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Sample records for achieve sustained horizontal

  1. Using Design To Achieve Sustainability

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sustainability is defined as meeting the needs of this generation without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their needs. This is a conditional statement that places the responsibility for achieving sustainability squarely in hands of designers and planners....

  2. Perlman receives Sustained Achievement Award

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petit, Charles; Perlman, David

    David Perlman was awarded the Sustained Achievement Award at the AGU Fall Meeting Honors Ceremony, which was held on December 10, 1997, in San Francisco, California. The award recognizes a journalist who has made significant, lasting, and consistent contributions to accurate reporting or writing on the geophysical sciences for the general public.

  3. Achieving sustainable cultivation of potatoes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Every phase of the production cycle impacts the sustainability of potato. Potato physiology determines how genetically encoded developmental attributes interact with local environmental conditions as modified through agricultural practice to produce a perishable crop. In this chapter we highlight ho...

  4. Achieving a sustainable service advantage.

    PubMed

    Coyne, K P

    1993-01-01

    Many managers believe that superior service should play little or no role in competitive strategy; they maintain that service innovations are inherently copiable. However, the author states that this view is too narrow. For a company to achieve a lasting service advantage, it must base a new service on a capability gap that competitors cannot or will not copy.

  5. Achieving and sustaining full employment.

    PubMed

    Rosen, S M

    1995-01-01

    Human rights and public health considerations provide strong support for policies that maximize employment. Ample historical and conceptual evidence supports the feasibility of full employment policies. New factors affecting the labor force, the rate of technological change, and the globalization of economic activity require appropriate policies--international as well as national--but do not invalidate the ability of modern states to apply the measures needed. Among these the most important include: (I) systematic reduction in working time with no loss of income, (2) active labor market policies, (3) use of fiscal and monetary measures to sustain the needed level of aggregate demand, (4) restoration of equal bargaining power between labor and capital, (5) social investment in neglected and outmoded infrastructure, (6) accountability of corporations for decisions to shift or reduce capital investment, (7) major reductions in military spending, to be replaced by socially needed and economically productive expenditures, (8) direct public sector job creation, (9) reform of monetary policy to restore emphasis on minimizing unemployment and promoting full employment. None are without precedent in modern economies. The obstacles are ideological and political. To overcome them will require intellectual clarity and effective advocacy. PMID:7499512

  6. Factors Contributing to Institutions Achieving Environmental Sustainability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Matthew; Card, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to determine what factors contributed to three universities achieving environmental sustainability. Design/methodology/approach: A case study methodology was used to determine how each factor contributed to the institutions' sustainability. Site visits, fieldwork, document reviews, and interviews with…

  7. ACHIEVING SUSTAINABILITY - FINAL STEPS IN A DYNAMIC DANCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Achieving sustainability relies upon adequate metrics to evaluate the environment and guide decisions. Although adequate assessment is important to prescribing remedies, achieving a sustainable environment cannot be delayed. It must be achieved today as well as tomorrow so that t...

  8. Achieving true sustainability of zoo populations.

    PubMed

    Lacy, Robert C

    2013-01-01

    For the last 30 years, cooperative management of irreplaceable animal populations in zoos and aquariums has focused primarily on the goal of minimizing genetic decay within defined time frames, and large advances have been made in technologies to optimize genetic management of closed populations. However, recent analyses have shown that most zoo programs are not projected to meet their stated goals. This has been described as a lack of achieving "sustainability" of the populations, yet by definition a goal of managed decay is not a plan for sustainability. True sustainability requires management of the resource in manner that does not deplete its value for the future. Achieving such sustainability for many managed populations may require changing from managing isolated populations to managing populations that are part of a broader metapopulation, with carefully considered exchange between populations across a spectrum of ex situ to in situ. Managing zoo populations as components of comprehensive conservation strategies for the species will require research on determinants of various kinds of genetic, physiological, behavioral, and morphological variation and their roles in population viability, development of an array of management techniques and tools, training of population managers in metapopulation management and integrated conservation planning, and projections of impacts of management strategies on the viability of the captive populations and all populations that are interactively managed or affected. Such a shift in goals and methods would result in zoo population management being an ongoing part of species conservation rather than short-term or isolated from species conservation. Zoo Biol. 32:19-26, 2013. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Achieving true sustainability of zoo populations.

    PubMed

    Lacy, Robert C

    2013-01-01

    For the last 30 years, cooperative management of irreplaceable animal populations in zoos and aquariums has focused primarily on the goal of minimizing genetic decay within defined time frames, and large advances have been made in technologies to optimize genetic management of closed populations. However, recent analyses have shown that most zoo programs are not projected to meet their stated goals. This has been described as a lack of achieving "sustainability" of the populations, yet by definition a goal of managed decay is not a plan for sustainability. True sustainability requires management of the resource in manner that does not deplete its value for the future. Achieving such sustainability for many managed populations may require changing from managing isolated populations to managing populations that are part of a broader metapopulation, with carefully considered exchange between populations across a spectrum of ex situ to in situ. Managing zoo populations as components of comprehensive conservation strategies for the species will require research on determinants of various kinds of genetic, physiological, behavioral, and morphological variation and their roles in population viability, development of an array of management techniques and tools, training of population managers in metapopulation management and integrated conservation planning, and projections of impacts of management strategies on the viability of the captive populations and all populations that are interactively managed or affected. Such a shift in goals and methods would result in zoo population management being an ongoing part of species conservation rather than short-term or isolated from species conservation. Zoo Biol. 32:19-26, 2013. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:22753040

  10. Sustainable Horizontal Bioventing and Vertical Biosparging Implementation (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leu, J.; Lin, J.; Ferris, S.

    2013-12-01

    A former natural gas processing site with total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) and benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (BTEX) impacts in both soil and groundwater was partially excavated to remove 2,400 cubic yards of impacted soil. However, due to active natural gas pipelines within the impacted footprint, excavation was discontinued and an area of impacted soil containing maximum concentrations of 5,000 mg/kg gasoline-range organics (GRO), 8,600 mg/kg diesel-range organics (DRO), and 130 mg/kg motor oil-range organics (ORO). Groundwater was impacted with concentrations up to 2,300 μg/L GRO and 4,200 μg/L DRO remained in place. Taking advantage of the open excavation, horizontal-screened piping was placed in the backfill to deliver air for bioventing, which resulted in successful remediation of soil in a physically inaccessible area. The combined use of excavation of the source area, bioventing of surrounding inaccessible soil, and biosparging of the groundwater and smear zone resulted in nearing a no-further-action status at the site. The sustainable bioventing system consisted of one 3-HP blower and eight horizontal air injection wells. Five dual-depth nested vapor monitoring points (VMPs) were installed at 5 feet and 10 feet below ground surface as part of the monitoring system for human health and system performance. The bioventing system operated for one year followed by a three-month rebound test. During the one-year operation, air flow was periodically adjusted to maximize removal of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from the vent wells with elevated photo-ionization detector readings. After the bioventing successfully remediated the inaccessible impacted soil, the biosparging system incorporated the pre-existing bioventing unit with an upgraded 5-HP blower and three vertical biosparging wells to biodegrade dissolved phase impacts in the groundwater. The subsequent monitoring system includes the VMPs, the air injection wells, and four groundwater

  11. Perspectives on achieving sustainable energy production and use

    EPA Science Inventory

    The traditional definition of sustainability calls for polices and strategies that meet society's present needs without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs. Achieving operational sustainability requires three critical elements: advances in scien...

  12. ACHIEVING SUSTAINABILITY THROUGH LIFE CYCLE STRATEGIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sustainability is, of course, not a recent concept. But our understanding of what it means and what we need to do to meet the challenge it presents continues to grow. Throughout the ages, nations have had to address the issue of harmony between the environment, society and the e...

  13. Language Teacher Action Research: Achieving Sustainability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Emily; Burns, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Action research (AR) is becoming increasingly popular in ELT contexts as a means of continuous professional development. The positive impacts of AR on language teacher development are well documented, but the important question of how those impacts can be sustained over time is virtually unexplored. Drawing on findings from a study of teachers in…

  14. Achieving scale strategies for sustained competitive performance.

    PubMed

    Grube, Mark E; Gish, Ryan S; Tkach, Sasha N

    2008-05-01

    Growth to achieve scale requires the following strategic initiatives: Having a clear understanding of what the organization is and what it wants to become. Ensuring a structured and rigorous growth process. Leveraging size to achieve benefits of scale. Recognizing the importance of physicians, ambulatory care, and primary care. Establishing and maintaining accountability as growth occurs.

  15. Horizontal directional drilling: a green and sustainable technology for site remediation.

    PubMed

    Lubrecht, Michael D

    2012-03-01

    Sustainability has become an important factor in the selection of remedies to clean up contaminated sites. Horizontal directional drilling (HDD) is a relatively new drilling technology that has been successfully adapted to site remediation. In addition to the benefits that HDD provides for the logistics of site cleanup, it also delivers sustainability advantages, compared to alternative construction methods.

  16. Hemostasis Achieved Endoscopically for Diverticular Bleeding from the Horizontal Portion of the Duodenum

    PubMed Central

    Matuso, Yasumasa; Yasuda, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Midori; Ishigooka, Shinya; Ozawa, Shun-ichiro; Yamashita, Masaki; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Itoh, Fumio

    2015-01-01

    Diverticulum of the horizontal portion of the duodenum is a rare cause of upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. Since it is difficult to access the horizontal portion of the duodenum by standard upper GI endoscopy, only a very few cases of endoscopic hemostasis have been reported. Herein, we report a case of diverticular bleeding from the horizontal portion of the duodenum for which hemostasis was achieved using a small-caliber colonoscope, which has an insertion part designed with a passive-bending function/high-force transmission and a transparent tip hood. PMID:26692767

  17. Sustaining School Achievement in California's Elementary Schools after State Monitoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCabe, Molly

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the Academic Performance Index (API) and Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) achievement trends between 2004 and 2006 of 58 California public elementary schools after exiting state monitoring and investigated practices for sustaining consistent achievement growth. Statistical methods were used to analyze statewide achievement trends…

  18. Sustaining Continued Acceleration in Reading Comprehension Achievement Following an Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lai, Mei Kuin; McNaughton, Stuart; Timperley, Helen; Hsiao, Selena

    2009-01-01

    Schooling improvement initiatives have demonstrated that moderate but significant achievement gains are possible with well designed interventions, but there is little research into whether these gains can be sustained. The present study examines the extent to which acceleration in achievement made during a three-year literacy intervention and the…

  19. Achievement Effects of Sustained Silent Reading in a Middle School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Mary Pinson

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the reading achievement effects of a school-year-long program of sustained silent reading in a middle school. Students' scores on the Stanford Achievement Test, Ninth Edition across three years (2006, 2007, and 2008) were analyzed to test eleven null hypotheses. A 3 x 3 repeated measures factorial ANOVA…

  20. Implementing vertical and horizontal engineering students' integration and assessment of consequence academic achievement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Zubaidy, Sarim; Abdulaziz, Nidhal; Dashtpour, Reza

    2012-08-01

    Recent scholarship references indicate that integration of the student body can result in an enhanced learning experience for students and also greater satisfaction. This paper reports the results of a case study whereby mechanical engineering students studying at a newly established branch campus in Dubai of a British university were exposed to vertical and horizontal integration. Different activities have been embedded to ensure that students integrated and worked together with their peers and colleagues at different levels. The implemented processes and practices led to improved academic achievements, which were better than those of a similar cohort of students where no effort had been made to integrate. The analysis revealed that cooperative learning and the degree of academic support provided by teachers are positively and directly correlated with academic as well as the students' own sense of personal achievement. The results are discussed in light of previous research and with reference to the cultural context of the study.

  1. Recovery after disaster: achieving sustainable development, mitigation and equity.

    PubMed

    Berke, P R; Kartez, J; Wenger, D

    1993-06-01

    This paper reviews key findings and raises issues that are not fully addressed by the predominant disaster recovery literature. Achievement of equity, mitigation and sustainable development, particularly through local participation in redevelopment planning and institutional cooperation, is the central issue of the review. Previous research and past assumptions about the process by which communities rebuild after a disaster are reviewed. A conceptual model for understanding local disaster recovery efforts is then presented. The conceptual and practical significance of this model is then demonstrated by presenting case studies of local recovery experiences. Finally, conclusions on the current understanding of disaster redevelopment planning, as well as implications for public policy and future research are offered.

  2. DEVELOPMENT AND APPLICATION OF PLANNING PROCESS TO ACHIEVE SUSTAINABILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Concepts of sustainability are numerous, widely discussed, and necessary, but sustainability needs to be applied to development projects to succeed. However, few applications are made and their measures are unclear. Sustainability indicators are typically used as measures, but ...

  3. The role of marine reserves in achieving sustainable fisheries.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Callum M; Hawkins, Julie P; Gell, Fiona R

    2005-01-29

    Many fishery management tools currently in use have conservation value. They are designed to maintain stocks of commercially important species above target levels. However, their limitations are evident from continuing declines in fish stocks throughout the world. We make the case that to reverse fishery declines, safeguard marine life and sustain ecosystem processes, extensive marine reserves that are off limits to fishing must become part of the management strategy. Marine reserves should be incorporated into modern fishery management because they can achieve many things that conventional tools cannot. Only complete and permanent protection from fishing can protect the most sensitive habitats and vulnerable species. Only reserves will allow the development of natural, extended age structures of target species, maintain their genetic variability and prevent deleterious evolutionary change from the effects of fishing. Species with natural age structures will sustain higher rates of reproduction and will be more resilient to environmental variability. Higher stock levels maintained by reserves will provide insurance against management failure, including risk-prone quota setting, provided the broader conservation role of reserves is firmly established and legislatively protected. Fishery management measures outside protected areas are necessary to complement the protection offered by marine reserves, but cannot substitute for it.

  4. The role of marine reserves in achieving sustainable fisheries

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Callum M.; Hawkins, Julie P.; Gell, Fiona R.

    2005-01-01

    Many fishery management tools currently in use have conservation value. They are designed to maintain stocks of commercially important species above target levels. However, their limitations are evident from continuing declines in fish stocks throughout the world. We make the case that to reverse fishery declines, safeguard marine life and sustain ecosystem processes, extensive marine reserves that are off limits to fishing must become part of the management strategy. Marine reserves should be incorporated into modern fishery management because they can achieve many things that conventional tools cannot. Only complete and permanent protection from fishing can protect the most sensitive habitats and vulnerable species. Only reserves will allow the development of natural, extended age structures of target species, maintain their genetic variability and prevent deleterious evolutionary change from the effects of fishing. Species with natural age structures will sustain higher rates of reproduction and will be more resilient to environmental variability. Higher stock levels maintained by reserves will provide insurance against management failure, including risk-prone quota setting, provided the broader conservation role of reserves is firmly established and legislatively protected. Fishery management measures outside protected areas are necessary to complement the protection offered by marine reserves, but cannot substitute for it. PMID:15713592

  5. Achieving and Maintaining Existing Building Sustainability Certification at Georgetown University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Payant, Richard P.

    2013-01-01

    Sustainability is the promotion of high performance, healthful, energy-efficient, and environmentally stable buildings. Buildings intended for sustainable certification must meet guidelines developed by the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) of the U.S. Green Building Council. The problem is that LEED certification often fails to…

  6. Achieving Transformative Sustainability Learning: Engaging Head, Hands and Heart

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sipos, Yona; Battisti, Bryce; Grimm, Kurt

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The current UN Decade of Education for Sustainable Development echoes many scholars' calls to re-envision education for sustainability. Short of a complete overhaul of education, the paper seeks to propose learning objectives that can be integrated across existing curricula. These learning objectives are organized by head, hands and…

  7. Achieving sustainable plant disease management through evolutionary principles.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Jiasui; Thrall, Peter H; Burdon, Jeremy J

    2014-09-01

    Plants and their pathogens are engaged in continuous evolutionary battles and sustainable disease management requires novel systems to create environments conducive for short-term and long-term disease control. In this opinion article, we argue that knowledge of the fundamental factors that drive host-pathogen coevolution in wild systems can provide new insights into disease development in agriculture. Such evolutionary principles can be used to guide the formulation of sustainable disease management strategies which can minimize disease epidemics while simultaneously reducing pressure on pathogens to evolve increased infectivity and aggressiveness. To ensure agricultural sustainability, disease management programs that reflect the dynamism of pathogen population structure are essential and evolutionary biologists should play an increasing role in their design.

  8. Sustaining College Students' Persistence and Achievement through Exemplary Instructional Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gentry, Ruben

    2014-01-01

    A "take it or leave it" attitude has no place in higher education. Society needs an educated citizenry to sustain and advance its technological and global mission. Too few students are entering college and even fewer than might reasonably be expected are graduating. Retention and graduation rates serve as key indicators of performance…

  9. Is Sustainability Achievable? Exploring the Limits of Sustainability with Model Systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    Successful implementation of sustainability ideas in ecosystem management requires a basic understanding of the often nonlinear and non-intuitive relationships amongst different dimensions of sustainability, particularly the systemwide implications of human actions. This basic un...

  10. An international waste convention: measures for achieving sustainable development.

    PubMed

    Meyers, Gary D; McLeod, Glen; Anbarci, Melanie A

    2006-12-01

    Waste is a by-product of economic growth. Consequently, economic growth presents challenges for sustainable resource management and development because continued economic growth implies continued growth in waste outputs. Poor management of waste results in the inappropriate depletion of natural resources and potentially adverse effects on the environment, health and the economy. It is unsustainable. This paper begins by outlining the magnitude of and the current response to the growth in the quantity of waste outputs. This is followed by a consideration of why the international response to date, including the Rio Declaration and Agenda 21, fails to address the issue adequately. The paper concludes with a discussion on why and how an international treaty or other measure could advance sustainable development by providing an appropriate framework within which to address the problem.

  11. Achieving high sustained performance in an unstructured mesh CFD application

    SciTech Connect

    Keyes, D E; Anderson, W K; Gropp, W D; Kaushik, D K; Smith, B F

    1999-12-10

    This paper highlights a three-year project by an interdisciplinary team on a legacy F77 computational fluid dynamics code, with the aim of demonstrating that implicit unstructured grid simulations can execute at rates not far from those of explicit structured grid codes, provided attention is paid to data motion complexity and the reuse of data positioned at the levels of the memory hierarchy closest to the processor, in addition to traditional operation count complexity. The demonstration code is from NASA and the enabling parallel hardware and (freely available) software toolkit are from DOE, but the resulting methodology should be broadly applicable, and the hardware limitations exposed should allow programmers and vendors of parallel platforms to focus with greater encouragement on sparse codes with indirect addressing. This snapshot of ongoing work shows a performance of 15 microseconds per degree of freedom to steady-state convergence of Euler flow on a mesh with 2.8 million vertices using 3072 dual-processor nodes of ASCI Red, corresponding to a sustained floating-point rate of 0.227 Tflop/s.

  12. The Failure of Non-Binding Declarations to Achieve University Sustainability: A Need for Accountability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bekessy, S. A.; Samson, K.; Clarkson, R. E.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to assess the impact and value of non-binding agreements or declarations in achieving sustainability in universities. Design/methodology/approach: A case study of Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology (RMIT) University is presented, analysing the reasons for lack of progress towards sustainability and evaluating best…

  13. A TWO CENTURY HISTORY OF PACIFIC NORTHWEST SALMON: LESSONS LEARNED FOR ACHIEVING A SUSTAINABLE FUTURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Achieving ecological sustainability is a daunting challenge. In the Pacific Northwest one of the most highly visible public policy debates concerns the future of salmon populations. Throughout the Pacific Northwest, many wild salmon stocks have declined and some have disappeare...

  14. The role of partnership functioning and synergy in achieving sustainability of innovative programmes in community care.

    PubMed

    Cramm, Jane M; Phaff, Sanne; Nieboer, Anna P

    2013-03-01

    This cross-sectional study (conducted in April-May 2011) explored associations between partnership functioning synergy and sustainability of innovative programmes in community care. The study sample consisted of 106 professionals (of 244 individuals contacted) participating in 21 partnerships that implemented different innovative community care programmes in Rotterdam, The Netherlands. Partnership functioning was evaluated by assessing leadership, resources administration and efficiency. Synergy was considered the proximal outcome of partnership functioning, which, in turn, influenced the achievement of programme sustainability. On a 5-point scale of increasing sustainability, mean sustainability scores ranged from 1.9 to 4.9. The results of the regression analysis demonstrated that sustainability was positively influenced by leadership (standardised regression coefficient β = 0.32; P < 0.001) and non-financial resources (β = 0.25; P = 0.008). No significant relationship was found between administration or efficiency and programme sustainability. Partnership synergy acted as a mediator for partnership functioning and significantly affected sustainability (β = 0.39; P < 0.001). These findings suggest that the sustainability of innovative programmes in community care is achieved more readily when synergy is created between partners. Synergy was more likely to emerge with boundary-spanning leaders, who understood and appreciated partners' different perspectives, and could bridge their diverse cultures and were comfortable sharing ideas, resources and power. In addition, the acknowledgement of and ability to use members' resources were found to be valuable in engaging partners' involvement and achieving synergy in community care partnerships.

  15. The Effects of Sustained Silent Reading on Reading Achievement and Reading Attitudes of Fourth Grade Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Holly Lynn

    2012-01-01

    This study tested the effects of a Sustained Silent Reading program on reading achievement and reading attitude. The study accessed scores from the DIBELS Oral Reading Fluency (Good, Kaminski, & Dill, 2007) to measure reading achievement. This measure was given before and after a twelve week period, during which the treatment group…

  16. Estuary-type circulation as a factor sustaining horizontal nutrient gradients in freshwater-influenced coastal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmeister, Richard; Flöser, Götz; Schartau, Markus

    2016-09-01

    Estuary-type circulation is a residual circulation in coastal systems with horizontal density gradients. It drives the accumulation of suspended particulate matter in coastal embayments where density gradients are sustained by some freshwater inflow from rivers. Ebenhöh et al. (Ecol Model 174(3):241-252, 2004) found that shallow water depth can explain nutrient gradients becoming established towards the coast even in the absence of river inflow. The present study follows their concept and investigates the characteristic transport of organic matter towards the coast based on idealised scenarios whereby an estuary-type circulation is maintained by surface freshwater fluxes and pronounced shoaling towards the coast. A coupled hydrodynamical and biogeochemical model is used to simulate the dynamics of nutrient gradients and to derive budgets of organic matter flux for a coastal transect. Horizontal nutrient gradients are considered only in terms of tidal asymmetries of suspended matter transport. The results show that the accumulation of organic matter near the coast is not only highly sensitive to variations in the sinking velocity of suspended matter but is also noticeably enhanced by an increase in precipitation. This scenario is comparable with North Sea conditions. By contrast, horizontal nutrient gradients would be reversed in the case of evaporation-dominated inverse estuaries (cf. reverse gradients of nutrient and organic matter concentrations). Credible coastal nutrient budget calculations are required for resolving trends in eutrophication. For tidal systems, the present results suggest that these calculations require an explicit consideration of freshwater flux and asymmetries in tidal mixing. In the present case, the nutrient budget for the vertically mixed zone also indicates carbon pumping from the shelf sea towards the coast from as far offshore as 25 km.

  17. Challenges to achievement of metal sustainability in our high-tech society

    SciTech Connect

    Izatt, Reed M.; Izatt, Steven R.; Bruening, Ronald L.; Izatt, Neil; Moyer, Bruce A

    2014-01-01

    Achievement of sustainability in metal life cycles from mining of virgin ore to consumer and industrial devices to end-of-life products requires greatly increased recycling and improved processing of metals. Electronic and other high-tech products containing precious, toxic, and specialty metals usually have short lifetimes and low recycling rates. Products containing these metals generally are incinerated, discarded as waste in landfills, or dismantled in informal recycling using crude and environmentally irresponsible procedures. Low metal recycling rates coupled with increasing demand for products containing them necessitate increased mining with attendant environmental, health, energy, water, and carbon-footprint consequences. In this tutorial review, challenges to achieving metal sustainability in present high-tech society are presented; health, environmental, and economic incentives for various stakeholders to improve metal sustainability are discussed; a case for technical improvements in separations technology, especially employing molecular recognition, is given; and global consequences of continuing on the present path are examined.

  18. Achieving Our Environmental Sustainability Goals: The Opportunities and Pitfalls of Applying Life Cycle Thinking

    EPA Science Inventory

    An increasing number of people around the world are beginning to realize that a systems approach, such as life cycle thinking, is necessary to truly achieve environmental sustainability. Without the holistic perspective that life cycle thinking provides, our actions risk leading ...

  19. Program Proposal: Certificates of Competence, Certificate of Achievement, Associate in Applied Science Degree in Sustainable Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pezzoli, Jean A.; Ainsworth, Don

    This document proposes a program in sustainable technology at Maui Community College (Hawaii). This new career program would be designed to provide four Certificates of Competence, a Certificate of Achievement, and an Associate in Applied Science degree. The primary objectives of the program are to meet student, county, and state needs for…

  20. Influence of School Climate on Students' Achievement and Teachers' Productivity for Sustainable Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adeogun, A. A.; Olisaemeka, Blessing U.

    2011-01-01

    The study covers ten secondary schools in Lagos State of Nigeria. The purpose is to ascertain the relationship between school climate and student achievements and teachers' productivity for sustainable development. A total sample of 150 respondents was taken. Ten principals, seven teachers and seven students were randomly picked per school. This…

  1. Sustained Silent Reading in Middle School and Its Impact on Students' Attitudes and Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Margaret Peggy S.

    2013-01-01

    Sustained Silent Reading (SSR) is a period of time given to students to read self-selected materials during their school day. This study examines the effect of participation in a SSR program on reading attitudes and reading achievement of students as measured by the Adolescent Motivation to Read Profile (AMRP) and the Northwest Evaluation…

  2. Ecosystem management to achieve ecological sustainability: The case of South Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harwell, Mark A.; Long, John F.; Bartuska, Ann M.; Gentile, John H.; Harwell, Christine C.; Myers, Victoria; Ogden, John C.

    1996-07-01

    The ecosystems of South Florida are unique in the world. The defining features of the natural Everglades (large spatial scale, temporal patterns of water storage and sheetflow, and low nutrient levels) historically allowed a mosaic of habitats with characteristic animals. Massive hydrological alterations have halved the Everglades, and ecological sustainability requires fundamental changes in management. The US Man and the Biosphere Human-Dominated Systems Directorate is conducting a case study of South Florida using ecosystem management as a framework for exploring options for mutually dependent sustainability of society and the environment. A new methodology was developed to specify sustainability goals, characterize human factors affecting the ecosystem, and conduct scenario/consequence analyses to examine ecological and societal implications. South Florida has sufficient water for urban, agricultural, and ecological needs, but most water drains to the sea through the system of canals; thus, the issue is not competition for resources but storage and management of water. The goal is to reestablish the natural system for water quantity, timing, and distribution over a sufficient area to restore the essence of the Everglades. The societal sustainability in the Everglades Agricultural Area (EAA) is at risk because of soil degradation, vulnerability of sugar price supports, policies affecting Cuban sugar imports, and political/economic forces aligned against sugar production. One scenario suggested using the EAA for water storage while under private sugar production, thereby linking sustainability of the ecological system with societal sustainability. Further analyses are needed, but the US MAB project suggests achieving ecological sustainability consistent with societal sustainability may be feasible.

  3. Modulation of a sustained calcium current by intracellular pH in horizontal cells of fish retina

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    A sustained high voltage-activated (HVA), nifedipine- and cadmium- sensitive calcium current and a sustained calcium action potential (AP) were recorded from horizontal cells isolated from catfish retina. pH indicator dyes showed that superfusion with NH4Cl alkalinized these cells and that washout of NH4Cl or superfusion with Na-acetate acidified them. HVA current was slightly enhanced during superfusion of NH4Cl but was suppressed upon NH4Cl washout or application of Na- acetate. When 25 mM HEPES was added to the patch pipette to increase intracellular pH buffering, the effects of NH4Cl and Na-acetate on HVA current were reduced. These results indicated that intracellular acidification reduces HVA calcium current and alkalinization increases it. Sustained APs, recorded with high resistance, small diameter microelectrodes, were blocked by cobalt and cadmium and their magnitude varied with extracellular calcium concentration. These results provide confirmatory evidence that the HVA current is a major component of the AP and indicate that the AP can be used as a measure of how the HVA current can be modified in intact, undialyzed cells. The duration of APs was increased by superfusion with NH4Cl and reduced by washout of NH4Cl or superfusion with Na-acetate. The Na-acetate and NH4Cl washout- dependent shortening of the APs was observed in the presence of intracellular BAPTA, a calcium chelator, IBMX, a phosphodiesterase inhibitor, and in Na-free or TEA-enriched saline. These findings provide supportive evidence that intracellular acidification may directly suppress the HVA calcium current in intact cells. Intracellular pH changes would thereby be expected to modulate not only the resting membrane potential of these cells in darkness, but calcium- dependent release of neurotransmitter from these cells as well. Furthermore, this acidification-dependent suppression of calcium current could serve a protective role by reducing calcium entry during retinal ischemia, which

  4. Addressing China's grand challenge of achieving food security while ensuring environmental sustainability.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yonglong; Jenkins, Alan; Ferrier, Robert C; Bailey, Mark; Gordon, Iain J; Song, Shuai; Huang, Jikun; Jia, Shaofeng; Zhang, Fusuo; Liu, Xuejun; Feng, Zhaozhong; Zhang, Zhibin

    2015-02-01

    China's increasingly urbanized and wealthy population is driving a growing and changing demand for food, which might not be met without significant increase in agricultural productivity and sustainable use of natural resources. Given the past relationship between lack of access to affordable food and political instability, food security has to be given a high priority on national political agendas in the context of globalization. The drive for increased food production has had a significant impact on the environment, and the deterioration in ecosystem quality due to historic and current levels of pollution will potentially compromise the food production system in China. We discuss the grand challenges of not only producing more food but also producing it sustainably and without environmental degradation. In addressing these challenges, food production should be considered as part of an environmental system (soil, air, water, and biodiversity) and not independent from it. It is imperative that new ways of meeting the demand for food are developed while safeguarding the natural resources upon which food production is based. We present a holistic approach to both science and policy to ensure future food security while embracing the ambition of achieving environmental sustainability in China. It is a unique opportunity for China to be a role model as a new global player, especially for other emerging economies.

  5. Review: Balancing Limiting Factors and Economic Drivers to Achieve Sustainable Midwestern US Agricultural Residue Feedstock Supplies

    SciTech Connect

    Wally W. Wilhelm; J. Richard Hess; Douglas L. Karlen; David J. Muth; Jane M. F. Johnson; John M. Baker; Hero T. Gollany; Jeff M. Novak; Diane E. Stott; Gary E. Varvel

    2010-10-01

    Advanced biofuels will be developed using cellulosic feedstock rather than grain or oilseed crops that can also be used for food and feed. To be sustainable, these new agronomic production systems must be economically viable without degrading soil resources. This review examines six agronomic factors that collectively define many of the limits and opportunities for harvesting crop residue for biofuel feedstock. These six “limiting factors” are discussed in relationship to economic drivers associated with harvesting corn (Zea mays L.) stover as a potential cellulosic feedstock. The limiting factors include soil organic carbon, wind and water erosion, plant nutrient balance, soil water and temperature dynamics, soil compaction, and off-site environmental impacts. Initial evaluations using the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation 2.0 (RUSLE2) show that a single factor analysis based on simply meeting tolerable soil loss might indicate stover could be harvested sustainably, but the same analysis based on maintaining soil organic carbon shows the practice to be non-sustainable. Modifying agricultural management to include either annual or perennial cover crops is shown to meet both soil erosion and soil carbon requirements. The importance of achieving high yields and planning in a holistic manner at the landscape scale are also shown to be crucial for balancing limitations and drivers associated with renewable bioenergy production.

  6. Addressing China's grand challenge of achieving food security while ensuring environmental sustainability.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yonglong; Jenkins, Alan; Ferrier, Robert C; Bailey, Mark; Gordon, Iain J; Song, Shuai; Huang, Jikun; Jia, Shaofeng; Zhang, Fusuo; Liu, Xuejun; Feng, Zhaozhong; Zhang, Zhibin

    2015-02-01

    China's increasingly urbanized and wealthy population is driving a growing and changing demand for food, which might not be met without significant increase in agricultural productivity and sustainable use of natural resources. Given the past relationship between lack of access to affordable food and political instability, food security has to be given a high priority on national political agendas in the context of globalization. The drive for increased food production has had a significant impact on the environment, and the deterioration in ecosystem quality due to historic and current levels of pollution will potentially compromise the food production system in China. We discuss the grand challenges of not only producing more food but also producing it sustainably and without environmental degradation. In addressing these challenges, food production should be considered as part of an environmental system (soil, air, water, and biodiversity) and not independent from it. It is imperative that new ways of meeting the demand for food are developed while safeguarding the natural resources upon which food production is based. We present a holistic approach to both science and policy to ensure future food security while embracing the ambition of achieving environmental sustainability in China. It is a unique opportunity for China to be a role model as a new global player, especially for other emerging economies. PMID:26601127

  7. Addressing China’s grand challenge of achieving food security while ensuring environmental sustainability

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yonglong; Jenkins, Alan; Ferrier, Robert C.; Bailey, Mark; Gordon, Iain J.; Song, Shuai; Huang, Jikun; Jia, Shaofeng; Zhang, Fusuo; Liu, Xuejun; Feng, Zhaozhong; Zhang, Zhibin

    2015-01-01

    China’s increasingly urbanized and wealthy population is driving a growing and changing demand for food, which might not be met without significant increase in agricultural productivity and sustainable use of natural resources. Given the past relationship between lack of access to affordable food and political instability, food security has to be given a high priority on national political agendas in the context of globalization. The drive for increased food production has had a significant impact on the environment, and the deterioration in ecosystem quality due to historic and current levels of pollution will potentially compromise the food production system in China. We discuss the grand challenges of not only producing more food but also producing it sustainably and without environmental degradation. In addressing these challenges, food production should be considered as part of an environmental system (soil, air, water, and biodiversity) and not independent from it. It is imperative that new ways of meeting the demand for food are developed while safeguarding the natural resources upon which food production is based. We present a holistic approach to both science and policy to ensure future food security while embracing the ambition of achieving environmental sustainability in China. It is a unique opportunity for China to be a role model as a new global player, especially for other emerging economies. PMID:26601127

  8. What Is an Education for Sustainable Development Supposed to Achieve--A Question of What, How and Why

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hofman, Maria

    2015-01-01

    This is a theoretical article to open the discussion of what an education for sustainable development is supposed to achieve and how teachers can help students to develop skills that might be needed in order to support a sustainable future. The focus in the article will be on education. As it is an article aiming to open this kind of discussion…

  9. Socially cooperative choices: An approach to achieving resource sustainability in the coastal zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crance, Colin; Draper, Dianne

    1996-03-01

    Achieving resource sustainability, particularly in the coastal zone, is complicated by a variety of interdependencies and trade-offs between economic, social, and ecological variables. Although trade-offs between each of these variables are important, this paper emphasizes the social components of resource management. In this regard a distinction is made between individual and cooperative choices. Individual choices frequently are made from a shortterm, self-interested perspective, whereas cooperative choices are made from a long-term, community and resource-sustainability perspective. Typically, when presented with a spectrum of resource management decisions, individuals have a tendency to act in a self-interested manner. Thus, cooperative benefits, such as reduced conflict and improved resource certainty, are not realized. An overview of selected aspects of social dilemma theory suggests that socially cooperative choice outcomes are attainable in coastal zone management by integrating structural and behavioral solutions in resource use decision making. Three barriers to successful integration of structural and behavioral solutions are identified as self-interest, mistrust, and variable perceptions of resource amenities. Examples from coastal zone management indicate that these barriers may be overcome using approaches such as scopereduction, co-management, community education, and local participation. The paper also provides comment on the potential benefits of integrating structural and behavioral solutions in international coastal zone management efforts.

  10. Untangling the debate surrounding strategies for achieving sustainable high coverage of insecticide-treated nets.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Warren

    2005-01-01

    On the question of how to achieve the goal of long-term high utilisation of insecticide-treated nets (ITNs), most protagonists fall into one of two camps: free distribution or market development. The 'free distribution' camp argue that given the health benefit to be gained and lives saved, not to mention the relative cost effectiveness of ITNs, such an intervention should be provided free and paid for by governments or donors. In addition, they argue that it is unrealistic to ask the poorest of the population, who are often the ones at most risk, to pay for an ITN, and this risks producing greater inequalities in health. The market advocates counter that free distribution compromises sustainability, both in terms of demand and supply. Firstly they argue that, without a price, people will be less inclined to value ITNs. In turn this could mean lower utilisation, and a lower inclination to replace such an asset at the end of its useful life. In addition, on the supply side, without a price there is little chance of a local market developing for ITNs, although this would be the surest way to ensure a sustainable supply. It is hard to argue with either viewpoint, as both have merit. This article considers three major issues in the debate, and attempts to draw policy conclusions.

  11. Charting the course for home health care quality: action steps for achieving sustainable improvement: conference proceedings.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Penny Hollander; Peterson, Laura E; Reische, Laurie; Bruno, Lori; Clark, Amy

    2004-12-01

    On June 30 and July 1, 2003, the first national meeting Charting the Course for Home Health Care Quality: Action Steps for Achieving Sustainable Improvement convened in New York City. The Center for Home Care Policy & Research of the Visiting Nurse Service of New York (VNSNY) hosted the meeting with support from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Fifty-seven attendees from throughout the United States participated. The participants included senior leaders and managers and nurses working directly in home care today. The meeting's objectives were to: 1. foster dialogue among key constituents influencing patient safety and home care, 2. promote information-sharing across sectors and identify areas where more information is needed, and, 3. develop an agenda and strategy for moving forward. This article reports the meeting's proceedings.

  12. Achieving sustainability, quality and access: lessons from the world's largest revolving drug fund in Khartoum.

    PubMed

    Witter, S

    2007-01-01

    Ensuring a reliable and affordable supply of essential drugs to health facilities is one of the main challenges facing developing countries. This paper describes the revolving drug fund in Khartoum, which was set up in 1989 to improve access to high quality drugs across the State. An evaluation in 2004 showed that the fund has successfully managed a number of threats to its financial sustainability and has expanded its network of facilities, its range of products and its financial assets. It now supplies essential drugs to 3 million out of the 5 million population of Khartoum each year, at prices between 40% and 100% less than alternative sources. However, results illustrated the tension between achieving an efficient cost-recovery system and access for the poorest.

  13. Petit receives Robert C. Cowen Award for Sustained Achievement in Science Journalism: Citation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rademacher, Horst

    2012-01-01

    Charles W. Petit, a veteran science writer, received the 2011 Robert C. Cowan Award for Sustained Achievement in Science Journalism at the AGU Fall Meeting Honors Ceremony, held on 7 December 2011 in San Francisco, Calif. Petit covered earthquakes for the San Francisco Chronicle during the 1980s and 1990s and has recently served as "head tracker" for the Knight Science Journalism Tracker, a Massachusetts Institute of Technology-based daily blog that compiles and critiques science reporting worldwide. Petit was previously honored by AGU in 2003 when he received the David Perlman Award for an article about a new finding in oceanography. The Cowan Award, named for a former science editor of the Christian Science Monitor, is given no more than every 2 years and recognizes a journalist who has made "significant, lasting, and consistent contributions to accurate reporting or writing" on the Earth and space sciences for the general public.

  14. Petit receives Robert C. Cowen Award for Sustained Achievement in Science Journalism: Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petit, Charles W.

    2012-01-01

    Charles W. Petit, a veteran science writer, received the 2011 Robert C. Cowan Award for Sustained Achievement in Science Journalism at the AGU Fall Meeting Honors Ceremony, held on 7 December 2011 in San Francisco, Calif. Petit covered earthquakes for the San Francisco Chronicle during the 1980s and 1990s and has recently served as "head tracker" for the Knight Science Journalism Tracker, a Massachusetts Institute of Technology-based daily blog that compiles and critiques science reporting worldwide. Petit was previously honored by AGU in 2003 when he received the David Perlman Award for an article about a new finding in oceanography. The Cowan Award, named for a former science editor of the Christian Science Monitor, is given no more than every 2 years and recognizes a journalist who has made "significant, lasting, and consistent contributions to accurate reporting or writing" on the Earth and space sciences for the general public.

  15. Secondary Students' Reading Attitudes and Achievement in a Scaffolded Silent Reading Program versus Traditional Sustained Silent Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, Chandra Lorene

    2010-01-01

    This study explored the reading attitudes and achievement, as well as genre knowledge, of tenth, eleventh, and twelfth-grade students who participated in Scaffolded Silent Reading, Sustained Silent Reading, or a control group. The Reading and You attitude survey, Degrees of Reading Power achievement measure, and Genre Assessment were administered…

  16. Achieving and sustaining profound institutional change in healthcare: case study using neo-institutional theory.

    PubMed

    Macfarlane, Fraser; Barton-Sweeney, Cathy; Woodard, Fran; Greenhalgh, Trisha

    2013-03-01

    Change efforts in healthcare sometimes have an ambitious, whole-system remit and seek to achieve fundamental changes in norms and organisational culture rather than (or as well as) restructuring the service. Long-term evaluation of such initiatives is rarely undertaken. We report a secondary analysis of data from an evaluation of a profound institutional change effort in London, England, using a mixed-method longitudinal case study design. The service had received £15 million modernisation funding in 2004, covering multiple organisations and sectors and overseen by a bespoke management and governance infrastructure that was dismantled in 2008. In 2010-11, we gathered data (activity statistics, documents, interviews, questionnaires, site visits) and compared these with data from 2003 to 2008. Data analysis was informed by neo-institutional theory, which considers organisational change as resulting from the material-resource environment and three 'institutional pillars' (regulative, normative and cultural-cognitive), enacted and reproduced via the identities, values and activities of human actors. Explaining the long-term fortunes of the different components of the original programme and their continuing adaptation to a changing context required attention to all three of Scott's pillars and to the interplay between macro institutional structures and embedded human agency. The paper illustrates how neo-institutional theory (which is typically used by academics to theorise macro-level changes in institutional structures over time) can also be applied at a more meso level to inform an empirical analysis of how healthcare organisations achieve change and what helps or hinders efforts to sustain those changes. PMID:23415586

  17. Distinct foods with smaller unit would be an effective approach to achieve sustainable weight loss.

    PubMed

    Chang, Un Jae; Suh, Hyung Joo; Yang, Sun Ok; Hong, Yang Hee; Kim, Young Suk; Kim, Jin Man; Jung, Eun Young

    2012-01-01

    We studied the effects of food type and food unit size on food intake and satiety using fried rice mixed with Kimchi in healthy Korean young women (n=31). Amorphous fried rice (1st week), distinct large fried rice balls (100 g/unit, 2nd week) and distinct small fried rice balls (20 g/unit, 3rd week) were served in the same content and volume (500 g). Subjects ate significantly (p<.001) less distinct large fried rice balls (243.5 g) compared to amorphous fried rice (317.2 g). Despite consuming more amorphous fried rice, subjects did not feel significantly fuller after eating amorphous fried rice compared to distinct large fried rice balls. When distinct fried rice balls were served as smaller unit, subjects ate significantly less them (small unit; 190.6 g vs. large unit; 243.5 g, p<.01). Although subjects ate more distinct fried rice balls provided as large unit, they rated similar satiety and hunger levels for distinct small and distinct large fried rice balls. In conclusion, we propose that distinct foods with smaller unit would be an effective approach to achieve sustainable weight loss. PMID:22177403

  18. Sustainability.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chein-Chi; DiGiovanni, Kimberly; Mei, Ying; Wei, Li

    2016-10-01

    This review on Sustainability covers selected 2015 publications on the focus of Sustainability. It is divided into the following sections : • Sustainable water and wastewater utilities • Sustainable water resources management • Stormwater and green infrastructure • Sustainability in wastewater treatment • Life cycle assessment (LCA) applications • Sustainability and energy in wastewater industry, • Sustainability and asset management.

  19. Sustainability.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chein-Chi; DiGiovanni, Kimberly; Mei, Ying; Wei, Li

    2016-10-01

    This review on Sustainability covers selected 2015 publications on the focus of Sustainability. It is divided into the following sections : • Sustainable water and wastewater utilities • Sustainable water resources management • Stormwater and green infrastructure • Sustainability in wastewater treatment • Life cycle assessment (LCA) applications • Sustainability and energy in wastewater industry, • Sustainability and asset management. PMID:27620092

  20. Achieving and Sustaining Automated Health Data Linkages for Learning Systems: Barriers and Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Van Eaton, Erik G.; Devlin, Allison B.; Devine, Emily Beth; Flum, David R.; Tarczy-Hornoch, Peter

    2014-01-01

    challenges of idiosyncratic EHR implementations required each hospital to devote more IT resources than were predicted. Cost savings did not meet projections because of the increased IT resource requirements and a different source of lowered chart review costs. Discussion: CERTAIN succeeded in recruiting unaffiliated hospitals into the Automation Project to create an enhanced registry to achieve AHRQ goals. This case report describes several distinct barriers to central data aggregation for QI and CER across unaffiliated hospitals: (1) competition for limited on-site IT expertise, (2) concerns about data use for QI versus research, (3) restrictions on data automation to a defined subset of patients, and (4) unpredictable resource needs because of idiosyncrasies among unaffiliated hospitals in how EHR data are coded, stored, and made available for transmission—even between hospitals using the same vendor’s EHR. Therefore, even a fully optimized automation infrastructure would still not achieve complete automation. The Automation Project was unable to align sufficiently with internal hospital objectives, so it could not show a compelling case for sustainability. PMID:25848606

  1. Concepts for Life Cycle Cost Control Required to Achieve Space Transportation Affordability and Sustainability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, Russel E.; Zapata, Edgar; Levack, Daniel J. H.; Robinson, John W.; Donahue, Benjamin B.

    2009-01-01

    Cost control must be implemented through the establishment of requirements and controlled continually by managing to these requirements. Cost control of the non-recurring side of life cycle cost has traditionally been implemented in both commercial and government programs. The government uses the budget process to implement this control. The commercial approach is to use a similar process of allocating the non-recurring cost to major elements of the program. This type of control generally manages through a work breakdown structure (WBS) by defining the major elements of the program. If the cost control is to be applied across the entire program life cycle cost (LCC), the approach must be addressed very differently. A functional breakdown structure (FBS) is defined and recommended. Use of a FBS provides the visibifity to allow the choice of an integrated solution reducing the cost of providing many different elements of like function. The different functional solutions that drive the hardware logistics, quantity of documentation, operational labor, reliability and maintainability balance, and total integration of the entire system from DDT&E through the life of the program must be fully defined, compared, and final decisions made among these competing solutions. The major drivers of recurring cost have been identified and are presented and discussed. The LCC requirements must be established and flowed down to provide control of LCC. This LCC control will require a structured rigid process similar to the one traditionally used to control weight/performance for space transportation systems throughout the entire program. It has been demonstrated over the last 30 years that without a firm requirement and methodically structured cost control, it is unlikely that affordable and sustainable space transportation system LCC will be achieved.

  2. Current guidelines for nut consumption are achievable and sustainable: a hazelnut intervention.

    PubMed

    Tey, S L; Brown, R; Chisholm, A; Gray, A; Williams, S; Delahunty, C

    2011-05-01

    Nuts are known for their hypocholesterolaemic properties; however, to achieve optimal health benefits, nuts must be consumed regularly and in sufficient quantity. It is therefore important to assess the acceptability of regular consumption of nuts. The present study examined the long-term effects of hazelnut consumption in three different forms on 'desire to consume' and 'overall liking'. A total of forty-eight participants took part in this randomised cross-over study with three dietary phases of 4 weeks: 30 g/d of whole, sliced and ground hazelnuts. 'Overall liking' was measured in a three-stage design: a pre- and post-exposure tasting session and daily evaluation over the exposure period. 'Desire to consume' hazelnuts was measured during the exposure period only. Ratings were measured on a 150 mm visual analogue scale. Mean ratings of 'desire to consume' were 92 (SD 35) mm for ground, 108 (SD 33) mm for sliced and 116 (SD 30) mm for whole hazelnuts. For 'overall liking', the mean ratings were 101 (SD 29) mm for ground, 110 (SD 32) mm for sliced and 118 (SD 30) mm for whole hazelnuts. Ground hazelnuts had significantly lower ratings than both sliced (P ≤ 0·034) and whole hazelnuts (P < 0·001), with no difference in ratings between sliced and whole hazelnuts (P ≥ 0·125). For each form of nut, ratings of 'overall liking' and 'desire to consume' were stable over the exposure period, indicating that not only did the participants like the nuts, but also they wished to continue eating them. Therefore, the guideline to consume nuts on a regular basis appears to be a sustainable behaviour to reduce CVD.

