Science.gov

Sample records for achieve wild-type levels

  1. Viral adaptation to an antiviral protein enhances the fitness level to above that of the uninhibited wild type.

    PubMed

    Cherwa, James E; Sanchez-Soria, Pablo; Wichman, Holly A; Fane, Bentley A

    2009-11-01

    Viruses often evolve resistance to antiviral agents. While resistant strains are able to replicate in the presence of the agent, they generally exhibit lower fitness than the wild-type strain in the absence of the inhibitor. In some cases, resistant strains become dependent on the antiviral agent. However, the agent rarely, if ever, elevates dependent strain fitness above the uninhibited wild-type level. This would require an adaptive mechanism to convert the antiviral agent into a beneficial growth factor. Using an inhibitory scaffolding protein that specifically blocks phiX174 capsid assembly, we demonstrate that such mechanisms are possible. To obtain the quintuple-mutant resistant strain, the wild-type virus was propagated for approximately 150 viral life cycles in the presence of increasing concentrations of the inhibitory protein. The expression of the inhibitory protein elevated the strain's fitness significantly above the uninhibited wild-type level. Thus, selecting for resistance coselected for dependency, which was characterized and found to operate on the level of capsid nucleation. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a virus evolving a mechanism to productively utilize an antiviral agent to stimulate its fitness above the uninhibited wild-type level. The results of this study may be predictive of the types of resistant phenotypes that could be selected by antiviral agents that specifically target capsid assembly. PMID:19726521

  2. Cadmium tolerance, cysteine and thiol peptide levels in wild type and chromium-tolerant strains of Scenedesmus acutus (Chlorophyceae).

    PubMed

    Torricelli, Elena; Gorbi, Gessica; Pawlik-Skowronska, Barbara; Di Toppi, Luigi Sanità; Corradi, Maria Grazia

    2004-07-14

    Two strains of the unicellular green alga Scenedesmus acutus with different sensitivity to hexavalent chromium were compared for their tolerance of cadmium, by means of growth and recovery tests, and determination of cysteine, reduced glutathione and phytochelatin content, after short-term exposure to various cadmium concentrations (from 1.125 to 27 microM). Growth experiments showed that, after 7-day treatments with cadmium, the chromium-tolerant strain reached a significantly higher cell density and, after 24-h exposure to Cd, was able to resume growth significantly better than the wild type. Constitutive level of cysteine was higher in the chromium-tolerant strain, while glutathione levels were similar in the two strains. The higher content of cysteine and the maintenance of both reduced glutathione and phytochelatin high levels in the presence of cadmium, support the higher cadmium co-tolerance of the chromium-tolerant strain in comparison with the wild type one. PMID:15177949

  3. Polymerase C1 levels and poly(R-3-hydroxyalkanoate) synthesis in wild-type and recombinant Pseudomonas strains.

    PubMed Central

    Kraak, M N; Smits, T H; Kessler, B; Witholt, B

    1997-01-01

    A functional antibody highly specific for polymerase C1 of Pseudomonas oleovorans GPo1 was raised and used to determine polymerase C1 levels in in vivo experiments. The polymerase C1 antibodies did not show a cross-reaction with polymerase C2 of P. oleovorans. In wild-type P. oleovorans GPo1 and Pseudomonas putida KT2442, amounts of 0.075 and 0.06% polymerase relative to total protein, respectively, were found. P. oleovorans GPo1(pGEc405), which contained additional copies of the polymerase C1-encoding gene under the control of its native promoter, contained 0.5% polymerase C1 relative to total protein. Polymerase C1 reached 10% of total cell protein when the polymerase C1-encoding gene was overexpressed through the P(alk) promoter in P. oleovorans GPo1(pET702, pGEc74). Amounts of poly(R-3-hydroxyalkanoate) (PHA) increased significantly under non-nitrogen-limiting conditions when additional polymerase C1 was expressed in P. oleovorans. Whereas P. oleovorans produced 34% (wt/wt) PHA under these conditions, a PHA level of 64% (wt/wt) could be reached for P. oleovorans GPo1(pGEc405) and a PHA level of 52% (wt/wt) could be reached for P. oleovorans GPo1(pET702, pGEc74) after induction, compared to a PHA level of 13% for the uninduced control. All recombinant Pseudomonas strains containing additional polymerase C1 showed small changes in their PHA composition. Larger amounts of 3-hydroxyhexanoate monomer and smaller amounts of 3-hydroxyoctanoate and -decanoate were found compared to those of the wild type. Two different methods were developed to quantify rates of incorporation of new monomers into preexisting PHA granules. P. oleovorans GPo1 cells grown under nitrogen-limiting conditions showed growth stage-dependent incorporation rates. The highest PHA synthesis rates of 9.5 nmol of C8/C6 monomers/mg of cell dry weight (CDW)/min were found during the mid-stationary phase, which equals a rate of production of 80 g of PHA/kg of CDW/h. PMID:9260937

  4. Alcoholic fermentation by wild-type Hansenula polymorpha and Saccharomyces cerevisiae versus recombinant strains with an elevated level of intracellular glutathione.

    PubMed

    Grabek-Lejko, Dorota; Kurylenko, Olena O; Sibirny, Vladimir A; Ubiyvovk, Vira M; Penninckx, Michel; Sibirny, Andriy A

    2011-11-01

    The ability of baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and of the thermotolerant methylotrophic yeast Hansenula polymorpha to produce ethanol during alcoholic fermentation of glucose was compared between wild-type strains and recombinant strains possessing an elevated level of intracellular glutathione (GSH) due to overexpression of the first gene of GSH biosynthesis, gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase, or of the central regulatory gene of sulfur metabolism, MET4. The analyzed strains of H. polymorpha with an elevated pool of intracellular GSH were found to accumulate almost twice as much ethanol as the wild-type strain during glucose fermentation, in contrast to GSH1-overexpressing S. cerevisiae strains, which also possessed an elevated pool of GSH. The ethanol tolerance of the GSH-overproducing strains was also determined. For this, the wild-type strain and transformants with an elevated GSH pool were compared for their viability upon exposure to exogenous ethanol. Unexpectedly, both S. cerevisiae and H. polymorpha transformants with a high GSH pool proved more sensitive to exogenous ethanol than the corresponding wild-type strains.

  5. Genetic analysis of two OsLpa1-like genes in Arabidopsis reveals that only one is required for wild-type seed phytic acid levels

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytic acid (inositol-1,2,3,4,5,6-hexakisphosphate or InsP6) is the primary storage form of phosphorus in plant seeds. The rice OsLpa1 encodes a novel protein required for wild-type levels of seed InsP6 and was identified from a low phytic acid (lpa) mutant exhibiting a 45-50% reduction in seed InsP...

  6. Overexpression of the wild-type SPT1 subunit lowers desoxysphingolipid levels and rescues the phenotype of HSAN1.

    PubMed

    Eichler, Florian S; Hornemann, Thorsten; McCampbell, Alex; Kuljis, Dika; Penno, Anke; Vardeh, Daniel; Tamrazian, Eric; Garofalo, Kevin; Lee, Ho-Joon; Kini, Lohit; Selig, Martin; Frosch, Matthew; Gable, Ken; von Eckardstein, Arnold; Woolf, Clifford J; Guan, Guiman; Harmon, Jeffrey M; Dunn, Teresa M; Brown, Robert H

    2009-11-18

    Mutations in the SPTLC1 subunit of serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT) cause an adult-onset, hereditary sensory, and autonomic neuropathy type I (HSAN1). We previously reported that mice bearing a transgene-expressing mutant SPTLC1 (tgSPTLC1(C133W)) show a reduction in SPT activity and hyperpathia at 10 months of age. Now analyzed at a later age, we find these mice develop sensory loss with a distal small fiber neuropathy and peripheral myelinopathy. This phenotype is largely reversed when these mice are crossed with transgenic mice overexpressing wild-type SPTLC1 showing that the mutant SPTLC1 protein is not inherently toxic. Simple loss of SPT activity also cannot account for the HSAN1 phenotype, since heterozygous SPTLC1 knock-out mice have reduced SPT activity but are otherwise normal. Rather, the presence of two newly identified, potentially deleterious deoxysphingoid bases in the tgSPTLC1(C133W), but not in the wild-type, double-transgenic tgSPTLC1(WT + C133W) or SPTLC1(+/-) mice, suggests that the HSAN1 mutations alter amino acid selectivity of the SPT enzyme such that palmitate is condensed with alanine and glycine, in addition to serine. This observation is consistent with the hypothesis that HSAN1 is the result of a gain-of-function mutation in SPTLC1 that leads to accumulation of a toxic metabolite. PMID:19923297

  7. Spatiotemporal modelling of hormonal crosstalk explains the level and patterning of hormones and gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana wild-type and mutant roots.

    PubMed

    Moore, Simon; Zhang, Xiaoxian; Mudge, Anna; Rowe, James H; Topping, Jennifer F; Liu, Junli; Lindsey, Keith

    2015-09-01

    Patterning in Arabidopsis root development is coordinated via a localized auxin concentration maximum in the root tip, requiring the regulated expression of specific genes. However, little is known about how hormone and gene expression patterning is generated. Using a variety of experimental data, we develop a spatiotemporal hormonal crosstalk model that describes the integrated action of auxin, ethylene and cytokinin signalling, the POLARIS protein, and the functions of PIN and AUX1 auxin transporters. We also conduct novel experiments to confirm our modelling predictions. The model reproduces auxin patterning and trends in wild-type and mutants; reveals that coordinated PIN and AUX1 activities are required to generate correct auxin patterning; correctly predicts shoot to root auxin flux, auxin patterning in the aux1 mutant, the amounts of cytokinin, ethylene and PIN protein, and PIN protein patterning in wild-type and mutant roots. Modelling analysis further reveals how PIN protein patterning is related to the POLARIS protein through ethylene signalling. Modelling prediction of the patterning of POLARIS expression is confirmed experimentally. Our combined modelling and experimental analysis reveals that a hormonal crosstalk network regulates the emergence of patterns and levels of hormones and gene expression in wild-type and mutants. PMID:25906686

  8. Targeted entry via somatostatin receptors using a novel modified retrovirus glycoprotein that delivers genes at levels comparable to those of wild-type viral glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Li, Fang; Ryu, Byoung Y; Krueger, Robin L; Heldt, Scott A; Albritton, Lorraine M

    2012-01-01

    Here we report a novel viral glycoprotein created by replacing a natural receptor-binding sequence of the ecotropic Moloney murine leukemia virus envelope glycoprotein with the peptide ligand somatostatin. This new chimeric glycoprotein, which has been named the Sst receptor binding site (Sst-RBS), gives targeted transduction based on three criteria: (i) a gain of the use of a new entry receptor not used by any known virus; (ii) targeted entry at levels comparable to gene delivery by wild-type ecotropic Moloney murine leukemia virus and vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) G glycoproteins; and (iii) a loss of the use of the natural ecotropic virus receptor. Retroviral vectors coated with Sst-RBS gained the ability to bind and transduce human 293 cells expressing somatostatin receptors. Their infection was specific to target somatostatin receptors, since a synthetic somatostatin peptide inhibited infection in a dose-dependent manner and the ability to transduce mouse cells bearing the natural ecotropic receptor was effectively lost. Importantly, vectors coated with the Sst-RBS glycoprotein gave targeted entry of up to 1 × 10(6) transducing U/ml, a level comparable to that seen with infection of vectors coated with the parental wild-type ecotropic Moloney murine leukemia virus glycoprotein through the ecotropic receptor and approaching that of infection of VSV G-coated vectors through the VSV receptor. To our knowledge, this is the first example of a glycoprotein that gives targeted entry of retroviral vectors at levels comparable to the natural capacity of viral envelope glycoproteins.

  9. Heterologous minor coat proteins of Citrus tristeza virus strains affect encapsidation, but the coexpression of HSP70h and p61 restores encapsidation to wild-type levels.

    PubMed

    Tatineni, Satyanarayana; Gowda, Siddarame; Dawson, William O

    2010-07-01

    The long flexuous bipolar virions of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV), a Closterovirus, are encapsidated with two capsid proteins at opposite ends: the minor coat protein (CPm) encapsidates the 5' 630 nts of the genomic RNA and the major coat protein encapsidates the remainder of the genome. In this study, we found encapsidation of CTV CPm in the absence of other assembly-related proteins is highly specific in contrast to most plant viruses that allow virion assembly by a range of heterologous coat proteins. Heterologous CPms with 95-96% amino acid identity from related strains in CTV-CPm, a replicon with CPm as the only assembly-related ORF, either failed to initiate encapsidation or reduced encapsidation substantially. Substitution of subsets of amino acids revealed that the amino acids that differ between positions 121 and 180 of the VT strain, and 61 and 120 of the T3 strain were involved in specific encapsidation. We further mapped the specific encapsidation to a single amino acid: mutation of methionine(165) to threonine (VT type) or serine(105) to proline (T3 type) in CTV-CPm failed to form nucleocapsids. However, the heterologous CPm in combination with both HSP70h and p61 proteins, but not HSP70h or p61 alone, encapsidated at wild-type levels, suggesting that specific encapsidation by CPm was mitigated by the combination of HSP70h and p61. Thus, in addition to the previously described functions of HSP70h and p61 of greatly enhanced virion formation and restriction of CPm encapsidation to the 5' 630 nts of the genomic RNA, these proteins facilitate encapsidation by heterologous CPms. PMID:20399478

  10. Toll-Like Receptor 4 Wild Type Homozygozity of Polymorphisms +896 and +1196 Is Associated with High Gastrin Serum Levels and Peptic Ulcer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Pohjanen, Vesa-Matti; Koivurova, Olli-Pekka; Huhta, Heikki; Helminen, Olli; Mäkinen, Johanna M.; Karhukorpi, Jari M.; Joensuu, Tapio; Koistinen, Pentti O.; Valtonen, Jarno M.; Niemelä, Seppo E.; Karttunen, Riitta A.; Karttunen, Tuomo J.

    2015-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 is a part of the innate immune system and recognizes Helicobacter pylori lipopolysaccharide. The goal of this study was to analyze the role of Toll-like receptor 4 polymorphisms +896 (rs4986790) and +1196 (rs4986791) in the pathogenesis of Helicobacter pylori related gastroduodenal diseases in relation to gastric secretion and inflammation. Toll-like receptor 4 polymorphisms, serum gastrin-17 and pepsinogen I and II concentrations were determined, and gastroscopies with histopathological analyses were performed to 216 dyspeptic patients. As genotype controls, 179 controls and 61 gastric cancer patients were studied. In our study, the Toll-like receptor 4 +896 and +1196 polymorphisms were in total linkage disequilibrium. The homozygous wild types displayed higher gastrin-17 serum concentrations than the mutants (p = 0.001) and this effect was independent of Helicobacter pylori. The homozygous wild types also displayed an increased risk for peptic ulcers (OR: 4.390). Toll-like receptor 4 genotypes did not show any association with Helicobacter pylori positivity or the features of gastric inflammation. Toll-like receptor 4 expression was seen in gastrin and somatostatin expressing cells of antral mucosa by immunohistochemistry. Our results suggest a role for Toll-like receptor 4 in gastric acid regulation and that the Toll-like receptor 4 +896 and +1196 wild type homozygozity increases peptic ulcer risk via gastrin secretion. PMID:26161647

  11. Endogenous ergothioneine is required for wild type levels of conidiogenesis and conidial survival but does not protect against 254 nm UV-induced mutagenesis or kill.

    PubMed

    Bello, Marco H; Mogannam, John C; Morin, Dexter; Epstein, Lynn

    2014-12-01

    Ergothioneine, a histidine derivative, is concentrated in conidia of ascomycetous fungi. To investigate the function of ergothioneine, we crossed the wild type Neurospora crassa (Egt(+)) and an ergothioneine non-producer (Egt(-), Δegt-1, a knockout in NCU04343.5) and used the Egt(+) and Egt(-) progeny strains for phenotypic analyses. Compared to the Egt(+) strains, Egt(-) strains had a 59% reduction in the number of conidia produced on Vogel's agar. After storage of Egt(+) and Egt(-) conidia at 97% and 52% relative humidity (RH) for a time course to either 17 or 98 days, respectively, Egt(-) strains had a 23% and a 18% reduction in life expectancy at 97% and 52% RH, respectively, compared to the Egt(+) strains. Based on a Cu(II) reduction assay with the chelator bathocuproinedisulfonic acid disodium salt, ergothioneine accounts for 38% and 33% of water-soluble antioxidant capacity in N. crassa conidia from seven and 20 day-old cultures, respectively. In contrast, ergothioneine did not account for significant (α=0.05) anti-oxidant capacity in mycelia, which have lower concentrations of ergothioneine than conidia. The data are consistent with the hypothesis that ergothioneine has an antioxidant function in vivo. In contrast, experiments on the spontaneous mutation rate in Egt(+) and Egt(-) strains and on the effects of 254 nm UV light on mutation rate and conidial viability do not support the hypothesis that ergothioneine protects DNA in vivo.

  12. Analysis of adeno-associated virus (AAV) wild-type and mutant Rep proteins for their abilities to negatively regulate AAV p5 and p19 mRNA levels.

    PubMed Central

    Kyöstiö, S R; Owens, R A; Weitzman, M D; Antoni, B A; Chejanovsky, N; Carter, B J

    1994-01-01

    The rep gene of adeno-associated virus type 2 (AAV) encodes four overlapping Rep proteins that are involved in gene regulation and replication of the virus. We studied here the regulation of mRNA transcribed from the AAV p5 and p19 promoters, using transient expression in human 293 cells followed by Northern (RNA) blot analysis of the mRNA. The p5 transcript encodes the larger Rep proteins, Rep78 and Rep68, while the p19 transcript encodes the smaller proteins, Rep52 and Rep40. A plasmid (pNTC3) containing the entire AAV genome with an amber mutation in the rep gene accumulated higher levels of p5 and p19 mRNA than a plasmid containing the wild-type AAV genome. Addition of increasing amounts of the wild-type rep gene in trans from a heterologous promoter inhibited p5 and p19 mRNA accumulation from pNTC3, indicating that the levels of both transcripts were decreased by the Rep proteins. Cotransfections with plasmids producing individual wild-type Rep proteins in trans showed that p5 and p19 mRNA accumulation was inhibited 5- to 10-fold by Rep78 and Rep68 and 2- to 3-fold by Rep52 and Rep40. Analysis of carboxyl-terminal truncation mutants of Rep78 showed that the ability of Rep78 to decrease p5 and p19 mRNA levels was lost when 159 or more amino acids were deleted. Rep78 and Rep68 mutants deleted for the methionine at residue 225 showed decreased abilities to down-regulate both p5 and p19 transcript levels, while mutants containing a substitution of glycine for the methionine resembled the wild-type Rep78. A Rep78 protein with a mutation in the putative nucleoside triphosphate binding site inhibited expression from p5 but not from p19, suggesting that the regulation of p5 transcript levels by Rep78 and Rep68 differs from that of p19. A deletion analysis of AAV cis sequences revealed that an intact terminal repeat was not required for negative regulation of p5 and p19 transcript levels and that the regulation of p19 mRNA levels by Rep78 did not require the presence

  13. Teaching the Low Level Achiever.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salomone, Ronald E., Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Intended for teachers of the English language arts, the articles in this issue offer suggestions and techniques for teaching the low level achiever. Titles and authors of the articles are as follows: (1) "A Point to Ponder" (Rachel Martin); (2) "Tracking: A Self-Fulfilling Prophecy of Failure for the Low Level Achiever" (James Christopher Davis);…

  14. TraK and TraB are conserved outer membrane proteins of the Neisseria gonorrhoeae Type IV secretion system and are expressed at low levels in wild-type cells.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, Meghan E; Hackett, Kathleen T; Bender, Tobias; Kotha, Chaitra; van der Does, Chris; Dillard, Joseph P

    2014-08-15

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae uses a type IV secretion system (T4SS) to secrete chromosomal DNA into the medium, and this DNA is effective in transforming other gonococci via natural transformation. In addition, the T4SS is important in the initial stages of biofilm development and mediates intracellular iron uptake in the absence of TonB. To better understand the mechanism of type IV secretion in N. gonorrhoeae, we examined the expression levels and localization of two predicted T4SS outer membrane proteins, TraK and TraB, in the wild-type strain as well as in overexpression strains and in a strain lacking all of the T4SS proteins. Despite very low sequence similarity to known homologues, TraB (VirB10 homolog) and TraK (VirB9 homolog) localized similarly to related proteins in other systems. Additionally, we found that TraV (a VirB7 homolog) interacts with TraK, as in other T4SSs. However, unlike in other systems, neither TraK nor TraB required the presence of other T4SS components for proper localization. Unlike other gonococcal T4SS proteins we have investigated, protein levels of the outer membrane proteins TraK and TraB were extremely low in wild-type cells and were undetectable by Western blotting unless overexpressed or tagged with a FLAG3 triple-epitope tag. Localization of TraK-FLAG3 in otherwise wild-type cells using immunogold electron microscopy of thin sections revealed a single gold particle on some cells. These results suggest that the gonococcal T4SS may be present in single copy per cell and that small amounts of T4SS proteins TraK and TraB are sufficient for DNA secretion.

  15. TraK and TraB are conserved outer membrane proteins of the Neisseria gonorrhoeae Type IV secretion system and are expressed at low levels in wild-type cells.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, Meghan E; Hackett, Kathleen T; Bender, Tobias; Kotha, Chaitra; van der Does, Chris; Dillard, Joseph P

    2014-08-15

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae uses a type IV secretion system (T4SS) to secrete chromosomal DNA into the medium, and this DNA is effective in transforming other gonococci via natural transformation. In addition, the T4SS is important in the initial stages of biofilm development and mediates intracellular iron uptake in the absence of TonB. To better understand the mechanism of type IV secretion in N. gonorrhoeae, we examined the expression levels and localization of two predicted T4SS outer membrane proteins, TraK and TraB, in the wild-type strain as well as in overexpression strains and in a strain lacking all of the T4SS proteins. Despite very low sequence similarity to known homologues, TraB (VirB10 homolog) and TraK (VirB9 homolog) localized similarly to related proteins in other systems. Additionally, we found that TraV (a VirB7 homolog) interacts with TraK, as in other T4SSs. However, unlike in other systems, neither TraK nor TraB required the presence of other T4SS components for proper localization. Unlike other gonococcal T4SS proteins we have investigated, protein levels of the outer membrane proteins TraK and TraB were extremely low in wild-type cells and were undetectable by Western blotting unless overexpressed or tagged with a FLAG3 triple-epitope tag. Localization of TraK-FLAG3 in otherwise wild-type cells using immunogold electron microscopy of thin sections revealed a single gold particle on some cells. These results suggest that the gonococcal T4SS may be present in single copy per cell and that small amounts of T4SS proteins TraK and TraB are sufficient for DNA secretion. PMID:24914183

  16. Overexpression of Wild-Type Murine Tau Results in Progressive Tauopathy and Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Stephanie J.; Crook, Richard J.P.; DeTure, Michael; Randle, Suzanne J.; Innes, Amy E.; Yu, Xin Z.; Lin, Wen-Lang; Dugger, Brittany N.; McBride, Melinda; Hutton, Mike; Dickson, Dennis W.; McGowan, Eileen

    2009-01-01

    Here, we describe the generation and characterization of a novel tau transgenic mouse model (mTau) that overexpresses wild-type murine tau protein by twofold compared with endogenous levels. Transgenic tau expression was driven by a BAC transgene containing the entire wild-type mouse tau locus, including the endogenous promoter and the regulatory elements associated with the tau gene. The mTau model therefore differs from other tau models in that regulation of the genomic mouse transgene mimics that of the endogenous gene, including normal exon splicing regulation. Biochemical data from the mTau mice demonstrated that modest elevation of mouse tau leads to tau hyperphosphorylation at multiple pathologically relevant epitopes and accumulation of sarkosyl-insoluble tau. The mTau mice show a progressive increase in hyperphosphorylated tau pathology with age up to 15 to 18 months, which is accompanied by gliosis and vacuolization. In contrast, older mice show a decrease in tau pathology levels, which may represent hippocampal neuronal loss occurring in this wild-type model. Collectively, these results describe a novel model of tauopathy that develops pathological changes reminiscent of early stage Alzheimer’s disease and other related neurodegenerative diseases, achieved without overexpression of a mutant human tau transgene. This model will provide an important tool for understanding the early events leading to the development of tau pathology and a model for analysis of potential therapeutic targets for sporadic tauopathies. PMID:19717642

  17. Immunization with a replication-deficient mutant of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) induces a CD8+ cytotoxic T-lymphocyte response and confers a level of protection comparable to that of wild-type HSV-1.

    PubMed Central

    Brehm, M A; Bonneau, R H; Knipe, D M; Tevethia, S S

    1997-01-01

    Replication-deficient viruses provide an attractive alternative to conventional approaches used in the induction of antiviral immunity. We have quantitatively evaluated both the primary and memory cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) responses elicited by immunization with a replication-deficient mutant of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1). In addition, we have examined the potential role of these CTL in protection against HSV infection. Using bulk culture analysis and limiting-dilution analysis, we have shown that a replication-deficient virus, d301, generates a strong primary CTL response that is comparable to the response induced by the wild type-strain, KOS1.1. Furthermore, the CTL induced by d301 immunization recognized the immunodominant, H-2Kb-restricted, CTL recognition epitope gB498-505 to a level similar to that for CTL from KOS1.1-immunized mice. The memory CTL response evoked by d301 was strong and persistent, even though the frequencies of CTL were slightly lower than the frequencies of CTL induced by KOS1.1. Adoptive transfer studies indicated that both the CD8+ and the CD4+ T-cell responses generated by immunization with d301 and KOS1.1 were able to limit the extent of a cutaneous HSV infection to comparable levels. Overall, these results indicate that viral replication is not necessary to elicit a potent and durable HSV-specific immune response and suggest that replication-deficient viruses may be effective in eliciting protection against viral pathogens. PMID:9094625

  18. Ablation of Prion Protein in Wild Type Human Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) Transgenic Mice Does Not Alter The Proteolysis of APP, Levels of Amyloid-β or Pathologic Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Baybutt, Herbert; Diack, Abigail B.; Kellett, Katherine A. B.; Piccardo, Pedro; Manson, Jean C.

    2016-01-01

    The cellular prion protein (PrPC) has been proposed to play an important role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease. In cellular models PrPC inhibited the action of the β-secretase BACE1 on wild type amyloid precursor protein resulting in a reduction in amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides. Here we have assessed the effect of genetic ablation of PrPC in transgenic mice expressing human wild type amyloid precursor protein (line I5). Deletion of PrPC had no effect on the α- and β-secretase proteolysis of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) nor on the amount of Aβ38, Aβ40 or Aβ42 in the brains of the mice. In addition, ablation of PrPC did not alter Aβ deposition or histopathology phenotype in this transgenic model. Thus using this transgenic model we could not provide evidence to support the hypothesis that PrPC regulates Aβ production. PMID:27447728

  19. Ablation of Prion Protein in Wild Type Human Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) Transgenic Mice Does Not Alter The Proteolysis of APP, Levels of Amyloid-β or Pathologic Phenotype.

    PubMed

    Whitehouse, Isobel J; Brown, Deborah; Baybutt, Herbert; Diack, Abigail B; Kellett, Katherine A B; Piccardo, Pedro; Manson, Jean C; Hooper, Nigel M

    2016-01-01

    The cellular prion protein (PrPC) has been proposed to play an important role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. In cellular models PrPC inhibited the action of the β-secretase BACE1 on wild type amyloid precursor protein resulting in a reduction in amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides. Here we have assessed the effect of genetic ablation of PrPC in transgenic mice expressing human wild type amyloid precursor protein (line I5). Deletion of PrPC had no effect on the α- and β-secretase proteolysis of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) nor on the amount of Aβ38, Aβ40 or Aβ42 in the brains of the mice. In addition, ablation of PrPC did not alter Aβ deposition or histopathology phenotype in this transgenic model. Thus using this transgenic model we could not provide evidence to support the hypothesis that PrPC regulates Aβ production. PMID:27447728

  20. The Inability of Wild-Type Rabies Virus To Activate Dendritic Cells Is Dependent on the Glycoprotein and Correlates with Its Low Level of the De Novo-Synthesized Leader RNA

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yang; Huang, Ying; Gnanadurai, Clement W.; Cao, Shengbo; Liu, Xueqin

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Dendritic cells (DCs) are the most efficient antigen-presenting cells, playing a key role in the adaptive immune responses to viral infections. Our studies demonstrate that wild-type (wt) rabies virus (RABV) does not activate DCs. Adoptive transfer of DCs primed with wt RABV did not activate DCs, stimulate virus neutralizing antibodies (VNA), or protect recipients against challenge. However, adoptive transfer of DCs primed with laboratory-attenuated RABV resulted in DC activation, production of VNA, and protection against challenge. In vitro studies with recombinant RABV (laboratory-attenuated RABV expressing the glycoprotein or the phosphoprotein from wt RABV) demonstrate that DC activation is dependent on the glycoprotein and involves the IPS-1 pathway. Furthermore, binding to and entry into DCs by wt RABV is severely blocked, and the copy number of de novo-synthesized leader RNA was two logs lower in DCs infected with the wt than in DCs treated with laboratory-attenuated RABV. However, transient transfection of DCs with synthesized leader RNA from either wt or attenuated RABV is capable of activating DCs in a dose-dependent manner. Thus, the inability of wt RABV to activate DCs correlates with its low level of the de novo-synthesized leader RNA. IMPORTANCE Rabies remains a public health threat, with more than 55,000 fatalities each year around the world. Since DCs play a key role in the adaptive immune responses to viral infections, we investigated the ability of rabies virus (RABV) to activate DCs. It was found that the adoptive transfer of DCs primed with wt RABV did not activate DCs, stimulate VNA, or protect mice against lethal challenge. However, laboratory-attenuated RABV mediates the activation of DCs via the IPS-1 pathway and is glycoprotein dependent. We further show that wt RABV evades DC-mediated immune activation by inefficient binding/entry into DCs and as a result of a reduced level of de novo-synthesized leader RNA. These findings may

  1. Wild-Type and Non-Wild-Type Mycobacterium tuberculosis MIC Distributions for the Novel Fluoroquinolone Antofloxacin Compared with Those for Ofloxacin, Levofloxacin, and Moxifloxacin

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xia; Wang, Guirong; Chen, Suting; Wei, Guomei; Shang, Yuanyuan; Dong, Lingling; Schön, Thomas; Moradigaravand, Danesh; Peacock, Sharon J.

    2016-01-01

    Antofloxacin (AFX) is a novel fluoroquinolone that has been approved in China for the treatment of infections caused by a variety of bacterial species. We investigated whether it could be repurposed for the treatment of tuberculosis by studying its in vitro activity. We determined the wild-type and non-wild-type MIC ranges for AFX as well as ofloxacin (OFX), levofloxacin (LFX), and moxifloxacin (MFX), using the microplate alamarBlue assay, of 126 clinical Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains from Beijing, China, of which 48 were OFX resistant on the basis of drug susceptibility testing on Löwenstein-Jensen medium. The MIC distributions were correlated with mutations in the quinolone resistance-determining regions of gyrA (Rv0006) and gyrB (Rv0005). Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) data for AFX were retrieved from the literature. AFX showed lower MIC levels than OFX but higher MIC levels than LFX and MFX on the basis of the tentative epidemiological cutoff values (ECOFFs) determined in this study. All strains with non-wild-type MICs for AFX harbored known resistance mutations that also resulted in non-wild-type MICs for LFX and MFX. Moreover, our data suggested that the current critical concentration of OFX for Löwenstein-Jensen medium that was recently revised by the World Health Organization might be too high, resulting in the misclassification of phenotypically non-wild-type strains with known resistance mutations as wild type. On the basis of our exploratory PK/PD calculations, the current dose of AFX is unlikely to be optimal for the treatment of tuberculosis, but higher doses could be effective. PMID:27324769

  2. Wild-Type and Non-Wild-Type Mycobacterium tuberculosis MIC Distributions for the Novel Fluoroquinolone Antofloxacin Compared with Those for Ofloxacin, Levofloxacin, and Moxifloxacin.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xia; Wang, Guirong; Chen, Suting; Wei, Guomei; Shang, Yuanyuan; Dong, Lingling; Schön, Thomas; Moradigaravand, Danesh; Parkhill, Julian; Peacock, Sharon J; Köser, Claudio U; Huang, Hairong

    2016-09-01

    Antofloxacin (AFX) is a novel fluoroquinolone that has been approved in China for the treatment of infections caused by a variety of bacterial species. We investigated whether it could be repurposed for the treatment of tuberculosis by studying its in vitro activity. We determined the wild-type and non-wild-type MIC ranges for AFX as well as ofloxacin (OFX), levofloxacin (LFX), and moxifloxacin (MFX), using the microplate alamarBlue assay, of 126 clinical Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains from Beijing, China, of which 48 were OFX resistant on the basis of drug susceptibility testing on Löwenstein-Jensen medium. The MIC distributions were correlated with mutations in the quinolone resistance-determining regions of gyrA (Rv0006) and gyrB (Rv0005). Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) data for AFX were retrieved from the literature. AFX showed lower MIC levels than OFX but higher MIC levels than LFX and MFX on the basis of the tentative epidemiological cutoff values (ECOFFs) determined in this study. All strains with non-wild-type MICs for AFX harbored known resistance mutations that also resulted in non-wild-type MICs for LFX and MFX. Moreover, our data suggested that the current critical concentration of OFX for Löwenstein-Jensen medium that was recently revised by the World Health Organization might be too high, resulting in the misclassification of phenotypically non-wild-type strains with known resistance mutations as wild type. On the basis of our exploratory PK/PD calculations, the current dose of AFX is unlikely to be optimal for the treatment of tuberculosis, but higher doses could be effective. PMID:27324769

  3. Discrimination of oligonucleotides of different lengths with a wild-type aerolysin nanopore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Chan; Ying, Yi-Lun; Hu, Zheng-Li; Liao, Dong-Fang; Tian, He; Long, Yi-Tao

    2016-08-01

    Protein nanopores offer an inexpensive, label-free method of analysing single oligonucleotides. The sensitivity of the approach is largely determined by the characteristics of the pore-forming protein employed, and typically relies on nanopores that have been chemically modified or incorporate molecular motors. Effective, high-resolution discrimination of oligonucleotides using wild-type biological nanopores remains difficult to achieve. Here, we show that a wild-type aerolysin nanopore can resolve individual short oligonucleotides that are 2 to 10 bases long. The sensing capabilities are attributed to the geometry of aerolysin and the electrostatic interactions between the nanopore and the oligonucleotides. We also show that the wild-type aerolysin nanopores can distinguish individual oligonucleotides from mixtures and can monitor the stepwise cleavage of oligonucleotides by exonuclease I.

  4. CLIL Learning: Achievement Levels and Affective Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seikkula-Leino, Jaana

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate how successfully pupils had learned content in content and language integrated learning (CLIL) and to assess pupils' affective learning factors, such as motivation and self-esteem, in CLIL. Learning was presented in terms of achievement level, which was described as the relationship between measured levels…

  5. Variable stress-responsiveness in wild type and domesticated fighting fish.

    PubMed

    Verbeek, Peter; Iwamoto, Toshitaka; Murakami, Noboru

    2008-01-28

    We combined behavioral and physiological measures to compare coping style in wild-type Betta splendens and a domesticated strain selectively bred for sports fighting. We showed previously that the fighter strain is more aggressive than the wild type during experimental conditions that most closely resemble an actual fight. We predicted that compared to the wild type, the fighter strain would show a more proactive coping style, characterized by lesser cortisol and greater sympathetic responses to non-social challenges. We introduced males to an unfamiliar environment and spatial confinement as challenges that may resemble some of those that B. splendens may encounter in its natural habitat. We developed a non-invasive stress assay that enables repeated individual measures of water-borne cortisol. We estimated sympathetic activation through opercular beat rate and recorded the duration of behavioral immobility. We found that exposure to an unfamiliar environment raised cortisol levels in the wild type but not in the fighter strain and that confinement raised cortisol levels in both. In both strains opercular beat rates were significantly reduced during the latter stages of confinement compared to during the early stages. The fighter strain, but not the wild type, adopted a behavioral strategy of immobility from the very beginning of confinement.

  6. Variable stress-responsiveness in wild type and domesticated fighting fish.

    PubMed

    Verbeek, Peter; Iwamoto, Toshitaka; Murakami, Noboru

    2008-01-28

    We combined behavioral and physiological measures to compare coping style in wild-type Betta splendens and a domesticated strain selectively bred for sports fighting. We showed previously that the fighter strain is more aggressive than the wild type during experimental conditions that most closely resemble an actual fight. We predicted that compared to the wild type, the fighter strain would show a more proactive coping style, characterized by lesser cortisol and greater sympathetic responses to non-social challenges. We introduced males to an unfamiliar environment and spatial confinement as challenges that may resemble some of those that B. splendens may encounter in its natural habitat. We developed a non-invasive stress assay that enables repeated individual measures of water-borne cortisol. We estimated sympathetic activation through opercular beat rate and recorded the duration of behavioral immobility. We found that exposure to an unfamiliar environment raised cortisol levels in the wild type but not in the fighter strain and that confinement raised cortisol levels in both. In both strains opercular beat rates were significantly reduced during the latter stages of confinement compared to during the early stages. The fighter strain, but not the wild type, adopted a behavioral strategy of immobility from the very beginning of confinement. PMID:17884114

  7. Wild-type human p53 transactivates the human proliferating cell nuclear antigen promoter

    SciTech Connect

    Shivakumar, C.V.; Brown, D.R.; Deb, S.; Deb, S.P.

    1995-12-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor protein negatively regulates cell growth and somatic mutations in the p53 gene lead to uncontrolled cell growth and oncogenesis. This report describes research which demonstrates, using a number of different cell lines, that at low levels, wild-type p53 transactivates the human proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) promoter. When expressed at similar levels, tumor-derived p53 mutants did not transactivate the PCNA promoter. It also reports the identification of a wild-type human p53-binding site on the human PCNA promote. 84 refs., 5 figs, 3 tabs.

  8. Prion-Specific Antibodies Produced in Wild-Type Mice.

    PubMed

    Heegaard, Peter M H; Bergström, Ann-Louise; Andersen, Heidi Gertz; Cordes, Henriette

    2015-01-01

    Peptide-specific antibodies produced against synthetic peptides are of high value in probing protein structure and function, especially when working with challenging proteins, including not readily available, non-immunogenic, toxic, and/or pathogenic proteins. Here, we present a straightforward method for production of mouse monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against peptides representing two sites of interest in the bovine prion protein (boPrP), the causative agent of bovine spongiform encephalopathy ("mad cow disease") and new variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob's disease (CJD) in humans, as well as a thorough characterization of their reactivity with a range of normal and pathogenic (misfolded) prion proteins. It is demonstrated that immunization of wild-type mice with ovalbumin-conjugated peptides formulated with Freund's adjuvant induces a good immune response, including high levels of specific anti-peptide antibodies, even against peptides very homologous to murine protein sequences. In general, using the strategies described here for selecting, synthesizing, and conjugating peptides and immunizing 4-5 mice with 2-3 different peptides, high-titered antibodies reacting with the target protein are routinely obtained with at least one of the peptides after three to four immunizations with incomplete Freund's adjuvant.

  9. Prion-Specific Antibodies Produced in Wild-Type Mice.

    PubMed

    Heegaard, Peter M H; Bergström, Ann-Louise; Andersen, Heidi Gertz; Cordes, Henriette

    2015-01-01

    Peptide-specific antibodies produced against synthetic peptides are of high value in probing protein structure and function, especially when working with challenging proteins, including not readily available, non-immunogenic, toxic, and/or pathogenic proteins. Here, we present a straightforward method for production of mouse monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against peptides representing two sites of interest in the bovine prion protein (boPrP), the causative agent of bovine spongiform encephalopathy ("mad cow disease") and new variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob's disease (CJD) in humans, as well as a thorough characterization of their reactivity with a range of normal and pathogenic (misfolded) prion proteins. It is demonstrated that immunization of wild-type mice with ovalbumin-conjugated peptides formulated with Freund's adjuvant induces a good immune response, including high levels of specific anti-peptide antibodies, even against peptides very homologous to murine protein sequences. In general, using the strategies described here for selecting, synthesizing, and conjugating peptides and immunizing 4-5 mice with 2-3 different peptides, high-titered antibodies reacting with the target protein are routinely obtained with at least one of the peptides after three to four immunizations with incomplete Freund's adjuvant. PMID:26424281

  10. Aggression and aspects of impulsivity in wild-type rats.

    PubMed

    Coppens, Caroline M; de Boer, Sietse F; Buwalda, Bauke; Koolhaas, Jaap M

    2014-01-01

    Aggression is closely related to impulsive behavior both in humans and in animals. To avoid potential negative consequences, aggressive behavior is kept in control by strong inhibitory mechanisms. Failure of these inhibitory mechanisms results in violent behavior. In the present experiments, we investigated whether aggressive behavior is related to impulsive behavior. Furthermore, we investigated if violent behavior can be distinguished from "normal" aggressive behavior in terms of impulsivity levels. We used rats of the wild-type Groningen strain, rats of this strain differ widely in their level of offensive aggression expressed toward an unfamiliar intruder male, ranging from no aggression at all to very high levels of intense and sometimes violent behavior. Violent behavior was displayed by some of the animals that were given repeated winning experience. We used behavioral performance in an unpredictable operant conditioning paradigm for food reinforcement (variable interval 15) and performance in a differential-reinforcement of low rate (DRL-60s) responding as determinants for impulsivity. We predicted that offensive aggression is correlated with behavioral flexibility measured by the VI-15 procedure and that aggressive behavior is characterized by low behavioral inhibition on the DRL task. In addition we expected that violent animals would be characterized by extremely low levels of behavioral inhibition on the DRL task. We showed that the level of offensive aggression indeed positively correlated with VI-15 performance. In addition, we showed that behavioral performance on the DRL procedure is similar in low and high aggressive rats. However, violent animals can be dissociated by a lower efficiency of lever pressing on a DRL-60s schedule of reinforcement.

  11. Achieving success: moving beyond the comfort level.

    PubMed

    Manji, I

    1993-11-01

    Understanding the stages of growth, saturation and transition is the first step to setting meaningful career goals. While this concept is fairly new in dentistry, it is not new in other commercial enterprises. Business managers and owners have known for decades that growth stagnates after a period of time. At that point, a new infusion of energy and a reformation of the business's objectives and methods are needed to launch forward into the next phase of growth. Transition management in dentistry represents periods of growth that are followed by saturation and a comparatively rapid changeover to a new practice form. Saturation occurs when the clinical capacity of a practice is exceeded by the needs of a growing patient base. The key transitions in the career of a dentist are those from school to practising, and practising to retirement. A great number of dentists (due to low motivation, the comfort level or poor management skills) never reach the saturation point during their practising career. For these dentists, starting out and retirement are the only transitions that will ever apply to them. Dentists evaluating transition options must first identify which career stage they belong to since their objectives will be different at each stage. Dentists in the growth phase should focus on practice management and achieving saturation before attempting a transition. Since transitions like start-up, retirement, partnerships, associateships and buy-ins have pivotal roles in the life cycle of a practice, transitions must be managed carefully to achieve successful results.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. DNA binding properties of dioxin receptors in wild-type and mutant mouse hepatoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cuthill, S.; Poellinger, L.

    1988-04-19

    The current model of action of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (dioxin) entails stimulation of target gene transcription via the formation of dioxin-receptor complexes and subsequent accumulation of the complexes within the cell nucleus. Here, the authors have analyzed the DNA binding properties of the dioxin receptor in wild-type mouse hepatoma (Hepa 1c1c7) cells and a class of nonresponsive mutant cells which fail to accumulate dioxin-receptor complexes within the nucleus in vivo. In vitro, both the wild-type and mutant (/sup 3/H)dioxin-receptor complexes exhibited low affinity for DNA-cellulose (5-8% and around 4% retention, respectively) in the absence of prior biochemical manipulations. However, following chromatography on heparin-Sepharose, the wild-type but not the mutant dioxin receptor was transformed to a species with an increased affinity for DNA (40-50% retention on DNA-cellulose). The gross molecular structure of the mutant, non DNA binding dioxin receptor did not appear to be altered as compared to that of the wild-type receptor. These results imply that the primary deficiency in the mutant dioxin receptor form may reside at the DNA binding level and that, in analogy to steroid hormone receptors, DNA binding of the receptor may be an essential step in the regulation of target gene transcription by dioxin.

  13. Biomass Productivities in Wild Type and Pigment Mutant of Cyclotella sp. (Diatom)

    SciTech Connect

    Huesemann, Michael H.; Hausmann, Tom S.; Bartha, Richard; Aksoy, M.; Weissman, Joseph C.; Benemann, John

    2008-07-03

    Microalgae are expected to play a significant role in greenhouse gas mitigation because they can utilize CO2 from powerplant flue gases directly while producing a variety of renewable carbon-neutral biofuels. In order for such a microalgal climate change mitigation strategy to become economically feasible, it will be necessary to significantly improve biomass productivities. One approach to achieve this objective is to reduce, via mutagenesis, the number of light harvesting pigments, which, according to theory, should significantly improve the light utilization efficiency, primarily by increasing the light intensity at which photosynthesis saturates (Is). Employing chemical (ethylmethylsulfonate, EMS) and UV mutagenesis of a wild type strain of the diatom Cyclotella, approximately 10,000 pigment mutants were generated, and two of the most promising ones (CM1 and CM1-1) were subjected to further testing in both laboratory cultures and outdoor ponds. Measurements of photosynthetic oxygen production rates as a function of light intensity (i.e., P-I curves) of samples taken from laboratory batch cultures during the exponential and linear growth phase indicated that the light intensity at which photosynthesis saturates (Is) was two to three times greater in the pigment mutant CM1-1 than in the wild type, i.e., 355-443 versus 116-169 μmole/m2∙sec, respectively. While theory, i.e., the Bush equation, predicts that such a significant gain in Is should increase light utilization efficiencies and thus biomass productivities, particularly at high light intensities, no improvements in biomass productivities were observed in either semi-continuous laboratory cultures or outdoor ponds. In fact, the maximum biomass productivity in semi-continuous laboratory culture was always greater in the wild type than in the mutant, namely 883 versus 725 mg/L∙d, respectively at low light intensity (200 μmole/m2∙sec) and 1229 versus 1043 mg/L∙d, respectively at high light intensity

  14. Production of Cystatin C Wild Type and Stabilized Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Szymanska, Aneta; Lindstrom, Veronica; Grubb, Anders

    2010-01-01

    Cystatin C is produced in all nucleated cells. It has various functions and biological activities. Researchers are focused on its role in kidney diseases as a marker of glomerular filtration but also as a very important link in development of amyloid diseases. This work describes expression and purification of both wild type (wt) and stabilized form (stab 1 and 2) of wt cystatin C and amyloid-forming L68Q mutant of cystatin C. The recombinant cystatin C can be used in projects requiring pure cystatin C to examine models of dimerization and fibrils formation as well as a standard in clinical tests.

  15. Porphyrin Interactions with Wild Type and Mutant Mouse Ferrochelatase

    SciTech Connect

    Ferreira, Gloria C.; Franco, Ricardo; Lu, Yi; Ma, Jian-Guo; Shelnutt, John A.

    1999-05-19

    Ferrochelatase (EC 4.99.1.1), the terminal enzyme of the heme biosynthetic pathway, catalyzes Fe2+ chelation into protoporphyrin IX. Resonance Raman and W-visible absorbance spectroscopes of wild type and engineered variants of murine ferrochelatase were used to examine the proposed structural mechanism for iron insertion into protoporphyrin by ferrochelatase. The recombinant variants (i.e., H207N and E287Q) are enzymes in which the conserved amino acids histidine-207 and glutamate-287 of murine ferrochelatase were substituted with asparagine and glutamine, respectively. Both of these residues are at the active site of the enzyme as deduced from the Bacillus subtilis ferrochelatase three-dimensional structure. Addition of free base or metalated porphyrins to wild type ferrochelatase and H207N variant yields a quasi 1:1 complex, possibly a monomeric protein-bound species. In contrast, the addition of porphyrin (either free base or metalated) to E287Q is sub-stoichiometric, as this variant retains bound porphyrin in the active site during isolation and purification. The specificity of porphyrin binding is confirmed by the narrowing of the structure-sensitive resonance Raman lines and the vinyl vibrational mode. Resonance Raman spectra of free base and metalated porphyrins bound to the wild type ferrochelatase indicate a nonplanar distortion of the porphyrin macrocycle, although the magnitude of the distortion cannot be determined without first defining the specific type of deformation. Significantly, the extent of the nonplanar distortion varies in the case of H207N- and E287Q-bound porphyrins. In fact, resonance Raman spectral decomposition indicates a homogeneous ruffled distortion for the nickel protoporphyrin bound to the wild type ferrochelatase, whereas both a planar and ruffled conformations are present for the H207N-bound porphyrin. Perhaps more revealing is the unusual resonance , 3 Raman spectrum of the endogenous E287Q-bound porphyrin, which has

  16. Enigmatic in vivo iduronate-2-sulfatase (IDS) mutant transcript correction to wild-type in Hunter syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lualdi, Susanna; Tappino, Barbara; Di Duca, Marco; Dardis, Andrea; Anderson, Christopher J; Biassoni, Roberto; Thompson, Peter W; Corsolini, Fabio; Di Rocco, Maja; Bembi, Bruno; Regis, Stefano; Cooper, David N; Filocamo, Mirella

    2010-04-01

    Sequence analysis of the X-linked iduronate-2-sulfatase (IDS) gene in two Hunter syndrome patients revealed a lack of concordance between IDS genomic DNA and cDNA. These individuals were found to be hemizygous respectively for a nonsense mutation [c.22C>T;p.R8X] and a frameshift micro-insertion [c.10insT;p.P4Sfs] in their genomic DNA. However, both wild-type and mutant IDS sequences were evident upon cDNA analysis. Similar discrepant results were also obtained in a third unrelated patient carrying the same p.R8X mutation. Since both p.R8X mutations were inherited from carrier mothers, somatic mosaicism could be excluded. Although the presence of wild-type IDSmRNA-transcripts was confirmed in all three patients by restriction enzyme digestion, clone sequencing, pyrosequencing and single nucleotide primer extension (SNuPE), no wild-type IDS genomic sequence was detectable. The relative abundance of wild-type and mutation-bearing IDS-transcripts in different tissues was quantified by SNuPE. Although IDS transcript levels, as measured by real-time PCR, were reduced (51-71% normal) in these patients, some wild-type IDS protein was detectable by western blotting. Various possible explanations for these unprecedented findings (e.g. accidental contamination, artefactual in vitro nucleotide misincorporation, malsegregation of an extra maternal X-chromosome) were explored and experimentally excluded. PCR-based discriminant assay and segregation analysis of a linked IDS polymorphism (rs1141608) also served to exclude the presence of IDS cDNA derived from the maternal wild-type chromosome. Although it remains to be formally demonstrated by direct experimentation, the intriguing possibility arises that we have observed the in vivo correction of heritable gene lesions at the RNA level operating via a correction mechanism akin to RNA-editing. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. "Wild type" GIST: Clinicopathological features and clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Wada, Ryuichi; Arai, Hiroki; Kure, Shoko; Peng, Wei-Xia; Naito, Zenya

    2016-08-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) is a mesenchymal tumor of the gastrointestinal tract. Mutation of KIT and PDGFRA genes is implicated in the tumorigenesis. Approximately 10% of GISTs do not harbor mutation of these genes, and they are designated as "wild type" GIST. They are classified into succinate dehydrogenase (SDH)-deficient and non-SDH-deficient groups. SDH-deficient group includes Carney triad and Carney Stratakis syndrome. The patients are young women. Tumors occur in the antrum of the stomach, and tumor cells are epithelioid. Lymph node metastasis is frequent. The non-SDH-deficient group includes neurofibromatosis (NF) type 1 and GISTs with mutations of BRAF, KRAS, and PIK3CA and with the ETV6-NTRK3 fusion gene. GIST in NF occurs in the small intestine, and tumor cells are spindle shaped. GIST with BRAF mutation arises in the small intestine. Attention to the age, gender, family history and other neoplasms may raise the prediction of syndromic disease. Location of the tumor, morphology, and pleomorphism of the tumor cells are further informative. Lymphovascular invasion should be carefully evaluated. The determination of KIT expression is essential for the diagnosis. When wild type GIST is suspected, intensive genetic analysis is required. Further, a careful and long-time observation is recommended. PMID:27427238

  18. Relationship between Uric Acid Level and Achievement Motivation. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mueller, Ernst F.; French, John R. P., Jr.

    In an investigation of the relationship of uric acid (a metabolic end product) to achievement, this study hypothesized that a person's serum urate level (a factor often associated with gout) is positively related to achievement need as well as indicators of actual achievement. (Speed of promotion and number of yearly publications were chosen as…

  19. Perceived District-Level Leadership Influences upon Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mart, Daniel T.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand district-level leadership's perceived influences on and barriers to improved student achievement. The following research questions were addressed: (a) How do superintendents view their influence on student achievement? (b) How do school board presidents view their influence on student achievement? (c)…

  20. Predicting Mathematics Achievement by Motivation and Self-Efficacy across Gender and Achievement Levels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sartawi, AbdelAziz; Alsawaie, Othman N.; Dodeen, Hamzeh; Tibi, Sana; Alghazo, Iman M.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the extent to which self-efficacy and motivation served as a predictor for mathematics achievement of fifth grade students in United Arab Emirates (UAE) across gender and achievement levels. Self-efficacy was measured by two scales, which differed in levels of specificity--Category Specific and Task Specific. Motivation was…

  1. Comments on the NAE Evaluation of the NAGB Achievement Levels.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kane, Michael

    The National Academy of Education (NAE) Panel has drawn two major conclusions in its evaluation of the National Assessment Governing Board's (NAGB) efforts to set achievement levels for the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP). They are that the Angoff procedure is fundamentally flawed for the setting of achievement levels, and that…

  2. Combined effect of temperature and zinc on Caenorhabditis elegans wild type and daf-21 mutant strains.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yunbiao; Ezemaduka, Anastasia N

    2014-04-01

    Heavy metal pollution in aquatic ecosystems is a far reaching environmental problem. The possible influences of heavy metal exposure and the potential harm to organisms when combined with other environmental stressors such as temperature have been largely unexplored. An aquatic toxicity test of Caenorhabditis elegans was performed to estimate the 24h median lethal concentration (LC50) of different zinc concentrations at different temperatures (15°C, 20°C, 25°C, and 30°C). We also examined the time course thermotolerance on wild type (N2) and daf-21 null (JT6130) adults exposed to 6.1mM zinc at 37°C. Hsp90 protein expression level in response to the combined effect of temperature and zinc toxicity was also investigated by both Western blots and ELISA. Our results show that C. elegans wild type nematodes exhibit severe lethal toxicity after a 24h exposure to zinc at higher temperatures. In addition, the expression level of Hsp90 was highly inhibited in adult worms subjected to zinc stress. This toxicity assay at different temperatures provides insight into organism response to combined effects of temperature and zinc toxicity. PMID:24679967

  3. Comparative metabolic profiling of mce1 operon mutant vs wild-type Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains.

    PubMed

    Queiroz, Adriano; Medina-Cleghorn, Daniel; Marjanovic, Olivera; Nomura, Daniel K; Riley, Lee W

    2015-11-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis disrupted in a 13-gene operon (mce1) accumulates free mycolic acids (FM) in its cell wall and causes accelerated death in mice. Here, to more comprehensively analyze differences in their cell wall lipid composition, we used an untargeted metabolomics approach to compare the lipid profiles of wild-type and mce1 operon mutant strains. By liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, we identified >400 distinct lipids significantly altered in the mce1 mutant compared to wild type. These lipids included decreased levels of saccharolipids and glycerophospholipids, and increased levels of alpha-, methoxy- and keto mycolic acids (MA), and hydroxyphthioceranic acid. The mutant showed reduced expression of mmpL8, mmpL10, stf0, pks2 and papA2 genes involved in transport and metabolism of lipids recognized to induce proinflammatory response; these lipids were found to be decreased in the mutant. In contrast, the transcripts of mmpL3, fasI, kasA, kasB, acpM and RV3451 involved in MA transport and metabolism increased; MA inhibits inflammatory response in macrophages. Since the mce1 operon is known to be regulated in intracellular M. tuberculosis, we speculate that the differences we observed in cell wall lipid metabolism and composition may affect host response to M. tuberculosis infection and determine the clinical outcome of such an infection. PMID:26319139

  4. Codon Optimization of the Human Papillomavirus E7 Oncogene Induces a CD8+ T Cell Response to a Cryptic Epitope Not Harbored by Wild-Type E7

    PubMed Central

    Lorenz, Felix K. M.; Wilde, Susanne; Voigt, Katrin; Kieback, Elisa; Mosetter, Barbara; Schendel, Dolores J.; Uckert, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Codon optimization of nucleotide sequences is a widely used method to achieve high levels of transgene expression for basic and clinical research. Until now, immunological side effects have not been described. To trigger T cell responses against human papillomavirus, we incubated T cells with dendritic cells that were pulsed with RNA encoding the codon-optimized E7 oncogene. All T cell receptors isolated from responding T cell clones recognized target cells expressing the codon-optimized E7 gene but not the wild type E7 sequence. Epitope mapping revealed recognition of a cryptic epitope from the +3 alternative reading frame of codon-optimized E7, which is not encoded by the wild type E7 sequence. The introduction of a stop codon into the +3 alternative reading frame protected the transgene product from recognition by T cell receptor gene-modified T cells. This is the first experimental study demonstrating that codon optimization can render a transgene artificially immunogenic through generation of a dominant cryptic epitope. This finding may be of great importance for the clinical field of gene therapy to avoid rejection of gene-corrected cells and for the design of DNA- and RNA-based vaccines, where codon optimization may artificially add a strong immunogenic component to the vaccine. PMID:25799237

  5. Codon optimization of the human papillomavirus E7 oncogene induces a CD8+ T cell response to a cryptic epitope not harbored by wild-type E7.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, Felix K M; Wilde, Susanne; Voigt, Katrin; Kieback, Elisa; Mosetter, Barbara; Schendel, Dolores J; Uckert, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Codon optimization of nucleotide sequences is a widely used method to achieve high levels of transgene expression for basic and clinical research. Until now, immunological side effects have not been described. To trigger T cell responses against human papillomavirus, we incubated T cells with dendritic cells that were pulsed with RNA encoding the codon-optimized E7 oncogene. All T cell receptors isolated from responding T cell clones recognized target cells expressing the codon-optimized E7 gene but not the wild type E7 sequence. Epitope mapping revealed recognition of a cryptic epitope from the +3 alternative reading frame of codon-optimized E7, which is not encoded by the wild type E7 sequence. The introduction of a stop codon into the +3 alternative reading frame protected the transgene product from recognition by T cell receptor gene-modified T cells. This is the first experimental study demonstrating that codon optimization can render a transgene artificially immunogenic through generation of a dominant cryptic epitope. This finding may be of great importance for the clinical field of gene therapy to avoid rejection of gene-corrected cells and for the design of DNA- and RNA-based vaccines, where codon optimization may artificially add a strong immunogenic component to the vaccine.

  6. Crystal structure of wild-type human procathepsin K.

    PubMed Central

    Sivaraman, J.; Lalumière, M.; Ménard, R.; Cygler, M.

    1999-01-01

    Cathepsin K is a lysosomal cysteine protease belonging to the papain superfamily. It has been implicated as a major mediator of osteoclastic bone resorption. Wild-type human procathepsin K has been crystallized in a glycosylated and a deglycosylated form. The latter crystals diffract better, to 3.2 A resolution, and contain four molecules in the asymmetric unit. The structure was solved by molecular replacement and refined to an R-factor of 0.194. The N-terminal fragment of the proregion forms a globular domain while the C-terminal segment is extended and shows substantial flexibility. The proregion interacts with the enzyme along the substrate binding groove and along the proregion binding loop (residues Ser138-Asn156). It binds to the active site in the opposite direction to that of natural substrates. The overall binding mode of the proregion to cathepsin K is similar to that observed in cathepsin L, caricain, and cathepsin B, but there are local differences that likely contribute to the specificity of these proregions for their cognate enzymes. The main observed difference is in the position of the short helix alpha3p (67p-75p), which occupies the S' subsites. As in the other proenzymes, the proregion utilizes the S2 subsite for anchoring by placing a leucine side chain there, according to the specificity of cathepsin K toward its substrate. PMID:10048321

  7. Gravitropism of hypocotyls of wild-type and starch-deficient Arabidopsis seedlings in spaceflight studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiss, J. Z.; Edelmann, R. E.; Wood, P. C.

    1999-01-01

    The major purpose of this spaceflight project was to investigate the starch-statolith hypothesis for gravity perception, and a secondary goal was to study plant growth and development under spaceflight conditions. This research was based on our ground studies of gravity perception in the wild type and three starch-deficient (one starchless and two reduced starch) mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. Dark-grown seedlings that developed in microgravity were given one of several (30 min, 60 min, or 90 min) 1-g stimuli by an on-board centrifuge, and additional controls for seedling development also were performed. These latter control experiments included a morphological study of plants that developed in space in microgravity (F microg), in space on a centrifuge (F 1g), on the ground (G 1g), and on a rotating clinostat on the ground. Since elevated levels of ethylene were reported in the spacecraft atmosphere, additional controls for morphology and gravitropism with added ethylene also were performed. While exogenous ethylene reduced the absolute magnitude of the response in all four strains of Arabidopsis, this gas did not appear to change the relative graviresponsiveness among the strains. The relative response of hypocotyls of microgravity-grown seedlings to the stimuli provided by the in-flight centrifuge was: wild type > starch-deficient mutants. Although the protoplast pressure model for gravity perception cannot be excluded, these results are consistent with a statolith-based model for perception in plants.

  8. Middle Level Best Practice and Student Achievement in Texas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Dawn Michelle

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the implementation level of best practice strategies for middle level education in the state of Texas described by This We Believe (AMLE, 2010) and to determine the relationship of those practices with the schools' academic achievement in math and reading. A survey was distributed to principals of all…

  9. Adolescent social defeat disturbs adult aggression-related impulsivity in wild-type rats.

    PubMed

    Coppens, Caroline M; Coolen, Alex; de Boer, Sietse F; Koolhaas, Jaap M

    2014-10-01

    Adolescence is generally considered as a developmental period during which adverse social experiences may have lasting consequences in terms of an increased vulnerability to affective disorders. This study aimed at determining the individual susceptibility to adolescent social stress using a rat model. We used rats of the Wild-type Groningen strain, which are characterized by a broad variation in adult levels of aggression and impulsivity. We hypothesized that experience of social defeat in adolescence results in heightened aggression and impulsivity levels in adulthood. In contrast to our expectation, adolescent social defeat did not lead to a difference in the average adult level of aggression and impulsivity, but the significant correlation between offensive aggression and impulsivity found in control animals was not present in animals defeated during adolescence.

  10. Biosafety of recombinant and wild type nucleopolyhedroviruses as bioinsecticides.

    PubMed

    Ashour, Mohamed-Bassem; Ragheb, Didair A; El-Sheikh, El-Sayed A; Gomaa, El-Adarosy A; Kamita, Shizuo G; Hammock, Bruce D

    2007-06-01

    The entomopathogenic Autographa californica (Speyer) nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) has been genetically modified to increase its speed of kill. The potential adverse effects of a recombinant AcMNPV (AcAaIT) as well as wild type AcMNPV and wild type Spodoptera littoralis NPV (SlNPV) were studied. Cotton plants were treated with these viruses at concentrations that were adjusted to resemble the recommended field application rate (4 x 10(12) PIBs/feddan, feddan = 4,200 m2) and 3rd instar larvae of S. littoralis were allowed to feed on the contaminated plants. SDS-PAGE, ELISA, and DNA analyses were used to confirm that larvae that fed on these plants were virus-infected. Polyhedra that were purified from the infected larvae were subjected to structural protein analysis. A 32 KDa protein was found in polyhedra that were isolated from all of the viruses. Subtle differences were found in the size and abundance of ODV proteins. Antisera against polyhedral proteins isolated from AcAaIT polyhedra were raised in rabbits. The terminal bleeds from rabbits were screened against four coating antigens (i.e., polyhedral proteins from AcAaIT, AcAaIT from field-infected larvae (AcAaIT-field), AcMNPV, and SlNPV) using a two-dimensional titration method with the coated antigen format. Competitive inhibition experiments were conducted in parallel to optimize antibody and coating antigen concentrations for ELISA. The IC50 values for each combination ranged from 1.42 to 163 microg/ml. AcAaIT-derived polyhedrin gave the lowest IC50 value, followed by those of SlNPV, AcAaIT-field, and AcMNPV. The optimized ELISA system showed low cross reactivity for AcMNPV (0.87%), AcAaIT-field (1.2%), and SlNPV (4.0%). Genomic DNAs isolated from AcAaIT that were passaged in larvae of S. littoralis that were reared in the laboratory or field did not show any detectable differences. Albino rats (male and female) that were treated with AcAaIT, AcMNPV or SlNPV (either orally or by intraperitoneal injection at

  11. Beta Cell Formation in vivo Through Cellular Networking, Integration and Processing (CNIP) in Wild Type Adult Mice.

    PubMed

    Doiron, Bruno; Hu, Wenchao; DeFronzo, Ralph A

    2016-01-01

    Insulin replacement therapy is essential in type 1 diabetic individuals and is required in ~40- 50% of type 2 diabetics during their lifetime. Prior attempts at beta cell regeneration have relied upon pancreatic injury to induce beta cell proliferation, dedifferentiation and activation of the embryonic pathway, or stem cell replacement. We report an alternative method to transform adult non-stem (somatic) cells into pancreatic beta cells. The Cellular Networking, Integration and Processing (CNIP) approach targets cellular mechanisms involved in pancreatic function in the organ's adult state and utilizes a synergistic mechanism that integrates three important levels of cellular regulation to induce beta cell formation: (i) glucose metabolism, (ii) membrane receptor function, and (iii) gene transcription. The aim of the present study was to induce pancreatic beta cell formation in vivo in adult animals without stem cells and without dedifferentiating cells to recapitulate the embryonic pathway as previously published (1-3). Our results employing CNIP demonstrate that: (i) insulin secreting cells can be generated in adult pancreatic tissue in vivo and circumvent the problem of generating endocrine (glucagon and somatostatin) cells that exert deleterious effects on glucose homeostasis, and (ii) longterm normalization of glucose tolerance and insulin secretion can be achieved in a wild type diabetic mouse model. The CNIP cocktail has the potential to be used as a preventative or therapeutic treatment or cure for both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. PMID:26696016

  12. H1-antihistamines exacerbate high-fat diet-induced hepatic steatosis in wild-type but not in apolipoprotein E knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Raveendran, Vineesh V; Kassel, Karen M; Smith, Donald D; Luyendyk, James P; Williams, Kurt J; Cherian, Rachel; Reed, Gregory A; Flynn, Colleen A; Csanaky, Iván L; Lickteig, Andrew L; Pratt-Hyatt, Matthew J; Klaassen, Curtis D; Dileepan, Kottarappat N

    2014-07-15

    We examined the effects of two over-the-counter H1-antihistamines on the progression of fatty liver disease in male C57Bl/6 wild-type and apolipoprotein E (ApoE)-/- mice. Mice were fed a high-fat diet (HFD) for 3 mo, together with administration of either cetirizine (4 mg/kg body wt) or fexofenadine (40 mg/kg body wt) in drinking water. Antihistamine treatments increased body weight gain, gonadal fat deposition, liver weight, and hepatic steatosis in wild-type mice but not in ApoE-/- mice. Lobular inflammation, acute inflammation, and necrosis were not affected by H1-antihistamines in either genotype. Serum biomarkers of liver injury tended to increase in antihistamine-treated wild-type mice. Serum level of glucose was increased by fexofenadine, whereas lipase was increased by cetirizine. H1-antihistamines reduced the mRNA expression of ApoE and carbohydrate response element-binding protein in wild-type mice, without altering the mRNA expression of sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1c, fatty acid synthase, or ApoB100, in either genotype. Fexofenadine increased both triglycerides and cholesterol ester, whereas cetirizine increased only cholesterol ester in liver, with a concomitant decrease in serum triglycerides by both antihistamines in wild-type mice. Antihistamines increased hepatic levels of conjugated bile acids in wild-type mice, with the effect being significant in fexofenadine-treated animals. The increase was associated with changes in the expression of organic anion transport polypeptide 1b2 and bile salt export pump. These results suggest that H1-antihistamines increase the progression of fatty liver disease in wild-type mice, and there seems to be an association between the severity of disease, presence of ApoE, and increase in hepatic bile acid levels.

  13. Wild-Type U2AF1 Antagonizes the Splicing Program Characteristic of U2AF1-Mutant Tumors and Is Required for Cell Survival

    PubMed Central

    Fei, Dennis Liang; Motowski, Hayley; Chatrikhi, Rakesh; Gao, Shaojian; Kielkopf, Clara L.; Varmus, Harold

    2016-01-01

    We have asked how the common S34F mutation in the splicing factor U2AF1 regulates alternative splicing in lung cancer, and why wild-type U2AF1 is retained in cancers with this mutation. A human lung epithelial cell line was genetically modified so that U2AF1S34F is expressed from one of the two endogenous U2AF1 loci. By altering levels of mutant or wild-type U2AF1 in this cell line and by analyzing published data on human lung adenocarcinomas, we show that S34F-associated changes in alternative splicing are proportional to the ratio of S34F:wild-type gene products and not to absolute levels of either the mutant or wild-type factor. Preferential recognition of specific 3′ splice sites in S34F-expressing cells is largely explained by differential in vitro RNA-binding affinities of mutant versus wild-type U2AF1 for those same 3′ splice sites. Finally, we show that lung adenocarcinoma cell lines bearing U2AF1 mutations do not require the mutant protein for growth in vitro or in vivo. In contrast, wild-type U2AF1 is required for survival, regardless of whether cells carry the U2AF1S34F allele. Our results provide mechanistic explanations of the magnitude of splicing changes observed in U2AF1-mutant cells and why tumors harboring U2AF1 mutations always retain an expressed copy of the wild-type allele. PMID:27776121

  14. Liposome-mediated transfection of wild-type P53 DNA into human prostate cancer cells is improved by low-frequency ultrasound combined with microbubbles

    PubMed Central

    BAI, WEN-KUN; ZHANG, WEI; HU, BING; YING, TAO

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a common type of cancer in elderly men. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of ultrasound exposure in combination with SonoVue microbubbles on liposome-mediated transfection of wild-type P53 genes into human prostate cancer cells. PC-3 human prostate cancer cells were exposed to ultrasound; duty cycle was controlled at 20% (2 sec on, 8 sec off) for 5 min with and without SonoVue microbubble echo-contrast agent using a digital sonifier (frequency, 21 kHz; intensity, 46 mW/cm2). The cells were divided into eight groups, as follows: Group A (SonoVue + wild-type P53), group B (ultrasound + wild-type P53), group C (SonoVue + ultrasound + wild-type P53), group D (liposome + wild-type P53), group E (liposome + SonoVue + wild-type P53), group F (liposome + wild-type P53 + ultrasound), group G (liposome + wild-type P53 + ultrasound + SonoVue) and the control group (wild-type P53). Following treatment, a hemocytometer was used to measure cell lysis, reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blotting were performed to detect P53 gene transfection efficiency, Cell Counting Kit-8 was employed to reveal cell proliferation and Annexin V/propidium iodide staining was used to determine cell apoptosis. Cell lysis was minimal in each group. Wild-type P53 gene and protein expression were significantly increased in the PC-3 cells in group G compared with the control and all other groups (P<0.01). Cell proliferation was significantly suppressed in group G compared with the control group and all other groups (P<0.01). Cell apoptosis levels in group G were significantly improved compared with the control group and all other groups (P<0.01). Thus, the results of the present study indicate that the use of low-frequency and low-energy ultrasound in combination with SonoVue microbubbles may be a potent physical method for increasing liposome gene delivery efficiency. PMID:27313702

  15. Wild-Type Measles Virus with the Hemagglutinin Protein of the Edmonston Vaccine Strain Retains Wild-Type Tropism in Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Nagata, Noriyo; Kato, Sei-ich; Ami, Yasushi; Suzaki, Yuriko; Suzuki, Tadaki; Sato, Yuko; Tsunetsugu-Yokota, Yasuko; Mori, Kazuyasu; Van Nguyen, Nguyen; Kimura, Hideki; Nagata, Kyosuke

    2012-01-01

    A major difference between vaccine and wild-type strains of measles virus (MV) in vitro is the wider cell specificity of vaccine strains, resulting from the receptor usage of the hemagglutinin (H) protein. Wild-type H proteins recognize the signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM) (CD150), which is expressed on certain cells of the immune system, whereas vaccine H proteins recognize CD46, which is ubiquitously expressed on all nucleated human and monkey cells, in addition to SLAM. To examine the effect of the H protein on the tropism and attenuation of MV, we generated enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-expressing recombinant wild-type MV strains bearing the Edmonston vaccine H protein (MV-EdH) and compared them to EGFP-expressing wild-type MV strains. In vitro, MV-EdH replicated in SLAM+ as well as CD46+ cells, including primary cell cultures from cynomolgus monkey tissues, whereas the wild-type MV replicated only in SLAM+ cells. However, in macaques, both wild-type MV and MV-EdH strains infected lymphoid and respiratory organs, and widespread infection of MV-EdH was not observed. Flow cytometric analysis indicated that SLAM+ lymphocyte cells were infected preferentially with both strains. Interestingly, EGFP expression of MV-EdH in tissues and lymphocytes was significantly weaker than that of the wild-type MV. Taken together, these results indicate that the CD46-binding activity of the vaccine H protein is important for determining the cell specificity of MV in vitro but not the tropism in vivo. They also suggest that the vaccine H protein attenuates MV growth in vivo. PMID:22238320

  16. Organizational Health and Student Achievement in Tennessee Middle Level Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Christopher L.; Buehler, Alison E.; Stein, William L.; Dalton, John E.; Robinson, Teresa R.; Anfara, Vincent A., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    Although the successful middle level school was designed to address both the affective and cognitive development of young adolescents (NMSA 2003), academic achievement is the outcome of paramount importance in the current political context of accountability, high-stakes testing, and the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001. In their efforts to reform,…

  17. Describing NAEP Achievement Levels with Multiple Domain Scores.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schulz, E. Matthew; Lee, Won-Chan

    This study was conducted to demonstrate the potential for using multiple domains to describe achievement levels in the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) mathematics test. Mathematics items from the NAEP grade 8 assessment for the year 2000 were used. Curriculum experts provided ratings of when the skills required to answer the…

  18. Research Study of the 1998 Civics NAEP Achievement Levels.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loomis, Susan Cooper

    In 1999 a validation study of the 1998 Civics Assessment of the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) was conducted, combining a similarity classification study and a booklet classification study. The rationale was that if the teachers who had participated in the 5-day achievement levels-setting process could not use the descriptions…

  19. Personality and Academic Achievement in Three Educational Levels.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goh, David S.; Moore, Charles M.

    This study was undertaken to examine the relationship between "Personality fitness" and academic achievement. One hundred seventy-five subjects from three educational levels--university, vocational technical institute, and high school--were administered the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire, the Raven's Advanced Progressive Matrices and an…

  20. Considerations in Using Learning Progressions to Inform Achievement Level Descriptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alonzo, Alicia C.

    2010-01-01

    In their article "Innovations in Setting Performance Standards for K-12 Test-Based Accountability," Kristen Huff and Barbara S. Plake (2010) lay out three preconditions for continued investment in standard-setting methodology and practice, all focused on the sound development and use of achievement level descriptors (ALDs). Among these…

  1. Measures of Discrimination Among Achievement Levels in Statistics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huberty, Carl J.; Smith, Douglas U.

    Eight discriminators were identified and data were obtained from the records of 80 graduate students who attained one of four achievement levels at the conclusion of a beginning course in educational statistics. Although the internal discriminatory power of the set of eight measures was very high, estimates of the true power were discouragingly…

  2. Beyond ORF: Student-Level Predictors of Reading Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canto, Angela I.; Proctor, Briley E.

    2013-01-01

    This study explored student-level predictors of reading achievement among third grade regular education students. Predictors included student demographics (sex and socioeconomic status (SES), using free and reduced lunch as proxy for SES), direct observations of reading skills (oral reading fluency (ORF) and word decoding skill (nonsense word…

  3. Comparison of growth and pubertal progression in wild type female rats with different bedding types

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Byung Ho; Kim, Shin-Hee; Jung, Kyung A; Kim, So Youn; Chung, Sung-Hoon; Park, Young Shil; Yoon, Kyung Lim

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Endocrine-disrupting chemicals interfere with the endocrine system and therefore affect growth and pubertal progression. The study aim was to compare the growth and pubertal progression in wild-type female rats with different bedding types. Methods Twenty 5-week-old female wild-type Sprague Dawley rats were randomly assigned to two groups with different bedding types: one group received wood shaving bedding, while a second group received corncob bedding. We determined crown-rump length and body weight as anthropometric measurements and assessed the serum growth hormone (GH) and estradiol levels. The gh1 mRNA expression levels were compared using quantitative real time transcription polymerase chain reaction. The estrous cycle was evaluated by vaginal smear. Results The anthropometric measurements were not significantly different between the two groups. The mean relative expression of the gh1 gene was lower in the corncob bedding group than that in the wood shaving group (P=0.768). Meanwhile serum GH and estradiol were increased in the wood shaving bedding group; however this difference was not statistically significant. The time to first estrus and the length of the estrous cycle were increased in the corncob bedding group; the proportion of normal estrous cycles was also decreased. These findings indicate irregularities in the estrous cycle. Conclusion Endocrine-disrupting chemicals in corncob bedding might be associated with time to first estrus and length of the estrous cycle. Therefore, the type of bedding should be considered as a factor affecting pubertal progression in rodents. PMID:25883928

  4. Structure and age-dependent development of the turkey liver: a comparative study of a highly selected meat-type and a wild-type turkey line.

