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Sample records for achieve thrust propellantless

  1. Propellantless AOCS Design for a 160-m, 450-kg Sailcraft of the Solar Polar Imager Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wie, Bong; Thomas, Stephanie; Paluszek, Michael; Murphy, David

    2005-01-01

    An attitude and orbit control system (AOCS) is developed for a 160-m, 450-kg solar sail spacecraft of the Solar Polar Imager (SPI) mission. The SPI mission is one of several Sun- Earth Connections solar sail roadmap missions currently envisioned by NASA. A reference SPI sailcraft consists of a 160-m, 150-kg square solar sail, a 250-kg spacecraft bus, and 50-kg science payloads, The 160-m reference sailcraft has a nominal solar thrust force of 160 mN (at 1 AU), an uncertain center-of-mass/center-of-pressure offset of +/- 0.4 m, and a characteristic acceleration of 0.35 mm/sq s. The solar sail is to be deployed after being placed into an earth escaping orbit by a conventional launch vehicle such as a Delta 11. The SPI sailcraft first spirals inwards from 1 AU to a heliocentric circular orbit at 0.48 AU, followed by a cranking orbit phase to achieve a science mission orbit at a 75-deg inclination, over a total sailing time of 6.6 yr. The solar sail will be jettisoned after achieving the science mission orbit. This paper focuses on the solar sailing phase of the SPI mission, with emphasis on the design of a reference AOCS consisting of a propellantless primary ACS and a microthruster-based secondary (optional) ACS. The primary ACS employs trim control masses running along mast lanyards for pitch/yaw control together with roll stabilizer bars at the mast tips for quadrant tilt (roll) control. The robustness and effectiveness of such a propellantless primary ACS would be enhanced by the secondary ACS which employs tip-mounted, lightweight pulsed plasma thrusters (PPTs). The microPPT-based ACS is mainly intended for attitude recovery maneuvers from off-nominal conditions. A relatively fast, 70-deg pitch reorientation within 3 hrs every half orbit during the orbit cranking phase is shown to be feasible, with the primary ACS, for possible solar observations even during the 5-yr cranking orbit phase.

  2. Analysis of gas turbine engines using water and oxygen injection to achieve high Mach numbers and high thrust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henneberry, Hugh M.; Snyder, Christopher A.

    1993-01-01

    An analysis of gas turbine engines using water and oxygen injection to enhance performance by increasing Mach number capability and by increasing thrust is described. The liquids are injected, either separately or together, into the subsonic diffuser ahead of the engine compressor. A turbojet engine and a mixed-flow turbofan engine (MFTF) are examined, and in pursuit of maximum thrust, both engines are fitted with afterburners. The results indicate that water injection alone can extend the performance envelope of both engine types by one and one-half Mach numbers at which point water-air ratios reach 17 or 18 percent and liquid specific impulse is reduced to some 390 to 470 seconds, a level about equal to the impulse of a high energy rocket engine. The envelope can be further extended, but only with increasing sacrifices in liquid specific impulse. Oxygen-airflow ratios as high as 15 percent were investigated for increasing thrust. Using 15 percent oxygen in combination with water injection at high supersonic Mach numbers resulted in thrust augmentation as high as 76 percent without any significant decrease in liquid specific impulse. The stoichiometric afterburner exit temperature increased with increasing oxygen flow, reaching 4822 deg R in the turbojet engine at a Mach number of 3.5. At the transonic Mach number of 0.95 where no water injection is needed, an oxygen-air ratio of 15 percent increased thrust by some 55 percent in both engines, along with a decrease in liquid specific impulse of 62 percent. Afterburner temperature was approximately 4700 deg R at this high thrust condition. Water and/or oxygen injection are simple and straightforward strategies to improve engine performance and they will add little to engine weight. However, if large Mach number and thrust increases are required, liquid flows become significant, so that operation at these conditions will necessarily be of short duration.

  3. Propellantless Attitude Control of Solar Sail Technology Utilizing Reflective Control Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Munday, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    Solar sails offer an opportunity for a CubeSatscale, propellant-free spacecraft technology that enables long-term and long-distance missions not possible with traditional methods. Solar sails operate using the transfer of linear momentum from photons of sunlight reflected from the surface of the sail. To propel the spacecraft, no mechanically moving parts, thrusters, or propellant are needed. However, attitude control, or orientation, is still performed using traditional methods involving reaction wheels and propellant ejection, which severely limit mission lifetime. For example, the current state of the art solutions employed by upcoming missions couple solar sails with a state of the art propellant ejection gas system. Here, the use of the gas thruster has limited the lifetime of the mission. To solve the limited mission lifetime problem, the Propellantless Attitude Control of Solar Sail Technology Utilizing Reflective Control Devices project team is working on propellantless attitude control using thin layers of material, an optical film, electrically switchable from transparent to reflective. The technology is based on a polymer-dispersed liquid crystal (PDLC), which allows this switch upon application of a voltage. This technology removes the need for propellant, which reduces weight and cost while improving performance and lifetime.

  4. Abdominal thrusts

    MedlinePlus

    ... call 911 . If the person loses consciousness, start CPR . If you are not comfortable performing abdominal thrusts, ... American Red Cross. First Aid/CPR/AED Participant's Manual. 2nd ... Red Cross; 2014. Berg RA, Hemphill R, Abella BS, et al. Part 5: ...

  5. THRUST BEARING

    DOEpatents

    Heller, P.R.

    1958-09-16

    A thrust bearing suitable for use with a rotor or blower that is to rotate about a vertical axis is descrihed. A centrifagal jack is provided so thnt the device may opernte on one hearing at starting and lower speeds, and transfer the load to another bearing at higher speeds. A low viscosity fluid is used to lubricate the higher speed operation bearing, in connection with broad hearing -surfaces, the ability to withstand great loads, and a relatively high friction loss, as contraated to the lower speed operatio;n bearing which will withstand only light thrust loads but is sufficiently frictionfree to avoid bearing seizure during slow speed or startup operation. An axially aligned shaft pin provides the bearing surface for low rotational speeds, but at higher speed, weights operating against spring tension withdraw nthe shaft pin into the bearing proper and the rotor shaft comes in contact with the large bearing surfaces.

  6. Reverse thrust performance of the QCSEE variable pitch turbofan engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samanich, N. E.; Reemsnyder, D. C.; Blodmer, H. E.

    1980-01-01

    Results of steady state reverse and forward to reverse thrust transient performance tests are presented. The original quiet, clean, short haul, experimental engine four segment variable fan nozzle was retested in reverse and compared with a continuous, 30 deg half angle conical exlet. Data indicated that the significantly more stable, higher pressure recovery flow with the fixed 30 deg exlet resulted in lower engine vibrations, lower fan blade stress, and approximately a 20 percent improvement in reverse thrust. Objective reverse thrust of 35 percent of takeoff thrust was reached. Thrust response of less than 1.5 sec was achieved for the approach and the takeoff to reverse thrust transients.

  7. Low Thrust Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    This video presents an overview of low thrust rocket engine propulsion concepts for space missions. Chemical and electrical rocket engines are shown. Animation illustrates various propulsion applications.

  8. Measuring axial pump thrust

    DOEpatents

    Suchoza, B.P.; Becse, I.

    1988-11-08

    An apparatus for measuring the hydraulic axial thrust of a pump under operation conditions is disclosed. The axial thrust is determined by forcing the rotating impeller off of an associated thrust bearing by use of an elongate rod extending coaxially with the pump shaft. The elongate rod contacts an impeller retainer bolt where a bearing is provided. Suitable measuring devices measure when the rod moves to force the impeller off of the associated thrust bearing and the axial force exerted on the rod at that time. The elongate rod is preferably provided in a housing with a heat dissipation mechanism whereby the hot fluid does not affect the measuring devices. 1 fig.

  9. Measuring axial pump thrust

    DOEpatents

    Suchoza, Bernard P.; Becse, Imre

    1988-01-01

    An apparatus for measuring the hydraulic axial thrust of a pump under operation conditions is disclosed. The axial thrust is determined by forcing the rotating impeller off of an associated thrust bearing by use of an elongate rod extending coaxially with the pump shaft. The elongate rod contacts an impeller retainer bolt where a bearing is provided. Suitable measuring devices measure when the rod moves to force the impeller off of the associated thrust bearing and the axial force exerted on the rod at that time. The elongate rod is preferably provided in a housing with a heat dissipation mechanism whereby the hot fluid does not affect the measuring devices.

  10. PPT Thrust Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haag, Thomas W.

    1995-01-01

    A torsional-type thrust stand has been designed and built to test Pulsed Plasma Thrusters (PPT's) in both single shot and repetitive operating modes. Using this stand, momentum per pulse was determined strictly as a function of thrust stand deflection, spring constant, and natural frequency. No empirical corrections were required. The accuracy of the method was verified using a swinging impact pendulum. Momentum transfer data between the thrust stand and the pendulum were consistent to within 1%. Following initial calibrations, the stand was used to test a Lincoln Experimental Satellite (LES-8/9) thruster. The LES-8/9 system had a mass of approximately 7.5 kg, with a nominal thrust to weight ratio of 1.3 x 10(exp -5). A total of 34 single shot thruster pulses were individually measured. The average impulse bit per pulse was 266 microN-s, which was slightly less than the value of 300 microN-s published in previous reports on this device. Repetitive pulse measurements were performed similar to ordinary steady-state thrust measurements. The thruster was operated for 30 minutes at a repetition rate of 132 pulses per minute and yielded an average thrust of 573 microN. Using average thrust, the average impulse bit per pulse was estimated to be 260 microN-s, which was in agreement with the single shot data. Zero drift during the repetitive pulse test was found to be approximately 1% of the measured thrust.

  11. Variable thrust cartridge

    DOEpatents

    Taleyarkhan, Rusi P.

    2000-11-07

    The present invention is a variable thrust cartridge comprising a water-molten aluminum reaction chamber from which a slug is propelled. The cartridge comprises a firing system that initiates a controlled explosion from the reaction chamber. The explosive force provides a thrust to a slug, preferably contained within the cartridge.

  12. Ion thrusting system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartley, Frank T. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    An ion thrusting system is disclosed comprising an ionization membrane having at least one area through which a gas is passed, and which ionizes the gas molecules passing therethrough to form ions and electrons, and an accelerator element which accelerates the ions to form thrust. In some variations, a potential is applied to the ionization membrane may be reversed to thrust ions in an opposite direction. The ionization membrane may also include an opening with electrodes that are located closer than a mean free path of the gas being ionized. Methods of manufacture and use are also provided.

  13. Thrust vectoring systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, H. J.; Schnelker, D.; Ward, J. W.; Dulgeroff, C.; Vahrenkamp, R.

    1972-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and testing of thrust vectorable ion optical systems capable of controlling the thrust direction from both 5- and 30-cm diameter ion thrusters is described. Both systems are capable of greater than 10 deg thrust deflection in any azimuthal direction. The 5-cm system is electrostatic and hence has a short response time and minimal power consumption. It has recently been tested for more than 7500 hours on an operational thruster. The 30-cm system is mechanical, has a response time of the order of 1 min, and consumes less than 0.3% of the total system input power at full deflection angle.

  14. Maximum thrust mode evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orme, John S.; Nobbs, Steven G.

    1995-01-01

    Measured reductions in acceleration times which resulted from the application of the F-15 performance seeking control (PSC) maximum thrust mode during the dual-engine test phase is presented as a function of power setting and flight condition. Data were collected at altitudes of 30,000 and 45,000 feet at military and maximum afterburning power settings. The time savings for the supersonic acceleration is less than at subsonic Mach numbers because of the increased modeling and control complexity. In addition, the propulsion system was designed to be optimized at the mid supersonic Mach number range. Recall that even though the engine is at maximum afterburner, PSC does not trim the afterburner for the maximum thrust mode. Subsonically at military power, time to accelerate from Mach 0.6 to 0.95 was cut by between 6 and 8 percent with a single engine application of PSC, and over 14 percent when both engines were optimized. At maximum afterburner, the level of thrust increases were similar in magnitude to the military power results, but because of higher thrust levels at maximum afterburner and higher aircraft drag at supersonic Mach numbers the percentage thrust increase and time to accelerate was less than for the supersonic accelerations. Savings in time to accelerate supersonically at maximum afterburner ranged from 4 to 7 percent. In general, the maximum thrust mode has performed well, demonstrating significant thrust increases at military and maximum afterburner power. Increases of up to 15 percent at typical combat-type flight conditions were identified. Thrust increases of this magnitude could be useful in a combat situation.

  15. Thrust stand for low-thrust liquid pulsed rocket engines.

    PubMed

    Xing, Qin; Zhang, Jun; Qian, Min; Jia, Zhen-yuan; Sun, Bao-yuan

    2010-09-01

    A thrust stand is developed for measuring the pulsed thrust generated by low-thrust liquid pulsed rocket engines. It mainly consists of a thrust dynamometer, a base frame, a connecting frame, and a data acquisition and processing system. The thrust dynamometer assembled with shear mode piezoelectric quartz sensors is developed as the core component of the thrust stand. It adopts integral shell structure. The sensors are inserted into unique double-elastic-half-ring grooves with an interference fit. The thrust is transferred to the sensors by means of static friction forces of fitting surfaces. The sensors could produce an amount of charges which are proportional to the thrust to be measured. The thrust stand is calibrated both statically and dynamically. The in situ static calibration is performed using a standard force sensor. The dynamic calibration is carried out using pendulum-typed steel ball impact technique. Typical thrust pulse is simulated by a trapezoidal impulse force. The results show that the thrust stand has a sensitivity of 25.832 mV/N, a linearity error of 0.24% FSO, and a repeatability error of 0.23% FSO. The first natural frequency of the thrust stand is 1245 Hz. The thrust stand can accurately measure thrust waveform of each firing, which is used for fine control of on-orbit vehicles in the thrust range of 5-20 N with pulse frequency of 50 Hz. PMID:20887003

  16. Electronics Engineering Department Thrust Area report FY'84

    SciTech Connect

    Minichino, C.; Phelps, P.L.

    1984-01-01

    This report describes the work of the Electronics Engineering Department Thrust Areas for FY'84: diagnostics and microelectronic engineering; signal and control engineering; microwave and pulsed power engineering; computer-aided engineering; engineering modeling and simulation; and systems engineering. For each Thrust Area, an overview and a description of the goals and achievements of each project is provided.

  17. Environmental Thrust Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Agriculture, Washington, DC.

    This handbook was prepared as a tool to assist U. S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) employees coordinate their resources and efforts to help people improve their environment. Twenty-two projects are outlined as potential environmental thrusts at the community level. It is the role of USDA employees to encourage and assist, in every way possible,…

  18. Static Performance of Six Innovative Thrust Reverser Concepts for Subsonic Transport Applications: Summary of the NASA Langley Innovative Thrust Reverser Test Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asbury, Scott C.; Yetter, Jeffrey A.

    2000-01-01

    The NASA Langley Configuration Aerodynamics Branch has conducted an experimental investigation to study the static performance of innovative thrust reverser concepts applicable to high-bypass-ratio turbofan engines. Testing was conducted on a conventional separate-flow exhaust system configuration, a conventional cascade thrust reverser configuration, and six innovative thrust reverser configurations. The innovative thrust reverser configurations consisted of a cascade thrust reverser with porous fan-duct blocker, a blockerless thrust reverser, two core-mounted target thrust reversers, a multi-door crocodile thrust reverser, and a wing-mounted thrust reverser. Each of the innovative thrust reverser concepts offer potential weight savings and/or design simplifications over a conventional cascade thrust reverser design. Testing was conducted in the Jet-Exit Test Facility at NASA Langley Research Center using a 7.9%-scale exhaust system model with a fan-to-core bypass ratio of approximately 9.0. All tests were conducted with no external flow and cold, high-pressure air was used to simulate core and fan exhaust flows. Results show that the innovative thrust reverser concepts achieved thrust reverser performance levels which, when taking into account the potential for system simplification and reduced weight, may make them competitive with, or potentially more cost effective than current state-of-the-art thrust reverser systems. All data gathered in this investigation are contained in the CD-ROM.

  19. Static Performance of Six Innovative Thrust Reverser Concepts for Subsonic Transport Applications: Summary of the NASA Langley Innovative Thrust Reverser Test Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asbury, Scott C.; Yetter, Jeffrey A.

    2000-01-01

    The NASA Langley Configuration Aerodynamics Branch has conducted an experimental investigation to study the static performance of innovative thrust reverser concepts applicable to high-bypass-ratio turbofan engines. Testing was conducted on a conventional separate-flow exhaust system configuration, a conventional cascade thrust reverser configuration, and six innovative thrust reverser configurations. The innovative thrust reverser configurations consisted of a cascade thrust reverser with porous fan-duct blocker, a blockerless thrust reverser, two core-mounted target thrust reversers, a multi-door crocodile thrust reverser, and a wing-mounted thrust reverser. Each of the innovative thrust reverser concepts offer potential weight savings and/or design simplifications over a conventional cascade thrust reverser design. Testing was conducted in the Jet-Exit Test Facility at NASA Langley Research Center using a 7.9%-scale exhaust system model with a fan-to-core bypass ratio of approximately 9.0. All tests were conducted with no external flow and cold, high-pressure air was used to simulate core and fan exhaust flows. Results show that the innovative thrust reverser concepts achieved thrust reverser performance levels which, when taking into account the potential for system simplification and reduced weight, may make them competitive with, or potentially more cost effective than current state-of-the-art thrust reverser systems.

  20. Monte Mountain thrust, additional confirmation of the central Nevada thrust

    SciTech Connect

    Chamberlain, A.K. ); Chamberlain, R.L. )

    1990-05-01

    The Monte Mountain thrust, a newly identified thrust exposed in the Timpahute Range, east central Nevada places porous Devonian reservoir rocks over rich Mississippian source rocks at the peak oil generating window. The thrust provides insurmountable evidence of a thrust model that may lead to discovery of giant oil and gas fields along the 400-mi long central Nevada thrust belt. The Timpahute Range lies a little over 50 mi on strike to the south of the prolific Grant Canyon field. Scattered remnants of the north-trending thrust belt are obscured by parallel valleys of Tertiary valley fill and volcanics. The fact that the east-west-trending Timpahute Range could contain exposures of the north-south-trending central Nevada thrust belt attracted them to the range, Familiarity with the stratigraphic section led to the discovery of the thrust. As much as 750 ft of Devonian Guilmette sandstones, in the hanging wall just above the thrust contact have been erroneously mapped as Mississippian Scotty Wash sandstones. These Devonian sandstones could be excellent reservoir rocks. Sandstones in the Guilmette increase in thickness westward. East-vergent thrusting has juxtaposed plates of thicker Guilmette sandstones with plates of thinner sandstones, Reconstruction of Devonian paleogeography provides a clue to the amount of displacement along thrust boundaries.

  1. Thrust Measurements for a Pulse Detonation Engine Driven Ejector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santoro, Robert J.; Pak, Sibtosh; Shehadeh, R.; Saretto, S. R.; Lee, S.-Y.

    2005-01-01

    Results of an experimental effort on pulse detonation driven ejectors aimed at probing different aspects of PDE ejector processes, are presented and discussed. The PDE was operated using ethylene as the fuel and an equimolar oxygen/nitrogen mixture as the oxidizer at an equivalence ratio of one. The thrust measurements for the PDE alone are in excellent agreement with experimental and modeling results reported in the literature and serve as a Baseline for the ejector studies. These thrust measurements were then used as a basis for quantifying thrust augmentation for various PDE/ejector setups using constant diameter ejector tubes and various detonation tube/ejector tube overlap distances. The results show that for the geometries studied here, a maximum thrust augmentation of 24% is achieved. The thrust augmentation results are complemented by shadowgraph imaging of the flowfield in the ejector tube inlet area and high frequency pressure transducer measurements along the length of the ejector tube.

  2. Recommended Practices in Thrust Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polk, James E.; Pancotti, Anthony; Haag, Thomas; King, Scott; Walker, Mitchell; Blakely, Joseph; Ziemer, John

    2013-01-01

    Accurate, direct measurement of thrust or impulse is one of the most critical elements of electric thruster characterization, and one of the most difficult measurements to make. The American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics has started an initiative to develop standards for many important measurement processes in electric propulsion, including thrust measurements. This paper summarizes recommended practices for the design, calibration, and operation of pendulum thrust stands, which are widely recognized as the best approach for measuring micro N- to mN-level thrust and micro Ns-level impulse bits. The fundamentals of pendulum thrust stand operation are reviewed, along with its implementation in hanging pendulum, inverted pendulum, and torsional balance configurations. Methods of calibration and recommendations for calibration processes are presented. Sources of error are identified and methods for data processing and uncertainty analysis are discussed. This review is intended to be the first step toward a recommended practices document to help the community produce high quality thrust measurements.

  3. Low thrust vehicle concept study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Low thrust chemical (hydrogen-oxygen) propulsion systems configured specifically for low acceleration orbit transfer of large space systems were defined. Results indicate that it is cost effective and least risk to combine the OTV and stowed spacecraft in a single 65 K Shuttle. The study shows that the engine for an optimized low thrust stage (1) does not require very low thrust; (2) 1-3 K thrust range appears optimum; (3) thrust transient is not a concern; (4) throttling probably not worthwhile; and (5) multiple thrusters complicate OTV/LSS design and aggravate LSS loads. Regarding the optimum vehicle for low acceleration missions, the single shuttle launch (LSS and expendable OTV) is most cost effective and least risky. Multiple shuttles increase diameter 20%. The space based radar structure short OTV (which maximizes space available for packaged LSS) favors use of torus tank. Propellant tank pressures/vapor residuals are little affected by engine thrust level or number of burns.

  4. Lateral dampers for thrust bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hibner, D. H.; Szafir, D. R.

    1985-01-01

    The development of lateral damping schemes for thrust bearings was examined, ranking their applicability to various engine classes, selecting the best concept for each engine class and performing an in-depth evaluation. Five major engine classes were considered: large transport, military, small general aviation, turboshaft, and non-manrated. Damper concepts developed for evaluation were: curved beam, constrained and unconstrained elastomer, hybrid boost bearing, hydraulic thrust piston, conical squeeze film, and rolling element thrust face.

  5. A 10 nN resolution thrust-stand for micro-propulsion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty, Subha; Courtney, Daniel G.; Shea, Herbert

    2015-11-15

    We report on the development of a nano-Newton thrust-stand that can measure up to 100 μN thrust from different types of microthrusters with 10 nN resolution. The compact thrust-stand measures the impingement force of the particles emitted from a microthruster onto a suspended plate of size 45 mm × 45 mm and with a natural frequency over 50 Hz. Using a homodyne (lock-in) readout provides strong immunity to facility vibrations, which historically has been a major challenge for nano-Newton thrust-stands. A cold-gas thruster generating up to 50 μN thrust in air was first used to validate the thrust-stand. Better than 10 nN resolution and a minimum detectable thrust of 10 nN were achieved. Thrust from a miniature electrospray propulsion system generating up to 3 μN of thrust was measured with our thrust-stand in vacuum, and the thrust was compared with that computed from beam diagnostics, obtaining agreement within 50 nN to 150 nN. The 10 nN resolution obtained from this thrust-stand matches that from state-of-the-art nano-Newton thrust-stands, which measure thrust directly from the thruster by mounting it on a moving arm (but whose natural frequency is well below 1 Hz). The thrust-stand is the first of its kind to demonstrate less than 3 μN resolution by measuring the impingement force, making it capable of measuring thrust from different types of microthrusters, with the potential of easy upscaling for thrust measurement at much higher levels, simply by replacing the force sensor with other force sensors.

  6. Low-thrust rocket trajectories

    SciTech Connect

    Keaton, P.W.

    1986-01-01

    The development of low-thrust propulsion systems to complement chemical propulsion systems will greatly enhance the evolution of future space programs. Two advantages of low-thrust rockets are stressed: first, in a strong gravitational field, such as occurs near the Earth, freighter missions with low-thrust engines require one-tenth as much propellant as do chemical engines. Second, in a weak gravitational field, such as occurs in the region between Venus and Mars, low-thrust rockets are faster than chemical rockets with comparable propellant mass. The purpose here is to address the physics of low-thrust trajectories and to interpret the results with two simple models. Analytic analyses are used where possible - otherwise, the results of numerical calculations are presented in graphs. The author has attempted to make this a self-contained report. 57 refs., 10 figs.

  7. Low-thrust rocket trajectories

    SciTech Connect

    Keaton, P.W.

    1987-03-01

    The development of low-thrust propulsion systems to complement chemical propulsion systems will greatly enhance the evolution of future space programs. Two advantages of low-thrust rockets are stressed: first, in a strong gravitational field, such as occurs near the Earth, freighter missions with low-thrust engines require one-tenth as much propellant as do chemical engines. Second, in a weak gravitational field, such as occurs in the region between Venus and Mars, low-thrust rockets are faster than chemical rockets with comparable propellant mass. The purpose here is to address the physics of low-thrust trajectories and to interpret the results with two simple models. Analytic analyses are used where possible - otherwise, the results of numerical calculations are presented in graphs. The author has attempted to make this a self-contained report.

  8. Micro thrust and heat generator

    DOEpatents

    Garcia, Ernest J.

    1998-01-01

    A micro thrust and heat generator has a means for providing a combustion fuel source to an ignition chamber of the micro thrust and heat generator. The fuel is ignited by a ignition means within the micro thrust and heat generator's ignition chamber where it burns and creates a pressure. A nozzle formed from the combustion chamber extends outward from the combustion chamber and tappers down to a narrow diameter and then opens into a wider diameter where the nozzle then terminates outside of said combustion chamber. The pressure created within the combustion chamber accelerates as it leaves the chamber through the nozzle resulting in pressure and heat escaping from the nozzle to the atmosphere outside the micro thrust and heat generator. The micro thrust and heat generator can be microfabricated from a variety of materials, e.g., of polysilicon, on one wafer using surface micromachining batch fabrication techniques or high aspect ratio micromachining techniques (LIGA).

  9. Micro thrust and heat generator

    DOEpatents

    Garcia, E.J.

    1998-11-17

    A micro thrust and heat generator have a means for providing a combustion fuel source to an ignition chamber of the micro thrust and heat generator. The fuel is ignited by a ignition means within the micro thrust and heat generator`s ignition chamber where it burns and creates a pressure. A nozzle formed from the combustion chamber extends outward from the combustion chamber and tappers down to a narrow diameter and then opens into a wider diameter where the nozzle then terminates outside of said combustion chamber. The pressure created within the combustion chamber accelerates as it leaves the chamber through the nozzle resulting in pressure and heat escaping from the nozzle to the atmosphere outside the micro thrust and heat generator. The micro thrust and heat generator can be microfabricated from a variety of materials, e.g., of polysilicon, on one wafer using surface micromachining batch fabrication techniques or high aspect ratio micromachining techniques (LIGA). 30 figs.

  10. Thrust improvement with ablative insert nozzle extension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clayton, R. M.; Back, L. H.

    1986-01-01

    Aspects are examined of an investigation by the Marshall Space Flight Center into the conceptual feasibility of increasing the thrust performance of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) by using a conical nozzle extension fitted with an ablative insert in order to achieve a low-cost, near-term gain in payload. The ablating insert would provide a controlled increase in nozzle expansion ratio during launch and early climbout (first 30-60 seconds) so as to reduce thrust loss from nozzle over-expansion in the lower atmosphere. Summaries are given of JPL studies in the area of: defining the near-wall flow environment in the extended nozzle insert region; selecting potential insert materials; conceptualizing an extension/insert geometrical configuration; and identifying future experimental efforts necessary to verify the feasibility of the concepts.

  11. Static Performance of a Wing-Mounted Thrust Reverser Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asbury, Scott C.; Yetter, Jeffrey A.

    1998-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted in the Jet-Exit Test Facility at NASA Langley Research Center to study the static aerodynamic performance of a wing-mounted thrust reverser concept applicable to subsonic transport aircraft. This innovative engine powered thrust reverser system is designed to utilize wing-mounted flow deflectors to produce aircraft deceleration forces. Testing was conducted using a 7.9%-scale exhaust system model with a fan-to-core bypass ratio of approximately 9.0, a supercritical left-hand wing section attached via a pylon, and wing-mounted flow deflectors attached to the wing section. Geometric variations of key design parameters investigated for the wing-mounted thrust reverser concept included flow deflector angle and chord length, deflector edge fences, and the yaw mount angle of the deflector system (normal to the engine centerline or parallel to the wing trailing edge). All tests were conducted with no external flow and high pressure air was used to simulate core and fan engine exhaust flows. Test results indicate that the wing-mounted thrust reverser concept can achieve overall thrust reverser effectiveness levels competitive with (parallel mount), or better than (normal mount) a conventional cascade thrust reverser system. By removing the thrust reverser system from the nacelle, the wing-mounted concept offers the nacelle designer more options for improving nacelle aero dynamics and propulsion-airframe integration, simplifying nacelle structural designs, reducing nacelle weight, and improving engine maintenance access.

  12. Improved Rhenium Thrust Chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Dell, John Scott

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-cooled bipropellant thrust chambers are being considered for ascent/ descent engines and reaction control systems on various NASA missions and spacecraft, such as the Mars Sample Return and Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV). Currently, iridium (Ir)-lined rhenium (Re) combustion chambers are the state of the art for in-space engines. NASA's Advanced Materials Bipropellant Rocket (AMBR) engine, a 150-lbf Ir-Re chamber produced by Plasma Processes and Aerojet Rocketdyne, recently set a hydrazine specific impulse record of 333.5 seconds. To withstand the high loads during terrestrial launch, Re chambers with improved mechanical properties are needed. Recent electrochemical forming (EL-Form"TM") results have shown considerable promise for improving Re's mechanical properties by producing a multilayered deposit composed of a tailored microstructure (i.e., Engineered Re). The Engineered Re processing techniques were optimized, and detailed characterization and mechanical properties tests were performed. The most promising techniques were selected and used to produce an Engineered Re AMBR-sized combustion chamber for testing at Aerojet Rocketdyne.

  13. Thrust measurement in a 2-D scramjet nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuttle, Sean

    1995-01-01

    The two-dimensional thrust nozzle presents a challenging problem. The loading is not axisymmetric as in the case of a cone and the internal flow presents some design difficulties. A two-sting system has been chosen to accomodate the internal flow and achieve some symmetry. The situation is complicated by the fact that with the small ramp angle and the internal pressure on the nozzle walls, loading is predominantly transverse. Yet it is the axial thrust which is to be measured (i.e., the tensile waves propagating in the stings). Although bending stress waves travel at most at only 60% of the speed of the axial stress waves, the system needs to be stiffened against bending. The second sting was originally only used to preserve symmetry. However, the pressures on each thrust surface may be quite different at some conditions, so at this stage the signals from both stings are being averaged as a first order approximation of the net thrust. The expected axial thrust from this nozzle is not large so thin stings are required. In addition, the contact area between nozzle and sting needs to be maximized. The result was that it was decided to twist the stings through 90 deg, without distorting their cross-sectional shape, just aft of the nozzle. Finite element analysis showed that this would not significantly alter the propagation of the axial stress wave in the sting, while the rigidity of the system is greatly increased. A Mach 4 contoured nozzle is used in the experiments. The thrust calculated by integrating the static pressure measurements on the thrust surfaces is compared with the deconvolved strain measurement of the net thrust for the cases of air only and hydrogen fuel injected into air at approximately 9 MJ/kg nozzle supply enthalpy. The gain in thrust due to combustion is visible in this result.

  14. Low thrust optimal orbital transfers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cobb, Shannon S.

    1994-01-01

    For many optimal transfer problems it is reasonable to expect that the minimum time solution is also the minimum fuel solution. However, if one allows the propulsion system to be turned off and back on, it is clear that these two solutions may differ. In general, high thrust transfers resemble the well known impulsive transfers where the burn arcs are of very short duration. The low and medium thrust transfers differ in that their thrust acceleration levels yield longer burn arcs and thus will require more revolutions. In this research, we considered two approaches for solving this problem: a powered flight guidance algorithm previously developed for higher thrust transfers was modified and an 'averaging technique' was investigated.

  15. In-flight thrust determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abernethy, Robert B.; Adams, Gary R.; Ascough, John C.; Baer-Riedhart, Jennifer L.; Balkcom, George H.; Biesiadny, Thomas

    1986-01-01

    The major aspects of processes that may be used for the determination of in-flight thrust are reviewed. Basic definitions are presented as well as analytical and ground-test methods for gathering data and calculating the thrust of the propulsion system during the flight development program of the aircraft. Test analysis examples include a single-exhaust turbofan, an intermediate-cowl turbofan, and a mixed-flow afterburning turbofan.

  16. Micro thrust and heat generator

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, E.J.

    1995-12-31

    The present invention relates generally to micromachines such as microengines or micromotors. More specifically, the invention is directed to a micro rocket which functions as a source of heat and thrust, and utilizes chemical energy to drive or power micromechanical apparatuses. The invention is adaptable to applications involving defense, bio-medical, manufacturing, consumer product, aviation, automotive, computer, inspection, and safety systems. A micro thrust and heat generator has a means for providing a combustion fuel source to an ignition chamber of the micro thrust and heat generator. The fuel is ignited by a ignition means within the micro thrust and heat generator`s ignition chamber where it burns and creates a pressure. A nozzle formed from the combustion chamber extends outward from the combustion chamber and tappers down to a narrow diameter and then opens into a wider diameter where the nozzle then terminates outside of said combustion chamber. The pressure created within the combustion chamber accelerates as it leaves the chamber through the nozzle resulting in pressure and heat escaping from the nozzle to the atmosphere outside the micro thrust and heat generator. The micro thrust and heat generator can be microfabricated from a variety of materials, e.g., of polysilicon, on one wafer using surface micromachining batch fabrication techniques or high aspect ratio micromachine techniques (LIGA).

  17. Army (MANTECH) thrust area concept: Optics thrust area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopacz, Stanley P.

    1992-04-01

    With the shrinking of the U.S. Army's material needs and the compression of defense requirements, the Army Manufacturing Technology (MANTECH) Program has the opportunity to advance the manufacturing state-of-the-art and solve near term production problems of the U.S. industrial base. To exploit this opportunity, the Army restructured its MANTECH efforts in FY 90 based on a thrust area concept. Each of the ten current thrusts, directed by a thrust area manager, has a broad technical objective selected to improve specific manufacturing processes. The manager is charged with setting objectives, selecting tasks, monitoring execution, leveraging external resources, and establishing microfactories to promote technology transfer. The Optics Manufacturing Thrust is an example of the concept. It is currently directed at revitalizing the domestic precision optics manufacturing base, now characterized by high labor costs and 1940's technology, through introduction of revolutionary machines, new processes, and Computer Integrated Manufacturing (CIM) principles. Leveraging of MANTECH dollars with those of industry, academia, and state governments led to the establishment of the center for Optics Manufacturing and plans for regional centers. Recognition of the U.S. as a world leader in precision optics manufacturing and a dramatic reduction of both manufacturing time and cost should accrue from thrust area efforts.

  18. Evaluation of fluidic thrust vectoring nozzle via thrust pitching angle and thrust pitching moment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L.; Hirota, M.; Ouchi, K.; Saito, T.

    2016-03-01

    Shock vector control (SVC) in a converging-diverging nozzle with a rectangular cross-section is discussed as a fluidic thrust vectoring (FTV) method. The interaction between the primary nozzle flow and the secondary jet is examined using experiments and numerical simulations. The relationships between FTV parameters [nozzle pressure ratio (NPR) and secondary jet pressure ratio (SPR)] and FTV performance (thrust pitching angle and thrust pitching moment) are investigated. The experiments are conducted with an NPR of up to 10 and an SPR of up to 2.7. Numerical simulations of the nozzle flow are performed using a Navier-Stokes solver with input parameters set to match the experimental conditions. The thrust pitching angle and moment computed from the force-moment balance are used to evaluate FTV performance. The experiment and numerical results indicate that the FTV parameters (NPR and SPR) directly affect FTV performance. Conventionally, FTV performance evaluated by the common method using thrust pitching angle is highly dependent on the location of evaluation. Hence, in this study, we show that the thrust pitching moment, a parameter which is independent of the location, is the appropriate figure of merit to evaluate the performance of FTV systems.

  19. Uncertainty of in-flight thrust determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abernethy, Robert B.; Adams, Gary R.; Steurer, John W.; Ascough, John C.; Baer-Riedhart, Jennifer L.; Balkcom, George H.; Biesiadny, Thomas

    1986-01-01

    Methods for estimating the measurement error or uncertainty of in-flight thrust determination in aircraft employing conventional turbofan/turbojet engines are reviewed. While the term 'in-flight thrust determination' is used synonymously with 'in-flight thrust measurement', in-flight thrust is not directly measured but is determined or calculated using mathematical modeling relationships between in-flight thrust and various direct measurements of physical quantities. The in-flight thrust determination process incorporates both ground testing and flight testing. The present text is divided into the following categories: measurement uncertainty methodoogy and in-flight thrust measurent processes.

  20. Post-burnout thrust measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenna, E. F.; Smith, H. T.

    1980-06-01

    Research was conducted into the problems of avoiding collision between separated payloads and spent rocket motors due to post burnout thrust, and the problem of contamination of scientific instrumentation due to outgassing of the smoldering insulation. The post burnout thrust was measured using a payload instrument module separated from an instrumented Black Brant VC Rocket in the exoatmosphere. In addition to measuring acceleration and velocities the spent motor was observed by a TV camera on board the command attitude controlled payload module. Analysis shows that the payload separated cleanly from the vehicle at a relative separation velocity of 0.69 m/sec, however the residual thrust of the spent motor overcame this differential, catching up to the payload 37 sec after separation and continuing on a parallel velocity vector at about 1.03 m/sec.

  1. Low thrust propulsion literature survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monroe, Darrel

    1989-01-01

    A literature search was performed to investigate the area of low thrust propulsion. In an effort to evaluate this technology, a number of articles, obtained through the use of the NASA-RECON database, were collected and categorized. The study indicates that although much was done, particularly in the 1960's and 1970's, more can be done in the area of practical navigation and guidance. It is suggested that the older studies be reinvestigated to see what potential there exists for future low thrust applications.

  2. Another Look at Rocket Thrust

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hester, Brooke; Burris, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Rocket propulsion is often introduced as an example of Newton's third law. The rocket exerts a force on the exhaust gas being ejected; the gas exerts an equal and opposite force--the thrust--on the rocket. Equivalently, in the absence of a net external force, the total momentum of the system, rocket plus ejected gas, remains constant. The law of…

  3. Pulsed Electric Propulsion Thrust Stand Calibration Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, Andrea R.; Polzin, Kurt A.; Pearson, J. Boise

    2011-01-01

    The evaluation of the performance of any propulsion device requires the accurate measurement of thrust. While chemical rocket thrust is typically measured using a load cell, the low thrust levels associated with electric propulsion (EP) systems necessitate the use of much more sensitive measurement techniques. The design and development of electric propulsion thrust stands that employ a conventional hanging pendulum arm connected to a balance mechanism consisting of a secondary arm and variable linkage have been reported in recent publications by Polzin et al. These works focused on performing steady-state thrust measurements and employed a static analysis of the thrust stand response. In the present work, we present a calibration method and data that will permit pulsed thrust measurements using the Variable Amplitude Hanging Pendulum with Extended Range (VAHPER) thrust stand. Pulsed thrust measurements are challenging in general because the pulsed thrust (impulse bit) occurs over a short timescale (typically 1 micros to 1 millisecond) and cannot be resolved directly. Consequently, the imparted impulse bit must be inferred through observation of the change in thrust stand motion effected by the pulse. Pulsed thrust measurements have typically only consisted of single-shot operation. In the present work, we discuss repetition-rate pulsed thruster operation and describe a method to perform these measurements. The thrust stand response can be modeled as a spring-mass-damper system with a repetitive delta forcing function to represent the impulsive action of the thruster.

  4. Low-thrust chemical propulsion system pump technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabiers, R. L.; Siebenhaar, A.

    1981-01-01

    Candidate pump and driver systems for low thrust cargo orbit transfer vehicle engines which deliver large space structures to geosynchronous equatorial orbit and beyond are evaluated. The pumps operate to 68 atmospheres (1000 psi) discharge pressure and flowrates suited to cryogenic engines using either LOX/methane or LOX/hydrogen propellants in thrust ranges from 445 to 8900 N (100 to 2000 lb F). Analysis of the various pumps and drivers indicate that the low specific speed requirement will make high fluid efficiencies difficult to achieve. As such, multiple stages are required. In addition, all pumps require inducer stages. The most attractive main pumps are the multistage centrifugal pumps.

  5. 14 CFR 33.97 - Thrust reversers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    .... This test may be scheduled as part of the endurance run. (b) 175 reversals must be made from flight-idle forward thrust to maximum reverse thrust and 25 reversals must be made from rated takeoff...

  6. 14 CFR 33.97 - Thrust reversers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    .... This test may be scheduled as part of the endurance run. (b) 175 reversals must be made from flight-idle forward thrust to maximum reverse thrust and 25 reversals must be made from rated takeoff...

  7. 14 CFR 33.97 - Thrust reversers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    .... This test may be scheduled as part of the endurance run. (b) 175 reversals must be made from flight-idle forward thrust to maximum reverse thrust and 25 reversals must be made from rated takeoff...

  8. 14 CFR 33.97 - Thrust reversers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    .... This test may be scheduled as part of the endurance run. (b) 175 reversals must be made from flight-idle forward thrust to maximum reverse thrust and 25 reversals must be made from rated takeoff...

  9. Low thrust orbit determination program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, P. E.; Shults, G. L.; Huling, K. R.; Ratliff, C. W.

    1972-01-01

    Logical flow and guidelines are provided for the construction of a low thrust orbit determination computer program. The program, tentatively called FRACAS (filter response analysis for continuously accelerating spacecraft), is capable of generating a reference low thrust trajectory, performing a linear covariance analysis of guidance and navigation processes, and analyzing trajectory nonlinearities in Monte Carlo fashion. The choice of trajectory, guidance and navigation models has been made after extensive literature surveys and investigation of previous software. A key part of program design relied upon experience gained in developing and using Martin Marietta Aerospace programs: TOPSEP (Targeting/Optimization for Solar Electric Propulsion), GODSEP (Guidance and Orbit Determination for SEP) and SIMSEP (Simulation of SEP).

  10. Secondary production of massive quarks in thrust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang, André H.; Mateu, Vicent; Pietrulewicz, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    We present a factorization framework that takes into account the production of heavy quarks through gluon splitting in the thrust distribution for e+e- → hadrons. The explicit factorization theorems and some numerical results are displayed in the dijet region where the kinematic scales are widely separated, which can be extended systematically to the whole spectrum. We account for the necessary two-loop matrix elements, threshold corrections, and include resummation up to N3LL order. We include nonperturbative power corrections through a field theoretical shape function, and remove the O(ΛQCD) renormalon in the partonic soft function by appropriate mass-dependent subtractions. Our results hold for any value of the quark mass, from an infinitesimally small (merging to the known massless result) to an infinitely large one (achieving the decoupling limit). This is the first example of an application of a variable flavor number scheme to final state jets.

  11. Modular multi-engine thrust control assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Sakurai, S.

    1986-02-04

    This patent describes a modular thrust control lever assembly for controling forward/reverse thrust generated by an aircraft engine. It includes an electric/electronic engine thrust control system, an inhibit mechanism for preventing inadverent or premature establishment of at least one of forward and reverse engine thrust. It consists of a (a) housing; (b) a control lever assembly pivotally mounted within the housing for fore and aft pivotal movement in a single vertical plane; (c) movable inhibit mechanism normally mounted in the path of movement of the laterally projecting roller on the control lever assembly between at least one of the maximum thrust limit positions of the assembly and the adjacent intermediate idle thrust position; (d) a electric/electronic engine thrust control system including an mechanism for reconfiguring the thrust controls of the engine upon movement of the thrust control lever assembly to the adjacent intermediate idle thrust position; (e) a mechanism responsive to the output signal for shifting the inhibit mechanism out of the path of movement of the control lever assembly.

  12. Thrust chamber material technology program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrus, J. S.; Bordeau, R. G.

    1989-03-01

    This report covers work performed at Pratt & Whitney on development of copper-based materials for long-life, reusable, regeneratively cooled rocket engine thrust chambers. The program approached the goal of enhanced cyclic life through the application of rapid solidification to alloy development, to introduce fine dispersions to strengthen and stabilize the alloys at elevated temperatures. After screening of alloy systems, copper-based alloys containing Cr, Co, Hf, Ag, Ti, and Zr were processed by rapid-solidification atomization in bulk quantities. Those bulk alloys showing the most promise were characterized by tensile testing, thermal conductivity testing, and elevated-temperature, low-cycle fatigue (LFC) testing. Characterization indicated that Cu- 1.1 percent Hf exhibited the greatest potential as an improved-life thrust chamber material, exhibiting LCF life about four times that of NASA-Z. Other alloys (Cu- 0.6 percent Zr, and Cu- 0.6 percent Zr- 1.0 percent Cr) exhibited promise for use in this application, but needed more development work to balance properties.

  13. Thrust chamber material technology program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrus, J. S.; Bordeau, R. G.

    1989-01-01

    This report covers work performed at Pratt & Whitney on development of copper-based materials for long-life, reusable, regeneratively cooled rocket engine thrust chambers. The program approached the goal of enhanced cyclic life through the application of rapid solidification to alloy development, to introduce fine dispersions to strengthen and stabilize the alloys at elevated temperatures. After screening of alloy systems, copper-based alloys containing Cr, Co, Hf, Ag, Ti, and Zr were processed by rapid-solidification atomization in bulk quantities. Those bulk alloys showing the most promise were characterized by tensile testing, thermal conductivity testing, and elevated-temperature, low-cycle fatigue (LFC) testing. Characterization indicated that Cu- 1.1 percent Hf exhibited the greatest potential as an improved-life thrust chamber material, exhibiting LCF life about four times that of NASA-Z. Other alloys (Cu- 0.6 percent Zr, and Cu- 0.6 percent Zr- 1.0 percent Cr) exhibited promise for use in this application, but needed more development work to balance properties.

  14. Experimental Investigation of Unsteady Thrust Augmentation Using a Speaker-Driven Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paxson, Daniel E.; Wernet, Mark P.; John, Wentworth T.

    2007-01-01

    An experimental investigation is described in which a simple speaker-driven jet was used as a pulsed thrust source (driver) for an ejector configuration. The objectives of the investigation were twofold. The first was to expand the experimental body of evidence showing that an unsteady thrust source, combined with a properly sized ejector generally yields higher thrust augmentation values than a similarly sized, steady driver of equivalent thrust. The second objective was to identify characteristics of the unsteady driver that may be useful for sizing ejectors, and for predicting the thrust augmentation levels that may be achieved. The speaker-driven jet provided a convenient source for the investigation because it is entirely unsteady (i.e., it has no mean velocity component) and because relevant parameters such as frequency, time-averaged thrust, and diameter are easily variable. The experimental setup will be described, as will the two main measurements techniques employed. These are thrust and digital particle imaging velocimetry of the driver. It will be shown that thrust augmentation values as high as 1.8 were obtained, that the diameter of the best ejector scaled with the dimensions of the emitted vortex, and that the so-called formation time serves as a useful dimensionless parameter by which to characterize the jet and predict performance.

  15. An Experimental Investigation of Unsteady Thrust Augmentation Using a Speaker-Driven Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paxson, Daniel E.; Wernet, Mark P.; John, Wentworth T.

    2004-01-01

    An experimental investigation is described in which a simple speaker-driven jet was used as a pulsed thrust source (driver) for an ejector configuration. The objectives of the investigation were twofold: first, to add to the experimental body of evidence showing that an unsteady thrust source, combined with a properly sized ejector generally yields higher thrust augmentation values than a similarly sized, steady driver of equivalent thrust. Second, to identify characteristics of the unsteady driver that may be useful for sizing ejectors, and predicting what thrust augmentation values may be achieved. The speaker-driven jet provided a convenient source for the investigation because it is entirely unsteady (having no mean component) and because relevant parameters such as frequency, time-averaged thrust, and diameter are easily variable. The experimental setup will be described, as will the various measurements made. These include both thrust and Digital Particle Imaging Velocimetry of the driver. It will be shown that thrust augmentation values as high as 1.8 were obtained, that the diameter of the best ejector scaled with the dimensions of the emitted vortex, and that the so-called Formation Number serves as a useful dimensionless number by which to characterize the jet and predict performance.

  16. Solar electric propulsion thrust beam interactive effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellen, J. M., Jr.; Fitzgerald, D. J.

    1975-01-01

    Interactive effects between ion engine thrust beams and an SEP spacecraft and its science payload have been examined. AC electric contamination from thrust beam potential fluctuations of both 'common mode' and 'point-to-point' forms has been evaluated. Quenching of point-to-point E-fields by both thrust ion and charge exchange ion plasmas is expected. Reduction methods for AC electric contamination from common mode thrust beam potential fluctuations have been developed. Charged particle contamination of ambient space and plasma wave contamination may result from density magnitude and spatial extent of charge exchange plasma plumes. Reduction methods for cone of directions of high angle charge exchange ions have been examined.

  17. Design and evaluation of thrust vectored nozzles using a multicomponent thrust stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Thomas W.; Blattner, Ernest W.; Stagner, Robert E.; Contreras, Juanita; Lencioni, Dennis; Mcintosh, Greg

    1990-01-01

    Future aircraft with the capability of short takeoff and landing, and improved maneuverability especially in the post-stall flight regime will incorporate exhaust nozzles which can be thrust vectored. In order to conduct thrust vector research in the Mechanical Engineering Department at Cal Poly, a program was planned with two objectives; design and construct a multicomponent thrust stand for the specific purpose of measuring nozzle thrust vectors; and to provide quality low moisture air to the thrust stand for cold flow nozzle tests. The design and fabrication of the six-component thrust stand was completed. Detailed evaluation tests of the thrust stand will continue upon the receipt of one signal conditioning option (-702) for the Fluke Data Acquisition System. Preliminary design of thrust nozzles with air supply plenums were completed. The air supply was analyzed with regard to head loss. Initial flow visualization tests were conducted using dual water jets.

  18. Computer program for flat sector thrust bearing performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Presler, A. F.; Etsion, I.

    1977-01-01

    A versatile computer program is presented which achieves a rapid, numerical solution of the Reynolds equation for a flat sector thrust pad bearing with either compressible or liquid lubricants. Program input includes a range in values of the geometric and operating parameters of the sector bearing. Performance characteristics are obtained from the calculated bearing pressure distribution. These are the load capacity, center of pressure coordinates, frictional energy dissipation, and flow rates of liquid lubricant across the bearing edges. Two sample problems are described.

  19. Thrust Production and Wake Structure of an Actuated Lamprey Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchholz, James; Smits, Alexander

    2004-11-01

    Thrust generation is studied for a flexible lamprey model which is actuated periodically to produce a streamwise traveling wave. Shape memory alloy actuators are used to achieve this deformation. The flow field is investigated using DPIV and flow visualization for a range of Strouhal numbers based on peak-to-peak amplitude of the trailing edge. The vortex kinematics in the spanwise and streamwise planes are examined, and a three-dimensional unsteady vortex model of the wake will be discussed.

  20. Dielectric Barrier Discharge (DBD) Plasma Actuators Thrust-Measurement Methodology Incorporating New Anti-Thrust Hypothesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashpis, David E.; Laun, Matthew C.

    2014-01-01

    We discuss thrust measurements of Dielectric Barrier Discharge (DBD) plasma actuators devices used for aerodynamic active flow control. After a review of our experience with conventional thrust measurement and significant non-repeatability of the results, we devised a suspended actuator test setup, and now present a methodology of thrust measurements with decreased uncertainty. The methodology consists of frequency scans at constant voltages. The procedure consists of increasing the frequency in a step-wise fashion from several Hz to the maximum frequency of several kHz, followed by frequency decrease back down to the start frequency of several Hz. This sequence is performed first at the highest voltage of interest, then repeated at lower voltages. The data in the descending frequency direction is more consistent and selected for reporting. Sample results show strong dependence of thrust on humidity which also affects the consistency and fluctuations of the measurements. We also observed negative values of thrust or "anti-thrust", at low frequencies between 4 Hz and up to 64 Hz. The anti-thrust is proportional to the mean-squared voltage and is frequency independent. Departures from the parabolic anti-thrust curve are correlated with appearance of visible plasma discharges. We propose the anti-thrust hypothesis. It states that the measured thrust is a sum of plasma thrust and anti-thrust, and assumes that the anti-thrust exists at all frequencies and voltages. The anti-thrust depends on actuator geometry and materials and on the test installation. It enables the separation of the plasma thrust from the measured total thrust. This approach enables more meaningful comparisons between actuators at different installations and laboratories. The dependence on test installation was validated by surrounding the actuator with a large diameter, grounded, metal sleeve.

  1. The Beaufort Sea fold-and-thrust belt, northwestern Canada: Implications for thrust-belt evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Root, K.G. )

    1991-06-01

    The northeasternmost segment of the Cordilleran thrust belt of western North American underlies the Beaufort Sea continental margin. Folds and associated northesat-directed thrusts in this region formed synchronously with Tertiary sedimentation. As a result, the times of fold development can be determined from reflection seismic data by analyzing lateral thickness changes in stratigraphic sequences of known ages, and onlap and truncation relationships at unconformities. Thrust faulting occurred throughout the late Paleocene-Pliocene. The abundant temporal data indicate the deformational seuqence was significantly differet from the simple, steplike, foreland-propagating model formulated in other less well-dated thrust belts. Many thrusts were active simultaneously, especially during the late Eocnee, when the region of active thrusting had an across-strike width of greater than 200 km. This observation calls into question the popular concept that only one thrust moves at a time as a thrust belt develops. The thrust belt propagated along, as well as across, strike. During the late Paleocene-middle Eocene, the area of active thrusting was bounded on the southeast by poorly imaged zones of right-lateral strike-slip faults that apparently are the northern offshore continuation of the Rapid fault array. The change in the age of thrusting along strike results in no obvious geometrical anomalies and could not be deduced without timing information. This has an important implication: temporal data cannot necessarily be projected along strike in a thrust belt.

  2. Lightweight Chambers for Thrust Assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elam, Sandra K.; Lee, Jonathan; Holmes, Richard; Zimmerman, Frank; Effinger, Mike; Turner, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has successfully applied new materials and fabrication techniques to create actively cooled thrust chambers that operate 200-400 degrees hotter and weigh 50% lighter than conventional designs. In some vehicles, thrust assemblies account for as much as 20% of the engine weight. So, reducing the weight of these components and increasing their operating range will benefit many engines and vehicle designs, including Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) concepts. Obviously, copper and steel alloys have been used successfully for many years in the chamber components of thrust assemblies. Yet, by replacing the steel alloys with Polymer Matrix Composite (PMC) and/or Metal Matrix Composite (MMC) materials, design weights can be drastically reduced. In addition, replacing the traditional copper alloys with a Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC) or an advanced copper alloy (Cu-8Cr-4Nb, also known as GRCop-84) significantly increases allowable operating temperatures. Several small MMC and PMC demonstration chambers have recently been fabricated with promising results. Each of these designs included GRCop-84 for the cooled chamber liner. These units successfully verified that designs over 50% lighter are feasible. New fabrication processes, including advanced casting technology and a low cost vacuum plasma spray (VPS) process, were also demonstrated with these units. Hot-fire testing at MSFC is currently being conducted on the chambers to verify increased operating temperatures available with the GRCop-84 liner. Unique CMC chamber liners were also successfully fabricated and prepared for hot-fire testing. Yet, early results indicate these CMC liners need significantly more development in order to use them in required chamber designs. Based on the successful efforts with the MMC and PMC concepts, two full size "lightweight" chambers are currently being designed and fabricated for hot

  3. Rocket Engine Thrust Chamber Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornelius, Charles S. (Inventor); Counts, Richard H. (Inventor); Myers, W. Neill (Inventor); Lackey, Jeffrey D. (Inventor); Peters, Warren (Inventor); Shadoan, Michael D. (Inventor); Sparks, David L. (Inventor); Lawrence, Timothy W. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A thrust chamber assembly for liquid fueled rocket engines and the method of making it wherein a two-piece mandrel wrapped with a silica tape saturated with a phenolic resin, the tape extending along the mandrel and covering the combustion chamber portion of the mandrel to the throat portion. The phenolic in the tape is cured and the end of the wrap is machined. The remainder of the mandrel is wrapped with a third silica tape. The resin in the third tape is cured and the assembly is machined. The entire assembly is then wrapped with a tow of graphite fibers wetted with an epoxy resin and, after the epoxy resin is cured, the graphite is machined to final dimensions.

  4. High power thrust vector actuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kittock, M. J.

    1993-06-01

    Modern missile programs are frequently favoring electro-mechanical (EM) thrust vector actuation (TVA) over hydraulic for a variety of reasons. However, actuation system performance requirements are not relaxed for EM systems. Thus the development of EM systems with greater power output is required. The configuration of EM actuator studied consists of a DC brushless motor driving a spur gear train, which drives a ballscrew that converts rotary motion to rectilinear motion. This design produces an actuator with high levels of performance in a compact mechanical package. Design for manufacturability and assembly (DFMA) was part of the design process, resulting in an actuator that can be assembled easily and will operate reliably. This paper will discuss the mechanical details of the resultant actuator and report test results on a prototype derivative.

  5. Low thrust rocket test facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arrington, Lynn A.; Schneider, Steven J.

    1990-01-01

    A low thrust chemical rocket test facility has recently become operational at the NASA-Lewis. The new facility is used to conduct both long duration and performance tests at altitude over a thruster's operating envelope using hydrogen and oxygen gas for propellants. The facility provides experimental support for a broad range of objectives, including fundamental modeling of fluids and combustion phenomena, the evaluation of thruster components, and life testing of full rocket designs. The major mechanical and electrical systems are described along with aspects of the various optical diagnostics available in the test cell. The electrical and mechanical systems are designed for low down time between tests and low staffing requirements for test operations. Initial results are also presented which illustrate the various capabilities of the cell.

  6. Another Look at Rocket Thrust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hester, Brooke; Burris, Jennifer

    2012-12-01

    Rocket propulsion is often introduced as an example of Newton's third law. The rocket exerts a force on the exhaust gas being ejected; the gas exerts an equal and opposite force—the thrust—on the rocket.1,2 Equivalently, in the absence of a net external force, the total momentum of the system, rocket plus ejected gas, remains constant. The law of conservation of momentum is generally used in textbooks3,4 and elsewhere5 in deriving the rocket thrust equation. In this paper we take the somewhat different approach of explicitly applying Newton's second law to the rocket. This method provides a good opportunity to show the importance of choosing carefully the system to which Newton's second law is applied.

  7. Performance characteristics of two multiaxis thrust-vectoring nozzles at Mach numbers up to 1.28

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wing, David J.; Capone, Francis J.

    1993-01-01

    The thrust-vectoring axisymmetric (VA) nozzle and a spherical convergent flap (SCF) thrust-vectoring nozzle were tested along with a baseline nonvectoring axisymmetric (NVA) nozzle in the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel at Mach numbers from 0 to 1.28 and nozzle pressure ratios from 1 to 8. Test parameters included geometric yaw vector angle and unvectored divergent flap length. No pitch vectoring was studied. Nozzle drag, thrust minus drag, yaw thrust vector angle, discharge coefficient, and static thrust performance were measured and analyzed, as well as external static pressure distributions. The NVA nozzle and the VA nozzle displayed higher static thrust performance than the SCF nozzle throughout the nozzle pressure ratio (NPR) range tested. The NVA nozzle had higher overall thrust minus drag than the other nozzles throughout the NPR and Mach number ranges tested. The SCF nozzle had the lowest jet-on nozzle drag of the three nozzles throughout the test conditions. The SCF nozzle provided yaw thrust angles that were equal to the geometric angle and constant with NPR. The VA nozzle achieved yaw thrust vector angles that were significantly higher than the geometric angle but not constant with NPR. Nozzle drag generally increased with increases in thrust vectoring for all the nozzles tested.

  8. Static Investigation of a Multiaxis Thrust-Vectoring Nozzle With Variable Internal Contouring Ability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wing, David J.; Mills, Charles T. L.; Mason, Mary L.

    1997-01-01

    The thrust efficiency and vectoring performance of a convergent-divergent nozzle were investigated at static conditions in the model preparation area of the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel. The diamond-shaped nozzle was capable of varying the internal contour of each quadrant individually by using cam mechanisms and retractable drawers to produce pitch and yaw thrust vectoring. Pitch thrust vectoring was achieved by either retracting the lower drawers to incline the throat or varying the internal flow-path contours to incline the throat. Yaw thrust vectoring was achieved by reducing flow area left of the nozzle centerline and increasing flow area right of the nozzle centerline; a skewed throat deflected the flow in the lateral direction.

  9. Thrust bolting: roof bolt support apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Tadolini, Stephen C.; Dolinar, Dennis R.

    1992-01-01

    A method of installing a tensioned roof bolt in a borehole of a rock formation without the aid of a mechanical anchoring device or threaded tensioning threads by applying thrust to the bolt (19) as the bonding material (7') is curing to compress the strata (3) surrounding the borehole (1), and then relieving the thrust when the bonding material (7') has cured.

  10. Mu rhythm desynchronization by tongue thrust observation

    PubMed Central

    Sakihara, Kotoe; Inagaki, Masumi

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to investigate the mu rhythm in the sensorimotor area during tongue thrust observation and to obtain an answer to the question as to how subtle non-verbal orofacial movement observation activates the sensorimotor area. Ten healthy volunteers performed finger tap execution, tongue thrust execution, and tongue thrust observation. The electroencephalogram (EEG) was recorded from 128 electrodes placed on the scalp, and regions of interest were set at sensorimotor areas. The event-related desynchronization (ERD) and event-related synchronization (ERS) for the mu rhythm (8–13 Hz) and beta (13−25 Hz) bands were measured. Tongue thrust observation induced mu rhythm ERD, and the ERD was detected at the left hemisphere regardless whether the observed tongue thrust was toward the left or right. Mu rhythm ERD was also recorded during tongue thrust execution. However, temporal analysis revealed that the ERD associated with tongue thrust observation preceded that associated with execution by approximately 2 s. Tongue thrust observation induces mu rhythm ERD in sensorimotor cortex with left hemispheric dominance. PMID:26441599

  11. Measuring Model Rocket Engine Thrust Curves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penn, Kim; Slaton, William V.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a method and setup to quickly and easily measure a model rocket engine's thrust curve using a computer data logger and force probe. Horst describes using Vernier's LabPro and force probe to measure the rocket engine's thrust curve; however, the method of attaching the rocket to the force probe is not discussed. We show how a…

  12. Thrust Characterization for Vortex Ring Thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krieg, Mike; Mohseni, Kamran

    2007-11-01

    Synthetic jets are zero net mass pulsatile jets that are commonly used in flow control applications in air. In these cases the natural resonant frequency of the actuators plays an important role. In this work we will present thrust characterization of vortex ring thrusters (VRTs) in liquid (equivalent of synthetic jets in liquid medium). VRTs design are motivated by pulsatile jet propulsion in squid and jellyfish. A prototype jet thruster was designed and build for this investigation. The effect of the actuation frequency and stroke ratio on the thrust level was experimentally studied. A simplified slug model was defined which predicted the thrust according to the momentum transfer. According to the model the thrust values for various frequencies converges to a single non-dimensionalized thrust, which is only a function of the stroke ratio. The accuracy of the model was defined in terms of a coefficient α which related predicted thrust values to those measured experimentally. This coefficient was observed to be nearly unity for stroke ratios below the formation number of the jet, and for frequencies below critical cavitation frequencies. α was seen to decrease (measured thrust drops below predicted thrust) with increasing frequency for all jets with stroke ratios above the formation number. The feasibility of using such a device in typical marine vehicles was tested by implementing the thruster in an unmanned underwater vehicle. The vehicle test-bed was operated in various dynamic maneuvers, including a simulated parallel park.