  3. Lipophilic nalmefene prodrugs to achieve a one-month sustained release.

    PubMed

    Gaekens, Tim; Guillaume, Michel; Borghys, Herman; De Zwart, Loeckie L; de Vries, Ronald; Embrechts, Roger C A; Vermeulen, An; Megens, Anton A H P; Leysen, Josée E; Herdewijn, Piet; Annaert, Pieter P; Atack, John R

    2016-06-28

    Nalmefene is an opioid antagonist which as a once-a-day tablet formulation has recently been approved for reducing ethanol intake in alcoholic subjects. In order to address the compliance issue in this patient population, a number of potential nalmefene prodrugs were synthesized with the aim of providing a formulation that could provide plasma drug concentrations in the region of 0.5-1.0ng/mL for a one-month period when dosed intramuscular to dogs or minipigs. In an initial series of studies, three different lipophilic nalmefene derivatives were evaluated: the palmitate (C16), the octadecyl glutarate diester (C18-C5) and the decyl carbamate (CB10). They were administered intramuscularly to dogs in a sesame oil solution at a dose of 1mg-eq. nalmefene/kg. The decyl carbamate was released relatively quickly from the oil depot and its carbamate bond was too stable to be used as a prodrug. The other two derivatives delivered a fairly constant level of 0.2-0.3ng nalmefene/mL plasma for one month and since there was no significant difference between these two, the less complex palmitate monoester was chosen to demonstrate that dog plasma nalmefene concentrations were dose-dependent at 1, 5 and 20mg-eq. nalmefene/kg. In a second set of experiments, the effect of the chain length of the fatty acid monoester promoieties was examined. The increasingly lipophilic octanoate (C8), decanoate (C10) and dodecanoate (C12) derivatives were evaluated in dogs and in minipigs, at a dose of 5mg-eq. nalmefene/kg and plasma nalmefene concentrations were measured over a four-week period. The pharmacokinetic profiles were very similar in both species with Cmax decreasing and Tmax increasing with increasing fatty acid chain length and the target plasma concentrations (0.5-1.0ng/mL over a month-long period) were achieved with the dodecanoate (C12) prodrug. These data therefore demonstrate that sustained plasma nalmefene concentrations can be achieved in both dog and minipig using nalmefene

  4. Achieving Campus Sustainability: Top-Down, Bottom-Up, or Neither?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brinkhurst, Marena; Rose, Peter; Maurice, Gillian; Ackerman, Josef Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The dynamics of organizational change related to environmental sustainability on university campuses are examined in this article. Whereas case studies of campus sustainability efforts tend to classify leadership as either "top-down" or "bottom-up", this classification neglects consideration of the leadership roles of the institutional…

  5. In Pursuit of Sustained Achievement: A Case Study of One At-Risk School's Efforts to Change Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sorvig, Carol A.

    2010-01-01

    Sustained achievement remains out of reach for most Title I schools. While there are many programs and examples of schools touting improved performance, there are precious few that are able to maintain that improved performance over time. This case study examined the characteristics of changes made at one Colorado Title I elementary school that…

  6. The Sustainability of Reading Recovery Intervention on Reading Achievement of Students Identified as At-Risk for Early Reading Failure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harley, Anne J.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the impact and sustainability of successfully discontinued first grade Reading Recovery students as compared to non-Reading Recovery students in reading achievement measures as third graders. Schools are facing the unprecedented challenge to ensure reading success for all students by the end of second…

  7. Achieving a high-reliability organization through implementation of the ARCC model for systemwide sustainability of evidence-based practice.

    PubMed

    Melnyk, Bernadette Mazurek

    2012-01-01

    High-reliability health care organizations are those that provide care that is safe and one that minimizes errors while achieving exceptional performance in quality and safety. This article presents major concepts and characteristics of a patient safety culture and a high-reliability health care organization and explains how building a culture of evidence-based practice can assist organizations in achieving high reliability. The ARCC (Advancing Research and Clinical practice through close Collaboration) model for systemwide implementation and sustainability of evidence-based practice is highlighted as a key strategy in achieving high reliability in health care organizations.

  8. Perspectives on Federal Funding for State Health Care-Associated Infection Programs: Achievements, Barriers, and Implications for Sustainability.

    PubMed

    Ellingson, Katherine; McCormick, Kelly; Woodard, Tiffanee; Garcia-Williams, Amanda; Mendel, Peter; Kahn, Katherine; McDonald, Clifford; Jernigan, John; Sinkowitz-Cochran, Ronda

    2014-08-01

    In September 2009, federal funding for health care-associated infection (HAI) program development was dispersed through a cooperative agreement to 51 state and territorial health departments. From July to September 2011, 69 stakeholders from six states-including state health department employees, representatives from partner organizations, and health care facility employees-were interviewed to assess state HAI program achievements, implementation barriers, and strategies for sustainability. Respondents most frequently cited enhanced HAI surveillance as a program achievement and resource constraints as an implementation barrier. To sustain programs, respondents recommended ongoing support for HAI prevention activities, improved surveillance processes, and maintenance of partnerships. Findings suggest that state-level HAI program growth was achieved during the cooperative agreement but that maintenance of programs faces challenges.

  9. Early Stage Design Decisions: The Way to Achieve Sustainable Buildings at Lower Costs

    PubMed Central

    Bragança, Luís; Vieira, Susana M.; Andrade, Joana B.

    2014-01-01

    The construction industry attempts to produce buildings with as lower environmental impact as possible. However, construction activities still greatly affect environment; therefore, it is necessary to consider a sustainable project approach based on its performance. Sustainability is an important issue to consider in design, not only due to environmental concerns but also due to economic and social matters, promoting architectural quality and economic advantages. This paper aims to identify the phases through which a design project should be developed, emphasising the importance and ability of earlier stages to influence sustainability, performance, and life cycle cost. Then, a selection of sustainability key indicators, able to be used at the design conceptual phase and able to start predicting environmental sustainability performance of buildings is presented. The output of this paper aimed to enable designers to compare and evaluate the consequences of different design solutions, based on preliminary data, and facilitate the collaboration between stakeholders and clients and eventually yield a sustainable and high performance building throughout its life cycle. PMID:24578630

  10. Significant increase in ecosystem C can be achieved with sustainable forest management in subtropical plantation forests.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiaohua; Blanco, Juan A

    2014-01-01

    Subtropical planted forests are rapidly expanding. They are traditionally managed for intensive, short-term goals that often lead to long-term yield decline and reduced carbon sequestration capacity. Here we show how it is possible to increase and sustain carbon stored in subtropical forest plantations if management is switched towards more sustainable forestry. We first conducted a literature review to explore possible management factors that contribute to the potentials in ecosystem C in tropical and subtropical plantations. We found that broadleaves plantations have significantly higher ecosystem C than conifer plantations. In addition, ecosystem C increases with plantation age, and reaches a peak with intermediate stand densities of 1500-2500 trees ha⁻¹. We then used the FORECAST model to simulate the regional implications of switching from traditional to sustainable management regimes, using Chinese fir (Cunninghamia lanceolata) plantations in subtropical China as a study case. We randomly simulated 200 traditional short-rotation pure stands and 200 sustainably-managed mixed Chinese fir--Phoebe bournei plantations, for 120 years. Our results showed that mixed, sustainably-managed plantations have on average 67.5% more ecosystem C than traditional pure conifer plantations. If all pure plantations were gradually transformed into mixed plantations during the next 10 years, carbon stocks could rise in 2050 by 260.22 TgC in east-central China. Assuming similar differences for temperate and boreal plantations, if sustainable forestry practices were applied to all new forest plantation types in China, stored carbon could increase by 1,482.80 TgC in 2050. Such an increase would be equivalent to a yearly sequestration rate of 40.08 TgC yr⁻¹, offsetting 1.9% of China's annual emissions in 2010. More importantly, this C increase can be sustained in the long term through the maintenance of higher amounts of soil organic carbon and the production of timber products

  11. Significant Increase in Ecosystem C Can Be Achieved with Sustainable Forest Management in Subtropical Plantation Forests

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Xiaohua; Blanco, Juan A.

    2014-01-01

    Subtropical planted forests are rapidly expanding. They are traditionally managed for intensive, short-term goals that often lead to long-term yield decline and reduced carbon sequestration capacity. Here we show how it is possible to increase and sustain carbon stored in subtropical forest plantations if management is switched towards more sustainable forestry. We first conducted a literature review to explore possible management factors that contribute to the potentials in ecosystem C in tropical and subtropical plantations. We found that broadleaves plantations have significantly higher ecosystem C than conifer plantations. In addition, ecosystem C increases with plantation age, and reaches a peak with intermediate stand densities of 1500–2500 trees ha−1. We then used the FORECAST model to simulate the regional implications of switching from traditional to sustainable management regimes, using Chinese fir (Cunninghamia lanceolata) plantations in subtropical China as a study case. We randomly simulated 200 traditional short-rotation pure stands and 200 sustainably-managed mixed Chinese fir – Phoebe bournei plantations, for 120 years. Our results showed that mixed, sustainably-managed plantations have on average 67.5% more ecosystem C than traditional pure conifer plantations. If all pure plantations were gradually transformed into mixed plantations during the next 10 years, carbon stocks could rise in 2050 by 260.22 TgC in east-central China. Assuming similar differences for temperate and boreal plantations, if sustainable forestry practices were applied to all new forest plantation types in China, stored carbon could increase by 1,482.80 TgC in 2050. Such an increase would be equivalent to a yearly sequestration rate of 40.08 TgC yr−1, offsetting 1.9% of China’s annual emissions in 2010. More importantly, this C increase can be sustained in the long term through the maintenance of higher amounts of soil organic carbon and the production of timber

  12. In place of fear: aligning health care planning with system objectives to achieve financial sustainability.

    PubMed

    Birch, Stephen; Murphy, Gail Tomblin; MacKenzie, Adrian; Cumming, Jackie

    2015-04-01

    The financial sustainability of publicly funded health care systems is a challenge to policymakers in many countries as health care absorbs an ever increasing share of both national wealth and government spending. New technology, aging populations and increasing public expectations of the health care system are often cited as reasons why health care systems need ever increasing funding as well as reasons why universal and comprehensive public systems are unsustainable. However, increases in health care spending are not usually linked to corresponding increases in need for care within populations. Attempts to promote financial sustainability of systems such as limiting the range of services is covered or the groups of population covered may compromise their political sustainability as some groups are left to seek private cover for some or all services. In this paper, an alternative view of financial sustainability is presented which identifies the failure of planning and management of health care to reflect needs for care in populations and to integrate planning and management functions for health care expenditure, health care services and the health care workforce. We present a Health Care Sustainability Framework based on disaggregating the health care expenditure into separate planning components. Unlike other approaches to planning health care expenditure, this framework explicitly incorporates population health needs as a determinant of health care requirements, and provides a diagnostic tool for understanding the sources of expenditure increase.

  13. Disparities in achieving and sustaining viral suppression among a large cohort of HIV-infected persons in care - Washington, DC.

    PubMed

    Castel, Amanda D; Kalmin, Mariah M; Hart, Rachel L D; Young, Heather A; Hays, Harlen; Benator, Debra; Kumar, Princy; Elion, Richard; Parenti, David; Ruiz, Maria Elena; Wood, Angela; D'Angelo, Lawrence; Rakhmanina, Natella; Rana, Sohail; Bryant, Maya; Hebou, Annick; Fernández, Ricardo; Abbott, Stephen; Peterson, James; Wood, Kathy; Subramanian, Thilakavathy; Binkley, Jeffrey; Happ, Lindsey Powers; Kharfen, Michael; Masur, Henry; Greenberg, Alan E

    2016-11-01

    One goal of the HIV care continuum is achieving viral suppression (VS), yet disparities in suppression exist among subpopulations of HIV-infected persons. We sought to identify disparities in both the ability to achieve and sustain VS among an urban cohort of HIV-infected persons in care. Data from HIV-infected persons enrolled at the 13 DC Cohort study clinical sites between January 2011 and June 2014 were analyzed. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression were conducted to identify factors associated with achieving VS (viral load < 200 copies/ml) at least once, and Kaplan-Meier (KM) curves and Cox proportional hazards models were used to identify factors associated with sustaining VS and time to virologic failure (VL ≥ 200 copies/ml after achievement of VS). Among the 4311 participants, 95.4% were either virally suppressed at study enrollment or able to achieve VS during the follow-up period. In multivariate analyses, achieving VS was significantly associated with age (aOR: 1.04; 95%CI: 1.03-1.06 per five-year increase) and having a higher CD4 (aOR: 1.05, 95% CI 1.04-1.06 per 100 cells/mm(3)). Patients infected through perinatal transmission were less likely to achieve VS compared to MSM patients (aOR: 0.63, 95% CI 0.51-0.79). Once achieved, most participants (74.4%) sustained VS during follow-up. Blacks and perinatally infected persons were less likely to have sustained VS in KM survival analysis (log rank chi-square p ≤ .001 for both) compared to other races and risk groups. Earlier time to failure was observed among females, Blacks, publically insured, perinatally infected, those with longer standing HIV infection, and those with diagnoses of mental health issues or depression. Among this HIV-infected cohort, most people achieved and maintained VS; however, disparities exist with regard to patient age, race, HIV transmission risk, and co-morbid conditions. Identifying populations with disparate outcomes allows for appropriate targeting

  14. Out of the wilderness? Achieving sustainable development within Scottish national parks.

    PubMed

    Barker, Adam; Stockdale, Aileen

    2008-07-01

    The introduction of national parks to Scotland represents a significant shift in the evolution of protected area management within the UK. Although the National Parks (Scotland) Act 2000 adopts the established national park aims of conservation and recreation, provisions are also made for advancing notions of sustainable development. This paper provides an assessment of the degree to which the Scottish national park model is likely to enable the realisation of multiple national park objectives. Five key areas are considered for analysis. These relate to management aims, institutional arrangements, implementation, democratic accountability and funding. The evaluation reveals that whilst management provisions have been established in accordance with international sustainable development guidelines, a number of concerns relating to operational processes remain.

  15. Before Sustainable Development Goals (SDG): why Nigeria failed to achieve the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs)

    PubMed Central

    Oleribe, Obinna Ositadimma; Taylor-Robinson, Simon David

    2016-01-01

    World leaders adopted the UN Millennium Declaration in 2000, which committed the nations of the world to a new global partnership, aimed at reducing extreme poverty and other time-bound targets, with a stated deadline of 2015. Fifteen years later, although significant progress has been made worldwide, Nigeria is lagging behind for a variety of reasons, including bureaucracy, poor resource management in the healthcare system, sequential healthcare worker industrial action, Boko Haram insurgency in the north of Nigeria and kidnappings in the south of Nigeria. The country needs to tackle these problems to be able to significantly advance with the new sustainable development goals (SDGs) by the 2030 target date. PMID:27795754

  16. Achieving Sustainability Goals for Urban Coasts in the US Northeast: Research Needs and Challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Close, Sarah L.; Montalto, Franco; Orton, Philip; Antoine, Adrienne; Peters, Danielle; Jones, Hunter; Parris, Adam; Blumberg, Alan

    2016-01-01

    In the wake of Hurricane Sandy and other recent extreme events, urban coastal communities in the northeast region of the United States are beginning or stepping up efforts to integrate climate adaptation and resilience into long-term coastal planning. Natural and nature-based shoreline strategies have emerged as essential components of coastal resilience and are frequently cited by practitioners, scientists, and the public for the wide range of ecosystem services they can provide. However, there is limited quantitative information associating particular urban shoreline design strategies with specific levels of ecosystem service provision, and research on this issue is not always aligned with decision context and decision-maker needs. Engagement between the research community, local government officials and sustainability practitioners, and the non-profit and private sectors can help bridge these gaps. A workshop to bring together these groups discussed research gaps and challenges in integrating ecosystem services into urban sustainability planning in the urban northeast corridor. Many themes surfaced repeatedly throughout workshop deliberations, including the challenges associated with ecosystem service valuation, the transferability of research and case studies within and outside the region, and the opportunity for urban coastal areas to be a focal point for education and outreach efforts related to ecosystem services.

  17. The Knowledge Base for Achieving the Sustainable Development Goal Targets on Water Supply, Sanitation and Hygiene.

    PubMed

    Hutton, Guy; Chase, Claire

    2016-01-01

    Safe drinking water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) are fundamental to an improved standard of living. Globally, 91% of households used improved drinking water sources in 2015, while for improved sanitation it is 68%. Wealth disparities are stark, with rural populations, slum dwellers and marginalized groups lagging significantly behind. Service coverage is significantly lower when considering the new water and sanitation targets under the sustainable development goals (SDGs) which aspire to a higher standard of 'safely managed' water and sanitation. Lack of access to WASH can have an economic impact as much as 7% of Gross Domestic Product, not including the social and environmental consequences. Research points to significant health and socio-economic consequences of poor nutritional status, child growth and school performance caused by inadequate WASH. Groundwater over-extraction and pollution of surface water bodies have serious impacts on water resource availability and biodiversity, while climate change exacerbates the health risks of water insecurity. A significant literature documents the beneficial impacts of WASH interventions, and a growing number of impact evaluation studies assess how interventions are optimally financed, implemented and sustained. Many innovations in behavior change and service delivery offer potential for scaling up services to meet the SDGs. PMID:27240389

  18. The Knowledge Base for Achieving the Sustainable Development Goal Targets on Water Supply, Sanitation and Hygiene.

    PubMed

    Hutton, Guy; Chase, Claire

    2016-05-27

    Safe drinking water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) are fundamental to an improved standard of living. Globally, 91% of households used improved drinking water sources in 2015, while for improved sanitation it is 68%. Wealth disparities are stark, with rural populations, slum dwellers and marginalized groups lagging significantly behind. Service coverage is significantly lower when considering the new water and sanitation targets under the sustainable development goals (SDGs) which aspire to a higher standard of 'safely managed' water and sanitation. Lack of access to WASH can have an economic impact as much as 7% of Gross Domestic Product, not including the social and environmental consequences. Research points to significant health and socio-economic consequences of poor nutritional status, child growth and school performance caused by inadequate WASH. Groundwater over-extraction and pollution of surface water bodies have serious impacts on water resource availability and biodiversity, while climate change exacerbates the health risks of water insecurity. A significant literature documents the beneficial impacts of WASH interventions, and a growing number of impact evaluation studies assess how interventions are optimally financed, implemented and sustained. Many innovations in behavior change and service delivery offer potential for scaling up services to meet the SDGs.

  19. The Knowledge Base for Achieving the Sustainable Development Goal Targets on Water Supply, Sanitation and Hygiene

    PubMed Central

    Hutton, Guy; Chase, Claire

    2016-01-01

    Safe drinking water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) are fundamental to an improved standard of living. Globally, 91% of households used improved drinking water sources in 2015, while for improved sanitation it is 68%. Wealth disparities are stark, with rural populations, slum dwellers and marginalized groups lagging significantly behind. Service coverage is significantly lower when considering the new water and sanitation targets under the sustainable development goals (SDGs) which aspire to a higher standard of ‘safely managed’ water and sanitation. Lack of access to WASH can have an economic impact as much as 7% of Gross Domestic Product, not including the social and environmental consequences. Research points to significant health and socio-economic consequences of poor nutritional status, child growth and school performance caused by inadequate WASH. Groundwater over-extraction and pollution of surface water bodies have serious impacts on water resource availability and biodiversity, while climate change exacerbates the health risks of water insecurity. A significant literature documents the beneficial impacts of WASH interventions, and a growing number of impact evaluation studies assess how interventions are optimally financed, implemented and sustained. Many innovations in behavior change and service delivery offer potential for scaling up services to meet the SDGs. PMID:27240389

  20. Successful horizontal completions require an integrated approach

    SciTech Connect

    Richard, B.; Smejkal, K.; Penberthy, W. Jr.

    1997-01-01

    While a perfect well completion may not exist, depleting a hydrocarbon resource at a sustained high rate--without a workover--is the ultimate goal. Unfortunately, many horizontal well completions fail to achieve this due to wellbore damage or loss of reservoir pressure. These conditions manifest themselves in reduced production rates, extended well life and reduced profitability. Standard completion techniques are not always compatible with each other for site specific well applications. The combination of two incompatible technologies or slight changes in a completion procedure may negatively impact productivity. Hence, the most successful horizontal completion results are obtained using a compatible integrated system approach--an approach that carefully combines the best completion tools and processes to deliver an undamaged well completed at the lowest possible cost. After studying the compatibilities of various drill-in fluids, screens, filter cakes and gravel packs, recommended procedures are presented for successfully completing horizontal wells.

  1. Sustained Acceleration of Achievement in Reading Comprehension: The New Zealand Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lai, Mei Kuin; McNaughton, Stuart; Amituanai-Toloa, Meaola; Turner, Rolf; Hsiao, Selena

    2009-01-01

    Schools with primarily indigenous and ethnic minorities in low socioeconomic areas have long been associated with low levels of achievement, particularly in literacy. This is true for New Zealand despite high levels of reading comprehension by international comparisons (e.g., PISA). Recent reviews of schooling improvement suggest small gains over…

  2. Sustaining Success toward Closing the Achievement Gap: A Case Study of One Urban High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cabrera, Kimberly Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    Since the introduction of the Coleman Report (1966), the focus on closing the achievement gap has been a critical component of educational policy for political leaders and field research by educators. The economic crisis which California and the nation at large currently face creates a challenging situation in attempting to narrow the gap.…

  3. Challenges to Achieving Sustainable Sanitation in Informal Settlements of Kigali, Rwanda

    PubMed Central

    Tsinda, Aime; Abbott, Pamela; Pedley, Steve; Charles, Katrina; Adogo, Jane; Okurut, Kenan; Chenoweth, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Like most cities in developing countries, Kigali is experiencing rapid urbanisation leading to an increase in the urban population and rapid growth in the size and number of informal settlements. More than 60% of the city’s population resides in these settlements, where they experience inadequate and poor quality urban services including sanitation. This article discusses the issues and constraints related to the provision of sustainable sanitation in the informal settlements in Kigali. Two informal settlements (Gatsata and Kimisagara) were selected for the study, which used a mixed method approach for data collection. The research found that residents experienced multiple problems because of poor sanitation and that the main barrier to improved sanitation was cost. Findings from this study can be used by the city authorities in the planning of effective sanitation intervention strategies for communities in informal settlements. PMID:24336021

  4. Rock on Cafe: achieving sustainable systems changes in school lunch programs.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Yvonne; Denniston, Ray; Morgan, Molly; Bordeau, Mark

    2009-04-01

    The rising rate of overweight poses a significant threat to the health of children. Because roughly one third of a child's dietary intake occurs during school hours and because both health and academic outcomes have been linked to children's nutrition, school nutrition policies and programs have been identified as a key area for intervention. This article describes the components, processes, and initial successes of a grassroots effort and innovative project to improve the nutritional quality of the School Lunch Program through a sustainable systems intervention and policy change across a regional area of upstate New York. The Rock on Cafe intervention was partially funded by the Steps to a Healthier New York program and promises to be a model for creating a school environment that supports healthy dietary behaviors among children.

  5. Challenges to achieving sustainable sanitation in informal settlements of Kigali, Rwanda.

    PubMed

    Tsinda, Aime; Abbott, Pamela; Pedley, Steve; Charles, Katrina; Adogo, Jane; Okurut, Kenan; Chenoweth, Jonathan

    2013-12-10

    Like most cities in developing countries, Kigali is experiencing rapid urbanisation leading to an increase in the urban population and rapid growth in the size and number of informal settlements. More than 60% of the city's population resides in these settlements, where they experience inadequate and poor quality urban services including sanitation. This article discusses the issues and constraints related to the provision of sustainable sanitation in the informal settlements in Kigali. Two informal settlements (Gatsata and Kimisagara) were selected for the study, which used a mixed method approach for data collection. The research found that residents experienced multiple problems because of poor sanitation and that the main barrier to improved sanitation was cost. Findings from this study can be used by the city authorities in the planning of effective sanitation intervention strategies for communities in informal settlements.

  6. Rock on Cafe: achieving sustainable systems changes in school lunch programs.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Yvonne; Denniston, Ray; Morgan, Molly; Bordeau, Mark

    2009-04-01

    The rising rate of overweight poses a significant threat to the health of children. Because roughly one third of a child's dietary intake occurs during school hours and because both health and academic outcomes have been linked to children's nutrition, school nutrition policies and programs have been identified as a key area for intervention. This article describes the components, processes, and initial successes of a grassroots effort and innovative project to improve the nutritional quality of the School Lunch Program through a sustainable systems intervention and policy change across a regional area of upstate New York. The Rock on Cafe intervention was partially funded by the Steps to a Healthier New York program and promises to be a model for creating a school environment that supports healthy dietary behaviors among children. PMID:19454756

  7. Does the law stymie the science? The role of law in achieving sustainable groundwater management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allan, A.

    2012-04-01

    Legal frameworks for the management of groundwater evolved in an environment where scientific understanding of the resource was sketchy. As hydrogeological knowledge has improved over time, the law has often failed to catch up and enforcement of those laws that are in place has proved difficult. Consequently, groundwater in many countries is still managed by inadequate regimes that are unable to effectively integrate the impacts of land use management and surface water interactions. The Water Framework Directive and its associated Groundwater Directive require the integrated management of both ground and surface waters, but on a global level, this is unusual. Institutional frameworks often perpetuate this split, and the legal regime for the management of transboundary shared aquifers is a work in progress. Both national and international frameworks encourage a race to over-exploit groundwater resources. Symptomatic of the problems currently seen in groundwater management is a widespread inability to adapt to changing climate and environmental conditions. Users may be granted unchangeable rights of use in perpetuity, and the impacts of aquifer over-exploitation on dependent ecosystems may be ignored. There are therefore significant barriers to the application of existing science in many countries, and this seriously jeopardises efforts to sustainably manage groundwater. This presentation will assess current developments in the laws relating to the use of groundwater around the world, highlighting case studies from India, Australia and the USA, and assessing the implementation of the Groundwater Directive in selected European countries (in work derived from the EU-funded GENESIS project). It will also examine the legal architecture relating to international shared aquifers, and the extent to which it can cope with national groundwater use patterns that will shift in response to climate change and its consequences.

  8. Getting to Green: An Examination of the Relationship between Institutional Characteristics and Sustainability Achievement at Four-Year U.S. Based Colleges and Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Justin

    2014-01-01

    This study presents an examination of how institutional characteristics might influence a four-year institution of higher education's achievement in sustainability, as measured by the Sustainability Tracking, Assessment, and Rating System (STARS). Specifically, it examined the potential role Carnegie classification, sector, location, number of…

  9. Quaternary Aquifer of the North China Plain-assessing and achieving groundwater resource sustainability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, Stephen; Garduno, Hector; Evans, Richard; Olson, Doug; Tian, Yuan; Zhang, Weizhen; Han, Zaisheng

    The Quaternary Aquifer of the North China Plain is one of the world's largest aquifer systems and supports an enormous exploitation of groundwater, which has reaped large socio-economic benefits in terms of grain production, farming employment and rural poverty alleviation, together with urban and industrial water-supply provision. Both population and economic activity have grown markedly in the past 25 years. Much of this has been heavily dependent upon groundwater resource development, which has encountered increasing difficulties in recent years primarily as a result of aquifer depletion and related phenomena. This paper focuses upon the hydrogeologic and socio-economic diagnosis of these groundwater resource issues, and identifies strategies to improve groundwater resource sustainability. L'aquifère Quaternaire de la Plaine du Nord de la Chine est l'un des plus grands systèmes aquifères du monde; il permet une exploitation énorme d'eau souterraine, qui a permis des très importants bénéfices socio-économiques en terme de production de céréales, d'emplois ruraux et de réduction de la pauvreté rurale, en même temps que l'approvisionnement en eau potable et pour l'industrie. La population comme l'activité économique ont remarquablement augmenté au cours de ces 25 dernières années. Elles ont été sous la forte dépendance du développement de la ressource en eau souterraine, qui a rencontré des difficultés croissantes ces dernières années, du fait du rabattement de l'aquifère et des phénomènes associés. Cet article est consacré aux diagnostiques hydrogéologique et socio-économique des retombées de cette ressource en eau souterraine; il identifie les stratégies pour améliorer la pérennité des ressources en eau souterraine. El acuífero cuaternario de la Llanura Septentrional de China es uno de los mayores sistemas acuíferos del mundo y soporta una enorme explotación de su agua subterránea, las cuales han originado grandes

  10. Implant-supported overdenture manufactured using CAD/CAM techniques to achieve horizontal path insertion between the primary and secondary structure: A clinical case report

    PubMed Central

    Agustín-Panadero, Rubén; Peñarrocha-Oltra, David; Gomar-Vercher, Sonia; Ferreiroa, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    This report describes the case of an edentulous patient with an atrophic maxilla and severe class III malocclusion. Prosthetic rehabilitation was performed using CAD/CAM techniques for manufacturing an implant-supported overdenture with horizontal insertion. A vestibulo-lingual insertion overdenture is a precision prosthesis with a fixation system affording a good fit between the primary and secondary structure. Both structures exhibit passive horizontal adjustment. This treatment option requires the same number of implants as implant-supported fixed dentures. The horizontal assembly system prevents the prosthesis from loosening or moving in response to axial and non-axial forces. The technique was used to rehabilitate a patient presenting an atrophic upper maxilla, with the insertion of 8 implants. No complications were reported at follow-up 3, 6 and 12 months after fitting of the prosthesis. This system offers solutions to the clinical and laboratory complications associated with hybrid prostheses, concealing emergence of the chimneys and improving implant-prosthesis hygiene. PMID:26140179

  11. Implementing the UN Decade of Education for Sustainable Development (DESD): achievements, open questions and strategies for the way forward

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pigozzi, Mary Joy

    2010-06-01

    This paper looks at the implementation of the DESD from a global perspective. It takes the position that quality education is fundamental for learning how to live sustainably, and that the DESD needs to be better positioned in the education landscape and conceived as a global social movement that must be fostered and nurtured for the well-being of humankind. It suggests that, while there has been progress, much remains to be achieved. Several key challenges are identified. With regard to overcoming these obstacles, it focuses on macro-level strategies that would allow the development of environments in which actions can take root and grow so that the work of the DESD endures beyond the decade itself. Finally, it suggests that there are some opportunities that can be seized to make the task ahead easier to accomplish.

  12. Strengthening the partnership between routine immunization and the global polio eradication initiative to achieve eradication and assure sustainability.

    PubMed

    Abdelwahab, Jalaa; Dietz, Vance; Eggers, Rudolf; Maher, Christopher; Olaniran, Marianne; Sandhu, Hardeep; Vandelaer, Jos

    2014-11-01

    Since the launch of the Global Polio Eradication Initiative (GPEI) in 1988, the number of polio endemic countries has declined from 125 to 3 in 2013. Despite this remarkable achievement, ongoing circulation of wild poliovirus in polio-endemic countries and the increase in the number of circulating vaccine-derived poliovirus cases, especially those caused by type 2, is a cause for concern. The Polio Eradication and Endgame Strategic Plan 2013-2018 (PEESP) was developed and includes 4 objectives: detection and interruption of poliovirus transmission, containment and certification, legacy planning, and a renewed emphasis on strengthening routine immunization (RI) programs. This is critical for the phased withdrawal of oral poliovirus vaccine, beginning with the type 2 component, and the introduction of a single dose of inactivated polio vaccine into RI programs. This objective has inspired renewed consideration of how the GPEI and RI programs can mutually benefit one another, how the infrastructure from the GPEI can be used to strengthen RI, and how a strengthened RI can facilitate polio eradication. The PEESP is the first GPEI strategic plan that places strong and clear emphasis on the necessity of improving RI to achieve and sustain global polio eradication.

  13. Population Pharmacokinetics of Colistin Methanesulfonate in Rats: Achieving Sustained Lung Concentrations of Colistin for Targeting Respiratory Infections

    PubMed Central

    W. S. Yapa, Shalini; Li, Jian; Porter, Christopher J. H.; Nation, Roger L.

    2013-01-01

    Colistin methanesulfonate (CMS), the inactive prodrug of colistin, is administered by inhalation for the management of respiratory infections. However, limited pharmacokinetic data are available for CMS and colistin following pulmonary delivery. This study investigates the pharmacokinetics of CMS and colistin following intravenous (i.v.) and intratracheal (i.t.) administration in rats and determines the targeting advantage after direct delivery into the lungs. In addition to plasma, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid was collected to quantify drug concentrations in lung epithelial lining fluid (ELF). The resulting data were analyzed using a population modeling approach in S-ADAPT. A three-compartment model described the disposition of both compounds in plasma following i.v. administration. The estimated mean clearance from the central compartment was 0.122 liters/h for CMS and 0.0657 liters/h for colistin. Conversion of CMS to colistin from all three compartments was required to fit the plasma data. The fraction of the i.v. dose converted to colistin in the systemic circulation was 0.0255. Two BAL fluid compartments were required to reflect drug kinetics in the ELF after i.t. dosing. A slow conversion of CMS (mean conversion time [MCTCMS] = 3.48 h) in the lungs contributed to high and sustained concentrations of colistin in ELF. The fraction of the CMS dose converted to colistin in ELF (fm,ELF = 0.226) was higher than the corresponding fractional conversion in plasma after i.v. administration. In conclusion, pulmonary administration of CMS achieves high and sustained exposures of colistin in lungs for targeting respiratory infections. PMID:23917323

  14. Beyond good intentions: The role of proactive coping in achieving sustained behavioural change in the context of diabetes management.

    PubMed

    Thoolen, Bart Johan; de Ridder, Denise; Bensing, Jozien; Gorter, Kees; Rutten, Guy

    2009-03-01

    This study examines the effectiveness of a brief self-management intervention to support patients recently diagnosed with type-2 diabetes to achieve sustained improvements in their self-care behaviours. Based on proactive coping, the intervention emphasizes the crucial role of anticipation and planning in maintaining self-care behaviours. In a randomised controlled trial among recent screen-detected patients, participants who received the intervention were compared with usual-care controls, examining changes in proximal outcomes (intentions, self-efficacy and proactive coping), self-care behaviour (diet, physical activity and medication) and weight over time (0, 3 and 12 months). Subsequently, the contribution of proactive coping in predicting maintenance of behavioural change was analysed using stepwise hierarchical regression analyses, controlling for baseline self-care behaviour, patient characteristics, and intentions and self-efficacy as measured after the course. The intervention was effective in improving proximal outcomes and behaviour with regard to diet and physical activity, resulting in significant weight loss at 12 months. Furthermore, proactive coping was a better predictor of long-term self-management than either intentions or self-efficacy. Proactive coping thus offers new insights into behavioural maintenance theory and can be used to develop effective self-management interventions. PMID:20204991

  15. Sustain

    SciTech Connect

    2013-08-20

    Current building energy simulation technology requires excessive labor, time and expertise to create building energy models, excessive computational time for accurate simulations and difficulties with the interpretation of the results. These deficiencies can be ameliorated using modern graphical user interfaces and algorithms which take advantage of modern computer architectures and display capabilities. To prove this hypothesis, we developed an experimental test bed for building energy simulation. This novel test bed environment offers an easy-to-use interactive graphical interface, provides access to innovative simulation modules that run at accelerated computational speeds, and presents new graphics visualization methods to interpret simulation results. Our system offers the promise of dramatic ease of use in comparison with currently available building energy simulation tools. Its modular structure makes it suitable for early stage building design, as a research platform for the investigation of new simulation methods, and as a tool for teaching concepts of sustainable design. Improvements in the accuracy and execution speed of many of the simulation modules are based on the modification of advanced computer graphics rendering algorithms. Significant performance improvements are demonstrated in several computationally expensive energy simulation modules. The incorporation of these modern graphical techniques should advance the state of the art in the domain of whole building energy analysis and building performance simulation, particularly at the conceptual design stage when decisions have the greatest impact. More importantly, these better simulation tools will enable the transition from prescriptive to performative energy codes, resulting in better, more efficient designs for our future built environment.

  16. Sustain

    2013-08-20

    Current building energy simulation technology requires excessive labor, time and expertise to create building energy models, excessive computational time for accurate simulations and difficulties with the interpretation of the results. These deficiencies can be ameliorated using modern graphical user interfaces and algorithms which take advantage of modern computer architectures and display capabilities. To prove this hypothesis, we developed an experimental test bed for building energy simulation. This novel test bed environment offers an easy-to-use interactivemore » graphical interface, provides access to innovative simulation modules that run at accelerated computational speeds, and presents new graphics visualization methods to interpret simulation results. Our system offers the promise of dramatic ease of use in comparison with currently available building energy simulation tools. Its modular structure makes it suitable for early stage building design, as a research platform for the investigation of new simulation methods, and as a tool for teaching concepts of sustainable design. Improvements in the accuracy and execution speed of many of the simulation modules are based on the modification of advanced computer graphics rendering algorithms. Significant performance improvements are demonstrated in several computationally expensive energy simulation modules. The incorporation of these modern graphical techniques should advance the state of the art in the domain of whole building energy analysis and building performance simulation, particularly at the conceptual design stage when decisions have the greatest impact. More importantly, these better simulation tools will enable the transition from prescriptive to performative energy codes, resulting in better, more efficient designs for our future built environment.« less

  17. Radioactive Waste Management - It's Role in contributing and achieving Sustainability. R1.13 The French strategy of waste management: technical and political dimensions of sustainability

    SciTech Connect

    Bazile, F.

    2007-07-01

    The sustainability of an energy policy depends on the manner in which it satisfies environmental, economical and social requirements. Nuclear energy is not an exception. The objectives of the future nuclear systems, as defined in the Generation IV International Forum, tend to optimize the ability of nuclear energy to satisfy sustainable development goals. In this regard, they involve strong commitments concerning waste management policy : five designs in six are based on a closed fuel cycle, in order to minimize the volume and radiotoxicity of final waste, and to recycle the fissile materials to save natural resources. Since its beginnings, the French civil nuclear programme has considered a long-term perspective and has developed spent fuel reprocessing. The French current industrial technology has already permitted to recycle 96% of spent fuel materials, to save 30% of natural resources, to reduce by 5 the amount of waste and to reduce by 10 the waste radiotoxicity, all these benefits for less than 6% of the kWh total cost. This strategy has always been criticized by the nuclear opponents, precisely because they saw that it was a sustainable way, and didn't accept to consider nuclear energy as a sustainable source of power. Two arguments were put forward these criticisms. First, the cost of reprocessing versus once-through cycle and second, the risk of proliferation induced by U-Pu partitioning process. These arguments were also invoked in international debates, and they have also been pleaded by the anti-nukes during the National Debate on HLLLW, at the end of 2005, preceding the vote of a new law in 2006 by the French parliament. Fortunately they have not convinced public opinion in France nor political decision-makers. A majority of people with no regard to technical background understand that recycling and saving the natural resources are sustainable principles. And, from a technical point of view, the 6% over cost does not seem significant considering the

  18. Going Green: A Comparative Case Study of How Three Higher Education Institutions Achieved Progressive Measures of Environmental Sustainability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Matthew R.

    2009-01-01

    Leal Filho, MacDermot, and Padgam (1996) contended that post-secondary institutions are well suited to take on leadership responsibilities for society's environmental protection. Higher education has the unique academic freedom to engage in critical thinking and bold experimentation in environmental sustainability (Cortese, 2003). Although…

  19. When wastewater has worth: Water reconditioning opportunities in the food industry to achieve sustainable food manufacturing (abstract)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A major sustainability goal of food processing wastewater (FPWW) management is to not only decrease environmental pollution but also utilize valuable co-products present in the FPWW. Many processed food products, especially those from fruits and vegetables, result in FPWW streams that contain compou...

  20. Institutional Incorporation of Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT) in Residency Training: Achieving a Sustainable Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Denise M.; McLaurin-Jones, TyWanda; Brown, Fannie D.; Newton, Robin; Marshall, Vanessa J.; Kalu, Nnenna; Cain, Gloria E.; Taylor, Robert E.

    2012-01-01

    The success of implementing a screening, brief intervention and referral to treatment (SBIRT) program within a medical residency program for sustainability is contingent upon a well-crafted training curriculum that incorporates substance abuse education and clinical practice skills. The goal of the Howard University (HU) SBIRT program is to train…

  1. Implementing the UN Decade of Education for Sustainable Development (DESD): Achievements, Open Questions and Strategies for the Way Forward

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pigozzi, Mary Joy

    2010-01-01

    This paper looks at the implementation of the DESD from a global perspective. It takes the position that quality education is fundamental for learning how to live sustainably, and that the DESD needs to be better positioned in the education landscape and conceived as a global social movement that must be fostered and nurtured for the well-being of…

  2. The Effects of Sustained Classroom-Embedded Teacher Professional Learning on Teacher Efficacy and Related Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruce, Catherine D.; Esmonde, Indigo; Ross, John; Dookie, Lesley; Beatty, Ruth

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports on the impact of a classroom-embedded professional learning (PL) program for mathematics teaching in two contrasting districts in Canada, and investigates the relationship between teacher efficacy and student achievement. Before the PL, District A had lower teacher efficacy and student achievement than District B, but after the…

  3. Sustainable energy for all. Technical report of task force 1 in support of the objective to achieve universal access to modern energy services by 2030

    SciTech Connect

    Birol, Fatih

    2012-04-15

    The UN Secretary General established the Sustainable Energy for All initiative in order to guide and support efforts to achieve universal access to modern energy, rapidly increase energy efficiency, and expand the use of renewable energies. Task forces were formed involving prominent energy leaders and experts from business, government, academia and civil society worldwide. The goal of the Task Forces is to inform the implementation of the initiative by identifying challenges and opportunities for achieving its objectives. This report contains the findings of Task Force One which is dedicated to the objective of achieving universal access to modern energy services by 2030. The report shows that universal energy access can be realized by 2030 with strong, focused actions set within a coordinated framework.

  4. Sustainable Communities: A Lens for Envisioning and Achieving a Community-Based Culture of Social and Ecological Peace

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verhagen, Frans C.

    2014-01-01

    One of the obstacles to dealing with the social and ecological crises that obstruct the achievement of a culture of peace is silo thinking in global governance. A unidimensional mode of planning, silo thinking leads to decisions based on the area of expertise of a particular agency or intergovernmental organization and fails to recognize linkages…

  5. Hype, harmony and human factors: applying user-centered design to achieve sustainable telehealth program adoption and growth.

    PubMed

    Rossos, P G; St-Cyr, O; Purdy, B; Toenjes, C; Masino, C; Chmelnitsky, D

    2015-01-01

    Despite decades of international experience with the use of information and communication technologies in healthcare delivery, widespread telehealth adoption remains limited and progress slow. Escalating health system challenges related to access, cost and quality currently coincide with rapid advancement of affordable and reliable internet based communication technologies creating unprecedented opportunities and incentives for telehealth. In this paper, we will describe how Human Factors Engineering (HFE) and user-centric elements have been incorporated into the establishment of telehealth within a large academic medical center to increase acceptance and sustainability. Through examples and lessons learned we wish to increase awareness of HFE and its importance in the successful implementation, innovation and growth of telehealth programs.

  6. Moving Toward Universal Health Coverage (UHC) to Achieve Inclusive and Sustainable Health Development: Three Essential Strategies Drawn From Asian Experience

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ye; Huang, Cheng; Colón-Ramos, Uriyoán

    2015-01-01

    Binagwaho and colleagues’ perspective piece provided a timely reflection on the experience of Rwanda in achieving the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and a proposal of 5 principles to carry forward in post-2015 health development. This commentary echoes their viewpoints and offers three lessons for health policy reforms consistent with these principles beyond 2015. Specifically, we argue that universal health coverage (UHC) is an integrated solution to advance the global health development agenda, and the three essential strategies drawn from Asian countries’ health reforms toward UHC are: (1) Public financing support and sequencing health insurance expansion by first extending health insurance to the extremely poor, vulnerable, and marginalized population are critical for achieving UHC; (2) Improved quality of delivered care ensures supply-side readiness and effective coverage; (3) Strategic purchasing and results-based financing creates incentives and accountability for positive changes. These strategies were discussed and illustrated with experience from China and other Asian economies. PMID:26673477

  7. Achieving Sustainability in a Semi-Arid Basin in Northwest Mexico through an Integrated Hydrologic-Economic-Institutional Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munoz-Hernandez, A.; Mayer, A. S.

    2008-12-01

    The hydrologic systems in Northwest Mexico are at risk of over exploitation due to poor management of the water resources and adverse climatic conditions. The purpose of this work is to create and Integrated Hydrologic-Economic-Institutional Model to support future development in the Yaqui River basin, well known by its agricultural productivity, by directing the water management practices toward sustainability. The Yaqui River basin is a semi-arid basin with an area of 72,000 square kilometers and an average precipitation of 527 mm per year. The primary user of water is agriculture followed by domestic use and industry. The water to meet user demands comes from three reservoirs constructed, in series, along the river. The main objective of the integrated simulation-optimization model is to maximize the economic benefit within the basin, subject to physical and environmental constraints. Decision variables include the water allocation to major users and reservoirs as well as aquifer releases. Economic and hydrologic (including the interaction of the surface water and groundwater) simulation models were both included in the integrated model. The surface water model refers to a rainfall-runoff model created, calibrated, and incorporated into a MATLAB code that estimates the monthly storage in the main reservoirs by solving a water balance. The rainfall-runoff model was coupled with a groundwater model of the Yaqui Valley which was previously developed (Addams, 2004). This model includes flow in the main canals and infiltration to the aquifer. The economic benefit of water for some activities such as agricultural use, domestic use, hydropower generation, and environmental value was determined. Sensitivity analysis was explored for those parameters that are not certain such as price elasticities or population growth. Different water allocation schemes were created based on climate change, climate variability, and socio-economic scenarios. Addams L. 2004. Water resource

  8. Predictors and outcomes of sustained, intermittent or never achieving remission in patients with recent onset inflammatory polyarthritis: results from the Norfolk Arthritis Register

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Michael J.; Diffin, Janet; Scirè, Carlo A.; Lunt, Mark; MacGregor, Alex J.; Symmons, Deborah P. M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. Early remission is the current treatment strategy for patients with inflammatory polyarthritis (IP) and RA. Our objective was to identify baseline factors associated with achieving remission: sustained (SR), intermittent (IR) or never (NR) over a 5-year period in patients with early IP. Methods. Clinical and demographic data of patients with IP recruited to the Norfolk Arthritis Register (NOAR) were obtained at baseline and years 1, 2, 3 and 5. Remission was defined as no tender or swollen joints (out of 51). Patients were classified as NR or PR, respectively, if they were in remission at: no assessment or ⩾3 consecutive assessments after baseline, and IR otherwise. Ordinal regression and a random effects model, respectively, were used to examine the association between baseline factors, remission group and HAQ scores over time. Results. A total of 868 patients (66% female) were included. Of these, 54%, 34% and 12% achieved NR, IR and SR, respectively. In multivariate analysis, female sex (odds ratio, OR 0.47, 95% CI: 0.35, 0.63), higher tender joint count (OR = 0.94, 95% CI: 0.93, 0.96), higher HAQ (OR = 0.59, 95% CI: 0.48, 0.74), being obese (OR = 0.70, 95% CI: 0.50, 0.99), hypertensive (OR = 0.67, 95% CI: 0.50, 0.90) or depressed (OR = 0.74, 95% CI: 0.55, 1.00) at baseline were independent predictors of being in a lower remission group. IR and SR were associated with lower HAQ scores over time and lower DAS28 at year 5. Conclusion. Women with higher tender joint count and disability at baseline, depression, obesity and hypertension were less likely to achieve remission. This information could help when stratifying patients for more aggressive therapy. PMID:27220594

  9. Horizontal drilling developments

    SciTech Connect

    Gust, D.

    1997-05-01

    The advantages of horizontal drilling are discussed. Use of horizontal drilling has climbed in the past half decade as technology and familiarity offset higher costs with higher production rates and greater recoveries from new and existing wells. In essence, all types of horizontal wells expose a larger section of the reservoir to the wellbore with a resulting increase in flow rates. (A horizontal well may also be drilled to provide coning control or to intersect vertical fractures.) Thus, drilling horizontally, both onshore and offshore, reduces the number of wells necessary to develop a field.

  10. Spatio-temporal optimization of agricultural practices to achieve a sustainable development at basin level; framework of a case study in Colombia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uribe, Natalia; corzo, Gerald; Solomatine, Dimitri

    2016-04-01

    The flood events present during the last years in different basins of the Colombian territory have raised questions on the sensitivity of the regions and if this regions have common features. From previous studies it seems important features in the sensitivity of the flood process were: land cover change, precipitation anomalies and these related to impacts of agriculture management and water management deficiencies, among others. A significant government investment in the outreach activities for adopting and promoting the Colombia National Action Plan on Climate Change (NAPCC) is being carried out in different sectors and regions, having as a priority the agriculture sector. However, more information is still needed in the local environment in order to assess were the regions have this sensitivity. Also the continuous change in one region with seasonal agricultural practices have been pointed out as a critical information for optimal sustainable development. This combined spatio-temporal dynamics of crops cycle in relation to climate change (or variations) has an important impact on flooding events at basin areas. This research will develop on the assessment and optimization of the aggregated impact of flood events due to determinate the spatio-temporal dynamic of changes in agricultural management practices. A number of common best agricultural practices have been identified to explore their effect in a spatial hydrological model that will evaluate overall changes. The optimization process consists on the evaluation of best performance in the agricultural production, without having to change crops activities or move to other regions. To achieve this objectives a deep analysis of different models combined with current and future climate scenarios have been planned. An algorithm have been formulated to cover the parametric updates such that the optimal temporal identification will be evaluated in different region on the case study area. Different hydroinformatics

  11. First-line cART regimen impacts the course of CD8+ T-cell counts in HIV-infected patients that achieve sustained undetectable viral load.