    PubMed

    Hünigen, Hana; Mainzer, Kathleen; Hirschberg, Ruth M; Custodis, Pia; Gemeinhardt, Ole; Al Masri, Salah; Richardson, Kenneth C; Hafez, Hafez Mohamed; Plendl, Johanna

    2016-04-01

    In this study the macroscopic and microscopic structure of the liver of a fast growing, meat-type turkey line (British United turkeys BUT Big 6, n=25) and a wild-type turkey line (Wild Canadian turkey, n=48) were compared at the age of 4, 8, 12, 16, and 20 wk. Because the growth plates of long bones were still detectable in the 20-week-old wild-type turkeys, indicating immaturity, a group of 8 wild-type turkeys at the age of 24 wk was included in the original scope of the study. Over the term of the study, the body and liver weights of birds from the meat-type turkey line increased at a faster rate than those of the wild-type turkey line. However, the relative liver weight of the meat-type turkeys declined (from 2.7 to 0.9%) to a greater extent than that of the wild-type turkeys (from 2.8 to 1.9%), suggesting a mismatch in development between muscle weights and liver weights of the meat-type turkeys. Signs of high levels of fat storage in the liver were detected in both lines but were greater in the wild-type turkey line, suggesting a better feed conversion by the extreme-genotype birds i.e., meat-type birds. For the first time, this study presents morphologic data on the structure and arrangement of the lymphatic tissue within the healthy turkey liver, describing two different types of lymphatic aggregations within the liver parenchyma, i.e., aggregations with and without fibrous capsules. Despite differences during development, both adult meat-type and adult wild-type turkeys had similar numbers of lymphatic aggregations.

  5. Comparative genomics of wild type yeast strains unveils important genome diversity

    PubMed Central

    Carreto, Laura; Eiriz, Maria F; Gomes, Ana C; Pereira, Patrícia M; Schuller, Dorit; Santos, Manuel AS

    2008-01-01

    Background Genome variability generates phenotypic heterogeneity and is of relevance for adaptation to environmental change, but the extent of such variability in natural populations is still poorly understood. For example, selected Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains are variable at the ploidy level, have gene amplifications, changes in chromosome copy number, and gross chromosomal rearrangements. This suggests that genome plasticity provides important genetic diversity upon which natural selection mechanisms can operate. Results In this study, we have used wild-type S. cerevisiae (yeast) strains to investigate genome variation in natural and artificial environments. We have used comparative genome hybridization on array (aCGH) to characterize the genome variability of 16 yeast strains, of laboratory and commercial origin, isolated from vineyards and wine cellars, and from opportunistic human infections. Interestingly, sub-telomeric instability was associated with the clinical phenotype, while Ty element insertion regions determined genomic differences of natural wine fermentation strains. Copy number depletion of ASP3 and YRF1 genes was found in all wild-type strains. Other gene families involved in transmembrane transport, sugar and alcohol metabolism or drug resistance had copy number changes, which also distinguished wine from clinical isolates. Conclusion We have isolated and genotyped more than 1000 yeast strains from natural environments and carried out an aCGH analysis of 16 strains representative of distinct genotype clusters. Important genomic variability was identified between these strains, in particular in sub-telomeric regions and in Ty-element insertion sites, suggesting that this type of genome variability is the main source of genetic diversity in natural populations of yeast. The data highlights the usefulness of yeast as a model system to unravel intraspecific natural genome diversity and to elucidate how natural selection shapes the yeast genome

  6. Efficient quiescent infection of normal human diploid fibroblasts with wild-type herpes simplex virus type 1.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Robert; Walsh, Derek

    2008-10-01

    Quiescent infection of cultured cells with herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) provides an important, amenable means of studying the molecular mechanics of a nonproductive state that mimics key aspects of in vivo latency. To date, establishing high-multiplicity nonproductive infection of human cells with wild-type HSV-1 has proven challenging. Here, we describe simple culture conditions that established a cell state in normal human diploid fibroblasts that supported efficient quiescent infection using wild-type virus and exhibited many important properties of the in vivo latent state. Despite the efficient production of immediate early (IE) proteins ICP4 and ICP22, the latter remained unprocessed, and viral late gene products were only transiently and inefficiently produced. This low level of virus activity in cultures was rapidly suppressed as the nonproductive state was established. Entry into quiescence was associated with inefficient production of the viral trans-activating protein ICP0, and the accumulation of enlarged nuclear PML structures normally dispersed during productive infection. Lytic replication was rapidly and efficiently restored by exogenous expression of HSV-1 ICP0. These findings are in agreement with previous models in which quiescence was established with HSV mutants disrupted in their expression of IE gene products that included ICP0 and, importantly, provide a means to study cellular mechanisms that repress wild-type viral functions to prevent productive replication. We discuss this model in relation to existing systems and its potential as a simple tool to study the molecular mechanisms of quiescent infection in human cells using wild-type HSV-1.

  7. Cellular oxidative stress and the control of apoptosis by wild-type p53, cytotoxic compounds, and cytokines.

    PubMed Central

    Lotem, J; Peled-Kamar, M; Groner, Y; Sachs, L

    1996-01-01

    Apoptosis induced by wild-type p53 or cytotoxic compounds in myeloid leukemic cells can be inhibited by the cytokines interleukin 6, interleukin 3, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, and interferon gamma and by antioxidants. The antioxidants and cytokines showed a cooperative protective effect against induction of apoptosis. Cells with a higher intrinsic level of peroxide production showed a higher sensitivity to induction of apoptosis and required a higher cytokine concentration to inhibit apoptosis. Decreasing the intrinsic oxidative stress in cells by antioxidants thus inhibited apoptosis, whereas increasing this intrinsic stress by adding H2O2 enhanced apoptosis. Induction of apoptosis by wild-type p53 was not preceded by increased peroxide production or lipid peroxidation and the protective effect of cytokines was not associated with a decrease in these properties. The results indicate that the intrinsic degree of oxidative stress can regulate cell susceptibility to wild-type p53-dependent and p53-independent induction of apoptosis and the ability of cytokines to protect cells against apoptosis. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8799172

  8. Estimation of the wild-type minimum inhibitory concentration value distribution.

    PubMed

    Jaspers, Stijn; Aerts, Marc; Verbeke, Geert; Beloeil, Pierre-Alexandre

    2014-01-30

    Antimicrobial resistance has become one of the main public health burdens of the last decades, and monitoring the development and spread of non-wild-type isolates has therefore gained increased interest. Monitoring is performed based on the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values, which are collected through the application of dilution experiments. In order to account for the unobserved population heterogeneity of wild-type and non-wild-type isolates, mixture models are extremely useful. Instead of estimating the entire mixture globally, it was our major aim to provide an estimate for the wild-type first component only. The characteristics of this first component are not expected to change over time, once the wild-type population has been confidently identified for a given antimicrobial. With this purpose, we developed a new method based on the multinomial distribution, and we carry out a simulation study to study the properties of the new estimator. Because the new approach fits within the likelihood framework, we can compare distinct distributional assumptions in order to determine the most suitable distribution for the wild-type population. We determine the optimal parameters based on the AIC criterion, and attention is also paid to the model-averaged approach using the Akaike weights. The latter is thought to be very suitable to derive specific characteristics of the wild-type distribution and to determine limits for the wild-type MIC range. In this way, the new method provides an elegant means to compare distinct distributional assumptions and to quantify the wild-type MIC distribution of specific antibiotic-bacterium combinations.

  9. Steady state fluorescence studies of wild type recombinant cinnamoyl CoA reductase (Ll-CCRH1) and its active site mutants.

    PubMed

    Sonawane, Prashant; Vishwakarma, Rishi Kishore; Singh, Somesh; Gaikwad, Sushama; Khan, Bashir M

    2014-05-01

    Fluorescence quenching and time resolved fluorescence studies of wild type recombinant cinnamoyl CoA reductase (Ll-CCRH1), a multitryptophan protein from Leucaena leucocephala and 10 different active site mutants were carried out to investigate tryptophan environment. The enzyme showed highest affinity for feruloyl CoA (K(a)  = 3.72 × 10(5) M(-1)) over other CoA esters and cinnamaldehydes, as determined by fluorescence spectroscopy. Quenching of the fluorescence by acrylamide for wild type and active site mutants was collisional with almost 100% of the tryptophan fluorescence accessible under native condition and remained same after denaturation of protein with 6 M GdnHCl. In wild type Ll-CCRH1, the extent of quenching achieved with iodide (f(a) = 1.0) was significantly higher than cesium ions (f(a) = 0.33) suggesting more density of positive charge around surface of trp conformers under native conditions. Denaturation of wild type protein with 6 M GdnHCl led to significant increase in the quenching with cesium (f(a) = 0.54), whereas quenching with iodide ion was decreased (f(a) = 0.78), indicating reorientation of charge density around trp from positive to negative and heterogeneity in trp environment. The Stern-Volmer plots for wild type and mutants Ll-CCRH1 under native and denatured conditions, with cesium ion yielded biphasic quenching profiles. The extent of quenching for cesium and iodide ions under native and denatured conditions observed in active site mutants was significantly different from wild type Ll-CCRH1 under the same conditions. Thus, single substitution type mutations of active site residues showed heterogeneity in tryptophan microenvironment and differential degree of conformation of protein under native or denatured conditions. PMID:24322526

  10. Perturbation of Auxin Homeostasis by Overexpression of Wild-Type IAA15 Results in Impaired Stem Cell Differentiation and Gravitropism in Roots

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Da-Wei; Wang, Jing; Yuan, Ting-Ting; Hong, Li-Wei; Gao, Xiang; Lu, Ying-Tang

    2013-01-01

    Aux/IAAs interact with auxin response factors (ARFs) to repress their transcriptional activity in the auxin signaling pathway. Previous studies have focused on gain-of-function mutations of domain II and little is known about whether the expression level of wild-type Aux/IAAs can modulate auxin homeostasis. Here we examined the perturbation of auxin homeostasis by ectopic expression of wild-type IAA15. Root gravitropism and stem cell differentiation were also analyzed. The transgenic lines were less sensitive to exogenous auxin and exhibited low-auxin phenotypes including failures in gravity response and defects in stem cell differentiation. Overexpression lines also showed an increase in auxin concentration and reduced polar auxin transport. These results demonstrate that an alteration in the expression of wild-type IAA15 can disrupt auxin homeostasis. PMID:23472140

  11. First Demonstration of Positive Allosteric-like Modulation at the Human Wild Type Translocator Protein (TSPO).

    PubMed

    Narlawar, Rajeshwar; Werry, Eryn L; Scarf, Alana M; Hanani, Raphy; Chua, Sook Wern; King, Victoria A; Barron, Melissa L; Martins, Ralph N; Ittner, Lars M; Rendina, Louis M; Kassiou, Michael

    2015-11-12

    We show that changing the number and position of nitrogen atoms in the heteroatomic core of a pyrazolopyrimidine acetamide is sufficient to induce complex binding to wild type human TSPO. Only compounds with this complex binding profile lacked intrinsic effect on glioblastoma proliferation but positively modulated the antiproliferative effects of a synthetic TSPO ligand. To the best of our knowledge this is the first demonstration of allosteric-like interaction at the wild type human TSPO.

  12. Achieving network level privacy in Wireless Sensor Networks.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Riaz Ahmed; Jameel, Hassan; d'Auriol, Brian J; Lee, Heejo; Lee, Sungyoung; Song, Young-Jae

    2010-01-01

    Full network level privacy has often been categorized into four sub-categories: Identity, Route, Location and Data privacy. Achieving full network level privacy is a critical and challenging problem due to the constraints imposed by the sensor nodes (e.g., energy, memory and computation power), sensor networks (e.g., mobility and topology) and QoS issues (e.g., packet reach-ability and timeliness). In this paper, we proposed two new identity, route and location privacy algorithms and data privacy mechanism that addresses this problem. The proposed solutions provide additional trustworthiness and reliability at modest cost of memory and energy. Also, we proved that our proposed solutions provide protection against various privacy disclosure attacks, such as eavesdropping and hop-by-hop trace back attacks.

  13. Developmental Divergence of Sleep-Wake Patterns in Orexin Knockout and Wild-Type Mice

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Cassandra M.; Johnson, Eric D.; Shaw, Cynthia

    2008-01-01

    Narcolepsy, a disorder characterized by fragmented bouts of sleep and wakefulness during the day and night as well as cataplexy, has been linked in humans and non-human animals to the functional integrity of the orexinergic system. Adult orexin knockout mice and dogs with a mutation of the orexin receptor exhibit symptoms that mirror those seen in narcoleptic humans. As with narcolepsy, infant sleep-wake cycles in humans and rats are highly fragmented, with consolidated bouts of sleep and wakefulness developing gradually. Based on these common features of narcoleptics and infants, we hypothesized that the development of sleep-wake fragmentation in orexin knockout mice would be expressed as a developmental divergence between knockouts and wild-types, with the knockouts lagging behind the wild-types. We tested this hypothesis by recording the sleep-wake patterns of infant orexin knockout and wild-type mice across the first three postnatal weeks. Both knockouts and wild-types exhibited age-dependent, and therefore orexin-independent, quantitative and qualitative changes in sleep-wake patterning. At 3 weeks of age, however, by which time the sleep and wake bouts of the wild-types had consolidated further, the knockouts lagged behind the wild-types and exhibited significantly more bout fragmentation. These findings suggest the possibility that the fragmentation of behavioral states that characterizes narcolepsy in adults reflects reversion back toward the more fragmented sleep-wake patterns that characterize infancy. PMID:17284193

  14. Co-fibrillogenesis of Wild-type and D76N β2-Microglobulin

    PubMed Central

    Natalello, Antonino; Mangione, P. Patrizia; Giorgetti, Sofia; Porcari, Riccardo; Marchese, Loredana; Zorzoli, Irene; Relini, Annalisa; Ami, Diletta; Faravelli, Giulia; Valli, Maurizia; Stoppini, Monica; Doglia, Silvia M.; Bellotti, Vittorio; Raimondi, Sara

    2016-01-01

    The amyloidogenic variant of β2-microglobulin, D76N, can readily convert into genuine fibrils under physiological conditions and primes in vitro the fibrillogenesis of the wild-type β2-microglobulin. By Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy, we have demonstrated that the amyloid transformation of wild-type β2-microglobulin can be induced by the variant only after its complete fibrillar conversion. Our current findings are consistent with preliminary data in which we have shown a seeding effect of fibrils formed from D76N or the natural truncated form of β2-microglobulin lacking the first six N-terminal residues. Interestingly, the hybrid wild-type/variant fibrillar material acquired a thermodynamic stability similar to that of homogenous D76N β2-microglobulin fibrils and significantly higher than the wild-type homogeneous fibrils prepared at neutral pH in the presence of 20% trifluoroethanol. These results suggest that the surface of D76N β2-microglobulin fibrils can favor the transition of the wild-type protein into an amyloid conformation leading to a rapid integration into fibrils. The chaperone crystallin, which is a mild modulator of the lag phase of the variant fibrillogenesis, potently inhibits fibril elongation of the wild-type even once it is absorbed on D76N β2-microglobulin fibrils. PMID:26921323

  15. Dietary supplementation with ipriflavone decreases hepatic iron stores in wild type mice.

    PubMed

    Patchen, Bonnie; Koppe, Tiago; Cheng, Aaron; Seo, Young Ah; Wessling-Resnick, Marianne; Fraenkel, Paula G

    2016-09-01

    Hepcidin, a peptide produced in the liver, decreases intestinal iron absorption and macrophage iron release by causing degradation of the iron exporter, ferroportin. Because its levels are inappropriately low in patients with iron overload syndromes, hepcidin is a potential drug target. We previously conducted a chemical screen that revealed ipriflavone, an orally available small molecule, as a potent inducer of hepcidin expression. To evaluate ipriflavone's effect on iron homeostasis, we placed groups of 5-week old wild type or thalassemia intermedia (Hbb(Th3+/-)) mice on a soy-free, iron-sufficient diet, AIN-93G containing 220mg iron and 0-750mgipriflavone/kg of food for 50days. Ipriflavone 500mg/kg significantly reduced liver iron stores and intestinal ferroportin expression in WT mice, while increasing the ratio of hepcidin transcript levels to liver iron stores. Ipriflavone supplementation in Hbb(Th3+/-) mice failed to alleviate iron overload and was associated with a milder reduction in intestinal ferroportin and a failure to alter the ratio of hepcidin transcript levels to liver iron stores or splenic expression of the hepcidin-regulatory hormone, erythroferrone. These data suggest that dietary supplementation with ipriflavone alone would not be sufficient to treat iron overload in thalassemia intermedia. PMID:27519943

  16. Detailed conformation dynamics and activation process of wild type c-Abl and T315I mutant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Li-Jun; Zhao, Wen-Hua; Liu, Qian

    2014-10-01

    Bcr-Abl is an important target for therapy against chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) and acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL). The synergistic effect between myristyl pocket and the ATP pocket has been found. But its detailed information based on molecular level still has not been achieved. In this study, conventional molecular dynamics (CMD) and target molecular dynamics (TMD) simulations were performed to explore the effect of T315I mutation on dynamics and activation process of Abl containing the N-terminal cap (Ncap). The CMD simulation results reveal the increasing flexibility of ATP pocket in kinase domain (KD) after T315I mutation which confirms the disability of ATP-pocket inhibitors to the Abl-T315I mutant. On the contrary, the T315I mutation decreased the flexibility of remote helix αI which suggests the synergistic effect between them. The mobility of farther regions containing Ncap, SH3, SH2 and SH2-KD linker were not affected by T315I mutation. The TMD simulation results show that the activation process of wild type Abl and Abl-T315I mutant experienced global conformation change. Their differences were elucidated by the activation motion of subsegments including A-loop, P-loop and Ncap. Besides, the T315I mutation caused decreasing energy barrier and increasing intermediate number in activation process, which results easier activation process. The TMD and CMD results indicate that a drug targeting only the ATP pocket is not enough to inhibit the Abl-T315I mutant. An effective way to inhibit the abnormal activity of Abl-T315I mutant is to combine the ATP-pocket inhibitors with inhibitors binding at non-ATP pockets mainly related to Ncap, SH2-KD linker and myristyl pocket.

  17. Drought stress-induced compositional changes in tolerant transgenic rice and its wild type.

    PubMed

    Nam, Kyong-Hee; Kim, Do-Young; Shin, Hee Jae; Nam, Ki Jung; An, Joo Hee; Pack, In-Soon; Park, Jung-Ho; Jeong, Soon-Chun; Kim, Ho Bang; Kim, Chang-Gi

    2014-06-15

    Comparing well-watered versus deficit conditions, we evaluated the chemical composition of grains harvested from wild-type (WT) and drought-tolerant, transgenic rice (Oryza sativa L.). The latter had been developed by inserting AtCYP78A7, which encodes a cytochrome P450 protein. Two transgenic Lines, '10B-5' and '18A-4', and the 'Hwayoung' WT were grown under a rainout shelter. After the harvested grains were polished, their levels of key components, including proximates, amino acids, fatty acids, minerals and vitamins were analysed to determine the effect of watering system and genotype. Drought treatment significantly influenced the levels of some nutritional components in both transgenic and WT grains. In particular, the amounts of lignoceric acid and copper in the WT decreased by 12.6% and 39.5%, respectively, by drought stress, whereas those of copper and potassium in the transgenics rose by 88.1-113.3% and 10.4-11.9%, respectively, under water-deficit conditions.

  18. Resistance and gain-of-resistance phenotypes in cancers harboring wild-type p53

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Rivera, Michelle; Siddik, Zahid H.

    2012-01-01

    Chemotherapy is the bedrock for the clinical management of cancer, and the tumor suppressor p53 has a central role in this therapeutic modality. This protein facilitates favorable antitumor drug response through a variety of key cellular functions, including cell cycle arrest, senescence, and apoptosis. These functions essentially cease once p53 becomes mutated, as occurs in ~50% of cancers, and some p53 mutants even exhibit gain-of-function effects, which lead to greater drug resistance. However, it is becoming increasingly evident that resistance is also seen in cancers harboring wild-type p53. In this review, we discuss how wild-type p53 is inactivated to render cells resistant to antitumor drugs. This may occur through various mechanisms, including an increase in proteasomal degradation, defects in post-translational modification, and downstream defects in p53 target genes. We also consider evidence that the resistance seen in wild-type p53 cancers can be substantially greater than that seen in mutant p53 cancers, and this poses a far greater challenge for efforts to design strategies that increase drug response in resistant cancers already primed with wild-type p53. Because the mechanisms contributing to this wild-type p53 “gain-of-resistance” phenotype are largely unknown, a concerted research effort is needed to identify the underlying basis for the occurrence of this phenotype and, in parallel, to explore the possibility that the phenotype may be a product of wild-type p53 gain-of-function effects. Such studies are essential to lay the foundation for a rational therapeutic approach in the treatment of resistant wild-type p53 cancers. PMID:22227014

  19. S-palmitoylation regulates biogenesis of core glycosylated wild-type and F508del CFTR in a post-ER compartment.

    PubMed

    McClure, Michelle L; Wen, Hui; Fortenberry, James; Hong, Jeong S; Sorscher, Eric J

    2014-04-15

    Defects in CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator) maturation are central to the pathogenesis of CF (cystic fibrosis). Palmitoylation serves as a key regulator of maturational processing in other integral membrane proteins, but has not been tested previously for functional effects on CFTR. In the present study, we used metabolic labelling to confirm that wild-type and F508del CFTR are palmitoylated, and show that blocking palmitoylation with the pharmacologic inhibitor 2-BP (2-bromopalmitate) decreases steady-state levels of both wild-type and low temperature-corrected F508del CFTR, disrupts post-ER (endoplasmic reticulum) maturation and reduces ion channel function at the cell surface. PATs (protein acyl transferases) comprise a family of 23 gene products that contain a DHHC motif and mediate palmitoylation. Recombinant expression of specific PATs led to increased levels of CFTR protein and enhanced palmitoylation as judged by Western blot and metabolic labelling. Specifically, we show that DHHC-7 (i) increases steady-state levels of wild-type and F508del CFTR band B, (ii) interacts preferentially with the band B glycoform, and (iii) augments radiolabelling by [3H]palmitic acid. Interestingly, immunofluorescence revealed that DHHC-7 also sequesters the F508del protein to a post-ER (Golgi) compartment. Our findings point to the importance of palmitoylation during wild-type and F508del CFTR trafficking.

  20. A multiplex nested RT-PCR for the detection and differentiation of wild-type viruses from C-strain vaccine of classical swine fever virus.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Zhao, Jian-Jun; Li, Na; Shi, Zixue; Cheng, Dan; Zhu, Qing-Hu; Tu, Changchun; Tong, Guang-Zhi; Qiu, Hua-Ji

    2007-07-01

    A multiplex nested RT-PCR (RT-nPCR) was developed for the detection and differentiation of classical swine fever virus (CSFV). A fragment of 447 or 343 bp was amplified from the genomic RNA of C-strain or virulent Shimen strain, respectively, and two fragments of 447 and 343 bp were simultaneously amplified from the mixed samples of C-strain and Shimen. When detecting several wild-type isolates representative of different subgroups (1.1, 2.1, 2.2, and 2.3) circulating in Mainland China and samples from pigs experimentally infected with Shimen strain, the RT-nPCR resulted in an amplification pattern similar to Shimen. No amplification was achieved for uninfected cells, or cells infected with bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), and other viruses of porcine origin. The RT-nPCR was able to detect as little as 0.04 pg of CSFV RNA. The restrictive fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) demonstrated unique patterns of wild-type viruses and C-strain. Among the 133 field samples, 42 were tested to contain wild-type viruses and 18 showing presence of C-strain. The RT-nPCR can be used to detect and differentiate pigs infected with wild-type CSFV from those vaccinated with C-strain vaccine, thus minimizing the risk of culling vaccinates during outbreaks.

  1. How to achieve high-level expression of microbial enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Long; Yang, Haiquan; Shin, Hyun-dong; Chen, Rachel R.; Li, Jianghua; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian

    2013-01-01

    Microbial enzymes have been used in a large number of fields, such as chemical, agricultural and biopharmaceutical industries. The enzyme production rate and yield are the main factors to consider when choosing the appropriate expression system for the production of recombinant proteins. Recombinant enzymes have been expressed in bacteria (e.g., Escherichia coli, Bacillus and lactic acid bacteria), filamentous fungi (e.g., Aspergillus) and yeasts (e.g., Pichia pastoris). The favorable and very advantageous characteristics of these species have resulted in an increasing number of biotechnological applications. Bacterial hosts (e.g., E. coli) can be used to quickly and easily overexpress recombinant enzymes; however, bacterial systems cannot express very large proteins and proteins that require post-translational modifications. The main bacterial expression hosts, with the exception of lactic acid bacteria and filamentous fungi, can produce several toxins which are not compatible with the expression of recombinant enzymes in food and drugs. However, due to the multiplicity of the physiological impacts arising from high-level expression of genes encoding the enzymes and expression hosts, the goal of overproduction can hardly be achieved, and therefore, the yield of recombinant enzymes is limited. In this review, the recent strategies used for the high-level expression of microbial enzymes in the hosts mentioned above are summarized and the prospects are also discussed. We hope this review will contribute to the development of the enzyme-related research field. PMID:23686280

  2. Brucella abortus ΔrpoE1 confers protective immunity against wild type challenge in a mouse model of brucellosis.

    PubMed

    Willett, Jonathan W; Herrou, Julien; Czyż, Daniel M; Cheng, Jason X; Crosson, Sean

    2016-09-30

    The Brucella abortus general stress response (GSR) system regulates activity of the alternative sigma factor, σ(E1), which controls transcription of approximately 100 genes and is required for persistence in a BALB/c mouse chronic infection model. We evaluated the host response to infection by a B. abortus strain lacking σ(E1) (ΔrpoE1), and identified pathological and immunological features that distinguish ΔrpoE1-infected mice from wild-type (WT), and that correspond with clearance of ΔrpoE1 from the host. ΔrpoE1 infection was indistinguishable from WT in terms of splenic bacterial burden, inflammation and histopathology up to 6weeks post-infection. However, Brucella-specific serum IgG levels in ΔrpoE1-infected mice were 5 times higher than WT by 4weeks post-infection, and remained significantly higher throughout the course of a 12-week infection. Total IgG and Brucella-specific IgG levels peaked strongly in ΔrpoE1-infected mice at 6weeks, which correlated with reduced splenomegaly and bacterial burden relative to WT-infected mice. Given the difference in immune response to infection with wild-type and ΔrpoE1, we tested whether ΔrpoE1 confers protective immunity to wild-type challenge. Mice immunized with ΔrpoE1 completely resisted WT infection and had significantly higher serum titers of Brucella-specific IgG, IgG2a and IFN-γ after WT challenge relative to age-matched naïve mice. We conclude that immunization of BALB/c mice with the B. abortus GSR pathway mutant, ΔrpoE1, elicits an adaptive immune response that confers significant protective immunity against WT infection.

  3. De novo Comparative Transcriptome Analysis of Acremonium chrysogenum: High-Yield and Wild-Type Strains of Cephalosporin C Producer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yan; Xie, Liping; Gong, Guihua; Zhang, Wei; Zhu, Baoquan; Hu, Youjia

    2014-01-01

    β-lactam antibiotics are widely used in clinic. Filamentous fungus Acremonium chrysogenum is an important industrial fungus for the production of CPC, one of the major precursors of β-lactam antibiotics. Although its fermentation yield has been bred significantly over the past decades, little is known regarding molecular changes between the industrial strain and the wild type strain. This limits the possibility to improve CPC production further by molecular breeding. Comparative transcriptome is a powerful tool to understand the molecular mechanisms of CPC industrial high yield producer compared to wild type. A total of 57 million clean sequencing reads with an average length of 100 bp were generated from Illumina sequencing platform. 22,878 sequences were assembled. Among the assembled unigenes, 9502 were annotated and 1989 annotated sequences were assigned to 121 pathways by searching against the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway (KEGG) database. Furthermore, we compared the transcriptome differences between a high-yield and a wild-type strain during fermentation. A total of 4329 unigenes with significantly different transcription level were identified, among which 1737 were up-regulated and 2592 were down-regulated. 24 pathways were subsequently determined which involve glycerolipid metabolism, galactose metabolism, and pyrimidine metabolism. We also examined the transcription levels of 18 identified genes, including 11 up-regulated genes and 7 down-regulated genes using reverse transcription quantitative -PCR (RT-qPCR). The results of RT-qPCR were consistent with the Illumina sequencing. In this study, the Illumina sequencing provides the most comprehensive sequences for gene expression profile of Acremonium chrysogenum and allows de novo transcriptome assembly while lacking genome information. Comparative analysis of RNA-seq data reveals the complexity of the transcriptome in the fermentation of different yield strains. This is an important

  4. HPLC-MS/MS Analyses Show That the Near-Starchless aps1 and pgm Leaves Accumulate Wild Type Levels of ADPglucose: Further Evidence for the Occurrence of Important ADPglucose Biosynthetic Pathway(s) Alternative to the pPGI-pPGM-AGP Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, Francisco José; Li, Jun; Almagro, Goizeder; Montero, Manuel; Pujol, Pablo; Galarza, Regina; Kaneko, Kentaro; Oikawa, Kazusato; Wada, Kaede; Mitsui, Toshiaki; Pozueta-Romero, Javier

    2014-01-01

    In leaves, it is widely assumed that starch is the end-product of a metabolic pathway exclusively taking place in the chloroplast that (a) involves plastidic phosphoglucomutase (pPGM), ADPglucose (ADPG) pyrophosphorylase (AGP) and starch synthase (SS), and (b) is linked to the Calvin-Benson cycle by means of the plastidic phosphoglucose isomerase (pPGI). This view also implies that AGP is the sole enzyme producing the starch precursor molecule, ADPG. However, mounting evidence has been compiled pointing to the occurrence of important sources, other than the pPGI-pPGM-AGP pathway, of ADPG. To further explore this possibility, in this work two independent laboratories have carried out HPLC-MS/MS analyses of ADPG content in leaves of the near-starchless pgm and aps1 mutants impaired in pPGM and AGP, respectively, and in leaves of double aps1/pgm mutants grown under two different culture conditions. We also measured the ADPG content in wild type (WT) and aps1 leaves expressing in the plastid two different ADPG cleaving enzymes, and in aps1 leaves expressing in the plastid GlgC, a bacterial AGP. Furthermore, we measured the ADPG content in ss3/ss4/aps1 mutants impaired in starch granule initiation and chloroplastic ADPG synthesis. We found that, irrespective of their starch contents, pgm and aps1 leaves, WT and aps1 leaves expressing in the plastid ADPG cleaving enzymes, and aps1 leaves expressing in the plastid GlgC accumulate WT ADPG content. In clear contrast, ss3/ss4/aps1 leaves accumulated ca. 300 fold-more ADPG than WT leaves. The overall data showed that, in Arabidopsis leaves, (a) there are important ADPG biosynthetic pathways, other than the pPGI-pPGM-AGP pathway, (b) pPGM and AGP are not major determinants of intracellular ADPG content, and (c) the contribution of the chloroplastic ADPG pool to the total ADPG pool is low. PMID:25133777

  5. Identifying the genome-wide genetic variation between precocious trifoliate orange and its wild type and developing new markers for genetics research

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jin-Zhi; Liu, Sheng-Rui; Hu, Chun-Gen

    2016-01-01

    To increase our understanding of the genes involved in flowering in citrus, we performed genome resequencing of an early flowering trifoliate orange mutant (Poncirus trifoliata L. Raf.) and its wild type. At the genome level, 3,932,628 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), 1,293,383 insertion/deletion polymorphisms (InDels), and 52,135 structural variations were identified between the mutant and its wild type based on the citrus reference genome. Based on integrative analysis of resequencing and transcriptome analysis, 233,998 SNPs and 75,836 InDels were also identified between the mutant and its wild type at the transcriptional level. Also, 272 citrus homologous flowering-time transcripts containing genetic variation were also identified. Gene Ontology and Kyoto Encyclopaedia of Genes and Genomes annotation revealed that the transcripts containing the mutant- and the wild-type-specific InDel were involved in diverse biological processes and molecular function. Among these transcripts, there were 131 transcripts that were expressed differently in the two genotypes. When 268 selected InDels were tested on 32 genotypes of the three genera of Rutaceae for the genetic diversity assessment, these InDel-based markers showed high transferability. This work provides important information that will allow a better understanding of the citrus genome and that will be helpful for dissecting the genetic basis of important traits in citrus. PMID:27106267

  6. Identifying the genome-wide genetic variation between precocious trifoliate orange and its wild type and developing new markers for genetics research.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jin-Zhi; Liu, Sheng-Rui; Hu, Chun-Gen

    2016-08-01

    To increase our understanding of the genes involved in flowering in citrus, we performed genome resequencing of an early flowering trifoliate orange mutant (Poncirus trifoliata L. Raf.) and its wild type. At the genome level, 3,932,628 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), 1,293,383 insertion/deletion polymorphisms (InDels), and 52,135 structural variations were identified between the mutant and its wild type based on the citrus reference genome. Based on integrative analysis of resequencing and transcriptome analysis, 233,998 SNPs and 75,836 InDels were also identified between the mutant and its wild type at the transcriptional level. Also, 272 citrus homologous flowering-time transcripts containing genetic variation were also identified. Gene Ontology and Kyoto Encyclopaedia of Genes and Genomes annotation revealed that the transcripts containing the mutant- and the wild-type-specific InDel were involved in diverse biological processes and molecular function. Among these transcripts, there were 131 transcripts that were expressed differently in the two genotypes. When 268 selected InDels were tested on 32 genotypes of the three genera of Rutaceae for the genetic diversity assessment, these InDel-based markers showed high transferability. This work provides important information that will allow a better understanding of the citrus genome and that will be helpful for dissecting the genetic basis of important traits in citrus. PMID:27106267

  7. A positively gravitropic mutant mirrors the wild-type protonemal response in the moss Ceratodon purpureus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, T. A.; Cove, D. J.; Sack, F. D.

    1997-01-01

    Wild-type Ceratodon purpureus (Hedw.) Brid. protonemata grow up in the dark by negative gravitropism. When upright wild-type protonemata are reoriented 90 degrees, they temporarily grow down soon after reorientation ("initial reversal") and also prior to cytokinesis ("mitotic reversal"). A positively gravitropic mutant designated wrong- way response (wwr-1) has been isolated by screening ultraviolet light-mutagenized Ceratodon protonemata. Protonemata of wwr-l reoriented from the vertical to the horizontal grow down with kinetics comparable to those of the wild-type. Protonemata of wwr-1 also show initial and mitotic reversals where they temporarily grow up. Thus, the direction of gravitropism, initial reversal, and mitotic reversal are coordinated though each are opposite in wwr-1 compared to the wild-type. Normal plastid zonation is still maintained in dark-grown wwr-1 apical cells, but the plastids are more numerous and plastid sedimentation is more pronounced. In addition, wwr-1 apical cells are wider and the tips greener than in the wild-type. These data suggest that a functional WWR gene product is not necessary for the establishment of some gravitropic polarity, for gravitropism, or for the coordination of the reversals. Thus, the WWR protein may normally transduce information about cell orientation.

  8. A positively gravitropic mutant mirrors the wild-type protonemal response in the moss Ceratodon purpureus.

    PubMed

    Wagner, T A; Cove, D J; Sack, F D

    1997-06-01

    Wild-type Ceratodon purpureus (Hedw.) Brid. protonemata grow up in the dark by negative gravitropism. When upright wild-type protonemata are reoriented 90 degrees, they temporarily grow down soon after reorientation ("initial reversal") and also prior to cytokinesis ("mitotic reversal"). A positively gravitropic mutant designated wrong- way response (wwr-1) has been isolated by screening ultraviolet light-mutagenized Ceratodon protonemata. Protonemata of wwr-l reoriented from the vertical to the horizontal grow down with kinetics comparable to those of the wild-type. Protonemata of wwr-1 also show initial and mitotic reversals where they temporarily grow up. Thus, the direction of gravitropism, initial reversal, and mitotic reversal are coordinated though each are opposite in wwr-1 compared to the wild-type. Normal plastid zonation is still maintained in dark-grown wwr-1 apical cells, but the plastids are more numerous and plastid sedimentation is more pronounced. In addition, wwr-1 apical cells are wider and the tips greener than in the wild-type. These data suggest that a functional WWR gene product is not necessary for the establishment of some gravitropic polarity, for gravitropism, or for the coordination of the reversals. Thus, the WWR protein may normally transduce information about cell orientation. PMID:11541791

  9. Profile of Cytokines and Chemokines Triggered by Wild-Type Strains of Rabies Virus in Mice.

    PubMed

    Appolinário, Camila Michele; Allendorf, Susan Dora; Peres, Marina Gea; Ribeiro, Bruna Devidé; Fonseca, Clóvis R; Vicente, Acácia Ferreira; Antunes, João Marcelo A de Paula; Megid, Jane

    2016-02-01

    Rabies is a lethal infectious disease that causes 55,000 human deaths per year and is transmitted by various mammalian species, such as dogs and bats. The host immune response is essential for avoiding viral progression and promoting viral clearance. Cytokines and chemokines are crucial in the development of an immediate antiviral response; the rabies virus (RABV) attempts to evade this immune response. The virus's capacity for evasion is correlated with its pathogenicity and the host's inflammatory response, with highly pathogenic strains being the most efficient at hijacking the host's defense mechanisms and thereby decreasing inflammation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the expression of a set of cytokine and chemokine genes that are related to the immune response in the brains of mice inoculated intramuscularly or intracerebrally with two wild-type strains of RABV, one from dog and the other from vampire bat. The results demonstrated that the gene expression profile is intrinsic to the specific rabies variant. The prompt production of cytokines and chemokines seems to be more important than their levels of expression for surviving a rabies infection. PMID:26711511

  10. Profile of Cytokines and Chemokines Triggered by Wild-Type Strains of Rabies Virus in Mice.

    PubMed

    Appolinário, Camila Michele; Allendorf, Susan Dora; Peres, Marina Gea; Ribeiro, Bruna Devidé; Fonseca, Clóvis R; Vicente, Acácia Ferreira; Antunes, João Marcelo A de Paula; Megid, Jane

    2016-02-01

    Rabies is a lethal infectious disease that causes 55,000 human deaths per year and is transmitted by various mammalian species, such as dogs and bats. The host immune response is essential for avoiding viral progression and promoting viral clearance. Cytokines and chemokines are crucial in the development of an immediate antiviral response; the rabies virus (RABV) attempts to evade this immune response. The virus's capacity for evasion is correlated with its pathogenicity and the host's inflammatory response, with highly pathogenic strains being the most efficient at hijacking the host's defense mechanisms and thereby decreasing inflammation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the expression of a set of cytokine and chemokine genes that are related to the immune response in the brains of mice inoculated intramuscularly or intracerebrally with two wild-type strains of RABV, one from dog and the other from vampire bat. The results demonstrated that the gene expression profile is intrinsic to the specific rabies variant. The prompt production of cytokines and chemokines seems to be more important than their levels of expression for surviving a rabies infection.

  11. Extracellular enzyme activities during lignocellulose degradation by Streptomyces spp. : a comparative study of wild-type and genetically manipulated strains

    SciTech Connect

    Ramachandra, M.; Crawford, D.L.; Pometto, A.L. III

    1987-12-01

    The wild-type ligninolytic actinomycete Streptomyces viridosporus T7A and two genetically manipulated strains with enhanced abilities to produce a water-soluble lignin degradation intermediate, an acid-precipitable polymeric lignin (APPL), were grown on lignocellulose in solid-state fermentation cultures. Culture filtrates were periodically collected, analyzed for APPL, and assayed for extracellular lignocellulose-catabolizing enzyme activities. Two APPL-overproducing strains, UV irradiation mutant T7A-81 and protoplast fusion recombinant SR-10, had higher and longer persisting peroxidase, esterase, and endoglucanase activities than did the wild-type strain T7A. Results implicated one or more of these enzymes in lignin solubilization. Only mutant T7A-81 had higher xylanase activity than the wild type. The peroxidase was induced by both lignocellulose and APPL. This extracellular enzyme has some similarities to previously described ligninases in fungi. This is the first report of such an enzyme in Streptomyces spp. Four peroxidase isozymes were present, and all catalyzed the oxidation of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine, while one also catalyzed hydrogen peroxide-dependent oxidation of homoprotocatechuic acid and caffeic acid. Three constitutive esterase isozymes were produced which differed in substrate specificity toward ..cap alpha..-naphthyl acetate and ..cap alpha..-naphthyl butyrate. Three endoglucanase bands, which also exhibited a low level of xylanase activity, were identified on polyacrylamide gels as was one xylanase-specific band. There were no major differences in the isoenzymes produced by the different strains. The probable role of each enzyme in lignocellulose degradation is discussed.

  12. E2 Ubiquitin-conjugating Enzyme, UBE2C Gene, Is Reciprocally Regulated by Wild-type and Gain-of-Function Mutant p53.

    PubMed

    Bajaj, Swati; Alam, Sk Kayum; Roy, Kumar Singha; Datta, Arindam; Nath, Somsubhra; Roychoudhury, Susanta

    2016-07-01

    Spindle assembly checkpoint governs proper chromosomal segregation during mitosis to ensure genomic stability. At the cellular level, this event is tightly regulated by UBE2C, an E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme that donates ubiquitin to the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome. This, in turn, facilitates anaphase-onset by ubiquitin-mediated degradation of mitotic substrates. UBE2C is an important marker of chromosomal instability and has been associated with malignant growth. However, the mechanism of its regulation is largely unexplored. In this study, we report that UBE2C is transcriptionally activated by the gain-of-function (GOF) mutant p53, although it is transcriptionally repressed by wild-type p53. We showed that wild-type p53-mediated inhibition of UBE2C is p21-E2F4-dependent and GOF mutant p53-mediated transactivation of UBE2C is NF-Y-dependent. We further explored that DNA damage-induced wild-type p53 leads to spindle assembly checkpoint arrest by repressing UBE2C, whereas mutant p53 causes premature anaphase exit by increasing UBE2C expression in the presence of 5-fluorouracil. Identification of UBE2C as a target of wild-type and GOF mutant p53 further highlights the contribution of p53 in regulation of spindle assembly checkpoint.

  13. Regulation of the rab17 gene promoter in transgenic Arabidopsis wild-type, ABA-deficient and ABA-insensitive mutants.

    PubMed

    Vilardell, J; Martínez-Zapater, J M; Goday, A; Arenas, C; Pagès, M

    1994-02-01

    The abscisic acid-responsive gene rab17 is induced during maize embryo maturation and in vegetative tissues under water stress conditions. To investigate how ABA is involved in the induction of the rab17 gene, we present here a genetic approach to analyse the transcriptional regulation of the 1.3 kb rab17 promoter fragment in transgenic wild-type Arabidopsis and mutants which are deficient (aba) and insensitive (abi1, abi2 and abi3) to ABA. During seed development the rab17 promoter fragment confers similar temporal and spatial regulation on the reporter gene GUS, both in transgenic wild-type and ABA-deficient and ABA-insensitive mutants. The rab17 promoter was only active in embryo and endosperm during late seed development, although the ABA-deficient embryo mutant showed a reduction in the level of GUS activity. During germination rab17 promoter activity decreases, and GUS activity is not enhanced by water stress in transgenic wild-type and mutant plants. In contrast, transcription of the Arabidopsis endogenous rab gene is stimulated by water stress, both in wild-type and ABA-insensitive mutants. Our data suggest that different molecular mechanisms mediate seed-specific expression and ABA water stress induction of the rab17 gene and indicate strong conservation of the seed-specific regulatory mechanism for rab genes in monocot and dicot plants.

  14. Lung-targeted expression of the c-Raf-1 kinase in transgenic mice exposes a novel oncogenic character of the wild-type protein.

    PubMed

    Kerkhoff, E; Fedorov, L M; Siefken, R; Walter, A O; Papadopoulos, T; Rapp, U R

    2000-04-01

    The c-Raf-1 kinase is a downstream effector of Ras signaling. Both proteins are highly oncogenic when they are mutationally activated, but only the Ras GTPase is frequently mutated in naturally occurring tumors. Although the c-Raf-1 protein was found to be amplified in different lung cancer cell lines, overexpression of the wild-type c-Raf-1 protein was shown to be insufficient to transform cultured cells. Here we have addressed the question of whether overexpression of the wild-type c-Raf-1 kinase can induce lung cancer in mice. We show that lung-targeted expression of oncogenically activated or wild-type c-Raf-1 proteins induces morphologically indistinguishable lung adenomas in transgenic mice. Compared with mice transgenic for the activated c-Raf-1-BxB, tumor development is delayed and occurs at a lower incidence in wild-type c-Raf-1 transgenic mice. Our studies show that the c-Raf-1 expression level is a critical parameter in tumor development and should be analyzed in more detail to evaluate its potential in the induction of cancer.

  15. Transcriptional repression in normal human keratinocytes by wild-type and mutant p53.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Salas, L M; Velazquez, A; Lopez-Bayghen, E; Woodworth, C D; Garrido, E; Gariglio, P; DiPaolo, J A

    1995-05-01

    Wild-type p53 is a nuclear phosphoprotein that inhibits cell proliferation and represses transcriptionally most TATA box-containing promoters in transformed or tumor-derived cell lines. This study demonstrates that p53 alters transcription of the long control region (LCR) of human papillomavirus type 18 (HPV-18). Wild-type and mutant p53 143Val to Ala repressed the HPV-18 LCR promoter in normal human keratinocytes, the natural host cell for HPV infections. Repression by wild-type p53 was also observed in C-33A cells and in an HPV-16-immortalized cell line with an inducible wild-type p53. However, when C-33A cells were cotransfected with the HPV-18 LCR and mutant 143Val to Ala, repression did not occur. Mutant p53 135Cys to Ser did not induce repression in either normal human keratinocytes or in the C-33A line; although like 143Val to Ala, it is thought to affect the DNA binding activity of the wild-type protein. The ability of mutant p53 143Val to Ala to inactivate the HPV early promoter in normal cells (by approximately 60% reduction) suggests that this mutant may be able to associate with wild-type p53 and interact with TATA box-binding proteins. Therefore, these results demonstrate that the transcriptional activities of p53 mutants may be dependent upon the cell type assayed and the form of its endogenous p53. Furthermore, normal human keratinocytes represent an alternative model for determining the activities of p53 mutants.

  16. Induction of lytic pathways in T cell clones derived from wild-type or protein tyrosine kinase Fyn mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Lancki, D W; Fields, P; Qian, D; Fitch, F W

    1995-08-01

    The OVA-reactive CD4+ Th1 clones and alloreactive CD8+ clones derived from wild-type or fyn-/- mice serve as model systems which have allowed us to investigate several aspects of the molecular events associated with T cell-mediated cytotoxicity, including 1) the differential utilization of two distinct cytolytic pathways by CD4+ Th1 clones and CD8+ CTL, 2) a comparison of the pathways of lysis induced by stimulation of the TCR or by alternative stimuli, 3) the requirement of Fyn for derivation of antigen-specific T-cell clones having properties of CD4+ Th1 and CD8+ CTL cells 4) the differential requirement of Fyn in the induction of responses by TCR and the alternative stimuli. Stimulation through the TCR, either by APC bearing relevant antigen or by immobilized anti-CD3 mAb, resulted in comparable levels of target cell lysis by clones from both wild-type and fyn-/- mice. These clones also utilize the Fas pathway to lyse target cells. Thus, Fyn does not appear to be required for expression of the Fas pathway when triggered through the TCR. In contrast, lysis of target cells by T-cell clones lacking Fyn was deficient when stimulated through Thy-1 or Ly-6C (using mAb) or with Con A or phorbol ester as compared to clones derived from wild-type mice. The basis for the defect in response to stimulation through the GPI-linked molecules appears to be a signaling defect which affects all of the functional responses we measured, while the defect in response to Con A stimulation appears to affect lysis but not lymphokine production. Thus, Fyn expression is selectively required for efficient activation of the Fas pathway of lysis through Thy-1, Ly-6C, and by Con A or phorbol ester in these T-cell clones. CD8+ clones derived from fyn-/- mutant mice, like clones derived from wild-type mice, display antigen-specific lysis, and appear to express perforin message and perforin protein. A Ca(++)-dependent (presumably perforin/exocytosis) component and Fas component of lysis was

  17. Events Surrounding the Early Development of Euglena Chloroplasts: 14. Biosynthesis of Cytochrome c-552 in Wild Type and Mutant Cells.

    PubMed

    Freyssinet, G; Harris, G C; Nasatir, M; Schiff, J A

    1979-05-01

    Lack of a suitable assay has thwarted attempts to measure cytochrome c-552 in dark-grown wild type cells of Euglena gracilis var. bacillaris in mutants and in other situations where the concentrations are low. Purification methods are described based on electrofocusing which provide a cytochrome c-552 preparation homogeneous enough to elicit a single reactive antibody in rabbits; this antibody is then used as a specific and sensitive assay for cytochrome c-552. Dark-grown cells of wild type and of mutants O(1)BS, O(2)BX, G(1)BU and P(1)BXL (which make normal sized chloroplasts with abnormal internal structure in the light) have 0.02 to 0.1 x 10(-11) micromoles of cytochrome c-552 per cell, 10 to 150 times less than light-grown cells. Light-grown cells of these mutants and of wild type show a ratio of chlorophyll to cytochrome of about 300 (mole to mole). Cytochrome c-552 is undetectable in dark-grown Y(1)BXD, Y(3)BUD, and W(34)ZUD which cannot carry plastid development beyond the proplastid in light; the light-grown cells of these mutants have levels of cytochrome similar to or lower than dark-grown wild type cells. Cytochrome c-552 is undetectable in light- and dark-grown mutants in which plastid DNA is undetectable (such as Y(2)BUL, W(3)BUL, W(8)BHL, and W(10)BSmL) consistent with the view, but not proving, that this molecule may be coded, at least in part, in plastid DNA. During light-induced chloroplast development in resting cells, cytochrome c-552 formation behaves in all respects like chlorophyll except that the dark-grown cells contain low amounts of the cytochrome c-552 but lack chlorophyll. Thus, both cytochrome c-552 and chlorophyll show the same lag period even when the length is changed by nutritional manipulation; preillumination largely eliminates the lag in the formation of both molecules, cycloheximide and streptomycin both inhibit the biosynthesis of chlorophyll and cytochrome c-552 in the same manner, and the formation of both during chloroplast

  18. Sod1 gene ablation in adult mice leads to physiological changes at the neuromuscular junction similar to changes that occur in old wild-type mice.

    PubMed

    Ivannikov, Maxim V; Van Remmen, Holly

    2015-07-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are believed to be important mediators of muscle atrophy and weakness in aging and many degenerative conditions. However, the mechanisms and physiological processes specifically affected by elevated ROS in neuromuscular units that contribute to muscle weakness during aging are not well defined. Here we investigate the effects of chronic oxidative stress on neurotransmission and excitation-contraction (EC) coupling mechanisms in the levator auris longus (LAL) muscle from young (4-8 months) and old (22-28 months) wild-type mice and young adult Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase 1 knockout (Sod1(-/-)) mice. The frequency of spontaneous neurotransmitter release and the amplitude of evoked neurotransmitter release in young Sod1(-/-) and old wild-type LAL neuromuscular junctions were significantly reduced from the young wild-type values, and those declines were mirrored by decreases in synaptic vesicle pool size. Presynaptic cytosolic calcium concentration and mitochondrial calcium uptake amplitudes showed substantial increases in stimulated young Sod1(-/-) and old axon terminals. Surprisingly, LAL muscle fibers from old mice showed a greater excitability than fibers from either young wild-type or young Sod1(-/-) LAL. Both evoked excitatory junction potential (EJP) and spontaneous mini EJP amplitudes were considerably higher in LAL muscles from old mice than in fibers from young Sod1(-/-) LAL muscle. Despite a greater excitability, sarcoplasmic calcium influx in both old wild-type and young Sod1(-/-) LAL muscle fibers was significantly less. Sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium levels were also reduced in both old wild-type and young Sod1(-/-) mice, but the difference was not statistically significant in muscle fibers from old wild-type mice. The protein ratio of triad calcium channels RyR1/DHPR was not different in all groups. However, fibers from both young Sod1(-/-) and old mice had substantially elevated levels of protein carbonylation and S

  19. Wild-Type p53 Binds to the TATA-Binding Protein and Represses Transcription

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seto, Edward; Usheva, Anny; Zambetti, Gerard P.; Momand, Jamil; Horikoshi, Nobuo; Weinmann, Roberto; Levine, Arnold J.; Shenk, Thomas

    1992-12-01

    p53 activates transcription of genes with a p53 response element, and it can repress genes lacking the element. Here we demonstrate that wild-type but not mutant p53 inhibits transcription in a HeLa nuclear extract from minimal promoters. Wild-type but not mutant p53 binds to human TATA-binding protein (TBP). p53 does not bind to yeast TBP, and it cannot inhibit transcription in a HeLa extract where yeast TBP substitutes for human TBP. These results suggest a model in which p53 binds to TBP and interferes with transcriptional initiation.

  20. Physcomitrella patens auxin conjugate synthetase (GH3) double knockout mutants are more resistant to Pythium infection than wild type.

    PubMed

    Mittag, Jennifer; Šola, Ivana; Rusak, Gordana; Ludwig-Müller, Jutta

    2015-07-01

    Auxin homeostasis is involved in many different plant developmental and stress responses. The auxin amino acid conjugate synthetases belonging to the GH3 family play major roles in the regulation of free indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) levels and the moss Physcomitrella patens has two GH3 genes in its genome. A role for IAA in several angiosperm--pathogen interactions was reported, however, in a moss--oomycete pathosystem it had not been published so far. Using GH3 double knockout lines we have investigated the role of auxin homeostasis during the infection of P. patens with the two oomycete species, Pythium debaryanum and Pythium irregulare. We show that infection with P. debaryanum caused stronger disease symptoms than with P. irregulare. Also, P. patens lines harboring fusion constructs of an auxin-inducible promoter from soybean (GmGH3) with a reporter (ß-glucuronidase) showed higher promoter induction after P. debaryanum infection than after P. irregulare, indicating a differential induction of the auxin response. Free IAA was induced upon P. debaryanum infection in wild type by 1.6-fold and in two GH3 double knockout (GH3-doKO) mutants by 4- to 5-fold. All GH3-doKO lines showed a reduced disease symptom progression compared to wild type. Since P. debaryanum can be inhibited in growth on medium containing IAA, these data might indicate that endogenous high auxin levels in P. patens GH3-doKO mutants lead to higher resistance against the oomycete.

  1. Targeting Mdmx to treat breast cancers with wild-type p53

    PubMed Central

    Haupt, S; Buckley, D; Pang, J-MB; Panimaya, J; Paul, P J; Gamell, C; Takano, E A; Ying Lee, Y; Hiddingh, S; Rogers, T-M; Teunisse, A F A S; Herold, M J; Marine, J-C; Fox, S B; Jochemsen, A; Haupt, Y

    2015-01-01

    The function of the tumor suppressor p53 is universally compromised in cancers. It is the most frequently mutated gene in human cancers (reviewed). In cases where p53 is not mutated, alternative regulatory pathways inactivate its tumor suppressive functions. This is primarily achieved through elevation in the expression of the key inhibitors of p53: Mdm2 or Mdmx (also called Mdm4) (reviewed). In breast cancer (BrCa), the frequency of p53 mutations varies markedly between the different subtypes, with basal-like BrCas bearing a high frequency of p53 mutations, whereas luminal BrCas generally express wild-type (wt) p53. Here we show that Mdmx is unexpectedly highly expressed in normal breast epithelial cells and its expression is further elevated in most luminal BrCas, whereas p53 expression is generally low, consistent with wt p53 status. Inducible knockdown (KD) of Mdmx in luminal BrCa MCF-7 cells impedes the growth of these cells in culture, in a p53-dependent manner. Importantly, KD of Mdmx in orthotopic xenograft transplants resulted in growth inhibition associated with prolonged survival, both in a preventative model and also in a treatment model. Growth impediment in response to Mdmx KD was associated with cellular senescence. The growth inhibitory capacity of Mdmx KD was recapitulated in an additional luminal BrCa cell line MPE600, which expresses wt p53. Further, the growth inhibitory capacity of Mdmx KD was also demonstrated in the wt p53 basal-like cell line SKBR7 line. These results identify Mdmx growth dependency in wt p53 expressing BrCas, across a range of subtypes. Based on our findings, we propose that Mdmx targeting is an attractive strategy for treating BrCas harboring wt p53. PMID:26181202

  2. In vitro re-expression of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (Ahr) in cultured Ahr-deficient mouse antral follicles partially restores the phenotype to that of cultured wild-type mouse follicles

    PubMed Central

    Ziv-Gal, A; Gao, L.; Karman, B.N.; Flaws, J.A.

    2014-01-01

    Background The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) mediates the toxic effects of various endocrine disrupting chemicals. In female mice, global deletion of the Ahr (AhrKO) results in slow growth of ovarian antral follicles. No studies, however, have examined whether injection of the Ahr restores the phenotypes of cultured AhrKO ovarian antral follicles to wild-type levels. Methods We developed a system to construct a recombinant adenovirus containing the Ahr to re-express the Ahr in AhrKO granulosa cells and whole antral follicles. We then compared follicle growth and levels of factors in the AHR signaling pathway (Ahr, Ahrr, Cyp1a1, and Cyp1b1) in wild-type, AhrKO, and Ahr re-expressed follicles. Further, we compared the response to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) in wild-type, AhrKO, and Ahr re-expressed follicles. Results AdAhr injection into AhrKO follicles partially restored their growth pattern to wild-type levels. Further, Ahr re-expressed follicles had significantly higher levels of Ahr, Ahrr, Cyp1a1, and Cyp1b1 compared to wild-type follicles. Upon TCDD treatment, only Cyp1a1 levels were significantly higher in Ahr re-expressed follicles compared to the levels in wild-type follicles. Conclusion Our system of re-expression of the Ahr partially restores follicle growth and transcript levels of factors in the AHR signaling pathway to wild-type levels. PMID:25500125

  3. Discovery of an inhibitor of the production of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence factor pyocyanin in wild-type cells

    PubMed Central

    Morkunas, Bernardas; Gal, Balint; Galloway, Warren R J D; Hodgkinson, James T; Ibbeson, Brett M; Sing Tan, Yaw; Welch, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Summary Pyocyanin is a small molecule produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa that plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of infections by this notorious opportunistic pathogen. The inhibition of pyocyanin production has been identified as an attractive antivirulence strategy for the treatment of P. aeruginosa infections. Herein, we report the discovery of an inhibitor of pyocyanin production in cultures of wild-type P. aeruginosa which is based around a 4-alkylquinolin-2(1H)-one scaffold. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported example of pyocyanin inhibition by a compound based around this molecular framework. The compound may therefore be representative of a new structural sub-class of pyocyanin inhibitors, which could potentially be exploited in in a therapeutic context for the development of critically needed new antipseudomonal agents. In this context, the use of wild-type cells in this study is notable, since the data obtained are of direct relevance to native situations. The compound could also be of value in better elucidating the role of pyocyanin in P. aeruginosa infections. Evidence suggests that the active compound reduces the level of pyocyanin production by inhibiting the cell–cell signalling mechanism known as quorum sensing. This could have interesting implications; quorum sensing regulates a range of additional elements associated with the pathogenicity of P. aeruginosa and there is a wide range of other potential applications where the inhibition of quorum sensing is desirable. PMID:27559393

  4. Maternal and pup genotype contribution to growth in wild-type and tau mutant Syrian hamsters.

    PubMed

    Oklejewicz, M; Pen, I; Durieux, G C; Daan, S

    2001-07-01

    The single gene mutation tau in the Syrian hamster-apart from its effect on the circadian organization of locomotor activity--has a pronounced influence on body weight. In this study we investigate the impact of maternal and pup genotypes at the tau-locus on the growth rate of pups. Homozygous tau mutant hamsters (circadian period of 20 hours) had lower growth rates and adult body weights than wild-type hamsters, whereas heterozygous tau mutants (circadian period of 22 hours) were intermediate. In addition, heterozygous pups from heterozygous dams grew heavier than those from wild-type and homozygous dams. The effect of maternal genotype was further evaluated in a cross-foster design, where wild-type and homozygous mutant pups were fostered at birth to either wild-type or homozygous mutant dams. At all ages, the maternal tau genotype had a negative effect on body weight, whereas the pup tau genotype had a positive effect during the preweaning period and a negative effect afterward.

  5. Measuring cell wall elasticity on enteroaggregative Escherichia coli wild type and dispersin mutant by AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Beckmann, Melissa; Venkataraman, Sankar; Doktycz, Mitchel John; Nataro, James P; Sullivan, Claretta J; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L; Allison, David P

    2006-07-01

    Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) is pathogenic and produces severe diarrhea in humans. A mutant of EAEC that does not produce dispersin, a cell surface protein, is not pathogenic. It has been proposed that dispersin imparts a positive charge to the bacterial cell surface allowing the bacteria to colonize on the negatively charged intestinal mucosa. However, physical properties of the bacterial cell surface, such as rigidity, may be influenced by the presence of dispersin and may contribute to pathogenicity. Using the system developed in our laboratory for mounting and imaging bacterial cells by atomic force microscopy (AFM), in liquid, on gelatin coated mica surfaces, studies were initiated to measure cell surface elasticity. This was carried out in both wild type EAEC, that produces dispersin, and the mutant that does not produce dispersin. This was accomplished using AFM force-distance (FD) spectroscopy on the wild type and mutant grown in liquid or on solid medium. Images in liquid and in air of both the wild-type and mutant grown in liquid and on solid media are presented. This work represents an initial step in efforts to understand the pathogenic role of the dispersin protein in the wild-type bacteria.

  6. Tendon fascicle gliding in wild type, heterozygous, and lubricin knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Kohrs, Ross T; Zhao, Chunfeng; Sun, Yu-Long; Jay, Gregory D; Zhang, Ling; Warman, Matthew L; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C

    2011-03-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the role of lubricin in the lubrication of tendon fascicles. Lubricin, a glycoprotein, lubricates cartilage and tendon surfaces, but the function of lubricin within the tendon fascicle is unclear. We developed a novel method to assess the gliding resistance of a single fascicle in a mouse tail model and used it to test the hypothesis that gliding resistance would be increased in lubricin knockout mice. Thirty-six mouse tails were used from 12 wild type, 12 heterozygous, and 12 lubricin knockout mice. A 15 mm long fascicle segment was pulled proximally after being divided distally. The peak resistance during fascicle pullout and the fascicle perimeter were measured. Lubricin expression was evaluated by immunohistochemistry. The peak gliding resistance in the lubricin knockout mice was significantly higher than in the wild type (p < 0.05). Fascicles from heterozygous mice were intermediate in value, but not significantly different from either wild type or lubricin knockout fascicles in peak gliding resistance. No significant difference was found in fascicle perimeter among the three groups. No correlation was observed between fascicle perimeter and gliding resistance. While lubricin was detected by immunostaining on the fascicle surface in wild type and heterozygous mice, lubricin was not detectable in the tendons of knockout mice. We conclude that the absence of lubricin is associated with increased interfascicular friction and that lubricin may play an important role in interfascicular lubrication.

  7. ELECTROPHORETIC MOBILITIES OF ESCHERICHIA COLI 0157:H7 AND WILD-TYPE ESCHERICHIA COLI STRAINS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The electrophoretic mobility (EPM) of a number of human-virulent and "wild-type" Escherichia coli strains in phosphate buffered water was measured. The impact of pH, ionic strength, cation type (valence) and concentration, and bacterial strain on the EPM was investigated. Resul...

  8. Phosphate uptake in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Hansen wild type and phenotypes exposed to space flight irradiation.

    PubMed

    Berry, D; Volz, P A

    1979-10-01

    Rates of phosphate uptake were approximately twice as great for Saccharomyces cerevisiae single-cell phenotypic isolates exposed to space parameters as for the wild-type ground control. Quantitative determination of 32P was performed by liquid scintillation spectrometry utilizing Cerenkov radiation counting techniques. PMID:395899

  9. Comparative Effects of Wild-type, bmr-6, bmr-12 and Stacked Sorghum: Sorghum Stover Digestibility

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Comparative Effects of Wild-type, bmr-6, bmr-12 and Stacked Sorghum: Sorghum Stover Digestibility H. M. Dann,1 A. M. DiCerbo,1 J. F. Pedersen,2 and R. J. Grant1 1 William H. Miner Agricultural Research Institute, Chazy, NY 2 USDA, ARS, NPA Wheat, Sorghum and Forage Research, University of Nebraska, ...

  10. COMPARISON OF IN VITRO-CULTURED AND WILD-TYPE PERKINSUS MARINUS I: PATHOGEN VIRULENCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perkinsus marinus is a highly contagious pathogen of the eastern oyster Crassostrea virginica. Until recently, transmission studies have employed wild-type parasites isolated directly from infected oysters. Newly developed methods to propagate P. marinus in vitro have led to usin...

  11. Chloroplast parameters differ in wild type and transgenic poplars overexpressing gsh1 in the cytosol.

    PubMed

    Ivanova, L A; Ronzhina, D A; Ivanov, L A; Stroukova, L V; Peuke, A D; Rennenberg, H

    2009-07-01

    Poplar mutants overexpressing the bacterial genes gsh1 or gsh2 encoding the enzymes of glutathione biosynthesis are among the best-characterised transgenic plants. However, this characterisation originates exclusively from laboratory studies, and the performance of these mutants under field conditions is largely unknown. Here, we report a field experiment in which the wild-type poplar hybrid Populus tremula x P. alba and a transgenic line overexpressing the bacterial gene gsh1 encoding gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase in the cytosol were grown for 3 years at a relatively clean (control) field site and a field site contaminated with heavy metals. Aboveground biomass accumulation was slightly smaller in transgenic compared to wild-type plants; soil contamination significantly decreased biomass accumulation in both wild-type and transgenic plants by more than 40%. Chloroplasts parameters, i.e., maximal diameter, projection area and perimeter, surface area and volume, surface/volume ratio and a two-dimensional form coefficient, were found to depend on plant type, leaf tissue and soil contamination. The greatest differences between wild and transgenic poplars were observed at the control site. Under these conditions, chloroplast sizes in palisade tissue of transgenic poplar significantly exceeded those of the wild type. In contrast to the wild type, palisade chloroplast volume exceeded that of spongy chloroplasts in transgenic poplars at both field sites. Chlorophyll content per chloroplast was the same in wild and transgenic poplars. Apparently, the increase in chloroplast volume was not connected to changes in the photosynthetic centres. Chloroplasts of transgenic poplar at the control site were more elongated in palisade cells and close to spherical in spongy mesophyll chloroplasts. At the contaminated site, palisade and spongy cell chloroplasts of leaves from transgenic trees and the wild type were the same shape. Transgenic poplars also had a smaller chloroplast

  12. Math Anxiety: Its Impact on Graduate Level Statistics Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elmore, Patricia B.; Vasu, Ellen S.

    This study investigates the effect of attitudes toward mathematics-related coursework, previous mathematics coursework, student sex, spatial ability, and masculinity-feminity of interest pattern on statistics achievement. Subjects were 188 student volunteers from inferential statistics classes taught at a midwestern university during 1977-78.…

  13. Differences in Establishment of Persistence of Vaccine and Wild Type Rubella Viruses in Fetal Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Perelygina, Ludmila; Adebayo, Adebola; Metcalfe, Maureen; Icenogle, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Both wild type (WT) and vaccine rubella virus (RV) can pass through the placenta to infect a human fetus, but only wtRV routinely causes pathology. To investigate possible reasons for this, we compared establishment of persistence of wtRV and RA27/3 vaccine strains in fetal endothelial cells. We showed that yields of RA27/3 and wtRV were similar after the first round of replication, but then only vaccine-infected cultures went through a crisis characterized by partial cell loss and gradual decline of virus titer followed by recovery and establishment of persistent cultures with low levels of RA27/3 secretion. We compared various steps of virus replication, but we were unable to identify changes, which might explain the 2-log difference in RA27/3 and wtRV yields in persistently infected cultures. Whole genome sequencing did not reveal selection of virus variants in either the wtRV or RA27/3 cultures. Quantitative single-cell analysis of RV replication by in situ hybridization detected, on average, 1–4 copies of negative-strand RNA and ~50 copies of positive-strand genomic RNA in cells infected with both vaccine and WT viruses. The distinct characteristics of RA27/3 replication were the presence of large amounts of negative-strand RV RNA and RV dsRNA at the beginning of the crisis and the accumulation of high amounts of genomic RNA in a subpopulation of infected cells during crisis and persistence. These results suggest that RA27/3 can persist in fetal endothelial cells, but the characteristics of persistence and mechanisms for the establishment and maintenance of persistence are different from wtRV. PMID:26177032

  14. MicroRNA-based Therapeutic Strategies for Targeting Mutant and Wild Type RAS in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sriganesh B.; Ruppert, J. Michael

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRs) have been causally implicated in the progression and development of a wide variety of cancers. miRs modulate the activity of key cell signaling networks by regulating the translation of pathway component proteins. Thus, the pharmacological targeting of miRs that regulate cancer cell signaling networks, either by promoting (using miR-supplementation) or by suppressing (using anti-sense oligonucleotide based strategies) miR activity is an area of intense research. The RAS-Extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) pathway represents a major miR-regulated signaling network that endows cells with some of the classical hallmarks of cancer, and is often inappropriately activated in malignancies by somatic genetic alteration through point mutation or alteration of gene copy number. In addition, recent progress indicates that many tumors may be deficient in GTPase activating proteins (GAPs) due to the collaborative action of oncogenic microRNAs. Recent studies also suggest that in tumors harboring a mutant RAS allele there is a critical role for wild type RAS proteins in determining overall RAS-ERK pathway activity. Together, these two advances comprise a new opportunity for therapeutic intervention. In this review, we evaluate miR-based therapeutic strategies for modulating RAS-ERK signaling in cancers, in particular for more direct modulation of RAS-GTP levels, with the potential to complement current strategies in order to yield more durable treatment responses. To this end, we discuss the potential for miR-based therapies focused on three prominent miRs including the pan-RAS regulator let-7 and the GAP regulator comprised of miR-206 and miR-21 (miR-206/21). PMID:26284568

  15. Comparison of the Level of Using Metacognitive Strategies during Study between High Achieving and Low Achieving Prospective Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doganay, Ahmet; Demir, Ozden

    2011-01-01

    The main purpose of this study is to compare the level of using metacognitive strategies during study between high achieving and low achieving prospective classroom teachers. This study was designed as a mixed method study. Metacognitive Learning Strategies Scale developed by Namlu (2004) was used to measure the use of metacognitive strategies…

  16. Genetic Characterization of the Hemagglutinin Genes of Wild-Type Measles Virus Circulating in China, 1993–2009

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Zhen; Liu, Chunyu; Mao, Naiying; Ji, Yixin; Wang, Huiling; Jiang, Xiaohong; Li, Chongshan; Tang, Wei; Feng, Daxing; Wang, Changyin; Zheng, Lei; Lei, Yue; Ling, Hua; Zhao, Chunfang; Ma, Yan; He, Jilan; Wang, Yan; Li, Ping; Guan, Ronghui; Zhou, Shujie; Zhou, Jianhui; Wang, Shuang; Zhang, Hong; Zheng, Huanying; Liu, Leng; Ma, Hemuti; Guan, Jing; Lu, Peishan; Feng, Yan; Zhang, Yanjun; Zhou, Shunde; Xiong, Ying; Ba, Zhuoma; Chen, Hui; Yang, Xiuhui; Bo, Fang; Ma, Yujie; Liang, Yong; Lei, Yake; Gu, Suyi; Liu, Wei; Chen, Meng; Featherstone, David; Jee, Youngmee; Bellini, William J.; Rota, Paul A.; Xu, Wenbo

    2013-01-01

    Background China experienced several large measles outbreaks in the past two decades, and a series of enhanced control measures were implemented to achieve the goal of measles elimination. Molecular epidemiologic surveillance of wild-type measles viruses (MeV) provides valuable information about the viral transmission patterns. Since 1993, virologic surveillnace has confirmed that a single endemic genotype H1 viruses have been predominantly circulating in China. A component of molecular surveillance is to monitor the genetic characteristics of the hemagglutinin (H) gene of MeV, the major target for virus neutralizing antibodies. Principal Findings Analysis of the sequences of the complete H gene from 56 representative wild-type MeV strains circulating in China during 1993–2009 showed that the H gene sequences were clustered into 2 groups, cluster 1 and cluster 2. Cluster1 strains were the most frequently detected cluster and had a widespread distribution in China after 2000. The predicted amino acid sequences of the H protein were relatively conserved at most of the functionally significant amino acid positions. However, most of the genotype H1 cluster1 viruses had an amino acid substitution (Ser240Asn), which removed a predicted N-linked glycosylation site. In addition, the substitution of Pro397Leu in the hemagglutinin noose epitope (HNE) was identified in 23 of 56 strains. The evolutionary rate of the H gene of the genotype H1 viruses was estimated to be approximately 0.76×10−3 substitutions per site per year, and the ratio of dN to dS (dN/dS) was <1 indicating the absence of selective pressure. Conclusions Although H genes of the genotype H1 strains were conserved and not subjected to selective pressure, several amino acid substitutions were observed in functionally important positions. Therefore the antigenic and genetic properties of H genes of wild-type MeVs should be monitored as part of routine molecular surveillance for measles in China. PMID

  17. Transcriptional regulatory program in wild-type and retinoblastoma gene-deficient mouse embryonic fibroblasts during adipocyte differentiation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Although many molecular regulators of adipogenesis have been identified a comprehensive catalogue of components is still missing. Recent studies showed that the retinoblastoma protein (pRb) was expressed in the cell cycle and late cellular differentiation phase during adipogenesis. To investigate this dual role of pRb in the early and late stages of adipogenesis we used microarrays to perform a comprehensive systems-level analysis of the common transcriptional program of the classic 3T3-L1 preadipocyte cell line, wild-type mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs), and retinoblastoma gene-deficient MEFs (Rb-/- MEFs). Findings Comparative analysis of the expression profiles of 3T3-L1 cells and wild-type MEFs revealed genes involved specifically in early regulation of the adipocyte differentiation as well as secreted factors and signaling molecules regulating the later phase of differentiation. In an attempt to identify transcription factors regulating adipogenesis, bioinformatics analysis of the promoters of coordinately and highly expressed genes was performed. We were able to identify a number of high-confidence target genes for follow-up experimental studies. Additionally, combination of experimental data and computational analyses pinpointed a feedback-loop between Pparg and Foxo1. To analyze the effects of the retinoblastoma protein at the transcriptional level we chose a perturbated system (Rb-/- MEFs) for comparison to the transcriptional program of wild-type MEFs. Gene ontology analysis of 64 deregulated genes showed that the Rb-/- MEF model exhibits a brown(-like) adipocyte phenotype. Additionally, the analysis results indicate a different or additional role for pRb family member involvement in the lineage commitment. Conclusion In this study a number of commonly modulated genes during adipogenesis in 3T3-L1 cells and MEFs, potential transcriptional regulation mechanisms, and differentially regulated targets during adipocyte differentiation of Rb

  18. Antimicrobial susceptibility in Escherichia coli of human and avian origin--a comparison of wild-type distributions.

    PubMed

    Sjölund, M; Bengtsson, S; Bonnedahl, J; Hernandez, J; Olsen, B; Kahlmeter, G

    2009-05-01

    In the present study, the antimicrobial susceptibilities of 97 Escherichia coli isolates from birds, and 100 clinical isolates from blood cultures, were determined by disk diffusion. The wild-type distributions were defined by the normalized resistance interpretation method. It is shown that the avian and clinical inhibition zone diameter distributions of wild-type E. coli are indistinguishable.

  19. Expression of Pokeweed Antiviral Protein in Transgenic Plants Induces Virus Resistance in Grafted Wild-Type Plants Independently of Salicylic Acid Accumulation and Pathogenesis-Related Protein Synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Smirnov, S.; Shulaev, V.; Tumer, N. E.

    1997-01-01

    Pokeweed antiviral protein (PAP), a 29-kD protein isolated from Phytolacca americana, inhibits translation by catalytically removing a specific adenine residue from the large rRNA of the 60S subunit of eukaryotic ribosomes. Transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants expressing PAP or a variant (PAP-v) were shown to be resistant to a broad spectrum of plant viruses. Expression of PAP-v in transgenic plants induces synthesis of pathogenesis-related proteins and a very weak (<2-fold) increase in salicylic acid levels. Using reciprocal grafting experiments, we demonstrate here that transgenic tobacco rootstocks expressing PAP-v induce resistance to tobacco mosaic virus infection in both N. tabacum NN and nn scions. Increased resistance to potato virus X was also observed in N. tabacum nn scions grafted on transgenic rootstocks. PAP expression was not detected in the wild-type scions or rootstocks that showed virus resistance, nor was there any increase in salicylic acid levels or pathogenesis-related protein synthesis. Grafting experiments with transgenic plants expressing an inactive PAP mutant demonstrated that an intact active site of PAP is necessary for induction of virus resistance in wild-type scions. These results indicate that enzymatic activity of PAP is responsible for generating a signal that renders wild-type scions resistant to virus infection in the absence of increased salicylic acid levels and pathogenesis-related protein synthesis. PMID:12223762

  20. A mutant chaperone converts a wild-type protein into a tumor-specific antigen.

    PubMed

    Schietinger, Andrea; Philip, Mary; Yoshida, Barbara A; Azadi, Parastoo; Liu, Hui; Meredith, Stephen C; Schreiber, Hans

    2006-10-13

    Monoclonal antibodies have become important therapeutic agents against certain cancers. Many tumor-specific antigens are mutant proteins that are predominantly intracellular and thus not readily accessible to monoclonal antibodies. We found that a wild-type transmembrane protein could be transformed into a tumor-specific antigen. A somatic mutation in the chaperone gene Cosmc abolished function of a glycosyltransferase, disrupting O-glycan Core 1 synthesis and creating a tumor-specific glycopeptidic neo-epitope consisting of a monosaccharide and a specific wild-type protein sequence. This epitope induced a high-affinity, highly specific, syngeneic monoclonal antibody with antitumor activity. Such tumor-specific glycopeptidic neo-epitopes represent potential targets for monoclonal antibody therapy.

  1. Mating success of wild type and sepia mutants Drosophila melanogaster in different choice.

    PubMed

    Stanić, Snezana; Pavković-Lucic, Sofija

    2005-01-01

    Mating behaviour of red-eyed (wt) and brown-eyed (sepia) Drosophila melanogaster was studied under light conditions. Mating success was directly observed in mating vials and techniques usually applied in the studies of sexual selection ("female choice" and "multiple choice"). The comparison of sexual activity of mutant and wild types clearly indicates that they are not equally successful in matings. Sepia eye colour mutation decreases sexual activity of Drosophila melanogaster males, influences the preference ability of females and decreases the number of progeny from homogamic mating of the se x se type, as well as from heterogamic copulations in which sepia females take part. Non-random mating of wild type males and sepia females (in "multiple-choice" situation), with genetically and phenotypically different individuals, could be another mechanism for conservation of genetic polymorphism in natural populations. PMID:16440285

  2. Wild-type minimal inhibitory concentration distributions in bacteria of animal origin in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Pantozzi, Florencia L; Ibar, Mariela P; Nievas, Victorio F; Vigo, Germán B; Moredo, Fabiana A; Giacoboni, Gabriela I

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the antimicrobial resistance profiles of indicator bacteria isolated from domestic animal feces. Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) was determined by agar dilution. Interpretative criteria on the basis of wild-type MIC distributions and epidemiological cutoff values (ECOFF or ECV) were used according to the 'European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing' (EUCAST) data. Results from 237 isolates of Escherichia coli showed reduced susceptibility for ampicillin, streptomycin and tetracycline, the antimicrobials commonly used in intensive breeding of pigs and hens. Regarding all the species of the genus Enterococcus spp., there are only ECOFF or ECV for vancomycin. Of the 173 Enterococcus spp. isolated, only one showed reduced susceptibility to vancomycin and was classified as 'non-wild-type' (NWT) population. This is the first report in Argentina showing data of epidemiological cutoff values in animal bacteria.