  13. Oxygen/Alcohol Dual Thrust RCS Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angstadt, Tara; Hurlbert, Eric

    1999-01-01

    A non-toxic dual thrust RCS engine offers significant operational, safety, and performance advantages to the space shuttle and the next generation RLVs. In this concept, a single engine produces two thrust levels of 25 and 870 lbf. The low thrust level is provided by the spark torch igniter, which, with the addition of 2 extra valves, can also be made to function as a vernier. A dual thrust RCS engine allows 38 verniers to be packaged more efficiently on a vehicle. These 38 vemiers improve translation and reduce cross coupling, thereby providing more pure roll, pitch, and yaw maneuvers of the vehicle. Compared to the 6 vemiers currently on the shuttle, the 38 dual thrust engines would be 25 to 40% more efficient for the same maneuvers and attitude control. The vernier thrust level also reduces plume impingement and contamination concerns. Redundancy is also improved, thereby improving mission success reliability. Oxygen and ethanol are benign propellants which do not create explosive reaction products or contamination, as compared to hypergolic propellants. These characteristics make dual-thrust engines simpler to implement on a non-toxic reaction control system. Tests at WSTF in August 1999 demonstrated a dual-thrust concept that is successful with oxygen and ethanol. Over a variety of inlet pressures and mixture ratios at 22:1 area ratio, the engine produced between 230 and 297 sec Isp, and thrust levels from 8 lbf. to 50 lbf. This paper describes the benefits of dual-thrust engines and the recent results from tests at WSTF.

  14. An investigation of high performance, short thrust augmenting ejectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, T.; Jiang, T.; Pitts, D. R.; Ntone, F.

    1984-12-01

    The design of air-to-air, thrust augmenting ejectors having short curved wall diffusers utilizing boundary layer control is discussed. The design is achieved by an inverse method which uses the vorticity at the diffuser inlet as a flow parameter in the analysis. Three diffusers having ejector length-to-mixing chamber diameter ratios of approximately 6:1 and mixing chamber inlet area-to-primary nozzle area ratios of 20:1 and 40:1 were designed and tested. A new high level of performance was analytically predicted and achieved experimentally. Comparisons between predicted and observed performances, velocity distributions and pressure distributions are presented.

  15. Low thrust chemical rocket technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Steven J.

    1992-01-01

    An on-going technology program to improve the performance of low thrust chemical rockets for spacecraft on-board propulsion applications is reviewed. Improved performance and lifetime is sought by the development of new predictive tools to understand the combustion and flow physics, introduction of high temperature materials and improved component designs to optimize performance, and use of higher performance propellants. Improved predictive technology is sought through the comparison of both local and global predictions with experimental data. Predictions are based on both the RPLUS Navier-Stokes code with finite rate kinetics and the JANNAF methodology. Data were obtained with laser-based diagnostics along with global performance measurements. Results indicate that the modeling of the injector and the combustion process needs improvement in these codes and flow visualization with a technique such as 2-D laser induced fluorescence (LIF) would aid in resolving issues of flow symmetry and shear layer combustion processes. High temperature material fabrication processes are under development and small rockets are being designed, fabricated, and tested using these new materials. Rhenium coated with iridium for oxidation protection was produced by the Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) process and enabled an 800 K increase in rocket operating temperature. Performance gains with this material in rockets using Earth storable propellants (nitrogen tetroxide and monomethylhydrazine or hydrazine) were obtained through component redesign to eliminate fuel film cooling and its associated combustion inefficiency while managing head end thermal soakback. Material interdiffusion and oxidation characteristics indicated that the requisite lifetimes of tens of hours were available for thruster applications. Rockets were designed, fabricated, and tested with thrusts of 22, 62, 440 and 550 N. Performance improvements of 10 to 20 seconds specific impulse were demonstrated. Higher

  16. Low-Thrust Control of a Lunar Mapping Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harl, Nathan; Pernicka, Henry J.

    2007-01-01

    A method is presented for generating and maintaining a lunar mapping orbit using continuous low-thrust hardware. Optimal control theory is used to maintain a lunar orbit that is low-altitude, near-polar, and Sun-synchronous; three typical requirements for a successful lunar mapping mission. The analysis of the optimal control problem leads to the commonly seen two-point boundary value problem, which is solved using a simple indirect shooting algorithm. Simulations are presented for a 50-day mapping duration, in which it is shown that a very tight control is achieved with thrust levels below 1 N for a 1000 kg spacecraft. A straightforward approach for using the method presented to compute missions of any duration is also discussed.

  17. Static Thrust and Vectoring Performance of a Spherical Convergent Flap Nozzle with a Nonrectangular Divergent Duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wing, David J.

    1998-01-01

    The static internal performance of a multiaxis-thrust-vectoring, spherical convergent flap (SCF) nozzle with a non-rectangular divergent duct was obtained in the model preparation area of the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel. Duct cross sections of hexagonal and bowtie shapes were tested. Additional geometric parameters included throat area (power setting), pitch flap deflection angle, and yaw gimbal angle. Nozzle pressure ratio was varied from 2 to 12 for dry power configurations and from 2 to 6 for afterburning power configurations. Approximately a 1-percent loss in thrust efficiency from SCF nozzles with a rectangular divergent duct was incurred as a result of internal oblique shocks in the flow field. The internal oblique shocks were the result of cross flow generated by the vee-shaped geometric throat. The hexagonal and bowtie nozzles had mirror-imaged flow fields and therefore similar thrust performance. Thrust vectoring was not hampered by the three-dimensional internal geometry of the nozzles. Flow visualization indicates pitch thrust-vector angles larger than 10' may be achievable with minimal adverse effect on or a possible gain in resultant thrust efficiency as compared with the performance at a pitch thrust-vector angle of 10 deg.

  18. Collar nut and thrust ring

    DOEpatents

    Lowery, Guy B.

    1991-01-01

    A collar nut comprises a hollow cylinder having fine interior threads at one end for threadably engaging a pump mechanical seal assembly and an inwardly depending flange at the other end. The flange has an enlarged portion with a groove for receiving an O-ring for sealing against the intrusion of pumpage from the exterior. The enlarged portion engages a thrust ring about the pump shaft for crushing a hard O-ring, such as a graphite O-ring. The hard O-ring seals the interior of the mechanical seal assembly and pump housing against the loss of lubricants or leakage of pumpage. The fine threads of the hollow cylinder provide the mechanical advantage for crushing the hard O-ring evenly and easily with a hand tool from the side of the collar nut rather than by tightening a plurality of bolts from the end and streamlines the exterior surface of the mechanical seal. The collar nut avoids the spatial requirements of bolt heads at the end of a seal and associated bolt head turbulence.

  19. Rocket Engine Thrust Chamber Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornelius, Charles S. (Inventor); Counts, Richard H. (Inventor); Myers, W. Neill (Inventor); Lackey, Jeffrey D. (Inventor); Peters, Warren (Inventor); Shadoan, Michael (Inventor); Sparks, David L. (Inventor); Lawrence, Timothy W. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A thrust chamber assembly for liquid fueled rocket engines and the method of making it wherein a two-piece mandrel having the configuration of an assembly having a combustion chamber portion connected to a nozzle portion through a throat portion is wrapped with a silica tape saturated with a phenolic resin, the tape extending along the mandrel and covering the combustion chamber portion of the mandrel to the throat portion. The width of the tape is positioned at an angle of 30 to 50 deg. to the axis of the mandrel such that one edge of the tape contacts the mandrel while the other edge is spaced from the mandrel. The phenolic in the tape is cured and the end of the wrap is machined to provide a frusto-conical surface extending at an angle of 15 to 30 deg. with respect to the axis of the mandrel for starting a second wrap on the mandrel to cover the throat portion. The remainder of the mandrel is wrapped with a third silica tape having its width positioned at a angle of 5 to 20 deg. from the axis of the mandrel. The resin in the third tape is cured and the assembly is machined to provide a smooth outer surface. The entire assembly is then wrapped with a tow of graphite fibers wetted with an epoxy resin and, after the epoxy resin is cured, the graphite is machined to final dimensions.

  20. Experimental Study of an Axisymmetric Dual Throat Fluidic Thrust Vectoring Nozzle for Supersonic Aircraft Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flamm, Jeffrey D.; Deere, Karen A.; Mason, Mary L.; Berrier, Bobby L.; Johnson, Stuart K.

    2007-01-01

    design compromised thrust vector angle achieved, but some thrust vector control would be available, potentially for aircraft trim. The fixed area, expansion ratio of 1.0, Dual Throat Nozzle provided the best overall compromise for thrust vectoring and nozzle internal performance over the range of NPR tested compared to the variable geometry Dual Throat Nozzle.

  1. Low-thrust chemical orbit transfer propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pelouch, J. J., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The need for large structures in high orbit is reported in terms of the many mission opportunities which require such structures. Mission and transportation options for large structures are presented, and it is shown that low-thrust propulsion is an enabling requirement for some missions and greatly enhancing to many others. Electric and low-thrust chemical propulsion are compared, and the need for an requirements of low-thrust chemical propulsion are discussed in terms of the interactions that are perceived to exist between the propulsion system and the large structure.

  2. Rocket thrust variation with foamed liquid propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrell, G

    1957-01-01

    An analysis is presented on a method for varying rocket thrust by varying the bulk density of the propellants. This density variation was accomplished by uniformly dispersing an inert, insoluble gas in the liquid propellants. Only qualitative agreement with theory was obtained from preliminary experiments with a 1000-pound-thrust ammonia - nitric acid rocket engine; the required experimental gas-flow rates were two to six times greater than those predicted by theory. It was demonstrated, however, that this method of rocket-thrust variation is feasible.

  3. Design Enhancements of the Two-Dimensional, Dual Throat Fluidic Thrust Vectoring Nozzle Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flamm, Jeffrey D.; Deere, Karen A.; Mason, Mary L.; Berrier, Bobby L.; Johnson, Stuart K.

    2006-01-01

    A Dual Throat Nozzle fluidic thrust vectoring technique that achieves higher thrust-vectoring efficiencies than other fluidic techniques, without sacrificing thrust efficiency has been developed at NASA Langley Research Center. The nozzle concept was designed with the aid of the structured-grid, Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes computational fluidic dynamics code PAB3D. This new concept combines the thrust efficiency of sonic-plane skewing with increased thrust-vectoring efficiencies obtained by maximizing pressure differentials in a separated cavity located downstream of the nozzle throat. By injecting secondary flow asymmetrically at the upstream minimum area, a new aerodynamic minimum area is formed downstream of the geometric minimum and the sonic line is skewed, thus vectoring the exhaust flow. The nozzle was tested in the NASA Langley Research Center Jet Exit Test Facility. Internal nozzle performance characteristics were defined for nozzle pressure ratios up to 10, with a range of secondary injection flow rates up to 10 percent of the primary flow rate. Most of the data included in this paper shows the effect of secondary injection rate at a nozzle pressure ratio of 4. The effects of modifying cavity divergence angle, convergence angle and cavity shape on internal nozzle performance were investigated, as were effects of injection geometry, hole or slot. In agreement with computationally predicted data, experimental data verified that decreasing cavity divergence angle had a negative impact and increasing cavity convergence angle had a positive impact on thrust vector angle and thrust efficiency. A curved cavity apex provided improved thrust ratios at some injection rates. However, overall nozzle performance suffered with no secondary injection. Injection holes were more efficient than the injection slot over the range of injection rates, but the slot generated larger thrust vector angles for injection rates less than 4 percent of the primary flow rate.

  4. Performance characterization of a helicon double layer thruster using direct thrust measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pottinger, Sabrina; Lappas, Vaios; Charles, Christine; Boswell, Rod

    2011-06-01

    The performance of a helicon double layer thruster (HDLT) has been characterized using a pendulum type thrust stand and retarding field energy analyser. Data recorded for a fixed propellant flow rate of 16 sccm of krypton and fixed magnetic field topology show that the thrust generated increases linearly with increasing radio frequency input power over a range 250-650 W. Over the power range investigated thrust levels of approximately 1-2.8 mN were achieved. A maximum effective specific impulse of 280 s was determined using the thrust data. Ion energy distribution functions indicate that increasing power corresponds to improved plasma generation processes as general trends show increasing plasma and beam currents with increasing power.

  5. Thrust and power required in climbing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenig, George

    1923-01-01

    The following article shows that the phenomena of climbing flight can be determined with sufficient accuracy and represented very clearly, for all flight positions, by means of the thrust diagrams. This method has often given good results.

  6. 14 CFR 33.97 - Thrust reversers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Block Tests; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.97 Thrust reversers. (a) If the engine incorporates a reverser, the endurance calibration, operation, and vibration tests prescribed...

  7. Three dimensional thrust chamber life prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, W. H.; Brogren, E. W.

    1976-01-01

    A study was performed to analytically determine the cyclic thermomechanical behavior and fatigue life of three configurations of a Plug Nozzle Thrust Chamber. This thrust chamber is a test model which represents the current trend in nozzle design calling for high performance coupled with weight and volume limitations as well as extended life for reusability. The study involved the use of different materials and material combinations to evaluate their application to the problem of low-cycle fatigue in the thrust chamber. The thermal and structural analyses were carried out on a three-dimensional basis. Results are presented which show plots of continuous temperature histories and temperature distributions at selected times during the operating cycle of the thrust chamber. Computed structural data show critical regions for low-cycle fatigue and the histories of strain within the regions for each operation cycle.

  8. Low-thrust chemical rocket engine study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shoji, J. M.

    1981-01-01

    An analytical study evaluating thrust chamber cooling engine cycles and preliminary engine design for low thrust chemical rocket engines for orbit transfer vehicles is described. Oxygen/hydrogen, oxygen/methane, and oxygen/RP-1 engines with thrust levels from 444.8 N to 13345 N, and chamber pressures from 13.8 N/sq cm to 689.5 N/sq cm were evaluated. The physical and thermodynamic properties of the propellant theoretical performance data, and transport properties are documented. The thrust chamber cooling limits for regenerative/radiation and film/radiation cooling are defined and parametric heat transfer data presented. A conceptual evaluation of a number of engine cycles was performed and a 2224.1 N oxygen/hydrogen engine cycle configuration and a 2224.1 N oxygen/methane configuration chosen for preliminary engine design. Updated parametric engine data, engine design drawings, and an assessment of technology required are presented.

  9. Comparative investigation of multiplane thrust vectoring nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Capone, F.; Smereczniak, P.; Spetnagel, D.; Thayer, E.

    1992-01-01

    The inflight aerodynamic performance of multiplane vectoring nozzles is critical to development of advanced aircraft and flight control systems utilizing thrust vectoring. To investigate vectoring nozzle performance, subscale models of two second-generation thrust vectoring nozzle concepts currently under development for advanced fighters were integrated into an axisymmetric test pod. Installed drag and vectoring performance characteristics of both concepts were experimentally determined in wind tunnel testing. CFD analyses were conducted to understand the impact of internal flow turning on thrust vectoring characteristics. Both nozzles exhibited drag comparable with current nonvectoring axisymmetric nozzles. During vectored-thrust operations, forces produced by external flow effects amounted to about 25 percent of the total force measured.

  10. GSFC Technology Thrusts and Partnership Opportunities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le Moigne, Jacqueline

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the technology thrusts and the opportunities to partner in developing software in support of the technological advances at the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). There are thrusts in development of end-to-end software systems for mission data systems in areas of flight software, ground data systems, flight dynamic systems and science data systems. The required technical expertise is reviewed, and the supported missions are shown for the various areas given.

  11. Nanobalance: an automated interferometric balance for micro-thrust measurement.

    PubMed

    Canuto, Enrico; Rolino, Andrea

    2004-04-01

    The paper is concerned with a new instrument, nanobalance, measuring thrust and noise of space micro-thrusters in the range 0-1 mN with submicronewton accuracy. Low-noise micro-thrusters will be essential for upcoming "drag-free" space missions like GOCE, SMART-2, LISA, and Darwin. Nanobalance departs from traditional thrust measuring concepts so as to exploit sensitivity of in-vacuum Fabry-Pérot interferometers to subnanometric displacements. That is achieved by an optical cavity embraced by two equal pendulums suspended at a constant distance, one of which carrying the micro-thruster under test. Any thrust, changing the optical path length of the injected laser beam, is detected as the frequency variation restoring a standing wave in the cavity. The paper presents the measurement principles, the error budget as derived from recent tests as well as instrument automation, which is essential for facilitating instrument setup and adaptation from measurement trial to trial. The authors are responsible for instrument automation and measurement processing.

  12. Static performance investigation of a skewed-throat multiaxis thrust-vectoring nozzle concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wing, David J.

    1994-01-01

    The static performance of a jet exhaust nozzle which achieves multiaxis thrust vectoring by physically skewing the geometric throat has been characterized in the static test facility of the 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel at NASA Langley Research Center. The nozzle has an asymmetric internal geometry defined by four surfaces: a convergent-divergent upper surface with its ridge perpendicular to the nozzle centerline, a convergent-divergent lower surface with its ridge skewed relative to the nozzle centerline, an outwardly deflected sidewall, and a straight sidewall. The primary goal of the concept is to provide efficient yaw thrust vectoring by forcing the sonic plane (nozzle throat) to form at a yaw angle defined by the skewed ridge of the lower surface contour. A secondary goal is to provide multiaxis thrust vectoring by combining the skewed-throat yaw-vectoring concept with upper and lower pitch flap deflections. The geometric parameters varied in this investigation included lower surface ridge skew angle, nozzle expansion ratio (divergence angle), aspect ratio, pitch flap deflection angle, and sidewall deflection angle. Nozzle pressure ratio was varied from 2 to a high of 11.5 for some configurations. The results of the investigation indicate that efficient, substantial multiaxis thrust vectoring was achieved by the skewed-throat nozzle concept. However, certain control surface deflections destabilized the internal flow field, which resulted in substantial shifts in the position and orientation of the sonic plane and had an adverse effect on thrust-vectoring and weight flow characteristics. By increasing the expansion ratio, the location of the sonic plane was stabilized. The asymmetric design resulted in interdependent pitch and yaw thrust vectoring as well as nonzero thrust-vector angles with undeflected control surfaces. By skewing the ridges of both the upper and lower surface contours, the interdependency between pitch and yaw thrust vectoring may be eliminated

  13. Multiphysics Nuclear Thermal Rocket Thrust Chamber Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ten-See

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this effort is t o develop an efficient and accurate thermo-fluid computational methodology to predict environments for hypothetical thrust chamber design and analysis. The current task scope is to perform multidimensional, multiphysics analysis of thrust performance and heat transfer analysis for a hypothetical solid-core, nuclear thermal engine including thrust chamber and nozzle. The multiphysics aspects of the model include: real fluid dynamics, chemical reactivity, turbulent flow, and conjugate heat transfer. The model will be designed to identify thermal, fluid, and hydrogen environments in all flow paths and materials. This model would then be used to perform non- nuclear reproduction of the flow element failures demonstrated in the Rover/NERVA testing, investigate performance of specific configurations and assess potential issues and enhancements. A two-pronged approach will be employed in this effort: a detailed analysis of a multi-channel, flow-element, and global modeling of the entire thrust chamber assembly with a porosity modeling technique. It is expected that the detailed analysis of a single flow element would provide detailed fluid, thermal, and hydrogen environments for stress analysis, while the global thrust chamber assembly analysis would promote understanding of the effects of hydrogen dissociation and heat transfer on thrust performance. These modeling activities will be validated as much as possible by testing performed by other related efforts.

  14. The interaction between deepwater channel systems and growing thrusts and folds, toe-thrust region of the deepwater Niger Delta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolly, Byami; Whittaker, Alex; Lonergan, Lidia

    2015-04-01

    factor of > 2, with a corresponding width decrease of approximately 25%. Channel incision across growing structures is achieved through enhanced bed-shear stress driven incision (up to 200 Pa) and flow velocity (up to 5 ms-1), assuming typical bulk sediment concentrations of 0.6%. Comparison of structural uplift since 1.7 Ma, and channel incision over an equivalent period, shows that some of these channels are able to keep pace with the time-integrated uplift since 1.7 Ma, and may have reached a topographic (bathymetric) steady-state with respect to on-going thrusting. However, some of the sea-bed channels are yet to reach topographic steady-state because of factors which include recent change in gradient caused by structural uplift, and the impact of active channel diversion by growing structures. Generally, bed-shear stresses of ~150 Pa are sufficient to keep pace with structural strain rates of 10-15 s-1. More widely, our data demonstrates that submarine channel systems dynamically adjust their geometry and basal gradient in order to keep pace with growth of tectonic structures and our results suggest that these factors must be incorporated into models to fully predict the downslope pathways of sea-bed channels in structurally complex areas.

  15. Thrusting and sedimentation along an emergent thrust front: an example from the External Sierras of the Southern Pyrenees, Spain

    SciTech Connect

    Anastasio, D.J.; De Paor, D.G.

    1985-01-01

    Depending on the relative rates of thrusting and erosion, emergent thrusts, like glaciers, may advance or retreat while continually moving forward. The relative rates of thrusting and erosion as a thrust ruptures the land surface also control the mountain front geometry. For listric thrusts, the high angle of intersection with the land surface results in primarily upward rather than horizontal movement. If thrust movement is much faster than the prevailing erosion a large emergent toe will develop as the thrust sheet advances over its synorogenic deposits. Alternatively, if the erosion rates are generally faster than thrusting, synorogenic deposits will progressively onlap onto a receding mountain front. Comparable rates of thrusting and erosion result in steady state uplift and denudation. In the External Sierras the thrust front reached the synorogenic surface during the Paleogene and resulted in the accumulation of thick synorogenic deposits. Relatively slow rates of thrusting (<1mm/a) and uplift (<0.5mm/a) of the External Sierras, coupled with moderate erosion rates resulted in a near stationary mountain front. Despite this, temporal and spatial fluctuations in the thrusting resulted in three different mountain front geometries. In places, the thrust front has been buried by molasse, elsewhere, the emergent thrust sheet has deformed its proximal molasse by bulldozing, producing deposits analogous to push moraines, and in other places the frontal thrust has overridden its molasse. Striated cobbles within the molasse immediately below the frontal thrust may have functioned like ball bearings, reducing the friction with the overriding thrust sheet.

  16. Electrokinetics as a Propellantless Propulsion Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valone, Thomas

    This is a review of the worthwhile, innovative theories and concepts in electrogravitics and electrokinetics that could yield tremendous technological and economic dividends in both investment dollars and potential applications for future generations. Electrogravitics is most commonly associated with the 1918 work by Professor Nipher followed by the 1928 British patent #300,311 of T. Townsend Brown, the 1952 Special Inquiry File #24-185 of the Office of Naval Research into the "Electro-Gravity Device of Townsend Brown" and two widely circulated 1956 Aviation Studies Ltd. Reports on "Electrogravitics Systems" and "The Gravitics Situation." By definition, electrogravitics historically has had a purported relationship to gravity or the object's mass, as well as the applied voltage. An analysis of the 90-year old science of electrogravitics (or electrogravity) necessarily includes an analysis of electrokinetics. Electrokinetics, on the other hand, is more commonly associated with many patents of T. Townsend Brown as well as Agnew Bahnson, starting with the 1960 US patent #2,949,550 entitled, "Electrokinetic Apparatus." Electrokinetics, which often involves a capacitor and dielectric, has virtually no relationship that can be connected with mass or gravity. The Army Research Lab has recently issued a report on electrokinetics, analyzing the force on an asymmetric capacitor, while NASA has received three patents on the same design topic. To successfully describe and predict the purported motion in the direction of the positive terminal of the capacitor, it is desirable to use the classical electrokinetic field and force equations for the specific geometry involved. This initial review also suggests directions for further confirming measurements. This paper also reviews the published electrokinetic experiments by the Army Research Lab by Bahder and Fazi, California State University at Fullerton work by Woodward and Mahood, Erwin Saxl, and others.

  17. Middle Proterozoic thrusting in central New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Grambling, J.A.; Thompson, A.G. . Dept. of Earth and Planetary Sciences); Dallmeyer, R.D. . Dept. of Geology)

    1992-01-01

    Ductile thrust faults truncate contact-metamorphic aureoles surrounding two 1.4 Ga plutons in central New Mexico. The Priest quartz monzonite (1440 Ma) and Sandia granite (1420 Ma) are 50 km apart in the continuous Sandia/Manzano mountain chain. Thermobarometry and phase relations demonstrate that country-rock temperatures rose from 700 C toward the pluton, at pressure near 4 kb. The northern edge of this aureole is cut by the southeast-dipping ductile Monte Largo thrust fault. Prograde, greenschist-facies metamorphism of footwall rocks accompanied local retrogression of hangingwall rocks during thrusting. This second metamorphism took place at P-T conditions of 2-3 kb and 450-475 C. Another contact aureole surrounds the Sandia granite. Mafic rocks near the granite reflect amphibolite-facies conditions, whereas pelites display low-pressure contact assemblages. Quantitative temperatures increase from 500--750 C toward the granite, at pressures of 2.5--3.5 kb. The shallowly southeast-dipping Vincent Moore fault truncates the Sandia granite and the southern portion of its contact aureole. This ductile shear zone emplaced greenschist-facies rocks northwestward above the Sandia contact aureole. Footwall rocks were retrograded to the greenschist facies within 100 m of this fault; the retrograde phases are aligned parallel to the trace of the thrust. Metamorphic temperatures in hangingwall rocks (during thrusting ) were 400-475 C at pressures above 2.75 kb. Additional northwest-vergent ductile thrusts are found elsewhere in the mountain chain. This may represent the age of thrusting and of the related greenschist and the related greenschist-facies metamorphic overprint.

  18. Design of high power electromechanical actuator for thrust vector control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowan, J. R.; Myers, W. N.

    1991-01-01

    NASA-Marshall has undertaken the development of electromechanical actuators (EMAs) for thrust vector control (TVC) augmentation system implementation. The TVC EMA presented has as its major components two three-phase brushless dc motors, a two-pass gear-reduction system, and a roller screw for rotary-to-linear motion conversion. System control is furnished by a solid-state electronic controller and power supply; a pair of resolvers deliver position feedback to the controller, such that precise positioning is achieved. Peformance comparisons have been conducted between the EMA and comparable-performance hydraulic systems applicable to TVCs.

  19. On the Thrust of a Single Electrode Electrohydrodynamic Thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilit', Tomáš; Váry, Michal; Valko, Pavol

    2015-03-01

    Linear thrust generation by a single pin emitter electrode under AC excitation has been studied. Presented are thrust measurements of a single electrode thruster, in comparison with classical, two electrode electrohydrodynamic thruster. The experiments show comparable thrust for both configurations at low voltage levels, suggesting higher thrust-to-weight ratio of single electrode thrusters at low applied voltages. Further, a hypothesis of single electrode thrust creation is proposed.

  20. Design of thrust vectoring exhaust nozzles for real-time applications using neural networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prasanth, Ravi K.; Markin, Robert E.; Whitaker, Kevin W.

    1991-01-01

    Thrust vectoring continues to be an important issue in military aircraft system designs. A recently developed concept of vectoring aircraft thrust makes use of flexible exhaust nozzles. Subtle modifications in the nozzle wall contours produce a non-uniform flow field containing a complex pattern of shock and expansion waves. The end result, due to the asymmetric velocity and pressure distributions, is vectored thrust. Specification of the nozzle contours required for a desired thrust vector angle (an inverse design problem) has been achieved with genetic algorithms. This approach is computationally intensive and prevents the nozzles from being designed in real-time, which is necessary for an operational aircraft system. An investigation was conducted into using genetic algorithms to train a neural network in an attempt to obtain, in real-time, two-dimensional nozzle contours. Results show that genetic algorithm trained neural networks provide a viable, real-time alternative for designing thrust vectoring nozzles contours. Thrust vector angles up to 20 deg were obtained within an average error of 0.0914 deg. The error surfaces encountered were highly degenerate and thus the robustness of genetic algorithms was well suited for minimizing global errors.

  1. Thrust Stand for Electric Propulsion Performance Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markusic, T. E.; Jones, J. E.; Cox, M. D.

    2004-01-01

    An electric propulsion thrust stand capable of supporting thrusters with total mass of up to 125 kg and 1 mN to 1 N thrust levels has been developed and tested. The mechanical design features a conventional hanging pendulum arm attached to a balance mechanism that transforms horizontal motion into amplified vertical motion, with accommodation for variable displacement sensitivity. Unlike conventional hanging pendulum thrust stands, the deflection is independent of the length of the pendulum arm, and no reference structure is required at the end of the pendulum. Displacement is measured using a non-contact, optical linear gap displacement transducer. Mechanical oscillations are attenuated using a passive, eddy current damper. An on-board microprocessor-based level control system, which includes a two axis accelerometer and two linear-displacement stepper motors, continuously maintains the level of the balance mechanism - counteracting mechanical %era drift during thruster testing. A thermal control system, which includes heat exchange panels, thermocouples, and a programmable recirculating water chiller, continuously adjusts to varying thermal loads to maintain the balance mechanism temperature, to counteract thermal drifts. An in-situ calibration rig allows for steady state calibration both prior to and during thruster testing. Thrust measurements were carried out on a well-characterized 1 kW Hall thruster; the thrust stand was shown to produce repeatable results consistent with previously published performance data.

  2. Thrust Augmentation with Mixer/Ejector Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Presz, Walter M., Jr.; Reynolds, Gary; Hunter, Craig

    2002-01-01

    Older commercial aircraft often exceed FAA (Federal Aviation Administration) sideline noise regulations. The major problem is the jet noise associated with the high exhaust velocities of the low bypass ratio engines on such aircraft. Mixer/ejector exhaust systems can provide a simple means of reducing the jet noise on these aircraft by mixing cool ambient air with the high velocity engine gases before they are exhausted to ambient. This paper presents new information on thrust performance predictions, and thrust augmentation capabilities of mixer/ejectors. Results are presented from the recent development program of the patented Alternating Lobe Mixer Ejector Concept (ALMEC) suppressor system for the Gulfstream GII, GIIB and GIII aircraft. Mixer/ejector performance procedures are presented which include classical control volume analyses, compound compressible flow theory, lobed nozzle loss correlations and state of the art computational fluid dynamic predictions. The mixer/ejector thrust predictions are compared to subscale wind tunnel test model data and actual aircraft flight test measurements. The results demonstrate that a properly designed mixer/ejector noise suppressor can increase effective engine bypass ratio and generate large thrust gains at takeoff conditions with little or no thrust loss at cruise conditions. The cruise performance obtained for such noise suppressor systems is shown to be a strong function of installation effects on the aircraft.

  3. Static performance of a cruciform nozzle with multiaxis thrust-vectoring and reverse-thrust capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wing, David J.; Asbury, Scott C.

    1992-01-01

    A multiaxis thrust vectoring nozzle designed to have equal flow turning capability in pitch and yaw was conceived and experimentally tested for internal, static performance. The cruciform-shaped convergent-divergent nozzle turned the flow for thrust vectoring by deflecting the divergent surfaces of the nozzle, called flaps. Methods for eliminating physical interference between pitch and yaw flaps at the larger multiaxis deflection angles was studied. These methods included restricting the pitch flaps from the path of the yaw flaps and shifting the flow path at the throat off the nozzle centerline to permit larger pitch-flap deflections without interfering with the operation of the yaw flaps. Two flap widths were tested at both dry and afterburning settings. Vertical and reverse thrust configurations at dry power were also tested. Comparison with two dimensional convergent-divergent nozzles showed lower but still competitive thrust performance and thrust vectoring capability.

  4. Initiation of subduction by post-collision foreland thrusting and back-thrusting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, A. H. G.

    1984-07-01

    While postulated causes of initial subduction and trench formation include underthrusting, controls on its location and age have not been determined. Consideration of the age of subduction zones bordering five collisional orogens suggests that subduction may have been initiated by foreland thrusts and back-thrusts. Foreland thrusts develop within a continental foreland on the subducting plate mostly within 50 my of collision with an arc system; where the foreland is narrow the thrusts may intersect the continent-ocean crust boundary. Back-thrusts develop in the fore-arc or back-arc area on the overriding plate within 10 to 20 my of collision, and can result in tectonic burial of the magmatic arc; where the arc system is oceanic the back-thrusts may intersect the arc-ocean crust boundary. Possible examples of subduction initiated by foreland thrusts are the start of subduction in the late Jurassic beneath the northern Sunda Arc, and at the end-Miocene in the Negros Trench. Examples of back-thrusts which have initiated or may initiate subduction are the late Cenozoic eastward translation of Taiwan over the Philippine Sea plate, the incipient southward subduction of the Banda Sea beneath Timor, and the W-dipping back-thrust comprising the Highland Boundary Fault zone and postulated early Ordovician thrusts to the SE in Scotland. The suggested relationship of subduction to collision helps to explain the persistence of Wilson cycles in the still-active late Mesozoic to Cenozoic orogenic belts and implies that orogeny will cease only with collision between major continents.

  5. Kinematics of swimming and thrust production during powerstroking bouts of the swim frenzy in green turtle hatchlings.

    PubMed

    Booth, David T

    2014-01-01

    Hatchling sea turtles emerge from nests, crawl down the beach and enter the sea where they typically enter a stereotypical hyperactive swimming frenzy. During this swim the front flippers are moved up and down in a flapping motion and are the primary source of thrust production. I used high-speed video linked with simultaneous measurement of thrust production in tethered hatchlings, along with high-speed video of free swimming hatchlings swimming at different water speeds in a swim flume to investigate the links between kinematics of front flipper movement, thrust production and swimming speed. In particular I tested the hypotheses that (1) increased swimming speed is achieved through an increased stroke rate; (2) force produced per stroke is proportional to stroke amplitude, (3) that forward thrust is produced during both the down and up phases of stroking; and (4) that peak thrust is produced towards the end of the downstroke cycle. Front flipper stroke rate was independent of water speed refuting the hypothesis that swimming speed is increased by increasing stroke rate. Instead differences in swimming speed were caused by a combination of varying flipper amplitude and the proportion of time spent powerstroking. Peak thrust produced per stroke varied within and between bouts of powerstroking, and these peaks in thrust were correlated with both flipper amplitude and flipper angular momentum during the downstroke supporting the hypothesis that stroke force is a function of stroke amplitude. Two distinct thrust production patterns were identified, monophasic in which a single peak in thrust was recorded during the later stages of the downstroke, and biphasic in which a small peak in thrust was recorded at the very end of the upstroke and this followed by a large peak in thrust during the later stages of the downstroke. The biphasic cycle occurs in ∼20% of hatchlings when they first started swimming, but disappeared after one to two hours of swimming. The

  6. Kinematics of swimming and thrust production during powerstroking bouts of the swim frenzy in green turtle hatchlings.

    PubMed

    Booth, David T

    2014-09-04

    Hatchling sea turtles emerge from nests, crawl down the beach and enter the sea where they typically enter a stereotypical hyperactive swimming frenzy. During this swim the front flippers are moved up and down in a flapping motion and are the primary source of thrust production. I used high-speed video linked with simultaneous measurement of thrust production in tethered hatchlings, along with high-speed video of free swimming hatchlings swimming at different water speeds in a swim flume to investigate the links between kinematics of front flipper movement, thrust production and swimming speed. In particular I tested the hypotheses that (1) increased swimming speed is achieved through an increased stroke rate; (2) force produced per stroke is proportional to stroke amplitude, (3) that forward thrust is produced during both the down and up phases of stroking; and (4) that peak thrust is produced towards the end of the downstroke cycle. Front flipper stroke rate was independent of water speed refuting the hypothesis that swimming speed is increased by increasing stroke rate. Instead differences in swimming speed were caused by a combination of varying flipper amplitude and the proportion of time spent powerstroking. Peak thrust produced per stroke varied within and between bouts of powerstroking, and these peaks in thrust were correlated with both flipper amplitude and flipper angular momentum during the downstroke supporting the hypothesis that stroke force is a function of stroke amplitude. Two distinct thrust production patterns were identified, monophasic in which a single peak in thrust was recorded during the later stages of the downstroke, and biphasic in which a small peak in thrust was recorded at the very end of the upstroke and this followed by a large peak in thrust during the later stages of the downstroke. The biphasic cycle occurs in ∼20% of hatchlings when they first started swimming, but disappeared after one to two hours of swimming. The

  7. Kinematics of swimming and thrust production during powerstroking bouts of the swim frenzy in green turtle hatchlings

    PubMed Central

    Booth, David T.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hatchling sea turtles emerge from nests, crawl down the beach and enter the sea where they typically enter a stereotypical hyperactive swimming frenzy. During this swim the front flippers are moved up and down in a flapping motion and are the primary source of thrust production. I used high-speed video linked with simultaneous measurement of thrust production in tethered hatchlings, along with high-speed video of free swimming hatchlings swimming at different water speeds in a swim flume to investigate the links between kinematics of front flipper movement, thrust production and swimming speed. In particular I tested the hypotheses that (1) increased swimming speed is achieved through an increased stroke rate; (2) force produced per stroke is proportional to stroke amplitude, (3) that forward thrust is produced during both the down and up phases of stroking; and (4) that peak thrust is produced towards the end of the downstroke cycle. Front flipper stroke rate was independent of water speed refuting the hypothesis that swimming speed is increased by increasing stroke rate. Instead differences in swimming speed were caused by a combination of varying flipper amplitude and the proportion of time spent powerstroking. Peak thrust produced per stroke varied within and between bouts of powerstroking, and these peaks in thrust were correlated with both flipper amplitude and flipper angular momentum during the downstroke supporting the hypothesis that stroke force is a function of stroke amplitude. Two distinct thrust production patterns were identified, monophasic in which a single peak in thrust was recorded during the later stages of the downstroke, and biphasic in which a small peak in thrust was recorded at the very end of the upstroke and this followed by a large peak in thrust during the later stages of the downstroke. The biphasic cycle occurs in ∼20% of hatchlings when they first started swimming, but disappeared after one to two hours of swimming. The

  8. Status of Low Thrust Work at JSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Condon, Gerald L.

    2004-01-01

    High performance low thrust (solar electric, nuclear electric, variable specific impulse magnetoplasma rocket) propulsion offers a significant benefit to NASA missions beyond low Earth orbit. As NASA (e.g., Prometheus Project) endeavors to develop these propulsion systems and associated power supplies, it becomes necessary to develop a refined trajectory design capability that will allow engineers to develop future robotic and human mission designs that take advantage of this new technology. This ongoing work addresses development of a trajectory design and optimization tool for assessing low thrust (and other types) trajectories. This work targets to advance the state of the art, enable future NASA missions, enable science drivers, and enhance education. This presentation provides a summary of the low thrust-related JSC activities under the ISP program and specifically, provides a look at a new release of a multi-gravity, multispacecraft trajectory optimization tool (Copernicus) along with analysis performed using this tool over the past year.

  9. Test plan pressure fed thrust chamber technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, Glenn

    1990-01-01

    Aerojet is developing the technology for the design of a reliable, low cost, efficient, and lightweight LOX/RP-1 pressure fed engine. This technology program is a direct result of Aerojet's liquid rocket booster (LRB) study and previous NASA studies that identified liquid engines using high bulk density hydrocarbon fuels as very attractive for a space transportation system (STS). Previous large thrust LOX/RP-1 engine development programs were characterized by costly development problems due to combustion instability damage. The combustion stability solution was typically obtained through trial and error methods of minimizing instability damage by degrading engine performance. The approach to this program was to utilize existing and newly developed combustion analysis models and design methodology to create a thrust chamber design with features having the potential of producing reliable and efficient operation. This process resulted in an engine design with a unique high thrust-per-element OFO triplet injector utilizing a low cost modular approach. Cost efficient ablative materials are baselined for the injector face and chamber. Technology demonstration will be accomplished through a hot fire test program using appropriately sized subscale hardware. This subscale testing will provide a data base to supplement the current industry data bank and to anchor and validate the applied analysis models and design methodology. Once anchored and validated, these analysis models and design methodology can be applied with greatly increased confidence to design and characterize a large scale pressure fed LOX/RP-1 thrust chamber. The objective of this test program is to generate a data base that can be used to anchor and validate existing analysis models and design methodologies and to provide early concept demonstration of a low cost, efficient LOX/RP-1 thrust chamber. Test conditions and hardware instrumentation were defined to provide data sufficient to characterize combustion

  10. Artificial Martian frozen orbits and Sun-Synchronous orbits using continuous low-thrust control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhigang; Jiang, Fanghua; Li, Junfeng

    2014-08-01

    This paper analyses three types of artificial orbits around Mars pushed by continuous low-thrust control: artificial frozen orbits, artificial Sun-Synchronous orbits and artificial Sun-Synchronous frozen orbits. These artificial orbits have similar characteristics to natural frozen orbits and Sun-Synchronous orbits, and their orbital parameters can be selected arbitrarily by using continuous low-thrust control. One control strategy to achieve the artificial frozen orbit is using both the transverse and radial continuous low-thrust control, and another to achieve the artificial Sun-Synchronous orbit is using the normal continuous low-thrust control. These continuous low-thrust control strategies consider J 2, J 3, and J 4 perturbations of Mars. It is proved that both control strategies can minimize characteristic velocity. Relevant formulas are derived, and numerical results are presented. Given the same initial orbital parameters, the control acceleration and characteristic velocity taking into account J 2, J 3, and J 4 perturbations are similar to those taking into account J 2 perturbations for both Mars and the Earth. The control thrust of the orbit around Mars is smaller than that around the Earth. The magnitude of the control acceleration of ASFOM-4 (named as Artificial Sun-Synchronous Frozen Orbit Method 4) is the lowest among these strategies and the characteristic velocity within one orbital period is only 0.5219 m/s for the artificial Sun-Synchronous frozen orbit around Mars. It is evident that the relationship among the control thrusts and the primary orbital parameters of Martian artificial orbits is always similar to that of the Earth. Simulation shows that the control scheme extends the orbital parameters' selection range of three types of orbits around Mars, compared with the natural frozen orbit and Sun-Synchronous orbit.

  11. Wing design with attainable thrust considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, H. W.; Shrout, B. L.; Darden, C. M.

    1984-01-01

    A CAD process that includes leading-edge thrust considerations for wings with high aerodynamic efficiencies is outlined. Rectangular grids are used for evaluation of both subsonic and supersonic pressure loadings. Account is taken of the Mach number, Re, the wing planform, the presence of camber, the airfoil geometry and the locations and forces induced by shed vortices. Optimization techniques are applied to the candidate surfaces in order to consider the attainable thrust. Inclusion of the optimization techniques permits analyses of mission-adaptive wings and various flap systems and the elimination of singularities in the flight envelope.

  12. SEP thrust subsystem performance sensitivity analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atkins, K. L.; Sauer, C. G., Jr.; Kerrisk, D. J.

    1973-01-01

    This is a two-part report on solar electric propulsion (SEP) performance sensitivity analysis. The first part describes the preliminary analysis of the SEP thrust system performance for an Encke rendezvous mission. A detailed description of thrust subsystem hardware tolerances on mission performance is included together with nominal spacecraft parameters based on these tolerances. The second part describes the method of analysis and graphical techniques used in generating the data for Part 1. Included is a description of both the trajectory program used and the additional software developed for this analysis. Part 2 also includes a comprehensive description of the use of the graphical techniques employed in this performance analysis.

  13. A microNewton thrust stand for average thrust measurement of pulsed microthruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Wei-Jing; Hong, Yan-Ji; Chang, Hao

    2013-12-01

    A torsional thrust stand has been developed for the study of the average thrust for microNewton pulsed thrusters. The main body of the thrust stand mainly consists of a torsional balance, a pair of flexural pivots, a capacitive displacement sensor, a calibration assembly, and an eddy current damper. The behavior of the stand was thoroughly studied. The principle of thrust measurement was analyzed. The average thrust is determined as a function of the average equilibrium angle displacement of the balance and the spring stiffness. The thrust stand has a load capacity up to 10 kg, and it can theoretically measure the force up to 609.6 μN with a resolution of 24.4 nN. The static calibrations were performed based on the calibration assembly composed of the multiturn coil and the permanent magnet. The calibration results demonstrated good repeatability (less than 0.68% FSO) and good linearity (less than 0.88% FSO). The assembly of the multiturn coil and the permanent magnet was also used as an exciter to simulate the microthruster to further research the performance of the thrust stand. Three sets of force pulses at 17, 33.5, and 55 Hz with the same amplitude and pulse width were tested. The repeatability error at each frequency was 7.04%, 1.78%, and 5.08%, respectively.

  14. A microNewton thrust stand for average thrust measurement of pulsed microthruster.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wei-Jing; Hong, Yan-Ji; Chang, Hao

    2013-12-01

    A torsional thrust stand has been developed for the study of the average thrust for microNewton pulsed thrusters. The main body of the thrust stand mainly consists of a torsional balance, a pair of flexural pivots, a capacitive displacement sensor, a calibration assembly, and an eddy current damper. The behavior of the stand was thoroughly studied. The principle of thrust measurement was analyzed. The average thrust is determined as a function of the average equilibrium angle displacement of the balance and the spring stiffness. The thrust stand has a load capacity up to 10 kg, and it can theoretically measure the force up to 609.6 μN with a resolution of 24.4 nN. The static calibrations were performed based on the calibration assembly composed of the multiturn coil and the permanent magnet. The calibration results demonstrated good repeatability (less than 0.68% FSO) and good linearity (less than 0.88% FSO). The assembly of the multiturn coil and the permanent magnet was also used as an exciter to simulate the microthruster to further research the performance of the thrust stand. Three sets of force pulses at 17, 33.5, and 55 Hz with the same amplitude and pulse width were tested. The repeatability error at each frequency was 7.04%, 1.78%, and 5.08%, respectively.

  15. Variable thrust/specific-impulse of multiplexed electrospray microthrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenguito, G.; Fernandez de la Mora, J.; Gomez, A.

    We report on the development of a single-propellant ElectroSpray (ES) microthruster able to: (a) cover a wide range of specific impulse (Isp) and thrust at high propulsion efficiency, and (b) provide macroscopic thrust via micro-fabricated emitter arrays. The electrospray is a mature technology for the emission of fast nanodroplets at a propulsive efficiency larger than 50% over the full Isp range. The size of the droplets depends on the propellant flow rate and the physical properties of the electrolyte, especially the electric conductivity. To achieve a useful thrust one needs to multiplex the ES by operating many in parallel, which we achieve via silicon microfabrication of arrays of multiple and identical nozzles. The Multiplexed Electrospray (MES) micro-thruster is composed mainly of two electrodes: a nozzle-array and an extractor electrode, between which the electric field needed to form the ES is established. We tested nozzle arrays with up to 37 capillaries, that are spaced 1mm apart, with ID/OD = 10/30μ m. The capillaries are filled with 2.01μ m silicon dioxide beads to increase the hydraulic impedance and ensure uniform flow rate through the different emitters. A third electrode (accelerator) is mounted downstream the extractor to accelerate the droplets, thereby increasing the microthruster performance. The system is packaged in an alumina casing for electrical insulation and propellant feed. Tests run in a vacuum chamber at a pressure ≤ 10-5 mbar demonstrated reliable operation for several hours with a relatively high beam energy of 7.56kV. The 37-nozzle MES device was tested with the ionic liquid ethylammonium nitrate (EAN), at estimated total flow rates between 1.2 and 14 μ L/h, emitted currents between 14.2 and 23.0 μ A, specific impulse ranging between 710 and 1930s, and thrust ranging between 7.5 and 33 μ N. EAN is well suited to cover a relatively broad range of charge/mass- at an average propulsion efficiency of 66%. With further scale

  16. Take-off and propeller thrust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schrenk, Martin

    1933-01-01

    As a result of previous reports, it was endeavored to obtain, along with the truest possible comprehension of the course of thrust, a complete, simple and clear formula for the whole take-off distance up to a certain altitude, which shall give the correct relative weight to all the factors.

  17. Early Cenozoic thrust in Qiangtang block, Northern Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Z.; Ye, P.; Hu, D.; Lu, L.; Zhang, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Huge thrust systems, North Qiangtang Thrust (NQT) and South Qiangtang Thrust (SQT), were discovered in Qiangtang block, northern Tibetan Plateau. North Qiangtang thrust (NQT), including Dogai Coren thrust (DCT) and Longwei Co Thrust (LCT) formed in northern Qiangtang block. Triassic shale, sandstone and slate were thrusted southward over Late Cretaceous-Early Cenozoic conglomerate and sandstone (simplified as red-beds) along thrust faults of DCT, and Jurassic limestone and sandstone were thrusted over Late Cretaceous-Paleogene red-beds and Paleozoic metamorphic rocks along thrust faults of LCT in north of Central Qiangtang Uplift (CQU). South Qiangtang Thrust (SQT), including Xiaocaka-Shuanghu thrust (XST), Doma-Qixiang Co thrust (DQT) and Saibu Co-Zagya thrust (SZT), formed in southern Qiangtang block, accompanied by Nima-Silin thrust (NST) in northern Lhasa block. Permian marbleized limestone and dolomite, Triassic sandstone and shale, Jurassic limestone and ophiolite were thrusted southward over Paleogene red-beds along thrust faults of XST, DQT and SZT. Early Cenozoic thrust along NQT and SQT formed variety of tectonic slices, outliers and nappes of Permian-Jurassic rocks overlying Late Cretaceous-Paleogene red-beds in northern, central and southern Qiangtang block. Minimal estimation on southward offsets of DCT and LCT is 25km and 50km respectively, corresponding to 43% shortening in northern Qiangtang block, and minimal estimation on southward thrust offsets of XST, DQT and SZT yields ~90km southward thrust displacement of SQT, corresponding to ~47% shortening in southern Qiangtang block. Major thrust faults of NQT and SQT formed in upper crust according to seismic reflection profile, and such thrust and shortening were geodynamically related to northward subduction of India continental plate. Intensive thrust of NQT and SQT stopped before Early Miocene, followed by regional peneplanation, widespread lacustrine deposits in Early Miocene and crust extension as

  18. Thrust Stand for Electric Propulsion Performance Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polzin, Kurt A.; Markusic, Thomas E.; Stanojev, Boris J.; Dehoyos, Amado; Spaun, Benjamin

    2006-01-01

    An electric propulsion thrust stand capable of supporting testing of thrusters having a total mass of up to 125 kg and producing thrust levels between 100 microN to 1 N has been developed and tested. The design features a conventional hanging pendulum arm attached to a balance mechanism that converts horizontal deflections produced by the operating thruster into amplified vertical motion of a secondary arm. The level of amplification is changed through adjustment of the location of one of the pivot points linking the system. Response of the system depends on the relative magnitudes of the restoring moments applied by the displaced thruster mass and the twisting torsional pivots connecting the members of the balance mechanism. Displacement is measured using a non-contact, optical linear gap displacement transducer and balance oscillatory motion is attenuated using a passive, eddy-current damper. The thrust stand employs an automated leveling and thermal control system. Pools of liquid gallium are used to deliver power to the thruster without using solid wire connections, which can exert undesirable time-varying forces on the balance. These systems serve to eliminate sources of zero-drift that can occur as the stand thermally or mechanically shifts during the course of an experiment. An in-situ calibration rig allows for steady-state calibration before, during and after thruster operation. Thrust measurements were carried out on a cylindrical Hall thruster that produces mN-level thrust. The measurements were very repeatable, producing results that compare favorably with previously published performance data, but with considerably smaller uncertainty.

  19. Preliminary Design of Low-Thrust Interplanetary Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sims, Jon A.; Flanagan, Steve N.

    1997-01-01

    For interplanetary missions, highly efficient electric propulsion systems can be used to increase the mass delivered to the destination and/or reduce the trip time over typical chemical propulsion systems. This technology is being demonstrated on the Deep Space 1 mission - part of NASA's New Millennium Program validating technologies which can lower the cost and risk and enhance the performance of future missions. With the successful demonstration on Deep Space 1, future missions can consider electric propulsion as a viable propulsion option. Electric propulsion systems, while highly efficient, produce only a small amount of thrust. As a result, the engines operate during a significant fraction of the trajectory. This characteristic makes it much more difficult to find optimal trajectories. The methods for optimizing low-thrust trajectories are typically categorized as either indirect, or direct. Indirect methods are based on calculus of variations, resulting in a two-point boundary value problem that is solved by satisfying terminal constraints and targeting conditions. These methods are subject to extreme sensitivity to the initial guess of the variables - some of which are not physically intuitive. Adding a gravity assist to the trajectory compounds the sensitivity. Direct methods parameterize the problem and use nonlinear programming techniques to optimize an objective function by adjusting a set of variables. A variety of methods of this type have been examined with varying results. These methods are subject to the limitations of the nonlinear programming techniques. In this paper we present a direct method intended to be used primarily for preliminary design of low-thrust interplanetary trajectories, including those with multiple gravity assists. Preliminary design implies a willingness to accept limited accuracy to achieve an efficient algorithm that executes quickly.

  20. Analysis of the gas-lubricated flat-sector-pad thrust bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Etsion, I.

    1976-01-01

    A flat sector-shaped pad geometry for a gas-lubricated thrust bearing is analyzed considering both the pitch and roll of the pad. It is shown that maximum load capacity is achieved when the pad is tilted so as to create uniform minimum film thickness along the pad trailing edge. Performance characteristics for various geometries and operating conditions of gas thrust bearings are presented in the form of design curves, and a comparison is made with the rectangular slider approximation. It is found that this approximation is unsafe for practical design, since it always overestimates load capacity.

  1. Direct thrust measurement of a 30-cm ion thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, B.; Rawlin, V.; Weigand, A.; Walker, J.

    1975-01-01

    A direct thrust measurement of a 30-cm diameter ion thruster was accomplished by means of a laser interferometer thrust stand. The thruster was supported in a pendulum manner by three 3.65-m long wires. Electrical power was provided by means of 18 mercury filled pots. A movable 23-button planar probe rake was used to determine thrust loss due to ion beam divergence. Values of thrust, thrust loss due to ion beam divergence, and thrust loss due to multiple ionization were measured for ion beam currents ranging from 0.5 to 2.5 A. Measured thrust values indicate an accuracy of approximately 1% and are in good agreement with thrust values calculated by indirect measurements.

  2. Direct thrust measurement of a 30-cm ion thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, B.; Rawlin, V.; Weigand, A. J.; Walker, J.

    1975-01-01

    A direct thrust measurement of a 30-cm diameter ion thruster was accomplished by means of a laser interferometer thrust stand. The thruster was supported in a pendulum manner by three 3.65-m long wires. Electrical power was provided by means of 18 mercury filled pots. A movable 23-button planar probe rake was used to determine thrust loss due to ion beam divergence. Values of thrust, thrust loss due to ion beam divergence, and thrust loss due to multiple ionization were measured for ion beam currents ranging from 0.5 A to 2.5 A. Measured thrust values indicate an accuracy of approximately 1% and are in good agreement with thrust values calculated by indirect measurements.

  3. Thrusting and gravel progradation in foreland basins: A test of post-thrusting gravel dispersal

    SciTech Connect

    Burbank, D.W.; Beck, R.A.; Hobbs, R. ); Raynolds, R.G.H. ); Tahirkheli, R.A.K. )

    1988-12-01

    The use of gravels as syntectonic indicators of thrusting has recently been questioned by foreland-basin models that assign gravels to a post-thrusting interval of progradation, except in very proximal areas. On the basis of precise temporal control provided by magnetostratigraphically dated sections, the history of gravel progradation after a major thrusting and uplift event in the northwestern Himalaya is shown to be a virtually syntectonic phenomenon. Despite considerable crustal subsidence driven by a thick-skinned thrust, gravels prograded {approximately} 70 km during a 1.5-m.y.-long thrusting event. By 3 m.y. after the start of thrusting, gravels extended more than 110 km into the basin. Although delayed gravel progradation appears appropriate for many Rocky Mountain foreland basins, it is clearly not valid for the Himalaya. The authors attribute the difference in depositional response between these basins to difference in the quantity of sediment supplied to them (sediment starved vs. overfilled), the availability of resistates in the source area, and the size of the antecedent drainage.

  4. Proven, long-life hydrogen/oxygen thrust chambers for space station propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richter, G. Paul; Price, Harold G.

    1986-01-01

    A 25 lb sub f hydrogen/oxygen thruster has been developed and proven as a viable candidate to meet the needs of the Space Station Program. Likewise, a 50 lb sub f hydrogen/oxygen thrust chamber has been developed and has demonstrated reliable, long-life expectancy at anticipated Space Station operating conditions. Both these thrust chambers were based on design criteria developed in previous thruster programs. Extensive thermal analysis and models were used to design the thrusters to achieve total impulse goals of 2 million lb sub f sec. Test data from each thruster are compared to the analytical predictions for the performance and heat transfer characteristics. Also, the results of thrust chamber life verification tests are presented.

  5. The 727 airplane target thrust reverser static performance model test for refanned JT8D engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chow, C. T. P.; Atkey, E. N.

    1974-01-01

    The results of a scale model static performance test of target thrust reverser configurations for the Pratt and Whitney Aircraft JT8D-100 series engine are presented. The objective of the test was to select a series of suitable candidate reverser configurations for the subsequent airplane model wind tunnel ingestion and flight controls tests. Test results indicate that adequate reverse thrust performance with compatible engine airflow match is achievable for the selected configurations. Tapering of the lips results in loss of performance and only minimal flow directivity. Door pressure surveys were conducted on a selected number of lip and fence configurations to obtain data to support the design of the thrust reverser system.

  6. Thrust generation by a heaving flexible foil: Resonance, nonlinearities, and optimality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paraz, Florine; Schouveiler, Lionel; Eloy, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Flexibility of marine animal fins has been thought to enhance swimming performance. However, despite numerous experimental and numerical studies on flapping flexible foils, there is still no clear understanding of the effect of flexibility and flapping amplitude on thrust generation and swimming efficiency. Here, to address this question, we combine experiments on a model system and a weakly nonlinear analysis. Experiments consist in immersing a flexible rectangular plate in a uniform flow and forcing this plate into a heaving motion at its leading edge. A complementary theoretical model is developed assuming a two-dimensional inviscid problem. In this model, nonlinear effects are taken into account by considering a transverse resistive drag. Under these hypotheses, a modal decomposition of the system motion allows us to predict the plate response amplitude and the generated thrust, as a function of the forcing amplitude and frequency. We show that this model can correctly predict the experimental data on plate kinematic response and thrust generation, as well as other data found in the literature. We also discuss the question of efficiency in the context of bio-inspired propulsion. Using the proposed model, we show that the optimal propeller for a given thrust and a given swimming speed is achieved when the actuating frequency is tuned to a resonance of the system, and when the optimal forcing amplitude scales as the square root of the required thrust.

  7. Multiphysics Computational Analysis of a Solid-Core Nuclear Thermal Engine Thrust Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ten-See; Canabal, Francisco; Cheng, Gary; Chen, Yen-Sen

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this effort is to develop an efficient and accurate computational heat transfer methodology to predict thermal, fluid, and hydrogen environments for a hypothetical solid-core, nuclear thermal engine - the Small Engine. In addition, the effects of power profile and hydrogen conversion on heat transfer efficiency and thrust performance were also investigated. The computational methodology is based on an unstructured-grid, pressure-based, all speeds, chemically reacting, computational fluid dynamics platform, while formulations of conjugate heat transfer were implemented to describe the heat transfer from solid to hydrogen inside the solid-core reactor. The computational domain covers the entire thrust chamber so that the afore-mentioned heat transfer effects impact the thrust performance directly. The result shows that the computed core-exit gas temperature, specific impulse, and core pressure drop agree well with those of design data for the Small Engine. Finite-rate chemistry is very important in predicting the proper energy balance as naturally occurring hydrogen decomposition is endothermic. Locally strong hydrogen conversion associated with centralized power profile gives poor heat transfer efficiency and lower thrust performance. On the other hand, uniform hydrogen conversion associated with a more uniform radial power profile achieves higher heat transfer efficiency, and higher thrust performance.

  8. Spectacular exposures of thrusting in the core of concentric anticlines as models for oil exploration

    SciTech Connect

    Beall, J.J. )

    1996-01-01

    The Owl Creek Mountains are an east-west trending uplift located on the southern edge of the Bighorn Basin, Wyoming, comprised of a series of northwest-trending structures bounded by northeast-verging thrust faults. Mud Creek and Middle Mud Creek Anticlines are two basement-controlled folds located on the footwall of the Mud Creek-North Owl Creek Fault zone. Mud Creek and Middle Mud Creek anticlines are en echelon structures which trend approximately N30W. Exposed in the Jurassic section is a series of stacked thrust faults which die out downward into bedding. These faults achieve an additional structural relief on the crest of the anticline. This has important implications for the drilling of concentric structures and reservoir distribution. Three scenarios can possibly explain the en echelon arrangement of the two anticlines. The first calls for a single basement thrust, offset by a compartmental fault; the second possibility is two en enchelon thrust faults. The third is that of a single, sinuous, low-angle basement thrust fault. This third geometry will account for the apparent en echelon arrangement ofMud Creek - Middle Mud Creek Anticlines. Additionally, an abrupt change in the trend of Mud Creek Anticline is one of the indicators of left-oblique slip on west- trending basement faults of the north flank of the Owl Creeks and adjacent areas.

  9. Spectacular exposures of thrusting in the core of concentric anticlines as models for oil exploration

    SciTech Connect

    Beall, J.J.

    1996-12-31

    The Owl Creek Mountains are an east-west trending uplift located on the southern edge of the Bighorn Basin, Wyoming, comprised of a series of northwest-trending structures bounded by northeast-verging thrust faults. Mud Creek and Middle Mud Creek Anticlines are two basement-controlled folds located on the footwall of the Mud Creek-North Owl Creek Fault zone. Mud Creek and Middle Mud Creek anticlines are en echelon structures which trend approximately N30W. Exposed in the Jurassic section is a series of stacked thrust faults which die out downward into bedding. These faults achieve an additional structural relief on the crest of the anticline. This has important implications for the drilling of concentric structures and reservoir distribution. Three scenarios can possibly explain the en echelon arrangement of the two anticlines. The first calls for a single basement thrust, offset by a compartmental fault; the second possibility is two en enchelon thrust faults. The third is that of a single, sinuous, low-angle basement thrust fault. This third geometry will account for the apparent en echelon arrangement ofMud Creek - Middle Mud Creek Anticlines. Additionally, an abrupt change in the trend of Mud Creek Anticline is one of the indicators of left-oblique slip on west- trending basement faults of the north flank of the Owl Creeks and adjacent areas.

  10. Proven, long-life hydrogen/oxygen thrust chambers for space station propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richter, G. P.; Price, H. G.

    1986-01-01

    The development of the manned space station has necessitated the development of technology related to an onboard auxiliary propulsion system (APS) required to provide for various space station attitude control, orbit positioning, and docking maneuvers. A key component of this onboard APS is the thrust chamber design. To develop the required thrust chamber technology to support the Space Station Program, the NASA Lewis Research Center has sponsored development programs under contracts with Aerojet TechSystems Company and with Bell Aerospace Textron Division of Textron, Inc. During the NASA Lewis sponsored program with Aerojet TechSystems, a 25 lb sub f hydrogen/oxygen thruster has been developed and proven as a viable candidate to meet the needs of the Space Station Program. Likewise, during the development program with Bell Aerospace, a 50 lb sub f hydrogen/oxygen Thrust Chamber has been developed and has demonstrated reliable, long-life expectancy at anticipated space station operating conditions. Both these thrust chambers were based on design criteria developed in previous thruster programs and successfully verified in experimental test programs. Extensive thermal analyses and models were used to design the thrusters to achieve total impulse goals of 2 x 10 to the 6th power lb sub f-sec. Test data for each thruster will be compared to the analytical predictions for the performance and heat transfer characteristics. Also, the results of thrust chamber life verification tests will be presented.

  11. Development of a Lightweight Thrust Chamber Assembly Utilizing In-Situ Reinforced Silicon Nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elvander, J.; Wherley, B.; Claflin, S.