    PubMed Central

    Poizot-Martin, Isabelle; Allavena, Clotilde; Delpierre, Cyrille; Duvivier, Claudine; Obry-Roguet, Véronique; Cano, Carla E.; Guillouet de Salvador, Francine; Rey, David; Dellamonica, Pierre; Cheret, Antoine; Cuzin, Lise; Katlama, Christine; Cabié, André; Hoen, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the study was to investigate the impact of first-line combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) regimen on the course of CD8+ T-cell counts in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients. A retrospective observational study conducted on the French DAT’AIDS Cohort of HIV-infected patients. We selected 605 patients initiating a first-line cART between 2002 and 2009, and which achieved a sustained undetectable HIV plasma viral load (pVL) for at least 12 months without cART modification. The evolution of CD8+ T-cell counts according to cART regimen was assessed. CD8+ T-cell counts were assessed in 572 patients treated with 2NRTIs+1PI/r (n= 297), 2NRTIs+1NNRTI (n= 207) and 3NRTIs (n= 68). In multivariate analysis, after 12 months of follow-up, the 3NRTIs regimen was associated with a significantly smaller decrease of CD8+ T-cell count compared with NNRTI-containing regimens (–10.2 cells/μL in 3NRTIs vs –105.1 cells/μL; P=0.02) but not compared with PI-containing regimens (10.2 vs –60.9 cells/μL; P=0.21). After 24 months, the 3NRTIs regimen was associated with a smaller decrease of CD8+ T-cell count and % compared with PI/r- and NNRTI-containing regimens (0.2 in 3NRTIs vs –9.9 with PI/r-regimens, P=0.001, and vs –11.1 with NNRTI-regimens, p < 0.0001). A focus analysis on 11 patients treated with an INSTI-containing cART regimen during the study period showed after 12 months of follow-up, a median decrease of CD8+ T-cell count of –155 [inter quartile range: –302; –22] cells/μL. Our data highlight the fact that cART regimens have differential effects on CD8 pool down regulation. PMID:27741125

  12. Anomalous rectification in horizontal cells.

    PubMed Central

    Werblin, F S

    1975-01-01

    1. The electrical properties of horizontal cells in the mudpuppy in light and dark were measured with a pair of micropipettes separated by about 1 mum with low coupling resistance so that no bridge circuitry was required. 2. All horizontal cells studied showed significant anomalous rectification: the current-voltage characteristic for about 60 per cent of the cells studied had a slope resistance of about 20-30 M omega at the dark potential level; the slope resistance increased by about 15% for each 10 mV depolarization and decreased by about 15% for each 10 mV hyperpolarization. The remaining 40% of the horizontal cells showed a higher input resistance at corresponding potential levels but had similar rectifying properties. 3. The increase in resistance with depolrization developed with a time course of about 1/2 sec when steady steps of outward current were passed across the membrane, but the time course for resistance decrease with hyperpolarization was much shorter for steady inward current steps. In about half the horizontal cells there was a transient decrease in resistance lasting about 100 msec immediately following the outward current steps superimposed upon the slower sustained resistance increase. 4. The normal 20-30 mV hyperpolarizing light response was associated with little or no change in input resistance. However, if the membrane potential was held at the dark potential level with extrinsic current, thereby eliminating the potential-dependent resistance change, a light-elicited resistance increase of about 10 M omega was measured. 5. The time-dependent change in membrane resistance elicited by polarizing steps of current obscured the reversal potential for the response. However, when the reversal potential was measured at short times following polarization of the membrane, before the time-dependent resistance change developed, it was estimated at between +15 and +50 m V. 6. The results suggest that the horizontal cell response is mediated by a light

  13. Horizontal Cross Bracing Detail, Vertical Cross Bracing Detail, Horizontal Cross ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Horizontal Cross Bracing Detail, Vertical Cross Bracing Detail, Horizontal Cross Bracing Detail, Vertical Cross Bracing-End Detail - Cumberland Covered Bridge, Spanning Mississinewa River, Matthews, Grant County, IN

  14. Challenges facing the elimination of sleeping sickness in west and central Africa: sustainable control of animal trypanosomiasis as an indispensable approach to achieve the goal.

    PubMed

    Simo, Gustave; Rayaisse, Jean Baptiste

    2015-12-16

    African trypanosomiases are infectious diseases caused by trypanosomes. African animal trypanosomiasis (AAT) remains an important threat for livestock production in some affected areas whereas human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) is targeted for elimination in 2020. In West and Central Africa, it has been shown that the parasites causing these diseases can coexist in the same tsetse fly or the same animal. In such complex settings, the control of these diseases must be put in the general context of trypanosomiasis control or "one health" concept where the coordination of control operations will be beneficial for both diseases. In this context, implementing control activities on AAT will help to sustain HAT control. It will also have a positive impact on animal health and economic development of the regions. The training of inhabitants on how to implement and sustain vector control tools will enable a long-term sustainability of control operations that will lead to the elimination of HAT and AAT.

  15. RESTORATION PLUS: A COLLABORATIVE ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY RESEARCH PROGRAM TO DEVELOP AND EVALUATE ECOSYSTEM RESTORATION AND MANAGEMENT OPTIONS TO ACHIEVE ECOLOGICALLY AND ECONOMICALLY SUSTAINABLE SOLUTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) is evaluating ecosystem restoration and management techniques to ensure they create sustainable solutions for degraded watersheds. The ORD/NRMRL initiated the Restoration Plus (RePlus) program in 2002, which emphasizes collabora...

  16. RESTORATION PLUS: A COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH PROGRAM TO DEVELOP AND EVALUATE ECOSYSTEM RESTORATION AND MANAGEMENT OPTIONS TO ACHIEVE ECOLOGICALLY AND ECONOMICALLY SUSTAINABLE SOLUTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA is evaluating ecosystem restoration and management techniques to ensure they create sustainable solutions for degraded watersheds. ORD NRMRL initiated the Restoration Plus (RePlus) program in 2002 to a) evaluate ecosystem restoration and management options, b) assess the non-...

  17. Horizontal carbon nanotube alignment.

    PubMed

    Cole, Matthew T; Cientanni, Vito; Milne, William I

    2016-09-21

    The production of horizontally aligned carbon nanotubes offers a rapid means of realizing a myriad of self-assembled near-atom-scale technologies - from novel photonic crystals to nanoscale transistors. The ability to reproducibly align anisotropic nanostructures has huge technological value. Here we review the present state-of-the-art in horizontal carbon nanotube alignment. For both in and ex situ approaches, we quantitatively assess the reported linear packing densities alongside the degree of alignment possible for each of these core methodologies. PMID:27546174

  18. Horizontal carbon nanotube alignment.

    PubMed

    Cole, Matthew T; Cientanni, Vito; Milne, William I

    2016-09-21

    The production of horizontally aligned carbon nanotubes offers a rapid means of realizing a myriad of self-assembled near-atom-scale technologies - from novel photonic crystals to nanoscale transistors. The ability to reproducibly align anisotropic nanostructures has huge technological value. Here we review the present state-of-the-art in horizontal carbon nanotube alignment. For both in and ex situ approaches, we quantitatively assess the reported linear packing densities alongside the degree of alignment possible for each of these core methodologies.

  19. Horizontal Advanced Tensiometer

    SciTech Connect

    Hubbell, Joel M.; Sisson, James B.

    2004-06-22

    An horizontal advanced tensiometer is described that allows the monitoring of the water pressure of soil positions, particularly beneath objects or materials that inhibit the use of previous monitoring wells. The tensiometer includes a porous cup, a pressure transducer (with an attached gasket device), an adaptive chamber, at least one outer guide tube which allows access to the desired horizontal position, a transducer wire, a data logger and preferably an inner guide tube and a specialized joint which provides pressure on the inner guide tube to maintain the seal between the gasket of the transducer and the adaptive chamber.

  20. Narrowing the Achievement Gap and Sustaining Success: A Qualitative Study of the Norms, Practices, and Programs of a Successful High School with Urban Characteristics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Senesac, Donald Raymond

    2010-01-01

    The academic achievement gap is the manifestation of differential learning outcomes for students typified by membership in an ethnic minority sub group or economically disadvantaged sub group. Addressing the achievement gap has become vital for the nation as a whole, and even more critical for the state of California because the majority of…

  1. Sustainable Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmandt, Jurgen; Ward, C. H.; Marilu Hastings, Assisted By

    2000-04-01

    Demographers predict that the world population will double during the first half of the 21st century before it will begin to level off. In this volume, a group of prominent authors examine what societal changes must occur to meet this challenge to the natural environment and the transformational changes that we must experience to achieve sustainability. Frances Cairncross, Herman E. Daly, Stephen H. Schneider and others provide a broad discussion of sustainable development. They detail economic and environmental, as well as spiritual and religious, corporate and social, scientific and political factors. Sustainable Development: The Challenge of Transition offers many insightful policy recommendations about how business, government, and individuals must change their current values, priorities, and behavior to meet present and future challenges. It will appeal to scholars and decision makers interested in global change, environmental policy, population growth, and sustainable development, and also to corporate environmental managers.

  2. Three Years Sustained Complete Remission Achieved in a Primary Refractory ALK-Positive Anaplastic T Large Cell Lymphoma Treated with Crizotinib

    PubMed Central

    Mahuad, Carolina Valeria; Repáraz, María de los Ángeles Vicente; Zerga, Marta E.; Aizpurua, María Florencia; Casali, Claudia; Garate, Gonzalo

    2016-01-01

    The prognosis of the primary refractory anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK+) anaplastic T large cell lymphoma is ominous. The identification of molecular targets with potential to drive oncogenesis remains a cornerstone for the designing of new selective cancer therapies. Crizotinib is a selective ATP-competitive inhibitor for ALK, approved for its use in lung cancer with rearrangements on ALK gene. The reported cases describe the use of crizotinib as a bridging strategy prior to allotransplantation; there are no reported prolonged survivals under monotherapy with Crizotinib. We report a case of a primary refractory ALK+ anaplastic large-cell lymphoma that sustains complete response after 3 years of crizotinib monotherapy. PMID:27441079

  3. Three Years Sustained Complete Remission Achieved in a Primary Refractory ALK-Positive Anaplastic T Large Cell Lymphoma Treated with Crizotinib.

    PubMed

    Mahuad, Carolina Valeria; Repáraz, María de Los Ángeles Vicente; Zerga, Marta E; Aizpurua, María Florencia; Casali, Claudia; Garate, Gonzalo

    2016-06-28

    The prognosis of the primary refractory anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK+) anaplastic T large cell lymphoma is ominous. The identification of molecular targets with potential to drive oncogenesis remains a cornerstone for the designing of new selective cancer therapies. Crizotinib is a selective ATP-competitive inhibitor for ALK, approved for its use in lung cancer with rearrangements on ALK gene. The reported cases describe the use of crizotinib as a bridging strategy prior to allotransplantation; there are no reported prolonged survivals under monotherapy with Crizotinib. We report a case of a primary refractory ALK+ anaplastic large-cell lymphoma that sustains complete response after 3 years of crizotinib monotherapy. PMID:27441079

  4. District Power Equalization, Horizontal Equity and the Property Mix.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilley, John

    1980-01-01

    Argues that the traditional district power equalization (DPE) grant formula achieves horizontal equity, that the formula must be modified when the measure of fiscal capacity differs from the legal tax base, and that the inclusion of a tax exporting variable leads to the breakdown of horizontal equity. (Author/IRT)

  5. Horizontal Cross Bracing Detail, Vertical Cross Bracing Detail, Horizontal Cross ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Horizontal Cross Bracing Detail, Vertical Cross Bracing Detail, Horizontal Cross Bracing Joint, Vertical Cross Bracing End Detail - Ceylon Covered Bridge, Limberlost Park, spanning Wabash River at County Road 900 South, Geneva, Adams County, IN

  6. Horizontally mounted solar collector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, D. H. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    Solar energy is collected by using a vertical deflector assembly, a stationary reflector and a horizontally mounted solar collector. The deflector assembly contains a plurality of vanes which change the direction of the solar energy to the vertical, while constantly keeping the same side of the deflector facing the sun. The vertical rays are then reflected off the stationary reflector and are then absorbed by the collector.

  7. The Effects of a Sustained, Job-Embedded Professional Development on Elementary Teachers' Math Teaching Self-Efficacy and the Resulting Effects on Their Students' Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Althauser, Krista Louise

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the impact of a district-wide mathematics professional development program on elementary teachers' general and personal efficacy. It also explored connections among teacher efficacy and socioeconomic status with student achievement. Using a quantitative approach, a job-embedded professional development initiative…

  8. Strategies to achieve sustainability and quality in birth defects registries: the experience of the National Registry of Congenital Anomalies of Argentina.

    PubMed

    Groisman, Boris; Bidondo, Maria Paz; Gili, Juan Antonio; Barbero, Pablo; Liascovich, Rosa

    2013-01-01

    In many low-and middle-income countries, birth defects are not considered a public health priority and are perceived by the medical community as rare, unpreventable events. In this context, a registry of birth defects should address not only the collection, analysis, and dissemination of information but also contribute to local interventions like prevention, diagnosis, and treatment. We describe the National Registry of Congenital Anomalies of Argentina (RENAC) in terms of case definition, data collection, quality assurance, and data sending, coding, analysis, and information dissemination and we present the strategies used to ensure its sustainability. We emphasize strategies for motivating the people collecting data, such as training activities, participation in research projects, returning the processed data, making useful clinical information available, giving non-monetary rewards, and linking cases to genetic services. PMID:23778694

  9. Long-Term Treatment Outcomes of Patients Infected With Hepatitis C Virus: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of the Survival Benefit of Achieving a Sustained Virological Response

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, Bryony; Saleem, Jawaad; Heath, Katherine; Cooke, Graham S.; Hill, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Background. Achievement of a sustained virologic response (SVR) after treatment for Hepatitis C infection is associated with improved outcomes. This meta-analysis aimed to determine the impact of SVR on long-term mortality risk compared with nonresponders in a range of populations. Methods. An electronic search identified all studies assessing all-cause mortality in SVR and non-SVR patients. Eligible articles were stratified into general, cirrhotic, and populations coinfected with human immunodeficiency virus. The adjusted hazard ratio (95% confidence interval [CI]) for mortality in patients achieving SVR vs non-SVR, and pooled estimates for the 5-year mortality in each group were calculated. Results. 31 studies (n = 33 360) were identified as suitable for inclusion. Median follow-up time was 5.4 years (interquartile range, 4.9–7.5) across all studies. The adjusted hazard ratio of mortality for patients achieving SVR vs non-SVR was 0.50 (95% CI, .37–.67) in the general population, 0.26 (95% CI, .18–.74) in the cirrhotic group, and 0.21 (.10–.45) in the coinfected group. The pooled 5-year mortality rates were significantly lower for patients achieving SVR compared with non-SVR in all 3 populations. Conclusions. The results suggest that there is a significant survival benefit of achieving an SVR compared with unsuccessful treatment in a range of populations infected with hepatitis C virus. PMID:25987643

  10. Simulations towards the achievement of non-inductive current ramp-up and sustainment in the National Spherical Torus Experiment Upgrade

    DOE PAGES

    Poli, F. M.; Andre, R. G.; Bertelli, N.; Gerhardt, S. P.; Mueller, D.; Taylor, G.

    2015-10-30

    One of the goals of the National Spherical Torus Experiment Upgrade (NSTX-U) (Menard et al 2012 Nucl. Fusion 52 083015) is the demonstration of fully non-inductive start-up, current ramp-up and sustainment. This work discusses predictive simulations where the available heating and current drive systems are combined to maximize the non-inductive current and minimize the solenoidal contribution. Radio-frequency waves at harmonics higher than the ion cyclotron resonance (high-harmonic fast waves (HHFW)) and neutral beam injection are used to ramp the plasma current non-inductively starting from an initial Ohmic plasma. An interesting synergy is observed in the simulations between the HHFW andmore » electron cyclotron (EC) wave heating. Furthermore, time-dependent simulations indicate that, depending on the phasing of the HHFW antenna, EC wave heating can significantly increase the effectiveness of the radio-frequency power, by heating the electrons and increasing the current drive efficiency, thus relaxing the requirements on the level of HHFW power that needs to be absorbed in the core plasma to drive the same amount of fast-wave current.« less

  11. China's strategy towards environmental governance: An examination of the interaction between pedagogy and practice of environmental education in creating and achieving objectives for sustainable development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darkhor, Patrick

    This thesis involves a case-study methodology that explores programs and initiatives undertaken in the fields of environmental education focusing on the elementary and middle school curriculum and teacher education programs in China. The major objectives of this research are (1) to study the status of environmental education in Chinese elementary and middle schools; (2) to study the commonalities in approaches to environmental education and education for sustainable development in the existing curriculum; and (3) to study the lived challenges of implementing environmental education in today's schools in China. The study will address the following question: How can elementary and middle schools integrate environmental education objectives into their existing school programs without radical curricula changes? The thesis suggests that environmental education programs can be combined naturally with a school curriculum by identifying points of overlap between existing curricula and environmental education goals to facilitate natural, unforced integration of these programs. I have investigated these programs and initiatives concomitantly with the proposals for curriculum reform developed in China. This investigation includes an in-depth examination of the impact of such programs on students, teacher education programs, school systems and local communities. Qualitative data was collected and used to describe the evolution of environmental education programs within schools in the country scrutinized in this study. Research was also conducted on the etiology, nature and potential of any program developed by Chinese school systems for the purpose of integrating environmental education within the teacher education programs and consequently within the regular classroom curriculum.

  12. Simulations towards the achievement of non-inductive current ramp-up and sustainment in the National Spherical Torus Experiment Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Poli, F. M.; Andre, R. G.; Bertelli, N.; Gerhardt, S. P.; Mueller, D.; Taylor, G.

    2015-10-30

    One of the goals of the National Spherical Torus Experiment Upgrade (NSTX-U) (Menard et al 2012 Nucl. Fusion 52 083015) is the demonstration of fully non-inductive start-up, current ramp-up and sustainment. This work discusses predictive simulations where the available heating and current drive systems are combined to maximize the non-inductive current and minimize the solenoidal contribution. Radio-frequency waves at harmonics higher than the ion cyclotron resonance (high-harmonic fast waves (HHFW)) and neutral beam injection are used to ramp the plasma current non-inductively starting from an initial Ohmic plasma. An interesting synergy is observed in the simulations between the HHFW and electron cyclotron (EC) wave heating. Furthermore, time-dependent simulations indicate that, depending on the phasing of the HHFW antenna, EC wave heating can significantly increase the effectiveness of the radio-frequency power, by heating the electrons and increasing the current drive efficiency, thus relaxing the requirements on the level of HHFW power that needs to be absorbed in the core plasma to drive the same amount of fast-wave current.

  13. Horizontal branch evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rood, R. T.; Crocker, D. A.

    In 1973 the outstanding problems confronting the theory of horizontal-branch (HB) evolution were the second-parameter problem and the Oosterhoff effect. Despite significant progress, particularly in the observations and in the observation/theory interface, they remain as the outstanding problems of 1988. The Oosterhoff effect is now discussed primarily in the guise of the Sandage period-shift effect. The morphology of the HB seems more complicated than ever. Many clusters show bimodal distributions along the HB. Here these are tentatively considered to be manifestations of the second parameter problem.

  14. Horizontal baffle for nuclear reactors

    DOEpatents

    Rylatt, John A.

    1978-01-01

    A horizontal baffle disposed in the annulus defined between the core barrel and the thermal liner of a nuclear reactor thereby physically separating the outlet region of the core from the annular area below the horizontal baffle. The horizontal baffle prevents hot coolant that has passed through the reactor core from thermally damaging apparatus located in the annulus below the horizontal baffle by utilizing the thermally induced bowing of the horizontal baffle to enhance sealing while accommodating lateral motion of the baffle base plate.

  15. Horizontal SPINning of transposons.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Clément; Pace, John K; Feschotte, Cédric

    2009-01-01

    The term 'horizontal transfer (HT)' refers to the transfer of genetic material between two reproductively isolated organisms. HT is thought to occur rarely in eukaryotes compared to vertical inheritance, the transmission of DNA from parent to offspring. In a recent study we have provided evidence that a family of DNA transposons, called SPACE INVADERS or SPIN, independently invaded horizontally the genome of seven distantly related tetrapod species and subsequently amplified to high copy number in each of them. This discovery calls for further investigations to better characterize the extent to which genomes have been shaped through HT events. In this addendum, we briefly discuss some general issues regarding the study of HT and further speculate on the sequence of events that could explain the current taxonomic distribution of SPIN. We propose that the presence of SPIN in the opossum (Monodelphis domestica), a taxon endemic to South America, reflects a transoceanic HT event that occurred from Old to New World, between 46 and 15 million years ago.

  16. Risk of Late Relapse or Reinfection With Hepatitis C Virus After Achieving a Sustained Virological Response: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, Bryony; Saleem, Jawaad; Hill, Andrew; Riley, Richard D.; Cooke, Graham S.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Treatment for hepatitis C virus (HCV) can lead to sustained virological response (SVR) in over 90% of people. Subsequent recurrence of HCV, either from late relapse or reinfection, reverses the beneficial effects of SVR. Methods. A search identified studies analysing HCV recurrence post-SVR. The recurrence rate for each study was calculated using events/person years of follow-up (PYFU). Results were pooled using a random-effects model and used to calculate 5-year recurrence risk. Three patient groups were analysed: (1) Mono-HCV infected “low-risk” patients; (2) Mono-HCV infected “high-risk” patients (injecting drug users or prisoners); (3) human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/HCV coinfected patients. Recurrence was defined as confirmed HCV RNA detectability post-SVR. Results. In the 43 studies of HCV mono-infected “low-risk” patients (n = 7969) the pooled recurrence rate was 1.85/1000 PYFU (95% confidence interval [CI], .71–3.35; I2 = 73%) leading to a summary 5-year recurrence risk of 0.95% (95% CI, .35%–1.69%). For the 14 studies of HCV monoinfected “high-risk” patients (n = 771) the pooled recurrence rate was 22.32/1000 PYFU (95% CI, 13.07–33.46; I2 = 27%) leading to a summary 5-year risk of 10.67% (95% CI, 6.38%–15.66%). For the 4 studies of HIV/HCV coinfected patients the pooled recurrence rate was 32.02/1000 PYFU (95% CI, .00–123.49; I2 = 96%) leading to a summary 5-year risk of 15.02% (95% CI, .00%–48.26%). The higher pooled estimates of recurrence in the high-risk and coinfected cohorts were driven by an increase in reinfection rather than late relapse. Conclusions. SVR appears durable in the majority of patients at 5 years post-treatment. The large difference in 5 year event rate by risk group is driven mainly by an increased reinfection risk. PMID:26787172

  17. Graphitic Carbon Nitride (g-C3N4)-Based Photocatalysts for Artificial Photosynthesis and Environmental Remediation: Are We a Step Closer To Achieving Sustainability?

    PubMed

    Ong, Wee-Jun; Tan, Lling-Lling; Ng, Yun Hau; Yong, Siek-Ting; Chai, Siang-Piao

    2016-06-22

    at the forefront of this research platform. It is anticipated that this review can stimulate a new research doorway to facilitate the next generation of g-C3N4-based photocatalysts with ameliorated performances by harnessing the outstanding structural, electronic, and optical properties for the development of a sustainable future without environmental detriment. PMID:27199146

  18. Is Sustainability Sustainable?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonevac, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    The most important concept in current environmental thinking is "sustainability". Environmental policies, economic policies, development, resource use--all of these things, according to the consensus, ought to be sustainable. But what is sustainability? What is its ethical foundation? There is little consensus about how these questions ought to be…

  19. Spin stabilized magnetic levitation of horizontal rotors.

    SciTech Connect

    Romero, Louis Anthony

    2004-10-01

    In this paper we present an analysis of a new configuration for achieving spin stabilized magnetic levitation. In the classical configuration, the rotor spins about a vertical axis; and the spin stabilizes the lateral instability of the top in the magnetic field. In this new configuration the rotor spins about a horizontal axis; and the spin stabilizes the axial instability of the top in the magnetic field.

  20. Horizontal axis windmill

    SciTech Connect

    Mundhenke, I.W.

    1984-05-22

    A base frame supports a horizontal shaft having one or more wind driven members secured thereon. Each of the wind driven members includes a shaft of light-weight framing and plurality of elongated longitudinally extending light-weight vanes having wind engaging surfaces. The vanes have a wind driving position on one side of the shaft and a return position of the other, and light-weight wind deflectors disposed at the front of the frame protecting the return position of the vanes from the wind. The wind deflectors are angularly adjustable whereby the deflected wind flowing off the longitudinal edges thereof is selectively directed against the vane surfaces in their driving position. The shaft has an output for operating a selected driven apparatus such as a generator. The base frame is rotatably supported on a pivot for selected adjustment relative to the wind.

  1. HORIZONTAL BOILING REACTOR SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Treshow, M.

    1958-11-18

    Reactors of the boiling water type are described wherein water serves both as the moderator and coolant. The reactor system consists essentially of a horizontal pressure vessel divided into two compartments by a weir, a thermal neutronic reactor core having vertical coolant passages and designed to use water as a moderator-coolant posltioned in one compartment, means for removing live steam from the other compartment and means for conveying feed-water and water from the steam compartment to the reactor compartment. The system further includes auxiliary apparatus to utilize the steam for driving a turbine and returning the condensate to the feed-water inlet of the reactor. The entire system is designed so that the reactor is self-regulating and has self-limiting power and self-limiting pressure features.

  2. Horizontally shaken impact pendulums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, T. J.; Xu, Y.; Sidhu, H.

    2016-03-01

    We consider two pendulum masses attached to the same pivot point and which interact with each other through Hertzian impacts. We show that this splitting of the mass leads to an instability in the conservative case, in which initially synchronized large amplitude motion may evolve into out-of-phase (impacting) motion. We then study in detail the response of the impacting masses in the presence of damping and driving through horizontal shaking of the pivot point. We find that synchronized modes are usually accompanied by small amplitude quasi-periodic, or even chaotic, impacts and a number of multi-period solutions may appear in the bifurcation diagram. We reveal the existence and stability of a number of impact modes and scan the frequency response of the system to a series of initial conditions to identify which modes may be more easily generated in experiment.

  3. A laboratory investigation of cementing horizontal wells

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, M.A.; Sabins, F.L. )

    1988-09-01

    Obtaining a successful cement job will remain one of the most important factors to the productive life of any well and will be especially critical for horizontal-well completions. Achieving a high mud-displacement efficiency under highly deviated or horizontal-well conditions requires that special attention be given to the many aspects of drilling/completion practices - e.g., drill-fluid systems and properties and casing and hole sizes - to obtain optimum mud displacement and cementing results. A study of factors affecting mud-displacement efficiency focused on cementing an ultralow-permeability formation that is being evaluated as a subject for horizontal completion. Realistic laboratory testing was conducted on a large-scale test model that has been used for many years to evaluate factors influencing drilling-fluid displacement efficiency. Factors evaluated for this study included influence of hold and pipe sizes, pipe centralization, displacement rates, and spacer systems. Findings from this study provided specific recommendations for low-permeability reservoirs that also can be applied to horizontally drilled wells. Various techniques for cementing horizonal wells will be discussed and general recommendations will be given.

  4. Orthodontic extrusion of horizontally impacted mandibular molars

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Zhigui; Yang, Chi; Zhang, Shanyong; Xie, Qianyang; Shen, Yuqing; Shen, Pei

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To introduce and evaluate a novel approach in treating horizontally impacted mandibular second and third molars. Materials and methods: An orthodontic technique was applied for treatment of horizontally impacted mandibular second and third molars, which included a push-type spring for rotation first, and then a cantilever for extrusion. There were 8 mandibular third molars (M3s) and 2 second molars (M2s) in this study. Tooth mobility, extraction time, the inclination and parallelism of the impacted tooth, alveolar bone height of the adjacent tooth, and the relationship of impacted M3 and the inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) were evaluated. Results: Two horizontally impacted M2s could be upright in the arch and good occlusal relationships were obtained after treatment. All impacted M3s were successfully separated from the IAN, without any neurologic consequences. The average extraction time was 5 minutes. There was a significant change in the inclination and parallelism of the impacted tooth after treatment. A new bone apposition with the average height of 3.2 mm was noted distal to the adjacent tooth. Conclusions: This two-step orthodontic technique as presented here may be a safe and feasible alternative in management of severely horizontally impacted mandibular molars, which achieves a successful separation of M3s from the IAN and an excellent position for M2s. PMID:25419364

  5. Inferring horizontal gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Ravenhall, Matt; Škunca, Nives; Lassalle, Florent; Dessimoz, Christophe

    2015-05-01

    Horizontal or Lateral Gene Transfer (HGT or LGT) is the transmission of portions of genomic DNA between organisms through a process decoupled from vertical inheritance. In the presence of HGT events, different fragments of the genome are the result of different evolutionary histories. This can therefore complicate the investigations of evolutionary relatedness of lineages and species. Also, as HGT can bring into genomes radically different genotypes from distant lineages, or even new genes bearing new functions, it is a major source of phenotypic innovation and a mechanism of niche adaptation. For example, of particular relevance to human health is the lateral transfer of antibiotic resistance and pathogenicity determinants, leading to the emergence of pathogenic lineages. Computational identification of HGT events relies upon the investigation of sequence composition or evolutionary history of genes. Sequence composition-based ("parametric") methods search for deviations from the genomic average, whereas evolutionary history-based ("phylogenetic") approaches identify genes whose evolutionary history significantly differs from that of the host species. The evaluation and benchmarking of HGT inference methods typically rely upon simulated genomes, for which the true history is known. On real data, different methods tend to infer different HGT events, and as a result it can be difficult to ascertain all but simple and clear-cut HGT events. PMID:26020646

  6. Inferring Horizontal Gene Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Lassalle, Florent; Dessimoz, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Horizontal or Lateral Gene Transfer (HGT or LGT) is the transmission of portions of genomic DNA between organisms through a process decoupled from vertical inheritance. In the presence of HGT events, different fragments of the genome are the result of different evolutionary histories. This can therefore complicate the investigations of evolutionary relatedness of lineages and species. Also, as HGT can bring into genomes radically different genotypes from distant lineages, or even new genes bearing new functions, it is a major source of phenotypic innovation and a mechanism of niche adaptation. For example, of particular relevance to human health is the lateral transfer of antibiotic resistance and pathogenicity determinants, leading to the emergence of pathogenic lineages [1]. Computational identification of HGT events relies upon the investigation of sequence composition or evolutionary history of genes. Sequence composition-based ("parametric") methods search for deviations from the genomic average, whereas evolutionary history-based ("phylogenetic") approaches identify genes whose evolutionary history significantly differs from that of the host species. The evaluation and benchmarking of HGT inference methods typically rely upon simulated genomes, for which the true history is known. On real data, different methods tend to infer different HGT events, and as a result it can be difficult to ascertain all but simple and clear-cut HGT events. PMID:26020646

  7. Early Initiation of Combination Antiretroviral Therapy in HIV-1–Infected Newborns Can Achieve Sustained Virologic Suppression With Low Frequency of CD4+ T Cells Carrying HIV in Peripheral Blood

    PubMed Central

    Bitnun, Ari; Samson, Lindy; Chun, Tae-Wook; Kakkar, Fatima; Brophy, Jason; Murray, Danielle; Justement, Shawn; Soudeyns, Hugo; Ostrowski, Mario; Mujib, Shariq; Harrigan, P. Richard; Kim, John; Sandstrom, Paul; Read, Stanley E.

    2014-01-01

    Background. A human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)–infected infant started on combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) at 30 hours of life was recently reported to have no detectable plasma viremia after discontinuing cART. The current study investigated the impact of early cART initiation on measures of HIV-1 reservoir size in HIV-1–infected children with sustained virologic suppression. Methods. Children born to HIV-1–infected mothers and started on cART within 72 hours of birth at 3 Canadian centers were assessed. HIV serology, HIV-1–specific cell-mediated immune responses, plasma viremia, cell-associated HIV-1 DNA and RNA, presence of replication-competent HIV-1, and HLA genotype were determined for HIV-1–infected children with sustained virologic suppression. Results. Of 136 cART-treated children, 12 were vertically infected (8.8%). In the 4 who achieved sustained virologic suppression, HIV serology, HIV-1–specific cell-mediated immune responses (Gag, Nef), and ultrasensitive viral load were negative. HIV-1 DNA was not detected in enriched CD4+ T cells of the 4 children (<2.6 copies/106 CD4+ T cells), whereas HIV-1 RNA was detected (19.5–130 copies/1.5 µg RNA). No virion-associated HIV-1 RNA was detected following mitogenic stimulation of peripheral blood CD4+ T cells (5.4–8.0 million CD4+ T cells) in these 4 children, but replication competent virus was detected by quantitative co-culture involving a higher number of cells in 1 of 2 children tested (0.1 infectious units/106 CD4+ T cells). Conclusions. In perinatally HIV-1–infected newborns, initiation of cART within 72 hours of birth may significantly reduce the size of the HIV-1 reservoirs. Cessation of cART may be necessary to determine whether functional HIV cure can be achieved in such children. PMID:24917662

  8. Understanding Horizontal Governance. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Horizontal governance is an umbrella term that covers a range of approaches to policy development, service delivery issues, and management practices. A horizontal initiative may take place across levels of government, across boundaries between units of a single department or agency or among multiple departments or agencies, or across public,…

  9. Sustainable development.

    PubMed

    Dudani, A T

    1996-01-01

    Many attempts have been made over the last decade to define sustainable development (SD). However, it is much easier to describe one's expectations of SD. The discussion over SD grew in the wake of the Brundlandt Commission report, Our Common Future (OCF), which describes SD as a process of change in which resources, the direction of investment, orientation of technological development, and institutional change all enhance the potential to meet human needs today and in the future. The OCF stresses the interrelationship between SD and economic development such that nothing can be at the expense of environmental destruction. Close cooperation is needed at the domestic and international political, social, and economic levels and spheres in order to achieve long-term SD. The author discusses the state of affairs in the US and sustainable agriculture and SD.

  10. Achieving Sustainable Construction in Affordable Housing

    SciTech Connect

    Barcik, M.K.; Creech, D.B.; Ternes, M.P.

    1998-12-07

    An energy-efficient design and construction checklist and information sheets on energy-efficient design and construction are two products being developed. These products will help affordable housing providers take the first steps toward a whole-house approach to the design and implementation of energy-efficient construction practices. The checklist presents simple and clear guidance on energy improvements that can be readily addressed now by most affordable housing providers. The information sheets complement the checklist by providing installation instructions and material specifications that are accompanied by detailed graphics. The information sheets also identify benefits of recommended energy-efficiency measures and procedures including cost savings and impacts on health and comfort. This paper presents details on the checklist and information sheets and discusses their use in two affordable housing projects.

  11. Achieving Sustainability in Learning and Teaching Initiatives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brew, Angela; Cahir, Jayde

    2014-01-01

    Universities have a long history of change in learning and teaching to suit various government initiatives and institutional priorities. Academic developers now are frequently required to address strategic learning and teaching priorities. This paper asks how, in such a context, academic developers can ensure that work they do in relation to one…

  12. The integrated curriculum: experiences, achievements and problems.

    PubMed

    Gale, J

    1984-01-01

    In this article the aims, experiences and achievements of vertical and horizontal integration in undergraduate medical education are considered and reviewed, and some problems are identified. It is concluded that a clearer definition of integration would now be helpful.

  13. Horizontal and Vertical Line Designs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johns, Pat

    2003-01-01

    Presents an art lesson in which students learn about the artist Piet Mondrian and create their own abstract artworks. Focuses on geometric shapes using horizontal and vertical lines. Includes background information about the artist. (CMK)

  14. How Schools Sustain Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chrisman, Valerie

    2005-01-01

    A growing number of the US schools, under the microscope of increased accountability, are identified as underperforming on the basis of low-test scores. Yet sustained increases in student achievement are problematic for underperforming schools.

  15. Lifetime achievement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlowicz, Michael

    The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) is accepting nominations for the 1996 Philip Hauge Abelson Prize. The prize is awarded annually to either a public servant who has made sustained contributions to the advancement of science or to scientists who have distinguished themselves for both the quality of their work and their leadership in the scientific community.

  16. Horizontal running mattress suture modified with intermittent simple loops.

    PubMed

    Chacon, Anna H; Shiman, Michael I; Strozier, Narissa; Zaiac, Martin N

    2013-01-01

    Using the combination of a horizontal running mattress suture with intermittent loops achieves both good eversion with the horizontal running mattress plus the ease of removal of the simple loops. This combination technique also avoids the characteristic railroad track marks that result from prolonged non-absorbable suture retention. The unique feature of our technique is the incorporation of one simple running suture after every two runs of the horizontal running mattress suture. To demonstrate its utility, we used the suturing technique on several patients and analyzed the cosmetic outcome with post-operative photographs in comparison to other suturing techniques. In summary, the combination of running horizontal mattress suture with simple intermittent loops demonstrates functional and cosmetic benefits that can be readily taught, comprehended, and employed, leading to desirable aesthetic results and wound edge eversion.

  17. A shear horizontal surface wave in magnetoelectric materials.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinxi; Fang, Daining; Liu, Xiangling

    2007-07-01

    We show that a semi-infinite magnetoelectric (ME) material adjoining a vacuum sustains the propagation of a shear horizontal wave accompanied by electromagnetic waves. The ME material is assumed to possess hexagonal (6 mm) symmetry. The expression for the phase velocity of this wave is obtained explicitly. The result is helpful for applications of piezoelectric-piezomagnetic composites to acoustic wave and microwave devices.

  18. Nuclear component horizontal seismic restraint

    DOEpatents

    Snyder, Glenn J.

    1988-01-01

    A nuclear component horizontal seismic restraint. Small gaps limit horizontal displacement of components during a seismic occurrence and therefore reduce dynamic loadings on the free lower end. The reactor vessel and reactor guard vessel use thicker section roll-forged rings welded between the vessel straight shell sections and the bottom hemispherical head sections. The inside of the reactor guard vessel ring forging contains local vertical dovetail slots and upper ledge pockets to mount and retain field fitted and installed blocks. As an option, the horizontal displacement of the reactor vessel core support cone can be limited by including shop fitted/installed local blocks in opposing alignment with the reactor vessel forged ring. Beams embedded in the wall of the reactor building protrude into apertures in the thermal insulation shell adjacent the reactor guard vessel ring and have motion limit blocks attached thereto to provide to a predetermined clearance between the blocks and reactor guard vessel ring.

  19. Decision Guidance for Sustainable Manufacturing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shao, Guodong

    2013-01-01

    Sustainable manufacturing has significant impacts on a company's business performance and competitiveness in today's world. A growing number of manufacturing industries are initiating efforts to address sustainability issues; however, to achieve a higher level of sustainability, manufacturers need methodologies for formally describing, analyzing,…

  20. Speckle Imaging Over Horizontal Paths

    SciTech Connect

    Carrano, C J

    2002-05-21

    Atmospheric aberrations reduce the resolution and contrast in surveillance images recorded over horizontal or slant paths. This paper describes our recent horizontal and slant path imaging experiments of extended scenes as well as the results obtained using speckle imaging. The experiments were performed with an 8-inch diameter telescope placed on either a rooftop or hillside and cover ranges of interest from 0.5 km up to 10 km. The scenery includes resolution targets, people, vehicles, and other structures. The improvement in image quality using speckle imaging is dramatic in many cases, and depends significantly upon the atmospheric conditions. We quantify resolution improvement through modulation transfer function measurement comparisons.

  1. Success in horizontal barrier developments

    SciTech Connect

    Pettit, P.J.; Ridenour, D.E.; Jalovec, J.

    1996-06-01

    A successful proof of concept demonstration has been conducted of operational methods and tooling for the in situ construction of underground horizontal barriers for the control and containment of groundwater and contamination. The method involves jet grouting with specially adapted tools guided between twin, parallel wells for the placement of a grout beneath a waste site. The objective of the work is to develop reliable methods of constructing extensive, competent horizontal barriers underneath waste sites without excavating or penetrating the waste during the process.

  2. Horizontal electric fields from lightning return strokes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomson, E. M.; Medelius, P. J.; Rubinstein, M.; Uman, M. A.; Johnson, J.

    1988-01-01

    An experiment to measure simultaneously the wideband horizontal and vertical electric fields from lightning return strokes is described. Typical wave shapes of the measured horizontal and vertical fields are presented, and the horizontal fields are characterized. The measured horizontal fields are compared with calculated horizontal fields obtained by applying the wavetilt formula to the vertical fields. The limitations and sources of error in the measurement technique are discussed.

  3. Horizontal Launch: A Versatile Concept for Assured Space Access

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartolotta, Paul; Wilhite, Alan W.; Schaffer, Mark; Voland, Randall T.; Huebner, Larry

    2011-01-01

    The vision of horizontal launch is the capability to provide a mobile launch pad that can use existing aircraft runways, cruise above weather, loiter for mission instructions, and achieve precise placement for orbital intercept, rendezvous, or reconnaissance. Another compelling benefit of horizontal launch is that today s ground-based vertical launch pads are a single earthquake, hurricane, or terrorist attack away from disruption of critical U.S. launch capabilities. The study did not attempt to design a new system concept for horizontal launch, but rather focused on the refinement of many previously-studied horizontal launch concepts. Because of the large number of past horizontal launch studies, a process was developed to narrow the number of concepts through prescreening, screening, and evaluation of point designs. The refinement process was not intended to select the "best" concept, but rather to establish the feasibility of horizontal launch from a balanced assessment of figures of merit and to identify potential concepts that warrant further exploration.

  4. Theoretical horizontal-branch evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sweigart, Allen V.

    1987-01-01

    The general features of the theoretical evolution of canonical horizontal-branch (HB) stars are briefly reviewed with specific emphasis on the track morphology in the HR diagram and the determination of the globular cluster helium abundance. The observational evidence for the occurrence of semiconvection is discussed together with some remaining theoretical uncertainty.

  5. Horizontal drilling installs dutch waterline

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-08-01

    A 32-in. potable water line system, installed by Van Eijk Leidingen B.V. in Holland, was laid through an intensively cultivated vegetable gardening area, and designed to furnish additional irrigation water. Using a horizontally drilled 42-in. hole under the Maasdijk, though a difficult job, reduced the length by more than 3 miles.

  6. Dragging a floating horizontal cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Duck-Gyu; Kim, Ho-Young

    2010-11-01

    A cylinder immersed in a fluid stream experiences a drag, and it is well known that the drag coefficient is a function of the Reynolds number only. Here we study the force exerted on a long horizontal cylinder that is dragged perpendicular to its axis while floating on an air-water interface with a high Reynolds number. In addition to the flow-induced drag, the floating body is subjected to capillary forces along the contact line where the three phases of liquid/solid/gas meet. We first theoretically predict the meniscus profile around the horizontally moving cylinder assuming the potential flow, and show that the profile is in good agreement with that obtained experimentally. Then we compare our theoretical predictions and experimental measurement results for the drag coefficient of a floating horizontal cylinder that is given by a function of the Weber number and the Bond number. This study can help us to understand the horizontal motion of partially submerged objects at air-liquid interface, such as semi-aquatic insects and marine plants.

  7. Some Considerations on Horizontal Displacement and Horizontal Displacement Coefficient B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajduś, Krzysztof; Tajduś, Antoni

    2015-12-01

    Mining-induced deformations of the ground surface and within the rock mass may pose danger not only for surface constructions but also for underground objects (e.g., tunnels, underground storages, garages), diverse types of pipelines, electric cables, etc. For a proper evaluation of hazard for surface and underground objects, such parameters as horizontal displacement and horizontal deformations, especially their maximum values, are of crucial importance. The paper is an attempt at a critical review of hitherto accomplished studies and state of the art of predicting horizontal displacement u, in particular the coefficient B, whose value allows determination of the value of maximum displacement if the value of maximum slope is known, or the value of maximum deformation if the value of maximum trough slope is recognized. Since the geodesic observations of fully developed subsidence troughs suggest that the value of the coefficient depends on the depth H, radius of main influences range r and properties of overburden rock, in particular the occurrence of sub-eras Paleogene and Neogene layers (old name: Quaternary and Tertiary) with low strength parameters, therefore a formula is provided in the present paper allowing for the estimation of the influence of those factors on the value of coefficient B.

  8. Reliability of a Unilateral Horizontal Leg Power Test to Assess Stretch Load Tolerance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Rhianna Parker; Cronin, John

    2006-01-01

    Drop jumping has previously been used to measure fast stretch shorten cycle (SSC) ability and stretch load tolerance. To the knowledge of these authors a test does not exist to achieve this in the horizontal direction. The purpose of this study therefore was to estimate the reliability of a new unilateral horizontal leg power test to assess these…

  9. Horizontal drilling opportunities in Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Noel, J.A. )

    1991-08-01

    Horizontal drilling has become commonplace in certain parts of Texas. The Austin Chalk is the favorite target, especially where fracture systems are present. The activity has become so intense that leases are now costly or nearly impossible to find. This type of activity was prevalent during the late oil boom, but with vertical wells. So, the same areas that were drilled then are being redone with horizontal drilling. In the past few months, carbonates with little or no evidence of fracture systems are being drilled with some success. Because of the difficulty in lease acquisition, operators are turning their attention elsewhere. Even though horizontal drilling has been conducted limitedly in the Devonian black shales, the Appalachian basin is an area that calls for attention. In Ohio, there have been instances of discoveries of one-well fields in both the Trenton and Trempealeau formations. The initial production from these wells ranges from a few to hundreds of barrels of oil per day. The lack of success in offset wells has been attributed to the interpretation that the producing wells were serendipitously drilled into a limited fractured reservoir. In most cases, the producer is surrounded by clusters of dry holes. These Ohio wells and wells in one other area are studied using well data, spectral and sonic logs, aerial photographs, side-looking radar surveys, and other data. The results are presented on structure contour and lineament maps, and quantitative log interpretations. The maps show the interpretations of those areas of fracture systems that might be viable targets for horizontal drilling.

  10. Horizontal-branch stellar evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sweigart, Allen V.

    1990-01-01

    The results of canonical theory for the evolution of horizontal-branch (HB) stars are examined. Particular attention is given to how an HB star maintains the appropriate composition distribution within the semiconvective zone and how this composition is affected by the finite time-dependence with which convective boundaries actually move. Newly developed models based on time-dependent overshooting are presented for both the core-helium-exhaustion and main HB phases.

  11. Remediation using nested, horizontal wells

    SciTech Connect

    Desantis, P.J.; Andrilenas, J.S.; Cheng, S.; Esler, C.; Miller, R.S.; Lew, K.V.

    1995-11-01

    A pair of nested, horizontal wells (one for vapor extraction, one for groundwater extraction) were utilized to remediate a mixed aromatic volatile organic compound (AVOC) and halogenated volatile organic compound (HVOC) soil and groundwater plume. The project site is an operating gasoline service station located in Portland, Oregon. The site has low permeability soils, a thin unconfined aquifer, with a relatively steep groundwater gradient. Each of the nested horizontal wells was drilled using the continuous borehole directional drilling method. The wells are each 110 meters long employing 73 meters of pre-packed well screen. The groundwater extraction well was pumped via vacuum-enhanced methods utilizing a two-pump configuration to eliminate the need for installation of a pump within the horizontal well and to increase both flow and radius of influence in fine-grained soils. Two groundwater models, a 2D analytical model and a finite element model, were utilized to analyze the potential and actual performance of the well. Of the two models used, the finite element model has produced results closely matching the actual performance of the well. After one year of operation, both AVOCs and HVOCs concentrations have been reduced by between 70 to 100%. All but two downgradient site wells have met cleanup standards for AVOCs; all have met substantial compliance for HVOCs.

  12. Industry survey for horizontal wells. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, D.D.; Kaback, D.S.; Denhan, M.E.; Watkins, D.

    1993-07-01

    An international survey of horizontal environmental wells was performed during May and June of 1993. The purpose of the survey was to provide the environmental industry with an inventory of horizontal environmental wells and information pertaining to the extent of the use of horizontal environmental wells, the variety of horizontal environmental well applications, the types of geologic and hydrogeologic conditions within which horizontal environmental wells have been installed, and the companies that perform horizontal environmental well installations. Other information, such as the cost of horizontal environmental well installations and the results of tests performed on the wells, is not complete but is provided as general information with the caveat that the information should not be used to compare drilling companies. The result of the survey is a catalogue of horizontal environmental wells that are categorized by the objective or use of the wells, the vertical depth of the wells, and the drilling company contracted to install the wells.

  13. MMH fluids reduce formation damage in horizontal wells

    SciTech Connect

    Fraser, L. ); Williamson, D. ); Haydel, S. )

    1994-02-01

    It has been more than 3 years since a mixed metal hydroxide fluid was used by Texaco to drill the Gulf of Mexico's first horizontal hole. Since, the fluid has been used to drill dozens of horizontal sections worldwide, including Australia, Indonesia, CIS, UAE, UK, and in North an South America. Due to Texaco's drilling success on the first Gulf of Mexico horizontal well in 1990, several horizontal wells were drilled in the Gulf's shallow gas sands. Fluids were weighted exclusively with ground marble. The marble, with measured grind size distributions similar to commercial barite, is used as a combination weighting and bridging material and is about 99% acid soluble. Completions were carried out by running a slotted liner, displacing the mixed metal hydroxide (MMH) fluid with calcium chloride brine, and running prepacked screens. Clean-up times where short and production rates equaled or exceeded expectations. Since the technique was relatively new, no comparisons could be made. One operator, however, achieved success during 18 months of production. During this period, the fluid was also used to drill a horizontal section through the Cardium Sandstone at Lodgepole in Alberta, Canada. The fluid out-performed other in return permeability tests on cores from the reservoir. Its performance was enhanced by addition of propylene glycol. High field production rates supported laboratory findings.