  3. Engineered zinc-finger proteins can compensate genetic haploinsufficiency by transcriptional activation of the wild-type allele: application to Willams-Beuren syndrome and supravalvular aortic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pei; Huang, Angela; Morales-Ruiz, Manuel; Starcher, Barry C; Huang, Yan; Sessa, William C; Niklason, Laura E; Giordano, Frank J

    2012-11-01

    Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS) and supravalvular aortic stenosis (SVAS) are genetic syndromes marked by the propensity to develop severe vascular stenoses. Vascular lesions in both syndromes are caused by haploinsufficiency of the elastin gene. We used these distinct genetic syndromes as models to evaluate the feasibility of using engineered zinc-finger protein transcription factors (ZFPs) to achieve compensatory expression of haploinsufficient genes by inducing augmented expression from the remaining wild-type allele. For complex genes with multiple splice variants, this approach could have distinct advantages over cDNA-based gene replacement strategies. Targeting the elastin gene, we show that transcriptional activation by engineered ZFPs can induce compensatory expression from the wild-type allele in the setting of classic WBS and SVAS genetic mutations, increase elastin expression in wild-type cells, induce expression of the major elastin splice variants, and recapitulate their natural stoichiometry. Further, we establish that transcriptional activation of the mutant allele in SVAS does not overcome nonsense-mediated decay, and thus ZFP-mediated transcriptional activation is not likely to induce production of a mutant protein, a crucial consideration. Finally, we show in bioengineered blood vessels that ZFP-mediated induction of elastin expression is capable of stimulating functional elastogenesis. Haploinsufficiency is a common mechanism of genetic disease. These findings have significant implications for WBS and SVAS, and establish that haploinsufficiency can be overcome by targeted transcriptional activation without inducing protein expression from the mutant allele.

  4. Stability of Iowa mutant and wild type Aβ-peptide aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alred, Erik J.; Scheele, Emily G.; Berhanu, Workalemahu M.; Hansmann, Ulrich H. E.

    2014-11-01

    Recent experiments indicate a connection between the structure of amyloid aggregates and their cytotoxicity as related to neurodegenerative diseases. Of particular interest is the Iowa Mutant, which causes early-onset of Alzheimer's disease. While wild-type Amyloid β-peptides form only parallel beta-sheet aggregates, the mutant also forms meta-stable antiparallel beta sheets. Since these structural variations may cause the difference in the pathological effects of the two Aβ-peptides, we have studied in silico the relative stability of the wild type and Iowa mutant in both parallel and antiparallel forms. We compare regular molecular dynamics simulations with such where the viscosity of the samples is reduced, which, we show, leads to higher sampling efficiency. By analyzing and comparing these four sets of all-atom molecular dynamics simulations, we probe the role of the various factors that could lead to the structural differences. Our analysis indicates that the parallel forms of both wild type and Iowa mutant aggregates are stable, while the antiparallel aggregates are meta-stable for the Iowa mutant and not stable for the wild type. The differences result from the direct alignment of hydrophobic interactions in the in-register parallel oligomers, making them more stable than the antiparallel aggregates. The slightly higher thermodynamic stability of the Iowa mutant fibril-like oligomers in its parallel organization over that in antiparallel form is supported by previous experimental measurements showing slow inter-conversion of antiparallel aggregates into parallel ones. Knowledge of the mechanism that selects between parallel and antiparallel conformations and determines their relative stability may open new avenues for the development of therapies targeting familial forms of early-onset Alzheimer's disease.

  5. Fatal wild-type varicella-zoster virus encephalitis without a rash in a vaccinated child.

    PubMed

    Ibraheem, Mam; Marin, Mona; Leung, Jessica; Bryce, Clare H; Schmid, D Scott; Zaki, Sherif R; Drew, Clifton; Liu, Lindy; Smelser, Chad

    2013-02-01

    Encephalitis associated with varicella-zoster virus, rare among children in the varicella vaccine era, has generally been associated with a rash. We report fatal wild-type varicella-zoster virus encephalitis without a rash in a child who had received 1 dose of varicella vaccine. Varicella-zoster virus encephalitis should be considered in the differential diagnosis for children presenting with acute neurologic symptoms, even vaccine recipients.

  6. Stability of Iowa mutant and wild type Aβ-peptide aggregates

    SciTech Connect

    Alred, Erik J.; Scheele, Emily G.; Berhanu, Workalemahu M.; Hansmann, Ulrich H. E.

    2014-11-07

    Recent experiments indicate a connection between the structure of amyloid aggregates and their cytotoxicity as related to neurodegenerative diseases. Of particular interest is the Iowa Mutant, which causes early-onset of Alzheimer's disease. While wild-type Amyloid β-peptides form only parallel beta-sheet aggregates, the mutant also forms meta-stable antiparallel beta sheets. Since these structural variations may cause the difference in the pathological effects of the two Aβ-peptides, we have studied in silico the relative stability of the wild type and Iowa mutant in both parallel and antiparallel forms. We compare regular molecular dynamics simulations with such where the viscosity of the samples is reduced, which, we show, leads to higher sampling efficiency. By analyzing and comparing these four sets of all-atom molecular dynamics simulations, we probe the role of the various factors that could lead to the structural differences. Our analysis indicates that the parallel forms of both wild type and Iowa mutant aggregates are stable, while the antiparallel aggregates are meta-stable for the Iowa mutant and not stable for the wild type. The differences result from the direct alignment of hydrophobic interactions in the in-register parallel oligomers, making them more stable than the antiparallel aggregates. The slightly higher thermodynamic stability of the Iowa mutant fibril-like oligomers in its parallel organization over that in antiparallel form is supported by previous experimental measurements showing slow inter-conversion of antiparallel aggregates into parallel ones. Knowledge of the mechanism that selects between parallel and antiparallel conformations and determines their relative stability may open new avenues for the development of therapies targeting familial forms of early-onset Alzheimer's disease.

  7. PHEX Mimetic (SPR4-Peptide) Corrects and Improves HYP and Wild Type Mice Energy-Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Zelenchuk, Lesya V.; Hedge, Anne-Marie; Rowe, Peter S. N.

    2014-01-01

    Context PHEX or DMP1 mutations cause hypophosphatemic-rickets and altered energy metabolism. PHEX binds to DMP1-ASARM-motif to form a complex with α5β3 integrin that suppresses FGF23 expression. ASARM-peptides increase FGF23 by disrupting the PHEX-DMP1-Integrin complex. We used a 4.2 kDa peptide (SPR4) that binds to ASARM-peptide/motif to study the DMP1-PHEX interaction and to assess SPR4 for the treatment of energy metabolism defects in HYP and potentially other bone-mineral disorders. Design Subcutaneously transplanted osmotic pumps were used to infuse SPR4-peptide or vehicle (VE) into wild-type mice (WT) and HYP-mice (PHEX mutation) for 4 weeks. Results SPR4 partially corrected HYP mice hypophosphatemia and increased serum 1.25(OH)2D3. Serum FGF23 remained high and PTH was unaffected. WT-SPR4 mice developed hypophosphatemia and hypercalcemia with increased PTH, FGF23 and 1.25(OH)2D3. SPR4 increased GAPDH HYP-bone expression 60× and corrected HYP-mice hyperglycemia and hypoinsulinemia. HYP-VE serum uric-acid (UA) levels were reduced and SPR4 infusion suppressed UA levels in WT-mice but not HYP-mice. SPR4 altered leptin, adiponectin, and sympathetic-tone and increased the fat mass/weight ratio for HYP and WT mice. Expression of perlipin-2 a gene involved in obesity was reduced in HYP-VE and WT-SPR4 mice but increased in HYP-SPR4 mice. Also, increased expression of two genes that inhibit insulin-signaling, ENPP1 and ESP, occurred with HYP-VE mice. In contrast, SPR4 reduced expression of both ENPP1 and ESP in WT mice and suppressed ENPP1 in HYP mice. Increased expression of FAM20C and sclerostin occurred with HYP-VE mice. SPR4 suppressed expression of FAM20C and sclerostin in HYP and WT mice. Conclusions ASARM peptides and motifs are physiological substrates for PHEX and modulate osteocyte PHEX-DMP1-α5β3-integrin interactions and thereby FGF23 expression. These interactions also provide a nexus that regulates bone and energy metabolism. SPR4 suppression of

  8. Comparison of the Proteomes of Three Yeast Wild Type Strains: CEN.PK2, FY1679 and W303

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Peter Mose; Blomberg, Anders; Görg, Angelika; Roepstorff, Peter; Norbeck, Joakim; Fey, Stephen John

    2001-01-01

    Yeast deletion strains created during gene function analysis projects very often show drastic phenotypic differences depending on the genetic background used. These results indicate the existence of important molecular differences between the CEN.PK2, FY1679 and W303 wild type strains. To characterise these differences we have compared the protein expression levels between CEN.PK2, FY1679 and W303 strains using twodimensional gel electrophoresis and identified selected proteins by mass spectrometric analysis. We have found that FY1679 and W303 strains are more similar to each other than to the CEN.PK2 strain. This study identifies 62 proteins that are differentially expressed between the strains and provides a valuable source of data for the interpretation of yeast mutant phenotypes observed in CEN.PK2, FY1679 and W303 strains. PMID:18628919

  9. Expression profiling of wild type and β-catenin gene disrupted human BxPC-3 pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Petter Angell; Lund, Kaja; Krauss, Stefan

    2015-06-01

    To study the role of WNT/β-catenin signaling in pancreatic adenocarcinoma, human BxPC-3 cell lines deficient of the central canonical WNT signaling protein β-catenin were established by using zinc-finger nuclease mediated targeted genomic disruption of the β-catenin gene (CTNNB1). Comparison of the global transcription levels in wild type cells with two β-catenin gene disrupted clones identified 85 transcripts that were the most differentially regulated. Gene ontology (GO) term enrichment analysis of these transcripts identified "cell adhesion" as the most significantly enriched GO term. Here we describe the data from the transcription profiling analysis published in the article "Implications of Targeted Genomic Disruption of β-Catenin in BxPC-3 Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma Cells" [1]. Data have been deposited to the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database repository with the dataset identifier GSE63072. PMID:26484203

  10. A comparison of the immune responses of dogs exposed to canine distemper virus (CDV) — Differences between vaccinated and wild-type virus exposed dogs

    PubMed Central

    Perrone, Danielle; Bender, Scott; Niewiesk, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV)-specific immune response was measured in different dog populations. Three groups of vaccinated or wild-type virus exposed dogs were tested: dogs with a known vaccination history, dogs without a known vaccination history (shelter dogs), and dogs with potential exposure to wild-type CDV. The use of a T-cell proliferation assay demonstrated a detectable CDV-specific T-cell response from both spleen and blood lymphocytes of dogs. Qualitatively, antibody assays [enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and neutralization assay] predicted the presence of a T-cell response well, although quantitatively neither antibody assays nor the T-cell assay correlated well with each other. An interesting finding from our study was that half of the dogs in shelters were not vaccinated (potentially posing a public veterinary health problem) and that antibody levels in dogs living in an environment with endemic CDV were lower than in vaccinated animals. PMID:20885846

  11. Sensitivity of phenotypic susceptibility analyses for nonthymidine nucleoside analogues conferred by K65R or M184V in mixtures with wild-type HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Underwood, Mark R; Ross, Lisa L; Irlbeck, David M; Gerondelis, Peter; Rouse, Elizabeth; St Clair, Marty H; Trinh, Lan; Parkin, Neil; Lanier, E Randall

    2009-01-01

    Thymidine-sparing triple-nucleoside regimens have exhibited poor virologic response despite apparent phenotypic susceptibility to 2 of 3 regimen components at early time points. Phenotypic resistance masking by wild-type virus may explain this discrepancy.Consistent with this notion were (1) the presence of low level nucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitor-resistant human immunodeficiency virus in subjects receiving failing first-line regimens consisting of tenofovir (TDF), abacavir (ABC), and lamivudine (3TC); (2) lower fold resistance associated with mixtures versus mutants in a clinical-isolate database; and (3) dose dependent changes in susceptibility to ABC, 3TC, TDF, and didanosine on titration of K65R and/or M184V with wild-type virus. These findings underscore the limitations of stand-alone phenotypic susceptibility measures and emphasize the importance of complementary and/or more sensitive techniques.

  12. Wild-Type N-Ras, Overexpressed in Basal-like Breast Cancer, Promotes Tumor Formation by Inducing IL-8 Secretion via JAK2 Activation.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ze-Yi; Tian, Lin; Bu, Wen; Fan, Cheng; Gao, Xia; Wang, Hai; Liao, Yi-Hua; Li, Yi; Lewis, Michael T; Edwards, Dean; Zwaka, Thomas P; Hilsenbeck, Susan G; Medina, Daniel; Perou, Charles M; Creighton, Chad J; Zhang, Xiang H-F; Chang, Eric C

    2015-07-21

    Basal-like breast cancers (BLBCs) are aggressive, and their drivers are unclear. We have found that wild-type N-RAS is overexpressed in BLBCs but not in other breast cancer subtypes. Repressing N-RAS inhibits transformation and tumor growth, whereas overexpression enhances these processes even in preinvasive BLBC cells. We identified N-Ras-responsive genes, most of which encode chemokines; e.g., IL8. Expression levels of these chemokines and N-RAS in tumors correlate with outcome. N-Ras, but not K-Ras, induces IL-8 by binding and activating the cytoplasmic pool of JAK2; IL-8 then acts on both the cancer cells and stromal fibroblasts. Thus, BLBC progression is promoted by increasing activities of wild-type N-Ras, which mediates autocrine/paracrine signaling that can influence both cancer and stroma cells.

  13. Clavulanic acid production by the MMS 150 mutant obtained from wild type Streptomyces clavuligerus ATCC 27064.

    PubMed

    da Silva Vasconcelos, Eliton; de Lima, Vanderlei Aparecido; Goto, Leandro Seiji; Cruz-Hernández, Isara Lourdes; Hokka, Carlos Osamu

    2013-12-01

    Clavulanic acid (CA) is a powerful inhibitor of the beta-lactamases, enzymes produced by bacteria resistants to penicillin and cefalosporin. This molecule is produced industrially by strains of Streptomyces clavuligerus in complex media which carbon and nitrogen resources are supplied by inexpensive compounds still providing high productivity. The genetic production improvement using physical and chemical mutagenic agents is an important strategy in programs of industrial production development of bioactive metabolites. However, parental strains are susceptible to loss of their original productivity due genetic instability phenomenona. In this work, some S. clavuligerus mutant strains obtained by treatment with UV light and with MMS are compared with the wild type (Streptomyces clavuligerus ATCC 27064). The results indicated that the random mutations originated some strains with different phenotypes, most divergent demonstrated by the mutants strains named AC116, MMS 150 and MMS 54, that exhibited lack of pigmentation in their mature spores. Also, the strain MMS 150 presented a larger production of CA when cultivated in semi-synthetics media. Using other media, the wild type strain obtained a larger CA production. Besides, using the modifed complex media the MMS 150 strain showed changes in its lipolitic activity and a larger production of CA. The studies also allowed finding the best conditions for a lipase activity exhibited by wild type S. clavuligerus and the MMS150 mutant.

  14. Clavulanic acid production by the MMS 150 mutant obtained from wild type Streptomyces clavuligerus ATCC 27064

    PubMed Central

    da Silva Vasconcelos, Eliton; de Lima, Vanderlei Aparecido; Goto, Leandro Seiji; Cruz-Hernández, Isara Lourdes; Hokka, Carlos Osamu

    2013-01-01

    Clavulanic acid (CA) is a powerful inhibitor of the beta-lactamases, enzymes produced by bacteria resistants to penicillin and cefalosporin. This molecule is produced industrially by strains of Streptomyces clavuligerus in complex media which carbon and nitrogen resources are supplied by inexpensive compounds still providing high productivity. The genetic production improvement using physical and chemical mutagenic agents is an important strategy in programs of industrial production development of bioactive metabolites. However, parental strains are susceptible to loss of their original productivity due genetic instability phenomenona. In this work, some S. clavuligerus mutant strains obtained by treatment with UV light and with MMS are compared with the wild type (Streptomyces clavuligerus ATCC 27064). The results indicated that the random mutations originated some strains with different phenotypes, most divergent demonstrated by the mutants strains named AC116, MMS 150 and MMS 54, that exhibited lack of pigmentation in their mature spores. Also, the strain MMS 150 presented a larger production of CA when cultivated in semi-synthetics media. Using other media, the wild type strain obtained a larger CA production. Besides, using the modifed complex media the MMS 150 strain showed changes in its lipolitic activity and a larger production of CA. The studies also allowed finding the best conditions for a lipase activity exhibited by wild type S. clavuligerus and the MMS150 mutant. PMID:24688492

  15. Mutant and wild-type alpha-synuclein interact with mitochondrial cytochrome C oxidase.

    PubMed

    Elkon, Hanock; Don, Jermy; Melamed, Eldad; Ziv, Ilan; Shirvan, Anat; Offen, Daniel

    2002-06-01

    Alpha-synuclein, a presynaptic protein, was found to be the major component in the Lewy bodies (LB) in both inherited and sporadic Parkinson's disease (PD). Furthermore, rare mutations of alpha-synuclein cause autosomal-dominant PD. However, it is unknown how alpha-synuclein is involved in the pathogenesis of nigral degeneration in PD. In this study, we examine the protein-protein interactions of wild-type and mutant (A53T) a-synuclein with adult human brain cDNA expression library using the yeast two-hybrid technique. We found that both normal and mutant alpha-synuclein specifically interact with the mitochondrial complex IV enzyme, cytochrome C oxidase (COX). Wild-type and mutant alpha-synuclein genes were further fused with c-Myc tag and translated in rabbit reticulocyte lysate. Using anti-c-Myc antibody, we demonstrated that both wild-type and mutant alpha-synuclein, coimmunoprecipitated with COX. We also showed that potassium cyanide, a selective COX inhibitor, synergistically enhanced the sensitivity of SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells to dopamine-induced cell death. In conclusion, we found specific protein-protein interactions of alpha-synuclein, a major LB protein, to COX, a key enzyme of the mithochondrial respiratory system. This interaction suggests that alpha-synuclein aggregation may contribute to enhance the mitochondrial dysfunction, which might be a key factor in the pathogenesis of PD.

  16. Physiology and metabolic fluxes of wild-type and riboflavin-producing Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed Central

    Sauer, U; Hatzimanikatis, V; Hohmann, H P; Manneberg, M; van Loon, A P; Bailey, J E

    1996-01-01

    Continuous cultivation in a glucose-limited chemostat was used to determine the growth parameters of wild-type Bacillus subtilis and of a recombinant, riboflavin-producing strain. Maintenance coefficients of 0.45 and 0.66 mmol of glucose g-1 h-1 were determined for the wild-type and recombinant strains, respectively. However, the maximum molar growth yield of 82 to 85 g (cell dry weight)/mol of glucose was found to be almost identical in both strains. A nonlinear relationship between the specific riboflavin production rate and the dilution rate was observed, revealing a coupling of product formation and growth under strict substrate-limited conditions. Most prominently, riboflavin formation completely ceased at specific growth rates below 0.15 h-1. For molecular characterization of B. subtilis, the total amino acid composition of the wild type was experimentally determined and the complete building block requirements for biomass formation were derived. In particular, the murein sacculus was found to constitute approximately 9% of B. subtilis biomass, three- to fivefold more than in Escherichia coli. Estimation of intracellular metabolic fluxes by a refined mass balance approach revealed a substantial, growth rate-dependent flux through the oxidative branch of the pentose phosphate pathway. Furthermore, this flux is indicated to be increased in the strain engineered for riboflavin formation. Glucose catabolism at low growth rates with reduced biomass yields was supported mainly by the tricarboxylic acid cycle. PMID:8837424

  17. Interaction of root gravitropism and phototropism in Arabidopsis wild-type and starchless mutants.

    PubMed

    Vitha, S; Zhao, L; Sack, F D

    2000-02-01

    Root gravitropism in wild-type Arabidopsis and in two starchless mutants, pgm1-1 and adg1-1, was evaluated as a function of light position to determine the relative strengths of negative phototropism and of gravitropism and how much phototropism affects gravitropic measurements. Gravitropism was stronger than phototropism in some but not all light positions in wild-type roots grown for an extended period, indicating that the relationship between the two tropisms is more complex than previously reported. Root phototropism significantly influenced the time course of gravitropic curvature and the two measures of sensitivity. Light from above during horizontal exposure overestimated all three parameters for all three genotypes except the wild-type perception time. At the irradiance used (80 micromol m(-2) s(-1)), the shortest periods of illumination found to exaggerate gravitropism were 45 min of continuous illumination and 2-min doses of intermittent illumination. By growing roots in circumlateral light or by gravistimulating in the dark, corrected values were obtained for each gravitropic parameter. Roots of both starchless mutants were determined to be about three times less sensitive than prior estimates. This study demonstrates the importance of accounting for phototropism in the design of root gravitropism experiments in Arabidopsis.

  18. Developmentally controlled telomere addition in wild-type and mutant paramecia.

    PubMed Central

    Forney, J D; Blackburn, E H

    1988-01-01

    We analyzed sites of macronuclear telomere addition at a single genetic locus in Paramecium tetraurelia. We showed that in homozygous wild-type cells, differential genomic processing during macronuclear development resulted in the A surface antigen gene being located 8, 13, or 26 kilobases upstream from a macronuclear telomere. We describe variable rearrangements that occurred at the telomere 8 kilobases from the A gene. A mutant (d48) that forms a telomere near the 5' end of the A gene was also analyzed. This mutant was shown to create simple terminal deletions; telomeric repeats were added directly to the truncated wild-type A gene sequence. In both the mutant and wild-type cells, the telomeric sequences (a mixture of C4A2 and C3A3 repeats) were added to various sequences within a specific 200- to 500-base-pair region rather than to a single site. No similarities were found in the primary sequences surrounding the telomere addition sites. The mutation in d48 changed the region of telomere addition at the A gene locus; this is the first example in ciliates of a mutation that affects the site of telomere addition. Images PMID:3336360

  19. Effect of Fluorosis on Liver Cells of VC Deficient and Wild Type Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Wei; Jiao, Yan; Ma, Yonghui; Stuart, John M.; Li, Xiudian; Zhao, Fusheng; Wang, Lishi; Sun, DianJun

    2014-01-01

    For decades, mouse and other rodents have been used for the study of oxidative or related studies such as the effect of fluoride. It is known that rodents normally synthesize their own vitamin C (VC) due to the presence of a key enzyme in ascorbic acid synthesis, l-gulono-lactone-γ-oxidase (Gulo), while humans do not have the capacity of VC synthesis due to the deletion of most parts of the GULO gene. The spontaneous fracture (sfx) mouse recently emerged as a model for study of VC deficiency. We investigated the effect of fluoride on liver cells from wild type Balb/c and sfx mice. We found that activities of SOD, GPx, and CAT were reduced in both wild type and sfx mice; however, the amount of reduction in the sfx cells is more than that in Balb/c cells. In addition, while both cells increased MDA, the increase in the sfx cells is greater than that in Balb/c cells. Gene networks of Sod, Gpx, and Cat in the liver of humans and mice are also different. Our study suggests that reaction to fluoride in vitamin C deficient mice might be different from that of wild type mice. PMID:24693236

  20. Root graviresponsiveness and cellular differentiation in wild-type and a starchless mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R.

    1989-01-01

    Primary roots of a starchless mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana L. are strongly graviresponsive despite lacking amyloplasts in their columella cells. The ultrastructures of calyptrogen and peripheral cells in wild-type as compared to mutant seedlings are not significantly different. The largest difference in cellular differentiation in caps of mutant and wild-type roots is the relative volume of plastids in columella cells. Plastids occupy 12.3% of the volume of columella cells in wild-type seedlings, but only 3.69% of columella cells in mutant seedlings. These results indicate that: (1) amyloplasts and starch are not necessary for root graviresponsiveness; (2) the increase in relative volume of plastids that usually accompanies differentiation of columella cells is not necessary for root graviresponsiveness; and (3) the absence of starch and amyloplasts does not affect the structure of calyptrogen (i.e. meristematic) and secretory (i.e. peripheral) cells in root caps. These results are discussed relative to proposed models for root gravitropism.

  1. Search for differences in post-transcriptional modification patterns of mitochondrial DNA-encoded wild-type and mutant human tRNALys and tRNALeu(UUR).

    PubMed

    Helm, M; Florentz, C; Chomyn, A; Attardi, G

    1999-02-01

    Post-transcriptional modifications are characteristic features of tRNAs and have been shown in a number of cases to influence both their structural and functional properties, including structure stabilization, amino-acylation and codon recognition. We have developed an approach which allows the investigation of the post-transcriptional modification patterns of human mitochondrial wild-type and mutant tRNAs at both the qualitative and the quantitative levels. Specific tRNA species are long-term labeled in vivo with [32P]orthophosphate, isolated in a highly selective way, enzymatically digested to mononucleotides and then subjected to two-dimensional thin layer chromatographic analysis. The wild-type tRNALysand the corresponding tRNALyscarrying the A8344G mutation associated with the MERRF (Myoclonic Epilepsy with Ragged Red Fibers) syndrome exhibit the same modified nucleotides at the same molar concentrations. By contrast, a quantitatively different modification pattern was observed between the wild-type tRNALeu(UUR)and its counterpart carrying the A3243G mutation associated with the MELAS (Mitochondrial Myopathy, Encephalopathy with Lactic Acidosis and Stroke-like episodes) syndrome, the latter exhibiting a 50% decrease in m2G content. Complementary sequencing of tRNALeu(UUR)has allowed the localization of this modification at position 10 within the D-stem of the tRNA. The decreased level of this modification may have important implications for understanding the molecular mechanism underlying the MELAS-associated mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:9889270

  2. Reduced enzyme activity and starch level in an induced mutant of chloroplast phosphoglucose isomerase

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, T.W.; Gottlieb, L.D.; Pichersky, E.

    1986-06-01

    Ethyl methane sulfonate treatment was used to induce a mutation in the nuclear gene encoding the chloroplast isozyme of phosphoglucose isomerase in Clarkia xantiana. The mutation, which proved allelic to wild type activity, was backcrossed to wild type for five generations so that the two could be compared in a near isogenic background. An immunological analysis showed that the mutant, when homozygous, reduced the activity of the isozyme by about 50%. In contrast to wild type, the mutant showed little change in leaf starch level over a diurnal period or following a 72-hour continuous light treatment. By the end of the diurnal light period, the mutant accumulated only about 60% as much starch as wild type. However, mutant leaves had an increased sucrose level presumably because photosynthate was directly exported from the chloroplasts. The mutant also exhibited reduced leaf weight. These changes in metabolism and growth suggest that the wild type level of plastid phosphoglucose isomerase activity is necessary to achieve wild type carbohydrate status.

  3. Genetic relationships and epidemiological links between wild type 1 poliovirus isolates in Pakistan and Afghanistan

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background/Aim Efforts have been made to eliminate wild poliovirus transmission since 1988 when the World Health Organization began its global eradication campaign. Since then, the incidence of polio has decreased significantly. However, serotype 1 and serotype 3 still circulate endemically in Pakistan and Afghanistan. Both countries constitute a single epidemiologic block representing one of the three remaining major global reservoirs of poliovirus transmission. In this study we used genetic sequence data to investigate transmission links among viruses from diverse locations during 2005-2007. Methods In order to find the origins and routes of wild type 1 poliovirus circulation, polioviruses were isolated from faecal samples of Acute Flaccid Paralysis (AFP) patients. We used viral cultures, two intratypic differentiation methods PCR, ELISA to characterize as vaccine or wild type 1 and nucleic acid sequencing of entire VP1 region of poliovirus genome to determine the genetic relatedness. Results One hundred eleven wild type 1 poliovirus isolates were subjected to nucleotide sequencing for genetic variation study. Considering the 15% divergence of the sequences from Sabin 1, Phylogenetic analysis by MEGA software revealed that active inter and intra country transmission of many genetically distinct strains of wild poliovirus type 1 belonged to genotype SOAS which is indigenous in this region. By grouping wild type 1 polioviruses according to nucleotide sequence homology, three distinct clusters A, B and C were obtained with multiple chains of transmission together with some silent circulations represented by orphan lineages. Conclusion Our results emphasize that there was a persistent transmission of wild type1 polioviruses in Pakistan and Afghanistan during 2005-2007. The epidemiologic information provided by the sequence data can contribute to the formulation of better strategies for poliomyelitis control to those critical areas, associated with high risk

  4. Comparative effects of chlorpyrifos in wild type and cannabinoid Cb1 receptor knockout mice

    SciTech Connect

    Baireddy, Praveena; Liu, Jing; Hinsdale, Myron; Pope, Carey

    2011-11-15

    Endocannabinoids (eCBs) modulate neurotransmission by inhibiting the release of a variety of neurotransmitters. The cannabinoid receptor agonist WIN 55.212-2 (WIN) can modulate organophosphorus (OP) anticholinesterase toxicity in rats, presumably by inhibiting acetylcholine (ACh) release. Some OP anticholinesterases also inhibit eCB-degrading enzymes. We studied the effects of the OP insecticide chlorpyrifos (CPF) on cholinergic signs of toxicity, cholinesterase activity and ACh release in tissues from wild type (+/+) and cannabinoid CB1 receptor knockout (-/-) mice. Mice of both genotypes (n = 5-6/treatment group) were challenged with CPF (300 mg/kg, 2 ml/kg in peanut oil, sc) and evaluated for functional and neurochemical changes. Both genotypes exhibited similar cholinergic signs and cholinesterase inhibition (82-95% at 48 h after dosing) in cortex, cerebellum and heart. WIN reduced depolarization-induced ACh release in vitro in hippocampal slices from wild type mice, but had no effect in hippocampal slices from knockouts or in striatal slices from either genotype. Chlorpyrifos oxon (CPO, 100 {mu}M) reduced release in hippocampal slices from both genotypes in vitro, but with a greater reduction in tissues from wild types (21% vs 12%). CPO had no significant in vitro effect on ACh release in striatum. CPF reduced ACh release in hippocampus from both genotypes ex vivo, but reduction was again significantly greater in tissues from wild types (52% vs 36%). In striatum, CPF led to a similar reduction (20-23%) in tissues from both genotypes. Thus, while CB1 deletion in mice had little influence on the expression of acute toxicity following CPF, CPF- or CPO-induced changes in ACh release appeared sensitive to modulation by CB1-mediated eCB signaling in a brain-regional manner. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer C57Bl/6 mice showed dose-related cholinergic toxicity following subcutaneous chlorpyrifos exposure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Wild type and

  5. Structural and morphometric comparison of the molar teeth in pre-eruptive developmental stage of PACAP-deficient and wild-type mice.

    PubMed

    Sandor, B; Fintor, K; Felszeghy, Sz; Juhasz, T; Reglodi, D; Mark, L; Kiss, P; Jungling, A; Fulop, B D; Nagy, A D; Hashimoto, H; Zakany, R; Nagy, A; Tamas, A

    2014-11-01

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) is a pleiotropic neuropeptide with widespread distribution. It plays pivotal role in neuronal development. PACAP-immunoreactive fibers have been found in the tooth pulp, and recently, it has been shown that PACAP may also play a role in the regeneration of the periodontium after luxation injuries. However, there is no data about the effect of endogenous PACAP on tooth development. Ectodermal organogenesis including tooth development is regulated by different members of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP), fibroblast growth factor (FGF), hedgehog (HH), and Wnt families. There is also a growing evidence to support the hypothesis that PACAP interacts with sonic hedgehog (SHH) receptor (PTCH1) and its downstream target (Gli1) suggesting its role in tooth development. Therefore, our aim was to study molar tooth development in mice lacking endogenous PACAP. In this study morphometric, immunohistochemical and structural comparison of molar teeth in pre-eruptive developmental stage was performed on histological sections of 7-day-old wild-type and PACAP-deficient mice. Further structural analysis was carried out with Raman microscope. The morphometric comparison of the 7-day-old samples revealed that the dentin was significantly thinner in the molars of PACAP-deficient mice compared to wild-type animals. Raman spectra of the enamel in wild-type mice demonstrated higher diversity in secondary structure of enamel proteins. In the dentin of PACAP-deficient mice higher intracrystalline disordering in the hydroxyapatite molecular structure was found. We also obtained altered SHH, PTCH1 and Gli1 expression level in secretory ameloblasts of PACAP-deficient mice compared to wild-type littermates suggesting that PACAP might play an important role in molar tooth development and matrix mineralization involving influence on SHH signaling cascade. PMID:25112419

  6. B7-1/CD80-transduced tumor cells elicit better systemic immunity than wild-type tumor cells admixed with Corynebacterium parvum.

    PubMed

    Chen, L; McGowan, P; Ashe, S; Johnston, J V; Hellström, I; Hellström, K E

    1994-10-15

    Tumor cells genetically modified by transduction of B7 (B7-1/CD80), a natural ligand for the T-cell costimulatory molecules CD28 and CTLA-4, can elicit potent tumor immunity, and they can be effective for treatment of established cancers in animal models. In this study, three tumor lines, the EL4 lymphoma, the P815 mastocytoma, and the MCA102 sarcoma were transduced with recombinant retrovirus containing the murine B7 gene, and their potency to induce systemic immunity protective against challenge with wild-type tumor was compared to that of the same tumor cells admixed with the commonly used adjuvant Corynebacterium parvum. While admixture of tumor cells with C. parvum resulted in complete regression of tumors in syngeneic mice, it did not induce protective immunity against a subsequent challenge of wild-type cells from any of the 3 tumors tested. In contrast, B7-transduced EL4 and P815 tumors regressed locally and induced a potent systemic immunity to wild-type tumors and a higher level of cytotoxic T-cell activity than did tumor cells admixed with C. parvum. No systemic immunity was induced by B7-transduced nonimmunogenic MCA102 sarcoma cells. Our results demonstrate that immunogenic tumor cells transduced with the B7 gene are superior to tumor cells mixed with C. parvum for the induction of systemic tumor immunity. PMID:7522958

  7. Cytoplasmic localization of wild-type survivin is associated with constitutive activation of the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway and represents a favorable prognostic factor in patients with acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Serrano-López, Juana; Serrano, Josefina; Figueroa, Vianihuini; Torres-Gomez, Antonio; Tabares, Salvador; Casaño, Javier; Fernandez-Escalada, Noemi; Sánchez-Garcia, Joaquín

    2013-01-01

    Survivin is over-expressed in most hematologic malignancies but the prognostic significance of the subcompartmental distribution of wild-type or splicing variants in acute myeloid leukemia has not been addressed yet. Using western blotting, we assessed the expression of wild-type survivin and survivin splice variants 2B and Delta-Ex3 in nuclear and cytoplasmic protein extracts in samples taken from 105 patients at the time of their diagnosis of acute myeloid leukemia. Given that survivin is a downstream effector of the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway, survivin expression was also correlated with pSer473-Akt. Wild-type survivin and the 2B splice variant were positive in 76.3% and 78.0% of samples in the nucleus, cytoplasm or both, whereas the Delta-Ex3 isoform was only positive in the nucleus in 37.7% of samples. Cytoplasmic localization of wild-type survivin was significantly associated with the presence of high levels of pSer473-Akt (P<0.001). Inhibition of the PI3K/Akt pathway with wortmannin and Ly294002 caused a significant reduction in the expression of cytoplasmic wild-type survivin. The presence of cytoplasmic wild-type survivin and pSer473-Akt was associated with a lower fraction of quiescent leukemia stem cells (P=0.02). The presence of cytoplasmic wild-type survivin and pSer473-Akt were favorable independent prognostic factors. Moreover, the activation of the PI3K/Akt pathway with expression of cytoplasmic wild-type survivin identified a subgroup of acute myeloid leukemia patients with an excellent outcome (overall survival rate of 60.0±21.9% and relapse-free survival of 63.0±13.5%). Our findings suggest that cytoplasmic wild-type survivin is a critical downstream effector of the PI3K/Akt pathway leading to more chemosensitive cells and a more favorable outcome in acute myeloid leukemia. PMID:23812937

  8. Insulin-Like Growth Factor-Type 1 Receptor Inhibitor NVP-AEW541 Enhances Radiosensitivity of PTEN Wild-Type but Not PTEN-Deficient Human Prostate Cancer Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Isebaert, Sofie F.; Swinnen, Johannes V.; McBride, William H.; Haustermans, Karin M.

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: During the past decade, many clinical trials with both monoclonal antibodies and small molecules that target the insulin-like growth factor-type 1 receptor (IGF-1R) have been launched. Despite the important role of IGF-1R signaling in radioresistance, studies of such agents in combination with radiotherapy are lagging behind. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effect of the small molecule IGF-1R kinase inhibitor NVP-AEW541 on the intrinsic radioresistance of prostate cancer cells. Methods and Materials: The effect of NVP-AEW541 on cell proliferation, cell viability, IGF-1R signaling, radiosensitivity, cell cycle distribution, and double strand break repair was determined in three human prostate cancer cell lines (PC3, DU145, 22Rv1). Moreover, the importance of the PTEN pathway status was explored by means of transfection experiments with constitutively active Akt or inactive kinase-dead Akt. Results: NVP-AEW541 inhibited cell proliferation and decreased cell viability in a time-and dose-dependent manner in all three cell lines. Radiosensitization was observed in the PTEN wild-type cell lines DU145 and 22Rv1 but not in the PTEN-deficient PC3 cell line. NVP-AEW541-induced radiosensitization coincided with downregulation of phospho-Akt levels and high levels of residual double strand breaks. The importance of PTEN status in the radiosensitization effect was confirmed by transfection experiments with constitutively active Akt or inactive kinase-dead Akt. Conclusions: NVP-AEW541 enhances the effect of ionizing radiation in PTEN wild-type, but not in PTEN-deficient, prostate cancer cells. Proper patient selection based on the PTEN status of the tumor will be critical to the achievement of optimal results in clinical trials in which the combination of radiotherapy and this IGF-1R inhibitor is being explored.

  9. Structural and Morphometric Comparison of Lower Incisors in PACAP-Deficient and Wild-Type Mice.

    PubMed

    Sandor, B; Fintor, K; Reglodi, D; Fulop, D B; Helyes, Z; Szanto, I; Nagy, P; Hashimoto, H; Tamas, A

    2016-06-01

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) is a neuropeptide with widespread distribution. PACAP plays an important role in the development of the nervous system, it has a trophic and protective effect, and it is also implicated in the regulation of various physiological functions. Teeth are originated from the mesenchyme of the neural crest and the ectoderm of the first branchial arch, suggesting similarities with the development of the nervous system. Earlier PACAP-immunoreactive fibers have been found in the odontoblastic and subodontoblastic layers of the dental pulp. Our previous examinations have shown that PACAP deficiency causes alterations in the morphology and structure of the developing molars of 7-day-old mice. In our present study, morphometric and structural comparison was performed on the incisors of 1-year-old wild-type and PACAP-deficient mice. Hard tissue density measurements and morphometric comparison were carried out on the mandibles and the lower incisors with micro-CT. For structural examination, Raman microscopy was applied on frontal thin sections of the mandible. With micro-CT morphometrical measurements, the size of the incisors and the relative volume of the pulp to dentin were significantly smaller in the PACAP-deficient group compared to the wild-type animals. The density of calcium hydroxyapatite in the dentin was reduced in the PACAP-deficient mice. No structural differences could be observed in the enamel with Raman microscopy. Significant differences were found in the dentin of PACAP-deficient mice with Raman microscopy, where increased carbonate/phosphate ratio indicates higher intracrystalline disordering. The evaluation of amide III bands in the dentin revealed higher structural diversity in wild-type mice. Based upon our present and previous results, it is obvious that PACAP plays an important role in tooth development with the regulation of morphogenesis, dentin, and enamel mineralization. Further studies are

  10. Adaptive thermogenesis and thermal conductance in wild-type and UCP1-KO mice

    PubMed Central

    Willershäuser, Monja; Jastroch, Martin; Rourke, Bryan C.; Fromme, Tobias; Oelkrug, Rebecca; Heldmaier, Gerhard; Klingenspor, Martin

    2010-01-01

    We compared maximal cold-induced heat production (HPmax) and cold limits between warm (WA; 27°C), moderate cold (MCA; 18°C), or cold acclimated (CA; 5°C) wild-type and uncoupling-protein 1 knockout (UCP1-KO) mice. In wild-type mice, HPmax was successively increased after MCA and CA, and the cold limit was lowered to −8.3°C and −18.0°C, respectively. UCP1-KO mice also increased HPmax in response to MCA and CA, although to a lesser extent. Direct comparison revealed a maximal cold-induced recruitment of heat production by +473 mW and +227 mW in wild-type and UCP1-KO mice, respectively. The increase in cold tolerance of UCP1-KO mice from −0.9°C in MCA to −10.1°C in CA could not be directly related to changes in HPmax, indicating that UCP1-KO mice used the dissipated heat more efficiently than wild-type mice. As judged from respiratory quotients, acutely cold-challenged UCP1-KO mice showed a delayed transition toward lipid oxidation, and 5-h cold exposure revealed diminished physical activity and less variability in the control of metabolic rate. We conclude that BAT is required for maximal adaptive thermogenesis but also allows metabolic flexibility and a rapid switch toward sustained lipid-fuelled thermogenesis as an acute response to cold. In both CA groups, expression of contractile proteins (myosin heavy-chain isoforms) showed minor training effects in skeletal muscles, while cardiac muscle of UCP1-KO mice had novel expression of beta cardiac isoform. Neither respiration nor basal proton conductance of skeletal muscle mitochondria were different between genotypes. In subcutaneous white adipose tissue of UCP1-KO mice, cold exposure increased cytochrome-c oxidase activity and expression of the cell death-inducing DFFA-like effector A by 3.6-fold and 15-fold, respectively, indicating the recruitment of mitochondria-rich brown adipocyte-like cells. Absence of functional BAT leads to remodeling of white adipose tissue, which may significantly contribute

  11. Suppressed Accumulation of Cerebral Amyloid β Peptides in Aged Transgenic Alzheimer’s Disease Mice by Transplantation with Wild-Type or Prostaglandin E2 Receptor Subtype 2-Null Bone Marrow

    PubMed Central

    Keene, C. Dirk; Chang, Rubens C.; Lopez-Yglesias, Americo H.; Shalloway, Bryan R.; Sokal, Izabella; Li, Xianwu; Reed, Patrick J.; Keene, Lisa M.; Montine, Kathleen S.; Breyer, Richard M.; Rockhill, Jason K.; Montine, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    A complex therapeutic challenge for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is minimizing deleterious aspects of microglial activation while maximizing beneficial actions, including phagocytosis/clearance of amyloid β (Aβ) peptides. One potential target is selective suppression of microglial prostaglandin E2 receptor subtype 2 (EP2) function, which influences microglial phagocytosis and elaboration of neurotoxic cytokines. To test this hypothesis, we transplanted bone marrow cells derived from wild-type mice or mice homozygous deficient for EP2 (EP2−/−) into lethally irradiated 5-month-old wild-type or APPswe-PS1ΔE9 double transgenic AD mouse model recipients. We found that cerebral engraftment by bone marrow transplant (BMT)-derived wild-type or EP2−/− microglia was more efficient in APPswe-PS1ΔE9 than in wild-type mice, and APPswe-PS1ΔE9 mice that received EP2−/− BMT had increased cortical microglia compared with APPswe-PS1ΔE9 mice that received wild-type BMT. We found that myeloablative irradiation followed by bone marrow transplant-derived microglia engraftment, rather than cranial irradiation or BMT alone, was responsible for the approximate one-third reduction in both Aβ plaques and potentially more neurotoxic soluble Aβ species. An additional 25% reduction in cerebral cortical Aβ burden was achieved in mice that received EP2−/− BMT compared with mice that received wild-type BMT. Our results provide a foundation for an adult stem cell-based therapy to suppress soluble Aβ peptide and plaque accumulation in the cerebrum of patients with AD. PMID:20522650

  12. Rearing in Seawater Mesocosms Improves the Spawning Performance of Growth Hormone Transgenic and Wild-Type Coho Salmon

    PubMed Central

    Leggatt, Rosalind A.; Hollo, Tanya; Vandersteen, Wendy E.; McFarlane, Kassandra; Goh, Benjamin; Prevost, Joelle; Devlin, Robert H.

    2014-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) transgenes can significantly accelerate growth rates in fish and cause associated alterations to their physiology and behaviour. Concern exists regarding potential environmental risks of GH transgenic fish, should they enter natural ecosystems. In particular, whether they can reproduce and generate viable offspring under natural conditions is poorly understood. In previous studies, GH transgenic salmon grown under contained culture conditions had lower spawning behaviour and reproductive success relative to wild-type fish reared in nature. However, wild-type salmon cultured in equal conditions also had limited reproductive success. As such, whether decreased reproductive success of GH transgenic salmon is due to the action of the transgene or to secondary effects of culture (or a combination) has not been fully ascertained. Hence, salmon were reared in large (350,000 L), semi-natural, seawater tanks (termed mesocosms) designed to minimize effects of standard laboratory culture conditions, and the reproductive success of wild-type and GH transgenic coho salmon from mesocosms were compared with that of wild-type fish from nature. Mesocosm rearing partially restored spawning behaviour and success of wild-type fish relative to culture rearing, but remained lower overall than those reared in nature. GH transgenic salmon reared in the mesocosm had similar spawning behaviour and success as wild-type fish reared in the mesocosm when in full competition and without competition, but had lower success in male-only competition experiments. There was evidence of genotype×environmental interactions on spawning success, so that spawning success of transgenic fish, should they escape to natural systems in early life, cannot be predicted with low uncertainty. Under the present conditions, we found no evidence to support enhanced mating capabilities of GH transgenic coho salmon compared to wild-type salmon. However, it is clear that GH transgenic salmon are

  13. Insights into wild-type and mutant p53 functions provided by genetically engineered mice.

    PubMed

    Donehower, Lawrence A

    2014-06-01

    Recent whole-exome sequencing studies of numerous human cancers have now conclusively shown that the TP53 tumor-suppressor gene is the most frequently mutated gene in human cancers. Despite extensive studies of the TP53 gene and its encoded protein (p53), our understanding of how TP53 mutations contribute to cancer initiation and progression remain incomplete. Genetically engineered mice with germline or inducible Trp53 somatic mutations have provided important insights into the mechanisms by which different types of p53 mutation influence cancer development. Trp53 germline mutations that alter specific p53 structural domains or posttranslation modification sites have benefitted our understanding of wild-type p53 functions in a whole organism context. Moreover, genetic approaches to reestablish functional wild-type p53 to p53-deficient tissues and tumors have increased our understanding of the therapeutic potential of restoring functional p53 signaling to cancers. This review outlines many of the key insights provided by the various categories of Trp53 mutant mice that have been generated by multiple genetic engineering approaches.

  14. Accelerated Telomere Shortening and Replicative Senescence in Human Fibroblasts Overexpressing Mutant and Wild Type Lamin A

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shurong; Risques, Rosa Ana; Martin, George M.; Rabinovitch, Peter S.; Oshima, Junko

    2008-01-01

    LMNA mutations are responsible for a variety of genetic disorders, including muscular dystrophy, lipodystrophy, and certain progeroid syndromes, notably Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria. Although a number of clinical features of these disorders are suggestive of accelerated aging, it is not known whether cells derived from these patients exhibit cellular phenotypes associated with accelerated aging. We examined a series of isogenic skin fibroblast lines transfected with LMNA constructs bearing known pathogenic point mutations or deletion mutations found in progeroid syndromes. Fibroblasts overexpressing mutant lamin A exhibited accelerated rates of loss of telomeres and shortened replicative lifespans, in addition to abnormal nuclear morphology. To our surprise, these abnormalities were also observed in lines overexpressing wild-type lamin A. Copy number variants are common in human populations; those involving LMNA, whether arising meiotically or mitotically, might lead to progeroid phenotypes. In an initial pilot study of 23 progeroid cases without detectible WRN or LMNA mutations, however, no cases of altered LMNA copy number were detected. Nevertheless, our findings raise a hypothesis that changes in lamina organization may cause accelerated telomere attrition, with different kinetics for overexpession of wild-type and mutant lamin A, which leads to rapid replicative senescence and progroid phenotypes. PMID:17870066

  15. High Pathogenicity of Wild-Type Measles Virus Infection in CD150 (SLAM) Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sellin, Caroline I.; Davoust, Nathalie; Guillaume, Vanessa; Baas, Dominique; Belin, Marie-Françoise; Buckland, Robin; Wild, T. Fabian; Horvat, Branka

    2006-01-01

    Measles virus (MV) infection causes an acute childhood disease, associated in certain cases with infection of the central nervous system and development of a severe neurological disease. We have generated transgenic mice ubiquitously expressing the human protein SLAM (signaling lymphocytic activation molecule), or CD150, recently identified as an MV receptor. In contrast to all other MV receptor transgenic models described so far, in these mice infection with wild-type MV strains is highly pathogenic. Intranasal infection of SLAM transgenic suckling mice leads to MV spread to different organs and the development of an acute neurological syndrome, characterized by lethargy, seizures, ataxia, weight loss, and death within 3 weeks. In addition, in this model, vaccine and wild-type MV strains can be distinguished by virulence. Furthermore, intracranial MV infection of adult transgenic mice generates a subclinical infection associated with a high titer of MV-specific antibodies in the serum. Finally, to analyze new antimeasles therapeutic approaches, we created a recombinant soluble form of SLAM and demonstrated its important antiviral activity both in vitro and in vivo. Taken together, our results show the high susceptibility of SLAM transgenic mice to MV-induced neurological disease and open new perspectives for the analysis of the implication of SLAM in the neuropathogenicity of other morbilliviruses, which also use this molecule as a receptor. Moreover, this transgenic model, in allowing a simple readout of the efficacy of an antiviral treatment, provides unique experimental means to test novel anti-MV preventive and therapeutic strategies. PMID:16775330

  16. Proteomic response to physiological fermentation stresses in a wild-type wine strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Trabalzini, Lorenza; Paffetti, Alessandro; Scaloni, Andrea; Talamo, Fabio; Ferro, Elisa; Coratza, Grazietta; Bovalini, Lucia; Lusini, Paola; Martelli, Paola; Santucci, Annalisa

    2003-01-01

    We report a study on the adaptive response of a wild-type wine Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain, isolated from natural spontaneous grape must, to mild and progressive physiological stresses due to fermentation. We observed by two-dimensional electrophoresis how the yeast proteome changes during glucose exhaustion, before the cell enters its complete stationary phase. On the basis of their identification, the proteins representing the S. cerevisiae proteomic response to fermentation stresses were divided into three classes: repressed proteins, induced proteins and autoproteolysed proteins. In an overall view, the proteome adaptation of S. cerevisiae at the time of glucose exhaustion seems to be directed mainly against the effects of ethanol, causing both hyperosmolarity and oxidative responses. Stress-induced autoproteolysis is directed mainly towards specific isoforms of glycolytic enzymes. Through the use of a wild-type S. cerevisiae strain and PMSF, a specific inhibitor of vacuolar proteinase B, we could also distinguish the specific contributions of the vacuole and the proteasome to the autoproteolytic process. PMID:12401115

  17. Prolactin inhibits a major tumor-suppressive function of wild type BRCA1.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kuan-Hui Ethan; Walker, Ameae M

    2016-06-01

    Even though mutations in the tumor suppressor, BRCA1, markedly increase the risk of breast and ovarian cancer, most breast and ovarian cancers express wild type BRCA1. An important question is therefore how the tumor-suppressive function of normal BRCA1 is overcome during development of most cancers. Because prolactin promotes these and other cancers, we investigated the hypothesis that prolactin interferes with the ability of BRCA1 to inhibit the cell cycle. Examining six different cancer cell lines with wild type BRCA1, and making use of both prolactin and the growth-inhibiting selective prolactin receptor modulator, S179D PRL, we demonstrate that prolactin activation of Stat5 results in the formation of a complex between phospho-Stat5 and BRCA1. Formation of this complex does not interfere with nuclear translocation or binding of BRCA1 to the p21 promoter, but does interfere with the ability of BRCA1 to transactivate the p21 promoter. Overexpression of a dominant-negative Stat5 in prolactin-stimulated cells resulted in increased p21 expression. We conclude that prolactin inhibits a major tumor-suppressive function of BRCA1 by interfering with BRCA1's upregulation of expression of the cell cycle inhibitor, p21.

  18. Molecular dynamics studies on the structural stability of wild-type dog prion protein.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiapu; Liu, David D W

    2011-06-01

    Prion diseases such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob diseases, Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker syndrome, Fatal Familial Insomnia, Kuru in humans, scrapie in sheep, bovine spongiform encephalopathy (or 'mad-cow' disease) and chronic wasting disease in cattle are invariably fatal and highly infectious neurodegenerative diseases affecting humans and animals. However, by now there have not been some effective therapeutic approaches to treat all these prion diseases. In 2008, canine mammals including dogs (canis familials) were the first time academically reported to be resistant to prion diseases (Vaccine 26: 2601-2614 (2008)). Thus, it is very worth studying the molecular structures of dog prion protein to obtain insights into the immunity of dogs to prion diseases. This paper studies the molecular structural dynamics of wild-type dog prion protein. The comparison analyses with rabbit prion protein show that the dog prion protein has stable molecular structures whether under neutral or low pH environments. We also find that the salt bridges such as D177-R163 contribute to the structural stability of wild-type rabbit prion protein under neutral pH environment. PMID:21469747

  19. Plastid sedimentation kinetics in roots of wild-type and starch-deficient mutants of Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacCleery, S. A.; Kiss, J. Z.

    1999-01-01

    Sedimentation and movement of plastids in columella cells of the root cap were measured in seedlings of wild-type, a reduced starch mutant, and a starchless mutant of Arabidopsis. To assay for sedimentation, we used both linear measurements and the change of angle from the cell center as indices in vertical and reoriented plants with the aid of computer-assisted image analysis. Seedlings were fixed at short periods after reorientation, and plastid sedimentation correlated with starch content in the three strains of Arabidopsis. Amyloplasts of wild-type seedlings showed the greatest sedimentation, whereas plastids of the starchless mutant showed no significant sedimentation in the vertically grown and reoriented seedlings. Because previous research has shown that a full complement of starch is needed for full gravitropic sensitivity, this study correlates increased sensitivity with plastid sedimentation. However, although plastid sedimentation contributed to gravisensitivity, it was not required, because the gravitropic starchless mutant had plastids that did not sediment. This is the first study, to our knowledge, to measure plastid sedimentation in Arabidopsis roots after reorientation of seedlings. Taken together, the results of this study are consistent with the classic plastid-based and protoplast-based models of graviperception and suggest that multiple systems of perception exist in plant cells.

  20. The mechanical properties of tail tendon fascicles from lubricin knockout, wild type and heterozygous mice.

    PubMed

    Reuvers, John; Thoreson, Andrew R; Zhao, Chunfeng; Zhang, Ling; Jay, Gregory D; An, Kai-Nan; Warman, Matthew L; Amadio, Peter C

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the effects of lubricin on tendon stiffness and viscoelasticity. A total of 36 mice were tested with 12 mice in each of the following groups: lubricin knock-out ⁻/⁻, heterozygous ⁺/⁻ and wild-type ⁺/⁺. A ramp test was used to determine the elastic modulus by pulling the fascicles to 2.5% strain amplitude at a rate of 0.05 mm/s. Then, followed by a relaxation test that pulled the fascicles to 5% strain amplitude at a rate of 2 mm/s. The fascicles were allowed to relax for 2 min at the maximum strain and a single-cycle relaxation ratio was used to characterize viscoelastic properties. There was no significant difference in the Young's modulus between the three groups (p > 0.05), but the knockout mice had a significantly (p < 0.05) lower relaxation ratio than the wild type mice. Based on these data, we concluded that lubricin expression has an effect on the viscoelastic properties of tendon fascicles. The clinical significance of this finding, if any, remains to be demonstrated.

  1. The mechanical properties of tail tendon fascicles from lubricin knockout, wild type and heterozygous mice

    PubMed Central

    Reuvers, John; Thoreson, Andrew R.; Zhao, Chunfeng; Zhang, Ling; Jay, Gregory D.; An, Kai-Nan; Warman, Matthew L.; Amadio, Peter C.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the effects of lubricin on tendon stiffness and viscoelasticity. A total of 36 mice were tested with 12 mice in each of the following groups: lubricin knock-out (−/−), heterozygous (+/−) and wild-type (+/+). A ramp test was used to determine the elastic modulus by pulling the fascicles to 2.5% strain amplitude at a rate of 0.05 mm/s. Then, followed by a relaxation test that pulled the fascicles to 5% strain amplitude at a rate of 2 mm/s. The fascicles were allowed to relax for 2 min at the maximum strain and a single-cycle relaxation ratio was used to characterize viscoelastic properties. There was no significant difference in the Young’s modulus between the three groups (p > 0.05), but the knockout mice had a significantly (p < 0.05) lower relaxation ratio than the wild type mice. Based on these data, we concluded that lubricin expression has an effect on the viscoelastic properties of tendon fascicles. The clinical significance of this finding, if any, remains to be demonstrated. PMID:21821131

  2. Mycoplasma gallisepticum infection in wild-type turkeys living in close contact with domestic fowl.

    PubMed

    Jessup, D A; DaMassa, A J; Lewis, R; Jones, K R

    1983-12-01

    Mycoplasma gallisepticum was isolated from 2 wild-type turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo) and 1 domestic turkey living in close contact on a farm in Tehama County, California. Sinusitis was detected in 2 of 14 wild-type turkeys and in 1 of 12 feral broad-breasted bronze turkeys, but in none of several chickens on the premises. The entire mixed flock was captured, sinus aspirates were collected from affected birds, and blood samples were obtained from all birds for serologic testing. Blood samples also were obtained from 10 domestic turkeys on adjacent premises from which breeding stock had been borrowed. The M gallisepticum isolated from sinus aspirates was typed and inoculated into susceptible chickens, resulting in airsacculitis. California wild turkeys with and without histories of exposure to domestic fowl and wild turkeys shipped into California from Texas for release were tested for antibodies to M gallisepticum, using the plate agglutination test. Evidence of M gallisepticum infection was not found in wild turkeys at any location other than the original premises.

  3. Craniofacial statistical deformation models of wild-type mice and Crouzon mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ólafsdóttir, Hildur; Darvann, Tron A.; Ersbøll, Bjarne K.; Hermann, Nuno V.; Oubel, Estanislao; Larsen, Rasmus; Frangi, Alejandro F.; Larsen, Per; Perlyn, Chad A.; Morriss-Kay, Gillian M.; Kreiborg, Sven

    2007-03-01

    Crouzon syndrome is characterised by premature fusion of cranial sutures and synchondroses leading to craniofacial growth disturbances. The gene causing the syndrome was discovered approximately a decade ago and recently the first mouse model of the syndrome was generated. In this study, a set of Micro CT scans of the heads of wild-type (normal) mice and Crouzon mice were investigated. Statistical deformation models were built to assess the anatomical differences between the groups, as well as the within-group anatomical variation. Following the approach by Rueckert et al. we built an atlas using B-spline-based nonrigid registration and subsequently, the atlas was nonrigidly registered to the cases being modelled. The parameters of these registrations were then used as input to a PCA. Using different sets of registration parameters, different models were constructed to describe (i) the difference between the two groups in anatomical variation and (ii) the within-group variation. These models confirmed many known traits in the wild-type and Crouzon mouse craniofacial anatomy. However, they also showed some new traits.

  4. Global carbon utilization profiles of wild-type, mutant, and transformant strains of Hypocrea jecorina.

    PubMed

    Druzhinina, Irina S; Schmoll, Monika; Seiboth, Bernhard; Kubicek, Christian P

    2006-03-01

    The ascomycete Hypocrea jecorina (Trichoderma reesei), an industrial producer of cellulases and hemicellulases, can efficiently degrade plant polysaccharides. However, the catabolic pathways for the resulting monomers and their relationship to enzyme induction are not well known. Here we used the Biolog Phenotype MicroArrays technique to evaluate the growth of H. jecorina on 95 carbon sources. For this purpose, we compared several wild-type isolates, mutants producing different amounts of cellulases, and strains transformed with a heterologous antibiotic resistance marker gene. The wild-type isolates and transformed strains had the highest variation in growth patterns on individual carbon sources. The cellulase mutants were relatively similar to their parental strains. Both in the mutant and in the transformed strains, the most significant changes occurred in utilization of xylitol, erythritol, D-sorbitol, D-ribose, D-galactose, L-arabinose, N-acetyl-D-glucosamine, maltotriose, and beta-methyl-glucoside. Increased production of cellulases was negatively correlated with the ability to grow on gamma-aminobutyrate, adonitol, and 2-ketogluconate; and positively correlated with that on d-sorbitol and saccharic acid. The reproducibility, relative simplicity, and high resolution (+/-10% of increase in mycelial density) of the phenotypic microarrays make them a useful tool for the characterization of mutant and transformed strains and for a global analysis of gene function.

  5. Genetic recombination of tick-borne flaviviruses among wild-type strains.

    PubMed

    Norberg, Peter; Roth, Anette; Bergström, Tomas

    2013-06-01

    Genetic recombination has been suggested to occur in mosquito-borne flaviviruses. In contrast, tick-borne flaviviruses have been thought to evolve in a clonal manner, although recent studies suggest that recombination occurs also for these viruses. We re-analyzed the data and found that previous conclusions on wild type recombination were probably falsely drawn due to misalignments of nucleotide sequences, ambiguities in GenBank sequences, or different laboratory culture histories suggestive of recombination events in laboratory. To evaluate if reliable predictions of wild type recombination of tick-borne flaviviruses can be made, we analyzed viral strains sequenced exclusively for this study, and other flavivirus sequences retrieved from GenBank. We detected genetic signals supporting recombination between viruses within the three clades of TBEV-Eu, TBEV-Sib and TBEV-Fe, respectively. Our results suggest that the tick-borne encephalitis viruses may undergo recombination under natural conditions, but that geographic barriers restrict most recombination events to involve only closely genetically related viruses.

  6. Glucocorticoid-regulated glycoprotein maturation in wild-type and mutant rat cell lines

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    Glucocorticoid hormones can regulate the posttranslational maturation of mouse mammary tumor virus (MTV) precursor polyproteins in M1.54, a stably infected rat hepatoma cell line. We have used complement- mediated cytolysis to recover variants of M1.54 that fail to express MTV cell surface glycoproteins in a hormone-regulated manner (Firestone, G.L., and K.R. Yamamoto, 1983, Mol. Cell. Biol., 3:149- 160). One such clonal isolate, CR4, is similar to wild-type with respect to synthesis of MTV mRNAs, production of the MTV glycoprotein precursor (gPr74env) and a glycosylated maturation product (gp51), and hormone-induced processing of two MTV phosphoproteins. In contrast, three viral cell surface glycoproteins (gp78, gp70, and gp32) and one extracellular species (gp70s), which derive from gPr74env in glucocorticoid-treated wild-type cells, fail to appear in CR4. CR4 showed no apparent alterations in proliferation rate, cell shape, or expression of total functional mRNA and bulk glycoproteins. We conclude that the genetic lesion in CR4 defines a highly selective hormone- regulated glycoprotein maturation pathway that alters the fate of a restricted subset of precursor species. PMID:3023398

  7. Structural insights into conformational stability of both wild-type and mutant EZH2 receptor

    PubMed Central

    Aier, Imlimaong; Varadwaj, Pritish Kumar; Raj, Utkarsh

    2016-01-01

    Polycomb group (PcG) proteins have been observed to maintain the pattern of histone by methylation of the histone tail responsible for the gene expression in various cellular processes, of which enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) acts as tumor suppressor. Overexpression of EZH2 results in hyper activation found in a variety of cancer. Point mutation on two important residues were induced and the results were compared between the wild type and mutant EZH2. The mutation of Y641 and A677 present in the active region of the protein alters the interaction of the top ranked compound with the newly modeled binding groove of the SET domain, giving a GLIDE score of −12.26 kcal/mol, better than that of the wild type at −11.664 kcal/mol. In depth analysis were carried out for understanding the underlying molecular mechanism using techniques viz. molecular dynamics, principal component analysis, residue interaction network and free energy landscape analysis, which showed that the mutated residues changed the overall conformation of the system along with the residue-residue interaction network. The insight from this study could be of great relevance while designing new compounds for EZH2 enzyme inhibition and the effect of mutation on the overall binding mechanism of the system. PMID:27713574

  8. What Is Important in Electronic Textbooks for Students of Different Achievement Levels?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luik, Piret; Mikk, Jaan

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports the findings of a study that explored which characteristics of electronic textbooks correlated with knowledge acquisition by learners of different achievement levels. The study was carried out on 35 units of electronic textbooks that were studied by 19 high-achieving and 19 low-achieving students in four Estonian schools. The…

  9. Co-fibrillogenesis of Wild-type and D76N β2-Microglobulin: THE CRUCIAL ROLE OF FIBRILLAR SEEDS.

    PubMed

    Natalello, Antonino; Mangione, P Patrizia; Giorgetti, Sofia; Porcari, Riccardo; Marchese, Loredana; Zorzoli, Irene; Relini, Annalisa; Ami, Diletta; Faravelli, Giulia; Valli, Maurizia; Stoppini, Monica; Doglia, Silvia M; Bellotti, Vittorio; Raimondi, Sara

    2016-04-29

    The amyloidogenic variant of β2-microglobulin, D76N, can readily convert into genuine fibrils under physiological conditions and primes in vitro the fibrillogenesis of the wild-type β2-microglobulin. By Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy, we have demonstrated that the amyloid transformation of wild-type β2-microglobulin can be induced by the variant only after its complete fibrillar conversion. Our current findings are consistent with preliminary data in which we have shown a seeding effect of fibrils formed from D76N or the natural truncated form of β2-microglobulin lacking the first six N-terminal residues. Interestingly, the hybrid wild-type/variant fibrillar material acquired a thermodynamic stability similar to that of homogenous D76N β2-microglobulin fibrils and significantly higher than the wild-type homogeneous fibrils prepared at neutral pH in the presence of 20% trifluoroethanol. These results suggest that the surface of D76N β2-microglobulin fibrils can favor the transition of the wild-type protein into an amyloid conformation leading to a rapid integration into fibrils. The chaperone crystallin, which is a mild modulator of the lag phase of the variant fibrillogenesis, potently inhibits fibril elongation of the wild-type even once it is absorbed on D76N β2-microglobulin fibrils. PMID:26921323

  10. Retinal ganglion cell responses to voltage and current stimulation in wild-type and rd1 mouse retinas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goo, Yong Sook; Ye, Jang Hee; Lee, Seokyoung; Nam, Yoonkey; Ryu, Sang Baek; Kim, Kyung Hwan

    2011-06-01

    Retinal prostheses are being developed to restore vision for those with retinal diseases such as retinitis pigmentosa or age-related macular degeneration. Since neural prostheses depend upon electrical stimulation to control neural activity, optimal stimulation parameters for successful encoding of visual information are one of the most important requirements to enable visual perception. In this paper, we focused on retinal ganglion cell (RGC) responses to different stimulation parameters and compared threshold charge densities in wild-type and rd1 mice. For this purpose, we used in vitro retinal preparations of wild-type and rd1 mice. When the neural network was stimulated with voltage- and current-controlled pulses, RGCs from both wild-type and rd1 mice responded; however the temporal pattern of RGC response is very different. In wild-type RGCs, a single peak within 100 ms appears, while multiple peaks (approximately four peaks) with ~10 Hz rhythm within 400 ms appear in RGCs in the degenerated retina of rd1 mice. We find that an anodic phase-first biphasic voltage-controlled pulse is more efficient for stimulation than a biphasic current-controlled pulse based on lower threshold charge density. The threshold charge densities for activation of RGCs both with voltage- and current-controlled pulses are overall more elevated for the rd1 mouse than the wild-type mouse. Here, we propose the stimulus range for wild-type and rd1 retinas when the optimal modulation of a RGC response is possible.

  11. Impact of sex and ozone exposure on the course of pneumonia in wild type and SP-A (−/−) mice

    PubMed Central

    Mikerov, Anatoly N.; Hu, Sanmei; Durrani, Faryal; Gan, Xiaozhuang; Wang, Guirong; Umstead, Todd M.; Phelps, David S.; Floros, Joanna

    2012-01-01

    Female mice exhibited higher survival rate than males after pneumonia, with a reversal of this pattern following ozone exposure. Surfactant protein A (SP-A) plays an important role in innate immunity and SP-A (−/−) mice were more susceptible to pneumonia than wild type mice. Here, we investigated underlying mechanisms of the differential susceptibility of mice to pneumonia. Wild type and SP-A (−/−) C57BL/6J male and female mice were exposed to ozone or filtered air (FA) and then infected intratracheally with Klebsiella pneumoniae. Blood, spleen, and lung were analyzed for bacterial counts, lung and spleen weights, and sex hormone and cortisol levels were measured in plasma within two days post-infection. We found: 1) in the absence of ozone-induced oxidative stress, males had higher level of bacterial dissemination compared to females; ozone exposure decreased pulmonary clearance in both sexes and ozone-exposed females were more affected than males; 2) ozone exposure increased lung weight, but decreased spleen weight in both sexes, and in both cases ozone-exposed females were affected the most; 3) plasma cortisol levels in infected mice changed: ozone-exposed > FA-exposed, females > males, and infected > non-infected; 4) no major sex hormone differences were observed in the studied conditions; 5) differences between wild type and SP-A (−/−) mice were observed in some of the studied conditions. We concluded that reduced pulmonary clearance, compromised spleen response to infection, and increased cortisol levels in ozone-exposed females, and the higher level of lung bacterial dissemination in FA-exposed males, contribute to the previously observed survival outcomes. PMID:22285567

  12. Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy discriminates the response to microglial stimulation of wild type and Alzheimer’s disease models

    PubMed Central

    Pardon, Marie-Christine; Yanez Lopez, Maria; Yuchun, Ding; Marjańska, Małgorzata; Prior, Malcolm; Brignell, Christopher; Parhizkar, Samira; Agostini, Alessandra; Bai, Li; Auer, Dorothee P.; Faas, Henryk M

    2016-01-01

    Microglia activation has emerged as a potential key factor in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease. Metabolite levels assessed by magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) are used as markers of neuroinflammation in neurodegenerative diseases, but how they relate to microglial activation in health and chronic disease is incompletely understood. Using MRS, we monitored the brain metabolic response to lipopolysaccharides (LPS)-induced microglia activation in vivo in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease (APP/PS1) and healthy controls (wild-type (WT) littermates) over 4 hours. We assessed reactive gliosis by immunohistochemistry and correlated metabolic and histological measures. In WT mice, LPS induced a microglial phenotype consistent with activation, associated with a sustained increase in macromolecule and lipid levels (ML9). This effect was not seen in APP/PS1 mice, where LPS did not lead to a microglial response measured by histology, but induced a late increase in the putative inflammation marker myoinositol (mI) and metabolic changes in total creatine and taurine previously reported to be associated with amyloid load. We argue that ML9 and mI distinguish the response of WT and APP/PS1 mice to immune mediators. Lipid and macromolecule levels may represent a biomarker of activation of healthy microglia, while mI may not be a glial marker. PMID:26813748

  13. Accelerating Influenza Research: Vaccines, Antivirals, Immunomodulators and Monoclonal Antibodies. The Manufacture of a New Wild-Type H3N2 Virus for the Human Viral Challenge Model

    PubMed Central

    Fullen, Daniel J.; Noulin, Nicolas; Catchpole, Andrew; Fathi, Hosnieh; Murray, Edward J.; Mann, Alex; Eze, Kingsley; Balaratnam, Ganesh; Borley, Daryl W.; Gilbert, Anthony; Lambkin-Williams, Rob

    2016-01-01

    Background Influenza and its associated diseases are a major cause of morbidity and mortality. The United States Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices recommends influenza vaccination for everyone over 6 months of age. The failure of the flu vaccine in 2014–2015 demonstrates the need for a model that allows the rapid development of novel antivirals, universal/intra-seasonal vaccines, immunomodulators, monoclonal antibodies and other novel treatments. To this end we manufactured a new H3N2 influenza virus in compliance with Good Manufacturing Practice for use in the Human Viral Challenge Model. Methods and Strain Selection We chose an H3N2 influenza subtype, rather than H1N1, given that this strain has the most substantial impact in terms of morbidity or mortality annually as described by the Centre for Disease Control. We first subjected the virus batch to rigorous adventitious agent testing, confirmed the virus to be wild-type by Sanger sequencing and determined the virus titres appropriate for human use via the established ferret model. We built on our previous experience with other H3N2 and H1N1 viruses to develop this unique model. Human Challenge and Conclusions We conducted an initial safety and characterisation study in healthy adult volunteers, utilising our unique clinical quarantine facility in London, UK. In this study we demonstrated this new influenza (H3N2) challenge virus to be both safe and pathogenic with an appropriate level of disease in volunteers. Furthermore, by inoculating volunteers with a range of different inoculum titres, we established the minimum infectious titre required to achieve reproducible disease whilst ensuring a sensitive model that can be translated to design of subsequent field based studies. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02525055 PMID:26761707

  14. Comparative Transcriptome Analyses between a Spontaneous Late-Ripening Sweet Orange Mutant and Its Wild Type Suggest the Functions of ABA, Sucrose and JA during Citrus Fruit Ripening

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ya-Jian; Wang, Xing-Jian; Wu, Ju-Xun; Chen, Shan-Yan; Chen, Hong; Chai, Li-Jun; Yi, Hua-Lin

    2014-01-01

    A spontaneous late-ripening mutant of ‘Jincheng’ (C. sinensis L. Osbeck) sweet orange exhibited a delay of fruit pigmentation and harvesting. In this work, we studied the processes of orange fruit ripening through the comparative analysis between the Jincheng mutant and its wild type. This study revealed that the fruit quality began to differ on 166th days after anthesis. At this stage, fruits were subjected to transcriptome analysis by RNA sequencing. 13,412 differentially expressed unigenes (DEGs) were found. Of these unigenes, 75.8% were down-regulated in the wild type, suggesting that the transcription level of wild type was lower than that of the mutant during this stage. These DEGs were mainly clustered into five pathways: metabolic pathways, plant-pathogen interaction, spliceosome, biosynthesis of plant hormones and biosynthesis of phenylpropanoids. Therefore, the expression profiles of the genes that are involved in abscisic acid, sucrose, and jasmonic acid metabolism and signal transduction pathways were analyzed during the six fruit ripening stages. The results revealed the regulation mechanism of sweet orange fruit ripening metabolism in the following four aspects: First, the more mature orange fruits were, the lower the transcription levels were. Second, the expression level of PME boosted with the maturity of the citrus fruit. Therefore, the expression level of PME might represent the degree of the orange fruit ripeness. Third, the interaction of PP2C, PYR/PYL, and SnRK2 was peculiar to the orange fruit ripening process. Fourth, abscisic acid, sucrose, and jasmonic acid all took part in orange fruit ripening process and might interact with each other. These findings provide an insight into the intricate process of sweet orange fruit ripening. PMID:25551568

  15. Experimental investigation of magneto-aerotaxis on wild-type magnetotactic bacteria in sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, X.; Egli, R.

    2012-12-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MB) synthesize chains of magnetic particles, called magnetosomes, which provide a magnetic dipole that passively aligns the cells along the geomagnetic field. Flagellar propulsion allows MB to swim straight along field lines in what is known as magnetotaxis. The flagellum rotation sense is controlled by the chemical environment, so that MB can efficiently move across chemically stratified environments to reach the so-called oxic-anoxic interface (OAI). This combination of oriented swimming controlled by chemical (oxygen) sensing is called magneto-aerotaxis (Frankel 1997). Experiments with MB cultures show that magnetic spirilla can change instantaneously the swimming direction, while the behaviour of cocci depends on a sort of 'internal state' dictated by their original location with respect to the OAI. Here, we present first results the magneto-aerotactic behaviour of wild-type MB living in microcosms created with sediment retrieved from lake Chiemsee (Bavaria, Germany). In these microcosms, a stable population of MB (mainly unidentified strains of cocci, and Magnetobacterium Bavaricum) occur in the upmost few cm below the sediment surface, with maximum concentrations just below the OAI. We tested the reaction of this MB population to changes in chemical conditions by putting the microcosm inside a glove box with controlled oxygen-free atmospheres (N2 and CO2). A new equilibrium was reached within few weeks, with the OAI first moving upward and then disappearing. The depth distribution and swimming direction of MB was tested during and after the formation of a new equilibrium. We were never able to observe swimming directions consistent with bacteria moving upward in the sediment, as it was the case with cultured cocci in Frankel [1997], even long time after the entire sediment column became completely anoxic. Nevertheless, the disappearance of the OAI was accompanied by a slight but significant decrease of the total MB population

  16. Induction of dendritic cell production of type I and type III interferons by wild-type and vaccine strains of measles virus: role of defective interfering RNAs.

    PubMed

    Shivakoti, Rupak; Siwek, Martina; Hauer, Debra; Schultz, Kimberly L W; Griffin, Diane E

    2013-07-01

    The innate immune response to viral infection frequently includes induction of type I interferons (IFN), but many viruses have evolved ways to block this response and increase virulence. In vitro studies of IFN production after infection of susceptible cells with measles virus (MeV) have often reported greater IFN synthesis after infection with vaccine than with wild-type strains of MeV. However, the possible presence in laboratory virus stocks of 5' copy-back defective interfering (DI) RNAs that induce IFN independent of the standard virus has frequently confounded interpretation of data from these studies. To further investigate MeV strain-dependent differences in IFN induction and the role of DI RNAs, monocyte-derived dendritic cells (moDCs) were infected with the wild-type Bilthoven strain and the vaccine Edmonston-Zagreb strain with and without DI RNAs. Production of type I IFN, type III IFN, and the interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs) Mx and ISG56 by infected cells was assessed with a flow cytometry-based IFN bioassay, quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR), and immunoassays. Bilthoven infected moDCs less efficiently than Edmonston-Zagreb. Presence of DI RNAs in vaccine stocks resulted in greater maturation of moDCs, inhibition of virus replication, and induction of higher levels of IFN and ISGs. Production of type I IFN, type III IFN, and ISG mRNA and protein was determined by both the level of infection and the presence of DI RNAs. At the same levels of infection and in the absence of DI RNA, IFN induction was similar between wild-type and vaccine strains of MeV. PMID:23678166

  17. Long-term continuous allopregnanolone elevation causes memory decline and hippocampus shrinkage, in female wild-type B6 mice.

