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Sample records for achieve sustained erythroid

  1. Using Design To Achieve Sustainability

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sustainability is defined as meeting the needs of this generation without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their needs. This is a conditional statement that places the responsibility for achieving sustainability squarely in hands of designers and planners....

  2. BVL-1-like VL30 promoter sustains long-term expression in erythroid progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Staplin, William R; Knezetic, Joseph A

    2003-03-01

    Congenital blood disorders are common and yet clinically challenging globin disorders. Gene therapy continues to serve as a potential therapeutic method to treat these disorders. While tremendous advances have been made in vivo, gene delivery protocols and vector prototypes still require optimization. Alternative cis-acting promoter elements derived from VL30 retroelements have been effective in expressing tissue-specific transgene expression in vivo in nonerythroid cells. VL30 promoter elements were isolated from ELM-I-1 erythroid progenitor cells upon erythropoietin (epo) treatment. These promoters were inserted into a VL30-derived expression vector and reintroduced into the ELM-I-1 cells. beta-Galactosidase reporter gene activity from the ELM 5 clone, a BVL-1-like VL30 promoter, was capable of expressing sustained levels of the transgene expression over a 16-week assay period. These findings delineate the potential utility of these retroelement promoters as transcriptionally active, erythroid-specific, long terminal repeat (LTR) components for current globin vector constructs.

  3. Achieving sustainable cultivation of potatoes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Every phase of the production cycle impacts the sustainability of potato. Potato physiology determines how genetically encoded developmental attributes interact with local environmental conditions as modified through agricultural practice to produce a perishable crop. In this chapter we highlight ho...

  4. Achieving a sustainable service advantage.

    PubMed

    Coyne, K P

    1993-01-01

    Many managers believe that superior service should play little or no role in competitive strategy; they maintain that service innovations are inherently copiable. However, the author states that this view is too narrow. For a company to achieve a lasting service advantage, it must base a new service on a capability gap that competitors cannot or will not copy.

  5. Achieving and sustaining full employment.

    PubMed

    Rosen, S M

    1995-01-01

    Human rights and public health considerations provide strong support for policies that maximize employment. Ample historical and conceptual evidence supports the feasibility of full employment policies. New factors affecting the labor force, the rate of technological change, and the globalization of economic activity require appropriate policies--international as well as national--but do not invalidate the ability of modern states to apply the measures needed. Among these the most important include: (I) systematic reduction in working time with no loss of income, (2) active labor market policies, (3) use of fiscal and monetary measures to sustain the needed level of aggregate demand, (4) restoration of equal bargaining power between labor and capital, (5) social investment in neglected and outmoded infrastructure, (6) accountability of corporations for decisions to shift or reduce capital investment, (7) major reductions in military spending, to be replaced by socially needed and economically productive expenditures, (8) direct public sector job creation, (9) reform of monetary policy to restore emphasis on minimizing unemployment and promoting full employment. None are without precedent in modern economies. The obstacles are ideological and political. To overcome them will require intellectual clarity and effective advocacy.

  6. Activation of Stat 5b in erythroid progenitors correlates with the ability of ErbB to induce sustained cell proliferation.

    PubMed Central

    Mellitzer, G; Wessely, O; Decker, T; Meinke, A; Hayman, M J; Beug, H

    1996-01-01

    Self renewal of normal erythroid progenitors is induced by the receptor tyrosine kinase c-ErbB, whereas other receptors (c-Kit/Epo-R) regulate erythroid differentiation. To address possible mechanisms that could explain this selective activity of c-ErbB, we analyzed the ability of these receptors to activate the different members of the Stat transcription factor family. Ligand activation of c-ErbB induced the tyrosine phosphorylation, DNA-binding, and reporter gene transcription of Stat 5b in erythroblasts. In contrast, ligand activation of c-Kit was unable to induce any of these effects in the same cells. Activation of the erythropoietin receptor caused specific DNA-binding of Stat 5b, but failed to induce reporter gene transcription. These biochemical findings correlate perfectly with the selective ability of c-ErbB to cause sustained self renewal in erythroid progenitors. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8790376

  7. Factors Contributing to Institutions Achieving Environmental Sustainability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Matthew; Card, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to determine what factors contributed to three universities achieving environmental sustainability. Design/methodology/approach: A case study methodology was used to determine how each factor contributed to the institutions' sustainability. Site visits, fieldwork, document reviews, and interviews with…

  8. ACHIEVING SUSTAINABILITY - FINAL STEPS IN A DYNAMIC DANCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Achieving sustainability relies upon adequate metrics to evaluate the environment and guide decisions. Although adequate assessment is important to prescribing remedies, achieving a sustainable environment cannot be delayed. It must be achieved today as well as tomorrow so that t...

  9. Achieving true sustainability of zoo populations.

    PubMed

    Lacy, Robert C

    2013-01-01

    For the last 30 years, cooperative management of irreplaceable animal populations in zoos and aquariums has focused primarily on the goal of minimizing genetic decay within defined time frames, and large advances have been made in technologies to optimize genetic management of closed populations. However, recent analyses have shown that most zoo programs are not projected to meet their stated goals. This has been described as a lack of achieving "sustainability" of the populations, yet by definition a goal of managed decay is not a plan for sustainability. True sustainability requires management of the resource in manner that does not deplete its value for the future. Achieving such sustainability for many managed populations may require changing from managing isolated populations to managing populations that are part of a broader metapopulation, with carefully considered exchange between populations across a spectrum of ex situ to in situ. Managing zoo populations as components of comprehensive conservation strategies for the species will require research on determinants of various kinds of genetic, physiological, behavioral, and morphological variation and their roles in population viability, development of an array of management techniques and tools, training of population managers in metapopulation management and integrated conservation planning, and projections of impacts of management strategies on the viability of the captive populations and all populations that are interactively managed or affected. Such a shift in goals and methods would result in zoo population management being an ongoing part of species conservation rather than short-term or isolated from species conservation. Zoo Biol. 32:19-26, 2013. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Perspectives on achieving sustainable energy production and use

    EPA Science Inventory

    The traditional definition of sustainability calls for polices and strategies that meet society's present needs without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs. Achieving operational sustainability requires three critical elements: advances in scien...

  11. Language Teacher Action Research: Achieving Sustainability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Emily; Burns, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Action research (AR) is becoming increasingly popular in ELT contexts as a means of continuous professional development. The positive impacts of AR on language teacher development are well documented, but the important question of how those impacts can be sustained over time is virtually unexplored. Drawing on findings from a study of teachers in…

  12. ACHIEVING SUSTAINABILITY THROUGH LIFE CYCLE STRATEGIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sustainability is, of course, not a recent concept. But our understanding of what it means and what we need to do to meet the challenge it presents continues to grow. Throughout the ages, nations have had to address the issue of harmony between the environment, society and the e...

  13. Sustaining School Achievement in California's Elementary Schools after State Monitoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCabe, Molly

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the Academic Performance Index (API) and Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) achievement trends between 2004 and 2006 of 58 California public elementary schools after exiting state monitoring and investigated practices for sustaining consistent achievement growth. Statistical methods were used to analyze statewide achievement trends…

  14. Leadership Effects on Student Achievement and Sustained School Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobson, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of leadership on student achievement and sustained school success, especially in challenging, high-poverty schools. Design/methodology/approach: The paper combines a review of the leadership literature with findings drawn from longitudinal studies of the International Successful School…

  15. DEVELOPMENT AND APPLICATION OF PLANNING PROCESS TO ACHIEVE SUSTAINABILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Concepts of sustainability are numerous, widely discussed, and necessary, but sustainability needs to be applied to development projects to succeed. However, few applications are made and their measures are unclear. Sustainability indicators are typically used as measures, but ...

  16. The role of marine reserves in achieving sustainable fisheries

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Callum M.; Hawkins, Julie P.; Gell, Fiona R.

    2005-01-01

    Many fishery management tools currently in use have conservation value. They are designed to maintain stocks of commercially important species above target levels. However, their limitations are evident from continuing declines in fish stocks throughout the world. We make the case that to reverse fishery declines, safeguard marine life and sustain ecosystem processes, extensive marine reserves that are off limits to fishing must become part of the management strategy. Marine reserves should be incorporated into modern fishery management because they can achieve many things that conventional tools cannot. Only complete and permanent protection from fishing can protect the most sensitive habitats and vulnerable species. Only reserves will allow the development of natural, extended age structures of target species, maintain their genetic variability and prevent deleterious evolutionary change from the effects of fishing. Species with natural age structures will sustain higher rates of reproduction and will be more resilient to environmental variability. Higher stock levels maintained by reserves will provide insurance against management failure, including risk-prone quota setting, provided the broader conservation role of reserves is firmly established and legislatively protected. Fishery management measures outside protected areas are necessary to complement the protection offered by marine reserves, but cannot substitute for it. PMID:15713592

  17. Achieving and Maintaining Existing Building Sustainability Certification at Georgetown University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Payant, Richard P.

    2013-01-01

    Sustainability is the promotion of high performance, healthful, energy-efficient, and environmentally stable buildings. Buildings intended for sustainable certification must meet guidelines developed by the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) of the U.S. Green Building Council. The problem is that LEED certification often fails to…

  18. Achieving sustainable plant disease management through evolutionary principles.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Jiasui; Thrall, Peter H; Burdon, Jeremy J

    2014-09-01

    Plants and their pathogens are engaged in continuous evolutionary battles and sustainable disease management requires novel systems to create environments conducive for short-term and long-term disease control. In this opinion article, we argue that knowledge of the fundamental factors that drive host-pathogen coevolution in wild systems can provide new insights into disease development in agriculture. Such evolutionary principles can be used to guide the formulation of sustainable disease management strategies which can minimize disease epidemics while simultaneously reducing pressure on pathogens to evolve increased infectivity and aggressiveness. To ensure agricultural sustainability, disease management programs that reflect the dynamism of pathogen population structure are essential and evolutionary biologists should play an increasing role in their design.

  19. Is Sustainability Achievable? Exploring the Limits of Sustainability with Model Systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    Successful implementation of sustainability ideas in ecosystem management requires a basic understanding of the often nonlinear and non-intuitive relationships amongst different dimensions of sustainability, particularly the systemwide implications of human actions. This basic un...

  20. An international waste convention: measures for achieving sustainable development.

    PubMed

    Meyers, Gary D; McLeod, Glen; Anbarci, Melanie A

    2006-12-01

    Waste is a by-product of economic growth. Consequently, economic growth presents challenges for sustainable resource management and development because continued economic growth implies continued growth in waste outputs. Poor management of waste results in the inappropriate depletion of natural resources and potentially adverse effects on the environment, health and the economy. It is unsustainable. This paper begins by outlining the magnitude of and the current response to the growth in the quantity of waste outputs. This is followed by a consideration of why the international response to date, including the Rio Declaration and Agenda 21, fails to address the issue adequately. The paper concludes with a discussion on why and how an international treaty or other measure could advance sustainable development by providing an appropriate framework within which to address the problem.

  1. The mechanism of expansion of late erythroid progenitors during erythroid regeneration: target cells and effects of erythropoietin and interleukin-3.

    PubMed

    Umemura, T; Papayannopoulou, T; Stamatoyannopoulos, G

    1989-05-15

    Through immunologic means we have been able to separate primate bone marrow cells into populations containing late erythroid progenitors (colony forming units [CFUe] and e-clusters) but depleted of early erythroid progenitors (burst-forming units [BFUe]) or populations enriched in BFUe in relation to late progenitors. We used these fractionated populations in a two stage liquid/semisolid culture system and have assessed the effect of erythropoietin (Epo) and interleukin-3 (IL-3) on the proliferation and differentiation of erythroid progenitors in the presence or absence of early progenitors. We found that populations that contained CFUe but were depleted of BFUe failed to show any amplification of CFUe or e-clusters in the presence of Epo (or Epo plus IL-3). In contrast, populations containing BFUe yielded a striking (sixfold for CFUe; 23-fold for e-clusters) expansion of late progenitors in the presence of Epo. Maximum amplification (15-fold for CFUe; 32-fold for e-clusters) was achieved when both IL-3 and Epo were present in culture. Our results imply that CFUe and e-clusters lack the capacity to amplify their numbers and suggests that the expansion of late erythroid progenitors during rapid erythroid regeneration is accomplished by influx of BFUe rather than amplification of CFUe. These data are of relevance to models of acute marrow expansion and to the mechanism of activation of fetal hemoglobin production during rapid erythroid regeneration.

  2. Achieving high sustained performance in an unstructured mesh CFD application

    SciTech Connect

    Keyes, D E; Anderson, W K; Gropp, W D; Kaushik, D K; Smith, B F

    1999-12-10

    This paper highlights a three-year project by an interdisciplinary team on a legacy F77 computational fluid dynamics code, with the aim of demonstrating that implicit unstructured grid simulations can execute at rates not far from those of explicit structured grid codes, provided attention is paid to data motion complexity and the reuse of data positioned at the levels of the memory hierarchy closest to the processor, in addition to traditional operation count complexity. The demonstration code is from NASA and the enabling parallel hardware and (freely available) software toolkit are from DOE, but the resulting methodology should be broadly applicable, and the hardware limitations exposed should allow programmers and vendors of parallel platforms to focus with greater encouragement on sparse codes with indirect addressing. This snapshot of ongoing work shows a performance of 15 microseconds per degree of freedom to steady-state convergence of Euler flow on a mesh with 2.8 million vertices using 3072 dual-processor nodes of ASCI Red, corresponding to a sustained floating-point rate of 0.227 Tflop/s.

  3. A TWO CENTURY HISTORY OF PACIFIC NORTHWEST SALMON: LESSONS LEARNED FOR ACHIEVING A SUSTAINABLE FUTURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Achieving ecological sustainability is a daunting challenge. In the Pacific Northwest one of the most highly visible public policy debates concerns the future of salmon populations. Throughout the Pacific Northwest, many wild salmon stocks have declined and some have disappeare...

  4. The role of partnership functioning and synergy in achieving sustainability of innovative programmes in community care.

    PubMed

    Cramm, Jane M; Phaff, Sanne; Nieboer, Anna P

    2013-03-01

    This cross-sectional study (conducted in April-May 2011) explored associations between partnership functioning synergy and sustainability of innovative programmes in community care. The study sample consisted of 106 professionals (of 244 individuals contacted) participating in 21 partnerships that implemented different innovative community care programmes in Rotterdam, The Netherlands. Partnership functioning was evaluated by assessing leadership, resources administration and efficiency. Synergy was considered the proximal outcome of partnership functioning, which, in turn, influenced the achievement of programme sustainability. On a 5-point scale of increasing sustainability, mean sustainability scores ranged from 1.9 to 4.9. The results of the regression analysis demonstrated that sustainability was positively influenced by leadership (standardised regression coefficient β = 0.32; P < 0.001) and non-financial resources (β = 0.25; P = 0.008). No significant relationship was found between administration or efficiency and programme sustainability. Partnership synergy acted as a mediator for partnership functioning and significantly affected sustainability (β = 0.39; P < 0.001). These findings suggest that the sustainability of innovative programmes in community care is achieved more readily when synergy is created between partners. Synergy was more likely to emerge with boundary-spanning leaders, who understood and appreciated partners' different perspectives, and could bridge their diverse cultures and were comfortable sharing ideas, resources and power. In addition, the acknowledgement of and ability to use members' resources were found to be valuable in engaging partners' involvement and achieving synergy in community care partnerships.

  5. Achievement Gap and Sustainability: A Case Study of an Elementary School Bridging the Achievement Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Sandra Jean

    2010-01-01

    The achievement gap problem is a growing phenomenon in the United States of America. In many schools, minority student populations are failing at alarming rates and are looking at different outcomes than those of their White and Asian counterparts. However, a few schools are breaking through the barriers of poverty, poor school attendance, low…

  6. The Effects of Sustained Silent Reading on Reading Achievement and Reading Attitudes of Fourth Grade Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Holly Lynn

    2012-01-01

    This study tested the effects of a Sustained Silent Reading program on reading achievement and reading attitude. The study accessed scores from the DIBELS Oral Reading Fluency (Good, Kaminski, & Dill, 2007) to measure reading achievement. This measure was given before and after a twelve week period, during which the treatment group…

  7. AKT induces erythroid-cell maturation of JAK2-deficient fetal liver progenitor cells and is required for Epo regulation of erythroid-cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Ghaffari, Saghi; Kitidis, Claire; Zhao, Wei; Marinkovic, Dragan; Fleming, Mark D; Luo, Biao; Marszalek, Joseph; Lodish, Harvey F

    2006-03-01

    AKT serine threonine kinase of the protein kinase B (PKB) family plays essential roles in cell survival, growth, metabolism, and differentiation. In the erythroid system, AKT is known to be rapidly phosphorylated and activated in response to erythropoietin (Epo) engagement of Epo receptor (EpoR) and to sustain survival signals in cultured erythroid cells. Here we demonstrate that activated AKT complements EpoR signaling and supports erythroid-cell differentiation in wild-type and JAK2-deficient fetal liver cells. We show that erythroid maturation of AKT-transduced cells is not solely dependent on AKT-induced cell survival or proliferation signals, suggesting that AKT transduces also a differentiation-specific signal downstream of EpoR in erythroid cells. Down-regulation of expression of AKT kinase by RNA interference, or AKT activity by expression of dominant negative forms, inhibits significantly fetal liver-derived erythroid-cell colony formation and gene expression, demonstrating that AKT is required for Epo regulation of erythroid-cell maturation.

  8. Chemical and Materials Information Management to Achieve Sustainable Engineering and Design for the 21st Century

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-11-01

    Approved for Public Release ; Distribution Unlimited Chemical and Materials Information Management to Achieve Sustainable Engineering and Design for...Data Sources Solution – Distributed Information System Logistics Sustainability Approved for Public Release ; Distribution Unlimited • Single point...currently valid OMB control number. 1. REPORT DATE NOV 2011 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2011 to 00-00-2011 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE

  9. Challenges to achievement of metal sustainability in our high-tech society

    SciTech Connect

    Izatt, Reed M.; Izatt, Steven R.; Bruening, Ronald L.; Izatt, Neil; Moyer, Bruce A

    2014-01-01

    Achievement of sustainability in metal life cycles from mining of virgin ore to consumer and industrial devices to end-of-life products requires greatly increased recycling and improved processing of metals. Electronic and other high-tech products containing precious, toxic, and specialty metals usually have short lifetimes and low recycling rates. Products containing these metals generally are incinerated, discarded as waste in landfills, or dismantled in informal recycling using crude and environmentally irresponsible procedures. Low metal recycling rates coupled with increasing demand for products containing them necessitate increased mining with attendant environmental, health, energy, water, and carbon-footprint consequences. In this tutorial review, challenges to achieving metal sustainability in present high-tech society are presented; health, environmental, and economic incentives for various stakeholders to improve metal sustainability are discussed; a case for technical improvements in separations technology, especially employing molecular recognition, is given; and global consequences of continuing on the present path are examined.

  10. Sustained Silent Reading in Middle School and Its Impact on Students' Attitudes and Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Margaret Peggy S.

    2013-01-01

    Sustained Silent Reading (SSR) is a period of time given to students to read self-selected materials during their school day. This study examines the effect of participation in a SSR program on reading attitudes and reading achievement of students as measured by the Adolescent Motivation to Read Profile (AMRP) and the Northwest Evaluation…

  11. Influence of School Climate on Students' Achievement and Teachers' Productivity for Sustainable Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adeogun, A. A.; Olisaemeka, Blessing U.

    2011-01-01

    The study covers ten secondary schools in Lagos State of Nigeria. The purpose is to ascertain the relationship between school climate and student achievements and teachers' productivity for sustainable development. A total sample of 150 respondents was taken. Ten principals, seven teachers and seven students were randomly picked per school. This…

  12. Program Proposal: Certificates of Competence, Certificate of Achievement, Associate in Applied Science Degree in Sustainable Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pezzoli, Jean A.; Ainsworth, Don

    This document proposes a program in sustainable technology at Maui Community College (Hawaii). This new career program would be designed to provide four Certificates of Competence, a Certificate of Achievement, and an Associate in Applied Science degree. The primary objectives of the program are to meet student, county, and state needs for…

  13. Achieving Our Environmental Sustainability Goals: The Opportunities and Pitfalls of Applying Life Cycle Thinking

    EPA Science Inventory

    An increasing number of people around the world are beginning to realize that a systems approach, such as life cycle thinking, is necessary to truly achieve environmental sustainability. Without the holistic perspective that life cycle thinking provides, our actions risk leading ...

  14. Ecosystem Management to Achieve Ecological Sustainability: The Case of South Florida

    PubMed

    Harwell; Long; Bartuska; Gentile; Harwell; Myers; Ogden

    1996-07-01

    The ecosystems of South Florida are unique in the world. The defining features of the natural Everglades (large spatial scale, temporal patterns of water storage and sheetflow, and low nutrient levels) historically allowed a mosaic of habitats with characteristic animals. Massive hydrological alterations have halved the Everglades, and ecological sustainability requires fundamental changes in management.The US Man and the Biosphere Human-Dominated Systems Directorate is conducting a case study of South Florida using ecosystem management as a framework for exploring options for mutually dependent sustainability of society and the environment. A new methodology was developed to specify sustainability goals, characterize human factors affecting the ecosystem, and conduct scenario/consequence analyses to examine ecological and societal implications. South Florida has sufficient water for urban, agricultural, and ecological needs, but most water drains to the sea through the system of canals; thus, the issue is not competition for resources but storage and management of water. The goal is to reestablish the natural system for water quantity, timing, and distribution over a sufficient area to restore the essence of the Everglades.The societal sustainability in the Everglades Agricultural Area (EAA) is at risk because of soil degradation, vulnerability of sugar price supports, policies affecting Cuban sugar imports, and political/economic forces aligned against sugar production. One scenario suggested using the EAA for water storage while under private sugar production, thereby linking sustainability of the ecological system with societal sustainability. Further analyses are needed, but the US MAB project suggests achieving ecological sustainability consistent with societal sustainability may be feasible.

  15. Ecosystem management to achieve ecological sustainability: The case of South Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harwell, Mark A.; Long, John F.; Bartuska, Ann M.; Gentile, John H.; Harwell, Christine C.; Myers, Victoria; Ogden, John C.

    1996-07-01

    The ecosystems of South Florida are unique in the world. The defining features of the natural Everglades (large spatial scale, temporal patterns of water storage and sheetflow, and low nutrient levels) historically allowed a mosaic of habitats with characteristic animals. Massive hydrological alterations have halved the Everglades, and ecological sustainability requires fundamental changes in management. The US Man and the Biosphere Human-Dominated Systems Directorate is conducting a case study of South Florida using ecosystem management as a framework for exploring options for mutually dependent sustainability of society and the environment. A new methodology was developed to specify sustainability goals, characterize human factors affecting the ecosystem, and conduct scenario/consequence analyses to examine ecological and societal implications. South Florida has sufficient water for urban, agricultural, and ecological needs, but most water drains to the sea through the system of canals; thus, the issue is not competition for resources but storage and management of water. The goal is to reestablish the natural system for water quantity, timing, and distribution over a sufficient area to restore the essence of the Everglades. The societal sustainability in the Everglades Agricultural Area (EAA) is at risk because of soil degradation, vulnerability of sugar price supports, policies affecting Cuban sugar imports, and political/economic forces aligned against sugar production. One scenario suggested using the EAA for water storage while under private sugar production, thereby linking sustainability of the ecological system with societal sustainability. Further analyses are needed, but the US MAB project suggests achieving ecological sustainability consistent with societal sustainability may be feasible.

  16. Achieving and Sustaining Universal Health Coverage: Fiscal Reform of the National Health Insurance in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lan, Jesse Yu-Chen

    2016-10-25

    The paper discusses the expansion of the universal health coverage (UHC) in Taiwan through the establishment of National Health Insurance (NHI), and the fiscal crisis it caused. Two key questions are addressed: How did the NHI gradually achieve universal coverage, and yet cause Taiwanese health spending to escalate to fiscal crisis? What measures have been taken to reform the NHI finance and achieve moderate success to date? The main argument of this paper is that the Taiwanese Government did try to implement various reforms to save costs and had moderate success, but the path-dependent process of reform does not allow increasing contribution rates significantly and thereby makes sustainability challenging.

  17. Challenges to achievement of metal sustainability in our high-tech society.

    PubMed

    Izatt, Reed M; Izatt, Steven R; Bruening, Ronald L; Izatt, Neil E; Moyer, Bruce A

    2014-04-21

    Achievement of sustainability in metal life cycles from mining of virgin ore to consumer and industrial devices to end-of-life products requires greatly increased recycling rates and improved processing of metals using conventional and green chemistry technologies. Electronic and other high-tech products containing precious, toxic, and specialty metals usually have short lifetimes and low recycling rates. Products containing these metals generally are incinerated, discarded as waste in landfills, or dismantled in informal recycling using crude and environmentally irresponsible procedures. Low recycling rates of metals coupled with increasing demand for high-tech products containing them necessitate increased mining with attendant environmental, health, energy, water, and carbon-footprint consequences. In this tutorial review, challenges to achieving metal sustainability, including projected use of urban mining, in present high-tech society are presented; health, environmental, and economic incentives for various government, industry, and public stakeholders to improve metal sustainability are discussed; a case for technical improvements, including use of molecular recognition, in selective metal separation technology, especially for metal recovery from dilute feed stocks is given; and global consequences of continuing on the present path are examined.

  18. Review: Balancing Limiting Factors and Economic Drivers to Achieve Sustainable Midwestern US Agricultural Residue Feedstock Supplies

    SciTech Connect

    Wally W. Wilhelm; J. Richard Hess; Douglas L. Karlen; David J. Muth; Jane M. F. Johnson; John M. Baker; Hero T. Gollany; Jeff M. Novak; Diane E. Stott; Gary E. Varvel

    2010-10-01

    Advanced biofuels will be developed using cellulosic feedstock rather than grain or oilseed crops that can also be used for food and feed. To be sustainable, these new agronomic production systems must be economically viable without degrading soil resources. This review examines six agronomic factors that collectively define many of the limits and opportunities for harvesting crop residue for biofuel feedstock. These six “limiting factors” are discussed in relationship to economic drivers associated with harvesting corn (Zea mays L.) stover as a potential cellulosic feedstock. The limiting factors include soil organic carbon, wind and water erosion, plant nutrient balance, soil water and temperature dynamics, soil compaction, and off-site environmental impacts. Initial evaluations using the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation 2.0 (RUSLE2) show that a single factor analysis based on simply meeting tolerable soil loss might indicate stover could be harvested sustainably, but the same analysis based on maintaining soil organic carbon shows the practice to be non-sustainable. Modifying agricultural management to include either annual or perennial cover crops is shown to meet both soil erosion and soil carbon requirements. The importance of achieving high yields and planning in a holistic manner at the landscape scale are also shown to be crucial for balancing limitations and drivers associated with renewable bioenergy production.

  19. Addressing China's grand challenge of achieving food security while ensuring environmental sustainability.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yonglong; Jenkins, Alan; Ferrier, Robert C; Bailey, Mark; Gordon, Iain J; Song, Shuai; Huang, Jikun; Jia, Shaofeng; Zhang, Fusuo; Liu, Xuejun; Feng, Zhaozhong; Zhang, Zhibin

    2015-02-01

    China's increasingly urbanized and wealthy population is driving a growing and changing demand for food, which might not be met without significant increase in agricultural productivity and sustainable use of natural resources. Given the past relationship between lack of access to affordable food and political instability, food security has to be given a high priority on national political agendas in the context of globalization. The drive for increased food production has had a significant impact on the environment, and the deterioration in ecosystem quality due to historic and current levels of pollution will potentially compromise the food production system in China. We discuss the grand challenges of not only producing more food but also producing it sustainably and without environmental degradation. In addressing these challenges, food production should be considered as part of an environmental system (soil, air, water, and biodiversity) and not independent from it. It is imperative that new ways of meeting the demand for food are developed while safeguarding the natural resources upon which food production is based. We present a holistic approach to both science and policy to ensure future food security while embracing the ambition of achieving environmental sustainability in China. It is a unique opportunity for China to be a role model as a new global player, especially for other emerging economies.

  20. Addressing China’s grand challenge of achieving food security while ensuring environmental sustainability

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yonglong; Jenkins, Alan; Ferrier, Robert C.; Bailey, Mark; Gordon, Iain J.; Song, Shuai; Huang, Jikun; Jia, Shaofeng; Zhang, Fusuo; Liu, Xuejun; Feng, Zhaozhong; Zhang, Zhibin

    2015-01-01

    China’s increasingly urbanized and wealthy population is driving a growing and changing demand for food, which might not be met without significant increase in agricultural productivity and sustainable use of natural resources. Given the past relationship between lack of access to affordable food and political instability, food security has to be given a high priority on national political agendas in the context of globalization. The drive for increased food production has had a significant impact on the environment, and the deterioration in ecosystem quality due to historic and current levels of pollution will potentially compromise the food production system in China. We discuss the grand challenges of not only producing more food but also producing it sustainably and without environmental degradation. In addressing these challenges, food production should be considered as part of an environmental system (soil, air, water, and biodiversity) and not independent from it. It is imperative that new ways of meeting the demand for food are developed while safeguarding the natural resources upon which food production is based. We present a holistic approach to both science and policy to ensure future food security while embracing the ambition of achieving environmental sustainability in China. It is a unique opportunity for China to be a role model as a new global player, especially for other emerging economies. PMID:26601127

  1. What Is an Education for Sustainable Development Supposed to Achieve--A Question of What, How and Why

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hofman, Maria

    2015-01-01

    This is a theoretical article to open the discussion of what an education for sustainable development is supposed to achieve and how teachers can help students to develop skills that might be needed in order to support a sustainable future. The focus in the article will be on education. As it is an article aiming to open this kind of discussion…

  2. Automated monitoring: a potential solution for achieving sustainable improvement in hand hygiene practices.

    PubMed

    Levchenko, Alexander I; Boscart, Veronique M; Fernie, Geoff R

    2014-08-01

    Adequate hand hygiene is often considered as the most effective method of reducing the rates of hospital-acquired infections, which are one of the major causes of increased cost, morbidity, and mortality in healthcare. Electronic monitoring technologies provide a promising direction for achieving sustainable hand hygiene improvement by introducing the elements of automated feedback and creating the possibility to automatically collect individual hand hygiene performance data. The results of the multiphase testing of an automated hand hygiene reminding and monitoring system installed in a complex continuing care setting are presented. The study included a baseline Phase 1, with the system performing automated data collection only, a preintervention Phase 2 with hand hygiene status indicator enabled, two intervention Phases 3 and 4 with the system generating hand hygiene reminding signals and periodic performance feedback sessions provided, and a postintervention Phase 5 with only hand hygiene status indicator enabled and no feedback sessions provided. A significant increase in hand hygiene performance observed during the first intervention Phase 3 was sustained over the second intervention Phase 4, with the postintervention phase also indicating higher hand hygiene activity rates compared with the preintervention and baseline phases. The overall trends observed during the multiphase testing, the factors affecting acceptability of the automated hand hygiene monitoring system, and various strategies of technology deployment are discussed.

  3. Petit receives Robert C. Cowen Award for Sustained Achievement in Science Journalism: Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petit, Charles W.

    2012-01-01

    Charles W. Petit, a veteran science writer, received the 2011 Robert C. Cowan Award for Sustained Achievement in Science Journalism at the AGU Fall Meeting Honors Ceremony, held on 7 December 2011 in San Francisco, Calif. Petit covered earthquakes for the San Francisco Chronicle during the 1980s and 1990s and has recently served as "head tracker" for the Knight Science Journalism Tracker, a Massachusetts Institute of Technology-based daily blog that compiles and critiques science reporting worldwide. Petit was previously honored by AGU in 2003 when he received the David Perlman Award for an article about a new finding in oceanography. The Cowan Award, named for a former science editor of the Christian Science Monitor, is given no more than every 2 years and recognizes a journalist who has made "significant, lasting, and consistent contributions to accurate reporting or writing" on the Earth and space sciences for the general public.

  4. Petit receives Robert C. Cowen Award for Sustained Achievement in Science Journalism: Citation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rademacher, Horst

    2012-01-01

    Charles W. Petit, a veteran science writer, received the 2011 Robert C. Cowan Award for Sustained Achievement in Science Journalism at the AGU Fall Meeting Honors Ceremony, held on 7 December 2011 in San Francisco, Calif. Petit covered earthquakes for the San Francisco Chronicle during the 1980s and 1990s and has recently served as "head tracker" for the Knight Science Journalism Tracker, a Massachusetts Institute of Technology-based daily blog that compiles and critiques science reporting worldwide. Petit was previously honored by AGU in 2003 when he received the David Perlman Award for an article about a new finding in oceanography. The Cowan Award, named for a former science editor of the Christian Science Monitor, is given no more than every 2 years and recognizes a journalist who has made "significant, lasting, and consistent contributions to accurate reporting or writing" on the Earth and space sciences for the general public.

  5. Charting the course for home health care quality: action steps for achieving sustainable improvement: conference proceedings.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Penny Hollander; Peterson, Laura E; Reische, Laurie; Bruno, Lori; Clark, Amy

    2004-12-01

    On June 30 and July 1, 2003, the first national meeting Charting the Course for Home Health Care Quality: Action Steps for Achieving Sustainable Improvement convened in New York City. The Center for Home Care Policy & Research of the Visiting Nurse Service of New York (VNSNY) hosted the meeting with support from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Fifty-seven attendees from throughout the United States participated. The participants included senior leaders and managers and nurses working directly in home care today. The meeting's objectives were to: 1. foster dialogue among key constituents influencing patient safety and home care, 2. promote information-sharing across sectors and identify areas where more information is needed, and, 3. develop an agenda and strategy for moving forward. This article reports the meeting's proceedings.

  6. Secondary Students' Reading Attitudes and Achievement in a Scaffolded Silent Reading Program versus Traditional Sustained Silent Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, Chandra Lorene

    2010-01-01

    This study explored the reading attitudes and achievement, as well as genre knowledge, of tenth, eleventh, and twelfth-grade students who participated in Scaffolded Silent Reading, Sustained Silent Reading, or a control group. The Reading and You attitude survey, Degrees of Reading Power achievement measure, and Genre Assessment were administered…

  7. Induction of erythroid differentiadon in K562 cells by different butyrate regimens.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhi-Jie; Qian, Xin-Hua; Li, Xi-Ping; Yao, Ying-Min

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the hemoglobinization induced by butyrate and observe the effects of different butyrate regimens on erythroid differentiation of K562 cells. METHODS: K562 cells, used as an in vitro model system, were stained with benzidine to assess hemoglobin (Hb) production in response to different treatment regimens of butyrate at varied concentrations. Comparison of the percentage of benzidine-positive cells (BZ%)in untreated and butyrate-treated K562 cells was performed. Protein absorption at 414 nm using a spectrophotometer and cellulose acetate gel electrophoresis were employed to determine the changes of Hb production in K562 cells. RESULT: The BZ% increased by 4 to 6 fold and Hb production by 9 to 14 fold 3 d after the cells were incubated with butyrate which selectively promoted fetal hemoglobin(HbF) production in K562 cells. The BZ% increased gradually and reached the peak of l9% to 28% on day 3 or 4 in cells receiving pulse treatment with butyrate for only once, followed by a subsequent rapid fall and on day 7 to 9, it decreased to the level of untreated K562 cells. The length of time for incubation with butyrate was not related to in the increment or the maintenance of the increased level of BZ%. Continuous treatment with butyrate yielded a similar result to that of a single administration of pulse treatment. In contrast, in cells with intermittent pulse treatment the BZ% reached a peak after 72 h and was maintained between 20% and 30% till 3 cycles of treatment was completed. CONCLUSION: Butyrate can induce the expression of globin genes and augment Hb producfion especially that of HbF. A sustained erythroid differentiation of K562 cells can be achieved by intermittent pulse treatment with butyrate which can be an ideal regimen for children with beta globin diseases.

  8. Sustainability.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chein-Chi; DiGiovanni, Kimberly; Mei, Ying; Wei, Li

    2016-10-01

    This review on Sustainability covers selected 2015 publications on the focus of Sustainability. It is divided into the following sections : • Sustainable water and wastewater utilities • Sustainable water resources management • Stormwater and green infrastructure • Sustainability in wastewater treatment • Life cycle assessment (LCA) applications • Sustainability and energy in wastewater industry, • Sustainability and asset management.

  9. Sustainability.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chein-Chi; DiGiovanni, Kimberly; Mei, Ying; Wei, Li

    2016-10-01

    This review on Sustainability covers selected 2015 publications on the focus of Sustainability. It is divided into the following sections : Sustainable water and wastewater utilities Sustainable water resources management Stormwater and green infrastructure Sustainability in wastewater treatment Life cycle assessment (LCA) applications Sustainability and energy in wastewater industry, Sustainability and asset management.

  10. Calcium Signaling Is Required for Erythroid Enucleation

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Sarah M.; Humbert, Patrick O.

    2016-01-01

    Although erythroid enucleation, the property of erythroblasts to expel their nucleus, has been known for 7ore than a century, surprisingly little is known regarding the molecular mechanisms governing this unique developmental process. Here we show that similar to cytokinesis, nuclear extrusion requires intracellular calcium signaling and signal transduction through the calmodulin (CaM) pathway. However, in contrast to cytokinesis we found that orthochromatic erythroblasts require uptake of extracellular calcium to enucleate. Together these functional studies highlight a critical role for calcium signaling in the regulation of erythroid enucleation. PMID:26731108

  11. Erythroid development in the mammalian embryo.

    PubMed

    Baron, Margaret H; Vacaru, Andrei; Nieves, Johnathan

    2013-12-01

    Erythropoiesis is the process by which progenitors for red blood cells are produced and terminally differentiate. In all vertebrates, two morphologically distinct erythroid lineages (primitive, embryonic, and definitive, fetal/adult) form successively within the yolk sac, fetal liver, and marrow and are essential for normal development. Red blood cells have evolved highly specialized functions in oxygen transport, defense against oxidation, and vascular remodeling. Here we review key features of the ontogeny of red blood cell development in mammals, highlight similarities and differences revealed by genetic and gene expression profiling studies, and discuss methods for identifying erythroid cells at different stages of development and differentiation.

  12. A novel role for nuclear factor-erythroid 2 in erythroid maturation by modulation of mitochondrial autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Gothwal, Monika; Wehrle, Julius; Aumann, Konrad; Zimmermann, Vanessa; Gründer, Albert; Pahl, Heike L.

    2016-01-01

    We have recently demonstrated that the transcription factor nuclear factor-erythroid 2, which is critical for erythroid maturation and globin gene expression, plays an important role in the pathophysiology of myeloproliferative neoplasms. Myeloproliferative neoplasm patients display elevated levels of nuclear factor-erythroid 2 and transgenic mice overexpressing the transcription factor develop myeloproliferative neoplasm, albeit, surprisingly without erythrocytosis. Nuclear factor-erythroid 2 transgenic mice show both a reticulocytosis and a concomitant increase in iron deposits in the spleen, suggesting both enhanced erythrocyte production and increased red blood cell destruction. We therefore hypothesized that elevated nuclear factor-erythroid 2 levels may lead to increased erythrocyte destruction by interfering with organelle clearance during erythroid maturation. We have previously shown that nuclear factor-erythroid 2 overexpression delays erythroid maturation of human hematopoietic stem cells. Here we report that increased nuclear factor-erythroid 2 levels also impede murine maturation by retarding mitochondrial depolarization and delaying mitochondrial elimination. In addition, ribosome autophagy is delayed in transgenics. We demonstrate that the autophagy genes NIX and ULK1 are direct novel nuclear factor-erythroid 2 target genes, as these loci are bound by nuclear factor-erythroid 2 in chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. Moreover, Nix and Ulk1 expression is increased in transgenic mice and in granulocytes from polycythemia vera patients. This is the first report implying a role for nuclear factor-erythroid 2 in erythroid maturation by affecting autophagy. PMID:27479815

  13. Sustainability.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chein-Chi; DiGiovanni, Kimberly; Zhang, Gong; Yang, Xiahua; You, Shao-Hong

    2015-10-01

    This review on Sustainability covers selected 2014 publications on the focus of the following sections: • Sustainable water and wastewater utilities • Sustainable water resources management • Stormwater and green infrastructure • Sustainability in wastewater treatment • Life cycle assessment (LCA) applications • Sustainability and energy in wastewater industry, • Sustainability and asset management.

  14. Concepts for Life Cycle Cost Control Required to Achieve Space Transportation Affordability and Sustainability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, Russel E.; Zapata, Edgar; Levack, Daniel J. H.; Robinson, John W.; Donahue, Benjamin B.

    2009-01-01

    Cost control must be implemented through the establishment of requirements and controlled continually by managing to these requirements. Cost control of the non-recurring side of life cycle cost has traditionally been implemented in both commercial and government programs. The government uses the budget process to implement this control. The commercial approach is to use a similar process of allocating the non-recurring cost to major elements of the program. This type of control generally manages through a work breakdown structure (WBS) by defining the major elements of the program. If the cost control is to be applied across the entire program life cycle cost (LCC), the approach must be addressed very differently. A functional breakdown structure (FBS) is defined and recommended. Use of a FBS provides the visibifity to allow the choice of an integrated solution reducing the cost of providing many different elements of like function. The different functional solutions that drive the hardware logistics, quantity of documentation, operational labor, reliability and maintainability balance, and total integration of the entire system from DDT&E through the life of the program must be fully defined, compared, and final decisions made among these competing solutions. The major drivers of recurring cost have been identified and are presented and discussed. The LCC requirements must be established and flowed down to provide control of LCC. This LCC control will require a structured rigid process similar to the one traditionally used to control weight/performance for space transportation systems throughout the entire program. It has been demonstrated over the last 30 years that without a firm requirement and methodically structured cost control, it is unlikely that affordable and sustainable space transportation system LCC will be achieved.

  15. Current guidelines for nut consumption are achievable and sustainable: a hazelnut intervention.

    PubMed

    Tey, S L; Brown, R; Chisholm, A; Gray, A; Williams, S; Delahunty, C

    2011-05-01

    Nuts are known for their hypocholesterolaemic properties; however, to achieve optimal health benefits, nuts must be consumed regularly and in sufficient quantity. It is therefore important to assess the acceptability of regular consumption of nuts. The present study examined the long-term effects of hazelnut consumption in three different forms on 'desire to consume' and 'overall liking'. A total of forty-eight participants took part in this randomised cross-over study with three dietary phases of 4 weeks: 30 g/d of whole, sliced and ground hazelnuts. 'Overall liking' was measured in a three-stage design: a pre- and post-exposure tasting session and daily evaluation over the exposure period. 'Desire to consume' hazelnuts was measured during the exposure period only. Ratings were measured on a 150 mm visual analogue scale. Mean ratings of 'desire to consume' were 92 (SD 35) mm for ground, 108 (SD 33) mm for sliced and 116 (SD 30) mm for whole hazelnuts. For 'overall liking', the mean ratings were 101 (SD 29) mm for ground, 110 (SD 32) mm for sliced and 118 (SD 30) mm for whole hazelnuts. Ground hazelnuts had significantly lower ratings than both sliced (P ≤ 0·034) and whole hazelnuts (P < 0·001), with no difference in ratings between sliced and whole hazelnuts (P ≥ 0·125). For each form of nut, ratings of 'overall liking' and 'desire to consume' were stable over the exposure period, indicating that not only did the participants like the nuts, but also they wished to continue eating them. Therefore, the guideline to consume nuts on a regular basis appears to be a sustainable behaviour to reduce CVD.

  16. Achieving Campus Sustainability: Top-Down, Bottom-Up, or Neither?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brinkhurst, Marena; Rose, Peter; Maurice, Gillian; Ackerman, Josef Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The dynamics of organizational change related to environmental sustainability on university campuses are examined in this article. Whereas case studies of campus sustainability efforts tend to classify leadership as either "top-down" or "bottom-up", this classification neglects consideration of the leadership roles of…

  17. The Sustainability of Reading Recovery Intervention on Reading Achievement of Students Identified as At-Risk for Early Reading Failure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harley, Anne J.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the impact and sustainability of successfully discontinued first grade Reading Recovery students as compared to non-Reading Recovery students in reading achievement measures as third graders. Schools are facing the unprecedented challenge to ensure reading success for all students by the end of second…

  18. A Study of the Effect of Sustained, Whole-school Professional Development on Student Achievement in Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Carla C.; Kahle, Jane Butler; Fargo, Jamison D.

    2007-01-01

    This longitudinal study of middle school science teachers explored the relationship, if any, between teacher participation in whole-school, sustained, collaborative professional development and student achievement in science. Eleven teachers from Glendale Middle School participated in the Discovery Model Schools Initiative 2-week summer institute,…

  19. Partnership for Sustainable Communities: Three Years of Helping Communities Achieve Their Visions for Growth and Prosperity

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This report from the Partnership for Sustainable Communities reports on the three years of progress since the Partnership started in 2009. It includes case studies of Partnership projects in communities around the country.

  20. Navy Needs to Establish Effective Metrics to Achieve Desired Outcomes for SPY1 Radar Sustainment (Redacted)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-08-01

    incorporated into the follow-on PBL contracts and the fleet’s SPY-1 radar sustainment needs are met without a formal agreement binding ATAC to deliver...Phased Array Radar (SPY-1 radar) performance-based logistics contracts appropriately incentivized the support contractors. This audit is the second in...metrics into the performance-based logistics contracts used to sustain SPY-1 radars. Specifically, the metrics did not effectively incentivize

  1. Early stage design decisions: the way to achieve sustainable buildings at lower costs.

    PubMed

    Bragança, Luís; Vieira, Susana M; Andrade, Joana B

    2014-01-01

    The construction industry attempts to produce buildings with as lower environmental impact as possible. However, construction activities still greatly affect environment; therefore, it is necessary to consider a sustainable project approach based on its performance. Sustainability is an important issue to consider in design, not only due to environmental concerns but also due to economic and social matters, promoting architectural quality and economic advantages. This paper aims to identify the phases through which a design project should be developed, emphasising the importance and ability of earlier stages to influence sustainability, performance, and life cycle cost. Then, a selection of sustainability key indicators, able to be used at the design conceptual phase and able to start predicting environmental sustainability performance of buildings is presented. The output of this paper aimed to enable designers to compare and evaluate the consequences of different design solutions, based on preliminary data, and facilitate the collaboration between stakeholders and clients and eventually yield a sustainable and high performance building throughout its life cycle.

  2. Early Stage Design Decisions: The Way to Achieve Sustainable Buildings at Lower Costs

    PubMed Central

    Bragança, Luís; Vieira, Susana M.; Andrade, Joana B.

    2014-01-01

    The construction industry attempts to produce buildings with as lower environmental impact as possible. However, construction activities still greatly affect environment; therefore, it is necessary to consider a sustainable project approach based on its performance. Sustainability is an important issue to consider in design, not only due to environmental concerns but also due to economic and social matters, promoting architectural quality and economic advantages. This paper aims to identify the phases through which a design project should be developed, emphasising the importance and ability of earlier stages to influence sustainability, performance, and life cycle cost. Then, a selection of sustainability key indicators, able to be used at the design conceptual phase and able to start predicting environmental sustainability performance of buildings is presented. The output of this paper aimed to enable designers to compare and evaluate the consequences of different design solutions, based on preliminary data, and facilitate the collaboration between stakeholders and clients and eventually yield a sustainable and high performance building throughout its life cycle. PMID:24578630

  3. Significant Increase in Ecosystem C Can Be Achieved with Sustainable Forest Management in Subtropical Plantation Forests

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Xiaohua; Blanco, Juan A.

    2014-01-01

    Subtropical planted forests are rapidly expanding. They are traditionally managed for intensive, short-term goals that often lead to long-term yield decline and reduced carbon sequestration capacity. Here we show how it is possible to increase and sustain carbon stored in subtropical forest plantations if management is switched towards more sustainable forestry. We first conducted a literature review to explore possible management factors that contribute to the potentials in ecosystem C in tropical and subtropical plantations. We found that broadleaves plantations have significantly higher ecosystem C than conifer plantations. In addition, ecosystem C increases with plantation age, and reaches a peak with intermediate stand densities of 1500–2500 trees ha−1. We then used the FORECAST model to simulate the regional implications of switching from traditional to sustainable management regimes, using Chinese fir (Cunninghamia lanceolata) plantations in subtropical China as a study case. We randomly simulated 200 traditional short-rotation pure stands and 200 sustainably-managed mixed Chinese fir – Phoebe bournei plantations, for 120 years. Our results showed that mixed, sustainably-managed plantations have on average 67.5% more ecosystem C than traditional pure conifer plantations. If all pure plantations were gradually transformed into mixed plantations during the next 10 years, carbon stocks could rise in 2050 by 260.22 TgC in east-central China. Assuming similar differences for temperate and boreal plantations, if sustainable forestry practices were applied to all new forest plantation types in China, stored carbon could increase by 1,482.80 TgC in 2050. Such an increase would be equivalent to a yearly sequestration rate of 40.08 TgC yr−1, offsetting 1.9% of China’s annual emissions in 2010. More importantly, this C increase can be sustained in the long term through the maintenance of higher amounts of soil organic carbon and the production of timber

  4. Significant increase in ecosystem C can be achieved with sustainable forest management in subtropical plantation forests.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiaohua; Blanco, Juan A

    2014-01-01

    Subtropical planted forests are rapidly expanding. They are traditionally managed for intensive, short-term goals that often lead to long-term yield decline and reduced carbon sequestration capacity. Here we show how it is possible to increase and sustain carbon stored in subtropical forest plantations if management is switched towards more sustainable forestry. We first conducted a literature review to explore possible management factors that contribute to the potentials in ecosystem C in tropical and subtropical plantations. We found that broadleaves plantations have significantly higher ecosystem C than conifer plantations. In addition, ecosystem C increases with plantation age, and reaches a peak with intermediate stand densities of 1500-2500 trees ha⁻¹. We then used the FORECAST model to simulate the regional implications of switching from traditional to sustainable management regimes, using Chinese fir (Cunninghamia lanceolata) plantations in subtropical China as a study case. We randomly simulated 200 traditional short-rotation pure stands and 200 sustainably-managed mixed Chinese fir--Phoebe bournei plantations, for 120 years. Our results showed that mixed, sustainably-managed plantations have on average 67.5% more ecosystem C than traditional pure conifer plantations. If all pure plantations were gradually transformed into mixed plantations during the next 10 years, carbon stocks could rise in 2050 by 260.22 TgC in east-central China. Assuming similar differences for temperate and boreal plantations, if sustainable forestry practices were applied to all new forest plantation types in China, stored carbon could increase by 1,482.80 TgC in 2050. Such an increase would be equivalent to a yearly sequestration rate of 40.08 TgC yr⁻¹, offsetting 1.9% of China's annual emissions in 2010. More importantly, this C increase can be sustained in the long term through the maintenance of higher amounts of soil organic carbon and the production of timber products

  5. In place of fear: aligning health care planning with system objectives to achieve financial sustainability.

    PubMed

    Birch, Stephen; Murphy, Gail Tomblin; MacKenzie, Adrian; Cumming, Jackie

    2015-04-01

    The financial sustainability of publicly funded health care systems is a challenge to policymakers in many countries as health care absorbs an ever increasing share of both national wealth and government spending. New technology, aging populations and increasing public expectations of the health care system are often cited as reasons why health care systems need ever increasing funding as well as reasons why universal and comprehensive public systems are unsustainable. However, increases in health care spending are not usually linked to corresponding increases in need for care within populations. Attempts to promote financial sustainability of systems such as limiting the range of services is covered or the groups of population covered may compromise their political sustainability as some groups are left to seek private cover for some or all services. In this paper, an alternative view of financial sustainability is presented which identifies the failure of planning and management of health care to reflect needs for care in populations and to integrate planning and management functions for health care expenditure, health care services and the health care workforce. We present a Health Care Sustainability Framework based on disaggregating the health care expenditure into separate planning components. Unlike other approaches to planning health care expenditure, this framework explicitly incorporates population health needs as a determinant of health care requirements, and provides a diagnostic tool for understanding the sources of expenditure increase.

  6. Future Tactical Truck System Maximization: A Achieving Objective Force Sustainment and Distribution Requirements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    automatically execute a convoy standing operating procedure that creates the convoy chain of command and S/V team roles in the convoy for execution of...responsibility for their assigned vehicle. Soldiers are culturally indoctrinated to understand their individual S/V team role in the greater sustainment

  7. Endogenous K-ras signaling in erythroid differentiation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Lodish, Harvey F

    2007-08-15

    K-ras is one of the most frequently mutated genes in virtually all types of human cancers. Using mouse fetal liver erythroid progenitors as a model system, we studied the role of endogenous K-ras signaling in erythroid differentiation. When oncogenic K-ras is expressed from its endogenous promoter, it hyperactivates cytokine-dependent signaling pathways and results in a partial block in erythroid differentiation. In erythroid progenitors deficient in K-ras, cytokine-dependent Akt activation is greatly reduced, leading to delays in erythroid differentiation. Thus, both loss- and gain-of-Kras functions affect erythroid differentiation through modulation of cytokine signaling. These results support the notion that in human cancer patients oncogenic Ras signaling might be controlled by antagonizing essential cytokines.

  8. The Sustainable Development Goals cannot be achieved without improving maternal and child nutrition.

    PubMed

    Baye, Kaleab

    2017-02-01

    Poor nutrition is a global pandemic with social, economic, and environmental causes and consequences. Of the 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), only SDG2 explicitly mentions nutrition. Turning the aspirations of the SDGs into reality will require recognition that good nutrition ensured through sustainable agriculture, is simultaneously an absolutely fundamental input and output. Because all of the other SDGs are directly or indirectly linked to improving nutrition, funding to improve nutrition is essential to success for many SDGs. Greater focus on cooperation across disciplines to advance the science of program delivery and to understand the full contribution of nutrition to many desirable outcomes as part of development are surely the ways forward. Missing today's opportunities to advance thinking and program implementation for more effectively improving nutrition for all, especially for women and children, will lead to a wider failure to meet the SDGs.

  9. Out of the wilderness? Achieving sustainable development within Scottish national parks.

    PubMed

    Barker, Adam; Stockdale, Aileen

    2008-07-01

    The introduction of national parks to Scotland represents a significant shift in the evolution of protected area management within the UK. Although the National Parks (Scotland) Act 2000 adopts the established national park aims of conservation and recreation, provisions are also made for advancing notions of sustainable development. This paper provides an assessment of the degree to which the Scottish national park model is likely to enable the realisation of multiple national park objectives. Five key areas are considered for analysis. These relate to management aims, institutional arrangements, implementation, democratic accountability and funding. The evaluation reveals that whilst management provisions have been established in accordance with international sustainable development guidelines, a number of concerns relating to operational processes remain.

  10. The Dynamic Integrated Evaluation Model (DIEM): Achieving Sustainability in Organizational Intervention through a Participatory Evaluation Approach.

    PubMed

    von Thiele Schwarz, Ulrica; Lundmark, Robert; Hasson, Henna

    2016-10-01

    Recently, there have been calls to develop ways of using a participatory approach when conducting interventions, including evaluating the process and context to improve and adapt the intervention as it evolves over time. The need to integrate interventions into daily organizational practices, thereby increasing the likelihood of successful implementation and sustainable changes, has also been highlighted. We propose an evaluation model-the Dynamic Integrated Evaluation Model (DIEM)-that takes this into consideration. In the model, evaluation is fitted into a co-created iterative intervention process, in which the intervention activities can be continuously adapted based on collected data. By explicitly integrating process and context factors, DIEM also considers the dynamic sustainability of the intervention over time. It emphasizes the practical value of these evaluations for organizations, as well as the importance of their rigorousness for research purposes. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Before Sustainable Development Goals (SDG): why Nigeria failed to achieve the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs).

    PubMed

    Oleribe, Obinna Ositadimma; Taylor-Robinson, Simon David

    2016-01-01

    World leaders adopted the UN Millennium Declaration in 2000, which committed the nations of the world to a new global partnership, aimed at reducing extreme poverty and other time-bound targets, with a stated deadline of 2015. Fifteen years later, although significant progress has been made worldwide, Nigeria is lagging behind for a variety of reasons, including bureaucracy, poor resource management in the healthcare system, sequential healthcare worker industrial action, Boko Haram insurgency in the north of Nigeria and kidnappings in the south of Nigeria. The country needs to tackle these problems to be able to significantly advance with the new sustainable development goals (SDGs) by the 2030 target date.

  12. Visual sustained attention and numerosity sensitivity correlate with math achievement in children.

    PubMed

    Anobile, Giovanni; Stievano, Paolo; Burr, David C

    2013-10-01

    In this study, we investigated in school-age children the relationship among mathematical performance, the perception of numerosity (discrimination and mapping to number line), and sustained visual attention. The results (on 68 children between 8 and 11 years of age) show that attention and numerosity perception predict math scores but not reading performance. Even after controlling for several variables, including age, gender, nonverbal IQ, and reading accuracy, attention remained correlated with math skills and numerosity discrimination. These findings support previous reports showing the interrelationship between visual attention and both numerosity perception and math performance. It also suggests that attentional deficits may be implicated in disturbances such as developmental dyscalculia.

  13. Before Sustainable Development Goals (SDG): why Nigeria failed to achieve the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs)

    PubMed Central

    Oleribe, Obinna Ositadimma; Taylor-Robinson, Simon David

    2016-01-01

    World leaders adopted the UN Millennium Declaration in 2000, which committed the nations of the world to a new global partnership, aimed at reducing extreme poverty and other time-bound targets, with a stated deadline of 2015. Fifteen years later, although significant progress has been made worldwide, Nigeria is lagging behind for a variety of reasons, including bureaucracy, poor resource management in the healthcare system, sequential healthcare worker industrial action, Boko Haram insurgency in the north of Nigeria and kidnappings in the south of Nigeria. The country needs to tackle these problems to be able to significantly advance with the new sustainable development goals (SDGs) by the 2030 target date. PMID:27795754

  14. The Knowledge Base for Achieving the Sustainable Development Goal Targets on Water Supply, Sanitation and Hygiene

    PubMed Central

    Hutton, Guy; Chase, Claire

    2016-01-01

    Safe drinking water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) are fundamental to an improved standard of living. Globally, 91% of households used improved drinking water sources in 2015, while for improved sanitation it is 68%. Wealth disparities are stark, with rural populations, slum dwellers and marginalized groups lagging significantly behind. Service coverage is significantly lower when considering the new water and sanitation targets under the sustainable development goals (SDGs) which aspire to a higher standard of ‘safely managed’ water and sanitation. Lack of access to WASH can have an economic impact as much as 7% of Gross Domestic Product, not including the social and environmental consequences. Research points to significant health and socio-economic consequences of poor nutritional status, child growth and school performance caused by inadequate WASH. Groundwater over-extraction and pollution of surface water bodies have serious impacts on water resource availability and biodiversity, while climate change exacerbates the health risks of water insecurity. A significant literature documents the beneficial impacts of WASH interventions, and a growing number of impact evaluation studies assess how interventions are optimally financed, implemented and sustained. Many innovations in behavior change and service delivery offer potential for scaling up services to meet the SDGs. PMID:27240389

  15. Achieving Sustainability Goals for Urban Coasts in the US Northeast: Research Needs and Challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Close, Sarah L.; Montalto, Franco; Orton, Philip; Antoine, Adrienne; Peters, Danielle; Jones, Hunter; Parris, Adam; Blumberg, Alan

    2016-01-01

    In the wake of Hurricane Sandy and other recent extreme events, urban coastal communities in the northeast region of the United States are beginning or stepping up efforts to integrate climate adaptation and resilience into long-term coastal planning. Natural and nature-based shoreline strategies have emerged as essential components of coastal resilience and are frequently cited by practitioners, scientists, and the public for the wide range of ecosystem services they can provide. However, there is limited quantitative information associating particular urban shoreline design strategies with specific levels of ecosystem service provision, and research on this issue is not always aligned with decision context and decision-maker needs. Engagement between the research community, local government officials and sustainability practitioners, and the non-profit and private sectors can help bridge these gaps. A workshop to bring together these groups discussed research gaps and challenges in integrating ecosystem services into urban sustainability planning in the urban northeast corridor. Many themes surfaced repeatedly throughout workshop deliberations, including the challenges associated with ecosystem service valuation, the transferability of research and case studies within and outside the region, and the opportunity for urban coastal areas to be a focal point for education and outreach efforts related to ecosystem services.

  16. The Knowledge Base for Achieving the Sustainable Development Goal Targets on Water Supply, Sanitation and Hygiene.

    PubMed

    Hutton, Guy; Chase, Claire

    2016-05-27

    Safe drinking water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) are fundamental to an improved standard of living. Globally, 91% of households used improved drinking water sources in 2015, while for improved sanitation it is 68%. Wealth disparities are stark, with rural populations, slum dwellers and marginalized groups lagging significantly behind. Service coverage is significantly lower when considering the new water and sanitation targets under the sustainable development goals (SDGs) which aspire to a higher standard of 'safely managed' water and sanitation. Lack of access to WASH can have an economic impact as much as 7% of Gross Domestic Product, not including the social and environmental consequences. Research points to significant health and socio-economic consequences of poor nutritional status, child growth and school performance caused by inadequate WASH. Groundwater over-extraction and pollution of surface water bodies have serious impacts on water resource availability and biodiversity, while climate change exacerbates the health risks of water insecurity. A significant literature documents the beneficial impacts of WASH interventions, and a growing number of impact evaluation studies assess how interventions are optimally financed, implemented and sustained. Many innovations in behavior change and service delivery offer potential for scaling up services to meet the SDGs.

  17. Sustaining Success toward Closing the Achievement Gap: A Case Study of One Urban High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cabrera, Kimberly Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    Since the introduction of the Coleman Report (1966), the focus on closing the achievement gap has been a critical component of educational policy for political leaders and field research by educators. The economic crisis which California and the nation at large currently face creates a challenging situation in attempting to narrow the gap.…

  18. Challenges to Achieving Sustainable Sanitation in Informal Settlements of Kigali, Rwanda

    PubMed Central

    Tsinda, Aime; Abbott, Pamela; Pedley, Steve; Charles, Katrina; Adogo, Jane; Okurut, Kenan; Chenoweth, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Like most cities in developing countries, Kigali is experiencing rapid urbanisation leading to an increase in the urban population and rapid growth in the size and number of informal settlements. More than 60% of the city’s population resides in these settlements, where they experience inadequate and poor quality urban services including sanitation. This article discusses the issues and constraints related to the provision of sustainable sanitation in the informal settlements in Kigali. Two informal settlements (Gatsata and Kimisagara) were selected for the study, which used a mixed method approach for data collection. The research found that residents experienced multiple problems because of poor sanitation and that the main barrier to improved sanitation was cost. Findings from this study can be used by the city authorities in the planning of effective sanitation intervention strategies for communities in informal settlements. PMID:24336021

  19. Rock on Cafe: achieving sustainable systems changes in school lunch programs.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Yvonne; Denniston, Ray; Morgan, Molly; Bordeau, Mark

    2009-04-01

    The rising rate of overweight poses a significant threat to the health of children. Because roughly one third of a child's dietary intake occurs during school hours and because both health and academic outcomes have been linked to children's nutrition, school nutrition policies and programs have been identified as a key area for intervention. This article describes the components, processes, and initial successes of a grassroots effort and innovative project to improve the nutritional quality of the School Lunch Program through a sustainable systems intervention and policy change across a regional area of upstate New York. The Rock on Cafe intervention was partially funded by the Steps to a Healthier New York program and promises to be a model for creating a school environment that supports healthy dietary behaviors among children.

  20. The role of Ethiopia's public universities in achieving the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Keeffe, Paul

    2016-12-01

    In recent years, the Ethiopian government has embarked on an ambitious agriculture development strategy aimed at raising Ethiopia to the status of a middle-income-level country by 2025. Encouraged by the international development push behind the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), the rapid expansion of public universities has taken centre stage in facilitating the country's aim of equipping a new generation with the expertise needed to fuel the country's economic development. While impressive strides have been made over the last two decades, various development challenges threaten to derail this promising progress. This article examines three of the main challenges - urbanisation, climate change and food security - and the potential for universities to address them. Based on a study using key informant analysis research with 50 experts in Ethiopian education and development, the author concludes that the developing public university system offers promising capabilities to assist the country on its developmental path despite many inherent problems.

  1. Reprogramming erythroid cells for lysosomal enzyme production leads to visceral and CNS cross-correction in mice with Hurler syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wang, Daren; Zhang, Wei; Kalfa, Theodosia A; Grabowski, Gregory; Davies, Stella; Malik, Punam; Pan, Dao

    2009-11-24

    Restricting transgene expression to maturing erythroid cells can reduce the risk for activating oncogenes in hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and their progeny, yet take advantage of their robust protein synthesis machinery for high-level protein production. This study sought to evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of reprogramming erythroid cells for production of a lysosomal enzyme, alpha-L-iduronidase (IDUA). An erythroid-specific hybrid promoter provided inducible IDUA expression and release during in vitro erythroid differentiation in murine erythroleukemia cells, resulting in phenotypical cross-correction in an enzyme-deficient lymphoblastoid cell line derived from patients with mucopolysaccharidosis type I (MPS I). Stable and higher than normal plasma IDUA levels were achieved in vivo in primary and secondary MPS I chimeras for at least 9 months after transplantation of HSCs transduced with the erythroid-specific IDUA-containing lentiviral vector (LV). Moreover, long-term metabolic correction was demonstrated by normalized urinary glycosaminoglycan accumulation in all treated MPS I mice. Complete normalization of tissue pathology was observed in heart, liver, and spleen. Notably, neurological function and brain pathology were significantly improved in MPS I mice by erythroid-derived, higher than normal peripheral IDUA protein. These data demonstrate that late-stage erythroid cells, transduced with a tissue-specific LV, can deliver a lysosomal enzyme continuously at supraphysiological levels to the bloodstream and can correct the disease phenotype in both viscera and CNS of MPS I mice. This approach provides a paradigm for the utilization of RBC precursors as a depot for efficient and potentially safer systemic delivery of nonsecreted proteins by ex vivo HSC gene transfer.

  2. Acute erythroid leukemia with multilineage dysplasia in a cat.

    PubMed

    Shirani, Dariush; Nassiri, Seyed Mahdi; Aldavood, Seyed Javid; Seddigh, Hamideh Salari; Fathi, Ezzatollah

    2011-04-01

    Dysplastic features of erythroid and megakaryocytic lineages were observed in a cat with acute erythroid leukemia. We demonstrated that flow cytometry analysis of the expression of glycophorin A and CD71 by neoplastic cells can be helpful in the diagnosis of this type of feline leukemia.

  3. The role of Ikaros in human erythroid differentiation.

    PubMed

    Dijon, Marilyne; Bardin, Florence; Murati, Anne; Batoz, Michèle; Chabannon, Christian; Tonnelle, Cécile

    2008-02-01

    Ikaros--a factor that positively or negatively controls gene transcription--is active in murine adult erythroid cells, and involved in fetal to adult globin switching. Mice with Ikaros mutations have defects in erythropoiesis and anemia. In this paper, we have studied the role of Ikaros in human erythroid development for the first time. Using a gene-transfer strategy, we expressed Ikaros 6 (Ik6)--a known dominant--negative protein that interferes with normal Ikaros activity-in cord blood or apheresis CD34(+) cells that were induced to differentiate along the erythroid pathway. Lentivirally induced Ik6-forced expression resulted in increased cell death, decreased cell proliferation, and decreased expression of erythroid-specific genes, including GATA1 and fetal and adult globins. In contrast, we observed the maintenance of a residual myeloid population that can be detected in this culture system, with a relative increase of myeloid gene expression, including PU1. In secondary cultures, expression of Ik6 favored reversion of sorted and phenotypically defined erythroid cells into myeloid cells, and prevented reversion of myeloid cells into erythroid cells. We conclude that Ikaros is involved in human adult or fetal erythroid differentiation as well as in the commitment between erythroid and myeloid cells.

  4. Sustained availability of trimethoprim in drinking water to achieve higher plasma sulphonamide-trimethoprim antibacterial activity in broilers.

    PubMed

    Sumano, H; Hernandez, L; Gutierrez, L; Bernad-Bernad, M J

    2005-02-01

    (1) In order to make trimethoprim (TMP) available to broilers throughout the day, a sustained release formulation (SRF) of the drug in the form of granules was added to the water tank that supplies drinking water. (2) Broilers were initially dosed with sulphachloropiridazine-TMP (SCP-TMP 5:1) and then further medicated throughout the day, achieving in the end a dose of 30 mg/kg each of SCP and TMP (group A). Group B received a preparation with the same dose of SCP and TMP (1:1) as group A, but administered as a single dose without the SRF of TMP. Group C received the customary SCP-TMP 5:1 preparation (30 and 6 mg/kg, respectively). Water tanks were completely consumed in 3 to 4 h. (3) Broilers were bled at different times and concentration of antibacterial activity in serum determined by correlating the composite antibacterial activity of SCP and TMP with actual concentrations of these drugs by means of a microbiological agar diffusion assay. (4) Time vs serum concentrations of activity were higher in group B; the increments in the maximum serum concentration for group B over groups A and C being 39 and 67%, respectively. (5) However, the sustained concentration of activity over time, measured as the area under the cu)rve, was highest in group A. Group B had higher values for area under the curve than group C. (6) An additional dose of TMP to achieve 30 mg/kg of both SCP and TMP improves the serum concentration of this combination over the customary 5:1 proportion. The best values for sustaining antibacterial activity were obtained using a 1:1 ratio as in group A. The use of a SRF as in group A may translate into better clinical results.

  5. Achieving and sustaining advanced scenarios in ITER modelled by CRONOS and DINA-CH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besseghir, K.; Garcia, J.; Artaud, J.-F.; Imbeaux, F.; Khayrutdinov, R. R.; Lister, J. B.; Lukash, V. E.; Maget, P.

    2013-12-01

    The heating and current drive characteristics for accessing advanced scenarios in ITER, close to those obtained in present-day experiments, are analysed together with the plasma performance using the prescribed-boundary CRONOS suites of codes. For the hybrid scenario, a sensitivity analysis shows the sensitivity to the parameter range which leads to an appropriate control of the safety factor and pressure profiles. A steady-state regime with no internal transport barrier is obtained as a natural extension of the hybrid regime. These prescribed-boundary scenario developments are used as an initial step for a complete free-boundary simulation carried out with the DINA-CH code coupled to CRONOS, which once again underlines how sensitive the ITER advanced scenarios are to small plasma geometry changes. Both scenarios were achieved within the technical limits of ITER, specifically the poloidal field coil currents, voltages, forces and fields.