  14. Sustainability Frontiers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selby, David

    2010-01-01

    This article introduces Sustainability Frontiers, a newly formed, international, not-for-profit alliance of sustainability and global educators dedicated to challenging and laying bare the assumptions, exposing the blind spots, and transgressing the boundaries of mainstream understandings of sustainability-related education. Among the orthodoxies…

  15. Measuring Energy Sustainability

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, David L

    2009-01-01

    For the purpose of measurement, energy sustainability is defined as ensuring that future generations have energy resources that enable them to achieve a level of well-being at least as good as that of the current generation. It is recognized that there are valid, more comprehensive understandings of sustainability and that energy sustainability as defined here is only meaningful when placed in a broader context. Still, measuring energy sustainability is important to society because the rates of consumption of some fossil resources are now substantial in relation to measures of ultimate resources, and because conflicts between fossil energy use and environmental sustainability are intensifying. Starting from the definition, an equation for energy sustainability is derived that reconciles renewable fl ows and nonrenewable stocks, includes the transformation of energy into energy services, incorporates technological change and, at least notionally, allows for changes in the relationship between energy services and societal well-being. Energy sustainability must be measured retrospectively as well as prospectively, and methods for doing each are discussed. Connections to the sustainability of other resources are also critical. The framework presented is merely a starting point; much remains to be done to make it operational.

  16. Portable Horizontal-Drilling And Positioning Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smigocki, Edmund; Johnson, Clarence

    1988-01-01

    Portable horizontal-drilling and positioning device, constructed mainly of off-the-shelf components, accurately drills horizontal small holes in irregularly shaped objects. Holes precisely placed and drilled in objects that cannot be moved to shop area. New device provides three axes of movement while maintaining horizontal drilling.

  17. Panspermia and horizontal gene transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klyce, Brig

    2009-08-01

    Evidence that extremophiles are hardy and ubiquitous is helping to make panspermia a respectable theory. But even if life on Earth originally came from space, biologists assume that the subsequent evolution of life is still governed by the darwinian paradigm. In this review we show how panspermia could amend darwinism and point to a cosmic source for, not only extremophiles but, all of life. This version of panspermia can be called "strong panspermia." To support this theory we will discuss recent evidence pertaining to horizontal gene transfer, viruses, genes apparently older than the Earthly evolution of the features they encode, and primate-specific genes without identifiable precursors.

  18. Sustainability Research Under EPA/NRMRL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sustainability means different things to different people, but most can agree that maintaining and supporting critical ecosystems over the long term is important for environmental and human health. Achieving sustainability involves a broad view of environmental stewardship. When ...

  19. Orphan penumbrae: Submerging horizontal fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurčák, J.; Bellot Rubio, L. R.; Sobotka, M.

    2014-04-01

    Aims: We investigate the properties of orphan penumbrae, which are photospheric filamentary structures observed in active regions near polarity inversion lines that resemble the penumbra of regular sunspots but are not connected to any umbra. Methods: We use Hinode data from the Solar Optical Telescope to determine the properties of orphan penumbrae. Spectropolarimetric data are employed to obtain the vector magnetic field and line-of-sight velocities in the photosphere. Magnetograms are used to study the overall evolution of these structures, and G-band and Ca ii H filtergrams are to investigate their brightness and apparent horizontal motions. Results: Orphan penumbrae form between regions of opposite polarity in places with horizontal magnetic fields. Their magnetic configuration is that of Ω-shaped flux ropes. In the two cases studied here, the opposite-polarity regions approach each other with time and the whole structure submerges as the penumbral filaments disappear. Orphan penumbrae are very similar to regular penumbrae, including the existence of strong gas flows. Therefore, they could have a similar origin. The main difference between them is the absence of a "background" magnetic field in orphan penumbrae. This could explain most of the observed differences. Conclusions: The fast flows we detect in orphan penumbrae may be caused by the siphon flow mechanism. Based on the similarities between orphan and regular penumbrae, we propose that the Evershed flow is also a manifestation of siphon flows. A movie attached to Fig. 11 is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  20. Sustainability and Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hales, David

    2008-01-01

    People face four fundamental dilemmas, which are essentially moral choices: (1) alleviating poverty; (2) removing the gap between rich and poor; (3) controlling the use of violence for political ends; and (4) changing the patterns of production and consumption and achieving the transition to sustainability. The world in which future generations…

  1. Horizontal intra-articular patellar dislocation resulting in quadriceps avulsion and medial patellofemoral ligament tear: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Dennis E; Simoni, Michael K

    2013-07-01

    Intra-articular patellar dislocations are rare. We present a 13-year-old boy who sustained a complete horizontal intra-articular patellar dislocation following blunt trauma to the flexed knee. Closed reduction was unsuccessful and open reduction indicated a repairable quadriceps avulsion and medial patellofemoral ligament tear. He is the youngest patient to sustain a quadriceps rupture and the only patient to sustain a medial patellofemoral ligament tear to date. His flexed knee and the horizontally positioned patella (seen on lateral radiograph) were indicative of a complete rotational injury with extensor mechanism involvement. Open reduction allowed for the repair of both injuries and a favorable outcome.

  2. DOES THE VARIATION OF THE SOLAR INTRA-NETWORK HORIZONTAL FIELD FOLLOW THE SUNSPOT CYCLE?

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, C. L.; Wang, J. X.

    2015-07-01

    The ubiquitousness of the solar inter-network horizontal magnetic field has been revealed by space-borne observations with high spatial resolution and polarization sensitivity. However, no consensus has been achieved on the origin of the horizontal field among solar physicists. For a better understanding, in this study, we analyze the cyclic variation of the inter-network horizontal field by using the spectro-polarimeter observations provided by the Solar Optical Telescope on board Hinode, covering the interval from 2008 April to 2015 February. The method of wavelength integration is adopted to achieve a high signal-to-noise ratio. It is found that from 2008 to 2015 the inter-network horizontal field does not vary when solar activity increases, and the average flux density of the inter-network horizontal field is 87 ± 1 G, In addition, the imbalance between horizontal and vertical fields also keeps invariant within the scope of deviation, i.e., 8.7 ± 0.5, from the solar minimum to maximum of solar cycle 24. This result confirms that the inter-network horizontal field is independent of the sunspot cycle. The revelation favors the idea that a local dynamo is creating and maintaining the solar inter-network horizontal field.

  3. Explorando nuevos horizontes en NASA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villanueva, G. L.

    A pesar de la incesante expansión del Universo iniciada con el Big Bang 14 mil millones de años atrás, nuestro Universo se siente cada día más cercano. La inquebrantable vocación de la humanidad por descubrir nuevos horizontes ha permitido el acercamiento de civilizaciones en nuestro planeta y nos ha permitido conocer nuestro lugar en el Universo como nunca antes. En este artículo presento una breve sinopsis de nuestro trabajo que se relaciona con diversas investigaciones con implicaciones astrobiológicas, desde el origen de los ingredientes de la "sopa de la vida", hasta la evolución y composición de la atmósfera de Marte.

  4. Horizontal gene transfer in choanoflagellates.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Richard P

    2013-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT), also known as lateral gene transfer, results in the rapid acquisition of genes from another organism. HGT has long been known to be a driving force in speciation in prokaryotes, and there is evidence for HGT from symbiotic and infectious bacteria to metazoans, as well as from protists to bacteria. Recently, it has become clear that as many as a 1,000 genes in the genome of the choanoflagellate Monosiga brevicollis may have been acquired by HGT. Interestingly, these genes reportedly come from algae, bacteria, and other choanoflagellate prey. Some of these genes appear to have allowed an ancestral choanoflagellate to exploit nutrient-poor environments and were not passed on to metazoan descendents. However, some of these genes are also found in animal genomes, suggesting that HGT into a common ancestor of choanozoans and animals may have contributed to metazoan evolution.

  5. Sustainable Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cadwell, Louise; Dillon, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Green schools have moved into a new era that focuses on building a culture of sustainability in every aspect of learning in schools. In the early stages of sustainability education, the focus was on recycling and turning off the lights. Now, students and adults together are moving into the areas of advocacy and action that are based on a deep…

  6. Sustainability 101

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shi, David

    2008-01-01

    Sustainability is one of the leading issues of this time. Climate change is real, and widespread commitment and creativity are needed to combat its negative effects. Higher education is the seedbed of the sustainability movement. Much climate research and environmental science takes place on college and university campuses, which are, by their…

  7. System for Estimating Horizontal Velocity During Descent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Andrew; Cheng, Yang; Wilson, Reg; Goguen, Jay; Martin, Alejandro San; Leger, Chris; Matthies, Larry

    2007-01-01

    The descent image motion estimation system (DIMES) is a system of hardware and software, designed for original use in estimating the horizontal velocity of a spacecraft descending toward a landing on Mars. The estimated horizontal velocity is used in generating rocket-firing commands to reduce the horizontal velocity as part of an overall control scheme to minimize the landing impact. DIMES can also be used for estimating the horizontal velocity of a remotely controlled or autonomous aircraft for purposes of navigation and control.

  8. Unpacking vertical and horizontal integration: childhood overweight/obesity programs and planning, a Canadian perspective

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Increasingly, multiple intervention programming is being understood and implemented as a key approach to developing public health initiatives and strategies. Using socio-ecological and population health perspectives, multiple intervention programming approaches are aimed at providing coordinated and strategic comprehensive programs operating over system levels and across sectors, allowing practitioners and decision makers to take advantage of synergistic effects. These approaches also require vertical and horizontal (v/h) integration of policy and practice in order to be maximally effective. Discussion This paper examines v/h integration of interventions for childhood overweight/obesity prevention and reduction from a Canadian perspective. It describes the implications of v/h integration for childhood overweight and obesity prevention, with examples of interventions where v/h integration has been implemented. An application of a conceptual framework for structuring v/h integration of an overweight/obesity prevention initiative is presented. The paper concludes with a discussion of the implications of vertical/horizontal integration for policy, research, and practice related to childhood overweight and obesity prevention multiple intervention programs. Summary Both v/h integration across sectors and over system levels are needed to fully support multiple intervention programs of the complexity and scope required by obesity issues. V/h integration requires attention to system structures and processes. A conceptual framework is needed to support policy alignment, multi-level evaluation, and ongoing coordination of people at the front lines of practice. Using such tools to achieve integration may enhance sustainability, increase effectiveness of prevention and reduction efforts, decrease stigmatization, and lead to new ways to relate the environment to people and people to the environment for better health for children. PMID:20478054

  9. Design, installation and operational methods of implementing horizontal wells for in situ groundwater and soil remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, R.B.

    1996-12-31

    The design and installation of horizontal wells is the primary factor in the efficiency of the remedial actions. Often, inadequacies in the design and installation of remediation systems are not identified until remedial actions have commenced, at which time, required modifications of operational methods can be costly. The parameters required for designing a horizontal well remediation system include spatial variations in contaminant concentrations and lithology, achievable injection and/or extraction rates, area of influence from injection and/or extraction processes, and limitations of installation methods. As with vertical wells, there are several different methods for the installation of horizontal wells. This paper will summarize four installation methods for horizontal wells, including four sites where horizontal wells have been utilized for in-situ groundwater and soil remediation.

  10. Sustainable Biofuels Development Center

    SciTech Connect

    Reardon, Kenneth F.

    2015-03-01

    The mission of the Sustainable Bioenergy Development Center (SBDC) is to enhance the capability of America’s bioenergy industry to produce transportation fuels and chemical feedstocks on a large scale, with significant energy yields, at competitive cost, through sustainable production techniques. Research within the SBDC is organized in five areas: (1) Development of Sustainable Crops and Agricultural Strategies, (2) Improvement of Biomass Processing Technologies, (3) Biofuel Characterization and Engine Adaptation, (4) Production of Byproducts for Sustainable Biorefining, and (5) Sustainability Assessment, including evaluation of the ecosystem/climate change implication of center research and evaluation of the policy implications of widespread production and utilization of bioenergy. The overall goal of this project is to develop new sustainable bioenergy-related technologies. To achieve that goal, three specific activities were supported with DOE funds: bioenergy-related research initiation projects, bioenergy research and education via support of undergraduate and graduate students, and Research Support Activities (equipment purchases, travel to attend bioenergy conferences, and seminars). Numerous research findings in diverse fields related to bioenergy were produced from these activities and are summarized in this report.

  11. Sustainability Base Construction Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mewhinney, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Construction of the new Sustainability Base Collaborative support facility, expected to become the highest performing building in the federal government continues at NASA's Ames Research Center, Moffet Field, Calif. The new building is designed to achieve a platinum rating under the leadership in Energy and Environment Design (LEED) new construction standards for environmentally sustainable construction developed by the U. S. Green Building Council, Washington, D. C. When completed by the end of 2011, the $20.6 million building will feature near zero net energy consumption, use 90 percent less potable water than conventionally build buildings of equivalent size, and will result in reduced building maintenance costs.

  12. Horizontal Shear Wave Imaging of Large Optics

    SciTech Connect

    Quarry, M J

    2007-09-05

    When complete the National Ignition Facility (NIF) will be the world's largest and most energetic laser and will be capable of achieving for the first time fusion ignition in the laboratory. Detecting optics features within the laser beamlines and sizing them at diameters of 0.1 mm to 10 mm allows timely decisions concerning refurbishment and will help with the routine operation of the system. Horizontally polarized shear waves at 10 MHz were shown to accurately detect, locate, and size features created by laser operations from 0.5 mm to 8 mm by placing sensors at the edge of the optic. The shear wave technique utilizes highly directed beams. The outer edge of an optic can be covered with shear wave transducers on four sides. Each transducer sends a pulse into the optic and any damage reflects the pulse back to the transmitter. The transducers are multiplexed, and the collected time waveforms are enveloped and replicated across the width of the element. Multiplying the data sets from four directions produces a map of reflected amplitude to the fourth power, which images the surface of the optic. Surface area can be measured directly from the image, and maximum depth was shown to be correlated to maximum amplitude of the reflected waveform.

  13. Widespread horizontal transfer of retrotransposons

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Ali Morton; Kortschak, R. Daniel; Gardner, Michael G.; Bertozzi, Terry; Adelson, David L.

    2013-01-01

    In higher organisms such as vertebrates, it is generally believed that lateral transfer of genetic information does not readily occur, with the exception of retroviral infection. However, horizontal transfer (HT) of protein coding repetitive elements is the simplest way to explain the patchy distribution of BovB, a long interspersed element (LINE) about 3.2 kb long, that has been found in ruminants, marsupials, squamates, monotremes, and African mammals. BovB sequences are a major component of some of these genomes. Here we show that HT of BovB is significantly more widespread than believed, and we demonstrate the existence of two plausible arthropod vectors, specifically reptile ticks. A phylogenetic tree built from BovB sequences from species in all of these groups does not conform to expected evolutionary relationships of the species, and our analysis indicates that at least nine HT events are required to explain the observed topology. Our results provide compelling evidence for HT of genetic material that has transformed vertebrate genomes. PMID:23277587

  14. Widespread horizontal transfer of retrotransposons.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Ali Morton; Kortschak, R Daniel; Gardner, Michael G; Bertozzi, Terry; Adelson, David L

    2013-01-15

    In higher organisms such as vertebrates, it is generally believed that lateral transfer of genetic information does not readily occur, with the exception of retroviral infection. However, horizontal transfer (HT) of protein coding repetitive elements is the simplest way to explain the patchy distribution of BovB, a long interspersed element (LINE) about 3.2 kb long, that has been found in ruminants, marsupials, squamates, monotremes, and African mammals. BovB sequences are a major component of some of these genomes. Here we show that HT of BovB is significantly more widespread than believed, and we demonstrate the existence of two plausible arthropod vectors, specifically reptile ticks. A phylogenetic tree built from BovB sequences from species in all of these groups does not conform to expected evolutionary relationships of the species, and our analysis indicates that at least nine HT events are required to explain the observed topology. Our results provide compelling evidence for HT of genetic material that has transformed vertebrate genomes. PMID:23277587

  15. Widespread horizontal transfer of retrotransposons.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Ali Morton; Kortschak, R Daniel; Gardner, Michael G; Bertozzi, Terry; Adelson, David L

    2013-01-15

    In higher organisms such as vertebrates, it is generally believed that lateral transfer of genetic information does not readily occur, with the exception of retroviral infection. However, horizontal transfer (HT) of protein coding repetitive elements is the simplest way to explain the patchy distribution of BovB, a long interspersed element (LINE) about 3.2 kb long, that has been found in ruminants, marsupials, squamates, monotremes, and African mammals. BovB sequences are a major component of some of these genomes. Here we show that HT of BovB is significantly more widespread than believed, and we demonstrate the existence of two plausible arthropod vectors, specifically reptile ticks. A phylogenetic tree built from BovB sequences from species in all of these groups does not conform to expected evolutionary relationships of the species, and our analysis indicates that at least nine HT events are required to explain the observed topology. Our results provide compelling evidence for HT of genetic material that has transformed vertebrate genomes.

  16. Horizontally opposed internal combustion engine

    SciTech Connect

    Honkanen, E.G.

    1992-07-28

    This patent describes a internal combustion engine. It comprises a base plate coincident with a horizontal plane and generally symmetrical with respect to a central longitudinal axis coincident with a vertical plane extending between fore and aft ends of the base plate, a main power crankshaft suspended below the base plate and extending parallel with the central longitudinal axis, a plurality of open-ended piston cylinders disposed below the base plate arranged in axially aligned pairs, a pair of auxiliary crankshafts detachably journaled below the base plate on opposite sides of the vertical plane; a connecting rod assembly pivotally interconnecting the pair of auxiliary crankshafts with the main power crankshaft; a piston assembly in each of the cylinders operatively connected with the associated auxiliary crankshaft and including a piston having a head, a wrist-pin and a connecting rod connecting the wrist-pin of each piston with the associated auxiliary crankshaft; a fuel induction assembly for admitting a combustible fuel mixture into the cylinders between the opposed heads of the pistons in a controlled sequence correlated to the receding movement of the pistons in the cylinders in a fuel intake stroke; means for igniting the fuel mixture compressed between the juxtaposed heads of the pistons; means for exhausting from the cylinders the products of combustion of the fuel mixture in correlation to the movement of the pistons in an exhaust stroke; and means including an oil pan enclosing the auxiliary crankshafts.

  17. Worldwide experience shows horizontal well success

    SciTech Connect

    Karlsson, H.; Bitto, R.

    1989-03-01

    The convergence of technology and experience has made horizontal drilling an important tool in increasing production and solving a variety of completion problems. Since the early 1980s, horizontal drilling has been used to improve production on more than 700 oil and gas wells throughout the world. Approximately 200 horizontal wells were drilled in 1988 alone. Interest in horizontal drilling has been accelerating rapidly as service companies have developed and offered new technology for drilling and producing horizontal wells. Simultaneously, oil companies have developed better methods for evaluating reservoirs for potential horizontal applications, while their production departments have gained experience at completing and producing them. To date, most horizontal wells have been drilled in the United States. A major application is to complete naturally fractured formations, such as the Austin chalk in Texas, the Bakken shale in the Williston basin, the Spraberry in West Texas and the Devonian shale in the Eastern states. In addition, many horizontal wells have been drilled to produce the Niagaran reefs and the irregular Antrim shale reservoirs in Michigan.

  18. 33 CFR 84.17 - Horizontal sectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Horizontal sectors. 84.17 Section 84.17 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INLAND NAVIGATION RULES ANNEX I: POSITIONING AND TECHNICAL DETAILS OF LIGHTS AND SHAPES § 84.17 Horizontal sectors....

  19. How a GNSS Receiver Is Held May Affect Static Horizontal Position Accuracy.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Steven A; Ucar, Zennure; Bettinger, Pete; Merry, Krista

    2015-01-01

    The static horizontal position accuracy of a mapping-grade GNSS receiver was tested in two forest types over two seasons, and subsequently was tested in one forest type against open sky conditions in the winter season. The main objective was to determine whether the holding position during data collection would result in significantly different static horizontal position accuracy. Additionally, we wanted to determine whether the time of year (season), forest type, or environmental variables had an influence on accuracy. In general, the F4Devices Flint GNSS receiver was found to have mean static horizontal position accuracy levels within the ranges typically expected for this general type of receiver (3 to 5 m) when differential correction was not employed. When used under forest cover, in some cases the GNSS receiver provided a higher level of static horizontal position accuracy when held vertically, as opposed to held at an angle or horizontally (the more natural positions), perhaps due to the orientation of the antenna within the receiver, or in part due to multipath or the inability to use certain satellite signals. Therefore, due to the fact that numerous variables may affect static horizontal position accuracy, we only conclude that there is weak to moderate evidence that the results of holding position are significant. Statistical test results also suggest that the season of data collection had no significant effect on static horizontal position accuracy, and results suggest that atmospheric variables had weak correlation with horizontal position accuracy. Forest type was found to have a significant effect on static horizontal position accuracy in one aspect of one test, yet otherwise there was little evidence that forest type affected horizontal position accuracy. Since the holding position was found in some cases to be significant with regard to the static horizontal position accuracy of positions collected in forests, it may be beneficial to have an

  20. How a GNSS Receiver Is Held May Affect Static Horizontal Position Accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, Steven A.; Ucar, Zennure; Bettinger, Pete; Merry, Krista

    2015-01-01

    The static horizontal position accuracy of a mapping-grade GNSS receiver was tested in two forest types over two seasons, and subsequently was tested in one forest type against open sky conditions in the winter season. The main objective was to determine whether the holding position during data collection would result in significantly different static horizontal position accuracy. Additionally, we wanted to determine whether the time of year (season), forest type, or environmental variables had an influence on accuracy. In general, the F4Devices Flint GNSS receiver was found to have mean static horizontal position accuracy levels within the ranges typically expected for this general type of receiver (3 to 5 m) when differential correction was not employed. When used under forest cover, in some cases the GNSS receiver provided a higher level of static horizontal position accuracy when held vertically, as opposed to held at an angle or horizontally (the more natural positions), perhaps due to the orientation of the antenna within the receiver, or in part due to multipath or the inability to use certain satellite signals. Therefore, due to the fact that numerous variables may affect static horizontal position accuracy, we only conclude that there is weak to moderate evidence that the results of holding position are significant. Statistical test results also suggest that the season of data collection had no significant effect on static horizontal position accuracy, and results suggest that atmospheric variables had weak correlation with horizontal position accuracy. Forest type was found to have a significant effect on static horizontal position accuracy in one aspect of one test, yet otherwise there was little evidence that forest type affected horizontal position accuracy. Since the holding position was found in some cases to be significant with regard to the static horizontal position accuracy of positions collected in forests, it may be beneficial to have an

  1. Sustainable Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Auerbach, Raymond

    1994-01-01

    Discusses South African national development priorities, sustainable development, and the future of agriculture and presents three scenarios of possible national action: production for sale and export, household food security, and conservation of natural resources. (MKR)

  2. Horizontal air drilling increases gas recovery in depleted zone

    SciTech Connect

    Elrod, J.P.

    1997-06-30

    Increased gas recoveries in depleted gas zones can be achieved through horizontal air drilling. In December 1995, OXY USA Inc. drilled the Pirkle 2, the first air-drilled horizontal well in the Carthage field of Texas. Targeting the Cretaceous Frost ``A`` zone of the lower Pettit limestone at 6,000 ft true vertical depth, the well established production in a 1,400 ft lateral section with a bottom hole pressure (BHP) of 185 psi. The initial BHP for the zone was 3,280 psi in 1942. As of April 27, 1997, the Pirkle 2 had produced 530 MMcf of gas at a rate of 1.1 MMcfd. Total cumulative gas production for the lower Pettit limestone in the Carthage field was 3.83 tcf as of January 1997. The paper discusses reservoir properties, abandonment pressure, minimizing well bore damage, drilling fluid selection, special equipment and modifications, compressors, BOPs, steering tools, drilling, completion, and production.

  3. Multiple Tune Jumps to Overcome Horizontal Depolarizing Resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, H.; Ahrens, L. A.; Bai, M.; Brown, K. A.; Dutheil, Y.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J. W.; Lin, F.; Mackay, W. W.; Meot, F.; Poblaguev, A.; Ranjbar, V.; Roser, T.; Schoefer, V.; Tepikian, S.; Tsoupas, N.; Yip, K.; Zelenski, A.; Zeno, K.

    2016-02-01

    Imperfection and vertical intrinsic depolarizing resonances have been overcome by the two partial Siberian snakes in the Alternative Gradient Synchrotron(AGS). The relatively weak but numerous horizontal resonances are the main source of polarization loss in the AGS. A pair of horizontal tune jump quads have been used to overcome these weak resonances. The locations of the two quads have to be chosen such that the disturbance to the beam optics is minimum. The emittance growth has to be mitigated for this method to work. In addition, this technique needs very accurate jump timing. Using two partial Siberian snakes, with vertical tune inside the spin tune gap and 80% polarization at AGS injection, polarized proton beam had reached 1.5 × 1011 proton per bunch with 65% polarization. With the tune jump timing optimized and emittance preserved, more than 70% polarization with 2 × 1011 protons per bunch has been achieved.

  4. Horizontal integration of the basic sciences in the chiropractic curriculum.

    PubMed

    Ward, Kevin P

    2010-01-01

    Basic science curricula at most chiropractic colleges consist of courses (eg, general anatomy, physiology, biochemistry, etc) that are taught as stand-alone content domains. The lack of integration between basic science disciplines causes difficulties for students who need to understand how the parts function together as an integrated whole and apply this understanding to solving clinical problems. More horizontally integrated basic science curricula could be achieved by several means: integrated Part I National Board of Chiropractic Examiners questions, a broader education for future professors, an increased emphasis on integration within the current model, linked courses, and an integrated, thematic basic science curriculum. Horizontally integrating basic science curricula would require significant efforts from administrators, curriculum committees, and instructional faculty. Once in place this curriculum would promote more clinically relevant learning, improved learning outcomes, and superior vertical integration.

  5. Sustainable markets for sustainable energy

    SciTech Connect

    Millan, J.; Smyser, C.

    1997-12-01

    The author discusses how the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) is involved in sustainable energy development. It presently has 50 loans and grants for non conventional renewable energy projects and ten grants for efficiency programs for $600 and $17 million respectively, representing 100 MW of power. The IDB is concerned with how to create a sustainable market for sustainable energy projects. The IDB is trying to work with government, private sector, NGOs, trading allies, credit sources, and regulators to find proper roles for such projects. He discusses how the IDB is working to expand its vision and objectives in renewable energy projects in Central and South America.

  6. Moving Toward Universal Health Coverage (UHC) to Achieve Inclusive and Sustainable Health Development: Three Essential Strategies Drawn From Asian Experience Comment on "Improving the World's Health Through the Post-2015 Development Agenda: Perspectives from Rwanda".

    PubMed

    Xu, Ye; Huang, Cheng; Colón-Ramos, Uriyoán

    2015-01-01

    Binagwaho and colleagues' perspective piece provided a timely reflection on the experience of Rwanda in achieving the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and a proposal of 5 principles to carry forward in post-2015 health development. This commentary echoes their viewpoints and offers three lessons for health policy reforms consistent with these principles beyond 2015. Specifically, we argue that universal health coverage (UHC) is an integrated solution to advance the global health development agenda, and the three essential strategies drawn from Asian countries' health reforms toward UHC are: (1) Public financing support and sequencing health insurance expansion by first extending health insurance to the extremely poor, vulnerable, and marginalized population are critical for achieving UHC; (2) Improved quality of delivered care ensures supply-side readiness and effective coverage; (3) Strategic purchasing and results-based financing creates incentives and accountability for positive changes. These strategies were discussed and illustrated with experience from China and other Asian economies. PMID:26673477

  7. Moving Toward Universal Health Coverage (UHC) to Achieve Inclusive and Sustainable Health Development: Three Essential Strategies Drawn From Asian Experience Comment on "Improving the World's Health Through the Post-2015 Development Agenda: Perspectives from Rwanda".

    PubMed

    Xu, Ye; Huang, Cheng; Colón-Ramos, Uriyoán

    2015-01-01

    Binagwaho and colleagues' perspective piece provided a timely reflection on the experience of Rwanda in achieving the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and a proposal of 5 principles to carry forward in post-2015 health development. This commentary echoes their viewpoints and offers three lessons for health policy reforms consistent with these principles beyond 2015. Specifically, we argue that universal health coverage (UHC) is an integrated solution to advance the global health development agenda, and the three essential strategies drawn from Asian countries' health reforms toward UHC are: (1) Public financing support and sequencing health insurance expansion by first extending health insurance to the extremely poor, vulnerable, and marginalized population are critical for achieving UHC; (2) Improved quality of delivered care ensures supply-side readiness and effective coverage; (3) Strategic purchasing and results-based financing creates incentives and accountability for positive changes. These strategies were discussed and illustrated with experience from China and other Asian economies.

  8. Columnar interactions determine horizontal propagation of recurrent network activity in neocortex

    PubMed Central

    Wester, Jason C.; Contreras, Diego

    2012-01-01

    The cortex is organized in vertical and horizontal circuits that determine the spatiotemporal properties of distributed cortical activity. Despite detailed knowledge of synaptic interactions among individual cells in the neocortex, little is known about the rules governing interactions among local populations. Here we used self-sustained recurrent activity generated in cortex, also known as up-states, in rat thalamocortical slices in vitro to understand interactions among laminar and horizontal circuits. By means of intracellular recordings and fast optical imaging with voltage sensitive dyes, we show that single thalamic inputs activate the cortical column in a preferential L4→L2/3→L5 sequence, followed by horizontal propagation with a leading front in supra and infragranular layers. To understand the laminar and columnar interactions, we used focal injections of TTX to block activity in small local populations, while preserving functional connectivity in the rest of the network. We show that L2/3 alone, without underlying L5, does not generate self-sustained activity and is inefficient propagating activity horizontally. In contrast, L5 sustains activity in the absence of L2/3 and is necessary and sufficient to propagate activity horizontally. However, loss of L2/3 delays horizontal propagation via L5. Finally, L5 amplifies activity in L2/3. Our results show for the first time that columnar interactions between supra and infragranular layers are required for the normal propagation of activity in the neocortex. Our data suggest that supra and infragranular circuits with their specific and complex set of inputs and outputs, work in tandem to determine the patterns of cortical activation observed in vivo. PMID:22514308

  9. Horizontal fields generated by return strokes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooray, Vernon

    1991-01-01

    Horizontal fields generated by return strokes play an important role in the interaction of lightning generated electric fields with power lines. In many of the recent investigations on the interaction of lightning electromagnetic fields with power lines, the horizontal field was calculated by employing the expression for the tilt of the electric field of a plane wave propagating over finitely conducting earth. The method is suitable for calculating horizontal fields generated by return strokes at distances as close as 200m. At these close ranges, the use of the wavetilt expression can cause large errors.

  10. Fabrication of cm scale buckypapers of horizontally aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes highly filled with Fe3C: the key roles of Cl and Ar-flow rates.

    PubMed

    Boi, Filippo S; Guo, Jian; Wang, Shanling; He, Yi; Xiang, Gang; Zhang, Xi; Baxendale, Mark

    2016-03-18

    A key challenge in the fabrication of ferromagnetically filled carbon-nanotube buckypapers in the presence of Cl-radicals is the achievement of a preferential horizontal nanotube-alignment. We show that a horizontal-alignment can be achieved by tuning two main CVD parameters for a fixed dichlorobenzene concentration: the precursor-evaporation temperature and the flow rate. PMID:26905009

  11. Recompletion by horizontal drilling pays off

    SciTech Connect

    Holifield, R.H.; Rehm, B.

    1989-03-01

    More than 20 wells have been recompleted in the Giddings field by drilling a new, horizontal interval from existing 5 1/2-in. cased wells for distances of 300 to 1,250 ft. Recompleting existing wells is much cheaper than drilling a new well. Plus, the new completions, overall, produce better. The horizontal wells are routinely profitable now, and pay out occurs in 3 to 24 months. During this program, the techniques for slim-hole- medium-radius, horizontal drilling in Giddings have been mastered and costs have dropped 75%. It is believed that this program may be the first (or among the first) continuing horizontal project drilled out of cased wells with repeatable profitability as opposed to projected viability.

  12. Annual Sustainability Report FY 2014. Incorporates NREL Site Sustainability Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Rukavina, Frank

    2015-07-01

    NREL's Sustainability Program is responsible for upholding all executive orders, federal regulations, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) orders, and goals related to sustainable and resilient facility operations. But NREL continues to expand sustainable practices above and beyond the laboratory's regulations and requirements to ensure that the laboratory fulfills its mission into the future, leaves the smallest possible legacy footprint, and models sustainable operations and behaviors on national, regional, and local levels. The report, per the GRI reporting format, elaborates on multi-year goals relative to executive orders, achievements, and challenges; and success stories provide specific examples. A section called 'Sustaining NREL's Future Through Integration' provides insight into how NREL is successfully expanding the adoption of renewable energy technologies through integration.

  13. Achieving Energy Efficiency Through Real-Time Feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Nesse, Ronald J.

    2011-09-01

    Through the careful implementation of simple behavior change measures, opportunities exist to achieve strategic gains, including greater operational efficiencies, energy cost savings, greater tenant health and ensuing productivity and an improved brand value through sustainability messaging and achievement.

  14. Rock characterization in reservoirs targeted for horizontal drilling

    SciTech Connect

    Skopec, R.A. )

    1993-12-01

    Achieving the maximum economic benefit from horizontal drilling requires thorough understanding of reservoir characteristics. The direct measurement of rock properties from oriented core is critical in horizontal-wellbore design. This paper outlines the measures and testing necessary to evaluate naturally fractured reservoirs effectively with field and laboratory technologies. Rock mechanical properties, fracture strike, and principal in-situ stress magnitudes and directions should be known before a horizontal wellbore is drilled. These data can then be used to maximize the intersection of natural fractures and to minimize the potential of borehole failure. In exploration wells, a vertical pilot hole must first be drilled. The zone of interest is cored, field tests are performed, laboratory testing is completed, and the reservoir is evaluated. With this information available, decisions can be made to optimize the borehole azimuth and well placement. The authors have used this approach to formation evaluation in several reservoirs where rock characterization is essential in the exploration and drilling program. 72 refs., 10 figs.

  15. Overcoming horizontal depolarizing resonances with multiple tune jumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, H.; Ahrens, L. A.; Bai, M.; Brown, K. A.; Dutheil, Y.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J. W.; Lin, F.; MacKay, W. W.; Meot, F.; Poblaguev, A.; Ranjbar, V.; Roser, T.; Schoefer, V.; Tepikian, S.; Tsoupas, N.; Yip, K.; Zelenski, A.; Zeno, K.

    2014-08-01

    In a medium energy proton synchrotron, strong enough partial Siberian snakes can be used to avoid both imperfection and vertical intrinsic depolarizing resonances. However, partial snakes tilt the stable spin direction away from vertical, which generates depolarizing resonances associated with horizontal tune. The relatively weak but numerous horizontal intrinsic resonances are the main source of the residual polarization losses. A pair of horizontal tune jump quads have been used in the Brookhaven Alternating Gradient Synchrotron to overcome these weak resonances. The locations of the two quads have to be chosen such that the disturbance to the beam optics is minimum. The emittance growth has to be mitigated for this method to work. In addition, this technique needs very accurate jump timing. Using two partial Siberian snakes, with vertical tune inside the spin tune gap and 80% polarization at the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron injection, polarized proton beam had reached 1.5×1011 proton per bunch with 65% polarization. With the tune jump timing optimized and emittance preserved, more than 70% polarization with 2×1011 protons per bunch has been achieved. The polarization transport efficiency is close to 90%.

  16. Horizontal sidetrack taps reservoir sweet spots''

    SciTech Connect

    Wible, J.R. )

    1994-02-21

    Cutting a window at 85[degree] deviation allowed a sidetrack to pass through the high-resistivity sections in a Gulf of Mexico reservoir. Results from logging-while-drilling (LWD) tools indicated the original horizontal bore dropped too low in the reservoir, possibly leading to a low productivity well. The subsequent sidetrack successfully delivered the desired well bore, and the increased productivity justified the efforts in cutting a window in the horizontal section.

  17. Report of the Horizontal Launch Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilhite, Alan W.; Bartolotta, Paul A.

    2011-01-01

    A study of horizontal launch concepts has been conducted. This study, jointly sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) was tasked to estimate the economic and technical viability of horizontal launch approaches. The study team identified the key parameters and critical technologies which determine mission viability and reported on the state of the art of critical technologies, along with objectives for technology development.

  18. SAW convolvers using the transverse-horizontal bilinear field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monks, T.; Paige, E. G. S.; Woods, R. C.

    1983-06-01

    The surface-acoustic-wave (SAW) convolver provides a means of achieving high time-bandwidth, programmable signal processing. The operation of most SAW convolver designs has been based on the detection of an electric-polarization field normal to the crystal surface. The field arises from the mixing of two counter-propagating surface-acoustic waves. The present investigation is concerned with a new type of convolver which is based on the detection of the bilinear electric polarization parallel to the crystal surface and to the input wave-front. The new device is called a transverse-horizontal convolver (THC). A new electrode arrangement is needed to detect the polarization.

  19. Productivity improvement by frontier horizontal drilling in Italy

    SciTech Connect

    Schenato, A.

    1995-12-31

    Italian domestic activity on horizontal wells has been specially addressed to carbonate reservoir and specifically targeted to re-entry in existing wells. The speech will focus on the specific experience matured in frontier applications in Italy, from 1989 with the short radius drain holes in Sicily, throughout world record deep water short radius in the southern part of Adriatic sea and depth world record medium radius in a HP/HT reservoir in the Po Valley. Production results will be reported as well as the achieved technological aspects.

  20. Emotion recognition (sometimes) depends on horizontal orientations

    PubMed Central

    Huynh, Carol M; Balas, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Face recognition depends critically on horizontal orientations (Goffaux & Dakin, 2010). Face images that lack horizontal features are harder to recognize than those that have that information preserved. Presently, we asked if facial emotional recognition also exhibits this dependency by asking observers to categorize orientation-filtered happy and sad expressions. Furthermore, we aimed to dissociate image-based orientation energy from object-based orientation by rotating images 90-degrees in the picture-plane. In our first experiment, we showed that the perception of emotional expression does depend on horizontal orientations and that object-based orientation constrained performance more than image-based orientation. In Experiment 2 we showed that mouth openness (i.e. open versus closed-mouths) also influenced the emotion-dependent reliance on horizontal information. Lastly, we describe a simple computational analysis that demonstrates that the impact of mouth openness was not predicted by variation in the distribution of orientation energy across horizontal and vertical orientation bands. Overall, our results suggest that emotion recognition does largely depend on horizontal information defined relative to the face, but that this bias is modulated by multiple factors that introduce variation in appearance across and within distinct emotions. PMID:24664854

  1. Exergy sustainability.

    SciTech Connect

    Robinett, Rush D. III; Wilson, David Gerald; Reed, Alfred W.

    2006-05-01

    Exergy is the elixir of life. Exergy is that portion of energy available to do work. Elixir is defined as a substance held capable of prolonging life indefinitely, which implies sustainability of life. In terms of mathematics and engineering, exergy sustainability is defined as the continuous compensation of irreversible entropy production in an open system with an impedance and capacity-matched persistent exergy source. Irreversible and nonequilibrium thermodynamic concepts are combined with self-organizing systems theories as well as nonlinear control and stability analyses to explain this definition. In particular, this paper provides a missing link in the analysis of self-organizing systems: a tie between irreversible thermodynamics and Hamiltonian systems. As a result of this work, the concept of ''on the edge of chaos'' is formulated as a set of necessary and sufficient conditions for stability and performance of sustainable systems. This interplay between exergy rate and irreversible entropy production rate can be described as Yin and Yang control: the dialectic synthesis of opposing power flows. In addition, exergy is shown to be a fundamental driver and necessary input for sustainable systems, since exergy input in the form of power is a single point of failure for self-organizing, adaptable systems.

  2. The road to sustainability

    SciTech Connect

    Sarrao, John L; Crabtree, George

    2009-01-01

    Sustainability is the hottest topic in energy research today, but what does it actually mean? George Crabtree and John Sarrao describe what makes a technology sustainable, and outline the materials-science challenges standing between us and clean, long-lasting energy. Although most people agree that more-sustainable energy technologies are desirable, they often find it harder to agree on exactly how sustainable these technologies need to be, and even precisely what is meant by sustainability. To clarify the debate, we suggest three criteria for sustainability, each of which captures a different feature of the problem. While we do not have the lUxury of achieving full sustainability for all of our next-generation energy technologies, we can use these definitions to select our strategic sustainability targets and track our progress toward achieving them. As will become clear, the most sustainable energy technologies require the most challenging fundamental science breakthroughs. The first criterion for sustainability is 'lasts a long time'. This quality has been a feature of many energy sources we have used historically, including wood in ancient times and oil throughout most of the 20th century. The definition of 'long time' is, of course, relative: the world's demand for energy long ago outpaced the ability of wood to supply it, and the production of oil is likely to peak sometime within the next few decades. Substantial reductions in the rate of oil consumption through higher-efficiency processes can significantly impact on how long non-renewable resources last. In applying the 'long time' criterion, we need to distinguish between energy sources that are effectively limitless and those that are finite but, for the moment, adequate. The second criterion for sustainability is 'does no harm'. Burning fossil fuels releases pollutants such as sulphur and mercury that endanger human health, as well as greenhouse gases like carbon dioxide that threaten climate stability

  3. Y-12 Site Sustainability Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, Charles G

    2012-12-01

    The accomplishments to date and the long-range planning of the Y-12 Energy Management and Sustainability and Stewardship programs support the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) vision for a commitment to energy effi ciency and sustainability and to achievement of the Guiding Principles. Specifi cally, the Y-12 vision is to support the Environment, Safety and Health Policy and the DOE Strategic Sustainability Performance Plan, while promoting overall sustainability and reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. The mission of the Y-12 Energy Management program is to incorporate energy-effi cient technologies site-wide and to position Y-12 to meet NNSA energy requirement needs through 2025 and beyond. The plan addresses greenhouse gases, buildings, fleet management, water use, pollution prevention, waste reduction, sustainable acquisition, electronic stewardship and data centers, site innovation and government-wide support.

  4. Horizontal and vertical concentrations in the evolution of hospital competition.

    PubMed

    Starkweather, D B; Carman, J M

    1987-01-01

    Summing across the three phases, the pattern of evolution was as follows: (1) the emergence of a market orientation by hospitals as the industry moved away from regulation; (2) steady expansion of what the hospitals considered to be their business, to include nonacute and wellness services, with vertical integration and diversification the vehicle for accomplishing this; (3) remarkable change with respect to who was competing with whom, stemming from restructuring of the market toward horizontal concentration and domination by a few rather than continuing open competition among many; (4) a shift in the market from one of competitive consumer choices among physicians and hospitals toward one of competitive choice among health plans; and (5) the beginnings of price dynamics within the context of oligopoly, due primarily to heightened power of corporate and other purchasers. A striking feature of this evolution was the role of concentration as both a response to increased competition and a vector of change in restructuring the market. Another notable feature was the relationship of vertical and horizontal integrations to each other: Stage I corporate reorganization and limited vertical integration provided the vehicle for horizontal integration in Stage II; then horizontal integration achieved a new critical mass and market dominance, yielding more vertical integration in Stage III. Finally, we note that of the numerous reasons advanced for mergers in industrial sectors and among hospitals in particular, a singular motivation was pursued in Community A: in an era of increasing competition, the stronger hospitals moved with determination to reduce competition and establish domination. The fundamental motive was market control. PMID:10291980

  5. Horizontal and vertical concentrations in the evolution of hospital competition.

    PubMed

    Starkweather, D B; Carman, J M

    1987-01-01

    Summing across the three phases, the pattern of evolution was as follows: (1) the emergence of a market orientation by hospitals as the industry moved away from regulation; (2) steady expansion of what the hospitals considered to be their business, to include nonacute and wellness services, with vertical integration and diversification the vehicle for accomplishing this; (3) remarkable change with respect to who was competing with whom, stemming from restructuring of the market toward horizontal concentration and domination by a few rather than continuing open competition among many; (4) a shift in the market from one of competitive consumer choices among physicians and hospitals toward one of competitive choice among health plans; and (5) the beginnings of price dynamics within the context of oligopoly, due primarily to heightened power of corporate and other purchasers. A striking feature of this evolution was the role of concentration as both a response to increased competition and a vector of change in restructuring the market. Another notable feature was the relationship of vertical and horizontal integrations to each other: Stage I corporate reorganization and limited vertical integration provided the vehicle for horizontal integration in Stage II; then horizontal integration achieved a new critical mass and market dominance, yielding more vertical integration in Stage III. Finally, we note that of the numerous reasons advanced for mergers in industrial sectors and among hospitals in particular, a singular motivation was pursued in Community A: in an era of increasing competition, the stronger hospitals moved with determination to reduce competition and establish domination. The fundamental motive was market control.

  6. GIS-mapping of environmental assessment of the territories in the region of intense activity for the oil and gas complex for achievement the goals of the Sustainable Development (on the example of Russia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yermolaev, Oleg

    2014-05-01

    The uniform system of complex scientific-reference ecological-geographical should act as a base for the maintenance of the Sustainable Development (SD) concept in the territories of the Russian Federation subjects or certain regions. In this case, the assessment of the ecological situation in the regions can be solved by the conjugation of the two interrelated system - the mapping and the geoinformational. The report discusses the methodological aspects of the Atlas-mapping for the purposes of SD in the regions of Russia. The Republic of Tatarstan viewed as a model territory where a large-scale oil-gas complex "Tatneft" PLC works. The company functions for more than 60 years. Oil fields occupy an area of more than 38 000 km2; placed in its territory about 40 000 oil wells, more than 55 000 km of pipelines; more than 3 billion tons of oil was extracted. Methods for to the structure and requirements for the Atlas's content were outlined. The approaches to mapping of "an ecological dominant" of SD conceptually substantiated following the pattern of a large region of Russia. Several trends of thematically mapping were suggested to be distinguished in the Atlas's structure: • The background history of oil-fields mine working; • The nature preservation technologies while oil extracting; • The assessment of natural conditions of a humans vital activity; • Unfavorable and dangerous natural processes and phenomena; • The anthropogenic effect and environmental surroundings change; • The social-economical processes and phenomena. • The medical-ecological and geochemical processes and phenomena; Within these groups the other numerous groups can distinguished. The maps of unfavorable and dangerous processes and phenomena subdivided in accordance with the types of processes - of endogenous and exogenous origin. Among the maps of the anthropogenic effects on the natural surroundings one can differentiate the maps of the influence on different nature's spheres

  7. Teaching Sustainability/Teaching Sustainably

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartels, Kirsten Allen, Ed.; Parker, Kelly A., Ed.

    2011-01-01

    Over the coming decades, every academic discipline will have to respond to the paradigm of more sustainable life practices because students will be living in a world challenged by competition for resources and climate change, and will demand that every academic discipline demonstrate substantial and corresponding relevance. This book takes as its…

  8. Sustainable NREL

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory prides itself on not only advancing the renewable energy, but "walking the talk" when it comes to sustainable practices. "When you look at our laboratories, you will see energy efficiency in action, but you'll also see renewable energy. We walk the walk and we talk the talk. We believe in it and we want to live it also."

  9. Sustainable NREL

    SciTech Connect

    2011-01-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory prides itself on not only advancing the renewable energy, but "walking the talk" when it comes to sustainable practices. "When you look at our laboratories, you will see energy efficiency in action, but you'll also see renewable energy. We walk the walk and we talk the talk. We believe in it and we want to live it also."

  10. Graded Achievement, Tested Achievement, and Validity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brookhart, Susan M.

    2015-01-01

    Twenty-eight studies of grades, over a century, were reviewed using the argument-based approach to validity suggested by Kane as a theoretical framework. The review draws conclusions about the meaning of graded achievement, its relation to tested achievement, and changes in the construct of graded achievement over time. "Graded…

  11. Efficient Storage and Querying of Horizontal Tables Using a PIVOT Operation in Commercial Relational DBMSs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Sung-Hyun; Moon, Yang-Sae; Kim, Jinho; Kim, Sang-Wook

    In recent years, a horizontal table with a large number of attributes is widely used in OLAP or e-business applications to analyze multidimensional data efficiently. For efficient storing and querying of horizontal tables, recent works have tried to transform a horizontal table to a traditional vertical table. Existing works, however, have the drawback of not considering an optimized PIVOT operation provided (or to be provided) in recent commercial RDBMSs. In this paper we propose a formal approach that exploits the optimized PIVOT operation of commercial RDBMSs for storing and querying of horizontal tables. To achieve this goal, we first provide an overall framework that stores and queries a horizontal table using an equivalent vertical table. Under the proposed framework, we then formally define 1) a method that stores a horizontal table in an equivalent vertical table and 2) a PIVOT operation that converts a stored vertical table to an equivalent horizontal view. Next, we propose a novel method that transforms a user-specified query on horizontal tables to an equivalent PIVOT-included query on vertical tables. In particular, by providing transformation rules for all five elementary operations in relational algebra as theorems, we prove our method is theoretically applicable to commercial RDBMSs. Experimental results show that, compared with the earlier work, our method reduces storage space significantly and also improves average performance by several orders of magnitude. These results indicate that our method provides an excellent framework to maximize performance in handling horizontal tables by exploiting the optimized PIVOT operation in commercial RDBMSs.