    PubMed

    Bengtsson, Sara K S; Johansson, Maja; Bäckström, Torbjörn

    2016-02-01

    Chronic stress in various forms increases the risk for cognitive dysfunction, dementia and Alzheimer's disease. While the pathogenesis behind these findings is unknown, growing evidence suggests that chronic increase in neurosteroid levels, such as allopregnanolone, is part of the mechanism. We treated wild-type C57BL/6J mice with allopregnanolone for 5months, using osmotic pumps. This treatment led to moderately increased levels of allopregnanolone, equivalent to that of mild chronic stress. After an interval of no treatment for 1month, female mice showed impaired learning and memory function in the Morris water maze (MWM) in combination with diminished hippocampus weight and increased cerebellum weight, both correlating to MWM performance. Male mice showed a minor reduction in memory function and no differences in brain structure. We conclude that chronic allopregnanolone elevation can lead to cognitive dysfunction and negative brain alterations. We suggest that allopregnanolone could play a key role in the pathogenesis of stress-induced cognitive disturbances and perhaps dementia. PMID:26497250

  18. Ethylene-Mediated Programmed Cell Death during Maize Endosperm Development of Wild-Type and shrunken2 Genotypes.

    PubMed Central

    Young, T. E.; Gallie, D. R.; DeMason, D. A.

    1997-01-01

    We characterized the progression of programmed cell death during maize (Zea mays L.) endosperm development of starchy (Su; wild-type) and shrunken2 (sh2) genotypes and tested the involve ment of ethylene in mediating this process. Histological and viability staining demonstrated that endosperm cell death was initiated earlier and progressed more rapidly in sh2 endosperm compared with Su endosperm. Internucleosomal DNA fragmentation accompanied endosperm cell death and occurred more extensively in sh2 endosperm. 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid levels peaked approximately 16 d after pollination (dap) in Su endosperm and gradually decreased during subsequent development, whereas two large 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid peaks were observed in sh2 endosperm, the first between 16 and 20 dap and the second at 36 dap. Ethylene levels were elevated in sh2 kernels compared with Su kernels, with an initial peak 20 dap approximately 3-fold higher than in Su kernels and a second peak 36 dap approximately 5-fold higher than that in Su kernels. Ethylene treatment of Su kernels resulted in earlier and more extensive endosperm cell death and DNA fragmentation. Aminoethoxyvinylglycine treatment of sh2 kernels reduced the extent of DNA fragmentation. We conclude that ethylene is involved in triggering programmed cell death in developing maize endosperm and is responsible for the aberrant phenotype of sh2 kernels. PMID:12223841

  19. Tropomodulin 1 directly controls thin filament length in both wild-type and tropomodulin 4-deficient skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Gokhin, David S.; Ochala, Julien; Domenighetti, Andrea A.; Fowler, Velia M.

    2015-01-01

    The sarcomeric tropomodulin (Tmod) isoforms Tmod1 and Tmod4 cap thin filament pointed ends and functionally interact with the leiomodin (Lmod) isoforms Lmod2 and Lmod3 to control myofibril organization, thin filament lengths, and actomyosin crossbridge formation in skeletal muscle fibers. Here, we show that Tmod4 is more abundant than Tmod1 at both the transcript and protein level in a variety of muscle types, but the relative abundances of sarcomeric Tmods are muscle specific. We then generate Tmod4−/− mice, which exhibit normal thin filament lengths, myofibril organization, and skeletal muscle contractile function owing to compensatory upregulation of Tmod1, together with an Lmod isoform switch wherein Lmod3 is downregulated and Lmod2 is upregulated. However, RNAi depletion of Tmod1 from either wild-type or Tmod4−/− muscle fibers leads to thin filament elongation by ∼15%. Thus, Tmod1 per se, rather than total sarcomeric Tmod levels, controls thin filament lengths in mouse skeletal muscle, whereas Tmod4 appears to be dispensable for thin filament length regulation. These findings identify Tmod1 as the key direct regulator of thin filament length in skeletal muscle, in both adult muscle homeostasis and in developmentally compensated contexts. PMID:26586224

  20. [Drug susceptibility of wild-type and mutant H7N9 neuraminidase to zanamivir and oseltamivir].

    PubMed

    Wei, Yan-Nan; Zhang, Chao; Chen, Qing; Guo, Ying

    2014-07-01

    This study aimed to investigate the drug susceptibility of wild-type and mutant avian influenza A (H7N9) virus neuraminidase (NA) to oseltamivir and zanamivir. Codon optimized DNA of H7N9 (A/ Hangzhou/1/2013) NA was synthesized and constructed into the pcDNA3.1/His vector (NA(H7N9-WT)). Mutant NA(H7N9-H274Y) and NA(H7N9-R292K) plasmids were constructed by directed mutagenesis PCR using NA(H7N9-WT) plasmid as the template followed by sequencing. NA plasmids were transfected into 293T cells and cell lysates containing NAs were collected 48 h post-transfection. Wild-type and mutant NAs were analyzed by Western blotting and their activities were tested by the 4-MUNANA-based assay. All three NAs were expressed and enzymatic activities were confirmed. The effects of oseltamivir and zanamivir on all three NAs were then tested. It showed that the half maximal inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) of oseltamivir carboxylate on NA(H7N9-WT), NA(H7N9-H274Y) and NA(H7N9-R292K) were 1.6 nM, 15.1 nM, and > 1 000 nM with fold changes of 9 and > 625, respectively. The IC50 values of zanamivir on NA(H7N9-WT), NA(H7N9-H274Y), and NA(H7N9-R292K) were 1.1 nM, 1.4 nM, and 38.0 nM with fold changes of 1.3 and 34, respectively. These results indicated that oseltamivir and zanamivir could significantly inhibit NA(H7N9-WT). NA(H7N9-R292K) showed high-level resistance to both drugs (34-fold and 625-fold) and NA(H7N9-H274Y) was sensitive to both (1.3-fold and 9-fold). These results indicated that both oseltamivir and zanamivir could be used for patients infected with the H7N9 virus. However, when patients carried the H7N9 virus with a NA R292K mutation, other medications would be preferred over oseltamivir or zanamivir. PMID:25272593

  1. Genome Sequence of SG33 Strain and Recombination between Wild-Type and Vaccine Myxoma Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Gretillat, Magalie; Py, Robert; Gelfi, Jacqueline; Guérin, Jean-Luc; Bertagnoli, Stéphane

    2011-01-01

    Myxomatosis in Europe is the result of the release of a South America strain of myxoma virus in 1952. Several attenuated strains with origins in South America or California have since been used as vaccines in the rabbit industry. We sequenced the genome of the SG33 myxoma virus vaccine strain and compared it with those of other myxoma virus strains. We show that SG33 genome carries a large deletion in its right end. Furthermore, our data strongly suggest that the virus isolate from which SG33 is derived results from an in vivo recombination between a wild-type South America (Lausanne) strain and a California MSD-derived strain. These findings raise questions about the use of insufficiently attenuated virus in vaccination. PMID:21470452

  2. Purification of extrachloroplastic. beta. -amylase from leaves of starchless and wild type Arabidopsis

    SciTech Connect

    Somerville, C.; Monroe, J.; Preiss, J. )

    1989-04-01

    Amylase activity in crude leaf extracts from starchless mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana is 5 to 10 fold higher than in the wild type (WT) when plants are grown under a 12 h photoperiod. Visualized on native PAGE, the increased activity is attributed primarily to a previously characterized extrachloroplastic {beta}-(exo)amylase. The {beta}-amylases from phosoglucomutase deficient (starchless) and WT leaves were purified to homogeneity in two steps utilizing polyethylene glycol fractionation, and cyclohexaamylose affinity chromatography. The enzyme from both mutant and WT leaves had negligible activity toward either {beta}-limit dextrin or pullulan. The specific activities of both purified enzymes were similar indicating that the protein is over-expressed in the mutant. Preliminary antibody neutralization experiments suggest that the two {beta}-amylases are not different.

  3. Quality assessment of the blue mussel (Mytilus edulis): comparison between commercial and wild types.

    PubMed

    De Witte, B; Devriese, L; Bekaert, K; Hoffman, S; Vandermeersch, G; Cooreman, K; Robbens, J

    2014-08-15

    This study compared species identity, microplastics, chemical and microbial contamination between consumption mussels and wild type mussels, collected at Belgian department stores and Belgian groynes and quaysides, respectively. Species identification based on genetic analysis showed a high number of Mytilus (M.) edulis compared to M. galloprovincialis and M. edulis/galloprovincialis hybrid mussels. The number of total microplastics varied from 2.6 to 5.1 fibres/10 g of mussel. A higher prevalence of orange fibres at quaysides is related to fisheries activities. Chemical contamination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and polychlorobiphenyls could be related to industrial activities and water turbidity, with maximum concentrations at the quayside of port Zeebrugge. The inverse was noted for Escherichia coli contamination, which was relatively low at Zeebrugge quayside with a total count of 3.9 × 10(2)CFU/100 g tissue, due to limited agricultural effluents. Results of this complementary analysis stress the importance of integrated monitoring and quality assessment.

  4. The Phenotypic Effects of Royal Jelly on Wild-Type D. melanogaster Are Strain-Specific.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Stefanie L; Seggio, Joseph A; Nascimento, Nara F; Huh, Dana D; Hicks, Jasmin A; Sharp, Katherine A; Axelrod, Jeffrey D; Wang, Kevin C

    2016-01-01

    The role for royal jelly (RJ) in promoting caste differentiation of honeybee larvae into queens rather than workers is well characterized. A recent study demonstrated that this poorly understood complex nutrition drives strikingly similar phenotypic effects in Drosophila melanogaster, such as increased body size and reduced developmental time, making possible the use of D. melanogaster as a model system for the genetic analysis of the cellular mechanisms underlying RJ and caste differentiation. We demonstrate here that RJ increases the body size of some wild-type strains of D. melanogaster but not others, and report significant delays in developmental time in all flies reared on RJ. These findings suggest that cryptic genetic variation may be a factor in the D. melanogaster response to RJ, and should be considered when attempting to elucidate response mechanisms to environmental changes in non-honeybee species.

  5. Adeno-Associated Virus Enhances Wild-Type and Oncolytic Adenovirus Spread

    PubMed Central

    Laborda, Eduardo; Puig-Saus, Cristina; Cascalló, Manel; Chillón, Miguel

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The contamination of adenovirus (Ad) stocks with adeno-associated viruses (AAV) is usually unnoticed, and it has been associated with lower Ad yields upon large-scale production. During Ad propagation, AAV contamination needs to be detected routinely by polymerase chain reaction without symptomatic suspicion. In this study, we describe that the coinfection of either Ad wild type 5 or oncolytic Ad with AAV results in a large-plaque phenotype associated with an accelerated release of Ad from coinfected cells. This accelerated release was accompanied with the expected decrease in Ad yields in two out of three cell lines tested. Despite this lower Ad yield, coinfection with AAV accelerated cell death and enhanced the cytotoxicity mediated by Ad propagation. Intratumoral coinjection of Ad and AAV in two xenograft tumor models improved antitumor activity and mouse survival. Therefore, we conclude that accidental or intentional AAV coinfection has important implications for Ad-mediated virotherapy. PMID:24020980

  6. Expression of Escherichia coli virulence usher protein attenuates wild-type Salmonella.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xinghong; Suo, Zhiyong; Thornburg, Theresa; Holderness, Kathryn; Cao, Ling; Lim, Timothy; Walters, Nancy; Kellerman, Laura; Loetterle, Linda; Avci, Recep; Pascual, David W

    2012-01-01

    Generation of a live attenuated vaccine for bacterial pathogens often requires prior knowledge of the pathogen's virulence factors. We hypothesized an alternative approach of heterologous gene expression would make a wild-type (wt) pathogen more susceptible to host cell killing, thus, resulting in immunization. As proof of concept, the heterologous expression of enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) colonization factor antigen I (CFA/I) was tested to attenuate Salmonella. The overexpression of CFA/I resulted in significant attenuation of wt Salmonella. In-depth studies revealed the attenuation depended on the co-expression of chaperone (CfaA) and usher (CfaC) proteins. Remarkably, the CfaAC-attenuated Salmonella conferred protection against wt Salmonella challenge. Mechanistic study indicated CfaAC made Salmonella outer membranes permeable, causing Salmonella to be vulnerable to host destruction. Thus, enhancing bacterial permeability via CfaAC represents an alternative method to attenuate pathogens despite the presence of unknown virulence factors. PMID:22286706

  7. Comparation of enhanced green fluorescent protein gene transfected and wild-type porcine neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yue-Mao; An, Zhi-Xing; Zhao, Xiao-E; Quan, Fu-Sheng; Zhao, Hui-Ying; Zhang, Ya-Rong; Liu, Jun; He, Xiao-Ying; He, Xiao-Ning

    2010-02-01

    The aim of this study was to transfect and express the enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP) gene into porcine neural stem cells (NSCs) to determine whether EGFP can be used as a marker to monitor NSCs. NSCs were isolated from embryonic day 30 fetal pig brain and transfected with EGFP gene using lipofection. Transfected and wild-type NSCs were induced to differentiate into cells of neuronal and myogenic lineages. Markers of passage three NSCs and their differentiated cells were tested by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. The results showed that EGFP could be expressed in NSCs and the differentiated cells. NSCs expressed Nestin, NogoA, DCX, Hes1, Oct4, CD-90 and Sox2. NSCs could differentiated into astrocyte (GFAP(+)), oligodendrocyte (GalC(+)), neuron (NF(+), NSE(+) and MAP2(+)) and myocyte (myf-6(+) and myoD(+)). We concluded that EGFP can be used as a marker in monitoring NSCs. PMID:19580981

  8. Comparation of enhanced green fluorescent protein gene transfected and wild-type porcine neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yue-Mao; An, Zhi-Xing; Zhao, Xiao-E; Quan, Fu-Sheng; Zhao, Hui-Ying; Zhang, Ya-Rong; Liu, Jun; He, Xiao-Ying; He, Xiao-Ning

    2010-02-01

    The aim of this study was to transfect and express the enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP) gene into porcine neural stem cells (NSCs) to determine whether EGFP can be used as a marker to monitor NSCs. NSCs were isolated from embryonic day 30 fetal pig brain and transfected with EGFP gene using lipofection. Transfected and wild-type NSCs were induced to differentiate into cells of neuronal and myogenic lineages. Markers of passage three NSCs and their differentiated cells were tested by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. The results showed that EGFP could be expressed in NSCs and the differentiated cells. NSCs expressed Nestin, NogoA, DCX, Hes1, Oct4, CD-90 and Sox2. NSCs could differentiated into astrocyte (GFAP(+)), oligodendrocyte (GalC(+)), neuron (NF(+), NSE(+) and MAP2(+)) and myocyte (myf-6(+) and myoD(+)). We concluded that EGFP can be used as a marker in monitoring NSCs.

  9. Expression of Escherichia coli virulence usher protein attenuates wild-type Salmonella.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xinghong; Suo, Zhiyong; Thornburg, Theresa; Holderness, Kathryn; Cao, Ling; Lim, Timothy; Walters, Nancy; Kellerman, Laura; Loetterle, Linda; Avci, Recep; Pascual, David W

    2012-01-01

    Generation of a live attenuated vaccine for bacterial pathogens often requires prior knowledge of the pathogen's virulence factors. We hypothesized an alternative approach of heterologous gene expression would make a wild-type (wt) pathogen more susceptible to host cell killing, thus, resulting in immunization. As proof of concept, the heterologous expression of enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) colonization factor antigen I (CFA/I) was tested to attenuate Salmonella. The overexpression of CFA/I resulted in significant attenuation of wt Salmonella. In-depth studies revealed the attenuation depended on the co-expression of chaperone (CfaA) and usher (CfaC) proteins. Remarkably, the CfaAC-attenuated Salmonella conferred protection against wt Salmonella challenge. Mechanistic study indicated CfaAC made Salmonella outer membranes permeable, causing Salmonella to be vulnerable to host destruction. Thus, enhancing bacterial permeability via CfaAC represents an alternative method to attenuate pathogens despite the presence of unknown virulence factors.

  10. Analysis of purified Wild type and mutant adenovirus particles by SILAC based quantitative proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Alqahtani, Ali; Heesom, Kate; Bramson, Jonathan L.; Curiel, David; Ugai, Hideyo

    2014-01-01

    We used SILAC (stable isotope labelling of amino acids in cell culture) and high-throughput quantitative MS mass spectrometry to analyse the protein composition of highly purified WT wild type adenoviruses, mutant adenoviruses lacking an internal protein component (protein V) and recombinant adenoviruses of the type commonly used in gene therapy, including one virus that had been used in a clinical trial. We found that the viral protein abundance and composition were consistent across all types of virus examined except for the virus lacking protein V, which also had reduced amounts of another viral core protein, protein VII. In all the samples analysed we found no evidence of consistent packaging or contamination with cellular proteins. We believe this technique is a powerful method to analyse the protein composition of this important gene therapy vector and genetically engineered or synthetic virus-like particles. The raw data have been deposited at proteomexchange, identifer PXD001120. PMID:25096814

  11. Modest increased sensitivity to radiation oncogenesis in ATM heterozygous versus wild-type mammalian cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smilenov, L. B.; Brenner, D. J.; Hall, E. J.

    2001-01-01

    Subpopulations that are genetically predisposed to radiation-induced cancer could have significant public health consequences. Individuals homozygous for null mutations at the ataxia telangiectasia gene are indeed highly radiosensitive, but their numbers are very small. Ataxia Telangiectasia heterozygotes (1-2% of the population) have been associated with somewhat increased radiosensitivity for some end points, but none directly related to carcinogenesis. Here, intralitter comparisons between wild-type mouse embryo fibroblasts and mouse embryo fibroblasts carrying ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) null mutation indicate that the heterozygous cells are more sensitive to radiation oncogenesis than their normal, litter-matched, counterparts. From these data we suggest that Ataxia Telangiectasia heterozygotes could indeed represent a societally-significant radiosensitive human subpopulation.

  12. The Phenotypic Effects of Royal Jelly on Wild-Type D. melanogaster Are Strain-Specific

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Stefanie L.; Seggio, Joseph A.; Hicks, Jasmin A.; Sharp, Katherine A.; Axelrod, Jeffrey D.; Wang, Kevin C.

    2016-01-01

    The role for royal jelly (RJ) in promoting caste differentiation of honeybee larvae into queens rather than workers is well characterized. A recent study demonstrated that this poorly understood complex nutrition drives strikingly similar phenotypic effects in Drosophila melanogaster, such as increased body size and reduced developmental time, making possible the use of D. melanogaster as a model system for the genetic analysis of the cellular mechanisms underlying RJ and caste differentiation. We demonstrate here that RJ increases the body size of some wild-type strains of D. melanogaster but not others, and report significant delays in developmental time in all flies reared on RJ. These findings suggest that cryptic genetic variation may be a factor in the D. melanogaster response to RJ, and should be considered when attempting to elucidate response mechanisms to environmental changes in non-honeybee species. PMID:27486863

  13. Organophosphonate Utilization by the Wild-Type Strain of Penicillium notatum

    PubMed Central

    Bujacz, B.; Wieczorek, P.; Krzysko-Lupicka, T.; Golab, Z.; Lejczak, B.; Kavfarski, P.

    1995-01-01

    We studied the biodegradation of compounds containing phosphorus-to-carbon bonds by using a wild-type strain of Penicillium notatum. The substrate specificity of this strain was studied, and we found that it is able to utilize structurally diverse organophosphonates as sole sources of phosphorus. This ability seems to be inducible, as indicated by the presence of a lag phase during growth. A popular herbicide, glyphosate, inhibited fungal growth, but it was also degraded by the fungus if it was applied in sublethal doses. This indicates that P. notatum may play an important role in biodegradation of organophosphonates. The strain which we used did not metabolize any of the phosphonates which we tested when they were used as sole carbon or nitrogen sources. PMID:16535094

  14. Efficient Reassignment of a Frequent Serine Codon in Wild-Type Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Ho, Joanne M; Reynolds, Noah M; Rivera, Keith; Connolly, Morgan; Guo, Li-Tao; Ling, Jiqiang; Pappin, Darryl J; Church, George M; Söll, Dieter

    2016-02-19

    Expansion of the genetic code through engineering the translation machinery has greatly increased the chemical repertoire of the proteome. This has been accomplished mainly by read-through of UAG or UGA stop codons by the noncanonical aminoacyl-tRNA of choice. While stop codon read-through involves competition with the translation release factors, sense codon reassignment entails competition with a large pool of endogenous tRNAs. We used an engineered pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetase to incorporate 3-iodo-l-phenylalanine (3-I-Phe) at a number of different serine and leucine codons in wild-type Escherichia coli. Quantitative LC-MS/MS measurements of amino acid incorporation yields carried out in a selected reaction monitoring experiment revealed that the 3-I-Phe abundance at the Ser208AGU codon in superfolder GFP was 65 ± 17%. This method also allowed quantification of other amino acids (serine, 33 ± 17%; phenylalanine, 1 ± 1%; threonine, 1 ± 1%) that compete with 3-I-Phe at both the aminoacylation and decoding steps of translation for incorporation at the same codon position. Reassignments of different serine (AGU, AGC, UCG) and leucine (CUG) codons with the matching tRNA(Pyl) anticodon variants were met with varying success, and our findings provide a guideline for the choice of sense codons to be reassigned. Our results indicate that the 3-iodo-l-phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase (IFRS)/tRNA(Pyl) pair can efficiently outcompete the cellular machinery to reassign select sense codons in wild-type E. coli.

  15. An Ultra-Violet Tolerant Wild-Type Strain of Melanin-Producing Bacillus thuringiensis

    PubMed Central

    Sansinenea, Estibaliz; Salazar, Francisco; Ramirez, Melanie; Ortiz, Aurelio

    2015-01-01

    Background: Bacillus thuringiensis is the most successful biological control agent used in agriculture, forestry and mosquito control. However, the insecticidal activity of the B. thuringiensis formulation is not very stable and rapidly loses its biological activity under field conditions, due to the ultraviolet radiation in sunlight. Melanin is known to absorb radiation therefore photo protection of B. thuringiensis based on melanin has been extensively studied. Objectives: The aim of this study was to find a wild type strain of naturally melanin-producing B. thuringiensis to avoid any mutation or manipulation that can affect the Cry protein content. Materials and Methods: Bacillus thuringiensis strains were isolated from soils of different States of Mexico and pigment extraction was followed by lowering the pH to 2 using 1N HCl. Pigment was characterized by some chemical tests based on its solubility, bleaching by H2O2 and flocculation with FeCl3, and using an Infrared (IR) spectrum. Ultraviolet (UV) irradiation experiment was performed to probe the melanin efficacy. Results: ELI52 strain of B. thuringiensis was confirmed to naturally produce melanin. The Cry protein analysis suggested that ELI52 is probably a B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis strain with toxic activity against the Diptera order of insects. Ultra Violet protection efficacy of melanin was probed counting total viable colonies after UV radiation and comparing the results with the non-producing melanin strain L-DOPA (L-3, 4-dihydroxyphenylalanine) was also detected in the culture. ELI52 strain showed an antagonistic effect over some common bacteria from the environment. Conclusions: ELI52 wild-type strain of B. thuringiensis is a good bio-insecticide that produces melanin with UV-resistance that is probably toxic against the Diptera order of insects and can inhibit the growth of other environmental bacteria. PMID:26421136

  16. LOC283731 promoter hypermethylation prognosticates survival after radiochemotherapy in IDH1 wild-type glioblastoma patients.

    PubMed

    Mock, Andreas; Geisenberger, Christoph; Orlik, Christian; Warta, Rolf; Schwager, Christian; Jungk, Christine; Dutruel, Céline; Geiselhart, Lea; Weichenhan, Dieter; Zucknick, Manuela; Nied, Ann-Katrin; Friauf, Sara; Exner, Janina; Capper, David; Hartmann, Christian; Lahrmann, Bernd; Grabe, Niels; Debus, Jürgen; von Deimling, Andreas; Popanda, Odilia; Plass, Christoph; Unterberg, Andreas; Abdollahi, Amir; Schmezer, Peter; Herold-Mende, Christel

    2016-07-15

    MGMT promoter methylation status is currently the only established molecular prognosticator in IDH wild-type glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Therefore, we aimed to discover novel therapy-associated epigenetic biomarkers. After enrichment for hypermethylated fractions using methyl-CpG-immunoprecipitation (MCIp), we performed global DNA methylation profiling for 14 long-term (LTS; >36 months) and 15 short-term (STS; 6-10 months) surviving GBM patients. Even after exclusion of the G-CIMP phenotype, we observed marked differences between the LTS and STS methylome. A total of 1,247 probes in 706 genes were hypermethylated in LTS and 463 probes in 305 genes were found to be hypermethylated in STS patients (p values < 0.05, log2 fold change ± 0.5). We identified 13 differentially methylated regions (DMRs) with a minimum of four differentially methylated probes per gene. Indeed, we were able to validate a subset of these DMRs through a second, independent method (MassARRAY) in our LTS/STS training set (ADCY1, GPC3, LOC283731/ISLR2). These DMRs were further assessed for their prognostic capability in an independent validation cohort (n = 62) of non-G-CIMP GBMs from the TCGA. Hypermethylation of multiple CpGs mapping to the promoter region of LOC283731 correlated with improved patient outcome (p = 0.03). The prognostic performance of LOC283731 promoter hypermethylation was confirmed in a third independent study cohort (n = 89), and was independent of gender, performance (KPS) and MGMT status (p = 0.0485, HR = 0.63). Intriguingly, the prediction was most pronounced in younger GBM patients (<60 years). In conclusion, we provide compelling evidence that promoter methylation status of this novel gene is a prognostic biomarker in IDH1 wild-type/non-G-CIMP GBMs. PMID:26934681

  17. Real-time quantification of wild-type contaminants in glyphosate tolerant soybean

    PubMed Central

    Battistini, Elena; Noli, Enrico

    2009-01-01

    Background Trait purity is a key factor for the successful utilization of biotech varieties and is currently assessed by analysis of individual seeds or plants. Here we propose a novel PCR-based approach to test trait purity that can be applied to bulk samples. To this aim the insertion site of a transgene is characterized and the corresponding sequence of the wild-type (wt) allele is used as diagnostic target for amplification. As a demonstration, we developed a real-time quantitative PCR method to test purity of glyphosate tolerant (Roundup Ready®, RR) soybean. Results The soybean wt sequence at the RR locus was characterized and found to be highly conserved among conventional genotypes, thus allowing the detection of possibly any soybean non-trait contaminant. On the other hand, no amplification product was obtained from RR soybean varieties, indicating that the wt sequence is single copy and represents a suitable marker of conventional soybean presence. In addition, results obtained from the analysis of wt-spiked RR samples demonstrate that it is possible to use the real-time PCR assay to quantify the non-trait contamination with an acceptable degree of accuracy. Conclusion In principle this approach could be successfully applied to any transgenic event, provided that the wild-type sequence is conserved and single copy. The main advantages of the assay here described derive from its applicability to bulk samples, which would allow to increase the number of single seeds or plants forming the analytical sample, thus improving accuracy and throughput while containing costs. For these reasons this application of quantitative PCR could represent a useful tool in agricultural biotechnology. PMID:19267904

  18. Effects of female pheromones on gonadotropin-releasing hormone gene expression and luteinizing hormone release in male wild-type and oestrogen receptor-alpha knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Gore, A C; Wersinger, S R; Rissman, E F

    2000-12-01

    Pheromones are an important class of environmental cues that affect the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in a variety of vertebrate species, including humans. When male mice contact female-soiled bedding, or urine, they display a reflexive luteinizing hormone (LH) surge within 30 min. Aside from the requirement that males have gonads to show this response, the physiological mechanisms that underlie this pituitary response are unknown. In this experiment, we asked if female pheromones acted at the level of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) gene expression to affect this hormone response. In addition, we also examined the contribution of one of the oestrogen receptors (ERalpha) by studying this neuroendocrine reflex in wild-type and oestrogen receptor-alpha knockout (ERalphaKO) males. Both ERalphaKO and wild-type males showed the expected LH surge, 45 and 90 min after contact with female pheromones. Males housed in clean bedding or bedding soiled by another adult male did not display the LH elevation. Interestingly, this dramatic change in LH concentrations was not accompanied by any alterations in GnRH mRNA expression or levels of primary transcript in the preoptic area-anterior hypothalamus. The one exception to this was a significant increase in GnRH mRNA expression in tissue collected from wild-type males exposed to bedding from another male. This is particularly intriguing since LH was not elevated in these males. These data replicate and extend our previous finding that ERalphaKO males do exhibit an LH surge in response to female pheromones. Thus, this neuroendocrine response is regulated by a steroid receptor other than ERalpha and does not require alterations in GnRH mRNA expression.

  19. Mitochondrial Function in Cell Wall Glycoprotein Synthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae NCYC 625 (Wild Type) and [rho0] Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Iung, Annie Rakotoarivony; Coulon, Joël; Kiss, Ferenc; Ekome, Jacques Ngondi; Vallner, Judit; Bonaly, Roger

    1999-01-01

    We studied phosphopeptidomannans (PPMs) of two Saccharomyces cerevisiae NCYC 625 strains (S. diastaticus): a wild type strain grown aerobically, anaerobically, and in the presence of antimycin and a [rho0] mutant grown aerobically and anaerobically. The aerobic wild-type cultures were highly flocculent, but all others were weakly flocculent. Ligands implicated in flocculation of mutants or antimycin-treated cells were not aggregated as much by concanavalin A as were those of the wild type. The [rho0] mutants and antimycin-treated cells differ from the wild type in PPM composition and invertase, acid phosphatase, and glucoamylase activities. PPMs extracted from different cells differ in the protein but not in the glycosidic moiety. The PPMs were less stable in mitochondrion-deficient cells than in wild-type cells grown aerobically, and this difference may be attributable to defective mitochondrial function during cell wall synthesis. The reduced flocculation of cells grown in the presence of antimycin, under anaerobiosis, or carrying a [rho0] mutation may be the consequence of alterations of PPM structures which are the ligands of lectins, both involved in this cell-cell recognition phenomenon. These respiratory chain alterations also affect peripheral, biologically active glycoproteins such as extracellular enzymes and peripheral PPMs. PMID:10583995

  20. Acquired transmissibility of sheep-passaged L-type bovine spongiform encephalopathy prion to wild-type mice.

    PubMed

    Okada, Hiroyuki; Masujin, Kentaro; Miyazawa, Kohtaro; Yokoyama, Takashi

    2015-07-13

    L-type bovine spongiform encephalopathy (L-BSE) is an atypical form of BSE that is transmissible to cattle and several lines of prion protein (PrP) transgenic mice, but not to wild-type mice. In this study, we examined the transmissibility of sheep-passaged L-BSE prions to wild-type mice. Disease-associated prion protein (PrP(Sc)) was detected in the brain and/or lymphoid tissues during the lifespan of mice that were asymptomatic subclinical carriers, indicating that wild-type mice were susceptible to sheep-passaged L-BSE. The morphological characteristics of the PrP(Sc) of sheep-passaged L-BSE included florid plaques that were distributed mainly in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus of subsequent passaged mice. The PrP(Sc) glycoform profiles of wild-type mice infected with sheep-passaged L-BSE were similar to those of the original isolate. The data indicate that sheep-passaged L-BSE has an altered host range and acquired transmissibility to wild-type mice.

  1. Acquired transmissibility of sheep-passaged L-type bovine spongiform encephalopathy prion to wild-type mice.

    PubMed

    Okada, Hiroyuki; Masujin, Kentaro; Miyazawa, Kohtaro; Yokoyama, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    L-type bovine spongiform encephalopathy (L-BSE) is an atypical form of BSE that is transmissible to cattle and several lines of prion protein (PrP) transgenic mice, but not to wild-type mice. In this study, we examined the transmissibility of sheep-passaged L-BSE prions to wild-type mice. Disease-associated prion protein (PrP(Sc)) was detected in the brain and/or lymphoid tissues during the lifespan of mice that were asymptomatic subclinical carriers, indicating that wild-type mice were susceptible to sheep-passaged L-BSE. The morphological characteristics of the PrP(Sc) of sheep-passaged L-BSE included florid plaques that were distributed mainly in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus of subsequent passaged mice. The PrP(Sc) glycoform profiles of wild-type mice infected with sheep-passaged L-BSE were similar to those of the original isolate. The data indicate that sheep-passaged L-BSE has an altered host range and acquired transmissibility to wild-type mice. PMID:26169916

  2. Farnesol restores wild-type colony morphology to 96% of Candida albicans colony morphology variants recovered following treatment with mutagens.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Ellen C; Hornby, Jacob M; Pagliaccetti, Nicole E; Wolter, Chuleeon M; Nickerson, Kenneth W; Atkin, Audrey L

    2006-04-01

    Candida albicans is a diploid fungus that undergoes a morphological transition between budding yeast, hyphal, and pseudohyphal forms. The morphological transition is strongly correlated with virulence and is regulated in part by quorum sensing. Candida albicans produces and secretes farnesol that regulates the yeast to mycelia morphological transition. Mutants that fail to synthesize or respond to farnesol could be locked in the filamentous mode. To test this hypothesis, a collection of C. albicans mutants were isolated that have altered colony morphologies indicative of the presence of hyphal cells under environmental conditions where C. albicans normally grows only as yeasts. All mutants were characterized for their ability to respond to farnesol. Of these, 95.9% fully or partially reverted to wild-type morphology on yeast malt (YM) agar plates supplemented with farnesol. All mutants that respond to farnesol regained their hyphal morphology when restreaked on YM plates without farnesol. The observation that farnesol remedial mutants are so common (95.9%) relative to mutants that fail to respond to farnesol (4.1%) suggests that farnesol activates and (or) induces a pathway that can override many of the morphogenesis defects in these mutants. Additionally, 9 mutants chosen at random were screened for farnesol production. Two mutants failed to produce detectable levels of farnesol. PMID:16699554

  3. Endogenous p53 protein generated from wild-type alternatively spliced p53 RNA in mouse epidermal cells.

    PubMed Central

    Kulesz-Martin, M F; Lisafeld, B; Huang, H; Kisiel, N D; Lee, L

    1994-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that a wild-type alternatively spliced p53 (p53as) RNA exists in mouse cultured cells and normal mouse tissues at approximately 25 to 33% of the level of the major p53 RNA form. The alternative RNA transcript is 96 nucleotides longer than the major transcript as a result of alternative splicing of intron 10 sequences. The protein expected to be generated from the p53as transcript is 9 amino acids shorter than the major p53 protein and has 17 different amino acids at the carboxyl terminus. We report here that p53as protein exists in nontransformed and malignant epidermal cells and is localized to the nucleus. In addition, p53as protein is preferentially expressed during the G2 phase of the cell cycle and in cells with greater than G2 DNA content compared with the major p53 protein, which is preferentially expressed in G1. The p53as immunoreactivity is elevated and shifted to the G1 phase of the cell cycle following actinomycin D treatment of nontransformed cells but not malignant cells. In view of the dimerization and tetramerization of p53 protein which may be necessary for its DNA binding and transcriptional activation activities, the presence of p53as protein in cells has important implications for understanding the physiological function(s) of the p53 gene. Images PMID:8114705

  4. BCAT1 promotes cell proliferation through amino acid catabolism in gliomas carrying wild-type IDH1

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yoon Jung; Wang, Wei; Schlotter, Magdalena; Lindroth, Anders M; Pleier, Sabrina V; Bai, Alfa H C; Karra, Daniela; Piro, Rosario M; Felsberg, Jörg; Addington, Adele; Lemke, Dieter; Weibrecht, Irene; Hovestadt, Volker; Rolli, Claudio G; Campos, Benito; Turcan, Sevin; Sturm, Dominik; Witt, Hendrik; Chan, Timothy A; Herold-Mende, Christel; Kemkemer, Ralf; König, Rainer; Schmidt, Kathrin; Hull, William-Edmund; Pfister, Stefan M; Jugold, Manfred; Hutson, Susan M; Plass, Christoph; Okun, Jürgen G; Reifenberger, Guido; Lichter, Peter; Radlwimmer, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    Here we show that glioblastoma express high levels of branched-chain amino acid transaminase 1 (BCAT1), the enzyme that initiates the catabolism of branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs). Expression of BCAT1 was exclusive to tumors carrying wild-type isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) and IDH2 genes and was highly correlated with methylation patterns in the BCAT1 promoter region. BCAT1 expression was dependent on the concentration of α-ketoglutarate substrate in glioma cell lines and could be suppressed by ectopic overexpression of mutant IDH1 in immortalized human astrocytes, providing a link between IDH1 function and BCAT1 expression. Suppression of BCAT1 in glioma cell lines blocked the excretion of glutamate and led to reduced proliferation and invasiveness in vitro, as well as significant decreases in tumor growth in a glioblastoma xenograft model. These findings suggest a central role for BCAT1 in glioma pathogenesis, making BCAT1 and BCAA metabolism attractive targets for the development of targeted therapeutic approaches to treat patients with glioblastoma. PMID:23793099

  5. Melatonin enhances cold tolerance in drought-primed wild-type and abscisic acid-deficient mutant barley.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiangnan; Tan, Dun-Xian; Jiang, Dong; Liu, Fulai

    2016-10-01

    Melatonin is involved in multiple plant developmental processes and various stress responses. To explore the roles of melatonin played as well as its association with abscisic acid (ABA) in a process of drought priming-induced cold tolerance (DPICT), a wild-type barley and its ABA-deficient mutant Az34 counterpart were selected for comparison, in which the effects of melatonin application (either foliarly or rhizospherically) and/or drought priming on the cold tolerance of both types of barleys were systematically investigated. It was demonstrated that the early drought priming induced an increase of endogenous melatonin production, which is not ABA dependent. In addition, exogenously applied melatonin resulted in higher ABA concentration in the drought-primed plants than in the nonprimed plants when exposed to cold stress, indicating that ABA responded in a drought-dependent manner. The interplay of melatonin and ABA leads to plants maintaining better water status. Drought priming-induced melatonin accumulation enhanced the antioxidant capacity in both chloroplasts and mitochondria, which sustained the photosynthetic electron transport in photosynthetic apparatus of the plants under cold stress. These results suggest that the exogenous melatonin application enhances the DPICT by modulating subcellular antioxidant systems and ABA levels in barley. PMID:27299847

  6. Characterization of phenotype variations of luminescent and non-luminescent variants of Vibrio harveyi wild type and quorum sensing mutants.

    PubMed

    Hong, N T X; Baruah, K; Vanrompay, D; Bossier, P

    2016-03-01

    Vibrio harveyi, a luminescent Gram-negative motile marine bacterium, is an important pathogen responsible for causing severe diseases in shrimp, finfish and molluscs leading to severe economic losses. Non-luminescent V. harveyi obtained by culturing luminescent strains under static and dark condition were reported to alter the levels of virulence factors and metalloprotease gene and luxR expression when compared to their luminescent variants. Presently, we conducted an in vitro study aiming at the characterization of virulence-related phenotypic traits of the wild-type V. harveyi BB120 strain and its isogenic quorum sensing mutants before and after switching to the non-luminescent status. We measured the production of caseinase, haemolysin and elastase and examined swimming motility and biofilm formation. Our results showed that switching from the bioluminescent to the non-luminescent state changed the phenotypic physiology or behaviour of V. harveyi resulting in alterations in caseinase and haemolytic activities, swimming motility and biofilm formation. The switching capacity was to a large extent independent from the quorum sensing status, in that quorum sensing mutants were equally capable of making the phenotypic switch.

  7. Abscisic acid-responsive guard cell metabolomes of Arabidopsis wild-type and gpa1 G-protein mutants.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xiaofen; Wang, Rui-Sheng; Zhu, Mengmeng; Jeon, Byeong Wook; Albert, Reka; Chen, Sixue; Assmann, Sarah M

    2013-12-01

    Individual metabolites have been implicated in abscisic acid (ABA) signaling in guard cells, but a metabolite profile of this specialized cell type is lacking. We used liquid chromatography-multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry for targeted analysis of 85 signaling-related metabolites in Arabidopsis thaliana guard cell protoplasts over a time course of ABA treatment. The analysis utilized ∼ 350 million guard cell protoplasts from ∼ 30,000 plants of the Arabidopsis Columbia accession (Col) wild type and the heterotrimeric G-protein α subunit mutant, gpa1, which has ABA-hyposensitive stomata. These metabolomes revealed coordinated regulation of signaling metabolites in unrelated biochemical pathways. Metabolites clustered into different temporal modules in Col versus gpa1, with fewer metabolites showing ABA-altered profiles in gpa1. Ca(2+)-mobilizing agents sphingosine-1-phosphate and cyclic adenosine diphosphate ribose exhibited weaker ABA-stimulated increases in gpa1. Hormone metabolites were responsive to ABA, with generally greater responsiveness in Col than in gpa1. Most hormones also showed different ABA responses in guard cell versus mesophyll cell metabolomes. These findings suggest that ABA functions upstream to regulate other hormones, and are also consistent with G proteins modulating multiple hormonal signaling pathways. In particular, indole-3-acetic acid levels declined after ABA treatment in Col but not gpa1 guard cells. Consistent with this observation, the auxin antagonist α-(phenyl ethyl-2-one)-indole-3-acetic acid enhanced ABA-regulated stomatal movement and restored partial ABA sensitivity to gpa1.

  8. Mice deficient for wild-type p53-induced phosphatase 1 display elevated anxiety- and depression-like behaviors.

    PubMed

    Ruan, C S; Zhou, F H; He, Z Y; Wang, S F; Yang, C R; Shen, Y J; Guo, Y; Zhao, H B; Chen, L; Liu, D; Liu, J; Baune, B T; Xiao, Z C; Zhou, X F

    2015-05-01

    Mood disorders are a severe health burden but molecular mechanisms underlying mood dysfunction remain poorly understood. Here, we show that wild-type p53-induced phosphatase 1 (Wip1) negatively responds to the stress-induced negative mood-related behaviors. Specifically, we show that Wip1 protein but not its mRNA level was downregulated in the hippocampus but not in the neocortex after 4 weeks of chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS) in mice. Moreover, the CUMS-responsive WIP1 downregulation in the hippocampus was restored by chronic treatment of fluoxetine (i.p. 20 mg/kg) along with the CUMS procedure. In addition, Wip1 knockout mice displayed decreased exploratory behaviors as well as increased anxiety-like and depression-like behaviors in mice without impaired motor activities under the non-CUMS condition. Furthermore, the Wip1 deficiency-responsive anxiety-like but not depression-like behaviors were further elevated in mice under CUMS. Although limitations like male-alone sampling and multiply behavioral testing exist, the present study suggests a potential protective function of Wip1 in mood stabilization. PMID:25732137

  9. The Effects of Kindergarten Attendance on Mathematics Achievement of Middle and Low Socioeconomic Level Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coats, Boyne; Napier, Lee

    Achievement patterns of one hundred first-grade children are investigated with respect to socioeconomic status and kindergarten attendance. Twenty-five pupils were selected from each of the following groups: (1) middle socioeconomic levels who attended kindergarten; (2) middle levels who did not; (3) lower socioeconomic levels who attended…

  10. Profiling Differences in Achievement and Social Goals of Students at Different Levels of Expertise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Malley, Patricia Tenowich; Sonnenschein, Susan

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to integrate domain-learning theory and goal theory to investigate the learning processes, achievement goals, social goals, and achievement of 141 college students. Cluster-analytic procedures were used to categorize participants at different levels of expertise based on their responses on knowledge, interest, and…

  11. Leading in the Middle: Leadership Behaviors of Middle Level Principals that Promote Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minus, Eric L.

    2010-01-01

    This study sought to investigate the relationship between middle school principals' instructional leadership behaviors and student achievement. In particular, this study investigated the specific principal leadership behaviors of middle level principals that promote student achievement in school. A secondary variable for consideration was student…

  12. Correlates of Achievement: Prediction and Cross-Validation for Intermediate Grade Levels.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall, Jon C.; Powers, Jerry M.

    A study was conducted to: (1) determine the simple and multiple correlation coefficients between selected educational/personal variables and academic achievement at intermediate grade levels as measured by the Iowa Tests of Basic Skills; (2) determine the multiple linear regression equations for predicting individual student achievement as…

  13. The Role of Pre-School Education on Learning Achievement at Primary Level in Bangladesh

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nath, Samir Ranjan

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the impact of pre-school education on learning achievement at primary level in Bangladesh. Evidence from learning achievement test and household and school-related data were obtained from 7093 pupils attending 440 primary schools in Bangladesh. Findings suggest that a small proportion (15.3%) of primary school pupils attended…

  14. The Impact of Grading Standards on Student Achievement, Educational Attainment, and Entry-Level Earnings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Betts, Julian R.; Grogger, Jeff

    2003-01-01

    Using data from the High School and Beyond survey, estimates the effects of grading standards on student achievement, educational attainment, and entry-level earnings. Finds that higher standards raise test scores throughout the distribution of achievement, but have no positive effect on educational attainment--in fact have negative effects on…

  15. Real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction method for detection of Canine distemper virus modified live vaccine shedding for differentiation from infection with wild-type strains.

    PubMed

    Wilkes, Rebecca P; Sanchez, Elena; Riley, Matthew C; Kennedy, Melissa A

    2014-01-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) remains a common cause of infectious disease in dogs, particularly in high-density housing situations such as shelters. Vaccination of all dogs against CDV is recommended at the time of admission to animal shelters and many use a modified live virus (MLV) vaccine. From a diagnostic standpoint for dogs with suspected CDV infection, this is problematic because highly sensitive diagnostic real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) tests are able to detect MLV virus in clinical samples. Real-time PCR can be used to quantitate amount of virus shedding and can differentiate vaccine strains from wild-type strains when shedding is high. However, differentiation by quantitation is not possible in vaccinated animals during acute infection, when shedding is low and could be mistaken for low level vaccine virus shedding. While there are gel-based RT-PCR assays for differentiation of vaccine strains from field strains based on sequence differences, the sensitivity of these assays is unable to match that of the real-time RT-PCR assay currently used in the authors' laboratory. Therefore, a real-time RT-PCR assay was developed that detects CDV MLV vaccine strains and distinguishes them from wild-type strains based on nucleotide sequence differences, rather than the amount of viral RNA in the sample. The test is highly sensitive, with detection of as few as 5 virus genomic copies (corresponding to 10(-1) TCID(50)). Sequencing of the DNA real-time products also allows phylogenetic differentiation of the wild-type strains. This test will aid diagnosis during outbreaks of CDV in recently vaccinated animals.

  16. Proline Metabolism in the Wild-Type and in a Salt-Tolerant Mutant of Nicotiana plumbaginifolia Studied by 13C-Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging1

    PubMed Central

    Roosens, Nancy H.; Willem, Rudolph; Li, Yan; Verbruggen, Ingrid; Biesemans, Monique; Jacobs, Michel

    1999-01-01

    To obtain insight into the link between proline (Pro) accumulation and the increase in osmotolerance in higher plants, we investigated the biochemical basis for the NaCl tolerance of a Nicotiana plumbaginifolia mutant (RNa) that accumulates Pro. Pro biosynthesis and catabolism were investigated in both wild-type and mutant lines. 13C-Nuclear magnetic resonance with [5-13C]glutamate (Glu) as the Pro precursor was used to provide insight into the mechanism of Pro accumulation via the Glu pathway. After 24 h under 200 mm NaCl stress in the presence of [5-13C]Glu, a significant enrichment in [5-13C]Pro was observed compared with non-stress conditions in both the wild type (P2) and the mutant (RNa). Moreover, under the same conditions, [5-13C]Pro was clearly synthesized in higher amounts in RNa than in P2. On the other hand, measurements of enzyme activities indicate that neither the biosynthesis via the ornithine pathway, nor the catabolism via the Pro oxidation pathway were affected in the RNa mutant. Finally, the regulatory effect exerted by Pro on its biosynthesis was evaluated. In P2 plantlets, exogenous Pro markedly reduced the conversion of [5-13C]Glu into [5-13C]Pro, whereas Pro feedback inhibition was not detected in the RNa plantlets. It is proposed that the origin of tolerance in the RNa mutant is due to a mutation leading to a substantial reduction of the feedback inhibition normally exerted in a wild-type (P2) plant by Pro at the level of the Δ-pyrroline-5-carboxylate synthetase enzyme. PMID:10594115

  17. Early Transcriptional Responses of Bovine Chorioallantoic Membrane Explants to Wild Type, ΔvirB2 or ΔbtpB Brucella abortus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Mol, Juliana P. S.; Costa, Erica A.; Carvalho, Alex F.; Sun, Yao-Hui; Tsolis, Reneé M.; Paixão, Tatiane A.; Santos, Renato L.

    2014-01-01

    The pathogenesis of the Brucella-induced inflammatory response in the bovine placenta is not completely understood. In this study we evaluated the role of the B. abortus Type IV secretion system and the anti-inflammatory factor BtpB in early interactions with bovine placental tissues. Transcription profiles of chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) explants inoculated with wild type (strain 2308), ΔvirB2 or ΔbtpB Brucella abortus were compared by microarray analysis at 4 hours post infection. Transcripts with significant variation (>2 fold change; P<0.05) were functionally classified, and transcripts related to defense and inflammation were assessed by quantitative real time RT-PCR. Infection with wild type B. abortus resulted in slightly more genes with decreased than increased transcription levels. Conversely, infection of trophoblastic cells with the ΔvirB2 or the ΔbtpB mutant strains, that lack a functional T4SS or that has impaired inhibition of TLR signaling, respectively, induced more upregulated than downregulated genes. Wild type Brucella abortus impaired transcription of host genes related to immune response when compared to ΔvirB and ΔbtpB mutants. Our findings suggest that proinflammatory genes are negatively modulated in bovine trophoblastic cells at early stages of infection. The virB operon and btpB are directly or indirectly related to modulation of these host genes. These results shed light on the early interactions between B. abortus and placental tissue that ultimately culminate in inflammatory pathology and abortion. PMID:25259715

  18. Molecular and Cellular Analysis of Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Induced Apoptosis in Lymphoblastoid T-Cell-Line-Expressing Wild-Type and Mutated CD4 Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Moutouh, Laure; Estaquier, Jérôme; Richman, Douglas D.; Corbeil, Jacques

    1998-01-01

    We have previously shown that the presence of the CD4 cytoplasmic tail is critical for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-induced apoptosis (J. Corbeil, M. Tremblay, and D. D. Richman, J. Exp. Med. 183:39–48, 1996). We have pursued our investigation of the role of the CD4 transduction pathway in HIV-induced apoptosis. To do this, wild-type and mutant forms of the CD4 cytoplasmic tail were stably expressed in the lymphoblastoid T-cell line A2.01. Apoptosis was prevented when CD4 truncated at residue 402 was expressed; however, cells expressing mutated receptors that do not associate with p56lck (mutated at the dicysteine motif and truncated at residue 418) but which conserved proximal domains of the cytoplasmic tail underwent apoptosis like wild-type CD4. The differences between wild-type and mutated receptors in the induction of apoptosis were not related to levels of p56lck or NF-κB activation. Initial signaling through the CD4 receptor played a major role in the sensitization of HIV-infected T cells to undergo apoptosis. Incubation of HIV-infected cells with monoclonal antibody (MAb) 13B8-2, which binds to CD4 in a region critical for dimerization of the receptor, prevented apoptosis without inhibiting HIV replication. Moreover, the apoptotic process was not related to Fas-Fas ligand interaction; however, an antagonistic anti-Fas MAb (ZB-4) enhanced apoptosis in HIV-infected cells without inducing apoptosis in uninfected cells. These observations demonstrate that CD4 signaling mediates HIV-induced apoptosis by a mechanism independent of Fas-Fas ligand interaction, does not require p56lck signaling, and may involve a critical region for CD4 dimerization. PMID:9733846

  19. A nonimmunogenic sarcoma transduced with the cDNA for interferon gamma elicits CD8+ T cells against the wild-type tumor: correlation with antigen presentation capability

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    To be recognized by CD8+ T lymphocytes, target cells must process and present peptide antigens in the context of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules. The nonimmunogenic, low class I- expressing, methylcholanthrene (MCA)-induced murine sarcoma cell line, MCA 101, is a poor presenter of endogenously generated viral antigens to specific CD8+ T lymphocytes and cannot be used to generate tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL). Since interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) has been shown to upregulate three sets of molecules important for antigen processing and presentation, we retrovirally transduced wild-type MCA 101 (101.WT) tumor with the mIFN-gamma cDNA to create the 101.NAT cell line. Unlike 101.WT, some clones of retrovirally transduced 101.NAT tumor expressed high levels of class I, and could be used to generate CD8+ TIL. More importantly, these TIL were therapeutic in vivo against established pulmonary metastases from the wild-type tumor. Although not uniformly cytotoxic amongst several separate cultures, these TIL did specifically release cytokines (IFN-gamma and tumor necrosis factor- alpha) in response to 101.WT targets. 101.WT's antigen presentation deficit was also reversed by gene modification with mIFN-gamma cDNA. 101.NAT had a greatly improved capacity to present viral antigens to CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes. These findings show that a nonimmunogenic tumor, incapable of generating a CD8+ T cell immune response, could be gene-modified to generate a therapeutically useful immune response against the wild-type tumor. This strategy may be useful in developing treatments for tumor histologies not thought to be susceptible to T cell-based immunotherapy. PMID:1588273

  20. Structural design, solid-phase synthesis and activity of membrane-anchored β-secretase inhibitors on Aβ generation from wild-type and Swedish-mutant APP.

    PubMed

    Schieb, Heinke; Weidlich, Sebastian; Schlechtingen, Georg; Linning, Philipp; Jennings, Gary; Gruner, Margit; Wiltfang, Jens; Klafki, Hans-Wolfgang; Knölker, Hans-Joachim

    2010-12-27

    Covalent coupling of β-secretase inhibitors to a raftophilic lipid anchor via a suitable spacer by using solid-phase peptide synthesis leads to tripartite structures displaying substantially improved inhibition of cellular secretion of the β-amyloid peptide (Aβ). Herein, we describe a series of novel tripartite structures, their full characterization by NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry, and the analysis of their biological activity in cell-based assays. The tripartite structure concept is applicable to different pharmacophores, and the potency in terms of β-secretase inhibition can be optimized by adjusting the spacer length to achieve an optimal distance of the inhibitor from the lipid bilayer. A tripartite structure containing a transition-state mimic inhibitor was found to be less potent on Aβ generation from Swedish-mutant amyloid precursor protein (APP) than from the wild-type protein. Moreover, our observations suggest that specific variants of Aβ are generated from wild-type APP but not from Swedish-mutant APP and are resistant to β-secretase inhibition. Efficient inhibition of Aβ secretion by tripartite structures in the absence of appreciable neurotoxicity was confirmed in a primary neuronal cell culture, thus further supporting the concept. PMID:21132705

  1. Transgenic tobacco plants with improved cyanobacterial Rubisco expression but no extra assembly factors grow at near wild-type rates if provided with elevated CO2.

    PubMed

    Occhialini, Alessandro; Lin, Myat T; Andralojc, P John; Hanson, Maureen R; Parry, Martin A J

    2016-01-01

    Introducing a carbon-concentrating mechanism and a faster Rubisco enzyme from cyanobacteria into higher plant chloroplasts may improve photosynthetic performance by increasing the rate of CO2 fixation while decreasing losses caused by photorespiration. We previously demonstrated that tobacco plants grow photoautotrophically using Rubisco from Synechococcus elongatus, although the plants exhibited considerably slower growth than wild-type and required supplementary CO2 . Because of concerns that vascular plant assembly factors may not be adequate for assembly of a cyanobacterial Rubisco, prior transgenic plants included the cyanobacterial chaperone RbcX or the carboxysomal protein CcmM35. Here we show that neither RbcX nor CcmM35 is needed for assembly of active cyanobacterial Rubisco. Furthermore, by altering the gene regulatory sequences on the Rubisco transgenes, cyanobacterial Rubisco expression was enhanced and the transgenic plants grew at near wild-type growth rates, although still requiring elevated CO2 . We performed detailed kinetic characterization of the enzymes produced with and without the RbcX and CcmM35 cyanobacterial proteins. These transgenic plants exhibit photosynthetic characteristics that confirm the predicted benefits of introduction of non-native forms of Rubisco with higher carboxylation rate constants in vascular plants and the potential nitrogen-use efficiency that may be achieved provided that adequate CO2 is available near the enzyme.

  2. Transgenic tobacco plants with improved cyanobacterial Rubisco expression but no extra assembly factors grow at near wild-type rates if provided with elevated CO2.

    PubMed

    Occhialini, Alessandro; Lin, Myat T; Andralojc, P John; Hanson, Maureen R; Parry, Martin A J

    2016-01-01

    Introducing a carbon-concentrating mechanism and a faster Rubisco enzyme from cyanobacteria into higher plant chloroplasts may improve photosynthetic performance by increasing the rate of CO2 fixation while decreasing losses caused by photorespiration. We previously demonstrated that tobacco plants grow photoautotrophically using Rubisco from Synechococcus elongatus, although the plants exhibited considerably slower growth than wild-type and required supplementary CO2 . Because of concerns that vascular plant assembly factors may not be adequate for assembly of a cyanobacterial Rubisco, prior transgenic plants included the cyanobacterial chaperone RbcX or the carboxysomal protein CcmM35. Here we show that neither RbcX nor CcmM35 is needed for assembly of active cyanobacterial Rubisco. Furthermore, by altering the gene regulatory sequences on the Rubisco transgenes, cyanobacterial Rubisco expression was enhanced and the transgenic plants grew at near wild-type growth rates, although still requiring elevated CO2 . We performed detailed kinetic characterization of the enzymes produced with and without the RbcX and CcmM35 cyanobacterial proteins. These transgenic plants exhibit photosynthetic characteristics that confirm the predicted benefits of introduction of non-native forms of Rubisco with higher carboxylation rate constants in vascular plants and the potential nitrogen-use efficiency that may be achieved provided that adequate CO2 is available near the enzyme. PMID:26662726

  3. Quantitative analysis of fatty-acid-based biofuels produced by wild-type and genetically engineered cyanobacteria by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Guan, Wenna; Zhao, Hui; Lu, Xuefeng; Wang, Cong; Yang, Menglong; Bai, Fali

    2011-11-11

    Simple and rapid quantitative determination of fatty-acid-based biofuels is greatly important for the study of genetic engineering progress for biofuels production by microalgae. Ideal biofuels produced from biological systems should be chemically similar to petroleum, like fatty-acid-based molecules including free fatty acids, fatty acid methyl esters, fatty acid ethyl esters, fatty alcohols and fatty alkanes. This study founded a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method for simultaneous quantification of seven free fatty acids, nine fatty acid methyl esters, five fatty acid ethyl esters, five fatty alcohols and three fatty alkanes produced by wild-type Synechocystis PCC 6803 and its genetically engineered strain. Data obtained from GC-MS analyses were quantified using internal standard peak area comparisons. The linearity, limit of detection (LOD) and precision (RSD) of the method were evaluated. The results demonstrated that fatty-acid-based biofuels can be directly determined by GC-MS without derivation. Therefore, rapid and reliable quantitative analysis of fatty-acid-based biofuels produced by wild-type and genetically engineered cyanobacteria can be achieved using the GC-MS method founded in this work.

  4. Effects of temperature and growth hormone on individual growth trajectories of wild-type and transgenic coho salmon Oncorhynchus kisutch.

    PubMed

    Lõhmus, M; Björklund, M; Sundström, L F; Devlin, R H

    2010-02-01

    In this study, individual growth patterns of wild-type and growth-enhanced coho salmon Oncorhynchus kisutch at 8, 12 and 16 degrees C water temperature were followed. Despite large differences among individuals in growth rates, there was generally little variation in the shape of the growth curves among O. kisutch individuals of both genotypes and at all temperatures. Typically, individuals that were relatively large initially were also relatively large at the end of the growth period. The limitation in variation was more pronounced in the growth-enhanced O. kisutch than in the wild type, where the relative size of some individuals reared at 12 and 8 degrees C changed by the end of the trial. As a warmer temperature seems to decrease the plasticity of growth trajectories in wild-type fish, it is possible that global warming will influence the ability of wild fish to adapt their growth to changing conditions.

  5. Data for proteomic profiling of Anthers from a photosensitive male sterile mutant and wild-type cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.).

    PubMed

    Liu, Ji; Pang, Chaoyou; Wei, Hengling; Song, Meizhen; Meng, Yanyan; Ma, Jianhui; Fan, Shuli; Yu, Shuxun

    2015-09-01

    Cotton is an important economic crop, used mainly for the production of textile fiber. Using a space mutation breeding technique, a novel photosensitive genetic male sterile mutant CCRI9106 was isolated from the wild-type upland cotton cultivar CCRI040029. To study the male sterile mechanisms of CCRI9106, histological and iTRAQ-facilitated proteomic analyses of anthers were performed. This data article contains data related to the research article titled iTRAQ-Facilitated Proteomic Profiling of Anthers From a Photosensitive Male Sterile Mutant and Wild-type Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.)[1]. This research article describes the iTRAQ-facilitated proteomic analysis of the wild-type and a photosensitive male sterile mutant in cotton. The report indicated that exine formation defect is the key reason for male sterility in mutant plant. The information presented here represents the tables and figures that detail the processing of the raw data obtained from iTRAQ analysis. PMID:26958592

  6. Detection and differentiation of wild-type and a vaccine strain of Streptococcus equi ssp. equi using pyrosequencing.

    PubMed

    Livengood, Julia L; Lanka, Saraswathi; Maddox, Carol; Tewari, Deepanker

    2016-07-25

    Streptococcus equi subspecies equi (S. equi), the causative agent of strangles, is an important equine pathogen. Strangles is a highly contagious disease and a commercial modified live vaccine (MLV) is used for protection, which although effective, may also result in clinical signs of the disease. A rapid means to differentiate between the MLV and wild-type infection is crucial for quarantine release and limiting the disease spread. This study describes the use of a pyrosequencing assay targeting a single nucleotide deletion upstream of the SzPSe gene to distinguish between the wild-type and vaccine strains. A set of 96 characterized clinical specimens and isolates were tested using the assay. The assay was successful in differentiating between wild-type S. equi and the vaccine strains and in discriminating S. equi from other Streptococci. The vaccine strain was identified in 61.7% (29/47) of the strangles cases in horses with a history of MLV vaccination.

  7. The effect of mild traumatic brain injury on peripheral nervous system pathology in wild-type mice and the G93A mutant mouse model of motor neuron disease.

    PubMed

    Evans, T M; Jaramillo, C A; Sataranatarajan, K; Watts, L; Sabia, M; Qi, W; Van Remmen, H

    2015-07-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is associated with a risk of neurodegenerative disease. Some suggest a link between TBI and motor neuron disease (MND), including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). To investigate the potential mechanisms linking TBI to MND, we measured motor function and neuropathology following mild-TBI in wild-type and a transgenic model of ALS, G93A mutant mice. Mild-TBI did not alter the lifespan of G93A mice or age of onset; however, rotarod performance was impaired in G93A verses wild-type mice. Grip strength was reduced only in G93A mice after mild-TBI. Increased electromyography (EMG) abnormalities and markers of denervation (AchR, Runx1) indicate that mild-TBI may result in peripheral effects that are exaggerated in G93A mice. Markers of inflammation (cell edema, astrogliosis and microgliosis) were detected at 24 and 72h in the brain and spinal cord in wild-type and G93A mice. Levels of F2-isoprostanes, a marker of oxidative stress, were increased in the spinal cord 24h post mild-TBI in wild-type mice but were not affected by TBI in G93A mice. In summary, our data demonstrate that mild-TBI induces inflammation and oxidative stress and negatively impacts muscle denervation and motor performance, suggesting mild-TBI can potentiate motor neuron pathology and influence the development of MND in mice.

  8. Establishment of three cell lines from Chinese giant salamander and their sensitivities to the wild-type and recombinant ranavirus.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jiang-Di; Chen, Zhong-Yuan; Huang, Xing; Gao, Xiao-Chan; Zhang, Qi-Ya

    2015-06-12

    Known as lethal pathogens, Ranaviruses have been identified in diseased fish, amphibians (including Chinese giant salamander Andrias davidianus, the world's largest amphibian) and reptiles, causing organ necrosis and systemic hemorrhage. Here, three Chinese giant salamander cell lines, thymus cell line (GSTC), spleen cell line (GSSC) and kidney cell line (GSKC) were initially established. Their sensitivities to ranaviruses, wild-type Andrias davidianus ranavirus (ADRV) and recombinant Rana grylio virus carrying EGFP gene (rRGV-EGFP) were tested. Temporal transcription pattern of ranavirus major capsid protein (MCP), fluorescence and electron microscopy observations showed that both the wild-type and recombinant ranavirus could replicate in the cell lines.

  9. The mechanism of dehydration in chromophore maturation of wild-type green fluorescent protein: A theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yingying; Yu, Jian-Guo; Sun, Qiao; Li, Zhen; Smith, Sean C.

    2015-07-01

    An interesting aspect of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) is its autocatalytic chromophore maturation. Numerous experimental studies have indicated that dehydration is the last step in the chromophore maturation process of wild-type GFP. Based on the crystal structure of wild-type GFP, the mechanism of the reverse reaction of dehydration was investigated by using density functional theory (DFT) in this study. Our results proposed that the dehydration is exothermic. Moreover, the rate-limiting step of the mechanism is the proton on guanidinium of Arg96 transferring to the β-carbon anion of Tyr66, which is consistent with the experimental observation.

  10. The effects on interest, instruction, and achievement on the science question level of middle school students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuccio Schirripa, Santine

    The effects of instruction in writing researchable questions, science topic interest, and achievement (science, reading, and mathematics) on science question level in seventh grade students were investigated experimentally. The hypotheses were: students instructed in researchable questioning in science would outperform students who were not instructed on a measure of science question level; students interested in science topics would score higher on a measure of science question level, than when they are not interested; and high achieving students in mathematics, reading or science would outperform students who are not high achievers on a measure of science question level. Eight classes of normally achieving seventh graders (n = 106 students), from a middle school in west central Florida, were randomly assigned to two treatments. One group received instruction in writing researchable questions in science, the other group did not receive instruction. Each student in each of the eight classes completed "The Middle School Students' Science Topic Interest Rating Scale", developed for this study (test-retest reliability, rsbs =.84), rating each of the thirteen topics from one to three. All students selected two topics in which they were least interested, and two topics in which they were most interested. They then wrote researchable questions for each topic. All students took the Scholastic Aptitude Tests (SAT) in reading, mathematics and science. The questions were rated using the four levels described by "The Middle School Students' Science Question Rating Scale", developed for this study (inter-rater reliability, rsbs =.96). The scores for each question were averaged for two raters then summed for each interest level for each student The means and standard deviations were computed for questions generated at a low level of interest, questions generated at a high level of interest, reading SAT scores, mathematics SAT scores, and science SAT scores. The data were

  11. Regulation of unbalanced redox homeostasis induced by the expression of wild-type HIV-1 viral protein R (NL4-3Vpr) in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Gazdag, Zoltán; Stromájer-Rácz, Timea; Belagyi, Joseph; Zhao, Richard Y; Elder, Robert T; Virág, Eszter; Pesti, Miklós

    2015-09-01

    The wild-type viral protein R (Vpr) of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 exerts multiple effects on cellular activities during infection, including the induction of cell cycle G2 arrest and the death of human cells and cells of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. In this study, wild-type Vpr (NL4-3Vpr) integrated as a single copy gene in S. pombe chromosome was used to investigate the molecular impact of Vpr on cellular oxidative stress. NL4-3Vpr triggered an atypical response in early (14-h), and a wellregulated oxidative stress response in late (35-h) log-phase cultures. Specifically, NL4-3Vpr expression induced oxidative stress in the 14-h cultures leading, to decreased levels of superoxide anion (O(2)(·-)), hydroxyl radical (·OH) and glutathione (GSH), and significantly decreased activities of catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and glutathione S-transferase. In the 35-h cultures, elevated levels of O(2)(·-) and peroxides were accompanied by increased activities of most antioxidant enzymes, suggesting that the Vpr-induced unbalanced redox state of the cells might contribute to the adverse effects in HIV-infected patients. PMID:26344028

  12. Experimental Adaptation of Wild-Type Canine Distemper Virus (CDV) to the Human Entry Receptor CD150

    PubMed Central

    Bieringer, Maria; Han, Jung Woo; Kendl, Sabine; Khosravi, Mojtaba; Plattet, Philippe; Schneider-Schaulies, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV), a close relative of measles virus (MV), is widespread and well known for its broad host range. When the goal of measles eradication may be achieved, and when measles vaccination will be stopped, CDV might eventually cross the species barrier to humans and emerge as a new human pathogen. In order to get an impression how fast such alterations may occur, we characterized required adaptive mutations to the human entry receptors CD150 (SLAM) and nectin-4 as first step to infect human target cells. Recombinant wild-type CDV-A75/17red adapted quickly to growth in human H358 epithelial cells expressing human nectin-4. Sequencing of the viral attachment proteins (hemagglutinin, H, and fusion protein, F) genes revealed that no adaptive alteration was required to utilize human nectin-4. In contrast, the virus replicated only to low titres (102 pfu/ml) in Vero cells expressing human CD150 (Vero-hSLAM). After three passages using these cells virus was adapted to human CD150 and replicated to high titres (105 pfu/ml). Sequence analyses revealed that only one amino acid exchange in the H-protein at position 540 Asp→Gly (D540G) was required for functional adaptation to human CD150. Structural modelling suggests that the adaptive mutation D540G in H reflects the sequence alteration from canine to human CD150 at position 70 and 71 from Pro to Leu (P70L) and Gly to Glu (G71E), and compensates for the gain of a negative charge in the human CD150 molecule. Using this model system our data indicate that only a minimal alteration, in this case one adaptive mutation, is required for adaptation of CDV to the human entry receptors, and help to understand the molecular basis why this adaptive mutation occurs. PMID:23554862

  13. Susceptibility of Different Mouse Wild Type Strains to Develop Diet-Induced NAFLD/AFLD-Associated Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fengler, Vera H. I.; Macheiner, Tanja; Kessler, Sonja M.; Czepukojc, Beate; Gemperlein, Katja; Müller, Rolf; Kiemer, Alexandra K.; Magnes, Christoph; Haybaeck, Johannes; Lackner, Carolin; Sargsyan, Karine

    2016-01-01

    Although non-alcoholic and alcoholic fatty liver disease have been intensively studied, concerning pathophysiological mechanisms are still incompletely understood. This may be due to the use of different animal models and resulting model-associated variation. Therefore, this study aimed to compare three frequently used wild type mouse strains in their susceptibility to develop diet-induced features of non-alcoholic/alcoholic fatty liver disease. Fatty liver disease associated clinical, biochemical, and histological features in C57BL/6, CD-1, and 129Sv WT mice were induced by (i) high-fat diet feeding, (ii) ethanol feeding only, and (iii) the combination of high-fat diet and ethanol feeding. Hepatic and subcutaneous adipose lipid profiles were compared in CD-1 and 129Sv mice. Additionally hepatic fatty acid composition was determined in 129Sv mice. In C57BL/6 mice dietary regimens resulted in heterogeneous hepatic responses, ranging from pronounced steatosis and inflammation to a lack of any features of fatty liver disease. Liver-related serum biochemistry showed high deviations within the regimen groups. CD-1 mice did not exhibit significant changes in metabolic and liver markers and developed no significant steatosis or inflammation as a response to dietary regimens. Although 129Sv mice showed no weight gain, this strain achieved most consistent features of fatty liver disease, apparent from concentration alterations of liver-related serum biochemistry as well as moderate steatosis and inflammation as a result of all dietary regimens. Furthermore, the hepatic lipid profile as well as the fatty acid composition of 129Sv mice were considerably altered, upon feeding the different dietary regimens. Accordingly, diet-induced non-alcoholic/alcoholic fatty liver disease is most consistently promoted in 129Sv mice compared to C57BL/6 and CD-1 mice. As a conclusion, this study demonstrates the importance of genetic background of used mouse strains for modeling diet

  14. Investigating the Relationship between School Level Accountability Practices and Science Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gándara, Fernanda; Randall, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the relationship between school-level accountability practices and science achievement of 15-year-olds, across four counties: Australia, Korea, Portugal, and the United States. We used PISA 2006 data, since 2006 is the only administration that has focused on science. School-level accountability practices are here defined as…

  15. The Influence of Parents Educational Level on Secondary School Students Academic Achievements in District Rajanpur

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khan, Rana Muhammad Asad; Iqbal, Nadeem; Tasneem, Saima

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to focus the influence and impact of parents educational level on students academic achievement at secondary level of education. The study utilizes the students results of the 9th class in secondary school certificate examination taken by the Board of Intermediate & Secondary Education Dera Ghazi Khan. Oral interview,…

  16. The Relation between Pre-Service Music Teachers' Psychological Resilience and Academic Achievement Levels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yokus, Tuba

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to examine the relation between pre-service music teachers' psychological resilience and academic achievement levels and to determine what variables influence their psychological resilience levels. The study sample consisted of students enrolled in a music education program in the 2013-2014 academic year (N = 333). In respect with…

  17. Principal and School-Level Effects on Elementary School Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brockmeier, Lantry L.; Starr, Gene; Green, Ronny; Pate, James L.; Leech, Donald W.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if principal tenure, principal stability, and principal educational experience in public education along with school-level variables predicted elementary school student achievement. A second purpose was to examine whether there was a significant difference between (a) levels of principal tenure and levels…

  18. Measuring the Outliers: An Introduction to Out-of-Level Testing with High-Achieving Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rambo-Hernandez, Karen E.; Warne, Russell T.

    2015-01-01

    Out-of-level testing is an underused strategy for addressing the needs of students who score in the extremes, and when used wisely, it could provide educators with a much more accurate picture of what students know. Out-of-level testing has been shown to be an effective assessment strategy with high-achieving students; however, out-of-level…

  19. The effect of teacher education level, teaching experience, and teaching behaviors on student science achievement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Danhui

    Previous literature leaves us unanswered questions about whether teaching behaviors mediate the relationship between teacher education level and experience with student science achievement. This study examined this question with 655 students from sixth to eighth grade and their 12 science teachers. Student science achievements were measured at the beginning and end of 2006-2007 school year. Given the cluster sampling of students nested in classrooms, which are nested in teachers, a two-level multilevel model was employed to disentangle the effects from teacher-level and student-level factors. Several findings were discovered in this study. Science teachers possessing of advanced degrees in science or education significantly and positively influenced student science achievement. However, years of teaching experience in science did not directly influence student science achievement. A significant interaction was detected between teachers possessing an advanced degree in science or education and years of teaching science, which was inversely associated to student science achievement. Better teaching behaviors were also positively related to student achievement in science directly, as well as mediated the relationship between student science achievement and both teacher education and experience. Additionally, when examined separately, each teaching behavior variable (teacher engagement, classroom management, and teaching strategies) served as a significant intermediary between both teacher education and experience and student science achievement. The findings of this study are intended to provide insights into the importance of hiring and developing qualified teachers who are better able to help students achieve in science, as well as to direct the emphases of ongoing teacher inservice training.

  20. Trifluoperazine rescues human dopaminergic cells from wild-type α-synuclein-induced toxicity.

    PubMed

    Höllerhage, Matthias; Goebel, Joachim N; de Andrade, Anderson; Hildebrandt, Tobias; Dolga, Amalia; Culmsee, Carsten; Oertel, Wolfgang H; Hengerer, Bastian; Höglinger, Günter U

    2014-07-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the most frequent neurodegenerative movement disorder. Presently, there is no causal therapy available to slow down or halt disease progression. The presynaptic protein alpha-synuclein aggregates to form intraneuronal Lewy bodies in PD. It is generally believed that intermediates on the way from monomers to the large aggregates would mediate neurotoxicity, but the precise species and mechanism responsible for neuronal death are controversially debated. To study alpha-synuclein-mediated toxicity, we developed a new model in which moderate overexpression of wild-type alpha-synuclein led to gradual death of human postmitotic dopaminergic neurons. In accordance with findings in postmortem PD brains, small oligomeric species occurred and the autophagic flux was impaired in our model. The phenothiazine neuroleptic trifluoperazine, an activator of macroautophagy, selectively reduced one particular alpha-synuclein species and rescued cells. Inversely, blocking of autophagy led to an accumulation of this oligomeric species and increased cell death. These data show that activation of autophagy is a promising approach to protect against alpha-synuclein pathology and likely acts by targeting one specific alpha-synuclein species.

  1. Gravitropism and development of wild-type and starch-deficient mutants of Arabidopsis during spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiss, J. Z.; Katembe, W. J.; Edelmann, R. E.

    1998-01-01

    The "starch-statolith" hypothesis has been used by plant physiologists to explain the gravity perception mechanism in higher plants. In order to help resolve some of the controversy associated with ground-based research that has supported this theory, we performed a spaceflight experiment during the January 1997 mission of the Space Shuttle STS-81. Seedlings of wild-type (WT) Arabidopsis, two reduced-starch strains, and a starchless mutant were grown in microgravity and then given a gravity stimulus on a centrifuge. In terms of development in space, germination was greater than 90% for seeds in microgravity, and flight seedlings were smaller (60% in total length) compared to control plants grown on the ground and to control plants on a rotating clinostat. Seedlings grown in space had two structural features that distinguished them from the controls: a greater density of root hairs and an anomalous hypocotyl hook structure. However, the slower growth and morphological changes observed in the flight seedlings may be due to the effects of ethylene present in the spacecraft. Nevertheless, during the flight hypocotyls of WT seedlings responded to a unilateral 60 min stimulus provided by a 1-g centrifuge while those of the starch-deficient strains did not. Thus the strain with the greatest amount of starch responded to the stimulus given in flight and therefore, these data support the starch-statolith model for gravity sensing.

  2. Cellular Distribution and Functions of Wild-Type and Constitutively Activated Dictyostelium PakBV⃞

    PubMed Central

    de la Roche, Marc; Mahasneh, Amjad; Lee, Sheu-Fen; Rivero, Francisco; Côté, Graham P.

