanli, D.

    2016-04-01

    GPS Precise Point Positioning (PPP) is now routinely used in many geophysical applications. Static positioning and 24 h data are requested for high precision results however real life situations do not always let us collect 24 h data. Thus repeated GPS surveys of 8-10 h observation sessions are still used by some research groups. Positioning solutions from shorter data spans are subject to various systematic influences, and the positioning quality as well as the estimated velocity is degraded. Researchers pay attention to the accuracy of GPS positions and of the estimated velocities derived from short observation sessions. Recently some research groups turned their attention to the study of seasonal effects (i.e. meteorological seasons) on GPS solutions. Up to now usually regional studies have been reported. In this study, we adopt a global approach and study the various seasonal effects (including the effect of the annual signal) on GPS solutions produced from short observation sessions. We use the PPP module of the NASA/JPL's GIPSY/OASIS II software and globally distributed GPS stations' data of the International GNSS Service. Accuracy studies previously performed with 10-30 consecutive days of continuous data. Here, data from each month of a year, incorporating two years in succession, is used in the analysis. Our major conclusion is that a reformulation for the GPS positioning accuracy is necessary when taking into account the seasonal effects, and typical one term accuracy formulation is expanded to a two-term one.

  7. Accuracy investigation of phthalate metabolite standards.

    PubMed

    Langlois, Éric; Leblanc, Alain; Simard, Yves; Thellen, Claude

    2012-05-01

    Phthalates are ubiquitous compounds whose metabolites are usually determined in urine for biomonitoring studies. Following suspect and unexplained results from our laboratory in an external quality-assessment scheme, we investigated the accuracy of all phthalate metabolite standards in our possession by comparing them with those of several suppliers. Our findings suggest that commercial phthalate metabolite certified solutions are not always accurate and that lot-to-lot discrepancies significantly affect the accuracy of the results obtained with several of these standards. These observations indicate that the reliability of the results obtained from different lots of standards is not equal, which reduces the possibility of intra-laboratory and inter-laboratory comparisons of results. However, agreements of accuracy have been observed for a majority of neat standards obtained from different suppliers, which indicates that a solution to this issue is available. Data accuracy of phthalate metabolites should be of concern for laboratories performing phthalate metabolite analysis because of the standards used. The results of our investigation are presented from the perspective that laboratories performing phthalate metabolite analysis can obtain accurate and comparable results in the future. Our findings will contribute to improving the quality of future phthalate metabolite analyses and will affect the interpretation of past results.

  8. Accuracy of References in Five Entomology Journals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kristof, Cynthia

    ln this paper, the bibliographical references in five core entomology journals are examined for citation accuracy in order to determine if the error rates are similar. Every reference printed in each journal's first issue of 1992 was examined, and these were compared to the original (cited) publications, if possible, in order to determine the…

  9. Task Speed and Accuracy Decrease When Multitasking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Lin; Cockerham, Deborah; Chang, Zhengsi; Natividad, Gloria

    2016-01-01

    As new technologies increase the opportunities for multitasking, the need to understand human capacities for multitasking continues to grow stronger. Is multitasking helping us to be more efficient? This study investigated the multitasking abilities of 168 participants, ages 6-72, by measuring their task accuracy and completion time when they…

  10. High Accuracy Transistor Compact Model Calibrations

    SciTech Connect

    Hembree, Charles E.; Mar, Alan; Robertson, Perry J.

    2015-09-01

    Typically, transistors are modeled by the application of calibrated nominal and range models. These models consists of differing parameter values that describe the location and the upper and lower limits of a distribution of some transistor characteristic such as current capacity. Correspond- ingly, when using this approach, high degrees of accuracy of the transistor models are not expected since the set of models is a surrogate for a statistical description of the devices. The use of these types of models describes expected performances considering the extremes of process or transistor deviations. In contrast, circuits that have very stringent accuracy requirements require modeling techniques with higher accuracy. Since these accurate models have low error in transistor descriptions, these models can be used to describe part to part variations as well as an accurate description of a single circuit instance. Thus, models that meet these stipulations also enable the calculation of quantifi- cation of margins with respect to a functional threshold and uncertainties in these margins. Given this need, new model high accuracy calibration techniques for bipolar junction transis- tors have been developed and are described in this report.