  12. Y-12 Site Sustainability Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Sherry, T D; Kohlhorst, D P; Little, S K

    2011-12-01

    The accomplishments to date and the long-range planning of the Y-12 Energy Management and Sustainability and Stewardship programs support the DOE and the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) vision for a commitment to energy efficiency and sustainability and to achievement of the Guiding Principles. Specifically, the Y-12 vision is to support the Environment, Safety and Health Policy and the DOE Strategic Sustainability Performance Plan (SSPP) while promoting overall sustainability and reduction of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Table ES.2 gives a comprehensive overview of Y-12's performance status and planned actions. B&W Y-12's Energy Management mission is to incorporate renewable energy and energy efficient technologies site-wide and to position Y-12 to meet NNSA energy requirement needs through 2025 and beyond. During FY 2011, the site formed a sustainability team (Fig. ES.1). The sustainability team provides a coordinated approach to meeting the various sustainability requirements and serves as a forum for increased communication and consistent implementation of sustainability activities at Y-12. The sustainability team serves as an information exchange mechanism to promote general awareness of sustainability information, while providing a system to document progress and to identify resources. These resources are necessary to implement activities that support the overall goals of sustainability, including reducing the use of resources and conserving energy. Additionally, the team's objectives include: (1) Foster a Y-12-wide philosophy to conserve resources; (2) Reduce the impacts of production operations in a cost-effective manner; (3) Increase materials recycling; (4) Use a minimum amount of energy and fuel; (5) Create a minimum of waste and pollution in achieving Y-12-strategic objectives; (6) Develop and implement techniques, technologies, process modifications, and programs that support sustainable acquisition; (7) Minimize the impacts to

  13. How to drill horizontal sections faster

    SciTech Connect

    Chaffin, M. )

    1991-12-01

    This paper reports that fewer trips, reduced slide time and lower drag during sliding have resulted from the application of downhole-adjustable stabilizers to horizontal drilling. Faster drilling times mean lower measurement while drilling (MWD) cost, and less wear on downhole equipment, motors and bits. These advantages combined with reduced drilling shocks have increased drilling rates and efficiency. Applying existing technology in new situations is an important way of reducing the cost of finding, exploring for and developing reserves. Engineers are responsible for using current technology to its fullest and developing new technology to reduce drilling expenses. Horizontal drilling was used in its early stages to develop the Austin chalk formation in Pearsall oil field more effectively. As procedures were generated to drill horizontal wells, Oryx drilling engineers began to develop new technology and investigate ways for existing technology to be used or altered to fit horizontal drilling programs. The new technology of downhole-adjustable stabilizers has been used successfully to further improve horizontal drilling efficiency.

  14. Why Sustainable Practices Matter.

    PubMed

    Rich, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    Sustainable thinking provides an opportunity to create new value to the mission of health care, rather than settling for less. Success stories and case studies exist, which if replicated can have an enormous positive effect. The future holds promise. Many health care organizations are signing up with efforts such as the Healthier Hospitals initiative, a program of the Practice Greenhealth membership organization for sustainable health care, to set new standards and learn more about methods to reduce the environmental footprint and negative health effects from the delivery of care to their communities. Providing safe and affordable care to patients and their families must remain paramount in the decisions that are made, but good environmental stewardship can be achieved. Setting organizational goals holds the key to finding the optimal balance. PMID:27333682

  15. Why Sustainable Practices Matter.

    PubMed

    Rich, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    Sustainable thinking provides an opportunity to create new value to the mission of health care, rather than settling for less. Success stories and case studies exist, which if replicated can have an enormous positive effect. The future holds promise. Many health care organizations are signing up with efforts such as the Healthier Hospitals initiative, a program of the Practice Greenhealth membership organization for sustainable health care, to set new standards and learn more about methods to reduce the environmental footprint and negative health effects from the delivery of care to their communities. Providing safe and affordable care to patients and their families must remain paramount in the decisions that are made, but good environmental stewardship can be achieved. Setting organizational goals holds the key to finding the optimal balance.

  16. Photometric identification of blue horizontal branch stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, K. W.; Bailer-Jones, C. A. L.; Klement, R. J.; Xue, X. X.

    2010-11-01

    We investigate the performance of some common machine learning techniques in identifying blue horizontal branch (BHB) stars from photometric data. To train the machine learning algorithms, we use previously published spectroscopic identifications of BHB stars from Sloan digital sky survey (SDSS) data. We investigate the performance of three different techniques, namely k nearest neighbour classification, kernel density estimation for discriminant analysis and a support vector machine (SVM). We discuss the performance of the methods in terms of both completeness (what fraction of input BHB stars are successfully returned as BHB stars) and contamination (what fraction of contaminating sources end up in the output BHB sample). We discuss the prospect of trading off these values, achieving lower contamination at the expense of lower completeness, by adjusting probability thresholds for the classification. We also discuss the role of prior probabilities in the classification performance, and we assess via simulations the reliability of the dataset used for training. Overall it seems that no-prior gives the best completeness, but adopting a prior lowers the contamination. We find that the support vector machine generally delivers the lowest contamination for a given level of completeness, and so is our method of choice. Finally, we classify a large sample of SDSS Data Release 7 (DR7) photometry using the SVM trained on the spectroscopic sample. We identify 27 074 probable BHB stars out of a sample of 294 652 stars. We derive photometric parallaxes and demonstrate that our results are reasonable by comparing to known distances for a selection of globular clusters. We attach our classifications, including probabilities, as an electronic table, so that they can be used either directly as a BHB star catalogue, or as priors to a spectroscopic or other classification method. We also provide our final models so that they can be directly applied to new data. Full Tables 7, A.3

  17. Horizontal drilling techniques at Prudhoe Bay, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkirson, J.P.; Smith, J.H.; Stagg, T.O.; Walters, D.A.

    1986-01-01

    Three extended departure horizontal wells have been drilled and completed at Prudhoe Bay, Alaska by Standard Alaska Production Company. Horizontal slotted liner completions of 1575 feet (480 m), 1637 feet (499 m), and 1163 feet (354 m) were accomplished at an average vertical depth of 9000 feet (2743 m). Improvements in technology and operating procedures have resulted in a cost per foot reduction of 40% over the three well program. When compared to conventional completions, initial production data indicates rate benefits of 300% and a major increase in ultimate recovery. This paper discusses the development of the techniques used to drill horizontal wells at Prudhoe Bay and reviews the drilling operations for each well.

  18. ESP's placed in horizontal lateral increase production

    SciTech Connect

    Gallup, A.; Wilson, B.L. ); Marshall, R. )

    1990-06-18

    By design, the electric submersible pump (ESP) is an effective method of lifting fluids from horizontal wells. But this ESP application does have unique installation and operating parameters that need to be considered. ESP's have been used for many years in directional wells. This application provides an experience base for understanding deflection limits on the unit. To avoid damaging the ESP, special equipment may be required in some horizontal installations. This paper discusses how several ESP's have been designed specifically for medium-radius wells. In these applications, the deeper pump setting provides for a significant increase in production rate. In general, to realize the full benefit of a horizontal installation, the ESP should be considered when planning, drilling, and completing the well.

  19. Horizontal molecular orientation in solution-processed organic light-emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, L.; Inoue, M.; Komino, T.; Kim, J.-H.; Ribierre, J. C. E-mail: adachi@cstf.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Center for Organic Photonics and Electronics Research , Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Nishi, Fukuoka 819-0395; Japan Science and Technology Agency , ERATO, Adachi Molecular Exciton Engineering Project, c and others

    2015-02-09

    Horizontal orientation of the emission transition dipole moments achieved in glassy vapor-deposited organic thin films leads to an enhancement of the light out-coupling efficiency in organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). Here, our combined study of variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry and angle dependent photoluminescence demonstrates that such a horizontal orientation can be achieved in glassy spin-coated organic films based on a composite blend of a heptafluorene derivative as a dopant and a 4,4′-bis(N-carbazolyl)-1,1′-biphenyl as a host. Solution-processed fluorescent OLEDs with horizontally oriented heptafluorene emitters were then fabricated and emitted deep blue electroluminescence with an external quantum efficiency as high as 5.3%.

  20. Space shuttle horizontal flight test plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mosley, R. L.

    1972-01-01

    A horizontal takeoff flight test concept for testing space shuttle vehicles is presented. The guidelines used in planning and support requirements for the flight tests are developed. Details of the test program are provided. The instrumentation requirements are defined. The limitations imposed by the short flight endurance and restricted maneuvering capability of the shuttle booster/orbiter in the horizontal mode are described. The test program covers the following investigations. (1) stall and lift boundary tests, (2)takeoff and landing tests, (3) level flight speed power tests, (4) longitudinal and laterial directional dynamic stability, and (5) static directional stability.

  1. Sustaining automobility

    SciTech Connect

    Pasek, J.E.; Schneider, R.W.; Sciance, F.S.

    1996-12-31

    This year marks the 100th anniversary of the automobile in America. This paper discusses the history of the automobile, its value to personal transportation, and the challenges faced in making the automobile energy efficient and environmentally compatible. Also included are some thoughts on how personal mobility can be sustained into the future. Understanding the history of transportation innovation and the reasons for the huge success of the automobile can help point the way to the successful innovations that will improve mankind`s mobility in the future and at the same time continue to make it cleaner, safer, and more energy efficient.

  2. 33 CFR 84.17 - Horizontal sectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... practical cut-off at not more than 5 degrees outside the prescribed sectors. (b) All-round lights shall be... RULES ANNEX I: POSITIONING AND TECHNICAL DETAILS OF LIGHTS AND SHAPES § 84.17 Horizontal sectors. (a)(1... intensities. The intensities shall decrease to reach practical cut-off between 1 and 3 degrees outside...

  3. 33 CFR 84.17 - Horizontal sectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... practical cut-off at not more than 5 degrees outside the prescribed sectors. (b) All-round lights shall be... RULES ANNEX I: POSITIONING AND TECHNICAL DETAILS OF LIGHTS AND SHAPES § 84.17 Horizontal sectors. (a)(1... intensities. The intensities shall decrease to reach practical cut-off between 1 and 3 degrees outside...

  4. Horizontally separated 1-in-1 crossing insertions

    SciTech Connect

    Syphers, M.J.

    1985-10-01

    Previous to this workshop, realistic lattices have been developed for vertically separated l-in-l (e.g., D.E. Johnson, A.A. Garren) and 2-in-1 (e.g., S. Heifets) magnets as well as for horizontally separated 2-in-l magnets (e.g., SSC RDS). Bringing together the widely separated ({approximately}60-70 cm) beams in a reasonable length of tunnel and keeping the dispersion zero at the interaction point has been difficult in the vertical l-in-l case. Most designs have required spacial 2-in-1 quadrupoles near the interaction point where the beams are separated by 15 cm or less. It is not clear that such magnets, as dictated by some of these lattice designs, can easily be built. The purpose of this exercise is to provide a crossing insertion for a realistic lattice which involves horizontally separated l-in-l magnets. The following horizontal crossing insertions, which incorporate the dispersion suppressors and phase trombones into the major arcs, need no special 2-in-1 magnets near the interaction point. The dispersion at the IP created by the horizontal crossing can be cancelled by the dispersion suppressor and one set of triplets.

  5. Teaching Activities on Horizontal Nuclear Proliferation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zola, John

    1990-01-01

    Provides learning activities concerning the horizontal proliferation of nuclear weapons. Includes step-by-step directions for four activities: (1) the life cycle of nuclear weapons; (2) nuclear nonproliferation: pros and cons; (3) the nuclear power/nuclear weapons connection; and (4) managing nuclear proliferation. (NL)

  6. Cutting Down the Tall Poppies: Horizontal Violence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Funk, Carole

    Many women in educational leadership positions experience negative treatment from female teachers and female superintendents. This phenomenon is known as horizontal violence, "the curious behavior of members of oppressed groups who often lash out at their peers in response to oppression instead of attacking their oppressors." This paper explores…

  7. [From vertical to horizontal. Writing in adolescence].

    PubMed

    Catheline-Antipoff, N

    1995-04-01

    Writing at adolescence has a non negligible part in identity's construction. Vertical writing as tags, graphs and graffiti refer to a narcissism deficiency and express a pulsional necessity, whereas, horizontal writing as private diaries, letters and novels express object's search and are made in dreaming attitude.

  8. Electroluminescence from completely horizontally oriented dye molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komino, Takeshi; Sagara, Yuta; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Oki, Yuji; Nakamura, Nozomi; Fujimoto, Hiroshi; Adachi, Chihaya

    2016-06-01

    A complete horizontal molecular orientation of a linear-shaped thermally activated delayed fluorescent guest emitter 2,6-bis(4-(10Hphenoxazin-10-yl)phenyl)benzo[1,2-d:5,4-d'] bis(oxazole) (cis-BOX2) was obtained in a glassy host matrix by vapor deposition. The orientational order of cis-BOX2 depended on the combination of deposition temperature and the type of host matrix. Complete horizontal orientation was obtained when a thin film with cis-BOX2 doped in a 4,4'-bis(N-carbazolyl)-1,1'-biphenyl (CBP) host matrix was fabricated at 200 K. The ultimate orientation of guest molecules originates from not only the kinetic relaxation but also the kinetic stability of the deposited guest molecules on the film surface during film growth. Utilizing the ultimate orientation, a highly efficient organic light-emitting diode with the external quantum efficiency of 33.4 ± 2.0% was realized. The thermal stability of the horizontal orientation of cis-BOX2 was governed by the glass transition temperature (Tg) of the CBP host matrix; the horizontal orientation was stable unless the film was annealed above Tg.

  9. Horizontal Axis Levitron--A Physics Demonstration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michaelis, Max M.

    2014-01-01

    After a brief history of the Levitron, the first horizontal axis Levitron is reported. Because it is easy to operate, it lends itself to educational physics experiments and analogies. Precession and nutation are visualized by reflecting the beam from a laser pointer off the "spignet". Precession is fundamental to nuclear magnetic…

  10. Farming with Grass: Achieving Sustainable Mixed Agricultural Landscapes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Agriculture in grassland environments is facing multiple stresses from shifting demographics, declining and fragmented agricultural landscapes, declining environmental quality, variable and changing climate, volatile and increasing energy costs, marginal economic returns, and globalization. Grassla...

  11. Successful systems sustaining change.

    PubMed

    Bullas, Sheila; Bryant, John

    2007-01-01

    Much has been published on the success and particularly the failure of IT projects; still failures are commonplace. This prospective study focused from the outset on assessing risk of failure and addressing critical success factors. The aim was to apply existing methods in a challenging acute care hospital where success demanded rapid achievement of sustainable improvements in clinical and administrative processes. The implementations were part of the English National Programme for IT. The desired outcomes required the integration of accepted tools and techniques to provide a pragmatic approach to systems implementation: Lean, Six Sigma, PRINCE2 and Benefits Management. The outcome and further insights into success and failure of IT projects in healthcare are described. In particular lessons are identified related to the business need for the project and the successful achievement of the required benefits and business change.

  12. Materials for Sustainable Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crabtree, George

    2009-03-01

    The global dependence on fossil fuels for energy is among the greatest challenges facing our economic, social and political future. The uncertainty in the cost and supply of oil threatens the global economy and energy security, the pollution of fossil combustion threatens human health, and the emission of greenhouse gases threatens global climate. Meeting the demand for double the current global energy use in the next 50 years without damaging our economy, security, environment or climate requires finding alternative sources of energy that are clean, abundant, accessible and sustainable. The transition to greater sustainability involves tapping unused energy flows such as sunlight and wind, producing electricity without carbon emissions from clean coal and high efficiency nuclear power plants, and using energy more efficiently in solid-state lighting, fuel cells and transportation based on plug-in hybrid and electric cars. Achieving these goals requires creating materials of increasing complexity and functionality to control the transformation of energy between light, electrons and chemical bonds. Challenges and opportunities for developing the complex materials and controlling the chemical changes that enable greater sustainability will be presented.

  13. Day one sustainability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orr, John; Ibell, Timothy; Evernden, Mark; Darby, Antony

    2015-05-01

    Emissions reductions targets for the UK set out in the Climate Change Act for the period to 2050 will only be achieved with significant changes to the built environment, which is currently estimated to account for 50% of the UK's carbon emissions. The socio-technological nature of Civil Engineering means that this field is uniquely placed to lead the UK through such adaptations. This paper discusses the importance of interdisciplinary teaching to produce multi-faceted team approaches to sustainable design solutions. Methods for measuring success in education are often not fit for purpose, producing good students but poor engineers. Real-world failures to apply sustainable design present a serious, difficult to detect, and ultimately economically negative situation. Techniques to replace summative examinations are presented and discussed, with the aim of enhancing core technical skills alongside those required for sustainable design. Finally, the role of our future engineers in policy-making is discussed. In addition to carbon, the provision of water and food will heavily influence the work of civil engineers in the coming decades. Leadership from civil engineers with the technical knowledge and social awareness to tackle these issues will be required. This provides both opportunities and challenges for engineering education in the UK.

  14. Sustainable water management practices and remote sensing.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency’s charge to protect human health and the environment requires a long-term commitment to creating sustainable solutions to environmental problems. The most direct way to ensure that management practices are achieving sustainability...

  15. Applying a Model of Sustainability on Campus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waite, Phillip S.

    2003-01-01

    Examines the natural resource planning theory of Walter Firey as a conceptual base for planning efforts aimed at achieving sustainable policies and practices on university and college campuses. Explains that sustainable policies and practices are those that, according to Firey's theory, are simultaneously ecologically possible, economically…

  16. Professional Development Leading to Sustained Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stickney, Catherine Alaimo

    2012-01-01

    Determining effective change that leads to sustainable improved student achievement remains an elusive goal for most educational communities. This research addresses the question of what factors of professional development promote sustained change within a school organization. The survey questions focus on the formation of professional learning…

  17. Online PBL: A Route to Sustainability Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomkinson, Bland; Hutt, Ian

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate online problem-based learning (PBL) as a route to achieving sustainability education using sponsored projects. Design/methodology/approach: The Royal Academy of Engineering sponsored project at Manchester; to foster education in sustainability through inter-disciplinary problem-based approaches,…

  18. Our Vision for a Sustainable Wales

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidson, Jane

    2010-01-01

    The Welsh Assembly Government is committed to putting sustainable development at the heart of all it does. In May 2009, the Assembly launched its latest scheme, "One Wales: One Planet," which sets out a clear definition of sustainable development as enhancing the economic, social and environmental wellbeing of people and communities, achieving a…

  19. Can Horizontal Hydraulic Fracturing Lead to Less Expensive Achievement of More Natural River Flows?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kern, J.; Characklis, G. W.

    2014-12-01

    High ramp rates and low costs make hydropower an extremely valuable resource for meeting "peak" hourly electricity demands, but dams that employ variable, stop-start reservoir releases can have adverse impacts on downstream riverine ecosystems. In recent years, efforts to mitigate the environmental impacts of hydropower peaking have relied predominantly on the use of ramp rate restrictions, or limits on the magnitude of hour-to-hour changes in reservoir discharge. These restrictions shift some hydropower production away from peak hours towards less valuable off-peak hours and impose a financial penalty on dam owners that is a function of: 1) the "spread" (difference) between peak and off-peak electricity prices; and 2) the total amount of generation shifted from peak to off-peak hours. In this study, we show how variability in both the price spread and reservoir inflows can cause large swings in the financial cost of ramp rate restrictions on a seasonal and annual basis. Of particular interest is determining whether current low natural gas prices (largely attributable to improvements in hydraulic fracturing) have reduced the cost of implementing ramp rate restrictions at dams by narrowing the spread between peak and off-peak electricity prices. We also examine the role that large year-to-year fluctuations in the cost of ramp rate restrictions may play in precluding downstream stakeholders (e.g., conservation trusts) from "purchasing" more natural streamflow patterns from dam owners. In recent years, similar arrangements between conservation trusts and consumptive water users have been put into practice in the U.S. for the purposes of supplementing baseflows in rivers. However, significant year-to-year uncertainty in the size of payments necessary to compensate hydropower producers for lost peaking production (i.e., uncertainty in the cost of ramp rate restrictions) makes transactions that aim to mitigate the environmental impacts of hydropower peaking untenable. In order to reduce this financial uncertainty, we propose the use of "collar" agreements between a downstream stakeholder and a third party insurer that would provide a stable price for parties "buying" more natural flows.

  20. Implementing Vertical and Horizontal Engineering Students' Integration and Assessment of Consequence Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Zubaidy, Sarim; Abdulaziz, Nidhal; Dashtpour, Reza

    2012-01-01

    Recent scholarship references indicate that integration of the student body can result in an enhanced learning experience for students and also greater satisfaction. This paper reports the results of a case study whereby mechanical engineering students studying at a newly established branch campus in Dubai of a British university were exposed to…

  1. Sustainability Science Needs Sustainable Data!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downs, R. R.; Chen, R. S.

    2013-12-01

    Sustainability science (SS) is an 'emerging field of research dealing with the interactions between natural and social systems, and with how those interactions affect the challenge of sustainability: meeting the needs of present and future generations while substantially reducing poverty and conserving the planet's life support systems' (Kates, 2011; Clark, 2007). Bettencourt & Kaur (2011) identified more than 20,000 scientific papers published on SS topics since the 1980s with more than 35,000 distinct authors. They estimated that the field is currently growing exponentially, with the number of authors doubling approximately every 8 years. These scholars are undoubtedly using and generating a vast quantity and variety of data and information for both SS research and applications. Unfortunately we know little about what data the SS community is actually using, and whether or not the data that SS scholars generate are being preserved for future use. Moreover, since much SS research is conducted by cross-disciplinary, multi-institutional teams, often scattered around the world, there could well be increased risks of data loss, reduced data quality, inadequate documentation, and poor long-term access and usability. Capabilities and processes therefore need to be established today to support continual, reliable, and efficient preservation of and access to SS data in the future, especially so that they can be reused in conjunction with future data and for new studies not conceived in the original data collection activities. Today's long-term data stewardship challenges include establishing sustainable data governance to facilitate continuing management, selecting data to ensure that limited resources are focused on high priority SS data holdings, securing sufficient rights to allow unforeseen uses, and preparing data to enable use by future communities whose specific research and information needs are not yet known. Adopting sustainable models for archival

  2. Horizontal Path Laser Communications Employing MEMS Adaptive Optics Correction

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, C A; Wilks, S C; Brase, J M; Young, R A; Johnson, G W; Ruggiero, A J

    2001-09-05

    Horizontal path laser communications are beginning to provide attractive alternatives for high-speed optical communications, In particular, companies are beginning to sell fiberless alternatives for intranet and sporting event video. These applications are primarily aimed at short distance applications (on the order of 1 km pathlength). There exists a potential need to extend this pathlength to distances much greater than a 1km. For cases of long distance optical propagation, atmospheric turbulence will ultimately limit the maximum achievable data rate. In this paper, we propose a method of improved signal quality through the use of adaptive optics. In particular, we show work in progress toward a high-speed, small footprint Adaptive Optics system for horizontal path laser communications. Such a system relies heavily on recent progress in Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) deformable mirrors as well as improved communication and computational components. In this paper we detail two Adaptive Optics approaches for improved through-put, the first is the compensated receiver (the traditional Adaptive Optics approach), the second is the compensated transmitter/receiver. The second approach allows for correction of the optical wavefront before transmission from the transmitter and prior to detection at the receiver.

  3. Task specific adaptations in rat locomotion: runway versus horizontal ladder.

    PubMed

    Bolton, David A E; Tse, Arthur D Y; Ballermann, Mark; Misiaszek, John E; Fouad, Karim

    2006-04-01

    In walking quadrupeds the alternating activity pattern of antagonistic leg muscles and the coordination between legs is orchestrated by central pattern generating networks within the spinal cord. These networks are activated by tonic input from the reticular formation in the brainstem. Under more challenging conditions, such as walking on a horizontal ladder, successful locomotion relies upon additional context dependent input from pathways such as the cortico- and rubro-spinal tracts. In this study we used electromyographic and kinematic approaches to characterize the adaptations in the walking pattern in adult uninjured rats crossing a horizontal ladder. We found that the placement of a hind limb on a rung precisely followed the placement of the ipsilateral fore limb. This is different to normal walking where the hind limb is placed behind the position of the ipsilateral fore limb. The increased reach of the hind limbs is achieved by increased flexion of the hip and rotation of the pelvis during the swing phase. Electromyographic observations showed decreased burst duration in Tibialis anterior an ankle flexor muscle. Further changes in the muscle activity pattern were likely due to the reduced stepping frequency during ladder walking. Following a lesion of the dorsal column, containing major parts of the corticospinal tract, we found an increased number of stepping errors and changes in the stepping strategy. The step length of the fore limbs was reduced and the hind limbs were frequently positioned on rungs other than those occupied by the fore limb. PMID:16406145

  4. Multi-mode reliability-based design of horizontal curves.

    PubMed

    Essa, Mohamed; Sayed, Tarek; Hussein, Mohamed

    2016-08-01

    Recently, reliability analysis has been advocated as an effective approach to account for uncertainty in the geometric design process and to evaluate the risk associated with a particular design. In this approach, a risk measure (e.g. probability of noncompliance) is calculated to represent the probability that a specific design would not meet standard requirements. The majority of previous applications of reliability analysis in geometric design focused on evaluating the probability of noncompliance for only one mode of noncompliance such as insufficient sight distance. However, in many design situations, more than one mode of noncompliance may be present (e.g. insufficient sight distance and vehicle skidding at horizontal curves). In these situations, utilizing a multi-mode reliability approach that considers more than one failure (noncompliance) mode is required. The main objective of this paper is to demonstrate the application of multi-mode (system) reliability analysis to the design of horizontal curves. The process is demonstrated by a case study of Sea-to-Sky Highway located between Vancouver and Whistler, in southern British Columbia, Canada. Two noncompliance modes were considered: insufficient sight distance and vehicle skidding. The results show the importance of accounting for several noncompliance modes in the reliability model. The system reliability concept could be used in future studies to calibrate the design of various design elements in order to achieve consistent safety levels based on all possible modes of noncompliance.

  5. Multi-mode reliability-based design of horizontal curves.

    PubMed

    Essa, Mohamed; Sayed, Tarek; Hussein, Mohamed

    2016-08-01

    Recently, reliability analysis has been advocated as an effective approach to account for uncertainty in the geometric design process and to evaluate the risk associated with a particular design. In this approach, a risk measure (e.g. probability of noncompliance) is calculated to represent the probability that a specific design would not meet standard requirements. The majority of previous applications of reliability analysis in geometric design focused on evaluating the probability of noncompliance for only one mode of noncompliance such as insufficient sight distance. However, in many design situations, more than one mode of noncompliance may be present (e.g. insufficient sight distance and vehicle skidding at horizontal curves). In these situations, utilizing a multi-mode reliability approach that considers more than one failure (noncompliance) mode is required. The main objective of this paper is to demonstrate the application of multi-mode (system) reliability analysis to the design of horizontal curves. The process is demonstrated by a case study of Sea-to-Sky Highway located between Vancouver and Whistler, in southern British Columbia, Canada. Two noncompliance modes were considered: insufficient sight distance and vehicle skidding. The results show the importance of accounting for several noncompliance modes in the reliability model. The system reliability concept could be used in future studies to calibrate the design of various design elements in order to achieve consistent safety levels based on all possible modes of noncompliance. PMID:27180287

  6. Articulating Support for Horizontal Resistive Exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gundo, Daniel; Schaffner, Grant; Bentley, Jason; Loehr, James A.

    2005-01-01

    A versatile mechanical device provides support for a user engaged in any of a variety of resistive exercises in a substantially horizontal orientation. The unique features and versatility of the device promise to be useful in bedrest studies, rehabilitation, and specialized strength training. The device affords a capability for selectively loading and unloading of portions of the user s body through its support mechanisms, so that specific parts of the body can be trained with little or no effect on other parts that may be disabled or in the process of recovery from injury. Thus, the device is ideal for rehabilitation exercise programs prescribed by physicians and physical therapists. The capability for selective loading and support also offers potential benefits to strength and conditioning trainers and athletes who wish to selectively strengthen selected parts. The principal innovative aspect of the device is that it supports the subject s weight while enabling the subject, lying substantially horizontally, to perform an exercise that closely approximates a full standing squat. The device includes mechanisms that support the subject in such a way that the hips are free to translate both horizontally and vertically and are free to rotate about the line connecting the hips. At the same time, the shoulders are free to translate horizontally while the upper back is free to rotate about the line connecting the shoulders. Among the mechanisms for hip motion and support is a counterbalance that offsets the weight of the subject as the subject s pelvis translates horizontally and vertically and rotates the pelvis about the line connecting the hips. The counterbalance is connected to a pelvic support system that allows these pelvic movements. The subject is also supported at the shoulder by a mechanism that can tilt to provide continuous support of the upper back while allowing the rotation required for arching the back as the pelvis is displaced. The shoulder support

  7. Horizontally staggered lightguide solar concentrator with lateral displacement tracking for high concentration applications.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hongcai; Wu, Lin

    2015-07-10

    We present the design of a horizontally staggered lightguide solar concentrator with lateral displacement tracking for high concentration applications. This solar concentrator consists of an array of telecentric primary concentrators, a horizontally staggered lightguide layer, and a vertically tapered lightguide layer. The primary concentrator is realized by two plano-aspheric lenses with lateral movement and maintains a high F-number over an angle range of ±23.5°. The results of the simulations show that the solar concentrator achieves a high concentration ratio of 500× with ±0.5° of acceptance angle by a single-axis tracker and dual lateral translation stages.

  8. Horizontal modular dry irradiated fuel storage system

    DOEpatents

    Fischer, Larry E.; McInnes, Ian D.; Massey, John V.

    1988-01-01

    A horizontal, modular, dry, irradiated fuel storage system (10) includes a thin-walled canister (12) for containing irradiated fuel assemblies (20), which canister (12) can be positioned in a transfer cask (14) and transported in a horizontal manner from a fuel storage pool (18), to an intermediate-term storage facility. The storage system (10) includes a plurality of dry storage modules (26) which accept the canister (12) from the transfer cask (14) and provide for appropriate shielding about the canister (12). Each module (26) also provides for air cooling of the canister (12) to remove the decay heat of the irradiated fuel assemblies (20). The modules (26) can be interlocked so that each module (26) gains additional shielding from the next adjacent module (26). Hydraulic rams (30) are provided for inserting and removing the canisters (12) from the modules (26).

  9. Elf cites 5 advantages of horizontal drilling

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-06-01

    ELF Aquitaine used horizontal drilling during a pilot test program to bring commercial production from its Rospo Mare oil discovery in the Adriatic, which would have been a costly disappointment if drilled by a conventional vertical well bore. Rospo Mare is a large reservoir containing a top column of highly viscous crude underlain by a water column. The company felt that a well bore that penetrated the reservoir vertically would bring early flooding of the oil column and yield only water. By penetrating the reservoir with a horizontal well drilled high in the oil column, the well successfully produced on numerous tests from Oct. 1982 until the end of the test program in 1983. Production was termed excellent, with productivity during tests reportedly reaching ca 15 times the rate produced from nearby vertical wells. However, ELF said the results usually average ca 5 times the usual rate of vertical wells.

  10. Film condensation in a horizontal rectangular duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Qing; Suryanarayana, N. V.

    1993-01-01

    Condensation heat transfer in a horizontal rectangular duct was experimentally and analytically investigated. To prevent the dripping of condensate on the film, the experiment was conducted inside a horizontal rectangular duct with vapor condensing only on the bottom cooled plate of the duct. R-113 and FC-72 (Fluorinert Electronic Fluid developed by the 3M Company) were used as the condensing fluids. The experimental program included measurements of film thickness, local and average heat transfer coefficients, wave length, wave speed, and a study of wave initiation. The measured film thickness was used to obtain the local heat transfer coefficient. The wave initiation was studied both with condensation and with an adiabatic air-liquid flow. The test sections used in both experiments were identical.

  11. Horizontal slug flow modeling and metering

    SciTech Connect

    Kouba, G.E.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental and theoretical investigation of horizontal two-phase slug flow was performed with the purpose of developing a method to measure the in-situ flow rates of the liquid and the gas phases using non-intrusive devices. A microcomputer based data acquisition system was used to acquire slug flow data on a 3 in.(76.2 mm) diameter, 1370 ft (418 m) long, horizontal pipeline. These data include the following slug characteristics: liquid holdups in the slug and film, slug and gas pocket lengths, and slug translational velocity. The data were gathered over a wide range of flow conditions in groups of constant superficial liquid and mixture velocities. The volumetric phase flow rate equation, for either liquid or gas, was developed for slug flow conditions. Within the flow rate equation, a key flow distribution parameter was defined that related the phase velocity in the slug to the translational velocity of the slug.

  12. The role of municipal committees in the development of an integrated urban water policy in Belo Horizonte, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Costa, G M; Costa, H S M; Dias, J B; Welter, M G

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses the challenges involved in adopting an integrated approach to urban water policies and management, a particularly problematic issue in Brazil due to the incomplete nature of urbanization, defined as the lack of adequate and/or universalized access to infrastructure and services, informal housing and conflicts between environmental protection and social housing needs. In the last two decades strong social movements have influenced urban environmental policies from national to local levels. In Belo Horizonte since 1993, decision-making processes have involved important mechanisms of democratic inclusion, which have contributed to fairer urban policies. A brief discussion of the concept of governance follows, introducing the municipal urban policy within which drainage and sanitation policies have been implemented. This paper presents the constitutional and institutional role of the five municipal committees dealing with water governance issues, as they are important arenas for civil society participation. The main constraints to achieving integrated urban water governance at the local level and the extent to which such policies are able to reduce social inequalities and promote social environmental justice in the use and appropriation of urban water, are discussed. This paper is part of the SWITCH-Sustainable Water Management Improves Tomorrow's Cities' Health-research network. PMID:19955636

  13. Horizontal drilling in shallow, geologically complex reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Venable, S.D.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this project is to test the concept that multiple hydraulic fracturing from a directionally-drilled horizontal well, using the medium radius build rate method, can increase gas production sufficiently to justify economic viability over conventional stimulated vertical wells. The test well is located in Yuma County, Colorado, in a favorable area of established production to avoid exploration risks. This report presents: background information; project description which covers location selection/geologic considerations; and preliminary work plan. (AT)

  14. Horizontal drilling in shallow, geologically complex reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Venable, S.D.

    1992-10-01

    The objective of this project is to test the concept that multiple hydraulic fracturing from a directionally-drilled horizontal well, using the medium radius build rate method, can increase gas production sufficiently to justify economic viability over conventional stimulated vertical wells. The test well is located in Yuma County, Colorado, in a favorable area of established production to avoid exploration risks. This report presents: background information; project description which covers location selection/geologic considerations; and preliminary work plan. (AT)

  15. Management of horizontally impacted dilacerated lateral incisor

    PubMed Central

    Katta, Anil Kumar; Peddu, Revathi; Vannala, Venkataramana; Dasari, Vaishnavi

    2015-01-01

    Impaction of maxillary lateral incisor with odontome and retained deciduous tooth is not often seen in regular dental practice. Impaction of anterior teeth cause generalized spacing which affects the esthetics of the face. Here we report a case of an 18-year-old patient with horizontally impacted dilacerated lateral incisor, which was bought into occlusion with the help of orthodontic tooth movement within a span of 18 months. PMID:26538954

  16. Zonal isolation and evaluation for cemented horizontal liners

    SciTech Connect

    Gai, H; Summers, T.D.; Cocking, D.A.; Greaves, C.

    1996-12-01

    This paper discusses the novel application of technology in the cementing and bond evaluation from the world-record breaking extended-reach drilling (ERD) wells in Wytch Farm, where horizontal liners of the order of 800 to 1,300 m at TVD of approximately 1,600 m have been successfully cemented and perforated. Detailed analysis of the conditions by a multidisciplinary team provided some practical procedures that enabled the authors to achieve their objectives of zonal isolation and cement bond evaluation successfully. Important aspects of zonal isolation, such as the use of spiral-blade centralizers, rotating the liner, and trials of the external casing packer (ECP), are discussed in detail. Cement bond evaluation is also detailed, involving coiled tubing (CT) deployment and various bond-logging tools, including ultrasonic tools. The cement bond log (CBL) was found to be surprisingly reliable if used correctly.

  17. IDENTIFYING BLUE HORIZONTAL BRANCH STARS USING THE z FILTER

    SciTech Connect

    Vickers, John J.; Grebel, Eva K.; Huxor, Avon P.

    2012-04-15

    In this paper we present a new method for selecting blue horizontal branch (BHB) candidates based on color-color photometry. We make use of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey z band as a surface gravity indicator and show its value for selecting BHB stars from quasars, white dwarfs, and main-sequence A-type stars. Using the g, r, i, and z bands, we demonstrate that extraction accuracies on a par with more traditional u, g, and r photometric selection methods may be achieved. We also show that the completeness necessary to probe major Galactic structure may be maintained. Our new method allows us to efficiently select BHB stars from photometric sky surveys that do not include a u-band filter such as the Panoramic Survey Telescope and Rapid Response System.

  18. Sustainable Scientists

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, Evan

    2008-12-31

    Scientists are front and center in quantifying and solving environmental problems. Yet, as a spate of recent news articles in scientific journals point out, much can be done to enhance sustainability within the scientific enterprise itself, particularly by trimming the energy use associated with research facilities and the equipment therein (i,ii,iii, iv). Sponsors of research unwittingly spend on the order of $10 billion each year on energy in the U.S. alone, and the underlying inefficiencies drain funds from the research enterprise while causing 80 MT CO2-equivalent greenhouse-gas emissions (see Box). These are significant sums considering the opportunity costs in terms of the amount of additional research that could be funded and emissions that could be reduced if the underlying energy was used more efficiently. By following commercially proven best practices in facility design and operation, scientists--and the sponsors of science--can cost-effectively halve these costs, while doing their part to put society on alow-carbon diet.

  19. Sustainable NREL - Site Sustainability Plan FY 2015

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2015-01-01

    NREL's Site Sustainability Plan FY 2015 reports on sustainability plans for the lab for the year 2015 based on Executive Order Goals and provides the status on planned actions cited in the FY 2014 report.

  20. 12. VIEW LOOKING SOUTHWEST, CHESTNUT ST. (lower horizontal line) TO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. VIEW LOOKING SOUTHWEST, CHESTNUT ST. (lower horizontal line) TO WALNUT ST. (upper horizontal line), SHOWING SECOND BANK OF U.S. - Independence National Historical Park, Walnut, Sixth, Chestnut & Second Streets, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  1. Sustainable Campus: Engaging the Community in Sustainability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Too, Linda; Bajracharya, Bhishna

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to identify the major factors necessary for engaging university campus community in sustainability. While general awareness in sustainability issues has improved in recent years through mass media coverage, this knowledge is not always translated into actual sustainable practice. Studies have indicated that…

  2. Comparing Science Achievement Constructs: Targeted and Achieved

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrara, Steve; Duncan, Teresa

    2011-01-01

    This article illustrates how test specifications based solely on academic content standards, without attention to other cognitive skills and item response demands, can fall short of their targeted constructs. First, the authors inductively describe the science achievement construct represented by a statewide sixth-grade science proficiency test.…

  3. Regional horizontal stress and its effect on longwall mining in the northern Appalachian coal field

    SciTech Connect

    Su, D.W.H.; Hasenfus, G.J.

    1995-11-01

    This paper presents the results of in situ horizontal stress measurements using a Minifrac system in several northern Appalachian coal mines. The effect of stress magnitude and orientation on longwall gate entry stability was analyzed using a series of three-dimensional finite element analyses. The best headgate stability is achieved if the maximum horizontal stress is aligned with the direction of longwall retreat or if the panel is oriented such that the maximum stress relaxes over the headgate due to the presence of the newly formed gob. The degree of horizontal stress damage to longwall gate entries depends largely on the stress magnitude and roof geology. Accurate assessments of support or design techniques which may mitigate longwall headgate or tailgate instability in areas of thinly laminated roof and high horizontal stresses must account for the in situ horizontal stress state and site specific roof geology. The ability to measure stresses and map geology is thus essential to prevent ground control failures at the longwall headgate.

  4. Development of a reduced area horizontal tail for a wide body jet aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rising, Jerry J.

    1984-01-01

    Commercial transport aircraft fuel consumption can be significantly reduced by decreasing the size of the horizontal tail. Work on reducing the horizontal tail area of the L-1011 is discussed. The reduced area horizontal tail program consisted of design, fabrication and wind tunnel testing of horizontal tails with reduced planform areas of 30 to 38 percent relative to the standard L-1011 tail. The total drag of the aircraft in cruise was reduced by approximately 2 percent. However, it was necessary to impose forward center of gravity limitations on the aircraft because the maximum lift goal of the reduced area tail was not achieved and sufficient nose-up control authority was not available. On a new design this problem could have been solved by moving the landing gear aft and enlarging the cut-out in the aft fuselage to allow for larger horizontal stabilizer deflections. However, since this is an existing design, these modifications were unfeasible and resulted in the center of gravity restriction.

  5. A self-decoupling piezoresistive sensor for measuring microforce in horizontal and vertical directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jie; Rong, Weibin; Wang, Lefeng; Gao, Peng; Sun, Lining

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents the design, fabrication and calibration of a novel two-dimension microforce sensor with nano-Newton resolution. The sensor, mainly composed of a clamped-clamped beam (horizontal detecting beam), an overhanging beam (vertical detecting beam) and a half-folded beam, is highly sensitive to microforces in the horizontal (parallel to the probe of the designed sensor) and vertical (perpendicular to the wafer surface) directions. The four vertical sidewall surface piezoresistors (horizontal piezoresistors) and two surface piezoresistors (vertical piezoresistors) were fabricated to achieve the requirements of two-dimension microforce measurements. Combining the sensor structure with Wheatstone bridge configurations, the microforce decoupling among the x, y, and z direction can be realized. Accordingly, the sensor is capable of detecting microforces in the horizontal and vertical directions independently. The calibration results verified that the sensor sensitivities at room temperature are 210.58 V N-1and 159.2 V N-1 in the horizontal and vertical directions, respectively. Additionally, the sensor’s corresponding force resolutions are estimated at 2 nN and 3 nN in theory, respectively. The sensor can be used to measure the contact force between manipulating tools and micro-objects, in fields such as microassembly and biological assays.

  6. A comparative analysis of vertical and horizontal fixation disparity in sentence reading.

    PubMed

    Jainta, S; Blythe, H I; Nikolova, M; Jones, M O; Liversedge, S P

    2015-05-01

    Humans have two, frontally placed eyes and during reading oculomotor and sensory processes are needed to combine the two inputs into a unified percept of the text. Generally, slight vergence errors, i.e., fixation disparities, occur but do not cause double vision since disparate retinal inputs fall into Panum's fusional area, that is, a range of disparity wherein sensory fusion of the two retinal images is achieved. In this study, we report benchmark data with respect to the mean magnitude and range of vertical compared to horizontal fixation disparities for natural reading. Our data clearly fit to an elliptical pattern of Panum's fusional area that corresponds with theoretical estimates. Furthermore, when we examined disparity-driven vergence adjustments during fixations by comparing monocular with binocular reading conditions, we found that only horizontal fixation disparities increased significantly under conditions of monocular stimulation. Also, no significant vertical fine-tuning (vergence adjustment) was observed for vergence eye movements during reading fixations. Thus, horizontal and vertical fixation disparities and vergence adjustments during reading showed quite different characteristics, and this dissociation is directly related to the functional role of vergence adjustments: vertical fusion - and vertical vergence - subserve the maintenance of a single percept and stereopsis by keeping the eyes in register and allowing for horizontal fusional processes to successfully operate over a vertically aligned input. A reliable and stable vertical alignment is, thus, a pre-requisite over which horizontal fusional responses (and depth perception) can work most efficiently - even in a task like reading.

  7. A self-decoupling piezoresistive sensor for measuring microforce in horizontal and vertical directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jie; Rong, Weibin; Wang, Lefeng; Gao, Peng; Sun, Lining

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents the design, fabrication and calibration of a novel two-dimension microforce sensor with nano-Newton resolution. The sensor, mainly composed of a clamped–clamped beam (horizontal detecting beam), an overhanging beam (vertical detecting beam) and a half-folded beam, is highly sensitive to microforces in the horizontal (parallel to the probe of the designed sensor) and vertical (perpendicular to the wafer surface) directions. The four vertical sidewall surface piezoresistors (horizontal piezoresistors) and two surface piezoresistors (vertical piezoresistors) were fabricated to achieve the requirements of two-dimension microforce measurements. Combining the sensor structure with Wheatstone bridge configurations, the microforce decoupling among the x, y, and z direction can be realized. Accordingly, the sensor is capable of detecting microforces in the horizontal and vertical directions independently. The calibration results verified that the sensor sensitivities at room temperature are 210.58 V N‑1and 159.2 V N‑1 in the horizontal and vertical directions, respectively. Additionally, the sensor’s corresponding force resolutions are estimated at 2 nN and 3 nN in theory, respectively. The sensor can be used to measure the contact force between manipulating tools and micro-objects, in fields such as microassembly and biological assays.

  8. Study of the Local Horizon. (Spanish Title: Estudio del Horizonte Local.) Estudo do Horizonte Local

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ros, Rosa M.

    2009-12-01

    The study of the horizon is fundamental to easy the first observations of the students at any education center. A simple model, to be developed in each center, allows to easy the study and comprehension of the rudiments of astronomy. The constructed model is presented in turn as a simple equatorial clock, other models (horizontal and vertical) may be constructed starting from it. El estudio del horizonte es fundamental para poder facilitar las primeras observaciones de los alumnos en un centro educativo. Un simple modelo, que debe realizarse para cada centro, nos permite facilitar el estudio y la comprensión de los primeros rudimentos astronómicos. El modelo construido se presenta a su vez como un sencillo modelo de reloj ecuatorial y a partir de él se pueden construir otros modelos (horizontal y vertical). O estudo do horizonte é fundamental para facilitar as primeiras observações dos alunos num centro educativo. Um modelo simples, que deve ser feito para cada centro, permite facilitar o estudo e a compreensão dos primeiros rudimentos astronômicos. O modelo construído apresenta-se, por sua vez, como um modelo simples de relógio equatorial e a partir dele pode-se construir outros modelos (horizontal e vertical)

  9. YPF uses horizontal reentry to aid thin bed production

    SciTech Connect

    Acosta, M.R.; Leiro, F.A.; Sesano, G.S.; Hill, D.

    1997-01-01

    Reentry and horizontal drilling/completion techniques have proven themselves useful in exploiting thin beds. A pilot horizontal reentry contracted by Yacimiento Petroliferos Fiscales (YPF) for a marginal well in its Lomita Sur field resulted in decreased water coning and production rates four times greater than expected. Further horizontal reentries in this thin-bed field are planned.

  10. Sidewall containment of liquid metal with horizontal alternating magnetic fields

    DOEpatents

    Praeg, Walter F.

    1995-01-01

    An apparatus for confining molten metal with a horizontal alternating magnetic field. In particular, this invention employs a magnet that can produce a horizontal alternating magnetic field to confine a molten metal at the edges of parallel horizontal rollers as a solid metal sheet is cast by counter-rotation of the rollers.

  11. Sidewall containment of liquid metal with horizontal alternating magnetic fields

    DOEpatents

    Pareg, Walter F.

    1990-01-01

    An apparatus for confining molten metal with a horizontal alternating magnetic field. In particular, this invention employs a magnet that can produce a horizontal alternating magnetic field to confine a molten metal at the edges of parallel horizontal rollers as a solid metal sheet is cast by counter-rotation of the rollers.

  12. Horizontal core acquisition and orientation for formation evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Skopec, R.A. ); Mann, M.M. ); Grier, S.P. )

    1992-03-01

    The increase in horizontal drilling activity has produced a need for improved coring technology. The development of a reliable horizontal (medium-radius) coring and orientation system has greatly improved the acquisition of information necessary for formation evaluation and reservoir engineering. This paper describes newly developed hardware and methods for obtaining horizontal core sections.

  13. Mobility and Reading Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waters, Theresa Z.

    A study examined the effect of geographic mobility on elementary school students' achievement. Although such mobility, which requires students to make multiple moves among schools, can have a negative impact on academic achievement, the hypothesis for the study was that it was not a determining factor in reading achievement test scores. Subjects…

  14. University Presidents' Conceptualizations of Sustainability in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Tarah

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine how a cohort of university presidents and vice-presidents in Canadian universities conceptualize sustainable development, sustainable universities, the role universities play in achieving a sustainable future, key issues facing the university, and the barriers to implementing sustainability…

  15. Horizontal Transmission of Cytosolic Sup35 Prions by Extracellular Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shu; Hossinger, André; Hofmann, Julia P.; Denner, Philip

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Prions are infectious protein particles that replicate by templating their aggregated state onto soluble protein of the same type. Originally identified as the causative agent of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, prions in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) are epigenetic elements of inheritance that induce phenotypic changes of their host cells. The prototype yeast prion is the translation termination factor Sup35. Prions composed of Sup35 or its modular prion domain NM are heritable and are transmitted vertically to progeny or horizontally during mating. Interestingly, in mammalian cells, protein aggregates derived from yeast Sup35 NM behave as true infectious entities that employ dissemination strategies similar to those of mammalian prions. While transmission is most efficient when cells are in direct contact, we demonstrate here that cytosolic Sup35 NM prions are also released into the extracellular space in association with nanometer-sized membrane vesicles. Importantly, extracellular vesicles are biologically active and are taken up by recipient cells, where they induce self-sustained Sup35 NM protein aggregation. Thus, in mammalian cells, extracellular vesicles can serve as dissemination vehicles for protein-based epigenetic information transfer. PMID:27406566

  16. Horizontal tapping furnace and method of operation

    SciTech Connect

    Wunsche, E.R.