  6. Getting to Green: An Examination of the Relationship between Institutional Characteristics and Sustainability Achievement at Four-Year U.S. Based Colleges and Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Justin

    2014-01-01

    This study presents an examination of how institutional characteristics might influence a four-year institution of higher education's achievement in sustainability, as measured by the Sustainability Tracking, Assessment, and Rating System (STARS). Specifically, it examined the potential role Carnegie classification, sector, location, number of…

  7. Quaternary Aquifer of the North China Plain-assessing and achieving groundwater resource sustainability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, Stephen; Garduno, Hector; Evans, Richard; Olson, Doug; Tian, Yuan; Zhang, Weizhen; Han, Zaisheng

    The Quaternary Aquifer of the North China Plain is one of the world's largest aquifer systems and supports an enormous exploitation of groundwater, which has reaped large socio-economic benefits in terms of grain production, farming employment and rural poverty alleviation, together with urban and industrial water-supply provision. Both population and economic activity have grown markedly in the past 25 years. Much of this has been heavily dependent upon groundwater resource development, which has encountered increasing difficulties in recent years primarily as a result of aquifer depletion and related phenomena. This paper focuses upon the hydrogeologic and socio-economic diagnosis of these groundwater resource issues, and identifies strategies to improve groundwater resource sustainability. L'aquifère Quaternaire de la Plaine du Nord de la Chine est l'un des plus grands systèmes aquifères du monde; il permet une exploitation énorme d'eau souterraine, qui a permis des très importants bénéfices socio-économiques en terme de production de céréales, d'emplois ruraux et de réduction de la pauvreté rurale, en même temps que l'approvisionnement en eau potable et pour l'industrie. La population comme l'activité économique ont remarquablement augmenté au cours de ces 25 dernières années. Elles ont été sous la forte dépendance du développement de la ressource en eau souterraine, qui a rencontré des difficultés croissantes ces dernières années, du fait du rabattement de l'aquifère et des phénomènes associés. Cet article est consacré aux diagnostiques hydrogéologique et socio-économique des retombées de cette ressource en eau souterraine; il identifie les stratégies pour améliorer la pérennité des ressources en eau souterraine. El acuífero cuaternario de la Llanura Septentrional de China es uno de los mayores sistemas acuíferos del mundo y soporta una enorme explotación de su agua subterránea, las cuales han originado grandes

  8. Isocitrate ameliorates anemia by suppressing the erythroid iron restriction response.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Chanté L; Delehanty, Lorrie L; Bullock, Grant C; Rival, Claudia M; Tung, Kenneth S; Kimpel, Donald L; Gardenghi, Sara; Rivella, Stefano; Goldfarb, Adam N

    2013-08-01

    The unique sensitivity of early red cell progenitors to iron deprivation, known as the erythroid iron restriction response, serves as a basis for human anemias globally. This response impairs erythropoietin-driven erythropoiesis and underlies erythropoietic repression in iron deficiency anemia. Mechanistically, the erythroid iron restriction response results from inactivation of aconitase enzymes and can be suppressed by providing the aconitase product isocitrate. Recent studies have implicated the erythroid iron restriction response in anemia of chronic disease and inflammation (ACDI), offering new therapeutic avenues for a major clinical problem; however, inflammatory signals may also directly repress erythropoiesis in ACDI. Here, we show that suppression of the erythroid iron restriction response by isocitrate administration corrected anemia and erythropoietic defects in rats with ACDI. In vitro studies demonstrated that erythroid repression by inflammatory signaling is potently modulated by the erythroid iron restriction response in a kinase-dependent pathway involving induction of the erythroid-inhibitory transcription factor PU.1. These results reveal the integration of iron and inflammatory inputs in a therapeutically tractable erythropoietic regulatory circuit.

  9. Strengthening the partnership between routine immunization and the global polio eradication initiative to achieve eradication and assure sustainability.

    PubMed

    Abdelwahab, Jalaa; Dietz, Vance; Eggers, Rudolf; Maher, Christopher; Olaniran, Marianne; Sandhu, Hardeep; Vandelaer, Jos

    2014-11-01

    Since the launch of the Global Polio Eradication Initiative (GPEI) in 1988, the number of polio endemic countries has declined from 125 to 3 in 2013. Despite this remarkable achievement, ongoing circulation of wild poliovirus in polio-endemic countries and the increase in the number of circulating vaccine-derived poliovirus cases, especially those caused by type 2, is a cause for concern. The Polio Eradication and Endgame Strategic Plan 2013-2018 (PEESP) was developed and includes 4 objectives: detection and interruption of poliovirus transmission, containment and certification, legacy planning, and a renewed emphasis on strengthening routine immunization (RI) programs. This is critical for the phased withdrawal of oral poliovirus vaccine, beginning with the type 2 component, and the introduction of a single dose of inactivated polio vaccine into RI programs. This objective has inspired renewed consideration of how the GPEI and RI programs can mutually benefit one another, how the infrastructure from the GPEI can be used to strengthen RI, and how a strengthened RI can facilitate polio eradication. The PEESP is the first GPEI strategic plan that places strong and clear emphasis on the necessity of improving RI to achieve and sustain global polio eradication.

  10. The exosome complex establishes a barricade to erythroid maturation

    PubMed Central

    McIver, Skye C.; Kang, Yoon-A; DeVilbiss, Andrew W.; O’Driscoll, Chelsea A.; Ouellette, Jonathan N.; Pope, Nathaniel J.; Camprecios, Genis; Chang, Chan-Jung; Yang, David; Bouhassira, Eric E.; Ghaffari, Saghi

    2014-01-01

    Complex genetic networks control hematopoietic stem cell differentiation into progenitors that give rise to billions of erythrocytes daily. Previously, we described a role for the master regulator of erythropoiesis, GATA-1, in inducing genes encoding components of the autophagy machinery. In this context, the Forkhead transcription factor, Foxo3, amplified GATA-1–mediated transcriptional activation. To determine the scope of the GATA-1/Foxo3 cooperativity, and to develop functional insights, we analyzed the GATA-1/Foxo3-dependent transcriptome in erythroid cells. GATA-1/Foxo3 repressed expression of Exosc8, a pivotal component of the exosome complex, which mediates RNA surveillance and epigenetic regulation. Strikingly, downregulating Exosc8, or additional exosome complex components, in primary erythroid precursor cells induced erythroid cell maturation. Our results demonstrate a new mode of controlling erythropoiesis in which multiple components of the exosome complex are endogenous suppressors of the erythroid developmental program. PMID:25115889

  11. Is voluntary certification of tropical agricultural commodities achieving sustainability goals for small-scale producers? A review of the evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeFries, Ruth S.; Fanzo, Jessica; Mondal, Pinki; Remans, Roseline; Wood, Stephen A.

    2017-03-01

    Over the last several decades, voluntary certification programs have become a key approach to promote sustainable supply chains for agricultural commodities. These programs provide premiums and other benefits to producers for adhering to environmental and labor practices established by the certifying entities. Following the principles of Cochrane Reviews used in health sciences, we assess evidence to evaluate whether voluntary certification of tropical agricultural commodities (bananas, cocoa, coffee, oil palm, and tea) has achieved environmental benefits and improved economic and social outcomes for small-scale producers at the level of the farm household. We reviewed over 2600 papers in the peer-review literature and identified 24 cases of unique combinations of study area, certification program, and commodity in 16 papers that rigorously analyzed differences between treatment (certified households) and control groups (uncertified households) for a wide range of response variables. Based on analysis of 347 response variables reported in these papers, we conclude that certification is associated on average with positive outcomes for 34% of response variables, no significant difference for 58% of variables, and negative outcomes for 8% of variables. No significant differences were observed for different categories of responses (environmental, economic and social) or for different commodities (banana, coffee and tea), except negative outcomes were significantly less for environmental than other outcome categories (p = 0.01). Most cases (20 out of 24) investigated coffee certification and response variables were inconsistent across cases, indicating the paucity of studies to conduct a conclusive meta-analysis. The somewhat positive results indicate that voluntary certification programs can sometimes play a role in meeting sustainable development goals and do not support the view that such programs are merely greenwashing. However, results also indicate that

  12. Population Pharmacokinetics of Colistin Methanesulfonate in Rats: Achieving Sustained Lung Concentrations of Colistin for Targeting Respiratory Infections

    PubMed Central

    W. S. Yapa, Shalini; Li, Jian; Porter, Christopher J. H.; Nation, Roger L.

    2013-01-01

    Colistin methanesulfonate (CMS), the inactive prodrug of colistin, is administered by inhalation for the management of respiratory infections. However, limited pharmacokinetic data are available for CMS and colistin following pulmonary delivery. This study investigates the pharmacokinetics of CMS and colistin following intravenous (i.v.) and intratracheal (i.t.) administration in rats and determines the targeting advantage after direct delivery into the lungs. In addition to plasma, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid was collected to quantify drug concentrations in lung epithelial lining fluid (ELF). The resulting data were analyzed using a population modeling approach in S-ADAPT. A three-compartment model described the disposition of both compounds in plasma following i.v. administration. The estimated mean clearance from the central compartment was 0.122 liters/h for CMS and 0.0657 liters/h for colistin. Conversion of CMS to colistin from all three compartments was required to fit the plasma data. The fraction of the i.v. dose converted to colistin in the systemic circulation was 0.0255. Two BAL fluid compartments were required to reflect drug kinetics in the ELF after i.t. dosing. A slow conversion of CMS (mean conversion time [MCTCMS] = 3.48 h) in the lungs contributed to high and sustained concentrations of colistin in ELF. The fraction of the CMS dose converted to colistin in ELF (fm,ELF = 0.226) was higher than the corresponding fractional conversion in plasma after i.v. administration. In conclusion, pulmonary administration of CMS achieves high and sustained exposures of colistin in lungs for targeting respiratory infections. PMID:23917323

  13. Beyond good intentions: The role of proactive coping in achieving sustained behavioural change in the context of diabetes management.

    PubMed

    Thoolen, Bart Johan; de Ridder, Denise; Bensing, Jozien; Gorter, Kees; Rutten, Guy

    2009-03-01

    This study examines the effectiveness of a brief self-management intervention to support patients recently diagnosed with type-2 diabetes to achieve sustained improvements in their self-care behaviours. Based on proactive coping, the intervention emphasizes the crucial role of anticipation and planning in maintaining self-care behaviours. In a randomised controlled trial among recent screen-detected patients, participants who received the intervention were compared with usual-care controls, examining changes in proximal outcomes (intentions, self-efficacy and proactive coping), self-care behaviour (diet, physical activity and medication) and weight over time (0, 3 and 12 months). Subsequently, the contribution of proactive coping in predicting maintenance of behavioural change was analysed using stepwise hierarchical regression analyses, controlling for baseline self-care behaviour, patient characteristics, and intentions and self-efficacy as measured after the course. The intervention was effective in improving proximal outcomes and behaviour with regard to diet and physical activity, resulting in significant weight loss at 12 months. Furthermore, proactive coping was a better predictor of long-term self-management than either intentions or self-efficacy. Proactive coping thus offers new insights into behavioural maintenance theory and can be used to develop effective self-management interventions.

  14. Regulation of erythroid cell-specific gene expression during erythropoiesis.

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, P. R.; Plumb, M.; Frampton, J.; Llewellyn, D.; Chester, J.; Chambers, I.; MacLeod, K.; Fleming, J.; O'Prey, J.; Walker, M.

    1988-01-01

    The aim of our group's work over the past few years has been to investigate the molecular mechanisms regulating erythroid cell-specific gene expression during erythroid cell differentiation. In addition to the alpha-globin gene, we have focussed on two non-globin genes of interest encoding the rabbit red cell-specific lipoxygenase (LOX) and the mouse glutathione peroxidase (GSHPX), an important seleno-enzyme responsible for protection against peroxide-damage. Characterisation of the GSHPX gene showed that the seleno-cysteine residue in the active site of the enzyme is encoded by UGA, which usually functions as a translation-termination codon. This novel finding has important implications regarding mRNA sequence context effects affecting codon recognition. The regulation of the GSHPX and red cell LOX genes has been investigated by functional transfection experiments. The 700 bp upstream of the GSHPX promoter seems to function equally well when linked to the bacterial chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) gene and transfected into mouse erythroid or fibroblast cell lines. However, the presence of tissue-specific DNase I hypersensitive sites (DHSS) in the 3' flanking region of the GSHPX gene suggests that such sites may be important in its regulation in the various cell types in which it is highly expressed, i.e., erythroid cells, liver and kidney. The transcription unit of the RBC LOX gene has also been defined and 5' and 3' flanking regions are being investigated for erythroid-specific regulatory elements: a region upstream of the LOX gene gives increased expression of a linked CAT gene when transfected into mouse erythroid cell lines compared to non-erythroid cell lines.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3151147

  15. Pathogenesis of the erythroid failure in Diamond Blackfan anaemia.

    PubMed

    Sieff, Colin A; Yang, Jing; Merida-Long, Lilia B; Lodish, Harvey F

    2010-02-01

    Diamond Blackfan anaemia (DBA) is a severe congenital failure of erythropoiesis. Despite mutations in one of several ribosome protein genes, including RPS19, the cause of the erythroid specificity is still a mystery. We hypothesized that, because the chromatin of late erythroid cells becomes condensed and transcriptionally inactive prior to enucleation, the rapidly proliferating immature cells require very high ribosome synthetic rates. RNA biogenesis was measured in primary mouse fetal liver erythroid progenitor cells; during the first 24 h, cell number increased three to fourfold while, remarkably, RNA content increased sixfold, suggesting an accumulation of an excess of ribosomes during early erythropoiesis. Retrovirus infected siRNA RPS19 knockdown cells showed reduced proliferation but normal differentiation, and cell cycle analysis showed a G1/S phase delay. p53 protein was increased in the knockdown cells, and the mRNA level for p21, a transcriptional target of p53, was increased. Furthermore, we show that RPS19 knockdown decreased MYB protein, and Kit mRNA was reduced, as was the amount of cell surface KIT protein. Thus, in this small hairpin RNA murine model of DBA, RPS19 insufficient erythroid cells may proliferate poorly because of p53-mediated cell cycle arrest, and also because of decreased expression of the key erythroid signalling protein KIT.

  16. Sustain

    SciTech Connect

    2013-08-20

    Current building energy simulation technology requires excessive labor, time and expertise to create building energy models, excessive computational time for accurate simulations and difficulties with the interpretation of the results. These deficiencies can be ameliorated using modern graphical user interfaces and algorithms which take advantage of modern computer architectures and display capabilities. To prove this hypothesis, we developed an experimental test bed for building energy simulation. This novel test bed environment offers an easy-to-use interactive graphical interface, provides access to innovative simulation modules that run at accelerated computational speeds, and presents new graphics visualization methods to interpret simulation results. Our system offers the promise of dramatic ease of use in comparison with currently available building energy simulation tools. Its modular structure makes it suitable for early stage building design, as a research platform for the investigation of new simulation methods, and as a tool for teaching concepts of sustainable design. Improvements in the accuracy and execution speed of many of the simulation modules are based on the modification of advanced computer graphics rendering algorithms. Significant performance improvements are demonstrated in several computationally expensive energy simulation modules. The incorporation of these modern graphical techniques should advance the state of the art in the domain of whole building energy analysis and building performance simulation, particularly at the conceptual design stage when decisions have the greatest impact. More importantly, these better simulation tools will enable the transition from prescriptive to performative energy codes, resulting in better, more efficient designs for our future built environment.

  17. An Examination of Successful Leadership Behaviors Exhibited by Middle School Principals in Stimulating and Sustaining African-American Students' Achievement on the California Standards Test in Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Jacqueline

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this research study was to examine leadership behaviors of middle school principals who have been successful in stimulating and sustaining African-American students' mathematics achievement on the California Standards Test. Specifically, this research sought to answer the following questions: 1) How do middle school principal…

  18. Biology of Heme in Mammalian Erythroid Cells and Related Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Fujiwara, Tohru; Harigae, Hideo

    2015-01-01

    Heme is a prosthetic group comprising ferrous iron (Fe2+) and protoporphyrin IX and is an essential cofactor in various biological processes such as oxygen transport (hemoglobin) and storage (myoglobin) and electron transfer (respiratory cytochromes) in addition to its role as a structural component of hemoproteins. Heme biosynthesis is induced during erythroid differentiation and is coordinated with the expression of genes involved in globin formation and iron acquisition/transport. However, erythroid and nonerythroid cells exhibit distinct differences in the heme biosynthetic pathway regulation. Defects of heme biosynthesis in developing erythroblasts can have profound medical implications, as represented by sideroblastic anemia. This review will focus on the biology of heme in mammalian erythroid cells, including the heme biosynthetic pathway as well as the regulatory role of heme and human disorders that arise from defective heme synthesis. PMID:26557657

  19. Abnormal erythroid cell proliferation and myelofibrosis in a cat.

    PubMed

    Iwanaga, Tomoko; Miura, Naoki; Miyoshi, Noriaki; Endo, Yasuyuki; Momoi, Yasuyuki

    2012-07-01

    A cat was presented with severe progressive anemia despite marked erythroblastosis. The cat was negative for feline leukemia virus antigen and feline immunodeficiency virus antibody. Bone marrow cytology revealed an excess of erythroid cells with a predominance of prorubricytes and basophilic rubricytes. No response to immunosuppressive therapy was obtained, and a tentative diagnosis of myelodysplastic syndrome was made. The cat showed a partial response to low-dose cytarabine (20 mg/m(2) subcutaneously q24) but died 51 days after the 1st admission. Histopathological examination revealed fibrosis in the bone marrow and marked infiltration of erythroid cells into other organs.

  20. TMEM14C is required for erythroid mitochondrial heme metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Yien, Yvette Y.; Robledo, Raymond F.; Schultz, Iman J.; Takahashi-Makise, Naoko; Gwynn, Babette; Bauer, Daniel E.; Dass, Abhishek; Yi, Gloria; Li, Liangtao; Hildick-Smith, Gordon J.; Cooney, Jeffrey D.; Pierce, Eric L.; Mohler, Kyla; Dailey, Tamara A.; Miyata, Non; Kingsley, Paul D.; Garone, Caterina; Hattangadi, Shilpa M.; Huang, Hui; Chen, Wen; Keenan, Ellen M.; Shah, Dhvanit I.; Schlaeger, Thorsten M.; DiMauro, Salvatore; Orkin, Stuart H.; Cantor, Alan B.; Palis, James; Koehler, Carla M.; Lodish, Harvey F.; Kaplan, Jerry; Ward, Diane M.; Dailey, Harry A.; Phillips, John D.; Peters, Luanne L.; Paw, Barry H.

    2014-01-01

    The transport and intracellular trafficking of heme biosynthesis intermediates are crucial for hemoglobin production, which is a critical process in developing red cells. Here, we profiled gene expression in terminally differentiating murine fetal liver-derived erythroid cells to identify regulators of heme metabolism. We determined that TMEM14C, an inner mitochondrial membrane protein that is enriched in vertebrate hematopoietic tissues, is essential for erythropoiesis and heme synthesis in vivo and in cultured erythroid cells. In mice, TMEM14C deficiency resulted in porphyrin accumulation in the fetal liver, erythroid maturation arrest, and embryonic lethality due to profound anemia. Protoporphyrin IX synthesis in TMEM14C-deficient erythroid cells was blocked, leading to an accumulation of porphyrin precursors. The heme synthesis defect in TMEM14C-deficient cells was ameliorated with a protoporphyrin IX analog, indicating that TMEM14C primarily functions in the terminal steps of the heme synthesis pathway. Together, our data demonstrate that TMEM14C facilitates the import of protoporphyrinogen IX into the mitochondrial matrix for heme synthesis and subsequent hemoglobin production. Furthermore, the identification of TMEM14C as a protoporphyrinogen IX importer provides a genetic tool for further exploring erythropoiesis and congenital anemias. PMID:25157825

  1. Radioactive Waste Management - It's Role in contributing and achieving Sustainability. R1.13 The French strategy of waste management: technical and political dimensions of sustainability

    SciTech Connect

    Bazile, F.

    2007-07-01

    The sustainability of an energy policy depends on the manner in which it satisfies environmental, economical and social requirements. Nuclear energy is not an exception. The objectives of the future nuclear systems, as defined in the Generation IV International Forum, tend to optimize the ability of nuclear energy to satisfy sustainable development goals. In this regard, they involve strong commitments concerning waste management policy : five designs in six are based on a closed fuel cycle, in order to minimize the volume and radiotoxicity of final waste, and to recycle the fissile materials to save natural resources. Since its beginnings, the French civil nuclear programme has considered a long-term perspective and has developed spent fuel reprocessing. The French current industrial technology has already permitted to recycle 96% of spent fuel materials, to save 30% of natural resources, to reduce by 5 the amount of waste and to reduce by 10 the waste radiotoxicity, all these benefits for less than 6% of the kWh total cost. This strategy has always been criticized by the nuclear opponents, precisely because they saw that it was a sustainable way, and didn't accept to consider nuclear energy as a sustainable source of power. Two arguments were put forward these criticisms. First, the cost of reprocessing versus once-through cycle and second, the risk of proliferation induced by U-Pu partitioning process. These arguments were also invoked in international debates, and they have also been pleaded by the anti-nukes during the National Debate on HLLLW, at the end of 2005, preceding the vote of a new law in 2006 by the French parliament. Fortunately they have not convinced public opinion in France nor political decision-makers. A majority of people with no regard to technical background understand that recycling and saving the natural resources are sustainable principles. And, from a technical point of view, the 6% over cost does not seem significant considering the

  2. The heme exporter Flvcr1 regulates expansion and differentiation of committed erythroid progenitors by controlling intracellular heme accumulation.

    PubMed

    Mercurio, Sonia; Petrillo, Sara; Chiabrando, Deborah; Bassi, Zuni Irma; Gays, Dafne; Camporeale, Annalisa; Vacaru, Andrei; Miniscalco, Barbara; Valperga, Giulio; Silengo, Lorenzo; Altruda, Fiorella; Baron, Margaret H; Santoro, Massimo Mattia; Tolosano, Emanuela

    2015-06-01

    Feline leukemia virus subgroup C receptor 1 (Flvcr1) encodes two heme exporters: FLVCR1a, which localizes to the plasma membrane, and FLVCR1b, which localizes to mitochondria. Here, we investigated the role of the two Flvcr1 isoforms during erythropoiesis. We showed that, in mice and zebrafish, Flvcr1a is required for the expansion of committed erythroid progenitors but cannot drive their terminal differentiation, while Flvcr1b contributes to the expansion phase and is required for differentiation. FLVCR1a-down-regulated K562 cells have defective proliferation, enhanced differentiation, and heme loading in the cytosol, while FLVCR1a/1b-deficient K562 cells show impairment in both proliferation and differentiation, and accumulate heme in mitochondria. These data support a model in which the coordinated expression of Flvcr1a and Flvcr1b contributes to control the size of the cytosolic heme pool required to sustain metabolic activity during the expansion of erythroid progenitors and to allow hemoglobinization during their terminal maturation. Consistently, reduction or increase of the cytosolic heme rescued the erythroid defects in zebrafish deficient in Flvcr1a or Flvcr1b, respectively. Thus, heme export represents a tightly regulated process that controls erythropoiesis.

  3. Heme-bound iron activates placenta growth factor in erythroid cells via erythroid Krüppel-like factor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xunde; Mendelsohn, Laurel; Rogers, Heather; Leitman, Susan; Raghavachari, Nalini; Yang, Yanqin; Yau, Yu Ying; Tallack, Michael; Perkins, Andrew; Taylor, James G; Noguchi, Constance Tom; Kato, Gregory J

    2014-08-07

    In adults with sickle cell disease (SCD), markers of iron burden are associated with excessive production of the angiogenic protein placenta growth factor (PlGF) and high estimated pulmonary artery pressure. Enforced PlGF expression in mice stimulates production of the potent vasoconstrictor endothelin-1, producing pulmonary hypertension. We now demonstrate heme-bound iron (hemin) induces PlGF mRNA >200-fold in a dose- and time-dependent fashion. In murine and human erythroid cells, expression of erythroid Krüppel-like factor (EKLF) precedes PlGF, and its enforced expression in human erythroid progenitor cells induces PlGF mRNA. Hemin-induced expression of PlGF is abolished in EKLF-deficient murine erythroid cells but rescued by conditional expression of EKLF. Chromatin immunoprecipitation reveals that EKLF binds to the PlGF promoter region. SCD patients show higher level expression of both EKLF and PlGF mRNA in circulating blood cells, and markers of iron overload are associated with high PlGF and early mortality. Finally, PlGF association with iron burden generalizes to other human diseases of iron overload. Our results demonstrate a specific mechanistic pathway induced by excess iron that is linked in humans with SCD and in mice to markers of vasculopathy and pulmonary hypertension. These trials were registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00007150, #NCT00023296, #NCT00081523, and #NCT00352430.

  4. CD14+ cells from peripheral blood positively regulate hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell survival resulting in increased erythroid yield.

    PubMed

    Heideveld, Esther; Masiello, Francesca; Marra, Manuela; Esteghamat, Fatemehsadat; Yağcı, Nurcan; von Lindern, Marieke; Migliaccio, Anna Rita F; van den Akker, Emile

    2015-11-01

    Expansion of erythroblasts from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells is 4- to 15-fold more efficient than that of CD34(+) cells purified from peripheral blood mononuclear cells. In addition, purified CD34(+) and CD34(-) populations from blood do not reconstitute this erythroid yield, suggesting a role for feeder cells present in blood mononuclear cells that increase hematopoietic output. Immunodepleting peripheral blood mononuclear cells for CD14(+) cells reduced hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell expansion. Conversely, the yield was increased upon co-culture of CD34(+) cells with CD14(+) cells (full contact or transwell assays) or CD34(+) cells re-constituted in conditioned medium from CD14(+) cells. In particular, CD14(++)CD16(+) intermediate monocytes/macrophages enhanced erythroblast outgrowth from CD34(+) cells. No effect of CD14(+) cells on erythroblasts themselves was observed. However, 2 days of co-culturing CD34(+) and CD14(+) cells increased CD34(+) cell numbers and colony-forming units 5-fold. Proliferation assays suggested that CD14(+) cells sustain CD34(+) cell survival but not proliferation. These data identify previously unrecognized erythroid and non-erythroid CD34(-) and CD34(+) populations in blood that contribute to the erythroid yield. A flow cytometry panel containing CD34/CD36 can be used to follow specific stages during CD34(+) differentiation to erythroblasts. We have shown modulation of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell survival by CD14(+) cells present in peripheral blood mononuclear cells which can also be found near specific hematopoietic niches in the bone marrow.

  5. When wastewater has worth: Water reconditioning opportunities in the food industry to achieve sustainable food manufacturing (abstract)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A major sustainability goal of food processing wastewater (FPWW) management is to not only decrease environmental pollution but also utilize valuable co-products present in the FPWW. Many processed food products, especially those from fruits and vegetables, result in FPWW streams that contain compou...

  6. Going Green: A Comparative Case Study of How Three Higher Education Institutions Achieved Progressive Measures of Environmental Sustainability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Matthew R.

    2009-01-01

    Leal Filho, MacDermot, and Padgam (1996) contended that post-secondary institutions are well suited to take on leadership responsibilities for society's environmental protection. Higher education has the unique academic freedom to engage in critical thinking and bold experimentation in environmental sustainability (Cortese, 2003). Although…

  7. Institutional Incorporation of Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT) in Residency Training: Achieving a Sustainable Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Denise M.; McLaurin-Jones, TyWanda; Brown, Fannie D.; Newton, Robin; Marshall, Vanessa J.; Kalu, Nnenna; Cain, Gloria E.; Taylor, Robert E.

    2012-01-01

    The success of implementing a screening, brief intervention and referral to treatment (SBIRT) program within a medical residency program for sustainability is contingent upon a well-crafted training curriculum that incorporates substance abuse education and clinical practice skills. The goal of the Howard University (HU) SBIRT program is to train…

  8. The role of DNA methylation in catechol-enhanced erythroid differentiation of K562 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xiao-Fei; Wu, Xiao-Rong; Xue, Ming; Wang, Yan; Wang, Jie; Li, Yang; Suriguga,; Zhang, Guang-Yao; Yi, Zong-Chun

    2012-11-15

    Catechol is one of phenolic metabolites of benzene in vivo. Catechol is also widely used in pharmaceutical and chemical industries. In addition, fruits, vegetables and cigarette smoke also contain catechol. Our precious study showed that several benzene metabolites (phenol, hydroquinone, and 1,2,4-benzenetriol) inhibited erythroid differentiation of K562 cells. In present study, the effect of catechol on erythroid differentiation of K562 cells was investigated. Moreover, to address the role of DNA methylation in catechol-induced effect on erythroid differentiation in K562 cells, methylation levels of erythroid-specific genes were analyzed by Quantitative MassARRAY methylation analysis platform. Benzidine staining showed that exposure to catechol enhanced hemin-induced hemoglobin accumulation in K562 cells in concentration- and time-dependent manners. The mRNA expression of erythroid specific genes, including α-globin, β-globin, γ-globin, erythroid 5-aminolevulinate synthase, erythroid porphobilinogen deaminase, and transcription factor GATA-1 genes, showed a significant concentration-dependent increase in catechol-treated K562 cells. The exposure to catechol caused a decrease in DNA methylation levels at a few CpG sites in some erythroid specific genes including α-globin, β-globin and erythroid porphobilinogen deaminase genes. These results indicated that catechol improved erythroid differentiation potency of K562 cells at least partly via up-regulating transcription of some erythroid related genes, and suggested that inhibition of DNA methylation might be involved in up-regulated expression of some erythroid related genes. -- Highlights: ► Catechol enhanced hemin-induced hemoglobin accumulation. ► Exposure to catechol resulted in up-regulated expression of erythroid genes. ► Catechol reduced methylation levels at some CpG sites in erythroid genes.

  9. Sustainable energy for all. Technical report of task force 1 in support of the objective to achieve universal access to modern energy services by 2030

    SciTech Connect

    Birol, Fatih

    2012-04-15

    The UN Secretary General established the Sustainable Energy for All initiative in order to guide and support efforts to achieve universal access to modern energy, rapidly increase energy efficiency, and expand the use of renewable energies. Task forces were formed involving prominent energy leaders and experts from business, government, academia and civil society worldwide. The goal of the Task Forces is to inform the implementation of the initiative by identifying challenges and opportunities for achieving its objectives. This report contains the findings of Task Force One which is dedicated to the objective of achieving universal access to modern energy services by 2030. The report shows that universal energy access can be realized by 2030 with strong, focused actions set within a coordinated framework.

  10. Haemoglobin biosynthesis site in rabbit embryo erythroid cells.

    PubMed

    Cianciarullo, Aurora M; Bertho, Alvaro L; Soares, Maurilio J; Hosoda, Tânia M; Nogueira-Silva, Simone; Beçak, Willy

    2003-01-01

    Properly metabolized globin synthesis and iron uptake are indispensable for erythroid cell differentiation and maturation. Mitochondrial participation is crucial in the process of haeme synthesis for cytochromes and haemoglobin. We studied the final biosynthesis site of haemoglobin using an ultrastructural approach, with erythroid cells obtained from rabbit embryos, in order to compare these results with those of animals treated with saponine or phenylhydrazine. Our results are similar to those obtained in assays with adult mammals, birds, amphibians, reptiles and fish, after induction of haemolytic anaemia. Therefore, the treatment did not interfere with the process studied, confirming our previous findings. Immunoelectron microscopy showed no labelling of mitochondria or other cellular organelles supposedly involved in the final biosynthesis of haemoglobin molecules, suggesting instead that it occurs free in the cytoplasm immediately after the liberation of haeme from the mitochondria, by electrostatic attraction between haeme and globin chains.

  11. Cpeb4-mediated translational regulatory circuitry controls terminal erythroid differentiation.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wenqian; Yuan, Bingbing; Lodish, Harvey F

    2014-09-29

    While we have considerable understanding of the transcriptional networks controlling mammalian cell differentiation, our knowledge of posttranscriptional regulatory events is very limited. Using differentiation of primary erythroid cells as a model, we show that the sequence-specific mRNA-binding protein Cpeb4 is strongly induced by the erythroid-important transcription factors Gata1 and Tal1 and is essential for terminal erythropoiesis. By interacting with the translation initiation factor eIF3, Cpeb4 represses the translation of a large set of mRNAs, including its own mRNA. Thus, transcriptional induction and translational repression combine to form a negative feedback loop to control Cpeb4 protein levels within a specific range that is required for terminal erythropoiesis. Our study provides an example of how translational control is integrated with transcriptional regulation to precisely control gene expression during mammalian cell differentiation.

  12. Cpeb4-mediated translational regulatory circuitry controls terminal erythroid differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Wenqian; Yuan, Bingbing; Lodish, Harvey F.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY While we have considerable understanding of the transcriptional networks controlling mammalian cell differentiation, our knowledge of post-transcriptional regulatory events is very limited. Using differentiation of primary erythroid cells as a model, we show that the sequence-specific mRNA-binding protein Cpeb4 is strongly induced by the erythroid important transcription factors Gata1 and Tal1 and is essential for terminal erythropoiesis. By interacting with the translation initiation factor eIF3 Cpeb4 represses the translation of a large set of mRNAs, including its own mRNA. Thus transcriptional induction and translational repression combine to form a negative feedback loop to control Cpeb4 protein levels within a specific range that is required for terminal erythropoiesis. Our study provides an example of how translational control is integrated with transcriptional regulation to precisely control gene expression during mammalian cell differentiation. PMID:25220394

  13. Down-regulation of Myc is essential for terminal erythroid maturation.

    PubMed

    Jayapal, Senthil Raja; Lee, Kian Leong; Ji, Peng; Kaldis, Philipp; Lim, Bing; Lodish, Harvey F

    2010-12-17

    Terminal differentiation of mammalian erythroid progenitors involves 4-5 cell divisions and induction of many erythroid important genes followed by chromatin and nuclear condensation and enucleation. The protein levels of c-Myc (Myc) are reduced dramatically during late stage erythroid maturation, coinciding with cell cycle arrest in G(1) phase and enucleation, suggesting possible roles for c-Myc in either or both of these processes. Here we demonstrate that ectopic Myc expression affects terminal erythroid maturation in a dose-dependent manner. Expression of Myc at physiological levels did not affect erythroid differentiation or cell cycle shutdown but specifically blocked erythroid nuclear condensation and enucleation. Continued Myc expression prevented deacetylation of several lysine residues in histones H3 and H4 that are normally deacetylated during erythroid maturation. The histone acetyltransferase Gcn5 was up-regulated by Myc, and ectopic Gcn5 expression partially blocked enucleation and inhibited the late stage erythroid nuclear condensation and histone deacetylation. When overexpressed at levels higher than the physiological range, Myc blocked erythroid differentiation, and the cells continued to proliferate in cytokine-free, serum-containing culture medium with an early erythroblast morphology. Gene expression analysis demonstrated the dysregulation of erythropoietin signaling pathway and the up-regulation of several positive regulators of G(1)-S cell cycle checkpoint by supraphysiological levels of Myc. These results reveal an important dose-dependent function of Myc in regulating terminal maturation in mammalian erythroid cells.

  14. Sustainable Communities: A Lens for Envisioning and Achieving a Community-Based Culture of Social and Ecological Peace

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verhagen, Frans C.

    2014-01-01

    One of the obstacles to dealing with the social and ecological crises that obstruct the achievement of a culture of peace is silo thinking in global governance. A unidimensional mode of planning, silo thinking leads to decisions based on the area of expertise of a particular agency or intergovernmental organization and fails to recognize linkages…

  15. A Systematic Approach for Measuring Sustained Effect and for Comparing Compensatory Education Programs Using Achievement Test Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noonan, Al

    The system discussed in this paper was successfully used to track approximately 17,000 students participating in various educational programs and to measure their gains through achievement test results. It was developed for a school district with twelve supplementary instruction programs, and has been in use since the 1975-76 school year. The…

  16. Hype, harmony and human factors: applying user-centered design to achieve sustainable telehealth program adoption and growth.

    PubMed

    Rossos, P G; St-Cyr, O; Purdy, B; Toenjes, C; Masino, C; Chmelnitsky, D

    2015-01-01

    Despite decades of international experience with the use of information and communication technologies in healthcare delivery, widespread telehealth adoption remains limited and progress slow. Escalating health system challenges related to access, cost and quality currently coincide with rapid advancement of affordable and reliable internet based communication technologies creating unprecedented opportunities and incentives for telehealth. In this paper, we will describe how Human Factors Engineering (HFE) and user-centric elements have been incorporated into the establishment of telehealth within a large academic medical center to increase acceptance and sustainability. Through examples and lessons learned we wish to increase awareness of HFE and its importance in the successful implementation, innovation and growth of telehealth programs.

  17. Moving Toward Universal Health Coverage (UHC) to Achieve Inclusive and Sustainable Health Development: Three Essential Strategies Drawn From Asian Experience

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ye; Huang, Cheng; Colón-Ramos, Uriyoán

    2015-01-01

    Binagwaho and colleagues’ perspective piece provided a timely reflection on the experience of Rwanda in achieving the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and a proposal of 5 principles to carry forward in post-2015 health development. This commentary echoes their viewpoints and offers three lessons for health policy reforms consistent with these principles beyond 2015. Specifically, we argue that universal health coverage (UHC) is an integrated solution to advance the global health development agenda, and the three essential strategies drawn from Asian countries’ health reforms toward UHC are: (1) Public financing support and sequencing health insurance expansion by first extending health insurance to the extremely poor, vulnerable, and marginalized population are critical for achieving UHC; (2) Improved quality of delivered care ensures supply-side readiness and effective coverage; (3) Strategic purchasing and results-based financing creates incentives and accountability for positive changes. These strategies were discussed and illustrated with experience from China and other Asian economies. PMID:26673477

  18. The role of DNA methylation in catechol-enhanced erythroid differentiation of K562 cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Fei; Wu, Xiao-Rong; Xue, Ming; Wang, Yan; Wang, Jie; Li, Yang; Suriguga; Zhang, Guang-Yao; Yi, Zong-Chun

    2012-11-15

    Catechol is one of phenolic metabolites of benzene in vivo. Catechol is also widely used in pharmaceutical and chemical industries. In addition, fruits, vegetables and cigarette smoke also contain catechol. Our precious study showed that several benzene metabolites (phenol, hydroquinone, and 1,2,4-benzenetriol) inhibited erythroid differentiation of K562 cells. In present study, the effect of catechol on erythroid differentiation of K562 cells was investigated. Moreover, to address the role of DNA methylation in catechol-induced effect on erythroid differentiation in K562 cells, methylation levels of erythroid-specific genes were analyzed by Quantitative MassARRAY methylation analysis platform. Benzidine staining showed that exposure to catechol enhanced hemin-induced hemoglobin accumulation in K562 cells in concentration- and time-dependent manners. The mRNA expression of erythroid specific genes, including α-globin, β-globin, γ-globin, erythroid 5-aminolevulinate synthase, erythroid porphobilinogen deaminase, and transcription factor GATA-1 genes, showed a significant concentration-dependent increase in catechol-treated K562 cells. The exposure to catechol caused a decrease in DNA methylation levels at a few CpG sites in some erythroid specific genes including α-globin, β-globin and erythroid porphobilinogen deaminase genes. These results indicated that catechol improved erythroid differentiation potency of K562 cells at least partly via up-regulating transcription of some erythroid related genes, and suggested that inhibition of DNA methylation might be involved in up-regulated expression of some erythroid related genes.

  19. Use of science to guide city planning policy and practice: how to achieve healthy and sustainable future cities.

    PubMed

    Sallis, James F; Bull, Fiona; Burdett, Ricky; Frank, Lawrence D; Griffiths, Peter; Giles-Corti, Billie; Stevenson, Mark

    2016-12-10

    Land-use and transport policies contribute to worldwide epidemics of injuries and non-communicable diseases through traffic exposure, noise, air pollution, social isolation, low physical activity, and sedentary behaviours. Motorised transport is a major cause of the greenhouse gas emissions that are threatening human health. Urban and transport planning and urban design policies in many cities do not reflect the accumulating evidence that, if policies would take health effects into account, they could benefit a wide range of common health problems. Enhanced research translation to increase the influence of health research on urban and transport planning decisions could address many global health problems. This paper illustrates the potential for such change by presenting conceptual models and case studies of research translation applied to urban and transport planning and urban design. The primary recommendation of this paper is for cities to actively pursue compact and mixed-use urban designs that encourage a transport modal shift away from private motor vehicles towards walking, cycling, and public transport. This Series concludes by urging a systematic approach to city design to enhance health and sustainability through active transport and a move towards new urban mobility. Such an approach promises to be a powerful strategy for improvements in population health on a permanent basis.

  20. Human uroporphyrinogen-III synthase: genomic organization, alternative promoters, and erythroid-specific expression.

    PubMed

    Aizencang, G; Solis, C; Bishop, D F; Warner, C; Desnick, R J

    2000-12-01

    Uroporphyrinogen-III (URO) synthase is the heme biosynthetic enzyme defective in congenital erythropoietic porphyria. The approximately 34-kb human URO-synthase gene (UROS) was isolated, and its organization and tissue-specific expression were determined. The gene had two promoters that generated housekeeping and erythroid-specific transcripts with unique 5'-untranslated sequences (exons 1 and 2A) followed by nine common coding exons (2B to 10). Expression arrays revealed that the housekeeping transcript was present in all tissues, while the erythroid transcript was only in erythropoietic tissues. The housekeeping promoter lacked TATA and SP1 sites, consistent with the observed low level expression in most cells, whereas the erythroid promoter contained GATA1 and NF-E2 sites for erythroid specificity. Luciferase reporter assays demonstrated that the housekeeping promoter was active in both erythroid K562 and HeLa cells, while the erythroid promoter was active only in erythroid cells and its activity was increased during hemin-induced erythroid differentiation. Thus, human URO-synthase expression is regulated during erythropoiesis by an erythroid-specific alternative promoter.

  1. Shallow Geothermal Admissibility Maps: a Methodology to Achieve a Sustainable Development of Shallow Geothermal Energy with Regards to Groundwater Resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bréthaut, D.; Parriaux, A.; Tacher, L.

    2009-04-01

    .g. map of contaminated areas) was gathered in order to produce the admissibility maps. For one area, a more detailed study has been performed and a complete 3D geological model has been constructed using an in-house modelling software called GeoShape. The model was then imported into a geographical information system which has been used to realize the admissibility map. Resulting maps were judged to be consistent and satisfying. In a second part of the project, this method will be applied at a larger scale. An admissibility map of the canton of Vaud (3200 km2) will be created. Considering the fast growth of the number of implanted GSHP and GWSHP throughout the world, it is clear that admissibility maps will play a major role in developing shallow geothermal energy as an environmentally friendly and sustainable resource.

  2. Functions of BET proteins in erythroid gene expression.

    PubMed

    Stonestrom, Aaron J; Hsu, Sarah C; Jahn, Kristen S; Huang, Peng; Keller, Cheryl A; Giardine, Belinda M; Kadauke, Stephan; Campbell, Amy E; Evans, Perry; Hardison, Ross C; Blobel, Gerd A

    2015-04-30

    Inhibitors of bromodomain and extraterminal motif proteins (BETs) are being evaluated for the treatment of cancer and other diseases, yet much remains to be learned about how BET proteins function during normal physiology. We used genomic and genetic approaches to examine BET function in a hematopoietic maturation system driven by GATA1, an acetylated transcription factor previously shown to interact with BETs. We found that BRD2, BRD3, and BRD4 were variably recruited to GATA1-regulated genes, with BRD3 binding the greatest number of GATA1-occupied sites. Pharmacologic BET inhibition impaired GATA1-mediated transcriptional activation, but not repression, genome-wide. Mechanistically, BETs promoted chromatin occupancy of GATA1 and subsequently supported transcriptional activation. Using a combination of CRISPR-Cas9-mediated genomic engineering and shRNA approaches, we observed that depletion of either BRD2 or BRD4 alone blunted erythroid gene activation. Surprisingly, depletion of BRD3 only affected erythroid transcription in the context of BRD2 deficiency. Consistent with functional overlap among BET proteins, forced BRD3 expression substantially rescued defects caused by BRD2 deficiency. These results suggest that pharmacologic BET inhibition should be interpreted in the context of distinct steps in transcriptional activation and overlapping functions among BET family members.

  3. Cdk6 contributes to cytoskeletal stability in erythroid cells.

    PubMed

    Uras, Iris Z; Scheicher, Ruth M; Kollmann, Karoline; Glösmann, Martin; Prchal-Murphy, Michaela; Tigan, Anca S; Fux, Daniela A; Altamura, Sandro; Neves, Joana; Muckenthaler, Martina; Bennett, Keiryn L; Kubicek, Stefan; Hinds, Philip W; von Lindern, Marieke; Sexl, Veronika

    2017-03-02

    Mice lacking Cdk6 kinase activity suffer from mild anemia accompanied by elevated numbers of Ter119+ cells in the bone marrow. The animals show hardly any alterations in erythroid development, indicating that Cdk6 is not required for proliferation and maturation of erythroid cells. There is also no difference in stress erythropoiesis following hemolysis in vivo. However, Cdk6-/- erythrocytes have a shortened lifespan and are more sensitive to mechanical stress in vitro, suggesting differences in the cytoskeletal architecture. Erythroblasts contain both Cdk4 and Cdk6, while mature erythrocytes apparently lack Cdk4 and their Cdk6 is partly associated with the cytoskeleton. We used mass spectrometry to show that Cdk6 interacts with a number of proteins involved in cytoskeletal organization. Cdk6-/- erythroblasts show impaired F-actin formation and lower levels of gelsolin, which interacts with Cdk6. We show further that Cdk6 regulates the transcription of a panel of genes involved in actin (de-) polymerization. Cdk6-deficient cells are sensitive to drugs that interfere with the cytoskeleton, suggesting that our findings are relevant to the treatment of patients with anemia and may be relevant to cancer patients treated with the new generation of CDK6 inhibitors.

  4. Erythroid expression and DNAaseI-hypersensitive sites of the carbonic anhydrase 1 gene.

    PubMed Central

    Sowden, J; Edwards, M; Morrison, K; Butterworth, P H; Edwards, Y H

    1992-01-01

    The carbonic anhydrase 1 gene is expressed in adult human and mouse erythroid cells and colon epithelia from two distinct promoters. We have explored the erythroid promoter for cis-acting sequences involved in transcription using DNAaseI as a probe. Two DNAaseI-hypersensitive sites (DHS-1 and DHS-2) have been identified in the distal erythroid promoter in CA1-expressing erythroleukaemic cells. These sites are present at low levels in K562 cells, which have a foetal/embryonic phenotype and do not express CA1. DHS-1 and DHS-2 are not present in non-erythroid cells, including colon cells, which express CA1 from the proximal colon promoter. DHS-1 and DHS-2 were also generated in an heterologous CA1 gene containing 5 kb of erythroid promoter sequence after transfection into erythroid cells, including K562 cells. These transfection studies showed that both this fragment, and an abbreviated 817 bp promoter fragment which contains only DHS-1, were sufficient to confer erythroid-specific expression to a reporter gene. These promoters were active in cell lines expressing CA1 and in K562 cells. This latter observation implies that a developmental repressor factor is both present in K562 cells and binds to a cis-acting sequence that is absent from the sequence 5 kb upstream of the erythroid transcription start site. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. PMID:1463458

  5. Long-term follow-up of myelodysplastic syndrome patients with moderate/severe anaemia receiving human recombinant erythropoietin + 13-cis-retinoic acid and dihydroxylated vitamin D3: independent positive impact of erythroid response on survival.

    PubMed

    Crisà, Elena; Foli, Cristina; Passera, Roberto; Darbesio, Antonella; Garvey, Kimberly B; Boccadoro, Mario; Ferrero, Dario

    2012-07-01

    We previously reported a 60% erythroid response rate with recombinant erythropoietin + 13-cis retinoic acid + dihydroxylated vitamin D3 in 63 elderly myelodysplastic patients (median age 75 years) with unfavourable features for response to erythropoietin alone [70% transfusion-dependent, 35% refractory anaemia with ring sideroblasts/refractory anaemia with excess of blasts type 1 (RAEB1), 70% with International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS) Intermediate-1 or -2]. This report updates that case study at a 7-year follow-up, and compared the impact on overall survival of erythroid response to known prognostic factors. The erythroid response duration (median 17 months; 22 in non-RAEB patients, with 20% patients in response after 6 years of therapy) was longer than in most studies with erythropoietin alone. Overall survival (median 55 months in non-RAEB, 15 in RAEB1 patients) was negatively affected by RAEB1 diagnosis, IPSS and WPSS intermediate scores and transfusion-dependence. In the multivariate analysis, erythroid response maintained an independent positive impact on survival, particularly in non-RAEB patients in the first 3 years from diagnosis (90% survival compared to 50% of non-responders). In conclusion, the long-term follow-up confirmed the achievement, by our combined treatment, of fairly long-lasting erythroid response in the majority of MDS patients with unfavourable prognostic features for response to erythropoietin: this translated in a survival benefit that was independent from other prognostic features.

  6. Glutathione peroxidase 4 prevents necroptosis in mouse erythroid precursors

    PubMed Central

    Canli, Özge; Alankuş, Yasemin B.; Grootjans, Sasker; Vegi, Naidu; Hültner, Lothar; Hoppe, Philipp S.; Schroeder, Timm; Vandenabeele, Peter; Bornkamm, Georg W.

    2016-01-01

    Maintaining cellular redox balance is vital for cell survival and tissue homoeostasis because imbalanced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) may lead to oxidative stress and cell death. The antioxidant enzyme glutathione peroxidase 4 (Gpx4) is a key regulator of oxidative stress–induced cell death. We show that mice with deletion of Gpx4 in hematopoietic cells develop anemia and that Gpx4 is essential for preventing receptor-interacting protein 3 (RIP3)-dependent necroptosis in erythroid precursor cells. Absence of Gpx4 leads to functional inactivation of caspase 8 by glutathionylation, resulting in necroptosis, which occurs independently of tumor necrosis factor α activation. Although genetic ablation of Rip3 normalizes reticulocyte maturation and prevents anemia, ROS accumulation and lipid peroxidation in Gpx4-deficient cells remain high. Our results demonstrate that ROS and lipid hydroperoxides function as not-yet-recognized unconventional upstream signaling activators of RIP3-dependent necroptosis. PMID:26463424

  7. Long noncoding RNA-mediated anti-apoptotic activity in murine erythroid terminal differentiation.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wenqian; Yuan, Bingbing; Flygare, Johan; Lodish, Harvey F

    2011-12-15

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are differentially expressed under both normal and pathological conditions, implying that they may play important biological functions. Here we examined the expression of lncRNAs during erythropoiesis and identified an erythroid-specific lncRNA with anti-apoptotic activity. Inhibition of this lncRNA blocks erythroid differentiation and promotes apoptosis. Conversely, ectopic expression of this lncRNA can inhibit apoptosis in mouse erythroid cells. This lncRNA represses expression of Pycard, a proapoptotic gene, explaining in part the inhibition of programmed cell death. These findings reveal a novel layer of regulation of cell differentiation and apoptosis by a lncRNA.

  8. Daclatasvir plus sofosbuvir, with or without ribavirin, achieved high sustained virological response rates in patients with HCV infection and advanced liver disease in a real-world cohort

    PubMed Central

    Welzel, Tania M; Petersen, Jörg; Herzer, Kerstin; Ferenci, Peter; Gschwantler, Michael; Wedemeyer, Heiner; Berg, Thomas; Spengler, Ulrich; Weiland, Ola; van der Valk, Marc; Rockstroh, Jürgen; Peck-Radosavljevic, Markus; Zhao, Yue; Jimenez-Exposito, Maria Jesus; Zeuzem, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Objective We assessed the effectiveness and safety of daclatasvir (DCV) plus sofosbuvir (SOF), with or without ribavirin (RBV), in a large real-world cohort, including patients with advanced liver disease. Design Adults with chronic HCV infection at high risk of decompensation or death within 12 months and with no available treatment options were treated in a European compassionate use programme. The recommended regimen was DCV 60 mg plus SOF 400 mg for 24 weeks; RBV addition or shorter duration was allowed at physicians' discretion. The primary endpoint was sustained virological response at post-treatment week 12 (SVR12). Results Of the 485 evaluable patients, 359 received DCV+SOF and 126 DCV+SOF+RBV. Most patients were men (66%), white (93%) and treatment-experienced (70%). The most frequent HCV genotypes were 1b (36%), 1a (33%) and 3 (21%), and 80% of patients had cirrhosis (42% Child–Pugh B/C; 46% Model for End-Stage Liver Disease score >10). SVR12 (modified intention-to-treat) was achieved by 91% of patients (419/460); 1 patient had virological breakthrough and 13 patients relapsed. Virological failure was not associated with treatment group (adjusted risk difference DCV+SOF minus DCV+SOF+RBV: 1.06%; 95% CI −2.22% to 4.35%). High SVR12 was observed regardless of HCV genotype or cirrhosis, liver transplant or HIV/HCV coinfection status. Twenty eight patients discontinued treatment due to adverse events (n=18) or death (n=10) and 18 died during follow-up. Deaths and most safety events were associated with advanced liver disease and not considered treatment related. Conclusions DCV+SOF with or without RBV achieved high SVR12 and was well tolerated in a diverse cohort of patients with severe liver disease. Trial registration number NCT0209966. PMID:27605539

  9. The Potential Role of Cell Penetrating Peptides in the Intracellular Delivery of Proteins for Therapy of Erythroid Related Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Papadopoulou, Lefkothea C.; Tsiftsoglou, Asterios S.

    2013-01-01

    The erythroid related disorders (ERDs) represent a large group of hematological diseases, which in most cases are attributed either to the deficiency or malfunction of biosynthetic enzymes or oxygen transport proteins. Current treatments for these disorders include histo-compatible erythrocyte transfusions or allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation. Gene therapy delivered via suitable viral vectors or genetically modified HSCs have been under way. Protein Transduction Domain (PTD) technology has allowed the production and intracellular delivery of recombinant therapeutic proteins, bearing Cell Penetrating Peptides (CPPs), into a variety of mammalian cells. Remarkable progress in the field of protein transduction leads to the development of novel protein therapeutics (CPP-mediated PTs) for the treatment of monogenetic and/or metabolic disorders. The “concept” developed in this paper is the intracellular protein delivery made possible via the PTD technology as a novel therapeutic intervention for treatment of ERDs. This can be achieved via four stages including: (i) the production of genetically engineered human CPP-mediated PT of interest, since the corresponding native protein either is missing or is mutated in the erythroid progenitor cell (ErPCs) or mature erythrocytes of patients; (ii) isolation of target cells from the peripheral blood of the selected patients; (iii) ex vivo transduction of cells with the CPP-mediated PT of interest; and (iv) re-administration of the successfully transduced cells back into the same patients. PMID:24275786

  10. Force Dependent Changes in Non-Erythroid Spectrin and Ankyrins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degaga, Eleni; Forstner, Martin

    2012-02-01

    Mechanotransduction in cells describes the process by which external physical stimuli are converted into biochemical activity and plays an important role in many biological functions on both the cell and tissue level. However, the specific mechanisms by which mechanical forces lead to particular molecular and cellular responses are much less understood. We investigate the changes in non-erythroid spectrin and ankyrins as a result of equi-biaxial strain application to live cells in culture. Specifically, we focus on the spectrins' role in the ubiquitination process - a vital process in the regulation of protein degradation- of spectrin and ankyrins. We utilize immune-fluorescence staining and fluorescent fusion proteins for quantitative fluorescence imaging as well as biochemical methods to measure changes in of cell's spectrin and ankyrin content. Protein expression levels and localization between cells exposed to mechanical stimuli of different temporal and spatial profiles are compared. In addition, the threshold behavior of cell proliferation - as measured by number densities - of a variety of cell types as a function of mechano-stimulation is investigated.

  11. Successful achievement of sustained virological response to triple combination therapy containing simeprevir in two patients with chronic hepatitis C who had failed asunaprevir:Daclatasvir combination therapy.

    PubMed

    Ozeki, Itaru; Nakajima, Tomoaki; Yamaguchi, Masakatsu; Kimura, Mutsuumi; Arakawa, Tomohiro; Kuwata, Yasuaki; Ohmura, Takumi; Sato, Takahiro; Hige, Shuhei; Karino, Yoshiyasu; Toyota, Joji

    2016-10-01

    Patients 1 and 2 were treatment-naive women who had genotype 1b chronic hepatitis C. Both had IL-28B genotype TT, and amino acid substitutions of core 70 and 91 were both wild type. Search for the presence of resistance-associated variants (RAV) in non-structural (NS)3 and NS5A regions confirmed wild-type D168 and L31, along with Y93H, in both patients. These patients participated in a Japanese phase III clinical study of asunaprevir and daclatasvir at the age of 52 and 67 years, respectively, and were treated with the combination regimen for 24 weeks. However, both experienced post-treatment relapse, and then treated with triple combination therapy with simeprevir, pegylated interferon (IFN) and ribavirin at the age of 53 and 68 years, respectively, and achieved sustained virological response. A search for RAV prior to simeprevir treatment identified multiple resistance including D168E, Y93H and L31V in both patients. It has been demonstrated that, in many cases, a treatment failure with a combination of asunaprevir and daclatasvir results in acquisition of RAV in NS3 and NS5A regions and that drug-resistant mutants, particularly those in the NS5A region, survive for a long time. In these cases, direct-acting antivirals targeted towards the NS5A region may have a limited efficacy. The present case report is based on an idea that a regimen containing IFN with simeprevir could be a therapeutic option particularly for those who are likely to be highly sensitive and tolerable to IFN.

  12. Sustaining Excellence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moorse, Rosemary; Reisenberger, Anna

    This publication outlines prerequisites for success, critical factors in achieving excellence, and strategies for sustaining excellence once high levels of performance have been achieved. It considers how quality and improvement models might be used to support colleges in this work and draws on the work of 10 colleges in the United Kingdom that…

  13. The thyroid hormone receptor functions as a ligand-operated developmental switch between proliferation and differentiation of erythroid progenitors.

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, A; Mikulits, W; Lagger, G; Stengl, G; Brosch, G; Beug, H

    1998-01-01

    The avian erythroblastosis virus (AEV) oncoprotein v-ErbA represents a mutated, oncogenic thyroid hormone receptor alpha (c-ErbA/ TRalpha). v-ErbA cooperates with the stem cell factor-activated, endogenous receptor tyrosine kinase c-Kit to induce self-renewal and to arrest differentiation of primary avian erythroblasts, the AEV transformation target cells. In this cooperation, v-ErbA substitutes for endogenous steroid hormone receptor function required for sustained proliferation of non-transformed erythroid progenitors. In this paper, we propose a novel concept of how v-ErbA transforms erythroblasts. Using culture media strictly depleted from thyroid hormone (T3) and retinoids, the ligands for c-ErbA/TRalpha and its co-receptor RXR, we show that overexpressed, unliganded c-ErbA/ TRalpha closely resembles v-ErbA in its activity on primary erythroblasts. In cooperation with ligand-activated c-Kit, c-ErbA/ TRalpha causes steroid-independent, long-term proliferation and tightly blocks differentiation. Activation of c-ErbA/ TRalpha by physiological T3 levels causes the loss of self-renewal capacity and induces synchronous, terminal differentiation under otherwise identical conditions. This T3-induced switch in erythroid progenitor development is correlated with a decrease of c-ErbA-associated histone deacetylase activity. Our results suggest that the crucial role of the mutations activating v-erbA as an oncogene is to 'freeze' c-ErbA/ TRalpha in its non-liganded, repressive conformation and to facilitate its overexpression. PMID:9687498

  14. A phase 1 study of ACE-536, a regulator of erythroid differentiation, in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Attie, Kenneth M; Allison, Mark J; McClure, Ty; Boyd, Ingrid E; Wilson, Dawn M; Pearsall, Amelia E; Sherman, Matthew L

    2014-07-01

    ACE-536, a recombinant protein containing a modified activin receptor type IIB, is being developed for the treatment of anemias caused by ineffective erythropoiesis, such as thalassemias and myelodysplastic syndromes. ACE-536 acts through a mechanism distinct from erythropoiesis-stimulating agents to promote late-stage erythroid differentiation by binding to transforming growth factor-β superfamily ligands and inhibiting signaling through transcription factors Smad 2/3. The goal of this Phase 1 study was to evaluate the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamic effects of ascending dose levels of ACE-536 in healthy volunteers. Thirty-two postmenopausal women were randomized in sequential cohorts of eight subjects each to receive up to two doses of either ACE-536 (0.0625-0.25 mg/kg) or placebo (3:1 randomization) given subcutaneously every 2 weeks. Mean baseline age was 59.4 years, and hemoglobin was 13.2 g/dL. ACE-536 was well tolerated at dose levels up to 0.25 mg/kg over the 1-month treatment period. There were no serious or severe adverse events, nor clinically meaningful changes in safety laboratory measures or vital signs. Mean ACE-536 AUC0-14d and Cmax increased proportionally after first dose; mean t½ was 15-16 days. Dose-dependent increases in hemoglobin concentration were observed, beginning 7 days after initiation of treatment and maintained for several weeks following treatment. The proportion of subjects with a hemoglobin increase ≥1.0 g/dL increased in a dose-dependent manner to 83.3% of subjects in the highest dose group, 0.25 mg/kg. ACE-536 was well tolerated and resulted in sustained increases in hemoglobin levels in healthy postmenopausal women.

  15. Neonatal CD71+ erythroid cells do not modify murine sepsis mortality

    PubMed Central

    Wynn, James L.; Scumpia, Philip O.; Stocks, Blair T.; Romano-Keeler, Joann; Alrifai, Mhd Wael; Liu, Jin-Hua; Kim, Annette S.; Alford, Catherine E.; Matta, Pranathi; Weitkamp, Jörn-Hendrik; Moore, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis is a major cause of neonatal mortality and morbidity worldwide. A recent report suggested murine neonatal host defense against infection could be compromised by immunosuppressive CD71+ erythroid splenocytes. We examined the impact of CD71+ erythroid splenocytes on murine neonatal mortality to endotoxin challenge or polymicrobial sepsis and characterized circulating CD71+ erythroid (CD235a+) cells in human neonates. Adoptive transfer or antibody-mediated reduction of neonatal CD71+ erythroid splenocytes did not alter murine neonatal survival to endotoxin challenge or polymicrobial sepsis challenge. Ex vivo immunosuppression of stimulated adult CD11b+ cells was not limited to neonatal splenocytes as it also occurred with adult and neonatal bone marrow. Animals treated with anti-CD71 antibody showed reduced splenic bacterial load following bacterial challenge compared to isotype-treated mice. However, adoptive transfer of enriched CD71+ erythroid splenocytes to CD71+-reduced animals did not reduce bacterial clearance. Human CD71+CD235a+ cells were common among cord blood mononuclear cells and were shown to be reticulocytes. In summary, a lack of effect on murine survival to polymicrobial sepsis following adoptive transfer or diminution of CD71+ erythroid splenocytes under these experimental conditions suggests the impact of these cells on neonatal infection risk and progression may be limited. An unanticipated immune priming effect of anti-CD71 antibody treatment was likely responsible for the reported enhanced bacterial clearance, rather than a reduction of immunosuppressive CD71+ erythroid splenocytes. In humans, the well-described rapid decrease in circulating reticulocytes after birth suggests they may have a limited role in reducing inflammation secondary to microbial colonization. PMID:26101326

  16. Caspase-3 Is Involved in the Signalling in Erythroid Differentiation by Targeting Late Progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Giarratana, Marie-Catherine; Darghouth, Dhouha; Faussat, Anne-Marie; Harmand, Laurence; Douay, Luc

    2013-01-01

    A role for caspase activation in erythroid differentiation has been established, yet its precise mode of action remains elusive. A drawback of all previous investigations on caspase activation in ex vivo erythroid differentiation is the lack of an in vitro model producing full enucleation of erythroid cells. Using a culture system which renders nearly 100% enucleated red cells from human CD34+ cells, we investigated the role of active caspase-3 in erythropoiesis. Profound effects of caspase-3 inhibition were found on erythroid cell growth and differentiation when inhibitors were added to CD34+ cells at the start of the culture and showed dose-response to the concentration of inhibitor employed. Enucleation was only reduced as a function of the reduced maturity of the culture and the increased cell death of mature cells while the majority of cells retained their ability to extrude their nuclei. Cell cycle analysis after caspase-3 inhibition showed caspase-3 to play a critical role in cell proliferation and highlighted a novel function of this protease in erythroid differentiation, i.e. its contribution to cell cycle regulation at the mitotic phase. While the effect of caspase-3 inhibitor treatment on CD34+ derived cells was not specific to the erythroid lineage, showing a similar reduction of cell expansion in myeloid cultures, the mechanism of action in both lineages appeared to be distinct with a strong induction of apoptosis causing the decreased yield of myeloid cells. Using a series of colony-forming assays we were able to pinpoint the stage at which cells were most sensitive to caspase-3 inhibition and found activated caspase-3 to play a signalling role in erythroid differentiation by targeting mature BFU-E and CFU-E but not early BFU-E. PMID:23658722

  17. Erythropoietin triggers a burst of GATA-1 in normal human erythroid cells differentiating in tissue culture.

    PubMed Central

    Dalyot, N; Fibach, E; Ronchi, A; Rachmilewitz, E A; Ottolenghi, S; Oppenheim, A

    1993-01-01

    GATA-1 is a central transcription-activator of erythroid differentiation. In the present work we have studied the kinetics of its expression and activity during development of normal human erythroid progenitors, grown in primary cultures. In response to the addition of erythropoietin (Epo), the cells undergo proliferation and differentiation in a synchronized fashion. This recently developed experimental system allows biochemical dissection of erythroid differentiation in a physiological meaningful environment. No DNA-binding activity of GATA-1 could be detected before the addition of Epo, although a very low level of mRNA was observed. Following Epo addition there was a sharp parallel rise in both mRNA and DNA-binding activity, consistent with positive autoregulation of the GATA-1 gene. After reaching a peak on day 7-9, both mRNA and protein activity decreased. The binding activity of the ubiquitous factor SP1 showed a biphasic pattern; its second peak usually coincided with the GATA-1 peak, suggesting that SP1 also plays a specific role in erythroid maturation. The highest activity of GATA-1 per erythroid cell was found on day 6-8, immediately preceding the major rise in globin gene mRNA and in the number of hemoglobinized cells. The results imply that a high level of GATA-1 activity is necessary for globin gene expression and erythroid maturation, suggesting that a requirement for a threshold concentration of GATA-1 is part of the mechanism that determines the final steps of erythroid maturation. Images PMID:8371977

  18. Characterization of Putative Erythroid Regulators of Hepcidin in Mouse Models of Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Mirciov, Cornel S. G.; Wilkins, Sarah J.; Dunn, Linda A.; Anderson, Gregory J.; Frazer, David M.

    2017-01-01

    Iron is crucial for many biological functions, but quantitatively the most important use of iron is in the production of hemoglobin in red blood cell precursors. The amount of iron in the plasma, and hence its availability for hemoglobin synthesis, is determined by the liver-derived iron regulatory hormone hepcidin. When the iron supply to erythroid precursors is limited, as often occurs during stimulated erythropoiesis, these cells produce signals to inhibit hepatic hepcidin production, thereby increasing the amount of iron that enters the plasma. How stimulated erythropoiesis suppresses hepcidin production is incompletely understood, but erythroferrone, Gdf15 and Twsg1 have emerged as candidate regulatory molecules. To further examine the relationship between erythropoiesis and the candidate erythroid regulators, we have studied five mouse models of anemia, including two models of β-thalassemia (Hbbth3/+ and RBC14), the hemoglobin deficit mouse (hbd), dietary iron deficient mice and mice treated with phenylhydrazine to induce acute hemolysis. Hematological parameters, iron status and the expression of Erfe (the gene encoding erythroferrone), Gdf15 and Twsg1 in the bone marrow and spleen were examined. Erfe expression was the most consistently upregulated of the candidate erythroid regulators in all of the mouse models examined. Gene expression was particularly high in the bone marrow and spleen of iron deficient animals, making erythroferrone an ideal candidate erythroid regulator, as its influence is strongest when iron supply to developing erythroid cells is limited. Gdf15 expression was also upregulated in most of the anemia models studied although the magnitude of the increase was generally less than that of Erfe. In contrast, very little regulation of Twsg1 was observed. These results support the prevailing hypothesis that erythroferrone is a promising erythroid regulator and demonstrate that Erfe expression is stimulated most strongly when the iron supply

  19. Mitochondrial Hspa9/Mortalin regulates erythroid differentiation via iron-sulfur cluster assembly.

    PubMed

    Shan, Yuxi; Cortopassi, Gino

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial iron-sulfur cluster (ISC) biogenesis provides iron-sulfur cofactors to several mitochondrial proteins, but the extent to which ISC biogenesis regulates hematopoiesis has been unclear. The blood disease Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is characterized by ineffective hematopoiesis, and the disease overlaps with the gene Hspa9/Mortalin in multiple ways: the HSPA9 locus maps to 5q31.2 that is frequently deleted in human MDS; mutant Hspa9 causes zebrafish MDS; and Hspa9 knockdown mice have decreased hematopoiesis. We show here that HSPA9 functions in mitochondrial ISC biogenesis, and is required for erythroid differentiation. HSPA9 interacts with and stabilizes the mitochondrial ISC biogenesis proteins frataxin, Nfs1, ISCU, and Nfu. MDS-causing mutations in HSPA9 protein change its interactions with ISC biogenesis proteins. Depletion of HSPA9 decreases aconitase activity, which requires an ISC at its active site, but not that of the non-ISC requiring malate dehydrogenase, and increases IRP1 binding activity. In erythroid cell lines, Hspa9 depletion inhibited erythroid differentiation, post-transcriptionally regulating the expression of Alas2 and FeCH, as expected through known ISC control of the IRE response elements in these genes. By contrast, the Alas2 open reading frame rescued the Hspa9-dependent defect in erythroid differentiation, but not when uncoupled from its 5'-IRE sequence. Thus, Hspa9 depletion causes a mitochondrial ISC deficit, altering IRP1-IRE binding and FeCH stability, which consequently inhibits Alas2 translation, heme synthesis, and erythroid differentiation, i.e.: Hspa9->ISC->IRP/IRE->Alas2->heme synthesis->erythroid differentiation. Thus Hspa9 regulates erythroid differentiation through ISC cluster assembly, providing a pathophysiological mechanism for an MDS subtype characterized by HSPA9 haploinsufficiency, and suggests hemin and other pharmacological stimulators of ISC synthesis as potential routes to therapy.

  20. Vitamin K2 modulates differentiation and apoptosis of both myeloid and erythroid lineages.

    PubMed

    Sada, Eriko; Abe, Yasunobu; Ohba, Rie; Tachikawa, Yoshimichi; Nagasawa, Eriko; Shiratsuchi, Motoaki; Takayanagi, Ryoichi

    2010-12-01

    Vitamin K2 (VK2) can improve cytopenia in some patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Although it is well known that VK2 induces differentiation and apoptosis in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cell lines, little is known about its effect on normal hematopoietic progenitors. The effects of VK2 on primary myeloid and erythroid progenitors were examined. Mobilized CD34-positive cells from peripheral blood were used for the examination of myeloid lineage cells, and erythroid progenitors purified from peripheral blood were used for erythroid lineage cells. VK2 upregulated the expressions of myeloid markers CD11b and CD14, and increased the mRNA expression levels of CCAAT/enhancer binding protein-α (C/EBPα) and PU.1 in myeloid progenitors. In erythroid progenitors, VK2 did not show a significant effect on differentiation. However, VK2 exhibited an anti-apoptotic effect on erythroid progenitors under erythropoietin depletion. This anti-apoptotic effect was restricted to normal erythroid progenitors and was not shown in erythroleukemic cell line AS-E2. Steroid and xenobiotic receptor (SXR), which was recently identified as a receptor of VK2, was expressed on myeloid progenitors, and the SXR agonist rifampicin (RIF) also upregulated CD11b and CD14 expressions on myeloid progenitors. These results indicate that SXR is involved in the effect of VK2 on myeloid progenitors. The major effect of VK2 on myeloid progenitors was promoting differentiation, whereas its anti-apoptotic effect seemed to be dominant in erythroid progenitors. Although the detailed mechanism of VK2's effect on differentiation or apoptosis of hematopoietic progenitors remains unknown, the effect of VK2 therapy in patients with MDS could be partly explained by these mechanisms.