    1999-06-01

    The paper describes the status of the Light Weight Thrust Chamber Assembly (LWTCA) program currently underway at Boeing Rocketdyne Propulsion and Power, under contract with the US Air Force Research Laboratory. The goal of the program is to demonstrate technology which will lead to a 40% reduction in weight (including the nozzle), a 50% reduction in cost, a 75% reduction in part count and a 3% increase in specific impulse on a full scale, 400 klbf thrust LOX/hydrogen booster engine. The demonstration will be performed through the use of manufacturing technology demonstrator hardware and 60 klbf thrust hot-fire tests. The primary means to achieving these goals is by using in-situ reinforced silicon nitride for structural components. Silicon nitride is an advanced ceramic material that has high specific strength and fracture toughness, and can be cast to near- net part shape. Tests to validate the material properties of in-situ reinforced silicon nitride are discussed, along with the resulting changes to traditional thrust chamber design as a result of the improved properties. The progress towards manufacturing and hot-fire testing a thrust chamber assembly from the material is also described.

  12. Thrust measurements of a hollow-cathode discharge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, A.; Banks, B. A.

    1972-01-01

    Thrust measurements of a hollow cathode mercury discharge were made with a synthetic mica target on a torsion pendulum. Thrust measurements were made for various target angles, tip temperatures, flow rates, keeper discharge powers, and accelerator electrode voltages. The experimental thrust data are compared with theoretical values for the case where no discharge power was employed.

  13. Thrust and Propulsive Efficiency from an Instructive Viewpoint

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, Richard D.

    2010-01-01

    In a typical engineering or physics curriculum, the momentum equation is used for the determination of jet engine thrust. Even a simple thrust analysis requires a heavy emphasis on mathematics that can cause students and engineers to lose a physical perspective on thrust. This article provides for this physical understanding using only static…

  14. Relationship between Biomechanical Characteristics of Spinal Manipulation and Neural Responses in an Animal Model: Effect of Linear Control of Thrust Displacement versus Force, Thrust Amplitude, Thrust Duration, and Thrust Rate

    PubMed Central

    Reed, William R.; Cao, Dong-Yuan; Long, Cynthia R.; Kawchuk, Gregory N.; Pickar, Joel G.

    2013-01-01

    High velocity low amplitude spinal manipulation (HVLA-SM) is used frequently to treat musculoskeletal complaints. Little is known about the intervention's biomechanical characteristics that determine its clinical benefit. Using an animal preparation, we determined how neural activity from lumbar muscle spindles during a lumbar HVLA-SM is affected by the type of thrust control and by the thrust's amplitude, duration, and rate. A mechanical device was used to apply a linear increase in thrust displacement or force and to control thrust duration. Under displacement control, neural responses during the HVLA-SM increased in a fashion graded with thrust amplitude. Under force control neural responses were similar regardless of the thrust amplitude. Decreasing thrust durations at all thrust amplitudes except the smallest thrust displacement had an overall significant effect on increasing muscle spindle activity during the HVLA-SMs. Under force control, spindle responses specifically and significantly increased between thrust durations of 75 and 150 ms suggesting the presence of a threshold value. Thrust velocities greater than 20–30 mm/s and thrust rates greater than 300 N/s tended to maximize the spindle responses. This study provides a basis for considering biomechanical characteristics of an HVLA-SM that should be measured and reported in clinical efficacy studies to help define effective clinical dosages. PMID:23401713

  15. Relationship between Biomechanical Characteristics of Spinal Manipulation and Neural Responses in an Animal Model: Effect of Linear Control of Thrust Displacement versus Force, Thrust Amplitude, Thrust Duration, and Thrust Rate.

    PubMed

    Reed, William R; Cao, Dong-Yuan; Long, Cynthia R; Kawchuk, Gregory N; Pickar, Joel G

    2013-01-01

    High velocity low amplitude spinal manipulation (HVLA-SM) is used frequently to treat musculoskeletal complaints. Little is known about the intervention's biomechanical characteristics that determine its clinical benefit. Using an animal preparation, we determined how neural activity from lumbar muscle spindles during a lumbar HVLA-SM is affected by the type of thrust control and by the thrust's amplitude, duration, and rate. A mechanical device was used to apply a linear increase in thrust displacement or force and to control thrust duration. Under displacement control, neural responses during the HVLA-SM increased in a fashion graded with thrust amplitude. Under force control neural responses were similar regardless of the thrust amplitude. Decreasing thrust durations at all thrust amplitudes except the smallest thrust displacement had an overall significant effect on increasing muscle spindle activity during the HVLA-SMs. Under force control, spindle responses specifically and significantly increased between thrust durations of 75 and 150 ms suggesting the presence of a threshold value. Thrust velocities greater than 20-30 mm/s and thrust rates greater than 300 N/s tended to maximize the spindle responses. This study provides a basis for considering biomechanical characteristics of an HVLA-SM that should be measured and reported in clinical efficacy studies to help define effective clinical dosages.

  16. 14 CFR 33.79 - Fuel burning thrust augmentor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuel burning thrust augmentor. 33.79... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.79 Fuel burning thrust augmentor. Each fuel burning thrust augmentor, including the nozzle, must— (a) Provide cutoff...

  17. An Autonomous Onboard Targeting Algorithm Using Finite Thrust Maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scarritt, Sara K.; Marchand, Belinda G.; Brown, Aaron J.; Tracy, William H.; Weeks, Michael W.

    2010-01-01

    In earlier investigations, the adaptation and implementation of a modified two-level corrections (or targeting) process as the onboard targeting algorithm for the Trans-Earth Injection phase of Orion is presented. The objective of that targeting algorithm is to generate the times of ignition and magnitudes of the required maneuvers such that the desired state at entry interface is achieved. In an actual onboard flight software implementation, these times of ignition and maneuvers are relayed onto Flight Control for command and execution. Although this process works well when the burn durations or burn arcs are small, this might not be the case during a contingency situation when lower thrust engines are employed to perform the maneuvers. Therefore, a new model for the two-level corrections process is formulated here to accommodate finite burn arcs. This paper presents the development and formulation of the finite burn two-level corrector, used as an onboard targeting algorithm for the Trans-Earth Injection phase of Orion. A performance comparison between the impulsive and finite burn models is also presented. The present formulation ensures all entry constraints are met, without violating the available fuel budget, while allowing for low-thrust scenarios with long burn durations.

  18. NATURAL BARRIERS TARGETED THRUST FY 2004 PROJECTS

    SciTech Connect

    NA

    2005-07-27

    This booklet contains project descriptions of work performed by the Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), Office of Science and Technology and International's (OST&I) Natural Barriers Targeted Thrust during Fiscal Year (FY) 2004. The Natural Barriers Targeted Thrust is part of OST&I's Science and Technology Program which supports the OCRWM mission to manage and dispose of high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel in a manner that protects health, safety, and the environment; enhances national and energy security; and merits public confidence. In general, the projects described will continue beyond FY 2004 assuming that the technical work remains relevant to the proposed Yucca Mountain Repository and sufficient funding is made available to the Science and Technology Program.

  19. MATERIALS PERFORMANCE TARGETED THRUST FY 2004 PROJECTS

    SciTech Connect

    DOE

    2005-09-13

    The Yucca Mountain site was recommended by the President to be a geological repository for commercial spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. The multi-barrier approach was adopted for assessing and predicting system behavior, including both natural barriers and engineered barriers. A major component of the long-term strategy for safe disposal of nuclear waste is first to completely isolate the radionuclides in waste packages for long times and then to greatly retard the egress and transport of radionuclides from penetrated packages. The goal of the Materials Performance Targeted Thrust program is to further enhance the understanding of the role of engineered barriers in waste isolation. In addition, the Thrust will explore technical enhancements and seek to offer improvements in materials costs and reliability.

  20. High temperature thrust chamber for spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chazen, Melvin L. (Inventor); Mueller, Thomas J. (Inventor); Kruse, William D. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A high temperature thrust chamber for spacecraft (20) is provided herein. The high temperature thrust chamber comprises a hollow body member (12) having an outer surface and an internal surface (16) defining the high temperature chamber (10). The body member (12) is made substantially of rhenium. An alloy (18) consisting of iridium and at least alloying metal selected of the group consisting of rhodium, platinum and palladium is deposited on at least a portion of the internal surface (16) of the body member (12). The iridium and the alloying metal are electrodeposited onto the body member (12). A HIP cycle is performed upon the body member (12) to cause the coating of iridium and the alloying metal to form the alloy (18) which protects the body member (12) from oxidation.

  1. Low-thrust chemical rocket engine study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mellish, J. A.

    1980-01-01

    Parametric data and preliminary designs on liquid rocket engines for low thrust cargo orbit-transfer-vehicles are described and those items where technology is required to enhance the designs are identified. The results of film cooling studies to establish the upper chamber pressure limit are given. The study showed that regen cooling with RP-1 was not feasible over the entire thrust and chamber pressure ranges. The thermal data showed that the RP-1 bulk temperature exceeded the study coking temperature limit of 1010 R. Based upon the results presented, O2/H2 and O2/CH4 regen engine systems and O2/H2 film cooled engines were selected for further study in the system analysis. Six engine design concepts are examined.

  2. Static Thrust Analysis of the Lifting Airscrew

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Montgomery; Hefner, Ralph A

    1937-01-01

    This report presents the results of a combined theoretical and experimental investigation conducted at the Georgia School of Technology on the static thrust of the lifting air screw of the type used in modern autogiros and helicopters. The theoretical part of this study is based on Glauert's analysis but certain modifications are made that further clarify and simplify the problem. Of these changes the elimination of the solidity as an independent parameter is the most important. The experimental data were obtained from tests on four rotor models of two, four, and five blades and, in general, agree quite well with the theoretical calculations. The theory indicates a method of evaluating scale effects on lifting air screws, and these corrections have been applied to the model results to derive general full-scale static thrust, torque, and figure-of-merit curves for constant-chord, constant-incidence rotors. Convenient charts are included that enable hovering flight performance to be calculated rapidly.

  3. Electromechanical actuator for thrust vector control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubkow, Zygmunt

    Attention is given to the development and testing of electromechanical actuator (EMA) systems for use in first- and second-stage thrust vector control of rocket engines. An overview of the test program is also presented. Designs for both first- and second-stage actuators employ redundant dc brushless, three-phase rare-earth permanent magnet motors. The first-stage actuator is about 28 hp per motor and uses a roller screw. Second-stage thrust vector control is implemented with a much smaller actuator of about 1 hp per motor. This actuator uses a gear drive with a recycling ball screw mechanism. An operational EMA is presented. This 6.5-in. actuator is capable of a stall force of 1350 pounds per motor and a frequency response of about 5 HZ.

  4. Thrust production by a mechanical swimming lamprey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leftwich, M. C.; Smits, A. J.

    2011-05-01

    To develop a comprehensive model of lamprey locomotion, we use a robotic lamprey to investigate the formation of the wake structure, the shedding vorticity from the body, and the relationship between thrust production and pressure on the surface of the robot. The robot mimics the motion of living lamprey in steady swimming by using a programmable microcomputer to actuate 13 servomotors that produce a traveling wave along the length of the lamprey body. The amplitude of the phase-averaged surface pressure distribution along the centerline of the robot increases toward the tail, which is consistent with previous momentum balance experiments. This indicates that thrust is produced mainly at the tail. The phase relationship between the pressure signal and the vortex shedding from the tail is also examined, showing a clear connection between the location of vortex structures and the fluctuations of the pressure signal.

  5. Low-thrust Isp sensitivity study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoenman, L.

    1982-01-01

    A comparison of the cooling requirements and attainable specific impulse performance of engines in the 445 to 4448N thrust class utilizing LOX/RP-1, LOX/Hydrogen and LOX/Methane propellants is presented. The unique design requirements for the regenerative cooling of low-thrust engines operating at high pressures (up to 6894 kPa) were explored analytically by comparing single cooling with the fuel and the oxidizer, and dual cooling with both the fuel and the oxidizer. The effects of coolant channel geometry, chamber length, and contraction ratio on the ability to provide proper cooling were evaluated, as was the resulting specific impulse. The results show that larger contraction ratios and smaller channels are highly desirable for certain propellant combinations.

  6. CFD Code Survey for Thrust Chamber Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, Klaus W.

    1990-01-01

    In the quest fo find analytical reference codes, responses from a questionnaire are presented which portray the current computational fluid dynamics (CFD) program status and capability at various organizations, characterizing liquid rocket thrust chamber flow fields. Sample cases are identified to examine the ability, operational condition, and accuracy of the codes. To select the best suited programs for accelerated improvements, evaluation criteria are being proposed.

  7. Lightweight Chambers for Thrust Cell Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elam, S.; Effinger, M.; Holmes, R.; Lee, J.; Jaskowiak, M.

    2000-01-01

    Traditional metals like steel and copper alloys have been used for many years to fabricate injector and chamber components of thruster assemblies. While the materials perform well, reducing engine weights would help existing and future vehicles gain performance and payload capability. It may now be possible to reduce current thruster weights up to 50% by applying composite materials. In this task, these materials are being applied to an existing thrust cell design to demonstrate new fabrication processes and potential weight savings. Two ceramic matrix composite (CMC) designs, three polymer matrix composite (PMC) designs, and two metal matrix composite (MMC) designs are being fabricated as small chamber demonstration units. In addition, a new alloy of copper, chrome, and niobium (Cu-8Cr-4Nb) is being investigated for thrust chamber liners since it offers higher strength and increased cycle life over traditional alloys. This new alloy is being used for the liner in each MMC and PMC demonstration unit. During June-August of 2000, hot-fire testing of each unit is planned to validate designs in an oxygen/hydrogen environment at chamber pressures around 850 psi. Although the weight savings using CMC materials is expected to be high, they have proven to be much harder to incorporate into chamber designs based on current fabrication efforts. However, the PMC & MMC concepts using the Cu-8Cr-4Nb liner are nearly complete and ready for testing. Additional efforts intend to use the PMC & MMC materials to fabricate a full size thrust chamber (60K lb(sub f) thrust class). The fabrication of this full size unit is expected to be complete by October 2000, followed by hot-fire testing in November-December 2000.

  8. Low Carbon Propulsion Strategic Thrust Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dryer, Jay

    2014-01-01

    NASA is taking a leadership role with regard to developing new options for low-carbon propulsion. Work related to the characterization of alternative fuels is coordinated with our partners in government and industry, and NASA is close to concluding a TC in this area. Research on alternate propulsion concepts continues to grow and is an important aspect of the ARMD portfolio. Strong partnerships have been a key enabling factor for research on this strategic thrust.

  9. The thrust belts of Western North America

    SciTech Connect

    Moulton, F.C.

    1993-08-01

    Most of the Basin and Range physiographic province of western North America is now believed to be part of the overthrust. The more obvious overthrust belt along the eastern edge of the Basin and Range Province is named the Sevier orogenic belt, where older rocks are observed thrust onto younger rocks. More detailed surface geological mapping, plus deep multiple-fold geophysical work and many oil and gas wildcat wells, have confirmed an east-vergent shortened and stacked sequence is present in many places in the Basin and Range. This western compressive deformed area in east central Nevada is now named the Elko orogenic belt by the U.S. Geological Survey. This older compressed Elko orogenic belt started forming approximately 250 m.y. ago when the North American plate started to move west as the Pangaea supercontinent started to fragment. The North American plate moved west under the sediments of the Miogeocline that were also moving west. Surface-formed highlands and oceanic island arcs on the west edge of the North American plate restricted the westward movement of the sediments in the Miogeocline, causing east-vergent ramp thrusts to form above the westward-moving North American plate. The flat, eastward-up-cutting thrust assemblages moved on the detachment surfaces.

  10. Development of sputtered techniques for thrust chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullaly, J. R.; Hecht, R. J.; Schmid, T. E.; Torrey, C. T.

    1975-01-01

    Techniques and materials were developed and evaluated for the fabrication and coating of advanced, long life, regeneratively cooled thrust chambers. Materials were analyzed as fillers for sputter application of OFHC copper as a closeout layer to channeled inner structures; of the materials evaluated, aluminum was found to provide the highest bond strength and to be the most desirable for chamber fabrication. The structures and properties were investigated of thick sputtered OFHC copper, 0.15 Zr-Cu, Al2O3,-Cu, and SiC-Cu. Layered structures of OFHC copper and 0.15 Zr-Cu were investigated as means of improving chamber inner wall fatigue life. The evaluation of sputtered Ti-5Al-2.5Sn, NASA IIb-11, aluminum and Al2O3-Al alloys as high strength chamber outer jackets was performed. Techniques for refurbishing degraded thrust chambers with OFHC copper and coating thrust chambers with protective ZrO2 and graded ZrO2-copper thermal barrier coatings were developed.

  11. Thrust and power measurements of Olympic swimmers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Timothy; Wu, Vicki; Hutchison, Sean; Mark, Russell

    2012-11-01

    Elite level swimming is an extremely precise and even choreographed activity. Swimmers not only know the exact number of strokes necessary to take them across the pool, they also plan to be a precise distance from the wall at the end of their last stroke. Too far away and they lose time by drifting into the wall. Too close and their competitor may slide in before their hand comes forward to touch the wall. In this context, it is important to know, in detail, where and how a swimmer propels her/himself through the water. Over the past decade, state-of-the-art flow and thrust measurement diagnostics have been brought to competitive swimming. But the ability to correlate stroke mechanics to thrust production without somehow constraining the swimmer has here-to-fore not been possible. Using high speed video, a simple approach to mapping the swimmer's speed, thrust and net power output in a time resolved manner has been developed. This methodology has been applied to Megan Jendrick, gold medalist in the 100 individual breast stroke and 4 × 100 medley relay events in 2000 and Ariana Kukors, 2009 world champion and continuing world record holder in the 200 individual medley. Implications for training future elite swimmers will be discussed.

  12. Thrust Vector Control for Nuclear Thermal Rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ensworth, Clinton B. F.

    2013-01-01

    Future space missions may use Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR) stages for human and cargo missions to Mars and other destinations. The vehicles are likely to require engine thrust vector control (TVC) to maintain desired flight trajectories. This paper explores requirements and concepts for TVC systems for representative NTR missions. Requirements for TVC systems were derived using 6 degree-of-freedom models of NTR vehicles. Various flight scenarios were evaluated to determine vehicle attitude control needs and to determine the applicability of TVC. Outputs from the models yielded key characteristics including engine gimbal angles, gimbal rates and gimbal actuator power. Additional factors such as engine thrust variability and engine thrust alignment errors were examined for impacts to gimbal requirements. Various technologies are surveyed for TVC systems for the NTR applications. A key factor in technology selection is the unique radiation environment present in NTR stages. Other considerations including mission duration and thermal environments influence the selection of optimal TVC technologies. Candidate technologies are compared to see which technologies, or combinations of technologies best fit the requirements for selected NTR missions. Representative TVC systems are proposed and key properties such as mass and power requirements are defined. The outputs from this effort can be used to refine NTR system sizing models, providing higher fidelity definition for TVC systems for future studies.

  13. Nozzle Thrust Optimization While Reducing Jet Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seiner, J. M.; Gilinsky, M. M.

    1995-01-01

    A Bluebell nozzle design concept is proposed for jet noise reduction with minimal thrust loss or even thrust augmentation. A Bluebell nozzle has a sinusoidal lip line edge (chevrons) and a sinusoidal cross section shape with linear amplitude increasing downstream in the divergent nozzle part (corrugations). The experimental tests of several Bluebell nozzle designs have shown nose reduction relative to a convergent-divergent round nozzle with design exhaust number M(e) = 1.5. The best design provides an acoustic benefit near 4dB with about 1 percent thrust augmentation. For subsonic flow ((M(e)= 0.6)), the tests indicated that the present method for design of Bluebell nozzles gives less acoustic benefit and in most cases jet noise increased. The proposed designs incorporate analytical theory and 2D and 3D numerical simulations. Full Navier-Stokes and Euler solvers were utilized. Boundary layer effects were used. Several different designs were accounted for in the Euler applications.

  14. Evolutionary Computing for Low-thrust Navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Seungwon; Fink, Wolfgang; vonAllmed, Paul; Petropoulos, Anastassios E.; Russell, Ryan P.; Terrile, Richard J.

    2005-01-01

    The development of new mission concepts requires efficient methodologies to analyze, design and simulate the concepts before implementation. New mission concepts are increasingly considering the use of ion thrusters for fuel-efficient navigation in deep space. This paper presents parallel, evolutionary computing methods to design trajectories of spacecraft propelled by ion thrusters and to assess the trade-off between delivered payload mass and required flight time. The developed methods utilize a distributed computing environment in order to speed up computation, and use evolutionary algorithms to find globally Pareto-optimal solutions. The methods are coupled with two main traditional trajectory design approaches, which are called direct and indirect. In the direct approach, thrust control is discretized in either arc time or arc length, and the resulting discrete thrust vectors are optimized. In the indirect approach, a thrust control problem is transformed into a costate control problem, and the initial values of the costate vector are optimized. The developed methods are applied to two problems: 1) an orbit transfer around the Earth and 2) a transfer between two distance retrograde orbits around Europa, the closest to Jupiter of the icy Galilean moons. The optimal solutions found with the present methods are comparable to other state-of-the-art trajectory optimizers and to analytical approximations for optimal transfers, while the required computational time is several orders of magnitude shorter than other optimizers thanks to an intelligent design of control vector discretization, advanced algorithmic parameterization, and parallel computing.

  15. Studies of Operating Frequency Effects On Ejector-based Thrust Augmentation in a Pulse Detonation Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landry, K.

    2005-01-01

    operating frequency observed with the rounded inlet occurred at an operating frequency of 30-Hz, resulting in thrust augmentation percentages greater than 100 percent. The effect that the engine operating frequency had on thrust augmentation levels attained with an ejector was characterized and optimum performance parameters were established. Insight into the frequency dependent nature of the ejector performance was pursued. Suggestions for future experiments which are needed to fully understand the means in which thrust augmentation is achieved in a PDE-ejector configuration were noted.

  16. Initiation process of a thrust fault revealed by analog experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Yasuhiro; Dotare, Tatsuya; Adam, Juergen; Hori, Takane; Sakaguchi, Hide

    2016-04-01

    We conducted 2D (cross-sectional) analog experiments with dry sand using a high resolution digital image correlation (DIC) technique to reveal initiation process of a thrust fault in detail, and identified a number of "weak shear bands" and minor uplift prior to the thrust initiation. The observations suggest that the process can be divided into three stages. Stage 1: characterized by a series of abrupt and short-lived weak shear bands at the location where the thrust will be generated later. Before initiation of the fault, the area to be the hanging wall starts to uplift. Stage 2: defined by the generation of the new thrust and its active displacement. The location of the new thrust seems to be constrained by its associated back-thrust, produced at the foot of the surface slope (by the previous thrust). The activity of the previous thrust turns to zero once the new thrust is generated, but the timing of these two events is not the same. Stage 3: characterized by a constant displacement along the (new) thrust. Similar minor shear bands can be seen in the toe area of the Nankai accretionary prism, SW Japan and we can correlate the along-strike variations in seismic profiles to the model results that show the characteristic features in each thrust development stage.

  17. Input shaped large thrust maneuver with a tethered debris object

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasper, Lee; Schaub, Hanspeter

    2014-03-01

    In order to reduce the debris population in LEO, remediation is necessary. An active debris removal method is explored that utilizes fuel reserves on a recently launched upper stage to rendezvous with, and tether to, debris. The system's tethered dynamics are explored using a discretized tether model attached to six degree of freedom end bodies. The thrust output is shaped to remove the spectral energy at the natural frequencies of the tether, significantly reducing the post-burn relative motion between the vehicles. The sensitivity of the input shaping performance due to imperfect knowledge of the debris mass demonstrates that a double notch spanning multiple frequencies around the first mode is necessary to be robust to unknown debris mass. On-orbit simulations show that input shaping helps the tethered system achieve smooth oscillations about a gravity gradient alignment, reducing collision likelihood.

  18. Input Shaped Large Thrust Maneuver with a Tethered Debris Object

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasper, L.; Schaub, H.

    2013-08-01

    In order to reduce the debris population in LEO, remediation is necessary. An active debris removal method is explored that utilizes fuel reserves on a recently launched upper stage to rendezvous with, and tether to, debris. The system's tethered dynamics are explored using a discretized tether model attached to six degree of freedom end bodies. The thrust output is shaped to remove the spectral energy at the natural frequencies of the tether, significantly reducing the post-burn relative motion between the vehicles. The sensitivity of the input shaping performance due to imperfect knowledge of the debris mass demonstrates that a double notch spanning multiple frequencies around the first mode is necessary to be robust to unknown debris mass. On-orbit simulations show that input shaping helps the tethered system achieve smooth oscillations about a gravity gradient alignment, reducing collision likelihood.

  19. Extended performance solar electric propulsion thrust system study. Volume 2: Baseline thrust system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poeschel, R. L.; Hawthorne, E. I.

    1977-01-01

    Several thrust system design concepts were evaluated and compared using the specifications of the most advanced 30- cm engineering model thruster as the technology base. Emphasis was placed on relatively high-power missions (60 to 100 kW) such as a Halley's comet rendezvous. The extensions in thruster performance required for the Halley's comet mission were defined and alternative thrust system concepts were designed in sufficient detail for comparing mass, efficiency, reliability, structure, and thermal characteristics. Confirmation testing and analysis of thruster and power-processing components were performed, and the feasibility of satisfying extended performance requirements was verified. A baseline design was selected from the alternatives considered, and the design analysis and documentation were refined. The baseline thrust system design features modular construction, conventional power processing, and a concentractor solar array concept and is designed to interface with the space shuttle.

  20. Stress, strain, and fault behavior at a thrust ramp: Insights from the Naukluft thrust, Namibia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fagereng, Åke; Smith, Zach; Rowe, Christie D.; Makhubu, Bandile; Sylvester, Fernando Y. G.

    2014-01-01

    We report observations from a kilometer-scale thrust ramp on the Naukluft thrust, Namibia. The Naukluft thrust is a low angle thrust that was active at subgreenschist facies conditions and accommodated several tens of kilometers of displacement at the base of the Naukluft Nappe Complex in the Pan-African Damara Orogeny. The fault zone is generally planar and a few meters thick, comprising predominantly a dolomite-rich cataclasite. At the ramp, the fault-rock assemblage increases in thickness, and the hanging-wall, which elsewhere is relatively intact, contains a high density network of inclined quartz veins, subvertical dolomite and calcite veins, breccia zones, as well as injectites of cataclastic fault rock emanating from the fault surface. The geometry of the hanging-wall structures indicates local subhorizontal extension. Local tensile stress can be explained by bending in the hanging-wall as it deformed to slide above the ramp structure. High fluid pressures created dynamically during fast slip by decarbonation of carbonate fault rock, and by dewatering of the footwall under an impermeable fault during interseismic periods, led to additional reduction in local effective compressive stresses. In this location, the ramp is more optimally oriented for slip in the inferred regional stress field, and therefore likely to fail before the contiguous thrust flats that are subparallel to the maximum principal stress. As such, the ramp represents the likely location for nucleation of fault slip, which could both trigger dynamic failure of the adjacent thrust faults, and produce hanging-wall extensional structures.

  1. Thrust Performance of a Low Power Hall Thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Naoji; Ezaki, Toru; Nakashima, Hideki

    For the application of Hall thrusters to small satellites, we have been developing a low power Hall thruster. As an initial test, we evaluated the thrust performance of a 50 W class miniature Hall thruster developed at Kyushu University. The outer diameter and the length of the acceleration channel are 18 mm and 7 mm, respectively. A torsional type thrust stand was developed, since the estimated thrust is 1-3 mN, which is too small to be measured by means of a conventional pendulum type thrust stand for Hall thrusts. The uncertainty of this thrust stand is less than 10% at 2 mN with calibration. The thrust, the discharge current, specific impulse and the thrust efficiency at xenon mass flow rate of 0.30 mg/s and discharge voltage of 125 V were 1.7 mN, 0.35 A, 600 sec and 11.4%, respectively. The thrust increased with an increase in discharge voltage and the thrust became 3.1 mN at discharge voltage of 250 V.

  2. High-power, null-type, inverted pendulum thrust stand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Kunning G.; Walker, Mitchell L. R.

    2009-05-01

    This article presents the theory and operation of a null-type, inverted pendulum thrust stand. The thrust stand design supports thrusters having a total mass up to 250 kg and measures thrust over a range of 1 mN to 5 N. The design uses a conventional inverted pendulum to increase sensitivity, coupled with a null-type feature to eliminate thrust alignment error due to deflection of thrust. The thrust stand position serves as the input to the null-circuit feedback control system and the output is the current to an electromagnetic actuator. Mechanical oscillations are actively damped with an electromagnetic damper. A closed-loop inclination system levels the stand while an active cooling system minimizes thermal effects. The thrust stand incorporates an in situ calibration rig. The thrust of a 3.4 kW Hall thruster is measured for thrust levels up to 230 mN. The uncertainty of the thrust measurements in this experiment is ±0.6%, determined by examination of the hysteresis, drift of the zero offset and calibration slope variation.

  3. High-power, null-type, inverted pendulum thrust stand.

    PubMed

    Xu, Kunning G; Walker, Mitchell L R

    2009-05-01

    This article presents the theory and operation of a null-type, inverted pendulum thrust stand. The thrust stand design supports thrusters having a total mass up to 250 kg and measures thrust over a range of 1 mN to 5 N. The design uses a conventional inverted pendulum to increase sensitivity, coupled with a null-type feature to eliminate thrust alignment error due to deflection of thrust. The thrust stand position serves as the input to the null-circuit feedback control system and the output is the current to an electromagnetic actuator. Mechanical oscillations are actively damped with an electromagnetic damper. A closed-loop inclination system levels the stand while an active cooling system minimizes thermal effects. The thrust stand incorporates an in situ calibration rig. The thrust of a 3.4 kW Hall thruster is measured for thrust levels up to 230 mN. The uncertainty of the thrust measurements in this experiment is +/-0.6%, determined by examination of the hysteresis, drift of the zero offset and calibration slope variation.

  4. Initiation of a thrust fault revealed by analog experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dotare, Tatsuya; Yamada, Yasuhiro; Adam, Juergen; Hori, Takane; Sakaguchi, Hide

    2016-08-01

    To reveal in detail the process of initiation of a thrust fault, we conducted analog experiments with dry quartz sand using a high-resolution digital image correlation technique to identify minor shear-strain patterns for every 27 μm of shortening (with an absolute displacement accuracy of 0.5 μm). The experimental results identified a number of "weak shear bands" and minor uplift prior to the initiation of a thrust in cross-section view. The observations suggest that the process is closely linked to the activity of an adjacent existing thrust, and can be divided into three stages. Stage 1 is characterized by a series of abrupt and short-lived weak shear bands at the location where the thrust will subsequently be generated. The area that will eventually be the hanging wall starts to uplift before the fault forms. The shear strain along the existing thrust decreases linearly during this stage. Stage 2 is defined by the generation of the new thrust and active displacements along it, identified by the shear strain along the thrust. The location of the new thrust may be constrained by its back-thrust, generally produced at the foot of the surface slope. The activity of the existing thrust falls to zero once the new thrust is generated, although these two events are not synchronous. Stage 3 of the thrust is characterized by a constant displacement that corresponds to the shortening applied to the model. Similar minor shear bands have been reported in the toe area of the Nankai accretionary prism, SW Japan. By comparing several transects across this subduction margin, we can classify the lateral variations in the structural geometry into the same stages of deformation identified in our experiments. Our findings may also be applied to the evaluation of fracture distributions in thrust belts during unconventional hydrocarbon exploration and production.

  5. Mercury's global fabric of thrust faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimczak, C.; Byrne, P. K.; Solomon, S. C.

    2014-12-01

    Mercury's global tectonic history is thought to have been shaped by two major processes: tidal despinning and global contraction. Each process is expected to have produced a distinctive global stress field and resultant fault pattern. Data from three years of orbital operations by the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft reveal thousands of thrust faults that are attributed to global contraction, but no global signature of tidal despinning has been conclusively documented. Global contraction operated throughout an extended portion of Mercury's geologic history, whereas tidal despinning likely operated for a shorter duration. Therefore, any tidal despinning pattern, if not entirely obliterated by the late heavy bombardment, either would have formed together with global contraction, or would have been modified by global contraction after despinning was complete. Here, we reassess global fracture patterns predicted to result from tidal despinning alone, and from a combination of tidal despinning and global contraction. We specifically make use of rock strength and deformability parameters appropriate for Mercury's fractured lithosphere. Our results indicate that a tidal despinning pattern would consist only of a global set of opening-mode fractures (joints) in the upper part of the lithosphere, whereas the combination of tidal despinning and global contraction would have produced a global population of thrust faults, with no preferred orientations in the polar regions but with an increasing preference for north-south orientations toward the equator. If an equatorial bulge from an early state of rapid spin were supported by Mercury's lithosphere, two end-member scenarios for the timing and duration of these two processes can be considered. In one, tidal despinning predated global contraction; in the other, tidal despinning and global contraction temporally overlapped. We test the predictions for both scenarios against the

  6. STOL landing thrust: Reverser jet flowfields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kotansky, D. R.; Glaze, L. W.

    1987-01-01

    Analysis tools and modeling concepts for jet flow fields encountered upon use of thrust reversers for high performance military aircraft are described. A semi-empirical model of the reverser ground wall jet interaction with the uniform cross flow due to aircraft forward velocity is described. This ground interaction model is used to demonstrate exhaust gas ingestion conditions. The effects of control of exhaust jet vector angle, lateral splay, and moving versus fixed ground simulation are discussed. The Adler/Baron jet-in-cross flow model is used in conjunction with three dimensional panel methods to investigate the upper surface jet induced flow field.

  7. Low-thrust chemical rocket engine study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mellish, J. A.

    1981-01-01

    Engine data and information are presented to perform system studies on cargo orbit-transfer vehicles which would deliver large space structures to geosynchronous equatorial orbit. Low-thrust engine performance, weight, and envelope parametric data were established, preliminary design information was generated, and technologies for liquid rocket engines were identified. Two major engine design drivers were considered in the study: cooling and engine cycle options. Both film-cooled and regeneratively cooled engines were evaluated. The propellant combinations studied were hydrogen/oxygen, methane/oxygen, and kerosene/oxygen.

  8. Numerical methods and a computer program for subsonic and supersonic aerodynamic design and analysis of wings with attainable thrust considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, H. W.; Walkley, K. B.

    1984-01-01

    This paper describes methodology and an associated computer program for the design of wing lifting surfaces with attainable thrust taken into consideration. The approach is based on the determination of an optimum combination of a series of candidate surfaces rather than the more commonly used candidate loadings. Special leading-edge surfaces are selected to provide distributed leading-edge thrust forces which compensate for any failure to achieve the full theoretical leading-edge thrust, and a second series of general candidate surfaces is selected to minimize drag subject to constraints on the lift coefficient and, if desired, on the pitching moment coefficient. A primary purpose of the design approach is the introduction of attainable leading-edge thrust considerations so that relatively mild camber surfaces may be employed in the achievement of aerodynamic efficiencies comparable to those attainable if full theoretical leading-edge thrust could be achieved. The program provides an analysis as well as a design capability and is applicable to both subsonic and supersonic flow.

  9. Influence of hydrodynamic thrust bearings on the nonlinear oscillations of high-speed rotors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatzisavvas, Ioannis; Boyaci, Aydin; Koutsovasilis, Panagiotis; Schweizer, Bernhard

    2016-10-01

    This paper investigates the effect of hydrodynamic thrust bearings on the nonlinear vibrations and the bifurcations occurring in rotor/bearing systems. In order to examine the influence of thrust bearings, run-up simulations may be carried out. To be able to perform such run-up calculations, a computationally efficient thrust bearing model is mandatory. Direct discretization of the Reynolds equation for thrust bearings by means of a Finite Element or Finite Difference approach entails rather large simulation times, since in every time-integration step a discretized model of the Reynolds equation has to be solved simultaneously with the rotor model. Implementation of such a coupled rotor/bearing model may be accomplished by a co-simulation approach. Such an approach prevents, however, a thorough analysis of the rotor/bearing system based on extensive parameter studies. A major point of this work is the derivation of a very time-efficient but rather precise model for transient simulations of rotors with hydrodynamic thrust bearings. The presented model makes use of a global Galerkin approach, where the pressure field is approximated by global trial functions. For the considered problem, an analytical evaluation of the relevant integrals is possible. As a consequence, the system of equations of the discretized bearing model is obtained symbolically. In combination with a proper decomposition of the governing system matrix, a numerically efficient implementation can be achieved. Using run-up simulations with the proposed model, the effect of thrust bearings on the bifurcations points as well as on the amplitudes and frequencies of the subsynchronous rotor oscillations is investigated. Especially, the influence of the magnitude of the axial force, the geometry of the thrust bearing and the oil parameters is examined. It is shown that the thrust bearing exerts a large influence on the nonlinear rotor oscillations, especially to those related with the conical mode of the

  10. Reconciling Himalayan midcrustal discontinuities: The Main Central thrust system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, Kyle P.; Ambrose, Tyler K.; Webb, A. Alexander G.; Cottle, John M.; Shrestha, Sudip

    2015-11-01

    The occurrence of thrust-sense tectonometamorphic discontinuities within the exhumed Himalayan metamorphic core can be explained as part of the Main Central thrust system. This imbricate thrust structure, which significantly thickened the orogenic midcrustal core, comprises a series of thrust-sense faults that all merge into a single detachment. The existence of these various structures, and their potential for complex overprinting along the main detachment, may help explain the contention surrounding the definition, mapping, and interpretation of the Main Central thrust. The unique evolution of specific segments of the Main Central thrust system along the orogen is interpreted to be a reflection of the inherent basement structure and ramp position, and structural level of exposure of the mid-crust. This helps explain the variation in the timing and structural position of tectonometamorphic discontinuities along the length of the mountain belt.

  11. Fluid storage and transport in thrust belts: the Gavarnie Thrust system revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCaig, Andrew

    2015-04-01

    There has been renewed interest in the pressure and movement of fluids in thrust systems in recent years with the discovery and increasing importance of slow slip earthquakes. Unfortunately the overpressured regime thought to be the source region for both normal and slow-slip earthquakes is inaccessible to direct observation, so information about the actual water content, flow regimes and permeability structure at the time of thrusting can only be obtained in exhumed rocks. The Gavarnie Thrust System in the Pyrenees (including the immediate footwall of the thrust and overlying thrust sheets) is exceptionally well studied in terms of structural and microstructural work, fluid inclusions, and isotopic tracing of fluid flow. Southward thrusting by 12-15 km occurred during the Eocene, and the current geometry of the thrust is a broad dome, allowing sampling at many locations. There is abundant evidence for near-lithostatic fluid pressures at depths of 8-15 km in the crust and temperatures of 300-400 °C, and fluids at these levels are dominated by hypersaline brines with Cl/Br ratios indicating evaporation of seawater. They are inferred to be derived from widespread Triassic evaporates, and stored in underlying redbeds and fractured basement rocks. There is also evidence from fluid inclusions for periodic pressure cycling down to near-hydrostatic values. This is thought to be related to co-seismic fault valve behaviour with release of fluid both into the shallow thrust and into steeply dipping shear zones in the hangingwall. Isotopic studies of carbonate mylonites along the Gavarnie thrust indicate unidirectional southward (structurally upward) flow of fluid , again probably mainly during transient veining events. These relatively slow moving fluids appear to have fed into a hydrostatic regime with topographically driven flow at higher levels. If time averaged permeability was high, most of the fluid would have rapidly escaped, since there is little opportunity to

  12. Cretaceous biostratigraphy in the Wyoming thrust belt

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, D.J.; Jacobson, S.R.

    1982-07-01

    Biostratigraphy is essential to exploration for oil and gas in the Wyoming thrust belt because fossils provide a temporal framework for interpretation of events of faulting, erosion, sedimentation, and the development of hydrocarbon traps and migration pathways. In the Cretaceous section, fossils are especially useful for dating and correlating repetitive facies of different ages in structurally complex terrain. The biostratigraphic zonation for the region is based on megafossils (chiefly ammonites), which permit accurate dating and correlation of outcrop sections, and which have been calibrated with the radiometric time scale for the Western Interior. Molluscan and vertebrate zone fossils are difficult to obtain from the subsurface, however, and ammonities are restricted to rocks of margin origin. Palynomorphs (plant microfossils) have proven to be the most valuable fossils in investigations of stratigraphy and structures in the subsurface of the thrust belt because palynomorphs can be recovered from drill cuttings. Palynomorphs also are found in both marine and nonmarine rocks and can be used for correlation between facies. In this paper, stratigraphic ranges of selected Cretaceous marine and nonmarine palynomorphs in previously designated reference sections in Fossil Basin, Wyoming, are correlated with the occurrence of ammonities and other zone fossils in the same sections. These correlations can be related to known isotopic ages, and they contribute to the calibration of palynomorph ranges in the Cretaceous of the Western Interior.

  13. Experimental Results of Schlicher's Thrusting Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fralick, Gustave C.; Niedra, Janis M.

    2001-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to test the claims by Rex L. Schlicher, et al., (Patent 5,142,86 1) that a certain antenna geometry produces thrust greatly exceeding radiation reaction, when driven by repetitive, fast rise, and relatively slower decay current pulses. In order to test this hypothesis, the antenna was suspended by strings as a 3 in pendulum. Current pulses were fed to the antenna along the suspension path by a very flexible coaxial line constructed from loudspeaker cable and copper braid sheath. When driving the antenna via this cabling, our pulser was capable of sustaining 1200 A pulses at a rate of 30 per second up to a minute. In this way, bursts of pulses could be delivered in synch with the pendulum period in order to build up any motion. However, when using a laser beam passing through a lens attached to the antenna to amplify linear displacement by a factor of at least 25, no correlated motion of the beam spot could be detected on a distant wall. We conclude, in agreement with the momentum theorem of classical electromagnetic theory, that any thrust produced is far below practically useful levels. Hence, within classical electrodynamics, there is little hope of detecting any low level motion that cannot be explained by interactions with surrounding structural steel and the Earth's magnetic field.

  14. Thrust vector control using electric actuation

    SciTech Connect

    Bechtel, R.T.; Hall, D.K.

    1995-01-25

    Presently, gimbaling of launch vehicle engines for thrust vector control is generally accomplished using a hydraulic system. In the case of the space shuttle solid rocket boosters and main engines, these systems are powered by hydrazine auxiliary power units. Use of electromechanical actuators would provide significant advantages in cost and maintenance. However, present energy source technologies such as batteries are heavy to the point of causing significant weight penalties. Utilizing capacitor technology developed by the Auburn University Space Power Institute in collaboration with the Auburn CCDS, Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and Auburn are developing EMA system components with emphasis on high discharge rate energy sources compatible with space shuttle type thrust vector control requirements. Testing has been done at MSFC as part of EMA system tests with loads up to 66000 newtons for pulse times of several seconds. Results show such an approach to be feasible providing a potential for reduced weight and operations costs for new launch vehicles. {copyright} 1995 {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}

  15. Rocket thrust chamber thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batakis, A. P.; Vogan, J. W.

    1985-01-01

    A research program was conducted to generate data and develop analytical techniques to predict the performance and reliability of ceramic thermal barrier coatings in high heat flux environments. A finite element model was used to analyze the thermomechanical behavior of coating systems in rocket thrust chambers. Candidate coating systems (using a copper substrate, NiCrAlY bond coat and ZrO2.8Y2O3 ceramic overcoat) were selected for detailed study based on photomicrographic evaluations of experimental test specimens. The effects of plasma spray application parameters on the material properties of these coatings were measured and the effects on coating performance evaluated using the finite element model. Coating design curves which define acceptable operating envelopes for seleted coating systems were constructed based on temperature and strain limitations. Spray gun power levels was found to have the most significant effect on coating structure. Three coating systems were selected for study using different power levels. Thermal conductivity, strain tolerance, density, and residual stress were measured for these coatings. Analyses indicated that extremely thin coatings ( 0.02 mm) are required to accommodate the high heat flux of a rocket thrust chamber and ensure structural integrity.

  16. Effects of thrust reversing in ground proximity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joshi, P. B.; Hughes, R. V.

    1987-01-01

    The changes in stability and control characteristics encountered by a thrust reversing aircraft during its final approach, landing, and ground roll are described. These changes include a strong pitch-up accompanied by the loss of horizontal tail and aileron control effectiveness. The magnitude of reverser induced changes in ground effect are much larger than corresponding changes in free air. Some unexpected unsteady motions exhibited in wind tunnel by an aircraft model with reversers operating in ground proximity are also described. The cause of this oscillatory behavior was determined to be an unsteady interaction between the wall jets formed by impingement of reverser jets on the ground and the on-coming free stream. Time histories of rolling moments measured by the wind tunnel balance or support system were removed and frequencies were scaled by Strouhal number to full scale. Corrected time series were used to simulate the motion of a fighter aircraft with thrust reversers in ground effect. The simulation predicted large roll angles and nose down attitude at touchdown. Some phenomena of jet attachment to solid surfaces are discussed and areas for future research are recommended.

  17. OMV/VTE variable thrust engine analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larosillere, Louis; Litchford, Ron; Jeng, San-Mou

    1989-01-01

    The objective of the present work is to develop a predictive CFD based analytical tool for the variable thrust engine (VTE) in the orbital maneuvering vehicle (OMV). This objective is being accomplished within the framework of the Los Alamos KIVA computer code for chemically reactive flows with sprays. For the OMV application, the main structure of KIVA is to be retained while reformulating many of the phenomenological submodels, enhancing some of the numerics, and adding more features. The analytical model consists of the general conservation equations for two phase reactive flows and of submodels for turbulence, chemical reactions, and bipropellant sprays. Tailoring this model to the OMV engine brings about the added complexities of combustion and flow processes that occur in a liquid hypergolic propellant rocket chamber. This report exposes the foundation upon which the analytical tool is being constructed and developed. Results from a cursory computational exercise involving the simulation of the flow and combustion processes in a hypothetical N2H4/N2O4 rocket engine thrust chamber is presented and discussed.

  18. OMV/VTE variable thrust engine analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larosillere, L.; Litchford, R.; Jeng, S. M.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of the present work is to develop a predictive CFD based analytical tool for the Variable Thrust Engine (VTE) in the Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV). This objective is being accomplished within the framework of the Los Alamos KIVA computer code for chemically reactive flows with sprays. For the OMV application, the main structure of KIVA is to be retained while reformulating many of the phenomenological submodels, enhancing some of the numerics, and adding more features. The analytical model consists of the general conservation equations for two-phase reactive flows and of submodels for turbulence, chemical reactions, and bipropellant sprays. Tailoring this model to the OMV engine brings about the added complexities of combustion and flow processes that occur in a liquid hypergolic propellant rocket chamber. This report exposes the foundation upon which the analytical tool is being constructed and developed. Results from a cursory computational exercise involving the simulation of the flow and combustion processes in a hypothetical N2H4/N204 rocket engine thrust chamber is presented and discussed.

  19. Emergency Control Aircraft System Using Thrust Modulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burken, John J. (Inventor); Burcham, Frank W., Jr. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A digital longitudinal Aircraft Propulsion Control (APC system of a multiengine aircraft is provided by engine thrust modulation in response to comparing an input flightpath angle signal (gamma)c from a pilot thumbwheel. or an ILS system with a sensed flightpath angle y to produce an error signal (gamma)e that is then integrated (with reasonable limits) to generate a drift correction signal to be added to the error signal (gamma)e after first subtracting a lowpass filtered velocity signal Vel(sub f) for phugoid damping. The output error signal is multiplied by a constant to produce an aircraft thrust control signal ATC of suitable amplitude to drive a throttle servo for all engines. each of which includes its own full-authority digital engine control (FADEC) computer. An alternative APC system omits sensed flightpath angle feedback and instead controls the flightpath angle by feedback of the lowpass filtered velocity signal Vel(sub f) which also inherently provides phugoid damping. The feature of drift compensation is retained.

  20. Feedback control for counterflow thrust vectoring with a turbine engine: Experiment design and robust control design and implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dores, Delfim Zambujo Das

    2005-11-01

    Engineering research over the last few years has successfully demonstrated the potential of thrust vector control using counterflow at conditions up to Mach 2. Flow configurations that include the pitch vectoring of rectangular jets and multi-axis vector control in diamond and axisymmetric nozzle geometries have been studied. Although bistable (on-off) fluid-based control has been around for some time, the present counterflow thrust vector control is unique because proportional and continuous jet response can be achieved in the absence of moving parts, while avoiding jet attachment, which renders most fluidic approaches unacceptable for aircraft and missile control applications. However, before this study, research had been limited to open-loop studies of counterflow thrust vectoring. For practical implementation it was vital that the counterflow scheme be used in conjunction with feedback control. Hence, the focus of this research was to develop and experimentally demonstrate a feedback control design methodology for counterflow thrust vectoring. This research focused on 2-D (pitch) thrust vectoring and addresses four key modeling issues. The first issue is to determine the measured variable to be commanded since the thrust vector angle is not measurable in real time. The second related issue is to determine the static mapping from the thrust vector angle to this measured variable. The third issue is to determine the dynamic relationship between the measured variable and the thrust vector angle. The fourth issue is to develop dynamic models with uncertainty characterizations. The final and main goal was the design and implementation of robust controllers that yield closed-loop systems with fast response times, and avoid overshoot in order to aid in the avoidance of attachment. These controllers should be simple and easy to implement in real applications. Hence, PID design has been chosen. Robust control design is accomplished by using ℓ1 control theory in

  1. A 3-D Model of Stacked Thrusts in the Sevier Thrust Belt, Eastern Idaho

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clayton, R. W.; Clayton, S. R.

    2014-12-01

    Using published and new geologic map data and two exploratory wells for control, we constructed a three-dimensional geological model of the Pine Creek area in the Big Hole Mountains of eastern Idaho, where stacked Sevier thrust sheets are exposed at the surface. In this area, Cretaceous crustal shortening displaced and folded strata from Cambrian to Cretaceous in age. Using geologic map data as a primary input to a 3-D model presents a number of challenges, especially representing fault geometries at depth and maintaining strata thicknesses. The highly variable attitudes measured at the surface are also difficult to represent in a subsurface model because they require extensive extrapolation to depth. To overcome these challenges we EarthVision software, which has tools for model construction with minimal data inputs and uses a minimum tension algorithm to create geologically realistic surfaces. We also constructed two primary cross-sections to constrain strata and fault geometries according to structural principles, and used these to guide construction of fault and horizon surfaces. We then designated horizons with the best control as reference horizons to constrain strata geometries, and built the remaining horizons using isochores to add or subtract from those surfaces. The model shows classic flat-ramp thrust geometries as seen farther southeast in the Wyoming section of the thrust belt. The model also shows uniform southwestward tilting of faults and strata in the north end above younger thrusts, but strong effects from a duplex on a younger thrust fault encountered in the southern well, which rotated the strata and older faults above it.

  2. Design and test of a magnetic thrust bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allaire, P. E.; Mikula, A.; Banerjee, B.; Lewis, D. W.; Imlach, J.

    1993-01-01

    A magnetic thrust bearing can be employed to take thrust loads in rotating machinery. The design and construction of a prototype magnetic thrust bearing for a high load per weight application is described. The theory for the bearing is developed. Fixtures were designed and the bearing was tested for load capacity using a universal testing machine. Various shims were employed to have known gap thicknesses. A comparison of the theory and measured results is presented.

  3. Foil Gas Thrust Bearings for High-Speed Turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edmonds, Brian; DellaCorte, Christopher; Dykas, Brian

    2010-01-01

    A methodology has been developed for the design and construction of simple foil thrust bearings intended for parametric performance testing and low marginal costs, supporting continued development of oil-free turbomachinery. A bearing backing plate is first machined and surface-ground to produce flat and parallel faces. Partial-arc slots needed to retain the foil components are then machined into the plate by wire electrical discharge machining. Slot thicknesses achievable by a single wire pass are appropriate to accommodate the practical range of foil thicknesses, leaving a small clearance in this hinged joint to permit limited motion. The backing plate is constructed from a nickel-based superalloy (Inconel 718) to allow heat treatment of the entire assembled bearing, as well as to permit hightemperature operation. However, other dimensionally stable materials, such as precipitation-hardened stainless steel, can also be used for this component depending on application. The top and bump foil blanks are cut from stacks of annealed Inconel X-750 foil by the same EDM process. The bump foil has several azimuthal slits separating it into five individual bump strips. This configuration allows for variable bump spacing, which helps to accommodate the effects of the varying surface velocity, thermal crowning, centrifugal dishing, and misalignment. Rectangular tabs on the foil blanks fit into the backing plate slots. For this application, a rather traditional set of conventionally machined dies is selected, and bump foil blanks are pressed into the dies for forming. This arrangement produces a set of bump foil dies for foil thrust bearings that provide for relatively inexpensive fabrication of various bump configurations, and employing methods and features from the public domain.

  4. A review of thrust-vectoring schemes for fighter applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berrier, B. L.; Re, R. J.

    1978-01-01

    This paper presents a review of thrust vectoring schemes for advanced fighter applications. Results are presented from wind tunnel and system integration studies on thrust vectoring nozzle concepts. Vectoring data are presented from wind tunnel tests of axisymmetric C-D (convergent-divergent) and nonaxisymmetric wedge, C-D, single ramp and USB (upper-surface blowing) nozzle concepts. Results from recent airframe/nozzle integration studies on the impact of thrust vectoring on weight, cooling and performance characteristics are discussed. This review indicates that the aircraft designer has, at his disposal, a wide range of thrust vectoring schemes which offer potential for added or improved aircraft capability.

  5. Unsteady thrust measurement techniques for pulse detonation engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Dibesh Dhoj

    Thrust is a critical performance parameter and its correct determination is necessary to characterize an engine. Many conventional thrust measurement techniques prevail. However, further developments are required for correct measurement of thrust in the case of a pulse detonation engine (PDE), since the entire thrust generation process is intermittent. The significant effect of system dynamics in the form of inertial forces, stress wave propagation and reflections initiated in the structure due to detonations and pulse-to-pulse interaction in a fast operating PDE further complicate the thrust measurement process. These complications call for a further, detailed study of the unsteady thrust characteristics. A general approach was first developed to recover actual thrust from the measured thrust generated by the PDE. The developed approach consisted of two steps. The first step incorporated a deconvolution procedure using a pre-established system transfer function and measured input to reconstruct the output yielding the deconvolved thrust. The second step accounted for inertial forces through an acceleration compensation procedure. These two steps allowed the actual thrust to be determined. A small scale PDE operating at 10 and 20 Hz with varied filling fractions and mixture equivalence ratios was used for the experimental application of the general approach. The analytical study of gas dynamics in the PDE while in operation and the measured pressure histories at the exit of the engine allowed the generated thrust during a cycle to be determined semi-empirically. The thrust values determined semi-empirically were compared against the experimental results. A dynamical model of the PDE was created for the study of the unsteady thrust characteristics using finite element analysis. The results from finite element analysis were compared against semi-empirical and experimental results. In addition, finite element analysis also facilitated to numerically determine the

  6. Space shuttle orbit maneuvering engine reusable thrust chamber program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Senneff, J. M.

    1975-01-01

    The feasibility of potential reusable thrust chamber concepts is studied. Propellant condidates were examined and analytically combined with potential cooling schemes. A data base of engine data which would assist in a configuration selection was produced. The data base verification was performed by the demonstration of a thrust chamber of a selected coolant scheme design. A full scale insulated columbium thrust chamber was used for propellant coolant configurations. Combustion stability of the injectors and a reduced size thrust chamber were experimentally verified as proof of concept demonstrations of the design and study results.

  7. Kinematic modeling of folding above listric propagating thrusts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardozo, Nestor; Brandenburg, J. P.

    2014-03-01

    We describe a kinematic approach to simulate folds above listric propagating thrusts. The model is based on a pre-defined circular thrust geometry with a maximum central angle beyond which the thrust is planar, inclined shear above the circular thrust, and trishear in front of the thrust. Provided the trajectory of thrust propagation is established, the model can be run forward and backwards. We use this last feature to implement a global simulated annealing, inverse modeling strategy. This inverse modeling strategy is applied to synthetic folds as well as two real examples in offshore Venezuela and the Niger Delta toe-thrust system. These three examples illustrate the benefits of the algorithm, particularly in predicting the possible range of models that can fit the structures. Thrust geometry, depth to detachment level, and backlimb geometry have high impact in model parameters such as backlimb shear angle and fault slip; while forelimb geometry is critical to constrain parameters such as fault propagation to fault slip ratio and trishear angle. Steep to overturned beds in forelimb areas are often not imaged by seismic, so in the absence of additional well data, considering all possible thrust-fold geometries is critical for the modeling and whatever prediction (e.g. hydrocarbon trap integrity) is made from it.

  8. Thrust enhancement via gel-type liquid confinement of laser ablation of solid metal propellant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Soojin; Han, Tae-Hee; Gojani, Ardian B.; Yoh, Jack J.

    2010-01-01

    Laser propulsion has been developed as a suitable small thruster technology for the attitude control of micro and nano class satellites. Laser-based thrusters meet the satellite design criteria for being of light weight and cost effective, because they do not require fuel storing and oxidizer for combustion. Also, thrust control by laser propulsion is achieved fairly easy. In this paper, we consider the confinement of plasma expansion by a gel-type liquid material, which results in the enhancement of the thrust for propulsion. We also present our attempts to resolve some known issues regarding laser ablation of solid and liquid targets. The level of thrust is quantified via the momentum coupling coefficient, which was experimentally measured using a ballistic pendulum system. We have discovered that the laser ablation confinement by the gel-type medium results in 2.3 times more enhanced driving force as compared to the water confinement. A proof of performance is demonstrated for using gel-type material for generating propulsion, and material characterization for optimal thrust performance is presented.

  9. Simultaneous thrust vector control and vibration isolation of satellites using steerable smart platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghasemi-Nejhad, Mehrdad N.; Ma, Kougen

    2010-04-01

    This paper presents an innovative concept, control strategies and experimental verification of simultaneous thrust vector control and vibration isolation of satellites. First, the innovative concept is introduced by employing a smart platform as an active structural interface between the main thruster of a satellite and the satellite structure. Second, the inverse kinematics and singularity analysis of the smart platform are performed. Third, thrust vector control model of satellites with smart platforms is deduced. Fourth, a multiple loop control strategy is proposed. It includes three cascaded feedback loops for nonlinear compensation of actuators, smart platform control and trust vector control, respectively, and a combined feedback-feedforward control scheme for vibration isolation. Finally, experiments are carried out and experimental results are illustrated and discussed. The cascaded multiple feedback loops compensate the hysteresis (for piezoelectric stacks inside the three linear actuators that individually have simultaneous precision positioning and vibration suppression), dead-zone, back-lash, and friction nonlinearities very well, and provide precision and quick smart platform control and satisfactory thrust vector control capability. The experimental results demonstrate that the simultaneous thrust vector control and vibration suppression is achieved with satisfactory performance.

  10. Geometric factors affecting noise suppresion and thrust loss of divergent-lobe supersonic jet noise suppressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huff, R. G.; Groesbeck, D. E.

    1973-01-01

    The thrust loss and noise suppression of a divergent-lobe supersonic jet noise suppressor were experimentally determined over a range of nozzle pressure ratios of 1.5 to 4.0. These small-scale cold flow tests were made to determine the effect on thrust and noise of: suppressor length, rearward facing step height, suppressor divergence angle, and ejector shroud length and location. Noise suppression was achieved at nozzle pressure ratios of 2.5 and greater. Maximum lobe jet noise attenuation of 15 db with thrust loss differences of 1.5 percent compared to the convergent nozzle were obtained at a nozzle pressure ratio of 3.5 with an ejector shroud two nozzle diameters long. Without the ejector the attenuation was 13 db with thrust loss differences of 11 percent. Short suppressors approximately one primary nozzle throat diameter long performed as well as longer suppressors. Rearward facing step height had a significant effect on noise suppression. Ejector shrouds two nozzle diameters in length are feasible.

  11. Small centrifugal pumps for low thrust rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulbrandsen, N. C.; Furst, R. B.; Burgess, R. M.; Scheer, D. D.

    1985-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a combined analytical and experimental investigation of low specific speed pumps for potential use as components of propellant feed systems for low thrust rocket engines. Shrouded impellers and open face impellers were tested in volute type and vaned diffuser type pumps. Full- and partial-emission diffusers and full- and partial-admission impellers were tested. Axial and radial loads, head and efficiency versus flow, and cavitation tests were conducted. Predicted performance of two pumps are compared when pumping water and liquid hydrogen. Detailed pressure loss and parasitic power values are presented for two pump configurations. Partial-emission diffusers were found to permit use of larger impeller and diffuser passages with a minimal performance penalty. Normal manufacturing tolerances were found to result in substantial power requirement variation with only a small pressure rise change. Impeller wear ring leakage was found to reduce pump pressure rise to an increasing degree as the pump flowrate was decreased.

  12. Thrust Production in a Mechanical Swimming Lamprey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leftwich, Megan; Smits, Alexander

    2008-11-01

    To develop a comprehensive model of lamprey locomotion, we use a robotic lamprey as a means of investigating the surface pressure and wake structure during swimming. A programmable microcomputer actuates 11 servomotors that produce a traveling wave along the length of the lamprey body. The waveform is based on the motion of the American eel (Anguilla rostrata), as described by Tytell and Lauder (2004) and kinematic studies of living lamprey. The amplitude of the phase-averaged surface pressure distribution along the centerline of the robot increases toward the tail, which is consistent with previous momentum balance experiments indicating that thrust is produced mainly at the tail. The phase relationship between the pressure signal and the vortex shedding from the tail is also examined. The project is supported by NIH CNRS Grant 1R01NS054271.

  13. A magnetic coupling thrust stand for microthrust measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, W. P.; Ferrer, P.

    2016-01-01

    A direct thrust measurement system that is based on a horizontal lever and utilizes a novel magnetic coupling mechanism to measure thrust has been developed. The system is capable of measuring thrusts as low as 10’s of μN. While zero drift is observed in the balance, tests have shown that they do not have an appreciable effect on thrust measurements. The thrust stand’s sensitivity can be adjusted by shifting the position of the coupling magnet inside the stand’s thrust support member, which allows flexibility for testing both higher and lower powered thrusters. The thrust stand has been modeled theoretically and the predicted results from the model are compared with experimentally measured data. The system was tested using a simple cold gas thruster and provided credible results that can be compared with other systems studied in the literature. Advantages include that the thrust stand is very cheap and easy to construct and further, the calibration process takes no longer than half an hour, facilitating rapid turnaround times while still retaining accuracy. Repeatability tests have shown that the balance gives consistent results.

  14. Thrust augmentation nozzle (TAN) concept for rocket engine booster applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forde, Scott; Bulman, Mel; Neill, Todd

    2006-07-01

    Aerojet used the patented thrust augmented nozzle (TAN) concept to validate a unique means of increasing sea-level thrust in a liquid rocket booster engine. We have used knowledge gained from hypersonic Scramjet research to inject propellants into the supersonic region of the rocket engine nozzle to significantly increase sea-level thrust without significantly impacting specific impulse. The TAN concept overcomes conventional engine limitations by injecting propellants and combusting in an annular region in the divergent section of the nozzle. This injection of propellants at moderate pressures allows for obtaining high thrust at takeoff without overexpansion thrust losses. The main chamber is operated at a constant pressure while maintaining a constant head rise and flow rate of the main propellant pumps. Recent hot-fire tests have validated the design approach and thrust augmentation ratios. Calculations of nozzle performance and wall pressures were made using computational fluid dynamics analyses with and without thrust augmentation flow, resulting in good agreement between calculated and measured quantities including augmentation thrust. This paper describes the TAN concept, the test setup, test results, and calculation results.