    1987-07-14

    A metallurgical furnace is described including: a furnace floor and a furnace wall means extending generally upwardly about the floor, the furnace having a vertical axis and a horizontal axis, means mounting the furnace for pivotal tilting movement about the horizontal axis between a non-tilted, normal upright position, and a tilted discharge position with the furnace tilted less than 15/sup 0/ to the vertical axis; a hearth zone defined between the floor and wall means adapted to house a bath of liquid metal of predetermined volume, the hearth zone having an upper end defining a predetermined upper level for the bath and for a layer of liquid slag floating on the upper level, when the furnace is in a non-tilted, normal upright position; the hearth zone having a lower end adjacent the floor, a tapping passage extending through the wall means from a liquid metal discharge outlet at an outer end into the lower end of the hearth zone, at an inner end, the discharge outlet being defined by an outwardly facing passage wall and the passage at the outer end; the tapping passage disposed generally parallel to the horizontal axis and vertically below the predetermined upper level, when the furnace is in the non-tilted, normal, upright position; a discharge outlet closure having a closure surface and pivotally mounted externally of the passage for pivotal to and for movement towards and away from the furnace wall means between a first position. The closure surface engages the passage wall at the outer end to fully close the discharge outlet, and a second position spaced apart from the passage wall.

  17. Does horizontal transmission invalidate cultural phylogenies?

    PubMed Central

    Greenhill, Simon J.; Currie, Thomas E.; Gray, Russell D.

    2009-01-01

    Phylogenetic methods have recently been applied to studies of cultural evolution. However, it has been claimed that the large amount of horizontal transmission that sometimes occurs between cultural groups invalidates the use of these methods. Here, we use a natural model of linguistic evolution to simulate borrowing between languages. The results show that tree topologies constructed with Bayesian phylogenetic methods are robust to realistic levels of borrowing. Inferences about divergence dates are slightly less robust and show a tendency to underestimate dates. Our results demonstrate that realistic levels of reticulation between cultures do not invalidate a phylogenetic approach to cultural and linguistic evolution. PMID:19324763

  18. In situ bioremediation using horizontal wells

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-01

    In Situ Bioremediation (ISB), which is the term used in this report for Gaseous Nutrient Injection for In Situ Bioremediation, remediates soils and ground water contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs) both above and below the water table. ISB involves injection of air and nutrients (sparging and biostimulation) into the ground water and vacuum extraction to remove .VOCs from the vadose zone concomitant with biodegradation of VOCs. The innovation is in the combination of 3 emerging technologies, air stripping, horizontal wells, and bioremediation via gaseous nutrient injection with a baseline technology, soil vapor extraction, to produce a more efficient in situ remediation system.

  19. Impulse absorption by horizontal magnetic granular chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leng, Dingxin; Wang, Xiaojie; Liu, Guijie; Sun, Lingyu

    2016-02-01

    The granular medium is known as a protecting material for shock mitigation. We study the impulse absorption of an alignment of magnetic spheres placed horizontally under a non-uniform magnetic field. The phenomenon of the wave dispersion is presented. This system can absorb 85% ˜ 95% (88% ˜ 98%) of the incident peak force (energy) under the applied magnetic field strength in 0.1 T ˜ 1.0 T. The shock attenuation capacities are enhanced by the increment of field strength. With an intelligent control system, it is conceivable that the magnetic granular chain may offer possibilities in developing adaptive shock protectors.

  20. Does horizontal transmission invalidate cultural phylogenies?

    PubMed

    Greenhill, Simon J; Currie, Thomas E; Gray, Russell D

    2009-06-22

    Phylogenetic methods have recently been applied to studies of cultural evolution. However, it has been claimed that the large amount of horizontal transmission that sometimes occurs between cultural groups invalidates the use of these methods. Here, we use a natural model of linguistic evolution to simulate borrowing between languages. The results show that tree topologies constructed with Bayesian phylogenetic methods are robust to realistic levels of borrowing. Inferences about divergence dates are slightly less robust and show a tendency to underestimate dates. Our results demonstrate that realistic levels of reticulation between cultures do not invalidate a phylogenetic approach to cultural and linguistic evolution.

  1. Horizontal stability of a bouncing ball

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBennett, Brendan G.; Harris, Daniel M.

    2016-09-01

    We present an investigation of a partially elastic ball bouncing on a vertically vibrated concave parabolic surface in two dimensions. In particular, we demonstrate that simple vertical motion, wherein the ball bounces periodically at the parabola's vertex, is unstable to horizontal perturbations when the parabolic coefficient defining the surface shape exceeds a critical value. The result is a new periodic solution where the ball bounces laterally over the vertex. As the parabola is further steepened, this new solution also becomes unstable which gives rise to other complex periodic and chaotic bouncing states, all characterized by persistent lateral motion.

  2. An Understanding of Sustainability and Education for Sustainable Development among German Student Teachers and Trainee Teachers of Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burmeister, Mareike; Eilks, Ingo

    2013-01-01

    Sustainable development is a central concern of today's politics across the world. Different political agendas have been developed to promote sustainability and make it a political goal worldwide. As stated in Agenda 21, the political debate seems to agree that education has to play a key role in achieving sustainability. But practices…

  3. Education for Sustainability-Challenges and Opportunities: The Case of RCEs (Regional Centres of Expertise in Education for Sustainable Development)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wade, Ros

    2016-01-01

    This article will focus on the challenges of leadership and management of a key initiative of the 20052014 UN Decade of Education for Sustainable Development (DESD), namely the Regional Centres of Expertise in Education for Sustainability (RCEs). It will argue that in order to achieve sustainability, there is a need to move away from outdated…

  4. Effect of a horizontal plane boundary on a falling horizontal cylinder at low Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.-J.; Hussey, R. G.

    1980-05-01

    Experimental results are presented for the change in velocity of a slender cylinder with its axis horizontal as it falls through a viscous fluid toward a horizontal plane boundary. When the boundary influence is strong, the deceleration of the cylinder is observed to be constant, and the velocity extrapolates to zero at the boundary. When the relative change in velocity is small (less than 20%), it is observed to depend inversely on the square of the distance from the boundary. The Reynolds number based on cylinder diameter ranges from 2.9 to 0.015 and the Reynolds number based on cylinder length ranges from 122 to 0.16.

  5. Youth Action Council on Sustainable Innovation (YACSI) Report: Making Innovation Sustainable Among Youth in Canada.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    A study surveyed 241 high-achieving youth aged 15-25 regarding how innovation can be made sustainable among youth in Canada. Results were insightful and pointed to actionable steps for the Youth Action Council for Sustainable Innovation and the federal government. Findings indicated the following: youth can be more innovative if they have the…

  6. Is Sustainable Remediation Now a Self-Sustaining Process? an International Progress Report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, J. W. N.

    2014-12-01

    Sustainable remediation - the consideration of environmental, social and economic factors associated with soil and groundwater risk-management options, to help select the best overall solution - has been a rapidly evolving topic in recent years. The first published reference[1] to 'sustainable remediation' was in the title of a 1999 conference paper by Kearney et al., (1999), but activity really accelerated in the middle-late 2000's, with establishment of a number of collaborative sustainable remediation groups and fora, and increased publication rates in the peer reviewed literature (Fig 1). Figure 1. Journal paper publications with search term 'sustainable remediation' (SCOPUS survey, 17 July 2014) This presentation will review the international progress of sustainable remediation concept development and application in regulatory and corporate decision-making processes. It will look back at what has already been achieved, provide an update on the latest initiatives and developments, and look forward to what the future of sustainable remediation might look like. Specifically it will describe: Sustainable remediation frameworks: synergies and international collaboration; Latest guidance and tools developed by the various sustainable remediation organisations (SuRFs), including the SuRF-UK Best Management Practices and Tier 1 Briefcase; Best practice standard development by ASTM and ISO; Regulatory acceptance of sustainable remediation, including incorporation into legislation, and the NICOLE - Common Forum Joint statement on 'risk-informed and sustainable remediation' in Europe; Examples of corporate adoption of sustainable remediation principles. The presentation will conclude with a look forward to a vision of sustainable remediation in 2020.

  7. Generation of Large-Scale Winds in Horizontally Anisotropic Convection.

    PubMed

    von Hardenberg, J; Goluskin, D; Provenzale, A; Spiegel, E A

    2015-09-25

    We simulate three-dimensional, horizontally periodic Rayleigh-Bénard convection, confined between free-slip horizontal plates and rotating about a distant horizontal axis. When both the temperature difference between the plates and the rotation rate are sufficiently large, a strong horizontal wind is generated that is perpendicular to both the rotation vector and the gravity vector. The wind is turbulent, large-scale, and vertically sheared. Horizontal anisotropy, engendered here by rotation, appears necessary for such wind generation. Most of the kinetic energy of the flow resides in the wind, and the vertical turbulent heat flux is much lower on average than when there is no wind. PMID:26451558

  8. Horizontal coherence in the NPAL experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vera, Michael; Dzieciuch, Matthew

    2001-05-01

    Acoustic transmissions from a broadband source near Kauai with a center frequency of 75 Hz were recorded on a two-dimensional receiver array at a range of 3900 km as part of the North Pacific Acoustic Laboratory (NPAL) experiment. The receiver array consisted of five vertical line arrays (VLAs), with separations transverse to the propagation path ranging from a few hundred meters to a few kilometers. The coherences derived from the data have been compared to two different numerical predictions based on sound-speed perturbations due to internal waves. An approximation to the acoustic path integral yields a prediction for the length scale of horizontal coherence. Parabolic-equation simulations of propagation from the source to each VLA through multiple realizations of a random internal-wave field provide another estimate of the coherence at each horizontal separation. [Work supported by ONR.] a)J. A. Colosi, B. D. Cornuelle, B. D. Dushaw, M. A. Dzieciuch, B. M. Howe, J. A. Mercer, R. C. Spindel, and P. F. Worcester.

  9. Reservoir visualization for geosteering of horizontal wells

    SciTech Connect

    Bryant, I.D.; Baygun, B.; Frass, M.; Casco, R.

    1996-08-01

    Horizontal infill wells in the Lower Lagunillas reservoir of Bloque IV, Lake Maracaibo are being drilled in thin, oil-bearing zones that have been bypassed by gas. Steering the horizontal sections of these wells requires high resolution reservoir models that can be updated during drilling. An example from well VLD-1152 serves to illustrate how these models are generated and used. Resistivity images collected by wireline and logging-while-drilling (LWD) tools in the pilot well formed the basis of prejob, high resolution modeling of the formation properties. 3-D seismic data and data from an offset vertical seismic profile collected in the pilot well provided the structural model. During drilling information from cuttings and LWD tools was used to continuously update these models. After the well had been drilled, analysis of LWD resistivity images provided a detailed model of the relationship between the well trajectory and the dip of the formation. This information is used to improve interpretation of the LWD logs to provide a petrophysical evaluation of the well.

  10. Horizontal Air Bearing Experiment Number 1

    SciTech Connect

    Clauson, T.L.

    1999-08-31

    The Horizontal Air Bearing Experiment No.1 is a series of tests intended to further the understanding of rotational dynamics. A simple experimental assembly is rotated using the Horizontal Air Bearing and allowed to spin freely as the internal rotational damping is measured. The low friction of the bearing effectively isolates the test assembly, allowing the internal damping of the test object to be evaluated. The experimental assembly is composed of an aluminum ball within a spherical cavity. A flanged pipe section and an auxiliary adapter plate secure the assembly to the Air Bearing interface plate. Three aluminum balls are interchanged to vary test parameters. The aluminum balls are free to move independently as the entire assembly rotates. The aluminum balls vary in diameter and/or surface finish. While the diameter and surface finish is varied, the space between the ball and socket is dry. To examine the effect of viscosity, the space is filled with a lubricant while the ball diameter and surface finish is held constant.

  11. Sustainability and the health care manager: part I.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Bernardo; Oetjen, Reid M; Malvey, Donna

    2011-01-01

    Given the current operating climate, organizations are coming under pressure to develop and implement sustainability programs and projects, yet few managers truly understand what is meant by sustainability and its implications for managing organizations. This article examines the concept of sustainability and provides a broader definition of the term than going "green." Using a puzzle metaphor, the authors outline and explain the different components of sustainability and provide a checklist for achieving sustainability goals. In addition, resources such as guides and tools are reviewed and offered to assist managers in gaining more insight into the challenges and complexity of sustainability.

  12. Dairy washwater treatment using a horizontal flow biofilm system.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, M; de Paor, D; Clifford, E

    2008-01-01

    In Ireland, dairy farmyard washwater commonly comprises farmyard run-off and dairy parlour washings. Land-spreading is the most widely used method for treating this wastewater. However, this method can be labour intensive and can cause, in some cases, the degradation of surface and ground waters, mainly due to nitrogen contamination. In this study, a horizontal flow biofilm reactor (HFBR) with step-feed was constructed and tested in the laboratory, to remove organic carbon and nitrogen from a agricultural strength synthetic washwater (SWW). The HFBR had an average top plan surface area (TPSA) of 0.1002 m(2) and consisted of a stack of 45 polystyrene horizontal sheets--15 sheets embedded with 25 mm deep frustums above 30 sheets with 10 mm deep frustums. The frustums acted as miniature reservoirs. The sheets were alternately offset to allow the wastewater to flow horizontally along each sheet and vertically from sheet to sheet down through the reactor. Biofilms developed on the sheets and treated the wastewater. During the 212-d study, the total hydraulic loading rate based on the TPSA of the sheets was 35 l m(-2) d(-1). SWW was pumped for 10 min each hour, in a step feed arrangement at a rate of 23.33 l m(-2) d(-1) on to the top sheet during Phases 1 and 2, and 11.67 l m(-2) d(-1) onto Sheet 16 during Phase 1 (days 1-92) and onto Sheet 30 during Phase 2 (days 93-212). The substrate loading rate during Phases 1 and 2 was 94.8 g total chemical oxygen demand (COD) m(-2) d(-1) and 10.5 g total nitrogen (TN) m(-2) d(-1), based on the TPSA. At steady state in Phase 2, the unit achieved excellent carbon removal of 99.7% 5-day biochemical oxygen demand (BOD(5)) and 96.7% total COD, equivalent to TPSA removal rates of 67.5 g BOD(5)m(-2)d(-1) and 91.7 g COD m(-2) d(-1). The nitrogen removal percentages were 98.3% total ammonium-nitrogen (NH(4)-N(t)) and 72.8% TN, which equated to TPSA removal rates of 4.8 g NH(4)-N(t) m(-2) d(-1) and 7.6g TN m(-2) d(-1). No sloughing of

  13. Sustaining Writing Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patrick, Amy M.

    2010-01-01

    This article examines ways in which the fundamentals of both writing studies and sustainability studies overlap and complement each other, ultimately moving toward a theory of writing that not only is sustainable, but that also sustains writing practice across a variety of areas. For example, in order to be sustainable, both writing and…

  14. 2010 Campus Sustainability Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    With this review of campus sustainability efforts in 2010, the editors aim to give readers--those who are often immersed in the day-to-day particulars of sustainability efforts--the same chance to take a step back and take a broader look at where they stand with sustainability in higher education. This inaugural 2010 Campus Sustainability Review…

  15. SUSTAINABILITY AND COMPLEX SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The important question in sustainability is not whether the world is sustainable, but whether a humanly acceptable regime of the world is sustainable. World commission on environment and development defines sustainability as ‘development that meets the needs of the present withou...

  16. Designing sustainable acute hospitals.

    PubMed

    Cory, Alistair

    2008-01-01

    The need to provide sustainable hospitals lies in the fact that we have an obligation to act responsibly towards good stewardship of our environment and the world's precious resources, ensuring a healthy future for coming generations. As such, a sustainable hospital must sit squarely in a sustainable society, and the global and local context should be considered when designing a sustainable health facility.

  17. Organizing for Sustainability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, William M.; Hamburger, Michael W.

    2012-01-01

    A successful campus sustainability effort catalyzes broad engagement of the campus community and integration of sustainability principles into the academic and operational components of campus life. Although many universities have embraced sustainability as a new core value, others have been more sluggish in adopting sustainability principles to…

  18. Focus on sustainability.

    PubMed

    Thompson, R J; Godiksen, L; Hansen, G; Gustafson, D J; Brinkerhoff, D W; Ingle, M D; Rounds, T; Wing, H

    1990-01-01

    In recent years, sustainability has become one of the most critical concepts in international development and is having a dramatic impact on the way development is conceptualized and carried out. The US Agency for International Development (USAID) is incorporating this concept into its programs and projects. Factors encouraging sustainability of projects and programs include host government policies that support or constrain program objectives, national and/or local commitment to project goals, managerial leadership that helps shape improved policies, collaboration at all staff levels in program management, financial resources that cover program operational costs, appropriate program technology, integration of the program with the social and cultural setting of the country, community involvement in the program, sound environmental management, technical assistance oriented to transferring skills and increasing institutional capacity, perception by the host country that the project is "effective," training provided by the project to transfer skill needed for capacity-building, integration of the program into existing institutional framework, and external political, economic and environmental factors. Impediments to sustainability are often inherent in the donor agency's programming process. This includes the implicit assumption that program objectives can be accomplished in a relatively short time frame, when in fact capacity-building requires a lengthy commitment. USAID professionals are pressured to show near-term results which emphasize outputs rather than purpose and goal-level accomplishments achievable only after extensive effort. The emphasis on obligating money and on the project paper as a sales document leads project designers to talk with a great deal more certainty about project results than is warranted by the complex development situation. Uncertainty and flexibility should be designed into projects so activities and objects can change as more

  19. General Achievement Trends: Oklahoma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  20. General Achievement Trends: Georgia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  1. General Achievement Trends: Nebraska

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  2. General Achievement Trends: Arkansas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  3. General Achievement Trends: Maryland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  4. General Achievement Trends: Maine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  5. General Achievement Trends: Iowa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  6. General Achievement Trends: Texas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  7. General Achievement Trends: Hawaii

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  8. General Achievement Trends: Kansas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  9. General Achievement Trends: Florida

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  10. General Achievement Trends: Massachusetts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  11. General Achievement Trends: Tennessee

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  12. General Achievement Trends: Alabama

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  13. General Achievement Trends: Virginia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  14. General Achievement Trends: Michigan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  15. General Achievement Trends: Colorado

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This general achievement trends profile includes information that the Center on Education Policy (CEP) and the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) obtained from states from fall 2008 through April 2009. Included herein are: (1) Bullet points summarizing key findings about achievement trends in that state at three performance…

  16. Inverting the Achievement Pyramid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White-Hood, Marian; Shindel, Melissa

    2006-01-01

    Attempting to invert the pyramid to improve student achievement and increase all students' chances for success is not a new endeavor. For decades, educators have strategized, formed think tanks, and developed school improvement teams to find better ways to improve the achievement of all students. Currently, the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) is…

  17. Achievement Test Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Dept. of Education, Columbus. Trade and Industrial Education Service.

    The Ohio Trade and Industrial Education Achievement Test battery is comprised of seven basic achievement tests: Machine Trades, Automotive Mechanics, Basic Electricity, Basic Electronics, Mechanical Drafting, Printing, and Sheet Metal. The tests were developed by subject matter committees and specialists in testing and research. The Ohio Trade and…

  18. School Effects on Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nichols, Robert C.

    The New York State Education Department conducts a Pupil Evaluation Program (PEP) in which each year all third, sixth, and ninth grade students in the state are given a series of achievement tests in reading and mathematics. The data accumulated by the department includes achievement test scores, teacher characteristics, building and curriculum…

  19. Heritability of Creative Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piffer, Davide; Hur, Yoon-Mi

    2014-01-01

    Although creative achievement is a subject of much attention to lay people, the origin of individual differences in creative accomplishments remain poorly understood. This study examined genetic and environmental influences on creative achievement in an adult sample of 338 twins (mean age = 26.3 years; SD = 6.6 years). Twins completed the Creative…

  20. Confronting the Achievement Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, David

    2007-01-01

    This article talks about the large achievement gap between children of color and their white peers. The reasons for the achievement gap are varied. First, many urban minorities come from a background of poverty. One of the detrimental effects of growing up in poverty is receiving inadequate nourishment at a time when bodies and brains are rapidly…

  1. Achieving Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abowitz, Kathleen Knight

    2011-01-01

    Public schools are functionally provided through structural arrangements such as government funding, but public schools are achieved in substance, in part, through local governance. In this essay, Kathleen Knight Abowitz explains the bifocal nature of achieving public schools; that is, that schools are both subject to the unitary Public compact of…

  2. Achieving permanency for LGBTQ youth.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Jill; Freundlich, Madelyn

    2006-01-01

    This article brings together two significant efforts in the child welfare field: achieving permanence for youth in out-of-home care and meeting the needs of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and questioning (LGBTQ) youth. During the past several years, a national movement has taken place to assure all children and youth have a permanent family connection before leaving the child welfare system; however, LGBTQ youth are not routinely included in the permanency discussions. At the same time, efforts in addressing the needs of LGBTQ youth have increased, but permanency is rarely mentioned as a need. This article offers models of permanence and practices to facilitate permanence with LGBTQ youth and their families. It also offers a youth-driven, individualized process, using youth development principles to achieve relational, physical, and legal permanence. Reunification efforts are discussed, including services, supports, and education required for youth to return to their family of origin. For those who cannot return home, other family resources are explored. The article also discusses cultural issues as they affect permanence for LGBTQ youth, and, finally, addresses the need for ongoing support services to sustain and support permanency.

  3. Horizontal Gene Transfer, Dispersal and Haloarchaeal Speciation

    PubMed Central

    Papke, R. Thane; Corral, Paulina; Ram-Mohan, Nikhil; de la Haba, Rafael R.; Sánchez-Porro, Cristina; Makkay, Andrea; Ventosa, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The Halobacteria are a well-studied archaeal class and numerous investigations are showing how their diversity is distributed amongst genomes and geographic locations. Evidence indicates that recombination between species continuously facilitates the arrival of new genes, and within species, it is frequent enough to spread acquired genes amongst all individuals in the population. To create permanent independent diversity and generate new species, barriers to recombination are probably required. The data support an interpretation that rates of evolution (e.g., horizontal gene transfer and mutation) are faster at creating geographically localized variation than dispersal and invasion are at homogenizing genetic differences between locations. Therefore, we suggest that recurrent episodes of dispersal followed by variable periods of endemism break the homogenizing forces of intrapopulation recombination and that this process might be the principal stimulus leading to divergence and speciation in Halobacteria. PMID:25997110

  4. Passive magnetic bearing for a horizontal shaft

    DOEpatents

    Post, Richard F.

    2003-12-02

    A passive magnetic bearing is composed of a levitation element and a restorative element. The levitation element is composed of a pair of stationary arcuate ferromagnetic segments located within an annular radial-field magnet array. The magnet array is attached to the inner circumference of a hollow shaft end. An attractive force between the arcuate segments and the magnet array acts vertically to levitate the shaft, and also in a horizontal transverse direction to center the shaft. The restorative element is comprised of an annular Halbach array of magnets and a stationary annular circuit array located within the Halbach array. The Halbach array is attached to the inner circumference of the hollow shaft end. A repulsive force between the Halbach array and the circuit array increases inversely to the radial space between them, and thus acts to restore the shaft to its equilibrium axis of rotation when it is displaced therefrom.

  5. Conjugate natural convection between horizontal eccentric cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasiri, Davood; Dehghan, Ali Akbar; Hadian, Mohammad Reza

    2016-06-01

    This study involved the numerical investigation of conjugate natural convection between two horizontal eccentric cylinders. Both cylinders were considered to be isothermal with only the inner cylinder having a finite wall thickness. The momentum and energy equations were discretized using finite volume method and solved by employing SIMPLER algorithm. Numerical results were presented for various solid-fluid conductivity ratios (KR) and various values of eccentricities in different thickness of inner cylinder wall and also for different angular positions of inner cylinder. From the results, it was observed that in an eccentric case, and for KR < 10, an increase in thickness of inner cylinder wall resulted in a decrease in the average equivalent conductivity coefficient (overline{{K_{eq} }} ); however, a KR > 10 value caused an increase in overline{{K_{eq} }} . It was also concluded that in any angular position of inner cylinder, the value of overline{{K_{eq} }} increased with increase in the eccentricity.

  6. Horizontal Drop of 21- PWR Waste Package

    SciTech Connect

    A.K. Scheider

    2007-01-31

    The objective of this calculation is to determine the structural response of the waste package (WP) dropped horizontally from a specified height. The WP used for that purpose is the 21-Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) WP. The scope of this document is limited to reporting the calculation results in-terms of stress intensities. This calculation is associated with the WP design and was performed by the Waste Package Design group in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for: Waste Package Design Description for LA'' (Ref. 16). AP-3.12Q, ''Calculations'' (Ref. 1 1) is used to perform the calculation and develop the document. The sketches attached to this calculation provide the potential dimensions and materials for the 21-PWR WP design.

  7. Horizontal Gene Exchange in Environmental Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Aminov, Rustam I.

    2011-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) plays an important role in the evolution of life on the Earth. This view is supported by numerous occasions of HGT that are recorded in the genomes of all three domains of living organisms. HGT-mediated rapid evolution is especially noticeable among the Bacteria, which demonstrate formidable adaptability in the face of recent environmental changes imposed by human activities, such as the use of antibiotics, industrial contamination, and intensive agriculture. At the heart of the HGT-driven bacterial evolution and adaptation are highly sophisticated natural genetic engineering tools in the form of a variety of mobile genetic elements (MGEs). The main aim of this review is to give a brief account of the occurrence and diversity of MGEs in natural ecosystems and of the environmental factors that may affect MGE-mediated HGT. PMID:21845185

  8. Method for horizontally growing ribbon crystal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kudo, B.

    1980-01-01

    A high speed method for forming ribbon crystal of desired width and thickness is characterized by drawing out the ribbon through a space whose distance is 5.7 times that of the thickness of the grown ribbon. The ribbon is drawn out between the molten body of the lower surface and the tip of the upper surface of the seed crystal and growing crystal. The ribbon growing at the tip of the seed crystal is drawn out horizontally and centrifugally by controlling the amount of cooling and heating. The temperature is maintained about equal to the upper surface of the outlets from which the molten substance is drawn, at least in certain portions of the crucible rim, the rim is elevated to prevent dropping of the molten raw material.

  9. Horizontal gene transfer, dispersal and haloarchaeal speciation.

    PubMed

    Papke, R Thane; Corral, Paulina; Ram-Mohan, Nikhil; Haba, Rafael R de la; Sánchez-Porro, Cristina; Makkay, Andrea; Ventosa, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The Halobacteria are a well-studied archaeal class and numerous investigations are showing how their diversity is distributed amongst genomes and geographic locations. Evidence indicates that recombination between species continuously facilitates the arrival of new genes, and within species, it is frequent enough to spread acquired genes amongst all individuals in the population. To create permanent independent diversity and generate new species, barriers to recombination are probably required. The data support an interpretation that rates of evolution (e.g., horizontal gene transfer and mutation) are faster at creating geographically localized variation than dispersal and invasion are at homogenizing genetic differences between locations. Therefore, we suggest that recurrent episodes of dispersal followed by variable periods of endemism break the homogenizing forces of intrapopulation recombination and that this process might be the principal stimulus leading to divergence and speciation in Halobacteria. PMID:25997110

  10. Large, horizontal-axis wind turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linscott, B. S.; Perkins, P.; Dennett, J. T.

    1984-01-01

    Development of the technology for safe, reliable, environmentally acceptable large wind turbines that have the potential to generate a significant amount of electricity at costs competitive with conventional electric generating systems are presented. In addition, these large wind turbines must be fully compatible with electric utility operations and interface requirements. There are several ongoing large wind system development projects and applied research efforts directed toward meeting the technology requirements for utility applications. Detailed information on these projects is provided. The Mod-O research facility and current applied research effort in aerodynamics, structural dynamics and aeroelasticity, composite and hybrid composite materials, and multiple system interaction are described. A chronology of component research and technology development for large, horizontal axis wind turbines is presented. Wind characteristics, wind turbine economics, and the impact of wind turbines on the environment are reported. The need for continued wind turbine research and technology development is explored. Over 40 references are sited and a bibliography is included.

  11. Horizontal Hostility among Non-Meat Eaters

    PubMed Central

    Rothgerber, Hank

    2014-01-01

    The present study examined intergroup judgments made between four groups of non-meat eaters: health vegetarians; ethical vegetarians; health vegans, and ethical vegans. Consistent with hypotheses based on horizontal hostility and the need to maintain ingroup distinctiveness, ethical vegetarians gave unfavorable evaluations to health vegetarians relative to vegans, especially when the mainstream omnivore group was made salient. Contrary to expectations, vegans gave relatively more favorable evaluations to ethical vegetarians than health vegetarians when mainstream salience was low. This was especially true for vegans who were motivated primarily by ethical concerns. When mainstream salience was high, vegans did not distinguish between the vegetarian subgroups. Results suggest that one’s motives for abstaining from meat often play a larger role in this type of intergroup perceptions than one’s dietary practices. PMID:24809342

  12. Horizontal gene transfer: A critical view

    PubMed Central

    Kurland, C. G.; Canback, B.; Berg, Otto G.

    2003-01-01

    It has been suggested that horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is the “essence of phylogeny.” In contrast, much data suggest that this is an exaggeration resulting in part from a reliance on inadequate methods to identify HGT events. In addition, the assumption that HGT is a ubiquitous influence throughout evolution is questionable. Instead, rampant global HGT is likely to have been relevant only to primitive genomes. In modern organisms we suggest that both the range and frequencies of HGT are constrained most often by selective barriers. As a consequence those HGT events that do occur most often have little influence on genome phylogeny. Although HGT does occur with important evolutionary consequences, classical Darwinian lineages seem to be the dominant mode of evolution for modern organisms. PMID:12902542

  13. An assay for determining minimal concentrations of antibiotics that drive horizontal transfer of resistance.

    PubMed

    Jutkina, Jekaterina; Rutgersson, Carolin; Flach, Carl-Fredrik; Larsson, D G Joakim

    2016-04-01

    Ability to understand the factors driving horizontal transfer of antibiotic resistance from unknown, harmless bacteria to pathogens is crucial in order to tackle the growing resistance problem. However, current methods to measure effects of stressors on horizontal gene transfer have limitations and often fall short, as the estimated endpoints can be a mix of both the number of transfer events and clonal growth of transconjugants. Our aim was therefore to achieve a proper strategy for assessing the minimal concentration of a stressor (exemplified by tetracycline) that drives horizontal transfer of antibiotic resistance from a complex community to a model pathogen. Conditions were optimized to improve a culture-based approach using the bacterial community of treated sewage effluent as donor, and fluorescent, traceable Escherichia coli as recipient. Reduced level of background resistance, differentiation of isolates as well as decreased risk for measuring effects of selection were achieved through the use of chromogenic medium, optimization of conjugation time as well as applying a different antibiotic for isolation of transconjugants than the one tested for its ability to drive transfer. Using this assay, we showed that a very low concentration of tetracycline, 10μg/L i.e. 150 times below the minimal inhibitory concentration of the recipient, promoted horizontal transfer of multiple antibiotic-resistance determinants. Higher concentrations favoured selection of a tetracycline-resistance phenotype along with a decline in the number of detectable transfer events. The described method can be used to evaluate different environmental conditions and factors that trigger horizontal dissemination of mobile resistance elements, eventually resulting in the formation of drug-resistant pathogens.

  14. Health and sustainability.

    PubMed

    Kjӕrgård, Bente; Land, Birgit; Bransholm Pedersen, Kirsten

    2014-09-01

    In the present article, we explore how sustainable development strategies and health promotion strategies can be bridged. The concept of the 'duality of structure' is taken as our starting point for understanding the linkages between health promotion and sustainable development, and for uncovering the structural properties or conditions which either enable or constrain sustainable public health initiatives. We argue that strategies towards health promotion are not sufficiently integrated with strategies for sustainable development, and thus political strategies aimed at solving health problems or sustainability problems may cause new, undesired and unforeseen environmental or health problems. First, we explore how the relation between health and sustainability is articulated in international policy documents. Next, we develop a model for understanding the relation between health promotion and sustainability. Third, we use examples from agriculture and food production to illustrate that health and sustainability are mutually enabling and constraining. We conclude that while the renewed focus on food security and food inequalities has brought the health and sustainability dimensions of the food system onto the political agenda, the conceptualization of duality between health and sustainability could be a new platform for a critical and theoretical stance towards the market-oriented food system strategy. Thinking along the lines of duality means that the integration of health promotion strategies and sustainable development strategies cannot be based on an approach to integration in which either health or sustainability is given precedence over the other. From a duality perspective, integration means conceiving sustainability from a health perspective and health from a sustainability perspective.

  15. Activity at work, innovation and sustainable development.

    PubMed

    Béguin, P; Duarte, F; Lima, F; Pueyo, V

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present and discuss a French-Brazilian project (CAPES-COFECUB) centered on the relations between sustainable development, innovation and changes in work activities that accompany these innovations for sustainable development. Sustainable development calls for an integrated approach of three dimensions: social equity, economic viability and environmental sustainability. In order to achieve this integration, considerable innovations efforts are required. However, the work, understood as a productive act, is deeply lacking in the current researches. Starting from the idea that work is a "fundamental need" the goal of this project is to propose innovative methods that can be used for designing production systems from the perspective of sustainable development. PMID:22316705

  16. Sustaining Rural Communities through Sustainable Agriculture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ikerd, John

    A 5-year collaborative project between Missouri, Michigan State, and Nebraska Universities to provide new opportunities for rural community self-development through sustainable agriculture had mixed results. This happened because community members did not understand the principles of sustainability, and because the extension education system was…

  17. The Road to Sustainability. Sustainability Workbook

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Afterschool Alliance, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Sustainability seems generally thought to mean raising money. But money is only part of the equation. Money cannot be raised without a quality program, a quality program demonstrates results, effective results are based on sound management practices, etc. Sustainability therefore, is many things that in combination make something capable of…

  18. Modeling Tourism Sustainable Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shcherbina, O. A.; Shembeleva, E. A.

    The basic approaches to decision making and modeling tourism sustainable development are reviewed. Dynamics of a sustainable development is considered in the Forrester's system dynamics. Multidimensionality of tourism sustainable development and multicriteria issues of sustainable development are analyzed. Decision Support Systems (DSS) and Spatial Decision Support Systems (SDSS) as an effective technique in examining and visualizing impacts of policies, sustainable tourism development strategies within an integrated and dynamic framework are discussed. Main modules that may be utilized for integrated modeling sustainable tourism development are proposed.

  19. An Urban Middle School Case Study of Mathematics Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paul, Cynthia S.; Vaidya, Sheila R.

    2014-01-01

    What does it take to change a school's mathematics achievement profile from low to one that is proficient and advanced? Is this transformed achievement profile sustainable? Such is the story presented here, in this three-phase case study of a K-8 urban charter school's mathematics program. The first phase discusses the school's…

  20. Did Tanzania Achieve the Second Millennium Development Goal? Statistical Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magoti, Edwin

    2016-01-01

    Development Goal "Achieve universal primary education", the challenges faced, along with the way forward towards achieving the fourth Sustainable Development Goal "Ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all". Statistics show that Tanzania has made very promising steps…

  1. Recovery of bypassed oil in the Dundee Formation using horizontal drains. Quarterly report, October 1 - December 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, J.R.

    1997-01-01

    The principal objective of this project is to demonstrate the feasibility and economic success of producing oil from abandoned or nearly abandoned fields in the Dundee Formation of Central Michigan using horizontal drilling technology. A site for a horizontal well was selected in Crystal Field, a nearly-abandoned Dundee oil field in Michigan. This field had produced over 8 million barrels of oil, mostly in the 1930`s and 1940`s. At the height of development, Crystal Field produced from 193 wells, but by 1995, only seven producing wells remained, each producing less than 10 bbls/day. A horizontal well was drilled as a field demonstration pilot, funded through this DOE project, and was successful. It has produced over 37,000 bbls of oil as of December 31, 1996 at sustained rate of {approximately}100 bbls/day. At a nominal wellhead price of $20/bbl, this well has made about $750,000 and is still going strong. Two additional horizontal wells have just been completed and are on test. Core and logs from the Dundee interval were recovered from a vertical borehole at the same surface location. The horizontal well was brought on production at a rate of 100 bbls/day and is probably capable of producing at a higher rate. The addition of several horizontal wells, similar to the demonstration well, will likely add another 2 million bbls (or more) to the cumulative production of the field over the next few years. The presence of untapped oil in this Dundee field was dramatically demonstrated and the favorable economics were made clearly evident. If other abandoned Dundee fields are re-developed in a similar manner, the additional oil produced could exceed 80 million barrels. Horizontal drilling will likely revolutionize the development of old carbonate fields such as those in the Dundee of Michigan.

  2. Student Achievement and Motivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flammer, Gordon H.; Mecham, Robert C.

    1974-01-01

    Compares the lecture and self-paced methods of instruction on the basis of student motivation and achieveme nt, comparing motivating and demotivating factors in each, and their potential for motivation and achievement. (Authors/JR)

  3. Three-dimensional spatial cognition: information in the vertical dimension overrides information from the horizontal.

    PubMed

    Holbrook, Robert I; Burt de Perera, Theresa

    2011-07-01

    Fish live in three-dimensional environments, through which they swim with three translational and three rotational degrees of freedom. Navigating through such environments is recognised as a difficult problem, yet fish, and other animals that swim and fly, achieve this regularly. Despite this, the vast majority of research has considered how animals navigate horizontally from place to place and has ignored the vertical component. Here, we test the importance of the vertical axis of space for fish solving a three-dimensional spatial cognition task. We trained banded tetras (Astyanax fasciatus) to learn the route towards a goal in a rotating Y-maze in which the arms led either up and left or down and right in an environment that allowed access to visual landmarks providing horizontal and vertical information. Our results revealed that the landmarks increased navigational efficiency during training. However, these landmarks were ignored when the horizontal and vertical components were placed in conflict with each other by rotating the maze 90° during testing. From this surprising result, we conclude that the cues that are present in the vertical axis (presumably hydrostatic pressure) override landmark cues that have been shown to be salient in experiments that only consider the horizontal component of space.

  4. Using Sustainable Development as a Competitive Strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spearman, Pat

    Sustainable development reduces construction waste by 43%, generating 50% cost savings. Residential construction executives lacking adequate knowledge regarding the benefits of sustainable development practices are at a competitive disadvantage. Drawing from the diffusion of innovation theory, the purpose of this qualitative case study was to explore knowledge acquisition within the bounds of sustainable residential construction. The purposive sample size of 11 executive decision makers fulfilled the sample size requirements and enabled the extraction of meaningful data. Participants were members of the National Home Builders Association and had experience of a minimum of 5 years in residential construction. The research question addressed how to improve knowledge acquisition relating to the cost benefits of building green homes and increase the adoption rate of sustainable development among residential builders. Data were collected via semistructured telephone interviews, field observation, and document analysis. Transcribed data were validated via respondent validation, coded into 5 initial categories aligned to the focus of the research, then reduced to 3 interlocking themes of environment, competitive advantage, and marketing. Recommendations include developing comprehensive public policies, horizontal and vertical communications networks, and green banks to capitalize sustainable development programs to improve the diffusion of green innovation as a competitive advantage strategy. Business leaders could benefit from this data by integrating sustainable development practices into their business processes. Sustainable development reduces operational costs, increases competitive advantage for builders, and reduces greenhouse gas emissions. Implications for social change increase energy independence through conservation and developing a legislative policy template for comprehensive energy strategies. A comprehensive energy strategy promotes economic development

  5. Sustaining Cyberinfrastructure Interoperabililty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, R. W.; Rajasekar, A.

    2015-12-01

    The National Science Foundation has initiated multiple cyberinfrastructure projects through the DataNet Parters, Data Infrastructure Building Blocks, Big Data Hubs, EarthCube, and XSEDE programs. Each project builds a component of cyberinfrastructure, such as collaboration environments, repositories, archives, union catalogs, or data manipulation services. The DataNet Federation Consortium (DFC) (datafed.org) has explored the types of interoperability mechanisms that are needed to build research collaboration environments that span the multiple NSF projects. Based on collaborations with each group, three basic mechanisms have proven to be sufficient: 1) Strong Federation: Tightly coupled federations in which shared name spaces are used for users and files along with communications based on well-defined protocols and API interfaces. Trust relationships based on policies play a major role in this federation. 2) Soft Federation: Loosly coupled federation where one system invokes remote services offered by another using service level communications. No name spaces are shared in such a federation. This type of federation is useful when well-defined services are available remotely on the internet. 3) Asynchronous Federation: Weakly coupled federation in which no direct interaction occurs between the systems. This level of federation is very extensible and flexible. Long-term sustainability can be achieved when the interoperability mechanisms enable interaction between old and new technologies - with the interactions being flexible or rigid depending upon the strength of trust needed between the systems. Sustaining cyberinfrastructure interoperability becomes feasible when the mechanisms enable the capture of the knowledge needed for interaction, without requiring changes to either sets of infrastructure. The DFC project has implemented all three types of federation to link services and systems based on the needs of the users.

  6. Demonstration of a utility industry horizontal drilling system: Horizontal well AMH-5 installation report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    The Department of Energy`s Office of Technology Development initiated an integrated demonstration of innovative technologies and systems for cleanup of VOCs in soils and groundwater at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in 1989. The overall goal of the program is demonstration of multiple technologies and systems in the fields of drilling, characterization, monitoring, and remediation at a single test bed. Innovative technologies are compared to one another and to baseline technologies in terms of technical performance and cost effectiveness. Transfer of successfully demonstrated technologies and systems to DOE environmental restoration organizations, to other government agencies, and to industry is a critical part of the program. Directional drilling has been shown to be a successful technique for enhancing access to the subsurface, thus improving remediation systems, especially remediation systems which perform in situ. Demonstration of an innovative directional drilling system at the Integrated Demonstration Site at the SRS, was initiated in June of 1992. The directional drilling system was designed to install an in situ remediation system. The drilling system is an experimental compaction/dry drilling technique developed by Charles Machine Works (Ditch Witch{reg_sign}) of Perry, Oklahoma. A horizontal well was installed in the M Area of the SRS below and parallel to an abandoned tile process sewer line. The installation of the horizontal well was a two-part process. Part one consisted of drilling the borehole, and part two was the horizontal well completion.

  7. Exploring the Ambiguity: What Faculty Leaders Really Think of Sustainability in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Tarah; Horst, Naomi

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine how a cohort of university faculty leaders in Canadian universities conceptualize sustainable development, sustainable universities, the role universities play in achieving a sustainable future, key issues facing the university, and the barriers to implementing sustainability initiatives on campus.…

  8. New solutions for the confined horizontal aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akylas, Evangelos; Gravanis, Elias

    2016-04-01

    The Boussinesq equation is a dynamical equation for the free surface of saturated subsurface flows over an impervious bed. Boussinesq equation is non-linear. The non-linearity comes from the reduction of the dimensionality of the problem: The flow is assumed to be vertically homogeneous, therefore the flow rate through a cross section of the flow is proportional to the free surface height times the hydraulic gradient, which is assumed to be equal to the slope of the free surface. In the present work we consider the case of the subsurface flow with horizontal bed. This is a case with an infinite Henderson and Wooding parameter, that is, it is the limiting case where the non-linear term is present in the Boussinesq equation while the linear spatial derivative term vanishes. Nonetheless, no analogue of the kinematic wave exists in this case as there is no exact solution for the build-up phase. Neither is there an exact recession-phase solution that holds in early times, as the Boussinesq separable solution is actually an asymptotic solution for large times. We construct approximate solutions for the horizontal aquifer which utilize directly the dynamical content of the non-linear Boussinesq equation. The approximate character of the solution lies in the fact that we start with a pre-supposed form for the solution, an educated guess, based on the nature of the initial condition as well as empirical observations from the numerical solution of the problem. The forms we shall use are power series of the location variable x along the bed with time-dependent coefficients. The series are not necessarily analytic. The boundary conditions are incorporated in the structure of the series from the beginning. The time-dependent coefficients are then determined by applying the Boussinesq equation and its spatial derivatives at the end-points of the aquifer. The forms are chosen also on the basis of their solubility; we would like to be able to construct explicitly the approximate

  9. FORUM: Is Ecotourism Sustainable?

    PubMed

    Wall

    1997-07-01

    / It is legitimate to ask whether and in what form tourism might contribute to sustainable development. This is not the same as sustainable tourism which, as a single-sector approach to development, may overlook important linkages with other sectors. If tourism is to contribute to sustainable development, then it must be economically viable, ecologically sensitive and culturally appropriate. Ecotourism is often advocated as being a sustainable form of tourism but imprecision in terminology clouds basic issues and there are strong economic, ecological, and cultural reasons for believing that, even in its purest forms, ecotourism is likely to present substantial challenges to destination areas, particularly if it competes for scarce resources and displaces existing uses and users. Sustainable tourism and ecotourism are not synonyms, many forms of ecotourism may not be sustainable, and if ecotourism is to contribute to sustainable development, then careful planning and management will be required.KEY WORDS: Ecotourism; Sustainable development; Development; Tourism PMID:9175538

  10. Sustainability Indicators and Metrics

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sustainability is about preserving human existence. Indicators and metrics are absolutely necessary to provide at least a semi-quantitative assessment of progress towards or away from sustainability. Otherwise, it becomes impossible to objectively assess whether progress is bei...

  11. FORUM: Is Ecotourism Sustainable?

    PubMed

    Wall

    1997-07-01

    / It is legitimate to ask whether and in what form tourism might contribute to sustainable development. This is not the same as sustainable tourism which, as a single-sector approach to development, may overlook important linkages with other sectors. If tourism is to contribute to sustainable development, then it must be economically viable, ecologically sensitive and culturally appropriate. Ecotourism is often advocated as being a sustainable form of tourism but imprecision in terminology clouds basic issues and there are strong economic, ecological, and cultural reasons for believing that, even in its purest forms, ecotourism is likely to present substantial challenges to destination areas, particularly if it competes for scarce resources and displaces existing uses and users. Sustainable tourism and ecotourism are not synonyms, many forms of ecotourism may not be sustainable, and if ecotourism is to contribute to sustainable development, then careful planning and management will be required.KEY WORDS: Ecotourism; Sustainable development; Development; Tourism

  12. Urban climate, weather and sustainability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Gerald

    As concentrated areas of human activities, urban areas and urbanization are key drivers of global environmental change and pose a challenge to the achievement of sustainability. One of the key goals of sustainable development is to separate increases in non-renewable resource use (particularly fossil fuels) from economic growth. This is to be accomplished by modifying individual practices, encouraging technological innovation and redesigning systems of production and consumption. Settlements represent a scale at which significant advances on each of these can be made and where there is an existing management structure. However, urban areas currently consume a disproportionate share of the Earth's resources and urbanization has modified local climate and weather significantly, usually to the detriment of urban dwellers. There is now a lengthy history of urban climate study that links existing settlement form to climatic consequences yet, there is little evidence that climate information is incorporated into urban designs or that the climatic impact of different plans is considered. Consequently, opportunities for planning sustainable urban forms that are suitable to local climates and promote energy conservation and healthy atmospheres are not taken and much effort is later expended in `fixing' problems that emerge. This paper will outline the links between urban climate and sustainability, identify gaps in our urban climate knowledge and discuss the opportunities and barriers to the application of this knowledge to urban design and planning.

  13. Social sustainability and collaborative learning.

    PubMed

    Källström, Helena Nordström; Ljung, Magnus

    2005-06-01

    The social dimension is central to sustainable development of agri-food systems. If farmers are not satisfied with their situation or motivated to continue farming, many of today's environmental goals will be impossible to achieve. Between 1997 and 2003, several case studies were carried out on social sustainability, the importance of recognition in the farming system, and the potential role of increased collaboration between actors. The main hypothesis was that improved recognition is a basis for sustainable social conditions. Our findings show that many farmers today perceive an impoverished social situation. They believe they lack control over decisions, which hinders their ability to continue farming. Public images and political decisions show a lack of respect for farmers' skills and knowledge. However, increased collaboration among actors is believed to be one important way forward, creating stronger relationships and networks, as well as a stronger identity for farmers. Our findings emphasize the need for authorities and other organizations to support farmers and to facilitate collaborative learning and decision-making processes for socioecological sustainability.

  14. Horizontal gene transfer of stress resistance genes through plasmid transport.

    PubMed

    Shoeb, Erum; Badar, Uzma; Akhter, Jameela; Shams, Hina; Sultana, Maria; Ansari, Maqsood A

    2012-03-01

    The horizontal gene transfer of plasmid-determined stress tolerance was achieved under lab conditions. Bacterial isolates, Enterobacter cloacae (DGE50) and Escherichia coli (DGE57) were used throughout the study. Samples were collected from contaminated marine water and soil to isolate bacterial strains having tolerance against heavy metals and antimicrobial agents. We have demonstrated plasmid transfer, from Amp(+)Cu(+)Zn(-) strain (DGE50) to Amp(-)Cu(-)Zn(+) strain (DGE57), producing Amp(+)Cu(+)Zn(+) transconjugants (DGE(TC50→57)) and Amp(+)Cu(-)Zn(+) transformants (DGE(TF50→57)). DGE57 did not carry any plasmid, therefore, it can be speculated that zinc tolerance gene in DGE57 is located on chromosome. DGE50 was found to carry three plasmids, out of which two were transferred through conjugation into DGE57, and only one was transferred through transformation. Plasmid transferred through transformation was one out of the two transferred through conjugation. Through the results of transformation it was revealed that the genes of copper and ampicillin tolerance in DGE50 were located on separate plasmids, since only ampicillin tolerance genes were transferred through transformation as a result of one plasmid transfer. By showing transfer of plasmids under lab conditions and monitoring retention of respective phenotype via conjugation and transformation, it is very well demonstrated how multiple stress tolerant strains are generated in nature. PMID:22805823

  15. Running with horizontal pulling forces: the benefits of towing.

    PubMed

    Grabowski, Alena M; Kram, Rodger

    2008-10-01

    Towing, or running with a horizontal pulling force, is a common technique used by adventure racing teams. During an adventure race, the slowest person on a team determines the team's overall performance. To improve overall performance, a faster runner tows a slower runner with an elastic cord attached to their waists. Our purpose was to create and validate a model that predicts the optimal towing force needed by two runners to achieve their best overall performance. We modeled the effects of towing forces between two runners that differ in solo 10-km performance time and/or body mass. We calculated the overall time that could be saved with towing for running distances of 10, 20, and 42.2-km based on equations from previous research. Then, we empirically tested our 10-km model on 15 runners. Towing improved overall running performance considerably and our model accurately predicted this performance improvement. For example, if two runners (a 70 kg runner with a 35 min solo 10-km time and a 70-kg runner with a 50-min solo 10-km time) maintain an optimal towing force throughout a 10-km race, they can improve overall performance by 15%, saving almost 8 min. Ultimately, the race performance time and body mass of each runner determine the optimal towing force.