  1. Spatio-temporal optimization of agricultural practices to achieve a sustainable development at basin level; framework of a case study in Colombia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uribe, Natalia; corzo, Gerald; Solomatine, Dimitri

    2016-04-01

    The flood events present during the last years in different basins of the Colombian territory have raised questions on the sensitivity of the regions and if this regions have common features. From previous studies it seems important features in the sensitivity of the flood process were: land cover change, precipitation anomalies and these related to impacts of agriculture management and water management deficiencies, among others. A significant government investment in the outreach activities for adopting and promoting the Colombia National Action Plan on Climate Change (NAPCC) is being carried out in different sectors and regions, having as a priority the agriculture sector. However, more information is still needed in the local environment in order to assess were the regions have this sensitivity. Also the continuous change in one region with seasonal agricultural practices have been pointed out as a critical information for optimal sustainable development. This combined spatio-temporal dynamics of crops cycle in relation to climate change (or variations) has an important impact on flooding events at basin areas. This research will develop on the assessment and optimization of the aggregated impact of flood events due to determinate the spatio-temporal dynamic of changes in agricultural management practices. A number of common best agricultural practices have been identified to explore their effect in a spatial hydrological model that will evaluate overall changes. The optimization process consists on the evaluation of best performance in the agricultural production, without having to change crops activities or move to other regions. To achieve this objectives a deep analysis of different models combined with current and future climate scenarios have been planned. An algorithm have been formulated to cover the parametric updates such that the optimal temporal identification will be evaluated in different region on the case study area. Different hydroinformatics

  2. First-line cART regimen impacts the course of CD8+ T-cell counts in HIV-infected patients that achieve sustained undetectable viral load.

    PubMed Central

    Poizot-Martin, Isabelle; Allavena, Clotilde; Delpierre, Cyrille; Duvivier, Claudine; Obry-Roguet, Véronique; Cano, Carla E.; Guillouet de Salvador, Francine; Rey, David; Dellamonica, Pierre; Cheret, Antoine; Cuzin, Lise; Katlama, Christine; Cabié, André; Hoen, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the study was to investigate the impact of first-line combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) regimen on the course of CD8+ T-cell counts in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients. A retrospective observational study conducted on the French DAT’AIDS Cohort of HIV-infected patients. We selected 605 patients initiating a first-line cART between 2002 and 2009, and which achieved a sustained undetectable HIV plasma viral load (pVL) for at least 12 months without cART modification. The evolution of CD8+ T-cell counts according to cART regimen was assessed. CD8+ T-cell counts were assessed in 572 patients treated with 2NRTIs+1PI/r (n= 297), 2NRTIs+1NNRTI (n= 207) and 3NRTIs (n= 68). In multivariate analysis, after 12 months of follow-up, the 3NRTIs regimen was associated with a significantly smaller decrease of CD8+ T-cell count compared with NNRTI-containing regimens (–10.2 cells/μL in 3NRTIs vs –105.1 cells/μL; P=0.02) but not compared with PI-containing regimens (10.2 vs –60.9 cells/μL; P=0.21). After 24 months, the 3NRTIs regimen was associated with a smaller decrease of CD8+ T-cell count and % compared with PI/r- and NNRTI-containing regimens (0.2 in 3NRTIs vs –9.9 with PI/r-regimens, P=0.001, and vs –11.1 with NNRTI-regimens, p < 0.0001). A focus analysis on 11 patients treated with an INSTI-containing cART regimen during the study period showed after 12 months of follow-up, a median decrease of CD8+ T-cell count of –155 [inter quartile range: –302; –22] cells/μL. Our data highlight the fact that cART regimens have differential effects on CD8 pool down regulation. PMID:27741125

  3. A highly conserved SOX6 double binding site mediates SOX6 gene downregulation in erythroid cells

    PubMed Central

    Cantu', Claudio; Grande, Vito; Alborelli, Ilaria; Cassinelli, Letizia; Cantu’, Ileana; Colzani, Maria Teresa; Ierardi, Rossella; Ronzoni, Luisa; Cappellini, Maria Domenica; Ferrari, Giuliana; Ottolenghi, Sergio; Ronchi, Antonella

    2011-01-01

    The Sox6 transcription factor plays critical roles in various cell types, including erythroid cells. Sox6-deficient mice are anemic due to impaired red cell maturation and show inappropriate globin gene expression in definitive erythrocytes. To identify new Sox6 target genes in erythroid cells, we used the known repressive double Sox6 consensus within the εy-globin promoter to perform a bioinformatic genome-wide search for similar, evolutionarily conserved motifs located within genes whose expression changes during erythropoiesis. We found a highly conserved Sox6 consensus within the Sox6 human gene promoter itself. This sequence is bound by Sox6 in vitro and in vivo, and mediates transcriptional repression in transient transfections in human erythroleukemic K562 cells and in primary erythroblasts. The binding of a lentiviral transduced Sox6FLAG protein to the endogenous Sox6 promoter is accompanied, in erythroid cells, by strong downregulation of the endogenous Sox6 transcript and by decreased in vivo chromatin accessibility of this region to the PstI restriction enzyme. These observations suggest that the negative Sox6 autoregulation, mediated by the double Sox6 binding site within its own promoter, may be relevant to control the Sox6 transcriptional downregulation that we observe in human erythroid cultures and in mouse bone marrow cells in late erythroid maturation. PMID:20852263

  4. Stress Granules contribute to α-globin homeostasis in differentiating erythroid cells

    PubMed Central

    Ghisolfi, Laura; Dutt, Shilpee; McConkey, Marie E.; Ebert, Benjamin L.; Anderson, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Hemoglobin is the major biosynthetic product of developing erythroid cells. Assembly of hemoglobin requires the balanced production of globin protein and the oxygen-carrying heme moiety. The heme-regulated inhibitor kinase (HRI) participates in this process by phosphorylating eIF2α and inhibiting the translation of globin protein when levels of free heme are limiting. HRI is also activated in erythroid cells subjected to oxidative stress. Phospho-eIF2α-mediated translational repression induces the assembly of stress granules (SG), cytoplasmic foci that harbor untranslated mRNAs and promote the survival of cells subjected to adverse environmental conditions. We have found that differentiating erythroid, but not myelomonocytic or megakaryocytic, murine and human progenitor cells assemble SGs, in vitro and in vivo. Targeted knockdown of HRI or G3BP, a protein required for SG assembly, inhibits spontaneous and arsenite-induced assembly of SGs in erythroid progenitor cells. This is accompanied by reduced globin production and increased apoptosis suggesting that G3BP+ SGs facilitate the survival of developing erythroid cells. PMID:22452989

  5. Human Cord Blood and Bone Marrow CD34+ Cells Generate Macrophages That Support Erythroid Islands

    PubMed Central

    Belay, Eyayu; Hayes, Brian J.; Blau, C. Anthony; Torok-Storb, Beverly

    2017-01-01

    Recently, we developed a small molecule responsive hyperactive Mpl-based Cell Growth Switch (CGS) that drives erythropoiesis associated with macrophages in the absence of exogenous cytokines. Here, we compare the physical, cellular and molecular interaction between the macrophages and erythroid cells in CGS expanded CD34+ cells harvested from cord blood, marrow or G-CSF-mobilized peripheral blood. Results indicated that macrophage based erythroid islands could be generated from cord blood and marrow CD34+ cells but not from G-CSF-mobilized CD34+ cells. Additional studies suggest that the deficiency resides with the G-CSF-mobilized CD34+ derived monocytes. Gene expression and proteomics studies of the in vitro generated erythroid islands detected the expression of erythroblast macrophage protein (EMP), intercellular adhesion molecule 4 (ICAM-4), CD163 and DNASE2. 78% of the erythroblasts in contact with macrophages reached the pre reticulocyte orthochromatic stage of differentiation within 14 days of culture. The addition of conditioned medium from cultures of CD146+ marrow fibroblasts resulted in a 700-fold increase in total cell number and a 90-fold increase in erythroid cell number. This novel CD34+ cell derived erythroid island may serve as a platform to explore the molecular basis of red cell maturation and production under normal, stress and pathological conditions. PMID:28135323

  6. In vitro culture of stress erythroid progenitors identifies distinct progenitor populations and analogous human progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Jie; Wu, Dai-Chen; Chen, Yuanting

    2015-01-01

    Tissue hypoxia induces a systemic response designed to increase oxygen delivery to tissues. One component of this response is increased erythropoiesis. Steady-state erythropoiesis is primarily homeostatic, producing new erythrocytes to replace old erythrocytes removed from circulation by the spleen. In response to anemia, the situation is different. New erythrocytes must be rapidly made to increase hemoglobin levels. At these times, stress erythropoiesis predominates. Stress erythropoiesis is best characterized in the mouse, where it is extramedullary and utilizes progenitors and signals that are distinct from steady-state erythropoiesis. In this report, we use an in vitro culture system that recapitulates the in vivo development of stress erythroid progenitors. We identify cell-surface markers that delineate a series of stress erythroid progenitors with increasing maturity. In addition, we use this in vitro culture system to expand human stress erythroid progenitor cells that express analogous cell-surface markers. Consistent with previous suggestions that human stress erythropoiesis is similar to fetal erythropoiesis, we demonstrate that human stress erythroid progenitors express fetal hemoglobin upon differentiation. These data demonstrate that similar to murine bone marrow, human bone marrow contains cells that can generate BMP4-dependent stress erythroid burst-forming units when cultured under stress erythropoiesis conditions. PMID:25608563

  7. Inactivation of 3-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase 2 delays zebrafish erythroid maturation by conferring premature mitophagy

    PubMed Central

    Davuluri, Gangarao; Song, Ping; Liu, Zhuoming; Wald, David; Sakaguchi, Takuya F.; Devireddy, L.

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria are the site of iron utilization, wherein imported iron is incorporated into heme or iron–sulfur clusters. Previously, we showed that a cytosolic siderophore, which resembles a bacterial siderophore, facilitates mitochondrial iron import in eukaryotes, including zebrafish. An evolutionarily conserved 3-hydroxy butyrate dehydrogenase, 3-hydroxy butyrate dehydrogenase 2 (Bdh2), catalyzes a rate-limiting step in the biogenesis of the eukaryotic siderophore. We found that inactivation of bdh2 in developing zebrafish embryo results in heme deficiency and delays erythroid maturation. The basis for this erythroid maturation defect is not known. Here we show that bdh2 inactivation results in mitochondrial dysfunction and triggers their degradation by mitophagy. Thus, mitochondria are prematurely lost in bdh2-inactivated erythrocytes. Interestingly, bdh2-inactivated erythroid cells also exhibit genomic alterations as indicated by transcriptome analysis. Reestablishment of bdh2 restores mitochondrial function, prevents premature mitochondrial degradation, promotes erythroid development, and reverses altered gene expression. Thus, mitochondrial communication with the nucleus is critical for erythroid development. PMID:26929344

  8. Decreased differentiation of erythroid cells exacerbates ineffective erythropoiesis in β-thalassemia

    PubMed Central

    Libani, Ilaria V.; Guy, Ella C.; Melchiori, Luca; Schiro, Raffaella; Ramos, Pedro; Breda, Laura; Scholzen, Thomas; Chadburn, Amy; Liu, YiFang; Kernbach, Margrit; Baron-Lühr, Bettina; Porotto, Matteo; de Sousa, Maria; Rachmilewitz, Eliezer A.; Hood, John D.; Cappellini, M. Domenica; Giardina, Patricia J.; Grady, Robert W.; Gerdes, Johannes

    2008-01-01

    In β-thalassemia, the mechanism driving ineffective erythropoiesis (IE) is insufficiently understood. We analyzed mice affected by β-thalassemia and observed, unexpectedly, a relatively small increase in apoptosis of their erythroid cells compared with healthy mice. Therefore, we sought to determine whether IE could also be characterized by limited erythroid cell differentiation. In thalassemic mice, we observed that a greater than normal percentage of erythroid cells was in S-phase, exhibiting an erythroblast-like morphology. Thalassemic cells were associated with expression of cell cycle–promoting genes such as EpoR, Jak2, Cyclin-A, Cdk2, and Ki-67 and the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-XL. The cells also differentiated less than normal erythroid ones in vitro. To investigate whether Jak2 could be responsible for the limited cell differentiation, we administered a Jak2 inhibitor, TG101209, to healthy and thalassemic mice. Exposure to TG101209 dramatically decreased the spleen size but also affected anemia. Although our data do not exclude a role for apoptosis in IE, we propose that expansion of the erythroid pool followed by limited cell differentiation exacerbates IE in thalassemia. In addition, these results suggest that use of Jak2 inhibitors has the potential to profoundly change the management of this disorder. PMID:18480424

  9. Implementation of erythroid lineage analysis by flow cytometry in diagnostic models for myelodysplastic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Cremers, Eline M.P.; Westers, Theresia M.; Alhan, Canan; Cali, Claudia; Visser-Wisselaar, Heleen A.; Chitu, Dana A.; van der Velden, Vincent H.J.; te Marvelde, Jeroen G.; Klein, Saskia K.; Muus, Petra; Vellenga, Edo; de Greef, Georgina E.; Legdeur, Marie-Cecile C.J.C.; Wijermans, Pierre W.; Stevens-Kroef, Marian J.P.L.; da Silva-Coelho, Pedro; Jansen, Joop H.; Ossenkoppele, Gert J.; van de Loosdrecht, Arjan A.

    2017-01-01

    Flow cytometric analysis is a recommended tool in the diagnosis of myelodysplastic syndromes. Current flow cytometric approaches evaluate the (im)mature myelo-/monocytic lineage with a median sensitivity and specificity of ~71% and ~93%, respectively. We hypothesized that the addition of erythroid lineage analysis could increase the sensitivity of flow cytometry. Hereto, we validated the analysis of erythroid lineage parameters recommended by the International/European LeukemiaNet Working Group for Flow Cytometry in Myelodysplastic Syndromes, and incorporated this evaluation in currently applied flow cytometric models. One hundred and sixty-seven bone marrow aspirates were analyzed; 106 patients with myelodysplastic syndromes, and 61 cytopenic controls. There was a strong correlation between presence of erythroid aberrancies assessed by flow cytometry and the diagnosis of myelodysplastic syndromes when validating the previously described erythroid evaluation. Furthermore, addition of erythroid aberrancies to two different flow cytometric models led to an increased sensitivity in detecting myelodysplastic syndromes: from 74% to 86% for the addition to the diagnostic score designed by Ogata and colleagues, and from 69% to 80% for the addition to the integrated flow cytometric score for myelodysplastic syndromes, designed by our group. In both models the specificity was unaffected. The high sensitivity and specificity of flow cytometry in the detection of myelodysplastic syndromes illustrates the important value of flow cytometry in a standardized diagnostic approach. The trial is registered at www.trialregister.nl as NTR1825; EudraCT n.: 2008-002195-10 PMID:27658438

  10. Expression of transcription factors during sodium phenylacetate induced erythroid differentiation in K562 cells.

    PubMed

    Rath, A V; Schmahl, G E; Niemeyer, C M

    1997-01-01

    During 15 days of treatment of K562 cells with sodium phenylacetate, we observed an increase in the cellular hemoglobin concentration with a similar increase in the expression of gamma-globin mRNA. Morphological studies demonstrated characteristic features of erythroid differentiation and maturation. At the same time there was no change in the level of expression of the cell surface antigenes CD33, CD34, CD45, CD71 and glycophorin A. Likewise, the level of expression of the erythroid transcription factors GATA-1, GATA-2, NF-E2, SCL and RBTN2, all expressed in untreated K562 cells, did not increase during sodium phenylacetate induced erythroid differentiation. The expression of the nuclear factors Evi-1 and c-myb, known to inhibit erythroid differentiation, did not decrease. We conclude that sodium phenylacetate treatment of K562 cells increases gamma-globin mRNA and induces cell maturation as judged by morphology without affecting the expression of the erythroid transcription factors, some of which are known to be involved in the regulation of beta-like globin genes.

  11. ETO-2 associates with SCL in erythroid cells and megakaryocytes and provides repressor functions in erythropoiesis.

    PubMed

    Schuh, Anna H; Tipping, Alex J; Clark, Allison J; Hamlett, Isla; Guyot, Boris; Iborra, Francesco J; Rodriguez, Patrick; Strouboulis, John; Enver, Tariq; Vyas, Paresh; Porcher, Catherine

    2005-12-01

    Lineage specification and cellular maturation require coordinated regulation of gene expression programs. In large part, this is dependent on the activator and repressor functions of protein complexes associated with tissue-specific transcriptional regulators. In this study, we have used a proteomic approach to characterize multiprotein complexes containing the key hematopoietic regulator SCL in erythroid and megakaryocytic cell lines. One of the novel SCL-interacting proteins identified in both cell types is the transcriptional corepressor ETO-2. Interaction between endogenous proteins was confirmed in primary cells. We then showed that SCL complexes are shared but also significantly differ in the two cell types. Importantly, SCL/ETO-2 interacts with another corepressor, Gfi-1b, in red cells but not megakaryocytes. The SCL/ETO-2/Gfi-1b association is lost during erythroid differentiation of primary fetal liver cells. Genetic studies of erythroid cells show that ETO-2 exerts a repressor effect on SCL target genes. We suggest that, through its association with SCL, ETO-2 represses gene expression in the early stages of erythroid differentiation and that alleviation/modulation of the repressive state is then required for expression of genes necessary for terminal erythroid maturation to proceed.

  12. Erythroid cell-specific alpha-globin gene regulation by the CP2 transcription factor family.

    PubMed

    Kang, Ho Chul; Chae, Ji Hyung; Lee, Yeon Ho; Park, Mi-Ae; Shin, June Ho; Kim, Sung-Hyun; Ye, Sang-Kyu; Cho, Yoon Shin; Fiering, Steven; Kim, Chul Geun

    2005-07-01

    We previously demonstrated that ubiquitously expressed CP2c exerts potent erythroid-specific transactivation of alpha-globin through an unknown mechanism. This mechanism is reported here to involve specific CP2 splice variants and protein inhibitor of activated STAT1 (PIAS1). We identify a novel murine splice isoform of CP2, CP2b, which is identical to CP2a except that it has an additional 36 amino acids encoded by an extra exon. CP2b has an erythroid cell-specific transcriptional activation domain, which requires the extra exon and can form heteromeric complexes with other CP2 isoforms, but lacks the DNA binding activity found in CP2a and CP2c. Transcriptional activation of alpha-globin occurred following dimerization between CP2b and CP2c in erythroid K562 and MEL cells, but this dimerization did not activate the alpha-globin promoter in nonerythroid 293T cells, indicating that an additional erythroid factor is missing in 293T cells. PIAS1 was confirmed as a CP2 binding protein by the yeast two-hybrid screen, and expression of CP2b, CP2c, and PIAS1 in 293T cell induced alpha-globin promoter activation. These results show that ubiquitously expressed CP2b exerts potent erythroid cell-specific alpha-globin gene expression by complexing with CP2c and PIAS1.

  13. Challenges facing the elimination of sleeping sickness in west and central Africa: sustainable control of animal trypanosomiasis as an indispensable approach to achieve the goal.

    PubMed

    Simo, Gustave; Rayaisse, Jean Baptiste

    2015-12-16

    African trypanosomiases are infectious diseases caused by trypanosomes. African animal trypanosomiasis (AAT) remains an important threat for livestock production in some affected areas whereas human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) is targeted for elimination in 2020. In West and Central Africa, it has been shown that the parasites causing these diseases can coexist in the same tsetse fly or the same animal. In such complex settings, the control of these diseases must be put in the general context of trypanosomiasis control or "one health" concept where the coordination of control operations will be beneficial for both diseases. In this context, implementing control activities on AAT will help to sustain HAT control. It will also have a positive impact on animal health and economic development of the regions. The training of inhabitants on how to implement and sustain vector control tools will enable a long-term sustainability of control operations that will lead to the elimination of HAT and AAT.

  14. Resveratrol induces human K562 cell apoptosis, erythroid differentiation, and autophagy.

    PubMed

    Yan, Hui-Wen; Hu, Wei-Xin; Zhang, Jie-Ying; Wang, Ye; Xia, Kun; Peng, Min-Yuan; Liu, Jing

    2014-06-01

    Resveratrol (Res) is a naturally occurring phytoalexin with apoptotic and inducing-glob effects in leukemic cells, but the potential induction of erythroid differentiation in cells is not fully understood. Here, we investigated the effects of Res on human erythro-megakaryoblastic leukemia cell line K562. Among the treated cells, proliferation was inhibited and the occurrence of cell apoptosis and cell death were detected. Erythroid differentiation assay was explored, and we found that Res could increase the expression of glycophorin A (GPA), HBA1, HBB, and γ-globin genes and enforced the expression of GPA, CD71, and Band3 proteins. Res also induced K562 cell autophagy when the concentration of Res was increased up to 50 or 100 μM. Our findings suggested that Res possesses the potency not only inducing apoptosis but also inducing erythroid differentiation and autophagy in K562 cells. These results provide that Res may be a therapeutic candidate for chronic myelogenous leukemia treatment.

  15. RESTORATION PLUS: A COLLABORATIVE ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY RESEARCH PROGRAM TO DEVELOP AND EVALUATE ECOSYSTEM RESTORATION AND MANAGEMENT OPTIONS TO ACHIEVE ECOLOGICALLY AND ECONOMICALLY SUSTAINABLE SOLUTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) is evaluating ecosystem restoration and management techniques to ensure they create sustainable solutions for degraded watersheds. The ORD/NRMRL initiated the Restoration Plus (RePlus) program in 2002, which emphasizes collabora...

  16. Induction of erythroid differentiation and increased globin mRNA production with furocoumarins and their photoproducts

    PubMed Central

    Salvador, Alessia; Brognara, Eleonora; Vedaldi, Daniela; Castagliuolo, Ignazio; Brun, Paola; Zuccato, Cristina; Lampronti, Ilaria; Gambari, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Differentiation-therapy is an important approach in the treatment of cancer, as in the case of erythroid induction in chronic myelogenous leukemia. Moreover, an important therapeutic strategy for treating beta-thalassemia and sickle-cell anemia could be the use of drugs able to induce erythroid differentiation and fetal hemoglobin (HbF) accumulation: in fact, the increased production of this type of hemoglobin can reduce the clinical symptoms and the frequency of transfusions. An important class of erythroid differentiating compounds and HbF inducers is composed by DNA-binding chemotherapeutics: however, they are not used in most instances considering their possible devastating side effects. In this contest, we approached the study of erythrodifferentiating properties of furocoumarins. In fact, upon UV-A irradiation, they are able to covalently bind DNA. Thus, the erythrodifferentiation activity of some linear and angular furocoumarins was evaluated in the experimental K562 cellular model system. Quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase-chain reaction assay was employed to evaluate the accumulation of different globin mRNAs. The results demonstrated that both linear and angular furocoumarins are strong inducers of erythroid differentiation of K562 cells. From a preliminary screening, we selected the most active compounds and investigated the role of DNA photodamage in their erythroid inducing activity and mechanism of action. Moreover, some cytofluorimetric experiments were carried out to better study cell cycle modifications and the mitochondrial involvement. A further development of the work was carried out studying the erythroid differentiation of photolysis products of these molecules. 5,5′-Dimethylpsoralen photoproducts induced an important increase in γ-globin gene transcription in K562 cells. PMID:23518160

  17. The VP1u Receptor Restricts Parvovirus B19 Uptake to Permissive Erythroid Cells

    PubMed Central

    Leisi, Remo; Von Nordheim, Marcus; Ros, Carlos; Kempf, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Parvovirus B19 (B19V) is a small non-enveloped virus and known as the causative agent for the mild childhood disease erythema infectiosum. B19V has an extraordinary narrow tissue tropism, showing only productive infection in erythroid precursor cells in the bone marrow. We recently found that the viral protein 1 unique region (VP1u) contains an N-terminal receptor-binding domain (RBD), which mediates the uptake of the virus into cells of the erythroid lineage. To further investigate the role of the RBD in connection with a B19V-unrelated capsid, we chemically coupled the VP1u of B19V to the bacteriophage MS2 capsid and tested the internalization capacity of the bioconjugate on permissive cells. In comparison, we studied the cellular uptake and infection of B19V along the erythroid differentiation. The results showed that the MS2-VP1u bioconjugate mimicked the specific internalization of the native B19V into erythroid precursor cells, which further coincides with the restricted infection profile. The successful mimicry of B19V uptake demonstrates that the RBD in the VP1u is sufficient for the endocytosis of the viral capsid. Furthermore, the recombinant VP1u competed with B19V uptake into permissive cells, thus excluding a significant alternative uptake mechanism by other receptors. Strikingly, the VP1u receptor appeared to be expressed only on erythropoietin-dependent erythroid differentiation stages that also provide the necessary intracellular factors for a productive infection. Taken together, these findings suggest that the VP1u binds to a yet-unknown erythroid-specific cellular receptor and thus restricts the virus entry to permissive cells. PMID:27690083

  18. Is erythroferrone finally the long sought-after systemic erythroid regulator of iron?

    PubMed Central

    Lawen, Alfons

    2015-01-01

    Iron metabolism is regulated on the cellular and the systemic level. Over the last decade, the liver peptide “hepcidin” has emerged as the body’s key irons store regulator. The long postulated “erythroid regulator of iron”, however, remained elusive. Last year, evidence was provided, that a previously described myokine “myonectin” may also function as the long sought erythroid regulator of iron. Myonectin was therefore re-named “erythroferrone”. This editorial provides a brief discussion on the two functions of erythroferrone and also briefly considers the emerging potential role of transferrin receptor 2 in erythropoiesis. PMID:26322167

  19. Protein Arginine Methyltransferase 1 Interacts with and Activates p38α to Facilitate Erythroid Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Wei-Kai; Chang, Yuan-I; Yao, Chao-Ling; Hwang, Shiaw-Min; Chang, Chung-Yi; Lin, Wey-Jinq

    2013-01-01

    Protein arginine methylation is emerging as a pivotal posttranslational modification involved in regulating various cellular processes; however, its role in erythropoiesis is still elusive. Erythropoiesis generates circulating red blood cells which are vital for body activity. Deficiency in erythroid differentiation causes anemia which compromises the quality of life. Despite extensive studies, the molecular events regulating erythropoiesis are not fully understood. This study showed that the increase in protein arginine methyltransferase 1 (PRMT1) levels, via transfection or protein transduction, significantly promoted erythroid differentiation in the bipotent human K562 cell line as well as in human primary hematopoietic progenitor CD34+ cells. PRMT1 expression enhanced the production of hemoglobin and the erythroid surface marker glycophorin A, and also up-regulated several key transcription factors, GATA1, NF-E2 and EKLF, which are critical for lineage-specific differentiation. The shRNA-mediated knockdown of PRMT1 suppressed erythroid differentiation. The methyltransferase activity-deficient PRMT1G80R mutant failed to stimulate differentiation, indicating the requirement of arginine methylation of target proteins. Our results further showed that a specific isoform of p38 MAPK, p38α, promoted erythroid differentiation, whereas p38β did not play a role. The stimulation of erythroid differentiation by PRMT1 was diminished in p38α- but not p38β-knockdown cells. PRMT1 appeared to act upstream of p38α, since expression of p38α still promoted erythroid differentiation in PRMT1-knockdown cells, and expression of PRMT1 enhanced the activation of p38 MAPK. Importantly, we showed for the first time that PRMT1 was associated with p38α in cells by co-immunoprecipitation and that PRMT1 directly methylated p38α in in vitro methylation assays. Taken together, our findings unveil a link between PRMT1 and p38α in regulating the erythroid differentiation program and

  20. Setd1a and NURF mediate chromatin dynamics and gene regulation during erythroid lineage commitment and differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ying; Schulz, Vincent P.; Deng, Changwang; Li, Guangyao; Shen, Yong; Tusi, Betsabeh K.; Ma, Gina; Stees, Jared; Qiu, Yi; Steiner, Laurie A.; Zhou, Lei; Zhao, Keji; Bungert, Jörg; Gallagher, Patrick G.; Huang, Suming

    2016-01-01

    The modulation of chromatin structure is a key step in transcription regulation in mammalian cells and eventually determines lineage commitment and differentiation. USF1/2, Setd1a and NURF complexes interact to regulate chromatin architecture in erythropoiesis, but the mechanistic basis for this regulation is hitherto unknown. Here we showed that Setd1a and NURF complexes bind to promoters to control chromatin structural alterations and gene activation in a cell context dependent manner. In human primary erythroid cells USF1/2, H3K4me3 and the NURF complex were significantly co-enriched at transcription start sites of erythroid genes, and their binding was associated with promoter/enhancer accessibility that resulted from nucleosome repositioning. Mice deficient for Setd1a, an H3K4 trimethylase, in the erythroid compartment exhibited reduced Ter119/CD71 positive erythroblasts, peripheral blood RBCs and hemoglobin levels. Loss of Setd1a led to a reduction of promoter-associated H3K4 methylation, inhibition of gene transcription and blockade of erythroid differentiation. This was associated with alterations in NURF complex occupancy at erythroid gene promoters and reduced chromatin accessibility. Setd1a deficiency caused decreased associations between enhancer and promoter looped interactions as well as reduced expression of erythroid genes such as the adult β-globin gene. These data indicate that Setd1a and NURF complexes are specifically targeted to and coordinately regulate erythroid promoter chromatin dynamics during erythroid lineage differentiation. PMID:27141965

  1. Dysplastic changes in erythroid precursors as a manifestation of lead poisoning: report of a case and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Lv, Chenglan; Xu, Yueyi; Wang, Jing; Shao, Xiaoyan; Ouyang, Jian; Li, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Dysplastic changes in erythroid precursors occur not only in patients with hematologic diseases, but also those with other diseases. Here, we report on a patient that presented with dysplastic changes in erythroid precursors due to lead poisoning from the intake of Chinese folk remedies.

  2. Dysplastic changes in erythroid precursors as a manifestation of lead poisoning: report of a case and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Chenglan; Xu, Yueyi; Wang, Jing; Shao, Xiaoyan; Ouyang, Jian; Li, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Dysplastic changes in erythroid precursors occur not only in patients with hematologic diseases, but also those with other diseases. Here, we report on a patient that presented with dysplastic changes in erythroid precursors due to lead poisoning from the intake of Chinese folk remedies. PMID:25755780

  3. Narrowing the Achievement Gap and Sustaining Success: A Qualitative Study of the Norms, Practices, and Programs of a Successful High School with Urban Characteristics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Senesac, Donald Raymond

    2010-01-01

    The academic achievement gap is the manifestation of differential learning outcomes for students typified by membership in an ethnic minority sub group or economically disadvantaged sub group. Addressing the achievement gap has become vital for the nation as a whole, and even more critical for the state of California because the majority of…

  4. A Sustainable WMD Nonproliferation Strategy for East Africa: Connecting the WMD Nonproliferation Agenda with Local Border Security Needs to Achieve Mutually Beneficial Outcomes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    East African Case Study in Dual-Benefit Assistance Solving the problem of bridging the security/development divide, which prevents sustainable...nuclear and other radioactive materials. Last year alone, the IAEA’s Nuclear Incident and Trafficking Database (ITDB) confirmed 146 such cases . That...expansion • Reform public finance • Encourage entrepreneurship through loan reform • Secure cross-border trade flows; encourage investment Tangible

  5. Sustainable Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmandt, Jurgen; Ward, C. H.; Marilu Hastings, Assisted By

    2000-04-01

    Demographers predict that the world population will double during the first half of the 21st century before it will begin to level off. In this volume, a group of prominent authors examine what societal changes must occur to meet this challenge to the natural environment and the transformational changes that we must experience to achieve sustainability. Frances Cairncross, Herman E. Daly, Stephen H. Schneider and others provide a broad discussion of sustainable development. They detail economic and environmental, as well as spiritual and religious, corporate and social, scientific and political factors. Sustainable Development: The Challenge of Transition offers many insightful policy recommendations about how business, government, and individuals must change their current values, priorities, and behavior to meet present and future challenges. It will appeal to scholars and decision makers interested in global change, environmental policy, population growth, and sustainable development, and also to corporate environmental managers.

  6. Cytotoxicity of quantum dots and graphene oxide to erythroid cells and macrophages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Guangbo; Wang, Xiaoyan; Wang, Zhe; Liu, Sijin; Jiang, Guibing

    2013-04-01

    Great concerns have been raised about the exposure and possible adverse influence of nanomaterials due to their wide applications in a variety of fields, such as biomedicine and daily lives. The blood circulation system and blood cells form an important barrier against invaders, including nanomaterials. However, studies of the biological effects of nanomaterials on blood cells have been limited and without clear conclusions thus far. In the current study, the biological influence of quantum dots (QDs) with various surface coating on erythroid cells and graphene oxide (GO) on macrophages was closely investigated. We found that QDs posed great damage to macrophages through intracellular accumulation of QDs coupled with reactive oxygen species generation, particularly for QDs coated with PEG-NH2. QD modified with polyethylene glycol-conjugated amine particles exerted robust inhibition on cell proliferation of J744A.1 macrophages, irrespective of apoptosis. Additionally, to the best of our knowledge, our study is the first to have demonstrated that GO could provoke apoptosis of erythroid cells through oxidative stress in E14.5 fetal liver erythroid cells and in vivo administration of GO-diminished erythroid population in spleen, associated with disordered erythropoiesis in mice.

  7. Notch1-promoted TRPA1 expression in erythroleukemic cells suppresses erythroid but enhances megakaryocyte differentiation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ji-Lin; Ping, Yueh-Hsin; Tseng, Min-Jen; Chang, Yuan-I; Lee, Hsin-Chen; Hsieh, Rong-Hong; Yeh, Tien-Shun

    2017-02-21

    The Notch1 pathway plays important roles in modulating erythroid and megakaryocyte differentiation. To screen the Notch1-related genes that regulate differentiation fate of K562 and HEL cells, the expression of transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) was induced by Notch1 receptor intracellular domain (N1IC), the activated form of Notch1 receptor. N1IC and v-ets erythroblastosis virus E26 oncogene homolog 1 (Ets-1) bound to TRPA1 promoter region to regulate transcription in K562 cells. Transactivation of TRPA1 promoter by N1IC depended on the methylation status of TRPA1 promoter. N1IC and Ets-1 suppressed the DNA methyltransferase 3B (DNMT3B) level in K562 cells. Inhibition of TRPA1 expression after Notch1 knockdown could be attenuated by nanaomycin A, an inhibitor of DNMT3B, in K562 and HEL cells. Functionally, hemin-induced erythroid differentiation could be suppressed by TRPA1, and the reduction of erythroid differentiation of both cells by N1IC and Ets-1 occurred via TRPA1. However, PMA-induced megakaryocyte differentiation could be enhanced by TRPA1, and the surface markers of megakaryocytes could be elevated by nanaomycin A. Megakaryocyte differentiation could be reduced by Notch1 or Ets-1 knockdown and relieved by TRPA1 overexpression. The results suggest that Notch1 and TRPA1 might be critical modulators that control the fate of erythroid and megakaryocyte differentiation.

  8. Insight into GATA1 transcriptional activity through interrogation of cis elements disrupted in human erythroid disorders.

    PubMed

    Wakabayashi, Aoi; Ulirsch, Jacob C; Ludwig, Leif S; Fiorini, Claudia; Yasuda, Makiko; Choudhuri, Avik; McDonel, Patrick; Zon, Leonard I; Sankaran, Vijay G

    2016-04-19

    Whole-exome sequencing has been incredibly successful in identifying causal genetic variants and has revealed a number of novel genes associated with blood and other diseases. One limitation of this approach is that it overlooks mutations in noncoding regulatory elements. Furthermore, the mechanisms by which mutations in transcriptionalcis-regulatory elements result in disease remain poorly understood. Here we used CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing to interrogate three such elements harboring mutations in human erythroid disorders, which in all cases are predicted to disrupt a canonical binding motif for the hematopoietic transcription factor GATA1. Deletions of as few as two to four nucleotides resulted in a substantial decrease (>80%) in target gene expression. Isolated deletions of the canonical GATA1 binding motif completely abrogated binding of the cofactor TAL1, which binds to a separate motif. Having verified the functionality of these three GATA1 motifs, we demonstrate strong evolutionary conservation of GATA1 motifs in regulatory elements proximal to other genes implicated in erythroid disorders, and show that targeted disruption of such elements results in altered gene expression. By modeling transcription factor binding patterns, we show that multiple transcription factors are associated with erythroid gene expression, and have created predictive maps modeling putative disruptions of their binding sites at key regulatory elements. Our study provides insight into GATA1 transcriptional activity and may prove a useful resource for investigating the pathogenicity of noncoding variants in human erythroid disorders.

  9. BMP-mediated specification of the erythroid lineage suppresses endothelial development in blood island precursors

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Candace T.

    2013-01-01

    The developmental relationship between the blood and endothelial cell (EC) lineages remains unclear. In the extra-embryonic blood islands of birds and mammals, ECs and blood cells are closely intermixed, and blood island precursor cells in the primitive streak express many of the same molecular markers, leading to the suggestion that both lineages arise from a common precursor, called the hemangioblast. Cells within the blood island of Xenopus also coexpress predifferentiation markers of the blood and EC lineages. However, using multiple assays, we find that precursor cells in the Xenopus blood island do not normally differentiate into ECs, suggesting that classic hemangioblasts are rare or nonexistent in Xenopus. What prevents these precursor cells from developing into mature ECs? We have found that bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling is essential for erythroid differentiation, and in the absence of BMP signaling, precursor cells adopt an EC fate. Furthermore, inhibition of the erythroid transcription pathway leads to endothelial differentiation. Our results indicate that bipotential endothelial/erythroid precursor cells do indeed exist in the Xenopus blood island, but BMP signaling normally acts to constrain EC fate. More generally, these results provide evidence that commitment to the erythroid lineage limits development of bipotential precursors toward an endothelial fate. PMID:24100450

  10. Establishment of Immortalized Human Erythroid Progenitor Cell Lines Able to Produce Enucleated Red Blood Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kurita, Ryo; Suda, Noriko; Sudo, Kazuhiro; Miharada, Kenichi; Hiroyama, Takashi; Miyoshi, Hiroyuki; Tani, Kenzaburo; Nakamura, Yukio

    2013-01-01

    Transfusion of red blood cells (RBCs) is a standard and indispensable therapy in current clinical practice. In vitro production of RBCs offers a potential means to overcome a shortage of transfusable RBCs in some clinical situations and also to provide a source of cells free from possible infection or contamination by microorganisms. Thus, in vitro production of RBCs may become a standard procedure in the future. We previously reported the successful establishment of immortalized mouse erythroid progenitor cell lines that were able to produce mature RBCs very efficiently. Here, we have developed a reliable protocol for establishing immortalized human erythroid progenitor cell lines that are able to produce enucleated RBCs. These immortalized cell lines produce functional hemoglobin and express erythroid-specific markers, and these markers are upregulated following induction of differentiation in vitro. Most importantly, these immortalized cell lines all produce enucleated RBCs after induction of differentiation in vitro, although the efficiency of producing enucleated RBCs remains to be improved further. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of the feasibility of using immortalized human erythroid progenitor cell lines as an ex vivo source for production of enucleated RBCs. PMID:23533656

  11. Insight into GATA1 transcriptional activity through interrogation of cis elements disrupted in human erythroid disorders

    PubMed Central

    Wakabayashi, Aoi; Ulirsch, Jacob C.; Ludwig, Leif S.; Fiorini, Claudia; Yasuda, Makiko; Choudhuri, Avik; McDonel, Patrick; Zon, Leonard I.; Sankaran, Vijay G.

    2016-01-01

    Whole-exome sequencing has been incredibly successful in identifying causal genetic variants and has revealed a number of novel genes associated with blood and other diseases. One limitation of this approach is that it overlooks mutations in noncoding regulatory elements. Furthermore, the mechanisms by which mutations in transcriptional cis-regulatory elements result in disease remain poorly understood. Here we used CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing to interrogate three such elements harboring mutations in human erythroid disorders, which in all cases are predicted to disrupt a canonical binding motif for the hematopoietic transcription factor GATA1. Deletions of as few as two to four nucleotides resulted in a substantial decrease (>80%) in target gene expression. Isolated deletions of the canonical GATA1 binding motif completely abrogated binding of the cofactor TAL1, which binds to a separate motif. Having verified the functionality of these three GATA1 motifs, we demonstrate strong evolutionary conservation of GATA1 motifs in regulatory elements proximal to other genes implicated in erythroid disorders, and show that targeted disruption of such elements results in altered gene expression. By modeling transcription factor binding patterns, we show that multiple transcription factors are associated with erythroid gene expression, and have created predictive maps modeling putative disruptions of their binding sites at key regulatory elements. Our study provides insight into GATA1 transcriptional activity and may prove a useful resource for investigating the pathogenicity of noncoding variants in human erythroid disorders. PMID:27044088

  12. Notch1-promoted TRPA1 expression in erythroleukemic cells suppresses erythroid but enhances megakaryocyte differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ji-Lin; Ping, Yueh-Hsin; Tseng, Min-Jen; Chang, Yuan-I; Lee, Hsin-Chen; Hsieh, Rong-Hong; Yeh, Tien-Shun

    2017-01-01

    The Notch1 pathway plays important roles in modulating erythroid and megakaryocyte differentiation. To screen the Notch1-related genes that regulate differentiation fate of K562 and HEL cells, the expression of transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) was induced by Notch1 receptor intracellular domain (N1IC), the activated form of Notch1 receptor. N1IC and v-ets erythroblastosis virus E26 oncogene homolog 1 (Ets-1) bound to TRPA1 promoter region to regulate transcription in K562 cells. Transactivation of TRPA1 promoter by N1IC depended on the methylation status of TRPA1 promoter. N1IC and Ets-1 suppressed the DNA methyltransferase 3B (DNMT3B) level in K562 cells. Inhibition of TRPA1 expression after Notch1 knockdown could be attenuated by nanaomycin A, an inhibitor of DNMT3B, in K562 and HEL cells. Functionally, hemin-induced erythroid differentiation could be suppressed by TRPA1, and the reduction of erythroid differentiation of both cells by N1IC and Ets-1 occurred via TRPA1. However, PMA-induced megakaryocyte differentiation could be enhanced by TRPA1, and the surface markers of megakaryocytes could be elevated by nanaomycin A. Megakaryocyte differentiation could be reduced by Notch1 or Ets-1 knockdown and relieved by TRPA1 overexpression. The results suggest that Notch1 and TRPA1 might be critical modulators that control the fate of erythroid and megakaryocyte differentiation. PMID:28220825

  13. Imaging Flow Cytometry for the Study of Erythroid Cell Biology and Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Samsel, Leigh; McCoy, J Philip

    2015-01-01

    Erythroid cell maturation and diseases affecting erythrocytes are frequently accompanied by morphologic and immunophenotypic changes to these cells. In the past, these changes have been assessed primarily through the use of manual microscopy, which substantially limits the statistical rigor, throughput, and objectivity of these studies. Imaging flow cytometry provides a technology to examine both the morphology of cells as well as to quantify the staining intensity and signal distribution of numerous fluorescent markers on a cell-by-cell basis with high throughput in a statistically robust manner, and thus is ideally suited to studying erythroid cell biology. To date imaging flow cytometry has been used to study erythrocytes in three areas: 1) erythroid cell maturation, 2) sickle cell disease, and 3) infectious diseases such as malaria. In the maturation studies, imaging flow cytometry can closely recapitulate known stages of maturation and has led to the identification of a new population of erythroid cell precursors. In sickle cell disease, imaging flow cytometry provides a robust method to quantify sickled erythrocytes and to identify cellular aggregates linked to morbidities, and in malaria, imaging flow cytometry has been used to screen for new chemotherapeutic agents. These studies have demonstrated the value of imaging flow cytometry for investigations of erythrocyte biology and pathology. PMID:25858229

  14. Probing conformational stability and dynamics of erythroid and nonerythroid spectrin: effects of urea and guanidine hydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Patra, Malay; Mukhopadhyay, Chaitali; Chakrabarti, Abhijit

    2015-01-01

    We have studied the conformational stability of the two homologous membrane skeletal proteins, the erythroid and non-erythroid spectrins, in their dimeric and tetrameric forms respectively during unfolding in the presence of urea and guanidine hydrochloride (GuHCl). Fluorescence and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy have been used to study the changes of intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence, anisotropy, far UV-CD and extrinsic fluorescence of bound 1-anilinonapthalene-8-sulfonic acid (ANS). Chemical unfolding of both proteins were reversible and could be described as a two state transition. The folded erythroid spectrin and non-erythroid spectrin were directly converted to unfolded monomer without formation of any intermediate. Fluorescence quenching, anisotropy, ANS binding and dynamic light scattering data suggest that in presence of low concentrations of the denaturants (up-to 1M) hydrogen bonding network and van der Waals interaction play a role inducing changes in quaternary as well as tertiary structures without complete dissociation of the subunits. This is the first report of two large worm like, multi-domain proteins obeying twofold rule which is commonly found in small globular proteins. The free energy of stabilization (ΔGuH20) for the dimeric spectrin has been 20 kcal/mol lesser than the tetrameric from.

  15. Histones to the cytosol: exportin 7 is essential for normal terminal erythroid nuclear maturation.

    PubMed

    Hattangadi, Shilpa M; Martinez-Morilla, Sandra; Patterson, Heide Christine; Shi, Jiahai; Burke, Karly; Avila-Figueroa, Amalia; Venkatesan, Srividhya; Wang, Junxia; Paulsen, Katharina; Görlich, Dirk; Murata-Hori, Maki; Lodish, Harvey F

    2014-09-18

    Global nuclear condensation, culminating in enucleation during terminal erythropoiesis, is poorly understood. Proteomic examination of extruded erythroid nuclei from fetal liver revealed a striking depletion of most nuclear proteins, suggesting that nuclear protein export had occurred. Expression of the nuclear export protein, Exportin 7 (Xpo7), is highly erythroid-specific, induced during erythropoiesis, and abundant in very late erythroblasts. Knockdown of Xpo7 in primary mouse fetal liver erythroblasts resulted in severe inhibition of chromatin condensation and enucleation but otherwise had little effect on erythroid differentiation, including hemoglobin accumulation. Nuclei in Xpo7-knockdown cells were larger and less dense than normal and accumulated most nuclear proteins as measured by mass spectrometry. Strikingly,many DNA binding proteins such as histones H2A and H3 were found to have migrated into the cytoplasm of normal late erythroblasts prior to and during enucleation, but not in Xpo7-knockdown cells. Thus, terminal erythroid maturation involves migration of histones into the cytoplasm via a process likely facilitated by Xpo7.

  16. Homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2 plays an important role in normal terminal erythroid differentiation.

    PubMed

    Hattangadi, Shilpa M; Burke, Karly A; Lodish, Harvey F

    2010-06-10

    Gene-targeting experiments report that the homeodomain-interacting protein kinases 1 and 2, Hipk1 and Hipk2, are essential but redundant in hematopoietic development because Hipk1/Hipk2 double-deficient animals exhibit severe defects in hematopoiesis and vasculogenesis, whereas the single knockouts do not. These serine-threonine kinases phosphorylate and consequently modify the functions of several important hematopoietic transcription factors and cofactors. Here we show that Hipk2 knockdown alone plays a significant role in terminal fetal liver erythroid differentiation. Hipk1 and Hipk2 are highly induced during primary mouse fetal liver erythropoiesis. Specific knockdown of Hipk2 inhibits terminal erythroid cell proliferation (explained in part by impaired cell-cycle progression as well as increased apoptosis) and terminal enucleation as well as the accumulation of hemoglobin. Hipk2 knockdown also reduces the transcription of many genes involved in proliferation and apoptosis as well as important, erythroid-specific genes involved in hemoglobin biosynthesis, such as alpha-globin and mitoferrin 1, demonstrating that Hipk2 plays an important role in some but not all aspects of normal terminal erythroid differentiation.

  17. Histones to the cytosol: exportin 7 is essential for normal terminal erythroid nuclear maturation

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Morilla, Sandra; Patterson, Heide Christine; Shi, Jiahai; Burke, Karly; Avila-Figueroa, Amalia; Venkatesan, Srividhya; Wang, Junxia; Paulsen, Katharina; Görlich, Dirk; Murata-Hori, Maki; Lodish, Harvey F.

    2014-01-01

    Global nuclear condensation, culminating in enucleation during terminal erythropoiesis, is poorly understood. Proteomic examination of extruded erythroid nuclei from fetal liver revealed a striking depletion of most nuclear proteins, suggesting that nuclear protein export had occurred. Expression of the nuclear export protein, Exportin 7 (Xpo7), is highly erythroid-specific, induced during erythropoiesis, and abundant in very late erythroblasts. Knockdown of Xpo7 in primary mouse fetal liver erythroblasts resulted in severe inhibition of chromatin condensation and enucleation but otherwise had little effect on erythroid differentiation, including hemoglobin accumulation. Nuclei in Xpo7-knockdown cells were larger and less dense than normal and accumulated most nuclear proteins as measured by mass spectrometry. Strikingly, many DNA binding proteins such as histones H2A and H3 were found to have migrated into the cytoplasm of normal late erythroblasts prior to and during enucleation, but not in Xpo7-knockdown cells. Thus, terminal erythroid maturation involves migration of histones into the cytoplasm via a process likely facilitated by Xpo7. PMID:25092175

  18. Functional interaction of CP2 with GATA-1 in the regulation of erythroid promoters.

    PubMed

    Bosè, Francesca; Fugazza, Cristina; Casalgrandi, Maura; Capelli, Alessia; Cunningham, John M; Zhao, Quan; Jane, Stephen M; Ottolenghi, Sergio; Ronchi, Antonella

    2006-05-01

    We observed that binding sites for the ubiquitously expressed transcription factor CP2 were present in regulatory regions of multiple erythroid genes. In these regions, the CP2 binding site was adjacent to a site for the erythroid factor GATA-1. Using three such regulatory regions (from genes encoding the transcription factors GATA-1, EKLF, and p45 NF-E2), we demonstrated the functional importance of the adjacent CP2/GATA-1 sites. In particular, CP2 binds to the GATA-1 HS2 enhancer, generating a ternary complex with GATA-1 and DNA. Mutations in the CP2 consensus greatly impaired HS2 activity in transient transfection assays with K562 cells. Similar results were obtained by transfection of EKLF and p45 NF-E2 mutant constructs. Chromatin immunoprecipitation with K562 cells showed that CP2 binds in vivo to all three regulatory elements and that both GATA-1 and CP2 were present on the same GATA-1 and EKLF regulatory elements. Adjacent CP2/GATA-1 sites may represent a novel module for erythroid expression of a number of genes. Additionally, coimmunoprecipitation and glutathione S-transferase pull-down experiments demonstrated a physical interaction between GATA-1 and CP2. This may contribute to the functional cooperation between these factors and provide an explanation for the important role of ubiquitous CP2 in the regulation of erythroid genes.

  19. Three Years Sustained Complete Remission Achieved in a Primary Refractory ALK-Positive Anaplastic T Large Cell Lymphoma Treated with Crizotinib

    PubMed Central

    Mahuad, Carolina Valeria; Repáraz, María de los Ángeles Vicente; Zerga, Marta E.; Aizpurua, María Florencia; Casali, Claudia; Garate, Gonzalo

    2016-01-01

    The prognosis of the primary refractory anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK+) anaplastic T large cell lymphoma is ominous. The identification of molecular targets with potential to drive oncogenesis remains a cornerstone for the designing of new selective cancer therapies. Crizotinib is a selective ATP-competitive inhibitor for ALK, approved for its use in lung cancer with rearrangements on ALK gene. The reported cases describe the use of crizotinib as a bridging strategy prior to allotransplantation; there are no reported prolonged survivals under monotherapy with Crizotinib. We report a case of a primary refractory ALK+ anaplastic large-cell lymphoma that sustains complete response after 3 years of crizotinib monotherapy. PMID:27441079

  20. The β-globin locus control region in combination with the EF1α short promoter allows enhanced lentiviral vector-mediated erythroid gene expression with conserved multilineage activity.

    PubMed

    Montiel-Equihua, Claudia A; Zhang, Lin; Knight, Sean; Saadeh, Heba; Scholz, Simone; Carmo, Marlene; Alonso-Ferrero, Maria E; Blundell, Michael P; Monkeviciute, Aiste; Schulz, Reiner; Collins, Mary; Takeuchi, Yasuhiro; Schmidt, Manfred; Fairbanks, Lynette; Antoniou, Michael; Thrasher, Adrian J; Gaspar, H Bobby

    2012-07-01

    Some gene therapy strategies are compromised by the levels of gene expression required for therapeutic benefit, and also by the breadth of cell types that require correction. We designed a lentiviral vector system in which a transgene is under the transcriptional control of the short form of constitutively acting elongation factor 1α promoter (EFS) combined with essential elements of the locus control region of the β-globin gene (β-LCR). We show that the β-LCR can upregulate EFS activity specifically in erythroid cells but does not alter EFS activity in myeloid or lymphoid cells. Experiments using the green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter or the human adenosine deaminase (ADA) gene demonstrate 3-7 times upregulation in vitro but >20 times erythroid-specific upregulation in vivo, the effects of which were sustained for 1 year. The addition of the β-LCR did not alter the mutagenic potential of the vector in in vitro mutagenesis (IM) assays although microarray analysis showed that the β-LCR upregulates ~9% of neighboring genes. This vector design therefore combines the benefits of multilineage gene expression with high-level erythroid expression, and has considerable potential for correction of multisystem diseases including certain lysosomal storage diseases through a hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) gene therapy approach.

  1. Study of clinical, haematological and cytogenetic profile of patients with acute erythroid leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Linu, Jacob Abraham; Udupa, MS Namratha; Madhumathi, DS; Lakshmaiah, KC; Babu, K Govind; Lokanatha, D; Babu, MC Suresh; Lokesh, KN; Rajeev, LK; Rudresha, AH

    2017-01-01

    Background Acute erythroid leukaemia (AEL) is a rare subtype of acute myeloid leukaemia (AML), constituting <5% of all the cases of AML. The World Health Organization (WHO) in 2001 classified AEL into two types: (1) erythroid/myeloid leukaemia which required ≥50% erythroid precursors with ≥20% of the non-erythroid cells to be myeloid blasts and (2) pure erythroleukemia (pEL) with ≥80% erythroblasts. The WHO 2008 classification kept these subcategories, but made erythroleukemia a diagnosis of exclusion. There are very few studies on the clinico haematological and cytogenetic profile of this disease, considering the rarity of its occurrence and poor prognosis. Materials and methods This study was done by retrospective analysis of data from 32 case files of patients diagnosed with AEL. Clinical details noted down were the demographic profile, peripheral blood smear details and bone marrow examination details: (1) blasts-erythroblasts and myeloblasts, (2) dysplasia in the cell lineages and (3) cytogenetic abnormalities. Results The most common presenting symptom was fever. Pancytopenia at presentation was seen in 81.25% of patients. Dysplasia was observed in bone marrow in 100% of erythroblasts and in 40% of myeloblasts in erythroid/myeloid subtype. In pure myeloid subtype, myeloid and megakaryocytic dysplasias were not obvious. Complex karyotype was noticed only in patients of pEL. Conclusion AEL is a rare group of heterogeneous diseases with many neoplastic and non-neoplastic conditions mimicking the diagnosis. The clinical presentation and cytogenetics are also non-specific, presenting additional challenges to the diagnosis. PMID:28144286

  2. Isolation and transcriptome analyses of human erythroid progenitors: BFU-E and CFU-E.

    PubMed

    Li, Jie; Hale, John; Bhagia, Pooja; Xue, Fumin; Chen, Lixiang; Jaffray, Julie; Yan, Hongxia; Lane, Joseph; Gallagher, Patrick G; Mohandas, Narla; Liu, Jing; An, Xiuli

    2014-12-04

    Burst-forming unit-erythroid (BFU-E) and colony-forming unit-erythroid (CFU-E) cells are erythroid progenitors traditionally defined by colony assays. We developed a flow cytometry-based strategy for isolating human BFU-E and CFU-E cells based on the changes in expression of cell surface markers during in vitro erythroid cell culture. BFU-E and CFU-E are characterized by CD45(+)GPA(-)IL-3R(-)CD34(+)CD36(-)CD71(low) and CD45(+)GPA(-)IL-3R(-)CD34(-)CD36(+)CD71(high) phenotypes, respectively. Colony assays validated phenotypic assignment giving rise to BFU-E and CFU-E colonies, both at a purity of ∼90%. The BFU-E colony forming ability of CD45(+)GPA(-)IL-3R(-)CD34(+)CD36(-)CD71(low) cells required stem cell factor and erythropoietin, while the CFU-E colony forming ability of CD45(+)GPA(-)IL-3R(-)CD34(-)CD36(+)CD71(high) cells required only erythropoietin. Bioinformatic analysis of the RNA-sequencing data revealed unique transcriptomes at each differentiation stage. The sorting strategy was validated in uncultured primary cells isolated from bone marrow, cord blood, and peripheral blood, indicating that marker expression is not an artifact of in vitro cell culture, but represents an in vivo characteristic of erythroid progenitor populations. The ability to isolate highly pure human BFU-E and CFU-E progenitors will enable detailed cellular and molecular characterization of these distinct progenitor populations and define their contribution to disordered erythropoiesis in inherited and acquired hematologic disease. Our data provides an important resource for future studies of human erythropoiesis.

  3. FOXO3-mTOR Metabolic Cooperation in the Regulation of Erythroid Cell Maturation and Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xin; Campreciós, Genís; Rimmelé, Pauline; Liang, Raymond; Yalcin, Safak; Mungamuri, Sathish Kumar; Barminko, Jeffrey; D’Escamard, Valentina; Baron, Margaret H.; Brugnara, Carlo; Papatsenko, Dmitri; Rivella, Stefano; Ghaffari, Saghi

    2014-01-01

    Ineffective erythropoiesis is observed in many erythroid disorders including β-thalassemia and anemia of chronic disease in which increased production of erythroblasts that fail to mature exacerbate the underlying anemias. As loss of the transcription factor FOXO3 results in erythroblast abnormalities similar to the ones observed in ineffective erythropoiesis, we investigated the underlying mechanisms of the defective Foxo3−/− erythroblast cell cycle and maturation. Here we show that loss of Foxo3 results in overactivation of the JAK2/AKT/mTOR signaling pathway in primary bone marrow erythroblasts partly mediated by redox modulation. We further show that hyperactivation of mTOR signaling interferes with cell cycle progression in Foxo3 mutant erythroblasts. Importantly, inhibition of mTOR signaling, in vivo or in vitro enhances significantly Foxo3 mutant erythroid cell maturation. Similarly, in vivo inhibition of mTOR remarkably improves erythroid cell maturation and anemia in a model of β-thalassemia. Finally we show that FOXO3 and mTOR are likely part of a larger metabolic network in erythroblasts as together they control the expression of an array of metabolic genes some of which are implicated in erythroid disorders. These combined findings indicate that a metabolism-mediated regulatory network centered by FOXO3 and mTOR control the balanced production and maturation of erythroid cells. They also highlight physiological interactions between these proteins in regulating erythroblast energy. Our results indicate that alteration in the function of this network might be implicated in the pathogenesis of ineffective erythropoiesis. PMID:24966026

  4. EPO-mediated expansion of late-stage erythroid progenitors in the bone marrow initiates recovery from sublethal radiation stress

    PubMed Central

    Peslak, Scott A.; Wenger, Jesse; Bemis, Jeffrey C.; Kingsley, Paul D.; Koniski, Anne D.; McGrath, Kathleen E.

    2012-01-01

    Erythropoiesis is a robust process of cellular expansion and maturation occurring in murine bone marrow and spleen. We previously determined that sublethal irradiation, unlike bleeding or hemolysis, depletes almost all marrow and splenic erythroblasts but leaves peripheral erythrocytes intact. To better understand the erythroid stress response, we analyzed progenitor, precursor, and peripheral blood compartments of mice post–4 Gy total body irradiation. Erythroid recovery initiates with rapid expansion of late-stage erythroid progenitors–day 3 burst-forming units and colony-forming units, associated with markedly increased plasma erythropoietin (EPO). Although initial expansion of late-stage erythroid progenitors is dependent on EPO, this cellular compartment becomes sharply down-regulated despite elevated EPO levels. Loss of EPO-responsive progenitors is associated temporally with a wave of maturing erythroid precursors in marrow and with emergence of circulating erythroid progenitors and subsequent reestablishment of splenic erythropoiesis. These circulating progenitors selectively engraft and mature in irradiated spleen after short-term transplantation, supporting the concept that bone marrow erythroid progenitors migrate to spleen. We conclude that sublethal radiation is a unique model of endogenous stress erythropoiesis, with specific injury to the extravascular erythron, expansion and maturation of EPO-responsive late-stage progenitors exclusively in marrow, and subsequent reseeding of extramedullary sites. PMID:22889760

  5. Comprehensive characterization of erythroid-specific enhancers in the genomic regions of human Krüppel-like factors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mapping of DNase I hypersensitive sites (DHSs) is a powerful tool to experimentally identify cis-regulatory elements (CREs). Among CREs, enhancers are abundant and predominantly act in driving cell-specific gene expression. Krüppel-like factors (KLFs) are a family of eukaryotic transcription factors. Several KLFs have been demonstrated to play important roles in hematopoiesis. However, transcriptional regulation of KLFs via CREs, particularly enhancers, in erythroid cells has been poorly understood. Results In this study, 23 erythroid-specific or putative erythroid-specific DHSs were identified by DNase-seq in the genomic regions of 17 human KLFs, and their enhancer activities were evaluated using dual-luciferase reporter (DLR) assay. Of the 23 erythroid-specific DHSs, the enhancer activities of 15 DHSs were comparable to that of the classical enhancer HS2 in driving minimal promoter (minP). Fifteen DHSs, some overlapping those that increased minP activities, acted as enhancers when driving the corresponding KLF promoters (KLF-Ps) in erythroid cells; of these, 10 DHSs were finally characterized as erythroid-specific KLF enhancers. These 10 erythroid-specific KLF enhancers were further confirmed using chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled to sequencing (ChIP-seq) data-based bioinformatic and biochemical analyses. Conclusion Our present findings provide a feasible strategy to extensively identify gene- and cell-specific enhancers from DHSs obtained by high-throughput sequencing, which will help reveal the transcriptional regulation and biological functions of genes in some specific cells. PMID:23985037

  6. C(5) modified uracil derivatives showing antiproliferative and erythroid differentiation inducing activities on human chronic myelogenous leukemia K562 cells

    PubMed Central

    Brognara, Eleonora; Lampronti, Ilaria; Breveglieri, Giulia; Accetta, Alessandro; Corradini, Roberto; Manicardi, Alex; Borgatti, Monica; Canella, Alessandro; Multineddu, Chiara; Marchelli, Rosangela; Gambari, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    The K562 cell line has been proposed as a useful experimental system to identify anti-tumor compounds acting by inducing terminal erythroid differentiation. K562 cells exhibit a low proportion of hemoglobin-synthesizing cells under standard cell growth conditions, but are able to undergo terminal erythroid differentiation when treated with a variety of anti-tumor compounds. In this paper we report a screening study on a set of different modified C(5) uracil derivatives for the evaluation of their antiproliferative effect in connection with erythroid differentiation pathways, and for defining a new class of drug candidates for the treatment of chronic myelogenous leukemia. Activity of the derivatives tested can be classified in two effect: an antiproliferative effect linked to a high level of erythroid differentiation activity and an antiproliferative effect without activation of gamma globin genes The highest antiproliferative effect and erythroid induction was shown by compound 9, a thymine derivative bearing a n-octyl chain on nitrogen N(1), whereas thymine did not show any effect, suggesting the importance of the linear alkyl chain in position N(1). To our knowledge this compound should be considered among the most efficient inducers of erythroid differentiation of K562 cells. This work is the starting point for the quest of more effective and specific drugs for the induction of terminal erythroid differentiation, for leading new insights in the treatment of neoplastic diseases with molecules acting by inducing differentiation rather than by simply exerting cytotoxic effects. PMID:21958870

  7. Spontaneous and Fas-induced apoptosis of low-grade MDS erythroid precursors involves the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Gyan, E; Frisan, E; Beyne-Rauzy, O; Deschemin, J-C; Pierre-Eugene, C; Randriamampita, C; Dubart-Kupperschmitt, A; Garrido, C; Dreyfus, F; Mayeux, P; Lacombe, C; Solary, E; Fontenay, M

    2008-10-01

    Spontaneous apoptosis of bone marrow erythroid precursors accounts for the anemia that characterizes most low-grade myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). We have shown that death of these precursors involved the Fas-dependent activation of caspase-8. To explore the pathway leading from caspase-8 activation to apoptosis, we transduced MDS bone marrow CD34(+) cells with a lentivirus encoding wild-type (WT) or endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-targeted Bcl-2 protein before inducing their erythroid differentiation. Both WT-Bcl-2 and ER-targeted Bcl-2 prevented spontaneous and Fas-dependent apoptosis in MDS erythroid precursors. ER-targeted Bcl-2 inhibited mitochondrial membrane depolarization and cytochrome c release in MDS erythroid precursors undergoing apoptosis, indicating a role for the ER in the death pathway, upstream of the mitochondria. MDS erythroid precursors demonstrated elevated ER Ca(2+) stores and these stores remained unaffected by ER-targeted Bcl-2. The ER-associated protein Bcl-2-associated protein (BAP) 31 was cleaved by caspase-8 in MDS erythroid precursors undergoing apoptosis. The protective effect of ER-targeted Bcl-2 toward spontaneous and Fas-induced apoptosis correlated with inhibition of BAP31 cleavage. A protective effect of erythropoietin against Fas-induced BAP31 cleavage and apoptosis was observed. We propose that apoptosis of MDS erythroid precursors involves the ER, downstream of Fas and upstream of the mitochondria, through the cleavage of the ER-associated BAP31 protein.

  8. The role of catechol-O-methyltransferase in catechol-enhanced erythroid differentiation of K562 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Suriguga,; Li, Xiao-Fei; Li, Yang; Yu, Chun-Hong; Li, Yi-Ran; Yi, Zong-Chun

    2013-12-15

    Catechol is widely used in pharmaceutical and chemical industries. Catechol is also one of phenolic metabolites of benzene in vivo. Our previous study showed that catechol improved erythroid differentiation potency of K562 cells, which was associated with decreased DNA methylation in erythroid specific genes. Catechol is a substrate for the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT)-mediated methylation. In the present study, the role of COMT in catechol-enhanced erythroid differentiation of K562 cells was investigated. Benzidine staining showed that exposure to catechol enhanced hemin-induced hemoglobin accumulation and induced mRNA expression of erythroid specific genes in K562 cells. Treatment with catechol caused a time- and concentration-dependent increase in guaiacol concentration in the medium of cultured K562 cells. When COMT expression was knocked down by COMT shRNA expression in K562 cells, the production of guaiacol significantly reduced, and the sensitivity of K562 cells to cytotoxicity of catechol significantly increased. Knockdown of COMT expression by COMT shRNA expression also eliminated catechol-enhanced erythroid differentiation of K562 cells. In addition, the pre-treatment with methyl donor S-adenosyl-L-methionine or its demethylated product S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine induced a significant increase in hemin-induced Hb synthesis in K562 cells and the mRNA expression of erythroid specific genes. These findings indicated that O-methylation catalyzed by COMT acted as detoxication of catechol and involved in catechol-enhanced erythroid differentiation of K562 cells, and the production of S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine partly explained catechol-enhanced erythroid differentiation. - Highlights: • Catechol enhanced hemin-induced hemoglobin accumulation. • COMT-catalyzed methylation acted as detoxication of catechol. • COMT involved in catechol-enhanced erythroid differentiation.

  9. Strategies to achieve sustainability and quality in birth defects registries: the experience of the National Registry of Congenital Anomalies of Argentina.

    PubMed

    Groisman, Boris; Bidondo, Maria Paz; Gili, Juan Antonio; Barbero, Pablo; Liascovich, Rosa

    2013-01-01

    In many low-and middle-income countries, birth defects are not considered a public health priority and are perceived by the medical community as rare, unpreventable events. In this context, a registry of birth defects should address not only the collection, analysis, and dissemination of information but also contribute to local interventions like prevention, diagnosis, and treatment. We describe the National Registry of Congenital Anomalies of Argentina (RENAC) in terms of case definition, data collection, quality assurance, and data sending, coding, analysis, and information dissemination and we present the strategies used to ensure its sustainability. We emphasize strategies for motivating the people collecting data, such as training activities, participation in research projects, returning the processed data, making useful clinical information available, giving non-monetary rewards, and linking cases to genetic services.

  10. Continuing to Build a Community Consensus on the Future of Human Space Flight: Report of the Fourth Community Workshop on Achievability and Sustainability of Human Exploration of Mars (AM IV)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thronson, Harley A.; Baker, John; Beaty, David; Carberry, Chris; Craig, Mark; Davis, Richard M.; Drake, Bret G.; Cassady, Joseph; Hays, Lindsay; Hoffman, Stephen J.; Mason, Lee S.

    2016-01-01

    To continue to build broadly based consensus on the future of human space exploration, the Fourth Community Workshop on Achievability and Sustainability of Human Exploration of Mars (AM IV), organized by Explore Mars, Inc. and the American Astronautical Society, was held at the Double Tree Inn in Monrovia, CA., December 68, 2016. Approximately 60 invited professionals from the industrial and commercial sectors, academia, and NASA, along with international colleagues, participated in the workshop. These individuals were chosen to be representative of the breadth of interests in astronaut and robotic Mars exploration.

  11. Simulations towards the achievement of non-inductive current ramp-up and sustainment in the National Spherical Torus Experiment Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Poli, F. M.; Andre, R. G.; Bertelli, N.; Gerhardt, S. P.; Mueller, D.; Taylor, G.

    2015-10-30

    One of the goals of the National Spherical Torus Experiment Upgrade (NSTX-U) (Menard et al 2012 Nucl. Fusion 52 083015) is the demonstration of fully non-inductive start-up, current ramp-up and sustainment. This work discusses predictive simulations where the available heating and current drive systems are combined to maximize the non-inductive current and minimize the solenoidal contribution. Radio-frequency waves at harmonics higher than the ion cyclotron resonance (high-harmonic fast waves (HHFW)) and neutral beam injection are used to ramp the plasma current non-inductively starting from an initial Ohmic plasma. An interesting synergy is observed in the simulations between the HHFW and electron cyclotron (EC) wave heating. Furthermore, time-dependent simulations indicate that, depending on the phasing of the HHFW antenna, EC wave heating can significantly increase the effectiveness of the radio-frequency power, by heating the electrons and increasing the current drive efficiency, thus relaxing the requirements on the level of HHFW power that needs to be absorbed in the core plasma to drive the same amount of fast-wave current.

  12. Simulations towards the achievement of non-inductive current ramp-up and sustainment in the National Spherical Torus Experiment Upgrade

    DOE PAGES

    Poli, F. M.; Andre, R. G.; Bertelli, N.; ...