  15. Impact of plasma noise on a direct thrust measurement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pottinger, S. J.; Lamprou, D.; Knoll, A. K.; Lappas, V. J.

    2012-03-01

    In order to evaluate the accuracy and sensitivity of a pendulum-type thrust measurement system, a linear variable differential transformer (LVDT) and a laser optical displacement sensor have been used simultaneously to determine the displacement resulting from an applied thrust. The LVDT sensor uses an analog interface, whereas the laser sensor uses a digital interface to communicate the displacement readings to the data acquisition equipment. The data collected by both sensors show good agreement for static mass calibrations and validation with a cold gas thruster. However, the data obtained using the LVDT deviate significantly from that of the laser sensor when operating two varieties of plasma thrusters: a radio frequency (RF) driven plasma thruster, and a DC powered plasma thruster. Results establish that even with appropriate shielding and signal filtering the LVDT sensor is subject to plasma noise and radio frequency interactions which result in anomalous thrust readings. Experimental data show that the thrust determined using the LVDT system in a direct current plasma environment and a RF discharge is approximately a factor of three higher than the thrust values obtained using a laser sensor system for the operating conditions investigated. These findings are of significance to the electric propulsion community as LVDT sensors are often utilized in thrust measurement systems and accurate thrust measurement and the reproducibility of thrust data is key to analyzing thruster performance. Methods are proposed to evaluate system susceptibility to plasma noise and an effective filtering scheme presented for DC discharges.

  16. A Target Indirect Thrust Measurement Method of Pulse Detonation Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xiqiao; Xiong, Yuefei; Li, Chao; Zheng, Longxi; Li, Qing

    2015-05-01

    An indirect thrust measurement method based on impulse of a target plate was developed, and a new thrust measurement system (TMS) was successfully designed and constructed. A series of multi-cycle experiments on thrust measurement were conducted to investigate the feasibility of this method with the newly-built indirect TMS. The thrust measurement of PDE was made at different plate target axial positions and operating frequencies. All the experiments were conducted using gasoline as fuel and air as oxidant. The experimental results implied that the thrust of PDE by using the indirect impulse method was a function of the target plate axial position, and there existed an optimum measurement position for PDE with a diameter of 60 mm. The optimum target plate position located at 3.33. According to the experimental results, the thrusts obtained by using indirect TMS were less than the actual values, and so the observed value of thrust was modified in order to make the thrust more reliable. A relative accurate calibration formula depending on the operating frequency was found.

  17. The 30-centimeter ion thrust subsystem design manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The principal characteristics of the 30-centimeter ion propulsion thrust subsystem technology that was developed to satisfy the propulsion needs of future planetary and early orbital missions are described. Functional requirements and descriptions, interface and performance requirements, and physical characteristics of the hardware are described at the thrust subsystem, BIMOD engine system, and component level.

  18. Optimal low-thrust, Earth-Moon trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kluever, Craig Allen

    1993-01-01

    A variety of optimal trajectories from a circular low-Earth parking orbit to a circular low-lunar parking orbit are computed for a range of low-thrust spacecraft. The problem is studied in the context of the classical restricted three-body problem. Minimum-fuel, planar trajectories with a fixed thrust-coast-thrust engine sequence are computed for both a 'high-end' low-thrust spacecraft and 'moderate' low-thrust nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) spacecraft. Since a low-thrust trajectory is a long duration transfer with slowly developing spirals about the Earth and Moon, the minimum-fuel Earth-Moon trajectory is obtained by formulating and successively solving a hierarchy of subproblems. The subproblems include optimal Earth-escape and Moon-capture trajectories and sub-optimal translunar trajectories. The complete minimum-fuel trajectory problem is eventually solved using a 'hybrid' direct/indirect method which utilizes the benefits of a direct optimization method and an indirect method from optimal control theory. Minimum-fuel transfers are also computed using a switching function structure which results in multiple thrust and coast arcs. In addition, a new combined vehicle and trajectory optimization problem of maximum payload fraction is formulated and solved. Finally, 3-D minimum-fuel trajectories are obtained for both the 'high-end' and 'moderate' low-thrust spacecraft. Numerical results are presented for various optimal Earth-Moon trajectories.

  19. Heat pipe technology for advanced rocket thrust chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rousar, D. C.

    1971-01-01

    The application of heat pipe technology to the design of rocket engine thrust chambers is discussed. Subjects presented are: (1) evaporator wick development, (2) specific heat pipe designs and test results, (3) injector design, fabrication, and cold flow testing, and (4) preliminary thrust chamber design.

  20. Anomalous Thrust Production from an RF Test Device Measured on a Low-Thrust Torsion Pendulum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brady, David A.; White, Harold G.; March, Paul; Lawrence, James T.; Davies, Frank J.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the test campaigns designed to investigate and demonstrate viability of using classical magnetoplasmadynamics to obtain a propulsive momentum transfer via the quantum vacuum virtual plasma. This paper will not address the physics of the quantum vacuum plasma thruster (QVPT), but instead will describe the recent test campaign. In addition, it contains a brief description of the supporting radio frequency (RF) field analysis, lessons learned, and potential applications of the technology to space exploration missions. During the first (Cannae) portion of the campaign, approximately 40 micronewtons of thrust were observed in an RF resonant cavity test article excited at approximately 935 megahertz and 28 watts. During the subsequent (tapered cavity) portion of the campaign, approximately 91 micronewtons of thrust were observed in an RF resonant cavity test article excited at approximately 1933 megahertz and 17 watts. Testing was performed on a low-thrust torsion pendulum that is capable of detecting force at a single-digit micronewton level. Test campaign results indicate that the RF resonant cavity thruster design, which is unique as an electric propulsion device, is producing a force that is not attributable to any classical electromagnetic phenomenon and therefore is potentially demonstrating an interaction with the quantum vacuum virtual plasma.

  1. Tectonic Significance of Intraoceanic Thrusts in the Nankai Trough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuji, T.; Kodaira, S.; Park, J.; Ashi, J.; Fukao, Y.; Moore, G. F.; Matsuoka, T.

    2009-12-01

    The Nankai Trough is a convergent margin where the Philippine Sea plate is subducting beneath southwest Japan. Because this subduction zone has repeatedly generated great earthquakes with Mw>8, seismic reflection studies have been intensively carried out in the whole Nankai Trough region. However, the role of oceanic crust in plate convergent margins was not well understood. Recently, Tsuji et al. [2009] identified intraoceanic thrusts developed as imbricate structures within the subducting Philippine Sea plate off the Kii Peninsula in central Japan manifesting as strong-amplitude reflections observed in an industry-standard 3D seismic reflection data set. In this study, we use other 2D and 3D seismic reflection data acquired in the whole Nankai Trough region and extract geometries of (1) intraoceanic thrusts, (2) surface of oceanic crust and (3) Moho in order to discuss characteristics of intraoceanic thrusts distributed in the whole Nankai Trough region. We mainly use seismic reflection data acquired by JAMSTEC. Seismic profiles demonstrate that intraoceanic faults are densely distributed eastern side of the Cape Shionomisaki (southern edge of the Kii Peninsula). Large displacements of a few major intraoceanic thrusts elevate the crust surface, and the offset due to cumulative displacements reaches >1 km at the sediment-igneous crust interface. A part of Kashinozaki-Knoll is also uplifted by the thrust displacement. These imbricate intraoceanic thrusts cut through the oceanic crust as a discontinuous thrust plane. The intraoceanic thrusts strike nearly parallel to the trend of the trough axis. However the fault traces are bending at the western termination; the fault planes extend upward from side edges of the underlying intraoceanic thrusts and work as lateral faults. The deformation within oceanic crust may have continued until recently with subduction, because the shallow sediment as well as the seafloor is deformed due to the thrust displacement [Kodaira et

  2. New Highly Dynamic Approach for Thrust Vector Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hecht, M.; Ettl, J.; Grothe, D.; Hrbud, I.

    2015-09-01

    For a new launcher system a thrust vector control system is needed. This launch vehicle system consists of two rockets which are namely the VS-50 (two-stage suborbital vehicle) and the VLM-1 (three-stage microsatellite launch vehicle). VLM-1 and VS-50 are developed in a cooperation between the German Aerospace Center (DLR) and the Brazilian Aeronautics and Space Institute (IAE). To keep these two rockets on its trajectory during flight a highly dynamic thrust vector control system is required. For the purpose of developing such a highly dynamic thrust vector control system a master thesis was written by the author. The development includes all mechanical constructions as well as control algorithms and electronics design. Moreover an optimization of control algorithms was made to increase the dynamic capabilities of the thrust vector control system. The composition of the right components plus the sophisticated control algorithm make the thrust vector control system highly dynamic.

  3. Static thrust recovery of PAR craft on solid surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matveev, K. I.

    2008-08-01

    Power-Augmented-Ram Vehicles belong to a new class of ground-effect machines with hybrid support. Recovered static thrust and static lift on solid surfaces are important amphibious characteristics of this craft. Experimental data for the static thrust recovery and the transition to a hovering mode are obtained in the tests with a vehicle model on two types of ground surface and with variable engine thrust and flap trailing-edge gap. The uphill surface and increased mass of the model demonstrate reductions in thrust recovery. A comparison with a two-dimensional potential-flow theory is presented. The static thrust accumulation, identified in the pre-hovering regime of a model on solid surface, does not significantly benefit the low-speed forward motion.

  4. Interactive property of large thrust sheets with footwall rocks—the Sub thrust interactive duplex hypothesis: A mechanism of dome formation in thrust sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatcher, Robert D.

    1991-06-01

    Recently acquired Appalachian Ultradeep Core Hole (ADCOH) Project site investigation seismic reflection data and geologic data from the Appalachians and several other orogenic belts suggest an important mutually interdependent relationship exists between emplacement of large crystalline thrust sheets and the deforming foreland rocks beneath. This relationship suggests isolated domes beneath crystalline thrust sheets may be produced by passive folding of the sheet as a result of formation of an antiformal stack duplex in the platform sedimentary sequence beneath. Suggestions that domes in crystalline thrust sheets formed by interference of late open folds is doubtlessly still valid in places, but the platform duplex mechanism is probably also valid to explain the late doming of many crystalline and other large thrust sheets. The dome beneath the Shooting Creek and Brasstown Bald windows in the ADCOH site region is imaged as an antiformal stack duplex at depth. The Tallulah Falls dome, Grandfather Mountain and Mountain City windows, and Smokies Foothills duplex in the site region and elsewhere in the southern Blue Ridge are all late isolated domes and all are probably or demonstrably underlain by antiformal stack duplexes beneath the Blue Ridge-Piedmont composite crystalline thrust sheet. The Assynt window and footwall duplex benath the Arnabol and Moine thrusts in Scotland, and the Engadine window in the Alps may be similar structures.

  5. Initial Thrust Measurements of Marshall's Ion-ioN Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caruso, Natalie R. S.; Scogin, Tyler; Liu, Thomas M.; Walker, Mitchell L. R.; Polzin, Kurt A.; Dankanich, John W.

    2015-01-01

    Electronegative ion thrusters are a variation of traditional gridded ion thruster technology differentiated by the production and acceleration of both positive and negative ions. Benefits of electronegative ion thrusters include the elimination of lifetime-limiting cathodes from the thruster architecture and the ability to generate appreciable thrust from both charge species. While much progress has been made in the development of electronegative ion thruster technology, direct thrust measurements are required to unambiguously demonstrate the efficacy of the concept and support continued development. In the present work, direct thrust measurements of the thrust produced by the MINT (Marshall's Ion-ioN Thruster) are performed using an inverted-pendulum thrust stand in the High-Power Electric Propulsion Laboratory's Vacuum Test Facility-1 at the Georgia Institute of Technology with operating pressures ranging from 4.8 x 10(exp -5) and 5.7 x 10(exp -5) torr. Thrust is recorded while operating with a propellant volumetric mixture ratio of 5:1 argon to nitrogen with total volumetric flow rates of 6, 12, and 24 sccm (0.17, 0.34, and 0.68 mg/s). Plasma is generated using a helical antenna at 13.56 MHz and radio frequency (RF) power levels of 150 and 350 W. The acceleration grid assembly is operated using both sinusoidal and square waveform biases of +/-350 V at frequencies of 4, 10, 25, 125, and 225 kHz. Thrust is recorded for two separate thruster configurations: with and without the magnetic filter. No thrust is discernable during thruster operation without the magnetic filter for any volumetric flow rate, RF forward Power level, or acceleration grid biasing scheme. For the full thruster configuration, with the magnetic filter installed, a brief burst of thrust of approximately 3.75 mN +/- 3 mN of error is observed at the start of grid operation for a volumetric flow rate of 24 sccm at 350 W RF power using a sinusoidal waveform grid bias at 125 kHz and +/- 350 V

  6. Sandbox modelling of sequential thrusting in a mechanically two-layered system and its implications in fold-and-thrust belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Puspendu; Bose, Santanu; Mandal, Nibir

    2016-10-01

    Many fold-and-thrust belts display multi-storied thrust sequences, characterizing a composite architecture of the thrust wedges. Despite dramatic progress in sandbox modelling over the last three decades, our understanding of such composite thrust-wedge mechanics is limited and demands a re-visit to the problem of sequential thrusting in mechanically layered systems. This study offers a new approach to sandbox modelling, designed with a two-layered sandpack simulating a mechanically weak Coulomb layer, resting coherently upon a stronger Coulomb layer. Our experimental models reproduce strikingly similar styles of the multi-storied frontal thrust sequences observed in natural fold-and- thrust belts. The upper weak horizon undergoes sequential thrusting at a high spatial frequency, forming numerous, closely spaced frontal thrusts, whereas the lower strong horizon produces widely spaced thrusts with progressive horizontal shortening. This contrasting thrust progression behaviour gives rise to composite thrust architecture in the layered sandpack. We show the evolution of such composite thrust sequences as a function of frictional strength (μb) at the basal detachment and thickness ratio (Tr) between the weak and strong layers. For any given values of Tr and μb, the two thrust sequences progress at different rates; the closely-spaced, upper thrust sequence advances forelandward at a faster rate than the widely-spaced, lower thrust sequence. Basal friction (μb) has little effects on the vergence of thrusts in the upper weak layer; they verge always towards foreland, irrespective of Tr values. But, the lower strong layer develops back-vergent thrusts when μb is low (∼0.36). In our experiments, closely spaced thrusts in the upper sequence experience intense reactivation due to their interaction with widely spaced thrusts in the lower sequence. The interaction eventually affects the wedge topography, leading to two distinct parts: inner and outer wedges

  7. Multibeam study of the Flores Backarc Thrust Belt, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silver, Eli A.; Breen, Nancy A.; Prasetyo, Hardi; Hussong, Donald M.

    1986-03-01

    Using the SeaMARC II seafloor mapping tool in conjunction with closely spaced seismic reflection profiles, we have mapped a segment of the Flores back arc thrust zone. Structural irregularities along the deformation front of the thrust zone result from changing stratigraphy and basement structure of the lower plate. NE trending faults cutting the outer slope of the Flores basin are easily mapped because they truncate dense drainage patterns obliquely. Mud diapirs, probably indicating elevated fluid pressures, have formed throughout the accretionary wedge but appear to be concentrated (as do back arc thrust earthquakes) at the ends of thrust faults. The overall orientation of the deformation front of the accretionary wedge is 100°, suggesting a NNE sense of thrust motion and supporting an origin of the thrust zone by collision of the arc with Australia rather than by magmatic forcing or gravitational sliding or spreading. Orientations of faults and folds close to the arc are not consistent with the trends of the frontal thrusts, however, and the difference may be due to either different initial orientations or to later rotations of structural features as the accretionary wedge grew.

  8. Thrust and propulsive efficiency from an instructive viewpoint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufman, Richard D.

    2010-09-01

    In a typical engineering or physics curriculum, the momentum equation is used for the determination of jet engine thrust. Even a simple thrust analysis requires a heavy emphasis on mathematics that can cause students and engineers to lose a physical perspective on thrust. This article provides for this physical understanding using only static pressures that act on engine surfaces. Such an alternative, but equivalent, method can offer insights into some special examples of jet engine thrust that contradict commonly held beliefs. One such example is provided by the engine bellmouth that is used for testing jet engines on the ground. The static pressure distribution clearly shows that the engine bellmouth actually experiences forward thrust. Another example is provided by the conic exhaust nozzle that is used at the end of some jet engines. The static pressure distribution shows that the conic nozzle does not experience any forward thrust (although the nozzle increases the overall thrust of an engine through higher pressures upstream of the nozzle). Following these examples, a basis for conceptualizing propulsive efficiency is discussed. This illustrates that it is more efficient to have a smaller acceleration of a large amount of air than a larger acceleration of a smaller amount of air.

  9. Thrust Stand Characterization of the NASA Evolutionary Xenon Thruster (NEXT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diamant, Kevin D.; Pollard, James E.; Crofton, Mark W.; Patterson, Michael J.; Soulas, George C.

    2010-01-01

    Direct thrust measurements have been made on the NASA Evolutionary Xenon Thruster (NEXT) ion engine using a standard pendulum style thrust stand constructed specifically for this application. Values have been obtained for the full 40-level throttle table, as well as for a few off-nominal operating conditions. Measurements differ from the nominal NASA throttle table 10 (TT10) values by 3.1 percent at most, while at 30 throttle levels (TLs) the difference is less than 2.0 percent. When measurements are compared to TT10 values that have been corrected using ion beam current density and charge state data obtained at The Aerospace Corporation, they differ by 1.2 percent at most, and by 1.0 percent or less at 37 TLs. Thrust correction factors calculated from direct thrust measurements and from The Aerospace Corporation s plume data agree to within measurement error for all but one TL. Thrust due to cold flow and "discharge only" operation has been measured, and analytical expressions are presented which accurately predict thrust based on thermal thrust generation mechanisms.

  10. Structural style of the Marathon thrust belt, West Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickman, Robert G.; Varga, Robert J.; Altany, Robert M.

    2009-09-01

    The Marathon portion of the Ouachita thrust belt consists of a highly deformed allochthonous wedge of Cambrian-Pennsylvanian slope strata (Marathon facies) that was transported to the northwest and emplaced over Pennsylvanian foredeep sediments. The foredeep strata in turn overlie early-middle Paleozoic shelfal sediments which are deformed by late Paleozoic basement-involved reverse faults. The Dugout Creek thrust is the basal thrust of the allochthon. Shortening in this sheet and overlying sheets is ˜80%. Steep imbricate faults link the Dugout Creek thrust to upper level detachments forming complex duplex zones. Progressive thrusting and shortening within the allochthon folded the upper level detachments and associated thrust sheets. The Caballos Novaculite is the most competent unit within the Marathon facies and controlled development of prominent detachment folds. Deeper imbricate sheets composed of the Late Pennsylvanian foredeep strata, and possibly early-middle Paleozoic shelfal sediments developed concurrently with emplacement of the Marathon allochthon and folded the overlying allochthon. Following termination of thrusting in the earliest Permian, subsidence and deposition shifted northward to the Delaware, Midland and Val Verde foreland basins.

  11. Interseismic coupling on the main Himalayan thrust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, V. L.; Avouac, J. P.

    2015-07-01

    We determine the slip rate and pattern of interseismic coupling on the Main Himalayan Thrust along the entire Himalayan arc based on a compilation of geodetic, interferometric synthetic aperture radar, and microseismicity data. We show that convergence is perpendicular to the arc and increases eastwards from 13.3 ± 1.7 mm/yr to 21.2 ± 2.0 mm/yr. These rates are comparable to geological and geomorphic estimates, indicating an essentially elastic geodetic surface strain. The interseismic uplift rate predicted from the coupling model closely mimics the topography, suggesting that a small percentage of the interseismic strain is permanent. We find that the fault is fully locked along its complete length over about 100 km width. We don't find any resolvable aseismic barrier that could affect the seismic segmentation of the arc and limit the along-strike propagation of seismic ruptures. The moment deficit builds up at a rate of 15.1 ± 1 × 1019 N m/yr for the entire length of the Himalaya.

  12. Cretaceous biostratigraphy in the Wyoming thrust belt.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nichols, D.J.; Jacobson, S.R.

    1982-01-01

    In the Cretaceous section of the thrust belt, fossils are especially useful for dating and correlating repetitive facies of different ages in structurally complex terrain. The biostratigraphic zonation for the region is based on megafossils (chiefly ammonites) , which permit accurate dating and correlation of outcrop sections, and which have been calibrated with the radiometric time scale for the Western Interior. Molluscan and vertebrate zone fossils are difficult to obtain from the subsurface, however, and ammonites are restricted to rocks of marine origin. Palynomorphs (plant microfossils) have proven to be the most valuable fossils in the subsurface because they can be recovered from drill cuttings. Palynomorphs also are found in both marine and nonmarine rocks and can be used for correlation between facies. Stratigraphic ranges of selected Cretaceous marine and nonmarine palynomorphs in previously designated reference sections in Fossil Basin, Wyoming are correlated with the occurrence of ammonites and other zone fossils in the same sections. These correlations can be related to known isotopic ages, and they contribute to the calibration of palynomorph ranges in the Cretaceous of the Western Interior. -from Authors

  13. Electronegative Gas Thruster - Direct Thrust Measurement Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dankanich, John (Principal Investigator); Aanesland, Ane; Polzin, Kurt; Walker, Mitchell

    2015-01-01

    This effort is an international collaboration and academic partnership to mature an innovative electric propulsion (EP) thruster concept to TRL 3 through direct thrust measurement. The initial target application is for Small Satellites, but can be extended to higher power. The Plasma propulsion with Electronegative GASES (PEGASES) concept simplifies ion thruster operation, eliminates a neutralizer requirement and should yield longer life capabilities and lower cost implementation over conventional gridded ion engines. The basic proof-of concept has been demonstrated and matured to TRL 2 over the past several years by researchers at the Laboratoire de Physique des Plasma in France. Due to the low maturity of the innovation, there are currently no domestic investments in electronegative gas thrusters anywhere within NASA, industry or academia. The end product of this Center Innovation Fund (CIF) project will be a validation of the proof-of-concept, maturation to TRL 3 and technology assessment report to summarize the potential for the PEGASES concept to supplant the incumbent technology. Information exchange with the foreign national will be one-way with the exception of the test results. Those test results will first go through a standard public release ITAR/export control review, and the results will be presented in a public technical forum, and the results will be presented in a public technical forum.

  14. Propeller thrust analysis using Prandtl's lifting line theory, a comparison between the experimental thrust and the thrust predicted by Prandtl's lifting line theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kesler, Steven R.

    The lifting line theory was first developed by Prandtl and was used primarily on analysis of airplane wings. Though the theory is about one hundred years old, it is still used in the initial calculations to find the lift of a wing. The question that guided this thesis was, "How close does Prandtl's lifting line theory predict the thrust of a propeller?" In order to answer this question, an experiment was designed that measured the thrust of a propeller for different speeds. The measured thrust was compared to what the theory predicted. In order to do this experiment and analysis, a propeller needed to be used. A walnut wood ultralight propeller was chosen that had a 1.30 meter (51 inches) length from tip to tip. In this thesis, Prandtl's lifting line theory was modified to account for the different incoming velocity depending on the radial position of the airfoil. A modified equation was used to reflect these differences. A working code was developed based on this modified equation. A testing rig was built that allowed the propeller to be rotated at high speeds while measuring the thrust. During testing, the rotational speed of the propeller ranged from 13-43 rotations per second. The thrust from the propeller was measured at different speeds and ranged from 16-33 Newton's. The test data were then compared to the theoretical results obtained from the lifting line code. A plot in Chapter 5 (the results section) shows the theoretical vs. actual thrust for different rotational speeds. The theory over predicted the actual thrust of the propeller. Depending on the rotational speed, the error was: at low speeds 36%, at low to moderate speeds 84%, and at high speeds the error increased to 195%. Different reasons for these errors are discussed.

  15. An Autonomous Onboard Targeting Algorithm Using Finite Thrust Maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scarritt, Sara K.; Marchand, Belinda G.; Weeks, Michael W.

    2009-01-01

    In earlier investigations, the adaptation and implementation of a modified two-level corrections process as the onboard targeting algorithm for the Trans-Earth Injection phase of Orion is presented. The objective of that targeting algorithm is to generate the times of ignition and magnitudes of the required maneuvers such that the desired state at entry interface is achieved. In an actual onboard flight software implementation, these times of ignition and maneuvers are relayed onto Flight Control for command and execution. Although this process works well when the burn durations or burn arcs are small, this might not be the case during a contingency situation when lower thrust engines are employed to perform the maneuvers. Therefore, a new version of the modified two-level corrections process is formulated to handle the case of finite burn arcs. This paper presents the development and formulation of that finite burn modified two-level corrections process which can again be used as an onboard targeting algorithm for the Trans-Earth Injection phase of Orion. Additionally, performance results and a comparison between the two methods are presented. The finite burn two-level corrector formulation presented here ensures the entry constraints at entry interface are still met without violating the available fuel budget, while still accounting for much longer burn times in its design.

  16. Thrust stand for high-power electric propulsion devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haag, T. W.

    1991-05-01

    A thrust stand for use with magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thrusters operated at powers up to 250 kW steady state has been built and tested. The stand was based on an inverted pendulum configuration which resulted in large displacements and high resolution. Up to 50 mm of deflection was observed under a force of 5 N. This large range of displacement significantly reduced the effects of facility induced vibrations on thrust measurements. A remotely operated system was provided for in situ calibration of the thrust stand prior to and immediately after data were obtained. Calibrations showed that thrust measurements were linear and repeatable to within a fraction of 1%. Structural distortions of the vacuum facility due to pumpdown were detected with an inclinometer located in the thrust stand base. Slope deviations as small as 10 arcsec could be compensated using a remotely controlled leveling motor. Early problems with magnetically induced tares caused by the thruster discharge current were reduced by rerouting high-current cables to decrease stray fields. Tares due to discharge current were on the order of 26 mN at 3000 A, and those due to an applied field current were 63 mN at 1400 A. The thrust stand was used with a water-cooled, applied field, steady-state MPD device at power levels up to 125 kW. Hot thruster firings as long as 1 h were performed. By precisely maintaining a level thrust stand base, thermal drift was held to about 2% of the full scale reading over this period. The remaining thermal drift could be subtracted from the thrust measurement to further reduce systematic error. Tares caused by the applied magnetic field were similarly removed. By subtracting tabulated discharge current magnetic tares, thrust measurement uncertainty was reduced to approximately 2% of the measured value.

  17. Electric sail control mode for amplified transverse thrust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toivanen, P.; Janhunen, P.; Envall, J.

    2015-01-01

    The electric solar wind sail produces thrust by centrifugally spanned high voltage tethers interacting with the solar wind protons. The sail attitude can be controlled and attitude maneuvers are possible by tether voltage modulation synchronous with the sail rotation. Especially, the sail can be inclined with respect to the solar wind direction to obtain transverse thrust to change the osculating orbit angular momentum. Such an inclination has to be maintained by a continual control voltage modulation. Consequently, the tether voltage available for the thrust is less than the maximum voltage provided by the power system. Using a spherical pendulum as a model for a single rotating tether, we derive analytical estimations for the control efficiency for two separate sail control modes. One is a continuous control modulation that corresponds to strictly planar tether tip motion. The other is an on-off modulation with the tether tip moving along a closed loop on a saddle surface. The novel on-off mode is introduced here to both amplify the transverse thrust and reduce the power consumption. During the rotation cycle, the maximum voltage is applied to the tether only over two thrusting arcs when most of the transverse thrust is produced. In addition to the transverse thrust, we obtain the thrusting angle and electric power consumption for the two control modes. It is concluded that while the thrusting angle is about half of the sail inclination for the continuous modulation it approximately equals to the inclination angle for the on-off modulation. The efficiency of the on-off mode is emphasized when power consumption is considered, and the on-off mode can be used to improve the propulsive acceleration through the reduced power system mass.

  18. Powered Descent Guidance with General Thrust-Pointing Constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carson, John M., III; Acikmese, Behcet; Blackmore, Lars

    2013-01-01

    The Powered Descent Guidance (PDG) algorithm and software for generating Mars pinpoint or precision landing guidance profiles has been enhanced to incorporate thrust-pointing constraints. Pointing constraints would typically be needed for onboard sensor and navigation systems that have specific field-of-view requirements to generate valid ground proximity and terrain-relative state measurements. The original PDG algorithm was designed to enforce both control and state constraints, including maximum and minimum thrust bounds, avoidance of the ground or descent within a glide slope cone, and maximum speed limits. The thrust-bound and thrust-pointing constraints within PDG are non-convex, which in general requires nonlinear optimization methods to generate solutions. The short duration of Mars powered descent requires guaranteed PDG convergence to a solution within a finite time; however, nonlinear optimization methods have no guarantees of convergence to the global optimal or convergence within finite computation time. A lossless convexification developed for the original PDG algorithm relaxed the non-convex thrust bound constraints. This relaxation was theoretically proven to provide valid and optimal solutions for the original, non-convex problem within a convex framework. As with the thrust bound constraint, a relaxation of the thrust-pointing constraint also provides a lossless convexification that ensures the enhanced relaxed PDG algorithm remains convex and retains validity for the original nonconvex problem. The enhanced PDG algorithm provides guidance profiles for pinpoint and precision landing that minimize fuel usage, minimize landing error to the target, and ensure satisfaction of all position and control constraints, including thrust bounds and now thrust-pointing constraints.

  19. Role of detachments and thrust kinematics in Structural evolution of Kohat and Potwar fold thrust belt in Pakistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghani, Humaad; Zeilinger, Gerold; Sobel, Edward; Heidarzadeh, Ghasem

    2016-04-01

    The Kohat and Potwar fold thrust belts in Pakistan represent the outermost external zone of the Himalayan fold and thrust system. The Main Boundary thrust marks their northern extent, showing that they are genetically linked; however, both exhibit a distinct contrast between the structural style at the surface and subsurface. This contrast becomes more conspicuous at the leading edge of the thrust belt where the Potwar allochothon extends further south, linked to Kohat in the north via an active strike-slip fault. Previous workers explained the structural evolution of the two belts separately, disregarding the influence of similar fold and thrusts developed in both belts. This research focuses on the preparation of a 3D structural model at the boundary of the two thrust belts to understand similarities and differences in their structural style and evolution. The model is constrained by integrating field, seismic and well data for better subsurface interpretation. Cross sections show that Potwar evolved on thrust faults originating from a basal detachment in Precambrian (pC) salt and terminating in Miocene Molasse forming duplexes of pre Himalayan strata. To the south, the Potwar allochothon is glided over a salt detachment with rare internal deformation toward its leading edge, forming fault bend fold thrust structure known as Salt range. The structural evolution towards the west in Kohat results from deformation on multiple detachment horizons at the pC salt, Eocene evaporites and Miocene Molasse. Disharmonic folding over Eocene evaporites is evident from their presence in the cores of outcropping folds. In the subsurface, closely spaced thrusts cut up section from basal detachment terminates in Eocene evaporites forming duplex in northern part of area. In south change of lithological facies from evaporites to limestone shift detachment level upward in to molasse strata which resemble structural style in northern Potwar. Thrusts at the surface evolved from the

  20. Managing Momentum on the Dawn Low Thrust Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Brett A.; Vanelli, Charles A.; Swenka, Edward R.

    2009-01-01

    Dawn is low-thrust interplanetary spacecraft enroute to the asteroids Vesta and Ceres in an effort to better understand the early creation of the solar system. After launch in September 2007, the spacecraft will flyby Mars in February 2009 before arriving at Vesta in summer of 2011 and Ceres in early 2015. Three solar electric ion-propulsion engines are used to provide the primary thrust for the Dawn spacecraft. Ion engines produce a very small but very efficient force, and therefore must be thrusting almost continuously to realize the necessary change in velocity to reach Vesta and Ceres.

  1. Multiphysics Thrust Chamber Modeling for Nuclear Thermal Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ten-See; Cheng, Gary; Chen, Yen-Sen

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this effort is to develop an efficient and accurate thermo-fluid computational methodology to predict environments for a solid-core, nuclear thermal engine thrust chamber. The computational methodology is based on an unstructured-grid, pressure-based computational fluid dynamics formulation. A two-pronged approach is employed in this effort: A detailed thermo-fluid analysis on a multi-channel flow element for mid-section corrosion investigation; and a global modeling of the thrust chamber to understand the effect of heat transfer on thrust performance. Preliminary results on both aspects are presented.

  2. Dual-action gas thrust bearing for improving load capacity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Etsion, I.

    1976-01-01

    The principle of utilizing hydrodynamic effects in diverging films to improve the load carrying capacity in gas thrust bearings is discussed. A new concept of a dual action bearing based on that principle is described and analyzed. The potential of the new bearing is demonstrated both analytically for an infinitely long slider and by numerical solution for a flat sector shaped thrust bearing. It is shown that the dual action bearing can extend substantially the range of load carrying capacity in gas lubricated thrust bearings and can improve their efficiency.

  3. Characteristics of thrust fault imbrication near the frontal edge of the Blue Ridge thrust sheet, Buffalo Mountain, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Duddy, M.M.; Woodward, N.B.

    1985-01-01

    The Buffalo Mountain thrust sheet, located along the western margin of the Blue Ridge in northeastern Tennessee, provides an excellent opportunity to examine transitional structural styles and deformation mechanisms between the Valley and Ridge and Blue Ridge. Previous interpretation suggests that, because of pre-fault tilting, thrust faults within the Buffalo Mountain complex cut down stratigraphic section. Geometric data from the present study indicate, however, that the thrust faults cut up section with stratigraphic separations of up to 16,500'. Footwall and hanging wall bedding orientations reveal a stair-step thrust geometry; the Unicoi Fm. (basal Chilhowee Gp. quartzite) is a hanging wall flat, and the Knox Gp. (Cambro-Ordovician carbonate) is a footwall ramp. Ductile and brittle deformation mechanisms are represented by mesofabric elements. Important deformation mechanisms and elements include: flexural slip and flexural flow folding styles, pressure solution cleavage, extensional and contractional fractures, quartz filled tensional fractures and cataclastic fault zones. Although previous workers have determined that thrusting within the Blue Ridge occurs in an out-of-sequence pattern, the Buffalo Mountain thrust complex provides an example of in-sequence thrusting. Thus, based on this example, deformation styles and mechanisms within the Blue Ridge appear to be similar to Valley and Ridge deformation styles and mechanisms.

  4. Interplay of thrust, back-thrust, strike-slip and salt tectonics in a fold and thrust belt system: an example from Zakynthos Island, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelilidis, A.; Papatheodorou, G.; Maravelis, A. G.; Christodoulou, D.; Tserolas, P.; Fakiris, E.; Dimas, X.; Georgiou, N.; Ferentinos, G.

    2016-10-01

    The southwestern flank of the Hellenic fold and thrust belt, situated along the southern edge of the Dinarides-Albanides-Hellenides continental convergent zone, was examined for reconstructing the tectonic deformation. This investigation presents an integrated study of onshore sedimentological and structural analyses, as well as offshore seismic lines, across the Pliocene-Pleistocene sedimentary succession in Zakynthos Island. Back-thrust faults, using the Triassic evaporites as decollement surface, during the Pliocene, and coeval diapiric intrusions formed three sub-basins on the hangingwall of the Kalamaki back-thrust fault. This interaction is responsible for the growth of the Skopos Mountain and the soft sediment deformation that formed synclines and slumps, respectively. Back-thrust and strike-slip faults were active during the early Pleistocene, and diapiric intrusions modified the bathymetry on the sea floor, giving rise to slumps and recumbent folds. At least five events of synsedimentary diapiric intrusions have been recognized and are marked by five slump horizons. During the Holocene, the diapiric intrusions between the Kalamaki back-thrust and the Vrachionas anticline could be either related to normal faults or gravitationally driven.

  5. Development of sputtered techniques for thrust chambers, task 1. [evaluation of filler materials for regeneratively cooled thrust chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullaly, J. R.; Schmid, T. E.; Hecht, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    Filler materials proposed for use in the sputter fabrication regeneratively cooled thrust chambers were evaluated. Low melting castable alloys, CERROBEND. CERROCAST, and CERROTRU, slurry applied SERMETEL 481 and flame-sprayed aluminum were investigated as filler materials. Sputter deposition from a cylindrical cathode inverted magnestron was used to apply an OFHC copper closeout layer to filled OFHC copper ribbed-wall cylindrical substrates. The sputtered closeout layer structure was evaluated with respect to filler material contamination, predeposition machining and finishing operations, and deposition parameters. The application of aluminum by flame-spraying resulted in excessiver filler porosity. Though the outgassing from this porosity was found to be detrimental to the closeout layer structure, bond strengths in excess of 10,500 psi were achieved. Removal of the aluminum from the grooves was readily accomplished by leaching in a 7.0 molar solution of sodium hydroxide at 353 K. Of the other filler materials evaluated, CERROTRU was found to be the most suitable material with respect to completely filling the ribbed-wall cylinders and vacuum system compatibility. However, bond contamination resulted in low closeout layer bond strength with the CERROTRU filler. CERROBEND, CERROCAST, and SERMETEL 481 were found to be unacceptable as filler materials.

  6. Test Plan. GCPS Task 4, subtask 4.2 thrust structure development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenberg, H. S.

    1994-09-01

    The Single Stage To Orbit (SSTO) vehicle is designed to lift off from a vertical position, go into orbit, return to earth for a horizontal landing, and be reusable for the next mission. (NASA baseline only) In order to meet its performance goals, the SSTO relies on light weight structure and the use of 8 tri-propellant engines. These engines are mounted to the thrust structure. This test plan addresses selection of the material for this structure, and the integrity of the design through testing of elements and a full-scale subcomponent. This test plan supports the development of the design for an advanced composite thrust structure for a Single Stage to Orbit manned, heavy launch vehicle. The thrust structure is designed to transmit very high thrust loads from the engines to the rest of the vehicle (see Figure 1 ). The thrust structure will also be used for primary attachment of the twin vertical tails and possibly act as the aft attach point for the wing. The combination of high loading, high vibration, long service life and high acoustic environments will need to be evaluated by tests. To minimize design risk, a building block approach will be used. We will first screen materials to determine which materials show the most promise for this application. Factors in this screening will be the suitability of these materials for chosen design concepts, particularly concerning specific strength, environmental compatibility and applicability to fabrication processes. Next we will characterize two material systems that will be used in the design; the characterization will allow us to generate preliminary design data that will be used for the analysis. Element testing will be performed to evaluate critical structural locations under load. Final testing on the full scale test article will be performed to verify the design and to demonstrate predictability of the analysis. Additionally, risks associated with fabricating full scale thrust structures will be reduced through

  7. Test Plan. GCPS Task 4, subtask 4.2 thrust structure development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenberg, H. S.

    1994-01-01

    The Single Stage To Orbit (SSTO) vehicle is designed to lift off from a vertical position, go into orbit, return to earth for a horizontal landing, and be reusable for the next mission. (NASA baseline only) In order to meet its performance goals, the SSTO relies on light weight structure and the use of 8 tri-propellant engines. These engines are mounted to the thrust structure. This test plan addresses selection of the material for this structure, and the integrity of the design through testing of elements and a full-scale subcomponent. This test plan supports the development of the design for an advanced composite thrust structure for a Single Stage to Orbit manned, heavy launch vehicle. The thrust structure is designed to transmit very high thrust loads from the engines to the rest of the vehicle (see Figure 1 ). The thrust structure will also be used for primary attachment of the twin vertical tails and possibly act as the aft attach point for the wing. The combination of high loading, high vibration, long service life and high acoustic environments will need to be evaluated by tests. To minimize design risk, a building block approach will be used. We will first screen materials to determine which materials show the most promise for this application. Factors in this screening will be the suitability of these materials for chosen design concepts, particularly concerning specific strength, environmental compatibility and applicability to fabrication processes. Next we will characterize two material systems that will be used in the design; the characterization will allow us to generate preliminary design data that will be used for the analysis. Element testing will be performed to evaluate critical structural locations under load. Final testing on the full scale test article will be performed to verify the design and to demonstrate predictability of the analysis. Additionally, risks associated with fabricating full scale thrust structures will be reduced through

  8. Investigation of Pneumatic Inlet and Diffuser Blowing on a Ducted Fan Propulsor in Static Thrust Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kondor, Shayne; Englar, Robert J.; Lee, Warren J.

    2003-01-01

    , to generate circulation in the sense of an accelerating duct design. The intent is to improve static thrust performance of a ducted fan tailored for high speed axial flight, while at the same time significantly reduce the pressure signature on the ground plane. Circulation control on the fan shroud is achieved by the Coanda effect.

  9. 53. THRUST SECTION HEATER AND GASEOUS NITROGEN PURGE CONTROLS ON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    53. THRUST SECTION HEATER AND GASEOUS NITROGEN PURGE CONTROLS ON EAST SIDE OF LAUNCH DECK. LAUNCHER IN BACKGROUND. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 East, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  10. The Development of NASA's Low Thrust Trajectory Tool Set

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sims, Jon; Artis, Gwen; Kos, Larry

    2006-01-01

    Highly efficient electric propulsion systems can enable interesting classes of missions; unfortunately, they provide only a limited amount of thrust. Low-thrust (LT) trajectories are much more difficult to design than impulsive-type (chemical propulsion) trajectories. Previous low-thrust (LT) trajectory optimization software was often difficult to use, often had difficulties converging, and was somewhat limited in the types of missions it could support. A new state-of-the-art suite (toolbox) of low-thrust (LT) tools along with improved algorithms and methods was developed by NASA's MSFC, JPL, JSC, and GRC to address the needs of our customers to help foster technology development in the areas of advanced LT propulsion systems, and to facilitate generation of similar results by different analysts.

  11. Thrust Characteristics of Water Rocket and Their Improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Rikio; Tomita, Nobuyuki; Takemae, Toshiaki

    The propulsive characteristics of water rockets are analyzed theoretically and experimentally. The unsteady thrust force acting on a PET bottle and the air pressure inside the bottle are measured simultaneously by the thrust test stand we have developed. The semi-empirical thrust history is obtained utilizing the air pressure history and it is compared with the measured thrust history. The results show qualitative agreement. The observation of the flow inside bottle by a high-speed video camera shows that the air precedes water when it is about to be discharged entirely. We have developed a flow regulator attached to the nozzle cap to reduce the precursor air discharge that is considered as a result of the swirling flow inside the bottle. The experimental results show that the air discharge and the body vibration are suppressed effectively.

  12. Development of pneumatic thrust-deflecting powered-lift systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Englar, R. J.; Nichols, J. H., Jr.; Harris, M. J.; Eppel, J. C.; Shovlin, M. D.

    1986-01-01

    Improvements introduced into the Circulation Control Wing/Upper Surface Blowing (CCW/USB) STOL concept (Harris et al., 1982) are described along with results of the full-scale static ground tests and model-scale wind tunnel investigations. Tests performed on the full-scale pneumatic thrust-deflecting system installed on the NASA QSRA aircraft have demonstrated that, relative to the original baseline configuration, a doubling of incremental thrust deflection due to blowing resulted from improvements that increased the blowing span and momentum, as well as from variations in blowing slot height and geometry of the trailing edge. A CCW/Over the Wing model has been built and tested, which was shown to be equivalent to the CCW/USB system in terms of pneumatic thrust deflection and lift generation, while resolving the problem of cruise thrust loss due to exhaust scrubbing on the wing upper surface.

  13. Fourth Programme Cycle in Population Education Addresses New Thrusts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Population Education Newsletter and Forum, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the developments of the Regional Population Education Program of the Unesco Principal Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific during the period 1984-87. Discusses new projects, technical assistance activities, national capabilities, and new program thrusts. (TW)

  14. Low-thrust solar electric propulsion navigation simulation program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagar, H. J.; Eller, T. J.

    1973-01-01

    An interplanetary low-thrust, solar electric propulsion mission simulation program suitable for navigation studies is presented. The mathematical models for trajectory simulation, error compensation, and tracking motion are described. The languages, input-output procedures, and subroutines are included.

  15. Style and timing of frontal structures, thrust belt, Central Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Lawton, T.F.

    1985-07-01

    The Cordilleran fold and thrust belt in central Utah may be divided into a western belt of Precambrian to lower Mesozoic strata shortened above ramp-style thrust faults and an eastern belt of folded middle to upper Mesozoic rocks. Shortening in the eastern foldbelt occurred above a bedding-plane thrust fault system that terminates within a thick section of Jurassic shale, siltstone, and anhydrite. Demonstrable synthrusting deposits within the region are late Early to Late Cretaceous in age. The age of synorogenic deposits and structural relations of postorogenic strata indicate that deformation was complete by the close of the Cretaceous or early Paleocene, and support a thrust mechanism for much of the folding in the region.

  16. A lifting surface theory for thrust augmenting ejectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bevilaqua, P. M.

    1977-01-01

    The circulation theory of airfoil lift has been applied to calculate the performance of thrust augmenting ejectors. The ejector shroud is considered to be 'flying' in the secondary velocity field induced by the entrainment of the primary jet, so that the augmenting thrust is viewed as analogous to the lift on an airfoil. Vortex lattice methods are utilized to compute the thrust augmentation from the force on the flaps. The augmentation is shown to be a function of the length and shape of the flaps, as well as their position and orientation. Predictions of this new theory are compared with the results of classical methods of calculating the augmentation by integration of the stream thrust.

  17. Control-Volume Analysis Of Thrust-Augmenting Ejectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drummond, Colin K.

    1990-01-01

    New method of analysis of transient flow in thrust-augmenting ejector based on control-volume formulation of governing equations. Considered as potential elements of propulsion subsystems of short-takeoff/vertical-landing airplanes.

  18. Aerodynamics of thrust vectoring by Navier-Stokes solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tseng, Jing-Biau; Lan, C. Edward

    1991-01-01

    Induced aerodynamics from thrust vectoring are investigated by a computational fluid dynamic method. A thin-layer Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes code with multiblock capability is used. Jet properties are specified on the nozzle exit plane to simulate the jet momentum. Results for a rectangular jet in a cross flow are compared with data to verify the code. Further verification of the calculation is made by comparing the numerical results with transonic data for a wing-body combination. Additional calculations were performed to elucidate the following thrust vectoring effects: the thrust vectoring effect on shock and expansion waves, induced effects on nearby surfaces, and the thrust vectoring effect on the leading edge vortex.

  19. Direct thrust force measurement of pulse detonation engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahid, Mazlan Abdul; Faiz, M. Z. Ahmad; Saqr, Khalid M.

    2012-06-01

    In this paper we present the result of High-Speed Reacting Flow Laboratory (HiREF) pulse detonation engine (PDE) experimental study on direct thrust measurement. The thrust force generated by the repetitive detonation from a 50 mm inner diameter and 600 mm length tube was directly measured using load cell. Shchelkin spiral was used as an accelerator for the Deflagration to Detonation Transition (DDT) phenomenon. Propane-oxygen at stoichiometric condition was used as the combustible fuel-air mixture for the PDE. The PDE was operated at the operation frequency of 3Hz during the test. The amount of thrust force that was measured during the test reaching up to 70N. These values of thrust force were found to be fluctuating and its combustion phenomenon has been analyzed and discussed.

  20. A double pendulum plasma thrust balance and thrust measurement at a tandem mirror exhaust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, T. F.; Liu, Ping; Chang-Díaz, F. R.; Lander, Harvey; Childs, R. A.; Becker, H. D.; Fairfax, S. A.

    1995-09-01

    For the purpose of measuring the plasma momentum flux in a plasma system, a highly sensitive and precision balance has been developed. It can measure a force, an impulse, or thrust as low as 0.1 mN free of mechanical noise, electrical and magnetic pickups. The double pendulum system consists of two parallel conducting plates. One or both of the plates can be suspended by needles. The needle suspended plate (or plates) can swing freely with negligible friction because of the sharp points of the needles. When one of the plates is impacted by an impulse it will swing relatively to the fixed plate or other movable plate. The capacitance between the plates changes as a result of such a motion. The change of capacitance as a function of time is recorded as an oscillating voltage signal. The amplitude of such a voltage signal is proportional to the impacting force or impulse. The proportional factor can be calibrated. The forces can thus be read out from the recorded value of the voltage. The equation of motion for the pendulum system has been solved analytically. The circuit equation for the electronic measurement system has been formulated and solved numerically. Using this balance the thrust at the exhaust of a Tandem Mirror plasma thruster has been measured. The analytical solution of the overall characteristics agrees greatly with the measurement.

  1. A double pendulum plasma thrust balance and thrust measurement at a tandem mirror exhaust

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, T.F.; Liu, P.; Chang-Diaz, F.R.; Lander, H.; Childs, R.A.; Becker, H.D.; Fairfax, S.A.

    1995-09-01

    For the purpose of measuring the plasma momentum flux in a plasma system, a highly sensitive and precision balance has been developed. It can measure a force, an impulse, or thrust as low as 0.1 mN free of mechanical noise, electrical and magnetic pickups. The double pendulum system consists of two parallel conducting plates. One or both of the plates can be suspended by needles. The needle suspended plate (or plates) can swing freely with negligible friction because of the sharp points of the needles. When one of the plates is impacted by an impulse it will swing relatively to the fixed plate or other movable plate. The capacitance between the plates changes as a result of such a motion. The change of capacitance as a function of time is recorded as an oscillating voltage signal. The amplitude of such a voltage signal is proportional to the impacting force or impulse. The proportional factor can be calibrated. The forces can thus be read out from the recorded value of the voltage. The equation of motion for the pendulum system has been solved analytically. The circuit equation for the electronic measurement system has been formulated and solved numerically. Using this balance the thrust at the exhaust of a Tandem Mirror plasma thruster has been measured. The analytical solution of the overall characteristics agrees greatly with the measurement. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  2. Lower extremity thrust and non-thrust joint mobilization for patellofemoral pain syndrome: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Brad G; Simon, Corey B

    2014-01-01

    A 40-year old female presented to physical therapy with a one-year history of insidious right anteromedial and anterolateral knee pain. Additionally, the patient had a history of multiple lateral ankle sprains bilaterally, the last sprain occurring on the right ankle 1 year prior to the onset of knee pain. The patient was evaluated and given a physical therapy diagnosis of patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS), with associated talocrural and tibiofemoral joint hypomobility limiting ankle dorsiflexion and knee extension, respectively. Treatment included a high-velocity low amplitude thrust manipulation to the talocrural joint, which helped restore normal ankle dorsiflexion range of motion. The patient also received tibiofemoral joint non-thrust manual therapy to regain normal knee extension mobility prior to implementing further functional progression exercises to her home program (HEP). This case report highlights the importance of a detailed evaluation of knee and ankle joint mobility in patients presenting with anterior knee pain. Further, manual physical therapy to the lower extremity was found to be successful in restoring normal movement patterns and pain-free function in a patient with chronic anterior knee pain. PMID:24976753

  3. Acoustically shielded exhaust system for high thrust jet engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carey, John P. (Inventor); Lee, Robert (Inventor); Majjigi, Rudramuni K. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A flade exhaust nozzle for a high thrust jet engine is configured to form an acoustic shield around the core engine exhaust flowstream while supplementing engine thrust during all flight conditions, particularly during takeoff. The flade airflow is converted from an annular 360.degree. flowstream to an arcuate flowstream extending around the lower half of the core engine exhaust flowstream so as to suppress exhaust noise directed at the surrounding community.

  4. Recent advances in low-thrust propulsion technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, James R.

    1988-01-01

    The NASA low-thrust propulsion technology program is aimed at providing high performance options to a broad class of near-term and future missions. Major emphases of the program are on storable and hydrogen/oxygen low-thrust chemical, low-power (auxiliary) electrothermal, and high-power electric propulsion. This paper represents the major accomplishments of the program and discusses their impact.

  5. The Selection of Propellers for High Thrust at Low Airspeed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conway, Robert N.; Biermann, David

    1941-01-01

    Problem of improving thrust at low speeds is primarily one of reducing angle of attack of operation of sections to improve L/D or reducing blade helix angle. An analysis, based on recent propeller data, is presented for determining improvements in thrust or efficiency which could be obtained by increased number of blades, increased blade width, increased diameter, dual rotation, and two-speed gearing. All methods were found very effective, particularly two-speed gearing.

  6. Development of sputtered high temperature coatings for thrust chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Busch, R.; Bayne, M. A.

    1976-01-01

    Adherent insulating coatings were developed for thrust chamber service. The coatings consisted of nickel and a ceramic, and were graded in composition from pure nickel at the thrust chamber wall to pure ceramic at the coating surface. The coatings were deposited by rf sputtering from a target with a reversed composition gradient, which was produced by plasma spraying powder mixtures. The effect of deposition parameters on coating characteristics and adherence is discussed.

  7. Anomalous Thrust Production from an RF Test Device Measured on a Low-Thrust Torsion Pendulum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brady, David; White, Harold G.; March, Paul; Lawrence, James T.; Davies, Frank J.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the eight-day August 2013 test campaign designed to investigate and demonstrate viability of using classical magnetoplasmadynamics to obtain a propulsive momentum transfer via the quantum vacuum virtual plasma. This paper will not address the physics of the quantum vacuum plasma thruster, but instead will describe the test integration, test operations, and the results obtained from the test campaign. Approximately 30-50 micro-Newtons of thrust were recorded from an electric propulsion test article consisting primarily of a radio frequency (RF) resonant cavity excited at approximately 935 megahertz. Testing was performed on a low-thrust torsion pendulum that is capable of detecting force at a single-digit micronewton level, within a stainless steel vacuum chamber with the door closed but at ambient atmospheric pressure. Several different test configurations were used, including two different test articles as well as a reversal of the test article orientation. In addition, the test article was replaced by an RF load to verify that the force was not being generated by effects not associated with the test article. The two test articles were designed by Cannae LLC of Doylestown, Pennsylvania. The torsion pendulum was designed, built, and operated by Eagleworks Laboratories at the NASA Johnson Space Center of Houston, Texas. Approximately six days of test integration were required, followed by two days of test operations, during which, technical issues were discovered and resolved. Integration of the two test articles and their supporting equipment was performed in an iterative fashion between the test bench and the vacuum chamber. In other words, the test article was tested on the bench, then moved to the chamber, then moved back as needed to resolve issues. Manual frequency control was required throughout the test. Thrust was observed on both test articles, even though one of the test articles was designed with the expectation that it would not

  8. An Experimental/Modeling Study of Jet Attachment during Counterflow Thrust Vectoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strykowski, Paul J.

    1997-01-01

    Recent studies have shown the applicability of vectoring rectangular jets using asymmetrically applied counterflow in the presence of a short collar. This novel concept has applications in the aerospace industry where counterflow can be used to vector the thrust of a jet's exhaust, shortening take-off and landing distances and enhancing in-flight maneuverability of the aircraft. Counterflow thrust vectoring, 'CFTV' is desirable due to its fast time response, low thrust loss, and absence of moving parts. However, implementation of a CFTV system is only possible if bistable jet attachment can be prevented. This can be achieved by properly designing the geometry of the collar. An analytical model is developed herein to predict the conditions under which a two-dimensional jet will attach to an offset curved wall. Results from this model are then compared with experiment; for various jet exit Mach numbers, collar offset distances, and radii of curvature. Their excellent correlation permits use of the model as a tool for designing a CFTV system.

  9. Study of ejector geometry on thrust augmentation for pulse detonation engine ejector systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shehadeh, Ra'fat

    Pulse detonation engine (PDE) technology is a novel form of propulsion that offers the potential of high efficiency combustion with reduced hardware complexity. Although the primary interest of the research in the pulse detonation engine field is directed towards overcoming the problems associated with operating a pure PDE system, there are other worthy options to be considered for these engines. The PDE driven ejector concept is one such option where the system would be part of a hybrid PD/Turbofan engine. This system offers the promise of replacing the high-pressure turbine sections of the core of a high bypass turbofan engine. The purpose of the current research is to investigate the thrust augmentation capabilities of a PDE driven ejector and provide experimental data that would assist in understanding the behavior of such a system. The major potential advantages of the PDE-ejector include reduced costs due to the reduced engine weight, along with improved specific fuel consumption and specific power inherent in the incorporation of a PDE component. To achieve the goal of this research, the thrust augmentation of a PDE driven ejector was characterized for a set of configurations. Two separate PDE's were utilized in this study. The first PDE was capable of operating at a constant frequency of 10 Hz de to flow rate limitations, and another PDE built to have an operational frequency range of 10 Hz-70 Hz to test the effect of operational frequency on PDE-ejector systems. Optical diagnostics were employed at specific positions of interest to understand the physical behavior of the flow. Baseline experimental results helped define and understand the operational characteristics of the PDE's utilized in this study. Thrust measurements were then made for PDE driven ejector configurations. The parameters that were independently changed were the inlet geometry of a constant diameter ejector, as well as the overlap distance between the PDE tube exit and ejector tube inlet

  10. Development of a Thrust Stand to Meet LISA Mission Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, William D., III; Zakrzwski, Charles M.; Merkowitz, Stephen M.

    2002-01-01

    A thrust stand has been built to measure the force-noise produced by electrostatic micro-Newton (muN) thrusters. The LISA mission's Disturbance Reduction System (DRS) requires thrusters that are capable of producing continuous thrust levels between 1-100 muN with a resolution of 0.1 muN. The stationary force-noise produced by these thrusters must not exceed 0.1 muN/dHz in the measurement bandwidth 10(exp -4) to 1 Hz. The LISA Thrust Stand (LTS) is a torsion-balance type thrust stand designed to meet the following requirements: stationary force-noise measurements from l0( -4) to 1 Hz with 0.1 muN/dHz sensitivity, absolute thrust measurements from 1-100 muN with better than 0.1 muN resolution, and dynamic thruster response from to 10 Hz. The LTS employs a unique vertical configuration, autocollimator for angular position measurements, and electrostatic actuators that are used for dynamic pendulum control and null-mode measurements. Force-noise levels are measured indirectly by characterizing the thrust stand as a spring-mass system. The LTS was initially designed to test the indium FEEP thruster developed by the Austrian Research Center in Seibersdorf (ARCS), but can be modified for testing other thrusters of this type.

  11. Thrust Stand for Vertically Oriented Electric Propulsion Performance Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moeller, Trevor; Polzin, Kurt A.

    2010-01-01

    A variation of a hanging pendulum thrust stand capable of measuring the performance of an electric thruster operating in the vertical orientation is presented. The vertical orientation of the thruster dictates that the thruster must be horizontally offset from the pendulum pivot arm, necessitating the use of a counterweight system to provide a neutrally-stable system. Motion of the pendulum arm is transferred through a balance mechanism to a secondary arm on which deflection is measured. A non-contact light-based transducer is used to measure displacement of the secondary beam. The members experience very little friction, rotating on twisting torsional pivots with oscillatory motion attenuated by a passive, eddy current damper. Displacement is calibrated using an in situ thrust calibration system. Thermal management and self-leveling systems are incorporated to mitigate thermal and mechanical drifts. Gravitational restoring force and torsional spring constants associated with flexure pivots provide restoring moments. An analysis of the design indicates that the thrust measurement range spans roughly four decades, with the stand capable of measuring thrust up to 12 N for a 200 kg thruster and up to approximately 800 mN for a 10 kg thruster. Data obtained from calibration tests performed using a 26.8 lbm simulated thruster indicated a resolution of 1 mN on 100 mN-level thrusts, while those tests conducted on 200 lbm thruster yielded a resolution of roughly 2.5 micro at thrust levels of 0.5 N and greater.

  12. Polyphase thrust tectonic in the Barberton greenstone belt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paris, I. A.

    1986-01-01

    In the circa 3.5 by-old Barberton greenstone belt, the supracrustal rocks form a thick and strongly deformed thrust complex. Structural studies in the southern part of the belt have shown that 2 separate phases of over-thrusting (D sub 1 and D sub 2) successively dismembered the original stratigraphy. Thrust nappes were subsequently refolded during later deformations (D sub 3 and D sub 4). This report deals with the second thrusting event which, in the study region appears to be dominant, and (unlike the earlier thrusting), affects the entire supracrustal pile. The supracrustal rocks form a predominantly NE/SW oriented, SE dipping tectonic fan (the D sub 2 fan) in which tectonic slices of ophiolitic-like rocks are interleaved with younger sedimentary sequences of the Diepgezet and malalotcha groups. Structural and sedimentological data indicate that the D sub 2 tectonic fan was formed during a prolonged, multi-stage regional horizontal shortening event during which several types of internal deformation mechanisms were successively and/or simultaneously active. Movement appears to have been predominantly to the NW and to the N. During D sub 2, periods of quiescence and sedimentation followed periods of thrust propagation. Although the exact kinematics which led to the formation of this fan is not yet known, paleoenvironmental interpretations together with structural data suggest that D sub 2 was probably related to (an) Archean collision(s).

  13. Superposed fold-thrust events at the Nevada Test Site

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cashman, Patricia H.; Cole, James C.; Trexler, James H.

    2000-01-01

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS), in southern Nye County, Nevada, straddles significant pre-Tertiary structural and stratigraphic boundaries. Detailed stratigraphy and biostratigraphy of the Upper Paleozoic section delineates the regional trust sheets and constrains their burial histories. The Paleozoic rocks record three phases of contractional deformation, overprinted by strike-slip faulting. These occured in the folloing order: (1) foreland-vergant folding and imbricate thrusting in the footwall of the Belted Range thrust; (2) hinterland-vergent folding and thrusting; and (3) north-vergant folding that we interpret as footwall deformation below a third major thrust system. Sinistral slip, typically accompanied by minor east-west shortening, has occured along a series of north-northeast--north-northwest--striking faults around Yucca Flat. This strike-slip faulting postdates both foreland-vergent and hinterland-vergent deformation, and predates the Cretaceous Climax stock; its age relative to the north-vergent folding and thrusting is unknown. Our new understanding of the geometry of these structures provides new insights into the correlation and interpretation of regional structural features. Field trip stops will examine: (1) the stratigraphic differences that allow us to distinguish the regional thrust sheets and constrain their burial histories; and (2) the field relationships that document the kinematics and relative ages of the penetrative deformational events.

  14. Momentum Flux Measurements Using an Impact Thrust Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chavers, Greg; Chang-Diaz, Franklin; Breizman, Boris; Bengtson, Roger

    2004-01-01

    A device has been developed to measure the force caused by a beam of charged and neutral particles impacting a target plate. This device, an impact thrust stand, was developed to allow thrusters, during early stages of development, to be quickly and easily exhausted and compared to other thrusters. Since some thruster concepts are tested using laboratory equipment that is heavy and cumbersome, measuring the momentum flux of the particles in the plume can be much simpler than placing the entire thruster on a thrust stand. Conservation of momentum requires the momentum flux measured in the plume to be related to the thrust produced by the thruster. The impact thrust stand was designed to be placed in the plume of an electric thruster and has been tested and compared to the thrust measured from a Hall thruster placed on a pendulum thrust stand. Force measurements taken at several axial locations in the magnetic nozzle region of the Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket will be presented.

  15. Thrust stand for vertically oriented electric propulsion performance evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Moeller, Trevor; Polzin, Kurt A.

    2010-11-15

    A variation of a hanging pendulum thrust stand capable of measuring the performance of an electric thruster operating in the vertical orientation is presented. The vertical orientation of the thruster dictates that the thruster must be horizontally offset from the pendulum pivot arm, necessitating the use of a counterweight system to provide a neutrally stable system. Motion of the pendulum arm is transferred through a balance mechanism to a secondary arm on which deflection is measured. A noncontact light-based transducer is used to measure displacement of the secondary beam. The members experience very little friction, rotating on twisting torsional pivots with oscillatory motion attenuated by a passive, eddy-current damper. Displacement is calibrated using an in situ thrust calibration system. Thermal management and self-leveling systems are incorporated to mitigate thermal and mechanical drifts. Gravitational force and torsional spring constants associated with flexure pivots provide restoring moments. An analysis of the design indicates that the thrust measurement range spans roughly four decades, with the stand capable of measuring thrust up to 12 N for a 200 kg thruster and up to approximately 800 mN for a 10 kg thruster. Data obtained from calibration tests performed using a 26.8 lbm simulated thruster indicated a resolution of 1 mN on 100 mN level thrusts, while those tests conducted on a 200 lbm thruster yielded a resolution of roughly 2.5 mN at thrust levels of 0.5 N and greater.