  11. Adult Metacomprehension: Judgment Processes and Accuracy Constraints

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhao, Qin; Linderholm, Tracy

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to review and synthesize two interrelated topics in the adult metacomprehension literature: the bases of metacomprehension judgment and the constraints on metacomprehension accuracy. Our review shows that adult readers base their metacomprehension judgments on different types of information, including experiences…

  12. Observed Consultation: Confidence and Accuracy of Assessors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tweed, Mike; Ingham, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    Judgments made by the assessors observing consultations are widely used in the assessment of medical students. The aim of this research was to study judgment accuracy and confidence and the relationship between these. Assessors watched recordings of consultations, scoring the students on: a checklist of items; attributes of consultation; a…

  13. Accuracy Of Stereometry In Assessing Orthognathic Surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Geoffrey E.; Bays, R. A.

    1983-07-01

    An X-ray stereometric technique has been developed for the determination of 3-dimensional coordinates of spherical metallic markers previously implanted in monkey skulls. The accuracy of the technique is better than 0.5mm. and uses readily available demountable X-ray equipment. The technique is used to study the effects and stability of experimental orthognathic surgery.

  14. Proper installation ensures turbine meter accuracy

    SciTech Connect

    Peace, D.W.

    1995-07-01

    Turbine meters are widely used for natural gas measurement and provide high accuracy over large ranges of operation. However, as with many other types of flowmeters, consideration must be given to the design of the turbine meter and the installation piping practice to ensure high-accuracy measurement. National and international standards include guidelines for proper turbine meter installation piping and methods for evaluating the effects of flow disturbances on the design of those meters. Swirl or non-uniform velocity profiles, such as jetting, at the turbine meter inlet can cause undesirable accuracy performance changes. Sources of these types of flow disturbances can be from the installation piping configuration, an upstream regulator, a throttled valve, or a partial blockage upstream of the meter. Test results on the effects of swirl and jetting on different types of meter designs and sizes emphasize the need to consider good engineering design for turbine meters, including integral flow conditioning vanes and adequate installation piping practices for high accuracy measurement.

  15. Direct Behavior Rating: Considerations for Rater Accuracy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, Sayward E.; Riley-Tillman, T. Chris; Chafouleas, Sandra M.

    2014-01-01

    Direct behavior rating (DBR) offers users a flexible, feasible method for the collection of behavioral data. Previous research has supported the validity of using DBR to rate three target behaviors: academic engagement, disruptive behavior, and compliance. However, the effect of the base rate of behavior on rater accuracy has not been established.…

  16. Highly Spinning Initial Data: Gauges and Accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zlochower, Yosef; Ruchlin, Ian; Healy, James; Lousto, Carlos

    2016-03-01

    We recently developed a code for solving the 3+1 system of constraints for highly-spinning black-hole binary initial data in the puncture formalism. Here we explore how different choices of gauge for the background metric improve both the efficiency and accuracy of the initial data solver and the subsequent fully nonlinear numerical evolutions of these data.