    2015-10-30

    One of the goals of the National Spherical Torus Experiment Upgrade (NSTX-U) (Menard et al 2012 Nucl. Fusion 52 083015) is the demonstration of fully non-inductive start-up, current ramp-up and sustainment. This work discusses predictive simulations where the available heating and current drive systems are combined to maximize the non-inductive current and minimize the solenoidal contribution. Radio-frequency waves at harmonics higher than the ion cyclotron resonance (high-harmonic fast waves (HHFW)) and neutral beam injection are used to ramp the plasma current non-inductively starting from an initial Ohmic plasma. An interesting synergy is observed in the simulations between the HHFW andmore » electron cyclotron (EC) wave heating. Furthermore, time-dependent simulations indicate that, depending on the phasing of the HHFW antenna, EC wave heating can significantly increase the effectiveness of the radio-frequency power, by heating the electrons and increasing the current drive efficiency, thus relaxing the requirements on the level of HHFW power that needs to be absorbed in the core plasma to drive the same amount of fast-wave current.« less

  13. Is Sustainability Sustainable?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonevac, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    The most important concept in current environmental thinking is "sustainability". Environmental policies, economic policies, development, resource use--all of these things, according to the consensus, ought to be sustainable. But what is sustainability? What is its ethical foundation? There is little consensus about how these questions…

  14. An erythroid enhancer of BCL11A subject to genetic variation determines fetal hemoglobin level

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Daniel E.; Kamran, Sophia C.; Lessard, Samuel; Xu, Jian; Fujiwara, Yuko; Lin, Carrie; Shao, Zhen; Canver, Matthew C.; Smith, Elenoe C.; Pinello, Luca; Sabo, Peter J.; Vierstra, Jeff; Voit, Richard A.; Yuan, Guo-Cheng; Porteus, Matthew H.; Stamatoyannopoulos, John A.; Lettre, Guillaume; Orkin, Stuart H.

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have ascertained numerous trait-associated common genetic variants, frequently localized to regulatory DNA. We find that common genetic variation at BCL11A associated with fetal hemoglobin (HbF) level lies in noncoding sequences decorated by an erythroid enhancer chromatin signature. Fine-mapping uncovers a motif-disrupting common variant associated with reduced transcription factor binding, modestly diminished BCL11A expression and elevated HbF. The surrounding sequences function in vivo as a developmental stage-specific lineage-restricted enhancer. Genome engineering reveals the enhancer is required in erythroid but not B-lymphoid cells for BCL11A expression. These findings illustrate how GWAS may expose functional variants of modest impact within causal elements essential for appropriate gene expression. We propose the GWAS-marked BCL11A enhancer represents an attractive target for therapeutic genome engineering for the β-hemoglobinopathies. PMID:24115442

  15. An erythroid enhancer of BCL11A subject to genetic variation determines fetal hemoglobin level.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Daniel E; Kamran, Sophia C; Lessard, Samuel; Xu, Jian; Fujiwara, Yuko; Lin, Carrie; Shao, Zhen; Canver, Matthew C; Smith, Elenoe C; Pinello, Luca; Sabo, Peter J; Vierstra, Jeff; Voit, Richard A; Yuan, Guo-Cheng; Porteus, Matthew H; Stamatoyannopoulos, John A; Lettre, Guillaume; Orkin, Stuart H

    2013-10-11

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have ascertained numerous trait-associated common genetic variants, frequently localized to regulatory DNA. We found that common genetic variation at BCL11A associated with fetal hemoglobin (HbF) level lies in noncoding sequences decorated by an erythroid enhancer chromatin signature. Fine-mapping uncovers a motif-disrupting common variant associated with reduced transcription factor (TF) binding, modestly diminished BCL11A expression, and elevated HbF. The surrounding sequences function in vivo as a developmental stage-specific, lineage-restricted enhancer. Genome engineering reveals the enhancer is required in erythroid but not B-lymphoid cells for BCL11A expression. These findings illustrate how GWASs may expose functional variants of modest impact within causal elements essential for appropriate gene expression. We propose the GWAS-marked BCL11A enhancer represents an attractive target for therapeutic genome engineering for the β-hemoglobinopathies.

  16. A qualitative and quantitative cytochemical assay of dihydrofolate reductase in erythroid cells.

    PubMed

    Nano, R; Gerzeli, G; Invernizzi, R; Supino, R

    1989-01-01

    The distribution and intensity of dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) cytochemically demonstrable was studied in erythroid cells. Cells of normal human bone marrow, of human erythroleukaemia (M6), and cells of the Friend (MEL) clone 745A murine erythroleukaemia (also after differentiation with dimethylsulphoxide, DMSO) were stained according to Gerzeli and de Piceis Polver (1969) technique; quantification of the reaction product was made using a Vickers M86 microdensitometer. The enzyme activity progressively decreased during the normal differentiation of the erythropoietic series while persisted at high levels in erythroleukaemia cells. It can be suggested that in the 1st case, the cytochemical pattern of dihydrofolate reductase may be a useful added tool for studying the erythroid differentiation. In the 2nd case, the increased level of this enzyme may be related to an amplification of the gene of DHFR in the malignant transformation.

  17. New insights into the mechanisms of mammalian erythroid chromatin condensation and enucleation.

    PubMed

    Ji, Peng

    2015-01-01

    A unique feature in mammalian erythropoiesis is the dramatic chromatin condensation followed by enucleation. This step-by-step process starts at the beginning of terminal erythropoiesis after the hematopoietic stem cells are committed to erythroid lineage. Although this phenomenon is known for decades, the mechanisms of chromatin condensation and enucleation remain elusive. Recent advances in cell and molecular biology have started to reveal the molecular pathways in the regulation of chromatin condensation, the establishment of nuclear polarity prior enucleation, and the rearrangement of actin cytoskeleton in enucleation. However, many challenging questions, especially whether and how the apoptotic mechanisms are involved in chromatin condensation and how to dissect the functions of many actin cytoskeleton proteins in cytokinesis and enucleation, remain to be answered. Here I review our current understanding of mammalian erythroid chromatin condensation and enucleation during terminal differentiation with a focus on more recent studies. I conclude with my perspective of future works in this rising topic in developmental and cell biology.

  18. The uniqueness of morphological features of pure erythroid leukemia in myeloid neoplasm with erythroid predominance: A reassessment using criteria revised in the 2016 World Health Organization classification

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yao-Chung; Yeh, Chiu-Mei; Gau, Jyh-Pyng; Yu, Yuan-Bin; Hsiao, Liang-Tsai; Tzeng, Cheng-Hwai; Chen, Po-Min; Chiou, Tzeon-Jye

    2017-01-01

    We reviewed 97 consecutive cases of myeloid neoplasm with erythroid predominance (MN-EP) between 2000 and 2015. Following 2016 WHO classification, MN-EP patients were classified into four groups. Eight pure erythroid leukemia (PEL) (including t-MN and AML-MRC morphologically fulfilled criteria for PEL) patients had dismal outcomes (median OS: 1 month) and showed more bone marrow fibrosis, worse performance status (PS) and higher serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) at diagnosis than the other groups. In the univariate analysis, risks of death in MN-EP patients included the morphologic features of PEL, very poor cytogenetic risk by IPSS-R, bone marrow fibrosis, leukocytosis, anemia, hypoalbuminemia, high LDH, and poor PS. In the multivariate analysis, independent predictors of death were morphologic features of PEL (adjusted hazards ratio [HR] 3.48, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.24–9.74, p = 0.018), very poor cytogenetic risk by IPSS-R (adjusted HR 2.73, 95% CI 1.22–6.10, p = 0.015), hypoalbuminemia (< 3.7 g/dl) (adjusted HR 2.33, 95% CI 1.10–4.91, p = 0.026) and high serum LDH (≥ 250 U/L) (adjusted HR 2.36, 95% CI 1.28–4.36, p = 0.006). Poor or unfavorable risk in different cytogenetic risk systems independently predicted death and UKMRC-R was the best model. PMID:28196090

  19. The role of catechol-O-methyltransferase in catechol-enhanced erythroid differentiation of K562 cells.

    PubMed

    Suriguga; Li, Xiao-Fei; Li, Yang; Yu, Chun-Hong; Li, Yi-Ran; Yi, Zong-Chun

    2013-12-15

    Catechol is widely used in pharmaceutical and chemical industries. Catechol is also one of phenolic metabolites of benzene in vivo. Our previous study showed that catechol improved erythroid differentiation potency of K562 cells, which was associated with decreased DNA methylation in erythroid specific genes. Catechol is a substrate for the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT)-mediated methylation. In the present study, the role of COMT in catechol-enhanced erythroid differentiation of K562 cells was investigated. Benzidine staining showed that exposure to catechol enhanced hemin-induced hemoglobin accumulation and induced mRNA expression of erythroid specific genes in K562 cells. Treatment with catechol caused a time- and concentration-dependent increase in guaiacol concentration in the medium of cultured K562 cells. When COMT expression was knocked down by COMT shRNA expression in K562 cells, the production of guaiacol significantly reduced, and the sensitivity of K562 cells to cytotoxicity of catechol significantly increased. Knockdown of COMT expression by COMT shRNA expression also eliminated catechol-enhanced erythroid differentiation of K562 cells. In addition, the pre-treatment with methyl donor S-adenosyl-L-methionine or its demethylated product S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine induced a significant increase in hemin-induced Hb synthesis in K562 cells and the mRNA expression of erythroid specific genes. These findings indicated that O-methylation catalyzed by COMT acted as detoxication of catechol and involved in catechol-enhanced erythroid differentiation of K562 cells, and the production of S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine partly explained catechol-enhanced erythroid differentiation.

  20. UK-EOF: a collaborative UK partnership for coordinating sustained efforts on measuring the environment. What, why, achievements so far and what's next?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenaway, B.

    2011-12-01

    The UK-Environmental Observation Framework (UK-EOF) strives to change the way the UK perceives, values, archives and uses information from observation activities by working across public departments and agencies, the voluntary sector, industry and academia. The UK-EOF is a self contained programme of Living With Environmental Change (LWEC), funded by the major sponsors of environmental observations in the UK and delivered via a series of work streams. It has strong links and synergies with GEO as well as the European programmes of GMES, SEIS and INSPIRE. The partnership covers all types of regularly collected environmeental data for all purposes. This talk will focus on the aims and objectives of the partnership as well as achievements and lessons to date.

  1. Analysis of the erythroid differentiation effect of flavonoid apigenin on K562 human chronic leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Isoda, Hiroko; Motojima, Hideko; Onaga, Shoko; Samet, Imen; Villareal, Myra O; Han, Junkyu

    2014-09-05

    The erythroid differentiation-inducing effect of apigenin and its derivatives on human chronic myeloid leukemia K562 has been reported but the functional group in its structure responsible for the effect has not yet been elucidated. Here, we determined the moiety responsible for the erythroid differentiation induction effect of apigenin by using different flavonoids to represent the functional groups in its structure. In addition, we compared apigenin and apigetrin, a flavonoid similar in structure to apigenin except for the glycoside in its structure. Morphological changes as well as expressions of specific markers in K562 cells treated with apigenin were compared with those treated with apigetrin, flavone, 7-hydroxyflavone, chrysin, luteolin, or naringenin. The anti-proliferative and erythroid differentiation-inducing effect of apigenin and the five flavonoids were then investigated and their effects on the α, β, and γ globin genes expressions were compared using real-time PCR. Results of the comparison between apigenin and apigetrin revealed that the glycoside part of apigetrin does not have a role in the induction of cell differentiation. Based on glycophorin A expression, the potency of the other flavonoids for induction of differentiation, was: apigenin>chrysin>flavone/7-hydroxyflavone>luteolin/naringenin. Results of the analysis of the relationship between the structure and function of the flavonoids suggest that the apigenin-induced K562 cell differentiation was due to the 2-3 double bond and hydroxyl groups in its structure. This is the first study that identified the specific functional group in apigenin that impact the erythroid differentiation effect in K562 cells.

  2. The Effect of Mir-451 Upregulation on Erythroid Lineage Differentiation of Murine Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Obeidi, Narges; Pourfathollah, Ali Akbar; Soleimani, Masoud; Nikougoftar Zarif, Mahin; Kouhkan, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Objective MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small endogenous non-coding regulatory RNAs that control mRNAs post-transcriptionally. Several mouse stem cells miRNAs are cloned differentially regulated in different hematopoietic lineages, suggesting their possible role in hematopoietic lineage differentiation. Recent studies have shown that specific miRNAs such as Mir-451 have key roles in erythropoiesis. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, murine embryonic stem cells (mESCs) were infected with lentiviruses containing pCDH-Mir-451. Erythroid differentiation was assessed based on the expression level of transcriptional factors (Gata-1, Klf-1, Epor) and hemoglobin chains (α, β, γ , ε and ζ) genes using quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and presence of erythroid surface antigens (TER-119 and CD235a) using flow cytometery. Colony-forming unit (CFU) assay was also on days 14thand 21thafter transduction. Results Mature Mir-451 expression level increased by 3.434-fold relative to the untreated mESCs on day 4 after transduction (P<0.001). Mir-451 up-regulation correlated with the induction of transcriptional factor (Gata-1, Klf-1, Epor) and hemoglobin chain (α, β, γ, ε and ζ) genes in mESCs (P<0.001) and also showed a strong correlation with presence of CD235a and Ter- 119 markers in these cells (13.084and 13.327-fold increse, respectively) (P<0.05). Moreover, mESCs treated with pCDH-Mir-451 showed a significant raise in CFU-erythroid (CFU-E) colonies (5.2-fold) compared with untreated control group (P<0.05). Conclusion Our results showed that Mir-451 up-regulation strongly induces erythroid differentiation and maturation of mESCs. Overexpression of Mir-451 may have the potential to produce artificial red blood cells (RBCs) without the presence of any stimulatory cytokines. PMID:27540521

  3. Graphitic Carbon Nitride (g-C3N4)-Based Photocatalysts for Artificial Photosynthesis and Environmental Remediation: Are We a Step Closer To Achieving Sustainability?

    PubMed

    Ong, Wee-Jun; Tan, Lling-Lling; Ng, Yun Hau; Yong, Siek-Ting; Chai, Siang-Piao

    2016-06-22

    at the forefront of this research platform. It is anticipated that this review can stimulate a new research doorway to facilitate the next generation of g-C3N4-based photocatalysts with ameliorated performances by harnessing the outstanding structural, electronic, and optical properties for the development of a sustainable future without environmental detriment.

  4. Risk of Late Relapse or Reinfection With Hepatitis C Virus After Achieving a Sustained Virological Response: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, Bryony; Saleem, Jawaad; Hill, Andrew; Riley, Richard D.; Cooke, Graham S.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Treatment for hepatitis C virus (HCV) can lead to sustained virological response (SVR) in over 90% of people. Subsequent recurrence of HCV, either from late relapse or reinfection, reverses the beneficial effects of SVR. Methods. A search identified studies analysing HCV recurrence post-SVR. The recurrence rate for each study was calculated using events/person years of follow-up (PYFU). Results were pooled using a random-effects model and used to calculate 5-year recurrence risk. Three patient groups were analysed: (1) Mono-HCV infected “low-risk” patients; (2) Mono-HCV infected “high-risk” patients (injecting drug users or prisoners); (3) human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/HCV coinfected patients. Recurrence was defined as confirmed HCV RNA detectability post-SVR. Results. In the 43 studies of HCV mono-infected “low-risk” patients (n = 7969) the pooled recurrence rate was 1.85/1000 PYFU (95% confidence interval [CI], .71–3.35; I2 = 73%) leading to a summary 5-year recurrence risk of 0.95% (95% CI, .35%–1.69%). For the 14 studies of HCV monoinfected “high-risk” patients (n = 771) the pooled recurrence rate was 22.32/1000 PYFU (95% CI, 13.07–33.46; I2 = 27%) leading to a summary 5-year risk of 10.67% (95% CI, 6.38%–15.66%). For the 4 studies of HIV/HCV coinfected patients the pooled recurrence rate was 32.02/1000 PYFU (95% CI, .00–123.49; I2 = 96%) leading to a summary 5-year risk of 15.02% (95% CI, .00%–48.26%). The higher pooled estimates of recurrence in the high-risk and coinfected cohorts were driven by an increase in reinfection rather than late relapse. Conclusions. SVR appears durable in the majority of patients at 5 years post-treatment. The large difference in 5 year event rate by risk group is driven mainly by an increased reinfection risk. PMID:26787172

  5. Development of Erythroid Progenitors under Erythropoietin Stimulation in Xenopus laevis Larval Liver.

    PubMed

    Okui, Takehito; Hosozawa, Sakiko; Kohama, Satoka; Fujiyama, Shingo; Maekawa, Shun; Muto, Hiroshi; Kato, Takashi

    2016-12-01

    Erythroid progenitors that respond to erythropoietin (Epo) are present in the liver of adult Xenopus laevis. However, cells responding to Epo in the larval liver and through the metamorphosis period under hepatic remodeling have not been characterized. In this study, tadpoles were staged using the tables of Nieuwkoop and Faber (NF). Liver cells from pre- (NF56) or post- (NF66) metamorphic stage were cultured in the presence of Epo. β2-globin mRNA expression peaked at day 7 after the start of culture. Larval β2-globin was highly expressed in NF56-derived cells, while adult β2-globinwas detected in those of NF66. In both NF56- and NF66-derived cells, mRNA expression of eporand gata2 peaked at day 5 and days 3-4, respectively. In contrast, gata1 expression peaked at day 6 in NF56 cells and at day 5 in NF66 cells. Half maximal proliferation of erythrocytic blast cells derived from the liver at NF66 was observed at day 3, which was earlier than that of NF56. These results indicate that erythroid progenitors that respond to Xenopus laevis Epo are maintained in pre- and post-metamorphic liver, although the tissue architecture changes dramatically during metamorphosis. Additionally, the globin switching occurred, and/or the erythroid progenitors for larval erythrocytes were replaced by those for adult erythrocytes in the metamorphic liver.

  6. Immunophenotypic analysis of erythroid dysplasia in myelodysplastic syndromes. A report from the IMDSFlow working group.

    PubMed

    Westers, Theresia M; Cremers, Eline M P; Oelschlaegel, Uta; Johansson, Ulrika; Bettelheim, Peter; Matarraz, Sergio; Orfao, Alberto; Moshaver, Bijan; Brodersen, Lisa Eidenschink; Loken, Michael R; Wells, Denise A; Subirá, Dolores; Cullen, Matthew; Te Marvelde, Jeroen G; van der Velden, Vincent H J; Preijers, Frank W M B; Chu, Sung-Chao; Feuillard, Jean; Guérin, Estelle; Psarra, Katherina; Porwit, Anna; Saft, Leonie; Ireland, Robin; Milne, Timothy; Béné, Marie C; Witte, Birgit I; Della Porta, Matteo G; Kern, Wolfgang; van de Loosdrecht, Arjan A

    2017-02-01

    Current recommendations for diagnosing myelodysplastic syndromes endorse flow cytometry as an informative tool. Most flow cytometry protocols focus on the analysis of progenitor cells and the evaluation of the maturing myelomonocytic lineage. However, one of the most frequently observed features of myelodysplastic syndromes is anemia, which may be associated with dyserythropoiesis. Therefore, analysis of changes in flow cytometry features of nucleated erythroid cells may complement current flow cytometry tools. The multicenter study within the IMDSFlow Working Group, reported herein, focused on defining flow cytometry parameters that enable discrimination of dyserythropoiesis associated with myelodysplastic syndromes from non-clonal cytopenias. Data from a learning cohort were compared between myelodysplasia and controls, and results were validated in a separate cohort. The learning cohort comprised 245 myelodysplasia cases, 290 pathological, and 142 normal controls; the validation cohort comprised 129 myelodysplasia cases, 153 pathological, and 49 normal controls. Multivariate logistic regression analysis performed in the learning cohort revealed that analysis of expression of CD36 and CD71 (expressed as coefficient of variation), in combination with CD71 fluorescence intensity and the percentage of CD117(+) erythroid progenitors provided the best discrimination between myelodysplastic syndromes and non-clonal cytopenias (specificity 90%; 95% confidence interval: 84-94%). The high specificity of this marker set was confirmed in the validation cohort (92%; 95% confidence interval: 86-97%). This erythroid flow cytometry marker combination may improve the evaluation of cytopenic cases with suspected myelodysplasia, particularly when combined with flow cytometry assessment of the myelomonocytic lineage.

  7. FOG-1 and GATA-1 act sequentially to specify definitive megakaryocytic and erythroid progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Mancini, Elena; Sanjuan-Pla, Alejandra; Luciani, Luisa; Moore, Susan; Grover, Amit; Zay, Agnes; Rasmussen, Kasper D; Luc, Sidinh; Bilbao, Daniel; O'Carroll, Donal; Jacobsen, Sten Eirik; Nerlov, Claus

    2012-01-01

    The transcription factors that control lineage specification of haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) have been well described for the myeloid and lymphoid lineages, whereas transcriptional control of erythroid (E) and megakaryocytic (Mk) fate is less understood. We here use conditional removal of the GATA-1 and FOG-1 transcription factors to identify FOG-1 as required for the formation of all committed Mk- and E-lineage progenitors, whereas GATA-1 was observed to be specifically required for E-lineage commitment. FOG-1-deficient HSCs and preMegEs, the latter normally bipotent for the Mk and E lineages, underwent myeloid transcriptional reprogramming, and formed myeloid, but not erythroid and megakaryocytic cells in vitro. These results identify FOG-1 and GATA-1 as required for formation of bipotent Mk/E progenitors and their E-lineage commitment, respectively, and show that FOG-1 mediates transcriptional Mk/E programming of HSCs as well as their subsequent Mk/E-lineage commitment. Finally, C/EBPs and FOG-1 exhibited transcriptional cross-regulation in early myelo-erythroid progenitors making their functional antagonism a potential mechanism for separation of the myeloid and Mk/E lineages. PMID:22068055

  8. Secondary pure erythroid leukaemia in relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukaemia: lineage switch or chemotherapy effect?

    PubMed

    Gupta, Sanjeev Kumar; Kumar, Rajive; Chharchhodawala, Taher; Kumar, Lalit

    2014-05-19

    Pure erythroid leukaemia is a rare subtype of acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) and its occurrence at acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) relapse has not been reported earlier. A 39-year-old man received chemotherapy for Philadelphia-negative B cell ALL. Subsequently, he developed pure erythroid leukaemia with >80% immature erythroid precursors in bone marrow showing block positivity on periodic acid-Schiff stain, expressing CD71, CD34 but lacking CD235a. The interval between exposure to multidrug chemotherapy including cyclophosphamide and AML diagnosis was 2 years and 9 months. No cytogenetic abnormality was detected at the time of relapse. The patient died 2 weeks after starting AML chemotherapy. The relatively narrow time interval (usually 5-10 years) between chemotherapy and AML development and normal karyotype at relapse raises a possibility of lineage switch besides therapy-related AML as the likely pathogenesis. Further exploration of such cases may unravel the pathways responsible for lineage assignment in pluripotent stem cells.

  9. p73 Plays a Role in Erythroid Differentiation through GATA1 Induction*

    PubMed Central

    Marqués-García, Fernando; Ferrandiz, Nuria; Fernández-Alonso, Rosalía; González-Cano, Laura; Herreros-Villanueva, Marta; Rosa-Garrido, Manuel; Fernández-García, Belén; Vaque, José P.; Marqués, Margarita M.; Alonso, María Eugenia; Segovia, José Carlos; León, Javier; Marín, María C.

    2009-01-01

    The TP73 gene gives rise to transactivation domain-p73 isoforms (TAp73) as well as ΔNp73 variants with a truncated N terminus. Although TAp73α and -β proteins are capable of inducing cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and differentiation, ΔNp73 acts in many cell types as a dominant-negative repressor of p53 and TAp73. It has been proposed that p73 is involved in myeloid differentiation, and its altered expression is involved in leukemic degeneration. However, there is little evidence as to which p73 variants (TA or ΔN) are expressed during differentiation and whether specific p73 isoforms have the capacity to induce, or hinder, this differentiation in leukemia cells. In this study we identify GATA1 as a direct transcriptional target of TAp73α. Furthermore, TAp73α induces GATA1 activity, and it is required for erythroid differentiation. Additionally, we describe a functional cooperation between TAp73 and ΔNp73 in the context of erythroid differentiation in human myeloid cells, K562 and UT-7. Moreover, the impaired expression of GATA1 and other erythroid genes in the liver of p73KO embryos, together with the moderated anemia observed in p73KO young mice, suggests a physiological role for TP73 in erythropoiesis. PMID:19509292

  10. Erythroid colony formation and effect of hemin in vitro in hereditary sideroblastic anemias.

    PubMed

    Partanen, S; Pasanen, A; Juvonen, E; Tenhunen, R; Ruutu, T

    1988-05-01

    Colony formation by erythroid burst-forming units (BFU-E) and erythroid colony-forming units (CFU-E) and the effect of hemin on colony growth was studied in vitro in three Finnish families with hereditary sideroblastic anemia (HSA). Defective activity of heme synthase has been demonstrated in family A and that of delta-aminolevulinic acid synthase in family B. No biochemical defect has been recognized so far in family C. CFU-E colony growth was defective in seven of the eight persons studied. The formation of BFU-E colonies was normal in family A and increased in family C, whereas of the two members of family B one showed normal and one decreased BFU-E colony growth. Hemin in 30-120 microM concentration increased significantly both BFU-E (p less than 0.01) and CFU-E (p less than 0.005) colony formation in family C. No effect was seen in family A, and in family B the only effect was normalization of the decreased BFU-E colony growth by the highest hemin concentration in one person. This study indicates that differences exist between families with HSA in erythroid colony formation and in response to hemin in vitro, but the low number of investigated members in each family does not permit a conclusive evaluation of the impact of the carrier versus patient status or of sex on the results.

  11. FOG-1 and GATA-1 act sequentially to specify definitive megakaryocytic and erythroid progenitors.

    PubMed

    Mancini, Elena; Sanjuan-Pla, Alejandra; Luciani, Luisa; Moore, Susan; Grover, Amit; Zay, Agnes; Rasmussen, Kasper D; Luc, Sidinh; Bilbao, Daniel; O'Carroll, Donal; Jacobsen, Sten Eirik; Nerlov, Claus

    2012-01-18

    The transcription factors that control lineage specification of haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) have been well described for the myeloid and lymphoid lineages, whereas transcriptional control of erythroid (E) and megakaryocytic (Mk) fate is less understood. We here use conditional removal of the GATA-1 and FOG-1 transcription factors to identify FOG-1 as required for the formation of all committed Mk- and E-lineage progenitors, whereas GATA-1 was observed to be specifically required for E-lineage commitment. FOG-1-deficient HSCs and preMegEs, the latter normally bipotent for the Mk and E lineages, underwent myeloid transcriptional reprogramming, and formed myeloid, but not erythroid and megakaryocytic cells in vitro. These results identify FOG-1 and GATA-1 as required for formation of bipotent Mk/E progenitors and their E-lineage commitment, respectively, and show that FOG-1 mediates transcriptional Mk/E programming of HSCs as well as their subsequent Mk/E-lineage commitment. Finally, C/EBPs and FOG-1 exhibited transcriptional cross-regulation in early myelo-erythroid progenitors making their functional antagonism a potential mechanism for separation of the myeloid and Mk/E lineages.

  12. Induction of erythroid differentiation and modulation of gene expression by tiazofurin in K-562 leukemia cells.

    PubMed Central

    Olah, E; Natsumeda, Y; Ikegami, T; Kote, Z; Horanyi, M; Szelenyi, J; Paulik, E; Kremmer, T; Hollan, S R; Sugar, J

    1988-01-01

    Tiazofurin (2-beta-D-ribofuranosyl-4-thiazole-carboxamide; NSC 286193), an antitumor carbon-linked nucleoside that inhibits IMP dehydrogenase (IMP:NAD+ oxidoreductase; EC 1.1.1.205) and depletes guanylate levels, can activate the erythroid differentiation program of K-562 human leukemia cells. Tiazofurin-mediated cell differentiation is a multistep process. The inducer initiates early (less than 6 hr) metabolic changes that precede commitment to differentiation; among these early changes are decreases in IMP dehydrogenase activity and in GTP concentration, as well as alterations in the expression of certain protooncogenes (c-Ki-ras). K-562 cells do express commitment-i.e., cells exhibit differentiation without tiazofurin. Guanosine was effective in preventing the action of tiazofurin, thus providing evidence that the guanine nucleotides are critically involved in tiazofurin-initiated differentiation. Activation of transcription of the erythroid-specific gene that encodes A gamma-globin is a late (48 hr) but striking effect of tiazofurin. Down-regulation of the c-ras gene appears to be part of the complex process associated with tiazofurin-induced erythroid differentiation and relates to the perturbations of GTP metabolism. Images PMID:2901100

  13. GATA1 and PU.1 Bind to Ribosomal Protein Genes in Erythroid Cells: Implications for Ribosomopathies

    PubMed Central

    Amanatiadou, Elsa P.; Papadopoulos, Giorgio L.; Strouboulis, John; Vizirianakis, Ioannis S.

    2015-01-01

    The clear connection between ribosome biogenesis dysfunction and specific hematopoiesis-related disorders prompted us to examine the role of critical lineage-specific transcription factors in the transcriptional regulation of ribosomal protein (RP) genes during terminal erythroid differentiation. By applying EMSA and ChIP methodologies in mouse erythroleukemia cells we show that GATA1 and PU.1 bind in vitro and in vivo the proximal promoter region of the RPS19 gene which is frequently mutated in Diamond-Blackfan Anemia. Moreover, ChIPseq data analysis also demonstrates that several RP genes are enriched as potential GATA1 and PU.1 gene targets in mouse and human erythroid cells, with GATA1 binding showing an association with higher ribosomal protein gene expression levels during terminal erythroid differentiation in human and mouse. Our results suggest that RP gene expression and hence balanced ribosome biosynthesis may be specifically and selectively regulated by lineage specific transcription factors during hematopoiesis, a finding which may be clinically relevant to ribosomopathies. PMID:26447946

  14. Immunophenotypic analysis of erythroid dysplasia in myelodysplastic syndromes. A report from the IMDSFlow working group

    PubMed Central

    Westers, Theresia M.; Cremers, Eline M.P.; Oelschlaegel, Uta; Johansson, Ulrika; Bettelheim, Peter; Matarraz, Sergio; Orfao, Alberto; Moshaver, Bijan; Brodersen, Lisa Eidenschink; Loken, Michael R.; Wells, Denise A.; Subirá, Dolores; Cullen, Matthew; te Marvelde, Jeroen G.; van der Velden, Vincent H.J.; Preijers, Frank W.M.B.; Chu, Sung-Chao; Feuillard, Jean; Guérin, Estelle; Psarra, Katherina; Porwit, Anna; Saft, Leonie; Ireland, Robin; Milne, Timothy; Béné, Marie C.; Witte, Birgit I.; Della Porta, Matteo G.; Kern, Wolfgang; van de Loosdrecht, Arjan A.

    2017-01-01

    Current recommendations for diagnosing myelodysplastic syndromes endorse flow cytometry as an informative tool. Most flow cytometry protocols focus on the analysis of progenitor cells and the evaluation of the maturing myelomonocytic lineage. However, one of the most frequently observed features of myelodysplastic syndromes is anemia, which may be associated with dyserythropoiesis. Therefore, analysis of changes in flow cytometry features of nucleated erythroid cells may complement current flow cytometry tools. The multicenter study within the IMDSFlow Working Group, reported herein, focused on defining flow cytometry parameters that enable discrimination of dyserythropoiesis associated with myelodysplastic syndromes from non-clonal cytopenias. Data from a learning cohort were compared between myelodysplasia and controls, and results were validated in a separate cohort. The learning cohort comprised 245 myelodysplasia cases, 290 pathological, and 142 normal controls; the validation cohort comprised 129 myelodysplasia cases, 153 pathological, and 49 normal controls. Multivariate logistic regression analysis performed in the learning cohort revealed that analysis of expression of CD36 and CD71 (expressed as coefficient of variation), in combination with CD71 fluorescence intensity and the percentage of CD117+ erythroid progenitors provided the best discrimination between myelodysplastic syndromes and non-clonal cytopenias (specificity 90%; 95% confidence interval: 84–94%). The high specificity of this marker set was confirmed in the validation cohort (92%; 95% confidence interval: 86–97%). This erythroid flow cytometry marker combination may improve the evaluation of cytopenic cases with suspected myelodysplasia, particularly when combined with flow cytometry assessment of the myelomonocytic lineage. PMID:27758818

  15. A core erythroid transcriptional network is repressed by a master regulator of myelo-lymphoid differentiation.

    PubMed

    Wontakal, Sandeep N; Guo, Xingyi; Smith, Cameron; MacCarthy, Thomas; Bresnick, Emery H; Bergman, Aviv; Snyder, Michael P; Weissman, Sherman M; Zheng, Deyou; Skoultchi, Arthur I

    2012-03-06

    Two mechanisms that play important roles in cell fate decisions are control of a "core transcriptional network" and repression of alternative transcriptional programs by antagonizing transcription factors. Whether these two mechanisms operate together is not known. Here we report that GATA-1, SCL, and Klf1 form an erythroid core transcriptional network by co-occupying >300 genes. Importantly, we find that PU.1, a negative regulator of terminal erythroid differentiation, is a highly integrated component of this network. GATA-1, SCL, and Klf1 act to promote, whereas PU.1 represses expression of many of the core network genes. PU.1 also represses the genes encoding GATA-1, SCL, Klf1, and important GATA-1 cofactors. Conversely, in addition to repressing PU.1 expression, GATA-1 also binds to and represses >100 PU.1 myelo-lymphoid gene targets in erythroid progenitors. Mathematical modeling further supports that this dual mechanism of repressing both the opposing upstream activator and its downstream targets provides a synergistic, robust mechanism for lineage specification. Taken together, these results amalgamate two key developmental principles, namely, regulation of a core transcriptional network and repression of an alternative transcriptional program, thereby enhancing our understanding of the mechanisms that establish cellular identity.

  16. Global discovery of erythroid long noncoding RNAs reveals novel regulators of red cell maturation.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Dominguez, Juan R; Hu, Wenqian; Yuan, Bingbing; Shi, Jiahai; Park, Staphany S; Gromatzky, Austin A; van Oudenaarden, Alexander; Lodish, Harvey F

    2014-01-23

    Erythropoiesis is regulated at multiple levels to ensure the proper generation of mature red cells under multiple physiological conditions. To probe the contribution of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) to this process, we examined >1 billion RNA-seq reads of polyadenylated and nonpolyadenylated RNA from differentiating mouse fetal liver red blood cells and identified 655 lncRNA genes including not only intergenic, antisense, and intronic but also pseudogene and enhancer loci. More than 100 of these genes are previously unrecognized and highly erythroid specific. By integrating genome-wide surveys of chromatin states, transcription factor occupancy, and tissue expression patterns, we identify multiple lncRNAs that are dynamically expressed during erythropoiesis, show epigenetic regulation, and are targeted by key erythroid transcription factors GATA1, TAL1, or KLF1. We focus on 12 such candidates and find that they are nuclear-localized and exhibit complex developmental expression patterns. Depleting them severely impaired erythrocyte maturation, inhibiting cell size reduction and subsequent enucleation. One of them, alncRNA-EC7, is transcribed from an enhancer and is specifically needed for activation of the neighboring gene encoding BAND 3. Our study provides an annotated catalog of erythroid lncRNAs, readily available through an online resource, and shows that diverse types of lncRNAs participate in the regulatory circuitry underlying erythropoiesis.

  17. PPAR-α and glucocorticoid receptor synergize to promote erythroid progenitor self-renewal.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hsiang-Ying; Gao, Xiaofei; Barrasa, M Inmaculada; Li, Hu; Elmes, Russell R; Peters, Luanne L; Lodish, Harvey F

    2015-06-25

    Many acute and chronic anaemias, including haemolysis, sepsis and genetic bone marrow failure diseases such as Diamond-Blackfan anaemia, are not treatable with erythropoietin (Epo), because the colony-forming unit erythroid progenitors (CFU-Es) that respond to Epo are either too few in number or are not sensitive enough to Epo to maintain sufficient red blood cell production. Treatment of these anaemias requires a drug that acts at an earlier stage of red cell formation and enhances the formation of Epo-sensitive CFU-E progenitors. Recently, we showed that glucocorticoids specifically stimulate self-renewal of an early erythroid progenitor, burst-forming unit erythroid (BFU-E), and increase the production of terminally differentiated erythroid cells. Here we show that activation of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPAR-α) by the PPAR-α agonists GW7647 and fenofibrate synergizes with the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) to promote BFU-E self-renewal. Over time these agonists greatly increase production of mature red blood cells in cultures of both mouse fetal liver BFU-Es and mobilized human adult CD34(+) peripheral blood progenitors, with a new and effective culture system being used for the human cells that generates normal enucleated reticulocytes. Although Ppara(-/-) mice show no haematological difference from wild-type mice in both normal and phenylhydrazine (PHZ)-induced stress erythropoiesis, PPAR-α agonists facilitate recovery of wild-type but not Ppara(-/-) mice from PHZ-induced acute haemolytic anaemia. We also show that PPAR-α alleviates anaemia in a mouse model of chronic anaemia. Finally, both in control and corticosteroid-treated BFU-E cells, PPAR-α co-occupies many chromatin sites with GR; when activated by PPAR-α agonists, additional PPAR-α is recruited to GR-adjacent sites and presumably facilitates GR-dependent BFU-E self-renewal. Our discovery of the role of PPAR-α agonists in stimulating self-renewal of early erythroid

  18. PPARα and glucocorticoid receptor synergize to promote erythroid progenitor self-renewal

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hsiang-Ying; Gao, Xiaofei; Barrasa, M. Inmaculada; Li, Hu; Elmes, Russell R.; Peters, Luanne L.; Lodish, Harvey F.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Many acute and chronic anemias, including hemolysis, sepsis, and genetic bone marrow failure diseases such as Diamond-Blackfan Anemia (DBA), are not treatable with erythropoietin (Epo), because the colony-forming unit erythroid progenitors (CFU-Es) that respond to Epo are either too few in number or are not sensitive enough to Epo to maintain sufficient red blood cell production 1,2,3–5,6,7,8,9. Treatment of these anemias requires a drug that acts at an earlier stage of red cell formation and enhances the formation of Epo-sensitive CFU-E progenitors. Recently we showed that glucocorticoids specifically stimulate self-renewal of the early erythroid progenitor, the burst-forming unit erythroid (BFU-E), and increase the production of terminally differentiated erythroid cells 10,11. Here we demonstrate that activation of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα) by PPARα agonists, GW7647 and fenofibrate, synergizes with glucocorticoid receptor (GR) to promote BFU-E self-renewal. Over time these agonists greatly increase production of mature red blood cells in cultures both of mouse fetal liver BFU-Es and of mobilized human adult CD34+ peripheral blood progenitors, the latter employing a new and effective culture system that generates normal enucleated reticulocytes. While PPARα−/− mice show no hematological difference from wild-type mice in both normal and phenylhydrazine (PHZ)-induced stress erythropoiesis, PPARα agonists facilitate recovery of wild-type mice, but not PPARα−/− mice, from PHZ-induced acute hemolytic anemia. We also showed that PPARα alleviates anemia in a mouse model of chronic anemia. Finally, both in control and corticosteroid-treated BFU-E cells PPARα co-occupies many chromatin sites with GR; when activated by PPARα agonists, additional PPARα is recruited to GR-adjacent sites and presumably facilitates GR-dependent BFU-E self-renewal. Our discovery of the role of PPARα agonists in stimulating self

  19. Sustainability Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Stichnothe, Heinz

    2017-03-17

    The long-term substitution of fossil resources can only be achieved through a bio-based economy, with biorefineries and bio-based products playing a major role. However, it is important to assess the implications of the transition to a bio-based economy. Life cycle-based sustainability assessment is probably the most suitable approach to quantify impacts and to identify trade-offs at multiple levels. The extended utilisation of biomass can cause land use change and affect food security of the most vulnerable people throughout the world. Although this is mainly a political issue and governments should be responsible, the responsibility is shifted to companies producing biofuels and other bio-based products. Organic wastes and lignocellulosic biomass are considered to be the preferred feedstock for the production of bio-based products. However, it is unlikely that a bio-based economy can rely only on organic wastes and lignocellulosic biomass.It is crucial to identify potential problems related to socio-economic and environmental issues. Currently there are many approaches to the sustainability of bio-based products, both quantitative and qualitative. However, results of different calculation methods are not necessarily comparable and can cause confusion among decision-makers, stakeholders and the public.Hence, a harmonised, globally agreed approach would be the best solution to secure sustainable biomass/biofuels/bio-based chemicals production and trade, and to avoid indirect effects (e.g. indirect land use change). However, there is still a long way to go.Generally, the selection of suitable indicators that serve the purpose of sustainability assessment is very context-specific. Therefore, it is recommended to use a flexible and modular approach that can be adapted to various purposes. A conceptual model for the selection of sustainability indicators is provided that facilitates identifying suitable sustainability indicators based on relevance and significance in a

  20. 'Sustainability' in global health.

    PubMed

    Yang, Alice; Farmer, Paul E; McGahan, Anita M

    2010-01-01

    'Sustainability' has become a central criterion used by funders - including foundations, governmental agencies and international agencies - in evaluating public health programmes. The criterion became important as a result of frustration with discontinuities in the provision of care. As a result of its application, projects that involve building infrastructure, training or relatively narrow objectives tend to receive support. In this article, we argue for a reconceptualisation of sustainability criteria in light of the idea that health is an investment that is itself sustaining and sustainable, and for the abandonment of conceptualisations of sustainability that focus on the consumable medical interventions required to achieve health. The implication is a tailoring of the time horizon for creating value that reflects the challenges of achieving health in a community. We also argue that funders and coordinating bodies, rather than the specialised health providers that they support, are best positioned to develop integrated programmes of medical interventions to achieve truly sustainable health outcomes.

  1. The Asymmetric Cell Division Regulators Par3, Scribble and Pins/Gpsm2 Are Not Essential for Erythroid Development or Enucleation

    PubMed Central

    Wölwer, Christina B.; Gödde, Nathan; Pase, Luke B.; Elsum, Imogen A.; Lim, Krystle Y. B.; Sacirbegovic, Faruk; Walkley, Carl R.; Ellis, Sarah; Ohno, Shigeo; Matsuzaki, Fumio; Russell, Sarah M.; Humbert, Patrick O.

    2017-01-01

    Erythroid enucleation is the process by which the future red blood cell disposes of its nucleus prior to entering the blood stream. This key event during red blood cell development has been likened to an asymmetric cell division (ACD), by which the enucleating erythroblast divides into two very different daughter cells of alternate molecular composition, a nucleated cell that will be removed by associated macrophages, and the reticulocyte that will mature to the definitive erythrocyte. Here we investigated gene expression of members of the Par, Scribble and Pins/Gpsm2 asymmetric cell division complexes in erythroid cells, and functionally tested their role in erythroid enucleation in vivo and ex vivo. Despite their roles in regulating ACD in other contexts, we found that these polarity regulators are not essential for erythroid enucleation, nor for erythroid development in vivo. Together our results put into question a role for cell polarity and asymmetric cell division in erythroid enucleation. PMID:28095473

  2. ZFP36L2 is required for self-renewal of early burst-forming unit erythroid progenitors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lingbo; Prak, Lina; Rayon-Estrada, Violeta; Thiru, Prathapan; Flygare, Johan; Lim, Bing; Lodish, Harvey F

    2013-07-04

    Stem cells and progenitors in many lineages undergo self-renewing divisions, but the extracellular and intracellular proteins that regulate this process are largely unknown. Glucocorticoids stimulate red blood cell formation by promoting self-renewal of early burst-forming unit-erythroid (BFU-E) progenitors. Here we show that the RNA-binding protein ZFP36L2 is a transcriptional target of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) in BFU-Es and is required for BFU-E self-renewal. ZFP36L2 is normally downregulated during erythroid differentiation from the BFU-E stage, but its expression is maintained by all tested GR agonists that stimulate BFU-E self-renewal, and the GR binds to several potential enhancer regions of ZFP36L2. Knockdown of ZFP36L2 in cultured BFU-E cells did not affect the rate of cell division but disrupted glucocorticoid-induced BFU-E self-renewal, and knockdown of ZFP36L2 in transplanted erythroid progenitors prevented expansion of erythroid lineage progenitors normally seen following induction of anaemia by phenylhydrazine treatment. ZFP36L2 preferentially binds to messenger RNAs that are induced or maintained at high expression levels during terminal erythroid differentiation and negatively regulates their expression levels. ZFP36L2 therefore functions as part of a molecular switch promoting BFU-E self-renewal and a subsequent increase in the total numbers of colony-forming unit-erythroid (CFU-E) progenitors and erythroid cells that are generated.

  3. Differences in background characteristics of patients with chronic hepatitis C who achieved sustained virologic response with interferon-free versus interferon-based therapy and the risk of developing hepatocellular carcinoma after eradication of hepatitis C virus in Japan.

    PubMed

    Toyoda, H; Tada, T; Takaguchi, K; Senoh, T; Shimada, N; Hiraoka, A; Michitaka, K; Ishikawa, T; Kumada, T

    2016-12-16

    We compared the background characteristics of patients with chronic hepatitis C who achieved eradication of hepatitis C virus (HCV), that is sustained virologic response (SVR), with interferon (IFN)-based versus IFN-free antiviral therapy in Japan. In addition, we used a previously reported risk assessment model to compare the incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) after SVR by treatment type. Pretreatment characteristics of 1533 patients who achieved SVR with IFN-based therapy and 1086 patients with IFN-free therapy from five institutions across Japan were compared. The risk of HCC after SVR was assessed based on pretreatment characteristics, and the incidence of HCC after SVR was estimated in both groups. Age and serum alpha-fetoprotein levels were higher, platelet count was lower, and liver fibrosis was more advanced in patients who achieved SVR with IFN-free therapy compared with IFN-based therapy. The incidence of HCC after SVR in the IFN-free group was estimated to be more than twofold higher than in the IFN-based therapy group (7.29% vs. 3.09%, and 6.23% vs. 3.01% when excluding patients who have underwent curative treatment for HCC). There are large differences in pretreatment characteristics between patients who achieved SVR with IFN-based and IFN-free therapies in Japan, which are associated with differential risk of HCC after SVR. These differences can influence the incidence of HCC after SVR and should be taken into consideration when comparing IFN-based and IFN-free therapies in terms of hepatocarcinogenesis suppression with HCV eradication.

  4. Detection of Occult Hepatitis C Virus Infection in Patients Who Achieved a Sustained Virologic Response to Direct-Acting Antiviral Agents for Recurrent Infection After Liver Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Elmasry, Sandra; Wadhwa, Sanya; Bang, Bo-Ram; Cook, Linda; Chopra, Shefali; Kanel, Gary; Kim, Brian; Harper, Tammy; Feng, Zongdi; Jerome, Keith R; Kahn, Jeffrey A; Saito, Takeshi

    2017-02-01

    Occult infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV) is defined as the presence of the HCV genome in either liver tissue or peripheral blood monocytes, despite constant negative results from tests for HCV RNA in serum. We investigated whether patients who maintained a sustained virologic response 12 weeks after therapy (SVR12) with direct-acting antiviral (DAA) agents for recurrent HCV infection after liver transplantation had occult HCV infections. We performed a prospective study of 134 patients with recurrent HCV infection after liver transplantation who were treated with DAAs, with or without ribavirin, from 2014 through 2016 (129 patients achieved an SVR12). In >10% of the patients who achieved SVR12 (n = 14), serum levels of aminotransferases did not normalize during or after DAA therapy, or they normalized transiently but then increased sharply after DAA therapy. Of these 14 patients, 9 were assessed for occult HCV infection by reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction. This analysis revealed that 55% of these patients (n = 5) had an occult infection, with the detection of negative strand viral genome, indicating viral replication. These findings indicate the presence of occult HCV infection in some patients with abnormal levels of serum aminotransferases, despite SVR12 to DAAs for HCV infection after liver transplantation.

  5. Tissue-specific regulation of the rabbit 15-lipoxygenase gene in erythroid cells by a transcriptional silencer.

    PubMed Central

    O'Prey, J; Harrison, P R

    1995-01-01

    The 15-lipoxygenase (lox) gene is expressed in a tissue-specific manner, predominantly in erythroid cells but also in airway epithelial cells and eosinophils. We demonstrate in this report that the 5' flanking DNA of the 15-lox gene contains sequences which down-regulate its activity in a variety of non-erythroid cell lines but not in two erythroid cell lines. The element has characteristics of a transcriptional 'silencer' since it functions in both orientations. The main activity of the silencer has been mapped to the first 900 bp of 5' flanking DNA, which contains nine binding sites for a nuclear factor present in non-erythroid cells but not in erythroid cells. These binding sites have similar sequences and multiple copies of the binding sites confer tissue-specific down-regulation when attached to a minimal lox promoter fragment. The 5' flanking DNA also contains a cluster of three binding sites for the GATA family of transcription factors. Images PMID:7478994

  6. Induction of foetal haemoglobin synthesis in erythroid progenitor stem cells: mediated by water-soluble components of Terminalia catappa.

    PubMed

    Aimola, I A; Inuwa, H M; Nok, A J; Mamman, A I

    2014-06-01

    Current novel therapeutic agents for the treatment of sickle cell anaemia (SCA) focus on increasing foetal haemoglobin (HbF) levels in SCA patients. Unfortunately, the only approved HbF-inducing agent, hydroxyurea, has long-term unpredictable side effects. Studies have shown the potential of plant compounds to modulate HbF synthesis in primary erythroid progenitor stem cells. We isolated a novel HbF-inducing Terminalia catappa distilled water active fraction (TCDWF) from Terminalia catappa leaves that induced the commitment of erythroid progenitor stem cells to the erythroid lineage and relatively higher HbF synthesis of 9.2- and 6.8-fold increases in both erythropoietin (EPO)-independent and EPO-dependent progenitor stem cells respectively. TCDWF was differentially cytotoxic to EPO-dependent and EPO-independent erythroid progenitor stem cell cultures as revealed by lactate dehydrogenase release from the cells. TCDWF demonstrated a protective effect on EPO-dependent and not EPO-independent progenitor cells. TCDWF induced a modest increase in caspase 3 activity in EPO-independent erythroid progenitor stem cell cultures compared with a significantly higher (P˂0.05) caspase 3 activity in EPO-dependent ones. The results demonstrate that TCDWF may hold promising HbF-inducing compounds, which work synergistically, and suggest a dual modulatory effect on erythropoiesis inherent in this active fraction.

  7. Mathematical modeling reveals differential effects of erythropoietin on proliferation and lineage commitment of human hematopoietic progenitors in early erythroid culture

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Daniel; Carter, Deborah; Homer, Martin; Marucci, Lucia; Gampel, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    Erythropoietin is essential for the production of mature erythroid cells, promoting both proliferation and survival. Whether erythropoietin and other cytokines can influence lineage commitment of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells is of significant interest. To study lineage restriction of the common myeloid progenitor to the megakaryocyte/erythroid progenitor of peripheral blood CD34+ cells, we have shown that the cell surface protein CD36 identifies the earliest lineage restricted megakaryocyte/erythroid progenitor. Using this marker and carboxyfluorescein succinimidyl ester to track cell divisions in vitro, we have developed a mathematical model that accurately predicts population dynamics of erythroid culture. Parameters derived from the modeling of cultures without added erythropoietin indicate that the rate of lineage restriction is not affected by erythropoietin. By contrast, megakaryocyte/erythroid progenitor proliferation is sensitive to erythropoietin from the time that CD36 first appears at the cell surface. These results shed new light on the role of erythropoietin in erythropoiesis and provide a powerful tool for further study of hematopoietic progenitor lineage restriction and erythropoiesis. PMID:26589912

  8. CP2 binding to the promoter is essential for the enhanced transcription of globin genes in erythroid cells.

    PubMed

    Chae, Ji Hyung; Kim, Chul Geun

    2003-02-28

    We have previously reported that the reduced level of CP2 suppresses the mouse alpha- and beta-globin gene expression and hemoglobin synthesis during terminal differentiation of mouse erythroleukemia (MEL) cells in vitro [Chae et al. (1999)]. As an extension of this study, we demonstrated that human alpha-, epsilon-, and gamma- globin genes were also suppressed by the reduced expression of CP2 in K562 cells. To address how much CP2 contributes in the regulation of globin gene expression, we measured transcriptional activities of the wild type alpha-globin promoter and its various factor-binding sites mutants in erythroid and nonerythroid cells. Interestingly, CP2 site dependent transcriptional activation occurred in an erythroid-cell specific manner, even though CP2 is ubiquitously expressed. In addition, CP2 site mutation within the alpha-promoter severely suppressed promoter activity in differentiated, but not in undifferentiated MEL cells, suggesting that the CP2 binding site is needed for the enhanced transcription of globin genes during erythroid differentiation. When the human beta-globin locus control region was linked to the alpha-promoter, suppression was more severe in the CP2 site mutant in differentiated MEL cells. Overall data indicate that CP2 is a major factor in the regulation of globin expression in human and mouse erythroid cells, and CP2 binding to the globin gene promoter is essential for the enhanced transcription of globin genes in erythroid differentiation.

  9. Uroporphyrinogen III synthase erythroid promoter mutations in adjacent GATA1 and CP2 elements cause congenital erythropoietic porphyria.

    PubMed

    Solis, C; Aizencang, G I; Astrin, K H; Bishop, D F; Desnick, R J

    2001-03-01

    Congenital erythropoietic porphyria, an autosomal recessive inborn error of heme biosynthesis, results from the markedly deficient activity of uroporphyrinogen III synthase. Extensive mutation analyses of 40 unrelated patients only identified approximately 90% of mutant alleles. Sequencing the recently discovered erythroid-specific promoter in six patients with a single undefined allele identified four novel mutations clustered in a 20-bp region: (a) a -70T to C transition in a putative GATA-1 consensus binding element, (b) a -76G to A transition, (c) a -86C to A transversion in three unrelated patients, and (d) a -90C to A transversion in a putative CP2 binding motif. Also, a -224T to C polymorphism was present in approximately 4% of 200 unrelated Caucasian alleles. We inserted these mutant sequences into luciferase reporter constructs. When transfected into K562 erythroid cells, these constructs yielded 3 +/- 1, 54 +/- 3, 43 +/- 6, and 8 +/- 1%, respectively, of the reporter activity conferred by the wild-type promoter. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays indicated that the -70C mutation altered GATA1 binding, whereas the adjacent -76A mutation did not. Similarly, the -90C mutation altered CP2 binding, whereas the -86A mutation did not. Thus, these four pathogenic erythroid promoter mutations impaired erythroid-specific transcription, caused CEP, and identified functionally important GATA1 and CP2 transcriptional binding elements for erythroid-specific heme biosynthesis.

  10. Gamma-interferon alters globin gene expression in neonatal and adult erythroid cells

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, B.A.; Perrine, S.P.; Antognetti, G.; Perlmutter, D.H.; Emerson, S.G.; Sieff, C.; Faller, D.V.

    1987-06-01

    The effect of gamma-interferon on fetal hemoglobin synthesis by purified cord blood, fetal liver, and adult bone marrow erythroid progenitors was studied with a radioligand assay to measure hemoglobin production by BFU-E-derived erythroblasts. Coculture with recombinant gamma-interferon resulted in a significant and dose-dependent decrease in fetal hemoglobin production by neonatal and adult, but not fetal, BFU-E-derived erythroblasts. Accumulation of fetal hemoglobin by cord blood BFU-E-derived erythroblasts decreased up to 38.1% of control cultures (erythropoietin only). Synthesis of both G gamma/A gamma globin was decreased, since the G gamma/A gamma ratio was unchanged. Picograms fetal hemoglobin per cell was decreased by gamma-interferon addition, but picograms total hemoglobin was unchanged, demonstrating that a reciprocal increase in beta-globin production occurred in cultures treated with gamma-interferon. No toxic effect of gamma-interferon on colony growth was noted. The addition of gamma-interferon to cultures resulted in a decrease in the percentage of HbF produced by adult BFU-E-derived cells to 45.6% of control. Fetal hemoglobin production by cord blood, fetal liver, and adult bone marrow erythroid progenitors, was not significantly affected by the addition of recombinant GM-CSF, recombinant interleukin 1 (IL-1), recombinant IL-2, or recombinant alpha-interferon. Although fetal progenitor cells appear unable to alter their fetal hemoglobin program in response to any of the growth factors added here, the interaction of neonatal and adult erythroid progenitors with gamma-interferon results in an altered expression of globin genes.

  11. Daughter Cells and Erythroid Cells Budding from PGCCs and Their Clinicopathological Significances in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dan; Yang, Xiaoyun; Yang, Zhengduo; Fei, Fei; Li, Shuyuan; Qu, Jie; Zhang, Mingqing; Li, Yuwei; Zhang, Xipeng; Zhang, Shiwu

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: We previously reported that polyploid giant cancer cells (PGCCs) induced by cobalt chloride (CoCl2) exhibit cancer stem cell properties. Daughter cells generated by PGCCs possess epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) phenotype changes and EMT plays an important role in cancer development and progression. This study investigated the characteristics of PGCCs from LoVo and HCT116 induced by CoCl2 and the clinicopathological significances of PGCCs in colorectal cancer (CRC). Materials and Methods: Western blotting and immunocytochemical staining were used to compare the expression levels of EMT-related proteins between PGCCs with budding daughter cells and the control cells. In addition, tissue samples were collected from 159 patients with CRC for analysis of PGCCs, vasculogenic mimicry (VM), and single stromal PGCCs with budding, as well as immunohistochemical staining for cathepsin B, vimentin, and hemoglobin A. Results: Single PGCCs induced by CoCl2 formed spheroids in vitro. Poorly differentiated CRCs showed the highest numbers of PGCCs and VM, and expression of cathepsin B. There was greater expression of EMT-related proteins in PGCCs with budding daughter cells than in control cells. The expression of vimentin located in PGCC nuclei. Single stomal PGCCs with budding were detected in 27.45% of well differentiated, 50% of moderately differentiated, and 90.20% of poorly differentiated CRC samples. PGCCs can generate erythroid cells that express delta-hemoglobin to form VM. Erythroid cells generated by PGCCs were positive for hemoglobin A immunocytochemical staining. Conclusion: PGCCs from LoVo and HCT116 treated by CoCl2 exhibited cancer stem cell properties. The number of PGCCs and VM were associated with CRC differentiation and daughter cells budded from PGCCs may promote the lymph node metastasis via expression of EMT-related proteins. PGCCs and their newly generated erythroid cells form VM structures. PMID:28261349

  12. Erythroid and megakaryocytic differentiation of K562 erythroleukemic cells by monochloramine.

    PubMed

    Ogino, T; Kobuchi, H; Fujita, H; Matsukawa, A; Utsumi, K

    2014-03-01

    The induction of leukemic cell differentiation is a hopeful therapeutic modality. We studied the effects of monochloramine (NH2Cl) on erythroleukemic K562 cell differentiation, and compared the effects observed with those of U0126 and staurosporine, which are known inducers of erythroid and megakaryocytic differentiation, respectively. CD235 (glycophorin) expression, a marker of erythroid differentiation, was significantly increased by NH2Cl and U0126, along with an increase in cd235 mRNA levels. Other erythroid markers such as γ-globin and CD71 (transferrin receptor) were also increased by NH2Cl and U0126. In contrast, CD61 (integrin β3) and CD42b (GP1bα) expression, markers of megakaryocytic differentiation, was increased by staurosporine, but did not change significantly by NH2Cl and U0126. NH2Cl retarded cell proliferation without a marked loss of viability. When ERK phosphorylation (T202/Y204) and CD235 expression were compared using various chemicals, a strong negative correlation was observed (r = -0.76). Paradoxically, NH2Cl and staurosporine, but not U0126, induced large cells with multiple or lobulated nuclei, which was characteristic to megakaryocytes. NH2Cl increased the mRNA levels of gata1 and scl, decreased that of gata2, and did not change those of pu.1 and klf1. The changes observed in mRNA expression were different from those of U0126 or staurosporine. These results suggest that NH2Cl induces the bidirectional differentiation of K562. Oxidative stress may be effective in inducing leukemic cell differentiation.

  13. A new molecular link between defective autophagy and erythroid abnormalities in chorea-acanthocytosis.

    PubMed

    Lupo, Francesca; Tibaldi, Elena; Matte, Alessandro; Sharma, Alok K; Brunati, Anna Maria; Alper, Seth L; Zancanaro, Carlo; Benati, Donatella; Siciliano, Angela; Bertoldi, Mariarita; Zonta, Francesca; Storch, Alexander; Walker, Ruth H; Danek, Adrian; Bader, Benedikt; Hermann, Andreas; De Franceschi, Lucia

    2016-12-22

    Chorea-acanthocytosis is one of the hereditary neurodegenerative disorders known as the neuroacanthocytoses. Chorea-acanthocytosis is characterized by circulating acanthocytes deficient in chorein, a protein of unknown function. We report here for the first time that chorea-acanthocytosis red cells are characterized by impaired autophagy, with cytoplasmic accumulation of active Lyn and of autophagy-related proteins Ulk1 and Atg7. In chorea-acanthocytosis erythrocytes, active Lyn is sequestered by HSP90-70 to form high-molecular-weight complexes that stabilize and protect Lyn from its proteasomal degradation, contributing to toxic Lyn accumulation. An interplay between accumulation of active Lyn and autophagy was found in chorea-acanthocytosis based on Lyn coimmunoprecipitation with Ulk1 and Atg7 and on the presence of Ulk1 in Lyn-containing high-molecular-weight complexes. In addition, chorein associated with Atg7 in healthy but not in chorea-acanthocytosis erythrocytes. Electron microscopy detected multivesicular bodies and membrane remnants only in circulating chorea-acanthocytosis red cells. In addition, reticulocyte-enriched chorea-acanthocytosis red cell fractions exhibited delayed clearance of mitochondria and lysosomes, further supporting the impairment of authophagic flux. Because autophagy is also important in erythropoiesis, we studied in vitro CD34(+)-derived erythroid precursors. In chorea-acanthocytosis, we found (1) dyserythropoiesis; (2) increased active Lyn; (3) accumulation of a marker of autophagic flux and autolysososme degradation; (4) accumlation of Lamp1, a lysosmal membrane protein, and LAMP1-positive aggregates; and (5) reduced clearance of lysosomes and mitochondria. Our results uncover in chorea-acanthocytosis erythroid cells an association between accumulation of active Lyn and impaired autophagy, suggesting a link between chorein and autophagic vesicle trafficking in erythroid maturation.

  14. Cognitive Processes and Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, Dennis; Randhawa, Bikkar S.

    For a group of 165 fourth- and fifth-grade students, four achievement test scores were correlated with success on nine tests designed to measure three cognitive functions: sustained attention, successive processing, and simultaneous processing. This experiment was designed in accordance with Luria's model of the three functional units of the…

  15. Clinical utility of the IRF: assessment of erythroid regeneration following parvo B19 infection.

    PubMed

    Wyrick-Glatzel, Janis; Conway-Klaassen, Janice

    2002-01-01

    Parvo B19 (Fifth disease) is an erythrotropic virus which attaches through the 'P' globoside receptor on the surface of human red blood cells and precursors. This typically benign viral infection can cause a transient aplastic anemia in patients with underlying red cell disorders. In this case, a two-year-old child presents with severe aplastic anemia without evidence of underlying disease. Erythroid regeneration is monitored through the use of the immature reticulocyte fraction (IRF) and is demonstrated by the presence of high and medium fluorescence reticulocytes in the peripheral blood three to five days prior to the peak in absolute reticulocytes.

  16. Roles of Erythroid Differentiation Regulator 1 (Erdr1) on Inflammatory Skin Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Houh, Youn Kyung; Kim, Kyung Eun; Park, Hyun Jeong; Cho, Daeho

    2016-01-01

    Erythroid Differentiation Regulator 1 (Erdr1) is known as a hemoglobin synthesis factor which also regulates cell survival under conditions of stress. In addition, previous studies have revealed the effects of Erdr1 on cancer progression and its negative correlation with interleukin (IL)-18, a pro-inflammatory cytokine. Based on this evidence, the therapeutic effects of Erdr1 have been demonstrated in several inflammatory skin diseases such as malignant skin cancer, psoriasis, and rosacea. This article reviews the roles of Erdr1 in skin inflammation, suggesting that Erdr1 is a potential therapeutic molecule on inflammatory disorders. PMID:27941650

  17. Literacy Achievement through Sustained Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Douglas; Frey, Nancy; Nelson, John

    2012-01-01

    Development efforts, the 44 schools in this study increased students' reading proficiency. Over the years, teams of teachers from each school were provided professional development and opportunities to lead their colleagues in implementation of the instructional framework. The teachers used their instructional materials as resources to plan…

  18. Achieving Sustainability in Learning and Teaching Initiatives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brew, Angela; Cahir, Jayde

    2014-01-01

    Universities have a long history of change in learning and teaching to suit various government initiatives and institutional priorities. Academic developers now are frequently required to address strategic learning and teaching priorities. This paper asks how, in such a context, academic developers can ensure that work they do in relation to one…

  19. Achieving Sustainable Construction in Affordable Housing

    SciTech Connect

    Barcik, M.K.; Creech, D.B.; Ternes, M.P.

    1998-12-07

    An energy-efficient design and construction checklist and information sheets on energy-efficient design and construction are two products being developed. These products will help affordable housing providers take the first steps toward a whole-house approach to the design and implementation of energy-efficient construction practices. The checklist presents simple and clear guidance on energy improvements that can be readily addressed now by most affordable housing providers. The information sheets complement the checklist by providing installation instructions and material specifications that are accompanied by detailed graphics. The information sheets also identify benefits of recommended energy-efficiency measures and procedures including cost savings and impacts on health and comfort. This paper presents details on the checklist and information sheets and discusses their use in two affordable housing projects.

  20. [Cycling to achieve healthy and sustainable alternatives].

    PubMed

    de Carvalho, Mauren Lopes; de Freitas, Carlos Machado

    2012-06-01

    The quest for healthier cities and citizens has contributed to the strengthening of public policies championing the bicycle as a means of transportation and offering benefits to individual wellbeing in various countries, however there is also an increased risk of accidents. The scope of this review is to analyze scientific output dealing with the relationship between cycling as a means of transportation and public health. PubMed, LILACS and SciELO were the chosen databases used in the research and 66 complete articles were selected. The results show that concern about this theme is recent, especially in developing countries. The most recurrent topics raised by the researchers were: traffic safety, public policies and the effects of cycling on health. We concluded that the decision to use the bicycle as a means of transportation occurs in a very heterogeneous manner, albeit with potentially greater impacts in developing countries where the inclusion of this theme in the research agendas related to the promotion of active transport, health and traffic safety is a matter of urgency.

  1. How Schools Sustain Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chrisman, Valerie

    2005-01-01

    A growing number of the US schools, under the microscope of increased accountability, are identified as underperforming on the basis of low-test scores. Yet sustained increases in student achievement are problematic for underperforming schools.

  2. Hydroxycarbamide alters erythroid gene expression in children with sickle cell anaemia.

    PubMed

    Flanagan, Jonathan M; Steward, Shirley; Howard, Thad A; Mortier, Nicole A; Kimble, Amy C; Aygun, Banu; Hankins, Jane S; Neale, Geoffrey A; Ware, Russell E

    2012-04-01

    Sickle cell anaemia (SCA) is a severe debilitating haematological disorder associated with a high degree of morbidity and mortality. The level of fetal haemoglobin (HbF) is well-recognized as a critical laboratory parameter: lower HbF is associated with a higher risk of vaso-occlusive complications, organ damage, and early death. Hydroxycarbamide treatment can induce HbF, improve laboratory parameters, and ameliorate clinical complications of SCA but its mechanisms of action remain incompletely defined and the HbF response is highly variable. To identify pathways of hydroxycarbamide activity, we performed microarray expression analyses of early reticulocyte RNA obtained from children with SCA enrolled in the HydroxyUrea Study of Long-term Effects (NCT00305175) and examined the effects of hydroxycarbamide exposure in vivo. Hydroxycarbamide affected a large number of erythroid genes, with significant decreases in the expression of genes involved in translation, ribosome assembly and chromosome organization, presumably reflecting the daily cytotoxic pulses of hydroxycarbamide. Hydroxycarbamide also affected expression of numerous genes associated with HbF including BCL11A, a key regulator of baseline HbF levels. Together, these data indicate that hydroxycarbamide treatment for SCA leads to substantial changes in erythroid gene expression, including BCL11A and other potential signalling pathways associated with HbF induction.

  3. Interaction of the Macrophage and Primitive Erythroid Lineages in the Mammalian Embryo

    PubMed Central

    Palis, James

    2017-01-01

    Two distinct forms of erythropoiesis, primitive and definitive, are found in mammals. Definitive erythroid precursors in the bone marrow mature in the physical context of macrophage cells in “erythroblastic islands.” In the murine embryo, overlapping waves of primitive hematopoietic progenitors and definitive erythro-myeloid progenitors, each containing macrophage potential, arise in the yolk sac prior to the emergence of hematopoietic stem cells. Primitive erythroblasts mature in the bloodstream as a semi-synchronous cohort while macrophage cells derived from the yolk sac seed the fetal liver. Late-stage primitive erythroblasts associate with macrophage cells in erythroblastic islands in the fetal liver, indicating that primitive erythroblasts can interact with macrophage cells extravascularly. Like definitive erythroblasts, primitive erythroblasts physically associate with macrophages through α4 integrin–vascular adhesion molecule 1-mediated interactions and α4 integrin is redistributed onto the plasma membrane of primitive pyrenocytes. Both in vitro and in vivo studies indicate that fetal liver macrophage cells engulf primitive pyrenocytes. Taken together, these studies indicate that several aspects of the interplay between macrophage cells and maturing erythroid precursor cells are conserved during the ontogeny of mammalian organisms. PMID:28119687

  4. Canavanine inhibits vimentin assembly but not its synthesis in chicken embryo erythroid cells.

    PubMed

    Moon, R T; Lazarides, E

    1983-10-01

    In chicken embryo erythroid cells, newly synthesized vimentin first enters a Triton X-100 (TX-100)-soluble pool and subsequently assembles posttranslationally into TX-100-insoluble vimentin filaments (Blikstad I., and E. Lazarides, J. Cell Biol., 96:1803-1808). Here we show that incubation of chicken embryo erythroid cells in a medium in which arginine has been substituted by its amino acid analogue, canavanine, results in the inhibition of the posttranslational assembly of vimentin into the TX-100-insoluble filaments. Immunoprecipitation and subsequent SDS gel electrophoresis showed that the synthesis of canavanine-vimentin is not inhibited and that it accumulates in the TX-100-soluble compartment. Pulse-chase experiments with [35S]methionine demonstrated that while arginine-vimentin can be rapidly chased from the soluble to the cytoskeletal fraction, canavanine-vimentin remains in the soluble fraction, where it turns over. The effect of canavanine on the assembly of vimentin did not prevent the assembly of arginine-vimentin, as cells labeled with [35S]methionine first in the presence of canavanine and then in the presence of arginine contained labeled canavanine-vimentin only in the soluble fraction, and arginine-vimentin in both the soluble and cytoskeletal fractions. These results suggest that arginine residues play an essential role in the assembly of vimentin in vivo.