    2005-01-01

    Dictyostelium PakB, previously termed myosin I heavy chain kinase, is a member of the p21-activated kinase (PAK) family. Two-hybrid assays showed that PakB interacts with Dictyostelium Rac1a/b/c, RacA (a RhoBTB protein), RacB, RacC, and RacF1. Wild-type PakB displayed a cytosolic distribution with a modest enrichment at the leading edge of migrating cells and at macropinocytic and phagocytic cups, sites consistent with a role in activating myosin I. PakB fused at the N terminus to green fluorescent protein was proteolyzed in cells, resulting in removal of the catalytic domain. C-terminal truncated PakB and activated PakB lacking the p21-binding domain strongly localized to the cell cortex, to macropinocytic cups, to the posterior of migrating cells, and to the cleavage furrow of dividing cells. These data indicate that in its open, active state, the N terminus of PakB forms a tight association with cortical actin filaments. PakB-null cells displayed no significant behavioral defects, but cells expressing activated PakB were unable to complete cytokinesis when grown in suspension and exhibited increased rates of phagocytosis and pinocytosis. PMID:15509655

  3. Comparative transcriptomic analysis of silkwormBmovo-1 and wild type silkworm ovary

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Renyu; Hu, Xiaolong; Zhu, Liyuan; Cao, Guangli; Huang, Moli; Xue, Gaoxu; Song, Zuowei; Lu, Jiayu; Chen, Xueying; Gong, Chengliang

    2015-01-01

    The detailed molecular mechanism of Bmovo-1 regulation of ovary size is unclear. To uncover the mechanism of Bmovo-1 regulation of ovarian development and oogenesis using RNA-Seq, we compared the transcriptomes of wild type (WT) and Bmovo-1-overexpressing silkworm (silkworm+Bmovo-1) ovaries. Using a pair-end Illumina Solexa sequencing strategy, 5,296,942 total reads were obtained from silkworm+Bmovo-1 ovaries and 6,306,078 from WT ovaries. The average read length was about 100 bp. Clean read ratios were 98.79% for silkworm+Bmovo-1 and 98.87% for WT silkworm ovaries. Comparative transcriptome analysis showed 123 upregulated and 111 downregulated genes in silkworm+Bmovo-1 ovaries. These differentially expressed genes were enriched in the extracellular and extracellular spaces and involved in metabolism, genetic information processing, environmental information processing, cellular processes and organismal systems. Bmovo-1 overexpression in silkworm ovaries might promote anabolism for ovarian development and oogenesis and oocyte proliferation and transport of nutrients to ovaries by altering nutrient partitioning, which would support ovary development. Excessive consumption of nutrients for ovary development alters nutrient partitioning and deters silk protein synthesis. PMID:26643037

  4. Probing flagellar promoter occupancy in wild-type and mutant Caulobacter crescentus by chromatin immunoprecipitation.

    PubMed

    Davis, Nicole J; Viollier, Patrick H

    2011-06-01

    In the asymmetric predivisional cell of Caulobacter crescentus, TipF and TipN mark the cellular pole for future flagellar development. TipF is essential for motility and contains a cyclic-di-GMP phosphodiesterase-like (EAL) domain that is necessary for proper function. TipN is localized to the flagellar pole before TipF and is essential for the proper placement of the flagellum in C. crescentus. Using β-galactosidase promoter-probe assays and quantitative chromatin immunoprecipitation, we investigated the influence of the C. crescentus flagellar assembly regulator TipF on flagellar gene transcription. We compared the transcriptional activity of class II-fliF-lacZ, class III-flgE-lacZ, and class IV-fljL-lacZ fusions in a ΔtipF mutant with that of other flagellar mutants and the wild-type strain. We subsequently verified the in vivo occupancy of the fliF, flgE, and fljL flagellar promoters by the flagellar regulators CtrA, FlbD, and FliX in addition to RNA polymerase. We deduce that TipF contributes to proper expression of flagellar genes in C. crescentus by acting both within and outside of the canonical flagellar gene expression hierarchy.

  5. Auto-Assembling Detoxified Staphylococcus aureus Alpha-Hemolysin Mimicking the Wild-Type Cytolytic Toxin.

    PubMed

    Fiaschi, Luigi; Di Palo, Benedetta; Scarselli, Maria; Pozzi, Clarissa; Tomaszewski, Kelly; Galletti, Bruno; Nardi-Dei, Vincenzo; Arcidiacono, Letizia; Mishra, Ravi P N; Mori, Elena; Pallaoro, Michele; Falugi, Fabiana; Torre, Antonina; Fontana, Maria Rita; Soriani, Marco; Bubeck Wardenburg, Juliane; Grandi, Guido; Rappuoli, Rino; Ferlenghi, Ilaria; Bagnoli, Fabio

    2016-06-01

    Staphylococcus aureus alpha-hemolysin (Hla) assembles into heptameric pores on the host cell membrane, causing lysis, apoptosis, and junction disruption. Herein, we present the design of a newly engineered S. aureus alpha-toxin, HlaPSGS, which lacks the predicted membrane-spanning stem domain. This protein is able to form heptamers in aqueous solution in the absence of lipophilic substrata, and its structure, obtained by transmission electron microscopy and single-particle reconstruction analysis, resembles the cap of the wild-type cytolytic Hla pore. HlaPSGS was found to be impaired in binding to host cells and to its receptor ADAM10 and to lack hemolytic and cytotoxic activity. Immunological studies using human sera as well as sera from mice convalescent from S. aureus infection suggested that the heptameric conformation of HlaPSGS mimics epitopes exposed by the cytolytic Hla pore during infection. Finally, immunization with this newly engineered Hla generated high protective immunity against staphylococcal infection in mice. Overall, this study provides unprecedented data on the natural immune response against Hla and suggests that the heptameric HlaPSGS is a highly valuable vaccine candidate against S. aureus.

  6. Wild-Type Transthyretin Cardiac Amyloidosis: Novel Insights From Advanced Imaging.

    PubMed

    Narotsky, David L; Castano, Adam; Weinsaft, Jonathan W; Bokhari, Sabahat; Maurer, Mathew S

    2016-09-01

    Amyloidosis is caused by extracellular deposition of abnormal protein fibrils, resulting in destruction of tissue architecture and impairment of organ function. The most common forms of systemic amyloidosis are light-chain and transthyretin-related (ATTR). ATTR can result from an autosomal dominant hereditary transmission of mutated genes in the transthyretin or from a wild-type form of disease (ATTRwt), previously known as senile cardiac amyloidosis. With the aging of the worldwide population, ATTRwt will emerge as the most common type of cardiac amyloidosis that clinicians encounter. Diagnosis of systemic amyloidosis is often delayed, either because of the false assumption that it is a rare disease, or because of misdiagnosis as a result of mistaking it with other conditions. Clinicians must integrate clinical clues from history, physical examination, and common diagnostic tests to raise suspicion for ATTRwt. The historical gold standard for diagnosis of cardiac amyloid is endomyocardial biopsy analysis with pathological distinction of precursor protein type, but this method often results in delayed diagnosis because of the limited availability of expertise to perform and interpret the endomyocardial biopsy specimen. Emerging noninvasive imaging modalities provide easier, accurate screening for ATTRwt. These modalities include advanced echocardiography, using strain imaging and the myocardial contraction fraction; nuclear scintigraphy, which can differentiate between ATTR and light-chain cardiac amyloid; and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, using extracellular volume measurement, late gadolinium enhancement, and distinct T1 mapping. These novel approaches reveal insights into the prevalence, clinical course, morphological effects, and prognosis of ATTRwt. PMID:27568874

  7. Molecular analysis of mutant and wild type alcohol dehydrogenase alleles from Drosophila

    SciTech Connect

    Batzer, M.A.

    1988-01-01

    Wild type alcohol dehydrogenase polypeptides (ADH) from Drosophila melanogaster transformants were examined using western blots and polyclonal antiserum specific for Drosophila melanogaster ADH. Mutants induced in Drosophila spermatozoa at the alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) locus using X-rays, 1-ethyl-1-nitrosourea (ENU) or ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) were characterized using genetic complementation tests, western blots, Southern blots, northern blots and enzymatic amplification of the Adh locus. Genetic complementation tests showed that 22/30 X-ray-induced mutants, and 3/13 ENU and EMS induced mutants were multi-locus deficiencies. Western blot analysis of the intragenic mutations showed that 4/7 X-ray-induced mutants produced detectable polypeptides, one of which was normal in molecular weight and charge. In contrast 8/10 intragenic ENU and EMS induced mutants produced normal polypeptides. Southern blot analysis showed that 5/7 intragenic X-ray induced mutants and all 10 of the intragenic ENU and EMS induced mutants were normal with respect to the alleles they were derived from.

  8. Quantification of gait parameters in freely walking wild type and sensory deprived Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Mendes, César S; Bartos, Imre; Akay, Turgay; Márka, Szabolcs; Mann, Richard S

    2013-01-01

    Coordinated walking in vertebrates and multi-legged invertebrates such as Drosophila melanogaster requires a complex neural network coupled to sensory feedback. An understanding of this network will benefit from systems such as Drosophila that have the ability to genetically manipulate neural activities. However, the fly's small size makes it challenging to analyze walking in this system. In order to overcome this limitation, we developed an optical method coupled with high-speed imaging that allows the tracking and quantification of gait parameters in freely walking flies with high temporal and spatial resolution. Using this method, we present a comprehensive description of many locomotion parameters, such as gait, tarsal positioning, and intersegmental and left-right coordination for wild type fruit flies. Surprisingly, we find that inactivation of sensory neurons in the fly's legs, to block proprioceptive feedback, led to deficient step precision, but interleg coordination and the ability to execute a tripod gait were unaffected. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00231.001 PMID:23326642

  9. Auto-Assembling Detoxified Staphylococcus aureus Alpha-Hemolysin Mimicking the Wild-Type Cytolytic Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Fiaschi, Luigi; Di Palo, Benedetta; Scarselli, Maria; Pozzi, Clarissa; Tomaszewski, Kelly; Galletti, Bruno; Nardi-Dei, Vincenzo; Arcidiacono, Letizia; Mishra, Ravi P. N.; Mori, Elena; Pallaoro, Michele; Falugi, Fabiana; Torre, Antonina; Fontana, Maria Rita; Soriani, Marco; Bubeck Wardenburg, Juliane; Grandi, Guido; Rappuoli, Rino

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus alpha-hemolysin (Hla) assembles into heptameric pores on the host cell membrane, causing lysis, apoptosis, and junction disruption. Herein, we present the design of a newly engineered S. aureus alpha-toxin, HlaPSGS, which lacks the predicted membrane-spanning stem domain. This protein is able to form heptamers in aqueous solution in the absence of lipophilic substrata, and its structure, obtained by transmission electron microscopy and single-particle reconstruction analysis, resembles the cap of the wild-type cytolytic Hla pore. HlaPSGS was found to be impaired in binding to host cells and to its receptor ADAM10 and to lack hemolytic and cytotoxic activity. Immunological studies using human sera as well as sera from mice convalescent from S. aureus infection suggested that the heptameric conformation of HlaPSGS mimics epitopes exposed by the cytolytic Hla pore during infection. Finally, immunization with this newly engineered Hla generated high protective immunity against staphylococcal infection in mice. Overall, this study provides unprecedented data on the natural immune response against Hla and suggests that the heptameric HlaPSGS is a highly valuable vaccine candidate against S. aureus. PMID:27030589

  10. Wild-type p53 controls cell motility and invasion by dual regulation of MET expression

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Chang-Il; Matoso, Andres; Corney, David C.; Flesken-Nikitin, Andrea; Körner, Stefanie; Wang, Wei; Boccaccio, Carla; Thorgeirsson, Snorri S.; Comoglio, Paolo M.; Hermeking, Heiko; Nikitin, Alexander Yu.

    2011-01-01

    Recent observations suggest that p53 mutations are responsible not only for growth of primary tumors but also for their dissemination. However, mechanisms involved in p53-mediated control of cell motility and invasion remain poorly understood. By using the primary ovarian surface epithelium cell culture, we show that conditional inactivation of p53 or expression of its mutant forms results in overexpression of MET receptor tyrosine kinase, a crucial regulator of invasive growth. At the same time, cells acquire increased MET-dependent motility and invasion. Wild-type p53 negatively regulates MET expression by two mechanisms: (i) transactivation of MET-targeting miR-34, and (ii) inhibition of SP1 binding to MET promoter. Both mechanisms are not functional in p53 absence, but mutant p53 proteins retain partial MET promoter suppression. Accordingly, MET overexpression, cell motility, and invasion are particularly high in p53-null cells. These results identify MET as a critical effector of p53 and suggest that inhibition of MET may be an effective antimetastatic approach to treat cancers with p53 mutations. These results also show that the extent of advanced cancer traits, such as invasion, may be determined by alterations in individual components of p53/MET regulatory network. PMID:21831840

  11. Evaluation of short-interfering RNAs treatment in experimental rabies due to wild-type virus.

    PubMed

    Appolinario, Camila Michele; Allendorf, Susan Dora; Peres, Marina Gea; Fonseca, Clovis Reynaldo; Vicente, Acacia Ferreira; Antunes, João Marcelo Azevedo de Paula; Pantoja, José Carlos Figueiredo; Megid, Jane

    2015-01-01

    We have evaluated the efficacy of short-interfering RNAs targeting the nucleoprotein gene and also the brain immune response in treated and non-treated infected mice. Mice were inoculated with wild-type virus, classified as dog (hv2) or vampire bat (hv3) variants and both groups were treated or left as controls. No difference was observed in the lethality rate between treated and non-treated groups, although clinical evaluation of hv2 infected mice showed differences in the severity of clinical disease (p=0.0006). Evaluation of brain immune response 5 days post-inoculation in treated hv2 group showed no difference among the analyzed genes, whereas after 10 days post-inoculation there was increased expression of 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetase 1, tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin 12, interferon gamma, and C-X-C motif chemokine 10 associated with higher expression of N gene in the same period (p<0.0001). In hv2 non-treated group only higher interferon beta expression was found at day 5. The observed differences in results of the immune response genes between treated and non-treated groups is not promising as they had neither impact on mortality nor even a reduction in the expression of N gene in siRNA treated animals. This finding suggests that the use of pre-designed siRNA alone may not be useful in rabies treatment. PMID:26254692

  12. Subcellular potassium and sodium distribution in Saccharomyces cerevisiae wild-type and vacuolar mutants.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Rito; Álvarez, María C; Gelis, Samuel; Ramos, José

    2013-09-15

    Living cells accumulate potassium (K⁺) to fulfil multiple functions. It is well documented that the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae grows at very different concentrations of external alkali cations and keeps high and low intracellular concentrations of K⁺ and sodium (Na⁺) respectively. However less attention has been paid to the study of the intracellular distribution of these cations. The most widely used experimental approach, plasma membrane permeabilization, produces incomplete results, since it usually considers only cytoplasm and vacuoles as compartments where the cations are present in significant amounts. By isolating and analysing the main yeast organelles, we have determined the subcellular location of K⁺ and Na⁺ in S. cerevisiae. We show that while vacuoles accumulate most of the intracellular K⁺ and Na⁺, the cytosol contains relatively low amounts, which is especially relevant in the case of Na⁺. However K⁺ concentrations in the cytosol are kept rather constant during the K⁺-starvation process and we conclude that, for that purpose, vacuolar K⁺ has to be rapidly mobilized. We also show that this intracellular distribution is altered in four different mutants with impaired vacuolar physiology. Finally, we show that both in wild-type and vacuolar mutants, nuclei contain and keep a relatively constant and important percentage of total intracellular K⁺ and Na⁺, which most probably is involved in the neutralization of negative charges.

  13. Evaluation of short-interfering RNAs treatment in experimental rabies due to wild-type virus.

    PubMed

    Appolinario, Camila Michele; Allendorf, Susan Dora; Peres, Marina Gea; Fonseca, Clovis Reynaldo; Vicente, Acacia Ferreira; Antunes, João Marcelo Azevedo de Paula; Pantoja, José Carlos Figueiredo; Megid, Jane

    2015-01-01

    We have evaluated the efficacy of short-interfering RNAs targeting the nucleoprotein gene and also the brain immune response in treated and non-treated infected mice. Mice were inoculated with wild-type virus, classified as dog (hv2) or vampire bat (hv3) variants and both groups were treated or left as controls. No difference was observed in the lethality rate between treated and non-treated groups, although clinical evaluation of hv2 infected mice showed differences in the severity of clinical disease (p=0.0006). Evaluation of brain immune response 5 days post-inoculation in treated hv2 group showed no difference among the analyzed genes, whereas after 10 days post-inoculation there was increased expression of 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetase 1, tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin 12, interferon gamma, and C-X-C motif chemokine 10 associated with higher expression of N gene in the same period (p<0.0001). In hv2 non-treated group only higher interferon beta expression was found at day 5. The observed differences in results of the immune response genes between treated and non-treated groups is not promising as they had neither impact on mortality nor even a reduction in the expression of N gene in siRNA treated animals. This finding suggests that the use of pre-designed siRNA alone may not be useful in rabies treatment.

  14. Fluorescent Trimethoprim Conjugate Probes To Assess Drug Accumulation in Wild Type and Mutant Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Reduced susceptibility to antimicrobials in Gram-negative bacteria may result from multiple resistance mechanisms, including increased efflux pump activity or reduced porin protein expression. Up-regulation of the efflux pump system is closely associated with multidrug resistance (MDR). To help investigate the role of efflux pumps on compound accumulation, a fluorescence-based assay was developed using fluorescent derivatives of trimethoprim (TMP), a broad-spectrum synthetic antibiotic that inhibits an intracellular target, dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR). Novel fluorescent TMP probes inhibited eDHFR activity with comparable potency to TMP, but did not kill or inhibit growth of wild type Escherichia coli. However, bactericidal activity was observed against an efflux pump deficient E. coli mutant strain (ΔtolC). A simple and quick fluorescence assay was developed to measure cellular accumulation of the TMP probe using either fluorescence spectroscopy or flow cytometry, with validation by LC-MS/MS. This fluorescence assay may provide a simple method to assess efflux pump activity with standard laboratory equipment. PMID:27737551

  15. Rootcap structure in wild type and in a starchless mutant of Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sack, F. D.; Kiss, J. Z.

    1989-01-01

    Rootcaps of the wild type (WT) and of a starchless, gravitropic mutant (TC7) of Arabidopsis thaliana L. were examined by electron microscopy to identify cellular polarities with respect to gravity. In columella cells, nuclei are located proximally, and the nuclear envelope is continuous with endoplasmic reticulum (ER) that is in turn connected to nearby plasmodesmata. Impregnation of ER with osmium ferricyanide revealed numerous contacts between columella plastids and ER in both genotypes. ER is present mostly in the outer regions of the columella protoplast except in older columella cells that are developing into peripheral cells. In vertical roots, only columella cells that are intermediate in development (story 2 cells) have a higher surface density (S) of ER in the distal compared to proximal regions of the cell. The distal but not the proximal S of the ER is constant throughout columella development. Plastids are less sedimented in TC7 columella cells compared to those of the WT. It is hypothesized that plastid contact with the ER plays a role in gravity perception in both genotypes.

  16. Intraperitoneal Infection of Wild-Type Mice with Synthetically Generated Mammalian Prion.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xinhe; McGovern, Gillian; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Fei; Zha, Liang; Jeffrey, Martin; Ma, Jiyan

    2015-07-01

    The prion hypothesis postulates that the infectious agent in transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) is an unorthodox protein conformation based agent. Recent successes in generating mammalian prions in vitro with bacterially expressed recombinant prion protein provide strong support for the hypothesis. However, whether the pathogenic properties of synthetically generated prion (rec-Prion) recapitulate those of naturally occurring prions remains unresolved. Using end-point titration assay, we showed that the in vitro prepared rec-Prions have infectious titers of around 104 LD50/μg. In addition, intraperitoneal (i.p.) inoculation of wild-type mice with rec-Prion caused prion disease with an average survival time of 210-220 days post inoculation. Detailed pathological analyses revealed that the nature of rec-Prion induced lesions, including spongiform change, disease specific prion protein accumulation (PrP-d) and the PrP-d dissemination amongst lymphoid and peripheral nervous system tissues, the route and mechanisms of neuroinvasion were all typical of classical rodent prions. Our results revealed that, similar to naturally occurring prions, the rec-Prion has a titratable infectivity and is capable of causing prion disease via routes other than direct intra-cerebral challenge. More importantly, our results established that the rec-Prion caused disease is pathogenically and pathologically identical to naturally occurring contagious TSEs, supporting the concept that a conformationally altered protein agent is responsible for the infectivity in TSEs.

  17. Mitochondrially targeted wild-type p53 induces apoptosis in a solid human tumor xenograft model

    PubMed Central

    Palacios, Gustavo; Crawford, Howard C.; Vaseva, Angelina; Moll, Ute M.

    2013-01-01

    Classic but also novel roles of p53 are becoming increasingly well characterized. We previously showed that ex vivo retroviral transfer of mitochondrially targeted wild type p53 (mitop53) in the Eμ-myc mouse lymphoma model efficiently induces tumor cell killing in vivo. In an effort to further explore the therapeutic potential of mitop53 for its pro-apoptotic effect in solid tumors, we generated replication-deficient recombinant human Adenovirus type 5 vectors. We show here that adenoviral delivery of mitop53 by intratumoral injection into HCT116 human colon carcinoma xenograft tumors in nude mice is surprisingly effective, resulting in tumor cell death of comparable potency to conventional p53. These apoptotic effects in vivo were confirmed by Ad5-mitop53 mediated cell death of HCT116 cells in culture. Together, these data provide encouragement to further explore the potential for novel mitop53 proteins in cancer therapy to execute the shortest known circuitry of p53 death signaling. PMID:18719383

  18. Wild-type p53 binds to MYC promoter G-quadruplex

    PubMed Central

    Petr, Marek; Helma, Robert; Polášková, Alena; Krejčí, Aneta; Dvořáková, Zuzana; Kejnovská, Iva; Navrátilová, Lucie; Adámik, Matej; Vorlíčková, Michaela; Brázdová, Marie

    2016-01-01

    G-quadruplexes are four-stranded nucleic acid structures that are implicated in the regulation of transcription, translation and replication. Genome regions enriched in putative G-quadruplex motifs include telomeres and gene promoters. Tumour suppressor p53 plays a critical role in regulatory pathways leading to cell cycle arrest, DNA repair and apoptosis. In addition to transcriptional regulation mediated via sequence-specific DNA binding, p53 can selectively bind various non-B DNA structures. In the present study, wild-type p53 (wtp53) binding to G-quadruplex formed by MYC promoter nuclease hypersensitive element (NHE) III1 region was investigated. Wtp53 binding to MYC G-quadruplex is comparable to interaction with specific p53 consensus sequence (p53CON). Apart from the full-length wtp53, its isolated C-terminal region (aa 320–393) as well, is capable of high-affinity MYC G-quadruplex binding, suggesting its critical role in this type of interaction. Moreover, wtp53 binds to MYC promoter region containing putative G-quadruplex motif in two wtp53-expressing cell lines. The results suggest that wtp53 binding to G-quadruplexes can take part in transcriptional regulation of its target genes. PMID:27634752

  19. Ultrastructural analysis of wild type and mutant Drosophila melanogaster using helium ion microscopy.

    PubMed

    Boseman, Adam; Nowlin, Kyle; Ashraf, Sarmadia; Yang, Jijin; Lajeunesse, Dennis

    2013-08-01

    Insects have evolved numerous adaptations to survive a variety of environmental conditions. Given that the primary interface between insects and the environment is mediated through their skin or cuticle, many of these adaptations are found in extraordinary cuticle diversity both in morphology and structure. Not all of these adaptions manifest themselves in changes in the chemical composition of the cuticle but rather as elaborations of the surface structures of the cuticle. Typically the examination of these micro- and nanoscale structures has been performed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Typically, in order to decrease surface charging and increase resolution, an obscuring conductive layer is applied to the sample surface, but this layer limits the ability to identify nanoscale surface structures. In this paper we use a new technology, helium ion microscopy (HIM) to examine surface structures on the cuticle of wild type and mutant Drosophila. Helium ion microscopy permits high resolution imaging of biological samples without the need for coating. We compare HIM to traditional SEM and demonstrate certain advantages of this type of microscopy, with our focus being high resolution characterization of nanostructures on the cuticle of Drosophila melanogaster and potentially other biological specimens.

  20. Comparative analysis of leg and antenna development in wild-type and homeotic Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Cummins, Mark; Pueyo, Jose I; Greig, Steve A; Couso, Juan Pablo

    2003-07-01

    The insect leg and antenna are thought to be homologous structures, evolved from a common ancestral appendage. The homeotic transformations of antenna to leg in Drosophila produced by mutation of the Hox gene Antennapedia are position-specific, such that every particular antenna structure is transformed into a specific leg counterpart. This has been taken to suggest that the developmental programmes of these two appendages are still similar. In particular, the mechanisms for the specification of a cell's position within the appendage would be identical, only their interpretation would be different and subject to homeotic gene control. Here we explore the degree of conservation between the developmental programmes of leg and antenna in Drosophila and other dipterans, in wild-type and homeotic conditions. Most of the appendage pattern-forming genes are active in both appendages, and their expression domains are partially conserved. However, the regulatory relationships and interactions between these genes are different, and in fact cells change their expression while undergoing homeotic transformation. Thus, the positional information, and the mechanisms which generate it, are not strictly conserved between leg and antenna; and homeotic genes alter the establishment of positional clues, not only their interpretation. The partial conservation of pattern-forming genes in both appendages ensures a predictable re-specification of positional clues, producing the observed positional specificity of homeotic transformations.

  1. WILD-TYPE GROSS LEUKEMIA VIRUS AND THE PATHOGENESIS OF THE GLOMERULONEPHRITIS OF NEW ZEALAND MICE

    PubMed Central

    Mellors, Robert C.; Shirai, Toshikazu; Aoki, Tadao; Huebner, Robert J.; Krawczynski, Krzysztof

    1971-01-01

    The pathogenesis of the spontaneous glomerulonephritis of NZB and (NZB x NZW) F1 hybrid mice is related at least in part to the formation of natural antibody against antigens of the G (Gross) system, and apparently to the deposition in the glomeruli of immune complexes of G natural antibody with G soluble antigen (GSA), type-specific antigen specified by wild-type Gross leukemia virus. G natural antibody and GSA are detectable in the acid-buffer eluate of the kidneys of NZB mice during the course of the glomerulonephritis. (NZB x NZW) F1 hybrid mice develop glomerulonephritis and produce GSA and free G natural antibody earlier in life than do NZB mice. The proteinuria manifestation of the gomerulonephritis of (NZB x NZW) F1 hybrid mice becomes increasingly prevalent as GSA undergoes immune elimination from the circulation. Gross leukemia virus-specified antigens together with bound immunoglobulins are located in the glomerular lesions of (NZB x NZW) F1 hybrid mice, both in the mesangium as observed in NZB mice and also in the wall of the peripheral capillary loops of the glomeruli. PMID:4924198

  2. A microarray-based comparative analysis of gene expression profiles during grain development in transgenic and wild type wheat.

    PubMed

    Gregersen, Per L; Brinch-Pedersen, Henrik; Holm, Preben B

    2005-12-01

    Global, comparative gene expression analysis is potentially a very powerful tool in the safety assessment of transgenic plants since it allows for the detection of differences in gene expression patterns between a transgenic line and the mother variety. In the present study, we compared the gene expression profile in developing seeds of wild type wheat and wheat transformed for endosperm-specific expression of an Aspergillus fumigatus phytase. High-level expression of the phytase gene was ensured by codon modification towards the prevalent codon usage of wheat genes and by using the wheat 1DX5HMW glutenin promoter for driving transgene expression. A 9K wheat unigene cDNA microarray was produced from cDNA libraries prepared mainly from developing wheat seed. The arrays were hybridised to flourescently labelled cDNA prepared from developing seeds of the transgenic wheat line and the mother variety, Bobwhite, at three developmental stages. Comparisons and statistical analyses of the gene expression profiles of the transgenic line vs. that of the mother line revealed only slight differences at the three developmental stages. In the few cases where differential expression was indicated by the statistical analysis it was primarily genes that were strongly expressed over a shorter interval of seed development such as genes encoding storage proteins. Accordingly, we interpret these differences in gene expression levels to result from minor asynchrony in seed development between the transgenic line and the mother line. In support of this, real time PCR validation of results from selected genes at the late developmental stage could not confirm differential expression of these genes. We conclude that the expression of the codon-modified A. fumigatus phytase gene in the wheat seed had no significant effects on the overall gene expression patterns in the developing seed.

  3. Algal Lipid Bodies: Stress Induction, Purification, and Biochemical Characterization in Wild-Type and Starchless Chlamydomonas reinhardtii▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zi Teng; Ullrich, Nico; Joo, Sunjoo; Waffenschmidt, Sabine; Goodenough, Ursula

    2009-01-01

    When the unicellular green soil alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is deprived of nitrogen after entering stationary phase in liquid culture, the cells produce abundant cytoplasmic lipid bodies (LBs), as well as abundant starch, via a pathway that accompanies a regulated autophagy program. After 48 h of N starvation in the presence of acetate, the wild-type LB content has increased 15-fold. When starch biosynthesis is blocked in the sta6 mutant, the LB content increases 30-fold, demonstrating that genetic manipulation can enhance LB production. The use of cell wall-less strains permitted development of a rapid “popped-cell” microscopic assay to quantitate the LB content per cell and permitted gentle cell breakage and LB isolation. The highly purified LBs contain 90% triacylglycerol (TAG) and 10% free fatty acids (FFA). The fatty acids associated with the TAGs are ∼50% saturated (C16 and C18) fatty acids and ∼50% unsaturated fatty acids, half of which are in the form of oleic acid (C18:1). The FFA are ∼50% C16 and ∼50% C18. The LB-derived TAG yield from a liter of sta6 cells at 107 cells/ml after starvation for 48 h is calculated to approach 400 mg. The LB fraction also contains low levels of charged glycerolipids, with the same profile as whole-cell charged glycerolipids, that presumably form LB membranes; chloroplast-specific neutral glycerolipids (galactolipids) are absent. Very low levels of protein are also present, but all matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-identified species are apparent contaminants. Nitrogen stress-induced LB production in C. reinhardtii has the hallmarks of a discrete pathway that should be amenable to additional genetic and culture condition manipulation. PMID:19880756

  4. Expression profile and subcellular location of the plasmid-encoded virulence (Spv) proteins in wild-type Salmonella dublin.

    PubMed

    El-Gedaily, A; Paesold, G; Krause, M

    1997-08-01

    The plasmid-encoded virulence genes (spvABCD) in nontyphoid Salmonella strains mediate lethal infections in a variety of animals. Previous studies have shown that these genes are transcriptionally regulated by stationary-phase growth. We studied the expression profile and the subcellular locations of the SpvABCD proteins in wild-type S. dublin by using polyclonal antibodies against SpvA, SpvB, SpvC, and SpvD. The cellular levels of the individual proteins were determined during growth by quantitative immunoblotting. As expected, SpvA, SpvB, SpvC, and SpvD were not detectable before the late logarithmic growth phase and appeared in the sequence SpvA, SpvB, SpvC, and SpvD. In contrast to the transcriptional regulation, however, SpvA and SpvB reached their maximal expression shortly after induction and declined during further growth whereas SpvC and SpvD expression remained high throughout the stationary phase, indicating that the Spv proteins are individually regulated at a posttranscriptional level. To localize SpvABCD within the bacteria, the cells were fractionated into the periplasmic, cytoplasmic, inner membrane, and outer membrane components. The cell fractions and the culture supernatant were analyzed by immunoblotting. SpvA was present in the outer membrane, SpvB was present in the cytoplasm and the inner membrane, and SpvC was present in the cytoplasm. SpvD was secreted into the supernatant; however, a substantial portion of this protein was also detected in the cytoplasm and membranes. The molecular weights of SpvD in the supernatant and in the cytoplasm appeared to be equal, suggesting that SpvD is not cleaved upon secretion.

  5. The developmental levels in achieving Magnet® designation, part 2.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Gail; Finlayson, Susan; Hayden, Margaret; Hoolahan, Susan; Mazzoccoli, Andrea

    2014-04-01

    Magnet® designation has been shown to be a cost-effective strategy resulting in improved patient, staff, and organizational outcomes. Achieving this designation requires an organization to successfully progress through developmental levels on their journey. Part 1 of this article described a 4-level developmental model applied to each of the Magnet components. In part 2, we will discuss a 5-step process and leadership strategies for developing units or departments through the various levels. PMID:24662687

  6. The developmental levels in achieving Magnet® designation, part 1.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Gail; Finlayson, Susan; Hayden, Margaret; Hoolahan, Susan; Mazzoccoli, Andrea

    2014-03-01

    Magnet® designation has been shown to be a cost-effective strategy resulting in improved patient, staff, and organizational outcomes. Achieving this designation requires an organization to successfully progress through developmental levels on their journey to excellence. Part 1 of this article describes a 4-level developmental model that is applied to each of the Magnet components. Part 2 will discuss a 5-step developmental process and leadership strategies for developing a unit or department through the various levels. PMID:24531285

  7. The developmental levels in achieving Magnet® designation, part 1.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Gail; Finlayson, Susan; Hayden, Margaret; Hoolahan, Susan; Mazzoccoli, Andrea

    2014-03-01

    Magnet® designation has been shown to be a cost-effective strategy resulting in improved patient, staff, and organizational outcomes. Achieving this designation requires an organization to successfully progress through developmental levels on their journey to excellence. Part 1 of this article describes a 4-level developmental model that is applied to each of the Magnet components. Part 2 will discuss a 5-step developmental process and leadership strategies for developing a unit or department through the various levels.

  8. The developmental levels in achieving Magnet® designation, part 2.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Gail; Finlayson, Susan; Hayden, Margaret; Hoolahan, Susan; Mazzoccoli, Andrea

    2014-04-01

    Magnet® designation has been shown to be a cost-effective strategy resulting in improved patient, staff, and organizational outcomes. Achieving this designation requires an organization to successfully progress through developmental levels on their journey. Part 1 of this article described a 4-level developmental model applied to each of the Magnet components. In part 2, we will discuss a 5-step process and leadership strategies for developing units or departments through the various levels.

  9. Proteomic Analysis of Wild-Type Sinorhizobium meliloti Responses to N-Acyl Homoserine Lactone Quorum-Sensing Signals and the Transition to Stationary Phase†

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hancai; Teplitski, Max; Robinson, Jayne B.; Rolfe, Barry G.; Bauer, Wolfgang D.

    2003-01-01

    Proteome analysis revealed that two long-chain N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs) produced by Sinorhizobium meliloti 1021 induced significant differences in the accumulation of more than 100 polypeptides in early-log-phase cultures of the wild type. Fifty-six of the corresponding proteins have been identified by peptide mass fingerprinting. The proteins affected by addition of these two AHLs had diverse functions in carbon and nitrogen metabolism, energy cycles, metabolite transport, DNA synthesis, and protein turnover. Two hours of exposure to 3-oxo-C16:1-homoserine lactone (3-oxo-C16:1-HL) affected the accumulation of 40 of the 56 identified proteins, whereas comparable exposure to C14-HL affected 13 of the 56 proteins. Levels of four proteins were affected by both AHLs. Exposure to 3-oxo-C16:1-HL for 8 h affected the accumulation of 17 proteins, 12 of which had reduced accumulation. Of the 80 proteins identified as differing in accumulation between early-log- and early-stationary-phase cultures, only 13 were affected by exposure to 3-oxo-C16:1-HL or C14-HL. These results provide a foundation for future studies of the functions regulated by AHL quorum sensing in S. meliloti and help to establish proteomic analysis as a powerful global approach to the identification of quorum-sensing regulatory patterns in wild-type bacteria. PMID:12923075

  10. iTRAQ-facilitated proteomic profiling of anthers from a photosensitive male sterile mutant and wild-type cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.).

    PubMed

    Liu, Ji; Pang, Chaoyou; Wei, Hengling; Song, Meizhen; Meng, Yanyan; Ma, Jianhui; Fan, Shuli; Yu, Shuxun

    2015-08-01

    Male sterility is a common phenomenon in flowering plants, and it has been successfully developed in several crops by taking advantage of heterosis. Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) is an important economic crop, used mainly for the production of textile fiber. Using a space mutation breeding technique, a novel photosensitive genetic male sterile mutant CCRI9106 was isolated from the wild-type upland cotton cultivar CCRI040029. To use CCRI9106 in cotton hybrid breeding, it is of great importance to study the molecular mechanisms of its male sterility. Here, histological and iTRAQ-facilitated proteomic analyses of anthers were performed to explore male sterility mechanisms of the mutant. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy of the anthers showed that the development of pollen wall in CCRI9106 was severely defective with a lack of exine formation. At the protein level, 6121 high-confidence proteins were identified and 325 of them showed differential expression patterns between mutant and wild-type anthers. The proteins up- or down-regulated in MT anthers were mainly involved in exine formation, protein degradation, calcium ion binding,etc. These findings provide valuable information on the proteins involved in anther and pollen development, and contribute to elucidate the mechanism of male sterility in upland cotton.

  11. Comparative Transcriptome of Wild Type and Selected Strains of the Microalgae Tisochrysis lutea Provides Insights into the Genetic Basis, Lipid Metabolism and the Life Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Carrier, Gregory; Garnier, Matthieu; Le Cunff, Loïc; Bougaran, Gaël; Probert, Ian; De Vargas, Colomban; Corre, Erwan; Cadoret, Jean-Paul; Saint-Jean, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    The applied exploitation of microalgae cultures has to date almost exclusively involved the use of wild type strains, deposited over decades in dedicated culture collections. Concomitantly, the concept of improving algae with selection programs for particular specific purposes is slowly emerging. Studying since a decade an economically and ecologically important haptophyte Tisochrysis lutea (Tiso), we took advantage of the availability of wild type (Tiso-Wt) and selected (Tiso-S2M2) strains to conduct a molecular variations study. This endeavour presented substantial challenges: the genome assembly was not yet available, the life cycle unknown and genetic diversity of Tiso-Wt poorly documented. This study brings the first molecular data in order to set up a selection strategy for that microalgae. Following high-throughput Illumina sequencing, transcriptomes of Tiso-Wt and Tiso-S2M2 were de novo assembled and annotated. Genetic diversity between both strains was analyzed and revealed a clear conservation, while a comparison of transcriptomes allowed identification of polymorphisms resulting from the selection program. Of 34,374 transcripts, 291 were differentially expressed and 165 contained positional polymorphisms (SNP, Indel). We focused on lipid over-accumulation of the Tiso-S2M2 strain and 8 candidate genes were identified by combining analysis of positional polymorphism, differential expression levels, selection signature and by study of putative gene function. Moreover, genetic analysis also suggests the existence of a sexual cycle and genetic recombination in Tisochrysis lutea. PMID:24489800

  12. Combined use of anti-ErbB monoclonal antibodies and erlotinib enhances antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity of wild-type erlotinib-sensitive NSCLC cell lines

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is an established target for anti-cancer treatment in different tumour types. Two different strategies have been explored to inhibit this pivotal molecule in epithelial cancer development: small molecules TKIs and monoclonal antibodies. ErbB/HER-targeting by monoclonal antibodies such as cetuximab and trastuzumab or tyrosine-kinase inhibitors as gefitinib or erlotinib has been proven effective in the treatment of advanced NSCLC. Results In this study we explored the potential of combining either erlotinib with cetuximab or trastuzumab to improve the efficacy of EGFR targeted therapy in EGFR wild-type NSCLC cell lines. Erlotinib treatment was observed to increase EGFR and/or HER2 expression at the plasma membrane level only in NSCLC cell lines sensitive to the drug inducing protein stabilization. The combined treatment had marginal effect on cell proliferation but markedly increased antibody-dependent, NK mediated, cytotoxicity in vitro. Moreover, in the Calu-3 xenograft model, the combination significantly inhibited tumour growth when compared with erlotinib and cetuximab alone. Conclusion Our results indicate that erlotinib increases surface expression of EGFR and/or HER2 only in EGFR-TKI sensitive NSCLC cell lines and, in turns, leads to increased susceptibility to ADCC both in vitro and in a xenograft models. The combination of erlotinib with monoclonal antibodies represents a potential strategy to improve the treatment of wild-type EGFR NSCLC patients sensitive to erlotinib. PMID:23234355

  13. The wild-type gene for glutamine synthetase restores ammonia control of nitrogen fixation to Gln- (glnA) mutants of Rhodopseudomonas capsulata.

    PubMed Central

    Scolnik, P A; Virosco, J; Haselkorn, R

    1983-01-01

    The wild-type glnA gene, coding for glutamine synthetase, was cloned from the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas capsulata by using a cosmid library to complement the Gln- phenotype of an Escherichia coli glnA deletion strain. The original cosmid plasmid contained 37 kilobase pairs (kbp) of R. capsulata DNA, of which only 2 kbp was necessary for Gln complementation in E. coli. A plasmid containing this 2-kbp insert was mobilized into G29, a Gln- mutant of R. capsulata which is also unable to repress nitrogenase in ammonia-containing media (Nifc phenotype). The 2-kbp fragment restored glutamine-independent growth and ammonia repression of nitrogenase, indicating that in R. capsulata, production of the signal for nitrogen repression of nif depends on the activity of the glnA gene. Repression of nitrogenase was shown, by hybridization of RNA to cloned nif DNA, to occur at the level of transcription in the wild-type and the complemented G29 strains. Images PMID:6134715

  14. A comparative study of cytokinins in caryopsis development in the maize miniature 1 seed mutant and its wild type

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We report here a comparative developmental profile of cytokinins, both total quantity and diversity of various forms, in relation to cell size, cell number and endoreduplication in developing caryopses of a cell wall invertase-deficient miniature1 (mn1) seed mutant and its wild type, Mn1, genotype. ...

  15. Responses of Wild-Type and Resistant Strains of the Hyperthermophilic Bacterium Thermotoga maritima to Chloramphenicol Challenge▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Montero, Clemente I.; Johnson, Matthew R.; Chou, Chung-Jung; Conners, Shannon B.; Geouge, Sarah G.; Tachdjian, Sabrina; Nichols, Jason D.; Kelly, Robert M.

    2007-01-01

    Transcriptomes and growth physiologies of the hyperthermophile Thermotoga maritima and an antibiotic-resistant spontaneous mutant were compared prior to and following exposure to chloramphenicol. While the wild-type response was similar to that of mesophilic bacteria, reduced susceptibility of the mutant was attributed to five mutations in 23S rRNA and phenotypic preconditioning to chloramphenicol. PMID:17557852

  16. Long-Term Treatment with Erlotinib for EGFR Wild-Type Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Polychronidou, Genovefa; Papakotoulas, Pavlos

    2013-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) gefitinib and erlotinib are known to have greater efficacy in EGFR mutation-positive non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), although erlotinib also has activity in wild-type disease. We report the successful long-term maintenance treatment of a patient with EGFR wild-type NSCLC with gefitinib and later erlotinib. The patient (male; 44 years old; smoker) was diagnosed with EGFR wild-type NSCLC after computer tomography had revealed a mediastinal mass, and histology and mutation testing had identified the tumor as an EGFR wild-type grade 3 adenocarcinoma. The patient received multiple rounds of chemotherapy, followed by gefitinib maintenance (3 years). Later on, he received erlotinib maintenance and developed a persistent rash (grade 1/2) that lasted throughout the treatment. The patient's condition has remained stable on erlotinib for more than 5 years, with no evidence of progression. We describe the patient's disease course and treatment in the context of EGFR TKI therapy and the prognostic factors for long-term clinical outcomes of NSCLC, including the development of erlotinib-induced rash.

  17. Differential proteomic responses of selectively bred and wild-type Sydney rock oyster populations exposed to elevated CO2.

    PubMed

    Thompson, E L; O'Connor, W; Parker, L; Ross, P; Raftos, D A

    2015-03-01

    Previous work suggests that larvae from Sydney rock oysters that have been selectively bred for fast growth and disease resistance are more resilient to the impacts of ocean acidification than nonselected, wild-type oysters. In this study, we used proteomics to investigate the molecular differences between oyster populations in adult Sydney rock oysters and to identify whether these form the basis for observations seen in larvae. Adult oysters from a selective breeding line (B2) and nonselected wild types (WT) were exposed for 4 weeks to elevated pCO2 (856 μatm) before their proteomes were compared to those of oysters held under ambient conditions (375 μatm pCO2 ). Exposure to elevated pCO2 resulted in substantial changes in the proteomes of oysters from both the selectively bred and wild-type populations. When biological functions were assigned, these differential proteins fell into five broad, potentially interrelated categories of subcellular functions, in both oyster populations. These functional categories were energy production, cellular stress responses, the cytoskeleton, protein synthesis and cell signalling. In the wild-type population, proteins were predominantly upregulated. However, unexpectedly, these cellular systems were downregulated in the selectively bred oyster population, indicating cellular dysfunction. We argue that this reflects a trade-off, whereby an adaptive capacity for enhanced mitochondrial energy production in the selectively bred population may help to protect larvae from the effects of elevated CO2 , whilst being deleterious to adult oysters.

  18. Cytoplasmic localization of wild-type p53 in glioblastomas correlates with expression of vimentin and glial fibrillary acidic protein.

    PubMed Central

    Sembritzki, Olivier; Hagel, Christian; Lamszus, Katrin; Deppert, Wolfgang; Bohn, Wolfgang

    2002-01-01

    Cytoplasmic accumulation of wild-type p53 in tumor cells indicates that the tumor suppressor is inactive with regard to growth suppressive functions. Whether this occurs randomly during tumor development or characterizes a certain tumor cell subset is not known. Here we assayed primary glioblastomas for expression and subcellular localization of p53 and determined a correlation with expression of intermediate filament proteins characterizing glial cell development. Sixty-nine percent of the tumors were p53 positive in immunohistochemistry. A significant number of tumors (23%) accumulated wild-type p53 in the cytoplasm, which correlated with the presence of vimentin and glial fibrillary acidic protein, except for 1 case. Tumors with exclusive nuclear p53 contained none or only one of these intermediate filament proteins. In an alternative approach, tumors positive for glial fibrillary acidic protein were screened for expression of p53 and vimentin. Thirty-eight percent of these tumors showed cytoplasmic p53, and all of those also expressed vimentin. Tumors with only nuclear p53 were vimentin negative, except for 1 case. No mutation was detected in p53 exons 5 to 8 in tumors with cytoplasmic p53, suggesting that they express wild-type p53. The data indicate that a cytoplasmic accumulation of wild-type p53 in human primary glioblastomas correlates with a certain intermediate filament protein expression, suggesting that it identifies a certain subset of tumors. PMID:12084347

  19. Receptor usage and differential downregulation of CD46 by measles virus wild-type and vaccine strains.

    PubMed

    Schneider-Schaulies, J; Schnorr, J J; Brinckmann, U; Dunster, L M; Baczko, K; Liebert, U G; Schneider-Schaulies, S; ter Meulen, V

    1995-04-25

    Recently, two cell surface molecules, CD46 and moesin, have been found to be functionally associated with measles virus (MV) infectivity of cells. We investigated the receptor usage of MV wild-type, subacute sclerosing panencephalitis, and vaccine strains and their effect on the down-regulation of CD46 after infection. We found that the infection of human cell lines with all 19 MV strains tested was inhibitable with antibodies against CD46. In contrast, not all strains of MV led to the downregulation of CD46 following infection. The group of CD46 non-downregulating strains comprised four lymphotropic wild-type isolates designated AB, DF, DL, and WTF. Since the downregulation of CD46 is caused by interaction with newly synthesized MV hemagglutinin (MV-H), we tested the capability of recombinant MV-H proteins to downregulate CD46. Recombinant MV-H proteins of MV strains Edmonston, Halle, and CM led to the down-regulation of CD46, whereas those of DL and WTF did not. This observed differential downregulation by different MV strains has profound consequences, since lack of CD46 on the cell surface leads to susceptibility of cells to complement lysis. These results suggest that lymphotropic wild-type strains of MV which do not downregulate CD46 may have an advantage for replication in vivo. The relatively weak immune response against attenuated vaccine strains of MV compared with wild-type strains might be related to this phenomenon. PMID:7732009

  20. School Achievement and Personality. Description of School Achievement in Terms of Ability, Trait, Situational and Background Variables. II: Operations at the Variable Level.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niskanen, Erkki A.

    This monograph contains the second section, operations at the variable level, of a report of studies done in Helsinki, Finland, describing school achievement in terms of ability, trait, situational, and background variables. The report (1) investigates the structure of school achievement, (2) describes school achievement in terms of selected…

  1. Candida albicans Als3p is required for wild-type biofilm formation on silicone elastomer surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiaomin; Daniels, Karla J.; Oh, Soon-Hwan; Green, Clayton B.; Yeater, Kathleen M.; Soll, David R.; Hoyer, Lois L.

    2007-01-01

    Candida albicans ALS3 encodes a large cell-surface glycoprotein that has adhesive properties. Immunostaining of cultured C. albicans germ tubes showed that Als3p is distributed diffusely across the germ tube surface. Two-photon laser scanning microscopy of model catheter biofilms grown using a PALS3-green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter strain showed GFP production in hyphae throughout the biofilm structure while biofilms grown using a PTPI1-GFP reporter strain showed GFP in both hyphae and yeast-form cells. Model catheter biofilms formed by an als3Δ/als3Δ strain were weakened structurally and had approximately half the biomass of a wild-type biofilm. Reintegration of a wild-type ALS3 allele restored biofilm mass and wild-type biofilm structure. Production of an Als3p-Agα1p fusion protein under control of the ALS3 promoter in the als3Δ/als3Δ strain restored some of the wild-type biofilm structural features, but not the wild-type biofilm mass. Despite its inability to restore wild-type biofilm mass, the Als3p-Agα1p fusion protein mediated adhesion of the als3Δ/als3Δ C. albicans strain to human buccal epithelial cells (BECs). The adhesive role of the Als3p N-terminal domain was further demonstrated by blocking adhesion of C. albicans to BECs with immunoglobulin reactive against the Als3p N-terminal sequences. Together, these data suggest that portions of Als3p that are important for biofilm formation may be different from those that are important in BEC adhesion, and that Als3p may have multiple functions in biofilm formation. Overexpression of ALS3 in an efg1Δ/efg1Δ strain that was deficient for filamentous growth and biofilm formation resulted in growth of elongated C. albicans cells, even under culture conditions that do not favour filamentation. In the catheter biofilm model, the ALS3 overexpression strain formed biofilm with a mass similar to that of a wild-type control. However, C. albicans cells in the biofilm had yeast-like morphology. This

  2. Selection for Evi1 activation in myelomonocytic leukemia induced by hyperactive signaling through wild-type NRas.

    PubMed

    Wolf, S; Rudolph, C; Morgan, M; Büsche, G; Salguero, G; Stripecke, R; Schlegelberger, B; Baum, C; Modlich, U

    2013-06-20

    Activation of NRas signaling is frequently found in human myeloid leukemia and can be induced by activating mutations as well as by mutations in receptors or signaling molecules upstream of NRas. To study NRas-induced leukemogenesis, we retrovirally overexpressed wild-type NRas in a murine bone marrow transplantation (BMT) model in C57BL/6J mice. Overexpression of wild-type NRas caused myelomonocytic leukemias ∼3 months after BMT in the majority of mice. A subset of mice (30%) developed malignant histiocytosis similar to mice that received mutationally activated NRas(G12D)-expressing bone marrow. Aberrant Ras signaling was demonstrated in cells expressing mutationally active or wild-type NRas, as increased activation of Erk and Akt was observed in both models. However, more NRas(G12D) were found to be in the activated, GTP-bound state in comparison with wild-type NRas. Consistent with observations reported for primary human myelomonocytic leukemia cells, Stat5 activation was also detected in murine leukemic cells. Furthermore, clonal evolution was detected in NRas wild-type-induced leukemias, including expansion of clones containing activating vector insertions in known oncogenes, such as Evi1 and Prdm16. In vitro cooperation of NRas and Evi1 improved long-term expansion of primary murine bone marrow cells. Evi1-positive cells upregulated Bcl-2 and may, therefore, provide anti-apoptotic signals that collaborate with the NRas-induced proliferative effects. As activation of Evi1 has been shown to coincide with NRAS mutations in human acute myeloid leukemia, our murine model recapitulates crucial events in human leukemogenesis. PMID:22847614

  3. Only minor differences in renal osteodystrophy features between wild-type and sclerostin knockout mice with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Cejka, Daniel; Parada-Rodriguez, Diego; Pichler, Stefanie; Marculescu, Rodrig; Kramer, Ina; Kneissel, Michaela; Gross, Thomas; Reisinger, Andreas; Pahr, Dieter; Monier-Faugere, Marie-Claude; Haas, Martin; Malluche, Hartmut H

    2016-10-01

    Renal osteodystrophy affects the majority of patients with advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD) and is characterized by progressive bone loss. This study evaluated the effects of sclerostin knockout on bone in a murine model of severe, surgically induced CKD in both sclerostin knockout and wild-type mice. Mice of both genotypes with normal kidney function served as controls. Tibiae were analyzed using micro-computed tomography, and lumbar vertebrae were analyzed by histomorphometry. Results were tested for statistical significance by 2-way ANOVA to investigate whether bone of the knockout mice reacted differently to CKD compared with bone of wild-type mice. In the tibiae, there was no difference after creation of CKD between wild-type and knockout animals for cortical thickness or cross-sectional moment of inertia. Increases in cortical porosity induced by CKD differed significantly between genotypes in the tibial metaphysis but not in the diaphysis. In the trabecular compartment, no difference in reaction to CKD between genotypes was found for bone volume, trabecular number, trabecular thickness, and trabecular separation. In the lumbar vertebrae, significant differences in response to CKD between wild-type and knockout mice were seen for both bone volume and trabecular thickness. Osteoblast parameters did not differ significantly, whereas osteoclast numbers significantly increased in the wild-type but significantly decreased in knockout mice with CKD. No differences in response to CKD between genotypes were found for bone formation rate or mineral apposition rate. Thus, complete absence of sclerostin has only minor effects on CKD-induced bone loss in mice. PMID:27528549

  4. Research on the ultrafast fluorescence property of thylakoid membranes of the wild-type and mutant rice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Zhao-Yu; Xu, Xiao-Ming; Wang, Shui-Cai; Xin, Yue-Yong; He, Jun-Fang; Hou, Xun

    2003-10-01

    A high yielding rice variety mutant (Oryza sativa L., Zhenhui 249) with low chlorophyll b (Chl b) has been discovered in natural fields. It has a quality character controlled by a pair of recessive genes (nuclear gene). The partial loss of Chl b in content affects the efficiency of light harvest in a light harvest complex (LHC), thus producing the difference of the exciting energy transfer and the efficiency of photochemistry conversion between the mutant and wild-type rice in photosynthetic unit. The efficiency of utilizing light energy is higher in the mutant than that in the wild-type rice relatively. For further discussion of the above-mentioned difference and learning about the mechanism of the increase in the photochemical efficiency of the mutant, the pico-second resolution fluorescence spectrum measurement with delay-frame-scanning single photon counting technique is adopted. Thylakoid membranes of the mutant and the wild-type rice are excited by an Ar+ laser with a pulse width of 120 ps, repetition rate of 4 MHz and wavelength of 514 nm. Compared with the time and spectrum property of exciting fluorescence, conclusions of those ultrafast dynamic experiments are: 1) The speeds of the exciting energy transferred in photo-system I are faster than that in photo-system II in both samples. 2) The speeds of the exciting energy transfer of mutant sample are faster than those of the wild-type. This might be one of the major reasons why the efficiency of photosynthesis is higher in mutant than that in the wild-type rice.

  5. Rapid Phosphoproteomic Effects of Abscisic Acid (ABA) on Wild-Type and ABA Receptor-Deficient A. thaliana Mutants*

    PubMed Central

    Minkoff, Benjamin B.; Stecker, Kelly E.; Sussman, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA)1 is a plant hormone that controls many aspects of plant growth, including seed germination, stomatal aperture size, and cellular drought response. ABA interacts with a unique family of 14 receptor proteins. This interaction leads to the activation of a family of protein kinases, SnRK2s, which in turn phosphorylate substrates involved in many cellular processes. The family of receptors appears functionally redundant. To observe a measurable phenotype, four of the fourteen receptors have to be mutated to create a multilocus loss-of-function quadruple receptor (QR) mutant, which is much less sensitive to ABA than wild-type (WT) plants. Given these phenotypes, we asked whether or not a difference in ABA response between the WT and QR backgrounds would manifest on a phosphorylation level as well. We tested WT and QR mutant ABA response using isotope-assisted quantitative phosphoproteomics to determine what ABA-induced phosphorylation changes occur in WT plants within 5 min of ABA treatment and how that phosphorylation pattern is altered in the QR mutant. We found multiple ABA-induced phosphorylation changes that occur within 5 min of treatment, including three SnRK2 autophosphorylation events and phosphorylation on SnRK2 substrates. The majority of robust ABA-dependent phosphorylation changes observed were partially diminished in the QR mutant, whereas many smaller ABA-dependent phosphorylation changes observed in the WT were not responsive to ABA in the mutant. A single phosphorylation event was increased in response to ABA treatment in both the WT and QR mutant. A portion of the discovery data was validated using selected reaction monitoring-based targeted measurements on a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer. These data suggest that different subsets of phosphorylation events depend upon different subsets of the ABA receptor family to occur. Altogether, these data expand our understanding of the model by which the family of ABA receptors directs

  6. Intravenous ascorbate improves spatial memory in middle-aged APP/PSEN1 and wild type mice.

    PubMed

    Kennard, John A; Harrison, Fiona E

    2014-05-01

    The present study investigated the effects of a single intravenous (i.v.) dose of Vitamin C (ascorbate, ASC) on spatial memory in APP/PSEN1 mice, an Alzheimer's disease model. First, we confirmed the uptake time course in ASC-depleted gulo (-/-) mice, which cannot synthesize ASC. Differential tissue uptake was seen based on ASC transporter distribution. Liver (SVCT1 and SVCT2) ASC was elevated at 30, 60 and 120 min post-treatment (125 mg/kg, i.v.), whereas spleen (SVCT2) ASC increased at 60 and 120 min. There was no detectable change in cortical (SVCT2 at choroid plexus, and neurons) ASC within the 2-h interval, although the cortex preferentially retained ASC. APP/PSEN1 and wild type (WT) mice at three ages (3, 9, or 20 months) were treated with ASC (125 mg/kg, i.v.) or saline 45 min before testing on the Modified Y-maze, a two-trial task of spatial memory. Memory declined with age and ASC treatment improved performance in 9-month-old APP/PSEN1 and WT mice. APP/PSEN1 mice displayed no behavioral impairment relative to WT controls. Although dopamine and metabolite DOPAC decreased in the nucleus accumbens with age, and improved spatial memory was correlated with increased dopamine in saline treated mice, acute ASC treatment did not alter monoamine levels in the nucleus accumbens. These data show that the Modified Y-maze is sensitive to age-related deficits, but not additional memory deficits due to amyloid pathology in APP/PSEN1 mice. They also suggest improvements in short-term spatial memory were not due to changes in the neuropathological features of AD or monoamine signaling.

  7. Wild-Type p53 Enhances Efficiency of Simian Virus 40 Large-T-Antigen-Induced Cellular Transformation▿

    PubMed Central

    Hermannstädter, Andrea; Ziegler, Christine; Kühl, Marion; Deppert, Wolfgang; Tolstonog, Genrich V.

    2009-01-01

    Abortive infection of BALB/c mouse embryo fibroblasts differing in p53 gene status (p53+/+ versus p53−/−) with simian virus 40 (SV40) revealed a quantitatively and qualitatively decreased transformation efficiency in p53−/− cells compared to p53+/+ cells, suggesting a supportive effect of wild-type (wt) p53 in the SV40 transformation process. SV40 transformation efficiency also was low in immortalized p53−/− BALB/c 10-1 cells but could be restored to approximately the level in immortalized p53+/+ BALB/c 3T3 cells by reconstituting wt p53, but not mutant p53 (mutp53), expression. Stable expression of large T antigen (LT) in p53+/+ 3T3 cells resulted in full transformation, while LT expression in p53−/− 10-1 cells could not promote growth in suspension or in soft agar to a significant extent. The helper effect of wt p53 is mediated by its cooperation with LT and resides in the p53 N terminus, as an N-terminally truncated p53 (ΔNp53) could not rescue the p53-null phenotype. The p53 N terminus serves as a scaffold for recruiting transcriptional regulators like p300/CBP and Mdm2 into the LT-p53 complex. Consequently, LT affected global and specific gene expression in p53+/+ cells significantly more than in p53−/− cells. Our data suggest that recruitment of transcriptional regulators into the LT-p53 complex may help to modify cellular gene expression in response to the needs of cellular transformation. PMID:19625393

  8. Intravenous ascorbate improves spatial memory in middle-aged APP/PSEN1 and wild type mice

    PubMed Central

    Kennard, John A.; Harrison, Fiona E.

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigated the effects of a single intravenous (i.v.) dose of Vitamin C (ascorbate, ASC) on spatial memory in APP/PSEN1 mice, an Alzheimer's disease model. First, we confirmed the uptake time course in ASC-depleted gulo (−/−) mice, which cannot synthesize ASC. Differential tissue uptake was seen based on ASC transporter distribution. Liver (SVCT1 & SVCT2) ASC was elevated at 30, 60 and 120 min post-treatment (125 mg/kg, i.v.), whereas spleen (SVCT2) ASC increased at 60 and 120 min. There was no detectable change in cortical (SVCT2 at choroid plexus, and neurons) ASC within the 2-hour interval, although the cortex preferentially retained ASC. APP/PSEN1 and wild type (WT) mice at three ages (3, 9, or 20 months) were treated with ASC (125 mg/kg, i.v.) or saline 45 min before testing on the Modified Y-maze, a two-trial task of spatial memory. Memory declined with age and ASC treatment improved performance in 9 month-old APP/PSEN1 and WT mice. APP/PSEN1 mice displayed no behavioral impairment relative to WT controls. Although dopamine and metabolite DOPAC decreased in the nucleus accumbens with age, and improved spatial memory was correlated with increased dopamine in saline treated mice, acute ASC treatment did not alter monoamine levels in the nucleus accumbens. These data show that the Modified Y-maze is sensitive to age-related deficits, but not additional memory deficits due to amyloid pathology in APP/PSEN1 mice. They also suggest improvements in short-term spatial memory were not due to changes in the neuropathological features of AD or monoamine signaling. PMID:24508240

  9. An EGFR wild type-EGFRvIII-HB-EGF feed forward loop regulates the activation of EGFRvIII

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li; Chakraborty, Sharmistha; Yang, Chin-Rang; Hatanpaa, Kimmo J.; Cipher, Daisha J.; Puliyappadamba, Vineshkumar Thidil; Rehman, Alizeh; Jiwani, Ameena J.; Mickey, Bruce; Madden, Christopher; Raisanen, Jack; Burma, Sandeep; Saha, Debabrata; Wang, Zhixiang; Pingle, Sandeep C.; Kesari, Santosh; Boothman, David A.; Habib, Amyn A.

    2014-01-01

    EGFRvIII is a key oncogene in glioblastoma (GBM). EGFRvIII results from an in frame deletion in the extracellular domain of EGFR, does not bind ligand, and is thought to be constitutively active. While EGFRvIII dimerization is known to activate EGFRvIII, the factors that drive EGFRvIII dimerization and activation are not well understood. Here we present a new model of EGFRvIII activation and propose that oncogenic activation of EGFRvIII in glioma cells is driven by co-expressed activated EGFR wild type (EGFRwt). Increasing EGFRwt leads to a striking increase in EGFRvIII tyrosine phosphorylation and activation while silencing EGFRwt inhibits EGFRvIII activation. Both the dimerization arm and the kinase activity of EGFRwt are required for EGFRvIII activation. EGFRwt activates EGFRvIII by facilitating EGFRvIII dimerization. We have previously identified HB-EGF, a ligand for EGFRwt, as a gene induced specifically by EGFRvIII. In this study we show that HB-EGF, is induced by EGFRvIII only when EGFRwt is present. Remarkably, altering HB-EGF recapitulates the effect of EGFRwt on EGFRvIII activation. Thus, increasing HB-EGF leads to a striking increase in EGFRvIII tyrosine phosphorylation while silencing HB-EGF attenuates EGFRvIII phosphorylation, suggesting that an EGFRvIII-HB-EGF-EGFRwt feed forward loop regulates EGFRvIII activation. Silencing EGFRwt or HB-EGF leads to a striking inhibition of EGFRvIII induced tumorigenicity, while increasing EGFRwt or HB-EGF levels resulted in accelerated EGFRvIII mediated oncogenicity in an orthotopic mouse model. Furthermore, we demonstrate the existence of this loop in human GBM. Thus, our data demonstrate that oncogenic activation of EGFRvIII in GBM is likely maintained by a continuous EGFRwt-EGFRvIII-HBEGF loop, potentially an attractive target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:24077285

  10. Rapid Phosphoproteomic Effects of Abscisic Acid (ABA) on Wild-Type and ABA Receptor-Deficient A. thaliana Mutants.

    PubMed

    Minkoff, Benjamin B; Stecker, Kelly E; Sussman, Michael R

    2015-05-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA)¹ is a plant hormone that controls many aspects of plant growth, including seed germination, stomatal aperture size, and cellular drought response. ABA interacts with a unique family of 14 receptor proteins. This interaction leads to the activation of a family of protein kinases, SnRK2s, which in turn phosphorylate substrates involved in many cellular processes. The family of receptors appears functionally redundant. To observe a measurable phenotype, four of the fourteen receptors have to be mutated to create a multilocus loss-of-function quadruple receptor (QR) mutant, which is much less sensitive to ABA than wild-type (WT) plants. Given these phenotypes, we asked whether or not a difference in ABA response between the WT and QR backgrounds would manifest on a phosphorylation level as well. We tested WT and QR mutant ABA response using isotope-assisted quantitative phosphoproteomics to determine what ABA-induced phosphorylation changes occur in WT plants within 5 min of ABA treatment and how that phosphorylation pattern is altered in the QR mutant. We found multiple ABA-induced phosphorylation changes that occur within 5 min of treatment, including three SnRK2 autophosphorylation events and phosphorylation on SnRK2 substrates. The majority of robust ABA-dependent phosphorylation changes observed were partially diminished in the QR mutant, whereas many smaller ABA-dependent phosphorylation changes observed in the WT were not responsive to ABA in the mutant. A single phosphorylation event was increased in response to ABA treatment in both the WT and QR mutant. A portion of the discovery data was validated using selected reaction monitoring-based targeted measurements on a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer. These data suggest that different subsets of phosphorylation events depend upon different subsets of the ABA receptor family to occur. Altogether, these data expand our understanding of the model by which the family of ABA receptors directs

  11. Modified protocol for in vivo imaging of wild-type mouse retina with customized miniature spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) device

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    This protocol outlines and evaluates a modified scanning procedure for a customized spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) imaging apparatus within the wild-type C57Bl/6 mouse posterior segment. This modified protocol allows for the capture of a 50 degree field of view spanning 3 mm by 3 mm perimeter with the optic disc as the central point. By utilizing this scanning protocol a more reliable measurement of retinal thickness can be achieved outside the fluctuating region of the optic disc. This protocol, when applied to this high resolution device, enables non-invasive in vivo histological imaging and biometric assessment of the various layers of the rodent posterior segment within a 20 – 30 min procedural time-frame. This protocol could establish a standardized method for evaluating morphological changes, with this commercial SDOCT device, when assessing longitudinal disease pathophysiology and treatment response in mouse models for future vision science research. PMID:23057840

  12. Learning nanotechnology with texts and comics: the impacts on students of different achievement levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Shu-Fen; Lin, Huann-shyang

    2016-05-01

    Comics are popular with adolescents because of their features of humor, narrative, and visual imagery. The purposes of this study were to examine the learning outcomes and emotional perceptions of reading a science comic book and a science text booklet for students of different levels of achievement, and to explore the main factors of the two media which attract high-school students to learn science. A mixed-method quasi-experimental design was adopted. The participants were 697 grade ten students from eight schools with different levels of academic achievement. Two similar classes in each of the eight schools were assigned as the comic group or the text group. The results indicated that the science comic book benefited medium achievers more than the science text booklet did, but the contrary result was found for the high achievers. In comparison, the two media benefited the low achievers equally, but both had only a limited effect due to the students' lack of prior knowledge. We conclude four kinds of evidence, including perceived difficulty of comprehension, reasons for interest/disinterest, emotional perceptions of learning science, and learning time, to support the phenomenon of the learning benefit of media specific to certain achievers' science learning.

  13. Crystal structure of wild-type human thrombin in the Na+-free state

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Daniel J. D.; Adams, Ty E.; Li, Wei; Huntington, James A.

    2005-01-01

    Regulation of thrombin activity is critical for haemostasis and the prevention of thrombosis. Thrombin has several procoagulant substrates, including fibrinogen and platelet receptors, and essential cofactors for stimulating its own formation. However, thrombin is also capable of serving an anticoagulant function by activating protein C. The specificity of thrombin is primarily regulated by binding to the cofactor TM (thrombomodulin), but co-ordination of Na+ can also affect thrombin activity. The Na+-free form is often referred to as ‘slow’ because of reduced rates of cleavage of procoagulant substrates, but the slow form is still capable of rapid activation of protein C in the presence of TM. The molecular basis of the slow proteolytic activity of thrombin has remained elusive, in spite of two decades of solution studies and many published crystallographic structures. In the present paper, we report the first structure of wild-type unliganded human thrombin grown in the absence of co-ordinating Na+. The Na+-binding site is observed in a highly ordered position 6 Å (1 Å=0.1 nm) removed from that seen in the Na+-bound state. The movement of the Na+ loop results in non-catalytic hydrogen-bonding in the active site and blocking of the S1 and S2 substrate-binding pockets. Similar, if more dramatic, changes were observed in a previous structure of the constitutively slow thrombin variant E217K. The slow behaviour of thrombin in solutions devoid of Na+ can now be understood in terms of an equilibrium between an inert species, represented by the crystal structure described in the present paper, and an active form, where the addition of Na+ populates the active state. PMID:16201969

  14. Assessing benzene-induced toxicity on wild type Euglena gracilis Z and its mutant strain SMZ.

    PubMed

    Peng, Cheng; Arthur, Dionne M; Sichani, Homa Teimouri; Xia, Qing; Ng, Jack C

    2013-11-01

    Benzene is a representative member of volatile organic compounds and has been widely used as an industrial solvent. Groundwater contamination of benzene may pose risks to human health and ecosystems. Detection of benzene in the groundwater using chemical analysis is expensive and time consuming. In addition, biological responses to environmental exposures are uninformative using such analysis. Therefore, the aim of this study was to employ a microorganism, Euglena gracilis (E. gracilis) as a putative model to monitor the contamination of benzene in groundwater. To this end, we examined the wild type of E. gracilis Z and its mutant form, SMZ in their growth rate, morphology, chlorophyll content, formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and DNA damage in response to benzene exposure. The results showed that benzene inhibited cell growth in a dose response manner up to 48 h of exposure. SMZ showed a greater sensitivity compared to Z in response to benzene exposure. The difference was more evident at lower concentrations of benzene (0.005-5 μM) where growth inhibition occurred in SMZ but not in Z cells. We found that benzene induced morphological changes, formation of lipofuscin, and decreased chlorophyll content in Z strain in a dose response manner. No significant differences were found between the two strains in ROS formation and DNA damage by benzene at concentrations affecting cell growth. Based on these results, we conclude that E. gracilis cells were sensitive to benzene-induced toxicities for certain endpoints such as cell growth rate, morphological change, depletion of chlorophyll. Therefore, it is a potentially suitable model for monitoring the contamination of benzene and its effects in the groundwater.

  15. Effects of chronic variable stress on cognition and Bace1 expression among wild-type mice.

    PubMed

    Cordner, Z A; Tamashiro, K L K

    2016-01-01

    Stressful life events, activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and glucocorticoids are now thought to have a role in the development of several neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders including Alzheimer's disease (AD) through mechanisms that may include exacerbation of cognitive impairment, neuronal loss, and beta-amyloid (Aβ) and tau neuropathology. In the current study, we use a wild-type mouse model to demonstrate that chronic variable stress impairs cognitive function and that aged mice are particularly susceptible. We also find that stress exposure is associated with a 1.5- to 2-fold increase in the expression of Bace1 in the hippocampus of young adult mice and the hippocampus, prefrontal cortex and amygdala of aged mice. Further, the increased expression of Bace1 was associated with decreased methylation of several CpGs in the Bace1 promoter region. In a second series of experiments, exposure to environmental enrichment (EE) prevented the stress-related changes in cognition, gene expression and DNA methylation. Together, these findings re-affirm the adverse effects of stress on cognition and further suggest that aged individuals are especially susceptible. In addition, demonstrating that chronic stress results in decreased DNA methylation and increased expression of Bace1 in the brain may provide a novel link between stress, Aβ pathology and AD. Finally, understanding the mechanisms by which EE prevented the effects of stress on cognition and Bace1 expression will be an important area of future study that may provide insights into novel approaches to the treatment of AD. PMID:27404286

  16. DR4 specific TRAIL variants are more efficacious than wild-type TRAIL in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Yu, Rui; Albarenque, Stella Maris; Cool, Robbert H; Quax, Wim J; Mohr, Andrea; Zwacka, Ralf M

    2014-01-01

    Current treatment modalities for pancreatic carcinoma afford only modest survival benefits. TRAIL, as a potent and specific inducer of apoptosis in cancer cells, would be a promising new treatment option. However, since not all pancreatic cancer cells respond to TRAIL, further improvements and optimizations are still needed. One strategy to improve the effectiveness of TRAIL-based therapies is to specifically target one of the 2 cell death inducing TRAIL-receptors, TRAIL-R1 or TRAIL-R2 to overcome resistance. To this end, we designed constructs expressing soluble TRAIL (sTRAIL) variants that were rendered specific for either TRAIL-R1 or TRAIL-R2 by amino acid changes in the TRAIL ectodomain. When we expressed these constructs, including wild-type sTRAIL (sTRAIL(wt)), TRAIL-R1 (sTRAIL(DR4)) and TRAIL-R2 (sTRAIL(DR5)) specific variants, in 293 producer cells we found all to be readily expressed and secreted into the supernatant. These supernatants were subsequently transferred onto target cancer cells and apoptosis measured. We found that the TRAIL-R1 specific variant had higher apoptosis-inducing activity in human pancreatic carcinoma Colo357 cells as well as PancTu1 cells that were additionally sensitized by targeting of XIAP. Finally, we tested TRAIL-R1 specific recombinant TRAIL protein (rTRAIL(DR4)) on Colo357 xenografts in nude mice and found them to be more efficacious than rTRAIL(wt). Our results demonstrate the benefits of synthetic biological approaches and show that TRAIL-R1 specific variants can potentially enhance the therapeutic efficacy of TRAIL-based therapies in pancreatic cancer, suggesting that they can possibly become part of individualized and tumor specific combination treatments in the future. PMID:25482930

  17. Selective modulation of wild type receptor functions by mutants of G-protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Le Gouill, C; Parent, J L; Caron, C A; Gaudreau, R; Volkov, L; Rola-Pleszczynski, M; Stanková, J

    1999-04-30

    Members of the G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family are involved in most aspects of higher eukaryote biology, and mutations in their coding sequence have been linked to several diseases. In the present study, we report that mutant GPCR can affect the functional properties of the co-expressed wild type (WT) receptor. Mutants of the human platelet-activating factor receptor that fail to show any detectable ligand binding (N285I and K298stop) or coupling to a G-protein (D63N, D289A, and Y293A) were co-expressed with the WT receptor in Chinese hamster ovary and COS-7 cells. In this context, N285I and K298stop mutant receptors inhibited 3H-WEB2086 binding and surface expression. Co-transfection with D63N resulted in a constitutively active receptor phenotype. Platelet-activating factor-induced inositol phosphate production in cells transfected with a 1:1 ratio of WT:D63N was higher than with the WT cDNA alone but was abolished with a 1:3 ratio. We confirmed that these findings could be extended to other GPCRs by showing that co-expression of the WT C-C chemokine receptor 2b with a carboxyl-terminal deletion mutant (K311stop), resulted in a decreased affinity and responsiveness to MCP-1. A better understanding of this phenomenon could lead to important tools for the prevention or treatment of certain diseases. PMID:10212233

  18. Single-Parent Households and Children’s Educational Achievement: A State-Level Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Amato, Paul R.; Patterson, Sarah; Beattie, Brett

    2015-01-01

    Although many studies have examined associations between family structure and children’s educational achievement at the individual level, few studies have considered how the increase in single-parent households may have affected children’s educational achievement at the population level. We examined changes in the percentage of children living with single parents between 1990 and 2011 and state mathematics and reading scores on the National Assessment of Educational Progress. Regression models with state and year fixed effects revealed that changes in the percentage of children living with single parents were not associated with test scores. Increases in maternal education, however, were associated with improvements in children’s test scores during this period. These results do not support the notion that increases in single parenthood have had serious consequences for U.S. children’s school achievement. PMID:26188447

  19. The effects of student-level and classroom-level factors on elementary students' science achievement in five countries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaya, Sibel

    The interest in raising levels of achievement in math and science has led to a focus on investigating the factors that shape achievement in these subjects (Lamb & Fullarton, 2002) as well as understanding how these factors operate across countries (Baker, Fabrega, Galindo, & Mishook, 2004). The current study examined the individual student factors and classroom factors on fourth grade science achievement within and across five countries. Guided by the previous school learning models, the elements of students' science learning were categorized as student-level and classroom-level factors. The student-level factors included gender, self-confidence in science, and home resources. The classroom-level factors included teacher characteristics, instructional variables and classroom composition. Results for the United States and four other countries, Singapore, Japan, Australia, and Scotland were reported. Multilevel effects of student and classroom variables were examined through Hierarchical Linear Modeling (HLM) using the Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) 2003 fourth grade dataset. The outcome variable was the TIMSS 2003 science score. Overall, the results of this study showed that selected student background characteristics were consistently related to elementary science achievement in countries investigated. At the student-level, higher levels of home resources and self-confidence and at the classroom-level, higher levels of class mean home resources yielded higher science scores on the TIMSS 2003. In general, teacher and instructional variables were minimally related to science achievement. There was evidence of positive effects of teacher support in the U.S. and Singapore. The emphasis on science inquiry was positively related to science achievement in Singapore and negatively related in the U.S. and Australia. Experimental studies that investigate the impacts of teacher and instructional factors on elementary science achievement are

  20. Addition by Subtraction: The Relation between Dropout Rates and School-Level Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glennie, Elizabeth; Bonneau, Kara; vanDellen, Michelle; Dodge, Kenneth A.

    2012-01-01

    Background/Context: Efforts to improve student achievement should increase graduation rates. However, work investigating the effects of student-level accountability has consistently demonstrated that increases in the standards for high school graduation are correlated with increases in dropout rates. The most favored explanation for this finding…

  1. Homework Self-Regulation: Grade, Gender, and Achievement-Level Differences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hong, Eunsook; Peng, Yun; Rowell, Lonnie L.