  16. Heat Transfer from a Horizontal Cylinder Rotating in Oil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seban, R. A.; Johnson, H. A.

    1959-01-01

    Measurements of the heat transfer from a horizontal cylinder rotating about its axis have been made with oil as the surrounding fluid to provide an addition to the heat-transfer results for this system heretofore available only for air. The results embrace a Prandtl number range from about 130 to 660, with Reynolds numbers up to 3 x 10(exp 4), and show an increasing dependence of free-convection heat transfer on rotation as the Prandtl number is increased by reducing the oil temperature. Some correlation of this effect, which agrees with the prior results for air, has been achieved. At higher rotative speeds the flow becomes turbulent, the free- convection effect vanishes, and the results with oil can be correlated generally with those for air and with mass-transfer results for even higher Prandtl numbers. For this system, however, the analogy calculations which have successfully related the heat transfer to the friction for pipe flows at high Prandtl numbers fail.

  17. Results from the first ARM diffuse horizontal shortwave irradiance comparison

    SciTech Connect

    Michalsky, J J.; Dolce, R; Dutton, E. G.; Haeffelin, Martial; Major, G; Schlemmer, J A.; Slater, Donald W. ); Hickey, J R.; Jeffries, W Q.; Los, A; Mathias, D; McArthur, LJ B.; Philipona, R; Reda, I; Stoffel, T

    2003-02-07

    The first intensive observation period (IOP) dedicated exclusively to the measurement of diffuse horizontal shortwave irradiance was held in the Fall 2001 at the central facility of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site with the cooperation of the Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN) community. Fourteen simultaneous measurements were obtained over a two-week period under mostly clear skies with low to moderate aerosol loading. Overcast data were obtained during the morning of one day. The purpose of the comparison was to assess the level of agreement in diffuse irradiance measurements among most commercial pyranometers and a few prototypes calibrated independently using current practices. The hope was to achieve a consensus for this measurement with the goal of improving the uncertainty of shortwave diffuse irradiance measurements. All diffuse broadband measurements were made using the same type of two-axis tracker with the direct beam blocked by shading balls. Tracking was very good during the IOP with no outages associated with tracker problems. Five of the measurements are reproducible to about 2 W/m2 at the 95% confidence level. Four more agree with the most consistent group to about 4 W/m2 at the 95% confidence level after correction for thermal offsets. The prototypes agree less well with the most consistent group.

  18. Transferring Education for Sustainability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gafoor, Kunnathodi Abdul; Umer Farooque, T. K.

    2013-01-01

    Sustainability stands for sustaining the past, meeting needs of the present without compromising the ability to meet future needs. It should meet the individual and social needs, present and future needs local and global needs. A sustainable education that meets this requirements surely be a transferable education; an education that transfers from…

  19. Sustainable Learning Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Velazquez, Luis E.; Esquer, Javier; Munguia, Nora E.; Moure-Eraso, Rafael

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to debate how companies may better become a sustainable learning organization by offering the most used and insightful concepts of sustainability. Design/methodology/approach: Through literature review, learning organization and sustainability perspectives are explored and compared. Findings: Learning…

  20. Custodial Operations: Green & Sustainable

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, J. Kirk

    2008-01-01

    Custodial Operations can have a significant impact on institutional green and sustainable goals if given the proper support and challenge. This article describes the green and sustainable custodial operations in place at Carleton College in Northfield, Minnesota. The article reviews the college's sustainable efforts on biodegradables, packaging,…

  1. Sustainability Statement and Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Education for Sustainable Development, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This article presents nine resources that focus on environmental education and sustainability. These include: (1) "Sustainability Statement and Policy," Dalhousie University, Nova Scotia, Canada, 2009, which is available at http://office.sustainability.dal.ca/Governance; (2) "Climate Literacy: The Essential Principles of Climate Sciences,"…

  2. Measuring Educational Sustainability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selvanathan, Rani G.

    2013-01-01

    There are many definitions that are attributable to the meaning of sustainability. Sustainability can be viewed as long-lasting, effective result of a project, venture, action, or investment without consuming additional future resources. Because of the wide nature of its applicability, a universal measure of sustainability is hard to come by. This…

  3. Shallow water model for horizontal centrifugal casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boháček, J.; Kharicha, A.; Ludwig, A.; Wu, M.

    2012-07-01

    A numerical model was proposed to simulate the solidification process of an outer shell of work roll made by the horizontal centrifugal casting technique. Shallow water model was adopted to solve the 2D average flow dynamics of melt spreading and the average temperature distribution inside the centrifugal casting mould by considering the centrifugal force, Coriolis force, viscous force due to zero velocity on the mould wall, gravity, and energy transport by the flow. Additionally, a 1D sub-model was implemented to consider the heat transfer in the radial direction from the solidifying shell to the mould. The solidification front was tracked by fulfilling the Stefan condition. Radiative and convective heat losses were included from both, the free liquid surface and the outer wall of the mould. Several cases were simulated with the following assumed initial conditions: constant height of the liquid metal (10, 20, and 30 mm), uniform temperature of the free liquid surface (1755 K). The simulation results have shown that while the solidification front remained rather flat, the free surface was disturbed by waves. The amplitude of waves increased with the liquid height. Free surface waves diminished as the solidification proceeded.

  4. Magneto-convective instabilities in horizontal cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mistrangelo, Chiara; Bühler, Leo

    2016-02-01

    A linear stability analysis is performed to investigate the onset of convective motions in a flat cavity filled with liquid metal. A volumetric heat source is uniformly distributed in the fluid and a horizontal magnetic field is imposed. Walls perpendicular to the magnetic field are thermally insulating, and the top wall is isothermal and the bottom adiabatic. When a magnetic field is applied, electromagnetic forces tend to transform 3D convective flow structures into quasi-2D rolls aligned to the magnetic field. By integrating 3D equations along magnetic field lines, a quasi-2D mathematical model has been derived. A dissipation term in the 2D equations accounts for 3D viscous effects in boundary layers at Hartmann walls perpendicular to the magnetic field. The influence of various parameters on flow stability is investigated. The flow is stabilized by increasing the magnetic field intensity or the electric conductance of Hartmann walls and by reducing the aspect ratio of the cavity. Numerical simulations are performed to verify the analytical results and to describe the main convective flow patterns in the non-linear regime.

  5. Yaw dynamics of horizontal axis wind turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, A.C. )

    1992-05-01

    Designers of a horizontal axis wind turbine yaw mechanism are faced with a difficult decision. They know that if they elect to use a yaw- controlled rotor then the system will suffer increased initial cost and increased inherent maintenance and reliability problems. On the other hand, if they elect to allow the rotor to freely yaw they known they will have to account for unknown and random, though bounded, yaw rates. They will have a higher-risk design to trade-off against the potential for cost savings and reliability improvement. The risk of a yaw-free system could be minimized if methods were available for analyzing and understanding yaw behavior. The complexity of yaw behavior has, until recently, discouraged engineers from developing a complete yaw analysis method. The objectives of this work are to (1) provide a fundamental understanding of free-yaw mechanics and the design concepts most effective at eliminating yaw problems, and (2) provide tested design tools and guidelines for use by free-yaw wind systems manufacturers. The emphasis is on developing practical and sufficiently accurate design methods.

  6. Film condensation in a horizontal rectangular duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Qing; Suryanarayana, N. V.

    1992-01-01

    Condensation heat transfer in an annular flow regime with and without interfacial waves was experimentally investigated. The study included measurements of heat transfer rate with condensation of vapor flowing inside a horizontal rectangular duct and experiments on the initiation of interfacial waves in condensation, and adiabatic air-liquid flow. An analytical model for the condensation was developed to predict condensate film thickness and heat transfer coefficients. Some conclusions drawn from the study are that the condensate film thickness was very thin (less than 0.6 mm). The average heat transfer coefficient increased with increasing the inlet vapor velocity. The local heat transfer coefficient decreased with the axial distance of the condensing surface, with the largest change at the leading edge of the test section. The interfacial shear stress, which consisted of the momentum shear stress and the adiabatic shear stress, appeared to have a significant effect on the heat transfer coefficients. In the experiment, the condensate flow along the condensing surface experienced a smooth flow, a two-dimensional wavy flow, and a three-dimensional wavy flow. In the condensation experiment, the local wave length decreased with the axial distance of the condensing surface and the average wave length decreased with increasing inlet vapor velocity, while the wave speed increased with increasing vapor velocity. The heat transfer measurements are reliable. And, the ultrasonic technique was effective for measuring the condensate film thickness when the surface was smooth or had waves of small amplitude.

  7. Maximal liquid bridges between horizontal cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooray, Himantha; Huppert, Herbert E.; Neufeld, Jerome A.

    2016-08-01

    We investigate two-dimensional liquid bridges trapped between pairs of identical horizontal cylinders. The cylinders support forces owing to surface tension and hydrostatic pressure that balance the weight of the liquid. The shape of the liquid bridge is determined by analytically solving the nonlinear Laplace-Young equation. Parameters that maximize the trapping capacity (defined as the cross-sectional area of the liquid bridge) are then determined. The results show that these parameters can be approximated with simple relationships when the radius of the cylinders is small compared with the capillary length. For such small cylinders, liquid bridges with the largest cross-sectional area occur when the centre-to-centre distance between the cylinders is approximately twice the capillary length. The maximum trapping capacity for a pair of cylinders at a given separation is linearly related to the separation when it is small compared with the capillary length. The meniscus slope angle of the largest liquid bridge produced in this regime is also a linear function of the separation. We additionally derive approximate solutions for the profile of a liquid bridge, using the linearized Laplace-Young equation. These solutions analytically verify the above-mentioned relationships obtained for the maximization of the trapping capacity.

  8. Horizontal visibility graphs from integer sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacasa, Lucas

    2016-09-01

    The horizontal visibility graph (HVG) is a graph-theoretical representation of a time series and builds a bridge between dynamical systems and graph theory. In recent years this representation has been used to describe and theoretically compare different types of dynamics and has been applied to characterize empirical signals, by extracting topological features from the associated HVGs which have shown to be informative on the class of dynamics. Among some other measures, it has been shown that the degree distribution of these graphs is a very informative feature that encapsulates nontrivial information of the series's generative dynamics. In particular, the HVG associated to a bi-infinite real-valued series of independent and identically distributed random variables is a universal exponential law P(k)=(1/3){(2/3)}k-2, independent of the series marginal distribution. Most of the current applications have however only addressed real-valued time series, as no exact results are known for the topological properties of HVGs associated to integer-valued series. In this paper we explore this latter situation and address univariate time series where each variable can only take a finite number n of consecutive integer values. We are able to construct an explicit formula for the parametric degree distribution {P}n(k), which we prove to converge to the continuous case for large n and deviates otherwise. A few applications are then considered.

  9. Sustainability of physical activity promoting environments and influences on sustainability following a structural intervention in residential children's homes.

    PubMed

    Dominick, Gregory M; Tudose, Alina; Pohlig, Ryan T; Saunders, Ruth P

    2016-04-01

    Research examining sustainability of health promotion programs within organizational settings is limited. The Environmental Interventions in Residential Children's Homes (ENRICH) was a structural intervention that trained Wellness Teams (WTs) within residential children's homes (RCH) to target environmental changes that promote physical activity (PA) among residential youth. This study examines the sustainability of PA promoting environments and influences on sustainability within RCHs. A sustainability survey was administered to 14 RCHs 2 years after receiving ENRICH. Variables included sustainability of PA promoting environments, Organizational Influences, perceived organizational and individual benefits, and implementation of PA and general (i.e. Global) wellness activities. Activities reported as sustained and barriers were used descriptively to inform sustainability. Path analyses explained the relationship between sustainability influences and sustainability of PA promoting environments. Sustainability was found in 8 of 14 (57%) RCHs. Sustained activities reflected greater Global versus PA implementation. Global implementation mediated the relationship between Organizational Influences and sustainability, which may have been more easily achieved since Global activities were most likely controlled by WTs and did not require extensive organizational support from RCH administrators. Results highlight the importance of defining and assessing different implementation types when measuring sustainability and influences on sustainability within RCHs organizations.

  10. Horizontal Precipitation in a Semiarid Cloud Forest: A Feedback Between Vegetation and Water Availability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hildebrandt, A.; Eltahir, E. A.

    2005-12-01

    We investigate the particular hydrology of an endangered semiarid cloud forest in the governorate of Dhofar (Oman). This forest is currently overexploited by browsing cattle feeding on tree canopies, leading to degradation of forest into grassland. In this region the forests survive in a relatively dry climate (annual rainfall below 250mm/year, annual temperature 21degC) as a result of the microclimate provided by annual reoccurrence of seasonal cloud immersion, which coincides with the wet summer season. Besides decreasing incoming radiation, the cloud cover provides for an additional water source besides rainfall. Due to turbulent exchange cloud droplets are mixed from surrounding clouds into the vegetation canopy, where they are captured by leaves, and eventually drip down to the ground (horizontal precipitation). In Dhofar, horizontal precipitation was estimated to account for up to two times the rainfall amount, based on results of a field experiment in 2004. Horizontal precipitation, and therefore plant available water, depends on the surface roughness, which is greatly enhanced by the presence of tall vegetation. On the other hand, water availability determines vegetation height in a water limited environment. We included a model for horizontal precipitation into a dynamical vegetation model (IBIS) to investigate, if the degradation of forest into grassland leads to a decrease in plant available water that is strong enough to substantially limit net primary productivity and vegetation height. Our model results suggest that tree removal triggers a feedback leading to substantially smaller water gain by the vegetation, resulting in an overall drier environment that prevents re-establishment of tree vegetation, and sustains the landscape in a degraded state.

  11. Applications of horizontal well completions to gas-productive formations

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, R.E.; Peterson, R.E.; Middlebrook, M.I. ); Aslakson, J.K. )

    1993-08-01

    The Gas Research Institute (GRI) has initiated a project to determine the reservoir characteristics and appropriate horizontal well designs in various gas-productive formations. The goal of the project is to evaluate horizontal completions as a means of reducing unit production costs in comparison to vertical well-completion methods. Three gas-productive formations were evaluated in the initial phase of the project: the Mancos B on the Douglas Creek arch in northwestern Colorado; the Davis Sand in the Fort Worth basin; and the Barnett Shale, also in the Fort Worth basin. Geologic and engineering data from vertical wells were collected for each formation and used to strategically plan offset horizontal wells. Specifically, information was gathered to characterize the natural and induced fractures, model the reservoirs, and establish a production baseline for each reservoir. The next phase involved GRI participation in the drilling of the three offset horizontal wells with three independent producers. A 1500-ft horizontal section was air drilled across the Mancos B; a 2000-ft horizontal well was air drilled in the Davis sandstone; and a 2000-ft horizontal section was fluid drilled across the 300-ft-thick Barnett Shale. Each of the horizontal wells exhibit varying reservoir characteristics and associated gas production.

  12. Horizontal technology helps spark Louisiana`s Austin chalk trend

    SciTech Connect

    Koen, A.D.

    1996-04-29

    A handful of companies paced by some of the most active operators in the US are pressing the limits of horizontal technology to ramp up Cretaceous Austin chalk exploration and development (E and D) across Louisiana. Companies find applications in Louisiana for lessons learned drilling horizontal wells to produce chalk intervals in Texas in Giddings, Pearsall, and Brookeland fields. Continuing advances in horizontal well technology are helping operators deal with deeper, hotter reservoirs in more complex geological settings that typify the chalk in Louisiana. Better horizontal drilling, completion, formation evaluation, and stimulation techniques have enabled operators to produce oil and gas from formations previously thought to be uneconomical. Most of the improved capabilities stem from better horizontal tools. Horizontal drilling breakthroughs include dual powered mud motors and retrievable whipstocks, key links in the ability to drill wells with more than one horizontal lateral. Better geosteering tools have enabled operators to maintain horizontal wellbores in desired intervals by signaling bit positions downhole while drilling. This paper reviews the technology and provides a historical perspective on the various drilling programs which have been completed in this trend. It also makes predictions on future drilling successes.

  13. Chord Panel Post, Vertical X Bracing & Horizontal Tie Joint ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Chord Panel Post, Vertical X Bracing & Horizontal Tie Joint Detail; Chord Joining Block & Spacer Block Detail; Cross Bracing Joint Detail; Chord Panel Post Diagonal & Horizontal Tie Joint Detail - Jackson Covered Bridge, Spanning Sugar Creek, CR 775N (Changed from Spanning Sugar Creek), Bloomingdale, Parke County, IN

  14. Horizontal biases in rats' use of three-dimensional space.

    PubMed

    Jovalekic, Aleksandar; Hayman, Robin; Becares, Natalia; Reid, Harry; Thomas, George; Wilson, Jonathan; Jeffery, Kate

    2011-09-23

    Rodent spatial cognition studies allow links to be made between neural and behavioural phenomena, and much is now known about the encoding and use of horizontal space. However, the real world is three dimensional, providing cognitive challenges that have yet to be explored. Motivated by neural findings suggesting weaker encoding of vertical than horizontal space, we examined whether rats show a similar behavioural anisotropy when distributing their time freely between vertical and horizontal movements. We found that in two- or three-dimensional environments with a vertical dimension, rats showed a prioritization of horizontal over vertical movements in both foraging and detour tasks. In the foraging tasks, the animals executed more horizontal than vertical movements and adopted a "layer strategy" in which food was collected from one horizontal level before moving to the next. In the detour tasks, rats preferred the routes that allowed them to execute the horizontal leg first. We suggest three possible reasons for this behavioural bias. First, as suggested by Grobety and Schenk, it allows minimisation of energy expenditure, inasmuch as costly vertical movements are minimised. Second, it may be a manifestation of the temporal discounting of effort, in which animals value delayed effort as less costly than immediate effort. Finally, it may be that at the neural level rats encode the vertical dimension less precisely, and thus prefer to bias their movements in the more accurately encoded horizontal dimension. We suggest that all three factors are related, and all play a part.

  15. Performance sustaining intracortical neural prostheses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuyujukian, Paul; Kao, Jonathan C.; Fan, Joline M.; Stavisky, Sergey D.; Ryu, Stephen I.; Shenoy, Krishna V.

    2014-12-01

    Objective. Neural prostheses, or brain-machine interfaces, aim to restore efficient communication and movement ability to those suffering from paralysis. A major challenge these systems face is robust performance, particularly with aging signal sources. The aim in this study was to develop a neural prosthesis that could sustain high performance in spite of signal instability while still minimizing retraining time. Approach. We trained two rhesus macaques implanted with intracortical microelectrode arrays 1-4 years prior to this study to acquire targets with a neurally-controlled cursor. We measured their performance via achieved bitrate (bits per second, bps). This task was repeated over contiguous days to evaluate the sustained performance across time. Main results. We found that in the monkey with a younger (i.e., two year old) implant and better signal quality, a fixed decoder could sustain performance for a month at a rate of 4 bps, the highest achieved communication rate reported to date. This fixed decoder was evaluated across 22 months and experienced a performance decline at a rate of 0.24 bps yr-1. In the monkey with the older (i.e., 3.5 year old) implant and poorer signal quality, a fixed decoder could not sustain performance for more than a few days. Nevertheless, performance in this monkey was maintained for two weeks without requiring additional online retraining time by utilizing prior days’ experimental data. Upon analysis of the changes in channel tuning, we found that this stability appeared partially attributable to the cancelling-out of neural tuning fluctuations when projected to two-dimensional cursor movements. Significance. The findings in this study (1) document the highest-performing communication neural prosthesis in monkeys, (2) confirm and extend prior reports of the stability of fixed decoders, and (3) demonstrate a protocol for system stability under conditions where fixed decoders would otherwise fail. These improvements to decoder

  16. Iowa Women of Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohrn, Deborah Gore, Ed.

    1993-01-01

    This issue of the Goldfinch highlights some of Iowa's 20th century women of achievement. These women have devoted their lives to working for human rights, education, equality, and individual rights. They come from the worlds of politics, art, music, education, sports, business, entertainment, and social work. They represent Native Americans,…

  17. Achieving Peace through Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarken, Rodney H.

    While it is generally agreed that peace is desirable, there are barriers to achieving a peaceful world. These barriers are classified into three major areas: (1) an erroneous view of human nature; (2) injustice; and (3) fear of world unity. In a discussion of these barriers, it is noted that although the consciousness and conscience of the world…

  18. Increasing Male Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Barbara Talbert

    2008-01-01

    The No Child Left Behind legislation has brought greater attention to the academic performance of American youth. Its emphasis on student achievement requires a closer analysis of assessment data by school districts. To address the findings, educators must seek strategies to remedy failing results. In a mid-Atlantic district of the Unites States,…

  19. Leadership Issues: Raising Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horsfall, Chris, Ed.

    This document contains five papers examining the meaning and operation of leadership as a variable affecting student achievement in further education colleges in the United Kingdom. "Introduction" (Chris Horsfall) discusses school effectiveness studies' findings regarding the relationship between leadership and effective schools, distinguishes…

  20. Achievements or Disasters?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwin, MacArthur

    2000-01-01

    Focuses on policy issues that have affected arts education in the twentieth century, such as: interest in discipline-based arts education, influence of national arts associations, and national standards and coordinated assessment. States that whether the policy decisions are viewed as achievements or disasters are for future determination. (CMK)

  1. Achieving True Consensus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Napier, Rod; Sanaghan, Patrick

    2002-01-01

    Uses the example of Vermont's Middlebury College to explore the challenges and possibilities of achieving consensus about institutional change. Discusses why, unlike in this example, consensus usually fails, and presents four demands of an effective consensus process. Includes a list of "test" questions on successful collaboration. (EV)

  2. School Students' Science Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shymansky, James; Wang, Tzu-Ling; Annetta, Leonard; Everett, Susan; Yore, Larry D.

    2013-01-01

    This paper is a report of the impact of an externally funded, multiyear systemic reform project on students' science achievement on a modified version of the Third International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) test in 33 small, rural school districts in two Midwest states. The systemic reform effort utilized a cascading leadership strategy…

  3. Essays on Educational Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ampaabeng, Samuel Kofi

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation examines the determinants of student outcomes--achievement, attainment, occupational choices and earnings--in three different contexts. The first two chapters focus on Ghana while the final chapter focuses on the US state of Massachusetts. In the first chapter, I exploit the incidence of famine and malnutrition that resulted to…

  4. Assessing Handwriting Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ediger, Marlow

    Teachers in the school setting need to emphasize quality handwriting across the curriculum. Quality handwriting means that the written content is easy to read in either manuscript or cursive form. Handwriting achievement can be assessed, but not compared to the precision of assessing basic addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division facts.…

  5. Intelligence and Educational Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deary, Ian J.; Strand, Steve; Smith, Pauline; Fernandes, Cres

    2007-01-01

    This 5-year prospective longitudinal study of 70,000+ English children examined the association between psychometric intelligence at age 11 years and educational achievement in national examinations in 25 academic subjects at age 16. The correlation between a latent intelligence trait (Spearman's "g"from CAT2E) and a latent trait of educational…

  6. Explorations in achievement motivation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helmreich, Robert L.

    1982-01-01

    Recent research on the nature of achievement motivation is reviewed. A three-factor model of intrinsic motives is presented and related to various criteria of performance, job satisfaction and leisure activities. The relationships between intrinsic and extrinsic motives are discussed. Needed areas for future research are described.

  7. NCLB: Achievement Robin Hood?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bracey, Gerald W.

    2008-01-01

    In his "Wall Street Journal" op-ed on the 25th of anniversary of "A Nation At Risk", former assistant secretary of education Chester E. Finn Jr. applauded the report for turning U.S. education away from equality and toward achievement. It was not surprising, then, that in mid-2008, Finn arranged a conference to examine the potential "Robin Hood…

  8. Achieving All Our Ambitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartley, Tricia

    2009-01-01

    National learning and skills policy aims both to build economic prosperity and to achieve social justice. Participation in higher education (HE) has the potential to contribute substantially to both aims. That is why the Campaign for Learning has supported the ambition to increase the proportion of the working-age population with a Level 4…

  9. INTELLIGENCE, PERSONALITY AND ACHIEVEMENT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MUIR, R.C.; AND OTHERS

    A LONGITUDINAL DEVELOPMENTAL STUDY OF A GROUP OF MIDDLE CLASS CHILDREN IS DESCRIBED, WITH EMPHASIS ON A SEGMENT OF THE RESEARCH INVESTIGATING THE RELATIONSHIP OF ACHIEVEMENT, INTELLIGENCE, AND EMOTIONAL DISTURBANCE. THE SUBJECTS WERE 105 CHILDREN AGED FIVE TO 6.3 ATTENDING TWO SCHOOLS IN MONTREAL. EACH CHILD WAS ASSESSED IN THE AREAS OF…

  10. SALT and Spelling Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Joan

    A study investigated the effects of suggestopedic accelerative learning and teaching (SALT) on the spelling achievement, attitudes toward school, and memory skills of fourth-grade students. Subjects were 20 male and 28 female students from two self-contained classrooms at Kennedy Elementary School in Rexburg, Idaho. The control classroom and the…

  11. Appraising Reading Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ediger, Marlow

    To determine quality sequence in pupil progress, evaluation approaches need to be used which guide the teacher to assist learners to attain optimally. Teachers must use a variety of procedures to appraise student achievement in reading, because no one approach is adequate. Appraisal approaches might include: (1) observation and subsequent…

  12. Steerable vertical to horizontal energy transducer for mobile robots

    DOEpatents

    Spletzer, Barry L.; Fischer, Gary J.; Feddema, John T.

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides a steerable vertical to horizontal energy transducer for mobile robots that less complex and requires less power than two degree of freedom tilt mechanisms. The present invention comprises an end effector that, when mounted with a hopping actuator, translates along axis (typically vertical) actuation into combined vertical and horizontal motion. The end effector, or foot, mounts with an end of the actuator that moves toward the support surface (typically a floor or the earth). The foot is shaped so that the first contact with the support surface is off the axis of the actuator. Off-axis contact with the support surface generates an on-axis force (typically resulting in vertical motion) and a moment orthogonal to the axis. The moment initiates a horizontal tumbling motion, and tilts the actuator so that its axis is oriented with a horizontal component and continued actuation generates both vertical and horizontal force.

  13. Achieving yield gains in wheat.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Matthew; Foulkes, John; Furbank, Robert; Griffiths, Simon; King, Julie; Murchie, Erik; Parry, Martin; Slafer, Gustavo

    2012-10-01

    Wheat provides 20% of calories and protein consumed by humans. Recent genetic gains are <1% per annum (p.a.), insufficient to meet future demand. The Wheat Yield Consortium brings expertise in photosynthesis, crop adaptation and genetics to a common breeding platform. Theory suggest radiation use efficiency (RUE) of wheat could be increased ~50%; strategies include modifying specificity, catalytic rate and regulation of Rubisco, up-regulating Calvin cycle enzymes, introducing chloroplast CO(2) concentrating mechanisms, optimizing light and N distribution of canopies while minimizing photoinhibition, and increasing spike photosynthesis. Maximum yield expression will also require dynamic optimization of source: sink so that dry matter partitioning to reproductive structures is not at the cost of the roots, stems and leaves needed to maintain physiological and structural integrity. Crop development should favour spike fertility to maximize harvest index so phenology must be tailored to different photoperiods, and sensitivity to unpredictable weather must be modulated to reduce conservative responses that reduce harvest index. Strategic crossing of complementary physiological traits will be augmented with wide crossing, while genome-wide selection and high throughput phenotyping and genotyping will increase efficiency of progeny screening. To ensure investment in breeding achieves agronomic impact, sustainable crop management must also be promoted through crop improvement networks.

  14. The stimulus integration area for horizontal vergence.

    PubMed

    Allison, Robert S; Howard, Ian P; Fang, Xueping

    2004-06-01

    Over what region of space are horizontal disparities integrated to form the stimulus for vergence? The vergence system might be expected to respond to disparities within a small area of interest to bring them into the range of precise stereoscopic processing. However, the literature suggests that disparities are integrated over a fairly large parafoveal area. We report the results of six experiments designed to explore the spatial characteristics of the stimulus for vergence. Binocular eye movements were recorded using magnetic search coils. Each dichoptic display consisted of a central target stimulus that the subject attempted to fuse, and a competing stimulus with conflicting disparity. In some conditions the target was stationary, providing a fixation stimulus. In other conditions, the disparity of the target changed to provide a vergence-tracking stimulus. The target and competing stimulus were combined in a variety of conditions including those in which (1) a transparent textured-disc target was superimposed on a competing textured background, (2) a textured-disc target filled the centre of a competing annular background, and (3) a small target was presented within the centre of a competing annular background of various inner diameters. In some conditions the target and competing stimulus were separated in stereoscopic depth. The results are consistent with a disparity integration area with a diameter of about 5 degrees. Stimuli beyond this integration area can drive vergence in their own right, but they do not appear to be summed or averaged with a central stimulus to form a combined disparity signal. A competing stimulus had less effect on vergence when separated from the target by a disparity pedestal. As a result, we propose that it may be more useful to think in terms of an integration volume for vergence rather than a two-dimensional retinal integration area. PMID:14985895

  15. Research on Sustainable Steelmaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fruehan, R. J.

    2009-04-01

    The international steel community is faced with the challenge of developing processes that will make steel production more sustainable in the future. Specifically, processes that produce less CO2 and less net waste materials and emissions and that consume less energy are required. This article outlines where energy consumption and CO2 emissions are high and can be reduced. Reductions can be achieved by incremental improvements to existing processes or by a “break-through innovative process”; both strategies are examined. Since most of the energy consumption and CO2 generation occur in ironmaking, research in this area is emphasized. Research on controlling the cohesive zone in the blast furnace, improving the final stages of reduction in direct reduction processes, the use of biomass, and other innovative processes for ironmaking are reviewed. In oxygen steelmaking, improved postcombustion (PC) to allow for more scrap melting is examined. Postcombustion and slag foaming in the electric arc furnace (EAF) in order to reduce energy is reviewed.

  16. Energy and sustainable development in North American Sunbelt cities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roosa, Stephen A.

    The goals of sustainable development are often misunderstood and variously applied. Sustainability as an urban goal is hindered by the lack of a consensus definition of sustainable development. The failure to focus on energy in cities as a means of achieving urban sustainability is one reason that successful empirical examples of implementing sustainable development are rare. The paradox is that as society attempts to achieve the goals of sustainable development, cities are using more fossil fuel based energy, which results in more pollution and ultimately makes sustainability more difficult to achieve. This dissertation explores the linkages between energy and sustainability and their connection to urban polices. This research provides a detailed review of the history of the concept of sustainability, a review of literature to date, and comparative issues concerning sustainability. The literature review will describe the underlying causes and effects of changes which have led to concerns about urban sustainability. The types of urban policies that are used by Sunbelt cities will be discussed. The purpose of this research is multifold: (1) to study the energy related policies of Sunbelt cities; (2) to propose a workable typology of policies; (3) to develop an index by which cities can be ranked in terms of sustainability; and (4) to assess and evaluate the relationships between the adoption of urban policies that promote energy efficiency, energy conservation and alternative energy to determine if they are associated with reduced energy use and greater urban sustainability. This research involves use of empirical data, U.S. census information, database explorations and other data. Both qualitative and quantitative analysis methodologies were employed as a means of defining and exploring the dimensions of energy and sustainable development in urban areas. The research will find that certain urban policies are related to changes in indicators and measures of urban

  17. What is sustainability and what influences it?

    SciTech Connect

    Schock, R.N.

    1997-06-04

    I was asked to speak on the subject of ``What do we mean by sustainability and what factors have the most impact on it?`` I am afraid I must admit that if there is a generally accepted definition of sustainability, at least as applied to mankind and terrestrial systems, then I am not aware of it. But I expect you know that, or you would not be having this session. The subject of sustainability is one that interests us all. In fact, I think that it fascinates us all because the concept is one to which we can intimately relate. Sustainability implies eternal life; and throughout history, humankind has sought, sometimes secretly, sometimes openly, eternal life, if not for ourselves at least for our progeny. What I will try to do is (1) briefly discuss some of what has been said about this topic, (2) propose a definition that I believe is workable, and point out some of the issues that derive from it, and then (3) suggest what I think we can all do to ensure the sustainability of the planet. I confess to you at the outset that I am an optimist on this subject, and a technological optimist at that. By that I mean that I believe that humans and technology are inextricably linked and that technology provides one of the great keys to helping human beings achieve their goals. I also believe that sustainability is an achievable goal and that it is not a concept to be feared, either intrinsically or economically.

  18. [Health and environmental governance for sustainable development].

    PubMed

    Buss, Paulo Marchiori; Machado, Jorge Mesquita Huet; Gallo, Edmundo; Magalhães, Danielly de Paiva; Setti, Andréia Faraoni Freitas; Franco Netto, Francisco de Abreu; Buss, Daniel Forsin

    2012-06-01

    The United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development, Rio+20, will address the challenges for sustainable development (SD), 'green economy and poverty eradication' and the 'institutional structure of sustainable development'. Therefore it will address the governance needed to achieve such goals. This paper discusses the structure of global, regional and national governance of and for health and environment in the context of SD. Among other global actions, the Millenium Development Goals were a significant recent political effort, but despite its advances, it fails when ignores the structural causes of production and consumption patterns and the unequal distribution of power, which are responsible for inequities and impede true development. To achieve SD, proposals must avoid reductionism, advancing conceptually and methodologically to face the challenges of the socio-environmental determinants of health through intersectoral action, including social participation and all levels of government. It is paramount to continue the implementation of Agenda 21, to meet the MDGs and to create 'Sustainable Development Goals'. Regarding the health field, Rio+20 Summit must reassure the connection between health and sustainability - as a part of the Social pillar of sustainable development - inspiring politics and actions in multiple levels.

  19. Horizontal oil well applications and oil recovery assessment. Volume 1: Success of horizontal well technology, Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Deskins, W.G.; McDonald, W.J.; Knoll, R.G.; Springer, S.J.

    1995-03-01

    Horizontal technology has been applied in over 110 formations in the USA. Volume I of this study addresses the overall success of horizontal technology, especially in less-publicized formations, i.e., other than the Austin Chalk, Bakken, and Niobrara. Operators in the USA. and Canada were surveyed on a formation-by-formation basis by means of a questionnaire. Response data were received describing horizontal well projects in 58 formations in the USA. and 88 in Canada. Operators responses were analyzed for trends in technical and economic success based on lithology (clastics and carbonates) and resource type (light oil, heavy oil, and gas). The potential impact of horizontal technology on reserves was also estimated. A forecast of horizontal drilling activity over the next decade was developed.

  20. Project ACHIEVE final report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-13

    Project ACHIEVE was a math/science academic enhancement program aimed at first year high school Hispanic American students. Four high schools -- two in El Paso, Texas and two in Bakersfield, California -- participated in this Department of Energy-funded program during the spring and summer of 1996. Over 50 students, many of whom felt they were facing a nightmare future, were given the opportunity to work closely with personal computers and software, sophisticated calculators, and computer-based laboratories -- an experience which their regular academic curriculum did not provide. Math and science projects, exercises, and experiments were completed that emphasized independent and creative applications of scientific and mathematical theories to real world problems. The most important outcome was the exposure Project ACHIEVE provided to students concerning the college and technical-field career possibilities available to them.

  1. Our Commitment to Bioenergy Sustainability

    SciTech Connect

    2015-06-18

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) is committed to developing the resources, technologies, and systems needed to support a thriving bioenergy industry that protects natural resources and ad- vances environmental, economic, and social benefits. BETO’s Sustainability Technology Area proactively identifies and addresses issues that affect the scale-up potential, public acceptance, and long-term viability of advanced bioenergy systems; as a result, the area is critical to achieving BETO’s overall goals.

  2. [What is sustainability science?].

    PubMed

    Wu, Jian-Guo; Guo, Xiao-Chuan; Yang, Jie; Qian, Gui-Xia; Niu, Jian-Ming; Liang, Cun-Zhu; Zhang, Qing; Li, Ang

    2014-01-01

    Sustainability is the theme of our time and also the grandest challenge to humanity. Since the 1970s, the term, sustainable development, has frequently appeared in the scientific literature, governmental documents, media promotions for public goods, and commercial advertisements. However, the science that provides the theoretical foundation and practical guidance for sustainable development--sustainability science--only began to emerge in the beginning of the 21st century. Nevertheless, the field has rapidly developed in depth and expanded in scope during the past decade, with its core concepts and research methods coalescing. China, as the most populous country in the world and home to the philosophical root of sustainability science-the unity of man and nature, is obligated to take upon the challenge of our time, to facilitate global sustainability while pursuing the Chinese Dream, and to play a leading role in the development of sustainability science. Toward this grandiose goal, this paper presents the first Chinese introduction to sustainability science, which discusses its basic concepts, research questions, and future directions. Sustainability science is the study of the dynamic relationship between humans and the environment, particularly focusing on the vulnerability, robustness, resilience, and stability of the coupled human-environment system. It is a transdisciplinary science that integrates natural sciences with humanities and social sciences. It hinges on the environment-economy-society nexus, and merges basic and applied research. The key components of sustainability often change with time, place, and culture, and thus sustainability science needs to emphasize multi-scale studies in space and time, with emphasis on landscapes and regions over a horizon of 50 to 100 years. It needs to focus on the relationship between ecosystem services and human well-being, as influenced by biodiversity and ecosystem processes as well as climate change, land use

  3. Formation damage effects on horizontal-well flow efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Renard, G.; Dupuy, J.M. )

    1991-07-01

    Wellbore damage commonly is accounted for by an apparent skin factor. A better relative index for determining the efficiency with which a well has been drilled and completed is the flow efficiency, the ration of a well's actual PI to ideal PI. The flow efficiency of horizontal wells is derived assuming steady-state flow of an incompressible fluid in a homogeneous, anisotropic medium. A comparison between the flow efficiencies of vertical and horizontal wells indicates that permeability reduction around the wellbore is less detrimental to horizontal wells. This paper shows that the effect of damage around a horizontal wellbore is reduced slightly by increasing the well length. Conversely, if the vertical permeability is less than the horizontal permeability, the anisotropy ratio, {radical} k{sub H}/k{sub V}, magnifies the influence of formation damage near the horizontal wellbore. Examples of flow efficiency calculations assuming a formation damage or a formation collapse around a liner in poorly consolidated formations are provided for horizontal and vertical wells.

  4. Geologic aspects of horizontal drilling in self-sourcing reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Illich, H.A. )

    1991-03-01

    Horizontal drilling techniques provide a way to exploit hydrocarbon reserves that are either noneconomic or only marginally economic using vertical drilling techniques. A significant fraction of these reserves is contained in reservoirs that are self-sourcing or in reservoirs that are closely associated with their resources. Most formations drilled as horizontal targets are self-sourcing. The Austin Chalk, Niobrara, Mesaverde, and Bakken are examples of horizontally drilled, self-sourcing reservoir systems. In formations like the Bakken or Austin Chalk, the close relationship between reservoir and source makes risks associated with migration and accumulation less important. Reservoirs of this kind can contain oil or gas and often have little or no associated water. They can be matrix-dominated reservoirs, dual-porosity reservoirs (Mesaverde), or fractured reservoirs (Austin Chalk, Bakken, and Niobrara). Fractured, self-sourcing reservoirs also can possess matrix characteristics that contribute increased recovery efficiency. Most reservoirs drilled horizontally possess matrix characteristics that contribute increased recovery efficiency. Most reservoirs drilled horizontally possess highly heterogeneous reservoir systems. Characterization of the style of reservoir heterogeneity in self-sourcing systems is important if the favorable properties of horizontally oriented bore holes are to be realized. Production data and rock mechanics considerations are important in horizontal drilling ventures. Examples of the use of these data for the purpose of defining reservoir characteristics are discussed. Knowledge of lateral changes in reservoir properties is essential if we are to recover known reserves efficiently.

  5. Chromospheric Circulation Driven by Horizontally Inhomogeneous Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasyliunas, V. M.; Song, P.

    2013-12-01

    The rate of chromospheric heating by damping of Alfvén waves propagating upward from below the photosphere (Song and Vasyliunas, 2011) depends on the strength of the magnetic field. In regions of locally confined very strong magnetic field, particularly at the boundaries of the chromospheric network, the heating rate is greatly enhanced, and the heating per unit mass is concentrated toward higher altitudes. Song and Vasyliunas (2012) proposed that the resulting inhomogeneity of pressure may drive circulating flows in the chromosphere, horizontally away from the strong-field region at one altitude and returning at another. We investigate this circulation further, with particular attention to the flow patterns and to the question to what extent the circulation might be impeded by MHD effects. The heating process acts equally on the plasma and on the neutral gas, but because most of the chromosphere is weakly ionized, the flow is predominantly that of the neutral gas. Below the altitude he at which electron collision frequency equals electron gyrofrequency, all the species (electrons, ions, neutrals) flow together; the magnetic field can change relative to the flow only by diffusion. In the altitude range above he but below the altitude hi at which ion collision frequency equals ion gyrofrequency, ions and neutrals flow together, but electron flow is decoupled from neutral flow; the magnetic field is frozen to the motion of electrons. Above hi neutrals are decoupled from ions, while electrons and ions flow nearly together with the common plasma flow; the magnetic field is frozen to the plasma flow. (This is analogous to the well-studied neutral-wind dynamo process in the terrestrial ionosphere and thermosphere, except that at the Sun there is no counterpart to the non-conducting terrestrial atmosphere.) The circulation, confined to altitudes above he, consists of neutral and ion flow between he and hi; above hi, there is only neutral flow, with ions at rest, while

  6. Computational studies of horizontal axis wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Guanpeng

    A numerical technique has been developed for efficiently simulating fully three-dimensional viscous fluid flow around horizontal axis wind turbines (HAWT) using a zonal approach. The flow field is viewed as a combination of viscous regions, inviscid regions and vortices. The method solves the costly unsteady Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations only in the viscous region around the turbine blades. It solves the full potential equation in the inviscid region where flow is irrotational and isentropic. The tip vortices are simulated using a Lagrangean approach, thus removing the need to accurately resolve them on a fine grid. The hybrid method is shown to provide good results with modest CPU resources. A full Navier-Stokes based methodology has also been developed for modeling wind turbines at high wind conditions where extensive stall may occur. An overset grid based version that can model rotor-tower interactions has been developed. Finally, a blade element theory based methodology has been developed for the purpose of developing improved tip loss models and stall delay models. The effects of turbulence are simulated using a zero equation eddy viscosity model, or a one equation Spalart-Allmaras model. Two transition models, one based on the Eppler's criterion, and the other based on Michel's criterion, have been developed and tested. The hybrid method has been extensively validated for axial wind conditions for three rotors---NREL Phase II, Phase III, and Phase VI configurations. A limited set of calculations has been done for rotors operating under yaw conditions. Preliminary simulations have also been carried out to assess the effects of the tower wake on the rotor. In most of these cases, satisfactory agreement has been obtained with measurements. Using the numerical results from present methodologies as a guide, Prandtl's tip loss model and Corrigan's stall delay model were correlated with present calculations. An improved tip loss model has been

  7. Collaborative procurement for developing a sustainable campus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nifa, Faizatul Akmar Abdul; Rahim, Syukran Abdul; Rani, Wan Nurul Mardiah Wan Mohd; Ismail, Mohd. Noorizhar

    2016-08-01

    It is particularly challenging to achieve sustainability in campus universities, where a high volume of users and activities has made it more imperative to promote green buildings that reduce energy and water consumption while having a minimal carbon footprint. At present, the frameworks for sustainable campus have seldom focused on the project procurement method which would improve construction team integration in developing the physical aspect of campus development. Therefore, in response to that challenge, this paper investigates how the delivery team, responsible for the design and construction of a project, can be integrated to work together more efficiently and more using the collaborative procurement method known as partnering. This paper reports part of a previous research and sets the base for ongoing research on the critical factors in partnering for sustainable campus development. The outcome or result of this study will meet and support the requirement for construction, maintenance, and operation process for universities towards sustainable building/campus in the future.

  8. Numerical investigation of flow motion and performance of a horizontal axis tidal turbine subjected to a steady current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lin-juan; Zheng, Jin-hai; Peng, Yu-xuan; Zhang, Ji-sheng; Wu, Xiu-guang

    2015-04-01

    Horizontal axis tidal turbines have attracted more and more attentions nowadays, because of their convenience and low expense in construction and high efficiency in extracting tidal energy. The present study numerically investigates the flow motion and performance of a horizontal axis tidal turbine with a supporting vertical cylinder under steady current. In the numerical model, the continuous equation and incompressible Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations are solved, and the volume of fluid method is employed to track free surface motion. The RNG k- ɛ model is adopted to calculate turbulence transport while the fractional area/volume obstacle representation method is used to describe turbine characteristics and movement. The effects of installation elevation of tidal turbine and inlet velocity on the water elevation, and current velocity, rotating speed and resultant force on turbine are discussed. Based on the comparison of the numerical results, a better understanding of flow structure around horizontal axis tidal turbine and turbine performance is achieved.

  9. Does achievement motivation mediate the semantic achievement priming effect?

    PubMed

    Engeser, Stefan; Baumann, Nicola

    2014-10-01

    The aim of our research was to understand the processes of the prime-to-behavior effects with semantic achievement primes. We extended existing models with a perspective from achievement motivation theory and additionally used achievement primes embedded in the running text of excerpts of school textbooks to simulate a more natural priming condition. Specifically, we proposed that achievement primes affect implicit achievement motivation and conducted pilot experiments and 3 main experiments to explore this proposition. We found no reliable positive effect of achievement primes on implicit achievement motivation. In light of these findings, we tested whether explicit (instead of implicit) achievement motivation is affected by achievement primes and found this to be the case. In the final experiment, we found support for the assumption that higher explicit achievement motivation implies that achievement priming affects the outcome expectations. The implications of the results are discussed, and we conclude that primes affect achievement behavior by heightening explicit achievement motivation and outcome expectancies. PMID:24820250

  10. Energy and the ecological economics of sustainability

    SciTech Connect

    Peet, J.

    1992-05-01

    This book examines the roots of the present environmental crisis in the neoclassical economics upon which modern industrial society is based. The author explains that only in view of the larger context of the global ecosystem and in acceptance of the physical limits as to what is possible can sustainability be achieved.

  11. OPTIMAL CONTROL THEORY FOR SUSTAINABLE ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sustainable management of the human and natural systems, taking into account their interactions, has become paramount. To achieve this complex multidisciplinary objective, systems theory based techniques prove useful. The proposed work is a step in that direction. Taking a food w...

  12. Lifelong Learning and Sustainable Managed Forests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Odgaard, Gunde

    In forestry, as in other fields, technological advances have resulted in significant changes in work practices and skill requirements. Vocational training and improvement of forestry workers' skills through lifelong learning can help achieve sustainability in forestry. The objectives of lifelong learning are to integrate people into working life…

  13. Education, Skills, Sustainability and Growth: Complex Relations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Kenneth

    2009-01-01

    The global education agenda, embedded in the Education for All (EFA) Goals, and the Millennium Development Goals, has emphasised the importance of reaching EFA rather than sustaining this achievement. As a corollary, the emphasis for external aid has also been on increasing aid to secure EFA rather than on the dangers of aid dependency in securing…

  14. Progress in Horizontal and Slant-Path Imaging Speckle Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Carrano, C J

    2003-01-30

    The difficulty in terrestrial imaging over long horizontal or slant paths is that atmospheric aberrations and distortions reduce the resolution and contrast in images recorded at high resolution. This paper will describe the problem of horizontal-path imaging, briefly cover various methods for imaging over horizontal paths and then describe the speckle imaging method actively being pursued at LLNL. We will review some closer range (1-3 km range) imagery of people we have already published, as well as show new results of vehicles we have obtained over longer slant-range paths greater than 20 km.

  15. Horizontal Transfer and the Evolution of Host-Pathogen Interactions

    PubMed Central

    de la Casa-Esperón, Elena

    2012-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer has been long known in viruses and prokaryotes, but its importance in eukaryotes has been only acknowledged recently. Close contact between organisms, as it occurs between pathogens and their hosts, facilitates the occurrence of DNA transfer events. Once inserted in a foreign genome, DNA sequences have sometimes been coopted by pathogens to improve their survival or infectivity, or by hosts to protect themselves against the harm of pathogens. Hence, horizontal transfer constitutes a source of novel sequences that can be adopted to change the host-pathogen interactions. Therefore, horizontal transfer can have an important impact on the coevolution of pathogens and their hosts. PMID:23227424

  16. Sustained Spheromak Physics Experiment, SSPX

    SciTech Connect

    Hooper, E.B.