  5. Nanomechanical properties of composite protein networks of erythroid membranes at lipid surfaces.

    PubMed

    Encinar, Mario; Casado, Santiago; Calzado-Martín, Alicia; Natale, P; San Paulo, Álvaro; Calleja, Montserrat; Vélez, Marisela; Monroy, Francisco; López-Montero, Iván

    2017-01-01

    Erythrocyte membranes have been particularly useful as a model for studies of membrane structure and mechanics. Native erythroid membranes can be electroformed as giant unilamellar vesicles (eGUVs). In the presence of ATP, the erythroid membrane proteins of eGUVs rearrange into protein networks at the microscale. Here, we present a detailed nanomechanical study of individual protein microfilaments forming the protein networks of eGUVs when spread on supporting surfaces. Using Peak Force tapping Atomic Force Microscopy (PF-AFM) in liquid environment we have obtained the mechanical maps of the composite lipid-protein networks supported on solid surface. In the absence of ATP, the protein pool was characterized by a Young's Modulus Epool≈5-15MPa whereas the complex filaments were found softer after protein supramolecular rearrangement; Efil≈0.4MPa. The observed protein softening and reassembling could be relevant for understanding the mechanisms of cytoskeleton reorganization found in pathological erythrocytes or erythrocytes that are affected by biological agents.

  6. Transcription of the hypersensitive site HS2 enhancer in erythroid cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tuan, D.; Suming Kong; Hu, K. )

    1992-12-01

    In the human genome, the erythroid-specific hypersensitive site HS2 enhancer regulates the transcription of the downstream [beta]-like globin genes 10-50 kilobases away. The mechanism of HS2 enhancer function is not known. The present study employs RNA protection assays to analyze the transcriptional status of the HS2 enhancer in transfected recombinant chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) plasmids. In erythroid K562 cells in which the HS2 enhancer is active, the HS2 sequence directs the synthesis of long enhancer transcripts that are initiated apparently from within the enhancer and elongated through the intervening DNA into the cis-linked CAT gene. In nonerythroid HL-60 cells in which the HS2 enhancer is inactive, long enhancer transcripts are not detectable. Splitting the HS2 enhancer between two tandem Ap1 sites abolishes the synthesis of a group of long enhancer transcripts and results in loss of enhancer function and transcriptional silencing of the cis-linked CAT gene. In directing the synthesis of RNA through the intervening DNA and the gene by a tracking and transcription mechanism, the HS2 enhancer may (i) open up the chromatin structure of a gene domain and (ii) deliver enhancer binding proteins to the promoter sequence where they may stimulate the transcription of the gene at the cap site. 42 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Functional plasticity of the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor in differentiating human erythroid precursor cells

    PubMed Central

    Hänggi, Pascal; Telezhkin, Vsevolod; Kemp, Paul J.; Schmugge, Markus; Gassmann, Max; Goede, Jeroen S.; Speer, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Calcium signaling is essential to support erythroid proliferation and differentiation. Precise control of the intracellular Ca2+ levels in erythroid precursor cells (EPCs) is afforded by coordinated expression and function of several cation channels, including the recently identified N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR). Here, we characterized the changes in Ca2+ uptake and electric currents mediated by the NMDARs occurring during EPC differentiation using flow cytometry and patch clamp. During erythropoietic maturation, subunit composition and properties of the receptor changed; in proerythroblasts and basophilic erythroblasts, fast deactivating currents with high amplitudes were mediated by the GluN2A subunit-dominated receptors, while at the polychromatic and orthochromatic erythroblast stages, the GluN2C subunit was getting more abundant, overriding the expression of GluN2A. At these stages, the currents mediated by the NMDARs carried the features characteristic of the GluN2C-containing receptors, such as prolonged decay time and lower conductance. Kinetics of this switch in NMDAR properties and abundance varied markedly from donor to donor. Despite this variability, NMDARs were essential for survival of EPCs in any subject tested. Our findings indicate that NMDARs have a dual role during erythropoiesis, supporting survival of polychromatic erythroblasts and contributing to the Ca2+ homeostasis from the orthochromatic erythroblast stage to circulating red blood cells. PMID:25788577

  8. Characterization of human erythroid burst-promoting activity derived from bone marrow conditioned media

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, P.N.; Ogawa, M.

    1982-06-01

    Bone marrow conditioned media (BMCM) increases burst number and the incorporation of /sup 59/Fe into heme by bursts when peripheral blood or bone marrow cells are cultured at limiting serum concentrations. Burst-promoting activity (BPA) has now been purified approximately 300-fold from this source by ion-exchange chromatography on DEAE-Sephadex and absorption chromatography on hydroxyapatite agarose gel. Marrow BPA increased burst number and hemoglobin (Hb) synthesis in a dose-dependent manner. A larger increase in Hb synthesis than in burst number was consistently observed, which was probably a consequence of the increase in the number of cells per burst that occurs in the presence of BPA. The role of BPA in culture could be distinguished from erythropoietin (Ep), since no bursts grew in the absence of Ep, whether or not BPA was present, and since it had no effect on the growth of erythroid colonies scored at day 5 of culture. Our purified fraction did not support the growth of CFU-C in culture. Activity was stable at temperatures of 70 degrees C or lower for 10 min; exposure to 80 degrees C resulted in approximately 50% loss of activity. BPA was completely inactivated by treatment at 100 degrees C for 10 min. Thus, human bone marrow cells produce a heat-sensitive factor that specifically promotes the growth of early erythroid progenitors in culture.

  9. 36 CFR 219.20 - Ecological sustainability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Ecological sustainability... Sustainability § 219.20 Ecological sustainability. To achieve ecological sustainability, the responsible official... diversity and species diversity are components of ecological sustainability. The planning process...

  10. 36 CFR 219.20 - Ecological sustainability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ecological sustainability... Sustainability § 219.20 Ecological sustainability. To achieve ecological sustainability, the responsible official... diversity and species diversity are components of ecological sustainability. The planning process...

  11. Decision Guidance for Sustainable Manufacturing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shao, Guodong

    2013-01-01

    Sustainable manufacturing has significant impacts on a company's business performance and competitiveness in today's world. A growing number of manufacturing industries are initiating efforts to address sustainability issues; however, to achieve a higher level of sustainability, manufacturers need methodologies for formally describing, analyzing,…

  12. Rps14 haploinsufficiency causes a block in erythroid differentiation mediated by S100A8/S100A9

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Rebekka K.; Schenone, Monica; Ferreira, Monica Ventura; Kramann, Rafael; Joyce, Cailin E.; Hartigan, Christina; Beier, Fabian; Brümmendorf, Tim H.; Gehrming, Ulrich; Platzbecker, Uwe; Büsche, Guntram; Knüchel, Ruth; Chen, Michelle C.; Waters, Christopher S.; Chen, Edwin; Chu, Lisa P.; Novina, Carl D.; Lindsley, R. Coleman; Carr, Steven A.; Ebert, Benjamin L.

    2016-01-01

    Heterozygous deletion of RPS14 occurs in del(5q) MDS and has been linked to impaired erythropoiesis, characteristic of this disease subtype. We generated a murine model with conditional inactivation of Rps14 and demonstrated a p53-dependent erythroid differentiation defect with apoptosis at the transition from polychromatic to orthochromatic erythroblasts resulting in age-dependent progressive anemia, megakaryocyte dysplasia, and loss of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) quiescence. Using quantitative proteomics, we identified significantly increased expression of proteins involved in innate immune signaling, particularly the heterodimeric S100a8/S100a9 proteins in purified erythroblasts. S100a8 expression was significantly increased in erythroblasts, monocytes and macrophages and recombinant S100a8 was sufficient to induce an erythroid differentiation defect in wild-type cells. We rescued the erythroid differentiation defect in Rps14 haploinsufficient HSCs by genetic inactivation of S100a8 expression. Our data link Rps14 haploinsufficiency to activation of the innate immune system via induction of S100A8/A9 and the p53-dependant erythroid differentiation defect in del(5q) MDS. PMID:26878232

  13. VENTX induces expansion of primitive erythroid cells and contributes to the development of acute myeloid leukemia in mice

    PubMed Central

    Gentner, Eva; Vegi, Naidu M.; Mulaw, Medhanie A.; Mandal, Tamoghna; Bamezai, Shiva; Claus, Rainer; Tasdogan, Alpaslan; Quintanilla-Martinez, Leticia; Grunenberg, Alexander; Döhner, Konstanze; Döhner, Hartmut; Bullinger, Lars; Haferlach, Torsten; Buske, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Homeobox genes are key regulators in normal and malignant hematopoiesis. The human Vent-like homeobox gene VENTX, a putative homolog of the Xenopus laevis Xvent-2 gene, was shown to be highly expressed in normal myeloid cells and in patients with acute myeloid leukemia. We now demonstrate that constitutive expression of VENTX suppresses expression of genes responsible for terminal erythroid differentiation in normal CD34+ stem and progenitor cells. Transplantation of bone marrow progenitor cells retrovirally engineered to express VENTX caused massive expansion of primitive erythroid cells and partly acute erythroleukemia in transplanted mice. The leukemogenic potential of VENTX was confirmed in the AML1-ETO transplantation model, as in contrast to AML1-ETO alone co-expression of AML1-ETO and VENTX induced acute myeloid leukemia, partly expressing erythroid markers, in all transplanted mice. VENTX was highly expressed in patients with primary human erythroleukemias and knockdown of VENTX in the erythroleukemic HEL cell line significantly blocked cell growth. In summary, these data indicate that VENTX is able to perturb erythroid differentiation and to contribute to myeloid leukemogenesis when co-expressed with appropriate AML oncogenes and point to its potential significance as a novel therapeutic target in AML. PMID:27888632

  14. MicroRNA-486-5p is an erythroid oncomiR of the myeloid leukemias of Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Shaham, Lital; Vendramini, Elena; Ge, Yubin; Goren, Yaron; Birger, Yehudit; Tijssen, Marloes R; McNulty, Maureen; Geron, Ifat; Schwartzman, Omer; Goldberg, Liat; Chou, Stella T; Pitman, Holly; Weiss, Mitchell J; Michaeli, Shulamit; Sredni, Benjamin; Göttgens, Berthold; Crispino, John D; Taub, Jeffrey W; Izraeli, Shai

    2015-02-19

    Children with Down syndrome (DS) are at increased risk for acute myeloid leukemias (ML-DS) characterized by mixed megakaryocytic and erythroid phenotype and by acquired mutations in the GATA1 gene resulting in a short GATA1s isoform. The chromosome 21 microRNA (miR)-125b cluster has been previously shown to cooperate with GATA1s in transformation of fetal hematopoietic progenitors. In this study, we report that the expression of miR-486-5p is increased in ML-DS compared with non-DS acute megakaryocytic leukemias (AMKLs). miR-486-5p is regulated by GATA1 and GATA1s that bind to the promoter of its host gene ANK1. miR-486-5p is highly expressed in mouse erythroid precursors and knockdown (KD) in ML-DS cells reduced their erythroid phenotype. Ectopic expression and KD of miR-486-5p in primary fetal liver hematopoietic progenitors demonstrated that miR-486-5p cooperates with Gata1s to enhance their self renewal. Consistent with its activation of AKT, overexpression and KD experiments showed its importance for growth and survival of human leukemic cells. Thus, miR-486-5p cooperates with GATA1s in supporting the growth and survival, and the aberrant erythroid phenotype of the megakaryocytic leukemias of DS.

  15. Erythroid cell growth and differentiation in vitro in the simulated microgravity environment of the NASA rotating wall vessel bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sytkowski, A. J.; Davis, K. L.

    2001-01-01

    Prolonged exposure of humans and experimental animals to the altered gravitational conditions of space flight has adverse effects on the lymphoid and erythroid hematopoietic systems. Although some information is available regarding the cellular and molecular changes in lymphocytes exposed to microgravity, little is known about the erythroid cellular changes that may underlie the reduction in erythropoiesis and resultant anemia. We now report a reduction in erythroid growth and a profound inhibition of erythropoietin (Epo)-induced differentiation in a ground-based simulated microgravity model system. Rauscher murine erythroleukemia cells were grown either in tissue culture vessels at 1 x g or in the simulated microgravity environment of the NASA-designed rotating wall vessel (RWV) bioreactor. Logarithmic growth was observed under both conditions; however, the doubling time in simulated microgravity was only one-half of that seen at 1 x g. No difference in apoptosis was detected. Induction with Epo at the initiation of the culture resulted in differentiation of approximately 25% of the cells at 1 x g, consistent with our previous observations. In contrast, induction with Epo at the initiation of simulated microgravity resulted in only one-half of this degree of differentiation. Significantly, the growth of cells in simulated microgravity for 24 h prior to Epo induction inhibited the differentiation almost completely. The results suggest that the NASA RWV bioreactor may serve as a suitable ground-based microgravity simulator to model the cellular and molecular changes in erythroid cells observed in true microgravity.

  16. TGF-β inhibitors stimulate red blood cell production by enhancing self-renewal of BFU-E erythroid progenitors.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiaofei; Lee, Hsiang-Ying; da Rocha, Edroaldo Lummertz; Zhang, Cheng; Lu, Yi-Fen; Li, Dandan; Feng, Yuxiong; Ezike, Jideofor; Elmes, Russell R; Barrasa, M Inmaculada; Cahan, Patrick; Li, Hu; Daley, George Q; Lodish, Harvey F

    2016-12-08

    Burst-forming unit erythroid progenitors (BFU-Es) are so named based on their ability to generate in methylcellulose culture large colonies of erythroid cells that consist of "bursts" of smaller erythroid colonies derived from the later colony-forming unit erythroid progenitor erythropoietin (Epo)-dependent progenitors. "Early" BFU-E cells forming large BFU-E colonies presumably have higher capacities for self-renewal than do "late" BFU-Es forming small colonies, but the mechanism underlying this heterogeneity remains unknown. We show that the type III transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) receptor (TβRIII) is a marker that distinguishes early and late BFU-Es. Transient elevation of TβRIII expression promotes TGF-β signaling during the early BFU-E to late BFU-E transition. Blocking TGF-β signaling using a receptor kinase inhibitor increases early BFU-E cell self-renewal and total erythroblast production, suggesting the usefulness of this type of drug in treating Epo-unresponsive anemias.

  17. Strict in vivo specificity of the Bcl11a erythroid enhancer.

    PubMed

    Smith, Elenoe C; Luc, Sidinh; Croney, Donyell M; Woodworth, Mollie B; Greig, Luciano C; Fujiwara, Yuko; Nguyen, Minh; Sher, Falak; Macklis, Jeffrey D; Bauer, Daniel E; Orkin, Stuart H

    2016-10-05

    BCL11A, a repressor of human fetal (γ-)globin expression, is required for immune and hematopoietic stem cell functions and brain development. Regulatory sequences within the gene, which are subject to genetic variation affecting fetal globin expression, display hallmarks of an erythroid enhancer in cell lines and transgenic mice. As such this enhancer is a novel, attractive target for therapeutic gene editing. To explore the roles of such sequences in vivo, we generated mice in which the orthologous 10 kb intronic sequences were removed. Bcl11a-enhancer deleted mice (Bcl11a(Δenh)) phenocopy the BCL11A-null state with respect to alterations of globin expression, yet are viable and exhibit no observable blood, brain, or other abnormalities. These preclinical findings provide strong in vivo support for genetic modification of the enhancer for therapy of hemoglobin disorders.

  18. Erythroid Differentiation Regulator 1 as a Novel Biomarker for Hair Loss Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Yu Ri; Hwang, Sewon; Jeong, Seo Won; Cho, Dae Ho; Park, Hyun Jeong

    2017-01-01

    Erythroid differentiation regulator 1 (Erdr1) is known to be involved in the inflammatory process via regulating the immune system in many cutaneous disorders, such as psoriasis and rosacea. However, the role of Erdr1 in various hair loss disorders remains unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the putative role of Erdr1 in alopecias. Skin samples from 21 patients with hair loss disorders and five control subjects were retrieved, in order to assess their expression levels of Erdr1. Results revealed that expression of Erdr1 was significantly downregulated in the epidermis and hair follicles of patients with hair loss disorders, when compared to that in the control group. In particular, the expression of Erdr1 was significantly decreased in patients with alopecia areata. We propose that Erdr1 downregulation might be involved in the pathogenesis of hair loss, and could be considered as a novel biomarker for hair loss disorders. PMID:28165377

  19. Transcription factor CP2 is crucial in hemoglobin synthesis during erythroid terminal differentiation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Chae, J H; Lee, Y H; Kim, C G

    1999-09-24

    The transcription factor CP2 was initially identified to bind to the promoter region of the murine alpha-globin gene and known to stimulate the expression of alpha-globin by increasing CP2 transcripts 3- to 5-fold during induced differentiation of mouse erythroleukemic (MEL) cells in vitro. Here, we report that this increment of CP2 expression is crucial in erythroid-specific globin gene expression and hemoglobin synthesis. When antisense CP2 was overexpressed in MEL cells, production of endogenous CP2 protein was reduced 70-80%, and significant loss of its promoter binding activity was observed. During HMBA-induced terminal differentiation of antisense CP2 expressing MEL cells, the transcription of endogenous alpha-globin gene was suppressed as expected. Moreover, both beta-globin gene expression and hemoglobin synthesis were also severely impaired, without affecting the expression of key heme enzyme genes or HMBA-induced proliferation and viability.

  20. CTCF and CohesinSA-1 Mark Active Promoters and Boundaries of Repressive Chromatin Domains in Primary Human Erythroid Cells

    PubMed Central

    Steiner, Laurie A.; Schulz, Vincent; Makismova, Yelena; Lezon-Geyda, Kimberly; Gallagher, Patrick G.

    2016-01-01

    Background CTCF and cohesinSA-1 are regulatory proteins involved in a number of critical cellular processes including transcription, maintenance of chromatin domain architecture, and insulator function. To assess changes in the CTCF and cohesinSA-1 interactomes during erythropoiesis, chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled with high throughput sequencing and mRNA transcriptome analyses via RNA-seq were performed in primary human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC) and primary human erythroid cells from single donors. Results Sites of CTCF and cohesinSA-1 co-occupancy were enriched in gene promoters in HSPC and erythroid cells compared to single CTCF or cohesin sites. Cell type-specific CTCF sites in erythroid cells were linked to highly expressed genes, with the opposite pattern observed in HSPCs. Chromatin domains were identified by ChIP-seq with antibodies against trimethylated lysine 27 histone H3, a modification associated with repressive chromatin. Repressive chromatin domains increased in both number and size during hematopoiesis, with many more repressive domains in erythroid cells than HSPCs. CTCF and cohesinSA-1 marked the boundaries of these repressive chromatin domains in a cell-type specific manner. Conclusion These genome wide data, changes in sites of protein occupancy, chromatin architecture, and related gene expression, support the hypothesis that CTCF and cohesinSA-1 have multiple roles in the regulation of gene expression during erythropoiesis including transcriptional regulation at gene promoters and maintenance of chromatin architecture. These data from primary human erythroid cells provide a resource for studies of normal and perturbed erythropoiesis. PMID:27219007

  1. Resveratrol accelerates erythroid maturation by activation of FoxO3 and ameliorates anemia in beta-thalassemic mice

    PubMed Central

    Franco, Sara Santos; De Falco, Luigia; Ghaffari, Saghi; Brugnara, Carlo; Sinclair, David A.; Matte’, Alessandro; Iolascon, Achille; Mohandas, Narla; Bertoldi, Mariarita; An, Xiuli; Siciliano, Angela; Rimmelé, Pauline; Cappellini, Maria Domenica; Michan, Shaday; Zoratti, Elisa; Anne, Janin; De Franceschi, Lucia

    2014-01-01

    Resveratrol, a polyphenolic-stilbene, has received increased attention in the last decade due to its wide range of biological activities. Beta(β)-thalassemias are inherited red cell disorders, found worldwide, characterized by ineffective erythropoiesis and red cell oxidative damage with reduced survival. We evaluated the effects of low-dose-resveratrol (5 μM) on in vitro human erythroid differentiation of CD34+ from normal and β-thalassemic subjects. We found that resveratrol induces accelerated erythroid-maturation, resulting in the reduction of colony-forming units of erythroid cells and increased intermediate and late erythroblasts. In sorted colony-forming units of erythroid cells resveratrol activates Forkhead-box-class-O3, decreases Akt activity and up-regulates anti-oxidant enzymes as catalase. In an in vivo murine model for β-thalassemia, resveratrol (2.4 mg/kg) reduces ineffective erythropoiesis, increases hemoglobin levels, reduces reticulocyte count and ameliorates red cell survival. In both wild-type and β-thalassemic mice, resveratrol up-regulates scavenging enzymes such as catalase and peroxiredoxin-2 through Forkhead-box-class-O3 activation. These data indicate that resveratrol inhibits Akt resulting in FoxO3 activation with upregulation of cytoprotective systems enabling the pathological erythroid precursors to resist the oxidative damage and continue to differentiate. Our data suggest that the dual effect of resveratrol on erythropoiesis through activation of FoxO3 transcriptional factor combined with the amelioration of oxidative stress in circulating red cells may be considered as a potential novel therapeutic strategy in treating β-thalassemia. PMID:23975182

  2. Tolerance and autoimmunity to erythroid differentiation (B-G) major histocompatibility complex alloantigens of the chicken

    PubMed Central

    1982-01-01

    Hematopoietic chimeras were produced at four different stages of ontogeny between two allogeneic strains of chickens. All chimeras produced by parabiosis at day 12 of embryogenesis and the majority (83%) of the ones produced at day 15 by intravenous injection of allogeneic stem cells remained healthy, chimeric, and specifically tolerant at both the humoral and cell-mediated level throughout a long examination period. Chimeras generated at day 17 of embryogenesis demonstrated specific unresponsiveness at the cell-mediated level but produced specific anti-donor alloantibodies directed against erythrocyte-associated major histocompatibility complex (MHC) (B-G) antigens. These chimeras and a minority (17%) of the chimeras generated at day 15 of embryogenesis developed severe antibody-mediated autoimmune hemolytic anemia after the 5th mo of age and succumbed to massive bursal lymphomas and metastases by the 10th mo of age. The immunological and pathological characteristics of these birds appear to reflect an autoimmune state rather than one of tolerance. Erythroid chimeras generated at day 21 of ontogenic development displayed normal levels of GVH reactivity. These birds were eventually able to eliminate the chimeric state and remained healthy until deliberately killed. These results show that there is a critical period in embryogenesis during which the induction of allogeneic erythrocytic chimerism leads to the development, in adult life, of severe autoimmune anemia, B cell lymphomas, and death. B-G MHC antigens are erythroid differentiation antigens of the chicken. Polymorphic determinants on B-G antigens appear to be important cross-reactive determinants (with environmental bacteria), against which a high background immunity exists. Evidence is presented that the immune response to B-G antigens is responsible for the development of autoimmunity and other pathological events that follow and that tolerance to class I MHC antigens (B-F antigens) shared by lymphocytes

  3. The exon-intron organization of the human erythroid [beta]-spectrin gene

    SciTech Connect

    Amin, K.M.; Forget, B.G. ); Scarpa, A.L.; Curtis, P.J. ); Winkelmann, J.C. )

    1993-10-01

    The human erythrocyte [beta]-spectrin gene DNA has been cloned from overlapping human genomic phage and cosmid recombinants. The entire erythroid [beta]-spectrin mRNA is encoded by 32 exons that range in size from 49 to 871 bases. The exon/intron junctions have been identified and the exons mapped. There is no correlation between intron positions and the repeat units of 106 amino acids within domain II of the [beta]-spectrin gene. The scatter of the introns over the 17 repeats argues against the 106-amino-acid unit representing a minigene that underwent repeated duplication resulting in the present [beta]-spectrin gene. In fact, the two largest exons, exon 14 (871 bp) and 16 (757 bp), extend over 4 and 3 repeat units of 106 amino acids, respectively, while repeat [beta]10 is encoded by 4 exons. No single position of an intron in the [beta]-spectrin gene is conserved between any of the 17 [beta]-spectrin and 22 [alpha]-spectrin repeat units. The nucleotide sequences of the exon/intron boundaries conform to the consensus splice site sequences except for exon 20, whose 5[prime] donor splice-site sequence begins with GC. The [beta]-spectrin isoform present in the human brain, the skeletal muscle, and the cardiac muscle is an alternatively spliced product of the erythroid [beta]-spectrin gene. This splice site is located within the coding sequences of exon 32 and its utilization in nonerythroid tissues leads to the use of 4 additional downstream exons with a size range of 44 to 530 bp. 55 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Sustainable weight loss among overweight and obese lactating women is achieved with an energy-reduced diet in line with dietary recommendations: results from the LEVA randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Bertz, Fredrik; Winkvist, Anna; Brekke, Hilde K

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate dietary changes during and after a dietary treatment shown to result in significant and sustained weight loss among lactating overweight and obese women. This is crucial before clinical implementation. Data were collected from the LEVA (in Swedish: Livsstil för Effektiv Viktminskning under Amning [Lifestyle for Effective Weight Loss During Lactation]) randomized controlled factorial trial with a 12-week intervention and a 1-year follow up. At 10 to 14 weeks postpartum, 68 lactating Swedish women with a prepregnancy body mass index (calculated as kg/m(2)) of 25 to 35 were randomized to structured dietary treatment, physical exercise treatment, combined treatment, or usual care (controls) for a 12-week intervention, with a 1-year follow-up. Dietary intake was assessed with 4-day weighed dietary records. Recruitment took place between 2007 and 2010. The main outcome measures were changes in macro- and micronutrient intake from baseline to 12 weeks and 1 year. Main and interaction effects of the treatments were analyzed by a 2×2 factorial approach using a General Linear Model adjusted for relevant covariates (baseline intake and estimated underreporting). It was found that at baseline, the women had an intake of fat and sucrose above, and an intake of total carbohydrates and fiber below, recommended levels. At 12 weeks and 1 year, the dietary treatment led to reduced intake of energy (P<0.001 and P=0.005, respectively), fat (both P values <0.001), and sucrose (P<0.001 and P=0.050). At 12 weeks, total carbohydrates were reduced (P<0.001). A majority of women in all groups reported low intakes of vitamin D, folate, and/or iron. In conclusion, a novel dietary treatment led to reduced intake of fat and carbohydrates. Diet composition changed to decreased proportions of fat and sucrose, and increased proportions of complex carbohydrates, protein and fiber. Weight loss through dietary treatment was achieved with a diet in line with

  5. Changes in erythroid membrane proteins during erythropoietin-mediated terminal differentiation.

    PubMed

    Koury, M J; Bondurant, M C; Rana, S S

    1987-12-01

    Membrane and membrane skeleton proteins were examined in erythroid progenitor cells during terminal differentiation. The employed model system of erythroid differentiation was that in which proerythroblasts from mice infected with the anemia-inducing strain of Friend virus differentiate in vitro in response to erythropoietin (EP). With this system, developmentally homogeneous populations of cells can be examined morphologically and biochemically as they progress from proerythroblasts through enucleated reticulocytes. alpha and beta spectrins, the major proteins of the erythrocyte membrane skeleton, are synthesized in the erythroblasts both before and after EP exposure. At all times large portions of the newly synthesized spectrins exist in and are turned over in the cytoplasm. The remaining newly synthesized spectrin is found in a cellular fraction containing total membranes. Pulse-chase experiments show that little of the cytoplasmic spectrins become membrane associated, but that the proportion of newly synthesized spectrin which is membrane associated increases as maturation proceeds. A membrane fraction enriched in plasma membranes has significant differences in the stoichiometry of spectrin accumulation as compared to total cellular membranes. Synthesis of band 3 protein, the anion transporter, is induced only after EP addition to the erythroblasts. All of the newly synthesized band 3 is membrane associated. A two-dimensional gel survey was conducted of newly synthesized proteins in the plasma membrane enriched fraction of the erythroblasts as differentiation proceeded. A majority of the newly synthesized proteins remain in the same proportion to each other during maturation; however, a few newly synthesized proteins greatly increase following EP induction while others decrease markedly. Of the radiolabeled proteins observed in two dimensional gels, only the spectrins, band 3 and actin become major proteins of the mature erythrocyte membrane. Examination of

  6. The DEK Oncoprotein Is a Critical Component of the EKLF/KLF1 Enhancer in Erythroid Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lohmann, Felix; Dangeti, Mohan; Soni, Shefali; Chen, Xiaoyong; Planutis, Antanas; Baron, Margaret H.; Choi, Kyunghee

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how transcriptional regulators are themselves controlled is important in attaining a complete picture of the intracellular effects that follow signaling cascades during early development and cell-restricted differentiation. We have addressed this issue by focusing on the regulation of EKLF/KLF1, a zinc finger transcription factor that plays a necessary role in the global regulation of erythroid gene expression. Using biochemical affinity purification, we have identified the DEK oncoprotein as a critical factor that interacts with an essential upstream enhancer element of the EKLF promoter and exerts a positive effect on EKLF levels. This element also binds a core set of erythroid transcription factors, suggesting that DEK is part of a tissue-restricted enhanceosome that contains BMP4-dependent and -independent components. Together with local enrichment of properly coded histones and an open chromatin domain, optimal transcriptional activation of the EKLF locus can be established. PMID:26303528

  7. Evaluation of hematopoietic cells and myeloid/erythroid ratio in the bone marrow of the pheasant (Phasianus colchicus).

    PubMed

    Tadjalli, Mina; Nazifi, Saeed; Haghjoo, Rahil

    2013-01-01

    In order to study the normal hematopoiesis, cellular components and myeloid/erythroid (M/E) ratio in the bone marrow of the pheasant (Phasianus colchicus), bone marrow samples were collected from the proximal tibiotarsus bone of 16 clinically healthy adult pheasant. The bone marrow smears were stained using the Giemsa stain. The results indicated that the development and formation of blood cells in the bone marrow of pheasant were similar to other birds, whereas the morphology of the cells was similar to chickens, ducks, quail, and black-head gull. The mean M/E ratio was 1.24, the mean erythroid percentage was 42.24, the mean myeloid percentage was 52.62, and the mean percentage of all other cells percentage was 5.38. There was no significant difference in any of the cellular composition between male and female.

  8. Hereditary sideroblastic anaemia due to a mutation in exon 10 of the erythroid 5-aminolaevulinate synthase gene.

    PubMed

    Edgar, A J; Wickramasinghe, S N

    1998-02-01

    DNA sequencing of the coding region of the erythroid 5-aminolaevulinate synthase (ALAS2) cDNA from a male with pyridoxine-responsive sideroblastic anaemia revealed a missense mutation C1622G and a closely linked polymorphism C1612A in exon 10 of the gene. Sequence analysis of the genomic DNA from other family members revealed that the proband's mother and daughter were heterozygous carriers of the mutation, consistent with the X-linked inheritance. The C1622G mutation results in a histidine to aspartic acid substitution at amino acid residue 524. The histidine residue is conserved in both the erythroid and housekeeping ALAS proteins in vertebrates, all other known ALAS proteins and other oxamine synthases that have pyridoxal 5'-phosphate as a co-factor. This histidine is located in a predicted loop, preceding a long alpha-helix region near the carboxy-terminus.

  9. Sustainability Frontiers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selby, David

    2010-01-01

    This article introduces Sustainability Frontiers, a newly formed, international, not-for-profit alliance of sustainability and global educators dedicated to challenging and laying bare the assumptions, exposing the blind spots, and transgressing the boundaries of mainstream understandings of sustainability-related education. Among the orthodoxies…

  10. Efficient Generation of β-Globin-Expressing Erythroid Cells Using Stromal Cell-Derived Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells from Patients with Sickle Cell Disease.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Naoya; Haro-Mora, Juan J; Fujita, Atsushi; Lee, Duck-Yeon; Winkler, Thomas; Hsieh, Matthew M; Tisdale, John F

    2017-03-01

    Human embryonic stem (ES) cells and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells represent an ideal source for in vitro modeling of erythropoiesis and a potential alternative source for red blood cell transfusions. However, iPS cell-derived erythroid cells predominantly produce ε- and γ-globin without β-globin production. We recently demonstrated that ES cell-derived sacs (ES sacs), known to express hemangioblast markers, allow for efficient erythroid cell generation with β-globin production. In this study, we generated several iPS cell lines derived from bone marrow stromal cells (MSCs) and peripheral blood erythroid progenitors (EPs) from sickle cell disease patients, and evaluated hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell (HSPC) generation after iPS sac induction as well as subsequent erythroid differentiation. MSC-derived iPS sacs yielded greater amounts of immature hematopoietic progenitors (VEGFR2 + GPA-), definitive HSPCs (CD34 + CD45+), and megakaryoerythroid progenitors (GPA + CD41a+), as compared to EP-derived iPS sacs. Erythroid differentiation from MSC-derived iPS sacs resulted in greater amounts of erythroid cells (GPA+) and higher β-globin (and βS-globin) expression, comparable to ES sac-derived cells. These data demonstrate that human MSC-derived iPS sacs allow for more efficient erythroid cell generation with higher β-globin production, likely due to heightened emergence of immature progenitors. Our findings should be important for iPS cell-derived erythroid cell generation. Stem Cells 2017;35:586-596.

  11. Increase of microRNA-210, Decrease of Raptor Gene Expression and Alteration of Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Regulated Proteins following Mithramycin Treatment of Human Erythroid Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bianchi, Nicoletta; Finotti, Alessia; Ferracin, Manuela; Lampronti, Ilaria; Zuccato, Cristina; Breveglieri, Giulia; Brognara, Eleonora; Fabbri, Enrica; Borgatti, Monica; Negrini, Massimo; Gambari, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Expression and regulation of microRNAs is an emerging issue in erythroid differentiation and globin gene expression in hemoglobin disorders. In the first part of this study microarray analysis was performed both in mithramycin-induced K562 cells and erythroid precursors from healthy subjects or β-thalassemia patients producing low or high levels of fetal hemoglobin. We demonstrated that: (a) microRNA-210 expression is higher in erythroid precursors from β-thalassemia patients with high production of fetal hemoglobin; (b) microRNA-210 increases as a consequence of mithramycin treatment of K562 cells and human erythroid progenitors both from healthy and β-thalassemia subjects; (c) this increase is associated with erythroid induction and elevated expression of γ-globin genes; (d) an anti-microRNA against microRNA-210 interferes with the mithramycin-induced changes of gene expression. In the second part of the study we have obtained convergent evidences suggesting raptor mRNA as a putative target of microRNA-210. Indeed, microRNA-210 binding sites of its 3’-UTR region were involved in expression and are targets of microRNA-210-mediated modulation in a luciferase reporter assays. Furthermore, (i) raptor mRNA and protein are down-regulated upon mithramycin-induction both in K562 cells and erythroid progenitors from healthy and β-thalassemia subjects. In addition, (ii) administration of anti-microRNA-210 to K562 cells decreased endogenous microRNA-210 and increased raptor mRNA and protein expression. Finally, (iii) treatment of K562 cells with premicroRNA-210 led to a decrease of raptor mRNA and protein. In conclusion, microRNA-210 and raptor are involved in mithramycin-mediated erythroid differentiation of K562 cells and participate to the fine-tuning and control of γ-globin gene expression in erythroid precursor cells. PMID:25849663

  12. Nrf-2-driven long noncoding RNA ODRUL contributes to modulating silver nanoparticle-induced effects on erythroid cells.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ming; Zhao, Beibei; Chen, Minjun; Liu, Yun; Xu, Ming; Wang, Zhe; Liu, Sijin; Zhang, Chengdong

    2017-06-01

    The biosafety and biological effects of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) on human health attract increasing concern. Although considerable studies have been performed to reveal the molecular mechanisms responsible for AgNP-induced effects, the current understanding mainly focuses on oxidative stress-associated signaling pathways activated by Ag particles and/or Ag ions. However, the molecular bases underlying the activation of these stress signaling pathways have not been thoroughly elucidated yet. In the current study, we aimed to shed light on the molecular bases of AgNP-induced effects on erythroid cells from the perspective of long noncoding RNAs. We identified a long-noncoding RNA molecule, ODRUL, which was substantially enhanced in K562 erythroid cells responding to AgNPs, coupled to accelerated cell death. Further, we uncovered oxidative stress-driven Nrf2 transcriptionally promoted ODRUL expression in K562 cells. Downstream of Nrf2-ODRUL activation by AgNPs, ODRUL was recognized to interact with PI4Kα protein to modulate the activities of its targets AKT and JNK. As a result, the Bcl-2 level was negatively regulated by PI4K-AKT/JNK signaling under AgNP-induced stress, leading to enhanced cell death. Together, our findings unearthed that Nrf2-mediated lncRNA ODRUL was indispensable for AgNP-induced toxicity in erythroid cells through regulation of AKT/JNK-Bcl-2 signaling dependent on a physical interaction with PI4Kα. Thus, this study would open a new path to depict the molecular bases of AgNP-induced effects on erythroid cells.

  13. Characterization of thrombopoietin (TPO)-responsive progenitor cells in adult mouse bone marrow with in vivo megakaryocyte and erythroid potential.

    PubMed

    Ng, Ashley P; Kauppi, Maria; Metcalf, Donald; Di Rago, Ladina; Hyland, Craig D; Alexander, Warren S

    2012-02-14

    Hematopoietic progenitor cells are the progeny of hematopoietic stem cells that coordinate the production of precise numbers of mature blood cells of diverse functional lineages. Identification of cell-surface antigen expression associated with hematopoietic lineage restriction has allowed prospective isolation of progenitor cells with defined hematopoietic potential. To clarify further the cellular origins of megakaryocyte commitment, we assessed the in vitro and in vivo megakaryocyte and platelet potential of defined progenitor populations in the adult mouse bone marrow. We show that megakaryocytes arise from CD150(+) bipotential progenitors that display both platelet- and erythrocyte-producing potential in vivo and that can develop from the Flt3(-) fraction of the pregranulocyte-macrophage population. We define a bipotential erythroid-megakaryocyte progenitor population, the CD150(+)CD9(lo)endoglin(lo) fraction of Lin(-)cKit(+)IL7 receptor alpha(-)FcγRII/III(lo)Sca1(-) cells, which contains the bulk of the megakaryocyte colony-forming capacity of the bone marrow, including bipotential megakaryocyte-erythroid colony-forming capacity, and can generate both erythrocytes and platelets efficiently in vivo. This fraction is distinct from the CD150(+)CD9(hi)endoglin(lo) fraction, which contains bipotential precursors with characteristics of increased megakaryocytic maturation, and the CD150(+)CD9(lo)endoglin(hi) fraction, which contains erythroid lineage-committed cells. Finally, we demonstrate that bipotential erythroid-megakaryocyte progenitor and CD150(+)CD9(hi)endoglin(lo) cells are TPO-responsive and that the latter population specifically expands in the recovery from thrombocytopenia induced by anti-platelet serum.

  14. A screen for Fli-1 transcriptional modulators identifies PKC agonists that induce erythroid to megakaryocytic differentiation and suppress leukemogenesis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tangjingjun; Yao, Yao; Zhang, Gang; Wang, Ye; Deng, Bin; Song, Jialei; Li, Xiaogang; Han, Fei; Xiao, Xiao; Yang, Jue; Xia, Lei; Li, You-Jun; Plachynta, Maksym; Zhang, Mu; Yan, Chen; Mu, Shuzhen; Luo, Heng; Zacksenhaus, Eldad; Hao, Xiaojiang; Ben-David, Yaacov

    2016-12-30

    The ETS-related transcription factor Fli-1 affects many developmental programs including erythroid and megakaryocytic differentiation, and is frequently de-regulated in cancer. Fli-1 was initially isolated following retrovirus insertional mutagenesis screens for leukemic initiator genes, and accordingly, inhibition of this transcription factor can suppress leukemia through induction of erythroid differentiation. To search for modulators of Fli-1, we hereby performed repurposing drug screens with compounds isolated from Chinese medicinal plants. We identified agents that can transcriptionally activate or inhibit a Fli-1 reporter. Remarkably, agents that increased Fli-1 transcriptional activity conferred a strong anti-cancer activity upon Fli-1-expressing leukemic cells in culture. As opposed to drugs that suppress Fli1 activity and lead to erythroid differentiation, growth suppression by these new Fli-1 transactivating compounds involved erythroid to megakaryocytic conversion (EMC). The identified compounds are structurally related to diterpene family of small molecules, which are known agonists of protein kinase C (PKC). In accordance, these PKC agonists (PKCAs) induced PKC phosphorylation leading to activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway, increased cell attachment and EMC, whereas pharmacological inhibition of PKC or MAPK diminished the effect of our PKCAs. Moreover, in a mouse model of leukemia initiated by Fli-1 activation, the PKCA compounds exhibited strong anti-cancer activity, which was accompanied by increased presence of CD41/CD61 positive megakaryocytic cells in leukemic spleens. Thus, PKC agonists offer a novel approach to combat Fli-1-induced leukemia, and possibly other cancers,by inducing EMC in part through over-activation of the PKC-MAPK-Fli-1 pathway.

  15. Control System for Sustainable Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlman, Inga

    2008-10-01

    Ecological sustainability presupposes that a global human population acts in such ways, that their total impact on the biosphere, together with nature's reactions, keeps the biosphere sufficient for sustaining generations to come. Human conduct is ultimately controlled by means of law. The problem can be summed up as: Controlling system—Population—Sustainable ecosystems This paper discusses two interlinked issues: a) the social scientific need for systems theory in the context of achieving and maintaining sustainable development and b) how theory of anticipatory modelling and computing can be applied when constructing and applying societal controlling systems for ecological sustainability with as much local democracy and economic efficiency as possible.

  16. Glucocorticoids improve erythroid progenitor maintenance and dampen Trp53 response in a mouse model of Diamond-Blackfan anaemia.

    PubMed

    Sjögren, Sara E; Siva, Kavitha; Soneji, Shamit; George, Amee J; Winkler, Marcus; Jaako, Pekka; Wlodarski, Marcin; Karlsson, Stefan; Hannan, Ross D; Flygare, Johan

    2015-11-01

    Diamond-Blackfan anaemia (DBA) is a rare congenital disease causing severe anaemia and progressive bone marrow failure. The majority of patients carry mutations in ribosomal proteins, which leads to depletion of erythroid progenitors in the bone marrow. As many as 40% of all DBA patients receive glucocorticoids to alleviate their anaemia. However, despite their use in DBA treatment for more than half a century, the therapeutic mechanisms of glucocorticoids remain largely unknown. Therefore we sought to study disease specific effects of glucocorticoid treatment using a ribosomal protein s19 (Rps19) deficient mouse model of DBA. This study determines for the first time that a mouse model of DBA can respond to glucocorticoid treatment, similar to DBA patients. Our results demonstrate that glucocorticoid treatment reduces apoptosis, rescues erythroid progenitor depletion and premature differentiation of erythroid cells. Furthermore, glucocorticoids prevent Trp53 activation in Rps19-deficient cells- in a disease-specific manner. Dissecting the therapeutic mechanisms behind glucocorticoid treatment of DBA provides indispensible insight into DBA pathogenesis. Identifying mechanisms important for DBA treatment also enables development of more disease-specific treatments of DBA.

  17. The glucocorticoid receptor is a key regulator of the decision between self-renewal and differentiation in erythroid progenitors.

    PubMed Central

    Wessely, O; Deiner, E M; Beug, H; von Lindern, M

    1997-01-01

    During development and in regenerating tissues such as the bone marrow, progenitor cells constantly need to make decisions between proliferation and differentiation. We have used a model system, normal erythroid progenitors of the chicken, to determine the molecular players involved in making this decision. The molecules identified comprised receptor tyrosine kinases (c-Kit and c-ErbB) and members of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily (thyroid hormone receptor and estrogen receptor). Here we identify the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) as a key regulator of erythroid progenitor self-renewal (i.e. continuous proliferation in the absence of differentiation). In media lacking a GR ligand or containing a GR antagonist, erythroid progenitors failed to self-renew, even if c-Kit, c-ErbB and the estrogen receptor were activated simultaneously. To induce self-renewal, the GR required the continuous presence of an activated receptor tyrosine kinase and had to cooperate with the estrogen receptor for full activity. Mutant analysis showed that DNA binding and a functional AF-2 transactivation domain are required for proliferation stimulation and differentiation arrest. c-myb was identified as a potential target gene of the GR in erythroblasts. It could be demonstrated that delta c-Myb, an activated c-Myb protein, can functionally replace the GR. PMID:9029148

  18. Erythroid precursors from patients with low-risk myelodysplasia demonstrate ultrastructural features of enhanced autophagy of mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Houwerzijl, E J; Pol, H-W D; Blom, N R; van der Want, J J L; de Wolf, J Th M; Vellenga, E

    2009-05-01

    Recent studies in erythroid cells have shown that autophagy is an important process for the physiological clearance of mitochondria during terminal differentiation. However, autophagy also plays an important role in removing damaged and dysfunctional mitochondria. Defective mitochondria and impaired erythroid maturation are important characteristics of low-risk myelodysplasia. In this study we therefore questioned whether the autophagic clearance of mitochondria might be altered in erythroblasts from patients with refractory anemia (RA, n=3) and RA with ringed sideroblasts (RARS, n=6). Ultrastructurally, abnormal and iron-laden mitochondria were abundant, especially in RARS patients. A large proportion (52+/-16%) of immature and mature myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) erythroblasts contained cytoplasmic vacuoles, partly double membraned and positive for lysosomal marker LAMP-2 and mitochondrial markers, findings compatible with autophagic removal of dysfunctional mitochondria. In healthy controls only mature erythroblasts comprised these vacuoles (12+/-3%). These findings were confirmed morphometrically showing an increased vacuolar surface in MDS erythroblasts compared to controls (P<0.0001). In summary, these data indicate that MDS erythroblasts show features of enhanced autophagy at an earlier stage of erythroid differentiation than in normal controls. The enhanced autophagy might be a cell protective mechanism to remove defective iron-laden mitochondria.

  19. In vivo erythropoietin requirements of regenerating erythroid progenitors (BFU-e, CFU-e) in bone marrow of mice.

    PubMed

    Udupa, K B; Reissmann, K R

    1979-06-01

    Erythroid progenitors (B-8, B-4, CFU-e) in the femoral marrow of polycythemic mice were measured by in vitro culture assays after a single administration of BCNU or Myleran. BCNU reduced pluripotent stem cells to 40% and erythroid progenitors to less than 5% of normal. B-8, the earliest erythroid progenitors, regenerated without erythropoietin (Epo) completely within 5 days. At 14 days after BCNU, intermediate progenitors (B-4) attained 60% of their normal numbers and CFU-e attained approximately 30%. Daily injections of Epo promptly restored normal B-4 numbers and near-normal CFU-e numbers in BCNU-treated mice. After Myleran, CFU-s remained below 2% of normal for 14 days, and no regeneration of the B-8 occurred with or without daily Epo injections. The findings suggest that regneration of B-8 was dependent on cell inflow from the pluripotent stem cell compartment but was independent of the presence of Epo. Intermediate progenitors (B-4) required Epo and the presence of B-8 for complete and permanent regeneration. CFU-e were the most Epo-dependent of the three progenitors. B-4, recruited by Epo, required after their formation a second exposure to the hormone in order to progress into the CFU-e stage.

  20. RNA Trans-Splicing Targeting Endogenous β-Globin Pre-Messenger RNA in Human Erythroid Cells.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Naoya; Washington, Kareem N; Mozer, Brian; Platner, Charlotte; Ballantine, Josiah; Skala, Luke P; Raines, Lydia; Shvygin, Anna; Hsieh, Matthew M; Mitchell, Lloyd G; Tisdale, John F

    2017-02-14

    Sickle cell disease results from a point mutation in exon 1 of the β-globin gene (total 3 exons). Replacing sickle β-globin exon 1 (and exon 2) with a normal sequence by trans-splicing is a potential therapeutic strategy. Therefore, this study sought to develop trans-splicing targeting β-globin pre-messenger RNA among human erythroid cells. Binding domains from random β-globin sequences were comprehensively screened. Six candidates had optimal binding, and all targeted intron 2. Next, lentiviral vectors encoding RNA trans-splicing molecules were constructed incorporating a unique binding domain from these candidates, artificial 5' splice site, and γ-globin cDNA, and trans-splicing was evaluated in CD34(+) cell-derived erythroid cells from healthy individuals. Lentiviral transduction was efficient, with vector copy numbers of 9.7 to 15.3. The intended trans-spliced RNA product, including exon 3 of endogenous β-globin and γ-globin, was detected at the molecular level. Trans-splicing efficiency was improved to 0.07-0.09% by longer binding domains, including the 5' splice site of intron 2. In summary, screening was performed to select efficient binding domains for trans-splicing. Detectable levels of trans-splicing were obtained for endogenous β-globin RNA in human erythroid cells. These methods provide the basis for future trans-splicing directed gene therapy.

  1. Genome-wide identification of TAL1's functional targets: insights into its mechanisms of action in primary erythroid cells.

    PubMed

    Kassouf, Mira T; Hughes, Jim R; Taylor, Stephen; McGowan, Simon J; Soneji, Shamit; Green, Angela L; Vyas, Paresh; Porcher, Catherine

    2010-08-01

    Coordination of cellular processes through the establishment of tissue-specific gene expression programs is essential for lineage maturation. The basic helix-loop-helix hemopoietic transcriptional regulator TAL1 (formerly SCL) is required for terminal differentiation of red blood cells. To gain insight into TAL1 function and mechanisms of action in erythropoiesis, we performed ChIP-sequencing and gene expression analyses from primary fetal liver erythroid cells. We show that TAL1 coordinates expression of genes in most known red cell-specific processes. The majority of TAL1's genomic targets require direct DNA-binding activity. However, one-fifth of TAL1's target sequences, mainly among those showing high affinity for TAL1, can recruit the factor independently of its DNA binding activity. An unbiased DNA motif search of sequences bound by TAL1 identified CAGNTG as TAL1-preferred E-box motif in erythroid cells. Novel motifs were also characterized that may help distinguish activated from repressed genes and suggest a new mechanism by which TAL1 may be recruited to DNA. Finally, analysis of recruitment of GATA1, a protein partner of TAL1, to sequences occupied by TAL1 suggests that TAL1's binding is necessary prior or simultaneous to that of GATA1. This work provides the framework to study regulatory networks leading to erythroid terminal maturation and to model mechanisms of action of tissue-specific transcription factors.

  2. Inactivation of Rb and E2f8 synergizes to trigger stressed DNA replication during erythroid terminal differentiation.

    PubMed

    Ghazaryan, Seda; Sy, Chandler; Hu, Tinghui; An, Xiuli; Mohandas, Narla; Fu, Haiqing; Aladjem, Mirit I; Chang, Victor T; Opavsky, Rene; Wu, Lizhao

    2014-08-01

    Rb is critical for promoting cell cycle exit in cells undergoing terminal differentiation. Here we show that during erythroid terminal differentiation, Rb plays a previously unappreciated and unorthodox role in promoting DNA replication and cell cycle progression. Specifically, inactivation of Rb in erythroid cells led to stressed DNA replication, increased DNA damage, and impaired cell cycle progression, culminating in defective terminal differentiation and anemia. Importantly, all of these defects associated with Rb loss were exacerbated by the concomitant inactivation of E2f8. Gene expression profiling and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) revealed that Rb and E2F8 cosuppressed a large array of E2F target genes that are critical for DNA replication and cell cycle progression. Remarkably, inactivation of E2f2 rescued the erythropoietic defects resulting from Rb and E2f8 deficiencies. Interestingly, real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) on E2F2 ChIPs indicated that inactivation of Rb and E2f8 synergizes to increase E2F2 binding to its target gene promoters. Taken together, we propose that Rb and E2F8 collaborate to promote DNA replication and erythroid terminal differentiation by preventing E2F2-mediated aberrant transcriptional activation through the ability of Rb to bind and sequester E2F2 and the ability of E2F8 to compete with E2F2 for E2f-binding sites on target gene promoters.

  3. Inactivation of Rb and E2f8 Synergizes To Trigger Stressed DNA Replication during Erythroid Terminal Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Ghazaryan, Seda; Sy, Chandler; Hu, Tinghui; An, Xiuli; Mohandas, Narla; Fu, Haiqing; Aladjem, Mirit I.; Chang, Victor T.; Opavsky, Rene

    2014-01-01

    Rb is critical for promoting cell cycle exit in cells undergoing terminal differentiation. Here we show that during erythroid terminal differentiation, Rb plays a previously unappreciated and unorthodox role in promoting DNA replication and cell cycle progression. Specifically, inactivation of Rb in erythroid cells led to stressed DNA replication, increased DNA damage, and impaired cell cycle progression, culminating in defective terminal differentiation and anemia. Importantly, all of these defects associated with Rb loss were exacerbated by the concomitant inactivation of E2f8. Gene expression profiling and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) revealed that Rb and E2F8 cosuppressed a large array of E2F target genes that are critical for DNA replication and cell cycle progression. Remarkably, inactivation of E2f2 rescued the erythropoietic defects resulting from Rb and E2f8 deficiencies. Interestingly, real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) on E2F2 ChIPs indicated that inactivation of Rb and E2f8 synergizes to increase E2F2 binding to its target gene promoters. Taken together, we propose that Rb and E2F8 collaborate to promote DNA replication and erythroid terminal differentiation by preventing E2F2-mediated aberrant transcriptional activation through the ability of Rb to bind and sequester E2F2 and the ability of E2F8 to compete with E2F2 for E2f-binding sites on target gene promoters. PMID:24865965

  4. Study on Hydroxyurea Response in Hemoglobinopathies Patients Using Genetic Markers and Liquid Erythroid Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Sclafani, Serena; Agrigento, Veronica; Troia, Antonio; Di Maggio, Rosario; Sacco, Massimiliano; Maggio, Aurelio; D’Alcamo, Elena; Di Marzo, Rosalba

    2016-01-01

    Increased expression of fetal hemoglobin (HbF) may ameliorate the clinical course of hemoglobinopathies. Hydroxyurea (HU) is the only inducer approved for the treatment of these diseases able to stimulate HbF production but patients’ response is highly variable indicating the utility of the identification of pharmacogenomic biomarkers in order to predict pharmacological treatment efficacy. To date few studies to evaluate the role of genetic determinants in HU response have been conducted showing contradictory results. In this study we analyzed BCL11A, GATA-1, KLF-1 genes and γ-globin promoter in 60 alleles from 30 hemoglobinopathies patients under HU treatment to assess the role of these markers in HU response. We did not find any association between these genetic determinants and HU response. Before treatment started, the same patients were analyzed in vitro using liquid erythroid cultures in a test able to predict their response to HU. The results of our analysis confirm the absence of pharmacogenomic biomarker associated to HU response indicating that, the quantification of γ-globin mRNA fold increase remains the only method able to predict in vivo patients response to the drug. PMID:28053695

  5. Novel roles for erythroid Ankyrin-1 revealed through an ENU-induced null mouse mutant

    PubMed Central

    Rank, Gerhard; Sutton, Rosemary; Marshall, Vikki; Lundie, Rachel J.; Caddy, Jacinta; Romeo, Tony; Fernandez, Kate; McCormack, Matthew P.; Cooke, Brian M.; Foote, Simon J.; Crabb, Brendan S.; Curtis, David J.; Hilton, Douglas J.; Kile, Benjamin T.

    2009-01-01

    Insights into the role of ankyrin-1 (ANK-1) in the formation and stabilization of the red cell cytoskeleton have come from studies on the nb/nb mice, which carry hypomorphic alleles of Ank-1. Here, we revise several paradigms established in the nb/nb mice through analysis of an N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU)–induced Ank-1–null mouse. Mice homozygous for the Ank-1 mutation are profoundly anemic in utero and most die perinatally, indicating that Ank-1 plays a nonredundant role in erythroid development. The surviving pups exhibit features of severe hereditary spherocytosis (HS), with marked hemolysis, jaundice, compensatory extramedullary erythropoiesis, and tissue iron overload. Red cell membrane analysis reveals a complete loss of ANK-1 protein and a marked reduction in β-spectrin. As a consequence, the red cells exhibit total disruption of cytoskeletal architecture and severely altered hemorheologic properties. Heterozygous mutant mice, which have wild-type levels of ANK-1 and spectrin in their RBC membranes and normal red cell survival and ultrastructure, exhibit profound resistance to malaria, which is not due to impaired parasite entry into RBC. These findings provide novel insights into the role of Ank-1, and define an ideal model for the study of HS and malarial resistance. PMID:19179303

  6. Antibodies to human fetal erythroid cells from a nonimmune phage antibody library

    PubMed Central

    Huie, Michael A.; Cheung, Mei-Chi; Muench, Marcus O.; Becerril, Baltazar; Kan, Yuet W.; Marks, James D.

    2001-01-01

    The ability to isolate fetal nucleated red blood cells (NRBCs) from the maternal circulation makes possible prenatal genetic analysis without the need for diagnostic procedures that are invasive for the fetus. Such isolation requires antibodies specific to fetal NRBCs. To generate a panel of antibodies to antigens present on fetal NRBCs, a new type of nonimmune phage antibody library was generated in which multiple copies of antibody fragments are displayed on each phage. Antibody fragments specific for fetal NRBCs were isolated by extensive predepletion of the phage library on adult RBCs and white blood cells (WBCs) followed by positive selection and amplification on fetal liver erythroid cells. After two rounds of selection, 44% of the antibodies analyzed bound fetal NRBCs, with two-thirds of these showing no binding of WBCs. DNA fingerprint analysis revealed the presence of at least 16 unique antibodies. Antibody specificity was confirmed by flow cytometry, immunohistochemistry, and immunofluorescence of total fetal liver and adult RBCs and WBCs. Antibody profiling suggested the generation of antibodies to previously unknown fetal RBC antigens. We conclude that multivalent display of antibodies on phage leads to efficient selection of panels of specific antibodies to cell surface antigens. The antibodies generated to fetal RBC antigens may have clinical utility for isolating fetal NRBCs from maternal circulation for noninvasive prenatal genetic diagnosis. Some of the antibodies may also have possible therapeutic utility for erythroleukemia. PMID:11226299

  7. Intron 1 GATA site enhances ALAS2 expression indispensably during erythroid differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yingchi; Zhang, Jingliao; An, Wenbin; Wan, Yang; Ma, Shihui; Yin, Jie; Li, Xichuan; Gao, Jie; Yuan, Weiping; Guo, Ye; Engel, James Douglas; Shi, Lihong; Cheng, Tao; Zhu, Xiaofan

    2017-01-01

    The first intronic mutations in the intron 1 GATA site (int-1-GATA) of 5-aminolevulinate synthase 2 (ALAS2) have been identified in X-linked sideroblastic anemia (XLSA) pedigrees, strongly suggesting it could be causal mutations of XLSA. However, the function of this int-1-GATA site during in vivo development remains largely unknown. Here, we generated mice lacking a 13 bp fragment, including this int-1-GATA site (TAGATAAAGCCCC) and found that hemizygous deletion led to an embryonic lethal phenotype due to severe anemia resulting from a lack of ALAS2 expression, indicating that this non-coding sequence is indispensable for ALAS2 expression in vivo. Further analyses revealed that this int-1-GATA site anchored the GATA site in intron 8 (int-8-GATA) and the proximal promoter, forming a long-range loop to enhance ALAS2 expression by an enhancer complex including GATA1, TAL1, LMO2, LDB1 and Pol II at least, in erythroid cells. However, compared with the int-8-GATA site, the int-1-GATA site is more essential for regulating ALAS2 expression through CRISPR/Cas9-mediated site-specific deletion. Therefore, the int-1-GATA site could serve as a valuable site for diagnosing XLSA in cases with unknown mutations. PMID:28123038

  8. Inhibition of human erythroid colony-forming units by tumor necrosis factor requires beta interferon.

    PubMed Central

    Means, R T; Krantz, S B

    1993-01-01

    We have previously reported that inhibition of human CFU-erythroid (E) colony formation by tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is an indirect effect mediated by a soluble factor released from a fraction of marrow accessory cells which are predominantly stromal elements (Means, R. T., Jr., E. N. Dessypris, and S. B. Krantz. 1990. J. Clin. Invest. 86:538-541). Further studies reported here identify a mediator of this effect. The inhibitory effect of recombinant TNF on marrow CFU-E is ablated by neutralizing antibodies to human beta IFN, but not by antibodies to gamma IFN or IL-1. Anti-beta IFN also neutralizes the inhibitory effect of conditioned medium prepared from marrow cells exposed to TNF. Human beta IFN inhibits colony formation by unpurified marrow CFU-E as well as highly purified CFU-E generated from peripheral blood progenitors, and limiting dilution analysis shows that this is a direct inhibitory effect. TNF has been implicated in the pathogenesis of the anemia of chronic diseases since blood TNF levels are elevated in many patients with this syndrome, and since exposure to TNF produces a similar anemia in either humans or mice. The present study demonstrates that beta IFN is a required mediator of this inhibitory effect on erythropoiesis. PMID:8432849

  9. Therapeutic Effects of Erythroid Differentiation Regulator 1 on Imiquimod-Induced Psoriasis-Like Skin Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung Eun; Houh, Younkyung; Park, Hyun Jeong; Cho, Daeho

    2016-02-17

    Psoriasis is a common skin disease accompanied by chronic inflammation. In previous studies, erythroid differentiation regulator 1 (ERDR1) was shown to have a negative correlation with proinflammatory cytokine IL-18. However, the role of ERDR1 in the inflammatory skin disease psoriasis has not been evaluated. In this study, to investigate the role of ERDR1 in psoriasis, recombinant ERDR1 was injected intraperitoneally into a psoriasis mouse model. Recombinant ERDR1 (rERDR1) significantly alleviated the symptoms of psoriasis-like skin inflammation and reduced the mRNA of various psoriasis-related markers, including keratin 14, S100A8, and Th17-related cytokines IL-17 and IL-22, suggesting that rERDR1 exerts therapeutic effects on psoriasis via the regulation of Th17 functions. Additionally, the expression of CCL20, a well-known Th17 attracting chemokine, was determined. CCL20 expression significantly decreased in the rERDR1-injected group compared with the vehicle (PBS)-injected group. CCR6 expression in the psoriatic lesional skin was also decreased by rERDR1 administration, implying the inhibition of CCR6-expressing Th17 cell chemotaxis via the downregulation of CCL20. Taken together, this study provides the first evidence that ERDR1 may be a potential therapeutic target for psoriasis.

  10. The structure and organization of the human erythroid anion exchanger (AE1) gene

    SciTech Connect

    Sahr, K.E.; Taylor, W.M.; Daniels, B.P.

    1994-12-01

    The AE1 (anion exchanger, band 3) protein is expressed in erythrocytes and in the A-type intercalated cells of the kidney distal collecting tubule. In both cell types it mediates the electroneutral transport of chloride and bicarbonate ions across the lipid bilayer, and, in erythrocytes, it also serves as the critical attachment site of the peripheral membrane skeleton. We have characterized the human AE1 gene using overlapping clones isolated from a phage library of human genomic DNA. The gene spans {approximately}20 kb and consists of 20 exons separated by 19 introns. The structure of the human AE1 gene corresponds closely with that of the previously characterized mouse AE1 gene, with a high degree of conservation of exon/intron junctions, as well as exon and intron nucleotide sequences. The putative upstream and internal promoter sequences of the human AE1 gene used in erythroid and kidney cells, respectively, are described. We also report the nucleotide sequence of the entire 3{prime} noncoding region of exon 20, which was lacking in the published cDNA sequences. In addition, we have characterized 9 Alu repeat elements found within the body of the human AE1 gene that are members of 4 related subfamilies that appear to have entered the genome at different times during primate evolution. 59 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Nuclear factor, erythroid 2-like 2-associated molecular signature predicts lung cancer survival.

    PubMed

    Qian, Zhongqing; Zhou, Tong; Gurguis, Christopher I; Xu, Xiaoyan; Wen, Qing; Lv, Jingzhu; Fang, Fang; Hecker, Louise; Cress, Anne E; Natarajan, Viswanathan; Jacobson, Jeffrey R; Zhang, Donna D; Garcia, Joe G N; Wang, Ting

    2015-11-24

    Nuclear factor, erythroid 2-like 2 (NFE2L2), a transcription factor also known as NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), is a key cytoprotective gene that regulates critical antioxidant and stress-responsive genes. Nrf2 has been demonstrated to be a promising therapeutic target and useful biomarker in malignant disease. We hypothesized that NFE2L2-mediated gene expression would reflect cancer severity and progression. We conducted a meta-analysis of microarray data for 240 NFE2L2-mediated genes that were enriched in tumor tissues. We then developed a risk scoring system based on NFE2L2 gene expression profiling and designated 50 tumor-associated genes as the NFE2L2-associated molecular signature (NAMS). We tested the relationship between this gene expression signature and both recurrence-free survival and overall survival in lung cancer patients. We find that NAMS predicts clinical outcome in the training cohort and in 12 out of 20 validation cohorts. Cox proportional hazard regressions indicate that NAMS is a robust prognostic gene signature, independent of other clinical and pathological factors including patient age, gender, smoking, gene alteration, MYC level, and cancer stage. NAMS is an excellent predictor of recurrence-free survival and overall survival in human lung cancer. This gene signature represents a promising prognostic biomarker in human lung cancer.

  12. Nuclear factor, erythroid 2-like 2-associated molecular signature predicts lung cancer survival

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Zhongqing; Zhou, Tong; Gurguis, Christopher I.; Xu, Xiaoyan; Wen, Qing; Lv, Jingzhu; Fang, Fang; Hecker, Louise; Cress, Anne E.; Natarajan, Viswanathan; Jacobson, Jeffrey R.; Zhang, Donna D.; Garcia, Joe G. N.; Wang, Ting

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear factor, erythroid 2-like 2 (NFE2L2), a transcription factor also known as NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), is a key cytoprotective gene that regulates critical antioxidant and stress-responsive genes. Nrf2 has been demonstrated to be a promising therapeutic target and useful biomarker in malignant disease. We hypothesized that NFE2L2-mediated gene expression would reflect cancer severity and progression. We conducted a meta-analysis of microarray data for 240 NFE2L2-mediated genes that were enriched in tumor tissues. We then developed a risk scoring system based on NFE2L2 gene expression profiling and designated 50 tumor-associated genes as the NFE2L2-associated molecular signature (NAMS). We tested the relationship between this gene expression signature and both recurrence-free survival and overall survival in lung cancer patients. We find that NAMS predicts clinical outcome in the training cohort and in 12 out of 20 validation cohorts. Cox proportional hazard regressions indicate that NAMS is a robust prognostic gene signature, independent of other clinical and pathological factors including patient age, gender, smoking, gene alteration, MYC level, and cancer stage. NAMS is an excellent predictor of recurrence-free survival and overall survival in human lung cancer. This gene signature represents a promising prognostic biomarker in human lung cancer. PMID:26596768

  13. EWS/FLI-1 induces rapid onset of myeloid/erythroid leukemia in mice.

    PubMed

    Torchia, Enrique C; Boyd, Kelli; Rehg, Jerold E; Qu, Chunxu; Baker, Suzanne J

    2007-11-01

    EWS/FLI-1 is a chimeric oncogene generated by chromosomal translocation in Ewing tumors, a family of poorly differentiated pediatric tumors arising predominantly in bone but also in soft tissue. The fusion gene combines sequences encoding a strong transactivating domain from the EWS protein with the DNA binding domain of FLI-1, an ETS transcription factor. A related fusion, TLS/ERG, has been found in myeloid leukemia. To determine EWS/FLI-1 function in vivo, we engineered mice with Cre-inducible expression of EWS/FLI-1 from the ubiquitous Rosa26 locus. When crossed with Mx1-cre mice, Cre-mediated activation of EWS/FLI-1 resulted in the rapid development of myeloid/erythroid leukemia characterized by expansion of primitive mononuclear cells causing hepatomegaly, splenomegaly, severe anemia, and death. The disease could be transplanted serially into naïve recipients. Gene expression profiles of primary and transplanted animals were highly similar, suggesting that activation of EWS/FLI-1 was the primary event leading to disease in this model. The Cre-inducible EWS/FLI-1 mouse provides a novel model system to study the contribution of this oncogene to malignant disease in vivo.