  16. Full Flight Envelope Direct Thrust Measurement on a Supersonic Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conners, Timothy R.; Sims, Robert L.

    1998-01-01

    Direct thrust measurement using strain gages offers advantages over analytically-based thrust calculation methods. For flight test applications, the direct measurement method typically uses a simpler sensor arrangement and minimal data processing compared to analytical techniques, which normally require costly engine modeling and multisensor arrangements throughout the engine. Conversely, direct thrust measurement has historically produced less than desirable accuracy because of difficulty in mounting and calibrating the strain gages and the inability to account for secondary forces that influence the thrust reading at the engine mounts. Consequently, the strain-gage technique has normally been used for simple engine arrangements and primarily in the subsonic speed range. This paper presents the results of a strain gage-based direct thrust-measurement technique developed by the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center and successfully applied to the full flight envelope of an F-15 aircraft powered by two F100-PW-229 turbofan engines. Measurements have been obtained at quasi-steady-state operating conditions at maximum non-augmented and maximum augmented power throughout the altitude range of the vehicle and to a maximum speed of Mach 2.0 and are compared against results from two analytically-based thrust calculation methods. The strain-gage installation and calibration processes are also described.

  17. Application of Chaboche Model in Rocket Thrust Chamber Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asraff, Ahmedul Kabir; Suresh Babu, Sheela; Babu, Aneena; Eapen, Reeba

    2015-12-01

    Liquid Propellant Rocket Engines are commonly used in space technology. Thrust chamber is one of the most important subsystems of a rocket engine. The thrust chamber generates propulsive thrust force for flight of the rocket by ejection of combustion products at supersonic speeds. Often double walled construction is employed for these chambers. The thrust chamber investigated here has its hot inner wall fabricated out of a high thermal conductive material like copper alloy and outer wall made of stainless steel. Inner wall is subjected to high thermal and pressure loads during operation of engine due to which it will be in the plastic regime. Main reasons for the failure of such chambers are fatigue in the plastic range (called as low cycle fatigue since the number of cycles to failure will be low in plastic range), creep and thermal ratcheting. Elasto plastic material models are required to simulate the above effects through a cyclic stress analysis. This paper gives the details of cyclic stress analysis carried out for the thrust chamber using different plasticity model combinations available in ANSYS (Version 15) FE code. The best model among the above is applied in the cyclic stress analysis of two dimensional (plane strain and axisymmetric) and three dimensional finite element models of thrust chamber. Cyclic life of the chamber is calculated from stress-strain graph obtained from above analyses.

  18. Thrusting and wedge growth, Southern Alps of Lombardia (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roeder, Dietrich

    1992-06-01

    A south-vergent fold-thrust belt of Miocene-Recent age accompanies the south slope of the Lombardian Alps and is partly buried beneath Plio-Pleistocene Po Valley basin fill. The belt is probably detached along a trans-crustal thrust, named Main South Alpine Thrust (MSAT), with an estimated dip slip of 70-100 km. Transport on this thrust piggybacks the Adamello pluton of Late Eocene age, pre-Adamello folds, and Oligocene-Miocene Insubric strike-slip structures, by ramping up through 12-15 km of Austro-Alpine (Adria) crust and through 8-10 km of Triassic to Eocene sediments. Folds in the Front Ranges are ascribed to MSAT ramping, not to pre-Adamello compression. The MSAT soles upward in a blind thrust beneath 3-4 km of Oligocene-Pliocene foredeep fill. Initial regional failure along the MSAT implies substantial and pre-existing topographic relief near the Insubric line. An average of 25% wedge thickening during MSAT transport is consistent with the requirement of Coulomb critical taper. Progression of the south-Alpine detachment from the MSAT to the base of the foreland sediments has added a thickness of 6-12 km in footwall imbrications to the base and the toe of the thrust wedge. This addition in wedge volume is consistent with wedge dynamics only if a mid-Miocene or younger spike of excess Alpine topography is admitted.

  19. Timing and conditions of peak metamorphism and cooling across the Zimithang Thrust, Arunachal Pradesh, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Clare J.; Singh, Athokpam K.; Roberts, Nick M. W.; Regis, Daniele; Halton, Alison M.; Singh, Rajkumar B.

    2014-07-01

    The Zimithang Thrust juxtaposes two lithotectonic units of the Greater Himalayan Sequence in Arunachal Pradesh, NE India. Monazite U-Pb, muscovite 40Ar/39Ar and thermobarometric data from rocks in the hanging and footwall constrain the timing and conditions of their juxtaposition across the structure, and their subsequent cooling. Monazite grains in biotite-sillimanite gneiss in the hanging wall yield LA-ICP-MS U-Pb ages of 16 ± 0.2 to 12.7 ± 0.4 Ma. A schistose gneiss within the high strain zone yields overlapping-to-younger monazite ages of 14.9 ± 0.3 to 11.5 ± 0.3 Ma. Garnet-staurolite-mica schists in the immediate footwall yield older monazite ages of 27.3 ± 0.6 to 17.1 ± 0.2 Ma. Temperature estimates from Ti-in-biotite and garnet-biotite thermometry suggest similar peak temperatures were achieved in the hanging and footwalls (~ 525-650 °C). Elevated temperatures of ~ 700 °C appear to have been reached in the high strain zone itself and in the footwall further from the thrust. Single grain fusion 40Ar/39Ar muscovite data from samples either side of the thrust yield ages of ~ 7 Ma, suggesting that movement along the thrust juxtaposed the two units by the time the closure temperature of Ar diffusion in muscovite had been reached. These data confirm previous suggestions that major orogen-parallel out-of-sequence structures disrupt the Greater Himalayan Sequence at different times during Himalayan evolution, and highlight an eastwards-younging trend in 40Ar/39Ar muscovite cooling ages at equivalent structural levels along Himalayan strike.

  20. Evolution of the Puente Hills Thrust Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergen, K. J.; Shaw, J. H.; Dolan, J. F.

    2013-12-01

    This study aims to assess the evolution of the blind Puente Hills thrust fault system (PHT) by determining its age of initiation, lateral propagation history, and changes in slip rate over time. The PHT presents one of the largest seismic hazards in the United States, given its location beneath downtown Los Angeles. The PHT is comprised of three fault segments: the Los Angeles (LA), Santa Fe Springs (SFS), and Coyote Hills (CH). The LA and SFS segments are characterized by growth stratigraphy where folds formed by uplift on the fault segments have been continually buried by sediment from the Los Angeles and San Gabriel rivers. The CH segment has developed topography and is characterized by onlapping growth stratigraphy. This depositional setting gives us the unique opportunity to measure uplift on the LA and SFS fault segments, and minimum uplift on the CH fault segment, as the difference in sediment thicknesses across the buried folds. We utilize depth converted oil industry seismic reflection data to image the fold geometries. Identifying time-correlative stratigraphic markers for slip rate determination in the basin has been a problem for researchers in the past, however, as the faunal assemblages observed in wells are time-transgressive by nature. To overcome this, we utilize the sequence stratigraphic model and well picks of Ponti et al. (2007) as a basis for mapping time-correlative sequence boundaries throughout our industry seismic reflection data from the present to the Pleistocene. From the Pleistocene to Miocene we identify additional sequence boundaries in our seismic reflection data from imaged sequence geometries and by correlating industry well formation tops. The sequence and formation top picks are then used to build 3-dimensional surfaces in the modeling program Gocad. From these surfaces we measure the change in thicknesses across the folds to obtain uplift rates between each sequence boundary. Our results show three distinct phases of

  1. Electromechanical actuation for thrust vector control applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Mary Ellen

    At present, actuation systems for the Thrust Vector Control (TVC) for launch vehicles are hydraulic systems. The Advanced Launch System (ALS), a joint initiative between NASA and the Air Force, is a launch vehicle that is designed to be cost effective, highly reliable and operationally efficient with a goal of reducing the cost per pound to orbit. As part of this initiative, an electromechanical actuation system is being developed as an attractive alternative to the hydraulic systems used today. NASA-Lewis is developing and demonstrating an Induction Motor Controller Actuation System with a 40 hp peak rating. The controller will integrate 20 kHz resonant link Power Management and Distribution (PMAD) technology and Pulse Population Modulation (PPM) techniques to implement Field Oriented Vector Control (FOVC) of a new advanced induction motor. Through PPM, multiphase variable frequency, variable voltage waveforms can be synthesized from the 20 kHz source. FOVC shows that varying both the voltage and frequency and their ratio (V/F), permits independent control of both torque and speed while operating at maximum efficiency at any point on the torque-speed curve. The driver and the FOVC will be microprocessor controlled. For increased system reliability, a Built-in Test (BITE) capability will be included. This involves introducing testability into the design of a system such that testing is calibrated and exercised during the design, manufacturing, maintenance and prelaunch activities. An actuator will be integrated with the motor controller for performance testing of the EMA TVC system. The design and fabrication of the motor controller is being done by General Dynamics Space Systems Division. The University of Wisconsin-Madison will assist in the design of the advanced induction motor and in the implementation of the FOVC theory. A 75 hp electronically controlled dynamometer will be used to test the motor controller in all four quadrants of operation using flight type

  2. Electromagnetic launch, then lessening chemical thrust over time as laser beam powered ion thrust grows{emdash}to any orbit

    SciTech Connect

    Morse, T.M.

    1996-03-01

    The ElectroMagnetic (EM) Launch Tube (LT), using High-Temp SuperConduction (HTSC) EM launch coils if developed, will be built in a tall building, or, if not, at a steep angle up the west slope of an extinct volcano. The Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) exits the LT at such high velocity that the otherwise violent entry into the atmosphere is made possible by Special-Laser-Launch-Assist (SLLA), which ionizes and expands the atmosphere immediately ahead of the RLV. At first a brief period of chemical thrust is followed by a long period of ion thrust during ascent to orbit. As decades pass and greater ion thrust is developed, the period of chemical thrust shortens until it is no longer needed. The RLV{close_quote}s ion thrusters are powered by laser/maser, beamed first from the launch site, then from two large Solar-Power-Satellites (SPS) 180{degree} apart in Medium Earth Orbit (MEO) orbit. In orbit, the RLV is limited in where it can go only by the amount of propellant it carries or is stored in various orbits. The RLV can land at a launch site on Earth by using both chemical and ion thrust at first, and later by ion thrust alone as developments cause a far lighter RLV to carry no chemical engines/fuel/tanks. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  3. Thrust calculation of electric solar wind sail by particle-in-cell simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshi, Kento; Kojima, Hirotsugu; Muranaka, Takanobu; Yamakawa, Hiroshi

    2016-09-01

    In this study, thrust characteristics of an electric solar wind sail were numerically evaluated using full three-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation. The thrust obtained from the PIC simulation was lower than the thrust estimations obtained in previous studies. The PIC simulation indicated that ambient electrons strongly shield the electrostatic potential of the tether of the sail, and the strong shield effect causes a greater thrust reduction than has been obtained in previous studies. Additionally, previous expressions of the thrust estimation were modified by using the shielded potential structure derived from the present simulation results. The modified thrust estimation agreed very well with the thrust obtained from the PIC simulation.

  4. A Voice of One's Own: Born, Achieved, or Thrust upon One?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Leary, Maureen E.

    As Langston Hughes' poem, "Theme for English B" recognizes, it is difficult for beginning writing students to develop a writing voice that is personal, yet expresses an awareness of context and community. Each writer/student potentially has three voices: (1) the voice students are born to, which reflects socio-economic and cultural background,…

  5. Optimum Low Thrust Elliptic Orbit Transfer Using Numerical Averaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarzi, Zahi Bassem

    Low-thrust electric propulsion is increasingly being used for spacecraft missions primarily due to its high propellant efficiency. Since analytical solutions for general low-thrust transfers are not available, a simple and fast method for low-thrust trajectory optimization is of great value for preliminary mission planning. However, few low-thrust trajectory tools are appropriate for preliminary mission design studies. The method presented in this paper provides quick and accurate solutions for a wide range of transfers by using numerical orbital averaging to improve solution convergence and include orbital perturbations. Thus allowing preliminary trajectories to be obtained for transfers which involve many revolutions about the primary body. This method considers minimum fuel transfers using first order averaging to obtain the fuel optimum rates of change of the equinoctial orbital elements in terms of each other and the Lagrange multipliers. Constraints on thrust and power, as well as minimum periapsis, are implemented and the equations are averaged numerically using a Gaussian quadrature. The use of numerical averaging allows for more complex orbital perturbations to be added without great difficulty. Orbital perturbations due to solar radiation pressure, atmospheric drag, a non-spherical central body, and third body gravitational effects have been included. These perturbations have not been considered by previous methods using analytical averaging. Thrust limitations due to shadowing have also been considered in this study. To allow for faster convergence of a wider range of problems, the solution to a transfer which minimizes the square of the thrust magnitude is used as a preliminary guess for the minimum fuel problem. Thus, this method can be quickly applied to many different types of transfers which may include various perturbations. Results from this model are shown to provide a reduction in propellant mass required over previous minimum fuel solutions

  6. Thrust Production and Wake Structure of an Actuated Three-Dimensional Manta Ray Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Rick; Yungster, Nir; Smits, Alexander

    2004-11-01

    Thrust generation and wake structure is studied for a flexible manta ray model. The three-dimensional model is actuated periodically to produce a streamwise traveling wave, where the phase of the wave varies with spanwise distance. Mechanical actuators are used to achieve this deformation. The flow field is investigated using DPIV and flow visualization for a range of Strouhal numbers based on peak-to-peak amplitude of the trailing edge. The vortex kinematics in the spanwise and streamwise planes are examined, and a three-dimensional unsteady vortex model of the wake will be discussed.

  7. Potential applications of skip SMV with thrust engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Weilin; Savvaris, Al

    2016-11-01

    This paper investigates the potential applications of Space Maneuver Vehicles (SMV) with skip trajectory. Due to soaring space operations over the past decades, the risk of space debris has considerably increased such as collision risks with space asset, human property on ground and even aviation. Many active debris removal methods have been investigated and in this paper, a debris remediation method is first proposed based on skip SMV. The key point is to perform controlled re-entry. These vehicles are expected to achieve a trans-atmospheric maneuver with thrust engine. If debris is released at altitude below 80 km, debris could be captured by the atmosphere drag force and re-entry interface prediction accuracy is improved. Moreover if the debris is released in a cargo at a much lower altitude, this technique protects high value space asset from break up by the atmosphere and improves landing accuracy. To demonstrate the feasibility of this concept, the present paper presents the simulation results for two specific mission profiles: (1) descent to predetermined altitude; (2) descent to predetermined point (altitude, longitude and latitude). The evolutionary collocation method is adopted for skip trajectory optimization due to its global optimality and high-accuracy. This method is actually a two-step optimization approach based on the heuristic algorithm and the collocation method. The optimal-control problem is transformed into a nonlinear programming problem (NLP) which can be efficiently and accurately solved by the sequential quadratic programming (SQP) procedure. However, such a method is sensitive to initial values. To reduce the sensitivity problem, genetic algorithm (GA) is adopted to refine the grids and provide near optimum initial values. By comparing the simulation data from different scenarios, it is found that skip SMV is feasible in active debris removal and the evolutionary collocation method gives a truthful re-entry trajectory that satisfies the

  8. Geologic mapping delineates new thrust sheets, duplex structures, and timing relationships between the Meade and Crawford thrusts in Wyoming, Idaho, and Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Coogan, J.C.

    1993-04-01

    New geologic maps of nine complete and six partial 7.5[prime] quadrangles delineate a large-scale duplex comprised of at least five thrust sheets that together form the Sheep Creek culmination in the footwall of the Meade thrust. From west to east, the Sheep Creek culmination includes the Home Canyon, Sheep Creek, Red Mountain, northern Crawford, and Afton thrust sheets. The thrusts are floored by the regional sole decollement in the Cambrian Gros Ventre Formation and merge upward with a roof thrust that lies along the Meade thrust in the west and decollements in the Jurassic Gypsum Spring and Preuss salt intervals in the east. The individual thrusts of Sheep Creek culmination are generally blind thrusts that are recognized by integrating the surface mapping with subsurface well and seismic data in balanced cross sections. The common map expression for individual thrust sheets is marked by translated fault-propagation anticlines in upper Paleozoic, Triassic, and lower Jurassic rocks that are bordered to the east by frontal decollement fold trains in middle and upper Jurassic rocks. The Meade thrust is folded above the Sheep Creek culmination in the northern part of the map area, and it is specifically folded above the Crawford fault-propagation fold, Sublette anticline, north of the map area at Elk Valley, Idaho. Thus, the Meade and Crawford thrusts are not coeval, linked thrusts as previously assumed. Instead, the individual thrusts of Sheep Creek culmination form a linked, eastward-younging thrust system along which 30 km of Crawford thrust displacement in Utah is partitioned between the Sheep Creek, Red Mountain, northern Crawford, and Afton thrusts in Idaho and Wyoming.

  9. Modelling hanging wall accommodation above rigid thrust ramps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonini, Marco; Sokoutis, Dimitrios; Mulugeta, Genene; Katrivanos, Emmanouil

    2000-08-01

    Experimental models are used to study the role of material rheology in hanging wall accommodation above rigid flat-ramp-flat thrust footwalls. The deformation in the hanging wall was accomplished by forwards sliding along a rigid basal staircase trajectory with a variable ramp angle, α, ranging from 15° to 60°. We model different ramp angles to examine hanging wall accommodation styles above thrust ramps of overthrust faults ( α ranging from 15° to 30°), as well as above pre-existing normal faults ( α ranging from 45° to 60°). For the hanging walls we used stratified frictional (sand) and viscous (silicone putty) materials. In this paper we study three types of models. Type 1 models represent purely frictional hanging walls where accommodation above thrust ramps was by layer-parallel thickening and by generating a series of back thrusts. Type 2 and 3 models represent stratified frictional/viscous hanging walls. In these models, accommodation was by a complex association of reverse and normal faults, mainly controlled by the rheological anisotropy as well as by the ramp inclination angle α. In Type 2 models the silicone covered only the lower flat, while in Type 3 models it also covered the rigid ramp. For α≤30° in Type 2 models and α≤45° in Type 3 models, the viscous layer inhibited the development of back thrusts in the frictional hanging wall, instead the silicone thickened to develop a 'ductile ramp'. For α-values higher than 30° in Type 2 models and α=45° in Type 3 models, back thrusts develop in response to the bulk compression. The experiments simulate many structures observed above natural thrust ramps with α≤30° and pre-existing normal faults with α≥45°. The models emphasise the importance of a basal ductile layer, which allows the hanging wall to step-up over the rigid ramp by building up its own ductile ramp. The models also emphasise that foreland-directed normal faulting can develop at a thrust front in the case that the

  10. Bilateral and multiple cavitation sounds during upper cervical thrust manipulation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The popping produced during high-velocity, low-amplitude (HVLA) thrust manipulation is a common sound; however to our knowledge, no study has previously investigated the location of cavitation sounds during manipulation of the upper cervical spine. The primary purpose was to determine which side of the spine cavitates during C1-2 rotatory HVLA thrust manipulation. Secondary aims were to calculate the average number of pops, the duration of upper cervical thrust manipulation, and the duration of a single cavitation. Methods Nineteen asymptomatic participants received two upper cervical thrust manipulations targeting the right and left C1-2 articulation, respectively. Skin mounted microphones were secured bilaterally over the transverse process of C1, and sound wave signals were recorded. Identification of the side, duration, and number of popping sounds were determined by simultaneous analysis of spectrograms with audio feedback using custom software developed in Matlab. Results Bilateral popping sounds were detected in 34 (91.9%) of 37 manipulations while unilateral popping sounds were detected in just 3 (8.1%) manipulations; that is, cavitation was significantly (P < 0.001) more likely to occur bilaterally than unilaterally. Of the 132 total cavitations, 72 occurred ipsilateral and 60 occurred contralateral to the targeted C1-2 articulation. In other words, cavitation was no more likely to occur on the ipsilateral than the contralateral side (P = 0.294). The mean number of pops per C1-2 rotatory HVLA thrust manipulation was 3.57 (95% CI: 3.19, 3.94) and the mean number of pops per subject following both right and left C1-2 thrust manipulations was 6.95 (95% CI: 6.11, 7.79). The mean duration of a single audible pop was 5.66 ms (95% CI: 5.36, 5.96) and the mean duration of a single manipulation was 96.95 ms (95% CI: 57.20, 136.71). Conclusions Cavitation was significantly more likely to occur bilaterally than unilaterally during upper cervical HVLA

  11. Simple control laws for low-thrust orbit transfers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petropoulos, Anastassios E.

    2003-01-01

    Two methods are presented by which to determine both a thrust direction and when to apply thrust to effect specified changes in any of the orbit elements except for true anomaly, which is assumed free. The central body is assumed to be a point mass, and the initial and final orbits are assumed closed. Thrust, when on, is of a constant value, and specific impulse is constant. The thrust profiles derived from the two methods are not propellant-optimal, but are based firstly on the optimal thrust directions and location on the osculating orbit for changing each of the orbit elements and secondly on the desired changes in the orbit elements. Two examples of transfers are presented, one in semimajor axis and inclination, and one in semimajor axis and eccentricity. The latter compares favourably with a propellant-optimized transfer between the same orbits. The control laws have few input parameters, but can still capture the complexity of a wide variety of orbit transfers.

  12. Grenville foreland thrust belt hidden beneath the eastern US midcontinent

    SciTech Connect

    Hauser, E.C. )

    1993-01-01

    Grenville foreland thrust structures are observed beneath the eastern US midcontinent on COCORP (Consortium for Continental Reflection Profiling) line OH-1 and a short seismic line in southwest Ohio. These structures represent the first evidence for a significant Grenville foreland thrust belt preserved in eastern North America. On the COCORP lines, the structures include a thrust ramp anticline and an associated asymmetric syncline. The Grenville front tectonic zone appears to truncate these foreland structures, indicating a later, second phase expressed as a deeply penetrating, out-of-sequence thrust zone associated with the main uplift of the Grenville province on the east. A short, shallow seismic line in southwestern Ohio reveals an east-dipping sequence of prominently layered rocks that may lie above a footwall ramp to a deeper Grenville thrust fault. A drill hole into the less reflective top of this dipping sequence encountered unmetamorphosed sedimentary rocks like those increasingly reported from other drill holes in southwestern Ohio and adjacent states. Although possibly part of a late Precambrian (Keweenawan ) rift, these clastic sedimentary rocks may instead preserve evidence of a heretofore unrecognized Grenville foreland basin in eastern North America. Alternatively these Precambrian sedimentary rocks together with an underlying, but yet undrilled, strongly layered sequence may correlate with similarly layered rocks observed on COCORP and industrial seismic lines within the Middle Proterozoic granite-rhyolite province to the west in Indiana and Illinois and indicate that unmetamorphosed sedimentary material is an important constituent of the granite-rhyolite province. 25 refs., 6 figs.

  13. Space shuttle orbit maneuvering engine reusable thrust chamber program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Senneff, J. M.

    1975-01-01

    Reusable thrust chamber and injector concepts were evaluated for the space shuttle orbit maneuvering engine (OME). Parametric engine calculations were carried out by computer program for N2O4/amine, LOX/amine and LOX/hydrocarbon propellant combinations for engines incorporating regenerative cooled and insulated columbium thrust chambers. The calculation methods are described including the fuel vortex film cooling method of combustion gas temperature control, and performance prediction. A method of acceptance of a regeneratively cooled heat rejection reduction using a silicone oil additive was also demonstrated by heated tube heat transfer testing. Regeneratively cooled thrust chamber operation was also demonstrated where the injector was characterized for the OME application with a channel wall regenerative thrust chamber. Bomb stability testing of the demonstration chambers/injectors demonstrated recovery for the nominal design of acoustic cavities. Cavity geometry changes were also evaluated to assess their damping margin. Performance and combustion stability was demonstrated of the originally developed 10 inch diameter combustion pattern operating in an 8 inch diameter thrust chamber.

  14. Thrust Augmentation Measurements Using a Pulse Detonation Engine Ejector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santoro, Robert J.; Pal, Sibtosh

    2005-01-01

    Results of an experimental effort on pulse detonation driven ejectors are presented and discussed. The experiments were conducted using a pulse detonation engine (PDE)/ejector setup that was specifically designed for the study and operated at frequencies up to 50 Hz. The results of various experiments designed to probe different aspects of the PDE/ejector setup are reported. The baseline PDE was operated using ethylene (C2H4) as the fuel and an oxygen/nitrogen O2 + N2) mixture at an equivalence ratio of one. The PDE only experiments included propellant mixture characterization using a laser absorption technique, high fidelity thrust measurements using an integrated spring-damper system, and shadowgraph imaging of the detonation/shock wave structure emanating from the tube. The baseline PDE thrust measurement results at each desired frequency agree with experimental and modeling results reported in the literature. These PDE setup results were then used as a basis for quantifying thrust augmentation for various PDE/ejector setups with constant diameter ejector tubes and various ejector lengths, the radius of curvature for the ejector inlets and various detonation tube/ejector tube overlap distances. For the studied experimental matrix, the results showed a maximum thrust augmentation of 106% at an operational frequency of 30 Hz. The thrust augmentation results are complemented by shadowgraph imaging of the flowfield in the ejector tube inlet area and high frequency pressure transducer measurements along the length of the ejector tube.

  15. Thrust Augmentation Measurements for a Pulse Detonation Engine Driven Ejector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pal, S.; Santoro, Robert J.; Shehadeh, R.; Saretto, S.; Lee, S.-Y.

    2005-01-01

    Thrust augmentation results of an ongoing study of pulse detonation engine driven ejectors are presented and discussed. The experiments were conducted using a pulse detonation engine (PDE) setup with various ejector configurations. The PDE used in these experiments utilizes ethylene (C2H4) as the fuel, and an equi-molar mixture of oxygen and nitrogen as the oxidizer at an equivalence ratio of one. High fidelity thrust measurements were made using an integrated spring damper system. The baseline thrust of the PDE engine was first measured and agrees with experimental and modeling results found in the literature. Thrust augmentation measurements were then made for constant diameter ejectors. The parameter space for the study included ejector length, PDE tube exit to ejector tube inlet overlap distance, and straight versus rounded ejector inlets. The relationship between the thrust augmentation results and various physical phenomena is described. To further understand the flow dynamics, shadow graph images of the exiting shock wave front from the PDE were also made. For the studied parameter space, the results showed a maximum augmentation of 40%. Further increase in augmentation is possible if the geometry of the ejector is tailored, a topic currently studied by numerous groups in the field.

  16. Internal performance characteristics of thrust-vectored axisymmetric ejector nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamb, Milton

    1995-01-01

    A series of thrust-vectored axisymmetric ejector nozzles were designed and experimentally tested for internal performance and pumping characteristics at the Langley research center. This study indicated that discontinuities in the performance occurred at low primary nozzle pressure ratios and that these discontinuities were mitigated by decreasing expansion area ratio. The addition of secondary flow increased the performance of the nozzles. The mid-to-high range of secondary flow provided the most overall improvements, and the greatest improvements were seen for the largest ejector area ratio. Thrust vectoring the ejector nozzles caused a reduction in performance and discharge coefficient. With or without secondary flow, the vectored ejector nozzles produced thrust vector angles that were equivalent to or greater than the geometric turning angle. With or without secondary flow, spacing ratio (ejector passage symmetry) had little effect on performance (gross thrust ratio), discharge coefficient, or thrust vector angle. For the unvectored ejectors, a small amount of secondary flow was sufficient to reduce the pressure levels on the shroud to provide cooling, but for the vectored ejector nozzles, a larger amount of secondary air was required to reduce the pressure levels to provide cooling.

  17. Orbit adjust maneuvers using very small tangential thrust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anthony, Maurice L.

    1987-10-01

    This paper develops approximate analytical solutions of the problem of transfer between coplanar circular orbits using very small tangential thrust, where the thrust acceleration is constant. Preliminary studies are made of the motions of both ascending and descending vehicles under continuous thrust, using the two variable expansion method. It is recognized that a descent trajectory starting from circular conditions may be considered as an ascent trajectory that terminates with circular conditions, by running the time in reverse. To solve the transfer problem, both the trajectory ascending from the smaller radius and the trajectory descending from the larger radius are required to end on the same Keplerian orbit. That is, the semimajor axis and eccentricity at the termination of the first burn must match those at the initiation of the second burn (termination of thrust on the descent arc). If thrust continues for more than a revolution, the two burn transfer has multiple solutions. Numerical examples of the analytical results compare remarkably well with results obtained by integrating the equations of motion numerically.

  18. Sandbox modeling of evolving thrust wedges with different preexisting topographic relief: Implications for the Longmen Shan thrust belt, eastern Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Chuang; Jia, Dong; Yin, Hongwei; Chen, Zhuxin; Li, Zhigang; Shen, Li; Wei, Dongtao; Li, Yiquan; Yan, Bin; Wang, Maomao; Fang, Shaozhi; Cui, Jian

    2016-06-01

    To understand the effects of substantial topographic relief on deformation localization in the seismically active mountains, like the Longmen Shan thrust belt in the eastern Tibet, sandbox experiments were performed based on the framework of the critical taper theory. First, a reference experiment revealed that the critical taper angle was 12° for our experimental materials. Subsequently, different proto wedges (subcritical (6° in taper angle), critical (12°), and supercritical (20°)) were introduced to cover the range of natural topographic relief, and we used two setups: setup A considered only across-strike topographic relief, whereas setup B investigated along-strike segmentation of topography, consist of two adjacent proto wedges. In all experiments, thrust wedges grew by in-sequence accretion of thrust sheets. Setup A revealed an alternating mode of slip partitioning on the accreted thrusts, with large-displacement thrust and small-displacement thrust developing in turn. And contrasting wedge evolutions occurred according to whether the proto wedge was subcritical or critical-supercritical. In setup B, the differential deformation along the strike produced transverse structures such as tear fault and lateral ramp during frontal accretion. The observed tear fault and its associated thrust system resemble the seismogenic fault system of the 2008 Mw7.9 Wenchuan earthquake. Our experimental results could also explain first-order deformation features observed in the Longmen Shan. Consequently, we conclude that topographic features, including topographic relief across the range and along-strike segmentation of topography, contribute significantly to the kinematics and deformation localization in such active mountains.

  19. Viscoplastic analysis of an experimental cylindrical thrust chamber liner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arya, Vinod K.; Arnold, Steven M.

    1992-01-01

    A viscoplastic stress-strain analysis of an experimental cylindrical thrust chamber is presented. A viscoelastic constitutive model incorporating a single internal state variable that represents kinematic hardening was employed to investigate whether such a viscoplastic model could predict the experimentally observed behavior of the thrust chamber. Two types of loading cycles were considered: a short cycle of 3.5-s duration that corresponded to the experiments, and an extended loading cycle of 485.1 s duration that is typical of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) operating cycle. The analysis qualitatively replicated the deformation behavior of the component as observed in experiments designed to simulate SSME operating conditions. The analysis also showed that the mode and location of failure in the component may depend on the loading cycle. The results indicate that using viscoplastic models for structural analysis can lead to a more realistic life assessment of thrust chambers.

  20. Full-scale thrust reverser testing in an altitude facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehalic, Charles M.; Lottig, Roy A.

    1987-01-01

    A two-dimensional convergent-divergent exhaust nozzle designed and fabricated by Pratt and Whitney Aircraft was installed on a PW1128 turbofan engine and tested during thrust reverser operation in an altitude facility at NASA Lewis Research Center. A unique collection system was used to capture the thrust reverser exhaust gas and transport it to the primary exhaust collector. Tests were conducted at three flight conditions with varying amounts of thrust reverse at each condition. Some reverser exhaust gas spillage by the collection system was encountered but engine performance was unaffected at all flight conditions tested. Based on the results of this test program, the feasibility of altitude testing of advanced multifunction exhaust nozzle systems has been demonstrated.

  1. Full-scale thrust reverser testing in an altitude facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehalic, Charles M.; Lottig, Roy A.

    1987-01-01

    A two-dimensional convergent-divergent exhaust nozzle designed and fabricated by Pratt and Whitney Aircraft was installed on a PW1128 turbofan engine and tested during thrust reverser operation in an altitude facility at NASA Lewis Research Center. A unique collection system was used to capture the thrust reverser exhaust gas and transport it to the primary exhaust collector. Tests were conducted at three flight conditions with varying amounts of thrust reverse at each condition. Some reverser exhaust gas spillage by the collection system was encountered but engine performance was unaffected at all flight conditions tested. Based on the results of this test program, the feasibility of altitude testing of advanced multi-function exhaust nozzle systems has been demonstrated.

  2. A Determinate Model of Thrust-Augmenting Ejectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitley, N.; Krothapalli, A.; van Dommelen, L.

    1996-01-01

    A theoretical analysis of the compressible flow through a constant-area jet-engine ejector in which a primary jet mixes with ambient fluid from a uniform free stream is pursued. The problem is reduced to a determinate mathematical one by prescribing the ratios of stagnation properties between the primary and secondary flows. For some selections of properties and parameters more than one solution is possible and the meaning of these solutions is discussed by means of asymptotic expansions. Our results further show that while under stationary conditions the thrust-augmentation ratio assumes a value of 2 in the large area-ratio limit, for a free-stream Mach number greater than 0.6 very little thrust augmentation is left. Due to the assumptions made, the analysis provides idealized values for the thrust-augmentation ratio and the mass flux entrainment factor.

  3. Equivalence ratio and constriction effects on RBCC thrust augmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koupriyanov, M.; Etele, J.

    2011-06-01

    A theoretical analysis of a variable area rocket based combined cycle engine with and without simultaneous mixing and combustion is presented. The flowfield is solved using a steady, quasi-one-dimensional, inviscid control volume formulation with combustion effects included via a generalized equilibrium calculation. Compression augmentation is shown to be sensitive to the equivalence ratio within the primary rocket chamber, where ejector section performance is greatest at both low and high equivalence ratios but near a minimum at stoichiometric conditions. The thrust generated by the RBCC engine compared to that generated by the same rocket in isolation can be increased by as much as 12% at constriction ratios of between 45% and 50%. Thrust augmentation is also shown to vary with equivalence ratio, where for a fixed geometry the maximum thrust is generated at equivalence ratios slightly below unity.

  4. Over-the-wing model thrust reverser noise tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodykoontz, J.; Gutierrez, O.

    1977-01-01

    Static acoustic tests were conducted on a 1/12 scale model over-the-wing target type thrust reverser. The model configuration simulates a design that is applicable to the over-the-wing short-haul advanced technology engine. Aerodynamic screening tests of a variety of reverser designs identified configurations that satisfied a reverse thrust requirement of 35 percent of forward thrust at a nozzle pressure ratio of 1.29. The variations in the reverser configuration included, blocker door angle, blocker door lip angle and shape, and side skirt shape. Acoustic data are presented and compared for the various configurations. The model data scaled to a single full size engine show that peak free field perceived noise (PN) levels at a 152.4 meter sideline distance range from 98 to 104 PNdb.

  5. Viscoplastic analysis of an experimental cylindrical thrust chamber liner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arya, Vinod K.; Arnold, Steven M.

    1991-01-01

    A viscoplastic stress-strain analysis of an experimental cylindrical thrust chamber is presented. A viscoelastic constitutive model incorporating a single internal state variable that represents kinematic hardening was employed to investigate whether such a viscoplastic model could predict the experimentally observed behavior of the thrust chamber. Two types of loading cycles were considered: a short cycle of 3.5 sec. duration that corresponded to the experiments, and an extended loading cycle of 485.1 sec. duration that is typical of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) operating cycle. The analysis qualitatively replicated the deformation behavior of the component as observed in experiments designed to simulate SSME operating conditions. The analysis also showed that the mode and location in the component may depend on the loading cycle. The results indicate that using viscoplastic models for structural analysis can lead to a more realistic life assessment of thrust chambers.

  6. Methods for determining atypical gate valve thrust requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Steele, R. Jr.; Watkins, J.C.; DeWall, K.G.

    1995-04-01

    Evaluating the performance of rising stem, wedge type, gate valves used in nuclear power plant is not a problem when the valves can be design-basis tested and their operability margins determined diagnostically. The problem occurs when they cannot be tested because of plant system limitations or when they can be tested only at some less-than-design-basis condition. To evaluate the performance of these valves requires various analytical and/or extrapolation methods by which the design-basis stem thrust requirement can be determined. This has been typically accomplished with valve stem thrust models used to calculate the requirements or by extrapolating the results from a less-than-design-basis test. The stem thrust models used by the nuclear industry to determine the opening or closing stem thrust requirements for these gate valves have generally assumed that the highest load the valve experiences during closure (but before seating) is at flow isolation and during unwedging or before flow initiation in the opening direction. However, during full-scale valve testing conducted for the USNRC, several of the valves produced stem thrust histories that showed peak closing stem forces occurring before flow isolation in the closing direction and after flow initiation in the opening direction. All of the valves that exhibited this behavior in the closing direction also showed signs of internal damage. Initially, we dismissed the early peak in the closing stem thrust requirement as damage-induced and labeled it nonpredictable behavior. Opening responses were not a priority in our early research, so that phenomenon was set aside for later evaluation.

  7. Fabrication of liquid-rocket thrust chambers by electroforming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duscha, R. A.; Kazaroff, J. M.

    1974-01-01

    Electroforming has proven to be an excellent fabrication method for building liquid rocket regeneratively cooled thrust chambers. NASA sponsored technology programs have investigated both common and advanced methods. Using common procedures, several cooled spool pieces and thrust chambers have been made and successfully tested. The designs were made possible through the versatility of the electroforming procedure, which is not limited to simple geometric shapes. An advanced method of electroforming was used to produce a wire-wrapped, composite, pressure-loaded electroformed structure, which greatly increased the strength of the structure while still retaining the advantages of electroforming.

  8. Problems of millipound thrust measurement. The "Hansen Suspension"

    SciTech Connect

    Carta, David G.

    2014-03-31

    Considered in detail are problems which led to the need and use of the 'Hansen Suspension'. Also discussed are problems which are likely to be encountered in any low level thrust measuring system. The methods of calibration and the accuracies involved are given careful attention. With all parameters optimized and calibration techniques perfected, the system was found capable of a resolution of 10 {mu} lbs. A comparison of thrust measurements made by the 'Hansen Suspension' with measurements of a less sophisticated device leads to some surprising results.

  9. Thrust involvement of metamorphic rocks, southwestern Brooks Range, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Till, A.B.; Schmidt, J.M.; Nelson, S.W. )

    1988-10-01

    Most models for the tectonic history of the western Brooks Range treat Proterozoic and lower Paleozoic metamorphic rocks exposed in the southern part of the range as passive structural basement vertically uplifted late in the Mesozoic orogenic episode. Mapping in the metamorphic rocks shows that they can de divided into two structurally and metamorphically distinct belts, both of which were folded and thrust during the orogeny. Recognition of these belts and the nature of the contact separating them is critical to construction of accurate tectonic models of the Brooks Range fold and thrust belt.

  10. LEO-to-GEO low thrust chemical propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shoji, J. M.

    1980-01-01

    One approach being considered for transporting large space structures from low Earth orbit (LEO) to geosynchronous equatorial orbit (GEO) is the use of low thrust chemical propulsion systems. A variety of chemical rocket engine cycles evaluated for this application for oxygen/hydrogen and oxygen/hydrocarbon propellants (oxygen/methane and oxygen/RF-1) are discussed. These cycles include conventional propellant turbine drives, turboalternator/electric motor pump drive, and fuel cell/electric motor pump drive as well as pressure fed engines. Thrust chamber cooling analysis results are presented for regenerative/radiation and film/radiation cooling.

  11. Thrusting, halotectonics, and sedimentation in the Spanish Pyrenees

    SciTech Connect

    Anastasio, D.J.

    1988-08-01

    The Spanish Pyrenees are a linked system of regional thrust sheets and intermontane basins which formed during the Tertiary collision of the European and Iberian plates. The structural evolution of the Pyrenees was controlled by Mesozoic extensional structures and evaporite-bearing strata which served as the regional decollement and produced widespread pre- to postthrusting halotectonic folds. Palinspastic restoration of Cretaceous strata from the Pyrenean realm delineates a large normal-faulted embayment in the northern Iberian margin. Thicker sediments within the bay, coupled with the southward emplacement of the Cotiella-Montsec thrust sheet, caused underlying evaporites to flow toward the basin margins, producing folds such as the Mediano anticline.

  12. Medium-frequency impulsive-thrust-activated liquid hydrogen reorientation with Geyser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Shyu, K. L.

    1992-01-01

    Efficient technique are studied for accomplishing propellant resettling through the minimization of propellant usage through impulsive thrust. A comparison between the use of constant-thrust and impulsive-thrust accelerations for the activation of propellant resettlement shows that impulsive thrust is superior to constant thrust for liquid reorientation in a reduced-gravity environment. This study shows that when impulsive thrust with 0.1-1.0-, and 10-Hz frequencies for liquid-fill levels in the range between 30-80 percent is considered, the selection of 1.0-Hz-frequency impulsive thrust over the other frequency ranges of impulsive thrust is the optimum. Characteristics of the slosh waves excited during the course of 1.0-Hz-frequency impulsive-thrust liquid reorientation were also analyzed.

  13. Was Himalayan normal faulting triggered by initiation of the Ramgarh-Munsiari Thrust?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, Delores M.; Pearson, Ofori N.

    2013-01-01

    The Ramgarh–Munsiari thrust is a major orogen-scale fault that extends for more than 1,500 km along strike in the Himalayan fold-thrust belt. The fault can be traced along the Himalayan arc from Himachal Pradesh, India, in the west to eastern Bhutan. The fault is located within the Lesser Himalayan tectonostratigraphic zone, and it translated Paleoproterozoic Lesser Himalayan rocks more than 100 km toward the foreland. The Ramgarh–Munsiari thrust is always located in the proximal footwall of the Main Central thrust. Northern exposures (toward the hinterland) of the thrust sheet occur in the footwall of the Main Central thrust at the base of the high Himalaya, and southern exposures (toward the foreland) occur between the Main Boundary thrust and Greater Himalayan klippen. Although the metamorphic grade of rocks within the Ramgarh–Munsiari thrust sheet is not significantly different from that of Greater Himalayan rock in the hanging wall of the overlying Main Central thrust sheet, the tectonostratigraphic origin of the two different thrust sheets is markedly different. The Ramgarh–Munsiari thrust became active in early Miocene time and acted as the roof thrust for a duplex system within Lesser Himalayan rocks. The process of slip transfer from the Main Central thrust to the Ramgarh–Munsiari thrust in early Miocene time and subsequent development of the Lesser Himalayan duplex may have played a role in triggering normal faulting along the South Tibetan Detachment system.

  14. Space Station auxiliary thrust chamber technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Philip J.

    1990-01-01

    The objective was to establish a technical data base to support future development of GO2/GH2 flight thrusters for a Space Station Auxiliary Propulsion System. Specific issues of concern were thruster performance and cycle life. To address these issues, NASA funded Aerojet to design, fabricate, and altitude test two 25-lbf GO2/GH2 thrusters. The first thruster was designed to operate at a nominal mixture ratio (O/F) of 4.0 and expansion area ratio (epsilon) of 100:1. It was tested over a range of O/F from 2.0 to 8.0, achieving a range of specific impulse (Isp) from 440 to 310 lbf-sec/Ibm. The second thruster was optimized for a nominal O/F of 8.0 at a lower nozzle expansion area ratio, epsilon, of 30:1. This second thruster was tested over an O/F range of 3.0 to 9.5, achieving an Isp range of 416 to 3323 lbf-sec/Ibm, respectively. At O/F = 8.0, the Isp was 360 lbf-sec/Ibm, as predicted.

  15. Aircraft ground test and subscale model results of axial thrust loss caused by thrust vectoring using turning vanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Steven A.

    1992-01-01

    The NASA-Dryden F/A-18 high alpha research vehicle was modified to incorporate three independently controlled turning vanes located aft of the primary nozzle of each engine to vector thrust for pitch and yaw control. Ground measured axial thrust losses were compared with the results from a 14.25 pct. cold jet model for single and dual vanes inserted up to 25 degs into the engine exhaust. Data are presented for nozzle pressure ratios of 2.0 and 3.0 and nozzle exit areas of 253 and 348 sq in. The results indicate that subscale nozzle test results properly predict trends but underpredict the full scale results by approx. 1 to 4.5 pct. in thrust loss.

  16. Implicit time-marching solution of the Navier-Stokes equations for thrust reversing and thrust vectoring nozzle flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imlay, S. T.

    1986-01-01

    An implicit finite volume method is investigated for the solution of the compressible Navier-Stokes equations for flows within thrust reversing and thrust vectoring nozzles. Thrust reversing nozzles typically have sharp corners, and the rapid expansion and large turning angles near these corners are shown to cause unacceptable time step restrictions when conventional approximate factorization methods are used. In this investigation these limitations are overcome by using second-order upwind differencing and line Gauss-Siedel relaxation. This method is implemented with a zonal mesh so that flows through complex nozzle geometries may be efficiently calculated. Results are presented for five nozzle configurations including two with time varying geometries. Three cases are compared with available experimental data and the results are generally acceptable.

  17. Tectonothermal history of an exhumed thrust-sheet-top basin: An example from the south Pyrenean thrust belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labaume, Pierre; Meresse, Florian; Jolivet, Marc; Teixell, Antonio; Lahfid, Abdeltif

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents a new balanced structural cross section of the Jaca thrust-sheet-top basin of the southern Pyrenees combined with paleothermometry and apatite fission track (AFT) thermochronology data. The cross section, based on field data and interpretation of industrial seismic reflection profiles, allows refinement of previous interpretations of the south directed thrust system, involving the identification of new thrust faults, and of the kinematic relationships between basement and cover thrusts from the middle Eocene to the early Miocene. AFT analysis shows a southward decrease in the level of fission track resetting, from totally reset Paleozoic rocks and lower Eocene turbidites (indicative of heating to Tmax > ~120°C), to partially reset middle Eocene turbidites and no/very weak resetting in the upper Eocene-lower Oligocene molasse (Tmax < ~60°C). AFT results indicate a late Oligocene-early Miocene cooling event throughout the Axial Zone and Jaca Basin. Paleomaximum temperatures determined by vitrinite reflectance measurements and Raman spectroscopy of carbonaceous material reach up to ~240°C at the base of the turbidite succession. Inverse modeling of AFT and vitrinite reflectance data with the QTQt software for key samples show compatibility between vitrinite-derived Tmax and the AFT reset level for most of the samples. However, they also suggest that the highest temperatures determined in the lowermost turbidites correspond to a thermal anomaly rather than burial heating, possibly due to fluid circulation during thrust activity. From these results, we propose a new sequential restoration of the south Pyrenean thrust system propagation and related basin evolution.

  18. Optimization of very-low-thrust trajectories using evolutionary neurocontrol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dachwald, Bernd

    2005-07-01

    Searching optimal interplanetary trajectories for low-thrust spacecraft is usually a difficult and time-consuming task that involves much experience and expert knowledge in astrodynamics and optimal control theory. This is because the convergence behavior of traditional local optimizers, which are based on numerical optimal control methods, depends on an adequate initial guess, which is often hard to find, especially for very-low-thrust trajectories that necessitate many revolutions around the sun. The obtained solutions are typically close to the initial guess that is rarely close to the (unknown) global optimum. Within this paper, trajectory optimization problems are attacked from the perspective of artificial intelligence and machine learning. Inspired by natural archetypes, a smart global method for low-thrust trajectory optimization is proposed that fuses artificial neural networks and evolutionary algorithms into so-called evolutionary neurocontrollers. This novel method runs without an initial guess and does not require the attendance of an expert in astrodynamics and optimal control theory. This paper details how evolutionary neurocontrol works and how it could be implemented. The performance of the method is assessed for three different interplanetary missions with a thrust to mass ratio <0.15mN/kg (solar sail and nuclear electric).

  19. Engineering Research, Development and Technology, FY95: Thrust area report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-02-01

    The mission of the Engineering Research, Development, and Technology Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is to develop the knowledge base, process technologies, specialized equipment, tools and facilities to support current and future LLNL programs. Engineering`s efforts are guided by a strategy that results in dual benefit: first, in support of Department of Energy missions, such as national security through nuclear deterrence; and second, in enhancing the nation`s economic competitiveness through their collaboration with US industry in pursuit of the most cost-effective engineering solutions to LLNL programs. To accomplish this mission, the Engineering Research, Development, and Technology Program has two important goals: (1) identify key technologies relevant to LLNL programs where they can establish unique competencies, and (2) conduct high-quality research and development to enhance their capabilities and establish themselves as the world leaders in these technologies. To focus Engineering`s efforts, technology thrust areas are identified and technical leaders are selected for each area. The thrust areas are comprised of integrated engineering activities, staffed by personnel from the nine electronics and mechanical engineering divisions, and from other LLNL organizations. This annual report, organized by thrust area, describes Engineering`s activities for fiscal year 1995. The report provides timely summaries of objectives methods, and key results from eight thrust areas: computational electronics and electromagnetics; computational mechanics; microtechnology; manufacturing technology; materials science and engineering; power conversion technologies; nondestructive evaluation; and information engineering.

  20. Blueschist-facies metamorphism related to regional thrust faulting

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blake, M.C.; Irwin, W.P.; Coleman, R.G.

    1969-01-01

    Rocks of the blueschist (glaucophane schist) facies occur throughout the world in narrow tectonic belts associated with ultramafic rocks. In the Coast Range province of California, blueschist rocks are devloped in the eugeosynclinal Franciscan Formation of Late Mesozoic age. The blueschist rocks form a narrow belt for more than 800 km along the eastern margin of this province and commonly are separated from rocks of an overlying thrust plate by serpentinite. Increasing metamorphism upward toward the thrust fault is indicated mineralogically by a transition from pumpellyite to lawsonite and texturally by a transition from metagraywacke to schist. The blueschist metamorphism probably occurred during thrusting in a zone of anomalously high water pressure in the lower plate along the sole of the thrust fault. This tectonic mode of origin for blueschist differs from the generally accepted hypothesis involving extreme depth of burial. Other belts of blueschist-facies rocks, including the Sanbagawa belt of Japan, the marginal synclinal belt of New Zealand, and the blueschist-ultramafic belts of Venezuela, Kamchatka, Ural mountains, and New Caledonia have similar geologic relations and might be explained in the same manner. ?? 1969.

  1. Initial Thrust Measurements of Marshall's Ion-ioN Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schloeder, Natalie R.; Scogin, Tyler; Liu, Thomas M.; Walker, Mitchell L. R.; Polzin, Kurt A.; Dankanich, John W.; Aanesland, Ane

    2015-01-01

    Electronegative ion thrusters are a variation of tradition gridded ion thruster technology differentiated by the production and acceleration of both positive and negative ions. Benefits of electronegative ion thrusters include the elimination of lifetime-limiting cathodes from the thruster architecture and the ability to generate appreciable thrust from both charge species. Following the continued development of electronegative ion thruster technology as exhibited by the PEGASES (Plasma Propulsion with Electronegative GASES) thruster, direct thrust measurements are required to push interest in electronegative ion thruster technology forward. For this work, direct thrust measurements of the MINT (Marshall's Ion-ioN Thruster) will be taken on a hanging pendulum thrust stand for propellant mixtures of Sulfur Hexafluoride and Argon at volumetric flow rates of 5-25 sccm at radio frequency power levels of 100-600 watts at a radio frequency of 13.56 MHz. Acceleration grid operation is operated using a square waveform bias of +/-300 volts at a frequency of 25 kHz.

  2. 10. DETAIL SHOWING THRUST MEASURING SYSTEM. Looking up from the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. DETAIL SHOWING THRUST MEASURING SYSTEM. Looking up from the test stand deck to east. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-A, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  3. Solid rocket booster thrust vector control subsystem description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redmon, J., Jr. (Compiler)

    1983-01-01

    Major Solid Rocket Booster-Thrust Vector Control (SRB-TVC) subsystem components and subcomponents used in the Space Transportation System (STS) are identified. Simplified schematics, detailed schematics, figures, photographs, and data are included to acquaint the reader with the operation, performance, and physical layout as well as the materials and instrumentation used.

  4. Cooling of rocket thrust chambers with liquid oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, Elizabeth S.; Schlumberger, Julie A.

    1990-01-01

    Rocket engines using high pressure liquid oxygen (LOX) and kerosene (RP-1) as the propellants have been considered for future launch vehicle propulsion. Generaly, in regeneratively cooled engines, thefuel is used to cool the combustion chamber. However, hydrocarbons such as RP-1 are limited in their cooling capability at high temperatures and pressures. Therefore, LOX is being considered as an alternative coolant. However, there has been concern as to the effect on the integrity of the chamber liner if oxygen leaks into the combustion zone through fatigue cracks that may develop between the cooling passages and the hot-gas side wall. To address this concern, an investigation was previously conducted with simulated fatigue cracks upstream of the thrust chamber throat. When these chambers were tested, an unexpected melting in the throat region developed which was not in line with the simulated fatigue cracks. The current experimental program was conducted in order to determine the cause for the failure in the earlier thrust chambers and to further investigate the effects of cracks in the thrust chamber liner upstream of the throat. The thrust chambers were tested at oxygen-to-fuel mixture ratios from 1.5 to 2.86 at a nominal chamber pressure of 8.6 MPa. As a result of the test series, the reason for the failure occurring in the earlier work was determined to be injector anomalies. The LOX leaking through the simulated fatigue cracks did not affect the integrity of the chambers.

  5. The Effect of Atmospheric Pressure on Rocket Thrust -- Part I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leitner, Alfred

    1982-01-01

    The first of a two-part question asks: Does the total thrust of a rocket depend on the surrounding pressure? The answer to this question is provided, with accompanying diagrams of rockets. The second part of the question (and answer) are provided in v20 n7, p479, Oct 1982 of this journal. (Author/JN)

  6. Experiments on the Thrust of a Synthetic Jet in Crossflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayers, Bradley; Henoch, Charles; Johari, Hamid

    2014-11-01

    A set of water tunnel experiments were conducted to investigate the effect of crossflow on the thrust of a synthetic jet. This research was motivated by the desire to generate significant turning moments on a fully-submerged, supercavitating vehicle without using control fins or canards. The water tunnel model was a sting-mounted, 3-inch diameter cylindrical body interfaced to a 6-axis waterproof load cell. The synthetic jet actuator was contained within the model and the jet orifice located near the aft end of the model was oriented perpendicular to the mean flow. The actuator consisted of an externally controlled solenoid driving a piston into the cavity. The jet thrust was measured over a broad range of synthetic jet operating parameters, including the actuation frequency and duty cycle, as well as the jet-to-crossflow velocity ratios. Previous work which is based on the slug flow model of an individual vortex ring predicts the time-averaged thrust scales with the square of actuation frequency and the stroke length. The measurements will be compared with the theoretical predictions, and the results will be used to assess the effect of crossflow on the thrust of synthetic jet. Sponsored by the ONR-ULI program.

  7. 14 CFR 33.79 - Fuel burning thrust augmentor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Fuel burning thrust augmentor. 33.79 Section 33.79 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.79 Fuel...

  8. 14 CFR 33.73 - Power or thrust response.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Power or thrust response. 33.73 Section 33.73 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.73 Power...

  9. Digital field trip to the Central Nevada Thrust Belt

    SciTech Connect

    Chamberlain, A.K.; Hook, S.C.; Frost, K.R.

    1996-12-31

    Hydrocarbon exploration in the Central Nevada Thrust Belt is still in its infancy. However, this thrust belt contains all the elements necessary for hydrocarbon accumulations: thick, organically-rich shales; reefs, regional unconformities, karst surfaces, porous sandstones, and extensive and pervasive fractures; anticlines tens of miles long by miles wide; thrust faults that juxtapose potential source and reservoir rocks; and oil seeps. Along a fairway from Las Vegas to Elko, for example, thick Mississippian shales contain 4-6% total organic carbon and are oil-prone and thermally mature. This presentation from a laptop computer and LCD projector is a multimedia version of our October 12-14, 1995 field trip to document the hydrocarbon potential of the thrust belt in Clark, Lincoln, and Nye Counties. Outcrop images were recorded by a digital camera that has a resolution equivalent to a 14 inch computer screen; these images were then downloaded to the computer. All of the images were processed digitally on location to enhance picture quality and color contrast. Many were annotated on location with our observations, measurements, and interpretations. These field annotations are supplemented in this presentation by laboratory analyses. The presentation includes full-color, annotated outcrop images, sounds, and animations. The results show the viability of the new, inexpensive digital cameras to geologic field work in which a multimedia report, ready for presentation to management, can be generated in the field.

  10. Operant Control of Pathological Tongue Thrust in Spastic Cerebral Palsy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, George A., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The behavior modification procedure, carried out at mealtime with a ten-year-old retarded boy who had spastic cerebral palsy, consisted of differential reinforcement and punishment, and resulted in substantial decreases in tongue thrust (reverse swallowing) and food expulsion, and a large increase in observed chewing. (Author/DLS)

  11. A Regeneratively Cooled Thrust Chamber For The Fastrac Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Kendall K.; Sparks, Dave; Woodcock, Gordon

    2000-01-01

    Abstract This paper presents the development of a low-cost, regeneratively-cooled thrust chamber for the Fastrac engine. The chamber was fabricated using hydraformed copper tubing to form the coolant jacket and wrapped with a fiber reinforced polymer composite Material to form a structural jacket. The thrust chamber design and fabrication approach was based upon Space America. Inc.'s 12,000 lb regeneratively-cooled LOX/kerosene rocket engine. Fabrication of regeneratively cooled thrust chambers by tubewall construction dates back to the early US ballistic missile programs. The most significant innovations in this design was the development of a low-cost process for fabrication from copper tubing (nickel alloy was the usual practice) and use of graphite composite overwrap as the pressure containment, which yields an easily fabricated, lightweight pressure jacket around the copper tubes A regeneratively-cooled reusable thrust chamber can benefit the Fastrac engine program by allowing more efficient (cost and scheduler testing). A proof-of-concept test article has been fabricated and will he tested at Marshall Space Flight Center in the late Summer or Fall of 2000.

  12. 14 CFR 33.73 - Power or thrust response.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Power or thrust response. 33.73 Section 33.73 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.73 Power...

  13. 14 CFR 33.79 - Fuel burning thrust augmentor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Fuel burning thrust augmentor. 33.79 Section 33.79 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.79 Fuel...

  14. 14 CFR 33.73 - Power or thrust response.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Power or thrust response. 33.73 Section 33.73 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.73 Power...

  15. 14 CFR 33.79 - Fuel burning thrust augmentor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Fuel burning thrust augmentor. 33.79 Section 33.79 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.79 Fuel...

  16. 14 CFR 33.73 - Power or thrust response.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Power or thrust response. 33.73 Section 33.73 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.73 Power...

  17. Sub-micronewton thrust measurements of indium field emission thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziemer, J. K.

    2003-01-01

    The performance of three indium field emission thrusters (In-FETs) developed by the Austrian Research Center Seibersdorf (ARCS) have been measured up to 200 muN, 2 mA, and 20 W using a submicronewton resolution thrust stand.

  18. 49. VIEW OF EAST SIDE OF LAUNCH PAD. THRUST SECTION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    49. VIEW OF EAST SIDE OF LAUNCH PAD. THRUST SECTION HEATER AND DUCTS ON RIGHT; UMBILICAL MAST POWER CONNECTORS ON LEFT; RAIL SYSTEM AND FIRE SUPPRESSION NOZZLES IN FOREGROUND. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 East, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  19. Transient flow thrust prediction for an ejector propulsion concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drummond, Colin K.

    1989-01-01

    A method for predicting transient thrust augmenting ejector characteristics is introduced. The analysis blends classic self-similar turbulent jet descriptions with a mixing region control volume analysis to predict transient effects in a new way. Details of the theoretical foundation, the solution algorithm, and sample calculations are given.

  20. Design of an ion thruster movable grid thrust vectoring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kural, Aleksander; Leveque, Nicolas; Welch, Chris; Wolanski, Piotr

    2004-08-01

    Several reasons justify the development of an ion propulsion system thrust vectoring system. Spacecraft launched to date have used ion thrusters mounted on gimbals to control the thrust vector within a range of about ±5°. Such devices have large mass and dimensions, hence the need exists for a more compact system, preferably mounted within the thruster itself. Since the 1970s several thrust vectoring systems have been developed, with the translatable accelerator grid electrode being considered the most promising. Laboratory models of this system have already been built and successfully tested, but there is still room for improvement in their mechanical design. This work aims to investigate possibilities of refining the design of such movable grid thrust vectoring systems. Two grid suspension designs and three types of actuators were evaluated. The actuators examined were a micro electromechanical system, a NanoMuscle shape memory alloy actuator and a piezoelectric driver. Criteria used for choosing the best system included mechanical simplicity (use of the fewest mechanical parts), accuracy, power consumption and behaviour in space conditions. Designs of systems using these actuators are proposed. In addition, a mission to Mercury using the system with piezoelectric drivers has been modelled and its performance presented.

  1. Closed form low-thrust trajectories for Mars missions

    SciTech Connect

    Purvis, J.W.

    1992-01-01

    Several closed form trajectory solutions have been developed for low-thrust interplanetary flight and used with patched conics for analysis of combined propulsion systems. The solutions provide insight into alternative types of Mars missions, and show considerable mass savings for fast crewed missions with outbound trip times on the order of 90--100 days. 7 refs.

  2. Closed form low-thrust trajectories for Mars missions

    SciTech Connect

    Purvis, J.W.

    1992-08-01

    Several closed form trajectory solutions have been developed for low-thrust interplanetary flight and used with patched conics for analysis of combined propulsion systems. The solutions provide insight into alternative types of Mars missions, and show considerable mass savings for fast crewed missions with outbound trip times on the order of 90--100 days. 7 refs.

  3. Cooling of rocket thrust chambers with liquid oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, Elizabeth S.; Schlumberger, Julie A.

    1990-01-01

    Rocket engines using high pressure liquid oxygen (LOX) and kerosene (RP-1) as the propellants have been considered for future launch vehicle propulsion. Generally, in regeneratively cooled engines, the fuel is used to cool the combustion chamber. However, hydrocarbons such as RP-1 are limited in their cooling capability at high temperatures and pressures. Therefore, LOX is being considered as an alternative coolant. However, there has been concern as to the effect on the integrity of the chamber liner if oxygen leaks into the combustion zone through fatigue cracks that may develop between the cooling passages and the hot-gas side wall. To address this concern, an investigation was previously conducted with simulated fatigue cracks upstream of the thrust chamber throat. When these chambers were tested, an unexpected melting in the throat region developed which was not in line with the simulated fatigue cracks. The current experimental program was conducted in order to determine the cause for the failure in the earlier thrust chambers and to further investigate the effects of cracks in the thrust chamber liner upstream of the throat. The thrust chambers were tested at oxygen-to-fuel mixture ratios from 1.5 to 2.86 at a nominal chamber pressure of 8.6 MPa. As a result of the test series, the reason for the failure occurring in the earlier work was determined to be injector anomalies. The LOX leaking through the simulated fatigue cracks did not affect the integrity of the chambers.