  17. Analyzing thematic maps and mapping for accuracy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosenfield, G.H.

    1982-01-01

    Two problems which exist while attempting to test the accuracy of thematic maps and mapping are: (1) evaluating the accuracy of thematic content, and (2) evaluating the effects of the variables on thematic mapping. Statistical analysis techniques are applicable to both these problems and include techniques for sampling the data and determining their accuracy. In addition, techniques for hypothesis testing, or inferential statistics, are used when comparing the effects of variables. A comprehensive and valid accuracy test of a classification project, such as thematic mapping from remotely sensed data, includes the following components of statistical analysis: (1) sample design, including the sample distribution, sample size, size of the sample unit, and sampling procedure; and (2) accuracy estimation, including estimation of the variance and confidence limits. Careful consideration must be given to the minimum sample size necessary to validate the accuracy of a given. classification category. The results of an accuracy test are presented in a contingency table sometimes called a classification error matrix. Usually the rows represent the interpretation, and the columns represent the verification. The diagonal elements represent the correct classifications. The remaining elements of the rows represent errors by commission, and the remaining elements of the columns represent the errors of omission. For tests of hypothesis that compare variables, the general practice has been to use only the diagonal elements from several related classification error matrices. These data are arranged in the form of another contingency table. The columns of the table represent the different variables being compared, such as different scales of mapping. The rows represent the blocking characteristics, such as the various categories of classification. The values in the cells of the tables might be the counts of correct classification or the binomial proportions of these counts divided by

  18. The impact of accuracy motivation on interpretation, comparison, and correction processes: accuracy x knowledge accessibility effects.

    PubMed

    Stapel, D A; Koomen, W; Zeelenberg, M

    1998-04-01

    Four studies provide evidence for the notion that there may be boundaries to the extent to which accuracy motivation may help perceivers to escape the influence of fortuitously activated information. Specifically, although accuracy motivations may eliminate assimilative accessibility effects, they are less likely to eliminate contrastive accessibility effects. It was found that the occurrence of different types of contrast effects (comparison and correction) was not significantly affected by participants' accuracy motivations. Furthermore, it was found that the mechanisms instigated by accuracy motivations differ from those ignited by correction instructions: Accuracy motivations attenuate assimilation effects because perceivers add target interpretations to the one suggested by primed information. Conversely, it was found that correction instructions yield contrast and prompt respondents to remove the priming event's influence from their reaction to the target. PMID:9569650

  19. Analysis of deformable image registration accuracy using computational modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong Hualiang; Kim, Jinkoo; Chetty, Indrin J.

    2010-03-15

    Computer aided modeling of anatomic deformation, allowing various techniques and protocols in radiation therapy to be systematically verified and studied, has become increasingly attractive. In this study the potential issues in deformable image registration (DIR) were analyzed based on two numerical phantoms: One, a synthesized, low intensity gradient prostate image, and the other a lung patient's CT image data set. Each phantom was modeled with region-specific material parameters with its deformation solved using a finite element method. The resultant displacements were used to construct a benchmark to quantify the displacement errors of the Demons and B-Spline-based registrations. The results show that the accuracy of these registration algorithms depends on the chosen parameters, the selection of which is closely associated with the intensity gradients of the underlying images. For the Demons algorithm, both single resolution (SR) and multiresolution (MR) registrations required approximately 300 iterations to reach an accuracy of 1.4 mm mean error in the lung patient's CT image (and 0.7 mm mean error averaged in the lung only). For the low gradient prostate phantom, these algorithms (both SR and MR) required at least 1600 iterations to reduce their mean errors to 2 mm. For the B-Spline algorithms, best performance (mean errors of 1.9 mm for SR and 1.6 mm for MR, respectively) on the low gradient prostate was achieved using five grid nodes in each direction. Adding more grid nodes resulted in larger errors. For the lung patient's CT data set, the B-Spline registrations required ten grid nodes in each direction for highest accuracy (1.4 mm for SR and 1.5 mm for MR). The numbers of iterations or grid nodes required for optimal registrations depended on the intensity gradients of the underlying images. In summary, the performance of the Demons and B-Spline registrations have been quantitatively evaluated using numerical phantoms. The results show that parameter

  20. Mathematics anxiety and mathematics achievement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, Brian F.; Wither (Post.), David P.

    2003-09-01

    This paper is a distillation of the major result from the 1998 Ph.D. thesis of the late David Wither. It details a longitudinal study over five years of the relationship between mathematics anxiety and mathematics achievement. It starts from the already well documented negative correlation between the two, and seeks to establish one of the three hypotheses—that mathematics anxiety causes an impairment of mathematics achievement; that lack of mathematics achievement causes mathematics anxiety; or that there is a third underlying cause of the two.