  14. Genomic Structure and Variation of Nuclear Factor (Erythroid-Derived 2)-Like 2

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hye-Youn

    2013-01-01

    High-density mapping of mammalian genomes has enabled a wide range of genetic investigations including the mapping of polygenic traits, determination of quantitative trait loci, and phylogenetic comparison. Genome sequencing analysis of inbred mouse strains has identified high-density single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for investigation of complex traits, which has become a useful tool for biomedical research of human disease to alleviate ethical and practical problems of experimentation in humans. Nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (NRF2) encodes a key host defense transcription factor. This review describes genetic characteristics of human NRF2 and its homologs in other vertebrate species. NRF2 is evolutionally conserved and shares sequence homology among species. Compilation of publically available SNPs and other genetic mutations shows that human NRF2 is highly polymorphic with a mutagenic frequency of 1 per every 72 bp. Functional at-risk alleles and haplotypes have been demonstrated in various human disorders. In addition, other pathogenic alterations including somatic mutations and misregulated epigenetic processes in NRF2 have led to oncogenic cell survival. Comprehensive information from the current review addresses association of NRF2 variation and disease phenotypes and supports the new insights into therapeutic strategies. PMID:23936606

  15. Nuclear Factor Erythroid 2-Related Factor 2 Drives Podocyte-Specific Expression of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor γ Essential for Resistance to Crescentic GN

    PubMed Central

    Bollee, Guillaume; Lenoir, Olivia; Dhaun, Neeraj; Camus, Marine; Chipont, Anna; Flosseau, Kathleen; Mandet, Chantal; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Karras, Alexandre; Thervet, Eric; Bruneval, Patrick; Nochy, Dominique; Mesnard, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Necrotizing and crescentic rapidly progressive GN (RPGN) is a life-threatening syndrome characterized by a rapid loss of renal function. Evidence suggests that podocyte expression of the transcription factor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) may prevent podocyte injury, but the function of glomerular PPARγ in acute, severe inflammatory GN is unknown. Here, we observed marked loss of PPARγ abundance and transcriptional activity in glomerular podocytes in experimental RPGN. Blunted expression of PPARγ in podocyte nuclei was also found in kidneys from patients diagnosed with crescentic GN. Podocyte-specific Pparγ gene targeting accentuated glomerular damage, with increased urinary loss of albumin and severe kidney failure. Furthermore, a PPARγ gain-of-function approach achieved by systemic administration of thiazolidinedione (TZD) failed to prevent severe RPGN in mice with podocyte-specific Pparγ gene deficiency. In nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NRF2)–deficient mice, loss of podocyte PPARγ was observed at baseline. NRF2 deficiency markedly aggravated the course of RPGN, an effect that was partially prevented by TZD administration. Furthermore, delayed administration of TZD, initiated after the onset of RPGN, still alleviated the severity of experimental RPGN. These findings establish a requirement for the NRF2–PPARγ cascade in podocytes, and we suggest that these transcription factors have a role in augmenting the tolerance of glomeruli to severe immune-complex mediated injury. The NRF2–PPARγ pathway may be a therapeutic target for RPGN. PMID:25999406

  16. Aclacinomycin A sensitizes K562 chronic myeloid leukemia cells to imatinib through p38MAPK-mediated erythroid differentiation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yueh-Lun; Chen, Chih-Wei; Liu, Fu-Hwa; Huang, Yu-Wen; Huang, Huei-Mei

    2013-01-01

    Expression of oncogenic Bcr-Abl inhibits cell differentiation of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Differentiation therapy is considered to be a new strategy for treating this type of leukemia. Aclacinomycin A (ACM) is an antitumor antibiotic. Previous studies have shown that ACM induced erythroid differentiation of CML cells. In this study, we investigate the effect of ACM on the sensitivity of human CML cell line K562 to Bcr-Abl specific inhibitor imatinib (STI571, Gleevec). We first determined the optimal concentration of ACM for erythroid differentiation but not growth inhibition and apoptosis in K562 cells. Then, pretreatment with this optimal concentration of ACM followed by a minimally toxic concentration of imatinib strongly induced growth inhibition and apoptosis compared to that with simultaneous co-treatment, indicating that ACM-induced erythroid differentiation sensitizes K562 cells to imatinib. Sequential treatment with ACM and imatinib induced Bcr-Abl down-regulation, cytochrome c release into the cytosol, and caspase-3 activation, as well as decreased Mcl-1 and Bcl-xL expressions, but did not affect Fas ligand/Fas death receptor and procaspase-8 expressions. ACM/imatinib sequential treatment-induced apoptosis was suppressed by a caspase-9 inhibitor and a caspase-3 inhibitor, indicating that the caspase cascade is involved in this apoptosis. Furthermore, we demonstrated that ACM induced erythroid differentiation through the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. The inhibition of erythroid differentiation by p38MAPK inhibitor SB202190, p38MAPK dominant negative mutant or p38MAPK shRNA knockdown, reduced the ACM/imatinib sequential treatment-mediated growth inhibition and apoptosis. These results suggest that differentiated K562 cells induced by ACM-mediated p38MAPK pathway become more sensitive to imatinib and result in down-regulations of Bcr-Abl and anti-apoptotic proteins, growth inhibition and

  17. Sustainability and Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hales, David

    2008-01-01

    People face four fundamental dilemmas, which are essentially moral choices: (1) alleviating poverty; (2) removing the gap between rich and poor; (3) controlling the use of violence for political ends; and (4) changing the patterns of production and consumption and achieving the transition to sustainability. The world in which future generations…

  18. Rifampicin Attenuated Global Cerebral Ischemia Injury via Activating the Nuclear Factor Erythroid 2-Related Factor Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Beibei; Cao, Huimin; Chen, Lili; Yang, Xuemei; Tian, Xiaoyan; Li, Rong; Cheng, Oumei

    2016-01-01

    Background: Recent studies have found that rifampicin has neuroprotective properties in neurodegenerative diseases. However, the exact mechanisms of action remain unclear. The nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) has been considered a potential target for neuroprotection. In this study, we examined whether rifampicin exhibits beneficial effects mediated by the Nrf2 pathway after global cerebral ischemia (GCI). Methods: Rats were randomly assigned to four groups that included a sham group and three treatment groups with global ischemia-reperfusion [control, rifampicin, and rifampicin plus brusatol (an inhibitor of Nrf2)]. Rats were subjected to transient GCI induced by bilateral common carotid artery occlusion for 20 min with systemic hypotension by blood withdrawal. The Morris water maze test was performed for neurobehavioral testing, whereas the pathological changes were investigated using HE and TUNEL staining. The protein expression of Nrf2, hemeoxygenase-1 (HO-1) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in the hippocampus were analyzed by Western blotting. The immunofluorescence staining was used to determine the distribution of Nrf2. Results: Rifampicin treatment significantly improved spatial learning ability compared with the control group, which was consistent with the pathological changes. In addition, rifampicin significantly elevated the nuclear expression of Nrf2, Nrf2 downstream anti-oxidant protein, HO-1 compared with the control group, and it simultaneously downregulated the expression of COX-2 in the hippocampus on day 3 after ischemia-reperfusion. Interestingly, the forenamed effects of rifampicin were abolished by pretreatment with brusatol, a specific inhibitor of Nrf2 activation. Conclusions: Rifampicin exerts neuroprotective effects against global cerebral ischemia, which may be attributed to activation of the Nrf2 pathway. PMID:27965540

  19. Measurement of generation-dependent proliferation rates and death rates during mouse erythroid progenitor cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Akbarian, Vahe; Wang, Weijia; Audet, Julie

    2012-05-01

    Herein, we describe an experimental and computational approach to perform quantitative carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester (CFSE) cell-division tracking in cultures of primary colony-forming unit-erythroid (CFU-E) cells, a hematopoietic progenitor cell type, which is an important target for the treatment of blood disorders and for the manufacture of red blood cells. CFSE labeling of CFU-Es isolated from mouse fetal livers was performed to examine the effects of stem cell factor (SCF) and erythropoietin (EPO) in culture. We used a dynamic model of proliferation based on the Smith-Martin representation of the cell cycle to extract proliferation rates and death rates from CFSE time-series. However, we found that to accurately represent the cell population dynamics in differentiation cultures of CFU-Es, it was necessary to develop a model with generation-specific rate parameters. The generation-specific rates of proliferation and death were extracted for six generations (G(0) -G(5) ) and they revealed that, although SCF alone or EPO alone supported similar total cell outputs in culture, stimulation with EPO resulted in significantly higher proliferation rates from G(2) to G(5) and higher death rates in G(2) , G(3) , and G(5) compared with SCF. In addition, proliferation rates tended to increase from G(1) to G(5) in cultures supplemented with EPO and EPO + SCF, while they remained lower and more constant across generations with SCF. The results are consistent with the notion that SCF promotes CFU-E self-renewal while EPO promotes CFU-E differentiation in culture.

  20. Recombinant erythroid differentiation regulator 1 inhibits both inflammation and angiogenesis in a mouse model of rosacea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Miri; Kim, Kyung-Eun; Jung, Haw Young; Jo, Hyunmu; Jeong, Seo-Won; Lee, Jahyung; Kim, Chang Han; Kim, Heejong; Cho, Daeho; Park, Hyun Jeong

    2015-09-01

    The erythroid differentiation regulator 1 (Erdr1), which is a novel and highly conserved factor, was recently reported to be negatively regulated by IL-18 and to play a crucial role as an antimetastatic factor. IL-18 is a proinflammatory cytokine that functions as an angiogenic mediator in inflammation. Rosacea is a chronic inflammatory skin disorder that is characterized by abnormal inflammation and vascular hyperactivity of the facial skin. To determine whether Erdr1 contributes to the regulation of the chronic inflammatory process in the development of rosacea, an immunohistochemical analysis was performed in healthy donors and patients with rosacea. In this study, we showed that Erdr1 was downregulated, whereas IL-18 was upregulated, in patients with rosacea, which led us to question the role of Erdr1 in this disorder. Moreover, a rosacea-like BALB/c mouse model was used to determine the role of Erdr1 in rosacea in vivo. LL-37 injection induced typical rosacea features, including erythema, telangiectasia and inflammation. Treatment with recombinant Erdr1 (rErdr1) resulted in a significant reduction of erythema, inflammatory cell infiltration (including CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells), and microvessel density with vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Taken together, our findings suggest that rErdr1 may be involved in attenuating the inflammation and angiogenesis associated with the pathogenesis of rosacea. Thus, these results provide new insight into the mechanism involved in this condition and indicate that rErdr1 could be a potential target for therapeutic intervention of rosacea.

  1. Immunosuppressive CD71+ erythroid cells compromise neonatal host defence against infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elahi, Shokrollah; Ertelt, James M.; Kinder, Jeremy M.; Jiang, Tony T.; Zhang, Xuzhe; Xin, Lijun; Chaturvedi, Vandana; Strong, Beverly S.; Qualls, Joseph E.; Steinbrecher, Kris A.; Kalfa, Theodosia A.; Shaaban, Aimen F.; Way, Sing Sing

    2013-12-01

    Newborn infants are highly susceptible to infection. This defect in host defence has generally been ascribed to the immaturity of neonatal immune cells; however, the degree of hyporesponsiveness is highly variable and depends on the stimulation conditions. These discordant responses illustrate the need for a more unified explanation for why immunity is compromised in neonates. Here we show that physiologically enriched CD71+ erythroid cells in neonatal mice and human cord blood have distinctive immunosuppressive properties. The production of innate immune protective cytokines by adult cells is diminished after transfer to neonatal mice or after co-culture with neonatal splenocytes. Neonatal CD71+ cells express the enzyme arginase-2, and arginase activity is essential for the immunosuppressive properties of these cells because molecular inhibition of this enzyme or supplementation with L-arginine overrides immunosuppression. In addition, the ablation of CD71+ cells in neonatal mice, or the decline in number of these cells as postnatal development progresses parallels the loss of suppression, and restored resistance to the perinatal pathogens Listeria monocytogenes and Escherichia coli. However, CD71+ cell-mediated susceptibility to infection is counterbalanced by CD71+ cell-mediated protection against aberrant immune cell activation in the intestine, where colonization with commensal microorganisms occurs swiftly after parturition. Conversely, circumventing such colonization by using antimicrobials or gnotobiotic germ-free mice overrides these protective benefits. Thus, CD71+ cells quench the excessive inflammation induced by abrupt colonization with commensal microorganisms after parturition. This finding challenges the idea that the susceptibility of neonates to infection reflects immune-cell-intrinsic defects and instead highlights processes that are developmentally more essential and inadvertently mitigate innate immune protection. We anticipate that these

  2. Erythroid Krüppel-like factor (EKLF) is active in primitive and definitive erythroid cells and is required for the function of 5'HS3 of the beta-globin locus control region.

    PubMed

    Tewari, R; Gillemans, N; Wijgerde, M; Nuez, B; von Lindern, M; Grosveld, F; Philipsen, S

    1998-04-15

    Disruption of the gene for transcription factor EKLF (erythroid Krüppel-like factor) results in fatal anaemia caused by severely reduced expression of the adult beta-globin gene, while other erythroid-specific genes, including the embryonic epsilon- and fetal gamma-globin genes, are expressed normally. Thus, EKLF is thought to be a stage-specific factor acting through the CACC box in the beta-gene promoter, even though it is already present in embryonic red cells. Here, we show that a beta-globin gene linked directly to the locus control region (LCR) is expressed at embryonic stages, and that this is only modestly reduced in EKLF-/- embryos. Thus, embryonic beta-globin expression is not intrinsically dependent on EKLF. To investigate whether EKLF functions in the locus control region, we analysed the expression of LCR-driven lacZ reporters. This shows that EKLF is not required for reporter activation by the complete LCR. However, embryonic expression of reporters driven by 5'HS3 of the LCR requires EKLF. This suggests that EKLF interacts directly with the CACC motifs in 5'HS3 and demonstrates that EKLF is also a transcriptional activator in embryonic erythropoiesis. Finally, we show that overexpression of EKLF results in an earlier switch from gamma- to beta-globin expression. Adult mice with the EKLF transgene have reduced platelet counts, suggesting that EKLF levels affect the balance between the megakaryocytic and erythroid lineages. Interestingly, the EKLF transgene rescues the lethal phenotype of EKLF null mice, setting the stage for future studies aimed at the analysis of the EKLF protein and its role in beta-globin gene activation.

  3. Delivering sustainability therapy in sustainable development projects.

    PubMed

    Bell, Simon; Morse, Stephen

    2005-04-01

    This paper explores the apparent contradiction between the 'linearity' of most Sustainable Development projects, with time-bound and defined outputs achieved at a fixed cost, and an implied 'circularity' of the theory whereby there is no 'end'. Projects usually have clear parameters within which they are implemented, and the inclusion of elements such as the need for accountability, measurable impact and 'value for money' have grown in importance. It could be argued that we live in a 'projectified' and therefore linear world. The paper explores the potential contradiction between 'linearity' and 'circularity', and suggests that one way around this is to frame the project within a form of the Kolb Learning Cycle heuristic. This will facilitate a rationalisation from those implementing the sustainable development project as to why decisions are being made and for whom. If these questions are opened up to the project stakeholders, including beneficiaries, then the Kolb cycle could encourage learning and understanding by all involved. It could also provide Sustainability Therapy to those trapped in processes, which they find orthogonal to their own perceptions. It is suggested that such learning, therapy and reflective practice should be a valid output of the sustainable development project, although typically the focus is only upon the final outputs and how they feed into policy. Ironically funders would be well advised to take a broader perspective in order to achieve true 'value for money' within such projects, even if learning is not an easily measurable or tangible outcome. These points are explored within the context of the wider literature and experience with a sustainable development project undertaken in Malta.

  4. Sustainable Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cadwell, Louise; Dillon, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Green schools have moved into a new era that focuses on building a culture of sustainability in every aspect of learning in schools. In the early stages of sustainability education, the focus was on recycling and turning off the lights. Now, students and adults together are moving into the areas of advocacy and action that are based on a deep…

  5. Sustainability 101

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shi, David

    2008-01-01

    Sustainability is one of the leading issues of this time. Climate change is real, and widespread commitment and creativity are needed to combat its negative effects. Higher education is the seedbed of the sustainability movement. Much climate research and environmental science takes place on college and university campuses, which are, by their…

  6. Expression of oncogenic K-ras from its endogenous promoter leads to a partial block of erythroid differentiation and hyperactivation of cytokine-dependent signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Liu, Yangang; Beard, Caroline; Tuveson, David A; Jaenisch, Rudolf; Jacks, Tyler E; Lodish, Harvey F

    2007-06-15

    When overexpressed in primary erythroid progenitors, oncogenic Ras leads to the constitutive activation of its downstream signaling pathways, severe block of terminal erythroid differentiation, and cytokine-independent growth of primary erythroid progenitors. However, whether high-level expression of oncogenic Ras is required for these phenotypes is unknown. To address this issue, we expressed oncogenic K-ras (K-ras(G12D)) from its endogenous promoter using a tetracycline-inducible system. We show that endogenous K-ras(G12D) leads to a partial block of terminal erythroid differentiation in vivo. In contrast to results obtained when oncogenic Ras was overexpressed from retroviral vectors, endogenous levels of K-ras(G12D) fail to constitutively activate but rather hyperactivate cytokine-dependent signaling pathways, including Stat5, Akt, and p44/42 MAPK, in primary erythroid progenitors. This explains previous observations that hematopoietic progenitors expressing endogenous K-ras(G12D) display hypersensitivity to cytokine stimulation in various colony assays. Our results support efforts to modulate Ras signaling for treating hematopoietic malignancies.

  7. Coxsackievirus B3 Infects the Bone Marrow and Diminishes the Restorative Capacity of Erythroid and Lymphoid Progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Althof, Nadine

    2013-01-01

    Coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) is known to infect stem cells in the neonatal central nervous system. Here, we evaluated the effects of CVB3 infection on the major source and repository of stem cells, the bone marrow (BM). Viral genome was detectable in BM within 24 h of infection, and productive infection of BM cells was evident, peaking at 48 h postinfection (p.i.), when ∼1 to 2% of BM cells produced infectious virus particles. Beginning at 2 to 3 days p.i., a dramatic and persistent loss of immature erythroid cells, B and T lymphocytes, and neutrophils was observed in BM and, by day 3 to 4 p.i., the femoral BM stroma was largely destroyed. Analysis of peripheral blood revealed a modest neutrophilia, a loss of reticulocytes, and a massive lymphopenia. The abundance of multipotent progenitor cells (Lin−/c-kit+/Flt3+) in BM declined ∼10-fold during CVB3 infection and, consistent with a deficiency of primitive hematopoietic progenitors, serum levels of the hematopoietic growth factor Flt3 ligand were dramatically elevated. Therefore, we analyzed the regenerative capacity of BM from CVB3-infected mice. Granulocyte/macrophage progenitors displayed a relatively normal proliferative ability, consistent with the fact that the peripheral blood level of neutrophils—which are very short-lived cells—remained high throughout infection. However, erythroid and lymphoid hematopoietic progenitors in BM from CVB3-infected mice showed a markedly reduced colony-forming capacity, consonant with the observed loss of both lymphocytes and immature erythroid cells/reticulocytes from the BM and peripheral blood. In summary, CVB3 infects the BM and exerts differential effects on the various hematopoietic progenitor populations. PMID:23269810

  8. High-Efficiency Serum-Free Feeder-Free Erythroid Differentiation of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells Using Small Molecules.

    PubMed

    Olivier, Emmanuel N; Marenah, Lamin; McCahill, Angela; Condie, Alison; Cowan, Scott; Mountford, Joanne C

    2016-10-01

    : This article describes a good manufacturing practice (GMP)-compatible, feeder-free and serum-free method to produce large numbers of erythroid cells from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs), either embryonic or induced. This multistep protocol combines cytokines and small molecules to mimic and surpass the early stages of development. It produces, without any selection or sorting step, a population of cells in which 91.8% ± 5.4% express CD34 at day 7, 98.6% ± 1.3% express CD43 at day 10, and 99.1% ± 0.95% of cells are CD235a positive by day 31 of the differentiation process. Moreover, this differentiation protocol supports extensive expansion, with a single hPSC producing up to 150 hematopoietic progenitor cells by day 10 and 50,000-200,000 erythroid cells by day 31. The erythroid cells produced exhibit a definitive fetal hematopoietic type, with 90%-95% fetal globin and variable proportion of embryonic and adult globin at the protein level. The presence of small molecules during the differentiation protocol has quantitative and qualitative effects; it increases the proportion of adult globin and decreases the proportion of embryonic globin. Given its level of definition, this system provides a powerful tool for investigation of the mechanisms governing early hematopoiesis and erythropoiesis, including globin switching and enucleation. The early stages of the differentiation protocol could also serve as a starting point for the production of endothelial cells and other hematopoietic cells, or to investigate the production of long-term reconstituting hematopoietic stem cells from hPSCs.

  9. Sustainable Biofuels Development Center

    SciTech Connect

    Reardon, Kenneth F.

    2015-03-01

    The mission of the Sustainable Bioenergy Development Center (SBDC) is to enhance the capability of America’s bioenergy industry to produce transportation fuels and chemical feedstocks on a large scale, with significant energy yields, at competitive cost, through sustainable production techniques. Research within the SBDC is organized in five areas: (1) Development of Sustainable Crops and Agricultural Strategies, (2) Improvement of Biomass Processing Technologies, (3) Biofuel Characterization and Engine Adaptation, (4) Production of Byproducts for Sustainable Biorefining, and (5) Sustainability Assessment, including evaluation of the ecosystem/climate change implication of center research and evaluation of the policy implications of widespread production and utilization of bioenergy. The overall goal of this project is to develop new sustainable bioenergy-related technologies. To achieve that goal, three specific activities were supported with DOE funds: bioenergy-related research initiation projects, bioenergy research and education via support of undergraduate and graduate students, and Research Support Activities (equipment purchases, travel to attend bioenergy conferences, and seminars). Numerous research findings in diverse fields related to bioenergy were produced from these activities and are summarized in this report.

  10. Sustainability Base Construction Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mewhinney, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Construction of the new Sustainability Base Collaborative support facility, expected to become the highest performing building in the federal government continues at NASA's Ames Research Center, Moffet Field, Calif. The new building is designed to achieve a platinum rating under the leadership in Energy and Environment Design (LEED) new construction standards for environmentally sustainable construction developed by the U. S. Green Building Council, Washington, D. C. When completed by the end of 2011, the $20.6 million building will feature near zero net energy consumption, use 90 percent less potable water than conventionally build buildings of equivalent size, and will result in reduced building maintenance costs.

  11. High-Efficiency Serum-Free Feeder-Free Erythroid Differentiation of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells Using Small Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Marenah, Lamin; McCahill, Angela; Condie, Alison; Cowan, Scott

    2016-01-01

    This article describes a good manufacturing practice (GMP)-compatible, feeder-free and serum-free method to produce large numbers of erythroid cells from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs), either embryonic or induced. This multistep protocol combines cytokines and small molecules to mimic and surpass the early stages of development. It produces, without any selection or sorting step, a population of cells in which 91.8% ± 5.4% express CD34 at day 7, 98.6% ± 1.3% express CD43 at day 10, and 99.1% ± 0.95% of cells are CD235a positive by day 31 of the differentiation process. Moreover, this differentiation protocol supports extensive expansion, with a single hPSC producing up to 150 hematopoietic progenitor cells by day 10 and 50,000–200,000 erythroid cells by day 31. The erythroid cells produced exhibit a definitive fetal hematopoietic type, with 90%–95% fetal globin and variable proportion of embryonic and adult globin at the protein level. The presence of small molecules during the differentiation protocol has quantitative and qualitative effects; it increases the proportion of adult globin and decreases the proportion of embryonic globin. Given its level of definition, this system provides a powerful tool for investigation of the mechanisms governing early hematopoiesis and erythropoiesis, including globin switching and enucleation. The early stages of the differentiation protocol could also serve as a starting point for the production of endothelial cells and other hematopoietic cells, or to investigate the production of long-term reconstituting hematopoietic stem cells from hPSCs. Significance This differentiation protocol allows the production of a large amount of erythroid cells from pluripotent stem cells. Its efficiency is compatible with that of in vitro red blood cell production, and it can be a considerable asset for studying developmental erythropoiesis and red blood cell enucleation, thereby aiding both basic and translational research. In

  12. Sustainable Futures

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Sustainable Futures is a voluntary program that encourages industry to use predictive models to screen new chemicals early in the development process and offers incentives to companies subject to TSCA section 5.

  13. Agriculture: Sustainability

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Sustainability creates and maintains the conditions under which humans and nature can exist in productive harmony, that permit fulfilling the food, feed, and fiber needs of our country and the social, economic and other requirements.

  14. Sustainable Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Auerbach, Raymond

    1994-01-01

    Discusses South African national development priorities, sustainable development, and the future of agriculture and presents three scenarios of possible national action: production for sale and export, household food security, and conservation of natural resources. (MKR)

  15. Implementing sustainable development

    SciTech Connect

    Loran, B.

    1997-08-01

    Criteria for the implementation of sustainable development are presented. These criteria are derived systematically from a definition of desirable goals, a comparison with the present situation, and an identification of available means to achieve the desired results. A revision of the standards used to measure a country status level (national standards) is found to be a key element. The present situation involves a largely unchecked population expansion in locations least suited to accommodate it, lack of energy and resource use plans, and national standards based on development, or growth. A sustainable development, on the other hand, requires stabilized population and energy and resource use, and national standards moving away from growth and accepting quality of life in its place. Examples of specific applications to different cultural environments and references to pertinent studies are provided, showing that sustainable development is a concrete possibility, once the basic criteria identified are recognized as desirable goals and receive gradual acceptance.

  16. Gebruikershandleiding SUSTAINED (User Manual Sustained)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-05-01

    Facility CCA - Contamination Control Area Tabel 1 Objecten en mogelijke stati. maO r.ppo~t Pagina 8 C, I~ LII~LTh Fig. 2: Processchema " Sustained ". TNO...90-Al-22 9 Gebruikershandleiding Sustained Niets uit daze uilgave meg worderr vermenigvutdigdi en/of openbaar gemaakt door ,nddlet van druMk...0 V.O - 1140 rapport Pagina rapport no. FEL-90-AI22 titel .Gebruikershandleiding SUSTAINED auteurs Ir. S.A. van Merrignboer, Ing. R. van Rij instituut

  17. Sustainable markets for sustainable energy

    SciTech Connect

    Millan, J.; Smyser, C.

    1997-12-01

    The author discusses how the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) is involved in sustainable energy development. It presently has 50 loans and grants for non conventional renewable energy projects and ten grants for efficiency programs for $600 and $17 million respectively, representing 100 MW of power. The IDB is concerned with how to create a sustainable market for sustainable energy projects. The IDB is trying to work with government, private sector, NGOs, trading allies, credit sources, and regulators to find proper roles for such projects. He discusses how the IDB is working to expand its vision and objectives in renewable energy projects in Central and South America.

  18. Immunophenotypic Profiling of Erythroid Progenitor-Derived Extracellular Vesicles in Diamond-Blackfan Anaemia: A New Diagnostic Strategy.

    PubMed

    Macrì, Serena; Pavesi, Elisa; Crescitelli, Rossella; Aspesi, Anna; Vizziello, Claudia; Botto, Carlotta; Corti, Paola; Quarello, Paola; Notari, Patrizia; Ramenghi, Ugo; Ellis, Steven Robert; Dianzani, Irma

    2015-01-01

    Diamond-Blackfan Anaemia (DBA) is a rare inherited anaemia caused by heterozygous mutations in one of 13 ribosomal protein genes. Erythroid progenitors (BFU-E and CFU-E) in bone marrow (BM) show a proapoptotic phenotype. Suspicion of DBA is reached after exclusion of other forms of BM failure syndromes. To improve DBA diagnosis, which is confirmed by mutation analysis, we tested a new approach based on the study of extracellular vesicles (EVs) isolated from plasma by differential centrifugations and analysed by flow cytometry. We chose CD34, CD71 and CD235a markers to study erythroid EVs. We characterised the EVs immunophentoypic profiles of 13 DBA patients, 22 healthy controls and 16 patients with other haematological diseases. Among the three EVs clusters we found, only the CD34+/CD71low population showed statistically significant differences between DBA patients and controls (p< 0.05). The absence of this cluster is in agreement with the low levels of BFU-E found in DBA patients. The assessment of ROC curves demonstrated the potential diagnostic value of this population. We suggest that this assay may be useful to improve DBA diagnosis as a quicker and less invasive alternative to BM BFU-E culture analysis.

  19. Development of phenotypic screening assays for γ-globin induction using primary human bone marrow day 7 erythroid progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Hu; Xie, Wensheng; Gore, Elizabeth R; Montoute, Monica N; Bee, Weilin Tiger; Zappacosta, Francesca; Zeng, Xin; Wu, Zining; Kallal, Lorena; Ames, Robert S; Pope, Andrew J; Benowitz, Andrew; Erickson-Miller, Connie L

    2013-12-01

    Sickle cell anemia (SCA) is a genetic disorder of the β-globin gene. SCA results in chronic ischemia with pain and tissue injury. The extent of SCA symptoms can be ameliorated by treatment with drugs, which result in increasing the levels of γ-globin in patient red blood cells. Hydroxyurea (HU) is a Food and Drug Administration-approved drug for SCA, but it has dose-limiting toxicity, and patients exhibit highly variable treatment responses. To identify compounds that may lead to the development of better and safer medicines, we have established a method using primary human bone marrow day 7 erythroid progenitor cells (EPCs) to screen for compounds that induce γ-globin production. First, human marrow CD34(+) cells were cultured and expanded for 7 days and characterized for the expression of erythroid differentiation markers (CD71, CD36, and CD235a). Second, fresh or cryopreserved EPCs were treated with compounds for 3 days in 384-well plates followed by γ-globin quantification by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), which was validated using HU and decitabine. From the 7408 compounds screened, we identified at least one new compound with confirmed γ-globin-inducing activity. Hits are undergoing analysis in secondary assays. In this article, we describe the method of generating fit-for-purpose EPCs; the development, optimization, and validation of the ELISA and secondary assays for γ-globin detection; and screening results.

  20. Increased oxidative metabolism is associated with erythroid precursor expansion in β0-thalassaemia/Hb E disease.

    PubMed

    Leecharoenkiat, Amporn; Wannatung, Tirawat; Lithanatudom, Pathrapol; Svasti, Saovaros; Fucharoen, Suthat; Chokchaichamnankit, Daranee; Srisomsap, Chantragan; Smith, Duncan R

    2011-10-15

    Erythropoiesis in β0-thalassaemia/Hb E patients, the most common variant form of β-thalassaemia in Southeast Asia, is characterized by accelerated differentiation and over-expansion of erythroid precursor cells. The mechanism driving this accelerated expansion and differentiation remain unknown. To address this issue a proteomic analysis was undertaken to firstly identify proteins differentially expressed during erythroblast differentiation and a second analysis was undertaken to identify proteins differentially expressed between β0-thalassaemia/Hb E erythroblasts and control erythroblasts. The majority of proteins identified as being differentially expressed between β0-thalassaemia/Hb E and control erythroblasts were constituents of the glycolysis/TCA pathway and levels of oxidative stress correlated with the degree of erythroid expansion. A model was constructed linking these observations with previous studies showing increased phosphorylation of ERK1/2 in thalassemic erythroblasts which predicted the increased activation of PKA, PKB and PKC which Western analysis confirmed. Inhibition of PKA or PKC reduced β0-thalassaemia/Hb E erythroblast differentiation and/or expansion. We propose that increased expansion and differentiation of β0-thalassaemia/Hb E erythroblasts occur as a result of feedback loops acting through increased oxidative metabolism.

  1. Erythroid Krüppel-like factor (EKLF) contains a multifunctional transcriptional activation domain important for inter- and intramolecular interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, X; Bieker, J J

    1996-01-01

    Erythroid Krüppel-like factor (EKLF) is a red cell-restricted transcriptional activator that plays a dominant role in establishing high levels of beta-globin gene expression during erythroid ontogeny. Although its DNA binding domain belongs to the well-studied class of Krüppel-like zinc fingers, its proline-rich activation region has not been thoroughly examined. We have analyzed this region by monitoring the functional effects of its mutagenesis upon EKLF activity in vivo and in vitro. First, using co-transfection assays, we find that the transactivation region contains discrete stimulatory and inhibitory subdomains. Second, in vitro binding assays indicate that the inhibitory domain exerts its effect in cis by interfering with DNA binding. Third, in vivo competition assays demonstrate that EKLF interacts with a positive-acting cellular factor, and that the domain responsible for this trans interaction lies within a 40 amino acid sequence that is coincident with the EKLF minimal transactivation domain. Finally, site-directed mutagenesis of this domain implies that conformation and/or phosphorylation status of its central core may be critical for such interactions. These results point towards post-translational steric and/or allosteric control of EKLF function that may be important not just for its DNA binding ability, but also for its potential to interact with other proteins that fully establish the correct stereospecific array leading to efficient switching of beta-globin transcription during development. Images PMID:8918466

  2. Enforced expression of HOX11 is associated with an immature phenotype in J2E erythroid cells.

    PubMed

    Greene, Wayne K; Ford, Jette; Dixon, Darcelle; Tilbrook, Peta A; Watt, Paul M; Klinken, S Peter; Kees, Ursula R

    2002-09-01

    The HOX11 gene encodes a homeodomain transcription factor that is essential for spleen development during embryogenesis. HOX11 is also leukaemogenic, both through its clinical association with childhood T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, and its ability to immortalize other haematopoietic cell lineages experimentally. To examine the pathological role of HOX11 in tumorigenesis, we constitutively expressed HOX11 cDNA in J2E murine erythroleukaemic cells, which are capable of terminal differentiation. Enforced HOX11 expression was found to induce a profound alteration in J2E cellular morphology and differentiation status. Our analyses revealed that HOX11 produced clones with a preponderance of less differentiated cells that were highly adherent to plastic. Morphologically, the cells overexpressing HOX11 were larger and had decreased globin levels, as well as a reduction in haemoglobin synthesis in response to erythropoietin (EPO). Immunocytochemical analysis confirmed the immature erythroid phenotype imposed by HOX11, with clones transfected with HOX11 demonstrating expression of the c-Kit stem cell marker, while retaining EPO receptor expression. Taken together, these results show that HOX11 alters erythroid differentiation, favouring a less mature progenitor-like stage. This supports the notion that disrupted haematopoietic cell differentiation is responsible for pre-leukaemic immortalization by the HOX11 oncoprotein.

  3. UFBP1, a Key Component of the Ufm1 Conjugation System, Is Essential for Ufmylation-Mediated Regulation of Erythroid Development

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Yafei; Pi, Wenhu; Sivaprakasam, Satish; Zhu, Xiaobin; Zhang, Mingsheng; Chen, Jijun; Makala, Levi; Lu, Chunwan; Wu, Jianchu; Teng, Yong; Pace, Betty; Tuan, Dorothy; Singh, Nagendra; Li, Honglin

    2015-01-01

    The Ufm1 conjugation system is an ubiquitin-like modification system that consists of Ufm1, Uba5 (E1), Ufc1 (E2), and less defined E3 ligase(s) and targets. The biological importance of this system is highlighted by its essential role in embryogenesis and erythroid development, but the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. UFBP1 (Ufm1 binding protein 1, also known as DDRGK1, Dashurin and C20orf116) is a putative Ufm1 target, yet its exact physiological function and impact of its ufmylation remain largely undefined. In this study, we report that UFBP1 is indispensable for embryonic development and hematopoiesis. While germ-line deletion of UFBP1 caused defective erythroid development and embryonic lethality, somatic ablation of UFBP1 impaired adult hematopoiesis, resulting in pancytopenia and animal death. At the cellular level, UFBP1 deficiency led to elevated ER (endoplasmic reticulum) stress and activation of unfolded protein response (UPR), and consequently cell death of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. In addition, loss of UFBP1 suppressed expression of erythroid transcription factors GATA-1 and KLF1 and blocked erythroid differentiation from CFU-Es (colony forming unit-erythroid) to proerythroblasts. Interestingly, depletion of Uba5, a Ufm1 E1 enzyme, also caused elevation of ER stress and under-expression of erythroid transcription factors in erythroleukemia K562 cells. By contrast, knockdown of ASC1, a newly identified Ufm1 target that functions as a transcriptional co-activator of hormone receptors, led to down-regulation of erythroid transcription factors, but did not elevate basal ER stress. Furthermore, we found that ASC1 was associated with the promoters of GATA-1 and Klf1 in a UFBP1-dependent manner. Taken together, our findings suggest that UFBP1, along with ASC1 and other ufmylation components, play pleiotropic roles in regulation of hematopoietic cell survival and differentiation via modulating ER homeostasis and erythroid lineage

  4. Therapeutic levels of fetal hemoglobin in erythroid progeny of β-thalassemic CD34+ cells after lentiviral vector-mediated gene transfer

    PubMed Central

    Wilber, Andrew; Hargrove, Phillip W.; Kim, Yoon-Sang; Riberdy, Janice M.; Sankaran, Vijay G.; Papanikolaou, Eleni; Georgomanoli, Maria; Anagnou, Nicholas P.; Orkin, Stuart H.; Nienhuis, Arthur W.

    2011-01-01

    β-Thalassemia major results from severely reduced or absent expression of the β-chain of adult hemoglobin (α2β2;HbA). Increased levels of fetal hemoglobin (α2γ2;HbF), such as occurs with hereditary persistence of HbF, ameliorate the severity of β-thalassemia, raising the potential for genetic therapy directed at enhancing HbF. We used an in vitro model of human erythropoiesis to assay for enhanced production of HbF after gene delivery into CD34+ cells obtained from mobilized peripheral blood of normal adults or steady-state bone marrow from patients with β-thalassemia major. Lentiviral vectors encoding (1) a human γ-globin gene with or without an insulator, (2) a synthetic zinc-finger transcription factor designed to interact with the γ-globin gene promoters, or (3) a short-hairpin RNA targeting the γ-globin gene repressor, BCL11A, were tested. Erythroid progeny of normal CD34+ cells demonstrated levels of HbF up to 21% per vector copy. For β-thalassemic CD34+ cells, similar gene transfer efficiencies achieved HbF production ranging from 45% to 60%, resulting in up to a 3-fold increase in the total cellular Hb content. These observations suggest that both lentiviral-mediated γ-globin gene addition and genetic reactivation of endogenous γ-globin genes have potential to provide therapeutic HbF levels to patients with β-globin deficiency. PMID:21156846

  5. Moving Toward Universal Health Coverage (UHC) to Achieve Inclusive and Sustainable Health Development: Three Essential Strategies Drawn From Asian Experience Comment on "Improving the World's Health Through the Post-2015 Development Agenda: Perspectives from Rwanda".

    PubMed

    Xu, Ye; Huang, Cheng; Colón-Ramos, Uriyoán

    2015-08-26

    Binagwaho and colleagues' perspective piece provided a timely reflection on the experience of Rwanda in achieving the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and a proposal of 5 principles to carry forward in post-2015 health development. This commentary echoes their viewpoints and offers three lessons for health policy reforms consistent with these principles beyond 2015. Specifically, we argue that universal health coverage (UHC) is an integrated solution to advance the global health development agenda, and the three essential strategies drawn from Asian countries' health reforms toward UHC are: (1) Public financing support and sequencing health insurance expansion by first extending health insurance to the extremely poor, vulnerable, and marginalized population are critical for achieving UHC; (2) Improved quality of delivered care ensures supply-side readiness and effective coverage; (3) Strategic purchasing and results-based financing creates incentives and accountability for positive changes. These strategies were discussed and illustrated with experience from China and other Asian economies.

  6. Firm foundations for sustainability.

    PubMed

    Pratt, Rob

    2009-05-01

    Ensuring that modern healthcare facilities are designed, constructed and maintained sustainably is now as important as specifying the right equipment to provide the very best in healthcare. But how can engineers, and those others in the healthcare sector responsible for the environmental aspects of new schemes, meet the current requirements, and what factors must be considered? Rob Pratt, director at independent engineering consultant Henderson Green, explains how BREEAM Healthcare can help organisations achieve a clean bill of health.

  7. Annual Sustainability Report FY 2014. Incorporates NREL Site Sustainability Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Rukavina, Frank

    2015-07-01

    NREL's Sustainability Program is responsible for upholding all executive orders, federal regulations, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) orders, and goals related to sustainable and resilient facility operations. But NREL continues to expand sustainable practices above and beyond the laboratory's regulations and requirements to ensure that the laboratory fulfills its mission into the future, leaves the smallest possible legacy footprint, and models sustainable operations and behaviors on national, regional, and local levels. The report, per the GRI reporting format, elaborates on multi-year goals relative to executive orders, achievements, and challenges; and success stories provide specific examples. A section called 'Sustaining NREL's Future Through Integration' provides insight into how NREL is successfully expanding the adoption of renewable energy technologies through integration.

  8. Direct evidence for interaction between human erythroid progenitor cells and a hemoglobin switching activity present in fetal sheep serum.

    PubMed Central

    Stamatoyannopoulos, G; Nakamoto, B; Kurachi, S; Papayannopoulou, T

    1983-01-01

    An activity that induces Hb F to Hb A switching in human cells is present in fetal sheep serum. To test directly the role of cell-to-environment interactions in hemoglobin switching and to define the level of erythroid cell differentiation at which this activity operates, colony transfer experiments were done. Clones grown in the presence of switching activity-containing medium (fetal sheep serum) or control medium (fetal calf serum) were transferred, at the 16- to 30-cell stage, to either fetal sheep serum or fetal calf serum plates and Hb F synthesis was determined in the fully mature erythroid bursts. Fetal calf serum-to-fetal calf serum transfers produced colonies with the high Hb F levels characteristic of undisturbed fetal calf serum-grown clones. Fetal sheep serum-to-fetal calf serum transfers resulted in significant decrease in Hb F synthesis, revealing an interaction between hemoglobin switching activity and cells at an early stage of progenitor cell development. The reduction of Hb F synthesis in fetal calf serum-to-fetal sheep serum transfers indicated that hemoglobin switching activity interacts with cells at later stages of progenitor cell development. Maximal decrease in Hb F synthesis was observed in fetal sheep serum-to-fetal sheep serum transfers, indicating that optimal effects on Hb switching are obtained when the environment that induces Hb switching is present throughout the development of progenitor cells. By splitting single early clones into two parts and transferring them to either a fetal sheep serum or a fetal calf serum environment, these interactions were further demonstrated in the progeny of a single erythroid burst-forming unit. Since all clone transfers were done on cell-free plates, the results of fetal calf serum-to-fetal sheep serum and of fetal sheep serum-to-fetal sheep serum transfers indicated that the switching activity does not require helper cells for its action. These studies show directly that (i) Hb F synthesis is

  9. Identification of Cell Type-Specific Differences in Erythropoietin Receptor Signaling in Primary Erythroid and Lung Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Salopiata, Florian; Depner, Sofia; Wäsch, Marvin; Böhm, Martin E.; Mücke, Oliver; Plass, Christoph; Lehmann, Wolf D.; Kreutz, Clemens; Timmer, Jens; Klingmüller, Ursula

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer, with its most prevalent form non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC), is one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths worldwide, and is commonly treated with chemotherapeutic drugs such as cisplatin. Lung cancer patients frequently suffer from chemotherapy-induced anemia, which can be treated with erythropoietin (EPO). However, studies have indicated that EPO not only promotes erythropoiesis in hematopoietic cells, but may also enhance survival of NSCLC cells. Here, we verified that the NSCLC cell line H838 expresses functional erythropoietin receptors (EPOR) and that treatment with EPO reduces cisplatin-induced apoptosis. To pinpoint differences in EPO-induced survival signaling in erythroid progenitor cells (CFU-E, colony forming unit-erythroid) and H838 cells, we combined mathematical modeling with a method for feature selection, the L1 regularization. Utilizing an example model and simulated data, we demonstrated that this approach enables the accurate identification and quantification of cell type-specific parameters. We applied our strategy to quantitative time-resolved data of EPO-induced JAK/STAT signaling generated by quantitative immunoblotting, mass spectrometry and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) in CFU-E and H838 cells as well as H838 cells overexpressing human EPOR (H838-HA-hEPOR). The established parsimonious mathematical model was able to simultaneously describe the data sets of CFU-E, H838 and H838-HA-hEPOR cells. Seven cell type-specific parameters were identified that included for example parameters for nuclear translocation of STAT5 and target gene induction. Cell type-specific differences in target gene induction were experimentally validated by qRT-PCR experiments. The systematic identification of pathway differences and sensitivities of EPOR signaling in CFU-E and H838 cells revealed potential targets for intervention to selectively inhibit EPO-induced signaling in the tumor cells but leave the responses in erythroid

  10. Progressive inactivation of the expression of an erythroid transcriptional factor in GM- and G-CSF-dependent myeloid cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Crotta, S; Nicolis, S; Ronchi, A; Ottolenghi, S; Ruzzi, L; Shimada, Y; Migliaccio, A R; Migliaccio, G

    1990-01-01

    The transcriptional binding protein NFE-1 (also called GF-1 and Ery-f1) is thought to play a necessary, but not sufficient, role in the regulation of differentiation-related gene expression in a subset of hematopoietic lineages (erythroid, megakaryocytic, and basophil-mast cell). In order to clarify the mechanism which underlies the lineage-specificity of the NFE-1 expression, as well as the relationship between the expression of this factor and growth factor responsiveness, we have evaluated the capacity of erythropoietin (Epo)-, granulomonocytic (GM)-colony stimulating factor (CSF)-, and granulocyte (G)-CSF-dependent subclones derived from the interleukin 3 (IL-3)-dependent cell line 32D, to express 1) NFE-1 mRNA, 2) NFE-1-related nuclear proteins, and 3) chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) activity when transfected with a CAT gene under the control of NFE-1 cognate sequences. NFE-1 mRNA was found to be expressed not only in cells with mast cell (IL-3-dependent 32D) and erythroid (Epo-dependent 32D Epo1) phenotypes, but also in cells with predominantly granulocyte/macrophage properties, such as the GM-CSF- (early myelomonocytic) and G-CSF- (myelocytic) dependent subclones of 32D. However, a gradient of expression, correlating with the lineage, the stage of differentiation, and the growth factor responsiveness of the cell lines, was found among the different subclones: Epo greater than or equal to IL-3 greater than GM-CSF greater than G-CSF. Binding experiments demonstrated NFE-1 activity in all cell lines except the G-CSF-dependent line. Function of the NFE-1 protein was assessed by the expression of the CAT gene linked to the SV40 promoter and a mutant (-175 T----C) HPFH gamma-globin promoter. High level CAT expression was seen only in the Epo1 cells although low level expression was also seen in the parent 32D. These results demonstrate that the specificity of the expression of NFE-1 for the erythroid--megakaryocytic--mast cell lineages is obtained by

  11. Community-Based Interventions to Improve and Sustain Antiretroviral Therapy Adherence, Retention in HIV Care and Clinical Outcomes in Low- and Middle-Income Countries for Achieving the UNAIDS 90-90-90 Targets

    PubMed Central

    Adetokunboh, Olatunji; Uthman, Olalekan A.; Knowlton, Amy W.; Altice, Frederick L.; Schechter, Mauro; Galárraga, Omar; Geng, Elvin; Peltzer, Karl; Chang, Larry W.; Van Cutsem, Gilles; Jaffar, Shabbar S.; Ford, Nathan; Mellins, Claude A.; Remien, Robert H.; Mills, Edward J.

    2017-01-01

    Little is known about the effect of community versus health facility-based interventions to improve and sustain antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence, virologic suppression, and retention in care among HIV-infected individuals in low-and middle-income countries (LMICs). We systematically searched four electronic databases for all available randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and comparative cohort studies in LMICs comparing community versus health facility-based interventions. Relative risks (RRs) for pre-defined adherence, treatment engagement (linkage and retention in care), and relevant clinical outcomes were pooled using random effect models. Eleven cohort studies and eleven RCTs (N = 97,657) were included. Meta-analysis of the included RCTs comparing community- versus health facility-based interventions found comparable outcomes in terms of ART adherence (RR = 1.02, 95 % CI 0.99 to 1.04), virologic suppression (RR = 1.00, 95 % CI 0.98 to 1.03), and all-cause mortality (RR = 0.93, 95 % CI 0.73 to 1.18). The result of pooled analysis from the RCTs (RR = 1.03, 95 % CI 1.01 to 1.06) and cohort studies (RR = 1.09, 95 % CI 1.03 to 1.15) found that participants assigned to community-based interventions had statistically significantly higher rates of treatment engagement. Two studies found community-based ART delivery model either cost-saving or cost-effective. Community- versus facility-based models of ART delivery resulted in at least comparable outcomes for clinically stable HIV-infected patients on treatment in LMICs and are likely to be cost-effective. PMID:27475643

  12. Exergy sustainability.

    SciTech Connect

    Robinett, Rush D. III; Wilson, David Gerald; Reed, Alfred W.

    2006-05-01

    Exergy is the elixir of life. Exergy is that portion of energy available to do work. Elixir is defined as a substance held capable of prolonging life indefinitely, which implies sustainability of life. In terms of mathematics and engineering, exergy sustainability is defined as the continuous compensation of irreversible entropy production in an open system with an impedance and capacity-matched persistent exergy source. Irreversible and nonequilibrium thermodynamic concepts are combined with self-organizing systems theories as well as nonlinear control and stability analyses to explain this definition. In particular, this paper provides a missing link in the analysis of self-organizing systems: a tie between irreversible thermodynamics and Hamiltonian systems. As a result of this work, the concept of ''on the edge of chaos'' is formulated as a set of necessary and sufficient conditions for stability and performance of sustainable systems. This interplay between exergy rate and irreversible entropy production rate can be described as Yin and Yang control: the dialectic synthesis of opposing power flows. In addition, exergy is shown to be a fundamental driver and necessary input for sustainable systems, since exergy input in the form of power is a single point of failure for self-organizing, adaptable systems.

  13. Generation of a High Number of Healthy Erythroid Cells from Gene-Edited Pyruvate Kinase Deficiency Patient-Specific Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Garate, Zita; Quintana-Bustamante, Oscar; Crane, Ana M.; Olivier, Emmanuel; Poirot, Laurent; Galetto, Roman; Kosinski, Penelope; Hill, Collin; Kung, Charles; Agirre, Xabi; Orman, Israel; Cerrato, Laura; Alberquilla, Omaira; Rodriguez-Fornes, Fatima; Fusaki, Noemi; Garcia-Sanchez, Felix; Maia, Tabita M.; Ribeiro, Maria L.; Sevilla, Julian; Prosper, Felipe; Jin, Shengfang; Mountford, Joanne; Guenechea, Guillermo; Gouble, Agnes; Bueren, Juan A.; Davis, Brian R.; Segovia, Jose C.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Pyruvate kinase deficiency (PKD) is a rare erythroid metabolic disease caused by mutations in the PKLR gene. Erythrocytes from PKD patients show an energetic imbalance causing chronic non-spherocytic hemolytic anemia, as pyruvate kinase defects impair ATP production in erythrocytes. We generated PKD induced pluripotent stem cells (PKDiPSCs) from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PB-MNCs) of PKD patients by non-integrative Sendai viral vectors. PKDiPSCs were gene edited to integrate a partial codon-optimized R-type pyruvate kinase cDNA in the second intron of the PKLR gene by TALEN-mediated homologous recombination (HR). Notably, we found allele specificity of HR led by the presence of a single-nucleotide polymorphism. High numbers of erythroid cells derived from gene-edited PKDiPSCs showed correction of the energetic imbalance, providing an approach to correct metabolic erythroid diseases and demonstrating the practicality of this approach to generate the large cell numbers required for comprehensive biochemical and metabolic erythroid analyses. PMID:26549847

  14. Association between Variants at BCL11A Erythroid-Specific Enhancer and Fetal Hemoglobin Levels among Sickle Cell Disease Patients in Cameroon: Implications for Future Therapeutic Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Pule, Gift Dineo; Ngo Bitoungui, Valentina Josiane; Chemegni, Bernard Chetcha; Kengne, Andre Pascal; Antonarakis, Stylianos

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Variants in BCL11A were previously associated with fetal hemoglobin (HbF) levels among Cameroonian sickle cell disease (SCD) patients, however explaining only ∼2% of the variance. In the same patients, we have investigated the relationship between HbF and two SNPs in a BCL11A erythroid-specific enhancer (N = 626). Minor allele frequencies in rs7606173 and rs1427407 were 0.42 and 0.24, respectively. Both variants were significantly associated with HbF levels (p = 3.11e-08 and p = 6.04e-06, respectively) and explained 8% and 6.2% variations, respectively. These data have confirmed a stronger effect on HbF of genomic variations at the BCL11A erythroid-specific enhancer among patients with SCD in Cameroon, the first report on a West African population. The relevance of these findings is of prime importance because the disruption of this enhancer would alter BCL11A expression in erythroid precursors and thus HbF expression, while sparing the induced functional challenges of any alterations on the expression of this transcription factor in non-erythroid lineages, thus providing an attractive approach for new treatment strategies of SCD. PMID:26393293

  15. Enhancement of erythroid colony growth by triiodothyronine in cell cultures from bone marrow of normal and anemic rats with chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Malgor, L A; Valsecia, M E; Verges, E G; de Markowsky, E E

    1995-01-01

    In order to make a contribution in clarifying the role of thyroid hormones on modulation of erythropoiesis and to gain a further insight on the effects of these hormones in the anemia of chronic renal failure (CRF), we studied the action of triiodo-1-thyronine (LT3) and DT3, a dextrorotary non-calorigenic isomer of T3 on late (CFU-E) and early (BFU-E) committed erythroid precursor cells from bone marrow of normal and anemic uremic rats. Cultures were prepared using the methylcellulose technique containing a standard dose (182 mU/ml) of erythropoietin (Ep), LT3 and DT3 in doses of 0.5 and 1.5 micrograms/ml. Thyroid hormones were added to cultures in the absence of Ep. Our results demonstrated that LT3 and DT3 produced a direct and significant stimulation of CFU-E formation and a moderate increase of BFU-E. A dose-correlation was apparent in cultures containing thyroid hormones. DT3 was somewhat less active than LT3. As expected, Ep also produced a significant increase in erythroid colony formation, mainly CFU-E. It is notheworthy that the effects of LT3, DT3 and Ep on erythroid colony growth were significantly higher in marrow cultures from anemic rats with CRF, indicating an increased proliferative cell kinetics of committed erythroid cells in response to these drugs.

  16. Spi-1/PU.1 but not Fli-1 inhibits erythroid-specific alternative splicing of 4.1R pre-mRNA in murine erythroleukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Théoleyre, Orianne; Deguillien, Mireille; Morinière, Madeleine; Starck, Joëlle; Moreau-Gachelin, Françoise; Morlé, François; Baklouti, Faouzi

    2004-01-29

    The inclusion of exon 16 in mature protein 4.1R mRNA arises from a stage-specific splicing event that occurs during late erythroid development. We have shown that mouse erythroleukemia (MEL) cells reproduce this erythroid-specific splicing event upon induction of differentiation. We here found that this splicing event is regulated specifically in erythroleukemic cells that have the potential to differentiate and produce hemoglobin, regardless of the nature of the differentiation inducer. Knowing that dysregulated expression of spi-1/pu.1 and fli-1 oncogenes is involved in MEL cell differentiation arrest, we looked at their effect on exon 16 erythroid splicing. We found that exon 16 inclusion requires Spi-1/PU.1 shutdown in MEL cells, and that enforced expression of Spi-1/PU.1 inhibits exon selection, regardless of the presence or absence of a chemical inducer. By contrast, endogenous overexpression or enforced expression of Fli-1 has no effect on exon selection. We further showed that Spi-1/PU.1 acts similarly on the endogenous and on a transfected exon 16, suggesting a promoter-independent effect of Spi-1/PU.1 on splicing regulation. This study provides the first evidence that Spi-1/PU.1 displays the unique property, not shared with Fli-1, to inhibit erythroid-specific pre-mRNA splicing in erythroleukemia cell context.

  17. In vitro generated Rh(null) red cells recapitulate the in vivo deficiency: a model for rare blood group phenotypes and erythroid membrane disorders.

    PubMed

    Cambot, Marie; Mazurier, Christelle; Canoui-Poitrine, Florence; Hebert, Nicolas; Picot, Julien; Clay, Denis; Picard, Véronique; Ripoche, Pierre; Douay, Luc; Dubart-Kupperschmitt, Anne; Cartron, Jean-Pierre

    2013-05-01

    Lentiviral modification combined with ex vivo erythroid differentiation was used to stably inhibit RhAG expression, a critical component of the Rh(rhesus) membrane complex defective in the Rh(null) syndrome. The cultured red cells generated recapitulate the major alterations of native Rh(null) cells regarding antigen expression, membrane deformability, and gas transport function, providing the proof of principle for their use as model of Rh(null) syndrome and to investigate Rh complex biogenesis in human primary erythroid cells. Using this model, we were able to reveal for the first time that RhAG extinction alone is sufficient to explain ICAM-4 and CD47 loss observed on native Rh(null) RBCs. Together with the effects of RhAG forced expression in Rh(null) progenitors, this strongly strengthens the hypothesis that RhAG is critical to Rh complex formation. The strategy is also promising for diagnosis purpose in order to overcome the supply from rare blood donors and is applicable to other erythroid defects and rare phenotypes, providing models to dissect membrane biogenesis of multicomplex proteins in erythroid cells, with potential clinical applications in transfusion medicine.

  18. The road to sustainability

    SciTech Connect

    Sarrao, John L; Crabtree, George

    2009-01-01

    Sustainability is the hottest topic in energy research today, but what does it actually mean? George Crabtree and John Sarrao describe what makes a technology sustainable, and outline the materials-science challenges standing between us and clean, long-lasting energy. Although most people agree that more-sustainable energy technologies are desirable, they often find it harder to agree on exactly how sustainable these technologies need to be, and even precisely what is meant by sustainability. To clarify the debate, we suggest three criteria for sustainability, each of which captures a different feature of the problem. While we do not have the lUxury of achieving full sustainability for all of our next-generation energy technologies, we can use these definitions to select our strategic sustainability targets and track our progress toward achieving them. As will become clear, the most sustainable energy technologies require the most challenging fundamental science breakthroughs. The first criterion for sustainability is 'lasts a long time'. This quality has been a feature of many energy sources we have used historically, including wood in ancient times and oil throughout most of the 20th century. The definition of 'long time' is, of course, relative: the world's demand for energy long ago outpaced the ability of wood to supply it, and the production of oil is likely to peak sometime within the next few decades. Substantial reductions in the rate of oil consumption through higher-efficiency processes can significantly impact on how long non-renewable resources last. In applying the 'long time' criterion, we need to distinguish between energy sources that are effectively limitless and those that are finite but, for the moment, adequate. The second criterion for sustainability is 'does no harm'. Burning fossil fuels releases pollutants such as sulphur and mercury that endanger human health, as well as greenhouse gases like carbon dioxide that threaten climate stability

  19. Y-12 Site Sustainability Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, Charles G

    2012-12-01

    The accomplishments to date and the long-range planning of the Y-12 Energy Management and Sustainability and Stewardship programs support the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) vision for a commitment to energy effi ciency and sustainability and to achievement of the Guiding Principles. Specifi cally, the Y-12 vision is to support the Environment, Safety and Health Policy and the DOE Strategic Sustainability Performance Plan, while promoting overall sustainability and reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. The mission of the Y-12 Energy Management program is to incorporate energy-effi cient technologies site-wide and to position Y-12 to meet NNSA energy requirement needs through 2025 and beyond. The plan addresses greenhouse gases, buildings, fleet management, water use, pollution prevention, waste reduction, sustainable acquisition, electronic stewardship and data centers, site innovation and government-wide support.

  20. Achieving Energy Efficiency Through Real-Time Feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Nesse, Ronald J.

    2011-09-01

    Through the careful implementation of simple behavior change measures, opportunities exist to achieve strategic gains, including greater operational efficiencies, energy cost savings, greater tenant health and ensuing productivity and an improved brand value through sustainability messaging and achievement.

  1. Is Sustainability Possible? A Review and Commentary on Empirical Studies of Program Sustainability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheirer, Mary Ann

    2005-01-01

    An important final step in the life cycles of programs and their evaluation involves assessing new programs' or innovations' sustainability. This review and synthesis of 19 empirical studies of the sustainability of American and Canadian health-related programs examines the extent of sustainability achieved and summarizes factors contributing to…

  2. Antioxidants for Healthy Skin: The Emerging Role of Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptors and Nuclear Factor-Erythroid 2-Related Factor-2

    PubMed Central

    Furue, Masutaka; Uchi, Hiroshi; Mitoma, Chikage; Hashimoto-Hachiya, Akiko; Chiba, Takahito; Ito, Takamichi; Nakahara, Takeshi; Tsuji, Gaku

    2017-01-01

    Skin is the outermost part of the body and is, thus, inevitably exposed to UV rays and environmental pollutants. Oxidative stress by these hazardous factors accelerates skin aging and induces skin inflammation and carcinogenesis. Aryl hydrocarbon receptors (AHRs) are chemical sensors that are abundantly expressed in epidermal keratinocytes and mediate the production of reactive oxygen species. To neutralize or minimize oxidative stress, the keratinocytes also express nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor-2 (NRF2), which is a master switch for antioxidant signaling. Notably, there is fine-tuned crosstalk between AHR and NRF2, which mutually increase or decrease their activation states. Many NRF2-mediated antioxidant phytochemicals are capable of up- and downmodulating AHR signaling. The precise mechanisms by which these phytochemicals differentially affect the AHR and NRF2 system remain largely unknown and warrant future investigation. PMID:28273792

  3. Defective erythroid differentiation in miR-451 mutant mice mediated by 14-3-3ζ

    PubMed Central

    Patrick, David M.; Zhang, Cheng C.; Tao, Ye; Yao, Huiyu; Qi, Xiaoxia; Schwartz, Robert J.; Jun-Shen Huang, Lily; Olson, Eric N.

    2010-01-01

    Erythrocyte formation occurs throughout life in response to cytokine signaling. We show that microRNA-451 (miR-451) regulates erythropoiesis in vivo. Mice lacking miR-451 display a reduction in hematrocrit, an erythroid differentiation defect, and ineffective erythropoiesis in response to oxidative stress. 14-3-3ζ, an intracellular regulator of cytokine signaling that is repressed by miR-451, is up-regulated in miR-451−/− erythroblasts, and inhibition of 14-3-3ζ rescues their differentiation defect. These findings reveal an essential role of 14-3-3ζ as a mediator of the proerythroid differentiation actions of miR-451, and highlight the therapeutic potential of miR-451 inhibitors. PMID:20679397

  4. Antioxidants for Healthy Skin: The Emerging Role of Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptors and Nuclear Factor-Erythroid 2-Related Factor-2.

    PubMed

    Furue, Masutaka; Uchi, Hiroshi; Mitoma, Chikage; Hashimoto-Hachiya, Akiko; Chiba, Takahito; Ito, Takamichi; Nakahara, Takeshi; Tsuji, Gaku

    2017-03-03

    Skin is the outermost part of the body and is, thus, inevitably exposed to UV rays and environmental pollutants. Oxidative stress by these hazardous factors accelerates skin aging and induces skin inflammation and carcinogenesis. Aryl hydrocarbon receptors (AHRs) are chemical sensors that are abundantly expressed in epidermal keratinocytes and mediate the production of reactive oxygen species. To neutralize or minimize oxidative stress, the keratinocytes also express nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor-2 (NRF2), which is a master switch for antioxidant signaling. Notably, there is fine-tuned crosstalk between AHR and NRF2, which mutually increase or decrease their activation states. Many NRF2-mediated antioxidant phytochemicals are capable of up- and downmodulating AHR signaling. The precise mechanisms by which these phytochemicals differentially affect the AHR and NRF2 system remain largely unknown and warrant future investigation.

  5. Integrating sustainability and health care.

    PubMed

    Podein, Rian J; Hernke, Michael T

    2010-03-01

    Unsustainable development around the world has contributed to ecological degradation and human suffering while compromising the ability of ecosystems and social institutions to support human life. The United States health care system and its institutions are significant contributors to unsustainable development, but leaders of change are emerging from the health care arena. Health professionals, including primary care providers, are poised to serve as models for sustainability and to facilitate the necessary transformation toward more sustainable practices. Health professionals must, within a practical framework, embrace an objective definition of sustainability and then act to achieve it.

  6. Growth factor independence 1b (gfi1b) is important for the maturation of erythroid cells and the regulation of embryonic globin expression.

    PubMed

    Vassen, Lothar; Beauchemin, Hugues; Lemsaddek, Wafaa; Krongold, Joseph; Trudel, Marie; Möröy, Tarik

    2014-01-01

    Growth factor independence 1b (GFI1B) is a DNA binding repressor of transcription with vital functions in hematopoiesis. Gfi1b-null embryos die at midgestation very likely due to defects in erythro- and megakaryopoiesis. To analyze the full functionality of Gfi1b, we used conditionally deficient mice that harbor floxed Gfi1b alleles and inducible (Mx-Cre, Cre-ERT) or erythroid specific (EpoR-Cre) Cre expressing transgenes. In contrast to the germline knockout, EpoR-Cre mediated erythroid specific ablation of Gfi1b allows full gestation, but causes perinatal lethality with very few mice surviving to adulthood. Both the embryonic deletion of Gfi1b by EpoR-Cre and the deletion in adult mice by Mx-Cre or Cre-ERT leads to reduced numbers of erythroid precursors, perturbed and delayed erythroid maturation, anemia and extramedullary erythropoiesis. Global expression analyses showed that the Hba-x, Hbb-bh1 and Hbb-y embryonic globin genes were upregulated in Gfi1b deficient TER119+ fetal liver cells over the gestation period from day 12.5-17.5 p.c. and an increased level of Hbb-bh1 and Hbb-y embryonic globin gene expression was even maintained in adult Gfi1b deficient mice. While the expression of Bcl11a, a regulator of embryonic globin expression was not affected by Gfi1b deficiency, the expression of Gata1 was reduced and the expression of Sox6, also involved in globin switch, was almost entirely lost when Gfi1b was absent. These findings establish Gfi1b as a regulator of embryonic globin expression and embryonic and adult erythroid maturation.

  7. JAK2 V617F stimulates proliferation of erythropoietin-dependent erythroid progenitors and delays their differentiation by activating Stat1 and other nonerythroid signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jiahai; Yuan, Bingbing; Hu, Wenqian; Lodish, Harvey

    2016-11-01

    JAK2 V617F is a mutant-activated JAK2 kinase found in most polycythemia vera (PV) patients; it skews normal proliferation and differentiation of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells and simulates aberrant expansion of erythroid progenitors. JAK2 V617F is known to activate some signaling pathways not normally activated in mature erythroblasts, but there has been no systematic study of signal transduction pathways or gene expression in erythroid cells expressing JAK2 V617F undergoing erythropoietin (Epo)-dependent terminal differentiation. Here we report that expression of JAK2 V617F in murine fetal liver Epo-dependent progenitors allows them to divide approximately six rather than the normal approximately four times in the presence of Epo, delaying their exit from the cell cycle. Over time, the number of red cells formed from each Epo-dependent progenitor increases fourfold, and these cells eventually differentiate into normal enucleated reticulocytes. We report that purified fetal liver Epo-dependent progenitors express many cytokine receptors additional to the EpoR. Expression of JAK2 V617F triggers activation of Stat5, the only STAT normally activated by Epo, as well as activation of Stat1 and Stat3. Expression of JAK2 V617F also leads to transient induction of many genes not normally activated in terminally differentiating erythroid cells and that are characteristic of other hematopoietic lineages. Inhibition of Stat1 activation blocks JAK2 V617F hyperproliferation of erythroid progenitors, and we conclude that Stat1-mediated activation of nonerythroid signaling pathways delays terminal erythroid differentiation and permits extended cell divisions.

  8. Human Erythroid 5-Aminolevulinate Synthase Mutations Associated with X-Linked Protoporphyria Disrupt Conformational Equilibrium and Enhance Product Release†

    PubMed Central

    Fratz, Erica J.; Clayton, Jerome; Hunter, Gregory A.; Ducamp, Sarah; Breydo, Leonid; Uversky, Vladimir N.; Deybach, Jean-Charles; Gouya, Laurent; Puy, Hervé; Ferreira, Gloria C.

    2015-01-01

    Regulation of 5-aminolevulinate synthase (ALAS) is at the origin of balanced heme production in mammals. Mutations in the C-terminal region of human erythroid-specific ALAS (hALAS2) are associated with X-linked protoporphyria (XLPP), a disease characterized by extreme photosensitivity, with elevated blood concentrations of free protoporphyrin IX and zinc protoporphyrin. To investigate the molecular basis for this disease, recombinant hALAS2 and variants of the enzyme harboring the gain-of-function XLPP mutations were constructed, purified, and analyzed kinetically, spectroscopically and thermodynamically. Enhanced activities of the XLPP variants resulted from accelerations in the rate at which the product 5-aminolevulinate (ALA) was released from the enzyme. Circular dichroism spectroscopy revealed that the XLPP mutations altered the microenvironment of the pyridoxal 5’-phosphate cofactor, which underwent further and specific alterations upon succinyl-CoA binding. Transient kinetic analyses of the variant-catalyzed reactions and protein fluorescence quenching upon ALA binding to the XLPP variants demonstrated that the protein conformational transition step associated with product release was predominantly affected. Of relevance, XLPP could also be modeled in cell culture. We propose that 1) the XLPP mutations destabilize the succinyl-CoA-induced hALAS2 closed conformation and thus accelerate ALA release, 2) the extended C-terminus of wild-type mammalian ALAS2 provides a regulatory role that allows for allosteric modulation of activity, thereby controlling the rate of erythroid heme biosynthesis, and 3) this control is disrupted in XLPP, resulting in porphyrin accumulation. PMID:26300302

  9. Cloning, expression, and characterization of a novel guanylate-binding protein, GBP3 in murine erythroid progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Han, B H; Park, D J; Lim, R W; Im, J H; Kim, H D

    1998-05-19

    We report the molecular cloning of a novel guanylate-binding protein (GBP), termed mouse GBP3 (mGBP3) in Friend virus-induced mouse erythroid progenitor (FVA) cells. The 71-kDa mGBP3 belongs to a family of known GBPs that contain the first two consensus motifs, GXXXXGK(S/T) and DXXG, but lack the third element, (N/T)KXD, found in typical GTP-binding proteins. Recombinant mGBP3 protein, expressed using a baculovirus expression system, binds to agarose-immobilized guanine nucleotides (GTP, GDP and GMP). Moreover, mGBP3 has been found to have an intrinsic GTPase activity with K(m) and Vmax values of 77 +/- 4 microM and 21 +/- 0.5 pmol min-1 microgram-1 of protein, respectively. The mGBP3 is distinct from the other GBPs, in that it does not have an isoprenylation/methylation motif CAAX at the carboxyl terminus. The mGBP3 appears to be localized in the cytosol based on immunofluorescence staining. Although the mGBP3 transcript is expressed to a varying degree in numerous mouse tissues, the message is most abundant in FVA cells. The mGBP3 transcript increases in FVA cells undergoing differentiation to a maximum within a few hours and then decreases to an undetectable level by 24 h. These results, taken together, suggest that mGBP3 is a novel member of a family of guanylate-binding proteins, which plays a role in the erythroid differentiation. The nucleotide sequence reported in this paper has been submitted to the GenBank with accession number U44731.

  10. Complete genomic organization of the human erythroid p55 gene (MPP1), a membrane-associated guanylate kinase homologue

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, A.C.; Metzenberg, A.B.; Sahr, K.E.

    1996-01-15

    Human p55 is an abundantly palmitoylated phosphoprotein of the erythroid membrane. It is the prototype of a newly discovered family of membrane-associated proteins termed MAGUKs (membrane-associated guanylate kinase homologues). The MAGUKs interact with the cytoskeleton and regulate cell proliferation, signaling pathways, and intercellular junctions. Here, we report the complete intron-exon map of the human erythroid p55 gene (HGMW-approved symbol MPP1). The structure of the p55 gene was determined from cosmid clones isolated from a cosmid library specific for the human X chromosome. There is a single copy of the p55 gene, composed of 12 exons and spanning approximately 28 kb in the q28 region of the human X chromosome. The exon sizes range from 69 (exon 5) to 203 bp (intron 2) to {approximately}14 kb (intron 1). The intron-exon boundaries conform to the donor/acceptor consensus sequence, GT-AG, for splice junctions. Several of the exon boundaries correspond to the boundaries of functional domains in the p55 protein. These domains include a SH3 motif and a region that binds to cytoskeletal protein 4.1. In addition, a comparison of the genomic and the primary structures of p55 reveals a highly conserved phosphotyrosine domain located between the protein 4.1 binding domain and the guanylate kinase domain. Finally, promoter activity measurements of the region immediately upstream of the p55 gene, which contains several cis-elements commonly found in housekeeping genes, suggest that a CpG island may be associated with the p55 gene expression in vivo. 42 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  11. H-Ferritin Is Preferentially Incorporated by Human Erythroid Cells through Transferrin Receptor 1 in a Threshold-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Soichiro; Kawabata, Hiroshi; Masuda, Taro; Uchiyama, Tatsuki; Mizumoto, Chisaki; Ohmori, Katsuyuki; Koeffler, H. Phillip; Kadowaki, Norimitsu; Takaori-Kondo, Akifumi

    2015-01-01

    Ferritin is an iron-storage protein composed of different ratios of 24 light (L) and heavy (H) subunits. The serum level of ferritin is a clinical marker of the body’s iron level. Transferrin receptor (TFR)1 is the receptor not only for transferrin but also for H-ferritin, but how it binds two different ligands and the blood cell types that preferentially incorporate H-ferritin remain unknown. To address these questions, we investigated hematopoietic cell-specific ferritin uptake by flow cytometry. Alexa Fluor 488-labeled H-ferritin was preferentially incorporated by erythroid cells among various hematopoietic cell lines examined, and was almost exclusively incorporated by bone marrow erythroblasts among human primary hematopoietic cells of various lineages. H-ferritin uptake by erythroid cells was strongly inhibited by unlabeled H-ferritin but was only partially inhibited by a large excess of holo-transferrin. On the other hand, internalization of labeled holo-transferrin by these cells was not inhibited by H-ferritin. Chinese hamster ovary cells lacking functional endogenous TFR1 but expressing human TFR1 with a mutated RGD sequence, which is required for transferrin binding, efficiently incorporated H-ferritin, indicating that TFR1 has distinct binding sites for H-ferritin and holo-transferrin. H-ferritin uptake by these cells required a threshold level of cell surface TFR1 expression, whereas there was no threshold for holo-transferrin uptake. The requirement for a threshold level of TFR1 expression can explain why among primary human hematopoietic cells, only erythroblasts efficiently take up H-ferritin. PMID:26441243

  12. Teaching Sustainability/Teaching Sustainably

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartels, Kirsten Allen, Ed.; Parker, Kelly A., Ed.

    2011-01-01

    Over the coming decades, every academic discipline will have to respond to the paradigm of more sustainable life practices because students will be living in a world challenged by competition for resources and climate change, and will demand that every academic discipline demonstrate substantial and corresponding relevance. This book takes as its…

  13. A Longitudinal Study of School Districts' Sustained Improvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sampson, Pauline M.