  4. REAR DETAIL OF RIGHT ENGINE AND WING. THRUST REVERSER REMAINS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    REAR DETAIL OF RIGHT ENGINE AND WING. THRUST REVERSER REMAINS OPEN. MECHANICS JONI BAINE (R) AND BILL THEODORE(L) OPEN FLAP CARRIAGE ACCESS WITH AN IMPACT GUN. THEY WILL CHECK TRANSMISSION FLUID AND OIL THE JACK SCREW. AT FAR LEFT UTILITY MECHANICS BEGIN BODY POLISHING. - Greater Buffalo International Airport, Maintenance Hangar, Buffalo, Erie County, NY

  5. Efficient Optimization of Low-Thrust Spacecraft Trajectories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Seungwon; Fink, Wolfgang; Russell, Ryan; Terrile, Richard; Petropoulos, Anastassios; vonAllmen, Paul

    2007-01-01

    A paper describes a computationally efficient method of optimizing trajectories of spacecraft driven by propulsion systems that generate low thrusts and, hence, must be operated for long times. A common goal in trajectory-optimization problems is to find minimum-time, minimum-fuel, or Pareto-optimal trajectories (here, Pareto-optimality signifies that no other solutions are superior with respect to both flight time and fuel consumption). The present method utilizes genetic and simulated-annealing algorithms to search for globally Pareto-optimal solutions. These algorithms are implemented in parallel form to reduce computation time. These algorithms are coupled with either of two traditional trajectory- design approaches called "direct" and "indirect." In the direct approach, thrust control is discretized in either arc time or arc length, and the resulting discrete thrust vectors are optimized. The indirect approach involves the primer-vector theory (introduced in 1963), in which the thrust control problem is transformed into a co-state control problem and the initial values of the co-state vector are optimized. In application to two example orbit-transfer problems, this method was found to generate solutions comparable to those of other state-of-the-art trajectory-optimization methods while requiring much less computation time.

  6. Separability of drag and thrust in undulatory animals and machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bale, Rahul; Shirgaonkar, Anup A.; Neveln, Izaak D.; Bhalla, Amneet Pal Singh; Maciver, Malcolm A.; Patankar, Neelesh A.

    2014-12-01

    For nearly a century, researchers have tried to understand the swimming of aquatic animals in terms of a balance between the forward thrust from swimming movements and drag on the body. Prior approaches have failed to provide a separation of these two forces for undulatory swimmers such as lamprey and eels, where most parts of the body are simultaneously generating drag and thrust. We nonetheless show that this separation is possible, and delineate its fundamental basis in undulatory swimmers. Our approach unifies a vast diversity of undulatory aquatic animals (anguilliform, sub-carangiform, gymnotiform, bal-istiform, rajiform) and provides design principles for highly agile bioinspired underwater vehicles. This approach has practical utility within biology as well as engineering. It is a predictive tool for use in understanding the role of the mechanics of movement in the evolutionary emergence of morphological features relating to locomotion. For example, we demonstrate that the drag-thrust separation framework helps to predict the observed height of the ribbon fin of electric knifefish, a diverse group of neotropical fish which are an important model system in sensory neurobiology. We also show how drag-thrust separation leads to models that can predict the swimming velocity of an organism or a robotic vehicle.

  7. Performance of Simple Gas Foil Thrust Bearings in Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruckner, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Foil bearings are self-acting hydrodynamics devices used to support high speed rotating machinery. The advantages that they offer to process fluid lubricated machines include: high rotational speed capability, no auxiliary lubrication system, non-contacting high speed operation, and improved damping as compared to rigid hydrodynamic bearings. NASA has had a sporadic research program in this technology for almost 6 decades. Advances in the technology and understanding of foil journal bearings have enabled several new commercial products in recent years. These products include oil-free turbochargers for both heavy trucks and automobiles, high speed electric motors, microturbines for distributed power generation, and turbojet engines. However, the foil thrust bearing has not received a complimentary level of research and therefore has become the weak link of oil-free turbomachinery. In an effort to both provide machine designers with basic performance parameters and to elucidate the underlying physics of foil thrust bearings, NASA Glenn Research Center has completed an effort to experimentally measure the performance of simple gas foil thrust bearing in air. The database includes simple bump foil supported thrust bearings with full geometry and manufacturing techniques available to the user. Test conditions consist of air at ambient pressure and temperatures up to 500 C and rotational speeds to 55,000 rpm. A complete set of axial load, frictional torque, and rotational speed is presented for two different compliant sub-structures and inter-pad gaps. Data obtained from commercially available foil thrust bearings both with and without active cooling is presented for comparison. A significant observation made possible by this data set is the speed-load capacity characteristic of foil thrust bearings. Whereas for the foil journal bearing the load capacity increases linearly with rotational speed, the foil thrust bearing operates in the hydrodynamic high speed limit. In

  8. Why style matters - uncertainty and structural interpretation in thrust belts.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, Rob; Bond, Clare; Watkins, Hannah

    2016-04-01

    Structural complexity together with challenging seismic imaging make for significant uncertainty in developing geometric interpretations of fold and thrust belts. Here we examine these issues and develop more realistic approaches to building interpretations. At all scales, the best tests of the internal consistency of individual interpretations come from structural restoration (section balancing), provided allowance is made for heterogeneity in stratigraphy and strain. However, many existing balancing approaches give misleading perceptions of interpretational risk - both on the scale of individual fold-thrust (trap) structures and in regional cross-sections. At the trap-scale, idealised models are widely cited - fault-bend-fold, fault-propagation folding and trishear. These make entirely arbitrary choices for fault localisation and layer-by-layer deformation: precise relationships between faults and fold geometry are generally invalidated by real-world conditions of stratigraphic variation and distributed strain. Furthermore, subsurface predictions made using these idealisations for hydrocarbon exploration commonly fail the test of drilling. Rarely acknowledged, the geometric reliability of seismic images depends on the assigned seismic velocity model, which in turn relies on geological interpretation. Thus iterative approaches are required between geology and geophysics. The portfolio of commonly cited outcrop analogues is strongly biased to examples that simply conform to idealised models - apparently abnormal structures are rarely described - or even photographed! Insight can come from gravity-driven deep-water fold-belts where part of the spectrum of fold-thrust complexity is resolved through seismic imaging. This imagery shows deformation complexity in fold forelimbs and backlimbs. However, the applicability of these, weakly lithified systems to well-lithified successions (e.g. carbonates) of many foreland thrust belts remains conjectural. Examples of

  9. Seismic Investigations of the Zagros-Bitlis Thrust Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gritto, R.; Sibol, M.; Caron, P.; Quigley, K.; Ghalib, H.; Chen, Y.

    2009-05-01

    We present results of crustal studies obtained with seismic data from the Northern Iraq Seismic Network (NISN). NISN has operated 10 broadband stations in north-eastern Iraq since late 2005. At present, over 800 GB of seismic waveform data have been analyzed. The aim of the present study is to derive models of the local and regional crustal structure of north and north-eastern Iraq, including the northern extension of the Zagros collision zone. This goal is, in part, achieved by estimating local and regional seismic velocity models using receiver function- and surface wave dispersion analyses and to use these velocity models to obtain accurate hypocenter locations and event focal mechanisms. Our analysis of hypocenter locations produces a clear picture of the seismicity associated with the tectonics of the region. The largest seismicity rate is confined to the active northern section of the Zagros thrust zone, while it decreases towards the southern end, before the intensity increases in the Bandar Abbas region again. Additionally, the rift zones in the Read Sea and the Gulf of Aden are clearly demarked by high seismicity rates. Our analysis of waveform data indicates clear propagation paths from the west or south-west across the Arabian shield as well as from the north and east into NISN. Phases including Pn, Pg, Sn, Lg, as well as LR are clearly observed on these seismograms. In contrast, blockage or attenuation of Pg and Sg-wave energy is observed for propagation paths across the Zagros-Bitlis zone from the south, while Pn and Sn phases are not affected. These findings are in support of earlier tectonic models that suggested the existence of multiple parallel listric faults splitting off the main Zagros fault zone in east-west direction. These faults appear to attenuate the crustal phases while the refracted phases, propagating across the mantle lid, remain unaffected. We will present surface wave analysis in support of these findings, indicating multi

  10. The Madong Early Paleozoic fold-thrust belt in southern Tarim Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yue-Jun; Wen, Lei; Li, Hui-Li; Peng, Geng-Xin; Qiu, Bin; Zheng, Duo-Ming; Luo, Jun-Cheng; Zhang, Qiang; Jia, Tie-Gan

    2016-01-01

    The Madong fold-thrust belt, which strikes NE-SW and thrusts southeastward, locates in the southern Tarim Basin. It is a part of the Kunlun Early Paleozoic foreland fold-thrust belt, and so is the Tangnan fold-thrust belt on the southeast of Madong. The Madong and Tangnan fold-thrust belts developed in Cambrian-Ordovician strata, and the Middle Cambrian gypsum-salt layer serves as the main décollement surface. The Middle Silurian and above strata unconformably overlie Madong while the upper Lower Silurian unconformably overlie Tangnan. On the basis of the facts that: (1) the Upper Ordovician is the youngest strata involved in the fold-thrust deformation, (2) the upper-Lower to Middle Silurian is the oldest strata unconformably overlying the foreland fold-thrust belt (including Madong and Tangnan), and growth strata exist in the upper part of the Upper Ordovician, we infer that the deformation time of the Kunlun Early Paleozoic foreland fold-thrust belt (including Madong and Tangnan) was during the Late Ordovician-Early Silurian. Tangnan is the residual of the major part of the foreland fold-thrust belt. Its northwestward thrust direction represents the main thrust direction of the foreland fold-thrust belt. Madong is the front belt of the foreland fold-thrust belt. It mainly thrusts southeastward and serves as the back-thrust belt of the Kunlun Early Paleozoic foreland fold-thrust belt. It is a triangle zone between Madong and Tangnan. The Madong fold-thrust belt is the best-preserved section of the Kunlun Early Paleozoic collisional orogenic belt, and thus is an important geological record of the Kunlun Early Paleozoic orogeny.

  11. Three-dimensional geometry, strain rates and basement deformation mechanisms of thrust-bend folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wibberley, Christopher A. J.

    1997-03-01

    Models for thrust-bend folding of an isotropic medium are used to predict initial basement thrust sheet geometries and sub-surface thrust fault shapes from final basement thrust sheet structure. Predicted strains and strain rates from these models are compared with data on deformation fabrics in an example of a basement thrustbend fold in order to characterise the deformation response to thrust-bend folding. The Glencoul thrust sheet in the Moine Thrust Zone of north-west Scotland is restored to an initial thrust sheet geometry. Spatial and orientation distribution data of syn-emplacement fractures and cataclastic fault zones from within the Glencoul thrust sheet are then compared with the strain and strain rate histories predicted by thrust-bend folding models. A different set of cataclastic fault seams is demonstrated to have been generated at each frontal thrust bend. Cataclastic failure is restricted to portions of the thrust sheet that have moved over frontal bends with smaller radii of curvature. From model thrust-bend geometries and an assumed slip rate of 1 x 10 -10 ms -1, estimated minimum (critical) strain rates required for fracture failure of the Lewisian basement are 10 -11 to 10 -14 s -1 for shear strain rates and 10 -12 to 10 -15 s -1 for extensional strain rates.

  12. Thrust Area Report, Engineering Research, Development and Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Langland, R. T.

    1997-02-01

    The mission of the Engineering Research, Development, and Technology Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is to develop the knowledge base, process technologies, specialized equipment, tools and facilities to support current and future LLNL programs. Engineering`s efforts are guided by a strategy that results in dual benefit: first, in support of Department of Energy missions, such as national security through nuclear deterrence; and second, in enhancing the nation`s economic competitiveness through our collaboration with U.S. industry in pursuit of the most cost- effective engineering solutions to LLNL programs. To accomplish this mission, the Engineering Research, Development, and Technology Program has two important goals: (1) identify key technologies relevant to LLNL programs where we can establish unique competencies, and (2) conduct high-quality research and development to enhance our capabilities and establish ourselves as the world leaders in these technologies. To focus Engineering`s efforts technology {ital thrust areas} are identified and technical leaders are selected for each area. The thrust areas are comprised of integrated engineering activities, staffed by personnel from the nine electronics and mechanical engineering divisions, and from other LLNL organizations. This annual report, organized by thrust area, describes Engineering`s activities for fiscal year 1996. The report provides timely summaries of objectives, methods, and key results from eight thrust areas: Computational Electronics and Electromagnetics; Computational Mechanics; Microtechnology; Manufacturing Technology; Materials Science and Engineering; Power Conversion Technologies; Nondestructive Evaluation; and Information Engineering. Readers desiring more information are encouraged to contact the individual thrust area leaders or authors. 198 refs., 206 figs., 16 tabs.

  13. Extended performance solar electric propulsion thrust system study. Volume 3: Tradeoff studies of alternate thrust system configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawthorne, E. I.

    1977-01-01

    Several thrust system design concepts were evaluated and compared using the specifications of the most advanced 30 cm engineering model thruster as the technology base. Emphasis was placed on relatively high power missions. The extensions in thruster performance required for the Halley's comet mission were defined and alternative thrust system concepts were designed in sufficient detail for comparing mass, efficiency, reliability, structure, and thermal characteristics. Confirmation testing and analysis of thruster and power-processing components were performed. A baseline design was selected from the alternatives considered, and the design analysis and documentation were refined. A program development plan was formulated that outlines the work structure considered necessary for developing, qualifying, and fabricating the flight hardware for the baseline thrust system within the time frame of a project to rendezvous with Halley's comet. An assessment was made of the costs and risks associated with a baseline thrust system as provided to the mission project under this plan. Critical procurements and interfaces were identified and defined.

  14. Thrust Augmentation of a Turbojet Engine at Simulated Flight Conditions by Introduction of a Water-Alcohol Mixture into the Compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Useller, James W.; Auble, Carmon M.; Harvey, Ray W., Sr.

    1952-01-01

    An investigation was conducted at simulated high-altitude flight conditions to evaluate the use of compressor evaporative cooling as a means of turbojet-engine thrust augmentation. Comparison of the performance of the engine with water-alcohol injection at the compressor inlet, at the sixth stage of the compressor, and at the sixth and ninth stages was made. From consideration of the thrust increases achieved, the interstage injection of the coolant was considered more desirable preferred over the combined sixth- and ninth-stage injection because of its relative simplicity. A maximum augmented net-thrust ratio of 1.106 and a maximum augmented jet-thrust ratio of 1.062 were obtained at an augmented liquid ratio of 2.98 and an engine-inlet temperature of 80 F. At lower inlet temperatures (-40 to 40 F), the maximum augmented net-thrust ratios ranged from 1.040 to 1.076 and the maximum augmented jet-thrust ratios ranged from 1.027 to 1.048, depending upon the inlet temperature. The relatively small increase in performance at the lower inlet-air temperatures can be partially attributed to the inadequate evaporation of the water-alcohol mixture, but the more significant limitation was believed to be caused by the negative influence of the liquid coolant on engine- component performance. In general, it is concluded that the effectiveness of the injection of a coolant into the compressor as a means of thrust augmentation is considerably influenced by the design characteristics of the components of the engine being used.

  15. Design of a thrust stand for high power electric propulsion devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haag, Thomas W.

    1989-01-01

    A thrust stand for use with high power electric propulsion devices was designed and tested. The thrust stand was specifically tailored to the needs of a 100 to 250 kW magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thruster program currently in progress at the NASA Lewis Research Center. The thrust stand structure was built as an inverted pendulum arrangement, supported at the base by water-cooled electrical power flexures. Thrust stand tares due to thruster discharge current were demonstrated to be negligible. Tares due to an applied field magnet current, after considerable effort, were reduced to less than 3.0 percent of measured thrust. These tares, however, could be determined independently and subtracted from the indicated thrust measurement. A detailed description is given for the thrust stand design and operation with a 100 kW class MPD device. Other thrust stand tares due to vibration and thermal effects are discussed, along with issues of accuracy and repeatability.

  16. Preliminary Analysis of Low-Thrust Gravity Assist Trajectories by An Inverse Method and a Global Optimization Technique.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Pascale, P.; Vasile, M.; Casotto, S.

    The design of interplanetary trajectories requires the solution of an optimization problem, which has been traditionally solved by resorting to various local optimization techniques. All such approaches, apart from the specific method employed (direct or indirect), require an initial guess, which deeply influences the convergence to the optimal solution. The recent developments in low-thrust propulsion have widened the perspectives of exploration of the Solar System, while they have at the same time increased the difficulty related to the trajectory design process. Continuous thrust transfers, typically characterized by multiple spiraling arcs, have a broad number of design parameters and thanks to the flexibility offered by such engines, they typically turn out to be characterized by a multi-modal domain, with a consequent larger number of optimal solutions. Thus the definition of the first guesses is even more challenging, particularly for a broad search over the design parameters, and it requires an extensive investigation of the domain in order to locate the largest number of optimal candidate solutions and possibly the global optimal one. In this paper a tool for the preliminary definition of interplanetary transfers with coast-thrust arcs and multiple swing-bys is presented. Such goal is achieved combining a novel methodology for the description of low-thrust arcs, with a global optimization algorithm based on a hybridization of an evolutionary step and a deterministic step. Low thrust arcs are described in a 3D model in order to account the beneficial effects of low-thrust propulsion for a change of inclination, resorting to a new methodology based on an inverse method. The two-point boundary values problem (TPBVP) associated with a thrust arc is solved by imposing a proper parameterized evolution of the orbital parameters, by which, the acceleration required to follow the given trajectory with respect to the constraints set is obtained simply through

  17. Interseismic Strain Accumulation Across Metropolitan Los Angeles: Puente Hills Thrust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argus, D.; Liu, Z.; Heflin, M. B.; Moore, A. W.; Owen, S. E.; Lundgren, P.; Drake, V. G.; Rodriguez, I. I.

    2012-12-01

    Twelve years of observation of the Southern California Integrated GPS Network (SCIGN) are tightly constraining the distribution of shortening across metropolitan Los Angeles, providing information on strain accumulation across blind thrust faults. Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (InSAR) and water well records are allowing the effects of water and oil management to be distinguished. The Mojave segment of the San Andreas fault is at a 25° angle to Pacific-North America plate motion. GPS shows that NNE-SSW shortening due to this big restraining bend is fastest not immediately south of the San Andreas fault across the San Gabriel mountains, but rather 50 km south of the fault in northern metropolitan Los Angeles. The GPS results we quote next are for a NNE profile through downtown Los Angeles. Just 2 mm/yr of shortening is being taken up across the San Gabriel mountains, 40 km wide (0.05 micro strain/yr); 4 mm/yr of shortening is being taken up between the Sierra Madre fault, at the southern front of the San Gabriel mountains, and South Central Los Angeles, also 40 km wide (0.10 micro strain/yr). We find shortening to be more evenly distributed across metropolitan Los Angeles than we found before [Argus et al. 2005], though within the 95% confidence limits. An elastic models of interseismic strain accumulation is fit to the GPS observations using the Back Slip model of Savage [1983]. Rheology differences between crystalline basement and sedimentary basin rocks are incorporated using the EDGRN/EDCMP algorithm of Wang et al. [2003]. We attempt to place the Back Slip model into the context of the Elastic Subducting Plate Model of Kanda and Simons [2010]. We find, along the NNE profile through downtown, that: (1) The deep Sierra Madre Thrust cannot be slipping faster than 2 mm/yr, and (2) The Puente Hills Thrust and nearby thrust faults (such as the upper Elysian Park Thrust) are slipping at 9 ±2 mm/yr beneath a locking depth of 12 ±5 km (95% confidence limits

  18. Design and Analysis of a Thrust Vector Mechanism Applied in a Flying Wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yanhe; Gao, Liang; Wang, Hongwei; Zhao, Jie

    This paper presents the design and analysis of a thrust vector mechanism applied in a flying wing. A thrust vector mechanism driven by two servos is developed. An analysis of the dynamic differences in minimum hovering radius between conventional flying wing and one with thrust vector mechanism is given and validated with simulation. It is shown that thrust vector has obvious advantages over the usual flying wing including decreasing the hovering radius and decreasing roll angle. The benefits should improve maneuverability and agility.

  19. Thrust Measurement of Dielectric Barrier Discharge (DBD) Plasma Actuators: New Anti-Thrust Hypothesis, Frequency Sweeps Methodology, Humidity and Enclosure Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashpis, David E.; Laun, Matthew C.

    2014-01-01

    We discuss thrust measurements of Dielectric Barrier Discharge (DBD) plasma actuators devices used for aerodynamic active flow control. After a review of our experience with conventional thrust measurement and significant non-repeatability of the results, we devised a suspended actuator test setup, and now present a methodology of thrust measurements with decreased uncertainty. The methodology consists of frequency scans at constant voltages. The procedure consists of increasing the frequency in a step-wise fashion from several Hz to the maximum frequency of several kHz, followed by frequency decrease back down to the start frequency of several Hz. This sequence is performed first at the highest voltage of interest, then repeated at lower voltages. The data in the descending frequency direction is more consistent and selected for reporting. Sample results show strong dependence of thrust on humidity which also affects the consistency and fluctuations of the measurements. We also observed negative values of thrust, or "anti-thrust", at low frequencies between 4 Hz and up to 64 Hz. The anti-thrust is proportional to the mean-squared voltage and is frequency independent. Departures from the parabolic anti-thrust curve are correlated with appearance of visible plasma discharges. We propose the anti-thrust hypothesis. It states that the measured thrust is a sum of plasma thrust and anti-thrust, and assumes that the anti-thrust exists at all frequencies and voltages. The anti-thrust depends on actuator geometry and materials and on the test installation. It enables the separation of the plasma thrust from the measured total thrust. This approach enables more meaningful comparisons between actuators at different installations and laboratories. The dependence on test installation was validated by surrounding the actuator with a grounded large-diameter metal sleeve. Strong dependence on humidity is also shown; the thrust significantly increased with decreasing humidity, e

  20. Inclusion of Higher Order Harmonics in the Modeling of Optimal Low-Thrust Orbit Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kéchichian, Jean A.

    2008-03-01

    The higher fidelity modeling of minimum-time transfers using continuous constant acceleration low-thrust is depicted by including the higher zonal harmonics J 3 and J 4for the Earth gravity model. The inclusion of these higher order harmonics is of great benefit in carrying out accurate transfer simulations, especially for long duration flights dwelling in low altitudes where the effects of these zonals are greatest. The analysis presented here can also be coded in the flight guidance computer of spacecraft for autonomous operations and on ground computers for solution uploads and resetting during low-thrust transfers. Equinoctial elements are used to avoid singularities when orbits are circular or equatorial and the applicability of the theory is of a general nature regardless of the size, shape and spatial orientation of the orbits provided they are not of the parabolic or hyperbolic types. To this end, two sets of dynamic and adjoint differential equations in terms of nonsingular orbital elements are derived by further considering a more accurate perturbation model in the form of the higher order Earth zonal harmonics J 3and J 4. Previous analyses involved only the first-order J 2 term in order to model optimal lowthrust transfers between any two given circular or elliptic orbits. The first formulation uses the eccentric longitude as the sixth element of an equinoctial set of elements while describing the thrust as well as the zonal accelerations in the so called direct equinoctial frame. The second formulation makes use of the true longitude as the sixth element instead while resolving the thrust and the zonal accelerations in the rotating Euler-Hill frame simplifying considerably the algebraic derivations leading to the generation of the nonsingular differential equations that are also free of any singularity for the important zero eccentricity and zero inclination cases often encountered in Earth orbit transfer problems. The derivations of both nonsingular

  1. Advances in Thrust-Based Emergency Control of an Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Creech, Gray; Burken, John J.; Burcham, Bill

    2003-01-01

    Engineers at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center have received a patent on an emergency flight-control method implemented by a propulsion-controlled aircraft (PCA) system. Utilizing the preexisting auto-throttle and engine-pressure-ratio trim controls of the airplane, the PCA system provides pitch and roll control for landing an airplane safely without using aerodynamic control surfaces that have ceased to function because of a primary-flight-control-system failure. The installation of the PCA does not entail any changes in pre-existing engine hardware or software. [Aspects of the method and system at previous stages of development were reported in Thrust-Control System for Emergency Control of an Airplane (DRC-96-07), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 25, No. 3 (March 2001), page 68 and Emergency Landing Using Thrust Control and Shift of Weight (DRC-96-55), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 26, No. 5 (May 2002), page 58.]. Aircraft flight-control systems are designed with extensive redundancy to ensure low probabilities of failure. During recent years, however, several airplanes have exhibited major flight-control-system failures, leaving engine thrust as the last mode of flight control. In some of these emergency situations, engine thrusts were successfully modulated by the pilots to maintain flight paths or pitch angles, but in other situations, lateral control was also needed. In the majority of such control-system failures, crashes resulted and over 1,200 people died. The challenge lay in creating a means of sufficient degree of thrust-modulation control to safely fly and land a stricken airplane. A thrust-modulation control system designed for this purpose was flight-tested in a PCA an MD-11 airplane. The results of the flight test showed that without any operational control surfaces, a pilot can land a crippled airplane (U.S. Patent 5,330,131). The installation of the original PCA system entailed modifications not only of the flight-control computer (FCC) of the airplane but

  2. Rotary-Jet Thrust Augmentor with Jet-Flapped Blades.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordier, Stephane Jean

    The concepts and the mechanisms of thrust augmentation are analyzed. The theoretical performance of different types of thrust augmentors is discussed with an emphasis on the Rotary-Jet ejector. The application of thrust augmentors to STOVL aircrafts and the merits of the ejector in this application are discussed where the theoretical performance of the Rotary-Jet is shown to be particularly attractive. A review of previous steady-flow and Rotary-Jet ejector experimental data shows equivalent performance levels. Recent experimental work on the Rotary-Jet is analyzed and several factors adversely affecting performance are identified and discussed. To address these problems a new configuration is proposed where the rotor is fitted with blades, allowing better control of the primary/secondary interaction. The jet sheet exiting at the trailing edge of the foil forms a jet flap. A two-dimensional analysis of the aerodynamics around a jet-flapped airfoil is performed for the first time using a fluid finite element code. Whereas in previous models the presence of the pressure gradient across the jet sheet is an assumption, its presence is predicted by the present method. Results of a test run show good agreement with experimental results by others. This method is applied to the geometry of blade model #10. An original three-dimensional model of the self -driven, jet-flapped bladed rotor is presented which, given set geometrical parameters and operating conditions, solves at each section for the jet and blade angle and calculates the rotor thrust augmentation. The results of parametric runs identify favorable design trends which are applied to the design of prototype test models. An experimental test program has been performed. Flow visualization and local flow velocity and pressure measurements were used to identify favorable jet sheet characteristics. The presence of losses in the spinning rotor are evidenced. Seven blade models were tested in a parametric study. Rotor

  3. Scale independence of décollement thrusting

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McBride, John H.; Pugin, Andre J.M.; Hatcher, Robert D.

    2007-01-01

    Orogen-scale décollements (detachment surfaces) are an enduring subject of investigation by geoscientists. Uncertainties remain as to how crustal convergence processes maintain the stresses necessary for development of low-angle fault surfaces above which huge slabs of rock are transported horizontally for tens to hundreds of kilometers. Seismic reflection profiles from the southern Appalachian crystalline core and several foreland fold-and-thrust belts provide useful comparisons with high-resolution shallow-penetration seismic reflection profiles acquired over the frontal zone of the Michigan lobe of the Wisconsinan ice sheet northwest of Chicago, Illinois. These profiles provide images of subhorizontal and overlapping dipping reflections that reveal a ramp-and-flat thrust system developed in poorly consolidated glacial till. The system is rooted in a master décollement at the top of bedrock. These 2–3 km long images contain analogs of images observed in seismic reflection profiles from orogenic belts, except that the scale of observation in the profiles in glacial materials is two orders of magnitude less. Whereas the décollement beneath the ice lobe thrust belt lies ∼70 m below thrusted anticlines having wavelengths of tens of meters driven by an advancing ice sheet, seismic images from overthrust terranes are related to lithospheric convergence that produces décollements traceable for thousands of kilometers at depths ranging from a few to over 10 km. Dual vergence or reversals in vergence (retrocharriage) that developed over abrupt changes in depth to the décollement can be observed at all scales. The strikingly similar images, despite the contrast in scale and driving mechanism, suggest a scale- and driving mechanism–independent behavior for décollement thrust systems. All these systems initially had the mechanical properties needed to produce very similar geometries with a compressional driving mechanism directed subparallel to Earth's surface

  4. Global Optimization of Low-Thrust Interplanetary Trajectories Subject to Operational Constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Englander, Jacob Aldo; Vavrina, Matthew; Hinckley, David

    2016-01-01

    Low-thrust electric propulsion provides many advantages for mission to difficult targets-Comets and asteroids-Mercury-Outer planets (with sufficient power supply)Low-thrust electric propulsion is characterized by high power requirements but also very high specific impulse (Isp), leading to very good mass fractions. Low-thrust trajectory design is a very different process from chemical trajectory.

  5. 14 CFR 25.934 - Turbojet engine thrust reverser system tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Turbojet engine thrust reverser system... TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant General § 25.934 Turbojet engine thrust reverser system tests. Thrust reversers installed on turbojet engines must meet...

  6. 14 CFR 25.934 - Turbojet engine thrust reverser system tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Turbojet engine thrust reverser system... TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant General § 25.934 Turbojet engine thrust reverser system tests. Thrust reversers installed on turbojet engines must meet...

  7. Evaluation of various thrust calculation techniques on an F404 engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Ronald J.

    1990-01-01

    In support of performance testing of the X-29A aircraft at the NASA-Ames, various thrust calculation techniques were developed and evaluated for use on the F404-GE-400 engine. The engine was thrust calibrated at NASA-Lewis. Results from these tests were used to correct the manufacturer's in-flight thrust program to more accurately calculate thrust for the specific test engine. Data from these tests were also used to develop an independent, simplified thrust calculation technique for real-time thrust calculation. Comparisons were also made to thrust values predicted by the engine specification model. Results indicate uninstalled gross thrust accuracies on the order of 1 to 4 percent for the various in-flight thrust methods. The various thrust calculations are described and their usage, uncertainty, and measured accuracies are explained. In addition, the advantages of a real-time thrust algorithm for flight test use and the importance of an accurate thrust calculation to the aircraft performance analysis are described. Finally, actual data obtained from flight test are presented.

  8. 14 CFR 25.1155 - Reverse thrust and propeller pitch settings below the flight regime.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Reverse thrust and propeller pitch settings... Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 25.1155 Reverse thrust and propeller pitch settings below the flight regime. Each control for reverse thrust and for propeller pitch settings below the flight regime...

  9. 14 CFR 25.1155 - Reverse thrust and propeller pitch settings below the flight regime.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Reverse thrust and propeller pitch settings... Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 25.1155 Reverse thrust and propeller pitch settings below the flight regime. Each control for reverse thrust and for propeller pitch settings below the flight regime...

  10. 14 CFR 25.1155 - Reverse thrust and propeller pitch settings below the flight regime.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Reverse thrust and propeller pitch settings... Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 25.1155 Reverse thrust and propeller pitch settings below the flight regime. Each control for reverse thrust and for propeller pitch settings below the flight regime...

  11. 14 CFR 25.1155 - Reverse thrust and propeller pitch settings below the flight regime.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Reverse thrust and propeller pitch settings... Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 25.1155 Reverse thrust and propeller pitch settings below the flight regime. Each control for reverse thrust and for propeller pitch settings below the flight regime...

  12. 14 CFR 25.1155 - Reverse thrust and propeller pitch settings below the flight regime.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Reverse thrust and propeller pitch settings... Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 25.1155 Reverse thrust and propeller pitch settings below the flight regime. Each control for reverse thrust and for propeller pitch settings below the flight regime...

  13. Calibration for Thrust and Airflow Measurements in the CE-22 Advanced Nozzle Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werner, Roger A.; Wolter, John D.

    2010-01-01

    CE-22 facility procedures and measurements for thrust and airflow calibration obtained with choked-flow ASME nozzles are presented. Six calibration nozzles are used at an inlet total pressure from 20 to 48 psia. Throat areas are from 9.9986 to 39.986 sq. in.. Throat Reynolds number varies from 1.8 to 7.9 million. Nozzle gross thrust coefficient (CFG) uncertainty is 0.25 to 0.75 percent, with smaller uncertainly generally for larger nozzles and higher inlet total pressure. Nozzle discharge coefficient (CDN) uncertainty is 0.15 percent or less for all the data. ASME nozzle calibrations need to be done before and after research model testing to achieve these uncertainties. In addition, facility capability in terms of nozzle pressure ratio (NPR) and nozzle airflow are determined. Nozzle pressure ratio of 50 or more is obtainable at 40 psia for throat areas between 20 and 30 sq. in.. Also presented are results for two of the ASME nozzles vectored at 10deg, a dead-weight check of the vertical (perpendicular to the jet axis) force measurement, a calibration of load cell forces for the effects of facility tank deflection with tank pressure, and the calibration of the metric-break labyrinth seal.

  14. Elimination of High-Frequency Combustion Instability in the Fastrac Engine Thrust Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rocker, Marvin; Nesman, Thomas E.

    1998-01-01

    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center(MSFC) has been tasked with developing a 60,000 pound thrust, pump-fed, LOX/RP-1 engine under the Advanced Space Transportation Program(ASTP). This government-led design has been designated the Fastrac engine. The X-34 vehicle will use the Fastrac engine as the main propulsion system. The X-34 will be a suborbital vehicle developed by the Orbital Sciences Corporation. The X-34 vehicle will be launched from an L-1011 airliner. After launch, the X-34 vehicle will be able to climb to altitudes up to 250,000 feet and reach speeds up to Mach 8, over a mission range of 500 miles. The overall length, wingspan, and gross takeoff weight of the X-34 vehicle are 58.3 feet, 27.7 feet and 45,000 pounds, respectively. This report summarizes the plan of achieving a Fastrac thrust chamber assembly(TCA) stable bomb test that meets the JANNAF standards, the Fastrac TCA design, and the combustion instabilities exhibited by the Fastrac TCA during testing at MSFC's test stand 116 as determined from high-frequency fluctuating pressure measurements. This report also summarizes the characterization of the combustion instabilities from the pressure measurements and the steps taken to eliminate the instabilities.

  15. Cenozoic thrust emplacement of a Devonian batholith, northeastern Brooks Range: Involvement of crystalline rocks in a foreland fold-and-thrust belt

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, W.K.; Hanks, C.L. )

    1990-05-01

    Involvement of crystalline rocks in thrusting near the foreland basin of a fold-and-thrust belt is relatively uncommon. In the northeastern Brooks Range, the Devonian Okpilak batholith was thrust northward and structurally elevated above adjacent foreland basin deposits during Cenozoic fold-and-thrust deformation. The batholith may have acted initially as a regional structural buttress, but a drop in the basal detachment surface to greater depth south of the batholith resulted in northward transport of the batholith. Shortening within the batholith was accommodated by (1) the development of discrete thrust slices bounded by ductile shear zones, (2) simple shear and development of penetrative mesoscopic and microscopic fabrics throughout the batholith, or both. The Mississippian Kayak Shale, a regional detachment horizon at the base of the overlying cover sequence, is depositionally thin or absent adjacent to the batholith. Thus, most of the cover sequence remained structurally coupled to the batholith during thrusting and was shortened by the development of penetrative structures.

  16. NASA's In-Space Propulsion Technology Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, L.; Robinson, J.

    2004-11-01

    NASA's In-Space Propulsion Technology Program is investing in technologies that have the potential to revolutionize the robotic exploration of deep space. For robotic exploration and science missions, increased efficiencies of future propulsion systems are critical to reduce overall life-cycle costs and, in some cases, enable missions previously considered impossible. Continued reliance on conventional chemical propulsion alone will not enable the robust exploration of deep space - the maximum theoretical efficiencies have almost been reached and they are insufficient to meet needs for many ambitious science missions currently being considered. The In-Space Propulsion Technology Program's technology portfolio includes many advanced propulsion systems. From the next generation ion propulsion system operating in the 5 - 10 kW range, to advanced cryogenic propulsion, substantial advances in spacecraft propulsion performance are anticipated. Some of the most promising technologies for achieving these goals use the environment of space itself for energy and propulsion and are generically called, ``propellantless" because they do not require on-board fuel to achieve thrust. Propellantless propulsion technologies include scientific innovations such as solar sails, electrodynamic and momentum transfer tethers, aeroassist, and aerocapture. This paper will provide an overview of both propellantless and propellant-based advanced propulsion technologies, and NASA's plans for advancing them as part of the \\$60M per year In-Space Propulsion Technology Program. Solar sails and aerocapture are candidates for flight validation as early as 2008 in partnership with NASA's New Millennium Program.

  17. NASA In-Space Propulsion Technology Program: Overview and Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Les; Alexander, Leslie; Baggett, Randy M.; Bonometti, Joseph A.; Herrmann, Melody; James, Bonnie F.; Montgomery, Sandy E.

    2004-01-01

    NASA's In-Space Propulsion Technology Program is investing in technologies that have the potential to revolutionize the robotic exploration of deep space. For robotic exploration and science missions, increased efficiencies of future propulsion systems are critical to reduce overall life-cycle costs and, in some cases, enable missions previously considered impossible. Continued reliance on conventional chemical propulsion alone will not enable the robust exploration of deep space - the maximum theoretical efficiencies have almost been reached and they are insufficient to meet needs for many ambitious science missions currently being considered. The In-Space Propulsion Technology Program's technology portfolio includes many advanced propulsion systems. From the next-generation ion propulsion system operating in the 5- to 10-kW range to aerocapture and solar sails, substantial advances in - spacecraft propulsion performance are anticipated. Some of the most promising technologies for achieving these goals use the environment of space itself for energy and propulsion and are generically called 'propellantless' because they do not require onboard fuel to achieve thrust. Propellantless propulsion technologies include scientific innovations such as solar sails, electrodynamic and momentum transfer.tethers, aeroassist and aerocapture. This paper will provide an overview of both propellantless and propellant-based advanced propulsion technologies, as well as NASA's plans for advancing them as part of the In-Space Propulsion Technology Program.

  18. NASA's In-Space Propulsion Technology Program: A Step Toward Interstellar Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Les; James, Bonnie; Baggett, Randy; Montgomery, Sandy

    2005-01-01

    NASA's In-Space Propulsion Technology Program is investing in technologies that have the potential to revolutionize the robotic exploration of deep space. For robotic exploration and science missions, increased efficiencies of future propulsion systems are critical to reduce overall life-cycle costs and, in some cases, enable missions previously considered impossible. Continued reliance on conventional chemical propulsion alone will not enable the robust exploration of deep space. The maximum theoretical efficiencies have almost been reached and are insufficient to meet needs for many ambitious science missions currently being considered. By developing the capability to support mid-term robotic mission needs, the program is laying the technological foundation for travel to nearby interstellar space. The In-Space Propulsion Technology Program s technology portfolio includes many advanced propulsion systems. From the next-generation ion propulsion systems operating in the 5-10 kW range, to solar sail propulsion, substantial advances in spacecraft propulsion performance are anticipated. Some of the most promising technologies for achieving these goals use the environment of space itself for energy and propulsion and are generically called "propellantless" because they do not require onboard fuel to achieve thrust. Propellantless propulsion technologies include scientific innovations, such as solar sails, electrodynamic and momentum transfer tethers, and aerocapture. This paper will provide an overview of those propellantless and propellant-based advanced propulsion technologies that will most significantly advance our exploration of deep space.

  19. NASA's In-Space Propulsion Technology Program: Overview and Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Les; Alexander, Leslie; Baggett, Randy M.; Bonometti, Joseph A.; Herrmann, Melody; James, Bonnie F.; Montgomery, Sandy E.

    2004-01-01

    NASA's In-Space Propulsion Technology Program is investing in technologies that have the potential to revolutionize the robotic exploration of deep space. For robotic exploration and science missions, increased efficiencies of future propulsion systems are critical to reduce overall life-cycle costs and, in some cases, enable missions previously considered impossible. Continued reliance on conventional chemical propulsion alone will not enable the robust exploration of deep space - the maximum theoretical efficiencies have almost been reached and they are insufficient to meet needs for many ambitious science missions currently being considered. The In-Space Propulsion Technology Program s technology portfolio includes many advanced propulsion systems. From the next-generation ion propulsion system operating in the 5- to 10-kW range to aerocapture and solar sails, substantial advances in spacecraft propulsion performance are anticipated. Some of the most promising technologies for achieving these goals ase the environment of space itself for energy and propulsion and are generically called 'propellantless' because they do not require onboard fuel to achieve thrust. Propellantless propulsion technologies include scientific innovations such as solar sails, electrodynamic and momentum transfer tethers, aeroassist, and aerocapture. This paper will provide an overview of both propellantless and propellant-based advanced propulsion technologies, as well as NASA s plans for advancing them as part of the In-Space Propulsion Technology Program.

  20. NASA's In-Space Propulsion Technology Program: Overview and Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Les; Alexander, Leslie; Baggett, Randy; Bonometti, Joe; Herrmann, Melody; James, Bonnie; Montgomery, Sandy

    2004-01-01

    NASA's In-Space Propulsion Technology Program is investing in technologies that have the potential to revolutionize the robotic exploration of deep space. For robotic exploration and science missions, increased efficiencies of future propulsion systems are critical to reduce overall life-cycle costs and, in some cases, enable missions previously considered impossible. Continued reliance on conventional chemical propulsion alone will not enable the robust exploration of deep space - the maximum theoretical efficiencies have almost been reached and they are insufficient to meet needs for many ambitious science missions currently being considered. The In-Space Propulsion Technology Program s technology portfolio includes many advanced propulsion systems. From the next generation ion propulsion system operating in the 5 - 10 kW range, to advanced cryogenic propulsion, substantial advances in spacecraft propulsion performance are anticipated. Some of the most promising technologies for achieving these goals use the environment of space itself for energy and propulsion and are generically called, 'propellantless' because they do not require onboard fuel to achieve thrust. Propellantless propulsion technologies include scientific innovations such as solar sails, electrodynamic and momentum transfer tethers, aeroassist, and aerocapture. This paper will provide an overview of both propellantless and propellant-based advanced propulsion technologies, and NASA s plans for advancing them as part of the $60M per year In-Space Propulsion Technology Program.

  1. High Thrust-to-Power Annular Engine Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Michael; Thomas, Robert; Crofton, Mark; Young, Jason A.; Foster, John E.

    2015-01-01

    Gridded ion engines have the highest efficiency and total impulse of any mature electric propulsion technology, and have been successfully implemented for primary propulsion in both geocentric and heliocentric environments with excellent ground-in-space correlation of performance. However, they have not been optimized to maximize thrust-to-power, an important parameter for Earth orbit transfer applications. This publication discusses technology development work intended to maximize this parameter. These activities include investigating the capabilities of a non-conventional design approach, the annular engine, which has the potential of exceeding the thrust-to-power of other EP technologies. This publication discusses the status of this work, including the fabrication and initial tests of a large-area annular engine. This work is being conducted in collaboration among NASA Glenn Research Center, The Aerospace Corporation, and the University of Michigan.

  2. High Thrust-to-Power Annular Engine Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Michael J.; Thomas, Robert E.; Crofton, Mark W.; Young, Jason A.; Foster, John E.

    2015-01-01

    Gridded ion engines have the highest efficiency and total impulse of any mature electric propulsion technology, and have been successfully implemented for primary propulsion in both geocentric and heliocentric environments with excellent ground/in-space correlation of performance. However, they have not been optimized to maximize thrust-to-power, an important parameter for Earth orbit transfer applications. This publication discusses technology development work intended to maximize this parameter. These activities include investigating the capabilities of a non-conventional design approach, the annular engine, which has the potential of exceeding the thrust-to-power of other EP technologies. This publication discusses the status of this work, including the fabrication and initial tests of a large-area annular engine. This work is being conducted in collaboration among NASA Glenn Research Center, The Aerospace Corporation, and the University of Michigan.

  3. Modular thrust subsystem approaches to solar electric propulsion module design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cake, J. E.; Sharp, G. R.; Oglebay, J. C.; Shaker, F. J.; Zevesky, R. J.

    1976-01-01

    Three approaches are presented for packaging the elements of a 30 cm ion thrustor subsystem into a modular thrust subsystem. The individual modules, when integrated into a conceptual solar electric propulsion module are applicable to a multimission set of interplanetary flights with the Space Shuttle/Interim Upper Stage as the launch vehicle. The emphasis is on the structural and thermal integration of the components into the modular thrust subsystems. Thermal control for the power processing units is either by direct radiation through louvers in combination with heat pipes of an all heat pipe system. The propellant storage and feed system and thrustor gimbal system concepts are presented. The three approaches are compared on the basis of mass, cost, testing, interfaces, simplicity, reliability, and maintainability.

  4. Extended performance solar electric propulsion thrust system design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cake, J. E.; Hawthorne, E. I.; Poeschel, R. L.

    1978-01-01

    A thrust system design has been established for an extended performance technology, 6.4 kW, 4800 sec specific impulse ion thruster. The configuration is comprised of ten thrusters configured with a power management and control subsystem in a modular thrust system design. The system design approach is an adaptation of that previously established for the baseline technology 2.7 kW, 3000 sec specific impulse ion thruster. The power management and control subsystem design includes a combination of individual electronics for each thruster and a set of electronics with redundancy that are common to all thrusters. The thermal dissipation from all electronics is removed with a common heat pipe/radiator assembly.

  5. Modular thrust subsystem approaches to solar electric propulsion module design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cake, J. E.; Sharp, G. R.; Oglebay, J. C.; Shaker, F. J.; Zavesky, R. J.

    1976-01-01

    Three approaches are presented for packaging the elements of a 30 cm ion thruster subsystem into a modular thrust subsystem. The individual modules, when integrated into a conceptual solar electric propulsion module are applicable to a multimission set of interplanetary flights with the space shuttle interim upper stage as the launch vehicle. The emphasis is on the structural and thermal integration of the components into the modular thrust subsystems. Thermal control for the power processing units is either by direct radiation through louvers in combination with heat pipes or an all heat pipe system. The propellant storage and feed system and thruster gimbal system concepts are presented. The three approaches are compared on the basis of mass, cost, testing, interfaces, simplicity, reliability, and maintainability.

  6. Investigation of electroforming techniques. [fabrication of regeneratively cooled thrust chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malone, G. A.

    1975-01-01

    Copper and nickel electroforming was examined for the purpose of establishing the necessary processes and procedures for repeatable, successful fabrication of the outer structures of regeneratively cooled thrust chambers. The selection of electrolytes for copper and nickel deposition is described. The development studies performed to refine and complete the processes necessary for successful chamber shell fabrication and the testing employed to verify the applicability of the processes and procedures to small scale hardware are described. Specifications were developed to afford a guideline for the electroforming of high quality outer shells on regeneratively cooled thrust chamber liners. Test results indicated repeatable mechanical properties could be produced in copper deposits from the copper sulfate electrolyte with periodic current reversal and in nickel deposits from the sulfamate solution. Use of inert, removable channel fillers and the conductivizing of such is described. Techniques (verified by test) which produce high integrity bonds to copper and copper alloy liners are discussed.

  7. Optimization of Low-Thrust Spiral Trajectories by Collocation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falck, Robert D.; Dankanich, John W.

    2012-01-01

    As NASA examines potential missions in the post space shuttle era, there has been a renewed interest in low-thrust electric propulsion for both crewed and uncrewed missions. While much progress has been made in the field of software for the optimization of low-thrust trajectories, many of the tools utilize higher-fidelity methods which, while excellent, result in extremely high run-times and poor convergence when dealing with planetocentric spiraling trajectories deep within a gravity well. Conversely, faster tools like SEPSPOT provide a reasonable solution but typically fail to account for other forces such as third-body gravitation, aerodynamic drag, solar radiation pressure. SEPSPOT is further constrained by its solution method, which may require a very good guess to yield a converged optimal solution. Here the authors have developed an approach using collocation intended to provide solution times comparable to those given by SEPSPOT while allowing for greater robustness and extensible force models.

  8. Optimal low-thrust rendezvous using equinoctial orbit elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kechichian, Jean Albert

    1996-01-01

    The problem of optimal low-thrust rendezvous using continuous constant acceleration is presented based on the use of the non-singular equinoctial orbit elements. State and adjoint equations are integrated numerically by applying the thrust vector along a direction that maximizes the variational Hamiltonian at each instant of time. The two-point-boundary-value problem is solved via a Newton-Raphson scheme after guessing the initial values of the Lagrange multipliers as well as the total flight time. The transversality condition for the Hamiltonian at the final time is also used to carry out the 7 × 7 search. Equinoctial elements have previously been used to carry out minimum-time orbit transfers by considering only the five slowly varying elements. The inclusion of the sixth element representing the fast variable has allowed us to extend the applicability of the non-singular formulation to problems of orbital rendezvous.

  9. Erosion influences the seismicity of active thrust faults.

    PubMed

    Steer, Philippe; Simoes, Martine; Cattin, Rodolphe; Shyu, J Bruce H

    2014-11-21

    Assessing seismic hazards remains one of the most challenging scientific issues in Earth sciences. Deep tectonic processes are classically considered as the only persistent mechanism driving the stress loading of active faults over a seismic cycle. Here we show via a mechanical model that erosion also significantly influences the stress loading of thrust faults at the timescale of a seismic cycle. Indeed, erosion rates of about ~0.1-20 mm yr(-1), as documented in Taiwan and in other active compressional orogens, can raise the Coulomb stress by ~0.1-10 bar on the nearby thrust faults over the inter-seismic phase. Mass transfers induced by surface processes in general, during continuous or short-lived and intense events, represent a prominent mechanism for inter-seismic stress loading of faults near the surface. Such stresses are probably sufficient to trigger shallow seismicity or promote the rupture of deep continental earthquakes up to the surface.

  10. Propellant management for low thrust chemical propulsion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamlyn, K. M.; Dergance, R. H.; Aydelott, J. C.

    1981-01-01

    Low-thrust chemical propulsion systems (LTPS) will be required for orbital transfer of large space systems (LSS). The work reported in this paper was conducted to determine the propellant requirements, preferred propellant management technique, and propulsion system sizes for the LTPS. Propellants were liquid oxygen (LO2) combined with liquid hydrogen (LH2), liquid methane or kerosene. Thrust levels of 100, 500, and 1000 lbf were combined with 1, 4, and 8 perigee burns for transfer from low earth orbit to geosynchronous earth orbit. This matrix of systems was evaluated with a multilayer insulation (MLI) or a spray-on-foam insulation. Vehicle sizing results indicate that a toroidal tank configuration is needed for the LO2/LH2 system. Multiple perigee burns and MLI allow far superior LSS payload capability. Propellant settling, combined with a single screen device, was found to be the lightest and least complex propellant management technique.

  11. Engineering research, development and technology. Thrust area report, FY93

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    The mission of the Engineering Research, Development, and Technology Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is to develop the technical staff, tools, and facilities needed to support current and future LLNL programs. The efforts are guided by a dual-benefit research and development strategy that supports Department of Energy missions, such as national security through nuclear deterrence and economic competitiveness through partnerships with U.S. industry. This annual report, organized by thrust area, describes the activities for the fiscal year 1993. The report provides timely summaries of objectives, methods, and results from nine thrust areas for this fiscal year: Computational Electronics and Electromagnetics; Computational Mechanics; Diagnostics and Microelectronics; Fabrication Technology; Materials Science and Engineering; Power Conversion Technologies; Nondestructive Evaluation; Remote Sensing, Imaging, and Signal Engineering; and Emerging Technologies. Separate abstracts were prepared for 47 papers in this report.

  12. Geophysical interpretations of the Libby thrust belt, northwestern Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kleinkopf, M. Dean; with sections by Harrison, Jack Edward; Stanley, W.D.

    1997-01-01

    Interpretations of gravity and aeromagnetic anomaly data, supplemented by results from two seismic reflection profiles and five magnetotelluric soundings, were used to study buried structure and lithology of the Libby thrust belt of northwestern Montana. The gravity anomaly data show a marked correlation with major structures. The Purcell anticlinorium and the Sylvanite anticline are very likely cored by stacks of thrust slices of dense crystalline basement rocks that account for the large gravity highs across these two structures. Gravity anomaly data for the Cabinet Mountains Wilderness show a string of four broad highs. The principal magnetic anomaly sources are igneous intrusive rocks, major fault zones, and magnetite-bearing sedimentary rocks of the Ravalli Group. The most important magnetic anomalies in the principal study area are five distinct positive anomalies associated with Cretaceous or younger cupolas and stocks.

  13. Hinterland-vergent tectonic wedge below the Riwat thrust, Himalayan foreland, Pakistan: Implications for hydrocarbon exploration

    SciTech Connect

    Jadoon, I.A.K.; Frisch, W.

    1997-03-01

    The Riwat thrust, with a surface trace of over 50 km, is one of the major faults in the footwall of the main boundary thrust in the Himalayan foreland of Pakistan. Surface geology shows that the Riwat thrust is a foreland-vergent thrust along which lower to middle Siwalik molasse strata are thrust southward over upper Siwalik strata. Seismic reflection interpretation shows that the Riwat thrust developed as a roof thrust of a hinterland-vergent tectonic wedge (triangle zone) underlain by evaporites. The Riwat thrust propagates upsection from depth of about 4 km at the base of the Siwalik Group. At this depth, it merges into a hinterland-vergent blind thrust that propagates upsection as a ramp from Eocambrian evaporites covering the basement at a depth of about 6 km. Bounded between this set of conjugate faults, a tectonic wedge of Eocambrian (evaporites) to Neogene strata is thrust toward the hinterland to form a triangle zone. The roof thrusts of triangles zones have been widely mapped as backthrusts in deformed mountain fronts. Hinterland motion of tectonic wedges as in the Riwat thrust triangle zone may be a feature of the fold-and-thrust belts underlain by evaporites acting as an extremely weak decollement layer. Their recognition, with a trap-forming geometry below a thrust, is important for interpreting particular fold belts and for hydrocarbon exploration. These structures could be predicted by the surface geology data where hinterland vergence of a fold below a thrust is apparent; however, seismic reflection data appear to be critical in recognizing these structures.

  14. Jet-Engine Exhaust Nozzle With Thrust-Directing Flaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wing, David J.

    1996-01-01

    Convergent/divergent jet-engine exhaust nozzle has cruciform divergent passage containing flaps that move to deflect flow of exhaust in either or both planes perpendicular to main fore-and-aft axis of undeflected flow. Prototype of thrust-vector-control nozzles installed in advanced, high-performance airplanes to provide large pitching (usually, vertical) and yawing (usually, horizontal) attitude-control forces independent of attitude-control forces produced by usual aerodynamic control surfaces.

  15. Space transportation booster engine thrust chamber technology, large scale injector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, J. A.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of the Large Scale Injector (LSI) program was to deliver a 21 inch diameter, 600,000 lbf thrust class injector to NASA/MSFC for hot fire testing. The hot fire test program would demonstrate the feasibility and integrity of the full scale injector, including combustion stability, chamber wall compatibility (thermal management), and injector performance. The 21 inch diameter injector was delivered in September of 1991.

  16. Low-thrust chemical propulsion system pump technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meadville, J. W.

    1980-01-01

    A study was conducted within the thrust range 450 to 9000 N (100 to 2000 pounds). Performance analyses were made on centrifugal, pitot, Barske, drag, Tesla, gear, piston, lobe, and vane pumps with liquid hydrogen, liquid methane, and liquid oxygen as propellants. Gaseous methane and hydrogen driven axial impulse turbines, vane expanders, piston expanders, and electric motors were studied as drivers. Data are presented on performance, sizes, weights, and estimated service lives and costs.

  17. A graphite-lined regeneratively cooled thrust chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stubbs, V. R.

    1972-01-01

    Design concepts, based on use of graphite as a thermal barrier for regeneratively cooled FLOX-methane thrust chambers, have been screened and concepts selected for detailed thermodynamic, stress, and fabrication analyses. A single design employing AGCarb-101, a fibrous graphite composite material, for a thermal barrier liner and an electroformed nickel structure with integral coolant passages was selected for fabrication and testing. The fabrication processes and the test results are described and illustrated.

  18. Fracturing and brecciation along the Max Meadows thrust, southwestern Virginia

    SciTech Connect

    Haneberg, W.C.

    1984-04-01

    Fracturing is an important mechanism of porosity development in deformed hydrocarbon provinces such as the Eastern Overthrust belt, but the sizes and shapes of fractured zones place critical constraints on exploration strategies. Fracturing and brecciation associated with the Max Meadows thrust, along which the Cambrian Rome Formation have been emplaced atop the younger Cambrian Elbrook and Conococheague Formations of the Pulaski thrust sheet, are controlled by lithology, proximity to the fault, and mesoscopic folding. Within the Max Meadows sheet, Rome carbonates are highly fractured and, in fold cores near the fault, brecciated. Rome mudstones and sandstones are tightly folded, and near the fault have developed both an incipient axial planar cleavage and a set of closely spaced fractures striking perpendicular to fold axes. In comparison, the wholly carbonate sequence of the Pulaski sheet had earlier been folded into a large syncline characterized by bedding-parallel shear in shaly and thin-bedded layers, flexural slip folding, and localized fracturing of thick layers. Thus breccia and fracture porosity zones in the study area are highly localized, of irregular geometry, and essentially restricted to the upper thrust sheet. Zones of tectonic breccia and fracture porosity are not attractive exploration targets, then, unless they occur as uniform and widespread broken zones in sedimentologically and mechanically homogeneous beds.

  19. Paleogene thrust tectonics in northwestern Venezuela: Petroleum system implications

    SciTech Connect

    Quijada, E.; Oropeza, S.

    1996-08-01

    Oil exploration in northeastern Perija Mountains, northwestern Maracaibo basin, has been difficult, mainly due to the various tectonic events that have strongly deformed this area. This study is an attempt at better understanding the effect of a Paleogene thrusting event on the petroleum system development in the area. Subsidence analysis interpretation at both sides of the NNE directed Tigre fault (which separates the northern Perija Mountains from the rest of the Maracaibo basin) suggests the onset of a foreland basin during, at least, Paleocene-Early Eocene time. Continuous sedimentation occurred from Late Cretaceous to Early Eocene, as long as it kept pace with subsidence, in the west block of the fault, while the east block acted as an obstacle against the thrust-sheet movement, delaying its subsidence. Sedimentation for this time is associated with a thick unit of mainly paralic sediments west of that fault and thinner continental (fluvial) to shallow marine sediments, with an intra-Paleocene/Early Eocene unconformity, east of it. So, this tectonic event, associated with convergence from the north, caused a south-verging thrust sheet giving rise to differences in the evolution of the petroleum system on both sides of the Tigre fault, mainly regarding the existence of source rocks and their generation/migration of hydrocarbons, preservation time and critical moment. Finally, in order to evaluate the oil exploration opportunities in northeastern Perija mountains, it is advisable that any integrated interpretation of the petroleum system processes (generation-migration-accumulation) take into account this tectonic event.

  20. Structural analysis of cylindrical thrust chambers, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, W. H.

    1979-01-01

    Life predictions of regeneratively cooled rocket thrust chambers are normally derived from classical material fatigue principles. The failures observed in experimental thrust chambers do not appear to be due entirely to material fatigue. The chamber coolant walls in the failed areas exhibit progressive bulging and thinning during cyclic firings until the wall stress finally exceeds the material rupture stress and failure occurs. A preliminary analysis of an oxygen free high conductivity (OFHC) copper cylindrical thrust chamber demonstrated that the inclusion of cumulative cyclic plastic effects enables the observed coolant wall thinout to be predicted. The thinout curve constructed from the referent analysis of 10 firing cycles was extrapolated from the tenth cycle to the 200th cycle. The preliminary OFHC copper chamber 10-cycle analysis was extended so that the extrapolated thinout curve could be established by performing cyclic analysis of deformed configurations at 100 and 200 cycles. Thus the original range of extrapolation was reduced and the thinout curve was adjusted by using calculated thinout rates at 100 and 100 cycles. An analysis of the same underformed chamber model constructed of half-hard Amzirc to study the effect of material properties on the thinout curve is included.

  1. The NPL/ESA Micro-Newton Thrust Balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Ben; Perez Luna, Jaime

    2012-07-01

    Europe is pursuing a number of unique science missions which require extremely high performance micro- propulsion systems to perform precision attitude control to meet their challenging scientific goals. A number of different propulsion systems are under development to try and meet these needs, including systems based on FEEP, mini-ion and cold gas thruster technologies. The critical performance requirements for the thrusters are related to thrust accuracy, dynamic response and noise, where very challenging requirements are set. Although it is anticipated that the thruster technologies can meet these challenging requirements, verification of these performances by test presents its own difficulties, since the magnitude of the thrust noise required is close to the limit of available measurement devices, and the practicalities of testing thrusters under vacuum provide their own challenges. To address the complex measurement requirements, the UK’s National Physical Laboratory (NPL) is working closely with ESTEC to develop a state-of-the-art thrust balance that will provide traceable (to international measurement standards) measurements with a target measurement uncertainty of 1 μN (k = 2) and measurement bandwidth of 0 Hz to 10 Hz. The paper will focus on the design of the instrument, the detrimental effects of external vibration noise on the measurement, how this problem is being addressed and how we determine the measurement uncertainty in the presence of noise.

  2. A Simple Model of Pulsed Ejector Thrust Augmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Jack; Deloof, Richard L. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    A simple model of thrust augmentation from a pulsed source is described. In the model it is assumed that the flow into the ejector is quasi-steady, and can be calculated using potential flow techniques. The velocity of the flow is related to the speed of the starting vortex ring formed by the jet. The vortex ring properties are obtained from the slug model, knowing the jet diameter, speed and slug length. The model, when combined with experimental results, predicts an optimum ejector radius for thrust augmentation. Data on pulsed ejector performance for comparison with the model was obtained using a shrouded Hartmann-Sprenger tube as the pulsed jet source. A statistical experiment, in which ejector length, diameter, and nose radius were independent parameters, was performed at four different frequencies. These frequencies corresponded to four different slug length to diameter ratios, two below cut-off, and two above. Comparison of the model with the experimental data showed reasonable agreement. Maximum pulsed thrust augmentation is shown to occur for a pulsed source with slug length to diameter ratio equal to the cut-off value.

  3. Thrust Augmentation Measurements Using a Pulse Detonation Engine Ejector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santoro, Robert J.; Pal, Sibtosh

    2003-01-01

    The present NASA GRC-funded three-year research project is focused on studying PDE driven ejectors applicable to a hybrid Pulse Detonation/Turbofan Engine. The objective of the study is to characterize the PDE-ejector thrust augmentation. A PDE-ejector system has been designed to provide critical experimental data for assessing the performance enhancements possible with this technology. Completed tasks include demonstration of a thrust stand for measuring average thrust for detonation tube multi-cycle operation, and design of a 72-in.-long, 2.25-in.-diameter (ID) detonation tube and modular ejector assembly. This assembly will allow testing of both straight and contoured ejector geometries. Initial ejectors that have been fabricated are 72-in.-long-constant-diameter tubes (4-, 5-, and 6-in.-diameter) instrumented with high-frequency pressure transducers. The assembly has been designed such that the detonation tube exit can be positioned at various locations within the ejector tube. PDE-ejector system experiments with gaseous ethylene/ nitrogen/oxygen propellants will commence in the very near future. The program benefits from collaborations with Prof. Merkle of University of Tennessee whose PDE-ejector analysis helps guide the experiments. The present research effort will increase the TRL of PDE-ejectors from its current level of 2 to a level of 3.

  4. Camera Layout Design for the Upper Stage Thrust Cone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wooten, Tevin; Fowler, Bart

    2010-01-01

    Engineers in the Integrated Design and Analysis Division (EV30) use a variety of different tools to aid in the design and analysis of the Ares I vehicle. One primary tool in use is Pro-Engineer. Pro-Engineer is a computer-aided design (CAD) software that allows designers to create computer generated structural models of vehicle structures. For the Upper State thrust cone, Pro-Engineer was used to assist in the design of a layout for two camera housings. These cameras observe the separation between the first and second stage of the Ares I vehicle. For the Ares I-X, one standard speed camera was used. The Ares I design calls for two separate housings, three cameras, and a lighting system. With previous design concepts and verification strategies in mind, a new layout for the two camera design concept was developed with members of the EV32 team. With the new design, Pro-Engineer was used to draw the layout to observe how the two camera housings fit with the thrust cone assembly. Future analysis of the camera housing design will verify the stability and clearance of the camera with other hardware present on the thrust cone.