    1997-05-15

    The Sustained Spheromak Physics Experiment is proposed for experimental studies of spheromak confinement issues in a controlled way: in steady state relative to the confinement timescale and at low collisionality. Experiments in a flux - conserver will provide data on transport in the presence of resistive modes in shear-stabilized systems and establish operating regimes which pave the way for true steady-state experiments with the equilibrium field supplied by external coils. The proposal is based on analysis of past experiments, including the achievement of T{sub e} = 400 eV in a decaying spheromak in CTX. Electrostatic helicity injection from a coaxial ``gun`` into a shaped flux conserver will form and sustain the plasma for several milliseconds. The flux conserver minimizes fluxline intersection with the walls and provides MHD stability. Improvements from previous experiments include modem wall conditioning (especially boronization), a divertor for density and impurity control, and a bias magnetic flux for configurational flexibility. The bias flux will provide innovative experimental opportunities, including testing helicity drive on the large-radius plasma boundary. Diagnostics include Thomson scattering for T{sub e} measurements and ultra-short pulse reflectrometry to measure density and magnetic field profiles and turbulence. We expect to operate at T{sub e} of several hundred eV, allowing improved understanding of energy and current transport due to resistive MHD turbulence during sustained operation. This will provide an exciting advance in spheromak physics and a firm basis for future experiments in the fusion regime.

  17. Wood Energy Production, Sustainable Farming Livelihood and Multifunctionality in Finland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huttunen, Suvi

    2012-01-01

    Climate change and the projected depletion of fossil energy resources pose multiple global challenges. Innovative technologies offer interesting possibilities to achieve more sustainable outcomes in the energy production sector. Local, decentralized alternatives have the potential to sustain livelihoods in rural areas. One example of such a…

  18. Benchmarking Exponential Growth of Educational Reform: The Sustainability Index

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia, Ray

    2009-01-01

    After decades of reform efforts in public school systems in the United States, there is minimal student achievement progress to measure. This article addresses the ongoing challenges and complexities of the sustainability of educational reform through a review of the literature and the proposal of a Sustainability Index as a metric to benchmark…

  19. Developing a Quantitative Tool for Sustainability Assessment of HEIs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waheed, Bushra; Khan, Faisal I.; Veitch, Brian

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Implementation of a sustainability paradigm demands new choices and innovative ways of thinking. The main objective of this paper is to provide a meaningful sustainability assessment tool for make informed decisions, which is applied to higher education institutions (HEIs). Design/methodology/approach: The objective is achieved by…

  20. Preview Scheduled Model Predictive Control For Horizontal Axis Wind Turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laks, Jason H.

    This research investigates the use of model predictive control (MPC) in application to wind turbine operation from start-up to cut-out. The studies conducted are focused on the design of an MPC controller for a 650˜KW, three-bladed horizontal axis turbine that is in operation at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's National Wind Technology Center outside of Golden, Colorado. This turbine is at the small end of utility scale turbines, but it provides advanced instrumentation and control capabilities, and there is a good probability that the approach developed in simulation for this thesis, will be field tested on the actual turbine. A contribution of this thesis is a method to combine the use of preview measurements with MPC while also providing regulation of turbine speed and cyclic blade loading. A common MPC technique provides integral-like control to achieve offset-free operation. At the same time in wind turbine applications, multiple studies have developed "feed-forward" controls based on applying a gain to an estimate of the wind speed changes obtained from an observer incorporating a disturbance model. These approaches are based on a technique that can be referred to as disturbance accommodating control (DAC). In this thesis, it is shown that offset-free tracking MPC is equivalent to a DAC approach when the disturbance gain is computed to satisfy a regulator equation. Although the MPC literature has recognized that this approach provides "structurally stable" disturbance rejection and tracking, this step is not typically divorced from the MPC computations repeated each sample hit. The DAC formulation is conceptually simpler, and essentially uncouples regulation considerations from MPC related issues. This thesis provides a self contained proof that the DAC formulation (an observer-controller and appropriate disturbance gain) provides structurally stable regulation.

  1. 27. Credit JTL. Second floor, detail of Eureka horizontal wheat ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. Credit JTL. Second floor, detail of Eureka horizontal wheat scourer, by S. Howes Co., (Silver Creek, NY). After leaving scourer, grain passed directly to the Midget Marvel Machine. - Bunker Hill Mill, County Route 26, Bunker Hill, Berkeley County, WV

  2. Nurse Against Nurse: Horizontal Bullying in the Nursing Profession.

    PubMed

    Granstra, Katherine

    2015-01-01

    Healthcare professionals are not immune to bullying; in fact, they experience bullying at an alarming rate. Sometimes the bullying is passed down from superiors, but frequently bullying occurs between coworkers. This is known as "horizontal bullying," and it has become a serious issue within the nursing profession. Horizontal bullying between nurses can cause negative consequences for everyone involved, in particular the nurses, patients, and the entire organization. To fully address and resolve horizontal bullying in the nursing profession, we must consider many factors. The first step is to establish what constitutes bullying and to develop a clear process for dealing with it when it occurs. Before it is possible to eliminate the problem, we need to understand why bullying takes place. To be effective, solutions to the problem of horizontal bullying in the nursing profession must include the entire healthcare industry.

  3. Chord, Horizontal Tie Bar & Crossbracing Joint Details; Crossbracing Center ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Chord, Horizontal Tie Bar & Crossbracing Joint Details; Crossbracing Center Joint Detail; Chord, Panel Posts, Braces & Counterbrace Joint Detail - Brownsville Covered Bridge, Spanning East Fork Whitewater River (moved to Eagle Creek Park, Indianapolis), Brownsville, Union County, IN

  4. Lessons learned from installation of an environmental horizontal well

    SciTech Connect

    Oakley, D.B.; Nickelson, M.D.

    1994-12-31

    At Williams Air Force Base near Phoenix, Arizona, a Pilot Study/Demonstration Study is being performed to evaluate the effectiveness of horizontal vs vertical wells in remediating and containing a jet fuel contaminant plume. An early stage of this project included successful installation of the world`s longest, deepest environmental horizontal wells. The horizontal well was installed using river crossing technology developed for drilling boreholes and installing utility conduits under rivers. Boreholes over 5,000 ft long have been successfully installed using river crossing technology. However, these boreholes are typically shallower than 100 ft below land surface (BLS). Installation of the environmental horizontal well proved to be extremely challenging because of the depth (235 ft BLS), the length (2,500 ft) of the borehole, and the requirements dictated by well installation criteria. Two installation attempts failed before the successful installation.

  5. Naval Air Station Lighter than Air Hangar, wood construction horizontal ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Naval Air Station Lighter than Air Hangar, wood construction horizontal rolling door. Drawing no. 2122 820. - Marine Corps Air Station Tustin, Northern Lighter Than Air Ship Hangar, Meffett Avenue & Maxfield Street, Tustin, Orange County, CA

  6. Naval Air Station Lighter than Air Hangar, wood construction horizontal ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Naval Air Station Lighter than Air Hangar, wood construction horizontal rolling door. Drawing no. 2122 820. - Marine Corps Air Station Tustin, East of Red Hill Avenue between Edinger Avenue & Barranca Parkway, Tustin, Orange County, CA

  7. 7. NORTH SIDE CHESTNUT ST. (horizontal line) BETWEEN THIRD (left) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. NORTH SIDE CHESTNUT ST. (horizontal line) BETWEEN THIRD (left) AND BREAD (right) STS., SHOWING OLD BUILDINGS - Independence National Historical Park, Walnut, Sixth, Chestnut & Second Streets, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  8. 16. INDEPENDENCE HALL LOOKING SOUTH ON CHESTNUT ST. (horizontal line) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. INDEPENDENCE HALL LOOKING SOUTH ON CHESTNUT ST. (horizontal line) BETWEEN SIXTH (right) AND FIFTH (left) STS. - Independence National Historical Park, Walnut, Sixth, Chestnut & Second Streets, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  9. 2. EAST ELEVATION OF POWER PLANT TEST STAND (HORIZONTAL TEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. EAST ELEVATION OF POWER PLANT TEST STAND (HORIZONTAL TEST STAND REMNANTS OF BUILDING-BLANK WHITE WALL ONLY ORIGINAL REMAINS. - Marshall Space Flight Center, East Test Area, Power Plant Test Stand, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  10. 10. INTERIOR VIEW OF BUILDING 106, SHOWING HORIZONTAL CATAPULT, LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. INTERIOR VIEW OF BUILDING 106, SHOWING HORIZONTAL CATAPULT, LOOKING NORTHEAST - Frankford Arsenal, Building No. 106, South of Tacony Street between Bridge Street & tracks of former Pennsylvania Railroad, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  11. 9. INTERIOR VIEW OF BUILDING 106, SHOWING HORIZONTAL CATAPULT, LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. INTERIOR VIEW OF BUILDING 106, SHOWING HORIZONTAL CATAPULT, LOOKING NORTHEAST - Frankford Arsenal, Building No. 106, South of Tacony Street between Bridge Street & tracks of former Pennsylvania Railroad, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  12. 7. Underside of Roadbed (Interior beams cast horizontal, imprints of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Underside of Roadbed (Interior beams cast horizontal, imprints of timbers used as formwork visible on abutment walls and beams) - North Bridge, Spanning Quarton Lake branch of River Rouge, Birmingham, Oakland County, MI

  13. 7. Underside of Roadbed (Interior beams cast horizontal, imprints of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Underside of Roadbed (Interior beams cast horizontal, imprints of timbers used as formwork visible on abutment walls and beams) - South Bridge, Spanning Quarton Lake branch of River Rouge, Birmingham, Oakland County, MI

  14. 15. Detail of Well Head Showing Horizontal Release Pipe for ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. Detail of Well Head Showing Horizontal Release Pipe for Natural Gas, Looking North - David Renfrew Oil Rig, East side of Connoquenessing Creek, 0.4 mile North of confluence with Thorn Creek, Renfrew, Butler County, PA

  15. 5. HORIZONTAL COOLEDWATER STORAGE TANKS. Hot Springs National Park, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. HORIZONTAL COOLED-WATER STORAGE TANKS. - Hot Springs National Park, Bathhouse Row, Fordyce Bathhouse: Mechanical & Piping Systems, State Highway 7, 1 mile north of U.S. Highway 70, Hot Springs, Garland County, AR

  16. Determination of Elastic Twist in Horizontal Axis Wind Turbines (HAWTs)

    SciTech Connect

    Stoddard, F.; Nelson, V.; Starcher, K.; Andrews, B.

    2006-06-01

    This report presents the results of a project at the Alternative Energy Institute (AEI) which measured and calculated the elastic twist of three representative composite horizontal-axis blades: Carter 300, Gougeon ESI 54, and UTRC 8 kW.

  17. 36. ISLAND PLANT: Nos. 1 AND 2 TWENTYSIX INCH HORIZONTAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    36. ISLAND PLANT: Nos. 1 AND 2 TWENTY-SIX INCH HORIZONTAL SAMSON TURBINES - American Falls Water, Power & Light Company, Island Power Plant, Snake River, below American Falls Dam, American Falls, Power County, ID

  18. 13. DETAIL OF BEVEL GEAR TRANSFERRING HORIZONTAL DRIVE FROM MAIN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. DETAIL OF BEVEL GEAR TRANSFERRING HORIZONTAL DRIVE FROM MAIN WATERWHEEL SHAFT TO VERTICAL SHAFT DRIVING COFFEE HUSKING MILL ON SECOND FLOOR - Hacienda Cafetalera Santa Clara, Coffee Mill, KM 19, PR Route 372, Hacienda La Juanita, Yauco Municipio, PR

  19. Energy Security, Innovation & Sustainability Initiative

    SciTech Connect

    2010-04-30

    More than a dozen energy experts convened in Houston, Texas, on February 13, 2009, for the first in a series of four regionally-based energy summits being held by the Council on Competitiveness. The Southern Energy Summit was hosted by Marathon Oil Corporation, and participants explored the public policy, business and technological challenges to increasing the diversity and sustainability of U.S. energy supplies. There was strong consensus that no single form of energy can satisfy the projected doubling, if not tripling, of demand by the year 2050 while also meeting pressing environmental challenges, including climate change. Innovative technology such as carbon capture and storage, new mitigation techniques and alternative forms of energy must all be brought to bear. However, unlike breakthroughs in information technology, advancing broad-based energy innovation requires an enormous scale that must be factored into any equation that represents an energy solution. Further, the time frame for developing alternative forms of energy is much longer than many believe and is not understood by the general public, whose support for sustainability is critical. Some panelists estimated that it will take more than 50 years to achieve the vision of an energy system that is locally tailored and has tremendous diversity in generation. A long-term commitment to energy sustainability may also require some game-changing strategies that calm volatile energy markets and avoid political cycles. Taking a page from U.S. economic history, one panelist suggested the creation of an independent Federal Energy Reserve Board not unlike the Federal Reserve. The board would be independent and influence national decisions on energy supply, technology, infrastructure and the nation's carbon footprint to better calm the volatile energy market. Public-private efforts are critical. Energy sustainability will require partnerships with the federal government, such as the U.S. Department of Energy

  20. Robust syntaxin-4 immunoreactivity in mammalian horizontal cell processes

    PubMed Central

    HIRANO, ARLENE A.; BRANDSTÄTTER, JOHANN HELMUT; VILA, ALEJANDRO; BRECHA, NICHOLAS C.

    2009-01-01

    Horizontal cells mediate inhibitory feed-forward and feedback communication in the outer retina; however, mechanisms that underlie transmitter release from mammalian horizontal cells are poorly understood. Toward determining whether the molecular machinery for exocytosis is present in horizontal cells, we investigated the localization of syntaxin-4, a SNARE protein involved in targeting vesicles to the plasma membrane, in mouse, rat, and rabbit retinae using immunocytochemistry. We report robust expression of syntaxin-4 in the outer plexiform layer of all three species. Syntaxin-4 occurred in processes and tips of horizontal cells, with regularly spaced, thicker sandwich-like structures along the processes. Double labeling with syntaxin-4 and calbindin antibodies, a horizontal cell marker, demonstrated syntaxin-4 localization to horizontal cell processes; whereas, double labeling with PKC antibodies, a rod bipolar cell (RBC) marker, showed a lack of co-localization, with syntaxin-4 immunolabeling occurring just distal to RBC dendritic tips. Syntaxin-4 immunolabeling occurred within VGLUT-1-immunoreactive photoreceptor terminals and underneath synaptic ribbons, labeled by CtBP2/RIBEYE antibodies, consistent with localization in invaginating horizontal cell tips at photoreceptor triad synapses. Vertical sections of retina immunostained for syntaxin-4 and peanut agglutinin (PNA) established that the prominent patches of syntaxin-4 immunoreactivity were adjacent to the base of cone pedicles. Horizontal sections through the OPL indicate a one-to-one co-localization of syntaxin-4 densities at likely all cone pedicles, with syntaxin-4 immunoreactivity interdigitating with PNA labeling. Pre-embedding immuno-electron microscopy confirmed the subcellular localization of syntaxin-4 labeling to lateral elements at both rod and cone triad synapses. Finally, co-localization with SNAP-25, a possible binding partner of syntaxin-4, indicated co-expression of these SNARE proteins in

  1. Rate limits in silicon sheet growth - The connections between vertical and horizontal methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Paul D.; Brown, Robert A.

    1987-01-01

    Meniscus-defined techniques for the growth of thin silicon sheets fall into two categories: vertical and horizontal growth. The interactions of the temperature field and the crystal shape are analyzed for both methods using two-dimensional finite-element models which include heat transfer and capillarity. Heat transfer in vertical growth systems is dominated by conduction in the melt and the crystal, with almost flat melt/crystal interfaces that are perpendicular to the direction of growth. The high axial temperature gradients characteristic of vertical growth lead to high thermal stresses. The maximum growth rate is also limited by capillarity which can restrict the conduction of heat from the melt into the crystal. In horizontal growth the melt/crystal interface stretches across the surface of the melt pool many times the crystal thickness, and low growth rates are achievable with careful temperature control. With a moderate axial temperature gradient in the sheet a substantial portion of the latent heat conducts along the sheet and the surface of the melt pool becomes supercooled, leading to dendritic growth. The thermal supercooling is surpressed by lowering the axial gradient in the crystal; this configuration is the most desirable for the growth of high quality crystals. An expression derived from scaling analysis relating the growth rate and the crucible temperature is shown to be reliable for horizontal growth.

  2. SNAP25 Expression in Mammalian Retinal Horizontal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hirano, Arlene A.; Brandstätter, Johann Helmut; Morgans, Catherine W.; Brecha, Nicholas C.

    2014-01-01

    Horizontal cells mediate inhibitory feedforward and feedback lateral interactions in the outer retina at photoreceptor terminals and bipolar cell dendrites; however, the mechanisms that underlie synaptic transmission from mammalian horizontal cells are poorly understood. The localization of a vesicular γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporter (VGAT) to horizontal cell processes in primate and rodent retinae suggested that mammalian horizontal cells release transmitter in a vesicular manner. Toward determining whether the molecular machinery for vesicular transmitter release is present in horizontal cells, we investigated the expression of SNAP25 (synaptosomal-associated protein of 25 kDa), a key SNARE protein, by immunocytochemistry with cell type-specific markers in the retinae of mouse, rat, rabbit, and monkey. Different commercial antibodies to SNAP25 were tested on vertical sections of retina. We report the robust expression of SNAP25 in both plexiform layers. Double labeling with SNAP25 and calbindin antibodies demonstrated that horizontal cell processes and their endings in photoreceptor triad synapses were strongly labeled for both proteins in mouse, rat, rabbit, and monkey retinae. Double labeling with parvalbumin antibodies in monkey retina verified SNAP25 immunoreactivity in all horizontal cells. Pre-embedding immunoelectron microscopy in rabbit retina confirmed expression of SNAP25 in lateral elements within photoreceptor triad synapses. The SNAP25 immunoreactivity in the plexiform layers and outer nuclear layer fell into at least three patterns depending on the antibody, suggesting a differential distribution of SNAP25 isoforms. The presence of SNAP25a and SNAP25b isoforms in mouse retina was established by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. SNAP25 expression in mammalian horizontal cells along with other SNARE proteins is consistent with vesicular exocytosis. PMID:21280047

  3. SATURATED-SUBCOOLED STRATIFIED FLOW IN HORIZONTAL PIPES

    SciTech Connect

    Richard Schultz

    2010-08-01

    Advanced light water reactor systems are designed to use passive emergency core cooling systems with horizontal pipes that provide highly subcooled water from water storage tanks or passive heat exchangers to the reactor vessel core under accident conditions. Because passive systems are driven by density gradients, the horizontal pipes often do not flow full and thus have a free surface that is exposed to saturated steam and stratified flow is present.

  4. Horizontal slim-hole drilling with coiled tubing; An operator's experience

    SciTech Connect

    Ramos, A.B. Jr.; Faahel, R.A.; Chaffin, M.G.; Pulis, K.H. )

    1992-10-01

    What is believed to be the first horizontal well drilled with directionally controlled coiled tubing recently was completed in the Austin Chalk formation. an existing well was sidetracked out of 4 1/2-in. casing with a conventional whipstock. an average build rate of 15[degrees]/100 ft was achieved in the curve, and a 1,458-ft vertical section was drilled with 2-in. coiled tubing, downhole mud motors, wireline steering tools, a mechanical downhole orienting tool, and 3 7/8-in. bits. This paper discusses the orienting and directional tools and techniques developed during this operation. It also describes improvements made for the second well.

  5. Sonar tracking of horizontally moving targets by the big brown bat Eptesicus fuscus.

    PubMed

    Masters, W M; Moffat, A J; Simmons, J A

    1985-06-14

    When following a moving target, echolocating bats (Eptesicus fuscus) keep their heads aimed at the target's position. This tracking behavior seems not to involve predicting the target's trajectory, but is achieved by the bat's pointing its head at the target's last known position. The bat obtains frequent position updates by emitting sonar signals at a high rate. After the lag between head and target positions and the nonunity tracking gain were corrected for, bats' tracking accuracy in the horizontal plane was +/- 1.6 degree.

  6. Productivity and Injectivity of Horizontal Wells

    SciTech Connect

    Aziz, Khalid; Hewett, Thomas A.; Arbabi, Sepehr; Smith, Marilyn

    1999-11-16

    The generation of suitable simulation grids for heterogeneous media and specific discretization issues that arise. Streamlines and equipotentials are used to define our base grids. Since streamlines are concentrated in high velocity regions they provide a natural means of clustering fine grid cells in crucial flow regions. For complex configurations and particularly for strongly heterogeneous regions the resulting grid cells can become very distorted due to extremely high curvatures. Two types of cell centered formulation are examined together with a cell vertex-point distributed scheme. Important distinctions are found for highly distorted cells. The new grids are tested for accuracy in terms of critical breakthrough parameters and it is shown that a much higher level of grid resolution is required by conventional simulators in order to achieve results that are comparable with those computed on relatively coarse streamline-potential grids.

  7. Achieving closure at Fernald

    SciTech Connect

    Bradburne, John; Patton, Tisha C.

    2001-02-25

    When Fluor Fernald took over the management of the Fernald Environmental Management Project in 1992, the estimated closure date of the site was more than 25 years into the future. Fluor Fernald, in conjunction with DOE-Fernald, introduced the Accelerated Cleanup Plan, which was designed to substantially shorten that schedule and save taxpayers more than $3 billion. The management of Fluor Fernald believes there are three fundamental concerns that must be addressed by any contractor hoping to achieve closure of a site within the DOE complex. They are relationship management, resource management and contract management. Relationship management refers to the interaction between the site and local residents, regulators, union leadership, the workforce at large, the media, and any other interested stakeholder groups. Resource management is of course related to the effective administration of the site knowledge base and the skills of the workforce, the attraction and retention of qualified a nd competent technical personnel, and the best recognition and use of appropriate new technologies. Perhaps most importantly, resource management must also include a plan for survival in a flat-funding environment. Lastly, creative and disciplined contract management will be essential to effecting the closure of any DOE site. Fluor Fernald, together with DOE-Fernald, is breaking new ground in the closure arena, and ''business as usual'' has become a thing of the past. How Fluor Fernald has managed its work at the site over the last eight years, and how it will manage the new site closure contract in the future, will be an integral part of achieving successful closure at Fernald.

  8. You have no credibility: nursing students' experiences of horizontal violence.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Janette; Bowen, Isla; Reid, Amanda

    2007-05-01

    Horizontal violence is a significant issue confronting the nursing profession both in Australia and internationally. The term horizontal violence is used to describe bullying and aggression involving inter-group conflict. Some evidence suggests that nursing students commonly experience this during clinical placement(s). Despite the current shortage of nurses and the fact that clinical placement experiences may influence whether students remain in the nursing profession, there has been little research undertaken on this topic. This study used a questionnaire to investigate 152 second and third year nursing student's experiences of horizontal violence (either directly experienced or witnessed). Analysis identified five major themes: humiliation and lack of respect; powerlessness and becoming invisible; hierarchical nature of horizontal violence; coping strategies; and future employment choices. More than half of the sample indicated that they had experienced or witnessed horizontal violence; importantly, most of these (51% of the total sample) also indicated that it would impact on their future career and/or their employment choices. Strategies are discussed that could be implemented to reduce the effect of horizontal violence, including giving a higher priority to debriefing within a supportive university environment, and teaching assertiveness and conflict resolution skills within the Bachelor of Nursing Degree. PMID:17689439

  9. Utilization of horizontal drainholes in developing multilayered reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Siddiqui, T.K.; Al Khatib, H.M.; Sultan, A.J.

    1995-10-01

    Drilling deviated wells in the Upper Zakum field did not allow to develop this field to its full potential. It is an offshore field, only a limited number of platforms are available. Therefore, it may become uneconomical to drill a large number of deviated wells for the full development of the reservoirs. Application of horizontal wells in this filed helped in redeveloping the reservoirs. Data were integrated form different petroleum engineering disciplines and analyzed to identify problems in the reservoirs. Horizontal wells played a vital role to resolve various problems faced in different parts of these heterogeneous reservoirs. This paper reviews the field development strategy which was further refined with time as more horizontal wells were drilled in this field. Performance of horizontal wells have been compared and evaluated with the deviated wells. A brief discussion on drilling, completion, and stimulation procedures used for horizontal wells has also been included. This study contributed to some extent in resolving reservoir problems ranging from enhancement of productivity index, development of reservoir flanks, and recovering un-swept oil from water flooded layers with the applications of horizontal wells.

  10. Should sex-ratio distorting parasites abandon horizontal transmission?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Sex-ratio distorting parasites are of interest due to their effects upon host population dynamics and their potential to influence the evolution of host sex determination systems. In theory, the ability to distort host sex-ratios allows a parasite with efficient vertical (hereditary) transmission to dispense completely with horizontal (infectious) transmission. However, recent empirical studies indicate that some sex-ratio distorting parasites have retained the capability for horizontal transmission. Results Numerical simulations using biologically realistic parameters suggest that a feminising parasite is only likely to lose the capability for horizontal transmission if its host occurs at low density and/or has a male-biased primary sex ratio. It is also demonstrated that even a small amount of horizontal transmission can allow multiple feminising parasites to coexist within a single host population. Finally it is shown that, by boosting its host's rate of population growth, a feminising parasite can increase its own horizontal transmission and allow the invasion of other, more virulent parasites. Conclusions The prediction that sex-ratio distorting parasites are likely to retain a degree of horizontal transmission has important implications for the epidemiology and host-parasite interactions of these organisms. It may also explain the frequent co-occurrence of several sex-ratio distorting parasite species in nature. PMID:22188680

  11. Sustainable Technology at WPI

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartelson, Jon

    2009-01-01

    Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) seeks to foster a community that produces sustainable solutions in all facets of campus life: (1) teaching; (2) research; (3) service; and (4) administrative operations. The university strives to model the three tenets of sustainability (environmental preservation, economic prosperity, and social equity for…

  12. NEWS - SUSTAINABILITY SCIENCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A series of papers contributed by a diversified collection of researchers endeavor to depict sustainability science as an incomplete but necessary global endeavor. Their concern rests on the perceived inability of science and technology to solely lead the development of sustain...

  13. Sustainability Actions in Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webster, Jenni; Robinson, Leigh; Trimper, Kelvin; Salagaras, Stan

    2007-01-01

    This article presents Australian case studies of educational buildings with environmentally sustainable designs. This includes the new public school complex for Williamstown High School and the Peel Learning Centre designed for Murdoc University. This article also includes sustainability initiatives by private developers working in collaboration…

  14. Developing Sustainable Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, Brent, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    Developing and sustaining leaders is a major challenge for all those involved in education today. This book contains a collection of essays from recognized authors to provide insights, frameworks and ideas on how to sustain school leaders and develop values-based leadership. It also offers guidance on countering short-term management solutions,…

  15. Sustainability and Scotland's Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Her Majesty's Inspectorate of Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This report evaluates how effectively Scotland's colleges have embraced and taken forward sustainability in the context of the Scottish Government's commitment to improve Scotland's natural and built environment and the sustainable use and enjoyment of it. "Greener Scotland" is one of the five strategic objectives that form part of the…

  16. Sustainability Takes Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downey, Peter R.

    2004-01-01

    This is a story of transformation at Sheffield Hallam University, UK. It describes the progress and thinking along the path to introducing the university's vision of sustainability since the conclusion of EMSU 1999. It describes how sustainable practice has been incorporated within the formal democratic structures of the university, and describes…

  17. Sustainability at BPA 2012

    SciTech Connect

    2012-12-01

    BPA’s Sustainability Action Plan is grounded in our commitment to environmental stewardship and Executive Order 13514 that calls on the federal agencies to “lead by example” by setting a 2020 greenhouse gas emissions target, increasing energy efficiency; reducing fleet petroleum consumption; conserving water; reducing waste; supporting sustainable communities; and leveraging federal purchasing power to promoting environmentally responsible products and technologies.

  18. Sustainability in the Union

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Patrick; Taylor, John

    2012-01-01

    Operating as the center of student life, college unions have a central role to teach citizenship, social responsibility, and leadership. Unions can serve as locations for education and conversations about sustainability, as well as for organizations operationally and programmatically engaged in sustainable practices. In this chapter, the authors…

  19. Sustainability as Moral Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunn, Merrily S.; Hart-Steffes, Jeanne S.

    2012-01-01

    When one considers sustainability as a moral action, there are equally complex realities at hand--climate change, resource depletion, water and land rights. One author describes this broad sense of sustainability as "the connection of specific social and environmental problems to the functioning of human and ecological systems" (Jenkins, 2011).…

  20. Sustainable soils: Synthesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The six chapters of the "Sustainable Soils" section of the book "Soil Ecology and Ecoystem Services" support the fundamental role that soil biota play in sustaining soil structure and nutrient cycling as the foundation for nearly all ecosystem services while illustrating the challenges of documentin...

  1. Implementing Sustainable Institutional Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shepard, Joseph; Johnson, Lewis

    2009-01-01

    Recent research has found that few institutions of higher education implemented the necessary strategies to make their campuses sustainable (Thompson and Green 2005). Ironically, universities are the segment of society with the most access to the intellectual capital needed to provide sound sustainable practices and measurements. Having top…

  2. Leading Sustainability in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, Katie

    2016-01-01

    What is the role of schools, and more specifically school leadership, in the transition to a sustainable future for humankind? What different forms of leadership are needed to enable this role? The challenges are huge and complex and for those of us engaged in promoting sustainability learning, it is clear that the issue has never been more…

  3. Sustaining the wild equals sustaining the world.

    PubMed

    Nelson, G

    1994-01-01

    Sustainable development and carrying capacity are concepts that denote meeting society's needs without compromising the survival of future generations. The United States and other industrialized countries are pursuing a self-destructive course when fueling their economies by consuming their capital and degrading and depleting their resource base. Maximum exploitation of all resources has been the guiding ethic without paying respect to the environmental consequences. A sustainable society is still possible if strong political leadership and an ecologically literate society with an environmental ethic evolves. In the 1990s the world's population is calculated to increase to 6.3 billion people, the population of the United States already exceeds its carrying capacity and neither of these population increases are sustainable in the long run. In 1916 the US had 98 million people, and in 1994 it had about 260 million and it is still growing. The consequences are already obvious: the National Park System had just 358,000 visitors in 1916, 33 million in 1950, 172 million in 1970, and over 270 million in 1993. Often economists are an impediment to a sustainable economy because they fail to factor in the accumulated environmental deficit or annual cost of environmental deterioration when measuring annual economic output. Fortunately, in the US a conservation ethic is beginning to develop that will eventually become a strong social, political, and economic force. For instance, Wisconsin has mandated environmental education in every school from kindergarten through 12th grade. Such a program will provide the moral and political support to move the country to a sustainable economy. Even losing nations have recovered from World War II, but there is no recovery from destroyed ecosystems.

  4. The challenge of sustainability

    SciTech Connect

    Orr, D.W.

    1993-01-01

    This paper discusses sustainability in a world that has changed rapidly. The author suggests that ecological assumptions embedded in communism and capitalism are badly flawed, but the flaws were not apparent when there were fewer than a billion people on earth living at low technology levels. Sustaining the earth's vital signs is a challenge to our perception of time, and the numbers - population, environmental damage, oil consumption, waste disposal - are too large to comprehend easily. There is a global debate about what sustainability means. In fact the challenge of sustainability is 6 different challenges: overcoming the tendency to deny inconvenient realities; establishing accurate indicators of human and ecological health; questions about the kinds of technology necessary to make the transition to sustainability; education; the need for an emotional bond between man and nature; rebuilding the existing democratic institutions. 16 refs.

  5. The sustainability solutions agenda.

    PubMed

    Sarewitz, Daniel; Clapp, Richard; Crumbley, Cathy; Kriebel, David; Tickner, Joel

    2012-01-01

    Progress toward a more sustainable society is usually described in a "knowledge-first" framework, where science characterizes a problem in terms of its causes and mechanisms as a basis for subsequent action. Here we present a different approach-A Sustainability Solutions Agenda (SSA)-which seeks from the outset to identify the possible pathways to solutions. SSA focuses on uncovering paths to sustainability by improving current technological practice, and applying existing knowledge to identify and evaluate technological alternatives. SSA allows people and organizations to transition toward greater sustainability without sacrificing essential technological functions, and therefore does not threaten the interests that depend on those functions. Whereas knowledge-first approaches view scientific information as sufficient to convince people to take the right actions, even if those actions are perceived as against their immediate interests, SSA allows values to evolve toward greater attention to sustainability as a result of the positive experience of solving a problem. PMID:22776577

  6. The sustainability solutions agenda.

    PubMed

    Sarewitz, Daniel; Clapp, Richard; Crumbley, Cathy; Kriebel, David; Tickner, Joel

    2012-01-01

    Progress toward a more sustainable society is usually described in a "knowledge-first" framework, where science characterizes a problem in terms of its causes and mechanisms as a basis for subsequent action. Here we present a different approach-A Sustainability Solutions Agenda (SSA)-which seeks from the outset to identify the possible pathways to solutions. SSA focuses on uncovering paths to sustainability by improving current technological practice, and applying existing knowledge to identify and evaluate technological alternatives. SSA allows people and organizations to transition toward greater sustainability without sacrificing essential technological functions, and therefore does not threaten the interests that depend on those functions. Whereas knowledge-first approaches view scientific information as sufficient to convince people to take the right actions, even if those actions are perceived as against their immediate interests, SSA allows values to evolve toward greater attention to sustainability as a result of the positive experience of solving a problem.

  7. Large-Actuator-Number Horizontal Path Correction of Atmospheric Turbulence utilizing an Interferometric Phase Conjugate Engine

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, K L; Stappaerts, E A; Gavel, D; Tucker, J; Silva, D A; Wilks, S C; Olivier, S S; Olsen, J

    2004-08-25

    An adaptive optical system used to correct horizontal beam propagation paths has been demonstrated. This system utilizes an interferometric wave-front sensor and a large-actuator-number MEMS-based spatial light modulator to correct the aberrations incurred by the beam after propagation along the path. Horizontal path correction presents a severe challenge to adaptive optics systems due to the short atmospheric transverse coherence length and the high degree of scintillation incurred by laser propagation along these paths. Unlike wave-front sensors that detect phase gradients, however, the interferometric wave-front sensor measures the wrapped phase directly. Because the system operates with nearly monochromatic light and uses a segmented spatial light modulator, it does not require that the phase be unwrapped to provide a correction and it also does not require a global reconstruction of the wave-front to determine the phase as required by gradient detecting wave-front sensors. As a result, issues with branch points are eliminated. Because the atmospheric probe beam is mixed with a large amplitude reference beam, it can be made to operate in a photon noise limited regime making its performance relatively unaffected by scintillation. The MEMS-based spatial light modulator in the system contains 1024 pixels and is controlled to speeds in excess of 800 Hz, enabling its use for correction of horizontal path beam propagation. In this article results are shown of both atmospheric characterization with the system and open loop horizontal path correction of a 1.53 micron laser by the system. To date Strehl ratios of greater than 0.5 have been achieved.

  8. Achievement Goals and Achievement Emotions: A Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Chiungjung

    2011-01-01

    This meta-analysis synthesized 93 independent samples (N = 30,003) in 77 studies that reported in 78 articles examining correlations between achievement goals and achievement emotions. Achievement goals were meaningfully associated with different achievement emotions. The correlations of mastery and mastery approach goals with positive achievement…

  9. Advanced Horizontal Well Recirculation Systems for Geothermal Energy Recovery in Sedimentary and Crystalline Formations

    SciTech Connect

    Bruno, Mike S.; Detwiler, Russell L.; Lao, Kang; Serajian, Vahid; Elkhoury, Jean; Diessl, Julia; White, Nicky

    2012-12-13

    There is increased recognition that geothermal energy resources are more widespread than previously thought, with potential for providing a significant amount of sustainable clean energy worldwide. Recent advances in drilling, completion, and production technology from the oil and gas industry can now be applied to unlock vast new geothermal resources, with some estimates for potential electricity generation from geothermal energy now on the order of 2 million megawatts. The primary objectives of this DOE research effort are to develop and document optimum design configurations and operating practices to produce geothermal power from hot permeable sedimentary and crystalline formations using advanced horizontal well recirculation systems. During Phase I of this research project Terralog Technologies USA and The University of California, Irvine (UCI), have completed preliminary investigations and documentation of advanced design concepts for paired horizontal well recirculation systems, optimally configured for geothermal energy recovery in permeable sedimentary and crystalline formations of varying structure and material properties. We have also identified significant geologic resources appropriate for application of such technology. The main challenge for such recirculation systems is to optimize both the design configuration and the operating practices for cost-effective geothermal energy recovery. These will be strongly influenced by sedimentary formation properties, including thickness and dip, temperature, thermal conductivity, heat capacity, permeability, and porosity; and by working fluid properties.

  10. Decade of Education for Sustainable Development (DESD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshikawa, Hiroyuki

    The purpose of this paper is to clarify the aim, contents and significance of the education for sustainability (ESD) , together with the background of the Japanese proposal at WSSD. In 2002, a worldwide activity for the education for sustainable development was proposed by the Japanese Government in the occasion of World Summit of Sustainable Development (WSSD) which was held at Johannesburg. The proposal was formally adopted by the General Assembly of the United Nations in 2005 and then the Decade of Education for Sustainable Development (DESD) was inaugurated by UNESCO which was designated its lead agency. Prior to the Japanese proposal, there have been discussions about the necessity of the education of sustainable development, because it requests people to think nature and society in considerably different manner from the traditional way. The characters of the traditional education such as disciplinary structure of knowledge, the basic aspects of science that are directed to analysis and separation of natural sciences and social sciences ; reveal the insufficiency of educating people who would act and confront the difficult challenges of sustainability. The Japanese proposal has given a timely trigger for the world to start cooperative actions for the ESD. We are now on the half way of DESD and must step into the phase of integrating our achievements cooperatively, not only within Japan but also internationally.

  11. A science framework (SF) for agricultural sustainability.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Ferdous; Al-Amin, Abul Q; Masud, Muhammad M; Kari, Fatimah; Mohamad, Zeeda

    2015-09-01

    The significance of Science Framework (SF) to date is receiving more acceptances all over the world to address agricultural sustainability. The professional views, however, advocate that the SF known as Mega Science Framework (MSF) in the transitional economies is not converging effectively in many ways for the agricultural sustainability. Specially, MSF in transitional economies is mostly incapable to identify barriers in agricultural research, inadequate to frame policy gaps with the goal of strategizing the desired sustainability in agricultural technology and innovation, inconsistent in finding to identify the inequities, and incompleteness to rebuild decisions. Therefore, this study critically evaluates the components of MSF in transitional economies and appraises the significance, dispute and illegitimate issue to achieve successful sustainable development. A sound and an effective MSF can be developed when there is an inter-linkage within principal components such as of (a) national priorities, (b) specific research on agricultural sustainability, (c) adequate agricultural research and innovation, and (d) alternative policy alteration. This maiden piece of research which is first its kind has been conducted in order to outline the policy direction to have an effective science framework for agricultural sustainability.

  12. Entrepreneur achievement. Liaoning province.

    PubMed

    Zhao, R

    1994-03-01

    This paper reports the successful entrepreneurial endeavors of members of a 20-person women's group in Liaoning Province, China. Jing Yuhong, a member of the Family Planning Association at Shileizi Village, Dalian City, provided the basis for their achievements by first building an entertainment/study room in her home to encourage married women to learn family planning. Once stocked with books, magazines, pamphlets, and other materials on family planning and agricultural technology, dozens of married women in the neighborhood flocked voluntarily to the room. Yuhong also set out to give these women a way to earn their own income as a means of helping then gain greater equality with their husbands and exert greater control over their personal reproductive and social lives. She gave a section of her farming land to the women's group, loaned approximately US$5200 to group members to help them generate income from small business initiatives, built a livestock shed in her garden for the group to raise marmots, and erected an awning behind her house under which mushrooms could be grown. The investment yielded $12,000 in the first year, allowing each woman to keep more than $520 in dividends. Members then soon began going to fairs in the capital and other places to learn about the outside world, and have successfully ventured out on their own to generate individual incomes. Ten out of twenty women engaged in these income-generating activities asked for and got the one-child certificate.

  13. Where the Grass Grows Again: Knowledge Exchange in the Sustainable Agriculture Movement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hassanein, Neva; Kloppenburg, Jack R., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    Intensive rotational grazing by Wisconsin dairy farmers represents a local expression of the sustainable agriculture movement. Contrary to interpretations that view local knowledge in agriculture as idiosyncratic, these graziers use horizontal forms of organizing and information exchange to overcome the limits of personal experience and share…

  14. Design and Application of Novel Horizontal Circulating Fluidized Bed Boiler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lit, Q. H.; Zhang, Y. G.; Meng, A. H.

    The vertical circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boiler has been found wide application in power generation and tends to be enlarged in capacity. Because CFB is one of environment friendly and high efficiency combustion technologies, the CFB boiler has also been expected to be used in the industrial area, such as textile mill, region heating, brewery, seed drying and so on. However, the necessary height of furnace is hard to be implemented for CFB with especially small capacity. Thereby, a novel horizontal circulating fluidized bed boiler has been proposed and developed. The horizontal CFB is composed of primary combustion chamber, secondary combustion chamber, burnout chamber, cyclone, loop seal, heat recovery area. The primary combustion chamber is a riser like as that in vertical CFB, and the secondary combustion chamber is a downward passage that is a natural extension of the primary riser, which can reduce the overall height of the boiler. In some extent, the burnout chamber is also the extension of primary riser. The capacity of horizontal CFB is about 4.2-24.5MWth (6-35t/h) steam output or equivalent hot water supply. The hot water boiler of 7MWth and steam boilers of 4.2MWth (6t/h) and 10.5MWth (15t/h) are all designed and working well now. The three units of hot water horizontal CFB boiler were erected in the Neimenggu Autonomous Region, Huhehaote city for region heating. The three units of steam horizontal CFB has been installed in Yunnan, Jiang Xi and Guangdong provinces, respectively. The basic principle for horizontal CFB and experiences for designing and operating are presented in this paper. Some discussions are also given to demonstrate the promising future of horizontal CFB.

  15. Cleanup/stimulation of a horizontal wellbore using propellants

    SciTech Connect

    Rougeot, J.E.; Lauterbach, K.A.

    1993-01-01

    This report documents the stimulation/cleanup of a horizontal well bore (Wilson 25) using propellants. The Wilson 25 is a Bartlesville Sand well located in the Flatrock Field, Osage County, Oklahoma. The Wilson 25 was drilled to determine if horizontal drilling could be used as a means to economically recover primary oil that had been left in place in a mostly abandoned oil field because of the adverse effects of water coning. Pump testing of the Wilson 25 horizontal well bore before cleanup or stimulation produced 6 barrels of oil and .84 barrels of water per day. The high percentage of daily oil production to total daily fluid production indicated that the horizontal well bore had accessed potentially economical oil reserves if the fluid production rate could be increased by performing a cleanup/stimulation treatment. Propellants were selected as an inexpensive means to stimulate and cleanup the near well bore area in a uniform manner. The ignition of a propellant creates a large volume of gas which penetrates the formation, creating numerous short cracks through which hydrocarbons can travel into the well bore. More conventional stimulation/cleanup techniques were either significantly more expensive, less likely to treat uniformly, or could not be confined to the near well bore area. Three different propellant torpedo designs were tested with a total of 304' of horizontal well bore being shot and producible. The initial test shot caused 400' of the horizontal well bore to become plugged off, and subsequently it could not be production tested. The second and third test shots were production tested, with the oil production being increased 458% and 349%, respectively, on a per foot basis. The Wilson 25 results indicate that a propellant shot treatment is an economically viable means to cleanup/stimulate a horizontal well bore.

  16. Sustainability Infused Curriculum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibarra, D. L.

    2015-12-01

    The Independent Schools Foundation Academy (ISF) in Hong Kong established a sustainability policy in 2015, which explicitly states, "an experimentally integrated, environmentally and ethically sustainable system of science education and conservation practices based on the 2012 Jeju Declaration of the World Conservation Congress will be implemented through the school". ISF Academy is a private Chinese bilingual school in Hong Kong serving over 1500 students K-12, following the framework and curriculum of the International Baccalaureate Organization (IBO). The strategy behind the implementation of this policy includes: development of a scientific sustainable curriculum that is age appropriate; establish a culture of sustainability within the ISF community and beyond to the wider HK community; install sustainable infrastructure that allows students to learn; and learn first hand sustainable living practices. It is well understood that solutions to the environmental challenges facing Hong Kong and our planet will require multiple disciplines. The current sustainability programs at ISF include: a) a whole school aerobic food waste composting system and organic farming, b) energy consumption monitoring of existing buildings, c) upcoming installation of an air pollution monitoring equipment that will correlate with the AQHI data collected by the Hong Kong government, d) a Renewable Energy Education Center (REEC) that will teach students about RE and also produce solar energy for classroom consumption, and e) student lead environmental group that manages the paper and used cooking oil recycling on campus. The Shuyuan Science and Sustainability faculty work closely with classroom teachers to ensure that the above mentioned projects are incorporated into the curriculum throughout the school. Interdisciplinary units (IDU) of study are being developed that encourage faculty and students to work across subject areas. Projects include Personal Projects, Extended Essays

  17. Sustainability. Systems integration for global sustainability.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianguo; Mooney, Harold; Hull, Vanessa; Davis, Steven J; Gaskell, Joanne; Hertel, Thomas; Lubchenco, Jane; Seto, Karen C; Gleick, Peter; Kremen, Claire; Li, Shuxin

    2015-02-27

    Global sustainability challenges, from maintaining biodiversity to providing clean air and water, are closely interconnected yet often separately studied and managed. Systems integration—holistic approaches to integrating various components of coupled human and natural systems—is critical to understand socioeconomic and environmental interconnections and to create sustainability solutions. Recent advances include the development and quantification of integrated frameworks that incorporate ecosystem services, environmental footprints, planetary boundaries, human-nature nexuses, and telecoupling. Although systems integration has led to fundamental discoveries and practical applications, further efforts are needed to incorporate more human and natural components simultaneously, quantify spillover systems and feedbacks, integrate multiple spatial and temporal scales, develop new tools, and translate findings into policy and practice. Such efforts can help address important knowledge gaps, link seemingly unconnected challenges, and inform policy and management decisions.

  18. Sustainability. Systems integration for global sustainability.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianguo; Mooney, Harold; Hull, Vanessa; Davis, Steven J; Gaskell, Joanne; Hertel, Thomas; Lubchenco, Jane; Seto, Karen C; Gleick, Peter; Kremen, Claire; Li, Shuxin

    2015-02-27

    Global sustainability challenges, from maintaining biodiversity to providing clean air and water, are closely interconnected yet often separately studied and managed. Systems integration—holistic approaches to integrating various components of coupled human and natural systems—is critical to understand socioeconomic and environmental interconnections and to create sustainability solutions. Recent advances include the development and quantification of integrated frameworks that incorporate ecosystem services, environmental footprints, planetary boundaries, human-nature nexuses, and telecoupling. Although systems integration has led to fundamental discoveries and practical applications, further efforts are needed to incorporate more human and natural components simultaneously, quantify spillover systems and feedbacks, integrate multiple spatial and temporal scales, develop new tools, and translate findings into policy and practice. Such efforts can help address important knowledge gaps, link seemingly unconnected challenges, and inform policy and management decisions. PMID:25722418

  19. Contributions to Sustainability by Communities and Individuals: Problems and Prospects

    SciTech Connect

    MacGregor, D.; Tonn, B.E.

    1998-11-01

    This report examines relationships between a comprehensive set of definitions of and viewpoints on the concept of Sustainability and the abilities of communities and individuals in the United States to meet the behavioral prescriptions inherent in these definitions and viewpoints. This research is timely because sustainability is becoming a cornerstone of national and international environmental strategies designed to simultaneously achieve environmental, economic, and social goals. In the United States, many communities have adopted sustainability principles as the foundation for both their environmental protection efforts and their socioeconomic development initiatives. This research is important because it highlights serious problems communities and inviduals may have in achieving sustainability expectations, and illustrates how much work is needed to help communities and individuals overcome numerous considerable and complex constraints to sustainability.

  20. Jet mixing long horizontal storage tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Perona, J.J.; Hylton, T.D.; Youngblood, E.L.; Cummins, R.L.

    1994-12-01

    Large storage tanks may require mixing to achieve homogeneity of contents for several reasons: prior to sampling for mass balance purposes, for blending in reagents, for suspending settled solids for removal, or for use as a feed tank to a process. At ORNL, mixed waste evaporator concentrates are stored in 50,000-gal tanks, about 12 ft in diameter and 60 ft long. This tank configuration has the advantage of permitting transport by truck and therefore fabrication in the shop rather than in the field. Jet mixing experiments were carried out on two model tanks: a 230-gal (1/6-linear-scale) Plexiglas tank and a 25,000-gal tank (about 2/3 linear scale). Mixing times were measured using sodium chloride tracer and several conductivity probes distributed through the tanks. Several jet sizes and configurations were tested. One-directional and two-directional jets were tested in both tanks. Mixing times for each tank were correlated with the jet Reynolds number. Mixing times were correlated for the two tank sizes using the recirculation time for the developed jet. When the recirculation times were calculated using the distance from the nozzle to the end of the tank as the length of the developed jet, the correlation was only marginally successful. Data for the two tank sizes were correlated empirically using a modified effective jet length expressed as a function of the Reynolds number raised to the 1/3 power. Mixing experiments were simulated using the TEMTEST computer program. The simulations predicted trends correctly and were within the scatter of the experimental data with the lower jet Reynolds numbers. Agreement was not as good at high Reynolds numbers except for single nozzles in the 25,000-gal tank, where agreement was excellent over the entire range.