    2011-01-01

    In this longitudinal study of one region in the state of Texas, there was an examination of district leadership and the sustaining of high student achievement for their districts. The results of this study suggest that sustained improvement of student achievement is very difficult. The districts that had sustained improvement had stable district…

  14. GIS-mapping of environmental assessment of the territories in the region of intense activity for the oil and gas complex for achievement the goals of the Sustainable Development (on the example of Russia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yermolaev, Oleg

    2014-05-01

    The uniform system of complex scientific-reference ecological-geographical should act as a base for the maintenance of the Sustainable Development (SD) concept in the territories of the Russian Federation subjects or certain regions. In this case, the assessment of the ecological situation in the regions can be solved by the conjugation of the two interrelated system - the mapping and the geoinformational. The report discusses the methodological aspects of the Atlas-mapping for the purposes of SD in the regions of Russia. The Republic of Tatarstan viewed as a model territory where a large-scale oil-gas complex "Tatneft" PLC works. The company functions for more than 60 years. Oil fields occupy an area of more than 38 000 km2; placed in its territory about 40 000 oil wells, more than 55 000 km of pipelines; more than 3 billion tons of oil was extracted. Methods for to the structure and requirements for the Atlas's content were outlined. The approaches to mapping of "an ecological dominant" of SD conceptually substantiated following the pattern of a large region of Russia. Several trends of thematically mapping were suggested to be distinguished in the Atlas's structure: • The background history of oil-fields mine working; • The nature preservation technologies while oil extracting; • The assessment of natural conditions of a humans vital activity; • Unfavorable and dangerous natural processes and phenomena; • The anthropogenic effect and environmental surroundings change; • The social-economical processes and phenomena. • The medical-ecological and geochemical processes and phenomena; Within these groups the other numerous groups can distinguished. The maps of unfavorable and dangerous processes and phenomena subdivided in accordance with the types of processes - of endogenous and exogenous origin. Among the maps of the anthropogenic effects on the natural surroundings one can differentiate the maps of the influence on different nature's spheres

  15. Sustainable NREL

    SciTech Connect

    2011-01-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory prides itself on not only advancing the renewable energy, but "walking the talk" when it comes to sustainable practices. "When you look at our laboratories, you will see energy efficiency in action, but you'll also see renewable energy. We walk the walk and we talk the talk. We believe in it and we want to live it also."

  16. Sustainable NREL

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory prides itself on not only advancing the renewable energy, but "walking the talk" when it comes to sustainable practices. "When you look at our laboratories, you will see energy efficiency in action, but you'll also see renewable energy. We walk the walk and we talk the talk. We believe in it and we want to live it also."

  17. Y-12 Site Sustainability Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Sherry, T D; Kohlhorst, D P; Little, S K

    2011-12-01

    The accomplishments to date and the long-range planning of the Y-12 Energy Management and Sustainability and Stewardship programs support the DOE and the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) vision for a commitment to energy efficiency and sustainability and to achievement of the Guiding Principles. Specifically, the Y-12 vision is to support the Environment, Safety and Health Policy and the DOE Strategic Sustainability Performance Plan (SSPP) while promoting overall sustainability and reduction of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Table ES.2 gives a comprehensive overview of Y-12's performance status and planned actions. B&W Y-12's Energy Management mission is to incorporate renewable energy and energy efficient technologies site-wide and to position Y-12 to meet NNSA energy requirement needs through 2025 and beyond. During FY 2011, the site formed a sustainability team (Fig. ES.1). The sustainability team provides a coordinated approach to meeting the various sustainability requirements and serves as a forum for increased communication and consistent implementation of sustainability activities at Y-12. The sustainability team serves as an information exchange mechanism to promote general awareness of sustainability information, while providing a system to document progress and to identify resources. These resources are necessary to implement activities that support the overall goals of sustainability, including reducing the use of resources and conserving energy. Additionally, the team's objectives include: (1) Foster a Y-12-wide philosophy to conserve resources; (2) Reduce the impacts of production operations in a cost-effective manner; (3) Increase materials recycling; (4) Use a minimum amount of energy and fuel; (5) Create a minimum of waste and pollution in achieving Y-12-strategic objectives; (6) Develop and implement techniques, technologies, process modifications, and programs that support sustainable acquisition; (7) Minimize the impacts to

  18. Childhood vaccination: achievements and challenges.

    PubMed

    Ndumbe, P

    1996-09-01

    As the goal of eradicating smallpox was being met, the World Health Organization created its Expanded Programme on Immunisation (EPI) in 1974 and reached its initial goal of achieving full vaccination of 80% of the world's children by 1990. This effort was aided by the creation of "cold chain" delivery systems and resulted in the annual saving of 3.5 million children in less-developed countries. Current EPI vaccination goals include 1) eradication of poliomyelitis by the year 2000, 2) elimination of neonatal tetanus by the year 1995, 3) control of measles and hepatitis B, and 4) immunization of 90% of the world's children 1 year or younger by the year 2000. Goals of the Children's Vaccine Initiative (formed in 1991) include 1) provision of an adequate supply of affordable, safe, and effective vaccines; 2) production of improved and new vaccines; and 3) simplification of the logistics of vaccine delivery. Future challenges are to sustain high vaccination coverage, reach the unreached, achieve proper storage of vaccines and reduce waste, integrate new vaccines into national programs, and achieve vaccine self-sufficiency. The fact that these challenges will be difficult to achieve is illustrated by the situation in Africa where the high immunization levels achieved in 1990 have dropped dramatically. Those who must act to implement immunization programs are health personnel, families, governments, and development partners. In order to achieve equity in health, every child must be reached, governments must be made accountable for programs, health workers must convince families of the importance of vaccination, delivery systems must be in place to take advantage of the new vaccines being delivered, and a multisectoral approach must be taken to assure sustainability.

  19. How Sustainable Freight Creates a More Efficient Supply Chain

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This EPA presentation focuses on the challenges in achieving sustainable freight transport in the supply chain, spotlighting Mondelez International and C.H. Robinson, their sustainability efforts, and how SmartWay helps.

  20. Graded Achievement, Tested Achievement, and Validity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brookhart, Susan M.

    2015-01-01

    Twenty-eight studies of grades, over a century, were reviewed using the argument-based approach to validity suggested by Kane as a theoretical framework. The review draws conclusions about the meaning of graded achievement, its relation to tested achievement, and changes in the construct of graded achievement over time. "Graded…

  1. cAMP and in vivo hypoxia induce tob, ifr1, and fos expression in erythroid cells of the chick embryo.

    PubMed

    Dragon, Stefanie; Offenhäuser, Nina; Baumann, Rosemarie

    2002-04-01

    During avian embryonic development, terminal erythroid differentiation occurs in the circulation. Some of the key events, such as the induction of erythroid 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate (2,3-BPG), carbonic anhydrase (CAII), and pyrimidine 5'-nucleotidase (P5N) synthesis are oxygen dependent (Baumann R, Haller EA, Schöning U, and Weber M, Dev Biol 116: 548-551, 1986; Dragon S and Baumann R, Am J Physiol Regulatory Integrative Comp Physiol 280: R870-R878, 2001; Dragon S, Carey C, Martin K, and Baumann R, J Exp Biol 202: 2787-2795, 1999; Dragon S, Glombitza S, Götz R, and Baumann R, Am J Physiol Regulatory Integrative Comp Physiol 271: R982-R989, 1996; Dragon S, Hille R, Götz R, and Baumann R, Blood 91: 3052-3058, 1998; Million D, Zillner P, and Baumann R, Am J Physiol Regulatory Integrative Comp Physiol 261: R1188-R1196, 1991) in an indirect way: hypoxia stimulates the release of norepinephrine (NE)/adenosine into the circulation (Dragon et al., J Exp Biol 202: 2787-2795, 1999; Dragon et al., Am J Physiol Regulatory Integrative Comp Physiol 271: R982-R989, 1996). This leads via erythroid beta-adrenergic/adenosine A(2) receptor activation to a cAMP signal inducing several proteins in a transcription-dependent manner (Dragon et al., Am J Physiol Regulatory Integrative Comp Physiol 271: R982-R989, 1996; Dragon et al., Blood 91: 3052-3058, 1998; Glombitza S, Dragon S, Berghammer M, Pannermayr M, and Baumann R, Am J Physiol Regulatory Integrative Comp Physiol 271: R973-R981, 1996). To understand how the cAMP-dependent processes are initiated, we screened an erythroid cDNA library for cAMP-regulated genes. We detected three genes that were strongly upregulated (>5-fold) by cAMP in definitive and primitive red blood cells. They are homologous to the mammalian Tob, Ifr1, and Fos proteins. In addition, the genes are induced in the intact embryo during short-term hypoxia. Because the genes are regulators of proliferation and differentiation in other cell types, we suggest that c

  2. Institute for Sustainable Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Agrawal, Ajay

    2016-03-28

    Alternate fuels offer unique challenges and opportunities as energy source for power generation, vehicular transportation, and industrial applications. Institute for Sustainable Energy (ISE) at UA conducts innovative research to utilize the complex mix of domestically-produced alternate fuels to achieve low-emissions, high energy-efficiency, and fuel-flexibility. ISE also provides educational and advancement opportunities to students and researchers in the energy field. Basic research probing the physics and chemistry of alternative fuels has generated practical concepts investigated in a burner and engine test platforms.

  3. Annual Sustainability Report FY2015

    SciTech Connect

    2016-08-01

    NREL's Sustainability Program is responsible for upholding all executive orders, federal regulations, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) orders, and goals related to sustainable and resilient facility operations. But NREL continues to expand sustainable practices above and beyond the laboratory's regulations and requirements to ensure that the laboratory fulfills its mission into the future, leaves the smallest possible legacy footprint, and models sustainable operations and behaviors on national, regional, and local levels. The report, per the GRI reporting format, elaborates on multi-year goals relative to executive orders, achievements, and challenges; and success stories provide specific examples. A section called 'NREL's Resiliency is Taking Many Forms' provides insight into how NREL is drawing on its deep knowledge of renewable energy and energy efficiency to help mitigate or avoid climate change impacts.

  4. Lesson Learned in Sustainable Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowdeswell, Elizabeth

    1998-01-01

    The emerging global society must stress environmental and social cooperation as much as economic competition. Five elements are necessary for the emergence of empowered communities and civil society. Achieving sustainable development requires changing the way we think and act, and education is essential for that. Individuals and nongovernmental…

  5. Understanding Students' Conceptions of Sustainability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walshe, Nicola

    2008-01-01

    There has recently been significant emphasis placed on environmental education through, for example, the UN's Decade of Education for Sustainable Development. Despite this, there is still considerable debate within the literature as to how the aims of environmental education can be achieved within schools. It seems likely that if there is a lack…

  6. Biogenesis of the avian erythroid membrane skeleton: receptor-mediated assembly and stabilization of ankyrin (goblin) and spectrin.

    PubMed

    Moon, R T; Lazarides, E

    1984-05-01

    Ankyrin is an extrinsic membrane protein in human erythrocytes that links the alpha beta-spectrin-based extrinsic membrane skeleton to the membrane by binding simultaneously to the beta-spectrin subunit and to the transmembrane anion transporter. To analyse the temporal and spatial regulation of assembly of this membrane skeleton, we investigated the kinetics of synthesis and assembly of ankyrin ( goblin ) with respect to those of spectrin in chicken embryo erythroid cells. Electrophoretic analysis of Triton X-100 soluble and cytoskeletal fractions show that at steady state both ankyrin and spectrin are detected exclusively in the cytoskeleton. In contrast, continuous labeling of erythroid cells with [35S]methionine, and immunoprecipitation of ankyrin and alpha- and beta-spectrin, reveals that newly synthesized ankyrin and spectrin are partitioned into both the cytoskeletal and Triton X-100 soluble fractions. The soluble pools of ankyrin and beta-spectrin reach a plateau of labeling within 1 h, whereas the soluble pool of alpha-spectrin is substantially larger and reaches a plateau more slowly, reflecting an approximately 3:1 ratio of synthesis of alpha- to beta-spectrin. Ankyrin and beta-spectrin enter the cytoskeletal fraction within 10 min of labeling, and the amount assembled into the cytoskeletal fraction exceeds the amount present in their respective soluble pools within 1 h of labeling. Although alpha-spectrin enters the cytoskeletal fraction with similar kinetics to beta-spectrin and ankyrin, and in amounts equimolar to beta-spectrin, the amount of cytoskeletal alpha-spectrin does not exceed the amount of soluble alpha-spectrin even after 3 h of labeling. Pulse-chase labeling experiments reveal that ankyrin and alpha- and beta-spectrin assembled into the cytoskeleton exhibit no detectable turnover, whereas the Triton X-100 soluble polypeptides are rapidly catabolized, suggesting that stable assembly of the three polypeptides is dependent upon their

  7. Materials for Sustainable Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crabtree, George

    2009-03-01

    The global dependence on fossil fuels for energy is among the greatest challenges facing our economic, social and political future. The uncertainty in the cost and supply of oil threatens the global economy and energy security, the pollution of fossil combustion threatens human health, and the emission of greenhouse gases threatens global climate. Meeting the demand for double the current global energy use in the next 50 years without damaging our economy, security, environment or climate requires finding alternative sources of energy that are clean, abundant, accessible and sustainable. The transition to greater sustainability involves tapping unused energy flows such as sunlight and wind, producing electricity without carbon emissions from clean coal and high efficiency nuclear power plants, and using energy more efficiently in solid-state lighting, fuel cells and transportation based on plug-in hybrid and electric cars. Achieving these goals requires creating materials of increasing complexity and functionality to control the transformation of energy between light, electrons and chemical bonds. Challenges and opportunities for developing the complex materials and controlling the chemical changes that enable greater sustainability will be presented.

  8. Day one sustainability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orr, John; Ibell, Timothy; Evernden, Mark; Darby, Antony

    2015-05-01

    Emissions reductions targets for the UK set out in the Climate Change Act for the period to 2050 will only be achieved with significant changes to the built environment, which is currently estimated to account for 50% of the UK's carbon emissions. The socio-technological nature of Civil Engineering means that this field is uniquely placed to lead the UK through such adaptations. This paper discusses the importance of interdisciplinary teaching to produce multi-faceted team approaches to sustainable design solutions. Methods for measuring success in education are often not fit for purpose, producing good students but poor engineers. Real-world failures to apply sustainable design present a serious, difficult to detect, and ultimately economically negative situation. Techniques to replace summative examinations are presented and discussed, with the aim of enhancing core technical skills alongside those required for sustainable design. Finally, the role of our future engineers in policy-making is discussed. In addition to carbon, the provision of water and food will heavily influence the work of civil engineers in the coming decades. Leadership from civil engineers with the technical knowledge and social awareness to tackle these issues will be required. This provides both opportunities and challenges for engineering education in the UK.

  9. Online PBL: A Route to Sustainability Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomkinson, Bland; Hutt, Ian

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate online problem-based learning (PBL) as a route to achieving sustainability education using sponsored projects. Design/methodology/approach: The Royal Academy of Engineering sponsored project at Manchester; to foster education in sustainability through inter-disciplinary problem-based approaches,…

  10. Sustainable water management practices and remote sensing.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency’s charge to protect human health and the environment requires a long-term commitment to creating sustainable solutions to environmental problems. The most direct way to ensure that management practices are achieving sustainability...

  11. Sustainability Science Needs Sustainable Data!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downs, R. R.; Chen, R. S.

    2013-12-01

    Sustainability science (SS) is an 'emerging field of research dealing with the interactions between natural and social systems, and with how those interactions affect the challenge of sustainability: meeting the needs of present and future generations while substantially reducing poverty and conserving the planet's life support systems' (Kates, 2011; Clark, 2007). Bettencourt & Kaur (2011) identified more than 20,000 scientific papers published on SS topics since the 1980s with more than 35,000 distinct authors. They estimated that the field is currently growing exponentially, with the number of authors doubling approximately every 8 years. These scholars are undoubtedly using and generating a vast quantity and variety of data and information for both SS research and applications. Unfortunately we know little about what data the SS community is actually using, and whether or not the data that SS scholars generate are being preserved for future use. Moreover, since much SS research is conducted by cross-disciplinary, multi-institutional teams, often scattered around the world, there could well be increased risks of data loss, reduced data quality, inadequate documentation, and poor long-term access and usability. Capabilities and processes therefore need to be established today to support continual, reliable, and efficient preservation of and access to SS data in the future, especially so that they can be reused in conjunction with future data and for new studies not conceived in the original data collection activities. Today's long-term data stewardship challenges include establishing sustainable data governance to facilitate continuing management, selecting data to ensure that limited resources are focused on high priority SS data holdings, securing sufficient rights to allow unforeseen uses, and preparing data to enable use by future communities whose specific research and information needs are not yet known. Adopting sustainable models for archival

  12. Hydrogen Sulfide Levels and Nuclear Factor-Erythroid 2-Related Factor 2 (NRF2) Activity Are Attenuated in the Setting of Critical Limb Ischemia (CLI)

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Kazi N; Polhemus, David J; Donnarumma, Erminia; Brewster, Luke P; Lefer, David J

    2015-01-01

    Background Cystathionine γ-lyase, cystathionine β-synthase, and 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase are endogenous enzymatic sources of hydrogen sulfide (H2S). Functions of H2S are mediated by several targets including ion channels and signaling proteins. Nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 is responsible for the expression of antioxidant response element–regulated genes and is known to be upregulated by H2S. We examined the levels of H2S, H2S-producing enzymes, and nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 activation status in skeletal muscle obtained from critical limb ischemia (CLI) patients. Methods and Results Gastrocnemius tissues were attained postamputation from human CLI and healthy control patients. We found mRNA and protein levels of cystathionine γ-lyase, cystathionine β-synthase, and 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase were significantly decreased in skeletal muscle of CLI patients as compared to control. H2S and sulfane sulfur levels were significantly decreased in skeletal muscle of CLI patients. We also observed significant reductions in nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 activation as well as antioxidant proteins, such as Cu, Zn-superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase in skeletal muscle of CLI patients. Biomarkers of oxidative stress, such as malondialdehyde and protein carbonyl formation, were significantly increased in skeletal muscle of CLI patients as compared to healthy controls. Conclusions The data demonstrate that H2S bioavailability and nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 activation are both attenuated in CLI tissues concomitant with significantly increased oxidative stress. Reductions in the activity of H2S-producing enzymes may contribute to the pathogenesis of CLI. PMID:25977470

  13. When diagnostics meets translational research: detection of hemoglobin fractions in cellular lysates from in vitro erythroid cultures by Capillarys 2 Flex Piercing analyzer (Sebia).

    PubMed

    Aprile, Annamaria; Passerini, Gabriella; Cappellini, Maria Domenica; Marktel, Sarah; Ciceri, Fabio; Ferrari, Giuliana; Ceriotti, Ferruccio

    2016-03-01

    Detection of hemoglobin (Hb) variants represents an important issue for diagnosis and adequate treatment of hemoglobinopathies. The Capillarys 2 Flex Piercing analyzer (Capillarys) by Sebia is routinely used in our clinical laboratories to detect Hb variants in peripheral blood (PB). This automated method separates Hb fractions by capillary electrophoresis, giving a spectrophotometric measure of their relative proportion. The scientific research in the field of hemoglobinopathies needs robust procedures to evaluate the efficacy of experimental therapies, as gene therapy. We investigated for the first time the feasibility to use Capillarys on cellular lysates from in vitro erythroid cultures. Because total Hb concentration in erythroid lysates is up to 20-fold lower than in hemolysates from PB, we analyzed diluted blood samples, thanks to the manual mode included in the Capillarys setting. We compared analytical precision, accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity of this procedure to the automatic method, routinely used in diagnostics. For instance, adult Hb intra- and interassay precision were estimated as coefficient of variation 0.2% and 0.3%, respectively. The manual mode is less robust for detection of fractions <3% and the lower level of sensitivity is 2 g/L of total Hb. Specificity of manual and automatic settings was equivalent. We confirmed the performance of the method by analyzing erythroid lysates from thalassemic patients' cultures. Our study demonstrated that the Capillarys 2 Flex Piercing manual method is comparable to the automatic one. The analysis is very robust at low Hb concentrations, as in erythroid cultures from patients affected by hemoglobinopathies, representing a useful tool also in translational research.

  14. Phorbol ester-treated human acute myeloid leukemia cells secrete G-CSF, GM-CSF and erythroid differentiation factor into serum-free media in primary culture.

    PubMed

    Scher, W; Eto, Y; Ejima, D; Den, T; Svet-Moldavsky, I A

    1990-12-10

    Upon treatment with the phorbol ester, tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (PMA), peripheral mononuclear blood cells from patients with acute myeloid leukemia secrete into serum-free cell-conditioned media (PMA-CCM) at least three distinct nondialysable 'hematopoietic' factors: granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), granulocyte/macrophage-colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and erythroid differentiation factor (EDF, activin A). G-CSF was identified by its stimulation of [3H]thymidine incorporation into a G-CSF-responsive cell line, NSF-60, and the inhibition of its stimulation by a G-CSF-specific monoclonal antibody (MAB). GM-CSF was identified by its stimulation of [3H]thymidine incorporation into a GM-CSF-responsive line, TALL-101, and the inhibition of its stimulation by a GM-CSF-specific MAB. EDF was identified by its ability to stimulate erythroid differentiation in mouse erythroleukemia cell lines, its identical retention times to those of authentic EDF on three successive reverse-phase HPLC columns and characterization of its penultimate N-terminal residue as leucine which is the same as that of authentic EDF. Both authentic EDF and the erythroid-stimulating activity in PMA-CCM were found to act synergistically with a suboptimal inducing concentration of a well-studied inducing agent, dimethyl sulfoxide, in inducing erythroid differentiation. In addition, a fourth activity was observed in PMA-CCM: normal human fetal bone marrow cell-proliferation stimulating activity (FBMC-PSA). FBMC-PSA was identified by its ability to stimulate the growth of granulocytes and macrophages in FBMC suspension cultures, which neither recombinant G-CSF or GM-CSF were found to do.

  15. Transcription factors Fli1 and EKLF in the differentiation of megakaryocytic and erythroid progenitor in 5q- syndrome and in Diamond-Blackfan anemia.

    PubMed

    Neuwirtova, Radana; Fuchs, Ota; Holicka, Monika; Vostry, Martin; Kostecka, Arnost; Hajkova, Hana; Jonasova, Anna; Cermak, Jaroslav; Cmejla, Radek; Pospisilova, Dagmar; Belickova, Monika; Siskova, Magda; Hochova, Ivana; Vondrakova, Jana; Sponerova, Dana; Kadlckova, Eva; Novakova, Ludmila; Brezinova, Jana; Michalova, Kyra

    2013-01-01

    Friend leukemia virus integration 1 (Fli1) and erythroid Krüppel-like factor (EKLF) participate under experimental conditions in the differentiation of megakaryocytic and erythroid progenitor in cooperation with other transcription factors, cytokines, cytokine receptors, and microRNAs. Defective erythropoiesis with refractory anemia and effective megakaryopoiesis with normal or increased platelet count is typical for 5q- syndrome. We decided to evaluate the roles of EKLF and Fli1 in the pathogenesis of this syndrome and of another ribosomopathy, Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA). Fli1 and EKLF mRNA levels were examined in mononuclear blood and bone marrow cells from patients with 5q- syndrome, low-risk MDS patients with normal chromosome 5, DBA patients, and healthy controls. In 5q- syndrome, high Fli1 mRNA levels in the blood and bone marrow mononuclear cells were found. In DBA, Fli1 expression did not differ from the controls. EKLF mRNA level was significantly decreased in the blood and bone marrow of 5q- syndrome and in all DBA patients. We propose that the elevated Fli1 in 5q- syndrome protects megakaryocytic cells from ribosomal stress contrary to erythroid cells and contributes to effective though dysplastic megakaryopoiesis.

  16. Identification of Stages of Erythroid Differentiation in Bone Marrow and Erythrocyte Subpopulations in Blood Circulation that Are Preferentially Lost in Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia in Mouse.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Sreoshi; Bhardwaj, Nitin; Saxena, Rajiv K

    2016-01-01

    Repeated weekly injections of rat erythrocytes produced autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) in C57BL/6 mice after 5-6 weeks. Using the double in vivo biotinylation (DIB) technique, recently developed in our laboratory, turnover of erythrocyte cohorts of different age groups during AIHA was monitored. Results indicate a significant decline in the proportion of reticulocytes, young and intermediate age groups of erythrocytes, but a significant increase in the proportion of old erythrocytes in blood circulation. Binding of the autoantibody was relatively higher to the young erythrocytes and higher levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) were also seen in these cells. Erythropoietic activity in the bone marrows and the spleen of AIHA induced mice was examined by monitoring the relative proportion of erythroid cells at various stages of differentiation in these organs. Cells at different stages of differentiation were enumerated flow cytometrically by double staining with anti-Ter119 and anti-transferrin receptor (CD71) monoclonal antibodies. Erythroid cells in bone marrow declined significantly in AIHA induced mice, erythroblast C being most affected (50% decline). Erythroblast C also recorded high intracellular ROS level along with increased levels of membrane-bound autoantibody. No such decline was observed in spleen. A model of AIHA has been proposed indicating that binding of autoantibodies may not be a sufficient condition for destruction of erythroid cells in bone marrow and in blood circulation. Last stage of erythropoietic differentiation in bone marrow and early stages of erythrocytes in blood circulation are specifically susceptible to removal in AIHA.

  17. Accumulation of gamma-globin mRNA and induction of irreversible erythroid differentiation after treatment of CML cell line K562 with new doxorubicin derivatives.

    PubMed

    Szulawska, Agata; Arkusinska, Justyna; Czyz, Malgorzata

    2007-01-15

    Human chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) cell line K562 can be chemically induced to differentiate and express embryonic and fetal globin genes. In this study, the effects of doxorubicin (DOX), an inducer of K562 cell erythroid differentiation, with those of epidoxorubicin (EDOX) as well as newly synthesized derivatives of both drugs (DOXM, DOXH, and EDOXM) on cell growth and differentiation were compared. Our results revealed that DOX, EDOX and their derivatives caused irreversible differentiation of K562 cells into more mature hemoglobin-containing cells. This phenomenon was linked to time-dependent inhibition of cell proliferation. Considering the impact of the structure of newly synthesized anthracyclines on their cellular activity, our data clearly indicated that among tested anthracyclines DOXM, a morpholine derivative of DOX exerted the highest antiproliferative and differentiating activity. An increase of gamma-globin mRNA level caused both by high transcription rate and by mRNA stabilization, as well as an enhancement of expression but not activity of erythroid transcription factor GATA-1 were observed. Therefore, a high level of hemoglobin-containing cells in the presence of DOXM resulted from transcriptional and post-transcriptional events on gamma-globin gene regulation. The same morpholine modification introduced to EDOX did not cause, however, similar effects on cellular level. Characterization of new powerful inducers of erythroid differentiation may contribute to the development of novel compounds for pharmacological approach by differentiation therapy to leukemia or to beta-globin disorder, beta-thalassemia.

  18. Sustainable systems as organisms?

    PubMed

    Ho, Mae-Wan; Ulanowicz, Robert

    2005-10-01

    Schrödinger [Schrödinger, E., 1944. What is Life? Cambridge University Press, Cambridge] marvelled at how the organism is able to use metabolic energy to maintain and even increase its organisation, which could not be understood in terms of classical statistical thermodynamics. Ho [Ho, M.W., 1993. The Rainbow and the Worm, The Physics of Organisms, World Scientific, Singapore; Ho, M.W., 1998a. The Rainbow and the Worm, The Physics of Organisms, 2nd (enlarged) ed., reprinted 1999, 2001, 2003 (available online from ISIS website www.i-sis.org.uk)] outlined a novel "thermodynamics of organised complexity" based on a nested dynamical structure that enables the organism to maintain its organisation and simultaneously achieve non-equilibrium and equilibrium energy transfer at maximum efficiency. This thermodynamic model of the organism is reminiscent of the dynamical structure of steady state ecosystems identified by Ulanowicz [Ulanowicz, R.E., 1983. Identifying the structure of cycling in ecosystems. Math. Biosci. 65, 210-237; Ulanowicz, R.E., 2003. Some steps towards a central theory of ecosystem dynamics. Comput. Biol. Chem. 27, 523-530]. The healthy organism excels in maintaining its organisation and keeping away from thermodynamic equilibrium--death by another name--and in reproducing and providing for future generations. In those respects, it is the ideal sustainable system. We propose therefore to explore the common features between organisms and ecosystems, to see how far we can analyse sustainable systems in agriculture, ecology and economics as organisms, and to extract indicators of the system's health or sustainability. We find that looking at sustainable systems as organisms provides fresh insights on sustainability, and offers diagnostic criteria for sustainability that reflect the system's health. In the case of ecosystems, those diagnostic criteria of health translate into properties such as biodiversity and productivity, the richness of cycles, the

  19. Sustainment Transformation: Achieving a Revolution in Distribution Based Logistics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    AND ADDRESS(ES) Colonel Louis H. Jordan Jr. Strategic Research and Analysis Department 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9...Revolution in Distribution Based Logistics by Colonel Kevin M. Powers United States Army Colonel Louis H. Jordan...Logistics DBL is an operational concept that relies on distribution velocity and precision rather than redundant supply mass… – Robert McKay & Kathy

  20. Farming with Grass: Achieving Sustainable Mixed Agricultural Landscapes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Agriculture in grassland environments is facing multiple stresses from shifting demographics, declining and fragmented agricultural landscapes, declining environmental quality, variable and changing climate, volatile and increasing energy costs, marginal economic returns, and globalization. Grassla...

  1. Structure of the Membrane Proximal Oxioreductase Domain of Human Steap3, the Dominant Ferrireductase of the Erythroid Transferrin Cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Sendamarai, A.K.; Ohgami, R.S.; Fleming, M.D.; Lawrence, C.M.

    2009-05-27

    The daily production of 200 billion erythrocytes requires 20 mg of iron, accounting for nearly 80% of the iron demand in humans. Thus, erythroid precursor cells possess an efficient mechanism for iron uptake in which iron loaded transferrin (Tf) binds to the transferrin receptor (TfR) at the cell surface. The Tf:TfR complex then enters the endosome via receptor-mediated endocytosis. Upon endosomal acidification, iron is released from Tf, reduced to Fe{sup 2+} by Steap3, and transported across the endosomal membrane by divalent metal iron transporter 1. Steap3, the major ferrireductase in erythrocyte endosomes, is a member of a unique family of reductases. Steap3 is comprised of an N-terminal cytosolic oxidoreductase domain and a C-terminal heme-containing transmembrane domain. Cytosolic NADPH and a flavin are predicted cofactors, but the NADPH/flavin binding domain differs significantly from those in other eukaryotic reductases. Instead, Steap3 shows remarkable, although limited homology to FNO, an archaeal oxidoreductase. We have determined the crystal structure of the human Steap3 oxidoreductase domain in the absence and presence of NADPH. The structure reveals an FNO-like domain with an unexpected dimer interface and substrate binding sites that are well positioned to direct electron transfer from the cytosol to a heme moiety predicted to be fixed within the transmembrane domain. Here, we discuss possible gating mechanisms for electron transfer across the endosomal membrane.

  2. The N-terminal zinc finger of the erythroid transcription factor GATA-1 binds GATC motifs in DNA.

    PubMed

    Newton, A; Mackay, J; Crossley, M

    2001-09-21

    The mammalian transcription factor GATA-1 is required for normal erythroid and megakaryocytic development. GATA-1 contains two zinc fingers, the C-terminal finger, which is known to bind (A/T)GATA(A/G) motifs in DNA and the N-finger, which is important for interacting with co-regulatory proteins such as Friend of GATA (FOG). We now show that, like the C-finger, the N-finger of GATA-1 is also capable of binding DNA but recognizes distinct sequences with the core GATC. We demonstrate that the GATA-1 N-finger can bind these sequences in vitro and that in cellular assays, GATA-1 can activate promoters containing GATC motifs. Experiments with mutant GATA-1 proteins confirm the importance of the N-finger, as the C-finger is not required for transactivation from GATC sites. Recently four naturally occurring mutations in GATA-1 have been shown to be associated with familial blood disorders. These mutations all map to the N-finger domain. We have investigated the effect of these mutations on the recognition of GATC sites by the N-finger and show that one mutation R216Q abolishes DNA binding, whereas the others have only minor effects.

  3. Application of high-performance liquid chromatographic methodology to the analysis of hemoglobins synthesized in erythroid progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Bhaumik, K; Huisman, T H

    1989-11-10

    High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) has been successfully used in the quantitation of the relatively minute amounts of hemoglobin types recovered from in vitro cultures of hemoglobin-synthesizing erythroid progenitor (BFU-E) cells. This reversed-phase HPLC method uses the Vydac C4 column and water-acetonitrile-trifluoroacetic acid as mobile phases; it has been applied to the study of fetal hemoglobin synthesis patterns in ten homozygous sickle cell anemia patients and a similar number of their heterozygous relatives along with a few normal control subjects. A significant increase in the total gamma chain level was observed in the BFU-E lysate samples corresponding to the whole blood lysates of all the patients and their heterozygous relatives, except in one patient with the beta S haplotype Mor. On the other hand, the relative level of the G gamma chains appeared to be decreased in the BFU-E lysate samples of all except the individuals carrying the Mor haplotype, where it is reversed. The method has considerable advantages over other chromatographic and electrophoretic procedures; it is extremely sensitive and allows quantitation of all different globin chains in one single chromatogram.

  4. Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 facilitates neuronal glutathione synthesis by upregulating neuronal excitatory amino acid transporter 3 expression.

    PubMed

    Escartin, Carole; Won, Seok Joon; Malgorn, Carole; Auregan, Gwennaelle; Berman, Ari E; Chen, Pei-Chun; Déglon, Nicole; Johnson, Jeffrey A; Suh, Sang Won; Swanson, Raymond A

    2011-05-18

    Astrocytes support neuronal antioxidant capacity by releasing glutathione, which is cleaved to cysteine in brain extracellular space. Free cysteine is then taken up by neurons through excitatory amino acid transporter 3 [EAAT3; also termed Slc1a1 (solute carrier family 1 member 1)] to support de novo glutathione synthesis. Activation of the nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-antioxidant responsive element (ARE) pathway by oxidative stress promotes astrocyte release of glutathione, but it remains unknown how this release is coupled to neuronal glutathione synthesis. Here we evaluated transcriptional regulation of the neuronal cysteine transporter EAAT3 by the Nrf2-ARE pathway. Nrf2 activators and Nrf2 overexpression both produced EAAT3 transcriptional activation in C6 cells. A conserved ARE-related sequence was found in the EAAT3 promoter of several mammalian species. This ARE-related sequence was bound by Nrf2 in mouse neurons in vivo as observed by chromatin immunoprecipitation. Chemical activation of the Nrf2-ARE pathway in mouse brain increased both neuronal EAAT3 levels and neuronal glutathione content, and these effects were abrogated in mice genetically deficient in either Nrf2 or EAAT3. Selective overexpression of Nrf2 in brain neurons by lentiviral gene transfer was sufficient to upregulate both neuronal EAAT3 protein and glutathione content. These findings identify a mechanism whereby Nrf2 activation can coordinate astrocyte glutathione release with neuronal glutathione synthesis through transcriptional upregulation of neuronal EAAT3 expression.

  5. The effects of erythropoietin signaling on telomerase regulation in non-erythroid malignant and non-malignant cells

    SciTech Connect

    Uziel, Orit; Kanfer, Gil; Beery, Einat; Yelin, Dana; Shepshelovich, Daniel; Bakhanashvili, Mary; Nordenberg, Jardena; Lahav, Meir

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • We assumed that some of erythropoietin adverse effects may be mediated by telomerase activity. • EPO administration increased telomerase activity, cells proliferation and migration. • The inhibition of telomerase modestly repressed the proliferative effect of erythropoietin. • Telomere shortening caused by long term inhibition of the enzyme totally abolished that effect. • This effect was mediated via the Lyn–AKT axis and not by the canonical JAK2–STAT pathway. - Abstract: Treatment with erythropoietin (EPO) in several cancers is associated with decreased survival due to cancer progression. Due to the major importance of telomerase in cancer biology we hypothesized that some of these effects may be mediated through EPO effect on telomerase. For this aim we explored the possible effects of EPO on telomerase regulation, cell migration and chemosensitivity in non-erythroid malignant and non-malignant cells. Cell proliferation, telomerase activity (TA) and cell migration increased in response to EPO. EPO had no effect on cancer cells sensitivity to cisplatinum and on the cell cycle status. The inhibition of telomerase modestly repressed the proliferative effect of EPO. Telomere shortening caused by long term inhibition of the enzyme abolished the effect of EPO, suggesting that EPO effects on cancer cells are related to telomere dynamics. TA was correlated with the levels of Epo-R. The increase in TA was mediated post-translationally through the Lyn-Src and not the canonical JAK2 pathway.

  6. Human and Murine Hematopoietic Stem Cell Aging Is Associated with Functional Impairments and Intrinsic Megakaryocytic/Erythroid Bias

    PubMed Central

    Rundberg Nilsson, Alexandra; Soneji, Shamit; Adolfsson, Sofia; Bryder, David; Pronk, Cornelis Jan

    2016-01-01

    Aging within the human hematopoietic system associates with various deficiencies and disease states, including anemia, myeloid neoplasms and reduced adaptive immune responses. Similar phenotypes are observed in mice and have been linked to alterations arising at the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) level. Such an association is, however, less established in human hematopoiesis and prompted us here to detail characteristics of the most primitive human hematopoietic compartments throughout ontogeny. In addition, we also attempted to interrogate similarities between aging human and murine hematopoiesis. Coupled to the transition from human cord blood (CB) to young and aged bone marrow (BM), we observed a gradual increase in frequency of candidate HSCs. This was accompanied by functional impairments, including decreased lymphoid output and reduced proliferative potential. Downstream of human HSCs, we observed decreasing levels of common lymphoid progenitors (CLPs), and increasing frequencies of megakaryocyte/erythrocyte progenitors (MEPs) with age, which could be linked to changes in lineage-affiliated gene expression patterns in aged human HSCs. These findings were paralleled in mice. Therefore, our data support the notion that age-related changes also in human hematopoiesis involve the HSC pool, with a prominent skewing towards the megakaryocytic/erythroid lineages, and suggests conserved mechanisms underlying aging of the blood cell system. PMID:27368054

  7. Extensive Ex Vivo Expansion of Functional Human Erythroid Precursors Established From Umbilical Cord Blood Cells by Defined Factors

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiaosong; Shah, Siddharth; Wang, Jing; Ye, Zhaohui; Dowey, Sarah N; Tsang, Kit Man; Mendelsohn, Laurel G; Kato, Gregory J; Kickler, Thomas S; Cheng, Linzhao

    2014-01-01

    There is a constant shortage of red blood cells (RBCs) from sufficiently matched donors for patients who need chronic transfusion. Ex vivo expansion and maturation of human erythroid precursors (erythroblasts) from the patients or optimally matched donors could represent a potential solution. Proliferating erythroblasts can be expanded from umbilical cord blood mononuclear cells (CB MNCs) ex vivo for 106–107-fold (in ~50 days) before proliferation arrest and reaching sufficient number for broad application. Here, we report that ectopic expression of three genetic factors (Sox2, c-Myc, and an shRNA against TP53 gene) associated with iPSC derivation enables CB-derived erythroblasts to undergo extended expansion (~1068-fold in ~12 months) in a serum-free culture condition without change of cell identity or function. These expanding erythroblasts maintain immature erythroblast phenotypes and morphology, a normal diploid karyotype and dependence on a specific combination of growth factors for proliferation throughout expansion period. When being switched to a terminal differentiation condition, these immortalized erythroblasts gradually exit cell cycle, decrease cell size, accumulate hemoglobin, condense nuclei and eventually give rise to enucleated hemoglobin-containing erythrocytes that can bind and release oxygen. Our result may ultimately lead to an alternative approach to generate unlimited numbers of RBCs for personalized transfusion medicine. PMID:24002691

  8. Reactive Oxygen Species and Nuclear Factor Erythroid 2-Related Factor 2 Activation in Diabetic Nephropathy: A Hidden Target

    PubMed Central

    Abdo, Shaaban; Zhang, Shao-Ling; Chan, John S.D.

    2015-01-01

    Hyperglycemia, oxidative stress and renin-angiotensin system (RAS) dysfunction have been implicated in diabetic nephropathy (DN) progression, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are far from being fully understood. In addition to the systemic RAS, the existence of a local intrarenal RAS in renal proximal tubular cells has been recognized. Angiotensinogen is the sole precursor of all angiotensins (Ang). Intrarenal reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, Ang II level and RAS gene expression are up-regulated in diabetes, indicating that intrarenal ROS and RAS activation play an important role in DN. The nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1) pathway is one of the major protective processes that occurs in response to intracellular oxidative stress. Nrf2 stimulates an array of antioxidant enzymes that convert excessive ROS to less reactive or less damaging forms. Recent studies have, however, revealed that Nrf2 activation might have other undesirable effects in diabetic animals and in diabetic patients with chronic kidney disease. This mini-review summarizes current knowledge of the relationship between ROS, Nrf2 and intra renal RAS activation in DN progression as well as possible novel target(s) for DN treatment. PMID:26213634

  9. Neuroprotective effects of salidroside on focal cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury involve the nuclear erythroid 2-related factor 2 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jing; Xiao, Qing; Lin, Yan-hua; Zheng, Zhen-zhu; He, Zhao-dong; Hu, Juan; Chen, Li-dian

    2015-01-01

    Salidroside, the main active ingredient extracted from Rhodiola crenulata, has been shown to be neuroprotective in ischemic cerebral injury, but the underlying mechanism for this neuroprotection is poorly understood. In the current study, the neuroprotective effect of salidroside on cerebral ischemia-induced oxidative stress and the role of the nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) pathway was investigated in a rat model of middle cerebral artery occlusion. Salidroside (30 mg/kg) reduced infarct size, improved neurological function and histological changes, increased activity of superoxide dismutase and glutathione-S-transferase, and reduced malon-dialdehyde levels after cerebral ischemia and reperfusion. Furthermore, salidroside apparently increased Nrf2 and heme oxygenase-1 expression. These results suggest that salidroside exerts its neuroprotective effect against cerebral ischemia through anti-oxidant mechanisms and that activation of the Nrf2 pathway is involved. The Nrf2/antioxidant response element pathway may become a new therapeutic target for the treatment of ischemic stroke. PMID:26889188

  10. Therapeutic effect of erythroid differentiation regulator 1 (Erdr1) on collagen-induced arthritis in DBA/1J mouse

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyung Eun; Kim, Sungryung; Park, Sunyoung; Houh, Younkyung; Yang, Yoolhee; Park, Seung Beom; Kim, Sangyoon; Kim, Daejin; Hur, Dae Young; Kim, Seonghan

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory autoimmune disease, and multiple inflammatory cytokines are involved in RA pathogenesis. Interleukin (IL)-18, in particular, has a significant positive correlation with RA. In this study, we investigated the effect of erythroid differentiation regulator 1 (Erdr1), which is negatively regulated by IL-18, in an animal model of inflammatory arthritis, collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in DBA/1J mice. Treatment of mice with recombinant (r)Erdr1 significantly suppressed the severity of arthritis, histologic features of arthritic tissue, and serum levels of anti-collagen autoantibodies (IgG, IgG1, IgG2a and IgM) in CIA. In addition, IL-18 expression was reduced in the affected synovium of rErdr1-treated mice. Interestingly, Erdr1 treatment suppressed migration in contrast to the pro-migratory effect of IL-18, indicating the therapeutic effects of Erdr1 on CIA through inhibiting synovial fibroblast migration. In addition, Erdr1 inhibited activation of ERK1/2, a key signaling pathway in migration of various cell types. Taken together, these data show that rErdr1 exerts therapeutic effects on RA by inhibiting synovial fibroblast migration, suggesting that rErdr1 treatment might be an effective therapeutic approach for RA. PMID:27823968

  11. Sustainable Scientists

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, Evan

    2008-12-31

    Scientists are front and center in quantifying and solving environmental problems. Yet, as a spate of recent news articles in scientific journals point out, much can be done to enhance sustainability within the scientific enterprise itself, particularly by trimming the energy use associated with research facilities and the equipment therein (i,ii,iii, iv). Sponsors of research unwittingly spend on the order of $10 billion each year on energy in the U.S. alone, and the underlying inefficiencies drain funds from the research enterprise while causing 80 MT CO2-equivalent greenhouse-gas emissions (see Box). These are significant sums considering the opportunity costs in terms of the amount of additional research that could be funded and emissions that could be reduced if the underlying energy was used more efficiently. By following commercially proven best practices in facility design and operation, scientists--and the sponsors of science--can cost-effectively halve these costs, while doing their part to put society on alow-carbon diet.

  12. Sustainable NREL - Site Sustainability Plan FY 2015

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2015-01-01

    NREL's Site Sustainability Plan FY 2015 reports on sustainability plans for the lab for the year 2015 based on Executive Order Goals and provides the status on planned actions cited in the FY 2014 report.

  13. Sustainable diets within sustainable food systems.

    PubMed

    Meybeck, Alexandre; Gitz, Vincent

    2017-02-01

    Sustainable diets and sustainable food systems are increasingly explored by diverse scientific disciplines. They are also recognised by the international community and called upon to orient action towards the eradication of hunger and malnutrition and the fulfilment of sustainable development goals. The aim of the present paper is to briefly consider some of the links between these two notions in order to facilitate the operationalisation of the concept of sustainable diet. The concept of sustainable diet was defined in 2010 combining two totally different perspectives: a nutrition perspective, focused on individuals, and a global sustainability perspective, in all its dimensions: environmental, economic and social. The nutrition perspective can be easily related to health outcomes. The global sustainability perspective is more difficult to analyse directly. We propose that it be measured as the contribution of a diet to the sustainability of food systems. Such an approach, covering the three dimensions of sustainability, enables identification of interactions and interrelations between food systems and diets. It provides opportunities to find levers of change towards sustainability. Diets are both the results and the drivers of food systems. The drivers of change for those variously involved, consumers and private individuals, are different, and can be triggered by different dimensions (heath, environment, social and cultural). Combining different dimensions and reasons for change can help facilitate the transition to sustainable diets, recognising the food system's specificities. The adoption of sustainable diets can be facilitated and enabled by food systems, and by appropriate policies and incentives.

  14. Sustainable Campus: Engaging the Community in Sustainability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Too, Linda; Bajracharya, Bhishna

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to identify the major factors necessary for engaging university campus community in sustainability. While general awareness in sustainability issues has improved in recent years through mass media coverage, this knowledge is not always translated into actual sustainable practice. Studies have indicated that…

  15. Leader as achiever.

    PubMed

    Dienemann, Jacqueline

    2002-01-01

    This article examines one outcome of leadership: productive achievement. Without achievement one is judged to not truly be a leader. Thus, the ideal leader must be a visionary, a critical thinker, an expert, a communicator, a mentor, and an achiever of organizational goals. This article explores the organizational context that supports achievement, measures of quality nursing care, fiscal accountability, leadership development, rewards and punishments, and the educational content and teaching strategies to prepare graduates to be achievers.

  16. Altered Turnover of Hypoxanthine Phosphoribosyltransferase in Erythroid Cells of Mice Expressing Hprt a and Hprt b Alleles

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Gerald G.; Chapman, Verne M.

    1987-01-01

    We have previously shown that mice expressing Hprt a allele(s) have erythrocyte hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) levels that are approximately 25-fold (Mus musculus castaneus) and 70-fold ( Mus spretus) higher than in mice that express the Hprt b allele (Mus musculus domesticus; C57BI/6J; C3H/HeHa), and that these differences in erythrocyte HPRT levels are due to differences in the turnover rates of the HPRT A and B proteins as reticulocytes mature to erythrocytes. We show here that: (1) the taxonomic subgroups of the genus Mus are essentially monomorphic for the occurrence of either the Hprt a or the Hprt b allele, with Hprt a being common in the aboriginal species (M. spretus, Mus hortulanus and Mus abbotti) and in several commensal species (Mus musculus musculus, M. m. castaneus, Mus musculus molossinus), while Hprt b is common in feral M. m. domesticus populations as well as in all inbred strains of mice tested; (2) in all these diverse Mus subgroups there is a strict association of Hprt a with high and Hprt b with low levels of erythrocyte HPRT; and, (3) the association between the occurrence of the Hprt a allele and elevated erythrocyte HPRT levels is retained following repeated backcrosses of wild-derived Hprt a allele(s) into the genetic background of inbred strains of mice with the Hprt b allele. Collectively, these observations indicate that the elevated and low levels of erythrocyte HPRT are specified by differences in the Hprt a and b structural genes. Since evidence indicates that Hprt a and b encode HPRT proteins which differ in primary structure, we infer that the structure of HPRT is an important factor in determining its sensitivity to turnover in mouse erythroid cells. Hprt a and b may provide a useful system of "normal" allelic gene products for identifying factors that participate in protein turnover during mouse reticulocyte maturation. PMID:3609725

  17. Co-operative signalling mechanisms required for erythroid precursor expansion in response to erythropoietin and stem cell factor.

    PubMed

    Arcasoy, Murat O; Jiang, Xiaohong

    2005-07-01

    The regeneration of circulating red blood cells in response to anaemia associated with blood loss or haemolysis involves an increased rate of erythropoiesis and expansion of proerythroblasts, the bone marrow precursor cells that terminally differentiate into mature erythrocytes. This study investigated the mechanisms by which erythropoietin (Epo) and stem cell factor (Scf) modulate the expansion of proerythroblasts. Homogenous populations of primary human proerythroblasts were generated in liquid cultures of CD34(+) cells. In serum-free cultures, proerythroblasts failed to survive in the presence of Epo or Scf alone, but exhibited synergistic proliferation in response to combined Epo and Scf treatment, exhibiting one-log expansion in 5 d. Intracellular signal transduction in response to Epo and Scf revealed that tyrosine phosphorylation of signal transducers and activators of transcription (Stat) 5, a downstream target for the non-receptor tyrosine kinase, Janus kinase 2 (Jak2), was mediated by Epo but not Scf. The mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) extracellular regulated kinase (Erk) 1-2 were phosphorylated in response to either Epo or Scf. Phosphorylation of Akt, a signalling molecule downstream of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), was observed following Scf but not Epo treatment. To determine the contribution of specific signalling pathways to synergistic expansion of proerythroblasts in response to co-operative effects of Epo and Scf, cells were treated with kinase inhibitors targeting Jak2, PI3K and MAPK kinase. There was a significant, dose-dependent inhibition of proerythroblast expansion in response to all three kinase inhibitors. In conclusion, Epo- and Scf-mediated co-operative, synergistic expansion of primary erythroid precursors requires selective activation of multiple signalling pathways, including the Jak-Stat, PI3K and MAPK pathways.

  18. Pathophysiological processes in multiple sclerosis: focus on nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor 2 and emerging pathways

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Philipp; Mojumder, Deb; DeToledo, John; Lucius, Ralph; Wilms, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a disease of the central nervous system that is characterized by the demyelination of neuronal axons. Four different patterns of demyelination have been described, showing the heterogeneity in the immunopathologic processes involved in the demyelination. This review will focus on reactive oxygen species (ROS)-related inflammation in MS. Special emphasis will be placed on the nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) as it regulates the transcription of ROS-protective genes. In the cytosol, Nrf2 binds to Keap1 (Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1), and together they are degraded by the 26S proteasome after ubiquitination. If challenged by ROS Nrf2, binding to Keap1 is abrogated, and it translocates into the nucleus. Here it binds to the antioxidant response element and to a small protein termed Maf (musculoaponeurotic fibrosarcoma oncogene homolog). This leads to an enhanced transcription of ROS protective genes and represents the physiological answer against ROS challenge. It has been shown that dimethyl fumarate (DMF) has the same effect and leads to an enhanced transcription of ROS-protective genes. This response is mediated through a reduced binding of Nrf2 to Keap1, thus resulting in a higher level of free Nrf2 in the cytosol. Consequently, more Nrf2 translocates to the nucleus, promoting transcription of its target genes. DMF has been used for the treatment of psoriasis for many years in Germany without the occurrence of major side effects. In psoriasis, DMF reduces ROS-related inflammation in skin. A DMF analog, BG-12, was recently approved for the treatment of relapsing-remitting MS by the European Union and the US Food and Drug Administration. As an oral formulation, it gives patients a convenient and effective alternative to the injectable immune modulators in the long-term treatment of MS. PMID:24591852

  19. CD45 tyrosine phosphatase inhibits erythroid differentiation of umbilical cord blood CD34+ cells associated with selective inactivation of Lyn.

    PubMed

    Harashima, Akira; Suzuki, Motoyuki; Okochi, Ayumi; Yamamoto, Mayuko; Matsuo, Yoshinobu; Motoda, Ryuichi; Yoshioka, Tamotsu; Orita, Kunzo

    2002-12-15

    CD45 is a membrane-associated tyrosine phosphatase that dephosphorylates Src family kinases and Janus kinases (JAKs). To clarify the role of CD45 in hematopoietic differentiation, we examined the effects of anti-CD45 monoclonal antibody NU-L(PAN) on the proliferation and differentiation of umbilical cord blood CD34(+) cells. NU-L(PAN) showed a prominent inhibition of the proliferation of CD34(+) cells induced by the mouse bone marrow stromal cell line MS-5 or erythropoietin (EPO). However, NU-L(PAN) did not affect the proliferation induced by interleukin 3. NU-L(PAN) also inhibited MS-5-induced or EPO-induced erythroid differentiation of CD34(+) cells. The cells stimulated with EPO in the presence of NU-L(PAN) morphologically showed differentiation arrest at the stage of basophilic erythroblasts after 11 days of culture, whereas the cells treated with EPO without NU-L(PAN) differentiated into mature red blood cells. The Src family kinase Lyn and JAK2 were phosphorylated when erythroblasts obtained after 4 days of culture of CD34(+) cells in the presence of EPO were restimulated with EPO. Overnight NU-L(PAN) treatment before addition of EPO reduced the phosphorylation of Lyn but not that of JAK2. Simultaneously, the enhancement of Lyn kinase activity after restimulation with EPO was reduced by NU-L(PAN) treatment. These results indicate selective inactivation of Lyn by CD45 activated with NU-L(PAN) and could partly explain the inhibitory mechanism on erythropoiesis exhibited by EPO. These findings suggest that CD45 may play a pivotal role in erythropoiesis.

  20. Biochemical measurements on single erythroid progenitor cells shed light on the combinatorial regulation of red blood cell production.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weijia; Akbarian, Vahe; Audet, Julie

    2013-02-02

    Adult bone marrow (BM) erythrocyte colony-forming units (CFU-Es) are important cellular targets for the treatment of anemia and also for the manufacture of red blood cells (RBCs) ex vivo. We obtained quantitative biochemical measurements from single and small numbers of CFU-Es by isolating and analyzing c-Kit(+)CD71(high)Ter119(-) cells from adult mouse BM and this allowed us to identify two mechanisms that can be manipulated to increase RBC production. As expected, maximum RBC output was obtained when CFU-Es were stimulated with a combination of Stem Cell Factor (SCF) and Erythropoietin (EPO) mainly because SCF supports a transient CFU-E expansion and EPO promotes the survival and terminal differentiation of erythroid progenitors. However, we found that one of the main factors limiting the output in RBCs was that EPO induces a downregulation of c-Kit expression which limits the transient expansion of CFU-Es. In the presence of SCF, the EPO-mediated downregulation of c-Kit on CFU-Es is delayed but still significant. Moreover, treatment of CFU-Es with 1-Naphthyl PP1 could partially inhibit the downregulation of c-Kit induced by EPO, suggesting that this process is dependent on a Src family kinase, v-Src and/or c-Fyn. We also found that CFU-E survival and proliferation was dependent on the level of time-integrated extracellular-regulated kinase (ERK) activation in these cells, all of which could be significantly increased when SCF and EPO were combined with mouse fetal liver-derived factors. Taken together, these results suggest two novel molecular strategies to increase RBC production and regeneration.

  1. V-erbA generates ribosomes devoid of RPL11 and regulates translational activity in avian erythroid progenitors.

    PubMed

    Nguyen-Lefebvre, A T; Leprun, G; Morin, V; Viñuelas, J; Couté, Y; Madjar, J-J; Gandrillon, O; Gonin-Giraud, S

    2014-03-20

    The v-erbA oncogene transforms chicken erythrocytic progenitors (T2EC) by blocking their differentiation and freezing them in a state of self-renewal. Transcriptomes of T2EC, expressing either v-erbA or a non-transforming form of v-erbA (S61G), were compared using serial analysis of gene expression and some, but not all, mRNA-encoding ribosomal proteins were seen to be affected by v-erbA. These results suggest that this oncogene could modulate the composition of ribosomes. In the present study, we demonstrate, using two-dimensional difference in gel electrophoresis, that v-erbA-expressing cells have a lower amount of RPL11 associated with the ribosomes. The presence of ribosomes devoid of RPL11 in v-erbA-expressing cells was further confirmed by immunoprecipitation. In order to assess the possible impact of these specialized ribosomes on the translational activity, we analyzed proteomes of either v-erbA or S61G-expressing cells using 2D/mass spectrometry, and identified nine proteins present in differing amounts within these cells. Among these proteins, we focused on HSP70 because of its involvement in erythroid differentiation. Our results indicate that, in v-erbA-expressing cells, hsp70 is not only transcribed but also translated more efficiently, as shown by polyribosome fractionation experiments. We demonstrate here, for the first time, the existence of ribosomes with different protein components, notably ribosomes devoid of RPL11, and a regulation of mRNA translation depending on v-erbA oncogene expression.

  2. Education for Sustainability-Challenges and Opportunities: The Case of RCEs (Regional Centres of Expertise in Education for Sustainable Development)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wade, Ros

    2016-01-01

    This article will focus on the challenges of leadership and management of a key initiative of the 20052014 UN Decade of Education for Sustainable Development (DESD), namely the Regional Centres of Expertise in Education for Sustainability (RCEs). It will argue that in order to achieve sustainability, there is a need to move away from outdated…

  3. An Understanding of Sustainability and Education for Sustainable Development among German Student Teachers and Trainee Teachers of Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burmeister, Mareike; Eilks, Ingo

    2013-01-01

    Sustainable development is a central concern of today's politics across the world. Different political agendas have been developed to promote sustainability and make it a political goal worldwide. As stated in Agenda 21, the political debate seems to agree that education has to play a key role in achieving sustainability. But practices focusing on…

  4. Is Sustainable Remediation Now a Self-Sustaining Process? an International Progress Report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, J. W. N.

    2014-12-01

    Sustainable remediation - the consideration of environmental, social and economic factors associated with soil and groundwater risk-management options, to help select the best overall solution - has been a rapidly evolving topic in recent years. The first published reference[1] to 'sustainable remediation' was in the title of a 1999 conference paper by Kearney et al., (1999), but activity really accelerated in the middle-late 2000's, with establishment of a number of collaborative sustainable remediation groups and fora, and increased publication rates in the peer reviewed literature (Fig 1). Figure 1. Journal paper publications with search term 'sustainable remediation' (SCOPUS survey, 17 July 2014) This presentation will review the international progress of sustainable remediation concept development and application in regulatory and corporate decision-making processes. It will look back at what has already been achieved, provide an update on the latest initiatives and developments, and look forward to what the future of sustainable remediation might look like. Specifically it will describe: Sustainable remediation frameworks: synergies and international collaboration; Latest guidance and tools developed by the various sustainable remediation organisations (SuRFs), including the SuRF-UK Best Management Practices and Tier 1 Briefcase; Best practice standard development by ASTM and ISO; Regulatory acceptance of sustainable remediation, including incorporation into legislation, and the NICOLE - Common Forum Joint statement on 'risk-informed and sustainable remediation' in Europe; Examples of corporate adoption of sustainable remediation principles. The presentation will conclude with a look forward to a vision of sustainable remediation in 2020.

  5. Youth Action Council on Sustainable Innovation (YACSI) Report: Making Innovation Sustainable Among Youth in Canada.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    A study surveyed 241 high-achieving youth aged 15-25 regarding how innovation can be made sustainable among youth in Canada. Results were insightful and pointed to actionable steps for the Youth Action Council for Sustainable Innovation and the federal government. Findings indicated the following: youth can be more innovative if they have the…

  6. Air Force Sustainment Center Logistics and Sustainment Enterprise 2040. Version 2.0

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-15

    maintenance operations. f) Minimizing water contaminants, air pollutants /emissions, noise pollution , and hazardous waste streams to improve the...US AIR FORCE Distribution A. Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited (72ABW-2015-0046), Air Force Sustainment Center 15...April 2016 i Foreword The Air Force Sustainment Center (AFSC) continues to make great gains toward achieving the Art of the Possible

  7. Energy sustainability: consumption, efficiency, and ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    One of the critical challenges in achieving sustainability is finding a way to meet the energy consumption needs of a growing population in the face of increasing economic prosperity and finite resources. According to ecological footprint computations, the global resource consumption began exceeding planetary supply in 1977 and by 2030, global energy demand, population, and gross domestic product are projected to greatly increase over 1977 levels. With the aim of finding sustainable energy solutions, we present a simple yet rigorous procedure for assessing and counterbalancing the relationship between energy demand, environmental impact, population, GDP, and energy efficiency. Our analyses indicated that infeasible increases in energy efficiency (over 100 %) would be required by 2030 to return to 1977 environmental impact levels and annual reductions (2 and 3 %) in energy demand resulted in physical, yet impractical requirements; hence, a combination of policy and technology approaches is needed to tackle this critical challenge. This work emphasizes the difficulty in moving toward energy sustainability and helps to frame possible solutions useful for policy and management. Based on projected energy consumption, environmental impact, human population, gross domestic product (GDP), and energy efficiency, for this study, we explore the increase in energy-use efficiency and the decrease in energy use intensity required to achieve sustainable environmental impact le

  8. Comparing Science Achievement Constructs: Targeted and Achieved

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrara, Steve; Duncan, Teresa

    2011-01-01

    This article illustrates how test specifications based solely on academic content standards, without attention to other cognitive skills and item response demands, can fall short of their targeted constructs. First, the authors inductively describe the science achievement construct represented by a statewide sixth-grade science proficiency test.…

  9. Sustainable development - lessons from success

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, W.V.C. )

    1989-05-01

    This article examines the push of development agencies and multilateral development banks in developing countries to achieve economic, political and social sustainability without considering long-term environmental costs. A case in point is dams built for irrigation and hydroelectric power; the benefits are outweighed by the environmental costs of salt intrusion, delta erosion, drying of downstream lakes and channel deepening as well as the effects of displacement of people. The information and technologies that form the basis of ecologically sustainable development already exist. Energy efficiency projects could reduce the balance of trade deficits in developing nations. In addition, great advances in agricultural, forest and range productivity could be achieved at very low capital costs through soil and water conservation techniques, intercropping, agroforestry and organic fertilization.

  10. Sustainability and the health care manager: part I.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Bernardo; Oetjen, Reid M; Malvey, Donna

    2011-01-01

    Given the current operating climate, organizations are coming under pressure to develop and implement sustainability programs and projects, yet few managers truly understand what is meant by sustainability and its implications for managing organizations. This article examines the concept of sustainability and provides a broader definition of the term than going "green." Using a puzzle metaphor, the authors outline and explain the different components of sustainability and provide a checklist for achieving sustainability goals. In addition, resources such as guides and tools are reviewed and offered to assist managers in gaining more insight into the challenges and complexity of sustainability.

  11. Which Achievement Gap?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Sharon; Medrich, Elliott; Fowler, Donna

    2007-01-01

    From the halls of Congress to the local elementary school, conversations on education reform have tossed around the term "achievement gap" as though people all know precisely what that means. As it's commonly used, "achievement gap" refers to the differences in scores on state or national achievement tests between various…

  12. Assessing sustainable remediation frameworks using sustainability principles.

    PubMed

    Ridsdale, D Reanne; Noble, Bram F

    2016-12-15

    The remediation industry has grown exponentially in recent decades. International organizations of practitioners and remediation experts have developed several frameworks for integrating sustainability into remediation projects; however, there has been limited attention to how sustainability is approached and operationalized in sustainable remediation frameworks and practices - or whether sustainability plays any meaningful role at all in sustainable remediation. This paper examines how sustainability is represented in remediation frameworks and the guidance provided for practical application. Seven broad sustainability principles and review criteria are proposed and applied to a sample of six international remediation frameworks. Not all review criteria were equally satisfied and none of the frameworks fully met all criteria; however, the best performing frameworks were those identified as sustainability remediation frameworks. Intra-generational equity was addressed by all frameworks. Integrating social, economic and biophysical components beyond triple-bottom-line indicators was explicitly addressed only by the sustainable remediation frameworks. No frameworks provided principle- or rule-based guidance for dealing with trade-offs in sustainability decisions.

  13. Organizing for Sustainability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, William M.; Hamburger, Michael W.

    2012-01-01

    A successful campus sustainability effort catalyzes broad engagement of the campus community and integration of sustainability principles into the academic and operational components of campus life. Although many universities have embraced sustainability as a new core value, others have been more sluggish in adopting sustainability principles to…

  14. Sustaining Writing Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patrick, Amy M.

    2010-01-01

    This article examines ways in which the fundamentals of both writing studies and sustainability studies overlap and complement each other, ultimately moving toward a theory of writing that not only is sustainable, but that also sustains writing practice across a variety of areas. For example, in order to be sustainable, both writing and…

  15. SUSTAINABILITY AND COMPLEX SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The important question in sustainability is not whether the world is sustainable, but whether a humanly acceptable regime of the world is sustainable. World commission on environment and development defines sustainability as ‘development that meets the needs of the present withou...

  16. 2010 Campus Sustainability Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    With this review of campus sustainability efforts in 2010, the editors aim to give readers--those who are often immersed in the day-to-day particulars of sustainability efforts--the same chance to take a step back and take a broader look at where they stand with sustainability in higher education. This inaugural 2010 Campus Sustainability Review…

  17. Y-12 Site Sustainability Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Erhart, Steven C.; Spencer, Charles G.

    2013-12-01

    The accomplishments to date and the long-range planning of the Y-12 Energy Management and Sustainability and Stewardship programs support the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) vision for a commitment to energy effi ciency and sustainability and to achievement of the Guiding Principles. Specifi cally, the Y-12 vision is to support the Environment, Safety and Health Policy and the DOE Strategic Sustainability Performance Plan (SSPP), while promoting overall sustainability and reduction of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The mission of the Y-12 Energy Management program is to incorporate energy-efficient technologies site-wide and to position Y-12 to meet NNSA energy requirement needs through 2025 and beyond. This plan addresses: Greenhouse Gas Reduction and Comprehensive Greenhouse Gas Inventory; Buildings, ESPC Initiative Schedule, and Regional and Local Planning; Fleet Management; Water Use Efficiency and Management; Pollution Prevention and Waste Reduction; Sustainable Acquisition; Electronic Stewardship and Data Centers; Renewable Energy; Climate Change; and Budget and Funding.

  18. Identification of Stages of Erythroid Differentiation in Bone Marrow and Erythrocyte Subpopulations in Blood Circulation that Are Preferentially Lost in Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia in Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Sreoshi; Bhardwaj, Nitin; Saxena, Rajiv K.

    2016-01-01

    Repeated weekly injections of rat erythrocytes produced autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) in C57BL/6 mice after 5–6 weeks. Using the double in vivo biotinylation (DIB) technique, recently developed in our laboratory, turnover of erythrocyte cohorts of different age groups during AIHA was monitored. Results indicate a significant decline in the proportion of reticulocytes, young and intermediate age groups of erythrocytes, but a significant increase in the proportion of old erythrocytes in blood circulation. Binding of the autoantibody was relatively higher to the young erythrocytes and higher levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) were also seen in these cells. Erythropoietic activity in the bone marrows and the spleen of AIHA induced mice was examined by monitoring the relative proportion of erythroid cells at various stages of differentiation in these organs. Cells at different stages of differentiation were enumerated flow cytometrically by double staining with anti-Ter119 and anti-transferrin receptor (CD71) monoclonal antibodies. Erythroid cells in bone marrow declined significantly in AIHA induced mice, erythroblast C being most affected (50% decline). Erythroblast C also recorded high intracellular ROS level along with increased levels of membrane-bound autoantibody. No such decline was observed in spleen. A model of AIHA has been proposed indicating that binding of autoantibodies may not be a sufficient condition for destruction of erythroid cells in bone marrow and in blood circulation. Last stage of erythropoietic differentiation in bone marrow and early stages of erythrocytes in blood circulation are specifically susceptible to removal in AIHA. PMID:27870894

  19. Variation of erythroid and myeloid precursors in the marrow and peripheral blood of volunteer subjects infected with human parvovirus (B19).

    PubMed Central

    Potter, C G; Potter, A C; Hatton, C S; Chapel, H M; Anderson, M J; Pattison, J R; Tyrrell, D A; Higgins, P G; Willman, J S; Parry, H F

    1987-01-01

    Infection of normal individuals with human parvovirus (B19) results in a mild disease (erythema infectiosum) but gives rise to aplastic crises in patients with chronic hemolytic anemias. The effects of this disease on hemopoiesis were investigated following intranasal inoculation of the virus into three volunteers. A typical disease ensued with a viremia peaking at 9 d. Marrow morphology 6 d after inoculation appeared normal but at 10 d there was a severe loss of erythroid precursors followed by a 1-2-g drop in hemoglobin, and an increase in serum immunoreactive erythropoietin. Erythroid burst-forming units (BFU-E) from the peripheral blood were considerably reduced, starting at the time of viremia and persisting for 4-8 d depending on the individual. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-forming units (CFU-GM) were also affected but the loss started 2 d later. Both CFU-GM and BFU-E showed a sharp overshoot at recovery. In the marrow, BFU-E and CFU-E were reduced at 6 and 10 d in the individual having the longest period of peripheral progenitor loss. In contrast, there was an increase in BFU-E and CFU-E in the subject with least change in peripheral progenitors. In the third subject, with an intermediate picture, there was a loss at 6 d but an increase at 10 d of erythroid progenitors. It is suggested that the architecture of the marrow might partially isolate progenitors from high titers of virus in the serum and individual variation in this respect might give the results observed. PMID:3033026

  20. ABO alleles are linked with haplotypes of an erythroid cell-specific regulatory element in intron 1 with a few exceptions attributable to genetic recombination.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, T; Sano, R; Takahashi, Y; Watanabe, K; Kubo, R; Kobayashi, M; Takahashi, K; Takeshita, H; Kominato, Y

    2016-01-01

    Recent investigation of transcriptional regulation of the ABO genes has identified a candidate erythroid cell-specific regulatory element, named the +5·8-kb site, in the first intron of ABO. Six haplotypes of the site have been reported previously. The present genetic population study demonstrated that each haplotype was mostly linked with specific ABO alleles with a few exceptions, possibly as a result of hybrid formation between common ABO alleles. Thus, investigation of these haplotypes could provide a clue to further elucidation of ABO alleles.