    2009-01-01

    The study examined differences in students' reported homework value, motivation, and metacognitive strategy use during homework completion among two grades, gender, and three achievement levels. Differences among six homework self-regulation constructs (utility value, intrinsic value, effort, persistence, planning, and self-checking) were also…

  2. The Effects of Higher Education/Military Service on Achievement Levels of Police Academy Cadets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Thomas Allen

    This study compared levels of achievement of three groups of Houston (Texas) police academy cadets: those with no military service but with 60 or more college credit hours, those with military service and 0 hours of college credit, and those with military service and 1 to 59 hours of college credit. Prior to 1991, police cadets in Houston were…

  3. Resilience and Academic Achievement of Male and Female Secondary Level Students in Pakistan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sarwar, Muhammad; Inamullah, Hafiz; Khan, Naeemullah; Anwar, Nadeem

    2010-01-01

    Resilience is the ability to succeed despite barriers that make it difficult for the students to succeed. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between resilience and academic achievement of secondary level students of Gujranwala, Pakistan. A Resilience scale was used to collect data. The sample consisted of 127 secondary…

  4. Relationship among School Size, School Culture and Students' Achievement at Secondary Level in Pakistan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahmad Salfi, Naseer; Saeed, Muhammad

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: This paper seeks to determine the relationship among school size, school culture and students' achievement at secondary level in Pakistan. Design/methodology/approach: The study was descriptive (survey type). It was conducted on a sample of 90 secondary school head teachers and 540 primary, elementary and high school teachers working in…

  5. Multiage Programming Effects on Cognitive Developmental Level and Reading Achievement in Early Elementary School Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fosco, Andrea M.; Schleser, Robert; Andal, Jolynne

    2004-01-01

    Differences in cognitive developmental level and reading achievement of elementary school children in multiage programming and traditional classrooms were explored. There is controversy regarding the benefit of multiage classrooms for learning academic subjects. According to previous research (e.g., Almy, Chittenden, & Miller, 1967; Brekke,…

  6. Examining Perceived Control Level and Instability as Predictors of First-Year College Students' Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stupnisky, Robert H.; Perry, Raymond P.; Hall, Nathan C.; Guay, Frederic

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the intraindividual level and instability of perceived academic control (PC) among first-year college students, and their predictive effects on academic achievement. Two studies were conducted measuring situational (state) PC on different schedules: Study 1 (N = 242) five times over a 6-month period and…

  7. A History of NAEP Achievement Levels: Issues, Implementation, and Impact 1989-2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bourque, Mary Lyn

    2009-01-01

    A history of the achievement levels for the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) could be documented in different ways. A chronological history might be the obvious approach, but in the author's view, that could miss the most salient aspects of setting student performance standards on an assessment like NAEP. Further, new initiatives…

  8. Confronting the Universal Disbelief that Poor Children Can Achieve at High Levels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelleher, Paul

    2006-01-01

    In her first year as superintendent of the Atlanta Public Schools, Beverly Hall encountered what she describes as the nearly universal disbelief that poor children of color can achieve high levels of learning. This chapter recounts how she confronted this and other obstacles and challenges as the new leader of the Atlanta Public Schools. Hall is…

  9. Antecedent and Concurrent Psychosocial Skills That Support High Levels of Achievement within Talent Domains

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olszewski-Kubilius, Paula; Subotnik, Rena F.; Worrell, Frank C.

    2015-01-01

    Motivation and emotional regulation are important for the sustained focused study and practice required for high levels of achievement and creative productivity in adulthood. Using the talent development model proposed by the authors as a framework, the authors discuss several important psychosocial skills based on the psychological research…

  10. Effects of Eclectic Learning Approach on Students' Academic Achievement and Retention in English at Elementary Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suleman, Qaiser; Hussain, Ishtiaq

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the research paper was to investigate the effect of eclectic learning approach on the academic achievement and retention of students in English at elementary level. A sample of forty students of 8th grade randomly selected from Government Boys High School Khurram District Karak was used. It was an experimental study and that's why…

  11. Level of Students' Achievement in Mathematics at the End of Elementary Education in Yemen

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khair, Tarig Mohamed Ali Mohamed; Khairani, Ahmad Zamri; Elrofai, Tahra Aisa

    2012-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to investigate the level of student's achievement in mathematics in Yemen. This study use a sample of 200 male students and 200 female students, chosen from eight government schools on the basis of diversified sampling techniques. A mathematics test which composed of seventy five items that covered geometrical…

  12. Learning Nanotechnology with Texts and Comics: The Impacts on Students of Different Achievement Levels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Shu-Fen; Lin, Huann-shyang

    2016-01-01

    Comics are popular with adolescents because of their features of humor, narrative, and visual imagery. The purposes of this study were to examine the learning outcomes and emotional perceptions of reading a science comic book and a science text booklet for students of different levels of achievement, and to explore the main factors of the two…

  13. Proceedings of Achievement Levels Workshop (Boulder, Colorado, August 20-22, 1997).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bourque, Mary Lyn, Ed.

    The papers presented at this symposium explore each component of the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), from the development of the assessment frameworks through the reporting of assessment results. The papers are: (1) "NAEP Frameworks and Achievement Levels" (Robert A Forsyth); (2) "Assembly of Test Forms for Use in Large-Scale…

  14. Containing Cost without Sacrificing Achievement: Some Evidence from College-Level Economics Classes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zietz, Joachim; Cochran, Howard H., Jr.

    1997-01-01

    Summarizes a study that used a large database on the teaching of college economics (TUCE III) to identify and rank by cost-per-unit of student achievement various key controllable inputs into the educational process at the classroom level. Comprehensive final exams and regular homework assignments are highly effective inputs for raising student…

  15. 76 FR 9004 - Public Comment on Setting Achievement Levels in Writing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-16

    ... WestEd to assist in gathering feedback on the design document. Additional information on the Governing... kinds of information that the Governing Board is seeking to obtain regarding the Design ] Document, and... recommendations to improve the design proposed for setting achievement levels for NAEP in writing. This...

  16. Exploring the Relationship between Student Approaches to Learning and Reading Achievement at the School Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Musu-Gillette, Lauren E.; Barofsky, Meryl Y.; List, Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    Using the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Kindergarten Cohort of 1998 (ECLS-K, 98), a nationally representative sample of kindergarteners in the United States, we investigated the relationship between approaches to learning and spring reading achievement with particular emphasis on classroom and school-level differences. We employed…

  17. Exploring Informal Mathematical Products of Low Achievers at the Secondary School Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karsenty, Ronnie; Arcavi, Abraham; Hadas, Nurit

    2007-01-01

    This article examines the notion of informal mathematical products, in the specific context of teaching mathematics to low achieving students at the secondary school level. The complex and relative nature of this notion is illustrated and some of its characteristics are suggested. These include the use of ad-hoc strategies, mental calculations,…

  18. Analyzing State and Private School Students' Achievement Goal Orientation Levels in Terms of Some Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Türkçapar, Ünal

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the state and private school students' achievement goal orientation levels in terms of some variables. Quantitative survey method was used in this study. Study group in this research consists of 201 students who are studying at state and private school in Kahramanmaras during the 2014-2015 academic year.…

  19. Teaching Aptitude of Student Teachers and their Academic Achievements at Graduate Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sajan, K. S.

    2010-01-01

    The present investigation aims at studying teaching aptitude of student teachers with respect to their gender and academic achievement at graduate level examination. The sample for this study is selected by stratified random sampling from the Teacher Education institutions of Malabar area of Kerala. Teaching Aptitude Test Battery (T A T B)…

  20. Playing level achieved, throwing history, and humeral torsion in Masters baseball players.

    PubMed

    Whiteley, Rod; Adams, Roger; Ginn, Karen; Nicholson, Leslie

    2010-09-01

    Humeral torsion is thought to be beneficial for throwing. To examine this hypothesis, the throwing and non-throwing arms of 84 Masters baseball players over 35 years of age were measured for humeral torsion, and the highest playing level they achieved and their playing history were recorded. Regression analyses were used to obtain predictors of the highest playing level achieved, throwing arm humeral torsion, and side-to-side difference in humeral torsion. Equations accounting for 36%, 46%, and 12% of the variance respectively were produced. Achieving representative level playing status was associated with the number of seasons played under 16 years of age and having greater throwing arm humeral retrotorsion. Throwing arm humeral retrotorsion was associated with non-throwing arm humeral retrotorsion and an increased number of seasons played before the age of 16 years. A model in which repeated throwing develops an adaptive unilateral bone torsion along with growth in baseball expertise is proposed. Thus dominant arm humeral retrotorsion is a predictor of highest baseball playing level achieved, which in turn is influenced by genetic endowment (as seen in the torsion of the non-throwing arm) and amount of throwing activity, particularly prior to the age of 16.

  1. Setting Student Performance Standards: The Role of Achievement Level Descriptions in the Standard Setting Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bourque, Mary Lyn

    This paper looks at using descriptions of subject matter content to assist in the development and interpretation of student performance on the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP). These descriptions of content, called achievement level descriptions (ALDs), were initially conceptualized as exemplary statements of the knowledge and…

  2. NAEP Reading Revisit: An Evaluation of the 1992 Achievement Levels Descriptions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Coll. Testing Program, Iowa City, IA.

    A study was designed to provide recommendations regarding the use of the achievement levels set in 1992 for reporting National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) reading results in 1994 and in future NAEP reading assessments. Two procedures were used: the Item Difficulty Categorization (IDC) procedure involved an evaluation of the…

  3. The Efficacy of Instructional Strategy on Mathematics Achievement, Attitudes, and Anxiety Levels of Developmental Math Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas-Browne, Carmen G.

    2009-01-01

    This dissertation investigated three instructional strategies in developmental math classes to determine if instructional strategy had a positive effect on student achievement, attitude towards mathematics, and anxiety level towards mathematics at a college in western Pennsylvania for students majoring in applied arts. The significance of this…

  4. A Comparative Study of Age-Related Hearing Loss in Wild Type and Insulin-Like Growth Factor I Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Riquelme, Raquel; Cediel, Rafael; Contreras, Julio; Lourdes, Rodriguez-de la Rosa; Murillo-Cuesta, Silvia; Hernandez-Sanchez, Catalina; Zubeldia, Jose M.; Cerdan, Sebastian; Varela-Nieto, Isabel

    2010-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) belongs to the family of insulin-related peptides that fulfils a key role during the late development of the nervous system. Human IGF1 mutations cause profound deafness, poor growth and mental retardation. Accordingly, Igf1−/− null mice are dwarfs that have low survival rates, cochlear alterations and severe sensorineural deafness. Presbycusis (age-related hearing loss) is a common disorder associated with aging that causes social and cognitive problems. Aging is also associated with a decrease in circulating IGF-I levels and this reduction has been related to cognitive and brain alterations, although there is no information as yet regarding the relationship between presbycusis and IGF-I biodisponibility. Here we present a longitudinal study of wild type Igf1+/+ and null Igf1−/− mice from 2 to 12 months of age comparing the temporal progression of several parameters: hearing, brain morphology, cochlear cytoarchitecture, insulin-related factors and IGF gene expression and IGF-I serum levels. Complementary invasive and non-invasive techniques were used, including auditory brainstem-evoked response (ABR) recordings and in vivo MRI brain imaging. Igf1−/− null mice presented profound deafness at all the ages studied, without any obvious worsening of hearing parameters with aging. Igf1+/+ wild type mice suffered significant age-related hearing loss, their auditory thresholds and peak I latencies augmenting as they aged, in parallel with a decrease in the circulating levels of IGF-I. Accordingly, there was an age-related spiral ganglion degeneration in wild type mice that was not evident in the Igf1 null mice. However, the Igf1−/− null mice in turn developed a prematurely aged stria vascularis reminiscent of the diabetic strial phenotype. Our data indicate that IGF-I is required for the correct development and maintenance of hearing, supporting the idea that IGF-I-based therapies could contribute to prevent or

  5. Molecular characterization and functional analysis of pteridine reductase in wild-type and antimony-resistant Leishmania lines.

    PubMed

    de Souza Moreira, Douglas; Ferreira, Rafael Fernandes; Murta, Silvane M F

    2016-01-01

    Pteridine reductase (PTR1) is an NADPH-dependent reductase that participates in the salvage of pteridines, which are essential to maintain growth of Leishmania. In this study, we performed the molecular characterization of ptr1 gene in wild-type (WTS) and SbIII-resistant (SbR) lines from Leishmania guyanensis (Lg), Leishmania amazonensis (La), Leishmania braziliensis (Lb) and Leishmania infantum (Li), evaluating the chromosomal location, mRNA levels of the ptr1 gene and PTR1 protein expression. PFGE results showed that the ptr1 gene is located in a 797 kb chromosomal band in all Leishmania lines analyzed. Interestingly, an additional chromosomal band of 1070 kb was observed only in LbSbR line. Northern blot results showed that the levels of ptr1 mRNA are increased in the LgSbR, LaSbR and LbSbR lines. Western blot assays using the polyclonal anti-LmPTR1 antibody demonstrated that PTR1 protein is more expressed in the LgSbR, LaSbR and LbSbR lines compared to their respective WTS counterparts. Nevertheless, no difference in the level of mRNA and protein was observed between the LiWTS and LiSbR lines. Functional analysis of PTR1 enzyme was performed to determine whether the overexpression of ptr1 gene in the WTS L. braziliensis and L. infantum lines would change the SbIII-resistance phenotype of transfected parasites. Western blot results showed that the expression level of PTR1 protein was increased in the transfected parasites compared to the non-transfected ones. IC50 analysis revealed that the overexpression of ptr1 gene in the WTS L. braziliensis line increased 2-fold the SbIII-resistance phenotype compared to the non-transfected counterpart. Furthermore, the overexpression of ptr1 gene in the WTS L. infantum line did not change the SbIII-resistance phenotype. These results suggest that the PTR1 enzyme may be implicated in the SbIII-resistance phenotype in L. braziliensis line.

  6. The Anti-proliferative Response of Indole-3-carbinol in human melanoma cells is Triggered by an Interaction with NEDD4-1 and Disruption of Wild-type PTEN Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Quirit, Jeanne G.; Firestone, Gary L.

    2014-01-01

    Human melanoma cells displaying distinct PTEN genotypes were used to assess the cellular role of this important tumor suppressor protein during the anti-proliferative response induced by the chemopreventative agent indole-3-carbinol (I3C), a natural indolecarbinol compound derived from the breakdown of glucobrassicin produced in cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli and Brussels sprouts. I3C induced a G1-phase cell cycle arrest and apoptosis by stabilization of PTEN in human melanoma cells that express wild-type PTEN, but not in cells with mutant or null PTEN genotypes. Importantly, normal human epidermal melanocytes were unaffected by I3C treatment. In wild-type PTEN-expressing melanoma xenografts, formed in athymic mice, I3C inhibited the in vivo tumor growth rate and increased PTEN protein levels in the residual tumors. Mechanistically, I3C disrupted the ubiquitination of PTEN by NEDD4-1 (NEDD4), which prevented the proteasome-mediated degradation of PTEN without altering its transcript levels. RNAi-mediated knockdown of PTEN prevented the I3C induced apoptotic response; whereas, knockdown of NEDD4-1 mimicked the I3C apoptotic response, stabilized PTEN protein levels and down-regulated phosphorylated AKT1 levels. Co-knockdown of PTEN and NEDD4-1 revealed that I3C regulated apoptotic signaling through NEDD4-1 requires the presence of the wild-type PTEN protein. Finally, in silico structural modeling in combination with isothermal titration calorimetry analysis demonstrated that I3C directly interacts with purified NEDD4-1 protein. Implications This study identifies NEDD4-1 as a new I3C target protein, and that the I3C disruption of NEDD4-1 ubiquitination activity triggers the stabilization of the wild-type PTEN tumor suppressor to induce an anti-proliferative response in melanoma. PMID:25009292

  7. Expressing International Educational Achievement in Terms of U.S. Performance Standards: Linking NAEP Achievement Levels to TIMSS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Gary W.

    2007-01-01

    Educators, researchers, and policymakers have considerable interest in how the American educational system compares to those in other countries. One major index for comparison is student academic achievement. This paper links the scale of the "National Assessment of Educational Progress" ("NAEP") to the scale of the "Third International…

  8. Relationship between heat-labile enterotoxin secretion capacity and virulence in wild type porcine-origin enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli strains.

    PubMed

    Wijemanne, Prageeth; Xing, Jun; Berberov, Emil M; Marx, David B; Francis, David H; Moxley, Rodney A

    2015-01-01

    Heat-labile enterotoxin (LT) is an important virulence factor secreted by some strains of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC). The prototypic human-origin strain H10407 secretes LT via a type II secretion system (T2SS). We sought to determine the relationship between the capacity to secrete LT and virulence in porcine-origin wild type (WT) ETEC strains. Sixteen WT ETEC strains isolated from cases of severe diarrheal disease were analyzed by GM1ganglioside enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to measure LT concentrations in culture supernatants. All strains had detectable LT in supernatants by 2 h of culture and 1 strain, which was particularly virulent in gnotobiotic piglets (3030-2), had the highest LT secretion level all porcine-origin WT strains tested (P<0.05). The level of LT secretion (concentration in supernatants at 6-h culture) explained 92% of the variation in time-to-a-moribund-condition (R2 = 0.92, P<0.0001) in gnotobiotic piglets inoculated with either strain 3030-2, or an ETEC strain of lesser virulence (2534-86), or a non-enterotoxigenic WT strain (G58-1). All 16 porcine ETEC strains were positive by PCR analysis for the T2SS genes, gspD and gspK, and bioinformatic analysis of 4 porcine-origin strains for which complete genomic sequences were available revealed a T2SS with a high degree of homology to that of H10407. Maximum Likelihood phylogenetic trees constructed using T2SS genes gspC, gspD, gspE and homologs showed that strains 2534-86 and 3030-2 clustered together in the same clade with other porcine-origin ETEC strains in the database, UMNK88 and UMN18. Protein modeling of the ATPase gene (gspE) further revealed a direct relationship between the predicted ATP-binding capacities and LT secretion levels as follows: H10407, -8.8 kcal/mol and 199 ng/ml; 3030-2, -8.6 kcal/mol and 133 ng/ml; and 2534-86, -8.5 kcal/mol and 80 ng/ml. This study demonstrated a direct relationship between predicted ATP-binding capacity of GspE and LT secretion, and

  9. Effect of certain indigenous processing methods on the bioactive compounds of ten different wild type legume grains.

    PubMed

    Vadivel, Vellingiri; Biesalski, Hans K

    2012-12-01

    In recent years, research efforts are under-way on the possibilities of utilization of natural source of bioactive compounds for the dietary management of certain chronic diseases such as diabetes, obesity, cardiovascular diseases, cancer etc. In this connection, seed materials of promising wild type under-utilized food legume grains such as Acacia nilotica (L.) Willd. Ex Delile, Bauhinia purpurea L., Canavalia ensiformis (L.) DC., Cassia hirsuta L., Caesalpinia bonducella F., Erythrina indica L., Mucuna gigantea (Willd.) DC., Pongamia pinnata (L.) Pierre, Sebania sesban (L.) Merr. and Xylia xylocarpa Roxb. Taub., collected from South India, were investigated for certain bioactive compounds. All the samples were found to constitute a viable source of total free phenolics (3.12-6.69 g/100 g DM), tannins (1.10-4.41 g/100 g DM), L-Dopa (1.34-5.45 g/100 g DM) and phytic acid (0.98-3.14 g/100 g DM). In general, the seed materials of X. xylocarpa recorded high levels of total free phenolics and tannins, whereas the maximum levels of L-Dopa and phytic acid were noticed in M. gigantea and S. sesban, respectively. Further, presently investigated all the bioactive compounds were drastically reduced during soaking in tamarind solution + cooking as well as soaking in alkaline solution + cooking, and thus these treatments were considered to be more aggressive practices. Open-pan roasting also demonstrated a significant reduction of total free phenolics, tannins and moderate loss of L-Dopa and phytic acid. Alternatively, sprouting + oil-frying showed significant level of increase of total free phenolics (9-27%) and tannins (12-28%), but diminishing effect on phytic acid and L-Dopa. Hence, among the presently employed treatments, sprouting + oil-frying could be recommended as a suitable treatment for the versatile utilization of these wild under-utilized legume grains for the dietary management of certain chronic diseases. PMID:24293686

  10. Cofactor Specificity of the Bifunctional Alcohol and Aldehyde Dehydrogenase (AdhE) in Wild-Type and Mutant Clostridium thermocellum and Thermoanaerobacterium saccharolyticum

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Tianyong; Olson, Daniel G.; Tian, Liang; Bomble, Yannick J.; Himmel, Michael E.; Lo, Jonathan; Hon, Shuen; Shaw, A. Joe; van Dijken, Johannes P.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Clostridium thermocellum and Thermoanaerobacterium saccharolyticum are thermophilic bacteria that have been engineered to produce ethanol from the cellulose and hemicellulose fractions of biomass, respectively. Although engineered strains of T. saccharolyticum produce ethanol with a yield of 90% of the theoretical maximum, engineered strains of C. thermocellum produce ethanol at lower yields (∼50% of the theoretical maximum). In the course of engineering these strains, a number of mutations have been discovered in their adhE genes, which encode both alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) enzymes. To understand the effects of these mutations, the adhE genes from six strains of C. thermocellum and T. saccharolyticum were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli, the enzymes produced were purified by affinity chromatography, and enzyme activity was measured. In wild-type strains of both organisms, NADH was the preferred cofactor for both ALDH and ADH activities. In high-ethanol-producing (ethanologen) strains of T. saccharolyticum, both ALDH and ADH activities showed increased NADPH-linked activity. Interestingly, the AdhE protein of the ethanologenic strain of C. thermocellum has acquired high NADPH-linked ADH activity while maintaining NADH-linked ALDH and ADH activities at wild-type levels. When single amino acid mutations in AdhE that caused increased NADPH-linked ADH activity were introduced into C. thermocellum and T. saccharolyticum, ethanol production increased in both organisms. Structural analysis of the wild-type and mutant AdhE proteins was performed to provide explanations for the cofactor specificity change on a molecular level. IMPORTANCE This work describes the characterization of the AdhE enzyme from different strains of C. thermocellum and T. saccharolyticum. C. thermocellum and T. saccharolyticum are thermophilic anaerobes that have been engineered to make high yields of ethanol and can solubilize components of

  11. Wild-Type Phosphoribosylpyrophosphate Synthase (PRS) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis: A Bacterial Class II PRS?

    PubMed Central

    Breda, Ardala; Martinelli, Leonardo K. B.; Bizarro, Cristiano V.; Rosado, Leonardo A.; Borges, Caroline B.; Santos, Diógenes S.; Basso, Luiz A.

    2012-01-01

    The 5-phospho-α-D-ribose 1-diphosphate (PRPP) metabolite plays essential roles in several biosynthetic pathways, including histidine, tryptophan, nucleotides, and, in mycobacteria, cell wall precursors. PRPP is synthesized from α-D-ribose 5-phosphate (R5P) and ATP by the Mycobacterium tuberculosis prsA gene product, phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthase (MtPRS). Here, we report amplification, cloning, expression and purification of wild-type MtPRS. Glutaraldehyde cross-linking results suggest that MtPRS predominates as a hexamer, presenting varied oligomeric states due to distinct ligand binding. MtPRS activity measurements were carried out by a novel coupled continuous spectrophotometric assay. MtPRS enzyme activity could be detected in the absence of Pi. ADP, GDP and UMP inhibit MtPRS activity. Steady-state kinetics results indicate that MtPRS has broad substrate specificity, being able to accept ATP, GTP, CTP, and UTP as diphosphoryl group donors. Fluorescence spectroscopy data suggest that the enzyme mechanism for purine diphosphoryl donors follows a random order of substrate addition, and for pyrimidine diphosphoryl donors follows an ordered mechanism of substrate addition in which R5P binds first to free enzyme. An ordered mechanism for product dissociation is followed by MtPRS, in which PRPP is the first product to be released followed by the nucleoside monophosphate products to yield free enzyme for the next round of catalysis. The broad specificity for diphosphoryl group donors and detection of enzyme activity in the absence of Pi would suggest that MtPRS belongs to Class II PRS proteins. On the other hand, the hexameric quaternary structure and allosteric ADP inhibition would place MtPRS in Class I PRSs. Further data are needed to classify MtPRS as belonging to a particular family of PRS proteins. The data here presented should help augment our understanding of MtPRS mode of action. Current efforts are toward experimental structure determination of Mt

  12. Wild-type phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthase (PRS) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis: a bacterial class II PRS?

    PubMed

    Breda, Ardala; Martinelli, Leonardo K B; Bizarro, Cristiano V; Rosado, Leonardo A; Borges, Caroline B; Santos, Diógenes S; Basso, Luiz A

    2012-01-01

    The 5-phospho-α-D-ribose 1-diphosphate (PRPP) metabolite plays essential roles in several biosynthetic pathways, including histidine, tryptophan, nucleotides, and, in mycobacteria, cell wall precursors. PRPP is synthesized from α-D-ribose 5-phosphate (R5P) and ATP by the Mycobacterium tuberculosis prsA gene product, phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthase (MtPRS). Here, we report amplification, cloning, expression and purification of wild-type MtPRS. Glutaraldehyde cross-linking results suggest that MtPRS predominates as a hexamer, presenting varied oligomeric states due to distinct ligand binding. MtPRS activity measurements were carried out by a novel coupled continuous spectrophotometric assay. MtPRS enzyme activity could be detected in the absence of P(i). ADP, GDP and UMP inhibit MtPRS activity. Steady-state kinetics results indicate that MtPRS has broad substrate specificity, being able to accept ATP, GTP, CTP, and UTP as diphosphoryl group donors. Fluorescence spectroscopy data suggest that the enzyme mechanism for purine diphosphoryl donors follows a random order of substrate addition, and for pyrimidine diphosphoryl donors follows an ordered mechanism of substrate addition in which R5P binds first to free enzyme. An ordered mechanism for product dissociation is followed by MtPRS, in which PRPP is the first product to be released followed by the nucleoside monophosphate products to yield free enzyme for the next round of catalysis. The broad specificity for diphosphoryl group donors and detection of enzyme activity in the absence of P(i) would suggest that MtPRS belongs to Class II PRS proteins. On the other hand, the hexameric quaternary structure and allosteric ADP inhibition would place MtPRS in Class I PRSs. Further data are needed to classify MtPRS as belonging to a particular family of PRS proteins. The data here presented should help augment our understanding of MtPRS mode of action. Current efforts are toward experimental structure determination of

  13. Amino acid uptake profiling of wild type and recombinant Streptomyces lividans TK24 batch fermentations.

    PubMed

    D'Huys, Pieter-Jan; Lule, Ivan; Van Hove, Sven; Vercammen, Dominique; Wouters, Christine; Bernaerts, Kristel; Anné, Jozef; Van Impe, Jan F M

    2011-04-10

    Streptomyces lividans is considered an interesting host for the secretory production of heterologous proteins. To obtain a good secretion yield of heterologous proteins, the availability of suitable nitrogen sources in the medium is required. Often, undefined mixtures of amino acids are used to improve protein yields. However, the understanding of amino acid utilization as well as their contribution to the heterologous protein synthesis is poor. In this paper, amino acid utilization by wild type and recombinant S. lividans TK24 growing on a minimal medium supplemented with casamino acids is profiled by intensive analysis of the exometabolome (metabolic footprint) as a function of time. Dynamics of biomass, substrates, by-products and heterologous protein are characterized, analyzed and compared. As an exemplary protein mouse Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha (mTNF-α) is considered. Results unveil preferential glutamate and aspartate assimilation, together with glucose and ammonium, but the associated high biomass growth rate is unfavorable for protein production. Excretion of organic acids as well as alanine is observed. Pyruvate and alanine overflow point at an imbalance between carbon and nitrogen catabolism and biosynthetic fluxes. Lactate secretion is probably related to clump formation. Heterologous protein production induces a slowdown in growth, denser clump formation and a shift in metabolism, as reflected in the altered substrate requirements and overflow pattern. Besides glutamate and aspartate, most amino acids are catabolized, however, their exact contribution in heterologous protein production could not be seized from macroscopic quantities. The metabolic footprints presented in this paper provide a first insight into the impact and relevance of amino acids on biomass growth and protein production. Type and availability of substrates together with biomass growth rate and morphology affect the protein secretion efficiency and should be optimally controlled

  14. Single-Tubed Wild-Type Blocking Quantitative PCR Detection Assay for the Sensitive Detection of Codon 12 and 13 KRAS Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Guang-Jie; Shi, Yan; Deng, Guo-Hong; Xia, Han; Xu, Han-Qing; Zhao, Na; Fu, Wei-Ling; Huang, Qing

    2015-01-01

    The high degree of intra-tumor heterogeneity has meant that it is important to develop sensitive and selective assays to detect low-abundance KRAS mutations in metastatic colorectal carcinoma (mCRC) patients. As a major potential source of tumor DNA in the aforementioned genotyping assays, it was necessary to conduct an analysis on both the quality and quantity of DNA extracted from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE). Therefore, four commercial FFPE DNA extraction kits were initially compared with respect to their ability to facilitate extraction of amplifiable DNA. The results showed that TrimGen kits showed the greatest performance in relation to the quality and quantity of extracted FFPE DNA solutions. Using DNA extracted by TrimGen kits as a template for tumor genotyping, a real-time wild-type blocking PCR (WTB-PCR) assay was subsequently developed to detect the aforementioned KRAS mutations in mCRC patients. The results showed that WTB-PCR facilitated the detection of mutated alleles at a ratio of 1:10,000 (i.e. 0.01%) wild-type alleles. When the assay was subsequently used to test 49 mCRC patients, the results showed that the mutation detection levels of the WTB-PCR assay (61.8%; 30/49) were significantly higher than that of traditional PCR (38.8%; 19/49). Following the use of the real-time WTB-PCR assay, the ΔCq method was used to quantitatively analyze the mutation levels associated with KRAS in each FFPE sample. The results showed that the mutant levels ranged from 53.74 to 0.12% in the patients analyzed. In conclusion, the current real-time WTB-PCR is a rapid, simple, and low-cost method that permits the detection of trace amounts of the mutated KRAS gene. PMID:26701781

  15. EXAFS of Klebsiella pneumoniae nitrogenase MoFe protein from wild-type and nif V mutant strains

    SciTech Connect

    Eidsness, M.K.; Flank, A.M.; Smith, B.E.; Flood, A.C.; Garner, C.D.; Cramer. S.P.

    1986-05-14

    The enzyme nitrogenase catalyzes the biological reduction of N/sub 2/ to NH/sub 3/. In Klebsiella pneumoniae a cluster of 17 genes in seven transcriptional units has been associated with nitrogen fixation. The nitrogenase enzyme from the nif V mutants is relatively ineffective at dinitrogen reduction, is more efficient than the wild-type enzyme at HCN reduction, and has its hydrogen evolution activity inhibited up to 80% by CO. This altered substrate specificity has been shown to be associated with the iron-molybdenum cofactor, FeMo-co, of the enzyme. X-ray absorption spectroscopy has been a valuable tool for probing the molybdenum environment of wild-type nitrogenase, and the authors report here similar studies on the Nif V/sup -/ enzyme.

  16. Gastroenteritis in NF-κB-Deficient Mice Is Produced with Wild-Type Camplyobacter jejuni but Not with C. jejuni Lacking Cytolethal Distending Toxin despite Persistent Colonization with Both Strains

    PubMed Central

    Fox, James G.; Rogers, Arlin B.; Whary, Mark T.; Ge, Zhongming; Taylor, Nancy S.; Xu, Sandy; Horwitz, Bruce H.; Erdman, Susan E.

    2004-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni continues to be a leading cause of bacterial enteritis in humans. However, because there are no readily available animal models to study the pathogenesis of C. jejuni-related diseases, the significance of potential virulence factors, such as cytolethal distending toxin (CDT), in vivo are poorly understood. Mice deficient in NF-κB subunits (p50−/− p65+/−) in a C57BL/129 background are particularly susceptible to colitis induced by another enterohepatic microaerobe, Helicobacter hepaticus, which, like C. jejuni, produces CDT. Wild-type C. jejuni 81-176 and an isogenic mutant lacking CDT activity (cdtB mutant) were inoculated into NF-κB-deficient (3X) and C57BL/129 mice. Wild-type C. jejuni colonized 29 and 50% of the C57BL/129 mice at 2 and 4 months postinfection (p.i.), respectively, whereas the C. jejuni cdtB mutant colonized 50% of the C57BL/129 mice at 2 p.i. but none of the mice at 4 months p.i. Although the C57BL/129 mice developed mild gastritis and typhlocolitis, they had robust immunoglobulin G (IgG) and Th1-promoted IgG2a humoral responses to both the wild-type strain and the C. jejuni cdtB mutant. In contrast, 75 to 100% of the 3X mice were colonized with both the wild type and the C. jejuni cdtB mutant at similar levels at all times examined. Wild-type C. jejuni caused moderately severe gastritis and proximal duodenitis in 3X mice that were more severe than the gastrointestinal lesions caused by the C. jejuni cdtB mutant. Persistent colonization of NF-κB-deficient mice with the wild type and the C. jejuni cdtB mutant was associated with significantly impaired IgG and IgG2a humoral responses (P < 0.001), which is consistent with an innate or adaptive immune system defect(s). These results suggest that the mechanism of clearance of C. jejuni is NF-κB dependent and that CDT may have proinflammatory activity in vivo, as well as a potential role in the ability of C. jejuni to escape immune surveillance. NF-κB-deficient mice

  17. A cerebellar learning model of vestibulo-ocular reflex adaptation in wild-type and mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Clopath, Claudia; Badura, Aleksandra; De Zeeuw, Chris I; Brunel, Nicolas

    2014-05-21

    Mechanisms of cerebellar motor learning are still poorly understood. The standard Marr-Albus-Ito theory posits that learning involves plasticity at the parallel fiber to Purkinje cell synapses under control of the climbing fiber input, which provides an error signal as in classical supervised learning paradigms. However, a growing body of evidence challenges this theory, in that additional sites of plasticity appear to contribute to motor adaptation. Here, we consider phase-reversal training of the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR), a simple form of motor learning for which a large body of experimental data is available in wild-type and mutant mice, in which the excitability of granule cells or inhibition of Purkinje cells was affected in a cell-specific fashion. We present novel electrophysiological recordings of Purkinje cell activity measured in naive wild-type mice subjected to this VOR adaptation task. We then introduce a minimal model that consists of learning at the parallel fibers to Purkinje cells with the help of the climbing fibers. Although the minimal model reproduces the behavior of the wild-type animals and is analytically tractable, it fails at reproducing the behavior of mutant mice and the electrophysiology data. Therefore, we build a detailed model involving plasticity at the parallel fibers to Purkinje cells' synapse guided by climbing fibers, feedforward inhibition of Purkinje cells, and plasticity at the mossy fiber to vestibular nuclei neuron synapse. The detailed model reproduces both the behavioral and electrophysiological data of both the wild-type and mutant mice and allows for experimentally testable predictions.

  18. Full Genome Sequence-Based Comparative Study of Wild-Type and Vaccine Strains of Infectious Laryngotracheitis Virus from Italy.

    PubMed

    Piccirillo, Alessandra; Lavezzo, Enrico; Niero, Giulia; Moreno, Ana; Massi, Paola; Franchin, Elisa; Toppo, Stefano; Salata, Cristiano; Palù, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    Infectious laryngotracheitis (ILT) is an acute and highly contagious respiratory disease of chickens caused by an alphaherpesvirus, infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV). Recently, full genome sequences of wild-type and vaccine strains have been determined worldwide, but none was from Europe. The aim of this study was to determine and analyse the complete genome sequences of five ILTV strains. Sequences were also compared to reveal the similarity of strains across time and to discriminate between wild-type and vaccine strains. Genomes of three ILTV field isolates from outbreaks occurred in Italy in 1980, 2007 and 2011, and two commercial chicken embryo origin (CEO) vaccines were sequenced using the 454 Life Sciences technology. The comparison with the Serva genome showed that 35 open reading frames (ORFs) differed across the five genomes. Overall, 54 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and 27 amino acid differences in 19 ORFs and two insertions in the UL52 and ORFC genes were identified. Similarity among the field strains and between the field and the vaccine strains ranged from 99.96% to 99.99%. Phylogenetic analysis revealed a close relationship among them, as well. This study generated data on genomic variation among Italian ILTV strains revealing that, even though the genetic variability of the genome is well conserved across time and between wild-type and vaccine strains, some mutations may help in differentiating among them and may be involved in ILTV virulence/attenuation. The results of this study can contribute to the understanding of the molecular bases of ILTV pathogenicity and provide genetic markers to differentiate between wild-type and vaccine strains. PMID:26890525

  19. Full Genome Sequence-Based Comparative Study of Wild-Type and Vaccine Strains of Infectious Laryngotracheitis Virus from Italy

    PubMed Central

    Niero, Giulia; Moreno, Ana; Massi, Paola; Franchin, Elisa; Toppo, Stefano; Salata, Cristiano; Palù, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    Infectious laryngotracheitis (ILT) is an acute and highly contagious respiratory disease of chickens caused by an alphaherpesvirus, infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV). Recently, full genome sequences of wild-type and vaccine strains have been determined worldwide, but none was from Europe. The aim of this study was to determine and analyse the complete genome sequences of five ILTV strains. Sequences were also compared to reveal the similarity of strains across time and to discriminate between wild-type and vaccine strains. Genomes of three ILTV field isolates from outbreaks occurred in Italy in 1980, 2007 and 2011, and two commercial chicken embryo origin (CEO) vaccines were sequenced using the 454 Life Sciences technology. The comparison with the Serva genome showed that 35 open reading frames (ORFs) differed across the five genomes. Overall, 54 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and 27 amino acid differences in 19 ORFs and two insertions in the UL52 and ORFC genes were identified. Similarity among the field strains and between the field and the vaccine strains ranged from 99.96% to 99.99%. Phylogenetic analysis revealed a close relationship among them, as well. This study generated data on genomic variation among Italian ILTV strains revealing that, even though the genetic variability of the genome is well conserved across time and between wild-type and vaccine strains, some mutations may help in differentiating among them and may be involved in ILTV virulence/attenuation. The results of this study can contribute to the understanding of the molecular bases of ILTV pathogenicity and provide genetic markers to differentiate between wild-type and vaccine strains. PMID:26890525

  20. Siderophore receptor PupA as a marker to monitor wild-type Pseudomonas putida WCS358 in natural environments.

    PubMed Central

    Raaijmakers, J M; Bitter, W; Punte, H L; Bakker, P A; Weisbeek, P J; Schippers, B

    1994-01-01

    For application of genetically engineered fluorescent Pseudomonas spp., specific markers are required for monitoring of wild-type Pseudomonas strains and their genetically modified derivatives in natural environments. In this study, the specific siderophore receptor PupA of plant growth-promoting Pseudomonas putida WCS358 was used as a marker to monitor wild-type strain WCS358. After introduction into natural soil and rhizosphere environments, strain WCS358 could be recovered efficiently on a medium amended with 300 microM pseudobactin 358. Although low population densisties of indigenous pseudomonads (less than or equal to 10(3)/g of soil or root) were recovered on the pseudobactin 358-amended medium, subsequent agglutination assays with a WCS358-specific polyclonal antiserum enabled accurate monitoring of populations of wild-type strain WCS358 over a range of approximately 10(3) to 10(7) CFU/g of soil or root. Genetic analysis of the background population by PCR and Southern hybridization revealed that natural occurrence of the pupA gene was limited to a very small number of indigenous Pseudomonas spp. which are very closely related to P. putida WCS358. The PupA marker system enabled the study of differences in rhizosphere colonization among wild-type strain WCS358, rifampin-resistant derivative WCS358rr, and Tn5 mutant WCS358::xylE. Chromosomally mediated rifampin resistance did not affect the colonizing ability of P. putida WCS358. However, Tn5 mutant WCS358::xylE colonized the radish rhizosphere significantly less than did its parental strain. Images PMID:8017914

  1. Functional independence of monomeric CHIP28 water channels revealed by expression of wild-type mutant heterodimers.

    PubMed

    Shi, L B; Skach, W R; Verkman, A S

    1994-04-01

    CHIP28 is a major water transporting protein in erythrocytes and kidney which forms tetramers in membranes (Verbavatz, J. M., Brown, D., Sabolic, I., Valenti, G., Ausiello, D. A., Van Hoek, A. N., Ma, T., and Verkman, A. S. (1993) J. Cell Biol. 123, 605-618). To determine whether CHIP28 monomers function independently, chimeric cDNA dimers were constructed which contained wild-type CHIP28 in series with either wild-type CHIP28, a non-water transporting CHIP28 mutant (C189W), or a functional but mercurial-insensitive CHIP28 mutant (C189S). Transcribed cRNAs were injected in Xenopus oocytes and plasma membrane expression was assayed by quantitative immunofluorescence. Water channel function was measured by osmotically induced swelling. CHIP28 homo- and heterodimers were targeted to the oocyte plasma membrane and functioned as water channels. Relative osmotic water permeability (Pf) values (normalized for plasma membrane expression of monomeric subunits) were: 1.0 (CHIP28 monomer), 0.0 (C189W), 1.07 (C189S), 1.10 (CHIP28-CHIP28 dimer) and 0.52 (CHIP28-C189W). The increase in oocyte Pf was linearly related to plasma membrane expression of wild-type CHIP28 and C189S subunits. HgCl2 (0.3 mM) inhibited channel-mediated Pf in oocytes expressing wild-type CHIP28 monomers and dimers by 85-90%, but did not inhibit Pf in oocytes expressing C189S. HgCl2 inhibited Pf in oocytes expressing CHIP28-C189S dimers by 44 +/- 7%, consistent with one mercurial-sensitive and one insensitive subunit in the heterodimer. These results indicate that despite their assembly in tetramers, monomeric CHIP28 subunits function independently as water channels. PMID:7511600

  2. A Path Analysis of Basic Need Support, Self-Efficacy, Achievement Goals, Life Satisfaction and Academic Achievement Level among Secondary School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diseth, Age; Danielsen, Anne G.; Samdal, Oddrun

    2012-01-01

    Teachers' support of basic psychological needs, self-efficacy, achievement goals, life satisfaction and academic achievement level was measured in a sample of 240 secondary school students (8th and 10th grades). Correlation analysis showed significant positive relations between all of the variables, except for the relation between need support of…

  3. Prognosis and Clinicopathologic Features of Patients With Advanced Stage Isocitrate Dehydrogenase (IDH) Mutant and IDH Wild-Type Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Lipika; Govindan, Aparna; Sheth, Rahul A.; Nardi, Valentina; Blaszkowsky, Lawrence S.; Faris, Jason E.; Clark, Jeffrey W.; Ryan, David P.; Kwak, Eunice L.; Allen, Jill N.; Murphy, Janet E.; Saha, Supriya K.; Hong, Theodore S.; Wo, Jennifer Y.; Ferrone, Cristina R.; Tanabe, Kenneth K.; Chong, Dawn Q.; Deshpande, Vikram; Borger, Darrell R.; Iafrate, A. John; Bardeesy, Nabeel; Zheng, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Background. Conflicting data exist regarding the prognostic impact of the isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) mutation in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC), and limited data exist in patients with advanced-stage disease. Similarly, the clinical phenotype of patients with advanced IDH mutant (IDHm) ICC has not been characterized. In this study, we report the correlation of IDH mutation status with prognosis and clinicopathologic features in patients with advanced ICC. Methods. Patients with histologically confirmed advanced ICC who underwent tumor mutational profiling as a routine part of their care between 2009 and 2014 were evaluated. Clinical and pathological data were collected by retrospective chart review for patients with IDHm versus IDH wild-type (IDHwt) ICC. Pretreatment tumor volume was calculated on computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. Results. Of the 104 patients with ICC who were evaluated, 30 (28.8%) had an IDH mutation (25.0% IDH1, 3.8% IDH2). The median overall survival did not differ significantly between IDHm and IDHwt patients (15.0 vs. 20.1 months, respectively; p = .17). The pretreatment serum carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9) level in IDHm and IDHwt patients was 34.5 and 118.0 U/mL, respectively (p = .04). Age at diagnosis, sex, histologic grade, and pattern of metastasis did not differ significantly by IDH mutation status. Conclusion. The IDH mutation was not associated with prognosis in patients with advanced ICC. The clinical phenotypes of advanced IDHm and IDHwt ICC were similar, but patients with IDHm ICC had a lower median serum CA19-9 level at presentation. Implications for Practice: Previous studies assessing the prognostic impact of the isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) gene mutation in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC) mainly focused on patients with early-stage disease who have undergone resection. These studies offer conflicting results. The target population for clinical trials of IDH inhibitors is patients with

  4. Student-Support Portfolio System with Students' Assessment of Their Own Level of Achievement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oishi, Hisami; Saika, Takashi

    A JABEE educational program must be regularly improved in educational methods and educational environment. For the purpose, the program must establish a system that enhances students' understanding of class work, promoting students' enthusiasm to learn, while coping with students' requests. The mechanical engineering departments of Kogakuin University have established a portfolio system to support students from entrance to graduation. Specifically the portfolios on students' learning and life are continuously maintained, and students' ledgers are arranged and updated. Furthermore, a system, by which students can assess their own level of achievement against the program's learning and educational objectives, is also introduced. The achievement level can be checked from various viewpoints so that students could improve their learning plans.

  5. The fusion protein of wild-type canine distemper virus is a major determinant of persistent infection

    SciTech Connect

    Plattet, Philippe; Rivals, Jean-Paul; Zuber, BenoIt; Brunner, Jean-Marc; Zurbriggen, Andreas; Wittek, Riccardo . E-mail: Riccardo.Wittek@unil.ch

    2005-07-05

    The wild-type A75/17 canine distemper virus (CDV) strain induces a persistent infection in the central nervous system but infects cell lines very inefficiently. In contrast, the genetically more distant Onderstepoort CDV vaccine strain (OP-CDV) induces extensive syncytia formation. Here, we investigated the roles of wild-type fusion (F{sub WT}) and attachment (H{sub WT}) proteins in Vero cells expressing, or not, the canine SLAM receptor by transfection experiments and by studying recombinants viruses expressing different combinations of wild-type and OP-CDV glycoproteins. We show that low fusogenicity is not due to a defect of the envelope proteins to reach the cell surface and that H{sub WT} determines persistent infection in a receptor-dependent manner, emphasizing the role of SLAM as a potent enhancer of fusogenicity. However, importantly, F{sub WT} reduced cell-to-cell fusion independently of the cell surface receptor, thus demonstrating that the fusion protein of the neurovirulent A75/17-CDV strain plays a key role in determining persistent infection.

  6. Assessment of allele-specific gene silencing by RNA interference with mutant and wild-type reporter alleles.

    PubMed

    Ohnishi, Yusuke; Tokunaga, Katsushi; Kaneko, Kiyotoshi; Hohjoh, Hirohiko

    2006-02-28

    Allele-specific gene silencing by RNA interference (RNAi) is therapeutically useful for specifically suppressing the expression of alleles associated with disease. To realize such allele-specific RNAi (ASPRNAi), the design and assessment of small interfering RNA (siRNA) duplexes conferring ASP-RNAi is vital, but is also difficult. Here, we show ASP-RNAi against the Swedish- and London-type amyloid precursor protein (APP) variants related to familial Alzheimer's disease using two reporter alleles encoding the Photinus and Renilla luciferase genes and carrying mutant and wild-type allelic sequences in their 3'-untranslated regions. We examined the effects of siRNA duplexes against the mutant alleles in allele-specific gene silencing and off-target silencing against the wild-type allele under heterozygous conditions, which were generated by cotransfecting the reporter alleles and siRNA duplexes into cultured human cells. Consistently, the siRNA duplexes determined to confer ASP-RNAi also inhibited the expression of the bona fide mutant APP and the production of either amyloid beta 40- or 42-peptide in Cos-7 cells expressing both the full-length Swedish- and wild-type APP alleles. The present data suggest that the system with reporter alleles may permit the preclinical assessment of siRNA duplexes conferring ASP-RNAi, and thus contribute to the design and selection of the most suitable of such siRNA duplexes.

  7. Response to metal stress of Nicotiana langsdorffii plants wild-type and transgenic for the rat glucocorticoid receptor gene.

    PubMed

    Fuoco, Roger; Bogani, Patrizia; Capodaglio, Gabriele; Del Bubba, Massimo; Abollino, Ornella; Giannarelli, Stefania; Spiriti, Maria Michela; Muscatello, Beatrice; Doumett, Saer; Turetta, Clara; Zangrando, Roberta; Zelano, Vincenzo; Buiatti, Marcello

    2013-05-01

    Recently our findings have shown that the integration of the gene coding for the rat gluco-corticoid receptor (GR receptor) in Nicotiana langsdorffii plants induced morphophysiological effects in transgenic plants through the modification of their hormonal pattern. Phytohormones play a key role in plant responses to many different biotic and abiotic stresses since a modified hormonal profile up-regulates the activation of secondary metabolites involved in the response to stress. In this work transgenic GR plants and isogenic wild type genotypes were exposed to metal stress by treating them with 30ppm cadmium(II) or 50ppm chromium(VI). Hormonal patterns along with changes in key response related metabolites were then monitored and compared. Heavy metal up-take was found to be lower in the GR plants. The transgenic plants exhibited higher values of S-abscisic acid (S-ABA) and 3-indole acetic acid (IAA), salicylic acid and total polyphenols, chlorogenic acid and antiradical activity, compared to the untransformed wild type plants. Both Cd and Cr treatments led to an increase in hormone concentrations and secondary metabolites only in wild type plants. Analysis of the results suggests that the stress responses due to changes in the plant's hormonal system may derive from the interaction between the GR receptor and phytosteroids, which are known to play a key role in plant physiology and development.

  8. Cellular Oxidative Stress and the Control of Apoptosis by Wild-Type p53, Cytotoxic Compounds, and Cytokines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotem, Joseph; Peled-Kamar, Mira; Groner, Yoram; Sachs, Leo

    1996-08-01

    Apoptosis induced by wild-type p53 or cytotoxic compounds in myeloid leukemic cells can be inhibited by the cytokines interleukin 6, interleukin 3, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, and interferon γ and by antioxidants. The antioxidants and cytokines showed a cooperative protective effect against induction of apoptosis. Cells with a higher sensitivity to induction of apoptosis and required a higher cytokine concentration to inhibit apoptosis. Decreasing the intrinsic oxidative stress in cells by antioxidants thus inhibited apoptosis, whereas increasing this intrinsic stress by adding H2O2 enhanced apoptosis. Induction of apoptosis by wild-type p53 was not preceded by increased peroxide production or lipid peroxidation and the protective effect of cytokines was not associated with a decrease in these properties. The results indicate that the intrinsic degree of oxidative stress can regulate cell susceptibility to wild-type p53-dependent and p53-independent induction of apoptosis and the ability of cytokines to protect cells against apoptosis.

  9. AAV delivery of wild-type rhodopsin preserves retinal function in a mouse model of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Mao, Haoyu; James, Thomas; Schwein, Alison; Shabashvili, Arseniy E; Hauswirth, William W; Gorbatyuk, Marina S; Lewin, Alfred S

    2011-05-01

    Autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (ADRP) is frequently caused by mutations in RHO, the gene for rod photoreceptor opsin. Earlier, a study on mice carrying mutated rhodopsin transgenes on either RHO + / +  or RHO + /- backgrounds suggested that the amount of wild-type rhodopsin affected survival of photoreceptors. Therefore, we treated P23H RHO transgenic mice with adeno-associated virus serotype 5 (AAV5) expressing a cDNA clone of the rhodopsin gene (RHO301) that expressed normal opsin from the mouse opsin promoter. Analysis of the electroretinogram (ERG) demonstrated that increased expression of RHO301 slowed the rate of retinal degeneration in P23H mice: at 6 months, a-wave amplitudes were increased by 100% and b-wave amplitudes by 79%. In contrast, nontransgenic mice injected with AAV5 RHO301 demonstrated a decrease in the ERG, confirming the damaging effect of rhodopsin overproduction in normal photoreceptors. In P23H mice, the increase in the ERG amplitudes was correlated with improvement of retinal structure: the thickness of the outer nuclear layer in RHO301-treated eyes was increased by 80% compared with control eyes. These findings suggest that the wild-type RHO gene can be delivered to rescue retinal degeneration in mice carrying a RHO mutation and that increased production of normal rhodopsin can suppress the effect of the mutated protein. These findings make it possible to treat ADRP caused by different mutations of RHO with the expression of wild-type RHO.

  10. Adenoviral-E2F-1 radiosensitizes p53{sup wild-type} and p53{sup null} human prostate cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Khanh H.; Hachem, Paul; Khor, L.-Y.; Salem, Naji; Hunt, Kelly K.; Calkins, Peter R.; Pollack, Alan . E-mail: Alan.Pollack@fccc.edu

    2005-09-01

    Purpose: E2F-1 is a transcription factor that enhances the radiosensitivity of various cell lines by inducing apoptosis. However, there are conflicting data concerning whether this enhancement is mediated via p53 dependent pathways. Additionally, the role of E2F-1 in the response of human prostate cancer to radiation has not been well characterized. In this study, we investigated the effect of Adenoviral-E2F-1 (Ad-E2F-1) on the radiosensitivity of p53{sup wild-type} (LNCaP) and p53{sup null} (PC3) prostate cancer cell lines. Methods and Materials: LNCaP and PC3 cells were transduced with Ad-E2F-1, Adenoviral-Luciferase (Ad-Luc) control vector, or Adenoviral-p53 (Ad-p53). Expression of E2F-1 and p53 was examined by Western blot analysis. Annexin V and caspase 3 + 7 assays were performed to estimate the levels of apoptosis. Clonogenic survival assays were used to determine overall cell death. Statistical significance was determined by analysis of variance, using the Bonferroni method to correct for multiple comparisons. Results: Western blot analysis confirmed the efficacy of transductions with Ad-E2F-1 and Ad-p53. Ad-E2F-1 transduction significantly enhanced apoptosis and decreased clonogenic survival in both cell lines. These effects were compounded by the addition of RT. Although E2F-1-mediated radiosensitization was independent of p53 status, this effect was more pronounced in p53{sup wild-type} LNCaP cells. When PC3 cells were treated with Ad-p53 in combination with RT and Ad-E2F-1, there was at least an additive reduction in clonogenic survival. Conclusions: Our results suggest that Ad-E2F-1 significantly enhances the response of p53{sup wild-type} and p53{sup null} prostate cancer cells to radiation therapy, although radiosensitization is more pronounced in the presence of p53. Ad-E2F-1 may be a useful adjunct to radiation therapy in the treatment of prostate cancer.

  11. Transcriptomic analysis of Clostridium thermocellum Populus hydrolysate-tolerant mutant strain shows increased cellular efficiency in response to Populus hydrolysate compared to the wild type strain

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The thermophilic, anaerobic bacterium, Clostridium thermocellum is a model organism for consolidated processing due to its efficient fermentation of cellulose. Constituents of dilute acid pretreatment hydrolysate are known to inhibit C. thermocellum and other microorganisms. To evaluate the biological impact of this type of hydrolysate, a transcriptomic analysis of growth in hydrolysate-containing medium was conducted on 17.5% v/v Populus hydrolysate-tolerant mutant (PM) and wild type (WT) strains of C. thermocellum. Results In two levels of Populus hydrolysate medium (0% and 10% v/v), the PM showed both gene specific increases and decreases of gene expression compared to the wild-type strain. The PM had increased expression of genes in energy production and conversion, and amino acid transport and metabolism in both standard and 10% v/v Populus hydrolysate media. In particular, expression of the histidine metabolism increased up to 100 fold. In contrast, the PM decreased gene expression in cell division and sporulation (standard medium only), cell defense mechanisms, cell envelope, cell motility, and cellulosome in both media. The PM downregulated inorganic ion transport and metabolism in standard medium but upregulated it in the hydrolysate media when compared to the WT. The WT differentially expressed 1072 genes in response to the hydrolysate medium which included increased transcription of cell defense mechanisms, cell motility, and cellulosome, and decreased expression in cell envelope, amino acid transport and metabolism, inorganic ion transport and metabolism, and lipid metabolism, while the PM only differentially expressed 92 genes. The PM tolerates up to 17.5% v/v Populus hydrolysate and growth in it elicited 489 genes with differential expression, which included increased expression in energy production and conversion, cellulosome production, and inorganic ion transport and metabolism and decreased expression in transcription and cell

  12. Effects of Temperature on the p53-DNA Binding Interactions and Their Dynamical Behavior: Comparing the Wild Type to the R248Q Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Barakat, Khaled; Issack, Bilkiss B.; Stepanova, Maria; Tuszynski, Jack

    2011-01-01

    Background The protein p53 plays an active role in the regulation of cell cycle. In about half of human cancers, the protein is inactivated by mutations located primarily in its DNA-binding domain. Interestingly, a number of these mutations possess temperature-induced DNA-binding characteristics. A striking example is the mutation of Arg248 into glutamine or tryptophan. These mutants are defective for binding to DNA at 310 K although they have been shown to bind specifically to several p53 response elements at sub-physiological temperatures (298–306 K). Methodology/Principal Findings This important experimental finding motivated us to examine the effects of temperature on the structure and configuration of R248Q mutant and compare it to the wild type protein. Our aim is to determine how and where structural changes of mutant variants take place due to temperature changes. To answer these questions, we compared the mutant to the wild-type proteins from two different aspects. First, we investigated the systems at the atomistic level through their DNA-binding affinity, hydrogen bond networks and spatial distribution of water molecules. Next, we assessed changes in their long-lived conformational motions at the coarse-grained level through the collective dynamics of their side-chain and backbone atoms separately. Conclusions The experimentally observed effect of temperature on the DNA-binding properties of p53 is reproduced. Analysis of atomistic and coarse-grained data reveal that changes in binding are determined by a few key residues and provide a rationale for the mutant-loss of binding at physiological temperatures. The findings can potentially enable a rescue strategy for the mutant structure. PMID:22110706

  13. Events surrounding the early development of Euglena chloroplasts. 15. Origin of plastid thylakoid polypeptides in wild-type and mutant cells.

    PubMed

    Bingham, S; Schiff, J A

    1979-09-11

    Techniques are described for the isolation of plastid thylakoid membranes from light-grown and dark-grown cells of Euglena gracilis var. bacillaris, and from mutants affecting plastid development. These membranes, which have minimal contamination with other cell fractions, are localized in sucrose gradients by using the thylakoid membrane sulfolipid as a specific marker. The plastid thylakoid membrane polypeptides isolated from these membranes were separated on SDS polyacrylamide gels and yielded patterns containing 30-40 polypeptides. Light-grown strain Z gave patterns identical with bacillaris. Since the plastid thylakoid polypeptide patterns obtained from dark-grown wild-type cells and from a bleached mutant W3BUL in which plastid DNA is undetectable are identical, it appears that the proplastid thylakoid polypeptides of wild-type cannot be coded in plastid DNA and are probably coded in nuclear DNA. The plastid thylakoid polypeptide patterns obtained from various dark-grown mutants, making large but abnormal chloroplasts, show a correlation between the amount of chlorophyll formed and the amount of a plastid thylakoid polypeptide thought to be associated wtth one of the pigment-protein light-harvesting complexes. Treatment with SAN 9789 (4-chloro-5-(methylamino)-2(alpha, alpha, alpha,-trifluoro-m-tolyl)-3-(2H(pyridazinone) known to block carotenoid synthesis at the level of phytoene, causes a progressive loss of all plastid thylakoid polypeptides during growth in darkness and results in the establishment of a new, lowere steady-state level of sulfolipid. At least ten of the plastid thylakoid polypeptides become labeled when isolated chloroplasts are supplied with radioactive amono acids; of these six are undectable in W3BUL and are, therefore, candidates for coding by plastid DNA.

  14. Experimental Support for the Ecoimmunity Theory: Distinct Phenotypes of Nonlymphocytic Cells in SCID and Wild-Type Mice.

    PubMed

    Ochayon, David E; Baranovski, Boris M; Malkin, Peter; Schuster, Ronen; Kalay, Noa; Ben-Hamo, Rotem; Sloma, Ido; Levinson, Justin; Brazg, Jared; Efroni, Sol; Lewis, Eli C; Nevo, Uri

    2016-01-01

    Immune tolerance toward "self" is critical in multiple immune disorders. While there are several mechanisms to describe the involvement of immune cells in the process, the role of peripheral tissue cells in that context is not yet clear. The theory of ecoimmunity postulates that interactions between immune and tissue cells represent a predator-prey relationship. A lifelong interaction, shaped mainly during early ontogeny, leads to selection of nonimmune cell phenotypes. Normally, therefore, nonimmune cells that evolve alongside an intact immune system would be phenotypically capable of evading immune responses, and cells whose phenotype falls short of satisfying this steady state would expire under hostile immune responses. This view was supported until recently by experimental evidence showing an inferior endurance of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID)-derived pancreatic islets when engrafted into syngeneic immune-intact wild-type (WT) mice, relative to islets from WT. Here we extend the experimental exploration of ecoimmunity by searching for the presence of the phenotypic changes suggested by the theory. Immune-related phenotypes of islets, spleen, and bone marrow immune cells were determined, as well as SCID and WT nonlymphocytic cells. Islet submass grafting was performed to depict syngeneic graft functionality. Islet cultures were examined under both resting and inflamed conditions for expression of CD40 and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I/II and release of interleukin-1α (IL-1α), IL-1β, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), IL-10, and insulin. Results depict multiple pathways that appear to be related to the sculpting of nonimmune cells by immune cells; 59 SCID islet genes displayed relative expression changes compared with WT islets. SCID cells expressed lower tolerability to inflammation and higher levels of immune-related molecules, including MHC class I. Accordingly, islets exhibited a marked increase in insulin release upon

  15. Next-generation sequencing facilitates quantitative analysis of wild-type and Nrl−/− retinal transcriptomes

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Matthew J.; Rajasimha, Harsha K.; Roger, Jerome E.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Next-generation sequencing (NGS) has revolutionized systems-based analysis of cellular pathways. The goals of this study are to compare NGS-derived retinal transcriptome profiling (RNA-seq) to microarray and quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT–PCR) methods and to evaluate protocols for optimal high-throughput data analysis. Methods Retinal mRNA profiles of 21-day-old wild-type (WT) and neural retina leucine zipper knockout (Nrl−/−) mice were generated by deep sequencing, in triplicate, using Illumina GAIIx. The sequence reads that passed quality filters were analyzed at the transcript isoform level with two methods: Burrows–Wheeler Aligner (BWA) followed by ANOVA (ANOVA) and TopHat followed by Cufflinks. qRT–PCR validation was performed using TaqMan and SYBR Green assays. Results Using an optimized data analysis workflow, we mapped about 30 million sequence reads per sample to the mouse genome (build mm9) and identified 16,014 transcripts in the retinas of WT and Nrl−/− mice with BWA workflow and 34,115 transcripts with TopHat workflow. RNA-seq data confirmed stable expression of 25 known housekeeping genes, and 12 of these were validated with qRT–PCR. RNA-seq data had a linear relationship with qRT–PCR for more than four orders of magnitude and a goodness of fit (R2) of 0.8798. Approximately 10% of the transcripts showed differential expression between the WT and Nrl−/− retina, with a fold change ≥1.5 and p value <0.05. Altered expression of 25 genes was confirmed with qRT–PCR, demonstrating the high degree of sensitivity of the RNA-seq method. Hierarchical clustering of differentially expressed genes uncovered several as yet uncharacterized genes that may contribute to retinal function. Data analysis with BWA and TopHat workflows revealed a significant overlap yet provided complementary insights in transcriptome profiling. Conclusions Our study represents the first detailed analysis of retinal

  16. Sulphide Resistance in the Cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa: a Comparative Study of Morphology and Photosynthetic Performance Between the Sulphide-Resistant Mutant and the Wild-Type Strain.

    PubMed

    Bañares-España, Elena; del Mar Fernández-Arjona, María; García-Sánchez, María Jesús; Hernández-López, Miguel; Reul, Andreas; Mariné, Mariona Hernández; Flores-Moya, Antonio

    2016-05-01

    The cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa is a mesophilic freshwater organism, which cannot tolerate sulphide. However, it was possible to isolate a sulphide-resistant (S(r)) mutant strain that was able to survive in a normally lethal medium sulphide. In order to evaluate the cost of the mutation conferring sulphide resistance in the S(r) strain of M. aeruginosa, the morphology and the photosynthetic performance were compared to that found in the wild-type, sulphide-sensitive (S(s)) strain. An increase in size and a disrupted morphology was observed in S(r) cells in comparison to the S(s) counterpart. Phycoerythrin and phycocyanin levels were higher in the S(r) than in the S(s) cells, whereas a higher carotenoid content, per unit volume, was found in the S(s) strain. The irradiance-saturated photosynthetic oxygen-production rate (GPR max) and the photosynthetic efficiency (measured both by oxygen production and fluorescence, α(GPR) and α(ETR)) were lower in the S(r) strain than in the wild-type. These results appear to be the result of package effect. On the other hand, the S(r) strain showed higher quantum yield of non-photochemical quenching, especially those regulated mechanisms (estimated throughout qN and Y(NPQ)) and a significantly lower slope in the maximum quantum yield of light-adapted samples (Fv'/Fm') compared to the S(s) strain. These findings point to a change in the regulation of the quenching of the transition states (qT) in the S(r) strain which may be generated by a change in the distribution of thylakoidal membranes, which somehow could protect metalloenzymes of the electron transport chain from the lethal effect of sulphide. PMID:26677166

  17. Sulphide Resistance in the Cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa: a Comparative Study of Morphology and Photosynthetic Performance Between the Sulphide-Resistant Mutant and the Wild-Type Strain.

    PubMed

    Bañares-España, Elena; del Mar Fernández-Arjona, María; García-Sánchez, María Jesús; Hernández-López, Miguel; Reul, Andreas; Mariné, Mariona Hernández; Flores-Moya, Antonio

    2016-05-01

    The cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa is a mesophilic freshwater organism, which cannot tolerate sulphide. However, it was possible to isolate a sulphide-resistant (S(r)) mutant strain that was able to survive in a normally lethal medium sulphide. In order to evaluate the cost of the mutation conferring sulphide resistance in the S(r) strain of M. aeruginosa, the morphology and the photosynthetic performance were compared to that found in the wild-type, sulphide-sensitive (S(s)) strain. An increase in size and a disrupted morphology was observed in S(r) cells in comparison to the S(s) counterpart. Phycoerythrin and phycocyanin levels were higher in the S(r) than in the S(s) cells, whereas a higher carotenoid content, per unit volume, was found in the S(s) strain. The irradiance-saturated photosynthetic oxygen-production rate (GPR max) and the photosynthetic efficiency (measured both by oxygen production and fluorescence, α(GPR) and α(ETR)) were lower in the S(r) strain than in the wild-type. These results appear to be the result of package effect. On the other hand, the S(r) strain showed higher quantum yield of non-photochemical quenching, especially those regulated mechanisms (estimated throughout qN and Y(NPQ)) and a significantly lower slope in the maximum quantum yield of light-adapted samples (Fv'/Fm') compared to the S(s) strain. These findings point to a change in the regulation of the quenching of the transition states (qT) in the S(r) strain which may be generated by a change in the distribution of thylakoidal membranes, which somehow could protect metalloenzymes of the electron transport chain from the lethal effect of sulphide.

  18. Development of a Rotavirus-Shedding Model in Rhesus Macaques, Using a Homologous Wild-Type Rotavirus of a New P Genotype

    PubMed Central

    McNeal, Monica M.; Sestak, Karol; Choi, Anthony H.-C.; Basu, Mitali; Cole, Michael J.; Aye, Pyone P.; Bohm, Rudolf P.; Ward, Richard L.

    2005-01-01

    Although there are several reports on rotavirus inoculation of nonhuman primates, no reliable model exists. Therefore, this study was designed to develop a rhesus macaque model for rotavirus studies. The goals were to obtain a wild-type macaque rotavirus and evaluate it as a challenge virus for model studies. Once rotavirus was shown to be endemic within the macaque colony at the Tulane National Primate Research Center, stool specimens were collected from juvenile animals (2.6 to 5.9 months of age) without evidence of previous rotavirus infection and examined for rotavirus antigen. Six of 10 animals shed rotavirus during the 10-week collection period, and the electropherotypes of all isolates were identical to each other but distinct from those of prototype simian rotaviruses. These viruses were characterized as serotype G3 and subgroup 1, properties typical of many animal rotaviruses, including simian strains. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the VP4 gene was performed with a culture-grown isolate from the stool of one animal, designated the TUCH strain. Based on both genotypic and phylogenetic comparisons between TUCH VP4 and cognate proteins of representatives of the reported 22 P genotypes, the TUCH virus belongs to a new genotype, P[23]. A pool of wild-type TUCH was prepared and intragastrically administered to eight cesarean section-derived, specific-pathogen-free macaques 14 to 42 days of age. All animals were kept in a biocontainment level 2 facility. Although no diarrhea was observed and the animals remained clinically normal, all animals shed large quantities of rotavirus antigen in their feces after inoculation, which resolved by the end of the 14-day observation period. Therefore, TUCH infection of macaques provides a useful nonhuman primate model for studies on rotavirus protection. PMID:15613323

  19. The impact of agrin on the formation of orthogonal arrays of particles in cultured astrocytes from wild-type and agrin-null mice.

    PubMed

    Fallier-Becker, Petra; Sperveslage, Jan; Wolburg, Hartwig; Noell, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Astrocytic endfeet membranes are studded with aquaporin-4 (AQP4) containing orthogonal arrays of particles (OAP) which can be visualized exclusively by the freeze-fracturing method. They are predominantly expressed where the astroglial membrane is in contact with the superficial and perivascular basal lamina. This polarity seems to be essential for the integrity of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). The basal lamina containing many extracellular matrix (ECM) components such as collagen, laminin and heparansulfate proteoglycans like agrin is thought to influence this OAP-related polarity of astrocytes. Recently, we have shown that agrin, in particular the neuronal isoform A4B8, is capable of influencing the formation of OAPs in astrocytes when cultured in the presence of agrin-conditioned media. In this paper we wanted to investigate whether coating with exogenous agrin compared to coating with other ECM components would induce OAP formation in astrocytes of the agrin-null mouse. For this purpose, we cultured astrocytes from agrin-null and wild-type mice on agrin- or ECM-coated surfaces. Immunofluorescent cytochemical staining of AQP4 indicated a higher AQP4 expression level in cultures with agrin- or ECM-coated than in cultures with uncoated surfaces, whereas western blot analyses and PCR showed no differences. α-Dystroglycan is thought to be a potential receptor of agrin and was immunostained in wild-type as well as in agrin-null astrocytes. In freeze-fracture replicas, we observed an increase in OAP density in astrocytes when growing on agrin- and ECM-coatings. These results concurred with other experiments in which changes in volume were measured following hypotonic stress, which supported the positive influence of exogenous agrin on AQP4 insertion into the membrane, on OAP formation and on water transport. PMID:20920487

  20. Intratumoral spread of wild-type adenovirus is limited after local injection of human xenograft tumors: virus persists and spreads systemically at late time points.

    PubMed

    Sauthoff, Harald; Hu, Jing; Maca, Cielo; Goldman, Michael; Heitner, Sheila; Yee, Herman; Pipiya, Teona; Rom, William N; Hay, John G

    2003-03-20

    Oncolytic replicating adenoviruses are a promising new modality for the treatment of cancer. Despite the assumed biologic advantage of continued viral replication and spread from infected to uninfected cancer cells, early clinical trials demonstrate that the efficacy of current vectors is limited. In xenograft tumor models using immune-incompetent mice, wild-type adenovirus is also rarely able to eradicate established tumors. This suggests that innate immune mechanisms may clear the virus or that barriers within the tumor prevent viral spread. The aim of this study was to evaluate the kinetics of viral distribution and spread after intratumoral injection of virus in a human tumor xenograft model. After intratumoral injection of wild-type virus, high levels of titratable virus persisted within the xenograft tumors for at least 8 weeks. Virus distribution within the tumors as determined by immunohistochemistry was patchy, and virus-infected cells appeared to be flanked by tumor necrosis and connective tissue. The close proximity of virus-infected cells to the tumor-supporting structure, which is of murine origin, was clearly demonstrated using a DNA probe that specifically hybridizes to the B1 murine DNA repeat. Importantly, although virus was cleared from the circulation 6 hr after intratumoral injection, after 4 weeks systemic spread of virus was detected. In addition, vessels of infected tumors were surrounded by necrosis and an advancing rim of virus-infected tumor cells, suggesting reinfection of the xenograft tumor through the vasculature. These data suggest that human adenoviral spread within tumor xenografts is impaired by murine tumor-supporting structures. In addition, there is evidence for continued viral replication within the tumor, with subsequent systemic dissemination and reinfection of tumors via the tumor vasculature. Despite the limitations of immune-incompetent models, an understanding of the interactions between the virus and the tumor

  1. Addition by Subtraction: The Relation Between Dropout Rates and School-Level Academic Achievement

    PubMed Central

    GLENNIE, ELIZABETH; BONNEAU, KARA; VANDELLEN, MICHELLE; DODGE, KENNETH A.

    2013-01-01

    Background/Context Efforts to improve student achievement should increase graduation rates. However, work investigating the effects of student-level accountability has consistently demonstrated that increases in the standards for high school graduation are correlated with increases in dropout rates. The most favored explanation for this finding is that high-stakes testing policies that mandate grade repetition and high school exit exams may be the tipping point for students who are already struggling academically. These extra demands may, in fact, push students out of school. Purpose/Objective/Focus This article examines two hypotheses regarding the relation between school-level accountability and dropout rates. The first posits that improvements in school performance lead to improved success for everyone. If school-level accountability systems improve a school for all students, then the proportion of students performing at grade level increases, and the dropout rate decreases. The second hypothesis posits that schools facing pressure to improve their overall accountability score may pursue this increase at the cost of other student outcomes, including dropout rate. Research Design Our approach focuses on the dynamic relation between school-level academic achievement and dropout rates over time—that is, between one year’s achievement and the subsequent year’s dropout rate, and vice versa. This article employs longitudinal data of records on all students in North Carolina public schools over an 8-year period. Analyses employ fixed-effects models clustering schools and districts within years and controls each year for school size, percentage of students who were free/reduced-price lunch eligible, percentage of students who are ethnic minorities, and locale. Findings/Results This study finds partial evidence that improvements in school-level academic performance will lead to improvements (i.e., decreases) in school-level dropout rates. Schools with improved

  2. Achieving population-level violence declines: implications of the international crime drop for prevention programming.

    PubMed

    Eisner, Manuel; Nivette, Amy; Murray, Aja Louise; Krisch, Maria

    2016-09-01

    The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) adopted by the United Nations for the period 2016-2030 aim to achieve a substantial reduction of interpersonal violence. An increasing body of evidence of what works, emerging from randomized controlled trials, can inform public health policy decisions. However, there is very limited evidence on the kinds of mechanisms that lead to sustained declines in interpersonal violence at the population level. We discuss the implications of what is known about recent major declines in violence to guide violence-reduction policies. PMID:27638243

  3. Achieving population-level violence declines: implications of the international crime drop for prevention programming.

    PubMed

    Eisner, Manuel; Nivette, Amy; Murray, Aja Louise; Krisch, Maria

    2016-09-01

    The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) adopted by the United Nations for the period 2016-2030 aim to achieve a substantial reduction of interpersonal violence. An increasing body of evidence of what works, emerging from randomized controlled trials, can inform public health policy decisions. However, there is very limited evidence on the kinds of mechanisms that lead to sustained declines in interpersonal violence at the population level. We discuss the implications of what is known about recent major declines in violence to guide violence-reduction policies.

  4. Achieving very low mercury levels in refinery wastewater by membrane filtration.

    SciTech Connect

    Urgun Demirtas, M.; Benda, P.; Gillenwater, P. S.; Negri, M. C.; Xiong, H.; Snyder, S. W.

    2012-05-15

    Microfiltration (MF), ultrafiltration (UF), nanofiltration (NF) and reverse osmosis (RO) membranes were evaluated for their ability to achieve the world's most stringent Hg discharge criterion (<1.3 ng/L) in an oil refinery's wastewater. The membrane processes were operated at three different pressures to demonstrate the potential for each membrane technology to achieve the targeted effluent mercury concentrations. The presence of mercury in the particulate form in the refinery wastewater makes the use of MF and UF membrane technologies more attractive in achieving very low mercury levels in the treated wastewater. Both NF and RO were also able to meet the target mercury concentration at lower operating pressures (20.7 bar). However, higher operating pressures ({ge}34.5 bar) had a significant effect on NF and RO flux and fouling rates, as well as on permeate quality. SEM images of the membranes showed that pore blockage and narrowing were the dominant fouling mechanisms for the MF membrane while surface coverage was the dominant fouling mechanism for the other membranes. The correlation between mercury concentration and particle size distribution was also investigated to understand mercury removal mechanisms by membrane filtration. The mean particle diameter decreased with filtration from 1.1 {+-} 0.0 {micro}m to 0.74 {+-} 0.2 {micro}m after UF.

  5. Building America Residential System Research Results: Achieving 30% Whole House Energy Savings Level in Cold Climates

    SciTech Connect

    Building Industry Research Alliance; Building Science Consortium; Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings; Florida Solar Energy Center; IBACOS; National Renewable Energy Laboratory

    2006-08-01

    The Building America program conducts the system research required to reduce risks associated with the design and construction of homes that use an average of 30% to 90% less total energy for all residential energy uses than the Building America Research Benchmark, including research on homes that will use zero net energy on annual basis. To measure the program's progress, annual research milestones have been established for five major climate regions in the United States. The system research activities required to reach each milestone take from 3 to 5 years to complete and include research in individual test houses, studies in pre-production prototypes, and research studies with lead builders that provide early examples that the specified energy savings level can be successfully achieved on a production basis. This report summarizes research results for the 30% energy savings level and demonstrates that lead builders can successfully provide 30% homes in Cold Climates on a cost-neutral basis.

  6. Achieving behavioral control with millisecond resolution in a high-level programming environment.

    PubMed

    Asaad, Wael F; Eskandar, Emad N

    2008-08-30

    The creation of psychophysical tasks for the behavioral neurosciences has generally relied upon low-level software running on a limited range of hardware. Despite the availability of software that allows the coding of behavioral tasks in high-level programming environments, many researchers are still reluctant to trust the temporal accuracy and resolution of programs running in such environments, especially when they run atop non-real-time operating systems. Thus, the creation of behavioral paradigms has been slowed by the intricacy of the coding required and their dissemination across labs has been hampered by the various types of hardware needed. However, we demonstrate here that, when proper measures are taken to handle the various sources of temporal error, accuracy can be achieved at the 1 ms time-scale that is relevant for the alignment of behavioral and neural events.

  7. Predictors of gender achievement in physical science at the secondary level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlenko, Brittany Hunter

    This study used the 2009 National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) science restricted data-set for twelfth graders. The NAEP data used in this research study is derived from a sample group of 11,100 twelfth grade students that represented a national population of over 3,000,000 twelfth grade students enrolled in science in the United States in 2009. The researcher chose the NAEP data set because it provided a national sample using uniform questions. This study investigated how the factors of socioeconomic status (SES), parental education level, mode of instruction, and affective disposition affect twelfth grade students' physical science achievement levels in school for the sample population and subgroups for gender. The factors mode of instruction and affective disposition were built through factor analysis based on available questions from the student surveys. All four factors were found to be significant predictors of physical science achievement for the sample population. NAEP exams are administered to a national sample that represents the population of American students enrolled in public and private schools. This was a non-experimental study that adds to the literature on factors that impact physical science for both genders. A gender gap is essentially nonexistent at the fourth grade level but appears at the eighth grade level in science based on information from NAEP (NCES, 1997). The results of the study can be used to make recommendation for policy change to diminish this gender gap in the future. Educators need to be using research to make instructional decisions; research-based instruction helps all students.