  5. Design and analysis report for the RL10-2B breadboard low thrust engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, J. R.; Foust, R. R.; Galler, D. E.; Kanic, P. G.; Kmiec, T. D.; Limerick, C. D.; Peckham, R. J.; Swartwout, T.

    1984-01-01

    The breadboard low thrust RL10-2B engine is described. A summary of the analysis and design effort to define the multimode thrust concept applicable to the requirements for the upper stage vehicles is provided. Baseline requirements were established for operation of the RL10-2B engine under the following conditions: (1) tank head idle at low propellant tank pressures without vehicle propellant conditioning or settling thrust; (2) pumped idle at a ten percent thrust level for low G deployment and/or vehicle tank pressurization; and (3) full thrust (15,000 lb.). Several variations of the engine configuration were investigated and results of the analyses are included.

  6. Direct thrust measurement of a permanent magnet helicon double layer thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, K.; Lafleur, T.; Charles, C.; Alexander, P.; Boswell, R. W.; Perren, M.; Laine, R.; Pottinger, S.; Lappas, V.; Harle, T.; Lamprou, D.

    2011-04-04

    Direct thrust measurements of a permanent magnet helicon double layer thruster have been made using a pendulum thrust balance and a high sensitivity laser displacement sensor. At the low pressures used (0.08 Pa) an ion beam is detected downstream of the thruster exit, and a maximum thrust force of about 3 mN is measured for argon with an rf input power of about 700 W. The measured thrust is proportional to the upstream plasma density and is in good agreement with the theoretical thrust based on the maximum upstream electron pressure.

  7. Direct thrust measurement of a permanent magnet helicon double layer thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, K.; Lafleur, T.; Charles, C.; Alexander, P.; Boswell, R. W.; Perren, M.; Laine, R.; Pottinger, S.; Lappas, V.; Harle, T.; Lamprou, D.

    2011-04-01

    Direct thrust measurements of a permanent magnet helicon double layer thruster have been made using a pendulum thrust balance and a high sensitivity laser displacement sensor. At the low pressures used (0.08 Pa) an ion beam is detected downstream of the thruster exit, and a maximum thrust force of about 3 mN is measured for argon with an rf input power of about 700 W. The measured thrust is proportional to the upstream plasma density and is in good agreement with the theoretical thrust based on the maximum upstream electron pressure.

  8. Cataclasites-ultracataclasites in a major thrust zone: Gaissa Thrust, N. Norwegian Caledonides.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, A. Hugh N.; Grasemann, Bernhard

    2015-04-01

    Narrow fault zones of intense deformation imply strain localisation. This is superbly shown by the ~horizontal Caledonian basal décollement in N. Norway, where ~127 km of top E-to-ESE thrust displacement is concentrated in a ~3 cm thick principle slip zone within lower strain hanging wall and footwall cataclasites less than a few centimetres thick. A scan of a transport-direction parallel 8.5x11.5cm thin-section of the fault is enlarged to 0.7x1.0m in the poster. The Caledonian external imbricate zone here places anchizone pre-Marinoan quartzite/shales onto diagenetic-zone post-Gaskiers red/green shales, silts and fine sandstones. Carbonates are absent. The displacement was estimated from balanced cross-sections and branch-line restorations. In the hangingwall cataclastic zone, a coarse qtz-rich/clay-rich cataclastic compositional layering dips at <30° towards the hinterland. Sedimentary features are nowhere seen in this pervasively, cyclically fractured rock. A cataclastic foliation is locally present parallel to the compositional layering. Close to the principle slip zone, an irregular fabric develops parallel to the detachment. The hangingwall cataclasites are cut by foreland-dipping (<70°) fractures at all scales, with offsets of up to a few mm, rarely with a reverse shear-sense, creating lozenge shaped clasts of earlier cataclasites. Fractures concentrate darker material, indicating pressure solution; similar layers lie parallel to the compositional layering. The principle slip zone has at least 11 distinct bands, although these contain microstructural variations; not all persist across the sample. Three types of band can be distinguished, separated generally by principle slip surfaces. (1) layers containing abundant angular fragments of earlier cataclasite. A variably oriented cataclastic foliation is irregularly developed, dipping towards both foreland and hinterland and wrapping larger clasts. Some elongate clasts have an (oblique) earlier internal

  9. Geometry and Kinematics of the Lamu Basin Deep-Water Fold-and-Thrust Belt (East Africa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barchi, Massimiliano R.; Cruciani, Francesco; Porreca, Massimiliano

    2016-04-01

    are comparable to that of analogue-scaled structures, developed at convergent plate boundaries, e.g. the foreland fold-and-trust belts. However, its kinematic evolution shows some peculiar characters: shortening seems largely synchronous across the whole thrust belt and the maximum shortening is achieved in its frontal part (toe thrust), diminishing landward.

  10. Constraining the erosional response of deep-water channel systems to growing folds and thrusts, Niger Delta.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whittaker, A. C.; Lonergan, L.; Jolly, B. A.

    2015-12-01

    Gravity-driven folds and thrusts often characterize the slope and deep-water settings of passive margins. These structures exert a significant control on sediment gravity flows because they determine the location and configuration of sediment depo-centres and transport systems. Here we exploit 3D seismic data in the outer toe-thrust region of the deep-water Niger Delta to analyse the interaction between Plio-Pleistocene channel systems and actively-growing folds and thrusts. We first map folds and thrusts from the seismic data and we use this data to reconstruct the history of fold growth in detail. We then make quantitative measurements of the geomorphic response of submarine channels to growing tectonic structures in order to provide new constraints on their long-term erosional dynamics. This information is used to infer morphodyanamic processes that sculpted the channel systems through time, and to estimate the bed shear stresses and fluid velocities of typical flow events. The bathymetric long profiles of these channels have concavities that range from -0.08 to -0.34, and an average gradient of ~1o. Thrusts are associated with a local steepening in channel gradient of up to 3 times, and this effect extends 0.5 - 2 km upstream of the thrust. Within these knickzones, channel incision increases by approximately by a factor of 2, with a corresponding width decrease of approximately 25%. Channel incision across growing structures is achieved through enhanced bed-shear stress driven incision (up to 200 Pa) and flow velocity (up to 5 ms-1) assuming typical bulk sediment concentrations of 0.6%. Comparison of structural uplift since 1.7 Ma, and channel incision over an equivalent period, shows that many of these channels are able to keep pace with the time-integrated uplift since 1.7 Ma, and may have reached a bathymetric steady-state. Generally, bed-shear stresses of ~150 Pa are sufficient to keep pace with structural strain rates of 10-15 s-1. More widely, our data

  11. Evaluation of thrusting and folding of the Deadman Creek Thrust Fault, Sangre de Cristo range, Saguache County, Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weigel, Jacob F., II

    The Deadman Creek Thrust Fault was mapped in a structural window on the west side of the Sangre de Cristo Range. The study area, located in southern Colorado, is a two square mile area halfway between the town of Crestone and the Great Sand Dunes National Park. The Deadman Creek Thrust Fault is the center of this study because it delineates the fold structure in the structural window. The fault is a northeast-directed low-angle thrust folded by subsequent additional compression. This study was directed at understanding the motion of the Deadman Creek Thrust Fault as affected by subsequent folding, and the driving mechanism behind the folding of the Pole Creek Anticline as part of a broader study of Laramide thrust faulting in the range. This study aids in the interpretation of the geologic structure of the San Luis Valley, which is being studied by staff of the United States Geological Survey (USGS), to understand Rio Grande Rift basin evolution by focusing on rift and pre-rift tectonic activity. It also provides a geologic interpretation for the Saguache County Forest Service, Great Sand Dunes National Park, and its visitors. The Sangre de Cristo Mountain Range has undergone tectonic events in the Proterozoic, Pennsylvanian (Ancestral Rocky Mountains), Cretaceous-Tertiary (Laramide Orogeny) and mid-Tertiary (Rio Grande Rift). During the Laramide Orogeny the Deadman Creek Thrust Fault emplaced Proterozoic gneiss over Paleozoic sedimentary rocks and Proterozoic granodiorite in the area. Continued deformation resulted in folding of the fault to form the Pole Creek Anticline. The direction of motion of both the fault and fold is northeastward. A self-consistent net of cross-sections and stereonet plots generated from existing and new field data show that the anticline is an overturned isoclinal fold in Pole Creek Canyon, which shows an increasing inter-limb angle and a more vertical axial surface northwestward toward Deadman Creek Canyon. Southwest-directed apparent

  12. Advanced Active-Magnetic-Bearing Thrust-Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imlach, Joseph; Kasarda, Mary; Blumber, Eric

    2008-01-01

    An advanced thrust-measurement system utilizes active magnetic bearings to both (1) levitate a floating frame in all six degrees of freedom and (2) measure the levitation forces between the floating frame and a grounded frame. This system was developed for original use in measuring the thrust exerted by a rocket engine mounted on the floating frame, but can just as well be used in other force-measurement applications. This system offers several advantages over prior thrust-measurement systems based on mechanical support by flexures and/or load cells: The system includes multiple active magnetic bearings for each degree of freedom, so that by selective use of one, some, or all of these bearings, it is possible to test a given article over a wide force range in the same fixture, eliminating the need to transfer the article to different test fixtures to obtain the benefit of full-scale accuracy of different force-measurement devices for different force ranges. Like other active magnetic bearings, the active magnetic bearings of this system include closed-loop control subsystems, through which the stiffness and damping characteristics of the magnetic bearings can be modified electronically. The design of the system minimizes or eliminates cross-axis force-measurement errors. The active magnetic bearings are configured to provide support against movement along all three orthogonal Cartesian axes, and such that the support along a given axis does not produce force along any other axis. Moreover, by eliminating the need for such mechanical connections as flexures used in prior thrust-measurement systems, magnetic levitation of the floating frame eliminates what would otherwise be major sources of cross-axis forces and the associated measurement errors. Overall, relative to prior mechanical-support thrust-measurement systems, this system offers greater versatility for adaptation to a variety of test conditions and requirements. The basic idea of most prior active

  13. Attitude Control for an Aero-Vehicle Using Vector Thrusting and Variable Speed Control Moment Gyros

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shin, Jong-Yeob; Lim, K. B.; Moerder, D. D.

    2005-01-01

    Stabilization of passively unstable thrust-levitated vehicles can require significant control inputs. Although thrust vectoring is a straightforward choice for realizing these inputs, this may lead to difficulties discussed in the paper. This paper examines supplementing thrust vectoring with Variable-Speed Control Moment Gyroscopes (VSCMGs). The paper describes how to allocate VSCMGs and the vectored thrust mechanism for attitude stabilization in frequency domain and also shows trade-off between vectored thrust and VSCMGs. Using an H2 control synthesis methodology in LMI optimization, a feedback control law is designed for a thrust-levitated research vehicle and is simulated with the full nonlinear model. It is demonstrated that VSCMGs can reduce the use of vectored thrust variation for stabilizing the hovering platform in the presence of strong wind gusts.

  14. Taconian foreland-style thrust system in the Great Smoky Mountains, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Connelly, J.B. ); Woodward, N.B. )

    1992-02-01

    Four major thrust faults dominate the Great Smoky Mountains foothills region: the Greenbrier, Dunn Creek, Miller Cove, and Great Smoky. The Greenbrier and Dunn Creek thrust sheets were emplaced prior to Taconian regional cleavage development and peak metamorphism. Cleavage and most deformation features formed during the emplacement of a thrust sheet now floored by the Miller Cove thrust fault. Alleghanian emplacement of the Great Smoky-Miller Cove thrust sheet dissected these earlier structures. If the effects of the younger structures are removed, the basal faults of the Dunn Creek and Greenbrier sheets reveal ramp-flat geometries typical of foreland fold-thrust belts including bedding-parallel faults, ramps, and angular ramp-related folds. The Great Smoky Mountains region is therefore unique in the southern Appalachians because a foreland-style fold-thrust belt of Taconian age is well preserved.

  15. Evaluation of an Outer Loop Retrofit Architecture for Intelligent Turbofan Engine Thrust Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litt, Jonathan S.; Sowers, T. Shane

    2006-01-01

    The thrust control capability of a retrofit architecture for intelligent turbofan engine control and diagnostics is evaluated. The focus of the study is on the portion of the hierarchical architecture that performs thrust estimation and outer loop thrust control. The inner loop controls fan speed so the outer loop automatically adjusts the engine's fan speed command to maintain thrust at the desired level, based on pilot input, even as the engine deteriorates with use. The thrust estimation accuracy is assessed under nominal and deteriorated conditions at multiple operating points, and the closed loop thrust control performance is studied, all in a complex real-time nonlinear turbofan engine simulation test bed. The estimation capability, thrust response, and robustness to uncertainty in the form of engine degradation are evaluated.

  16. Static internal performance of a single expansion ramp nozzle with multiaxis thrust vectoring capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Capone, Francis J.; Schirmer, Alberto W.

    1993-01-01

    An investigation was conducted at static conditions in order to determine the internal performance characteristics of a multiaxis thrust vectoring single expansion ramp nozzle. Yaw vectoring was achieved by deflecting yaw flaps in the nozzle sidewall into the nozzle exhaust flow. In order to eliminate any physical interference between the variable angle yaw flap deflected into the exhaust flow and the nozzle upper ramp and lower flap which were deflected for pitch vectoring, the downstream corners of both the nozzle ramp and lower flap were cut off to allow for up to 30 deg of yaw vectoring. The effects of nozzle upper ramp and lower flap cutout, yaw flap hinge line location and hinge inclination angle, sidewall containment, geometric pitch vector angle, and geometric yaw vector angle were studied. This investigation was conducted in the static-test facility of the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel at nozzle pressure ratios up to 8.0.

  17. Thrust performance of unsteady propulsors using a novel measurement system, and corresponding wake patterns

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Richard P.; Smits, Alexander J.

    2009-01-01

    An apparatus is described for the measurement of unsteady thrust and propulsive efficiency produced by biologically inspired oscillating hydrodynamic propulsors. Force measurement is achieved using a strain-gauge-based force transducer, augmented with a lever to amplify or attenuate the applied force and control the measurement sensitivity and natural frequency of vibration. The lever can be used to tune the system to a specific application and it is shown that, using the lever, the stiffness can be made to increase more rapidly than the measurement sensitivity decreases. Efficiency is computed from measurements of the time-averaged power imparted to the fluid. The apparatus is applied to two different propulsors, demonstrating the versatility of the system; wake visualizations are examined, which provide insight into the physical mechanisms of efficient propulsion. PMID:19946574

  18. Thrust Measurement of Laser Detonation Thruster with a Pulsed Glass Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bin; Han, Taro; Michigami, Keisuke; Komurasaki, Kimiya; Arakawa, Yoshihiro

    2011-11-01

    Experimental studies were carried out for measuring the laser propulsion thrust with using of a Q-switched Nd:Glass laser. In the tests, a laser beam with 33 ns FWHM pulse width was focused to generate breakdown in the cone-shaped nozzle of aluminum thrusters which were fixed at the end of a ballistic pendulum. The pulse energy used was 1.0 J and the focusing number is 6.27, which gave the highest energy conversion efficiency from laser energy to that of induced blast wave as found in previous research. The momentum coupling coefficient Cm dependency on nozzle apex angles, 30°, 45° and 60°, were investigated with carefully controlling of the laser ignition positions. Results show that, solid-state laser could be a candidate to suffice laser propulsion missions in term of Cm it can achieve.

  19. Trajectory optimization of spacecraft high-thrust orbit transfer using a modified evolutionary algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirazi, Abolfazl

    2016-10-01

    This article introduces a new method to optimize finite-burn orbital manoeuvres based on a modified evolutionary algorithm. Optimization is carried out based on conversion of the orbital manoeuvre into a parameter optimization problem by assigning inverse tangential functions to the changes in direction angles of the thrust vector. The problem is analysed using boundary delimitation in a common optimization algorithm. A method is introduced to achieve acceptable values for optimization variables using nonlinear simulation, which results in an enlarged convergence domain. The presented algorithm benefits from high optimality and fast convergence time. A numerical example of a three-dimensional optimal orbital transfer is presented and the accuracy of the proposed algorithm is shown.

  20. Thermal barrier coatings (TBC's) for high heat flux thrust chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, Christopher M.

    The last 30 years materials engineers have been under continual pressure to develop materials with a greater temperature potential or to produce configurations that can be effectively cooled or otherwise protected at elevated temperature conditions. Turbines and thrust chambers produce some of the harshest service conditions for materials which lead to the challenges engineers face in order to increase the efficiencies of current technologies due to the energy crisis that the world is facing. The key tasks for the future of gas turbines are to increase overall efficiencies to meet energy demands of a growing world population and reduce the harmful emissions to protect the environment. Airfoils or blades tend to be the limiting factor when it comes to the performance of the turbine because of their complex design making them difficult to cool as well as limitations of their thermal properties. Key tasks for space transportation it to lower costs while increasing operational efficiency and reliability of our space launchers. The important factor to take into consideration is the rocket nozzle design. The design of the rocket nozzle or thrust chamber has to take into account many constraints including external loads, heat transfer, transients, and the fluid dynamics of expanded hot gases. Turbine engines can have increased efficiencies if the inlet temperature for combustion is higher, increased compressor capacity and lighter weight materials. In order to push for higher temperatures, engineers need to come up with a way to compensate for increased temperatures because material systems that are being used are either at or near their useful properties limit. Before thermal barrier coatings were applied to hot-section components, material alloy systems were able to withstand the service conditions necessary. But, with the increased demand for performance, higher temperatures and pressures have become too much for those alloy systems. Controlled chemistry of hot

  1. Cataclasites along the Saltville thrust, U.S.A. and their implications for thrust-sheet emplacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    House, William M.; Gray, David R.

    Cataclasis and frictional wear are the primary bulk deformation mechanisms along steeply dipping portions of the Saltville thrust in the southern Appalachian foreland zone, U.S.A. Fault character ranges from a single discrete sliding surface with negligible gouge, to a zone of several discrete sliding surfaces or a zone (up to 0.3 m thick) of pervasive cataclasite. Marked fracturing occurs up to 20 m above the fault, whereas minimal deformation is found in the footwall rocks. Hanging wall dolomites range from crush breccias (less than 5% matrix) to ultracataclasites (with 90% matrix), although cataclasites (50-70% matrix) are predominant. Foliated cataclasites occur where dolomite is thrust over shale. Progressive development of cataclastic fabrics is due to comminution by fracturing and grinding along intersecting fractures. Continued frictional grinding results in complete disruption of the original fabric to produce cataclasite and minor ultracataclasite. Grain alignment occurs by rigid body rotation with subsequent local enhancement by pressure-solution. Microstructural relations of the fault gouge suggest periodic fluctuations in fluid pressure, where λv (ratio of fluid to overburden pressure) probably ranged between 0.45 and 1. The Saltville thrust-sheet emplacement must have occurred in a caterpillar-like fashion involving aseismic and seismic shear. Shear stresses accompanying fault motion as determined from dolomite twin lamellae are in the order of 65 mPa.

  2. Closed-loop thrust and pressure profile throttling of a nitrous oxide/hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene hybrid rocket motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Zachary W.

    Hybrid motors that employ non-toxic, non-explosive components with a liquid oxidizer and a solid hydrocarbon fuel grain have inherently safe operating characteristics. The inherent safety of hybrid rocket motors offers the potential to greatly reduce overall operating costs. Another key advantage of hybrid rocket motors is the potential for in-flight shutdown, restart, and throttle by controlling the pressure drop between the oxidizer tank and the injector. This research designed, developed, and ground tested a closed-loop throttle controller for a hybrid rocket motor using nitrous oxide and hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene as propellants. The research simultaneously developed closed-loop throttle algorithms and lab scale motor hardware to evaluate the fidelity of the throttle simulations and algorithms. Initial open-loop motor tests were performed to better classify system parameters and to validate motor performance values. Deep-throttle open-loop tests evaluated limits of stable thrust that can be achieved on the test hardware. Open-loop tests demonstrated the ability to throttle the motor to less than 10% of maximum thrust with little reduction in effective specific impulse and acoustical stability. Following the open-loop development, closed-loop, hardware-in-the-loop tests were performed. The closed-loop controller successfully tracked prescribed step and ramp command profiles with a high degree of fidelity. Steady-state accuracy was greatly improved over uncontrolled thrust.

  3. Polymers as fuel for laser-based microthrusters: An investigation of thrust, material, plasma and shockwave properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urech, L.; Lippert, T.; Phipps, C. R.; Wokaun, A.

    2007-07-01

    The micro-laser plasma thruster (μ-LPT) is a micropropulsion device, designed for steering and propelling of small satellites (1-10 kg). A laser is focused onto a polymer layer on a substrate to form a plasma, which produces the thrust that is used to control the satellite motion. Three different polymers were tested to understand the influence of their specific properties on the thrust performance: poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) as a low-energetic material, a glycidyl azide polymer (GAP), and poly(vinyl nitrate) (PVN) as high-energetic polymers. Different absorbers (carbon nanoparticles or an IR dye) were added to the polymer to achieve absorption at the irradiation wavelength (1064 nm). The influence of the material and dopant properties on the decomposition characteristics and the energy release were investigated by thrust measurements and ns-shadowgraphy. Mass spectrometry and time- and space-resolved plasma emission spectroscopy in air and vacuum were used to analyze the degree of fragmentation as function of the material properties. The kinetic energies of selected fragments were calculated from the spectra. GAP + C showed the best performance in all measurements at high fluences, while at low fluences PVN + C revealed the best performance.

  4. Effect of thrust on the aeroelastic instability of a composite swept wing with two engines in subsonic compressible flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firouz-Abadi, R. D.; Askarian, A. R.; Zarifian, P.

    2013-01-01

    This paper aims to investigate aeroelastic stability boundary of subsonic wings under the effect of thrust of two engines. The wing structure is modeled as a tapered composite box-beam. Moreover, an indicial function based model is used to calculate the unsteady lift and moment distribution along the wing span in subsonic compressible flow. The two jet engines mounted on the wing are modeled as concentrated masses and the effect of thrust of each engine is applied as a follower force. Using Hamilton's principle along with Galerkin's method, the governing equations of motion are derived, then the obtained equations are solved in frequency domain using the K-method and the aeroelastic instability conditions are determined. The flutter analysis results of four example wings are compared with the experimental and analytical results in the literature and good agreements are achieved which validate the present model. Furthermore, based on several case studies on a reference wing, some attempts are performed to analyze the effect of thrust on the stability margin of the wing and some conclusions are outlined.

  5. The thrust belt in Southwest Montana and east-central Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruppel, Edward T.; Lopez, David A.

    1984-01-01

    The leading edge of the Cordilleran fold and thrust in southwest Montana appears to be a continuation of the edge of the Wyoming thrust belt, projected northward beneath the Snake River Plain. Trces of the thrust faults that form the leading edge of the thrust belts are mostly concealed, but stratigraphic and structural evidence suggests that the belt enters Montana near the middle of the Centennial Mountains, continues west along the Red Rock River valley, and swings north into the Highland Mountains near Butte. The thrust belt in southwest Montana and east-central Idaho includes at least two major plates -- the Medicine Lodge and Grasshopper thrust plates -- each of which contains a distinctive sequence of rocks, different in facies and structural style from those of the cratonic region east of the thrust belt. The thrust plates are characterized by persuasive, open to tight and locally overturned folds, and imbricate thrust faults, structural styles unusual in Phanerozoic cratonic rocks. The basal decollement zones of the plates are composed of intensely sheared, crushed, brecciated, and mylonitized rocks, the decollement at the base of the Medicine Lodge plate is as much as 300 meters thick. The Medicine Lodge and Grasshopper thrust plates are fringed on the east by a 10- to 50-kilometer-wide zone of tightly folded rocks cut by imbricate thrust fauls, a zone that forms the eastern margin of the thrust belt in southwest Montana. The frontal fold and thrust zone includes rocks that are similar to those of the craton, even though they differ in details of thickness, composition, or stratigraphic sequence. The zone is interpreted to be one of terminal folding and thrusting in cratonic rocks overridden by the major thrust plates from farther west. The cratonic rocks were drape-folded over rising basement blocks that formed a foreland bulge in front of the thrust belt. The basement blocks are bounded by steep faults of Proterozoic ancestry, which also moved as tear

  6. Fault interaction along the Central Andean thrust front: The Las Peñas thrust, Cerro Salinas thrust and the Montecito Anticline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoenbohm, L. M.; Costa, C. H.; Brooks, B. A.; Bohon, W.; Gardini, C.; Cisneros, H.

    2013-12-01

    The region in west-central Argentina between the thin-skinned Precordillera and the thick-skinned Sierras Pampeanas structural domain is among the most active zones of thrust tectonics in the world. We quantify the rates of deformation on the east-vergent Las Peñas thrust (LPT), and the west-vergent Cerro Salinas thrust (CST). The Montecito anticline (MA) is located at their intersection. We mapped three key locations, collected stratigraphic logs from the MA, dated three ashes using U-Pb in zircon and dated 10 terraces using cosmogenic Be-10 depth profiles. Five terrace levels are present where the Rio Las Peñas crosses the LPT, up to 45 m above the modern river. Cosmogenic dating of the uppermost terrace (T1) yields and age of 123.8 +26.5/-12.3 ka. A reconstruction of this surface using a blind thrust rupture scenario indicates 73 +/- 7 m horizontal shortening and 34 +/- 3 m vertical displacement. Shortening across the structure is therefore 0.59 +0.10/-0.13 mm/yr with a vertical uplift rate of 0.27 +0.05/-0.06 mm/a. Previous work indicates higher rates to the south on the order of 2 mm/yr (Schmidt et al., 2011). Lower terraces give ages of 38.0 +11/-6.2 ka (T2) and 1.5 +5.0/-0.6 ka (T4). Three terrace levels are preserved near the center of the CST. The middle surface (T2) is folded across the axis of the structure and yields an age of 112.5 +33/-14.4 ka. Given 22.9 m surface uplift, this indicates a vertical uplift rate of 0.20 +0.05/-0.06 mm/yr, similar to the rate on the LPT. The upper terrace (T1) yields a younger age (97.1 +29.8/-12.4 ka); the T1 and T2 ages overlap within uncertainty, indicating rapid river incision at the time of their formation. An intercalated ash within the Neogene strata gives an age of 16.2 +/- 0.2. Previous work indicates long-term shortening rates of 0.8 mm/yr (Verges et al., 2007) and that the CST initiated after 8.5 Ma. The lowermost unit exposed in the MA is the Los Pozos Fm., with no indication of syn-depositional deformation

  7. The Cenozoic fold-and-thrust belt of Eastern Sardinia: Evidences from the integration of field data with numerically balanced geological cross section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arragoni, S.; Maggi, M.; Cianfarra, P.; Salvini, F.

    2016-06-01

    Newly collected structural data in Eastern Sardinia (Italy) integrated with numerical techniques led to the reconstruction of a 2-D admissible and balanced model revealing the presence of a widespread Cenozoic fold-and-thrust belt. The model was achieved with the FORC software, obtaining a 3-D (2-D + time) numerical reconstruction of the continuous evolution of the structure through time. The Mesozoic carbonate units of Eastern Sardinia and their basement present a fold-and-thrust tectonic setting, with a westward direction of tectonic transport (referred to the present-day coordinates). The tectonic style of the upper levels is thin skinned, with flat sectors prevailing over ramps and younger-on-older thrusts. Three regional tectonic units are present, bounded by two regional thrusts. Strike-slip faults overprint the fold-and-thrust belt and developed during the Sardinia-Corsica Block rotation along the strike of the preexisting fault ramps, not affecting the numerical section balancing. This fold-and-thrust belt represents the southward prosecution of the Alpine Corsica collisional chain and the missing link between the Alpine Chain and the Calabria-Peloritani Block. Relative ages relate its evolution to the meso-Alpine event (Eocene-Oligocene times), prior to the opening of the Tyrrhenian Sea (Tortonian). Results fill a gap of information about the geodynamic evolution of the European margin in Central Mediterranean, between Corsica and the Calabria-Peloritani Block, and imply the presence of remnants of this double-verging belt, missing in the Southern Tyrrhenian basin, within the Southern Apennine chain. The used methodology proved effective for constraining balanced cross sections also for areas lacking exposures of the large-scale structures, as the case of Eastern Sardinia.

  8. Why do airlines want and use thrust reversers? A compilation of airline industry responses to a survey regarding the use of thrust reversers on commercial transport airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yetter, Jeffrey A.

    1995-01-01

    Although thrust reversers are used for only a fraction of the airplane operating time, their impact on nacelle design, weight, airplane cruise performance, and overall airplane operating and maintenance expenses is significant. Why then do the airlines want and use thrust reversers? In an effort to understand the airlines need for thrust reversers, a survey of the airline industry was made to determine why and under what situations thrust reversers are currently used or thought to be needed. The survey was intended to help establish the cost/benefits trades for the use of thrust reversers and airline opinion regarding alternative deceleration devices. A compilation and summary of the responses given to the survey questionnaire is presented.

  9. Kinematic history of the ongoing growth of Himalayan fold-thrust belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, H.; Webb, A. G.

    2012-12-01

    Ongoing growth of the Himalayan fold-thrust belt since the Middle Miocene is mostly accomplished by the deformation of the Lesser Himalayan Sequence (a deformed package of rocks which dominates the southern half of the Himalaya). However, the first-order kinematic evolution of this process remains unclear. Four end-member models are proposed: frontal accretion through forward-propagation of a basal thrust; discrete underplating of thrust horses from the downgoing plate to the fold-thrust belt; expansion of the orogen via incremental accretion along the basal shear zone; and out-of-sequence faulting. Both the underplating and out-of-sequence models can explain the rapid uplift and exhumation observed along the central belt of the Himalaya. We test these models by determining the relationship between major thrust faults within the Lesser Himalayan sequence: the Berinag thrust and Tons thrust. Map geometries require >40 km and >80 km displacements along the Berinag and Tons thrusts, respectively. Field mapping along the Tons Valley and the lower Pabbar valley across the Lesser Himalayan Sequence reveals a new first-order thrust fault, which we term the Pabbar thrust. The Pabbar thrust is a ~300 m thick ductile shear zone separating the hanging wall of the Tons thrust (the Outer Lesser Himalayan Sequence) above from the hanging wall of the Berinag thrust (the Berinag Group) below, marked by S-C fabrics, mylonitic fabrics, and sheath folds, demonstrating top-to-the-southwest thrusting. Sheath folds, with hinges parallel to the stretching lineations defined by strongly elongated quartz grains in NE-SW direction, developed at cm to m scale of wavelength and amplitude within the shear zone. The Berinag and Tons thrust zones display both brittle features and ductile shear fabrics including southwest-directed brittle faults, southwest verging tight to open folds, and week southwest-trending stretching lineations. The ductile nature of the Pabbar thrust and the brittle

  10. Finite strain and strain variation analysis in the Sheeprock Thrust Sheet: an internal thrust sheet in the Provo salient of the Sevier Fold-and-Thrust belt, Central Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukul, Malay; Mitra, Gautam

    1998-04-01

    The Sheeprock thrust sheet in west-central Utah is an internal thrust sheet in the Provo salient of the Sevier fold-and-thrust belt. We have measured finite strain in quartzites (the dominant lithology), sampled along a square grid within the thrust sheet, using the modified normalized Fry method (McNaught M.A. (1994) Modifying the normalized Fry method for aggregates of non-elliptical grains. Journal of Structural Geology16 493-503). The {X}/{Y} and {X}/{Z} axial ratios from unsampled locations within the sample area were estimated using the spatial statistics approach. The strain ellipsoids exhibit a variable three-dimensional orientation pattern resulting from modification of the initial layer parallel shortening (LPS) strain ellipsoid by fault parallel shear in conjunction with vertical flattening and/or horizontal stretching indicating that the thrust sheet did not undergo plane strain deformation in the transport plane. This suggests that the plane strain assumption used in drawing restorable balanced cross-sections breaks down for internal thrust sheets with more than one penetrative-strain producing deformation event. The {X}/{Z} strain axial ratios decrease away from the thrust towards the middle of the sheet. The {X}/{Y} strain axial ratios from interpolated image diagrams indicate transport-parallel stretching at the front end of the sheet and strike-parallel stretching at the back end of the sheet. The footwall and hanging wall finite strain patterns are similar indicating that most of the strain in the Sheeprock thrust sheet developed early in the deformation history of the thrust sheet before and perhaps during the growth of a large fault propagation fold pair.

  11. Style and magnitude of Mesozoic thrust faulting in the hinterland of the Sevier thrust belt Pequop Mountains-Wood Hills-East Humboldt Range region, northeast Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Camilleri, P.A. . Dept. of Geology and Geophysics)

    1993-04-01

    The Pequop Mountains (PM), Wood Hills (WH) and East Humboldt Range (EHR), NE Nevada, provide evidence that the hinterland of the Sevier thrust belt experienced large-magnitude Mesozoic shortening ([>=]55 km) and crustal thickening ([>=] 30 km). These ranges expose a structurally continuous crustal cross section of unmetamorphosed to high pressure upper amphibolite facies Triassic to Precambrian miogeoclinal strata. This sequence lies structurally beneath unmetamorphosed extensional klippen that omit metamorphic grade and crustal section, but also repeat stratigraphic units. Because they repeat stratigraphic units, the underlying miogeoclinal section, or footwall, must have once lain beneath a thrust fault (herein named the Windermere thrust). The footwall of the Windermere thrust was exhumed by two generations of top-to-the-W-NW low-angle normal faults that are distinguished by whether they are depositionally overlapped by Eocene volcanic rocks or if they cut the volcanic rocks in their hanging walls. The latter phase is associated with development of the mid-Tertiary extensional mylonitic shear zone in the EHR. An integration of geobarometric, metamorphic, and map data suggest (1) a NW dip of the footwall of the Windermere thrust with metamorphic facies belts trending perpendicular to dip direction and metamorphic grade increasing down dip, and (2) a top-to-the-SE sense-of-slip for the Windermere thrust. Assuming that the Windermere thrust comprised a flat on the youngest rocks exposed in the footwall (Triassic), the Mesozoic depth to the Windermere thrust in the northern PM is [>=] 7 km, in WH is [approximately]10--16 km, and in the EHR[>=]30 km. The Windermere thrust accommodated a minimum of 50 km of shortening associated with the Independence thrust is [>=] 5 km. These data indicate that the amount of hinterland shortening in NE Nevada greatly exceeds that to the south in the Eureka belt.

  12. Structural evidence for northeastward movement on the Chocolate Mountains thrust, southeasternmost Calfornia

    SciTech Connect

    Dillon, J.T. ); Haxel, G.B. ); Tosdal, R.M. )

    1990-11-10

    The Late Cretaceous Chocolate Mountains thrust of southeastern California and southwestern Arizona places a block of Proterozoic and Mesozoic continental crust over the late Mesozoic continental margin oceanic sedimentary and volcanic rocks of the regionally distinctive Orocopia Schist. The Chocolate Mountains thrust is interpreted as a thrust (burial, subduction) fault rather than a low-angle normal (exhumation, unroofing, uplift) fault. The Chocolate Mountains thrust zone contains sparse to locally abundant mesoscopic asymmetric folds. Fabric relations indicate that these folds are an integral part of and coeval with the thrust zone. On a lower hemisphere equal-area plot representing the orientation and sense of asymmetry of 80 thrust zone folds from 36 localities, spread over an area 60 by 10 km, Z folds plot northwest of and S folds plot southeast of a northeast-southwest striking vertical plane of overall monoclinic symmetry. The only sense of movement consistent with the collective asymmetry of the thrust zone folds is top to the northeast. Paleomagnetic data suggest that the original sense of thrusting, prior to Neogene vertical axis tectonic rotation related to the San Andreas fault system, was northward. The essential point is that movement of the upper plate of the Chocolate Mountains thrust evidently was continentward. Continentward thrusting suggests a tectonic scenario in which an insular or peninsular microcontinental fragment collided with mainland southern California. Alternative tectonic models involving subduction of the Orocopia Schist eastward beneath continental southern California circumvent the suture problem but are presently not supported by any direct structural evidence.

  13. Investigation of Asymmetric Thrust Detection with Demonstration in a Real-Time Simulation Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chicatelli, Amy; Rinehart, Aidan W.; Sowers, T. Shane; Simon, Donald L.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this effort is to develop, demonstrate, and evaluate three asymmetric thrust detection approaches to aid in the reduction of asymmetric thrust-induced aviation accidents. This paper presents the results from that effort and their evaluation in simulation studies, including those from a real-time flight simulation testbed. Asymmetric thrust is recognized as a contributing factor in several Propulsion System Malfunction plus Inappropriate Crew Response (PSM+ICR) aviation accidents. As an improvement over the state-of-the-art, providing annunciation of asymmetric thrust to alert the crew may hold safety benefits. For this, the reliable detection and confirmation of asymmetric thrust conditions is required. For this work, three asymmetric thrust detection methods are presented along with their results obtained through simulation studies. Representative asymmetric thrust conditions are modeled in simulation based on failure scenarios similar to those reported in aviation incident and accident descriptions. These simulated asymmetric thrust scenarios, combined with actual aircraft operational flight data, are then used to conduct a sensitivity study regarding the detection capabilities of the three methods. Additional evaluation results are presented based on pilot-in-the-loop simulation studies conducted in the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) flight simulation testbed. Data obtained from this flight simulation facility are used to further evaluate the effectiveness and accuracy of the asymmetric thrust detection approaches. Generally, the asymmetric thrust conditions are correctly detected and confirmed.

  14. Investigation of Asymmetric Thrust Detection with Demonstration in a Real-Time Simulation Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chicatelli, Amy K.; Rinehart, Aidan W.; Sowers, T. Shane; Simon, Donald L.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this effort is to develop, demonstrate, and evaluate three asymmetric thrust detection approaches to aid in the reduction of asymmetric thrust-induced aviation accidents. This paper presents the results from that effort and their evaluation in simulation studies, including those from a real-time flight simulation testbed. Asymmetric thrust is recognized as a contributing factor in several Propulsion System Malfunction plus Inappropriate Crew Response (PSM+ICR) aviation accidents. As an improvement over the state-of-the-art, providing annunciation of asymmetric thrust to alert the crew may hold safety benefits. For this, the reliable detection and confirmation of asymmetric thrust conditions is required. For this work, three asymmetric thrust detection methods are presented along with their results obtained through simulation studies. Representative asymmetric thrust conditions are modeled in simulation based on failure scenarios similar to those reported in aviation incident and accident descriptions. These simulated asymmetric thrust scenarios, combined with actual aircraft operational flight data, are then used to conduct a sensitivity study regarding the detection capabilities of the three methods. Additional evaluation results are presented based on pilot-in-the-loop simulation studies conducted in the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) flight simulation testbed. Data obtained from this flight simulation facility are used to further evaluate the effectiveness and accuracy of the asymmetric thrust detection approaches. Generally, the asymmetric thrust conditions are correctly detected and confirmed.

  15. Structural analysis using thrust-fault hanging-wall sequence diagrams: Ogden duplex, Wasatch Range, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Schirmer, T.W.

    1988-05-01

    Detailed mapping and cross-section traverses provide the control for structural analysis and geometric modeling of the Ogden duplex, a complex thrust system exposed in the Wasatch Mountains, east of Ogden, Utah. The structures consist of east-dipping folded thrust faults, basement-cored horses, lateral ramps and folds, and tear faults. The sequence of thrusting determined by means of lateral overlap of horses, thrust-splay relationships, and a top-to-bottom piggyback development is Willard thrust, Ogden thrust, Weber thrust, and Taylor thrust. Major decollement zones occur in the Cambrian shales and limestones. The Tintic Quartzite is the marker for determining gross geometries of horses. This exposed duplex serves as a good model to illustrate the method of constructing a hanging-wall sequence diagram - a series of longitudinal cross sections that move forward in time and space, and show how a thrust system formed as it moved updip over various footwall ramps. A hanging wall sequence diagram also shows the complex lateral variations in a thrust system and helps to locate lateral ramps, lateral folds, tear faults, and other features not shown on dip-oriented cross sections. 8 figures.

  16. Thrust stand evaluation of engine performance improvement algorithms in an F-15 airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conners, Timothy R.

    1992-01-01

    An investigation is underway to determine the benefits of a new propulsion system optimization algorithm in an F-15 airplane. The performance seeking control (PSC) algorithm optimizes the quasi-steady-state performance of an F100 derivative turbofan engine for several modes of operation. The PSC algorithm uses an onboard software engine model that calculates thrust, stall margin, and other unmeasured variables for use in the optimization. As part of the PSC test program, the F-15 aircraft was operated on a horizontal thrust stand. Thrust was measured with highly accurate load cells. The measured thrust was compared to onboard model estimates and to results from posttest performance programs. Thrust changes using the various PSC modes were recorded. Those results were compared to benefits using the less complex highly integrated digital electronic control (HIDEC) algorithm. The PSC maximum thrust mode increased intermediate power thrust by 10 percent. The PSC engine model did very well at estimating measured thrust and closely followed the transients during optimization. Quantitative results from the evaluation of the algorithms and performance calculation models are included with emphasis on measured thrust results. The report presents a description of the PSC system and a discussion of factors affecting the accuracy of the thrust stand load measurements.

  17. Gravity sliding, thrusting, and petroleum traps in the Magdalena Basins and Cordillera Orientale, Colombia

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, P.B. )

    1993-02-01

    Major gravity slides on flanks of mountain belts can be misinterpreted as tectonic thrusts. They occur as synclines ([open quotes]fauteuils glisses[close quotes]) striking sub-parallel to dip slopes of major uplifts, overlie low-angle listric thrusts which pass upslope into listric or bedding-parallel normal faults, and may be associated with gravity-driven buried thrust fronts. The Nuevo Mondo syncline, underlain by the La Salinas thrust, and similar synclines along the east side of the Magdalena valley are interpreted as [open quotes]fauteuils glisses[close quotes], whose occurrence at the edge of the Cordillera Orientale creates an illusion of westward thrusting. Minor faults, formerly interpreted as east-dipping reverse faults along the west edge of the Cordillera Orientale are too small to have uplifted the Cordillera or to be correlatable with the major thrusts beneath synclines. They are reinterpreted as major west-dipping parallel faults, pass downslope westward beneath the synclines and/or into blind imbricate thrust structures. The Magdalena basins contain attractive east-verging tectonic thrust traps for hydrocarbons, and less attractive post-tectonic west-verging thrust traps formed by sliding down the east flank of the basin. Interpretation of these structures as post-deformational features allows modeling of the Cordillera Orientale as an overthrust sheet about 10 km thick that moved over 160 km southeastward. Its ramp underlies the east flank of the Magdalena basins. Its buried thrust front marks the edge of the Llanos basin.

  18. Fault-related fluid flow, Beech Mountain thrust sheet, Blue Ridge Province, Tennessee-North Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Waggoner, W.K.; Mora, C.I. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1992-01-01

    The latest proterozoic Beech Granite is contained within the Beech Mountain thrust sheet (BMTS), part of a middle-late Paleozoic thrust complex located between Mountain City and Grandfather Mountain windows in the western Blue Ridge of TN-NC. At the base of the BMTS, Beech Granite is juxtaposed against lower Paleozoic carbonate and elastics of the Rome Fm. along the Stone Mountain thrust on the southeaster margin of the Mountain City window. At the top of the BMTS, Beech Granite occurs adjacent to Precambrian mafic rocks of the Pumpkin Patch thrust sheet (PPTS). The Beech Granite is foliated throughout the BMTS with mylonitization and localized cataclasis occurring within thrust zones along the upper and lower margins of the BMTS. Although the degree of mylonitization and cataclasis increases towards the thrusts, blocks of relatively undeformed granite also occur within these fault zones. Mylonites and thrusts are recognized as conduits for fluid movement, but the origin of the fluids and magnitude and effects of fluid migration are not well constrained. This study was undertaken to characterize fluid-rock interaction within the Beech Granite and BMTS. Extensive mobility of some elements/compounds within the thrust zones, and the isotopic and mineralogical differences between the thrust zones and interior of the BMTS indicate that fluid flow was focused within the thrust zones. The wide range of elevated temperatures (400--710 C) indicated by qz-fsp fractionations suggest isotopic disequilibrium. Using a more likely temperature range of 300--400 C for Alleghanian deformation, calculated fluid compositions indicate interactions with a mixture of meteoric-hydrothermal and metamorphic water with delta O-18 = 2.6--7.5[per thousand] for the upper thrust zone and 1.3 to 6.2[per thousand] for the lower thrust zone. These ranges are similar to isotopic data reported for other Blue Ridge thrusts and may represent later periods of meteoric water influx.

  19. Tsunami Hazard Assessment and Recent Mega-Thrust Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorito, S.

    2012-12-01

    Recent mega-thrust earthquakes and tsunamis like the Sumatra-Andaman 2004 and Tohoku 2011, among several others in the last decade, caused immense damage and casualties and revealed some limitations in our previous knowledge of tectonic processes. How does this understanding affects our ability to designing countermeasures for tsunami risk mitigation? To start answering this question, I will review some studies about the tsunami causative sources of the Maule 2010 and Tohoku 2011 mega-thrust events. In both cases, coseismic ruptures were different from what was generally expected in terms of slip amplitude and distribution over the fault plane, and therefore about the way the accumulated tectonic strain was released. However, exceptional monitoring efforts were performed in advance in these two subduction zones and these events ended up being the best recorded ever of their kind. The geophysical datasets made available to the scientific community fostered studies about the source by means of inversion techniques that were already refined in the last decades, and especially after the Sumatra-Andaman 2004 earthquake and tsunami. This unprecedented amount of high quality research significantly improved our general knowledge of mega-thrust events while opening several new questions. Based on the ongoing scientific discussion, I will illustrate some of the learned lessons to be taken into account for making tsunami hazard assessment more effective, which cannot be considered a straightforward extension of common seismic hazard assessment, especially if considering the trade off between 1) the feasibility of the computational effort needed if the full expected source variability is included, and 2) the sensitivity of tsunami hazard results to simplifying assumptions about the seismic source characterization.

  20. Dynamic visual acuity during passive head thrusts in canal planes.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Michael C; Migliaccio, Americo A; Della Santina, Charles C

    2006-12-01

    We sought to determine whether the dynamic visual acuity (DVA) test, which has been used to measure the function of the two horizontal semicircular canals (SCCs), could be adapted to measure the individual function of all six SCCs using transient, rapid, unpredictable head rotation stimuli (head thrusts) in the direction of maximum sensitivity of each SCC. We examined head-thrust DVA (htDVA) performance in 19 healthy control subjects, five patients before and six patients after plugging of one superior SCC for treatment of superior canal dehiscence, and two subjects with unilateral vestibular deafferentation (UVD) by vestibular neurectomy. We compared htDVA results for each SCC to vestibulo-ocular reflex gains measured using 3-D scleral coil recordings during a passive head-thrust-test paradigm. Individuals with normal vestibular function had similar htDVA scores for each of the six directions (canals) tested (mean 0.058 +/- 0.050 LogMAR). Individuals tested after surgical plugging of one superior SCC were similar to normal for all SCCs except the plugged SCC, which had significantly worse htDVA scores (mean 0.270 +/- 0.08 LogMAR). Individuals with UVD had significantly worse htDVA scores for head rotations maximally exciting any of the ipsilesional SCC (mean 0.317 +/- 0.129 LogMAR) and scores similar to normal subjects for contralesional rotations (0.063 +/- 0.051 LogMAR). These findings suggest that the htDVA test, which does not require scleral coil placement, magnetic field coils, or expensive oculography equipment, can provide a useful quantitative measure of individual SCC function.

  1. Large-scale geometry of Montana thrust belt

    SciTech Connect

    Sears, J.W.; Dolberg, D.M.

    1986-08-01

    Regional plunge of a structural culmination in the Sawtooth Mountains, combined with seismic profiles and borehole data, show that the imbricated faults of the Montana Disturbed belt gather upward to merge into a duplex beneath a large thrust plate dominated by the Precambrian Belt Supergroup. The duplex formed after deposition of the Paleocene St. Mary River Formation. This thrust plate overlies the Lewis, Hoadley, El dorado, Steinbach, and related thrust faults and forms the main ranges of the Montana Rocky Mountains. The plate is shaped like a northeasterly tapering wedge; it is 3 to 4 km (10,000 to 13,000 ft) thick at its leading edge, but thickens to more than 25 km (15 mi) to the southwest. At its leading edge, the plate carries lower parts of the Belt supergroup, including the Greyson, Empire, and Spokane formations. These units and overlying parts of the Belt Supergroup thicken dramatically westward within the plate, and the older, very thick, metamorphosed Prichard Formation emerges along the Purcell and related anticlinoria. The plate forms a south-facing monocline along the Lewis and Clark line. The monocline is corrugated into a series of southeast-plunging en echelon folds of Late Cretaceous age and merges with the southern terminus of the Purcell anticlinorium. Along these folds, metamorphosed Belt strata of the plate plunge systematically beneath Paleozoic and Mesozoic rocks that are preserved in a regional structural depression at the foot of the monocline. Geometric constructions based on areal geology suggest that the monocline has 25 km (15 mi) of structural relief and overlies a major footwall ramp that continues northward beneath the Purcell anticlinorium. This footwall ramp corresponds to the depositional locus for the easterly tapering belt strata of the plate, suggesting a total northeasterly displacement of about 50 km (30 mi) for the plate.

  2. Investigation of the Longitudinal Characteristics of a Large-Scale Jet Transport Model Equipped with Controllable Thrust Reversers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hickey, David H.; Tolhurst, William H., Jr.; Aoyagi, Kiyoshi

    1961-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine the effect of thrust control by means of controllable thrust reversers on the longitudinal characteristics of a large-scale airplane model with a 35' sweptback wing of aspect ratio of 7 and four pylon-mounted jet engines equipped with target-type thrust reversers designed to provide thrust control ranging from full forward thrust to full reverse thrust. The thrust control in landing-approach configurations formed the major portion of the study. Results were obtained with both leading- and trailing-edge high-lift devices.

  3. Earth tides can trigger shallow thrust fault earthquakes.

    PubMed

    Cochran, Elizabeth S; Vidale, John E; Tanaka, Sachiko

    2004-11-12

    We show a correlation between the occurrence of shallow thrust earthquakes and the occurrence of the strongest tides. The rate of earthquakes varies from the background rate by a factor of 3 with the tidal stress. The highest correlation is found when we assume a coefficient of friction of mu = 0.4 for the crust, although we see good correlation for mu between 0.2 and 0.6. Our results quantify the effect of applied stress on earthquake triggering, a key factor in understanding earthquake nucleation and cascades whereby one earthquake triggers others.

  4. Computer Tomography Analysis of Fastrac Composite Thrust Chamber Assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beshears, Ronald D.

    2000-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) inspection has been integrated into the production process for NASA's Fastrac composite thrust chamber assemblies (TCAs). CT has been proven to be uniquely qualified to detect the known critical flaw for these nozzles, liner cracks that are adjacent to debonds between the liner and overwrap. CT is also being used as a process monitoring tool through analysis of low density indications in the nozzle overwraps. 3d reconstruction of CT images to produce models of flawed areas is being used to give program engineers better insight into the location and nature of nozzle flaws.

  5. Passive Thrust Oscillation Mitigation for the CEV Crew Pallet System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sammons, Matthew; Powell, Cory; Pellicciotti, Joseph; Buehrle, Ralph; Johnson, Keith

    2012-01-01

    The Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) was intended to be the next-generation human spacecraft for the Constellation Program. The CEV Isolator Strut mechanism was designed to mitigate loads imparted to the CEV crew caused by the Thrust Oscillation (TO) phenomenon of the proposed Ares I Launch Vehicle (LV). The Isolator Strut was also designed to be compatible with Launch Abort (LA) contingencies and landing scenarios. Prototype struts were designed, built, and tested in component, sub-system, and system-level testing. The design of the strut, the results of the tests, and the conclusions and lessons learned from the program will be explored in this paper.

  6. Three dimensional thermal analysis of rocket thrust chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Naraghi, M.H.N.; Armstrong, E.S.

    1988-06-01

    A numerical model for the three dimensional thermal analysis of rocket thrust chambers and nozzles has been developed. The input to the model consists of the composition of the fuel/oxidant mixture and flow rates, chamber pressure, coolant entrance temperature and pressure, dimensions of the engine, materials and the number of nodes in different parts of the engine. The model allows for temperature variation in three dimensions: axial, radial and circumferential directions and by implementing an iterative scheme, it provides nodal temperature distribution, rates of heat transfer, hot gas and coolant thermal and transport properties.

  7. Future thrusts in the U.S. planetary program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedman, L. D.

    1977-01-01

    The aim of the U.S. deep space program concept is to complete the reconnaissance of the solar system and to transfer to the era of space utilization. Such spacecraft as the Voyager Jupiter-Saturn and the Pioneer Venus will be used to visit all the planets and smaller bodies of the solar system by the year 2000. In the present paper, some missions, still in the early planning stage and requiring Congressional approval are discussed, and the enormous capabilities of Solar Electric Propulsion (SEP) and Solar Sailing are pointed out. The advantages of such low-thrust propulsion systems in performance, mission design, and operations flexibility are noted.

  8. Low-thrust trajectory analysis for the geosynchronous mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jasper, T. P.

    1973-01-01

    Methodology employed in development of a computer program designed to analyze optimal low-thrust trajectories is described, and application of the program to a Solar Electric Propulsion Stage (SEPS) geosynchronous mission is discussed. To avoid the zero inclination and eccentricity singularities which plague many small-force perturbation techniques, a special set of state variables (equinoctial) is used. Adjoint equations are derived for the minimum time problem and are also free from the singularities. Solutions to the state and adjoint equations are obtained by both orbit averaging and precision numerical integration; an evaluation of these approaches is made.

  9. Performance of a transpiration-regenerative cooled rocket thrust chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valler, H. W.

    1979-01-01

    The analysis, design, fabrication, and testing of a liquid rocket engine thrust chamber which is gas transpiration cooled in the high heat flux convergent portion of the chamber and water jacket cooled (simulated regenerative) in the barrel and divergent sections of the chamber are described. The engine burns LOX-hydrogen propellants at a chamber pressure of 600 psia. Various transpiration coolant flow rates were tested with resultant local hot gas wall temperatures in the 800 F to 1400 F range. The feasibility of transpiration cooling with hydrogen and helium, and the use of photo-etched copper platelets for heat transfer and coolant metering was successfully demonstrated.

  10. Thrust vector control algorithm design for the Cassini spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Enright, Paul J.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes a preliminary design of the thrust vector control algorithm for the interplanetary spacecraft, Cassini. Topics of discussion include flight software architecture, modeling of sensors, actuators, and vehicle dynamics, and controller design and analysis via classical methods. Special attention is paid to potential interactions with structural flexibilities and propellant dynamics. Controller performance is evaluated in a simulation environment built around a multi-body dynamics model, which contains nonlinear models of the relevant hardware and preliminary versions of supporting attitude determination and control functions.

  11. Three dimensional thermal analysis of rocket thrust chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naraghi, M. H. N.; Armstrong, E. S.

    1988-01-01

    A numerical model for the three dimensional thermal analysis of rocket thrust chambers and nozzles has been developed. The input to the model consists of the composition of the fuel/oxidant mixture and flow rates, chamber pressure, coolant entrance temperature and pressure, dimensions of the engine, materials and the number of nodes in different parts of the engine. The model allows for temperature variation in three dimensions: axial, radial and circumferential directions and by implementing an iterative scheme, it provides nodal temperature distribution, rates of heat transfer, hot gas and coolant thermal and transport properties.

  12. Theoretical Performance of Hydrogen-Oxygen Rocket Thrust Chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sievers, Gilbert K.; Tomazic, William A.; Kinney, George R.

    1961-01-01

    Data are presented for liquid-hydrogen-liquid-oxygen thrust chambers at chamber pressures from 15 to 1200 pounds per square inch absolute, area ratios to approximately 300, and percent fuel from about 8 to 34 for both equilibrium and frozen composition during expansion. Specific impulse in vacuum, specific impulse, combustion-chamber temperature, nozzle-exit temperature, characteristic velocity, and the ratio of chamber-to-nozzle-exit pressure are included. The data are presented in convenient graphical forms to allow quick calculation of theoretical nozzle performance with over- or underexpansion, flow separation, and introduction of the propellants at various initial conditions or heat loss from the combustion chamber.

  13. Thrust vector control for the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Counter, D. N.; Brinton, B. C.

    1975-01-01

    Thrust vector control (TVC) for the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor (SRM) is obtained by omniaxis vectoring of the nozzle. The development and integration of the system are under the cognizance of Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The nozzle and flexible bearing have been designed and will be built by Thiokol Corporation/Wasatch Division. The vector requirements of the system, the impact of multiple reuse on the components, and the unique problems associated with a large flexible bearing are discussed. The design details of each of the major TVC subcomponents are delineated. The subscale bearing development program and the overall development schedule also are presented.

  14. Estimation of unmodeled forces on a low-thrust space vehicle. [trajectory analysis for Eros asteroid flyby

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tapley, B. D.; Hagar, H.

    1975-01-01

    The application of a sequential estimation algorithm, which compensates for random errors in the dynamic model, to the problem of estimating the state of a continuously thrusting solar electric propulsion space vehicle is investigated. The dynamic model errors, due to random anomalies in the propulsion system, are approximated successfully by both first order and second order Gauss-Markov processes to obtain a more accurate and stable orbit determination algorithm. The importance of correct dynamic and measurement modeling in achieving accurate estimates is demonstrated.

  15. Antiformal closure in ductile and brittle-ductile in fold-and-thrust belt tranverse zones, Moine Thrust Belt, NW Scotland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leslie, G.; Krabbendam, M.

    2009-04-01

    Abrupt lateral changes in thrust geometry occur in many mountain-building fold-and-thrust belts. Such changes in architecture are referred to as so-called transverse zones, and are commonly thought to be related to kinematic responses to irregularities generated across pre-existing, sometimes re-activated, basement faults. In many cases however the causative structure is concealed, either by distal parts of the thrust belt or the foreland basin. Sharp lateral changes in the structural geometry of ductile thrust stacks are less widely studied and reported. In NW Scotland, the classic Caledonian WNW-vergent Moine Thrust Belt exposes excellent examples of the structural architecture in such transverse zones, both in kilometre-scale thick monolithic (meta-)sandstone packages subject to ductile deformation, and in much thinner heterolithic packages subject to brittle-ductile deformation. In both cases the amplitude of the antiformal disturbance associated with the transverse zone is much greater than amplitude of any irregularity identified in the basement below. In Neoproterozoic Moine rocks in the hanging wall of the Moine Thrust, a large-scale lateral culmination wall forms a component part of the Oykel Transverse Zone (OTZ), a kilometre-scale thick constrictional ductile shear zone striking sub-parallel to the WNW-directed thrust transport direction. The OTZ forms the SW limit of the Cassley Culmination. ESE-plunging mullions are an integral part of the fabric of the transverse zone and were generated by constriction sub-parallel to the WNW-directed thrust transport direction. Main folds and fabrics in the transverse zone hanging-wall are folded by main folds and fabrics in the footwall, demonstrating the overall foreland-propagating record of ductile deformation as the Cassley Culmination grew. Constriction and mullion development are attributed to differential, transtensional movement across the transverse zone during the later stages of culmination development

  16. Direct thrust measurements and modelling of a radio-frequency expanding plasma thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Lafleur, T.; Charles, C.; Boswell, R. W.; Takahashi, K.

    2011-08-15

    It is shown analytically that the thrust from a simple plasma thruster (in the absence of a magnetic field) is given by the maximum upstream electron pressure, even if the plasma diverges downstream. Direct thrust measurements of a thruster are then performed using a pendulum thrust balance and a laser displacement sensor. A maximum thrust of about 2 mN is obtained at 700 W for a thruster length of 17.5 cm and a flow rate of 0.9 mg s{sup -1}, while a larger thrust of 4 mN is obtained at a similar power for a length of 9.5 cm and a flow rate of 1.65 mg s{sup -1}. The measured thrusts are in good agreement with the maximum upstream electron pressure found from measurements of the plasma parameters and in fair agreement with a simple global approach used to model the thruster.

  17. Experimental results for a two-dimensional supersonic inlet used as a thrust deflecting nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johns, Albert L.; Burstadt, Paul L.

    1984-01-01

    Nearly all supersonic V/STOL aircraft concepts are dependent on the thrust deflecting capability of a nozzle. In one unique concept, referred to as the reverse flow dual fan, not only is there a thrust deflecting nozzle for the fan and core engine exit flow, but because of the way the propulsion system operates during vertical takeoff and landing, the supersonic inlet is also used as a thrust deflecting nozzle. This paper presents results of an experimental study to evaluate the performance of a supersonic inlet used as a thrust deflecting nozzle for this reverse flow dual fan concept. Results are presented in terms of nozzle thrust coefficient and thrust vector angle for a number of inlet/nozzle configurations. Flow visualization and nozzle exit flow survey results are also shown.

  18. Attitude control of a spinning rocket via thrust vectoring

    SciTech Connect

    White, J.E.

    1990-12-19

    Two controllers are developed to provide attitude control of a spinning rocket that has a thrust vectoring capability. The first controller has a single-input/single-output design that ignores the gyroscopic coupling between the control channels. The second controller has a multi-input/multi-output structure that is specifically intended to account for the gyroscopic coupling effects. A performance comparison between the two approached is conducted for a range of roll rates. Each controller is tested for the ability to track step commands, and for the amount of coupling impurity. Both controllers are developed via a linear-quadratic-regulator synthesis procedure, which is motivated by the multi-input/multi-output nature of second controller. Time responses and a singular value analysis are used to evaluate controller performance. This paper describes the development and comparison of two controllers that are designed to provide attitude control of a spinning rocket that is equipped with thrust vector control. 12 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Compact and High Thrust Air Turbo Ram Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Hiroaki; Kitahara, Kazuki; Inukai, Yasuo

    The Air Turbo Ramjet (ATR) is a combined cycle engine which performs like a turbojet engine at subsonic speeds and a ramjet at supersonic speeds and therefore the ATR is an attractive propulsion system for the wide operation range (e.g. Mach 0 to Mach 4). The ATR can provide a higher specific impulse than a solid fuel rocket engine and a higher thrust per frontal area than a turbojet engine. The major ATR components are the inlet, fan (compressor), turbine, gas generator, combustor and exhaust nozzle. In the ATR, the turbine drive gas is generated by a decomposed liquid or solid fuel gas generator. In order to carry heavier payloads and to attain shorter flight time, the compact and high thrust engine is required. In this study, the ram combustor with the double-staged flameholders and the fan with tandem blade were introduced to shorten the engine length and to increase the fan pressure ratio, respectively. Furthermore, the engine testing was carried out on sea level static condition to confirm the engine component integration technologies for the ATR propulsion system.

  20. A robotic platform for studying sea lion thrust production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leftwich, Megan; Patel, Rahi; Kulkarni, Aditya; Friedman, Chen

    California Sea Lions are agile swimmers and, uniquely, use their foreflippers (rather than hind flipper undulation) to generate thrust. Recently, a sea lion flipper from a deceased subject was externally scanned in high detail for fluid dynamics research. The flipper's geometry is used in this work to build an accurate scaled down flipper model (approximately 68% of the full size span). The flipper model is placed in a water flume to obtain lift and drag force measurements. The unique trailing edge features are then examined for their effect on the measured forces by comparing to similar flipper models with a smooth trailing edge, sinusoidal trailing edge, and a saw-tooth trailing edge. Additionally, a robotic flipper is being designed and built, replicating the sea lion foreflipper anatomical structure. The robot is actuated by a set of servo motors and replicates the sea lion flipper clap motion based on previously extracted kinematics. The flipper tip speed is designed to match typical full scale Reynolds numbers for an acceleration from rest maneuver. The model is tested in the water flume as well to obtain the forces and flow structures during the thrust production phase of the flipper motion.