  1. Antisense myb inhibition of purified erythroid progenitors in development and differentiation is linked to cycling activity and expression of DNA polymerase alpha

    SciTech Connect

    Valtieri, M.; Venturelli, D.; Care, A.; Fossati, C.; Pelosi, E.; Labbaye, C.; Mattia, G.; Gewirtz, A.M.; Calabretta, B.; Peschle, C. )

    1991-03-15

    These studies aimed to determine the expression and functional role of c-myb in erythroid progenitors with different cycling activities. In the first series of experiments the erythroid burst-forming unit (BFU-E) and colony-forming unit (CFU-E) populations from adult peripheral blood (PB), bone marrow (BM), and embryonic-fetal liver (FL) were treated with either c-myb antisense oligomers or 3H-thymidine (3H-TdR). A direct correlation was always observed between the inhibitory effect of anti-myb oligomers and the level of cycling activity. Thus, the inhibitory effect of antisense c-myb on the number of BFU-E colonies was 28.3% +/- 15.8% in PB, 53.4% +/- 9.3% in BM, and 68.2% +/- 24.5% in FL. Both adult and embryonic CFU-E were markedly inhibited. Using purified PB progenitors, we observed a similar pattern, although with slightly lower inhibitory effects. In the 3H-TdR suicide assay the killing index of BFU-E was 8.9% +/- 4.2% in PB, 29.4% +/- 6.5% in BM, and 40.1% +/- 9.6% in FL. The values for adult and embryonic CFU-E were 55.7% +/- 7.9% and 60.98% +/- 6.6%, respectively. We then investigated the kinetics of c-myb mRNA level during the erythroid differentiation of purified adult PB and FL BFU-E, as evaluated in liquid-phase culture by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Adult erythroid precursors showed a gradual increase of c-myb mRNA from day 4 through day 8 of culture and a sharp decrease at later times, whereas the expression of c-myb mRNA and protein in differentiation embryonic precursors peaked 2 days earlier. In both cases, c-myb mRNA level peaked at the CFU-E stage of differentiation. Finally, highly purified adult PB BFU-E were stimulated into cycling by a 3-day treatment with interleukin-3 in liquid phase: both the sensitivity to c-myb antisense oligomers and the 3H-TdR suicide index showed a gradual, strictly parallel increase.

  2. Health and sustainability.

    PubMed

    Kjӕrgård, Bente; Land, Birgit; Bransholm Pedersen, Kirsten

    2014-09-01

    In the present article, we explore how sustainable development strategies and health promotion strategies can be bridged. The concept of the 'duality of structure' is taken as our starting point for understanding the linkages between health promotion and sustainable development, and for uncovering the structural properties or conditions which either enable or constrain sustainable public health initiatives. We argue that strategies towards health promotion are not sufficiently integrated with strategies for sustainable development, and thus political strategies aimed at solving health problems or sustainability problems may cause new, undesired and unforeseen environmental or health problems. First, we explore how the relation between health and sustainability is articulated in international policy documents. Next, we develop a model for understanding the relation between health promotion and sustainability. Third, we use examples from agriculture and food production to illustrate that health and sustainability are mutually enabling and constraining. We conclude that while the renewed focus on food security and food inequalities has brought the health and sustainability dimensions of the food system onto the political agenda, the conceptualization of duality between health and sustainability could be a new platform for a critical and theoretical stance towards the market-oriented food system strategy. Thinking along the lines of duality means that the integration of health promotion strategies and sustainable development strategies cannot be based on an approach to integration in which either health or sustainability is given precedence over the other. From a duality perspective, integration means conceiving sustainability from a health perspective and health from a sustainability perspective.

  3. The Road to Sustainability. Sustainability Workbook

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Afterschool Alliance, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Sustainability seems generally thought to mean raising money. But money is only part of the equation. Money cannot be raised without a quality program, a quality program demonstrates results, effective results are based on sound management practices, etc. Sustainability therefore, is many things that in combination make something capable of…

  4. Sustaining Rural Communities through Sustainable Agriculture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ikerd, John

    A 5-year collaborative project between Missouri, Michigan State, and Nebraska Universities to provide new opportunities for rural community self-development through sustainable agriculture had mixed results. This happened because community members did not understand the principles of sustainability, and because the extension education system was…

  5. Sequences responsible for erythroid and lymphoid leukemia in the long terminal repeats of Friend-mink cell focus-forming and Moloney murine leukemia viruses.

    PubMed Central

    Ishimoto, A; Takimoto, M; Adachi, A; Kakuyama, M; Kato, S; Kakimi, K; Fukuoka, K; Ogiu, T; Matsuyama, M

    1987-01-01

    Despite the high degree of homology (91%) between the nucleotide sequences of the Friend-mink cell focus-forming (MCF) and the Moloney murine leukemia virus (MuLV) genomic long terminal repeats (LTRs), the pathogenicities determined by the LTR sequences of the two viruses are quite different. Friend-MCF MuLV is an erythroid leukemia virus, and Moloney MuLV is a lymphoid leukemia virus. To map the LTR sequences responsible for the different disease specificities, we constructed nine viruses with LTRs recombinant between the Friend-MCF and Moloney MuLVs. Analysis of the leukemia induced with the recombinant viruses showed that a 195-base-pair nucleotide sequence, including a 75-base-pair nucleotide Moloney enhancer, is responsible for the tissue-specific leukemogenicity of Moloney MuLV. However, not only the enhancer but also its downstream sequences appear to be necessary. The Moloney virus enhancer and its downstream sequence exerted a dominant effect over that of the Friend-MCF virus, but the enhancer sequence alone did not. The results that three of the nine recombinant viruses induced both erythroid and lymphoid leukemias supported the hypothesis that multiple viral genetic determinants control both the ability to cause leukemia and the type of leukemia induced. PMID:3033317

  6. Cis-vaccenic acid induces differentiation and up-regulates gamma globin synthesis in K562, JK1 and transgenic mice erythroid progenitor stem cells.

    PubMed

    Aimola, Idowu A; Inuwa, Hajiya M; Nok, Andrew J; Mamman, Aisha I; Bieker, James J

    2016-04-05

    Gamma globin induction remains a promising pharmacological therapeutic treatment mode for sickle cell anemia and beta thalassemia, however Hydroxyurea remains the only FDA approved drug which works via this mechanism. In this regard, we assayed the γ-globin inducing capacity of Cis-vaccenic acid (CVA). CVA induced differentiation of K562, JK1 and transgenic mice primary bone marrow hematopoietic progenitor stem cells. CVA also significantly up-regulated γ-globin gene expression in JK-1 and transgenic mice bone marrow erythroid progenitor stem cells (TMbmEPSCs) but not K562 cells without altering cell viability. Increased γ-globin expression was accompanied by KLF1 suppression in CVA induced JK-1 cells. Erythropoietin induced differentiation of JK-1 cells 24h before CVA induction did not significantly alter CVA induced differentiation and γ-globin expression in JK-1 cells. Inhibition of JK-1 and Transgenic mice bone marrow erythroid progenitor stem cells Fatty acid elongase 5 (Elovl5) and Δ(9) desaturase suppressed the γ-globin inductive effects of CVA. CVA treatment failed to rescue γ-globin expression in Elovl5 and Δ(9)-desaturase inhibited cells 48 h post inhibition in JK-1 cells. The data suggests that CVA directly modulates differentiation of JK-1 and TMbmEPSCs, and indirectly modulates γ-globin gene expression in these cells. Our findings provide important clues for further evaluations of CVA as a potential fetal hemoglobin therapeutic inducer.

  7. Natural killer cells recognize friend retrovirus-infected erythroid progenitor cells through NKG2D-RAE-1 interactions In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Tatsuya; Tsuji-Kawahara, Sachiyo; Yuasa, Takae; Kinoshita, Saori; Chikaishi, Tomomi; Takamura, Shiki; Matsumura, Haruo; Seya, Tsukasa; Saga, Toshihiko; Miyazawa, Masaaki

    2011-06-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells function as early effector cells in the innate immune defense against viral infections and also participate in the regulation of normal and malignant hematopoiesis. NK cell activities have been associated with early clearance of viremia in experimental simian immunodeficiency virus and clinical human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infections. We have previously shown that NK cells function as major cytotoxic effector cells in vaccine-induced immune protection against Friend virus (FV)-induced leukemia, and NK cell depletion totally abrogates the above protective immunity. However, how NK cells recognize retrovirus-infected cells remains largely unclear. The present study demonstrates a correlation between the expression of the products of retinoic acid early transcript-1 (RAE-1) genes in target cells and their susceptibility to killing by NK cells isolated from FV-infected animals. This killing was abrogated by antibodies blocking the NKG2D receptor in vitro. Further, the expression of RAE-1 proteins on erythroblast surfaces increased early after FV inoculation, and administration of an RAE-1-blocking antibody resulted in increased spleen infectious centers and exaggerated pathology, indicating that FV-infected erythroid cells are recognized by NK cells mainly through the NKG2D-RAE-1 interactions in vivo. Enhanced retroviral replication due to host gene-targeting resulted in markedly increased RAE-1 expression in the absence of massive erythroid cell proliferation, indicating a direct role of retroviral replication in RAE-1 upregulation.

  8. In utero and in vitro effects of benzene and its metabolites on erythroid differentiation and the role of reactive oxygen species

    SciTech Connect

    Badham, Helen J.; Winn, Louise M.

    2010-05-01

    Benzene is a ubiquitous occupational and environmental toxicant. Exposures to benzene both prenatally and during adulthood are associated with the development of disorders such as aplastic anemia and leukemia. Mechanisms of benzene toxicity are unknown; however, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by benzene metabolites may play a role. Little is known regarding the effects of benzene metabolites on erythropoiesis. Therefore, to determine the effects of in utero exposure to benzene on the growth and differentiation of fetal erythroid progenitor cells (CFU-E), pregnant CD-1 mice were exposed to benzene and CFU-E numbers were assessed in fetal liver (hematopoietic) tissue. In addition, to determine the effect of benzene metabolite-induced ROS generation on erythropoiesis, HD3 chicken erythroblast cells were exposed to benzene, phenol, or hydroquinone followed by stimulation of erythrocyte differentiation. Our results show that in utero exposure to benzene caused significant alterations in female offspring CFU-E numbers. In addition, exposure to hydroquinone, but not benzene or phenol, significantly reduced the percentage of differentiated HD3 cells, which was associated with an increase in ROS. Pretreatment of HD3 cells with polyethylene glycol-conjugated superoxide dismutase (PEG-SOD) prevented hydroquinone-induced inhibition of erythropoiesis, supporting the hypothesis that ROS generation is involved in the development of benzene erythrotoxicity. In conclusion, this study provided evidence that ROS generated as a result of benzene metabolism may significantly alter erythroid differentiation, potentially leading to the development of Blood Disorders.

  9. Identification of an arginine452 to histidine substitution in the erythroid 5-aminolaevulinate synthetase gene in a large pedigree with X-linked hereditary sideroblastic anaemia.

    PubMed

    Edgar, A J; Losowsky, M S; Noble, J S; Wickramasinghe, S N

    1997-01-01

    The coding region of the erythroid 5-aminolaevulinate synthetase gene (ALAS2) from a large pedigree with pyridoxine-responsive X-linked hereditary sideroblastic anaemia was examined for mutations. In three affected males from this pedigree, single strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP) analysis showed anomalous migration of a PCR product spanning exon 9. Sequencing of amplified genomic DNA from one of these affected males revealed a guanine to adenine transition at nucleotide 1407 of the cDNA sequence in exon 9 of the gene. This mutation results in the loss of an HhaI restriction enzyme digest site. An HhaI digest assay demonstrated the presence of this mutation in other affected males but not in unaffected males and unrelated individuals. The point mutation results in an arginine to histidine substitution at amino acid residue 452. The arginine residue is conserved in both the erythroid and housekeeping ALAS genes in all known vertebrate sequences. This arginine is located in the middle of a predicted alpha-helix.

  10. Overactivation of the nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2-antioxidant response element pathway in hepatocytes decreases hepatic ischemia/reperfusion injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Lung-Yi; Harberg, Calvin; Matkowskyj, Kristina A; Cook, Shelly; Roenneburg, Drew; Werner, Sabine; Johnson, Jeffrey; Foley, David P

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI) is a critical component of hepatic surgery. Oxidative stress has long been implicated as a key player in IRI. In this study, we examine the cell-specific role of the nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2)-antioxidant response element pathway in warm hepatic IRI. Nrf2 knockout (KO) and wild-type (WT) animals and novel transgenic mice expressing a constitutively active nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (caNrf2) mutant in hepatocytes (AlbCre+/caNrf2+) and their littermate controls underwent partial hepatic ischemia or sham surgery. The animals were killed 6 hours after reperfusion, and their serum and tissue were collected for analysis. As compared to WT animals after ischemia/reperfusion (IR), Nrf2 KO mice had increased hepatocellular injury with increased serum alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase, Suzuki score, apoptosis, an increased inflammatory infiltrate, and enhanced inflammatory cytokine expression. On the other hand, AlbCre+/caNrf2+ that underwent IR had significantly reduced serum transaminases, less necrosis on histology, and a less pronounced inflammatory infiltrate and inflammatory cytokine expression as compared to the littermate controls. However, there were no differences in apoptosis. Taken together, Nrf2 plays a critical role in our murine model of warm hepatic IRI, with Nrf2 deficiency exacerbating hepatic IRI and hepatocyte-specific Nrf2 overactivation providing protection against warm hepatic IRI.

  11. A dominant-negative mutant of C/EBPalpha, associated with acute myeloid leukemias, inhibits differentiation of myeloid and erythroid progenitors of man but not mouse.

    PubMed

    Schwieger, Maike; Löhler, Jürgen; Fischer, Meike; Herwig, Uwe; Tenen, Daniel G; Stocking, Carol

    2004-04-01

    The CCAAT/enhancer binding protein alpha (C/EBPalpha) is an essential transcription factor for granulocytic differentiation. C/EBPalpha mutations are found in approximately 8% of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients. Most of these mutations occur in the N-terminal coding region, resulting in a frame shift and the enhanced translation of a dominant-negative 30-kDa protein, which may be responsible for the differentiation block observed in AML. To test this hypothesis, we introduced a cDNA encoding an N-terminal mutated C/EBPalpha (mut10) into primary hematopoietic progenitors using a retroviral vector. Expression of mut10 in human CD34+ cord blood cells dramatically inhibited differentiation of both myeloid and erythroid lineages. Immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated coexpression of both myeloid and erythroid markers in the immature transformed cells. Surprisingly, mut10 did not block myelocytic differentiation in murine progenitors but did alter their differentiation kinetics and clonogenicity. Experiments were performed to confirm that the differential effect of mut10 on murine and human progenitors was not due to species-specific differences in C/EBPalpha protein sequences, expression levels, or inefficient targeting of relevant cells. Taken together, our results underline the intrinsic differences between hematopoietic controls in mouse and human and support the hypothesis that mutations in CEBPA are critical events in the disruption of myeloid differentiation in AMLs.

  12. p210(BCR-ABL) reprograms transformed and normal human megakaryocytic progenitor cells into erythroid cells and suppresses FLI-1 transcription.

    PubMed

    Buet, D; Raslova, H; Geay, J-F; Jarrier, P; Lazar, V; Turhan, A; Morlé, F; Vainchenker, W; Louache, F

    2007-05-01

    The BCR-ABL oncoprotein exhibits deregulated protein tyrosine kinase activity and is implicated in the pathogenesis of Philadelphia chromosome (Ph)-positive human leukemias. Here, we report that ectopic expression of p210(BCR-ABL) in the megakaryoblastic Mo7e cell line and in primary human CD34(+) progenitors trigger erythroid differentiation at the expense of megakaryocyte (MK) differentiation. Clonal culture of purified CD41(+)CD42(-) cells, a population highly enriched in MK progenitors, combined with the conditional expression of p210(BCR-ABL) tyrosine kinase activity by imatinib identified a true lineage reprogramming. In both Mo7e or CD41(+)CD42(-) cells transduced with p210(BCR-ABL), lineage switching was associated with a downregulation of the friend leukemia Integration 1 (FLI-1) transcription factor. Re-expression of FLI-1 in p210(BCR-ABL)-transduced Mo7e cells rescued the megakaryoblastic phenotype. Altogether, these results demonstrate that alteration of signal transduction via p210(BCR-ABL) reprograms MK cells into erythroid cells by a downregulation of FLI-1. In addition, our findings underscore the role of kinases in lineage choice and infidelity in pathology and suggest that downregulation of FLI-1 may have important implications in CML pathogenesis.

  13. PLC-beta 1 regulates the expression of miR-210 during mithramycin-mediated erythroid differentiation in K562 cells

    PubMed Central

    Fiume, Roberta; Blalock, William; Matteucci, Alessandro; Ramazzotti, Giulia; McCubrey, James A.; Cocco, Lucio; Faenza, Irene

    2014-01-01

    PLC-beta 1 (PLCβ1) inhibits in human K562 cells erythroid differentiation induced by mithramycin (MTH) by targeting miR-210 expression. Inhibition of miR-210 affects the erythroid differentiation pathway and it occurs to a greater extent in MTH-treated cells. Overexpression of PLCβ1 suppresses the differentiation of K562 elicited by MTH as demonstrated by the absence of γ-globin expression. Inhibition of PLCβ1 expression is capable to promote the differentiation process leading to a recovery of γ-globin gene even in the absence of MTH. Our experimental evidences suggest that PLCβ1 signaling regulates erythropoiesis through miR-210. Indeed overexpression of PLCβ1 leads to a decrease of miR-210 expression after MTH treatment. Moreover miR-210 is up-regulated when PLCβ1 expression is down-regulated. When we silenced PKCα by RNAi technique, we found a decrease in miR-210 and γ-globin expression levels, which led to a severe slowdown of cell differentiation in K562 cells and these effects were the same encountered in cells overexpressing PLCβ1. Therefore we suggest a novel role for PLCβ1 in regulating miR-210 and our data hint at the fact that, in human K562 erythroleukemia cells, the modulation of PLCβ1 expression is able to exert an impairment of normal erythropoiesis as assessed by γ-globin expression. PMID:24962066

  14. Cis-vaccenic acid induces differentiation and up-regulates gamma globin synthesis in K562, JK1 and transgenic mice erythroid progenitor stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Aimola, Idowu A.; Inuwa, Hajiya M.; Nok, Andrew J.; Mamman, Aisha I.; Bieker, James J.

    2017-01-01

    Gamma globin induction remains a promising pharmacological therapeutic treatment mode for sickle cell anemia and beta thalassemia, however Hydroxyurea remains the only FDA approved drug which works via this mechanism. In this regard, we assayed the γ-globin inducing capacity of Cis-vaccenic acid (CVA). CVA induced differentiation of K562, JK1 and transgenic mice primary bone marrow hematopoietic progenitor stem cells. CVA also significantly up-regulated γ-globin gene expression in JK-1 and transgenic mice bone marrow erythroid progenitor stem cells (TMbmEPSCs) but not K562 cells without altering cell viability. Increased γ-globin expression was accompanied by KLF1 suppression in CVA induced JK-1 cells. Erythropoietin induced differentiation of JK-1 cells 24 h before CVA induction did not significantly alter CVA induced differentiation and γ-globin expression in JK-1 cells. Inhibition of JK-1 and Transgenic mice bone marrow erythroid progenitor stem cells Fatty acid elongase 5 (Elovl5) and Δ9 desaturase suppressed the γ-globin inductive effects of CVA. CVA treatment failed to rescue γ-globin expression in Elovl5 and Δ9-desaturase inhibited cells 48 h post inhibition in JK-1 cells. The data suggests that CVA directly modulates differentiation of JK-1 and TMbmEPSCs, and indirectly modulates γ-globin gene expression in these cells. Our findings provide important clues for further evaluations of CVA as a potential fetal hemoglobin therapeutic inducer PMID:26879870

  15. Erythroid differentiation of mouse erythroleukemia cells results in reorganization of protein-DNA complexes in the mouse beta maj globin promoter but not its distal enhancer.

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, P M; Shen, C K

    1993-01-01

    Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) induction of mouse erythroleukemia (MEL) cells represents a well-defined in vitro system of terminal erythroid differentiation. We have studied the molecular mechanisms of transcriptional activation of the mouse beta maj globin gene during MEL cell differentiation by analyzing nuclear factor-DNA interactions in vivo at the gene's upstream promoter and a distal enhancer, 5'HS-2. Genomic footprinting data indicate that three motifs, CAC, NF-E2/AP1, and GATA-1, of the 5'HS-2 enhancer are bound with nuclear factors in MEL cells both prior to and after DMSO induction. No obvious conformational change of these nuclear factor-DNA complexes could be detected upon terminal differentiation of MEL cells. On the other hand, DMSO induction of MEL cells leads to the formation of specific nuclear factor-DNA complexes at several transcriptional regulatory elements of the mouse beta maj globin upstream promoter. Our genomic footprinting data have interesting implications with respect to the molecular mechanisms of transcriptional regulation and chromatin change of the mouse beta maj globin gene during erythroid differentiation. Images PMID:8423777

  16. Achieving permanency for LGBTQ youth.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Jill; Freundlich, Madelyn

    2006-01-01

    This article brings together two significant efforts in the child welfare field: achieving permanence for youth in out-of-home care and meeting the needs of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and questioning (LGBTQ) youth. During the past several years, a national movement has taken place to assure all children and youth have a permanent family connection before leaving the child welfare system; however, LGBTQ youth are not routinely included in the permanency discussions. At the same time, efforts in addressing the needs of LGBTQ youth have increased, but permanency is rarely mentioned as a need. This article offers models of permanence and practices to facilitate permanence with LGBTQ youth and their families. It also offers a youth-driven, individualized process, using youth development principles to achieve relational, physical, and legal permanence. Reunification efforts are discussed, including services, supports, and education required for youth to return to their family of origin. For those who cannot return home, other family resources are explored. The article also discusses cultural issues as they affect permanence for LGBTQ youth, and, finally, addresses the need for ongoing support services to sustain and support permanency.

  17. 'No delays achiever'.

    PubMed

    2007-05-01

    The latest version of the NHS Institute for Innovation and Improvement's 'no delays achiever', a web based tool created to help NHS organisations achieve the 18-week target for GP referrals to first treatment, is available at www.nodelaysachiever.nhs.uk.

  18. Vicarious Achievement Orientation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leavitt, Harold J.; And Others

    This study tests hypotheses about achievement orientation, particularly vicarious achievement. Undergraduate students (N=437) completed multiple-choice questionnaires, indicating likely responses of one person to the success of another. The sex of succeeder and observer, closeness of relationship, and setting (medical school or graduate school of…

  19. Heritability of Creative Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piffer, Davide; Hur, Yoon-Mi

    2014-01-01

    Although creative achievement is a subject of much attention to lay people, the origin of individual differences in creative accomplishments remain poorly understood. This study examined genetic and environmental influences on creative achievement in an adult sample of 338 twins (mean age = 26.3 years; SD = 6.6 years). Twins completed the Creative…

  20. Confronting the Achievement Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, David

    2007-01-01

    This article talks about the large achievement gap between children of color and their white peers. The reasons for the achievement gap are varied. First, many urban minorities come from a background of poverty. One of the detrimental effects of growing up in poverty is receiving inadequate nourishment at a time when bodies and brains are rapidly…

  1. Achievement-Based Resourcing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fletcher, Mike; And Others

    1992-01-01

    This collection of seven articles examines achievement-based resourcing (ABR), the concept that the funding of educational institutions should be linked to their success in promoting student achievement, with a focus on the application of ABR to postsecondary education in the United Kingdom. The articles include: (1) "Introduction" (Mick…

  2. States Address Achievement Gaps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christie, Kathy

    2002-01-01

    Summarizes 2 state initiatives to address the achievement gap: North Carolina's report by the Advisory Commission on Raising Achievement and Closing Gaps, containing an 11-point strategy, and Kentucky's legislation putting in place 10 specific processes. The North Carolina report is available at www.dpi.state.nc.us.closingthegap; Kentucky's…

  3. Sustaining Cyberinfrastructure Interoperabililty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, R. W.; Rajasekar, A.

    2015-12-01

    The National Science Foundation has initiated multiple cyberinfrastructure projects through the DataNet Parters, Data Infrastructure Building Blocks, Big Data Hubs, EarthCube, and XSEDE programs. Each project builds a component of cyberinfrastructure, such as collaboration environments, repositories, archives, union catalogs, or data manipulation services. The DataNet Federation Consortium (DFC) (datafed.org) has explored the types of interoperability mechanisms that are needed to build research collaboration environments that span the multiple NSF projects. Based on collaborations with each group, three basic mechanisms have proven to be sufficient: 1) Strong Federation: Tightly coupled federations in which shared name spaces are used for users and files along with communications based on well-defined protocols and API interfaces. Trust relationships based on policies play a major role in this federation. 2) Soft Federation: Loosly coupled federation where one system invokes remote services offered by another using service level communications. No name spaces are shared in such a federation. This type of federation is useful when well-defined services are available remotely on the internet. 3) Asynchronous Federation: Weakly coupled federation in which no direct interaction occurs between the systems. This level of federation is very extensible and flexible. Long-term sustainability can be achieved when the interoperability mechanisms enable interaction between old and new technologies - with the interactions being flexible or rigid depending upon the strength of trust needed between the systems. Sustaining cyberinfrastructure interoperability becomes feasible when the mechanisms enable the capture of the knowledge needed for interaction, without requiring changes to either sets of infrastructure. The DFC project has implemented all three types of federation to link services and systems based on the needs of the users.

  4. Exploring the Ambiguity: What Faculty Leaders Really Think of Sustainability in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Tarah; Horst, Naomi

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine how a cohort of university faculty leaders in Canadian universities conceptualize sustainable development, sustainable universities, the role universities play in achieving a sustainable future, key issues facing the university, and the barriers to implementing sustainability initiatives on campus.…

  5. Sustainable Water Infrastructure

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Resources for state and local environmental and public health officials, and water, infrastructure and utility professionals to learn about sustainable water infrastructure, sustainable water and energy practices, and their role.

  6. FORUM: Is Ecotourism Sustainable?

    PubMed

    Wall

    1997-07-01

    / It is legitimate to ask whether and in what form tourism might contribute to sustainable development. This is not the same as sustainable tourism which, as a single-sector approach to development, may overlook important linkages with other sectors. If tourism is to contribute to sustainable development, then it must be economically viable, ecologically sensitive and culturally appropriate. Ecotourism is often advocated as being a sustainable form of tourism but imprecision in terminology clouds basic issues and there are strong economic, ecological, and cultural reasons for believing that, even in its purest forms, ecotourism is likely to present substantial challenges to destination areas, particularly if it competes for scarce resources and displaces existing uses and users. Sustainable tourism and ecotourism are not synonyms, many forms of ecotourism may not be sustainable, and if ecotourism is to contribute to sustainable development, then careful planning and management will be required.KEY WORDS: Ecotourism; Sustainable development; Development; Tourism

  7. Supporting Sustainable Rural Communities

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Supporting Sustainable Rural Communities summarizes the findings of a work group of EPA, HUD, DOT, and USDA and creates a framework for the Partnership for Sustainable Communities’ future work with rural communities.

  8. Sustainability Indicators and Metrics

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sustainability is about preserving human existence. Indicators and metrics are absolutely necessary to provide at least a semi-quantitative assessment of progress towards or away from sustainability. Otherwise, it becomes impossible to objectively assess whether progress is bei...

  9. Social sustainability and collaborative learning.

    PubMed

    Källström, Helena Nordström; Ljung, Magnus

    2005-06-01

    The social dimension is central to sustainable development of agri-food systems. If farmers are not satisfied with their situation or motivated to continue farming, many of today's environmental goals will be impossible to achieve. Between 1997 and 2003, several case studies were carried out on social sustainability, the importance of recognition in the farming system, and the potential role of increased collaboration between actors. The main hypothesis was that improved recognition is a basis for sustainable social conditions. Our findings show that many farmers today perceive an impoverished social situation. They believe they lack control over decisions, which hinders their ability to continue farming. Public images and political decisions show a lack of respect for farmers' skills and knowledge. However, increased collaboration among actors is believed to be one important way forward, creating stronger relationships and networks, as well as a stronger identity for farmers. Our findings emphasize the need for authorities and other organizations to support farmers and to facilitate collaborative learning and decision-making processes for socioecological sustainability.

  10. Sustainable Materials Management Challenge Data

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Sustainable Materials Management (SMM) is a systemic approach to using and reusing materials more productively over their entire lifecycles. It represents a change in how our society thinks about the use of natural resources and environmental protection. By looking at a product's entire lifecycle we can find new opportunities to reduce environmental impacts, conserve resources, and reduce costs. There are multiple challenge programs available as part of the SMM program, including the Food Recovery Challenge, the Electronics Challenge, the Federal Green Challenge, and the WasteWise program. As part of EPA's Food Recovery Challenge, organizations pledge to improve their sustainable food management practices and report their results. The SMM Electronics Challenge encourages electronics manufacturers, brand owners and retailers to strive to send 100 percent of the used electronics they collect from the public, businesses and within their own organizations to third-party certified electronics refurbishers and recyclers. The Federal Green Challenge, a national effort under the EPA??s Sustainable Materials Management Program, challenges EPA and other federal agencies throughout the country to lead by example in reducing the federal government's environmental impact. EPA??s WasteWise encourages organizations and businesses to achieve sustainability in their practices and reduce select industrial wastes. WasteWise is part of EPA??s sustaina

  11. [Securing the sustainability of biobanks].

    PubMed

    Kirsten, Romy; Hummel, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Active research sites in biomedicine need professionally structured, sustainable biobanks that represent established resources and technology platforms across different locations and disciplines. Currently, the funding of research biobanks is not uniformly regulated, mainly because of the different focuses, services and concepts. On the other hand, the samples and associated data of biobanks gain significant value over time, and therefore their long-term storage should be envisaged right from the start.The sustainability of biobank structures can be viewed from various perspectives, but financial sustainability certainly represents the most demanding challenge. The financing of biobanks can be achieved by a well-balanced model consisting of institutional resources and other funding sources such as infrastructure and research projects, complemented by reimbursement. Structural measures such as the creation of centralized biobank structures and involvement in consortia and networks contribute to the long-term use and exchange of samples across biobanks. In turn, a quality-controlled and transparent documentation of all processes and structures is required, which guarantees the utilization of the sparse financial resources for the most efficient use of the precious resource of human biomaterial. The long-term goal is the sustainable financing of an infrastructure that is essential for any modern biomedical research and provides benefit for the society.

  12. Did Tanzania Achieve the Second Millennium Development Goal? Statistical Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magoti, Edwin

    2016-01-01

    Development Goal "Achieve universal primary education", the challenges faced, along with the way forward towards achieving the fourth Sustainable Development Goal "Ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all". Statistics show that Tanzania has made very promising steps…

  13. Enterprise Sustainment Metrics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The Air Force sustainment enterprise does not have metrics that . . . adequately measure key sustainment parameters, according to the 2011 National...Research Council of the National Academies study, Examination of the U.S. Air Force’s Aircraft Sustainment Needs in the Future and Its Strategy to Meet...standardized and do not contribute to the overall assessment of the sustainment enterprise. This paper explores the development of a single metric

  14. Achievability for telerobotic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kress, Reid L.; Draper, John V.; Hamel, William R.

    2001-02-01

    Methods are needed to improve the capabilities of autonomous robots to perform tasks that are difficult for contemporary robots, and to identify those tasks that robots cannot perform. Additionally, in the realm of remote handling, methods are needed to assess which tasks and/or subtasks are candidates for automation. We are developing a new approach to understanding the capability of autonomous robotic systems. This approach uses formalized methods for determining the achievability of tasks for robots, that is, the likelihood that an autonomous robot or telerobot can successfully complete a particular task. Any autonomous system may be represented in achievability space by the volume describing that system's capabilities within the 3-axis space delineated by perception, cognition, and action. This volume may be thought of as a probability density with achievability decreasing as the distance from the centroid of the volume increases. Similarly, any task may be represented within achievability space. However, as tasks have more finite requirements for perception, cognition, and action, each may be represented as a point (or, more accurately, as a small sphere) within achievability space. Analysis of achievability can serve to identify, a priori, the survivability of robotic systems and the likelihood of mission success; it can be used to plan a mission or portions of a mission; it can be used to modify a mission plan to accommodate unpredicted occurrences; it can also serve to identify needs for modifications to robotic systems or tasks to improve achievability. .

  15. Selection of Sustainable Processes using Sustainability ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Chemical products can be obtained by process pathways involving varying amounts and types of resources, utilities, and byproduct formation. When such competing process options such as six processes for making methanol as are considered in this study, it is necessary to identify the most sustainable option. Sustainability of a chemical process is generally evaluated with indicators that require process and chemical property data. These indicators individually reflect the impacts of the process on areas of sustainability, such as the environment or society. In order to choose among several alternative processes an overall comparative analysis is essential. Generally net profit will show the most economic process. A mixed integer optimization problem can also be solved to identify the most economic among competing processes. This method uses economic optimization and leaves aside the environmental and societal impacts. To make a decision on the most sustainable process, the method presented here rationally aggregates the sustainability indicators into a single index called sustainability footprint (De). Process flow and economic data were used to compute the indicator values. Results from sustainability footprint (De) are compared with those from solving a mixed integer optimization problem. In order to identify the rank order of importance of the indicators, a multivariate analysis is performed using partial least square variable importance in projection (PLS-VIP)

  16. Sustainable Learning Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Velazquez, Luis E.; Esquer, Javier; Munguia, Nora E.; Moure-Eraso, Rafael

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to debate how companies may better become a sustainable learning organization by offering the most used and insightful concepts of sustainability. Design/methodology/approach: Through literature review, learning organization and sustainability perspectives are explored and compared. Findings: Learning…

  17. Sustainability: An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wormsley, W. E.

    1990-01-01

    This article introduces a group of six papers on sustainability of programs for visually handicapped persons in developing countries. Sustainability is discussed from an anthropological perspective, noting the importance of a social soundness analysis and a social impact assessment, enemies of sustainability, and the need for broad local input in…

  18. Custodial Operations: Green & Sustainable

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, J. Kirk

    2008-01-01

    Custodial Operations can have a significant impact on institutional green and sustainable goals if given the proper support and challenge. This article describes the green and sustainable custodial operations in place at Carleton College in Northfield, Minnesota. The article reviews the college's sustainable efforts on biodegradables, packaging,…

  19. Measuring Educational Sustainability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selvanathan, Rani G.

    2013-01-01

    There are many definitions that are attributable to the meaning of sustainability. Sustainability can be viewed as long-lasting, effective result of a project, venture, action, or investment without consuming additional future resources. Because of the wide nature of its applicability, a universal measure of sustainability is hard to come by. This…

  20. Transferring Education for Sustainability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gafoor, Kunnathodi Abdul; Umer Farooque, T. K.

    2013-01-01

    Sustainability stands for sustaining the past, meeting needs of the present without compromising the ability to meet future needs. It should meet the individual and social needs, present and future needs local and global needs. A sustainable education that meets this requirements surely be a transferable education; an education that transfers from…

  1. Sustainability Statement and Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Education for Sustainable Development, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This article presents nine resources that focus on environmental education and sustainability. These include: (1) "Sustainability Statement and Policy," Dalhousie University, Nova Scotia, Canada, 2009, which is available at http://office.sustainability.dal.ca/Governance; (2) "Climate Literacy: The Essential Principles of Climate…

  2. Sustainability of physical activity promoting environments and influences on sustainability following a structural intervention in residential children's homes.

    PubMed

    Dominick, Gregory M; Tudose, Alina; Pohlig, Ryan T; Saunders, Ruth P

    2016-04-01

    Research examining sustainability of health promotion programs within organizational settings is limited. The Environmental Interventions in Residential Children's Homes (ENRICH) was a structural intervention that trained Wellness Teams (WTs) within residential children's homes (RCH) to target environmental changes that promote physical activity (PA) among residential youth. This study examines the sustainability of PA promoting environments and influences on sustainability within RCHs. A sustainability survey was administered to 14 RCHs 2 years after receiving ENRICH. Variables included sustainability of PA promoting environments, Organizational Influences, perceived organizational and individual benefits, and implementation of PA and general (i.e. Global) wellness activities. Activities reported as sustained and barriers were used descriptively to inform sustainability. Path analyses explained the relationship between sustainability influences and sustainability of PA promoting environments. Sustainability was found in 8 of 14 (57%) RCHs. Sustained activities reflected greater Global versus PA implementation. Global implementation mediated the relationship between Organizational Influences and sustainability, which may have been more easily achieved since Global activities were most likely controlled by WTs and did not require extensive organizational support from RCH administrators. Results highlight the importance of defining and assessing different implementation types when measuring sustainability and influences on sustainability within RCHs organizations.

  3. Culture and Achievement Motivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maehr, Martin L.

    1974-01-01

    A framework is suggested for the cross-cultural study of motivation that stresses the importance of contextual conditions in eliciting achievement motivation and emphasizes cultural relativity in the definition of the concept. (EH)

  4. Achieving Salary Equity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nevill, Dorothy D.

    1975-01-01

    Three techniques are outlined for use by higher education institutions to achieve salary equity: salary prediction (using various statistical procedures), counterparting (comparing salaries of persons of similar rank), and grievance procedures. (JT)

  5. Performance sustaining intracortical neural prostheses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuyujukian, Paul; Kao, Jonathan C.; Fan, Joline M.; Stavisky, Sergey D.; Ryu, Stephen I.; Shenoy, Krishna V.

    2014-12-01

    Objective. Neural prostheses, or brain-machine interfaces, aim to restore efficient communication and movement ability to those suffering from paralysis. A major challenge these systems face is robust performance, particularly with aging signal sources. The aim in this study was to develop a neural prosthesis that could sustain high performance in spite of signal instability while still minimizing retraining time. Approach. We trained two rhesus macaques implanted with intracortical microelectrode arrays 1-4 years prior to this study to acquire targets with a neurally-controlled cursor. We measured their performance via achieved bitrate (bits per second, bps). This task was repeated over contiguous days to evaluate the sustained performance across time. Main results. We found that in the monkey with a younger (i.e., two year old) implant and better signal quality, a fixed decoder could sustain performance for a month at a rate of 4 bps, the highest achieved communication rate reported to date. This fixed decoder was evaluated across 22 months and experienced a performance decline at a rate of 0.24 bps yr-1. In the monkey with the older (i.e., 3.5 year old) implant and poorer signal quality, a fixed decoder could not sustain performance for more than a few days. Nevertheless, performance in this monkey was maintained for two weeks without requiring additional online retraining time by utilizing prior days’ experimental data. Upon analysis of the changes in channel tuning, we found that this stability appeared partially attributable to the cancelling-out of neural tuning fluctuations when projected to two-dimensional cursor movements. Significance. The findings in this study (1) document the highest-performing communication neural prosthesis in monkeys, (2) confirm and extend prior reports of the stability of fixed decoders, and (3) demonstrate a protocol for system stability under conditions where fixed decoders would otherwise fail. These improvements to decoder

  6. The erythroid function of transferrin receptor 2 revealed by Tmprss6 inactivation in different models of transferrin receptor 2 knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Nai, Antonella; Pellegrino, Rosa M.; Rausa, Marco; Pagani, Alessia; Boero, Martina; Silvestri, Laura; Saglio, Giuseppe; Roetto, Antonella; Camaschella, Clara

    2014-01-01

    Transferrin receptor 2 (TFR2) is a transmembrane glycoprotein expressed in the liver and in the erythroid compartment, mutated in a form of hereditary hemochromatosis. Hepatic TFR2, together with HFE, activates the transcription of the iron-regulator hepcidin, while erythroid TFR2 is a member of the erythropoietin receptor complex. The TMPRSS6 gene, encoding the liver-expressed serine protease matriptase-2, is the main inhibitor of hepcidin and inactivation of TMPRSS6 leads to iron deficiency with high hepcidin levels. Here we evaluate the phenotype resulting from the genetic loss of Tmprss6 in Tfr2 total (Tfr2−/−) and liver-specific (Tfr2LCKO) knockout mice. Tmprss6−/−Tfr2−/− and Tmprss6−/−Tfr2LCKO mice have increased hepcidin levels and show iron-deficiency anemia like Tmprss6−/−mice. However, while Tmprss6−/−Tfr2LCKO are phenotypically identical to Tmprss6−/− mice, Tmprss6−/−Tfr2−/− mice have increased red blood cell count and more severe microcytosis than Tmprss6−/− mice. In addition hepcidin expression in Tmprss6−/−Tfr2−/− mice is higher than in the wild-type animals, but lower than in Tmprss6−/− mice, suggesting partial inhibition of the hepcidin activating pathway. Our results prove that hepatic TFR2 acts upstream of TMPRSS6. In addition Tfr2 deletion causes a relative erythrocytosis in iron-deficient mice, which likely attenuates the effect of over-expression of hepcidin in Tmprss6−/− mice. Since liver-specific deletion of Tfr2 in Tmprss6−/− mice does not modify the erythrocyte count, we speculate that loss of Tfr2 in the erythroid compartment accounts for the hematologic phenotype of Tmprss6−/−Tfr2−/− mice. We propose that TFR2 is a limiting factor for erythropoiesis, particularly in conditions of iron restriction. PMID:24658816

  7. Infrastructure Task Force Sustainable Infrastructure Goals and Concepts Document - November 2011

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document outlines the concepts of appropriate infrastructure and sustainable management entities to guide the coordinated federal efforts to achieve greater sustainable access to safe drinking water and basic sanitation.

  8. Energy and sustainable development in North American Sunbelt cities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roosa, Stephen A.

    The goals of sustainable development are often misunderstood and variously applied. Sustainability as an urban goal is hindered by the lack of a consensus definition of sustainable development. The failure to focus on energy in cities as a means of achieving urban sustainability is one reason that successful empirical examples of implementing sustainable development are rare. The paradox is that as society attempts to achieve the goals of sustainable development, cities are using more fossil fuel based energy, which results in more pollution and ultimately makes sustainability more difficult to achieve. This dissertation explores the linkages between energy and sustainability and their connection to urban polices. This research provides a detailed review of the history of the concept of sustainability, a review of literature to date, and comparative issues concerning sustainability. The literature review will describe the underlying causes and effects of changes which have led to concerns about urban sustainability. The types of urban policies that are used by Sunbelt cities will be discussed. The purpose of this research is multifold: (1) to study the energy related policies of Sunbelt cities; (2) to propose a workable typology of policies; (3) to develop an index by which cities can be ranked in terms of sustainability; and (4) to assess and evaluate the relationships between the adoption of urban policies that promote energy efficiency, energy conservation and alternative energy to determine if they are associated with reduced energy use and greater urban sustainability. This research involves use of empirical data, U.S. census information, database explorations and other data. Both qualitative and quantitative analysis methodologies were employed as a means of defining and exploring the dimensions of energy and sustainable development in urban areas. The research will find that certain urban policies are related to changes in indicators and measures of urban

  9. [Health and environmental governance for sustainable development].

    PubMed

    Buss, Paulo Marchiori; Machado, Jorge Mesquita Huet; Gallo, Edmundo; Magalhães, Danielly de Paiva; Setti, Andréia Faraoni Freitas; Franco Netto, Francisco de Abreu; Buss, Daniel Forsin

    2012-06-01

    The United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development, Rio+20, will address the challenges for sustainable development (SD), 'green economy and poverty eradication' and the 'institutional structure of sustainable development'. Therefore it will address the governance needed to achieve such goals. This paper discusses the structure of global, regional and national governance of and for health and environment in the context of SD. Among other global actions, the Millenium Development Goals were a significant recent political effort, but despite its advances, it fails when ignores the structural causes of production and consumption patterns and the unequal distribution of power, which are responsible for inequities and impede true development. To achieve SD, proposals must avoid reductionism, advancing conceptually and methodologically to face the challenges of the socio-environmental determinants of health through intersectoral action, including social participation and all levels of government. It is paramount to continue the implementation of Agenda 21, to meet the MDGs and to create 'Sustainable Development Goals'. Regarding the health field, Rio+20 Summit must reassure the connection between health and sustainability - as a part of the Social pillar of sustainable development - inspiring politics and actions in multiple levels.

  10. What is sustainability and what influences it?

    SciTech Connect

    Schock, R.N.

    1997-06-04

    I was asked to speak on the subject of ``What do we mean by sustainability and what factors have the most impact on it?`` I am afraid I must admit that if there is a generally accepted definition of sustainability, at least as applied to mankind and terrestrial systems, then I am not aware of it. But I expect you know that, or you would not be having this session. The subject of sustainability is one that interests us all. In fact, I think that it fascinates us all because the concept is one to which we can intimately relate. Sustainability implies eternal life; and throughout history, humankind has sought, sometimes secretly, sometimes openly, eternal life, if not for ourselves at least for our progeny. What I will try to do is (1) briefly discuss some of what has been said about this topic, (2) propose a definition that I believe is workable, and point out some of the issues that derive from it, and then (3) suggest what I think we can all do to ensure the sustainability of the planet. I confess to you at the outset that I am an optimist on this subject, and a technological optimist at that. By that I mean that I believe that humans and technology are inextricably linked and that technology provides one of the great keys to helping human beings achieve their goals. I also believe that sustainability is an achievable goal and that it is not a concept to be feared, either intrinsically or economically.

  11. Practical appraisal of sustainable development-Methodologies for sustainability measurement at settlement level

    SciTech Connect

    Moles, Richard; Foley, Walter; Morrissey, John; O'Regan, Bernadette

    2008-02-15

    This paper investigates the relationships between settlement size, functionality, geographic location and sustainable development. Analysis was carried out on a sample of 79 Irish settlements, located in three regional clusters. Two methods were selected to model the level of sustainability achieved in settlements, namely, Metabolism Accounting and Modelling of Material and Energy Flows (MA) and Sustainable Development Index Modelling. MA is a systematic assessment of the flows and stocks of material within a system defined in space and time. The metabolism of most settlements is essentially linear, with resources flowing through the urban system. The objective of this research on material and energy flows was to provide information that might aid in the development of a more circular pattern of urban metabolism, vital to sustainable development. In addition to MA, a set of forty indicators were identified and developed. These target important aspects of sustainable development: transport, environmental quality, equity and quality of life issues. Sustainability indices were derived through aggregation of indicators to measure dimensions of sustainable development. Similar relationships between settlement attributes and sustainability were found following both methods, and these were subsequently integrated to provide a single measure. Analysis identified those attributes of settlements preventing, impeding or promoting progress towards sustainability.

  12. Our Commitment to Bioenergy Sustainability

    SciTech Connect

    2015-06-18

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) is committed to developing the resources, technologies, and systems needed to support a thriving bioenergy industry that protects natural resources and ad- vances environmental, economic, and social benefits. BETO’s Sustainability Technology Area proactively identifies and addresses issues that affect the scale-up potential, public acceptance, and long-term viability of advanced bioenergy systems; as a result, the area is critical to achieving BETO’s overall goals.

  13. [What is sustainability science?].

    PubMed

    Wu, Jian-Guo; Guo, Xiao-Chuan; Yang, Jie; Qian, Gui-Xia; Niu, Jian-Ming; Liang, Cun-Zhu; Zhang, Qing; Li, Ang

    2014-01-01

    Sustainability is the theme of our time and also the grandest challenge to humanity. Since the 1970s, the term, sustainable development, has frequently appeared in the scientific literature, governmental documents, media promotions for public goods, and commercial advertisements. However, the science that provides the theoretical foundation and practical guidance for sustainable development--sustainability science--only began to emerge in the beginning of the 21st century. Nevertheless, the field has rapidly developed in depth and expanded in scope during the past decade, with its core concepts and research methods coalescing. China, as the most populous country in the world and home to the philosophical root of sustainability science-the unity of man and nature, is obligated to take upon the challenge of our time, to facilitate global sustainability while pursuing the Chinese Dream, and to play a leading role in the development of sustainability science. Toward this grandiose goal, this paper presents the first Chinese introduction to sustainability science, which discusses its basic concepts, research questions, and future directions. Sustainability science is the study of the dynamic relationship between humans and the environment, particularly focusing on the vulnerability, robustness, resilience, and stability of the coupled human-environment system. It is a transdisciplinary science that integrates natural sciences with humanities and social sciences. It hinges on the environment-economy-society nexus, and merges basic and applied research. The key components of sustainability often change with time, place, and culture, and thus sustainability science needs to emphasize multi-scale studies in space and time, with emphasis on landscapes and regions over a horizon of 50 to 100 years. It needs to focus on the relationship between ecosystem services and human well-being, as influenced by biodiversity and ecosystem processes as well as climate change, land use

  14. Hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn due to anti-Ge3: combined antibody-dependent hemolysis and erythroid precursor cell growth inhibition.

    PubMed

    Blackall, Douglas P; Pesek, Gina D; Montgomery, Matthew M; Oza, Krishna K; Arndt, Patricia A; Garratty, George; Shahcheraghi, Ali; Denomme, Gregory A

    2008-10-01

    The Gerbich (Ge) antigens are a collection of high-incidence antigens carried on the red blood cell membrane glycoproteins, glycophorins C and D. Antibodies against these antigens are uncommon, and there have been only rare case reports of hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn due to anti-Ge. In this case report, we present a neonate with severe anemia and hyperbilirubinemia due to anti-Ge3. Routine and special laboratory studies undertaken in this case suggested two mechanisms for the patient's hemolysis and persistent anemia. Antibody-dependent hemolysis was associated with early-onset hyperbilirubinemia, anemia, and a mild reticulocytosis, and inhibition of erythroid progenitor cell growth was associated with late anemia and normal bilirubin and reticulocyte values. Though rare, anti-Ge3 can be a dangerous antibody in pregnancy. Affected neonates may require intensive initial therapy and close follow-up for at least several weeks after delivery.

  15. Efficacy of Rapamycin as Inducer of Hb F in Primary Erythroid Cultures from Sickle Cell Disease and β-Thalassemia Patients.

    PubMed

    Pecoraro, Alice; Troia, Antonio; Calzolari, Roberta; Scazzone, Concetta; Rigano, Paolo; Martorana, Adriana; Sacco, Massimiliano; Maggio, Aurelio; Di Marzo, Rosalba

    2015-01-01

    Phenotypic improvement of hemoglobinopathies such as sickle cell disease and β-thalassemia (β-thal) has been shown in patients with high levels of Hb F. Among the drugs proposed to increase Hb F production, hydroxyurea (HU) is currently the only one proven to improve the clinical course of these diseases. However, Hb F increase and patient's response are highly variable, indicating that new pharmacological agents could be useful for patients not responding to HU or showing a reduction of response during long-term therapy. In this study we evaluated the efficacy of rapamycin, a lypophilic macrolide used for the prevention of acute rejection in renal transplant recipients, as an inducer of Hb F production. The analyses were performed in cultured erythroid progenitors from 25 sickle cell disease and 25 β-thal intermedia (β-TI) patients. The use of a quantitative Real-Time-polymerase chain reaction ReTi-PCR technique and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) allowed us to determine the increase in γ-globin mRNA expression and Hb F production in human erythroid cells treated with rapamycin. The results of our study demonstrated an increase in vitro of γ-globin mRNA expression in 15 sickle cell disease and 14 β-TI patients and a corresponding Hb F increase. The induction by rapamycin, even if lower or similar in most of samples analyzed, in some cases was higher than HU. These data suggest that rapamycin could be a good candidate to be used in vivo for the treatment of hemoglobinopathies.

  16. Erythroid progenitor cells (CFU-E*) from Friend virus-infected mice undergo VVFe suicide in vitro in the absence of added erythropoietin

    SciTech Connect

    Del Rizzo, D.F.; Axelrad, A.A.

    1985-11-01

    The authors have investigated the effect of VVFe on the survival in suspension of erythropoietin (epo)-independent erythroid progenitor cells (CFU-E*) induced by Friend polycythemia virus (FV). Spleen cells from C3Hf/Bi mice previously infected with FV were exposed to carrier-free VVFe, and the survival of CFU-E* as a function of time in liquid medium was determined from the number of erythroid colonies that developed from these cells seeded in plasma cultures without added epo. The results showed that spleen CFU-E* were highly vulnerable to VVFe. Marrow CFU-E* behaved in a similar manner. The VVFe responsible for their suicide had been presented to the progenitor cells only during the 4-h period of incubation, after which they were washed and plated in excess nonradioactive iron. They therefore conclude that CFU-E* themselves, and not only their progeny, are capable of actively incorporating iron. Under the same conditions in the absence of added epo, the effect of VVFe on the survival of normal spleen or marrow CFU-E could not be assessed because two few normal CFU-E survived the incubation period. Normal bone marrow cells incubated in complete medium containing epo retained their capacity for erythrocytic colony formation, and CFU-E could then be shown to be vulnerable to VVFe. Thus, either the iron-incorporating system of normal CFU-E was inducible by epo, or else epo permitted survival of the CFU-E so that the activity of a constitutive iron-incorporating system could be recognized.

  17. Response to erythropoietin in erythroid subclones of the factor-dependent cell line 32D is determined by translocation of the erythropoietin receptor to the cell surface.

    PubMed Central

    Migliaccio, A R; Migliaccio, G; D'Andrea, A; Baiocchi, M; Crotta, S; Nicolis, S; Ottolenghi, S; Adamson, J W

    1991-01-01

    Regulation of the expression of the erythropoietin (Epo) receptor (EpoR) gene is under the control of transcriptional regulatory factor GATA-1. GATA-1 is expressed widely among the nonerythroid, factor-dependent subclones of the interleukin 3-dependent mouse cell line 32D. Consequently, to determine whether GATA-1 and EpoR gene expression are linked even in nonerythroid cells, we have studied the correlation of GATA-1 expression with expression and function of EpoR in these cell lines. EpoR mRNA (by RNase protection analysis) and EpoR protein (by specific antibody immunoprecipitation of metabolically labeled EpoR protein) were detectable not only in 32D and 32D Epo (an Epo-dependent subclone) but also in 32D GM, a subclone dependent for growth on granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor. EpoR mRNA also was detectable by PCR in 32D G, a subclone dependent for growth on granulocyte colony-stimulating factor. However, only 32D Epo cells bound 125I-labeled Epo and expressed EpoR protein on the cell surface, as determined by immunoprecipitation of surface-labeled proteins. These results indicate that, in these factor-dependent cell lines, the major regulatory step determining the erythroid-specific response to Epo is the efficiency of EpoR protein translocation to the cell surface. Mechanisms that could affect lineage-specific translocation are the presence of a chaperone protein, erythroid-specific editing of EpoR mRNA, or altered processing of the EpoR protein to the cell surface. In this model, lineage-restricted responses to growth factors such as Epo are determined not by expression of the genes for growth factor receptors but, rather, by appropriate processing of the receptor protein. Images PMID:1722318

  18. Eto2/MTG16 and MTGR1 are heteromeric corepressors of the TAL1/SCL transcription factor in murine erythroid progenitors

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Ying; Xu, Zhixiong; Xie, Jingping; Ham, Amy-Joan L.; Koury, Mark J.; Hiebert, Scott W.; Brandt, Stephen J.

    2009-12-11

    The TAL1 (or SCL) gene, originally discovered through its involvement by a chromosomal translocation in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, encodes a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor essential for hematopoietic and vascular development. To identify its interaction partners, we expressed a tandem epitope-tagged protein in murine erythroleukemia (MEL) cells and characterized affinity-purified Tal1-containing complexes by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis. In addition to known interacting proteins, two proteins related to the Eight-Twenty-One (ETO) corepressor, Eto2/Mtg16 and Mtgr1, were identified from the peptide fragments analyzed. Tal1 interaction with Eto2 and Mtgr1 was verified by coimmunoprecipitation analysis in Tal1, Eto2-, and Mtgr1-transfected COS-7 cells, MEL cells expressing V5 epitope-tagged Tal1 protein, and non-transfected MEL cells. Mapping analysis with Gal4 fusion proteins demonstrated a requirement for the bHLH domain of Tal1 and TAF110 domain of Eto2 for their interaction, and transient transfection and glutathione S-transferase pull-down analysis showed that Mtgr1 and Eto2 enhanced the other's association with Tal1. Enforced expression of Eto2 in differentiating MEL cells inhibited the promoter of the Protein 4.2 (P4.2) gene, a direct target of TAL1 in erythroid progenitors, and transduction of Eto2 and Mtgr1 augmented Tal1-mediated gene repression. Finally, chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis revealed that Eto2 occupancy of the P4.2 promoter in MEL cells decreased with differentiation, in parallel with a decline in Eto2 protein abundance. These results identify Eto2 and Mtgr1 as authentic interaction partners of Tal1 and suggest they act as heteromeric corepressors of this bHLH transcription factor during erythroid differentiation.

  19. Forced FOG1 expression in erythroleukemia cells: Induction of erythroid genes and repression of myelo-lymphoid transcription factor PU.1.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Tohru; Sasaki, Katsuyuki; Saito, Kei; Hatta, Shunsuke; Ichikawa, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Masahiro; Okitsu, Yoko; Fukuhara, Noriko; Onishi, Yasushi; Harigae, Hideo

    2017-02-16

    The transcription factor GATA-1-interacting protein Friend of GATA-1 (FOG1) is essential for proper transcriptional activation and repression of GATA-1 target genes; yet, the mechanisms by which FOG1 exerts its activating and repressing functions remain unknown. Forced FOG1 expression in human K562 erythroleukemia cells induced the expression of erythroid genes (SLC4A1, globins) but repressed that of GATA-2 and PU.1. A quantitative chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis demonstrated increased GATA-1 chromatin occupancy at both FOG1-activated as well as FOG1-repressed gene loci. However, while TAL1 chromatin occupancy was significantly increased at FOG1-activated gene loci, it was significantly decreased at FOG1-repressed gene loci. When FOG1 was overexpressed in TAL1-knocked down K562 cells, FOG1-mediated activation of HBA, HBG, and SLC4A1 was significantly compromised by TAL1 knockdown, suggesting that FOG1 may require TAL1 to activate GATA-1 target genes. Promoter analysis and quantitative ChIP analysis demonstrated that FOG1-mediated transcriptional repression of PU.1 would be mediated through a GATA-binding element located at its promoter, accompanied by significantly decreased H3 acetylation at lysine 4 and 9 (K4 and K9) as well as H3K4 trimethylation. Our results provide important mechanistic insight into the role of FOG1 in the regulation of GATA-1-regulated genes and suggest that FOG1 has an important role in inducing cells to differentiate toward the erythroid lineage rather than the myelo-lymphoid one by repressing the expression of PU.1.

  20. Recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV)-mediated expression of a human gamma-globin gene in human progenitor-derived erythroid cells.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, J L; Donahue, R E; Sellers, S E; Samulski, R J; Young, N S; Nienhuis, A W

    1994-01-01

    Effective gene therapy for the severe hemoglobin (Hb) disorders, sickle-cell anemia and thalassemia, will require an efficient method to transfer, integrate, and express a globin gene in primary erythroid cells. To evaluate recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) for this purpose, we constructed a rAAV vector encoding a human gamma-globin gene (pJM24/vHS432A gamma). Its 4725-nucleotide genome consists of two 180-bp AAV inverted terminal repeats flanking the core elements of hypersensitive sites 2, 3, and 4 from the locus control region of the beta-globin gene cluster, linked to a mutationally marked A gamma-globin gene (A gamma) containing native promoter and RNA processing signals. CD34+ human hematopoietic cells were exposed to rAAV particles at a multiplicity of infection of 500-1000 and cultured in semisolid medium containing several cytokines. A reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction assay distinguished mRNA signals derived from transduced and endogenous human gamma-globin genes. Twenty to 40% of human erythroid burst-forming unit-derived colonies expressed the rAAV-transduced A gamma-globin gene at levels 4-71% that of the endogenous gamma-globin genes. The HbF content of pooled control colonies was 26%, whereas HbF was 40% of the total in pooled colonies derived from rAAV transduced progenitors. These data establish that rAAV containing elements from the locus control region linked to a gamma-globin gene are capable of transferring and expressing that gene in primary human hematopoietic cells resulting in a substantial increase in HbF content. Images PMID:7524085

  1. Cell-specific overactivation of nuclear erythroid 2 p45-related factor 2-mediated gene expression in myeloid cells decreases hepatic ischemia/reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Lee, Lung-Yi; Harberg, Calvin; Matkowskyj, Kristina A; Cook, Shelly; Roenneburg, Drew; Werner, Sabine; Johnson, Delinda A; Johnson, Jeffrey A; Foley, David P

    2016-08-01

    Hepatic ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI) is an unavoidable consequence of liver transplantation that can lead to postoperative hepatic dysfunction. Myeloid cells that include Kupffer cells, monocytes, and neutrophils contribute to the inflammatory response and cellular injury observed during hepatic IRI. We hypothesize that overactivation of the nuclear erythroid 2 p45-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-antioxidant response element (ARE) pathway in myeloid cells leads to decreased cellular damage after hepatic IRI. We constructed transgenic mice with constitutively active nuclear erythroid 2 p45-related factor 2 (caNrf2) that over activates the Nrf2-ARE pathway in myeloid cells (lysozyme M cre recombinase [LysMcre]+/caNrf2+, n = 9), and their littermate controls lacking transgene expression (LysMcre+/caNrf2-, n = 11). The mice underwent either sham or partial hepatic ischemia surgery, with 60 minutes of ischemia followed by 6 hours of reperfusion. After IRI, LysMcre+/caNrf2+ mice demonstrated significantly decreased serum alanine aminotransferase and decreased areas of necrosis. Immunohistochemistry and immunoblot of caspase 3 showed a significantly decreased cleaved to full-length caspase 3 ratio in LysMcre+/caNrf2+ animals. Lymphocyte antigen 6 complex locus G and CD68 staining demonstrated reduced inflammatory cell infiltration. LysMcre+/caNrf2+ animals also had significantly decreased gene expression of proinflammatory cytokines, including interleukin (IL) 1β, IL6, tumor necrosis factor α, chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2, and chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 10, and significantly decreased levels of 8-isoprostanes. In our model, Nrf2 overactivation in myeloid cells leads to decreased hepatocellular damage, necrosis, apoptosis, inflammation, and oxidative stress. Pharmacologic targeting of the Nrf2-ARE pathway in myeloid cells may be a novel strategy to mitigate hepatic IRI. Liver Transplantation 22 1115-1128 2016 AASLD.

  2. Structural and dynamic study of the tetramerization region of non-erythroid alpha-spectrin: a frayed helix revealed by site-directed spin labeling electron paramagnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Li, Qufei; Fung, L W-M

    2009-01-13

    The N-terminal region of alpha-spectrin is responsible for its association with beta-spectrin in a heterodimer, forming functional tetramers. Non-erythroid alpha-spectrin (alphaII-spectrin) has a significantly higher association affinity for beta-spectrin than the homologous erythroid alpha-spectrin (alphaI-spectrin). We have previously determined the solution structure of the N-terminal region of alphaI-spectrin by NMR methods, but currently no structural information is available for alphaII-spectrin. We have used cysteine scanning, spin labeling electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) methods to study the tetramerization region of alphaII-spectrin. EPR data clearly show that, in alphaII-spectrin, the first nine N-terminal residues were unstructured, followed by an irregular helix (helix C'), frayed at the N-terminal end, but rigid at the C-terminal end, which merges into the putative triple-helical structural domain. The region corresponding to the important unstructured junction region linking helix C' to the first structural domain in alphaI-spectrin was clearly structured. On the basis of the published model for aligning helices A', B', and C', important interactions among residues in helix C' of alphaI- and alphaII-spectrin and helices A' and B' of betaI- and betaII-spectrin are identified, suggesting similar coiled coil helical bundling for spectrin I and II in forming tetramers. The differences in affinity are likely due to the differences in the conformation of the junction regions. Equilibrium dissociation constants of spin-labeled alphaII and betaI complexes from ITC measurements indicate that residues 15, 19, 37, and 40 are functionally important residues in alphaII-spectrin. Interestingly, all four corresponding homologous residues in alphaI-spectrin (residues 24, 28, 46, and 49) have been reported to be clinically significant residues involved in hematological diseases.

  3. Proteasome-Mediated Proteolysis of SRSF5 Splicing Factor Intriguingly Co-occurs with SRSF5 mRNA Upregulation during Late Erythroid Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Breig, Osman; Baklouti, Faouzi

    2013-01-01

    SR proteins exhibit diverse functions ranging from their role in constitutive and alternative splicing, to virtually all aspects of mRNA metabolism. These findings have attracted growing interest in deciphering the regulatory mechanisms that control the tissue-specific expression of these SR proteins. In this study, we show that SRSF5 protein decreases drastically during erythroid cell differentiation, contrasting with a concomitant upregulation of SRSF5 mRNA level. Proteasome chemical inhibition provided strong evidence that endogenous SRSF5 protein, as well as protein deriving from stably transfected SRSF5 cDNA, are both targeted to proteolysis as the cells undergo terminal differentiation. Consistently, functional experiments show that overexpression of SRSF5 enhances a specific endogenous pre-mRNA splicing event in proliferating cells, but not in differentiating cells, due to proteasome-mediated targeting of both endogenous and transfection-derived SRSF5. Further investigation of the relationship between SRSF5 structure and its post-translation regulation and function, suggested that the RNA recognition motifs of SRSF5 are sufficient to activate pre-mRNA splicing, whereas proteasome-mediated proteolysis of SRSF5 requires the presence of the C-terminal RS domain of the protein. Phosphorylation of SR proteins is a key post-translation regulation that promotes their activity and subcellular availability. We here show that inhibition of the CDC2-like kinase (CLK) family and mutation of the AKT phosphorylation site Ser86 on SRSF5, have no effect on SRSF5 stability. We reasoned that at least AKT and CLK signaling pathways are not involved in proteasome-induced turnover of SRSF5 during late erythroid development. PMID:23536862

  4. Collaborative procurement for developing a sustainable campus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nifa, Faizatul Akmar Abdul; Rahim, Syukran Abdul; Rani, Wan Nurul Mardiah Wan Mohd; Ismail, Mohd. Noorizhar

    2016-08-01

    It is particularly challenging to achieve sustainability in campus universities, where a high volume of users and activities has made it more imperative to promote green buildings that reduce energy and water consumption while having a minimal carbon footprint. At present, the frameworks for sustainable campus have seldom focused on the project procurement method which would improve construction team integration in developing the physical aspect of campus development. Therefore, in response to that challenge, this paper investigates how the delivery team, responsible for the design and construction of a project, can be integrated to work together more efficiently and more using the collaborative procurement method known as partnering. This paper reports part of a previous research and sets the base for ongoing research on the critical factors in partnering for sustainable campus development. The outcome or result of this study will meet and support the requirement for construction, maintenance, and operation process for universities towards sustainable building/campus in the future.

  5. SALT and Spelling Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Joan

    A study investigated the effects of suggestopedic accelerative learning and teaching (SALT) on the spelling achievement, attitudes toward school, and memory skills of fourth-grade students. Subjects were 20 male and 28 female students from two self-contained classrooms at Kennedy Elementary School in Rexburg, Idaho. The control classroom and the…

  6. Iowa Women of Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohrn, Deborah Gore, Ed.

    1993-01-01

    This issue of the Goldfinch highlights some of Iowa's 20th century women of achievement. These women have devoted their lives to working for human rights, education, equality, and individual rights. They come from the worlds of politics, art, music, education, sports, business, entertainment, and social work. They represent Native Americans,…

  7. Schools Achieving Gender Equity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Revis, Emma

    This guide is designed to assist teachers presenting the Schools Achieving Gender Equity (SAGE) curriculum for vocational education students, which was developed to align gender equity concepts with the Kentucky Education Reform Act (KERA). Included in the guide are lesson plans for classes on the following topics: legal issues of gender equity,…

  8. Achieving Peace through Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarken, Rodney H.

    While it is generally agreed that peace is desirable, there are barriers to achieving a peaceful world. These barriers are classified into three major areas: (1) an erroneous view of human nature; (2) injustice; and (3) fear of world unity. In a discussion of these barriers, it is noted that although the consciousness and conscience of the world…

  9. Explorations in achievement motivation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helmreich, Robert L.

    1982-01-01

    Recent research on the nature of achievement motivation is reviewed. A three-factor model of intrinsic motives is presented and related to various criteria of performance, job satisfaction and leisure activities. The relationships between intrinsic and extrinsic motives are discussed. Needed areas for future research are described.

  10. Increasing Male Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Barbara Talbert

    2008-01-01

    The No Child Left Behind legislation has brought greater attention to the academic performance of American youth. Its emphasis on student achievement requires a closer analysis of assessment data by school districts. To address the findings, educators must seek strategies to remedy failing results. In a mid-Atlantic district of the Unites States,…

  11. Appraising Reading Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ediger, Marlow

    To determine quality sequence in pupil progress, evaluation approaches need to be used which guide the teacher to assist learners to attain optimally. Teachers must use a variety of procedures to appraise student achievement in reading, because no one approach is adequate. Appraisal approaches might include: (1) observation and subsequent…

  12. Graders' Mathematics Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bond, John B.; Ellis, Arthur K.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this experimental study was to investigate the effects of metacognitive reflective assessment instruction on student achievement in mathematics. The study compared the performance of 141 students who practiced reflective assessment strategies with students who did not. A posttest-only control group design was employed, and results…

  13. Achieving All Our Ambitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartley, Tricia

    2009-01-01

    National learning and skills policy aims both to build economic prosperity and to achieve social justice. Participation in higher education (HE) has the potential to contribute substantially to both aims. That is why the Campaign for Learning has supported the ambition to increase the proportion of the working-age population with a Level 4…

  14. Improving Educational Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York University Education Quarterly, 1979

    1979-01-01

    This is a slightly abridged version of the report of the National Academy of Education panel, convened at the request of HEW Secretary Joseph Califano and Assistant Secretary for Education Mary F. Berry, to study recent declines in student achievement and methods of educational improvement. (SJL)

  15. The Achievement Club

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Ibram

    2009-01-01

    When Gabrielle Carpenter became a guidance counselor in Northern Virginia nine years ago, she focused on the academic achievement gap and furiously tried to close it. At first, she was compelled by tremendous professional interest. However, after seeing her son lose his zeal for school, Carpenter joined forces with other parents to form an…

  16. Achievement in Problem Solving

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friebele, David

    2010-01-01

    This Action Research Project is meant to investigate the effects of incorporating research-based instructional strategies into instruction and their subsequent effect on student achievement in the area of problem-solving. The two specific strategies utilized are the integration of manipulatives and increased social interaction on a regular basis.…

  17. Essays on Educational Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ampaabeng, Samuel Kofi

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation examines the determinants of student outcomes--achievement, attainment, occupational choices and earnings--in three different contexts. The first two chapters focus on Ghana while the final chapter focuses on the US state of Massachusetts. In the first chapter, I exploit the incidence of famine and malnutrition that resulted to…

  18. Advancing Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walberg, Herbert J.

    2010-01-01

    For the last half century, higher spending and many modern reforms have failed to raise the achievement of students in the United States to the levels of other economically advanced countries. A possible explanation, says Herbert Walberg, is that much current education theory is ill informed about scientific psychology, often drawing on fads and…

  19. NCLB: Achievement Robin Hood?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bracey, Gerald W.

    2008-01-01

    In his "Wall Street Journal" op-ed on the 25th of anniversary of "A Nation At Risk", former assistant secretary of education Chester E. Finn Jr. applauded the report for turning U.S. education away from equality and toward achievement. It was not surprising, then, that in mid-2008, Finn arranged a conference to examine the…

  20. Sustainability and substitutability.

    PubMed

    Fenichel, Eli P; Zhao, Jinhua

    2015-02-01

    Developing a quantitative science of sustainability requires bridging mathematical concepts from fields contributing to sustainability science. The concept of substitutability is central to sustainability but is defined differently by different fields. Specifically, economics tends to define substitutability as a marginal concept while fields such as ecology tend to focus on limiting behaviors. We explain how to reconcile these different views. We develop a model where investments can be made in knowledge to increase the elasticity of substitution. We explore the set of sustainable and optimal trajectories for natural capital extraction and built and knowledge capital accumulation. Investments in substitutability through knowledge stock accumulation affect the value of natural capital. Results suggest that investing in the knowledge stock, which can enhance substitutability, is critical to desirable sustainable outcomes. This result is robust even when natural capital is not managed optimally. This leads us to conclude that investments in the knowledge stock are of first order importance for sustainability.