  8. Photosystem II Activity of Wild Type Synechocystis PCC 6803 and Its Mutants with Different Plastoquinone Pool Redox States.

    PubMed

    Voloshina, O V; Bolychevtseva, Y V; Kuzminov, F I; Gorbunov, M Y; Elanskaya, I V; Fadeev, V V

    2016-08-01

    To assess the role of redox state of photosystem II (PSII) acceptor side electron carriers in PSII photochemical activity, we studied sub-millisecond fluorescence kinetics of the wild type Synechocystis PCC 6803 and its mutants with natural variability in the redox state of the plastoquinone (PQ) pool. In cyanobacteria, dark adaptation tends to reduce PQ pool and induce a shift of the cyanobacterial photosynthetic apparatus to State 2, whereas illumination oxidizes PQ pool, leading to State 1 (Mullineaux, C. W., and Holzwarth, A. R. (1990) FEBS Lett., 260, 245-248). We show here that dark-adapted Ox(-) mutant with naturally reduced PQ is characterized by slower QA(-) reoxidation and O2 evolution rates, as well as lower quantum yield of PSII primary photochemical reactions (Fv/Fm) as compared to the wild type and SDH(-) mutant, in which the PQ pool remains oxidized in the dark. These results indicate a large portion of photochemically inactive PSII reaction centers in the Ox(-) mutant after dark adaptation. While light adaptation increases Fv/Fm in all tested strains, indicating PSII activation, by far the greatest increase in Fv/Fm and O2 evolution rates is observed in the Ox(-) mutant. Continuous illumination of Ox(-) mutant cells with low-intensity blue light, that accelerates QA(-) reoxidation, also increases Fv/Fm and PSII functional absorption cross-section (590 nm); this effect is almost absent in the wild type and SDH(-) mutant. We believe that these changes are caused by the reorganization of the photosynthetic apparatus during transition from State 2 to State 1. We propose that two processes affect the PSII activity during changes of light conditions: 1) reversible inactivation of PSII, which is associated with the reduction of electron carriers on the PSII acceptor side in the dark, and 2) PSII activation under low light related to the increase in functional absorption cross-section at 590 nm.

  9. Photosystem II Activity of Wild Type Synechocystis PCC 6803 and Its Mutants with Different Plastoquinone Pool Redox States.

    PubMed

    Voloshina, O V; Bolychevtseva, Y V; Kuzminov, F I; Gorbunov, M Y; Elanskaya, I V; Fadeev, V V

    2016-08-01

    To assess the role of redox state of photosystem II (PSII) acceptor side electron carriers in PSII photochemical activity, we studied sub-millisecond fluorescence kinetics of the wild type Synechocystis PCC 6803 and its mutants with natural variability in the redox state of the plastoquinone (PQ) pool. In cyanobacteria, dark adaptation tends to reduce PQ pool and induce a shift of the cyanobacterial photosynthetic apparatus to State 2, whereas illumination oxidizes PQ pool, leading to State 1 (Mullineaux, C. W., and Holzwarth, A. R. (1990) FEBS Lett., 260, 245-248). We show here that dark-adapted Ox(-) mutant with naturally reduced PQ is characterized by slower QA(-) reoxidation and O2 evolution rates, as well as lower quantum yield of PSII primary photochemical reactions (Fv/Fm) as compared to the wild type and SDH(-) mutant, in which the PQ pool remains oxidized in the dark. These results indicate a large portion of photochemically inactive PSII reaction centers in the Ox(-) mutant after dark adaptation. While light adaptation increases Fv/Fm in all tested strains, indicating PSII activation, by far the greatest increase in Fv/Fm and O2 evolution rates is observed in the Ox(-) mutant. Continuous illumination of Ox(-) mutant cells with low-intensity blue light, that accelerates QA(-) reoxidation, also increases Fv/Fm and PSII functional absorption cross-section (590 nm); this effect is almost absent in the wild type and SDH(-) mutant. We believe that these changes are caused by the reorganization of the photosynthetic apparatus during transition from State 2 to State 1. We propose that two processes affect the PSII activity during changes of light conditions: 1) reversible inactivation of PSII, which is associated with the reduction of electron carriers on the PSII acceptor side in the dark, and 2) PSII activation under low light related to the increase in functional absorption cross-section at 590 nm. PMID:27677553

  10. Novel software for analysis of root gravitropism: comparative response patterns of Arabidopsis wild-type and axr1 seedlings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ishikawa, H.; Evans, M. L.

    1997-01-01

    In an earlier study (Evans, Ishikawa & Estelle 1994, Planta 194, 215-222) we used a video digitizer system to compare the kinetics of auxin action on root elongation in wild-type seedlings and seedlings of auxin response mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. We have since modified the system software to allow determination of elongation on opposite sides of vertical or gravistimulated roots and to allow continuous measurement of the angle of orientation of sequential subsections of the root during the response. We used this technology to compare the patterns of differential growth that generate curvature in roots of the Columbia ecotype and in the mutants axr1-3, axr1-12 and axr2, which show reduced gravitropic responsiveness and reduced sensitivity to inhibition by auxin. The pattern of differential growth during gravitropism differed in roots of wild-type and axr1 seedlings. In wild-type roots, initial curvature resulted from differential inhibition of elongation in the distal elongation zone (DEZ). This was followed by an acceleration of elongation along the top side of the DEZ. In roots of axr1-3, curvature resulted from differential stimulation of elongation whereas in roots of axr1-12 the response was variable. Roots of axr2 did not exhibit gravitropic curvature. The observation that the pattern of differential growth causing curvature is dramatically altered by a change in sensitivity to auxin is consistent with the classical Cholodny-Went theory of gravitropism which maintains that differential growth patterns induced by gravistimulation are mediated primarily by gravi-induced shifts in auxin distribution. The new technology introduced with this report allows automated determination of stimulus response patterns in the small but experimentally popular roots of Arabidopsis.

  11. Accumulation of a bioactive benzoisochromanequinone compound kalafungin by a wild type antitumor-medermycin-producing streptomycete strain.

    PubMed

    Lü, Jin; He, Qiang; Huang, Luyao; Cai, Xiaofeng; Guo, Wenwen; He, Jing; Zhang, Lili; Li, Aiying

    2015-01-01

    Medermycin and kalafungin, two antibacterial and antitumor antibiotics isolated from different streptomycetes, share an identical polyketide skeleton core. The present study reported the discovery of kalafungin in a medermycin-producing streptomycete strain for the first time. A mutant strain obtained through UV mutagenesis showed a 3-fold increase in the production of this antibiotic, compared to the wild type strain. Heterologous expression experiments suggested that its production was severely controlled by the gene cluster for medermycin biosynthesis. In all, these findings suggested that kalafungin and medermycin could be accumulated by the same streptomycete and share their biosynthetic pathway to some extent in this strain. PMID:25695632

  12. Visualization of Melanosome Dynamics within Wild-Type and Dilute Melanocytes Suggests a Paradigm for Myosin V Function In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xufeng; Bowers, Blair; Rao, Kang; Wei, Qin; Hammer, John A.

    1998-01-01

    Unlike wild-type mouse melanocytes, where melanosomes are concentrated in dendrites and dendritic tips, melanosomes in dilute (myosin Va−) melanocytes are concentrated in the cell center. Here we sought to define the role that myosin Va plays in melanosome transport and distribution. Actin filaments that comprise a cortical shell running the length of the dendrite were found to exhibit a random orientation, suggesting that myosin Va could drive the outward spreading of melanosomes by catalyzing random walks. In contrast to this mechanism, time lapse video microscopy revealed that melanosomes undergo rapid (∼1.5 μm/s) microtubule-dependent movements to the periphery and back again. This bidirectional traffic occurs in both wild-type and dilute melanocytes, but it is more obvious in dilute melanocytes because the only melanosomes in their periphery are those undergoing this movement. While providing an efficient means to transport melanosomes to the periphery, this component does not by itself result in their net accumulation there. These observations, together with previous studies showing extensive colocalization of myosin Va and melanosomes in the actin-rich periphery, suggest a mechanism in which a myosin Va–dependent interaction of melanosomes with F-actin in the periphery prevents these organelles from returning on microtubules to the cell center, causing their distal accumulation. This “capture” model is supported by the demonstration that (a) expression of the myosin Va tail domain within wild-type cells creates a dilute-like phenotype via a process involving initial colocalization of tail domains with melanosomes in the periphery, followed by an ∼120-min, microtubule-based redistribution of melanosomes to the cell center; (b) microtubule-dependent melanosome movement appears to be damped by myosin Va; (c) intermittent, microtubule-independent, ∼0.14 μm/s melanosome movements are seen only in wild-type melanocytes; and (d) these movements do

  13. Accumulation of a Bioactive Benzoisochromanequinone Compound Kalafungin by a Wild Type Antitumor-Medermycin-Producing Streptomycete Strain

    PubMed Central

    Lü, Jin; He, Qiang; Huang, Luyao; Cai, Xiaofeng; Guo, Wenwen; He, Jing; Zhang, Lili; Li, Aiying

    2015-01-01

    Medermycin and kalafungin, two antibacterial and antitumor antibiotics isolated from different streptomycetes, share an identical polyketide skeleton core. The present study reported the discovery of kalafungin in a medermycin-producing streptomycete strain for the first time. A mutant strain obtained through UV mutagenesis showed a 3-fold increase in the production of this antibiotic, compared to the wild type strain. Heterologous expression experiments suggested that its production was severely controlled by the gene cluster for medermycin biosynthesis. In all, these findings suggested that kalafungin and medermycin could be accumulated by the same streptomycete and share their biosynthetic pathway to some extent in this strain. PMID:25695632

  14. Accumulation of a bioactive benzoisochromanequinone compound kalafungin by a wild type antitumor-medermycin-producing streptomycete strain.

    PubMed

    Lü, Jin; He, Qiang; Huang, Luyao; Cai, Xiaofeng; Guo, Wenwen; He, Jing; Zhang, Lili; Li, Aiying

    2015-01-01

    Medermycin and kalafungin, two antibacterial and antitumor antibiotics isolated from different streptomycetes, share an identical polyketide skeleton core. The present study reported the discovery of kalafungin in a medermycin-producing streptomycete strain for the first time. A mutant strain obtained through UV mutagenesis showed a 3-fold increase in the production of this antibiotic, compared to the wild type strain. Heterologous expression experiments suggested that its production was severely controlled by the gene cluster for medermycin biosynthesis. In all, these findings suggested that kalafungin and medermycin could be accumulated by the same streptomycete and share their biosynthetic pathway to some extent in this strain.

  15. Inhibitory activity of oxyresveratrol on wild-type and drug-resistant varicella-zoster virus replication in vitro.

    PubMed

    Sasivimolphan, Pattaraporn; Lipipun, Vimolmas; Likhitwitayawuid, Kittisak; Takemoto, Masaya; Pramyothin, Pornpen; Hattori, Masao; Shiraki, Kimiyasu

    2009-10-01

    The anti-herpes simplex virus (HSV) compound, oxyresveratrol, purified from a Thai traditional medicinal plant of Artocarpus lakoocha, was evaluated for its anti-varicella-zoster virus (VZV) activity. This compound exhibited IC(50) values (50%-inhibitory concentrations for virus plaque formation) of 12.82, 12.80, 12.99 and 12.82 microg/ml against wild type, thymidine kinase-deficient and two types of DNA polymerase mutants with acyclovir-resistance, respectively. Thus oxyresveratrol showed a broad spectrum of anti-VZV activity with a mechanism of action different from that of acyclovir.

  16. Strategies for achieving high-level expression of genes in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Makrides, S C

    1996-01-01

    Progress in our understanding of several biological processes promises to broaden the usefulness of Escherichia coli as a tool for gene expression. There is an expanding choice of tightly regulated prokaryotic promoters suitable for achieving high-level gene expression. New host strains facilitate the formation of disulfide bonds in the reducing environment of the cytoplasm and offer higher protein yields by minimizing proteolytic degradation. Insights into the process of protein translocation across the bacterial membranes may eventually make it possible to achieve robust secretion of specific proteins into the culture medium. Studies involving molecular chaperones have shown that in specific cases, chaperones can be very effective for improved protein folding, solubility, and membrane transport. Negative results derived from such studies are also instructive in formulating different strategies. The remarkable increase in the availability of fusion partners offers a wide range of tools for improved protein folding, solubility, protection from proteases, yield, and secretion into the culture medium, as well as for detection and purification of recombinant proteins. Codon usage is known to present a potential impediment to high-level gene expression in E. coli. Although we still do not understand all the rules governing this phenomenon, it is apparent that "rare" codons, depending on their frequency and context, can have an adverse effect on protein levels. Usually, this problem can be alleviated by modification of the relevant codons or by coexpression of the cognate tRNA genes. Finally, the elucidation of specific determinants of protein degradation, a plethora of protease-deficient host strains, and methods to stabilize proteins afford new strategies to minimize proteolytic susceptibility of recombinant proteins in E. coli. PMID:8840785

  17. Viscoelasticity in wild-type and vinculin-deficient (5.51) mouse F9 embryonic carcinoma cells examined by atomic force microscopy and rheology.

    PubMed

    Goldmann, W H; Ezzell, R M

    1996-07-10

    We have been studying mouse F9 embryonic carcinoma cells which contain no detectable vinculin protein (5.51 cells), and compared them with F9 wild-type cells. Employing atomic force microscopy, we probed the elastic properties of individual F9 wild-type and 5.51 cells by measuring the dynamic response of controlled loads of the cantilever tip. An elastic modulus (Young) of approximately 3.8 and approximately 2.5 kPa was calculated for wild-type and 5.51 cells, respectively. Using disc rheometry, we detected a marked change in shear of a 1000g pellet of approximately 55 x 10(6) cells between wild-type and 5.51 mutants. These differences are attributed to the loss of vinculin and altered cytoskeletal organization in these cells.

  18. Viscoelasticity in wild-type and vinculin-deficient (5.51) mouse F9 embryonic carcinoma cells examined by atomic force microscopy and rheology.

    PubMed

    Goldmann, W H; Ezzell, R M

    1996-07-10

    We have been studying mouse F9 embryonic carcinoma cells which contain no detectable vinculin protein (5.51 cells), and compared them with F9 wild-type cells. Employing atomic force microscopy, we probed the elastic properties of individual F9 wild-type and 5.51 cells by measuring the dynamic response of controlled loads of the cantilever tip. An elastic modulus (Young) of approximately 3.8 and approximately 2.5 kPa was calculated for wild-type and 5.51 cells, respectively. Using disc rheometry, we detected a marked change in shear of a 1000g pellet of approximately 55 x 10(6) cells between wild-type and 5.51 mutants. These differences are attributed to the loss of vinculin and altered cytoskeletal organization in these cells. PMID:8660960

  19. ALL-Based Reporting: A Brief Report. Using the "Australian Language Levels (ALL) Guidelines to Report Student Achievement."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vale, David

    1992-01-01

    Reports student achievement using the "Australian Language Levels Guidelines." Presents semester report forms for German at all Year levels and weights the three "domains" of language use: interpersonal, informational and aesthetic. (Author/CK)

  20. Role of p53β in the inhibition of proliferation of gastric cancer cells expressing wild-type or mutated p53.

    PubMed

    Ji, Wansheng; Ma, Jingrong; Zhang, Hongmei; Zhong, Hua; Li, Lei; Ding, Na; Jiao, Jianxin; Gao, Zhixing

    2015-07-01

    p53 is a tumor suppressor gene whose mutation is highly associated with tumorigenesis. The present study investigated the role of p53β in the inhibition of proliferation of gastric cancer cell lines expressing wild-type or mutated p53. Wild-type p53 is expressed in MKN45 cells, but deleted in KATOIII cells, whereas mutated p53 is expressed in SGC7901 cells. The mRNA expression levels of p53β and Δ133p53 were detected in MKN45, SGC-7901 and KATOIII gastric cancer cell lines using nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The mRNA expression levels of p53, p53β and B-cell lymphoma 2-associated X protein (Bax) were detected in the MKN45 and SGC-7901 cells following treatment with cisplatin by reverse transcription-PCR. The inhibition of cellular proliferation following treatment with cisplatin was measured by MTT assay. The results of the present study demonstrated that both p53β and Δ133p53 mRNA were expressed in the MKN45 cells, whereas only p53β mRNA was expressed in the SGC7901 cells. No expression of p53β or Δ133p53 mRNA was detected in the KATOIII cells. Following treatment with cisplatin, the number of both MKN45 and SGC-7901 cells was significantly reduced (P<0.001). In the MKN45 cells, p53β, p53 and Bax mRNA expression levels gradually increased with the dose of cisplatin, and the expression of p53β was positively correlated with the expression of p53 (tr=6.358, P<0.05) and Bax (tr=8.023, P<0.05). In the SGC-7901 cells, the expression levels of p53β, p53 and Bax mRNA did not alter with the dose of cisplatin, and the expression of p53β was positively correlated to the expression of p53 (tr=26.41, P<0.01) but not that of Bax. The present study identified the different roles of the p53β isoform in gastric cancer cells with different p53 backgrounds. Enhanced knowledge regarding the p53 status is required for the development of specific biological therapies against gastric cancer. PMID:25695150

  1. The establisment of an achievement test for determination of primary teachers' knowledge level of earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydin, Süleyman; Haşiloǧlu, M. Akif; Kunduraci, Ayşe

    2016-04-01

    In this study it was aimed to improve an academic achievement test to establish the students' knowledge about the earthquake and the ways of protection from earthquakes. In the method of this study, the steps that Webb (1994) was created to improve an academic achievement test for a unit were followed. In the developmental process of multiple choice test having 25 questions, was prepared to measure the pre-service teachers' knowledge levels about the earthquake and the ways of protection from earthquakes. The multiple choice test was presented to view of six academics (one of them was from geographic field and five of them were science educator) and two expert teachers in science Prepared test was applied to 93 pre-service teachers studying in elementary education department in 2014-2015 academic years. As a result of validity and reliability of the study, the test was composed of 20 items. As a result of these applications, Pearson Moments Multiplication half-reliability coefficient was found to be 0.94. When this value is adjusted according to Spearman Brown reliability coefficient the reliability coefficient was set at 0.97.

  2. Prognosis and management of adult wild type gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs): A pooled analysis and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, N R; Collins, D; Crotty, P; Ridgway, P F

    2016-09-01

    A pooled review was performed to determine survival in adult WT GIST (Wild Type GastroIntestinal Stromal Tumours) and compare the same with pediatric WT GISTs. Electronic databases were searched using the terms "Wild type" AND "GIST". Eighty-two adult patients from 14 studies were included in the pooled analysis. Cumulative survival was greater than 50% in both age groups, hence medial survival could not be computed. Mean survival in adults was 15.7 years ± 0.78 and in children was 18.8 years ± 1.3 (p = 0.241). Median disease free survival in adults was 10 years while 5-year overall survival was 88%. There was no statistically significant difference in the survival between the two groups (p = 0.241). Overall survival in adults with WT GISTs is favourable compared to other adult GIST subtypes likely reflects a common molecular pathway similar to pediatric GIST. PMID:27566016

  3. Combination of cetuximab and PP242 synergistically suppress the progression of wild-type KRAS colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Lei; Xia, Zuguang; Bian, Xinyu; Li, Guangchao; Hu, Jing; Cao, Ya; Wang, Qing; Qian, Xiaoping

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) has been shown to be overactive in human colorectal cancer, but the first-generation mTOR inhibitor, rapamycin, has failed to show clinical efficacy against colorectal cancer. On the other hand, although the second-generation mTOR inhibitor, PP242, has exerted substantial efficacy, it was revealed that independent inhibition by PP242 was transient, which could lead to positive-feedback loop to EGFR. Using wild-type KRAS colorectal cancer cells as models, we investigate the treatment efficacy of a widely used anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody, cetuximab, and PP242, alone or in combination in vitro and in vivo. Results of cell viability assays confirmed the synergistic inhibitory effect of PP242 and cetuximab on the survival of Caco-2 and HT-29 cells. Moreover, the ability of cancer-cell invasion and proliferation was also significantly inhibited by the combination therapy when compared with cetuximab or PP242 alone. Interestingly, the percentage of CD44-positive cancer cells was substantially decreased by the combination therapy in comparison with PP242 alone through fluorescence-activated cell sorting. The growth of cancer stem-like cell spheres in vitro was also maximally inhibited by combination therapy, in terms of either diameter or number. More importantly, the efficacy of combination therapy was more prominent than either drug alone in established tumor xenografts. These findings supported the potential use of combination therapy of PP242 and cetuximab against wild-type KRAS colorectal carcinomas.

  4. Infection patterns in barley and wheat spikes inoculated with wild-type and trichodiene synthase gene disrupted Fusarium graminearum.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Carin; von Wettstein, Diter; Schäfer, Wilhelm; Kogel, Karl-Heinz; Felk, Angelika; Maier, Frank J

    2005-11-15

    Fusarium head blight epidemics of wheat and barley cause heavy economic losses to farmers due to yield decreases and production of mycotoxin that renders the grain useless for flour and malt products. No highly resistant cultivars are available at present. Hyphae of germinating fungal spores use different paths of infection: After germination at the extruded tip of an ovary, the hyphae travel along the epicarp in the space between the lemma and palea. Infection of the developing kernel proceeds through the epicarp, successively destroying the layers of the fruit coat and finally the starch and protein accumulating endosperm. Hyphae reaching the rachis proceed to apically located developing kernels. Using a constitutively green fluorescence protein-expressing Fusarium wild-type strain, and its knockout mutant, preventing trichothecene synthesis, we demonstrate that trichothecenes are not a virulence factor during infection through the fruit coat. In the absence of trichothecenes, the fungus is blocked by the development of heavy cell wall thickenings in the rachis node of Nandu wheat, a defense inhibited by the mycotoxin. In barley hyphae of both wild-type and the trichothecene knockout mutant, are inhibited at the rachis node and rachilla, limiting infection of adjacent florets through the phloem and along the surface of the rachis. Effective resistance to Fusarium head blight requires expression of genes that combat these different pathways of infection.

  5. Lymphocyte invasion in IC10/Basal-like breast tumors is associated with wild-type TP53

    PubMed Central

    Quigley, David; Silwal-Pandit, Laxmi; Dannenfelser, Ruth; Langerød, Anita; Vollan, Hans Kristian Moen; Vaske, Charles; Siegel, Josie Ursini; Troyanskaya, Olga; Chin, Suet-Feung; Caldas, Carlos; Balmain, Allan

    2014-01-01

    Lymphocytic infiltration is associated with better prognosis in several epithelial malignancies including breast cancer. The tumor suppressor TP53 is mutated in approximately 30% of breast adenocarcinomas, with varying frequency across molecular subtypes. In this study of 1,420 breast tumors, we tested for interaction between TP53 mutation status and tumor subtype determined by PAM50 and Integrative Cluster analysis. In Integrative Cluster 10 (IC10)/Basal-like breast cancer we identify an association between lymphocytic infiltration, determined by an expression score, and retention of wild-type TP53. The expression-derived score agreed with the degree of lymphocytic infiltration assessed by pathological review, and application of the Nanodissect algorithm was suggestive of this infiltration being primarily of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). Elevated expression of this CTL signature was associated with longer survival in IC10/Basal-like tumors. These findings identify a new link between the TP53 pathway and the adaptive immune response in ER-negative breast tumors, suggesting a connection between TP53 inactivation and failure of tumor immunosurveillance. IMPLICATIONS The association of lymphocytic invasion of estrogen receptor-negative breast tumors with the retention of wild-type TP53 implies a novel protective connection between TP53 function and tumor immunosurveillance. PMID:25351767

  6. Infection patterns in barley and wheat spikes inoculated with wild-type and trichodiene synthase gene disrupted Fusarium graminearum

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, Carin; von Wettstein, Diter; Schäfer, Wilhelm; Kogel, Karl-Heinz; Felk, Angelika; Maier, Frank J.

    2005-01-01

    Fusarium head blight epidemics of wheat and barley cause heavy economic losses to farmers due to yield decreases and production of mycotoxin that renders the grain useless for flour and malt products. No highly resistant cultivars are available at present. Hyphae of germinating fungal spores use different paths of infection: After germination at the extruded tip of an ovary, the hyphae travel along the epicarp in the space between the lemma and palea. Infection of the developing kernel proceeds through the epicarp, successively destroying the layers of the fruit coat and finally the starch and protein accumulating endosperm. Hyphae reaching the rachis proceed to apically located developing kernels. Using a constitutively green fluorescence protein-expressing Fusarium wild-type strain, and its knockout mutant, preventing trichothecene synthesis, we demonstrate that trichothecenes are not a virulence factor during infection through the fruit coat. In the absence of trichothecenes, the fungus is blocked by the development of heavy cell wall thickenings in the rachis node of Nandu wheat, a defense inhibited by the mycotoxin. In barley hyphae of both wild-type and the trichothecene knockout mutant, are inhibited at the rachis node and rachilla, limiting infection of adjacent florets through the phloem and along the surface of the rachis. Effective resistance to Fusarium head blight requires expression of genes that combat these different pathways of infection. PMID:16263921

  7. Intra-host competition between nef-defective escape mutants and wild-type human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Altes, H K; Jansen, V A

    2000-01-01

    Various forms of nef genes with deletions at conserved positions along the sequence have been reported to persist in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infected patients. We investigate the forces maintaining such variants in the proviral population. The main selection pressures are preservation of function and host immune response. The crippled Nef protein might have fewer epitopes, and as such be less visible to the specific immune response, but it will lose some function. Does a trade-off between avoidance of the immune response and loss of function explain the dynamics of the crippled virus found in the patients? To answer this question, we formulated a deterministic model of the virus-host interactions. We found that when the crippled protein presents few epitopes and suffers little loss of function, the two viral types can coexist. Otherwise, the wild-type comes to prevail. The mutant form might initially dominate, but as the selective pressure by the CD84+ T cells decreases over the course of infection, the advantage for the crippled form of losing epitopes disappears. Hence, we go from a situation of coexistence of wild-type and mutant, to a situation of only full-length nef. The results are discussed in the context of the suggested use of live attenuated vaccines having deletions in nef. PMID:10687825

  8. Phylogenetic analysis of the haemagglutinin gene of current wild-type canine distemper viruses from South Africa: lineage Africa.

    PubMed

    Woma, Timothy Y; van Vuuren, Moritz; Bosman, Ana-Mari; Quan, Melvyn; Oosthuizen, Marinda

    2010-07-14

    There are no reports of CDV isolations in southern Africa, and although CDV is said to have geographically distinct lineages, molecular information of African strains has not yet been documented. Viruses isolated in cell cultures were subjected to reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and the complete H gene was sequenced and phylogenetically analysed with other strains from GenBank. Phylogenetic comparisons of the complete H gene of CDV isolates from different parts of the world (available in GenBank) with wild-type South African isolates revealed nine clades. All South African isolates form a separate African clade of their own and thus are clearly separated from the American, European, Asian, Arctic and vaccine virus clades. It is likely that only the 'African lineage' of CDV may be circulating in South Africa currently, and the viruses isolated from dogs vaccinated against CDV are not the result of reversion to virulence of vaccine strains, but infection with wild-type strains.

  9. Infection patterns in barley and wheat spikes inoculated with wild-type and trichodiene synthase gene disrupted Fusarium graminearum.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Carin; von Wettstein, Diter; Schäfer, Wilhelm; Kogel, Karl-Heinz; Felk, Angelika; Maier, Frank J

    2005-11-15

    Fusarium head blight epidemics of wheat and barley cause heavy economic losses to farmers due to yield decreases and production of mycotoxin that renders the grain useless for flour and malt products. No highly resistant cultivars are available at present. Hyphae of germinating fungal spores use different paths of infection: After germination at the extruded tip of an ovary, the hyphae travel along the epicarp in the space between the lemma and palea. Infection of the developing kernel proceeds through the epicarp, successively destroying the layers of the fruit coat and finally the starch and protein accumulating endosperm. Hyphae reaching the rachis proceed to apically located developing kernels. Using a constitutively green fluorescence protein-expressing Fusarium wild-type strain, and its knockout mutant, preventing trichothecene synthesis, we demonstrate that trichothecenes are not a virulence factor during infection through the fruit coat. In the absence of trichothecenes, the fungus is blocked by the development of heavy cell wall thickenings in the rachis node of Nandu wheat, a defense inhibited by the mycotoxin. In barley hyphae of both wild-type and the trichothecene knockout mutant, are inhibited at the rachis node and rachilla, limiting infection of adjacent florets through the phloem and along the surface of the rachis. Effective resistance to Fusarium head blight requires expression of genes that combat these different pathways of infection. PMID:16263921

  10. Utilization of Whole-Cell MALDI-TOF Mass Spectrometry to Differentiate Burkholderia pseudomallei Wild-Type and Constructed Mutants.

    PubMed

    Niyompanich, Suthamat; Srisanga, Kitima; Jaresitthikunchai, Janthima; Roytrakul, Sittiruk; Tungpradabkul, Sumalee

    2015-01-01

    Whole-cell matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (whole-cell MALDI-TOF MS) has been widely adopted as a useful technology in the identification and typing of microorganisms. This study employed the whole-cell MALDI-TOF MS to identify and differentiate wild-type and mutants containing constructed single gene mutations of Burkholderia pseudomallei, a pathogenic bacterium causing melioidosis disease in both humans and animals. Candidate biomarkers for the B. pseudomallei mutants, including rpoS, ppk, and bpsI isolates, were determined. Taxon-specific and clinical isolate-specific biomarkers of B. pseudomallei were consistently found and conserved across all average mass spectra. Cluster analysis of MALDI spectra of all isolates exhibited separate distribution. A total of twelve potential mass peaks discriminating between wild-type and mutant isolates were identified using ClinProTools analysis. Two peaks (m/z 2721 and 2748 Da) were specific for the rpoS isolate, three (m/z 3150, 3378, and 7994 Da) for ppk, and seven (m/z 3420, 3520, 3587, 3688, 4623, 4708, and 5450 Da) for bpsI. Our findings demonstrated that the rapid, accurate, and reproducible mass profiling technology could have new implications in laboratory-based rapid differentiation of extensive libraries of genetically altered bacteria. PMID:26656930

  11. An antibody raised against a pathogenic serpin variant induces mutant-like behaviour in the wild-type protein.

    PubMed

    Irving, James A; Miranda, Elena; Haq, Imran; Perez, Juan; Kotov, Vadim R; Faull, Sarah V; Motamedi-Shad, Neda; Lomas, David A

    2015-05-15

    A monoclonal antibody (mAb) that binds to a transient intermediate may act as a catalyst for the corresponding reaction; here we show this principle can extend on a macro molecular scale to the induction of mutant-like oligomerization in a wild-type protein. Using the common pathogenic E342K (Z) variant of α1-antitrypsin as antigen-whose native state is susceptible to the formation of a proto-oligomeric intermediate-we have produced a mAb (5E3) that increases the rate of oligomerization of the wild-type (M) variant. Employing ELISA, gel shift, thermal stability and FRET time-course experiments, we show that mAb5E3 does not bind to the native state of α1-antitrypsin, but recognizes a cryptic epitope in the vicinity of the post-helix A loop and strand 4C that is revealed upon transition to the polymerization intermediate, and which persists in the ensuing oligomer. This epitope is not shared by loop-inserted monomeric conformations. We show the increased amenity to polymerization by either the pathogenic E342K mutation or the binding of mAb5E3 occurs without affecting the energetic barrier to polymerization. As mAb5E3 also does not alter the relative stability of the monomer to intermediate, it acts in a manner similar to the E342K mutant, by facilitating the conformational interchange between these two states.

  12. Isolation and characterization of DNA sequences that are specifically bound by wild-type p53 protein.

    PubMed Central

    Foord, O; Navot, N; Rotter, V

    1993-01-01

    Wild-type p53 was shown to function as a transcription factor. The N-terminal region of the protein contains the transcription activation domain, while the C terminus is responsible for DNA binding. Localization of the DNA-binding domain of the p53 protein to the highly conserved carboxy-terminal region suggests that the interaction of p53 with DNA is important for its function. We have developed a strategy for studying the DNA sequence specificity of p53-DNA binding that is based on random sequence selection. We report here on the isolation of murine genomic DNA clones that are specifically bound by the wild-type p53 protein but are not bound by mutant p53 protein forms. The isolated p53 target gene contains the unique DNA-binding sequence GACACTGGTCACACTTGGCTGCTTAGGAAT. This fragment exhibits promoter activity as measured by its capacity to activate transcription of the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter gene. Our results suggest that p53 directly binds DNA and functions as a typical transcription factor. Images PMID:8441383

  13. Accelerated telomere shortening and replicative senescence in human fibroblasts overexpressing mutant and wild-type lamin A

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Shurong; Risques, Rosa Ana; Martin, George M.; Rabinovitch, Peter S.; Oshima, Junko

    2008-01-01

    LMNA mutations are responsible for a variety of genetic disorders, including muscular dystrophy, lipodystrophy, and certain progeroid syndromes, notably Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria. Although a number of clinical features of these disorders are suggestive of accelerated aging, it is not known whether cells derived from these patients exhibit cellular phenotypes associated with accelerated aging. We examined a series of isogenic skin fibroblast lines transfected with LMNA constructs bearing known pathogenic point mutations or deletion mutations found in progeroid syndromes. Fibroblasts overexpressing mutant lamin A exhibited accelerated rates of loss of telomeres and shortened replicative lifespans, in addition to abnormal nuclear morphology. To our surprise, these abnormalities were also observed in lines overexpressing wild-type lamin A. Copy number variants are common in human populations; those involving LMNA, whether arising meiotically or mitotically, might lead to progeroid phenotypes. In an initial pilot study of 23 progeroid cases without detectable WRN or LMNA mutations, however, no cases of altered LMNA copy number were detected. Nevertheless, our findings raise a hypothesis that changes in lamina organization may cause accelerated telomere attrition, with different kinetics for overexpession of wild-type and mutant lamin A, which leads to rapid replicative senescence and progroid phenotypes.

  14. Identification of enzymes and quantification of metabolic fluxes in the wild type and in a recombinant aspergillus oryzae strain

    PubMed

    Pedersen; Carlsen; Nielsen

    1999-01-01

    Two alpha-amylase-producing strains of Aspergillus oryzae, a wild-type strain and a recombinant containing additional copies of the alpha-amylase gene, were characterized with respect to enzyme activities, localization of enzymes to the mitochondria or cytosol, macromolecular composition, and metabolic fluxes through the central metabolism during glucose-limited chemostat cultivations. Citrate synthase and isocitrate dehydrogenase (NAD) activities were found only in the mitochondria, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and glutamate dehydrogenase (NADP) activities were found only in the cytosol, and isocitrate dehydrogenase (NADP), glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase, malate dehydrogenase, and glutamate dehydrogenase (NAD) activities were found in both the mitochondria and the cytosol. The measured biomass components and ash could account for 95% (wt/wt) of the biomass. The protein and RNA contents increased linearly with increasing specific growth rate, but the carbohydrate and chitin contents decreased. A metabolic model consisting of 69 fluxes and 59 intracellular metabolites was used to calculate the metabolic fluxes through the central metabolism at several specific growth rates, with ammonia or nitrate as the nitrogen source. The flux through the pentose phosphate pathway increased with increasing specific growth rate. The fluxes through the pentose phosphate pathway were 15 to 26% higher for the recombinant strain than for the wild-type strain.

  15. A recombinant measles vaccine virus expressing wild-type glycoproteins: consequences for viral spread and cell tropism.

    PubMed

    Johnston, I C; ter Meulen, V; Schneider-Schaulies, J; Schneider-Schaulies, S

    1999-08-01

    Wild-type, lymphotropic strains of measles virus (MV) and tissue culture-adapted MV vaccine strains possess different cell tropisms. This observation has led to attempts to identify the viral receptors and to characterize the functions of the MV glycoproteins. We have functionally analyzed the interactions of MV hemagglutinin (H) and fusion (F) proteins of vaccine (Edmonston) and wild-type (WTF) strains in different combinations in transfected cells. Cell-cell fusion occurs when both Edmonston F and H proteins are expressed in HeLa or Vero cells. The expression of WTF glycoproteins in HeLa cells did not result in syncytia, yet they fused efficiently with cells of lymphocytic origin. To further investigate the role of the MV glycoproteins in virus cell entry and also the role of other viral proteins in cell tropism, we generated recombinant vaccine MVs containing one or both glycoproteins from WTF. These viruses were viable and grew similarly in lymphocytic cells. Recombinant viruses expressing the WTFH protein showed a restricted spread in HeLa cells but spread efficiently in Vero cells. Parental WTF remained restricted in both cell types. Therefore, not only differential receptor usage but also other cell-specific factors are important in determining MV cell tropism. PMID:10400788

  16. Learning Strategies of Physics Teacher Candidates: Relationships with Physics Achievement and Class Level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selçuk, Gamze S.; Çalişkan, Serap; Erol, Mustafa

    2007-04-01

    Learning strategy concept was introduced in the education field from the development of cognitive psychology. Learning strategies are behaviors and thoughts that a learner engages in during learning which are intended to influence the learner's encoding process. Literature on learning strategies in physics field is very scarce. Participants of the research consist of teacher candidates (n=137) from 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th and 5th grade attending Department of Physics Education, Education Faculty of Buca, Dokuz Eylül University in Turkey. Data of this research was collected by ``Scale of Learning Strategies Usage in Physics'' (Cronbach's Alpha=0.93). Mean, Standard Deviation, Analysis of Variance were used to analyze the research data. This paper reports on teacher candidates' learning strategies used in physics education The paper investigates the relationships between learning strategies and physics achievement, class level. Some important outcomes of the research are presented, discussed and certain suggestions are made.

  17. Leveraging People-Related Maturity Issues for Achieving Higher Maturity and Capability Levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buglione, Luigi

    During the past 20 years Maturity Models (MM) become a buzzword in the ICT world. Since the initial Crosby's idea in 1979, plenty of models have been created in the Software & Systems Engineering domains, addressing various perspectives. By analyzing the content of the Process Reference Models (PRM) in many of them, it can be noticed that people-related issues have little weight in the appraisals of the capabilities of organizations while in practice they are considered as significant contributors in traditional process and organizational performance appraisals, as stressed instead in well-known Performance Management models such as MBQA, EFQM and BSC. This paper proposes some ways for leveraging people-related maturity issues merging HR practices from several types of maturity models into the organizational Business Process Model (BPM) in order to achieve higher organizational maturity and capability levels.

  18. Setting Standards for the 1998 NAEP in Civics and Writing: Using Focus Groups To Finalize the Achievement Levels Descriptions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanick, Patricia L.; Loomis, Susan Cooper

    The description of achievement levels is important to the process of reporting student performance on the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP). A process was designed to develop achievement level descriptions (ALDs) for writing and civics. To begin, focus groups were conducted in each of the four NAEP regions for both writing and…

  19. Developmental expression of wild-type and mutant presenilin-1 in hippocampal neurons from transgenic mice: evidence for novel species-specific properties of human presenilin-1.

    PubMed Central

    Lévesque, L.; Annaert, W.; Craessaerts, K.; Mathews, P. M.; Seeger, M.; Nixon, R. A.; Van Leuven, F.; Gandy, S.; Westaway, D.; St George-Hyslop, P.; De Strooper, B.; Fraser, P. E.

    1999-01-01

    Presenilins 1 (PS1) and 2 (PS2) are multispanning transmembrane proteins associated with familial Alzheimer disease (FAD). They are developmentally regulated, being expressed at highest levels during neuronal differentiation and are sustained at a lower level throughout life. We investigated the distribution and metabolism of endogenous murine PS1 as well as human wild-type (wtPS1) and the familial AD Met146Leu (M146L) mutant presenilins in dissociated cultures of hippocampal neurons derived from control and transgenic mice. We found that the PS1 endoproteolytic fragments and, to a lesser extent, the full-length protein, were expressed as early as day 3 post-plating. Both species increased until the cells were fully differentiated at day 12. Confocal microscopy revealed that presenilin is present in the Golgi and endoplasmic reticulum and, as in punctate, vesicle-like structures within developing neurites and growth cones. Using a human-specific PS1 antibody, we were able to independently examine the distribution of the transgenic protein which, although similar to the endogenous, showed some unique qualities. These included (i) some heterogeneity in the proteolytic fragments of human PS1; (ii) significantly reduced levels of full-length human PS1, possibly as a result of preferential processing; and (iii) a more discrete intracellular distribution of human PS1. Colocalization with organelle-specific proteins revealed that PS1 was located in a diffuse staining pattern in the MAP2-positive dendrites and in a punctate manner in GAP43-positive axons. PS1 showed considerable overlap with GAP43, particularly at the growth cones. Similar patterns of PS1 distribution were detected in cultures derived from transgenic animals expressing human wild-type or mutant presenilins. The studies demonstrate that mutant presenilins are not grossly different in their processing or distribution within cultured neurons, which may represent more physiological models as compared to

  20. Metabolism of the EGFR tyrosin kinase inhibitor gefitinib by cytochrome P450 1A1 enzyme in EGFR-wild type non small cell lung cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Gefitinib is a tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) especially effective in tumors with activating EGFR gene mutations while EGFR wild-type non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients at present do not benefit from this treatment. The primary site of gefitinib metabolism is the liver, nevertheless tumor cell metabolism can significantly affect treatment effectiveness. Results In this study, we investigated the intracellular metabolism of gefitinib in a panel of EGFR wild-type gefitinib-sensitive and -resistant NSCLC cell lines, assessing the role of cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1) inhibition on gefitinib efficacy. Our results indicate that there is a significant difference in drug metabolism between gefitinib-sensitive and -resistant cell lines. Unexpectedly, only sensitive cells metabolized gefitinib, producing metabolites which were detected both inside and outside the cells. As a consequence of gefitinib metabolism, the intracellular level of gefitinib was markedly reduced after 12-24 h of treatment. Consistent with this observation, RT-PCR analysis and EROD assay showed that mRNA and activity of CYP1A1 were present at significant levels and were induced by gefitinib only in sensitive cells. Gefitinib metabolism was elevated in crowded cells, stimulated by exposure to cigarette smoke extract and prevented by hypoxic condition. It is worth noting that the metabolism of gefitinib in the sensitive cells is a consequence and not the cause of drug responsiveness, indeed treatment with a CYP1A1 inhibitor increased the efficacy of the drug because it prevented the fall in intracellular gefitinib level and significantly enhanced the inhibition of EGFR autophosphorylation, MAPK and PI3K/AKT/mTOR signalling pathways and cell proliferation. Conclusion Our findings suggest that gefitinib metabolism in lung cancer cells, elicited by CYP1A1 activity, might represent an early assessment of gefitinib responsiveness in NSCLC

  1. Expression pattern of matrix metalloproteinase and TIMP genes in fibroblasts derived from Ets-1 knock-out mice compared to wild-type mouse fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Hahne, Jens Claus; Fuchs, Tanja; El Mustapha, Haddouti; Okuducu, Ali Fuat; Bories, Jean Christophe; Wernert, Nicolas

    2006-07-01

    Matrix-degrading proteases play a key role in normal development, wound healing, many diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and, in particular, tumour invasion. In invasive tumours, these enzymes are expressed by fibroblasts of the tumour stroma. Their expression and activity are tightly regulated at several levels, an important one being transcription. Previous in vitro and in vivo findings pointed to a major role of the Ets-1 transcription factor for this level of regulation. In the present study, we tried to prove this role in fibroblasts. We stimulated wild-type mouse fibroblasts with physiological doses of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF, known to induce different proteases and expressed by tumour cells) and compared the results to those obtained in Ets-1 -/- fibroblasts derived from Ets-1 knock-out mice. We found that basal Ets-1 levels are necessary not only for a fast induction of MMPs 2, 3 and 13 by bFGF but also for maintenance of the bFGF-induced expression of tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) 1, 2 and 3, which are known not only to inhibit but also participate as activators of certain pro-MMPs.

  2. Characterization of global yeast quantitative proteome data generated from the wild-type and glucose repression Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains: the comparison of two quantitative methods

    PubMed Central

    Usaite, Renata; Wohlschlegel, James; Venable, John D.; Park, Sung K.; Nielsen, Jens; Olsson, Lisbeth; Yates, John R.

    2008-01-01

    The quantitative proteomic analysis of complex protein mixtures is emerging as a technically challenging but viable systems-level approach for studying cellular function. This study presents a large-scale comparative analysis of protein abundances from yeast protein lysates derived from both wild-type yeast and yeast strains lacking key components of the Snf1 kinase complex. Four different strains were grown under well-controlled chemostat conditions. Multidimensional protein identification technology followed by quantitation using either spectral counting or stable isotope labeling approaches was used to identify relative changes in the protein expression levels between the strains. A total of 2388 proteins were relatively quantified and more than 350 proteins were found to have significantly different expression levels between the two strains of comparison when using the stable isotope labeling strategy. The stable isotope labeling based quantitative approach was found to be highly reproducible among biological replicates when complex protein mixtures containing small expression changes were analyzed. Where poor correlation between stable isotope labeling and spectral counting was found, the major reason behind the discrepancy was the lack of reproducible sampling for proteins with low spectral counts. The functional categorization of the relative protein expression differences that occur in Snf1-deficient strains uncovers a wide range of biological processes regulated by this important cellular kinase. PMID:18173223

  3. A comparative study on the role of cytokinins in caryopsis development in the maize miniature1 seed mutant and its wild type.

    PubMed

    Rijavec, Tomaz; Kovac, Maja; Kladnik, Ales; Chourey, Prem S; Dermastia, Marina

    2009-09-01

    We report here on a comparative developmental profile of plant hormone cytokinins in relation to cell size, cell number and endoreduplication in developing maize caryopsis of a cell wall invertase-deficient miniature1 (mn1) seed mutant and its wild type, Mn1, genotype. Both genotypes showed extremely high levels of total cytokinins during the very early stages of development, followed by a marked and genotype specific reduction. While the decrease of cytokinins in Mn1 was associated with their deactivation by 9-glucosylation, the absolute and the relative part of active cytokinin forms was higher in the mutant. During the exponential growth phase of endosperm between 6 d after pollination and 9 d after pollination, the mean cell doubling time, the absolute growth rate and the level of endoreduplication were similar in the two genotypes. However, the entire duration of growth was longer in Mn1 compared with mn1, resulting in a significantly higher cell number in the Mn1 endosperm. These data correlate with the previously reported peak levels of the Mn1-encoded cell wall invertase-2 (INCW2) at 12 d after pollination in the Mn1 endosperm. A model showing possible crosstalk among cytokinins, cell cycle and cell wall invertase as causal to increased cell number and sink strength of the Mn1 developing endosperm is discussed. PMID:19723243

  4. Differential regulation of insulin-like growth factor-I receptor gene expression by wild type and mutant androgen receptor in prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Schayek, Hagit; Seti, Hila; Greenberg, Norman M; Sun, Shihua; Werner, Haim; Plymate, Stephen R

    2010-07-29

    The progression of prostate cancer from an organ-confined, androgen-sensitive disease to a metastatic one is associated with dysregulation of androgen receptor (AR)-regulated target genes and with a decrease in insulin-like growth factor-I receptor (IGF-IR) expression. To investigate the differential effects of wild type (wt) and mutant AR on IGF-IR levels we employed a series of isogenic prostate-derived cell lines and human xenografts. We show that basal and phosphorylated IGF-IR levels progressively decreased as prostate cancer cells became more tumorigenic and metastatic. In addition, we show that wt, but not mutant, AR along with dihydrotestosterone treatment increased IGF-IR promoter activity and endogenous IGF-IR levels. ChIP analysis show enhanced AR binding to the IGF-IR promoter in AR-overexpressing cells. Finally, wt AR-overexpressing cells display an enhanced proliferation rate. In summary, we provide evidence that activated wt AR enhances IGF-IR transcription in prostate cancer cells via a mechanism that involves AR binding to the IGF-IR promoter. AR mutations alter the ability of the mutated protein to regulate IGF-IR expression. Our results suggest that prostate cancer progression is associated with a decrease in IGF-IR expression that could be the result of impaired ability of AR to stimulate IGF-IR gene expression. PMID:20417685

  5. Gender, level of participation, and type of sport: differences in achievement goal orientation and attributional style.

    PubMed

    Hanrahan, Stephanie J; Cerin, Ester

    2009-07-01

    Findings regarding gender differences in achievement goal orientations and attributional style have been somewhat inconsistent. One possible explanation for varied findings is that potentially confounding variables such as level of participation and type of sport have not been considered. Athletes (108 males and 164 females) from team and individual sports, competing at recreational and competitive levels, completed the Task and Ego Orientation in Sport Questionnaire, the Sport Attributional Style Scale, and a demographic questionnaire. Athletes competing in individual sports had a higher ego orientation than those from team sports, and females scored higher in task orientation than males. Individual sport athletes made more internal, stable, and global, and less externally controllable attributions for positive events, and more internal attributions for negative events than team sport athletes. Competitive female athletes made less global attributions for positive events than did recreational female athletes. This difference was not observed in male athletes. Competitive individual, but not team, athletes made less global attributions than recreational individual athletes. The significant interactions regarding globality suggest that the tradition in sport psychology attribution research to focus solely on internality, stability, and controllability may be inadequate. From an applied perspective, sport psychologists and coaches may find it beneficial to target individual sport athletes and males for interventions designed to enhance task orientation. Similarly, team sport athletes may be appropriate as a focus for attribution retraining programs.

  6. Enhanced specificity of TPMT*2 genotyping using unidirectional wild-type and mutant allele-specific scorpion primers in a single tube.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dong; Yang, Zhao; Xia, Han; Huang, Jun-Fu; Zhang, Yang; Jiang, Tian-Nun; Wang, Gui-Yu; Chuai, Zheng-Ran; Fu, Wei-Ling; Huang, Qing

    2014-01-01

    Genotyping of thiopurine S-methyltransferase (TPMT) is recommended for predicting the adverse drug response of thiopurines. In the current study, a novel version of allele-specific PCR (AS-PCR), termed competitive real-time fluorescent AS-PCR (CRAS-PCR) was developed to analyze the TPMT*2 genotype in ethnic Chinese. This technique simultaneously uses wild-type and mutant allele-specific scorpion primers in a single reaction. To determine the optimal conditions for both traditional AS-PCR and CRAS-PCR, we used the Taguchi method, an engineering optimization process that balances the concentrations of all components using an orthogonal array rather than a factorial array. Instead of running up to 264 experiments with the conventional factorial method, the Taguchi method achieved the same optimization using only 16 experiments. The optimized CRAS-PCR system completely avoided non-specific amplification occurring in traditional AS-PCR and could be performed at much more relaxed reaction conditions at 1% sensitivity, similar to traditional AS-PCR. TPMT*2 genotyping of 240 clinical samples was consistent with published data. In conclusion, CRAS-PCR is a novel and robust genotyping method, and the Taguchi method is an effective tool for the optimization of molecular analysis techniques. PMID:24705376

  7. Enhanced Specificity of TPMT*2 Genotyping Using Unidirectional Wild-Type and Mutant Allele-Specific Scorpion Primers in a Single Tube

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Dong; Yang, Zhao; Xia, Han; Huang, Jun-Fu; Zhang, Yang; Jiang, Tian-Nun; Wang, Gui-Yu; Chuai, Zheng-Ran; Fu, Wei-Ling; Huang, Qing

    2014-01-01

    Genotyping of thiopurine S-methyltransferase (TPMT) is recommended for predicting the adverse drug response of thiopurines. In the current study, a novel version of allele-specific PCR (AS-PCR), termed competitive real-time fluorescent AS-PCR (CRAS-PCR) was developed to analyze the TPMT*2 genotype in ethnic Chinese. This technique simultaneously uses wild-type and mutant allele-specific scorpion primers in a single reaction. To determine the optimal conditions for both traditional AS-PCR and CRAS-PCR, we used the Taguchi method, an engineering optimization process that balances the concentrations of all components using an orthogonal array rather than a factorial array. Instead of running up to 264 experiments with the conventional factorial method, the Taguchi method achieved the same optimization using only 16 experiments. The optimized CRAS-PCR system completely avoided non-specific amplification occurring in traditional AS-PCR and could be performed at much more relaxed reaction conditions at 1% sensitivity, similar to traditional AS-PCR. TPMT*2 genotyping of 240 clinical samples was consistent with published data. In conclusion, CRAS-PCR is a novel and robust genotyping method, and the Taguchi method is an effective tool for the optimization of molecular analysis techniques. PMID:24705376

  8. Efficient mannitol production by wild-type Lactobacillus reuteri CRL 1101 is attained at constant pH using a simplified culture medium.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Maria Eugenia; Raya, Raúl R; Mozzi, Fernanda

    2015-10-01

    Mannitol is a natural polyol with multiple industrial applications. In this work, mannitol production by Lactobacillus reuteri CRL 1101 was studied at free- and controlled-pH (6.0-4.8) fermentations using a simplified culture medium containing yeast and beef extracts and sugarcane molasses. The activity of mannitol 2-dehydrogenase (MDH), the enzyme responsible for mannitol synthesis, was determined. The effect of the initial biomass concentration was further studied. Mannitol production (41.5 ± 1.1 g/l), volumetric productivity (Q Mtl 1.73 ± 0.05 g/l h), and yield (Y Mtl 105 ± 11 %) were maximum at pH 5.0 after 24 h while the highest MDH activity (1.66 ± 0.09 U/mg protein) was obtained at pH 6.0. No correlation between mannitol production and MDH activity was observed when varying the culture pH. The increase (up to 2000-fold) in the initial biomass concentration did not improve mannitol formation after 24 h although a 2-fold higher amount was produced at 8 h using 1 or 2 g cell dry weight/l comparing to the control (0.001 g cell dry weight/l). Finally, mannitol isolation under optimum fermentation conditions was achieved. The mannitol production obtained in this study is the highest reported so far by a wild-type L. reuteri strain and, more interestingly, using a simplified culture medium.

  9. State-level variations in income-related inequality in health and health achievement in the US.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ke Tom

    2006-07-01

    The objective of this study was to examine state-level variations in income-related inequality in health and overall health achievement in the US. Data that were representative of the US and each state in 2001 were extracted from the Current Population Survey 2001. Income-related inequality in health and health achievement were measured by Health Concentration and Health Achievement Indices, respectively. Significant variations were found across states in income-related inequality in health and health achievement. In particular, states in the south and east regions, on average, experienced a higher degree of health inequality and lower health achievement. About 80% of the state-level variation in health achievement could be explained by demographics, economic structure and performance, and state and local government spending and burden. In contrast, medical care resource indicators were not found to contribute to health achievement in states. States with better health achievement were more urbanized, had lower proportions of minority groups, females and the elderly, fewer individuals below the poverty line, larger primary industry, and lower unemployment rates. Also, per capita state and local government spending, particularly the proportion spent on public health, was positively associated with better health achievement. Because of the direct implications of health level and distribution in resource allocation and social norms, states with a lower level of health achievement need to prioritize efforts in increasing and reallocating resources to diminish health inequality and to improve population health.

  10. Achievement motivation level in students of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences and its influential factors

    PubMed Central

    KAVOUSIPOUR, SOMAYEH; NOORAFSHAN, ALI; POURAHMAD, SAEEDEH; DEHGHANI-NAZHVANI, ALI

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Many studies have investigated the relationship between motivation and educational outcomes. The present study was conducted to determine whether the students’ motivation in Shiraz University of Medical Sciences (SUMS) decreases during educational years. Methods: 770 students in SUMS were selected by multi-stage stratified random sampling from each field and entrance year. The first questionnaire contained 57 questions on the effect of economic, social, educational, geographical and personality factors on the students’ motivation. The second one was based on 50 incomplete sentences. The validity and reliability of these questionnaires were approved by the experts and Cronbach's Alpha coefficients (85% and 90%, respectively). In this cross-sectional study, ANOVA, t-test and Chi-square tests were applied for data analysis at the 0.05 significance level. Results: Six factors with the most effect on academic motivation were "family attitudes", "getting good jobs in future", "respect for themselves", " the ability to learn", "believing their role in victory and defeat" and "the tendency toward optimism about themselves". In addition, comparing professional doctorate and basic sciences’ results revealed no significant relationship between academic motivation and educational years (F=0.819, p=0.397). But comparing field by field showed that Dentistry and Hospital Management and Medical Information (HMMI) had a significant decrease in motivation score by increase in educational years (F=3.991, p=0.015). Conclusion: Achievement motivation level in SUMS students was higher than average and did not decrease during educational years. Also, the results showed that personal, social and educational related factors affected motivation level more than economic and environmental factors. PMID:25587552

  11. Achieving Population-Level Immunity to Rabies in Free-Roaming Dogs in Africa and Asia

    PubMed Central

    Morters, Michelle K.; McKinley, Trevelyan J.; Horton, Daniel L.; Cleaveland, Sarah; Schoeman, Johan P.; Restif, Olivier; Whay, Helen R.; Goddard, Amelia; Fooks, Anthony R.; Damriyasa, I. Made; Wood, James L. N.

    2014-01-01

    Canine rabies can be effectively controlled by vaccination with readily available, high-quality vaccines. These vaccines should provide protection from challenge in healthy dogs, for the claimed period, for duration of immunity, which is often two or three years. It has been suggested that, in free-roaming dog populations where rabies is endemic, vaccine-induced protection may be compromised by immuno-suppression through malnutrition, infection and other stressors. This may reduce the proportion of dogs that seroconvert to the vaccine during vaccination campaigns and the duration of immunity of those dogs that seroconvert. Vaccination coverage may also be limited through insufficient vaccine delivery during vaccination campaigns and the loss of vaccinated individuals from populations through demographic processes. This is the first longitudinal study to evaluate temporal variations in rabies vaccine-induced serological responses, and factors associated with these variations, at the individual level in previously unvaccinated free-roaming dog populations. Individual-level serological and health-based data were collected from three cohorts of dogs in regions where rabies is endemic, one in South Africa and two in Indonesia. We found that the vast majority of dogs seroconverted to the vaccine; however, there was considerable variation in titres, partly attributable to illness and lactation at the time of vaccination. Furthermore, >70% of the dogs were vaccinated through community engagement and door-to-door vaccine delivery, even in Indonesia where the majority of the dogs needed to be caught by net on successive occasions for repeat blood sampling and vaccination. This demonstrates the feasibility of achieving population-level immunity in free-roaming dog populations in rabies-endemic regions. However, attrition of immune individuals through demographic processes and waning immunity necessitates repeat vaccination of populations within at least two years to ensure

  12. Does High School Facility Quality Affect Student Achievement? A Two-Level Hierarchical Linear Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowers, Alex J.; Urick, Angela

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to isolate the independent effects of high school facility quality on student achievement using a large, nationally representative U.S. database of student achievement and school facility quality. Prior research on linking school facility quality to student achievement has been mixed. Studies that relate overall…

  13. First-line cetuximab-based chemotherapies for patients with advanced or metastatic KRAS wild-type colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Uemura, Mamoru; Kim, Ho Min; Hata, Tsuyoshi; Sakata, Kazuya; Okuyama, Masaki; Takemoto, Hiroyoshi; Fujii, Hitoshi; Fukuzaki, Takayuki; Morita, Tetsushi; Hata, Taishi; Takemasa, Ichiro; Satoh, Taroh; Mizushima, Tsunekazu; Doki, Yuichiro; Mori, Maski

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most commonly occurring cancers worldwide. A burgeoning number of studies have demonstrated that the addition of cetuximab to another standard first-line regimen markedly improves the outcome of CRC treatment. However, at present, the efficacy and safety of cetuximab-based combination chemotherapy has not been well described in Japan. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of first-line chemotherapies that included cetuximab for patients with advanced or metastatic Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS) wild-type CRC in Japan. This prospective multicenter observational study was conducted at 13 affiliated medical institutions. A total of 64 patients were enrolled between 2010 and 2013. The patients met the following criteria for eligibility: i) histologically confirmed, advanced or metastatic KRAS wild-type CRC; and ii) cetuximab-based chemotherapies administered as a first-line treatment. First-line cetuximab-based treatments were administered as follows: 29 patients (45.3%) received a combination of infusional fluorouracil, leucovorin and oxaliplatin; 14 patients (21.9%) received a combination of capecitabine and oxaliplatin; and 10 patients (15.6%) received a combination of infusional fluorouracil, leucovorin and irinotecan. The overall response rate (including complete plus partial responses) was 50% (32/64 patients). Initially, 48 lesions were diagnosed as unresectable. Among those, 13 lesions (27.1%) were converted to a resectable status following cetuximab-based combination chemotherapy treatments. The median overall survival time and the progression-free survival time were 1,189 and 359 days, respectively. The most frequent grade 3/4 adverse event was neutropenia, which occurred in 20.3% of the patients. The incidence of grade 3/4 skin toxicity was 17.2% (11/64 patients). Cetuximab-based therapies may represent a promising first-line regimen for patients with advanced or

  14. Comparative Proteomic Analysis of Streptomyces lividans Wild-Type and ppk Mutant Strains Reveals the Importance of Storage Lipids for Antibiotic Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Le Maréchal, Pierre; Decottignies, Paulette; Marchand, Christophe H.; Degrouard, Jeril; Jaillard, Danièle; Dulermo, Thierry; Froissard, Marine; Smirnov, Aleksey; Chapuis, Violaine

    2013-01-01

    Streptomyces lividans TK24 is a strain that naturally produces antibiotics at low levels, but dramatic overproduction of antibiotics occurs upon interruption of the ppk gene. However, the role of the Ppk enzyme in relation to the regulation of antibiotic biosynthesis remains poorly understood. In order to gain a better understanding of the phenotype of the ppk mutant, the proteomes of the wild-type (wt) and ppk mutant strains, grown for 96 h on R2YE medium limited in phosphate, were analyzed. Intracellular proteins were separated on two-dimensional (2D) gels, spots were quantified, and those showing a 3-fold variation or more were identified by mass spectrometry. The expression of 12 proteins increased and that of 29 decreased in the ppk mutant strain. Our results suggested that storage lipid degradation rather than hexose catabolism was taking place in the mutant. In order to validate this hypothesis, the triacylglycerol contents of the wt and ppk mutant strains of S. lividans as well as that of Streptomyces coelicolor M145, a strain that produces antibiotics at high levels and is closely related to S. lividans, were assessed using electron microscopy and thin-layer chromatography. These studies highlighted the large difference in triacylglycerol contents of the three strains and confirmed the hypothetical link between storage lipid metabolism and antibiotic biosynthesis in Streptomyces. PMID:23872561

  15. Comparative proteomic analysis of Streptomyces lividans Wild-Type and ppk mutant strains reveals the importance of storage lipids for antibiotic biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Le Maréchal, Pierre; Decottignies, Paulette; Marchand, Christophe H; Degrouard, Jeril; Jaillard, Danièle; Dulermo, Thierry; Froissard, Marine; Smirnov, Aleksey; Chapuis, Violaine; Virolle, Marie-Joelle

    2013-10-01

    Streptomyces lividans TK24 is a strain that naturally produces antibiotics at low levels, but dramatic overproduction of antibiotics occurs upon interruption of the ppk gene. However, the role of the Ppk enzyme in relation to the regulation of antibiotic biosynthesis remains poorly understood. In order to gain a better understanding of the phenotype of the ppk mutant, the proteomes of the wild-type (wt) and ppk mutant strains, grown for 96 h on R2YE medium limited in phosphate, were analyzed. Intracellular proteins were separated on two-dimensional (2D) gels, spots were quantified, and those showing a 3-fold variation or more were identified by mass spectrometry. The expression of 12 proteins increased and that of 29 decreased in the ppk mutant strain. Our results suggested that storage lipid degradation rather than hexose catabolism was taking place in the mutant. In order to validate this hypothesis, the triacylglycerol contents of the wt and ppk mutant strains of S. lividans as well as that of Streptomyces coelicolor M145, a strain that produces antibiotics at high levels and is closely related to S. lividans, were assessed using electron microscopy and thin-layer chromatography. These studies highlighted the large difference in triacylglycerol contents of the three strains and confirmed the hypothetical link between storage lipid metabolism and antibiotic biosynthesis in Streptomyces.

  16. Gender differences between hypocretin/orexin knockout and wild type mice: age, body weight, body composition, metabolic markers, leptin and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Ramanathan, Lalini; Siegel, Jerome M

    2014-12-01

    Female hypocretin knockout (Hcrt KO) mice have increased body weight despite decreased food intake compared to wild type (WT) mice. In order to understand the nature of the increased body weight, we carried out a detailed study of Hcrt KO and WT, male, and female mice. Female KO mice showed consistently higher body weight than WT mice, from 4 to 20 months (20-60%). Fat, muscle, and free fluid levels were all significantly higher in adult (7-9 months) as well as old (18-20 months) female KO mice compared to age-matched WT mice. Old male KO mice showed significantly higher fat content (150%) compared to age-matched WT mice, but no significant change in body weight. Respiratory quotient (-19%) and metabolic rates (-14%) were significantly lower in KO mice compared to WT mice, regardless of gender or age. Female KO mice had significantly higher serum leptin levels (191%) than WT mice at 18-20 months, but no difference between male mice were observed. Conversely, insulin resistance was significantly higher in both male (73%) and female (93%) KO mice compared to age- and sex-matched WT mice. We conclude that absence of the Hcrt peptide has gender-specific effects. In contrast, Hcrt-ataxin mice and human narcoleptics, with loss of the whole Hcrt cell, show weight gain in both sexes.

  17. Limited In Vivo Production of Type I or Type III Interferon After Infection of Macaques with Vaccine or Wild-Type Strains of Measles Virus

    PubMed Central

    Shivakoti, Rupak; Hauer, Debra; Adams, Robert J.; Lin, Wen-Hsuan W.; Duprex, William Paul; de Swart, Rik L.

    2015-01-01

    The innate immune response to viral infections often includes induction of types I and III interferons (IFNs) and production of antiviral proteins. Measles is a severe virus-induced rash disease, but in vitro studies suggest that in the absence of defective interfering RNAs, neither wild-type (WT) nor vaccine strains of measles virus (MeV) induce IFN. To determine whether IFN is produced in vivo, we studied tissues from macaques infected with vaccine or WT strains of MeV using quantitative reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction to assess levels of IFN and IFN-stimulated gene (ISG) mRNAs and a flow cytometry-based bioassay to assess levels of biologically active IFN. There was little to no induction of type I IFN, type III IFN, Mx, or ISG56 mRNAs in monkeys infected with vaccine or WT MeV and no IFN detection by bioassay. Therefore, the innate responses to infection with vaccine or WT strains of MeV are not dependent on IFN production. PMID:25517681

  18. Transcription Analysis of the Beta-Glucosidase Precursor in Wild-Type and l-4i Mutant Bombyx mori (Lepidoptera: Bombycidae).

    PubMed

    Kang, Lequn; Huang, Fei; Wu, Fan; Zhao, Qiaoling

    2015-01-01

    Lethal fourth-instar larvae (l-4i) mutant of Bombyx mori, a recently discovered novel mutant, die from energy depletion due to genetic mutation. Beta-glucosidase is a common digestive enzyme that hydrolyzes cellulose in the diet to provide energy. In this study, the mRNA expression profiles of B. mori beta-glucosidase precursor (BmpreBG) were characterized by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The transcription level of BmpreBG varied in different tissues and developmental stages, except in the pupa and moth, which are the no-diet period. Remarkably, the mRNA expression level of BmpreBG was sharply reduced in l-4i but not in the wild type, which suggested that the digestive function of the mutant was severely damaged. This was consistent with the l-4i phenotypic traits of not eating mulberries, lack of energy, and ultimate death. 5'-rapid amplification of cDNA ends showed, for the first time, that BmpreBG has a 160-bp 5'-untranslated region. These findings suggested that B. mori β-glucosidase precursor was involved in the death process of l-4i mutant larvae.

  19. Comparisons of numerical magnitudes in children with different levels of mathematical achievement. An ERP study.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Velázquez, Fabiola Reveca; Berumen, Gustavo; González-Garrido, Andrés Antonio

    2015-11-19

    The ability to map between non-symbolic and symbolic magnitude representations is crucial in the development of mathematics and this map is disturbed in children with math difficulties. In addition, positive parietal ERPs have been found to be sensitive to the number distance effect and skills solving arithmetic problems. Therefore we aimed to contrast the behavioral and ERP responses in children with different levels of mathematical achievement: low (LA), average (AA) and high (HA), while comparing symbolic and non-symbolic magnitudes. The results showed that LA children repeatedly failed when comparing magnitudes, particularly the symbolic ones. In addition, a positive correlation between correct responses while analyzing symbolic quantities and WRAT-4 scores emerged. The amplitude of N200 was significantly larger during non-symbolic comparisons. In addition, P2P amplitude was consistently smaller in LA children while comparing both symbolic and non-symbolic quantities, and correlated positively with the WRAT-4 scores. The latency of P3 seemed to be sensitive to the type of numerical comparison. The results suggest that math difficulties might be related to a more general magnitude representation problem, and that ERP are useful to study its timecourse in children with different mathematical skills.

  20. [Construction of the new Escherichia coli K-12 wild-type strain with improved growth characteristics for application in metabolic engineering].

    PubMed

    Biriukova, I V; Krylov, A A; Kiseleva, E M; Minaeva, N I; Mashko, S V

    2010-03-01

    MG1655 of Escherichia coli K-12 is frequently used in metabolic engineering as the wild-type strain. However, its two mutations, ilvG and rph-1 provide a negative effect on culture growth. The "polar effect" of rph-1 decreases the level of pyrE expression, causing partial auxotrophy for pyrimidines. Mutation ilvG leading to the appearance of Val(S) phenotype causes retardation of cell growth rate on media containing amino acids. In this work, the substitution of two loci in the genome of MG1655 with the recovery of the wild-type phenotype was accomplished. Gene rph(wt) from the chromosome of E. coli TG1 was marked via Red-dependent integration of DNA fragment carrying lambda attL-Cm(R)-lambda attR and transduced with phage P1 into MG1655; later, the Cm(R) marker was removed with the use of lambda Xis/Int recombinase. Parallel to this procedure, a spontaneous Val(R) mutant of E. coli MG1655 yielding colonies of maximal size on M9 medium with glucose in the presence of Val (50 microg/ml) was isolated. It was shown that a nucleotide deletion in the isolated Val(R) strain had been generated in the region of the identified E. coli K-12 ilvG mutation, which led to the recovery of the reading frame and active protein synthesis. This mutation named ilvG-15, which is the only reason for the Val(R) phenotype in the obtained strain, was transferred to MG1655-rph(wt) using cotransduction, by analogy to the transfer of rph(wt). Evaluation of rates of aerobically growing cells (microm, hour(-1)) on M9 medium with glucose produced the following values: 0.56, 0.69, and 0.73 for strains MG1655, MG1655-rph(wt), and MG1655-(rph(wt), ilvG-15), respectively.

  1. Structure of wild-type yeast RNA polymerase II and location of Rpb4 and Rpb7.

    PubMed

    Jensen, G J; Meredith, G; Bushnell, D A; Kornberg, R D

    1998-04-15

    The three-dimensional structure of wild-type yeast RNA polymerase II has been determined at a nominal resolution of 24 A. A difference map between this structure and that of the polymerase lacking subunits Rpb4 and Rpb7 showed these two subunits forming part of the floor of the DNA-binding (active center) cleft, and revealed a slight inward movement of the protein domain surrounding the cleft. Surface plasmon resonance measurements showed that Rpb4 and Rpb7 stabilize a minimal pre-initiation complex containing promoter DNA, TATA box-binding protein (TBP), transcription factor TFIIB and the polymerase. These findings suggest that Rpb4 and Rpb7 play a role in coupling the entry of DNA into the active center cleft to closure of the cleft. Such a role can explain why these subunits are necessary for promoter-specific transcription in vitro and for a normal stress response in vivo.

  2. Comparison of fluorescence properties of wild type and the W15F mutant of horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eftink, Maurice R.; Wong, Cing-Yuen; Park, Doo-Hong; Shearer, Gretchen L.; Plapp, Bryce V.

    1994-08-01

    Horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase is a homodimeric protein; each subunit has two tryptophan residues that are in distinctly different microenvironments. Trp-15 is located on the surface and Trp-314 is buried at the intersubunit interface. Steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence and phosphorescence studies have enabled the assignment of parameters, e.g., quantum yield, emission maximum, decay times, to the individual tryptophan residues of the protein. We have prepared, by site-directed mutagenesis, the mutated W15F protein and have characterized its fluorescence properties. We show that the Trp-314 of the mutant experiences an apolar microenvironment, but that the fluorescence decay and exposure to solute quenchers of the mutant are somewhat different than was expected from the assignments for the wild type.

  3. A comparison of nucleotide sequences of measles virus L genes derived from wild-type viruses and SSPE brain tissues.

    PubMed

    Komase, K; Rima, B K; Pardowitz, I; Kunz, C; Billeter, M A; ter Meulen, V; Baczko, K

    1995-04-20

    The nucleotide sequences of the large protein (L) gene derived from two wild-type measles viruses (MV) and two SSPE brain-derived viruses have been determined. All sequences have single large open reading frames encoding 2183 amino acid residues. The deduced L proteins are well conserved and the proposed functional domains which have been identified for rhabdo- and paramyxoviruses are completely conserved in all strains. The degree of variability of L proteins is the lowest of all structural proteins of MV, reflecting its role in virus reproduction and persistence. Biased hypermutation was not observed in the L genes derived from SSPE brain tissue. None of the nucleotide changes can be associated with the attenuated phenotype of the Edmonston vaccine viruses. PMID:7747453

  4. High-throughput functional screening of steroid substrates with wild-type and chimeric P450 enzymes.

    PubMed

    Urban, Philippe; Truan, Gilles; Pompon, Denis

    2014-01-01

    The promiscuity of a collection of enzymes consisting of 31 wild-type and synthetic variants of CYP1A enzymes was evaluated using a series of 14 steroids and 2 steroid-like chemicals, namely, nootkatone, a terpenoid, and mifepristone, a drug. For each enzyme-substrate couple, the initial steady-state velocity of metabolite formation was determined at a substrate saturating concentration. For that, a high-throughput approach was designed involving automatized incubations in 96-well microplate with sixteen 6-point kinetics per microplate and data acquisition using LC/MS system accepting 96-well microplate for injections. The resulting dataset was used for multivariate statistics aimed at sorting out the correlations existing between tested enzyme variants and ability to metabolize steroid substrates. Functional classifications of both CYP1A enzyme variants and steroid substrate structures were obtained allowing the delineation of global structural features for both substrate recognition and regioselectivity of oxidation. PMID:25243177

  5. High-Throughput Functional Screening of Steroid Substrates with Wild-Type and Chimeric P450 Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Truan, Gilles; Pompon, Denis

    2014-01-01

    The promiscuity of a collection of enzymes consisting of 31 wild-type and synthetic variants of CYP1A enzymes was evaluated using a series of 14 steroids and 2 steroid-like chemicals, namely, nootkatone, a terpenoid, and mifepristone, a drug. For each enzyme-substrate couple, the initial steady-state velocity of metabolite formation was determined at a substrate saturating concentration. For that, a high-throughput approach was designed involving automatized incubations in 96-well microplate with sixteen 6-point kinetics per microplate and data acquisition using LC/MS system accepting 96-well microplate for injections. The resulting dataset was used for multivariate statistics aimed at sorting out the correlations existing between tested enzyme variants and ability to metabolize steroid substrates. Functional classifications of both CYP1A enzyme variants and steroid substrate structures were obtained allowing the delineation of global structural features for both substrate recognition and regioselectivity of oxidation. PMID:25243177

  6. Phytoremediation of explosives (TNT, RDX, HMX) by wild-type and transgenic plants.

    PubMed

    Panz, Katarzyna; Miksch, Korneliusz

    2012-12-30

    The large-scale production and processing of munitions has led to vast environmental pollution by the compounds TNT(2,4,6-trinitrotoluene), RDX(hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine) and HMX(octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine). Explosives contain these toxic and mutagenic xenobiotics, which are stable in the environment and recalcitrant to remediation. Certain technologies used thus far (incineration, adsorption, advanced oxidations processes, chemical reduction etc.) have not only been very expensive but also caused additional environmental problems. During recent decades, the most popular technologies have been biotechnological methods, such as phytoremediation, which is relatively cheap, environmentally friendly, and a highly accepted solution by society. The most promising of these technologies is the usage of genetically modified plants, which combines the ability of bacterial genes to detoxify compounds with the phytoremediation benefits of plants. This paper is a review related to the latest and most important achievements in the field of phytoremediation of water and soil contaminated with TNT, RDX and HMX. PMID:22996005

  7. Atm heterozygous mice are more sensitive to radiation-induced cataracts than are their wild-type counterparts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Worgul, Basil V.; Smilenov, Lubomir; Brenner, David J.; Junk, Anna; Zhou, Wei; Hall, Eric J.

    2002-01-01

    It is important to know whether the human population includes genetically predisposed radiosensitive subsets. In vitro studies have shown that cells from individuals homozygous for ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) are much more radiosensitive than cells from unaffected individuals. Although cells heterozygous for the ATM gene (ATM(+/-)) may be slightly more radiosensitive in vitro, it remained to be determined whether the greater susceptibility of ATM(+/-) cells translates into an increased sensitivity for late effects in vivo, though there is a suggestion that radiotherapy patients that are heterozygous for the ATM gene may be more at risk of developing late normal tissue damage. We chose cataractogenesis in the lens as a means to assay for the effects of ATM deficiency in a late-responding tissue. One eye of wild-type, Atm heterozygous and homozygous knockout mice was exposed to 0.5-, 1.0-, 2.0-, or 4.0-Gy x rays. The animals were followed weekly for cataract development by conventional slit-lamp biomicroscopy. Cataract development in the animals of all three groups was strongly dependent on dose. The lenses of homozygous mice were the first to opacify at any given dose. Most important in the present context is that cataracts appeared earlier in the heterozygous versus wild-type animals. The data suggest that ATM heterozygotes in the human population may also be radiosensitive. This may influence the choice of individuals destined to be exposed to higher than normal doses of radiation, such as astronauts, and may also suggest that radiotherapy patients who are ATM heterozygotes could be predisposed to increased late normal tissue damage.