  1. Resin Transfer Moulding Of An Engine Thrust Frame Cone Cap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodsjo, Anders; Fatemi, Javad; de Vries, Henri

    2012-07-01

    For the Ariane 5 Midlife Evolution, a new Engine Thrust Frame for the upper stage is being developed. Part of this Engine Thrust Frame is the so-called Cone Cap, which closes the inverted cone shape of the structure. This part is highly loaded, as it transfers all the loads from the engines to the cone shape, and includes the hinge points for the mechanism that steer the engines. Besides strength to cope with the loads, stiffness is a very important design parameter. A composite design of this structure has been developed, which is approximately 15 kg’s lighter than the aluminium structure. To manufacture such a part in composites is challenging, because of the complexity of the shape and large laminate thickness. Due to these requirements, Resin Transfer Moulding has been selected as manufacturing method, which allows this highly integrated structure to be made in one step. As part of this project, a quarter segment of the full-scale design has been manufactured. From the design model, a detailed design for the dry fibre preform has been made using advanced composite laminate software tools. This preform was placed inside a heated, double sided tool and injected with the resin.

  2. Preliminary Assessment of Thrust Augmentation of NEP Based Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chew, Gilbert; Pelaccio, Dennis G.; Chiroux, Robert; Pervan, Sherry; Rauwolf, Gerald A.; White, Charles

    2005-01-01

    Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC), with support from NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, has conducted a preliminary study to compare options for augmenting the thrust of a conventional nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) system. These options include a novel nuclear propulsion system concept known as Hybrid Indirect Nuclear Propulsion (HINP) and conventional chemical propulsion. The utility and technical feasibility of the HINP concept are assessed, and features and potential of this new in-space propulsion system concept are identified. As part of the study, SAIC developed top-level design tools to model the size and performance of an HINP system, as well as for several chemical propulsion options, including liquid and gelled propellants. A mission trade study was performed to compare a representative HINP system with chemical propulsion options for thrust augmentation of NEP systems for a mission to Saturn's moon Titan. Details pertaining to the approach, features, initial demonstration results for HINP model development, and the mission trade study are presented. Key technology and design issues associated with the HINP concept and future work recommendations are also identified.

  3. Thrust and efficiency model for electron-driven magnetic nozzles

    SciTech Connect

    Little, Justin M.; Choueiri, Edgar Y.

    2013-10-15

    A performance model is presented for magnetic nozzle plasmas driven by electron thermal expansion to investigate how the thrust coefficient and beam divergence efficiency scale with the incoming plasma flow and magnetic field geometry. Using a transformation from cylindrical to magnetic coordinates, an approximate analytical solution is derived to the axisymmetric two-fluid equations for a collisionless plasma flow along an applied magnetic field. This solution yields an expression for the half-width at half-maximum of the plasma density profile in the far-downstream region, from which simple scaling relations for the thrust coefficient and beam divergence efficiency are derived. It is found that the beam divergence efficiency is most sensitive to the density profile of the flow into the nozzle throat, with the highest efficiencies occurring for plasmas concentrated along the nozzle axis. Increasing the expansion ratio of the magnetic field leads to efficiency improvements that are more pronounced for incoming plasmas that are not concentrated along the axis. This implies that the additional magnet required to increase the expansion ratio may be worth the added complexity for plasma sources that exhibit poor confinement.

  4. Simulations of Pulse Detonation Engines with MHD Thrust Augmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeineh, Christopher; Roth, Timothy; Cole, Lord; Karagozian, Ann; Cambier, Jean-Luc

    2008-11-01

    Pulse detonation rocket engines (PDREs) have received significant attention in recent years due to their potentially superior performance over constant-pressure engines. Yet unsteady chamber pressures cause the PDRE flow to be either over-expanded or under-expanded for the majority of the cycle, with substantial performance loss in atmospheric flight applications. The present computational studies examine the potential benefits of using magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) thrust augmentation by extracting energy via a generator in the PDRE nozzle and applying it to a separate, secondary stream. In the present studies, which involve both transient quasi-1D and 2D numerical simulations, the energy extracted from the nozzle flow is directly applied to a by-pass air stream through an MHD accelerator. The air stream is first shocked by the under-expanded nozzle flow and raised to high temperature, allowing thermal ionization. The specific conditions for thrust augmentation are examined. Alternative configurations utilizing a magnetic piston in the PDRE chamber are also explored. Results show potential performance gains but with significant challenges, depending on the operating and flight conditions.

  5. Status and tendencies for low to medium thrust propulsion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopmann, Helmut; Pitt, Richard; Schwende, Manfred; Zewen, Helmut

    The previous use of space liquid propulsion systems in the low thrust range (up to approx. 400 N) has been almost entirely devoted to providing the attitude and orbit control of satellites, including apogee injection. The use of hydrazine peroxide gave way to monopropellant hydrazine in the late sixties whilst the advent of bipropellant systems came with the launch of the Symphonie satellite in 1974. In general, these propulsion systems, together with their feed system components, are more or less standardized with only minor changes required in terms of configuration or propellant mass (tank size) for each satellite. The future, however, promises much greater diversification for the low and medium thrust propulsion systems with increasing technical demands on the engines and their associated equipment. Space Station programs, like Columbus with its in-orbit servicing requirement, will require longer life components and increased modularity whilst manned launch vehicles, such as Ariane 5 with Hermes or Space Planes such as Sänger or Hotol, will demand much higher safety and reliability requirements together with maximum reusability.

  6. Preloading of the thrust phase in cross-country skiing.

    PubMed

    Komi, P V; Norman, R W

    1987-03-01

    Based on the assumption that the stretch-shortening cycle is a natural way of muscle function, the occurrence of such a cycle was investigated in a diagonal technique of cross-country skiing. Cinematographic, special force platform, and telemetered EMG techniques were employed. The four subjects studied were all elite international level cross-country skiers, and the measurements were taken either under world championship conditions (cinematography) or during special test situations outdoors (EMG, force platform, and cinematography). The skiing was performed on the fixed uphill course (competition) and on the variable uphill tracks (2.5 degrees-11 degrees). The latter condition allowed mounting of a special long force platform system under the track. The results indicated that the leg kick phase is preceded by a typical unweighting phase, which is followed by braking and propulsion phases. Angular velocity curves of the hip, knee, and ankle joints revealed indirectly the segmental occurrence of the stretch-shortening cycle. Similar phenomena could be identified for the elbow joint during the pole plant and thrust phases. On a steep uphill track, the muscle activation pattern and the ground reaction forces resembled in many instances those of slow level running. Based on the results, a model was suggested to describe how the preloading of the leg thrust phase takes place as a sequential flow from one joint to another.

  7. Three-dimensional geometry of thrust surfaces and the origin of sinuous thrust traces in orogenic belts: Insights from scaled sandbox experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chattopadhyay, A.; Jain, M.; Bhattacharjee, D.

    2014-12-01

    Sinuous traces of emerging thrust tips, comprising multiple salients and recesses, are commonly observed in orogenic belts (e.g. Lesser Himalayas of India, Nepal and Bhutan) and in accretionary prisms (e.g. Nankai Trough off the coast of Japan). Lateral (along the strike of the deformation zone) variation in the depths of foreland basins (i.e. variable sediment thickness) or in the strength of the basal detachment, or presence of a curved indenter has been traditionally cited to explain the formation of salients in fold-and-thrust belts, although they are not applicable in all cases. In the present work, we have carried out four series of scaled analog model experiments using dry quartz sand, changing the dip of the basal decollément (β = 0° or 5°) and the basal friction (μb = 0.5 or 0.3) to investigate the 3D shape of thrust surfaces under varying overall boundary conditions, but without any lateral variation of these parameters, within the models. The experimental results show that under all boundary conditions, thrust surfaces are curved both in their dip and strike directions (i.e. spoon-shaped in 3D). Multiple concave-upward and convex-upward segments constitute a thrust surface, which produces a sinuous trace when the tip line intersects the Earth's surface. It is also shown that thrust surface curvatures occur at different scales, and the overall thrust surface roughness (corrugations) has a self-affine fractal geometry.

  8. Numerical simulation of magnetohydrodynamic thrust augmentation for pulse detonation rocket engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeineh, Christopher

    Pulse detonation engines (PDEs) are the focus of increasing attention due to their potentially superior performance over conventional engines, as either an alternate for an airbreathing engine or a rocket engine. Due to its unsteady chamber pressure, the Pulse Detonation Rocket Engine (PDRE) system will either be over- or under-expanded for the majority of the cycle, with energy applied toward suboptimal impulse generation, especially at very high speeds and high altitudes. Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) augmentation offers the opportunity to extract energy and apply it to a separate stream in the engine where the net thrust will be increased. With MHD augmentation, such as in the Pulse Detonation Rocket-Induced MHD Ejector (PDRIME) concept, energy could be extracted from the high-speed fluid in the nozzle and reapplied elsewhere in the fluid as a. body force. The present work explored the potential performance of such propulsion systems. In the PDRIME, at the appropriate point in the PDRE cycle, the MHD energy extracted from the PDRE's nozzle is reintroduced to a separate bypass tube by an MHD accelerator which acts to accelerate the bypass air and impart a net positive thrust to the system over the course of engine cycle. An alternative configuration, involving application of a "magnetic piston" in the PDRE chamber, with and without PDRIME bypass, is also explored. The present simulations mainly involve use of detailed transient numerical simulations (quasi-one-dimensional and two-dimensional) for the exploration of the PDRE, PDRIME, magnetic piston, and other geometries, and comparisons with a simpler blowdown model are also made. Results show that potential performance gains and operational benefits for specific flight Mach number and altitude conditions may be achieved and that conditions creating the performance improvements are similarly predicted between quasi-1 D and 2D numerical simulations.

  9. Quantitative evaluation of a thrust vector controlled transport at the conceptual design phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricketts, Vincent Patrick

    The impetus to innovate, to push the bounds and break the molds of evolutionary design trends, often comes from competition but sometimes requires catalytic political legislature. For this research endeavor, the 'catalyzing legislation' comes in response to the rise in cost of fossil fuels and the request put forth by NASA on aircraft manufacturers to show reduced aircraft fuel consumption of +60% within 30 years. This necessitates that novel technologies be considered to achieve these values of improved performance. One such technology is thrust vector control (TVC). The beneficial characteristic of thrust vector control technology applied to the traditional tail-aft configuration (TAC) commercial transport is its ability to retain the operational advantage of this highly evolved aircraft type like cabin evacuation, ground operation, safety, and certification. This study explores if the TVC transport concept offers improved flight performance due to synergistically reducing the traditional empennage size, overall resulting in reduced weight and drag, and therefore reduced aircraft fuel consumption. In particular, this study explores if the TVC technology in combination with the reduced empennage methodology enables the TAC aircraft to synergistically evolve while complying with current safety and certification regulation. This research utilizes the multi-disciplinary parametric sizing software, AVD Sizing, developed by the Aerospace Vehicle Design (AVD) Laboratory. The sizing software is responsible for visualizing the total system solution space via parametric trades and is capable of determining if the TVC technology can enable the TAC aircraft to synergistically evolve, showing marked improvements in performance and cost. This study indicates that the TVC plus reduced empennage methodology shows marked improvements in performance and cost.

  10. Finite-thrust optimization of interplanetary transfers of space vehicle with bimodal nuclear thermal propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharytonov, Oleksii M.; Kiforenko, Boris M.

    2011-08-01

    The nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) propulsion is one of the leading promising technologies for primary space propulsion for manned exploration of the solar system due to its high specific impulse capability and sufficiently high thrust-to-weight ratio. Another benefit of NTR is its possible bimodal design, when nuclear reactor is used for generation of a jet thrust in a high-thrust mode and (with an appropriate power conversion system) as a source of electric power to supply the payload and the electric engines in a low-thrust mode. The model of the NTR thrust control was developed considering high-thrust NTR as a propulsion system of limited power and exhaust velocity. For the proposed model the control of the thrust value is accomplished by the regulation of reactor thermal power and propellant mass flow rate. The problem of joint optimization of the combination of high- and low-thrust arcs and the parameters of bimodal NTR (BNTR) propulsion system is considered for the interplanetary transfers. The interplanetary trajectory of the space vehicle is formed by the high-thrust NTR burns, which define planet-centric maneuvers and by the low-thrust heliocentric arcs where the nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) is used. The high-thrust arcs are analyzed using finite-thrust approach. The motion of the corresponding dynamical system is realized in three phase spaces concerning the departure planet-centric maneuver by means of high-thrust NTR propulsion, the low-thrust NEP heliocentric maneuver and the approach high-thrust NTR planet-centric maneuver. The phase coordinates are related at the time instants of the change of the phase spaces due to the relations between the space vehicle masses. The optimal control analysis is performed using Pontryagin's maximum principle. The numerical results are analyzed for Earth-Mars "sprint" transfer. The optimal values of the parameters that define the masses of NTR and NEP subsystems have been evaluated. It is shown that the low-thrust

  11. Development of a two-dimensional dual pendulum thrust stand for Hall thrusters.

    PubMed

    Nagao, N; Yokota, S; Komurasaki, K; Arakawa, Y

    2007-11-01

    A two-dimensional dual pendulum thrust stand was developed to measure thrust vectors [axial and horizontal (transverse) direction thrusts] of a Hall thruster. A thruster with a steering mechanism is mounted on the inner pendulum, and thrust is measured from the displacement between inner and outer pendulums, by which a thermal drift effect is canceled out. Two crossover knife-edges support each pendulum arm: one is set on the other at a right angle. They enable the pendulums to swing in two directions. Thrust calibration using a pulley and weight system showed that the measurement errors were less than 0.25 mN (1.4%) in the main thrust direction and 0.09 mN (1.4%) in its transverse direction. The thrust angle of the thrust vector was measured with the stand using the thruster. Consequently, a vector deviation from the main thrust direction of +/-2.3 degrees was measured with the error of +/-0.2 degrees under the typical operating conditions for the thruster.

  12. Static internal performance characteristics of two thrust reverser concepts for axisymmetric nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leavitt, L. D.; Re, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    The statis performance of two axisymmetric nozzle thrust reverser concepts was investigated. A rotating vane thrust reverser represented a concept in which reversing is accomplished upstream of the nozzle throat, and a three door reverser concept provided reversing downstream of the nozzle throat. Nozzle pressure ratio was varied from 2.0 to approximately 6.0. The results of this investigation indicate that both the rotating vane and three door reverser concepts were effective static thrust spoilers with the landing approach nozzle geometry and were capable of providing at least a 50 percent reversal of static thrust when fully deployed with the ground roll nozzle geometry.

  13. Subsidence history of the Alabama promontory in response to Late Paleozoic Appalachian-Ouachita thrusting

    SciTech Connect

    Whitting, B.M.; Thomas, W.A. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1994-03-01

    The Alabama promontory of North American continental crust was framed during late Precambrian-Cambrian rifting by the northeast-striking Blue Ridge rift and the northwest-striking alabama-Oklahoma transform fault. A passive margin persisted along the western side of the promontory from Cambrian to Mississippian time, but the eastern side was affected by the Taconic and Acadian orogenies. Prior to initiation of Ouachita and Appalachian (Alleghanian) thrusting, the outline of the rifted margin of continental crust on the Alabama promontory remained intact; and the late paleozoic thrust belt conformed to the shape of the promontory, defining northwest-striking Ouachita thrust faults along the southwest side of the promontory, north-striking Appalachian (Georgia-Tennessee) thrust faults on the east, and northeast-striking Appalachian (Alabama) thrust faults across the corner of the promontory. Subsidence profiles perpendicular to each of the strike domains of the thrust belt have been constructed by calculating total subsidence from decompacted thickness of the synorogenic sedimentary deposits. The profile perpendicular to the Ouachita thrust belt shows increasing subsidence rates through time and toward the thrust front, indicating the classic signature of an orogenic foreland basin. The profile perpendicular to the Georgia-Tennessee Appalachian thrust belt similarly shows increasing subsidence rates through time and toward the orogenic hinterland. These quantitative results support the conclusion that Black Warrior basin subsidence is tectonically rather than sedimentologically driven, and the timing of subsidence events reported here has implications for regional tectonic models.

  14. Development of a two-dimensional dual pendulum thrust stand for Hall thrusters

    SciTech Connect

    Nagao, N.; Yokota, S.; Komurasaki, K.; Arakawa, Y.

    2007-11-15

    A two-dimensional dual pendulum thrust stand was developed to measure thrust vectors (axial and horizontal (transverse) direction thrusts) of a Hall thruster. A thruster with a steering mechanism is mounted on the inner pendulum, and thrust is measured from the displacement between inner and outer pendulums, by which a thermal drift effect is canceled out. Two crossover knife-edges support each pendulum arm: one is set on the other at a right angle. They enable the pendulums to swing in two directions. Thrust calibration using a pulley and weight system showed that the measurement errors were less than 0.25 mN (1.4%) in the main thrust direction and 0.09 mN (1.4%) in its transverse direction. The thrust angle of the thrust vector was measured with the stand using the thruster. Consequently, a vector deviation from the main thrust direction of {+-}2.3 deg. was measured with the error of {+-}0.2 deg. under the typical operating conditions for the thruster.

  15. Theoretical Comparison of Several Methods of Thrust Augmentation for Turbojet Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Eldon W; Wilcox, E Clinton

    1950-01-01

    A theoretical investigation of tail-pipe burning, water injection at the compressor inlet, combination tail-pipe burning plus water injection, bleedoff, and rocket-assist methods thrust augmentation for turbojet engines was made for an engine representative of those in current use. The effect of augmented liquid ratio on augmented thrust ratio and the effects of altitude and flight Mach number on the performance of various methods were determined. The additional take-off weight involved by the use of the different thrust augmentation methods, as well as the effect of the various thrust augmentation methods on the range of a representative aircraft was also investigated.

  16. A Method for Integrating Thrust-Vectoring and Actuated Forebody Strakes with Conventional Aerodynamic Controls on a High-Performance Fighter Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lallman, Frederick J.; Davidson, John B.; Murphy, Patrick C.

    1998-01-01

    A method, called pseudo controls, of integrating several airplane controls to achieve cooperative operation is presented. The method eliminates conflicting control motions, minimizes the number of feedback control gains, and reduces the complication of feedback gain schedules. The method is applied to the lateral/directional controls of a modified high-performance airplane. The airplane has a conventional set of aerodynamic controls, an experimental set of thrust-vectoring controls, and an experimental set of actuated forebody strakes. The experimental controls give the airplane additional control power for enhanced stability and maneuvering capabilities while flying over an expanded envelope, especially at high angles of attack. The flight controls are scheduled to generate independent body-axis control moments. These control moments are coordinated to produce stability-axis angular accelerations. Inertial coupling moments are compensated. Thrust-vectoring controls are engaged according to their effectiveness relative to that of the aerodynamic controls. Vane-relief logic removes steady and slowly varying commands from the thrust-vectoring controls to alleviate heating of the thrust turning devices. The actuated forebody strakes are engaged at high angles of attack. This report presents the forward-loop elements of a flight control system that positions the flight controls according to the desired stability-axis accelerations. This report does not include the generation of the required angular acceleration commands by means of pilot controls or the feedback of sensed airplane motions.

  17. Preliminary performance of a vertical-attitude takeoff and landing, supersonic cruise aircraft concept having thrust vectoring integrated into the flight control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robins, A. W.; Beissner, F. L., Jr.; Domack, C. S.; Swanson, E. E.

    1985-01-01

    A performance study was made of a vertical attitude takeoff and landing (VATOL), supersonic cruise aircraft concept having thrust vectoring integrated into the flight control system. Those characteristics considered were aerodynamics, weight, balance, and performance. Preliminary results indicate that high levels of supersonic aerodynamic performance can be achieved. Further, with the assumption of an advanced (1985 technology readiness) low bypass ratio turbofan engine and advanced structures, excellent mission performance capability is indicated.

  18. Static internal performance of a single-engine onaxisymmetric-nozzle vaned-thrust-reverser design with thrust modulation capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leavitt, L. D.; Burley, J. R., II

    1985-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted at wind-off conditions in the stati-test facility of the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel. The tests were conducted on a single-engine reverser configuration with partial and full reverse-thrust modulation capabilities. The reverser design had four ports with equal areas. These ports were angled outboard 30 deg from the vertical impart of a splay angle to the reverse exhaust flow. This splaying of reverser flow was intended to prevent impingement of exhaust flow on empennage surfaces and to help avoid inlet reingestion of exhaust gas when the reverser is integrated into an actual airplane configuration. External vane boxes were located directly over each of the four ports to provide variation of reverser efflux angle from 140 deg to 26 deg (measured forward from the horizontal reference axis). The reverser model was tested with both a butterfly-type inner door and an internal slider door to provide area control for each individual port. In addition, main nozzle throat area and vector angle were varied to examine various methods of modulating thrust levels. Other model variables included vane box configuration (four or six vanes per box), orientation of external vane boxes with respect to internal port walls (splay angle shims), and vane box sideplates. Nozzle pressure ratio was varied from 2.0 approximately 7.0.

  19. Graded Achievement, Tested Achievement, and Validity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brookhart, Susan M.

    2015-01-01

    Twenty-eight studies of grades, over a century, were reviewed using the argument-based approach to validity suggested by Kane as a theoretical framework. The review draws conclusions about the meaning of graded achievement, its relation to tested achievement, and changes in the construct of graded achievement over time. "Graded…

  20. Microstructural variation in the transport direction of a large-scale mid-crustal thrust (Woodroffe Thrust, Central Australia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wex, Sebastian; Mancktelow, Neil S.; Hawemann, Friedrich; Pennacchioni, Giorgio; Camacho, Alfredo

    2016-04-01

    The over ˜600 km long E-W trending mid-crustal Woodroffe Thrust is one the most prominent structures of a range of large-scale shear zones that developed in the Musgrave Ranges region in Central Australia. During the Petermann Orogeny around 550 Ma the Woodroffe Thrust placed 1.2 Ga granulites onto similarly-aged amphibolite and granulite facies gneisses along a south-dipping plane with a top-to-north shear sense. Due to late-stage open folding of the thrust plane, a nearly continuous N-S profile of 60 km length in the direction of thrusting could be studied for variation in microstructure. The regional P/T variations in the mylonitized footwall (600 to 500 °C at ~ 0.8 GPa from S to N) indicate that the original angle of dip was shallow (~ 10°) towards the south. Along the profile, evidence for fluid-present conditions are effectively absent in the more southerly areas and only present on a local scale in the north, characterizing the regional conditions to be "dry". This is indicated by: 1) only rare syntectonic quartz veins in the footwall; 2) very little sericitization of plagioclase; 3) breakdown of plagioclase to kyanite + garnet, rather than kyanite + clinozoisite; and 4) variable presence of hydrothermally introduced calcite. These changes in P/T conditions and fluid availability are associated with corresponding changes in mineral assemblage and microstructure. Mylonitized dolerites consists of a syn-kinematic assemblage (decreasing modal amounts from left to right) of Pl + Cpx + Grt + Ky + Rt + Ilm ± Opx ± Amp ± Qz in the central/southern areas and Pl + Bt + Amp + Chl + Ilm ± Kfs ± Mag ± Ap in the north. The amount of newly grown garnet decreases towards the north and garnet is generally absent in the northernmost exposures of the Woodroffe Thrust. Mylonitized felsic granulites and granitoids consist of syn-kinematic assemblages of Qz + Pl + Kfs + Grt + Cpx + Ky + Ilm + Rt ± Bt ± Amp ± Opx ± Ap in the south and Qz + Pl + Kfs + Bt + Czo + Grt

  1. Pressure drop and thrust predictions for transonic micronozzle flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, J.; Groll, R.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, the expansion of xenon, argon, krypton, and neon gases through a Laval nozzle is studied experimentally and numerically. The pressurized gases are accelerated through the nozzle into a vacuum chamber in an attempt to simulate the operating conditions of a cold-gas thruster for attitude control of a micro-satellite. The gases are evaluated at several mass flow rates ranging between 0.178 mg/s and 3.568 mg/s. The Re numbers are low (8-256) and the estimated values of Kn number lie between 0.33 and 0.02 (transition and slip-flow regime). Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) and continuum-based simulations with a no-slip boundary condition are performed. The DSMC and the experimental results show good agreement in the range Kn > 0.1, while the Navier-Stokes results describe the experimental data more accurately for Kn < 0.05. Comparison between the experimental and Navier-Stokes results shows high deviations at the lower mass flow rates and higher Kn numbers. A relation describing the deviation of the pressure drop through the nozzle as a function of Kn is obtained. For gases with small collision cross sections, the experimental pressure results deviate more strongly from the no-slip assumption. From the analysis of the developed function, it is possible to correct the pressure results for the studied gases, both in the slip-flow and transition regimes, with four gas-independent accommodation coefficients. The thrust delivered by the cold-gas thruster and the specific impulse is determined based on the numerical results. Furthermore, an increase of the thickness of the viscous boundary layer through the diffuser of the micronozzle is observed. This results in a shock-less decrease of the Mach number and the flow velocity, which penalizes thrust efficiency. The negative effect of the viscous boundary layer on thrust efficiency can be lowered through higher values of Re and a reduction of the diffuser length.

  2. Geometry of Thrust Faults Beneath Amenthes Rupes, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vidal, A.; Mueller, K. M.; Golombek, M. P.

    2005-01-01

    Amenthes Rupes is a 380 km-long lobate fault scarp located in the eastern hemisphere of Mars near the dichotomy boundary. The scarp is marked by about 1 km of vertical separation across a northeast dipping thrust fault (top to the SW) and offsets heavily-cratered terrain of Late Noachian age, the visible portion of which was in place by 3.92 Ga and the buried portion in place between 4.08 and 4.27 Ga. The timing of scarp formation is difficult to closely constrain. Previous geologic mapping shows that near the northern end of Amenthes Rupes, Hesperian age basalts terminate at the scarp, suggesting that fault slip predated the emplacement of these flows at 3.69 to 3.9 Ga. Maxwell and McGill also suggest the faulting ceased before the final emplacement of the Late Hesperian lavas on Isidis Planitia. The trend of the faults at Amenthes, like many thrust faults at the dichotomy boundary, parallels the boundary itself. Schultz and Watters used a dislocation modeling program to match surface topography and vertical offset of the scarp at Amenthes Rupes, varying the dip and depth of faulting, assuming a slip of 1.5 km on the fault. They modeled faulting below Amenthes Rupes as having a dip of between 25 and 30 degrees and a depth of 25 to 35 km, based on the best match to topography. Assuming a 25 degree dip and surface measurements of vertical offset of between 0.3 and 1.2 km, Watters later estimated the maximum displacement on the Amenthes Rupes fault to be 2.90 km. However, these studies did not determine the geometry of the thrust using quantitative constraints that included shortening estimates. Amenthes Rupes deforms large preexisting impact craters. We use these craters to constrain shortening across the scarp and combine this with vertical separation to infer fault geometry. Fault dip was also estimated using measurements of scarp morphology. Measurements were based on 460 m (1/128 per pixel) digital elevation data from the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA), an

  3. Controls on the architecture of the Himalayan thrust belt, NW India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, D. M.; Paul, S. K.; Chambers, J. A.; Kohn, M. J.

    2009-12-01

    In the Himalayan-Tibetan orogen, the syntaxes at the eastern and western terminations of the orogen connect a 2400 km long thrust belt. If the two syntaxes are locked, the behavior of the thrust belt may be different in the syntaxes than in the central part of the thrust belt. In fact, recent work in the central part of the Himalayan thrust belt reveals shortening estimates of ~700-900 km while closer to the syntaxes, the amount of shortening may be nearly half that (~470 km). Thus, there should be an identifiable region where the character of the thrust belt changes from that of the syntaxes to that of the central part of the thrust belt. In the Himachal Pradesh region of NW India, a transition exists in the architecture of the thrust belt. North of the Kanga reentrant, the high mountains are close to the frontal part of the thrust belt; yet, near the Beas River, ~90 km to the east, and further east still in the Sutlej and Yamuna valleys, the high mountains of the thrust belt are located far into the hinterland. The presence or absence of the Greater Himalayan rocks at the surface appears to control this pattern: when Greater Himalayan rocks are absent at the surface, as near the town of Dharamsala, the thrust belt is very narrow (<20 km) and the high mountains are located near the front of the thrust belt; however, when Greater Himalayan rocks are present, as they are further eastward, the thrust belt is wider (>150 km) and the high mountains are located in the hinterland. The presence/absence of Greater Himalayan rocks at the surface also appears to control where focused erosion is presently occurring and, subsequently, the erosional exposure of Lesser Himalayan rocks. Three models reveal the possible kinematic roles of the Greater Himalayan rocks and its subsequent control of the architecture of the thrust belt: 1) the fault that carries Greater Himalayan rocks may tip out at depth; 2) slip on that fault may continue to the surface; 3) the fault tips out and

  4. Strain fabric associated with the Meade thrust sheet: implications for cross-section balancing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Protzman, Gretchen M.; Mitra, Gautam

    Emplacement of the Meade thrust sheet, southeastern Idaho, U.S.A., was accompanied by the development of a strain fabric and significant footwall deformation. Characteristics of the strain fabric are based on strain estimates using pressure-solution cleavage and deformed fossils within the Jurassic Twin Creek Formation. The strain fabric formed during early layer-parallel shortening at the thrust front and accommodates from 10 to 35% shortening within the incipient thrust sheet. Footwall strata were later folded above a detachment at the base of the Twin Creek Formation, and the early strain fabric was passively rotated. The structural development of this area, consisting of (1) strain fabric development, (2) folding of the footwall and (3) the truncation of footwall structures by imbricates of the Meade thrust, are placed in a relative time frame to aid in section reconstruction. The passive reorientation of the strain fabric and the truncation and incorporation of footwall structures into the thrust sheet are used as kinematic and geometric constraints for cross-section balancing. We present a sequential retrodeformation of the Meade thrust sheet in which strain is removed from the cross-section at the appropriate geometric stages in the deformation. These sections illustrate some methods by which strain data can be incorporated into cross-sections and also indicate the difficulty involved in balancing cross-sections of internally deformed thrust sheets. Interpretation of these sections suggests that a significant amount of footwall deformation accompanied the emplacement of the Meade thrust sheet and that footwall deformation is strongly controlled by the local stratigraphic package. The sections also illustrate that the earliest deformation within a thrust sheet may be unrelated to motion on the underlying incipient thrust, and that the trace of a thrust fault which cuts previously deformed strata will not restore to a typical ramp and flat geometry.

  5. The Effects of Thrust Uncertainty and Attitude Knowledge Errors on the MMS Formation Maintenance Maneuver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsai, Dean C.

    2005-01-01

    The Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) Mission will use a formation of four spinning spacecraft to study the Earth s magnetosphere. The science objectives of MMS require a near-regular tetrahedron formation to be maintained with side lengths ranging from ten kilometers to several thousand kilometers at orbit apogee. To reduce spacecraft complexity and cost, the current mission concept assumes MMS can achieve its formation goals through open-loop orbit control from the ground, rather than in-flight, closed-loop formation control that has been the subject of recent study. Significant analysis has been performed to provide optimal reference orbit and relative orbit designs. However, the feasibility of achieving these orbits, and maintaining them for an extended period of time in the presence of real world errors and perturbations has not been investigated. In particular, attitude knowledge and control errors, which may have a negligible effect on orbit control for conventional missions with spinning spacecraft, can contribute significant errors to the MMS orbits. In this work, a 6 degree-of-freedom (DOF) simulation is developed and used to analyze the effects of realistic errors on formation maintenance maneuver accuracy. Several realistic considerations including a finite-burn model, attitude perturbations, and thrust uncertainty are studied. The primary objective is to quantify the effects of realistic attitude and orbit control, knowledge, and actuator errors on the formation geometry by observing representative maneuver errors of a single spacecraft.

  6. Two-DOF precision platform for spacecraft thrust vector control: control strategies and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Kougen; Ghasemi-Nejhad, Mehrdad N.

    2004-07-01

    This paper presents control strategies and simulations of a two-DOF precision platform as an adaptive thruster mount structure with precision positioning and active vibration suppression capabilities for thrust vector control of space satellites. First, the configuration of the two-DOF precision platform is introduced, which is an intelligent tripod with two in-plane rotational degrees of freedom for the top device-plate. Precision positioning of this platform is achieved using active members that extend or contract to tilt the top device-plate where the thruster is mounted. Kinematic analysis of the platform is then presented and followed by two control strategies; namely local control strategy and global control strategy. In the local control strategy, the motion of each active member is controlled locally according to the kinematical feature of the platform and the local sensor information to achieve the desired tilt of the top device-plate. In the global control strategy, the motion of each active member is adjusted according to the system level information from a tilt sensor. Fuzzy logic control is employed and the two control strategies are simulated and compared.

  7. Tectonics of the Himalayan thrust belt in northern Pakistan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeats, R. S.; Lawrence, R. D.

    1982-01-01

    It is pointed out that the Himalayan ranges of southern Asia represent a dilemma in modern plate tectonic theory. Alvarez (1982) has tried to resolve some of the problems, but inconsistencies remain. The present investigation considers some of the problems which are now encountered in light of present knowledge. The investigation is concerned mainly with the evolution of the Himalaya south of the Main Mantle Thrust (MMT) and the Indus-Tsangpo suture zone, taking into account the neotectonic setting of northern Pakistan. Attention is given to subdivisions of the central Indian Himalaya, the transition from central Himalaya to northern Pakistan, subdivisions of the Himalaya of northern Pakistan, and aspects of neotectonics. Problems for future work are also discussed.

  8. Thrust Measurements in Ballistic Pendulum Ablative Laser Propulsion Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brazolin, H.; Rodrigues, N. A. S.; Minucci, M. A. S.

    2008-04-01

    This paper describes a setup for thrust measurement in ablative laser propulsion experiments, based on a simple ballistic pendulum associated to an imaging system, which is being assembled at IEAv. A light aluminium pendulum holding samples is placed inside a 100 liters vacuum chamber with two optical windows: the first (in ZnSe) for the laser beam and the second (in fused quartz) for the pendulum visualization. A TEA-CO2 laser beam is focused to the samples providing ablation and transferring linear moment to the pendulum as a whole. A CCD video camera captures the oscillatory movement of the pendulum and the its trajectory is obtained by image processing. By fitting the trajectory of the pendulum to a dumped sinusoidal curve is possible to obtain the amplitude of the movement which is directly related to the momentum transfered to the sample.

  9. Procedure for utilizing the lift and thrust forces of ornithopters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bezard, C.

    1985-01-01

    This procedure is distinguished by two beating wings which together describe, in space, a succession of interlaced triangles. On these wings, whose incidence varies automatically, identical forces are exerted: simultaneous lift and thrust when they make their descent, which is inclined toward the front of the craft, and lift alone when they make their ascent, which is inclined toward the rear of the craft and follows a slide horizontal movement. A mechanical device makes these movements possible. It includes: two wings with hollow profiles, connected by a framework located above a rigid frame and attached to it by bars with joints. These bars are moved with control rods which gear down the drive force. A mechanism with elastic bands or springs automatically varies the incidence of the wings.

  10. Experimental investigation of combustor effects on rocket thrust chamber performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    A design and experimental program to develop special instrumentation systems, design engine hardware, and conduct tests using LOX/GH2 propellants in which the propellant flow stratification was controlled is described. The mixture ratio was varied from 4.6 to 6 overall. The mixture ratios in the core and outer zone were varied from 3.5 to 6 and 5 to 8, respectively. The range in boundary layer coolant was from 0 to 10 percent of the fuel. The nominal chamber pressure and thrust were 225 psia and 7000 pounds, respectively. Pressure and heat flux profiles as well as gas sampling of the exhaust products were obtained. Specific impulse efficiencies of approximately 94 percent and characteristic velocity efficiencies of approximately 97 percent were obtained during the experiments.

  11. Reversed cowl flap inlet thrust augmentor. [with adjustable airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, D. Y. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    An adjustable airfoil is described for varying the geometry of a jet inlet and an ejector inlet in a jet engine for providing thrust augmentation and noise reduction. The airfoil comprises essentially a plurality of segments which are extended radially outward and retracted relative to the longitudinal axis of the engine as a function of a change in the pressure differential between the upstream and downstream surfaces of the airfoil. A servo mechanism responsive to the change in the pressure differential is coupled to the airfoil to extend and retract the airfoil segments to maintain the pressure at a maximum on the downstream side of the airfoil relative to the pressure on the upstream side of the airfoil. At low speeds, such as at take-offs and landings, the airfoil is fully extended while at high speeds it is fully retracted.

  12. Mixing, Noise and Thrust Benefits Using Corrugated Designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Samuel G.; Gilinsky, Mikhail M.

    1998-01-01

    This project was conducted as a support for effective research, training and teaching of Hampton University students in Fluid Mechanics and Acoustics. Basically, this work is organized and implemented by the new Fluid Mechanics and Acoustics Laboratory (FM & AL) which was established at Hampton University in the School of Engineering and Technology (E & T) in 1996. In addition, FM & AL in cooperation with NASA LaRC jointly conducts research with the Central AeroHydrodynamics Institute (TSAGI, Moscow) in Russia under a 2 year Civilian Research and Development Foundation (CRDF). This project is also conducted under control of NASA HQ. For fulfillment of the current project, several researchers were involved as was shown in the proposal to NASA in 1996. This work is the development and support for projects solve problems with the goal of reducing jet noise and increasing nozzle thrust.

  13. Space transportation system solid rocket booster thrust vector control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verble, A. J., Jr.; Mccool, A. A.; Potter, J. H.

    1979-01-01

    The Solid Rocket Booster, Thrust Vector Control (TVC) system was designed in accordance with the following requirements: self-contained power supply, fail-safe operation, 20 flight uses after exposure to seawater landings, optimized cost, and component interchangeability. Trade studies were performed which led to the selection of a recirculating hydraulic system powered by Auxiliary Power Units (APU) which drive the hydraulic actuators and gimbal the solid rocket motor nozzle. Other approaches for the system design were studied in arriving at the recirculating hydraulic system powered by an APU. These systems must withstand the imposed environment and be usable for a minimum of 20 Space Transportation System flights with a minimum of refurbishment. The TVC system has completed the major portion of qualification and verification tests and is prepared to be cleared for the first Shuttle flight (STS-1). Substantiation data will include analytical and test data.

  14. Space Transportation System solid rocket booster thrust vector control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verble, A. J., Jr.; Mccool, A. A.; Potter, J. H.

    1980-01-01

    The Solid Rocket Booster, Thrust Vector Control (TVC) system was designed in accordance with the following requirements: self-contained power supply, failsafe operation, 20 flight uses after exposure to seawater landings, optimized cost, and component interchangeability. Trade studies were performed which led to the selection of a recirculating hydraulic system powered by Auxiliary Power Units (APU) which drive the hydraulic actuators and gimbal the solid rocket motor nozzle. Other approaches for the system design were studied in arriving at the recirculating hydraulic system powered by an APU. These systems must withstand the imposed environment and be usable for a minimum of 20 Space Transportation System flights with a minimum of refurbishment. The TVC system completed the required qualification and verification tests and is certified for the intended application. Substantiation data include analytical and test data.

  15. Computational analysis of Variable Thrust Engine (VTE) performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giridharan, M. G.; Krishnan, A.; Przekwas, A. J.

    1993-01-01

    The Variable Thrust Engine (VTE) of the Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV) uses a hypergolic propellant combination of Monomethyl Hydrazine (MMH) and Nitrogen Tetroxide (NTO) as fuel and oxidizer, respectively. The performance of the VTE depends on a number of complex interacting phenomena such as atomization, spray dynamics, vaporization, turbulent mixing, convective/radiative heat transfer, and hypergolic combustion. This study involved the development of a comprehensive numerical methodology to facilitate detailed analysis of the VTE. An existing Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code was extensively modified to include the following models: a two-liquid, two-phase Eulerian-Lagrangian spray model; a chemical equilibrium model; and a discrete ordinate radiation heat transfer model. The modified code was used to conduct a series of simulations to assess the effects of various physical phenomena and boundary conditions on the VTE performance. The details of the models and the results of the simulations are presented.

  16. Computational analysis of Variable Thrust Engine (VTE) performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giridharan, M. G.; Krishnan, A.; Przekwas, A. J.

    1993-02-01

    The Variable Thrust Engine (VTE) of the Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV) uses a hypergolic propellant combination of Monomethyl Hydrazine (MMH) and Nitrogen Tetroxide (NTO) as fuel and oxidizer, respectively. The performance of the VTE depends on a number of complex interacting phenomena such as atomization, spray dynamics, vaporization, turbulent mixing, convective/radiative heat transfer, and hypergolic combustion. This study involved the development of a comprehensive numerical methodology to facilitate detailed analysis of the VTE. An existing Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code was extensively modified to include the following models: a two-liquid, two-phase Eulerian-Lagrangian spray model; a chemical equilibrium model; and a discrete ordinate radiation heat transfer model. The modified code was used to conduct a series of simulations to assess the effects of various physical phenomena and boundary conditions on the VTE performance. The details of the models and the results of the simulations are presented.

  17. Application of the electroosmotic effect for thrust generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Thomas Edward

    The present work focuses on demonstrating the capabilities of electroosmotic pumps, (EOP) to generate thrust. An underwater glider was successfully propelled by electroosmosis for the first time published - at 0.85 inches per second. Asymmetric AC voltage pulsing proved to produce higher flow rates then equivalent DC pumps for the same average voltage. Ultra-short pulsing proved 100 nanosecond rise times in EOP are possible, which surpassed published predictions by three orders of magnitude. Theories behind efficiency losses of high power EOP were investigated. Direct measurement of effective voltage at the face of a membrane is the most accurate way to determine voltage drop across the electrolyte of an EOP. Forced convection lowered efficiency of the EOP for low voltages by preventing capacitance charging, but proved to prolong pump life during high power application.

  18. A thrust-sheet propulsion concept using fissionable elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moeckel, W. E.

    1976-01-01

    A space propulsion concept is proposed and analyzed which consists of a thin sheet coated on one side with fissionable material, so that nuclear power is converted directly into propulsive power. Thrust is available both from ejected fission fragments and from thermal radiation. Optimum thicknesses are determined for the active and substrate layers. This concept is shown to have potential mission capability (in terms of velocity increments) superior to that of all other advanced propulsion concepts for which performance estimates are available. A suitable spontaneously fissioning material such as Cf254 could provide an extremely high-performance first stage beyond earth orbit. In contrast with some other advanced nuclear propulsion concepts, there is no minimum size below which this concept is infeasible.

  19. Turbulence modelling of flow fields in thrust chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. P.; Kim, Y. M.; Shang, H. M.

    1993-01-01

    Following the consensus of a workshop in Turbulence Modelling for Liquid Rocket Thrust Chambers, the current effort was undertaken to study the effects of second-order closure on the predictions of thermochemical flow fields. To reduce the instability and computational intensity of the full second-order Reynolds Stress Model, an Algebraic Stress Model (ASM) coupled with a two-layer near wall treatment was developed. Various test problems, including the compressible boundary layer with adiabatic and cooled walls, recirculating flows, swirling flows, and the entire SSME nozzle flow were studied to assess the performance of the current model. Detailed calculations for the SSME exit wall flow around the nozzle manifold were executed. As to the overall flow predictions, the ASM removes another assumption for appropriate comparison with experimental data to account for the non-isotropic turbulence effects.

  20. A thrust-sheet propulsion concept using fissionable elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moeckel, W. E.

    1976-01-01

    A space propulsion concept is proposed and analyzed which consists of a thin sheet coated on one side with fissionable material, so that nuclear power is converted directly into propulsive power. Thrust is available both from ejected fission fragments and from thermal radiation. Optimum thicknesses are determined for the active and substrate layers. This concept is shown to have potential mission capability (in terms of velocity increments) superior to that of all other advanced propulsion concepts for which performance estimates are available. A suitable spontaneously fissioning material such as Cf-254 could provide an extremely high-performance first stage beyond earth orbit. In contrast with some other advanced nuclear propulsion concepts, there is no minimum size below which this concept is infeasible.

  1. Landing on the Moon with Limited Thrust Modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knauer, Matthias; Büskens, Christof; Tietjen, Jan

    Recently the ESA showed a clear interest in bringing manned or unmanned space vessels to objects in the solar system, especially the moon and Mars. To take material samples, it is necessary to be able to land safely on the objects' surface. As current descent algorithms date back to the 1960's, they don't comply with today's security standards and cost-risk calculations. We want to demonstrate, how mathematical methods can be used as a tool for mission analysis. A robust algorithm based on optimal control theory is used to generate reference trajectories to bring space vessels from a low orbit onto the ground, by using only engines with no or few thrust modulation. During this descent maneuver, disturbance might appear. Their impact on the mission can be simulated and balanced using model-based feedback control laws.

  2. Thrust Measurements in Ballistic Pendulum Ablative Laser Propulsion Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Brazolin, H.; Rodrigues, N. A. S.; Minucci, M. A. S.

    2008-04-28

    This paper describes a setup for thrust measurement in ablative laser propulsion experiments, based on a simple ballistic pendulum associated to an imaging system, which is being assembled at IEAv. A light aluminium pendulum holding samples is placed inside a 100 liters vacuum chamber with two optical windows: the first (in ZnSe) for the laser beam and the second (in fused quartz) for the pendulum visualization. A TEA-CO{sub 2} laser beam is focused to the samples providing ablation and transferring linear moment to the pendulum as a whole. A CCD video camera captures the oscillatory movement of the pendulum and the its trajectory is obtained by image processing. By fitting the trajectory of the pendulum to a dumped sinusoidal curve is possible to obtain the amplitude of the movement which is directly related to the momentum transfered to the sample.

  3. Adaptive Control of a Transport Aircraft Using Differential Thrust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stepanyan, Vahram; Krishnakumar, Kalmanje; Nguyen, Nhan

    2009-01-01

    The paper presents an adaptive control technique for a damaged large transport aircraft subject to unknown atmospheric disturbances such as wind gust or turbulence. It is assumed that the damage results in vertical tail loss with no rudder authority, which is replaced with a differential thrust input. The proposed technique uses the adaptive prediction based control design in conjunction with the time scale separation principle, based on the singular perturbation theory. The application of later is necessitated by the fact that the engine response to a throttle command is substantially slow that the angular rate dynamics of the aircraft. It is shown that this control technique guarantees the stability of the closed-loop system and the tracking of a given reference model. The simulation example shows the benefits of the approach.

  4. Space shuttle orbit maneuvering engine reusable thrust chamber program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pauckert, R. P.; Tobin, R. D.

    1975-01-01

    Analyses and preliminary designs of candidate OME propellant combinations and corresponding engine designs were conducted and evaluated in terms of performance, operating limits, program cost, risk, inherent life and maintainability. For the Rocketdyne recommended and NASA approved propellant combination and cooling concept (NTO/MMH regeneratively cooled engine), a demonstration thrust chamber was designed, fabricated, and experimentally evaluated to define operating characteristics and limits. Alternate fuel (50-50) operating characteristics were also investigated with the demonstration chamber. Adverse operating effects on regenerative cooled operation were evaluated using subscale electrically heated tubes and channels. An investigation of like doublet element characteristics using subscale tests was performed. Full scale 8- and 10-inch diameter like-doublet injectors for the OME were designed, fabricated, and tested. Injector stability was evaluated analytically and experimentally.

  5. Data Archive and Portal Thrust Area Strategy Report

    SciTech Connect

    Sivaraman, Chitra; Stephan, Eric G.; Macduff, Matt C.; Hagler, Clay D.

    2014-09-30

    This report describes the Data Archive and Portal (DAP), a key capability of the U.S. Department of Energy's Atmosphere to Electron (A2e) initiative. The DAP Thrust Area Planning Group was organized to develop a plan for deploying this capability. Primarily, the report focuses on a distributed system--a DOE Wind Cloud--that functions as a repository for all A2e data. The Wind Cloud will be accessible via an open, easy-to-navigate user interface that facilitates community data access, interaction, and collaboration. DAP management will work with the community, industry, and international standards bodies to develop standards for wind data and to capture important characteristics of all data in the Wind Cloud.

  6. Thrust Stand Measurements of the Conical Theta Pinch FARAD Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallock, Ashley K.; Polzin, Kurt A.

    2010-01-01

    It is found that the impulse of a pulsed inductive plasma thruster utilizing preionization is maximized for a particular ratio of the stored energy in the capacitor to the injected propellant mass. The fact that the impulse depends on the ratio of the initial stored energy to injected propellant mass agrees with previous current sheet studies, supporting the idea that a Townsend-like breakdown process strongly influences current sheet formation, and in turn, current sheet formation strongly affects the operational efficiency of the device. The optimum in half cone angle of the inductive coil can be explained in terms of a balance between the direct axial acceleration and the radial pinching contribution to thrust. From the trends in these data we conclude that operation at the correct ratio of capacitor energy to propellant mass is essential for efficient operation of pulsed inductive plasma thrusters employing a preionized propellant.

  7. Forebody vortex control as a complement to thrust vectoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malcolm, G. N.; Ng, T. T.

    1990-01-01

    The desire to enhance the controllability of fighter aircraft at high angles of attack, particularly yaw control, has fostered an interest in both vectored thrust and active control of forebody vortices. This paper reviews several methods of forebody vortex control that have been investigated with water and wind tunnel tests of both generic and actual fighter configurations. The methods investigated include pneumatic or blowing techniques using surface-mounted jets and slots, surface suction, variable-height deployable strakes, and rotatable tip strakes. Flow visualization, and force and moment measurements have shown that all of the methods are effective in manipulating the forebody vortices over a wide range of angles of attack and sideslip, primarily through control over flow separation on the surface of the forebody. All are most effective when applied near the forebody tip. The advantages and limitations of the various methods are reviewed.

  8. Analysis of Tank PMD Rewetting Following Thrust Resettling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weislogel, M. M.; Sala, M. A.; Collicott, S. H.; Rame, Enrique (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Recent investigations have successfully demonstrated closed-form analytical solutions of spontaneous capillary flows in idealized cylindrical containers with interior corners. In this report, the theory is extended and applied to complex containers modeling spacecraft fuel tanks employing propellant management devices (PMDs). The specific problem investigated is one of spontaneous rewetting of a typical partially filled liquid fuel/cryogen tank with PMD after thrust resettling. The transients of this flow impact the logistics of orbital maneuvers and potentially tank thermal control. The general procedure to compute the initial condition (mean radius of curvature for the interface) for the closed-form transient flows is first outlined then solved for several 'complex' cylindrical tanks exhibiting symmetry. The utility and limitations of the technique as a design tool are discussed in a summary, which also highlights comparisons with NASA flight data of a model propellant tank with PMD.

  9. Stress triggering in thrust and subduction earthquakes and stress interaction between the southern San Andreas and nearby thrust and strike-slip faults

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lin, J.; Stein, R.S.

    2004-01-01

    We argue that key features of thrust earthquake triggering, inhibition, and clustering can be explained by Coulomb stress changes, which we illustrate by a suite of representative models and by detailed examples. Whereas slip on surface-cutting thrust faults drops the stress in most of the adjacent crust, slip on blind thrust faults increases the stress on some nearby zones, particularly above the source fault. Blind thrusts can thus trigger slip on secondary faults at shallow depth and typically produce broadly distributed aftershocks. Short thrust ruptures are particularly efficient at triggering earthquakes of similar size on adjacent thrust faults. We calculate that during a progressive thrust sequence in central California the 1983 Mw = 6.7 Coalinga earthquake brought the subsequent 1983 Mw = 6.0 Nunez and 1985 Mw = 6.0 Kettleman Hills ruptures 10 bars and 1 bar closer to Coulomb failure. The idealized stress change calculations also reconcile the distribution of seismicity accompanying large subduction events, in agreement with findings of prior investigations. Subduction zone ruptures are calculated to promote normal faulting events in the outer rise and to promote thrust-faulting events on the periphery of the seismic rupture and its downdip extension. These features are evident in aftershocks of the 1957 Mw = 9.1 Aleutian and other large subduction earthquakes. We further examine stress changes on the rupture surface imparted by the 1960 Mw = 9.5 and 1995 Mw = 8.1 Chile earthquakes, for which detailed slip models are available. Calculated Coulomb stress increases of 2-20 bars correspond closely to sites of aftershocks and postseismic slip, whereas aftershocks are absent where the stress drops by more than 10 bars. We also argue that slip on major strike-slip systems modulates the stress acting on nearby thrust and strike-slip faults. We calculate that the 1857 Mw = 7.9 Fort Tejon earthquake on the San Andreas fault and subsequent interseismic slip brought

  10. Momentum Management Tool for Low-Thrust Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swenka, Edward R.; Smith, Brett A.; Vanelli, Charles A.

    2010-01-01

    A momentum management tool was designed for the Dawn low-thrust interplanetary spacecraft en route to the asteroids Vesta and Ceres, in an effort to better understand the early creation of the solar system. Momentum must be managed to ensure the spacecraft has enough control authority to perform necessary turns and hold a fixed inertial attitude against external torques. Along with torques from solar pressure and gravity-gradients, ion-propulsion engines produce a torque about the thrust axis that must be countered by the four reaction wheel assemblies (RWA). MomProf is a ground operations tool built to address these concerns. The momentum management tool was developed during initial checkout and early cruise, and has been refined to accommodate a wide range of momentum-management issues. With every activity or sequence, wheel speeds and momentum state must be checked to avoid undesirable conditions and use of consumables. MomProf was developed to operate in the MATLAB environment. All data are loaded into MATLAB as a structure to provide consistent access to all inputs by individual functions within the tool. Used in its most basic application, the Dawn momentum tool uses the basic principle of angular momentum conservation, computing momentum in the body frame, and RWA wheel speeds, for all given orientations in the input file. MomProf was designed specifically to be able to handle the changing external torques and frequent de - saturations. Incorporating significant external torques adds complexity since there are various external torques that act under different operational modes.

  11. Landward thrusting in accretionary wedges: evidence for seafloor rupture?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cubas, N.; Souloumiac, P.

    2015-12-01

    The 2004 Sumatra and 2011 Japan earthquakes took the community by surprise because they ruptured frontal sections of megathrust thought to slip aseismically. Studying the deformation of accretionary prisms can help in characterizing the specific structures associated to frontal propagation and determining the mechanical properties leading to this behavior. Recent observations suggest a correlation between landward faults and frontal propagation of earthquakes along the Sumatra subduction zone. Large sections of landward thrusts are also observed along Cascadia known to have ruptured in 1700 with a M~9 generating a large tsunami. In this study, we propose to investigate if specific frictional properties could lead to a landward sequence of thrusting with the limit analysis approach. We first show that such sequence requires very low effective friction along the megathrust with a rather high internal effective friction. We also show that landward sequence appears close to the extensional critical limit. We retrieve the megathrust effective friction for three wedges with different sediment incomes. For Cascadia, we find a maximal effective friction of 0.032. For northern and southern Sumatra, we find μ≤0.02 and μ≤ 0.08 respectively. This very low effective friction is probably due to lithostatic pore pressure. This high pore pressure could either be a long-term property or due to dynamic effects such as thermal pressurization. The fact that landward vergence appears far from the compressional critical limit favors a dynamic effect. Indeed, a wedge would move away from this limit if material is added synchronously to the deformation or if it is suddenly submitted to a lower effective friction. In addition, the long-term high pore pressure could be due to a low permeability enhancing thermal pressurization and co-seismic slip along the frontal part of the megathrust.

  12. Coseismic fault-related fold model, growth structure, and the historic multisegment blind thrust earthquake on the basement-involved Yoro thrust, central Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishiyama, Tatsuya; Mueller, Karl; Sato, Hiroshi; Togo, Masami

    2007-03-01

    We use high-resolution seismic reflection profiles, boring transects, and mapping of fold scarps that deform late Quaternary and Holocene sediments to define the kinematic evolution, subsurface geometry, coseismic behavior, and fault slip rates for an active, basement-involved blind thrust system in central Japan. Coseismic fold scarps on the Yoro basement-involved fold are defined by narrow fold limbs and angular hinges on seismic profiles, suggesting that at least 3.9 km of fault slip is consumed by wedge thrust folding in the upper 10 km of the crust. The close coincidence and kinematic link between folded horizons and the underlying thrust geometry indicate that the Yoro basement-involved fold has accommodated slip at an average rate of 3.2 ± 0.1 mm/yr on a shallowly west dipping thrust fault since early Pleistocene time. Past large-magnitude earthquakes, including an historic M˜7.7 event in A.D. 1586 that occurred on the Yoro blind thrust, are shown to have produced discrete folding by curved hinge kink band migration above the eastward propagating tip of the wedge thrust. Coseismic fold scarps formed during the A.D. 1586 earthquake can be traced along the en echelon active folds that extend for at least 60 km, in spite of different styles of folding along the apparently hard-linked Nobi-Ise blind thrust system. We thus emphasize the importance of this multisegment earthquake rupture across these structures and the potential risk for similar future events in en echelon active fold and thrust belts.

  13. Effect of forward velocity and crosswind on the reverse-thrust performance of a variable-pitch fan engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reemsnyder, D. C.; Sagerser, D. A.

    1979-01-01

    A full-size variable-pitch fan engine was tested in the Ames 40 by 80 foot wind tunnel to determine the effect of forward velocity and crosswind on reverse-thrust performance. Two flight-type inlet configurations were tested, and a flared fan nozzle was installed as an inlet for reverse-thrust operation. Steady-state reverse-thrust performance was obtained up to 54 m/s (105 knots). An abrupt decrease in reverse thrust occurred at about 30 m/s (60 knots). Reverse thrust was established following forward-to-reverse thrust transients both statically and with forward velocities only up to 30 m/s.

  14. Extension of frozen orbits and Sun-synchronous orbits around terrestrial planets using continuous low-thrust propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhigang; Jiang, Fanghua; Li, Junfeng

    2015-11-01

    Frozen orbits and Sun-synchronous orbits are useful in exploration of terrestrial planets' surface and atmosphere with a view to future human exploration. This work therefore develops novel orbits around terrestrial planets using continuous low-thrust propulsion to enable one new and unique investigations of the planets. This paper considers the use of continuous acceleration by solar electric propulsion, to achieve artificial frozen orbits and artificial Sun-synchronous orbits around terrestrial planets. These artificial orbits are similar to natural frozen orbits and Sun-synchronous orbits around Mercury, Venus, the Earth, and Mars, and the orbital parameters can be designed arbitrarily with the help of continuous low-thrust control. The control strategies to achieve the artificial orbits take into account J2, J3, and J4 perturbations of terrestrial planets. It is proved that the control strategies minimize characteristic velocity. Relevant formulas are derived, and numerical results are presented. For the natural frozen orbits, the arguments of periapsis are about 270° for Mercury, Venus, and Mars, whereas about 90° for the Earth. By exerting both radial and transverse thrusts simulation shows that the control acceleration and characteristic velocity of the artificial frozen orbit around Mercury are the smallest among these plants. The characteristic velocity within one orbital period for Mercury is only 0.0089 m/s. The natural Sun-synchronous orbits exist around the Earth and Mars, but not around Mercury and Venus. By offsetting the perturbation acceleration in norm direction, the control acceleration and characteristic velocity of the artificial Sun-synchronous orbit around Mars are less than those of the others. The characteristic velocity within one orbital period is only 18.0885 m/s for the artificial Sun-synchronous orbit around Mars. The relationships between the control thrusts and the primary orbital parameters of the artificial orbits around other

  15. 14 CFR 33.8 - Selection of engine power and thrust ratings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES General § 33.8 Selection of engine power and thrust ratings. (a) Requested engine power and thrust ratings must be selected by the applicant. (b) Each... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Selection of engine power and...

  16. Structural development and petroleum potential of the Dagestan foreland thrust belt, Terek-Caspian Basin, Russia

    SciTech Connect

    Sobornov, K. )

    1994-07-01

    The Dagestan foreland thrust belt represents a transition zone between the Terek-Caspian basin and Caucasus. Boreholes and seismic data obtained during the last decade in the course of petroleum exploration reveal considerable differences between the surface and subsurface structures of the area. The new data suggest that the allochthonous assemblage of the belt is formed mainly by stacked north-verging thrust sheets made up mostly of Mesozoic carbonates and sandstones bounded at the top and bottom by conjugate detachment surfaces. The thrust sheets are interpreted to be inserted into the clastic section of the Terek-Caspian foredeep along the base of Oligocene-early Miocene mudstones. The interpreted geometry of the thrust-belt front implies a shortening of about 20-50 km. The blind subsurface thrusts have been active since late Miocene and Holocene. The interpreted structural relationships between Mesozoic-Cenozoic stratigraphic units imply that principal thrusts were formed due to reactivation and inversion of low-angle normal faults, which were active in the Jurassic - early Miocene. Mechanical weakness and low density of the overpressured Oligocene - lower Miocene Maykop Formation aided subsurface thrusting. The new interpretation of the regional structure offers a petroleum exploration play consisting of structural traps within the buried antiformal stacks. Oil- and gas-bearing Upper Cretaceous and Upper Jurassic carbonate rocks involved in thrust sheets are considered primary prospecting targets.

  17. Experimental evaluation of foil-supported resilient-pad gas-lubricated thrust bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Z. N.

    1977-01-01

    A new type of resilient-pad gas thrust bearing was tested to determine the feasibility of the design. The bearing consists of carbon graphite pads mounted asymmetrically on foil beams. Two bearing configurations were tested at thrust loads from 27 to 80 newtons at speeds to 9000 rpm. The outside diameter of the bearing was 8.9 centimeters.

  18. The In-Space Propulsion Technology Project Low-Thrust Trajectory Tool Suite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dankanich, John W.

    2008-01-01

    The ISPT project released its low-thrust trajectory tool suite in March of 2006. The LTTT suite tools range in capabilities, but represent the state-of-the art in NASA low-thrust trajectory optimization tools. The tools have all received considerable updates following the initial release, and they are available through their respective development centers or the ISPT project website.

  19. Critical taper wedge mechanics of fold-and-thrust belts on Venus - Initial results from Magellan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suppe, John; Connors, Chris

    1992-01-01

    Examples of fold-and-thrust belts from a variety of tectonic settings on Venus are introduced. Predictions for the mechanics of fold-and-thrust belts on Venus are examined on the basis of wedge theory, rock mechanics data, and currently known conditions on Venus. The theoretical predictions are then compared with new Magellan data.

  20. Fuel-optimal low-thrust formation reconfiguration via Radau pseudospectral method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jing

    2016-07-01

    This paper investigates fuel-optimal low-thrust formation reconfiguration near circular orbit. Based on the Clohessy-Wiltshire equations, first-order necessary optimality conditions are derived from the Pontryagin's maximum principle. The fuel-optimal impulsive solution is utilized to divide the low-thrust trajectory into thrust and coast arcs. By introducing the switching times as optimization variables, the fuel-optimal low-thrust formation reconfiguration is posed as a nonlinear programming problem (NLP) via direct transcription using multiple-phase Radau pseudospectral method (RPM), which is then solved by a sparse nonlinear optimization software SNOPT. To facilitate optimality verification and, if necessary, further refinement of the optimized solution of the NLP, formulas for mass costate estimation and initial costates scaling are presented. Numerical examples are given to show the application of the proposed optimization method. To fix the problem, generic fuel-optimal low-thrust formation reconfiguration can be simplified as reconfiguration without any initial and terminal coast arcs, whose optimal solutions can be efficiently obtained from the multiple-phase RPM at the cost of a slight fuel increment. Finally, influence of the specific impulse and maximum thrust magnitude on the fuel-optimal low-thrust formation reconfiguration is analyzed. Numerical results shown the links and differences between the fuel-optimal impulsive and low-thrust solutions.