  8. Spectroscopic studies of wild-type and mutant "zinc finger" peptides: determinants of domain folding and structure.

    PubMed

    Párraga, G; Horvath, S; Hood, L; Young, E T; Klevit, R E

    1990-01-01

    The "zinc finger" model [Miller, J., McLachlan, A. D. & Klug, A. (1985) EMBO J. 4, 1609-1614; Brown, R. S., Sander, C. & Argos, P. (1985) FEBS Lett. 186, 271-274] makes both specific structural and specific functional predictions about zinc finger consensus sequences that can be tested with a combination of genetic, molecular biological, and biophysical techniques. The yeast transcription factor ADR1 contains two adjacent zinc finger domains; genetic and deletion analyses showed that amino acid substitutions and deletions in the zinc finger domains resulted in the loss of protein activity. To test the structural and folding predictions of the zinc finger model, peptides encompassing each of the ADR1 fingers were synthesized (ADR1a and ADR1b) as well as a mutant finger peptide (del138) deleted for a single amino acid residue. The folding and metal-binding characteristics of these were assessed by 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and visible spectroscopy. While a single unique conformational species was detected for the two wild-type peptides upon tetrahedral binding of zinc, the deletion peptide did not bind zinc with tetrahedral geometry, nor did it fold into a zinc finger domain. The metal-binding and folding results found with the mutant peptide were similar to those obtained when thiol alkylation or imidazole protonation of the wild-type peptides was performed. These data indicate that ligand spacing and both thiol and imidazole participation in zinc binding are specific and necessary requirements for zinc finger folding, which provides direct support for the initial predictions of the model.

  9. Spectroscopic studies of wild-type and mutant "zinc finger" peptides: determinants of domain folding and structure.

    PubMed Central

    Párraga, G; Horvath, S; Hood, L; Young, E T; Klevit, R E

    1990-01-01

    The "zinc finger" model [Miller, J., McLachlan, A. D. & Klug, A. (1985) EMBO J. 4, 1609-1614; Brown, R. S., Sander, C. & Argos, P. (1985) FEBS Lett. 186, 271-274] makes both specific structural and specific functional predictions about zinc finger consensus sequences that can be tested with a combination of genetic, molecular biological, and biophysical techniques. The yeast transcription factor ADR1 contains two adjacent zinc finger domains; genetic and deletion analyses showed that amino acid substitutions and deletions in the zinc finger domains resulted in the loss of protein activity. To test the structural and folding predictions of the zinc finger model, peptides encompassing each of the ADR1 fingers were synthesized (ADR1a and ADR1b) as well as a mutant finger peptide (del138) deleted for a single amino acid residue. The folding and metal-binding characteristics of these were assessed by 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and visible spectroscopy. While a single unique conformational species was detected for the two wild-type peptides upon tetrahedral binding of zinc, the deletion peptide did not bind zinc with tetrahedral geometry, nor did it fold into a zinc finger domain. The metal-binding and folding results found with the mutant peptide were similar to those obtained when thiol alkylation or imidazole protonation of the wild-type peptides was performed. These data indicate that ligand spacing and both thiol and imidazole participation in zinc binding are specific and necessary requirements for zinc finger folding, which provides direct support for the initial predictions of the model. PMID:2104978

  10. Computational characterization for catalytic activities of human CD38's wild type, E226 and E146 mutants.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, My H; Dang, Van U; Luu, Boi V

    2010-06-01

    A series of the complexes of human CD38's wild type, E226 and E146 mutants as well have been simulated. The biosoftwares well simulate the penetration of nicotinamide-adenine-dinucleotide (NAD) into the active site. The nicotinamide end of NAD penetrates deep into the active site consistent with cleavage of the nicotinamide-glycosidic bond which is the first step of catalysis creating a Michaelis complex regarded as the intermediate product of NAD cyclase and hydrolysis reaction. The breaking down hydrogen bond between 2'-3' OH ribosyl and the residues replaced Glu(226) makes NAD to be less constrained in active site and nicotinamide (NA) becomes more difficult to be cleaved and eliminates the mutant catalytic activities. The large majority of the substrate NAD is hydrolyzed to ADPR while the conversion of NAD to cADPR is not the dominant reaction catalyzed by wild-type human CD38. The more strongly kept ribosyl group by hydrogen bonds the more NADase and the less cyclase activity. Breaking hydrogen bonds of ribosyl 2'- and 3'-OH by mutation will loosen it to promote the cyclase. The cyclic adenosine diphosphate-ribose (cADPR) could also penetrate deeply into active site to make some hydrogen bonds with Glu(146) and Glu(226); however, its docking poses are affected by a residue located at the entrance of the catalytic pocket (Lys(129)). These results are in good agreement with the previous crystallographic analysis and the experiments quantified the catalytic activities of human CD38 and its mutants.

  11. A Killed, Genetically Engineered Derivative of a Wild-Type Extraintestinal Pathogenic E. coli strain is a Vaccine Candidate

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Thomas A.; Beanan, Janet M.; Olson, Ruth; Genagon, Stacy A.; MacDonald, Ulrike; Cope, John J.; Davidson, Bruce A.; Johnston, Brian; Johnson, James R.

    2007-01-01

    Infections due to extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) result in significant morbidity, mortality and increased healthcare costs. An efficacious vaccine against ExPEC would be desirable. In this report we explore the use of killed-whole E. coli as a vaccine immunogen. Given the diversity of capsule and O-antigens in ExPEC we have hypothesized that alternative targets are viable vaccine candidates. We have also hypothesized that immunization with a genetically engineered strain that is deficient in the capsule and O-antigen will generate a greater immune response against antigens other than the capsular and O-antigen epitopes than a wild-type strain. Lastly, we hypothesize that mucosal immunization with killed E. coli has the potential to generate a significant immune response. In this study we demonstrated that nasal immunization with a formalin-killed ExPEC derivative deficient in capsule and O-antigen results in a significantly greater overall humoral response compared to its wild-type derivative (which demonstrates that capsule and/or the O-antigen impede the development of an optimal humoral immune response) and a significantly greater immune response against non-capsular and O-antigen epitopes. These antibodies also bound to a subset of heterologous ExPEC strains and enhanced neutrophil-mediated bactericidal activity against the homologous and a heterologous strain. Taken together these studies support the concept that formalin-killed genetically engineered ExPEC derivatives are whole cell vaccine candidates to prevent infections due to ExPEC. PMID:17306426

  12. Combination of cetuximab and PP242 synergistically suppress the progression of wild-type KRAS colorectal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Lei; Xia, Zuguang; Bian, Xinyu; Li, Guangchao; Hu, Jing; Cao, Ya; Wang, Qing; Qian, Xiaoping

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) has been shown to be overactive in human colorectal cancer, but the first-generation mTOR inhibitor, rapamycin, has failed to show clinical efficacy against colorectal cancer. On the other hand, although the second-generation mTOR inhibitor, PP242, has exerted substantial efficacy, it was revealed that independent inhibition by PP242 was transient, which could lead to positive-feedback loop to EGFR. Using wild-type KRAS colorectal cancer cells as models, we investigate the treatment efficacy of a widely used anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody, cetuximab, and PP242, alone or in combination in vitro and in vivo. Results of cell viability assays confirmed the synergistic inhibitory effect of PP242 and cetuximab on the survival of Caco-2 and HT-29 cells. Moreover, the ability of cancer-cell invasion and proliferation was also significantly inhibited by the combination therapy when compared with cetuximab or PP242 alone. Interestingly, the percentage of CD44-positive cancer cells was substantially decreased by the combination therapy in comparison with PP242 alone through fluorescence-activated cell sorting. The growth of cancer stem-like cell spheres in vitro was also maximally inhibited by combination therapy, in terms of either diameter or number. More importantly, the efficacy of combination therapy was more prominent than either drug alone in established tumor xenografts. These findings supported the potential use of combination therapy of PP242 and cetuximab against wild-type KRAS colorectal carcinomas. PMID:26586952

  13. Synonymous codon usage affects the expression of wild type and F508del CFTR.

    PubMed

    Shah, Kalpit; Cheng, Yi; Hahn, Brian; Bridges, Robert; Bradbury, Neil A; Mueller, David M

    2015-03-27

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is an anion channel composed of 1480 amino acids. The major mutation responsible for cystic fibrosis results in loss of amino acid residue, F508 (F508del). Loss of F508 in CFTR alters the folding pathway resulting in endoplasmic-reticulum-associated degradation. This study investigates the role of synonymous codon in the expression of CFTR and CFTR F508del in human HEK293 cells. DNA encoding the open reading frame (ORF) for CFTR containing synonymous codon replacements was expressed using a heterologous vector integrated into the genome. The results indicate that the codon usage greatly affects the expression of CFTR. While the promoter strength driving expression of the ORFs was largely unchanged and the mRNA half-lives were unchanged, the steady-state levels of the mRNA varied by as much as 30-fold. Experiments support that this apparent inconsistency is attributed to nonsense mediated decay independent of exon junction complex. The ratio of CFTR/mRNA indicates that mRNA containing native codons was more efficient in expressing mature CFTR as compared to mRNA containing synonymous high-expression codons. However, when F508del CFTR was expressed after codon optimization, a greater percentage of the protein escaped endoplasmic-reticulum-associated degradation resulting in considerable levels of mature F508del CFTR on the plasma membrane, which showed channel activity. These results indicate that codon usage has an effect on mRNA levels and protein expression, for CFTR, and likely on chaperone-assisted folding pathway, for F508del CFTR.

  14. Synonymous Codon Usage Affects the Expression of Wild Type and F508del CFTR

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Kalpit; Cheng, Yi; Hahn, Brian; Bridges, Robert; Bradbury, Neil; Mueller, David M.

    2015-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is an anion channel composed of 1480 amino acids. The major mutation responsible for cystic fibrosis results in loss of amino acid residue, F508, (F508del). Loss of F508 in CFTR alters the folding pathway resulting in endoplasmic reticulum associated degradation (ERAD). This study investigates the role of synonymous codon in the expression of CFTR and CFTR F508del in human HEK293 cells. DNA encoding the open reading frame (ORF) for CFTR containing synonymous codon replacements, were expressed using a heterologous vector integrated into the genome. The results indicate that the codon usage greatly affects the expression of CFTR. While the promoter strength driving expression of the ORFs was largely unchanged and the mRNA half-lives were unchanged, the steady state levels of the mRNA varied by as much as 30 fold. Experiments support that this apparent inconsistency is attributed to exon junction complex independent nonsense mediated decay. The ratio of CFTR/mRNA indicates that mRNA containing native codons was more efficient in expressing mature CFTR as compared to mRNA containing synonymous high expression codons. However, when F508del CFTR was expressed after codon optimization, a greater percentage of the protein escaped ERAD resulting in considerable levels of mature F508del CFTR on the plasma membrane, which showed channel activity. These results indicate that for CFTR, codon usage has an effect on mRNA levels, protein expression and likely, for F508del CFTR, chaperone assisted folding pathway. PMID:25676312

  15. The Relationship between Professional Learning Communities, Personal Teacher Efficacy, and Student Achievement at the High School Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Sherri L.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this correlational study was to determine if there was a relationship between professional learning community (PLC), personal teacher efficacy (PTE), and student achievement. The study examined teacher perception of PLC implementation and PET as it related to student achievement at the high school level on the Virginia End-of Course…

  16. How Do Other Countries Measure Up to the Mathematics Achievement Levels on the National Assessment of Educational Progress?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hambleton, Ronald K.; Sireci, Stephen G.; Smith, Zachary R.

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we mapped achievement levels from the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) onto the score scales for selected assessments from the Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) and the Program for International Student Achievement (PISA). The mapping was conducted on NAEP, TIMSS, and PISA Mathematics…

  17. A Multi-Level Simultaneous Analysis of How Student and School Characteristics Are Related to Students' English Language Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Güvendir, Emre

    2015-01-01

    This study examines how student and school characteristics are related to Turkish students' English language achievement in Evaluation of Student Achievement Test (ÖBBS) of 2009. The participants of the study involve 43707 ninth year students who were required to take ÖBBS in 2009. For data analysis two level hierarchical linear modeling was…

  18. The Impact of Retrieval Processes, Age, General Achievement Level, and Test Scoring Scheme for Children's Metacognitive Monitoring and Controlling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krebs, Saskia Susanne; Roebers, Claudia Maria

    2012-01-01

    This multi-phase study examined the influence of retrieval processes on children's metacognitive processes in relation to and in interaction with achievement level and age. First, N = 150 9/10- and 11/12-year old high and low achievers watched an educational film and predicted their test performance. Children then solved a cloze test regarding the…

  19. An Examination of Tri-Level Collaboration around Student Achievement Using the Gap Analysis Approach: School Site Leadership Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salinas, Esther Charlotte

    2013-01-01

    Using the Gap Analysis problem-solving framework (Clark & Estes, 2008), this project examined collaboration around student achievement at the school site leadership level in the Pasadena Unified School District (PUSD). This project is one of three concurrent studies focused on collaboration around student achievement in the PUSD that include…

  20. An Examination of Tri-Level Collaboration around Student Achievement Using the Gap Analysis Approach: Central Office Leadership Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Llamas, Sonia Rodarte

    2013-01-01

    Using the Gap Analysis problem-solving framework (Clark & Estes, 2008), this study examined collaboration around student achievement at the central office leadership level in the Pasadena Unified School District (PUSD). This study is one of three concurrent studies focused on collaboration around student achievement in the PUSD that include…

  1. An Examination of Tri-Level Collaboration around Student Achievement Using the Gap Analysis Approach: Teacher Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carruthers, Anthony Steven

    2013-01-01

    Using the Gap Analysis problem-solving framework (Clark & Estes, 2008), this project examined collaboration around student achievement in the Pasadena Unified School District (PUSD) from the teacher perspective. As part of a tri-level study, two other projects examined collaboration around student achievement in PUSD from the perspectives of…

  2. MDM2 overexpression generates a skin phenotype in both wild type and p53 null mice.

    PubMed

    Alkhalaf, M; Ganguli, G; Messaddeq, N; Le Meur, M; Wasylyk, B

    1999-02-18

    The MDM2 proto-oncogene is overexpressed in human tumours and regulates the activities of the tumour suppressors p53 and pRB. We created mice that overexpress MDM2 under the control of the CMV promoter. These mice did not display an increased tumour incidence, but rather a specific skin phenotype, characterized by desquamation and hyperkeratosis. Transgenic MDM2 was found to be overexpressed in the epidermis, a tissue that normally expresses high levels of MDM2. The phenotype appeared during the first week after birth and then lessened with age, closely following the level of expression of the transgene. MDM2 overexpression was associated with an increase in proliferation in the basal layer, thickening of the epidermis, altered expression of the differentiation markers cytokeratin CK14, CK10 and CK1, and a decrease in the size and the number of granules that contain products of differentiation. Transgenic mice on a p53 null background displayed similar although not identical changes, showing that the effects of MDM2 are to a certain degree p53 independent. The skin is a major site of MDM2 expression in mice, raising the possibility that MDM2 overexpression perturbs the normal pattern of MDM2 expression and inhibits differentiation of the epidermis. PMID:10050879

  3. PCR bias toward the wild-type k-ras and p53 sequences: implications for PCR detection of mutations and cancer diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Barnard, R; Futo, V; Pecheniuk, N; Slattery, M; Walsh, T

    1998-10-01

    PCR-based cancer diagnosis requires detection of rare mutations in k-ras, p53 or other genes. The assumption has been that mutant and wild-type sequences amplify with near equal efficiency, so that they are eventually present in proportions representative of the starting material. Work on factor IX suggests that this assumption is invalid for one case of near-sequence identity. To test the generality of this phenomenon and its relevance to cancer diagnosis, primers distant from point mutations in p53 and k-ras were used to amplify wild-type and mutant sequences from these genes. A substantial bias against PCR amplification of mutants was observed for two regions of the p53 gene and one region of k-ras. For k-ras and p53, bias was observed when the wild-type and mutant sequences were amplified separately or when mixed in equal proportions before PCR. Bias was present with proofreading and non-proofreading polymerases. Mutant and wild-type segments of the factor V, cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator and prothrombin genes were amplified and did not exhibit PCR bias. Therefore, the assumption of equal PCR efficiency for point mutant and wild-type sequences is invalid in several systems. Quantitative or diagnostic PCR will require validation for each locus, and enrichment strategies may be needed to optimize detection of mutants. PMID:9793653

  4. Regulation of allantoate transport in wild-type and mutant strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Chisholm, V T; Lea, H Z; Rai, R; Cooper, T G

    1987-01-01

    Accumulation of intracellular allantoin and allantoate is mediated by two distinct active transport systems in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Allantoin transport (DAL4 gene) is inducible, while allantoate uptake is constitutive (it occurs at full levels in the absence of any allantoate-related compounds from the culture medium). Both systems appear to be sensitive to nitrogen catabolite repression, feedback inhibition, and trans-inhibition. Mutants (dal5) that lack allantoate transport have been isolated. These strains also exhibit a 60% loss of allantoin transport capability. Conversely, dal4 mutants previously described are unable to transport allantoin and exhibit a 50% loss of allantoate transport. We interpret the pleiotropic behavior of the dal4 and dal5 mutations as deriving from a functional interaction between elements of the two transport systems. PMID:3549700

  5. Activation of nicotinic α(7) acetylcholine receptor enhances long term potentation in wild type mice but not in APP(swe)/PS1ΔE9 mice.

    PubMed

    Söderman, Andreas; Mikkelsen, Jens D; West, Mark J; Christensen, Ditte Z; Jensen, Morten S

    2011-01-10

    Amyloid β (Aβ) plays a central role in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and binds to the nicotinic α(7) receptor (α(7) nAChR). Little is known about the degree to which the binding of Aβ to the α(7) nAChR influences the role of this receptor in long-term potentiation (LTP), however. We have studied the effect of the partial α(7) nAChR agonist SSR180711 on hippocampal slice preparations from normal wild type (Wt) and APP(swe)/PS1ΔE9 transgenic (Tg) mice. In the hippocampal slices from the 6 months old Wt mice, the application of both nicotine (5μM) and SSR180711 (300nM) resulted in a significant enhancement of LTP expressed in area CA1. However, in the Tg mice the application of SSR180711 did not result in an increase in LTP beyond control levels. The amount of binding of the α(7) nAChR ligand 125-I-α-bungarotoxin was not different between in Tg and Wt mice. These findings indicate that the α(7) nAChR is functionally blocked in the hippocampal neurons, downstream of the α(7) nAChR, and that this is likely due to an interaction between the receptor and Aβ, which leads to changes in LTP.

  6. Subcellular localization of SREBP1 depends on its interaction with the C-terminal region of wild-type and disease related A-type lamins

    PubMed Central

    Duband-Goulet, Isabelle; Woerner, Stephanie; Gasparini, Sylvaine; Attanda, Wikayatou; Kondé, Emilie; Tellier-Lebègue, Carine; Craescu, Constantin T.; Gombault, Aurélie; Roussel, Pascal; Vadrot, Nathalie; Vicart, Patrick; Östlund, Cecilia; Worman, Howard J.; Zinn-Justin, Sophie; Buendia, Brigitte

    2011-01-01

    Lamins A and C are nuclear intermediate filament proteins expressed in most differentiated somatic cells. Previous data suggested that prelamin A, the lamin A precursor, accumulates in some lipodystrophy syndromes caused by mutations in the lamin A/C gene, and binds and inactivates the sterol regulatory element binding protein 1 (SREBP1). Here we show that, in vitro, the tail regions of prelamin A, lamin A and lamin C bind a polypeptide of SREBP1. Such interactions also occur in HeLa cells, since expression of lamin tail regions impedes nucleolar accumulation of the SREBP1 polypeptide fused to a nucleolar localization signal sequence. In addition, the tail regions of A-type lamin variants that occur in Dunnigan-type familial partial lipodystrophy of (R482W) and Hutchison Gilford progeria syndrome (Δ607–656) bind to the SREBP1 polypeptide in vitro, and the corresponding FLAG-tagged full-length lamin variants co-immunoprecipitate the SREBP1 polypeptide in cells. Overexpression of wild-type A-type lamins and variants favors SREBP1 polypeptide localization at the intranuclear periphery, suggesting its sequestration. Our data support the hypothesis that variation of A-type lamin protein level and spatial organization, in particular due to disease-linked mutations, influences the sequestration of SREBP1 at the nuclear envelope and thus contributes to the regulation of SREBP1 function. PMID:21993218

  7. Iron and zinc complexation in wild-type and ferritin-expressing wheat grain: implications for mineral transport into developing grain.

    PubMed

    Neal, Andrew L; Geraki, Kalotina; Borg, Søren; Quinn, Paul; Mosselmans, J Fred; Brinch-Pedersen, Henrik; Shewry, Peter R

    2013-06-01

    We have used synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence and absorption techniques to establish both metal distribution and complexation in mature wheat grains. In planta, extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy reveals iron phytate and zinc phytate structures in aleurone cells and in modified aleurone cells in the transfer region of the grain: iron is coordinated octahedrally by six oxygen atoms and fewer than two phosphorous atoms. Zinc is coordinated tetrahedrally by four oxygen atoms and approximately 1.5 phosphorus atoms in an asymmetric coordination shell. We also present evidence of modified complexation of both metals in transgenic grain overexpressing wheat ferritin. For zinc, there is a consistent doubling of the number of complexing phosphorus atoms. Although there is some EXAFS evidence for iron phytate in ferritin-expressing grain, there is also evidence of a structure lacking phosphorus. This change may lead to an excess of phosphorus within the storage regions of grain, and in turn to the demonstrated increased association of phosphorus with zinc in ferritin-expressing grains. Derivative X-ray absorption spectra also suggest that mineral complexation in the transfer region of ferritin-expressing grains is quite different from that in wild-type grain. This may explain why the raised levels of minerals transported to the developing grain accumulate within the crease region of the transgenic grain.

  8. Combining animal personalities with transcriptomics resolves individual variation within a wild-type zebrafish population and identifies underpinning molecular differences in brain function.

    PubMed

    Rey, S; Boltana, S; Vargas, R; Roher, N; Mackenzie, S

    2013-12-01

    Resolving phenotype variation within a population in response to environmental perturbation is central to understanding biological adaptation. Relating meaningful adaptive changes at the level of the transcriptome requires the identification of processes that have a functional significance for the individual. This remains a major objective towards understanding the complex interactions between environmental demand and an individual's capacity to respond to such demands. The interpretation of such interactions and the significance of biological variation between individuals from the same or different populations remain a difficult and under-addressed question. Here, we provide evidence that variation in gene expression between individuals in a zebrafish population can be partially resolved by a priori screening for animal personality and accounts for >9% of observed variation in the brain transcriptome. Proactive and reactive individuals within a wild-type population exhibit consistent behavioural responses over time and context that relates to underlying differences in regulated gene networks and predicted protein-protein interactions. These differences can be mapped to distinct regions of the brain and provide a foundation towards understanding the coordination of underpinning adaptive molecular events within populations.

  9. Subcellular localization of SREBP1 depends on its interaction with the C-terminal region of wild-type and disease related A-type lamins

    SciTech Connect

    Duband-Goulet, Isabelle; Woerner, Stephanie; Gasparini, Sylvaine; Attanda, Wikayatou; Konde, Emilie; Tellier-Lebegue, Carine; Craescu, Constantin T.; Roussel, Pascal; Vadrot, Nathalie; Vicart, Patrick; Oestlund, Cecilia; Worman, Howard J.; and others

    2011-12-10

    Lamins A and C are nuclear intermediate filament proteins expressed in most differentiated somatic cells. Previous data suggested that prelamin A, the lamin A precursor, accumulates in some lipodystrophy syndromes caused by mutations in the lamin A/C gene, and binds and inactivates the sterol regulatory element binding protein 1 (SREBP1). Here we show that, in vitro, the tail regions of prelamin A, lamin A and lamin C bind a polypeptide of SREBP1. Such interactions also occur in HeLa cells, since expression of lamin tail regions impedes nucleolar accumulation of the SREBP1 polypeptide fused to a nucleolar localization signal sequence. In addition, the tail regions of A-type lamin variants that occur in Dunnigan-type familial partial lipodystrophy of (R482W) and Hutchison Gilford progeria syndrome ( Increment 607-656) bind to the SREBP1 polypeptide in vitro, and the corresponding FLAG-tagged full-length lamin variants co-immunoprecipitate the SREBP1 polypeptide in cells. Overexpression of wild-type A-type lamins and variants favors SREBP1 polypeptide localization at the intranuclear periphery, suggesting its sequestration. Our data support the hypothesis that variation of A-type lamin protein level and spatial organization, in particular due to disease-linked mutations, influences the sequestration of SREBP1 at the nuclear envelope and thus contributes to the regulation of SREBP1 function.

  10. Dual-Targeting Nanovesicles for In Situ Intracellular Imaging of and Discrimination between Wild-type and Mutant p53.

    PubMed

    Qian, Ruocan; Cao, Yue; Long, Yi-Tao

    2016-01-11

    p53 is a tumor-suppressor protein related to the cell cycle and programmed cell apoptosis. Herein, dual-targeting nanovesicles are designed for in situ imaging of intracellular wild-type p53 (WTp53) and mutant p53 (MUp53). Nanovesicle-encapsulated plasmonic gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were functionalized with consensus DNA duplexes, and a fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-marked anti-MUp53 antibody was conjugated to the nanovesicle surface. After entering the cytoplasm, the released AuNPs aggregated through recognition of WTp53 and the double-stranded DNA. The color changes of AuNPs were observed using dark-field microscopy, which showed the intracellular WTp53 distribution. The MUp53 location was detected though the immunological recognition between FITC-labeled anti-MUp53 and MUp53. Thus, a one-step incubation method for the in situ imaging of intracellular WTp53 and MUp53 was obtained; this was used to monitor the p53 level under a drug treatment.

  11. Changes in polyphenol and sugar concentrations in wild type and genetically modified Nicotiana langsdorffii Weinmann in response to water and heat stress.

    PubMed

    Ancillotti, Claudia; Bogani, Patrizia; Biricolti, Stefano; Calistri, Elisa; Checchini, Leonardo; Ciofi, Lorenzo; Gonnelli, Cristina; Del Bubba, Massimo

    2015-12-01

    In this study wild type Nicotiana langsdorffii plants were genetically transformed by the insertion of the rat gene (gr) encoding the glucocorticoid receptor or the rolC gene and exposed to water and heat stress. Water stress was induced for 15 days by adding 20% PEG 6000 in the growth medium, whereas the heat treatment was performed at 50 °C for 2 h, after that a re-growing capability study was carried out. The plant response to stress was investigated by determining electrolyte leakage, dry weight biomass production and water content. These data were evaluated in relation to antiradical activity and concentrations of total polyphenols, selected phenolic compounds and some soluble sugars, as biochemical indicators of metabolic changes due to gene insertion and/or stress treatments. As regards the water stress, the measured physiological parameters evidenced an increasing stress level in the order rolC < gr < WT plants (e.g. about 100% and 50% electrolyte leakage increase in WT and gr samples, respectively) and complied with the biochemical pattern, which consisted in a general decrease of antiradical activity and phenolics, together with an increase in sugars. As regard heat stress, electrolyte leakage data were only in partial agreement with the re-growing capability study. In fact, according to this latter evaluation, gr was the genotype less affected by the heat shock. In this regard, sugars and especially phenolic compounds are informative of the long-term effects due to heat shock treatment.

  12. A few-polyhedra mutant and wild-type nucleopolyhedrovirus remain as a stable polymorphism during serial coinfection in Trichoplusia ni.

    PubMed

    Bull, James C; Godfray, H C J; O'Reilly, David R

    2003-04-01

    Few-polyhedra (FP) mutants of nucleopolyhedroviruses (NPVs) are a well-known phenomenon during serial passage of virus in cell culture. Under these circumstances such mutants produce low yields of occlusion bodies (OBs) and poorly occlude virions, but they are selected for through advantageous rates of budded virus replication. Spontaneous insertion of transposable elements originating from host cell DNA into the viral fp25 gene has been shown to be a common cause of the phenotype. A model of NPV population genetics predicts that mutants with these characteristics might persist within stable polymorphisms in viral populations during serial passage of virus in vivo. However, this hypothesis was previously untested, and FP mutants have not been recovered from field isolates of NPVs. We isolated and characterized an FP mutant that arose during routine passage of Autographa californica multinucleocapsid NPV (AcMNPV) in cell culture and identified a transposable element within the fp25 gene. We tracked the fates of coinfecting wild-type and FP mutant AcMNPV strains through serial passage in fifth-instar Trichoplusia ni larvae. The levels of both strains remained stable during successive rounds of infection. We applied the data obtained to a model of NPV population genetics in order to derive the frequency distribution of the multiplicity of cell infection in infected insects and estimated that 4.3 baculovirus genomes per OB-producing cell would account for this equilibrium.

  13. Interactions of abiraterone, eplerenone, and prednisolone with wild-type and mutant androgen receptor: a rationale for increasing abiraterone exposure or combining with MDV3100.

    PubMed

    Richards, Juliet; Lim, Ai Chiin; Hay, Colin W; Taylor, Angela E; Wingate, Anna; Nowakowska, Karolina; Pezaro, Carmel; Carreira, Suzanne; Goodall, Jane; Arlt, Wiebke; McEwan, Iain J; de Bono, Johann S; Attard, Gerhardt

    2012-05-01

    Prostate cancer progression can be associated with androgen receptor (AR) mutations acquired following treatment with castration and/or an antiandrogen. Abiraterone, a rationally designed inhibitor of CYP17A1 recently approved for the treatment of docetaxel-treated castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), is often effective, but requires coadministration with glucocorticoids to curtail side effects. Here, we hypothesized that progressive disease on abiraterone may occur secondary to glucocorticoid-induced activation of mutated AR. We found that prednisolone plasma levels in patients with CRPC were sufficiently high to activate mutant AR. Mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists, such as spironolactone and eplerenone that are used to treat side effects related to mineralocorticoid excess, can also bind to and activate signaling through wild-type or mutant AR. Abiraterone inhibited in vitro proliferation and AR-regulated gene expression of AR-positive prostate cancer cells, which could be explained by AR antagonism in addition to inhibition of steroidogenesis. In fact, activation of mutant AR by eplerenone was inhibited by MDV3100, bicalutamide, or greater concentrations of abiraterone. Therefore, an increase in abiraterone exposure could reverse resistance secondary to activation of AR by residual ligands or coadministered drugs. Together, our findings provide a strong rationale for clinical evaluation of combined CYP17A1 inhibition and AR antagonism.

  14. Under the Radar: The Impact of Relatively Young Age for Grade Level on Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryken, Klazina

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether age differences affect students' academic achievement, and whether age differences affect students in low-income areas differently than those in mixed or higher-income areas. Student achievement data for grades 3, 7, and 11 in language arts and math were obtained from a variety of schools…

  15. Effect of Cooperative Learning on Achievement of Students in General Science at Secondary Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parveen, Qaisara; Batool, Sadia

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to explore the effects of cooperative learning on General Science achievement among 9th class students. Based upon previous research literature it was hypothesized that significant difference existed between the mean posttest scores of General Science achievement of experimental group and control group. The pretest…

  16. Developing and Improving Modified Achievement Level Descriptors: Rationale, Procedures, and Tools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quenemoen, Rachel; Albus, Debra; Rogers, Chris; Lazarus, Sheryl

    2010-01-01

    Some states are developing alternate assessments based on modified achievement standards (AA-MAS) to measure the academic achievement of some students with disabilities (Albus, Lazarus, Thurlow, & Cormier, 2009; Lazarus, Thurlow, Christensen, & Cormier, 2007). These assessments measure the same content as the general assessment for a given…

  17. A wild-type DNA ligase I gene is expressed in Bloom's syndrome cells

    SciTech Connect

    Petrini, J.H.J.; Huwiler, K.G.; Weaver, D.T. )

    1991-09-01

    Alteration of DNA ligase I activity is a consistent biochemical feature of Bloom's syndrome (BS) cells. DNA ligase I activity in BS cells either is reduced and abnormally thermolabile or is present in an anomalously dimeric form. To assess the role of DNA ligase function in the etiology of BS, the authors have cloned the DNA ligase I cDNA from normal human cells by a PCR strategy using degenerate oligonucleotide primers based on conserved regions of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe DNA ligase genes. Human DNA ligase I cDNAs from normal and BS cells complemented a S. cerevisiae DNA ligase mutation, and protein extracts prepared from S. cerevisiae transformants expressing normal and BS cDNA contained comparable levels of DNA ligase I activity. DNA sequencing and Northern blot analysis of DNA ligase I expression in two BS human fibroblast lines representing each of the two aberrant DNA ligase I molecular phenotypes demonstrated that this gene was unchanged in BS cells. Thus, another factor may be responsible for the observed reduction in DNA ligase I activity associated with this chromosomal breakage syndrome.

  18. Fluoroquinolone interactions with Mycobacterium tuberculosis gyrase: Enhancing drug activity against wild-type and resistant gyrase

    PubMed Central

    Aldred, Katie J.; Kerns, Robert J.; Berger, James M.; Osheroff, Neil

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a significant source of global morbidity and mortality. Moxifloxacin and other fluoroquinolones are important therapeutic agents for the treatment of tuberculosis, particularly multidrug-resistant infections. To guide the development of new quinolone-based agents, it is critical to understand the basis of drug action against M. tuberculosis gyrase and how mutations in the enzyme cause resistance. Therefore, we characterized interactions of fluoroquinolones and related drugs with WT gyrase and enzymes carrying mutations at GyrAA90 and GyrAD94. M. tuberculosis gyrase lacks a conserved serine that anchors a water–metal ion bridge that is critical for quinolone interactions with other bacterial type II topoisomerases. Despite the fact that the serine is replaced by an alanine (i.e., GyrAA90) in M. tuberculosis gyrase, the bridge still forms and plays a functional role in mediating quinolone–gyrase interactions. Clinically relevant mutations at GyrAA90 and GyrAD94 cause quinolone resistance by disrupting the bridge–enzyme interaction, thereby decreasing drug affinity. Fluoroquinolone activity against WT and resistant enzymes is enhanced by the introduction of specific groups at the C7 and C8 positions. By dissecting fluoroquinolone–enzyme interactions, we determined that an 8-methyl-moxifloxacin derivative induces high levels of stable cleavage complexes with WT gyrase and two common resistant enzymes, GyrAA90V and GyrAD94G. 8-Methyl-moxifloxacin was more potent than moxifloxacin against WT M. tuberculosis gyrase and displayed higher activity against the mutant enzymes than moxifloxacin did against WT gyrase. This chemical biology approach to defining drug–enzyme interactions has the potential to identify novel drugs with improved activity against tuberculosis. PMID:26792518

  19. An integrative analysis of the transcriptome and proteome of the pulp of a spontaneous late-ripening sweet orange mutant and its wild type improves our understanding of fruit ripening in citrus

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Hualin

    2014-01-01

    Fruit ripening is a complex, genetically programmed process that occurs in conjunction with the differentiation of chloroplasts into chromoplasts and involves changes to the organoleptic properties of the fruit. In this study, an integrative analysis of the transcriptome and proteome was performed to identify important regulators and pathways involved in fruit ripening in a spontaneous late-ripening mutant (‘Fengwan’ orange, Citrus sinensis L. Osbeck) and its wild type (‘Fengjie 72-1’). At the transcript level, 628 genes showed a 2-fold or more expression difference between the mutant and wild type as detected by an RNA sequencing approach. At the protein level, 130 proteins differed by 1.5-fold or more in their relative abundance, as indicated by iTRAQ (isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation) analysis. A comparison of the transcriptome and proteome data revealed some aspects of the regulation of metabolism during orange fruit ripening. First, a large number of differential genes were found to belong to the plant hormone pathways and cell-wall-related metabolism. Secondly, we noted a correlation between ripening-associated transcripts and sugar metabolites, which suggests the importance of these metabolic pathways during fruit ripening. Thirdly, a number of genes showed inconsistency between the transcript and protein level, which is indicative of post-transcriptional events. These results reveal multiple ripening-associated events during citrus ripening and provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying citrus ripening regulatory networks. PMID:24600016

  20. An integrative analysis of the transcriptome and proteome of the pulp of a spontaneous late-ripening sweet orange mutant and its wild type improves our understanding of fruit ripening in citrus.

    PubMed

    Wu, Juxun; Xu, Zhilong; Zhang, Yajian; Chai, Lijun; Yi, Hualin; Deng, Xiuxin

    2014-04-01

    Fruit ripening is a complex, genetically programmed process that occurs in conjunction with the differentiation of chloroplasts into chromoplasts and involves changes to the organoleptic properties of the fruit. In this study, an integrative analysis of the transcriptome and proteome was performed to identify important regulators and pathways involved in fruit ripening in a spontaneous late-ripening mutant ('Fengwan' orange, Citrus sinensis L. Osbeck) and its wild type ('Fengjie 72-1'). At the transcript level, 628 genes showed a 2-fold or more expression difference between the mutant and wild type as detected by an RNA sequencing approach. At the protein level, 130 proteins differed by 1.5-fold or more in their relative abundance, as indicated by iTRAQ (isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation) analysis. A comparison of the transcriptome and proteome data revealed some aspects of the regulation of metabolism during orange fruit ripening. First, a large number of differential genes were found to belong to the plant hormone pathways and cell-wall-related metabolism. Secondly, we noted a correlation between ripening-associated transcripts and sugar metabolites, which suggests the importance of these metabolic pathways during fruit ripening. Thirdly, a number of genes showed inconsistency between the transcript and protein level, which is indicative of post-transcriptional events. These results reveal multiple ripening-associated events during citrus ripening and provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying citrus ripening regulatory networks.

  1. The dietary effect of milk sphingomyelin on the lipid metabolism of obese/diabetic KK-A(y) mice and wild-type C57BL/6J mice.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Ippei; Uemura, Mariko; Hosokawa, Masashi; Iwashima-Suzuki, Ai; Shiota, Makoto; Miyashita, Kazuo

    2016-09-14

    Purified milk sphingomyelin (SM) was obtained from lipid concentrated butter serum (LC-BS) by successive separations involving solvent fractionation, selective saponification, and silicic acid column chromatography. The SM obtained was given to obese/diabetic KK-A(y) mice and wild-type C57BL/6J mice. SM supplementation significantly increased fecal lipids paralleled with a decrease in non-HDL cholesterol levels in the serum and neutral lipids and in cholesterol levels in the livers of KK-A(y) mice. The reduction of liver lipid levels also resulted in a decrease in the total fatty acid content of the KK-A(y) mice livers, while n-3 fatty acids derived from the conversion of α-linolenic acid (18:3n-3) increased due to SM supplementation. In contrast to the KK-A(y) mice, little change in the serum and liver lipids was observed in wild-type C57BL/6J mice. The present study suggests that SM may be effective only in subjects with metabolic disorders. PMID:27501823

  2. Coordinated Zinc Homeostasis Is Essential for the Wild-Type Virulence of Brucella abortus

    PubMed Central

    Sheehan, Lauren M.; Budnick, James A.; Roop, R. Martin

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Metal homeostasis in bacterial cells is a highly regulated process requiring intricately coordinated import and export, as well as precise sensing of intracellular metal concentrations. The uptake of zinc (Zn) has been linked to the virulence of Brucella abortus; however, the capacity of Brucella strains to sense Zn levels and subsequently coordinate Zn homeostasis has not been described. Here, we show that expression of the genes encoding the zinc uptake system ZnuABC is negatively regulated by the Zn-sensing Fur family transcriptional regulator, Zur, by direct interactions between Zur and the promoter region of znuABC. Moreover, the MerR-type regulator, ZntR, controls the expression of the gene encoding the Zn exporter ZntA by binding directly to its promoter. Deletion of zur or zntR alone did not result in increased zinc toxicity in the corresponding mutants; however, deletion of zntA led to increased sensitivity to Zn but not to other metals, such as Cu and Ni, suggesting that ZntA is a Zn-specific exporter. Strikingly, deletion of zntR resulted in significant attenuation of B. abortus in a mouse model of chronic infection, and subsequent experiments revealed that overexpression of zntA in the zntR mutant is the molecular basis for its decreased virulence. IMPORTANCE The importance of zinc uptake for Brucella pathogenesis has been demonstrated previously, but to date, there has been no description of how overall zinc homeostasis is maintained and genetically controlled in the brucellae. The present work defines the predominant zinc export system, as well as the key genetic regulators of both zinc uptake and export in Brucella abortus. Moreover, the data show the importance of precise coordination of the zinc homeostasis systems as disregulation of some elements of these systems leads to the attenuation of Brucella virulence in a mouse model. Overall, this study advances our understanding of the essential role of zinc in the pathogenesis of

  3. Effects of Bio-Au Nanoparticles on Electrochemical Activity of Shewanella oneidensis Wild Type and ΔomcA/mtrC Mutant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ranran; Cui, Li; Chen, Lixiang; Wang, Chao; Cao, Changli; Sheng, Guoping; Yu, Hanqing; Zhao, Feng

    2013-11-01

    Both Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 wild type and its mutant ΔomcA/mtrC are capable of transforming AuIII into Au nanoparticles (AuNPs). Cyclic voltammetry reveals a decrease in redox current after the wild type is exposed to AuIII but an increase in oxidation current for the mutant. The peak current of the wild type is much higher than that of the mutant before the exposure of AuIII, but lower than that of the mutant after the formation of AuNPs. This suggests that damage to the electron transfer chain in the mutant could be repaired by AuNPs to a certain extent. Spectroscopy and SDS-PAGE analysis indicate a decrease in cell protein content after the formation of AuNPs, which provides a convenient way to detect intracellular information on cells.

  4. Effects of bio-Au nanoparticles on electrochemical activity of Shewanella oneidensis wild type and ΔomcA/mtrC mutant.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ranran; Cui, Li; Chen, Lixiang; Wang, Chao; Cao, Changli; Sheng, Guoping; Yu, Hanqing; Zhao, Feng

    2013-11-22

    Both Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 wild type and its mutant ΔomcA/mtrC are capable of transforming Au(III) into Au nanoparticles (AuNPs). Cyclic voltammetry reveals a decrease in redox current after the wild type is exposed to Au(III) but an increase in oxidation current for the mutant. The peak current of the wild type is much higher than that of the mutant before the exposure of Au(III), but lower than that of the mutant after the formation of AuNPs. This suggests that damage to the electron transfer chain in the mutant could be repaired by AuNPs to a certain extent. Spectroscopy and SDS-PAGE analysis indicate a decrease in cell protein content after the formation of AuNPs, which provides a convenient way to detect intracellular information on cells.

  5. Detection and differentiation of wild-type and vaccine strains of canine distemper virus by a duplex reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Dong, X Y; Li, W H; Zhu, J L; Liu, W J; Zhao, M Q; Luo, Y W; Chen, J D

    2015-01-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) is the cause of canine distemper (CD) which is a severe and highly contagious disease in dogs. In the present study, a duplex reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) method was developed for the detection and differentiation of wild-type and vaccine strains of CDV. Four primers were designed to detect and discriminate the two viruses by generating 638- and 781-bp cDNA products, respectively. Furthermore, the duplex RT-PCR method was used to detect 67 field samples suspected of CD from Guangdong province in China. Results showed that, 33 samples were to be wild-type-like. The duplex RT-PCR method exhibited high specificity and sensitivity which could be used to effectively detect and differentiate wild-type and vaccine CDV, indicating its use for clinical detection and epidemiological surveillance. PMID:27175171

  6. Detection and differentiation of wild-type and vaccine strains of canine distemper virus by a duplex reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction

    PubMed Central

    Dong, X. Y.; Li, W. H.; Zhu, J. L.; Liu, W. J.; Zhao, M. Q.; Luo, Y. W.; Chen, J. D.

    2015-01-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) is the cause of canine distemper (CD) which is a severe and highly contagious disease in dogs. In the present study, a duplex reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) method was developed for the detection and differentiation of wild-type and vaccine strains of CDV. Four primers were designed to detect and discriminate the two viruses by generating 638- and 781-bp cDNA products, respectively. Furthermore, the duplex RT-PCR method was used to detect 67 field samples suspected of CD from Guangdong province in China. Results showed that, 33 samples were to be wild-type-like. The duplex RT-PCR method exhibited high specificity and sensitivity which could be used to effectively detect and differentiate wild-type and vaccine CDV, indicating its use for clinical detection and epidemiological surveillance. PMID:27175171

  7. After a cold conditioning swim, UCP2-deficient mice are more able to defend against the cold than wild type mice.

    PubMed

    Abdelhamid, Ramy E; Kovács, Katalin J; Nunez, Myra G; Larson, Alice A

    2014-08-01

    Uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) is widely distributed throughout the body including the brain, adipose tissue and skeletal muscles. In contrast to UCP1, UCP2 does not influence resting body temperature and UCP2-deficient (-/-) mice have normal thermoregulatory responses to a single exposure to cold ambient temperatures. Instead, UCP2-deficient mice are more anxious, exhibit anhedonia and have higher circulating corticosterone than wild type mice. To test the possible role of UCP2 in depressive behavior we exposed UCP2-deficient and wild type mice to a cold (26°C) forced swim and simultaneously measured rectal temperatures during and after the swim. The time that UCP2-deficient mice spent immobile did not differ from wild type mice and all mice floated more on day 2. However, UCP2-deficient mice were more able to defend against the decrease in body temperature during a second daily swim at 26°C than wild type mice (area under the curve for wild type mice: 247.0±6.4; for UCP2-deficient mice: 284.4±3.8, P<0.0001, Student's t test). The improved thermoregulation of wild type mice during a second swim at 26°C correlated with their greater immobility whereas defense against the warmth during a swim at 41°C correlated better with greater immobility of UCP2-deficient mice. Together these data indicate that while the lack of UCP2 has no acute effect on body temperature, UCP2 may inhibit rapid improvements in defense against cold, in contrast to UCP1, whose main function is to promote thermogenesis. PMID:24952267

  8. After a cold conditioning swim, UCP2-deficient mice are more able to defend against the cold than wild type mice.

    PubMed

    Abdelhamid, Ramy E; Kovács, Katalin J; Nunez, Myra G; Larson, Alice A

    2014-08-01

    Uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) is widely distributed throughout the body including the brain, adipose tissue and skeletal muscles. In contrast to UCP1, UCP2 does not influence resting body temperature and UCP2-deficient (-/-) mice have normal thermoregulatory responses to a single exposure to cold ambient temperatures. Instead, UCP2-deficient mice are more anxious, exhibit anhedonia and have higher circulating corticosterone than wild type mice. To test the possible role of UCP2 in depressive behavior we exposed UCP2-deficient and wild type mice to a cold (26°C) forced swim and simultaneously measured rectal temperatures during and after the swim. The time that UCP2-deficient mice spent immobile did not differ from wild type mice and all mice floated more on day 2. However, UCP2-deficient mice were more able to defend against the decrease in body temperature during a second daily swim at 26°C than wild type mice (area under the curve for wild type mice: 247.0±6.4; for UCP2-deficient mice: 284.4±3.8, P<0.0001, Student's t test). The improved thermoregulation of wild type mice during a second swim at 26°C correlated with their greater immobility whereas defense against the warmth during a swim at 41°C correlated better with greater immobility of UCP2-deficient mice. Together these data indicate that while the lack of UCP2 has no acute effect on body temperature, UCP2 may inhibit rapid improvements in defense against cold, in contrast to UCP1, whose main function is to promote thermogenesis.

  9. Accuracy of Self-Reported College GPA: Gender-Moderated Differences by Achievement Level and Academic Self-Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caskie, Grace I. L.; Sutton, MaryAnn C.; Eckhardt, Amanda G.

    2014-01-01

    Assessments of college academic achievement tend to rely on self-reported GPA values, yet evidence is limited regarding the accuracy of those values. With a sample of 194 undergraduate college students, the present study examined whether accuracy of self-reported GPA differed based on level of academic performance or level of academic…

  10. School Librarian Staffing Levels and Student Achievement as Represented in 2006-2009 Kansas Annual Yearly Progress Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dow, Mirah J.; McMahon-Lakin, Jacqueline

    2012-01-01

    To address the presence or absence of school librarians in Kansas public schools, a study using analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) was designed to investigate staffing levels for library media specialists (LMSs), the label used for school librarians in licensed-personnel data in Kansas, and student achievement at the school level. Five subject areas…

  11. Phosphorylation at Ser-15 and Ser-392 in mutant p53 molecules from tumors is altered compared to wild-type p53

    SciTech Connect

    Ullrich, S.J.; Sakaguchi, K.; Fiscella, M.; Appella, E. ); Lees-Miller, S.P.; Anderson, C.W. ); Mercer, W.E. )

    1993-07-01

    The product of the p53 gene suppresses cell growth and plays a critical role in suppressing development of human tumors. p53 protein binds DNA, activates transcription, and can be phosphorylated at N- and C-terminal sites. Previously, wild-type p53 was shown to be hyperphosphorylated compared to mutant p53 during p53-mediated growth arrest in vivo. Here we show that Ser-15 and Ser-9 in the N-terminal transactivation domain of wild-type human p53 are phosphorylated in vivo in cells derived from the human glioblastoma line T98G. In [IIe[sup 237

  12. Genome-wide analyses of the transcriptomes of salicylic acid-deficient versus wild-type plants uncover Pathogen and Circadian Controlled 1 (PCC1) as a regulator of flowering time in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Segarra, Silvia; Mir, Ricardo; Martínez, Cristina; León, José

    2010-01-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) has been characterized as an activator of pathogen-triggered resistance of plants. SA also regulates developmental processes such as thermogenesis in floral organs and stress-induced flowering. To deepen our knowledge of the mechanism underlying SA regulation of flowering time in Arabidopsis, we compared the transcriptomes of SA-deficient late flowering genotypes with wild-type plants. Down- or up-regulated genes in SA-deficient plants were screened for responsiveness to ultraviolet (UV)-C light, which accelerates flowering in Arabidopsis. Among them, only Pathogen and Circadian Controlled 1 (PCC1) was up-regulated by UV-C light through a SA-dependent process. Moreover, UV-C light-activated expression of PCC1 was also dependent on the flowering activator CONSTANS (CO). PCC1 gene has a circadian-regulated developmental pattern of expression with low transcript levels after germination that increased abruptly by day 10. RNAi plants with very low expression of PCC1 gene were late flowering, defective in UV-C light acceleration of flowering and contained FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) transcript levels below 5% of that detected in wild-type plants. Although PCC1 seems to function between CO and FT in the photoperiod-dependent flowering pathway, transgenic plants overexpressing a Glucocorticoid Receptor (GR)-fused version of CO strongly activated FT but not PCC1 after dexamethasone treatment.

  13. A comparative glycoproteome study of developing endosperm in the hexose-deficient miniature1 (mn1) seed mutant and its wild type Mn1 in maize

    PubMed Central

    Silva-Sanchez, Cecilia; Chen, Sixue; Li, Jinxi; Chourey, Prem S.

    2014-01-01

    In maize developing seeds, transfer cells are prominently located at the basal endosperm transfer layer (BETL). As the first filial cell layer, BETL is a gateway to sugars, nutrients and water from mother plant; and anchor of numerous functions such as sucrose turnover, auxin and cytokinin biosynthesis/accumulation, energy metabolism, defense response, and signaling between maternal and filial generations. Previous studies showed that basal developing endosperms of miniature1 (mn1) mutant seeds lacking the Mn1-encoded cell wall invertase II, are also deficient for hexose. Given the role of glucose as one of the key sugars in protein glycosylation and proper protein folding; we performed a comparative large scale glycoproteome profiling of total proteins of these two genotypes (mn1 mutant vs. Mn1 wild type) using 2D gel electrophoresis and glycosylation/total protein staining, followed by image analysis. Protein identification was done by LC-MS/MS. A total of 413 spots were detected; from which, 113 spots matched between the two genotypes. Of these, 45 showed >20% decrease/increase in glycosylation level and were selected for protein identification. A large number of identified proteins showed decreased glycosylation levels in mn1 developing endosperms as compared to the Mn1. Functional classification of proteins, showed mainly of post-translational modification, protein turnover, chaperone activities, carbohydrate and amino acid biosynthesis/transport, and cell wall biosynthesis. These proteins and activities were related to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and unfolded protein response (UPR) as a result of the low glycolsylation levels of the mutant proteins. Overall, these results provide for the first time a global glycoproteome profile of maize BETL-enriched basal endosperm to better understand their role in seed development in maize. PMID:24616729

  14. Integrated proteomic analysis of major isoaspartyl-containing proteins in the urine of wild type and protein L-isoaspartate O-methyltransferase-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Dai, Shujia; Ni, Wenqin; Patananan, Alexander N; Clarke, Steven G; Karger, Barry L; Zhou, Zhaohui Sunny

    2013-02-19

    The formation of isoaspartyl residues (isoAsp or isoD) via either aspartyl isomerization or asparaginyl deamidation alters protein structure and potentially biological function. This is a spontaneous and nonenzymatic process, ubiquitous both in vivo and in nonbiological systems, such as in protein pharmaceuticals. In almost all organisms, protein L-isoaspartate O-methyltransferase (PIMT, EC2.1.1.77) recognizes and initiates the conversion of isoAsp back to aspartic acid. Additionally, alternative proteolytic and excretion pathways to metabolize isoaspartyl-containing proteins have been proposed but not fully explored, largely due to the analytical challenges for detecting isoAsp. We report here the relative quantitation and site profiling of isoAsp in urinary proteins from wild type and PIMT-deficient mice, representing products from excretion pathways. First, using a biochemical approach, we found that the total isoaspartyl level of proteins in urine of PIMT-deficient male mice was elevated. Subsequently, the major isoaspartyl protein species in urine from these mice were identified as major urinary proteins (MUPs) by shotgun proteomics. To enhance the sensitivity of isoAsp detection, a targeted proteomic approach using electron transfer dissociation-selected reaction monitoring (ETD-SRM) was developed to investigate isoAsp sites in MUPs. A total of 38 putative isoAsp modification sites in MUPs were investigated, with five derived from the deamidation of asparagine that were confirmed to contribute to the elevated isoAsp levels. Our findings lend experimental evidence for the hypothesized excretion pathway for isoAsp proteins. Additionally, the developed method opens up the possibility to explore processing mechanisms of isoaspartyl proteins at the molecular level, such as the fate of protein pharmaceuticals in circulation.

  15. Study of phytochelatins and other related thiols as complexing biomolecules of As and Cd in wild type and genetically modified Brassica juncea plants.

    PubMed

    Navaza, Ana Pereira; Montes-Bayón, Maria; LeDuc, Danika L; Terry, Norman; Sanz-Medel, Alfredo

    2006-03-01

    The accumulation of As and Cd in Brassica juncea plants and the formation of complexes of these elements with bioligands such as glutathione and/or phytochelatins (PCs) is studied. The genetic manipulation of these plants to induce higher As and Cd accumulation has been achieved by overexpressing the genes encoding for gamma-glutamyl cysteine synthetase (gamma-ECS) and glutathione synthetase (GS). These two enzymes are responsible for glutathione (GSH) formation in plants, which is the first step in the production of PCs. The biomass produced in both the wild type and the genetically modified plants, has been evaluated. Additionally, the total Cd and As concentration accumulated in the plant tissues was measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) after extraction. Speciation studies on the extracts were conducted using size exclusion liquid chromatography (SEC) coupled online with ICP-MS to monitor As, Cd and S. For further purification of the As fractions, reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) was used. Structural elucidation of the PCs and other thiols, as well as their complexes with As and Cd, was performed by electrospray-quadrupole-time-of-flight (ESI-Q-TOF). In both the Cd and As exposed plants it was possible to observe the presence of oxidized PC2 ([M + H]+, m/z 538), GS-PC2(-Glu) ([M + H]+, m/z 716) as well as reduced GSH ([M + H]+, m/z 308) and oxidized glutathione (GSSG) ([M + H]+, m/z 613). However, only the GS plants exhibited the presence of As(GS)3 complex ([M + H]+, m/z 994) that was further confirmed by MS/MS. This species is reported for the first time in B. juncea plant tissues. PMID:16421878

  16. Optimization of glutathione production in batch and fed-batch cultures by the wild-type and recombinant strains of the methylotrophic yeast Hansenula polymorpha DL-1

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Tripeptide glutathione (gamma-glutamyl-L-cysteinyl-glycine) is the most abundant non-protein thiol that protects cells from metabolic and oxidative stresses and is widely used as medicine, food additives and in cosmetic industry. The methylotrophic yeast Hansenula polymorpha is regarded as a rich source of glutathione due to the role of this thiol in detoxifications of key intermediates of methanol metabolism. Cellular and extracellular glutathione production of H. polymorpha DL-1 in the wild type and recombinant strains which overexpress genes of glutathione biosynthesis (GSH2) and its precursor cysteine (MET4) was studied. Results Glutathione producing capacity of H. polymorpha DL-1 depending on parameters of cultivation (dissolved oxygen tension, pH, stirrer speed), carbon substrate (glucose, methanol) and type of overexpressed genes of glutathione and its precursor biosynthesis during batch and fed-batch fermentations were studied. Under optimized conditions of glucose fed-batch cultivation, the glutathione productivity of the engineered strains was increased from ~900 up to ~ 2300 mg of Total Intracellular Glutathione (TIG) or GSH+GSSGin, per liter of culture medium. Meantime, methanol fed-batch cultivation of one of the recombinant strains allowed achieving the extracellular glutathione productivity up to 250 mg of Total Extracellular Glutathione (TEG) or GSH+GSSGex, per liter of the culture medium. Conclusions H. polymorpha is an competitive glutathione producer as compared to other known yeast and bacteria strains (Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Candida utilis, Escherichia coli, Lactococcus lactis etc.) with good perspectives for further improvement especially for production of extracellular form of glutathione. PMID:21255454

  17. Study of phytochelatins and other related thiols as complexing biomolecules of As and Cd in wild type and genetically modified Brassica juncea plants.

    PubMed

    Navaza, Ana Pereira; Montes-Bayón, Maria; LeDuc, Danika L; Terry, Norman; Sanz-Medel, Alfredo

    2006-03-01

    The accumulation of As and Cd in Brassica juncea plants and the formation of complexes of these elements with bioligands such as glutathione and/or phytochelatins (PCs) is studied. The genetic manipulation of these plants to induce higher As and Cd accumulation has been achieved by overexpressing the genes encoding for gamma-glutamyl cysteine synthetase (gamma-ECS) and glutathione synthetase (GS). These two enzymes are responsible for glutathione (GSH) formation in plants, which is the first step in the production of PCs. The biomass produced in both the wild type and the genetically modified plants, has been evaluated. Additionally, the total Cd and As concentration accumulated in the plant tissues was measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) after extraction. Speciation studies on the extracts were conducted using size exclusion liquid chromatography (SEC) coupled online with ICP-MS to monitor As, Cd and S. For further purification of the As fractions, reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) was used. Structural elucidation of the PCs and other thiols, as well as their complexes with As and Cd, was performed by electrospray-quadrupole-time-of-flight (ESI-Q-TOF). In both the Cd and As exposed plants it was possible to observe the presence of oxidized PC2 ([M + H]+, m/z 538), GS-PC2(-Glu) ([M + H]+, m/z 716) as well as reduced GSH ([M + H]+, m/z 308) and oxidized glutathione (GSSG) ([M + H]+, m/z 613). However, only the GS plants exhibited the presence of As(GS)3 complex ([M + H]+, m/z 994) that was further confirmed by MS/MS. This species is reported for the first time in B. juncea plant tissues.

  18. Impressive long-term disease stabilization by nilotinib in two pretreated patients with KIT/PDGFRA wild-type metastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumours.

    PubMed

    Pantaleo, Maria Abbondanza; Nannini, Margherita; Saponara, Maristella; Gnocchi, Chiara; Di Scioscio, Valerio; Lolli, Cristian; Catena, Fausto; Astolfi, Annalisa; Di Battista, Monica; Biasco, Guido

    2012-06-01

    KIT/PDGFRA wild-type (WT) gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) showed a response rate to imatinib ranging from 0 to 25%. Nilotinib is a new-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitor that has demonstrated clinical activity in pretreated GIST patients. At present, no correlation between nilotinib activity and clinical/pathological/molecular features is available. We report on two WT GIST patients resistant to imatinib and sunitinib, and enrolled in the CAMN107A2201 study who achieved an impressive disease control by nilotinib. Both patients have germ-line mutations in the SDHA gene. In April 2004, a 39-year-old woman presented gastric GIST with multiple liver metastases and was treated with imatinib 400 mg/day, followed by imatinib 800 mg/day and then sunitinib. In August 2007, because of disease progression, she was enrolled in the CAMN107A2201 study and assigned to the nilotinib 800 mg/day arm. In March 2005, a 27-year-old woman started imatinib 600 mg/day and then sunitinib for gastric GIST with multiple liver and lung metastases. In October 2007, because of disease progression, she was enrolled in the CAMN107A2201 study and assigned to the nilotinib 800 mg/day arm. One patient still showed stable disease after 46 months of treatment according to the Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumors, and a partial response after 9 months according to Choi's criteria. The other patient still showed stable disease after 42 months according to Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumors. At present, they continue to receive nilotinib. We report very long-term disease stabilization under nilotinib treatment in two pretreated WT GIST patients. In-vitro studies and clinical analyses are warranted to evaluate a potential correlation between nilotinib activity and WT genotype or other clinical/pathological features.

  19. Academic Achievement of Ugandan Sixth Grade Students: Influence of Parents' Education Levels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wamala, Robert; Kizito, Omala Saint; Jjemba, Evans

    2013-01-01

    The study investigates the influence of a father and mother's education on the academic achievement of their child. The investigation is based on data sourced from the 2009 Southern African Consortium for Monitoring Education Quality survey comprising 5,148 records of sixth grade students enrolled in Ugandan primary schools. Students' percentage…

  20. Examining Levels of Alignment between School and Afterschool and Associations with Student Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Tracy Leeann

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, attention has been given to the academic impact of afterschool programs. Some schools collaborate with afterschool programs in an attempt to align the learning that occurs during the school day with the learning that occurs during afterschool hours, and thus maximize the potential to positively impact student academic achievement.…

  1. Impact of Teacher Qualification on Student Achievement at the Elementary and Middle School Levels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, Sandra L.

    2012-01-01

    Although the federal No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act requires that classroom teachers be highly qualified, the assumption that achieving the highly qualified endorsement equates to teacher effectiveness in the classroom is unverified. The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of teacher qualification, as defined by the NCLB Act and…

  2. Computers and Traditional Teaching Practices: Factors Influencing Middle Level Students' Science Achievement and Attitudes about Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Odom, Arthur Louis; Marszalek, Jacob M.; Stoddard, Elizabeth R.; Wrobel, Jerzy M.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the association of middle school student science achievement and attitudes toward science with student-reported frequency of using computers to learn science and other classroom practices. Baseline comparison data were collected on the frequency of student-centred teaching practices (e.g. the use of group…

  3. The Effects of Class Size on Student Achievement in Intermediate Level Elementary Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McInerney, Melissa

    2014-01-01

    Class size and student achievement have been debated for decades. The vast amount of research on this topic is either conflicting or inconclusive. There are large and small scale studies that support both sides of this dilemma (Achilles, Nye, Boyd-Zaharias, Fulton, & Cain, 1994; Glass & Smith, 1979; Slavin, 1989). Class size reduction is a…

  4. A Comparison of Urban, Suburban, and Rural Principal Leadership Skills by Campus Student Achievement Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erwin, Susan; Winn, Pam; Gentry, Jim; Cauble, Mary

    2010-01-01

    Because of the importance of developing highly skilled school leaders, statewide assessments of 784 Texas public school administrators were compared to determine how leadership skills varied by type of campus (urban, suburban and rural) and by campus student achievement ratings. Important findings indicate differences exist by campus type and by…

  5. A Comparison of Urban, Suburban, and Rural Principal Leadership Skills by Campus Student Achievement Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erwin, Susan; Winn, Pam; Erwin, John

    2011-01-01

    Because of the importance of developing highly skilled school leaders, statewide assessments of 784 Texas public school administrators were compared in a causal-comparison study to determine how leadership skills varied by type of campus (urban, suburban and rural) and by campus student achievement ratings. Data were collected from a 2006-2008…

  6. Variability in Pretest-Posttest Correlation Coefficients by Student Achievement Level. NCEE 2011-4033

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Russell; Haimson, Joshua; Perez-Johnson, Irma; May, Henry

    2011-01-01

    State assessments are increasingly used as outcome measures for education evaluations. The scaling of state assessments produces variability in measurement error, with the conditional standard error of measurement increasing as average student ability moves toward the tails of the achievement distribution. This report examines the variability in…

  7. Student Misconceptions in Chemical Equilibrium as Related to Cognitive Level and Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheeler, Alan E.; Kass, Heidi

    Reported is an investigation to determine the nature and extent of student misconceptions in chemical equilibrium and to ascertain the degree to which certain misconceptions are related to chemistry achievement and to performance on specific tasks involving cognitive transformations characteristic of the concrete and formal operational stages of…

  8. Geographic Variation of District-Level Gender Achievement Gaps within the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reardon, Sean; Fahle, Erin; Kalogrides, Demetra; Podolsky, Anne; Zarate, Rosalia

    2016-01-01

    Gender achievement gaps on national and state assessments have been a popular research topic over the last few decades. Many prior studies examine these gaps in different subjects (e.g., mathematics, reading, and science) and grades (typically kindergarten through eighth grade) for students living in various regions (typically states or countries)…

  9. Computers and Traditional Teaching Practices: Factors influencing middle level students' science achievement and attitudes about science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odom, Arthur Louis; Marszalek, Jacob M.; Stoddard, Elizabeth R.; Wrobel, Jerzy M.

    2011-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the association of middle school student science achievement and attitudes toward science with student-reported frequency of using computers to learn science and other classroom practices. Baseline comparison data were collected on the frequency of student-centred teaching practices (e.g. the use of group experiments during science class) and traditional teaching practices (e.g. having students copy notes during science class) to learn science. The student sample was composed of 294 seventh-grade students enrolled in middle school science. Multiple regression was used to investigate the association of attitudes toward science, student-centred teaching practices, computer usage, and traditional teaching practices with science achievement. Both attitudes toward science and student-centred teaching practices were positively associated with science achievement, and student-centred teaching practice was positively associated with attitude toward science. Computer usage was found to have a negative association with student achievement, which was moderated by traditional teaching practices.

  10. The Use of the Arabic CBM Maze among Three Levels of Achievers in Jordan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abu-Hamour, Bashir

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the applicability of the Arabic version of the Curriculum Based Measurement Maze (CBM Maze) for Jordanian students. A sample of 150 students was recruited from two public primary schools in Jordan. The students were ranked into high, moderate, and low achievers in terms of their performance in the Arabic course. Then all of…

  11. Study-Orientation of High and Low Academic Achievers at Secondary Level in Pakistan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sarwar, Muhammad; Bashir, Muhammad; Khan, Muhammad Naemullah; Khan, Muhammad Saeed

    2009-01-01

    The study orientation of low and high academic achievers was compared, measured through a self-developed study orientation scale (SOS) primarily based on 47 items comparing study habits and attitude. Students' marks obtained in the 10th grade Examination determined the measure of academic performance. The analysis revealed that the high achievers…

  12. Isolation and characterization of liver epithelial cell lines from wild-type and mutant TgN737Rpw mice.

    PubMed Central

    Richards, W. G.; Yoder, B. K.; Isfort, R. J.; Detilleux, P. G.; Foster, C.; Neilsen, N.; Woychik, R. P.; Wilkinson, J. E.

    1997-01-01

    The Tg737 gene encodes a tetratricopeptide repeat containing protein that, when disrupted in TgN737Rpw mutant mice, results in pleiotropic phenotypes that include the proliferation of epithelial cells. In the kidney and liver, this causes a phenotype that resembles autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease. In the liver, the affected epithelial cells morphologically and immunologically resemble oval cells. Here we describe the isolation, culture, and characterization of epithelial cell lines derived from the livers of wild-type, heterozygous, and homozygous TgN737Rpw mice. Essentially homogeneous cell cultures were established and the expression of liver markers was examined by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and by immunohistochemistry. All of the cell lines reacted to the A6 antibody that was raised against mouse oval cells and expressed markers seen in oval cells. Cells transplanted into the interscapular fat pads of isogenic mice formed well defined ductular structures. Furthermore, in transfection experiments, we have demonstrated the involvement of Tg737 in cellular proliferation. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9094975

  13. Patterns of differential gene expression in adult rotation-resistant and wild-type western corn rootworm digestive tracts.

    PubMed

    Chu, Chia-Ching; Zavala, Jorge A; Spencer, Joseph L; Curzi, Matías J; Fields, Christopher J; Drnevich, Jenny; Siegfried, Blair D; Seufferheld, Manfredo J

    2015-08-01

    The western corn rootworm (WCR,Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte) is an important pest of corn. Annual crop rotation between corn and soybean disrupts the corn-dependent WCR life cycle and is widely adopted to manage this pest. This strategy selected for rotation-resistant (RR) WCR with reduced ovipositional fidelity to corn. Previous studies revealed that RR-WCR adults exhibit greater tolerance of soybean diets, different gut physiology, and host-microbe interactions compared to rotation-susceptible wild types (WT). To identify the genetic mechanisms underlying these phenotypic changes, a de novo assembly of the WCR adult gut transcriptome was constructed and used for RNA-sequencing analyses of RNA libraries from different WCR phenotypes fed with corn or soybean diets. Global gene expression profiles of WT- and RR-WCR were similar when feeding on corn diets, but different when feeding on soybean. Using network-based methods, we identified gene modules transcriptionally correlated with the RR phenotype. Gene ontology enrichment analyses indicated that the functions of these modules were related to metabolic processes, immune responses, biological adhesion, and other functions/processes that appear to correlate to documented traits in RR populations. These results suggest that gut transcriptomic divergence correlated with brief soybean feeding and other physiological traits may exist between RR- and WT-WCR adults. PMID:26240606

  14. Sex and Immunogen-Specific Benefits of Immunotherapy Targeting Islet Amyloid Polypeptide in Transgenic and Wild-Type Mice

    PubMed Central

    Krishnamurthy, Pavan K.; Rajamohamedsait, Hameetha B.; Gonzalez, Veronica; Rajamohamedsait, Wajitha J.; Ahmed, Nawal; Krishnaswamy, Senthilkumar; Sigurdsson, Einar M.

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is characterized by the deposition of islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) as amyloid in islets, a process thought to be toxic to β-cells. To determine the feasibility of targeting these aggregates therapeutically, we vaccinated transgenic (Tg) mice that overexpress human IAPP and were fed a high-fat diet to promote their diabetic phenotype. Our findings indicate that prophylactic vaccination with IAPP and its derivative IAPP7-19-TT, protects wild-type female mice, but not males, from obesity-induced early mortality, and the derivative showed a strong trend for prolonging the lifespan of Tg females but not males. Furthermore, IAPP7-19-TT-immunized Tg females cleared a glucose bolus more efficiently than controls, while IAPP-immunized Tg females showed an impaired ability to clear a glucose bolus compared to their adjuvant injected Tg controls. Interestingly, IAPP or IAPP7-19-TT treatments had no effect on glucose clearance in Tg males. Overall, these beneficial effects of IAPP targeted immunization depend on Tg status, sex, and immunogen. Hence, future studies in this field should carefully consider these variables that clearly affect the therapeutic outcome. In conclusion, IAPP targeting immunotherapy may have benefits in patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:27379014

  15. Cyclodextrin Alters GABAergic Input to CA1 Pyramidal Cells in Wild-Type But Not in NPC1-Deficient Mice.

    PubMed

    Frech, Moritz J; Rabenstein, Michael; Bovensiepen, Katja; Rost, Sebastian; Rolfs, Arndt

    2015-01-01

    Niemann-Pick type C1 disease (NPC1) is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by mutations in the NPC1 gene. Actual, no causative treatment for NPC1 is available, although some drugs have been proven to be beneficial to patients, for example, 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (CDX). In this study, we used the BALB/c_Nctr-Npc1m1N/-J mouse strain to study the effect of CDX, which is described to prolong the life span and to alleviate the pathogenic phenotype. By means of patch clamp recordings, we measured inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) of CA1 pyramidal cells of CDX-treated and -untreated animals to elucidate the influence of CDX on the synaptic transmission. Surprisingly, CDX induced a significantly higher GABAergic IPSC frequency in wild-type mice than in NPC1(-/-) mice. Although the IPSCs were mainly GABAergic, we observed a significant reduction of the IPSC frequency in the presence of the glycine receptor antagonist strychnine. The effect of strychnine did not differ in untreated and treated animals, indicating that the effect of CDX was most likely not based on an interaction with glycinergic transmission machinery. However, the unexpected effect of CDX on the GABAergic synaptic transmission is of special interest as a disturbance plays, for example, a crucial role in epilepsy and, moreover, as CDX is currently under investigation as a treatment for NPC1 in humans. PMID:26392920

  16. Zika virus infection during the period of maximal brain growth causes microcephaly and corticospinal neuron apoptosis in wild type mice

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wen-Chin; Abraham, Rachy; Shim, Byoung-Shik; Choe, Hyeryun; Page, Damon T.

    2016-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) infection in pregnant women has been established as a cause of microcephaly in newborns. Here we test the hypothesis that neurodevelopmental stages when the brain is undergoing rapid growth are particularly vulnerable to the effects of ZIKV infection. We injected ZIKV intracranially into wild type C57BL/6 mice at two different time points: early postnatal development, when the brain is growing at its maximal rate, and at weaning, when the brain has largely reached adult size. Both time points showed widespread immunoreactivity for ZIKV and cleaved caspase 3 (CC3, a marker of apoptosis) throughout the brain. However, in early postnatal ZIKV injected mice, some brain areas and cell types display particularly large increases in apoptosis that we did not observe in older animals. Corticospinal pyramidal neurons, a cell type implicated in human microcephaly associated with ZIKV infection, are an example of one such cell type. Proliferating cells in the ventricular zone stem cell compartment are also depleted. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that periods of rapid brain growth are especially susceptible to neurodevelopmental effects of ZIKV infection, and establish a valuable model to investigate mechanisms underlying neurodevelopmental effects of ZIKV infection and explore candidate therapeutics. PMID:27713505

  17. Comparative analysis of the integument transcriptomes of the black dilute mutant and the wild-type silkworm Bombyx mori

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Songyuan; Tong, Xiaoling; Peng, Chenxing; Xiong, Gao; Lu, Kunpeng; hu, Hai; Tan, Duan; Li, Chunlin; Han, Minjin; Lu, Cheng; Dai, Fangyin

    2016-01-01

    The insect cuticle is a critical protective shell that is composed predominantly of chitin and various cuticular proteins and pigments. Indeed, insects often change their surface pigment patterns in response to selective pressures, such as threats from predators, sexual selection and environmental changes. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the construction of the epidermis and its pigmentation patterns are not fully understood. Among Lepidoptera, the silkworm is a favorable model for color pattern research. The black dilute (bd) mutant of silkworm is the result of a spontaneous mutation; the larval body color is notably melanized. We performed integument transcriptome sequencing of the wild-type strain Dazao and the mutant strains +/bd and bd/bd. In these experiments, during an early stage of the fourth molt, a stage at which approximately 51% of genes were expressed genome wide (RPKM ≥1) in each strain. A total of 254 novel transcripts were characterized using Cuffcompare and BLAST analyses. Comparison of the transcriptome data revealed 28 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) that may contribute to bd larval melanism, including 15 cuticular protein genes that were remarkably highly expressed in the bd/bd mutant. We suggest that these significantly up-regulated cuticular proteins may promote melanism in silkworm larvae. PMID:27193628

  18. Registered report: RAF inhibitors prime wild-type RAF to activate the MAPK pathway and enhance growth.

    PubMed

    Bhargava, Ajay; Pelech, Steven; Woodard, Ben; Kerwin, John; Maherali, Nimet

    2016-01-01

    The Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology seeks to address growing concerns about reproducibility in scientific research by conducting replications of selected experiments from a number of high-profile papers in the field of cancer biology. The papers, which were published between 2010 and 2012, were selected on the basis of citations and Altmetric scores (Errington et al., 2014). This Registered Report describes the proposed replication plan of key experiments from 'RAF inhibitors prime wild-type RAF to activate the MAPK pathway and enhance growth' by Hatzivassiliou and colleagues, published in Nature in 2010 (Hatzivassiliou et al., 2010). Hatzivassiliou and colleagues examined the paradoxical response of RAF-WT tumors to treatment with RAF inhibitors. The key experiments being replicated include Figure 1A, in which the original authors demonstrated that treatment of a subset of BRAF(WT) tumor cell lines with RAF small molecule inhibitors resulted in an increase in cell viability, Figure 2B, which reported that RAF inhibitor activation of the MAPK pathway was dependent on CRAF but not BRAF, and Figure 4A, where the dimerization of BRAF and CRAF was modulated by the RAF inhibitor PLX4720, but not GDC-0879. The Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology is a collaboration between the Center for Open Science and Science Exchange, and the results of the replications will be published by eLife.

  19. Transcriptome Profiling of Wild-Type and pga-Knockout Mutant Strains Reveal the Role of Exopolysaccharide in Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans

    PubMed Central

    Shanmugam, Mayilvahanan; El Abbar, Faiha; Ramasubbu, Narayanan

    2015-01-01

    Exopolysaccharides have a diverse set of functions in most bacteria including a mechanistic role in protecting bacteria against environmental stresses. Among the many functions attributed to the exopolysaccharides, biofilm formation, antibiotic resistance, immune evasion and colonization have been studied most extensively. The exopolysaccharide produced by many Gram positive as well as Gram negative bacteria including the oral pathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is the homopolymer of β(1,6)-linked N-acetylglucosamine. Recently, we reported that the PGA-deficient mutant of A. actinomycetemcomitans failed to colonize or induce bone resorption in a rat model of periodontal disease, and the colonization genes, apiA and aae, were significantly down regulated in the mutant strain. To understand the role of exopolysaccharide and the pga locus in the global expression of A. actinomycetemcomitans, we have used comparative transcriptome profiling to identify differentially expressed genes in the wild-type strain in relation to the PGA-deficient strain. Transcriptome analysis revealed that about 50% of the genes are differently expressed (P < 0.05 and fold change >1.5). Our study demonstrated that the absence of the pga locus affects the genes involved in peptidoglycan recycling, glycogen storage, and virulence. Further, using confocal microscopy and plating assays, we show that the viability of pga mutant strain is significantly reduced during biofilm growth. Thus, this study highlights the importance of pga genes and the exopolysaccharide in the virulence of A. actinomycetemcomitans. PMID:26221956

  20. Development of infectious clones of a wild-type Korean rabies virus and evaluation of their pathogenic potential.

    PubMed

    Park, Jun-Sun; Kim, Chi-Kyeong; Um, Ji-Hye; Ju, Young Ran; Lee, Yeong Seon; Choi, Young-Ki; Kim, Su Yeon

    2016-09-01

    Most reverse genetic (RG) systems for rabies viruses (RVs) have been constructed on the genome background of laboratory-adapted strains. In this study, we developed an RG system using a Korean wild type (KGH) strain to investigate the pathogenic potential of different strains. We developed a RG system with the KGH strain for the first time. Following the compl